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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 7/7/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
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notis - ADA7390
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System ID: UF00028302:00388
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text
















The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 31
3 Sections, 24 Pages
________ ^_____________________


Thursday, July 7, 2011


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Local Science Fair Project Takes

Teen All The Way To Los Angeles
Teen A// T e. Way To Los Angeles


By MACHELLE DOLLAR'
For The Herald-Advocate
"And fourth place goes to ... Brooke
Conley."
The 15-year-old daughter of Greg and
Dana Conley of Wauchula had made her
way to California for the highly
acclaimed and competitive Intel
International Science & Engineering
Fair.
The trip had begun simply enough,
with a school Science Fair project. Yet
it took her across the nation.
And it put a $500 cash award in her
pocket.
While on her all-expenses-paid trip to
California, Brooke spent time traveling


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07103 92 71 0.05
07/04 90 72 0.00
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Source~ Univ. of FtL. One Resrch Cente

INDEX
Classifieds .........6B
Community Calendar ..4A
Courthouse Report ... 7C
Crime Blotter ....... 5C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup ..5A
Obituaries .......... 4A




7 IIIIIII ll I
18122 07290 3


the area, attended different happenings,
and earned the honor of placing fourth
at the prestigious International Science
& Engineering Fair. The event was held
at the Los Angeles Convention Center
May 8-13.
Beginning her journey before winter
break last school year, Brooke spent
many hours devising and formulating
the science project that has taken her
further than imagined.
"I thought this was going to be one of
those 'quick-and-easy' type projects.
Once I got into it I realized it was going
to be a lot of work but it was something
See SCIENCE 2A


State Closes Area

FHP, DCF Offices


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Florida Highway Patrol
has joined the Department of
Children & Families in closing
its offices servicing this area.
Troop F commander Maj.
Carlos Vazquez announced the
closing on Wednesday of last
week, saying it would be effec-
tive on Friday and citing state
cost-cutting measures.
In all, the state closed 10 FHP
stations. Two, the ones in Ar-
cadia and Lake Placid, directly
affect this county.
Vazquez, however, stated,
"The patrol's delivery of servic-
es to the local communities will
not be impacted."
He said motorists needed
crash reports may do so online
at flhsmv.gov/thp or by travel-


ing to the Bradenton office at
5023 53rd Ave. E.
Hardee County Sheriff Ar-
nold Lanier said troopers, too,
would have had to go to
Bradenton to complete their
reports, and instead offered
them office space within his
building in Wauchula.
"It would benefit the people
of Hardee County because
troopers would be right here in
the county," noted Maj. Randy
Dey.
Dey said the offer was
extended to the Department of
Children & Families as well,
since it, too, has shut down its
local offices. He said having
both agencies represented at the
Sheriff's Office benefits both
the public and sheriff's investi-
See STATE 2A


School Report Cards:


3 A's, 1 BAnd 1 C

Secondary-School Grades Pending


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
The students have come and
gone and have received their
final report cards, now it's time
for the schools to.
School grades were issued on
Thursday by the state
Department of Education, and
all but one in the district
improved. The five elementary
schools either maintained or
increased their school grade.
"I am extremely proud of the
students, parents, faculty and
staff members, and administra-
tors of our school district," said
Schools Superintendent David
Durastanti. "The resounding
success of our elementary
schools is a testament to their
hard work and dedication."
Two of the elementary
schools increased their ranking
by two levels, Bowling Green


Elementary jumped from a C to
an A and Zolfo Springs
Elementary reflected its name
as it sprang from a D to a B.
Wauchula Elementary im-
proved by one grade level,
going from a B to an A.
Hilltop Elementary main-
tained its A and North Wau-
chula Elementary maintained
its C grade.
Overall, the Hardee County
School District earned three out
of five A schools.
Durastanti also pointed out
that Hardee elementary schools
continue to outperform sur-
rounding counties. While Har-
dee had the highest percentage,
60, of its schools ranked A,
Highlands had 33 percent and
DeSoto had none earning an A.
"Even with the more strenu-
ous assessment and standards,
Hardee County schools contin-


ue their tradition of high aca-
demic achievement thanks to
the continued support of par-
ents, faculty, staff, administra-
tors, business partners, church-
es and civic organizatiQns,"
concluded Durastanti.
The Hardee County second-
ary school grades are still pend-
ing.
But grades are not the only
measure placed on schools.
Since the beginning of the
federal No Child Left Behind
Act of 2001, it has been
required of public schools to
make Adequate Yearly Progress
in hopes of having students
achieve 100 percent proficiency.
in English/language arts and
mathematics by the year 2014.
Once again, Hardee County
schools have not made AYP,
and according to Deputy Su-
See SCHOOL 2A


Killer Gets Deported


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A man who kicked a migrant
worker to death with his steel-
toed boots in an unprovoked
attack has been turned over to
federal Immigration & Customs
Enforcement authorities for
deportation.
Bernabe Garduna Pedroza,
37, of 639 Green St., Wauchula,
had been charged with second-
degree murder in the January
death of 30-year-old Antonio
Ruiz.
Ruiz had been violently
kicked in the head, chest and
stomach on the night of Jan. 14,
eventually crawling away from
his attacker, Maj. Randy Dey of
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office said.
He later was found dead,
however, in an office trailer
being stored by Southeast
Modular Steel Co. in a lot near
the Wal-Mart plaza in Wau-
chula.


Witnesses and evidence
pointed to Pedroza, and he was
arrested on Jan. 19.
And in Hardee Circuit Court
last week, Pedroza changed his
"not guilty" plea and was sen-
tenced by Circuit Judge Marcus
J. Ezelle.
Ezelle imposed a 15-year
prison term, which he ordered
followed by 10 more years of
probation.
He assessed fines and court
costs of $520, public defender
fees of $350, prosecution fees
of $100 and probation fees of
$220. All the amounts due,
however, were placed as a lien
against the man.
Pedroza instead faced the
more immediate "hold" placed
on him by the federal govern-
ment. He was released from the
Hardee County Jail into the cus-
tody of Immigration & Customs
Enforcement on Thursday.
He will be deported to
Mexico.


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office has welcomed work-
ers with the Department of Children & Families as well as
the Florida Highway Patrol after the state closed their
offices in this area. Here, DCF caseworker Jo Pace heads
to her new office.


Should Pedroza ever return to
this country, he will have to
serve the 15-year prison sen-
tence, the 10 years on super-
vised probation and any new
sentence imposed on him as a
convicted felon illegally enter-
ing the United States.


Pedroza


State


Press


Award
The Herald-Advocate won
state recognition for its report-
ing on Friday at the annual
Florida Press Association Con-
vention.
Taking third-place honors in
the Business Writ-ing category
was Michael Kelly's December
2010 story headlined, "Joe L.
Davis Real Estate Celebrates 50
Years."
Said the contest judges,
"Insights and quotes from the
subject celebrating 50 years in
business are priceless. Love the
quote about putting a penny in
the meter for 12 minutes and
getting in and out of the bank
with a loan before time ex-
pired!"
The contest was entered by
73 of the state's bi- tri- and
weekly newspapers in a total of
41 categories.
Attending the convention
held at the Renaissance Vinoy
Resort in St. Petersburg were
Publisher Jim Kelly, Managing
Editor Cynthia Krahl, Sports
Editor Joan Seaman and
Michael Kelly.


Dispatch Here

By Oct. 1

... Story 1C


17 Apply For

City Manager

... Story 2A


,"j Hooking Bass

Grand Slam
.. Column 3A


46e
plus 4g sales tax







2A The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


S DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living-Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
S Ads Tuesday noon .


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18; I yr.- S31; 2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months S22; 1 yr. -$41; 2 yrs. $79
Out of State
6 months -,27; 1 yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes .letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber. /
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
h. A


Sf Kelly's Column
By Jim


The minimum wage in Florida on June 1 increased slightly to
$7.31 an hour. Tipped employees must receive a base rate of at
least $4.29 an hour.

There was an exaggerated figure in last week's column about
the number of cats and dogs euthanized in the county last year.
The Hardee County Animal Control in its annual report ending
Sept. 30, 2010, reported for the unincorporated area there were 92
dog and 8 cats adopted and 351 dogs and 256 cats euthanized. In
addition 10 animals died in the kennel and 17 escaped.
Some of the 607 euthanized animals were because of sickness,
injuries, unweaned, aggressiveness or at the owner's request. Not
all the animals were adoptable.
Hardee Animal Control has no figures for the municipalities of
Wauchula, Zolfo Springs and Bowling Green which do not have an
interlocal agreement with the county.
Revenues for Hardee Animal Control for the last fiscal year
included adoptions, $3,735; boarding, $2,170; donations, $909;
impoundments; $485; quarantines, $1,400; and reimbursements,
$2,976. t .,' ..
Proper care oF.pels is very imnlant. saying and neutering
are vita to-prevent unwanted-kitteniwnd puppies. My wife is one
of the best pet owners I have ever seen. Sometimes I would like to
be her dog.

For Pete's sake, when will football season start? And when
will the NFL lockout of its $9 billion industry be settled? What
kind of season will the Hardee Wildcats and state college teams
have? Will Hardee defeat the Fort Meade Miners this year? What
can we expect from the Gators under new head coach Will
Muschamp and new offensive coordinator Charlie Weis?
The MLB season is very interesting, as the Tampa Bay Rays
trail theYankees and Red Sox in the AL East. Pro golf is not quite
as interesting without Tiger Woods who is out with a leg injury and
still trails Jack Nicklaus in majors titles, 18 to 14.
Pete is not crazy about hot weather and is looking forward to
football and fall weather.

Hardee has been getting quite a bit of rain lately. Peace River
and the creeks levels are up.
There were no organized fireworks the night of July 4th for the
first time in many years.

It is encouraging that gasoline prices are coming down in
recent weeks. Here's hoping they come down more.

Florida must operate under a balanced budget and reduced its
budget the past couple of years due to declining revenues.
In Washington, D.C., the Democrats. Republicans and
President Obama are trying to figure out how to reduce the annual
budget deficits while the national debt hits the latest ceiling of
$14.3 trillion.
It will be an interesting summer and fall of national politics as
the 2012 elections approach. President Obama plaris.to seek a sec-
--. -ndterm,,and the.Republican candidates are campaigning to be the
GOP nominee.




SCHOOL
Continued From 1A


perintendent Woody Caligan,
no record of ever making AYP
is available.
"In order to meet AYP a
school must have 95 percent
participation on the FCAT or
Florida Alternative Assessment
as well as meeting the individ-
ual math and reading scores,"
said Caligan. "This year, 79
percent of all students had to
pass the reading portion and 80
,percent needed to pass the
math.
"Unfortunately we did not
make AYP in the district and
I'm not sure if we ever have,"
he said.
"Since its "beginning, the
standards have continued to
rise, and in Florida they are
even higher. It's not a bad thing,
but only makes it that much
harder to reach them," Caligan


continue.
"We have hard-working folks
in the district who have dili-
gently worked to get our
schools up to the standards.
They not only have seven-hour
days, they have 18- to 24-hour
days, as they are constantly
working."
To determine the AYP, stu-
dents are broken up into sub-
groups based on economic
background, race/ethnicity, lim-
ited English proficiency, and
special education. There must
be a minimum of 30 students
per group.
The school grades and AYP
reports, along with the FCAT
scores, can be found at the
Florida Department of Educa-
tion's website at www.fldoe.-
org.


Wauchula Adds 4 Manager Applicants


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The growing list of applicants
for the Wauchula City Manager
position is back to 17.
Four more were received in
the last few days. Roger A.
Gorus of Oak Creek, Wise.,
Sandra Ambris of Cleveland,
Ohio, James F. Coleman of
Lady Lake and Terry Pittman of
Highlands City have joined the
applicants.
Commissioners are to review
all 17 this week and be prepared
to rank the top five at Monday's
regular monthly meeting at 6
p.m.
The four new ones, and any
others which come in this week,
includes Terry Atchley of Wau-
chula, Kenneth Wheeler of
Avon Park, Stephen Weeks of
Sebring, Kenneth Venables of
Palatka, D. Mack Seekinger of
Guyton, Ga., Richard Perez, of
Sunrise, Luke B. Olson of
Kearney, Neb., Joseph Miranti


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
But when the Son of Man
(Jesus) comes in His splen-
dor with all His angels with
Him, then He will take His
seat on His glorious throne.
All the nations will be assem-
bled before Him, and He will
separate men from each
other like a shepherd sepa-
rating sheep from goats.
Matthew 25:31-32a (PME)

FRIDAY
He will place the sheep on
His right hand and goats on
His left. Then the King will
say to those on His right,
"Come, you who have won
My Father's blessing! Take
your inheritance the king-
dom reserved for you since
the foundation of the world."
Matthew 25:33-34 (PME)

SATURDAY
"For I was hungry and you
gave Me food. I was thirsty
and you gave Me a drink. I
was lonely and You made
Me welcome. I was naked
and you clothed Me. I was ill
and you came and looked
after Me. I was in prison and
you came to visit Me there."
Matthew 25:35-36 (PME)

SUNDAY
Then the true men will
answer Him: "Lord, when
did we see You hungry and
gave You food? When did
we see You thirsty and gave
You something to drink?
When did we see You lonely
and make You welcome, or
see You naked and clothe
You, or see You ill or in
prison and go to see You?"
Matthew 25:37-39 (PME)

MONDAY
And the King will reply, "I
assure you that whatever
you did for the humblest of
My brothers, you did for
Me."
Matthew 25:40 (PME)

TUESDAY
Then He will say to those on
His left, "Out of My pres-
ence, cursed as you are; into
the eternal fire prepared for
the devil and his angels!"
Matthew 25:41 (PME)

WEDNESDAY
Then the King will answer
them with these words, "I
assure you whatever you
failed to do for the humblest
of My brothers, you failed to
do to Me." And these will go
off to eternal punishment,
but the true men to eternal
life.
Matthew 25:45-46 (PM6)

All verses are excerpted from
The Holy-Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


The first hemispherical sundial was described about the third century by Chaldean
astronomer Berossus.

Before winning the Presidential election in 1860, Abraham Lincoln had lost eight elec-
tions for various offices.


of St. Cloud, Therese "Terry"
Leary of Hilton Head, S.C. and
formerly of Florida, Steven
Henderson of Winter Haven, H.
Randall Dilling of Pqrt Char-
lotte, Newall Daughtrey of
Miami and Fred Baughman of
Oak Hill.
In other action at its resched-
uled Tuesday evening work-
shop, the commission:
-heard a presentation by
Ross D. Furry of Public Risk
Management 6f Florida, the
city's current property, casualty
and health insurance provider,
and Richard G. Schell of
Gallagher Benefit Services,
Inc., the insurance agent for
Public Risk Management of
Florida.
Both Finance Director James
Braddock, who is the city's vot-
ing member on the Public Risk
Management Board and Terry
Svendsen, employee relations
person for the city's 87 employ-
ees and alternate on the Risk


Management Board spoke high-
ly of the good service and lower
premiums available through the
group insurance program which
represents 5,000 employees in
city and county governments
around the state.
-discussed the denial of a
request from the First Meth-
odist Church of Wauchula to
place a sign on a vacant proper-
ty on East Townsend Street
because the city's land develop-
ment code prohibits such.
That item was entered into
the code many years ago when
campaign signs flooded vacant
property, said former commis-
sioner and city administrator
Jerry Conerly. It was noted that
a sign could be on someone
else's property as the Nicholas
Restaurant sign on U.S. 17
North is; that is allowable by
city codes.
The commission would have
to change the codes to allow it
on the vacant Revell property,


and is starting a revision or
update of the entire code book.
-discussed a tentative lease
of $1 a year for Peace River
Explorations Inc. to use the his-
toric depot for its welcomie cen-
ter. The non-profit organization
will carry liability and contents
insurance, and pay electricity
and alarm servids:
Peace River Explorations tic.
will make a presentation at the
Hardee County Commission
today (Thursday) with addition-
al information on its goals.
-had discussions on the pos-
sibilities of an employee incen-
tive and disaster assistance pro-
grams
-talked briefly about negoti-
ations to settle the D'Agostino
property dispute which is due to
come up to court on Aug. 1. and
closing on East Bay Street side-
walk property on Aug. 2.
Discussions of these items
will continue on the meeting on
Monday evening when votes
can be taken on these issues.


COURTESY PHOTO
Local student Brooke Conley's science fair project focused on biofuel production and
won her fourth place in the world and a $500 cash award.


SCIENCE
Continued From 1A


I was excited about," says Brooke.
"When I got to the Intel Science Fair,
I didn't know what I was up against and
never expected to actually place."
Brooke is the first local student in 12
years to advance beyond the regional
competitions. She never expected her
work would take her to the world's
largest pre-college science competition.
The annual event is the leading world-
wide science competition for students in
grades 9-12, and it brings together more
than 1,500 students from 65 countries.
To even be asked to be present is, in
itself, an honor.
"Oh, it felt great to be able to place,"
says Brooke. "It, overall, was a good
experience and I'm already beginning to
plan what I'm going to do for next
year."
While in California, Conley was able


to go bowling at Lucky Strike, .attend
the Kodak Theatre, ride the Metro, go
to the beach and pier, and take a free
trip to Universal Studios. She giggles as
she insists that "Florida's is better!"
Brooke's project dealt with determin-
ing which growth stimulant will
increase algae growth for biofuel pro-
duction. Plans for next year's science
fairs will be incorporated around her
current hypothesis.
"The judges kept saying I could go so
far with my project, and it could really
turn into something," she notes. "I
enjoyed working with it, and I want to
continue my research. I plan to expand
my project for next year using the same
data.
"Next year, I'm going all the way!"
she proclaims.


COURTESY PHOTO
Florida Highway Patrol Cpl. Kimberly Benavidez sits at her new workstation within the
Sheriff's Office after the state closed FHP offices here.


The Sheriff's Office has fur-
nished both the FHP and DCF
with computer hookups and
necessary office equipment.
Filling the DCF office are case-
workers Jo Pace and David
s Buemel. The FHP office sees a
rotation of troopers, he said.
In all, it's a match that bene-
fits everyone, Dey concluded.


gators, who oiten are involved
in investigations with case-
workers or troopers.
"The sheriff found the
space," Dey said. "It had been


used tor storage. We had too
much junk and we did quite a
bit of housekeeping." Now that
space brings and keeps state
workers in Hardee County.


STATE
Continued From 1A


) I O J


r-


A .







July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Hardee Beats State Scores Quick And Easy Fix-its For


On NVw Alorehra Enam Common Kitchen Mishaps


%.F95 J -LT V F V 5,& 45 % W 9 N, *A% v W E- N, Vr I


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
The Florida Department of
Education is beginning to make
its transition from the Florida
Comprehensive Assessment
Test to the new "End of Course"
tests; the first to experience that
switch are Algebra I students.
And Hardee Senior High
School ranked higher than the
statewide mean scale score for
this assessment.
. Said Dr. Eric J. Smith, educa-
tion commissioner until his res-
ignation in June, "I would like
to commend Florida's outstand-
ing Algebra I teachers for their
work this year to help students
be successful in this critical
course. Algebra I is widely con-
sidered as one of the most
important gatekeeper courses
for a pathway to college or a
career certification program."


The EOC Assessment is a
computer-based test and is part
of Florida's Next Generation
Strategic Plan for the purpose
of increasing student achieve-
ment and improving college
and career readiness.
As evident by this year's test
scores, it has accomplished just
.that in Hardee.
"Of course, to start some-
thing new we were all a little bit
eager as to how it would turn
out," began Hardee Senior
High's principal, Dr. Michele
Polk. "I am very pleased with
the results.
"Our teachers have worked
very hard this year to get our
students up to date with as
much information needed," she
added. "They've worked hard
to prepare them for this new
transition, and I'm very appre-
ciative of that."


Blue Crab Traps Not

Allowed July 10-19


The harvest of blue crabs
from traps will not be allowed
July 10-19 in the waters of
Broward through Pasco coun-
ties.
This closure will give author-
ized groups the opportunity to
identify and retrieve lost and
abandoned blue crab traps from
the coastal and inland waters in
this area.
All commercial and recre-
ational blue crab traps within
three nautical miles of shore
and in the inland waters of
Broward County, south to and
around the tip of Florida and
north up the Gulf Coast through
Pasco County must be removed
during the 10-day closed peri-
od.
The harvest of blue crabs by
other gear, such as dip nets and
fold-up traps, will still be per-
mitted during the 10-day clo-
sure. The closure also applies to
recreational harvesters who use
standard blue crab traps, unless


the traps are attached to private
property.
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
cited lost and abandoned blue
crab traps as a problem in the
blue crab fishery, because they
can continue to trap crabs and
fish when they are not checked
and maintained. They can also
be unsightly in the marine envi-
ronment, damage sensitive
habitats and pose navigational
hazards to boaters on the water.
Lost and abandoned traps can-
not easily be distinguished from
legal traps, so they often remain
in the water indefinitely.
The 10-day closure will
enable FWC-authorized groups
to collect lost and abandoned
blue crab traps that remain in
the water during the closed
period.
Other regional 10-day blue
crab trap closures throughout
Florida will occur at certain
times during the year.


Fish Busters
S By Bob Wattendorf
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


BLACK BASS GRAND SLAM
Jim Walker of Brooksville took less than six months to com-
plete the Florida black bass grand slam, then went one better.
"I was inspired by an article in 'Bassmaster' magazine and
made it my 2011 New Year's Resolution to catch all the Florida
black bass species this year," Walker said. Florida has four of the
nine black bass species that.make up the Bass Grand Slam.
Collectively, bass are the most popular sport fishes in North
America. The Florida largemouth is the largest and most popular of
all, but its smaller cousins provide great fishing as well. Complet-
ing the slam requires a commitment to travel, careful research and
a high level of skill.
Because of the immense popularity of black bass and their
potential to contribute to the ecological, economic and social well-
being of Florida, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission on June 9 approved a long-term management plan to
ensure anglers worldwide will recognize Florida as the undisputed
bass fishing capital of the world. Among the many action items in
the new plan is the idea of promoting the Florida black bass grand
slam, which can inspire anglers to seek out new opportunities and
emphasize the critical need for habitat management and conserva-
tion to keep these fisheries viable.
Walker's story epitomizes all that the FWC hopes to encour-
age in anglers.
His quest began April 2 with a trip to Oleno State Park on the
Santa Fe River, accompanied by his wife, Nancy, and their 4-year-
old son, Jack. While fishing there in a rented canoe, he caught both
a Suwannee bass, with its beautiful purplish colors along the later-
al line, and a Florida largemouth.
Walker next took on the shoal bass.
After researching the species on MyFWC.com and elsewhere,
he decided that the upper Chipola was the best place to go. He
loaded his family and took them to Florida Caverns State Park. On
the way, he tried fishing from shore and was rewarded with a beau-
tiful shoal bass from the Chipola near County Road 278 (Peacock
Bridge Road).
He described this as his favorite catch, as it slammed a finesse
worm and came two feet out of the water, giving them all a thrill.
It is also a beautiful fish, with tiger stripes along its cheeks, an
orange tint and bright red eyes. By the end of April, he had three of
the four Florida black basses to his credit.
Needing only the spotted bass, and wanting the best (most
recent) information available, he contacted the FWC. I had the
good fortune of taking his call and enjoyed a delightful conversa-
tion with this avid angler, conservationist and family man.
Enthralled by his story, I put him in touch with one 9f our regional
offices, where Katie Woodside and Matt Wegener provided him
with the information he needed.
In his words, "Some great folks there shared with me great
(and beautiful) locations to find my last species. This trip actually
began on my-birthday (May 26) and resulted with the accomplish-
ment.of my Florida bass slam."
He caught a qualifying spotted bass at the Hightower Springs
Landing on Holmes Creek, just by walking the bank with his fam-
ily and casting a finesse worm.
It must have been a memorable birthday and Memorial Day
weekend for him and his family.
That sounds like enough to make a great story and cover a
half-year of fishing, but the Walkers had more to offer. Jim's wife
is one fish shy of her Florida slam as well.
Jim has his own new goal. Now he wants to catch other species
of bass in Florida, and he can already scratch the non-native pea-
cock bass off his list.


While the EOC assessments
are slowly starting to replace
FCAT math and science tests,
this past year's students who
passed received their Algebra I
credit. The entering freshman
for this upcoming year (2011-
12) will be required to pass the
Algebra I EOC before they can
receive credit for Algebra I,
which is a requirement for grad-
uation. Although graduation
isn't quite dependent on passing
yet, within the next few years it
will be.
"As the state phases in End of
Course exams to replace FCAT
math and science tests, it will be
important for parents and stu-
dents to be aware of how the
change impacts them personal-
ly. Graduation will eventually
be tied to a student passing all
of the state EOC exams," con-
cluded Polk.


Sweden leads the world in
newspaper readership
with about 572 copies sold
,daily for every 1,000 peo-
ple.










The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
June 27-July 1. Listings include
the name of the owner or con-
tractor, the address for the proj-
ect, the type of work to be done,
and the cost involved. Only
projects valued at $1,000 or
more are listed.

ISSUED
James Cobb, Heard Bridge
Road, roofing, $6,785.
Gerald Waldron, First
Avenue, windows and doors,
$2,682.
Steve Johnson, Hancock
Road, demolition, $1,000.
Patsy Vickery, SR 64 East,
electric renovations, $2,000.
Sam Albritton, Rust Avenue,
electric repairs, $1,000.
Aubory Hartley, SR 66, shed,
$2,450.
Douglas Battey, Riverside
Drive, mechanical alterations,
$2,500.
Douglas Battey, Maxwell
Drive, mechanical alterations,
$1,700.
Elia Gaona, Hopkins Road,
Mobile Home, $5,000.
Robert White, Stansfield
Avenue, roofing, $2,000.
Gary Delatorre, Chester
Avenue, rehabilitation, $11,825.
James Jernigan, East Bay
Street, replace door and porch,
$1,800.
Douglas Battey, Mockingbird
Lane, mechanical repairs,
$2,100.
Andanelia Lopez, Mason-
Dixon, roofing, $2,834.

BUILDING BLOCKS
When complaints' of unli-
censed workers are turned into
the building department and it
is verified that work on con-
struction jobs is being done ille-
gally, it hurts the honest people
who have worked for their
licenses and insurance pay-
ments.
It may also cause home own-
ers to have substandard work on
jobs on their homes. In the long
run, the owner of the property is
in violation of Florida Statutes
489.103 (b). These violations
are turned over to the Internal
Revenue Service and the state
Department of Professional
Regulations as soon as they are
verified. It can end up being
very expensive for the home
owner, unlicensed contractor
and the public.

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
workshop to ,which all interested
persons are invited:
25th Annual Environmental
Permitting Summer School.
SWFWMD Governing Board
members may attend.
DATE/TIME: Wednesday, July
20-22, 2011; 8 a.m.
PLACE: Marco Island Marriott


All cooks have less than
desirable results from time to
time. The good news is that
whether it's the recipe's fault or
your own, most cooking disas-
ters can be fixed in a few easy
steps.
Whether the soup is too salty,
the sauce is too spicy or the
veggies are a mushy mess, mak-
ing a mistake in the kitchen
doesn't mean you have to start
from scratch, throwing out
expensive ingredients and wast-
ing precious time.
With these tips from restaura-
teur, "Top Chef' contestant and
DinnerTool.com blogger Ariane
Duarte, you can easily fix mis-
takes and save your meal.
Too Salty
If you accidentally dumped
the contents of your saltshaker
into your soup, a medium-sized
potato can save the day. Simply
peel and slice the potato, cook
for 20 minutes and discard. The


potato will release some of its
liquid and soak up some of that
extra salt.
Too Spicy
Ouch! Perhaps you overesti-
mated your heat tolerance for
jerk-rubbed chicken or you
used peppers in a sauce that
ended up hotter than you ex-
.pected. In sauces, adding sweet
ingredients such as tomatoes
can serve to dial down the spice
factor. A touch of butter, yogurt
or another creamy dairy product
can also tame the flames. If
you've over spiced your meat,
whip up a sweet, creamy sauce
and serve it on top.
Mushy Vegetables
While it's not possible to
undo an overcooked, mushy
serving of broccoli or aspara-
gus, you can give it a new life in
a soup. Puree the vegetables in
,a blender with some butter and
chicken stock, then simmer in a
pot with milk or cream. Season


with white pepper and you have
a delicious, nutrient-rich meal.
If you have overcooked sweet
potatoes or carrots, throw them
in a blender or food processor
with milk and butter to make a
yummy puree. If you have
soggy potatoes, fry them.
Overcooked Pasta
Good news. There is a simple
cure for overcooked pasta.
Saute the noodles in a hot pan
with some butter and olive oil-
the pasta will be revived and
take on a little bit of a crunch.
Serve as planned or simply add
a touch of wine, cream and
Parmesan cheese and you'll
have a great dish.
For tons of great tips on how
to fix common cooking blun-
ders, including scorched soup
and too sweet sauce, and for
ingredient- saving tips like what
to do with hardened cheese or
stale bread, go to www.dinner-
tool.com/tips.


Cuckoo clocks, containing carved wooden birds, which emerge and "sing" to tell the
time, were made in the Black Forest of Germany as early as 1730 and are still popular.

The record number of hands shaken by a public figure at an official function was 8,513
by President Theodore Roosevelt at a New Year's Day White House presentation in
1907.


Resort, 400 S. Collier Blvd. Marco
Island FL 34145
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
www.floridaenet.com, or Lou.
Kavouras@watermatters.org or
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order
EXE0153)
7:7c







4A The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011


SILAS OWEN KEEN
Silas Owen Keen, 69, of
Duette, died on Monday, July 4,
2011, at Bradenton.
Born on Oct. 27, 1941, at
Duette, he was a lifelong resi-
dent. He served in the U.S.
Army, was a dragline operator
for Mosaic and member of Dry
Prairie Baptist Church.
He was preceded in death by
a brother Jack Keen; and sister
Esther Kapo.
Survivors include his wife,
Carolyn Keen of Duette; three
daughters Sara Spencer. and
husband Ronald of Wauchula,
Veronica Keen and significant
other Jose Luis Diaz of
Palmetto, and Jackie Sheley
and husband David of Duette;
brother Bill Keen and wife
Maxine of Sebring; and seven
grandchildren.
Visitation is Friday 10 to 11
a.m. at Dry Prairie Baptist
Church, where services will be
held at 11 a.m. with the Rev.
James Harris and the Rev. Rudy
Williams Sr. officiating. Inter-
ment will be in Keen Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

TOMAS PEREZ
Tomas Perez, 79, of Wau-
chula, died on Saturday, July 2,
2011, at Wauchula.
Born Sept. 22, 1931, at Buda,
Texas, he came to Hardee
County 42 years ago. He was a
Church of God pastor
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Sophie Perez.
Survivors include four sons,
Tomas Perez and wife Mary,
and Joel Perez of Fruitland
Park, and Daniel Perez and
Able Perez, both of Wauchula;
three daughters Rosemary
Perez, and Linda Cardnes and
husband Joe, all of Fruitland
Park, and Ruth Perez and hus-
band JRaul of Wauchula; 21
grandchildren; and four great-
grandchildren.
Visitation Was Wednesday
from 6 to 9 p.m. at the funeral
home. Services are today
(Thursday) at 11 a.m. at Faith .
Assembly of God of Bowling
Green, with Pastor Juan De La
Cruz officiating. Interment fol-
lows at Wauchula Cemetery.
.." Robarts Family
SFuneral Homer -!--. ,i
Wauchula


koiutng Uemowoy
00189 EfM~q


SILAS OWEN KEEN
Silas Owen Keen, 69, of
Duette, died on Monday, Luly
4, 2011, at Bradenton.
He was born in Duette on
Oct. 27, 1941,'"and was a life-
long resident. He served in the
U.S. Army and was a.dragline
operator for Mosiac: He was a
member of Dry Prairie Baptist
Church.
He was preceded in death
by his brother Jack Keen: and
sister, Esther Kapo.
He is survived by his wife,
Carolyn Keen of Duette; three
daughters. Sara Spencer and
husband.Ronald of Wauchula,
Veronica Keen and significant
other Jose Luis Diaz of
Palmetto. and Jackie Sheley
and husband David of Duette;
brother Bill Keen and wife
Maxine of Sebring; and seven
grandchildren, Jacob, Joshua
and Macayla Spencer, Alyssa
Rodriguez, Reagan and Ry-
leigh Sheley, and Yasmin
Diaz.
Visitation is tomorrow (Fri-
day) from 10 to 11 a.m. at Dry
Prairie Baptist Church. Ser-
vices are at 11 a.m. at the
church with the Rev. James
Harris and the Rev. .Rudy
Williams Sr. officiating. In-
terment follows at Keen
Cemetery. Expressions of
comfort may be made at
robartsfh.com.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


THURSDAY. JULY 7
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
MONDAY, JULY 11
*Wauchula City Commis-
sion, regular meeting, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY. JULY 12
VBowling Green City
Commission, regular meet-
ing, 104 E. Main St., Bowling
Green, 6 p.m.

The most I can do for my
friend is simply be his
friend.

9n oV01ng9 ( eM0oy

HENRY JOEYY"
WINGATE
Henry "Joey" Wingate, 55,
of Polk City, and formerly of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
June 26, 2011, at his home.
He was born on Nov. 14,
1955, at Wauchula. He was a
pipefitter.
He is survived by his moth-
er, Beatrice Albritton of Wau-
chula; two sons, Michael
Shannon Wingate of Avon
Park and Kevin Dewayne
Wingate of Lake Butler; one
brother Harold Eugene Win-
gate of Wauchula; one sister,
Linda Drake of Ona; and four
grandchildren.
Visitation is Friday, July 1,
from 9 to 10 a.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel, followed by a
funeral service at 10 a.m.
Interment follows in Wau-
chula Cemetery. Expressions
of comfort may be' made at
robartsfh.com.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. MaiiStreet
-'Wiuchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts FamilypFuneral Home


Obituaries


Every portrait that is paint-
ed with feeling is a portrait
of the artist, not of the sit-
ter.


9i 0oring 8cemio0













RONALD ALLEN
THOMAS SR.
Ronald Allen Thomas Sr.,
76, of Venice, died on Sat-
urday, June 26, 2011, at Mag-
gie Valley, N.C.
He was born on Sept. 12,
1934 in Hardee County and
was a Bowling Green resident
for most of his life. He served
in the U.S. Army, was an elec-
trician in the phosphate min-
ing industry and was a mem-
ber of the Fort Green Baptist
Church.
He was preceded in death
by his parents.Fred and Ethel
Barley Thomas; wife Joan
Thomas; and brothers Fred Jr.,
Wayne, Dale and Eddie
Thomas.
He is survived by his wife,
Lynn Thomas of Maggie
Valley, N.C.; one son Ronald
Thomas Jr. and wife'Beth of
Venice; one daughter Pam
Lewis and husband Wayne of
Avon Park; one sister, Doris
Thornton of Bowling Green;
stepson Tim Cowart and wife
Sylina of Wauchula; step-
daughter Debbie Ljung and
husband Anders of Lake
Placid; five sisters-in-law
Eleanor Thomas of Felda,
Janelle Thomas of Okee-
chobee, Wanda Thomas of
Winter Haven, Sandra
Thomas of North Carolina
and Evelyn Cornwell of
Hiawassee, Ga.; three grand-
children; and five great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Thursday,
June 30th, from 2 to 3 p.m. at
Fort Green Baptist Church,
with services at 3 p.m. with
the Rev. Steve McGauhey
officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at Fort Green Bap-
tist/Methodist Cemetery. Ex-
pressions of comfort may be
made at robartsfh.com.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


THE FAMILY OF
HENRY JOEYY" WINGATE
greatly appreciates the kind
expression of sympathy in our loss.
Everyone's thoughts and efforts
were greatly appreciated.
Thank you for keeping us in
your thoughts.
Mom, Sis & Brother


Funeral service for over a century.




Compassionate Affordable Care


TOMAS PEREZ
Tomas Perez, 79, of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
July 2, 2011, at Wauchula.
He was born on Sept. 22,
1931, at Buda, Texas, and
came to Hardee County 42
years ago. He was a pastor at
Church of God.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Sophie Perez.
He is survived by four
sons, Tomas Perez and wife
Mary, and Joel Perez, all of
Fruitland Park, and Daniel
Perez and Abel Perez, both of
Wauchula; three daughters,
Rosemary Perez, and Linda
Cardnes and husband Joe, all
of Fruitland Park, and Ruth
Perez and husband Raul of
Wauchula; 21 grand children
and four great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday,
July 6, from 6 to 9 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel.
Services are 11 today (Thurs-
day) at Faith Assembly of
God in Bowling Green, with
Pastor Juan De La Cruz offici-
ating. Interment follows at
Wauchula Cemetery. Expres-
sions of comfort may be made
at robartsfh.com.


(gioa" && +
FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


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July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Successful Container Gardening


Container"gardening lets you
add character and color to your
patio or balcony. If you're really
hurting for space, then a win-
dow box can give you the
splash of color you're looking
for.


"Container gardening lets
you bring interior design com-
ponents to your outdoor space,"
said Lance Walheim, co-author
of "Landscaping for Dummies"
and gardening expert for Bayer
Advanced(tm). "It allows you
to express your creativity."
The National Gardening
Association says that more than
26 million households have
container gardens-that's the
equivalent of the total number
of households in California,
New York and Texas.
What to grow: You can try
just about anything as long as
the pot is big enough. Options:
Japa_nese maples, azaleas,
camellias, roses, dwarf apples,
lemons, peaches, pears, blue-
berries, strawberries, impatiens,
marigolds, geraniums, daffodils
and tulips.
Match the plant to the


container: A Japanese maple
looks great in a glazed ceramic
pot. You also want to have one
consistent style of pot, such as
clay or wood. Snap a photo of
your outdoor space with your
smart phone and let your garden
center guide you on options.
Make sure the pots have
drainage holes.
Buy packaged potting
soil, not gardening soil:
Potting soil is well aerated and
holds'necessary moisture and
nutrients for successful contain-
er gardening.
Plant flowers like you
arrange a bouquet: Taller
plants or flowers go in the mid-
dle. Place smaller ones around
that and cascading flowers
around the outside. Mix plants
with the same sun require-
ments.
Keep it moist: Stick your
finger deep into the soil. Water
the plants if the soil is dry.
You'll need to water often to


keep the root ball wet.
Establish a wellness plan:
Bayer Advanced Natria Insect,
Disease & Mite Control kills
aphids, mites, whiteflies, plant
bugs, black spot, powdery
mildew and leaf spot on contact
before they can damage or
destroy your container garden
(www.BayerAdvanced.com).
Always rea; 'nd follow label
directions.
Feed your container gar-
den: Frequent watering washes
nutrients from the soil, so you'll
need to fertilize more often to
keep your plants blooming.
If you do all the right things,
your plants will stay healthy
and grow. That means you'll
need to transplant them into
larger pots. You can reuse the
older pot when you buy new
plants or flowers.

In order to become the
master, the politician
poses as the servant.


qn 'Memory
MARIE BLISS WARD
Marie Bliss Ward, 90, of
Tampa, died on Wednesday,
June 29, 2011,
She was born April 20,
1921, and raised in Fish
Branch. Marie would like
everyone who reads this to be
aware that she was always
profoundly grateful that Our
Creator let her be born and
live when she did. From the
Model "T" Ford to man on
the moon (1969) to the antici-
pated trip to Mars in 2021,
great strides have been and
will continue to be made.
Future historians will agree
that Marie was born and lived
in the best times of America's
history.
She attended Gardner Ele-
mentary and graduated from
Wauchula High. In 1942,
after graduating from Capitol
City School of Nursing at
D.C. General Hospital in
Washington, D.C., she began
working as a registered nurse
and became administrative
assistant to three consecutive
Directors of Nursing at D. C.
General Hospital until her
retirement in 1972.
She was a member of
Gardner Baptist Church, First
Christian Church of Alex-
andria, Va., and later Forest
Hills Christian Church in
Tampa. Marie volunteered at
CCSN Alumnae, church,
Meals on Wheels, hospital
and in the community for 20
years.
She was preceded in death
by her beloved husband, Ray
Leroy Ward.
Survivors include three
generations of nieces and
nephews.
A memorial service was
held on July 6 at John Knox
Village in Tampa at 6:30 p.m.
Interment will be in the Gard-
ner Baptist Church Cemetery
in Gardner. Condolences may
be sent to www.nationalcre-
anon.com.
a~nfal Cremation S6ciety
Clearwater


I keep our land productive.


I am Mosaic.


Before we begin any mining for phosphate an essential
crop nutrient for growing food Mosaic develops a
government-approved plan for restoring the land to
productive use after mining. As reclamation supervisor,

I oversee the creation of wetlands, parks, wildlife habitats,.

and other areas for both people and wildlife to enjoy.

Knowing I'm helping to preserve nature makes my work

more than a job.


Actually, it's nothing short of a mission.


Mosaic



www.mosaicfla.com


PUBLIC NOTICE

The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners
will conduct their budget workshops beginning July
18, 2011 July 21, 2011, beginning at 8:30 a.m. each
day.

The workshops will be held in the County Commission
Chambers, 412 W. Orange Street, Room 102,
Wauchula, Florida.

For more information, please call the County
Manager's Office at 863/773-9430.

Terry Atchley, Chairman 7:7c


School Board
Changes Meeting
The regular session of the
Hardee County School
Board will be held on
Monday, July 18, at 9:45
a.m. instead of July 14th.
There will be a 9:30 a.m.
meeting to consider 2011-12
budget advertisements. The
second meeting for July will
be held Monday, July 25th at
5:20 p.m. instead of July
28th. There will be a public
hearing at 5:10 p.m. to con-
sider tentative millage rates
and proposed budget for
2011-12.
The meetings will be held
in the School Board Meeting
Room, 230 S. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula.

Phones Available
For Hearing Loss
Free amplified telephones
for Florida residents will be
available by appointment on
July 14 from 12:30 to 2:30
p.m. at the Catheryn Mc-
Donald Center, 310 N.
Eighth Ave., Wauchula.
Anyone with a hearing or
speech loss can get the free
-phone.'by calling 941-743-
8387 to set up an appoint-
ment.


2011
SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS FOR HARDEE COUNTY
COMMISSION AND APPOINTED BOARDS
Meetings to be held in County Commission Chambers.
Room 102. Courthouse Annex. 412 W. Orange Street.
Wauchula. Florida
unless otherwise noted

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Regular meetings every other Thursday at 8:30 a.m. &
6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF July 07th at 8:30 a.m. & 21st at 6:00 p.m.
Planning Session July 15, 2011 at 8:30 a.m.
Budget Workshops 07/18-07/20/2011 at 8:30 a.m.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY "INDEPEN-
DENT BOARD"
MONTH OF July No meeting scheduled

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD meets first Thursday
night of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF July 07th

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD
Meets on the second Monday night of each month at 6:00
p.m. in Building Department Conference Room, 401 West
Main Street
MONTH OF July -11th

COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD
Meets first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF July No meeting scheduled.

LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD
Meetings called as needed at Library in Annex II
MONTH OF July No meeting scheduled

HOUSING AUTHORITY
Meets second Friday of each month at 11:00 a.m. at 701
LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula
MONTH OF July To be announced.

HEALTH CARE TASK FORCE
Meets quarterly at Hardee County Health Department
Auditorium at Noon
MONTH OF July No meeting scheduled.

HARDEE COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE BOARD
Usually meets third Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m.
MONTH OF July 12th Present budget

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
County Commissioner's office at least forty-eight (48)
.hours prior to the public meeting.
This notice is published in compliance with Florida
Statutes 286.0105.
Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and
be heard. If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the members, with respect to any matter consid-
ered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record
of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Terry Atchley, Chairman 7:7c


S ( ~





The Herald-Advocate, May 12, 19, 26, 2011-18


o youMave Someone Jar Jo u or.


ive hem te i tat Wit altl near lona


Tu Sttcrption to ie JleraI-j7 ocate


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-$41


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-$49


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July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Week ending July 3, 2011
Abundant Rains During Week
Weather Summary: Seasonal rainfall was reported through-
out the State. Eight of the 36 Florida Automated Weather Network
(FAWN) stations reported rain levels of three to over five inches of
rain. Frostproof (5.61in.), Indian River (4.82 in.), and Kenansville
(4.46 in.) stations had the greatest amounts. As of July 1, the
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Division of Forestry reported. 117 active fires covering 22,129
Acres, a decrease compared to last week's 315 active fires. Fifty-six
percent of the topsoil moisture was rated as adequate or surplus, an
increase from last week's 40 percent. Subsoil ratings also showed
an increase with over 50 percent of the ratings being adequate or
surplus, whereas last week had only 35 percent with the same rat-
ings. Lake Okeechobee water levels, monitored by the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, remained virtually unchanged. Average tem-
peratures ranged from one degree below to three degrees above
normal. Highs were in the upper 80s and 90s. Lows were in the mid
60s to l9wer 70s.
Field Crops: Some fields have shown relief due to rains; how-
ever, continual drought condit. is have already affected crop
progress. More rain is needed liWall parts of the Panhandle and
north Florida. In Washington County, soybeans responded to the
rains. Dryland corn in the county had not recuperated and could not
pollinate due to heat and drought. Some in Gadsden County report-
ed similar scenarios with crops other than corn being receptive to
rains. Peanut conditions declined from the previous week with rat-.
ings of 2 percent very poor, 26 percent poor, 48 percent fair, and 24
percent good. The five-year average for peanut condition was 7
percent very poor, 14 percent poor, 28 percent fair, 41percent good,
and 10 percent excellent. Peanut pegging increased to 34-percent,
below last year's 35 percent and the five-year average of 41 per-
cent. Water restrictions have some sugarcane growers concerned.
Vegetables: Little vegetable activity included tomato harvest-
ing in western and central Florida with movement decreasing as
growers finish for the season. In Okeechobee, irrigated sweet corn
conditions were good..Okra harvesting took place in Miami-Dade
County. USDA, AMS market movement consisted of avocados,
okra, and tomatoes.
.Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture condition was
mostly fair to good. Pasture improved following the return of sea-
sonal rains; however, drought was the limiting factor to grass
growth. The overall condition of cattle was mostly fair to good, an
improvement in all areas from the previous week. In the Panhandle,
pasture and cattle condition ranged from very poor to good with
most poor to fair. Scattered rain gave some pastures short term
relief but pastures in many locations were still suffering from
drought. In the northern areas, pasture and cattle were in poor to
good condition. In the central areas, pasture and cattle condition
ranged from poor to excellent with most fair to good. The arrival of
summer rains improved pasture conditions. In the southwestern
areas, pasture and cattle condition ranged from poor to good with
most in good condition. Rain during the week raised water levels
in stock ponds. The pasture condition was improving since the
onset of rain two weeks ago.
Citrus: Temperatures were in the upper 60s and lower 70s at


night and the mid to lower 90s during the day for the majority of
the week. Heavier rainfall was reported with all but one of the sta-
tions receiving more than an inch. Frostproof recorded the most,
with 5.61 inches. Exceptional drought conditions exist in Palm
Beach, Martin, St Lucie, and most of Indian River counties.
Extreme drought conditions exist in the southeastern portion of the
State, with the most severe conditions in the remainder of Indian
River, Brevard, Okeechobee, and parts of Collier, Highlands,
Hendry, Osceola, and Glades counties according to the U.S.
Drought Monitor, last updated June 28, 2011. Although ten pack-
inghouses and 5 processors were still open, no processing activity
was reported. Grove activity included resetting new trees, young
tree care, applying herbicides, hedging and topping, brush removal,
and fertilizer application. The final Citrus Utilization Report for the
season was issued on June 26, 2011 by the Citrus Administrative
Committee,:



Defend Lips Against
Nature's Harshest Elements


Lips leave a lasting impres-
sion without even saying a
word. Make sure your pout
implies the positive. There are
easy ways to kiss goodbye the
damaging effects of chapping
and soreness caused by dry air,
cold temperatures, wind, heat
and sun.
Doctors have long touted pre-
vention as a key to a healthy
life. The availability of work
wellness programs and in-
creased usage of sun protection
all year long are a few signs of
consumers' willingness to pre-
vent health problems before
they arise.
Dr. Charles Zugerman, asso-
ciate professor of dermatology
at Northwestern University
Medical School, offers top tips
to maintain soft, supple and
healthy lips throughout the
year:
Hydrate. Drink the recom-
mended 8 oz. of water eight
times a day to maintain a
healthy complexion and avoid
dehydration. Water helps revi-
talize skin and keeps cells and
tissue strong.
Moisturize. Using a hu-
midifier adds moisture back
into the dry air, which is often a
contributing factor to chapped
lips and skin.
Protect. Lips can be ex-
posed to a number of conditions
on a daily basis from dry indoor


air, cold temperatures, sun and
wind when stepping outside. An
all-weather, all-season lip balm
ensures protection regardless of
the elements you face.
"My patients always ask for
advice on preventative meas-
ures for good health," said
Zugerman. "I tell them to keep
it simple. Activities such as
flossing, exercising, taking a
multivitamin and applying lip
balm with moisturizers and sun
protection are easy to do and go
a long way in preventing health
problems down the road."
Blistex Five Star Lip Protec-
tion contains dermatologist-rec-
ommended ingredients, includ-
ing:
Glycerin, which retains
moisture in dry air and pulls up
to 20 percent of its weight in
water from the surrounding
environment;
Candelilla, which forms a
barrier against moisture-rob-
bing wind;
Wheat germ oil to rehy-
drate heat-stressed lips;
* Calendula oil, which
soothes and helps heal cold-
chapped lips; and
Four sunscreens with
broad-spectrum SPF 30 UVA/-
UVB for year-round sun protec-
tion, recommended by the
American Academy of Derm-
atology.


Anglers Can Help


With FW
Biologists with the Florida
Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission's research institute
are seeking angler assistance
with a research project focusing
on red snapper caught in
Florida offshore waters.
This project will provide fish-
eries researchers and managers
with vital catch-and-release sur-
vival information needed for
assessing the status of this
important recreational fishery.
Biologists will approach an-
glers at public areas along the
Gulf Coast of Florida, including
boat ramps, fishing piers and
marinas, to request participa-
tion in the study. These biolo-
gists will distribute survey
cards designed to collect de-
tailed information on fishing
trips targeting red snapper.
This information includes
where red snapper are caught
and released, the type of fishing
equipment used, and the condi-
tion of the fish when released.
The data will provide vital
information that will help
improve the management of
this popular recreational fish-
ery.
Anyone fishing for red snap-
per in Florida can also request a
postage-paid survey card in the
mail, by mailing their name
and address to FishStats@-
MyFWC.com.


C Project
In addition to completing sur-
vey cards, anglers, vessel cap-
tains and mates can assist with
reef fish research by reporting
tagged fish to the Angler Tag
Return Hotline at 800-367-
4461.
Since 2009, FWRI biologists
have been tagging and releasing
reef fish back into the Gulf of
Mexico in an effort to evaluate
the survival of fish caught and
released with hook-and-line
recreational fishing gear.
Previous studies estimate 60.
percent of red snapper survive
when released after being
caught on hook-and-line. By
reporting tagged fish, anglers
will help to improve the accura-
cy of estimated release survival
rates for this species.
For this project, biologists are
inserting yellow or orange tags
near the dorsal fin of the fish.
Each tag has a unique number
printed on the side. When re-
porting a tagged fish, anglers
should provide the species of
fish, tag number, date and time
of capture, where the fish was
caught, fish length, type of bait
used and whether the fish was
kept or released.
If the fish is released, anglers
should leave the tag in the fish
so biologists can continue to
collect data.


Good people are good because they've come to wisdom
through failure.










BU YIN
GOD0SLE *DAOD


CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
.-The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold the regular scheduled meeting Monday July lt ,2011
immediately following the City Commission meeting which will convene at 6:00 pm
or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as fol-
lows: Commercial Grants, Brownfield Consultant RFP, Main Street Wauchula Update,
and any other business that may come before the Board.
The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby advis-
es that if any interested person decides.to appeal any decision made by the Board with
respect to any matter, considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863)
773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins *
'City Clerk


Now Taking Applications
for

Lead Carpenter
Must have
At least 5 years carpentry experience,
Strong leadership & communication skills,
Ability to read and understand construction drawings,
Ability to finish projects iii a timely manner

Pick up application at:
401 South Sixth Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873

Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
(863) 773-3839

Drug Free Workplace. EEOE. Criminal background
& driver's license checked prior to hiring.



Instruction
hic. 7:7c










HARDEE COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY
ONE BIG PRIZE


Tim.
7:30 p.m.


$1,000 O
VALUE
FRIDAY,. July 15, 2011
Drawing At Friday Night
Live


$10
Donation


Heritage Park Downtown Wauchula
You do not need to be present at the drawings to win.


CHOOSE ONE

SAmerican Tradition Gun
Henry Big Boy-Cowboy Edition II-44 Magnum
(Must be 18 years old and subject to Federal regulations)

* Heartland Gold Jewelry

$1,000 Visa Card


CALL 773-2122 OR 781-3613


TO GET YOURS TODAY


7:7c


7:7c


-Are You An Artist?.

Are You Crafty?

Do You Have Merchandise To Sell?


Main Street Wauchula

Invites You To Join Us!




TirriaZWi


Third Friday ofEvery Month!
Heritage Park in Downtown Wauchula

Get Your Vendor Application From

www.MainStreetWauchula.com

Or Call 863.767.0330

Application due no later than the Tuesday prior to each event.
Vendor acceptance is up to the digression of the
Main Street Wauchula Promoti'ons Committee.


NNW
























'Alki A ah PtLl
.... ,- PLUS ENTER FOR A
CHANCE TO WIN!
~$250 Sears Gift Card


FREE $25
SEARS GIFT CARDS
TO THE FIRST 10 CUSTOMERS!
limit one per household. See store for details. .

Join Joel McQueen and staff, ,
Owner of the NEW Sears in Wauchula!
131 West Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873
863-767-0022 Sears
;.;H ^*Sears*
Store Hours: Monday-Friday 9am-7pm
Saturday 9am-6pm Sunday 1lpm-6pm
ALL THE TOP BRANDS FOR YOUR HOME


SEARS PRICE MATCH PLUS POLICY: Retail CompeUtors if you find a lower price on an identical branded item with the same features (n Home Electronics identical brand and model number) currently available for sale at another local competitors retail store, Sears will match hat price plus,
give you 10 ol the difference. Just bring in the onginal advertisement to a sales associate at the time of, or within 14 days after. your purchase. Online Retail Competitors: you ld a lower online price (including shipping, handling and delivery) on an identical branded item with the same
features (in Home Electronics identical brand and model number) currently available rom a local competitor retail store honoring its own online price and the item s currently available for sale and delivery in your area. Sears vhil match that total price plus, give you 10% of the difference. Just
print the ordering page, including shipping, handling and delivery, and bring it to your Sears store at e time of, or within 14 days after, your purchase. If you are purchasing the item from sears.com, e-mail the information to order@customerservce.sears.om. Please note in some test markets,
an alteative Price Match Plus Policy is in effect. visit www.sears.corrpricematch for a list of test markets..Sears.Holis; f you find a lower price on an identical item (brand and model number) currently available for sale and delivery in your area from another Sears Holdings retail format or
website.Sears will match thal price, but will not provide the additional 10% of the difference. Sears will not pnce match limited time "Online Only" events. "Special Online Price" or conditional "Online Only Special Offers on our websites. Only items listed as Sold by Sears or Sold by Kmart are
eligible for price matching on our wesiles. All other rules for qualification apply. Exclusions Sears will not price match competitors' items that are limited in quantity, offered for sale for less tan six ours dunng a day. or offered for sale during the day after Thanksgiving. Sears will not price
match competitors' or our websites bonus or free offers, special offers, bundled offers, rebates, financing offers. coupons, clearance or closeout prices, orprices on used. damaged, retumed, open box or display merchandise. Sears will not price match services. Sears will not match typographical
errors or competitors' prices that result from a price match. Photocopies of advertisements or receipts will not be accepted as verification of competitor pncing. For other exclusions and further details see store associates or visit www.sears.com/pricematch. SFARQS.M-.ID.O MIOQN
ADRMI .ED ITEMS We try to have adequate stock of advertised items When otd-ol-stocks occur, Sears will oiler: An equal or better item at the advertised pnce. or A rai check for the advertised item Limited offers, special orders and items not normally available at your Sears stonr are
excluded. SALE MERCHANDISE is from specially selected groups unless identified as "all". EVERYDAY GREAT PRICE; Our everyday great price items are designed to deliver high levels of quality, style and features at great prices every day. Due to everyday great prices, additional discounts do
not apply. ALQN.W.I. E EX(LtMU1S; Special Purchases, everyday great price items, Lands' End merchandise. clearance, closeouts. outet store purchases, catalog orders, fragrances, fashion items and jackets, Introductory Offers, Celestial Star" diamonds, fitness accessories, video games,
video game systems, iPod. Weber merchandise, Plus Start batteries, propane tanks and exchanges, Kenmore PRO ', compact refrigeration, water heaters and water accessories, dehumidifiers, air conditioners. vacuum bags, bets and filters, floor care chemicals, automotive services. Pharmacy,
beer and wine, Sears licensed businesses, installed home improvements and repair service. Gift Cards, money orders, wire transfers and protection agreements. Sale dates as noted on back unless otthewise indicated. SEARS TOTAL SATISFACTION GUARANTEE RETURN POUCY: Our goal is
that you are satisfied with your purchase If you are no satisfied return your purchase in its onginal packaging, with your onginal receipt within 90 days of purchase; 30 days from the purchase date for select items Video Games, CDs. DVDs. computer software and sportsloy collectibles must be
unopened for a refund or exchange. Other select items. if the onginal packaging has been opened or tags andor labels have been removed, will only be exchanged with an identical em or a substantially similar tem of equal value. Exchanged items will only be exchanged. Returns and exchanges
are not allowed on customized jewelry. All refunds will be issued in the same form as the original method of payment IMPRTAIFT DFRED1 IN[EEST .DETAILS.I(WHEN OFFREO); Interest will be charged to your account froman the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within
ie promotional period or if you make a late payment With credit approval, for qualifying purchases made on a Sears card (Sears Commercal One" accounts excluded) Sears Home Improvement Account' valid on installed sales only. Offer is only valid for consumer accounts in good standing and
IS subject to change without noce. May not be combined with any other promotional otter. SEARS CARDS: As of 5&2/2011, APR for purchases: VARIABLE 724%-27.24% or NON-VARIABLE 14.00%-2999%. IMUM INTEREST CHARGE: ilTO An Annual Membership Fee of up to $59
may apply. See care agreement for details Seaws cards a1e issued by Citibank South Dakota), NA. Sears Solutons cards are issued by HSBC Bank Nevada. NA SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BAO: Exclusions apply. See Sars Relum Policy for more details. 1855
7:7C


5A The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011








PAGE ONE


TEE-BALL CHAMPS


COURTESY PHOTO
Tuning up their talent in Summer Band are (first row, from left) Rebeca Espinoza,
Azucena Lopez, Rosaura Guido, Terry Yanes and Diana Correa-Mariano; (second row)
Rodrigo Rodriguez, Erica DeLoera, Emma Wolgast, Elizabeth Flores, Alex Lopez and
Augustine Morales. With the students (in back) is band director Shayla Bryan. Not pic-
tured are young musicians Josephine Gamez and Mary Sinclair.

HJH Band, Chorus Classes

Are In Tune With Success


Hardee Junior High School's
band students recently partici-
pated in a two-week Summer
Band program.
Two sessions were, offered:
beginning band and advanced
band. During the beginning
band class, students learned
how to play another instrument,
while the advanced band group
focused on improving their
skills and technique on their
primary instrument. Most of the
students took part in both ses-
sions.
Band students presented a
concert for family members and
friends on the last day of
Summer Band.
Band and chorus are elective
classes offered at HJH for sixth-
through eighth-grade students.
There is still time to enroll for
the coming school year, and the
benefits to your child are many.
- Studies show that students
who participate in music devel-
op friendships, a work ethic,
self-esteem, and teamwork
skills. Research has also shown


that students who study music
are more successful on stan-
dardized tests and achieve high-
er grades in school.
Beginning band provides stu-
dents with the opportunity to
become proficient on a musical
instrument and learn how to
read music. No previous experi-
ence is required..
During the first two weeks of
school, students will learn the
basics of music and work
together with instructor Shayla
Bryan to select the instrument
they would like to play and are
best suited for.
Band instruments include
flute, clarinet, alto saxophone,
French horn, trumpet, trom-
bone, baritone, tuba, and per-
cussion
This past school year, the
HJH Band performed a winter
and a spring concert. Selected
students traveled to participate
in All-State, Heartland Honor
Band, and Solo & Ensemble.
Additionally, band students
cheered on the HJH football


Aspire, break bounds. Endeavor to be good, and better
still, best.
-Robert Browning


team at home games and
marched in the Homecoming
and Christmas parades.
Band trips included attending
the Band Day performance at
Florida Southern College and
performing at Music Perfor-
mance Assessment.
Chorus allows students to
develop their singing skills and
also learn how to read music.
Chorus students have many
opportunities to perform as
well, both at HJH and away.
Like the band, the chorus pre-
sented its winter and spring
concerts. Chorus students trav-
eled tosing at Music Perform-
ance Assessment and for resi-
dents of Hardee Manor during
the holidays. Students also sang
for the HJH Cultural Day and
fifth-grade Career Day.
It is not too late to enroll your
student in band or chorus for
the 2011-12 school year. If your
student would like to participate
in either instrumental or vocal
music, contact the Guidance
Office at 773-3147.



ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Tee-Ball All-Stars claimed the District 7 championship recently. Undefeated
in games against Frostproof, East Lakeland, Bartow, Fort Meade, and East Lakeland
again, the team is coached by Jason Clark, Gerry Lindsey, Tony Pazzaglia and Justin
Webb. In photo above (front row, left to right) are players Tony Rodriguez, Joe
Hamilton, Luke Roberts, Madi Jane Schraeder, Eric Mushrush, Matt Webb and Josiah
Lozano; (second row) Blake Rucker, Cody Halstead, Boone Pazzaglia, Taijaeous
Blandin, Kellon Lindsey and Dean Clark.


Outdoor Feature Trends


Growing In
Whatever the economic cli-
mate, homeowners prefer land-
scape trends that let them make
the most of the weather in their
own outdoor space.
A recent American Society of
Landscape Architects (ASLA)
Residential Trends Survey
asked residential landscape
architecture professionals to
rate the popularity of different
outdoor living and landscape
features. Today's homeowners,
the survey said, prefer function,
efficiency and-fire pits, choos-
ing such basic features as light,
fire, food and a place to sit and
enjoy it all.
Overall, 96.2 percent of
respondents rated exterior light-
ing as somewhat or very popu-


Popularity
lar for this year, followed by
fire pits/fire places (94.2 per-
cent), seating/dining areas (94.1
percent), grills (93.8 percent)
and installed seating like bench-
es or seat walls (89.5 percent).
While the most popular out-
door features reflect an endur-
ing sensibility, the interest in
modern technology such as
stereo systems (58.3 percent),
Internet access (46.3. percent)
and televisions (45.4 percent)
adds to the growing trend of
taking what people enjoy inside
to the outdoors-up to a point.
Only 10.4 percent.of re_spon-
dents thought outdoor sleeping
areas would be popular this
year.
"Homeowners continue to


reconnect with their outdoor
space. However, expect many
households this year to either
phase in projects over time or
carefully select fewer features,"
said ASLA executive vice pres-
ident and CEO Nancy Somer-
ville.
When it comes to landscape
elements, efficiency and sus-
tainability reign supreme. Very
popular are low-maintenance
landscapes (94.2 percent),
native plants (87.2 percent),
water-efficient irrigation (83.1
percent), ornamental water fea-
tures (81 percent) and food/veg-
etable gardens (80.3 percent).
Other popular sustainability
features include permeable
paving (77 percent), reduced
lawn (72.6 percent) and rainwa-
ter harvesting (63.6 percent).
More information can be
found at www.asla.org/residen-
tialinfo.


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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578.780)

Thursday, July 7, 2011


HANCHEY'S CARPETS
VISIT Us ONLINE At www.HancheysCarpets.com

i Commercial & Residential
.- H Carpet Vinyl Wood Laminate


"We Install What We Sell"
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1968
110 East Main Street Wauchula o
(863) 773-4792 *(863) 773-4738


Main Street Wauchula Celebrates Our

HOME TOWN HEROES


Yri4ay "Iight



Freedom Festival
Friday, July 15th from 6:00pm-9:00pm'
Main Street Heritage Park in Downtown Wauchula
















Business Partner: Wauchula Masonic Lodge
Bring Your Lawn Chair and Join Us Downtown!
For more information contact the Main Street office (, 863.767.0330 7:7c


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I







2B The HerlaM-Advocate, July 7, 2011




Hardee


Living


Jessica Brooke Brady of
Land O' Lakes has announced
the plans for her upcoming mar-
iriage to Eric Linn Baker of
Wauchula.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of 'Robert and Cindy
Smeltzer of Land O' Lakes. The
prospective groom is the son of.
Robert and Barbara Carter of
Wauchula.


Greetings from Fort Green!
Chrysta and Makayla Chan-
cey, along with Patrice ,Himrod
Strange and her family, spent
two days at Universal Studios
in Orlando last week. They
enjoyed both parks until closing
each day. A great time of fel-
lowship was had by all!
Katie Boyette got an eight-
point buck on SR 62 the other
day. Even though the antlers
were pretty, she would rather
not get them this way! It did
quite a bit of damage to her car.
The electrical companies did
not think of the birds when they
put in metal poles. The other
morning when I was walking I
heard a loud tapping and finally
located 4 small red-headed
woodpecker trying his best to
make a hole'in that metal elec-
tric pole!
Edith Bassett and I went to
the Health Fair June 30. There
were quite a few health tests
available plus many door
prizes. We were registering for
a three-month membership to
the Y; Edith said, "I will proba-
bly win this because I don't
really want it," and sure enough
she did! Her daughter got a nice
prize! Everyone should take
advantage of this Health Fair.
Another one is scheduled for
next winter.
Sandy Hash brought me a
delicious.homemade banana nut
cike for my birthday. She bakes
the best I have ever eaten and
it's no good to try and make
one, as it will not taste like hers!
We went to Lakeland for sup-
per, and since Penny Nicholson
and I share the same date, she
and Charles were there!
More of Fort Green's finest
young ladies were in a dance
recital in Avon Park last Friday
night. K-Lynn.Simpson, Kasey
Powell and Cierra Smith did a
super job. Lots of family mem-
bers and friends enjoyed the
show.
I was walking on the dirt road
and a big alligator turtle was
crossing the road. This was the
first I had seen since I moved to
Hardee County in '64. Dale
Chancey came along in his car
and just barely saw it in time to
swerve around it. I went on
home and got a shovel to move
it out of the road but by the time


The couple will exchange
wedding vows on Friday, July
15, at the St. Petersburg Lions
Club Beach House on Treasure
Island. The ceremony will
begin at 6 p.m.
A wedding reception will fol-
low the ceremony.
Friends and relatives of the
couple are invited.


I returned that old turtle knew
his life was on the line if he
stayed on the road. It is sad, but
I have seen cars try to run over
animals on the highway.
Among the family members
at the funeral of Ronnie Thom-
as was one of his sisters-in-law,
Wanda Thomas. She lives in
Winter Haven and says she gets
The Herald-Advocate, usually
on Thursday morning. She
eagerly looks forward to the
news to see what is happening.
Her husband was Dale Thomas
and they had a surveying busi-
ness for many a year.
I appreciate all of you who
called to see what was wrong
and why I did not write the Fort
Green News last week. I ex-
plained that the paper had
called me and there was so
much other news there just was-
n't room!
David McQuaig is in Af-
ghanistan and is scheduled to
go to the front lines next week.
He lost a buddy recently so
Please pray extra hard for
David's safety.
Elaine, the sister of Donald
SSamuels,-attended- church with
him. She and her son are visit-
ing from the Panhandle.
Everyone was happy to see
Buck Toole last Sunday, as he
has been absent for quite a few
Sunday. He is scheduled for a
kidney test this Tuesday. saw
Joe Jones and he said he is bet-
ter but still having severe
headaches.
Mr. Leo Blink has been under
the weather all week. Jack and
Linda Smith are not doing well.
Mabel Williamson is having
back problems. There are just
lots of sick. Please pray for all
of these.
Our, sincere sympathy is
extended to the family of Faye
Shackelford. The only grocery
stores I can remember when we
moved to Wauchula were the
Red & White and the S&S. I did
most of my shopping at the
S&S.
Wauchula has really grown.
Please pray for. our nation,
our country and our military.


Jarnagin
Brett Jarnagin
Graduates With'
Honors At UCF
Brett Clark Jarnagin graduat-
ed cum laude from the Univers-
ity of Central Florida in Or-
lando on May 6'
He earned a bachelor of arts
degree in art history.
While at UCF, Jarnagin was
active in the Art Club and the
Young Democrats.
He plans to attend graduate
school and would like to teach
at the university level, He is
presently employed with the
Greenspoon-Marder law firm in
Orlando.
Jarnagin is a 2006 honors
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School. He is the son of Kathy
Clark and Byron Jarnagin.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


WORLD WAR


II REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Bob Weidman, 88, of Wauchula spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, June
7, at the Panda Restaurant about being an Army Medic in Belgium and France in World
War II. He saw 145 soldiers get shot and was injured himself by an enemy bullet. His
best friend and many other comrades were killed. "I was 18. It helps to cry. In battle
you need to laugh. If you cry you want to go home. At 18 or 19 you do everything you
have to do. At 21 you will not. You think. I remember all of the war. I feel like I am 65."
He crawled in the mud to find a wounded soldier. If he was dead, Weidman removed
the bottom tag which had the name and serial number. "The Battle of the Bulge was
the worst. One truck had 75 dead men in the back-boys like me." He also suffered
frozen feet. He was in a foxhole once for two days, trapped by a machinegunner. From
left are W.H. Harward Jr., Bertie Weidman, Bob Weidman and Bob Hanchey.


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July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


MISSION MEMENTO


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Several members of the Hardee High School Junior ROTC attended the Wauchula
Lions Club meeting Thursday, June 9, at the Java Cafe. There were 146 in the program
this past school year, with 170 set for next year, with 90 on the waiting list, said instruc-
tor Lt. Col. Anthony Hingle. There are two instructors. Junior ROTC teachers leader-
ship, discipline, citizenship, integrity and service. From left are Dep. Commander Jesse
SBelcher, Commander Staci Macias, Raquel Rosales, Vernon Benbow, Alie Soils, 1st Sgt.
Andrew Hernandez, and Lt. Col. Hingle.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Janet Gilliard spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, June 21, at the Panda
Restaurant about conserving water. The Southwest Water Management District
Recommends irrigation between 4 and 7 a.m. A leaking faucet can waste up to 3,000
gallons a year. A leaking toilet can waste up to 200 gallons a day. Residents in this area
use and average of 111 gallons of water per person each day. SWFMD covers 10,000
square miles with over 5 million residents and has a budget of over $106 million. The
Florida Legislature and governor recently eliminated the eight basin boards, including
the Peace River basin, to save money. Low-flow faucets and showerheads are encour-
aged, as wellfas outdoor water collection systems and soaker hoses for hedges. From
left are Lex Albritton, Janet Gilliard, Lorie Ayers and John Edwards.




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My name is Callie, and I have been missing for several days from the
vicinity of Kelly Court and Tropicana Drive (close to North Wauchula
Elementary). My owners miss me terribly, and want me to come home. I
am a Siamese mix and have white fur with light brownish/gray patches
on my body, and some black patches on the back of all four of my legs.
My eyes are blue. There will be a reward offered for my safe return. If
you know of my whereabouts, please call 863-773-4587. Thank You!
4el A)


COURTESY PHOTO
The Wauchula Lions Club was recently presented with a slice from a log cut in Arab,
Ala., during a mission trip there to aid tornado victims. The club had lent its financial
support to the trip. Here (from left) Lions Paul Samuels and Kathleen Roehm accept
the memento from fellow Lions Noey Flores and Rick Knight, who were part of a local
team traveling to Alabama to help provide disaster relief.


STATE REPRESENTATIVE SPEAKS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
State Rep. Ben Albritton spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, June 14, at
the Panda Restaurant in Wauchula. The Wauchula citrus businessman was elected in
2010 and served on nine committees this year. He said the 2011 Florida Legislative ses-
sion was all about business and jobs. He said Gov. Rick Scott understands business,
knows about acquisitions and mergers, had to deal with less tax revenue and wants to
cut business restrictions and costs of government. Albritton said in today's economic
climate creating jobs is a zero sum game-bringing jobs here means taking them from
another state by way of company relocations. He said insurance reform is needed.
Albritton said he keeps a Bible on his desk and reads Proverbs and James for guid-
ance. From left are Michael Kelly, Ben Albritton and club president Thomas Trevino.


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4B The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011



WayBaIckT W heT
BH t^^^^^t^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B ^^^


This week in history, as
. researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
.Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate...

75 YEARS AGO
The question of the sheriff's
race, which has been hanging
over the fire for several weeks
was argued in a special court
session yesterday. Following
the election on June 2, incum-
bent Sheriff C.S. Dishong had a
total of 1,871 votes, while W.
Blocker Whidden and Judge
F.G. Janes Jr. had a combined
total of 1,870. According to the
demurrers, the Fort Green Pre-





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

CASE NO. 252011 CA000298

GLENDA C. BEST,
P.O. Box 716
Bowling Green, FL 33834
Plaintiff,

vs.

MICHELE C. DASHER a/k/a
MICHELE CAMP DASHER,
Sif alive, and if dead or not known
to be alive br dead, her unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees and creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, or
under those unknown natural
persons; and the unknown
assigns, successors In interest,
trustees or any other person
claiming by, through, under, or
against any corporation or other
"legal entity named as the
Defendant; and all claimants,
persons, or parties, natural or
corporate, or whose exact legal
status is unknown,
Defendants.
I/

NOTICE OF ACTION

:TO: MICHELE C. DASHER a/k/a
MICHELE CAMP DASHER
whose last known addresses
were:
P.O. Box 71, Zolfo Springs,
FL 33890
P.O. Box 71. Wauchula, FL
33873
P.O. Box 68, Wauchula, FL
33873
600 North Palmetto Creek,
Avon Park, FL 33825
981 Metheny Road,
Wauchula, FL 33873

if alive, and if dead or not known
to be alive or dead, her unknown
spouse heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, or creditors,
trustees, and all other parties
claiming and interest by, through,
under or against them, respec-
tively; and all unknown natural
persons if alive, and if dead or not
known to be dead or alive,
grantees, and creditors, or other
parties claiming an interest by,
through, or under those unknown
persons; and the several and
respective unknown assigns,
successors in interest, trustees,
or any other person claiming by,
through, under, or against any
corporation or other legal entity
named as a defendant; and all
claimants, persons or parties nat-
ural or corporate, or whose exact
legal status is unknown, claiming
under the above named or
described defendant or party or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in and to the lands here-
inafter described, AND ALL
OTHER IT MAY CONCERN.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a quiet
title action on the following
described real property in Hardee
County, Florida:

PARCEL A:

1/4 mineral interest in
the following: SW 1/4 of.
and West 26 2/3 acres
of NW 1/4 of SE 1/4 of
Section 28, Township 35
South, Range 23 East,
Hardee County, Florida

AND

PARCEL B:

1/4 mineral interest in
the following: North 1/2
of NW 1/4 of Section 33,
Township 35 South,
Range 23 East, Hardee
County Florida

has been filed against you by
Plaintiff, GLENDA C. BEST, and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any,
of Clifford M. Ables, III, Clifford
M. Ables, III, PA., Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is 202 W.
Main Street, Suite 103, Wauchula,
FL 33873, on or before August 5,
2011, and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before


service on Plaintiff's attorney or
,immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
DATED this 28 day of June
2011.

B.HUGH BRADLEY, Clerk

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk

7:7,14c


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r

L


cinct and Bowling Green
Precinct 9A had failed to tabu-
late the votes correctly, but it
would not have made a signifi-
cant difference in the results.
When Judge W.J. Barker of
Sebring had heard both sides of
the argument, he adjourned
court with a "no decision" ver-
dict.

Clyde E. Everhart, president
and general manager of the
Central Florida Canners Inc.,
announced Wednesday that the
canning plant will close
Wednesday for the summer and
resume operations in October or
November. The tomatoes com-
ing in were not of good enough
quality to fulfill his "Delicio"
brand and he does not wish to
degrade the brand.

The Ciiy Council of Wau-



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 25-2010-CA-000467

Deutsche Bank National Trust
Company, Trustee Saxon Asset
Securities Trust 2007-2 Mortgage
Loan Asset Backed Certificates,
Series 2007-2,

Plaintiff,

vs.

Tangela Guerrero, and Florida
Housing Finance Corporation,

Defendants.
I


NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Summary
Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated June 27, 2011 and entered
In Case No. 25-2010-CA-000467
of the Circuit Court of the 10th
Judicial Circuit in and for Hardee
County, Florida, wherein
Deutsche Bank National Trust
Company, Trustee Saxon Asset
Securities Trust 2007-2 Mortgage
Loan Asset Backed Certificates,
Series 2007-2, is Plaintiff and
Tangela Guerrero, and Florida
Housing Finance Corporation, are
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at
the Hardee County Courthouse,
417 W. Main Street, Second Floor
Hallway outside of Room 202,
Wauchula, FL 33873, at 11:00
o~,,ck A. 43ayafJuly,
O21i, the following described
property as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment to wit:

Begin at the SW corner of
Lot D of Block 3 of the
Kayton and Maddox addi-
tion to the City of
Wauchula, Hardee County,
Florida, as per Plat Book 1,
Page 1-94, also recorded
in Plat Bar A-9 In the Office
of the' Clerk of Court,
Hardee County,' Florida,
and run North 76.9 feet;
thence East 135 feet;
thence South 76.9 feet;
thence West 135 feet to
Point of Beginning, less
the West 30 feet for road
right of way
AND
Begin at the SW corner of
Lot D, Block 3 of the
Kayton and Maddox
Addition to the City of
Wauchula, Hardee County,
Florida, as per Plat Book 1,
Page 1-94, also recorded
in Plat Bar A-9 in the Office
of the Clerk of Court,
Hardee County, Florida,
and run thence Easterly
along the South line of
said Lot D a distance of
135.00 feet to the PO.B.;
thence continue Easterly
along said South line a dis-
tance of 59.80 feet, more,
or less, to a point 130.00
feet West of the Westerly
side of Eighth Avenue
(Said point also bing the
SE corner of said Lot D),
run thence Northerly paral-
lel with Eighth Avenue a
distance of 76.90 feet; run
thence Westerly parallel
with 'aforesaid South line
of Lot D a distance of 59.80
feet more or less to a Point
105.0 feet East of the
Easterly side of Ninth
Avenue, run 'thence
Southerly parallel with
Ninth Avenue a distance of
76.90 feet to the Point of
Beginning.

Street Address: 609 South
9th Avenue, Wauchula, FL
33873.

and all fixtures and personal
property located therein or there-
on, which are included as securi-
ty in Plaintiff's mortgage.

Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus funds from the
sale, if any, other than the proper-
ty owners as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated at Hardee County,
Florida, this 28 day of June, 2011.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of said Court

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk


7:7,14c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO.25-2009-CA-000572

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting through the United States
Department of Agriculture, Rural
.-Development, f/k/a Farmers
Home Administration,

Plaintiff,

vs.

BRENDA J. McMILLIAN, a single
woman, a/k/a BRENDA HINES
McMILLIAN, f/k/a BRENDA
-JOYCE HINES,

Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered
on June 27, 2011, by the above
entitled Court in the above styled
cause, the undersigned Clerk of
Court or any of his duly autho-
rized deputies, will sell the prop-
erty situated in .Hardee County,
Florida, described as:

Lots 15, 16, and 17, Harlem
Heights, a subdivision
located in Section 10,
Township 34 South, Range
25 East, according to plat
recorded in the public
records of Hardee County,
Florida, Plat Book 3, Page
18,

at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash on July
20, 2011, at 11:00 A.M., at the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 W. Main Street, in
Wauchula, Florida, in the second
floor hallway, outside room 202,
subject to all ad valorem taxes
and assessments for the real
property described above.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS WITH DISABILI-
TIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTICI-
PATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (863) 534-
4690, WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS SUMMONS. IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771,
OR VOICE (V) 1-800-955-87.70,
VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE.

SDated on 6-28, 2011.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office Drawer 1749
Wauchula, FL 33873

BY: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

7:7,14c


chula has withdrawn its plans
for a golf course project and
asked the county to work with
the planning board in getting a
golf course project constructed
east of the city near the airport.

Kimbrell's Bowling Alley in
the Smith building on East
Main Street will sponsor a
bowling tournament in mid-
July, said bowling alley manag-
er L.V. Douglas. To be eligible,
all contestants must bowl a
qualifying round of 175 within
the next week. Visitors are
always welcome and ladies will
be admitted to bowl free at any
time.

50 YEARS AGO
Budget requests totaling
$106,474 have been presented
by Sheriff Odell Carlton to the
Board of County Commission-
ers for the coming fiscal year.
It exceeds last year's budget by
$20,500. Carlton said crime is
on the increase in the county,
and the number of cases made
this year was up 50 percent over
last year. Officers have been
working 80 and 90 hours a
week to keep up with it.

The Board of County Com-
missioners has agreed to pur-
chase the right of way for the
paving of Lemon Grove Road
in hopes there will be enough
secondary road money to begin
the project this year. County
attorney Hoyt Carlton estimated
the cost of securing the right of
way as $5,500. The board con-
sidered the plea of Jack Jones
and the fears of Commissioner
Lee Hanchey that there would
not be enough money for that
road and the county's share of
four-laning U.S. 17.

A record high 1961 tax
assessment roll, up over four
percent over last year's in spite
of reductions from Hurricane
Donna storm damages, was
approved unchanged by the


NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered
on June 27, 2011, by the above
entitled Court in the above styled
cause, the undersigned Clerk of
Court or any of his duly author-
ized deputies, will sell the proper-
ty situated in Hardee County,
Florida, described as:

The South 85.00 feet of
Lots 16 and 17, Block 17,
Wauchula Hills, a Subdivi-
sion as recorded in Plat
Book 3, on Page 1, of the
Public Records of Hardee
County, Florida,

at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash on July
20, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., at the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 W. Main Street, in
Wauchula, Florida, in the second
floor hallway, outside-room 202,
subject to all ad valorem taxes
and assessments for the real
property described above.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS WITH DISABILI-
TIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTICI-
PATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR. TELEPHONE (863) 534-
4690, WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING
DAYS -OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS SUMMONS. IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-
8771, OFI VOICE (V) 1-800-955-
8770, VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERV-
ICE.

DATED on 6-28, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office Drawer 1749
Wauchula, Florida 33873

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
7:7,14c


Board of County Commission-
ers. The real estate tax roll pre-
sented by Tax Assessor Ann
May Taylor totaled $21,-
071,371, about $500,000 over
last year's roll.

Walker's Grocery has chuck
roast at 35 cents a pound, round
steak at 69 cents a pound, let-
tuce two heads for 39 cents, a
10-pound bag of, flour for 89
cents, and lemons for 29 cents a
dozen.

25 YEARS AGO
Construction of the Zolfo
Springs sewer system is sched-
uled to begin on or before July
22. In an emergency meeting on
Tuesday morning, after there
was no quorum at Monday
evening's meeting, two con-
struction contractors were con-
sidered. Western Construction
Co. has 360 consecutive calen-
dar days to build the wastewater
collection and transmission sys-
tem.

The Bowling Green Com-
mission is trying to hold the line
on taxes. On Tuesday night, the
board approved a tentative mill-
age rate of 4.920, the same as
last year. City attorney Marcus
Ezelle informed the board that
it has to prepare for trial on a
lawsuit filed last year on an
easement on the Forrester prop-
erty.

Sonny Coker, supervisor of
elections, has announced that
his office is located now at 315
N. Sixth Ave., Suite 110 in
Courthouse Annex II. Regis-
trations for the first and second
primary and general election
will close on Aug. 2 at 5 p.m.

The business directory this
week highlights Peace River
Automotive on East Orange
Street, Hazel's Flower & Gift
Shop in Bowling Green,
Wauchula Farmers Supply on
North Fifth Avenue, W.B. Olliff
Jr. Tree Surgeon, Ayers' fill dirt,
and the merger of Heartland
Small Engine and Mid-Florida
Foliage into Heartland Garden




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY
.CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO.: 25-2010-CA-000270
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting through the United States
Department of Agriculture, Rural
Development, f/k/a Farmers
Home Administration,

Plaintiff,

vs.

DEBBIE SAMBRANO, a single
person; and HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA,
Defendants.


Center.

10 YEARS AGO
Contract negotiators for
Hardee County school person-
nel are seeking a 6.3 percent
pay hike for the upcoming year.
Collective bargaining between
the Hardee County School
Board and union also includes
contract language and insurance
costs.

A zoning hearing for a pro-
posed compost plant in eastern
Hardee County begins at 6
tonight (Thursday). A standing-
room-only crowd with numer-


Bruce is a young Beagle.
He has a tri-colored coat, with a long tail. Sorry, but Bruce
was camera shy. Come on out to Hardee County Animal
Control at 685 Airport Road to get a better look at this
bashful guy!
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
.location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.








SPriscella
Owner/Stylist

^^ Allen Johnson
Barber/Stylist

(863) 2856300
302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL





I


60 minutes. 600 calories burned. One Hot dance floor.

FREE! MONDAYS and SATURDAYS
+ 50% OFF Joining fee (expires 7/31/11)

Low Impact/am/pm and weekend classes
Schedule and location www.jazzercise.com
Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland






GULF BEACH
MOTELRESORT






Located directly on beautiful

Lido Beach in Sarasota, Florida





Florida Residents receive 10% off
your rental fee!
Now through 12/15/11
(Not available on holidays. May not be combined with other offers)




Gulf Beach is the perfect place for family
and class reunions, beach weddings,
rowaantic getaways, family vacations or
just to relax on our private beach.
4roup Discounts Available

Amenities
Heated Pool
S:Shuffleboard
BBQ Grills
Tiki Hut
S.. Laundry Facilities
SKeypad Entry Lock
*Security Cameras
S* Free Wi-Fi


Gulf Beach Resort Motel
930 Ben Franklin Drive
Sarasota, FL 34236
(941) 388-2127 800-232-2489
www.gulfbeachsarasota.com
Email: gulfbeachresort@aol.com soc7:7p


Pet Of The Week


ous questions forced continua-
tion of the June 7 meeting to
obtain rnore information. The
plant, planned for Parnell Road
off Steve Roberts Special,
would take wastewater plant
residuals and convert it to
organic fertilizer.

S&S Suprex specials this
week include two half-gallons
of Shurfine ice cream for $4, a
five-pound bag of Vidalia
onions for $2.49, Dole
California lettuce for 79 cents a
head, rump roast for $1.89 a
pound, and pork roast for $1.59
a pound.

















RELAY FOR LIFE TRADITIONS
Welcome back! I'm sorry it has been a while since my last
article. I am still trying to get back into the swing of things since
my surgery in March.
Hardee County held its Relay For Life event in April. Even
though the lovebugs and the Florida heat were at their best, fun was
had by all.
This annual event helps to raise money for Hardee County
cancer patients, research, education to the public about cancer pre-
vention, and so much more. If we touched only one life during this
event whether through providing information about who can
help them, listening to them and comforting them, and/or remem-
bering their loved ones then this event was successful.
With this column are some pictures that were taken by next
year's event chair, Jose Canales. Please take the time to visit his
website, which not only has Relay For Life pictures but also keeps
a record of current events happening in Hardee County. The web-
site's address is socialhardee.com.
We are currently gearing up for next year's Relay For Life. If
you are interested in having a team and/or have questions about the


COURTESY PHOTOS
Participants keep the relay going, walking the track at
Wildcat Stadium to raise money for the battle against
cancer.


There are always fun things to do and see, and maybe
even learn about eating healthily!


event, you can e-mail me at jsussery@gmail.com.
Although every Relay For Life is different, there are certain
traditions at all relays, no matter where they are held. These tradi-
tions help participants celebrate, remember and fight back.
Celebrate The Survivors Lap
Relay For Life starts with a Survivors Lap, an inspirational
time when survivors are invited to circle the track together and help
everyone celebrate the victories we've achieved over cancer..
Remember The Luminaria Ceremony
After dark, we honor people who have been touched by can-
cer and remember loved ones lost to the disease during the
Luminaria Ceremony. Candles are lighted inside bags filled with
sand, each one bearing the name of a person to,.ched by cancer, and
participants often walk a lap in silence.
Fight Back The Fight Back Ceremony
Last, there is a Fight Back Ceremony, where we make a per-
sonal commitment to save lives by taking up the fight against can-
cer. That personal commitment may be to do something as simple
as getting a screening test, quitting smoking, or talking to elected
officials about cancer.
As always, stay safe and healthy.
Sharon Ussery is a board member for the Hardee Unit of the
American Cancer Society, located on West Main Street in down-
town Wauchula. For more information, call local Executive
Director Denise Benavides at (866) 739-5288, extension 5802.


Luminaria bags can be seen lining the track as this fami-
ly walks for cancer


Besides walking, there are plenty of activities to keep the
marathon relay interesting and fun. Contests, for
instance, bring out the crazy and creative.

The better work men do is always done under stress and
at great personal cost.
-William Carlos Williams


July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-County policy on frivolous complaints, 8:35 a.m.
-Peace River Explorations Inc. presentation, 8:50 am.
-Extension of business operations for Easton Sales & Rental,
9:05 a.m.
-Renewal of mutual fire protection agreement with Polk
County, 9:15 a.m.
-Ranking Economic Development Authority grant applica-
tions.
-Acceptance of Albritton Insurance as agent.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.

See first that the design is wise and just; that ascer-
tained, pursue it resolutely.
-William Shakespeare


INVITATION TO BID

The Hardee County Industrial Development Authority
requests proposals for annual contract:
All Landscape Maintenance
and Care Services at the
Hardee County Commerce Park located on S.R. 62.

Provide all the supplies, materials and equipment
necessary for the maintenance of the above refer
enced project, including maintenance of irrigation.
Maintain the grass area from the end of the roadway
maintenance to five feet behind the plant beds.
Additional services to include edging, pruning, trim-
ming, weed control, irrigation maintenance/operation
and fertilization.
Bahia grass will be fertilized once per year and plant
material will be fertilized two times per year.
Mulching two times per year with red or gold mulch.
$1,000,000 General Liability & Workers Comp Cert.
Maintenance of Lots.1 and 10. Services to include
mowing, edging, pruning, trimming, weed control,
irrigation maintenance/operation and fertilization.

All quotes to be submitted on a 'monthly quote' indicat-
ing the number of proposed maintenance visits.


Hardee County IDA
C/O Sarah Pelham
P.O. Box 458
Wauchula, Florida 33873


Due by close of business 4:30pm, July 29, 201.1
For additional information call 863.773.3030 between the
hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Marcus Shackelford, Chairman
Industrial Development Authority
Hardee County, Florida 7:7c


GATOR HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING


Remit quotes to:


---~--:-- i'






6B The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011





The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
,Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132* FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida.edu/hr


INSTRUCTOR, BIOLOGY
Full-time, 10-month position to teach Biology and related
courses (predominately human anatomy & physiology) in
Hardee and Desoto counties beginning in the Fall (August
2011). Master's degree in Biology (or 18 graduate semester
hours in Biology and a Master's degree) required; Ph.D.
preferred. Community college and distance learning experience
strongly preferred. Related field experience highly desirable.
Competitive salary and benefits including retirement, health/life
insurance, and sick leave. Application review will begin on
8/1/11 and will continue until appointments are made.
Application forms available in Human Resources, Building I
(Avon Park), at any SFCC campus/center, and on our Web site.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cl7:7,14c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
2004 Ford 2Dr Id 1FAFP45X84F202547
(Cancelled)

2000 Geor MH Id. 1FCMF53SXY0102554
Contact Linda or Shannon for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Friday July 15, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. at the Wauchula
State Bank parking lot located at 106 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL. c17:7.14c



HELP WANTED
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS

Full Time $22,360
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking
applications for full time Telecommunication
Specialists. You must be at least 19 years of age,
have a high school diploma or equivalent, never
been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor,
be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test,
pass a typing test and work shifts. Applications
may be obtained and returned by noon, July 22,
2011, at the Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit St.,
Wauchula, FL. If other arrangements are neces-
sary, call 863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE C7:7,14



SANI

-H \x V"YOURf TO
R/ EAL ESTATE
fleartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
I I(863) 382-3887

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
.Featured Properties


Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
MOTIVATED SELLER-BRING OFFERS! PRICE REDUCED to
$189,999. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.
REDUCED! 182 acres of rolling pasture for cattle, sod, farm, or
develop. Zoned farm residential, 90% improved, cow pens, cross
fenced, 3 ponds, 6" well with John Deere power unit. Also included is
a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home with fenced yard and well.
Call Jimmy Wohl @ 863-381-2437.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net ,,


Classifieds-


BUSH HOG hydraullc/PTO post
hole digger/auger $1,400 OBO,
863-781-7868. 6:9-7:7
DIESEL INJEC ION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and Install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc
1958 FORD 800 SERIES 45 HP
Tractor and bedder $3000. 2008
F250 XL Super Duty Diesel 4 x 4,
automatic, highway miles
$13,000. 773-5704, 381-4308. 7:7p


1988 JEEP GRAND WAGONEER
$750 firm, 863-445-0621. 7:7p


CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc


NOW HIRING: Lead Carpenter.
See display ad for more Info,
Section A; L. Cobb Construction,
Inc. 7:7c
CAREGIVER/STAFF, no criminal
record, CPR and first aid certified
a plus. Contact Southern Oaks,
773-9557 ask for Sanny or Mac.
7:7c
FT MAINTENANCE TECH. for
apartment complex In Wauchula.
Must have experience. DFWP and
EOE. Send resume to Rental
Office, 1104 Bartow Rd.,
Lakeland, FL 33801. 7:7c


SPEECH INSTRUCTORS-P/T
positions for day & evening class-
es at SFCC's campuses in
Highlands, Hardee and Desoto
counties. Min. master's degree
req. Teaching exp. pref. Visit our
website, www.southflorida.edu/hr
for complete info. (863)-784-7132.
EA/EO. 7:7c
MATH INSTRUCTORS-PT posi-
tions to teach college-level math
(evening classes) in Hardee &
DeSoto counties. Master's degree
In math req. Open until filled. Visit
www.southflorlda.edu/hr for
details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO.
7:7c


COW HORSE 4 yr. old philly, 16
hands, no papers $2,500, 863-
781-7868. 6:9-7:7p

Computers can figure out
all kinds of problems,
except the things in the
world that just don't add
up.
-James Magary


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Angel
Zamarripe, D.W. Tatis, William
Grisinger, Wally Gray will be sold
by warehouseman's lien at
Bowling Green Storage 5018 N.
Hwy 17 on July 19, 2011 at 9:00
am. 6:30;7:7p
PERSONAL PROPERTY of
Brianna Nillls, Lynn Roberts, Lori
Molina, Dwain Lane, Cora
Hudson, Darrick Rogers, Don
Hunt, Thomas Deemer, Rebecca
Talley, Candace Mclllwaln, Hector
Rivera, Jamie Batiste, Pam
Poucher, Katrina Daniels will be
sold by warehouseman's lien at
B&J Self-Storage, 667 S. 5th Ave.,
Wauchula, Florida on July 19,
2011 at 11:00 am. 6:30;7:7p
PERSONAL PROPERTY of Linda
McMillan, Wayne Baucom,
Whitney Justice will be sold by
warehouseman's lien at B & J
Storage, 210 N. 3rd Wachula,
Florida on July 19, 2011 at 10:00
am. 6:30;7:7p


TWO FEMALE Chihuahua pup-
plea for sale, $175. Small parents.
773-2668. 7:7p


HARDEE CAR COMPANY

* THIS WEEKS SPECIAL *
99 Mustang
$509950-







BuY HERE PAY HERE!
Wauchula
acros IJo11 First National Bank)
Monday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm
773-6667 Wauchula Hills, ,


l omenr of wy i and REA Rd.)
Friday & Saturday
10am to 7:30 pm
773-2011


Billy Hill
Owner


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs ci7:7


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


(863) 735-1495

(863) 735-1495


Zolfo Springs
cI8:2tc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


iFlore & Fflores, In
I* MEMNO


,-o




4BR/2B on corner lot in Georgetown.
Great room, cathedral ceilings, french
doors, stone fireplace, wood and tile
floors. Large porch w/screened in pool
and fenced yard. CB outbuilding has
pool bathroom and outdoor shower.
cl7:7,14p






Joe Loavis


I N C.,


Kenny Sanders
(863) 781-0153


REALTORS
| (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


10 acs cleared land on paved
rd w/4" well in western Hardee
Co. $65,000!
12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
traffic...Hello, peace & quiet!
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. $130,000!
Lovingly maintained/updated
4BR/2.5BA brick home in
Knollwood w/updated kitchen,
fireplace, back patio! $218,000!


PRICE REI
for 5 or 10
high/dry fen
vate rd! $40
acs! $50,000
septic!


PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
home on 4 lots w/beautiful oaks,
fenced in backyard. Close to
schools. NOW $69,000!
25+ ac fenced pasture,
Greenbelt qualified, on US Hwy
17 S w/well, septic & electric.
$192,900!
S20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!
10 ac w/paved rd frontage,
Great for pasture, farming or
homesite. $63,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 lots in
Wauchula w/over 975' total rd
frontage. Close to hospital,
schools & shopping. Will divide
or all for $75,000!
SCB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new flooring, cabinets,
countertops, being sold as is.


$65,000!
DUCED! Looking$65,0
acs? Two 5 a PRICE REDUCED TO
acs Tarewon a $74,000! Charming and priced
0ced parcels on pn to sell! 2BR/1BA 1060 SF home
for 5a csant 5wel & w/lots of updates: new A/C,
or 5acsw/well& insulation, carpeting, wiring.
Den can be 3rd BR.
REtAL R ASSOCA&TrS AFTER HOURS


KENNY SANDERS....,,71-01S3 SANDYLARRISON.... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL....... 781-7633 MONICA REAS.........81-.I
S DAVID OYAL...._.781-3490
S HIWGWA 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA FL 33873 t70tt


Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net

REDUCED

, .arpnK Tr" -,aim m *


Oralia D. Flores
(863) 781-2955


-I


.r


You must see this CB home with 4BR 2BA that sits on 2.24 acres
that is fenced and cross fenced for small farm animals. Property
includes various feeding barns and a 40x40 barn with lots of
storage and parking for 2 automobiles. Sit on the back 12x15
covered patio with panoramic view of hundreds of acres, as you
eat breakfast. Washed oak kitchen cabinetry with lighting hit-
ting the granite counter tops, recess lighting, gas counter-top
stove and electric oven. Home has central vacuum system and
electric is setup with a transfer box for generator during long
power outage, Make an appointment today to see this country
home that is 4 miles from Avon Park.
Reduced to $215,000


Ii


Wauchula 3BR/IBA CB home with a new central air & heat
unit Firsh paint inside and out New laminate flooring -
olome is ready to move into. Offered at $59,000




Sr---:




Bowling Green 3BR/2BA CB home with central air & heat -
Built in 2008 Ceramic Tile in common areas and carpet in
the bedrooms +/- 1/2 acre lot 1523 total sq ft I car garage
All this for $110,000
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember,Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours -
Oralla D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 ci7:7c


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service


t. GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Wor


~-- -
-


--4[-~L~1


lr~7'


I













The


July 7,2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B






Classirfieds


a-
FREE MALE CAT, neutered 863-
453-0419. 7:7nc
3 YR FEMALE Boston Terrier with
papers, $250. 767-0934. 7:7p


7 DOGS NEED A HOME, $20
Rabies shot. 1 kitten, 1st shots
$20. Come by to see. All
Creatures Animal Hospital. 7:7c
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh

aB


SUMMER PLANT SALE-All 3 gal
pots $4.50-1 gal pots $2.50.
Plumbago, Crape Myrtle,
Ugustrum, Texas Sage, Thryallis,
Viburnum, Jasmine and more.
Trees-Bottle Brush, Rain & Crape
Myrtle $10. Center Hill Nursery,
2949 Center Hill Road, between
Wauchula and Bowling Green, off
SR62, 4.5 miles west US 17. 863-.
223-5561. 7:7p


1843 KAZEN RD. 1.8 Acres
$20,000. 863-773-0421. 7:7,14p


Rentals


4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location in
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
for Information. 4:28tfc


WAUCHULA-3/2 Central A/C,-
Florida room, utility room, very
nice, 735-2626. 7:7c
2 BR HOUSE $400 month, 773-
9890. 7:7p
MOBILE HOME In Zolfo Springs 2
Bedroom $450 a month $350
security deposit, 773-9345. 7:7p


SMH, 3 BR/2 BA, Wauchula, good
neighborhood, no smoking, no
pets, $600/month, $500 deposit,
781-3570. 6:30;7:7c
3/2 MOBILE HOME in country,
fully furnished, $750 per month
863-781-1318. 6:30;7:7c
DUPLEX IN SEBRING, 2 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath, $600 first, last,
863-781-0982. 6:30-7:28p


705 MLK 4/1, $700 first and last,
863-781-0982. 6:30;7:7P
DUPLEX APARTMENT in good
neighborhood, Wauchula, no
smoking, no pets, 2BR/1BA, $550
monthly plus $500 deposit, 781-
3570. 6:30;7:7c
TWO BEDROOM apartment $550
plus deposit, no pets, 832-1984.
6:23-7:21 p
THREE BEDROOM, two bath,
$800 plus deposit, no pets, 832-
1984. 6:23-7:21p
APT. & HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 7:7c


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17. Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL

Buy Here! Heiscounts $ *jNo l. e"e
Pay lerel for Cash Deals








Lidif'As Htowse Thrif store

QUALITY MERCHANDISE



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street



9leaven (ent Cleaning service
By Sherry White Ministries
a0 a- 0~mm~ S~ g


773-0523 *


773-0877


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
1840 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 Individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc


VICKER'S LAWN CARE, free esti-
mates, no job too big/small, 863-
448-7491. 7;7-8:4p


n~nucc nC5aucI IooKing for
part time job opening, caring for
animals. Call ed 941-716-1411.
7:7p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLU
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
* MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
,nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh


ROBBY & SHERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR SERVICES & SOLUTIONS






(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
Scobbie@strato.net







FROM LAWNS TO REMODELING
H SHEETROCK AND PAINTING
METAL ROOFS TO POLE BARNS
TRACTOR SERVICES
2 CONCRETE AND DIRT WORK
>25 Years Experience

863-202-6465 or 863-735-0848
LIC.# CRC058080
6:30-7:21c


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


ELWOOD MERCHANT LAWN
Services. Affordable, free esti-
mates, call 863-781-1777.
6:23-7:21p


B SEE SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
6:16-7:17p
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
FRIDAY 8-? 711 Hanchey Rd.
Baby girl, women clothes, tools.
7:7p


'HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE.
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 1693 Steve
Roberts Special, Zolfo Springs, 3
houses from Merle Langford Rd.
Kids clothes, toys, misc. 7:7p.
SATURDAY, 8am-Noon, 164
SEarnest Rd., Wauchula. Clothes
and misc. Items. :7p


DRYER $75; 3 couches; dresser
with mirror $75. Lots of videos.
111 North 7th Ave., Wauchula.
7:7,14c
SATURDAY 8-? Multi-family sale.
Clothes for all, tools, household
items, baby. Items and much
morel 725 4th, Zolfo Springs. 7:7p
MOVING SALE FRIDAY, Saturday..
Furniture, refrig. dishwasher,
clothes, weedeaters, fishing.
equipment, 12 x 8 aluminum.
shed, misc. 1123 Mockingbird
Road, Village of Charlie Creek.
863-832-9825. 7:7p


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478





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Calvin Bates
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320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
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2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)


Monday Friday
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
Equal Opportuniro Emplo er & Provider


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L AMBER T
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402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
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with nice yard and screened porch. $29,000


1i SERVICE
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


cl7:7-28c


Classifieds


FINDING GOD ON A LIFE RAFT
All of us have gone through tough times in life, but Louie
Zamperini's were unique.
While a member of the Army Air Corps during World War II,
the B-24 Louie was on crashed into the Pacific, leaving only him-
self and two companions Russell Allen "Phil" Phillips and
Francis "Mac" McNamara alive.
Lost in the middle of the ocean on a small life raft, the three
men endured hunger, thirst, delirium, fear, being shot at by
Japanese war planes, and hungry sharks that were sometimes bold
enough to attack.
No human.beings had ever survived beyond 34 days in a sim-
ilar situation and, in fact, Mac passed away on the 33rd day. But
Louie and Phil held on for 47 days, when they were finally rescued
by a nearby ship. A Japanese ship.
And that's when Louie Zamperini's life really got hard.
Louie's life story is told in a best-selling book we were pleased
to honor with a Christopher Award this year. Written by "Seabis-
cuit" author Laura Hillenbrand, it's called "Unbroken: A World War
II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption." The book
embodies what the Christopher Award is.about because it focuses
on someone who endures incredibly horrific times,. yet eventually
makes the choice to not be overcome by the darkness but instead
be a light to others.
Zamperini sure was entitled to feel bitter in light of his expe-
riences on the life raft, and then two years of torture as a Japanese
prisoner-of-war. Though I won't give away the specifics of what



Easy Ways To Make

Health A Priority


Alyse Levine, MS, RD and
nutrition adviser, encourages all
Americans to maintain a focus
on their health through healthy
food choices and engaging
activities.
"All the latest research shows
that extreme-or fad-diets
don't work in the long term,
even if you're trying to get into
that favorite swimsuit or pair of
shorts," said Levine. "It's vital
to practice good habits all year
long, including finding fitness
activities you enjoy, eating bal-
anced meals and snacking on
nutrient-rich foods-like pista-
chios-to get you through the
day."
Levine suggests a few easy
tips to prioritize your health:
Get a leg up on fitness. You
can get your legs toned and
ready for shorts by giving up
your car one day a week and
traveling by bike or walking. As
a bonus, you'll save on gas and
help out the environment while
getting your body in shape.
SDon't be fake. Swap out
highly processed foods filled
with artificial ingredients for
foods packaged by nature. Pre-
packed, portion-controlled
snacks are a great idea when
you're counting calories, but
many are overly processed,
which can strip out a lot of




Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S.. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net


.Doris Lambert .
16.5 Acres with 3B/2Bth M/H built; 5 wells
located on property surrounded by large oaks.
$168,000
Old Florida Style Home, 3B/2Bth, ceramic tile
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5 ACRE TRACT excellent home site, paved
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5 Acres with large oaks and open field; very
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5 Acres of "Native Florida", abundant wildlife.
$22,500
STORAGE UNITS 30 units in excellent condi-
tion; very good rate of occupancy. Call Delois.
$75,000


CE YOU CAN CO


UNT ON [R
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


nutrients.
.* It all adds up. If you want
to maintain a healthy weight,
the equation is simple. Burn as
many calories as you consume
and make smart food choices
every day. Keeping track of
what you eat is often half the
battle. Use a food tracker tool to
log foods throughout the day
and set goals for the future.
Take the 49-nut challenge.
Incorporate a serving of pista-
chios into your daily diet to
help keep blood sugar levels' in
check and protect your heart. In
fact, research shows that, on
average, people who regularly
consume tree nuts, including
pistachios, have thinner waist-
lines and a better overall diet.
Pistachios are a power-packed
snack-filled with antioxidants
and.other key nutrients. Plus,
you can enjoy 49 pistachios in
every serving-more than any
other snack nut.
For more tips from Alyse
Levine, information on healthy
food options and ways to main-
tain- a healthy weight, visit
www.The GreenNut.org.


AM-SOUTH HEALTHY.
Each office independently owned and operated.

fII-i "6I'rF


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Light One Candle
By Tony Rossi
The Christophers


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720 ,
Oi


s. uale(ia uglescomputerservices.com www.GuglesComD uterServices.com




>' THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through July 31st
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

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S Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c7:7-28c


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Nancy Craft
832-0370


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781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


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located on 4.81 acres. ONLY $110000 c17:7c


happens, I will point out that the words "survival" and "redemp-
tion" are in the book's subtitle.
One interesting element is the way God introduces Himself
into the story in subtle ways. Though Louie was a good man who
nominally believed in God, he had never been religious, so the
divine wasn't a major factor in his life. But in times of distress, we
often express a natural instinct for God.
For instance, when Mac died on the raft, Louie wanted to offer
some religious words during the eulogy. The best he could do was
recall some Bible quotes he'd heard in movies. Then he offered the
most sincere prayer of his life. Hillenbrand writes, "(Louie) prayed
for himself and Phil, vowing that if God would save them, he
would serve heaven forever."
Soon after, Louie experienced a moment of grace.
Hillenbrand describes the scene on the raft: "One morning,
they woke to a strange stillness. The rise and fall of the raft had
ceased, and it sat virtually motionless. ... Phil watched the sky,
whispering that it looked like a pearl. The water looked so solid
that it seemed they could walk across it. ... Such beauty, (Louie)
thought, was too perfect to have come about by mere chance. That
day in the Pacific was, to him, a gift crafted deliberately, compas-
sionately, for him and Phil."
With every worldly comfort taken away from him, Louie
Zamperini experienced a hint of God's presence and design in his
surroundings that he had never noticed before. His life wasn't
immediately changed, but spiritual seeds were planted that would
blossom many years later.
If you're looking for a great summer read, I can't recommend
"Unbroken" highly enough. It's not only a true story of heart-
pounding adventure, but also one that will touch your heart and
soul in profound ways.
For a free copy of "Beyond Your Control," write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
nmail@christophers.org.

II. .11


Call todayforyour spo
17 -181-106 cl.23fc


David's Moving Business, LLC.
Licensed and Insured

We Also Do
Estate Sale
-' Pickups

P.O. Box 7301 863-235-1082
Sebring, FL 33872 863-441-7725
Email: davidsmoving business@yahoo.com ic7:7p


773-9743


ASSOCIATES


mq


L- L


I INHoMESERVCE1


IAAF









aid-Advocate
JSPS 578-780)
AU.uaay, July 7, 2011


PAGE ONE


Dispatcl
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
How is transfer of the Fire-
Rescue Dispatch changeover
proceeding?
Good, say both Sheriff
Arnold Lanier and Fire-Rescue
Chief Mike Choate. Both add
*that the bottom line is what's
best' for Hardee County resi-
dents and visitors.
Polk County Sheriff Grady
Judd has asked to be relieved of
the Fire-Rescue Dispatch by
Oct. 1, but will give or take a
few days if there's a delay in
implementing the Fire-Rescue
Dispatch at the Hardee Sheriff's
Office.
Lanier commented, "I look
forward to serving our dispatch.
We have a liaison with the Fire-
Rescue and will coordinate on
any problems we may have. I
believe we can all work togeth-
er for the people of the county
and do the best job we can."
Choate concurs. "I know
they're adding the modules to
meet all the needs of the CAD
(Computer Assisted Dispatch)
needed for Fire-Rescue. The
Positron system will be Phase II
compliant. At first, the mapping
won't be available to our
responders, but it is coming. I
believe long-range that it will
be good for the people of the
county.
A visit to the Hardee Sheriff's
Office dispatch center gives a
much better picture. Presently,
there are three dispatchers, each
at a console with earphones,
handling the variety of calls
which come in frequently. At an
adjacent alcove, there is a space
already set aside for the Fire-
Rescue dispatch specialist.
Lanier said he already has


More Answers


four of his experienced dis-
patchers in training for the addi-
tional 220 hours of training
expected for Fire-Rescue
Dispatching, medical terminol-
ogy, protocol and such. He will
add the four new dispatchers to
routine calls in their places,
three shifts plus a person to fill
in for vacations, sick leave and
absences. They will get the
basic 320 hours training similar
to law enforcement certifica-
tion.
The dispatchers now have
maps on their computers on
which they can zoom into the
exact location of a landline call
or triangulate to the area of a
cell phone call. The Global
Positioning System (GPS) will
be added as part of the upgrades
in planning. The unit has a
backup generator and/or can go
to the Wauchula Police Depart-
ment, where there is a backup
system.
Lanier has applied for equip-
ment financing through the
UASE (Urban Area Security
Initiative) which provides fund-
ing for a half dozen counties. It
is funneled through the Tampa
Police Department. Hardee's
funding is in place, awaiting
final approval by the City of
Tampa Commission. He also
expects to get some severance
tax funds for equipment. Lanier
expects to have the funds, order
the interface equipment and
software and be ready to roll by
Oct. 1.
Lanier said he has not been
meeting with Sheriff Judd as
rumors suggest. He said he met
with Judd in his office once,
when Judd expressed concern
for the liability of maintaining
dispatch for Hardee County.


Lanier said they met one other
time on this issue, when Judd
sent his letter to the Hardee
County Commission setting a
deadline to terminate the
Hardee dispatch.
Previously operated by the
county, Judd's office just took
over the dispatch responsibility
last year when the government
complex opened. Costs are
increasing everywhere and he
cannot dispatch for Hardee
County for the $42,000 which
has been charged. It would take
a huge increase to meet the
workload even without more
liability insurance.
Lanier said his 2012 budget
will include the $142,000 for
four dispatchers, but there will
be a savings to the county of
about $70,000 total for expens-
es related to Polk County dis-
patch. This includes the basic
cost, plus GIS interfacing, etc.
The Sheriff's Office budget
will not include the Byrne
Grant monies, which will pay
for one position he hopes to use
as a school resource officer at
the junior high school. Lanier
had hoped to add one or two
more narcotic deputies in the
budget as well. Domestic vio-
lence calls, related to people
losing their jobs are perhaps the
most dangerous ones his offi-
cers face, but drugs and drug-
related offenses such as burgla-
ries, are a close second.
There are presently 22 road
deputies, four property crime
investigators and four more in
drug interdiction. With office
personnel and administration,
there are over three dozen
employees, not counting dis-
patch and corrections.


A BIG HELP!


COURTESY PHOTO
Bowling Green Elementary School recently hosted a Volunteer Tea to honor its school
volunteers.The volunteers donated their time throughout the academic year and pro-
vided a variety of needed services. Certificates of appreciation were presented to each
helper. Shown are (from left) Assistant Principal Stuart Durastanti, Fay Williamson,
Judye Williamson, Larry Pullen, Missy Terry, Bessie Outley, Betty Durastanti and
Schools Superintendent David Durastanti.


MOMS T-SHIRTS


What are the proper proportions of a maxim? A minimum of sound to a maximum of
sense.
-Mark Twain

If there is one spot of sun spilling onto the floor, a cat will find it and soak it up.
-Jean Asper Mclntosh


MEETING


COURTESY PHOTO
How can a little softball player do well if her mother is cheering and doesn't have a
team T-shirt to show she's cheering for her team? Barry and Jill Edgley (from left) of
Stitch 'N Sign present a check of $438 to Hardee County Youth Sports treasurer Susan
Cartwright and board member Denise Erekson for the Team Mom T-shirt Fundraiser this
spring. For every T-shirt purchased, $3 was donated to benefit the Miss Hardee Softball
League.


NOTICE


THE HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

invites the Public to the



SUSTAINABLE HARDEE: VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE





EDUCATION MEETING


TUESDAY JULY 19, 2011


* 6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.


COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM

412 W. Orange St., Rm. 102, Courthouse Annex, 1st floor, Wauchula
Please come share your thoughts and ideas of what is needed in your community


All meetings are open to the public


For More Information

Call The County Planning Department at

863-767-1964

Email kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net

Visit www.hardeecounty.net/visioning


THERE MAY BE ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS IN ATTENDANCE

WHO MAY OR MAY NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE DISCUSSION


7:7.14C


I I II


I


I







2C The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011





-Schedule of Weekly Services-


;'Printed as a Public Service
by
Rhee d-Advocate
1W Wauchu't, Florida

[ iine: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ...............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday ......................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............ 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed, Prayer Meeting .....:....7:00 p.m:

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 lIwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Ilwy. 17. 375-2253-
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ............................ 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..:..........::.:6:30 pnrm.

WEDNESnAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Sieets 375-2340
Sunday School .....................:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............II:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study......7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISII CATIOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEI DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercolcs Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves Dc Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CIIURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIIURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School .:..................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................1:00 a.m.
Evening Service .........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bihle Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
S('omnmunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAII BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375--1409
Sunday School ...... .............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training...............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast.................. I1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
P.O. Box 780


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ....:...6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1 :00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship-.:...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..............:...6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer :..............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CIURCII
0, 76 Lily Chur -h Rd. 494-5622
""Sunday 'Schlooi l ................... 10: a.n.
:Iblrnihg Wfslpi 1I100 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time .........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service ...........1 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIIURCII
322 Ianchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
:Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service............ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups '
Adult Cell Group .....'........... 7:00 p:m.
Youth Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ...:......7:00 p.m.
Call i or latioins

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH-
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ... ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m .
Worship Senrice '.................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CIIRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
,Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
'*Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men Leader:ship & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
NMartin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CIIURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchevy Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................1... 0:00 a.m.
Priesthood ... ........................ I1:00 a.m.


S(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ...........10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....I11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Servicio .................... ...... 1:00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................... 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..:..147:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCII
OFGOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773.3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry...................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W orship ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CIIRISTIAN CHURCH .
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY!
Generations Cafie Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast.......................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ......................... 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRSTCIHURCH OF
TIHE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............. ... :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.nm.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.mi
Morning Service ................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........ .........6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ...................... 6:00,,p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday Sch ol ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Sdy............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ...................9:00 a.m..
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m..
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m..
Adult. Children & Radiate Youth Church.

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....l I:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship .............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coflfee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
W orship ............. ................ ... 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min. ...........7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
VWAUCIIULA, FL,
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPAN
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M artes .................................. 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ....................................7:30 p.m .
Domingo .................:.: .... 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to fanilia y amigos y
Disfruta de La'pjlara de Dios
Domingos .............................. 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ..................... :00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNACIORIAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service..... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service"....6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ......:.............7.....7:00 p.m.


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT.ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Maitin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) .................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45. a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
'Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............:... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00,p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St.- 735-0321 *
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 am.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3" Sun.
Communion ..................10:00 a.m.
2"' & 4' Sun.
Divine Worship................10:00a.m.
Bible Study ......................... 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH .
149 Manley Road EaSt Main
773-5814
Sunday School ...................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays.... ....9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 HWy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCII
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m .


Holy. Days .....................................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCII
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ...........7:00 a.m.
(English) ..................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ..............11.... 1:00 a.m.
(Creole)......................1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. .................0:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship .............7:30 p.m.


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ..................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ..:.........7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Church.................................. 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER.
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker 'rail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .....:......................... 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ...:..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... ...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .:..............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................1.1:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OFZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ...............:.. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worshil ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-54$6
Sunday School .................... l :00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................. 1:00 a.m.
. Wednesday Prayer .X...........7:00 p.m.

LIFECHANGING WRSHIPCENIER
3426.Qak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship .............................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening............................ 1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735.
8586
Morning Worship .............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.TH. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..............7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 1I:00 a.m.
............... .......................... 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ... ............... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ....................11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship...................I... a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service .............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones...........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina.............................. :30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ... ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club .......................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio.............................. 8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.
p


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
Ml w.'w a .i..., 0o
A?'Ak Gf-PI


A girl had justfinished drawing a
picture, when a drop, of ink
splashed right in the middle of it.
"Dad," she cried, "it's ruined."
"No," he said. "Draw a dog
around it."
She did, and took it to her
teacher: She exclaimed, "That
little dog makes a good drawing
even better."
A stain appeared in Joseph's
life. His brothers sold him into
slavery. But God raised him from
the pit to the palace. And he said to
them, "God turned into good what
you meant for evil."
Hag a d.adlastain come into.your
life? Don't give up. Trust God. He'll
turn it into good.

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4` given us a.
freedom... free

will. We are free to act, free to speak, and free to
live and worship as we choose. On Independence
Day, celebrate freedom. Worship regularly and
celebrate God's gift of free will, too.






Scriptusselected b TheAmercan Be Society
| 2011. Keister-Williams Newspaper Serices, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesvile.VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


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July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


WINNING WHEELS


BOOK BATTLE


COURTESY PHOTO
Veronica Gomez and Caleb Turner will spend summer vacation riding new bicycles as
winners for the final nine-week grading period at Zolfo Springs Elementary School.
Students who have earned Cat Cash for their positive behavior are able to put that
"money" into a box for a schoolwide drawing for a pair of bicycles. Veronica and Caleb
won the wheels.


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710
Held out from last week
Greetings from Fort Green! gone for over a week and en- ional early S
We have been receiving a lit- joyed the mountain scenery and for the arrival
tie rain most days, and it is cer- different areas to visit. Mary granddaughter
tainly good. It is a blessing not Lois said the lake water was too Bias. The lo\
to have to run the water in the cold for her, but the young ones made her app
orange grove. Besides the work, enjoyed it. The temperature in p.m. and weig
it sure makes the wallet a little the mornings was in the low and 14 ounces
happier! We have electric 60s! Amanda and l
pumps and must water half of Sherry and Wesley Smith with big brot
the grove at a time along with Cierra, Austin, Tyler doing fine, an
Last week was busy at Fort and Dustin had a wonderful keeper! Congr
Green. Vacation Bible School time at Snow Shoe Mountain. After this 1
was a success, but us old folks W.Va. Other family members stayed in Lake
are really tired! There was an met them there, and they had a dance recital!
average of 79 nightly and it is big cabin with numerous bed- Sympathy is
always. great,: pn,:,rmake new rooms. They enjoyed being family,of Josl
friends. ,r. with family; one brother had another casually
Our deepest and most sincere not seen the other in nine years, his wife is exp
sympathy- is extended to the and they all had fun on the zip will never get
family of Ronnie Thomas. line at New River Gorge, white- Joe Choate w
Ronnie knew he had cancer and water rafting, on mine trips, cle accident o
was always adamant that he exploring caves and playing in from VBS. Th
knew where he was going when the river. They were gone for he is in the Into
he left this earth; he made his two weeks and had a super Please pray fo
final flight last Sunday morn- time. reported at chu
ing. He had many brothers but Mabel Williamson's sister, Jones had .b
only one sister, Doris Thornton, Mary, is visiting her from Orlando beca
and she is the last of the line. It Cutler Bay. She said the name attack. This is
gives a person an unusual feel- used to be Cutler Ridge but they prayer.
ing when, all of a sudden, no changed it to Cutler Bay. I told Please reme
one knows what ,it was like her I thought my brother-in-law, each other, ou
when you were a child and Todd Silverman, lived there. I military.
growing up with your parents don't really know. if his area is
and siblings, called Perrine or Cutler Bay but
Byron and Rita Allison had do remember us going to the
their twin granddaughters' at mall in Cutler Ridge, but that
church last Sunday. They are was probably 30 years ago!
the cutest blue-eyed blond girls Quite a few of Fort Green's
and very petite in stature. They finest young ladies were in the
will be heart breakers when dance recital in Lakeland last
they grow up, and they already Saturday. Hannah and Holly
have their grandparents tied Brown, Abby Duke and'Karson
around their little fingers! Godwin all performed. Of
A super vacation is one where course this means the parents,
the family takes it together. grandparents, aunts and uncles
James and Michele Youmans were there. They report all did a
along with children Blake and very good job but it was a late
Allie and Michelle's parents, -night. Carol Brown said they
Mary Lois and Leonard Craw- didn't get home until 11:30.
ley, had a wonderful time at Betty Waters was really tired
Lake Lure, N.C. They were as she was at Lakeland Reg- if Y
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aturday morning
of her new great-
r, Finley Star
vely young .lady
earance at 12:25
hed eight pounds
;. Mom and Dad,
lickey Bias along
her Maddox are
d know she is a
atulations to all.
big event, Betty
land for Karson's
Extended to the
|ua Jetson. He is
ty of the-war, and
ecting twins who
to meet their dad.
vas in a motorcy-
n his way home
e last report was
pensive Care Unit.
r Joe. Also, they
rch that Emerson
een airlifted to
use of a heart
another need for
mber to pray for
r nation and our


COURTESY PHOTO
Teams from the county's five elementary schools met before the end of the school year
to participate in the annual "Battle of the Books" competition. Students from grades 3-
5 read the 15 books on the Florida Sunshine State young readers list, and then com-
peted in teams of six to correctly answer questions based on the books in a quiz-show
format. This year, Bowling Green Elementary's team won the championship and was
presented with a trophy, book gift cards and lunch at a restaurant of their choice. This
is the fifth BGE win. Pictured with Assistant Principal'Stuart Durastanti, team coach
Sharon Ekhoff and Schools Superintendent David Durastanti are (from left) team mem-
bers Jenny Lopez, Alexis McBride, Julissa Molina, Nakeisha Lemaine, Roman Alma-
quer and Miriam Gonzalez.


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4C The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011


Classes Were Bigger, But

Students Behaved Better


By ISABEL ABEL
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview is on Maria Cervantes.
Q: Where and when were you
born?
A: I was born in Texas on Sept. 5,
1948.
Q: At what age did you go to
school? How long did you go for?
SA: I started going to school when I
was about 7 years old. I went until I
was in the fifth grade; I had to drop out
because I had to go to work.
Q: Did you ever ride the bus, or
walk home? If you rode the bus, how
far away was the bus from your
house?
A: No, I walked to school. I had to
walk about a mile.
Q: What kind of games did you
play when you were my age?
A: I played tag, hide-and-go-seek,
bingo, and jump rope. I didn't play any
sports, though, because there weren't
any that I could play.
Q: What kind of attire would you
wear?
A: I wore miniskirts, boots, skorts
(combination skirt and shorts), long '
skirts, and.dresses. I also liked to wear
choker necklaces.
Q: When did you move to Florida?
How long did you plan on staying
here?
A: I moved to Florida in 1966. I
planned on staying here the rest of my
life, until God decided to take me away.
Q: What was technology like?
A: The televisions showed black and
white. The radios were about one foot
long and there were no cell phones, but
there were house phones and that's how
I communicated.
Q: Are the schools any different
now than they were back then?
A: Yes. The students were much more
behaved and the classrooms were big-
ger. There were no security cameras,
and instead of white boards there were
chalkboards.
Q: Were there any sports to be
played? Were you involved in any of
them?
A: No, I wasn't involved in any
sports because I just didn't have the
time. I was busy working.
Q: When you were my age, how did


you imagine your future was going to
be?
A: I wanted to settle down in a little
house with my grandkids running
around me. Fortunately, I got that.
Q: How did you cool yourself off on
a hot day?
A: I went swimming in the river.
Often I just sat in the shade and ate ice
cream.
Q: If you had a chance to reverse
time to a moment in your life, what
would that
moment be
and why? 'i 1
A: It a'
would be in
the hospital when I first held my child.
It was just an amazing experience.
Q: What would you spend your
summers doing?
A: I would spend my summers work-
ing or helping around the house. My
mom'was always teaching me how to
cook.
Q: What type of food did you eat?
A: All kinds. I ate watermelons, mel-
ons, mangos, oranges, beans, tortillas,
pork. My favorite food was this stuff
that my mom made; it was a combina-
tion of milk and rice.
Q: Did you know how to read and
write at my age? If not, at what age
did you learn?
A: Yes, I knew how to read and write.
Q: Did you have any pets? If so,
what type? If not, why not?
A: Yes, we had pets. We had dogs and
we loved them. We also had this beauti-
ful green parrot that knew how to say
my dad's name.
Q: What type of makeup did you
wear?
A: I didn't wear makeup; my mom
was very strict and she didn't let me.
Q: What was your first vehicle?
A: I don't quite remember. All I
remember is that it was white and it was
a convertible.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and fbr the enjoyment of
our readers.


A wise prince will seek
means by which his sub-
jects will, always and in
every possible condition of
things have need of his
government, and then they
will always be faithful to
him.
-Niccolo Machiavelli


Sports Update
By Joan Seaman

Well, it's a sorta lazy summertime, with not a lot happening, but
just wait a few weeks and everything will come alive as fall ath-
letes begin their conditioning and practices. They can start on or
after Aug. 8.
Volleyball takes the court, golf and football take the field,
swimmers head to the pool. Several are involved in summer camp
of one kind or another. Several boys are in Sertoma golf, football
and volleyball will have conditioning sessions, there's tennis
lessons, summer swim club and what not.
Men's Community and Women's Church Softball leagues are
active, occasionally losing to the thunderstorm or heavy rain.
Mostly, the teams go on anyway.
There are eight teams in the Men's Community League. Some
have some of the same teammates they had in the recently finished
Church Men's League. in which San Alfonso won the season title
and Holy Child won the tournament.
In the community league, the Legion of Doom, Dirty Dozen
and Regulators are still unbeaten. Five other teams have lost at
least one game.
In the Ladies League. Holy Child Catholic is at 4-0 and First
Christian 2-0, as they were among the teams off last week during
Bible School. They'll make up games with some double-headers,
I'm sure.
Recent HHS grad Taylor Barlow has won two of three of the
17-18 division Sertoma Youth tour golf matches to date. Seniors
are Daniel Miller, Matt Godwin, Dustin Scheel and Dalton Hewett.
Juniors are William Beattie and Will Bennett; sophs are Bradley
Brewer, Tyler Hewett, Bryson White and Eric Klein. Also playing
Sertoma are Chance Smoak and Cash Smoak, both in the 6-8 boys
division. Unless I'm mistaken. Gunner Smoak and Landon Smoak
live on the Highlands.County side of the line. If I'm wrong, some-
one please let me know.
Miller had an exciting pair of rounds in last weekend's Youth
Villa tournament in Bartow. He shota two-over-par 74 on Saturday
and followed it with par 72 on Sunday to place second in the pres-
tigious tournament. He was the only Hardee representative in it.
Our bits of information are that Hardee Youth Sports All-Stars
have all finished up. We understand the T-Ball teams skipped
through their division undefeated and will go on to the state com-
petition. Anyone have any books or information for me?'??
There are a bunch of changes in districting for fall sports. We'll
report those in the Back To School issue coming out just before
school opens Aug. 22.
Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heral-
dadvocate@embarcqmail.com with news for this biweekly column.

You cannot run away from a weakness; you must some-
times fight it out or perish. And if that be so, why not now
and where you stand?


THE BEST THINGS YOU Do,


You Do FOR YOURSELF"


By ADDISON AUBRY
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interviewee was my grandfather,
Richard Krause, also known as Papa.
He is my mother's father, and currently
resides here in Wauchula, Florida.
Richard Krause was
born on Dec. 12, 1939, as an addition to
his family of one older sister and par-
ents. In 1949, his family moved to Fort
Lauderdale, where he spent most of his
childhood.
Even though there were
only two children, each had a
chores they were responsible l
for daily. Richard was ,
responsible for making his
bed, keeping his room clean,
and helping with the dishes every day.
His favorite meal was meatloaf, pota-
toes and green beans which his
mother cooked. Richard says he had it
quite often. His family bought all food
supplies at the store. He had a spitz, all-
white, dog named Dixie; Dixie was his
first and only pet up until college.
When he wasn't doing chores,
Richard enjoyed wood-working and col-
lecting. He collected marbles, comic
books and postage stamps. He also
enjoyed spending time with his best
friend, Jan Smith. Jan lived right down
the road from Richard, so they played
together all the time. Plus, they went to
the same church and schools.
Richard recalls, "One of my fondest
memories with Jan was every weekend
when we'd go play football at the
park."
The normal attire was khaki pants, a
casual button-down shirt with a collar
and sleeves, and loafers or tennis shoes.
Richard attended school all the way
up through college, where he received
his bachelor's degree then his master's
degree in American history at Stetson
University.
The school he attended before col-
lege was a very old one; so old, in fact,
that it had been condemned by the city.
The building, plumbing and wiring
were really bad, but the school didn't
close down. It was the old school in
Fort Lauderdale at the time, and
although it was old, it was still nice.
Richard told me, "My favorite sub-
ject in school was Latin. I took three
years of it in high school. I loved my


Latin teacher. She was an older woman
who was very hard, but very good. The
reason I loved Latin was because it
helped me with my English a great
deal."
Richard and his family, and he and
his friends, had their own special rou-
tines. Richard said, "One of my favorite
family traditions was going to church
all the time. Any time the church doors
were open, we were there." He and his
friends also had similar routines. Their
main routine was going to
church together.
It ,e Richard was quite busy
,, tI growing up. His dad
S worked six days a'week,
his mother a housewife at home, and he
would go to school and deliver papers
seven days a week.
When asked to describe himself as
he was growing up in three words,
Richard replied, "I was hard-working; I
had a paper routed from the time I was
12 all the way through high school. I
was studious; I strived to get good
grades, and had an A average ip school.
I was very church-oriented; I was very
active in the church and all of its activi-
ties and events."
Richard said the only unusual.thing
about his upbringing was the fact that.
he grew up in Fort Lauderdale, which
was a small town when he moved there
in 1949. However, it was rapidly devel-
oping into a large city, like it is today.
I asked Richard what the biggest dif-
ference between the times he grew up in
and now was. He answered, "The
biggest difference, I think, is that chil-
dren growing up today are exposed to
electronic communication and, there-
fore, are not as protected from the evils
of our society."
Richard told me, "If I had to choose
between growing up now and.when I
did? I would choose the time I grew up,
for our society at that time was much
more focused on God."

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer.


-Albert Einstein


Some people are born on third base and go through life thinking they hit a triple.
-Barry Switzer


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July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Wauchula Awarded

$400,000 Grant


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A three-year, $400,000 grant
will help find all the potential
hazardous materials.
The Wauchula City Commis-
sion, acting as the Community
Redevelopment Board, and
later as a commission, approved
application for a federal grant
from the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA).
Awards were announced in
early June, with Wauchula one
of only 10 communities in
Florida to share $7 million "to
cleanup and revitalize commu-
nities." Some received more for
cleanup or redevelopment proj-
ects. Wauchula's was an assess-
ment grant. It can later apply for
additional money for cleanup of
identified sites.
The EPA established the
Brownfields program to clean
up abandoned gas stations, tex-
tile mills, closed smelters and
other abandoned industrial and
commercial properties where
expansion, redevelopment or
reuse is complicated by the
potential presence of a petrole-
um or other hazardous sub-
stance, pollutant or contami-
nant. The Brownfield assess-
ments and cleanup creates jobs
in under-served and economi-
cally disadvantaged :neighbor-
hoods, says a press release.
Locally, the CRA/Main
Street director Jessica Newman
will direct the. Brownfield
assessment, with the assistance
of Kimley-Horn, the city's on-
board planning agency. They


were able to complete a draft
work plan and send it to EPA
last week.
When the plan comes back
from EPA and it is fine-tuned to
meet its standards, then the
grant will be released to the
city, said Newman. A communi-
ty advisory board will review
Requests For Proposals for con-
sultants and decide which sites
to look at more closely.
Newman estimated the pre-
liminary work would take about
three months. The site invento-
ry is estimated to take three
years. It is part of the Com-
munity Redevelopment Plan
completed last year, giving an
overview of Wauchula, its
strengths and weaknesses, areas
that need improvements and
how to plan for them.
The Brownfields Revitaliza-
tion Act was passed by Con-
gress in 2002, as part of the
Small Business Liability Relief
Act. It expanded the definition
of a brownfield to include
mine-scarred lands, sites -con-
taminated by petroleum, or sites
contaminated as a result of
manufacturing and distribution
of illegal drugs (meth labs). The
original Brownsfields program
began in 1995. Since then EPA
has awarded more than $800
million for assessment, revolv-
ing loan funds and cleanup
grants.
The $7 million awarded in
Florida is part of more than $76
million national for three tribes
and 40 states to assess, cleanup
and redevelop properties.


You can discover more about a person in an hour of play
than in a year of conversation.


Stop by and see why so
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com
9 30tc 800-226-3325


Gene Davis
Sales and Leasing
Consultant


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
July 3, Tyler Lee Richardson, 23, of 880 Griffin Road, was
arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with possession of
marijuana.
July 3, a residential burglary on Baker St-i- and a theft on
East Main Street were reported.

July 2, Terry Lee Jones, 40, of 127 N. Gleenwood Ave., Avon
Park, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Eduardo Cruz
and charged with resisting an officer without violence.
S July 2, Stacy Michelle Payne, 22, of.22 Second St., Fort
Meade, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
July 2, Anjel Gonzales, 38, of 842 Third St. East, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with pos-
session of New Legend drugs and aggravated fleeing to elude an
officer.
July 2, Derek Gray Bissette, 23, of 1429 Kazen Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with battery.
July 2, burglary of a. conveyance on North Florida Avenue,
and vehicles stolen on SR 66 and on Clifton Bryan Road were
reported. ,

July 1, burglary of a conveyance on Griffin Road and thefts on
Sunset Drive, John Holt Road and Griffin Road were reported.

June 30, Kent Louis Brissette, 48, of 1645 U.S. 17, Arcqdia,
was arrested by Det. David Drake on a charge of violation of pro-
bation.
June 30, thefts on U.S. 17 North, Harvill Road and Park Drive
were reported.

June 29, Norman Rivers, 43, of 681 Sally Place, Wauchula,
was arrested by Det. John Shivers and charged with two counts of
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.
June 29, George Eugene Patterson, 46, of 879 Chamberlain
Blvd., Wauchula, was arrested by Special Agent Hough and
charged with conservation crimes, one count littering over 500
pounds, and three counts failure to comply.
June 29, Dennis Randall Goodman, 43, of 803 Hudson St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Det. David Drake and charged with
two counts of sexual assault.
June 29, Cherry Lee Brewer, 31, of 647 Aspen Road, West
Palm Beach, was arrested by Det. David Drake on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
June 29, Jamie Lee Barnett, 25, of 2903 Pigeon Lane, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Cpl. Mark McCoy and charged with bat-
tery.
June 29, criminal mischief on George Anderson Road and
thefts on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, Wren Road, Tuskegee
Street, Altman Road, U.S. 17 North, SR 62, Cypress Street, Old
Crewsville Road and Manley Road were reported.

June 28, Samuel Lee Mitchell, 40, of 406 W. Jones St., Bow-
ling Green, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on charges of
sale of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a specified location and viola-
tion of probation.
June 28, a business burglary. on U.S. 17 South and a theft on
SR 62 were-reported.


June 27, Thomas Melvin Hartley, 39, of 691 Shaw Road,
Wauchula, Was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with bat-
tery..
June 27, criminal mischief on Peterson Street and a theft on
U.S. 17 North were reported.
A A
WAUCHULA
SJuly 3, a'fight on U.S. 17 North was reported.

July 1, a residential burglary on East Bay Street was reported.

June 30, a theft on Heard Bridge Road and criminal mischief
on U.S. 17 North were reported.

June 29, a residential burglary on North Seventh Avenue and
a theft on Ohio Avenue were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
July 1, a business burglary on East Main Street was reported.
June 29, Arnesto Briseno, 40, of 105 E. Main St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Chief John Scheel and charged with possession of
drug 'paraphernalia and driving with knowledge of a suspended
license.








THE FLAG
The FLAG, Stars and Stripes of Red White and Blue!
... Waves o'er land and sea, trees and mountains tall
In highest blue on silver wings "Old Glory" flies
Beneath seas, freezing depths of silence calls.

On sacred soil, the fallen foughtand died ...
In freedom's fight for families, friends and all
S"Sacrifice" unforgotten; red-blood spilled
Tyrant's ambitious greed and cruelty foiled!

Let "Freedom Ring," taps be played, pledge renewed!
Home-of-the-free, the brave, strong-unsubdued
Hero's sacrifice draped in colors...

The "FLAG!"
The Stars and Stripes
The Red, White and Blue!

By Thomas W. Graham
Fort Myers
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


-, ,.2.a *JA -


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6C The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011



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COURTESY PHOTO
Elizabeth Abbott once lighted her home by kerosene lamp.


At PRECO, She Will



Always Be No. 1!

Still A Member After More Than 60 Years


One of Peace River Electric Coop-
erative's earliest members still receives
electricity from the co-op after more
than 60 years.
Elizabeth Abbott, a Fort Green
Springs resident, has lived most of her
very full life in rural Hardee County,
though born and raised in the state of
Maine.
She supported the World War II
effort by working as a riveter in an air-
plane factory, and she married the first
and only soldier she met on the job. She
moved to Florida a short time later in
1946, and with her husband, Albert
"Junior" Abbott, owned and operated a
local grocery store for 11 years.
Elizabeth Abbott has another dis-
tinction to add to her life story she is
listed as Peace River Electric Cooper-
ative's member No. 1.
Recently, the co-op reached a mile-
stone by issuing member number
100,000. Member numbers are not
reused, so as individuals and businesses
come and go in PRECO's service area,-.
new sequential numbers are assigned.~.
In 1940, when no stockholder-
owned utility would serve rural areas,
local residents wanting the benefits of
electricity joined together to form the
cooperative. A few years later in
PRECO's early history, member num-
bers were assigned to all accounts, and
the Abbotts became member No. 1.
Growing up in a city, Abbott
enjoyed the advantages of having elec-
tricity in her childhood home. But at the
conclusion of the war, she and her hus-
band traveled to rural Florida and pur-
chased a home a home with no elec-
tricity.
"I was 18. It really didn't bother
me," she shares. "It was like an adven-
ture."
Life was different before electricity
came to their new home. "We started


Protecting
Around the world, sight is
valued as the most _important
of the five senses, along with a
strong belief that good vision
positively impacts quality of
life.
However, while 85 percent of
Americans recognize that ultra-
violet (UV) rays damage their
eyes. only 65 percent wear sun-
glasses for protection and even
fewer (39 percent) make sure
their children wear sunglasses.
"Short-term damage can be
hard to notice, but long-term
exposure to the sun is a risk fac-
tor for harm to the eye and sur-
rounding tissue," explains
Christine W. Sindt, OD, FAAO.
associate professor of Clinical
Ophthalmology. University of
Iowa and chair of the American
Optometric Association Contact
Lens & Cornea Section.
"The effects of UV radiation
are cumulative over a person's
lifetime, and various ocular dis-


Eyes I
orders such as c
manifest for 2
point the dan
done. That's w
to make sure tl
maximum prot
sun beginning i
Compared to
have larger p
more light in th
lenses and are
Seye protection
periods more
adults. It is estil
nificant amou
exposure to UV
by age 18, anc
annual dose of
up to three time
While most sun
block UV rays
through the len
styles do not pr
reaching eyes tU
tops and bottonr
The best protect
nation of sung


with three kerosene lamps," she adds,
"... and I would only cook in the day-
light, so I wouldn't need a lamp."
In the days before they received
electricity, "We would hear about it and
hear about it, then someone came out
(from PRECO) and, yes, we wanted it!"
she recalls.
Hiring an electrician to wire their
home, the Abbotts soon had one electric
light in every room.
Many things changed after the cou-
ple gained electric service. They soon
added labor-saving devices. "It was
wonderful to add a washing machine. It
was my first appliance," she describes.
"Then my husband got a pump so we
could have running water in the house,
because we had a pitcher pump on the
back porch."
What were their first power bills
like? "Around $2," she says. "If it had
been any more, we couldn't have paid
it."
In 1959, the couple built a new
,,:home a short distance away but still
.enjoyed the benefits of receiving power
from PRECO. When asked what the co-
op's greatest asset over the years has
been, she replies, "Service."
Elizabeth and Junior celebrated 58
years of marriage before his death in
2003. Today, she still lives in the home
they shared for so many years, a home
full of fond memories.
PRECO is grateful for the opportu-
nity to serve long-term, dedicated mem-
bers like the Abbotts.
Since its formation through
President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New
Deal program, Peace River Electric
Cooperative has grown exponentially.
Today, spanning 10 Central Florida
counties, the cooperative serves the
electricity needs of nearly 35,000 con-
sumers across almost 4,000 miles of
power lines.




From UV Damage
:ataracts may not brimmed hat and, for some,
years, at which UV-blocking contact lenses.
iage is already Not all contact lenses offer UV
hy parents need protection and, in fact, most do
heir children get not. Of those that do, not all
section from the provide similar absorption lev-
n childhood." els.
adults, children For those who prefer the
upils (allowing option of a daily, disposable
eir eyes), clearer contact lens, 1 Day Acuvue
outside without Moist brand contact lenses offer
and for longer 82 percent UVA and 97 percent
frequently than UVB protection. On average,
mated that a sig- contact lenses without UV-
,nt of lifetime blocking capability allow 90
Says may occur percent of UVA radiation and
d that children's 70 percent of UVB radiation to
radiation may be pass through the lenses to your
es that of adults. eyes. Although UV-blocking
glasses can help contact lenses provide impor-
s from entering tant added protection, they
ises. most frame should not be viewed as a
-event rays from stand-alone solution. Contact
through the sides, lenses should always be worn in
is of the glasses, conjunction with high-quality
tion is a combi- UV-blocking sunglasses and a
:lasses, a wide- wide-brimmed hat.


Encouraging
Good news: Teen girls are
embracing being active, and
athletics is the leading activity
they participate in at school.
Today. 65 percent of high
school girls participate in a
school sport. The top 10 are
track and field, soccer, tennis.
basketball. volleyball, softball.
cross-country, swimming.
cheerleading and dance team.
Survey Results
A recent survey conducted by
Varsity Brands found that a
majority of female teens say
playing on a sport/spirit team
makes them happier (78 per-
cent), builds their overall confi-
dence (73 percent) and helps
relieve stress (69 percent).
Participating in athletics helps
teen girls make new friends (86
percent) and gives them a built-
in support system (65 percent).
The survey also found that
cheerleaders are more likely
than general teens (57 percent
vs. 46 percent) to hold a leader-
ship position in/out of school, to
be less shy (26 percent vs. 19
percent), and to be more com-
fortable speaking in public (64


Making small changes every
day may help your family have
a healthier lifestyle. Here are a
few to consider:
Eat a Variety of
Colorful Produce
A balanced breakfast can help
you start the day with focus and
energy. A 6-ounce serving of
juice is equal to one serving of
fruit or vegetables, according to
the USDA. Be sure to choose
juices made from real fruit and
without added sugar or artificial
ingredients. To reduce con-
sumption of unwanted pesticide
residues, choose organic
fruits, vegetables and beverages
when possible.
Snack Well
Snacks such as string cheese
and nuts are great sources of
protein for on-the-go energy.
For added crunch, pair with
fresh apple slices and organic,
whole-grain crackers. Kids love
.oolo'r'aridT choice. Ask children
to choosetheir favorite red, yel-
low and green vegetables, then


Healthy Habits
percent vs. 54 percent) and 81
percent have grade point aver-
ages of 3.5 or higher.
Other Advantages
"In addition to helping them
keep fit, participation in athlet-
ics gives teen girls a variety of
interpersonal benefits and
teaches them to enjoy healthy
competition," said Nicole La-
uchaire. vice president. Corp-
orate Marketing and Com-
munications for Varsity Brands,
the leading resource for cheer-
leading camps, competitions
and apparel. "Team athletics
like cheerleading give teens a
social outlet, confidence boost
and stress relief."
Many good reasons exist for
teen girls to participate on a
cheer team:
They become part of a
team of school leaders.
As some of the most visible
members of the student body,
cheerleaders can have a positive
influence on others.
Girls learn new skills and
stay in shape through a mix of
conditioning, skills training,
dance and cardio.


slice and serve with hummus
for a fun "traffic signal" snack.
Pack simple fresh veggies such
as sliced carrot and celery sticks
for lunch.
Get Moving
Try to balance getting ade-
quate rest and daily exercise.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention recom-
mends that children ages 6 to 17
should do 60 minutes of physi-
cal activity or more each day.
Keep it fun for the whole fami-
ly; try walking, jumping rope or
cycling together.
Drink Up
Hydration is important. Soda
sweetened with sugar can add
empty calories, so choose water
or dilute fruit juices with
sparkling water. Choose natu-
rally decaffeinated beverages
such as fruit juice or water after
lunchtime. Celebrate special
occasions with nonalcoholic
sparkling beverages such as
R.W. Knudsen Family(r)
sparkling Celebratory(r) b4ever-


In Teen Girls
Cheerleading builds life-
long character traits such as
confidence, leadership, positive
energy and motivational skills.
The Parents' Part
Parents can take active roles
in selecting the right cheer pro-
gram for their kids. Here are
some questions to ask:
Is the coach certified
through the American Associa-
tion of Cheerleading Coaches
and Administrators (AACCA)
and has the school conducted
the appropriate background
checks'?
Does the coach adhere to
AACCA practice and perform-
ance guidelines?
Does the coach properly
balance practice time between
athletic training and spirit lead-
ership instruction?
Does the squad have an
emergency plan in place?
Learn More
For more -information on
cheerleading benefits and
results from the Varsity Teen
Girl Survey, visit www.varsi-
ty.com.


ages.
Protect the
Environment
Buying organic products
helps support farmers who are
building healthy soil and pro-
moting biodiversity that
encourages wildlife to thrive.
Where possible, use public
transportation or carpool. If it's
safe enough for you to bike or
walk to work, the extra effort
may also boost your fitness in
addition to reducing vehicle
emissions.
To help families make smart
choices, R.W. Knudsen Family
offers wholesome fruit products
that contain no artificial flavors,
preservatives or added sugar. To
view 50 Healthy Lifestyle Tips
and details of a special 50th
Anniversary promotion, "The
Grape Escape," a trip for two to
Napa Valley, visit www.-
rwknudsenfamily.com, or "like"
R.W.' Knudsen 'Family on
Facebdbk at www.facebook.-
com/ rwknudsen.


I^ A ,." ;/"' ..',' ^. W^W-













Of Thursday, July 8, 1971

Front-Page Headlines:
Margaret Skipper Named All-Around Champion Cowgirl
0, Fisher Calls Audit The Best In 19 Years On Board
,{ Free Food Distribution Came To Halt Monday
,I Heavy Funds Cut-Back Is Faced By Schools


.: Margaret Skipper
Named All-R oun




S ; Champion Cowgirl










ii M arv: ,,.,..,. ,,Sk,,pper l5.of
*. <...,1 .. . . ,)




t h
,, Ar .


SFisher Calls Audit The Best In 19 Years On Board
/,' ...-

I ~,;Ihimnlnn Iowuhrl



S it I p,Ir



, I,, .r l a


I \ ,al "









; intor '.fll ?,qt wfi'r wit Il-rlkl.id ull.,HrUnd hrnpLM f C@ llf M

si' ... r, ,%' ... ," ... I ',',M, "


Small Changes Add Up


To A Healthier Lifestyle


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
-Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255








July 7, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252011CA000189
DISTRICT ADVISORY BOARD OF
THE SOUTHERN FLORIDA DIS-
TRICT, CHURCH OF THE
NAZARENE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF THE
NAZARENE, INCORPORATED, ET
AL,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JEHN DAVIS, Rt. 1, Box 63,
Wauchula, FL 33873


JIMMY STORY, Rt. 1, Box 63Z
A, Wauchula, FL 33873
their heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, or creditors,
trustees, and all other parties
claiming and interest by, through,
under or against them,
respectively; and all unknown
natural persons if alive, and if
dead or not known to be dead or
alive, grantees, and creditors, or
other parties claiming an Interest
by, through, or under those
unknown persons; and the sever-
al and respective unknown
assigns, successors in Interest,
trustees, or any other persons
claiming by, through, under, or
against any corporation or other
legal entity named as a defen-
dant; and all claimants, persons,
or parties natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status Is
unknown claiming under 'the
above named or described defen-
dant or party or claiming to have
any right, title, or Interest in and
to the lands hereinafter
described; AND ALL OTHERS IT
MAY CONCERN.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to quiet the title on the fol-
lowing described real property in
Hardee County, Florida:
Lots 6 and 7 and the North
28 feet of Lot 8, Block 13,
Carlton & McEwen Addition,
Hardee County, Florida, -as
per plat recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 2-11 (Hardee
County, Florida plats
recorded in DeSoto County,
Florida) and also recorded
in Plat Bar A-32, all in the
office of the Clerk of the
Courts of Hardee County,
Florida.
Parcel Id: 04-34-25-0260-
00013-0006
Commonly knqwn as: 511
West Palruetto Strmtt,
Wauchula, FL'S3873
has been filed against you by
Plaintiff, DISTRICT ADVISORY
BOARD OF THE SOUTHERN
FLORIDA DISTRICT, CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE, INC., a Florida
corporation, and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, on Clifford M.
Ables, III, Clifford M. Ables, III,
PA., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 202 W. Main Street,
Suite 103, Wauchula, FL 33873,
on or before July 22, 2011, and
file the original with the clerk of
this'court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the complaint.
DATED this 16 day of June
2011.
B.HUGH BRADLEY, Clerk
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
6:30;7:7c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.25-2010-CA-000171
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS
TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2004-OPT1, ASSET
BACKED PASS-THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES 2004-OPT1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHER TONG XIONG; TRIA V.
XIONG; TOU HER XIONG; ZOUA
XIONG; UNKNOWN PERSONS)
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
/

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
"NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
*Foreclosure Sale dated June 21,
2011, and entered in Case No. 25-
2010-CA-000171, of the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit
in and for HARDEE County,
Florida. WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A., AS TR ISTEE F)R CITI-
GROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2004-OPT1,
ASSET BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2004-OPT1 Is Plaintiff
and CHER TONG XIONG; TRIA V.
XIONG; TOU HER XIONG; ZOUA
XIONG; UNKNOWN PERSONS)
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY; are defen-
dants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash Hardee
County Courthouse 417 W. Main
St. Second Floor Hallway outside
of Roorm202 Wauchula, FL 33873,


Avoid Fraud: Research

Investment Tips Thoroughly


While there's nothing wrong
with getting investment ideas
from friends and acquaintances,
wise investors don't just rely on
casual tips. Before handing
over any money, thoroughly
research the investment and the
'person selling it.
It was a lesson Carolyn and
Ray Thompson learned the hard
way. Friends had told them
about a new and exciting green
energy opportunity involving
windmills.
They were told the windmills
would be small enough to
install on rooftops, Ray Thomp-
son, 71, said. Shareholders
could purchase exclusive terri-
tories and lease windmills to


homeowners and businesses.
The Thompsons invested
-$30,000 and were to receive
shares in the windmill compa-
ny, three territories in which
they could launch their wind-
mill business and three free
windmills of their own. But
after traveling to Las Vegas for
the initial shareholders meeting,
the Thompsons realized they'd
been scammed-there were no
innovative'new windmills. The
Thompsons and about 200 other
investors were shown .a full-size
windmill, still being set up in.
the middle of the desert.
"When I saw that windmill,"
said Carolyn Thompson, 65, "I



at 417 WEST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA In HARDEE County,
FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 20
day of July, 2011, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to'wit:
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP
34 SOUTH, RANGE 25
EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
A person claiming an Interest In.
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated this 22 day of June, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of said Court
By CONNIE COKER
As Deputy Clerk
This notice is provided pursuant
to Administrative Order No. 2.065.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act. If you are a
person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in
order to participate In this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no
Cost to you, to provisions of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact
the Court Administrator at 417
West Orange Street, Wauchula, FI
33873, Phone No. (863)534-4690
within 2 working days of your
receipt of this notice or pleading;
if you are hearing Impaired, call 1-
800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are
voice Impaired, call 1-800-995-
8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay
Services).
6:30;7:7c


couldn't stop the tears from
rolling down my cheeks. It was
nothing like what they were
telling us."
Con men regularly rely on
word of mouth to bring in new
victims. They also make their
pitches to groups, knowing that
subtle social pressure brings in
more iioney. Psychologists call
it "social consensus" and it is
the foundatibn of what's known
as affinity fraud, said John
Gannon, president of the
FINRA Investor Education
Foundation. "The thinking goes
that if everyone is doing it, it
must be okay. The problem is
no one looks behind the curtain
to question the man working the
levers."
In the Thompsons' case, that
man had a long history of al-
leged scams and was eventually
indicted by a federal grand jury.
Investors should always check
with the U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission (SEC)
or state securities regulators to
make sure an investment is reg-
istered, advises Gannon.
There's no guarantee a regis-
tered security will be a safe
investment, but the chances for
fraud increase substantially
with unregistered securities that
offer little or no public financial
information.
Investors should also ask if
the person selling the invest-
ment is registered with FINRA,
the SEC or the state's securities
regulator. Unregistered sellers
are not qualified to sell you
anything. If they say they're
registered, verify that with the
authorities. The FINRA Foun-
dation's fraud-fighting website
at www.SaveAndlnvest.org
provides the information, links
and phone numbers you'll need
to reach the appropriate agen-
cies.
"What we really feel bad
about," said Ray Thompson, "is
-that we. talked to other people
and got them into it, too. They
lost $10,000 each. My losses
are my fault, but when I bring
other people into it, I'm really
sorry about that."


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Casey Lucas Hopwood, 31,
Bowling Green, and' Kayla
Louise Granger, 24, Bowling
Green.
Antonio Watson, 41, Biftow,
and Artansis Warnette Lofton,
41, Bartow.
Victor Manuel Lopez, 41,
Tampa, and Keita Enid Ortiz,
29, Wauchula.
Tocory Nyron Daniels, 23,
Wauchula, and Osoterica Addie
Battle, 18, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Sarasota Municipal Em-
ployees Credit Union vs.
Arnold R. Gilmore, stipulated
settlement approved.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Dustin Wherry, default judg-
ment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Michelle Elizabeth Otero,
violation of probation (original
charge retail theft), probation
modified to change fines and
court costs to community ser-
vice hours, addition $100 pub-
lic defender fee and $50 cost of
prosecution (COP) placed on
lien.-
Jose Antonio Oliva, resisting
an officer without violence,
$325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP.
Leroy Fender Jr., trespassing
on a structure or conveyance
and petit theft, not prosecuted.
Jessica Joann Grantham,
retail theft and resisting a mer-
chant, 15 days in jail with cred-
it for time served (CTS), $325
fine and court costs, $50 COP,
$50 investigative costs; posses-
Ssion of marijuana,.adjudication
withheld, probation one year,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COP, $50 investigative costs,
50 hours community service.
Daniel Lee King, tWo counts
domestic battery, not prosecut-
ed.
Artemio Lopez Moralez, dis-
orderly conduct and domestic
battery, one month in jail CTS,
$677 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP.
Francisco Rivera Jr., posses-
Ssion of marijuana and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, $325
fine and court costs, $50 COP,
$50 investigative costs, 30
hours community service.
Bradford Allen Atchley,
domestic battery, two months
24 days in jail, CTS, $677 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP and
$50 investigative costs placed
on lien.
Joshua Garrett Brantley, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
probation one year, $325 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP.
Jimmy Reshod Fuller, pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
not prosecuted.
Christy Lucella Pace, retail
theft, probation one year, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP, 50
hours community service.
Larry Torrres, resisting arrest
without violence, three months
in jail CTS, fines and fees
waived.


Carlos Perez Rios, violation
of probation (original charge
battery), probation revoked,
three months in jail, $100 pub-
lic defender fee and $50 COP
placed on lien.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed 'recently in the'
office of the circuit court: .
Deborah Nicole Keen and
Horace Keen, divorce.
Annabel M. Luna and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Tocory Nyron
Daniels, petition for administra-
tive child support order.
Susan Michelle Thompson et
al vs. Matthew Kirk Thompson
et al, damages negligence.,
Danielle Nicole Tucker and
DOR vs. Adrian L. Barringer,
petition for administrative child
support order.
Simmie Smith and DOR vs.
Andre D. Thomas Jr., petition
for child support.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Bee Xioing and Melody
Xiong, divorce.
David Coughlin and JoAnn
Coughlin, divorce.
Jimmy L. Moss and Dorothy
Moss, divorce.
Tandi Dolmelia Patterson
and DOR vs. Omar Robinson,
voluntary dismissal.
Dana Porter and' Dustin
Porter, order.
SAlicia Lovering 'and John
Lovering, divorce.
Rebecca Lazo and DOR vs.
Adrian Santoyo, petition for
child support contempt dis-
missed.
Michael A. Sanders and
Heather Ashley Taylor Sanders,
divorce.
Karen Pilkington vs. Robert
H. Lovette,. dismissal of tempo-
Srary injunction for protection.
Maria Leon and DOR vs.
Aldo Reyes, child support
order.
Orlando Ramos vs. state'
Department of Corrections
(DOC), petition to' review
inmate status dismissed.
Stanley H, Hunter vs. DOC,
petitionidismissed.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed. of.
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and theNrecommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Tocory Daniels, violation of
probation (original charges two
counts selling marijuana within
1,000 feet of a church), proba-
tion modified to include 90
days in jail, $200 public defend-
er fees and $100 COP added to
outstanding fines and fees.
Steven Gregory Dunlop,
armed trespass other than struc-
ture or conveyance, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation one
year, $520 fine and court costs,
$100 COP.
Michael Sean Kicker, pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of methamphetamine,
transferred to drug pretrial


Icourthou seReportI


ABOUT...
Hardee Living
Hlarce.. Living print ,your,
news on,people, qclhs, ,.rd
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forfns are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


'm ---_Mm


PUBLIC NOTICE
CITY MANAGER, CITY OF WAUCHULA
Closing Date: Open until filled,
Deadline for first review July 11, 2011
Annual Salary Range: $48,000 to $71,000
DOQ with excellent benefits
Population (5,001)

Description: The City of Wauchula, Florida is seeking
qualified applicants for the .position of City Manager. A
professional position responsible to the seven (7) member
City'Commission for the proper adiTiiristthtion of all City
affairs, including but not limited to administration, person-
nel, finance and budgeting, community development,
public works, municipal airport, and public safety. The
City has an annual budget of $19.7 million with 80 full time
employees and 13 part time employees. The successful
candidate must become a resident of the City within one
(1) year of appointment.

Qualifications include a Bachelor's Degree in Business
Administration, Public Administration, or a related field
supplemented by course work in management. A mini-
mum of five (5) years of experience in a top-level adminis-
trative/management position for a city, county, school dis-
trict, other government entity or a private corporation or
entity is also required. Must possess/obtain a valid'
Florida driver's license, if selected, before reporting to
work.

Complete job description is available at http://www.city-
ofwauchula.com or by contacting the Human Resources
Office at (863) 773-3535. Applicants must submit a cover
letter, resume, signed Lithorization contained within job
description, salary history and at least five (5) profession-
al references to: City of Wauchula, RO. Box 818, 126 S.
7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873, Attn: Terri Svendsen or
e-mail to terri@cityofwauchula.com. Application dead-
line for first review is 5:00 p.m. July 11, 2011. The City is
a drug-free workplace and an EEO employer.

The City reserves the right to determine which applicants
meet the minimum qualifications for the job and to select
from among them the ones to be interviewed. The City
will select the candidate it feels is best qualified to fill the
position based on education, experience, references,
intelligence, attitude, interpersonal skills and other factors
related to being a fine City Manager.for the City of
Wauchula.
6:30;7:7c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held to consider the second reading and adoption of the follow-
ing ordinance.
ORDINANCE 2011-08

AN ORDINANCE TO CORRECT SCRIVENOR'S ERROR IN LEGAL DESCRIP-
TION OF ORDINANCE 2000-08 (ANNEXATION OF TOWN'S SPRAYFIELD
PROPERTY ; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.'

The Public Hearing will be held on the proposed ordinance at Regular Commission
Meeting on Monday, July 18, 201.1 at 6:00 RM. in the Commission Chambers at Zolfo
Springs Town Hall at which time the Town Commission will consider its adoption into law.
The ordinance in its entirety may be inspected at the office of the Town Clerk during reg-
ular working hours. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with
respect to the proposed ordinance.
Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any natter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is
made and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per
Florida Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Clerk's
Office at least 48 hours before the hearing by contacting (863) 735-0405 Fax (863) 735-
1684


George Neel, Mayor 7:7c


Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk


intervention program.
Daniel M. Lumley, violation
of community control-house
arrest (original charge -grand
theft), community control ter-
minated, outstanding fines and
fees placed on lien.
Cody Blaine McClain, flee-
ing to elude an officer with
active lights and siren, 18
months Florida State Prison,
$520 fine and court' costs, $200
public defender fees and $100
COP placed on lien; habitual
driving without a license, time
served.
Carla Denise Mink, two
counts simple assault on an
officer/firefighter/EMT, not
prosecuted.
Jose Morales Jr., violation of
probation (original charge bat-
tery), probation modified to
include two months in jail, $100
COP added to outstanding fines
and fees.
Jose Moralez, violation of
probation (original charges petit
theft and criminal mischief),
$200 public defender fees and
$100 COP added to outstanding
fines and fees.
David Nowakowski, DUI,
probation one year, license sus-
pended one year, $1,353 fine
and court costs and $100 COP
placed on lien; possession of
morphine and possession of a
prescription drug without a pre-
s,cription, not prosecuted.
Allan Dale Rhorer, DUI and
possession of oxycodone, adju-
dication withheld, probation
two years, $1,343'fines and
court costs, $200 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, 50 hours
community service; introducing
contraband into a county deten-
tion facility, not prosecuted.
Joedy S. Rios, felony driving
while license suspended, trans-
ferred to county traffic court.
Leigh Bersell Thomas, pos-
session of cocaine, adjudication
withheld, probation 18 months,-
$520 fine and court costs, $200
public defender fees, $100'
COP, 50 hours community ser-
vice.
. Bruce, Wayne Baughman,
possession of methampheta-
mine, possession of an electron-
ic device by a convicted felon,
possession of marijuana and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, adjudication withheld, pro-
bation 18 months, $520 fine and
court costs; $100 COP.
Brown Laster, leaving the
scene of a crash with property
damage and resisting arrest
without violence, $355 fine and
court costs, $100 COP; fleeing
to elude, police officers, not
prosecuted.
Raul Martinez Jr., dealing in
stolen property, sale of metham-
phetamine and trafficking in
hydrocodone, three years
Florida State Prison, fines and
court costs placed on lien; pos-
session of methamphetamine,
trafficking in oxycodone and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, not prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Wauchula State Bank to 3B'
Housing LLC, $47,500.
D&L Citrus Holdings Inc. to
Malcolm S. Farr, Julie G. Farr,
Keith H. Farr and Mary I. Farr,
$540,000.
Carlton R. and Emaline H.
Jones to Fred M. Braxton,
Michael Kyle Braxton and
Thomas Keller Braxton,
$195,000.
Jeertach LLC to Heartland
Housing LLC, $415,000.







8C The Herald-Advocate, July 7, 2011





Rodeo Bits

By Kathy Ann Gregg


A BUSY RANCH RODEO WEEKEND DAY 2, PART 1
After a long drive to and from the St. Lucie County Fair-
grounds (with a stop for an ice-cream cone in Okeechobee!) and
two ranch rodeo performances, there was just enough time to
charge the camera battery, pick out a new flash card, catch a few
winks, and then head down to the Arcadia rodeo grounds for the
RBst of the Rnnrhpe ranch rnlpon


This is the only ranch rodeo in the state of Florida that is part
of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association series, so the winner
of this event moves on to compete at the world finals in Amarillo,
Texas, in mid-November quite an honor.
As one might expect, Hardee County was there with flying
colors: Audubon Ranch/Belflower Cattle, the Carlton Ranches,
Stevens Land & Cattle/Fulford Cattle, and SMR/CJ Cattle (the lat-
ter part being Tamme Miller Fussell's family).
Now, as for color I can only applaud the SMR/CJ Cattle
team in turquoise and/or chambray blue. I have to convince
Carlton, Audubon and Stevens Land to wear real colors, then we
will truly be there with flying colors!
There were a total of 11 teams competing in five events: sad-
dle bronc riding, stray gathering, team branding, team sorting, and
wild cow milking.
No single-team dominated, with a different winner for each


This event has traditionally beenLa two-day event, and haes w-nt-g-score
been held on Labor Day weekend in September. But Mother Nature CarThe wo n d score f the saddle bron e oe Drake (of Stevens)
has not always been favorable at that time of year (the 2008 event tied for a 73, and Robert Fussell's bronc fell and rolled over (for-
was held in pouring down rain and nothing but mud), so the hosts t tel, nt on Robert)
decided to move it to April. tunately, not on Robert).
decided to move it to April The stray gathering is rarely used in FCA qualifiers, but is one
men's As ibutiti quwasfyiAn eets o Steure two Forat we teke of the events in Amarillo. Basically, it's two sets of double muggin'
so they had to hold it all in one day, on Sunday. going on in the arena at the same time. The pair to get done first
can go over and assist the second pair.
The only team to complete this event was SMR/CJ Cattle, with
Corey Fussell and Stevie John getting done first, then assisting
-s meantg gi Jimmy Fussell and Jason McEndree (whose rope had to be cut to
Si~ ~~ ': i .complete the event after first consulting a judge as to whether
..Bl "Z M- LM that was legal).
Ir '.." That's it for now. We'll continue with the rest of the events in
next week's column, where the winners will be announced!
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg


Jay Belflower flanks the calf, with Pat Thomas assisting,
as Dennis Carlton Jr. stands ready with the branding
iron, to end with a time of 1:21.80.




:- C

***-


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Dennis Carlton Jr. shows off his saddle bronc riding
skills for a score of 78 for the Audubon Ranch/Belflower
Cattle team.


The bronc leaps straight up in the air, trying unsuc-
cessfully to buck Matt Carlton off. Carlton scored a 73
for this ride.


77..
i .._- *K .

... '

Matt Carlton (center) and Dale Carlton hold the calf
steady while Brian Alexy brands it. Carlton Ranches
completed this event in 1:29.87.


in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!




-H ntng0 hngFoec s


7/8/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:38 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 48 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:06 PM
Set: 12:48 AM
Overhead: 7:51 PM
Underfoot: 7:25 AM
Moon Phase
50%
First Quarter
Major Times
7:25 AM 9:25 AM
7:51 PM -9:51 PM
Minor Times
12:48 AM -1:48 AM
2:06 PM 3:06 PM
Solunar Rating
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -4
7/9/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:38 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 47 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:11 PM
Set: 1:29 AM
Overhead: 8:46 PM
Underfoot: 8:18 AM
Moon Phase
66%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:18 AM -10:18 AM
8:46 PM 10:46 PM
Minor Times .
1:29 AM 2:29 AM
3:11 PM -4:11 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


7/10/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:38 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hr. 47 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:15 PM
Set: 2:14 AM
Overhead: 9:42 PM
Underfoot: 9:14 AM
Moon Phase
76%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:14 AM -11:14AM
9:42 PM 11:42 PM
Minor Times
2:14 AM 3:14 AM
4:15 PM 5:15 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
7/11/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:39 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 46 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:19 PM
Set: 3:05 AM
Overhead: 10:41 PM
Underfoot: 10:11 AM
Moon Phase
85%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:11 AM-12:11 PM
10:41 PM-12:41 AM
Minor Times
3:05 AM 4:05 AM
5:19 PM 6:19 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


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7/12/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:39 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 46 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:18 PM
Set: 4:00 AM
Overhead: 11:39 PM
Underfoot:11:10 AM
Moon Phase
92%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:10AM- 1:10 PM
11:39 PM 1:39 AM
Minor Times
4:00 AM 5:00 AM
6:18 PM 7:18 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
7/13/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:40 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 45 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:13 PM
Set: 4:58 AM
Overhead: --:-
Underfoot: 12:08 PM
Moon Phase
97%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
--:-- --:--
12:08 PM 2:08 PM
Minor Times
4:58 AM 5:58 AM
7:13 PM 8:13 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


7/14/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:40 AM
Set: 8:24 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 44 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:01 PM
Set: 5:59 AM
Overhead:12:36 AM
Underfoot: 1:03 PM
Moon Phase
100%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:36 AM -2:36 AM
1:03 PM 3:03 PM
Minor Times
5:59 AM 6:59 AM
8:01'PM 9:01 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
7/15/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:41 AM
Set: 8:24 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 43 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:44 PM
Set: 6:59 AM
Overhead: 1:30 AM
Underfoot: 1:55 PM
Moon Phase
S 100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
1:30 AM 3:30 AM
1:55 PM 3:55 PM
Minor Times
6:59 AM 7:59 AM
8:44 PM 9:44 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4