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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 7/28/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


Thursday, July 28, 2011


County Budget Down By $7 M


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
After two days of workshops
the Hardee County Commission
has proposed a 2011-12 budget
of $47,013,528, down more
than $7 million from this year.
The major decrease is from
less grant dollars and falling
property values bringing in less
ad valorem tax revenue to the


county. Falling property values
decreased the tax base by 3.81
percent to $1.47 billion.
Commissioners held the line
on 2010-11's millage of 8.55401,
which will generate a total of
$12,627,985, or $512,047 less
for the new fiscal year begin-
ning Oct. 1. To generate the
same amount of property taxes
as in 2010-11 $13,140,032


- would have meant raising
the tax rate to 8.8928 mills.
Proposed budgets for the var-
ious departments were similar
to .last year's requests, with
some lower due to the 192.5
county employees now con-
tributing three percent of their
salary toward retirement.
County employees were
given a 2.5 percent raise for the


coming year.
Public safety is the biggest
line item in the budget at
$13,107,701, which includes
the sheriff, county jail, build-
ings and inspections, emer-
gency management, E-911 and
emergency medical services.
Sheriff Arnold Lanier pre-
sented a proposed operating
budget of $7,345,347, down


slightly from last year. The total
budget for the Sheriff's Office
and county jail, including what
the County Commission pays
for out of its budget, brings the
total to $8,140,219..
Lanier will be adding four
dispatchers and two narcotic
officers in the coming year. His
employees will also be getting a
2.5 percent pay increase.


lion


The combined operating
budget presented by Fire Chief
Mike Choate for fire and EMS
next year will be $4,343,373,
and after contingencies and
reserves are added it comes to
$5,665,778.
The 44 fire and EMS em-
ployees will be getting a 2.5
percent pay increase and eight
See BUDGET 2A


Raid Nets





Stash Of





Stolen Items


COURTESY PHOTO
See anything? If your home or vehicle has been burglarized recently, your stolen items may have been found by theq,
Wauchula Police Department. Here, Police Chief Bill Beattie looks over just a portion of the items recovered from
several city thefts. Items on this table include jewelry, video games, a laptop computer, a Playstation, a camouflage
shotgun, flatscreen TV and more.


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A raid on a Wauchula home
has led to the recovery of thou-
sands of dollars in stolen prop-
erty.
City Police Chief Bill Beattie
said the search warrant served
on 208 Louisiana St. on Friday
culminated a month-long inves-
tigation into several break-ins
within municipal limits.
Two people who were at the
house as the search warrant was
executed were questioned by
detectives. A third suspect con-
nected to the probe is currently
being held at the Hardee


County Jail on unrelated
charges.
Arrests in this investigation
are expected soon, Beattie said.
Beattie said detectives Kevin
Brock and Jimmy Harrison led
the investigation, developing
tips and other intelligence infor-
mation implicating the resi-
dence and occupants as being
involved in a number of recent
burglaries and thefts in the city.
As the raid began, a man and
woman inside the home were
detained as searchers went
through the house and property.
They allegedly found a $3,000
See RAID NETS 2A


Fossil Tourism, Manufacturing Plant Top Rankings


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
So, how did the rankings for
economic development dollars
go?
Each of the municipalities
and the county commission
ranked nine applications for the
available Hardee County Ec-
onomic Development Authority
severance' tax dollars this ses-
sion. '
EDA will make the final deci-
sion at its morning meeting on
Aug. 9.
Originally, there were 10
applications, but the request for'
$1.4 million for Rapid Systems
E-911 expansion was with-



WEATHER
DATE HIGH LOW BRA
07120 92 68 0.00
07/21 93 71 0.00
07/22 93 72 0.78
107123 93 72 0.01
07/24 95 74 0.00
07125 94 74 0.00
07/26 89 71 0.17
TOTAL Rainfall to 07/26/11 -21.64
Same period last year 29.13
Ten Year Average 54.30
Su Unv. of Fl. One Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds .......... 6B
Community Calendar .7A
Courthouse Report ... 7C
Crime Blotter ........ 3C
Hardee Living ....... 28
Information Roundup ..7A
Obituaries .........4A



11 1111 11
7 1812207290 3


drawn as it had already been
allocated the money from the
Mosaic Mining Economic
Terms agreement by the Indus-
trial Development Authority at
its June meeting.
"Timing for the EDA grant
application process and coordi-
nation with the county, Fire-
Rescue, Sheriff's Office,
Motorola Radio, Motorola
Data, Rapid Systems and others
was too complex and too con-
tentious" explained Hardee
County Ecoromic Develop-
ment Director Bill Lambert.
Narrowing the rankings to
nine, then, showed a fairly con-
sistent ranking amount the four


government bodies. Interest-
ingly, Commissioner Grady
Johnson ranked none of them
worthy of the EDA money, and
Commissioner Minor Bryant
ranked only the FGH Innova-
tive Solutions Shelter Pac with
16 potential jobs, considering
the others to be more the
responsibility of the Wauchula
Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA) because it takes
dollars off the county tax roll or
did not create enough jobs.
Otherwise, ranking was simi-
lar.
Peace River Explorations Inc.
got first-place votes from
Wauchula and Zolfo Springs,,


Not Enough Rain?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
You just think you are going
to mow your lawn after work.
Forget about playing golf
after noontime; it's too, too hot,
or it's storming. Evening soft-
ball games; the chances of get-
ting them in are 50-50.
Or. or any number of other
outdoor activities.
How about time to cprl up
with a good book? That may be
more like it with the unexpected
thunderstorms and rain showers,
these days.
Would you believe that water
restrictions are still in effect?
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District Board
decided Tuesday to extend the
Phase I water shortage restric-
tions in its 16-county area,.
including Hardee. through Oct.
31.
Residents, who may not need
to water at all, are asked to


check their irrigation systems
timers, repair any broken pipes
or leaks, and damaged or tilted
sprinkler heads.
Cities and counties must con-
tinue to report how they are
enforcing the two-day-a-week
watering restrictions, which
limit watering to before 10 a.m.
or after 4 p.m. on the designat-
ed days.
According to SWFWMD
officials, the rainy season is off
to a slow start. While public
water supplies, are in relatively
good shape now, that's not
expected to last. "We may.need
to consider stricter measures if
the rest of the rainy season isn't
more consistently productive."
says SWFWMD.
They could be right. Accord-
ing to agency data, rainfall for
the month of July to date is four
inches less than the historic
average. Aquifer levels are still
in the minus category.


wai ranked second by Bowling
Green and fourth by the county.
The Country Gardens assist-
ed living and memory care
facility was ranked second by
Wauchula, and third by Zolfo
Springs, Bowling Green and the
county.
ShelterPac's manufacturing
facility was ranked first by
Bowling Green, second by the
county, third by Wauchula and
fourth by Zolfo Springs.
The IDA spec building for the


county's Commerce Park was
ranked first by the county,
fourth by Wauchula and
Bowling Green, and fifth by
Zolfo Springs.
The Center For Great Apes
expansion and tourism project
was ranked second by Zolfo
Springs, seventh by Bowling
Green, and ninth by both
Wauchula and the county.
Oakwood Construction's
Main Street Kitchen and Tile
Store was ranked fifth by the


county and Wauchula, sixth by
Zolfo Springs and ninth by
Bowling Green.
SonHaven Preparatory Acad-
emy's application for remodel-
ing and hiring teachers was
ranked sixth by the county and
Wauchula, seventh by Zolfo
Springs and eighth by Bowling
Green.
The Redding Farms dual
applications were generally
ranked one after the other, with
See FOSSIL 2A


PUT THAT OUT!

College Goes Tobacco-Free Monday


South Florida Community
College will become a Tobacco-
Free College as of Monday.
SFCC is one of five community
colleges in the state to adopt a
STobacco-Free College policy,
and several others are currently'
considering such a'rule. Over
500 colleges and universities
nationwide have adopted tobac-
co-free policies.
The new SFCC policy pro-
hibits the use, distribution or
sale of tobacco, or any object or
device intended to simulate
tobacco use, in all indoor and
outdoor areas of each campus,
center and other property under
the control of the college.
A tobacco-free policy differs
from a smoke-free policy be-
cause it prohibits all forms of
tobacco use.
According to Dr. Norm
Stephens, college president, a
variety of reasons prompted the
decision, including the endorse-
ment of the concept by the fac-
ulty council; continuing con-


cerns raised by students at open
forums regarding the negative
effects of tobacco use on cam-
pus; and the national trend of
hospitals, colleges and other
public facilities going tobacco-
free.
"Following discussions with
the SFCC District Board of
Trustees last fall, we carefully
designed and distributed two
surveys to determine the level
of support or opposition among
students and employees to the
Tobacco-Free College initia-
tive," Stephens said.
"Results of the survey indi-
cated that 75 percent of
employees and students sup-
ported adoption of the Tobacco-
Free College policy," he point-
ed out.
Glenn Little, vice president
of administrative services, also
cited some concerns that led to
the policy. "Our main concern
was the health and safety of our
students and employees. Of
course, there are the proven


dangers of second-hand smoke,
but there have been on-campus
incidents as well. Cigarette
butts are often not fully extin-
guished and have caused sever-
al small fires around campus,
including a fire in the Bayhead
Nature Trail last year which had
to be extinguished by the Fire
Department. That fire could
have quickly gotten out of con-
trol."
Another health concern was
the disposal of smokeless
tobacco waste. "The waste is
not discarded as it should be,
and our custodians are forced to
clean up the mess left behind,"
Little said.
Compliance with this tobac-
co-free policy is the shared
responsibility and the right of
all SFCC staff, students and
faculty members. Its success
depends upon the courtesy,
respect and cooperation of users
and non-users of tobacco prod-
..cts, Little noted.
See TOBACCO2A


SMain Street

SNames Royalty

... Photos 8C


Hunters Asked

To Check Deer

... Story 3B


S4-H Presents

J Annual Awards

... Story 4,5C


111th Year, No. 34
3 Sections, 28 Pages


46
plus 4i sales tax


II


i









2A The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011


SThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
SOR/ ~ Production Manager

SNOEY DE SANTIAGO.
^L Asst. Prod. Manager
rro J Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
$3873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


DEADLINES:
Schools- Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports'- Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon .


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18; I yr. $31; 2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2 yrs. $79
Out of State
6 months S27; 1 yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes .letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should bt
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.






Keep An Eye


On Your Vision


Americans agree that eye-
sight is one of the senses they
fear losing most, yet many peo-
ple pay no attention to their eye
health unless they notice a
problem. Many common eye
diseases that can lead to vision
loss and blindness, such as dia-
betic eye disease, glaucoma and
age-related macular degenera-
tion, often have no early warn-
ing signs or symptoms. While
having regular eye exams to
make sure the eyes are healthy
and seeing their best is impor-
tant for everyone, the risk of
vision loss and blindness is
higher for some people based
on race, ethnicity and other
demographic and socioeconom-
ic factors.
You might be at higher risk
for eye disease if you have a
family history of eye disease;
have diabetes; are African
American, Hispanic/Latino,
American Indian or an Alaska
Native; or are older than 50.
Some diseases affect certain
populations disproportionately.
SGlaucoma, which affects
'your side-or peripheral-vision
first, is three times more com-
mon in African Americans than
in Whites. It is a leading cause
of blindness in African Amer-
icans.
Diabetic retinopathy, a
leading cause of blindness
caused by uncontrolled dia-
betes, occurs more often in
Hispanics/Latinos than in
Whites.
American Indians and
Alaska Natives are 35 percent


more likely to have diabetes
than the average adult in the
United States, putting them at
increased risk of diabetic eye
disease.
Older adults are at higher
risk of developing age-related
eye diseases and conditions
such as age-related macular
degeneration (AMD), glaucoma
.and cataracts. AMD is a leading
cause of blindness in Whites.
"If you are at higher risk of
eye disease, having a compre-
hensive dilated eye exam is the
best thing you can do to protect
your vision," says Paul A.
Sieving, M.D., Ph.D., director
of the National Eye Institute,
part of the -ttional Institutes of
Health. &
"A comprehensive dilated
eye exam is a painless proce-
dure where your eye care pro-
fessional puts drops in the eyes
to dilate-or widen-the pupil so
he or she can get a good look at
the back of the eye to check for
signs of eye disease. With early
detection, treatment can slow or
stop vision loss and reduce the
iisk of blindness."
In addition to having regular
eye exams, eating a healthy
diet, not smoking and wearing
protective eyewear where neces-
sary are just a few other things
you can do to save your sight.
For more information on eye
exams, common eye diseases
and conditions and finding
financial assistance for eye
care, visit www.nei.nih.gov/-
healthyeyes.


to 10 employees will receive an
additional 2.5 percent step pay
increase as per union rules for
receiving additional training
and certification.
General government is bud-
geted at 5,548,587 for next year.
Included in general govern-
ment are the county commis-
sion, clerk of courts, county
manager, property appraiser,
supervisor of elections, human
resources, purchasing, commu-
nity development, budget and
finance, legal services, planning
and zoning, information tech-
nology, facilities management
and mining.
The commission has an oper-
ating budget of $249,576 pro-
posed for the coming year,
which includes commissioner
salaries of $31,219, a number
set by the state.
The clerk of courts is budget-
ed for $470,400, down slightly
from $475,000 last year.
The county manager' pro-
posed a budget of $206,253,
down more than $10,000 from
last year.
Property Appraiser Kathy
Crawford presented a proposed
budget of $673,547, up slightly
from last year. Crawford said



FOSSIl
Continued From 1A
preference given to the nursery
expansion rather than the jobs
retention/property purchase.
The nursery expansion was
ranked fifth by Bowling Green,
seventh by the county, and
eighth by Wauchula and Zolfo
Springs. The jobs retention was
ranked sixth by Bowling Green;
seventh by the county and
Wauchula and ninth by Zolfo
Springs
There could be enough
monies to fund almost all of
these-requests. When the 2004
Florida Legislature set up the
EDA, it set forth its member-
ship and terms to "solicit, rank
and fund" economic develop-
ment and infrastructure leading
to job creation in Hardee
County.





TOBACCO
Continued From 1A
"Respect for others and the
encouragement of a healthier
lifestyle for all is the main
emphasis for this campaign,
and we hope to promote it in a
positive way that shows this
policy is good for everyone,"
Litle said. "However," he ad-
ded, "we certainly support the
rights of adults to choose to use
tobacco products just not
here."
SFCC offers a variety of
resources that can be found on
the college website to help
those who wish to quit using
tobacco products. The college
will also work with the Area
Health Education Center to
offer free tobacco cessation
classes for employees, students
and community members.
For more information on
SFCC's tobacco-free policy or
for a list of tobacco cessation
resources, visit the SFCC web-
site at southflorida.edu.


ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Due to misinformation
supplied to the writer, an
article on the Economic
Development Council in
last week's issue incorrect-
ly said member Chet Hud-
dleston resigned because
of moving out of the coun-
ty.
Actually, it is because his
new job requires him to
travel to other counties,
making it difficult to attend
meetings.
The Herald-Advocate is
pleased to set the record
straight.
At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to' report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


the increase was due to having
to replace an old vehicle or her
budget would have been slight-
ly lower.
Supervisor of Elections Jeff
Ussery proposed a budget of
$312,629. He said it is up
$21,000 from last year because
of the elections taking place
during the coming budget year.
Tax Collector Zee Smith pro-
posed a budget of $639,661,
down slightly from last year.
Smith told the commission that
her office has takenT 'ver for the
.Division of Motor Vehicles, and
it has doubled the customers
coming into her office.
The road and bridge depart-
ment will have an operating
budget of $3,333,544 and has
44 employees.
Fleet maintenance, which is a
separate budget from road and
bridge, is budgeted for
$636,178 and has 12 additional
employees to keep the county
vehicles up and running.
Transportation capital proj-
ects, which is repaving, improv-
ing or building new roads, is
budgeted at $4,997,377 and
includes several roads slated for
work in the coming year. Roads
in the plan are Moffitt,
Scarborough, Bostick, Lime-
stone and Sweetwater.
Expenses for the Vandolah
and Wauchula Hills water and
wastewater expansions will
total $2,387,456 for the coming
year.
The expenses for operating,
recycling and closure costs for
the landfill will be $4,115,239.
Non-profit agencies request-
ing funding from the commis-
sion were budgeted for the most
part at $1,000 less than allocat-
ed last year, for a total of
$139,597 going toward human
services.
Receiving that funding were
Peace River Center, $9,000;
NU-Hope Elder Care, $28,000;
Resthaverf, $49,000; Cutting
Edge Ministries, $4,000; Ridge
Area Arc, $9,000; Caring
People Ministries, $4,000;
Veolia Transportation, $20,597;
Hardee Help Center, $9,000;
Alpha & Omega, $5,000; and
the Chamber of Commerce,
$2,000.
Making requests but not
receiving fundipDg.were the
Hardee County HIqlth Depart-
ment, Tri-County Human
Services, Early Learning
Coalition, YMCA, and the Ona
Range Cattle Station.
The Economic Development
Office was budgeted for
.. $235,000, down from $245,000
last year.
The Community Recreation
Complex, which is funded by
the city, county and School
Board, will receive $42,500
from the county.
Before the budget is finalized
there will be two public hear-
ings. The first will be Sept. 15
and the final, for adoption, will
be Sept. 26.




RANlNETS
Continued From 3A
stash of goods taken in break-
ins. The suspected stolen items
were seized, he said.
The chief added that officers
entering the residence also dis-
covered illegal drugs and nar-
cotics paraphernalia in plain
view throughout the house. A
second search warrant was
SObtained to retrieve that .evi-
dence, he said.
Beattie said recovered items
include a large amount of jew-
elry, small electronics, a num-
ber of video games, a Playsta-
tion, a flatscreen television set,
a laptop computer, a camou-
flage shotgun and much, much
more.
.The Wauchula Police De-
partment is currently in the
process of going through bur-
glary reports to match stolen
items to victims, he said.
Raiding the house and prop-
erty were Brock and Harrison;
Det. Matthew Whatley; ser-
geants John Eason, Gabe Garza
and Eddie Davis; corporals
Christopher LeConte and
Robert Spencer; officers Justin
Wyatt, Eric Thompson, Frank
Youdonis and Frank Tomlinson;
and Det. Sylvia Hendrickson of
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office.


Wauchula Ofc. Amy Drake
and Det. Maria Pearson secured
all the evidence collected at the
scene, processing and logging
all the recovered items.
Beattie said the number of
burglaries solved by the raid
has not yet been fully deter-
mined.
A true friend never gets in
your way unless you hap-
pen to be going down.


rNutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: Does exercising with those
big plastic balls I see in gyms
really provide any special
benefits?
A: Stability balls inflatable
plastic balls usually ranging
from 18 to 30 inches aren't
essential for fitness, but they are
inexpensive options and can
add benefits to the exercises
you do. Here's how: When you
lie with the ball under the small
of your back, with feet on the
floor holding you steady, the
abdominal, back and leg mus-
cles that make up your "core"
automatically start working to
keep you from rolling off. And,
when you use a stability ball for
abdominal crunches (like sit-
ups), this extra muscle work,
combined with the extra dis-
tance you can roll backward
compared to doing crunches flat
on the floor, provides extra ben-
efits because of the extra chal-
lenge to muscles. You can also
use a stability ball behind your
back as you stand with your
back to a wall, sliding up and
down into squats. As part of
stretching routines, the balls
can allow for a greater stretch.
You can also use the balls in
place of an exercise bench for
strength-training exercises in
which you lie on your back
(such as chest presses and tricep
extensions) or face-down (such
as flies); other muscles are
actively engaged to keep your
balance, and you are able to
extend motions farther than if
you were simply lying on the
floor. The balance can be a bit
tricky at first, so it can be help-
ful to check a video for stability
ball exercise technique before
you start. Most balls are 45, 55,
65 or 75 centimeters, and you
need a ball sized right for your
frame. Fully inflated, when you
sit on it with your feet flat on
the floor, your knees should
form a right angle so that your
thighs are parallel to the floor.

Q: Is it true Kombucha tea
fights cancer by boosting the
immune system?
A: Proponents suggest that
Kombucha tea (considered a
dietary supplement) caan stiniti-''
late the immune system to pro-
vide wide-ranging benefits, but
we don't have any human stud-
ies that show such effects, and
'for people with weakened
immune systems, this could be
a risky beverage. Kombucha is
made by fermenting sweetened
tea with a mixed culture of
yeasts and bacteria. The fer-
mentation produces acid, which
some say could have beneficial
effects in the gut. Limited labo-
ratory studies show that at least
some of 'these cultures can
inhibit growth of certain illness-
producing bacteria. However,
yeast and bacteria cultures vary
from one batch of Kombucha to
another, as do preparation
methods. Some Kombucha tea
may contain contaminants such
as molds and fungi, which can
actually cause illness, particu-
larly in people whose immune
systems are weakened by ill-
ness or certain types of cancer
treatment. The Natural Med-
icines Comprehensive Database
concludes "there is no scientific
evidence to support any thera-
peutic claims" for Kombucha
tea. And Memorial Sloan-
Ketter.ig Cancer Center's
Integfillive Medicine ceriter
warns, "Patients with sup-
pressed immune systems should
not consume Kombucha bever-
ages produced in an uncon-
trolled environment."

Q: Do older adults need extra
protein to avoid losing mus-
cle? If so, how much is
enough?
A: Research suggests that older
adults may need somewhat
more protein than younger
adults to avoid the loss of lean
body tissue like muscle and
bone that occur as we age. Most
studies involve those over age
65, but some include adults
over 55. This does not require
huge amounts of meat or pro-
tein supplements, however. The
long-time standard protein rec-
ommendation for adults has
been this formula: your body
weight in pounds divided by
three (thus, a 160 pound adult
needs 53 grams of protein).
Quite a few studies in recent
years suggest that older ,adults
lose less muscle and may actu-


ally gain muscle better if along
with strength-training exercise,
they consume protein equal to
their weight in pounds divided
by two. (So a person who
weighs 160 pounds may do well
to target 80 grams of protein per
day.) Studies do not show any


further benefit in maintaining or
gaining muscle with protein
consumption beyond that
amount. U.S. dietary surveys
suggest that average protein
consumption of adults ages 51-
70 generally meets that target.
However, about one in four
over 70 may be getting less than
the minumun and another 25
percent of adults over 50 may
be getting less than the pro-
posed higher target. You can
reach this higher level of pro-
tein with five to six ounces a
day of lean poultry, fish or meat
plus three servings of dairy
products or dairy alternatives as
part of a balanced diet that pro-
vides smaller amounts of pro-
tein from whole grains, vegeta-
bles, beans, nutsand seeds, and
perhaps some eggs, too. Those
who prefer to omit or minimize
meat or dairy products need to
include multiple servings of
vegetarian sources of protein.
Some research suggests that
protein may be more efficiently
used when it is spread out
through the day. As important
as protein seems to be, research
also emphasizes the vital role
that resistance (strength-train-
ing) exercise has in avoiding
lean tissue loss.

Q: I'm confused by all the
competing claims about dif-
ferent berries. Is there one
that offers more health pro-
tection than the others?
A: All berries offer health bene-
fits, so enjoy a variety. Straw-
berries are highest in vitamin C,
yet all are good sources. A cup
of most berries about two'
servings will supply from a
third of the recommended
amounts to the complete target.
Actually, much of the health.
promoting power of fruits and
vegetables comes not from the
classic antioxidant vitamin C,
but from natural protective
compounds in plants called
phytochemicals. Antidxidants
attract and neutralize highly
reactive molecules called free
radicals that can damage body
cells in ways that lead to cancer
aiid heati, disease. Yet focusing
only on antioxidant power, and'
systems' that rate that power,'
misses the big picture. Many
phytochemicals in berries may
also help protect against cancer
and other chronic diseases by
decreasing inflammation and
stimulating self-destruction of
abnormal cells. Two of these
are anthocyanins, which give
many berries their red color,
and ellagic acid. In animal stud-
ies, berries or the compounds
they contain have inhibited
development of colon,
esophageal, cervical, lung and
breast cancers. In several exper-
iments all berries were about
equally effective.
Q: Should I try to follow a low
glycemic index (low GI) diet
to lower cancer risk?
A: You may have heard that eat-
ing foods with a high glycemic
index (GI) makes blood sugars
go up, causing increased levels
of hormones like insulin that
seem to promote development
of some cancers. However,
while those effects have been
seen in short-term studies and
do make sense in theory,
longer-term studies do not show
consistent impact on hormone
levels. There are.plenty of rea--
sons for the confusion.
Although you can find lists of
foods with their GI value in
books and on websites, actual
blood sugar-raising effects of
foods vary substantially with
how they are cooked and
whether they are eaten alone or
along with sources of protein,
fiber or fat, all of which blunt
the effect. Furthermore, a large
portion of a "low GI food"
could end up raising blood
sugar as much as a small por-
tion of a "high GI food." Rather
than focus specifically on the
glycemic index of your diet,
aim for an overall strategy to
avoid elevated insulin with a
diet that supplies nutrients and
phytochemicals that reduce
cancer risk. To decrease insulin
resistance, accumulate at least
30 minutes of moderate physi-
cal activity throughout the day,
control portion sizes even of
"healthy" food to achieve and
maintain healthy weight, and
make vegetables, fruits, whole


grains and beans the largest part
of your plate. People with type
2 diabetes or the insulin resist-
ance of pre-diabetes and poly-
cystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
may be especially sensitive to
'foods' blood sugar-raising
effects, but best advice for now
seems to involve more than
choosing low GI foods.


Continued From 1A


YOUR



BUSINESS



COULD



APPEAR



HERE TOO !!



Con tact


Nancy, Trayce or Kim

at

The Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage.


115 Seventh Ave.


773-3255






July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Fighting


Benefit
Fighting corruption is essen- set
tial to improving people's lives
in poorer developing countries, cou
and it can benefit the U.S. econ- cor
omy and improve global stabil- -
ityas well. By
That's the word from experts nee
who estimate that more than 50 Wo
percent of U.S. exports now go ate
to developing countries around and
the world. Analysts also esti- eco
mate that every $1 billion worth U.S
of exports to these countries
equals 20,000 U.S. jobs. To Bai
help continue the recovery in cou
the U.S., economists contend, yea
it's important to promote eco- wh
nomic growth in those develop- The
ing countries and help them off
overcome poverty. Yet some- ple
thing stands in the way of these *
important aims: corruption. ers
Developmental experts at the mot
World Bank hold that corrup- bui
tion hits poor people the hard- mo:
est, since the poor rely most on per
public services and are least text
able to pay bribes for simple trib
things, such as a commercial *
driver's license or a permit to ple


Corruption Can


U.S. Economy
up a vegetable stand, basic health, nutrition or popu-
Many of the issues that poor lation .services; 310 million
entries face-including violent children immunized; 98 million
inflict, disease and pollution children with improved nutri-
are not contained by borders. tion; and about 33 million mos-
addressing these pressing quito nets purchased and/or dis-
eds in developing areas, the tribute to prevent malaria.
)rld Bank is working to cre- More than 113 million
greater global stability people given access to an
I a more solid foundation for improved water source and 5.8
inomic growth here in the million people provided with
S. access to almost 600,000
That's why many of the improved sanitation facilities.
nk's investments in poorer Poor governance and corrup-
intries-nearly $72 billion last tion remain among the most
ir-focus on helping the poor challenging problems today for
ile fighting corruption, many of the World Bank's
ese investments are paying clients, and the fight against
with big results. For exam- corruption won't be won
overnight. But making sure the
More than 3 million teach-, money goes where it's supposed
recruited and/or trained; to can make a big difference.
re than 2 million classrooms The World Bank also main-'
It or rehabilitated, benefiting tains an international hotline (1-
re than 105 million children 800-831-0463) for anyone to
year; and about 300 million report incidents of corruption.
books purchased and/or dis- To learn more about the World
uted. Bank and its anti-corruption
More than 47 million peo- programs, visit www.world-
provided with access to bank.org/integrity.


What Women Need To Know

To Reduce Their Risk


Last year, 280,000 women in
the U.S. were diagnosed with
breast and gynecological can-
cers. As a group, these are the
most often diagnosed cancers in
women. Joanne Mortimer,
M.D., director of Women's
Cancers Program of City of
Hope. says that there are three
ways women can reduce their
risk of the cancers that primari-
ly affect them.
"First, they can learn more
about breast and gynecological
cancer so they can recognize
the symptoms. Second, they
should get regular screenings,
because all cancers can most
effectively be treated at an early
stage. And, third, women
should learn about preventive
measures," says Mortimer.
Here are some facts from the
City of Hope cancer center:
Cervical cancer
Human papillomaviruses
(HPVs) are the main risk factor.
A weakened immune system,
having many sexual partners,
smoking, having other sexually
transmitted diseases and long-


term birth control use all add to
risk.
Symptoms include abnormal
vaginal bleeding, increased
vaginal discharge, pelvic pain
and pain duringintercourse.
A new vaccine provides pro-
tection from HPV and is recom-
mended for girls aged 9-26.
Breast cancer
Risk factors include age,
family history, hormonal fac-
tors, alcohol use and obesity.
Symptoms include changes in-
the way the breast or nipple
feels or looks and nipple dis-
charge.
Ovarian cancer
An ovarian cyst can develop
on the surface of an ovary or
inside it. Most are benign but if
the cyst is cancerous, it can
spread to other organs.
Risk factors include family
and reproductive history, age,
horrional factors and obesity.
Symptoms include pressure
or pain in the abdomen, pelvis,
back or legs, nausea, indiges-
tion and feeling tired. Less
common symptoms include


vaginal bleeding and a frequent
need to urinate.
If you experience any of
these symptoms, discuss them
with your doctor. If needed,
seek help at a qualified cancer
center such as City of Hope.
Scientists with City of
Hope's Women's Cancers Pro-
gram are investigating the biol-
ogy of breast, ovarian and
endometrial cancers as well as
interventions that could reduce
cancer risk. Researchers also
are identifying new treatments
and prevention methods and
examining issues affecting
women with cancer and their
families, such as spirituality, the
emotional impact of cancer on
caregivers, and other quality-
of-life issues.
You can get more informa-
tion about City of Hope at
www.-cityofhope.org and you
can get involved in supporting
research for women's cancers
by participating in Walk for
Hope. Visit www.walk4hope.-
org.


The Silent Epidemic: Protecting Aging

Americans From Elder Abuse


Every year, millions of aging
Americans experience physical,
financial and emotional abuse.
It is estimated that up to 10 per-
cent of people aged 65 years or
older have experienced some
form of abuse. However, ex-
perts suggest that only one out
of every 14 incidents ever
comes to the attention of
authorities.
May is Older Americans
Month an opportunity to
honor our elders by mobilizing
the community to report abuse
and ultimately prevent it.
S"We need to educate our-
selves to recognize the warning
signs of elder abuse so that we
can better protect our loved
ones from abuse or exploita-
tion," said Rhonda Randall,
D.O., executive vice president
and chief medical Officer at
UnitedHealthcare Medicare &
Retirement. "Seniors should
feel empowered to talk with
their caregivers, -family ,4ern)-,
beis,.physicians or other health
care providers anytime they feel
threatened, or when they sus-


pect someone is trying to
exploit them. In order to stop
elder abuse, we must talk about
it openly."
An area that is sometimes
overlooked when discussing
elder abuse is financial ex-
ploitation, the most common
form of elder abuse. Medicare
fraud-one aspect of financial
abuse-costs U.S. taxpayers $60
billion to $90 billion each year.
According to Randall, aging
Americans, caregivers and oth-
ers can work together to prevent
elder abuse by doing the fol-
lowing:
Know the warning signs of
physical and emotional abuse:
Clues to the presence of abuse
include unexplainable bruises
or injury, unreasonable fearful-
ness or suspicion, and changes
in personality, attitude or
behavior.
Take precautions to pre-
vent Medicare fraud: Never
give out Medicare, Social
Security or credit card informa-
tion to anyone without proper
identification. If a Medicare


card is lost or stolen, report it
immediately by calling (800)
772-1213. Never sign your
name to a form you do not fully
understand. Ask questions of
Medicare and health care pro-
viders in order to clarify any
questionable charges or claims.
Take advantage of re-
sources that can assist you.
Look to your community for
support-seek help from family
members, friends and neigh-
bors, senior organizations and
physicians.
*The most important thing is
to speak up. Elder abuse thrives
on silence. By educating our-
selves to recognize the signs
and through taking smart, pre-
ventive measures, we are work-
ing together to ensure aging
Americans are no longer abused
or exploited. To learn more
about elder abuse, including
information on recognizing and
reporting abuse, visit the
National Cen'T on Eld*-Abuse
at www.ncea.aoa.gov.


A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest.
-Irish Proverb
God sees us through our Mothers' eyes and rewards us for our virtues.
-Ganeshan Venkatarman


'Fhea










9 *d- dvoa-


Christmas In July


Sunday July


* 10:30 am


Come join us for a beautiful and inspiring

celebration of JESUS' birth. We'll turn the

thermostat way down, light a fire in our big

stone fireplace, and sing the songs of

Christmas as we gather under the evergreens

and twinkling lights. The band will play all

the familiar carols while many others will

sing your favorite Christmas songs. It'll be

a gathering that will warm your heart and

soul. CHRISTMAS IN JULY... could be just

what you need to beat those summer blues.



REAL LIFE


CHURCH

3365 Hwy. 17

863-375-4032


Come Join Us.

We'd Love To

*I Have You!


7:28c







4A The Herald-Advocate, July 28,2011


ETHEL L. WILSON
Ethel L. Wilson, 76, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
July 19, 2011, at Sebring.
She was born on March 1,
1935, at Valdosta, Ga. She was
a member of the New Mt. Zion
AME Church in Wauchula.
Survivors include two
daughters Mary Wilson of
Hollywood and Dianah Jackson
of St. Petersburg; two sons, Otis
Evans and Calvin Evans, both
of Tampa; adopted son Anthony
Craig Sr. of Tampa; four sisters
Doris Denson and Roberta
Williams, both of Detroit,
Mich., Barbara Gordon of
Tampa and Katie Williams of
Valdosta,'Ga.; two brothers
Clarence Evans and Frank
Evans, both of Valdosta, Ga.;
seven grandchildren; and five
great-grandchildren.
Visitation is tomorrow (Fri-
day) 6 to 8 p.m. at Mt. Zion
American Methodist Episcopal
Church of Wauchula, where
services will be held on Sat-
urday at 11 a.m.
Williams Funeral Home
Bartow


RICHARD NELSON
ANDERSON
Richard Nelson Anderson,
54, of Wauchula, died on
Saturday, July 23, 2011, at
Wauchula.
Born on May 20, 1957, at
Niota, Tenn., he came to Hardee
County from Arcadia 15 years
ago. He was a rancher.
Survivors include his wife
Linda Anderson of Wauchula;
father Kenneth Anderson of
Tennessee; son Justin Anderson
of. Bowling Green; brothers
Glen Anderson of Arcadia and
Mike Anderson of Sarasota; and
sisters Sharon Dyal of
Tennessee, Debbie Hrabal of
Sarasota, and Lisa Strickland
and Kellie Anderson, both of
Arcadia.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wanclhula


THOMAS RAY MUNDY
Thomas Ray Mundy, 85, of
Bonifay, died on Sunday, July
24,2011.
Born on April 17, 1926, in
Salineville, Ohio, he was a resi-
dent of Holmes County. He was
a WWII veteran who served in
the U.S. Army under Gen.
George W. Patton. He worked
as sergeant of corrections for
the Hardee C6unty Sheriff's
Office, retiring after 16 years.
He had worked in law enforce-
ment for over 54 years in
Holmes County, Fort Lauder-
dale and in Ohio. He was a
member of Carmel Assembly of
God.
He was preceded in death by
his parents John Raymond and
Anna Lohman Mundy.
Survivors include his wife of
35 years, Doris Mundy of
Bonifay; four sons, Robert
Locke of Brooklet, Ga., Jack
Locke and wife Rosalee of
Bonifay, Thomas Raymond
Mundy and wife Jane of New
Port Richey, and Donald Ray
Mundy and wife Pam of
Brooksville; one daughter,
Shenia French and husband
Chuck of Bonifay; 23 grand-
children;- and 12 great-grand-
children.
Visitation was 6 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday at CarmelAssembly of
God Church, where services
were held on Wednesday at 11
a.m. with the Rev. Tommy
Moore, the Rev. Jerry Moore,
the Rev. Jonathan West and the
Rev. Joel Glenn officiating.
Interment followed in the
church cemetery with military
honors.
Clary-Glenn Funeral Home
DeFuniak Springs

One out of twenty people
has an extra rib.
Baseball is almost the only
orderly thing in a very
unorderly world. If you get
three strikes, even the best.
lawyer in the world can't
get you off.
-Bill Veeck


Obituaries


Hubert Booth gets credit
for inventing the first mod-
ern vacuum cleaner in
1901.
The side of a hammer is
called the cheek.


qn 1Memory
JAMES VERNON SEE
James Vernon See, 88,
went to be with the Lord on
Tuesday, July 26, 2011, with
his family by his side.
He was born on Dec. 14,
1922, in Zolfo Springs to
William and Elizabeth See.
He served in the U.S. Air
Force, where he met and mar-
ried Ardis Mae Pennington on
July 7, 1945. They returned to
Wauchula, where they have
resided for 66 years.
He was an active member
of First Christian Church
where he served as an elder
for 45 years. He was an active
realtor in our community for
the past 50 years. At the time
of his death, he was a partner
of Jim See Realty.
He was preceded in death
by his parents and two broth-
ers.
Mr. See is survived by his
wife, Ardis; one brother,
Jackie See; his son Jim and
wife Linda See; daughters
Pam and husband Benny
Albritton, Penny and husband
James Carlton, and Amy and
husband Steve Woods. He
was blessed with 12 grand-
children and 21 great-grand-
children.
A celebration service will
be held at First Christian
Church of Wauchula on
Friday, July 29, 2011, at
10:30 a.m.
Donations may be made to
First Christian Church, 1121
W. Louisiana St., Wauchula.

TPongek-Kogys-g kady
Funeral Homes
Wauchula
3
P: r


SAMUEL DEAN
JUDAH JR.
Samuel Dean Judah Jr., 38,
of Wauchula, died on Friday,
July 22, 2011, at Wauchula.
Born Oct. 2, 1972, at Lake-
land, he was a lifelong resident
of Wauchula and a welder.
Survivors include his father
Samuel Judah of Lake Placid;
mother Shirley Patarini of
Wauchula; and brother Bruce
Judah and wife Kelley of
Wauchula.
Visitation was on Wednesday
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


Truth is the most valuable thing we have, so I try to con-
serve it.
-Mark Twain

Too many people overvalue what they are not and under-
value what they are.
-Malcolm S. Forbes


7:28-8:11c


The world is moved not only by the mighty shoves of the
heroes, but also by the aggregate of the tiny pushes of
each honest worker.
-Helen Keller


HR OBB ELLIT invites all
his friends and neighbors
l to come see him at


"JCHEVROLET i Cdmobl L
205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
S1-800-673-9512 *
www.directchew.com '


funeral service for over a century,




) Compassionate Affordable Care


BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
ATTOR IEYS AT LAW
50Ot WEST MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873-1729
TELEPHONE (863) 773-3241

WILLS & TRUSTS
PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
LARGE & SMALL ESTATES
HOMESTEAD DETERMINATION
DURABLE POWERS OF ATTORNEY
LIVING WILLS GUARDIANSHIPS
;7:21tfc


i eotifig itiemonv
SAMUEL DEAN
JUDAH JR.
Samuel Dean Judah Jr., of
Wauchula, died on Friday,
July 22, 2011, at Wauchula.
He was born on Oct. 2,
1972, at Lakeland, and was a
lifelong resident of Wauchula.
He was a welder.
He is survived by his father
Samuel Judah of Lake Placid;
mother Shirley Patarini of
Wauchula; brother Bruce
Judah and wife Kelley of
Wauchula; nephew Austin
Judah; and nieces Kristian and
Leah Judah.
A gathering of friends and
family will be held on
Wednesday, July 27, from 6 to
8 p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

ROBARTS


RICHARD NELSON
ANDERSON
Richard Nelson Anderson,
54, of Wauchula, died on
Saturday, July 23, 2011, at
Wauchula.
He was born on May 20,
1957 at Niota, Tenn., and
came to Hardee County from
Arcadia 15 years ago. He was
a rancher.
He is survived by his wife,
Linda Anderson of Wauchula;
father Kenneth Anderson of
Tennessee; son Justin Ander-
son of Bowling Green; broth-
ers Glen Anderson of Arcadia
and Mike Anderson of
Sarasota; and sisters Sharon
Dyal of Tennessee, Debbie
Hrabal of Sarasota, and Lisa
Strickland and Kellie And-
erson, both of Arcadia.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

ROBARTS


Having A Choice,

Having Options...

Thank you Hardee County for allowing us to be

part of this community.

If you currently have your prearrangements
made, we would like for you to know that
we accept most other company's plans. If
you don't, we would be happy to meet with
you to discuss your options.

We feel planning yours or a loved one's
last wishes are of the utmost importance,
right down to the last detail.

Call our funeral home today.





Funeral Homes




,r


404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com 7:2


PUBLIC NOTICE DISCLAIMER

Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Homes would like to-
notify the general public of several important facts.
We purchased the building location only, previously
known as Brant Funeral Chapel not the business en-
tity.. We urge anyone that has taken preneed agree-
ments with Brant Funeral Chapel to 12easeO contact
us to verify their records.


863-773-6400


- m











Employers Are From Mars,


Workers Are From Venus


Workers perceive college
degrees as less important for
job success than employers do,
they rate their job performance
higher than their bosses rate it
and dbn't plan to learn a foreign
language-even though employ-
ers say there's a growing
demand for language skills in
the global economy.
You could say that employ-
.ers are from Mars and workers
are from Venus.
To discover more about the
types of education and skills
-needed for jobs in the next 10
years, the University of
Phoenix Rbsearch Institute sur-
veyed employees and em-
ployers in diverse industries.
The results, published in "The
Great Divide: Worker and
Employer Perspectives of Cur-
rent and Future Workforce


Demands," indicate that work-
ers may be underestimating the
demands of the emerging job
market. More important, they
are not seeing eye to eye with
employers. This perception gap
is making a tough economy
even worse for many workers
and job seekers.
Workers rated the demand for
college degrees lower than
employers did, even though
research shows the fastest-
growing jobs in the next decade
are those that require degrees.
According to the U.S. Bureau
of Labor Statistics, jobs thas
require a college degree are
expected to grow by 17 percent
compared to only an 8 percent
growth in jobs that require on-
the-job training or related work
experience.


Promising Advances


In HIV/AIDS


As me world approaches 30
years since the first reported
AIDS case, people are com-
memorating the many achieve-
ments that have been made in
controlling the spread of the
disease. New advances in
HIV/AIDS prevention research
also add hope, on this HIV
Vaccine Awareness Day, in the
ability to end the epidemic.
Researchers are following up
on a clinical trial conducted in
Thailand that demonstrated for
the first time that an experimen-
tal HIV vaccine could protect
some people from HIV infec-
tion. Further research could
lead to the creation of other,
even more effective vaccine
candidates. In 2010, scientists
reported that HIV-fighting
drugs tested in preventive
strategies known as microbi-
cides and pre-exposure prophy-
laxis (PrEP) helped reduce new
infections. None of these ad-
vances would have been possi-
ble without the dedication and
commitment of the thousands
of study volunteers who partici-
pated in these and other trials.
"This is an exciting time for
lJprevention resaarcch' 'aid
Jeffrey Crowley, director of the
Office of National AIDS Policy
and senior advisor on disability
policy'at the White House. "If
we want to put a stop to this
devastating disease, we must
find a safe and effective HIV
vaccine. Our nation's contin-
ued investment in developing a
vaccine and other prevention
strategies is essential to ending
this epidemic."
HIV/AIDS still devastates
communities around the globe
and in the United States, where
the U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC)
estimates that 56,300 Ameri-
cans become newly infectec
with HIV every year. That's one
newly infected person every
91/2 minutes. More than 1 mil-
lion people are living with HIV
in the U.S.
While treatments have
helped millions of individuals
live fuller, longer and healthier
lives, it would be better for peo-
ple not to become infected in
the first place. HIistorically, vac-
cines have been the most pow-
erful weapon against many
infectious diseases, including
polio, measles and hepatitis B,
which have been practically
eradicated in many countries
where vaccines are adminis-
tered.
The development of lifesav-
ing medicines and vaccines can
take decades and require not
only the diligence and ingenuity
of scientists and researchers but
also the assistance of communi-
ties and individuals from all
walks of life who volunteer to
be in clinical trials or support
those who do. Their continued
generosity and commitment
will help the world one day be
free of HIV. To learn more
about HIV vaccine research,
visit www.bethegeneration.-
nih.gov.

About HIV Vaccine Studies:
The safety of volunteers is
a top priority.
i* HIV vaccine candidates do
not contain the HIV virus, so
they cannot infect trial volun-
teers.







--S -t**lllF il


Trials are, closely moni-
tored for safety.


Workers rated themselves
highly in being able to work
independently, in teams and in a
multicultural environment,
while employers say they have
difficulty finding workers with
these skills.
The largest perception gap,
however, seems to be in the area
of foreign language proficiency.
Employers are seeing the need
for workers with skills in
Spanish, Chinese, Arabic and
Russian, but few workers
intend to learn a foreign lan-
guage.
"Our study helps explain
why the skill set of the work-
force is becoming further
removed from the needs of
employers," says Dr. Tracey
Wilen-Daugenti, vice president
and managing director of the
University of Phoenix Research
Institute. "This dangerous trend
may be rooted in fundamentally
different perceptions about edu-
cation, economic reality and the
employment marketplace."
For a copy of the full report
or additional information, visit
the University of Phoenix Re-
search Institute at www.phoe-
nix.edu/institute.


I Sales Hours:0Mo-r. 0 -St m40


July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A













CITY OF WAUCHULA

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a Special Meeting on Monday,
August 1, 2011, at 6:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items
on the agenda are asfollows: Resolution 2011-15 setting tentative millage rate and
announcing tentative Public Hearing Dates for the Budget, Retroactive approval of
Brownfield Consultant RFQ, and'any other business that may come before the Com-
mission.

The regularly scheduled workshop will follow the Special Meeting. Items on the
workshop agenda are as follows: Review Lease with Peace River Explorations for
Train Depot, update from staff on cuts/collects procedure and status, update from
staff on ADA hearing requirements, and any other business that may come before
the Commission.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby
advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the' appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's, disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the.City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 7:28c


Kf'j~ffIviceHo :Mo-FriC dSa


BUIN





G D SV o IO






6A The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011


Kelly's Column
By Jim

Grace Emmerton, receptionist at Wauchula State Bank, on
Friday, July 15, was crowned as Queen of Wauchula Main Street.
She raised $1,810 for the Main Street Wauchula project.
Solomon's Castle south of Ona will celebrate its 40th anniver-
sary in April 2012. Founded by Howard Solomon, the castle is
open from Oct. 1 until June 30, being closed for the summer.
Regular hours are 11 to 4 Tuesday through Sunday. The restaurant
is open Friday and Saturday until 9 p.m.
SWFWMD reports there has been an 11 percent growth in sea-
grass in Tampa Bay since 2008. Seagrass requires clean water to
flourish and serves as bay nurseries for young fish and other marine
life. This makes fishing better.
SWFWMD encourages Floridians to conserve water, fertilize
wisely, plant trees and native vegetation, and keep water clean.
There are many opportunities for free or low cost recreation on
various SWFWMD properties, including hiking, camping, picnick-
ing, fishing, frogging, hunting and horsetrails. Go to watermat-
ters.org/recreation.
New officers of the Wauchula Lions Club are Talmadge
Albritton, president; Debbie Murray, first vice president; Helen
Summitt, treasurer; Paul Summitt, second vice president; Pattie
Detwiler, third vice president; Ed Algreen, secretary; Julie Watson,
tail twister; Rick.Knight, lion tamer and membership director; and
Kathleen Roehm, sight coordinator. Directors include Vernon
Benbow and Paul Paris. The club's new annual budget is $15,300.
Two weeks ago a letter to the editor by Charles Tillman of
Wauchula expressed his displeasure at an American flag being
"Made in China." A lot of people agree with him.
The Tampa Tribune reported last week the U.S. trade deficit in
Maywas $50 billion, up 15 percent from a year ago. The trade
deficit is at an annual rate of about $563 billion, an increase over
last year.
America needs to improve its manufacturing capacity. We
need to buy less foreign oil. Consumers can look for products
"Made in the U.S."
I am not smart enough to understand free world trade, how to
have world peace, how to resolve world challenges,-and how to
reduce the national debt.
Congress has until Aug. 2 to increase the national debt ceiling
of $14.3 trillion. This surely will happen soon as Republican and


Saturday July 30 10 am 2 pm
Specializing in Custom Hair Bows, Head Bands,
Bandana Dresses and All Your Little Diva Accessories


Democratic lawmakers and President Obama work together for the
nation's and world's well-being.
Improvements can occur by taking baby steps. One step would
be for more U.S. flags to be made in the USA.
The St. Petersburg Times recently reported the Major League
payroll of the New York Yankees is $201 million, Boston Red Sox
$161 million and Tampa Bay Rays $41 million. Tampa Bay has a
winning record and trails the Yankees and Red Sox in the American
League East. The Rays are last in the AL in attendance with an
average of 19,115 per game as of July 13, about 14 percent less
than last year.
Two more wi!l card teams may be added to MLB playoffs in
2012, said comn;..:ioner Bud Selig.
I like the Tropicana Dome in St. Pete (no rainouts) but some
people believe Rays' attendance would be higher in a new stadium
near I-4 and 1-75 on the east side of Tampa. Both sites are about the
same distance from Hardee County.
Rev. James W. Miller, 74, has been pastor of Faith Assembly
of God Church in Bowling Green for 35 years. Church services are
10:50 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Sunday and 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday.
The pentacostal church is located on North Hwy. 17.
The late Sammy Revels and his wife Myra Jean owned and
operated Revels Septic Tank Service in Hardee County for many
years. On his truck Revels called himself the "Do Do Man."
He once ran for state representative, saying he was the only
candidate in the race "with the tools to clean up Tallahassee."


GLORIA'S ,
RESTAURANT
/0 r n


Jimmy Parker, 70, will soon decide if he is going to farm this
fall. In 51 years the Bowling Green farmer has grown crops in the
fall and spring 102 seasons.
He has grown cucumbers, watermelons, tomatoes, oranges,
cattle, pepper, squash, cabbage, beans, eggplant, and cantaloupes.
He used to farm 2,000 'acres but recently 500 to 600 acres. In
the 1970s and early 1980s he was the largest cucumber packer in
Florida at a million bushels annually. Some days he would pack
15,000 bushels, with a high of 17,500 bushels.
Parker has had about three bad crops in a row. Growing cukes
and squash is a gamble. Even growing, a big crop does not indicate


financial success, because prices may be low due to supply and
demand. There was cold weather for the spring watermelon crop.
The national economy plays a role. People do not have to have
a watermelon or a cucumber. It costs more to farm.
"Fertilizer has gone from $35 a ton to $400 to $500 a ton. Seed
used to cost $1 to $1.25 a pound. Today pepper and watermelon
seed cost $1,.000 a pound. Cucumber seeds cost $1,300 a pound."
Diesel fuel used to cost 25 to 30 cents a gallon and now costs
$3.50 to $3.60. One power unit pump burns six gallons an lour. All
four pumps can burn $10,000 of fuel in a week.
Parker said there used to be 16 tomato canning plants in
Florida and today there are none. They were closed due to envi-
ronmental regulations.
In the early 1990s Parker owned a tomato canning plant in
Bowling Green that he had bought from the K.L. (Cooter) Knight
family and the Marcum brothers. "Cooter also had a peach canning
plant in Fort Valley, Ga. When they finished canning tomatoes the
Knight family would go to Georgia for six weeks to can peaches.
"Between the vegetable packing plant and the canning plant
we employed 60 to 70 people for six or seven months in Bowling
Green. They could make $150 a week. Me and Roberts Brothers in
Winter Haven had the last two canning plants in Florida." The can-
ners would buy the leftover tomatoes in the fields when the fresh
fruit market ended. Pickers could make extra money.
When Knight had the plant he buried a pipe to his pasture near
Peace River that could drain the leftover tomato residue. Most of
the time the tomato wastewater would be absorbed by the grass.
One rainy season two people from Missouri were canoeing
down Peace River and noticed some red water coming into the
river. They called a game warden who notified the Florida
Department of Environmental Regulation.
The DER said Parker would be fined $10,000 a day until the
plant stopped releasing the red water. Parker argued his case to no
avail, pointing out the economic benefit of the plant and that the
wastewater rarely reached the river and did not kill any fish. "We
canned 200,000 cases of tomatoes a year, many under a private
label for Winn-Dixie."
Parker got the fine lowered to one day and closed the plant.
Today in Florida hundreds of thousands, even millions, of tomatoes
are left unpicked in the fields after the fresh fruit harvest ends,
since the state's canning plants are history.
Parker's friends would not be surprised if he rolls the dice and
plants his 103rd crop next month.

It pays to advertise

in your Hometown

Newspaper

We are saving this space just

for


YOU!

The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
115 S. 7th Ave.

Telephone: 773-3255


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PROGRAM ACTIVITIES INCLUDE:

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Thousands of baby boomers
are turning 65 and entering the
Medicare program each month
and, like most Medicare new-
comers, they have a lot of ques-
tions.
"It's risky not to pay close
attention to the choices avail-
able to you now that you are eli-
gible for Medicare, but people
often aren't sure what to expect
or where to begin," said
Adrienne Muralidharan, senior
Medicare specialist for the
Allsup Medicare Advisor(r), an
impartial plan selection service
that helps people choose the
right Medicare coverage for
their needs.
People new to Medicare have
questions including:
When Can I Enroll?
If you're collecting Social


MONDAY. AUGUST 1
'VWauchula City Commis-
sion, planning meeting, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St., Wau-
chula, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY, AUG. 4
oHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 101, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wau-chula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County Planning
& Zoning Board, regular
meeting, Room 101, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.






ZSES To Present
School Supplies
Planning for an Aug. 11
school supply give-away for
Zolfo Springs Elementary
School is under way. FoTls'
can drop contributions in-a
box at the Dollar General
Store in the town until Aug. 9.
On Aug. 11, between 4:30
and 6 p.m., the first 100 chil-
dren to come to the town
offices at 3210 U.S. 17 North
will received a tote bag with
some school supplies. In
addition, residents can bring
their water bill receipts to. be
eligible for a drawing for a
school backpack full of
school supplies.


Security retirement benefits,
you should be enrolled in
Medicare automatically. If
you're not, you need to sign up
to get Medicare. You have
seven months to enroll: three
months before, the month of
and three months after your
65th birthday.
What Are My Options?
Traditional Medicare typical-
ly includes Part A (hospital cov-
erage) and Part B (doctor and
outpatient services). Part C
(also known as Medicare
Advantage) combines Parts A
and B and may include Part D
(prescription drug) coverage.
Supplemental plans are also
available to cover gaps in tradi-
t. onal Medicare.
Do I Have To Enroll In
Medicare If I Have
Private Coverage?
If you are working and have
health insurance through your
employer or your spouse is
working and has employer-pro-
vided health insurance under
which you are also covered, you
should still sign up for
Medicare Part A, which is free
for most people. However, you
may be able to defer Medicare
Part B. To do so, you must noti-
fy the Social Security
Administration that you are
seeking a deferral to avoid
penalties.
What Are The Penalties?
If you don't have an approved
deferral, you may have to pay a
late-enrollment penalty of 10
percent for each full 12-month


period that you could have been
enrolled in Part B. Likewise,
Part D imposes a penalty if
you go for more than 63 days
without coverage after enrolling
in Part B. These penalties stay
with you for as long as you
have Medicare.
Can I Change My Mind?
People can change plans
once a year during annual
enrollment (Oct. 15 to Dec. 7,
2011). Other specific circum-
stances, such as moving outside
your plan's coverage area, may
allow ybu -to make a change at
other times of the year.
"Health care costs can be a
significant part of a senior's
fixed income," Muralidharan
said. "Choosing carefully and
re-evaluating coverage regular-
ly could save you thousands of
dollars throughout your life-
time."
For Allsup's free guide,
"Medi_care and Reaching Re-
tirement Age," call (866) 521-
7655 or e-mail MedicareHelp-
@allsupinc.com, or learn more
at http://medicare.allsup.com.

Experts say if you want to
keep rabbits out of your
garden, try planting a dou-
ble row of onions around
it. Rabbits apparently hate
the smell of onions and
won't cross the rows.
Hares are not true rabbits.
In general, hares are larger
and usually have longer
ears and legs.


SERVING LUNCH & DINNER

MONDAY- Fizu)..N, Ciosi,-
SATURDANA,,, C i.os u:

f xemmle 61tef T11# -5,pallf
I soc7 28c


July 28,2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A

Hispanic Americans Less Likely To

Recognize Stroke Signs And Symptoms


Imagine this: All of a sudden,
one side of your body goes
numb and then your speech
becomes garbled. You know
what you want to say, but you
can't form the words. You're
confused and scared. You may
be having a stroke.
While many Americans do
not know the signs and symp-
toms of stroke, research indi-
cates this is especially true
among Hispanic Americans.
Cerebrovascular diseases,
which include stroke, are the
fourth-leading cause of death in
Hispanics in the United States.
Stroke or heart disease accounts
for one in four deaths among
Hispanic men and one in three
deaths among Hispanic women,
yet a study of 1,904 people sug-
gests that many in this popula-
tion do not recognize the signs
and symptoms of stroke or real-
ize the immediate need for
medical attention.
In a recent survey of 2,000
women about stroke, Hispanics
were less aware of the signs and
symptoms of stroke than were
Caucasians. Furthermore, in a
separate study of 25,426 indi-
viduals, non-English-speaking,
Hispanic Americans, compared
to those who spoke English,


were also less likely to identify
stroke signs and symptoms or
be aware of the immediate need
for medical attention.
A stroke occurs when a blood
vessel that carries blood and
oxygen to the brain is blocked
by plaque or a blood clot (acute
ischemic stroke), or breaks
(hemorrhagic stroke). The visi-
ble signs and symptoms of
stroke include speech impair-
ment, arm numbness and weak-
ness, severe headache, sudden
confusion, trouble seeing out of
one or both eyes, as well as
uncontrollable drooping of the
face.
In addition to a lack of
awareness surrounding the
signs and symptoms of stroke,
the Office of Minority Health
reports that Hispanics ages 35
to 64 are more likely to suffer a
stroke than non-Hispanic
whites. Hispanics are also more
likely to suffer a stroke at a
younger age, as their average
age for stroke is 67, compared
to 80 for non-Hispanic whites.
The FA.S.T. Test
In the event that you or
someone you know begins to
show signs and symptoms of a
stroke, the F.A.S.T. test can be
used as a quick screening tool:


Questions Answered For Thousands

Of Baby Boomers Joining Medicare


Press your tongue against the roof of your mouth when you perform abdominal
crunches to prevent using your neck muscles to assist yourself up.
Wheat is thought to be the most widely grown plant in the world. It has been cultivat-
ed for more than 7,000 years in every continent except Antarctica.


CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold a workshop on Monday August 1, 2011 immediately fol-
lowing the City Commission workshop which will convene at 6:00 pm or as soon
thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda-are as follows: Main
Street Place Concept, and any other business that may come before the Board.
The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby
advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
.appeal is to bebased. -
The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Any-
one requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities
Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk .7:28c


To Ovr !omerom w IeRos

Who Helped Make The July

Friday Night Live A Success


Wauchula Masonic Lodge

Hardee County Sheriff's Office

City of Wauchula Police Department

Hardee County Fire Rescue & EMS

Army National Guard

City of Bowling Green Police Department

Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

City of Wauchula Utilities
Peace River Electric
|T A Cooperative
VAUCHULA.J Progress Energy

Florida Hospital
0so7 28C


v


Face Ask the person to
smile. Does one side of the face
droop?
Arms Ask the person to
raise both arms. Does one arm
drift downward?
Speech Ask the person
to repeat a simple sentence. Are
the words slurred? 'Can he or
she repeat the sentence cor-
rectly?
Time If the person
shows any of these symptoms,
time is important. Immediate
medical attention may limit the
effects of stroke. Therefore, call
9-1-1 or get to the hospital
immediately.
"Stroke is a medical emer-
gency and can happen to any-
one," said Sandra M. Schneider,
M.D., FACEP, American Col-
lege of Emergency Physicians
president. "If you think you or
someone you know is experi-
encing any of the symptoms of
stroke, it is imperative you call
9-1-1 for immediate medical
attention, even if the symptoms
go away."
More Information
To learn more about stroke,
see your doctor, visit www.-
stroke.org or www.emergency-
careforyou.org, or call 1-800-
STROKES.





OA The Herald-Advocate, July 28,2011


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PAGE ONE


Fatal Crash Victim's

Family Needs Help


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
When a recent foggy morn-
ing crash left a Hardee County
family without husband and
father, his employer sought to
help out.
Jimmy Giles, a 38-year old-
employee of AG Outdoor
World, was headed to work one
morning when a semi struck his
vehicle, killing him. As he was
his family's only source of
income, his boss began a.com-
munity plea to provide support
and relief to the family.
Through donations and
Hardee Help Center assistance,
the Giles family was able to be
put into an apartment. Money
has already been raised to assist
with rent and utilities for sever-
al months as they get back on
their feet without Jimmy.
"One of the challenges this
family is now facing is that they
do not have a vehicle," says
Erica Scheipsmeier. "We would
like to assist them in the pur-
chase of a reliable vehicle. I can


promise you all the funds will
be used directly to benefit the
family."
Folks are being asked to
come together as a community
and to give any money they can
spare, regardless of the amount,
to help this family.
Donations can be made
through First Christian Church
of Wauchula, Manley & As-
sociates in Wauchula, the
Garden Center at 3350 U.S. 17
N. in Bowling Green or by
sending a check to P.O. Box 62,
Bowling Green 33834. All
checks are payable to First
Christian Church and any con-
tributions are tax deductible.
"If you have anything that
you can give, no matter the
amount, Anthony and I would
appreciate it from the bottom of
our hearts," says Scheipsmeier.
"I feel a tremendous need to
help this family and appreciate
any donations. Thank you so
much in advance for anything
that you can do!"


Memory Lane


SUBMITTED BY TIM SPAIN
This early 1930s photograph shows a group of hunters and their hounds proudly posing with
a panther killed in Hardee County. The photo, which belonged to Tim Spain's grandmother,
Eva Jane Watson, was taken at what is now downtown Wauchula, along Seventh Avenue near
Main Street. Panthers are now protected from hunting but a small number of these large cats
still roam the woods of Hardee County and South Florida.

SHARE YOUR OLD PHOTOS WITH US!
Take readers on a walk down Memory Lane by sharing your photos Irom Hardee County's past. Bring your submissions o1 the news-
paper office at 115 S Seventh Ave. or mail to The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338, Wauchula., FL 33873. Photos will be returned


There's been various and sundry summer sports.
Boxer Maria Dominguez participated in the women's National
Golden Gloves in Punta Gorda July 5-9. She fought Alicia
Napoleon of Brooklyn, N.Y. in four two-minute rounds. Better con-
ditioning showedas Napoleon won the decision.
Maria is getting training help from several trainers in
Jacksonville and Miami. Her .next fight is in the National PAL
(Police Athletic League) for Olympic weight class fighters on Oct.
1. Maria is listed 10th in the nation in the 165-pound rankings of
the Coaches International Task Force, which is responsible for
rankings. She trains with local pros Edner Cherry and Daniel
Lozano.

Speaking of boxing, the Sept. 9 Kers Winghouse Fight Night at
the A La Carte Pavillion in Tampa ,will feature a main event of
"U.S. amateur sensation Daniel Lozano (9-0-0) taking on the
always tough Ernie Marquez (9-8-2) from Denver, Colo. For the
WBC USNBC Title. Lozano will look to continue his pulverizing
tear through the flyweight division in search for a world title."
There will be several other stars on the undercard, including
Inka Lelaye (5-2-0), who has boxed and sparred with Dominguez.
Tickets start at $25 and can be purchased through Ticketmaster
(www.ticketmaster.com). For more information, visit www.fight-
nightproductions.com.

Hardee Youth Sports baseball boys have been swell this sum-
mer. The 6-and -under T-Ball team, 7-under T-Ball and Minors all
won District 7 All-Star championships and went on to state tourna-
ments. The Machine Pitch All-Stars placed third and the Boys
Division team was invited to play in the State Championships.
The Minors boys went undefeated in the District 7 champi-
onships, although Bartow gave them a battle in the championship
game. Hardee took the come-from-behind 7-6 victory, behind the
bat of Isaac Moreno. At last count, the Minors had defeated Lake
Placid I1-1 and Wesley Chapel 13-6 in the state tourney in Sebring.

In summer Sertoma Golf, Taylor Barlow, Daniel Miller,
Matthew Godwin and Dustin Scheel are playing in the 17-18 boys
-division. Barlow keeps battling Avon Park's Greg Gentry for the
lead in that division.
Will Bennett, William Beattie, Bryson White, Eric Klein and
Bradley Brewer are playing in the 15-16 group, with Bennett and
Beattie generally leading the other three in. The Smoak brothers,
Chance and Cash, play in the 6-8 age group and may be future
Hardee stars.

It won't be long before the start of fall high school and junior
high athletics.
Volleyball and basketball conditioning was held during the
summer. Volleyball tryouts for returning high school players or
incoming freshman girls will begin with three sessions a day on
Monday, Aug. 8. The sessions will be at 8 a.m., 1 p.m. and 5:30
p.m. on Monday and Tuesday. Girls must get their paperwork,
including insurance, before they can practice or try out. For more
information, contact coach Jessica Leupold at jleupold@-
hardee.kl2.fl.us. Paperwork can be picked up at the high school
and returned to assistant athletic director Suzanne Stagg at the high
school.

Summer softball is in full swing. At last count, Gilliard Fill
Dirt's Dirty Dozen was the only unbeaten team in the Men's city
League while Holy Child Catholic was the only undefeated team in
the Women's Church League.

In football, Hardee has been reassigned to Class 3A-Region 3,
District 10 with Bradenton Bayshore, Desoto, Lemon Bay,
Bradenton Southeast and Palmetto. The pre-season Classic will be
Aug. 28 at Lake Placid at 7:30 p.m. Most of the regular-season
games are at 7 p.m., with the exception of Bayshore and Palmetto,
which are at 7:30 p.m. JV Football begins at Mulberry on Sept. 1.
' The Florida High School Athletic Association redistricted this
year and divided into 8 football classifications, 1A and 2A for small
rural and urban schools, 2B and 2A, and 3A through 6A. Hardee is
in 3A for schools with 1,100-to 1,580 students.
In other sports, most Hardee teams are in 4A with Auburndale,
Lake Wales and Teneroc for schools 1,217-1,598, taking them
away from playing against DeSoto, which is under 1,217 students.
Hardee's school population is listed at 1,238. The soccer teams are
in 2A.
Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heral-
dadvocate@embacrqmail.com with news Jor this biweekly column.

Success is to be measured not so much by the position
that one has reached in life as by the obstacles he has
overcome trying to succeed.
-Booker T. Washington


The more you know about
food poisoning, the better you'll
be able to protect yourself and
your family.
The Problem
Also known as foodborne ill-
ness, it's a serious public health
threat in the U.S. The Centers
for Disease Control and Pre-
vention (CDC) estimates that
approximately one in six
Americans (48 million people)
will suffer from food poisoning
this year. While the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's
(USDA) Food Safety Inspec-
tion Service and other govern-


minent agencies are dedicated to
protecting consumers by setting
and enforcing food safety stan-
dards, the federal agencies also
want to give consumers the
information they need to be
safer when preparing food for
their families.
What Can Be Done
"When it comes to food safe-
ty, our No. 1 priority is preven-
tion," said USDA Under
-Secretary for Food Safety Dr.
Elisabeth Hagen. "Knowing
that the risk of foodborne ill-
nesses may never be zero, it is
important for us to get the word


out about what consumers can
do."
To help, the USDA, the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration,
the CDC and the Ad Council-a
private, nonprofit organization-
created the Food Safe Families
campaign, developed pro blono
by ad agency JWT New York.
The PSAs suggest these safe
food handling behaviors:
Clean: Clean kitchen sur-
faces, utensils and hands with
soap and water while preparing
food.
Separate: Separate raw
meats from other foods by


using different cutting boards.
Cook: Cook foods to the
right temperature by using a
food thermometer.
Chill: Chill raw and pre-
pared foods promptly.
The ads, in Spanish and
English, will air and run in
advertising time and space
entirely donated by the media.
Learn More
The campaign suggests
Americans visit www.Food-
Safety.gov, a recently refreshed
and updated site, where they
can learn about food safety
practices and access "Ask
Karen," an online database of
answers to specific questions
related to preventing foodborne
illnesses.


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Thursday, July 28, 2011


Protect Your Family Steps


To Prevent Food Poisoning


I


_ ~ ~ ~ ~








2B The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011


Hardee


3 ~ a l


Living


Casen

Casen Smith

Celebrates His

5th Birthday
Casen Smith, the son of
Andrew and Stephanie Smith of
Wauchula, turned 5 years old on
July 14.
Casen celebrated the occa-
sion with a birthday party held
at the home of his grandparents,
Gary and Sophie Smith, on
Saturday, July 9. Theme for the
party was Bakugan.
Guests were served pizza,
chips and dips, candy, cup-
cakes, cake and ice cream.
Joining in the celebration in
addition to his paternal grand-
parents were grandparents
Steven and Annette Zuniga,
great-grandparents Manuel and
Beatrice Zuniga, uncles Tyler
and Matt, aunt Danielle and
many other family members
and friends.









TWO BLUE, NO PINK
Mr. and Mrs. David Sleeper,
Newberry, twin sons, two-
pound, one-ounce Oliver James
and one-pound 15.8 ounce Jude
Alexander, born July 13, 2011,
at Shands Hospital, G4iaesville,
Mrs. Slee p er i's)he former.gell
Barone. Maternal grandparents
are Richard and Terry Baroneof
Bowling Green. Paternal grand-
parents are David and Jan
Sleeper of Wauchula.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months oJ the dale of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
The state fish hatchery,
through the Winter Haven
Hatchery, has given Hardee
County 11,000 black bass, mea-
suring three to seven inches.
They have been placed in the
Peace River, Charlie Creek and
Bushy Creek and will supply
Hardee County streams for sev-
eral years to come.
Mr. and Mrs. E.G. Roberts of
the New Zion community were
in town Wednesday, when Mrs.
Roberts brought in a freak egg
that weighed six ounces. The
diameter of the egg measured
seven-and-one-quarter inches.
It was laid by a Plymouth Rock
hen. It was the largest ever
brought into this office, and
would compare in size to a
turkey egg.
The film that many Hardee
County movie fans have been
waiting to see, the 12-round Joe
Louis-Max Schmeling fight
will be at the Royal Theatre for
a two-day showing, including
afternoon matinees. The smash-
ing upset by Schmeling in the.
heavyweight fighting game is a
fast and exciting bout.

Whidden's Cash Grocery, a
fresh line of groceries and
meats, is having specials: self-
rising flour, 24 pounds for 75-
cents; good stew beef for 10









Lake le Baptist. Church
will host the ministry team of
Southern Grace Ministries on
Sunday at 6 p.m.
A love offering will be taken.
Everyone is welcome at the
church at 3102 Heard Bridge
Road, Wauchula. For more
information, call 863-781-9442.

The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.


1 REAwimiII


Not Actual Photo


Jack Russell
White Female with
Brown Spots
Wearing A Blue Halter
Lost Near Golfview
863-781-4369


cents a pound; hamburger, two
pounds for 25 cents; red
sausage, two pounds for 25
cents; and five pounds of rice
for 25 cents.

50 YEARS AGO
A $200 a year raise in salary
for all Hardee County's 119
teachers is being considered at
the Board of Public Instruction
meeting on Aug. 7. There are
also proposed raises for office
personnel, bus drivers and
mechanics but not for custodi-
ans. The new schedule would
boost the starting salary for
teachers from $3,700 to $4,000,
following the recommendations
of the Hardee County Educa-
tion Association. All other
teachers would get the $200
raise.

It would take a levy of 26
mills to fund the county budget
of $573,853 for the next budget
year. The budget would cut
Sheriff Odell Carlton's pro-
posed budget by $20,000 and
the road and bridge department
budget by $13,000. The budget,
prepared by Clerk Ben Coker,
considers a mill reduction in
revenue.

The county filed suit this
week in Circuit Court to fore-
close on 76 old delinquent tax
certificates, some of them dat-
ing back to the division of the
county in the 1920s. The suit is
the first of its kind ever filed in
the county, said county attorney
Hoyt Carlton. None have accu-
mulated since 1953, he said.
Each of the 76 owners were
notified this week and given an
opportunity to redeem their
properties before they are sold
in a foreclosure sale or revert to
county ownership.

Hardee County has only one
ladies softball team this year,
but what they lack in numbers.
is made up in spirit as they entiii
the tournament in Lakeland this
week. Pictured are Evelyn
Davis, Lena Wilson, Mary Jo
Crawford, Connie Best, Zoe
Richardson, Sunny Johnson,
Barbara Sue Simmons, Stella
Repefosky, Janie Lambert,
Karen Chapman and Judi
Jucknath. Not in picture were
manager Jim Shephard, Janie
Cowart, Joyce Scott, Kathy
Olliff and Virginia Henry.
25 YEARS AGO
In the opening round of nego-
tiations Monday, the Hardee
County Education Association


asked school administrators for
a one-time $1,400 teacher
salary adjustment and a 6.1 per-
cent raise on top of that for fhe
1986-87 school, year. The pre-
sent starting salary for a begin-
ning teacher is $16,000. The
one-time adjustment to reach
parity with other.teachers in
Florida would make it $17,400
and the raise would bring it to
$18,557.
The Hardee County School
Board gave tentative approval
in a'public: hearing on Monday
night to a budget with a 7.132-
mill ad valorem tax levy.
Finapce Director Hugh Bradley
explained that .is an increase
from an earlier proposal be-
cause of an adjustment to the
local effort millage the state
requires in order to receive state
funding. The total budget is
about $13.8 million.

Student handbooks for the
high school and junior high
school were approved by the
Hardee County School Board
last week. Hardee Junior High
Principal Lee Burs said there
is little difference. At the senior
high, a minute has been added
between classes, giving stu-
dents five minutes to make their
way across campus.

Circle 3 Western Store has
school mark-downs: boys jeans
are $13.98, junior and missy's
are $18.98; students Levi's are


$14.50 to $17.50, boys $10.50
to $12.98, and girls $19.98.
10 YEARS AGO
Taxes will go up about eight
percent in a proposal to be con-
sidered by the Hardee County
School Board in a Monday
evening public hearing. The
total budget comes in at $43.5
million with a millage rate of
8.734. The same areas for 2000-
01 were $42.5 million and
8.651.

A question asked last week
by Commissioner Gcrdon
Norris spurred discussion of
code enforcement complaints.
Norris had asked Planning &
Development Director Kris
Delaney and Zoning Official
Malcolm Green to come talk
about the impact of anonymous
complaints on the workload of
zoning officials. In'the last eight
months, over one-fourth (26.4
percent) of 'anonymous com-


plaints were unfounded.

County commissioners met
for four days las.week in work-
shops considering the proposed
2001-02 operating budget of
$31.302 million, a decrease of
27 percent from the current
budget. It was based on the
same ad valorem tax millage of
8.75 mills. The first public
hearing is Sept. 13.

The business directory this
week included: Computer Em-
porium; The Footed Tub bed
and breakfast; 4 C's Floor Care;
Curry Raley Funeral Home;
Michael Heflin Plumbing;
Kelco Striping & Excavating;
Voogd Growers; The Heartland
Bug Doctor; Western Auto of
Fort Meade; Speedliner of
Central Florida roofing sys-
tems; and Robarts Family
Funeral Home.


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My name is Callie, and I have been missing since earlier this month from the vicin-
ity of Kelly Court and Tropicana Drive (close to North Wauchula Elementary). My
owners miss me terribly, and want me to come home. I am a Siamese mix and have
white fur with light brownish/gray patches on my body, and some black patches on
the back of all four of my legs. My eyes are blue. I could be hiding out in a shed or
other outdoor structure. If you know of my whereabouts, please call
863-773-4587.


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July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


MIGHTY MINORS


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Minors All-Stars performed spectacularly in the District 7 championships
behind the pitching of Dustin Willis, Zack Deuberry, Drew McGucking and Adrian
DeLeon, who held opponents to 11 runs in four games. The boys beat East Lakeland
9-2, Bartow, 4-2, Wahneta 11-1 and faced Bartow again in the championship game.
Bartow led 6-4 in the bottom of the sixth, and final inning. DeLeon singled. Miguel Ruiz
walked, McGuckin hit an RBI double and Isaac Moreno hit a line-drive triple to win 7-
6. The championship team includes (first row, from left) Tony Webb, Kaleb Floyd, Zack
Durastanti, Adrian DeLeon, Cody Helms and Bo Villarreal; (second row) Drew
McGuckin, Dustin Willis, Isaac Moreno, Matt Tyson and Miguel Ruiz; (back row) coach-
es Andrew McGuckin, Robert Deuberry and Ted Svendsen.




Hunters Asked To Help


Monitor Deer For Disease


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
not found any evidence of
chronic wasting disease after
years of extensive testing of the
state's white-tailed deer popula-
tion.
The FWC tested 910 free-
ranging deer during the past
year and 5,519 deer during the
past nine years, with no CWD-
positive results.
"We are fortunate that no
Florida deer has tested positive
for CWD. The effect this dis-
ease has had in other states is
substantial," Cory Morea,
FWC's deer coordinator and
biologist, said. "We would like
to obtain more samples of deer
from areas adjacent to captive
deer facilities, because the most
likely way for CWD to be intro-
duced into Florida is through
the importation of deer from
other states.'"---
Chronic wasting disease is a
contagious neurological disease
that has been found in. captive
and wild mule deer, white-


tailed deer, moose and Rocky
Mountain elk within several
Western states and more recent-
ly Eastern states.
The disease causes degenera-
tion of the brain of infected ani-
mals, resulting in emaciation,
abnormal behavior, loss of bod-
ily functions and death.
Virginia and West Virginia
are the only southeastern states
where it has been detected.
To reduce the chances of
chronic wasting disease enter-
ing Florida, the state prohibits
importing live deer unless they
come from a herd that has beem
certified CWD-free for five or
more years. Additionally, im-
portation of any species of deer,
elk or moose carcasses, with the
exception of cleaned skull caps,
antlers, tanned hides and de-
boned meat, is prohibited frol
19 states and two Canadian
provinces where CWD has been
detected.
Chronic wasting disease has
been detected in New Mexico,
Utah, Colorado, Wyoming,


rNutrition Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH

Q: Are iced-coffee drinks a antioxidants in coffee, may be
sensible treat if I'm watching lower in decaf coffee as well.
my weight? However, even with decaf ver-
A: A simple iced coffee or even sions, the true antioxidant bene-
an iced latte made with skim fits you receive depends on how
milk isn't a problem if you leave much you drink. As for con-
out added flavorings and cerns about caffeine, when con-
whipped cream and choose the sumed in moderation, it may
smallest size. A 12-ounce (oz.) not be as bad as you think.
iced latte or cappuccino made Some studies now suggest that
with skim milk usually contains caffeine's purported role in
about 130 calories; if made with increasing blood pressure may
2 percent milk it might, be clos- not be linked as strongly to cof-
er to 160 calories. But if you fee and tea. Note that people
add flavored syrups, whipped with sleep difficulties, however,
cream topping and other ingre- do need to be careful about the
dients, the calorie content rises amount and timing of caffeine
sharply. Portion size is key. The consumption. Also, most health
largest size at most of today's experts suggest that .pregnant
popular coffee bars is usually women limit total daily caffeine
24 oz., sometimes more. Order from coffee, soft drinks and
a large, and you could be get- other sources to about 300 mil-
ting up to 700 calories, lots of ligrams, the equivalent of three
additional fat and almost a half- 6-ounce cups of regular coffee.
cup of sugar. Even if you skip
the whipped cream these jumbo Q: How nutritious is water-
servings still provide about 450 melon compared to other
calories. While you may be fruits?
looking for a light, refreshing A: Each cup of watermelon
snack, what you may get is a (about half a large slice) offers
drink that's equivalent to one or about 13 milligrams of vitamin
two portions of dessert. To C (14 to 17 percent of currently
enjoy iced coffee drinks with- recommended daily intake).
out wreaking havoc on your This is not as high as can-
diet, order nonfat versions, skip taloupe or honeydew melon, or
the whipped cream and slowly other high-C fruits such as kiwi,
savor a small portion. If you're strawberries and oranges, but as
very thirsty, quench your thirst one of seven to ten servings of
with a cool glass of water first fruits and vegetables daily, it
and then you'll be able to fully makes an important contribu-
savor your icy treat. A: tion. Watermelon is also an out-
Compared to decaf, regular standing source of lycopene, an
green tea contains about three antioxidant phytochemical
titnes as much EGCG, the linked with lower risk of
antioxidant phytochemical that prostate. Lycopene is the
has shown cancer-prevention carotenoid that gives tomatoes,
effects in some laboratory stud- watermelon, guava, and red and
ies. Similarly, decaf black tea. pink grapefruit their character-
which contains another, less- istic color. Finally, watermelon
studied antioxidant called theo- also offers a weight-control
rubigin, also has lower amounts bonus. A one-cup serving can
(about 50 percent less) than its satisfy a sweet tooth with just
regular counterpart. Limited 49 calories, making it one of the
research suggests that chloro., fruits leasl concentrated in
genic acid, one of the main sut'"r ad cl:lories.


Kansas, Minnesota, Oklahoma,
Montana, South Dakota,
Nebraska, Wisconsin, Illinois,
New York, West Virginia,
Michigan, Virginia, Missouri,
North Dakota and Maryland)
and Alberta and Saskatchewan,
Canada.
"Early detection is the key to
limiting the spread of the dis-
ease, if such an outbreak should
occur in Florida," Morea said.
The FWC is once again turn-
ing to hunters and members of
the public this hunting season
for assistance in helping moni-
tor the state's deer herd.
"We're asking hunters to
report any sightings of sick or
emaciated deer, or deer found
dead from unknown causes,"
Morea said. "If you see such a
deer, do not touch it, but instead
contact us as soon as possible
by calling toll-free, 866-Cwd-
Watch (293-9282). Wildlife bi-
ologists will respond and, if
necessary, collect deer tissue for
testing."


There are two things to aim
at in life: first, to get what
you want and, after that, to
enjoy it. Only the wisest of
mankind achieve the sec-
ond.
-Logan Pearsall Smith


Giving
Forty years ago, the U.S. high
school graduation rate was the
highest in the world. Today. it's
19th. with just 70 percent of
students successfully complet-
ing their high school education.
But there are organizations and
individuals across the country
trying to change that. And they
believe classroom technology
can'help.

What Others Are Doing
One such person is Ron
Harper, who, along with his
wife Katherine, founded the
Harper Corporation in Char-
lotte, North Carolina. Harper
believes ignoring the decline in
education is akin to what he
calls a "silent disease"-some-
thing that will slowly but surely
damage the nation's future. He
believes more has to be done to
keep children interested and
engaged in their schoolwork, so
Harper made a commitment to
placing interactive whiteboards
in classrooms.
In the spring of 2010, work-
ing with Gaston County
Schools Superintendent L.
Reeves McGlohon, Harper
launched the SMART Board in
Every Classroom campaign.
The SMART Board has always
been the most popular brand of
interactive whiteboard in the
U.S. Combining the simplicity
of a whiteboard with the poweq


To Help E
of a computer, SMART Boards
let teachers deliver dynamic
lessons, write notes in digital
ink and save their work all
with the simple touch of a fin-
ger. The goal of Harper and
McGlohon's campaign was to
raise $4 million so that all 2,000
classrooms in Gaston County
would be equipped with a
SMART Board interactive
whiteboard. The campaign
reached its goal in March 2011.
Ron Harper is not alone in his
efforts. In Boston, the Lynch
Foundation, which counts edu-
cation as one of its main goals,
has an ongoing program of
matching grants designed to
place SMART Boards in
Boston-area Catholic schools.
"Technology has influenced and
affected all major industries; it
must be a central focus in our
educational system," said Katie
Everett, executive director.
"The interactive whiteboards
are one vehicle we can use to
integrate technology to a vast
audience, tailor lessons and
approaches, allow teachers to
identify their students' undeq-
standing of curriculum content
and make adjustments based on
real-time fact and student eval-
uation."
SMART Board interactive
whiteboards have also im-
pressed Jessica Flores, presi-
dent of The Riordan Foun-


Education
dation, of Los Angeles. The
Foundation, launched 30 years
ago by former Los Angeles
mayor Richard Riordan, aims to
provide all students, especially
in low-income communities,
with a high-quality education.
Each year, the Riordan
Foundation provides anywhere
from $2-5 million in grants to
schools, with some of that
going to technology, including
SMART Boards. "Technology
has changed the way society
operates; in order to succeed,
children are now required to
develop not only literacy skills
but familiarity with technolo-
gy," Flores explained. "Tech-
nology today permeates every
aspect of life. It is crucial that
classroom instruction be deliv-
ered in a manner that is engag-
ing and that prepares students to
function in modern society.
SMART Boards facilitate the
development of these skills."

How You Can Help
Parents, teachers and anyone
concerned about education in
America today can be a part of
the solution by encouraging
school districts to invest in this
kind of technology and by
donating to these and other
organizations that can help
them do so. For more informa-
tion, visit www.smarttech.com
or call 403-407-5128.


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4B The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011


No More Important Job

Than Being A Father
"The smallest moments can likely to experience education-
have the biggest impact on a al, health, emotional and behav-
child's life." ioral problems, to be victims of
That's the message of new child abuse and to engage in
public service advertisements criminal behavior than their
(PSAs) aimed at America's peers who live with their mar-
dads. According to the U.S. ried, biological (or adoptive)
Census Bureau, an estimated 24 parents.
million children (34 percent) in Whether they live together or
the U.S. live apart from theip just see each other occasionally,
fathers. research shows that kids benefit
The PSA campaign is an greatly when their fathers ard
effort between the U.S. De- actively involved in their lives.
apartment of Health and Human Spending time together can
Services' (HHS) Administration energize the relationship and
for Children and Families, create a stronger bond between
Office of Family Assistance and a father and child.
the Ad Council to show fathers All the PSAs direct fathers to
the irreplaceable role they play visit www.fatherhood.gov or
in their children's lives, call (877) 4DAD411 for pro-
From the time the Re-sponsi- grams, resources and a series of:
ble Fatherhood campaign began "Take Time Tips." Here are a
three years ago, the PSAs have few:
featured different segments of Create small moments that
the population each year. bring big rewards-Go for a
Created pro bono by Campbell walk, read a story, cook dinner,
Ewald (CE), this year's cam- play a video game or board
paign focuses on military and game, color a picture or do a
Hispanic fathers. crossword puzzle with your
"The President has said there child.
is no more important job he or Be a digital dad-Send your
any other man can have than child a text message for no rea-
being a father," said Joshua son at all, other than to say, "I
DuBois, special assistant to the love you" or "Great job on the
President and Executive Di-rec- test."
tor of the White House Office Come and get it-Eat meals
of Faith-based and Neighbo- with your children. Breakfast,
rhood Partnerships. lunch and dinner create an
According to the National opportunity to give your child
Responsible Fatherhood Clear- your full attention. Share news
inghouse (NRFC), children about your lives, have discus-
who live without their biologi- sions and make plans for your
cal fathers are on average at family.
least two to three times more

What is difficulty? Only a word indicating the degree of
strength requisite for accomplishing particular objects; a
mere notice of the necessity for exertion; a mere stimu-
lus to men.
-Samuel Warren


Seasonal Testing Of Blood Supply


Can Control West Nile Virus


The following permits were
applied bfr or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
JuIl 17-23. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Delois Washington, Lynn
Street, addition, $11,000.
Adrian Felix, Airport Road,
mechanical repairs, $2,686.
Adrian Felix, Oak Street,
mechanical repairs, $2.882.
Richie EVans, Fish Branch
Road, roofing, $4,500.
Jon Earhart, Orange Street,
windows and doors, $1,225.
Jon Earhart, Lee Street, win-
dows and doors, $1,600.
James W. Terry, Merle Lang-
ford Road, swimming pool/spa,
$30,000.
John Palmer, Airport Road,
electrical, $7,839.
Douglas Battey, Main Street
West, air conditioning, $5,200.
Douglas Battey, Ralph Smith
Road, Mechanical, $2,600.

BUILDING BLOCKS
The quality of your remodel-
ing, alteration, addition or new
home will be determined by the
quality of your contractor.
Failure to obtain the necessary
permits could result in fines,
extra expenses incurred in cor-
recting zoning and/or code vio-
lations, or even removal of the
structure. If the cost of your
project exceeds $2,500, a
Notice of Commencement must
be recorded with the Clerk of
Courts. Failure to comply with
the requirements of the Florida
Construction Lien Law could
result in you paying twice for
materials and/or services. Call
the local building department at
773-3236.

Bees, as in "bees and
honey," is Cockney rhym-
ing slang for money.


.. .. PUBLIC NOTICE .
: HARDEE COUNTY INDUSTRIAL

DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT-INFRASTRUCTURE
GRANT/LOAN FUNDING CYCLE

The Hardee County Industrial Development Authority will accept grant/loan, applications
for the Economic Terms Agreement contained in the Mosaic South Ft. Meade Mine Devel-
opment Agreement. Projects that provide economic development or infrastructure in
Hardee County by virtue of this notice are being solicited for consideration. The Authority
shall rank applications based on the criteria set forth in the application.

The Hardee County Indlstrial Development Authority reserves the right to reject any and
all applications.

Applications and Program Guidelines are available at the Hardee, County Economic De-
velopment Office, 107 East Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873; Phone: 863-773-3030; Fax:
863-773-4915; email info@hardeemail.com.

Applications will be accepted from July 20, 2011, through September 2, 2011, 8:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.

For more information, please call 863/773-3030.

Sarah Pelham, Economic Development Coordinator. 7:21,28c



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE 2011-03

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2011-03 will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the second
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main'Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 8th day of Au-
gust 2011, at 6:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. A copy of the
proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh
Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any person may appear and be heard with respect to
the proposed Ordinance: The proposed Ordinance is entitled as follows:

ORDINANCE 2011-03

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
A CHANGE OF THE ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF APPROXIMATELY .84
ACRES LOCATED AT 210, 212 AND 220 9TH AVENUE SOUTH, WAUCHULA,
DESIGNATED AS THE "HARDEE COUNTY BOCC PROPERTY", FROM CITY
"R-1 LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL" TO CITY "P-SP PUBLIC/SEMI PUBLIC";
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; AND PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission.with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


.Officials predict that warmer
temperatures and a wet spring
could increase the number of
mosquitoes carrying West Nile
virus (WNV).l Incidence rates
of this disease have been climb-
ing, and the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control reported a 42
percent increase in the number
of WNV cases between 2009
and 2010.2 3 Environmental
factors moving into the 2011
season have produced ideal
conditions for the virus to
thrive.
How West Nile
Virus Is Transmitted
WNV is transmitted from the
bite of an infected mosquito.
Although most people (nearly
80 percent) show no symptoms,
some people experience flulike
symptoms. In rare cases, WNV
can cause inflammation of the
brain and other potentially life-
threatening complications, par-
ticularly in the elderly or those
with compromised immune sys-
tems. Those who show no
symptoms may not realize they
are infected and may unwitting-
ly donate infected blood, which
can lead to transmission of
WNV from donor to the trans-
fusion recipient.
Protecting the Blood Supply
From West Nile Virus

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting:
Consider SWFWMD business
and administrative matters
including discussion of the
salary and benefits .analysis
and executive director recruit-
ment. Some Board members
may participate in the meeting
via communications media
technology.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, August 8,
2011; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXEO 15j
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103;. or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us
7:28c


According to Richard Ben-
jamin, M.D., chief medical offi-
cer at the American Red Cross,
"Blood centers play an extreme-
ly important role in protecting
the blood supply from WNV
Sand in early outbreak detection.
We have adopted the most
advanced technology available
to detect WNV in donated
blood and eliminate infected
units of blood before they reach
patients."
In 2002, after recognizing
that WNV could be transmitted
through blood transfusions, the
U.S. Food and Drug Admin-
istration (FDA) asked the health
care industry to quickly develop
a nucleic acid-based test (called
a NAT test) that could screen
donated blood for WNV.
Novartis Diagnostics was the
first company to receive FDA
approval for a WNV NAT
blood-screening test. Today,
this highly sensitive NAT tech-
nology is used to screen nearly
all the U.S. blood supply for
HIV type 1, hepatitis types B
and C virus, and WNV.4 In
2010, NAT testing identified
nearly 150 cases of infected
blood that had been donated by
people who had no symptoms
of WNV-preventing this con-
taminated blood from entering

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting:
Consider SWFWMD business
and administrative matters
including discussion of the
salary and benefits analysis
and executive director recruit-
ment. Some Board members
may participate in the meeting
via communications media
technology.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, August 9,
2011; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0159)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us
7:28c


the U.S. blood supply.3
'Avoid Mosquito Bites
to Avoid Infektion
When dealing with WNV,
prevention is your best bet.
Take the commonsense steps
below to reduce your risk.
(Information provided by the
U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.)5
Protect Yourself
Use insect repellent on
exposed skin when you go out-
doors.
Clothing can reduce mos-
quito bites. When weather per-
mits, wear long sleeves, long
pants and socks when outdoors.
Be aware of peak mosquito
hours. The hours from dusk to
dawn are peak biting times for
many species of mosquitoes.
Mosquitoproof Your Home
Drain standing water.
Mosquitoes, lay their eggs in
standing water. Get rid of items
that hold water.
Install or repair screens.
Keep mosquitoes outside by
having well-fitting screens on
both windows and doors.
For more information about
how to protect against West
Nile virus, visit www.cdc.gov/-
ncidod/dvbid/westnile/preven-
tion_info.htm.


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting:
Consider SWFWMD business
and administrative matters
including discussion of the
salary and benefits analysis
and executive director recruit-
ment. Some Board members
may participate in the meeting
via communications media
technology.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, August
11,2011; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org-Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;
1(800) 423-1476 (FL only) or
(352) 796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0157)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the'Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us
7:28c


I RP IAN


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED CHANGE
TO THE WAUCHULA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing to consider a proposed amendment
to the Comprehensive Plan will be held and thereafter Ordinance Number 2011-04 will be
presented to the City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida, for adoption upon the
second reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 8th
day of August 2011, at 6:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as can be heard. A copy of the
proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 126 South,Seventh
Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any person may appear and be heard with respect to
the proposed Ordinance. The proposed Ordinance is entitled as follows:

ORDINANCE 2011-04

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
THE AMENDMENT OF THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, SAID AMENDMENT
BEING KNOWN AS AMENDMENT 11-01-SS"; SPECIFICALLY, CHANGING
THE FUTURE LAND USE CLASSIFICATION FROM CITY "LOW DENSITY RES-
IDENTIAL" TO CITY "PUBLIC BUILDINGS" FOR THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF
LAND LOCATED AT 210, 212 AND 220 9TH AVENUE SOUTH, WAUCHULA,
DESIGNATED AS THE "HARDEE COUNTY BOCC PROPERTY"; AND TRANS-
MITTING SAID AMENDMENT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AF-
FAIRS FOR NOTIFICATION PURPOSES ONLY; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


s/Holly Collins
HOLLY COLLINS, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, ,Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


s/Holly Collins
HOLLY COLLINS, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida: 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


7:28c








July 28,2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


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How the planned combination of AT&T
and T-Mobile witt benefit Florida:

Over 98% of Florida residents, including many
in small towns and rural areas, will be covered
by the LTE network.

More than one million additional people living
in Florida will gain access to LTE.

An additional 20,000 square miles of the state
will be covered by the LTE network.


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Mobile broadband is taking another major step forward. The network
technology is called LTE and it's a super-fast way to connect to the Internet.

The planned combination of AT&T and T-Mobite wilt allow us to expand our
LTE mobile broadband network to reach more of Florida.

Our customers will get a stronger network. The state willtget a new choice
for broadband. And more of Florida will get access to a cutting-edge wireless
network and all the opportunities it brings.


7:28c


MobilizeEverything.com


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6B The Herald-Advocate, July 28,2011





-The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


PUT YOURSELF IN THE DRIVER'S SEAT
We make it easy to buy.


HARDEE CAR COMPANY
BuY HERE PAY -rHERE


o & F ore, 'B.


Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


uIr
-




Oralia D. Flores
(863) 781-2955


Specials of the Week








-




Wauchula 3BA/2BA frame home in the city limits of
Wauchula, central air & heat, fresh paint inside, and laminate
wood floors. Priced to sell at $59,000
5 Acre Tracts on E. Main St. outside the city limits of Wauchula.
Offered at $45,000
5 Acre Tracts offered on Johns Rd. outside the city limits of
Wauchula. Priced at $60,000
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl7:28c


Classifieds


1958 FORD 800 Series 45 HP trac-
tor and bedder $3,000. 773-5704
or 381-4308. 7:28p.
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


ELECTRIC STOVE works great
$100, two window AC units $50
each, refrigerator $50, 245-9020.
7:28p


05 DODGE PICKUP $4,850. 781-
1062. 7:28c
CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc


f-arr


2008 FORD F250XL Super Duty
*4x4 diesel, automatic, highway
miles, $13,000. 773-5704 or 381-
4308. 7:28p


LEAD ROOFER, metal shingles
and single ply systems, for small
busy company. Salary based on
experience. Call for interview
(863) 285-7381. 7:28-8:25p
HELP WANTED, experience in
fence building, 863-445-0026 or
863-773-3557. 7:28c
R & R MECHANIC contact
Cracker Trail Transmission, 863-
448-9283. 7:28;8:4c


THREE BEDROOM/two bath, dou-
ble wide on ten fenced acres,
garage, CBS storage building,
$110,000. 863-735-1801 or 863-
448-2877. 7:21-8:18p


Soi h
-'






CLOSED


VACATION


[y 25o29


i Ip RE-OPENING


REWARD: LOST Jack Russell,
female, near Golfview, white
w/brown spots, blue halter, 863-
781-4369. 7:28p


FOR SALE: Car dolly, $250, new
wheels and tires; 5500 generator,
$200, like new and on wheels.
Call 863-45-0953. 7:21


FREE PUPS 7 months old with
shots, kid friendly. Joe 239-425-
7209. 7:28nc
2 FEMALES, 1 MALE, II weeks
old, tri-color beagles, AKC regis-
tered, all shots & wormed. Both
sire & dame on premises, $200,
773-4314. 7:28;8:4p
FREE KITTENS to a good home,
adorable, 3 females, 1 male. 773-
3557. 7:28nc
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and.
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location In
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-7814529
for information. 4:28tfc

Never doubt that a small
group of thoughtful, com-
mitted citizens can change
the world. Indeed, it is the
only thing that ever.has.
-Margaret Mead


HELP WANTED
Afterschool Childcare
Workers. Must have posi-
tive attitude and be able
to work with children, ex-
perience preferred. Appli-
cants should be
knowledgeable in child-
care practices and be
able to work flexible
hours. Job responsibili-
ties include tutoring and
assisting with homework,
working with children in a
structured environment,
and delivering education
and health based pro-
gramming,
Applications
available at
the Hardee
County Family /
YMCA. 863- 1
773-6445. YMCA


I N C,







John H. O'Neal


REALTORS
[ 1^(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
SJOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! 38.5 ac on
the Peace River w/lots of beauti-
ful oaks, pines and palmettos!
Pole barn & 2BR/2BA MH.
$499,500!
50 acre grove; Valencia &
Hamlins, well, micro-jet.
$750,000!
10 acs' w/deeded access to
Peace River, well & septic, lots
of mature trees. $130,000!
PRICE REDUCED! High &
dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$110,000!
Imagine your new home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Fenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
farmland w/well, pump, fencing
on private road. NOW $65,000!
34 ac fenced pastureland on
private, graded rd in Zolfo
Springs, Two wells, Greenbelt
qualified. $238,000!


Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil hunt,
relax! $90,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Pack your
overnight bags & head to this
peaceful retreat! 5 ac fenced
w/lots of oaks, pond, creek,
12'x20' shed. $59,000!
Two beautiful building lots in
Zolfo zoned R-1A, each
155'x110'. City water available,
septic allowed. $7,000 each!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10- ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 333 ac
ranch has pasture, irrigation
system, 12" well, 3BR/3BA two-
story- home, 3,000 ft landing
strip. $1,165,500!


RFAI TOR ASSOCIATES AFfER OHOTS
KENNY SANDERS.--..781-0153 SANDY LARRISON.... 832-013
KAREN O'NEAL....... 781-7633 MONICA REAS 781-0888
0 DAVID ROYAL--.....781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH. WAUCHULA, FL 33873 cd7T28


GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.
Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning
Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 c8:2ttc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


^ COMPUTER REPAIR
Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow.?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
448-2561 c7:7-28p .773-0518



Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available.
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
O Monday Friday
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
O nPOUNIT Equal Opportunity Epnployer & Provider 17:7-28c


OPORT,*ITY C17:7-28C *
[ _~.....~...5
~LLIIiL


I -


Calltoda foryourspo
781106 ,1 23fc







July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds-


06 HOQIDA VTX1300C customized
for power and touring, low
mileage, $9,850; 03 Honda VT750
Shadow, low mileage, new tires,
$3,850; TC Arms Black Diamond
.50 cal. Realtree w/scope, $150;
Traditions 209 .50 cal. model 209
w/scope and sling, $100; both
rifles come with possibles bags,
correct ammunition and cleaning
goods. Capt. James Hand (863)
882-1382. 7:28p


TWO BEDROOM, one bath apart-
ment $450 plus deposit, 832-
1984. .7:28-8:25p
2 BR, 1 BA apartment, Wauchula,
no deposit, $450/month, no pets,
781-3570. 7:21,28c
3 BR, 2 BA, large home, 2 story,
R. Kazen Rd., Wauchula, no pets,
apartment on end (already rent-
ed), $800/month, $400 deposit,
417-867-3234. 7:28c
MH, 3 BR, 2 BA, Wauchula, good
neighborhood, no smoking, no
pets, $600/month, $500 deposit,
781-3570. 7:21,28c
DUPLEX IN SEBRING, 2 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath, $600 first, last,
863-781-0982. 6:30-7:28p
DUPLEX APARTMENT in good
neighborhood, Wauchula, no
smoking, no pets, 2BR, 1BA, $550
monthly plus $500 deposit, 781-
3570. 7:21,28c


THREE BEDROOM, two bath,
$800 plus deposit, no pets, 832-
1984. 7:28-8:25p
APT. and HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 7:28c
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh



OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
920 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc

A man wrapped up in him-
self makes a very small
bundle.


AC I

THE BEST DEAL o matter how you look at it,
There's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car.


__V~mSvATO AUTySALE


Large Selection of
Cars to Choose From

Buy Here Pay Here
M 30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only


OEM-,
BILSAO HEEAHMLO
863-81-460 83-78-908


WILL CARE FOR your loved one
who needs help around house or
cannot stay alone, have refer-
ences, 863-214-8430. 7:28p
CAREGIVER-Dependable, do
housekeeping, shopping, person-
al care, 863-773-0421. 7:28p
4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256-
749, 863-214-1471. 7:21-9:29p
VICKER'S LAWN CARE, free esti-
mates, no job too big/small, 863-
448-7491. 7:7-8:4p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh



DESOTO COUNTY





OWNER FINANCING
wwwJandcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 '





Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jiimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


S Ben Gibson
Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Robert Jones


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017 I
(863)781-1396 c17:28c


a


OVERCOMEIER" MEETINGS
(Gillesple) have been moved to
the Women's* -tub on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders Is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
'***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh

A hot dog at the ball game
beats roast beef at the
Ritz.




Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot e
863-382-0600


HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
SATURDAY, 7 am 3 pm, Jazzer-
cise Center, 808 St. Rd. 66, Zolfo
Springs. 7:28p
SATURDAY, 7 am-?, 801 N. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Lots of baby
clothes 7:28p
SATURDAY, 8-? 807 St. Rd. 66 in
Zolfo. Moving sale, lazy boy, dou-
ble bed, dresser, dryer, cabinet,
table & chairs, entertainment cen-
ter and more. Come see. 7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8'-? 1030
Magnolia Lane; Knollwood. Kids
clothes, toys, misc. 7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? 3 family,
lots of new stuff. 814 N. 9th Ave.,
Wauchula. 7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY,
daylight to dark. 2551 Mine View,
B.G. Furniture, appliances, baby
Items, misc. 7:28p
SATURDAY ONLY, 213 S. 7th Ave.,
Wauchula. 6:30 am noon. Furni-
ture, small appliances, kitchen
stuff, tools and more. 7:28p


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873.
Make an offer on this spacious family home;
4B/3Bth, large kitchen with plenty of cabinet
space, w/b fireplace, double garage, fenced
yard. $155,500
Updated C/B home,3B/1.5Bth, almost new A/C
and roof. List Price $115,000
16.5 Acres with 3B/2Bth M/H built; a total of 5
wells on this beautiful property surrounded by
large oaks. $175,000
5 Acres with large oaks and open field; very
secluded. $40,000
STORAGE UNITS 30 units in excellent con-
dition; very good rate of occupancy. Call Delois.
$55,000


Er SERVICE
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.., Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


E YOU C


773-9743


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.




f .*,


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


I Yar sa


SATURDAY, 2156 Ralph Smith
Rd., Wauchula. 7:28p
LARGE, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 3179
Platt Rd., Wauchula. Tools,
movies, books and books. 7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? Terrell
Rd., Wauchula. Furniture, clothes
and other Items. 7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? Garza Rd.
off Steve Roberts Special, Zolfo
Springs. 7:28p
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, Friday,
263 Boyd Cowart Rd., Wauchula,
9-2. 7:28-8:11p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8 am. 206
Ohio Ave., Wauchula. Name
brand clothes, shoes, electronics,
books, movies, CDs, household
items, furniture, toys. Low prices.
7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY. Antiques,
clothes, household items, toys.
104 Inglis Way, Wauchula. 7:28p
SATURDAY, SUNDAY 8-? Lots of
baby clothes, children's Items,
etc. 915 Tennessee St., Wauchula.
7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-? 2 family.
431 Cypress St., Wauchula. 7:28p
SATURDAY 7-? Misc items. 4953
Central Ave, Bowling Green.
7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 7-? 658
Apostolic Rd., Wauchula. 7:28p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-? 4716
Church Ave., B.G. Table, chairs,
camping gear and more.
Something for everyone. 7:28p


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net


Ken Lambert
3B/2B, C/B home, ceramic tile and carpet floors,
large eat- in kitchen, spacious bedrooms, locat-
ed in family neighborhood. $115,000
9 acres located on corner of two high volume
traffic areas; perfect commercial building site
or for home. $100,000
Build a house or place a mobile home on this 2.5
acre tract in western Hardee County. Acreage
is fenced on three sides and has a small shed.
$30,000
PRICE REDUCED! 26252 acres with road
frontage, large pines, 100 acres cleared. $3000
per acre
Storage Buildings 30 units in excellent condi-
tion and good location. $75,000
AN COUNT ON [E
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


STEVE JOHNSON


781-0518


702 SOUTH 6hAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


p


NEW LISTING!! 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath CB
home. Great Investment opportunity at a
great price. Only $35.000
NEW LISTING I! Commercial Lot, corner of
Main St. and Hwy 64 East, 1.28 acreage.
Priced ( $59.000
PRICE REDUCTION! $49.900 Charming two
story with 5 Bedrooms, 1.5 Baths includes
original claw foot bath tub and glass door
knobs for antique lovers, wood floors, large
carport and workshop.


NEW LISTING !!! Beautiful 3 bedroom / 2
Bath CB home in Knollwood. Central heat /
air, two car garage, close to schools, total
sq. ft. 3,079, on a cul-de-sac. Priced 0
$189.000
ONLY $7.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC fenced, 4
inch well, great location for home, farming,
multi-business. Ask for Nancy!!
OWNER MOTIVATED!! 2BR / 2Bth Home with
extra lot, Central heat/air, one car garage,
citrus trees, workshop, storage. $65.000 Call
Nancy for more information.


GOLF ANYONE!! Retirement Communityl 1 PRICED TO SELLH! 3 Bd / 2 Bth CB home
Bedroom 2 Bath M/H including lot. Call w/double lot, central heat and air, one car
today for more Information Only $53.000. garage, hardwood, carpet flooring, $110.000


QUIET FAMILY HOME!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Brick home outside city limits on a no traffic
road with large oaks, outbuildings and alarm
system. Only $175.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multi-family-Single Family Homes.
$76.000
150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, Home or both. $6.000
Per Acre Neaotiable!!
BOWLING GREENII 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home nice corner lot with total sq. ft. 1,292.
$38.000


MUST SEE TO BELIEVE! If your family
enjoys the outdoors, you must see this
unique listing that brings outdoor living to
you. Features 6 outbuildings includes 2,000
SF Barn w/23ft ceilings, work shop, storm
room, outdoor kitchen w/stainless steel fix-
tures, fire pit, potting shed, large gazebo
overlooks pond-well stocked w/fish,
includes aerator, outbuildings w/pens and
fenced. Also 14 x 60 MH sealed in rough cut
pine, front and back porches. Trees and
maintained lawn. MUCH MORE, Call Nanc
for Aoot. Priced at $175.000
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties. c7:28c


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478
*




Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience c


Hill's Auto World

U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441



W'R30RIAMTV 7K



MOTOR &


I J.Z I | TRANSMISSION A S("


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL


L ByuyHere!f I~ No Interest
Pay Here! FinancCharges
aA$ a C D
ff -


NEW....REDUCED PRICE! Beautiful home
located in Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath house with wrap around porch, detached
2 car garage with office and full bath. Was
$475,000.....Now $359,000!

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. WAS $97,500 ...
REDUCED TO $79,500!

18 acres. House & Grove. Close in approxi-
mately 1,850 st of living. Nice screened porch. 3
Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of grove, mostly ear-
lies. 6" deep well, microjet & diesel power unit.
Only $295,000

Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $89,000!


Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 h bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED TO $205,000!
Nice lot in Torrey community with frontage on
Hole Number 6 of Torrey Oaks Golf Course. Lot
$14,900 Owner will build to suit for just
$159,900!
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 h
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 h acres of
producing nurser". $430,000
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $229,000


11


-ii


11


It


ir


II


11


ASSOCIATES


-r~






8B The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011



-The



TREES UNLIMITED
Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured
Experienced Tree Surgery
*Aerial Bucket Trucks Wood Chipper
Stump Grinder Front End Loader
Dump Truck Land Clearing
Pond Digging Excavation ,"
Environmentally Responsible 863-781-7027
Storm Damage & Emergency Specialists Randy Garland




New Tires Include:
Free Mount & Balance
Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SRLE ON
ALL TIRES '
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula i
(across from Wal-Mart)
"=-S .i f V Billy Ayers
c16:16tfc Tire Technician


Topsy See
REAL ESTATE
Topsy See
1 ac. high & dry. Approx. 269 ft. road frontage-deed restricted.
$29,900.
Very nice 1980 M.H. 1982 sq. ft., fully furnished, move in ready,
includes linens, dishes, cookware, TV, most anything you will need.
This is a great buy at ft4P REDUCED $42,000.
3 BR 2 Bath 1987 DW 1890 sq. ft. all the extras including security
system. 5 acres with beautiful oaks and stocked pond. $115,000.
Beautiful secluded property in Golf View. 8.8 ac with 2 building sites.
$75,000
3BR 2 Bath DW. All appliances, window treatments, ceiling fans
included. Very nice home in excellent condition. Sets on 5.2 ac.
$J.2P9l. REDUCED $127500.
Hwy 17 frontage--1BR 1 Bath home sits on 50 x 152 lot in Bowling
Green. $84,500.
c17:28c

2 1 rn .. A .. L- --,



BOWINGu'KENQUIK LUB


I "No job's too big.

IBM~nBH^sffl^^B


** 1


I


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461




B YOUR Kt TO
REAL STATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties


Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
MOTIVATED SELLER-BRING OFFERS! PRICE REDUCED to
$189,999. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.
REDUCED! 182 acres of rolling pasture for cattle, sod, farm, or
develop. Zoned farm residential, 90% improved, cow pens, cross
fenced, 3 ponds, 6" well with John Deere power unit. Also included is
a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home with fenced yard and well.
Call Jimmy Wohl @ 863-381-2437.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net ,,,,,,,


U~


Classifieds-


Nutrition
V Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN IN:- 'UTE FOR 1
CANCER RESEARCH
Q: Are there tricks to make it
easier to start eating smaller
portions at home where there
is plenty of food?
A: Yes. Experiment with some
of these ways people have
learned to eat more appropriate
portions and see what might


1995 PONT
VIN: 1G2WJ52M8SF292831
8:00 A.M. AUG. 10, 2011
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL '


10 HOURS A
MONTH!
That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m: on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


work best for you. If you con-
trol how much food is prepared
and find that there is always
more than is really needed, try
cutting back on the amount you
fix, especially on the foods you
are trying to limit. If you don't
want extras to take for lunch or
freeze for a future meal, you'll
save money and face less temp-
tation. If you currently put serv-
ing bowls on the table, consider
keeping food off the table so
you have to get up to get any
second portions. Simply not
having a bowl of food right in
front of your eyes and the need
'to make an extra effort to get
more is often enough to help
.. you reconsider. Try starting off
with portions about 10 to 25
percent smaller than usual.
Studies suggest that we are
often satisfied with less than we


think we need. Some people
find it easier to take smaller
portions if they use a slightly
smaller plate. Others find that if
they fill their plates with a large
portion of vegetables or salad, it
makes it easier to take smaller
portions of everything else.
Allow for the possibility of
going back for seconds if you


3505 US HwY 17.S


Mon. Wed. 1 Oam- 6pm; Fri. & Sat. 10--7p,
Closed Thursday & Sunday
W7'iW. I
o_ .


are really hungry, but if you
wait just a few minutes in
between, you may be surprised
at how often that perceived
need for more passes quickly
away. Many people also note
that when they eat more slowly
and focus on really tasting their
food, they are satisfied with
smaller amounts.


THE PALMS

S Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through July 31st
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)
Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 c(
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c7:7-28c


uE .
EEL _L


- ZOLFO SPRINGS


Ly f'Is House Thlrv Store
QUALITY MERCHANDISE


Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street


leaven cent Cleaning service
By Sherry White Ministries

773-0523 773-0877


PRTS FoR dZ MAJOR BRANDS
LAWN MOWERS GOLF CARTS

P/SCOIATl'/C/A'
Call to compare before buying!

FAST FRIENDLY SERVICE
22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE LOCALLY OWNED Er OPERATED
**A * *A *******r* rt rp


773-4400


-i rk Ir


HIll'S Auto worTa

51 P9AN'S MOVEp TO ZOLFO SPRINeS


BIcG


735-0188

BUvY HERE! --
PAY HERE!

No INTEREST
OR
FINANCE CHARGES r


SAEE


THIS WEEKEND,
FRIDAY, JULY 29 & SATURDAY, JULY 30h


~





July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9B


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


*




*


REALITY RANCH YOUTH RODEO FINALS & BANQUET
After a hiatus of two years, the Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo
came back!
Starting in September, it ran every month (except for taking
the day off for Christmas) on the fourth Saturday. The finals were
held on April 23, and the banquet took place out at the Reality
And Hardee County had
many winners well, all of
these young cowboys and cow-
girls are winners, but I was
referring to saddle and buckle ,, .llitl~anc
winners. So in order to give SluZdl'' khl
everyone coverage, I am going -
to cover each division in a sepa- :
rate column between Reality
and Arcadia, I ought to be done
by Christmas of this year!
The Tots division had a .. .
twist this season the 3- to-6-
year-olds could elect to be Tiny
Tots: They rode with the regular
Tots, but were presented with a
participation medal at each
rodeo. And the smiles that came
from this award every month
made it well worth the while!
This entire group of tykes Cody Vina won an en-
consisted of Sela Rae Albritton, graved saddle as the All-
Matt Webb, Cameron Cantu, Around Champion Cowboy
Ryleigh Adams, Cody Vina andin the Tots division.
Kayleigh Harris.
Sela Rae (on her beautiful paint horse), Matt and Ryleigh rode
only in the barrel-racing event, and Kayleigh competed in the mut-
ton bustin'. Cameron rode in both barrels and breakaway roping.
And that leaves Cody Vina he rode barrels, pole bending, goat
tying, breakaway roping and calf riding.


Ryleigh gets her barrel-racing skills from her mom, and she
goes fast when she crosses those timers. Her dad, Trae Adams (a
member of the Carlton Ranches team), gave his time to be a judge
every month. This was Cameron's first year of roping, and he must
have been getting lessons from dad Luke or older brother Dawson,
because he was on fire, catching five times in a row between
Reality and Arcadia. Once Matt dismounted from older brother
Tony's white horse, he just about ran the arena riding the trac-
tor when they dragged, helping set up barrels, picking up hats, and
(my favorite) dancing with his buddy, Cayden Newsome.


Justin Webb presents young Cameron Cantu with a belt
buckle for placing first in the Tots breakaway.

All of the Tiny Tots received their very own belt buckles -
sized to fit their smaller waistlines. Cameron Cantu won the Tots
breakaway, and Cody Vina won the calf riding garnering each
of them a winner's belt buckle. And Cody went on to also win the
Tots All-Around Cowboy, giving him an engraved saddle. (I
thought his face was going to crack, his smile was so wide when
they announced his name!)
Congratulations to y'all! The.Juniors are coming next column.
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!

SA 1 U


Sela Rae Albritton rounds the third barrel as she dis-
plays her barrel-racing style. She was unable to attend
the banquet.

Sept. th


Ryleigh Adams is presented with a leather breastcollar
for placing fourth in Tiny Tots barrel racing.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Matt Webb receives his Tiny Tots belt buckle from his
dad, Justin.


Kayleigh Harris proudly shows her Tiny Tots belt buckle
for her mutton bustin'.


Revitalizing nature one habitat at a time


JESSICA



reclamation
ecologist


Florida


So America Grows


"Working for Florida Phosphate, I am able to nurture
the land by creating new habitats, planting water
lotus and protecting wildlife. Phosphate is a natural
product that helps boost crop growth so farmers can
produce more food at a lower cost. It's important
work, but what we leave behind is our real legacy."


www.floridaphosphate.com


7:28c


am-_livj%,-ii.m n


~?--------~


~~_ ._~ ._1.1 .







10B The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HARDEE COUNTY
CASE NO. 252011CP000056

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARION E. RATLIFF, also known
as
MARION GELKE RATUFF,
deceased.



NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of MARION E. RATLIFF,
also known as MARION GELKE
RATUFF, deceased, whose date
of death was January 31, 2011,
and whose social security num-
ber is xxx-xx-xxxx, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, Probate DIvlson,
the address of which is Post
Office Drawer 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1749. The name
and address of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice I required to be served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against the dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBUCA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is July 28, 2011.
Personal Representative:
BECKY HENDERSON
1001 E. Maine Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John W. H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopler: (866) 591-1658
Florida Bar Number: 0650137
7:28-8:4c


IN iE CIRCUiT COURT PC
HARDEE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252011CP000054

IN RE: ESTATE OP
MARY E. BAXLEY9 a/k/a
MARY ELIZABETH BAXLEY,
deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of t
estate of MARY E. BAXLEY, a/
MARY ELIZABETH BAXLI
deceased, whose date of dee
was May 28, 2011, Is pending
the Circuit Court for Hard
County, Florida, Probate Divisi
the. address of which Is Pc
Office Drawer 1749, Wauchu
Florida 33873. The name a
address of the Persoi
Representative and the Person
Representative's attorney are
forth below.
All creditors of the decade
and other persons having clali
or demands against deceden
estate on whom a copy of th
notice is required to be serve
must file their claims with t
court WITHIN THE LATER
THREE MONTHS AFTER TI
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THI
TY DAYS AFTER THE DATE C
SERVICE OF A COPY OF TH
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dec
dent and other persons havir
claims or demands against tl
decedent's estate must file the
claims with this court WITH
THREE MONTHS AFTER TH
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILE
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SE
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 C
THE FLORIDA PROBATE COE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIM
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOV
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (
YEARS OR MORE AFTER TH
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is July 28, 2011.
Personal Representatim
JOHN W. EASON, J
Post Office Box 9:
Wauchula, FL 3387
(863) 773-551
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Kenneth B. Evers, of
KENNETH B. EVERS, PA.
Florida Bar No. 0054852
PostOffice Drawer 1308
Wauchula, FL 33873-1308
Phone: (863) 773-5600
Facsimile: (866) 547-4362
Email: offtci@hardeelaw.com


7:28-8:



--7


RI


Fid CSrop]UpUI h


Week ending July 24, 2011
Weather Summary: Scattered rains continued during the
week of July 18 through 24. Several stations reported having less
than a tenth of an inch to over one inch of rain. Nearly two inches
of precipitation was recorded in Arcadia and Jay. Localities receiv-
ing over two inches of rainfall included Homestead, Kenansville,
and Orlando. Rainfall totaled over three inches in North Port. In
S Pensacola, over five inches was received for the week. Recent rains
helped decrease the threats of wildfires. The Florida Department of
Agriculture's Division of Forestry reported 32 active wildfires with
5 of those wildfires covering over 100 acres. Temperatures in the
he major cities averaged one degree below normal to three degrees
We above normal. Sultry daytime highs were in the 90s with the heat
ath index in the 100s for several stations across the Sunshine State.
in Evening lows were in the 60s and 70s.
lee
on, Field Crops: Growers welcomed the rains across the Panhan-
ost die with soil moisture supplies mostly adequate. Recovery mode
"a, for field crops progressed with crops having a chance of survival if
nd
nae drought conditions do not return. Pest and disease pressure
nal increased in field crops due to the improved moisture conditions
set coupled with the high temperatures. Rainfall over the Panhandle
boosted growth and development of some peanuts as well as cot-
ton. Growers reported the height of some cotton plants were short-
nt er than normal. Peanuts pegged progressed to 67 percent compared
t's to 72 percent last year. The peanut condition was rated 2 percent
his very poor, 4 percent poor, 33 percent fair, and 61 percent good. In
ed Putnam County, corn harvesting was active. Some growers in
he Walton County planted soybeans despite the late date. Recent rains
3F have promoted rapid sugarcane growth in the Everglades region.
HE However, stunted sugarcane growth during the earlier drought peri-
'A-
R- od represents lost growth potential that cannot be recovered by the
OF early fall harvest. There were reports of grasshopper outbreaks in
IS some sugarcane fields.


De-
ng
he
air
IN
HE
A-

ED
ET
OF
DE

IE
EE,
2)
HE
IS

on

re:
R.
38
73
93


4


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252010CA000629
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
2002 BLACK CHEVY TAHOE,
VIN # 1GNEK13Z52J241864

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MICHEL MENDEZ, AND ALL
OTHERS CLAIMING AND
INTEREST IN OR TO THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for forfeiture of the follow-
ing described personal property
In Hardee County, Florida:
2002 BLACK CHEVY TAHOE,
VIN # 1GNEK13Z52J241864


has been filed against you by
Petitioner, HARDEE COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1308, on or before
Aug. 19, 2011, and to file the orig-
Inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
c Petitioner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.
DATED on July 13, 2011.
B.HUGH BRADLEY,
As Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
as Deputy Clerk
7:21, 28c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252011CA000344
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$42,437.00 U.S. Currency
/
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: MICHEL MENDEZ, AND ALL
OTHERS CLAIMING AND
INTEREST IN OR TO THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for forfeiture of the follow-
ing described personal property
In Hardee County, Florida:
$42,437.00 U.S. CURRENCY
has been filed against you by
Petitioner, HARDEE COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1308, on or before
Aug. 19, 2011, and to file the orig.
final with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In the
petition.
DATED on July 13, 2011..
B.HUGH BRADLEY,
As Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
as Deputy Clerk
7:21. 28c


_


Backing up a motor vehicle is
inherently difficult and poten-
tially dangerous. That's why
Congress recently passed the
Kids Transportation Safety Act.
It requires that automakers
install backup cameras and
related video displays in all new
vehicles in the U.S. by Sep-
tember 2014. Such systems
help prevent pedestrian injuries
and deaths from accidents that
happen when a vehicle is
reversed. Young children are
especially vulnerable to such
accidents as they are often too
short to be seen. As it stands
today, the regulation requires
the rear camera display to turn
on in two seconds or less from
the time the vehicle is put in the
reverse gear, and the brightness
of the display must be at least
500 cd/m2. However, not all
rear camera displays are equal,
say the experts. When it comes
to choosing a rear camera dis-
play, go for:
Mirror integrated. The
mirror appears to be a safer
location for the display, likely
because it is in the driver's nat-
ural line of sight, can be viewed
while maintaining a heads-up
posture and is in a logical, intu-
itive and ergonomic location
that the driver is already accus-
tomed to viewing regularly-
especially when backing up.
Recent independent studies
reveal that displays in the
rearview mirror are more effec-
tive in helping drivers to detect
obstacles and avoid backover
accidents when compared with


drivers using in-dash displays.
Having the display in the mirror
also prevents sunlight from
washing out the display, which
may be a problem with dash-
mounted designs.
Faster. Mirror-integrated
rear camera displays tend to
turn on faster than those sharing
a display with the navigation or
infotainmefnt system, as those
systems can require significant
time to boot up. Gentex Corpor-
ation (NASDAQ: GNTX),.the
leading supplier of automatic-
dimming mirrors with integrat-
ed electronic features, provides
automakers with rear camera
displays that respond in two
seconds or less.
Brighter. Gentex display
mirrors are bright, too-300 to
500 percent brighter than in-
dash displays. The mirror dis-
play consists of a bright, high-
resolution display that works
with a video camera to provide
a view directly behind the vehi-
cle when backing up.
Cost effective. Mirror-inte-
grated displays also tend to be
less expensive than those
mounted in the-dash or center
console. The mirror's "plug and
play" design allows automakers
to avoid the significant expense
of tooling each vehicle's dash to
accommodate a display. In
addition, they allow consumers
to purchase the feature without
having to also pay for expen-
sive navigation or infotainment
systems.
For more information, visit
www.gentex.com.


2011
SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS FOR HARDEE COUNTY
COMMISSION AND APPOINTED BOARDS
Meetings to be held in County Commission Chambers.
Room 102. Courthouse Annex. 412 W. Orange Street.
Wauchula. Florida unless otherwise noted

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Regular meetings every other Thursday at 8:30 a.m. &
6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF August 04th at 8:30 a.m. & 18th at 6:00 p.m.
Planning Session August 12, 2011 at 8:30 a.m.
Visioning 08/02/11 at 6:00 p.m.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY "INDEPEN-
DENT BOARD"
MONTH OF August 23rd at 8:30 a.m. Grant
Presentations
PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD meets first Thursday
night of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF August 04th
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD
Meets on the second Monday night of each month at 6:00
p.m. in Building Department Conference Room, 401 West
Main Street
MONTH OF August 08th
COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD
Meets first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF August 01st
LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD
Meetings called as needed at Library in Annex II
MONTH OF August No meeting scheduled
HOUSING AUTHORITY
Meets second Friday of each month at 11:00 a.m. at 701
LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula
MONTH OF August To be announced.
HEALTH CARE TASK FORCE
Meets quarterly at Hardee County Health Department
Auditorium at Noon
MONTH OF August No meeting scheduled.
HARDEE COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE BOARD
Usually meets third Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m.
MONTH OF August 16th
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
County Commissioner's office at least forty-eight (48)
hours prior to the public meeting.
This notice is published in compliance with Florida
Statutes 286.0105.
Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and
be heard. If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the members, with respect to any matter consid-
ered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record
of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Terry Atchley, Chairman
7:28nc


MEETING NOTICE

THE HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
invites the Public to the


SUSTAINABLE HARDEE: VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE



QUALITY OF LIFE MEETING


TUESDAY August 02, 2011


6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM

412 W. Orange St., Rm. 102,

Courthouse Annex, 1st floor, Wauchula
Please come share your thoughts and ideas of what is needed in your community

All meetings are open to the public

For More Information

Call The County Planning Department at

863-767-1964

Emai kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net

"Ylt www.hardeecounty.net/visioning


THERE MAY BE ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS IN ATTENDANCE

WHO MAY OR MAY NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE DISCUSSION
1*-


Vegetables: Field preparations for the fall crop planting
remained active across central and southern Peninsula areas. Some
vegetable growers were busy disking and spraying weeds in order
to start laying plastic soon. Okra harvesting continued in Miami-
Dade County. Light supplies of avocados were marketed with
movement expected to increase next month.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture andccattle condi-
tions were mostly good. The pasture condition stabilized in the
northern counties and improved in the southwestern areas.
Supplemental hay was being fed. In the Panhandle and northern
areas, pasture ranged from very poor to excellent condition with
most in fair to good condition. Rain, the week of July 11, helped
pastures improve, but much pasture had not recovered from the
drought of the past several months. Livestock owners were feeding
hay where pastures had been overgrazed. The condition of the cat-
tle ranged from poor to excellent, with most fair to good. In the
central area, the pasture and cattle varied from very poor to excel-
lent, with most in fair to good condition. In the southwest area, pas-
ture and cattle conditions varied from poor to excellent, with most
in good condition. Grasshopper damage was noted in some pas-
tures. Stock ponds water levels were up and some low lying pas-
ture was flooded.

.Citrus: Temperatures were in the upper 60s and lower 70s at
night and the mid to lower 90s during the day for the majority of
the week. This week there was heavy, but scattered rainfall, with all
of the stations receiving some rainfall. Amounts received ranged
from 0.02 inch in Brooksville, to 3.39 inches in North Port.
Extreme drought conditions existed in parts of Martin, St Lucie,
and Palm Beach counties. Drought conditions were per the U.S.
Drought Monitor; last updated July 19, 2011. Grove activity
included resetting new trees, young tree care, applying herbicides,
hedging and topping, brush removal, and fertilizer application.




Protecting Children

From "Backover" Accidents






July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11B


Greetings from Fort Green!
We really need rain out this
way. While some of you have
been receiving it in Wauchula,
College Hill, etc., we might get


a sprinle but it never comes on
and rains!
I have mentioned how the
possums, coons and other
wildlife devour our grapes


rNutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH

Q: My son says that using a, compound in the body. Alcohol
energy drink as a mixer with'.. is also a solvent, enhancing the
alcohol reduces alcohol's penetration of other carcino-
effects. Is this true? gens (such as those from tobac-
A: No, the hot trend of mixing co) into body cells.
energy drinks with alcohol does
not reduce the many, risks from Q: What kinds of vegetables
alcohol, and actually poses are suitable for grilling?
increased concern for safety. A: Some of the classic veg-
Energy drinks are soft drinks, etable choices for grilling
with or without sugar, that gen- include asparagus, corn on the
erally contain caffeine equal to cob, onions, mushrooms, pep-
one to two cups of coffee per pers, zucchini and eggplant.
can. Stimulant effects can zoom Most of these can be grilled
beyond the usual caffeine boost, whole, as well as chopped and
however, due to interaction cooked in a grill basket or cut
with other ingredients in these into chunks and skewered to
drinks such as taurine, ginseng make vegetable kabobs. Brush
and guarana, and because peo- or toss them with a small
pie often consume multiple amount of olive oil. Cooked on
servings. The stimulant jolt a grill at medium-high heat,
from these drinks can mask the most are ready after about three
drowsiness-inducing effects of to five minutes per side. More
alcohol and make people feel dense vegetables like onions,
more alert, but it does not pre- sweet potatoes and eggplant
vent the impairment of judg- may need double that time or
ment that alcohol causes, more, depending on how large
Consuming energy drinks the pieces are. You can even
mixed with or shortly before grill vegetables in advance and
consuming alcohol leads people serve them at room temperature
to be less aware of how on their own or in salads.
impaired.they are (for example, Grilling brings out marvelous
they may be more likely to flavors in many vegetables, and
drive) and to continue drinking it does not lead to the develop-
longer. This raises not only ment of cancer-causing sub-
short-term concerns' including stances formed when meat and
alcohol poisoning, but also poultry are grilled.
long-term health concerns.
Excess alcohol raises the risk of
certain cancers, such as mouth, Competence like truth
colorectal and breast cancer. It ompetence l truth
beauty and contact lenses,
is metabolized to a compound is in the eye of the behold-
that.is a probable carcinogen, so the of the behold-
greater alcohol consumption e
means higher levels of this -Laurence J. Peter


before they get ready for us to
eat. Sherman came up with an
idea, and it has really worked.
In the past we even put up an
electric fence around the posts,
but they were smart enough to
jump over it. He put metal
flashing up about four feet on
every post and big vine. The
vines are loaded and no wild
animal is feasting!
Our sincere sympathy is
extended to the family of Doyle
Abbott. He made his final jour-
ney over a week ago. I did not
hear about it until everything
was over. I met Doyle before I
met the rest of the Fort Green
Abbotts. His parents were
Edgar and Belle, and Doyle was
a fine man. He is another one
who succumbed to cancer.
' Congratulations are extended
to Wes and Laren Chester. They
have a beautiful baby girl and
they named the little lady Em-
malynn Rae.
My older brother would have
been 76 on July 26. He made
his final journey when he was
only 45, so he never experi-
enced the aches of growing old!
You never get over missing
your siblings or parents.
Mason Waters turned 16 last
Sunday. He is a swell boy who
lives in our area. I guess he will
become the chauffer for his
mama and grandmama!
Donald Samuels told me his
birthday was July 31; I prompt-
ly told him we were having a
party for him, our ice cream
freeze-off! He didn't buy that
we were doing it for his day, but
seemed pleased by the thought.
His grandson, Clay, is still driv-
ing the racecar and doing real
good.
Dalton Richey is off at camp
this week. I hope he will have a
good time.
You can usually set your
clock by the time Mary and Earl
Bargeron arrive at Sunday
School. This past Sunday they
were not there. Earl came for
church and said Mary said she
hurt from the top of her head to
the bottom of her feet. Now
that is some pain, but back
problems can cause you to hurt


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
-773-6710


all over. Hopefully, she will get
better.
Dolene Fields said Destiny
had medical tests last week and
received a good report on every
one.
We were all very happy to see
Leo and Lila Blink back at
church. They both are amazing
and he is sorta like the Energiz-
er Bunny. He just keeps going!
Todd Silverman and his son,
Donnie, and grandson, Nick,
were down for a very short visit
last Friday. They were on the
way to Orlando, where his
granddaughter will be playing
ball. She is a pitcher and her
team did not make the playoffs,
but another team asked her if


she would play with them. She
has a 50 mph.fastball! She and
her family live in New Jersey.
Some of our neighbors, the
Chanceys and Waterses, were
on vacation last week. Even
though you do not see them
every day, the neighborhood
felt empty with them gone
Sherman and I babysat or
birdsat for Brianna Waters.
Something got into a nest,
killed some birds, and the moth-
er abandoned it. There were two
surviving babies..and Brianna
was having good luck feeding
them. We made the effort but
were not successful and I had to
have funeral services.
One hears that a tiny drip of


TO A BANK YOU CAN COUNT ON TODAY,


AND TOMORROW


Since 1926, we've been living, working and investing in communities like yours all over Florida. As neighbors, we've always relied on each other for a
helping hand -- and we'd like to say thank you by offering all the banking products and services you need, and the friendly service you'd expect from the
region's most-trusted community bank. In an ever-shifting world, Seacoast National Bank's support and earnest dedication to you and your neighbors is
one thing that you will always be able to count on.


Sray heO TO A MORE HUMAN WAY TO BANK


202 N. 6TH AvEi 863.773.4141 I SEACOASTNATIONAL.CO:M


Seacoast
NATIONAL BANK

'2..'"?' FDIC
;:? C*~a:.*; r<


7:28c


water wastes so much. Avie
Hogenauer found this to be a
very true statement. The water
line on the icemaker had a leak,
which caused flooding in her
kitchen and part of the living
room. They have had a mess
and large fans blowing con-
stantly to try and dry out the
floor. Most of the flooring was
ruined and has been removed.
She was out of town when the
problem occurred and did not
have a good homecoming!
Don't forget the ice cream
freeze-off after the sing this
Sunday night.
Remember to pray for one
another, our military and our
nation.


II.. :''d ':; .'-: "'
:. .-..1 nr~.r;n -~~ ~~, 81'ii3-, ;3E$L fibi~ii!i;
C 'I~;r ~ e


; ~ ~:P !saB) :


-i :;-'':


.hello





12B The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011
((- I


A strong MARKETING PLAN is vital in today's business world.
When considering an advertising strategy, don't ask yourself
-. "Should I advertise?" Ask yourself
"How can I advertise effectively?"
S. Marketing is an INVESTMENT in the growth of your
Al business. Your ability to plan and implement an effective
.i marketing plan will directly influence the future
", it SUCCESS of your business.
Here are some points to consider:
Determine your trade area
A-T G AARDEE COUNTY
COMMERCE PARK Identify your target market
Select appropriate advertising media
Determine an advertising budget
(that's where the Chamber can help)
Develop an effective, CREATIVE advertisement
o aMeasure your results
The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce wants to partner
with your business to help fund your MARKETING PLAN through the
Marketing Grant Program. Pick up your application packet today!
-----* -*- *-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-
MARKETING GRANT PROGRAM GUIDELINES
' Purpose and Objective:
The purpose of this grant is to encourage sustainability and economic growth to the Hardee County business community
by providing reimbursable matching grants to Chamber members for general marking and website design and/or
enhancement.
Program Description:
General Marketing
The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce will award approved Chamber members a reimbursable grant for
50% of an advertisement of their choice up to $250.
Advertisements include but are not limited to newspapers, radio, magazines, and websites.
Website Design and/or Enhancement:
The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce will award approved.Chamber members a reimbursable grant for
50% of the costs for website design and/or enhancement up to $500.
Design is defined as a new website not previously constructed.o
Enhancement is defined as any improvement of an existing website.

Program Rules:
Grants will be awarded through a quarterly grant application cycle.
Chamber members can only be awarded twice a calendar year.
Open grant cycles will be advertised one month in advance.
Each cycle, only one grant application per category can be submitted by an applicant.

Program Qualifications:
All applicants must be current members of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce.
The applicant must submit a completed grant application, quotes for said application, and plan of action if grant is
awarded to a subcommittee of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors.
All applications will be reviewed by the subcommittee of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce Board of
Directors within ten business days at the end of the cycle.
The committee will not review applications that are not complete.
If approved, the applicant will be notified immediately.
After paid invoices are submitted, funds will be dispersed.





107 East Main Street, P.O. Box 683 Wauchula, Florida 33873
Phone (863) 773-6967 Fax (863) 773-4915 728
7:28c


MARKETING



GRANT PROGRAM

I Now ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS








erald-Advocate
(wSPS YM7r0


sday, July 28, 2011
---- I_________


Radios Were A Luxury


By ASHLEY BAKER
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Claudia Conley was born in
Frostproof on Sept. 4, 1932.
Mrs. Claudia had four brothers and
five sisters. She is the third oldest child
in her family. Mrs. Claudia was raised
in Frostproof and moved to Wauchula in
1949.
She was 18 years old when she met
and married her husband.
When Mrs. Claudia was growing up,
she had many chores. She had to wake
up at 6 o'clock every morning before
school and help her parents with the
farm. After she did her chores, she
would then get ready for school. She
had to ride the school bus to school.
After school,.her chores were to clean
the house, do the laundry, and she did
yard work, too.
For fun, Mrs. Claudia played with
her brothers, sisters
and neighbors. They -,ac
would take turns .
jump-roping and rid- '9 ,
ing the bicycle. On the
weekend, it was fun for her to walk to
the movies. She liked to go and watch
Western movies. The movie was only
five cents and she had 20 cents to spend
on food.
When Mrs. Claudia was growing up,
she looked up to Roy Rogers and Dale
Evens. The "cool" thing to wear, Mrs.
Claudia said, was skirts, dungarees and
oxfords.
Her parents both had jobs. Her dad
worked in orange groves and her mom
worked in a restaurant as well as a
packing house. Mrs. Claudia had to
drop out of school in the seventh grade
to stay at home and take care of her lit-
tle brothers and sisters while her mom
and dad worked.
Mrs. Claudia's first paying job was


I


/ 2
. 'W
t I.'. .

Member E D, J'r' CL.C '-TIl
Member Bed.ndBreakfasi con,


PAGE ONE


Thfe Stanford Inn
555 E. Stanford Street Bartow
Restaurant Rated .4 Star by Lakeland Ledger
Tuesday-Sunday 11 AM-3PM tea/lunch
Sunday Brunch 11AM-2PM
Friday & Saturday 5PM-9PM dinner
For Reservations 863-533-2393


WB U UalorinW o


COURTESY PHOTO
Claudia Conley loved Westerns as a kid.
picking tomatoes and okra. Also,
S on that job, she helped gather
i ryt- crops and cut grass.
a "Time has changed a lot since
I was a teenager," says Mrs.
Claudia. There was no television in her
house, nor was there a washing.
machine. They would have to wash
their clothes in a washtub. When she
first saw a color TV, she said it was just
like going to the movies but you could
actually stay at your house!
Mrs. Claudia said that growing up, a
luxury would have been to have your
own car and/or radio and they didn't
have a radio.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders pt
Hardee Senior High School. Each :
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students andfor the enjoyment of our
readers.


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New or Refianced Loans


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by $50 ormore
or give You $5012
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www.midflorida.com


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MORTGAGES -S OND E- ` OW t?8ll(0r~


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2C The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011




-Schedule of Weekly Services


'Printed as a Public Service
by'.
d-Advocate "
Wu chulb, Florida

line: Thursday 5 p.m.
'----- -

BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening'....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .....................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ...............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship.................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
S 725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main& W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Iwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ....... ....................:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1045 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade)....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Youth'Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
.Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.,
Miercoles Estudior Juvehil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ...........I 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ................... :00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.mL

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ....... ....7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.......7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 7815887
Sunday Worship .................. :00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast..................I 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
RO. Box 780


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service..............7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... I1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services.
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club............................... 7:00 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCII
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ............. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCII
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ............... 10:00a.m.
Morning Worship ................I 1:00a.m.
Evening Worll ...................6:00 p.m..
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday PrayerTime.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Asostolic Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service....:............. 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service .....1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.... ....... 7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 lanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee'.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
'Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP-
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday EvenitSg Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..............7':00 p.m.
youth Cell Group .............,7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group .......... :00 p.m.
Call for Iawations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m...
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 5. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ...........................7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed.jNight Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
'Men'tv Li'adership & Training Class -
2nd'Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
.- CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 11:00 a.m .


(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CIIURCII OF WAUCIIULA HILLS
(SPANISIH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... I:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service....7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.7..............7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ....................... 10:00 a.n.
Servicio ................... ............11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio........ .............7:30 p.m .
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m .
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
M morning Service .................. 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITII PRESBYTERIAN
CIIURCII
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
" Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. I:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ...............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship. ....... 6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..... '.7:00 p.m.

FAITII TEMPLE CIIURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ............... 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCII
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SuNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry.................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
Worship .................... ......... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CIIRISTIAN CHURCII
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SuNDAY:
Generations Cafi Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m.
W orship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-Sthgrade .................. 6:15 p.m.
(lasses for children ages
PreK- 12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CIIURCIH OF
TIIE NAZARENE
511 W.Palmetto St.
Sunday School ................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............... 1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...... ....... 7:00 p.m.i
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday Schobl ..'................ 9:30 a.m.
M morning Service..................... 1:00 a.m.
Evening.Worship ............i:....6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/"
Bible Study ....................:..6:00 p.m.
Wed .Prayer/Bible Suly :.:...7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODISTICHURCH
207. N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
STuesday Bible-Study......... 10:00 a.m
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 plm.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School .....................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship............. 10:00 a.m..
Wed. Family Night .............7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship...: 11:00 a.m:-
Wednesday Worship ..........:...7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE'
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ... ..... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...... ..6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Ser\ice..... ..........7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CI:URCII
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts.................... 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .. ...... .......9.30 a m.


W orship................................ 10'30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ............ .6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult (C
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min ............7:00 p.m.

IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA IIISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes ................................ 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ..................... ...........7:30 p.m .
Dom ingo ........................ ... 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to fannilia y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos .......:.................... 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles...............................7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEIOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEIIOVAII'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 p.m.


LAKE I)AIE BAPTIST CHURCII
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.nm.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Canmbriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service...............7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CIURCII
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.n.
Evening Worship Service ...... 6:30 p.mn.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m.


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZiON A.ME!E CHIIIURCi
10 Martin Luther)ingg Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship
(lst & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship :'.............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...........;6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Sten~trom Road 773-2858
I' & 3" Sun.
Communion .................. .10:00 a.m.
2"' & Sun:
Divine Worship. .............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .. .....................11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ................. 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321. S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1...1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service......:........7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CIIURC('I
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ...... ................ ):00 a.m.


H ol ) D ays ............ ... ...... ... ..

St. MICILAEI'S
CATHOLIC CIHURCII
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday) Mass (English) .... 500 p.m
(Spanish .... 7.30 p.Im
Sunday (Spanish) 7i. ........ 7: a.mi
(English) ....................X:30 am
(Spanish) .................. 11:00 am .
(Creole) .. .... .... 1:00 p nin.
Daily Mass in English ... .. 30 a.m


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHIIURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ................ :30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ :00 am.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 pmi.

SOUTIISIDE BAPTIST CHURCH(
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................9.:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a..
Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................. 7:00 p.m

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ................ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .......... .... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Sidy.
& Child Train .................... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship.............7:30 p.m.

WAUCIIULA HILLS IIARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 A.\derson
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
C hurch..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................6:00 p mn.
Evening Service ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................ 7:30 p.m.

WNAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISII CIURCI OF GO1)
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.n).
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCIIULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ......... ...... 10:00 a.in.
Morning Worship ............ 1:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.mn.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CIIURCII
Gardner".: ; .
Sunday School' .. .M.:: 0:00.a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Servicee...............7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
IIwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ........................:....... 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CIURCI
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .... .......... I11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCII INC.
Corner of 6th and Iickory
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...........7....7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ......................7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................I :00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ...................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST C'IURCHI
South IIwy. 17- 494-5456
Sunday School ............ ...... 1):)00 ami
M morning \Voriship ................ 11:00 a.m
VWednesday Prayer ............. ..7:10 p.m.

IJFE CIAL.NGIN(; V'ORSI II1 (NtVER
3426.Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship .............. .:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATIIA BAPTIST CIlRC('II
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
W worship ................................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening...... .......................... 1:00 p.m .
\Ved. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP ('ENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship .......... .... 10:00 a.m.
Children c 's Church................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 pin.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ................ 10:00 a.m.
Evcning Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................ 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship .................. 7:30 p.m.

PRIMER MISSION
BAUTISTA IIISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escucla )ominiical ..............10:00 a.n.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
...................................... .. 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Micrcoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .. .................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ...................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ..................... 1:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPI'IST CIIURCI1
3676 U.S. HIwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School. ................ :30 a.m.
Morning Worship .................. I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
I)omingo Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Con fesiones........................... 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina............................ 11:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
-; 735-8025
Escuela dminnica . .. .......10:00 a.rh.
Scrvicio ................................ 1 1:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club ....................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Micrecolcs Merienda ............6:00( p.m.
Scrvicio.................................. :00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


Fanny Crosby lost her sight
when she was just a child. But she
didn't allow her misfortune to bring
her misery.
She turned her trial into triumph,
for out of her sightlessness came
some of our sweetest songs. One
day she wrote,
Oh, what a happy soul am I!
Although I cannot see,
I am resolved that in this world
Contented I will be;
How many blessings I enjoy
That other people don't;
To weep and sigh because I'm
blind
I cannot, and I won't.
Contentment comes when we
remember that what God chooses
is far better than what we choose.

.Visit us at: www. TheSower com


O n vacation there is so much to see and
do that it is easy to forget about worship. What
an opportunity to visit a new house of God, whether.
it is a monumental cathedral or a small historic
sanctuary. Stop in for a while and spend some time
with Him. Let serenity spread through your spirit.
Sing praises to the Lord, for He is with you wherever
you are...He is the Creator of the splendor that we
enjoy on vacation and each day. May God bless you
with His protection as you travel on your way.





Scapthues Selected by The American Bible Soc ety
@2011. Kester-Williams Newspaper Servicesr PO Box 8187 Chariotesvlle. VA22906 www kwnews com


SPeace sioer r6ters

Wholesale Nursery


1







July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


mC

During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
July 24, thefts on Lincoln Street and on SR 66 were reported.
July 23, James R. Baird, 31, of 72 E. North Ave., Cortland, Ill..
was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley on an out-of-county warrant.
July 22, Florence Randall, 26, of 711-59th Ave. E., Bradenton,.
was arrested by Dep. Donna McClesky on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
July 22, a theft on East Main Street was reported.
July 21, Mark Eugene Whitmer, 56, of 1549 SE Maple Dr.,
Arcadia, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with DUI.
July 21, Jose Carrillo Rosales, 39, of 905 N. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was ted by Sgt. Lyle Hart on three counts of failure to
appear in court. He was initially arrested by Wauchula Ofc.
Jonathan Corwin on a traffic charge.-
July 21, Christopher William Wolfe, 26, of 3258 James
Cowart Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and
charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.


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Vacation Bible School

St. Michael's Church
408 Heard Bridge Rd., Wauchula


Harvest Gods Gifts


August 8=12, 2011

9:00=12:00 noon

Ay^ and

6 30=8,30 p.m,


K6, Day Care, Crafts

Volunteer

Call Sf: Kitty


77A:4~I~


July 21, criminal mischief on Colson Road. and thefts on CR
663, Ken McLeod Road and on Makowski Road were reported.
July 20, Andy Byers. 20, of 2523 Garza Road, Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Det. David Drake and charged with robbery/car-
jacking with a firearm or weapon, robbery with a firearm and
aggravated battery.
July 20, Iston Selma' Williams, 60, of 4769 SR 66, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley on an out-of-county
warrant.
July 20, a theft on Roy Moore Road was reported.
July 19, residential burglaries on Seminole Run and on Knoll-
wood Circle, and thefts on Dansby Road, SR 62, Old Bradenton
Road. West Main Street and Creek Road were reported.
July 18, residential burglaries on Terrier Drive, Seventh Street
East and another address on Seminole Run, and thefts on Florida
Avenue and on U.S. 17 North were reported.
WAUCHULA
July 23, Teresa Faye Fugate, 40, of 106 Sunny Brook Court,
Warner Robbins, Ga., was arrested by Det. Matthew Whatley on an
out-of-state fugitive warrant.
July 23, Juan Moreno, 18, of 3418 Noll Point Dr., Garland,
Texas, was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte and charged with pos-
session of marijuana.
July 23, Sabas Candelario, 33, of 602 N. Seventh Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with battery..
July 23, Manuel Velasquez Garza, 55, of 3306 Schoolhouse
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and
charged with DUI and driving with knowledge of a suspended
license.
July 23, a residential burglary on Bell Street and criminal mis-
chief on South Fifth Ave. (U.S. 17 North) were reported.
July 22, Dwight Thomas McClintock, 24, of 722 S. Seventh
Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with
possession of drugs without a prescription.
July 20, Kenneth Lee Coughlin, 35, of 130 E. Townsend St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with
possession of marijuana and resisting an officer without violence.
At the jail, Det. Sgt. John Shivers detained Coughlin on a charge of
battery.
July 20, Michael Damien Brewer, 21, of 801 SR 66, Zolfo
Springs, and Shawn Curtis Rhymes, 25, of 1040 Makowski Road,
Wauchula, were arrested by Cpl. Kevin Brock and each charged
with larceny petit theft and burglary of a dwelling, structure or
conveyance, Brewer was also charged with criminal mischief-
damage to property,.
July 20, a fight on Heard Bridge Road and a theft on West
Main Street were reported.
July 19, Donald Milton Rimes, 31, of 1025 Whooping Crane
Lane, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer and charged with pos-
session of a weapon/ammo by a convicted felon and aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon: At the jail, Det. Manuel Martinez
detained Rimes on a charge of violation of probation.
July 19, Jevon Lee Burks, 30, of 2990 Lazy Arce Red Bird
Dr., Zolofo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas on a
charge of contempt of court violation of an injunction for pro-
tection.
July 19, criminal mischief on Court Street was reported.
July 18, Stanley Dean Jackson, 23, of 310 Martin Luther King
Jr. Blvd, Wauchula, Herman Thompson, 34 ,of 2711 Providence
Road, Lakeland, and Eliezer Greg Garza, 40, of 216 Carlton St.,
Wauchula,,were arrested by Sgt. Chris Le Conte and each charged
with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug'para-
phernalia,.fThqrppson as also charged with two counts of resisting
an officer without violence. Garza was also charged with resisting
an officer without violence and smuggling contraband into a deten-
tion facility.
July 18, Casey Nicole Pelham, 21, of 915 Denise Ave.,
Sebring, was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson on a charge of viola-
tion of probation.
July 18, Anthony Earl Richardson, 28, of 126 E. Townsend
St., Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Kevin Brock on an out-of-
county warrant.
BOWLING GREEN
July 18, Victor Bryon Allin Jackson, 23, of 203 Louisiana St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged
with burglary with assault or battery and larceny.
July 18; Joel Calvillo, 18, of 5121 Dixiana Dr., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Sean Guthas and charged with battery.
July 18, a residential burglary on Chester Avenue was report-


American Red Cross

Seeks Blood Donors


When the summer season
kicks into high gear. the nation's
blood supply is often at its low-
est. Blood shortages often occur
during the summer months.
when fewer donors are avail-
able to give due to vacation
schedules 'and other summer
activities.
"The Red Cross closely mon-
itors national and local invento-
ry levels to ensure we can pro-
vide blood where it's needed
when it's need_ed." said Dr.
Richard Benjamin. chief med-
ical officer. American Red
Cross. "Blood is a perishable
re_soiarce and must be re_plen-
ished through regular dona-
tion."
The Red Cross is asking cur-
rent and potential blood donors.
blood drive sponsors and com-
munity leaders to help recruit
blood donors, especially those
who are type O negative. Type
O negative blood can be in par-
ticularly high demand because
it can be transfused to patients
with any blood type. especially
in emergency situations. Type
O negative blood donors can,
make the difference between an
adequate blood supply and a
lingering summer shortage.
NASCAR driver Greg Biffle -
joined the effort by piomotinf
blood donation on his No. 16
Red Cross Ford this summer for
the race held on June 19. "As a
blood donor, myself." said


Biffle. "I encourage everyone
who is eligible to give blood to
call 1-800-RED-CROSS or
visit redcrossblood.org to find a
convenient blood donation
location and to schedule a life-
saving blood donation appoint-
ment."
Every two seconds, someone
in the United States needs
blood. The Red Cross must col-
lect 22.000 units of blood each
weekday and another 15.000
units each weekend to meet the
needs of hospital patients across
the country. Accident victims.
as well as patients with cancer.
sickle cell disease, blood disor-
ders and other illnesses, receive
lifesaving transfusions every
day. There is no substitute for
blood and volunteer donors are
the only source.
Individuals who are 17 years
of age (16 with parental permis-
sion in some states), meet
weight and height requirements
(110 pounds or more. depend-
ing on their height) and are in
generally good health may be
eligible to give blood. Please
bring your Red Cross blood
donor card or other form of pos-
itive ID when you come to
donate.
Eligible blood donors are
asked to please call (800) RED
CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or
visit www.red crossblood.org to
find a blood drive and to make
an appointment.


Pet Oj f TaheWee


4 4


Sprite is a darling little cur puppy who likes her play
toys. She came into the shelter with her sister, who
has already been adopted, leaving poor Sprite lonely.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.

The man who speaks his positive convictions is worth a
regiment of men who are always proclaiming their
doubts and suspicions.


HEARTLAND PHARMACY



DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our into our service
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.













411


STOP


.* I." '-


81


Ba~"g









4C The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011


'Today's


4


-H'ers


000


Tomorrow's


"Today's 4-H'ers ... Tomor-
row's Leaders" was the theme
for the 2011 4-H Awards &
Recognition Ceremony at the
Agri-Civic Center in Wauchula
on May 26.
Over 300 attendees enjoyed a
traditional menu of hamburgers
and hot dogs with all the trim-
mings, baked beans, watermelon
and cantaloupe, and homemade
desserts.


Victoria Floyd led the opening
ceremony and recognized special
guests. Mackenzie Burch and
Kyleigh Miller, members of
Green Acres 4-H Club, led the
Pledge of Allegiance to the
American flag and the 4-H
Pledge. The 4-H club leaders
were recognized with gifts of ap-
preciation for their hard work
and dedication as volunteers over
the past year.


2011 Club Spirit Awards


Country Clovers:
Alyssa Beers
Hallie Atchley
Daniel Sockalosky
*Kipp Cooper
Blake Tinsley
Tyler Lambert
Madison McCoy

Cracker Trail:
Zander Yeomans
Heath Hendry
Sarah Gibson
Hayden Lindsey

Green Acres:
Hannah Rast
Bobby Rast
Mackenzie Burch
Kyleigh Miller


Beef & Bacon:
Makenna Fite
Destiny McCauley

Heart of Hardee:
Clay Hancock
Emery Smith

Ona Community:
Seth McGee
Kaylie Carver

River Rats:
Allison Farr
Kaylee Barberee

Fort Green:
Destiny Fields
Norma Alejandro


2011 Record Book Awards


RABBIT
Blue
Hallie Atchley
Zackary Durastanti
Abigail Erekson
Naomi Erekson
Ruthie Erekson

POULTRY
Blue
Shelby Gibson
Cade Roberts

Red
Dalton Bryant
Kaleb Bryant
Aaron Bunch
Avery Bunch

White
Codi Ham
Garrett Ham
Ryan Ham

BEEF BREEDING
Blue
Griffin Clark
Allison Farr
Claudia Klein
Michaela Klein
Wyatt Maddox
Danielle Smith

Red
Laina Durrance
Megan Grills
Destiny McCauley
Luke Palmer
Larrett Smith

White
Kaylee Barberee
Dawson Cantu
Sid Crews

DAIRY
Red
Jessica Hunt

White
Andy Hunt

STEER
Blue
Colton Albritton
Aaron Bunch
Avery Bunch
Ohiffin Clark
Morgan Crtws
Steven Crews
Ladna Duttance
Makenna Filei
Hayden Lindtey
Quintin Litndsev
11i8 Palmte-
tad
Abby nak
kole RoIetIrtbse


^yk A*mA-An

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Cleston Sanders
Darby Sanders
Joshua Smith
Dana Terrell
Blake Tinsley
Jansen Walker
Kyle Ward,
Brandi Westberry
Tyler White

Red
Isabella Adams
Gracie Albritton
Esteban Anton
Holly Brown
Kipp Cooper
Dana Douglas
April Garland
Rachel Garland
Hunter Gibson
Paul Gough
Codi Ham
Garrett Ham
Ryan Ham
Wyatt Keller
,Madison McCoy
boone Paris
Dalton Rabon
Hannah Revell
Blake Richardson
Meagan Shivers
Jacob Smith
Daniel Sockalosky
Ty Trammell
Dalton Tubbs
Amber Westberry

White
Austin Jones
theyenne Pohl

SEWING
Blue
Norma Alejandro-Davis

ARCHERY
Blue
Dalton Richey

ANIMAL SCIENCE
Red
Jack Driskell

FOOD PREPARATION
Blue
Morgan Lanier

Red
Hlayden Lindsey
White
Griffin Clark
Quintin Lindsey
Ellie Pilmner

CRAFTS

Itts Walter









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Peace River Electric Cooper-
ative received the Friend of 4-H
Award, and Sharon and Denton
Cash received the Meritorious
Service Award for their generous
support of the Hardee County 4-
H program over the past year.
Carolyn Wyatt, extension 4-H
agent, and Mary Mitchell, exten-
sion program assistant, presented
the remainder of the evening's
awards.
4-H members Courtney Buck-
ley, Brittany Hines, Andrew
Hunt, Dillon Rabon, Dylan
Roberts, Kalan Royal, Jarrett
Stevenson and Kyle Ward, grad-
uates in the Class of 2011, were
each recognized with an en-
graved wooden plaque with their
name and years of membership
in 4-H. Estebon Anton, Victoria
Floyd, Michael Forrester and
Desarea Newcomb each received
a certificate for their 2011 high
school graduation.
The four graduates receiving
4-H Foundation scholarships
were Courtney Buckley, Brittany
Hines, Kalan Royal and Kyle
Ward.
Perfect attendance trophies
were awarded to all members
who attended all of their club's
monthly business meetings dur-
ing the year. One hundred eleven
4-H'ers had perfect attendance
this year! See the list of perfect
attendees by club which accom-
panies this article.
Engraved ceramic mugs were
.awarded to those displaying the
most club spirit. Club spirit
award winners are also listed
separately on this page.
Record books are an impor-
tant part of the 4-H program.
Over 100 4-H'ers turned in
record books for projects com-
pleted during the year. Many re-
ceived certificates and pins for
these completed record books. A
list of everyone who submitted a
record book for judging is also
included with this story.
Twenty 4-H'ers participated
in county and district competi-
tive events, each receiving rib-
bons and certificates for their
Participation in these two events.


Country Clovers:
Isabella Adams
Lacey Adams
Emily Albritton
Esteban Anton
Hallie Atchley
Hannah Atchley
Hunter Atchley
Emily Bennett
Will Bennett
Dylan Bozeman
Bradley Brewer
Dalton Bryant
J-T Bryant.
KaCey Bryant
Daniel Cantu
Kipp Cooper
Branden Douglas
Dana Douglas
April Garland
Joel Garland
Rachel Garland
Tamara Griffis
Codi Ham
tarrett Ham
Ryan Ham
JC. Kulig
Rayann Kulig
Oylan Lambert
tler Lambert
;hris Lee
MadiS,1n M C*,y
Amaonad McNabb
TAtra MeNabb

ckaitobRekh



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TIre sllt (-N :








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Destiny McCauley will compete
at state-level competitive events
at 4-H Congress in July in
Gainesville at the University of
Florida campus.
The Making the Best Better
Award is presented to 4-H'ers
who have been active at club and
county levels and worked hard at
making the best better for 4-H.
The junior winners were Kaylee
Barberee.Abigail Erekson, Han-
nah Rast and Elizabeth Weeks.
The intermediate winners were
Abby Clark, Morgan Crews.
Larrett Smith and Danielle
Weeks. The senior winners were
Steven Crews. Ruth Erekson and
Korin Roehm.
The Citizenship Award honors
4-H'ers who work for the better-
ment of not just their own lives,
but also the community in which
they live. The junior winner of
this award was Jansen Walker.
The intermediate winner was
Hunter Gibson, and the senior
winner was Taylor Pohl.
The Achievement Award is
given to members who have
made great strides and achieve-
ments in 4-H over the past year.
The two junior winners of this
award were Zack Durastanti and
Abigail Erekson. The intermedi-
ate winner was Darin Terry, and
the two senior winners were
Naomi Erekson and Destiny Mc-


Kaitlyn Shaw
Kole Robertson
Jensen Walker
Jamie Walker

Fort Green:
Destiny Fields
Norma Alejandro
Makayla Chancey
Kaylee Hogenauer
Dalton Richey
Desarea Newcomb

Green Acres:
Kelly Beall
Aryanna Burch
Mackenzie Burch
Kyleigh Miller
Abigail Erekson
Anna Erekson
Naomf Erekson
Rebekah Erekson
Ruth Erekson
Beef & Bacon:
Steven CrceO s
Makenna Fite
Megan Grills
Morgan Crews

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Cauley.
The Leadership Award honors
4-H'ers who have exhibited out-
standing leadership abilities at
club and county level and be-
yond. The junior winner was
Zack Durastanti. The intermedi-
ate winner was Anna Erekson,
and the senior winner was Victo-
ria Floyd.
The final honor was the
Award of the Green Clover,
which is given to the club whose
members have been the most ac-
tive for the past year. This year
the winner of the Award of the
Green Clover was the Green
Acres 4-H Club. The leaders of
this club are Denise Erekson and
Kristen Melendy.
Chosen for their club's com-
munity involvement throughout
the year, their club's name will
be added to the plaque that hangs
in the 4-H office.
The evening ended with the
traditional candle-lighting cere-
mony by county council mem-
bers Steven Crews. Ruth
Erekson, Victoria Floyd, Destiny
McCauley and Brian Terry. Bri-
anna Waters,' Fort Green 4-H
Club, was guest soloist for the
ceremony. Dr. DeWayne Wyatt
was photographer for the
evening's ceremony, assisted by
Linda Richards, 4-H Advisory
Committee member.


.















II
i ... -_



Green Acres 4-H Club
leader Denise Erekson ac-
cepted the 2011 Award of
the Green Clover on behalf
of the club.


Leadership awards were presented to Anna Erekson, Victoria Floyd and Zack Durastanti.


Victoria Floyd led the opening ceremony and greeted&
guests. Kyeigh Miller (on left) led the 4-H Pledge.


Le


2011 Perfect Attendance


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July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C
Event


I .. ,
Achievement Award winners included (from left) Zack Durastanti, Abigail Erekson, Des-
tiny McCauley, Darin Terry and Naomi Erekson.


The Friend of 4-H Award was given to Peace River Electric Cooperative for its generous
support of the Hardee County 4-H youth program. Accepting the award are Jeff Cor-
nelius, Nell McCauley, Mike Rouse, Lynelle Hines, Heather Lee and Mikey Driskell; in
center is Robert Roberts, who presented the award.


The Meritorious Service Award was presented to Denton
and Sharon Cash in recognition of their dedication to the
Hardee County 4-H program.


'44
44"
A!


Country Clovers 4-H Club leaders Joy and Robert Roberts
accept the Scrapbook Award.


Citizenship awards were presented to (from left) Jansen
Walker, Hunter Gibson and Taylor Pohl.


Record book winners received certificates and pins for their hard work and dedication
to keeping an organized, well-written and complete record book. See list with this arti-
cle.


Club Spirit Award winners received engraved ceramic
emony. See list with this article.


Class of 2011 graduating seniors were (front row, from left) Aubry Stark accepting plaque
for sister Courtney Buckley, Brittany Hines and Desarea Newcomb; (back row) Victoria
Floyd, Michael Forrester, Dylan Roberts, Kalan Royal and Jarrett Stevenson.


Leaders who received recognition and gifts of appreciation for their hard work
and dedication to the 4-H program were (front row, from left): Scott Farr, Leighton Bryant,
Joy Roberts, Charlotte Hogenauer, Patricia Richey, Debbie McNabb, Kay Crews and
Stacy Crews; (back row) Randy Crews, Todd Maddox, Robert Roberts, Nell McCauley,
Susan Brewer, Tracy Pate, Monica Stevenson, Chrystal Ham and Denise Erekson.


iCounty and district events participants were (front row, from left) Kyleigh Miller, Macken-
zie Burch, Kaylee Barberee, Elizabeth Weeks, Aryanna Burch, Rebekah Erekson, Sarah
Wright, Zack Durastanti and Hugh Pate; (back row) Abigail Erekson, Larrett Smith, Darin
Terry, Destiny McCauley, Sarah Thomas, Wyatt Kofke and Ruth Erekson.
A


0


Making the Best Better Award winners were (front row, from left) Abby Clark, Elizabeth
Weeks, Abigail Erekson and Kaylee Barberee; (back row) Ruth Erekson, Korin Roehm,
S Steven Crews and Morgan Crews.



.e Best Better!


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6C The Herald-Advocate, July 28, 2011


History: The Oxcart Trail, Part 2


Edited by Spessard Stone of Wauchula.
The following narrative, extracted from Chapter 4
of "At The End of the Oxcart Trail: The Robert Roberts
Family Saga," 2001, by Maria Stone and used with the
permission of Jane Wood, daughter of Mildred Roberts
Sherrod, continues the saga of the move of the family of
Robert Roberts Jr. from New Zion, west of Ona, to
Immokalee in December 1914.

Second Night
Blye continued, "By nightfall, the second night, we
stopped north of the Caloosahatchee River near Fort
Denaud.
"We kids sat right there in camp very quietly until
Papa came back from the store with supplies. There was
no yelling 'Papa, let us go, too' as one might hear from
the kids today."
Nina. added, "The Roans ran that store and were
beautiful, friendly people. I remember that. They came
out to see us."
Blye went on, "The Roans were so amazed to see
Mama and Papa with all these little children going to
what was almost considered a wilderness. There were
only about four or five families in the whole wide area
back then."

Abraham-
"The story of Abraham in the Bible reminds me of
my family. Abraham was called by God, and I just felt
that Papa was called to come out here by God."
"I feel the same way," said Nina.

Church History
Nina said, "Soon after we arrived here, our parents
organized the First Baptist Church in Immokalee. I have
a Bible that was given to me at that church in 1916 for
perfect attendance. I was already teaching 'Sun-beams.'
"There was an Episcopal church here when we
came, but it wasn't too active. They tried to work with
the Indians. Blye and I went once, and I thought it was
such a nice church.
"The First Baptist Church building that we built was
built in 1928. The First Baptist Church of Fort Myers
gave some land where the cemetery is now, and we built
a church on that land. Later the church building was
moved toward the area where Immokalee was develop-
ing. That building has been moved four times.
"Before we had a building, we met in the school.
The one that was built in 1951 is occupied now by the
Redland Christian Migrant Association. They have
nurseries in all the agricultural areas of Florida.
"That's our church's little history."

RivterCros ig t
Nina continued speaking, "Let's get back to our
story. The next morning after we camped, we packed up
the camp gear and loaded it. The whole caravan started
to the river crossing. The cattle were slow to move, so
it took us a while.
"When Papa got to the crossing, he had some prob-
lems. We were at the back so we kids didn't know all
about it, or we would have been scared to death. Our
papa was a brave man to do what he did that day."
Bobby came into the conversation, saying, "I


remember Daddy telling me in later years about that
trouble. Daddy said some men were there at the cross-
ing to stop him from driving his cattle and family across
the Olga Bridge that was a north crossing of the Caloos-
ahatchee River.
"When the men told Daddy not to cross the river,
Daddy just walked back and got his double-barreled
shotgun out of the spring wagon and laid it across his
saddle and headed across. They knew Daddy meant
business. After a while, those men stood by and let
Daddy and his cattle and familycross.
"Daddy told me this was wild country back then, and
there could be dangers all around besides outlaws. Of
course that was long before I was born. I only know
what Daddy and the others told me about it."
Dius said, "A man in those days had to be able to
handle any situation, and.our father was that man."
Nina said, "I hate to think about what it might have
been like for us all if there had been a shootout that day
at the river crossing. I know the Lord was with us. I'm
glad we were allowed to come to this new land. That
was Papa's dream."
Nina went on, "After we got everybody across the
bridge and well on the other side of the river, we head-
ed off across scrub oak and plain areas. I remember that
it was real wild country and how scared I was on that
move."
Blye said, "Mama would have followed Papa to the
end of.the earth. She knew he'd take care of her. I imag-
ine Papa and Mama had some fear or concern in their
hearts moving to a wild new place. Nevertheless, they
had the needed courage and faith in God. They were
young and strong, too."

Immokalee
Nina continued, "That third day we traveled all day
until we got to Burnt Pens, which is right outside of
Immokalee. Cattle people long before us used some
pens that were there. One night they burned, so that
place was always known as Burnt Pens after that.
"On the trip, we always had to stop and eat supper
before dark because there were no lights anywhere in
the world then. We stopped at Burnt Pens to eat supper
while it was still light out."
Blye said, "After supper, we drove on into Immo-
kalee. It was dark when we arrived, and I can remember
walking around outside looking at that house just like I
had done at our other house before we left."
Nina said, "When we arrived, I got more scared than
ever. As a child of 8 with no idea where we were or
what it would be like and darkness all around, I was so
scared. There was nothing but big oak scrub all around
in the darkness. We had never lived that close to the
woods. i dir
"It was more like open farm where we came from.
I remember being so afraid when I had to go to the bath-
room. After living here a while, we played hide and
seek in that scrub oak and weren't a bit afraid of it.
"When we arrived that night, it was late and dark
and we camped again in our new home. The men took
care of the animals.

Morning
"The next morning early, we were all up and busy

Love takes off masks that we fear we cannot live without
and know we cannot live within.


getting settled. We kids began to explore a little movie in
the daylight. The scrub oaks that had been so frighten-
ing in the dark didn't look so bad in the daylight.
"The men were busy unloading the oxcart and wag-
ons and seeing to the cattle. Mama was busy showing
the men where to place everything and organizing the
kitchen because she had a lot of people to prepare food
for."
Louise spoke next, "I was 3 years old, but I remem-
ber the trip. I remember Mama telling me about the trip
many times, too. Mama and Papa had an established
home in Ona. Seven of us were-born there.
"This was a long trip in those days for such young
children. As Nina and Blye said, Dius was 12 and had
big responsibilities. Ola was 10. Nina was almost 8.
Blye was 7. Lois was about 4. As I said. I was almost 3.
Josephine was 3 months old.
"It was a three-day and three-night trip, but it
seemed much longer than that to me. To me, it seemed
to go on."
Louise continued, "I remember Mama telling me
that she cooked for days to get food ready for that hun-
dred-mile, three-day, three-night trip. She had fried up
meat and sausage and packed it in five-gallon cans with
fat poured over it. Meat will keep in the fat that way for
several days.
."She made up hundreds of biscuits and cornbread
and syrup cookies. Rice and beans were part of the
meals in large quantities, too..Black coffee was a must
for the men.
"She said she had to be prepared for any emergency
that might arrive, too. Ola was big enough to help with
the baby, so that relieved Mother to do some of the
preparation. Knowing full well that children and work-
ing men got very hungry, she wanted to have plenty for
all.
"She knew that she would also need extra help to
feed us all for the first day or two in our new home. Our
mother was capable of it all, and she knew it. Papa knew
that she could be counted on to do her part, too. They
were a good team.
"The first few days in our new wilderness home.
must have been busy ones for everybody."

Postscript
Robert Roberts died May 22, 1963. Henri Roberts
died July 10, 1966.
Their modest cattle herd, which became the "Red
Cattle Co." by 1952, included over 107,000 acres in
Collier and Hendry counties. Active in the Florida
Cattlemen's Association, Robert was an honorary direc-
tor in 1957.
One of the moving figures inj le early development.
of Itnmokalee, Robert'as the first elected county com-
missioner from the Immokalee district of Collier
County.
A member of the Immokalee-Masonic Lodge 319,
Robert was a Mason for 53 years. His parent lodge was
in Wauchula.
Robert and Henri, charter members of the First
Baptist Church of Immokalee, chose as their family
motto, "A good name is rather to be chosen than great
riches, and loving favour rather than silver and- gold,"
Proverbs 22:1 (KJV), and left a legacy of good works.

A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D. or Ph.D.
Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B.


Wauchula Watch
By Ofc. Amy Drake
Wauchula Police Department


It's summertime and school's out. This is a time to relax and
have fun. Here are a few tips to help keep this summer a safe one.
Tips For Homeowners
Keep doors in your home closed and locked, including your
garage door. An open door is an invitation.
Be a good neighbor and alert police to any unusual' activity
in your neighborhood.
Plan for vacation by having your'mail and newspapers
stopped or having a neighbor pick them up. Leave inside lights on
timers to create the impression that your house is occupied. Be sure
to set your alarm system. Have a lawn service or neighbor mow
your lawn.
Avoid home improvement scams and deception burglaries
by taking a proactive approach. Be particularly alert to anyone in
your neighborhood looking to perform home repair, lawn services
or asking to gain entry into your home.
Tips For Drivers
Do not leave valuables or cash in your car. If you must leave
items in the car, lock them in the trunk.
Be alert for children playing in neighborhoods and residen-
tial areas. Young children may be more concerned about catching a
ball that rolls out into the street than watching for vehicles coming
toward them.
Drive safely and slowly around parks and playgrounds.
More children are out playing during the summer.
Tips For Parents
Provide a list of phone numbers of neighbors, family and
friends that your child can call in an emergency. Make sure your
Child knows how to dial 911 and when it is appropriate to do so.
Never leave children unattended in a pool, even if they
know how to swim.
Establish rules for using the Internet. Children should have
adult supervision when online. Make sure your child knows to
never give out personal information on the Internet.
Teach your child that there is safety in numbers and that it is
best to be with a group of friends when going places without an
adult.
Provide a bike helmet and require your child to wear it as
well as brightly colored or reflective clothing.
For more helpful information and tips, follow the Wauchula
Police Department on Facebook for up-to-date information and
local happenings.


NOTICE
TO HARDEE COUNTY HOMEOWNERS

and
POTENTIAL HOMEOWNERS

Hardee County announces the availability of $350,000 under the (SHIP) State Housing Initiatives
Partnership Program of the Florida Housing Finance Corporation to provide for the County's
2011/2012 Local Housing Assistance Plan. The Plan focuses on repairs to single-family, owner-oc-
cupied dwellings.(no mobile homes), and financial assistance to first time home buyers for homes
located anyWhere'within the boundaries of Hardee County (both incorporated and unincorporated
areas).

HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM

The Housing Rehabilitation program provides assistance for repairs of single family, owner occu-
pied dwellings, giving preference to the elderly and/or physically impaired households whose in-
come is in the very low and moderate income range. Mobile homes are excluded.

This is not a remodeling program. The Program provides for the repair of problems such as leaking
or sagging roofs, broken windows, rotted siding, bad plumbing or electrical wiring, poor founda-
tions, weak floors, heating., doors, etc. The Program also assists to make a house accessible to
physically disabled occupants where necessary.

FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Funds from the SHiP program are also allocated to First Time Home Buyers to aid with closing
costs and down payment. This assistance can be used toward new construction or for purchase
of an existing home.

APPLICATIONS FOR THE HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Applications are, available at the Hardee County Office of Community Development, Courthouse
Annex, 412 W. Orange Street, Room 201, Wauchula, FL 33873. If you have questions concerning
this program or any other SHIP Program, please call 863-773-6349.

NOTE: APPLICATIONS ON FILE WILL HAVE PRIORITY OVER NEW APPLICATIONS. PRIORITY
WILL CONTINUE TO BE GIVEN TO ELDERLY AND/OR PHYSICALLY IMPAIRED APPLICANTS
THAT MEET THE INCOME GUIDELINES OF THE PROGRAM.

7 28c






July 28, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Solomon prayed, "So give
your servant a discerning
heart to govern Your people
and to distinguish between
right and wrong." ... God
gave Solomon wisdom and
very great insight, and a
breadth of understanding as
measureless as the sand on
the seashore.
I Kings 3:9,4:29 ((NLT)

FRIDAY
Christ is the power of God
and the wisdom of God. For
the foolishness of God is
wiser than man, and the
weakness of God is stronger
than men. ... so that no
human being might boast.
God is the source of your life
in Christ Jesus, who is our
wisdom, righteousness,
sanctification and redemp-
tion.
I Corinthians 1:25,29 (PME)

SATURDAY
God does wonders that can-
not. be understood; He
makes the humble person
important and lifts the sad to
places of safety. He catches
the wise in their own clever
traps and sweeps away the
plans of those who try to
trick others.
Job 5:9,11,13 (NCV)

SUNDAY
At that time, Jesus declared,
"I thank Thee, Father, Lord of
heaven and earth, for hiding
these things from the
learned and wise and reveal-
ing them to the simple. ...
.Come to Me, all whose work
is hard, whose load is heavy.
... learn from Me, for I am
humble and gentle-hearted,
and your souls will find relief.
Matthew 11:25,28.(NEB)


MONDAY
The revelation of God is
whole and pulls our lives
together. The signposts of
God are clear, and point out
the right road. The life-maps
of God are right, showing
the way to joy. The direc-"
tions of God are plain and
easy on the eyes. .. '" ..'' ''
Psalm 19:1 (ME)

TUESDAY
All Scripture is inspired by
God and profitable for teach-
ing, for reproof, for correc-
tion, for training in righteous-
ness,.that God's man may
be complete, equipped for
every good work.
II Timothy 3:15 (RSV)

WEDNESDAY.
Don't be conceited, sure of
your own wisdom. Instead,
trust and reverence the Lord,
and turn your back on evil;
when you do that, then you
will be given renewed health
and vitality.
Proverbs 3:7-8 (TLB)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Jose Valencia Pena, 68, Avon
Park, and Edie Melinda Corbo,
51, Avon Park.
Stephen Alan Wingo, 36, of
Avon Park, and Jessica Marie
Brantner, 29, of Avon Park.

There were no small claims
cases disposed of in the last
week.

There was no misdemeanor
court as it was trial week.

CIRCUIT COURT
SThere no civil actions filed
by the time of this report.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Chassyte N. Kelley vs. Carl
Kelley and Stephanie Kelley,
order.
Kathy B. Gregg vs. Gary


Wilson Cartwright Jr. et al,
judgment.
Orvel Lloyd vs. Robert
Hines and others, Hardee
Correctional Institution, com-
plaint dismissed.
Joanne D. Smith and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Timothy S. Bonney, order
on child support contempt.
Christopher B. Montanez vs.
Annie Elaine Torres and DOR;
judgment on child support.
Marcus A. Taylor and Renay
Taylor, dismissed.
Tina Renee Grice and DOR
vs. Roger Ray Vickery, order.
Steven K. Jordan vs.
Stephanie L. Richardson, child
support order.
Ivery Tiana Jackson Casso
and DOR vs. Kenya Devynn
Jabbar Hooks, order on child
support contempt.
Maricela Enriquez Villa and
DOR vs. Anjel Gonsalez, child
support order.
Robin Michelle Knarr and
DOR vs. Daniel Ray Knarr,
modification of child support.
Larry Thomas vs. Edwin
Buss, state Department of


Light One Candle
By Gerald M. Costello
The Christophers


SAVING EACH OTHER'S LIVES
You're going to hear more of these 9/11 stories as the 10th
anniversary of that somber day draws nearer, and it's easy to see
why. Here's one of them, and I think you'll find, as I did, that it's
pretty hard to beat.
I first came across it in The Record, the newspaper that serves
northern New Jersey. It's about two people strangers to each
other, really, even though they worked in the same big office. One's
a white man; the other is a black Woman.
Paul Carris, now 55, lives in Hasbrouck Heights, NJ. Judith
Coppin, 61 and retired, is from Brooklyn. Their lives became for-
ever intertwined because they met that day, on Sept. 11,2001, and
in the process Paul came to understand with a delay, perhaps,
but understanding nevertheless what he was put on earth to do.
Paul and Judith both worked for the Port Authority of New York
and New Jersey, toiling away he as a transit engineer, she as a
manager of aviation projects on the 71st floor of the north tower
of the World Trade Center.
Everyone knows what happened that day.
When it became evident that the floor and the building would
have to be evacuated, Judith felt a touch of panic. With a lung dis-
ease and terribly swollen legs, she could barely walk a few feet
before exhaustion set in.
:,l "I thought I might die," she said. "I remember hoping that it
wouldn't be painful."
That's where Paul stepped in. He took.her hand and promised
to lead her to safety, down those 71 flights. And that's what he did,
holding on to her as countless others rushed by them, down and
down the stairway. They finally reached the ground floor and had
barely made it to a nearby building when the tower began its final
collapse.
That's the first part of the story.
Paul found it difficult to think of himself in the role of hero, as
Judith depicted him in a widely-circulated Internet tribute to him
so difficult, in fact, that he felt obliged to turn to therapy. He
finally broke out of it during a Cursillo retreat he attended, one in
which he not only shared his 9/11 experience but insisted that he
heard "a voice."
The voice, he is convinced, was the voice of God, and in time
he heard it calling him to a life of service in the church.
Encouraged by his wife, Carroll, and their two daughters, Paul
began the arduous preparation called for by the diaconate. That
meant five years of work: one year just for applications and inter-
views followed by four more of classes, term papers and exams, He
was still a Port Authority employee, this time with an office in
Newark.
Finally, the years of hard work paid off and on Saturday, May
21, in Newark's Sacred Heart Cathedral, Paul Carrs was ordained
a permanent deacon. He gave his first homily the following day in
his home parish of Corpus Christi in Hasbrouck Heights, calling on
the congregation to join him in knowing more about the purpose of
living.
There was a special guest of honor that 'day, too: Judith
Coppin, who came from Brooklyn for the occasion.
"Paul helped me to live," she said after the ceremony.
Paul's wife, Carroll, stepped in to hug them both.
"You saved one another," she said.
For a free copy of "Bring Out The Best In Others," write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
mail@christophers.org.


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION
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build your dream home, or do your remodeling.


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I courthouse Repori ^ ^I ti--1


Lyle E. Rickett to Paul E. and
Tina D. Rickett, $20,200.


Bernabe Gallardo to Fatima
Lozano, $19,626.31.


Corrections and David Lawr-
ence, Hardee Correctional
Institution, dismissed.
Amanda Nicole Jones Mc-
Kinney vs. William O. Mc-
Kinney III, modification of
injunction for protection.
Tamela Grace vs. Juan
Martin Valdez, injunction for
protection modified.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as it was
trial week.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were'filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Eraclio D. and Rachel
Martinez to Elias Fajardo,'
$82 235.
Edward and Joyce C. Reints
to Gregory D. and Adele M.
Reints, $10,000.
Federal Housing & Urban
Development to James Collier,
$45,000.


www.hungryhowies.com
Limited t:me offer. At partcpating locations.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
105 SR 64 East, Inside BP
735-2100
7:28c


Public Notice
Call For Nominations For Appointment to The
Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation Board
District Seat 1
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN for nominations to fill One (1) eligible seat on the above named
Soil and Water Conservation District Board of Supervisors. These seats have a term of Four
years expiring on December 31, 2014.

Candidates wishing to fill any board seat must reside and be a property owner within the
specified Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation District.
The nomination period runs until 5:00 p.m., August 31, 2011. Petitions for nomination must
be:
1. Signed by the nominee certifying the nominee's willingness to serve, if appointed.
2. Received by the Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation office no later than 5:00
p.m., August 31, 2011. Nominations may be faxed to 863-773-5757.
NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that an appointment to the Hardee County Soil and Water Con-
servation Board to fill the vacant seat(s) will be held in.October, 2011.

For more information, contact Charles Matheny 863-773-9644.
NOMINATION FORM
PRINTED NAME/SIGNATURE
1.

CERTIFICATE OF NOMINEE
I hereby certify that if appointed I will serve as Board member on the
Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation Board.

Signature of Nominee.

Mail or deliver nomination form(s) to:
Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation Board
316 North 7th Avenue Suite 101
Wauchula, FL 33873
(863) 773-9644 7:21,28C


OPW
w"


V i
YOU Can Appear In. .
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published In
this newspaper In "Poet's Place." a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear In.this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and-town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate; PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.



LARGE $r99
1-Topping Cay-Out
Additona Toppings

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DOWNTOWN ROYALTY
July's edition of the Friday Night Live event in downtown
Wauchula featured Hometown Heroes. Earning a salute
were members of Hardee County Fire-Rescue, the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office, the Wauchula Police Department,
the Army National Guard and the utility linemen who keep
the power flowing. Earning curtsies and bows were the
newly crowned king and queen of Main Street and their
courts. Queen Grace Emmerton and King Keith Nadaskay
won the crowns, receiving the most monetary "votes" in
the fund-raising competition. Also vying for the crowns
were Kari Noblett and Kelly Pace as queen contestants
and Mike Rouse and Thomas Harris for king. Queen Grace
is a receptionist at Wauchula State Bank. King Keith is a
city commissioner and a Mosaic employee. Total raised
to benefit Main Street Wauchula Inc. and its programs was
$5,625.
PHOTOS A MONTAGE BY RALPH HARRISON


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