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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 8/18/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text


















The


lllth Year, No. 37
4 Sections, 44 Pages


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
A e'


46
plus 40 sales tax


Thursday, August 18, 2011


New Water Rule Will Cost Billions


By MICHAEL KELLY
For The Herald-Advocate
Strict water quality standards
for Florida imposed by the
Environmental Protection
Agency and scheduled to take
effect March 6, 2012, will cost
Floridians billions of dollars



Landfill


Fire. 1Of


3 Saturday

By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It was a blazing Saturday
night!
Hardee Fire-Rescue got hit
hard, with three fires and three
medical calls in the space of a
couple of hours.
"Without the help we received,
we wouldn't have been able to
do it. We couldn't have done it
all by ourselves," said Hardee
Fire-Rescue Chief Michael
Choate, who was among those
responding all night long, and
finishing up by cleaning up
hose and restocking equipment
until 4 a.m.
The long night began with a
fury shortly after 10 p.m. when
firefighters were called to the
scene of a fire at an unoccupied
home at 717 S. Fifth Ave. (U.S.
17 North), Wauchula, where as
it turned out, ammunition and
propane were stored as a possi-
ble start of or a methampheta-
mine lab.
Wauchula Police Department
officers helped pull lines and
called city staff to disconnect
electric lines in the area,
although the vacant house itself
had no electric.
All three stations sent 12 staff
to combat the raging fire, which
was under control in 25 min-
utes. Some firefighters re-
mained on the scene until 1:45
a.m. to ensure it would not
reignite with stored ammuni-
tion, which apparently started
the fire. A fire marshal was
called to investigate.
While this fire was being sup-
pressed, a medical call at 10:30
broke off an ambulance crew to
rush to Bowling Green.
Twenty minutes later the sec-
ond fire call came; there was
trouble at the county landfill, on
top of the 100-foot mound. An
engine and crew pulled up to
the top with difficulty, but it
was the landfill staff who really
helped. After midnight, they
See LANDFILL 2A


WEATHER
DATE HIGH LOW BAI
08/10 83 74 0.61
08/11 93 74 0.00
08/12 94 74 0.00
08/13 93 72 0.08
08/14 91 72 1.04
08/15 92 75 0.03
08/16 90 75 0.00
TOQAL Rainfall to 08116111 29.61
Same period last year 38.88
Ten Year Average 54.30
Source: Unv. of Fla. One Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds..................4B
Community Calendar.... 1B
Courthouse Report.......6C
Crime Blotter..................6C
Hardee Living................2B
Obituaries......................4A
Information Roundup... 1B
School Lunch Menus....5A



II7 18122 07290I 3


and could threaten the agricul-
tural and mining industries.
In an effort to repeal the
impending changes, mining
executives from both Mosaic
and CF Industries met with
local leaders and a member of
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson's staff


Monday in Wauchula to express
concerns over the new require-
ments.
The tightened standards are a
result of a successful lawsuit
launched by environmental
groups against the EPA during
2008.


The regulations apply to
lakes and flowing waters in
Florida, and will affect indus-
tries that discharge pollutants,
publicly owned water treatment
facilities, and non-point source
contributors to nutrient pollu-
tion such as agriculture, man-


aged landscapes and urban charged and ending up in water
areas. bodies.
The new rule states: "In no A 2010 assessment by the
case shall nutrient concentra- EPA showed 26 percent of
tions of a body of water be assessed lakes were impaired
altered so as to cause an imbal- by excess nutrients along with
ance in natural populations of eight percent of assessed rivers
aquatic flora (plant life) or and streams.
fauna (fish and animals)." Craig Kovach, director of
The nutrients harming the environmental affairs for CF,
water bodies are phosphorus said the requirements would
and nitrogen, both of which cost his company tens of mil-
cause excessive plant and algal lions of dollars to become com-
growth bringing down the over- pliant.
all health and natural balance of Ray McClellan, public works
a water body. director for the city of Wau-
Some waters are naturally chula, guessed it would cost the
high in phosphorus due to phos- taxpayers $10 million to bring
phorus-rich bedrock and treated sewage water up to the
groundwater while most high new requirements.
levels are caused by excess CF currently receives one
nutrients being applied or dis- See NEW WATER 2A



City Manager


Selection Soon

Wauchula Completes Its.

Interviews Of 5 Finalists


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The interviews are over. Now
comes the hard part.
A decision on a new city
manager will wait until the
Wauchula City Commission
gathers for its regularly sched-
uled meeting on Sept. 12.
The commission interviewed
three candidates on Aug. 9 and
two more on Tuesday of this
week. They decided to discuss
how they wanted to rank them
to choose the top candidate.
That discussion, what needs
are most pressing, what they
want in a city manager, will be
at the monthly workshop re-
scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 6,
because of the Labor Day holi-
day. As usual, that meeting will
start-at 6 p.m.
Originally, the commission
had decided to consider six
applicants for city manager.
One, James Coleman of Lady
Lake, has been on deployment
in Mississippi with FEMA (the
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency) and was not


expected to be demobilized
until mid-August or later. He
did not complete and return the
questionnaire sent to him.
Interviewed on Aug. 9 were
Joseph "Joe" Miranti of St.
Cloud, Terry Atchley of Wau-
chula and Stephen Weeks of
Sebring. And this week, The-
rese "Terry" Leary of Hilton
Head, S. C. and formerly of
Florida, and Fred Baughman of.
Oak Hill, were interviewed.
Each 45-minute interview
followed the same pattern. The
candidate was given five min-
utes to tell a bit about himself or
herself. Then, each commis-
sioner had five minutes to ask
questions. The audience was
given a chance to ask questions,
and then Commission Chair-
man/Mayor Rick Knight fin-
ished up.
Questions covered all areas.
what can be done in a time of
economic downturn and declin-
ing revenue to revive things, the
airport and free trade zone, util-
ities, control and delegation of
See CITY MANAGER 2A


REGISTRATION STATION


in 11- --- ----i--.---------------------i--*
PHOTO BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Hardee County's roughly 5,000 students will head back to the classroom on Monday. Here, parents and kids get
ready for the big day as they complete registration forms at the front desk at Zolfo Springs Elementary School. Filled
with anticipation are (from left) Karl Adam, 5, who is being registered for kindergarten by parents Karel and Angely
Adam, while (front to back) Joe Garza, 9, Esmeralda Garza, 6, and Rosalba Garza, 11, wait for their father, Ignacio L
Garza, to enroll the two younger children. Rosalba, who will be going into the sixth grade at Hardee Junior High
School, can give pointers to her younger siblings as they all embark on a successful new academic year. For more
photos of early action at Zolfo Springs Elementary and Hardee Senior High School, see Inside this section.


ZS Moves

To Fill

Vacancy

By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The town of Zolfo Springs on
Monday night took the first step
in replacing the man who
served as its mayor and com-
missioner for several years.
George Neel died suddenly
on Aug. 2: He was 72.
In. a special meeting, the
Town Commission officially
declared the vacancy and estab-
lished a qualifying period for
candidates to fill it. Each
lamented Neel's loss.
The filing period' for candi-
dates for his Seat 2 on the com-
mission will open on Monday at
8 a.m. The week-long period
closes Friday, Aug. 26, at 4 p.m.
A town election will be held
on Monday, Sept. 12,
Qualifying packets can be
picked up at Town Hall, 3210
U.S. 17 S. The fee for filers is
$54.
The process itself is a fairly
simple one, requiring potential
candidates to take a loyalty
oath, fill out a short financial
See ZS MOVES 2A


Workshop Will

' Review Fire Dept.

... Story 7B


BACK-TO-SCHOOL

SECTION INSIDE!


Hey, Sports Fans,

Enter FNL Contest

... Story 6A


WHO'S THERE?


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
This oVwl gazes from atop patio furniture at Roxie Bentley's house on Ohio Avenue
Wednesday morning after trapping itself inside the screened-in enclosure overnight.
Bentley noticed the owl after waking up and looking out the window to see It sitting on
her table. It apparently slipped in through a gap between the enclosure and the roof.
Bentley opened both doors to the patio but the owl seems reluctant to leave, enjoying
his shady perch by the pool.


I









2A The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011


r The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage .
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor vR1



115 S. Seventh Ave. ro, -,
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


S DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
\ Ads -Tuesday noon /.


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months-$18; l yr.-S31;2yrs.-$60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2 yrs. $79
Out of State
6 months $27; 1 yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes .letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS: "
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Commissioner Minor Bryant (from left) led the meeting held with Diana McGee, regional director for U.S. Sen. Bill
Nelson. Commissioner Dale Johnson and Bryant both work in the agriculture business, and both are very concerned
over the numeric nutrient water quality criteria taking effect next March.


NEW WATER
Continued From 1A


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Van Adams, 80, of Zolfo Springs died August 7. He was a
long-time cattle rancher and citrus grower in Hardee County. He
was an overcome.
Due to a family emergency at age 6 he went to the Florida
Baptist Children's Home when it was located in Arcadia. After
growing up there he left and worked as a cowboy with Welles
Cattle Company in Arcadia, Ben Hill Griffin Jr., and Davis Ranch.
Adams enjoyed being in rodeos with such folks as Ken
McLeod, Roland Skipper and Gene Craft.
He went to work for a building contractor in Sebring, learned
the craft and became a contractor himself. He built homes for such
owners as Willard Durrance, Robert Ray Smith, Bob Norris and
Colemon Best, recalled his friend Marcus Shackelford.
After that he became a citrus grower and rancher. He was on
the board of directors of the Federal Land Bank. He was in the
Army as a young man and moved to Hardee County 58 years ago.
Adams was a member of Crewsville Bethel Baptist Church.

Tommy Jackson, who has worked at the local Ford dealership
for about 42 years, remembers in the 1950s he could take a quarter
to Wauchula for a good time at the movie theatre.
Admission was 9 cents. This included a double feature, a car-
toon, a serial and previews. A Coke, popcorn and a candy bar were
each 5 cents. This left a penny after the movies for a stick of
liquorice at Stansfield's Candy Store.
He also remembers a $5 bill would more than cover a Saturday
night in Wauchula in 1961. This included $2 for eight gallons of
premium gasoline at Bumby's Service Station. At Knight's
Restaurant he could buy a hamburger all the way for 30 cents,
French fries for 20 cents, and a fountain Coke for 10 cents.
Admission to the Star-Lite Drive-In Theatre was 25 cents a
person. Cokes and popcorn there were 10 cents each.

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences directly supports the Florida Foundation Seed Producers
which markets and licenses new plant varieties and process seed
and collects royalties.
There have been numerous successes, including new varieties
of sweet corn, tomatoes, strawberries, peanuts, sugarcane, blueber-
ries, ryegrass and peaches. Specific examples are the Sweet Charlie
strawberry, Emerald, Jewel and Star blueberries, SunOleic 95
peanut, Osceola white clover, and the UFSun peach.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers earlier this year began an
Area-wide Environmental Impact Study that addresses expansion
of phosphate mining, along with agriculture and urban develop-
ment, within the Central Florida Phosphate District.
Key geographic areas are the Peace River and the Myakka
River watersheds. Both rivers drain into Charlotte Harbor.
Phosphate mining began in this geographic area in the late 1880s.
SMost mining has been in the northern part of the district. Mosaic
and CF Industries are seeking to mine more acreage in the central
part of the district which includes Hardee County.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection are cooperating in the
study. The project website is phosphateaeis. org.
In the final analysis I hope a sound compromise can be
reached which allows phosphate to be mined while the water sys-
tems and much of the environment is protected. Wetlands, a beau-
tiful environment and fertilizer to produce food are all important.
Although mining is a temporary land use it will leave a lasting
legacy-for good and/or bad. This study is supposed to measure
the past and predict the future, which is quite a challenge. The envi-
ronment in the Central Florida Phosphate District has already been
impacted greatly by agriculture (cattle, citrus and row crops), phos-
phate mining, and development (urban, residential and commer-
cial).
Being good stewards now of the land and water resources is
important for future generations who choose to live here. Jobs and
production are important as well.

EBITDA is an important accounting term in business that
stands for.earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amorti-
zation..TSR is less frequently used but stands for total sharehold-
er return.
Many financial advisors recommend regular systematic sav-
ing. In other words-spend less than you make. That is a difficult
challenge in this day of credit cards and the buy now-pay later phi-
losophy. It is impossible if you do not have a job or earnings.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!

Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

773-3255


minions gallons of treated
wastewater per day from the
city and about 50 thousand gal-
lons per day from the county.
Once the new standards take





Continued From 1A
arrived and drove tractors and
dozers to stir the pile and give
. firefighters a chance to get it
out. They had to use 1,000 feet
of line and got help with a
tanker and engine from Fort
Meade. Over 16,000 gallons of
water were used to extinguish
it. Firefighters remained on the
scene until nearly two a.m. The
cause of the fire is still under
investigation.
"It was an impressive effort
for landfill staff, to come in to
operate that heavy equipment
and help us. And Fort Meade is
always so cooperative," said
Choate.
Shortly after 11:15, another
fire call came in, a car fire
threatening structures at Hardee
Correctional Institution at the
west end of the county. Another
engine, a tanker and crew-
pulled off the Wauchula house
fire and headed there. The
Department of Corrections van
was fully involved when fire-
fighters arrived. They used over
1,000 gallons of water to stop
the fire from spreading to the
carport and buildings around it.
While all this was going on,
Highlands County and "Polk
County responded to medical
calls at Resthaven and Bow-
ling Green.
"It was a Saturday night we
might expect in the height of
the season when all the winter
visitors, the transitional popula-
tion are here. For it to be a
Saturday night in August was
unusual. We got help from all
over, Wauchula Police, landfill
crews, neighboring counties.
Our shifts were up all night,
with everything overlapping
like that," concluded Choate.



CITY MANAGER
Continued From 1A
authority, resolving conduct,
employee incentives, manage-
ment style and experience,
duplication of tasks, strengths
and weaknesses, and finally,
why should we choose you as a
candidate over others.
Leary and Miranti were inter-
viewed in January by the com-
mission then. Since that time,
five new commissioners joined
Russell Smith and John Free-
man at the commission table.
Pattie Detwiler, Keith Nadas-
kay, Gary Smith, Ken Baker
and Knight were seeing Leary
and Miranti for the first time as
well as the other three candi-
dates.
All five candidates presented
themselves well, and had a vari-
ety of education, experiences,
strengths -and weaknesses:
Labor attorney Reynolds Al-
len's office has advised that the
commission has the fight to
waive any particular "require-
ment" in the posted tise-
ment for the positior.n,
not included in the City Chair,.
as a requirement. "Such'a waiv-
er for a legal and non-discrimi-
natory reason is within the
authority of the commission,"
says the memo from Allen's
office.


'I think it is discriminating against Florida, and it
would be a death warrant for. economic development in
the state.'
-County Commissioner Minor Bryant


effect, CF will no longer accept
the treated water unless it is
delivered at the quality required
by the EPA.
Park Winter, director of utilhl
ties for Hardee County, esti-
mates it will cost the county $2
million to implement.
Yvonne Kimball, city manag-
er for Bowling Green, said the
city sends it treated wastewater
to Mosaic, to use at its South
Fort Meade Mine. She did not
yet know how much it would
cost to upgrade the city's treat-
ment facility.
Zolfo Springs currently dis-
poses of its treated wastewater
by spraying it over a field and
letting it soak into the ground.
It i t w'would likely be forced
into xysive improvements to
the system before spraying the
water onto the field southeast of
town.
The wastewater might even
have to be put through a reverse
osmosis system to get its quali-
ty up to the required purity.
CF's Kovach told Diana
McGee, Nelson's -regional
director, the rules do not take
into account whether the water
body was healthy to begin with.
Kovach felt if the water body
was already polluted, the prop-
erty owner should not be
responsible for cleaning up pre-
existing contaminations.
He said a watershed for a
mine is tens of thousands of
acres, and CF's ability to con-
tinue mining is threatened if the
rules take effect.
Deidra Ciriello, manager of
regulatory strategy for Mosaic,
echoed Kovach's statements.



IS MOVES
Continued From 1A
disclosure rorm, ana open aa
campaign account at a bank.
Eligibility requirements are
simple as well. Candidates must
be 18 or older, registered to vote
in the town, and a resident with-
in town limits for at least the
past six months.
Town commissioners are paid
$150 a month. Whoever is cho-
sen as mayor receives $200
monthly.
Zolfo Springs, like Wauchula
and Bowling Green, has a city-
manager form of government,
meaning the mayor has no real
duties or authority. Instead, the
mayor is more a ceremonial
position.
Because of the city-manager
:form of government, residents
do not elect a mayor anymore.
Who will serve as mayor is a
matter decided by the commis-
sioners themselves, who nomi-
rate one among them and then
vote to approve that nomina-
tion.
Neel was selected by his fel-
low commissioners since 2006.
Chosen as vice mayor was
Juan Otero, who is now serving
as interim mayor.
Whoever is elected to Neel's
vacated seat will serve his
unexpired term, until the next
General Election.
That person will join Otero,
Sara Schofield, Lois Dandridge
and Rhonda Long at the com-
mission table.


She said a water body needs to
be looked at to insure that it is
healthy before requiring it to
meet the pending requirements.
Commissioner Minor Bryant
took issue with Florida being
the only state being forced to
use these new requirements.
"I think it is discriminating
against Florida, and it would be
a death warrant for economic
development in the state," he
said.
Commissioner Dale Johnson,
speaking as a farmer, told
McGee everyone wants clean
water and this is an unnecessary
burden.
Johnson said the deep well in
his orange grove would be con-
sideretL polluted by :the .stan-,
dards, yet he is comfortable
enough with the water to regu-
larly drink it. He said with fer-
tilizer prices being so high, a
farmer doesn't want to spend a.


An increasing number of
Americans are seeing their
way clear to seeing better with
the help of technology.
Now that physicians have
been specially trained to use
technology, they are using it to
help overcome the effects of
such eye diseases as macular
degeneration, retinitis pigmen-
tosa and ocular albinism.
The Problems
Macular degeneration is
generally associated with
aging and results in damaging
sharp and central vision.
Retinitis pigmentosa is a
progressive, genetic disease
that starts with difficulty see-
ing at night, advances to tunnel
vision and could end with
complete blindness, though
not always.
Ocular albinism is an inher-
ited condition in which the
eyes lack melanin pigment,
causing various vision prob-
lems including reduced vision;
nystagmus, an involuntary
back-and-forth movement of
the eye; strabismus, which is
crossed eyes or lazy eye; and a
sensitivity to bright light.
These three vision-limiting
conditions are all inoperable,
but highly trained, low-vision
optometrists can help patients


penny more than he has to by
applying excess nutrients.
Johnson is also concerned the
new law would apply to small
ponds such as the one behind
his house, and would he be
responsible for cleaning it up to
the new standards.
"I am probably not going to
do that and you'll have to come
and get me," he told McGee.
David Royal, president of the
Hardee County Farm Bureau,
said Tuesday the requirement
would put the entire Florida
agriculture community out of
business.
He said the EPA should not
apply a single standard for the
entire state and instead should
focus on different regions
Royal said the best manage-
ment practices being impte-
mented by farmers are helping
alleviate some of the problems,
and the new requirements are
excessive. Royal estimated that,
aqr', tle.h staethe rule change
coju-cost Floridians and indus-
tries up to $20 billion to make
the necessary changes to
become compliant with the
requirements.


function visually again.
A Solution
Believing there is life after
vision loss, doctors use tele-
scopic, miniature microscopes
and prismatic glasses to help
those with vision deficiencies
perform such activities as read-
ing, writing, playing sports and
games, watching TV and, in
some cases, even driving.
Said one patient, "I used to
walk with a cane, and with
these telescope glasses, I can
walk faster and without, the
cane. I don't bump into things
anymore. I used to be able to
read only one or two words at a
time; with these glasses, I can
read several words, which helps
me read more efficiently and to
see my computer."

What You Can Do
If you or someone you care
about is struggling with vision
loss, you can learn more from
the experts at the International
Academy of Low Vision
Specialists. They can tell you
how to find the nearest
optometrist who can help you
and will arrange for you to
speak with a doctor over the
phone at no cost, to see if you
are a candidate. Call (888) 778-
2030 or visit www.IALVS.org.


Music takes us out of the actual ana whispers to us dim
secrets that startle our wonder as to who we are, and for
what, whence and whereto.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


Help For People


With Low Vision




































COURTESY PHOTO
Making the Best Better Award winners announced at the 4-H banquet on May 26 were
(front row, from left) Abby Clark, Elizabeth Weeks, Abigail Erekson, Kaylee Barberee
and Larrett Smith; (back) Ruth Erekson, Korin Reohm, Steven Crews and Morgan
Crews.


Protecting Yourself From Investment Fraud


Even well-educated and
experienced investors can find
it difficult to avoid investment
fraud."
In fact, studies show that
investment fraud victims are
typically college-educated
males, with above-average
income and financial knowl-
edge, who tend to be open to
listening to new ideas or sales
pitches and may have experi-
enced a recent health or finan-
cial setback.
In one such instance, a
licensed stockbroker named
Steve Sampler invested
$40,000 in an oil well deal. In
the end, Sampler's years of
experience in the stock market
didn't protect him from being a
victim of a scam and he lost
the entire investment. "If it can
happen to me," he said, "it can
happen to anyone."
To help combat investment
fraud, the FINRA Investor
-Education Foundation, in col-


laboration with AARP, state
securities regulators and noted
fraud experts, developed Out-
smarting Investment Fraud, a
comprehensive, research-based
program that arms investors
with the tools and knowledge
needed to recognize and pre-
vent investment fraud.
The centerpiece of the pro-
gram is an hour-long documen-
tary, "Tricks of the Trade:
Outsmarting Investment
Fraud." Utilizing both humor
and compelling stories of real-
life victims-including Sampler-
and perpetrators, the film
explores who is at risk, how
fraudsters use persuasion to
carry out their schemes and
what simple steps investors can
take to prevent costly mistakes.
"We found that a majority of
investors ages 55 to 65 do not
perceive themselves as vulnera-
ble to investment fraud, yet
many engage in investment
behaviors that put them at risk,"


according to John Gannon,
president of the FINRA Foun-
dation. "The truth is, regardless
of age or circumstance, anyone
with money, is bound to hear
from a fraudster at some point."
Gannon encourages organi-
zations and individuals working
to protect citizens from finan-
cial fraud to watch the film and
use it to engage those who are
most vulnerable to scams.
"Even if you are not at risk for
investment fraud," said
Gannon, "you probably know
someone who is and who could
benefit from seeing 'Tricks of
the Trade.'"
The film's three-part mes-
sage of risk, persuasion and pre-
vention has been shown to
reduce the incidence of fraud by
approximately 50 percent.
To order a free DVD of
"Tricks of the Trade" or for
more information on avoiding
investment fraud, visit
www.SaveAndInvest.org.


The pat on the back, the arm around the shoulder, the praise for what was done right
and the sympathetic nod for what wasn't are as much a part of golf as life itself.
-Gerald R. Ford






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4-H AWARD


August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A







4A The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011


ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Qbituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships,
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par-
ents, siblings, children and
children's spouses and
grandchildren, and the num-
Sber of great-grandchildren.
If there are no immediate
" survivors, consideration of
other relationships may be
given.




1911n EoUVing uMemoity
EDGAR FORREST
WHEELER
Edgar Forrest Wheeler, 63,
of Wauchula, died on Thurs-
day, Aug. 11,2011.
He was born April 6, 1948,
in Fayetteville, N. C. and
came to Wauchula in 1983
from Whiting, N. J. He served
in the U.S. Navy and was a
washer operator with Mosaic.
He is survived by his wife,
Faye Wheeler of Wauchula;
one son, Edward Wheeler of
Sebring; two daughters
Cheryl Chavis of Sebring and
Shannon Sparks of Hender-
sonville, N.C.; three brothers,
Ronnie Wheeler of Debary,
Robert Wheeler of Enterprise,
and Gary Wheeler of Deltona;
and nine grandchildren.
A gathering of family and
friends was held on Wednes-
day, August 17, 2011, at
Robarts Garden Chapel from
5 to 7 p.m.
Expressions of comfort may
be made-at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA





In Memory
S MILDRED G.
BALLANTYNE
Mildred G. Ballantyne, 84,
of Wauchula, lost her 13-year
battle with cancer on Wed-
nesday, Aug. 10, 2011.
Born on June 24, 1927, in
Wauchula, she was a gradu-
ate of Wauchula High School
and attended Florida State
College for Women in Tal-
lahassee. A lifelong resident
of Hardee County, Mrs.
Ballantyne was a homemaker
and a citrus grower for over
60 years. She was.a member
of the Associate Reformed
Presbyterian Church of
-Bartow.
She was preceded in death
by her husband of 59 years,
Roy 1. Ballantyne; and her
brother Ward W. Gillette, Jr.
Mrs.' Ballantyne is sur-
vived by her daughters,
Kathy Mulcay and husband
Bill, and Debbie Pyle and
husband Jim, all of Wau-
chula;: granddaughters Kelly
Lowe and husband Mike of
Lakeland, and Karen Kelly
and husband David of Eustis;
and five great-grandchildren,
Matthew, Sarah and Anna
Lowe of Lakeland, and
Katherine and J.T. Kelly of
Eustis. Additionally. she is
survived by sisters-in-law
Peggy Gillette of Wauchula
and Carlotta Sinclair of
Independence, Mo.; and
brother-in-law Jim Ballan-
tyne, also of Independence,
Mo.
Visitation was held on
Aug. 13, from 10 to 11 a.m.,
- at the Associate Reformed
Presbyterian Church of Bar-
tow, where funeral services
Were held at 11 am. with the
Rev. Darrell Arnold, Mr.
William T. Mulcay, Jr. and
Mr. David R. Kelly officiat-


COURTESY PHOTO
The Wauchula Lions Club is once again sponsoring free
vision checks at Friday Night Live just in time for back-to-
schoolers and their parents. The Friday Night Live event
is, of course, tomorrow in downtown Wauchula. Look for
the Lions in the meeting room at the Java Caf6 from 6 to
8 p.m. Dr. Mark Sevigny and his staff will be on hand to
screen both children and adults. The complete exam is
free. The Lions report that last year during this event, the
vision exam helped a woman who was at risk of losing
her job at a local fast-food restaurant because she could
not read the order monitor and also identified a young
man who potentially had a serious health issue. Photos
from lasttyear's event show (top) Sevigny Associates Eye
Care staff members and (below) Dr. Mark Sevigny assist,
ing a little one with proper placement at the exam
machine.





"-


Obituaries

EDGAR FORREST
WHEELER
Edgar Forrest Wheeler, 63,
of Wauchula, died on Thursday,
Aug. 11,2011.
Born on April 6, 1948, in
Fayetteville, N.C., he came to
Wauchula from Whiting, N.J.,
in 1983. He was a U.S. Navy
veteran and was a washer oper-
ator with Mosaic.
Survivors include wife Faye
Wheeler of Wauchula; son
Edward Wheeler of Sebring;
daughters Cheryl Chavis of
Sebring and Shannon Sparks of
Hendersonville, N.C.; brothers
Ronnie Wheeler of Debary,
Robert Wheeler of Enterprise,
and Gary Wheeler of Deltona;
and nine grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 5 to 7 p.m. at the funeral
home.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


'In Memory
KATHERINE
SULTZBACH
Katherine Sultzbach. 96.
of Zolfo Springs. died on
Wednesday, Aug. 10.2011, at
her home.
She was born Dec. 17,
1914. to Ed C. and Lela V.
Sweeny Gover in Somerset,
Ky. and had been a resident
of Zolfo Springs since 1976,
coming from Danyille, Ky.
She -was a homemaker and
past member of the Eastern
Star. She was of the Met-
hodist faith, very active in
her church and taught Sun-
day School. She enjoyed oil
painting, sewing, quilting
and spending tim, with her
family.
She was preceded in death
by her husband. James Mal-
colm Sultlzbach; son James
Edward Sultzbach; and
brother Roy Gover.
She is survived by her
children. Janet Hawn of
Danville. Ky.; Stephen Bruce
Sultzbach and wife Kerry of
Harrodsburg. Ky., and Sara
Jane Bylund of Zolfo
Springs; seven grandchil-
dren, including special
grandson Hagan Bylund; 10
great-grandchildren; and one
great-great-grandchild.
Entombment was at Lake-
view Memorial Gardens in
Avon Park
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home
Sebring


Some minds seem almost to create themselves, springing up under every disadvan-
tage and working their solitary but irresistible way through a thousand obstacles.
-Washington Irving
U M


I


Memb DIAMONDCOLLECTON
Member Bb nkftcr


The Stanford Inn
555 E. Stanford Street Bartow
Restaurant Rated 4 Star by Lakeland Ledger
Tuesday-Sunday 1 1AM-3PM tea/lunch
Sunday Brunch 11AM-2PM
Friday & Saturday 5PM-9PM dinner
For Reservations 863-533-2393


CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR

PRE-ARRANGEMENTS?


ROBARTS HAS BEEN HELPING FAMILIES FOR
OVER A CENTURY. WE ARE THE SAME
YESTERDAY, TODAY AND IN THE FUTURE.

IF YOU HAVE PRE-ARRANGEMENTS ELSEWHERE
AND HAVE CONCERNS, WE WOULD BE PLEASED
TO HELP YOU REVIEW THEM WITHOUT
OBLIGATION.

YOU CAN COUNT ON OUR EXPERIENCE AND
INTEGRITY.



















2 Dennis. oarob 2Denni koarob, II
~ President ~ ~ Vice President ~


DROBARTS

FAMILYFUNERAL HOME

A Trusted Family Name Since 1906





529 West Main Street Wauchula 863-773-9773
View Obits at robartsfh.com 8:4tfc
__ ,


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-,
courages submissions from
Hardee C'ounty schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


g


We are the only one ...


We are the only one that the owners are Licensed Funeral Directors;
we personally over see and direct your family's funeral.
We are the only one that has over 50 years experience directing and
arranging funeral services.
We are the only one with a large chapel and family room which has
seating capacity for 250. This includes stained glass, recess and tray
lighting, flat screen TV, centralized speakers with PA system and
church style pews.
We are the only one that offers FREE DVD for visitations and
services plus a variety of music for all faiths.
We are the only one that has the largest Preneed Trust in the area. Our
trust has operated for over 50 years and has passed every state audit.



POR gek-9ay-owdy

Funeral Homes
-.-" -













lyson Ponger Karnes, Edward R. Pn ger, Chapel
-












Owner/Licensed Owner/Licensed
FIunralrl ire tnr Funeral Director 8:-s18


. ing. Interment services were
conducted at the Wauchula
Cemetery at 2 p.m. Memorial
contributions may be made to
the Associate Reformed
Presbyteriah Trust, P.O. Box
1411, Bartow, FL 33831 or
Covenant. Presbyterian
Church Building Fund, 4500
Sun 'N Lakes Blvd., Sebring,
FL 33872-2113. Condol-
ences may be sent to
www.whiddenmcleanfuner-
al home.com.
Whidden-McLean
Funeral Home
Bartow


m


.... . . IUF. .. .. .. 7 .. u&'t


l







August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


L "

Q: Should I boost the iodine
in my diet to reduce risk of
thyroid cancer?
A: Iodine is essential for normal
thyroid hormone production,
but there is no evidence that
consuming iodine above ade-
quate levels would protect
against thyroid cancer. We still
have much to learn about thy-
roid cancer, but so far this does
not seem to be a cancer as much
affectedd by diet as some other
cancers. Those at increased risk
include people who received
radiation, treatment during
childhood (cancer and other
abnormalities of the thyroid
gland can occur many years
afterward), a history of goiter or
a family history of thyroid dis-


[ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Graham Crackers, Blueberry
Poptart, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Hamburger on a Bun, Salad
Tray, Baked Beans, Cherry
Juice Bar, Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Mandarin
Oranges, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Hot Dogs, Garden Peas,
Salad Tray, Yellow Cake, Ice
Cream, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Pocket,
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Macaroni & Cheese,
Burrito, Salad Tray, Pinto Beans
Grape Juice, Apple Crisp,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Cinnamon Toast,
Oatmeal, Orange Juice, Condi-
*ments and Ilk "
Lunch: Rib-B-Que oft Bun,
Deli Turkey Sandwich, Potato
Rounds, Pears, Salad Tray,
Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Stick, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Toasted Ham
& Cheese, Salad Tray, Mexican
Rice, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Super
Donut, Bagel Bars, Juice,
Condi-ments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Hamburger on a Bun, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Baked
Beans, Juice Bar, Condiments
and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Mandarin
Oranges, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Pepperoni Pizza, Hotdogs,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Garden Peas, Yellow
Cake w/Chocolate Icing, Ice
Cream Cups, Condiments and
Milk -
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Biscuit
w/Egg, Sausage & Cheese,
Diced Pears, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Burrito, Alternate
meal, Sausage Pizza, Tossed
Salad, Pinto Beans Apple Crisp,
Condiments and Milk


KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CI
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH

ease. Studies from certain coun-
tries where children were
exposed to nuclear fallout (and
were therefore at increased risk
for thyroid cancer) showed that
those children with adequate
iodine status seem to have
reduced thyroid cancer risk.
The recommended intake for
iodine is 150 mcg daily, and in
the United States average
iodine consumption ranges
from 190 to 300 micrograms
(mcg) per day. That's above the
level associated with deficien-
cy, but well below the safe
upper limit of 1100 mcg daily.
As people work on adding less
salt to their food to reduce sodi-
um consumption, iodine intake
may decrease, since iodized salt


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Oatmeal, Buttered Toast, Juice,
Condiments and Milk .
Lunch: Rib-B-Que on a Bun,
Deli Turkey Sandwich,
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Potato
Rounds, Diced Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Stick, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and 'Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Toasted Ham
& Cheese, Sausage Pizza,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Mexican Rice,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Hamburger on a Bun, Chicken
& Rice, French Fries, Turnip
Greens, Pinto Beans, Tossed
Salad, Beets, Juice Jar,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Hamburger on a Bun,
French Fries, Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Fresh Potatoes, Broccoli,
Tossed Salad, Macaroni Salad,
Juice, Yellow Cake, Ice Cream,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Rib-B-Que on
Bun, French .Fries, Potato
Rounds, Baked Beans, Pears,
Tossed Salad, Condiments and
Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon
Toast, Oatmeal, Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Beef Burrito, Whole Kernel
Corn, Mexican Rice, Tossed
Salad, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Toasted Ham & Cheese, Potato
Salad, Peas & Carrots, Tossed
Salad, Butter Cookies, Juice
Bar, Condiments and Milk


Letter To The Editor

There Are Too Many

Homeowner Restrictions


is an important source.
However, two cups of milk or
yogurt daily supply nearly the
complete recommended iodine
target; fish and enriched grain
products are also important
sources. And for those who eat
seaweed, though content varies
widely, it is the most concen-
trated source in our food supply.
Federal surveys continue to
monitor markers of iodine sta-
tus, and pregnant women are
the only ones raising concern.
The bottom line: unless you are
in a group at specific risk of
inadequate iodine consumption,
such as vegans (vegetarians
who consume no animal prod-
ucts) or pregnant women
(whose needs increase), you are
more than likely getting enough
iodine in your diet. There is no
evidence it will change your
risk of thyroid cancer and too
much iodine can cause thyroid
damage the same as getting too
little.

Q: Is it true that getting more
sleep might help me lose
weight?
A: If you are already getting
adequate sleep (seven to nine
hours a night), getting, more
sleep will probably not affect
your weight. However, if like
many people, you are currently
getting less sleep than that,
more sleep might help. Studies-
show that adults who get less
sleep (6 hours a night or less in
most studies) are about 55 per-
cent more likely to be obese.
These associations (which have
also been shown for youth)
don't show cause and effect,
however a few studies that fol-
lowed people over ten or more
years do provide some evidence
that getting less than six or
seven hours of sleep a night is
linked with greater likelihood
of weight gain. In one study,
overweight people were put on
a controlled low-calorie diet
during two weeks of spending
only five-and-a-half hours in
bed nightly. Although they lost
the same amount of weight as
when they spent eight-and-and-
half hours in bed nightly, they
lost less body fat and dropped
60 percent more lean body tis-
"sue. Results like this are prelim-
inary, but wve do know that loss
of lean body tissue makes main-
tenance of weight loss more dif-
ficult. Too little sleep may lead
to weight gain by making us too
tired to be physically active or
more likely to turn to sweets
and other foods to perk up our
energy. Additionally, spending
less time sleeping leaves more
time available for eating and
that can mean consuming more
calories than you need.
Furthermore, limited but grow-
ing research suggests that peo-
ple who get less sleep tend to
show changes in two hormones
that can lead to increased
appetite,


YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At

773-3255
mm -... _


Dear Editor:
I have been living out of the
city limits for most of my life.
Why is it anyone's concern
about what I have on my prop-
erty?
Florida has too many restric-
tions, perqgu;. codes for every-
thing. Some people do .not have
any better thing to do but be
nosey. They drive around look-
ing for something or anything
to make people's lives miser-
able.
We, as people in the United
States, are losing all our free-
doms.
We have gone to school to
learn about our freedoms. But
we are not really free. Our
rights are becoming a joke.
' Learn all you can about free-
dom, then you find out you do
not have as much as you
thought. People these days are
just trying to survive.
Government and people in
offices dictate what you can and
cannot have on your land. We
ay taxes on everything we own
nd that is still not enough. A
freedom-taught nation is slowly
trying to be a communist
nation. Dictators. They try to
dictate what people can have on
their own land.
When you purchase anything
make sure first you are
"allowed" to own it. There will


always be a third party with
their hand out for something
they did not work for. They
have to get theirs by the sweat
of others.
Greed. Money lovers. It is all
about money and power over
people's lives.
Freedom is getting to be just
a word for Americans. All our
freedoms here are slipping
through our fingers. One per-
mit, one code at a time.
There are more important
matters in our world. World'
hunger diseases that need to
find cures, are a few.
We know there are some
things in our world with the
rules and restrictions. But a per-
mit for a $25 kiddie pool? Get
real.
The world needs to stop sell-
ing things to uninformed peo-
ple. Stop selling people things
they are not "allowed" to have.
There are many pools all
around in town. Larger pools,
not enclosed or anything. Drive
around.
One day soon we will not be
allowed to have any freedoms.
Dictators. This is just the begin-
ning. Lord, Help us all.

Clearly disgusted,
Sheila Miller
Ratliff Road
Wauchula


rNutrition Wise ,


NOTICE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA
REQUESTING APPLICANTS FOR THE CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD

NOTICE IS HIREBY GIVEN THAT the City of Wauchula will be accepting applicants who
would like to serve on the City of Wauchula's Code Enforcement Board. This Board has
the authority to hold hearings, subpoena evidence, witnesses and alleged violators, take
testimony under oath, issue orders to bring a violation into compliance and assess fines
against violators of the municipal codes and ordinances. All members are appointed by
the City Commission and must be a resident of the City. The Board meets the fourth Mon-
day of each month at 5:30 pm.

All interested individuals must have a resume to the City Clerk, 126 S. 7th Avenue,
Wauchula, FL 33873 by Friday, September 2nd at 5:00 pm. All applications received by
the deadline will be presented to the City Commission at the September 12, 2011 City
Commission Meeting at 6:00 pm for their review and possible selection.

Questions may be directed to:

City of Wauchula
Olivia Minshew, Director of Community Development
225 E. Main Street, Suite 106
Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-9193 ..

ominshew@cityofwauchula.com 8:18,25c



NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, AUGUST 22, 2011
5:30 P.M.


OLD CASES:
1. 09-131-M
2. 11-043-M

NEW CASES:
1. 11-066-M
2. 11-069-M
3. 11-069-L


A Kay McClelland
David & Josephine Garza


Klaus W & Dagmar E Kunkel
Percilla Stevens
Percilla Stevens


202 S 8th Ave
901 S 8th Ave


313 Heard Bridge Road
822 S 10th Ave
822 S 10th Ave


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a ver-
batim record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
8:18c



PROCLAMATION
The Town of Zolfo Springs Election Qualifying Period for the purpose of electing one (1)
Commission Member for Seat #2. Qualifying opens August 22, 2011 at 8:00 A.M. and runs
through August 26, 2011 at 4:00 P.M. for Special Election on Monday, September 12, 2011.
This commission seat will be held until the next general election.


PROCLAMACION
El pueblo de Zolfo Springs calificaci6n perfodo electoral con el fin de elegir a un miembro
de la Comisi6n (1) para asiento # 2. Calificaci6n abre el 22 de agosto de 2011 a las 8:00
A.M. y se ejecuta a trav6s de 26 de agosto de 2011 a las 16:00 horas para la elecci6n es-
pecial el lunes, 12 de septiembre de 2011. La sede de esta Comisi6n se celebrard hasta
las pr6ximas elecciones generals.


8:18c


Editor's Note: Hardee
County requires an inspection
and permit, costing $24 up, for
pools 24 inches or deeper. The
County Building Department
has handouts available for safe-
ty barrier guidelines published
by the U.S. Consumes Product
Safety Commission. The 12-
inch high kiddie pools do not
need a permit, inspection or
barrier. The goal is to prevent
drownings of children. The
writer had purchased a blow-up
pool for her 2-year old grand-
son. The county office is at 401
West Main Street in Wauchula.



ABOUT .
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must' be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for. that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
501 WEST MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873-1729
TELEPHONE (863) 773-3241

WILLS & TRUSTS
PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
LARGE & SMALL ESTATES
HOMESTEAD DETERMINATION
DURABLE POWERS OF ATTORNEY
LIVING WILLS GUARDIANSHIPS
7 211fc


Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk


NOTICE
Registration Books will close Friday, August 26, 2011, at the Supervisor of Elections office
at 4:00PM for the General Election for the Town of Zolfo Springs, Florida, to be held on
Monday, September 12, 2011.


NOTICIA
Libros de inscripci6n se cerrar6 el viernes, 26 de agosto de 2011 en la Oficina del Super-
visor de elecciones a las 4:00 PM para las elecciones generals para la poblaci6n de Zolfn
Springs, Florida, que se celebrara el lunes, 12 de septiembre de 2011.


Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk .


What's For


I- Lunch? I


Juan C. Otero, Vice-Mayor


Juan C. Otero, Vice-Mayor








6A The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011


HHS Leads The Back-To-School Charge
. ..i1


COURTESY PHOTOS
Hardee Senior High School's faculty returned to campus one week earlier than teachers
at other schools as they joined in a series of professional development workshops. Prin-
cipal Dr. Michele Polk said 66 of 74 instructional staff members attended these early
sessions, which she described as a "great kickoff to what is going to be a great year!"
Here, sharing the fun and excitement of learning are (from left) Selden Spencer and An-
drea Carver.


Early workshops at Hardee Senior High School included Kagan Cooperative Learning,
Positive Behavior Supports and Florida's Continuous Improvement Model. Discussing
strategies here are (from left) Steve Rewis, Merilyn Strickland, Martha Shiver and Buddy
Martin.


Teachers (from left) Tracey Beckett and David Valletutti solve a math problem as they
join their colleagues around the tables in taking on the roles of "student learner" during
an Aug. 8 workshop on Kagan Cooperative' Learning.


Kagan facilitator Heather DeMao provided math problems for the "students" to solve.
Working as a team to find the answer are (from left) Kim Smith and Jan Brutus.


Passing the pen as they work together are teachers (from left) Rod Smith and Gil
Vasquez.


Teacher Michael Hill proves the workshop's success in showing instructional strategies
which get students actively engaged in learning as opposed to simply being passive lis-
teners.



Are You The Biggest Sports


Fan? Prove It At FNL!


Show off your team spirit at
this week's Friday Night Live
in downtown Wauchula!
The monthly event hosted
by Main Street Wauchula Inc.
hits the downtown streets from
6 to 9 p.m. The theme for this
month's action is "Back-To-
School Tailgate Party."
The night will include as
much school spirit as you can
pack into one event!
It will also feature a contest
to help find The Biggest Sports
Fan! Is it you'?
Contestants can demon-
strate their spirit for any sports
teams they wish. There are no
rules. Contestants are only
limited by their imaginations.
This contest is open to all
ages, but only one person can
be The Biggest Sports Fan.
That one winner will receive
The Spirit Stick, 25 Down-
town Dollars and, of course,


bragging rights! The contest
will be held at 7:45 p.m., and
contestants should check in at
the Main Street Wauchula
Information Tent no later than
7:30.
As always, this month's FNL
event is jammed-packed with
fun, and it is the perfect way to
end the summer!
Inflatables and games are
Friday Night Live traditions,
but this month there will also be
a dunk tank brought to you by
the Hardee Athletic Foun-
dation. The foundation will also
have a booth for you to pick up
your reserved Hardee Wildcat
Football sea's and tickets. The
Hardee High Athletic Depart-
ment will also be on hand sell-
ing season tickets for all high
school sports.
Stop by the Mosaic booth for
a variety of orange and blue
goodies and prizes including a


Cats Spirit Tailgate Package.
Enjoy live entertainment by
Galaxy and get into the Wildcat
,spirit with demonstrations by
cheerleaders from youth sports,
the junior high, and senior high
junior varsity and varsity.
And a new addition this year
will be a performance by the
Hardee High School Band!
Get ready for school with a
free eye screenings sponsored
by the Lion's Club in partner-
ship with Dr. Mark Sevigny's
office. Eye screenings will be
available from 6 to 8 in the Java
Cafd meeting room and are
open to adults as well. [
You can also stop in the vari-
ety of downtown businesses for
school supplies and attire, and
bring your appetite because
downtown restaurants will be
open late for your convenience.
Business sponsor this month
is Mosaic.


There is little doubt about the excitement the workshops instilled as (from left) teachers
Idania English and Rachel Thompson celebrate their success in mastering the subject
at hand. School principal Dr. Michele Polk said teachers later evaluated the workshop
we6k, giving it "highly positive" reviews.


So the years hang like old clothes, forgotten in the wardrobe of our minds. Did I wear
that? Who was I then?
-Brian Moor









August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


It's W-e-1-c-o-m-e B-a-c-k At ZSE!


PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Fourth-grade teachers (from left) Sheena Hays and Nicole Moreau are cutting out sher-
iff's stars and horses as they prepare a Western theme for this classroom.
I MrONWb'


Kindergarten teachers perch on tiny chairs as they plan and schedule. Their new year
starts with new vocabulary and science studies, a data wall, sharp new crayons and col-
lections of stickers of apples and buses. Seated at the kid-size table are (from left) Jes-
sica Banda, Tamara Hendry, Debbie Floyd and Sandy Shivers; missing is Sherry
Thompson.


Veteran first-grade teacher Sharon Ussery works with the interactive Promethean board
in her classroom as she eagerly readies for the return of students.


Custodians (from left) Socorro DeLoera andNadcy Coronado work with smiles on their
I faces as they spruce up each room for the new year.


CLOSDMONDAY

902 Hwy17 S 0 AUCUA o7323 o 8


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.



The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting:
Consider SWFWMD business
and administrative matters
including executive director
Interviews. Some Board mem-
bers may participate in the
meeting via communications
media technology.
DATE/TIME: Monday, August 29,
2011; 2:00 p.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Ser-
vice Office, 7601 US Highway 301
North, Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1
(800) 423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0164)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
AnyQne requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us 8:18c


Music teacher Cathy DeLaney (right) stops by the com-
puter lab to pick up her laptop from tutor Judy Southwell.


Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate









SA The Herald-Advocate, August 18,2011



Jimmy Carter, 86, Still Teaches Sunday School


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Jimmy Carter, 86, of Plains,
Ga., was the 39th president of
the United States. His bad-luck
term was from 1976 to 1980.
Since returning to his home-
town after being defeated by
Ronald Reagan, Carter has es-
tablished a legacy of helping the
poor, promoting peace, monitor-
ing elections in foreign coun-
tries, and offering hope.
A Democrat, Carter teaches
Sunday School on a regular
basis at Maranatha Baptist
'Church. He grew up attending
Plains Baptist Church. His wife
Rosalynn Smith Carter also
grew up in Plains and was a
Methodist. They joined Mara-
natha Baptist Church in 1981.
The church was built in 1979
following a split at Plains Bap-
tist.
His boyhood house and farm
and his school, Plains High
School, today are open to the
public for free and operated by
the Department of Interior's Na-
tional Park Service.
Carter's father Earl operated a
farm and a supply store. They
grew several crops including
cotton and peanuts and also a
large garden. They had live-
stock, a blacksmith shop, made
their own sugar cane syrup,
killed hogs in the winter for their
smokehouse, and did many
*other chores that came with rural
farm life in Georgia in the mid-
1900s. A typical farm had a milk
cow or two for fresh milk and
home-churned butter.
Two white families and about
10 black families lived in the
area. Most of Carter's boyhood
friends were black. Carter liked
to fish and hunt as a boy. There
was even a Carter Worm Farm
in Plains.
His father taught him to repair
and make farming implements
in the blacksmith shop on the
farm. Carter later learned to be-
come a good craftsman with'
wood.
He made the wooden cross in-
side the church sanctuary, along
with some pieces of furniture
and four wooden collection
plates which are still used today.
He takes his turn at doing yard
work at the church and is called
when minor repairs are needed.
Carter has helped build many
Habitat For Humanity homes.
The couple live in the first
home they ever owned. Upon
their death they will be buried in
front of the home overlooking a
peaceful pond. At that time their
home will become part of the
National Park System and open
to the public for free tours.
Carter was an officer in the U.
S. Navy when his father died of
colon cancer at age 59. He de-
cided to move back to Plains to
run the agricultural business
against his wife's wishes. The
first year they lived in subsi-
dized housing on an income of
less than $300.
At Plains High School his
principal and seventh grade
teacher Julia Coleman encour-
aged the students with sayings
such as-
"Students, always do your
best. Someday one of you may
grow up to become President."
"We must adjust to changing
times and still hold to unchang-
ing principles."
"Music is the language of the
world."
."The child who plants a seed
and watches it blossom in
beauty gains knowledge."
"Booksare treasure chests of
knowledge."
Carter was in line to be vale-
dictorian until skipping school
one day with some friends, tak-
ing the train to nearby Americus
and posting their exploits in a
small ad in the newspaperthere.
As a boy Carter would take"
boiled peanuts to downtown
Plains on some Saturdays and
sell them for a nickel a bag.
After moving back to Plains
after his father's death he be-
came active in local politics. He
was on the Planning Board and
appointed to the School Board.
He was elected to the Georgia
State Senate in 1962 and ran for
e governor in 1966. He was
elected governor in 1970 and
e


COURTESY PHOTO
From left are Jim Kelly, former President Jimmy Carter, Rosalynn Carter and Jean
Kelly.


Jimmy Carter teaching Sunday School in Plains, Ga., on
July 31.


opened the state doors to blacks.
Carter is known for his com-
passion and unbending personal
moral code.
He ran for and was elected
U.S. President in 1976, defeat-
ing incumbent Gerald Ford who
was criticized for granting a
presidential pardon to former
President Richard Nixon over
the Watergate issue.
The Carter Center was opened
in 1982 in Atlanta to wage
peace, fight disease and build
hope.
Carter has written 25 books.
There were some tough eco-
nomic times during part of
Carter's presidency. The end of
his term was marked by 52
Americans being held hostage
from the American embassy in
Iran. Carter tried repeatedly to
negotiate their release by forces
under Ayatollah Khomeini, who
was opposed to the Shah of Iran
supported by the Carter Admin-
istration.
The embassy was seized by
Iranian students and revolution-
aries four days after the Shah
was allowed to come to America
to receive cancer treatment. The
hostage crisis lasted 444 days,
and they were released within
hours of Reagan taking office as
America's 40th President.
Carter and his wife appear to
be in good health. His right knee
was replaced in June and his left
knee replaced in early August of
this year. They have three sons
and a daughter.
On July 24 Maranatha Baptist
had attendance of 154 visitors
and 25 members. When Carter is
at church everyone must be
checked for weapons by a group
of Secret Service officers. He
teaches Sunday School in the
sanctuary. Years ago visitors
would number 600 to 800 a
week. Many were turned away.
On July 31 Carter taught
about God's justice from Isaiah
42:1-9.
He said, "Our country is in a
fiscal crisis."
Carter noted there was a crisis
in Norway recently when a gun-
man killed 77 people. The gun-
man condemned Muslim
immigrants.
Carter said it seems like the
U.S. needs an enemy to hate,
whether blacks, Japs or in the
last few years illegal aliens. "Im-
migrants have come here for 200
years. They do what Americans
do not want to do, like stoop
labor. They pick grapes, toma-
toes, oranges, sugar cane, and
other crops. A child born in the
U.S. becomes an American citi-
zen."
Plains has 630 residents and
85 Hispanics.
He said Georgia recently
passed a strict immigration law
and farmers had trouble getting
labor. Georgia tried using pris-
oners for farm work and that
lasted less than a week, he
noted.
Carter said the immigration
issue and living above our
means are afflictions facing
America.
"When I left office our na-
tional debt was less than $1 tril-
lion." Carter said the national
debt doubled under Reagan,
went up $1.5 trillion under


George W.H. Bush, increased
$1.4 trillion under Bill Clinton,
jumped $6.5 trillion under
George W. Bush, and has gone
up $2.5 trillion under Barack
Obama.
The national debt is now
$14.3 trillion, with interest of
$3.5 billion a day or $2 million
a minute, said Carter. The aver-
age American family's share of
the debt is $656,000. Why? "In
the last 30 years we have spent
more than our revenue, spending
a dollar for every 60 cents in
revenue. We are involved in
three costly wars.
"Our country is well able to
have a balanced budget. We
need more revenue."
Carter said in the Old Testa-
ment God displayed wrath and
condoned war. "He sent Jesus to
know the true character of God.
Justice makes people obey the
law by a series of punishments.
The law applies equally to all,
but it is not that way in the U.S.
Wealthy white Americans rarely
get executed."
Carter said not many whites
are in prison for cocaine use
compared to blacks. "In the eyes
of God everyone is equal."
He said Jesus was concerned
about healing the sick, forgive-
ness of sin, caring for the poor,
welcoming visitors, treating
everyone equally, and visiting
those in prison. The wages of sin
is death. "Christ took the punish-
ment for our sins. We accept that
through faith."
Carter said he has visited over
130 countries.
"Our country has gone down-
hill in the last 10 to 12 years.
Americans are more prejudiced
and more greedy to accept ben-
efits of government without pay-
ing taxes."
Carter said many politicians
are elected by promising no
more taxes. General Electric
paid no taxes last year despite
profits of billions.
"We need to eliminate tax
loopholes. A rich person can buy
a jet for half-price. "God's jus-
tice is to reach out to the poor,
the needy and the sick. Jesus
Christ stands for love, grace,
compassion, forgiveness. He
was a servant."
Carter said the U.S. will
weather this financial crisis.
Carter said, "I get full Social
Security benefits. Medicare pays
toward my knee surgery. I make
a lot of money selling books."
Carter said the White House
had no plan for overcoming the
financial crisis.
Carter said the U.S. has the
highest prison population per
1,000 residents than any other
country, seven times higher than
Europe. The system is geared to-
ward punishment, not rehabilita-
tion. In California it costs twice
as much annually to be in prison
than to go to college.
He said immigrations policy
should allow the people to be-
come a U.S. citizens if they live
here seven years, obey the laws
and pay a fine such as $5,000.
Carter said the current finan-
cial crisis in America can result
in positive changes on immigra-
tion policy, the rich paying more
taxes, political compromise,
pressure against military adven-
turism, more caution in the fu-
ture over unnecessary wars, and
reduction in the American prison
population.
Christians can show God's
justice by avoiding animosity,
prejudice and hate and display-
ing virtues of helping others,
compassion, being humble,
peace, service, forgiveness and
love.
Jimmy Carter ... a Georgia
farmer who rose to become a
two-term governor, one-term
U.S. President and long-term
Christian leader and worldwide
humanitarian.


Plains High School is now a welcome center and museum honoring Jimmy Carter's
boyhood education.

Hardee District Schools

Announces its policy for Free and Reduced-Price Meals for students under the

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND BREAKFAST PROGRAMS

Any interested person may review a copy of the policy by contacting

George Kelly, 1009 N. 6th Avenue Wauchula, FL 33873 Phone 863-773-9058

Household size and income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. An application can
not be approved unless it contains complete eligibility information. Once approved, meal
benefits are good for an entire year. You need not notify the organization of changes in in-
come and household size.

Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To
apply for Free or Reduced-Price Meals, households,must complete the application and re-
turn it to the school. Additional copies are available at the principal's office in each school.
The information provided on the application will be used for the purpose of determining el-
igibility and may be verified at any time during the school year. Applications may be sub-
mitted at any time during the year.

Households that receive SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) or TANF
(Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) are required to list on the application only the
child's name, SNAP / TANF case nujnber, and signature of adult household member.

Foster children will receive benefits (i.e., free, reduced-price, or paid) based on the child's
personal income regardless of the income of the household.

Households with children who are considered migrants, homeless, or runaway should con-
tact the district liaison Sherri Albritton at 863-767-0662..

For the purpose of determining household size, deployed service members are considered
a part of the household. Families should include the names of the deployed service mem-
bers on their application. Report only that portion of the deployed service member's income
made available to them or on their behalf to the family. Additionally, a housing allowance
that is part of the Military Housing Privatization Initiative is not to be included as income.

All other households must provide the following information listed on the application:

Total household income listed by gross amount received, type of income (e.g., wages,
child support, etc.) and how often the income is received by each household member;
Names of all household members check the "no income" box if applicable; if household
member is a child, list school name for each;
Signature of an adult household member certifying the information provided is correct;
and
Social security number of the adult signing the application or the word "NONE" for this
household member if he or she does not have a social security number.

If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school
should be contacted. Children of parents or guardians who become unemployed should
also contact the school.

Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced-Price meal policy

The Director of Food Service

will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with
the ruling of the official, he or she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining
official on an informal basis. If the parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he or she may
make a request either orally or in writing to

David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schocls.
1009 N. 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 863-773-9058

Unless indicated otherwise on the application, the information on the Free and Reduced-
Price Meal application may be used by the school system in determining eligibility for other
educational programs.

To determine annual income:
If you receive the income every week, multiply the total gross income by 52.
If you receive the income every two weeks, multiply the total gross income by 26.
If you receive the income twice a month, multiply the total gross income by 24.
If you receive the income monthly, multiply the total gross income by 12.

Rerfiember: The total income before taxes, social security, health benefits, union dues, or
other deductions must be reported.

"In accordance with Federal law, and US Department of Agriculture policy, this institution
is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or
disability. To file a complaint of discrimination write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights,
1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410,or call (800) 795-3272
(voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer."
8:18c


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255









PAGE ONE


Choate Earns Special Recognition


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Firkescue Chief
Michael ChoaWhas joined a
worldwide elite group.
At the Commission on Pro-
fessional Credentialing meeting
on July 18, Choate became one
of 814 Chief Fire Officers
,worldwide, 59 of them in the
United Kingdom (Great Britain
and its provinces), to be award-"
ed this designation.
A press release from the
Center for Public Safety Excel-
lence headquartered in Chan-
tilly, Va., about 20 miles west of
Washington, D. C., notes "The
designation is among the most
prestigious honors available
today for fire service leaders.
Chief Choate has a rich knowl-
edge of the emergency services
profession and has far sur-
passed the critical core compe-
tencies for personnel in senior
fire officer positions."
The center, a non-profit or-
ganization for more than a
decade, was established to help
local public service agencies
around the world streamline
and improve the services they
provide their communities.
Through its commissions, it
provides a host of programs for
accreditation for fire and emer-
gency agencies and profession-
al designation for senior-level
fire and emergency service offi-
cers, such as chief fire officer,
chief medical officer, fire mar-
shal, fire officers such as battal-
ion chief, engineers, fire ward
chiefs, deputy fire chief, fire
commissioner and others.
To become eligible for the
three-year "CFO designation,
applicants have to show excel-
lence in 20 areas of knowledge
and skills, as well as education,
community involvement, pro-
fessional contributions and
career development.
Choate began. his 21-year
career at the bottom, as a volun-
teer firefighter in 1990-91, fol-
lowing in the footsteps of his
father, James "Corky" Choate,
wro was in the Wauchula Fire
Department for many years.
He became a firefighter/-
emergency medical technician.
Obtaining an associate's degree
and then a bachelor's in fire sci-
ence, he moved to firefighter/-
paramedic from 1992-1996. He
continued training to obtain
state certification as a fire offi-


COURTESY PHOTO
Fire Chief Michael Choate keeps his gear handy, ready to
answer calls with his staff as often as his schedule will
allow.
cer, fire safety inspector, arson around the state have received
investigator and journeyman some form of designation for
firefighter, earning him promo- their excellence. The long list
tion to lieutenant, where he includes municipal, county and
served from 1996 to 2000. district departments, from
He was deputy fire chief from Pensacola to Fort Lauderdale .
2000 to 2002, when he became The closest is the US Air Force
Fire-Rescue chief. In 2004, the staff at the Avon Park Bombing
responsibility of public safety Range and it includes the
director was added to his duties. Kennedy Space Center, those
During this time, Chief from Florida serving in Iraq and
Choate also broadened his serv- Afghanistan, and large and
ice, first on the board of direc- small departments.
tors for the Florida Fire Chief's Designations of Excellence
Association, headquartered in have been awarded in the U.S.
Ormond Beach. He was select- from the state of Alaska to
ed by his peers to be the Arizona, from New Hampshire
Southwest Regional Director to Florida and everywhere in
over nine counties, a position he between. There have been those
still holds. in Saudi Arabia ani other over-
He is a member of the EMS seas locations as well.
and Fire Science Advisory Reached Tuesday for com-
Committee for both South ment, Choate said he "felt
Florida Community College proud and humbled. It's a big
and Southwest Florida College, recognition in fire service. I'm
which offer a variety of fire- pleased it's behind -me. It',
fighting certification courses. nearly a two-year process. The
A lifelong resident of the evaluations are strenuous, peer
county, he also serves as a dea- review from experts all over the
con and active member of nation. They look at everything.
Northside Baptist Church and If you don't meet their require-
has coached a variety of youth ments, they deny you. I'm glad
sports for his four sons. it's over."
Many of his co-leaders


CPR Classes
Set Monthly
South Florida Community
College is offering the four-
hour cardio-pulmonary re-
suscitation (CPR) and first
aid classes at both the
Hardee and Avon Park cam-
puses for five months. There
is a cost of $30 for each
class.
Classes are set at different
times, Aug. 18 and Nov. 16
from 1 to 5 p.m., Sept. 24
from 8 a.m. to noon, Oct. 20
from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. and
Dec. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
For more information, or to
sign up for one of these
classes, call Lorrie Key at
863-784-7033 or email
CorporateTraining @ south-
florida.edu.

Job Fairs Held
On Saturday
A job fair is held each
Saturday morning from 10
a.m. to noon at Lydia's
House Thrift .Store, 102
Carlton St., Wauchula. Re-
freshments and information
on job opportunities part-
time, day labor and full-time
will be given.
Anyone with a job opening,
or wanting a job, can stop by
or can contact Lydia's House
at 863-773-0877.

HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


Repair/Replace Free To

Save On Utility Bills


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Over $400,000 is available
for Hardee County residents
who need to repair or replace
insulation, appliances, air con-
ditioning and water heaters.
Some of that money is also
available for local contractors
and sub-contractors in air corm
ditioning or plumbing as well as
electricians.
The $407,036.70 must be
spent by February for Hardee
County homeowners or tenants
who have to pay their own util-
ities.
Weather caulking, new win-
dows and doors and other ener-
gy-efficient work may also be
done through local contractors





THURSDAY, AUG. 18
VHardee County Com-
mission, monthly evening
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.

THURSDAY, AUG. 25
WHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


approved by Centro Cam-
pesino, which was allotted the
money for this program.
There are income guidelines,
beginning at $21,780 for a one-
person household, to $29,420
for a family of two and on up,
adding $7,640 for each addi-
tional family member. Utility
bills, proof of income and resi-
dency and other information
will be needed to apply.
Contractors and sub-contrac-
tors have to provide proof of
insurance and licensing.
For information, go to web-
site www.centrocampesino.org
or contact Mayra Rodriguez at
305-245-7738 Ext, 236 or
Barbara Spence at 863-233-
6322.

Lightning is three times hot-
ter than the sun.

Congratulations. I knew the
record would stand until it
was broken.
-Yogi Berra

Danger breeds best on too
much confidence.
-Pierre Corneille

It is all right to hold a con-
versation but you should let
go of it now and then.
-Richard Armour


Fort Meade, Florida
GIREENWOO 205 N. Charleston
CHEVROLET Oldsmoblle. (863) 773-2530
Fort Meade, Florida 2 8 3
205 N. Charleston Ave. Fort Meade (863) 285-8131

Im..mw lin ~JI Unaimn 3 n.. Rw


Making a decision to have a child-it's momentous. It is to decide forever to have your
heart go walking around outside your body.
-Elizabeth Stone

Youth fades; love droops, the leaves of friendship fall/A mother's secret hope outlives
them all.
-Oliver Wendell Holmes






FALL LEAGUES WILL BE STARTING SOON TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL SPOTS AVAILABLE


DAY


LEAGUE


TIME


Monday Monday Night Mens 7:00 PM. Starts August 22
5 Man Teams
Early Birds Ladies 9:00 A.M. Starts August 23
Tuesday 4 Ladies on a Team
Guys & Dolls Mixed League 7:00 PM. Starts August 23
4 Person Teams

Wednesday Wed. Night Mens 7:30 PM. Starts August 24
4 Man Teams

Thursday Nite Owls Ladies League 6:30 RM. Starts August 25
5 Ladies on a Team _
TGIF League Mixed League
Friday TGIF League Mixed League 7:30 PM. Starts August 26
4 Person Teams
Juniors Ages 6-11, 12 & Up
Saturday Registration August 27 12 NOON Starts Sept. 10
11 am


I


MW I






Bowl-Of-Fun Laneo

Call Joan at 773-6391for more info
943 2outh 6th Ave Wauchula. FL 33873


NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500
EXT CAB
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
TIIt/Cruise,CD
Stk.#B1 060
$22,995

NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
IMPALA LS
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B299
$21,995


2006 FORD
EXPEDITION
EDDIE BAUER
Leather, 3rd Seat, Dual Air,
PW/PL, Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B1626B
$17,995
2007 CHEVROLET
TRAIL BLAZER
LT 4X4
Leather, Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Stk.#B1424A
$17,995

2005 CHEVROLET
TAHOE LT
4X4
*V8, Auto, Diesel, Air, Leather,
PW/PL, Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#B1729A
$15,995


NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500
REG CAB
Auto, Air, Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#B1316
$19,995

NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
CRUZE LS
Auto, Air, PW/PL,CD

Stk.#B316
$17,995


2009 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500
CREW CAB LT
V8, Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B297A
$24,995
2009 TOYOTA
CAMRY SE
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#B320A
$16,995

2009 FORD
ESCAPE XLT
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#9188A
$18,995


NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
COLORADO
REG CAB
Auto, Air, Tilt/Cruise,
CD,
Stk.#B1199
$16,995

NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
MALIBU LS
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B318

$19,995


2008 GMC
ACADIA
Auto, Dual Air, PW/PL
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B1652A
$23,995
2003 CHEVROLET
AVALANCHE Z66
Leather, V8, Auto,
Air, PW/PL,Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#B220A
$13,995


MIDFLORIO
Financing Available at
Greenwood Chevrolet


*All rebates and incentives assigned to dealer. APR Is W.A.C. for up to 60 months. All prices are plus tax, tag and $24.90 dealer fee.
Our selection of trucks, prices and customer service makes It worth the drive to Bob EllIott's Greenwood Chevrolett


The Herald-Advocate
(LISP5 A 7us.T2t1

Thursday, August 18,2011


'Tanning Special
S,,Buy 1 Month &
SGet 2 Weeks FREE!!!I
Endes 1 31/11
Priscella (863) 285-6300 Alien Johnson |
Owner/Stylist 302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL Barber/Stylst 8


LOVER 10101UERi DCARS AND:TRUCKS oCHOOE FRO!I]m


[ ^] s-F^flB 4W-







2B The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011




Hardee


Living


Dr. Elisa C. Robinson

Completes Residency


COURTESY PHOTOS
The Englishes today.
Toye & Juanita English

Mark 70th Anniversary
Toye and Juanita English ness duties. Toye is an avid
were married in Plant City on golfer and still enjoys playing
Aug. 17, 1941. They have three in the early morning hours.
children: Linda, Dana, and The couple are active mem-
James. They also have five bers of the First Baptist Church
grandchildren and six great of Wauchula.
grandchildren.
The Englishes have resided
in Wauchula for 31 years. They
moved here from Tampa when
Toye purchased the local
Chevrolet dealership.
Juanita is a previous member
of the Wauchula Woman's Club
and served that organization for
approximately 25 years. She is
also a member of the Florida
Hospital Auxiliary, and re-
ceived an award for serving as a
volunteer for 15,000 hours.
Toye has been actively
involved in many civic organi- The couple on their wed-
zations in addition to his busi- ding day in 1941.
One man practicing sportsmanship is far better than 50
preaching it.
-Knute Rockne









OCTOBER 7, 2011
Kathryn Pace & Daniel Barnett
OCTOBER 15, 2011
Savannah Locklar & James (Bubby) Chancey
Rebecca St. Romain & MichaelAdams

OCTOBER 22, 2011
Bobbi Barker & Jonathan Pleger

NOVEMBER 5, 2011
Jessica Webb & Ian Durrance
DECEMBER 10, 20,11
Dara Johnson & Andrew Judah


Dr. Elisa C. Robinson has
graduated from Virtua Hospital
System of Marlton, N.J,, after
three years of residency.
Robinson received training
in podiatric medicine and sur-
gery at the four hospitals, two
clinics, and surgery centers of
the Virtua Hospital System.
This past year, she was given
-the responsibility of chief resi-
dent, in which she preformed
the duties of the administrative
scheduling for the other podi-
atric residents while maintain-
ing both her own surgery sched-
ule and training regimen as a
third-year resident.
Dr. Elisa Robinson has been
hired at Reconstructive Ortho-
pedics in Lumberton, N.J., and
started working on Aug. 1.
Robinson graduated from
Hardee Senior High School in
1999 and was the salutatorian


Dr. Robinson
of the class.
She is the daughter of
William and Mae Robinson of
Wauchula. Her brother, Dr.
William Robinson III, lives in
Nashville, Tenn., with his wife,
Yolonda Brooks Robinson.
Robinson said she will
always be grateful to her mater-
nal grandmother, Elizabeth S.
Matthews of Wauchula, for her
encouragement and support.


On The Agenda


HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular
evening session today (Thursday) beginning at 6 p.m. in Room
102, Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The
following is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-Citizen discussion on frivolous complaints, 6:05 p.m.
-Industrial Development Authority grant application for
Hardee Lakes Park, 6:20 p.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


COURTESY PHOTO
KeAnna
Outley Grandchild Named
Junior Teen Cover Girl


KeAnna Whisenhunt,
granddaughter of Willie and
Bessie Outley of Wauchula,
reigns as the 2011 National
American Miss "Texas Junior
Teen Cover Girl."
The daughter of Kevin and
JoAnne Whisenhunt, KeAnna
won the pageant at the
InterContinental Hotel in
Houston on June 27. She
received a crown, banner and
trophy, and the right to com-
pete in the national pageant
which will be held in Ana-
heim, Calif., in November.
In addition to the Cover Girl
crown, KeAnna also was
named state ambassador and
received the Spirit of America
Award.
The National American
Miss pageants are dedicated to
celebrating America and
One day, in retrospect, the
you as the most beautiful.


encouraging its future leaders.
Emphasis is placed on learning
new skills, gaining self-confi-
dence, and setting and achiev-
ing personal goals.
Each year, it awards $1.5
million in cash, prizes and
scholarships to assist the devel-
opment of young women
nationwide.
KeAnna keeps busy as an
actress, spokesmodel, pianist,
and as Miss Photogenic.
As a participant in the
upcoming national pageant,
KeAnna also has earned the
opportunity to win a new 2011
Ford Mustang convertible,
cash, scholarships and prizes to
further her education and
development.
Sponsoring her pageant
efforts are the Outleys, her fam-
ily members and friends.
years of struggle will strike


The cadets of

Air Force

Junior ROTC

Unit FL-20055,

Hardee Senior High School,
want to thank

CF Industries, Inc.

for their outstanding
support, sponsorship, and
generous donation.
soc8:18c


S OPEN SATURDAY
AUGUST 20th 10am-2pm
SFor Last Minute Shopping

* * BACK-To-SCHOOL SPECIAL * *


I FREE


~6'~

'S


YOUR HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL YOUR WILDCAT m
T-SHIRTS POLOS JEWELRY BAGS
219 E. Main Street Wauchula 863-773-0452 byjove-69@hotmail.com
REGULAR HOURS: MON-FRI 9,.--6p?,,


NOW OPEN SATMRDAYS
*



BOARDING AVAILAiBL




Modern Poyvinyl Cages Outside Time In Secure Area

CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 773-6783
soc8:4-25p


Gifts Since 1970
' 117 East Main St. Wauchula -
(863) 773-6565
www.catsonmain.com


soc818c.,


7,eT5





August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
RLRNJrYDiscount
Factory Rebate
FMCC Rebate


s20,700
- 904
- 1,500
- 500


RLRN JfY PRICE
17, 796


s1w11350f


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Automatic, Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
RLRHNJODiscount
Factory Rebate
Trade-In


$27,000
- 2,149
- 2,500
- 500


LaN N PRICE
$21,851




Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Trailer Tow, 3rd Row Seating, Dual A/C, Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


6WLW


1031


Tilt, Cruise, CD, Automatic, My Key,
Trailer Tow, Limited Slip Axle
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
M.S.R.P s25,005 STUWBoM,
Factory Rebate -2,000 ::.-
FM.C.C. Rebate 1,000 -346
Trade-In Rebate 500











Factole Rebate 2,000
5mL rY PRICE
20,159




Tilt, Cruise, Automatic, Trailer Tow
Skid Plates, Limited Slip Axle
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
M.S.R.P s29,335 ".T-k,%D4290
RLRNiRYDiscout 2,080 ,,.---
Factory Rebate 2,000. A.
F.M.C.C. Rebate 1,000
Trade-In Rebate 500
RLRmNJRYPRICE
$23,755 .




Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, Automatic,
Trailer Tow, Electric Shift on the Fly
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
RLRNH JY Discount
Factory Rebate
F.M.C.C. Rebate
Trade-In Rebate


JaYr


'46,550
- 4,820
- 2,500
- 1,000
- 1,000


LRNJIRY PRICE
$37,230


U.S. HIGHWAY 17 N., Wauchula


* (863) 31 4-5370


S.a l Hou s: oF im .. Sat o


6OLRi ]rY.coM


S H ous M on-riClos S aS t


M.S.R.P
RLRoffYirDiscount
Factory Rebate


LRN JrY PRICE


279


$33,


Ooc' T Soes EBept




SaeTHUADSo'veyBetmlln ewFrd'nStc'


Z,-----


'39,060
- 2,781
- 3,000







4B The Hlerald-Advocate, August 18, 2011





The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Lale@quqlescomputerservices,com


Phone (863) 781-9720
www.GuQlesComputerServices.com


Classifieds-


DURAND-WAYLAND Citrus
sprayer, 500 gal. S.S. tank, good
condition. 863-773-6710 after 6
pm. 8:18p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


2001 GMC 4 x 4 Jimmy SLE 4 dr.,
clean, new tires, new brakes,
freshly serviced & inspected.
Runs good, looks good. $4,500
OBO. 863-448-6263. 8:18p
91 TRACKER 4 X 4, 5-speed, A/C,
$1,688 cash, 781-1062. 8:18c
2001 RANGER, $2,850 cash, firm,
781-1062. 8:18c


DESoro COUNTY




OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com _
1-941-778-7980/7565 2


Hill's Auto World


ZoLFo SPRiNes


735-0188

SBUY HERE!
PAY HEREE'


mn |I NO NoINTEREST Brand
FINANCE. CHARGES




Mon. Wed. 10am- 6pm; Fri. & Sat. 10.m-7pm/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HWY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS ,.m in


FLORIDA
INSUL


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ould have -a
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L_ _--------------------

Let The Experts Take Care Of You!!!
eResidential & Commercial Batt& Blown Fiberglass Insulation
Insulation Removal Acoustical Ceilings
Wire & Wood Ventilated Shelving (Provided by Cope Closets Concepts)
FREE ESTIMATES 863-402-2210
4441 US HWY 27 SOUTH, SEBRING


Highlands County License #HC0239


* JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/1 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED to $179,500!
REDUCEDI)!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town.
Cute house with nice landscaping. NOW $79,500!
18 acres. House & Grove. Close in approxi-
mately 1,850 sf of living. Nice screened porch. 3
Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of grove, mostly ear-
lies. 6" deep well. microjet & diesel power unit.
Only $295,000
2 acres zoned Commercial. Desoto County,
Highway 31. Subdivided. High and Dry. Double
paved road frontage. $89,900
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000


8ll I 1,) Ic


Jim See


Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000
Spacious home located in Briarwood Subdivi-
sion. 3 Bedroom, 2 V Bath house with wrap
around porch, detached 2 car garage with office
and full bath. $379,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 V.
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000


Realtor Associates
Robert Jones (863)781-1423 Calvin Bates (863)381-2242 |J
.i2 John H. Gross (863)273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161
Rick Knight (863)781-1396 cl8 18c


2005 DODGE CARAVAN $4,850,
781-1062. 8:18c
2000 FORD RANGER, work truck,
$1,500, rebuilt motor, 863-781-
9221. 8:18p
91 CADILLAC DEVILLE, white,
runs good, no A/C, $1,200. 863-
589-2303. 8:4-9:1p
CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767, 863-401-5085. 3:3tfc


DRIVERS-TEAMS: $6,000 Team
sign-on bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprises! Call
now for details, 1-888-567-4856.
8:18-9:8p
TEACHERS with FCCPC creden-
tials needed at local children's
learning center. Salary Is nego-
tiable depending on previous
work experience. Apply In person
Monday-Friday, 7:00 am 5:30
pm, 815 East Main Street,
Wauchula, FL. 8:11,18c
LEAD ROOFER, metal shingles
and single ply systems, for small
busy company. Salary based on
experience. Call for interview
(863) 285-7381. 7:28-8:25p




Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from. Home Depot
863-382-0600


LICENSED SECURITY Officer
wanted for part time (24 hours)
vacancy in Ft. Green area. Must
be able to pass background and
drug test. Please call 239-542-
1113 for more information and
application. 8:18p
BUSY MEDICAL office. Please fax
resume to Sevigny & Associates,
863-773-6458. 8:18,25c


4 BR 1 1/2 B at 409 Palmetto St.,
Bowling Green, 773-6667. 8:18c
3/1 CB HOME 1500 sq. ft., new
A/C, 1 acre, 3 miles out of town.
Lots more. 863-767-9055 not after
9:00 pm. $89,000. 8:11-9:8p
THREE BEDROOM/two bath, dou-
ble wide on ten fenced acres,
garage, CBS storage building,
$95,000. 863-735-1801 or 863-
448-2877. 7:21-8:18p


FOUND: Black & white Jack
Russell puppy found near west
Louisiana St., Wauchula, 863-245-
3972. 8:1nc
LOST: Angus bull, Vandolah area,
call 773-6424 or 832-1594.
8:18,25p


EXTRA NICE Bo-flex exercise
machine $500, paid $3,200, 773-
4726. 8:18p
HEADACHE RACK & DOT Lights
for escort service, 863-773-6710.
8:18p
18' LOWES flat bottom boat with
25 hp Mercury 4 stroke $4500
OBO. Hot tub $400 OBO. Kabota
Diesel lawn tractor 44" cut $550.
Cockatiel with cage $35. 735-
0094. 8:11,18p


PERSONAL PROPERTY of
Russell Sanchez and Gloria
Alvarado will be sold pursuant to
warehouseman's lien. Said sale
will be at 115 SR 66, Zolfo Springs
Storage at 9 am on August 20th,
2011 and at 114 Carlton Street,
Wauchula Storage on the back-
side on August 20th, 2011 at 9:30
am. 8:11,18c


ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires'that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


PLANT CITY HOUSING LLC













Located Rt. 60 & 39 PLANT CITY

BUT DEFINITELY WORTH THE DRIVE!

813-650-8100 6


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


ONLY $7,500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC fenced, 4
inch well, great location for home, farming,
multi-business. Ask for Nancy!!
$65.000. 2 Bedroom/1Bath home sits on 2.4
acres located between Wauchula and Avon
Park. Central heat & air, Private well, utility
shed, shingle roof, hardwood flooring, much
more.
150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, home or both. $6.000
Per Acre Negotiable!!
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multifamily-Single Family Homes.
$75.000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Brick home outside city
limits, central heat & air, one car carport, wall
to wall carpet, large oaks, outbuildings and
alarm system. Only $175.000
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath CB home. Great
Investment opportunity ata great price. Qnly
.$35,000
Commercial Lot, corner of Main St. and Hwy
64 East, Priced (aD $59,000 for 1.28 acreage.
Retirement Community! 1 Bedroom 2 bath
M/H including lot. Call today for more
information. Only $53.000.
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www. cbhardee. com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


Knollwood Circle!! Beautiful 3 Bedroom / 2
Bath CB home with Central heat / air, two car
garage, close to schools, on a cul-de-sac.
Priced (a) $189,000
PRICED TO SELL!! 3 Bd / 2 Bth CB home
w/double lot, central heat and air, one car
garage, hardwood / carpet flooring,
$110.000
MUST SEE TO BELIEVE!! If your family
enjoys the outdoors, you must see this
unique listing that brings outdoor living to
you. Features 6 outbuildings includes 2,000
SF. Barn w/23ft ceilings, work shop, storm
room, outdoor kitchen w/stainless steel fix-
tures, fire pit, potting shed, large gazebo
overlooks pond-well stocked w/fish,
includes aerator, outbuildings w/pens and
fenced. Also 14 x 60 MH sealed in rough cut
pine, front and back porches. Trees and
maintained lawn. MUCH MORE, Call Nancy
for Aopt. Priced at $175,000
2BR / 2Bth Home with extra lot, Central
heat/air, one car garage, citrus trees, work-
shop, storage. $65.000 Call Nancy for more
information.
Adults/Over 55 Only! Very well maintained
Mobile Home in Avion Palms Resort. Only
$75,000
BOWLING GREEN!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home nice corner lot with total sq. ft. 1,292.
Only $38.000 ci8:18c


S600 West College Drive
L (863) 784-7132- FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
SOUTH FLORIDA www.southflorida.edu/hr
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
NURSING INSTRUCTOR
Full-time, 11-month, tenure-track faculty position to teach
Nursing and related courses. Immediate opening. Master's
degree in Nursing required. A minimum of two years'
experience in clinical practice as a registered nurse and current
Florida RN licensure (or eligibility) required. Teaching and
Maternal Child Health experience strongly preferred. Some out
of district travel to clinical sites required. Competitive salary plus
a comprehensive benefits package, including retirement,
health/life insurance, and vacation/sick leave. Open until filled.
Please visit our website for more information.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cl8:11,18c


---I


ADD MOR


INSULATION T

YOUR ATTc TODAY


m


Inc.







August 18,2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


The


Classifieds-


BEAGLES for sale, 2 months,'
H/C. Call after 5:00 pm, 832-1059.
8:18p
DOGS large and young ones.
Cats that are fixed. $15 for adop-
tions. All Creatures Animal
Hospital, 773-9215. 8:18c
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773L3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


WHOLESALE PLANT SALE-All 3
gal pots $4.50-1 gal pots $2.50.
Plumbago, Crape Myrtle, Lig-
ustrum, Texas Sage, Thryallis,
Viburnum, Jasmine and more.
Trees-Bottle Brush, Rain & Crape-
Myrtle $10 or 3 for $25. Center
Hill Nursery, 2949 Center Hill
Road, between Wauchula and
Bowling Green, off SR62, 4.5
miles west US 17. 863-223-5561.
8:4-9:1 p



4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location in
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
for Information. 4:28tfc


ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh
2/1 DUPLEX, 318 S. 11th Ave.
$500 first & last, 245-6304. 8:18p
LARGE 3 BR, 2 BATH house
Riverview subdivision $1,000 plus
deposit, 773-4740. 8:11-9:8p
2 BR, 1 BATH upstairs apartment,
$750 monthly, $300 security. No
pets. No smoking. 863-773-6255.
8:11,18c
APARTMENTS 2 bedrooms and
up starting at $425. 863-773-0123.
8:4-9:1p
TWO BEDROOM, one bath apart-
ment $450 plus deposit, 832-
1984. 7:28-8:25p
THREE BEDROOM, two bath,
$800 plus deposit, no pets, 832-
1984. 7:28-8:25p
APT. and HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 8:18c
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-491.0 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441

30 DaY


IRRIIAIV


J I MMP. ]


TRIA(SAVSSWM A


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAOL

I Huv lere! HgDicutNo lnter't
Pa, Here! IFinance Charge
S. Sh










RealtorC
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER ...


310 Court St. m

Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
John D. Freeman
www.floresrealty.net (863) 781-4084

Reduced Listing


Wauchula 3BA/IBA CB home outside the city limits of
Wauchula, central air & heat, fresh paint inside, and laminate W
wood floors. Priced to sell at $49,900










Commercial Building CB office building in Wauchula right
on Hwy 17 across for the Hess Station 3500 Sqft under air -
paved parking lot 3 large offices 1 conference room 4
smaller offices & 4 bathrooms kitchenett central air and
heat For sale or leasing, call for details.


I -


Country Living 3BR/2BA CB home on 5 +/- acres Large
Barn with high entry door and ceilings Central air 8( Heat -
Hurricane shutters Large generator to service home in
extended power outages Large 41x14 screened lanai -
Completely fenced with access from two roads.
Priced to sell at $185,000
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
] Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours "*
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl8:18c


4/2 $700 monthly, $500 deposit,
refurbished. Hickory Court, Zolfo.
Available 9-1. 382-2699. 8:18,25p
3/2 HOME Ft. Green, $700 month-
ly and deposit. Available 9-1, 781-
4371. 8:18-9:15p
S---

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
920 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc


THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc


CAREIVER T wicare -for your
loved one, dilpendable, home
assistance, 4,.. or evening, 863-
773-0421. 8:18p
IN HOME CHILDCARE in my
home, close to schools, limited
space, CPR certified, 863-448-
3182. 8:11,18p
4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256-
749, 863-214-1471. 7:21-9:29p


We spend our time searching for security and hate it
when we get it.

























SUPER MATTr-


Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 lbs. Washers


SPECIAL ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDA Y

6AM-6PM 50% OFF

NORMAL/NORMALENTE SPECIAL/ESPECIAL


$250 DOUBLE/DOBLE
$400 MAX/MAXI
'6 LARGE/GRANDE
$700 SUPER/GRANDE


s125
$2oo
$300
$350


HwY 17 South Across from Nicholas Restaurant


OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillesple) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders Is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh


NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-.
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
RIDGE AREA ARC Thrift Store
Labor Day Sale. 1010 S. 6th Ave,
Wauchula. 50% off everything In
the Store, Saturday, 9am-3pm &
Tuesday 9am-5pm. 8:18,25c
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-2. 311
Turner Ave., Wauchula. 8:18,25p
ESTATE SALE
Friday, Saturday, 8-4. 729 Catfish
Creek Rd., Lake Placid. Lifetime
Hardee County resident sold
Lake Placid Homel Antiques, fur-
niture and morel Oak, glass,
porcelain, rugs, Florida Gator
items, household misc., and
more. See pics & complete list on
estatesales.net or call for info
863-464-0912 or 386-0300. 8:18c
SATURDAY 7-? Multi-family,
across CVS. Home decor, kids
clothes, toys, tools, Christmas
things. 8:18p


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
SATURDAY, 1289 Kelly Court
(behind Tropicana Motel).
Furniture, kids & adult clothes,
TVs, small appliances, household
Items. 8:18p
SEVERAL COUCHES, dresser
with mirror, bathroom cabinets,
other items. Monday thru
Thursday 9-4, Friday 9-6. 111
North 7th Ave., Wauchula. 8:18c
SATURDAY, 8 am, 3066 James
Cowart Rd., Wauchula. Kids,
clothes, books, disassembled
mini motorcycle, tools, lots of
misc. 8:18p
SATURDAY, 8-3. Furniture, kids
clothes, house goods, lots of
misc. 2206 Greenleaf Rd., at dead
end, Zolfo Springs. 8:18p
SATURDAY, 8-? 2136 Ralph Smith
RPd. Clothes, lots of misc. 8:18p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 408 North 8th
Ave. Teen clothes, too much to
mention. 8:18p
SATURDAY, 8-?, 537 Boyd Cowart
Rd.. Dining table with four chairs,
gun cabinet, queen bed, set of
new ATV tires, household, cloth-
Ing, misc. 8:18p

In 1939, Frank W. Cyr, a
professor at Columbia
University's Teachers Col-
lege, organized a national
conference on student
transportation. It resulted
in the adoption of stan-
dards for the nation's
school buses, including
the shade of yellow.


STHE PALMS ^'

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through August 31s"
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management S'taff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
1i3 (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 /.
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c8:4 25c/







Joe LTavlS
6i ?oo Dyn-5-


I NC.,


John O'Neal


R E A L T 0 R'S
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED TO
$74,000! Charming and priced
to sell! 2BR/1BA 1060 SF home
w/lots of updates: new A/C,
insulation, carpeting, wiring.
Den can be 3rd BR.
PRICE REDUCED! 5 lots in
Wauchula w/over 975' total rd
frontage. Close to hospital,
schools & shopping. Will divide
or all for $75,000!
10 ac w/paved rd frontage.
Great for pasture, farming or
homesite. $63,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 2BR/1.5BA
in Charlie Creek Estates on
large corner lot, 2 sheds,
screened porch. Now priced at
$24,900!
25+ ac fenced pasture,
Greenbelt qualified, on US Hwy
17 S w/well, septic & electric.
$192,900!
12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!
10 acs cleared land on paved
rd w/4" well in western Hardee
Co. $65,000!


CB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new flooring, cabinets,
countertops, being sold as is.
$65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 40 acs
farmland, 8" well, paved rd
frontage, near Wauchula.
$320,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
home on 4 lots w/beautiful oaks,
fenced in backyard. Close to
schools. NOW $60,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Looking
for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
septic!
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
traffic...Hello, peace & quiet!
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. $130,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45.900!


REAI.TOR ASSQC T&lS AFIER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS........781-0153 SANDY LARRISON.... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL............781-7633 MONICA REAS.............781-0888
DAVID ROYAL ...........781-3490
S HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 cl8:18o


Located at
699 Baker St., Wauchula


Carol's Realty
1534 Yancy St., Port Charlotte, FL 33952

Call lames Collie for appointment

(941) 627-2769

(863) 412-8932
{:1r 2816l






6B The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011




The


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
N 773-4478



F. ree Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience


Scott Hall
Project Manager
(863) 399-9781
SOUTHLAND CONSTRUCTION P.O. Box 1176
Ft. Meade, FL 33841
Ditch Cleaning Citrus Tree Removal
Land Clearing Pond Clearing
Pond Excavation cl8:4-25p


S
i


New Tires Include
Free Mount & Balance|
Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SHALE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
VISA '- Blly Ayers
cl6:16tfc Tire Technician


Lijot tS Htowse Thrwf Store
QUALITY MERCHANDISE
"- IONfIei NSi [0PFW1 M I4AU M


Mon.- Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street


9leaven en t Cleaning Yervice
By Sherry White Ministries
.]iai -i.i i -Sit" B 'ii lii n-( r.


773-0523 *


773-0877


30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only










Saturday August 20 10 AM
Inspection August 20 9-10 AM
52 Buses, 1 Truck
S50% DAY OF SALE
CASH/CASHIERS CHECK
HARROW'S AUCTIONS
AB500 (813) 621-0045
Call for Brochure
Visit website at www.pcsb.org
under Links
Saturay e ugus 20 910 A


Classifieds
I


fL X'


(863) 381-3523.
CARS, TRUCKS, RVs, SEMIs & BOATS s
OPEN (7) DAYS A WEEK
We Are Mobile We Come To You!


ROBBY & SHERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR. SERVICES & SOLUTIONS




(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 ?
robbie@ strato.net


TREES UNLIMITED
Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured
Experienced Tree Surgery
Aerial Bucket Trucks Wood Chipper
Stump Grinder Front End Loader
Dump Truck Land Clearing
Pond Digging Excavation
Environmentally Responsible 863-781-7027
Storm Damage & Emergency Specialists Randy Garland
c18:18tfc



LONEs TAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.
CUSTOM I()MES 'IE STEEL BUILDING
REMODELING CONCRETE


iiitii?"^~~-- -'" ^iii
GILLIARD
FILL DIRT INC.
Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
c,8:2ntc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Kemen's Auto Parts, Inc.
306 N. 6" Ave
Wauchula, FL 33873
Counterperson wanted. Please apply in
person. No information by phone. High
school diploma or GED preferred. C
Drug free workplace. Must pass drug test.
I I0


Pigs' can cover a mile in
about seven and a half min-
utes when running at top
speed.
Baby robins eat 14 feet.of
earthworms every day!


GREAT OPPORTUNITIES
for OWNER OPERATORS!
At FFE Transportation Services,
we offer recession proof refrigerated
freight, great pay, loads & miles!
- $2500 Lease Incentives Limited Time!
- Dedicated Operating Team to Support
Your Business
$.93- $1.30 per mile + FSC
"Are you interested in owning your own truck?
Ask about our exciting NEW Drive to Own program.
,DrivetoOwn
Call 855-780-8006
Orapply atwwwwdriveffecom 6


L AMBER TR
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Great location for this 3B/2Bth, 3100 sq. ft.
home; large eat-in kitchen, laundry, master
suite; 1+ acre lot, fruit trees and oaks. $120,000
NICE CURB APPEAL 3B/2Bth, updated
master suite, large kitchen and laundry; land-
scaped lawn with sprinkler system; convenient
location. $115,000
Updated C/B home, 3B/1.5Bth, almost new A/C
and roof. List Price $115,000
3B/2B, C/B home, ceramic tile and carpet
floors, large eat- in kitchen, spacious bedrooms,
located in family neighborhood. $115,000
9 acres located on corner of two high volume
traffic areas; perfect commercial building site
or home. $100,000
SERVICE YOU
DORIS S. LAMBERT, (G.R.I., Broker


That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly. It
is dearness only which gives everything its value.
-Thomas Paine


Callt*I toay for yoeur sT.po
781106ii


Azalea Apartments
2,3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)


OPPORTUNITY


Monday Friday
9:00 AM. 12:00 Noon
Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider


cl8:4-25c


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tio'nal word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


"No job's too big."

YORTIE*4."'"> TE-


TERRY


MIKE


* I / Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
SGas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461


Bus, (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net


C


Aen Lambert
Build a house or place a mobile home on this 2.5
acre tract in western Hardee County. Acreage
is fenced on three sides and has a small shed.
$30,000
PRICE REDUCED! 26252 acres with road
frontage, large pines, 100 acres cleared. $3000
per acre
3.4 acre corner lot; nice secluded property that
has native trees. $6,000
16+ acres approx. 1.5 miles from post office and
2005, 1200 sq. ft., 3B/2Bth M/H; four 2" wells
and one 4" well, surrounded by large oaks,
ponds, trails and campsite. $145,000
Large eat-in kitchen in this 3B/2Bth, C/B home
located in family neighborhood. $119,000
AN COUNT ON [R
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


M) LOIS JOHINSON 773-9743 CHARIAOTTI TI'ERRI: 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lic.e 291103-615
863-773-4779
"QLJALITY WORK AT IAN AFIlORDAIH1.1 PRIK( "
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE


COMPUTER REPAIR


~w!~aE


"0 Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardec County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
448-2561 Payment Plans Also Available 773-0518
computerrepairbygarryphillips.com ci8:18,25p


cl8 18c


4% -.OF


Buy Here


* Pay Here


3 1








August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


County Starts Workshops With Fire-Rescue


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
is the first ,to come under
scrutiny.
At its planning session last
Friday, Hardee County Com-
missioners said several topics
needed in-depth discussion
and decided to set a schedule
for its monthly workshops for
the rest of 2011.
After long back-and-forth
with the commission and
members of the audience, the
commission finally settled on
the topic of the Fire-Rescue
department as first up, at its
Sept. 9 meeting.
Commissioner Grady John-
son, who was late to the meet-
ing, alleged that the appointed
citizens fire committee had not
been allowed to meet without
interference from either the
county manager or fire chief.
Committee chairman Jay
Clark, any other members of
the committee, will be invited
to the workshop, which begins
at 8:30 a.m.
Johnson said the major con-
cern about Fire-Rescue is esca-
lating costs. "Overtime is as-
tronomical. It was 7,000 hours
a couple of years ago. The
totals blow me away. For me,
it's the fire service that is the
number one priority, one on
which there is constant ham-
mering. We need to look at it.
We could have a good or better
service."
Commission Chairman


U
ii i1 1 l4ie ra lv-Av d[v Ilgte


Terry Atchley said there needed
to be no accusations or innuen-
do, only facts discussed in the
workshops.
Commissioner Minor Bry-
ant said the fire and the rescue
staff are so connected they can't
be separated and need to be
handled and looked at together.
The 90-minute meeting
began with Atchley saying the
commission needed to set its
workshops through March, per-
haps alternating them morning
and evening so more could
attend. Friday evening, work-
shops are out because of foot-
ball, Friday night live and other
activities. Commissioner Sue
Birge suggested Thursdays as
she had committee meetings
and church on Mondays,
Tuesday and Wednesdays.
The commission talked
about possible workshop topics;
land development codes, coun-
ty policy and personnel, code
enforcement, the landfill, main-
tenance, roads, etc.
Bryant said a big need was
for the commission to develop
written policies that would give
the county manager more spe-
cific direction. There needs to
be an appeal process other than
the county manager as he is
most often involved in the
employee or other decision-
making process.
Bryant gave a for instance.
When workers are cleaning
ditches and a .nearby grower
wants that dirt to fill in low
places, it could be less expen-


sive than hauling it away and
waiting for a truck to come
back for more. He said he real-
ized it could possibly be a prob-
lem because of items thrown in
the ditches by motorists, but he
felt it could be worked out to
benefit both the county and
growers.
Commissioner Dale Bryant
said instead of workshops,
some items could be put on the
regular meeting agendas, morn-
ing or evening meetings, to
advertise and let the public have
some input.
Sweetwater resident Nancy
Craft said it was important to be
proactive and she thought the
commission as well as residents
needed to be educated on some
topics. "Bring in outside people
to educate yourself and the pub-
lic. Start brainstorming things,
like Pioneer Park Days, how it
could be improved," said Craft.
"There are many needs in the
county not being addressed,"
Craft continued. For instance,
in one of the largest housing
areas in the county, Wauchula
Hills, there is not a place for a
child to play. "It's a. shame they
can't use the school play-
grounds. Someone could donate
land for a park."
Bryant responded, "Society
is partly responsible for that.
You let kids play at the school
and things get destroyed. In
Magnolia Manor, the park used
to be torn up regularly until
someone in the community
stepped up to take responsibili-


ty for it."
Atchley said one of the hard-
est parts was to get the commu-
nity involved. Dale Johnson
said he is beginning to see a
change with the streaming of
the commission meetings.
"There were over 700 hits the
first time. Once people see it,
they will be more interested and
provide more information and
questions."
While all agreed that educa-
tion was the key to getting the
public to understand issues,
they also agreed that the bottom
line was the commission need-
ed to make decisions on a lot of
pending 'issues, instead of
tabling them for another meet-
ing or workshop.
Grady Johnson spoke again
the need for volunteers to assist
the local fire department and
cited instances of six fire sta-
tions in Highlands County
which are run by volunteers.
"If we compare our budget to
theirs, it's a lot less. Instead of
fear-mongering, let's take a
serious look at the possibilities.
"I've had numerous conver-
sations with Chief Choate and I
had a hard time last week just
trying to get two pieces of paper
(copies of the fire budget) It
turned out to be a hassle."
Atchley reminded everyone
that it "was an emotional issue
and we are tasked to handle it in
the best interest of the commu-
nity and put some closure to
this issue."



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


The Top 10 Reasons To

Love Hydrangeas


There's nothing wrong with
the old-fashioned "snowball"
hydrangeas at grandma's
house. But today's hydrangeas
have gotten a makeover, offer-
ing homeowners more choices
than ever before. Count down
the top 10 reasons to plant
them in your landscape.
10. One for any climate.
Panicle hydrangeas (Hydran-
gea paniculata) are the tough-
est, surviving even a Min-
nesota winter. The flowers
form in a large cone shape
(called a panic(e) and prefer
full sun.
Smooth hydrangeas (Hy-
drangea arborescens) are the
second hardiest, growing well
in cool climates. Flowers form
in a snowball shape. The best-
known variety, "Annabelle,"
was discovered growing -near
Anna, Illinois. It prefers partial
shade.
Oakleaf hydrangeas (Hy-
drangea quercifolia), native to
the southeast United States,
grow in partial shade, showing
off attractive shaggy bark,
large panicles and oakleaf-
shape leaves that sport bur-
gundy or red fall color. Grow a
dwarf variety if you have a
small yard. Oakleaves tolerate
drier conditions than other
types.
Mophead hydrangeas (Hy-
drangea macrophylla) display
the showiest flower heads and
grow best with morning sun,
afternoon shade and plenty of
moisture. These are the ones
people think of when they hear
the word "hydrangea."
9. Rebloomers. The
Forever & Ever(r) series of
hydrangeas (all mopheads)
promises continuous blooms.
Technically, they're "remon-
tant," which simply means
they bloom on new and old
wood. Add a controlled-
release, balanced (10-10-10)
fertilizer to the soil in spring
for a bloom boost. Since new
stems grow throughout the
summer, keep spent flowers
clipped to promote new flow-
ers.
8. Beautiful bouquets.
Wait until the flower heads


become slightly dry before cut-
ting hydrangeas for bouquets.
For fresh bouquets, make an
angled cut and place' stems into
water laced with a floral preser-
vative. Air-dry hydrangeas by
hanging them upside down or
just arrange them without water
in a large vase.
7. Foliage. The star attrac-
tions on some hydrangea vari-
eties are their colorful leaves,
such as chartreuse-yellow
"Lemon Daddy" or variegated
green-and-white First Editions
Light-O-Day.
4. Pink or blue. Hydrangeas
come in an impressive array of
shades including pure white,
chartreuse green, blues, purples
and pinks. A mophead hy-
drangea turns blue only if
there's aluminum present, found
naturally in acidic soils. If your
soil is alkaline, add aluminum
sulfate to turn blooms blue or
just enjoy the pink color.
5. Bicolor or double petals.
The cute Forever & Ever(r)
Peppermint looks like someone
took a brush and painted a
stripe down the center of each
petal. Forever & Ever(r) Double
Pink produces twice the number
of petals on each tiny flower.
4. Lacecaps. Take a mop-
head hydrangea, flatten its top
and you've got a showy lacecap.
Forever & Ever(r) Summer
Lace is the newest of the
reblooming lacecaps on the
market.
3. Monsters or dwarfs.
Want soccer ball-sized flowers?
Check out Incrediball, a smooth
hydrangea variety. Want a small
potted hydrangea for your
patio? Many of the mopheads
grow less than three feet tall,
well suited for a large container.
2. Sun or shade. Hydrangeas
need some sun to bloom well,
but they don't want to bake in
the afternoon; place mopheads
in partial shade or a spot where
they get afternoon shade. If
you've only got full sun, grow
panicle hydrangeas. The farther
north. you live, the more sun the
plants need to bloom profusely.
And the No. 1 reason to love
hydrangeas?
1. All of the above!


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8B The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011


Money may kindle but it cannot by itself and for very
long, burn.
l-Igor Stravinsky


Notice of Sheriff's Sale
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution
issued in the Circuit Court in and for Highlands County,
Florida on the 6th day of June 2011, in the cause wherein
Hicks Oil Co., Inc., is the Plaintiff and Mario Wilson, indi-
vidually and M & E Trucking, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability
Company, and 2 Brothers Ag Services, Inc. are Defen-
dants, being case number 09-263 GCS in said court, I,
Arnold Lanier, as Sheriff of Hardee County, Florida, have
levied upon all the right, title and interest of the above De-
fendants, Mario Wilson, individually and 2 Brothers Ag
Services, Inc., to-wit:
1999 Ford Truck F550
Vin: 1 FDAF56SOXEE36865
and
2006 Ford Truck F350
Vin: 1 FTWW33P26ED55623
and on September 27, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. or as soon there-
after 'as circumstances permit, I will offer for sale, all of the
Defendant's right, title and interest in the above described
personal property at public outcry and sell the same, sub-
ject to ALL prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any,
to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND, plus
Florida State Sales Tax, if applicable. The monies received
through the levy and sale will be paid as prescribed by Fla.
Stat. 56.27. The sale will be held at the main entrance of
the Hardee County Sheriff's Office located at 900 E. Sum-
mit St., Wauchula, Florida. The above-described property
may be viewed at Cliff's Wrecker Service located at 1071
Highway 17 N, Wauchula, Florida, Monday-Friday from
8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this proceeding shall contact the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office, 863-773-0304 ext.(208) not
later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Telephone
(904) 257-6097, 1-800-955-8771 (+TDD) or 1-800-955-
8770(v), via Florida Relay Service..
Dated August 15, 2011
Arnold Lanier, As Sheriff
of Hardee County, Florida
By: Sgt. Barbara Finneram
Deputy Sheriff
8:18-9:8c


1--. ILight One Candle
7e <_.. By Gerald M. Costello
The Christophers


FROM UNEMPLOYED TO EMPLOYED BY GOD
Suppose you're a single person with a college background,
holding down an up-and-coming human resources job with a well-
known discount retailer, approaching the mid-life phase of your
life, and suddenly the firm goes out of business.
The bottom has dropped out of everything. You've lost your
job, and you're coming to an age maybe you're there already -
where it's not that easy to find a new one. What do you do?
If you're Mary Sause, you turn to your parish priest.
And for poor people all over northern New Jersey, that proved
to be just the right move to make.
Before she died earlier this year at the much-too-young age of
59, Mary Sause had helped hundreds of families get over rough
spots in their lives all because she had come to one in her own.
I read about Sause in a story by Jay Levin, who learned from
her brother, Frank, that the human resources position was a natural
for her. She never met a person she didn't want to help, Frank
Sause said. And so she turned first to her parish, telling Father
Hilary Milton that she'd like to volunteer as a youth minister.
Before long Father Milton had offered her a full-time job, and
that's when Mary Sause's new career really took off.
"Mary had a wonderful way about her," Father Milton told
Levin. "She had this glowing smile and sunny disposition, and a
deep interest in people and their needs."
She put that interest to work right away, organizing youth trips,
driving seniors here and there, serving as the parish secretary. Soon
she was helping out at another parish, not far away. In time, she
became the pastoral associate the point person in the community.
There, if possible, her performance became even more passionate.
"Sause took charge of the Discipleship Team, which trains
teenagers to pass on their faith to others," Levin said. "She called
on the ill. She drove the elderly to medical appointments. And in
her signature accomplishment, she overhauled the food pantry."
Sause not only moved the pantry to a larger and more conven-
ient location; she computerized its operations and allied the pantry
with other community groups. Where once it had served 25 fami-
.lies a month, it now fed 130 families. Even more received special
packages at Christmas.
"Mary was wonderful with people and was able to organize a
group of volunteers who give their life to this pantry," said Michele


Palladino of St. Joseph's parish. "I never met a pastoral associate
like her. She worked with teenagers as easily as she worked with
90-year-olds. It didn't matter who you were; she knew how to con-
nect with you."
The end came quickly for Mary Sause; she was diagnosed with
an aggressive form of cancer and died in April. A promising busi-
ness career had ended just as abruptly a few years before, but after
it did she found a new life directly helping others.
Soon after she died, her brother answered the phTone at her
home. An older woman was calling to tell Mary she had some
clothing for her to pick up and deliver to those who needed it. Told
that Mary had passed away, she cried, and when she did so the
caller was far from alone.
Hundreds of other people shared her tears.
For a free copy of "Working Through A Tough Economy," write:
The Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-
mail: mail@christophers.org.















YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


CONCURRENT NOTICE
NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS

Date: August 18, 2011
Name of Responsible Entity: City of Bowling Green
Address: 104 East Main Street
Bowling Green, FL 33834-0608
Telephone Number: (863) 375-2255

These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities
to be undertaken by the City of Bowling Green.

REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS
On or about September 10, 2011, the City of Bowling Green will submit a request to the
Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) for the release of Community Development
Block Grant funds under Title I of the Housing and Community Development (HCD) Act of
1974, as amended, to undertake a project to make the following improvements:

ACTIVITY(IES):
Service Area #1 Jones Street/Mason Dixon Ave/Church Ave Water Line Replace-
ment Service Area:
03J Water Line Replacement
The replacement of approximately one thousand nine hundred and thirty linear feet
(1,930') of water line along Jones Street with new 12" PVC waterline and approxi-
mately one hundred and seventy five linear feet (175') of water line crossings along
Jones Street with new 8" PVC waterline. The water line is being replaced along
Jones Street between First Street, on the west and Church Avenue, on the east.
The replacement of approximately five hundred and ten linear feet (510') of water
line along Mason Dixon Avenue. The existing water line will be replaced with new
10" PVC waterline. The water line is being replaced along Mason Dixon Avenue be-
tween Jones Street, on the north and Main Street, on the south.
The replacement of approximately one thousand six hundred linear feet (1,600') of
water line along Church Street. The existing water line will be replaced with new'8"
PVC waterline. The water line is being replaced along Church Street between Grape
Street on the north and Main Street on the south.
Service Area #1 is bound on the north by Grape Street, on the south by Main Street, on
the east by the rear property lines of the homes located on the east side of Church Avenue
and on the west by First Street.
Service Area #2 Pleasant Way Water Line Replacement Service Area:
03J Water Line Replacement The replacement of approximately six hundred and thirty
linear feet (630') of water line located along Pleasant Way with new PVC water line. The
existing undersized water line is being replaced with new 6" PVC waterline. The water line
is being replaced along Pleasant Way between Dixiana Drive on the east and the Pleasant
Way cul-de-sac on the west. Water line replacement to include hydrants as required.
Service area #2 is bound on the north by rear property line of the homes located on the
north side of Pleasant Way, on the south by the rear property line of the homes located on
the south side of Pleasant Way, on the east by Dixiana Drive and on the west by the Pleas-
ant Way cul-de-sac.
Service Area #3 Mvrick Avenue Water Line Reglacement Service Area:
03J Water Line Replacement Disconnecting the homes located .on the east side of
Myrick Avenue from the old galvanized 2" line running in the city right of way and the in-
stallation of approximately two hundred and seventy linear feet (270') of water laterals un-
derneath Myrick Avenue with new PE water line to include reconnecting the existing water
meters) at each residence on the east side of Myrick Avenue to the 6" line with laterals.
Service Area #3 is bound on the north by Orange Street, on the south by Mitchell Street,
on the east by rear property line of the homes located on the east side of Myrick Avenue
and on the west by the front property line of the homes located on the west side of Myrick
Avenue.
Service Area #4 Grape Street Water Line Replacement Service Area:
03J Water Line Replacement Disconnecting the existing homes located on the south
side of Grape Street from the existing rear 2" galvanized water line and connecting them
to the 6" water main located in the City right of way on the north side of Grape Street. The
installation of approximately four hundred and twenty linear feet (420') of water laterals un-
derneath Grape Street with new PE water line; reconnects to include new meters, meter
boxes and lines to the residence.
Service Area #4 is bound on the north by front property line of the homes located on the
north side of Grape Street, on the south by the rear property line of the homes located on
the south side of Grape Street, on the east by Mason Dixon Avenue on the west by Dixiana
Drive.
Service Area #5 Poplar Avenue Water Line Replacement Service Area:
03J Water Line Replacement Disconnecting the existing homes located on the east
side of Poplar Avenue from the existing 2" galvanized water line running along the rear
property line of the property and connecting them to the 6" water main located in the City
right of way on the west side of Poplar Avenue. ,The installation of approximately four hun-
dred and sixty five linear feet (465') of water laterals underneath Poplar Street with new PE
water line and reconnecting the existing meters) at each residence on the east side of
Poplar AVenue to the 6" line with laterals.
Service Area #5 is bound on the north by County Line Road, on the south by Grape Street,
on the east by rear property line of the homes located on the east side of Poplar Avenue
and on the west by the front property line of the homes located on the west side of Poplar
Avenue.
Unmet Needs:
Service Area #6 Palmetto Street Water Line Replacement Service Area (Unmet

03J Water Line Replacement Replacement of approximately one thousand four hundred
and ten linear feet (1,410') of water line located along Palmetto Street with new PVC water /
line. The existing undersized water line is being replaced with new 6" PVC waterline. The
water line is being replaced along Palmetto Street between Mason Dixon Avenue on the


east and Dixiana Drive on the west.
Service Area #6 is bound on the north by rear property line of the homes located.on the
north side of Palmetto Street, on the south by the rear property line of the homes located
on the south side of Palmetto Street, on the east by Mason Dixon Avenue and on the west
by Dixiana Drive.
Service Area #7 Lynn Street Water Line Replacement Service Area (Unmet Need):
03J Water Line Replacement Replacement of approximately five hundred and eighty
linear feet (580') of water line located along Lynn Street with new PVC water line. The ex-
isting undersized water line is being replaced with new 6" PVC waterline. The water line is
being replaced along Lynn Street between Mason Dixon Avenue on the east and First
Street on the west.
Service Area #7 is bound on the north by the rear property line of the homes located on
the north side of Lynn Street, on the south by the rear property line of the homes located
on the south side of Lynn Street, on the east by Mason Dixon Avenue and on the west by
First Street.
Service Area #8 Brvan Avenue Water Line Replacement Service Area (Unmet Need):
03J Water Line Replacement Replacement of approximately one thousand three hun-
dred and fifty linear feet (1,350') of water line located along Bryan Avenue with new PVC
water line. The existing undersized water line is being replaced with new 6" PVC waterline.
The water line is being replaced along Bryan Avenue between Grape Street on the north
and Jones Street on the south.
Service Area #8 is bound on the north by Grape Street, on the south by Jones Street, on
the east by rear property line of the homes located on the east side of Bryan Avenue and
on the west by the rear property line of the homes located on the west side of Bryan Av-
enue.
Service Area #9 Starke Avenue Water Line Replacement Service Area (Unmet
Need):
03J Water Line Replacement Replacement of approximately five hundred and thirty lin-
ear feet (530') of water line located along Starke Avenue with new PVC water line. The ex-
isting undersized water line is being replaced with new 6" PVC waterline. The water line is
being replaced along Starke Avenue between Jones Street on the north and Main Street
on the south.
Service Area #9 is bound on the north by Jones Street, on the south by Main Street, on
the east by rear property line of the homes located on the east side of Starke Avenue and
on the west by the rear property line of the homes located on the west side of Starke Av-
enue.
Service Area #10 East Central Avenue Water Line Replacement Service Area (Unmet
Need).:
03J Water Line Replacement Replacement of approximately six hundred linear feet
(600') of water line located along East Central Avenue with new PVC water line. The exist-
ing undersized water line is being replaced with new 6" PVC waterline. The water line is
being replaced along East Central Avenue between Jones Street on the north and Main
Street on the south.
Service Area #10 is bound on the north by Jones Street, on the south by Main Street, on
the east by rear property line of the homes located on the east side of East Central avenue
and on the west by the rear property line of the homes located on the west side of East
Central Avenue.

The total amount of the City of Bowling Green's Community Development Block Grant
Small Cities Contract is $700,000.00.

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
The City of Bowling Green has determined that the project will have no significant impact
on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the Na-
tional Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project infor-
mation is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the City of Bowling
Green City Hall, 104 East Main Street, Bowling Green, FL 33834-0608 and may be exam-
ined or copied weekdays 8:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
PUBLIC COMMENTS
Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ERR to Yvonne Kim-
ball, City Manager,.City of Bowling Green, 104 East Main Street, Bowling Green, FL 33834-
0608. All comments must be received by September 3, 2011. Comments will be
considered prior to the City of Bowling Green requesting a release of funds. Comments
should specify which notice they are addressing.
RELEASE OF FUNDS
The City of Bowling Green certifies to the Florida Department of Community Affairs and
HUD that Perry Knight in his capacity as Mayor, City of Bowling Green, consents to accept
the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in
relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been sat-
isfied. The State's approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and
related laws and authorities and allows the City of Bowling Green to use the CDBG funds.
OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS
DCA will accept objections to its release of funds and the City of Bowling Green certification
for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt
of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one' of the following bases: (a) the
certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the City of Bowling Green; (b) the
City of Bowling Green has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required
by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part.58; (c) the grant recipienthas committed funds or in-
curred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by the
State; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted
a Written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental qual-
ity. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required proce-
dures at 24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76 and shall be addressed to the Florida Department of
Community Affairs, CDBG Program, 2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-2100. Potential objectors should contact the City of Bowling Green to verify the ac-
tual last day of the objection period.

Perry Knight, Mayor
City of Bowling Green 8:18c










[erald-Advocate
(USP5 57? -2)
day, August 18, 2011
*


PAGE ONE


YOUTH FOOTBALL FUN


RAYS TRAIN ALL-STARS


COURTESY PHOTO
Hardee Minors and Machine All-Star players had the opportunity Aug. 6 to get instruc-
tions from coaches and players with the Tampa Bay Rays minor league, team
Stonecrabs at the Charlotte County Sports Complex. Heather Nedley, Diana Youmans
and other Mosaic Fertilizer staff sponsored the day and provided lunch for the young-
sters and their parents. When the day wound down, the Rays gave each All-Star a gift
bag which Included tickets to a future Rays game.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Some of the Hardee Youth Football League players got an early start by attending a
Tampa Bay Bucaneers practice session. In top photo (left to right) are J.C. Thomas, Kai
Washington, Aiden Thomas and Lane Parks. In bottom photo, with Bucs Head Coach
Raheem Morris, are Washington, Parks, Hardee Pace, Christian Molina and Rabian
Molina. The Hardee Pop Warner teams start their season with an Aug. 20 jamboree.
They will plan four home and four away games.


1'' .

I,

Bmn s Ai1-----


Come fall, students every-
where want to start the new
school year off on the right
foot ... and that means looking
their best. While kids seek out
the hottest trends in clothing,
shoes, and accessories, parent
hunt for the best deals. The
good news is that there is a
-way for both parents and kids
to get what they want out of
back-to-school shopping.
At off-price retailers kids
will find the most sought-after
trends and designers, and par-
ents will love that they're all up
to 60 percent off department
and mall store prices. Check
out the style guide below for
back-to-school cool:
Girls:.Lightweight sweaters
top this year's must-have list.
Whether it's a cable-knit
sweater dress or thick vests
with toggle closures, sweaters
are a staple for the year. Varied


sleeves-long, short and dol-
man-keep things interesting,
and details like stripes, bright
colors, hoods and belts add
uniqueness to each look. Pair
sweaters with. the season's
hottest denim: bootlegs and
skinny styles in dark washes
and with pocket detailing.
Girls are putting their best foot
forward in ballet flats, bootr
and Mary Janes. Sequined
handbags, bright floral print
backpacks and animal print
shoulder bags top the list of
must-have accessories for any
school day.
Boys: This fall, boys are
showing their sportier side. It's
all about activewear, and boys
will be rocking performance
tops, shorts and pants by the
coolest brands that will take
them from the classroom to the
playground. He'll also find tees
and sweatshirts from his


favorite local sports team to
show off his pride. Vintage
screen print tops and dark
denim with whiskering and
pocket details give him a more
stylish look. For footwear, boys
will wear athletic styles and
skate shoes in bright, solid col-
ors. a
Teens: For teenage fashion-
istas, stylish knits rule in tops
and dresses this year, and from
wide dolman sleeves to volumi-
nous ponchos, bigger is better.
Chambray fabrics and floral
and plaid prints make their way
back to class in dresses and
rompers that add a touch of
sophistication for the high
school set. Graphic tees, light-
weight hoodies and shorts are
must-haves for 'teen boys.
Whether hanging at home or in
homeroom, these versatile
basics are comfortable, durable
and on-trend.


S. ~
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School-Time Cool


lThefS










The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011





--Schedule of Weekly Services


Printed as a Public Service
by'.
lfThI erald-Advocate "
,Wauchul', Florida

*. )adline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship............... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.
0
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITI ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hlwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCHl
Bowling Green
S. Ilwy. 17 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ....... .......9:30 a.m,
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m .
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCll
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ................ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.mn.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IG(;LESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00) p.m.
Marines Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Micrcoles Estudior Juvenil....7:0X) p.m.
Jueves l)e Predicacion .......... 7:00 p.m.

IMMANUELI BAPTIST CHURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACED)ONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIRIURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....:.........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
('ommnunion-2nd Sun. Eve. .6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAfPTIST CIIURCIH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd.. 375-4409
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training........... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast.................. 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday......12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service................... 6.00,p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico ................ 6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................:.. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship.................. 7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club............................. 7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.n.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00a.m.
Disciples Training............... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCII
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHIURCII
A. .'96 Lily-urch Rd. 494-5622
Sutmoy School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1I 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... .......... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
English Service.................. 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Ilanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celcbration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service .....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
f(lIine.I:l' .Evening ('ell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call fir location.

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCII
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship .. ..........6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday ........................... 7:30 p.m
CHIURCHI OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 1:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men s Leadership & Training C'lass -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHIURCHl OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST'
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ..................... I :00 a.m.


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ........................ 10:00 a.m .
Servicio ... ................ 11:00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio .'.............7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Manes Oracion .................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio.............. 10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.............7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CIIURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................I 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..:.-.?7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................ 10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .......7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCII
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study .......... 10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra............... 5:00 p.m.
Youth M inistry................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's M ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W orship .................... ........... 6:00 )p.m.
Adult ('hoir.Rchearsal ...... 7.(X) p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURC('l
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243

Generations ('Cal Opens... ....):30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5lh Grade Begins.. I 0:15 a.m.
Pre-K 1Blast ..... ...... ..... .. 10:45 a. n.
Kids World BL A.S.T.
(K -5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service ............... 10:45 a in.
WEDNESD)AY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ................ 6 15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK- 12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CIIURCII OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 am.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCII
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School .................... 9:30 anm.
Morning Service ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. :00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ......................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCII
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ....................9:45 ai.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m
Casual Sunday Worship .........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ...........6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ................... 9:00 a.m..
Morning Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night .... ..........7:00 p.m..
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
M morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening W orship ..................6:00 p i.n
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHIIURCHii
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts... ............ 9:00 a.m.


Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
W orship ............... ... ......... 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ...... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adull Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse M in... ..........7:00 p.m.

IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY,
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes ................................ 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves .................................. 7:30 p.m .
Domingo............................ 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ............................ 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................. 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAII'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service......................2:00 p.m .

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 0:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ...................1 :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... I 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m .


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 0:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
ChildrnFp i nistrifsftif lblt services
S4L:..- r ,
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(Ist & 3r Sun.) ..... ....... 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTIISIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... .......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m..
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1' & 3"' Sun.
Communion .................. 10:00 a.m.
2"' & 4" Sun.
Divine Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
B ible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday adter service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road- East Main
773-5814 ,
Sunday School .............. .....9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...............1... 1 :00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US llwy 17
Morning Service........... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHIITS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................:10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1 1:00 ai.m.
Everning Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CIIURCII
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday ................................ 9:00 a.m .
H oly D ays ........................... .............. ...

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m
Sunday (Spanish) ............... 7:00 a.m.
(English) .................... :30 a.m .
Spanish)..................11:00 a.m .
(Creole)...................... 1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m..

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE .
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. .... ...... 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Church...............................1... 0:00 a.m.
Youth Service ..................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m .
Evening Worship ..... .......7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker 'rail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................1... 0:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................1 I1:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Training Union ...................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426OQak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship .................. 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
W orship.........................1... I :00 a.m .
Evening................................1... :00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................ 0:00 a.m.
Children's Church..............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H.........:..7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ................ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ... ............. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................ 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
..............................................7 :00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .......................... 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .................. 11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship................... I I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ............. 7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones...........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina ....................1............. 1 1:30 a.m .'
L SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .......10:00 a.m.
Servicio ............................... 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Micrecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio ..................:............... 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.

SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER

W, A C...v. Do


The cross didn't take Christ by
surprise. He came to die. But
except He were willing to lay down
His life, it couldn't be taken from
Him. And He took it up again!
His resurrection is the heart of
Christianity. Without it, life is a
hopeless end. With it, life is an
endless hope.
His resurrection is the hub of
Christianity. On it all the doctrines
of grace depend. If Christ be not
risen, the consequence isn't that
death ends all, but we're still in our
sins:
His resurrection is the hope of
Christianity. Because He rose,
Christ is with us in our perplexity to
guide us, in our sorrow to comfort
us, in our trials to strengthen us,
and at death to bring us to heaven.
He came out of the grave into my
heart, Is He in your hart?


i A Thereveryou are, whatever you
V V thirst for, when your spirit is parched, God
can refresh you with His mercy and love. Our
Heavenly Father promises, "The poor and needy
search for water... their tongues are parched with
thirst. But 1 the Lord will answer them...I will
make rivers flow on barren heights, and springs
within the valleys." (Isaiah 41:17-18) Visit His
House this week and revive your thirst for God
who is good.




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Transportation Was By

Way Of Walking Or Donkey


By MICHAEL UGALDE
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your name?
A: Lorenzo Ugalde Castro.
Q: Where were you born?
A: Michoaccan, Mexico, on a ranch.


Q: When were you born?
A: Sept.
17, 1944.
Q: Did ^ -
you live in ,
the city or
out in the country?


)I

Ole


A: I lived on a ranch way out in the
country.
Q: Did you go to school?
A: Yes. I only went as far as second
grade.
Q: Did you have to pay for school?
A: No, I got to go for free.
Q: Did you have to walk to
school?
A: Yes, it was just down the road
about a mile.
Q: What were you taught?
A: Well, they only taught me the
alphabet, how to read and write, and
basic math.
Q: Was the lunch in the school
free or did you have to pay?
A: No, I didn't have to pay. For
lunch they would go back to their hous-
es to eat, then go back to school.
Q: What were the sports you
played in school?
A: I really liked to play baseball.
Q: What year did you graduate?
A: I didn't have the chance to gradu-
ate. My parents took me out of school
during second grade.
Q: How many brothers and sisters
do you have?
A: I had three brothers and five sis-
ters.
Q: What kind of games did you
and your family play?
A: I liked to play hide-and-seek and


marbles.
Q: How often did you get clothes
and shoes?
A: I had clothes about every month,
but shoes, they would only buy one
pair of shoes for me, and didn't buy
more until those shoes were messed
and ruined.
Q: What was the style of clothes
back then?
A: White and black striped pants
with really large bottoms.
Q: What was your favorite way of
transportation?
A: My way of transportation was a
donkey.
Q: Was food expensive back then?
A: I didn't pay for food. We provid-
ed our own food with crops and ani-
mals.
Q: What did you used to do when
you were my age?
A: I had to help my dad work in the
fields, so that we could bring the fami-
ly's basic needs to the house.
Q: What was the most popular
place you used to hang out?
A: I really didn't have a place to
hang out, I would just be right outside
my house.
Q: What kind of jobs did you have
in the past?
A: I used to cut wood, take care of
the lambs, cucumbers. I've had a lot, I
can't remember them all.
Q: What kind of things did you
and your family celebrate?
A: We rarely celebrated anything,
even if it was our birthdays, or holidays
like Christmas.
Q: Were there any televisions or
radios back then?
A: Yes, but I didn't see my first one
until I was 20 years old; I didn't hear
my first radio until I was 18 years old.
Q: What type of religion were
you?


A: I was Catholic.
Q: How often did you go to
church?
A: I only got to go a couple of times
because I was usually working with my
dad..
Back In Time is the result of a class


For most parents. the start
of a .new school year can't
come soon enough. Sixty per-
cent of moms and dads polled
in a new Yahoo! Shine survey
(Ipsos OTX MediaCT) say
they are extremely excited for
summer break to end. But
ramping up for the first day of
classes can be hectic and frus-
trating, as parents race to gath-
er school supplies while
watching their wallets.
The pressure to buy trendy
brands is as fierce as ever.
Half of the parents surveyed
said they buy their children
"hip" or "trendy" brands to
help them be more "popular"
or "cool" at school. And fami-
lies also say they are gearing
up for a busy year of after-
school activities. Three-_quar-
ters of the 2,001 adults _sur-
veyed say their children partic-
ipate in at least two extracur-
ricular activities.
How can families enjoy a
fresh start in the Fall while


August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocate
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High SchQol. Each
student is asked to, interview an older
person Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


keeping the stress at bay? There
are lots of ways technology can
help parents manage spending
and scheduling. Here are a few
tips from Yahoo! Web Life
Editor Heather Cabot:
Organize Your In-box.
For starters, you can get a han-
dle on electronic clutter in your
in-box by making use of the
new Yahoo! Mail service. The
new mail format allows you to
access the Web tools you use
most without leaving your in-
box.
From tracking your back-to-
school purchases with the All
My Purchases App to instantly
responding to Facebook mes-
sages and sending PTA meeting
Evites, Yahoo! Mail is the hub
for all your e-traffic and will
help you earn "Supermom" sta-
tus.
Get More Done With
Apps. Instead of wasting time
searching through a market-
place of hundreds of apps to
find the best grocery list maker,


calorie counter or comparison
shopping tool, now you can
take all the guesswork out of
finding the apps you need most.
Yahoo! AppSpot is a fast, easy
way to discover new apps that
are just right for you. Each day,
you get daily picks based on the
apps you already use and that
are most important to you. For
more information, visit
appspot .yahoo .com.
Don't Miss Out On Deals.
Don't waste time surfing the
entire Web for sales and promo-
tions. Instead, let Yahoo! Deals
do the coupon clipping for you.
The deal website scours the
Web to find coupons, sales and
bargains to save you money.
At deals.yahoo.com, visitors
can find everything from cheap
daily deals to codes for online
coupons, free grocery coupons
and printable local coupons for
all their favorite stores and
products.


No game in the world is as tidy and dramatically neat as baseball, with cause and
effect, crime and punishment, motive and result, so cleanly defined.
-Paul Gallico
The Arctic Tern's migration route spans 22,000 miles round-trip. It flies from the
Antarctic Ocean to the Arctic Ocean each year.





7Fhe 1 erald-1Advocate


Hardeer CounAty's Hometown verI e
PRNER ULIHR


Three Ways To Cope With

Back-To-School Stress


REPUBLICAN





SPOTLIGHT


That Americans value and should pre-
serve their feeling of national strength
aqd pride, and at the same time share
with people everywhere .
a desire for peace and '
freedom and the ',
extension of human ,,
rights throughout
the world.


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Greetings from Fort Green!
We received some good rain
last Sunday afternoon. What a
wonderful way to take that
afternoon nap with raindrops
hitting on the .tin roof! There
were a couple of drawbacks
though, the open house for Dr.
Elver Hodges and the plans for
the Junior High youth at church.
They were planning on playing
on the water slides all after-
noon! That is not a good idea
with the thunder and lightning
that is so common during a rain
shower.
The-slides 'were a tremendous
success during the Back-To-
School Bash. Kids were con-
stantly sliding down it and then
hitting the target to drop some-
one into the dunk tank.! There
were over a hundred youth who
registered for this fun-filled
day. Of course, all the youth
had at least one parent and
sometimes two, so we had a full
fellowship for lunch. This is the
type of thing that you know the
Lord has a' hand in or it would
not go so smoothly.
Faye Davis is a glutton for
punishment or just a great
teacher! She had a lock-in
Sunday night for her Wednes-
day night class. She said she did
not expect them to sleep as they
play video games and play on
the water slides all night. The
ones planning to have a great
night of fun before school
begins next Monday are Holly
Brown, Makayla Chancey,
Kaylee Hogenauer, Tyler and
Dustin Smith, Dalton Richey
and Amanda Wilson. Pam
Davis, another adult enjoyed
the night also.
Sharon Lynn is doing her part
to help the economy; she has
retired from driving a school
bus for over 20 years so that
opens up a job for someone.:
Congratulations, Sharon, and I
am confident she and Tom will
enjoy their new lifestyle. Tom is
already retired.
I go to Sylvia to get my hair
cut over in Sebring, at New
Beginnings. Last Friday when I
arrived, early as usual, Carla
Gibbs was there. It was great to
visit with her and, among the
things we talked about, was the
upcoming-reunion'of the '50s
and '60s classes.


ie Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


<80


-i Important Reminder!

* a
While you're busy filling out all that back to school
paperwork remember another important form to renew!

SYour 4-H Member Enrollment Form!


* Make Plans Now To Attend Our

4-H Open House


* # Thursday, August 25'th

3:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

SAgri-Civic Center
Altman Road


A special time for returning members U

to renew their enrollment and

NEW members to see what we

* have to offer in the 4-H Program!

H For more information call your club leader

H or the 4-H office at 773-2164 a

*Youth planning to show livestock in the 2011

Hardee County Fair MUST be registered in a 4-H
Club before Sept. 2, 2011!* .

^ The Florida cooperative Extension Service programs are available to all without regards to race,
color, sex, age, religion, national origin or handicapping conditions. 8:18,25c


4-H Revolutionizes Youth Robotics


She asked me if I knew our
generation had lived in the best
of times. I was surprised at the
question, because it is some-
thing Sherman says quite often.
I totally agree and said that was
the way "A Tale of Two Cities"
started; "It was the best of
times, it was the worst of
times."
The reunion will be great, but
all of you reflect on the times
and you will agree that this was
a great era in the USA. Gas was
only $3.41 in Sebring, com-
pared to $3.58 here.
Pastor Jerry Dunn is in the
Tampa hospital, or that was the
report last Sunday at church.
Janet Duke was scheduled for
hip surgery on the 17th and one
good piece of news is William
Porter is cancer-free, according
to the PET scan. He is doing
-well from his recent surgery.
Buck Toole has started treat-
ment and missed church last
Sunday. Tara McGaughey is
still not up to par but is improv-
ing. Carol Brown fell and cut
her leg, required stitches and
then got infected; She has
missed church. Please remem-
ber to pray for all these sick and
any others you may know
. about.
Allen Eures, Avie Hogenauer
and daughter Kaylee had a great
vacation and, while they were
enjoying the beach, their house
was being repaired. As a result
of the ice maker leaking and the
floor being ruined, they had a
new floor installed, the dry wall
repaired and all the walls paint-
ed except the bedrooms. It was
just like a new house and, the
best part is they were away hav-
ing fun during the renovation.
While they were at the beach,
TK and Gavin came over and
spent one night. They had a
good time.
We will have a Methodist
Cemetery workday on Satur-
day, Sept. 17, beginning early in
the a.m. Bring your weedeater,
and if you don't have one, come
anyway and pick up moss. We
will eat lunch under the beauti-
ful old oak trees and always
have a good time.
Remember to pray for one
another, the military and our
natio'r;.j 9


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Don't fear anything except
the Lord of the armies of
heaven! If you fear Him, you
need fear nothing else. ... I
will wait for the Lord to help
us. ... My only hope is in
Him.
Isaiah 10:13,17 (TLB)

FRIDA
Do you want more and more
of God's kindness and
peace? Then learn to know
Hiri better and better. For as
you know Him better,
through His great power,
everything you will have,
everything you need for liv-
ing a truly good life.
2 Peter 2:2,3a (TLB)

SATURDAY
Happy is the person whose
sins are forgiven, whose
wrongs are pardoned.
Happy is the person whom
the Lord does not consider
guilty, in whom there is noth-
ing false.
Psalm 32:1-2 (NCV)

SUNDAY
For God will work within you,
giving you 'the will and the
power to achieve His pur-
pose for you. Do all things
without grumbling or argu-
ing, so that you may live as
God's children.
Philippians 2:13-14 (PME)

MONDAY
Seek good and not evil -
and live: You talk about God,
the God-of-the-Angel Ar-
mies, being your best friend.
Well, live like it and maybe it
will happen. ... "Do you
know what I want? I want
justice, oceans of it. I want
fairness, rivers of it. That's
what I want. That's all I
want," says the Lord.
Amos 5:14,24 (ME)

TUESDAY
Be alert; stand firm in your
faith; be valiant and strong.
Let all you do be done in
love.
1 Corinthians 16:13 (NEB)

"These are -the two things
you are to do. Speak the
truth to each other, and ren-
der true and sound judg-
ments in your courts. Do not
plot evil against your neigh-
bor, and do not love to swear
falsely. I hate all this,"
declares the Lord.
Zechariah 8:16 (NIV)

Clinophobia is the fear of
beds.


With just two minutes until
their next match, members of
4-H's AIR Strike 78 robotics
team worked feverishly to
repair a broken chain on their
robot when the opponent
called a time-out. They were
relieved; they now had 10
more minutes to get the chain
and motor back in place before
their next match.
AIR Strike 78 is one of 60
4-H robotics teams across the
country participating in FIRST
Robotics, a competitive robot-
ics organization for middle and
high school youth. Teams have
six weeks to design and build a
robot to compete in a game'
that will challenge both their
engineering and sport skills.
4-H's growing robotics pro-
gram has inspired youth to
take an active interest in sci-
ence, technology, engineering
and mathematics over the last
few years. With the newly
released 4-H, Robotics Cur-
riculum, youth of all ages are
now engaged in robotics and
engineering concepts early on,
which sparks an interest in
pursuing science careers and
higher learning. .
"The great achievements of


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our youth in robotics are proof
positive of what we've learnec
from the longitudinal study
conducted by Tufts University:
Young people in 4-H perform
better in science, engineering,
technology and applied math
subjects, and are more interest-
ed in pursuing science careers
than their non-4-H peers." said
Donald T. Floyd Jr., National 4-
H Council president and CEO.
In addition to FIRST. 4-H'ers
also participate in robotics com-
petitions such as the MATE
(Marine Advanced Technology
Education) International ROV
competition, where youth btiild
robots that tackle real-world
issues, like repairing oil spills
completely underwater.
"Youth in 4-H have really
jumped into robotics: 12 of our
60 4-H teams were invited to
compete at the national level
this year, and we expect those
numbers to continue to .grow."
said Floyd. "Through their
experiences in 4-H. our young,.
people are on the path to
become the nation's next gener-
ation of great scientists and
engineers."
The rising interest in robotics
within the 110-year-old organi-


.HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(if office unattended, please leave
message.)


Frankie's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting
Hours:
Tuesday Friday 9-6, Saturday 9-3
Zk, 8718


YOU Can Appear In... -'- ,
'Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show It! Your work could be published in
this newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which rejlevt
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original'
work, written by you. not someone else. To appear In-this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Adyocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 338743
or fax 773-0657.


zation is representative of 4-H's
progression and ability to
remain relevant in the lives of
today's American youth. While
4-H has been known historical-
ly for its agricultural and
healthy living activities through
after-school clubs across the
country, it has evolved to
include a more diversified sci-
ence program that allows youth
to explore interests in a variety
of programs, from animal and
environmental science to rock-
etry and renewable energies.
As AIR Strike 78 and other
.4-H Robotics teams wrapped up
their pit stops between matches
at the national FIRST Robotics
Championship, they knew that
it's not always about winning
and losing.
"This is an amazing amount
of knowledge here," said a
member of the Camdenton
(Mo.) 4-H Laser robotics team.
"Just the hands-on experience, I
mean; you can never get this in
a classroom. It's an experience
like no other."
For more information on 4-H
Robotics and the new 4-H
Robotics Curriculum, visit
www.4-H.org.







August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocatj


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
Members of the Methodist
Church congregation began raz-
ing the building next to the
church, which housed the
Primary Sunday School for
'many years. When this is com-
pleted, a new building will be
erected. The wooden structure


Back To Bas
By /an Rice
Gospel Preacher


being razed was the first build-
ing to be used for the Methodist
Church in this city. It was first
located by the railroad tracks,
but was moved to its present
-location many years ago.
Wildcat fans will regret to
hear of the resignation of
Wildcat football mentor Cale
Keller; who has aGcepted a
position as head athletic coach
at Apalachicola high school.
One of the smartest coaches to
work under the Hardee colors,
he was coach of the Wildcats'
unbeaten, untied eleven of





tics "

; "


TRUE FELLOWSHIP
Many times the word "fellowship" is used to describe differ-
ent activities within religious circles. Some think that potlucks,
playing games and sharing company with one another constitutes
true fellowship.
Read I John 1:3: "That which we have seen and heard we
declare to you, that you also may have fellowship with us; and truly
our fellowship is with the Father and with His Son Jesus Christ."
I think it's safe to say that fellowship with John can't mean
those things.
Consider 1 John 1:6, "If we say that we have fellowship with
Him, and walk in darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth."
Fellowship with Christ definitely can't mean those things.
So what is fellowship?
A good explanation in 1 John 1:7, "walk in the light as He is
in the light," says nothing about sharing a meal, playing a game or
sharing company. It's not something we do, but something we
share or have in common.
Compare with Acts 2:42. We see that the disciples shared in
their devotions to God. Consider these definitions: "Thayer's
Greek Lexicon"' says "intercourse, fellowship, intimacy"; "Vine's
Dictionary" says "a communion, a sharing in common"; and
"Strong's Concordance" says "participation, intercourse, benefac-
tion."
True fellowship is a bond which unites Christians. It's the
bond that consists of a mutual love for God.
When walking in the light together, friendships will result -
but the friendliness is not the fellowship, it is a result of the fel-
lowship. Sharing a meal is'common among those who believe, but
it is not the fellowship, it is a result of the fellowship. How do we
then talk of a "fellowship hall"? A bond which unites Christian's
room? The concept doesn't agree with Scripture.
The apostle Paul wrote, "For as many of you as were baptized
into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek,
there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for
you are all one in Christ Jesus" Galatians 3:27-28.
Paul said that both Jews and Gentiles are all one in Christ,
those who were baptized into Christ. That same fellow wrote to the
church in Corinth, "God is faithful, by whom you were called into
the fellowship of His Son Jesus Christ our Lord" 1 Corinthians
1:9J '- .
The only way to have fellowship with God is to be cleansed
from your sin.
Get back to the basics and see what the Bible has to say about
true fellowship. Read, study and obey God's Word.
Ian Rice is the full-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchoJchrist.com.





Mama
You're amazing, you're fantastic,
You are so awesome, so loving, I just can't stand it,
I'm glad you love me, I'm glad you hold me,
You make me want to be the little girl you see,
'You make me climb the highest mountains,
Soar in the bluest skies,
Swim in the deepest oceans,
You make me try,
There's a little girl inside, trying to break free,
Mama I love you, say you love me,
So, I'm staring at this picture in my room, again,
Oh! So much fighting, when will it end,
It's all over, or has just begun,
You make me feel like I'm number one
You make me climb the highest mountains,
Soar in the bluest skies,
Swim in the deepest oceans,
You make me try,
There's a little girl inside, trying to break free,
Mama I love you, say you love me,
Please Mama hold on for a little bit longer,
One day it'll be easy, and I'll be stronger
Do you believe in second chances?
I guess all I'm to say is
You make me climb the highest mountains,
Soar in the bluest skies,
Swim in the deepest oceans,
You make me try,
There's a little girl inside, trying to break free!
Please Mama I love you,
Mama oh! Mama I love you,
Say you love me.
-Candice Torres, 16
Bowling Green
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


IWayBackWhen
^^U^^^IH^k^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^a ^^^^^^


1933. They issued a challenge
to the Lakeland Dreadnaughts,
winners of the Big Ten Confe-
rence, who would not play them
as they had scheduled a post-
season game against a team
from Utica. N.Y.
R.L. Woods has bought out
the former Table Supply Co. He
has hired Don Hall of Zolfo as
his meat cutter. A.W. Kim-
brough, who has been manager
of the All-American Thrift store
number 18 since he came here
in 1931, has purchased the gro-
cery store of Robert Pepper on
Main Street in partnership with
Mr. Elsberry of Wimauma.
The Wauchula Farmers
Supply Co. has 50 pounds of
Simon's Stock Kirby cucumber
seed to offer, limited to one
pound per customer. This stock
seed is truly different and will
not be introduced to the trade
until next year. Florida Do-
lomite Co. is touted as an excel-
lent soil conditioner. It will neu-
tralize soil acidity and increase
the efficiency of regular fertiliz-
ers as it supplies the plant foods
calcium and magnesium to has-
ten maturity.
50 YEARS AGO
The Wauchula Infirmary was
sold this week to a Bartow
physician and surgeon, and will
be operated again as a hospital
if a temporary license is grant-
ed. Dr. Alfred Massam, who
purchased it from Drs. Gene
and Margaret Moore, said he
has to show need for the hospi-
tal and complete extensive ren-
ovations to meet 1961 stan-
dards. The county lost half of its
hospital beds when the
Infirmary 'was closed after 23
years.
In spite of the shortage of rain
in the county during the last two
months, county groves have not
suffered too much, said County
Agent Jack Hayman this week.
Hayman said young trees plant-
ed this spring and summer have
had to be irrigated but the larg-
er ones show little effect.
The Wauchula City Council,
which has been holding forth in
anything but a fancy council
room for years, found a new
look when council members
assembled Monday night. They
met around a horseshoe-shaped
table in a room which has been
repaired, sadded and' painted
and new .,lhting fixtures
installed, at a cost of $450.
(Pictured at the table were
councilmen R.O. Grimsley,
George Spears, Marvin Stewart,
Chairman T.C. Underwood,
Vice Chairman Charles Can-
non, L.A. Rehberg and W.L.
Warren, along with city attor-
ney Hoyt Carlton, Mayor Paul
Thomas, Public Works Super-
intendent George Burris and
City Clerk Sam Southerland.)
M.E. Brown Inc. of Bowling
Green advertises for strawberry
sharecroppers. He will furnish


berry plants and fertilizer on
share to competent farmers or
will sell plants outright and buy
the berries. Reas Enterprises on
South Seventh Avenue advertis-
es automobile insurance for
young couples, drivers under 25
for just $28.90 for six months.
25 YEARS AGO
CF Mining will lay off 18
salaried and hourly employees
at their HtrIdee Complex by
Aug. 28. Th '.yoff is indefinite
and necessary to reduce operat-
ing costs because of overriding
problems from depressed eco-
nomic conditions.
A contractor whose payment
had a portion deducted because
of delays in completing the-
Bowling Green sewer project
has requested arbitration to set-
tle his claim. The amount of
$21,000 was deducted and will
be paid in full when the project
is completed, the contractor
was told.
The Hardee County School
Board reluctantly addressed the
alternative education program


which will be mandated by the
1987-88 school year. The pro-
gram is for grades 4-6 and 7-8
at the junior high. It is designed
to improve a student's skills in
reading and mathematics, and
his self-esteem and develop a
positive attitude toward school.
Beall's back-to-school sale
offers Levi's for boys sizes to
young men's reduced to $10.97
to $19.97, screen print T-shirts
at $8.97, Stone shirts and pants.
for boys at $6.97 and girls
Palmetto slacks at $11.97.
10 YEARS AGO
After signing an annexation
agreement with the intervening'
property owners, it will allow
Wauchula to also annex the
Wal-Mart Shopping Plaza and
Winn-Dixie and bring addition-
al taxes into the city. Each store
signed an agreement to volun-
tarily annex when possible in
order to get city water, electric
and sewer services.
County commissioners have
taken the first step in selecting a
person to be the assistant coun-


I- SI


Fr'


Back-to-School


TAILGATE

PARTY!


Presented By:


II


8:1


I






A,
































BC


Friday, August 19

6:00pm 9:00pm

Main Street Heritage Park
Downtown Wauchula

Live Entertainment By: GALAXY

-Hardee Wildcat Cheerleaders & HHS Marching Band-
-Games & Inflatables-
-Biggest Sports Fan Contest (all ages welcome)-
~Free Eye Screenings from the Lion's Club & Dr. Sevigny
(6-8pm, Java Caf6 Meeting Room)-
-Hardee Athletic Foundation Dunk Tank-
-Purchase Wildcat Sports Season Tickets from the HHS
Athletic Department-
-Shopping and Dining-

.. Bring Your Lawn Chair and Join Us Downtown!

HFor More Information Visit
www.mainstreetwauchula.com or Call 863.767.0330


HEARTLAND PHARMACY'

1123 US 17 S oiIa Ac .iia i

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our W into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


ty manager/economic devel.
ment director. In its meeting
today, commissioners will set a
schedule to interview the short
list of 28 applicants for the job,
which was created earlier this
year when the commission
withheld funds and forced the
volunteer Economic Develop-
ment Committee to resign.
Plans to convert the old
Thriftway into the Wauchula
Municipal Complex for police
and city officials sank into trou-
bled waters again at Monday
evening's meeting. For the
third consecutive meeting, local
officials were thwarted by
mushrooming estimates for
turning the 12,000-square-foot
building into offices.
Real estate ads this week
include a starter home, 3BR, IB
frame home with central air and
heat for $56,000; a historic
home in Wauchula with a big
yard for $131,000; a well-main-
tained 3BR, 2B CB home with
fenced back yard for only
$69,000; and a 2BR, IB home
on a large lot for $44,500.










'he Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Joseph Keith Futch, 56,
Wauchula, and Juana Lopez
Flores, 55, Wauchula.
Kerry Joseph Fitzgerald, 55,
Wauchula, and Tammy Jean
Cobb, 50, Wauchula.
Homer Curtis Kirk Jr., 31,
Wauchula, and Amber Starr
Stringer, 22, Wauchula.
Jose Alberto Velasco Limon,
23, Okeechobee, and Alejandra
Tinajero, 22, Wauchula.
Raul Alexander Garcia, 24,
Bartow, and Kaylah Sheree
Holton, 21, Bartow.
Michael Wayne Carte, 25,
Wauchula, and Melissa Ann


Albritton, 33, Wauchula.


There was no small claims
court last week.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently by the county
judge:
Carlos Nicolas Alejandro,
giving false identification to a
law enforcement officer, $325
fine and court costs, $50 cost of
prosecution (COP).
Nathan R. Bryan, attempting
to take deer by light and gun,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion six months, $325 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $50 COP, 25 hours
community service.
Miguel Angel Diaz-
Fernandez, transporting citrus


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Aug. 14, Manuel Hernandez, 29, of 4044 Maple Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of
violation of probation.
Aug. 14, Nelson Jacob Adams, 25, of 412 Rest Haven Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Todd Souther on an out-of-
county warrant.
Aug. 14, residential burglaries on Manatee Street and on
Maxwell Drive were reported.

Aug. 13, Ronald Keith Spiker, 47, of 1152 Downing Circle,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with
battery.
Aug. 13, thefts oi Johns Road and on Gebhart Road were
reported.

Aug. 12, Joel David Gutierrez, 26, of 233 Kelly Roberts Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged
with selling methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine
and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Aug. 12, Apolonia Mercedes Martinez, 19, of 846 Pleasant
Way, Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and
charged with battery.
Aug. 12, a vehicle stolen at Magnolia Street and SR 66, crim-
inal mischief on Third Street East and Third Street West, and thefts
on SR 64 East arid on Kazen Road were reported.

Aug. 11, Salomon Maldonado, 20, of 4626 Fair Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF)
and charged with possession of methamphetamine, tampering or
destroying evidence and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Aug. 11, Johnathan David Braddock, 27, of 624 Green St.,
Wau sh1ula, was arrested by Det. David Drake and charged with lar-
ceny, passing forged or altered ID to a regulated metals producer
and violation of probation.
Aug. 11, Jonathen Lamar Small, 19, of 5215 Dixiana Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by the DTF and charged with resist-
ing an officer without violence, and failure to obey an officer by
fleeing.
Aug. 11, criminal mischief on Doc. Coil Road, and a theft on
Sweetwater Road were reported.
Aug. 10, a theft on Altman Road was reported.

Aug. 9, thefts on SR 66, Nursery Road, Glades Street and
Goosepond Road were reported.

Aug. 8, Michelle Lee Paul, 39, of 1833 Oak Hill St., was
arrested by Dep. Thomas Abbott on a charge of withholding sup-
port of children.
Aug. 8, criminal mischief on Cracker Lane and on Diana Lane
and thefts on Mansfield Road, CR 666 and St. Johns Road and two
locations on U.S. 17 North were reported.

WAUCHULA
Aug. 14, Scott Michael Lacosse. 19, of 626 S. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin ahd charged with
violation of probation and driving with knowledge of a suspended
license.
Aug. 14, residential burglaries on Indiana Avenue and on
North Florida Avenue, and criminal mischief on Carlton Street
were reported.

Aug. 12, Jonathan Durand Williams, 19, of 3428 Acorn Dr.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged
with possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of probation.
Aug. 12, Brandon Keith Wisniewski, 26. of 401 S. 10th Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza aild charged with pos-
session of drug paraphernalia. At the jail, Dep. Michael Lake
detained Wisniewski on two counts of failure to appear in court.
Aug. 12, thefts on two locations on South Seventh Avenue
were reported.

Aug. 11, a theft on South Seventh Avenue was reported.

Aug. 10, Jevon Lee Burks, 31, of 123 Eighth Avenue, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson on an out-of-county
warrant.
Aug. 10, criminal mischief on North Eighth Avenue was
reported.

Aug. 9, Anthony Lamor Johnson. 25, of 201 Adams St., Fort
Meade, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with
robbery, resisting an officer with violence, battery. larceny and
wearing a hood or mask in public.
Aug. 9, Vera Jean Butler. 39. of 311 Bell St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with battery.
Aug. 9, a fight on Bell Street was reported.

Aug. 8, a robbery/holdup on West Oak Street anid a theft on
Carlton Street were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Aug. T3, Rolie Gamble, 52. of 4219 Church Av., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and charged with bat-
tery.
Aug. 13, a residential burglary on Lake Branch Road was
reported.

Aug. 8, John Jaimie Perez. 21, of 117 Pennsylvania Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged with
resisting an officer without violence and violation of probation.
Aug. 8, Stephen Chevo Rodriguez, 27. of 4802 Epps Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and
charged with disorderly intoxication.


without a trip ticket, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation six
months, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 COP, 25 hours com-
munity service; eight counts
transporting citrus without a
trip ticket, not prosecuted.
Jason Michael Swain, petit
theft, probation one year, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs, 50 hours
community service.
Herman Thoml: .n, resisting
an officer without violence,-
probation one year, $325 fine
and court' costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Amy Lynn Waldee, battery,
completed pretrial intervention
program, not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Jaterrica N. Robinson and
the state Department of
Revenue (DOR) vs. Michael
Bernard Jospeh, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Bank of America vs.
Katherine Alexa Webb et al,
petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Dean Simpson and Kathren

The Southwest, Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting,
Committee Meetings and
Public Hearing: Consider
SWFWMD business. Some
Board members may partici-
pate in the meeting via commu-
nications media technology.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, August 30,
2011; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Ser-
vice Office, 7601 US Highway 301
North, Tampa FL 33637 (Note:
this is a change of location from
the published calendar)
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards, Meet-
ings & Event Calendar; 1(800)
423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-
7211
For more information, you may
contact: Luanne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0163)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us
8:18c


Simpson, divorce.
Gloria Barboza-Ledezma vs.
Alejandro Salas-Munoz, peti-
tion for injunction for protec-
tion.
Maria Chavez o/b/o minor
child vs. Rocky Neal, petition
for injunction for protection.
Ashley N. White vs. William
A. Carlton, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Truman Boyette and Dorothy
Boyette vs. Transworld System
Inc., damages negligence.
Anita Brown and Ronald
Brown, divorce.
Bianca Renee Lobato vs.
Daniel Farias, petition for
injunction for protection.
Julie. Morales and Juan
David Villarreal, divorce.
Charles A. Manley vs. Misty
Smith, petition for injunction
for protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Melissa L. Summeryille and
DOR vs. Michael A. King, vol-
untary dismissal.
Esmeralda Calderon and
DOR vs. Eduardo Rivera, child
support suspended.
Gregoria Calderon vs.
Eduardo Rivera, child support
order,
Summers Inc. vs. Jorge
Martinez, voluntary dismissal.
Deoris Denson and DOR vs.
Margarita Rita Chavis, child


support order.
Bank of New York vs. Fred
C. Cook, judgment for defen-
dant.
Eudelia Ferrer Martinez and
DOR vs. Enedelia Lopez, child
support order.
Sofia Alarcon Cavazos and
Roberto Cavazos, divorce.
Raymond Medrano vs.
Claudia Mancillas, child sup-
port order.
Carolyn Josephine Huron
Flores and Augustine T. Flores,
divorce.
Richard S. Shepard vs.
Alisha Michelle Rutledge, vol-
untary dismissal.
In Re: Ford 150 and curren-
cy, order of forfeiture.
Rebecca J. Villegas and
DOR vs. Rosa Maria
Rodriguez, child support sus-
pended.
Janet Dickey vs. Kathy Jo
Liles Dickey and DOR, modifi-
cation of child support.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as the
judge was on vacation.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Shawn Duytschaver to Mark
and Kathleen M. Govan as
trustees, $24,000.
Jon Martin Duytschaver to
Mark and Kathleen M. Govan
as trustees, two properties,
$48,000.


Kathy Camp to Charlie
Creek Lodge LLC, $140,000.
Fannie Mae Federal National
Mortgage Association to
Maryann Kelley Reed, $34,000.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union to Premnauth R.
Budraj, $18,000.
Shari Steit Jansen estate to
Yuri Martinez and Jammy
Perez, $20,000.
Jesus and Rosalinda R.
Barajas to Barajas Fruit Co.,
$30,235.88.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. as trustee to Rey Luis
Mier, $144,900.
Hardee County Clerk of
Courts to Farmers Home
Administration Housing and
Urban Development, certificate
of title, $51,019.
Hardee County Clerk of
Courts to Wells Fargo Bank,
certificate of title, $30,100.
First National Bank of
Wauchula to Alejandro L.
Mondragon, $27,500.
Reginald and Helen M. Hunt
to Bruce and AnneMarie
Payette, $55,000.
James B. Johnson et al to
Mosaic Fertilizer Inc.,
$140,000.
Blanche Alice Petrenko to
James Dudley and Lavonda K.
Rogers, $16,000.
Rebecca Baron to William R.
and Marca Joy Goforth,
$27,500.
Richard A. Dye to William
R. and Marca Joy Goforth,
$27,500.


Wauchula


We Serve


Lions


Club


&


HARDEE COUNTY DELEGATION
NOTICE OF MEETING

TO: All agencies of local government and interested parties
FROM: Representative Ben Albritton, Chairman, Hardee County Legislative
Delegation
SUBJECT: Hardee County Legislative Delegation Annual Meeting and Public
Hearing

Representative Ben Albritton announces that the Hardee County Legislative Delegation
meeting will be held on WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. in the Hardee
County Commissioner's Chambers, Room 102, of the Hardee County Courthouse Annex
Building located at 412 West Orange Street in Wauchula.

If you would like to be placed on the agenda to speak, please contact Representative Ben
Albritton's District Secretary, Karen Whaley at 863-534-0073 no later than noon on
Wednesday. September 7. 2011. Five (5) copies of all handouts and other information
for delegation members must be received by Representative Albritton's District Office at
Post Office Box 1966, Bartow, Florida 33831 by Wednesday, September 7, 2011 or may
be hand delivered to 206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873.

Discussion of issues regarding local legislation for the 2012 Legislative Session will be held
at this time. All proposals for local bills are expected to be presented at the hearing and
must be drafted in bill form, accompanied by a Resolution from the local government sup-
port'i the prolesed legislation. This information must be received by Representative
Albf 's DisWt Office at Post Office Box 1966, Bartow, Florida 33831 bv Wednesday.
Sept ber 7.2011 or may be hand delivered to 206 North 6th Avenue; Wauchula, Florida
33873.

Individuals wishing to address the Delegation on local bills being considered should plan
to attend the public hearing at the Hardee County Court House Annex Building, Room 102,
412 West Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida. Following the consideration of local bills, the,
public will be invited to address the Delegation on state issues that are of concern.

If you have any questions or would like to be placed on the agenda for the Hardee County
Legislation Delegation Hearing, please email Karen Whaley at karen.whaley(myflorida-
house.gov or by phone at 863-534-0073.

Sincerely,
Ben Albritton
State Representative, District 66
8:11,18c


are teaming up at





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See You There!

Screenings will be held at Java Cafe in the back room.
I I I


















Week ending August 14, 2011
Weather Summary: Temperatures. averaged one to four
degrees above normal at major cities. Highs were in the upper 90s
and lows in the low 70s. Both topsoil and subsoil moisture supplies
improved from the previous week and were rated mostly adequate.
Rainfall was abundant across most of Florida with all of the 36
Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations reporting
precipitation. Homestead reported the most rainfall at 4.30 inches
followed by Indian River (4.03 inches), Ona (3.95 inches), Fort
Lauderdale (3.56), Fort Pierce (3.28 inches), and Citra (3.09 inch-


From The Heart 'd

By David Kelly



THE CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS
New York City is a great place to visit.
If you have never been to the big city I suggest you go. I
strongly suggest you save a little cash money before you go, too.
Things tend to be a little pricier in Manhattan than in Wauchula.
I say New York is a nice place to visit but I've only been twice,
but each time the city that never sleeps has kept me awake with
curiosity of what else there is to do that I haven't yet done. But
even though I don't think I'd mind living there, it wouldn't be my
first choice either. As my son said to me as our plane was about to
touch down in Orlando, "Dad, you know why I like home? You see
all that green stuff, all those woods? That's why I like home, not'so
many buildings."
I totally agree.
However, it is quite the change .of pace especially in an around
Times Square. There is always something going on. The last day
we were there this summer they had a Coca-Cola igloo the size of
my house in the street, giving away free Coke. I almost changed
my flight. Those of you who know my Coca-Cola addiction know
I'm not joking.
The family and I did a lot of firsts. We saw the Statue of
Liberty and were able to go up all the steps inside of her some
350 and look out into the harbor through the opening just below
her crown. I got to watch a baseball game in the new Yankee
Stadium. The kids and Karen saw "Spiderman," tile Broadway
play, and loved it.
We ate at some cool restaurants, took a bus tour, went shop-
ping way too much and walked a lot. My kids were amazed that
you could just get up and walk somewhere, they are so used to get-
ting in the car and driving. We took the subway and the cab to
round out our transportation experience.
The new 9/11 memorial'should be done by 2014, but the New
Yorkers we talked to said not to hold your breathe.
There is so much history in New York City. It really is fasci-
nating to learn about things that went on during the pre-
Revolutionary War era all the way up to modem day.
I'm not sure how New Yorkers fit into their clothes, though.
Not saying that I saw anyone in New York who was huge, but their
portions of food are unreal. I felt like I was on an episode of "Man
vs. Food" whenever I sat down to eat. Really, all you need is one
meal out a day and the rest of the day you could survive on the
street snacking.
The serving sizes may be.big time but most of the rooms and
inside those big, buildings.tare not as spacious and roomy as your
living'room. Space is trul'yla commodity, and every single inch is
utilized. Your hotel room is no exception. A family of four staying
in one room gets acquainted quickly, and learns to be thankful for
having their own bedrooms back home. Even though we were in
close quarters we had fun stepping on, over and through each other
during the week.
The best part of this New York trip for me was being with fam-
ily and watching my kids' eyes light up when they saw the bright
lights of Times Square, and feeling their little hands clutch mine a
little tighter on the streets during the first couple of days of uncer-
tainty. To hear all the questions and all the requests was exhausting
but exciting, too.
For me, there will always be a reason to go back to New York.
I enjoy the change in everyday routine, the bright lights, the traffic
even, the walking, the eating out, plays, ball games and even shop-
ping.
If you've never been because you think the city can't handle
all your country, well, it's kinda like my mama's collard greens: It
may not look like your kinda thing, but once you've tried it you'll
be going back for more.


es). Ten FAWN stations reported from two to three inches of rain-
fall, and nine stations reported from one to two inches. Although
soil moisture was mostly ,adequate for growing field crops, the
northern tier of counties bordering Georgia, were rated on August
9 as being in an extreme drought by the U.S. Drought Monitor.
Small areas of Okeechobee, Martin, St. Lucie, and Palm Beach
counties continued with an extreme drought rating. The Lake
Okeechobee water level as of August 15 was 10.33 feet, compared
to the historic average of 13.96 feet.

Field Crops: Crops in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties con-
tinued to be developing later than normal. In Jackson County, some
crops were stressed by the dry weather and near triple digit tem-
peratures. In Suwannee County, corn for grain was harvested.
Some areas of the county needed rainfall for other crops. In Putnam
County, harvesting of field corn was underway. In Walton County,
the cotton crop was in fair condition after being hampered by the
earlier season dry conditions. The soybean crop, despite some
delays in planting this season, appeared to be in good condition due
to recent adequate rainfall. The Florida peanut crop appeared to be
in mostly good to fair condition. Peanut acreage pegged was at 90
percent compared with the five-year average progress of 95 per-
cent. In Lafayette County, some peanuts.were behind schedule in
development due to the late planting caused by the drought. In
Columbia County, a few producers were digging green peanuts. In
Suwannee County, the peanut crop showed improvement due to
recent rains. In Jackson County,-the hot and dry conditions stopped
peanut blooming, but pegging and pod development.continued.

Vegetables: Light supplies of okra were being marketed. In
Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Hendry, and Lee counties, vegetable
growers were preparing land and laying plastic in preparation for


August 18, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 19

vegetable planting. In Miami-Dade County, some fields for veg-
etables had standing water in low lying areas due to the recent
rains. Land preparation for fall planting was getting underway in
Highlands County.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the pasture condition was
mostly good, with lack of soil moisture being the primary limiting
factor for grass growth. Some pastures in poor condition were
overgrazed earlier in the year. The cattle condition improved over
the previous week with most cattle in good condition. In the
Panhandle, the pasture condition varied from very poor to excel-
lent, with most fair to good. The high temperatures stressed grass
and livestock. Armyworms caused some damage to pastures. In the
northern areas, pastures ranged from very poor to good condition
with most in good condition. There was some damage from army-
worms. The condition of the cattle was mostly good. In the central
and the southwestern areas, the pasture ranged from poor to excel-
lent condition, with most in good condition. Most of the cattle were
in good condition.

Citrus: Temperatures were in the lower to mid 70s at night
and the mid to upper 90s during the day for the majority of the
week. This week there was heavy, but scattered rainfall with all of
the stations receiving some rainfall. Amounts received ranged from
0.39 inches in Belle Glade, to 4.03 inches in Indian River. Extreme
drought conditions existed in small parts of Okeechobee, Martin,
St Lucie, and Palm Beach counties. Drought conditions were per
the U.S. Drought Monitor; last updated August 9, 2011. Next sea-
son's oranges were larger than golf balls, and next season's grape-
fruit are between baseball and softball size. Grove activity includ-
ed resetting new trees, young tree care, applying herbicides, hedg-
ing and topping, brush removal, and fertilizer-application.


I6utigF shigFoeas


8/18/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6'59 AM
Set. 8:02 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 03 ninis.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:36 PM
'Set: 11:09 AM
Overhead: 4-35 AM
Underfoot: 4:56 PM
Moon Phase
79%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
4:35 AM 6:35 AM
4,56 PM 6:56 PM
Minor Times
11:09 AM-12:09 PM
10:36 PM-11:36 PM
Solunar Rating
Average

Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/19/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:59 AM
Set: 8.01 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 02 nuins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:13 PM
Set: 12:02 PM
Overhead: 5:18 AM
Underfoot: 5:40 PM
Moon Phase
71% *
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
5:18 AM 7:18 AM
5:40 PM 7:40 PM
Minor Times
12:02 PM 1:02 PM
11:I3 PM-12.13 AM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


8/20/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:00 AM
Set: 8.00 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 00 miins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:52 PM
Set: 12:55 PM
Overhead: 6:03 AM
Underfoot: 6:26 PM
Moon Phase
62%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
6:03 AM 8:03 AM
6:26 PM 8:26 PM
Minor Times
12:55 PM 1:55 PM
11:52 PM-12:52 AM
Solunar Rating
Average

Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/21/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:00 AM
Set. 7.59 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 59 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: --:--
Set: 1:49 PM
Overhead: 6:50 AM
Underfoot: 7:14 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter
Major Times
6:50 AM 8:50 AM
7:14 PM -9:14 PM
Minor Times
1:49 PM 2:49 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


8/22/2011
Sun Data
Rise 7:01 AMN
Set. 7.58 PM

Day Length
12 lrs. 57 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12.35 AMN
Set' 2 43 PM
Overhead: 7:39 AM
Underfoot: 8:05 PM
Moon Phase
43%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:39 AM 9:39 AM
8:05 PM 10:05 PM
Minor Times
12:35 AM -1:35 AM
2:43 PM 3:43 PM
Solunar Rating
Average+

Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/23/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:01 AM
Set: 7:57 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 56 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:25 AM
Set: 3:36 PM
Overhead: 8:31 AM
Underfoot. 8:58 PM
Moon Phase
33%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:31 AM -10:31 AM
8:58 PM 10:58 PM
Minor Times
1:25 AM 2:25 AM
3:36 PM 4:36 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC. -4


8/24/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:02 AM
Set 7:56 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 54 nuns.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:18 AM
Sel: 4'27 PM
Overhead: 9:25 AM
Underfoot. 9:52 PM
Moon Phase
24%
Waning Cfescent
Major Times
9:25 AM -11:25 AM
9.52 PM- 11:52 PM
Minor Times
2:18 AM 3:18 AM
4:27 PM 5:27 PM
Solunar Rating
Average

Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/25/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:02 AM
Set: 7:55 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:17 AM
Set: 5:16 PM
Overhead: 10:19 AM
Underfoot: 10:46 PM
Moon Phase
15%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:19 AM-12:19 PM
10:46 PM-12:46 AM
Minor Times
3-17 AM -4:17 AM
5:16 PM 6:16 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


I help the land yield its best.


I am Mosaic.


It's no surprise to find an orange grove here in Florida.

But most people don't realize that, along with providing

crop nutrients to farmers across America, Mosaic farms

its own citrus groves. We have about 6,000 acres of

citrus in production, and 500 of those acres are on

reclaimed land. As grove superintendent, I see things

through, from planning to harvest.


It makes sense that I keep Florida's land growing.







Mosaic


www.mosaicfla.com


8:18c


-------------i^ __.------------------------------------_ _ .....








The Herald-Advocate, August 18, 2011


Expanding our LTE mobile broadband

network across more of Florida.


PUBLIC SAFETY:
LTE wili provide a rnor advanced wi:e':ess
network tor c;or:da first responders.


ECONOMY:
Expa3rsdini lhigh-.speed wireless In cornt
across -'Ro'ia will: create jobs. fuel econom,:c
grow, h. a d .pur i,:;!.nov:Jftion


HEALTHCARE:
LTE will connect Ftorida fam i's to do.to!rs
and spec:aiUsts across the state a:d around
mre wortd


Mobile broadband is taking another major step forward.
The network technology is called LTE (Long Term Evolution), and it's more than just another update.
It's a whole new way to get online .... a super-fast wireless connection to the Internet.
The planned combination of AT&T and T-Mobile will allow us to expand our advanced network
to cover an additional 20,000 square miles in Florida delivering a new choice for
broadband Internet access.

Our customers will get a stronger network. Florida will get cutting-edge wireless technology.
And one million more Florida residents will get a new choice for mobile broadband and
alt the benefits it brings.


We can't wait to see what you do with it.


at&t


T a -Mobile"


MobilizeEverything.com