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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 8/4/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
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System ID: UF00028302:00392
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text





Bass Trophies

4 Coming In '12

... Column 4B


The


City Helps With

High Power Bills

... Story 1B


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


Thursday, August 4, 2011


HCSO: 'Family Time' Meant Grove Raids


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Doing things together as a
family meant plundering area
citrus groves for a Wauchula
mom, dad and son, the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office 'has
alleged.
And booked into the Hardee
County Jail on Friday as a fam-
ily were Dwight Earl Taylor,
45, and Linda Ann Taylor, 46,
both of 213 Keeton Road, and
Matthew Dwayne Taylor, 26, of
1014 Keeton Road.
All three were charged with
burglary of a structure.




Mayor



Neel



Dies
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
George Neel, the mayor of
the town of Zolfo Springs for
the past half-dqzen years, died
suddenly on Tuesday. He was
72.
Neel had served on the Zolfo
Springs Town Commission
since 2004. He was appointed
mayor in 2006.
His local political career led
to regional and state offices, as
he was elected treasurer of the
Ridge League of Cities in 2009
and was currently serving as its
elected secretary. Also this year,
Neel was appointed as a trustee
for the Florida Municipal
Insurance Trust and as a board
member for the Florida League
of Cities.
He was pastor of First United
See MAYOR 2A


Neel


WEATHER
07/27 9 73 M O,
07/28 94 73 &S67
07/29 94 73 0.25
07/30 94 72 0.00
07/31 93 73 o.oo
o00ol 93 74 04
09/02 91 72 0.01'
O2TA Rainfal to 08102/11 23.67
Sune ptod art yer 33.56
bn Year Avege 4.30
Soumo UnIv.. ofFOn. a FRnwc Crter.

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Community Calendar ..6A
Courthouse Report ... 7C
Crime Blotter........ 4C
Hardee Living ....... 2
Obituaries ..........4A



1III I111 110
7 18122 07290 3


Father and son also were
charged with grand theft and
criminal mischief.
And a charge of dealing in
stolen property was levied
against the father as well, sher-
iff's Maj. Randy Dey said.
Linda Taylor was released
from jail on her own recogni-
zance without a monetary
bail about five hours after
her Friday afternoon arrest, jail
records show. Matthew Taylor
posted a $2,250 bond on Mon-
day afternoon to gain his re-
lease pending trial. The father,
Dwight Taylor, remains behind


bars in lieu of $7,250 bond.
Dey said battery cables were
being cut and batteries and radi-
ators were being stolen from
pump motors in several groves
throughout Hardee County and
into DeSoto County. He said
agriculture Dep. James Adler
developed information on sus-
pects for the crimes.
Meanwhile, he alleged, the
stolen batteries and radiators
were being sold, some for scrap
at a local salvage yard.
Dey said the suspects were
under surveillance and were
See 'FAMILY TIME' 2A


Taylor, D


Taylor, M


Taylor, L


Kitchen Blaze

Consumes Home
Firefighters Treated For Heat Exhaustion


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Firefighter/paramedic Chris Campbell gratefully takes time for a cool drink.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Heraid-Advocate
Battling a blazing fire and the
noontime heat made firefighters
very grateful for the cool drinks
brought by caring neighbors.
That wasn't enough,elther.as
10 firemen receiveW intra-
venous treatment on the scene
just to stay on the job fighting
the Friday afternoon fire.
The fire heavily damaged the
wood frame house at 219 N.
Ninth Ave., Wauchula despite
the efforts of firefighters. The
house was unoccupied at the
time of the fire.
According to a press release,
Hardee Fire-Rescue was called
at 11:39 a.m. and the first units
arrived on the scene in approxi-
mately four minutes. A total of
17 firefighters, including sever-
al off-duty personnel, were
called in as they battled the
stubborn blaze for four and a
half hours before final staff left
the scene.
When firemen arrived, they
found the wood home with
heavy smoke coming from the
eaves. They began interior and
exterior attack but were forced
out of the building by the
intense heat. "The crew that
first made entry did a great
knockdown,, but once the fire
got into the attic, it became very
difficult to maintain safe opera-
tions so they were pulled out,"
explained Fire-Rescue Lt. Don
MacGregor.
The home had been undergo-
ing some renovation, including
drywall covering a wooden
tongue-and-groove ceiling. It
made the fire difficult to extin-
guish and the crews then settled
on defensive measures, protect-
ing neighbors and as much of
the home as they could.


Newspaper Article Sparks Fire Discussion

LaBelle Chief Says He Was Asked To Model All-Volunteer Department


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
A recent LaBelle newspaper
article states the Hardee County
Commission is interested in
changing to a volunteer fire
department and will model it
after the LaBelle Fire Depart-
ment.
Commission Chairman Terry
Atchley said Tuesday that is not
the case. He said the commis-
sion has never discussed plans
for changing to a volunteer
department, and the LaBelle
Fire Department has never been
brought up as a model.
The May 19 edition of the
Caloosa Belle quotes the La-
Belle fire chief as saying so,
however, during a monthly
meeting of the LaBelle City
Council.


"Hardee County has identi-
fied LFD as one of the better
volunteer departments," Chief
Ray Pittman told the council.
"Hardee County is interested in
changing over to volunteer sta-
tus and has chosen LFD to
model."
How Pittman came to that
understanding is unclear.
County Commissioner
Grady Johnson has had the mat-
ter placed on the agenda for dis-
cussion at today's (Thursday)
commission meeting. He did so
after learning the Caloosa Belle
article was being circulated
around Hardee County, and that
some people thought he was
responsible for Pittman's com-
ments.
IThnso ackioew!tledged
speaking to Pittman on the


phone last year while he was
campaigning for the County
Commission seat he ultimately
won. He said he spoke to
Pittman because the county fire
department was an issue he
wanted to address if elected.
Johnson said he called
Pittman to learn how his volun-
teer department operated, and
that he tried setting up a meet-
ing to take local leaders to
LaBqlle to find out more about
it.
The meeting was never tinal-
iLed and has not happened.
Johnson said he has not spo-
ken to Pittman since being
elected, and does not know why
Pittman would think that way or
bring it up at a city council
meeting months after the con-
versations took place.


Johnson said he never spoke
to Pittman on behalf of the
county or told him Hardee
County Fire-Rescue would be
changing to a volunteer depart-
ment or using the LaBelle Fire
Department as a model.
Hardee Fire Chief Mike
Choate said he has never talked
to Pittman and was surprised
when he read what was printed
in the LaBelle paper.
The constant controversy sur-
rounding his department recent-
ly is starting to have a negative
effect on employee morale,
Choate said. Some are worried
about losing their jobs.
Choate said Hardee County
Fire-Rescue will continue to
operate as normal, and that he
tells his firefighters not to
See NEWSPE R 2 -


The State Fire Marshal's
Office was called and deter-
mined the cause ofthe blaze to
be an unattended deep fryer in
the kitchen. Firefighters were
able to save the contents of one
of the roois that had been
largely untouched by the fire.
About 8,500 gallons of water
was used during the long after-
noon to battle the blaze.
Hardee Fire-Rescue sent
three engines, a tanker, an
ambulance, a brush truck and an
air supply trailer. Mutual aid
was provided by Fort Meade
Fire-Rescue, which sent an
engine and three firefighters.
While Hardee units were
engaged with the fire,
See KITCHEN 2A



Sales Tax


Holiday


Coming

By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Looking for a little extra help
with back-to-school supplies?
The state Legislature has
given shoppers a break by rein-
stating the popular "sales-tax
holiday." The weekend free of
sales taxes on school supplies
will be held Aug. 12-14.
During this period, no sales
taxes will be collected on pur-
chases of clothing, shoes and
certain accessories costing $75
or less or on certain school sup-
plies of $15 or less.
Tax-free items include but
are not limited to: clothes, back-
packs, caps and hats, coats,
raincoats, uniforms, binders,
calculators, composition books,
crayons, erasers, glue, lunch
boxes, notebooks, paste, pen-
cils, poster board, rulers and
scissors.
Online tips are given on the
state's website for saving even
more during this weekend.
Take advantage of the little
extra help by planning your
back-to-school shopping trips
for Friday the 12th through
Sunday the 14th. Make any big
purchases around this time.
Compare prices on what you
need to get the best deal, and
use coupons where available.
Not all stores will accept
coupons during the tax-free
weekend, so don't solely rely
on them for your pocketbook
savings.
For a complete list of what
items will be tax free. visit
myflorida.com/dor. Under
"Current Topics," click on
"2011 Sales Tax Holiday Tax
Information Publication."


111th Year, No. 35
3 Sections, Pages 24


460
plus usles. ax


I,,--~L-_~LI Ir IIII~










2A The Herald-Advocate, August 4,2011


, The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
SManaging Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor % %,,Ig



115 S. Seventh Ave., ,tos
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager,

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.

/ SUBSCRIPTIONS:
DEADLINES:
S DEADLINES: Hardee County
Schools -Thursday 5 p.m 6 months $18; I yr. $31; 2 yrs. $60
Sports Monday noon Florida
Hardee Living -Thursday 5 p.m. I Florida"
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m. 6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2.yrs. 579
General News Monday 5 p.m. Out of State
V Ads-Tuesday noon ,. Ou of t ,, : 4 ._,
AdTuesday noon 6 months -$27; I yr. 49; 2rs- 95

,LETTERS: '..
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and nust be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS: .
Pessreleases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the'above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Heavy smoke enveloping the home on North Ninth Avenue could be seen from blocks away.


IoTCHI F
Continued From 1A


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Football fans are happy that NFL owners and players have
reached a 10 year agreement and the lockout has ended. The sea-
son is around the corner.
Stock market investors on Tuesday saw the Dow Jones
Industrial Averages drop below 12,000. The DJIA hit a high of
14,000 before dropping to about 6,500 two or three years ago.
The regular season of Major League Baseball is on the down-
hill stretch, and the Tampa Bay Rays appear out of the playoff pic-
ture. The Atlanta Braves are still in the hunt.
August has arrived, bringing rain and continued hot weather.
The new school year began Monday in Georgia but will start
here Aug. 22.
Congress has voted to extend the U.S. debt ceiling but there
will be more budget battles to come. The 2012 national elections
will be very interesting.
Wauchula native Tom McEwen rose to fame as sports editor of
the Tampa Tribune for many years and was vital in bringing pro
sports to the Tampa Bay area. He died June 5 at 88.
The world is also smaller because James Arness, who was
Marshall Matt Dillon on the TV series "Gunsmoke," died earlier
this summer. I hope Tom McEwen can host a gathering with James
Arness, Richard Boone of "Have Gun Will Travel," John Wayne,
Roy Rogers and Gene Autry, among other deceased movie and TV
stars and sports celebrities.
We know democratic President Barack Obama will seek re-
election in November 2012, but who will be the Republican candi-
date? Will the Tea Party be.a prominent force? In the interest of
fairness, I would like to see the rise of a Coffee Party, Soda Party
or Juice Party.
Uncle Sam wants Americans to eat more fruits and vegetables,
whole grains, lean meats and fish so we can work harder and pay
more taxes. Uncle Sam also wants more jobs created and should
manage his finances better.




People With A Disability

Can Get A Ticket ToWork


Millions of Americans
receive disability benefits from
Social Security and there could
be good news for many of those
who want to work. A free and
voluntary program called Ticket
to Work gives individuals who
receive Supplemental Security
Income (SSI) or Social Security
Disability Insurance (SSDI)
access to meaningful employ-
ment while maintaining control
over benefit choices.
Ed Bairos, a farmer and
mechanic, went back to the
work he loved with the help of
the Ticket program. Ed went on
SSDI after suffering from
severe arthritis, complicated by
a knee injury that would require
20 surgeries. He was concerned
about losing the cash payments
and health care he needed to
survive and worried that
employers might not want to
hire him.
Then Bairos learned about
the Ticket to Work program
when he received a notice in the.
mail from Social Security. The
notice was a "Ticket" that
Bairos could use with an
Employment Network of his
choosing.
Employment Networks are
organizations that offer special-
ized services such as career
counseling, job search assis-
tance, vocational rehabilitation
and training. Bairos decided to
use his ticket with the Ticket to
Success/Tulare County Office
of Education and returned to
work. He continued to receive
health care and cash benefits
because of Work Incentives,


which are special considera-
tions that make it easier for ben-
eficiaries to explore whether
going back to work is right for
them. Pleased with Bairos'
industry knowledge and skills
as a farm manager, his employ-
er gave him a promotion and a
raise. Now he is self-sufficient,
working for another division
within the company. Bairos
earns., more money than he
would have by relying solely on
SSDI.
By using his "Ticket,"
Bairos' medical reviews were
put on hold and he is eligible to
receive Medicare coverage for
up to eight and a half years afteq
discontinuing his SSDI pay-
ments.
"Returning to work has made
me whole again, especially
being able to work in the area
that I love. My self-esteem was
at its lowest when I wasn't
working and on disability.
Returning to work not only
improved my self-worth but
also my financial wealth. The
Ticket to Work program and the
ability to keep my Medicare
was the .reason I was able to
return to work," he said.
If you receive SSI/SSDI ben-
efits, are between 18 and 64
years old and want to work, get-
ting started is easy. Call (866)
968-7842 (TDD [8661 833-
2967) to learn how going back
to work may affect your bene-
fits. You can also visit
www.ssa.gov/work for more
information on the ,Ticket to
Work program and work incen-
tives.


If instead of a gem, or even a nower, we should cast the
gift of a loving thought into the heart of a friend, that
would be giving as the angels give.
-George MacDonald


Highlands, Polk and DeSoto
counties staged amublances
near the county lines to respond
to any Emergency Medical
Service calls. Fortunately, they


worry about what is being said.
"We are paid to protect the
citizens of this county, and that
is our primary focus," he con-
cluded.



'FAMIlY
Continued
spotted at a grove just south of
Goosepond Road on County
Road 665. There, father and son
entered the pump shed, he fur-
ther alleged.
Mother drove them there and
waited in the vehicle for their
return, the major described.
Dey said a traffic stop was
conducted on the vehicle after it
left the grove area, up on State
Road 64. Officers saw two radi-
ators and a 24-volt battery in
plain view in the rear of the
vehicle, he alleged.
Radiators are valued at about


Methodist Church in Zolfo
Springs.
He was a talented musician.
The U.S. flag flew at half-
staff outside Town Hall on
Tuesday afternoon in his honor
by order of Vice Mayor Juan
Otero.
"We are so devastated by his
loss," Lois Dandridge, the
matriarch of Zolfo Springs pol-
itics, said Wednesday morning.
Dandridge, too, was once
mayor of the town, and has held
nearly every position in the tiny
municipality. She currently
serves as a town commissioner.
"He was a real asset to the
town of Zolfo Springs. We were
very fortunate that when he
retired, he ended up here," she
added.
Former mayor and town man-
ager Mike Schofield expressed
similar sentiments. "He was a
man of vision and he had a lot
of conviction," he said. "He
stood his ground."
His wife, Sara Schofield, is
currently a town commissioner
with Neel. "His time was divid-
ed between his church, his fam-
ily and his town," she said early
Wednesday. "He did alot for
the town and was always fair,
got along with, all the other
commissioners.
"He was a friend to every-
one," Commissioner Schofield
continued. "He always spoke to
you when he saw you."
Town Manager Linda
Roberson said. Neel was at'
Town Hall just hours before his
death on Tuesday. "He sat here
for two hours," she described.
"He was signing papers and
talking with staff."
Roberson said Neel left Town
Hall at about 11 a.m.
Town Clerk June Albritton
noted Neel went to the Post
Office after leaving Town Hall,
and then went home, planning a
short trip with his grandchil-


were not needed.
Firefighters also got assis-
tance from the Wauchula Police
Department and staff from
Hardee County Emergency


Calls by The Herald-Ad-
vocate to Pittman at the LaBelle
Fire Department were not
returned.



TIME'
From 1A
$1,200 apiece.
Dey encouraged other grove
owners and managers to report
any thefts suffered at their
groves.
"If we don't know about it,
we can't solve it," he said.
"If the grove owners don't
tell us they've been the victims
of burglaries and thefts, when
we come across stuff, some-
times we don't know where it
belongs and can't prove it was
stolen," Dey added. "Tell us.
We may solve it."


dren, who were visiting with
him and wife Judy in their
Suwannee Street home at the
time.
"He grabbed his chest and
fell," Albritton described. She
said she went to the house, and
was there as paramedics
worked to revive Neel. She also
drove his wife to Florida
Hospital Wauchula, where Neel
was pronounced dead.
Albritton said she was not the
only concerned citizen at the
home. "Church members were
there and neighbors were there,
there and at the. hospital," she
said. "That's how it is in this
small community."
Albritton, as well as other
town employees, was stricken
by Neel's sudden death. "He's
my pastor, he's my mayor and
he's my friend," she said
Wednesday morning.
Town Manager Roberson was
equally stunned by his death.
"We all just went home," she
said of Tuesday's news that
Neel had died.
"He's going to be missed,"
Roberson said. "We looked to
him a lot. He was a great help
and direction for us."
"It's going to be a great loss,"
added Albritton.
Neel is survived by wife
Judy, sons Jerry, Steven, Roger.
and Art, 14 grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be Saturday at
10 a.m. at the First United
Methodist Church of Zolfo
Springs. A memorial service
will follow at 11 a.m.
."We all just went home," she
said of Tuesday's news that
Neel had died.
"He's going to be missed,"
Roberson said. "We looked to
him a lot. He was a great help
and direction for us."
"It's going to be a great loss,"
added Albritton.


Although the outsides of a bone are hard, they are gen-
erally light and soft inside. They are about 75 percent
water.


Management, which provided
rehabilitation and scene support
during the long and complex
incident. "The temperature and
the heat index, combined with
the heavy workload, led to sev-
eral firefighters suffering from
heat exhaustion," said Emer-
gency Management Director
Rich Shepard.
The heat index that day was
105. When fully equipped and


working in the heat, a firefight-
er's core body temperature can
quickly reach 102 to 104
degrees.
Recently hired Deputy Fire
Chief Robert Clayton,just com-
pleting his first week on the job,
appreciated the support re-
ceived, "We couldn't have done
it without the support and assis-
tance of other agencies. I can't
thank them enough," he said.


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


HUNTER SAFETY CLASSES
With the dog days of summer upon us, it's hard to think about
hunting. But if you're between the ages of 16 and 36 and haven't
yet taken the state's hunter safety class, now's just the time to be
thinking about it.
Many of these classes, offered statewide, fill up fast during
hunting season while people scramble to get certified. Summer
months offer smaller class sizes and offer a better opportunity for
students to attend, because they often have more free time then.
People 16 or older and born after May 31, 1975, must com-
plete the FWC's hunter safety requirement before they can buy a
Florida hunting license.
There is an exception though. A law passed a few years ago
allows individuals to hunt under the supervision of a licensed
hunter, 21 or older, without having to complete the state's hunter
safety, certification. It's called the Hunter Safety Deferral License,
and it allows those people who purchase one to hunt on a one-year
trial basis.
It's designed to encourage experienced hunters to teach novice
hunters about our sport, and is a great incentive for getting more
people to give hunting a try. Individuals taking advantage of this
would have to pass a hunter safety class to be eligible to buy a
license and hunt the following year.
If you're a youngster and already hunt, I suggest you go ahead
and take a hunter safety class before you turn 16. Of course, until
then, you may hunt under adult supervision.
You can register for a hunter safety class by going to
MyFWC.com and clicking on Hunter Safety or by contacting your
nearest FWC regional office. Also, there are two versions for your
convenience.
There's the traditional course, which is 12 hours of classroom
instruction plus a four-hour "field day," or you can opt for taking
the online or CD-ROM version at home. But,.you'll still have to
sign up for the "skills day" part.
The traditional course is offered during four weekdays or on a
Saturday-Sunday. If you take it during the week, each session is.
three hours and offered after normal working hours. On the week-
end, you'll spend eight' hours Saturday and four hours Sunday
morning in the classroom. The remainder of Sunday you'll move
over to the shooting range to complete your certification.
The first thing you'll learn about in the traditional class is
Florida's many hunting laws. An FWC law enforcement officer
gives this introduction. Volunteer hunter safety instructors teach
the remaining curriculum.
You'll be taught ethics, hunter responsibility, parts of firearms,
various hunting lingo and the proper way to shoot. You'll discover
the differences between various bullets, calibers and gauges; how
to identify game animals; and learn wildlife conservation and best
management practices for native species. In addition, you'll find
out about outdoor survival techniques and learn how to administer
First Aid in the field. Archery and fundamentals of bowhunting
also are taught.
In your last hour in the classroom, you'll be given a standard-
ized test of true and false and multiple-choice questions. All you
need is to score an 80 percent or better, and then you get to move
outside to the shooting range for the field day portion.
This part takes about four hours. During that time, you'll get
to shoot clay pigeons with a shotgun, practice your archery skills
and target practice with a .22 rifle. You'll also receive a muzzle-
loader demonstration, where you'll have the chance to shoot one if
you'd like. All guns, bows, targets and ammo are'provided. All you
have to do is take aim!
After you complete the field day, you'll be given your hunter
safety card. At that point you can purchase a Florida hunting
license and get ready for opening day.
If you choose to take the hunter safety class online or by
CD-ROM, you'll learn all of the above-mentioned material and be
given a practice test to prepare you for the last segment the skills
day.
Skill days take about four hours to complete. You'll learn
much of what is taught during the traditional course, including
hunting laws and ethics, how to handle firearms safely, when to
take a shot and where to place the crosshairs. Then you'll get to.
shoot on the range and be given the same standardized test.
Register today to take a hunter safety class 'cause the 2011-12
hunting season is just around the corner!
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony.Young@MyFWC.com.


NEWSPAPER
Continued From 1A


MAYOm
Continued From 1A








August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Letter To The Editor


County Commissioner Has Too Much 'Negative


Dear Editor:
I am writing this letter as a
lifelong citizen and tax payer of
Hardee County. I'm concerned
about the misleading statements
or just plain fabrications that
one of our county commission-
ers is spreading to roughly 30 or
40 followers. I feel the other
12,000 plus registered voters
along with these followers need
to know the truth about this
commissioner.
During this commissioner's
campaign it was stated many
times, once elected, Lex Al-
britton the county manager and
the fire chief Michael Choate
would be fired. Additionally,
the fire department would be
disposed of and make our com-
bination paid fire department
completely volunteer.
One has to question motives
here. Running for commission-
er seems to have been for per-
sonal reasons and not the bene-
fit of us, the county taxpayers.
It is very apparent that if any-
one disagrees with this commis-
sioner they become part of a
"hit list" of sorts. It is evident to
me that all this commissioner is
focused on is character assassi-
nation.
Most recently, as posted on a
local website, all of the county
management was accused of
spreading propaganda and was
called disgraceful. Citizens, I
ask you ... does anyone deserve
this constant attempt to strong
arm? This commissioner has no
business speaking about profes-
sionalism. Never before have I
ever seen such a display of
unethical and unprofessional
behavior.
This commissioner gets so
caught up in untruth it makes it
impossible to remember which
lie he told and to whom. This is
exactly what happens every
time this commissioner is con-
fronted. It happened again last
week, immediately after the
budget workshops. This com-
missioner changed and redirect-
ed what was said, then contra-
dicted the story a countless
number of times during the con-
versation. Additionally, when
you watch the video, at the very
end, you will see that it happens


sion at least two different times.
Moreover, at a different
nighttime meeting just a couple
of weeks ago, this commission-
er told a small group of follow-
ers that the fire department's
budget was $6.8 million dollars,
almost the same as the Sher-
iff's. Further, there were so
many false statements made
about your fire insurance rat-
ings and how they are affected
by the fire department.
You would think a commis-
sioner in such an important
position would actually gather
all of the facts together, instead
of claiming to do so before
making such made-up state-
ments. Worse yet, maybe this
commissioner did actually get
some information prior to the
meeting. This means that there
is a total misunderstanding of
how to read revenues and
expenditures! (That is extreme-
ly problematic.) It was apparent
that most of the followers took
to heart every word that was
said. Honestly, who wouldn't?
After all, a county commission-
er should know the facts.
The true fact is...this com-
missioner was wrong then, and
is proven to be wrong quite
often. The fire department's
budget was projected up on the
big screen in the meeting last
week. The fire expenditures are
$2.6 million while the EMS
budget was $1.7 million. This is
a total amount of expenditures
of $4.3 million, a far cry from
the $6.8 million that was spread
around. But to be fair, you have
to look at the $1.5 million dollar
cash reserves (fund balance and
contingencies for future capital
purchases that cannot be
touched without county com-
mission approval) the grand
total for everything fire rescue
is $5.8 million. What are you
reading, commissioner?
DeSoto County and Hardee
County are the same size, rela-
tively the same tax base and
population. Their fire rescue
department has two more
employees on duty each day
than we do. Their fire chief
makes around $15,000 a year
more than ours. Okeechobee
County is also a comparable


$25,000 more. Do you see
DeSoto County or Okeechobee
or any other counties for that
matter trying to get rid of their
fire department and go to a
completely volunteer depart-
ment? This answer is NO. They
are just like us. They need vol-
unteers to help the paid fire-
fighters, not replace them!
Our fire department does
much, much more than just put
out fires. They respond to auto
accidents, to cut cars apart and
get injured people out. They put
out car fires 'when someone
may be trapped inside. They
also treat injuries at the scene.
Our firefighters are emergency
medical technicians and para-
medics.
Citizens of Hardee County,
can you imagine your family in
a wreck with your spouse and
two or three children seriously
injured, some trapped with just
a two-person EMS crew
responding. There would be
two people to treat four or five
serious injuries.
Commissioner, would you
like to choose .which two they
treat? With our fire rescue
department responding, there
are four to five people respond-
ing, therefore everyone gets
treated and cut out from the
wreckage at the same time.
Without your fire department
ready to respond immediately,
patients would have to wait 15
to 20 minutes longer for volun-
teers with half the training to
show up. Which would you
want for your loved ones?
Another example, if some-
one's mother is having a heart
attack or a stroke and dies prior
to the ambulance and the fire
truck arriving, there are four to
five firefighters to treat her,
bring her back, and if it is
GOD's will, save her life.
Without the department staffed
the way it is, there would only
be two EMS personnel. Believe
me, commissioner, if it's my
mother, I want five well-trained
firefighter/paramedics to show
up and start saving her life, not
just two and hope that a few
untrained medical volunteers
show up in 20 minutes when
you would have already been


Fact: When someone goes
into cardiac arrest and stops
breathing in the emergency
room they have three to six
nurses, a doctor and additional
staff working on them. The rea-
son for that, commissioner, is it
takes many trained profession-
als to increase the chance foq
survival. Believe me, it's a very
difficult task with two people
(I've been there). Someone has
to drive the ambulance.
My last two years with the
fire department, at my station
alone there were three people
whb went into cardiac arrest
and quite breathing. We had a
five-man crew and saved their
lives. One was in his 60's and
appeared to be a very healthy
man. He came by many times to
thank us. However, the changes
of his survival with just two
paramedics responding would
have been very slim, I'm not
sure they would have survived;
there are just too many urgent
Stasks that have to be performed
all at the same time.
What price do you put on
these three people's lives, com-
missioner? This was just three
lives out of a countless number
that have been saved just on my
shift out of my station in
Bowling Green, not counting
the other two stations in the
county.
A lot of times, all the ambu-
lances are busy and the fire
truck has to respond to medical
calls. The fire engines are
equipped with the exact same
advanced life support equip-
ment and paramedics as the
ambulances. The crews can
treat all medical patients exact-
ly the same as the ambulances;
however, obviously they cannot
transport the patient to the hos-
pital. The ambulance has to
come for the transport and
sometimes it very well could be
an ambulance from another
county.
As a commissioner, you talk
about growth for Hardee
County. Do you think business-
es would come here when they
know all we have is a volunteer
fire department with everyone
paying maximum fire insurance
ratings?


department, who will test the
hoses, test the ladders, certify
the pumps, keep the air packs
full of air, maintain the equip-
ment and small motors, keep
the volunteers trained, and send
them to school to be certified?
Commissioner, if you would do
your homework before giving
your speeches you might not
sound so ridiculous.
The National Fire Protection
Agency (NFPA) says that we
should respond to a single story
residential house fire with 15 to
17 firefighters. We only have
13 and very often they drop all
of the way down to 11 to keep
from paying overtime. There is
also what's called the two-in,
two-out rule at a fire, NFPA
1710 which was adopted by the
state of Florida, MANDATES
that you have two firefighters
ready on the outside before two
firefighters can enter a burning
house. Volunteers fall under
NFPA 1720, much more strin-
gent because of the vast differ-
ences in the training levels.
Citizens, did you know that
according to .the Florida
Department of Health, Division.
of Emergency Medical
Services, that 52 percent of all
EMS providers are fire-based
services, just like what we have,
here in good ole Hardee
County. Additionally, each year
more and more third party EMS
providers are absorbed by fire
departments. That very thing
just happened up in Polk
County. They had Polk EMS
and Polk Fire. They just moved
EMS under the fire chief 'and
created Polk County Fire
Rescue, now a 500-personnel
department. Much larger, but
the structure and response is
just like we have here in good
ole Hardee County.
My last thought is this, if
Hardee County went to a com-
pletely volunteer fire depart-
ment we would take a giant step
back into the '60s. This would
decrease the county's level of
fire and healthcare abilities
which would no doubt open up
this county for a lawsuit if
someone dies because of the
reduction in the services pro-
vided.


Energy'

County most all of my life. I
grew up in Bowling.Green. I
have seen many, many county
commissioners. If have never
seen a county commissioner
with such a negative and
destructive attitude. I have
never seen a commissioner \
berate and degrade the workers
and leaders of our county and
act so unprofessional. What do
you say commissioner, time to
give it a rest?
Commissioner, if you would
take all your negative energy
that you direct towards the
county manager, the fire chief
and the fire department and
apply the same amount of posi-
tive energy and focused on
some positive growth for i;
Hardee County, we would all be ,
better off. ''
At the budget meeting you
stated that the firemen should
not be at these meetings and
you wanted it stopped. You stat-
ed that the fire chief is allowing
them to be there and you told
the county manager he better
get control of the fire chief and
put a stop to it. I'll tell you like
the county manager told you,
these firemen are off duty and '
they have as much right as any
'other citizen to be at these
meetings.
I retired from Hardee County
Fire Rescue with 34 years of
service as a firefighter/para-
medic. All facts have been ref-
erenced and researched. I hope
this helps the citizens of Hardee
County better understand how
the Fire Department truly
works.
I end my letter by saying
Chief Choate has done a fan-
tastic job with the budget he has
to work with and the citizens of
Hardee County are fortunate to
have one of the best Fire Chiefs
and some of the best firefight-
er/paramedics and EMT's in the
state.

Robert L. Shiver .
Wauchula

Editor's Note: Robert Shiver is
Chief Choate's father-in-law
and is retired from Hardee
Fire/Rescue.


Commissioner Defends Stance On Fire Department, Manager


Mr. Jim Kelly of The Herald-
Advocate notified me that he'
had a letter to the editor that he
was sure referenced me. Mr.
Kelly stated he wanted me to
have a chance to address the
accusations and statements if I
so desired. I want to thank Mr.
Kelly and the Herald Advocate
for this opportunity. I am sure
everyone that reads Mr.
Shiver's letter to the editor will
agree that Mr. Shiver is in fact
talking about me.
First I will address the impli-
cation that there are only 30 or
40 'followers' that I represent. I
represent the taxpayers of
Hardee County. Mr. Shiver has
clearly ignored the fact that the
majority of the voters of this
county heard what I had to say
and asked me to represent them.
I am aware that my commit-
ment and dedication to this
honor is upsetting for those who
may have benefitted in the past
history of business as usual
which seemed to be "go along
to get along". The mandate
placed on me by the Hardee
County taxpayers is to establish
accountability for their money
and transparency of the actions
of all county government
charged with spending taxpay-
er's dollars.
Prior to and during my cam-
paign for office the fire depart-


ment was at the top of the list of
.many taxpayers to answer for
the escalation in costs.
Understand this is about the fire
budget not EMS. In fact, I have
been very clear to everyone
from day one that EMS should
be segregated administratively
with its own director. All para-
medics are funded as.full time
employees and should be
scheduled as such. But this does
not sit well with the union
because of overtime loses for
them (the 2011 adopted budget
for Overtime Dual Response
2011 was $204,774).
Let me state for the record
that Mr. Shiver has never per-
sonally held a conversation
with me about the fire depart-
ment or about any statements I
may or may not have made
before the campaign or after.
In reference to the county
manager, Lex Albritton, I made
no secret before my election
and after, that I have felt that he
needs to be replaced. Since my
election, Mr. Albritton has been
extended every opportunity to
recognize that the commission-
ers are the voice of the people
but he has chosen business as
usual. Approximately six years
ago I started attending the coun-
ty commission meetings and the
two things that were as clear as
could be was that the county


commissioners were not doing
the job they were elected to do
and were being blindly lead by
members of their own staff.
And the second thing was that
the county manager had not a
clue about how professional
public service standards should
apply to his job. The people
who elected me recognized this
very thing and have made it
clear that this has gone on way
too long.
During my campaign I'can
tell you that from one end of
this county to the other the citi-
zens made it clear they wanted
a change. That change was to
start with the manager being
replaced, and institute the ac-
countability and transparency
that clearly has not existed and
still does not exist today.
Because of a 4 to I vote the
changes wanted by the citizens
still have not occurred.
Chief Mike Choate personal-
ly is not an issue with me but
professionally Mr. Choate is on
the taxpayer's dime. So I can
tell you that I fully intend to
hold him to the same profes-
sional public service standards
as any other department head.
Mr. Choate has failed to demon-
strate to me that those standards
exist in his interpretation of
administrative responsibilities
to the board of county commis-


sioners. Throughout the past
years of my attending BOCC
meetings and fire board meet-
ings I have been taken aback by
the chief's deliberate intent to
produce inaccurate information
involving the fire department
and its operation. Long before I
was elected I questioned Mr.
Choate about this and he told
me that "this is the way it's
done". His fear mongering tac-
tics has allowed the tail to wag
the dog.
Ten of the 39 career Hardee
County fire fighters/EMS live
in Hardee County. Twenty-nine
(29) of these union fire fight-
ers/EMS employees, according
to Mr. Choate, live in Sarasota,
Bradenton, Lakeland, Tampa,
Orlando and elsewhere. The
question then is why we could
not take our own home grown
career firefighters, and as it is in
thousands of other fire depart-
ments across the nation, certify
them (if not already certified) to
instructor status, promote a
trained volunteer program, and
as it grew, and allow attrition to
cut back on fire fighters who
take over 1.4 million dollars a
year out of Hardee County to
their respective counties.
There is recent legislation
that assists in the training stan-
dards program for volunteer fire
fighters, especially in rural


communities. My research has
shown me that only the fire
departments controlled by
union rules limit the usefulness
of volunteer fire fighters by
restricting their duties, includ-
ing not interfering with over-
time pay for the union fire
fighter. In other words, equally
trained volunteers on duty can-
not respond to a fire if a union
fire fighter can get overtime.
The information obtained by
Mr. Choate's father-in-law in
the local region is the DeSoto
and Okeechobee fire depart-
ments who promote the same
union ideology. It is my inten-'
tion to bring information to the
citizens that reflects compara-
tively to the financial needs of
my county. Additional informa-
tion I have received from com-
parable counties can be found
on my website.
According to the US Fire
Service and Fire Analysis &
Research Service there are
1,148,100 fire fighters in the
USA. Career firefighters make
up 335,950 (29%) of the total.
Trained Volunteers make up
812,150 (71%) of the fire fight-
ers protecting our communities.
There are 30,165 local fire
departments in the USA. Of that
total there are 21,168 fire
departments that are all volun-
teer status. There are 4,989 fire


departments that are mostly
trained volunteer with some
career employees. Yet Mr. Al-
britton and Mr. Choate say this
is old school and that volunteers
are a thing of the past.
The question now is can
Hardee County afford to contin-
ue down this path? It is your
money and you should decide.
I am aware that my direct
approach in demanding clarity,
accountability and transparency
for tax payer's money as well as
all actions taken by our local
government is troublesome for
a few. But I truly believe only
those with :something to hide
will object.
As a commissioner I have
heard all arguments with a
majority saying that something.
needs to be done because the
cost is burdening the taxpayers.
I strongly feel that until we
achieve professional public
service standards throughout
the county, starting with a coun-
ty manager, and a strong
prompting by the commission-
ers to achieve that goal these
few kingdom builders who con-
tinue to try to deceive the com-
mission and the citizens will
continue to cripple Hardee
County and use your tax dollars
to do it.
Grady Johnson, County
Commissioner District 4


PUPIL PREPARATIONS


COURTESY PHOTO
SonHaven Preparatory Academy recently held a joint training workshop with the staffs of both the Sarasota and
Wauchula campuses at the Java Cafe in Wauchula. Classes were taught on the subjects of Philosophy of Christian
Education, Ethics in Education, Christian Approach to Dealing with Bullying, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and
First Aid. SonHaven will open its doors on Aug. 15 at the First Christian Church of Wauchula facility with 80 students
in grades K-4 to 12th grade. Pictured (front row, from left) are staff members Cindy Waters, Audra Sperry, Tammy
Sanders, Sabrina Crawford, Pamela Mack, Ralene Bates and Mary Panagiotou; (back row) Dr. Carolyn L. Hilt, Aimee
Bradley, Lorie Gill, Serena Fincel, Julie Hartman, Erika Galish and the Rev. Dr. Tom Hilt.


In addition to the Franklin stove, Benjamin Franklin is
said to have invented a rocking chair with a fan, an early
version of swim fins and the armonica, a type of musical,
instrument made of glass bowls.


PUBLIC NOTICE OF
MEETING CHANGE
The Hardee County Economic Development Council and
the Industrial Development Authority regular scheduled
meeting for August will be changed from Tuesday, August
9, 2011 at 9:00am to Tuesday, August 16, 2011 at 9:00am.
The Meeting will be held at the Board of County Commis-
sion Chambers, 412 W. Orange St., Room 103, Wauchula;
FL. If you would like further information please contact the
office at (863)773-3030.

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility, Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
Economic Development Office (773-3030) at least forty-
eight (48) hours prior to the meeting.

MARCUS SHACKELFORD, CHAIRMAN
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
8:4c


*-' I W-0








4A The Herald-Advocate, August 4, 2011


Obituaries

HARRY L. GRICE JR.
Harry L. Grice Jr, 62, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Aug. 2011, at home.
Born March 15, 1949, in
Wauchula, he was a lifelong
Hardee County resident. He
was 5 supervisor with Mobil
Mining and a member of New
Hope Baptist Church.
Survivors include wife Tina
Grice of Wauchula; three sons,
Christopher Grice of Titusville,
and Jake Grice and Kendall
Grice, both of Wauchula; three
daughters, Courtney Grice of
Gainesville, Tapanga Grice and
Haley Grice, both of Wauchula;
brother Darrell Grice and wife
April of 'Florida; and sister
Helen Faye Neal and husband
Rocky of Wauchula; and grand-
daughters Montana Grice and
Sheryl Grice.
Visitation is'tomorrow (Fri-
day) from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home. Services are
Saturday at 3 p.m. at First
Christian Church with the Rev,
Darin Canary officiating. Inter-
ment follows in New Hope
Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


C9 _qolg ul eino/a














HARRY L. GRICE JR.
Harry L. Grice Jr., 62, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Aug. 1,2011, at his home.
He was born in Wauchula
on March 15, 1949, and was a
lifelong Hardee County resi-
dent. He was a supervisor
with Mobil Mining and a
member of New Hope Baptist
Church.
He is survived by his wife,
Tina Grice of Wauchula; three
sons, Christopher Lowell
Grice of Titusville, and Jake
McKinnen.Grice and Kendall
Blake Grice, both of Wau-
chula; three daughters Court-
ney Lynn Grice of Gaines-
ville, and Tapanga Cheyenne
Grice and Haley Sara-
Elizabeth Grice, all of
Wauchula; brother Darrell
Grice and wife April of
Florida; sister Helen Faye
Neal and husband Rocky of
Wauchula; granddaughters
Montana McKenzie Grice and
Sheryl Lynn Grice; and sever-
al nieces and nephews.
Visitation is tomorrow,
Friday, Aug. 5, from 6 to 8
p.m. at Robarts Garden Chap-
el. Services are Saturday at 3
p.m. at First Christian Church
with the Rev. Darin Canary
officiating. Interment follows
in New Hope Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


Funeral Home
Wauchula


What is difficulty? Only a
word indicating the degree
of strength requisite for
accomplishing particular
objects; a mere notice of
the necessity for exertion;
a mere stimulus to men.
-Samuel Warren


IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA,IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 252009CA000544
HSBC BANK USA, AS TRUSTEE
FOR ACE SECURITIES CORP,
HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-HE3
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE,HEIRS
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENOR, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST THE
ESTATE OF CEFERINO VEGA
AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWN-
ERS,
Defendants.
/
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant
to Final Judgment of Foreclosure
for plaintiff entered In this cause
on August 20, 2010, In the Circuit
Court of Hardee County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in
Hardee County, Florida described
as:
THE NORTH 257 FEET OF
THE W 1/2 OF THE SE 1/4
OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE
1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWN-
SHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
25 EAST, HARDEE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, LESS 50'
EASEMENT OFF THE
WEST SIDE AND SUB-
JECT TO ROAD RIGHT OF
WAY ON NORTH SIDE FOR
STATE ROAD #64A; LESS:
A TRACT OF LAND LYING
IN SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP
34 SOUTH, RANGE 25
EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIB-
ED AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCING AT THE SE
CORNER OF THE W 1/2
OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF
SE 1/4 OF SAID, SECTION
5, THENCE DUE NORTH
ALONG THE EAST LINE
OF SAID W 1/2 A DIS-
TANCE OF 401.82 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING OF THE LAND
HEREIN DESCRIBED:
THENCE RUN NORTH 87*
35'20" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 330.66 FEET TO THE
,. WESTJJNE OF SAID W 1/2
3OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4;
THENCE S 00" 105'00" W
ALONG SAID WEST LINE A
DISTANCE OF 15.00 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89
48'40" E A DISTANCE OF
330.41 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
SUBJECT TO AN EASE-
MENT ON THE WEST SIDE
THEREOF.
and commonly known as: 1405
MAIN ST W, Wauchula, Fl 33873;
including the building, appurte-
nances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for cash, All
sales are held at the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 West
Main Street, Wauchula, Florida
(Second Floor Hallway outside of
Room 202), on August 17. 2011
at 11am.
Any persons claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Ils
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 26 day of July, 2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk


J. MARVIN TAYLOR
J. Marvin Taylor, 69, of
Myakka Head, died on Thurs-
day, July 28, 2011.
He was born in Myakka
Head on March 31, 1942. He
was a veteran and a lineman.
Survivors include son Jason
Taylor; daughter Patty Toft and
husband John; two brothers
Melvin Taylor and Perry Jef-
ferson Taylor; sister Ruth
Young; two grandsons, William
Taylor Embach and John Tyler
Toft; and two granddaughters
Jessica Brooke Embach and
Madison Renee Taylor.
Visitation is tomorrow (Fri-
day) 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home at 720 Manatee Ave.
West. Services are Saturday at
9:30 a.m. at Myakka Family
Worship Center, 33410 Sing-
letary Road, Myakka City with
the Rev. Lynn Howell officiat-
ing. Interment follows in New
Zion Cemetery in Ona.
Griffith-Cline Funeral Home
Bradenton


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 252011CA000123
FIDELITY BANK OF FLORIDA,
N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAUL JUAREZ, JR., VICTOR
JUAREZ and OPHELIA JUAREZ,
JUAN MARTINEZ, JOSE MAL-
DONADO, KATHY HENDRY,
TERESA CORTEZ, LEONARD
MARINO BARRON and WILLIAM
SMITH, AS TENANTS IN POS-
SESSION,
Defendants.
I

NOTICE OF SALE
SNOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore
closure entered in the above-enti-
tled cause in the Circuit Court of
Hardee County, Florida, B. Hugh
Bradley, Clerk of the Circuit Court,
will sell the property situate in
Hardee County, Florida, described
as:
Begin at the SW corner of
the NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of
the SE 1/4 of Section 33,
Township 33 South, Range
25 East, and run North
012'08" West, 20 feet to
Point of Beginning; thence
continue North 012'08"
West, 100 feet; thence
North 89"57'35" East,
434.35 feet; thence South
1214'08" East along the
Westerly right-of-way of
State Road #17, 102.60
feet; thence South
89*57'35" West 455.68 feet,
to Point of Beginning, all
lying and being in Section
33, Township 33 South,
Range 25 East, Hardee
County, Florida
at public sale at 11:00 a.m. on Au-
gust 17, 2011, to the highest bid-
der for cash, at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main St,
Second Floor Hallway outside of
Room 202, Wauchula, Florida
33873.
IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROP-
ERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE
A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS
AFTER THE SALE.
Dated this 26 day of July, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF COURTS
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
ATTN: PERSONS WITH DISABILI-
TIES
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
OFFICE OF THE COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATOR, 255 N. BROADWAY
AVENUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA
33830, (863) 534-4686, AT
LEAST, 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR
SCHEDULED COURT APPEAR-
ANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON
RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION
IF THE TIME BEFORE SCHED-
ULED APPEARANCE IS LESS
THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 711.
8:4,11c


S A
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915N. thAve, aucul


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CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 9 773-6783
):4-25p



CITY OF WAUCHULA

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular scheduled
meeting Monday August 8, 2011 at 6:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can
be held. Items on the agenda are as follows: Outsrdinance 2011-03 (Second Reading)
HCBCC Rezone, Ordinance 2011-04 (Second Reading) FLUM amendment HCBCC,
Ordinance 2011-06 (First Reading) 2010/2011 Budget Adjustments, Resolution 2011-
14 Approval of Peace River Explorations Lease of the Train Depot, Approve selection
of consultant for Brownfield Assessment Grant, set new date for September Com-
mission workshop, Approval of July 2011 Minutes, and any other business that may
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 773-6783

















come before Cithe Commission.
The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at on25 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.0-0 a




Pursuant to Section 286.01d07, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the




City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.








The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick Knight
Mayor


ATTEST
S/HClty Collir'
City Clerk


8:4c


PUBLIC NOTICE DISCLAIMER

Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Homes would like to
notify the general public of several important facts.
We purchased the building location only, previously
known as Brant Funeral Chapel not the business en-
tity. We urge anyone that has taken preneed agree-
ments with Brant Funeral Chapel to please contact
us to verify their records.
863-773-6400 7:28-8:11c


CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR


PRE-ARRANGEMENTS? ...


ROBARTS HAS BEEN HELPING FAMILIES FOR
OVER A CENTURY. WE ARE THE SAME
YESTERDAY, TODAY AND IN THE FUTURE.

IF YOU HAVE PRE-ARRANGEMENTS ELSEWHERE
AND HAVE CONCERNS, WE WOULD BE PLEASED
TO HELP YOU REVIEW THEM WITHOUT
OBLIGATION.

YOU CAN COUNT ON OUR EXPERIENCE AND
INTEGRITY.









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View Obits at robartsfh.com 8:4tfc
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BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
ATTORNEYS AT.LAW
501 WEST MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873-1729
TELEPHONE (863) 773-3241

WILLS & TRUSTS

PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
LARGE & SMALL ESTATES
HOMESTEAD DETERMINATION
DURABLEPOWERS OF ATTORNEY

LIVING WILLS GUARDIANSHIPS
7:21tfc






August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


REALITY RANCH YOUTH RODEO JUNIORS
First of all, I want to thank The Herald-Advocate for squeez-
ing in a sixth photo last week for the Tots division, but there was a
method to my (alleged) madness there are also six Juniors, and
I am not about to pick one of these tremendous cowboys or cow-
girls who doesn't get their photo in. So, here's hoping they will
accommodate one more week of an extra photo! And to help them
out, this column will be shorter, as it's the final standings and
awards.
There is one lone cowgirl in this division Gracie Albritton.


She won the barrel racing in her division on more than one occa-
sion. This is the only event Gracie rides in, and she wound up in
third place.
Now the cowboys, there are loads of them! Tony Webb and
Dawson Cantu a very familiar name in this column are the
longest riding rodeo contestants in this division, as they have been
competing for several years now. They both compete in goat-tying,
breakaway roping, buddy tie-down roping, and team roping. Tony
then climbs on the back of a steer to ride it, while Dawson gets in
the chute with a steer, grabs it by the head/horns, drags it across a
line and wrangles it to the ground.
The newcomers in this division are Clayton Harris, who is the
son of Peck Harris (whose team M&N Cattle won the Hardee
County Cattleman's Ranch Rodeo last weeke-'i!), who devotes his
time every month to judge these youngsters. Clayton rides calves.
And then there is the duo of Parker and Patrick Carlton, sons
of Dale Carlton, and whose family, Roman III Ranches, is one of
Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo's sponsors. Parker competes in chute-
doggin' and junior bullriding, while Patrick ropes in breakaway
and tie-down, and chute-doggin'. In fact, my favorite at the finals
was these two brothers in a tie-breaker in the chute-doggin' event!
Clayton placed second in the calf-riding. Tony took third place
in the steer-riding, but had a tough season in his other events.
Parker placed fourth in his debut season in the bullriding, and sec-
ond in chute-doggin' (winning the tie-breaker), while Patrick won
the tie-down buckle and placed third in the chute-doggin'.
That leaves Dawson, who placed third in goat-tying, third as
the header and fourth as the heeler in team roping, third in break-
away roping, and won the buckles for both the buddy tie-down rop-
ing (which he needs to thank dad Luke for his efforts) and the
chute-doggin'. Which means that Dawson also was the All-Around
Junior Cowboy, for which he took home an engraved saddle (and I
believe that this is the fifth saddle that this 10-year-old has won
over his career).
Congratulations, Cowgirl and Cowboys! Can't wait to see
y'all in September!


Patrick Carlton is awarded a winner's buckle from Jackie
Bishop for the Juniors tie-down roping.
M Er--""L~


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Gracie Albritton receives a bronc halter from Justin Webb
as the third-place winner in Juniors barrel racing.


Parker Carlton receives a new roughstock bag for his
fourth-place finish in his debut year of Juniors bullriding.


ir..

-- ir'


Dawson Cantu, with his engraved saddle as Junior All-
Around Cowboy and with family members (from left) dad
Luke, mom Mandy and brother Cameron.


MEETING


Clayton Harris shows off his new roughstock bag for sec-
ond place in the calf-riding event.


Tony Webb is presented with his roughstock bag by dad
Justin Webb for his third-place finish in steer-riding.


NOTICE


THE HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

invites the Public to the

SUSTAINABLE HARDEE: VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT meeting MONDAY,

LAND USE meeting TUESDAY, AUGUS


AUGUST


3T 30,


15, 2011


2011


INFRASTRUCTURE meeting MONDAY, SEPTEMBER


19,2011


QUALITY OF LIFE meeting TUESDAY,


SEPTEMBER 27,


201 1


412 W.


ALL MEETINGS 6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
Orange St., Rm. 102, Courthouse Annex, 1st floor, Wauchula
Please come share your thoughts and ideas of what is needed in your community
All meetings are open to the public


For More Information
Call The County Planning Department at

863-767-1964
Emait kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net
Visit www.hardeecounty.net/visioning


THERE MAY BE ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS IN ATTENDANCE
WHO MAY OR MAY NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE DISCUSSION


8:4c


III


I I I I







6A The Herald-Advocate, Augu

When Symptoms
Navigating The
The internet has been a boon
to helping patients understand
their illness, and a majority of
people today (68%) will first
research their symptoms online
to be better informed when
speaking with their doctor.
Unfortunately, for people af-
fected by a rare condition called
Cushing's disease, 1-2/million-
year worldwide, many signs
and symptoms, including
weight gain, depression, dia-
betes, fatigue and high blood
pressure, are also indicative of


Obituaries


GEORGE NEEL
George Neel, 72, of Zolfo
Springs, died on Tuesday, Aug.
2,2011.
Born on June 28, 1939, he
was the mayor of Zolfo Springs,
a retired United Methodist min-
ister, serving the First United
Methodist Church of Zolfo
Springs since 2002. During his
tenure on the Zolfo Springs
Town Commission he has also
held different positions with the
Florida League of Cities and the
Ridge League of Cities. He was
a member of the Masonic
Lodge in Wauchula.
He is survived by his wife of
44 years, Judy Neel of Zolfo
Springs; four sons, Jerry Neel
and wife Royce of Henderson,
Ky., Rev. Steven Neel and wife
Nancy of Jeffersontown, Ky.,
Roger Neel of Ottawa, Ohio,
and Art Neel of Zolfo Springs;
14 grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be Saturday at
10 a.m. at the Zolfo Springs
First United Methodist Church,
where a memorial service will
be held at 11 am. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be sent
to the Kentucky or Florida
Methodist Childrens' Home or
to Lydia House in Wauchula.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula






THURSDAy AUG. 4
eHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County Planning
& Zoning Board, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.
MONDAY. AUG. 8
VWauchula city Commis-
sion, regular meeting, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY. AUG. 9
/Bowling Green city
Commission, regular meet-
ing, City Hall, 104 E. Main
St., Bowling Green, 6:30
p.m.
THURSDAY, AUG. 11
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.,


st4, 2011

Don't Point To A Clear Diagnosis;
e Unknown of Cushing's Disease


other illnesses.
Cushing's disease is an endo-
crine disorder, which is caused
by a tumor on the pituitary.
gland at the base of the brain.
This tumor causes the pituitary
to secrete excess ACTH, a hor-
mone, that in turn stimulates the
adrenal glands to release excess
cortisol, a vital hormone thas
regulates metabolism, main-
tains cardiovascular function
and helps the body respond to
stress. Most often, Cushing's
disease affects adults between
the ages of 20 and 50 years, and
more than 70% of cases occur
in women.
The time to diagnosis for a
patient with Cushing's disease
can be several years from the
time they notice symptoms.
Patients with Cushing's disease
frequently see several special-
ists and undergo a large number
of medical tests before an accu-
rate diagnosis is made.
Lisa Alcorn, 29, of New York
City, was diagnosed with Cush-
ing's disease in 2008, three
years after she first started
experiencing symptoms. "Be-
ing diagnosed with Cushing's
disease was bittersweet; I final-
ly had an answer and felt a
sense of relief, but I still had so
many questions. There was lim-
ited information about the con-
dition available for my endocri-
nologist to share with me, and
my Internet searches provided
disappointing results. It was,
and still is, very challenging to
deal with, not only for me, but




Tackling
An important part of main-
taining a healthy neighborhood
and home for your family and
your pets is mosquito control,
which is achieved two ways: by
public health organizations and
careful inspections of standing
water by homeowners.
With just one bite, adult mos-
quitoes may transmit West Nile
virus, Eastern equine encephali-
tis and other viruses that can
cause sickness in both people
and animals. The bite of mos-
quitoes may also transmit heart-
worm disease to dogs and cats.
Taking a proactive approach to
pest control is a way every
community and homeowner can
reduce the number of biting,
flying and breeding mosqui-
toes.
Insect growth regulators
(IGRs) provide proven mosqui-
to control and a green approach
to pesticide. IGRs keep mosqui-
to populations at manageable
levels and reduce the need for
other chemicals to kill adult
mosquitoes.
IGRs "work through a
unique 'biorational' mechanism
that makes them remarkably
effective with a wide margin of
safety compared to other class-
es of insecticides," said Carl
Djerassi, Ph.D., founder of
Zoecon, the company that
developed IGR technology.
IGRs do not work like a typ-
ical pesticide, which kills the
current adult population imme-
diately. Instead, they keep
immature insects from growing
and are specifically targeted for
insect species without any
effect on mammals, amphib-
ians, birds and other nontarget
organisms. That's why it's
important to apply an IGR
before the mosquito breeding
season gets into full swing and
to reapply it to keep the popula-
tion under control. IGRs are
currently formulated to give
public health agencies multiple
delivery options depending on
their needs for control. Liquids


The correct response to the Irish greeting, "Top of the
morning to you' is "and the rest of the day to yourself."


also for my family."
There are a number of signs
that help differentiate Cushing's
disease from other diseases.
They include having a "moon
face" (round, red and full),
rapid weight gain resulting in
central obesity, reddish-purple
stretch marks, easy bruising and
fractured bones. Of" patients
have an odd coupling of symp-
toms that can manifest physi-
cally, hormonally or by meta-
bolic or cardiovascular effects.
Regardless of the signs and
symptoms, an important factor
affecting how quickly a diagno-
sis is made is a patient's persist-
ence and self-advocacy.
But when dealing with a rare
disease, becoming well in-
formed can be difficult. The
unusual combinations of symp-
toms and unexplained clinical
findings associated with
Cushing's disease can be puz-
zling. More publicly available
information may help increase
patient-physician dialogue, po-
tentially allowing physicians to
more easily recognize the
symptoms and reach a diagno-
sis more quickly.
Upon reflection of her journey
to diagnosis, Lisa said, "I find
the limited availability of
resources for patients with this
condition troubling in compari-
son to the abundance of medical
information accessible to the
public."
For more information please
visit www.Cushingsdisease.-
com.




The Pests
and pellets offer short-term
residual for short-term standing
water; briquettes can be used in
areas that remain wet for up to
150 days. Water-soluble torpe-
does containing IGRs are avail-
able for homeowners to use in
standing water areas such as
birdbaths, boat covers and out-
door garden ponds.
In addition to using IGRs, it's
a good idea to find a family-
friendly repellent and apply it
before enjoying extended time
in the yard, especially at dusk
and dawn. Also, mosquitoes
need a water source in which to
lay their eggs, so you should
drain any standing water around
your home.
The American Mosquito
Control Association also offers
the following tips:
Dispose of any tires. Tires
can breed thousands of mosqui-
toes.
Drill holes in the bottom of
recycling containers.
Clear roof gutters of
debris.
Clean pet water dishes reg-
ularly.
Check and empty chil-
dren's toys.
Repair leaky outdoor
faucets.
Change the water in bird-
baths at least once a week.
Canoes and other boats
should be turned over.
Avoid water collecting on
pool covers.
Empty water collected in
tarps around the yard or on
woodpiles.
Plug tree holes.
Even the smallest of con-
tainers (bottles, barrels, buck-
ets, overturned garbage can
lids) that can collect water can
breed hundreds to thousands of
mosquitoes.
More information on mos-
quito control is at www.mosqui-
tocontrolproducts.com,
www.centrallifesciences.com
and www.mosquito.org.


AT


lo


'V


FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 5pm9pm


SEE US FOR YOUR WILDCAT BOOSTER PASSES
OR CONTACT

ANDY JUDAH (863) 381-9984 ajuf99@YAHOO.COM

SUZANNE STAGG (863) 781-0310


2'J 14 F

S AUR9j Og A


r--n

I Ioosrs I
I PAUE I
IGeneral Admission
Ito all
2011-2012
IRegular Season
SVarsity and JV
SAthletic Contests

II


I each
L____--J


I II

I Fo8o@rsa I
PA$sE$ I
General Admission
to all
2011-2012
IRegular Season
SVarsity and JV
Football Games




each
L_____J


F ---


I ooss I


General Admission
to all 2011-2012
Regular Season
Varsity and JV
Athletic Contests
*Must be a student at
Hardee County Public School


140
1 I

each
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*FOR INFORMATION ON RESERVE SEATING FOR FOOTBAU SEASON CONTACT TANTA ROYAL AT (863) 7810310


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a Mini-IEMO Training
presented by Florida League of Cities on Friday August 5, 2011 at 9:00am, or as soon
thereafter as it reasonably can be held.
The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section. 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk a8:



NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING
OF CITY COMMISSIONERS OF THE
CITY OF WAUCHULA

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a Special Meeting on
Tuesday, August 9, 2011, at 4:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be
held. Item on the agenda: Interview Joseph Miranti, Terry Atchley, and Stephen
Weeks for the City Manager's Position, and any other business that may come before
the Commission.
The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, F. 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 8:4c


Visit With The

Hardee High School

Athletic Department ;
F4


4\










SIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 252011CP000058
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ERVIN MILTON LANIER
a.k.a E.M. LANIER
a.k.a. MILTON LANIER
SDeceased

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of ERVIN MILTON LANIER
a.k.a. E.M. LANIER a.k.a. MILTON
LANIER, deceased, whose date of
death was June 7, 2011, and
whose social security number is
xxx-xx-7979, is pending In the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
,Florida,' Probate Division, the
address of which s P.O. Drawer
1749, Wauchula, Florida 33873.
The namqs and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
SALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH. ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR IORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is August 4, 2011.


Personal Representative:
Florence Lanier
6894 Lanier Road
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
DAVID F. LANIER
E-Mail Address: lanier30@em-
barqmail.com
Florida Bar No. 045399
DAVID F. LANIER
P.O. Box 400
Avon Park, FL 33826-0400
8:4,11c


Why You Should Talk To

Your Healthcare Provider


Discussing symptoms with
your healthcare provider- even.
those that seem inconsequential
or may make you uncomfort-
able-is key to receiving an
accurate diagnosis. For women
with von Willebrand disease
(VWD), a common yet under
diagnosed bleeding disorder
caused by a missing or ineffec-
tive protein in the blood neces-
sary for clotting, honest and
open communication with their
healthcare provider is especial-
ly important.
To help bring attention to the
need for better communication
between women and their
healthcare providers, the
American Academy of Nurse
Practitioners(r) (AANP) has
Conducted a survey, as part of
its VWD Young Women's
Education Campaign.
Survey results show that.
close to 40 percent of women
have experienced one or more
of the potential symptoms of
VWD, but nearly half of them
have not discussed these symp-
toms with a healthcare provider.
Of those patients who did dis-
cuss their symptoms, the major-
ity did not recall being in-
formed that those symptoms
could indicate a bleeding disor-
der.
The five signs and symptoms
of VWD are easy bruising; fre-
quent or prolonged nosebleeds;
heavy, prolonged menstruation;
prolonged bleeding following
injury, childbirth or surgery;
and prolonged bleeding during
dental procedures.
"VWD symptoms may be
something many women do not
feel comfortable discussing, but
open communication can lead
to an accurate diagnosis and
ultimately a treatment plan that


can help you manage your con-
dition," said Josie Weiss, Ph.D.,
FNP-BC, associate professor,
Christine E. Lynn College of
Nursing at Florida Atlantic
University and fellow of the
American Academy of Nurse
Practitioners. "These findings
underscore the need for more
meaningful discussions about
VWD and its symptoms
between healthcare providers
and patients."
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC)
estimates that more than 1 per-
cent of the U.S. _population has
VWD. Roberta Smith, along
with several members of her
family, is among the approxi-
mately 3 million people living
with this common genetic dis-
order.
"After dealing with health
conditions over the years that
were caused by VWD, it is such
a relief to have a proper diagno-
sis and be receiving appropriate
_treatment," said Roberta. "I no
longer live in fear of bleeding
events."
While VWD affects both
men and women equally, it
takes women almost 16 years to
receive a diagnosis. Women
who are undiagnosed are at a
greater risk for serious compli-
cations such as miscarriages,
life-threatening bleeding fol-
lowing childbirth, and painful,
unnecessary hysterectomies.
More Information
To learn more about VWD,
visit www.AANP.org.
The survey was supported
through an educational grant
from CSL Behring, a biophar-
maceutical company that is
committed to the rare disease
and bleeding disorders commu-
nities.


August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A

Making a decision to have a child-it's momentous. It is to decide forever to have your
heart go walking around outside your body.
-Elizabeth Stone

Youth fades; love droops, the leaves of friendship fall/A mother's secret hope outlives
them all.

U U-~~


And Also A Special Thank You To

The Main Street Wauchula

Design Committee

Jerry Conerly, Mary K. Hanchey, Jim See,

Penny Hanchey, Susan Robertson, and Dani Valentim
8:4c

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By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With three events to go, a pair
of Wauchula youths lead the
Sertoma Junior Golf Tour.
Although the tour includes
youth ages 6 to 18, the upper
age groups have more Hardee
golfers. Some have played in all
seven events to date and some
have missed an event or two.
After the Bill Jarrett Match
Plat at River Greens in Avon
Park last Wednesday and
Thursday, 18-year-old Taylor
Barlow and 16-year-old Will
Bennett were leading their divi-
sions.


In the 17-18 age group
Barlow. at 287.was nine points
up on his nearest opponent,
Greg Gentry (278) of Avon
Park. Four of the remaining
seven players in that division
are from Hardee County. Daniel
Miller( 143) is third. Matt
Godwin (193) fifth; and Dalton
Hewett and Dustin Scheel tied
for sixth at 161.
In the 15-16 age group,
Bennett(288) has a four-point
lead over his nemesis Colin
Walkup (284). Of the two dozen
boys in this division, next from
Hardee is William Beattie
(153.5) 10th. missing three


The Herald-Advocate


gIt 42011
igust 4. 2911


I | Thursday, Au




Wauchula Helps Utility Payers


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula is trying to help its
utility customers cope with
greatly increased electric bills.
At Monday night's planning
session, the Wauchula City
Commission talked about re-
cent 30 percent increases in the
electricity costs from Tampa
Electric Co. (TECO). Negotia-
tions are under way and the city
will switch to Florida Power &
Light on Oct. I.
In the meantime, city officials
are working with customers on
meeting the higher obligations.
Finance officer James Brad-
dock explained that staff has
tried everything to keep from
turning off utilities.
"TECO is taking advantage.
They've got us over a barrel.
See.what you can do to work
with people. Mosaic has lay-
offs. Others too,", said Com-
missioner Russell Smith.
Braddock said if people come
in or call on the bill due date
and can't meet all the bill, they
will be allowed to pay half then
and the other half within two
weeks. Braddock noted there
have always been several peo-
ple who wait until the last pos-
sible time and call in to avoid
cut-off. These people are
known by the staff, but recently
there's been a 30 to 40 percent
increase in people being unable
to meet the higher bills.
If people have applied for
LIEAP (Low Income Energy
Assistance Program) or other
funds, which are on the way, the
city will wait until that payment
comes. "It's on a case by case
basis," said Braddock, who
noted the $15 late collection
charge is being waived in some
cases.
People with concerns should
check with the city billing
department at the administra-
tion building on South Seventh
Avenue.
In other news, the commis-
sion approved a tentative mill-
age rate of 5.6485 mills for the
2011-2012 fiscal year. This is
the "roll-back" rate of the cur-
rent 5.442 mills, which the city
has held for several yeats. In
effect, city residents will pay
about the same taxes as they do
now.
The "roll-back" rate is the
amount of money it would take
to raise the same ad valorem tax


revenue as this year. It is higher
this time because of a major
decrease in property values.
The county Property Apprais-
er's Office says properties in
the city limits reflect a decrease
in value from $112,167,237 to
$100,633.475, which amounts
to 10.28 percent or
$11,533,762.
The millage rate of 5.442
mills would raise $548.226, a
decrease of $64,306 from this
year's tax revenue. The "roll-
back" rate of 5.6485 would
raise $569,029,.only a $43,503
decrease from this year's tax
revenue.
"That $20,803 amounts to
about $1 per person; it will be
the same we've paid this year,
nothing extra," said Commis-
sioner Ken Baker. His motion
for the higher 5.6485 millage
rate was seconded by Commis-
sioner John Freeman. Com-
missioners Keith Nadaskay,
Gary Smith and Rick Knight
agreed. Commissioner Pattie
Detwiler was absent.
Commissioner Russell Smith
dissented. "I'd be hard pressed
to vote on a tax increase. We
need to hold the line on expen-
ditures, just as we expect our
residents to. I don't feel we
need it. The city can tighten its
belt just as citizens do."
Braddock pointed out that
auditors were concerned this
year about the decrease in the
General Fund balance and
reserves. Most city expenses are
met by what is called propri-
etary funds, such as the Utility
Fund, Police, Airport, etc., but
they have to be used for their
specific expenditures, with only
a small portion going to admin-
istrative costs to operate those
programs. General Revenue, ad
valorem tax dollars, pays for all
other city administrative costs.
Public hearings on the pro-
posed 2011-12 budget will be at
6 p.m. on Sept. 12 and again on
Sept. 27.
In other city business, the
commission:
-retroactively approved the
request for proposals for a con-
sultant on the Brownfield
$300,000 grant for an inventory
of all the petroleum or other
hazardous materials sites in the
city.
-reviewed the lease for
Peace River Explorations Inc.
of the historic city depot. PRE


has six months from when the
lease is approved to solidify
plans to renovate the north end
of the depot. Otherwise. the
lease will apply only to the
already renovated southern por-
tion of the depot.
There was discussion of fire
insurance. The city will insure
the building, but PRE will have
to insure the contents. Should
the building burn down anytime
within 20 years from May
12,1998 when the building was
given to the city, it would revert
back to the owner, Wauchula
Development Corp.
-discussed the cost of
$2,738 for 17.recorders and ear-
phones, five neck loops for
those with hearing aids and a
transmitter to put in the city
auditorium to meet the
Americans with Disability Act
requirements to make programs
in the auditorium accessible to
the hearing impaired.
Acting City Manager Olivia
Minshew said it could be met in
the current year's budget. She is
authorized to spend up to
$5,000 without officially going
out for bids.
Minshew also said three city
manager interviews are set for
Aug. 9, beginning at 4 p.m. and
continuing every 45 minutes.
Another two are set for Aug. 16.
The sixth candidate, James
Coleman is on deployment with
the Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency in Mississippi
until Aug. 17, the tentative date
he will be demobilized and
available for interview.
-opened as a Community
Redevelopment Agency board
and discussed plans for the old
Coker Fuel Building at Eighth
and Main. which is in the
process of demolition. They
have delayed it so there would-
n't be a vacant lot in the historic
downtown area.
Plans are to put an incubator
business complex and retail
shop in its place. CRA has
included $100,000 in this year's
-budget for planning and engi-
neering and $255,000 in next
year's budget for consttiiction
of the new building.
The back portion of the prop-
erty the city purchased two
years ago goes to within 20 feet
of the church on South Eighth
Avenue. The rear portion will
be used for a city parking lot
with about 40 spaces.




events. At 16th, Bryson White
(102) has also missed three
events. Following along are
Bradley Brewer, Tyler Hewett
and Eric Klein.
Results from last week's
event shows Barlow second to
underdog Russell Rigg (ninth in
the overall 17-18 standings).
Miller was right behind Taylor
and both were ahead of Gentry,
who placed fourth. Godwin was
sixth and Hewett seventh.
Scheel did not play in this one.
Walkup out-dueled Bennett
in the 15-16 group. Walkup was
first, Bennett second and White
sixth. There were no other
Hardee boys in that division last
week.
Final events are at Placid
Lakes, the Country Club of
Sebring and the final tour
championship at Sun N' Lake.


EMANYCOLOR


., IA iLYiurlII h ,l i ,AdCnet II on. affr u t i oi,, NIeed.


(LSPS 57


After


the)




UNITED WAY OF
CENTRAL FLORIDA


- school Program


Visit our website at www.thehardeey.org


oT flodidC.,l, Inc.
The IHardee County Family YMCA Inwstng InMidw,


TilHE HARDER YMCA 610 W. ORANGE AVE WAUCHULA 773-6445
I-- - - -~r _I I I-


PAGE ONE


Top High School Students To

Receive Specialized Education


The Florida Department of
Education has awarded $3.6
million in "Race to the Top"
funds over the next three years
to an educational group which
will include service to Hardee
County's top students.
The federal dollars are going
to the Panhandle Area Edu-
cational Consortium for the cre-
ation and implementation of a
special program for gifted and
talented students in 14 North-
west Florida school districts
and six in Central Florida's
Heartland Education Consor-
tium. "We are very pleased and
excited to have earned this
competitive award through the
hard work and creative efforts
of our school districts and staff.
More importantly; it is a great
opportunity for our small, rural
districts and their gifted and tal-
ented students," said Patrick L.
McDaniel, executive director of
the Panhandle consortium.
The state DOE has made
S.T.E.M. education Science,
Technology, Engineering and
Math one of its top priorities
for providing educational fund-
ing through the Race to the Top
initiative.
According to the 2010
Florida Council of 100 report
"Closing the Gap," within a
decade nearly nine out of 10


new jobs will require creden-
tials in a S.T.E.M. discipline
and education beyond a high
school diploma.
High school students eligi-
ble for services will include
those recommended by their
instructors, who score either a
four or a five on the mathemat-
ics and science portions of the
Florida Comprehensive Assess-'
ment Test, and those identified
by their school districts as gift-
ed or talented.
The districts in the Florida
Panhandle will include Walton,
Holmes, Washington,' Jackson,
Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty,
Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla, Taylor,
Jefferson and Madison coun-
ties. The districts in the
Heartland will include DeSoto,
Glades, Hardee, Hendry, High-
lands and Okeechobee.
The multi-faceted project
will involve higher-education
faculty, military, business and
industry as collaborators and
partners. Through these partner-
ships, teachers and students will
engage in authentic S.T.E.M.
research experiences and lead-
ership development. Curricu-
lum is designed to positively
impact perceptions, knowledge
and skills in S.T.E.M. and
engage parents throughout the
three year process.


On the most recent Program
for International Student As-
sessment exam, 24 countries
out-performed U.S. students in
mathematics and 16 countries
performed better in science.
When the Thomas Fordham In-
stitute examined data from the
National Assessment of Edu-
cational Progress exam, it
found that during the last
decade since the passage of the
No Child Left Behind act, low-
est performing students have
made learning gains but the
highest performing students
have made almost no learning
gains.
These research findings
greatly alarmed the Panhandle
Area Educational Consortium
and its member school districts,
and prompted the consortium to
lead the response to the recent
Florida Department of Educa-
tion call for proposals on behalf
of the 14 Panhandle member
school districts and the six
small and rural school districts
which comprise the Heartland
consortium.
"This award will help our
districts support their students
and enable them to compete in
the S.T.E.M. arena," said
McDaniel.


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PROGRAM ACTIVITIES INCLUDE:


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A A A Arts & Crafts


Sports


i' ~ II ~ 1I





2B The Herald-Advocate, August 4, 2011



SHardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO
Bobbie Barker & Jonathan Pleger
Bobbie Barker Engaged
To Marry Jonathan Pleger


Bobbie Jayne Barker and
Jonathan Howard Pleger, both
of Wauchula, announce their
engagement and coming mar-
riage.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of Deborah Barker of Zolfo
Springs and the late Bobby
Barker.


The prospective groom is the
son of Sandy and Howard
Pleger of Zolfo Springs.
Plans are being made for a
Saturday, Oct. 22, wedding.
The couple will exchange mar-
riage vows at the Zolfo Springs
home of the groom's parents.


Certain cheeses including aged Cheddar, Swiss and
Monterey Jack, are thought to help protect teeth from
decay.




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August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


NURSES OF YEAR


CHAMBER REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Vanessa Hernandez on Wednesday, June 1, spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club about the
Hardee County Chamber of Commerce, which promotes and helps local businesses
with a variety of services and programs. Shown (from left) are Lavon Cobb, club
President Sue Birge, Hernandez and Shaila Rahman of Vandolah Power. Hernandez is
an executive with Mid-Florida Credit Union and a chamber director.
Baseball is the only field of endeavor where a man can succeed three times out of 10
and be considered a good performer.
-Ted Williams


/Z4








From The Herald-Advocate
Of Thursday, August 1, 1968

Front-Page Headlines:
0 1968-69 School Budget Proposed At $2.6 Million
Two Rabid Coons Found In Hardee
Howard Reports Hardee Stadium Bonds 2-3 Sold
Hospital Bonds May Be For Sale in Fall
Four Cars Damaged In Accident in Wauchula

h tie Herrald-Advocate 5 o Pa I


SrHardee 1968-9 Sho
S rs Needed Bufet f

4. At $2.6 MiMio.



$V --:I, Two Rabid
S roaor.Cl CoonsFound

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4B T'he Hrrald-Advocate, August 4, 2011


Fish Busters
By Bob Wattendorf
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


BASS TROPHY PROGRAM IN THE WORKS
Once, catching and consuming fish was a matter of survival.
Later. catches offered something to barter or sell. Now, most peo-
pie fish recreationally.
Regardless of the purpose behind fishing, big catches still
stroke the angler's ego.
Today, recreational fishing has an annual $7.5 billion econom-
ic impact in Florida. Habitat conservation and regulations help sus-
tain these fisheries, but with greater demand it is increasingly
important to protect and recycle the largest trophy fish by also pro-
moting voluntary catch-and-release.
Florida's "Big Catch" angler recognition program helps stroke
the ego of successful anglers by allowing them to show off their
prowess. The Big Catch program provides a full-color certificate
and a window sticker for anglers who catch any of'33 species of
listed freshwater fishes that exceed a minimum length or weight.
If people catch five qualifying fish of the same species, they are
recognized as a Specialist. If they report five qualifying fish of dif-
ferent species, they become a Master Angler, and if they take and
report qualifying fish representing 10 different species, they are an
Elite Angler.
Young people can enter fish that are about 25 percent smaller
than adult qualifying sizes.
Big Catch also encourages anglers to fish for a variety of
species and to travel to locate them, while promoting appropriate
catch and release.
A new set of "TrophyCatch" marks and awards are in the
works for trophy bass anglers. The TrophyCatch angler recognition
program will be the hallmark of the long-term Florida Black Bass
Management Plan, which the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission approved in June. The FWC intends to ensure that
Florida is the undisputed bass fishing capital of the world.
TrophyCatch will be a full-fledged initiative to document
largemouth bass caught, and preferably released, throughout
Florida that are heavier than eight pounds. Incremental rewards and
recognition will be provided to anglers reporting bass in the 8-10,
10-12, 12-13 and greater than 13-pound categories.
The anticipated rollout for TrophyCatch is October 2012.
"This program, driven by private dollars, can substantially
enhance Florida bass fishing by addressing ecological issues and
encouraging recycling of trophy bass, but it will also have a great
social and economic impact," said Tom Champeau, director of the
FWC's Division of Freshwater Fisheries Management.
Biologists are developing specific handling guidelines to
ensure anglers do the best possible job of effectively releasing
these fish while providing the FWC with valuable research and
marketing information.
FWC representatives will certify bass over 13 pounds caught
from October through April (beginning in 2012) for entry'into the
Florida Trophy Bass Hall of Fame. Sponsors, corporate partners
and the media will provide incentives to encourage reporting and
releasing all such catches.
Fisheries biologists will use TrophyCatch reports to identify
Florida's best bass fisheries to determine which management prac-
tices (e.g., habitat and aquatic plant management, regulations,
stocking) are most effective in creating trophy fisheries.
VisitFlorida and the FWC will work with the media to use this
information to establish Florida as a prime trophy bass fishing des-
tination. Incorporating social media and online mapping resources
Swill make this information widely available to the public and cre-
Sate a buzz as anglers report new trophies and post photos.
Such recognition will increase both resident and nonresident
angler -participation and,. ee~jo t ic tackli-ad.license, sales,
tourism and help create the, next generation,maf cares about our
natural resources and outdoor recreational heritage.
In Florida, more recreational fishing days are spent on fresh
water (24.4 million days by 1.4 million anglers) than on salt water.
Largemouth bass are the most sought-after species not only in-
Florida but also in the nation. Bass anglers alone generate $1.25
billion for our economy, supporting thousands of jobs.
Consequently, promoting and safeguarding Florida's trophy bass
fisheries is good for everyone.
Tim O'Neil, an FWC marketing expert and liaison to the
Wildlife Foundation of Florida a public-support organization
affiliated with the FWC said that the FWC and the Foundation
want to work with the sportfishing industry. "TrophyCatch is in its
infancy but will grow quickly. We want to work with the best and
brightest in the corporate world to make this a win-win-win for the
environment, anglers and industry."
Learn more at MyFWC.com. Click on "Fishing," and select
"Freshwater Fishing" then "Big Catch." Send suggestions for ways
to enhance these partner-driven programs to me at Bob.Watten-
dorf@MyFWC.com.
With a record of trophy catches, we hope to reaffirm our sta-
tus as the Fishing Capital of the World and become the undisputed
Bass Fishing Capital of the World.



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Town of Zolfo Springs &

Neighborhood Watch

Is Having Their BlCI TO SCHOOL DRIVE

SUPPLIES To BE DISTRIBUTED

-- Thursday dugust 11t?
4:30 -6:00

Sat The City Hall.
1tOne Hundred Kids


X~ir
.t:
t

"


Victory Praise Center is host-
ing a gospel sing on Saturday at
7 p.m., featuring the Allison
Family.
Pastor Robert and Assistant
Pastor Vince invite everyone to
join them at the church at 132
E. Main St., Wauchula. Finger
snacks will follow the service.

Cowboy-Up Ministry will not
be holding services at Cracker
Trail Arena in August or
September. It will return to
Cracker Trail Arena on Oct. 7.
This evangelistic ministry
will have services at 10 a.m. in
the Arcadia Turner Center on
Aug. 7, 14 and 21. The ministry
will then travel to Fireman's
Field at the Highlands County
Fairgrounds for Aug. 28 and all
of September. For more infor-
mation, check the calendar at
www.cowboyupministry.com
or http://calendar.yahoo.com/-
horseministry.

The deadline for,Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.

The average car produces
a pound of pollution every
25 miles.


-S


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
This is what the Lord says,
"Do not act like other
nations. ... They cut down a
tree and carve an idol. It can-
not speak and it needs to be
carried, because it cannot
walk. ... Do not be afraid of
such gods, for they can nei-
ther harm you nor do you
any good."
Jeremiah 10:2,3b,5b (NLT)

FRIDAY
Lord, there is no one like
You! For You are great, and
Your name is full of power....
Among all the wise people of
the earth and in all the king-
doms of the world, there is
no one like You.
Jeremiah 10:6,7b (NLT)

SATURDAY
The wisest of people who
worship idols are stupid and
foolish. The things they wor-
ship are made of wood.
...But the Lord is the only
true God, the living God. He
is the everlasting King.
Jeremiah 10:8,10 (NLT)

SUNDAY
Say this to those who wor-


ship other gods, "Your so-
called gods, who did not
make the heavens and
earth, will vanish from the
face of the earth. But God
made the earth by His
power, and He preserves it
by His wisdom.
Jeremiah 10:11-12a (NLT)

MONDAY
He (God) has stretched out
the heavens by His under-
standing. When He speaks,
there is thunder in the heav-
ens. He causes the clouds to
rise up over the earth. He
sends the lightning with the
rain and releases the wind


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
.interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-Florida Paddling Trails agreement, Pattie Detwiler, 8:35 a.m.
-Award bid for emergency debris removal, 8:50 a.m.
-Plans for Hardee County Records Building, 9:05 a.m.
-2012 Legislative packet, 9:20 a.m.
Caloosa Belle newspaper article on volunteer fire department
and fire department budget review, Grady Johnson, 9:35 a.m.
-'Heartland Crimestoppers report.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.


2010 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
Wauchula Hills Water Treatment Plant
We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we
deliver to you every day. Our water source is the City of Wauchula, which receives its water from wells in the Floridan Aquifer. The water is then filtered
by reverse osmosis and chlorinated for disinfection purposes.
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact the Hardee County Utilities office at 863-773-3465. Wauchula
Hills routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated oth-
erwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2010.
In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as
feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.
MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
"ND" means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/I) one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (pg/I) one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.
Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) measure of the radioactivity in water.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition
of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health
In 2009, a source water assessment was conducted for our water system. The assessment found 16 potential sources of contamination near the wells.
These included petroleum storage tanks and a wastewater treatment plant. The level of risk is from low to moderate. Source water assessments are
posted at http://www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp/.
Radioactive Contaminants
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of MCL Level MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement Sampling. VYolatlon Detected
(moJyr.) Y/N, _: .
Alpha emitters (pCi/l) 3/08 N 7 0 15 Erosion of natural deposits -
Radium 226 or combined 3/08 N 0.9 0 5 Erosion of natural deposits
radium (pCi/l)


Inorganic Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Level Detected MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Unit of Measurement sampling Violation
(moJyr.) Y/N
Barium (ppm) 3/08 N 0.038 2 2 Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from
metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits
Fluoride (ppm) 3/08 N 0.5 4 4 Erosion of natural deposits; water additive
which promotes strong teeth when at.
optimum levels between 0.7 and 1.3 ppm;
discharge from fertilizer and aluminum
factories
Sodium (ppm) 3/08 N 9.3 N/A 160 Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil

Nitrate (as Nitrogen) 1/10 N 0.74 10 10 Runoff from fertilizeruse; leaching from
(ppm) septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural
deposits
Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of MCI.. Level Range MCLG or MCL or Likely Source of Contamination
Unit of sampling Violation Detected of MRDLG MRDL
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Results
Chlorine (ppm) Monthly N 0.8 0.342- MRDLG = 4 MRDL= 4 Water additive used to control microbes
1.6031
Haloacetic Acids 3/10 N 9.8 NA NA MCL= 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(five) (HAA5) (ppb)
TTHM [Total 3/10 N 28.54 NA NA MCL= 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
Trihalomethanes]


Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Contaminant and Unit Dales of AL 90th No. of MCLG AL Likely Source of Contamination
ofMeasurement sampling Violation Percentile sampling (Action
(mo./yr.) Y/N Result sites Level)
exceeding
the AL
Copper (tap water) 9/09 N 0.0175 0 1,3 1.3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems;
(ppm) erosion of natural deposits; leaching fiom wood
preservatives
Lead (tap water) 9/09 N 0.5 0 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems,
(ppb) ______ ______ erosion ofnatural deposits
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is pri-
marily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The City of Wauchula is responsible for providing high quality
drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can
minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing, your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned
about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to
minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels
over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up
substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or
domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and
petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that lap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which I;mit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by
public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide
the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of con-
taminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can
be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons
with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other Immune system disorders, some
elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from Infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
EPA/CDC guidelines oh appropriate means to lessen the risk of Infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from
the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 8:4c


(Zolfo Residents)

Will Recieve A Tote Bag With Goodies.
Bring Vour Last Water Bill Reciept To Enter
1 Drawing For & Backpack
Full Of School Supplies.
8:4c


from His storehouse.
Jeremiah 10:12b-13 (NLT)

TUESDAY
Compared to Him (God), all
people are foolish and have
no knowledge at all! They
make idols... but they are
frauds. They have'no power
or life in them.
Jeremiah 10:14-15a (NLT)

WEDNESDAY
Jeremiah prayed, "I know,
Lord, that a person's life is
not his own. No one is able
to plan his own course. So,
correct me, Lord, but please
be gentle."
Jeremiah 10:23 (NLT)








August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Light One Candle
By Gerald M. Costello
The Christophers


QUIT THE MINISTRY?
It's a story that's been told and re-told, but it's important to
those of us who think of ourselves as Christophers. It goes some-
thing like this:
Years ago when our founder, Father James Keller, was a sem-
inarian, he took a break from his studies and was thinking of call-
ing it quits. One night he asked a priest about making that decision,
and the priest's reply, that he would never advise the young Keller
to leave the seminary, was an eye-opener.
"After all," he told Keller, "in God's plan there may be thou-
sands of people whose salvation depends on what you do for them
as a priest."
Not only did Father Keller stay on, of course, but the ministry
he chose in The Christophers reached those thousands and more,
Catholic hnd non-Catholic alike.
I thought of that story when I read Father Joseph Breighner's
musings on his 40 years in the priesthood, in his column in The
Catholic Review. I've never met Father Joe, as he calls himself, but
I read his column regularly because I like his style and I like what
he has to say.
As Father Keller had done, he, too, had once thought of drop-
ping out. But he recalled the observation he'd heard years before
from another priest. "Some men feel compassion for themselves


and leave," he had said. "Others feel compassion for the people and
stay."
Over the: years Father Joe reached uncounted listeners through
his radio broadcasts, carried to more than 300 stations by the
Armed Forces Network. One listener, from California, wrote to tell
Father Joe that one night when he was intent on committing suicide
he had tuned into the program by chance, and that the words he had
heard from the priest convinced him to change his mind.
A second story from Father Joe's "most memorable" list is
more personal. Newly ordained, he was called to anoint a dying
man, and as he did so the man looked up from his hospital bed.
"Father Joe," he said, "it's a wonderful thing you're doing with
your life."
Father Breighner has seen a time of g." change since his
ordination day 40 years ago, a point he referred to in his column.
"Where there once were many priests, today there is a shortage.
Once packed churches have now been closed or clustered. Schools
run by nuns are gone. So are many of the nuns! Who could have
predicted this turnaround?"
But he took heart in the long view, the realization that over the
years the Church has undergone many such changes through
years that were grace-filled, and those that were barren. And, as he
quoted Mother Teresa, "We are not called to be successful; we are
called to be faithful."
Forty years is a long time, a major share of the human lifespan.
And Father Joe looked back on those years with a deep content-
ment.
"I don't regret risking my life for God," he wrote. "Some peo-
ple have to climb Mount Everest for reasons known only to them.
Others climb mountains of ministry, for reasons known only to
God."
Thank you, Father Joe.


Informe annual de calidad del agua potable de 2010
Planta de tratamlento de agua de Wauchula Hills
Nos complace presentar este informed annual de calidad de agua del ano. Este informed estd disefada para informarle sobre la calidad del agua y servicios
que le ofrecemos cada dia. Nuestra fuente de agua es la ciudad de Wauchula, que recibe su agua de pozos en el Floridan acuifero. El agua se filtra por
6smosis inversa y clorado pard fines de desinfecci6n.
Si tiene alguna pregunta acerca de este informed ni respect de la utilldad del agua, comuniquese con la Oficina de utilidades de condado de Hardee'
S en 863-773-3465. Wauchula colinas supervise rutinariamente de contaminants en el agua potable de acuerdo a las leyes federales y estatales,
normas y reglamentos. Excepto donde se indique lo contrario, este Informe se basa en los resultados de nuestra supervisl6n para el perfodo del 1 de
enero y el 31 de diciembre 2010.
En la siguiente tabla, se encuentra familiarizados t6rminos y abreviaturas. Para ayudarle a mejor comprender estos t6rminos hemos incluido las siguientes
definiciones:
Mdximo nivel de contaminants o LCM: el mas alto nivel de Ln contaminante que se permit en el agua potable. MCLs se establecen para la MCLGs
como factible utilizando la mejor tecnologia de tratamiento disponible.
Mdximo objetivo de nivel de contaminants o MCLG: el nivel de un contaminante en el agua potable por debajo del cual no hay ningin riesgo para la
salud conocido o esperado. MCLGs permiten un margen de seguridad.
Nivel de acci6n (AL): La concentraci6n de un contaminante que, si se supera, provoca el tratamiento u otros requisitos que debe seguir un sistema de
agua.
"ND" medios no detectan y indica que la sustancia no fue encontrada por anAlisis de laboratorio.
Parties por mill6n (ppm) o miligramos por litro (mg/I): una part en peso del analito a 1 mill6n de parties en peso de la muestra de agua.
Partes por mil millones (MPP) o microgramos por litro (pg/l): una part en peso del analito a mil millones de parties en peso de la muestra de agua.
Picocurie por litro (pCi/L): media de la radioactividad en el agua.
MAximo nivel de desinfectante residual o MRDL: el mayor nivel de desinfectante en el agua potable. Hay pruebas convincentes de que la adici6n de un
desinfectante es necesaria para control de contaminants microbianos.
MAximo objetivo nivel desinfectante residual o MRDLG: el nivel de un desinfectante de agua potable por debajo del cual no hay ningin riesgo para la
salud conocido o esperado
En 2009, se realize una evaluaci6n de agua de la fuente de nuestro sistema de agua. La evaluaci6n encuentra 16 fuentes potenciales de contaminaci6n
cerca de los pozos. Estos incluyeron tanques de almacenamiento de petr6leo y una plant de tratamiento de aguas residuales. Es el nivel de riesgo de
bajo a moderado. Evaluaciones de agua de origen se registran en http://www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp/.

Radiactivos Contaminantes
Contaminantes y unidad Fechas de MCL Nivel MCLG LCM Probablemente el origen de la contamlnael6n
de media muestreo violacl6n detectado
_(Mo/ano). S/N
Emisores alfa (pCi/I) 3/08 N 7 0 15 Erosi6n de dep6sitos naturales

Radio radio 226 o 3/08 N 0.9 0 5 Erosi6n de dep6sitos naturales
combinado (pCi/l)

Inorganicos Contaminantes

Contaminantes y Fechas de MCL Nivel detectado MCLG LCM Probablemente el origen de la
unidad de media muestreo violaci6n contamlnacl6n
(Mo/anlo). S/N
Bario (ppm) 3/08 N 0.038 2 2 Descarga de perforaci6n de desechos;
aprobaci6n de la gcsti6n de las refinerias de
metals; erosi6n de dep6sitos naturales
Fldior (ppm) 3/08 N 0.5 4 4 Erosi6n de dep6sitos naturales; aditivo de
agua que promucve fucrtes dientes cuando a
niveles 6ptimos entire 0,7 y 1,3 ppm;
aprobaci6n dc la gesti6n de las fibricas de
fertilizantes y de aluminio
Sodio (ppm) 3/08 N 9.3 N/A 160 Intrusi6n de agua salad, lixiviaci6n de suclo

Nitrato (como 1/10 N 0.74 10 10 Escorrentia de fertilizantes de uso; lixiviaci6n
nitr6geno) (ppm) de fosas spticas, alcantarillado; crosi6n de
dp__6sitos naturals

Etapa 1 desinfectante/desinfecci6n subproducto (D/DBP) contaminants
Contaminantes y Fechas LCM Nivel Gama de MCLG o MCL o Probablemente el origen de la
unidad de media dc Vlolaci6n Defectado los MRDLG MRDL contaminaci6n
muestreo S/n resultados
(Mo/aflo.)
Cloro (ppm) Mensual N 0.8 0.342- MRDLG = 4 RDL= 4 Aditivo de agua que se uliliza para controlar
1.6031 los microbios
Acidos Haloacetic 3/10 N 9.8 NA NA M CLI= 60 Subproducto de la desinfecci6n del agua
(cinco) (HAA5) potable
(MPP)
TTHM [Total 3/10 N 28.54 NA NA MCL =80 Subproducto de la desinfccci6n del agua
trihalometanos] potable
(MPP)_____________________________________________

Plomo y cobre (agua del grifo)
Contaminantes y unidar Fchas de AL Violaci6r Resultdo Lot itlos d' MCLG AL Probiblemcnte el origin de la contlminacl6n
de media muestreo S/n e percent muestreo (Nivd de
_Molflo). _0 superior al AL acd 6n),
Cobre (agua del grifo 9/09 N0.0175 1.3 1.3 Corrosi6n de los sistemas de fontaneria
(ppm) doindsticos; crosi6n de dep6sitos naturales;
lixiviaci6n de conservantes de la madera
Plomo (agua del grifo /09 N 05 0 015 Corrosi6n de los sistemas de fontaneria
(MPP) _____ domestica, erosi6n de dep6sitos naturales

Si esta present, los niveles elevados de plomo pueden causar problems graves de salud, especialmente para las mujeres embarazadas y niios pe-
quenos. Plomo en el agua potable es principalmente de materials y components asociados con las lineas de servicio y fontaneria dom6stlca. La
ciudad de Wauchula es responsible de proporcionar agua potable de alta calidad, pero no puede controlar la variedad de materials utilizados en los
components de fontaneria. Cuando el agua ha estado sentado durante varias horas, puede minimizar el potential de exposici6n al plomo vaclando
su grifo durante 30 segundos a 2 minutes antes de utilizar el agua para beber o cocinar. Si le preocupa acerca de plomo en el agua, debe tener el agua
probado. Informaci6n sobre el plomo en el agua potable, m6todos de prueba y pasos que puede seguir para minimizar la exposicl6n esta disponible
desde la linea de agua potable segura o en http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
Las fuentes de agua potable (agua del grifo y agua embotellada) incluyen rios, lagos, arroyos, lagunas, embalses, manantiales y pozos. Como agua
viaja a trav6s de la superficie de la tierra o a trav6s de la tierra, disuelve minerals naturales y, en algunos casos, el material radiactivo y puede recoger
sustancias resultantes de la presencia de animals o de la actividad humana.
Contaminantes que puedan star presents en el agua de la fuente incluyen:
(A) microbianas contaminants, tales como virus y bacteria, que pueden provenir de plants de tratamiento de aguas residuales, sistemas s6pticos,
las operaciones agricolas de ganado y vida silvestre.
(B) contaminants inorganicos, tales como sales y metales, que pueden ser naturales o como resultado de la'escorrentia de aguas pluviales urbanas,
vertidos de aguas residuales industriales o dom6sticas, producci6n de petr6leo y gas, la mineria o la agriculture.
(C) plaguicidas y herbicidas, que puede deberse a una variedad de fuentes, como la agriculture, la escorrentia de aguas pluviales urbanas y usoS
residenciales.
(D) contaminantes quimicos organicos, incluyendo qu[mico orgAnicos sint6ticos y.volatiles, que son subproductos de process Industriales y
producci6n de petr6leo y tambi6n pueden provenir de estaciones de gasoline, la escorrentfa de aguas pluviales urbanas y sistemas s6pticos.
(E) contaminants radiactivos, que puede ser que se produce naturalmente o ser el resultado de la produ ci6n de petr6leo y gas y las actividades
mineras.'
A fin de que agua del grifo es potable, la EPA establece normas que limitan la cantidad de ciertos contam antes en el agua proporcionada por sistemas
de agua p6blica. Los reglamentos de alimentos y drogas (FDA) establecen Ilmites de contaminantes en el agua embotellada, que debe proporcionar
la misma protecci6n para la salud piblica. /
Agua potable, incluyendo agua embotellada, puede esperarse razonablemente que contenga al menos pequefias cantidades de algunos contaminants.
La presencia decontaminantes no indica necesariamente que el agua supone un riesgo para la salud. Puede obtener mas informacl6n acerca de con-
taminantes y efectos potenciales sobre la saludob tener Ilamando a la line de asistencia de agua potable de la Agencia de protecci6n ambiental segura
al 1-800-426-4791.
Algunas personas pueden ser mas vulnerable a contaminants en el agua potable que la poblacl6n general. Las personas inmunodeflclentes, come
las personas con cancer que reciben quimioterapia, las personas que han side sometidos a trasplantes de 6rganos, personas con VIH/SIDA o otros
trastornos del sistema inmunol6gico, algunos ancianos y reci6n nacidos pueden ser particularmente en rlesgo de infecciones. Estas personas deben
buscar asesoramiento sobre el agua potable de sus proveedores de atenci6n m6dica. EPA/CDC guidelines sobre medios adecuados para disminuir el
riesgo de infecci6n per Cryptosporidium y otros contaminants microbiol6gicos estan disponibles desde la segura linea agua potable direct (800-426-
4791). 8:4c


Back To Basico
By lan Rice
Gospel Preacher


r-, -.
g: "f


AN EARNEST PLEA TO TAKE HEED
It causes heaviness of heart to look around and see that some
teachers won't acknowledge that a child of God can "die."
"And to the angel of the church in Sardis write, 'These things
say He who has the seven Spirits of God and the seven stars: "I
know your works, that you have a name that you are alive, but you
are dead. Be watchful, and strengthen the things which remain, that
are ready to die, for I have not found your works perfect before
God. Remember therefore how you have received and heard; hold
fast and repent.
"Therefore if you will not watch, I will come upon you as a
thief, and you will not know what hour I will come upon you. You
have a few names even in Sardis who have not defiled their gar-
ments; and they shall walk With Me in white, for they are worthy.
He who overcomes shall be clothed in white garments, and I will
not blot out his name from the Book of Life; but I will confess his
name before My Father and before His angels" (Rev. 3:1-5).
Jesus' warning is to the church in Sardis, and we know that the
Lord adds to the church those who are saved (Acts 2:47).
James wrote, "Brethren, if anyone among you wanders from
the truth, and someone turns him back, let him know that he who
turns a sinner from the error of his way will save a soul from death
and cover a multitude of sins" James 5:19-20.
Consider for yourself, how does one wander from the truth?
Paul spoke of men who had the ability to overthrow the faith
of some by convincing people of falsehood: "And their message
will spread like cancer. Hymenaeus and Philetus are of this sort,
who have strayed concerning the truth, saying that the resurrection
is already past; and they overthrow the faith of some" 2 Tim 2:17-
18.
No doubt these men were much like those that Timothy was
warned about in Paul's previous letter, "Now the Spirit expressly
says that in latter times some will depart from the faith, giving heed
to deceiving spirits and doctrines of demons, speaking lies in
hypocrisy, having their own conscience seared with a hot iron, for-
bidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from foods which
God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe
and know the truth" 1 Tim 4:1-3.
The Scriptures here plainly teach that some will depart from
the faith!
Yes, those who are saved can have their lampstand removed!
Jesus spoke of such concerning the church in Ephesus,
"Nevertheless I have this against you, that you have left your first
love. Remember therefore from where you have fallen; repent and
do the first works, or else I will come to you quickly and remove
your lampstand from its place, unless you repent" Rev 2:4-5.
Remember what Paul plainly admonished the saints in
Corinth, those who were members of the church: "Therefore let
him who thinks he stands take heed lest he fall" 1 Cor. 10:12.
Please get back to the basics. Read, study and obey God's
Word.
Ian Rice is the full-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist.com.


SW".Week ending July 31,2011
SWeather Summary: Another week of hot temperatures cou-
pled with light rains prevailed last week. Temperatures averaged
from normal to six degrees above normal. Muggy daytime highs
were in the upper 90s with the heat index in the 100s for several
localities. Nighttime lows were in 70s. Rainfall totals ranged from
minimal traces to over one inch in several stations. Alachua and
Carrabelle recorded over two inches of rain. Nearly three inches of
precipitation was received in Jay. Areas reporting over three inch-
es of rainfall included Bronson and Okahumpka. In Quincy, close
to five inches of rain was recorded. Water levels still remained low'
in Lake Okeechobee. As of July 26, the water level was at 10.26
feet according to the South Florida Water Management District.
Palm Beach and Broward counties remained under mandatory
watering and irrigation restrictions.

Field Crops: Both topsoil and subsoil moisture supplies were
rated mostly adequate. Peanuts continued to progress nicely with
rains boosting development. Growers continued to spray in order to
control disease and pests in peanut fields. Peanuts were in fair to
mostly good condition, with 85 percent pegged, the same as the
five-year average for this date. Last year, 79 percent of peanuts
were pegged by this date. Harvesting of field corn continued across
the Panhandle. In Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, younger cot-
ton lost blooms and squares due to recent rains. If this continues,
harvesting will be delayed. The grasshopper outbreak continued to
impact sugarcane fields in the Everglades region.

Vegetables: Growers began laying plastic for fall vegetables
over central and southern Peninsula areas. Tomato transplanting
concluded in the Quincy area last week. Miami-Dade County
growers continued to harvest okra.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture and cattle condi-
tion improved from the previous week. Scattered rain helped pas-
tures improve; however, drought was limiting grass growth. In the
Panhandle and northern areas, most pasture was in good condition.
The pasture improved following seasonal summer rain. However,
moisture reserves and cumulative pasture performance remain in a
deficit. Pasture remained poor in several locations. Armyworms
caused significant damage in some heavily fertilized pastures and
hay fields. The condition of the cattle ranged from poor to excel-
lent with most in good condition. In the central area, pasture ranged
from very poor to excellent condition with most in good condition.
In the southwestern area, pasture ranged from poor to excellent
condition with most in good condition. Most standing water from
previous rains has dried up.

Citrus: Temperatures were in the lower to mid 70s at night
and the mid to upper 90s during the day for the majority of the
week. This week there was heavy, but scattered rainfall, with all but
one of the stations receiving some rainfall. Amounts received
ranged from 0.00 inches in Indian River, to 3.72 inches in
Okahumpka. Extreme drought conditions existed in small parts of
Okeechobee, Martin, St Lucie, and Palm Beach counties. Drought
conditions were per the U.S. Drought Monitor; last updated July
26, 2011. Next season's oranges are golf ball sized and next sea-
son's grapefruit are baseball sized. Grove activity last week includ-
ed resetting new trees, young tree care, applying herbicides, hedg-
ing and topping, brush removal, and fertilizer application.

.4 ..-
YOU Can Appearr n..
i Poe0t's Pam -
Ar9o Le us show IIIYur6 yk ifc0d be published
nstan paper In "Poet's Place'n,"w-a tur* whlch
kT9 i Pe -Isr(ubamlslon Poeps pb .y
i y yrou, not moiono sis.. appm '
ly pyi; ~lrrand town bf risdene toa r t
p j kit 336 Ral Bx3 l u FLkp
.' . .. .- .' '.
- ..







6B The Herald-Advocate, August 4, 2011





-The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


I


S B rIR

9 New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance
Brand Name Tires!
I Semi & Trailer Tires


BIG SRLE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
VISA I cl6:16ffc


Billy Ayers
Tire Technician


I I



"No job's too big."

-Y ,HS 3 UA


MIKE


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions


*-1l


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461


m.


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


NEW LISTING!! 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath CB
home. Great Investment opportunity at d
great price. Only $35.000
NEW LISTING !! Commercial Lot, corner of
Main St. ard Hwy 64 East, 1.28 acreage.
Priced ( $59.000
PRICE REDUCTION!! $49.900 Charming two
story with 5 Bedrooms, 1.5 Baths includes
original claw foot bath tub and glass door
knobs for antique lovers, wood floors, large
carport and workshop.
QUIET FAMILY HOME!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Brick home outside city limits on a no traffic
road with large oaks, outbuildings and alarm
system. Only $175.000
BOWLING GREEN!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home nice corner lot with total sq. ft. 1,292.
$38.000
OWNER MOTIVATED!! 2BR / 2Bth Home with
extra lot, Central heat/air, one car garage,
citrus trees, workshop, storage. $65.000 Call
Nancy for more information.
Adults/Over 55 Only! Very well maintained
Mobile Home in Avion Palms resort. Qnly
$75.000
Retirement Community! 1 Bedroom 2 bath
M/H including lot. Call today for more
information. Only $53.000.
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.


LI


Classifieds


Agricultue-,
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install 13-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


05 DODGE Pickup, $4,850. 781-
1062. 8:4c
06 IMPALA, $6,000 OBO, 781-
1062. 8:4c
91 CADILLAC DEVILLE, white,
runs good, no A/C, $1,200. 863-
589-2303. 8:4-9:1 p
CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc


1992 TRACKER, automatic, 4 WD,
$1,300 cash, 781-1062. 8:4c


NEED CAREGIVER/STAFF, no
criminal record, CPR and first aid
certified a plus. contact Southern
Oaks, 773-9557 ask for Sanny or
Mac. (All previous applications
on file-no need to re-apply.) 8:4c
LEAD ROOFER, metal shingles
and single ply systems, for small
busy company. Salary based on
experience. Call for interview
(863) 285-7381. 7:28-8:25p
R & R MECHANIC contact
Cracker Trail Transmission, 863-
448-9283. 7:28;8:4c

The price of a queen bee is
about $15 each.


Ldija's HoIs Thrlf tore
QUALITY MERCHANDISE
m IiON[shAPECIATED
L3cU Seric Available,


Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street



9ieaven cenl Cleaning service
By Sherry White Ministries
l .[- -i I ^ [= -1- -ii -


773-0523 *


Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


NEW LISTING I!! Beautiful 3 Bedroom / 2
Bath CB home in Knollwood. Central heat /
air, two car garage, close to schools, total
sq. ft. 3,079, on a cul-de-sac. Priced (~
$189.000
MUST SEE TO BELIEVEII If your family
enjoys the outdoors, you must see this
unique listing that brings outdoor living to
you. Features 6 outbuildings includes 2,000
SF. Barn w/23ft ceilings, work shop, storm
room, outdoor kitchen w/stainless steel fix-
tures, fire pit, potting shed, large gazebo
overlooks pond-well stocked w/fish,
includes aerator, outbuildings w/pens and
fenced. Also 14 x 60 MH sealed in rough cut
pine, front and back porches. Trees and
maintained lawn. MUCH MORE, Call Nancy
for Appt. Priced at $175.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multi-family-Single Family Homes.
$75.000
150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, Home or both. $6.000
Per Acre Negotiable!!
ONLY $7.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC fenced, 4
inch well, great location for home, farming,
multi-business. Ask for Nancy!!
PRICED TO SELL!! 3 Bd / 2 Bth CB home
w/double lot, central heat and air, one car
garage, hardwood, carpet flooring, $110.000
c18:4c


773-0877


THREE BEDROOM/two bath, dou-
ble wide on ten fenced acres,
garage, CBS storage building,
$110,000. 863-735-1801 or 863-
448-2877. 7:21-8:18p


FOR SALE-king size mattress
and box springs, 2 months old.
Paid $680, now $250 OBO, 863-
832-3327. 8:4p


CKC REGISTERED Mini Dauch-
shund puppies, 2 males, 1 female
left, $350. Will be ready Aug. 15th,
taking deposit. 863-773-3808.
8:4,11nc
MALTESE PUPPY, shots. $450.
773-4308. 8:4c
ADULT CATS, fixed, young dogs
for adoption, $15 each, 773-9215.
8:4c
PITBULL PUPPIES $75 each, 3
males, 863-832-9737. 8:4p
2 FEMALES, 1 MALE, 11 weeks
old, tri-color beagles, AKC regis-
tered, all shots & wormed. Both
sire & dame on premises, $200,
773-4314. 7:28;8:4p


ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City.of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sbld in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


WHOLESALE PLANT SALE-All 3
gal pots $4.50-1 gal pots $2.50.
Plumbago, Crape Myrtle, Lig-
ustrum, Texas Sage, Thryallis,
Viburnum, Jasmine and more.
Trees-Bottle Brush, Rain & Crape
Myrtle $10 or 3 for $25. Center
Hill Nursery, 2949 Center Hill
Road, between Wauchula and
Bowling Green, off SR62, 4.5
miles west US 17. 863-223-5561.
8:4-9:1c


S|IEpRTIMND)
%YOUR TO
REAL ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 LIS Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties

.i -







Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
MOTIVATED SELLER-BRING OFFERS! PRICE REDUCED to
$189,999. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.
REDUCED! 182 acres of rolling pasture for cattle, sod, farm, or
develop. Zoned farm residential, 90% i .proved, cow pens, cross
fenced, 3 ponds, 6" well with John Deere power unit. Also included is
a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home with fenced yard and well.
Call Jimmy Wohl @ 863-381-2437.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net c8:4-25c


PLANT CITY HOUSING LLC













Located Rt. 60 & 39 PLANT CITY

BUT DEFINITELY WORTH HE DRIVE!

813-650-8100




Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441


- ~


I JMnlr I


30 DaY


MOTOR &

TRwAsMissiovN


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL


Buy Here!
Pay Here!


No Interest
i or
Finance Charges'


T(:-)wINC.g M. S.RAVILABLE


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
.. 773-4478




I Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience


I TERRY


M AIrlY. 8am 6 p.


I


DESOTO COUNTY




OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565


AOW


..-,OF


Ca 5- I I


I -I


I I ---


SAwDRn ;j


I


Iu'-







August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


m
4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location in
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
for information. 4:28tfc
S-

4/2, tile floor, $700 month plus
deposit, 382-2699. 8:4-9:1p
ONE BEDROOM trailer $150
weekly, $300 deposit. Includes
utilities, no pets, B.G. 863-712-
1126. 8:4p
3 BR, 1 1/2 B, Bowling Green,
781-1062. 8:4c
2 BR, 1 Bath, central A&H, car-
port, large lot, $575 month plus
deposit, Zolfo Springs, 407-929-
6491. 8:4,11c
3 BR, 2 BA, good location, nice
two story duplex, freshly painted,
remodeled, central AC and heat
for rent In Zolfo Springs, first and
last months rent, $625/month,
plus security deposit. Call 863-
781-4529 for Info. 8:4tfc
TWO BEDROOM, one bath apart-
ment $450 plus deposit, 832-
1984. 7:28-8:25p
THREE BEDROOM, two bath,
$800 plus deposit, no pets, 832-
1984. 7:28-8:25p


- --

APARTMENTS 2 bedrooms and
up starting at $425. 863-773-0123.
8:4-9:1p
1 BR APARTMENT, Hwy 17 North.
Very nice, clean and partially fur-
nished, good environment. 863-
773-6736 or 863-245-3321.
8:4-9:1p
APT. and HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 8:4c
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
4863-698-4908. 6:9tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh

A Freudian slip is when
you say one thing but
mean your mother.


ROBBY & SHERRY AtBRITTON
LABOR SERVICES & SOLLUTIOENS






(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
robbie@strato.net




PUT YOURSELF IN THE


DRIVER'S SEAT
We make it easy to buy.


HARDEE CAR COMPANY

BuY HERE PAY HERE


bw060 ri-f 4


Billy Hill
Owner


Wauchula
ilarc,' fror, First National Bank)
Monday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm
773-6667 Wauchula Hills
(Corner o1 Hwy 17 andR Rd.)
Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7:30 pm
773-2011


Joe L.Davis


Kenny Sanders
(863) 781-0153


REALTORS
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
S JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEA.L
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED TO
$74,000! Charming and priced
to sell! 2BR/1BA 1060 SF home
w/lots of updates: new A/C,
insulation, carpeting, wiring.
Den can be 3rd BR.
PRICE REDUCED! 5 lots in
Wauchula w/over 975' total rd
frontage. Close to hospital,
schools & shopping. Will divide
or all for $75,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 2BR/1.5BA
in Charlie Creek Estates on
large corner lot, 2 sheds,
screened porch. Now priced at
$24,900!
25+ ac fenced pasture, Green-
belt qualified, on US Hwy 17 S
w/well, septic & electric.
'$192,900!
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
traffic ... Hello, peace & quiet!
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. $130,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!


12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!
10 acs cleared land on paved
rd w/4" well in western Hardee
Co. $65,000!
CB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new flooring, cabinets,
countertops, being sold as is.
$65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 40 acs
farmland, 8" well, paved rd
frontage, near Wauchula.
$320,000!
10 ac w/paved rd frontage.
Great for pasture, farming or
homesite. $63,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
home on 4 lots w/beautiful oaks,
fenced in backyard. Close to
schools. NOW $69,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Looking
for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
septic!
Lovingly maintained/updated
4BR/2.5BA brick home in
Knollwood w/updated kitchen,
fireplace, back patio! $218,000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFIER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.......781-0153 SANDY LARRISON..-.. 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL......... 781-7633 MONICA REAS..............781-0888
DAVID ROYAL................781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c8:4c


OFFICE -SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
920 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc


CLEANING RESIDENTIAL/BUSI-
NESS. Call 863-245-1563. I have
references. Available after busi-
ness hours. 8:4p
CAREGIVER-Dependable, do
housekeeping, shopping, person-
al care, 863-773-0421. 7:28p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more Info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillesple) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc


4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions; CBC1256-
749, 863-214-1471. 7:21-9:29p
VICKER'S LAWN CARE, free esti-
mates, no job too big/small, 863-
448-7491. 7:7-8:4p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh



MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc


.'00 CHEVY CAVELIER


----
HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
3 FAMILY, Friday, Saturday, 1860
Dishong Rd., Wauchula. Clothes
for everyone, household items,
stroller. 8:4c
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-?, 1060
Knollwood Circle. Clothes, toys,
jewelry, house wares and much
more. 8:4p
SATURDAY 8-7, 501 Indiana Ave.,
Wauchula. Kid clothes, misc. 8:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-? Huge 3
family yard sale. Furniture,
clothes, lots of baby items. 1350
St. Rd. 64 East, Zolfo Springs.
8:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 7-?, 301
Garden Drive, Wauchula. A little
of everything. 8:4p
SATURDAY, 8-1. Clothing, toys,
misc, lots of $1 items. 308
Pennsylvania Ave., Wauchula.
8:4p


* '02 CHEVY IMPALA


.0 .
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, Friday,
263 Boyd Cowart Rd., Wauchula,
9-2. 7:28-8:11p
CHRISTMAS IN AUGUST. Sat 8-?,
310 Florida Ave. Parking in rear.
Fishing rods and reels, ABC
Items and lots more. Something
for everyone 8:4c
MULTI-FAMILY, Saturday, 8-?,
1150 South Florida Ave. Lots of
kids and adult clothes, misc. 8:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY. Baby items,
tools. 322 Turner Ave., Wauchula.
8:4p
SATURDAY, 8-12. 509 South
Florida Ave., Wauchula. 8:4p
SATURDAY, 7-11. Tools, toys,
clothing. Knollwood, 1062 Aspen
Lane. Wauchula. 8:4D


--, ------ --
SATURDAY, lots of Items, dryer,
clothes, shoes, jewelry. 3221
Myrtle St., Zolfo Springs. 8:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-? Kids
clothes, purses, jewelry, movies,
tools, game system, too much to
list. Lawndale Drive, Zolfo
Springs. 8:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-12, 3208
Perdue Rd., Wauchula. Furniture,
glassware, misc. 8:4p


Scott Hall
Project Manager

(863) 399-9781
SOUTHLAND CONSTRUCTION P.O. Box 1176
Ft. Meade, FL 33841

Ditch Cleaning Citrus Tree Removal
Land Clearing Pond Clearing
Pond Excavation cl8:4-25p




> THE PALMS

Available for

Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through August 31"
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
.'oClose to Sheriff'Statisn on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 (
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider cl8:4-25c


BIG SELECTION of CARS, TRUCKS & VANS

'98 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR '00 BUICK LESABRE


'03 KIA Rio


* '99 CHEVY TAHOE (2 TO CHOOSE FROM)


Mon. Wed. 1 Oam- 6m; Fri. & Sat. 10 Oa-7pm
Closed Thursday & Sunday
S I I ; II "' '


--


Ruby
cl8:4c






8B The Herald-Advocate, August 4, 2011


The


KELLER WILLAMS
^ 1 R,.-'" 'A L T Y

i I can hep!
Country Home for Rent $650 month.
S35 Acres, 4 Wells, Fenced,
SNegotiable Lease, 1-5 Years.
L* RV/Mobile Home Park $450,000
Donna Steffens Owner Financing Possible.
(863)781-3627 5 Acres $25,000 Residential.



S COMPUTER REPAIR
by
SGarry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
Payment Plans Also Available
448-2561 ci8:4-11c 773-0518






Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 r
John D. Freeman
www.floresrealty.net (863) 781-4084

Reduced Listing








Wauchula 3BA/1BA CB home outside the city limits of
Wauchula, central air & heat, fresh paint inside, and laminate
wood floors. Priced to sell at $49,900









Commercial Building CB office building in Wauchula right
on Hwy 17 across for the Hess Station 3500 Sqft under air -
paved parking lot 3 large offices 1 conference room 4
smaller offices & 4 bathrooms kitchenett central air and
heat For sale or leasing, call for details.









Country Living 3BR/2BA CB home on 5 +/- acres Large
Barn with high entry door and ceilings Central air & Heat -
Hurricane shutters Large generator to service home in
extended power outages Large 41x14 screened lanai -
Completely fenced with access from two roads.
Priced to sell at $185,000
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
- Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime
After Hours '
Oralla D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084.
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl8:4c


People didn't always say "hello" when they answered the
phone. When the first regular phone service was estab-
lished in 1878, people said "ahoy."


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech
INHOES ER Phone (863) 781-9720
s. auileiaquqlescomputerservices.com .www.GuQleSComputerServices.com


TREES UNLIMITED
Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured
Now ACCEPTING CREDIT CARDS
~tiankw ejow. -for having patience 'o
while I was servi-ft o-r co.trk -
over seas. I'cn back ".ow and vk
read to get to worle!
-Rndc ^flriai ( -cr4
Experienced Tree Surgery
Aerial Bucket Trucks Wood Chipper
Stump Grinder Front End Loader Dump Truck
Land Clearing Pond Digging Excavation
781-7027
Environmentally Responsible
Storm Damage & Emergency Specialists




Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)


I I


S in his ad o rec e this specialprice. 0
00 "R n ts ad o.. ee B *

Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66 Zolfo Springs
22 Years Of Service 735-1495 Best In Town 8:4c


Too many people overval-
ue what they are not and
undervalue what they are.


(IIIe~;9==--~------


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.,
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000
Well-built 3B/25Bth home, new kitchen, plenty
of storage inside plus 12x18 detached utility,
double garage and screened 12x16 porch.
$169,000
COMPLETELY FURNISHED 2B/1Bth M/H
with nice yard and screened porch. $29,000
Make an offer on this spacious family home;
4B/3Bth, large kitchen with plenty of cabinet
space, w/b fireplace, double garage, fenced
yard. $155,500
Updated C/B home, 3B/15Bth, almost new A/C
and roof. List Price $115,000
3.4 acre corner lot; nice secluded property that
has native trees. $6,000


SSERVIC
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
DELOIS JOHNSON 773-9743


:E YOU


C


ASSOCI


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert .
165 Acres with 3B/2Bth M/H built; a total of 5
wells on this beautiful property surrounded by
large oaks. $175,000
3B/2B, C/B home, ceramic tile and carpet floors,
large eat- in kitchen, spacious bedrooms, locat-
ed in family neighborhood. $115,000
9 acres located on corner of two high volume
traffic areas; perfect commercial building site
or for home. $100,000
Build a house or place a mobile home on this 2.5
acre tract in western Hardee County. Acreage
is fenced on three sides and has a small shed.
$30,000
PRICE REDUCED! 262.52 acres with road
frontage, large pines, 100 acres cleared. $3000
per acre

AN COUNT ON ['
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ATES S
STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518 "


On average, people fear
spiders more than they do
death.




Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Chance can allow you to
accomplish a goal every
once in a while, but consis-
tent achievement happens
only if you love what you
are doing.
-Bart Conner
There are no mistakes. The
events we bring upon our-
selves, no matter how
unpleasant, are necessary
in order to learn what we
need to learn; whatever
steps we take, they're nec-
essary to reach the places
we've chosen to go.
-Richard Bach

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1988 Ford Tempo 4 Door Tan
VIN: 2FAPP36X9JB185249
8:00 A.M., Aug. 19, 2011 o
HILL'S TOWING, INC.
4205 US HWY 17 N.
BOWLING GREEN, FL 33834


S GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Do you have electrical and mechanical experience?
Are you looking for rewarding challenges and want to
be part of a company with a long, proud heritage?
Oldcastle is currently hiring Maintenance & Repair
Mechanics at our Fort Green, FL location.
Apply online at http://www.oldcastle.com/careers.htm
An equal opportunity employer.



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JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
S Ben Gibson (941)737-2800 Robert Jones
1 Calvin Bates (863)381-2242 John H. Gross
Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Dusty Albritton


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


cl8:4c


Clas sifieds


Monday Friday
9:00 AM. 12:00 Noon
Equal Opporruntmv Employer & Provider


e m


OPPO~TUUIT~ cI8 4-25c (4~% .


REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town.
Cute house with nice landscaping. NOW $79,500!
18 acres. House & Grove. Close in approxi-
mately 1850 sf of living. Nice screened porch. 3
Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of grove, mostly ear-
lies. 6" deep well, microjet & diesel power unit.
Only $295,000
2 acres zoned Commercial. Desoto County,
Highway 31. Subdivided. High and Dry. Double
paved road frontage. $89,900
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED to $205,000!
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000
5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great place for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72500


.ust North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000
Spacious home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 / Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. $379,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 V acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000


U ____________________________________=


Call todyfryur
78 -1 62c1 2tf




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raid-Advocate
IUsPS 5U787S01
Thursday, August 4,2011


PAGE ONE
~a~s~ai i- i


COURTESY PHOTO
Hardee County special athlete Bruce Brummett takes
careful aim at the pins during the Special S.TA.R.S.
District Bowling competition in Lake Placid on July 9.

Special Athletes


Bowl In Districts


Special athletes from three
counties competed in a dis-
trictwide bowling match for
medals on Saturday, July 9, at
Royal Palms Bowling Center in
Lake Placid.
During the Special
S.T.A.R.S. District Bowling
competition, Highlands County
took home 42 medals while
Okeechobee won 18 medals
and Hardee took 11 medals.
There were 104 athletes com-
peting.
Hardee won six gold, one sil-
ver and four bronze medals.
The event opened with the
Lake Placid Elks Lodge pre-
senting the flag while Carl
Gillilan, of Sebring, sang the


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National Anthem. Bowlers
competed in-singles, doubles,
teams and ramps.
Medals and ribbons were
presented and a lunch was
served after the competition.
In a bracket of doubles,
Hardee Countians Bruce Brum-
mett and Thomas Dirkson took
gold medals, while Donna
Headdy and Lewis Simpson
won bronze medals.
Other Hardee County ath-
letes who won gold medals
were Thomas Whitfield, Julie
Kilbourne, Sue Egnoski and
Bill Flemer. Melinda Hatch-
cock won a silver medal. Carol
Vitale and Christa Haege both
won bronze medals.


Top Tea(
Seventy-two of the state's
total 180,000 teachers had the
privilege of participating in the
Florida Department of Educa-
tion's "Top Educator Award Cer-
emony" on Thursday, July 7.
The Hard Rock Caf6 at Uni-
versal's City Walk in Orlando
was the venue for the more than
200 attendees. To begin, each
county's Teacher of the Year was
individually introduced.
As Teacher of the Year Ninfa
Skipper from Hardee County
was walking across the stage, the
event narrator explained the 28-
year classroom veteran is "al-
ways finding new ways to
engage her students to show
them that math is important and
applicable to the real world."
Skipper had been selected as
Hardee County's Teacher of the
Year at a banquet here in Febru-
ary. As the district winner, she
advanced to the state competition
for that honor.
Little did she know that her
work was just beginning!
After winning at the local
level, the next challenge for
Skipper was putting together an
application for state considera-
tion. Two weeks of staying at
school after hours, 15 pages of
"teaching strategy" and a home-
made video of her students flying
a kite for a geometry lesson later,
she was on her way to the State
Teacher of the Year conference.
A group of supporters traveled
with Skipper to the state compe-
tition. Watching as she walked
across the stage was close friend
and fellow teacher Teresa Hall,
mother Ninfa Davis and sister
Lyn Winter as well as husband
James and daughter Calli.
Showing strong hometown
spirit, no other group of family
and friends made as much noise
for a nominee as the Hardee con-
tingent!
A person must be 35 years
old to be president, 30 to
be U.S. senator, 25 to be a
U.S. House member.


cher Attends State Contest


COURTESYPHOTO
Hardee County's teacher of the year with her family and prize at the state compe-
titidn in Orlando: (from left) Lyn Winter, Ninfa Davis, Ninfa Skipper, Calli Skipper and
James Skipper.


The ceremony featured prizes,
testimonials, special guest ap-
pearances and more. Again and
again, Florida's teachers were
commended and recognized for
their continuous efforts to edu-
cate students.
The awards ceremony was
sponsored by Macy's Depart-
ment Stores, and featured
Florida's new education com-


missioner, Gerard Robinson, in
his public debut. Commissioner
Robinson gave a well-received
speech which was themed,
"Every Teacher Matters." Robin-
son also an-nounced his plans to
tour the state school system to
get feedback from teachers.
From a personal and profes-
sional perspective, Skipper re-
ported that she was so impressed


with the other teachers and nom-
inees, and that it was truly an
honor to be in the company of
such dedicated teachers and lead-
ers.
And as if the evening wasn't
exciting enough, the Hardee
County Teacher of the Year even
had an impromptu meeting with
Education Commissioner Robin-
son in the elevator!


O-" .
',ember mBedoA I -D('oB
Member I Beda.dBrakfastoom


www~thestanford in- o


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^Wee V* poe>o ae000a ovdwrt?
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you with a fixed-rate Second Mortgage!


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insured by months would have payments of 68.30 with an effective APR (Annual Percentage Rate) of 4.23 Rate may vary based on your credit and the term of your loan. MIDFLORIDA is an equal housing lender. 2 To qualify for incentive this must be a new second mortgage (closed-end loan) of$ StOor more.
LENDER NCUA. Loans of $5,000 to t14999 will qualify for $100 credit if you do not have a MIDFLORIOA Visa Plapnum Card one will be opened for you. Allow up to two weeks for receipt of credit to Visa Platinum Card and new card, if applicable.This offer is not valid on the refinance of any MIDFLORIDA loan


The Arctic Tern's migration route spans 22,000 miles round-trip. It flies from the
Antarctic Ocean to the Arctic Ocean each year.
We did not change as we grew older; we just became more clearly ourselves.
-Lynn Hall
p UbI


TThe Stanford Inn
555 E. Stanford Street Bartow
Restaurant Rated 4 Star by Lakeland Ledger
Tuesday-Sunday 11AM-3PM tea/lunch
Sunday Brunch 11AM-2PM
Friday & Saturday SPM-9PM dinner
For Reservations 863-533-2393


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~E-~G~~









2C The Herald-Advocate,August 4, 2011





Schedule of Weekly Services


'Printed as a Public Service
S:by'.
>.MThe-e"ald-Advocate '
S' Wauchul, Florida

\DeAdline: Thursday 5 p.m.
..-.

BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday. Service ................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
S708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......:..........:....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday .........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1.....1:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ......................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a:m.
Sunday Evening ...................:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 IIwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ....... ........... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCIl
Bowling Greel
S. Iwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ..........................9:30 a.m.
Moining Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship..................6;30 p.m. '

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult .................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-S5h grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ...................7:00 p.m,

,FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCII
Baptist Church Road 77,-9013
Bible Connection 9............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening :.:...'."6;bu p.m.
Wednesday Supper ........ 6:00 p:m.'
Wednesday Bible Study ....7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD.
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEIL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....'11:00 pim.'
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Juriw s De IPredicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMIANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CITURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ..................... :30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/l'rayer ......7:00 p.m.
('ommnunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAIl BAPTIST CIIURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ................:.....9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.......7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
V Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship .................. 1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast................... I 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Surday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting'- Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........l 1:00 a.m.
SerVicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..... .............6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club............................... 7:00 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .....:..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ...... .:...........9:45 a.m.
Worship Service :.............. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prpyer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
.202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training:.................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CIIURCII
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CIIURCI
5076 Lily Church Rd. -494-5622
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
' f i gng Wor l1 .rpw. ..':.."00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:6& p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:(0 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
English Service ..................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIIURCII
; 4.-22HIanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
,,. hardee.elebration.org
.pndiyMorningSryvice, ...1l:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wcdifesdav Youth Service .,.5-30 p.m.
Childcarc'rovided at all services

CE:LE:BRATIONFELLOWSHIPII
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednewiayv Evening ell G(;roup
Adult tell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youtdi Cell Group ...............:..7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group .........7:00 p.m.
Call fir loations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCII
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I I:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .
CIIURCHI OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 1 :30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men v Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CIIURCII OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 hlanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ... ...................... I1:00 a.m .


VWholesale Nursery-

Dorinis & Kathy Barber
Hwy, 66 East' .: (86
P.O. Box 780' Zolf(


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 am.
Sunday Evening Service.......7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service..............7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dom inica ........ ................ 10:00 a.m .
Servicio ................................ 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
M artes Oracion .............:........7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.nm.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CIURCI
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday Schobl ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ........... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..:....7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................ 10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1..... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry...................... 6:00 p.m
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W worship ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Adult Choir Rehearsal ........ 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRIIISTIAN (C'IURCHII
S1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafl Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10:45 a.im.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ........................ 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
(lasses for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
TIE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ..........:.........10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship :.................6:00 p.m.
SWednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METIIODIST CIIURCII
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study........... 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School .....................9:00 a.m ..
Morning Worship ................0:00 a.m..
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m..
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church.

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
'Sunday Morning Worship....1 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ...... ........10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CIIURCII
1262 W; Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts............9...... 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......... ...9:30 a.m.


Worship........................ 10:310 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ............ 6():()() p.m.
Wed. Bodyhuilders Adult ('.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min. .............7:00 p.m.

iIIIllER GROUND)
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258,W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes .................................. 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves .................................... 7:30 p.m .
Domingo..............................10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ............................ 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road.
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service......................2:00 p.m.

JEIIOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Ieard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
SMorning Worship Service.... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ........................7:00 p.m.

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
.773-2929
Sunday,Service.................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MTL h1 ON A.l\I.Ei CHURCH
10 Martin Luther'king Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(Ist & 3rSun.) ................ 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................... 9:45 a.m.
' Morning Worship ...... .........11:00 a.m.
.2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............I 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3' Sun.
Communion .................. 10:00 a.m.
2"' & 4"' Sun.
Divine Worship................ 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .........................1 1:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY



Sunday School ...................9t30 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ........ ...7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH t
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service... ............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGIITS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..........9.......9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................1... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... ..11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .,:........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCII
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday .................................9:00 a.m .
H oly D ays .......................... ............

ST. NICIIAEL'S
CATHOLIC CIIURCII
408 lHeard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) .................7:00 a.m.
(English) .................. 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ..................11:00 a.m.
(Creol) ................... 00 p. .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. Ilth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ..................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1 :00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ................. 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:30 a m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .................... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship.... ......7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church............................... 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer...................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.

WAUCIULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
"Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service............ 7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Ilwy 66
(across from Oak Hills.Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a i.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
W wednesday ..........................7:30 p.m .

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................10:00 a.m .
Worship Service ................. 11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ...................5:00 p.nrm.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
SWednesday Prayer ........... ..7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School :...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426.0ak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................:30 p.m..
Wednesday Bible Study .......:6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd'
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
W orship ................................ :00 a.m.
Evening..................................1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ............ ...10:00 a.m.
Children's Church .............. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m:
Wed. Youth & FTH. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF -
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street .
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday. Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave; E.
Escuela Dominical ..........10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
............. ........................... 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ...................:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00'p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ................... 11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17-South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................... a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ...........7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones.......................... 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina............................... 11:30 a.m.

-SPANISIL hSSION
Sm -: 735-8025
Escuela Dominica . ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................................1:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club.......................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Micrecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................. 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes........5:00 p.m.

SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER

m w Caqal

The cross didn't take Christ by
surprise. He came to die. But
except He were willing to lay down
His life, it couldn't be taken from
Him. And He took it up again!
His resurrection is the heart of
Christianity. Without it, life is a
hopeless end. With it, life is an
endless hope.
His resurrection is the hub of
Christianity. On it all the doctrines
of grace depend. If Christ be not
risen, the consequence isn't that
death ends all, but we're still in our
sins.
His resurrection is the hope of
Christianity. Because He rose,
Christ is with Us irfour perplexity to
guide us, in our sorrow to comfort
us, in our trials to strengthen us,
and at death to bring us to heaven.
He came out of the grave into my
heart. Is He in your heart?


ladnglild
.ItILrusts her
parents to protect
her from harm -
parents know the
dangers out there.
:s .c Her parents bring
her to vGod' house
'.. each week. As a
family, they learn
of God's will for
their lives, they
bring peace and
well-being to their
home, and they
introduce their
child to God so she can grow up with His love and
strength. What better source of protection is there?
Play it safe and tvtrs1hp as a family.

Weekly Scripture Reading
Hebrews Hebrews Hebrews Hebrews Hebrews Matthew MMtthew
10.1-39 11.1-22 11.23-40 12.1-11 12.12-29 14.13-36 15.1-20
SakM S -cteWby Th r maian 0 SocIwe
02011. K"ster-Bf llarns NevMwsaM S rices, P.O. Box 8it8, Ctlatiotlesv O. VA 229 0 www ws co


"Peace Jivoer Grd6ters


3) 735-0470
o Springs, FL








August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
The local City Council
awarded the fuel oil and
kerosene contract to Standard
Oil Co. and the lubricating oil
contract to Gulf Refining Co.
Bids were read in an open meet-
ing, then the council, Chairman
L. Carlton, J.W. Earnest, L.W.
Bostick, C.P. Page, A.M.
Hendry, Floyd Darling and A.B.
Pearce, went into executive ses-
sion to discuss the bids. Carlton
also appointed a committee to
secure an engineer for the well
to be built in extension of the
local waterworks. Mayor S.E.
Ausley, city attorney W.W.
Whitehurst, Bostick, Pearce and
Earnest were named to the com-
mittee.

Local baseball fans will not
be without a team to follow
next spring, as the Syracuse
Chiefs of the International
League have signed to come
here for spring training ses-
sions. Mayor S.E. Ausley has
been working with several
major and minor league clubs.
One of the key players will be
centerfielder Wally Cazen,
recently obtained from the
Baltimore Orioles.

The Hardee County School
Board met Tuesday morning
and set the opening of school
for Sept. 14. It also passed a res-
olution that all students must be
in Hardee County at least two
weeks before they enter school
to eliminate any spreading of
disease that any student might
have gathered while out of the
county on vacation.

J.E. "Spud" Harp has a spot
ad this week, "giving the com-
munity the advance notice" of
his prices. "I am paying $2.75
for gator hides. Bring me your
hides and frogs for better
prices."

50 YEARS AGO
The first step in implement-
ing the Hardee County civil
defense plan was deemed satis-
factory by Civil Defense Dir-
ector Lamar Bostick as he met
this week with Zolfo Springs
Mayor W.H. Gilliard, County


Greetings from Fort Green!
Unbelievable that it is already
August and school will be start-
ing this month! Where has the
summer gone'?
Our sincere sympathy is ex-
tended to the family of Wesley
Smith. His dad made his final
journey recently. He lived in
Savannah, Ga., and was buried
in West Virginia. We also ex-
tend our sincere sympathy to
the Lester Russell family. His
funeral was Monday.
It was great to see a former
pastor of mine, Brother Joe
Wright. He was at the funeral
of Vernon See. Years ago I went
to church with Vernon, and Joe
was the pastor. Our sincere
sympathy is extended to Ver-
non's family.
Billy Porter came through his
surgery good and will be re-
leased from the hospital soon.
Gary Bargeron is in the Bartow
hospital, Bim Davis is in the
Wauchula hospital and Walter
Owens is in the Lakeland hospi-
tal. This is a lot of our members
or members' family in the hos-
pitals. Mildred Cooper was too
sick to attend church last
Sunday. She has a terrible
cough. Please pray for all of
these.
Charles and Lynda Abbott are
back from a month's stay at
their place in Blairsville, Ga.
Charles said the weather was
good, and even though the tem-
peratures got high in the after-
noon. it did not feel as hot as it
does here. As usual, they had a
wonderful time.
They said a bear had visited
several homes irl the neighbor-
hood. He only clawed the tree
in their front yard. I think there
are not enough woods for any
of the wild animals. Every-
where you look, there is a
house.
Arthur Womack is steadily
improving, as is Maxine. His
daughter and son-in- law were
down for a visit, and they
enjoyed them. They live in
California so do not get down


Commissioner Lee Hanchey
and Wauchula Mayor Paul
Thomas and other local offi-
cials, who were asked to review
it for discrepancies or prob-
lems. The plan would be put
into effect for any disaster or
emergency.

Registration certificates for
county pleasure boats are on
sale this week, said County Tax
Collector Curtis Ezelle. They
will be on sale until the Sept. 1
deadline, he said. Every plea-
sure boat propelled by over a
10-horsepower motor must be
registered. The fees are by
length of the boat, starting with
$1.50 for boats up to 16 feet.

A public hearing for a pro-
posed record high budget of
$1,140,154 for the Board of
Public Instruction will be held
on Monday. It would require the
maximum 20 mills on the coun-
ty tax roll plus one mill for a
band building (one time only).
In the Zolfo Springs district, it
would be an additional seven
mills. Under the proposed
schedule, no teacher will earn
less than $2,500 and top-rank-
ing teachers will earn $6,000.
The beginning salary for a
teacher with a four-year degree
is $4,000.

Real estate ads this week
include: one acre of rich garden
soil with a 3BR asbestos shin-
gle home in. Fort Green,
reduced from $4,000 to $3,500
with $3,000 down and $45 per
month; an attractive new 3BR
CB air-conditioned home on an
acre of land, down 20 percent to
$16,500; and a nice six-room
block house near paved road,
completely furnished for
$12,500.

25 YEARS AGO
The future for phosphate
mining here is uncertain as
there are less than favorable
agricultural and economic con-
ditions. Hardee County Tax
Collector Curtis Ezelle says the
county received $3,249,327 in
1985 ad valorem taxes from
phosphate companies, but due
to companies receiving agricul-
tural exemptions, the taxable
land values have dropped $77
million for fiscal year 1986-87.

The Wauchula City Council
will consider amending the
sewer rates and water and sewer


as often as they would like.
Our fifth Sunday sing was
well attended. We had lots of
visitors and some wonderful
singing. People outdid them-
selves on bringing finger foods
to go with the ice cream. Of
course, the ice cream freeze-off
was very enjoyable!
There were 15 different types
of ice cream. Arthur was well
enough to make one of the
churns of ice cream. Kasie
Powell was the first-place win-
ner, Chrysta Chancey was sec-
ond and Bud Abbott won third
place. Kasie won a gold ice
cream scoop and a gold crown
with jewels on it. (Well, it orig-
inally was a Burger King crown
but decorated it looked real
cute!)
Faye Davis turned another
year older on Monday, so we all
sang "Happy Birthday" to her
and helped her eat a delicious
cake.
Beka Brown received a letter
from Sen. Don Goetz of Florida
congratulating her on her high
FCAT scores for reading and
writing. He said she was not
just among the highest scorers
at Walton High or in Walton
County, but in the entire state!
Way to go, Beka!
She is probably taking after
her mama in writing, as Amy
Brown used to write the Fort
Green News!
Our Back-to-School Bash is
always a huge success. It will
be Aug. 15. Another important
function at Fort Green is every
five years we honor all mem-
bers over 70 years. The. date
will be Sept. II, followed by a
covered-dish dinner. A very
short biography is given of the
people being honored and then,
hopefully, some member of
their family will talk for a few
minutes about their life. It is
honoring'a person while they
are here and can hear! Mark
your calendars.
Please remember to pray for
one another, our county and the
military.


I[Wy ackWhn


charges as lenders want assur-
ance that fees will meet costs
for extensive renovations to the
aging sewer system. The maxi-
mum for residential users will
go from $9.75 to a $20.25 cap.
Tap fees will also increase to
meet actual costs.

Rainfall amounts through
July increased considerably this
year compared to last year. The
gauge at the Peace River
Electric Cooperative Station
measured 35.22 inches for this
July compared to 27.24 inches
last year. At the Ona Range
Cattle Station, it was 32.16
inches this year and 21.40 last
year.

S&S Suprex ads this week
include 79 cents a pound for
whole shoulders; cooked ham at
$1.99 a pound or sirloin steak at
$2.99 a pound; grapes at 69
cents a pound and bananas at 25
cents a pound; saltines are 99
cents a box and Shurfresh ham-
burger buns two for $1.

10 YEARS AGO
Corroded columns on the
Hardee County Courthouse
built in 1927 are just one of the
items to be restored in a mas-
sive renovation project which
begins this week. After lengthy
discussion, county commission-
ers recently approved the $1.4
million project. A ground floor
security system was installed
last year and replacement of the
leaky roof two years ago
stopped some of the damage to
top-floor offices and the court-


room.

"It is disheartening to me that
after all of our best efforts ...
we are unable to develop a
salary package ... our people
need and truly deserve. ... The
governor and the Legislature
have created a funding crisis in
Florida schools," said Dick
Daggett, Hardee Education
Associated/United president.
Employees will get an average
two percent increase in the
coming year. Starting teacher
salaries will be $25,763.

A dozen items were part of
the four-page request for more
information about a proposed
compost/fertilizer plant in east-
ern Hardee County. In a work-
shop on Friday, Commissioner
Bill Lambert asked a philosoph-
ical question, "Do we want,
from a planning and develop-
ment standpoint, to place a
regional facility in that part of
the county? It's in the dairy
area, but it will affect others."

Hill's Midway advertises a
"BIG BBQ" cookout on Friday
night. There's karaoke with
Jesse James on Wednesdays, a
dance party of hip-hop music
on Thursdays and Ricky
Trinton live on Friday and
Saturday nights.


Most people never run far
enough on their first wind
to find out they've got a
second.
-William James


The following, permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
July 25-29. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Autumn Blum, Rabbit Run,
new construction, steel build-
ing, $20,000.
Gary Frierson, U.S. 17 North,
ice house alterations, $3,800.
Chad Anderson, Jones Street,
interior demolition, $1,000.
Terry Franko, Peace River
Woods, install mobile home,
$8,650.
Gary Giddens, air condition-
ing, Ohio Avenue, $3,250.
Gary Giddens, Downing
Circle, air conditioning, $3,375.
Chester Robbins, East Main
Street, install mobile home,
$5,500.
Brent Driskell, Orange Street,
alterations, $12,826.
Edward Bartlett, Ralph Smith
Road, air conditioning, $3,100.
Rapid Systems, Sidney
Roberts Road, install tower,
$1,200.


Fort Green News

By Rilla Cooper

773-6710


Thank You Royal Friends

Thank you to all the wonderful people who supported me for
"Queen of Main Street". A special thank you to my
bank family and Patty Harrison, my enthusiastic
money raiser, for their help. We had a wonderful
time competing for "Queen". The chance to see
you, and talk with so many of you, made the ,
whole week a joy.

Thank you,

"Miss Grace" Enunerton
J


Rapid Systems, Fox Street,
install tower, $1,200.
Rapid Systems, Fourth Street,
install tower, $1,200.
Charles Morris, Fussell Road,
install mobile home, $38,500.
CMS Mechanical, U.S. 17
North, air conditioning, $6,053.

BUILDING BLOCKS
Did you know that a permit is
needed for installing a water
heater? An approved combina-
tion temperature and pressure
relief valve and relief valve dis-
charge pipe shall be properly
installed and maintained on
water heaters. For questions,
contact the building department
for information, or call 773-
3236.


ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must' be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.








4C The Herald-Advocate, August 4, 2011





During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
July 31, James Earl Fox, 26, of 1162 N. Florida Ave.,
Wauehula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with
two counts of battery.

July 30, Angel Chavez-Gomez, 31, of Rodeo Island, Arcadia,
was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Eduardo Cruz and
charged with DUI and another traffic offense.
July 30, a theft on Mockingbird Road was reported.

July 29, Linda Taylor, 46, and Dwight Earl Taylor, 45, both of.
213 Keeton Road, Wauchula, and Matthew Dwayne Taylor, 26, of
1014 Keeton Road, Wauchula, were arrested by Dep. James Adler
and each charged with burglary of a dwelling/structure or con-
veyance. Matthew Taylor was also charged with larceny and crim-
inal mischief damage to property. Dwight Taylor was also
charged with dealing in stolen property, larceny and criminal mis-
chief, damage to property.
July 29, a residential burglary on Goosepond Road was report-
ed.

July 28, a residential burglary on North Florida Avenue, bur-
glary of a conveyance on SR 64 East, tags stolen on Ramblewood
Drive and on Suwanee Street, and a theft on SR 64 East were
reported.

July 27, Harland Hardwick, 38, of 246 Lowry St., Fort
Recovery, Ohio, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged
with battery.
July 27, thefts on Lockmiller Road, two locations on U.S. 17
North, SR 62 and Stephens Road were reported.

July 26, burglary of a conveyance on Sweetwater Road, a
fight on Rainey Boulevard, criminal mischief on REA Road and a
theft on Sunset Drive were reported.

July 25, Donald Ray Mosley, 58, of 904 Pool Branch Road,
Fort Meade, was arrested by Det. John Shivers on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.
July 25, Ruben Ramirez Ybarra, 40, of 310 Georgia St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.
July 25, criminal mischief on Wren Road and a theft on
Lonnie Shackelford Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
July 31, Jesus Adrian Calvillo, 23, of 5121 Dixiana Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Chris Leconte and charged
with resisting an officer without violence.
July 31, Arthur Lee Nelson, 59, of 904 Florida Ave., Avon
Park, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with
refusal to submit to DUI test.

July 30, Randolph Hardee, 41, of 815 Gilmore Ave., Lake-
land, was arrested by Cpl. Chris Le Conte and charged with pos-
session of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252011CP000054

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARY E. BAXLEY, a/k/a
MARY ELIZABETH BAXLEY,
deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of MARY E. BAXLEY, a/k/a
MARY ELIZABETH BAXLEY,
deceased, whose date of death
was May 28, 2011, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Post
Office Drawer 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873. The name and
address of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with the
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is July 28, 2011.
Personal Representative:
JOHN W. EASON, JR.
Post Office Box 938
Wauchula, FL 33873
(863) 773-5593
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Kenneth B. Evers, of
KENNETH B. EVERS, P.A.
Florida Bar No. 0054852
Post Office Drawer 1308
Wauchula, FL 33873-1308
Phone: (863) 773-5600
Facsimile: (866) 547-4362
Email: office@hardeelaw.com


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HARDEE COUNTY
CASE NO. 252011CP000056
, ,. .
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARION E. RATUFF, also known
as
MARION GELKE RATLIFF,
deceased.

/
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of MARION E. RATLIFF,
also known as MARION GELKE
RATLIFF, deceased, whose date
of death was January 31, 2011,
and whose social security num-
ber is xxx-xx-xxxx, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, Probate Divison,
the address of which Is Post
Office Drawer 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1749. The name
and address of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands. against the dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST, PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN 733,702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is July 28, 2011.
Personal Representative:
BECKY HENDERSON
1001 E. Maine Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John W. H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (866) 591-1658
Florida Bar Number: 0650137


July 30, Christian Knight Salazar, 18, of 2215 Ralph Smith
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza and charged
with possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and
contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

July 29, Alfonso Espinoza, 27, of 9364 Eden Dr., Tampa, was
arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with possession of
methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.

July 28, a fight on U.S. 17 South and criminal mischief on
East Oak Street and on U.S. 17 South were reported.

July 27, criminal mischief on North Florida Avenue and on a
different East Oak Street address, and thefts on Georgia Street and
on North First Avenue were reported.

July 26, Patricio Gomez, 39, of 1182 Downing Circle,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jennifer Stanley and charged with
battery.

July 25, Michael Harry Mohn, 67, of 717 S. Sixth Ave. (U.S.
17 South) was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with
disorderly intoxication and resisting an officer without violence.
July 25, a residential burglary on East Main Street was report-
ed.

BOWLING GREEN
July 31, Javier Hernandez Castillo, 39, of 5201 Minor Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and
charged with battery.

July 30, a residential burglary on Pleasant Way, a fight on
Pleasant Way, criminal mischief on Grove Street, and thefts on
West Main Street and on Central Avenue were reported.


Chili is a Red-Nosed Pitbull.
He la a two years old male with a red coat and he is
neutered. Chili is looking for someone who can give him
lots of love and affection, and a nice yard to roam around
In. He can also sit. His adoption fee is $10.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
Ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.




Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Local Health Dept.


Warns Of Smoke


While the wildfire danger
index for Hardee County has
dropped to "low" due to the
recent heavy rains, the drought
index remains high due to a
multi-year drought cycle.
It does not take much for
wildfires to start and quickly
'spread.
In order to prepare citizens
for the possible threat of wild-
fires and the smoke that comes
with them, the Florida Depart-
-ment of Health is providing
health recommendations to
those who may be affected by
wildfire smoke.
Smoke is a respiratory irri-
tant, and can cause a scratchy
throat and/or irritated eyes and
nose. It also may worsen condi-
tions such as asthma and other
chronic respiratory or lung con-
ditions.
There are many steps you
can take to protect yourself and
your family from the health
effects of smoke:
Be your own health judge. If
you can see smoke outside, or
you feel the effects of the
smoke, avoid prolonged out-
door activities. It is especially
important to limit time spent
outdoors for children and per-


sons with existing medical con-
ditions.
* Stay indoors whenever possi-
ble. Run your air conditioner
with a clean filter and the fresh
air intake closed, to prevent
additional smoke from entering
your home. If you don't have an
air conditioner, and are at a
comfortable temperature inside
with the windows closed, stay
inside. If your home is too
warm, seek alternative shelter.
* Keep particle levels inside
and around your home lower by
not burning outdoor yard waste,
smoking tobacco or using any-
thing that burns, such as Wood
fireplaces, gas logs, gas stoves
and candles.
* Delay vacuuming when pos-
sible, as vacuuming stirs up par-
ticles already inside your home.
* Follow your doctor's advice
about taking your medications
and adhere to your asthma man-
agement plan if you have asth-
ma or other lung disease. Call
your doctor if your symptoms
worsen.
* Stay alert to health warnings
and local air quality reports. For
more information on the air
quality index, visit dep.-
state.fl.us.


Frankie's

773-5665
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PUBLIC NOTICE

Heartland Workforce has submitted an application to
Workforce Florida, Inc., requesting renewal of its author-
ization to operate as direct service provider (Direct Con-
trol) for delivery of certain services in the DeSoto,
Hardee, and Highlands county One-Stop Career Cen-
ters. The application is available for viewing on the
Heartland Workforce website at www.hwib.org. Ques-
tions or comments on the application may be directed
to pkozic@hwib.org,11c
8:4,11c


NOTICE
Water Shortage Order No. SWF 2010-022
Modified Phase I (Moderate Water Shortage) Restrictions Extended!
New Expiration Date: October 31, 2011
.. .... Southwest Florida
The District's Governing Board is continuing its S \ ;eu-:nt itrint
water shortage declaration through October 31, .. ..
2011, because although recent rainfall has resulted.-
in some improvements, not all water resource ,...
conditions are back to normal. A "Modified Phase I"


declaration means that some conditions are below
normal and that water users should take certain actions


ALL WATER USERS:
Reduce indoor water use on a voluntary basis.
Test and repair or adjust each irrigation system to
minimize water waste.
Continue to follow applicable year-round water
conservation measures (including the District's
maximum of twice-per-week lawn watering
schedule or any stricter local ordinance).
PIy
WATER UTILITIES:
Continue monthly warning and citation activity
reports, whether directly or in coordination with
local law or code enforcement agencies.
Continue to comply with other requirements specified
in the Water Shortage Order.

QUESTIONS?
Please call 1-800-848-0499 (FL. only) or send an inquiry to
Water.Restrictions@c WaterMatters.org.


,H A N N A 'N





H I LI I b n '
i .I1 K





M PA I f r C E


A.% : : rT .


Water Shortage Order
S''' ',..'.UA'ory

l l lW ,l ,"'


S.


Atrpl-d Area
- Diiroi Boundary


The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) does not discriminate on the basis of disability. This nondiscrimination policy
involves every aspect of the District's functions, including access to and participation in the District's programs and activities. Anyone requiring
reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact the District's Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad St., Brooksville, FL 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD 1-800-231z6103 (FL only); or email
ADACoordinator@WaterMatters.org.
,This notice is only a summary of Water Shortage Order No. SWF 2010-022, as modified. For complete information, please visit the District's website.


7:28-8:4c 7:28.8:4c 8:4c


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7:28-8:4c


7:28-8:4c


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HE OWNS THE BUILDING H


By DAVID GIBSON
Special To The Herald-Advocate
James Michael Rouse, my grandfather,
was born on Jan. 11, 1949, at the
Palmetto Medical Clinic.
The clinic was located on West
Palmetto Street in Wauchula. His parents
were Gilbert Carson Rouse from Rose
Hill, N.C., and Emily Madeira Johnson
from Wauchula. He has two younger sis-
ters. One, Susan Roberts, who lives here
in Wauchula. The other, Leigh Wright,
who lives in Cullowhee, N.C.
' After World War II and his service in
the U.S. Navy, his father moved to
Wauchula and operated a general mer-
chandise store where the Double J
Restaurant is currently located. Later, he
and a friend began to build houses
together as Fort & Rouse Construction
Co. He continued in this line of work
until his retirement, with the First
Christian Church of Wauchula on
Louisiana Street being his last project.
His mother was born in the same
house that my Papa Mike lives in today.'
She was a stay-at-home mom until the
opening of First National Bank of
Wauchula
on Main N'
'Street in .Y
1960. She :'.
worked for ,
FNB until she retired 31 years later.
Family, church, school and play occu-
pied most of my grandfather's time.
Car doors didn't need to be locked
when he was young, car air-conditioning
had just been invented, and he was
allowed to roam freely around town on
his bike and with friends.
For fun, he and his friends had neigh-
borhood games like football, baseball,
and clubhouses. They would also go to
catch a movie at the cost of 10 cents on
Saturday at the South Sixth Avenue
Movie Theater. In later years, they
attended the Wauchula Drive-In past
Wauchula Hills off Highway 17.
He was expected to do inside and out-
side chores around the house. He and his
two sisters alternated dishwashing duty.
They also had to keep their rooms clean.
Outside chores consisted of mowing the
yard on SWl,.days. His chores taught him
responsibility and to respect parental
authority.


COURTESY PHOTO
One of the first- photographs of Mike
Rouse, taken at "Robertson Studio" in
Bartow.
he attended kindergarten on Harvey
Street in Wauchula. Wauchula Elem-
entary School was then located on Oak
Street, where the tennis courts are today.
This is where he learned until he was in
the seventh grade. In seventh and eighth
grade, he attended Hardee Junior High
School, which is thecurrent location of
Wauchula Elementary School.
From then on, he went to Hardee
Senior High School, where the current
School Board offices are located oh
South Florida Avenue. His high school
graduation ceremony was held at City
Hall in Wauchula.
When he was 14, he worked as a stock
and bag boy at S&S Grocery Store on
Sixth Avenue. He was employed there
until a fire destroyed the store one Friday
night. Shortly after that, he worked after
school and on Saturdays at the Western
Auto store located at 130 W. Main St.
Ironically, that very building is owned
today by him and his wife. They have
just recently opened Shops On The
Corner there. His last job in high school
was See's 66 Service Station, located at
Bay Street and Highway 17. He worked
there until graduation from high school
in 1967.
The common clothing during his
childhood included blue jeans with
rolled up cuffs andbuttop-up shirts that
were plaid, paisley. and other,, prints.
Converse All-Star shoes were also popu-
lar, but only in black: Dress loafers and


'E WORKED IN
Red Bull Jets were also.very popular
shoes.
During the '50s and '60s, Wauchula
had several hometown churches and
family-owned grocery stores and restau-
rants. There were no fast-food restau-
rants, one high school, one junior high,
and sev,;al elementary schools. There
were several company-owned full-ser-
vice gas stations.
As for sports, there were four civic
club Little League teams sponsored by
the Lions, Elks, Rotary, etc. After that,
he played junior-high football and bas-
ketball. He also played one year of JV
football for Hardee Senior High.
He was also involved in Boy Scouts of
America. He said it taught him leader-
ship, discipline and life skills as he
worked side-by-side with professional
men and women from the surrounding
communities. He also learned about
teamwork, honesty and strengthening his
faith.
When asked about one of the most
memorable moments of his young life,
this is what he remembered. He caught
the Silver Meteor at the train depot in
4.3'"" "''*


August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


As A BoY
Avon Park, to go spend a summer in the
tobacco lands of eastern North Carolina.
He stayed with his grandparents, aunt,
uncle and cousins on their tobacco and
turkey farm. The train did not come to a
full stop at the depot, just north of
Highway 64 in Avon Park. The conduc-
tor grabbed his bags and pulled him up
as the train slowed down, but did not
completely stop.
He worked in the tobacco fields and
tobacco barns until it was time to get
back on the train to return to Florida for
his next school year. That was the sum-
mer that RC Cola came out with the new
Diet Rite Cola. Also, in 1962, while
working in the tobacco fields, they heard
that Marilyn Monroe had died. It ended
up being a great summer for him as a 13-
year-old boy from Florida.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


REPUBLICAN
In equal rights, equal justice,
Sand equal opportunity for all,
regardless of
race, creed,
age, sex, or
POTIGHT national origin.
Pol. adv. paid for and approved by HC Rep. Party


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255

. .


Large Washers & Dryers
Up To 125 Ibs. Washers

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10 HOURS A
MONTH!
That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


HEARTLAND PHARMACY


DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


-.- -~ ~
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.. .... ....
,. I" i ; .

- .i.n. ...- .. .. I.I ,
Jul--


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist
Hours:
SMonday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


.1 t I .......... . i,


I


a









6C The Herald-Advocate, August 4, 2011


NWES Recognizes Its PAWs And Cool Cats


Kindergarteners who received a Cool Cat Award for the last nine weeks were (front
row, from left) Hope Baker, Miguel Avalos, DeAnthony Jones, Evelin Bautist, Estefany
Ramirez, Sydney Willis and Alex Trevino; (back row) Alex Mendieta, Selena Ancelmo,
Jose Ibanez, Nathan Delarosa, Josiah Bragg, MeChelle Boyles and Sonya Solis.


First graders awarded for their good conduct were (front row, from left) Codee Walker,
Andon Whaley, Kaylie Grice, Emanuel Rodriguez, Jacarie Jones and Ashley Solis; (sec-
ond, row) Crystal Wingate, Jose Fernandez, Kadance Staton, Cristina Saldana,
Marvelous Lewis and Monika Valdez; (back row) Ariyana Leger, Kaden Bryan, Isaac
Rodriguez and Lizbeth Gomez.


Second grade Cool Cat winners were (front row, from left) Joshua Garay, Jose Santoyo,
Abelardo DeJesus-Leon, Richard Sanders, Jamie Walker, Hayden Mushrush, David
Edwards and Daniella Marrero; (back row) Heidi Smith, Isaiah Herrera, Melisa Sigin,
Mayte Tellez, Adrianna Consuegra, Brett Bennett, Richard Torres, Daisy Chavez and
Seth Durrance.


Third graders who were honored for the final Cool Cat Awards this year were (front
row, from left) Damian McWhorter, Hugh Pate, Brianna Valdez, Cruz Avalos, Sandra
Gomez, LeeAnna Reas and Austin Santoyo; (back row) Emilio Huss, Alex Morris,
.Weotpaoberts,,Rrianna Farias, Sandra Salgado and Coron Guajardo.


I ilpM W 1 I
Fourth graders who earned recognition for their achievements were (front row, from
left) Lindsey Boyette, Eric Romero, Yenny Saldana, Juaquin Morales and Justin
Williams; (back row) Haley Canary, Becca Kedzior, Marta Ramirez, J.D. Fannin and
Jasmine Gutierrez-Montes. Not pictured was Jose Gomez.


TFifthy graders who displayed Cool Cat attributes were (front row, from left) Adelina
Luna-Muniz, Julissa Flores, Elena Briones, Ricardo Rodriquez, Samantha Velez, Pablo
Salgado and Zack Macias; (back row) Kaylee Derby, Alexis Neel, Fabian Molina,
Mayrani Ramos and Romeo Martinez.


Third through fifth graders recognized as being Positively Awesome Workers were
(front row, from left) Caleb Thornton, Fabian Molina, Kodie Myers, Lyndsey Welch and
Fernando Patino; (back row) Samuel Perez, Anthony Merchant, Randy McLeod, Ben
Adams, Yareli Lopez and Veronica Molina.


Mosaic's "Spirit of Community Award" is given for outstanding citizenship, scholarship
and service. Pictured are (from left) Dale Wolgast, assistant principal; Mary Ann Harrell,
Four Corners Mine; and Beonce Mosley, recipient of the award.


COURTESY PHOTO
North Wauchula Elementary School held its final awards ceremony honoring its
Positively Awesome Workers and Cool Cats. Kindergartners through second graders
receiving the PA.W. award were (front row, from left) Jerrold Jefferson, Yasbeli
DeJeSus-Leon, Hunter Powell, Robert Mondragon and Eleazar Delacruz; (back row)
Jon Mosley, Chace Ross, Alicia Herrada, Alex Gonzales, Ethan Beyer and Alexia
Martinez. Not pictured was Michael Barber.







August 4, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Courthouse-Report
|Mjiiyiy-.{.U


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Raul J. Alamia Jr., 34, Zolfo
Springs, and Stacy Mendoza,
33,Zolfo Springs.
Mateo Ruiz Ambrocio, 24,
Avon Park, and Martha Santos
Cortes, 26, Avon Park.
Bruce Robert Flanders Jr.,
33, Zolfo Springs, and Kristie
Jean Ligon, 28, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Shona Tucker vs. Patty
Saunders, voluntary dismissal.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Ileana Mas-
corro Faison and Ahmad
Rashad Faison, judgment.
Citibank South Dakota NA
vs. Mary L. Crawley, judgment-
Rosa Lee Eaton vs. Anthony
W. Cantu and Rebecca R.
Tinker, order denying eviction.
Capital One Bank vs. Natalie
M. Pearson, stipulated settle-
ment approved dismissed.
Las Contracting Corp. vs.
Florid Department of Trans-
portation, voluntary dismissal.
W.V. Adams vs. Michael
Giannino, judgment of tenant
eviction.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Horace Edward Keen, viola-
tion of domestic violence


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting:
Consider SWFWMD business
and administrative matters
including discussion of the
salary and benefits analysis
and executive director recruit-
ment. These meetings have
been cancelled.
DATE/TIME: Monday, August 8,
Tuesday, August 9 and Thursday,
August 11,2011; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637
For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1 (800) 423-1,476 (FL
only) .or (352) 807.211, .X46.5
(Ad Order EXE0161)
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us8:4c
8:4I


injunction for protection, pro-
bation one year, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 cost of prosecu-
tion (COP) and $100 investiga-
tive costs.
Patrice Baker, battery, adju-
dication withheld, probation six
months, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 COP.
Terry Lee Jones, resisting an
officer without violence, one
month in jail with credit for
time served (CTS), $325 fine
and court costs, $50 public
defender fee, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Janet Marie Malagon,
domestic battery and battery,
probation six years, $677 fine
and court costs, $50 public
-.defender fee, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Raul Molina, domestic bat-
tery, resisting arrest without
violence and violation of proba-
tion (original charges trespass
on property other than structure
or conveyance, disorderly
intoxication and domestic bat-
tery), probation revoked, six
months in jail CTS, $677 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, and $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Jeffrey Scott Stringer, retail
theft and violation of probation
(original charge petit theft),
probation revoked, four months
in jail CTS, $325 fine'and court
costs, $150 public defender fees
and $100 COP added, to out-
standing fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Nathaniel Keith Toothman,
violation of a domestic violence
injunction for protection, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Marvin Upton, domestic bat-
tery, $325 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $50
COP, $50 investigative costs.
Roger Sylvester Darty, carry-
ing a concealed weapon, adju-
dication withheld, $325 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP.
Dontavia Shyaza Strange,
giving false identification to a
law enforcement officer, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Tyjuan Terrell Williams, pos-
session of marijuana, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and
resisting an officer without vio-
lence, three months in jail CTS
followed by probation six
months, $325 fine and court
costs, $5Q COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs.
Christy Ann Flores, resisting
an officer without violence, not
prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the


office of the circuit court:
Ashley N. Heirs and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Christopher Thompson,
petition for child support.
Hardee County Sheriff's
Dept. vs. Michel Mendez, peti-
tion for forfeiture.
Erica aD. Muse and Joshua
Muse, divorce.
Vanessa Gonzalez and Jose
Gonzalez, divorce.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust as trustee vs. Carl Brown,
petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Melissa L. Summerville and
DOR vs. Michael A. King, peti-
tion for child support.
Stephanie Escobedo and
DOR vs. Saul Alamia, petition
for child support-
Wells Fargo Bank vs. Robert
Hemmelstein, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
.Citibank South Dakota vs.
Rosa Jacqueline Lobert, dam-
ages contracts and indebted-
ness.
Kimberly Lynn Sanders and
DOR vs. Robert Donald Wills,
petition for administrative child
support order.
Chasity D. Smith and DOR
vs. Roger J. Rupe, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Annabel Aguirre and DOR
vs. John Anthony Medrano,
administrative child support
order.
Delores Zepeda and DOR vs.
Naomi Esquivel, petition for
child support-
Duetsche Bank National
Trust as trustee vs. Juanita
Wright, petition for mortgage
foreclosure.
Billy Joe Pellom and Aubry
Lee Pellom, divorce.
Asset Acquisition Group vs.
Vincente Cabrera, damages -
contracts and indebtedness.
Discover Bank vs. Laura
Bostick-Wells, damages -
contracts and indebtedness.
Juanita Lynne Johnson and
Rodney Cleveland Johnson,
divorce.
Christa D. Wolfe vs.
Christopher W. Wolfe, petition
for injunction for protection.'
Nikkie Lynn Johnson and
DOR vs. Robert Don Stevens,
petition for administrative child
support order.
Amanda Alcantar and DOR
vs. David Ochoa, petition for
administrative child support
order.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in.j& cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Orlando Ramos vs. State of
Florida Department of Correc-
tions (DOC), inmate petition
for reconsideration denied.
Carl Petz vs. Ed Buss, DOC
and D. W. Lawrence, Hardee
Correctional Institution, inmate
petition denied.
Ricky D. Nelson vs. Edwin
Buss, DOC, inmate petition


f-----------------------------^111
Hardee County Education Foundation Scholarships
Class of 2011 Deadline Approaching


Attention HHS Class of 2011 Graduates:


All of the following criteria must be met to be eligible for these funds.

You must have:
1. graduated from Hardee Senior High School with the Class of 2011,
2. attended the Hardee County School System for 8 years or more. They do not have to be in
consecutive years, and
3. now be pursuing a college, trade, or technical school education after high school.
After September 1, all the available money for the Class of 2011 will be divided equally among the
seniors who apply and qualify.


To apply for these funds, complete and return the form below. You must
include your acceptance letter or other proof of acceptance, i.e. an invoice from
your selected institution to verifying your eligibility.

-Scholarshp Al---it--n Fm-
Scholarship Application Form


Student Name:
IHome Mailing Address:


Student Social Security Number:


Telephone Number:
Name of College or University:


Complete Address of College or University's Financial Aid Office:


Telephone Number of Financial Aid Office:
Return by mail to:
Debra Daggett, contact person
Hardee Education Foundation, Inc.
P.O. Box 1678


VVauchula, FL 33873
or retum in person to the Hardee County School Board Office


41 completed applications must be received on or before September 1. 2011

Don't forget to include your acceptance letter or other proof of acceptance!

All requests will be processed after September 1, 2011. Funds will be disbursed only after all eligibility is
verified.
8:4,11c


denied.
Jesus Mendoza vs. SanJuana
Caldron, order.
Patricia A. Saunders and
Scott C. Saunders, divorce.
Matthew J. Rainey and
Dayna Rainey, divorce.
Kathy Lynn Stephens and
Eugene Lee Stephens, divorce.
Brittany D. Doyle and DOR
vs. Jason M. Spitler, child sup-
port order.
Sophia Gracia and DOR vs.
Margarite Baker Perez, order.
Arron Ray Chapman and
Shayla K. Chapman, divorce.
Janice Asiason Ellison and
DOR vs. Alexander Jackson,
order.
Stephanie L. Mouldin and
DOR vs. Jeremy L. Mouldin,
order on child support con-
tempt-
Rosalba Cardini Jaimes
Vallejo. and Ariel Vallejo,
divorce.
John Q. Scheel Jr and Angela
F. Scheel, order.
Timothy Massey and Melissa
Massey, order on child support
contempt.
Latoya Diana Roundtree and
DOR vs. Willie James Calhoun,
petition for child support con-
tempt withdrawn.
Evangelina Avalos Rod-
riguez and DOR vs. Heriberto
R. Garcia, order on child sup-
port contempt-
Alicia Rosales Lara and
DOR vs. Ginger Gallegos,
order on child support con-
tempt-
Candice Kimbrough vs.
Nathanial Toothman, dismissal
of injunction for protection.
Lynne Juanita Johnson and
.DOR vs. Jason Blain Arledge,
order on child support con-
tempt-
Billelica Maldonado and
DOR vs. Benny T. Cisneros,
modification of child support-
Elizabeth Riley and DOR vs.
Jeremy L. Mouldin, order on
child support contempt.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the Judge.
Jesse Paul Batts, possession
of marijuana with intent to sell
and possession of drug para-


phernalia, adjudication with-
held, probation 18 months,
$520 fine and court costs, $200
public defender fees, $100
COP, $18 first step probation
fees.
Halbert Diego, burglary of
dwelling and grand theft, adju-
dication withheld, community
control house arrest two
years, $520 fine and court costs,
$350 public defender fees, $100
COP, $48 first step, 75 hours
community service.
Heriberto Garcia Jr. violation
of probation (original charge
possession of methampheta-
mine), resume probation, $200
public defender fees and $100
COP added to outstanding fines
and fees.
Jose Fidencio Garza, posses-
sion of alprazolam and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
three months in jail CTS, $520
fine and court costs, $350 pub-
lic defender fees, $100 COP.
Janet Marie Malagon, grand
theft, five years Florida State
Prison suspended, probation
four years, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender
fees, $100 COP, $48 first step;
burglary of building, not prose-
cuted.
Melinda Denise Stringer,
manufacturing methampheta-
mine, delivery/distribution of
listed chemicals for manufac-
ture, possession of metham-
phetamine and possession/man-
ufacture of drug paraphernalia,
not prosecuted.
Andre Terron Louis, four
counts burglary of structure,


three counts grand theft and
fraudulent use of credit card,
one year, one day Florida State
Prison followed by probation
three years 11 months, $520
fine and court costs, $100 COP,
$47 first step.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Shaun Donovan and Housing
and Urban Development to
Odevilia Olmos, $60,000.
Margaret S. Henderson as
trustee to Marcus D. and Linda
N. Shackelford, $170,000.
Garcia's Agricultural LLC to
Deleon Agricultural Services
and Bautista Farms Trucking,
$115,663.83.
Curtis Brian and Shirley
'Elizabeth Jackson to Billy and
Janice Hill, $38,000.
Diane D. Roberts, David M.
Downing and Karen D. Porter
to Jeol D. and Kellie Latrelle
Fay, $85,000.
Hardee County Industrial
Development Authority to
Nutrapure Inc., $100,000.
Sherry K. Clifton to Paul S.
and Celia L. Hayman, $48,000.
Arturo and Alma D. Badillo
to Alex A. Badillo, $11,165.31.
Everett Cecil and Zelda
Estelle Nolen to Norman V. and
Bonnie G. Edwards, $27,500.
Arthur Long to Arthur Long
and Teresa Ann Young,
$17,500.
Robert E. and Nanette M.
Clauson to Yvonne M. Miller,
$18,000.


For the week ended July 28, 2011
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 7,498 com-
pared to 8,294 last week, and 9,415 last year. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to one week ago, slaughter cows unevenly steady, bulls 1.00 to
2.00 higher, feeder steers steady to 1.00 lower, heifers mostly
steady, replacement cows not tested.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 155.00-190.00
300-400 Ibs 132.00-180.00
400-500 lbs 123.00-145.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 137.50-165.00
300-400 Ibs 120.00-147.50
400-500 lbs 113.00-125.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 7 0-1200 lbs 85-90 percent 5L.00-
60.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs 80.00-
98.50


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held to consider the second reading and adoption of the following
ordinance.

ORDINANCE 2011-07

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE TEXT AND MAPS OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO
SPRINGS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE TOWN'S EVALUATION
AND APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR); PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The Public Hearing will be held on the proposed ordinance at Regular Commission Meeting
on Monday, August 15, 2011 at 6:00 P.M. in the Commission Chambers at Zolfo Springs
Town Hall at which time the Town Commission will consider its adoption into law. The or-
dinance in its entirety may be inspected at the office of the Town Clerk during regular work-
ing hours. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to
the proposed ordinance.

Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is made
and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per Florida
Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts.

Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Clerk's Office at
least 48 hours before the hearing by contacting (863) 735-0405 Fax (863) 735-1684


George Neel, Mayor


Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


A public hearing will be held to consider the second reading and adoption of the following
ordinance.

ORDINANCE 2011-09

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING
SECTION 275-12 OF THE TOWN CODE PROVIDING FOR A RULE WHEREBY
A LANDLORD MAY CHARGE A TENANT A HIGHER UTILITY DEPOSIT THAN
CHARGED BY THE TOWN; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, CONFLICTS, IN-
CLUSION IN THE CODE AND PROVIDING FOR EFFECTIVE DATE.

The Public Hearing will be held on the proposed ordinance at Regular Commission Meeting
on Monday, August 15, 2011 at 6:00 P.M. in the Commission Chambers at Zolfo Springs
Town Hall at which time the Town Commission will consider its adoption into law. The or-
dinance in its entirety may be inspected at the office of the Town Clerk during regular work-
ing hours. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to
the proposed ordinance.

Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is made
and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per Florida
Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts.

Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Clerk's Office at
least 48 hours before the hearing by contacting (863) 735-0405 Fax (863) 735-1684

Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk George Neel, Mayor8:4c
8:4c


I


1,








8C The Herald-Advocate, August 4, 2011


Women's League Winds Down


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With barely a week left in the
2011 Women's Church Softball
League season, there is only
one undefeated team, Holy
Child Catholic.
Reports from Field 1 were
urfavailable at press time, but
play on Field 2 over the last
month notes previously unbeat-
en First Christian losing twice,
to two other top teams. On con-
secutive nights, First Christian
lost to the First Methodist/
Bowling Green Baptist squad
and then to Holy Child.
Holy Child tops the standings
at 8-0, with only two games left
on its schedule, a rain-out and
the findl evening of play. First
Methodist/Bowling Green is
next at 7-1, followed by First
Christian, San Alfonso Mission,
Florida First Assembly of God,
St. Michael Catholic, New
Hope Baptist and New Vision
Worship Center.
Since there's a month of
reporting, only the highlights
will be reported.
Most of New Hope and New
Vision games were on Field 1.
Playing for New Hope are Beth
Radford, Kate Thomas, Kim
Benavides, Lori Barbaree,
Tasha Bishop, Kristin Robert-
son, Kaitlin Shaw, Melissa
Cride, Melanie Henderson,
Amanda Abbott, Brooke
Knight, Jennifer Shackelford,
Tyre Hagwood, Renee Graham,
Katie Jernigan, Sylvia Hend-
rickson, Savannah Roberson,
Donna Klein and Stephanie
Davidson.
Similarly, New Vision has a
large squad, including Brittany
Mansfield, Mindy Hayman,
Ann Talley, Beverly Pauley,
Rachel Coker, Caylah Coker,


Amanda Jones. America San-
doval, Sabrino Lazo, Sandra
Holt, Rhonda Perkins, Valerie
Klein, Alexi Santana, Aaislynn
Holt, Vanessa Olvera, Donna
Smith, Arin Johnson, Melinda
Helms, Baleigh Knight and
Savanah Pauley.
The July 5 game between
First Methodist/Bowling Green
and First Christian was a-
thriller, with First Methodist/
Bowling Green winning 13-12.
Jennifer Bryant, Brittany C.
and Shauntee Hines each
rounded the bases three times
for First Methodist/Bowling
Green. Krystal and Diane
Brummett added twin tallies.
Kim Tyson was stranded three
times.
For First Christian, Sami Jo
Morgan, Sandy Driskell and
Ketus each put a pair of scores
on the board. Christina, Erica
Deaton, Stephanie Roberson,
Stacy, Amy Franks and Lori
Crouse each added a run.
Deaton and Roberson were
each stranded twice.
The July 7 game of interest
was another nail-biter, with
Holy Child winning 11-10 over
First Christian.
Sabrina Hernandez, Maggie
Olvera, Kristina Garcia and
Rosa Villegas were twin-tally
batters for Holy Child, while
Liberty Lozano, Lucy Garcia
and Lacey Lambeth added a run
apiece. Lucy Garcia, Susanna
Castillo and Zita McBride were
eah left on base twice.
Leadoff batter Christina cir-
cled the bases three times for
First Christian. Melissa Albrit-
ton scored twice and Morgan,
Driskell, Ketus, Stacy and
Chelsea came home once each.
Ketus, Roberson and Crouse
were each stranded, Roberson


Hospital Workforce

Wins National Award


Adventist Health System,
which is comprised of 43 hospi-
tal campuses including Florida
Hospital Wauchula, has re-
ceived the Gallup Great Work-
place Award, recognizing the
organization as having one of
the best-performing workforces
in the world.
Adventist Health System
was presented the award during
the Gallup Summit May 10-12
in Omaha, Neb.
"Florida Hospital in Sebring,
Lake Placid and Wauchula is
home to more than 1,400 staff
members who are dedicated to
restoring and promoting health
in our community. As part of
the nearly 55,000 other AHS
employees across the country,
they work each day to offer
health, hope and healing to our
patients. This award shows that
our employees have a deep con-
nection with the work they do."


said Tim Cook, local chief
executive officer and president.
Adventist Health System is
among the 29 winning compa-
nies because it possesses one of
the most productive and en-
gaged workforces in the world.
During the Gallup Summit,
breat Worikpace Award win-
ners presented the best practices
they applied to their workplaces
and the improved business
results they achieved through
building an engaged workforce.
"We place a tremendous
value on our employees: they
are our most important asset."
said Donald L. Jernigan. Ad-
veritist Health System head.
"We will continue to focus on
creating and maintaining an
environment where employees
are engaged, fulfilled and
focused on our mission of
'Extending the Healing
Ministry of Christ.'"


all four times she got on base.
The July 21 game between
First Methodist/Bowling Green
and First Assembly was another
close encounter, with First
Methodist/Bowling Green pre-
vailing 20-19.
Hines and Krystal crossed
home plate three times apiece
for First Methodist/Bowling
Green. Heather, Brummett.
Tiffany, Tyson and Lacey put
twin scores on the board and
Brittany, Jeanne and Caylah
added a run each.
Bonnie Simpson topped First
Assembly with four trips to
home plate. April Lozano and
Vanessa Hernandez had a trio
apiece, while Meagan Smith,
Jamie Buckley and Elizabeth
Mier had twin tallies. Teresa
Gaitan, Tabby Prieto.and Ally
Simpson each added a run.
In a July 26 game, San
Alfonso and St. Michael battled
in the nightcap, with San
Alfonso winning 20-18.
Kourtney Henderson, Penny
McGuire and Sasha Castanon
each circled the bases three
times for San Alfonso. Leigh,
Honesty and Gloria Solis had
twin trips around the bases and
Meagan Henderson, Liz Ann
Woods, Stephanie, Aleeza and
Vanessa each added a run.
Dalia Flores, Lori Dees and
Rishonea Lampley scored four
times each for St. Michael.
Irene and Angel Ussery touched
home twice apiece and Aurora
Santiago and Naomi each added
a run.


7/28/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:48 AM
Set: 8:18 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 301 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:32 AM
Set: 6:3) PM
Overhead: 11:38 AM
Underfoot -:-
Moon Phase
5',f
Waning Crescent
Major Times
1:38 AM 1:38PM
Minor Times
4:32 AM 5:32 AM
6:39 PM 7:39 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4
7/29/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:48 AM
Set: 8:18 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 30 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:34 AM
Set: 7:27 PM
Overhead: 12:33 PM
Underfoot: 12:06 AM
Moon Phase
2%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:06 AM -2:06 AM
12:33 PM 2:33 PM
Minor Times
5:34 AM 6:34 AM
7.27 PM 8.27 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


7/30/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:49' AM
Set: 8:17 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:37 AM
Set: 8:10 PM
Overhead: 1:28 PM
Underfooit: 1:01 AM
Moon Phase
NEW MOON
Major Times
1:01 AM 3:01 AMN
1:28 PM 3:28 PM
Minor Times
6:37 AM 7:37 AM
8:10 PM- 9:10 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
7/31/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:49 AM
Set: 8:16 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 27 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:42 AM
Set: 8:51 PM
Overhead: 2:21 PM
Underfoot: 1:54 AM
Moon Phase
1%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1:54 AM 3:54 AM
2:21 PM 4:21 PM
Minor Times
7:42 AM 8:42 AM
8:51 PM- 9:51 PM
Solunar Rating
Better++++
Time Zone
UTC: -4


8/1/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:50 AM
Set: 8:16 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 26 mitn,.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:46 AM.
Set: 9:3I PM
Overhead: 3:13 PM
Underfoot: 2:47 AMN
Moon Phase
5%'
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:47 AM 4:47 AM
3:13 PM 5:13 PM
Minor Times
8:46 AM 9:46 AM
9:31 PM 10:31 P[M
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/2/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:50 AM
Set: 8:15 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 25 rmins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:51 AM
Set: 10:09 PM
Overhead: 4:04 PM
Underfoot: 3:38 AM
Moon Phase
I1%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
3:38 AM 5:38 AM
4:04 PM 6:04 PM
Minor Times
9:51 AM -10:51 AM
!0:09 PM I1:09 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


8/3/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:51 AM
Set: 8:14 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 23 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:55 ANt
Set: 10:48 PM
Overhead: 4:56 PM
Underfoot: 4:30 AM
Moon Phase
201%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
4:30 AM 6:30 AM
4:56 PM 6:56 PM
Minor Times
10:55 AM-I 1:55 AM
10:48 PM-11:48 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC:-4
8/4/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:52 AM
Set: 8:14 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 22 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:59 AM
Set: 11:30 PM
O erhead: 5:48 PM
Underfoot: 5:22 AM
Moon Phase
30%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
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Gilliard's Fill Dirt Leads Men's League


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Dirty Dozen of Gilliard
Fill Dirt remains the only
unbeaten squad in the 2011
Men's City Softball League.
With a pair of regular season
evenings and pair of rainout
evenings, the eight teams are
nearly ready for the post-season
tournament. Before that. Gil-
liard (10-0) may have to make
up against Mosaic's No. I team.
the Regulators. currently in sec-
ond-place with an 8-2 record.
Third-place belongs to the
Peace River Electric Corp.'s
Legion of Doom at 7-3.
Behind the leaders are
Mosaic #2, TNT/Nemesis, Los
Diablos, and 'Three Ranches
and Team Santarlas.
Over the last two weeks, the
eight teams have managed to
get games in around the late
afternoon or evening thunder-
showers. This report will be on
some of the tightest games. In
one not reported, Matt of
PRECo hit for the cycle on July
21, with a double, single, homer
and triple for the night.
The game of the night on July
9 was the Field 4 late game
between III Ranches and
Gilliard, which won 16-12.
Lester Hombake and Kellon
Durrance both circled the bases
three times for Gilliard.
Durrance collected a trio of
RBIs with his homer. Hornbake
had four hits, including a triple,
double and pair of singles.
For III Ranches, Weston
Palmer homered among his


three hits and three tallies.
Robert Fussell collected a half
dozen RBIs on a trio of doubles.
Palmer and Bobby Carraway
both came around to cross
home plate three times.
The July 21 nightcap on Field
4 was a battle royal between III
Ranches and Los Diablos.
which won 23-21.
Roy Santoyo and Valetin
Rosales both socked homers for
Los Diablos. The Rosales
homer was a grand slam. bring-
ing, Santoyo, Jose Lucho and
Bobby Flores home ahead of
him. Lucho scored three times
and eight other batters each
crossed home plate twice.
Justin Painter homered and
Doyle Tyson tripled twice for.
III Ranches. Mark Mcghee,
Cody Gullatt and Carraway
were triple-tally batters. Five
others came home twice each.
On July 26, TNT/Nemesis
clashed with Los Diablos,
which won 30-23.
Sammy Cisneros paced Los
Diablos with a homer, triple and
pair of doubles in almost hitting
for the cycle. Lucho, Junior
Cortez and Santoyo each made
four trips to home plate.
Cisneros, Jaime Rosas
and Eric Virgile chipped in with
three runs apiece.
For TNT/Nemesis, it was
Sam Rivera belting a pair of
homers and a triple. Kaleb
Saunders smacked four hits and
scored three times. Ruben
Rivas used three hits and a walk
to put four runs on the board.


Rivera also scored three times.
Both early games on July 28
were close encounters.
In the Field 3 opener, Team
Santarlas edged Los Diablos
16-15.
Dale Bucy tripled, doubled
and singled for Team Santarlas.
Ches Graham tripled and
Dalton Hewett and Walt Beattie
both doubled twice. Hewett,
Teddy Svendsen. Bucy and
Beattie each put twin tallies on
the board.
Tequila tripled for the only
long-ball hit for Los Diablos.
Sammy Arreola doubled twice
and singled for a trio of tallies.
Santoya also scored three times.
In the Field 4 game at 6:45,
Mosaic I inched past Mosaic II
24-23.
Ron Yeager used five hits,
including a homer and pair of
doubles to collect six RBIs for
Mosaic I. Austin Helms was
right ahead of Yeager and also
had a homer and pair of doubles
among five hits, but he only got
five RBIs. Helms scored five
times, and Mike Dixon and
Mike Carte both put three runs
in the book. Lewis Martin
homered and doubled' for four
RBIs and twin tallies.
For Mosaic II, it was Marcus
nearly hitting the cycle with a
triple, homer, double and sacri-
fice for a half dozen RBIs.
Howie and John McBride both
also homered. Leadoff batter
Tater scored four times, and
Marcus and D. Bow each added
three runs.


.MARKETING




GRANT PROGRAM


Now ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS


HRECON


A strong MARKETING PLAN is vital in today's business world.
When considering an advertising strategy, don't ask yourself
"Should I advertise?" Ask yourself

"How can I advertise effectively?"
Marketing is an INVESTMENT in the growth of your
business. Your ability to plan and implement an effective
marketing plan will directly influence the future
SUCCESS of your business.

Here are some points to consider: ,C R
* Determine your trade area
* Identify your target market
* Select appropriate advertising media
* Determine an advertising budget
(that's where the Chamber can help)
Develop an effective, CREATIVE advertisement
Measure your results

Thegafee County Chamber of Commerce wants to partner
with your business to help fund your MARKETING PLAN through the
Marketing Grant Program. Pick up your application packet today!


m -*---*U U*U U*U*U U U U

MARKETING GRANT PROGRAM GUIDELINES
Purpose and Objective:
The purpose of this grant is to encourage sustainability and economic growth to the Hardee County business community
by providing reimbursable matching grants to Chamber members for general marking and website design and/or
enhancement.

Program Description:
General Marketing
The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce will award approved Chamber members a reimbursable grant for
50% of an advertisement of their choice up to $250.
Advertisements include but are not limited to newspapers, radio, magazines, and websites.

Website Design and/or Enhancement:
The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce will award approved Chamber members a reimbursable grant for
50% of the costs for website design and/or enhancement up to $500.
Design is defined as a new website not previously constructed.,
Enhancement is defined as any improvement of an existing website.

Program Rules:
Grants will be awarded through a quaterly grant application cycle.
Chamber members can only be awarded twice a calendar year.
Open grant cycles will be advertised one month in advance.
Each cycle, only one grant-application per category can be submitted by an applicant.

Program Qualifications:
All applicants must be current members of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce.
The applicant must submit a completed grant application, quotes for said application, and plan of action if grant is
awarded to a subcommittee of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors.
All applications will be reviewed by the subcommittee of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce Board of
Directors within ten business days at the end of the cycle.
The committee will not review applications that are not complete.
If approved, the applicant will be notified immediately.
After paid invoices are submitted, funds will be dispersed.
________________


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S107 East Main Street, P.O. Box 683 Wauchula, Florida 33873
Ie Phone (863) 773-6967 Fax (863) 773-4915


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