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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00397
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 9/8/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00397
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text







SWFWMD OPENS

HOG HUNTS

... Story 3A


The


111th Year, No. 40
3 Sections, 24 Pages
I


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
A e'


46e
plus 4g sales tax


Thursday, September 8, 2011


Wauchula To Hire New Manager Monday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A final decision will be made
on Monday evening.
After lengthy discussion at
Tuesday evening's special
meeting and workshop, the
Wauchula City Commission is
poised to make its decision,
ending a year without a city
manager on board.
All agreed that Acting City

PLANT PROJECT


Atchley, Baughman Or Miranti


Manager /community planner
Olivia Minshew has done an
outstanding job since Rick
Giroux's forced resignation on
Aug. 18, 2010.
All agreed that it has come
down to three candidates, Terry
Atchley of Wauchula, Fred


Baughman of Oak Hill and
Joseph Miranti of St. Cloud.
Therese "Terry" Leary has
been removed from the list as
she has accepted a city manager
position in Lake Wales. Stephen
Weeks of Sebring was not
favored by any of the commis-


sioners.
The workshop discussion'
began with Commissioner
Pattie Detwiler reading her list
of what she wanted in a city
manager, someone who had
management experience, was
familiar with airports, rural eco-


nomic development, utilities
and infrastructure, grants, pub-
lic affairs and negotiating,
could vision, had some city
operations experience and
longevity (intended to stay
indefinitely, not just a year or
two).


Commissioner Keith Nadas-
kay agreed, but said personnel
and leadership ranked high with
him. He wanted someone inter-
ested in staying," not using this
job as a bridge to somewhere
else."
Commissioner Russell Smith
said he reviewed the 20 or so
applications, what he looked for
most was experience in state/-
See NEW MANAGER 2A


Farmers Market


For Pioneer Park?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Joshua Clemente has an idea,
one which could be successful
for Hardee County.
The Rabbit Run resident
came to the' Hardee County.
Commission last Thursday to
share his idea a farmers and
flea market twice weekly at
Pioneer Park in Zolfo Springs.
Clemente, a beekeeper, has
spent several months investigat-
ing the possibilities and talking
to several local leaders, who all
seemed to be in favor of it.
Commissioners were favor-
able, too. Acting Commission
Chairman Minor Bryant noted,
however that it should come
first to the Park Board, who will
make a recommendation to the
commission.
Commissioner Grady John-
son said it would be important
to find out how other farmers


COURTESY PHOTO
Seen in the wild, this flower may resemble a bright yellow daisy, but instead it is a very rare plant known only to Florida
- and even then, only in four counties. The Florida Golden Aster once thrived in Hardee, Manatee, Hillsborough and
Pinellas counties, but no more. In fact, in 1986 the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service placed it on its Endangered Species
list. Today, you can find 197 of the plants at Paynes Creek Historic State Park in Bowling Green. The golden asters
were brought there and planted late last month by Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales, which has begun a reintroduction
project for the rare native plant with federal and state funding. Seeds for these plants came from private landowners
in Hardee County where the flower still existed. It is known to grow in sandy scrub areas, and hopes are to bring it
back to the native wild.


District Lines Will


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
How do you spread 27,731
people over five districts, even-
ly within one percent?
That's the dilemma facing the
Hardee County Commission
and Hardee County School
Board this year. The School
Board usually goes along with
whatever the commission
decides.
Redistricting must occur in
odd years after the U.S. Census


WEATHER
DATE HIGH LOW RAIN
08/31 81 74 0.05
09/01 90 74- 2.95
09/02 89 72 0.00
09103 90 70 1,13
09104 88 73 ,014
09105 91 75 0.02
09o06 83 74 1.05
TOTAL Rainfall to 09106111 -40.41
Same period last year 42.91
Ten Year Average -54.30
Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Rsearch Center

INDEX
Classifieds.....................6B
Community Calendar....7A
Courthouse Report........8C
Crime Blotter..................6A
Hardee Living..........2B
Obituaries...................4A
Information Roundup... 7A
School Lunch Menus....8B



711111 III ill 3
7 18122 07290 3


is completed every 10 years. It
was last done in 2010, meaning
the county and schools must
redistrict in 2011, or wait until
2013. The state redistricting is
done in even years. The 2012
state redistricting is already
under way, although few local
people turned out for the first
public hearing held here last
month.
While changing district
boundaries, no current commis-
sioner or School Board member
can be disenfranchised, ex-
plained Kevin Denny, county
planner. He will work with
Supervisor of Elections Jeff
Ussery in the redistricting.
I Ussery is in the process of
possibly changing precinct lines
as the state changes its districts,
even considering splitting
Hardee County into two senate
or representative districts. Since
there are several precincts in


each of the county dis
won't greatly affect Ic
tricting decisions, sai
One of the problem
the prison population
Correctional Instituti
be counted in the cou
lation. That 1,878
presently are in Dist
which Sue Birge is thc
sioner and Mildred
School Board mem
district presently has
tion of 5,811, compare
4,677 for District 1,
served by Commissio
Bryant and School Bo
ber Paul Samuels.
Other changes are t
because of difference
populations of the ot
districts as well. D
Commissioner Terry
and School Board
Teresa Crawford, has
tion of 5,803. In D


Change
tricts, that Commissioner Dale Johnson
local redis- and School Board member Jan
d Ussery. Platt, it is 5,689. And, in Dis-
ms is that trict 5, Commissioner Grady
at Hardee Johnson and School Board
on has to member Thomas Trevino, the
inty popu- population is 5,751.
people, Denny's task is to even these
strict II, in numbers out as closely as possi-
e commis- ble, without anyone losing their
Smith .is School Board or commission
ber. That seat by being out of district. To
a popula- do it, Denny has to follow pub-
ed to only lic roads as much as possible,
which is avoiding using rivers or creeks
ner Minor as dividing lines because floods
)ard mem- can cause changes in these.
One push to get this done in
necessary 2011 is to have it well in control
es in the before the 2012 elections, so
her three any candidate will know where
district 3, the new district lines are locat-
Atchle'y ed.


member
a popula-
listrict 4,


One other complication is
obtaining approval of the feder-
See DISTRICT 2A


U.S. 17 Discussion Today


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Work on construction of the
northbound lanes of U.S. 17
from Sweetwater Road to Zolfo
Springs will be under way
shortly.
Before the work begins, there
will be a final open house on
the upcoming construction,
says a state Department of
Transportation release.
The open house will be today


(Thursday) from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Zolfo Springs Civic
Center, 3610 U.S. 17.
The project, which begins
just south of CR 634 (Sweet-
water Road) and goes all the
way to Seventh Avenue in Zolfo
Springs, will be widening U.S.
17 from two to four lanes. The
northbound lanes and south-
bound will be separate by a
grassy ditch.
Stormwater will flow into a
drainage system which will


include 10 new retention ponds.
The bridge over Alligator
Branch Creek will also be
widened and improved.
Additionally, water and
sewer facilities for the Town of
Zolfo Springs will be relocated.
There will be no formal pres-
entation at the open house.
Members of the public will
have the opportunity to speak
with project personnel and learn
about the roadway improve-
ments.


markets have worked out the
kinks so it didn't become a
giant yard sale.
Farmers and flea markets
have been quite successful at
Webster in Sumter County, in
Kingsport, Tenn., and most
recently in Lake Wales, report-
ed Clemente.
There would be a set of rules
for it to be run by the county for
the county, said Clemente as he
offered to become involved.-
(See his letter to the editor else-
where in this issue).
His idea is to have 20 to 30
members, people who raise pro-
duce, to bring it to Pioneer Park
on Wednesday and Saturdays
between 7 a.mn. and 3 p.m.,
when fellow residents could
come and make their choices of
the locally grown produce.
Members would each pay a fee
to belong and a stall fee on the'
See FARMERS MARKET 2A


Remembering 9/11

Prayer Gathering Sunday
Sunday is a special time for people to remember where they
were, what they were doing and the lives lost in the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington,
D.C.
There will be an opportunity at 4 p.m. for people to gather
together locally while others do all over America. The local
prayer gathering is at Faith Temple Ministries, 701 N. Seventh
Ave., Wauchula.
County coordinator Pastor Wendell G. Smith invites every-
one to the Hardee County Prayer Gathering, with focused
prayer for the community, the military, education, the church,
marriage, youth, friends, family and the spiritual condition of
this nation.
For more information, check out The Awakening America
Alliance or Cry Out America online at awakeningamerica.us/-
cryoutamerica or call 1-888-9Awake Us (2929-5387).




ZS Voters To Fill

Vacant Seat Monday


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Zolfo Springs voters will
elect a new town commissioner
on Monday.
Running in the special elec-
tion are Marie Schofield Guer-
rero and DiDi White.
The special election was
made necessary by the sudden
death of commissioner and
mayor George Neel on Aug. 2.
He was 72. Neel had held Seat 2
on the Town Commission.
Now, town voters will choose
between Guerrero and White to
finish out Neel's unexpired
term, serving until the next
General Election in 2012.
Guerrero resides at 402
Fourth St. E. This is her first bid
at elected office.
Guerrero is the daughter of
Sara and Mike Schofield. Sara
Schofield is a current town
commissioner. Mike Schofield
has served many roles in the
town, both elected and appoint-
ed, having been a commission-
er, mayor and town manager.
White, of 3404 Acorn Dr., is a
former town commissioner,


unseated by political newcomer
Rhonda Long last October by
just four votes.
White is retired from the
State Attorney's Office in
Wauchula, and hopes to once
again be able to add her knowl-
edge and experience to the
commission.
In that fall 2010 election,
only 56 voters showed up at
Town Hall to cast a ballot. The
White/Long matchup was the
only race on the ballot, perhaps
contributing to voter disinterest.
Voter turnout amounted to just
8-1/2 percent.
There are 648 people regis-
tered to vote in the town
Again, there will be the only
question for voters to decide.
Either Guerrero or White will
take Neel's place.
Town commissioners are paid
$150 a month. Whoever is cho-
sen for the ceremonial role of
mayor receives $200 monthly.
The winner of Monday's
election will join Otero, Sara
Schofield. Rhonda Long and
Lois Dandridge at the commis-
sion table.


Fire-Rescue

Workshop Friday

.. .Story 2A


-- ----------- ------ ---- ----I


I I-


I


I


I










2A The Herald-Advocate, September 8,2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor
* ,'


115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


f' DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
\ Ads Tuesday noon y.


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18; yr. S31; 2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2 yrs. $79
Out of State
6 months S27; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. $95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes .letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
SJ


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Clearing The' Smoke: Fire-Rescue


U




U


A Hardee County prayer gathering will be held Sunday at 4
p.m. at Faith Temple Church of God at 701 North 7th Ave. in
Wauchula with Rev. Wendell G. Smith officiating.
He is local coordinator for "Cry Out America," a nationwide
event sponsored by the Awakening America Alliance. Prayers will
focus on community, military, education, churches, marriage,
youth, friends, family and the nation's spiritual condition. This will
be the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attack in New York City and.
the Pentagon.

A letter in this week's issue asks where America's heroes have
gone? It is written by Rev. James L. Snyder, pastor of Family of
God Fellowship in Ocala, and has reference to 9-11-01.

The Hardee Wildcats looked very good in Friday's 21-6 win
over Fort Meade. The Cats will play at Avon Park this Friday at
7:30.
-- b
FSU, UF, UCF and USF openedheir fo9Aall season Saturday
with impressive victories.

September is when many Hardee Countians plant their fall
gardens.

SWFWMD's mission is for the wise use of water. SWFWMD
had an accidental unwise use of water on Sunday, July 3, when the
fire sprinkler system malfunctioned on the third floor of its
Building 4 at headquarters in Brooksville.
The water made its way into the first and second floor as well.
The old adage is water seeks the lowest level. Severe damage and
temporary relocation of 130 staff members ensued. Insurance will
help defray damage costs.

Wauchula native Tom McEwen, 88, of Tampa passed away
June 5 but left an amazing legacy of sports writing excellence and
community improvement. He was instrumental in bringing pro
sports to the Tampa Bay area and helping publicize Wauchula in his
Morning After column in the Tampa Tribune. He was sports editor
there from 1962 to 19'92.
He was a good friend and relative by marriage to Dr. Barbara
Carlton of Wauchula. She is a retired medical doctor and still loves
to hunt wild turkeys and quail. McEwen, Florida Gov. Doyle E.
Carlton Sr., and State Sen. Doyle E. Carlton Jr. are Hardee
County's most famous people.

A marker was recently dedicated in memory and honor of
Kissengen Spring, which used to be a gathering place and swim-
ming hole near Peace, River between Bartow and Homeland. The
flow of 72-degree water used to be 20 to 25 million gallons a day.
The spring was originally named DeLeon Spring but renamed
Kissengen Spring after a famous German health spa. The spring
stopped flowing in 1950 after a lot of nearby groundwater pump-
ing. The pumping was for phosphate mining, agricultural and resi-
dential use.
Polk County Democrat Editor Jeff Roslow wrote some wells
were 24 inches in diameter and mining operations back then used
up to 75 million gallons of water a day. Todpy the mining industry
reuses over 90 percent of its water.
The historical marker is at the Polk County Historical Museum
in downtown Bartow and later will be installed permanently at
Mosaic Peace River Park, wrote Tom Palmer of the Lakeland
Ledger.

Mosaic recently announced a $2.5 million donation to the
Florida Aquarium in Tampa. Mosaic has supported the aquarium
since it opened in 1995.

Tampa is losing it sports legends. First, New York Yankee
owner George Steinbrenner passed away in 2010, followed by Tom
McEwen earlier this year and now Tampa Bay Buc NFL Hall of
Famer Lee Roy Selmon, 56. Lee Roy suffered a stroke Friday and
died Sunday.

Florida is making great progress in shutting down "pill mills."
Florida used to have over 1,000 pill mills, and Florida doctors
bought 89 percent of all the Oxycodone sold in the U.S. in 2010,
the Lakeland Ledger reported Sept. 2 in a New York Times article
written by Lizette Alvarez.
Over 600 pill mills have been shut down, and over-80 doctors
have had their licenses suspended. Florida doctors, with few excep-
tions, as of July cannot dispense narcotics or other addictive med-
icines in their offices or clinics, wrote Alvarez.
Florida doctors' purchases of Oxycodone in the first half of
2010 were 32.2 million doses. Purchases in the first half of 2011
fell by 97 percent. Broward County had 29 pill mills and only 1
today. The street price of Oxycodone has gone from $8 to $15 a
pill, reported a Palm Beach Sheriff's Office captain. Shutting down
pill mills is a priority of Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.

Some people can be gullible. The Florida family of Rose
Marks has been accused of running a $40 million psychic scam for
the past 20 years. They were psychic readers and fortune tellers.
Some victims were as far away as Japan and Denmark, report-


Fl^rot J


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
This is the second in a two-par
series on the Hardee Counts
Fire-Rescue Department, wha
services it entails and what i
costs.
The Hardee County Fire.
Rescue Department has twc
parts. The Emergency Medica
Services department began ir
the late 1960s and was funded
from General Revenue (taxes'
and fees.
The fire department branch
began in 1987 when the Wau.
chula Fire Department merger
with Emergency Services as the
Wauchula department was mak-
ing most of its calls out of tht
city limits. It was first located ai
the Wauchula Station on Nortf
Fourth Avenue adjacent to Cit)
Hall, now a vacant lot used fol
parking..
Fire-Rescue moved to its
present home on K. D. Revel]
Road in 1999. The fire depart,
ment side of the budget is paid
through fire assessments, called



IISZTICT
Continued From 1A
al justice department. Under tho
Voting Rights Act of 1955
Hardee is one of five Florid,
counties, Suwanee, Monroe
Hillsborough, Manatee anc
Hardee, which were all at on(
time or another accused of ger.
rymandering, setting districts t(
keep any one ethnic group o0
race from voting in a solic
group. Since Hardee voters votc
districtwide for all races, thii
doesn't seem to be an issue
here.




FARMERS MAKII
Continued From 1A
two days of the week the mar-
ket was open. They would only
offer fresh produce from theii
farms/businesses.
To enhance sales, there could
also be food vendor booth:
from local eateries, and selected
flea market booths with solid
merchandise such as antiques
and collectibles. There might
also be a booth for sale of small
animals, dogs, cats, rabbits, etc.
Later on, there could also be
entertainment at the Nickerson-
Ullrich Building and the
Wildlife Refuge could offer
tours. Both are at the far wesi
end of the 100-acre park.
Clemente is interested in
hearing from people who are in
favor of this idea and want tc
get involved. He can be contact-
ed at cell phone, 863-990-6489


Herald-Advocate Price

Increase Coming Oct. 6
The single-copy price of The Herald-Advocate on Oct. 6 will
increase to 75 cents from 50 cents, announced publisher James
R. Kelly. The last price increases were in 1995 and 1980.
Increased costs of payroll, paper, ink, insurance, fuel, elec-
tricity, supplies, taxes and other components have caused the
need for a price hike, said Kelly. There will be increases in mail
subscriptions also on Oct. 6.
The new price will include 70 cents to The Herald-Advocate
and 5 cents in state sales tax.
The paper is currently distributed in 26 stores, 26 coin-oper-
ated racks, and through the U.S. mail.
"We try hard every week to publish a good quality newspa-
per that serves Hardee County. We greatly value our readers,
advertisers and employees," said the publisher.
The Herald-Advocate dates to 1900 with The Florida
Advocate and a 1955 combining of The Florida Advocate and
the Hardee County Herald.
The current press run is 4,500 which, should rise to 4,900 or
5,000 in February, said Kelly, adding that winter residents have
a welcome impact on the county's economy.




ed Kelli Kennedy of the Associated Press in the Sept. 2 Lakeland
Ledger. One victim, romance novelist Jude Deveraux, spent $20
million. Astrology, fortune telling and psychic reading should not
be taken seriously and should be avoided, Christian leaders say.

James Risher of Sanibel and Daniel Sebastian of Lakeland
have been charged with a $22 million Ponzi scheme, operating a
fake private equity fund and luring investors by promising returns
of 14 to 124 percent, wrote Lakeland Ledger reporter Chase Purdy.
There were funds with such names as Safe Harbor, Managed
Capital and Preservation of Principai. Con artists can be friendly,
smooth-talking and appear to be worthy of trust. An old addage is
a fool and his money are soon parted. Expecting huge returns on
investments can be a recipe for economic loss.
Safe investments are U.S. Treasury bonds and insured bank
savings. The higher the return, the higher the risk. Most municipal
and blue chip corporate bonds are considered fairly safe. The gen-
eral U.S. stock market historically has delivered returns of 7 to 8
percent over the long haul, but individual stocks and short-term
investing in stocks can be risk. I -.lad a $600 investment in
American Shipbuiling, run by George Steinbrenner, and a larger
investment in Montana Power Company that became zero.
Buying a home for decades was considered to be a safe and
growing investment, but the real estate downturn in 2008-09 has
seen home prices fall significantly in many areas.
The First United Methodist Church of Wauchula is sponsoring
a 12-week series on money management from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday.
Call 773-4267 for more information.


grant, Choate would have to use
his capital cost budget for only
10 percent of the cost. That
would give him more funds to
buy other needed equipment,
such as'bunker gear.
Over the years, Choate has
applied for a variety of grants,
some approved and some
denied. In 2003, that helped pay
$8,000 for self-contained
breathing equipment for fire-
fighters. In other years, there's
been grants for thermal imag-
ing, an air light trailer to refill
oxygen tanks on the scene, etc.
One task the department is
facing is refurbishing of fire
stations. Station 2 in Zolfo
Springs was replaced with a
new fire/police station after


damages from Hurricane
Charley left that unit in trailers
for years.
A similar situation exists in
the Bowling Green. Station 3,
now operating out of a trailer
and carport. The Bowling
Green City Commission recent-
ly offered the county its insur-
ance proceeds hnd the deed to
land for a permanent station.
The request has been placed on
this year's legislative proposal
list to be heard next Wednesday
at 2 p.m.
"We're very grateful for the
city's willingness to help us
rebuild the fire station complex.
We are hopeful we can get a
legislative appropriation to
make it possible," said Choate.


a municipal service budget unit
(MSBU). Fire assessments
t were $136 but were lowered
y this year to $121.25, based on
t the past five-year history of.
t calls.
The EMS side of the budget
is paid through tax dollars and
fees generated by Blue Cross/-
l Blue Shield, Medicare and
n Medipgid, vehicle insurance
I and the balance from private
) pay, those who do not have
insurance or heed to pay a
deductible. Some,,who could
pay don't, and others simply
I can't pay it. (the Indigent Board
$550,000 raised each year is
only paid for hospital services
to eligible Hardee County resi-
t dents). A significant portion of
past bills is written off each
y year.
r The total Fire-Rescue budget
for serving the 29,415 residents
s in the 637 square miles of
I Hardee County and visitors is
divided into three portions.
I Administrative costs are 58.33
1 percent fire budget and 41.67
percent in EMS. This includes
salaries, uniforms, training and
such.
Operations is 32.33 percent
in fire and 67.67 percent in
EMS. Direct costs, such as fire.
e hoses, IV solutions and other
medical supplies are paid from
a the appropriate budgets.
One factor driving deploy-
, ment or use of vehicles is the
Insurance Standards Organi-
zation (ISO) and its rating for
S residents and businesses. The
ISO rating, from 1 for best to 10
r for worst, is based 60 percent
on fire department staffing lev-
s els per station, number of fire
e apparatus, number of firefight-
ers/paramedics/EMTs dis-
pensed to an incident, training
records and dispatch communi-
cation system. The remaining
40 percent is a combination of
water supply (available hy-"
drants at minimum flow level or
the ability to take water to the
scene.
ISO ratings are evaluation
five years, when a staff member
comes in and looks at all the-
I data for each of the factors and
s strategies. Last done in 2006, it
lowered ISO ratings all over the
county.
Anoth factgrjs equipment
costs. The department presently
has three ambulances and one
reserve, three front-line engines
and one reserve, two tankers
and three brush trucks. At last
week's meeting of the Hardee
County Commission, Fire-
t Chief Michael Choate was
given permission to apply for a
1 $259,000 grant for a 3,000-gal-
l Ion tanker to replace a 1990
tanker which has had the chas-
sis replaced and is costing more
in maintenance. By getting the


description waiver recommend-
ed by city labor attorney
Reynolds Allen and his staff. In
moving to accept it, Nadaskay
had to read it in full.
"After having carefully com-
pleted the screening process of.
all the applicants for the City
Manager position, it appears to
me that the Commission is sat-
isfied that the five candidates
selected for interview are the
best to meet our needs from
those who applied.
"While one or two may not
meet some or all of the listed
preferred educational and CEO,
CFO or other experience, they
appear to have sufficient educa-
tional and management experi-
ence when coupled with other
experience, both life and work,
to do the job so long as we
determine they can perform the
essential duties and responsibil-
ities and have the knowledge,
skills and abilities we way we
are looking for in paragraphs B
and E'of thi job description.
"Therefore, I move that we
accept these five candidates as
sufficiently well qualified with
respect to their knowledge,
skills, abilities, education and
management experience to be
interviewed and considered for
the position of City Manager of
Wauchula and that we proceed
to select the one we believe is
best( suited to fit the needs fof
our unique community to be.
offered the job on terms and
conditions mutually agreeable
with the candidate selected and
the City Commission; provided,
that if after all of the interviews
a majority of the Commission
determines that none of the can-
didates is the person we feel can
get the job done for us, that the
Clerk is directed to re-advertise
the position.
"I further move, that in the
event that one of the candidates
is selected to be offered the job
of City Manager, that the1
Mayor, with the assistance of
the City Attorney or City Labor
Attorney, negotiate a tentative
agreement with the selectee to
be presented to the City Com-
mission for consideration and
final approval."
After discussion from the
commission and audience, the
motion was approved 6-1, with
Russell Smith dissenting "I
used the job description for the
short list, things I looked for in
the list of candidates. Each of
the five good candidates brings
something to the table. We set
high standards and now it
seems we are backing off from
them.-- -


P e t f i T h e ue e k 7 L


Heidi is a black, adult female Labrado Retriever. She Is a
calm all-round good dog. She likes to walk on the leash,
and she behaves Indoors as well as outdoors. Heidi
would make a great family or one-owner pet.
Adoption fees are $45 and include p rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you iare interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dos or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


NEW MANAGE
Continued From 1A


county/city government in
Florida, which has its unique
statutes, rules and regulations.
Another factor, he said, was
salary. He knew of a situation in
a neighboring county where a
person who had earned
$150,000 was hired at $100,000
and quickly became disgruntled
and moved on.
Smith said all five candidates
brought great qualities, some-
thing positive in the resume or
interview, but only two
(Baughman and Miranti) stood
out and he was on the fence'
between those two in which
was the best candidate. He said
Atchley did not have a back-
ground in government. Three
years on the county commission
was not enough.
Commissioner Kenny Baker
said after interviews two stood
out (Baughman and Atchley).
Both were well-connected,
either would be good. "I like to
hear visioning, someone who
knows where they're 'oifig.
Atchley already knows the
community, which is a plus."
Commissioner Gary Smith
agreed. Someone who "had
vision and carried out that or
visioning of the commission
was and important factor."
Detwiler added that "Terry
knows everyone here and that's
awesome. I liked Baqghman
because he has 30 years expen-
ence, knew about the free trade
zone, It would just be a learning
curve to meet everyone. He also
taught economics, knew grants
and airports. I liked his manner-
isms.
Commissioner John Freeman
said in his mind it came down
to two. He liked the experience
and knowledge of Baughman in
all aspects. Atchley carried his
interview well, has manage-
ment background and is local.
"He stood out from the begin-
ning on his background.
Detwiler commented that
although Atchley interviewed
well, she was surprised to learn
he didn't have a college degree,
although he took seminars at
Polk Community College.
Baker said, "I didn't know that
until we interviewed him, but
he has a lot of life experience."
Russell Smith said it wasn't
Atchley's education and experi-
ence that concerned him, it was
just overall knowledge of gov-
ernment in Florida. Both
Baughman and Miranti had
experience in it and made many
networking contacts which
would be invaluable.
Before the workshop, the
special meeting included- a-job-






September 8,2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


t
a
C
r

ii


believe it, this is a much different world today than it was 10 years
ago. .
Never forgetting means realizing that the hazards faced by
firefighters in rural America are equal to that of any metro fire-
fighter. It is the decisions that we make on a scene and the actions
that we take that define the level of risks that we're exposed to. No
amount of training or any specialized equipment will ever make the
duties that we perform risk-free, but every minute that we do ded-
icate to training and every dollar that we spend on improving our
equipment is certainly a way to help push the odds in our favor.
To never forget means to honor and respect the 343 firefight-
ers who died that day. They leave behind a legacy of leadership,
dedication and professionalism that simply can never be measured.
We must never tarnish the profession but realize that firefighters
are on the winning team, just like our, brothers and sisters in law,
enforcement.
To never forget means that the repercussions of that sunny'
Tuesday morning of Sept. 11, 2001, will always be felt by thou-
sands of families and first responders. Some will continue to seek
treatment for health and psychiatric complications for years to
come.
As firefighters, it is customary that we are "finished" with an
incident when everything is placed back into service, all reports are
written, all trucks are washed, etc. But the scars of Sept. llth are
forever. Trust me when I say, to those who were there and the fam-
ilies affected, they will never forget.

Help Us Help You
There have been too many claims that Hardee County Fire-
Rescue and the fire.chief don't want volunteer firefighters. This is
absolutely absurd and couldn't be further from the truth. Like I
have always maintained, if you are interested and are willing to
dedicate your time and efforts to the required training hours,
please, come by to find out more. We need you!
We do appreciate the overwhelming support and prayers that
we have been receiving. This is what makes our job not really a
job, but something we all love to do.


The formula for this is found
in the Old Testament. "If my
people, which are called by my
name, shall humble themselves,
and pray, and seek my face, and
turn from their wicked ways;
then will I hear from heaven,
and will forgive their sin, and
will heal their land" (2
Chronicles 7:14 KJV).
In 10 years, we have tried
everything else, and everything
has failed. Why not try God?

The Rev. James L. Snyder
Pastor,
Family of God Fellowship
Ocala


Letter Edo itor

Where Have All The Heroes Gone?
Dear Editor: average person's life. as quickly as they came.
In celebrating the 10th One of the things that amaze Many of those heroes gave
anniversary of one of the most me about Hollywood is when Ithe ultimate sacrifice, their life.
horrific events in the history of they produce their infamous 'Not thinking about their own
the United States one cannot reality shows, there is very little well-being, they put their life on
he"p but reflect back on the past' reality to it. The only reality the line to save someone they
decade. We have come a long about these shows is they make didn't even know. Many of
way, but I am wondering if we real money for those who pro- these heroes died doing their
havefgone the right way. duce it. I could live with that heroic deed. Some are, 10 years
My wife and I were thinking reality. Hollywood cannot do later, suffering physical conse-
about this the other night and anything without pizazz to daz- quences from their acts of bray-
she startled me with a question. zle the imagination of the intel- ery.
Most of the time she just startles lectually starved populace. Just what is a hero?
me, but this time she had sub- Then my mind drifted back to A hero is neither a iepub-
stance in the form of a question, my wife's question. lican nor a Democrat. A hero is
"I wonder," she said rather "Those heroes of 9/11," she simply an American who does
thoughtfully, "where all the responded. "Whatever happened his or her job when the need
heroes are today?" to all of those heroes that arises without any thought of
At first, I did not quite get her stepped to the front when the political affiliation. I am rather
rift, and so I query her on the need called for it?" tired of the political minutia
subject. Then I knew what she was that is paralyzing our country
First, I was thinking of all of talking about. A hero is someone today. Let me say that I believe
hose movie heroes that we hear who does ordinary work under our country is bigger than all
about so often. Perhaps she was abnormal or dangerous condi- the politicians in our country
thinking of Superman or Bat- tions. Ten years ago, when our today.
nan or some such hero. These country was attacked these If only we get the media to
lays, most of our heroes are heroes stepped forth, did their understand that all these politi-
nanufactured in Hollywood and job and then stepped back into cians are simply caricatures of
iave no real affinity for the the shadows of obscurity almost some political ideology ana not
real people at all. Politicians are
Washington's version of a reali-
ty show that has no basis what-
soever in reality.
A hero never blows his or her
S own horn and consequently
Chiefly Speakin many heroes fade into the back-
By Michael J. Choate ground and are never acknowl-
edged or even thanked. After
Fire-Rescue Chief all, a hero never looks for
thanks; a hero only does his or
her job to the best of his or her
REFLECTING ON SEPT. 11, 2001 ability. Sometimes a hero only
As you may or may not remember, I would write this "Chiefly does one heroic action in his
Speaking" piece each month. I have written it for several years but, life. He's a hero nevertheless.
admittedly, I have taken quite the hiatus. A true American hero does
As a matter of fact, the last one that I could find was written in his or her job when called upon
October 2009. Multiple factors are to blame, directly resulting in and then fades into the back-
he hiatus, but I won't bore you with the inconsequential details of ground so that some politician
my life. It is my intention to restart, or "refuel" if you will, my can step forward and take the
enthusiasmm to write again. I can't imagine a more perfect month credit. That seems to be the way
han this one, the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks politicians operate these days
rn the World Trade Center in New York City. the credit system. When
No doubt, Sept. 11,2001, has a different meaning to all of us. something goes right, they take
f you are old enough, can you recall where you were or what you credit for it. If something goes
were doing when President John F. Kennedy was shot? What about wrong, they give the credit to
he attempt on President Reagan? With any major event that has someone else. I'm ready for the
happened within our lifetime, I'm certain that we can all recall' politician to step forward with
exactly what we were doing on that particular day. cash on the barrelhead.
Sept. 11, 2001, was a "B" shift here at Hardee County Fire- I just have one simple ques-
Rescue. I was the deputy fire chief in charge of all operations. It tion. When you are in trouble,
was a typical Tuesday morning at work, nothing out of the ordinary whom do you want? The real
was going on. American hero or some politi-
At 8:46 a.m., American Flight No. 11 from Boston crashed cian . any politician?
nto the North Tower at the World Trade Center. When the aircraft was
Once we had learned that a plane had hit one of the Twin smashing into their target,
Flowers, we all gathered around the television in the day room. We, where were the politicians?
is firefighters, were all talking tactics and referring to the magni- When the buildings were col-
lude of such an event. We were discussing the rescue efforts, sup- lapsing and lives were being
?ression complications and the massive amount of resources that destroyed, 'where were the
vere going to be needed,, We were watching the media coverage politicians?') "
nd actually saw the second plane coming. Back in "the day," the politi-
At 9:03 a.m., United Flight No. 175 from Boston crashed into cian was' a servant of the peo-
he South Tower at the World Trade Center. pie, sent to Washington DC to
We all thought, and even verbalized, "There is no way this is do the people's business. That
really happening!" The paralyzing reality began to sink in this day is far over and probably
vas not a coincidence. Still, the thoughts of denial were there. never will return.
Even the media was as unclear; they were as much in denial as the Today, these politicians have
est of America. It wasn't until 9:45 a.m., when American Flight the idea that we, the people, are
Jo. 77 crashed into The Pentagon, that it wAs certain: We were to serve them. After all, they
inder an attack of indescribable proportions, know what's best for us. These
Some 3,000 innocent people were killed that day: 2,753 vic- politicians, who cannot take
ims in the World Trade Center, 343 FDNY firefighters, 60 police care of their own lives or their
officerss from NYPD and the Port Authority, and eight EMTs and own business or even pay their
'aramedics. Additionally, there were another 184 killed in the own income tax, are fully qual-
?entagon. And we can't forget about the innocent passengers from ified to take care of our busi-
he total four flights. ness. Is it any wonder our coun-
The overwhelming emotions that I felt personally came most- try is in the mess it's in today?
y through the countless number of news stories, interviews and A real hero is someone who
special programs which followed the attack. However, my emo- puts someone else's welfare
ions truly paled in comparison to those who lived this nightmare ahead of his or her own. They
vent first-hand. bravely put themselves in
harm's way to save someone
Never Forget they may not even know.
Since that day, people from around the world vowed to "never Perhaps, and I know this
forget" the fallen who paid the ultimate sacrifice. To never forget thought probably comes from
s to consciously understand that nearly 3,000 innocent lives were Mars, we ought to stop sending
wrongfully taken by this attack. politicians to Washington and
To never forget means that we as first responders must be pre- start sending heroes.
arid. Firefighters do not just fight fire. To quote Timothy Another kind of hero is need-
endelbach, "Fire-Rescue Magazine" editor, "We must seek the ed in our country today. That
roper training, enhance our knowledge base well beyond the hero is the one who will pray
cope of our previous generation, and develop skills necessary to for our country and ask God to
perform under the most extreme life-threatening circumstances." help us get out of the mess were
et's face it, although some do not want change and refuse to in.


Hurrica


Up Bef
Hurricane Irene was the first
of the season to keep Floridians
glued to their televisions, watch-
ing meteorology reports on the
news.
Maybe they should have been
outside, looking up, instead.
Prudent Floridians need to
take steps now to better "secure"
the trees in their landscape.
Don't wait until a hurricane
approaches.
One of the greatest dangers to
life and property during hurri-
canes is posed by falling trees
and limbs.
"Right now, get your trees as
ready as they can be to survive a
major storm. Don't wait until
the storm is headed your way,"
advises Tchukki Andersen of the
Tree Care Industry Association.
"Growing trees could 'catch'
more wind and be more suscep-
tible to increased chances of


Dear Editor:
Have you ever thought a
flea and farmers market would
be a good addition to Hardee
County? I have. My name is
Joshua Clemente. I own a
small beekeeping business
which I operate from my farm
in the eastern part of our coun-
ty.
For the last several years I
have entertained the thought of
starting a flea and farmers
market of my own. I visited
several markets in Florida and
Tennessee to see what worked
best. While studying. these
markets, I came across two
that impressed me the most.
One is the Webster flea mar-
ket here in Florida, and the
other is Kingsport farmers
market in Tennessee. These
markets have been operating
for many years and both of
them were started and current-
ly operated by the counties in
which they exist.
I saw the benefit of this
style of market and how it had
become such a large part of the
community. The county pro-
vides business opportunities to
its residents in the form of
rental spaces, and the money
that the county receives from
them is used for other projects
within the county.
It is better for the entire
community to prosper togeth-
er, instead of one person
becoming wealthy from the
others.
In March of this year I acted
upon my idea and told my
friend Mike Manley what I had
envisioned for the county. He
liked the idea and we agreed to
meet several days later and
discuss the matter in depth.
We came to the conclusion


that Pioneer Park would be a
good location for a flea and
, farmers market. The park has
good road frontage, existing
bathroom facilities and utilities,
parking, and plenty of land for
growth. It is owned by the
county and sits vacant most of
the year. It would be like
Pioneer Park Days every week,
eventually.
Mike and I have had several
meetings with county officials,
and I have spoken in front of
our county commissioners con-
cerning the matter.
Here is what I am proposing.
Pioneer Park will be the loca-
tion for a year-round flea and
farmers market, with a stronger
emphasis on the farmers market
in the beginning. The farmers
market will be a members-only
opportunity, with approximate-
ly 20 members in the beginning.
This number will grow as the
market gains popularity and the
number of consumers grows.
Members will pay an annual
fee, and stall rental fees will be
collected on market days.
Farmers can only sell what
they grow during the spring and
fall harvest times. They will be
allowed to buy and resell during
the off season. When the market
'first opens they will also be able
to buy and resell in order to
have a good supply for the pub-
lic. The market will be open on
Wednesday and Saturdays
7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
The flea market section will
not require a membership. Flea
market dealers will only have to
pay stall rental fees, Hardee.
county residents who are al-
ready in the catering and restau-
rant business will be encour-
aged to become food vendors.
In time, as the market grows,


ne Season: Look


ore The Storm!.


failure," explains Andersen.
"Preparing trees for a natural
disaster is a must, and should be
done well in advice ofithe
storm season. To help ease
these dangers, have a profes-
sional arborist evaluate your
trees. Doing this will help you
determine potential weaknesses
and dangers."
Look at your trees for the fol-
lowing warning signs:
Wires in contact with tree
branches. Trees may become
energized when they are con-
tacted by electric wires.
Dead or partially attached
limbs hung up in the higher
branches that could fall and
cause damage or injury.
Cracked stems and branch
forks that could cause cata-
strophic failure of a tree section.
Hollow or decayed areas on
the trunk or main limbs, or


Hog Hunts Available

Beginning In October
The Southwest Florida Water dog format. No still hunts will
Management District is organiz- be available.
ing a half dozen hog hunts in its In addition to obtaining a
various management lands this permit online, maps and hunt-
fall and winter, ing rules of the areas where the
Permits are $50 and on a hunts will take place are avail-
first-come, first-served basis. able on the district's website at
Permits can be purchased for www.WaterMatters.org/Hot
any of these hunts, beginning Hunt/.
Oct. 10 at 9 a.m. and continuing This is the fourth consecutive
until 5 p.m. Oct. 24, or until they year for the hunts. Last year's
are sold out. hunts removed 100 hogs from
The hunts are Nov. 15-17 at four different tracts of land
the Upper Hillsborough Pre- throughout the district. The dis-
serve's Alston Tract in Pasco trict allows hogs to be con-
County; Dec. 6-8 and again Jan. trolled when the damage they
24-26 at the McGregor Smith cause is at unacceptable levels.
Scout Reservation in Citrus Damage from hogs is occurring
County; Dec. 13-15 at Green more frequently and with
Swamp Wildness Preserve's increasing severity.
Hampton Tract in Polk County; Wild hogs, which are not
Jan. 10-12 and again Feb. 7-9 at native to Florida, feed on roots,
the Edward W. Chance Re- tubers and grubs by rooting
serve's Coker Prairie Tract in 'with their broad snouts and can
Manatee County; Jan. 17-19 at leave an area looking like a
Little Manatee River's South- plowed field. They also prey on
fork Tract in Manatee County; native wildlife, compete with
and Feb. 7-9 at the Conner native species for food and
Preserve in Pasco County. transmit diseases to other
These district-managed prop- wildlife, livestock and humans.
erties will be temporarily closed Additionally, hogs may facili-
to the public during the hog tate the spread of exotic plant
hunts.' Only permitted hog species by transporting seeds
hunters will be allowed access. and/or providing germination
All hunts will adhere to the hog- sites through rooting.


Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the
people with whom fate brings you together, but do so
with all your heart.
-Marcus Aurelius


a

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t

e
t

I

t


I
e




ti

a
t












0
p
ti

r

E
1'


ti






ti
e


Flea, Farmers Market


Proposed For Hardee


the Nickerson building at the
west side of the park could be
used for musical performances
and other events, which was an
idea that my friend Ron
Lambert had.
I think the best time to start
the market will be this fall. The
farmers will be harvesting their
fall crops, the summer rains will
be over, and our northern broth-
ers and sisters will be coming.
back for the winter. In my opin-
ion, this will help the market get
off to a better start. There will
also be a section set aside for
dealers selling small animals.
The goals of this plan are to
provide farmers the opportunity
to sell their produce directly to
the public, for the residents of.
Hardee county to support their
local farmers, to provide small
business opportunities to the
public in the form.of flea mar-
ket stalls, to better utilize the
vacant land at Pioneer Park, to
attract more people to our com-:
munity, and to generate more
revenue for the county which
will allow us to be more finan-
cially secure, without raising
taxes!
I have only covered the
basics in this letter. Currently
our county officials are working
together on this 'issue and, at
some future point I suspect you
will be invited to a public meet-
ing where this idea will be dis-
cussed in greater detail.
I would like to thank Mike
Manley, Bill Lambert, the
Economic Development Com-
mittee, our county commission-.
ers, and everyone else who has
contributed their ideas and time
to this plan. .*

Joshua Clemente
Wauchula


mushrooms growing from the
bark that indicate a decayed and
weakened stem.
Peeling bark or gaping
wounds in the trunk also indi-
cate structural weakness.
Fallen or uprooted trees put-
ting pressure on other trees.
beneath them.
Tight, V-shaped forks, which
are much more prone to failure
than open U-shaped ones.
Heaving soil at the tree base
is a potential indicator of an
unsound root system.
Remember, too, that a tree is
a living thing, and its integrity
and stability change over time,
so don't assume that a tree that
has survived nine severe storms
will necessarily survive a 10th.
A professional arborist can
assess your landscape and work
with you to determine the safest
course of action.



Nutrition
U Wise -
SKAREN COULNS, MS, RO, CD.l
SAMERICAN INSTrrUTE FOR I
CAcER RESEARCH
Q: Are broccoli stalks nutri-
tious, or should I ust stick to;
the florets?
A: Broccoli is a nutritional
powerhouse, providing vitamin
C, folate, beta-carotene and
lutein (a compound being stud-
ied for its role in eye health). In
addition, it is rich in isothio-
cyanates, phytochemicals that
may play a role in fighting can-
cer. While researchers cannot
pinpoint which areas of the
plant supply which phytochem-
icals, the location of some com-
pounds is known. The florets
and leaves, for example, are
higher in carotenoids -than the
pale stalks, although the stalks
remain good sources of vitamin
C and folate. Broccoli stalks are
also great sources of fiber.'
Regardless, be confident that
the whole broccoli stalk is pro-
viding solid nutrition. When the
stalks are peeled and sliced
thinly on the diagonal, they'
make a great, less expensive:
alternative to bamboo shoots in
a stir-fry. Their crunchy texture
also makes them a welcome
substitute in many recipes that
call for celery.


With lies you may ge
ahead In the world-but
you can ne r go back.
--Ru an Provrb


fo


p
S
p
sL
L


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(if office unattended, please leave
message.)






4A The Herald-Advocate, September 8,2011


Obituaries


HARRY REAGLE ELYEA
Harry Reagle Elyea, 94, of
Bowling Green, died on
Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, at
Wauchula.
Born Jan. 29, 1917, to
Charles F. and Cora Reagle
Elyea in Marengo Township
near Marshall, Mich. He retired
to Bowling Green after a life of
missionary service.
He was preceded in death by
his parents; sister Frances; and
brothers Robert, Charles and
Paul.
Survivors include his wife,
,Doretha Elyea; nine children,
Daniel Elyea of Okeechobee,
Frances Cook of Marshall,
Mich., *Thomas Elyea of
Portage, Mich., Douglas Elyea
of Belmont, Mich., Shirley
Aeschbacher of Versailles, Mo.,
Iva Grennell of Graham, Wash.,
Lorna Couch of Kentwood,
Mich, Timothy Elyea of
Belmont, Mich., and Roxann
Burton of Wauchula; brother
George Elyea; 30 grandchil-'
dren; and numerous great-
grandchildren.
Interment will take place in
Oakridge Cemetery in Mar-
shall, Mich.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

A truth that's told with bad
Intent beats all the lies you
can invent.
-William Blake
The least initial deviation
from the truth is multiplied
later a thousandfold.
-Aristotle


9n 11 o qing &Ueonoy













HARRY REAGLE ELYEA
Harry Reagle Elyea, 94, of
Bowling Green, went home to
be with his Savior on
Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, at
Wauchula.
He was born at home Jan.
29, 1917, to Charles F. and
Cora Reagle Elyea in Mar-
engo Township near Marshall,
Mich. He grew up on the fam-
ily farm, graduating from high
school in Marshall.
He attended Moody Bible
Institute three months after
marrying Doretha Elaine
Zerbel on June 23, 1940. After
graduating from Moody Bible
Institute, Harry and Doretha
traveled to Nigeria in 1945 as
missionaries with the Sudan
Interior Mission. There they
served mainly in Jos, Rahama
and Bursali, until 1968.
His giftedness in things
mechanical often brought him
to repairing vehicles and
equipment for other mission-
aries. His zeal for evangeliza-
tion found outlets in extensive
dispensary work and village
ministries. Back home in the
States, he was active in jail
ministry, tract distribution,
and installation of gospel
signs. He continued in min-
istry right up to the end of his
life.
He is survived by his wife
of 71 years, Doretha Elyea;
nine children, Daniel Elyea of
Okeechobee, Frances Cook of
Marshall, Mich., Thomas
Elyea of Portage, Mich.,
Douglas Elyea of Belmont,
Mich., Shirley Aeschbacher of
Versailles, Mo., Iva Grennell
of Graham, Wash., Lorna
Couch of Kentwood, Mich,
Timothy Elyea of Belmont,
Mich., and Roxann Burton of
Wauchula; 0 grandchildren;
numerous great-grandchil-
dren;, and a brother, George
Elyea of Marshall, Mich.
He was preceded in death
Jby parents, Charles F. and
Cora Reagle Elyea; his sister
Frances; and his brothers
Robert, Charles and Paul.
Interment will take place at


BRIAN JAME PAPPAS
Brian James Pappas, 61, of
Palm Coast, formerly of St.
Augustine, died on Wednesday,
Aug. 31,2011, in St. Augustine.
Born Nov. 18, 1949, in
Miami Beach, he was a lifelong
Florida resident. He earned a
bachelor in science in business
administration at the University
of Florida and his law degree
from South Texas College of
Law. He practiced law in
Hardee County until returning to
the University of Florida to get a
master's degree in taxation law.
Since retirement, he has been a
certified mediator, volleyball
coach, real estate developer and
minister at Embassy House
Ministries.
He is survived by his wife of
38 years, Sherri Pappas; daugh-
ters Christine Nicole Miller of
Deltona, Kimberly Anne
Fredrick of Florence, S.C.; and
Joanna Marie Pappas of St.
Augustine; sister Carolyn
Jackson of Maitland; brother
Steven Pappas of Davie; and his
grandchildren.
Services will be held on
Saturday, Sept. 10 at Mansion
Memorial Park, 1400 36th Ave.
East, Ellenton Florida. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests
memorial donations be sent to
Burzynski Clinic, 9432 Katy
Freeway, Suite 200, Houston,
Texas 77055 (Phone 713-335-
5631) on behalf of Brian's
brother, Seven Joseph Pappas
for his cancer treatment.
Condolences may be expressed
at www.craigfuneralhome.com.
Craig Funeral Home
St. Augustine

The most dangerous
untruths are truths moder-
ately distorted.
--Georg Christoph
Uchtenberg


E f'ovi/ig A enMORy


Greetings from Fort Green!
I sincerely hope everyone
enjoyed their day off to labor!
That is exactly what I used to
do on Labor Day, labor, and
then watch the Jerry Lewis
marathon, but I believe it is no
longer on television and I am
not much of a laborer anymore!
Time changes most things.
There were a great many of
the regulars absent from church
this past Sunday. Charles and
Lynda Abbott enjoyed a visit to
their mountain home in Blairs-
ville, Ga. If they don't do a
thing but sit on the porch and
enjoy the breeze, it is pleasant!
Avie and Kaylee Hogenauer
and Allen Eures spent the week-
end at Disney. They have sea-
son passes and they were going
to expire, about the middle of
September, so it was necessary
to use them one more time!
They had a super time. Bud and
Connie went to Georgia.
Quite a few of us went over to
Wimauma to the sing: Earl and
Mary Bargeron, John and Essie
Deer, Tom and Sharon Lynn,
Sam and Arden Rawls, Greg
and Shuree Rawls and yours
truly, Rilla and Sherman. We
always have a good time when
'we all go off in our motor
homes, and if there is a gospel
sing it is a double treat, plus one
of our favorites was preaching,
Randy Perry!
Our sincere sympathy is
extended to the family of Brian
Pappas. He went home last
Wednesday around 1:30 in the
morning. His wife and datigh-
ters were at his bedside. His
wife, Sherrie, is Sherman's first
cousin. Her dad, Vernon Abbott,
was the first of the A.E. and
Vashti Abbott clan to go.
Brian had cancer and got bet-
ter with the treatment he re-
ceived in Houston, but just was
not able to return. His brother,
Steve, is still receiving treat-




FREDA BROOKS
DOUGLAS
Freda Brooks Douglas, 78,
of Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
Aug. 30, 2011, at Florida Hos-
pital, Sebring.
Born on March 18, 1933, at.'
Oil City, Pa., she came to
Crystal Lake Village, Wauchula
in 1984.
She was a writer, and the
author of two books. She wrote
online articles and had worked
at The Herald-Advocate in sales
and writing a column.
She was preceded in death by
husbands Roland S. Phillips
and John Robert Douglas.
No services are scheduled.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


ment and is improving. Shemrrie
said in lieu of flowers she want-
ed us to send any donations to
the Burzynski Clinic, 9432
Katy Freeway, Suite 200,
Houston, TX 77055, Attn:
Shirley M. and in memory of
Brian, but to be used for Steve's
treatment.
We visited with Buck Toole
last week. You can't keep a
good man down; when .we


Fort Green News .
By Rilla Cooper +
773-6710


arrived he was just coming in
from driving in the pasture
checking on his cows. He said
he takes five pills the day
before he receives treatment
and the treatments still make
him feel a little bad. If you
have the time, Buck can tell you
a lot of history.
Our sincere sympathy is
extended to Suzanne Dupree
and family in the homegoing of
her mama. Suzanne and chil-
dren lived in Fort Green when
the children were growing up,
and Fort Green still claims
them! Mrs. Messick lived a
long life.
Remember to pray for each


other, our nation and the mili-
tary and don't forget the Senior
Day of praise at Fort Green
Baptist and covered-dish dinner
this coming Sunday, Sept. 11,
which is also 9-11. We didn't
think about the date when we
scheduled Senior Day, but lots
of the ones lost on 9-11 never
made it to their 70th birthdays.

The gdp in our economy is
between what we have and
what we think we ought to
have-and that is a moral
problem, not an economic
one.
-Paul Heyne


LIKE AN OLD FRIEND ...


WE JUST WANT YOU TO KNOW THAT WHEN YOU
SUFFER THE LOSS OF YOUR LOVED ONE, WE
WILL BE THERE FOR YOU WITH THE SAME
COMPASSION AND CARE THAT ROBARTS
HAS SHOWN FOR OVER A CENTURY.


SO IN YOUR TIME OF NEED, REMEMBER, WE'RE
MORE THAN JUST A FUNERAL HOME; WE'RE AN
OLD FRIEND ON WHOM YOU CAN RELY. WE
KNOW WHAT IT FEELS LIKE TO LOSE
SOMEONE YOU LOVE.




















2Dennid Kobarts 2ennis Kobarts, II
~ President ~ Vice President ~



) ROBARTS
FAMILYFUNERAL HOME

A Trusted Family Name Since 1906





529 West Main Street Wauchula 863-773-9773
View Obits at robartsfh.com 9:ec
i i L


ii.


FREDA BROOKS
DOUGLAS
Freda Brooks Douglas, 78,
of Wauchula, passed away on
Aug. 30, 2011, at Florida
Hospital in Sebring.
She was born on March 18,
1933, at Oil City, Pa., the
daughter of H. Alfred "Dutch"
Brooks and Helene Hastings
Brooks. She and her husband
John moved to Crystal Lake
Village in 1984 from
Pennsylvania.
Freda was an avid writer
her whole life. She had pub-
lished two books, "Cherish
the Past" in 2004 and "Winds
of Change" in .2008. She has
also written many articles on
FaithWriters.com. She work-
ed at The Herald-Advocate
for many years in sales and
wrote a column called
"Freda's Foibles" until she
moved to Alabama in 2007.
She came back to Hardee
County in 2009.
She was preceded in death
by husbands, Roland S.
Phillips in 1981, and John
Robert Douglas in 2001.
Freda is survived by tihe
family who adopted her in
2004, Linda Terhune, who
was her friend and caregiver,
Linda's son and his- wife,
Jason and Jennifer Hay, and
their son Garrett.
Her ashes will be scattered
on a hillside in Oil City, Pa.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfhcom.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


Tha s why we 11 come to you.


While we always do our best to ensure every family's comfort, we

understand that many people would rather not visit a funeral home

at all. If you have any questions and prefer to meet with someone

face-to-face, we are happy to come to you. Whether it's at your

home, at work, or even over coffee. Call us today.








Funeral Homes









404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400

9:8C PongerKaysGrady.com


Oakridge Cemetery in Mar-
shall, Mich.
- Expressions of comfort
may be made at
robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

PW I -,






September 8, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Legislative Meeting Sept. 14


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County has once
again prepared its wish list.
The resolution and packet for
the 2012 Legislative Delegation
hearing have been sent.
The meeting is next Wednes-
day, Sept. 14, at 2 p.m. in the
County Commission Chambers,
Room 102, Courthouse Annex
1, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula.
Rep. Ben Albritton and Sen.
J. D. Alexander, or a member of
their staffs, will' be on hand to
hear from county, School Board
and municipal officials on what
they expect or hope for from the
.'2012 legislature.
Hardee's list dropped some
and added some from last
year's list. Gov. Rick Scott
recently renewed the Rural
Area of Critical Economic
Concern (RACEC) designation


for the county, taking that off
the wish list.
Topping Hardee's list is con-
tinued funding for U.S. 17 four-
laning; continued funding for
the SCRAP (Small County
Road Assistance Program),
SCOP (Small County Opera-
tions Program) and Transpor-
tation Disadvantaged Programs;
wastewater expansion; court-
house renovations; and fire sta-
tion construction in Bowling
Green to replace the one heavi-
ly damaged by Hurricane
Charley.
The commission unanimous-
ly approved the resolution and
packet to be sent to Rep.
Albritton's office.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-approved the new year
contract with the Health De-
partment. Director Dr. Stephen


Gordon said it was the same as
last year except for a cut of
$423,000 in state funding. "We
expect more cuts as well, but
will continue to maintain the
same number of employees and
services as we have," said
Gordon.
-approved a grant applica-
tion for $259,000 for a 3,000-
gallon tanker for the Fire-
Rescue Department, replacing a
1990 tanker on which the chas-
sis has been replaced and much
work done. "It's close to the end
of its life, costing more in main-
tenance costs," said Fire Chief
Mike Choate. His department
would only have to use 10 per-
cent for local match and could
keep the rest of the money bud-
geted for the tanker for other
necessities, such as bunker gear.


The friend who holds your hand and says the wrong thing is made of dearer stuff than
the one who stays away.
-Barbara IKingsolver

I value the friend who for me finds time on his calendar, but I cherish the friend who
for me does not consult his calendar.
-Robert Brault




FREE-$40 GIFTCARD

SEE WILDCAT PAGE
Center Section of "C"

For Your Chance To Win


"You Name

The Score"
(A Winner Every Week)


'S


The C
September is Library Card
Sign-Up Month, and the Hardee
County Public Library wants to
make sure that all children in the
county have h-. smartest card of
all, a library. i, d.
Public library programming
and books for children make a
difference in the lives of stu-
dents. By providing school-age
children with engaging pro-
grams and amazing collections,
students from all backgrounds
become excited and enthusiastic
readers.
Activities at the Hardee
County Public Library during
Library Card Sign-Up Month
include giving away a Sonic
coupon for any child who signs
up for a library card.
"A library card has always
been the most important school
supply of all," says Patti Jean
Lang, library director.


county Li
"Today's libraries are thriv-
ing technology hubs that mil-
lions rely on as either their first
or only choice for computer and
Internet access. In doing so,
libraries provide children with
not only the tools to be literate,
but information literate as
well," she adds. "There's a lot
happening at the Hardee
County Public Library, and the
best part for both children and
parents, in these tough econom-
ic times, is that it's all free.witti
a library card."
Getting a library card is easy.
Residents of Hardee County are
eligible for a free library card.
When a child is applying for
a library card, a parent or
guardian must be present. The
adult must supply a current
photo identification in addition
to proof of residency. Proof of
residency must be one of the
namiMe^la'JfiBWrm i': "'!" "--SS


brary!
following documents, --which
are current, valid and issued in
Hardee County: Florida dri-
ver's license; school or college
ID card; voter's registration
card; vehicle registration; lease
or rental agreement for 12-
month period; current property
tax receipt bill; deed to proper-
ty; or Declaration of Domicile
from the Clerk of the Courts
Office.
Observed since 1987, Li-
brary Card Sign-Up Month is a,
time when the American
Library Association and li-
braries across the country
remind parents that a library
card is the most important
school supply of all.
For more information and to
sign up for a library card, visit
the Hardee County Public
Library at 315 N. Sixth Ave.
(U.S. 17); or call, 773-6438.


Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are avaaoe upon iequegl tt IPixdWtuals tn iJsaDires The
Employ Florida telephone may be reached by persons using TTY/rD equipment via me Florida Relay Snrce al 71). spor.-rDe an EsparKn
1' .- '* . 9:8c :'


CITY OF WAUCHULA :
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC ,
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular scheduled
meeting Monday September 12, 2011 at 6:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it
reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as follows: Ordinance
2011-06 (Second Reading) 2010/2011 Budget Adjustments, Ordinance 2011.-
05 (First Reading) Redevelopment Trust Fund/CRA Expansion, Ordinance
2011-07 (First Reading) Adopting 2011/2012 Budget, Resolution 2011-19
Constitution Week Proclamation, Resolution 2011-20.CRA/MSW Funding
Agreement, Resolution 2011-21 Bid Award for Airport Storm Water Pond Sys-
tem- QGS Development, Inc., Resolution 2011-22 Acceptance of FAA grant
offer, Resolution 2011-23 Avcon, Inc. 'Supplement Agreement 2011-03, Res-
olution 2011-24 Setting Final Millage Rate, Debris Management Contracts,
Resolution 2011-25 Eastern Star Local Chapter 100th Year CelebrationWeek
Proclamation, Revision to Lease Agreement w/ Peace River Explorations,
Inc., WHH Enterprises- Electric Rate Study Presentations and Recommen-
dations, First Southwest- Bond Refinancing Presentation, Mark Burrus- Dis-
puting Utility Accounts, Approval of August 2011 Minutes, City Manager
Selection, Appointment to Code Enforcement Board, Survey of D'Agostino
Property- Review of price quotes, and any other business that may come be-
fore the Commission.
The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, thle City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and.evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of thi Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
9:8c


COURTESY PHOTO
Hardee County Public Library staff member Alyssa Purdy-Grimes gives Elijah Valletutti
his new library card, which he immediately used to check out the book "Art & Max."



BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
ATTORNEYS AT. LAW
501 WEST MA tS'ITREt"'
WAUCHULA, FLOIEDA%33873-1729' :
TELEPHONE (863) 773-3241

WILLS & TRUSTS
PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
LARGE & SMALL ESTATES
HOMESTEAD DETERMINATION
DURABLE POWERS OF ATTORNEY
LIVING WILLS GUARDIANSHIPS
7:21tf



Mark of the Beast
.As calamities become more-frequent and intense and the world
continues to draw closer to the "beginning" of, the final conflict
(Revelation 13:11-17) the full development of the mark of the beast
is fast approaching. It is written in' Revelation 13:16 that some peo-
ple will get the mark in the right hand and others in their foreheads.
Those that are said to receive the mark in their forehead are the
ones that "think" in their minds that the mark is i0 their best interest.
The others that are said to get it in the right hand. are those that suc-
cumb to it because of economic hardships associated with not
being able to buy or sell (Revelation 13:17). Some may wonder why
anyone would think that something so soul threatening could be in
their best interest? It is because the Devil will blend it so well with the
good objectives such as family time, child development, preserva-
tion of resources, health, and general welfare that anyone who
would disagree with the mark will be accused of being against all of
the good causes as well. But the distinguishable characteristics of
the ones that gain the victory over Satan and his mark and do "not"
experience wrath without mercy (Revelation 14:10), are the keeping
of the "Commandments of God" by the power given to them as a
result of the faith they have in and from Jesus Christ (Revelation
14:12, 12:17, etc). There is .only One set of Commandments that
God took care to write with His own finger (Exodus 31:18), that
points out sin (1st John 3:4), and that is the 10 Commandments as
recorded in their entirety in Exodus 20:3-17 and recited and referred
to many times and in many different ways throughout the whole
Bible. Study carefully the 10 commandments to see what in your life
is not in harmony with them and heeds Jesus special touch.

Learn more of your Bible

Write to:
Bible Studies Unlimited
RO. Box 2385
Wauchula, FL 33873
9:8p


Get A 'Smart Card' At


I


IM A R IIW I El






6A The Herald-Advocate, September 8,2011


Week ending September 4, 2011
Weather Summary: High temperatures across the State were
mostly in the low to mid-90s during the week. Extremes were 101
degrees reported at Marianna and 99 degrees at Quincy.
Measurable rainfall was reported at all but two of the 36 Florida
Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations. Nine stations
reported less than one-half inch of rainfall, six stations reported
from one-half to one inch of rainfall, and 16 stations reported from
one to four inches of rainfall. The most rainfall was reported at
Homestead (4.47 inches), Fort Pierce (4.44 inches), and Ona (4.29
inches). The U.S. Drought Monitor showed extreme drought con-
ditions lingered primarily in the eastern Panhandle and Nassau
County. Lake Okeechobee benefited from August and last week's
rainfall, but remained about three feet below average at 10.77 feet
on September 6,2011. Topsoil and subsoil moisture ratings of ade-
quate and surplus were 78 percent and 74 percent, respectively.
These ratings were virtually unchanged from the previous week.

Field Crops: Armyworms were observed feeding on many
crops in some counties. High temperatures and dry weather
stressed crops in Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Washington counties.
Corn harvesting continued in many counties. Cotton was starting to
flower and form bolls, and a few fields had bolls opening. Peanut
harvesting was underway with three percent of the crop harvested.
Some peanut fields were planted late, so maturing and harvesting
will also be later than normal. Rainfall was welcomed to soften
soils for easier harvesting. Peanut crop condition did not differ
greatly from that of the previous week, with 4% very poor, 10%
poor, 24% fair, 54% good, and 8% excellent.

Vegetables: Field preparation, including laying plastic, con-
tinued for fall vegetable crops in southern Florida.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture condition slight-
ly improved from the previous week, with 65 percent in good con-
dition. Drought still limited forage growth in many locations. The
cattle condition was very poor to excellent with 65 percent in good
condition. In the Panhandle, pasture condition varied from very
poor to excellent. Drought and armyworms reduced pasture condi-
tion in several locations and some pasture remained poor due to
overgrazing. The seasonal decline in quality of summer perennials
forage was underway as nighttime temperatures go down.
Cattlemen were preparing land for planting winter forage. Most
cattle were in good condition. In the northern areas, pasture and
cattle ranged from fair to excellent condition with most in good
condition. In the central and southwestern areas, pasture ranged
from very poor to excellent condition with most in good condition.
Pastures improved following recent rains. The condition of the cat-
tle ranged from fair to excellent with most in good condition.

Citrus: Temperatures were in the upper 60s to the lower 70s
at night and the lower to mid-90s during the day for the majority of
the week. This week there was heavy, but scattered rainfall, with 23
of the 25 FAWN stations receiving some rainfall. Amounts
received ranged from 0.02 inch in Frostproof, to 4.44 inches in Ft
Pierce. Citra and Putnam Hall received no rainfall. Drought condi-
tions ranged from drought-free in the western half of the citrus
region to severe conditions, found in small parts of Okeechobee,
Martin, St Lucie, and Palm Beach counties, along the eastern and
north-eastern shore of Lake Okeechobee. Drought conditions were
per the U.S. Drought Monitor; last updated August 28, 2011. Next
season's oranges were almost baseball size, and next season's
grapefruit are approaching softball size. Grove activity last week
included resetting new trees, young tree care, applying herbicides,
hedging and topping, brush removal, and fertilizer application.


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Sept. 4, Joshua Cody Lopez, 23, of 2188 Ralph Smith Road,
Wauchula, was detained by Dep. John Cortez on a charge of with-
holding support of children. He had been arrested by Wauchula
Sgt. John Easoc ,.n a traffic charge.
Sept. 4, residential burglaries on two locations on Morning
Glory Loop, a fight on Blue Jay Road, and a theft on U.S. 17 were
reported.

Sept. 3, Crystal Danielle Bird, 28, of 1905 Gordon Ave.
South, Lehigh Acres, and Billiejean Maridith Burdette, 20, of 221
Gazelle Dr. North, Fort Myers, were arrested by Dep. Scott
Heasley and each charged with battery.
Sept. 3, a residential burglary on SR 64 West, a vehicle stolen
on CR 663, and a fight on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Sept. 2, Thomas Florez, 32, of 2280 Merle Langford Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge of viola-
tion of probation.
Sept 2, Ashley Jean Nicole Burson, 26, of 1320 Mockingbird
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged
with four counts eavesdropping/illegal interception of county
reception and violation of probation.
Sept. 2, a residential burglary on Kazen Road was reported.

Sept. 1, Melanie Michelle Smith, 38, of 3403 Kelly Court
Road, Mulberry, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson on a charge of
withholding support of children.
Sept. 1, Angelo Ramirez Ybarra, 43, of 312 Georgia St.,
Wauchula, was arrested on a charge of withholding support of chil-
dren.
Sept. 1, David Lopez Gomez, 26, of 4465 Church Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey and
charged with battery and trespassing on an occupied structure or
conveyance.
Sept. 1, Otis Jerome Faulk, 35, of 659 Baker St., Wauchula,
was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force and charged with
sale of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a place of worship or business,
possession of cocaine, sale of marijuana within 1,000 feet of a
specified place, possession of marijuana, possession/manufac-
ture/delivery of drug paraphernalia, possession of drug parapher-
nalia, four counts aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and
possession of weapon/ammo by a convicted felon.
Sept. 1, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 South and thefts on
Alderman Road and on Briar Patch Road were reported.

Aug. 31, Lesie Leann Turner, 25, of 1093 Downing Circle,
Wauchula, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Eduardo
Cruz and charged with resisting an officer without violence and a
traffic offense.
Aug. 31, a residential burglary on Hampton Road was report-
ed.

Aug. 30, residential burglaries on Reif Road and on Alamo
Avenue and a theft on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue were report-
ed.

Aug. 29, Eli Mariner, 35, of 630 E. Main St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on five counts of failure to appear in
court.
Aug. 29, Kenny Devynn Hooks, 36, of 512 Tangerine St.,


Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a
charge of withholding support of children.
Aug. 29, a business burglary on SR 64 West, a tag stolen on
CR 663, and a theft on Abendoff Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
Sept. 4, Marco Antonio Huerta, 23, of 828 S. 10th Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson and charged with
battery on an officer and a traffic charge.

Sept. 3, Christie Kay Leigh Owens, 21, of 6081 Van Simmons
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged
with battery, disorderly conduct and neglect of child without great
harm.

Sept. 2, Angela Maria Valdez, 34, of 604 E. Bay St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with
fraud giving a false ID to an officer. At the jail, Sgt. Lyle Hart
detained Valdez on two counts of withholding support of children..
Sept. 2, Alvin Dale Jackson, 20, of 611 E. Summit St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Ofc. Aron Thomas and charged with battery.
Sept. 2, a residential burglary in River Chase was reported.

Sept. 1, Destiny Nicole Froelich, 21, of 1021 S. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with
neglect of child without great harm.

Aug. 31, Brandon Keith Wisniewski, 26, of 401 S. 10th Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with
two counts of battery and possession of marijuana.
Aug. 31, Terry Lee Gaydon, 26, of 1433 Dena Circle,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith on an out-of-coun-
ty warrant.

Aug. 30, thefts on East Palmetto Street and on Louisiana
Street were reported.

Aug. 29, a business burglary on U.S. 17 South and a theft on
Orange Place was reported.

BOWING GREEN
Sept. 3, a fight on Pleasant Way was reported.
Sept. 2, a theft on Doc Coil Road was reported.

Sept. 1, Stephen Chevo Rodriguez, 27, of 4802 Epps Ave.,-
Bowling Green, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged
with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and two counts of
violation of probation.

Aug. 30, a theft on Tangerine Street was reported.

Aug. 29, Joel Calvillo, 18, of 5121 Dixiana Dr., Bowling
Green,w as arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with
simple assault threat to do violence.


LLOYD HALL invites all
m his friends and neighbors
to come see him at


Gtewooke M E oeqnopa_
205 N. Charleston FortlMead
1-800-673-9512 *
www.idrectchevy.com I


Florida


So America Grows


"When you ask kids 'Where does food come
from?' they say 'the grocery store.' Our U-Pick
Farm teaches them to see for themselves that real
food comes from the Earth with soil nourished
with the help of Florida Phosphate. It's a natural
product that allows farmers to provide good food,
good jobs and carry on a family tradition. There's
nothing like fresh and natural."


9:8c













Food/Shelter
Funds Coming
Hardee County has been
chosen to receive $13,938 to
supplement emergency food
and shelter programs in the
county. A local board will
determine how these funds
are to be distributed among
the food and shelter pro-
grams run by local service
agencies in the area.
Those who can apply are
private voluntary non-profits
or units of government which
hiave an accounting system,
practice nondiscrimination,
have demonstrated the abili-
ty to use-such programs and
have a voluntary board._To
apply, contact Andrea
Herigodt at 863-494-1068 for
an application by Sept. 15.

Golf Scramble
Could Earn Car
The third annual Frog Hair
Scramble at the Bartow Golf
Course will raise funds for
the Fort Meade Chamber of
Commerce and give folks a
change to win a 2011
Chevrolet Camaro. Other
prizes are a set of Callaway
irons, Sharp LCD flat-screen
TV, or roundtrip domestic air-
fare for two.
Cost is $200 for four-per-
son team or $50 per player.
The shotgun start is 7:45
a.m. Saturday. It includes a
continental breakfast, lunch,
mulligan package and
Chinese auction. Checks
can be sent to Fort Meade
Chamber of -Commerce, P.
0. Box 91, Fort Meade FL
33841.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO; 25-2008-CA-000535
THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS
SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE
OF SAMI II 2006-AR3
Plaintiff,
vs.
VIRGIL D. CALDWELL A/K/A VIR-
GIL CALDWELL; CHRISTINA
CALDWELL; EQUITY ONE, INC.,
D/B/A EQUITY ONE FINANCIAL
SERVICES COMPANY, and any
unknown heirs, devisees,.
grantees, creditors, and other
unknown persons or unknown
spouses claiming by, through
and under any of the above.
named Defendants,
Defendants.

AMENDED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that
the undersigned Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Hardee County,
Florida, will on the 21 day of
September, 2011, at 11:00 AM at
Hardee County Courthouse 417
W. Main St., Second Floor
Hallway outside of Room 202,
Wauchula, FL 33873, offer for sale
and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for cash,
the following-described property
situate in Hardee County, Florida:
The East 1/2 of the North
1/2 of Lot "I", less the
South 5.00 feet and the
East 30.00 feet, Block 3 of
KATYON & MADDOX
Addition to the City of
Wauchula, Hardee County,
Florida; also described as:
The West 112.50 feet of the
East 142.50 feet of the
North 1/2 of Lot "I", less
South 5.00 feet of KATYON
& MADDOX Addition to the
City of Wauchula, Hardee
County, Florida, as per plat
Book 1, Pages 1-94
pursuant to the Final Judgment
entered in a case pending in said
Court, the style of which Is Indi-
cated above.
Any person or entity claiming
an interest in the surplus, if any,
resulting from the foreclosure
sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens, must file a claim on
same with the Clerk of Court with-
in 60 days after the foreclosure
, sale.
WITNESS my hand and official
seal of said Court this 30 day of
Aug., 2011.
B. Hugh Bradley


1 Clerk of The Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion In order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863) 534-4690,
within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; If you
are hearing or voice Impaired,
call (TDD) (863) 534-7777, or
Florida Relay Service 800-955-
8770.


Free Home Repairs
For Needy Families
Centro Campesino Farm-
worker Center, has $407,-
036.70 to sped by Feb-
ruary on weatherization/-
rehab services to qualified
singles or families, renting or
owning. The goal is to re-
duce monthly utility expens-
es by replacing appliances
and hot water heaters, air
conditioning or heating, insu-
lation and other improve-
ments.
Eligibility is based on
income and family size. For
more information, call Bar-
bara Spence at 863-233-
6322 or Mayra Rodriguez at
305-245-778, ext. 236.
Local contractors can also
call Rodriguez to enter the
program.

Sign Up For
CPR Training
South Florida Community
College is offering a Cardio-
Respiratory Resuscitation
and First Aid class on Sept.
24, from 8 a.m. until noon.
Cost is $30.
Classes can also be
planned for a business loca-
tion. For more information, or
to enroll, call Lorrie Key at
863-784-7033 or e-mail
CorporateTraining @ south-
florida.edu.

Food Assistance
Here For Elders
Citizens age 60 or older
who need help with their gro-
cery bill can get it through
the Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program (former-
ly known as Food Stamps).
An application -can be
completed over the phone by
assistance from the Aging
Resource Center. To apply,
call toll free at 1-800-Elder or
1-800963-5337.

Pet Adoption
Fees Waived
There are many cats and
kittens, all colors and sizes,
waiting to be adopted.
Adoption fees will be waived
until the end of September.
To adopt a loving cat or
dog, call Leigh Sockalosky at
Hardee Animal Rescue
Team 781-2045.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 25-2011-CA-000182
UCN: 252011CA000182XXCICI
WALTER MORTGAGE COMPANY,
LLC
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAVID RIVERA; CRYSTAL
RIVERA; STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT,
PURSUANT TO THE JUDGMENT
OF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN
THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL
THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
DESCRIBED AS:
LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 30, 31
AND 32, BLOCK 1, BOWL-
ING GREEN CENTER SUB-
DIVISION, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 31, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGH-
EST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR
CASH, ON SEPTEMBER 21, 2011,
AT 11:00 AM AT Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 Wast Main
Street, 2nd floor hallway outside
Room 202, Wauchula, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER,
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT the
Office of the Court Administrator


at (863) 534-4686 AT LEAST
SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR
SCHEDULED COURT APPEAR-
ANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON
RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION
IF THE TIME BEFORE THE
SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS
LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF
YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE
IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
DATED: August 30, 2011.
CLERK OF THE COURT
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK


5 9:8,15c


H. A. R. T. Offers
Services For Pets
The Hardee Animal Res-
cue Team is offering a free
spay/neuter program to
Hardee County residents for
neutering of animals owned
by county residents,' since it
is healthier and less expen-
sive to spay and neuter ani-
mals rather than let them
reproduce unwanted pets.
The spay and neuter pro-
gram does have a $33.25
charge to cover the cost of
the Rabies and Distemper-
Parvo vaccine, which is
required. There is no charge
for the spay/neuter. To make
an appointment, call 863-
773-2424,






THURSDAY. AUG. 8
/Hardee County School
Board, Board Room, 230 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula, dis-
trict facilities work program
hearing 5:10 p.m.; final
budget hearing, 5:20 p.m.;
regular meeting, 5:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, AUG. 9
l/Hardee County Com-
mission, workshop on Fire-
Rescue, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.
MONDAY. AUG. 12
VWauchula City Com-
mission, first budget hearing
and regular meeting, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, first public
hearing, Town Hall, 3210
U.S. 17 North, Zolfo Springs,
6 p.m.
TUESDAY. AUG. 13
VHardee Tobacco Free
Partnership, monthly meet-
ing, Hardee County Health
Department, 115 K.D. Revell
Road, (off U. S. 17 North),
Wauchula, 4 p.m.
V*Bowling Green City
Commission, City Hall, 104
E. Main St., Bowling Green,
first budget hearing 6:15
p.m., regular meeting 6:30
p.m.
WEDNESDAY. AUG. 14
VLegislative Delegation
meeting, Hardee County
Commission Room, 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 2
p.m.
THURSDAY. AUG. 15
*Hardee County Com-
mission, first budget hearing
and regular evening meet-
ing, Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.


ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships,
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par-
ents, siblings, children and
children's spouses and
grandchildren, and the num-
ber of great-grandchildren.
If there are no immediate
survivors, consideration of
other relationships may be
given.



YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR


September 8, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A



ANNOUNCING


THE -OPENING

of




SEVEN




BASKETS


FARM


CSA


FOR 2011/2012


Enrollment has begun for memberships to the 2011/2012
vegetable growing season. We would like to thank everyone
who participated last year and made it a great success. We
anticipate a waiting list this year as we have only about 40
more openings for memberships. These opening are being
filled on a first come, first serve basis. If you are not famil-
iar with the term CSA, it is the acronym for Community
Supported Agriculture. CSA's are small to mid-sized farms
that grow and market produce and other farm related prod-
ucts directly to the consumer. Instead of growing large fields
of one item that is harvested and taken to packing houses for
distribution around the world, a CSA grows a large variety
of produce in successive plantings and then provides it's
members with baskets of fresh picked produce weekly
throughout the growing season. A typical weekly basket at
Seven Baskets Farm will consist of 5-12 different varieties of
fresh grown produce. The baskets are also available for
weekly purchase after all of the members weekly baskets are
prepared. Our prices are below and proceeds from Seven
Baskets Farm help support the programs of Sherry White
ministries.


WEEKLY BASKET PRICING


Single
1/2 bushel


One Time
10 Weeks
25 Weeks
Full Season


$20
$150
$250
$400


Couple
1 bushel

$30
$250
$500


Family
2 bushels

$40
$350
$750


$700 $1000


(about 40 weeks)

WHAT WE GROW
This is a list of the many different vegetables the we grow
throughout the year. The varieties change with the seasons
and we also welcome suggestions for new types and varieties
that our members may enjoy.
Bush Beans Eggplant Yellow Snuash


Lima Beans
Pole Beans
Leaf Lettuce
Romaine Lettuce
Butter Lettuce
Brussell Sprouts
Green Cabbage
Red Cabbage
Chinese Cabbage
Sweet Potatoes
Cauliflower
Cucumbers
Pickling Cukes
Swiss Chard
Rutabagas


Garlic
Mustards
Turnips
Kale
Collards
Carrots
Kohlrabi
Onions
Okra
Beets
Broccoli
Radish
Spinach
Leeks
Pumpkins
and more


Zuchini Squash
Patty Squash
Snow Peas
Sugar Snaps
English Peas
Conk Peas
Zipper Peas
Black Eyed Peas
Purple Hull Peas
Tomatoes
Potatoes
Watermelons
Cantaloupes
Sweet Peppers
Hot Peppers


SEVEN BASKETS FARM
770 Alton Carlton Rd, Wauchula, FL

863-832-2079

Everyone ate all they wanted, and the leftovers filled
seven large baskets. ~ Matthew 15:37 (CEV)
I 9:8c


HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


_ _,.__










8A The Herald-Advocate, September 8, 2011

Youthful Volleyball Off To Slow Start


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With only a trio of seniors
having experience, the Hardee
girls varsity volleyball team is
having a hard time "getting it
together."
Coach Ken Leupold has high
hopes for this happening short-
4y as the team gathers experi-
ence. They got some as a last-
minute replacement in an Aug.
25 tournament in Lakeland, in
which they played Lake Region
and the home team, Lakeland
Dreadnaughts. Although they
lost both, they gained invalu-
able experience.
The season started Aug. 29 at
Bradenton Southeast where,
although they were able to
block the 6-3 opponent, they
could not counter all the spikes
and serves they faced, losing in
three sets.
On Aug. 30, Hardee hosted
,always tough Sebring. Sebring
got the first three points, before
Hardee got started. Shortly, the
. Streaks were ahead 7-4. Then a
Sebring serve was dug by
Ashley Nichols and tipped over
.by Summer Palmer to get
Hardee within two points.
Katie Wheeler served to
bring Hardee even 7-7, before a
net return gave Sebring the
point. It stayed close at 10-9,
but Sebring gradually began
pulling away when Hardee
could not counter the jump
serve of the Streaks' tallest
player. Hardee finished that
game down 25-10.
Sebring had a slip to start


game two, with Nyshira
Jackson serving and a good
block by Desiree Smith giving
Hardee a 3-1 lead. When Se-
bring's top server came up, she
ran off six points. Hardee
fought back to 9-5, but again
could not overcome the power-
ful Sebring serves and lost 25-8.
In the third game, Hardee
made a go of it early and tied at
2-2 and 3-3 and came back
behind Smith serves to make it
7-7 and take a brief 8-7 advan-
tage. Sebring tied it, only to
have Hardee tie it again at 9-9
before Sebring forged ahead.
Hardee would not give in as
easily and lost 25-14.
Only Palmer, Nichols and
Maria Anselmo are seniors. The
juniors are Katie Wheeler,
Jackson, Smith and Jessica
Harrison, all moving up from
the JV last year. Sophs coming
up are Erica Roberts, Karlee
Henderson, Kayla "Louie"
Nichols and Ana Galvez, who is
new to the game but a deter-
mined player.
The varsity went to DeSoto
on Thursday night, facing one
of the toughest teams, with
many of its players o1 the court
or sand year-round. Hardee lost
in three games, with the scores
not indicative of the effort they
put into it.
Meanwhile, Coach Jeanne
Atkins has the JV on track,*
beginning the season with a trio
of victories. Led by sophs
Bailey Carlton, Jessica Broad-
head, Rachel Coker and Han-
nah Grisinger, the team also


includes frosh Brooke Dixon,
Emily Albritton, Tamara St.
Fort, Courtnee Richardson,
Jakaysha Lindsey, Gemi
Saunders, Destiny Thompson
and Allison Smith.
Atkins said she has a large
squad because she has planned
a, couple of ninth-grade only
matches during the season, one
against St. Cloud and another
not yet firmed up.
Hardee won at Southeast. JV
play the best of three games,
while the varsity is best of five.
At Southeast, Hardee won 25-
14, 25-22, behind the serving of
Carlton, who had 15 service
points,, including four aces.
Saunders also had a good serv-
ice string with two points in the
first game, but eight in the sec-
ond, including the last seven
points.
Against Sebring, Hardee took
the first game 25-22 and the
second 25-21. Sebring came
back to tie the game at 14-14
and again at 16-16, taking a
brief lead before Hardee evened
it at 19-19 and went on to the
victory, battling the junior Lady
Streaks for every point.
Hardee also won at DeSoto
on Thursday night, but results
were unavailable at press time.
The girls played at Lake
Placid on Tuesday and the var-
sity takes part in the Bartow
tournament Friday and
Saturday. After games at Fort
Meade next Thursday, Hardee
takes off for Key West for a
weekend tournament.


Wildcat Golf Wins Opener


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee boys won a tri-
match to start the season.
The boys, who now play at
The Bluffs as their home
course, defeated both Lake
Placid and DeSoto in the Aug.
30 opener. Their second match,
Thursday, at Lake Placid was
rained out.
The Lady Wildcats, mean-
while, started on the down side
on their opener at their home
opener at Torrey Oaks on Aug.
30. They did not have another
match last week.
For the boys, senior Dalton
Hewett led the way around the
course with a 40, followed by
classmate Daniel Miller, com-
ing in at 41. The other Hardee
scores were in the mid-40s, "not
bad for the first test of the sea-
son," said Coach George Heine.
Hardee won the match with
166, followed by Lake Placid at
183 and DeSoto 217.
Other players for the Wild-
cats are senior Matt Godwin,


juniors Trenton Moon, Will
Bennett and William Beattie;
juniors Brad Brewer, Eric
Klein, Tyler Hewett, Reed
Woods and Tristen Mont-
gomery; and freshman Justin
Davidson.
For the Lady Wildcats play-
ers are senior Courtney Parks;
sophs Kaitlyn Shaw, Brooke
Knight and Courtney Anderson;
and freshman Kendall Gough.
Shaw led the Lady 'Cats home
in the Aug. 30 match, with
Knight, Gough, Anderson and
Parks following along.
Frostproof proved the superi-
or team with four girls shooting
in the 40's. They are all back
from the district-winning team
last year. Avon Park had 240
and Hardee was close at 245.
"We lost three seniors in the
district-winning team last year,"
said Coach Byron Jarnigan. The
girls started this week in a trip
Tuesday to Bramble Ridge at
Mulberry. The course is built on
an old phosphate mine. The
match today (Thursday) is at


home against Lakeland Mc-
Keel. Next week's only match.
is Thursday with Frostproof
hosting on the Lacarica course
in Lake Wales. Avon Park will
also be playing.
The boys played Tuesday at
Pinecrest at Avon Park, and
play today against Frostproof
at the Lake Wales Country
Club. Next week's matches are
Tuesday at Fort Meade and
Thursday at Lake Wales, again
at the Lake Wales Country
Club.
The teams wind their seasons
down to the week of Oct. 17
with district competition.
Hardee is in a huge 10-team
Class lA, Region 6, District 16
with Sarasota Booker, Brad-
enton Christian (boys only),
Sarasota Cardinal Mooney,
DeSoto, Lake Placid, Sarasota
Out-of-Door, Sarasota Christian
(boys only) Bradenton South- .
east and Bradenton St.
Stephen's.


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a regular quarterly
General Employee Pension Meeting Tuesday September 12, 2011 at 5:45pm, or as
soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as follows:
Updates on the General Employee Pension Fund and any other business that may
come before the Commission.
The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Fiorida does not.discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities A or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 9:8c



CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a regular quarterly
Police Pension Meeting Tuesday September 12, 2011 at 5:30pm, or as soon there-
after as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as follows: Updates on
the Police Pension Fund and any other business that may come before the Commis-
sion.
The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 9:8


If a mother respects both herself and her child from his very first day onward, she will
never need to teach him respect for others.
-Alice Miller






11-5i. 7 h -i I- .uF








CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold the regular scheduled meeting Monday, September 12,
2011 Immediately following the City Commission meeting which will convene at 6:00
pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as
follows: Main CRA Commercial Grant, IDA Grants, Resolution 2011-05 Community
Redevelopment Trust Amendment, Main Street Wauchula Update, and any other
business that may come before the Board.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby ad-
vises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with
respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Any-
one requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabili-
ties Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863)
773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
9:8c


Liver & Onions Fish & Chips Broiled Fish
Baked Lasagna Country Fried Steak Fried Chicken
Chicken Stir Fry Chopped Sirloin

All the above served with your choice of 2 sides OR "one trip" salad bar.


OPEN uTu ii S IAY SUNDAYin M -ii iNai
CLOSDMONDAY

90 w 7S ACUA 7-33









PAGE ONE


Wildcats Maul Miners Swimmers


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcats domi-
nated the Fort Meade Miners
Friday night despite committing
numerous penalties and three
turnovers.
This week the Cats will look
to avenge last year's 3-0 loss to
Avon Park in a 7:30 kickoff at
Avon Park.
The Cats received the ball to
start thb game but gave the ball
back five plays into the drive on
a Keyonte Holley fumble.
Fort Meade took over at the
Hardee 48 and began driving
into Wildcat territory before
turning the ball over on downs
at the 25-yard line after going
for it on fourth down.
On the next play senior run-
ning back Andrew Hooks ran
up the middle into a pile of
Miners before breaking free and
racing in for a 75-yard touch-
down.


The Octavio Alvarez PAT
was true and Hardee led 7-0
with 6:13 left in the first quar-
ter.
Fort Meade caught a break
two plays into its next drive
when a Hooks interception he
returned to the 1-yard line was
negated by a roughing the pass-
er penalty against Hardee giv-
ing the ball back to the Miners
with a first down.
The drive ended with a Jack
Cortez 30-yard field goal mak-
ing it 7-3 Wildcats with 2:41
left in the first quarter.
After trading punts on the
next possessions the Wildcats
started at their own 42-yard
line.
Aaron Barker got the drive
going with a 16-yard run on the
first play and the Cats were
quickly threatening to score.
Senior quarterback Colby
Baker found Deonte Evans
open near the goal line but


HARDEE FORT MEADE1


PASSING COMPLETIONS
ATTEMPTS AND
INTERCEPTIONS
PASSING YARDS
RUSHING ATTEMPTS/
YARDS
TOTAL YARDS
TURNOVERS
FIRST DOWNS
PENALTIES, LOST
YARDAGE
SCORING BY QUARTER:
Hardee 7 7
Fort Meade 3 0


4-7-0
52

31/227
279

3
12

10-125


7 0
0 3


8-20-2
121

37/68
189

3
12

10-80


21
6


Evans lost the ball fighting to
get in the end zone and the
Miners recovered for a touch-
back.
Keshun Rivers came through
on the very next play and
picked off a Jay Smith pass on
the near sideline and weaved
his way 40 yards for a touch-
down.
The Alvarez PAT pushed the
lead to 14-3 with 6:35 left in the
half.
The next Miner drive ended'
after Smith found Jalen Brown
for a nice reception but the
Wildcat defense forced him to
fumble and Evans was there to
recover.
Hardee settled for a punt
which Alvarez kicked 50 yards
into the end zone for a touch-
back with 2:33 left in the half.
Fort Meade was unable to
score before time ran out.
The Miners got the ball to
start the second half and quick-
ly faced a 3rd and 15.
Smith dropped back and tried
to throw a screen pass but sen-
ior linebacker Mikey Retana
read the play and made a diving
interception at the Miner's 17-
yard line.
Two plays later Hooks found
the end zone again with a 14-
yard run around the left end.
The Alvarez PAT stretched
the Wildcats lead to 21-3 with
9:19 left in the third quarter.
The teams traded punts dur-
ing the rest of the third quarter.
Fort Meade started the fourth
by going on a long drive aided
by some penalties against the
Wildcats.
The Miners tried a 47-yard
field goal but a bad snap caused
the holder to run the ball for a 4-
yard gain, turning the ball over
on downs.
The Wildcats took over with
7:33 left in the game.
The Cats tried eating up
some clock but gave the Miners
the ball back at the Hardee 37
after a Barker fumble with 5:40
to go in the game.
The Miners settled for a 32-
yard field goal with 4:44 left in
the game.
The Cats went on a time con-
suming drive and never let the
Miners have the ball back.
Head Coach Buddy Martin
told his players after the game
he was very proud and they beat
a good football team tonight.
He then reminded them how
Avon Park embarrassed the
Wildcats last year at home and
they need to return the favor
Friday night.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


soc9:8c


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee boys and girls
swim teams have already gotten
their feet, and the rest of them,
too, in the pool.
The swim team had its first
meet last Thursday at the
Rowdy Gaines Pool in Winter
Haven, competing against All
Saints' Academy, Bartow,
Sebring and Haven Christian.
Event results were unavail-
able, but Hardee girls placed
fifth and the boys fourth. Diver
Morgan Garcia had a 111.90 but
his place in the event was
unknown.
Head Coach Jan Brutus was
overall pleased with her team's
effort. "We've got a lot of new
swimmers and it was a great
experience for them. I'm sure
we'll see improvement as they
got a good idea of what the
competition can do," said
Brutus, who is assisted by
Melissa Crider.
"We're in a weird district this
year," she continued. Hardee is
now in Class IA, District 5,
along with All Saints, Haven
Christian, Frostproof, Avon
Park, Tampa Holy Names
Academy (girls only), Lake


Placid,
Christia
land Sar
Boys
Justin I
Skyler
ford an
Royal,
Garrett.
Cody S


#14 Andrew Hooks
Offense
8 rushes, 118 yds,
2 TDs, 1 catch 8 yds


#2 Aaron Barker
Scout Team


#6 Mikey Retana
Defense
16 tackles, 6 assists,
1 interception


#19 Octavio Alvarez
Special Teams
Made all PATs
40 yard punt average


Jump
Lake Wales, Lakeland
n, Mulberry and Lake-
nta Fe Catholic.
on the squad are juniors
Rickett, Wyatt Kofke,
Simmons, Will Craw-
d Garcia; sophs Kramer
Cleston Sanders and
Albritton; and freshmen
Spencer, Keifer Kedzor


Sept. 1
Sept. 6
Sept. 10
Sept. 13
Sept. 15
Sept. 20
Sept. 22
Sept. 27
Sept. 29
Oct. 4
Oct. 11
Oct. 14
Oct. 15
Oct. 18


In Pool
and Kevin Kunkel.
On the girls team are senior
Jessica Hunt; junior April
Garland; sophs Emily Hughes,
Holly Hughes, Emily Rhodes,
Korin Roehm, Leah Weeks,
Savannah Miller, Megan Hart-
man and Carleigh Coleman;
and freshmen Alexandra "Alex"
Johnson and Caitlin Dufresne.


Hardee 2011 Swimming
Schedule


All Saints' Academy
Avon Park
Sebring
Haines City
Lake Placid
Mulberry
All Saints' Academy
Frostproof
Avon Park
Haven Christian
Santa Fe Catholic
Heartland Diving
Heartland Swimming
Okeechobee


Oct. 25-28 Districts
Nov. 4 Regionals
Nov. 11 States


Away 5:30 p.m.
HOME 5:30 p.m.
Away 8:30 a.m.
Away 5:30 p.m.
Away 5:30 p.m.
HOME 5:30 p.m.
Away 5:30 p.m.
HOME 5:30 p.m.
Away 5:30 p.m.
Away 5:30 p.m.
Away 5:30 p.m.
Away TBA
Away TBA
HOME 5:30 p.m.
(Senior Night)
Away TBA
Away TBA
Away TBA


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The Herald-Advocate
u --S PS. 78-7 0j

Thursday, September 8,2011


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'D The Herald-Advocate, september ,mi




Hardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO .
Lauren Dearing & Michael Masem

Lauren Dearing Engaged

To Marry Michael Masem


Debra Durrance Dearing of
Lakeland and formerly of
Wauchula announces the
engagement of her daughter,
Lauren Ashley Dearing, to
Michael Wayne Masem, the
son of Peter Masem and Debra
Greer of Seminole.
The bride-elect graduated in
May from the University of
South Florida with a bache-
lor's degree in business/mar-
keting. She resides in Tampa
and is employed by the univer-


sity at the College of Medi-
cine's Office of Research.
The prospective groom is a
2010 graduate of the Univer-
sity of South Florida with a
master's degree in manage-
ment. A resident of Tampa, he is
employed by the University of
South Florida Health in the
Office of Development.
Plans are being made for an
Oct. 15 wedding at The Chapel
By The Sea on Clearwater
Beach.


Morgan Crews MIGHTY MESSAGE
Member Of


Angus Group
Morgan Crews of Wauchula
is a new junior member of the
American Angus Association, a
national organization with
headquarters in Saint Joseph,
Mo.
Junior members of the associ-
ation are eligible to register cat-
tle in the American Angus
Association., participate in pro-
grams conducted by the Nat-
ional Junior Angus Association
and take part in association-
sponsored shows and other
national and regional events.
The American Angus Assoc-
iation is the largest beef breed
association in the world, with
nearly 30,000 active adult and
junior members.

Committee For
MLK Day Needs
New Members
New members are needed for
the committee which coordi-
nates an annual countywide cel-
ebration of the life and dream of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
The current Martin Luther
King Jr. Committee has served
for four years.
Members plan and orches-
trate local parades, banquets,
candlelight ceremonies, and
park exhibits and activities in
commemoration of the national
holiday each January for King's
birthday.
Anyone wishing to fill one of
the seven positions on the com-
mittee should call Daryle Cook
at 773-4045 or LaTicia Wilkins
at 245-1022.
A person needs only to be 18
or over, a local resident, and
desirous of honoring King and
keeping his dream alive.


IFl rwl .i A M


COURTESY PHOTO
The "Back-To-School Bash" sponsored by One Student Ministries on Wednesday, Aug.
24, drew a crowd of youngsters to The Rock youth building at First Baptist Church of
Wauchula. Students received school supplies sporting the "Be The Wall" slogan
against underage drinking along with various drug-free messages. About 200 youth
attended.


'Welcome Home' Event

Planned For 9-11 Riders


Bicyclists in the annual
Brotherhood Ride commemo-
rating the fallen heroes from
Sept. 11, 2001, will conclude
their trek from Naples to
Ground Zero in New York City
this Sunday.
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
members Todd Barton and
Bobby Respress are among the
participants pedaling 1,600
miles in 22 days in honor of the
411 first responders, firefighters
and police officers who lost
their lives that day as they tried
to save others.


JetBlue Airways will be
hosting a "Welcome Home"
ceremony for the riders on
Monday, Sept. 12, at the Fort
Myers International Airport.
The ceremony will begin at
4:45 p.m., and will last 30-40
minutes.
JetBlue, a corporate sponsor
for the Brotherhood Ride, is
providing a free flight home for
the 40 riders from as far away
as Texas and Massachusetts.
The public is invited to join
in welcoming the riders home.


soc9:8p





: Brridad




OCTOBER 7, 2011
Kathryn Pace & Daniel Barnett

OCTOBER 15, 2011
Savannah Locklar & James (Bubby) Chancey
Rebecca St. Romain & Michael Adams
Jessica Smith & Freddy Gauna Jr.

OCTOBER 22, 2011
Bobbi Barker & Jonathan Pleger

NOVEMBER 5, 2011
Jessica Webb & Ian Durrance

DECEMBER 3, 2011
Courtney Harrison & Kyle Martin

DECEMBER 10, 2011
Dara Johnson & Andrew Judah

MARCH 3, 2012
Michelle Kennedy & Tyler Belflower

Ct' On 9?tin

C .C.. Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula
(863)/773-6565
www.catsonmain.com s9:8c
soc9:8c


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Aug. 28-Sept. 2. Listings in-
clude the name of the owner or
contractor, the address for the
project, the type of work to be
done, and the cost involved.
Only projects valued at $1,000
or more are listed.
ISSUED
Ronald L. Sutton, CR 665,
residential barn, $50,419.
Jimmie Lee Smith, Griffin
Road, carport and porch,
$22,000.
Terry L. Franko, Apple
Blossom Lane, install mobile
home, $4,000.
Richard DiStefano, Maxwell
Drive, carport, $8,651.
Denis P. Rohaley, Erler,
McEwen, Petteway, Rigdon
Roads and Rainey Boulevard,
eight sewer connections, $1,500
each.
Brent A. Driskell, Diana
Avenue, exterior doors, $2,310.
Brent A. Driskell, Dena
Circle, replace windows,
$1,600.
Dwight Douglas, College
Lane, mobile home, $10,000.
Agustina Ormazabal', Mock-
ingbird Lane, mechanical,
$2,350.
Agustina Ormazabal, Solo-
mon Road, mechanical, $2,350.
Agustina Ormazabal, College
Lane, mechanical, $2,400,
Bradford T. Bowen, Knoll-
wood Circle, roofing, $2,100.
Mark Gilliard, Heard Bridge
Road, replace windows, $5,719.*
BUILDING BLOCKS
After Hurricane Katrina, pho-
tos take n Louisiana showed
completely destroyed homes in
the same area as homes with
only moderate damage. Homes
with superior construction ex-
perienced far less damage. The
effectiveness of local building
codes can help you predict how
well a structure will are in a
hurricane, earthquake or natural
disaster. ISO Building Code
effectiveness help you distin-
guish between communities
with effective building code.
enforcement and those with
weak enforcement. Premium
credits for insurance are based,
on ISO grades from 1 (exem-
plary) to 10 (no enforcement). I


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863-767-0166



*863-245-9032









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Owner: Jason and Crystal (Beasley) Johnson

Busy Bees Discovery Center's mission is to provide a safe,
developmentally appropriate environment for infants,
preschool, and school age children living in Hardee County.
Our goal is to provide an educational experience that promotes
emotional, social,physical, and cognitive development.
We will strive to make our children lifelong learners. soc9:8p
so9:8p


ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.












Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well Football Fans, it was an unusual opening week for col-
lege football with new coaching debuts, weather delays and the
passing of a legend. Will Muschamp and Dana Holgorsen won
their opening career games at Florida and West Virginia. Lightning
and heavy rains affected games at Michigan, Iowa, Notre Dame
and West Virginia. USF and Notre Dame had two delays for over a
2 hourand 35 minute period while West Virginia and Marshall
kicked off at 3:30 and finally called the game over at 10:30 with 14
minutes left in the 4th quarter.
The weekend was saddened by the passing of Buccaneer leg-
end Lee Roy Selmon. The former All-American at Oklahoma and
the first draft choice for Tampa Bay in 1976 passed away after suf-
fering a stroke two days prior. He had been the Athletic Director at
USF in recent years and established his own chain of steak restau-
rants in the area. Who can ever forget the front four of Lee Roy and
his brother Dewey, Council Rudolph and Dave Pear in 1976? Mr.
Selmon was truly one of the greats on and off the field. May the
first Buccaneer ever enshrined in the Canton, Ohio NFL Hall of
Fame rest irq peace. He will always be remembered.
The Gators looked good albeit vanilla against the outmanned
FAU Owls. QB John Brantley looks like a new man after Charlie
Weis has worked with him. He played well within the system and
his abilities. The Gator defense looked very stout as well. It was a
pleasant 77 degrees in the stands as the game moved on in the
Swamp. Gator legends Kevin Carter and Abby Wambach were
back in Gainesville as honored guests. FAU Coach Howard
Schnellenberger was a popular site as well. Still in his suit and tie,
the popular coach was easy to recognize on the sidelines.
The USF Bulls, as predicted by the Swami, did indeed beat
Notre Dame. Speed cannot be coached. The perennially overrated
Irish, who have not been relevant in college football since leather
helmets, fell on their faces again in the presence of a real football
team from the Big East. Notre Dame is a member of the Big East
for all sports except football which in their minds, they are too
good for. The fact that Notre Dame would not be any more of a
power than Rutgers in the conference has not affected its arrogance
in the least. The Big East won all of their games this weekend.
Great win USF.
Now let's look at this weeks Bill O' Fare...
1. UAB at Florida-Gators will have another tune-up before
Tennessee comes calling. Look for more of the same as last week.
Florida 51 UAB 7.
2. Central Michigan at Kentucky Cats didn't look like they
were wild against WKU but still have too much for a MAC team.
UK 33 CMU 17.
3. Norfolk St. at West Virginia With better weather and a
full 4 quarters, the Mountaineers will put up the 500-yards total
offense as expected. WVU 63 Norfolk St. 13.
4. Charleston Southern at FSU Cupcake number two for
Jimbo and the boys. FSU 58 CSU 14.
5. Southern Miss at Marshall Herd played a true freshman
QB against WVU. He played well. Marshall will open at home in
CUSA and make a statement. Marshall 31 USM 17.
6. Northern Colorado at Colorado St. After losing at home
to Lindenwood, its doubtful the Bears can play with the Rams.
Colorado St. 48 UNC 10.
7. Alabama at Penn St. Tide will Roll. This is not the 1987
Nittany Lions. Alabama 35 PSU 17.
8. Cincinnati at Tennessee Zack Collaros will pass the
Bearcats to a Rocky Top win. They will not put up another 72
points though. Cincinnati 38 Tennessee 27.
9. Stanford at Duke The SAT Bowl! No contest on the field
though. Andrew Luck should win the Heisman hands down.
Stanford 56 Duke 3.


10. Ball St. at USF Another team from Indiana but from
the MAC. These boys better stick to making Mason Jars. USF 48
Ball St. 10.
11. Connecticut at Vanderbilt UConn should have enough
to score a win. UConn 27 Vandy 24.
12. BYU at Texas No contest. Hook Em Horns. Texas 42
BYU 13.
13. South Carolina at Georgia Neither looked impressive
in the first week. Who will show that old second-week improve-
ment? South Carolina 27 Georgia 21.
14. Mississippi St at Auburn Bulldogs begin the SEC slide
for the National Champs. MSU 35 AU 17.
15. South Carolina St at Bethune-Cookman Wildcats put
up 63 points on ESPN against Prairie View. This could be their year
in the MEAC. BCC 48 S.C. St. 23.
16. New Orleans at Green Bay Can the Saints play a better
opener? Packers 34 New Orleans 31.
17. Pittsburgh at Baltimore Steelers and Ravens to begin
2011? Does it get any better? Pittsburgh will match defenses with
the Ravens. Steelers 27 Ravens 20.
18. New England at Miami Love the new battle cry in
Miami. Let's suck for Luck". Fans thinking a bad year will land
them the Stanford QB in the draft. Pats 34 Fish 17.
19. Detroit at Tampa Lions are vastly improved. Bucs
squeak. Tampa 27 Lions 24.
20. Tennessee at Jacksonville Titans win over the Jags.
Tennessee 30 Jags 24.





Lozano Friday Night


Fight Back On Tap


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It was just a little hitch in
plans, as Daniel Lozano was
.preparing for his title fight this
Friday night.
Scheduled as the main event,
it seemed to be up in the air
when his opponent, Ernie
Marquez of Denver, Colo.,
withdrew.
A behind-the-scenes scurry
located a new opponent for
Lozano, a 21-year-old undefeat-
ed flyweight from Bowling
Green. Since he turned pro
October 2008, he was won five
of his bouts by KO or TKO.
He takes his 9-0-0 record into
the A La Carte Pavilion in
Tampa for a chance at the
World Boxing Council's
USNBC title, and hopes that
will eventually lead to a shot at
the world title.


His new opponent is Jonathan
Arias, a 5'5" super flyweight
from the Dominican Republic
with a record of 12-7-0. Of his
dozen wins, 10 have come by
KO. His last bout was May 27.
in Panama in round one of a
schedule eight-rounder. He lost
an April 2 bout in Brooklyn,
N.Y against Angel Cruz in a
six-round decision.
Both boxers come in at near-
ly the same weight. Lozano is
normally at 112, while Arias
comes in at 113.
Tickets begin at $25, and can
be purchased through Tick-
etmaster (www.ticketmaster.-
com). The A La Carte Pavilion
is at 4050 Dana Shores Drive,
Tampa, which is featuring Kers
Winghouse Fight Night For
more information, visit
www.fightnightproductionos.co
m.


If you would attain to what you are not yet, you must
always be displeased by what you are. For where you are
pleased with yourself there you have remained. Keep
adding, keep walking, keep advancing.
-Saint Augustine


September 8, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B

S S-


r_


9/8/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:09 AM
Set: 7:40 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 31 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:20 PM
Set: 3:43 AM
Overhead: 10:58 PM
Underfoot: 10:35 AM
Moon Phase
87%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:35 AM-12:35 PM
10:58 PM-12:58 AM
Minor Times
3:43 AM 4:43 AM
5:20 PM 6:20 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
9/9/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:09 AM
Set: 7:39 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 30 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:56 PM
Set: 4:39 AM
Overhead: 11:44 PM
Underfoot: 11:21 AM
Moon Phase
93%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:21 AM 1:21 PM
11:44 PM 1:44 AM
Minor Times
4:39 AM 5:39 AM
5:56 PM 6:56 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4


9/10/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:10 AM
Set: 7:38 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:30 PM
Set: 5:34 AM
Overhead: -:-
Underfoot: 12:06 PM
Moon Phase
97%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:06 PM- 2:06 PM
Minor Times
5:34 AM 6:34 AM
6:30 PM 7:30 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC:-4
9/11/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:10 AM
Set: 7:37 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 27 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:02 PM
Set 6:27 AM
Overhead:12:27 AM
Underfoot: 12:48 PM
Moon Phase
99%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:27 AM -2:27 AM
12:48 PM 2:48 PM
Minor Times
6:27 AM 7:27 AM
7:02 PM 8:02 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4


9/12/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:11 AM
Set: 7:35 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 24 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:33 PM
Set: 7:20 AM
Overhead: 1:09 AM
Underfoot: 1:30 PM
Moon Phase
100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
1:09 AM 3:09 AM
1:30 PM -3:30PM
Minor Times
7:20 AM- 8:20AM
7:33 PM 8:33 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
9/13/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:11 AM
Set: 7:34 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 23 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:05 PM
Set: 8:11 AM
Overhead: 1:51 AM
Underfoot: 2:11 PM
Moon Phase
99%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times-
1:51 AM 3:51 AM
2:11 PM- 4:11 PM
Minor Times
8:11 AM 9:11 AM
8:05 PM 9:05 PM
Solunar Rating
Better-++++
Time Zone
UTC:-4


Rock gives children, on a silver platter, with all the pub-
lic authority of the entertainment Industry, everything;
their parents always used to tell them they had to wait for;
until they grew up and would understand later.
-Allan Bloom








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, ,


9/14/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:12 AM
Set: 7:33 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 21 mini.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:37 PM
Set: 9:03 AM
Overhead: 2:32 AM
Underfoot: 2:53 PM
Moon Phas
95%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
2:32 AM 4:32 AM
2:53 PM 4:53 PM
Minor Times
9:03 AM -10.03 AM
8:37 PM 9:37 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4
9/15/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:12 AM
Set: 7:32 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 20 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:13 PM
Set: 9:55 AM
Overhead: 3:15 AM
Underfoot: 3:37 PM
Moon Phase
91%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
3:15 AM 5:15 AM
3:37 PM 5:37 PM
Minor Times
9:55 AM -10:55 AM
9:13 PM 10:13 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4


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September 8, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


I WeekiBatr Whan


This week in h-istor6FyTa"
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
When the doors of Wauchula
High School open Monday
morning, it will mark the begin-
ning of the 34th year of this
institution. The school opened
in 1902 and the first class to
graduate was in 1906, with four
students receiving diplomas.
The school was held in the east
lend of what is now the grammar
school. The present school was
built in 1926.
Wauchula Camp No. 36 and
Wauchula Auxiliary No. 28,
United Spanish War Veterans,
met on Sunday afternoon. Each
group held an interesting ses-
sion. Both units have endorsed
the program of building cot-
tages at Bay Pines Hospital,
where relatives of veterans may
remain near their sick.
I.P. Barlow and A.. Yancy
Teachy, attorneys for J.C. Lowe
in his murder trial here, have
filed a motion for a new trial.
Lowe was found guilty of mur-


der in the first degree of E.D.
Atkinson of Clewiston after the
jury deliberated two hours and
15 minutes on Saturday after-
noon. Their verdict failed to
recommend mercy, which auto-
matically carried a penalty of
death in the electric chair. It was
the first time in the annals of
Hardee County's trials that any-
one has received a death sen-
tence.
Woods' Store offers Blue
Rose rice, four pounds for 23
cents; Stanley's cube starch,
three packages for 14 cents;
matches, three regular five-cent
boxes for 10 cents; and fresh
ground beef, two pounds for 25
cents.
50 YEARS AGO
The Board of Public In-struc-
tion has rejected a $200 across-
the-board raise for all county
school teachers while approv-
ing a record high budget of
$1,298,062. School bus drivers
will get a raise of about $70, the
band director was raised $400
and mechanics were given a
$300 a year raise. The board
will levy the maximum millage
allowed by law, 20 mills, plus a
special one mill for the band
building.


110 N. 6 Ave. Wauchula


773-9684
Reg. Hours:
Mon. Fri. 9:30 am 5:30 pm
Sat. 9:30 am 1:30 pm


$5


-s10


The county is ending up the
year so broke it will not be able
to pay some salaries or other
bills until next month, when the
new fiscal year begins. Board
Clerk Ben Coker said the coun-
ty will end the year about
$7,500 in debt. County com-
missioners received their salary
checks on Tuesday, although
Commissioner Jack Jones said
they should forego them in
view of the county's cramped
financial situation.
County drivers with birthdays
in September may now pur-
chase their 1962 driver's licens-
es in the judge's office in the
courthouse. Only those with a
birthday in September are to
purchase licenses under the new
system. The price of licenses
has gone up under the new reg-
ulations. The one-year opera-
tor's license is $1.50 instead of
$1.25 and the chauffeur's
licenses will be $2.50 for one
year.
Commodore Wendell A.
Turner provided an ad that the
Wauchula Boat Club has made
extensive improvements on its
building a Rqck Lake Boat
Landing. The building is now
completely closed in and
screened. Donations of $2.50
per member. and $5 to non-
members and other clubs will
help retire the indebtedness on
Improvements and upkeep.
25 YEARS AGO
Hardee County will get its
first look at the American
Legion's war memorial monu-
ment dedicated to Hardee
County servicemen killed in
World War I, World War II, and
the Korean and Vietnam wars.
The ceremony will be held at 2
p.m. at the corner of Palmetto
Street and U.S. 17 in Wauchula.
A color guard from Lake Placid
will open the program. Doyle
Carlton Jr. will give a brief ded-
ication speech and Sherry
Keene will direct the music.
Wendell Turner will receive
recognition for tracking down
the names which will appear on
the memorial. A wreath will be
placed by Dick Williams and
Loyce Whidden, brother and
sister of the late Herger
Williams.
The county fair will move


Receive this beautiful
magnetic hinged
Charming Bangle
absolutely FREE with a
single same day Brighton
purchase of $50.00
In charms, beads, or
spacers.
(Limit one per customer, while
supplies last, Mini Charms ex-
cluded. Charms shown sold sep-
arately. Purchase total includes
merchandise only, Gift Cards and
sale tax not included.) *At partici-
pating retailers.


a c ,ldreh', boique


106 6th Ive Wauchula

(863) 767-0017

www.shopjollyboans.com

Mon-Fri 9:30-5:30

saturday 9:30-1:30


from November to March
announced J.A. Clark, president
of the Hardee County Fair
Association, and Maurice
Henderson of the Hardee
County Cattlemen's Assoca-
tion. This means there will be
no fair in 1986. "There's not
much money in November. The
citrus and vegetable flow is bet-
ter in March," said Clark.
A Page On:, hoto shows the
1986 varsit, football team,
including Steve Adamson,
Richard Grantham, Tony
DeLeon, Bobby Helveston, Ray
Guzman, Mike Jackson, Mike
Thomas, Chris McWhorter,
Rufus Sasser, Ira Page, Jerry
Purser, Tim Selph, Shane
Forrester, Derren Bryan, Scott
Mislevy, Daniel Duke, Lee,
Raley, Chris Cook, David
Radford, Bruce Mosley, Gary
Teems, Reggie Brown, Vernon
Whidden, Robbie Clark, Dean
Patten, Tim Hegwood, Shawn
Lewis, West Palmer, Arnold
Faulk, Anthony White, Frank
Romeo and Robert Rawls,
along with head coach Bob
Martin and assistant coaches
Andy Drabik, Phil Rasmussen
and Derrel Bryan.
Pioneer Ford offers Ford
trucks and Broncos as low at
$9,495 and up to $16,495.
English Chevrolet has the 1986
Cavalier, Camaro sport coupe,
Nova four-door or the C10
Pickup at lease from $199 to
$244 per month.
10 YEARS AGO
Hardee County building offi-
cial Malcolm Green has made
his resignation effective Friday.
He has moved up his retirement
date of Nov. 30 because he was
hired as the building/zoning
officer in Indian Shores in
Pinellas County. He acknowl-


edged his move to apply else-
where was spurred by recent
disagreements with the County
Commission. Green said people
don't realize the difficult nature
of the job, "where you can't
please all of the people all of the
time."
The final figures for assess-
ments for most county resi-
dents: fire assessment, $67;
solid waste assessment, $172.
County commissioners voted
for them following the last pub-
lic hearing at the Agri-Civic
Center. It .has been 10 years
since the fire assessment was
changed. The solid waste
assessment includes mandatory
twice-a-week pickup in the
unincorporated areas of the
county. Municipal residents pay
the $70 disposal fee and collec-
tion through their utility bills.


The Hardee' County Com-
mission last week approved an
amended animal control ordi-
nance for dogs, cats and chick-
ens, noting how long each may
be impounded, fines and fees.
Chickens not redeemed by their
owners may be disposed of "in
any manner deemed appropri-
ate." The county shall provide
notice before stray or feral
(wild) chickens are picked up.
Circle 3 Western Store is
holding a Quitting Business
sale with most items 50 percent
off and over $3,000 in free
prizes at the end of the sale,
provided by coupons re-
deemable one per family.
Ladies select shirts, blouses and
jeans are 75 percent off, and
select men's jeans 60 percent
off.


ROBBY ELLoTT invites all
his friends and neighbors
1 to come see him at



S205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
S, 1-800-673-9512 *
www.directchevy.com 5





Lost Dog
Brown, Medium Size, Friendly,
no tail, crazy yellow eyes, bad haircut and
no collar. Lost near Ft. Green area CR664
Please Contact: 863-245-9378 863-245-4926


fit Ifi






|1Spectacular 6O's I

Friday, September 16

6:00pm 9:00pm

Main Street Heritage Park

Downtown Wauchula

Best Dressed Hippie Contest







Live Entertainment By: Yesterdaze !





^ Bring Your Lawn Chair and Join Us Downtown
SFor More Information
Call 863.767.0330 or Visit www.mainstreetwauchula.com
0sinerC lassiParsr ,1;
Call8637670330or isi wwwmaistretwaichla~o #4
.. .. .. .. .. .


I-NATIONAL .-.-. -,.

-_ MONTH ,
71 1 C>MAML -----------

Some Health & Beauty Benefits of Honey
Honey is composed of sugars like glucose and fructose and
minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium, sodium chlorine,
sulphur, iron and phosphate.
It contains vitamins B1, B2, C, B6, B5 and B3 all of which change
according to the qualities of the nectar and pollen. Besides the
above, copper, iodine, and zinc exist in it in small quantities.
Several kinds of hormones are also present in it. Approximately
one half of the human diet is derived directly or indirectly from
crops pollinated by bees. Today honeybees are an essential part
of a healthy agricultural economy.
If you have allergies, honey can be beneficial. If you eat honey
that is local to your area, it may help prevent you seasonal aller-
gies. Bees use the pollen from local plants and eventually it ends
up in your honey.
For all your HONEY &-HONEY PRODUCTS contact
Cantu Apiaries, Inc. Peace River Bees Skin Care
784 Steve Roberts Special, Zolfo 735-1679
www.peaceriverbees.com soc 9:8c


FRIDAY SATURDAY


Sept. 9 & Sept. 10


All Clearance Items


Summer Items 50% OFF


B CHARMED th's FREE BAn\LE


l-il
pip /W',


SEPTEMBER 9
thru
SEPTEMBER 25
rrigbhton.






6B The Herald-Advocate, September 8, 2011




The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
pJEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


4


773-0523 *


773-0877


HARDEE CAR COMPANY

BuY HERE PAY HERE


Wauchula
acrossa from First National Bank)
Monday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm
773-6667 Billy Hill
Owner


Wauchula Hills
(Corner of Hwy 17 and REA Rd.)
Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7:30 pm
773-2011
cl9:8c


Classifieds


Ag -
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Cal'" .rk Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


KIRBY VACUUM Heritage Model,
excellent condition, includes
accessories, $300 OBO. 863-448-
7590. 9:8dh
G.E. WASHER & dryer, god condi-
tion, $100 for both, OBO, 773-
9179. 9:8p


2001 SUZUKI BANDIT 600cc
Streetffighter, 16k miles, new tires
and battery. Reduced $1,8000.
863-443-3686. 9:8p
2000 F-350 FORD Diesel 4x4
flatbed dually, $9,000. 73,000
miles. 863-227-2098. 9:1,8p


CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767, 863-401-5085. 3:3tfc
ii;


2007 16' CAROLINA SKIFF, 9.9
Mercury Trollne Motor, fishing
seats, $2,850. 731-614-1297.
8:25-9:22p


LOOKING FOR Lube tech. Call
863-285-8187, Jenkins Ford, ask
for Jeremy. 9:8,15c
DRIVERS-TEAMS: $6,000 Team
sign-on bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprisesl Call
now for details, 1-888-567-4856.
9:8-10:6p


4/3 HOUSE central air/heat, all
appliances. 315 W. Palmetto St.
$189,500 OBO. All offers consid-
ered. 740-432-6661. 9:1 ,29p
3/1 BLOCK HOME with brick fire-
place. Nicely landscaped, large
back yard with privacy fence. 721
Green Street, $72,000. 863-832-
0324. 9:8-10:6p
3/1 CB HOME 1500 sq. ft., new
A/C, 1 acre, 3 miles out of town.
Lots more. 863-767-9055 not after
9:00 pm. $89,000. 8:11-9:8p


REVELLdVSAiES
3


522 H y1N-BwigGen(cosfo BP


' EA/ ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


WE HAVE BUYERS FOR GROVES
CALL MIKEY TODAY!
To view other available properties
Visit Our Website @
www.heartlandre.net CL9:8C


ITUg lICiT nEAl No matter how you look at it,
I BEST DEAL there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car


Large Selection of
Cars to Choose From


63~No job's too big."
Se 1111 1 im
15310li 1DNRH ayUG u Larne



V"'on Mobstor &ranmisigonOl


TERRY


MIKE


I M .ND -S UD 8,


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions


@1,


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461


I Hou-ses I


4 BR 1 112 B on Palmetto St.,
Bowling Green, 781-1062. For
sale or rent. 9:8c


LOST: DOG, $200 REWARD. Ft.
Green area near CR 664. Brown,
medium size, friendly, no tall,
crazy yellow eyes, bad hair cut,
no collar. 863-245-9378, 863-245-
4926. 9:8p
Egotism is the anesthetic
that dulls the pain of stupid-
ity.
-Frank Leahy


M i Homes


2007 D/W 3/2, den, 1612 SF,
porches, fenced, 5.14 acres,
$134,900. 731-614-1297.
8:25-9:22p
Notce
THE FOLLOWING storage will
sale under a warehouseman's
lien: Lori Molina, Luclano
Villafrance, Derrick Rogers, Tim
Carter, Jalme Batiste, Pam
Poucher, Katrina Daniels. Said
sale will be 11:00 am, September-
26, 2011 at B&J Self Storage, 667
Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula,
Florida. 9:8,15p


GILLIARD
FILL DIRT INC.



Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 d82c Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)


LJ
-POTnT


I Free
Bra

BIG
AL
773-0
S 116 RI
(acro
.. *


0

cl9:1-29c (4 %P


---- ----- --*, __ Emi


New Ilres include
Mount & Balance
and Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
SALE ON
L TIRES


777 773-0727
EA Rd., Wauchula
ss from Wal-Mart)
SVISA d6:16tfc


Billy Ayers
Tire Technician


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441




j- | TRANSlSSWION ..
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABIA ESPANOL








THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through September 30th
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)
Spacious 2,3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(=3 (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
-.-. Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider .lM1 : -9


a^ COMPUTER REPAIR
by
Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Availablel
448-2561 Payment Plans Also Available 773-0518
computerrepalrbygarryphillips.com cl9:.,8p


M'S owsa Tkft stoYs
QUALITY MERCHANDISE


Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
-:

eaen en n/ Cleaning service
By Sherry White Ministries
CommeiaI ResI:idential----alr frEsimaties


Monday Friday
9:00 AM. 12:00 Noon
Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider


0


I!


* Pay Here


Buy Here








September 8,2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


PERSONAL PROPERTY OF B See
Sound will be sold pursuant to
warehouseman's lien. Said sale
will be at Jack Ullrich Warehouse,
409 Goolsby St., September 24,
2011, at 9:30 am. 9:8,15c
THE FOLLOWING storage will
sale under a warehouseman's
lien: Eric Cobb, Chlquita
Robinson, Jose Maldonado,
Joyce Tapla, Mary Ramirez, Wally
Gray. Said sale will be 9:00 am,
September 26, 2011 at Bowling
Green Storage, Hwy. 17 North,
Bowling.Green, Florida. 9:8,15p


BLUE TICK HOUND puppies, 6
weeks, 863-781-9547. 9:1,8p
RABBITS for sale, 863-832-0533.
9:1,8p
DOGS large and young ones.
Cats that are fixed. $15 for adop-
tions. All Creatures Animal
Hospital, 773-9215. 9:8c
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


AKC GERMAN SHEPARD pup-
pies, black & tan, all shots &
wormed, $500 each. 863-585-
8899 or 863-661-4749. 9:8p
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


WHOLESALE PLANT SALE-AII 3
gal pots $4.50-1 gal pots $2.50.
Plumbago, Crape Myrtle, Lig-
ustrum, Texas Sage, Thryallis,
Viburnum, Jasmine and more.
Trees-Bottle Brush, Rain & Crape
Myrtle $10 or 3 for $25. Center
Hill Nursery, 2949 Center Hill
Road, between Wauchula and
Bowling Green, off SR62, 4.5
miles west US 17. 863-223-5561.
8:4-9:1 p



4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location in
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
for Information. 4:28tfc

The typical hen will lay
about 19 dozen eggs a year.


Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 lbs. Washers


SPECIAL /ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY

6AM-6PM 50% OFF


NORMAL/NORMAt-ENTE
$250 DOtUBLEADOBLE
s400 MAX/MAXI
$600 LARGE/GRANDE


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$125

$200
$300
$350


2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, good
neighborhood, Wauchula, fenced
yard, central air, $700 month, 863-
245-1747. 9:8p
3/2 REMODELED in town, large
enclosed workshop. 207 North
10th Ave., Wauchula. $800 month.
863-781-9140 or 305-338-4976.
9:ltfc
THREE BEDROOM TWO bath
central $700 plus, $500 deposit,
832-1984. 9:1-29p
TWO BEDROOM apartment, cen-
tral, not pets, $500 plus, deposit,
832-1984. 9:1-29p
3/1 NO AIR, Nice, garden spot,
$500 plus security 863-832-2021.
9:8,15p
4BR, 2 BATH, good location, nice
two-story duplex, freshly painted,
remodeled, central AC and heat,
for rent in Zolfo Springs. First and
last months rent, $650 month plus
security deposit. Call 863-781-
4529. 8:25tfc
4/2 $700 monthly, $500 deposit,
refurbished. Hickory Court, Zolfo.
Available 9-1. 382-2699. 8:18,25p


LARGE 3 BR, 2 BAT
Riverview subdivision $1
deposit, 773-4740.
2 BR, 1 BATH upstairs a
$750 monthly, utilities
$300 security. No pets.
ing. 863-773-6255.


Mon. Wed. 10am- 6pm; Fri. & Sat. 10am-7pm/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 1 7 S ZOLFO SPRINGS fcal:tic













PIMIrTSFoR dlI MAJOR BRANDS

LAWN MOWERS GOLF CARTS


DISCOII'T TPAlICIl

Call to compare before buying!


FAST &- FRIENDLY Y SER VICE
22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE LOCALLY OWNED Er OPERATED



7773-4400-

v .. ' "''


APT. and HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 9:8c
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc
2 BR 2 BA CB house, privacy
fence, shed, inside laundry, nice
updated Interior, $750 monthly,
$600 security. Move In after 9-26,
863-781-6303, 863-781-7915. 9:8p
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh

RetasC mmrca


H house OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
1,000 plus Perfect setting for medical office,
8:11-9:8p 920 square foot, flexible design,
apartment, front lobby, reception area, and 4-
Included, 5 individual rooms. $900 monthly
No smok- OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
8:25;9:1c 6:30tfc


Television: Chewing gum
for the eyes.
-Frank Lloyd Wright


DESOTO COUNTY




OWNER FINANCING
www4andcallnow.corn
1-941-778-7980/7565 |


RESIDENTIAL BUSINESS, no job
too big or small. Get ready for fall.
Thorough cleaning Inside and
outl House, garage, yard work
maintenance, complete cleaning.
Call Laurie 863-832-3066. 9:8p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting In Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more Info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders Is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


JAMES JUSTISS Painting/Handy-
man. Home phone 773-6186. Cell
832-0640. 8:25-9:22p
4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256-
749, 863-214-1471. 7:21-9:29p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. ., 3:24tfc
HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
DOWN SIZING-Everything cheap.
Used beds from $25. up. Twin
beds $75/set. Lots of furniture &
beds at 1/2 price. Refrigerators
and washers. Lots of Items In
parking lot 20% off. Also clothes
and/or racks. Ms. Edna's, beside
Double J. 9:8c
SATURDAY, MANAGER SALE.
Buy a bag, box or whole unit.
Bowling Green Storage. 9:8p
FRIDAY ONLY, 8-2. 764 Polk Rd.,
Wauchula. 9:8p
SATURDAY 8-? 2594 Heard
Bridge Rd. Lots of household,
adult and girls clothes, lots of
toys & misc items. 9:8c


PLANT CITY HOUSING LLC














Located Rt. 60 & 39 PLANT CITY

BUT DFINATELY WORTH THE DRIVE!

813-650-8100




JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V See, Jr., Broker James V See, Sr, Broker Rick Knight


SRobert Jones
m^J John H. Gross


Realtor Associates
(863)781-1423 Calvin Bates (863)381-2242
(863)273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161
Rick Knight (863)781-1396


cl9:8c


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

N 773-4478





IN,1 Free Estimates
insured 30+ years experienceclO:2tfc
Ic10:2H


Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Reclinqru start $3977
Spend oA $1,000~nd get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Hill's Auto World

", I73ZOLFO SPRINrs


i 735-0188


50 acre grove located 2 miles Northwest of
Wauchula. Valencia & E&M. Micro Jet, deep
well, power unit. $750,000
New Listing Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA one side. 3 BR,
2 BA other side. Central air & heat. Paved road.
City water & sewer. Asking $125,000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. WAS $97,500 ...
REDUCED TO $79,500!
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 i bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED TO $179,500!
20 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Laser leveled, deep well & irrigation. Ready for
your farm operation. Zoned FR. $230,000
REDUCED! Beautiful home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. Was
$475,001)0.....Now $359,001)0!


18 acres. House & Grove. Close in approxi-
mately 1,850 sf of living. Nice screened porch. 3
Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of grove, mostly ear-
lies. 6" deep well, microjet & diesel power unit.
Only $295,000
Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $89,000!
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $229,000
20 acres very close in to Wauchula on paved
road. Laser leveled and ready for your farm
operation. Zoned FR. $190,000


I _ _ _~iB~bel


ml L .....


Cal .ey. or.yor spo
781-106..









8B The Herald-Advocate, September 8, 2011


The


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLSI
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Graham Crackers, Blueberry
Poptart, Orange Juice, Condi-
.ments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice,
Pepperoni Pizza, Salad Tray,
Garden .Peas, Orange Juice
Bar, Rolls, Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Sausage
Patty, Biscuit, Applesauce, Con-
diments and Milk
Lunch: Fish Square, Ham-
burger Gravy, Mashed Pota-
toes, Salad Tray, Peaches,
Rolls, Jello, Condiments and
Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,


Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Corndog, French Fries, Salad
Tray, Applesauce, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Cheese Grits, Buttered
Toast, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Lasagna with Ground
Beef, Stacked Ham Sandwich,
Green Beans, Salad Tray,
Pears, Rolls, Condiments and
Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Cookie, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot Pock-


Conmmerical Property in Zolfo Springs 100x 126 Lot 1952
Total SF CB building formally used as a restaurant.
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
r Remember, Our listings are on the Internet. I M
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! .J
After Hours .""'
Oralla D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl9:8c


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Located on Intracoastal Waterway near Boca
Grande, this 3B/3Bth condo is fully furnished
and ready for your enjoyment. $220,000
Zolfo Springs C/B Home Updated 3B/1.5Bth,
owner anxious to sell. $115,000
16+ acres located within one mile of Walmart
Plaza and 3B/2Bth M/H in like- new condition;
four 2" wells and one 4" well, surrounded by
large oaks, ponds, trails and campsite.
$145,000
9 acres on corner of two high volume traffic
areas; perfect commercial site or new home.
$100,000
2.5 acre tract in western Hardee County;
acreage is fenced on three sides and has a small
shed. $30,000


CE'YOII CAN


1t1 SERVI
DORIS S. LAMNIBERT, (G.R.I., Broker


Classifieds


What'jsFor


et, Combo Sub, Salad Tray,
Corn, Mixed Fruit, Condiments
and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Super
Donuts, Bagel Bars, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice,
Rolls, Alternate Meal, Pepperoni
Pizza, Salad Bar, Tossed Salad,
Garden Peas, Juice Bar, Condi-
ments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Biscuits,
Sausage Patty, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Fish Sandwich,
Hamburger Gravy, Rolls,
Alternate Meal, Sausage Pizza,
Salad Bar, Tossed Salad,
Mashed Potatoes, Peaches,
Jello, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Diced Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Chicken Nuggets, Rolls, Alter-
nate Meal, Corndog, Lettuce &
Tomato, French Fries, Apple-
sauce, Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Cheese Grits, Buttered Toast,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Lasagna, Rolls, Alternate meal,
Stacked Ham Sandwich, Salad
Bar, Lettuce & Tomato, Green
Beans, Diced Pears, Con-


Rice, Tossed Salad, Mixed
Vegetables, Fruit Cocktail,
Rolls, Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Lasagna with
Ground Beef, French Fries,
Green Beans, Summer Squash,
Tossed Salad, Waldorf Salad,
Peaches, Rolls, Condiments
and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger. on a Bun, French Fries,
Toasted Ham & Cheese, Potato
Rounds, Baked Beans, Tossed
Salad, Butter Cookies, Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Individual menus are subject to
change.


diments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Cheese
Toast, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot Pock-
ets, Combo Sub, Meatloaf,
Cornbread, Alternate Meal,
Lettuce & Tomato, Whole Kernel
Corn, Fruit Cocktail, Condi-
ments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken &
Rice, French Fries, Turnip
Greens, Back-eyed Peas,
Tossed Salad, Beets, Juice Bar,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Hamburger Gravy, Mashed
Potatoes, Broccoli Normandy,
Tossed Salad, Peaches, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken
Nuggets, French Fries, Savory


I N C.


REALTORS
U (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! Pack your
overnight bags & head to this
peaceful retreat! 5 ac fenced
w/lots of oaks, pond, creek,
12'x20' shed. $59,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 acs
w/deeded access to Peace River,
well & septic, lots .of mature
trees. $110,000!
50 acre grove; Valencia &
Hamlins, well, micro-jet.
$750,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 385 ac on
the Peace River w/lots of beauti-
ful oaks, pines and palmettos!
Pole barn & 2BR/2BA MH.
$499,500!
Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil hunt,
relax! $90,000!


REAL TOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.....-781-0153 SANDY LARRISON...... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL-....... 781-7633 MONICA REAS .---...781-0888
DAVID ROYAL........781-3490
S GHWVAY 17 SOUTH. WAUCHULA. FL 33873 d9:8c


702 SOUTH 6thAV'ENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www. cbhardee. com


other games. Were we afraid-
no.
We were safer than our chil-
dren and grandchildren ever
will be.
Our rights as a American are
diminishing rapidly. I am a
proud American. The only thing
I am ashamed of is my govern-
ment's lack of pride in my coun-
try.
I am ashamed that my gov-
ernment threatened to delay
social security benefits o my
elders who actually earned their
benefits.
We never heard them threaten
to cut benefits to Congress and
delay their pay. Not once did we
hear that we would not be send-
ing billions of dollars in aid to
other countries or to cut bene-
fits to illegal immigrants.

Deborah Richardson
Wauchula


AM-SOUTH REALTY


Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft Richard Dasher
227-0202 832-0370 781-0162


New Listinagl 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath home in
Avon Park walking distance to Lake Verona.
$42.000.
New Listing!! 2 Bedroom / 2 bath on Taylor
Creek canal to Lake Okeechobee $161,000
New Listingl! 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath home on
canal to Lake June. $205.000
New Listinal! 3 Bedroom / 2.5 Bath with
frontage on Lake Jackson in Sebring
$229,000
Commercial Lot, corner of Main St. and
Hwy 64 East, Priced @ $59.000 for 1.28
acreage.
BOWLING GREEN!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home nice corner. Only $38.000
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath well maintained home
with extra lot. Priced @ $110.000
ONLY $7.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC fenced, 4
inch well, great location for home, farming,
multi-business. Ask for Nancy!!
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath CB home. Great
Investment opportunity at a great price.
Only $35.000
NICE residential lot in well kept neighbor-
hood. $11.900
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.


Victor Salazar
245-1054


New Listingal 3 Bedroom / 2 bath home in
Avon Park estates on 1 Acre, $89.900
New Listing!! 2 Bedroom / 1 Bath home in
Lake Placid near Lake Clay. $54.900
Priced To Sell!! Mobile Home Lot in well
maintained Retirement Park. Only. $30.000
Adults/Over 55 Only! Very well maintained 1
Bedroom / 1 Bath Mobile Home with central
heat and air, appliances, screened porch,
Community Center for Recreation, located
in Avion Palms Resort. Only $75.000
150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, home or both. $6.000
Per Acre-Negotiable!!
2BR / 2Bth Home with extra lot, Central
heat/air, one car garage, citrus trees, work-
shop, storage. $65.000 Call Nancy for more
information.
Knollwood Circle!! Beautiful 3 Bedroom / 2
Bath CB home with Central heat / air, two car
garage, close to schools, on a cul-de-sac.
Priced ( $189.000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Brick home outside city
limits, central heat & air, one car carport, wall
to wall carpet, large oaks, outbuildings and
alarm system. Only $175.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multifamily-Single Family Homes.
$75000 cl9:8c


Dear Editor:
As I was growing up I heard,
"The world is going to hell in a
hand basket." I never imagined
we would ever be in the shape
our country is in.
I had faith in our leaders until
about 10 to 15 years ago. What
happened? It seems as if you
are a proud American you have
something to be ashamed of.
If you believe in GOD, you
have something else to be ash-
amed of.
If you believe in our children
saying the Pledge of Allegance
you also have something to be
ashamed of.
If things do not change soon,
our country will be ashamed to
display our flag-Old Glory.
When if ever will pride in
America be restored?
I am angry that we have to be
so politically correct and worry
about hurting others feeling to.
the degee we have.
Are we the only country that
puts the world ahead of its peo-
ple?
Are we the only country that
lets its people go to bed hungry
while our government sends
billions of dollars to help other
countries? The same countries
that would not reach out a hand
if we were drowning.
Does any of this make you
wonder why children today
have so little respect for their
peers, parents or any authora-
tive figure?
I grew up in a world so dif
ferent than today. I respected
myself and others, the police
patrolled our neighborhoods
and sometimes stopped to just
say hello as we played ball or


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net


Doris Lambert
Spacious 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco home; large
kitchen, living room with w/b fireplace, double.
garage, fenced backyard. $155,500
Lovely older home in Wauchula, close to schools
and shopping; 3B/2Bth, wood floors, plenty of
inside and outside storage, lovely landscaping.
$95,000
ENJOY WINTERS IN FLORIDA in this
2B/lBth MI/H, completely furnished, screened
porch and concrete drive. $29,000
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000
STORAGE UNITS 30 units in excellent condi-
tion; very good rate of occupancy. Call Delois.
$55,000


COUNT ON [n
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


ASSOCIATES c
DEII.OIS JOIINSON 773-9743 CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518 D


--


YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At

773-3255


Letter To The Editor

When Will Pride In

America Be Restored


Sandy Larrison
(863) 781-0130


PRICE REDUCED! 333 ac
ranch has pasture, irrigation
system, 12" well, 3BR/3BA two-
story home, 3,000 ft landing
strip. $1,165,500!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
Two beautiful building lots in
Zolfo zoned R-1A, each
155'xllO'. City water available,
septic allowed. $7,000 each!
Imagine your new'home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Fenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!


. e L ..-.... v's


laFflores &FloeInc.1fi










*ald-Advocate


ulSPS tm7&e7Wi
September 8.,2011


PAGE ONE


Cross Country On The Run


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There's a bunch of boys and a
few girls running the roads and
trails around Hardee High these
days.
It's members of the 2011
Cross Country squad, which
opens its season by hosting the
Pioneer Run at Pioneer Park in
Zolfo Springs on Tuesday.
After that, there's a whole
string of meets. Hardee will
host another pair. One on course
I at Hardee Lakes Park near
Fort Green and the other on
course 2 at the park.
In between and afterward,
there are a variety of large and
small meets, scattered from
Sebring, Avon Park and Desoto
to the Disney Invitational, the
University of Florida Mountain
Dew Invitational and the Little
Everglades run in Dade City, a
preliminary to the state meet
there in mid-November.
Hardee is new Class 2
District 10, along with DeSoto,
St. Petersburg Lakewood, Le-


high, Bradenton Southeast and
Riverview Spoto. In nearby
District 8 are Avon Park,
Frostproof, Gulf at New Port
Richey, Lake Placid, Lake
Wales, Ridgewood at New Port
Richey, Mulberry and Lakeland
Teneroc.
The district meet is the week
of Nov. 1-5. The regional meet
is at the Chain of Lakes


Complex in Titusville and the
state meet is at Little
Everglades in Dade City.
Head Coach Don Trew
expects quite a bit of success
from his boys squad. Only two
girls have taken part in practice
as yet although several others
have expressed interest, said
Trew late last week.


GOOD TOURNEY


Sports Schedule Sept. 8-22


Sept. 8 Boys Golf
Girls Golf
JV Football


Frostproof
Mckeel
DeSoto


Away
Away
HOME


4 p.m.
4 p.m.
7 p.m.


Sept. 9 Varsity Football Avon Park Away 7:30 p.m.
V. Volleyball Bartow Away TBA
Sept. 10 Swimming Sebring Away 9 a.m.
V. Volleyball Bartow Away TBA
Sept. 13 Boys Golf Fort Meade TBA 4 p.m.
Swimming Haines City Away 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 15 Boys Golf Lake Wales Away 4 p.m.
Girls Golf Frostproof Away 4 p.m.
Swimming Lake Placid Away 5:30 p.m.
JV/V Volleyball Fort Meade Away 6/7:30 p.m
JV Football Fort Meade Away 7 p.m.
Sept. 16 V. Football Sebring Away 7 p.m.
Sept. 16-17 Volleyball Key West Tour. Away TBA

Sept..19 HJHS Softball Avon Park HOME 4:30 p.m.
V/JV Volleyball Santa Fe Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Sept. 20 Girls Golf Mulberry HOME 4 p.m.
HJHS Football Lake Placid Away 5:30 p.m.
Swimming Mulberry HOME 5:30 p.m.


Sept. 22 Girls Golf
Boys Golf
Swimming
JV Football


Avon Park
Sebring
Winter Haven
Frostproof


Away
Away
Away
Away


4 pm.
4 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7 p.m.


The Jerusalem artichoke has nothing to do with either Jerusalem or artichokes. It is
actually part of the sunflower family.
Hang on to your glass. Prior to 1750, coasters originally came with small wheels.so
drinks could be moved across a table. Sometimes shaped like tiny wagons, they were
also known as sliders.


Member BIdandBreaf


The Stanford Inn
555 E. Stanford Street Bartow
Restaurant Rated 4 Star by Lakeland Ledger
Tuesday-Sunday 11AM-3PM tea/lunch
Sunday Brunch 11AM-2PM
Friday & Saturday 5PM-9PM dinner
For Reservations 863-533-2393


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Minors travel team played in the Lake Wales Summer Shootout with seven
Polk County teams on Aug. 27-28. The Saturday games in which Hardee was sched-
uled were rained out. Hardee went back to play four games on Sunday. They won their
opener 6-4 against Team Adrenaline and the second 8-2 over Team Prime. They then
challenged the Lake Wales Legends and won 6-2. The final game was the champi-
onship matchup against Team Legacy from Eagle Lake. Trailing 4-2 in the bottom of the
sixth, and final, inning Hardee had two outs and no one on base, when they smacked
five hits in a row. Adrian Deleon, Drew McGuckin, Brock Short and Zack Deuberry hits
were followed by the game winner by Dustin Willis. Also contributing were Cody
Helms, Bo Villarreal, Andy Garza, Bryce Hernandez, Miguel Ruiz and Isaac Moreno.
They are coached by Robert Deuberry, Wally Helms and Andrew McGuckin.
The first known use of O.K. was in the New York New Era in 1840 as part of a name:
The Democratic O.K. Club. O.K. was an abbreviation for Old Kinderhook, a nickname
for future president Martin Van Buren. Kinderhook, New York was Van Buren's birth-
place.


Owner
, VISA


Bridget McVay Crystal Rivera /
Tax Practitioner Tax Practitioner
brmcvay@strato.net
1:13tfc
- .I .i ---: t. -. . . ,, .,


Free

Feline Leukemia/Aids Test
with the purchase of a cat package when purchased in the month of September












Mon./Tues./Thurs./Fri. 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Wed. 8:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
Sat. 8:oo a.m. 12:oo p.m.


SEAMLESS GUTTERS
6 inch GUTTERS b5 inch GUTTERS
$3.99 VI LB L $2.95
IIPEILJE4HT Specials H
DON'T WAITn Low PRICEs ONLY GooD THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30
M ter, .M I MaIa M IMt Ir dA
Emal:koccoa'srao et tae Crtfie Lcese CG 15538


HARDEE 2011 CROSS COUNTRY
Sept 13 Pioneer Park Run HOME 4:30 p.m.
Sept. 16 Sebring Away 4:30 p.m.
Sept 20 Hardee Lakes I HOME 4:30 p.m.
Sept.22 Lake Placid Away 4:30 p.m.
Sept. 24 Gainesville Away 8 a.m.
Sept. 29 DeSoto Away 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 4 Hardee Lakes 2 HOME 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 7 Lake Buena Vista Away 1 p.m.
Oct. 14 Dade City Away 2 p.m.
Oct. 20 Sebring Away 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 Avon Park Away 5 p.m.
Nov. 1-5 Districts Away TBA
Nov. 10-12 Regionals Away 8 a.m.
Nov. 19 States Away 8 a.m.


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property,
build your dream home, or do your remodeling.


w


Email: kochcon(,astrato.net


, State Certified License #CGC1515338 L











2CThe Herald-Advocate, September 8, 2011


Schedule of Weekly Services


nted as a Public SeiyIce

ajld-Advocate 'k
W auchtib, Florida

,. lii'e: Thursday 5 p.m.

$OWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
-UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................10:00 a.m.
Sur fy Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Tud day Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thdt day Service ...... ......7:30 p.m.

CI4ESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
,408 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Surnay Worship .................. 8:00 a.m.
Sun' Eve. Worship
Ist, 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tua, Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
"I Hwy. 17 South
Mo iing Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
You Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
41 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sui ay School .................. 10:00 a.m.
M iing Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evyeing Worship............... 6:30 p.m.
Wed esday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

.' CHURCH OF GOD
,'IUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
^ 725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Suj ay School .................... 9:45 a.m.
M(*ning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Tuqs. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
st Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

.COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Su ay AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Suifday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
We. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

IIAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
', 4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
S ay School......................9:45 a.m.
Mjning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disiples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
W01 nesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

.FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253

Bile Study .......................... 9:30 a.m .
MQ ning Worship ..............10:45 a.m.
Evining Worship .................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Dcipleship Training
'Youth & Adult ................6:30 p.m.
AANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

o FIRST UNITED
; METHODIST CHURCH
O ape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sf dday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
MI4ing Worship ................11:00 a.m.
YEtth Fellowship ............5:00 p.m.
Eening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
W'd'. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
/ CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
B le Connection ................ 9:45 a.m.
M=ming Worship ...........11:00 a.m.
S ,nday Evening ..... ..........6:00 p.m.
WMdnesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

S HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
D0mingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
unrtes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Nlercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jieves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ......................9:45 Tin.
coming Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
:,ening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
rnming Service .................11:00 a.m.
I ening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
ed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
cmmunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

4T. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
^ 6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
scoring Worship ................11:00 a.m.
disciples Training........... ....5:00 p.m.
eveningg Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
4 '.Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Snday Worship ...........11:00 a.m.
9d Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
SSunday Feast.............11.. :00 a.m.
IBead ofLife Sunday ........12:15 p.m.
(H.E. Meeting tuesday ....7:00 p.m.
4'


4,


*; Wholesa

ibonnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
PO. Box 780


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico................ 6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6:0....0 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship....................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .... ............. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNIONWAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
English Service ..................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ... 5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ................ 7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................ 7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................11:00 a.m .


oecr Gr5ters
lie Nursery


(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .... .... ............ 10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................1... 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion .................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio .............. 7:00 p.m.
EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Mattes Oracion .................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio..............10:30 a.m.
ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................1:30 a.m.
Evening Service..... ............7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night) ....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ..............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182

Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ............................. 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship ................6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra............... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir ....................... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .......................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade .................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK- 12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ....... .....6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ...... ...... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... ....... 6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
107 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.
FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............:.10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ...............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship...... ................... 0:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ..............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min............... 7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship ...11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9- Ave.
M artes ................................ 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ....................................7:30 p.m .
Domingo ............................ 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Dom ingos ..............,...............6:00 p.m .
M iercoles............................. 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service .................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ........................ 7:00 p.m.
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m .
Sunday School ............... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Wo-ship ..*.!'!...11:00 a.m.
2nd Sundayouth Serliee ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m..
.Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
l"&3'1Sun.
Communion ..:............... 10:00 a.m.
2" & 4* Sun.
Divine Worship..............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ........................11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ....... ......... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .... ........ 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.'

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evenidg Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N.9th Ave.- 773-6418
Sunday ............. ..........9:00 a.m.
Holy Days .....................................

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
498 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) .....'...............8:30 a.m .


(Spanish) .................. 1:00 a.m.
(Creole)...................... :00 p.m .
Catecismo ............................ 9:45 a.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. .................0:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .... ............ 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ... .............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m..,


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOYUP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................1.. 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Training Union .................... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .... ........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m .
Worship Service ................11:00 a.m.
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ......... ....10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENITE
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

MARANATHA BAPTIST'CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
W orship ..........................1...11:00 a.m .
Evening................................ 1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Pray.r-Meet....7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church.............. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H ...........7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship .............7:30 p.m.

PRJMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical .............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
..............................................7:00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ........................ 10:30 a.m..
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .......................... 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ..................11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School .................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship.....................l a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a,m.
Catecismo .........................1... 1:00 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ...........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................1...11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club ........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ......:.....6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................ 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


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SOWER
M4ic0el A Gaa OD
f-Aetier Georg.a


A mountaineer came to town
and saw some strange fruit.
"What's that?" he asked.
, "A tangerine," said the grocer.
"Try one."
"Nope," he answered. "I've got
some tastes now I can't satisfy.
I'm not aimin' to take on more."
Do you have tastes you can't
satisfy? Maybe that's because
you've rejected the Lord from your
life.
Without Him, you're on a road
that leads to ever-increasing
*dissatisfaction, emptiness and
frustration. You become a hollow
soul, a zero with the edges rubbed
off.
There was a poet like that, but he
turned to the Lord. He testified, "He
satisfieth the longing soul."



It is always the secure who
are humble.
-Gilbert Keith Chesterton

I love quotations because
Vanilla is still the most pop-
ular flavor in this country.


T he old-fashioned riverboat can float
quietly along, or with the flip of a switch
can power up its engines to go against the flow...
whatever is required for the safe and timely
delivery of trusting passengers to their destination.
It does seem easier to "go with the flow". Life
tempts us all; it's more difficult to rev up our
engines and go with God's flow. Visit your house
of worship and learn about the power His word
can provide. Find the right direction for your life.


srtluesKto uAmMroa SMc sr ,o, x1ay, 2
02011. Ketstler Willamas Newsvawp Sen cf. P.O. a8187, iwatottesasie, VA ?2906 www kwnewscr eI


r


mmmi


E~


Weekly Scripture Reading
MAtIllew Matthew MaMiew Matthew Matthew Matibew Matthew
7.1-29 12.1-21 12,22-50 13.1-23 13.24-U-212.1-22 2,23- I
46


I


I


I








Letter To The Editor

3 Basic Teachings:

Love God, Self, Others


Dear Editor:
It's the easiest thing in the
world to give up; to be defeat-
ed; to throw in the towel; yet
that's not what we are called to
do. The Bible says, "We are a
chosen generation, a royal
priesthood, a holy nation, a
peculiar people belonging to
God, that we may declare the
praises of Him who has called
out of darkness into His won-
derful light" (1 Peter 2:9). Yet,
day after day we walk in defeat
believing the lies of the devil
whose main purpose is to
destroy us! He doesn't even
have to work hard at it because
we, ourselves are doing the
work for him!
We don't have to live this
way. We are victorious! Jesus
proved this for us in His fin-
ished work at the cross. He
defeated death, hell and the
grave at the cross...period! We
as a royal priesthood must
understand who we are in
Christ and know that Christ is
in us; therefore, we also have
defeated Satan at the cross. It's
time to shed off those grave
clothes and put on our garments
of praise for the One who is
worthy of our praise.
Many, many years ago I read
a book by Mario Murillo enti-
tled, "Fresh Fire." In it he
describes a generation known
as the Lazarus Generation.
These are those who have been
radically saved in an instant and
show up in meetings and
churches wearing their 'grave
clothes' searching for the One
who saved them; hungry for the
Word of God; thirsty for the
Living Water of the Holy Spirit
that washed them clean and
finding people who were afraid
to come near them because they
were ... different. How awful is
that? It is still happening today!
Murillo goes on to say that
the church is becoming more
and more unequipped to teach
these peculiar people because
we haven't been properly
trained. Many of this Lazarus
Generation were former gang
members used to taking over
neighborhoods with automatic
weapons ... when you place a
Bible in their hand they want to
know where the trigger is and
how to fire it because they are
ready to take on these same


neighborhoods for God.
Get ready people! Don't be
afraid of those that God sends
you. We as Christians must
band together and fight for the
children of our Lord Jesus
Christ. Come back to the
Biblical teachings:
Love God.
Love self.
Love others.
I know this is the short ver-
sion but in this age of fast food,
fast Internet, instant messaging,
and instant gratification ... this
message is still as powerful
today as it was yesterday and
will be tomorrow! No single
church can contain all the peo-
ple that belong to God, who
love God, who love themselves,
and who love other people, it's
impossible. What is possible is
that all people, regardless of
race, age, creed, color, religion,
or lack of religion learn to love
God, love themselves, and love
each other through the Basic
Instructions Before Leaving
Earth; the BIBLE.
Now, let me throw in a-dis-
claimer: My opinions are not
necessarily those of this news-
paper, nor are they affiliated
with any denomination per say.
My intent is neither to alienate
nor to intimidate. I'm not trying
to hurt feelings; my intent is in
stirring them.
I am one of those peculiar
people whose life has been rad-
ically changed by the experi-
ences that God has allowed me
to go through and all I want to
do is share my experience,
strength, and hope with whom-
ever, wherever, and whenever. I
have not yet arrived ... I cherish
the journey ... my past has
become my stepping stone and
no longer my stumbling block. I
am not afraid of what lies
ahead.
My only fear is missing the
mark and even in that, I know
that my God is able to carry me
when I cannot carry myself.
Hope is a motivator and I have
hope.
Thank you for listening to me
and thanks to this paper for giv-
ing me a voice. Today, I live ...
and love.

Love in Christ,
Barbara Ratliff
Wauchula


WE'VE BEEN TOLD
Hurricane season is now in full swing, and everyone's atten-
tion is focused on the storms approaching from the sea.
There is much anticipation every time one of these storms
comes our way. People are often told to evacuate as hurricanes
approach, and warnings go out all over the radio and television -
even police officers sometimes warn folks to evacuate from the
streets.
Far too often though, there is plenty of time to get out, but hun-
dreds die only because they didn't listen.
That sad reality is very much like the end that many souls will
face one day. God's judgment awaits each of us.
Hear the warnings, "The soul who sins shall die. The son shall
not bear the guilt of the father, nor the father bear the guilt of the
son. The righteousness of the righteous shall be upon himself, and
the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon himself," Ezekiel
18:20. "For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal
life in Christ Jesus our Lord," Romans 6:23.
Those who ignore God's warnings will be lost eternally.
Consider the words of the Apostle Paul to the men of Athens,
"Truly, these times of ignorance God overlooked, but now com-
mands all men everywhere to repent, because He has appointed a
day on which He will judge the world in righteousness by the Man
whom He has ordained. He has given assurance of this to all by
raising Him from the dead," Acts 17:30-31. Paul clearly states that
being unaware or lacking in knowledge was once overlooked, but
God now demands that everyone turn away from sin.
We've been told.
In the judgment, no one is going to be able to say, "God didn't
tell me."
Why refuse His invitation? The Lord wants you to do what is
right! "The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some
count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any
should perish but that all should come to repentance," 2 Peter 3:9.
.The clock is ticking. Will you be one that God says would not lis-
ten?
Prepare your soul for eternity. Read, study and obey God's
Word.
lan Rice is the jidl-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist.com.





YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Forget about the wrong
things people do to you, and
do not try to get even. Love
your neighbor as you love
yourself. I am the Lord.
Leviticus 19:18 (NCV)
FRIDAY
(Jesus said), "Always treat
others as you like them to
treat you; that is the Law and
the prophets."
Matthew 7:12 (NEB)

SATURDAY
The day of the Lord is near
for all nations. As you have
done, it will be done to you;
your deeds will return upon
your own head.
Obadiah 15 (NLT)

SUNDAY
Jesus said, "But I say to you
that hear, 'Love your ene-
mies, do good to them that
hate you. Bless those who
curse you, pray for those
who abuse you ... and, as
you wish that men would do
to you, do so to them.'"
Luke 6:27, 31 (RSV)

MONDAY
If you stop your ears to the
cries of the poor, your cries
will go unheard, unan-
swered.
Proverbs 21:13 (ME)

TUESDAY
Be sure that no one repays a
bad turn by a bad turn; good
should be your objective
always, among yourselves
and in the world at large.
I Thessalonians 5:15 (PME)
WEDNESDAY
Seek the Lord while He may
be found; call on Him while
He is near. ... "For My
thoughts are not your
thoughts, neither are your
ways My ways," declares the
Lord. "As the heavens are
higher than the earth, so are
My ways higher than your
ways and My thoughts than
your thoughts."
Isaiah 55:6,8-9 (NIV)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV), King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


September 8, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C















The Coalition Partnership of Hardee, Highlands & Polk Counties

proudly presents the


2nd Annual Prescription Drug Summit


Monday, September 19,2011

The First Baptist Church of Bartow
410 E. Church Street, Bartow, Florida

Event Aaenda
7:30 am Registration Check-in, Complimentary Breakfast

8:15 am Keynote Speaker, Sharon Kelley, MS, PMD, CEO
-' Alliance for Global Narcotics Training, Inc.

S. 10:00 am Panel Discussions, followed by Complimentary Lunch

1:00 pm Solution Planning Breakout Groups & Debriefing

L (IS a 3:00-3:45 pm Everybody's a Teacher, special presentation by Circuit Leadership
focusing on community support for education of children in foster care.

FREE CEU's, CME's or Certificate of Attendance!

Be Part of the Solution! Become informed about the latest trends in prescription drug abuse and learn proactive
measures to prevent substance abuse in our families, schools and businesses.

Practice Safe & Proper Disposal! Learn how to dispose of unused medications in an environmentally safe manner
and decrease availability for youth to gain access to prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

Know Where to Seek Help! Find out what helpful resources are available in your community!

Advance Registration Required Limited Seating Reoister Early!


For online registration please visit:
http://www.surveymonkey.com!sY7D9FX62ndannualPrescriptionDrugSummit


Registration is also available by calling:


Hardee County ASAPP (863) 7734349 (to Suzanne Lambert)
Drug Free Highlands (863) 382-2138
StandUP Polk (863) 80777
.0L)


StandIP
POLK


This ifyr was developed in part) under grant numbts IH79SP016561-01 (Hardee Couny Arliance bor Sstanc Abte and Pegnancy Pmre on),fH79SP016563.0f
(Drug Free Highlands), and H79SPOf6699-01 (SlanduP Pol) from the Offte of NaioWal Dug Contiol Pcy and Sutance Abuse and Menal Healh Saices
Admiwstra U.S. DepartmeWt of Health and Hurnan Sewaes. The wews pooes, and opions expressed are those of the auths and do not neeossarly 'eect
those o ONOCP SAMHSA or HHS. 9:1,8c


IWHEARTLANDNPHARMACY




DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our W into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.
........ . . . . . . .


~--~ ~


. . . . . . .
:$s:a ::w ::: .
; :,, <*lf-

U


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm ^


.W i. t. i. s... ..!. ..t .


. . -.-....
I!- * * * -
; : : :_- ;.
l "1 - a --




















State Farm
Insurance

Wauchula 773-6100


.1*,


r .A .


490


Good Luck Cats! Let's Go AI.The Way!


~


773-4136


1-4 pj j f Y,-*




4 06
40 N. th& Ave.2
406 N. 6th Ave. f> fi


Now here 3rd Thursday of each month
9/15, 10/20 & 11/17
Vision Ace Hardware

q^ Save Xb h ^ r. W



BOWL OF FuN
Cow By & SEE Us AFTER THE GAME


proudly supports
Hardee Senior High Athletics

G'-C*! Luck And Go Wildcats!
S2 I CoNr, l. u62 ..bq . 0..... P. 33 *. U1-4 Im t.

.., - --
LUCK WIU.

Peace River Growers
Whnaab hrNuy
DONNIS BARBER
735-0470 WATS 1-800-533-1363 _
3521 NurMy Rd. .
Zof ,o Sping


,"i SENIOR (p- G LIGl1H


Taylor Pohl


Age: 17

Parents: Tammy &
.. Brian Pohl

;"-, Hobbies/Interests:
Varsity cheeleader,
dance team at
Wendy's Dance
&J Co., tennis team for
four years, student body, Cracker Trail
4-H club. NHS, secretary for the senior
class, and Lionette's chaplin. And I am
a member at First Christian Church. I
enjoy fishing, raising animals, and
being with my family.

Future Plans: Attend the University of
Florida and major in Animal Science to
become a large animal vet.



w ^I, 4, '
.II, , .


Aug. 26 Lake Placid
Sept. 2 Fort Meade


Sept. 9


Avon Park


Sept. 16 Sebring
Sept. 23 Bradenton
Bayshore *
Sept. 30 Mulberry
Oct. 7 Open
Oct. 14 Frostproof #
Oct. 21 Palmetto *
Oct. 28 Bradenton S.E.*
Nov. 4 DeSoto **
Nov. 11 Fort Pierce
Central


Away
Home
Away 7:30
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Away 7:30
Home 7:00


Home 7:00
Away 7:30
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Home 7:00

Away 7:00


* District Games # Homecoming **Senior Night



Lydia Alvarez %


WILDCAT R
NAME
Dalton Rabon
Aaron Barker
Keshun Rivers
Jesus Flores
Deonte Evans
Mikey Retana
Ramiro Briones
Keyon Brown
Kris Johnson
Jajuan Hooks
Colby Baker
Justin Knight
Andrew Hooks
James Greene
Maxon DelHomme
Michael Moreno
Murrell Winter
Octavio Alvarez
Ledarius Sampson


Carter Lambert
Jacquille Dewberry
Alonso Casso
Keyonte Holley
Caleb Brandeberry
Adam Khang
Waylon Pleger
Joseph McQuaig
Dawson Crawford
Dillon Skitka
Wintz Terrell
Adson DelHomme
Victor Lopez
Dylan Farr
Luke Palmer
Ramiro Ramirez
Rufino Gabriel
Uvaldo Sanchez
Jesus Zuniga
Julian Varela
Rito Lopez


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1 ~ .4


ULLIUCH'S ..,;'( H ,',,wr",:HW,




RI S OUR MIDOt.' ",.-'
"For All Your Water Needs"
409 Goolsby St., Wauchula, 773-6448



OIL CHANGE SPECIAL
10% DISCOUNT WITH THIS AD
Good September 1 November 30

740 HWY 17 N. Wauchula

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Son your $10 purchase.
Present this coupon at time of purchase
I Expires 11/19/11
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A 225 E Oak Sreet. Wauchula
.... 773-3148
ThB ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Lppu iC II JI T


ICE CREAM
The World's Most Amazing Ice Cream

1040 S. 6th Ave., Wauchula
Located right next to Domino's Pizza.


V\.o veriz.on

319 South 6th Ave 1863) 773 0001
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I I -[, I I 1

110 N 61M Avenue Wauchula, Florida 33873
maglree 1014@gmail corn


ROBBY & SHERRY ABRITTnON
LABOR SERVICES



159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs

OITice 735-9226 Cell 863-528-7085


FOSTER 2011


ST i
, :; -


XVu~v~' ,

7;.-*~ :~~ 'p


POS
WR/LB
TB/DB
WR/DB
FB/LB
WR/DB
WR/LB
WR/DB
FB/DE
QB/DB
WR/DB
QB/DB
WR/DB
TB/DB
FB/DE
FB/DT
WR/DB
WR/DE
WR/LB
TB/LB
TE/DE
WR/DB
FB/DT
FB/LB
TE/DE
WR/DB
FB/LB
OL/DT
OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT


FLORIDA HOSPI IAL BB -B
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gas nATma
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Meeting the financial needs of the
community since 1 929.

f0' 0-oWi -
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i~*~ *~*~1~
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AVON PARK
Last First Ht.
Guerreo Frandolph 5'8
Robertson Alonzo 6'3
Miller Tekovin 5'11
Taylor Garrett 5'9
Knight Travious 5'9
Dick Ryan 5'9
Hart Jarvielle 57
Louis Charles 5'9
Wooden LaDarius 5'4
Rushing Drew 5'9
Jackson Jamaal 57
Sterling Phillix 5'9
Jamison Eric 5'5
Torres Jomar 5'8
Jahna Mason 5'9
Antoine Akub 5'8
Hardy JD 5'11
Turner Lacy 5'10
Hipps Calago 5'9
Brown Charlie 6'
Perez Fernando 5'10
Scriven Earl 57
Louis Estevenson 5'10
Hedrick Austin 5'11
Brown Dylan 5'10
Roland Mitchell 5'9
Cuevas Louis 5'6
Vicens Jorge 5'9
Dunn Romeo 5'10
Thomas Akin 6'3
Brock Colt 5'10
Rodriguez Jonathan 5'8
Campbell Jeff 6'3
Pitter Michael 5'11


"RED DEVILS"


Grade
12
12
12
10
12
10
9
10
11
12
11
11
12
12
9
12
11
10
12
12
12
12
10
10
10
10
11
11
9
11
10
11
12
11


Pos.
WR/DB
WR/DE
QB/DB
QB/K
WR/DB
QB/LB
WR/DB
RB/LB
RB/DB
RB/LB
RB/LB
WR/DB
RB/DL
WR/DB
TE/LB
RB/DL
WR/DB
RB/LB
RB/LB
OL/LB
OLDE
OL/DL
OLIDL
OL/LB
OL/DE
OL/LB
OL/DL
OL/DL
OL/DL
TE/DE
TE/DE
WR/DB
TE/DE
OL/DE


Head Coach:
Buddy Martin
Offensive Coordinator: Ray Rivas
Defensive Coordinator: Steve Rewis
Assistant Coaches: Dale Carlton,
Rashad Faison,
Shawn Rivers, Travis Tubbs
%T ... ._- u-r.7y_ r..-- -- z: .-.. a--. -__--_- --


Just name the score of Friday night's Wildcat Football game and
you could win
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
All Other Games $40 Gift Certificate Payable to
one of our selected "Wildcat" page sponsors
CONTEST T RULES
* Contest is closed to all Herald-Advocate employees and families
* In the event of a tie, the winner will be picked by a random drawing.
* If no one picks the exact score, the closest score wins.
* Official entres only
!' ( 'lll l \ II I IE. A(CEPTED!
Winners will be picked Monday morning, notified by phone that
afternoon and announced in next week's paper.
ME
-COR


Sept. 9


Name:
Address:


Hardee


Day Phone: __
DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.
Fill out entry form and return It to: The Herald-Advocate .
115 S. Seventh Ave., Wauchula
---


ROBARTS
FAMILYFUNERAL HOME
A Trnim d FAInly Najmr %nKr 19Lt
Dennis Robarts
529 W. Main St. 773-9773


W ILDCiTS ,'- 4 ,
G Mark D. Sevigny O.D).
C.N. Timmerman O.D.
SEYEClARE, Ronald 0. Sevigny O.D.
OIA\@ Julia King, O.D.
Board Certified Physicians
735 N. 6th Ave. =. .
Wauchula, FL # 6 ,,; ".

ALL CREATeB E',
ANIMAL
:IOSPEB -. .. <.g^
Dr. Slade Hayman D..M.
Former Wildcat
773-9273 330 Hanchey


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
REALTORS .
E b-
JAMES V.SEE, JR."'b -
President
Phone: (863) 773-0060 -
E-Mail: jim@jimseerealty.com




o Wsaic



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BOWUNGREEN
SMALL EI RRVICE, INC.
LAWN i EQUIPMENT




PIP


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COME BY FOR GREAT FOOD BEFORE THE GAME


221 West Main St., Wauchula


Phone: (863) 767-5300


2!11I


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SINEUPJU.1 _

f66M6Yz Jflf Jeep

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O________ M. (863) 314-5370


Vales.Ho urs: Mon-Fi 8m-...m-St. .


Florida Fuel
of Hardee County.i..
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hulk luel dislrlh;ilor lor oem r 18 irar%!

7' Monica Reas, Owner I


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2114 N 6th Ave Wauchula Ph (863) 773-4101


i | .:..g. J...S


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6C The Herald-Advocate, September 8, 2011


Schools Score Successful Start!


Goodbye! It's the first day of school ever for kinder-
gartener Johnee Knight. Here, she tells mama goodbye in
the hallway at Hilltop Elementary School.


I -'-


Students work together at Hardee Senior High School.
This pair tackles a classroom assignment.


Hello! Johnee Knight meets her kindergarten teacher, Amy
Jernigan.


These freshmen are goal-oriented as they begin their high-school careers at Hardee
Senior High School. With college preparation in mind, they have team spirit mastered
already. Gator T's are welcome at the school, which approves college apparel in its dress
code.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Seniors are kings and queens of the campus on Spirit Fridays at Hardee Senior High
School. A new class of upcoming grads has now taken on the school's traditional privi-
lege of wearing "Senior Spirit Crowns" on each last day of the academic week.


Sixth graders make the transition to secondary school as they learn the ropes at Hardee
Junior High School. Here, reading teacher Melissa Davenport's class discusses expec-
tations for the young adults they are becoming.


seniorr cheerleaders are all smiles and excitement on the first "Spirit Friday" of the new
school year!


Seniors set the bar for school spirit with their individually designed crowns.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


Elaine Pearce's culinary arts class hits the kitchen cooking The classes didn't waste any
time getting started on their studies. Here, they are whipping up their first of many


With the new school year starting in August, these teens opt to stay put in the air-condi-
tioned cafeteria after finishing their lunches, rather than going out into the suffocating
heat of the outdoor student commons!









September 8, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


*




I


HARDEE COUNTY RANCH RODEO PART 2
OK, the Saturday night mutton busters will just have to wait
until next time I need to mix them up with the big cowboys and
cowgirls.
It was hot and muggy as can be expected in July in Florida
but at least the teams didn't get soaked in between events.
Friday night saw the Carlton Ranches ride, with regulars Matt
Carlton, Trae Adams, Clint Boney and Dale Carlton, but this time
Dale's sister Millie Bolin joined them as the female member of the
team. A couple of times her expression conveyed "What am I doing
out here?" but overall she dug in and did a great job, and even had
fun doing it. Robbie Lynn Burnett also rode on Friday night, with
the team from the Panhandle, LS Ranches. Both of these teams
competed in Okeechobee on Saturday night (but Millie let Kelly
Cumbeetake over her spot!).
Saturday night brought out M&N Cattle, with Clay and
Christy Newsome, Peck Harri _,;d Brandon Barthle (substituting
for the injured Luke Cantu) arid William Perry, who filled in the
bronc-riding slot. This team had competed in Okeechobee the night
before. Also riding Saturday were the FINR cowboys, K&M
Cattle, with James Scott and wife Paula, Mikey Woodham, B.J.
Carter and Cody Robinson. (Cody does the bullfighting for most of
the youth rodeos, and does a fine job at it, even being tossed about
20 feet in the air by a bull when fellow bullfighter Garrett Haskins
needed help.)
The first event was team sorting, with M&N Cattle complet-
ing it in 54.39 seconds, LS Ranches in 1:23.56, and Carlton and
K&M both receiving no-times (those calves can be slippery!).
This was followed by the team branding event. Robbie Lynn's
run across the arena contributed to their great time of 39.54 sec-
onds, while Millie's run added to their 49.51 time. Saturday saw
Christy having to run the length of the arena, with a 57.51 time
(including a five-second penalty), and K&M never got their calf
roped.


Millie Bolin holds the steer's head while Dale and Matt
Carlton finish tying it and Clint Boney gives the hands-up
signal for their time to stop. Carlton Ranches completed
this double-mugging event in 52.65 seconds.


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
William Perry holds the calf's head and Clay Newsome
and Brandon Barthle hold its legs as Christy Newsome
brands it. Peck Harris is out of view on horseback after
having roped the calf. The M&N Cattle team recorded a
time of 57.51 seconds for the team branding event.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 252011CA000040
SEACOAST NATIONAL BANK
successor by merger to
BIG LAKE NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
JESUS JUAREZ JR. and JESSE
JUAREZ d/b/a THE PRO'S
AUTOMOTIVE (sic) REPAIR
SHOP
Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
May 18, 2011, entered in Civil
CASE NO.
252011CA000040 of the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit
in and for HARDEE COUNTY,
Florida, wherein SEACOAST
NATIONAL BANK is the plaintiff
and JESUS JUAREZ, JR., et al.
are the Defendants:
I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash, via sale at the Hardee
County Courthouse located at the
Second Floor, outside of Room
202, at the Hardee County Court-
house, 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, at 11 o'clock
a.m. on the 21st day of Sept-
ember, 2011, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, tQ. wit:
Lots 6-10, Block 1, MAPLE
HEIGHTS ADDITIONS TO
THE CITY OF WAUCHULA,
according to the Plat there-
of, recorded in Plat Book 2,
Page 14, of the Public
Records of Hardee County
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
HARDEE COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 417 WEST MAIN
STREET, WAUCHULA, FLORIDA,
WITHIN TWO DAYS OF YOUR
RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OF
SALE. IF YOU ARE HEARING
IMPAIRED CALL 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), OR 1-800-955-8770 (V),
VIA FLORIDA RELAY SYSTEM.
DATED this 2 day of June, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY,
Clerk of Courts
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
9:1,8c


A lot has been said about
politics, some of it compli-
mentary but most of it
accurate.
-Eric Idle

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 252011DR000421
LUCIANO SANTOS HERNANDEZ,
Petitioner
and


TOMAS DE LA PAZ VALDEZ,
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: TOMAS DE LA PAZ VALDEZ
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to It on LUCIANO SANTOS
HERNANDEZ whose address is
615 7th Ave, Wauchula, FL,
33873, on or before September
30, 2011, and to file the original.
with the clerk of this Court at PO
Drawer 1749, or 417 W. Main St.,
Room #202, Wauchula, FL 33873,
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail
to do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.
Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review, these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Court's office notified of your cur-
rent address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to
the address on the record at the
clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated this 23 day of August, 2011
B.HUGH BRADLEY,
Clerk of'the Court
By: Connie Coker D.C.
If you are a person with a dis-
ability, who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate in
this proceeding you are entitled
at no cost to you, to the provision
or certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863)534-4690,
within two (2) days of your receipt
of this (describe notice); if you
are hearing or voice impaired,
call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida
Relay Service 711."
9 1-22p


Robbie Lynn Burnett brands the calf held by her LS
Ranches teammates, for a great time of 39.54 seconds in
this team branding event.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 25-2006-DR-000353
SECTION:
IN RE: THE MATTER OF:
REBECCA N. HAWK, and FLA.
DEPT. OF REVENUE
Petitioners,
and
MYRON LORENZO REFOURE,
JR.,
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: REBECCA N. HAWK
CURRENT ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED,
that a law suite has been filed
against you by MYRON LORENZO
REFOURE, JR., and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
the attorney representing MYRON
LORENZO REFOURE, JR., whose
mailing address is 1102 South
Florida Avenue, Lakeland,
Florida, 33803, on or before
September 30, 2011, and to file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitoner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
DATED this 24 day of August,
2011
B.HUGH BRADLEY,
As Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
9:1,8p


their winner's belt buckles! Congrats, Cowboys and Christy!

I would like to express my personal sympathies, as well as'
those of the rodeo community, to Matt Carlton for the recent loss'
of his mother. I am sure she will be in his heart every time Matt
competes.
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.,
Reach her at ksleepyk@Caol.coin or 773-9459. Keep on riding,:
Cowboys and Cowg ir/ls!


Darin Hughes (far left) of the Hardee County Cattlemen's
Association with winning M&N Cattle team members
(from left) Peck Harris, Clay and Christy Newsome,'
Brandon Barthle and William Perry. The cowpokes jr
front are Cayden Newsome and Grady Perry.


James Scott corrals the steer along the railing, with Cody
Robinson following closely and B.J. Carter and Mikey
Woodham riding in. The K&M Cattle team completed the
trailer loading event in 1:30.32.




Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels.'
At The Herald Advocate


P! U Land O' Lakes



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BEEF CATTLE FIELD DAY


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

9:00AM 3:00pm


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Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


Trailer loading came next. LS Ranches did it in 50.27 seconds,
followed closely by M&N Cattle at 53.31 seconds. K&M Cattle
completed it in 1:30.32, followed by Carlton Ranches at 1:31.04.
The final team event was the double muggin' (one of my
favorites!). M&N was on the money with a time of 45.25 seconds,
followed closely by Carlton Ranches at 52.65 seconds. K&M
Cattle completed it in l1:12.56 (with fearless Paula Scott right in the
middle of all the action, while husband James stays safe on his
horse!), and LS Ranches received a no-time.
The final event was the bronc riding. Matt Carlton was in his
usual fine form, and made a spectacular ride on Friday night,
receiving the highest score of 81. William Perry had a bumpy ride,
but came in with a.respectable score of 61. Jantzen Lord of LS
Ranches had a -runner" rather than a buckerr," so he came in at 42.
Cody Robinson didn't complete his eight-second ride, so didn't
receive a score.
And the winner was drumroll. please M&N Cattle.
Luke Cantu and Peck Harris will be riding in the finals at the
Silver Spurs Arena Sept. 30-Oct. 1, together with teammates Clay
and Christy Newsome and newcomer Robert Fussell (Corey's
cousin). It was a long season, but well worth it when they received


r1


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8C The Herald-Advocate, September 8, 2011


LifeLinks...
By Carolyn Hendry Wyatt
Extension Agent


4-H IS HEALTHY FOR YOU!
According to recent findings from Tufts University, 4-H youth
engage in positive healthy living behaviors more often than youth
who do not participate in 4-H.
According to the study, 4-H'ers, regardless of their back-
ground, socio-economic status, race and gender, thrive through the
health/safety education and experiences they receive through 4-H
programming. The research found that, when compared to other
youth, young people involved in 4-H are:
More likely to spend more time exercising or being physi-
cally active;
Two times less likely to engage in drug use;
Two times less likely to use cigarettes or drink alcohol.
Dr. Richard Lerner, who conducted this research study, stated,
"The results of this longitudinal study continually reinforce the
idea that when youth participate in programs such as 4-H, they
thrive in numerous ways, including health, positive development
and community contribution."
He went on to add, "The comparisons we've made between 4-
H youth and other young people highlight the considerable
strengths and health of the young men and young women partici-
pating in 4-H around the country."
4-H is a community of six million young people across
America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills.
Sponsored by the University of Florida's Institute of Food &
Agricultural Sciences, 4-H is in all 67 counties across the state of
Florida, just as it is in every state in the United States. 4-H pro-
grams are implemented by the 109 land-grant universities and the
Cooperative Extension System through their 3,100 local extension
offices across the country.
The 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development began in 2002,
through the support of the National 4-H Council. Youth develop-
rient scholar Lerner worked with researchers at the Institute ror
Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University to
conduct the study.
Youth are measured in "waves" across time, which compared
those who participate in 4-H to those who do not. The study is cur-
rently in wave seven. The 6,400 adolescents surveyed are racially
and geographically diverse, representing 34 states in the nation.
' In summary, the results of the study showed overwhelmingly
that 4-H youth are healthier in every way than those who do not
participate in the program.
For more information about the study, visit www.4-h.org.
With 4-H'ers less likely to smoke, drink alcohol or use drugs,
this is a program in which I would want my child (or children) to
become involved. Call the Hardee County Extension Office at 773-
2164 for more details about the 4-H program and how to join!



NOTICE OF INVALID VOTER
REGISTRATION AND NOTICE
TO SHOW CAUSE

Pursuant to Section 98.075(7), Florida Statutes, notice is
hereby given to the following persons) to show cause why
they should not be disqualified as a registered voter:
Doril R. Williams II
510 South Rd
Wauchula, FL 33873

Juan D. Villarreal
871 Chamberlain Blvd
Wauchula, FL 33873

Amanda L. Elisondo
612 E Bay Street
Wauchula, FL 33873

Bradford A. Atchley
4811 Church Ave.
Bowling Green, FL 33834

Nicholas A. Vasquez
730 W. Second
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890

The above individual's are notified to show cause why
his/her name should not be removed from the voter regis-
tration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days will result in
a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and re-
moval of your name from the statewide voter registration
system. For further information and instruction, contact the
Supervisor of Elections at 863-773-6061 within 30 days of
publication of this notice.
Jeffery Ussery
Supervisor of Elections
Hardee County

La NOTA DE VOTANTE
INVALIDO La MATRICULA
Y la NOTA para
MOSTRAR la CAUSA

Segtn Secci6n 98.075(7), los Estatutos de la Florida, la
nota por la present es dada a la persona (s) siguiente
para mostrar la causa por qu6 ellos no deben ser descali-
ficados como un votante registrado:

Doril R. Williams II
510 South Rd
Wauchula, FL 33873

Juan D. Villarreal
871 Chamberlain Blvd
Wauchula, FL 33873

Amanda L. Elisondo
612 E Bay Street
Wauchula, FL 33873

Bradford A. Atchley
4811 Church Ave.
Bowling Green, FL 33834

Nicholas A. Vasquez
730 W. Second
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890

El encima de4 individuo es notificado para mostrar la causa
por que su nombre no se debe quitar de los rollos de ma-
tricula de votante. El fracaso para responder dentro de 30
dias tendra como resultado una determinaci6n de ineligi-


COUNTY COURT
There were no marriage
licenses issued last week.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Capital One Bank USA vs.
Tami L. Dowden Halstead,
judgment, and judgment set
aside.
American Express Centurion
Bank vs. Carmen Dixon, judg-
ment, execution withheld.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Carmen Dixon, stipulated set-
tlement approved.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Jason Knapek, default judg-
ment.
Asset Acceptance LLc vs.
Robert A. Bair, default judg-
ment
Consolidated Asset Manage-
ment I LLC vs. Patricia Gun-
noe, judgment.
Ford Motor Credit co. LLC
vs. Brian K. McQuaig, judg-
ment.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Sofia Mederos, judgment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Jonathan Albert Mills, tres-
pass on property other than a
property or conveyance, and
misuse of wireless 911 system,
21 days in jail with credit for
time served (CTS), $325 fine
and court costs, and $50 cost of
prosecution (COP) placed on
lien.
Guy Glen Mullins, retail
theft, probation one year, $325
fine and court costs, $50 COP,
$50 investigative costs.
Roy Lee Collier Jr., domestic
battery, adjudication withheld,
probation one year, $677 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Manuel Delarosa, two counts
battery, adjudication withheld,
probation one year, $677 fine
and court costs, $100 COP,
$100 investigative costs.
Steven Heller, stalking and
harassing telephone calls, 28


days CTS, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 COP.
Manuel Juarez, possession of
marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia, completed
pretrial diversionary program,
not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Joanna Centeno and Mau-
ricio Centeno, divorce.
Margaret Gomez o/b/o minor
child vs. Maricel Marquez o/b/o
minor child, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Cierra Letice Camel Melton
and the state Department of
Revenue (DOR) vs. Arnell
Bridges III, petition for child
support.
Miranda Nichole Black and
DOR vs. Robert Preston
Bivens, petition for child sup-
port.
Tomeka Rodriguez and DOR
vs. Lance Thompkins., petition
for child support.
Alexis Kerg et al vs. Crystal
Martin et al, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Melanie Aguilar Bell vs.
Felipe 0. Aguilar, petition for
injunction for protection.
Tyeisha M. Anderson and
DOR vs. Terrell Smith, petition
for administrative child support
order.
Bethany L. Lazo and DOR v
s. Lorisma Desilus, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Sabir Abdul-Haqq Yasir vs.
Aramark Correctional Services,
petition to resolve inmate situa-
tion.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Edith Lipper vs. Sanford L.
Specter et al, voluntary dis-
missal.
Jesus Delreal vs. City
Electric Supply Co., settlement
agreement approved, case dis-


CourthoseRepor


missed.
Joe M. Gonzales vs. Maria L.
Martinez, order.
Jillian Frost vs. Bruce
Kilpatrick, order.
Lisa J. Cisneros and Ernesto
Cisneros, order.
Samantha Michelle Movery
and DOR vs. Anthony C.
Singleton, voluntary dismissal.
John Scheel vs. Angela
Frankie Scheel, injunction for
protection.
Donna Eures vs. Raul
Gonzales, injunction for protec-
tion.
Catalina Rodriguez vs.
Carlos Fabian, injunction for
protection.
Karen Harrison Counts vs.
Richard Earl Taylor, dismissal
of temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Reyes Lopez and Michelle F.
Lopez, amended divorce order.
Deborah B. Walker vs.
William B. Beeson III, order on
child support contempt.
Samuel Lee Johns and
Pamela Nicole Johns, divorce.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-


Notice of Sheriff's Sale
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution
issued in the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County,
Florida on the 6th day of June 2011, in the cause wherein
Hicks Oil Co., Inc., is the Plaintiff and Mario Wilson, indi-
vidually and M & E Trucking, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability
Company, and 2 Brothers Ag Services, Inc. are Defen-
dants, being case number 09-263 GCS in said court, I,
Arnold Lanier, as Sheriff of Hardee County, Florida, have
levied upon all the. right, title and interest of the above De-
fendants, Mario Wilson, individually and 2 Brothers Ag
Services, Inc., to-wit:
1999 Ford Truck F550
Vin: 1 FDAF56SOXEE36865
and
2006 Ford Truck F350
Vin: 1 FTWW33P26ED55623
and on September 27, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. or as soon there-
after as circumstances permit, I will offer for sale, all of the
Defendant's right, title and interest in the above described
personal property at public outcry and sell the same, sub-
ject to ALL prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any,
to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND, plus
Florida State Sales Tax, if applicable. The monies received
through the levy and sale will be paid as prescribed by Fla.
Stat. 56.27. The sale will be held at the main entrance of
the Hardee County Sheriff's Office located at 900 E. Sum-
mit St., Wauchula, Florida. The above-described property
may be viewed at Cliff's Wrecker Service located at 1071
Highway 17 N, Wauchula, Florida, Monday-Friday from
8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this proceeding shall contact the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office, 863-773-0304 ext.(208) not
later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Telephone
(904) 257-6097, 1-800-955-8771 (+TDD) or 1-800-955-
8770(v), via Florida Relay Service..
Dated August 15, 2011
Arnold Lanier, As Sheriff
of Hardee County, Florida
By: Sgt. Barbara Finneram
Deputy Sheriff
8:18-9:8c


Public Notice of
Meeting Location Change

The Hardee County Economic Development Council and
the Industrial Development Authority regular scheduled
meeting for September 13, 2011 will be held at the Hardee
County Board of County Commission Chambers located
at 412 West Orange Street, Wauchula, Fl 33873 at 9:00am.
If you would like further information please contact the of-
fice at (863)773-3030.

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
Economic Development Office (773 3030) at least forty-
eight (48) prior to the meeting.

MARCUS SHACKELFORD, CHAIRMAN
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
9:8c


MEETING NOTICE

The HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
invites the Public to the


SUSTAINABLE HARDEE: VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE



INFRASTRUCTURE MEETING


MONDAY SEPTEMBER 19, 2011


6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM

412 W. Orange St., Rm. 102,

'Courthouse Annex, 1st floor, Wauchula
Please come share your thoughts and ideas of what is needed in your community
All meetings are open to the public

For More Information

Call The County Planning Department at
.863-767-1964

Email kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net

Visit www.hardeecounty.net/visioning


THERE MAY BE ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS IN ATTENDANCE
WHO MAY OR MAY NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE DISCUSSION


ability por el Supervisor y la eliminaci6n de su nombre del
sistema a todo el estado de matricula de votante. Para la
informaci6n y la instrucci6n adicionales, avise al Supervi-
sor de Elecciones en 863-773-6061 dentro de 30 dias de
la publicaci6n de esta nota.
Jeffery Ussery
El Supervisor de Condado
de Elecciones Hardee 9:8c


lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Dawn Cimmino, burglary of
conveyance and grand theft,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, $520 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, restitution,
$24 first step probation fees.
Daniel Farias, aggravated
battery with a deadly weapon,
transferred to county misde-
meanor court.
Lonnie Gene King, workers
compensation fraud, probation
one year, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender
fees, $100 COP, restitution, $12
first step.
Pamela Faye Makowski, vio-
lation of probation (original
charge possession of drug para-
phernalia), affidavit withdrawn,
probation terminated.
Brooke Blalock, aggravated
battery causing bodily harm,
adjudication withheld, 11
months 29 days in jail suspend-
ed, probation 10 years, $520
fine and court costs, $100 COP,
restitution, $120 first step; rob-
bery, not prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Zackary R. Stevenson and
Sandy J. Staton to Timothy P.
and Shannon R. Staton,
$33,389.
EMBR Construction &
Development Inc. to Jason
Klein. $40,000.