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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 7/21/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text


















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 33
3 Sections, 28 Pages


46
Plus 40 sales tax
1I


Thursday, July 21, 2011


ZS Manager Invited To White House


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The manager of Hardee
County's smallest municipality
was invited to the White House
early this month to advise the
highest office holders in the
land.
While other local residents
spent the Fourth of July putting
grill marks on their burgers and
lighting firecrackers to delight
the kids, Zolfo Springs Town
Manager Linda Roberson was
packing for a trip to
Washington, D.C.
But, she humbly notes, first
she had to spend July 3rd shop-
ping for something to wear.
Roberson had been notified
less than two weeks earlier that
because of her tireless efforts to
revive the near-dying Zolfo
Springs both financially and
structurally and to make it
thrive, she had been named by


an Obama Administration offi-
cial as a Champion of Change.
Final word of her acceptance
into the program and invitation
to the White House did not
come until Thursday, June 30.
And Friday, July 1, was spent
hammering out all the neces-
sary arrangements for the trip.
-She flew to Washington on
Tuesday, July 5, and returned
home that Friday.
While at the White House,
Roberson participated in a two-
hour roundtable discussion with
Agriculture Secretary Tom
Vilsack and Domestic Policy
Advisor Melody Barnes on
Wednesday, July 6.
It was a meeting which
President Barack Obama joined
in part, personally greeting and
recognizing each of the less
than a dozen Champions of
Change at the table and speak-
ing about their contributions to.


'Most Wanted'


OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PHOTO BY PETE SOUZA
President Barack Obama talks with Zolfo Springs Town Manager Linda Roberson at the
Rural Champions of Change Roundtable meeting in the Eisenhower Executive Office
Building of the White House on Wednesday, July 6.


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
01 The Herald-Advocate
The No. I man on the state
Department of Corrections'
"Most Wanted" list was cap-
tured in Texas thanks to the dili-
gence and persistence of .the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office.
Jose Fernando Aguirre, 44,
was wanted here on sexual bat-
ler. with a deadly weapon, bur-
glary of a structure with an
assault while armed and failure
to register as a sex offender
charges for a 2008 violent rape
in Wauchula Hills.
Further, he was wanted in
Polk County on similar charges.
And, said Hardee County
Sheriff Arnold Lanier, "It
should be noted this subject is a
suspect in the same community
in which he was apprehended of


a sexual battery involving a
young female."
Aguirre was arrested on
Monday, July 11, in Waco by
federal agents with U.S. Im-
'migration & Customs Enforce-
ment using information provid-
ed by Hardee County 'sheriff's
Det. Sylvia Hendrickson.
Aguirre will be brought back
to face charges here.
Sheriff's Maj. Randy'Dey
said his original case here
opened with the July 6, 2008,
rape of a woman after breaking
into her Keeton Road home in
the middle of the night. DNA
evidence collected at the scene
identified Aguirre, a known sex
offender, as the suspect.
He had served time in Florida
State Prison, Dey said, and was
deported upon his release, but


their communities and to the
nation as a whole.
The Champions of Change
program was established by
executive order of President
Obama on June 9 of this year to
recognize and learn from "ordi-
nary Americans who are ac-
complishing extraordinary
things in their communities to
out-innovate, out-educate and
out-build the rest of the world,"
according to the program web-
site.
Champions of Change are
identified for such areas as edu-
cation, business, service, medi-
cine, transportation, farms and
rural communities. They come
to the White House for round-
table discussions with Obama
officials, as "the administration
acknowledges that the best
ideas come directly from the
American people."
See ZS MANAGER 2A




labbed
apparently re-entered the coun-
try and did not register as a sex
offender as required by law.
Because of that, the Department
of Corrections placed the vio-
See WANTED 2A
F .


Aguirre


Just Who & What Asks For EDA $$$?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There are 10 companies and
organizations applying for the
available economic develop-
ment monies available in the
latest round of severance tax
funding.
The money comes through
the Hardee County Economic
Development Authority set up
by the 2004 Florida Legislature
when it decided that Hardee and
Hamilton counties, the only
ones with current mining.
should split the severance tax
S dollars.


WEATHER
D *TE HIGH LOW& RAItN
07113 90 73 0.00
07/14 90 73 1.54
07/15 92 74 '0.02
07/16 93 71 0.01
07/17 92 73 0.00
07/18 88 72 0.00
07/19 92 69 0.00
TOTAL Rainfall to 0711911 20.68
Same period last year 27.09
Ten Year Average 54.30
Source: Univ. of Fla. On Rerch Center


INDEX
Classifieds ......... 68
Community Calendar .3A
Courthouse Report ... 5C
Crime Blotter ........ 5B
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Obituaries .......... 4A




I7 !111112'l ii2 113
7 18122 07290 3


The legislature set forth the
terms and membership of the
EDA (see related story) and that
the money was to "solicit, rank
and fund" economic develop-
ment and infrastructure leading
to job creation in Hardee
County.
Applications are received at
the office of County Manager
Lex Albritton. The Hardee
County Commission, and each
municipality's commission are


asked to rank them in the order
of the importance to the local
economy.
The EDA will then meet and
consider the rankings in making
their final decisions to award
the severance tax dollars, which
are based on the number of
draglines at work in the county
in the last year.
The 10 applications are
reviewed below in the order
they were submitted.


The Rapid Systems applica-
tion, however, was removed
from consideration on Monday.
Redding
Owner/president Wesley
Redding is applying for
$200,000 in two related cate-
gories. Presently leasing a
wholesale nursery operation on
Grimes Road, Redding hopes to
purchase the 24-acre site, clean
it up, re-open the wholesale


business and add a retail busi-
ness as well.
The acreage would include an
office and loading dock and
enable the business to keep its
15 employees, variously earn-
ing from $8 to $14 per hour.
The retail portion would give
local residents a place to pur-
chase nursery supplies other
than "the big box stores." About
95 percent of business revenue
is generated by the wholesale


nursery, which maintains the
$200,000 to $1 million in rev-
enue dollars coming to the
county from sales to out-of-
county businesses.
Center For Great Apes
Founder Patti Ragan estab-
lished the non-profit Center for
Orangutan and Chimpanzee
Conservation on Van Simmons
road east of Wauchula 13 years
See JUST WHO ;A


COURTESY PHOTO BY KATHY ANN GREGG
James Scott shows how it's done in an earlier saddle-bronc riding event.


By KATHY ANN GREGG
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Looking for something to do
this weekend? Come celebrate
all things cowboy at the Hardee
County Cattlemen's Associa-
tion third annual Ranch Rodeo.
Take in the action Friday
and Saturday nights at the
arena.
The timing of this rodeo is
most appropriate, as Saturday is"
National Day of the American
Cowboy. a federal designation
recognizing America's heritage
and the men and women who
helped settle the lands that have
become this great nation.
And since this is a Florida
Cattlemen's Association Ranch
Rodeo qualifying event, each
team will consist of four men
and one woman, so cowgirls
will be front and center, too.
From February through July


of each year, qualifying ranch
rodeos are held throughout the
state of Florida. Winners ad-
vance to the state finals, held
the first weekend in October at
the Silver Spurs Rodeo Arena in
Kissimmee. in conjunction with
an all-day Cracker Festival at
the adjacent Osceola Heritage
Park.
Teams travel all over to par-
ticipate in these qualifying
events, even after they have
won. Coming to Wauchula this
weekend are teams from as far
away as Brevard County'on the
east coast to one from the
Panhandle. Even the Seminole
Tribe has a team entered this
year.
Local teams include names
which are well-known in this
county: Carlton Ranches,
Charles Robert Stevens Ill's
See RODEO 9A


Big $$$ Fights

Citrus Disease

... Story 4C


Florida Grows

Christmas Trees?

... Story 3B


Youth Attend

SField Day

S... Story 1B


Ranch Rodeo


Rides Into Arena


I


t v -,e








2A The Herald-Advocate, July 21, 2011


The Herald-Advocate-
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate. PO. Box 338, Wauchula. FL 33873.


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living -Thursday 5 p.m.
General News- Monday 5 p.m.
Ads -Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS: -
Hardee County
6 months 518; I yr. S31; 2 yrs. S60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. S41; 2 yrs. 579
Out of State
6 months S27; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95


LETTERS: .
The Herald-Advocate welcomes .letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
L'


Kelly's Column
By Jim


The Hardee Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday gave
tentative approval to a 2011-12 county budget of $47.0 million
compared with a current budget of $54.3 million. The tentative
millage rate will remain at 8.5540 mills which will bring in
$318,533 less in advalorem taxes.
The county taxes roll went down 3.81 percent, and roll-up
millage rate to bring in the same tax revenue would have been
8.8928 mills. The commission also plans to slightly reduce fire
assessments.
FEMA has billed the county $J.06 million for overpayment of
federal funds following the 2004 hurricanes and the June 2003
storm. The county is asking to reimburse Uncle Sam in install-
ments.
The county received $16.26 million in FEMA funds for
Hurricane Charley and $502,790 for the June 2003 storm, plus
$5.99 million in insurance money. In the final analysis FEMA said
the county owes a refund of $759, 500 for Hurricane Charley and
$305,581 for the June 2003 storm.
The new sheriff's budget is up $108,000 to $7.44 million,
which includes four more dispatchers for E-911 and two more drug
investigators. Counting some jail maintenance costs, the total cost
to operate the sheriff's office and jail is $8.0 to $8.1 million.
Property Appraiser Kathy Crawford said residential values in
the county are down 20 percent from last year.
The county's taxable value of property was $1.69 billion in
2007 but has now dropped to $1.476 billion. In taxable value since
last year single family home values are down 19 percent, agricul-
tural property down 1 percent, non-agricultural acreage down 31
percent, vacant commercial property down 15 percent. "
The median sale price for single family homes in Hardee was
$46,750 in 2004, $88,825 in 2007 and $50,150 in 2010. A median
sale of a five-acre tract for residential was $25,00.0 in 2005,
$60,000 in 2008 and $25,000 in 2011, said Crawford.
She said mortgage foreclosures at the Hardee Courthouse are
26 in 2011,91 in 2010, 14 in 2009, 11 in 2008, 2 in 2007 and 2 in
2006.
The county health department asked for $100,000 from the
county commission for the coming year. Funded mainly by the
state the local health department helped 17,000 residents last year,
including 3,000 in the dental program, said Dr. Gordon, which
brought in $1.2 million in Medicaid funds. The BOCC has not
funded the county health department the last couple of years except
for maintaining the building. The $100,000 funding request was
denied.
The local Chamber of Commerce, which recently gained 172
new members for a total of 362, will get $2,000 from the county.
The local YMCA, helping over 300 youth'and making $7,000
in fundraisers this past year, requested $3,000 and will get the same
as last year-zero. .-'. ',
The new fire department budget is $2.58 milliori and new EMS
budget is $1.76 million, plus a continency and fund balance of $1.3
million for the fire department, a total of $5.6 millioii.'Fire/EMS
Chief Choate said actual operating expenditures will be $4.3 mil-
lion.
The new county budget is not set in stone. There will be pub-
lic hearings Thursday, Sept. 15, and Monday, Sept. 26, at 6 p.m.
The budget can still be amended btf tax rateS'and fire assessments
cannot be increased.

Former U.S.-first lady Betty Ford, wife of President Gerald
Ford, passed away July 8 at age 93 in California. She was quite a
lady.
Betty Ford went public with her case of breast cancer and
raised awareness of the disease. She encouraged her husband to be
a stronger supporter of equal rights for women.
A year or two after her husband lost his presidential re-election
campaign to Democrat Jimmy Carter, the governor and peanut
farmer from Georgia, Betty Ford was confronted by family and
friends to seek help for an addition to alcohol and prescription-
medication. That recovery later led to the Betty Ford Center which
has helped many people with recovery from addictions.
She and ambassador Leonard Firestone founded the Betty
Ford Center in 1982, located in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

Hardee County's five elementary schools had a great year in
the state's latest FCAT grading, reported superintendent of schools
David Durastanti.
Hilltop Elementary earned another A. Wauchula Elementary
nose from a B to an A. Bowling Green Elementary increased from
a C to an A. I live two stone throws from BGE.
Zolfo Springs Elementary jumped from a D to a B. North
Wauchula Elementary maintained a C grade and was only five
points from a'B.
Durastanti is very appreciative of the efforts of the students
and the continued support of parents, faculty, staff, administrators,
business partners, churches and civic organizations.
Congratulations to the Hardee school system.

Dr. Elver Hodges, who worked at the Range Cattle Station in
Ona for many years, will turn 99 on Aug. 2.

Florida's First Assembly of God.Church had 73.applications
.for pastor. The leading candidate, approved 9-0 by the pastor
search committee, will be at the church's Family Life Center July
30 and will lead the Sunday morning service on July 31.


___ MANAGER
Continued From 1A


r1roT -)j


THURSDAY, JULY 21
'Hardee County Com-
mission, monthly. evening
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.

MONDAY. JULY 25
VHardee County School
Board, tentative budget
hearing followed by regular
meeting, Board Room, 230
S. Florida Ave., Wauchula, 5
p.m.


like you were talking to a regu-
lar, friendly person."
After spending some time at
the roundtable, Obama left the
room as the discussion contin-
ued.
Roberson was selected
because of her years of persist-
ent communications and work
with the U.S. Department of
Agriculture to obtain grants and
loans to help repair and replace
the town's faulty sewer system,
a system whicP earned its
designer time in federal prison
and which nearly'bankrupted


the town.
Further, she worked to obtain
funding for two water and
wastewater projects, for a
much-needed backhoe, and for
Town Hall improvements to
make the facility accessible to
the handicapped.
She stuck with the town
through heartache and hardship,
as past town office holders bat-
tled each other and employees.
She advocated for the whipped
and twisted town following the
hurricanes of 2004.
But Roberson. town manager


for four years and its finance
director before that, puts all the
credit on others. "We couldn't
have done what we have done
without a supportive Town
Commission and without our
dedicated employees," she'says,
adding, "I'm just the lucky one
who got to go to Washington."
She calls it a rwvard for hard
work. And passion'
Yet, she adds, "That's what
I'm here for. That's my job."
The best part of her 'trip?
Roberson answers, "The
'Welcome Home' sign I found
on my desk the day I got back."


Roberson was one of only 11
people in 10 states identified by
the federal government as a
Rural Champion of Change.
She was asked to come to the
White House to share her
accomplishments and ideas
directly with President Obama
and his administration.
"This was a once in a lifetime
opportunity," she declares. "I
am still floating on air!"
Prior to her meeting with
Obama Administration offi-
cials, Roberson was taken on a
tour of the East Wing of the
White House along with the
other Champions of Change.
"The thing I think I was most
impressed with was the life-size
portrait of George Washing-
ton," she recalls.
Roberson laughs at what
appeared to be a highlight for
most of the others, however.
"Everybody got all excited
when the president's dog, Bo,
ran down the stairs," she says.
"He didn't make it to the bot-
tom of the stairs, though, before
an aide came and retrieved
him."
Following the tour, the
roundtable discussion began in'
the Eisenhower Executive
Office Building of the White
House. "It was to begin at
noon," she remembers.
"Everybody else was standing
around, looking or talking, but I
went over to the table and took
my seat."
This, she says, brought Ag
Secretary Vilsack to her side,
"He shook my hand and said, 'I
just want to congratulate you
for being the first to sit down
and say let's get to work!' "
The meeting was in progress
when the President arrived, she
says.
"You could almost hear the
air move as everybody sucked
in their breath when he walked
into the room," she describes.
The president "sat down then
told us he had read each of our
bios and that he was impressed
with the work we are doing for
our rural communities," she
says. "Then, he thanked us for
what we do."
Afterward, Obama went
around the room and personally
shook hands and spoke with
each of the Champions, of
Change.
"He asked -ne abdt
ulation of my; to\ n'si' '
"I told him ZAlfo SP V"tfih a'
population of 1,825."
An aide asked, "Is there any-
thing you wart to make bure'lhe
president knows?"
-Roberson was quick.;: to'
respond, "A lot of small cities
and towns are facing infrastric-
.ture that is getting to the point
where it is at itsl ife expectancy,
such as watei and sewer lines
that were put in in the '60s.
They need help. They need con-
tinued assistance from the
USDA and from CDBG grants
and loans."
Her interaction with ObamZ
brought some surprises, she
says. "He is much younger
looking in person that he is in
his pictures. He's.a lot thinner
than I thought. He is very'per-
sonable.,
"He seemed like a regular
man,'; she continues. "It was


WANTED
Continued From 1A
lent suspect on its Most Wanted
list.
Dey said that over the years
Hendrickson maintained con,-
tact with the victim in the 2008
rape, eventually developing
information on Aguirre's girl-
friend and where she was stay-
ing in Waco.
"Through her diligence, a
location of the subject was
obtained and forwarded to
I.C.E. agents, which resulted in
his arrest," noted Sheriff Lanier.
"This is a great conclusion,"
added Dey. "It shows the effec-
tiveness, the science of DNA
evidence and. it showss 'tbe
tenacity of Det. Syl'viaf'He'h-
drickson."


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
The door to Zolfo Springs Town Manager Linda Roberson's office door now bears a star
declaring her a "Presidential Advisor," thanks to her proud and prankster col-
leagues at Town Hall.

Snakes do not have eyelids, so even when they're asleep, iney cannot close neir
eyes. They do have a protective layer of clear scales, called brille, over their eyes.
The baby carriage was invented in 1848 by a New Yorker named Charles Burton. His
earliest model was a large box with four wheels and a handle attached to it. It wasn't
a hit in America, however, and Burton moved to Britain. Queen Victoria took a liking to
his invention and other moms soon followed stit.













YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
C. contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels


773-3255


USDA PHOTO BY LANCE CHEUNG
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack personally speaks with Zolfo Springs Town Manager
Linda Roberson during a meeting at the White House.






July 21,2011,The Herad.Advocate 3A


Who Works On Economic Development For County?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The county has three groups
busy on different aspects of
economic development.
Two of them have funding
available periodically for infra-
structUre, job creation and capi-
tal for new or expanding busi-
nesses.
For each pot of money, there
is an application process and
ranking procedure to ensure
that those of most benefit to the
county are financed. Financing
may be a direct grant or by
reimbursement for expenses
paid.
Following is an overview of
each of thd three groups and its
members.

Economic Development
Authority
This is the group presently
considering applications for 10
projects needing some funding.
The Hardee County Eco-
nomic Development Authority
(EDA) was first conceived over
a decade ago when then County
Manager Gary Oden suggested
to then Commissioner Bill
Lambert that there needed to be
a way to bring more severance
taxes back to the counties
where mining was active.
At that time, severance tax
(dollars per acre mined annual-
ly usually about $1 million
per dragline) was distributed to
all the counties and used for
such projects as replacing beach
erosion. Lambert worked with
those urban counties and state
legislators, including Sen. J.D.
Alexander, whose territory in-
cluded Hardee County.
The money was redirected to
Hamilton and Hardee counties,
the only ones where there was
active mining. For the first peri-
od, a dependent board named
by the commission received the
monies. The 2004 Florida Leg-
islature set up an Economic
Development Authority, an
independent board and ordered
who should be on it. Its pur-
pose was to "solicit, rank and
fund economic development
and infrastructure leading to job
creation in Hardee County.
One member is appointed
from the Governor's Office-


that now is Bridgett Merrill of
the state Office of Tourism,
Trade and Economic Develop-
ment (OTTED). Another mem-
ber is from the regional work-
force board now Roger
Hood. One represents the
Florida Phosphate Council -
presently Kenny Miller of CF
Industries. Coming from the
Hardee County Farm Bureau to
represent agricultural interests
is David Royal.
The Hardee Chamber of
Commerce has a member, usu-
ally its president; this year, it is
Derren Bryan. Hardee County
has two members, Lambert,
now economic development
director, and Commission
Chairman Terry Atchley.
Finally, the commission also
chooses two members from
several proposed by the three
municipalities-presently that
is Perry Knight, mayor of
Bowling Green and Bill
Beattie, Wauchula Police Chief.
County Manager Lex Albrit-
ton is a non-voting member. His
office receives the applications
for EDA funding and reviews
them for any inconsistent or
missing information (number of
jobs proposed and tentative
salary for them; etc.)

Industrial Development
Authority
The Hardee County Industrial
Development Authority (IDA)
became possible through a
change to Chapter 159.45 of the
Florida Statutes. The Hardee
Commission adopted a resolu-
tion naming the IDA in 1984,
"whenever there was a need for
the development and financing
of industry or projects in the
County. One of its duties was
the creation, managing and
marketing for the Hardee
commerce Park.
Another challenge is the
receipt and distribution of funds
under the Mosaic Mining eco-
nomic development agreement,
which calls for advance dollars
to be used for economic devel-
opment. Within 30 days of
when Mosaic started mining in
Hardee County, there was to be
an initial payment of $5 million,
with $500,000 to go to the com-
mission and $4.5 million to the


IDA. The IDA could use up to
$100,000 a year for administra-
tion.
As mining continued, by July
10 of the following year, there
was to be another $5 million,
$500,000 to the county and $4.5
million to IDA.
Over the next eight years of
mining, the annual amount
would be $4 million, $500,000
to the commission, and $3.5
million to IDA.
The IDA and county received
the first payments from Mosaic,
but mining was then halted by
an injunction and pending law-
suit over the wetlands involved
in the Fort Meade Mine -
Hardee Extension.
Applications for the $45 mil-
lion IDA monies are geared
toward development projects on
reclaimed land, county or
municipal infrastructure proj-
ects with economic develop-
ment objectives. Offsite mitiga-
tion and acceleration of diversi-
ty of employment, telecommu-
nications, and ecotourism are
possible projects.
Applications should make the
county economy or tax base
stronger, and failure to fund
them would hinder a stronger
economy. Applicants should
have complementary capital
investment for their projects.
Current members of the IDA
are Chairman Marcus Shack-
elford, Vice Chairman Rick
Justice, Treasurer/CPA Mike
Manley, Lory Durrance, Joe
Albritton, Jim See, Vanessa
Hernandez and Terry Atchley.
County attorney Ken Evers is
also IDA attorney.

Economic Development
Council
The Hardee County Eco-
nomic Development Council
(EDC) was created in 1966 as a
Florida 501c3 nonprofit corpo-
ration. Funding for the EDC
comes through the county com-
mission. The amount of present
funding is $240,000, with
which EDC employs a director
(Bill Lambert); and staff Sarah
Pelham, coordinator; and Kristi
Schierling, office manager.
Other administrative expenses
are included.
On the EDC at present are


Chairman Joe Albritton, Vice Rob
Chairman Vanessa Hernandez, Men
Treasurer Mike Manley, non- Ken
member CPA Robin Weeks, beci
Lory Durrance, Jim See, Wau
Marcus Shackelford, Rick men
Justice, Commissioner Sue both
Birge, Diana Youmans, John ston
O'Neal, Lavon Cobb, Mike he
Prescott, Nancy Craft, Paul El





ago as a permanent sanctuary, a and
safe enriching environment for met
animals who had been used in six-
the entertainment industry, bio- con
medical laboratories and exotic lan
pet trade. The center also works eve
to educate people on the need sho
for conservation of this species. offi
It is now the third largest such T
sanctuary in North America. stot
It seeks $316,400 to add a roo
new heated galvanized steel rooi
interior orangutan night house unit
for six maturing male orang- assi
utans needing to be separated peo
from others. Beside the 1,110- sea:
square-foot night house, the pati
new complex will include two $2,1
30-foot tall habitat domes, 100
about 250 feet of elevated con- tion
necting chutes for enrichment faci
and also visitor footprints to C
increase visitor capacity, for
It will add three jobs, each at mill
about $14 an hour plus benefits. of I
Visitors are primarily high the
school and college science stu- whi
dents and adult learners, scien- cream
t ists and artists, and other non- for
resident visitors. T
There are about II other by
facilities on the business-owned hea
property. The current annual Dr.
budget of $1.3 million is funded sen
mostly through grants and con- Uni
tributions. The center has been Col
repeatedly featured in television L
documentaries and news pro- local
grams, and national print mat
media, even more so since the die
chimp once belonging to alo
Michael Jackson came to live Ho
there. met
vel
Country Gardens nin
A 76-bed assisted living and vel
memory care facility is being He
planned for south Wauchula, on front
the east side of U.S. 17 North fin;


rts and Donald Samuels.
nbers Rick Knight and
ny Baker recently resigned
cause they were elected
uchula City Commission*
nbers and could not hold
Positions. Chet Huddle-
Srecently resigned because
moved out of the county.
DC is the chief marketing




Conftfwd From 1A
well south of the new apart-
it complex. It will be on a
acre site of a 34-acre master
imunity to be called Heart-
d Center, a retail hub to
ntually include a restaurant,
pping, hotel and medical
ces.
he 47,540-square foot one-
y building will have 62
ms, some studio or one-bed-
m and some two-bedroom
ts. There will be 48 units for
listed living and 14 units for
pie with Alzheimer's Di-
se or other memory care
ents. Average rent will be
100 a month. It will need
Employees during construc-
Sand 38 for maintaining the
lity
countryy Gardens is asking
$2.2 million of the $8.04
lion project, a joint venture
Lavon and Linda Cobb, and
Howard Park Group LLC,
ich specializes in design and
nation of living environments
senior citizens.
he facility will be managed
Sammor/MJM Associates,
ded by neurophysiologist
Martin Hamburg, who
ves on the faculty of Cornell
diversity's Weill Medical
lege.
. Cobb Construction is a
al design-build construction
management firm. It will han-
the site development plan
ng with Edward Ponier of
ward Park. Lavon Cobb is a
mber of the Economic De-
opment Council, the plan-
g/marketing economic de-
opment arm for the county.
had previously resigned
m the IDA and EDA, the
ancial economic develop-


anm of economic development
for the county, meeting with
potential business owners to
consider sustainable mew or
expansion of existing business-
es to bring diversity in employ-
ment to the county. The public
can attend its meetings, except
when negotiations am ongoing
with a potential business or
.ntitv.





ment arms, to avoid a conflict
of interest. (See related story on
these groups).

ShelterPac
FHG Innovative Solutions,
under its business name Shel-
terPac, manufactures and as-
sembles emergency deployable
structures for government and
military use, including residen-
tial housing. It also has a re-
search and development arm.
It hopes to establish a 6,000-
square-foot business in Hardee
County with a minimum of 16
jobs in administration and man-
ufacturing. It seeks $65,000 for
construction equipment and
other expenses, leasing the
building until it is remodeled
and has industry-specific equip-
ment on hand. It hopes to open
by Sept. I.

Spec Baldhng and
Broadband
Both of these are applications
initiated by the IDA and both
were granted "front" money at
the IDA's June 14 meeting.
One is for $700,000 for a
20,000-square-foot building at
the Hardee County Commerce
Park. IDA director Lambert
says it is needed to "gain a more
competitive advantage in the
market place."
A previous "spec building,"
constructed in 2009 is now
occupied by a distributor. It is
important to have a shell or
turnkey building for a potential
client in "order to be a player in
the economic development
business," said Lambert.
The second application. is
$1.4 million for Rapid Systems
SM JUST WHO 9A


OUTREACH OF THE HARDEE COUNTY MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATmIO
liIn.,.-.. nrn.a.ji .-. i.i:,la,. A on -. C- 1n .iA \


U


HARDEE SR HIGH SCHOOL WILCATS FOOTBALL PRESENTS





Little Cats Camp


Instructional Football Camp for Ages 7-13


0


When: July 26-28,2011

Where: Wildcat Football Stadium

Who: Ages 7-13

Cost: $30 Registration**
"Late Registration 820 9 tadium on first day
of camp, Tues 7/26

Includes: Camp T-Shirt, Gatorade, Water

Questions: Call Coach Martin (863)448-2390


Highlights:

* One on One Instruction from High School Staff

* Current and Former Wildcats as Guest Coaches

* Tests Provided in 40 yd Dash, Pro-Shutte, & PushUp

* Camp TShirtsProvided


MAIL THIS FORM & PAYMENT TO:
COACH MARTIN
HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
830 ALTMAN ROAD
WAUCHULA, FL 33873

NOTIFCATI OffSl unvdcrsmand at mhcc
are physical rikss associated with the heat and
physical nature of this outdoor football camp. As
the legal guardian of the ~ac camper, in case of
any injury I herebyauthoize Florida Hospital of
Wauchula, and any physician on their Medical Staff
to render treatment to my child. An authorized
school personnel from the Hardee County School
District will accompany him.

ParentsSignature


Little Cats Sign Up Form




Pants Name

AddMres



Em-gncy Phone Nunt





Notay dg ni


Mt:yCmfipSc
* Tdsay,7~l
8lMl:2jLa IkzianiArivAil
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8&3&-45 Flshu SiPkh
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0Ifr- l0gll oroadcHl r
I:o.l,.l:lOOiJDnfr. trmnndion


* Wednaey,7tr
t:-8:15 Camp Anive
1S.&25 Focus -Aliliide
Ut25.t Hc"Samli
-9400Ofraivc bnlWMi
9O-.H0tLR((Ar.auk>
9.S ItSO I50mick, mmns ion
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12Z-I200campmsDeWp




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IIo50-11. Break (Warfl
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T-SI Size
Method lPayment
DCash O Chec'

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Total: __






Nmieo Nof )ty. fWd Samped


HARDEE SR HIGH SCHOOL WILDCATS FOOTBALL
CHARACTER-ATTITUDE-TRUST-STRENGTH 7:21p


TO






o I te, July 21,2011

S-. Letter To The Editor
biltuaries Environmental Leader


(;UERRERO
: '' Matlhew Guerrro, age
!i,.,u lroibh,,( of VWauchula, died
iH 'Jifnll;; bY .',. July 13, 2011, at
i- ,'..;'s hom on Feb. 10,,
't(1 .! '/ ", ;pa.
i:r' ii include his mother
shl v ile Hiers of
\'- i, ~i: f ihct Christopher
J;lami holriipon of Wauchula;
nrtrn.:!a! i, an'dmother Angela
(crr-cro of Waiuchula; paternal
grni.ldparmts John 'D.
'bohmpnpom -and Amelia
Mich(ll. r'rish: brothers' Tony
G'lerrcr,,. and David Biown,
both of. Wauchula; and' sister
iK',elee Masscy of Wauchula.
V.i ;:,io v,.s Monday, July
1 I th,- i!iuai home from 1 to
' re n t f;T:v,.:ii.' services and
I I;;!,. n' .v;IW rI at Wauchula
('emeterv at 4 p m. with the
Pncv Tcom Ha-;rtman of First
Si~;m'or tlhiri'h officiating.
R'.,!arts Family
r,',ral Home
W,'>rhula


published
,. a public
b' i t be submit-
Si : ~' boiral home
', ': o of the
d\ ded.for


iliiin the
;" '," of resi-
S' dath, Occu-
't"' mmbher'ships,
"; :r ors and
) ; ''i' ts The
i : ,. iYy include
i ' '1 : : ls ouse, par-
h ildren and
S:li.) ,es and
;,;1 : tand the num-
;:: o ireatilandchildren.
', mo immediate
S 'ii l'ntiot n of
S 'i: hion mnay be
-:. / le


Praises Judge's Decision


Dear Editor,
I regret that I was unavailable
when The Herald-Advocate
called me last week. I was on
retreat in the mountains of
western Carolina, so the news
that the federal court had issued
another injunction on the South
Fort Meade Mine Extension/
Hardee County did not reach
me till I came home and
checked my messages.
I would therefore like to offer
my comments to you now:
It would be very difficult not
to feel elated by Judge Adams'
order since 'he accepted all of
our arguments and rejected all
of Mosaic's. Basically they
wanted to mine 700 acres with-
out any permit modifications
and the judge would not allow it
because it puts protected wet-
lands in jeopardy.
What's particularly interest-
ing is that his order was based
partly on Mosaic's arguments
last summer that they could not
mine uplands without permit
modifications and without
harming wetlands. According to
the order: "... Mosaic's own
evidence produced in August of
2010 calls uplands mining into
question from'an environmental
prospective."
In Judge Adams' order it is
said: "Without preliminary
.injunctive. relief, plaintiffs and
the: eni'ironnent will suffer
irreparable harm. The phos-


phate mining at issue requires
Mosaic to strip away vegeta-
tion, waterways, wetlands,-top-
soil, and overburden down to
the phosphate-containing layer
and further, repair of the exca-
vated wetlands and streams
with human-engineered wet-
lands and streams is controver-
sial."
Mosaic has already respond-
ed by accusing the environmen-
tal plaintiffs of creating hard-
ship for the people of this com-
munity and their' employees.
However, it is important to note
that the court is of the opinion
that ... "any harm to Mosaic is
largely self-inflicted ... Mosaic
has had ample time since the
beginning of this lawsuit in
June of 2010 to modify its fed-
eral mine plan ..."
Again I remind you that the
environmental plaintiffs have
always been willing to discuss a
mediated settlement with
Mosaic and that indeed we have
already conceded to allow lim-
ited mining to take place on the
site in exchange for preserving
two wetland bayheads associat-
ed with Stream 3.
Dennis Mader
Director, 3PR
Lily
Editor's Note: 3PR is one of
three environmental groups
opposing Mosaic's South Fort
Meade Mine Extension as pro-
posed.


.The first,.duty of society is to give each of its members
the possibility of,fulfilling his destiny. When it becomes
incapable: f performing this duty, it must be trans-
formed.
-Alexis Carrel

YOU Can Appear In...
'Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published in
this newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear in- this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.


The friend who holds your hand and says the wrong thing is made of dearer stuff than
the one who stays away.
-Barbara Kingsolver

I value the friend who for me finds time on his calendar, but I cherish the friend who
for me does not consult his calendar.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


U : -,'M yourself, you wont value your time. Until
: -sn time, you will not do anything with it.


1 funeral service for over a century.




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Affordable Funeral & Cremation Services


0






July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


-N nutrition
Light One Candle Wise
By Gerald M. Costello KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
l AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR l
The Christophers CANCER RESEARCH


BRINGING HOPE TO DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Years ago when people were first urged to start changing the
world through The Christophers, a few influential professions
loomed as the paths communications, education .and the like.
But over time it became apparent that many other fields offer the
same world-changing opportunities, and for at least a decade, a
Maryland surgeon has been proving that medicine takes a back seat
to none of them.
With military-style precision, Dr. Michael Murphy leads a
team of health professionals that journeys to the Dominican
Republic for seven days each April and November, delivering not
only free medical care but bringing with them a measure of hope
for all the people they're able to see.
Murphy, of Baltimore, has volunteered his services for more
than 10 years and is following a tradition established before him by
his former partner, Dr. Shaw Wilgis, who got the program going 20
years ago.
And it shows no signs of stopping now.
"As long as I'm able to, I will go," Dr. Murphy told an inter-
viewer. "You have to be able to come back. They have to trust that
you're coming back, and then they'll wait six months for you."
A lot of planning goes into the program, right down to the instruc-
tions for follow-up care that Murphy sees to for every patient who's
undergone surgery. He learned enough Spanish to write them out
in indelible ink on their casts, so that local doctors will know
what to do until he returns.
Here's the way the system works: Dominican doctors pre-
screen every patient. About 40 of those most in need get surgeries
performed by Dr. Murphy and his associates. That takes up the first
five days of the twice-a-year visits; the last two days are reserved
for follow-up checks and consultations. A local hotel puts up the
Murphy team, and air travel is taken care of by a fund at Union
Memorial Hospital in Baltimore.
There's almost no end to the volunteerism that makes possible
the medical visits. That begins with the doctors, nurses and other
health professionals who accompany Dr. Murphy. All volunteer for
the assignment,, with some of them using up vacation time as they
do.
Some of the staff members at Dr. Murphy's center spend days
before the trips organizing and sterilizing the surgical equipment
that will be needed. The center's suppliers donate other surgery-
related items: drapes, gowns, medical instruments of every type.
And, for the younger patients, everything from baseball caps to col-
oring books. None of it, Murphy knows, will be wasted.
Almost all of the patients, young and old, come from impov-
erished communities: Yet despite that, he said, they're good-heart-
ed people, appreciative of all the visitors can do.
Murphy's visits may be six months apart, but the day that one
trip ends, planning begins for the next one.
You might be changing the world, true, but it gets done the
old-fashioned way one day at a time.
For a free copy of "Volunteering," write: The Christophers, 5
Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail: mail@christo-
phers.org.


All the great things are simple, and many can be
expressed in a single word: freedom, justice, honor,
duty, mercy, hope.
-Winston Churchill


Q: Does a gluten-free diet
make me more likely to get
inadequate amounts of any
nutrients?
A: A gluten-free diet doesn't
necessarily have to run short on
any nutrients if it's built around
plenty of vegetables and fruit,
plus beans and nuts; un-
processed poultry, seafdod and
lean meat; and gluten-free
whole grains like brown rice,
corn and quinoa. Many of the
special gluten-free grain prod-
ucts are made of refined grains
like wheat, corn and potato
starch that are low in fiber and
lacking the nutrients and phyto-
chemicals found in whole
grains. These products are often
unfortified, too, which means
that if you're not eating well,
they can't make up for a lack of
the nutrients and vitamins iri
your diet, such as folate and
iron. Studies show that a
gluten-free diet can be
high-fat, low-fiber, and low in
several nutrients, but a regis-
tered dietitian can show you
how gluten-free food choices
can work together to meet nutri-
tional needs.

Q: Does eating more vegeta-
bles and fruits really help
lower blood cholesterol?
A: Studies suggest that it can
help. Vegetables and fruits con-
tain dietary fiber that can bind
up cholesterol in the digestive
tract and keep it from being
absorbed into the body. An
abundance of vegetables and
fruits .probably acts in other
ways to lower risk of heart dis-
ease, too. These foods supply a
variety of vitamins and natural
plant compounds that act as
antioxidants, protecting blood
vessels and keeping LDL blood
cholesterol in a less damaging
form. Furthermore, a plant-
based diet with plenty of veg-
etables and fruits seems to help
counter inflammation that oth-
erwise contributes to the build-
up of plaque in blood vessels.


Lawn Growing And Mowing Made Easier


When your yard is saying "I
want to be a lawn," six tips can
help the grass grow greener on
your side of the fence:
1. Water rarely but thorough-
ly. Most lawns need a good
soaking to a depth of six to
eight inches.
2. Water early, generally
before 10 a.m.. so that the grass
gets to dry before the sun gets
too hot.
3. Mow weekly: Regular
mowing makes your lawn
healthier and easier to cut.
4. Keep the mower blade
sharp for a clean cut and to
reduce lawn disease.
5. When you mow, cut only a
third of the height of the lawn to
encourage strong roots. Cutting
too short stresses the lawn, cre-
ating an environment ideal for
weed growth and disease.
6. Get a good mower. To
help, leading engine manufac-
turers are incorporating unique
new features into their products
that deliver professional results


and make cutting tie lawn a
much easier and ore enjoy-
able experience.
When selecting a walk-
behind mower, it's wise to look
at the engine. Select a reputable
engine brand and consider
these questions:
Is it easy to start? With
some engines today. priming
and choking are a thing of the
past. Smart-Choke technology
automatically manages the
start-up process so there's no
risk of flooding the engine.
Simply pull the cord and go.
Is it easy to fill? Filling the
fuel tank on many mowers can
be a challenge. Engines with
Accu-Fill, however, incorporate
a unique angled neck as well as
an opening that is 45 percent
larger than those in most mow-
ers. This translates to easier fill-
ing and less spilling of fuel,
which is better for the environ-
ment.
Will it perform? Look for
an engine with Consistent-Cut


technology. This system deliv-
ers more power to the mower in
extreme load conditions for a
great-looking cut every time-
even in thick, wet grass that can
stall other mowers. *
Is it well constructed? A
cool-running OHV (overhead
valve) design with cast-iron
cylinder bore will help your
mower stand up in harsh condi-
tions-letting you mow longer
and avoid costly trips to the
repair shop.
All these helpful features can
be found on Kohler Courage
XT engines. They can be found
in mowers from several popular
brands, including Toro, Hus-
qvarna, Ariens and Lawn-Boy.
Learn More
For additional resources to
help identify and select an
engine mower for your specific
needs, visit www.KohlerEn-
gines.com or call (800) 544-
2444.


The real religion of the world comes from women much more than from men-from
mothers most of all, who carry the key of our souls in their bosoms.
-Oliver Wendell Holmes
The pat on the back, the arm around the shoulder, the praise for what was done right
and the sympathetic nod for what wasn't are as much a part of golf as life itself.
-Gerald R. Ford


PUBLIC NOTICE
HARDEE COUNTY INDUSTRIAL
DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT-INFRASTRUCTURE
GRANT/LOAN FUNDING CYCLE
The Hardee County Industrial Development Authority will accept grant/loan applications
for the Economic Terms Agreement contained in the Mosaic South Ft. Meade Mine Devel-
opment Agreement. Projects that provide economic development or infrastructure in
Hardee County by virtue of this notice are being solicited for consideration. The Authority
shall rank applications based on the criteria set forth in the application..

The Hardee County Industrial Development Authority reserves the right to reject any and
all applications.
Applications and Program Guidelines are available at the Hardee County Economic De-
velopmeht Office, 107 East Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873; Phone: 883-773-3030; Fax:
863-773-4915; email info@hardeemdil.com.
Applications will be accepted from July 20, 2011, through September 2, 2011, 8:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
For more information, please call 863/773-3030.
Sarah Pelham, Economic Development Coordinator 7:21c


sayhello i



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6A The Herald-Advocate, July 21, 2011



Your Business Could Appear Herei
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or.Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
lei


"Our passion is our food, but our obsession is our service
here," he continued. "I'm particular about the presentation of our
dishes, everything is plated and garnished. Someone was'i kif
enough.to teach me about the service industry, andI wantto d".t,
same thing to ensure.the future of culinary arts." . .. i


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ......:...Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BI1.ING........Ads must be pre-paid.


CLASSIFICATIONS:
Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted


Miscellaneous Yard Sales


. Stop by and see why so
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com G
9:30tfc 800-226-3325 Sa/e


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF RULE REVISION or MODIFICATION
July 18, 2011
RULE NO. 5.04
SUBJECT: ORIGINAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL
Subject Area or Existing Rule: This rule establishes a policy for students initially
entering a public school in Hardee County.
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41 F.S.
Specific Law Implemented: 1003.01, 1003.22 F.S
Preliminary Text:
A copy of the full text of this rule may be obtained from the office of the
Superintendent of Schools. PPON-TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING
THE REVISIONS OR MODIFKITIONS IS: '
David'Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed revisions or modifications to the policy pro-
vide for requirements for original entry into a public school in Hardee County by the
adoption of recommendations from the Superintendent of Schools.
RULE NO. 5.05
SUBJECT: MARRIED AND/OR PREGNANT STUDENTS.
Subject Area or Existing Rule: This rule establishes a policy for the rights of married
and pregnant students to receive educational instruction or its equivalent as other stu-
dents.
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41 F.S.
Specific Law Implemented: 1003.21 F.S.
Preliminary Text:
A copy of the full text of this rule may be obtained from the office of the
Superintendent of Schools. PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING
THE REVISIONS OR MODIFICATIONS! IS:
David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed revisions or modifications to the policy pro-
vide for rights and responsibilities, in accordance with law, for married and pregnant stiL-
dents to be entitled to the same educational instruction or its equivalent as other stu-
dents by the adoption of recommendations from the Superintendent of Schools.
RULE NO. 5.34
SUBJECT: EXPULSION OF STUDENT
Subject Area or Existing Rule: This rule establishes a policy for recommending the
expulsion of a student from school.
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41 F.S.
Specific Law Implemented: 1006.07,1006.08, 1006.09 F.S...
Preliminary Text:
A copy of the fulltext of this rule may be obtained from the office of the
Superintendent of Schools. PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING,
THE REVISIONS OR MODIFICATIONS IS:
David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed revisions or modifications to the policy pro-
vide for the procedure when a student is suspended from school with a recommenda-
tion for expulsiofi by the adoption of recommendations from the Superintendent of
Schools.
RULE NO. 5.41
SUBJECT: 'ATHLETICS
Subject Area or Existing Rule: This rule establishes a policy for the administration of
athletics in secondary schools.
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41,1001.42 F.S.
Specific Statutory Authority: 1006.07, 1006.15, 1006.16 F.S.
Preliminary Text:
A copy of the full text of this rule may be obtained from the office of the
Superintendent of Schools. PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING
THE REVISIONS OR MODIFICATIONS IS:
David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed revisions or modifications to the policy pro-
vide for compliance of all rules and specifications set forth by the Florida High School
Athletic Association by the adoption of recommendations from the Superintendent of
Schools.
RULE NO. 5.42


SUBJECT:


GRANTING PERMISSION FOR STUDENT TO LEAVE SCHOnl


SSubject Area or Existing Rule: This rule establishes the policy for granting permission
for students to leave school grounds during regular school hours.


Citation of Legal Authority:


DINING DELIGHN Main Street has welcomed an addi-
tion to the variety of restaurants located in downtown Wauchula.
Main Street Grille opened its doors during the June Friday
Night Live event, and started serving lunch after the Fourth of July
holiday weekend..
SOwner Gary Delatorre decided to reopen the restaurant space
once again, although with a
different twist.
"We had Main Street
Pub from 2000 to 2004,
until the hurricanes hit,"
Delatorre explained. "The g
building sat vacant for a ""
while, so I decided to .
reopen with Tim Spain as 6 *.
my executive chef. We
talked about it and I decided
to go with his type of food." -
Offering a different
atmosphere from' the usual
S"Mom & Pop" eatery in the
county, Main Street Grilld
presents a fine dining oppor-
tunity hoping to attract those
in the community with an
exquisite taste as well as.
offering something for
everyone.
"We use all organic
vegetables, beef and every-
thing is made from scratch," Ying an Yang, night and day,
said Chef Spain. "It's a front and back. Executive Chef
small menu but with the Tim Spain (left) prides himself
extent we go to in order to on hiring local high-school stu-
prepare the meals, it's all we dents to help out in the kitchen
can do at this time. I cook as Robbie Sullivan works with
with a French technique but local employees in the front,
an American attitude." mixing the hometown atmos-
Spain spent his teen phere with that of fine dining.
years as a busboy at Nicholas' Family Restaurant, and it was then
that he first wanted to become a chef. While there are only 65 mas-
ter chef's in the world, Spain has had the privilege to work -with
three of them. He was born and raised in Hardee County but has
spent time in France and elsewhere in Europe learning his trade.


I:


1001.41, 1001.42 F.S..


Specific Statutory Authority: 1001.43, 1003.31 F.S.
Preliminary Text:
A copy of the full text of this rule may be obtained from the office of the
Superintendent of Schools. PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING
THE REVISIONS OR MODIFICATIONS IS:
David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed revisions or modifications to the policy pro-
vide for granting permission for a student to leave the school grounds prior to the regu-
lar dismissal of school under specified circumstances by the adoption of recomrienda-
tions from the Superintendent of Schools.
RULE NO. 5.50
,SUBJECT: STUDENT RECORDS ...
Subject Area or Existing Rule: This rule establishes the policy fop maintaining educ-
tional student records.
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41 FS.


Specific Statutory Authority: 1002.22 F.S.,.6A-1.0955
Preliminary Text:


A copy of the full text of this rule may be obtained from the office of the '
Superintendent of Schools. PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING
THE REVISIONS OR MODIFICATIONS IS:


David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools


Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed revisions or'modifications to the policy pro-
vide for maintaining educational student records consistent with the Federal Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 by the adoption of recommendations from
the Superintendent of Schools.
RULE NO. 5.60
SUBJECT: ADMINISTRATION OF MEDICATION DURING SCHOOL HOURS
Subject Area or Existing Rule: This rule establishes the policy for administration of '
medications to students during school hours.
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41 F.S.
Specific Statutory Authority: 1001.51
Preliminary Text:
A copy of the full text of this rule may be obtained from the office of the
Superintendent of Schools. PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING
THE REVISIONS OR MODIFICATIONS IS:
David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed revisions or modifications to the policypro-.
vide for the requirements and procedures for the administration of prescription and non-
prescription medication during school hours by the adoption of recommendations from.
the Superintendent of Schools.
Statement of Regulatory costs: The proposed rule revisions or modifications of the
above rules will create no additional district economic impact in excess of $100 except
for the cost of printing and distributions.
Location of Meeting, Time and Date: Hardee School Board Meeting Room, 230 South
Florida Avenue, Wauchula, FL at 5:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be
heard on August 25, 2011.
Notice: Any person who wishes to provide the School Board with information regarding
the statement of estimated regulatory costs or to provide a proposal for a lower cost
regulatory alternative must do so in writing within 21 days after publication of this notice.
Notice: If requested in writing and not deemed unnecessary by the Agency Head, a
Rule Development Workshop will be held at a time and dated to be advertised in the
future.
Notice: The procedure for obtaining a public hearing on this proposed rule is to
request, in writing a hearing. The request shall be submitted to the Superintendent of
Schools, in writing, within 21 days after publication of this notice. The request shall
specify how the person requesting the public hearing would be affected by the pro-
posed rule. The School Board, upon appropriate request, shall give affected persons
an opportunity to present evidence and argument on the issues under consideration.
Notice: Inspection and copying of all written materials constituting public records sub-
mitted to the agency regarding draft rules may be obtained by request, in writing, to the
Superintendent of Schools.
Notice: The School Board may recognize any material which may be judicially noticed
and to incorporate them into the record of the rule making proceeding. The School
Board may incorporate material by reference into the proposed rule.
Notice: If you' need accommodation in order to participate in this process, please notify,
David Durastanti, the Superintendent of Schools at (863) 773-9058 or at the Hardee
School Board, 1009 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873 at least 48 hours prior
to the meeting or workshop.
Notice: If the School Board adopts the proposed rule, one certified copy of the pro-
posed rule shall be filed in the office of the Superintendent of Schools pursuant to
Section 120.54(3)(e), Fla. Stat.
7:21c


Photos By MACHELLE DOLLAR
The inside of the old pub has been renovated to offer a'
more fine dining atmosphere, as compared to the usual
"Mom & Pop" restaurants of the county.
With that in mind, Spain visited Hardee Senior High School's
culinary arts class and hasnow hired many students from the pro-
gram. Working alongside them, he hopes to become that mieitor he'
once had. -
The restaurant is staffed with around 20 localpeople. Manager
Russell Smith and Spain have prided themselves on hiring local,
students and former students, persistent with the hope to light their
interest in continuing in the service industry.
Future goals include finishing a banquet room to house con-
ferences and private parties, providing live entertainment, and
expanding into a catering business as well. .,
The restaurant is currently fully licensed with full liquor bar
as well. Hours are from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. for the restaurant and
the bar is open until midnight.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating.? Call
Machelle Dollar at 773-3255 with your business news.
What a peculiar privilege has this little agitation of the
brain which we call thought, that we must make it tie
model of the whole universe. :
-David Humn
Usually, terrible things that are done with the excuse that
progress requires them are not really progress at all, but
just terrible things.
-Russell Baker


~..~......-.. -......--. -.- -.. -.-- -.~ .. --...- --..~,,


...~ ---


r


I


`I






July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


CHEER CAMP


NOTICE OF TAX FOR SCHOOL

CAPITAL OUTLAY


The Hardee County School Board will soon consider a
measure to impose a .500 mill property tax for the capital
outlay projects listed herein.


This tax is in additionto the School Board's proposed tax
of 7.104 mills for operating expenses and is proposed
solely at the discretion of the School Board.


The capital outlay


tax will generate approximately


$750.184 to be used for the following projects:


MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION, AND REPAIR


Educational and
ancillary facilities


Reimburse the General Fund for
costs of construction, renovation,


.... remodeling, maintenance, and re
S pair as permitted by Florida
Statutes.


.MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASES
Purchase one (1) school bus


PAYMENT OF PREMIUMS FOR PROPERTY AND CA-
SUALTY INSURANCE NECESSARY TO INSURE THE
EDUCATIONAL AND ANCILLARYPLANTS OF THE
jsnCHOOLDIyT ,ICT-


All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing to
be held on July 25, 2011, at 5:10 P.M., in the School
:Board meeting room located at 230 South Florida Av-
enue, Wauchula, Florida.


A DECISION on the proposed CAPITAL OUTLAY TAXES
will be made at this hearing.

7:21c


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Junior High School Cheer Team recently participated in the Universal
Cheerleaders Association (UCA) "home camp" at the school gym. The team spent
three days learning new material for the upcoming season, including cheers, sidelines
and dances. The team earned a
superior rating. In the .top
photo are HJH team members
(front row, from left) Ally
Dotson, Emily Bennett, Kristian
Judah, Megan McCullough,
Shelby Dees, Katie Crawford
and Andrea Crawford; (back
row) a UCA instructor, Joselyn
Thompson, Savannah Aubry,
Jakalya Mosely, Kendall Winter,
Faith Hays, Jacie Solis, Brenna
Parker, Rosie Rivers, Brooke
Fones and a UCA instructor. !
Five of the girls were selected
as All-American cheerleaders
and will have the opportunity to
perform, at the Thanksgiving
Tour at Walt Disney 'World
tom photo are the girls, select-
ed after their Xtreme Routine i
Dance, (from left) Rosie Rirers, ..1
Kendall Winter, Emily Bennett, .
Kristian Judah. and Shelby .
Dees.


YOU Can Appear In... .
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show It! Your work could be published In
this newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone .else. To appear n this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.




NOTICE OF

BUDGET HEARtI lG

The Hardee County School Board
will soon consider a budget for fiscal
year 2011-12. A public hearing to
make a DECISION on the budget
AND TAXES will be held on Monday,
July 25, 2011, at 5:10 P.M., in the
School Board meeting room located
at 230 South Florida Avenue, Wau-


chula, Florida.


7:21c


BUDGET SUMMARY
Hardee County School Board

Fiscal Year 2011-12
ProMaosimdilllaae Levies Subiect to 10-Mill Can:
Required Local Effort 5.3560 Capital Outlay 0.5000
asic Discretionary Operating 0.7480 Additional Discretibnary for Operations (Voted) 1.0000
discretionaryy Critical Needs Operating Total Millage 7.6040
SPECIAL DEBT CAPITAL PRIVATE
.i ... :.. GENERAL REVENUE SERVICE PROJECTS PURPOSE TOTAL
FUND FUNDS FUNDS FUNDS FUNDS ALL FUNDS
ESTIMATED REVENUES:
federal Sources $ 233,019 $ 10,714,207 $ $ $ $ 10,947,226
State Sou-ces $ 22,518,605 $ 49,714 $ 330,375 $ 42,000 $ $ 2,940,694
Local Sources $ 11.479.810 320.574 $ 175 752.414 $ 29 $ 12.553,002
TOTAL SOURCES $ 34,231,434 $ 11,084,495 $ 330,550 $ 794,414 $ 29 .$ 46,440,922
transfers In $ 600,953 $ $ $ $ $ 600,953
onrevenue Sources $ 5,000 $ -' $ $ $ $ 5,000
Fund Balance (July 1, 2011) $ 12,881,070 $ 643,581 $ 161,886 $ 1.390,430 $ 11,310 $ 15,088,277
TOCYAL REVENUES & BALANCES t 47.718.457 t 11.728.076 S 492.436 2.184.844 11.339 62.135.152
EXPENDITURES:
Instruction $ 19,805,192 $ 4,924,331 $ $ $ $ 24,729,523
Pupil Personnel Services $ 1,712,952 $ 1,328,172 $ $ $ $ 3,041,124
Instructional Media Services $ 684,715 $ 200 $ $ $ $ .$ 684,915
Instructional & Curriculum Development Services $ 307,842 $ 377,671 $ $ $ 685,513
Instructional Staff Training $ 325,483 $ 1,066,473 $ $ $ $ 1,391,956
InstructionRelated Technology $ 780,702 $ $ $ $ $ 780,702
Board of Education $ 345,983 $ $ $ $ $ 3,45,983
General Administration $ 282,162 $ 322,952 $ $ $ $ 605,114
school, Administration $ 1,961,433 $ 35,597 $ $ $ $ 1,997,030
Facilities Acquisition & Construction $ $ $$ 967,434 $ ,. 967,434
FiscaL Services $ 442,968 $ $ $ $ -. $' 442,968
Food Services $ $ 2,548,243 $ $ $ $ 2,548,243

OperatJon of Plant $ 3,960,920 $ $ $ $ 3,960,920
Maintenance of Plant $ 1,985,896 $ $ $ $ $ 1,985,896
Administrative Technology Services $ 221,292 $ $. $ $ $ 221,292
Community Services $ 175,591 $ $ $ $ 4,350 $ 179,941
Debt Service $- $ 333.130 $ $L $ 333.130
TOTAL EXPENDITURES $ 35,371,107 $ 10,932,306 $ 333,130 $ 967,434 $ 4,350 $ 47,608,327
Transfers Out $ $ $ $ 600,953 $ $ 600,953
Fund Balance (June 30, 2012) $ 12.347.350 $ 795.770 $ 159.306 $ 616.457 $ 6,989 13.925.872
TOTAL EXPENDITURES,
TRANSFERS & BALANCES_ 47.718.457 $ 11.728.076 492.436 184.844 11.339 6.135152
Complete-4etalllsfechIgsa rate part of the school budget summarized above are on file and are available for public Inspection at the Office of the irdel t Su~dintendent of
Schools Administration Budin 1009 N. 6th Avenue Wauchula. Florida. 7:21c


FWC Allows

Campfires

Once Again
Because recent rains have
improved dry conditions across
the state, the Floritia Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, in cooperation with the
Florida Division of Forestry,
has rescinded an executive
order issued last month that
S.;_.prohibited campfires in wildlife
F.~-cnafti aient areas; wildlife and
environmental areas, and all
other lands it manages.
Campfires are again allowed
in designated areas.
For rules and regulations per-
taining to individual wildlife
management areas, visit My-
FWC.com/Hunting and click on
"WMA brochures."
While the campfires are
allowed, the FWC wants to
remind everyone how important
it is to properly manage any
campfire to ensure it is under
control and completely extin-
guished when done.


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during last week. List-
ings include the name of the
owner or contractor, the ad-
dress for the project, the type of
work to be done, ond the cost
involved. Only projects valued
at $1,000 or more are listed.
ISSUED
William J. Wenzel, Vandolah
Road, fire alarm, $4,900.
Ronald C. Mooney, U.S. 17
South, reinforce tower,
$38,000.
Michael A. Bigelow, U.S. 17
South, cell tower, $13,500.
Denis P. Rohaley, 13 Stans-
field Avenue locations and 12
Rigdon Road locations, sewer
connections, $1,500 each.
James M. Cobb, Heard
Bridge Road, roofing, $6,000.
James Jernigan Construction,
McEwen Road, repair and reha-
bilitation, $15,400.
Pam Sellers, Second Avenue,
rehabilitation, $15,000.
Belmares, South 10th Ave-
nue, barn, $3,355.
Agustina Ormazabal, Edison
Avenue, air conditioning,
$2,300.
BUILDING BLOCKS
Unsure if your home im-
provement project requires a
building permit? Call the
Hardee County Building &
Code Enforcement Department
at 773-3236.







8A The Herald-Advocate, July 21, 2011


History: The Oxcart Trail


Edited by Spessard Stone
Introduction
Robert Roberts Jr., son of Robert and Mary Elizabeth
Carlton Roberts. was born Feb. 9, 1884, in the New Zion
community of Manatee County, now Hardee County.
At New Zion on Dec. 29, 1901, he married Sarah
Jane Hendry Cordell, born Nov. 29. 1882. at New Zion.
Nicknamed "Henri," she was the daughter of Albert
James and Lettie Ann Cobb Cordell, whose family had
moved from Decatur County, Ga., to New Zion in 1882.
Seeking better grazing land for his cattle, Robert
found what he wanted in Immokalee in July 1914 and,
thereafter, traded places with Charles Garner.
Then in December 1914, in a hundred-mile, three-
day, three-night trip, he and his family, driving about 300
cattle and some Duroc Jersey hogs before them, moved
by wagons and an oxcart from their New Zion home,
west of Ona, to Immokalee.
The family then consisted of Robert (Papa), 30, Henri
(Mama), 32, and seven children: Dius, 12; Ola, 10; Nina,
9; Blye, 7; Lois, 3 ; Louise, 2; and Josephine (Jo), 3
months. Born later at Immokalee were Mildred in 1919
and Bobby in 1922; they alone survive.
The following narrative is extracted from Chapters 3
and 4 of "At the End of the Oxcart Trail: The Robert
Roberts Family Saga," 2001. by Maria Stone and used'
with the permission of Jane Wood, daughter of Mildred
Roberts Sherrod.

The Trade
Dius spoke first, "Mama told me Allen was a well-
known name around Immokalee. A man by that name is
credited with being here in about 1873. This first settle-
ment was known as the 'Old Allen Place.' Papa kept.
hearing about it from cowmen and hunters.
"All those years Papa dreamed of his own spread. He
felt that he needed wide open spaces, so he was planning
and working toward that goal.
"It was 1914, during the summer. Papa was on a
drive of steers to Tappen Mann in LaBelle. He rode on
in to Immokalee and found the Baucom place was for
sale. By that time the 'Old Allen Place' was known as
the 'Baucom Place,' named for the family who had
owned it in time past, too.
"Charles Garner owned it in 1914. The Garner family
lived wheie our home is now.
"Papa and a friend rode over to the 'Old Allen Place'
to have a look around.
"Mr. Garner told them, 'Stay as long as you like and
make yourselves at home!'
"I guess Papa and his friend stayed about two weeks
riding in all directions checking it for cattle land. Papa
could see it was good grazing land.
"Just before they left home, which was in Ona,
Florida, Papa paid Mr. Garner $50 for an option to buy
in six months. This would give Papa time to sell his land
in DeSoto County, which is now Hardee.
"Mama said Papa was in luck! By the end of six
months Charles Garner had decided to move back to
DeSoto County. Since he and Papa each owned a 60-acre
tract of land with orange groves, they just traded places!
This was a good deal for Papa and Mama. It was just
what Papa had dreamed about.
"Papa was 30 years old at the time, and Mama was a
little older.
"After the transaction was final, Papa went back to
Ona to make plans to move his cattle, Mama. and the
seven children to Immokalee.
"The first thing Papa had to do was come down with
his brother and work over the old log house here. This is
Collier County now, but it was Lee County back then
when the log house was finished.


"There were many days of preparation for the trip,
which took three long days in 1914. Today, it is about a
two-hour trip."
"Brother Dius. you tell about the trip first; then we
girls will talk about what we remember."

Dius
Dius began, "I remember well. I came over with the
big move when my family came to Immokalee in 1914.
I helped load it all, and I was just 12 years old.
"I brought a mule and a wagon along. I was the first
one to bring a mule to this country. I wasn't afraid; I had
all'trust in that mule. My sisters might have been afraid,
but I wasn't.
"The ox teams had left, and 'way ahead of them were
the cattle being drove to their new home.
"I remember when we camped outside of Arcadia. It
wasn't often, but when we could, we followed paths or
trails made by the soldiers and the Indians. The govern-
ment anticipated further movements of settlers through
the area.
Stock
"We brought a start of hogs with us. They were pure-
bred Duroc Jersey. We drove them here.
"The cattle were range cattle. There were about 300
on that trail.
"Two years later our father arranged to purchase 200
head of our grandfather's cattle. All of our family cattle
came out of those cattle that we originally moved to
Immokalee. Our cattle today are direct lineage of the
original Cracker stock of the Carlton-Hendry cattle.

Indians
"You see at that time the country around Immokalee
was the United States but was still part of the Indian Ter-
ritory. We had to regard the Indians. They were familiar
with the American traders. The Browns were traders and
great people here years ahead of us. We weren't traders.
We were seeking territory for cattle.
"We found we had enemies and some friends. Friends
were of great value. It didn't matter what a man was; it
was necessary to seek his friendship, his favors and his
consideration.
"We worked to establish the Indian friendship, as well
as the white man's friendship.

Enemies
"Some of the white men were the worst enemies we
had. They would scatter what we had carried here and
what we had gained. I often thought how much better it
would have been for us as a family to be partly kin to
some of those cattlemen of that time instead of outsiders.
Of course, there again the worst enemy one can have is a
kinship that don't like you!
"When we came, it was open range, so it kept us busy
day and night looking after our interests."

Nina & Blye
Nina and Blye began telling what they remembered
about the move.
Nina said, "Papa had the furniture moved in oxcarts,
all right. Mr. Pelham drove the oxen. It was the longest
double wagon around. I can see it yet."
Blye said, "Yes, I remember it, too. When I knew we
were leaving. I remember going out in the yard and look-
ing around at everything. I knew I'd never see it any-
more."
Nina continued, "At that time we lived in New Zion
which is 14 miles west of Wauchula and 14 miles west
of Ona.
On The Trail
"On the trail that first night we stayed in a vacant sec-


COURTESY IMAGE
Papa, Mama and five of the seven children who made the
journey in 1914.
tion house. We put our bed in there. That was near Arca-
dia. We left about the same time as the oxen, but some-
times we got ahead of the oxcart wagon and sometimes
behind it.
"We kids came in the work wagon, and Dius drove
the mule that pulled it. That wagon was packed with bed-
ding and camp things. Dius brought this yellow cat
along. I remember it got away when we camped in the
prairie the second night. He was so upset, and so were
we girls over losing that cat."
Nina said, "I remember something scary. Driving the
cattle that 100 miles down here to Immokalee from New
Zion was a hard job. They stampeded once, and we even
lost some. At night some of the men had to stay up and
yell and make noise to keep the cattle from getting
spooked.
"We children slept soundly because we were so tired.
We weren't aware of all the dangers around us.

The Children
"Sister Jo was born Sept. 5, and we moved here Dec.
14.. She was 3 months old when we made that trip.
"Yes, Blye and I rode with Dius, who drove the work
wagon and mule. Ola rode in the wagon and took care of
Louise and Lois. Mama held Jo,pf course, and rode in
the spring wagon."
Blye said, "I don't remember ever seeing a road. We
just went through the woods. By night we were tired,
dirty and thirsty, as kids would be on such a long trip like
that.
"One time Papa got a little ahead of us, and I was
scared. I thought we were lost because I couldn't see
them. I said, 'Dius, hurry the old mule up a little bit!' At
7 years old, 1 was real scared. Imagine being out in the
wild woods with nothing in sight and our parents out of
view.
"I think Dius was frightened, too. He was 12, but
acted bigger.
"After a while, we could see our parents ahead
again."

To be continued, with The Oxcart Trail Part 2.


rNutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: Is it true that bacon is a
healthy choice because it con-
tains some of the same
healthy kind of fat that's in
olive oil?
A: Although bacon fat may con-
tain about half the amount of
the healthful monounsaturated
fatty acid oleicc acid) found in
olive oil, that does not make it
half as healthful. Besides the


difference in monounsaturated
fat, bacon fat contains twice as
much of the cholesterol-raising
saturated fat as found in olive
oil. Each slice of regular bacon
adds one gram of saturated fat.
The recommended maximum of
saturated fat for most adults is
15 to 20 grams per day.
Furthermore, olive oil contains
no sodium, whereas each slice


ot bacon contains about 185
milligrams (mg). That's a small
part of daily consumption, but
because most Americans take in
sodium well above recommen-
dations, we need to look for
ways to cut back. Also, bacon is
one of the processed meats
clearly linked to increased risk
of colon cancer.


I, ''I~II I I ~ 'I I I''







ehe
115S.7thAv. Wue* *FL337
Teflephon (86) 77-325

^ssQualit printings^ervices at^



H~a~competitiBefprBces!


IIl





July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9A


team, the cowboys from the
Florida Institute for Neurologic
Rehabilitation, and cowboys
Luke Cantu, Peck Harris and
his brother Ty, and Catlin
Courson.
Hardee County's is one of
the largest ranch rodeos, with
roughly 20 teams riding each
year.
There is a variety of events



JU$S
Continue
to establish a storage equipment
facility in Ona and enhance the
Broadband service already
available throughout the coun-
ty. The new division will add a
fiberoptic distributed antenna
system on most of the 17 poles
already in the county. It will
bolster coverage and capacity,
essential to public safety and
other carriers.
The new service, called
HIPTV, will provide next gen-
eration services at 1,000-plus
megabytes. It will include web-
based weather stations at a
dozen of the poles in Hardee
County. Rapid Systems will add
nine employees for this new
task.

SonHaven
SonHaven Preparatory Acad-
emy at 1121 Louisiana St.,
Wauchula, is asking for
$85,000 for remodeling its new
Hardee County facility, adding
educational equipment and hir-
ing four more teachers by 2013.
SonHaven began in Sarasota
in 2002 and uses pre-existing
structures to be environmental-
ly conscious and protect Flor-
ida's fragile eco-system from
more development.
The K-12 private, non-profit
school would run for 44 weeks.
It would be open about 30 hours
each week and plans to open
locally later this month with six
teachers offering one-on-one
instruction in a Bible-centered
curriculum.

Main Street Kitchen &
Tile Store
Longtime realtor Bill Ander-
son and his son Chad, experi-
enced in construction, are pre-
senting remodeling the old
Central Florida Lawn and
Garden Center at 230 W. Main
St., Wauchula, for an 82-foot
glass frontage to display the
'sto6e's elegant kitchen cabinits,
bathroom models and flooring,
at prices lower than the large
home improvement businesses.
The new 6,256-square-foot
building will be a one-stop cen-
ter, with 40 different cabinets,
all types of flooring, counter-
tops, soffit, fascia, screen enclo-
sures and other home construc-
tion products. It hopes to open
later this summer.
It seeks $186,000 toward its
equipment/remodeling. It will
also provide quality construc-
tion in kitchen, bath and floor-
ing remodeling, with years of
experience in the field. The
company expects 30 percent of
its business to come from out of
the county. It will have two.
employees initially.

Peace River
Explorations Inc.
Peace River Explorations
hopes to open by Oct. 1. The






School


Taxes


Down
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County School
Board is considering a proposal
that would reduce property
taxes for the upcoming year.
A tentative fiscal year 2011-
12 budget and its accompany-
*ing millage rate were approved
by the board on Monday morn-
ing of this week.
The final plan will be consid-
ered by the board in a public
hearing set for Monday at 5:10


p.m. in the Board Room at 230
S. Florida Ave. in Wauchula.
: The plan calls for a total
$62.1 million budget and a tax
rate of 7.6040. Capital outlay
funds will be used to purchase a
new school bus.
The millage for 2010-11 was
at 7.965, mostly due to state
requirements, which instead
were reduced for this coming
fiscal year.


I
el


used in these qualifying ranch
rodeos, but at least three of the
contests must be ones that are in
the finals. The various events
are double mugging, team
branding, a relay race, barrel
racing, wild-cow milking (with
a variation known as wild-cow
undecorating), saddle bronc rid-





r wO-
d Frnm .A
recently formed non-profit
organization hopes to be the
fossil-themed tourism develop-
ment catalyst for the communi-
ty. It seeks $2.9 million for
Phase One of its business,
which will eventually employ
10 people.
It will build its service organ-
ization on helping visitors use
the many historical and ecolog-
ical advantages of the Peace
River bone valley area.
The first plan, which requires
about $200,000, would enable
the group to open a welcome
center and concierge service at
the historic Wauchula Train
Depot, leased from the city for
$1 a year. Eventually, it will
include an art gallery featuring
local artists. Interest will be
generated in local shops, restau-
rants and accommodations.
Plans are to coordinate canoe
or bicycle rentals, fossil excur-
sions, special events, and wed-
dings and historical tours at the
Underwood Estate known as
Azalea Hill. It will eventually
include a showcase fossil muse-
um and fossil-themed water
park, all in the downtown area,
making it more pedestrian
friendly.


ing, trailer loading, a stampede
race, wild-colt riding, team
sorting (with the variation
women's sorting), and team
doctoring.
The usual number of events
is five at each ranch rodeo.
Hardee's will be the double
mugging, team branding, bronc
riding, team sorting, and trailer
loading. To give the teams an
intermission, there will also be
mutton bustin' for the little
cowboys and cowgirls ages 3-6.
This event is always a favorite
with the crowd, and the winner
from both days will be awarded
his or her very own belt buckle.
The winners of this event
also receive belt buckles, in
addition to the cash prizes
awarded to the top three teams.
In the double muggin',
everyone starts out on horse-
back. One member ropes a calf,
and the remaining team mem-
bers must dismount, wrangle
the calf to the ground, tie three
legs, and remove the roping
rope. The roper is not allowed
to leave his horse. This is often
a rough event, but great fun for
the crowd to watch.
Team sorting has a herd of
calves at one end of the arena.
The team lines up behind the
event line, the sorter crosses the
line, and a number is called out
- say, No. 5. The team then
has a maximum of three min-
utes to cut out calf No. 5, then
No. 6 and No. 7 from the herd,
all the time keeping the rest of
the herd intact and the sorted
calves on the far side of the line.
This event shows off the skills
of these well-trained ranch
horses as well as the riders.
Team branding starts out
like the double muggin', but all
team members can dismount
and participate. Once the rope is


Jake Anderson Taylor Barlow Michael Forrester


off the calf's head, they call for
the cowgirl, who has been
standing in the branding circle.
She runs to the calf, brands it -
using only a white powder -
then runs back to the circle,
when their time stops.
In the trailer loading, the
team cuts a numbered steer out
of a herd, runs it into a trailer,,
shuts the gate behind it, then
loads all five of the team mem-
bers' horses, shuts and locks the
back gate of the trailer, and runs
across the arena to the timer's
circle. Many of them will tell
you how difficult it is to run
when you're laughing.
The rodeo finishes up with
saddle bronc riding. With the
fine bucking stock that usually
comes to Hardee, this event
showcases the talents of one
tough individual on each team.
And let's not forget the pickup
men y'all may remember
Alton Langford being pulled
from his horse to the ground
last year by one of the bronc
riders!
SThe action starts each night
at 7:30 in the Cattlemen's Arena
at Altman and Stenstrom roads
in Wauchula.
There will be concessions
and vendors and plenty of
whooping and hollering and
stomping of feet for everyone's
favorite cowboys and cowgirls!


10 HOURS A
MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


Kevin uodwinl


uNutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
| AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: I have seen papayas in the
grocery store but never tried
one. What do I look for? Are
they very nutritious?
A: Papayas are extremely high
in vitamin C, and also provide.
lots of beta-carotene, folate,
magnesium and potassium.
Papayas differ in size and
shape, and the color of the flesh
inside may be yellow, pinkish-
orange or red. Because of these
color differences, it's difficult
to judge ripeness by color. Look
, for a papaya that gives slightly
to palm pressure without being
too soft. If needed, ripen it at
room temperature; store in the
refrigerator for up to a week
after that. The cluster of small
black seeds in the center is edi-
ble, though most people discard
them. Serve chunks of papaya
in a fruit plate, added to a green
salad, or as a topping for chick-
en or fish. It's also great
chopped with some cilantro and
sweet red pepper for a flavorful
salsa.

Q: How much difference does
it really make if I use a lower
fat alternative to cream or
half-n-half in cream soup?
A: Cream soups typically use
anywhere from two to six table-
spoons of cream or milk per
serving. So if you use heavy
cream, that alone accounts for
100 to 300 calories per serving
of soup. Using half-n-half drops
that to adding 40 to 120 calories
per serving. Heavy cream in
this amount also adds two to six
grams of saturated fat, so
heavy-handed use can account
for about a third of the recom-
mended limit for most adults.


But there are alternatives for
delicious creamy soup with
even lower calories and saturat-
ed fat. Two tablespoons of
whole milk add about 20 calo-
ries and just over half a gram of
saturated fat per serving.
Evaporated skim milk adds 25
calories and zero saturated fat,
and fat-free half-n-half adds 20
calories and no saturated fat
with each two tablespoons
added. People differ in which of
these alternatives appeals to
them most. One of the secrets
for reducing calories with any
of these options without losing
the thick, rich mouth feel of
cream soup is to include pureed
beans (such as cannellini or
Great Northern beans), winter
squash or potato. Cook them
first, or if using canned beans
drain and rinse them, and then
pure with a blender or food
processor. Add about one-half
to three-quarter cup of the pure
for each serving of soup. This
adds a thicker texture and extra
fiber and nutrients to the soup
as well.


Jake Mayer Dustin Ratliff


Continued From 1A


A Safe Place

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119

End The Abuse!
tfc-dh


*CF/Industries



CONGRATULATIONS TO HARDEE COUNTY'S TEACHERS, STUDENTS, STAFF

AND ADMINISTRATORS ON ANOTHER GREAT YEAR AND A JOB WELL DONE!


'























Mrs. Ninfa Skipper-2011 Hardee County Teacher of the Year
.TO THE 2011 HARDER HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES OF CF INDUSTRIES EMPLOYEE FAMILIES




1 -1





HARDEE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPRESENTATIVES JOINED WITH CFINDUSTRIES ON JUNE9TH IN TAMPA
FOR THE2011 COMMISSIONER'S BUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS. THE EVENT CELEBRATED SUCCESSFUL
ALLIANCES BETWEEN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY AND LOCAL SCHOOLS TO BENEFIT FLORIDA'S STUDENTS.
PICTURED (L TO R) ARE NICKKATZAFAS (CF INDUSTRIESS, JAN MCKlBBEN, MARIE DASHER (BolH HARDEE COUNTY
PbaC ScHOLs), RICHARD GHENT (CF IVOUSTRIES), AND COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION, DR. ERICJ. SMITH.











Mrs. Ninfa Skipper 2011 Hardee County Teacher of the Year



CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE 2011 HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES OF CF INDUSTRIES EMPLOYEE FAMILIES!


- ''




The Herald-Advocate,


Business Cards


* Stationery
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Labels


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Picker's Cards
'.. .. .-* ,- i n ; '," ia


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ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS IN ONE CONVENIENT


LOCATION!











Homeowner Finds

Crooks At His Home
By CYNTHIA KRAHL admitted they took a laptop
Of The Herald-Advocate computer and intended to take a
A man returning to his house television set, but saw that the
mid-afternoon discovered homeowner had returned. They
thieves walking out of it. fled the scene in their vehicle.
.Maj. Randy Dey of the.. The homeowner, however, --------.
Hardee County Sheriff's Office was able to give the Sheriff's --
said two suspects have been Office a description of that
arrested in connection with the vehicle. "A bunch of deputies
burglary and two laptop com- and detectives were working
puters have been recovered, this burglary and other burgla-
Kathy Ray Friel, 26, of 309 ries," Dey said. "Sometimes it
Georgia St., Wauchula, was comes down to knowing who
charged with burglary of a the players are in Hardee
dwelling, grand theft and deal- County."
ing in stolen property, all The description of the vehi-
felonies. cle, a pickup truck, was familiar
Halbert Diego, 21, of 2488 to authorities, he said, and the
Gobble Lane, Zolfo Springs, suspects were identified and .4
was charged with burglary of a: located.
dwelling and grand theft. A..&. Before their arrests, howev-
Dey alleged the 'pair broke er, Friel allegedly sold a laptop Det. Andrew McGuckin wit
into the back door of the house. to a man named "David" for from home burglary.
Friel, he said, told authorities $50, Dey alleged.
Diego kicked the door while The stolen items were recov-
she pushed on it. ered and the suspects were
Once inside, Friel allegedly jailed.



Talk About Investments To Help Parents Avoid Fraud


Most children turn to their
parents for financial guidance.
Sometimes, however, it's the
parent who needs help.
Older people are regularly
targeted by fraud criminals
because they have money,
whether it's retirement savings,
home equity or steady forms of
income. Experienced investors
may also believe they're too
smart to be scammed. Research
funded by the FINRA Investor
Education Foundation shows,
surprisingly, that financially
savvy, self-reliant investors are
more likely to be victims of
fraud than those who are less
knowledgeable.
"Investors who are overconfi-
dent about their ability to spot a
'great opportunity' are less like-
ly to ask for help and advice
from others," said Gerri Walsh
of the FINRA Foundation.
"And that's exactly what fraud
criminals want."
SAdult children should talk to
their parents about investment
fraud and be sure they are


familiar with the tactics that
fraud criminals use, Walsh said.
"Trick$ of the Trade: Out-
smarting Investment Fraud," a
documentary produced by the
Foundation and airing on public
television stations, explains
these tactics and the steps that
investors can take to protect
themselves. Free copies of the
movie can be ordered on the
Foundation's fraud-fighting
website, www.SaveAndIn-
vest.org. The website also
offers information on how to
check the background of a
financial professional and the
legitimacy of securities.
"It may be hard for some peo-
ple to talk about money," Walsh
said, "but getting your parents
to come to you or someone else
they trust for a second opinion
before making an investment
decision is a good way to avoid
trouble."
It is a discussion Robert
Kalinowski, a 25-year veteran
of the Vermont State Police,
wishes he had had with hir


father.
The older Kalinowski was
befriended by a financial advi-
sor. The two would go to high
school sporting events together-
but the friendship was a ruse to
steal $100,000 in an investment
scheme.
"I did not see this happen-
ing," Kalinowski said. "I felt
rotten. I was supposed to pro-
tect everybody ... but I did not
see this coming."
Checking the advisor's regis-
tration to sell securities would
have revealed that he was no
longer licensed. The advisor
was eventually charged with
embezzlement and grand larce-
ny but died before the trial.
"No matter what, it can hap-
pen to anybody," Kalinowski
said. "They have to check
before they invest their money,
ask questions, ask the experts,
do research. If it could happen
to our family, it could happen to
you.


Some minds seem almost to create themselves, springing up under every disadvan-
tage and working their solitary but irresistible way through a thousand obstacles.
-Washington Irving
So the years hang like old clothes, forgotten in the wardrobe of our minds. Did I wear
that? Who was I then?


I


COURTESY PHOTO
h laptop computers recovered


A cat improves the garden
wall in sunshine, and the
hearth in foul-weather.
-Judith Merkle Riley

Those who think it is per-
missible to tell white lies
soon grow color-blind. *
-Austin O'Malley


July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11A;

Ovarian Cancer: Two New Clinical
Research Studies Underway


Doctors around the globe are
now recruiting women with
recurrent ovarian cancer to par-
ticipate in two new clinical
research studies called TRINO-
VA-1 and TRINOVA-2.
Although there have been
-many treatment advances in
recent years, up to 90 percent of
women treated for advanced
ovarian cancer will still experi-
ence a relapse of their disease.
"For women with recurrent
ovarian cancer, participation in
a clinical research study may be
an option to consider," :said
Bradley Monk, M.D., a princi-
pal investigator for the TRINO-
VA-1 study at Catholic Health-
care West in Phoenix, AZ.
"Women participating in these
studies may receive an investi-
Sgational drug which may help
researchers find a new way to
treat this disease."
In the United States, ovarian
cancer is the fifth leading cause
of cancer-related deaths among
women.
The purpose of the TRINOVA-
1 and TRINOVA-2 studies are
to find out whether adding the
investigational drug AMG 386
to chemotherapy improves
the length of time until the dis-
ease progresses compared to
treatment with chemotherapy


alone.
AMG 386, developed by.
Amgen, is an investigational:
new medicine known as an
angiogenesis inhibitor. Angio-
genesis is the process the body:
uses to grow new blood vessels,
which provide cells and organs,
with the nutrients and oxygen
they need to thrive. Cancer cells
also require new blood vessels
supplying oxygen and nutrients
in order for tumors to grow.
Angiogenesis inhibitors are.
designed to stop the develop-
ment of these vessels, starving
the cancer and slowing or pre-
venting tumor growth.
Participants in the study will
receive treatment with either
chemotherapy plus AMG 386
or chemotherapy alone. The
studies are open to women 18
years of age or older who have
been diagnosed with recurrent
ovarian cancer and have been
previously treated with che-
motherapy for management of
their disease.
Taking part in a clinical
research study is voluntary and
a personal decision that should
be made after speaking with
your doctor. For more informa-
tion on the two new clinical
research trials, visit
www.TRINOVAstudies.com.


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Increase an additional 8-10 times by 2015.
Integrating T-Mobile's network resources, while continuing AT&T's
network investment, is the surest, fastest, and most efficient way to
meet this challenge.

Continued innovation for T-Mobile customers.
Through the integration with AT&T, T-Mobile customers can continue
to enjoy innovative technologies, devices, and services for many years to
come. They will have the freedom to keep their existing pricing plans
and phones, and will benefit in the future with expanded capabilities.
T-Mobile customers will also benefit from network enhancements .--.
such as improved coverage in remote regions and access to AT&T's
planned next generation networks.


Reaching more of Florida with LTE.
LTE technology is a super-fast way to connect to the Internet.
The combination of AT&T and T-Mobile will allow AT&T to expand its
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PAGE ONE


193 Attend Youth Field Day


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Living in an agricultural
community, having the Range
Cattle Research & Education
Center right here in the county
,is a helpful advantage.
The center is a unit of the
University of Florida's Institute
of Fodd & Agricultural
Sciences and is located near
Ona. The station was estab-
lished in 1941 for two purposes,
to learn how to produce quality
forage on sandy cut-over
pinelands and to investigate
breeding, feeding and manage-
ment of beef cattle.


For the past four years, it has
also hosted a Youth Field Day.
This year's field day was
held Thursday, June 30. The
Youth Field Day is a technical,
hands-on opportunity for those
age 8-18 to enhance their
knowledge in the agricultural
field, with a specific focus on
beef cattle and ranching in
Florida.
Five different student stations
were present to incorporate
hands-on, live-cattle and future-
focused activities.
The first station was the Beef
Bug Lab, where attendees put
beef production under the


microscope to culture manure..
Before the hands-on part of the
lesson, a slide show was pre-
sented to show everyone what
exactly they would be looking
for. Students then identified
microscopic parasites and pests.
The second station, entitled
Dig Deep into Dirt, allowed
everyone to get a "worm's eye
view" of one of the most impor-
tant parts of the ranch the
soil. Soil and water scientists
explained the importance of
soil, how it affects the grass
cows eat and even helps clean
the air and slow down global
warming.


Traveling around to the pens,
a cow with a plug was on dis-
play for the Scientific Stomach
activity. Learning the difference
between "what goes in and
what goes out," ranchers stuck
their hand inside a live cow's
stomach to better understand
their diet.
How many breeds can one
cow be? After attending the
field day, local youth could tell
you. They learned why and how
each breed is selected, and
learned to construct halters for
their own livestock.
Finally, representatives from
the University of Florida and


Abraham Baldwin Agricultural
College in Georgia spoke with
the youngsters and led them
through considerations of agri-
cultural college and career
opportunities, leaving a bit of
wisdom and planting the seed
of exploration.
This year 193 students, par-
ents and youth leaders were in
attendance.
"Both students and adults
enjoyed themselves and were
able to gain useful information
for their agriculture endeavors,
college plans/future careers,
and understanding of our pur-
pose as a University of Florida


research and education center,"
said Andrea Dunlap of the 2011
Youth Field Day Committee.
The Range Cattle Station has
five faculty members, 18 sup-
port personnel and 15 students
living and working at the center.
There are four programs: agron-
omy, animal sciences, soil and
water science, and weed sci-
ence. Currently, the station has
626 mature cows, 75 yearling
heifers, 584 calves and 35 bulls.
For more information about
the center or its programs, call
735-1314 or 'visit rcrec-
ona.ifas.ufl.edu.


PHOTOS BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
The Bug Beef Lab provided for a mucky class session as attendees put beef produc-
tion under the microscope literally!


Representatives from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Georgia explained to
the students the importance of shadowing, corresponding and researching their inter-
ests, no matter their age.

The bathtub was invented in 1850 and the telephone in 1875. In other words, if you had
been living in 1850, you could have sat in the bathtub for 25 years without having to
answer the phone.
-Bill DeWitt


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The Scientific Stomach kept everyone's attention as one of the ranchers stuck her
hand into a live cow's stomach, to sort what goes in and what comes out.


1 *" t
The University of Florida's Range Cattle Station near Ona held its fourth annual Youth
Field Day recently, with 193 in attendance.

You may have tangible wealth untold: caskets of jewels and coffers of gold. Richer
than I you can never be. I had a Mother who read to me.
-Strickland Gillilan






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The Herald-Advocate
iUSPS 78-'-1)

Thursday, July 21,2011


[HI OE 10UEDCR ADTRCsToCOSEFO






2B The Herald-Advocate, July 21,2011


Hardee


Living


Savannah Locklar Will


Wed James
Milton and Stacy Locklar of
Bowling Green and Leslie
Locklar and Lon Miller of
Wauchula announce the en-
gagement of their daughter,
Savannah Marie Locklar, to
James Lewis Chancey Jr., the
son of Lewis Chancey of
Bowling Green and Angie
Stewart of Wauchula.
The bride-elect resides in
Bowling Green and is a 2006
graduate of Hardee Senior High


YOUTH SEMINAR


Chancey Jr.
School. She is currently
employed at First National
Bank of Wauchula as an item
processor.
The prospective groom is a
2002 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School. He resides in
Bowling Green and is currently
employed at Pike Electric as a
lineman.
Plans are being made for a
private wedding in Tennessee
on Sept. 19.


Savannah Locklar & James Chancey Jr.


COURTESY PHOTO


The man who has done his level best, and who is con-
scious that he has done his best, is a success, even
though the world may write him down a failure.


COURTESY PHOTO
Two Hardee Senior High School sophomores, Katie
Wheeler and Will Bennett, attended the Mid-Florida HOBY
Seminar held June 17-19 at Eckerd College in St. Peters-
burg. The national program was started in 1958 by actor
Hugh O'Brian. It reaches out to every U.S. public and pri-
vate high school to provide leadership development-op-
portunities that empower the teens to achieve their high-
est potential. It is a seminar-based program including a
three-day lesson filled with panels, community service
and roundtable discussions. Attendees are able to en-
gage in conversations with experts in media, business
and technology. Pictured above are (left) Will and Katie,
representing HHS.


W"ri bi I I,

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302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort leade, ti. '





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90th BIRTHDAY!
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COURTESY PHOTO
Josephine "Ms. Jo" Martin celebrated her 90th birthday
with a trip to her home state of Arkansas for a family re-
union. Martin has three children: sons Joe Martin (wife
Nona) and Richard Martin; and daughter Joyce Summers
(husband Larry). She has seven grandchildren, 10 great-
grandchildren and five great-great-grandchildren.


1 11
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hg to 18 years BAAILE RAE KNIGHT
Owner/Instructor


IULY 30, 2011
Sarah Cowart & Jonathan Stephens
OCTOBER 15, 2011
Savannah Locklar & James (Bubby) Chancey
DECEMBER 10, 2011
Dara Johnson & Andrew Judah
Married May 29, 2011


Mr. & Mrs. Rob Hanchey
(Formerly ~ Katie Pendarvis)


Ca& On %9L/n
Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula .
(863) 773-6565
www.catsonmain.com


snc7:21 .


I


7C
Cy)Ej
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July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


LEADERSHIP GRADS


COURTESY PHOTO
Graduates of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce's fourth annual Leadership Hardee program are shown here
with (in far back row, from left) county commissioners Minor Bryant, Terry Atchley, Dale Johnson and Grady Johnson.
The program is designed for existing and up-and-coming leaders in various segments of the community, who gain
skills and knowledge to help address the challenges facing this county. The curriculum takes nine months to com-
plete. The 2010-11 graduates are (from left) Bo Conerly, Teresa Carver, Derren Bryan, Katrina Blandin, Millie Bolin,
Kevin Denny, James Bodeck, Patty Valerio, Michael Kelly, Micah Hendrickson, Jamie Braddock and Vanessa
Hernandez. Leadership Hardee is currently accepting applications from chamber members wishing to join the Class
of 2011-12.


The first television broad-
cast of a Major League
Baseball game was
between the Cincinnati
Reds and the Brooklyn
Dodgers on August 26,
1939.


COOL DOWN YOUR DOG
WITH A "SUMMER CUT"
781 -5864
3732 Peeples Lane
Wauchula
Monday Saturday
By Appointment



A
ti* *


By RACHEL ROBERTS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Gale Ratliff was born in Tampa. She
was born on a Saturday, at 12:01 a.m.
on June 13, 1942.
SShe lived in Zolfo Springs as a child,
with her parents J.P. and Frances Talley,
her brother, Philip, and her sister, Joyce.
Her responsibilities as a child includ-
ed going to school, completing her
homework, and doing her chores. She
also had to watch her
brother, who was 10-1/2 ,
years younger than her. 1
She attended first
through seventh grades at
Zolfo Elementary School, and eighth
through 12th at the old Hardee High
School. She got to school by riding the
bus. Her favorite teacher was Mrs.
Eloise Driskell, who taught her first-
and 12th-grade years. During these
,school-years, young ladies wore blous-..
jes, skirts anddAresses. hey would wear
'oxford shoes and-bobbi socks.
As a teenager, her hobbies were play-
ing volleyball and softball, and going
fishing at Charlie Creek. She also
enjoyed RC Cola and Moon Pies after
school. Girls did not play on school
sports teams, but they did play sports in
PE.
After school, during harvest time,
friends would go in the fields and play
under the pine trees. One of her favorite
childhood games was playing marbles.
The first time she went on a date was
at the age of 17. Her first car was a
1960 Ford. It was a two-door green


Progressive Missionary Bap-
tist Church will hold a Fun N'
Festival Day on Saturday from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Falcon. She once owned a white pit
bull, and a "big yellow kitty."
One of her childhood dreams was to
get out of school and go to work. In her
spare time, she was usually watching
Philip. As he was a baby, she would
stroll him around outside in the yard.
Gale learned to cook during home
economics in school, and after her mar-
riage to Clyde Thomas Ratliff Jr. Her
first job was working as a bookkeeper
at Wauchula State Bank.
SShe was paid a little over a
[i Itt O dollar an hour, minimum
S wage.
Her best childhood
memory was Christmas time. As a
young child, she would go see Santa
Claus and get a bag of candy with
apples and nuts. She loved the smell of
real Florida Christnias treesL Every year,
her family would go out and cut them
down.
The best advice she received as a
child was, "Don't start anything you
can't keep up," said by her grandpa,
Matthew Talley. She did not look up to
anyone in particular, she just did what
she had to do.
One thing that hasn't changed since
she was a child is Spook Hill.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Families and children of all
ages are invited to come to the
church at 149 Manley Road
corerr of Manley Road and
East Main Street) for the day of
fun.
The deadline fbr Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
Jbr ihe next edition.


Joseph Priestley is the dis-
coverer of oxygen, but he
was elected to the French
Academy of Sciences in
1772 and received a medal
from the Royal Society in
1773 for another discov-
ery. Priestley invented car-
bonated soda water in
1767.


II I,/f^^


Hardee County Cattlemen's Association 'I
3rd Annual Ranch Rodeo

Friday, July 22 and Saturday, July 23
7:30 p.m. Hardee County Cattlemen's Arena

SDouble Mugging. Team Branding Team Sorting
Bronc Riding Trailer Loading Mutton Busting %

Admission: Adults $10 per person
Senior Citizens $5 per person
Children 10 and under FREE
Cash only, please. Concession and vendors available on grounds


4 JS greatt fun for t&e



Mutton Busting Age 6 and under
Limited number each night-first come basis 1

r soc7:14,21c%
MIMI w


Health Department

Warns Of Heat Ills


The Hardee County Health
Department and the Florida
Department of Health are cau-
tioning all Floridians to be
aware of the warning signs of
heat exhaustion.
Heat exhaustion is a milder
form of heat-related illness that
can develop after several days
of exposure to high tempera-
tures and inadequate or unbal-
anced replacement of fluids.
Those most prone to heat
exhaustion are elderly people.
people with high blood pressure
or heart disease, people work-
ing or exercising in a hot envi-
ronment, and people who are
not acclimatized to the heat.
"We ask that Floridians and
visitors to our state and county
take the proper precautions to
ensure safe summer days," said
Hardee County Health Depart-
ment director Dr. Stephen
Gordon. "Knowing the warning
signs of heat exhaustion and
quick cooling methods can savd
a life."
Warning signs of heat ex-
haustion may vary, but include
the following:
Heavy sweating
Paleness
Muscle cramps


Tiredness
Weakness
Dizziness
Headache
Nausea or vomiting
Fainting
Skin: may be cool and
moist
Pulse rate: fast and weak
Breathing: fast and shallow
Untreated, heat exhaustion
may progress to heat stroke.
Seek medical attention immedi-
ately if symptoms are severe
and/or the victim has heart
problems or high blood pres-
sure.
Otherwise, help the victim to
rapidly cool off. Seek medical
attention if symptoms worsen
or last longer than one hour.
If heat exhaustion is suspect-
ed, the following cooling metg-
ods may be effective:
Drinking cool, non-alco-
holic beverages
Resting in an air-condi-
tioned environment
Taking a cool shower, bath
or sponge batg
Wearing lightweight cloth-
ing
Preventing sunburn, which
damages the skin's ability to
dissipate heat, by wearing sun-
screen of 30 SPF


The man who thinks he can live without others is mis-
taken; the one who thinks others can't live without him is
even more deluded.




HANCHEY'S CARPETS
VISIT Us ONLINE At www.HancheysCarpets.com
Commercial & Residential
*Carpet* Vinyl Wood Laminate

'



"We Install What We Sell"
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1968 N
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(863) 773-4792 (863) 773-4738 8


WHAT'S OUT THERE'


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They Always Cut A


Florida Christmas Tree


-






4B The Herald-Advocate, July 21,2011



Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


year's finals in Amarillo. (At least that got them in white but,
guys, is white really a color?)
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowsvirls!


THE FINALE TO A
BUSY RANCH RODEO WEEKEND
In the last column, I left y'all hanging in the middle of the
events at the Working Ranch Cowboys Association "Best of the
Ranches" ranch rodeo held on April 3 at the Arcadia rodeo
grounds.
Remember that our teams competing were Stevens Land &
SCattle/Fulford Cattle, the Carlton Ranches, Audubon Ranch/-
' Belflower Cattle and Schroder Manatee Ranch/CJ Cattle.
The Audubon/Belflower team consisted of their bronc rider,
Dennis Carlton Jr., Pat Thomas, Slade Bronson, Andy Morgan and
Wauchulan Jay Belflower, while Stevens/Fulford had Charles
Robert Stevens III, Billy Adams, Bobby Joe Fulford, Billy Joe
Tindall and their bronc rider, Joey Drake, competing for them.
The third event was the team branding. This runs teams side-
by-side, cutting from the same herd of calves, and they must rope
and brand three calves. SMR/CJ completed this event in 1:11.12,
with Audubon/Belflower in at 1:2'1.80, and Carlton at 1:29.87. The
roping gods were not smiling on Stevens/Fulford that day, as they
were unable to catch three calves before the buzzer sounded, and
they received a no-time.
With the odd number of teams, we were treated to the arena
staff participating in the sixth heat, with the roping done by Desoto
County Commissioner Elton Langford wearing a hot pink shirt!
(See, real cowboys are tough enough to wear pink!)
The sorting event done by Tamme Miller Fussell's husband
and the February "Homegrown Cowboy" Jimmy saw SMR/CJ
with a time of 30.77 seconds. This team was made up of Jimmy and
son Corey, cousin Robert Fussell, Stevie John and Jason
McEndree. All of our other teams received no-times, as the calves
kept getting out.
These ranch rodeos save the most injury-prone event, wild
cow milking, till last. The Florida Cattlemen's Association qualify-
ing rodeos run four teams simultaneously out of the bucking
chutes, whereas the WRCA releases the cow from one end of the
arena and the cowboys from the opposite end. Seeing Trae Adams
(with rope at the ready), Dale Carlton and Brian Alexy thundering
down that arena was a thrilling sight! The other members of the
Carlton Ranches team were Matt Carlton, Clint Boney and the guy
who keeps all them youngsters in line, Lloyd McGee.
Stevens/Fulford came in with an awesome time of 29.96 sec-
onds in this event (behind the winners by only half secondd!, with
Audubon/Belflower at 47.58 seconds, Carlton Ranches at 54.55
seconds, and SMR/CJ with 54.62 seconds.
And the winner is ... (drumroll, please) SMR/CJ Cattle!
Tamme, Jimmy, Corey and Jamie, together with cousin
Robert, Stevie and Lindsey John, and Jason and Leeann McEndree
FV. -if I2


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Heeling the calf is Charles Robert Stevens III as team-
mate Joey Drake keeps an eyeloo his leader rope in the
stray-gathering event. While thisrpair completed the job,
the other half of the Stevens Land/Fulford Cattle team
did not. resulting in a no-time.


Charles Roberts Stevens III and Joey Drake grab onto
the calf roped by Billy Adams (out of view) for branding.
Pickup man Alton Langford watches.


iE L LPYI I OEA N s )\

1/2 PRICE SHOE SALE


W www.shopjollyboans.com
N. 6th dve, Wauchula (863) 767-0017 g
Mon-Fri 9:30-5:30/gaturdag 9:30-1:30 .


HEARTLAND PHARMACY



DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist
Hours:


Monday-Friday


9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday


9:00 am to 1:00pm


Stevie John and Robert Fussell keep the calf on the
ground while Jimmy Fussell brands it. Corey Fussell
watches from horseback, ready to rope the next of three
calves required to receive a time in this event, which was
1:11.12.


will all be traveling to Amarillo. Texas. in November! They join
* what I'm sure will become a long line of Hardee County winners.
This rodeo was first held in Florida in 2007. The 2008 winners
(through all the mud and rain) were Stevens Land & Cattle (teamed
up that year with Hilliard Bros.), and the 2010 winners were the
Carlton Ranches who proudly wore their team shirts from last


.l














During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
July 17, Terry Richard Swearingen, 38, of 6703 Old Oak Ave.,
Sebring, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with battery.

July 16, break-ins were reported at residences on Boyd
SCowart Road in Wauchula and on Seminole Run in Bowling Green.

July 15, Blaine Christopher Abbott, 21, of 652 SR 62,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward and charged with
driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
July 15, burglary of a business on U.S. 17 South was report-
ed.

July 14, a residential burglary on Bagwell Drive, vehicle
stolen on Ralph Johns Road, and thefts on U.S. 17 North, Will
Duke Road, Sandpiper Drive, Hanusch Road and on Rigdon Road
were reported.

July 13, Shimarr Defun Jackson, 21, of 310 Martin Luther
King Jr. Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette on a
charge of failure to appear in court and a traffic charge.
July 13, Francisco Silva Centeno, 26, of 806 S. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. Russell Conley on charges of fail-
ure to appear in court and violation of probation.
July 13, Jerry Jerome Browdy, 38, of 760 LaPlaya Dr.,
Wauichula, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody on a traffic charge.
At the jail, Browdy was detained on a pair of out-of-county war-
rants.
July 13, thefts on Third Street East and on Peterson Street
were reported.

July 12, Daffney Michelle Smith, 32, of 2909 Garza Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina on a charge of
violation of probation.
July 12, Stanley Darryl Gavin, 20, of 5099 Billys Creek Dr.,
Fort Myers, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of retail
theft.
July 12, thefts on Evergreen Drive, U.S. 17 South, Acorn
Drive, Georgetown Loop, U.S. 17 North and Center Hill Road
were reported.

July 11, Daniel Lee Calvillo, 24, of 2813 Hampton Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with
battery.
July 11, a theft on Hickory Court was reported.

WAUCHULA
July 18, Eliezer Greg Garza, 40, of 216 Carlton St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Chris Leconte on charges of smuggling con-
traband into a detentioaal facility, possession of methamphetamine
and possession of narcotic equipment.
July 18, Stanley Dean Jackson, 23, of 310 Martin Luther King
Jr. Ave., Wauchula, and Herman Thompson, 34, of 2711 Provi-
dence Road, Lakeland, were arrested by Cpl. Chris Leconte and
each charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession
of narcotic equipment. Thompson faces an additional charge of
resisting an officer.

July 16, Brad Logan Bursler, 22, of 306 Bell St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Det. Jonathan Corwin and charged with possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana.
July 16, Curtis Matthew Frazier, 40, and Lisa Marie Frazier,
&32, both of 3423 U.S. 17 f:.. Bartow, were arrested by Sgt. Gabe
aGarza and charged wltnhj.se'sion of less than 20 grams of mari-
juana and possession of narcotic equipment.


July 15, a business on U.S. 17 North reported a burglary.

July 14, Joseph Anthony Burson, 31, of 1320 Mockingbird
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer and charged
with smuggling contraband into a detention facility, tampering with
evidence and possession of drugs without a prescription.
July 14, a vehicle stolen on Constitution Drive and a theft on
U.S.17 South were reported.

July 13, Jeremy Sean May, 20, of 236 Franklin St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson and charged with pos-
session of marijuana and possession of drugs without a prescrip-
tion.

July 12, Regina Darline Allmon, 41, of 208 W. Bay St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jennifer Stanley and charged with
unarmed burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, larceny and criminal
mischief damage to property.
July 12, criminal mischief on U.S. 16 South and a theft on
South Florida Avenue were reported.

July 11, thefts on East Townsend Street and on U .S. 17 South
were reported.


Back To Basics
By lan Rice
Gospel Preacher


WORKS NECESSARY TO OBTAIN SALVATION?
In the book of James'we read, "What does it profit, my
brethren, if someone says he has faith but does not have works?
Can faith save him? If a brother or sister is naked and destitute of
daily food, and one of you says to them, 'Depart in peace, be
warmed and filled,' but you do not give them the things which are
needed for the body, what does it profit? Thus also faith by itself,
if it does not have works, is dead" (verses 14-17).
We also read, "You believe that there is one God. You do well.
Even the demons believe and tremble!" (vs.19) and "You see
then that a man is justified by works, and not by faith only. (v.24),
and "For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without
works is dead also" (v. 26).
The apostle Paul said that even faith is a work: "For in Christ
Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision avails anything, but
faith working through love," Galatians 5:6. In Acts 10:34-35 we
read, "Then Peter opened his mouth and said: "In truth I perceive
that God shows no partiality. But in every nation whoever fears
Him and works righteousness is accepted by Him."
Wasn't Jesus Himself speaking of "works" when He pro-
claimed, "Not everyone who says to Me, 'Lord, Lord,' shall enter
the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in
heaven," Matthew 7:21?
In speaking of Jesus, the writer of Hebrews instructs, "And
having been perfected, He became the author of eternal salvation to
all who obey Him," Hebrews 5:9.
By these passages it is quite clear that one must be willing to
perform some type of works in seeking after God. The question
then becomes what kinds of works?
There are different kinds of works mentioned within the New
Testament. Let us consider some of them:
Works of the flesh Galatians 5:19-21
Our own works Acts 7:41,2 Timothy 1:9
Works of the law of Moses Galatians 2:16
Obviously, these aren't the works we should be doing. So what
type should we be considering?
We should be concerned with toe works-of obedience! Luke
records the words of Jesus in Chapter 6:46, "But why do you call
Me 'Lord, Lord,' and do not do the things which I say?"


July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B
Jesus also said that even belief is a work: "Jesus answered and
said to them, 'This is the work of God, that you believe in Him
whom He sent,' John 6:29. Paul declared to everyone, "...
throughout all the region of Judea, and then to the Gentiles, that
they should repent, turn to God, and do works befitting repen-
tance," Acts 26:19-20.
Nothing we can ever do will earn salvation, because we don't
deserve it. That being said, you must do something to obtain salva-
tion! Get back to the basics and see what these works are ... read,
study and obey God's Word!
Ian Rice is the full-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist.com.




For the week ended July 14, 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 9,841 com-
pared to N/S last week, and 10,791 last year. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to two weeks ago, slaughter cows and bulls unevenly steady,
feeder steers 1.00 to 2.00 higher, heifers 2.00 to 4.00 higher,
replacement cows poorly tested.


Feeder Steers:


Feeder Heifers:



Slaughter Cows:
60.00-73.00

Slaughter Bulls:
84.00-100.50


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 150.00-205.00
300-400 lbs 134.00-180.00
400-500 lbs 125.00-152.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 135.00-170.00
300-400 lbs 122.00-149.00
400-500 lbs 115.00-134.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent


Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs


OLD CASES:

1. 09-003-M
2. 09-136-M
3.. 10-034-M
4. 10-071-U
5. 10-072-M

NEW CASES:


DB
A


320 Pennsylvania Ave
217-221 E Main St
515 N 6th Ave
823 N Florida Ave
611 N 8th Ave


317 S 7th Ave
706 S 7th Ave


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to,.participation, employ-
meit or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. 7:21c


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a Special Meeting on
Monday, July 25, 2011 at 5:00 pm. Items on the agenda are as follows: Power Pur-
chase Contract for Full Requirements Electric Service between Florida Power & Light
Company and City of Wauchula, and any other business that may come before the
Commission.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the.
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 7:21c


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a regular quarterly Po-
lice Pension Meeting Monday July 25, 2011 at 4:30pm, or as soon thereafter as it rea-
sonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as follows: Updates on the Police
Pension Fund and any other business that may come before the Commission.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street; Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commissidn with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
7:21c


PUBLIC NOTICE

The Florida House and Florida Senate invite all interested
citizens to attend a joint Public Hearing about drawing new
congressional, state senate, and state house districts
based on the 2010 Census.
DATE: July 26, 2011
TIME: 8:00am-11:00am
LOCATION: Hardee County Civic Center
The Florida Legislature wants this to be the most open,
transparent, and interactive redistricting ever. To learn
about the legal requirements governing redistricting and
how to build and submit your own plan for districts in your
area or the entire state, visit www.flsenate.gov/redistricting
and www.floridaredistricting.org. The websites also list de-
tails for all 26 public hearings across the state, maps to
hearing locations, and more redistricting information.
If you have questions or comments or if you require special
accommodations at the hearing please write or call profes-
sional staff (email: RedistrictFlorida@flsenate.gov; phone:
(850) 487-5224).
Senator Don Gaetz, Chairman
Senate Reapportionment Committee
RHpres6fsttive Will Weatherford, Chairman
House'Redistricting Committee 72
7:21 c


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a regular quarterly
General Employee Pension Meeting Monday July 25, 2011 at 4:45pm, or as soon
thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as follows: Updates
on the General Employee Pension Fund and any other business that may come before
the Commission.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring .reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
I'Fr/rldrick M Knirht


Mayor \
Mayor


ATTEST,
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk


7:21c


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, JULY 25, 2011
5:30 RM.


Marilyn Peterson
Victory Investments
Pamela Ellis
Larry Reynolds & Heirs of Gloria J
Estella Villarreal & Heirs of Robert


Tanya S Sexton-Webb
Cresenciano Perez


11-056-M
11-060-M


I






6B The Herald-Advocate, July 21, 2011






-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEAbLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted


Miscellaneous Yard Sales I





", -/ YOUR TO
REAL 7SATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
1 -'- Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties


Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
MOTIVATED SELLER-BRING OFFERS! PRICE REDUCED to
$189,999. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.
REDUCED! 182 acres of rolling pasture for cattle, sod, farm, or
develop. Zoned farm residential, 96% improved, cow pens, cross
fenced, 3 ponds, 6" well with John Deere power unit. Also included is
a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage h4otawith fitced yard and well.
,Call Jimmy Wohl @ 81.381-2437.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our-website at
www.HeartlandRE.net .,7,:,7,


rt-lii-------


Classifieds


Agriculture
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and Insta '63-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


1993 GMC PICKUP with topper, 6
cyl., cold air, automatic, runs
great, $1,150. 863-448-1051.
7:21p
1983 CADILLAC EL DORADO
Coupe $2,000 OBO, 863-832-
0542. 7:21dh
CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc


ASSISTED LIVING has 11-7 night
kitchen opening and on call posi-
tion opening. Clean background
required. Only compassionate,
mature & dependable need to
apply at 298 Resthaven Rd., Zolfo
Springs. 7:21 c
FACILITY MAINTENANCE/
Grounds keeping-duties include
general cleaning, basic repairs,
and facility upkeep. Applications
available at the Hardee County
YMCA, 863-773-6445. 7:21 c
CHILDCARE DIRECTOR needed.
Enthusiastic & hard working. Call
863-245-9032 or send resume to
801 N. 8th Ave., Wauchula, 33873.
7:14,21p
SERVICE/ROUTE DRIVER. Apply
in person 409 Goolsby Street,
Wauchula. 7:14,21 c

The precursor of the mirror
is the mother's face.
-D.W. Winnicott


THREE BEDROOM/two bath, dou-
ble wide on ten fenced acres,
garage, CBS storage building,
$110,000. 863-735-1801 or 863-
448-2877. 7:21-8:18p


FRIENDLY DONKEY free to a
good home, 863-445-0757. 7:21nc



CRYSTAL LAKE 1 BR 1 Bath on
lake, furnished with W/D, remod-
eled, $6,800. 863-245-9020.
7:14,21 p
FOR SALE: Car dolly, $250, new
wheels and tires; 5500 generator,
$200, like new and on wheels.
Call 863-445-0953. 7:21,28p
2-TON AC UNIT w/handler, new
fan motor, $200. 832-9906. 7:21p

MobieHom


CRYSTAL LAKE 1 BR 1 Bath on
lake, furnished with W/D, remod-
eled, $6,800. 863-245-9020.
7:14,21p


New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!






116 REA Rd., Wauchula

S m a cl6:16tfc Tire Technician


Sweater, a garment worn
by child when its mother is
feeling chilly.
-Ambrose Bierce


CKC REGISTERED Mini Dauch-
shund puppies, 2 males, 1 female
left, $350. Will be ready Aug. 15th,
taking deposit. 863-773-3808.
7:21p
MUST FIND HOME for one year
old black and white male Bulldog.
Very sweet and playful, loves
everyone, great with kids and
other pets, good indoors, 863-
712-1126. 7:21p
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more .nforma-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold In Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh

The best part of beauty is
that which no picture can
express.
-Francis Bacon


Lda'R's HIVose Thrft store

QUALITY MERCHANDISE




Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street



9leaven rent Cleaning csrvice
By Sherry White Ministries
o ] ..aMIMII P4i M I-T- = 1 i 'lg


773-0523 *


773-0877


AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000
Well Built 3B/25Bth home, new kitchen, plenty
of storage inside plus 12x18 detached utility,
double garage and screened 12x16 porch.
$169,000
SPACIOUS 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco home; large
kitchen, living room with w/b fireplace, double
garage, spacious yard for outside entertaining.
$155,500
3B/2B, ,C/B home, ceramic tile and carpet
floors, large eat- in kitchen, spacious bedrooms,
located in family neighborhood. $115,000


t1 SERVICE
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.RJ.. Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


773-9743


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net


Saeve Jonnson
5 ACRE TRACT excellent home site, paved
road frontage. $65,000
5 Acres of "Native Florida", abundant wildlife.
$22,500
9 acres located on corner of two high volume
traffic areas; perfect commercial building site
or for home. $100,000
Build a house or place a mobile home on this 2.5
acre tract in western Hardee County. Acreage
is fenced on three sides and has a small shed.
$30,000
PRICE REDUCED! 262.52 acres with road
frontage, large pines, 100 acres cleared. $3000
per acre


CE YOU CAN CO


KUNT ON B B
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


781-0518


Jim See


(863)781-1423 LJ
(863)273-1017 1
(863)781-1396 c17:21c


ASSOCIATES
STEVE JOHNSON


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


B Ben Gibson
Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


.

AM-SOUTH HEALTHY
Each office independently owned and operated.

0~K] 4,


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LIJSTINGJ I Commercial Lot, corner of
Main St. and Hwy 64 East, 1.28 Acreage.
Priced $59.000
Room to Roam In this charming two story
home with Original claw foot bath tub and
glass door knobs for antique lovers. Wood
floors throughout and many extras, also
walking distance to Main Street. Only!!
$75.0QQ
GOLF ANYONEII Retirement Community! 1
Bedroom 2 Bath M/H including lot. Call
today for more Information Only $53.000.
COUNTRY HOME!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Brick
home with central heat-air, appliances, car-
pet/wood floors, one car carport. Only
$175.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multi-family-Single Family Homes.
$75.000
150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, Home or both. $6.000
Per Acre Neaotlablell
BOWLING GREENII 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home nice corner lot with total sq. ft. 1,292.
S38.000
Riverviewll Residential lot. Priced 0 $11.900
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.


702 SOUTH 6'hAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.cor


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


NEW LISTING -!! Beautiful 3 bedroom / 2
Bath CB home ina desirable neighborhood.
Central heat / air, two car garage, close to
schools, total sq. ft. 3,079, on a cul-de-sac.
Priced ( $189.000
ONLY $7.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC fenced, 4
inch well, house well, great location for
home, farming, multi-business. Ask for
Nancyll
AVION PALMS RESORT! M/H lot ini retired
resort!! PRICED @ $30.000
OWNER MOTIVATEDII 2BR / 2Bth Home with
extra lot, Central heat/air, one car garage,
citrus trees, workshop, storage. $65.000
PRICED TO SELL!! 3 Bd / 2 Bth CO home
w/double lot, central heat and air, one car
garage, hardwood, carpet flooring, $110.000
MUST SEE TO BELIEVE!! If your family
enjoys the outdoors, you must see this
unique listing that brings outdoor living to
you. Features 6 outbuildings Includes 2,000
SF. Barn w/23ft ceilings, work Shop, storm
room, outdoor kitchen w/stainless steel fix-
tures, fire pit, potting shed, large gazebo
overlooks pond-well stocked w/fish,
includes aerator, outbuildings w/pens and
fenced. Also 14 x 60 MH sealed in rough cut
pine, front and back porches. Trees and
maintained lawn. MUCH MORE, 6a Nancy
for Appt. Priced at $175.000
7c77:21c


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


L


I'.


REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom. 2 Bath house in town.
Cute house with nice landscaping. NOW $79.500!
NEW LISTING! 18 acres. House & Grove.
Close in approximately 1,850 sf of living. Nice
screened porch. 3 Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of
grove, mostly earlies. 6" deep well, microjet &
diesel power unit. Only $295,000
2 acres zoned Commercial. Desoto County,
Highway 31. Subdivided. High and Dry. Double
paved road frontage. $89,900
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED to $205,000!
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000
5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great place for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72,500


Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000

Spacious home' located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. $379,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 '/
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented ivith screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000

320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acre's
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12',well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000


--


- -- -j - - - - - 1- -1 -- --- -II.-


----~'--^







July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


4BRF2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location in
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
for information. 4:28tfc


MOTOR HOME $5,000. 1982
Sports Coach/Cross Country.
863-781-0692, 863-781-4122.
7:14,21p


3/2 ZOLFO $625 monthly, 1st,
last, $500 security, 863-781-4529,
7:21c;
3 BR HOME, in city limits, $600
monthly, 863-773-6998. 7:21 c
2 BR MOBILE HOME, Zolfo
Springs, $450 monthly, 773-9345.
7:21p
2 BR, 1 BA apartment, Wauchula,
no deposit, $450/month, no pets,
781-3570. 7:21,28c
2 BR, 1 BA, central air/heat, car-
port, large lot, Zolfo Springs,
$575/month plus deposit, 407-
929-6491. 7:14,21c
MH, 3 BR, 2 BA, Wauchula, good
neighborhood, no smoking, no
pets, $600/month, $500 deposit,
781-3570. 7:21,28c


I


3 BR, 2 BA, large home, 2 story,
R. Kazen Rd., Wauchula, no pets,
apartment on end (already rent-
ed), $800/month, $400 deposit,
417-867-3234. 7:21 c
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh
DUPLEX IN SEBRING, 2 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath, $600 first, last,
863-781-0982. 6:30-7:28p
DUPLEX APARTMENT in good
neighborhood, Wauchula, no
smoking, no pets, 2BR, 1BA, $550
monthly plus $500 deposit, 781-
3570. 7:21,28c
TWO BEDROOM apartment $550
plus deposit, no pets, 832-1984.
6:23-7:21 p


TTHE PALMS

Available for

Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through July 31s'
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
iRental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
S(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
= -. Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c7:7-28e



Pfi^--- B!-Fore,-Ic.


10 Acres and Home for $89,900 3BR/1BA CB home on 10 +/-
acres -! Central air & heat Metal roof Outbuildings -
Fenced
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
rT Remember, Our listings are on the Internet. '%
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! L1
After Hours "
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl7:21c


THREE BEDROOM, two bath,
$800 plus deposit, no pets, 832-
1984. 6:23-7:21p
APT. and HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 7:21c



OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
920 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 Individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc


4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256-
749, 863-214-1471. 7:21-9:29p
CHILDCARE AVAILABLE, stay at
home mom looking to care for 1
or 2 children. Contact Tarah. 863-
399-8963. 7:21p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more Info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc


HARDEE RESIDENT looking for
part-time job opening, caring for
animals. Call Ed 941-716-1411.
7:21p
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
VICKER'S LAWN CARE, free esti-
mates, no job too big/small, 863-
448-7491. 7:7-8:4p
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


4BR/2B on corner lot in Georgetown.
Great room, cathedral ceilings, french
doors, stone fireplace, wood and tile
floors. Large porch w/screened in pool
and fenced yard. CB outbuilding has pool
bathroom and outdoor shower, $199,000.
Call 448-4041 or 245-9662. 7:14,21p





WO RW 4


I N C. RREAL A L T 0 ORS


REALTORS
SJOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
Sandy Larrison www.joeldavis.com
(863) 832-0130 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED TO PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
$74,000! Charming and priced home on 4 lots w/beautiful oaks,
to sell! 2BR/1BA 1060 SF home fenced in backyard. Close to
w/lots of updates: new A/C, schools. NOW $69,000!
insulation, carpeting, wiring.
Den can be 3rd BR. PRICE REDUCED! Looking
for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
CB 3BR/1BA.home in Bowling high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
Green w/new flooring, cabinets, vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
countertops, being sold as is. acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
$65,000! septic!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 lots in Lovingly maintained/updated
Wauchula w/over 975' total rd 4BR/2.5BA brick home in
frontage. Close to hospital, Knollwood w/updated kitchen,
schools & shopping. Will divide fireplace, back patio! $218,000!
or all for $75,000!
o PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
10 ac w/paved rd frontage, traffic...Hello, peace & quiet!
Great for pasture, farming or 20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
homesite. $63,000! .288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. $130,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 2BR/1.5BA
in Charlie Creek Estates on PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
large corner lot, 2 sheds, cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
screened porch. Now priced at 258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
$24,900! mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000! 12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!
25+ ac fenced 'pasture,
Greenbelt qualified, on US Hwy 10 acs cleared land on paved
17 S w/well, septic & electric, rd w/4" well in western Hardee
$192,900! Co. $65,000!


ELWOOD MERCHANT LAWN
Services. Affordable, free esti-
mates, call 863-781-4777.
6:23-7:21p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10'Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


WANTED: HOT TUB In good work-
ing condition, 863-445-0430.
7:21dh


HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula.. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
977. 12:16tfc


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc


1339 HWY. 17 S. Frost free chest
freezer, large patio table with 2
chairs, lots of suitcases, baby
bed, king mattress/box $100 and
up. 7:21c


IL No matter how you look at it.
THE BEST DEAL there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car.


Large
Cars to


Selection of
Choose From


CLOSED


I FOR VACATION


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.-..-781-0153 SANDY LARRISON..-.. 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL........ 781-7633 MONICA REAS..........781-0888
DAVID ROYAL ........ 781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA FL 33873 c7:21c
I I


7:21,28


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL

Pay HereH! e.I s c"n
ift e-e-i$ for Cash Deals
Tovv[N(-] SrHH wi : AvmLABLEI
24 1 IOL11- LOWC^^^^ t Po^^ 's^ ble Rate,"^
^^lB----Smg^^^^^^Rc ^^^ab^^e
(863) 7 1-3090oi- 78--3091 16161f


HELP WANTED

Police Officer
The City of Bowling Green is accepting applications
for full time police officer position. The successful
applicant must.possess current Florida certification.
and fultill the hiring, prerequisites as set forth by the
department, which includes a thorough background
investigation and drug screening. The position will
remain open until filled. To obtain an application,
please contact Captain Brett Dowden or Chief John
Scheel at (863) 375-2255 or you may obtain one in per-
son at 104 E. Main St., Monday through Friday from
8:00 am till Noon and 1:00 pm until 5:00 pm. The police
department offers competitive pay and benefits and an
active, challenging work: environment. The city of
Bowling Green a a drug free workplace and an equal
opportunity employer. cl7:14,21c


SATURDAY, SUNDAY, 8:30-3, 329
Beeson Rd., Wauchula Hills. Rain
or shine, come Inside, everything
must go. 7:21p
SATURDAY, 7-3 pm. Corner of
west 4th Avenue and Cedar
Street, Zolfo Springs. 7:21p
FRIDAY 8 till noon, 711 Hanchey
Road. Women's and baby girl
clothes, golf clubs. 7:21p
SATURDAY, 7-1, 4 Families.
House cleaning, cheap, cheap,
stuff. 3951 Murray Road, Bowling
Green. Behind Church of God, off
Hwy. 17, follow signs. See you
there. 7:21p
3 FAMILY 2936 S.R. 64 west.
Baby stuff, stroller combo,
clothes, lots of goodies. 7:21p
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, 7-1. 1925
Heardbridge Rd., Wauchula. Rain
or shine. 7:21p
THURSDAY SATURDAY, 8-12
noon. 539 Terrell Rd., Wauchula.
7:21p
BIG YARD SALE, Zolfo Springs.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
Intersection of Steve Roberts
Special and Merle Langford, look
for signs. 7:21p
SATURDAY, Corner of Main and
Florida. Mufflers, hammocks,
trailer jacks, housewares,
clothes, lot of variety. 7:21p
MOVING SALE. Friday, Saturday,
7am-? Valencia Gardens, 635 S.
5th Ave., G-106, Wauchula.
Everything must go. Furniture, liv-
ing room, dining room and bed-
room sets, dressers, kitchenware,
what nots, clothes, etc. 7:21c
GARAGE SALE, Friday and
Saturday, 8-2, 3466 S. Hickory St.,
Zolfo Springs. 7:21p


I I


Buy Here Pay Here
Orasa l30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only










ii i44 nnr f


'"


11'





I






8B The Herald-Advocate. July 21. 2011





The

What people say you cannot do, you try and find that you
can.



Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service
Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs c,7:21 (863) 735-1495


W. 13. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773-4478




Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience :2


111111 1 AISM. li
GILLIARD ;I

FILL DIRT INC.


* Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
ci8:2tc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg,#MV-40625
"No job's too big.-"


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adeox Manager



Jg COMPUTER REPAIR
I1 Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
448-2561 c17:7-28p 773-0518



Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
O Monday Friday
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
EU1 w Elqual Opportunit\ Emplhrer & Proidier
OEPORTUNITV cl7:7-28c







S FROM LAWNS T REMODELING
S SHEETROCK AND PAINTING
METAL ROOFS TO POLE BARNS
TRACTOR SERVICES
CONCRETE AND DIRT WORK
25 Years Experience

863-202-6465 or 863-735-0848
LIC.# CRC058080
6:30-7:21c


Classifieds


Week ending July 17, 2011
Weather Summary: Florida's agricultural producers appreci-
ated a week of soaking rains to help crops and pastures grow. Nine
of the 36 Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations
had rain levels of over three inches. Seventeen stations reported
rainfall from one to three inches. The most rainfall for the week
was reported at Kenansville (9.34 inches). Carrabelle (8.49 inches),
Jay (6.95 inches), Belle Glade (4.67 inches), and Palmdale (4.09
inches). The rainfall in recent weeks improved soil moisture for
crops and pastures, but the lingering effects of months of drought
conditions was still evident. While the week's rainfall outpaced the
water usage and evaporation from Lake Okeechobee, the water
level at 10.13 feet as of July 18, was low enough to require the con-
tinuation of water usage restrictions. The amount of area rated by
the U.S. Drought Monitor as having extreme and exceptional
drought decreased byl3 percent during the week from 44 percent
to 31 percent. The area rated as having no drought was 10 percent
last week compared to 7 percent the previous week and 96 percent
a year ago. Average temperatures ranged from one to three degrees
above normal. Highs were in the mid-90s and lows were in the
mid-70s. Topsoil and subsoil moisture improved from the previous
week with fewer reports with a very short rating. Topsoil moisture
ratings were 3 percent very short, 22 percent short, 69 percent ade-
quate, and 6 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture ratings were 6 per-
cent very short, 30 percent short, 61 percent adequate, and 3 per-
cent surplus.
Field Crops: Widespread. rains were welcomed by producers
last week to help revitalize crops. In Jackson County, recent rains
improved crop growth, but most cotton and peanut fields appeared
to be three to four weeks behind average development. The
extreme western Panhandle was still short on rainfall, but showers
appeared with greater frequency. In Wakulla County, recent rains
greatly improved growing conditions throughout the county. In
South Florida, rains sustained sugarcane affected by drought.
Peanuts appeared to respond somewhat favorably to the rains. The
peanut condition was 2 percent very poor, 10 percent poor, 44 per-
cent fair, 44 percent good, and none excellent. The five-year aver-
age condition was 4 percent very poor, 7 percent poor, 26 percent


The only moon in our solar
system known to have an
atmosphere is a moon that
goes around Saturn.

HELP-WANTED
Afterschool Childcare
Workers. Must have posi-
tive attitude and be able
to work with children, ex-
perience preferred. Appli-
cants should be
knowledgeable in child-
care practices and be
able to work flexible
hours. Job responsibili-
ties include tutoring and
assisting with homework,
working with children in a
structured environment,
and delivering education
and health based pro-
gramming,
Applications
available at
the Hardee
County Family
YMCA. 863-
773-6445. yCA
YMCA


DESOTO COUNTY




OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com _
1-941-778-7980/7565




Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners sifirt $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


s.Qugle(oaualescomDuterservices.com


Phone (863) 781-9720
www.GuglesComputerServices.com


KELLER WILLIAMS,
R, A ..- L T Y

3/2 red brick home with metal
S roof in Riverview Heights
S 1238 sf Living, 1727 sf Total
319 Park Drive, Wauchula
Michael Scheipsmeier Asking Price $87,900 |
(863)781-3222


ROBBY & SHERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR SERtVICES & SOLUTIONS





(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
robbie @ strato.net


fair, 47 percent good, and 16 percent excellent. Several pests were
observed in peanut fields including rednecked peanut worms,
armyworms, white mold, and tomato spotted wilt virus. Peanuts
pegged progressed to 55 percent, compared to the five-year aver-
age of 64 percent.
Vegetables: In Gadsden County, planting of fall tomatoes was
on schedule. In Miami-Dade County, famers were harvesting okra.
Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture and cattle conditions
were mostly good for the first time this year. However, the condi-
tion 67 pasture in the Panhandle remained mostly fair. In the
Panhandle, pasture ranged from very poor to excellent. Pastures
have greened up, but grass growth was well behind normal for July.
Daily showers gave relief for pastures. The condition of the cattle
was mostly fair to good, with most ranches no longer having to
feed hay to supplement short pasture. In the northern areas, pasture
and cattle were in poor to excellent condition, with most in good
condition. In the central areas, 'asture and cattle condition varied
from very poor to excellent, with most in good condition. Recent
rains helped improve pastures, but stock pond water levels were
still low. In the southwestern areas, pasture and cattle conditions
ranged from poor to excellent, with most in good condition. The
pasture condition improved from the previous week.
Citrus: Temperatures were in the lower 70s at night and the
mid to lower 90s during the day for the majority of the week.
Heavier rainfall continued this week, with all but one of the sta-
tions receiving some rainfall. Amounts received ranged from 0.26
inches in Pierson, to 9.35 inches in Kenansville. Extreme drought
conditions existed in parts of Martin, St Lucie, Palm Beach, and
Indian River counties. Drought conditions were per the U.S.
Drought Monitor; last updated July 12, 2011. Grove activity
included resetting new trees, young tree care, applying herbicides,
hedging and topping, brush removal, and fertilizer applications.


Tips On Managing
When it comes to managing
your cholesterol, low isn't
always the goal. Higher levels
of "good," or HDL (high-_den-
sity lipoprotein), cholesterol
may help protect against heart
disease, while having low lev-
els (less than 40 mg/dL) may
increase the risk.
Medical experts think HDL
carries cholesterol away from
the arteries and back to the
liver, where it's passed from the
body and protects from heart
disease. Some experts believe
that HDL removes excess cho-
lesterol from arterial plaque,
slowing its buildup.
Dr. Richard Karas, Director
of Preventive Cardiology and
Co-Director of the Women's
Heart Center at Tufts Medical
Center, says women in particu-
lar need to pay attention to
HDL levels as it's typically 10
points higher in women than in
men. Furthermore, low HDL is
a more significant risk factor
for heart disease than high LDL
("bad") cholesterol ir women.
Although women may not be
diagnosed as aggressively as
men, more women die of heart
disease each year. In fact, in the
U.S., heart disease is the lead-
ing cause of death in women
and 38.2 million women (34
percent) are living with the dis-
ease.
The population at risk is even
larger.
Fortunately, even small
changes to daily habits can help
both men and women increase


Good Cholesterol
their HDL. Here are some tips:
Aerobic exercise. Regular
exercise that raises your heart
rate (walking, jogging or bike
riding) is one of the most effec-
tive ways to increase HDL lev-
els.
Lose weight. Obesity can
both increase LDL and lower
HDL cholesterol. If you're over-
weight, losing even a few
pounds can improve your HDL.
Stop smoking. Giving up
tobacco can increase your HDL
cholesterol by up to 10 percent.
Eliminate trans-fatty acids.
Trans-fatty acids are present in
many prepared foods-anything
with "partially hydrogenated
vegetable oils" on the nutrition
label. Removing them from
your diet, while not easy, will
almost certainly raise HDL.
Increase monounsaturated
fats. Monounsaturated fats-such
as canola oil, avocado oil and
olive oil, and fats found in
peanut butter-can increase HDL
without increasing your total
cholesterol.
Moderate alcohol con-
sumption. While excessive
alcohol puts you at increased
risk for heart disease, moderate
alcohol consumption can actu-
ally increase HDL a small
amount.
If your HDL level remains
low despite diet and exercise
changes, there are prescription
medicines that may help.
People with cholesterol issues
should speak with their physi-
cian about treatment options.


CLEANING Our THE GARAGE!
Hardee Car Company
This Saturday July 23" Only 8 am
(across from First National Bank)
TOOLS GOLF CART
SMALL TRAILERS PAINT
N MUCH MUCH MORE
EVERYONE WELCOME! c,,:2




HARDEE CAR COMPANY


III


LONESTAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.
CUSTOM HOMES STEEL BUILDING
REMODELING CONCRETE
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lice # 291103615.
863-773-4779
"QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LONWVST COMfPETITORS PRICE c17 .21


I


-~-~- ~- ~~-"-- --~ ~








3rald-Advocate


Th SPS. y 21. 201

I Thursday.July21.2011


PAGE ONE


It Big N
It was the first time in
decades that special athletes
competed in bowling in Hardee
County.
About 30 athletes with men-
t4l and physical disabilities
bowled at Bowl-of-Fun Lanes
in Wauchula on June 22 in the
Special Stars County Games.
They trained for two weeks
prior to that and then competed
for ribbons in the County
Games and the right to advance
to the District Games in Lake
Placid.
Some athletes paired up to
bowl doubles while others did
singles. Even those who were in
wheelchairs were able to use
ramps and compete. There were
two levels of ramp bowling -
assisted and unassisted.
Special awards were given
for the top athletes in Hardee.
Carol Vitale was given the


pith Local Awards


Best Assisted Ramp medal for
her best game score of 124 and
her average of 94. Julie Kil-
bourne won the Best Unassisted
Ramp medal for her score of
104 and average of 55.
The Best Male medal went to
Lewis Simpson, who had a 124
game and a 106 average. Donna
Headdy won the Best Female
medal with a score of 69 and an
average of 63.
The doubles team of Bruce
Brummett and Thomas Dirkson
placed first while Donna
Headdy and Lewis Simpson got
second. Ruth Whitfield and
Tina Miller won third.
In singles, Ashlee Smith and
Christa Haege got first; Susan
Egnoski and Mary Graham won
second; and Bill Flemer won
third.
In unassisted ramp bowling,
Lisa Tuell won first, Beatrice


Van won second and Julie
Kilbourne won third.
In assisted ramp, Lee Koon,
Thomas Whitfield and Melinda
Hatchcock won first; Kathleen
Nagle, Doug Nichols and
LeMichael Harris won second;
and Kimberly Coffee and
Michelle Parades won third.
Special Stars is a sports train-
ing and recreational services
program that is affiliated with
Ridge Area Arc. It is operated
by volunteers and provides
more than 12 different sports
and recreational programs for
250 children and adults with
mental and physical disabilities
in Hardee and Highlands coun-
ties.
For more information about
Special Stars, call coordinator
Cindy Marshall at (863) 452-
1295, extension 124.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


Member i DIAMOND Cf-kTIno
I"*11*1 '' .hnldan-Idattm


wwwvthesta^?6nford nncom7:21-98c


COURTESY PHOTOS
Medals were presented to the top bowlers in Hardee
County. Winners were (from left) Donna Headdy, Best
Female; Julie Kilbourne, Best Unassisted Ramp Bowler;
and Lewis Simpson, Best Male; not pictured was Carol
Vitale. Best Assisted Ramp Bowler.


Special Stars athlete LeMichael Harris was happy to be
able to push the ball down the ramp, to bowl with a vol-
unteer's assistance. Ramps were used by bowlers in
wheelchairs or those who had physical difficulties in lift-
ing the ball.
Wear your learning like your watcn, in a private pocket,
and do not pull it out and strike it merely to show that
you have one.
-Lord Chesterfield


Special Bowlers Strike


These great deals will help you start the year with your American vehicle in top shape!


C H1- RY SSL EM R


CHEVROLET


See deal.
f iLfor detail
OIL, LUBE and for eal
I FILTER SPECIAL
i Up to 5 quarts oil $ 9 5
I Check all levels .,s
Inspect belts and hoses


I uiesels and synthetic oils excluded
INCLUDES FREE TIRE ROTATION

WHEEL I
I ALIGNMENT |

I $2995 I
SSee dealer
for details
$ 2 .9EXP 08/31/11

S COOLANT I
I FLUSH I
$ 95 |
Sde dealer
for details
SEXP 08/31/11


-----lil lllm i --l --R--M--O--T
DIESEL FREE MOilOR
OIL, LUBE and IX H8OME AND RV
FILTER SPECIAL HOME AND RIT
Up to 15 quarts oil $A 95 MULTI POINT


Check all levels


Inspect belts and hoses
INCLUDES FREE TIRE


ROTATION_
U


I


FUEL INDUCTION I
SERVICE I

$4 nG95 i
See dealer
for details
EXP 08/31/11

FREE I
BRAKE I
INSPECTION I
See dealer
for details
S EXP 08/31/11


INSPECTION
See dealer
Complete Systems Check for details
EXP 08/31/11

TRANSMISSION
SERVICE

See dealer
for details
EXP 08/31/11

TIRE ROTATION I
AND BALANCE

See dealer
1 for details
SEXP 08/31/11j


Coupons Good for All Makes and Models
3200 U.S. 17 North Fort Meade


CWI 863-285-8187 myienkinsford.com (800)226-3325 ,
Service Hours: Monday Friday 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.* Saturday 8 a.m.- 2 p.m. ;


Apply For
'Leadership

Hardee'
The Hardee County Chamber
of Commerce is currently
accepting applications for its
fourth Leadership Hardee pro-
gram.
Participants will become the
program's Class of 2011-12.
The course is a comprehen-
sive, tuition-based program for
selected Chamber members to
gain the skills and knowledge to
become an effective community
leader.
The program, designed to
identify existing and emerging
leaders from various segments
of the community, will begin in
September.
The nine-month curriculum is
dedicated to building a network
of community leaders who will
utilize their diverse talents,
skills and unique perspectives
to address community-wide
challenges, identify viable
alternatives and help solve
problems facing Hardee County
today and in the future.
By focusing on, the selection,
training, advancement and re-
cognition of leadership, the pri-
mary objective of Leadership
Hardee is to educate and expose
a select number of individuals
to the societal and economic
challenges facing the communi-
ty.
The Hardee County Chamber
of Commerce is currently ac-
cepting applications for Lead-
ership Hardee 2011-12. For
more information or to inquire
about an application, contact
the Chamber at 773-6967 or
casey @hardeecc.com.

Her dignity consists in
being unknown to the
world; her glory is in the
esteem of her husband;
her pleasures in the happi-
ness of her family.
-Jean Rousseau


The Stanford- Inn
555 E. Stanford Street Bartow
Restaurant Rated 4 Star by Lakeland Ledger
Tuesday-Sunday 11AM-3PM tea/lunch
Sunday Brunch 11AM-2PM
Friday & Saturday 5PM-9PM dinner
For Reservations 863-533-2393


S I


I


'
!~RT








2C The Herald-Advocate, July 21,2011





Schedule of Weekly Services


'Printed as a Public Service
i by'.
TheJerld-Advocate
S Wauchuit, Florida

SDeadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CIIURCI
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................ 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................7:30 p.m.

CIHESTEft GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231 "
375-3100
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

.... FAITI ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Iwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIURCHI
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 .- 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ............................ :30 a.m .
Morning Worship .............. 10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHIIURCII
(rape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ :() a.m.
Youth Fellowship ...............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6: ) p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ............. 7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

IOLY CHILI)
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Iixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 1:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves D)e Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CIIURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School........ .. .....:45 a.m.




MACEI)ONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIIURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ...................:.9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ...... .........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
('ommunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAII BAPTIST CIIURCH
6210 Mit. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School .... ............ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training...............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time .......7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH .
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship ................. 1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast.................. 11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting -Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico.............. 6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....1 I:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club............................... 7:00 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH.
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training....................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CIIURCII
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........1..... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
English Service .............1... 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIURCI
322 IIanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....II :00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
(hildcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesdtu'a Evening Cell Grouips
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ............7...7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call.fir l>atioans

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CIURCII
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ I11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........ ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 ,S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m.
Worship Senrice ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men 'v L'aldei'rshlip & Training C/an.s -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 IIanchev Rd. 773-3532
Sac ament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
nday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ......................... .. 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study .........:.10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 1:00'a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio................... ..... 11:00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion .................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
.Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..:..'.7:00 p.m.

FAITI TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.mn.
Children's Chuch ...........10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ................... :00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCIH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all'ages .......9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry...................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W worship ............................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal .......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafl Opens.........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .........................:10:45 a.m .
Kids World B:L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade .................6:15 p.m.
(lasses for children ages
PreK-12th grade ............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CIURCI OF
TIE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
'BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ......................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
- Traditional Sunday Worship-1 :00-a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship......:...6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
; Morning Worship ................10i00 a.m..
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m..
Adult. Children & Radiate Youth Church.

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship ... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship .............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL.TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ...............1... 0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.


Worship .......................... 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ................600 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
('rossroads &
Lighthouse Min. .............7:00 p.m.

IIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....I 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Nighl Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA'
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes ............... .............7: 30 p.m .
Juees ..........................................7:30 p.m.
Dom ingo ..............................10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos .............. .........6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service......................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East'
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 1:00 a.m.
SEvening Worship Service...:..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m.

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service. .:............1 0:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship
(Ist & 3r Sun.) ................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I' & 3" Sun.
Communion .................... 10:00 a.m.
2" & 4"' Sun.
Divine Worship................ 10:00 a.ni.
Bible Study ......................... 11: 15 a.m.
** Fellowship eacll Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CIJRCH
S 149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ :00 a.m.
Evening Service ................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Serv;ice................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCII
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ................................. 9:00 a.m.


Holy Days ......... ............ ......

ST. MICIIAEL'S
CATIIOLIC CIHURCHI
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ...... 500 p.m.
(Spanish) ..... 7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ...........7.... .7:00 a.m.
(English) .................... :30 a.m.
(Spanish) ................ 1:00 a.m.
(C reole) .................... 1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
A'DVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. Illth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ..................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHIIURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. .................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship .............7:30 p.m.


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer............ ..........7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel).
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
SMorning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
S Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ............... ............. 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL'
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ........... ..........7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ......................... 10:00 a.m .
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday'School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Training Union ....... ........5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ............:.....6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1100 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING ORSHIPCENTER
34260 ak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship.............................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening................................ 1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTALCHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m..
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.......;............ ....................... 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ...................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service................... 11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY. .
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................... I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SSAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones...................... 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina........................... 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica .. .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................................ 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club......................... :30 p.m.
Scrvicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes........5:00 p.m.


Fanny Crosby lost her sight
when she was just a child. But she
didn't allow her misfortune to bring
her misery.
She turned her trial into triumph,
for out of her sightlessness came
some of our sweetest songs. One
day she wrote,
Oh, what a happy soul am I!
Although I cannot see,
I am resolved that in this world
Contented I will be;
How many blessings I enjoy
That other people don't;
To weep and sigh because I'm
blind
I cannot, and I won't.
Contentment comes when we
rememberthatwhat God chooses
is far better than what we choose.

SVisit us at: www TheSower.com


lie corf
SoaL Teballoons

_appear to
magi cay

drift across the

sky, but they
will quickly
collapse without
a whoosh of hot
air. Our spirits
can deflate
without the
warmth of God's
love to fill our
souls. Let your
Heavenly Father

give you the power you need to soar above the
stresses of everyday life. Worship in God's House

this week and get the lift you need.

BBBBBBBBIIBHHWeHHIN 'crituc RadngBBBBBBB-
Leviticus Numbers Joshua ^joshu; I oI I ri Jshua 'it dq
^^B^^"^^^^^~^^^^-^^^^^u^~-^^^^^^^^.1
16.1-34 14.1-25 1.1-18 2 1-24 1 61 ?7 13 1 2


Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
02011, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187. Charlottesville. VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


CPeace ivoer grcw5ters

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


1


r











By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The 2011 Men's Community
Softball League clashes are get-
ting more frequent.
The eight teams are jockey-
ing for position in the standings.
Gilliard Fill Dirt's Dirty Dozen
is not tle only undefeated team.
The Mosaic #1 Regulators are
close at 5-1, while the Peace
River Electric Cooperative's
Legion of Doom and Mosaic #2
are tied for third place with 4-2
records. Behind them are TNT/-
Nemesis, Los Diablos, III
Ranches and Team Santarlas.
The early game on Field 3 on
July 12 was a barn-burner, with
Gilliard outlasting TNT 26-23.
Abel Hernandez tripled and
Brent Gilliard doubled twice for
Gilliard's. Both had four hits.
Gilliard scored four times, and
Hernandez, Justin Bromley,
Lester, Hornbake, Chad Hays
and Joe Adams crossed home
three times apiece.
For TNT/ Pete Deluna home-
1 red. Julian Garcia Sr., Ram
Briones Jr. and Josh Sneider all
had four hits. Sneider was the
only one to cross home all four
times he got on base. Deluna,
Garcia and Briones came home
three times apiece.
Meanwhile, in the early game
on Field 4, PRECo whipped
past previously unbeaten Mo-
saic 15-5.
For PRECo, Rodger Brutus
homered twice and Matt P. had
a three -run shot in the fourth
inning. Calvin Brutus was the
only four-hit batter and Matt P.
the only four-score batter.
Jason Johnson smacked a
solo homer for Mosaic #1. He
and Travis Tubbs each scored


twice and Austin Helms added a
run.
In the Field 4 late game,
Mosaic #2 downed Los Diablos
21-9.
Jeff homered and triple for
Mosaic #2, while Mark and
Raul Garcia each also homered.
Marcus triple and doubled.
Cody Rawls, Howie and Jeff
each circled the bases three
times.
Without long ball hits, Los
Diablos had to scramble to pro-
duce its runs. Rich Taylor and
Robert Reyes crossed home
twice each. Bobby, Jose Lucho,
Sammy Arreola, Eric Virgile
and Eliseo Panatoya all added a
run.
In the Field 3 late game, it
was III Ranches 23, Team
Santarlas 17.
Justin Painter homered twice
for III.Ranches. Keith Revell,
Johnny and Mark each had
three hits, and Cody Gullatt,
Mark, Weston Johnson and
Johnny each put a trio of tallies
on the board.
Reid Benton and Danny
Summers each homered for
Team Santarlas. Ryan Thomas
used three hits and a walk to
gather four scores. Benton, Walt
Beattie, Ches Graham and
Thomas were each triple-tally
batters.
In the 6:45 game on Field 3
on July 14, Gilliard won 23-1
over Team Santarlas.
Every batter for Gilliard got
at least one hit Bromley had
three, including a homer.
Harold Smith tripled and
Gilliard and Hernandez each
also had three hits. Nate Lee,
Smith, Hernandez, Bromley
and Gilliard all put a trio of runs


on the board.
Talmadge Albritton scored
the lone run for Team Santarlas.
He had two hits and Ralton
Albritton doubled him home.
In the 6:45 game on Field 4.
Mosaic I came back for a 14-4
win over Los Diablos.
Tubbs and Hagan Bylund
each homered for Mosaic I.
Mike Carte and Jason Johnson
were triple-tally batters. Tubbs
and Todd Rogers added twin
tallies.
Valentin Rosales smacked a
three-run homer in the sixth
inning for Los Diablos, bring-
ing home Bobby and Lucho.
Robert also added a run.
In the July 14 nightcap on.
Field 4, Mosaic #2 won 22-9
over TNT.
Marcus picked up five RBIs
on a pair of homers and pair of
singles for Mosaic II. Jeff
homered and tripled, and Mark
tripled twice and doubled.
Marcus was the only four-score
batter, while Mark added three
runs.
Elias Ramirez had a trio of
RBIS after getting aboard on a
hit and an error. Ruben Rivas,
Deluna and Ram Briones Jr.
each had a pair of hits. Deluna
scored three times, while Rivas,
Ramirez, Julian Garcia Jr.,
Sneider, Jose Gomez and Joe
Torres each added a run.
In the Field 3 nightcap, PRE-
Co downed III Ranches 21-13.
Scott Driskell homered twice,
Brian Alexy homered and Billy
Alexy tripled to lead PRECo.
Driskell finished with four hits
and four scores. Brian Alexy
and Brian Pohl each had three
hits. Vent Crawford added three
runs.


July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Bowling Green To Consider

New Fire/Rescue Building


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Bowling Green City
Commission on Tuesday night.
July 12. approved buying a
John Deere TS 4x2 on a state
contract price of $5.575. This
"Gator" will be used by the
public works department. as
recommended by City Manager
Yvonne Kimball.
The commission also voted to
seek a delay in giving FEMA
(Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency) a $32.099 refund
in hurricane funds to repair the
old fire station next to City
Hall.
Kimball and Mayor Perry
Knight said the city could ask
FEMA if the money could be
used toward building a new
fire-rescue building since the
old one damaged by Hurricane
Charley in 2004 cannot be
repaired. The city has received
an insurance company payment
of $126,000 which could also
be used toward a new building,,
which would require additional
funding such as possible grants.
The commission, voted for
Kimball to estimate the extra
cost for picking up big trash
piles in the city. That cost could
then be divided among all city
residents and added to their
garbage collection bill. Mayor
Knight said city employees
have a hard time trying to deter-
mine the property owner for
billing purposes since trash
piles are often in front of some-
one else's property.
Commissioner Stuart Dura-
stanti, assistant principal for'
Bowling Green Elementary


School. was congratulated by
the mayor for BGE receiving an
"A: grade from the state this
year.
Kimball gave an updated on
engineering design specifica-
tions for the planned carport for
the Police Department. Bids
will be requested for the carport
project.
Mayor Knight said the city
should consider remodeling the
old community pool building
with city labor rather than hir-
ing a general contractor in order
to save money. "We could hire a
reputable building by the hour
and buy materials and save a lot
of money."
The old city pool was dam-
aged years ago when city
employees pumped dirty water
out of the pool during wet
weather and the western end of
the pool popped partly out of
the ground. The pool has been
replaced by a new tennis court.
Operating the old pool cost
more than the admission re-
ceipts.
The meeting began with a
presentation by Pattie Detwiler
on the planned Peace River Ex-
plorations economic develop-
ment project that would revolve
around fossils. Detwiler's
groups is seeking $2.9 million
in county phosphate severance
tax funds from the mining
industry and administered in
grants by the Hardee County
Economic Development Coun-
cil.
The next items on the agenda
was for the commission to rank
the 10. EDC grant applications
in order of importance. The


other nine applications were not
discussed or presented before
the ranking.
The city commission's rank-
ing of the 10 applications were
as follows, in order of impor-
tance.
1. FHG Innovative Solu-
tions LLC dba ShelterPac-
portable shelter manufacturing
business for 16 positions.
2. Peace River Explorations
Inc.-total project cost of
$2,921,681 creating 10 new
positions.
3. Hardee County Industrial
Development Authority-re-
quested $1.4 million for E-911
enhancements/services.
4. Country Gardens-
assisted living and memory.care
home, requesting $2,188,417
for 38 positions.
5. Hardee County Industrial
Development Authority-re-
questing $800,000 for a spec
building at Hardee Commerce
Park.
6. Redding Farms LLC,
requesting $200,000 for proper-
ty purchase assistance.
7. Redding Farms LLC,
retention of 15 positions at
$29,568 a year each.
8. Center For Orangutan
and Chimpanzee DBA Center
For Great Apes, visitor capacity
building initiative, requested
$316,400 for three new posi-
tions.
9. SonHaven Preparatory
Academy, 10 new jobs eventu-
ally.
10. Oakwood Construc-
tion-Main Street Kitchen and
Tile Store, creating two new
positions.


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4C The Herald-Advocate, July 21, 2011


$11 Million Goes To

Fight Citrus Disease
Florida Citrus Mutual learned Vilsack will appoint the board
on Monday that the U.S. De- members.
apartment of Agriculture will U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL)
fund $11 million for citrus dis- has been a long-time proponent
ease research over the next four of citrus disease research. He
years. has been working to bring this
Stopping citrus greening, a issue to the attention of the
bacterial disease that' attacks USDA and has told the industry
crops, is crucial to the future of he remains committed to estab-
the state's $9 billion citrus lishing a permanent citrus
industry, research trust fund financed
The money will be awarded through a portion of the tariff on
between now and 2014, with $2 imported orange juice.
million going to Florida-based Accbrding to the Congres-
researchers immediately and sional Budget Office, that legis-
the rest of the funding coming lation could generate $118 mil-
from a USDA competitive grant lion over five years for research
program, against invasive citrus pest and
"We deeply appreciate this diseases. The measure has
initial quick infusion of desper- broad support among citrus
ately needed research funding leaders in Texas, California and
to supplement what Florida Florida.
growers have already spent," Mutual President Vic Story
said Michael W. Sparks of Jr. applauded Nelson. He said
Florida Citrus Mutual. Mutual will continue to work
A stakeholder board com- tirelessly with the senator to
prised of producers and scien- make sure citrus research is
tists from the leading citrus- adequately funded for the long
producing states, including term. "The very future of a $9
Florida, California and Texas, billion industry and the 76,000
will oversee and evaluate the jobs it supports is at stake," he
funding and research. U.S. said.
Agriculture Secretary Tom




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INVITATION TO BID
The City of Bowling Green will accept sealed bids from
qualified contractors for a pre-manufactured parking struc-
ture adjacent to City Hall's Police Department. The project
consists of the design and construction of a Police Depart-
ment parking enclosure building. For project general de-
scription, structure specifications, engineering drawing and
site visits, please contact the City office during office hours
at 863-375-2255. Please submit two copies of each sealed
bid by 4:00 pm, August 2, 2010 to.the City Clerk, Bowling
Green City Hall, 104 E. Main St., P.O. Box 608, Bowling
Green, FL 33834. Envelopes must be sealed and clearly
marked "Bid: Police Car Port". All bids will be opened at
6:30 pm, August 9, 2011, at our City Commission meeting.
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A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
God doesn't miss a thing -
He's alert to good and evil
alike. Kind words heal and
help; cutting words wound
and maim.
Proverbs 15:3-4 (ME)
FRIDAY
A cheerful heart brings a
smile to your face; a sad
heart makes it hard to get
through the day.
Proverbs 15:-13 (ME)
SATURDAY
A miserable heart means a
miserable life; a cheerful
heart fills the day with song.
A simple life in the Fear-Of-
God is better than a rich life
with a ton of headaches.
Proverbs 15:16-17 (ME)
SUNDAY
Intelligent children make
their parents proud; lazy stu-
dents embarrass their par-
ents. The empty-headed
treat life as a plaything; the
perceptive grasp its mean-
ing and make a go of it.
Proverbs 15:20-21 (ME)
MONDAY
A twinkle in the eye means
joy in the heart, and good
news makes you feel fit as a
fiddle. Listen to good advice
if you want to live well; you
will be an honored guest
among wise men and
women. An undisciplined,
self-willed life is puny; an
obedient, God-willed life is
spacious.
Proverbs 15:30-32 (ME)
TUESDAY
Fear-of-God is a school in
skilled living first you learn
humility, then you experi-
ence glory. Mortals make
elaborate plans, but God
has the last word. Humans
are satisfied with whatever
looks good, God probes for
what is good.
Proverbs 15:33,16:1-3 (ME)
WEDNESDAY
Put God in charge of your
work, then what you've
planned will take place. ...
When God approves of your
life, even your enemies will
end' up shaking your hand.
... We plan the way we want
to live, but only God makes
us able to live it.
Proverbs 16:4,7,9 (ME).

A lie will easily get you out
of a scrape, and yet,
strangely and beautifully,
rapture possesses you
when you have taken the
scrape and left out the lie.
--Charles Edward
Montague


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at least 5 business days before the meeting,
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Monday, July 25, 2011
LAKELAND
2 p.m. 5 p.m.
Polk State College
Main Auditorium
3425 Winter Lake Rd
Lakeland, FL 33803



Tuesday, July 26, 2011


WAUCHULA
8 a.m. 11 a.m.
Hardee County.
Civic Center
515 Civic Center Dr
Wauchula, FL 33873


PagesFrmTePs







July 21,-20t-The-4erald-Advocate 5C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Cameron Matthew Durham,
22, Avon Park, and Courtney
Marie Thomas, 23, Wauchula.
Samuel Damon-Kyle Hud-
gins, 17, Wauchula, and Harley
Danielle Staton, 18, Wauchula.
Amado Rivera Jr., 21,
Wauchula and Jazmin Dalisa
Vazquez, 19, Wauchula.
SThere were no small claims
'cases reported in the last
week..

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Jamain Dante Robinson, pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
four months in jail with credit
for time served (CTS), $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 cost of
prosecution (COP).
Robert Lee Walton, domestic
battery, adjudication withheld,
probation one year, $677 fine
and court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Christopher Lee Baker, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
one month in jail CTS, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP and
$50 investigative costs placed
on lien.
Daniel Felix Mendoza, bat-
tery, probation six months,
$677 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP.
Adrian Rios, domestic bat-
tery, adjudication withheld, pro-
bation six months, $677 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP.
Ladorian Romeo, resisting
an officer without violent force,
$325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP.
Chong Thao, confinement of
animals without sufficient food,
water, exercise, $500 fine and
court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs, 100 hours
community service; cruelty to
animals, not prosecuted.
Virginia Susan Grisinger,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, adjudication withheld, $325


-fine and court costs, $50 COP.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
George Collins, Margaret
Collins and State Farm Mutual
Auto Insurance vs. Arlan Kyle
Clanton and State Farm Mutual'
Auto Insurance, damages -
auto negligence.
Lexton and Alma Albritton
in behalf of minor child vs.
Ronnie and Karen Redding in
behalf of minor child, petition
for injunction for protection.
Llolanda Cenorina Oropeza
and the state Department of
Revenue (DOR) vs. Melinda
Herrada, petition for child sup-
port.
Olga Herrera and DOR vs.
Oracio Herrera, petition for
child support.
Charlene Richard and Allen
Richard, divorce.
Jennifer Castillo and Freddie
Martin Castillo, divorce.-
Phillip Caldwell and Octavio
Pearl Caldwell, divorce.
Michael A. Albritton and
Sarah Albritton, divorce.
The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Joann Windham and DOR
vs. J. Jesus Urdiera, modifica-
tion of child support.
Kayla Danielle Miller and
DOR vs. Corey Deshawn
Fowler, child support order.
Maria V. Briseno vs. Roy R.
Briseno, injunction for protec-
tion.
Lexton and Alma Albritton
on behalf of minor child vs.
Ronnie and Karen Redding on
behalf of minor child, injunc-.
tion for protection.
Richard Anthony Martinez
and DOR vs. Maria Maryann
Montoya, child support order.
Christopher T. Carlton and
DOR vs: Laura A. Colbert,
child support order.
Robert and Charlotte Shue-
make vs. Santiago Olvera
Garcia vs. State Farm Mutual
Auto Insurance Co., stipulated
agreement approved, dismissed.
Terrell Cecil Green and DOR


HI Courth ouseReport',II^


vs. Diane Lois Santo, child sup-
port order.
Sylvia Regina Outley and
DOR vs. John Snell, child sup-
port order.
MidFlorida Credit Union vs.
Choua Lor, Rosabelle Lor'et al,
judgment of mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Ninfa C. Gomez and DOR
vs. Ninfa Gomez, child support
suspended.
Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Ser-
vices vs. Ag Land Services Inc.,
default judgment and perma-
nent injunction.
Frankie Reyna Jr. vs. Rudy
Valdez, child support order.
Margarita Sosa and DOR vs.
Lazaro Heriberto Pacheco Jr.,
voluntary dismissal.
Triangle Chemical Co. vs.
Parker Farms Inc., consent
judgment:
Nathryn Smith vs. Herman
Smith, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Dora Wingo vs. Clark
Wingo, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Tamela Grace vs. Juan
Martin Valdez, injunction for
protection.
Aldo Reyes and Mario Leon,
child support order.
Rebecca Lazo Santoyo and
DOR vs. Adrian Santoyo, mod-
ification of child support.
An entry in this section last
week was incorrect. It should
have said: Stacy Lynn Daniels
Baker vs. Douglas E. Barber
Jr., child support order.
The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Larry Driver, aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon,
no bill.
Bradley Travis Merchant,
two counts resisting an officer
with violence, probation one
year, $325 fine and court costs,
$200 public defender fees, $100
COP, $12 First Step probation


2 Fort Meade Groups Perform

At Walt Disney World Resort


charge.
Helen Elizabeth Rowland,
two counts grand theft, adjudi-
cation withheld, $520 fine and
court costs, $200 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, $12 First
Step, 50 hours community ser-
vice.
Marvin Upton, domestic bat-
tery by strangulation, trans-
ferred to county misdemeanor
court.
Terry La- ,r Pelham, lewd
battery, conm.inity control two
years followed by probation
five years, $520 fine and court
costs, $100 COP, $84 First Step.
Oracio Francisco, burglary
of dwelling and grand theft,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, $520 fine and
court costs, $100 COP, First
Step $24.
The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Fellix and Anavelia J. Sa-
linas to Thomas and Guillermi-
na J. Trevino, $14,000.
Julie Farrell to Dennis W.
and Geraldine A. Ridenour,
$52,000.
Roberto Rodriguez to David
H. Ritter as trustee, $90,000.
Octaviano R. Jr. and Oralia
D. Flores to Jason R. and
Crystal A. Johnson, $94,000.
Kathleen Carlton, Jeannie
Faye Conley Patrick, Mary
Elizabeth Abalos and Russell
Clyde Conley to Frankie Nell
Kelley, $20,000.



ABOUT...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box .338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


Students from the following
groups recently became stars of
their own Disney show as part
of the Disney Performing Arts
Program:
Lewis Anna Woodbury
Elementary School "Sound of
the Pride:" Chorus, which trav-
eled from Fort Meade to the
Walt Disney World Resort in
Florida and performed on une 3,
2011.
Wendy's Dance Company,
which traveled from Fort
Meade to the Walt Disney
World Resort in Florida and
performed on June 10, 2011.
Dance groups, choirs, ensem-
bles and marching bands from
around the world apply to per-
form each year as part of
Disney Performing Arts at both
the Disneyland and the Walt
Disney World Resorts. Once
selected, they are given the
opportunity to perform at the
resort for an international audi-
ence of theme park guests.
Millions of performers have
graced the stages of the Disney
Parks in the more than 25 year
history of the program.
Disney Performing Arts
offers band, choral, dance and
auxiliary performers the oppor-
tunity to learn, perform and


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AENER NCUA. Loans of S5,000 to S14,999 will qualify for 5100 credit. If you do not have a MIDFLORIDAVisa Platinum Card, one will be opened for you. Allow up to two weeks for receipt of credit to Visa Platinum Card and new card, if applicable.This offer is not valid on the refinance of any MIDFLORIDA loan.


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at 3.99% for 60
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compete at Disney theme parks.
For more information, visit
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Arts.com or call 1-800-603-
0552.
Disney Performing Arts
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where middle, junior, and sen-
ior high school choirs, bands,
orchestras, and auxiliary en-
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on select weekends from March
through May.
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Walt Disney World Resort, is a
pinnacle event established to
showcase, educate, and cele-
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school instrumental and choral
ensembles in March. Disney
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mental ensembles in the nation.


TOP


I








6C The Herald-Advocate, July 21, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO.: 25-2010-CA-000350

HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE REGIS-
TERED HOLDERS OF ACE
SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUI-
TY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2004-
HE4, ASSET BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES

Plaintiff,

v.

ROXANNE RODRIGUEZ;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROX-
ANNE RODRIGUEZ; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEN-
DANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS,

Defendants,

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Summary
Judgment dated June 29, 2011,
entered in Civil Case No. 25-2010-
CA-000350, of the Circuit Court of
the Tenth Judicial Circuit In and
for Hardee County, Florida where-
in HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED
HOLDERS OF ACE SECURITIES
CORP HOME EQUITY LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2004-HE4,
ASSET BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES is
Plantiff, and ROXANNE
RODRIGUEZ AND UNKNOWN
TENANT #1 N/K/A FLORENTINO
OBREGON, are Defendants.
I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash at 11:00 a.m., in the 2nu
Floor Hallway, Outside of Room
202, Hardee County Courthouse,
417 West Main Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873 on the 27 day of July,
2011 the following described real
property as set forth in said Final
Summary Judgment, to wit:

THE WEST 1/2 LOT 22, ALL
OF LOTS 23 & 24, BLOCK
B, W.T. GREEN'S SUBDIVI-
SION, CITY OF WAUCHU-
LA, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 8, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.

This property is located at
the Street address of: 620
Green Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873.

If you are a person claiming a
right to funds remaining after the
sale, you must file a claim with
the clerk no later than 60 days
after the sale. If you fall to file a
claim you will not be entitled to
any remaining funds. After 60
days, only the owner of record at
the date of the lis pendens may
claim the surplus.

WITNESS my hand and the
seal of the court on June 30,
2011.

B. H BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS DISABILITIES ACT,
If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Office of the Court Administra-
tion, (863) 534-4690 at least 7
working days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or Imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 day; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711.
7:14.21c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 25-2011CA-000073
SECTION NO.

MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION,
F/K/A MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff
v.

CHOUA LOR; ROSABELLE LOR;
TENANT #1; TENANT #2; AND'
ANY and ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
AND UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE


DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Final Judgment en-
tered in this case in the Circuit
Court of Hardee County, Florida,
the real property described as:

A boundary survey of Lot
35 of The Oaks, an un-
recorded subdivision lying


in Section 11, 14 and 15,
Township 35 South, Range
25 East, Hardee County,
Florida, described as fol-
lows: Commence at the
Southwest corner of said
Section 11; thence run on
an assumed bearing of
North 00"05'46" West,
861.35 feet thence South
89*52'38" East 1561.65
feet; thence North
00"26'19" East, 975.00 feet
to the Point of Beginning;
thence South 89*52'38"
East, 881.24 feet; thence
North 40*00'00" West,
435.90 feet to a curve con-
cave Southwesterly with a
radius of 300.00 feet;
thence Northwesterly
along said curve an arc dis-
tance of 261.16 feet,
through a central angle of
49*52'38" to the end of said
curve; thence North
89*52'38" West, 213.83 feet
to a curve Southeasterly
with a radius of 300.00 feet;
thence Southwesterly
along said curve an arc dis-
tance of 162.80 feet,
through a central angle of
31*05'33", thence South
0026'19" West, 396.89 feet
to the Point of Beginning.
Together with a 1995 Pal
Trailers Doublewide,
ID#PH097808AFL and PH
097808BFL

ADDRESS: 5134 Deer Run
Drive, Zolfo Springs,'FL
33890

will be sold at public sale, to
the highest and best bidder for
cash, at-the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main St,
Second floor Hallway outside
of Room 202, Wauchula, FL
33873, on August 3, 2011, at
11:00 a.m,

Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.

DATE: July 8, 2011

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO.' NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, 255 NORTH BROADWAY AV-
ENUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830,.
(863) 534-4686, AT LEAST 7 DAYS
BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED
COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMME-
DIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS
NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BE-
FORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR-
ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF
YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE,
IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
7:14.21 c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252010CA000629

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
2002 BLACK CHEVY TAHOE,
VIN # 1GNEK13Z52J241864


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: MICHEL MENDEZ, AND ALL
OTHERS CLAIMING AND
INTEREST IN OR TO THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for forfeiture of the follow-
ing described personal property
in Hardee County, Florida:

2002 BLACK CHEW TAHOE,
VIN # 1GNEK13Z52J241864

has been filed against you by
Petitioner, HARDEE COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1308, on or before
Aug. 19, 2011, and to file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.

DATED on July 13, 2011.

B.HUGH BRADLEY,
As Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker
as Deputy Clerk

7:21, 28c



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


Greetings from Fort Green!
We are in the middle of the
lazy days of summer out in our
neck of the woods. People are
taking vacations, and we who
remain at home believe it is too
hot to do anything icy produc-
tive!
John and Essie Deer are
enjoying their grandchildren
visiting from Texas.
Arthur Womack is home from
the hospital as is Cheryl Pier-
storff. Both are feeling better.
Leonard Crawley is recuperat-
ing from his knee repair but will
need to take it easy for a few
days. Everyone was glad to see
Betty Walker and Clint at
church last Sunday. They have
been missing for some time
because Betty just was not able
to come.
Mildred Cooper was at
church and had requested her
son to sing a special. It is hard
to turn down your mama, so
Sherman sang "I Can't Even
Walk Without You Holding My
Hand." We met the couple that
wrote this song at the Suwannee
Sing some time back.
The junior-high Wednesday
.night youth had a fun day last
week. Their teacher, Faye
Davis, rewarded the ones com-
pleting their assignments for a
certain length of time with a
trip. If the student does not
complete, then they are not



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252011CA000344


IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$42,437.00 U.S. Currency


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: MICHEL MENDEZ, AND ALL
OTHERS CLAIMING AND
INTEREST IN OR TO THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that' an
action for forfeiture of the follow-
ing described personal property
in Hardee County, Florida:

$42,437.00 U.S. CURRENCY

has been filed against you by
Petitioner, HARDEE COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1308, on or before
Aug. 19, 2011, and to file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.

DATED on July 13, 2011.

B.HUGH BRADLEY,
As Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker
as Deputy Clerk

7:21; 28c

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:

,Governing Board Meeting:
Consider SWFWMD business
and administrative matters
including executive director
interviews. Some Board mem-
bers may participate in the
meeting via communications
media technology.

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, August 2,
2011; 8:45 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water-
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; 1 (800) 423-1476
(FL only) or (352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0155)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered'at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us 7:21
7:21c


allowed to participate in the fun
activities. They went to a Fun
Park in Lakeland.
The youth attending were
Norma Alejandro, Holly
Brown, Jordan Chancey,
Kaylee Hogenauer, Makayla
Chancey, Dustin and Tyler
Smith, and Dalton Richey.
Brother Steve and Tara Mc-'
Gaughey went along as chaper-
ones. Faye is still having diffi-
culty breathing in the high
humidity, so Brother Steve got
to play miniature golf. Most of
the other games were in the air-
conditioned building!
Most everyone has heard of a
chili cookoff; we are having an
ice cream freeze-off contest at
Fort Green immediately after
the fifth Sunday night sing, on
July 31. The ice cream will be
entered anonymously and the
judges will select the three best
chums. A gold ice cream scoop
is awarded to the top contestant.
If you have a secret recipe,
now is the time to get it out and
get busy churning ice cream!
Ones not bringing ice cream are
requested to bring finger food,
sandwiches, cookies, etc. We
should have a rewarding night,
good music followed by good
food!
Our annual Back to School
Bash will be Aug. 13. This is
always a fun day, with hot dogs
served for lunch.
Last week's Herald had an
article on Paynes Creek and
stated July was National. State
Park Month. We went yesterday




The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:

SWFWMD Hunting Working
Group Meeting: Evaluate addi-
tional hunting opportunities on
SWFWMD-owned lands. Gov-
erning Board and Advisory
Committee members may
attend.

DATE/TIME: Friday, July 29,
2011;3 p.m.

PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
30 }.Noj;th:, Tampa FL,33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water-
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; 1 (800) 423-1476
(FL only) or (352)796-7211

For more information, you may
contact: Cheryl.Hill@watermat-
ters.org 1(800) 423-1476 (FL
only) or .(352) 796-7211, x4452
(Ad Order EXE0156)

If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.

Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act. should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us 7:21c


Fort Green News

By Rilla Cooper

773-6710


and thoroughly enjoyed the his-
torical information available.
The information about the mas-
sacre was well presented in the
Visitor's Center.
Then, if you are feeling ambi-
tious you can walk the trail
down to where the original fort
and trading post were located.
Mr. Payne and Mr. Whidden
were killed in their store and
their burial monument is across
the swinging bridge and down a
trail. This park is an asset to
Hardee County, and hopefully
most of you have visited it. I
had only been once before, and


Valencia Harvest Down


The U.S. Department of
Agriculture on Tuesday
released its final orange crop
forecast for the 2010-11 season,
,'showing a one million box
reduction to 139 million boxes.
Although the June to July
number was down, the overall
orange crop is four percent larg-
er than last season when Florida
growers produced 133.6 million
boxes of oranges.
"This has really been a suc-
cessful season for Florida citrus
growers," said Michael W.
Sparks of Florida Citrus
Mutual. "With all the chal-
lenges we faced, from cold
weather to pest and disease to
the drought conditions, the
quality of the 2010-11 crop
shows how skilled the Florida
citrus grower is at producing
their product. We look forward
to next season."
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end


of the season in July. The
USDA may adjust the final
number in September.
The 139 million box forecast
in 2010-11 is made up of 70
million early and midseason
varieties. The drop occurred in
valencias, which are down to 69
million boxes from 70 million
last month.
The USDA estimate fur
grapefruit remained unchanged
at 19.9 million boxes. Last sea-
son, Florida produced 20.3 mil-
lion boxes of grapefruit.. For
Florida specialty fruit, the
USDA's tangelo estimate
remained at 1.15 million boxes,
while the. tangerine forecast
remained at 4.6 million boxes.
The all variety yield for from,
frozen concentrated orange
juice decreased from 1.59 gal-
lons per 90-pound box to 1.58
gallons. The valencia yield
decreased from 1.68 gallons per
box to 1.66 gallons per box.


Troubles impending al-ways seem worse than troubles
surmounted, but this does not prove that they really are.
-Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.


CITY OF WAUCHULA
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL
CONSULTING SERVICES
EPA BROWNFIELDS ASSESSMENT
PROGRAM

The City of Wauchula (the "City") has received a $400,000
Brownfields Assessment Grant from the U.S. Environmen-
tal Protection Agency (EPA) funded by the American Re-
*covery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and is requesting
Statements of Qualifications from experienced environmen-
tal consultants or consultant teams t6-assist with the man-
agement and/or execution of this grant for a contract
period of approximately three years. The City supports di-
versity in its employees and consultants and therefore en-
courages qualified minority and disadvantaged firms to
apply.

The complete RFQ packet, including Scope of Work, Proj-
ect Deliverables, and Consultant Selection, can be down-
loaded from www.cityofwauchula.com or received by
request to 863.767.0330 or jnewman@cityofwauchula.
com.

The deadline for submissions is 4:00 PM, July 27, 2011.
Qualifications received after this date and time will not be
considered. Qualification packages should be directed to:

Mail or Express Delivery to:

CRA
Attn: Jessica Newman
107 E. Main Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
863.767.0330

The City reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject
all submissions, reissue a subsequent RFQ, terminate, re-
structure or amend this procurement process at any time.
This RFQ is not a bid request, nor a request for a full pro-
posal. 7:2.1c


Public Notice
Call For Nominations For Appointment to The
Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation Board
District Seat 1

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN for nominations to fill One (1) eligible seat on the above named
Soil and Water Conservation District Board of Supervisors. These seats have a term of Four
years expiring on December 31, 2014.

Candidates wishing to fill any board seat must reside and be a property owner within the
specified Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation District.

The nomination period runs until 5:00 p.m., August 31, 2011. Petitions for nomination must
be:
1. Signed by the nominee certifying the nominee's willingness to serve, if appointed.
2. Received by the Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation office no later than 5:00
p.m., August 31, 2011. Nominations may be faxed to 863-773-5757.

NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that an appointment to the Hardee County Soil and Water Con-
servation Board to fill the vacant seat(s) will be held in October, 2011.

For more information, contact Charles Matheny 863-773-9644.

NOMINATION FORM
PRINTED NAME/SIGNATURE


1.

CERTIFICATE OF NOMINEE
I hereby certify that if appointed I will serve as Board member on the
Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation Board.


Signature of Nominee.


Mail or deliver nomination form(s) to:
Hardee County Soil and Water Conservation Board
316 North 7th Avenue Suite 101
Wauchula, FL 33873
(863) 773-9644


7:21.28c


Sherman had never been!
One of the rangers did a dem-
onstration with a live small alli-
gator, snake and gopher. As hot
as it was, there was shade and a
little breeze under the big old
oak trees. Quite a few more dar-
ing youth went swimming in'
the creek. It has a sandy bottom
and really looked inviting! If
you haven't been, take a ride
and visit this park. It, like Har-
dee Lakes, would be better if
they had camping facilities for
motor homes.
Please pray for one another,
our nation and our county.








July 21, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


6 HHS Teams Hit The Books In Reading Rumble


The first annual Reading
Rumble was held on May 25 at
Hardee Senior High School.
This event was sponsored by
Barnes & Noble bookstores,
with members of the bookstore
staff serving as judges for the
competition.
The Reading Rumble was
designed to promote a love of
reading among high school stu-
dents. It encouraged students to
read a wide variety of books
and to remember information
about the plots, characters and
settings of those books.


The 15 books included in the
Reading Rumble were a collec-
tion from the Florida Teen
Reads Books for 2011. A grant
was acquired through the
Hardee County Education
Foundation to provide copies of
all 15 books for the six class-
rooms.
In competition were the six
college prep reading classes.
.Students were asked ques-
tions based on the information-
al content found in the books.
Points were earned for the dif-
ferent teams when the questions


were answered correctly.
The winning team was from
Vickie Conerly's class. Each of
the team members won a Nook,
an electronic book reader.
Brandon's Barnes & Noble
store also provided gift bags for
each participating team mem-
ber.
Hardee Senior High School
plans to continue this annual
event and welcomes the public
to attend and support the stu-
dents.


COURTESY PHOTO
Winners of the first annual Reading Rumble at Hardee Senior High School were mem-
bers of Vickie Conerly's team.


Mary Sue Maddox's rumble team.


The students competing on Kim Islas',reading team.


Ken Leupold's rumble team during the heat of competition.


The seniors who made up Heather Birch's rumble team.


With the runner-up trophy are the members of Jesse Brown's team.



STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF APPROVAL OF A
CONCEPTUAL RECLAMATION PLAN MODIFICATION

The Department of Environmental Protection (Department) gives notice of its approval of
a modification to the Fort Green Mine Conceptu.l Reclatmaton Plan of Mosaic Fertilizer
LLC (Mosaic), 13830 Circa Crossing Drive, Lithi and (@3547. Thi conceptual plan
(MOS-FG-CPJ, File No. 0142476-023) update is a modification to the waste disposal, hy-
drology, and post-reclamation plans to reflect changes in post reclamation land use and
topography. associated with the modification to the Manson Jenkins permit # 0142476-
009, to remove a parcel from the mine boundary; and to update the not-disturbed line and
several reclamation parcel boundaries. Fort Green mine is located in Hardee, Manatee,
and Polk Counties, Florida, in portions of Sections 9-11, 14-23, and 27-35, Township 32
South, Range 23 East; Sections 1-23 and 29-32, Township 33 South, Range 23 East; Sec-
tions 5-8 and 18-19, Township 34 South, Range 23 East; Section 36, Township 33 South,
Range 22 East; and Sections 1-2 and 11-14, Township 34 South, Range 22 East. The mine
includes land located in the Peace, Manatee, and Myakka River watersheds, all Class III
waters except the Manatee River, which is Class I (no impacts are proposed in the Manatee
River basin). This application was reviewed pursuant to Chapter 378, Florida Statutes,
(F.S.).

A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition
for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Pur-
suant to rule 28-106.201, Florida Administrative Code, (F.A.C.), a petition for an adminis-
trative hearing must contain the following information: (a) the name and address of each
agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b) the name,
address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes
during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner's substantial
interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) a statement of when and
how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) a statement of all disputed
issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) a concise state-
ment of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends
warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) a statement of the
specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the
agency's proposed action, including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the
specific rules or statutes; and (g) a statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating
precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the
agency's proposed action.

The petition must be filed (received by the Clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the
Department.at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000. Also, a copy of the petition shall be mailed to the applicant at the address in-
dicated above at the time of filing. Mediation is not available in this proceeding.

In accordance with rule 62-116.106(3), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing by
the applicant must be filed within 21 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by
any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under
section 120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 21 days of publication of the notice or within 21
days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under section 120.60(3), F.S.,
however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file
a petition within 21 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication.
The failure to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of
that person's right to request an administrative determination' (hearing) under sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it.
Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the
discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with rule 28-
106.205, F.A.C.

Under rule 62-110.106(4), F.A.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the
Department's action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an admin-
istrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an
extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General
Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline for filing a petition for an adminis-
trative hearing. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time
period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon.

Any party to this action has the right to seek judicial review pursuant to section 120.68,
F.S., by filing a Notice of Appeal pursuant to Rules 9.110 and 9.190, Florida Rules of Ap-
pellate Procedure, with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900
Commonwealth Boulevard, M.S. 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000; and by filing a copy
of the Notice of Appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate Dis-
trict Court of Appeal. The Notice of Appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date this
action is filed with the Clerk of the Department.

The files associated with this order are available for public inspection during normal busi-
ness hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the
Bureau of Mining and Minerals Regulation, 2051 E Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida
32310-3760. 7:21c







8C The Herald-Advocate, July 21,2011


This week in history,. as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
Doyle E. Carlton, former
governor and a candidate for
the U .S. Senate, has a "farmer
boy" background. He was born
and reared on his father's farm
and cattle ranch near Wauchula,
formerly DeSoto County and
now Hardee County. One of his
diversions is to return for brief
Vacations to his own farm and
ranch, involved in citrus grow-
ing, cattle raising and truck
farming: before returning to
political and civic matters.

T.E. Blackburn, superinten-
dent of schools, has announced
the final recommendations for
the eight schools remaining.
Miss Ruth Waldrop and J.
Wallace Smith will join Prin-
cipal Prof. J.K. Chapman, Mrs.
Septa Carlton, Mrs. Hilah
Cochrane, Mrs. Winifred
Evans, Mrs. Ara Finley, Mrs.
Grace Godley, Prof. A.R.
Howard, Mrs. Aleen Janes,
Cale Keller, Mrs. Alice Pearce,
Mrs. Johanne Roberts and Miss
Louise Southerland at the high
school. Other recommendations
are for Wauchula Grammar
School and the schools at
Castalia, Gardner and Lime-
stone.

Tamiami Trail Tours Inc. this
week has opened a bus and
freight station at the corner of
Main Street and Sixth Avenue
in the former Goldman's Dry
Goods Store location. Freight
will be handled on a two-day
service daily. The interior is
being remodeled in orange and
black, the company's colors.
The bus company has built a
business here, with Beeson's
Drug Store handling the bus
tickets efficiently.

J.W. Earnest & Co. is having
a summer suit sale. Curlee
"Summerhavens," the coolest
all wool suit of coat, vest and


pants in sport or plain styles, is
$18.75. Extra trousers are $5.
The Hart, Schaffner & Marx
"Dixie Weaver" tropical mixed
suit of coat and trousers is also
$18.75. Light tropicals are
$13.45.

50 YEARS AGO
The Wauchula Infirmary will
close tomorrow, but Drs. Gene
and Margaret Moore will con-
tinue to see patients in their
office. Only obstetrical patients
will be seen in the hospital,
which was not granted a license
by the Bureau of Special
Services for the state Depart-
ment of Health. The Moores say
the building does not come up
to state standards and would
require $40,000 to $60,000 of
renovations, including a sprin-
kler system, fire escapes and
new wiring.

'Owners of Shackelford's
Grocery on the Avon Park Road
east of Wauchula are still trying
to assess the damage to their
building, which was hit by a
small tornado last Friday night.
The building may be a total
loss. Terry Shackelford said he
had insurance and would
rebuild and reopen as soon as
possible.

Schools Superintendent Wil-
ton Stephens said he will not
accept a token $500 raise
offered by the Board of Public
Instruction. He said if his job is
not worth 10 percent more than
what the highest school em-
ployee is paid, he does not want
it. According to State Education
Association rules, the high
-school cannot be accredited if
the superintendent makes less
than an employee. Stephens
presently makes $7,500 a year
while one of the principals
makes $7,800.
Stephens also noted that the
south building of the Zolfo
Springs Elementary School is
falling down. The main sills are
eaten up by termites, causing
the building to sag, and the
building, constructed in 1916, is
too dangerous to walk in any


I w ay BackhenI


part of it, Stephens said.

Prices at the Hardee Live-
stock Market were up 63 cents
per hundred weight across the
board on Thursday. Buyers
were paying more than they had
in the last 12 months, reported
Market Manager Russell Farm-
er. A total of 837 head of cattle
were sold, with steers bringing
$15.50 to $20.25. The market
topped with a $28.25 calf going
to Locklar & Parker of Bowling
Green.

25 YEARS AGO
Less than a year after they did
away with the county adminis-
trator position, commissioners
are wondering if they need a
county "manager." Chairman
Roland Skipper brought up the
subject at a workshop on
Tuesday. "We need someone to
take the load off Gary Oden and
J.R. Prestridge, two county
maintenance supervisors who
are getting behind on their
paperwork for road projects."
Commissioners Benny Albrit-
ton and Jim Moye agreed.


Commissioners Maurice Hen-
derson and Sam Rawls were
hesitant, saying it would cost
$200,000 to hire the right per-
son and provide him with what
he needed to do the job.

A June house fire at Oak
Street and Rust Avenue was
mishandled, Wauchula Council
Chairman Henry Graham said
last week. Fire Chief Dean
Jackman and Assistant Chief
Dale Greer were both out of
town at fire school in Orlando.
The police chief was unavail-
able and assistant chief was out
of town. Men responding to the
fire were in shorts and shirts
without bunker gear and were
barefoot or had slide-on shoes.
People were allowed to run
over the hoses, said Graham,
who alleged the city was in bad
shape if anything had happened
to one of the volunteer firemen
or a spectator.

The Hardee County Board of
Adjustment upheld a recent
decision by Building Official
C.J. "Kach" Mroczka to deny


electrical hookup to a fire-dam-
aged mobile home. The owner
purchased 10 acres on Ham-
mock Road, built a storage shed
without a permit and moved in
a "burned out" mobile home
and wanted a permit to connect
electricity to it. "I've been
instructed that only livable
mobile homes in good condi-
tion can be placed in Hardee
County," said Mroczka.

Real estate sales this week
include: one acre with a 3BR,
IB home on a paved street two
miles each of Wauchula for
$30,000; a 3BR, 2B home with
double carport and fireplace on
large corner lot for $45,000; a
3BR, 1B home in a quiet neigh-
borhood for $32,000; and a
comfortable 2BR CB home in a
quiet neighborhood for
$27,500.

10 YEARS AGO
Universal, mandatory gar-
bage pickup and changes to fire
control and solid waste assess-
ments may be in place before
fall. The first public hearing on


From The Heart
By David Kelly


SUMMER CAMPS
How many of you have ever been to a week-long summer
camp? Well, singe I can't hear your responses, I'll assume some of
you have.
There are all types of summer camps out there. Music, theatre,
sports, art, wilderness, church and scout camps are just a few 'that
you could send your child to or that you may have attended as a
child.
I've gone to a few camps in my day. Basketball, baseball and
church camp are the ones I remember the most. I'm sure there were
others but I just don't recall at this moment.
As a camper, you expect a few things: good times, decent food
and a cool T-shirt. Another thing about campers is that they rarely
have any idea of all the hard work it takes to make those three
things happen.
For the last several years I've been on a leadership team that
puts together three camps a year. Southland Student Conferences
puts on a weekend retreat in Ocala for around 300 middle-school
students from Presbyterian churches throughout Florida. We also
put together a middle-school summer conference in High Springs
that usually is five days in July. And the last event is a high-school
conference located at Covenant College in Lookout Mountain, Ga.
This, oo, is held for a week in July.
I've been taking students to these camps for 10 years now as
a counselor. The last three years I've been the camp director for a
mid-winter weekend for middle-school students. One thing I've
learned about these events is that it takes a lot of people willing to
love students to make them happen.
As a leadership team we pray a lot. Mainly because we feel
without God being in charge and His Holy Spirit leading us and
others to focus on Him, that these events would never happen.
Our main goal at Southland is to point students to Christ and to
community. We really believe that students need to know how
much God loves them, and we need to offer solid biblical teaching
to show them God's love for them in His Word. We also feel stu-
dents need community; we all do. Students need opportunity to
learn how to love God and share God's love with others.
There are a lot of details involved in transporting, housing,
feeding, caring for and entertaining 300-500 students. Not to men-
tion the pressure of sending them home with a cool T-shirt. It also
costs a few dollars.
We are- solely a volunteer organization that is non-profit. As
we like to say, after 50 some years of doing this we've yet to make
a profit, but we hope and know that God's Word is profiting all
those who have heard it. We see the impact that this ministry has
had and will continue to have on students and their communities.
Where God places you He provides, and He has always done
this with Southland. Sure, there are always ways to do more and do
it better, but we've found we can honor God with what He gives us,
whether a little or a lot.
There is not a lot of sleep this time of year for youth workers
and volunteers. Many work long hours to make sure that camp is
"fun." Even though our goal is bigger and broader than "fun" and
"safe," we do spend a lot of time in working toward these two
goals.
If you are interested in supporting Southland and helping us
point students to Christ and community, you can contact me at
kdkelly32@embarqmail.com. If you want to know more about
Southland. you can check out our website at SouthlandCamps.com.
So if you send your students off to camp this year, whether it
is church camp or not, remind them to be thankful for all those who
have worked hard to make their camp happen. Remind them that
things don't just happen in life and that they should be grateful to
you for allowing them to go, and grateful to those who had a vision
for them to be there.
Thanks for supporting our future.


1 hleJp the laKnd yield its best


I am Mosaic.


It's no surprise to find an orange grove here in Florida.

But most people don't realize that, along with providing

crop nutrients to farmers across America, Mosaic farms

its own citrus groves. We have about 6,000 acres of

citrus in production, and 500 of those acres are on

reclaimed land. As grove superintendent, I see things

through, from planning to harvest.


It ai ke,:s .. 'ef t in I keep ror:iii; a' i:.a J gigir-A g.


ww.mosaica.om 7:21

Vww.mosaicfia.com 7:21c


I.


the proposals will be Aug. 2,
with the final public hearing
Aug. 30. It would include
twice-weekly garbage pickup.

Recent additions at Pioneer
Park are drawing attention.
State grant money helped creat-
ed a master plan for the natural-
habitat animal refuge and for
new playground equipment, a
slide, labyrinth, chute, swings
and more.

Hardee County students will
see a difference in their report
cards next year. Hardee County
School Board members re-
viewed a Pupil Progression
Plan that changes the grading
scale to a greater percentage
gap. An A will be 90 to 100 per-
cent, B 80-89, C 70-79, D 60 to
69 and F 0 to 59.

Vehicles on sale this week
include a 2001 Ford Explorer
for $29,495 or 2001 four-door
Crown Victoria for $19,977; a
2001 Ram 4x4 for $21,973; or
2001 Dakota Quad Cab for
$19,459.


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