<%BANNER%>
The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00386
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 6/23/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00386
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




















The


111th Year, No. 29
3 Sections, 24 Pages


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
A 'e


P40s
phls 4 sales tax


Thursday, June 23, 2011


BUILDING A FUTURE ON OUR PAST

Fossil Tourism Plan Could Be Hardee's Economic Answer


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A non-profit organization
composed of local residents is
proposing to establish a tourism
base that would capitalize on
the unique fossil opportunities
here to bring economic benefits



Who's

Trying To

Call You?
By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
How many times have you
been in a situation which re-
quired the help of the Sheriff's
Office? You've called them,
now they want to call you.
Local emergency officials
now have the capability to send
out automatic phone calls if
they feel the need to contact a
certain neighborhood or area.
The program is called Reverse
911, meaning just that. Instead
of you calling 911, the Sheriff's
Office is calling you.
With the use of cell phones
increasing and land lines de-
creasing, however, the Sheriff's
Office is sure it currently has an
outdated list of phone numbers,
and needs your current number
for the system to work.
Officials need the help of the
public in order to get the word
out to everyone. Folks need to
register their contact number
online or by phone in order to
receive calls and ensure their
own safety in the event of a dis-
aster.
"By using this device, it's a
way we can quickly get infor-
mation to the public," said
Gerald Shackelford of the
Sheriff's Office. "I've found
that most of the numbers in our
database now have either been
dropped or given away, and
therefore I need to update it.
"Both a cellphone or a land-'
line can be registered to a phys-
ical address, and it will help
ensure the safety of everyone,"
he added.
A pre-recorded message will
be sent out to homes withiri the
area of a crime, burglary, sex
offender or anything else the
Sheriff's Office may be on the
lookout for. Depending on the
crime, the "designated blocked
area" may be the size of a street,
a neighborhood, or bigger.
The program is in use
See WHO'S 2A



sI-s -- a ano2
'00,S N 63 0.02
OM 6 6 70 0.12
sonr o 0.01
-Me 96 6 0.10
w9 a6 6 0.00
S6 as 0.00
TOYA nae to Ob121/11 M.89

I=n.m I m, FWlA Onm e t.atrm

n-
Classafid ........ 6B
Courthouse Report ... 5A
Crime Blotter ....... 8C
Hardee Livlng ....... 2B
Information Roundup .4A
Obituarles ......... 44


to Hardee County.
Generations of Hardee Coun-
ty residents have spent years
seeking a clean, wholesome
industry in keeping with the
small, rural agrarian life here.
Peace River Explorations Inc.
is a non-profit organization re-
cently formed to include a host
of dreams for shops and activi-


ties centered in and around the
1915 Historic Wauchula Depot
and out into the community.
Eco-tourism would take advan-
tage of the natural beauty of the
Peace River, and underutilized
assets such as the city auditori-
um and depot, and blend activi-
ties around them.
Whether it's fossil hunting, a


museum and art gallery, wed-
dings in a historic setting, a
water slide, canoe and bicycle
rentals, tubing, catering, bird-
watching, cultural events of all
kinds, a dude ranch, horse
rental location, history, pioneer-
ing, sources for T-shirts, hats
and other promotional items,
summer camps and other inter-


ests, P.R.E. would spur satellite
or supportive shops and busi-
nesses,
A business of its own, it's
also wants to be a catalyst for a
host of other business through-
out Wauchula and Hardee
County. It hopes to open by
Oct. 1 and immediately develop
some home-grown businesses


FILE PHOTC
Researchers and Interested volunteers swarmed a rural Zolfo Springs ranch ust last fall after the land owner dis
covered bones from a prehistoric mammoth along the bed of Charlie Creek. A University of Florida paleontologil
described it as a significant find, and said it was the first full mammoth skeleton he ever unearthed in his 30 years
of fossil recovery. Hardee County's position in what is termed "Bone Valley" has brought phosphate mining compa.
nies here, but it is amateur and serious fossil hunters Peace River Explorations hopes to capitalize on for the coun
ty's future.


Health

Fair Next

Week
By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
The aging process is a part of
everyone's lives, but often
ignored until it seems to take
over and demand attention.
Give it some next week at a
community health fair dubbed
"Age Well At Any Age," spon-
sored by Florida Hospital, the
West Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging, Serving
Health Insurance Needs of
Elders (S.H.I.N.E.) and Nu-
Hope Elder Care Services.
The event will take place at
the Hardee County Agri-Civic
Center next Thursday, June 30,
from 8 to 11 a.m. The event is
free and open to the public.
"Everyone ages one way or
another, so everyone is wel-
come." said Sara Rosenbaum,
of Florida Hospital Heartland.
Services which will be
offered at the health fair are
blood pressure checks, blood
sugar testing, bone density
screenings, pulse and oxygen
level checks, HIV testing, edu-
cational sessions, _dmonstra-
See HEALTH 2A.


as well as bringing in some oth-
ers.
On its board of directors are
president-Jeraldine Crews; vice
president Louise Weis; secre-
tary Linda See; treasurer Eliza-
beth Durrance, who is also a
member of the Hardee County
See BUILDING 2A



Linemen


Rescue Z


From Fire
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A pair of Wauchula linemen
driving by saved two women in
a burning house.
Carl Carte and Jerry Welch
were working on a power out-
age in the 600 block of North
Seventh Avenue. late Tuesday
evening and "happened to have
their windows down as they
were returning to the shop for
materials."
Hearing a woman yelling as
they passed a home at 408 N.
Seventh Ave., they stopped.
Seeing there was a fire, Welch
grabbed the fire extinguisher as
they raced to the home. They
were able to get one woman in
the front out a window. Welch .
used up the extinguisher, slow-
ing the fire but unable to get it
out.
The woman said her sister
was in the back of the house.
While Carte called 9-1-1 and
cut the electricity to the house,
Welch ran to the back and got
the sister out of the home. The
police and fire trucks rolled up.
S According to Hardee County'
- Fire-Rescue reports, they re-
t ceived the call at 10:26 and
Were on scene in less than four
Minutes. They found a "work-
Sing attic fire" in the one-story
wood frame house and set up
the ladder to attack it from the
See LINEMEN 2A


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Wauchula linemen Carl Carte and Jerry Welch "just happened by" and rescued two women from this home In a
Tuesday night fire.


F Local Kids Win

" Citrus Contest

... Story 7A


Do You Want A

Clean County?

.... Story 3A


Catching Up On

Wauchula Issues:
...Story 1B


I a


I I '


112 029117













2A The Herald-Advocate, June 23,2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.mn
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
S Ads -Tuesday noon


LETrERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should bte
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
s r


Kelly's Column
By Jim


June 21 was the official beginning of summer. There has been
some rain lately but much more is needed. Lake and river levels are
lower than normal.

The Florida Gators are off to a 2-0 mark in the College World
Series jn Omaha, Nebraska-the corn and beef country.

The Tampa Bay Rays have been doing well lately and are nar-
rowly trailing Boston and New York in the American League East.
Pitcher James Shields is having a great year.
The Florida Marlins had a poor start in June. Their manager
resigned on Father's Day.

June is National Dairy Month, and Hardee has several big
dairies. It would be hard to imagine a world without milk, cheese,
ice cream, yogurt and other products that originate with milk cows.
Dairy cattle eat grass, grains and many other healthy foods
including agricultural byproducts such as citrus pulp, corn husks'
and cotton seed hulls. ......
, . .. \ 71r ,
A study has. shown that eating adlot of''sh can reduce the
chances of getting Alzheimer's. Our family has eaten fried bass a
couple of times lately with grits, baked beans and iced tea. Sharp
cheddar cheese goes good on grits, often referred to as Georgia ice
cream.

Congratulations to Rory Mcllroy of Northern Ireland for win-
ning the recent U.S. Open golf tournament by a record margin. I
hope Tiger Woods makes a comeback soon. With 14 major titles,
he is trying to beat Jack Nicklaus' record of 18.

Best wishes to the new graduates of high school and college. I
hope you are all successful and happy, that the world will be a bet-
ter place for you having been in it.

Congratulations to 1962 Hardee High graduate Eddie
Whidden of West Virginia for making the.HHS Hall of Fame. He
overcame a handicap and has devoted his life to helping the hand-
icapped.

John Edwards, 95, ran the local Farmers Home Administration
for many years in Wauchula, serving a.four-county area with home
financing. He lives in Bartow and still.loves being in the Kiwanis
Club and growing orchids.

Hobson Strain of Bartow was the Polk County tax collector for
30 years and has been happily retired for 17 years.'His late friend
Curtis Ezelle was Hardee's tax collector for almost 48 years.

I can understand why Mosaic might want to apply for some
local phosphate severance tax money for their Streamsong resort
project in south Polk County, a few miles north of the Hardee/Polk
line, especially if they could guarantee a percentage of the estimat-
ed 200 jobs going to Hardee County residents.
A second reason is that most of this severance tax money will
be paid by Mosaic. The Streamnsong project will have two world
class golf courses, a 220-room four-star hotel, and.world class
guided bass fishing, along with spas, horseback riding, birdwatch-
ing, conferences, etc. .
People from around the world could consider a visit to
Streamsong along' with other destinations like Disney World,
Busch Gardens, Universal Studios, and Legoland Florida which
will open in mid-October 2011. It could host an annual significant
golf tournament.
The biggest opposition to such a request would be local funds
going to an out-of-county project that is already underway. Polk
*County would get the property taxes and most of the other benefits.

Bob Weidman, 88, of Wauchula saw a lot of death and injury
as a U.S. Army medic in World War II in France and Belgium. His
best buddy Leo was killed.
Bob was wounded by an enemy bullet in his ribs and back. He
has steel in his back and neck from the injury. He suffered frozen
feet. If took nine months before his feet stopped bleeding from
walking. : ,.
He once spent two days trapped in a foxhole while pinned
down by an enemy machine gunner. One time he could only dig a
trench six inches deep so he moved to a nearby deeper hole. A mor-
tar or big gun shell soon exploded in the shallow trench where he
left his pack of medical supplies. He was 18 and 19 during the war.
A truck came by once carrying 75 dead soldiers. Some 25
Allied paratroopers were killed when.they landed along German
soldiers.
After the war Bob taught school six years and did naval
research for 32 years.

Here is a message from Anonymous:
"Please find time to print this soon. This is happening more
often than people realize via..Internet and verbally. Before you
make slanderous comments against sonmiene you better be able to
back it up or maybe the last laugh will be on you. If you are an
employer and see libel on e-mail Internet it is important not to let
this ruin a good person's reputation. It would not only be a shame


FILE PHOTO
The restored 1915 Wauchula Historic Depot will be the home for Peace River Explorations and its welcome center
and art gallery.


BUILDING
Continued From 1A


Chamber of Commerce; plus
board members Oneita Revell
and Alane Solomon. Other
directors with business acumen
and a passion for eco-tourism
are wanted.
It was originally suggested by
Economic Development Direc-
tor Bill Lambert for a fossil
museum, utilizing a natural
resource in the Peace River and
Bone Valley to attract people to
the county. He anticipated over
a million dollars "to do it right."
P.R.E. executive director/proj-
ect director Patty Detwiler and
marketing manager Kathleen
Roehm have spent weeks
researching information and
ideas, which resulted in forma-
tion of the board of directors in
late May. Detwiler has an ex-
tensive background in commer-
cial development and hospitali-
ty and Roehm 's expertise is in
marketing, grants and education
aspects.
Roehm and Detwiler have
spoken to the Wauchula and
Zolfo Springs commissions and
are on the agenda for the coun-
ty and Bowling Green meet-
ings. They are ready to go to
any civic organization or group
interested in learning more
about the excitement they have
planned.




LINEMEN
Continued From 1A
gable.
The fire had dropped down
through the ceiling and ignited
a bed and other materials. As
more firemen arrived, they
entered the front of the home,
put out the fire thereand pulled
down the ceiling to extinguish
embers between.
Although the fire in the
2,500-foot home was under
control in 22 minutes, firemen
remained on the scene until
shortly before midnight, using
thermal imaging to ensure there
were no hot spots or stray
embers.
Investigation showed the fire
started in the northwest corner
of the attic by electrical arcing,
which ignited the insulation and
spread to the wooden beams. It
was contained mostly to the
middle of the structure.
"It was probably one of our
more exciting evenings," said
Carte. He and Welch went on
about their job, securing a new
transformer and other materials
and resuming the job of restor-
ing power to the 600 block of
North Seventh Avenue.
"God alerted them to the
problem as they were driving
down the road and they were
able to save these two women.
Then they went back to the pub-
lic work's shop for parts and
went on with their work,"
reported Public Works Director
Ray McClellan, obviously
proud of his crewmen.


The Wauchula City Commis-
sion has approved use of the
historic depot for a nominal rent
for use as a visitor information
and welcome center and also a
central reservations point for
scheduling many of the pro-
posed activities. A concierge
service will maintain a schedule
of events, whether it be "The
Story of Jesus," Bensen Days,
Solomon's Castle, Hardee
Lakes, Pioneer Park Days,
Paynes Creek State Park,
Musicale or Garden Club,
Friday Night Live and other
events, and arrange attendance
at them.
Originally the center of
Wauchula life, the depot closed
several decades ago. It was
deeded to the city in 1998 with
the provision that the depot
remain. If it is removed at any
time, the property reverts to the
original owner. Several historic
preservation grants have helped
preserve it and remodel the.
south end.
P.R.E.-hopes to idnovate the
available south portion and
expand the north portion for the
museum/art gallery, complete
with video spots highlighting
many available activities in the'
county. They hope to obtain the
recently discovered wooly
mammoth and other artifacts
discovered locally.
There already is in place an
understanding with CF Indus-
tries to use its lands for fossil
hunting, horse trails, birding
and other outdoor activities.
Detwiler and Roehm are



HEALTH
Continued From 1A
tions, Medicare counseling with
trained S.H.I.N.E. counselors,
safety information, health infor-
mation and local medical, com-
munity and recreation program
information.
Representatives from com-
munity services will be present
along with various booths from
the Sheriff's Office, Emergency
Medical Technicians, Florida
Hospital departments, Health
Department, South Florida
Community College, assisted
living facilities, Florida Blood
Centers, substance abuse preg-
nancy prevention groups and
Sevigny & Timmerman, which
will provide free simple eye
screenings.
Refreshments will be served
and entertainment enjoyed
along with door prizes. In-
dividuals must be present to
win, as the giveaways will be
conducted throughout the
event.
The Agri-Civic Center is
located at 515 Civic Center Dr.,
at the corner of Stenstrom and
Altman roads in Wauchula.
For more information, call
773-3101 and ask for
Rosenbaum at extension 6476.


but could definitely attack you in the future.
"We all have moral obligations to resist this form of tyranny.
An employer should question others who know and have known
the injured person personally for a long period of time. Personal
knowledge should always triumph over the malicious words of a
cyber bully. Do not be fooled by them: What goes around comes
around. Someday it may be you or your child. Wouldn't you like
the opportunity of defending yourself. All that usually revolves
around is an insecure jealous person.
"If you do not defend others you dare not complain when such
verbal violence harms those you love and care for. Stand taller than
those you love can care for. Stand taller than those who use this
juvenile, cowardly bullying tactics. You are better than the one who
has put out this unwise and malicious conduct."


meeting with South Florida
Community College personnel
today (Thursday) in hopes of
bringing some of its cultural
events to the Wauchula Audito-
rium. They also hope to present
feature films on fossil hunting,
dairy farms, citrus and cattle
ranching, and Hardee Couhty
history and pioneering.
There is hope of having an
on-site fossil dig on the south-
east corer of U.S. 17 and Main
Street. Tentative plans would
have a second-story fossil/his-
toric museum there with inter-
active exhibits.
Eventually, there is to be a
fossil-themed water park on a
combined city/privately owned
site .
There are tentative plans for
using the Underwood Estate at
Azalea Hill, which is on the
National Register of Historic


Homes. It would showcase the
historic home and grounds, use
the adjacent citrus grove and
perhaps a small pasture area for
Cracker cows to educate visi-
tors on two of the main indus-
tries of the county.
It would show life in Florida
in the late 1800s and early
1900s and could include the
estate grounds available for
events and weddings. One of
the exciting belongings is an
original Steinway piano, one of
only a half dozen or so built by
Steinway himself.
There is a website available
and it is hoped to expand it with
virtual video games of the
Peace River. For more informa-
tion, connect to www.peac-
eriverexplorations.com or
info @peaceriverexplorations
.com. Roehm can be reached at
cell phone 781-2874.


WHO'S
Continued From: lA


throughout the entire county.
Once the warning has been
sent out, the device can report
to the Sheriff's Office whether
the call was received, if an
answering machine picked it
up, or if there was any kind of
interference.
If the call failed, it will be
sent out a few more times.
Officials can also tell overall
how many calls were sent and if
any or all were successful.
While this is not an actual
call placed, an example of a
message left could be as fol-
lows:
"This is a public service
announcement from the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office. A sex-
ual offender has moved into
your area. Her name is Jane
Doe and she resides at 123
Name of Street. She is a white


EFFICIENT HOMES
An article last week on
weatherization programs to
make your home more
energy efficient gave an
incorrect e-mail address.
Interested people may
call 863-233-6233 or e-mail
mrodriguez@centrocam-
pesino.org.

CRIME BLOTTER
An entry in the "County"
section of last week's
Crime Blotter should have
been listed in the "Wau-
chula" portion.
Robert Henry Lovette,
36, of 635 S. Fifth Ave.
(U.S. 17 North), Wauchula,
was arrested on June 12 by
Wauchula Ofc. John
Nicholas and charged with
battery.

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


female, 24 years old, has brown
hair, brown eyes, weighs 132
pounds and is 5'2" tall. For
additional information, view
the sexual offender website on
the FDLE website or contact
the deputy on the case at (num-
ber given)."
If anyone receiving a call
knows any information which
might assist authorities or wants
additional information on the
subject, that person can call a
number which is provided at the
end of the automated messages.
"Generally," Sheriff Arnold
Lanier explained, "the calls will
go out with a sex offender, but
they are sent with varying
crimes as well. If we need to be
on the lookout for something or
someone or if there was a rob-
bery, we can also send out a
warning.
"We can't do it for every-
thing," he added, "but will send
them out as we deem important.
We try to keep the messages
short, and send them out later in
the evening or after hours
because it ties up the phone
lines here as well."
In order to get the program in
full use with working numbers,
the Sheriff's Office is asking
county residents to visit the
website hardeeso.com to update
your information.
There is no charge to sign up
to receive the calls and the only
information needed is a name,
address and valid phone num-
ber, either a cell phone or land
line can be used.
By doing so, you, too, can
receive Reverse 911 calls per-
taining to you in the event of an
emergency.
The universal orotnernooo
of man is our most pre-
cious possession.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6months-518; 1 yr.- S31;2 yrs. 60
Florida
6 months S22; 1 yr. $41; 2 yrs. S79
Out of State
6 months S27; I yr. 549; 2 yrs. S95


lwtots .












June 23, 2011, TheHerald-Advocate 3A


Code Enforcement Scrutinized


By JOAN SEAMAN be willing to put their name on
Of The Herald-Advocate it?" asked Bryant. He later
Everyone wants it for their added, "I don't think you can
neighbors, just not for them- shut off anonymous complaints.
selves. It gives us other pairs of eyes.
It took two hours to discuss And, if you see something as
the.issues with code enforce- you're going down the street
ment in Hardee County. that needs attention, do so."
The Hardee County Com- Commissioner Sue Birge and
mission met for its planning Dale Johnson were in favor,
session on Friday and focused realizing that for various rea-
on code enforcement. sons, business, neighbor, fear,
Vice Chairman Minor Bryant etc., people were unwilling to
took the lead as Chairman Terry put their name on a complaint.
Atchley was absent due to ill- Commissioner Grady John-
ness. "Long ago we didn't have son said, "Most counties don't
code enforcement. With more address anonymous complaints.
people came more laws, more We are a rural community and
codes, code enforcement, which the economics are. going down.
it all right as long as it's your There's a fine line between
neighbor and not you," said code enforcement and a police
Bryant. state. We need to shut down
Planning and Development staff abuse. We need profes-
Director Kevin Denny opened sional standards and an investi-
the discussion by saying people gator to look at complaints of
have repeatedly said in the how residents feel they are
visioning meetings that they treated by code enforcement
want code enforcement, they staff.
want the county to be cleaned "Staff can't play judge, jury
up. "But we need direction. and executioner. Driving by and
Code enforcement has been stopping because of a visual
complaint driven. 'complaint' is dicey," continued
"Hardee County is a declin- Grady Johnson.
ing population, no progress. Denny said that it's not being
There's a need for jobs, but a police force. No one tries to
~hen a prospective business do that. "We are just enforcing
comes to the county, it is con- the laws you've already passed.
cerned for the look of the cor- Some of the codes may need to
munity. If it looks rundown, be changed, if that's what you
that affects the willingness of a want."
business to bring its employees Smith said he had worked in
here," continued Denny. New York state where he did
"Do you want selective en- have more authority and never
forcement, complaint driven? lost a case. He said he under:
What about when we are going stands and had instructed staff
to a complaint and pass another not to enter a property on a code
violation on the way? Should enforcement issue, but remain
we ignore it?" Denny asked as on the driveway or other public
he invited Building Official access. Inspectors can enter
Jerry Smith to join him at the property when it's a building
table, inspection as -there is consent
Smith explained, "When we given at the time thepermit is
get a complaint, do we put on filed.
blinders on the way to that com- There was discussion on eco-
plaint?" Smith said code en- nomics, if code enforcement
forcement specialist LaDonna was asking people to do things
(Perry) spends 50 to 75 percent they couldn't afford. Bryant
of her time on code enforce- noted, "It doesn't take a lot of
ment. money to pick up trash. People
"We want some direction, don't want to live next to people
should we spend time on nui- who don't contain their trash.
sance enforcement? We had 25 We don't need to change policy.
cases at the last court appear- I say, 'let's clean up the coun-
ance. Do we continue on anony- ty.'"
mous complaints?" Smith Dale Johnson noted that
asked. excessive vegetation can be a
The commission was divided :,.firetbazard and could result in a
on anonymous complaints. "If fire injuring children. Another
it affects health and welfare, problem is chickens crowing,
don't you think a person should some all day and all night. In a


rural area, it's all right to have
chickens, in a residential area,
it's not.
Comments were heard from
the audience. Nancy Craft said,
"It's time to get over the past
history and start with education
and move forward. Get church-
es to help people who can't
afford to paint their house or
unable to pick up trash. It's not
a Gestapo state," she said,
opposing anonymous com-
plaints, "You should have the
intestinal fortitude to give your
name. Everyone has a different
concept of what law enforce-
ment is."
A recent internet entry
explained it as: "A building
department is a law enforce-
ment agency within a local
jurisdiction whose function is to
enforce building codes for the
safety of occupants. The prime
mission is the prevention and
correction or abatement of code
violations."
It continues, "The building
inspector checks methods and
materials used in the construc-
tion of new as well as existing
structures to ensure that build-
ing codes, health and safety reg-
ulations, construction standards
and zoning ordinances are
met."
Codes are adopted by ordi-
nance of the county or munici-
pality. Once adopted, the build-
ing official cannot deviate from
compliance with these codes,
which are written to protect
health and safety, neighborhood
well-being, and conformity in
what is allowed or not allowed
in a particular zoned area.
Realtor Noey Flores agreed
that education was important to
the code enforcement process.
"It's important instead of just
bothering people," said Flores,
who notes that parking semi-
trucks in their yard is the only
place some people have.
There's a problem with tactful-
ness. It used to be allowed and
isn't now, explain what else
they could do, where they could
park legally."
Smith brought up health
issues. "We've worked with the
Health Department. In Florida,
people are required to have
heat, not air conditioning, just
heat. It's a state rule, we have to
follow it." .
Sherry White reviewed ongo-
ing' unhappiness with code
enforcement on camper trailers


Bay Scallop Season Will


Open Early, Close Late


The recreational harvest sea-
son for bay scallops in Florida
will begin June 25 and extend
through Sept. 25.
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission, in
support of Gov. Rick Scott and
Cabinet, added three weeks to
this year's season to help
relieve Florida fishing commu-
nities suffering from economic
hardships due to the 2010
Deepwater Horizon oil spill.
Open scalloping areas on
Florida's Gulf coast extend
from the west bank of the
Mexico Beach Canal in Bay
'County to the Pasco-Hernando
county line near Aripeka.
It is illegal to possess bay


scallops in or on state waters
outside the open harvest areas,
or to land bay scallops outside
the open areas.
There is a daily limit of two
gallons of whole bay scallops in
the shell or one pint of bay scal-
lop meat per person. In addi-
tion, no more than 10 gallons of
whole bay scallops in the shell
or one-half gallon of bay scal-
lop meat may be possessed
aboard any vessel at any time.
People may harvest bay scal-
lops only by hand or with a
landing or dip net. Bay scallops
may not be harvested for com-
mercial purposes.- A regular
Florida saltwater fishing license
or a free resident shore-based


license is needed.
During the season, scallop
harvesters can assist FWC's
scallop researchers by complet-
ing an online survey at svy.mk/-
bayscallops. Harvesters can
indicate where they harvest
scallops, how many they collect
and how long it takes to harvest
them. Participants can also e-
mail BayScallops@MyFWC.-
com to ask questions or send
additional information.
More information on bay
scallops, including manage-
ment rules, dive-flag regula-
tions and boating safety, is
available online at MyFWC.-
com by clicking "Fishing," and
then on "Regulations" under
'"Saltwater Fishing."


10 Items To Put On Your


Home Spring Clea
'he changing seasons are a chimney sweep to clear the flue
hinder that it's time to check and perform an inspection.
und the house to make sure 6. Caulk and weather strip:
igs are operating properly Keep rain from seeping in and
safely. Here are 10 often cooled or heated air from seep-
rlooked tasks to add to your ing out by caulking around win-
ne spring cleaning list. dows and doors.
.Defrost the freezer: Ice 7. Drain the hot water heat-
Idup makes freezers less er: Check for rust and remove
cient and takes up space. sediment that may have collect-
ow away out-of-date or ed at the bottom of your hot
:zer-burnt food. water heater.
.Update the first-aid kit: 8. Call the termite inspec-
place missing supplies and tor: Termites establish new
late emergency contact colonies every spring, so get a
:rmation, including the poi- professional inspection of your
control center, home.
.Donate old clothes: Clean 9. Review your family emer-
closets -and take unused agency plan: Have an estab-
hes to a clothing donation lished plan in case of fire or
ter. other emergency. Make sure
.Clean up the computer: windows and other escapes are
ete old files and e-mails, easy to open from the inside.
anize documents and photos 10. Check batteries: There
folders and run a virus are 21 battery-operated devices
n. in the average home-from flash-
.Clean the chimney: Hire a lights to smoke detectors to


ning List
cordless phones. Test each
device and replace the batteries
with fresh ones.
According to the U.S. Con-
sumer Product Safety Com-
mission, about 3,000 people in
the United States lose their lives
in residential fires every year.
You should test smoke alarfhs
once a month and change the
batteries inside at least twice a
year. Also replace smoke alarm
batteries if the detector emits a
warning sound, such as chirp-
ing or beeping. Make sure
there's at least one working
smoke alarm on every level of
your home, particularly inside
or near sleeping areas.
To help householders, Inter-
state Batteries makes 16,000
different kinds of batteries for
powering cars, laptops and
everything in between. The
company's All Battery Centers
promise to have, find or build
the right battery for just about
any gadget around your home.'


Some iuge athletes say they experience G-forces-or the pull of gravity- in some curves
.on a luge track comparable to what jet fighter pilots experience.


on her property and alleged it
was an anonymous false report
that should never have been
investigated. She also said that
commissioners and the people
are on different sides of the
code enforcement issue.
"People who are drug-addicted
don't care what their yard looks
like, just where their next fix
comes from. The elderly and
handicapped need help, not the
same restrictions as other peo-
ple have. Penalizing the poor is
not the answer. Reach down and
help those that can't help them-
selves."
Denny said "that's part of
what we do. It's all interrelated.
The bottom line is that educa-
tion and the social aspects have
to be considered while trying to
enforce the 500 pages of codes
they work with."
Mike Thompson, chairman of
the Planning & Zoning Board,
and Benny Hash of the
Construction Industry Licens-
ing Board also opposed anony-
mous complaints. "It's a rural
county which depends on mi-
grants and that means migrant
housing, which should be con-
trolled -by the Department of
Agriculture. Refer these cases
(too many people in a single-
family house) to D-A to investi-
gate.
Local attorney Steven South-
well said revising the codes is
most important. "You can't just
snap your fingers and it will
happen. It takes time. You have
to roll up your sleeves and get
going on it."
Bryant closed the meeting,
"That's what we all want. To
make Hardee County a better
place to live."
After the meeting, Grady
Johnson further explained his
professional standards rules as a
protection for both the public
and code enforcement staff. "If
a person understands they will
be sworn in and the interview
with an investigator will be
taped, most will withdraw the
complaint. Only the real serious
ones will follow through, even
knowing they will be referred to
the State Attorney's Office if.
they are found to lie under oath.
"It's the same for a code
enforcement person. If they are
unwilling to swear under oath,
they might say, they overreact-
ed. If they're right, they're
bound to stand by it."


~-

A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
(David prayed) "O loving
and kind God, have mercy.
Have pity upon me and take
away the awful stain of my
transgressions. Oh, wash
me, cleanse me from this
guilt. Let me be pure again.",
Psalm 51:1-2 (TLB)

FRIDAY
"It is against You, God, and
You alone that I sinned, and
did this terrible thing. You
saw it all and Your sentence
against me is just. ... You
deserve honesty from the
heart; yes, with sincerity and
truthfulness. Oh, give me
this wisdom."
Psalm 51:4,6 (TLB)

SATURDAY
"Sprinkle me with the
cleansing blood and I shall
be clean again. Wash me,
and I will be whiter than
snow.... Create in me a new,
clean heart, O God, filled
with clean thoughts and
right desires."
Psalm 51:7,10 (TLB)

SUNDAY
"Restore to me the joy of
Your salvation, and make me
willing to obey You. Then I
will teach Your ways to other
sinners and they guilty
like me Will repent and
turn to You."
Psalm 51:12-13 (TLB)

MONDAY
"It is a broken spirit You want
- remorse and penitence. A
broken and contrite heart, O
God, You will hot ignore."
Psalm 51:17-18 (TLB)

TUESDAY
God looks down from heav-
en, searching among all
mankind to see if there is a
single one who does right
and really seeks God. But all
have turned their backs on
Him, they are filthy with sin.
Psalm 53:2-3a (TLB)


From The Heart
By David Kelly


SERMON 2, PART 2
Next, let's look at verses 3-6:
"For you have spent enough time in the past doing what?
pagans choose to do living in debauchery, lust, drunkenness,:
orgies, carousing and detestable idolatry. They are surprised that-'
you do not join them in their reckless, wild living, and they heap
abuse on you. But they will have to give account to Him who is.
ready to judge the living and the dead. For this is the reason the:
gospel was preached even to those who are now dead, so that they."
might be judged according to human standards in regard to the.
body, but live according to God in regard to the spirit."
Pray, love and serve as a response to the Father's love.
People will be surprised when you do this. We are not to.
engage in sensuality, passions, drunkenness, origies, drinking par--
ties, and lawless idolatry. Don't join in this flood of debauchery.
But preach the gospel to the dead, so they might come to know the:;
Father! So they might come to live in the spirit the way God does.'.
God the Father will be the final judge. Not us. Not me. Not:
you. This is why we must pray to our Father that in Christ He.
would bring the lost to Himself. This is why we need to spend time:
loving God the Father, just spend time thanking Him and rejoicing.
that He is your Father and that from right now through eternity that:
will never change.
That is much more permanent than the fleeting high we get'
from the immoral behavior listed above. If we look at Jesus, He
took time to talk to His Dad, He took time to love His Dad, He took'
time to serve His Dad.
Everything He did was to serve His Dad. Everything He
thought, taught or took part in was to bring about God's will,
because Jesus understood infinitely more than we do that God
loved Him!
Do you see it yet? The Father's love? Are you starting to get a
picture, an idea, an inkling that The God, God the Father, loves
you? Well hold on, there's more.
Maybe you are not there yet, maybe you are like some of the
Old Testament believers that say God is Master and Lord, but
"Father" is a stretch.
I think He has to be everything to us before we can totally sub-
mit, even saying totally submit is kind of a ridiculous statement
once you have you see', it's not really submitting as much as it
is rejoicing over what you haye received.
Let's look at the last several verses:
"The end of all things is near. Therefore be alert and of sober
mind so that you may pray. Above all, love each other deeply,
because love covers over a multitude of sins. Offer hospitality to
one another without grumbling. Each of you should use whatever
gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God's
grace in its various forms. If anyone speaks, they should do so as
one who speaks the very words of God. If anyone serves, they
should do so with the strength God provides, so that in all things
God may be praised through Jesus Christ. To Him be the glory and
the power for ever and ever. Amen.
"As each has received a gift, use it to serve one another, as
good stewards of God's varied grace: In order that in everything,
God may be glorified through Jesus Christ."
What gift? God's varied Grace, God's riches, at Christ's
expense. His grace is so varied and so overwhelming and so unbe-
lievable, at times we feel like we can't receive it, but we must not
only receive this gift of grace we must be good stewards of it. We
must be grace dispensers, not lawless idolators!
-In everything! In our marriage, in our parenting, in our jobs, in
our friendships, in our families, in our society.
How? By the strength Ahat _God The Father supplies! Why? So
He may be glorified through Jesus Christ.
Because why? Because the glory and dominion forever and
ever are His! Not yours.
Once The God, is God The Father in everything, then you can,
no, then you will want to, no, then you will be glad to receive His
gift and gladly surrender your junk (life) and then you will be sur-
rounded by the Father's love, you will have complete freedom in
'Jesus Christ to approach the Father.
You can cry out to Him, love Him, rejoice over Him, share
Him, serve Him, with no worries, no fears, no shame.


WEDNESDAY
Let everyone bless God and
sing His praises, for He
holds our lives in His hands.
And He holds our feet to His
path. ... Blessed be God,
Who didn't turn away when I
was praying, and didn't
refuse me His kindness and
love.
Psalm 62:8-9,20 (TLB)


Letter To The Editor

Streamsong Project Will

Diversify Local Economy


Dear Editor:'
While Mosaic's representa-
tive at a recent Hardee County
Industrial Development Author-
ity (IDA) meeting provided an
extensive update on our
Streamsong resort and confer-
ence center project-as report-
ed in last week's Herald-
Advocate-we believe some
additional perspective on the
company's intentions would be
beneficial to your readers.
The economic development
funds Mosaic is providing
Hardee County over the next 10
years are to be used by the IDA
to invest in projects and pro-
grams that will grow and diver-
sify the local economy. As last
week's article reported, we have
contemplated the possibility of
applying for future grants for
projects that will be beneficial
to the local community, such as
Streamsong. However, it's im-
portant to emphasize that the
authority to allocate any grants
rests solely with the IDA.
Our company highly values
the collaborative relationship
we've built with the Hardee
County community over the
years. Many Hardee citizens
work at our operations or in
related industries, and we have
a deep appreciation for the need
to ensure a viable economic
future for the County, along


with neighboring communities
where we maintain operations.
The Streamsong project is an
example of our company's
commitment to building sus-
tainable economic drivers that
will remain long after mining is
complete. Located immediately
adjacent to Hardee County, the
resort will give birth to a new
industry for this region and has
the potential to be an economic
game changer for both Polk and
Hardee Counties.
Streamsong will generate
over 200 permanent full-time
jobs-but investments of its
type are coveted by the eco-
nomic development community
for many reasons beyond their
direct employment numbers.
The opportunities created by its
construction and long-term
operations will have significant
economic benefits for local res-
idents, vendors, businesses and
all of the surrounding area.
Mosaic fully respects Hardee
County's right to decide how to
invest in its future. We remain
committed to being a partner
with the county in helping to
ensure that future is a prosper-
ous one.
Tom Sunnarborg
Vice President-
Land Development &
Management
Mosaic


All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


T
rem
arot
thin
Sand
ove
hon
1
bui
effi
Thr
free
2
* Rep
.upd
info
son
3
out
clot
cen
4
Del
orge
into
scale
5












4A The Herald-Advocate, June 23,2011


Obituaries


OLLIE EDWARD HILL
Ollie Edward Hill, 65, of
Fort Meade, died on Thursday,
June 16, 2011, in Fort Meade.
Born on Dec. 3, 1945, in
Double Springs, Ala., he was a
lifelong resident of Fort Meade.
He was a U.S. Army veteran, a
member of the Fort Meade
American Legion Post # 23 and
a farmer.
Survivors include his wife,
Jane W. Hill of Fort Meade; two
sons, Travis Hill of Fort Meade
and Jonathan Hill of Raleigh,
N.C.; daughter Shellie Pawley
of Fort Meade; brother Jimmy
Hill of Fort Meade; four sisters
Sue McRae and Willie Mae
Sellers, both of Mulberry,
Gayle Mullins of Lakeland and
Bonnie Harbin of Bartow; and
three grandchildren, Tayten
Hill, Michael Pawley and Kylee
Hill.
Memorial services were held
on Sunday at 3 p.m. at the
funeral home.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade

RUSSELL A. GOODING n
Russell A. "Big Red" Good-
ing II, 83, of Gardner and
Arcadia, died on Tuesday, June
14, 2011, at home.
He was born Aug. 28, 1927,
the eldest child of Virgie and
Russell Gooding Sr. He served
in the Armed Forces and
worked'as a union iron worker
throughout the southeast.
He was preceded in death by
his parents; brother Bill Good-
ing; and sister Virginia Ritz.
He is survived by his chil-
den, Deborah Cooper, Elaine
Howard, Teresa Jernigan, Ida
Langston, Russell Gooding III
and William Gooding; brother
Jack Gooding; sister Patty
Colange; 14 grandchildren; and
10 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was held last
Thursday at the funeral home.
Services were held there on
Friday with the Rev. Harold
Brown officiating. Interment
followed at Gardner Baptist
Church Cemetery.
Robarts Funeral Home
Arcadia









-- -




JUANITA BELLE
STEWART GRAHAM
Juanita Belle Stewart
Graham, 96, of Wauchula,
went home to be with her
Lord and Savior on Saturday,
June 18, 2011, in Wauchula.
She was born on Dec. 17,
1914, in Manatee County to
Andrew Jackson and Theo-
dosia Stephens Stewart. She
came to Wauchula from
Myakka City in 1937. She
was a homemaker and mem-
ber of First Baptist Church of
Wauchula.
She was preceded in death
by her husband of 74 years,
Henry Cecil Graham; her eld-
est son Roy David Graham;
four sisters; and nine brothers.
Juanita was a loving moth-
er to her four children. She is
survived by two sons, Ray
Myron and wife Pat of
Wauchula, and Michael D.
and wife Beverly of Brandon,
Miss.; daughter Mary Jo of
Leesburg; daughter-in-law
Shelby of Haines City; eight
grandchildren; 16 great-
grandchildren; and one great-
great-grandchild.
SLovingly known as "Gran-
nie" to her family, she can
never be replaced, but our
memories will last forever.
Visitation is today (Thurs-
day) from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
Robarts Garden Chapel. Ser-
vices are Friday at 11 a.m. at
the chapel with the Rev. Mike
Graham and the Rev. Alan
Permenter officiating. Inter-
ment follows in Wauchula
Cemetery. Expressions of
comfort may be made at
robartsfh.com..


EDWARD KLEIN, JR.
Edward Klein, Jr., 74, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
June 19, 2011, in Wauchula.
Born on Nov. 28, 1936, in
Hardee County, he was a life-
long resident. He was a laborer
in citrus groves.
He is survived by his wife,
Ovita M. Klein of Wauchula;
two sons, Dennis Klein and
wife Lori of Wauchula, and
David Klein and wife Gale of
Madison; two daughters, Char-
lotte Vickery of Wauchula, and
Ovita Kilgore and husband
Eddie of Zolfo Springs; three
brothers, Robert Klein and wife
Joyce of Lake Branch, and John
Klein and wife Jane, and
Russell Klein and wife Angela,
all of Zolfo Springs; one sister,
Martha Ladwig of Zolfo
Springs; 17 grandchildren; and
10 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday 6 to 8
p.m. at the funeral home. Ser-
vices were Wednesday at the
funeral home with the Rev. Jeff
Giles officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at New Hope Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

ELOY GUERRA JR.
Eloy Guerra Jr., 22, died on
Saturday, June 11, 2011, in
Arcadia.
Born Jan. 22, 1989, in Ar-
cadia, he was a 2008 graduate
of the Charlotte Technical
Center, Port. Charlotte and a
cook in the restaurant business.
He was a member of St. Paul's
Catholic Church in Arcadia.
Survivors include his son,
Aden Guerra of Sarasota; par-
ents Eloy Sr. and Rosa Linda
Guerra of Arcadia; maternal
grandmother Maria Montoya of
Texas and paternal grandpar-
ents Francisco and Ovelia
Guerra of Arcadia; brother
Alejandro Guerra of Arcadia;
and two sisters, Brenda Mon-
toya of Port Charlotte and
Belinda Guerra of Arcadia.
Visitation was 6 to 8 p.m. on
Thursday, June 16, with a
rosary recital at 7 p.m. at the
funeral home. A Mass of
Christian Burial was held on
Friday at St. Paul's Catholic
Church in Arcadia. Interment
followed in Joshua Cemetery.
11Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home
And Cremation Services
Arcadia


tn moving AMeloty













EDWARD KLEIN, JR.
Edward Klein, Jr., 74, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
June 19, 2011, in Wauchula.
Born Nov. 28, 1936, in
Hardee County, he has been a
lifelong resident. He was a
laborer in citrus groves.
He is survived by his wife,
Ovita M. Klein of Wauchula;
two sons, Dennis Klein and
wife Lori of Wauchula, and
David Klein and wife Gale of
Madison; two daughters,
Charlotte Vickery of Wau-
chula, and Ovita Kilgore and
husband Eddie of Zolfo
Springs; three brothers, Rob-
ert Klein and wife Joyce of
Lake Branch, and John Klein
and wife Jane, and Russell
Klein and wife Angela, all of
Zolfo Springs; one sister,
Martha Ladwig of Zolfo
Springs; 17 grandchildren;
and 10 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday,
June 21, 2011, from 6 to 8
p.m. at Robarts Garden Chap-
el. Services were Wednesday,
June 22, 2011, at 10 a.m. at
the Robarts Garden Chapel
with the Rev. Jeff Giles offi-
ciating. Interment followed at
New Hope Cemetery. Ex-
pressions of comfort may be
made at robartsfh.com.


VERA MAE ROSE
Vera Mae Rose, 84, of The
Villages and formerly of Wau-
chula, died on Thursday, June
16, 2011, in The Villages.
Born Feb. 24, 1927, in Nash-
ville, Ga., she lived in Hardee
County for 14 years before
moving to The Villages from
Plant City. She was of the
Pentecostal faith.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Aulton W. Rose
Sr.; and one daughter Mary R.
Bennett.
Survivors include son Aulton
W. Rose Jr. of Summerfield;
daughter Joyce Russell and hus-
band Howard of Fruitland Park;
son-in-law Donald Bennett,
Wauchula; three sisters Hazel T.
Pippin of Plant City, Louise
Robbins of Zephyrhills, and
Mattie Lou Stump and husband
Dan of Plant City; 11 grandchil-
dren; and 14 great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitation was Sunday from
5 to 7 p.m. at the funeral home.
Services were Monday at the
funeral home with Pastor
Wendell G. Smith of Faith
Temple. Church of God officiat-
ing. Interment followed at New
Hope Cemetery.
Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Homes
Wauchula-Chapel

EDITH ALBRITTON
WILLIAMS
Edith Albritton Williams, 96,
of Arcadia, died on Friday, June
17, 2011, at DeSoto Memorial
Hospital.
Born Jan 2, 1915, in Bowling
Green, to the late Rufus and
Florence Lastinger Albritton,
she owned and operated the
Double J Bar and Restaurant in
Bowling Green for more than
50 years. She was a member of
the Arcadia Church of God.
She was preceded in death by
husband Clifton O'Bryan in
1997; parents Rufus and Flor-
ence Albritton; and son Jimmy
O'Bryan.
Survivors include son; Mich-
ael Wayne O'Bryan and wife
Alene of Hosford; daughter
Bonnie Stewart and husband
Daniel of Arcadia; brother
George Albritton of Miami; sis-
ter Ellamae Williams and hus-
band Charles of Bowling
Green; 12 grandchildren; 21
great-grandchildren; and 22
great-great-grandchildren.
Visitation was from 6 to 8
p.m. Sunday at the funeral
home. Services were Monday,
June 20, at 2 p.m. at the funeral
home with the Rev. Steve
Griffin officiating. Interment
followed in Bowling Green
Cemetery.
Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home
Arcadia

Humor Is the great thing,
the saving thing. The
minute it crops up, all our
irritation and resentments
slip away, and a sunny
spirit takes their place.
-Mark Twain


JUANITA BELLE
STEWART GRAHAM
Juanita Belle Stewart Gra-
ham, 96, of Wauchula, died on
Saturday, June 18, 2011, in
Wauchula.
Born Dec. 17, 1914, in
Manatee County to Andrew
Jackson and Theodosia -Step-
hens Stewart, she came to Wau-
chula from Myakka City in
1937. She was a homemaker
and member of First Baptist'
Church of Wauchula..
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 74 years, Henry
Cecil Graham; son Roy David
Graham; four sisters; and nine
brothers.
She is survived by two sons,
Ray Myron -Graham and wife
Pat of Wauchula, and Michael
D. Graham and wife Beverly of
Brandon, Miss.; daughter Mary
Jo of Leesburg; daughter-in-law
Shelby of Haines City; eight
grandchildren; 16 great-grand-
children; and one great-great-
grandchild.
Visitation is today (Thurs-
day) from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home. Services are
Friday at 11 a.m. with the Rev.
Mike Graham and the Rev. Alan
Permenter officiating. Inter-
ment follows in Wauchula
Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


Cancer Benefit
Account Set Up
A account has been set up
at Wauchula State Bank for
Dixie Gibson, a Wauchula
resident who is battling bone
cancer is now at Good Shep-
herd Hospice on Hammock
Road in Sebring.
The 63-year-old is not eli-
gible for Medicare yet and
any help with her expenses
would be appreciated. The
bank account is in her name
and that of her sister Carolyn
Villa. For more information,
you may cal ,jer ,at 735-
0091'
S nq
Block Party For
1990s Classes
All Hardee High School
graduates of the 1990s are
invited to a block party on
Saturday, from 7 to 11 p.m.
in downtown Wauchula.
Hosted by the Class of
1996, there is a $5 cost to
help cover expenses. There
will be a live DJ. For more
information, contact Jeanne
Craft at Jeanne_fla@hot-
mail.com or check Facebook
page 90sBlockParty


MIRROR, MIRROR
Oftentimes we look in the mirror to make adjustments to our
appearance. First thing in the morning, before we leave the house,
even periodically throughout our day.
In essence, we use mirrors to inspect, correct and assure.
God's Word serves as our spiritual mirror.
"But .be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving
yourselves. For if anyone is a hearer of the word and not a doer, he
is like a man observing his natural face in a mirror; for he observes
himself, goes away, and immediately forgets what kind of man he
was. But he who looks into the perfect law of liberty and contin-
ues in it, and is not a forgetful hearer but a doer of the work, this
one will be blessed in what he does," James 1:22-25.
If we hear and forget, it's like seeing the hair sticking up in the
back of your head and doing nothing about it. The doer will be
blessed.
Use God's Word for inspection. When reading Philippians 2
about the mind of Christ, we are compelled to inspect ourselves.
When reading Hebrews 11, we are forced to inspect ourselves.
Would I do what they did? When reading ICorinthians 13 about
love, we ask: "Do I love others, or is it all a show?"
Use God's Word for correcting error. The purpose of inspec-
tion is to put things aright. The Bible tells what corrections to
make. Revelation tells us to repent and do what's right. Replace
evil thinking with pure thought. Colossians 3 tells us to put off the
man of sin and put on the new man in Christ Jesus. In Colossians
3:2, we read: "Set your mind on things above, not on things that are
on the earth."
Use God's Word to assure us of our salvation. We can gain-
confidence in our obedience. God's Word assures whether or not
we are doing all we can to continue to be doers as taught.
Are we using God's Word for inspection, correction and assur-
ance?
Get back to the basics and read, study and obey God's Word.
lan Rice is the full-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist. corn.
A great deal of talent is lost to the world for want of a lit-
tIe courage. Every day sends to their graves obscure
men whose timidity prevented them from making a first
effort.
-Sydney Smith





DEPENDABLE/TRUSTWORTHY


COMPASSIONATE CARE





.. ..



ROBARTS
FAMILYFUNERALHOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906


View Obituaries at robartsfh.com

529 WEST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873
863-773-9773
6:23c


Having A Choice,

Having Options...

Thank you Hardee County for allowing us to be

part of this community.

If you currently have your prearrangements
made, we would like for you to know that
we accept most other company's plans. If

you don't, we would be happy to meet with
you to discuss your options.

We feel planning yours or a loved one's
last wishes are of the utmost importance,
right down to the last detail.

Call our funeral home today.





Funeral Homes







404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com 6:


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Maim Street




Provided as a couresy of
Robats Family Funeral Home





















COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
:in the office of the county
court:
Weston Lee Johnson, 25,
Bowling Green, and Kimberly
Amanda Jade Cason, 20,
Bowling Green.
Roy Lee Browning, 51,
Zolfo Springs, and Tammy
Lynn Newman, 39, Myakka
City.
John Christopher Albritton,
28, Zolfo Springs, and Keyha
Shackelford Tamayo, 30, Zolfo
'Springs.
Kenneth Grant Bonds III, 20,
Wauchuli, and Hannah Chris-
tine Jacobs, 18, Fort Meade.
Chance Dillon Moye, 20,
Bowling Green, and Harley
Dee Franklin, 19, Zolfo
Springs.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Discover Bank vs. Martha A.
Weems, judgment.
Target National Bank vs.
Angela K. Moore, judgment.
Brant Funeral Services LLC
vs. Millie Johnson, judgment.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Dana D. Rich-
ardson, judgment.
City of Wauchula vs. Jessie
Hatchet, judgment.
Citibank South Dakota NA
vs. Evelyn Marquez, stipulated
settlement approved.
Credit One Bank NA vs.
Nancy McClelland, stipulated
settlement approved.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Pedro Diaz-Cornejo, retail
theft, not prosecuted.
Sabrina Kenny, trespass on
property other than a struc-
ture/conveyance, not prosecut-
ed.
James Richard Galvan, bat-
:tery, not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Ernest Reigh vs. the state
Department of Corrections,
petition to review inmate situa-
tion.
Trerika L. Anderson ar, the
.1tate Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Kenya Devynn
Jabbar Hooks, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Samantha Valdez and DOR
vs. Johnny Rodriguez, petition
for administrative child support
order.
Veronica R. Villa and DOR
vs. Eustaquio M. Castillo, inter-
state petition for child support.
Pedro Cleto and DOR vs.
Maria Cleto, petition for child
support.
Deborah N. Keen and DOR
vs. Horace Keen, petition for
child support.
Joel Gannon and Abby
Gannon, divorce.
Debra Knarr and DOR vs.
Leona Katherine Knarr; petition
' for child support.


Philima Ann Macias and
DOR vs. Sergio Gabriel
Benavidez, interstate petition
for child support.
Candice Dawn Johnson and
Mark Anthony Johnson, di-
vorce.
Glenda C. Best vs. Michele
C. Dasher, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Tia Nachelle Davidson and
DOR vs. Nattiel E. Camel, peti-
tion for child support.
Karen Pilkington vs. Robert
H. Lovette, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Kimberly Ann Rodriguez
and DOR vs. Phillip Lloyd
Hagood, order.
Savana Lindsey and DOR vs.
Robert Lee Mitchell, child sup-
port order.
Tonya Denice Carroll and
DOR vs. Matthew Duwayne
Carroll, child support order.
Stephanie Nicole Adams and
DOR vs. Travis Edward Adams,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Claudia Estela Mancillas and
DOR vs. Raymond Mark Me-
drano, order on child support
contempt.
Lorenza Salazar Almaguer
and DOR vs. George Alamia,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Shaun Tamara Jean Mitchell
and DOR vs. Marcus Allen
Carter, order.
Debra Knarr and DOR vs.
Daniel Roy Knarr, voluntary
dismissal.
Teresa Miranda and DOR vs.
Ruben R. Perez Jr., voluntary'
dismissal.
Candice Kimbrough vs.
Nathaniel Toothman, injunction
for protection.
Monica Jean Norris vs.
Kirby L. Clarke, order.
Stacy Leann Roberts and
DOR vs. John Marcus Roberts,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Christine Marie Pelham and
.DOR vs. Dustin Earl Moses,
,order on child support con-
tempt.
Cynthia L. Martinez and
DOR vs. Catarino Dario Borjas,
order on child support coi-
tempt.
Melissa Montanez and DOR
vs. Joshua A. Gause, order.
Guadalupe Sanchez and
DOR vvs. Juan Sanchez, order
on child support contempt.
Citibank South Dakota vs.
Fiorella Fiorani, judgment.
Victor M. Lopez and Jessica
Ramirez Lopez, divorce.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of


ICollrlhoseRepot]


June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A
I. II


the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Wade Joseph Aubry, grand
theft of a dwelling/property,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, $520 fine and
court costs, $200 public defend-
er fees, $100 cost of prosecu-
tion (DOP); burglary of a
dwelling and dealing in stolen
property, not prosecuted.
William A. Dibble, violation
of probation (original charge
grand theft), probation revoked,
two years Florida State Prison
with credit for time served
(CTS), $200 public defender
fee and $100 COP added to out-
standing fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Kenneth Lloyd Duck, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge sexual activity with
child over 12 and less than 18),
probation revoked, 13 years
Florida State Prison, $350 pub-
lic defender fee and $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Leroy Fender Jr., burglary of
a dwelling/structure or con-
veyance, and possession of bur-
glary tools with intent to use,
transferred to county misde-
meanor court.
Darrell Anton Hines, grand
theft, adjudication withheld,
probation two years, $520 fine
and court costs, $200 public
defender fees, $100 COP, 50
hours community service.
Solomon Lee Lacy, burglary
of dwelling and grand theft of a
dwelling or property, probation
two years, $520 fine and court
costs, $3350 public defender
fees, $100 COP, 100 hours
community service.
Evelyn Louise Madison,
uttering a forged check, not
prosecuted.
Eric Daronne McClain, bur-
glary of structure and grand
theft, not prosecuted.
Christopher Brent Saldivar,
sale of marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia and unlaw-
ful use of a two-way communi-
cation device, six months in jail
CTS, $520 fine and court costs,
$200 public defender fees and
$100 COP placed on lien.
Kristina Lynn Skipper, pos-
session of methamphetamine
and possession of drug para-
phernalia, completed drug pre-
trial intervention program, dis-
missed.
SKevin Leonard Collazo, vio-
lation of probation (original
charge selling cocaine within
1,000 feet of a church), proba-
tion revoked, three years
Florida State Prison CTS, $200
public defender fees and $100
COP added to outstanding fines
and fees and placed on lien.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
First National Bank of
Wauchula to Homes of Wau-
chula Inc. (two properties),
$96,000.
Robert F. III and Amy D.
Harper to Edward G. and Irma
Enid Parker, $350,000.
Clarence J. Jr. and Vanette S.
See to Wauchula State Bank
(two properties), $140,000.


KINDERGARTEN
E
Hailey Lee
Ashley Magana-
Navarrette
Baily Mendoza-Acuna
Caleb Ybarra
Sergio Castillo-Botello
Willian Davis
Luisa Dela Rosa
Johathan Doyle
Dominigo Flores
Kelsey Gomez
Crystal Kapan
Maxwell Kimball
Jasmine Rodriguez
Karime Rodriguez
Yadira Sanchez
Brody Waters
Antonia Banda
AngieltaCasso
Amy Farias
Andrew Kuen
Chano Lara
David McQuaig
Ethen Arreola
Jared Fowler
Bernabe Gallardo
Viviana Hernandez
Alicia Ornelas
Vanessa Padilla-
Lucatero
Lydia Valadez
Jassmine Maldonado-
Orapeza

E/S
Analise Benevidez
Allie Gutierrez
Jennifer Hernandez-
Garcia
Cristian Lopez
Jeremiah Montoya
Jesus Rodriguez
Jose Roque-Gutierrez
Chloe Wilkins
Diego Bautista-
Luviano
Nadiah Belmarez
Maria Cruz
Troy Martinez
Brittany Martinez-
Villanueva
Jayleen Reyna
Arely Tavares-
Escamilla
Yeily Cruz-Abrego
Desteny Escamilla
Vincent Gardner
Anissa Retana
Connor Murray
Layton Taylor
Alvin Sanchez
Jose Hernandez
Cyclaliz Avila-Perez

FIRST GRADE
A
Jennifer Chavez
Eric Felix
Xiomara Martinez-


Bamaca
Leonardo Lujan
Fernando Castillo
Cayden Johnson
Zachery Palacios
Rose Tavarez
Destiny Badillo
Litzy Abrego-Ambriz
Ivan Molina
Dezeray Rivera
Hezekiah Austin
Caden Dunlap
Rodrigo Gutierrez
Samantha Maldonado
Raquel Marinez
Julian Monlina-Lozano
Erick Ontiveros
Ke'varries White
Nayeli Navarro

A/B
Dymalin Moreno
Guillermo Deluna
Jason Gonzalez
Mia Vega
Alexis Fabian-Luis
Oliver Mendoza
Joshua Knarr
Armando Mendoza
Ja'Naiyah White
Leonardo Gaytan
Tristan Clanton
Isaias Munoz
Aliya Silva
Scarlett Covarrubias-
Valencia,
Natalia Garcia
Briana Hernandez
Adrian Hurtado-
Dominguez
John McBride, Jr.
Alexi Rodriguez
Jaden Rodriguez
Ariel Gutierrez
Tristan Benavides
Carlos Pyatt V

SECOND GRADE
A
Griselda Vasquez
Jackson Casso
Kaylee Gibson
Julian Kimball
Isaac Kuen
Adrian Sanchez
Kimberly Walton

A/B '
Monica Hernandez-
Ruiz
Adan Molina
Emily Ownby
Amy Reyna
Jacqueline Rodriguez-
Suarez
Mason Pearson
Savannah Sperry
Joaquin Tavares
Garrett Tawes
Jose Hernandez
Julio Mateo-Armenta


Chloe Boyette
Irvin Campos
Andrew Casey
Valerio Hernandez
Breshia Hrabal
Vincente Jaimes
Leah Martinez
Myron Refoure
Alexandra Solis
Ranferi Hernandez-
Palacios

THIRD GRADE
A
Maria Gutierrez-
Arreola
Ciara Smith
Jordan Sperry
Jason Garcia

A/B
Faith Thompson
Fernando Ramirez
Luis Gapi
Caroline Coronado
Hunter Boyette
Oren Crawford
Emilio Garcia
Emilio Martinez
Tyresha Mclvery
Grey Miller
Jose Molina
Gabriela Ontiveros
Ta'Cariya Pyatt
Maisy Rodriguez
Cinthia Santiago-
Villanueva
Alexia Trejo
Luis. Valadez
Abel Vargas
Brenda Castillo
Dulce Martinez
Dorian Pulido
Evan Webster
Maria Roque
Arturo Bautista
Esmeraldo Garcia-
Saucedo
Omar Hurtado-
Dominguez
Jessica Rodguez
Mereildo Velazquez
Lorena Perez-Alvarad
Marisela Hinojos
Julyss4 Benavides

SF.OUTIJ-.GRfDE
-*'' ni > A). t % '*"
Roman Almaguer
Cassidy Wilson

A/B
Martika Garcia
Serenity Aguirre- ,
Banda
Tiffany Velezquez
Aracely Sanchez
Damian Rodriguez
Katia Kujawski
Savannah Walton
Ingrid Mendoza


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, JUNE 27, 2011
5.30 P.M.

Request for Fine Removal 10-046-L, NA Perez-Mendoza 818 N Florida Ave


OLD CASES:
1. 09-154-L
2. 09-136-M
3. 10-072-M
4. 10-034-M

NEW CASES
1. 11-014-M
2. 11-019-M
3. 11-045-M
4. 11-030-M
5. 11-043-M
6. 11-051-L
7. 11-054-L
8. 11-056-L
9. 11-060-L
10. 11-062-L
11. 11-063-NA
12. 11-065-NA
13. 11-065-L


Brian & Betty Larimer
Victory Investments
Estella Villarreal & Heirs of Robert
Pamela Ellis


Juan Jose Gonzales
Nyet Vui & Chen Lip Wong
Jesus L & Anita Naranjo
Hayden & Mary L Cobb
David & Josephine Garza
Jose III & Robin M Macias
Misael & Francisca Ramirez
Tanya S Sexton-Webb
Cresenciano Perez
Etta & Steve Malone
Elizabeth Moreno-Gutierrez
Joseph E & Pamela Cobb
Joseph E & Pamela Cobb


508 S 7th Ave
217-221 E Main St
611 N 8th Ave
515 N 6th Ave


208 Lane St
415 Heard Bridge Rd
713 N 9th Ave
515 N 7th Ave
901 S 8th Ave
713 Oak Forest Dr
409 Tulane Ave
317 S 7th Ave
706 S 7th Ave
510 E Palmetto St
202 Lane St
401 Polk St
401 Polk St


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a ver-
batim record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is
made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of.any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. 6:23c


Adilene Maya
Aaliyha Sanchez
Heydi Ambriz
Megan Markel
Kasie Powell
Israel Lopez
Daisy Calvillo
Yelena Esquivel
Adelfo Hernandez
Robert Johnston
Ignacio Lopez
Dacie Luna-Moreno
Daniel Ortiz
Madae'zya Perry
Jessica Wilkerson
Alex Ramos
Maria Aguilar

FIFTH GRADE
A
Sayra Campos
Alexis McBride
Marcus Knight
Abigail Maya

A/B
David Reyna
Stephanie Figueroa
Enrigue Gomez
Victoria Gomez
Pedro Hernandez
Jesus Hernandez
Jasmine Mendoza
Danny Ramirez
Christian Wabaninkee
Diamond White
Veronica Castillo
Cody Ellis
Miriam Gonzalez
Zachary Hooks
Nakeisha Lemaine
Jenny Lopez
Precial Martinez
Dray Miller
Juan Molina
Julissa Molina-Lozano
Hannah Revell
Jose-Luis Santiago
Graciela Silvan-
Macedo
Austin Smith,
Aissatou Tavarez
1o Oscar Trevino
Raul Trevino
Ismael Rodriguez
Alexis Garza
Austin Jones
'.-Johnny Chavira
Victoria Ibarra
Morgan Lanier
Denise Garza
Destinee Jackson-Pace
Jasmine Wheeler
Jesus Chavez-Munoz
David Espinoza
Juan Carlos Gaitan
Diana Gutierrez
Naulica Henry
Basilia Lozano
Stephen McQuaig


1, FL3














6A The Herald-Advocate, June 23. 2011

HES Recognizes 'Leading Lions' & Other Top Pupils


COURTESY PHOTO
Hilltop Elementary School recently held its final "Mane Event" ceremony for the school
year. Kindergarteners who received the Leading Lions award were (random order)
A'viana Escobedo, Veronica Paz, Brianna Salgado, Nataly Clemente, Amaria Canales,
Daring Jiang, Ireland Jackson and Abisai Castaneda.


First graders who were honored for their good conduct were (random order) Mario
Marcial-Palacios, Breahna Roberson, Yuridia Rojas, Omar Gamboa, Amanda Gonzalez,
Marissa Perez, Brijido Armenta and Nancy Bruno.


Second-grade students receiving an award for excellent citizenship were (random
order) Ernesto Campos, Miguel Santiago, Alejandro Campos, Nia Brown, Kya Batiste,
Filiberto Gutierrez, Gabriel Perez-Cruz and Irma Hernandez.
I-I T i ---


Third graders honored as Leading Lions were (random order) Herika Lopez, Laura
Carrillo, Handorich Martinez, Isabella Delarosa, Jesus Aviles-Solis and Azucena
Santiago-Padilla.


Fourth-grade students recognized for their outstanding leadership were (random
order) Luis Rojas, Jarisa Lindsey, Justus Clanton, Rosalinda Cruz, Lauren Sanchez and
Anastaisa Nobles.


Fifth-grade students setting the example for others were (random order) Adrian
Martinez, Maria Garcia, Carlos Suarez, Jose Aleman, German Arzte and Mahala Pippin.


Mural contest winners whose "pride" drawings will be turned into murals for the hall- Heartland Pediatrics Award winners for classroom pride included kindergarteners
ways in the school were (from left) kindergartener Jesus Velasco, first-grader Aliyanna (from left) Joel Santana Alejandro Lopez, Alexandra Mondragon and Lizzie McCoy,
McCumber, second-grader Ashawnta Price, third-grader Celia Ventura Mendoza, who was also the top winner for her grade level.
fourth-grader Ricardo Garcia and fifth-grader Madison McCoy.


I W :-7
First graders with the most pride were (from left) Brijido Armenta, Presley Gillard,
Caylin Skipper and Alex Torres, the top winner in grade level.


_I ..



Second graders accepting the pride award were (from left) Alma Sanchez, Esmeralda
Morales, Vanessa Delorosa and Erica Sebestian-Paz, the top winner in grade level.










June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Representing third-grade pie were (from left) Leonel Duarte, Nestor Alvarenga and
Celia Mendoza, the top winner in grade level.


__________~ r .1 ..Sk a
Fourth graders taking home the pride award were (from left) Isaac Carmona, Marixa
Bermudez and Cadee Richardson, the top winner in grade level.


Fifth graders showing their pride were (from left) Guadalupe Molina, Diana Deloera,
top winner in grade level, and Caroline Castillo, top winner in Mrs. Bissell's class. Not
pictured was Kevin Taylor.


I I U a a mm "
A Lowry Zoo animal caretaker showed a variety of animals, explaining their habitat and
habits to students.


1 'I
The Lowry Zoo To You visit offered students a chance to
see animals of the rain forest.


The Pride Action Club at Hilltop spends after-school time creating murals and anti-bul-
lying, recycling and Earth Day programs. PAC members funded a "Lowry Zoo To You"
visit during The Mane Event. Club members include (front row, from left) Kyra Wilson,
Jasmine Gonzalez, Vicente Gomez, Paul Palacios Mares, Margarita Torres-Lazaro,
Lisbet Ancelmo and Makayla Otero; (second row) Betsabe Rosas, Kaleb Floyd, Lauren
Sanchez, Jennifer Lucatero, Ana Guevara, Will Mason and Jasmine Alfaro; (back row)
Yashira Gomez, Deborah Figueroa, Jailenne Figueroa, Jasmine Otero, Samantha
Sockolosky, sponsor Gretchen Mason, Yesenia Lemus, Judith Zamora and Adrian
Hernandez. Not pictured was Karla Lopez.


2 WES Kids Win Big


$$$ In Citrus Contest


Five elementary students in
the Heartland counties used
their artistic talents to win
prizes for themselves, their
teachers and their schools in the
Florida Department of Citrus
"Creative Juices Challenge."
Carrie Taylor, 10, from
'Wauchula- Elementary School,
won the grand prize and a $500
American Express gift card for
her poster, "Florida Oranges -
From Juice to Tree." Carrie
used a camera to take photos of
herself picking, slicing, juicing
and drinking orange juice.
"I designed the poster to
show how orange juice is
made," she said. "Oranges are a
natural and healthy food. They
are so good for people and they
taste delicious!"
FDOC launched the chal-


lenge in conjunction with "The
Adventures of Captain Citrus"
school marketing program to
educate students about the
health benefits of Florida citrus.
For the contest, students were
asked to submit a poster, paint-
ing, poem, story, song or video
featuring oranges and orange
juice.
"We were amazed at the cre-
ative ways that students
expressed their ideas about
Florida citrus," said Leigh
Killeen, FDOC director of mar-
keting. "It was impressive to
see how much they learned
about citrus and how they used
this information to help others
understand the beneficial role
of oranges and orange juice."
Four runners-up received a
$200 American Express gift


card: Briana Medrano, 12,
from Wauchula Elementary in
Wauchula; Gabriella Forgue, 9,
from Medulla Elementary in
Lakeland; Sage Lail, 9, from
South McKeel Academy in
Lakeland; and Joanna Fria, 11,
from Horizons Elementary in
Davenport.
The students' teachers will
also receive an American
Express gift card and FDOC
will plant an orange tree at their
schools this fall.
"The Adventures of Captain
Citrus" program provides edu-
cational curriculum for kinder-
garten through fifth-grade
teachers to incorporate informa-
tion about citrus into lesson
plans, along with take-home
parent guides and online activi-
ties for kids.


Friday, June 24th 7:00 pm
at Harpoon Harry's Punta Gorda, Florida





HARDEE SR. HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER PROGRAM PRESENTS:

SYouth Soccer

Day Camp
SInstructional Soccer Camp
for Ages 4-14
o 5.,. Boys and Girls K4-8th grade

June 27-30, 2011


at Hardee Senior High School

$30 Registration
Includes Camp T-Shirt, Gatorade & Water
(Parents must show proof of medical Insurance at registration)
Highlights:
Fundamentals Instruction for High School Staff
Current HHS Players as Instructors and Staff
Daily Fun Competitions
Camp T-Shirts Provided

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL COACH AUBRY (863) 773-3181
soc6:23p


ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.









8A The Herald-Advocate, June 23,2011
COLLEGE CONTRACTS


PHOTO BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
The Take Stock In Children program recently awarded full college scholarships to several local students. For their
part, youngsters in the program sign contracts agreeing to maintain satisfactory grades, attendance and behavior
and to remain drug and crime free. Additionally, parents are asked to sign the contract and promise to support their
child's Involvement In the program. After successfully completing high school, the students will then be given four-
year scholarships to the Florida colleges of their choice. Pictured during the recent School Board presentation are
(from front left) Irene Castanon, program coordinator, with Junior high students Alexis Chavez, Jackeline DeLaCruz,
Eric Escalante and Angelica Gonzalez and senior high students Brandon Vargas and Daniel Villagran; (back row) pro-
gram director Don Appelquist, School Board Chairman Teresa Crawford and Schools Superintendent David
Durastanti. Not pictured is scholarship student Arissa Camel. The South Florida Community College Foundation
serves as the lead agency for Take Stock In Children. To date, 220 local students have graduated from TSIC.


Facebook Photos

Result In Arrest


Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission in-
vestigators arrested a Tampa
man June 17 after receiving a
complaint about photos that had
been posted on Facebook.
The complaint said that a
deer and alligator had been
freshly killed and that the sus-
pected hunter, Kyle Edwards,
21, was also in the photos.
The animals allegedly were
killed near Bronson in Levy
County on private property
north of Otter Creek.
FWC Investigator James
Smith interviewed Edwards,
who stated that on June 10, he
and a friend went to the proper-
ty in Otter Creek to camp and
shoot a new AK-47 he had
recently purchased at a Tampa
gun show.
The two men saw an alligator
on the dirt road leading to the
camp, and Edwards shot and
killed it.
He explained they cleaned it,
ate some of the meat and later


gave the rest of the alligator
meat to friends. The carcass
was disposed of on a dump pile
near the camp.
The next day, Edwards said,
he shot and killed the deer.
After taking a photograph of the
animal, they repeated the
process by cleaning the deer,
eating some of the meat and
giving the rest to friends. That
carcass also ended up in the
dump pile.
Edwards admitted to posting
the photographs on his Face-
book page and later removing
the photos. He gave Smith a
written statement about the
incidents.
FWC investigators were able
to locate and document the two
animal carcasses as evidence in
the case.
Edwards was issued a citation
for taking deer during the
closed season and for the illegal
taking of an American alligator,
both second-degree misde-
meanors.


New Education Commissioner Named


Following a day of interviews
with five finalists, Florida's
State Board of Education unai-
imously voted Tuesday to select
Gerard Robinson as Florida's
next education commissioner.
Currently serving as the
Commonwealth of Virginia's
secretary of education, where
he advises the governor in the
development and implementa-
tion of education policy,
Robinson joined a pool of 26
other candidates vying for the
Sunshine State's top education
position.
"As anticipated, Florida was
able to attract a very qualified,
very impressive group of final-
ists for this extremely important
position," said State Board of
Education Chair Kathleen
Shanahan. "Mr. Robinson was
able to showcase his passion for
education and his desire to lift
the achievement of all students


in a very effective way, and I'm
extraordinarily pleased in the
board's decision to make him
our next commissioner of edu-
cation."
Robinson will replace Edu-
cation Commissioner Eric J.
Smith, who resigned effective
June 10.
Smith was hired by the State
Board of Education in 2007,
and has captured national praise
for the progress achieved in
Florida schools, which recently
were ranked No. 5 in the nation
in an annual report published in
"Education Week."
Smith said only that it was
time for Florida's "newly elect-
ed governor to have input
through the State Board of
Education on the type of leader
to pursue his goals for educa-
tion." He declined any further
comment.
A written response from Gov.


Rick Scott was brief, "On
behalf of the state of Florida, I
thank him for his years of dedi-
cated service."
At Smith's resignation, Board
of Education Chair Shanahan
called his exit "a loss for
Florida's kids," and said Scott
had not forced Smith out but
had not embraced him either.
New commissioner Robinson
is the former president of the
Black Alliance for Education
Options and has also served as
the program director and princi-
pal investigator. He taught fifth
grade in Los Angeles, Calif.,
and was a graduate instructor at
the University of Virginia and
Piedmont Virginia Community
College.
He is a graduate of Howard
University and earned his mas-
ter's degree from Harvard
University.
"Mr. Robinson's application


presented a very strong candi-
date who has the experience
and qualifications to keep
Florida's ongoing. education
improvements moving full
steam ahead," said State Board
of Education Vice Chair
Roberto Martinez.
"His thoughtful responses to
the board during his interview
clearly defined a commissioner
of education that has the energy,
enthusiasm and talent to contin-
ue Florida's educational suc-
cesses, and improve the aca-
demic and life outcomes of our
young people," he added.
The commissioner of educa-
tion serves as Florida's chief
educational officer and is
responsible' for providing full
assistance to the State Board of
Education and developing
actions and policies that cham-
pion the mission and goals of
Florida's education system.


For the week ended June 15, 2011
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 7,674 head,
compared to 6,929 last week, and 7,634 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were unevenly
steady to 2.00 lower; feeder steers and heifers were unevenly
steady to 3.00 lower.


Feeder Steers:


Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 152.50-190.00
300-400 lbs 136.00-170.00
400-500 lbs 118.00-150.00
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 122.50-155.00
300-400 lbs 112.00-137.50
400-500 lbs 106.00-125.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent
63.00-71.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs
86.00-96.00
A people who mean to be their own governors, must arm
themselves with the power knowledge gives.


Storewide Summer Sale


Thursday, June 23

thru

Saturday, June 25




40 % 60% OFF
(Excluding Brighton and Kameleon Jewelry)


Thursday ONLY!
10:00am 12:00pm

Save an additional 10 o



d $4
^i 4a ,


(VI


'lK^s cA .ATree


110 N. 6' Ave. Waucula


* 773-9684


Reg. Hours: Mon. Fri. 9:30 am 5:30 pm Sat. 9:30 am 1:30 pm


.1m .
' *


.M4E


. ;:r-.^ ,-,y
a .. ... *,-
P *. *- ..-
^ ,;-. .,.-.:
.E., : ?"_. ,,:--.: ..


Annual



Summer


Clearance Sale


* June 23rd


- 25th


storewide sale 40% OFF


Exclusing Hairbows


ets Thursday only Shoes

10 am till Noon 50% OFF


Final clearance Rack 70% OFF

All Sales Final





a chIldren's boutique

106 N. 6th w Wau LA
(863) 767-0017
W www.shopjollyboans.com
Mon-Fri 9:30-5:30 aaturdau 9:30-1:30


Thurs. thru Sat.


Cl\o


ros


ci\













>PAGE ONE


Wauchula Considers Changing Insurance Agents


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The new Wauchula City
Commission met for two full
evenings last week to catch up
on a long list of items which
had accumulated since a full
commission last met in January.
The new commission select-
ed Rick Knight as its mayor/-
chairman and Kenny Baker as
mayor protem/vice chairman.
Other rnembers of the commis-
sion are Patty Detwiler, Russell
Smith, Keith Nadaskay, Gary
Smith and John Freeman.
Last Monday evening the
commission was presented with
a 16-item agenda. On Tuesday
evening, it sat first as the
Community Redevelopment
Agency Board with another
dozen items to consider. Then it
reconvened as the City Com-
mission again and tackled items
coming out of the CRA portion
of the meeting.
Faced with long lists of past-
due issues, the commission
nevertheless spent nearly an
hour in each of its meetings dis-
cussing a non-agenda item, city
health insurance.
Knight said that he was rais-
ing the question of changing
health insurance agents be-
cause the current city contract
with Public Risk Management
terminates Oct. 1 and there
would have to be adequate
notice to PRM of the possible
intent to change the insurance
or agent.
Knight said he had invited
Joe Albritton and Derren Bryafi
ofAlbritton Insurace Agency to
come on Tuesday evening and
explain the agent services the
company provides for the
Hardee County School Board.
Knight noted that both Hardee
and DeSoto counties are con-
sidering changing to Albritton
Insurance as its agent.
Local State Farm agent David
Singletary said PRM had im-
peccable representation and
rates with property and casualty
insurance since 1988 and health
insurance since 2004. PRM is a
conglomerate of 40 government
bodies (municipalities and
counties) which pool monies,
spreading the shared risk and
resulting in lower premiums for
all..
City Finance Director James
Braddock reported on Tuesday
that PRM required a 60-day
notice of intent to withdraw
from the pool by the next fiscal
year Oct. That means a notice
would have to be sent by Aug.
1.
Albritton explained his agent
services. His company would
be paid the same percentage or
fee all agents are paid. PRM


presently uses James Gallagher
and, if the commission decided
to change, would pay Albritton
the same amount. Any change-
over would need at least 90
days to implement. That meant
a decision to change agents
would have to be made before
July 1. The commission has a
workshop scheduled for July 5
and regular meeting set for July
11.
Albritton would first notify
PRM and about seven other
insurance carriers that utilize
service providers in Hardee
County and surrounding areas.
He would seek requests for pro-
posals (RFPs) from all eight,
evaluate them for the best
health insurance package and
make a recommendation to the
commission. He would also
help employees with insurance
claim problems work them out,
providing a local source to
which they could go for face-to-
face contact with an insurance
agent.
Former Wauchula commis-
sioner Jerry Conerly cautioned
the new commission that should
anything go wrong in the
changeover, it might cause a
lapse in coverage Oct. 1. He
recommended delaying any
changeover to the next fiscal
year to have time to work out
details.
The commission decided to
follow that advice and wait
until next spring to have a big-
ger window of opportunity to
consider insurance changes.

In other action of Monday
evening, the commission:
-decided to change bulk
electric suppliers to Florida
Power & Light Co., as recom-
mended by consultant Bill
Herrington, who will continue
to work for the city at a cost not
to exceed $15,000. Herrington
and Braddock will try to negoti-
ating a three- to five-year con-
tract with FP&L to replace that
of Tampa Electric Co. which
has raised its raises over 35 per-
cent. The new contract is ex-
pected to lower bulk power
costs $50,000 to $60,000 a
month. Most of that will be
passed on to Wauchula utility
users.
-approved final reading of
an ordinance updating the city's
Comprehensive Land Use Plan
to include eco-friendly or
"green" environments in any
new yard/subdivision/business
properties.
-approved first reading of
ordinances for rezones for two
properties. One changes .57
acres called the Cannon proper-
ty on South 10th Avenue from
Low Density Residential to


Professional neighborhood/-
commercial so it can be used
for offices.
The other is four acres east of
the present location of TNT
Childcare on South Florida
Avenue to allow its expansion
along High Street.
-approved a resolution
renewing the Department of
Corrections work squad con-
tracts.
-approved three resolutions
on contracts with the state and
federal airport authorities for
contracts for work on the
Wauchula Airport's master
stormwater pond projects.
-approved a resolution in
support of U.S. Rep. Vern
Buchanan's federal H.R. bill
1065, the Pill Mill Crackdown
Act of 2011. Florida is estimat-
ed to have 1,300 pill mills, the
most in the U .S., with more
than a half dozen people dying
daily from prescription drug
overdoses.
-heard a request from resi-
dent Dave Brown, who asked to
lease or purchase the historic
train depot as a location to
expand his home business,
which is producing labelers for
clothing for nursing home
patients, laundries, etc. He
presently has five people in the
home business and expects to
double or triple his business.
Commissioners said the de-
pot is a historic property and
has to be maintained for non-
profit organizations or revert
back to the owner. It is to be
used for historic, public proj-
ects.
-appointed commissioners
Russell Smith and Baker to join
Knight on the auditors' commit-
tee.
-approved the purchase of
two used Trailblazers for the
Wauchula Police Department at
a savings of about $25,000 and
pay them off on a 60-month
contract.
-were advised of the 12
active applicants for the vacant
city manager position and
decided to wait two more weeks
for any other applicants and
shortlist them at the July 5
workshop.
-approved past city min-
utes, between October 2010 and
the February 2011 workshop.
They were to be approved at the
Feb. 14 meeting, which did not
have a quorum. This is the first
commission meeting since that
time. The other commissioners
depended on Russell Smith and
Freeman to review the minutes
as they had been present during
those meetings. They were
approved on a 6-1 vote, with
Knight declining as he had not
been in office then and did not


know what occurred then.
-heard an update from attor-
ney Cliff Ables on pending liti-
gation on the D'Agostino prop-
erty situation. It is set for an
Aug. 1 hearing charging the city
with contempt for failure to
meet a court order to make a
road to the D'Agostino proper-
ty north and east of Rust
Avenue. The city cannot get a
permit from Southwest Florida
Water Management District to
construct a drive or road to the
property because of its wet-
lands.
The commission authorized
Ables to try to negotiate a set-
tlement with D'Agostino. It
would cost the city an estimated
$60,000 to buy wetlands to mit-
igate for those removed, and
would about $80,000 to build
the short road or street to the
property. It was a street only on
the plat D'Agostino received,
but there had never been an
actual street there.
--approved proceeding with a
contract for $50,000 for the pur-
chase of property along Azalea
Hill off the south side of East
Bay Street in order to build a
sidewalk so children walking
to school don't have to walk in
the street.
On Tuesday night, the com-
mission also:
-approved Donna Steffens
and Scott Lang to the vacancies
on the Planning & Zoning
board.
-decided to use $20,000 of
CRA monies for the East Bay
Street sidewalk and $5,000
from the city public works
*budget. That same ratio may be
used for the final $25,000 pay-
ment due by Nov. 1.
-approved commercial
grants for Health Centers
United Inc. on West Palmetto
Street, and the Friends of the
Library sign at the library in
Courthouse Annex I, and a res-
idential grant for a family on
North First Avenue. A commer-
cial grant for Cracker Trail
Transmissions was denied in
disagreement over a proposed
rooftop sign slanted to be seen
by U.S. 17 northbound traffic.
A commercial grant was ex-
tended for work on West Main
Street delayed by a property
issue.
-approved purchase of light
pole banners to be hung along
U.S. 17 northbound and south-
bound, similar to the ones along
Main Street.
-appointed Russell Smith to
work with CRA director Jessica
Newman and interim city man-
ager Olivia Townsend on an
agreement on Newman's job
duties with CRA and Main
Street Wauchula.


Miss Birdie is a female Pointer.
She has a white and brown ticked short coat and a long
tafl. She is looking for a job. She enjoys, well of course,
bird hunting! Interested seekers of a water-loving dog can
come see her resume at Hardee County Animal Control.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
Ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


Deer Harvest In Big


Cypress Protected
In an effort to allow the deer deer, reflect a dramatic decline
population to rebound if condi- in the deer population this past
tions improve, the Florida Fish decade.
& Wildlife Conservation Three deer, on average, were
Commission has approved new counted in surveys conducted in
deer harvest rules in two areas Zone 4 this year, the southern-
of the Big Cypress Wildlife most and wettest zone. Last
Management Area in South year, an average of seven deer
Florida. was observed. The previous
The rules will affect the year, 18 deer were observed
upcoming 2011-12 hunting sea- there.
son. Surveys were not conducted
The new rules will affect in 2008 due to lack of funds. In
zones 3 and 4 of the Stairsteps 2007, 123 deer were counted.
Unit (south and west of Loop The highest count since the sur-
Road). No deer may be harvest- veys began in 1995 was in
ed from Zone 4. 2002, with 523 deer.
Deer hunting will be allowed A joint task force of FWC
in Zone 3, but with a reduced and NPS scientists found the
bag limit from two to one deer number and duration of high-
per season, and all deer harvest- water, events have increased
ed from Zone 3 must have a significantly since 1995.
forked antler. Biologists believe that survival
The order will not affect of fawns and, to a lesser extent,
zones 1 and 2, where deer hunt- adult females, has been
ing will be allowed to continue decreased by high-water events,
under current regulations. habitat changes and predation.
Data collected from annual If the trends in these condi-
surveys, when FWC and tions reverse, deer populations
National Park Service biolo- would likely rebound.
gists fly over the area to count


Theodore Roosevelt was the first president to ride in an
automobile. He toured Hartford, Conn. in a Columbia
Electric Victoria Phaeton on August 22, 1902.


SUPER MATT

Coin Laundry


Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL /ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY

6AM-6PM 50% OFF


NORMAL/NORMALENTE


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL


$250 DOUBLE/DOBLE $125
$s00 MAX/MAXI $200
$600 LARGE/GRANDE $300

$700 SUPER/GRANDE $350
u/


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, June 23,201


^HEARTLAND PHARMACY



DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our V into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.
-- . . . . . . . . .. I


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


Pet Of The Week









2B The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011




-Hardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Paul Hayman

Amanda Smith Becomes

Bride Of Paul Hayman


Amanda Marie Smith ,of
Voorhees, N.J., and Paul
Cheyne Hayman of Wauchula
were united in marriage on the
evening of Saturday, April 23,
2011.
The bride is the daughter of
the late Edith Marie Smith from
New Jersey and of Ken and
Marianne Smith of Jupiter. The
groom is the son of Michelle
and Lee Yates of Lake Placid
and Dr. Slade and Celia
Hayman of Wauchula.
The couple exchanged wed-
ding vows at Omni Champions
Gate in Orlando, with Paul
Willis of Gainesville officiat-
ing, in a garden ceremony.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father. Maid of
honor was Linzi Trautwein of
Gainesville, the bride's sister.
Tending to the groom was best
man Chris Milliken of Orlando.


Noey DeSantiago
Jr. Celebrates His
First Birthday
Noey Daniel DeSantiago, the
son of Noey and Nancy De-
Santiago of Wauchula, celebrat-
ed his very first birthday on
June 8.
A party was held June 11 in
the home of his parents, with
many family members and
friends attending.
Guests were served tradition-
al Mexican foods.


Noey


After the exchange of vows, a
wedding reception was held at
ChampionsGate.
Following a honeymoon trip
to Alaska, the couple are at
home in Lakeland.
The bride is a graduate of the
University of Florida with a
bachelor's degree in advertis-
ing. She earned a master's
degree in ad design from
Florida International Universi-
ty.
She is currently employed as
an art director for Higgenboth-
am Auctioneers in Lakeland.
The groom is a graduate of
the University of Florida with a
bachelor's degree .in political
-science and a master's degree in
-agri-business. ..
He is a commercial loan offi-
cer with Farm Credit of Florida
in Wauchula.


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
June 13-17. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.
ISSUED
Otha Jones, South Hickory
Street, doors, windows, dry-
wall, etc., $7,200.
Manuel Formoso, Chester
Avenue, electrical work,
$1,500.
Guillermina Apolinar, North
Florida Avenue, demolition,
$1,000.
Adrian Chapman, Heard
Bridge Road, install pool,
$2,873.
James Cobb, U.S. 17 South,
roofing, $5,950.
Van Crawford, Altman Road,
new construction, $10,000.
Ricky Beigh, Steve Roberts
Special, electrical, $1,800.
Edward Sharkey, Commerce
Court, building, $40,000.
Sam Albritton, East Bay
Street, electrical, $1,100.
Douglas Battey, Stenstrom
Road, mechanical, $4,500.
Frederick Miller, South 11th
Avenue,,mechanical, $5,145.
Brent Driskell, Griffin Road,
residential barn, $11,880.
BUILDING BLOCKS
There is no such thing as a
"legal" jack-of-all-trades. An
"occupational license" is not a
regulatory license or certificate
of competency, but a tax for the
privilege of engaging in or
managing a business, profes-
sion or occupation. Home im-
provement contractors must be
certified by the state as a gener-
al, building or residential con-
tractor. If unsure,'call the build-
ing department at 773-3236.

The first Olympic race at
the ancient games was
won by Corubus, a chef.


COURTESY PHOTO
Cline Albritton and Vickie McClellan were joined in mar-
riage on June 16, 1961, at Zolfo Springs Baptist Church.
They celebrated 50 years together with family and friends
at a thanksgiving service on Saturday, June 18, at Oak
Grove Baptist Church. Later, the couple will celebrate
with a trip to Alaska with family and friends. The
Albrittons are the parents of Sharon Aigotti and Robby
Albritton, both of Zolfo Springs. Cline Albritton is retired
from CF Industries and Vickie Albritton is retired from the
Hardee County School Board. They reside in both
Hardee and Highlands counties.












Country Band I..

I. Raffle ,

Big Adoption Driye : cP.
Big Adoption Driy61


I

60 minutes. 600 calories burned. One Hot dance floor.
FREE! Monday and Saturdays
(through July 31st)
Low Impact/am/pm and weekend classes
Schedule and location www.jazzercise.com
Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland


_* ,, ^,.-, t.' "*
SERVINGG .

,KAKA .


&LUN


Same


Great Food'


REMEMBER

FRIDAY NIGHTS
for
GREAT STEAK SEAFOQD
CHICKEN & PRIME RIB
t -30p9:0 p
Jrd-iday Nigits -Rgwiair Menu)


ft rUn


Heartland

is pleased to announce


r I;nv*!


Gold


F


is now available!


Personalize just

JEWELRY BOXES


BRACELETS *


about anything you can imagine-


* RINGS


WATCHES


* GLASS *


WINE BOTTLES


* GOLD FOIL BIBLES OR ALBUMS


clc I]! .,,,~31I)M ~~ w
SUME HUR

MO. RI 7-- p -CLSD AT SN


AND MUCH MORE!


-A,


I


i-- :


'-4









June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


NEW ENOINER
r~-N


COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchulan Keith Nadaskay, shown above with his wife
Christina, recently learned that he has received state cer-
tWicatfon and professional licensure in engineering, a
lengthy process governed by the Florida Board of
Professional Engineers. In order to qualify, the Hardee
High graduate went on to obtain his bachelor's in chem-
ical engineering from Florida State University. After that,
there are several other steps, beginning with passing-the
fundamentals of engineering exam, which tests the fun-
damental principles of engineering academics. Next up
is working at least four years under the guidance of a
professional engineer. That person and three other pro-
fessional engineers must provide letters of recommen-
dation. The final step is an eight-hour comprehensive
exam that tests the breadth and depth of one's disci-
pline-specific knowledge. The exam is only offered twice
annually. Recently elected as a Wauchula commissioner,
Nadaskay took the exam on April 8 and received his pass-
ing results on May 27. He has worked for Mosaic Ferti-
lizer since January 2006.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The Audit Committee of the City of Wauchula will
hold a Meeting on Thursday, June 30, 2011 at 3:00pm to
discuss 2009/2010 audit.
The meetings will be held at the Administrative
Building located at 126 South 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL
33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as
amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any
interested person decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Commission with respect to any matter considered
at the proceedings, he'will need a record of the proceeding
and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal
is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida
does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's dis-
ability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access
to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or
activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section
286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at
(863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Olivia Minshew
Acting City Manager
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 6:23c


SUNDAY


JUNE 26


11:00 a.m.



WORSHIP THE

LORD WITH A

JOYFUL SOUND!

LED BY:
J DUCK SMITH


NURSERY PROVIDED


Letter To Editor
Mosaic's Streamsong Project
Should Not Get Hardee Funds


DIcar Ed;ili o
(ne cLan only be astounded
by the arrogance of Mosaic and
the way it considers its business
in Hardee County.
Background: In August of
2008 at the time the Hardee
County Commission issued a
Development Order for the
South Fort Meade Mine
Extension an additional sepa-
rate "development agreement"
was also approved designed
to provide economic mitigation
for the adverse impacts that the
mine would have on Hardee
County..
The two principals represent-
ing Mosaic and Hardee County
respectively, were Parker Keen
and Bill Lambert. The agree-
ment was for the mining com-
pany to pay about $4 million
per year for 10 years to Hardee
County's Economic Develop-
ment Authority, now headed by
Lambert.
The mitigation funds were


61(


Compi


Compw
Ul


ment to be used to develop an
alternative local economy in
anticipation of the day when the
phosphate resources of Hardee
County would be exhausted and
the be left with 125,000 acres of
post-mined land, 30,000 acres
of it in clay slimes, degraded
ground water and an economy
wit no engine.
Less than a year after the
mining of the South Fort Meade
Extension is underway Parker
Keen, now a hired consultant, is
at Lambert's door asking for the
money back to fund
Mosaic's high-risk golf fantasy
resort in the middle of the Bone
Valley mining district which
will supposedly embrace every-
thing from wellness retreats to
skeet-shooting.
It is not surprising that no
actual figures were revealed by
either side, Mr. Lambert was
quoted referring to it as a "sig-
nificant" amount.
There's is no telling exactly


* *

V!


how much Mosaic will spend to
build a fantasy golf resort. In
the long run it will probably
prove to be cheaper for the
company to hire two men to
design a golf course on unre-
claimed land than it would cost
to reclaim the land to state stan-
dards (which is not much any-
way.) They can contour the golf
course in such a way as to dis-
guise their perennial lack of fill
material, and persuade Polk and
Hardee Counties to post bonds
and make development grants. I
am sure there are numerous hid-
den cost advantages and loop-
holes that only Mosaic insiders


'4


can know about.
Anyway we can all watch in
anticipation of what the next
round of financial negotiations
with Mosaic will bring our
beleaguered county. Given the
unspoken policy of dishing out
whatever Mosaic asks of them.
I do not foresee a happy out-
come.
Dennis Mader,
Executive Director 3PR
Lily
Editor's Note: 3PR is one of
three environmental groups
suing Mosaic over the South
Fort Meade Mine extension.


Priscella
Owner/Stylist
Allen Johnson
Barber/Stylist


(863) 285-6300
2 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, Ft;
Fort eade .


4lX' SANC eA MY

773-6367

)A N. 6th Ave. Hwy 17 Wauchula |
(Across From Nicholas' family Restaurant)




/ ft ve Ve anCeTa

gummor Dance Clinic
Dtudonts will be instructed on several difforont JUMPg s TURN9
that will help them advance in their dance class.
iis Clinic is also the opportunity to audition for the 2011-2012 B.D.A.
potitive Dance Team for anyone who is interested.
o Previous Dance Experionce Is Required* :'
clinic is open to anyone from the ages of 5-18.
anu A Ages 5-7 *Juno 27"-30* 10am-12pm
a *B Agoe 8-12 *Juno 27"h-30"h lpm'4pm [
jang Ages 13-18 *July 5+ 9am-12pm onAL n" C, 1


f tudhioHrs -2 m D 773367 781-0452t stu o
studio Hours: Mon-Wod 4pm-7mrn 773-6367 e 781-0452 soc6 23c
.. . . .. . .. .. . . . . . S S


~W~~i~m:~~B~*V

I Iml


Alane Academy

K-5 Private School

Community Member Contributed

7 Scholarships $1,000 Each
Enroll Now & Apply Toward Tuition


All Alane Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education
Academy Teachers Master of Arts in Reading
are Certified National Board Certification in Literacy
Rigorous Based on National Standards
Academic Individualized & Small Group Instruction
Curriculum Enrichment and Critical Thinking Projects for
Students Needing a Challenge
Intervention for Struggling Students
Character 7 Habits of Happy Kids, based on Dr. Steven
Education Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
Learning Intimate, Hands-on, & Engaging
Environment Extensive Classroom Libraries & Manipulatives
Art & Music Integrated into the Daily Curriculum
Weekly Projects
Technology Computers in Every Classroom K-5



We'd love to show you around and answer any questions!
Call for Flexible Appointments 863-773-3192 or 863-559-3433
Stop By and Visit: 316 Terrell Road, Wauchula
soc6:23p


Pricela'sFablous Tuc


I


1.
OAK GROE^I

BAPTIST CHURCH^^^^^


~~-----











4B The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011
<


KINDERGARTEN
Aiden Thomas
Alex Mendieta
Alex Trevino
Alondra Luna
Alyssa Contreras
Anabella Gomez
Annaka Brace
Apolinar Almaguer
Blake Rucker
Brendan Holton
Briana Tambunga
Cassie Higginbotham
Christina LeConte
Danialee Gutierrez
David Hernandez
Desmas Davila
Devan Medrano
Deysi Rojas
Emma Eures
Eryn Hagwood
Estefany Ramirez
Ethan Tracy
Genesis Chavez
Gweneth Stevens
Hannah Atchley
Haylee Elisondo
Holly Rowe
Jaidyn Newman
Jayden Cabrera
Joana Hernandez
Joaquin Rodriquez
Jose Ibanez
Josh Vasquez
Kaelea Bryant
Kami Kelley
Karlie Alderman
Kiara Detrinidad
Leanna Bryant
Lillian Edwards
Luis Reyes-Ortiz
Mackenzie Bacon
Martin McClenithan
Morgan Dickey
Myra Benitez
Nathan DeLaRosa
Nathaniel Deemer
Robert Mondragon
Samantha Shackelford
Samara Arreola
Saul Ruiz
Serenity Walters
Sonya Silos
Trinity Vansickle
'Vanessa Peraza
Victor Fabila
Zander Yeomans
FIRST GRADE
Abby Neel
Alison Schultz
Allazae McLeod
Amey Moralez


Andon Whaley
Annalise Terrell
Arika Perez
Ariyana Leger
Azavie Calhoun
Brianna Downey
Brianna O'Bryan
Carter Birge
Cassandra Jaimes
Cecilia Alvarez
Christopher Sosa
Codee Walker
Cristina Saldana
Crystal Wingate
Darius Yang
David Orta
Dora Santoyo
Eliana Eriquez
Emanuel Rodriguez
Ethan Beyer
Eve Quintana
Gabby Garcia
Guillermo Ramos
Haven Rimes
Hunter Atchley
Iliana Ruiz
Isaac Badillo
Jacarie Jones
Jose Fernandez
Jose Torres
Juan Molina
Kaden Bryan
Karina Valadez
Kaydance Staton
Kaylie Grice
Khalid Lymon
Khloe Smith
Lahna Christian
Liliana Plata
Lillie Gaydon
Lizet Vargas
Luis Paulino
Marissa DeLoera
Maritza Mondragon
Matt Webb
Miguel Vasquez
Mollie O'Bryan
Petra Gaitan
Reese Stone
Ricardo Sanchez
Rojelio Hipolito
Sonia Macedo
Stephanie Perez
Tomas Hernandez
Valerie Martinez
Victor Torres
Yayoua Vang
Yesaily Martinez .-
Zaria DYIvilp

SECOND GRADE
Abel Servin
Acheline Delhomme


Alessa Valerio
Alex Jaimes
Amy Gutierrez
Breana Reynolds
Brianna Rivers
Caleb Arana
Caleb Macias
Chloe Martinez
Chloe Selph
Christopher Castaldi
Daisy Chavez
Daniella Marrero
David Edwards
Desirae Cabrera
Elvia Garcia
Esteban Fernandez
Hannah Ward
Heidi Smith
Hunter Davis
Hunter Rowe
Isabel Calvillo
Jamal Holley
Jamie Walker
Joseph Peters
Landon Newman
Leigha Alderman
Mackenzie Wallace
Macy Kingdon
Malaki Kangala
Matthew Peters
Mayte Tellez
Melisa Sigin
Michael Barber
Oscar DeSantiago
Reyna Rivera
Richard Torres
Robert Mushrush
Roman Rivas
Seth Durrance
Seth Gough
Trey Canary
Tulsi Patel
Veronica Rivera
Zachary Estrada
Zachery Perez
THIRD GRADE
Arana, Misael
Arvizu, Saul
Austin Santoyo
Briana Farias
Brianna Valadez
Bryce Rucker
Cinnamon Williams
Cristina Lopez-Rojas
Cruz Avalos
Diana Paulino-Pena
Elijah Powell
Emmanuel Pfiviose'--
Estrada, Isaac
E'vontae Rogers
Fabian Lopez
Hallie Atchley


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate




REPUBLICANIi
REPUBLICANS BELIEVE
the needs of the communi-
ties and law-abiding
citizens must take
priority over those
POTLIGHT of criminals.
Pol. adv. paid for and approved by HC Rep. Party 6:23c


Hannah Ford
Hugh Pate
Hunter Presley
Jesus Lopez
Jonathan Orta
Laura Perez-Ordehi
LeeAnna Reas
Maria Deloera
Promise Nichols
Rachel Garland
Rosa Guerrero
Sandra Gomez
Savannah Valletutti
Victor Aleman
Weston Roberts
FOURTH GRADE
Anahi Cano
Betsy Mejia-Flores
Devan Rimes
Erica Martinez
Fatima Ramirez
Guadalupe Diaz
Haley Canary
Hannah Bandy
Hannah Glisson
J.C. Kulig
J.D. Fannin
Jansen Walker
Jean St. Louis
Kareli Plata
Laura Kate Reynolds
Lindsey Boyette
Marisa Molina-
Santibanez
Marta Ramirez
Mary Young
Patricia DeLoera
Ramiro Guerrero-Leon
Randy McLeod
Tony Webb
Viviana Flores
Yenny Saldana
Zackary Durastanti
FIFTH GRADE
Alexis Neel
Anthony Loredo
Caleb McCoy
Casey Juarez
Chris Velez
Elizabeth Weeks
Emily Patarini
Garrett Norris
Julissa Flores
Kassidy Wallace
Maricruz Gonzales
Mario Gomez
:Nirbi Gomez
R icaldd:R6idriguez
Romeo Martinez
Taylor Bone
Zack Macias


Cancer Benefit
Account Set Up
A account has been set up
at Wauchula State Bank for
Dixie Gibson, a Wauchula
resident who is battling bone
cancer is now at Good Shep-
herd Hospice on Hammock
Road in Sebring.
The 63-year-old is not eli-
gible for Medicare yet and
any help with her expenses
would be appreciated. The
bank account is in her name
and that of her sister Carolyn
Villa. For more information,
you may call her at 735-
0091.


Snuffing Out Toxic Tobacco Waste


It's a little known fact that
smoking hurts both your health
and the environment. The earth
is not an ashtray, but, sadly, the
remnants of cigarette smoking
are the most common source of
litter collected across the
world's shores.
According to environmental
cleanup reports, nearly 2.2 mil-
lion cigarettes and cigarette fil-
ters are picked up international-
ly from beaches and inland
waterways every year. There
are more than 1 million in the
United States alone. Thousands
of cigarette lighters, cigar tips
and tobacco packages or wrap-
pers are also found. Cigarette
trash is the No. 1 littered item
found on U.S. beaches and
waterways as well as on road-
ways and streets. Tobacco prod-
ucts comprise roughly 38 per-
cent of litter found along U.S.
roadways.
"Smokers might be tossing
their butts without realizing the
impact it could have on the
environment," said Cheryl


Healton, DrPH, president and
CEO of Legacy. "It's possible
that smokers think that since
tobacco is organic, its waste is
harmless," stated Dr. Tom
Novotny, professor of Global
Health in the Graduate School
of Public Health at San Diego
State University. "However,
that is not the case, because
both the plastic filters and the
remnants of tobacco are poison-
ous to children and other living
organisms. These contain nico-
tine, heavy metals and other
toxic chemicals."
In fact, cigarette filters are
not biodegradable. Under ideal
conditions, the sun breaks down
the filter but only into smaller
particles of toxic waste.

Other Environmental
Problems
There are other environmen-
tal consequences of tobacco
use, including:
Deforestation as a result of
tobacco production: Wood is
used in the curing process (dry-


v


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property,
build your dream home, or do your remodeling.


SEAMLESS GUTTERS

6 inch GUTTERS CL ORS 5 inch GUTTERS
$3.99 I 2.95
PENEAFOOT Specials PER NEAR FOOT

DON'T WArT Low PR~ouE ONLY Goon THROUGH JUNE 30
I III.Im ILS. Ml WIR *M


Email: kochcon@strato.net


S State Certified Lcense #CGC1515338


"111:" INVITI). I)


p
0~r


OE I)\AY ONLY!





All COSTA 1 )lE. MAlR l )roDU 'S

FOR EVERY *10 YOU SPEND), olt (;ET YOUR NAME PUT
INTO A R.1FFLE TO 'WIN A COSTA Gil PACKAGE.
INCLUDEI.S: A PAIR OF GLASSES, H.AT/VISOR, STRAP, SHIRT,






SUMMER KICK1 SAII
$SlIVl IERDIi II* JUCI(


{} 41 IuIR )Ay ,IUN i 25


, S l I .' ,r ,ad o !


Friday, June 24th 7:00 pm

at Harpoon Harry's Punta Gorda, Florida

$15 for dinner *need to reserve by June 17th*


90's lockPart







H ~ostedby:Clas o 9


E0 o C t -


Imn


I


ing the leaves), and land used
for tobacco farming is devalued
for other crop uses.
Wild fires are often caused
by cigarette smoking.
Solid, liquid and airborne
wastes, several considered haz-
ardous, are produced during the
manufacturing process.

Where To Get Help
Smokers who want to quit for
good can get help from a
national smoking cessation
campaign called EX at
www.BecomeAnEX.org. It en-
courages smokers to "relearn"
life without cigarettes and pro-
vides evidence-based tools to
help smokers overcome their
addiction with practice and
preparation. The campaign is
run by the nonprofit organiza-
tion, Legacy, which is dedicated
to building a world where
young people reject tobacco
and anyone can quit. Want to
learn more about how to stop
this form of environmental pol-
lution? Visit www.cigwaste.org.









June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Getting the best health care
for the least amount of money is
on the minds of many Ameri-
cans these days. Fortunately,
there are ways you can use
nutrition to help support your
health, and government agen-
cies are working harder than
ever to ensure the safety of con-
sumers choosing to do so.
Here's how:
You can enhance your
health easily and inexpensive-
ly with the help of dietary
supplements. According to the
National Institutes of Health,
"Some supplements may help
ensure that you get adequate
amounts of essential nutrients
or help promote optimal health
and 'performance. Scientific
evidence shows that some
dietary supplements are benefi-
cial for overall health and for
managing some health condi-
tions. For example, calcium and
vitamin D are important for
keeping bones strong and
reducing bone loss; folic acid
decreases the risk of certain
birth defects; and omega-3 fatty
acids from fish oils might help
some people with heart dis-
ease."
That may be why the number
of Americans taking at least one
dietary supplement a day is esti-
mated to be more than 70 per-
cent, according to a study pub-
lished in The Journal of
Nutrition. Multivitamins, fish
oil and vitamin D are among the
most popular choices.
According to a study by The
Lewin Group, significant health


care cost savings could be
achieved if more people took
nutrition supplements.
For example, if older Ameri-
cans took enough calcium with
vitamin D, it's possible that
776,000 hospitalizations for hip
fractures could be avoided over
five years, reducing the need for
stays in skilled nursing facili-
ties. During those five years,
$16.1 billion could be saved as,
a result.
Government agencies have
increased oversight. The sup-
plements you get today in
health food stores, grocery
stores or online from major
companies are manufactured
under more government over-
sight than many people realize.
Dietary supplement oversight
by the U.S. government has
increased dramatically over the
past few years, with new laws
created and regulatory agencies
taking action more often against
companies breaking those laws.
The Dietary Supplement Health
and Education Act defines sup-
plements as a specially regulat-
ed food category. Several other
laws also regulate dietary sup-
plements, so now dietary sup-
plement manufacturing is more
closely regulated than most
other food categories.
Both the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration (FDA) and the
'Federal Trade Commission
(FTC) have been exercising
their authority over the industry
very vigorously. Every dietary
supplement maker now has to
have strict quality programs in


place to follow, called "Good
Manufacturing Practices." The
FDA also makes surprise visits
to manufacturers to ensure they
are following those rules.
In fact, many experts say, any
further regulation would lead to
these dietary supplements cost-
ing as much as prescription
medications. What's more,
these experts point to a proven
track record of safety as another
good reason not to regulate
vitamins the way drugs are.
"The dietary supplement in-
dustry has long supported rea-
sonable regulation, with these
rules now in effect: All manu-
facturers must follow FDA-
audited Good Manufacturing
Practices requiring safety and
identity testing; only FDA-
approved ingredients can be
used; steroid precursors and
other drugs are illegal in sup-
plements; companies must sub-
mit all complaints of serious
adverse events to the FDA,
which now has authority to
mandate product recalls," said
Neil E. Levin, CCN, DANLA,
past president of the American
Nutrition Association.
Learn More
You can get more information
about supplements and which,
if any, would be good for you
from your doctor. You can get
more information about healthy
lifestyles, dietary supplements
and government oversight from
a health advocacy group, Your
Voice For Health, at
www.yvfh.org.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA
TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
PLANNING BOARD MEETING: THURSDAY JULY 7, 2011; 6:00 PM
TOWN COMMISSION MEETING: MONDAY, JULY 18, 2011 6:00 PM

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS PLANNING & ZON-
ING BOARD WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER AND MAKE A RECOM-
MENDATION TO THE TOWN COMMISSION ON TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS TO THE
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE TOWN'S EVALU-
ATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR).

A TRANSMITTAL PUBLIC HEARING WILL THEN BE HELD BY THE ZOLFO SPRINGS
TOWN COMMISSION TO APPROVE THE AMENDMENTS FOR TRANSMITTAL TO THE
STATE. AT THIS HEARING, THE COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER FIRST READING OF
THE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, TITLED AS FOLLOWS:

PROPOSED ORDINANCE 2011-07: AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE TEXT AND MAPS OF THE
ZOLFO SPRINGS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BASED ON THE TOWN'S EVAL-
UATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR); PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


THE AREA COVERED UNDER THIS ORDINANCE IS THE
BELOW:


TOWN LIMITS, SHOWN


Town of Zolfo Springs, Florida


BOTH PUBLIC HEARINGS WILL BE HELD AT THE ZOLFO SPRINGS TOWN HALL
COMMISSION CHAMBERS, 3210 US HIGHWAY 17; ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA; THE
PUBLIC HEARINGS WILL BE HELD ON THE DATE AND TIME NOTED ABOVE OR AS
SOON THEREAFTER, AND IF NECESSARY TO BE CONTINUED TO A DATE CERTAIN.
ANY INTERESTED PERSONS WHO FEEL THEY ARE AFFECTED BY THESE CHANGES
ARE ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND ONE OR BOTH PUBLIC HEARINGS AND BE HEARD.

ANY PERQSN(S) WISHING TO VIEW RELEVANT INFORMATION IN ADVANCE OF THE
PUBLIC HEARINGS MAY CONTACT THE TOWN AT (863) 735-0405 AT LEAST 48 HOURS
IN ADVANCE OF THE SCHEDULED MEETING.

ANYONE WISHING TO APPEAL ANY DECISIONS MADE AT THE TOWN COMMISSION
HEARING WILL NEED A RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE THEY
MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE,
WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE
APPEAL IS MADE.


ATTEST:
June Albritton
Town Clerk


George Neel
Mayor 6:23c


There's helpful news for con-
sumers who want to improve or
maintain their credit standing.
New regulations on credit re-
porting will provide consumers
with a better understanding of
how lenders view their credit
history.
New rules from the Federal
Reserve apr the Federal Trade
Commission require lenders to
inform consumers about certain
aspects of their credit report.
The new rules introduce several
types of notices:
Credit Score Notice
In some cases, shortly after
you apply for credit, you will
get a notice that tells you your
credit score and information
about how your score compares
with other consumers' scores.
If you do not have a credit
score for example, if you
never had credit before the


lender's notice would identify
the particular credit bureau it
used to get information.
Risk-Based Pricing Notice
You may receive a "risk-
based" pricing notice from your
lender if there is negative infor-
mation in your credit report and
you are offered a loan with an
annual percentage rate (APR)
that is higher than the APR
offered to other consumers who
apply for that loan.
What Do the Notices
Do for Consumers?
These new notices give you
the opportunity to check the
accuracy of the information in
your credit report and dispute
any information that you
believe is incorrect.
If you receive a notice, the
experts at the Federal Reserve
Board suggest taking the fol-
lowing steps:


-Review the notice. Read it
carefully to make sure you
understand how your credit
report or credit score may affect
the price you pay for credit. Ask
the lender to explain anything
in the notice that you do not
understand.
-Get a copy of your credit
report. Go to www.annualcredit
report.com and get your free
credit report by following the
instructions on your notice.
Review the information careful-
ly.
-Dispute any errors. If you
find errors in your credit report,-
you may dispute the informa-
tion and request that the infor-
mation be deleted or corrected.
For more information in
English and Spanish, visit the
website at www.federalre-
serve.gov/credit reports.


Ise

WHO'S YOUR


HOMETOWN HERO

Join Main Street Wauchula as we celebrate and
honor our Hometown Heroes on July 15th from
6:00pm 9:00pm during Friday Night Live in
Heritage Park, Downtown Wauchula.

Visit www.MainStreetWauchula.com or call
863.767.0330 to find out how you can nominate
your Hometown Hero and give them a chance to
be recognized and win $20 Downtown Dollars.

Entries are due Tuesday, July 5th at
5:00pm so don't delay in getting your
nomination submitted. soc6:23,7:c


LP'N


SSHOW CHOW

un. FEED AND FEEDING

MANAGEMENT CLINIC

i THURSDAY JUNE 30

6:00pm

This will be an informative meeting on feeding your show calf for
maximum success. Any 4-H or FFA kids interested in showing
a steer or beef breeding animal are welcome to attend.
TOPICS WILL INCLUDE:
Daily Feeding Getting That Animal Finished Bloat Prevention
Supplements: Their Value And How To Use Them


HIGH OCTANE
POWER FUEL

....,-.


HIGH OCTANE
DEPTH CHARGE
There Will Also Be A
Questions & Answers Session
(so bring your questions)


HIGH OCTANE
CHAMPION DRIVE



A:-j-
*s -SSi F


HARDEE


RANCH SUPPLY, INC.

1309 Hwy. 17 South Wauchula


773-4322

Store Hours: Monday Friday 7 am 5:30 pm
Saturday 7 am 12 pm 6:2330c


Supplementing Your Health


New Notices Can Help

Consumers Manage Credit


PUBLIC NOTICE
You are hereby notified that on Thursday, June 9, 2011, upon
public hearing, the Board of County Commissioners of Hardee
County, Florida, adopted a resolution vacating and closing a
portion of Fussell Road, legally described as that portion of
Fussell Road lying within the W 1/2 of Section 2, Township 33
South, Range 25 East as shown in Plat Book 4, Page 105, also
know as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A of the Official Public Records of
Hardee County, Florida
Terry Atchley, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners 6:23c


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


rutt~L~.L~zL~.L'L~t


a- ,


II -w_


,c.
I


X











6B The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011






-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
Licensed and Insured Reg.MV-40625
S "No job's too big."

It Bie i fH -iems m


S5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager



Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
Monday Friday *,
S9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
So1 Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider c6
OUpoA OTUvMc16:2-30c


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Lovely, quality, 3B/2.5Bth home, large rooms,
new kitchen, plenty of storage inside plus 12x18
detached utility, double garage and screened
12x16 porch. $169,000
3B/2Bth CB/Stucco Home; ceramic tile and
carpet floors, eat- in kitchen, spacious bed-
rooms. $119,000
Spacious 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco home; large
kitchen, living room with w/b fireplace, double
garage, fenced backyard. $155,500
COMPLETELY FURNISHED 2B/1Bth M/H
with nice yard and screened porch. $29,000
Abundant wildlife on this 5 Acres of "Native
Florida". Offered at $22,500

11 SERVICE YOU
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


773-9743


CAN CO


ASSOCIATES


Classifieds


BUSH HOG hydraullc/PTO post
Shole digger/auger $1,400 OBO,
863-781-7868. 6:9-7:7p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


GLASS TOP STOVE $100; under-
cabinet microwave $50; SS dish-
washer $75; 773-4308. 6:23p


RED FIBERGLASS truck body
cover, short wheel base, good
condition, $100. Horace Graham
863-781-2457. 6:23,30c


1995 LAND ROVER DISCOVERY
needs head gasket runs well
$1,500. 2007 Chrysler Pacifica
64,000 miles, excellent condition
$14,000. 832-0957. 6:23p


CASH NOW! Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc


EVENRUE 4.5 BOAT,. motor,
trolling motor, $350. 767-1205.
6:23,30p


DINING ROOM OAK table and 6
chairs, $300. 375-2621. 6:23p

An artist cannot fail; it is a
success to be one.


Cal ody oryor po


It takes a long time to grow
an old friend.
-John Leonard




Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Steve Johnson
BEAUTIFUL 16.5 Acres with 3B/2Bth M/H
built; a total of 5 wells located on property sur-
rounded by large oaks. $168,000
Updated older home, 3B/2Bth, ceramic tile
floors, new appliances; beautifully landscaped,
large lot. $95,000
5 ACRE TRACT excellent home site, paved
road frontage. $65,000
5 Acres with large oaks and open field; very
secluded. $40,000
STORAGE UNITS 30 units in excellent condi-
tion; very good rate of occupancy. Call Delois.
$75,000


UNT ON ['
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


STEVE JOHNSON


781-0518


ALAN JAY CHEVROLET/Chrysler/
Dodge/Jeep of Wauchula is tak-
ing applications for a bodyshop
manager. Great benefits. Call
James Lizoette at 863-381-0916.
6:23,30c

S -


MOVE IN READY. 4BR/2B on cor-
ner lot in Georgetown
Subdivision. Cathedral ceilings,
french doors, stone fireplace,
wood and tile floors. Large porch
w/screened in pool. CB shed has
pool bathroom and outdoor
shower. Asking $219,000. Call
448-4041 for appt. 6:16-7:14p
HOUSE FOR SALE. Must see. 4/2
2800 sq/ft, central A/C, corner lot,
large rooms, Indoor laundry, big
front porch, 1,000 sq/ft master
suite w/jacuzzi tub and walk-In
closet, $92,500. 201 N. 8th Ave.
832-0957. 6:2-30p


COW HORSE 4 yr. old phllly, 16
hands, no papers $2,500, 863-
781-7868. 6:9-7:7p


SNAPPER RIDING MOWER $150.
781-0277. 6:23c
WANTED: Good tractor. 863-781-
0277. 6:23p
HOMEMADE utility trailer with
cover. Tool boxes for small and
mid-size pickups. Washer and
dryer. 863-255-0425. 6:23p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver, diamonds. Do not sell to
hotel buyers. They buy for melt
value. Do not send scrap gold in
the mail. You get stung. Buying
and selling 40 years. Capt. Ed
904-222-4607. 1:6tfc



Th FerldAdoct


Painting is easy when you
don't know how but very
difficult when you do.


HouseKeeping Aide
FULL-TIME to do housekeeping in a skilled
nursing facility. Apply in person to
Hardee Manor Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873
cl6:23c


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.

I[If Fi 4


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


QUIET FAMILY HOME!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Brick home, outside of city limits, on a no
traffic road with large oaks, outbuilding and
alarm system. $175.000
150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, Home or both. $6.000
Per Acre Negotiable!!
NEW LISTING!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home in
Bowling Green, nice corner lot with total sq.
ft. 1,292. Priced (@ $38.000
PRICE REDUCTION!!! Vacant canal lot on
Lakeside Drive In Sebring. Canal to Orange
Blossom Lake, Includes 19 x 20 metal build-
ing with bathroom. $14.000
THE BLUFFS! Retirement Community! Cute
and versatile everything you need and golf
cart too! Relax in the family room of this
home or use it as a second bedroom with it's
own bath. Totally Move in ready and waiting
for you!! Only $53.000
AVION PALMS RESORT!! 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Mobile Home and Lot. Central heat and air,
screened porch, appliances, utility shed,
M/H has skirting all around And move-in
ready. $75.000
RETIRED !! AVION PALMS RESORT!! M/H
LOT PRICED ( $30.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multi-family-Single Family Homes.
$75.000
Riverview! Residential lot. Priced (o $11,900


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


JUST LISTED!!! 10 AC fenced, 4 inch well,
house well casing. Great location for home,
farming, multi-business. Only $7.500 per
Acre. Ask for Nancy!!
READY TO MOVE IN!! 2 BR/2Bth House with
extra lot, central heat/air, one car garage
with door opener, many extras. 565.000 Call
Nancy for more information.
House on double lot located close to
Elementary School, walking distance to
town, courthouse, YMCA, can be used for
home or office, well maintained over the
years. Asking price @ $110.000
MUST SEE TO BELIEVE!! If your family
enjoys the outdoors, you must see this
unique listing that brings outdoor living to
you. Features 6 outbuildings includes 2,000
SF. Barn w/23ft ceilings, work Shop, storm
room, outdoor kitchen w/stainless steel fix-
tures, fire pit, potting shed, large gazebo
overlooks pond-well stocked w/fish,
includes aerator, outbuildings w/pens and
fenced. Also 14 x 60 MH sealed in rough cut
pine, front and back porches. Trees and
maintained lawn. MUCH MORE, Call Nancy
for Appt. Priced at $175.000
Love The Country? Look No More!! 4
Bedroom, 2 Bath Double Wide Mobile Home
located on 4.81 acres. ONLY $110,000
ONLY $75.000 Charming two story home
with 5 Bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Includes origi-
nal claw foot bath tub and glass door knobs
for antique lovers. Wood floors throughout,
Many extras and walking distance to main
street.
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties. c16:23c


DESoro COUNTY





OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 S


iT~--~=-~=~==~= '~U'


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 *Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com .
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker Robert Jones
REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath block home on 2+ acres. Close
Cute house with nice landscaping.NOW $79,500! to town. Asking $169,500.
GREAT CASH FLOW! 3 duplexes on Hwy 66 in Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Zolfo Springs. Each with approx. 2,000 sf of liv- Hardwood floors. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
ing area. Each is rented and ready to go. This rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000
won't last long....$275,000
won't last ong....$275,000 5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
NEW LISTING! 18 acres. House & Grove. Great place for your new residence. Deed
Close in approximately 1,850 sf of living. Nice restricted. $72,500
screened porch. 3 Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of i in Briarw
grove, mostly earlier. 6" deep well, microjet & Suivius home located 1 Barwood
diesel power unit. Only $295,000 Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath house wih
S p wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
2 acres zoned Commercial. Desoto County, office and full bath. $379,000
Highway 31. Subdivided. High and Dry. Double 4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
d rd f $ acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently Home is complimented with screened back porch
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
a dead end street in a great neighborhood. producing nursery. $430,000
REDUCED to $205,000!
REDUCED to $205,000! 320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 ajres
Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County! in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca- Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
on-site storage. $225,000 Asking $1,200,000

Realtor Associates
n Ben Gibson (941)737-2800 Robert Jones (863)781-1423
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242 John H. Gross (863)273-1017 l
Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161 Rick Knight (863)781-1396 c16:23c


PLANTCITYNousiG LL

3 R ik e

Deliery-et U


---


I vvvI II v I gvv'fvwl WW


romqtll~ylllw


----











June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


CHITIUAHUA PUPPY, 8 weeks,
female, NKC H/C, shots, $375,
781-1283. 6:16,23p
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
.call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


JUNE PLANT SALE-AII 3 gal pots
$5-1 gal pots $3. Plumbago,
Crape Myrtle, Ugustrum, Texas
Sage, Thryallls, Viburnum,
Jasmine and more. Trees-Bottle
Brush, Rain & Crape Myrtle
$8-$15. Center Hill Nursery, 2949
Center Hill Road, between
Wauchula and Bowling Green, off
SR62, 4.5 miles west US 17. 863-
223-5561. 6:23p


I iii o n


4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location in
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
fo'r information. 4:28tfc


WAUCHULA-Large 1 BR/1BA,
central A/C, utility room, fenced,
very nice, 863-735-2626. 6:23c
WAUCHULA-Huge 4/2 central,
A/C, utility room, very nice, $700.
832-0957. 6:23,30p
TWO BEDROOM apartment $550
plus deposit, no pets, 832-1984.
6:23-7:21 p
THREE BEDROOM, two bath,
$800 plus deposit, no pets, 832-
1984. 6:23-7:21 p
3 BEDROOM HOUSE, Duette
area, ideal location for anyone
working at Wingate, 4-Corners
mines or Hardee CI, $700 a
month, 941-730-8180. 6:23-7:21p
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc


COMPTON REALTY

George Cheshier
REALTOR'
863 202 6325
georgec@vistanet.net
0___


NOW OPEN





Large Selection of
Cars to Choose From

Buy Here Pay Here
?'S H 30 Day Guarantee
Esao on Motor & Transmission Only









THE PALMS

Available for

Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through June 30th
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.

Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 (.
L -. .==- Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider cl6;230


IN FT. MEADE-DUPELX 2/1, no
pets, $500 month, $300 deposit,
863-236-0261. 6:16,23p
APT. & HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 6:23c
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh
Rentals, Commercial

OFFICE SPACE for rent. Great
location, $450 plus deposit, 863-
832-1984. 5:26-6:23p


ELWOOD MERCHANT LAWN
Services. Affordable, free esti-
mates, call 863-781-1777.
6:23-7:21 p
B SEE SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
6:16-7:17p
CHRISTIAN LADY available for
home care for senior citizens,
personal assistant, companion
care. Call 863-245-0062. 6:2-30p


THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting In Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
***t
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


ydfl's HItoLSC T Triv Store

QUALITY MERCHANDISE




Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street



leaven enf Cleaning c ertce
By Sherry White Ministries
[e ..0,il,,[: -i..:jjei ii Ilig m i(:


773-0523 *


773-0877


KELLER WILLIAMS.
-, R '. A-- ..-T Y
,,,Buying or Selingl I Cai Help!
f Donna Steffens* (863)781-627

Short Sale/Mae, Offer
. ,i 4 BR, 2.5 Bath, Fenced Baci Yard
.-- List Price $95,000


Joe L. i


I N C.,


cl6-231 I


REALTORS


<, | | (863) 773-2128
/ REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
S- JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
1 REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
Karen O'Neal www.joeldavis.com
(863)781-7633 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED TO
$74,000! Charming and priced
to sell! 2BR/1BA 1060 SF home
w/lots of updates: new A/C,
insulation, carpeting, wiring.
Den can be 3rd BR.
CB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new flooring, cabinets,
countertops, being sold as is.
$65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 lots in
Wauchula w/over 975' total rd
frontage. Close to hospital,
schools & shopping. Will divide
or all for $75,000!
10 ac w/paved rd frontage.
Great for pasture, farming or
homesite. $63,000!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!
25+ ac fenced pasture,
Greenbelt qualified, on US Hwy
17 S w/well, septic & electric.
$192,900!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
home on 4 lots w/beautiful oaks,
fenced in backyard. Close to
schools. NOW $69,000!


PRICE REDUCED! Looking
for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
septic!
Wooded wonder! 5 ac w/beau-
tiful trees, paved road. $50,000!
Lovingly maintained/updated
4BR/2.5BA brick home in
Knollwood w/updated kitchen,
fireplace, back patio! $218,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
traffic...Hello, peace & quiet!
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. $130,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!
12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!
10 acs cleared land on paved
rd w/4" well in western Hardee
Co. $65,000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS 781-0153 SANDY LARRISON--832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL~ .- 781-7633 MONICA REAS-. 781-888
DAVID ROYAL--.. 781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 d6.23c


I See By Ap~spointm


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number, tfc-dh


HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
FRIDAY, 735 Grove Street,
Bowling Green. Something for
everyone. 6:23p
TWO FAMILY SALE. Saturday,
25th, 8 till ? 704 Tennessee St.,
Wacuhula. 6:23p
MULTI-FAMILY Cleaning out sale.
Lots of good stuff for males,
females, and children. 1445
Kazen Road. Saturday 8-2. 6:23p
GARAGE SALE. Kids clothes, fur-
niture, pictures, some tools,
housewares, misc. Friday 8-12
and Saturday 8-11. 10th Street
North, Wauchula, look for green
garage. 6:23p


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
'123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
Donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
USED EXECUTIVE OFFICE furni-
ture. Excellent condition. Mission
Thrift Store, 123 North 7th Ave.,
Wauchula, 773-3069. 6:16,23c
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-?
Community sale, Ralph Smith Rd.
Clothes, toys, nursing uniforms,
misc. 6:23p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 2227 Ralph
Smith Road, Wauchula. 6:23p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? Big yard
sale at 3223 Palmetto St., Zolfo.
Lots of baby girl clothes, toys,
furniture, food, TVs, WIl. 6:23p
MULTI-FAMILY, Saturday, 8-?,
2578 Heard Bridge Road,
Wauchula. Baby Items, fresh
honey, plus size clothes, misc.
6:23p
SATURDAY 7 till ? 1025
Knollwood Circle. Furniture, elec-
tronics, clothes, something for
everyone. 6:23p
MULTI-FAMILY Saturday8-noon
Apache Trail. Take 64E to Cracker
Lane to first road on right. Lots of
stuff. 6:23p


IEVIEL L AIJTO





Buv HERE PAY HERE

30 DAY WARRANTY

Se Habla Espahol


COME BY TO SEE US
Mon.-Sat. 8-- 7pm
5220 Hwy 17N Bowling Green (across from BP)


863-245-0383
cl6:16tfc






Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
.310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 Noey A. Flores
Noey A. Flores
www.floresrealty.net (863) 781-4585-

Special of the Week


You must see this CB home with 4BR 2BA that sits on 2.24
acres that is fenced and cross fenced for small farm animals.
Property includes various feeding barns and a 40x40 barn with
lots of storage and parking for 2 automobiles. Sit on the back
12x15 covered patio with panoramic view of hundreds of acres,
as you eat breakfast Washed oak kitchen cabinetry with
lighting hitting the granite counter tops, recess lighting, gas
counter-top stove and electric oven. Home has central vacuum
system and electric is setup with a transfer box for generator
during long power outage. Make an appointment today
to see this country home that is 4 miles from Avon Park.
Reduced to $222,900
Country Living 3BR/2BA CB home on 5 +/- acres Large Barn
with high entry door and ceilings Central air & Heat Hurricane
shutters Large generator to service home in extended power out-
ages Large 41x14 screened lanai Completely fenced with access
from two roads. Priced to sell at $185,000
Zolfo Springs 3BR/1BA CB home on a corner lot Ceramic Tile
- Central air & heat Price Reduced to $89,900
Ask us about the HUD Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are an authorized agent!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! J
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl6:23c


POSITION:
BUILDING & GROUNDS SUPERVISOR
PAY RATE: $32,999.60 ($15.87/hr.) -
$45,490.32 ($21.87/hr.)
The Hardee County Facilities Department is seeking a
Building & Grounds Supervisor. Highly responsible
supervisory administrative work in the planning and
directing operations, repair, maintenance, security and
improvement of County Buildings & Grounds/Parks &
Recreation. Prepares plans, drawings and specifications
for renovation of buildings. Ability to read and interpret
sketches and blueprints.
Must have High School Diploma or GED.
Seven (7) years experience in the general building
trades, for (2) years ojiywhich must have been ina super-
visory or equivalent capacity. Complete job description
and Application forms posted on County website:
www.hardeecounty.net.
Please submit applications to the Human Resources
Department, 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Phone: (863) 773- 2161. Position closes at 5:00 p.m., July
1, 2011. EOE-F/M/V. c16:23c


I










8B The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011





The




1 GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
clB:2tc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773-4478




Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience cl:




t+. Charles N. Flesher II, Inc
TILE & FLOORING SPECIALIST
TILE LAMINATE
I 7 WOOD ENGINEERED WOOD
Bathtubs Showers Backsplashes & More
When a product is installed with care and know-how, you'll receive
a service that I am willing to stake my name on! Charley
FREE ESTIMATES 6
863-781-2867 701 BUMBY LANE, WAUCHULA




Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAN~OL

Buy IIere! No Interest
Pay Here! Huinance

[`I t )1d RCl 11








4 Families & 2 Business Closeouts

Motorcycles: Minibike Parts & Accessories.
Hunting: Feeders, Hoist, Muzzle Loaders &
Accessories. Fishing: Rods, Reels, Tackle &
Antique Outboard. Trucking: Chains, Binders,
etc. Men & Women's Clothing.
Limited amount of Tools

Sat. 8 am to 6 pm Sun. 1 pm to 6 pm

863-832-1382

312 W. Oak Street Wauchula
cl6:236






New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance
Brand 1Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SAL-E ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula k .
(across from Wal-Mart)
V ISA' BillyhAyers
cl6:16tfc Tire Technician


HARDEE CAR COMPANY




$5 0 OFF IIIq[ rJI[


Wauchula
(1rou fom Fist National Bank)
Monday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm
773-6667 .\


(Fr
Fri
1


Billy Hill
Owner


Jauchula Hills
mor of Hwy 17 and REA Rd
iday & Saturday
IO am to 7:30 pm
773-2011


n


Ruby Q
__ u


Classifieds


Red Snapper

Season Ends

On July 18
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
approved a rule that makes the
recreational harvest season for
red snapper in Gulf of Mexico
, state waters consistent with the
season in Gulf federal waters.
This year's open recreational
harvest season for red snapper
in Gulf state waters opened
June 1 and will run through July
18. Florida state waters in the
Gulf extend out to nine nautical
miles from shore; federal
waters extend beyond that line.
Gulf red snapper stocks are
rebuilding but are still consid-
ered to be undergoing overfish-
ing, which means that red snap-
per are being taken at a rate
greater than established man-
agement goals for this fishery.
Shortening the fishing season
in Gulf state waters this year
will help to avoid a harvest
overrun and continue to rebuild
red snapper populations so that
longer red snapper fishing sea-
sons will be possible'in the
future.



FWC Revises
Gopher Tortoise
Guidelines
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
approved revisions to its gopher
tortoise permitting guidelines.
The FWC approved a man-
agement plan for gopher tor-
toises in September 2007, pro-
viding conservation measures
to ensure that gopher tortoises
thrive in Florida. The plan calls
for permitting guidelines that
make certain that Florida meets
the tortoise's habitat needs now
and in the future.
Initially approved in 2008,
these guidelines are revised as
the FWC learns more about the
needs of gopher tortoises and
receives input from the public.
The revisions approved last
week reflect input from meet-
ings with stakeholders during
the past year.
The revised guidelines in-
clude reduced monitoring re-
quirements for landowners who
receive relocated tortoises and a
modified conservation permit to
include an on-site relocation
option for public projects (e.g.,
roads, public schools or govern-
mental facilities) that occur on
or next to public conservation
lands.
Both revisions help reduce
landowner costs incurred in
relocating gopher tortoises.
"I encourage staff to think
outside the box," said Com-
mission Chairman Kathy
Barco. "We continue to look for
new ways to make the permit-
ting process more efficient and
equitable for all landowners."


Store Wide Sale
Dining rooml start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


Make Your Home "Bone Healthy":

Simple Tips To Help Avoid Falls At Home


Dehn. nurse practitioner at,the
Women Physicians Ob/Gyn
Medical Group, Mountain
View, California. "Doing things
like cleaning up spills right
away or removing cords from
open spaces can help avoid the
accidents that cause fractured
bones."
Along with helping to make
your home safer, there are other
key components to good bone
health. Exercising and eating a
balanced diet with the recom-
mended amount of calcium and
vitamin D are part of a well-
rounded bone health routine.
There are also medicines you
can take to improve bone
health, so it's important to talk
to your doctor about a treatment
that may be right for you.
"As we get older, we need to
do everything we can to keep
our bones strong," said Dehn.
"If you've been diagnosed with
postmenopausal osteoporosis,
then ask your health care pro-
vider about a medicine that may
increase bone mass, such as
once-monthly Boniva. This is a
prescription medicine for the
treatment and prevention of
osteoporosis in postmenopausal
women."
Indication
Boniva is a prescription med-
icine used to treat or prevent
osteoporosis in women after


menopause. Boniva helps in-
crease bone mass and helps
reduce the chance of having a
spinal fracture (break).
It is not known how long
Boniva works for the treatment
and prevention of osteoporosis.
You should see your doctor reg-
ularly to determine if Boniva is
still right for you.
Simple Tips for
Around the House
Bathroom:
Install grab bars
Use nonskid bath mats and
remove throw rugs (in the bath-
room and anywhere in the
home)
Use night-lights
Living Room:
Keep floors free of clutter
(in the living room and any-
where in the home)
Avoid cords (especially
ones that have frayed)
Be sure all carpets and area:
rugs have skidproof backing or
are tacked to the floor
Kitchen/Laundry Room:
Clean up spills immediate-
ly
Put away dryer sheets
Avoid climbing on counters
to reach items at the back of a
cabinet


Did you know that one out of
three adults age 65 and older
falls each year, putting them-
selves at risk for injury and
even broken bones? And rates
of fall-related fractures among
older women are more than
twice those for men. Avoiding
falls is important for people of
all ages, but it is especially
important for the nearly eight
million women who experience
postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Osteoporosis is a disease
where bones become brittle and
are more likely to break. For
women with postmenopausal
osteoporosis, a fall may mean
fractured or broken bones. That
is why taking precautions to
avoid falls is key to staying
healthy.
With a few simple steps, you
can help make sure your house
is safer for bone-healthy living.
Making changes in your bath-
room, living room and kitchen-
such as removing throw rugs-
can make a big difference. Also,
staying alert and focused,
remember to wear well-fitting
shoes with good treads and
using night-lights are all easy
ways you lower your chances of
falling.
"Every year, more than
80,000 people fall in their
homes and end up in the emer-
gency room," said Barbara


FFort Meade, Florida
0 205 N. Charleston
Iv. .oiit oW, VoD (863) 773-2530
CHEVROLET a Oldsmob9le. (863) 773-2530
Fort Meade, Florida (863) 285-8131
205 N. Charleston Ave. Fort Meade

VIST Us 24 Houns A DAY AT


www.directchevy.com


.NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500
EXT CAB
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise,CD
Stk.#B1060
$22,995


2002 JEEP
WRANGLER
4X4
6 Cylinder, Auto, Air,
Stk.#B276AB
$13,995
2007 CHEVROLET
TRAIL BLAZER
LT 4X4
Leather, Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Stk.#B1424A
$17,995

2009 CHEVROLET
TRAVERSE 2LT
Leather, 3" Row Seating, Dual
Air, PW/PL, Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B1571A
$26,995


NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500
REG CAB
Auto, Air, Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#B1 316
$19,995
NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
CRUZE LS
Auto, Air, PW/PL,CD

Stk.#B186
$17,995


2005 CHEVROLET
TAHOE Z71
Leather, 3rd Seat, Dual Air,
PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B1656A
$13,995
2007 TOYOTA
FJ CRUISER
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD, Rear DVD
Stk.#B1466B
$18,995
2009 FORD
ESCAPE XLT
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#B188A
$18,995


NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
SUBURBAN LS
VS, Auto, Dual Air, 3rd Seat,
PW/PL, Tilt/Cruise, CD,
Stk.#B1167
$39,995
NEW 2011 CHEVROLET
MALIBU LS
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B318
$19,995


2007 CHEVROLET
TAHOE LTZ
4X4
Leather, Sunroof, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B257B
$24,995
2008 HONDA
ACCORD
Auto, Air, PW/PL,
ilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B1430A
$16,995


MIDFLX3M
Financing Available at
Greenwood Chevrolet


*All rebates and Incentives assigned to dealer. APR la W.A.C. for up to 60 months. All prices are plus tax, tag and $249.90 dealer tee.
Our selection of trucks, prices and customer service makes it worth the drive to Bob Ellott's GOreenwod Chevroietl


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


,I ,


OVER 100 USED CARS ANDTRUCKs ToC.HOOSEFROM




















Holy Child Takes Tourney Title Bowling Green To get $650,000


Grant To Improve Water Lines


y JOAN SEAMAN First Christian Church.
f The Herald-Advocate The tourney resumed last
Th 011 1l MApn'sc nfthalll Ti.esAwi, itLth hattleo .,Ial Kbn


League came to close when the
post-season tournament fin-
ished on Thursday night.
When it was over, Holy Child
Catholic had beaten every team
it played and claimed the cham-
pionship.
The single-elimination tour-
nament had begun on June 9
and quickly eliminated four
teams, Northside Baptist, New
Vision Worship Center, Flor-
ida's First Assembly No. 2 and


i uesi.ay, vwim. a U IIaI Ie royai L.-
tween Florida's First Assembly
I and St. Michael Catholic.
First Assembly won the mara-
thon 26-22.
Abel Hernandez and Lavon
Cobb each came away with four
hits, including a Hernandez
homer and Cobb triple. Randy
Crews used three singles and a
walk to be the only four-score
batter. Weston Johnson, Steven
Crews, Troy Brant, Christ Rut-
ledge, Cobb and Hernandez


HHS Softball


Girls Honored


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Just before school ended for
the year, the girls softball team
held its awards ceremony.
Head Coach Shari Knight and
assistants Julian Garcia, Linda
Arredondo and Melanie Hen-
derson.
There were co-Most Valuable
Player awards this year, with
senior Elvira Servin and soph
Kayla Knight sharing it. Servin
also received the only four-year
award. Knight took the Best
Offense Award for her batting
average (.463) and Most Stolen
Bases Award (29).
The Defensive Player of the
Year Award went to junior out-
fielder/infielder Courtney
Parks, who also received the
only three-year award. The
Rookie of the Year Award went
to freshman Kate Thomas.
The most improved varsity
player award went to senior
Caylah Coker, in her first year
in the sport, showing progress
throughout the season. The
most improved JV player award
went to Rachel Coker,
Two-year letters or awards


were presented to sophs Knight
and Penny McGuire, while
Caylah Coker, Karlee Hender-
son, Brooke Tyson, Addison
Aubry, Ana Galvez, Arissa
Camel, Bailee Carlton and
Thomas all collected first-year
letters.
Expected to return next sea-
son are all the above-listed
underclassmen plus those who
have completed a JV season,
Rachel Coker, McKenzie Stat-
on, Isabel Abel, Noemi Na-
varro, Angelica Jackson, Maxie
Khang, Michelle. Delatorre,
Virdiana Chavez, Amber
Franks, Nicole Franks, Crystal
Huerta, Briona Speights and
America Sandoval.
In the off-season, Knight will
continue travel ball with the
Tropic Wave out of Venice.
They are currently holding a
hit-a-thon to raise funds for
their trip to play in either
Kentucky or California in the
Premier Girls Fast Pitch
League. Anyone who wants to
sponsor Kayla in her share of
the team's expenses can contact
Shari Knight at 781-1657.


B
o&


each added triple tallies.
Miguel Santoyo and Jose
Lucho each had four hits for St.
Michael. Bobby Flores. Val-
entin Rosales and Lucho each
circled the bases three times.
Flores and Junior Cortez each
tripled.
First Assembly turned around
to do battle against San Alfonso
Chapel, the season winner, who*
also won this game, 25-7..
Osles Lazarre and Raul Gar-
cia each smacked four hits for
San A Ifonso. Brent Gilliard,
Chad Hayes, Dale Roberts and
Lazarre each put three scores on
the board.
Rodger Brutus homered
among his two hits and five
RBIs for First Assembly. Cobb
had three hits. Hernandez was
the only two-score batter.
There was only one game on
Field 2 on Tuesday, as Holy
-Child downed Bowling Green
Baptist 24-13.
Elias Ramirez circled the
bases four times for Holy Child.
Sam Rivera and Jose Fernandez
each tripled. Rivera ended with
three scores.
Paul Roberts had the hot foot
for Bowling Green, racing
around the bases to score four
times. Ron Bromley hit a pair of
doubles and scored each time
he got on base. Austin Helms
and Doug Sutton each also had
twin hits.
So, it came down to Thurs-
day's game between San Al-
fonso and Holy Child, with
Holy Child prevailing 24-14.
Ruben Rivas homered twice
and had triple tallies for Holy
Child. Ramirez and Jesse Ra-
mirez each added three runs.
Julian Garcia Sr., Julian Jr. Jose
Gomez, Joe Torres, Josh Sneid-
er and Rodney Wimberly all put
a pair of runs in the book.
Gilliard homered and Garcia
tripled and doubled twice for
San Alfonso. Ralph Arce was
the only three-score batter.


this summer.
Mayor Knight asked the city
manager to do research on
upgrading the city hall's tele-
phone system which he said is
antiquated.
Leigh Sockalosky discussed
the problem with stray dogs and
cats in the city and county. She
and other recently formed the
Hardee Animal Rescue Team to
improve the situation. The goal
is to spay and neuter dogs and
cats and to find homes for
strays. She has been working
with Dr. Bill Lovett, a local vet-
erinarian, for 17 years. She sug-
gested the city apply for grants
to help pay for animal services.
For a $33.25 donation for
HART dogs will b vaccinated
for rabies and distemper-parvo
and cats for rabies.and distem-
per. Due to lack of spaying and
neutering, plus abandonment,
over 1,100 dogs and cats were
taken to Hardee Animal Control
last year, and only 92 dogs and
8 cats were adopted. The rest
were killed. For an appointment
call 773-2424.
The commission voted to
return leftover 2004 hurricane
funds $22,924.16 the county
with a stipulation the money be
used to rehabilitation homes.
Representatives from Girl
SScouts were on the a agenda to
request use of the old train
depot for their meetings. No


one showed up trom the Girl
Scouts and the matter was post-
poned.
The commission voted to
accept a Florida Small Cities
Community Development
Block Grant of about $650,00
for city-wide water line
improvements.
A motion was approved
between the city and the
Governor's Office of Tourism
to again designate the city as a
Rural Area of Critical
Economic Concern.
The city received a petition,
as requested by the mayor, of
concerned citizens who want
more sidewalks built in the city
for routes to the school. Mayor
Knight said he would contact
the Florida Department of
Transportation to see if grant
money is available for side-
walks.
Commissioner Durastanti,
assistant principal at Bowling
Green Elementary School, said
BGE had the highest writing
scores in the county for elemen-
tary schools and also entered
and won the "Battle of the
Books" competition that
encourages students to read
books.

It is the friends you can
call up at 4 a.m. that mat-
ter.
-Marlene Dietrich


Debt


Consolidation


7

" 41


10


t10


Whether you need reli
inspired to renovate yo
you with a fixed-rate Sf

- Debt Consolidatior
- Home Improvemer
- College Expenses


aS











ef from mounting debts or you are 20 A-t
iur home, MIDFLORIDA can help $200 redit'
second Mortgage! toyourMIDFLORIDA 1

n Upto8o%of Rates
urn;cds asUtlow 80 o) Visa Platinum Credit Card
n Uptnnroiprl h80%of as low1a with a new second mortgage!


its


-Vacation
oi whatever you may needle


Interest may be
tax deductible


(863)688-3733 ToilFree (866)913-3733


as


Effective APR 4.234/%
Fixed rates and terms available to 20 years


V'jhaS B rnk Sh* M Be


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Bowling Green City
Commissions on Tuesday, June
14, agreed to spend $5,000 to
$6,000 to buy a new John Deere
Gator vehicle to use in public
works and at the city cemetery
east -of the First United
Methodist Church.
Police Chief John Scheel said
the Gator would need a license
tag and seatbelts in order to
travel public streets. City
Manager Yvonne Kimball will
get bids and see if that type
vehicle is included on the state
bid list. She had recommended
the city buy a utility work vehi-
cle instead of a new lawnmow-
er.
The commission accepted the
lone bid from from Troy
Thomas of $809.11 to buy a-
2001 Ford Crown Victoria
police car that is no longer used,
The commission also agreed
to a request from city attorney
Gerald Buhr to restore his
hourly rate of $175. He had
lowered his fee in April 2010 to
$150 an hour to help out the
city financially.
A workshop will be held July
12 to discuss the city's retire-
ment plan.
At the May 10 city commis-
sion meeting Mayor Perry
Knight recognized long-time
city resident Bertha Fulse on
her 105th birthday. She is a res-
ident of Hardee Manor nursing
home in Wauchula. Knight, city
commissioner Stuart Durastanti
and Kimball visited her the
week before her birthday.
The commission received an
update of the city comprehen-
sive plan and amendments from
senior planner Marisa Branby.
The updated package was sent
to the Florida Department of
Community Affairs in
Tallahassee. The plan is expect-
ed to be finalized and approved


The Herald-Advocate

(ursday, JPSS- 2O,
Thursday, June 23,2011


Frankie's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now AcceptingHours:
SHours:
Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
j6 *16c


T
..e
.Y' ,
'*
~iL
..., df
.
~;~~
.

u-~~ n~_~:


q


L
:.-'ys'-c~tca'


4


Ir.


S Federally 1. The approval of a second mortgage is subject to application, credit and acceptable property, This offer available for pnmaryresidences and excludes manufactured homes. A 55 savings (hare) account is required for membership with MIDFLORIDA Credit Union A $20,000 second mortgage at 3.99% for 60
insured by mcnthr would have payments of S36830with an effect APR !Annual Percentage Rate) of A 234% Raes may vary based on your credit and the term ofyour loan. MIDFLORDA is an equal houswmg lender. 2.To quality for incentive, this must be a newsecond mortgage (closed-end loan) of 51500 or more.
N R NCUA. Luants 0i 5,C00 to S14,999 wil qualify for S1010 credit. If you do not have a MIDF'LOS10A Visa Platinum Card. one wii be opened for you Allow up to two weeks for receipt of credit to Visa Platinum Card and new card.if applicable. This offer Is not valid on the refinance of any MIDFLOIDA loan,
LENDER


,3.


aWppla<*JU W\uc


-


d

~c1














2C The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011




Schedule of Weekly Services


Printed as a Public Service
Sby'.
The Ietald-Advocate
;' Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ............. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ......... ......:.7:30 p.m.

CHIESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ............. .......8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ...... ......4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHIIRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...... ........ 6:30 p.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ........... 11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CIIRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITI ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 IIwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ..................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1.. :00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:0 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCII
Bowling Green
S.Illwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ...........................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WliDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade)....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHIIODIST CIURCII
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........I :00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship .................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship '.................. 6:0) p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CIIHURCII
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible ('onncction ............'......9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

IIOLY CHILD)
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEI DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Marlcs Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Micrcoles Esludior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves Dc Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CIIURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CITURCII
607 Palmetto St.
C('hurch School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. I11:00 a.m.
Evening SeTr\ ice ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
('omnunlon -2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAII BAPTIST CIIURCIH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ...... ...........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
l)isciples Training..... ....5:00 p.m.
E\ening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday) Prayer Time .......7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship ................. I1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast.................. :00 a.m.
Bread ol Life -.Sunday .......12:15 p.m.
TH E Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship. ................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCII
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1.:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .............1....10:00 a.m.
English Service ..................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIIURCII
322 Ianchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
I'cdnert'.rkv Ervening Cell 7Groupv
Adult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ............7...7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call fir locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCII
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ....................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .........11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.







CHURCH OF CIIRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men v Leadersh'rlip & Training Cla.\ r -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CIHURCII OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CIIURCII OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 IHanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ............... 00 a m.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:00 a.m


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCIHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 am.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service. ......7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. ..............7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dom inica .........................10:00 a.m .
Servicio ................................ 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..............1.. 1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CIIURCI
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .....:".7:00 p.m.

FAITI TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................ 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ............... 10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCII
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry.................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W orship ............................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNnAY':
Generations Cafr Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10 45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ......................... 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CIHURCII OF
TIE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
MIorning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ...................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ...................6...6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ._....7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study..........10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m..
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m..
Wed. Family Night................7:00 p.m..
Adult. Children & Radiate Youth Church.

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00'a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ...... ...........10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. :00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CIHURCII
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donus ....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday\ School ........ ..........9:30 a.m.


Worship. ... ............. 1030 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bod\builders Adult (I
Crosroads &
Lighthouse Mim .....7 00 pm.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... I :00 a m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 pm.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA IIISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9"' Ave.
M anres ..... ........................ 7: 30 p.m .
Jue \es ...................................7:30 p.m .
Dom ingo...... ............... ... 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Dom ingos .............................. 6:00 p.m .
M iercoles...............................7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening .....................:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Ieard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(A ll Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m .

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ................9...9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School .....................:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERASN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
l & 3', Sun.
Communion .................. 10:00 a.m.
2"' & 4"' Sun.
Divine Worship................ 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .................... 1.... 1:15 a.m.
Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ...... .....9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ..........7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1...1:00 a.m
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... ....7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ............ ...10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCII
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday ............................... 9:00 a.m .
Holy Days .... .

ST. MICILAEL'S
CATHOLIC CIIUR('I
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) 5:00 p m.
(Spanish) .....7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ...... ... .7:00 a.mI
(English) .................. :30 a.m
(Spanish)..... .......... I 1 00 a.m .
(C reole) ................. I:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8 30 a.n.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .................... 9:30 a m.
Morning Worship .......... I1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ..............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...... ..... I :00 am.
Evening Worship ..............6.00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ..................2:00 p.m
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Atnderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ............:.......7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................ 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....... ............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCII
Gardner
Sunday School ................:1000 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service............7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak lills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ................. ............ 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871- Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............ ........... 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ...... ................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m .
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426_Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ..................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATIIA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Worship..... .... ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evenig...................... 00 p.m
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ...........7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA IISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
.............................................. 7:00 p.m.
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .....................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ................... :30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m .

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ...................11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School .. .................9:30 a.in.
Morning Worship................ .... 1I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones.......................... 0:00 a.m.
Doctrina........................... 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club.......................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio...............................8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.

SSEEDS
FROM
STHE
l SOWER
M'I'hael A G.~o 00
Meti er. GCta


A mountaineer came to town
and saw some strange fruit.
"What's that?" he asked.
"A tangerine," said the grocer.
"Try one."
"Nope," he answered. "I've got
some tastes now I can't satisfy.
I'm not aimin' to take on more."
Do you have tastes you can't
satisfy? Maybe that's because
you've rejected the Lord from your
life.
Without Him, you're on a road
that leads to ever-increasing
dissatisfaction, emptiness and
frustration. You become a hollow
soul, a zero with the edges rubbed
off.
There was a poet like that, but he
tumed to the Lord. He testified, "He
satisfieth the longing soul."


A4/ 4 /. Al
*.4 tiiff lti~ "W


Sunday
Matthew
24.29-51


Z n this season of Advent. the four Sundays helfore
Christmas, we celebrate an old truth, the ciminig
of Christ. As we light a new candle on the traditional
Advent wrcalh each week, we are reminded anew
to prepare for the arrival of something momentous.
Refles.ing onn an event that happened so long ago
can reveal to us a new undcrsanding ,f how ut li.c
our lives tlxlta. Prepare for Chrisnmas in adJance
this Advent: altend your house of worship weekly.


Monday
Psalm
a


Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Isaiah Isaiah Isaiah Revelation Revelation
12.1-6 25.1-12 65.17-25 21.1-27 22.1-21


Sec-res Sele?:e- :' The Aarc.n 5,b a Sc be
'pyry(2I'3

CPecc 5Aioer gr6C ers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL













Dad Put The TV On Porch

So Everyone Could Watch


By JOSHUA ALMARAZ
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview was with Viola
Maldonado.
'Q: When and where were you
born?
A: I was born on April 29, 1947, in San
Benito, Texas.
Q: What was your school like when
you were in elementary school?
A: My school was very strict, and we
didn't have P.E., we had recess. And
that was the time we had to play out-
side.
I had to quit school when I was in
sixth grade and help work, but I eventu-
ally went back to school when my fami-
ly moved from Texas to California. And
I was also able to get my associate's
degree in theology.
Q: What did kids wear back then?
A: The boys would wear blue jeans,
Levis, either white T-shirts or plaid
shirts. And the girls would wear skirts,
penny loafers with bobby socks or black
or white socks. Also, the skirts used to
have a poodle on the front in different
colors.
Q: What did you do after school?
A: I used to work in the.fields picking
cotton. And if there was any extra time,
I would play jump rope, jacks or hop-
scotch.
Q: What did you do for fun?
A: We used to play hopscotch, jacks,
jump rope, and we used to go to base-
ball games. And even though it was
dumb, we used to go to the railroads
and put a spoon or nail on the railroad
tracks and then they would be flat and
we would get them after to play with
them.
I also used to go and help my grand-
ma after school to sell snow cones, and
she taught me how to make the syrup
that goes onto the snow cones.
Q: How much did candy or ice
cream cost?
A: Candies were at the most five
cents a box; candy apples cost five
cents. And the most popular candies


were Lemon Heads. Sugar Daddy, (iood
.n' Plenty and Baby Ruth. They all cost
five cents.
The chocolate milk at the cafeteria
was five cents also.
Q: What is your favorite childhood
memory?
A: My favorite childhood memory
was when my dad used to take us to
Boca Chica, a beach. And when he used
to take us to Padre Island. Also, when
my mom used to dress us up for Easter
in lavender, yellow, baby blue and pink
dresses that she would make herself
with the material that cost 50 cents a
yard.
Q: What childhood memory would
you like to relive if you had the
opportunity?
A: The memory I would want to
relive is, we used to have talent shows
in the back of a flatbed truck and I used
to dance the mashed potato and the
twist.
Q: What
did you 5 1 1
want to be ,
when you
grew up?
A: When I grew up I wanted to be a
nurse, but then I volunteered at a hospi-
tal for a while and I changed my mind.
So then I grew up and married a mis-
sionary, and I helped him for 40 years
in the ministry until he passed away on
Nov. 10, 2004.
Q: What was it like when you first
got color television?
A: Color television came out in the
'60s, and not a lot of people used to
have it because they couldn't afford it,
so my dad used to put it on the porch so
the neighbors and kids would be able to
watch it.
Q: Were there any wars happening
when you were a kid?
A: I don't remember.
Q: Did you listen to the radio or
watch television more?
A: I used to listen to the radio more.
We were only allowed to watch one and


a half or two hours of television, at the
most. We had a lot of chores to do, and
my dad said it wasn't good to watch a
lot of television.
Q: What was your favorite radio
station or television show?
A: I don't remember my favorite
radio station but my favorite television
show was "The Roy Rogers Show." It
was a cowboy show with Roy Rogers


June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C
and Dale Evans, his wife.

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


.-.


From The Herald-Advocate
Of Thursday, JUNE 20, 1995
Front-Page Headlines: X
N Finances Force School Time Changes
SBoard Seeks Public's Input On Monday Night
Sawmill Project Turns To Dust
SFreak Accident Seriously Injures Pair Inflating Tire
HIV Testing Day Set For Tuesday

Child Hit By Car
A While Crossing 17
By Cvnthia Krahl ran in front or the vehicle as she steering away from the child, but
A 12-yeanold Bowling Green tried to get to the other side of the was unable to avoid hitting her.
r wrlas struck by a car last week highway, DelaRosa said. Khristian collided with the
while tossing U.S. 17 6 The office said Berger took front left fender of the ca and
SKhrislianl Iin., nt' 310 Efpps evasive action, braking and went up into the windshield, he
SAve., appaicnrly was fleeing said. The child then fell to the
if rolnl pack oif dogs when slh pavement.
darted into the path of a car Hardee Fire-Rescue was called
driven by Slharirct t H ca Berger, to the scene, and the girl wa,
of Winter Haven. taken to Florids
Police Chief Bobby Brown said Hospital/Wauchula.
the collision of pedestrian and Berger, 24, was not injured in
vehicle occurred at about 7:23 in the accident, DeLaRosa raid. Her
lle ruorting oa Tuesday. vehicle sustained roughly S1,X000
Khiristian, who suffered a in damages.
b hroin leg und an injured She was cited for driving with
shoulder inl Ihe accident, is an expired tag, he added, No
currently recovering at home other charges are expected.
following a shot t hospital stay. Chiqufta Lane, Khristiar,'i
According to a report filed by mother, said Monday her
Of, Vin, cent Det~uRosa, who in- daughter did not fully recall thr
Sa .ideal, but is having dreams
tirivilt a 1994 Pontiac north- accident, b is having drt
bound on U.S. 17 in the right- about it.
0 0(


I love quotations because it is a joy to find thoughts one might have beautifully
expressed with much authority by someone recognized wiser than oneself.
-Marlene Dietrich
S it." :


c..*. 'V.'Ag'.


MEETING


NOTICE


THE HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

invites the Public to the



SUSTAINABLE HARDEE: VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE





INFRASTRUCTURE MEETING


TUESDAY


* JUNE 28, 2011


* 6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.


COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM

412 W. Orange St., Rm. 102, Courthouse Annex, 1st floor, Wauchula
Please come share your thoughts and ideas of what is needed in your community
All meetings are open to the public


For More Information
Call The County Planning Department at

863-767-1964

Email kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net Hll.

Visit www.hardeecounty.net/visioning


THERE MAY BE ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS IN ATTENDANCE WHO MAY
OR MAY NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE DISCUSSION
6 16.23c











4C The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011


Women Play Ball Twice Weekly


KINDERGARTEN
Zamarion Albritton
Corey Hill
Madi Hall
Callie Eisenhauer
Austin Garza
Drew Beattie
Maddie Jane Schraeder
Savannah Conerly
Latalious Faulk
Anabelle Servin
Abby Ellis
Emilee Worden
Dean Clark
Emmie Alexy
Shea Jones
Boone Pazzaglia
Lindsay Bolin
Kenyiin Lee
Logan Albritton
Taylor Hays
Gavin Sharp
Soriah Maldonado
Esther Avalos
Gatlin Thornton
Jensey Hays
Myia Lamy
Kaden Bryant
Joshua Block
Estrella Torres
Ella Stockton
Donald Ellis
Roman Hubbell
Amy Fimbres
Amy Eubanks
Cristian Soria
Lacee Ayers
Taijaeaus Blandin
Jeremiah Brown
Alvero Desantiago
Maddison Justiss
Seth Pautz
Rosa Poucher
Marlen Rosas
Haylee Norris
Doraelia Torres-
Martinez
Maria Sierra
Jonathan Garcia
Brenda Paul
Marco Montanez
Alex Harris
Ty Woods
Miah Velazquez
Kross Sandoval
Dane Risher
Zoie Hill
Rilya Battle
Sierra Perez
Guillermina Iracheta
Christopher Hansen
Jelacio Zamora
Duran Juarez
Trenton Alfred
Martin Cardoza
Diana Jaimes
Leah Judah
Janet Luis-Vasquez
Diego Mayorido
Ethan Ramirez
Ashley Ramos
Kimbery Reas
Flor Ruiz
Valerie Torres
Liais Velasco-Cruz
Juan Carlos Mares
Amalee Bruno-Perez
Ancelmo Macedo-
Banda
Averee Hanks
Ma'Ryah Trevino
Mikayla Metayer
Salud Villafuerte-
Herrera
Tony Will Rodriguez
Tyme Rimes
Wilney Francois


Wyatt Rowland
Alexis Lopez
Kaydence Lozano
Andrew Bergens
Gerardo Diego
Eli Duncan
Zamar Fils-Aime
Eva Hernandez
Obed Gonzalez
Madisyn Hines
Nathan Hughes
Briana Navarro
Mason Shepard
Adan Flores

FIRST GRADE
Dawson Bryant
Samuel Calvillo
Marvin Cook
Lauren Gainous
Lorena Bautista-
Martinez
Ariana Sanchez
Rigoberto Lopez
Pablo Iracheta
Natali Aguilar
Daniel Cantu
Jayden Hays
Sonia Hernandez
Dalton Johnson
Carlie Knight
David Navarro
Johana Ortiz-Diaz
Sylvia Preston
Emily Sheffield
Sean Souther
Jaime Villa
Kaylee Ayers
R. J. Cabrera
Joanna Mier
Christopher Nickerson
Aariah White
Elijah Albritton
Joseph Hamilton
Timothy Cowart
James Lang
Serena Thompson
Ali Abel
Shanteya Frederick
Manuelita Guzman
Amber Harrison
Ricardo Martinez
Nicole Martinez
SAdrianna Mier
Treasure Camel
Derek Taylor
Brin Conerly
Alyssa Cortez
Faith Davis
Tori Durden
Cason Gough
Clay Hancock
Gabriela Jose-Perez
Jake Stephens
Macy Grace Tyson
Cody Vina
Ashlyn Willis
Greysen Weeks
Yesenia Hernandez-
Benitez
Abby Burnett
Alexis Caballero
Baileigh Herrera
Ismael Mejia
Gabriela Paniagua
Jessica Patino
Zyann Parker
Gabriela Arana
Kaden Chapman
Desire Medina
Maria Moreno
Addyson Smith
Julie Tomas-Lagunas
Andrew Lee

SECOND GRADE
Emma McGuckin


Monika Poucher
Ellie Juarez
Zharia Cook
Ruben Perez
Hunter Harris
Lizbeth Morales
Mariela Torres-
Martinez
Javier Figueroa
Leah Hall
Samantha Hardin
Jessica Huckaby
Andy Medina
Christian Montanez
Riana Sutton
Carlos Ruiz
Leimy Moreno
Caleb Block
Da'Myah Carlton
Riley Justiss
Kaylee Ybarra
Diego Garcia Perez
Elizabeth Ramirez
Darla Joe Harned
Morgan Hellein
Katelynn Bolin
Sandra Solis
Kiara Coronado
Cole Hines
Parker Sasser
Lucy Stone
Skylar Tatum
Sailor Ullrich
Ethan Sanchez
Lindsey Garner
Keyla Romero
Nevaeh Gonzalez
Cheyanne Longoria
Jace Bryan
Abby Duke
Zoe Garza
Karson Goodwyn
Haven Gray
Tyler Jackson
Eboni Lamy
Cali Nguyen
Star Parker
Michelle Patterson
Alyssa Perez
Owen Schraeder
Carson Terrell

THIRD GRADE
Tony Guerrero
Hannah Brown
Javier Chavez
Griffin Clark
Dylan Davis
Jack Driskell
Jessica Kunkel
Quintin Lindsey
Adam Pazzaglia
Weston Schraeder
Maddy Stockton
Fabian Garza
Mariella Badillo
Kein Knight
Madison McGee
Adriana Perez
Carolina Ramirez
Rafael Alvarez
Lucia Galvez
Jacob Henderson
Marah Uri
Enrique Velazquez
Taylor Watkins
Michael Narciso
Sophie Allen
Dylan Crawford
Taleia Moreno
Jacob Lee
Liala Borjas .
Jonathan Carnley
Cristal Miranda
Tatiana Mier
Sandra Paniagua
Ramon Macedo-Banda


Summer Bond
Renell Herrera
Jerica Pierce
Meagan Strickland
Damian Hernandez-
Oliva

FOURTH GRADE
Aliyah Bias
Isaac Moreno
Lillian Salazar
Shelby Spencer
Aubrey Stark
Shelby Zeigler
Carrie Taylor
Riley Boyette
Logan Albritton
Daisy Badillo
Claire Carlton
Sarah Carlton
Tara Hines
Hardee Pace
Ashlee Patterson
Isaiah Torres
Noah Torres
Mike Trevino
Matt Tyson
Dustin Willis
Makayla Wilson
Aubrey Bragg
Marvin Cook
Trey Stephens
Joel Martinez
Venessa Valerio
Conchita Torres
Yasmin Ramirez
Denali Briones
Arianna Carter
Jerika Rimes
Victoria Salazar
Ederika Austin
Jakayla Hearns
Mercedes DeLeon
Lily Franco
Rachel St. Fort
Yamilex Miranda
Julien Benavidez
Lianna Albritton
Savannah Abbott
Arnout de Jong

FIFTH GRADE
Alexzandra Brant
Maribel Rodriguez
Maria Paniagua
Nubia Hernandez
Brilyance Augustus
Joel Lee .'.:
Brooke Shaw -
Miguel Ruiz
Adrian Rodriguez
Dora Cardoza
Jax Ullrich
Mercedes Cisneros
Nicholas Sellers
Ana Villa
Gaby Montoya
Ricardo Gomez-
Molina
Sarai Santana
Ellie Palmer
Jara Cummings
Cole Terrell
Sarai Espinoza
Gabriella Ruiz
Savannah Mullins
Shelby Gibson
Lindsey Barwick
Kara Friers
Peyton Roberts
Tanner Carlton
Yisselle Mier
Alicia Ruiz
Nickolas Ramirez
Destiny Scheel
Kendral Smith


The corn in corned beef dates back to a time when "corns" or kernels of coarse salt
were used to cure beef. No corn was actually involved in the process.

Short height and speeches on behalf of the Democra-tic party earned President James
Polk the nickname "Napoleon of the Stump."


i L !.
Environmental Engineer
fj.
log o,
;'89 ~ pa


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's two weeks down and
about eight to go in the 2011
Women's Church Softball
League.
In a sport that sees only four
games a week. two each on
Tuesday and Thursday even-
ings. a couple of teams did not
get into action last week.
There are slight changes in
the standings after the second
week of play. Holy Child Cath-
olic and San Alfonso Mission
join First Christian and First
Methodist-Wauchula/First Bap-
tist Bowling Green with 2-0
records. The last two teams sat
out this week.
Florida First Assembly and
New Hope Baptist are now at 1-
2 and St. Michael Catholic and
New Vision Worship Center are
looking for their first victories.
Games began last Tuesday
with Holy Child defeating New
Vision 23-4.
Sabrina Hernandez, Selena
Olmos, Darlene Torres and
Maggie Olvera were all triple-
score batters for Holy Child.
Kristina Garcia, Lucy Garcia.


Adriana Sneider and Becky
Briones added twin tallies.
Leadoff batter Rachel Coker
circled the bases twice for New
Vision. Vanessa Oberisk and
America Sandoval each
chipped in with a run. while
Aislynn Holt was stranded
twice and Sabrino Lazo. Caylah
Coker. Alexi Santana. Amanda
Jones and Donna Smith were
also left on base.
In the Tuesday late game. San
Alfonso outlasted First Assem-
bly 15-9.
Meagan Henderson came
home four times for San Al-
fonso. Gloria Solis added three
runs. Kourtney Henderson.
Emily Starratt and Aleeza each
two runs and Taylor and
SHonesty the final runs.
Jamie Buckley topped First
Assembly with four trips
around the bases. Teresa Gaitan,
Raquel Taylor. Bonnie Simp-
son. Brandy Sanchez and
Elizabeth Macias each added a
run.
In the early game on
Thursday, New Hope skipped
past New Vision 12-8.
Melanie Henderson and Kim


West Central Florida
Area Agency on Aging, Inc.






Assistance. Advocacy. Answers on Aging.






SH-IN
a Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders
Florida Department of Elder Affairs







LOCAL HELP FOR PEOPLE WITH MEDICARE


r NU-HOPE
SElder Care Services, Inc.
Supporting Seniors Strengthening Communities


FLORIDA HOSPITAL
Wauchula


Benavides led New Hope with
three scores apiece, while
Stephanie Davidson and Mindy
Hayman each put two runs on
the board and Lori Barbaree
and Sandra Holt added a run
each.
Valerie Klein put a pair of
runs in the book for New
Vision. Lazo, Oberisk, Ann.
Talley. Beverly Pauley, San-
doval and Hayman each
chipped in with a run.
The Thursday nightcap was
another thriller, with First
Assembly outlasting St.
Michael 19-16.
Buckley scored three times
for First Assembly. April
Lozano. Gaitan, Bonnie Simp-
son. Lynday Naranjo, Ally
Simpson and Macias added
twin tallies apiece and Raylor,
Meagan Smith, Peyton Her-
nandez and Vanessa Hernandez
each added a run.
Melinda W. led St. Michael
with three runs scored. Lori
Dees, Brianna and Blanca put a
pair of runs in the book and
Pricila Silva, Britney Coutre,
Aurora Santoyo, Susanna, De-
linda, Wanda Stetler and Lucy
Silva each added a run.


FREE


* Blood Pressure Checks
* Blood Sugar Testing
* Bone Density Screenings
* Pulse and Oxygen Levels
* HIV Testing (tentative)
* Educational Sessions
* Demonstrations
* Medicare Counseling with
Trained SHINE Counselors


AND


* Safety Information
* Health Information
* Local medical, community
and recreational program
information
* Representatives from
community services


DOOR PRIZES AND MORE I


For more information
Call (863) 773-3101
and ask for ext. 6476


I- ^- m 6:6.10 23C.Af


Hardee Help Center Thrift Store

226 W. Main St. Wauchula
(across from Giovanni's)






Now Offers Consignment

(Furniture Valued Over $50)



k 30-day Layaway Now Available
(for purchases over $50)






Outreach of the Hardee County Ministerial Association

Hours: Monday Friday 9:30 am 5:30 pm 23c





COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR


Age Well at Any Age


Thursday, June 30


8:00 11:00 A.M.



Hardee County Agri-Civic Center

515 Civic Center Drive

Corner of Stenstrom Rd. and Altman Rd.,

Wauchula


I I


-


A













June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


-l i C o [s] I3 [e F g ]k .1 (1d tS

Week ending June 19, 2011
Weather Summary: On June 13, Governor Rick Scott
declared Florida in a State of Emergency due to drought and wild-
fires. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, updated June 14, 8;6
percent of the State had moderate to exceptionally dry drought rat-
ings. Only a small portion of the State near Brooksville and Dade
City showed no drought. The Panhandle and southern Peninsula
are still showing extreme drought. Lake Okeechobee continued to
show declining water levels. Recent rains last week were wel-
comed, but more was needed to alleviate drought. Parts of south
and central Florida received greater amounts of rain while northern
Florida remained very dry. According to the Florida Automated
Weather Network (FAWN), Palmdale (3.94 inches), Kenansville
(2.43 inches), and Clewiston (2.31 inches) received the most rain-






Fort Green News

By Rilla Cooper

773-6710


Greetings from Fort Green!
"Ain't God Good" was one of
Jerry Clower's sayings, but we
at Fort Green can sure claim it.
We received one and 4/10ths of
an inch of rain Saturday after-
noon. The yard looks better and
the flowers are standing at
attention, saying "Thank You,
Lord!"
One day last week we were in
town and it rained so hard at
Wal-Mart and the wind blew the
shopping carts across the park-
ing lot, we felt sure all of
Wauchula was getting three
inches of rain! But Avis, who
lives in town, said she barely
got the yard sprinkled, maybe
1/10th of an inch.
All the people I have talked
to who have adopted children
really plan for the day they got
them! I saw Kimberly Godwin
in Lakeland last Friday, and she
said they were planning a fun-
filled weekend. This past week-
end marked the one-year an-
niversary of the date they got
their children, Megan and
Ethan.
They went to the Fun Park in
Lakeland Friday night, the
beach Saturday and then to Sea
World on Sunday. Kimberly
and Derek are very happy with
their ready-made family, and
we wish them all many more
years to celebrate!
I was on the way home last
Thursday from another doctor
appointment and was glad to
slam on brakes. Luckily there
was .no traffic-on the Bowling
Green Road as a quail walked
across the road with about 10
little biddies following her.
They were beautiful and I don't
know how long it has been
since I've seen this kind of
sight. It used to be fairly com-
mon but they are becoming a
thing of the past.
Dave Parks was working on
the road in front of our home
and during a lull, he asked if we
were related to Junior Cooper.
When I answered in the affir-
mative, he said they used to
work at the packing houses
together. You never worried
about Junior calling in sick, as
he never missed a day or night
of work. He said anyone could
work there, but most people
don't like manual labor any-
more!
Betty Walker is still so weak


she can't attend church. Chrysta
said they changed her medicine,
supposedly for the better, but it
has put her in this condition.
Her spot is really noticeable
when she and Clint are absent.
Faye Davis is waiting on
reports to tell her why she has
problems with her breathing
and congestion. She can hardly
breathe out in this hot air, and
this has gone for four to five
weeks. Maxine and Roy Albrit-
ton are flying to Arizona for a
procedure on her eyes. We pray
it is successful and please pray
for all these ladies.
James Williamson reported
his sister is an answer to prayer.
Lola Mae Shiver had broken
her ankle and had lots of rehab,
but it just looked doubtful if she
would ever get to walk normal
again. The other day when
James and Mabel went to visit,
she walked to the door to admit
them!
Our sincere sympathy is ex-
tended to the families of Mrs.
Henry Graham and Mrs.
Frances Frey. Mary Samuels
told me she and Frances were
first cousins.
Jake Willis signed a song at
church Sunday morning and did
a good job. Then the Gum
Creek Quartet sang, as we did
not have a choir. The front of
the church was taken up with
Bible School decorations. Rex
and Trish Richey did .a super
job of making a New York City,
complete with skyscrapers and
taxicabs! Dalton Richey and
Kasey Powell put on a little skit
for a preview of Bible School.
I really goofed up! Karson
Godwin goes to Wauchula Ele-
mentary! She won her award
from that school! I am sorry,
Karson.
Congratulations to Dana Ab-
bott as she is now a registered
nurse. This 'requires lots of
work and we are proud of her
for her dedication.
When you are in the Gaines-
ville area, listen to the Christian
radio station and try to hear
Brian Pappas. He and Sherry
have moved there and he is
preaching.
There will be a Methodist
Cemetery workday this Satur-
day. Come early, and lunch will
be furnished.
Please pray for another, our
country and the military.


fall. Temperatures averaged three to five degrees above normal.
High temperatures were mostly in the mid 90s. Seven of the 36
FAWN stations reported high temperatures of 100 degrees or more.
Lo\ws were in the mid to upper 60s. The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of Forestry had cur-
rent reports of 440 active wildfires covering 118,887 acres. As of
June 19. 36 new fires were reported covering 438 acres. The major-
ity of the \%ildfiles are along the East Coast.

Field Crops: Field crops continued to be stressed due to
drought. Scattered thunderstorms provided temporary but minor
reprieve for some fields. Approximately 75 percent of topsoil and
subsoil moisture levels were very short or short, In the north, corn,
cotton, and peanuts have been severely affec..J by drought. In
Santa Rosa and Walton counties, peanut planting was not complete.
Farmers in north Florida were deciding whether to plant an alter-
native crop in replacement of peanut acreage. Some cotton and
peanut fields were replanted. In Suwannee County, dryland corn is
in poor condition. In the south, sugarcane growers are concerned
about the potential effects of drought on cane. Surface water irri-
gation sources were low. Peanut planting was 98 percent complete,
two percent below last year, and comparable to the five-year aver-
age. The peanut crop condition was reported as 17 percent very
poor, 22 percent poor, 45 percent fair, and 16 percent good. More
rainfall is needed to improve peanut progress. Peanuts pegged were
3 percent compared to 14 percent last year, and the five-year aver-
age of 15 percent.

Vegetables: Light vegetable activity was taking place entail-
ing okra, tomato, and watermelon harvest and market movement.
Avocado movement was expected to increase. Potato harvest in the
tri-county area was complete.


Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture condition ranged
from very poor to good, with more pasture in fair to good condition
than last week. The cattle were in poor to excellent condition, with
most in fair condition. Their overall condition was unchanged from
the previous week. In the Panhandle and northern areas, pasture
condition ranged from very poor to good, with most poor to fair.
Scattered rain during the week at some locations gave minor relief
to pastures. Hay feeding was active with cattle producers feeding
stockpiled hay from last season. In many locations no hay was cut
this spring because it has been so dry. The condition of the cattle
ranged from poor to excellent, with most in fair condition. In the
central and southwest areas, pasture condition ranged from very
poor to good, with most in poor to fair condition. A few scattered
thundershowers around the area provided the pastures some relief.
The cattle condition ranged from very poor to excellent, with most
in poor to fair condition.

Citrus: Temperatures were in the upper 60s at night and the
upper 90s during the day for the majority of the week. There was
widely variable rainfall this week, with 24 stations receiving some
rainfall, 10 of them receiving an inch or more. Palmdale recorded
the most, with 3.94 inches. Exceptional drought conditions now
exist in Palm Beach and Martin counties. Extreme drought condi-
tions existed in the southeastern portion of the State, with the most
severe conditions in Indian River, St Lucie, Okeechobee, and parts
of Brevard, Collier, Highlands. Hendry, Osceola, and Glades coun-
ties. Twelve packinghouses and twelve processors were still run-
ning. Processing plants were running Valencia oranges and planned
to continue to operate through late June. Grove activity included
harvesting, resetting new trees, young tree care, applying herbi-
cides, hedging and topping, brush removal, and fertilizer applica-
tion.


I Hun5tTin/ishing Forecast


6/23/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:32 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Ri.~: 1:00 AM
Set: 1:43 PM
Overhead: 7:20 AM
Underfoot: 7:40 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter
Major Times
7:20 AM 9:20 AM
7:40 PM 9:40 PM
Minor Times
1:00 AM 2:00 AM
1:43 PM 2:43 PM
Prediction
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/24/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:32 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:32 AM
Set: 2:34 PM
.Overhead: 8:01 AM
jJnderfoot: 8:22 PM
Moon Phase
39%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:01 AM -10:01 AM
8:22 PM 10:22 PM
Minor Times
1:32 AM 2:32 AM
2:34 PM 3:34 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/25/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:33 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 tmins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:04 AM
Set: 3:27 PM
Overhead: S:44 AM
Underfoot: 9:06 PM
Moon Phase
30%;
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:44 AM -10:44 AM
9:06 PM- 11:06 PM
Minor Times
2:04 AM 3:04 AM
3:27 PM 4:27 PM
Prediction
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/26/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:33 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:40 AM
Set: 4:21 PM
Overhead: 9:29 AMN
Underfoot: 9:53 PM
Moon Phase
21%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:29 AM -11:29 AM
9:53 PM 11:53 PM
Minor Times
2:40 AM 3:40 AM
4:21 PM 5:21 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/27/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:33 AM
Set 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:19 AM
Set: 5:17 PM
Overhead:l0:17 AM
Underfoot: 10:42 PM
Moon Phase
14r%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:17 AM-12:17 PM
10:42 PM-12:42 AM
Minor Times
3:19 AM 4:19 AMl
5:17 PM 6:17 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/28/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:34 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:03 AM
Set: 6:12 PM
Overhead: 11:08 AM
Underfoot: 11:34 PM
Moon Phase
8%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
11:08 AM- 1:08 PM
11:34 PM 1:34 AM
Minor Times
4:03 AM 5:03 AM
6:12 PM 7:12 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/29/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:34 AM
Set: 8:26 PM

Day Length
13 hrs. 52 tnins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:53 AM
Set: 7:07 PM
Overhead: 12:01 PM
Underfoot: --:-
Moon Phase
3%C
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:01 PM- 2:01 PM
Minor Times
4:53 AM 5:53 AM
7:07 PM 8:07 PM
Prediction
Better -
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/30/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:34 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:48 AM
Set: 7:59 PM
Overhead. 12:56 PM
Underfoot:12:28 AM
Moon Phase
1I
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:28 AM 2:28 AM
12:56 PM 2:56 PM
Minor Times
5-48 AM 6:48 AM
7:59 PM 8:59 PM
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC. -4


I make sure the land yields its best.


I am Mosaic.

It's no surprise to find an orange grove here in Florida.

But most people don't realize that, along with providing

crop nutrients to farmers across America, Mosaic farms

its own groves on reclaimed mining lands. Right now,

we have about 6,000 acres of citrus in production.

As grove superintendent, I see things through, from

planning to harvest.


It makes sense that I keep Florida's land growing.








w .mosaica.com


www.mosaicfla.com


6:23c


-I












6C The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
A big Democratic rally will
be held on Saturday evening, at
which time the address of
President Roosevelt will be
heard. Those attending will be
known as Roosevelt nomina-
tors, as the president will accept
the nomination at this time.
Every local Democrat in
Hardee County is invited to be
present and make the meeting
the largest of its kind in the
county. Tickets are $1 each and
every penny will go toward the
national campaign fund.

Motorized mail service,
which has been in effect for
several weeks and proved more
reliable than the railroad, was
approved by the postmaster at
Fort Myers last week. The Star
route will go from Lakeland to
Fort Myers and back every day
but Sunday, a total of I 16 miles,
at a salary not to exceed $250
per month. It will arrive at
Wauchula at 11 a.m. and 5 p.m.
each day.

Paramount's gift to humanity,
blonde Mae West, moves into
the Royal Theatre on




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 25-2010-CA-000672
SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION,

Plaintiff,

V.

CAROLYN K. BROWN, TRUSTEE
OF THE CAROLYN K. BROWN
TRUST; CAROLYN K. BROWN,
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR.
OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT
#1; TENANT #2,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is here by given, pur-
suant to Final Judgment of
Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered
in this cause, in the Circuit Court
of HARDEE County, Florida; I will
sell the property situated in
HARDEE County, Florida
described as:

LOTS, 1, 2, 11 AND 12 OF
BLOCK 13 IN THE ORIGI-
NAL RAILROAD SURVEY
OF BOWLING GREEN,.
FLORIDA, TOGETHER
WITH THE NORTH 75.04
FEET OF AN ALLEY 15
FEET IN WIDTH LYING
BETWEEN LOTS 1 AND 2
AND LOTS 11 AND 12,
BLOCK 13, ORIGINAL
SURVEY OF BOWLING
GREEN, FLORIDA TERMI-
NATING ON JONES
STREET AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
30, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

and commonly known as: 4719
Church Avenue, Bowling Green,
FL 33834, at public sale, to the
highest and best bidder, for cash,
on the Second Floor Hallway out-
side of Room 202 of the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 W. Main
St., Wauchula, Florida 33873, on
June 29, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

Disability Language:
If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs assistance in order
to participate in a program or
service of the State Courts
System, you should contact the
Office of the Court Administrator
at (863) 534-4686 (voice), (863)
534-7777 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770
(Florida Relay Service), as much
in advance of your court appear-
ance or visit to the courthouse as
possible. Please be prepared to
explain your functional limitations


and suggest an auxiliary aid or
service that you believe will
enable you to effectively partici-
pate in the court program or serv-
ice.

DATED this June 8, 2011

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
6:16.23c


Wednesday and Thursday in her
newest recognition to the recon-
struction of the '90s, "Klondike
Annie." This gay and lusty tale
opens on the Barbary Coast in
San Francisco, shifts to the high
seas as she makes her escape,
and winds up in Alaska during
the Gold Rush.

J.P. "Goat" Mitchell has a
summer week-end special at the
Chevrolet Service Station, with
specialized lubrication just 50
cents and a wash and polish for
$1.


50 YEARS AGO
Prices were up on all classes
at the Hardee Livestock Market
last week, averaging about
$1.60 per hundredweight
across the board. Market man-
ager Russell Farmer called it
the largest advance in the histo-
ry of the market. Johnny
Johnson of Immokalee topped
the market with a $29.50 calf
weighing 235 pounds. Steers
ran from $16 to $22.25; heifers
from $15 to $19.75; and bulls
from $14 to $20.25.

The cost of cooking for pris-
oners is going to come high at
the new county jail, the Board
of County Commissioners
learned this week. Jail architect
Nelson Faebere of Naples esti-
mated the cost of the kitchen in
the new jail to be $8,000. Bids
will be advertised and will close
on July 20. Without the kitchen
or office equipment, the project
has cost $171,000. Completion
date is mid-November.

A four-page spread highlight-
ed the grand opening of the new
$200,000 First Federal Savings
& Loan Association offices at
the corner of North Sixth Ave-
nue and Palmetto Street. Over
2,000 people saw the large
murals in the offices of Presi-
dent Paul Thomas, several other
officers and the directors meet-
ing room. The heavy steel vault.
door was another special fea-
ture.

.Grady's Super Market on
North Sixth Avenue features
winter garden fruit pies for 33
cents each, lemons 29 cents a
dozen, three pounds of onions
for 19 cents, chuck steak at 39
cents a pound and hamburger at
39 cents a pound.

25 YEARS AGO
A small but diversely opin-
ioned audience assembled on
Monday morning when the
Hardee County School Board
met in workshop session to dis-




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 252011CA000012

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
WAUCHULA, a national banking
Association organized under the
laws of the United States of
America,
Plaintiff,
vs.

MARGARITA VARGAS, a married
Woman not joined by her
spouse, FRANSISCO VARGAS,
and JOHN DOE and JANE DOE
As Unknown Tenants In
Possession Of The Subject
Property,,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to Final Default Judgment
and Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on June 1, 2011, in the
above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash on the Second Floor
Hallway Outside of Room 202 of
the Hardee County Courthouse
located at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, on the 29h day
of June, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., the
following-described property:

SOUTH 1/2 OF THE FOL-
LOWING:
NW 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF NE
1/4 OF SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH,
RANGE 25 EAST, LESS
THE NORTH 233.71 FEET
THEROF, AND LESS THE
WEST 25 FEET THEROF
FOR ROAD RIGHT OF
WAY, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. TOGETHER
WITH AND INCLUDING A
1973 ARLI MOBILE HOME
ID #0663104AH AND ID
#0663104BH

DATED this 10'" day of June,
2011.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Courts
Hardee County, Florida

By: B. Reed
Deputy Clerk
6:16.23c


WaakWenB


cuss the pros and cons of an
appointed vs. elected superin-
tendent of schools. Board
Chairman Bill Lambert read a
prepared statement on the
"complicated bureaucracy" of
the school system, which is the
county's largest employer, with
over 500 employees, more than
60 pieces of transportation
equipment and 10 different
facilities. "It requires education
in management skills," he said.

The Hardee County landfill
may have only another five
years but still has a long way to
go to pay off its Farmers Home
Administration loan for its con-
struction. There is still about
$837,000 to be paid. The land-
fill handles about 27,000 cubic
yards of commercial and resi-
dential garbage each year. The
state Department of Environ-
mental Protection is now
requiring a leachate control sys-
tem, which has delayed ap-
proval of renewal of the land-
fill's permit.

Altman's Men's Wear at the
Hardee County Centre has Lee
Jeans, trim or regular fit, for
$11; men's suits regular $149
on special at $69.95; dress pants
down from $24 to $12; and
dress shirts from $15 down to
$8.
10 YEARS AGO
Kenneth B. Evers accepted
the position of county attorney
last week. After a meeting with
County Manager Gary Oden to
work out the details, Evers was
expected to begin his duties at
the regular biweekly meeting of
the commission today.

Realtors and restaurant own-
ers in the developing U.S. 17
North corridor receive city util-
ities but no municipal tax bill.
The City Council last week
developed a plan to offer volun-
tary annexing to property own-
ers between the present city
limits and the Winn-Dixie
'Marketplace and the coming
Wal-Mart Supercenter. The
city provides city water and
sewer with the stipulation that
those businesses will annex
when they become contiguous
properties.

The recently approved state
budget includes $1.4 million for
the Wauchula Hills Wastewater
Plant project and $412,126 for
local courthouse renovations,
including new state attorney
and state probation offices in
the old jail complex. There is
also a $200,000 state grant for a
Hardee Lakes recreation pro-
ject.

Real estate ads include a cou-
ple sales by owner; one 2 BR
2B home with screened porch
and fenced back yard is on spe-
cial for $65,000; an antique
brick home, 3BR 2B, with in-
ground pool for $98,900; a 3BR
2B mobile home on five acres
for $77,500; and a 3BR 2B CB
home on a large corner lot in
Bowling Green for $125,000.


KINDERGARTEN
E
Marisa Alvarez
Muizz Anchur
Isabela Anselmo
Azucena Arista
Keyara Auguste
Brandon Bailey
Ethan Barber
Alyssa Botello
Eduardo Cardenas-
Munoz
Mariah Carrizales
Elizabeth Castillo
Kimber Davidson
Jennifer DeSantiago
David Garcia
Veronica Gomez
Hunter Graham
Savana Granado
Braxton Holt
Jaqueline Jurado
Tayler Kiella
Rose Kirkland
Gloria Mendiola
Karen Monterrosa
Eric Mushrush
Carolina Paulino-
Mendieta
Eduardo Ramirez-
Ramos
Carmen Rivera
Arianna Rodriguez
Beau Schultz
Isai Venegas
Dinora Villa-Munoz
Donovan Weaver
William Willis

E/S
Ralee Barnett
Preston Barringer
Gus Carlton
Elizabeth Darty
Eduardo Diego-
Santibanez
Morgan Dunlap
Jessenia Duran
Cristian Gomez
Pablo Gonzales
Crystal Gonzalez-
Lopez
Haley Grice
Cody Knight
Sidney Madison
Stephanie McMillan
Briana Molina
Kyla Patton
Austyn Pedroza
Cristal Pena
Carlos Perez-Cuellar
Esteban Rios
Gilbert Rodriguez
Sandra Ruiz-Vasquez
Alberto Sierra
Antonio Sosa
Ami Taguja-Garduno
Marisol Villegas
Sergio Vizarraga-
Renteri
Gaoyoua Vue


Shaydan Ward


A
Perla Abarca
McKenzie Banda
Victor Chavez-Saldana
Katie Henderson
Valeria Montanez
Lindsey Montero
Ariana Olmos
Thalia Sanchez
Elicarmen Sargento-
Santiago
James "Levi" Taylor
Cierra Yarbrough

A/B
Adeline Adams
Michael Adams
Humberto Aguirre
Antonio Arellano ,
Grace Borjas
Justin Browning
Juliana Cisneros-
Motanez
Victor Cosme
Chloe Dean
Griselda Duran
Dakota Hancock
Esmeralda Hernandez-
Vasquez
Tyler Jones
Michael "Dylan"
Lambert
Summer Lanham
Diana Lopez
Odalis Lopez-Rojas
Yeng Lor
Azusena Martinez-
Alvarez
Itzel Mendez
Denis Mendieta
Marisa Mendieta
Rachael Mendoza
Adolfo Morales-
Herrera
Uriel Morales-Herrera
Ryan Newman
Brooke Ownby
Jesus Paniagua
Catherine Perez
Sadie Rivera
Adriana Rodriguez
Joaquin Rojo
Kolby Sanchez
Ari Soles
Alejandro Solis
Tyler Teuton
Katelyn Vasquez
Mattie Wells

SECOND GRADE
A
Colton Block
Cameron Cantu
Jake Cole
Justin Cole
Alexis Crews
Brianna Franks
David Mendez
Tomy Molina-Navarro
Rosalba Salazar-


a


a
-*

*


a







'I
e

o


'- -











L *-


1. .'. '*
*




o 1 -
e 1,


A/B
Jacklin "Alana" Barber
Kaylen Barringer
Erica Blasingain
Kaitlynn Brandeberry
Vicente Cabrera
Adrian Camili
Tanner Congleton
Daniel Contreras-
Ramirez
Billy Courtright
Oscar DeLeon
Jessica Estrada
Blake Graham
Anthony Griffis
Trinity Her
Palmer Klein
Robert Lee
Siera Lozano
Erin "Gracie" McElroy
Julian Mendoza
Pablo Molina-Rosales
Raquel Montanez
Jeremy Myers
Jasmine Rodriguez
Cheyann Strickland
Yacquelin Villalva
Jason. Walker

THIRD GRADE
A
Isabella Adams
Kipp Cooper
Jesus Jurado
Maria Martinez
Sydnie Steiner
Sierra Weaver

A/B
Dylan Bozeman
Aaron Bunch
Karina Carranza
Darren Daniels
Myrka DeLaTorre
Brayan Diego
Lucy Garcia
Bailey Harrell
Shaniah Hodges
Tyler Lambert
Mackenzie McCoy
Henry McElroy
Samantha McMillan
Briana Montero
Dallas Moses
Dawson Patterson
Donnell Patton
Angela Ramirez
Daniel Ramos
Liliana Ramos
Lizbet Ramos-Jaimes
Roy Revels
Rolando Reyes
Zaida Rojas
William Roland
Teron Salyers
Christian Turner
Joseph Wood


ATTENTION:


Hardee County )


. Disposal Customers: *,

s o


I

I ~


0'
0k










U'
C I




-. I


I.~
-~
-,O


Due to the



4TH OF JULY


holiday, Monday routes will be


pick-up on Thursday, July 7th.


All other routes will remain the same.


FIRST GRADE Barbosa


FOUTH GRADE
A
Luis Angeles
Amari DeLeon
Michaela Klein
David Martinez
Jose Romero-Vazquez

A/B
Destiny Ballard
Dawson Cantu
Christian Cardenas
Sandra Contreras-
Ramirez
Johnathon Couch
Mary Courtright
Katie Dayfert
Giovanni Diego
Javier Garcia
Jose "Tommy" Garcia
Adolfo Gonzalez
Rebekah Hinojosa-
Montelon
Cody Patterson
Laura Ramos
Infiniti Randolph
Sanjan Rifty
Dakota Roberts
Ivan Rojas Bautista
Claudia Rojo-Deleon
Jessica Roland
Guillermo Velasco
Daniela Villalva
Gabrielle Willis

FIFTH GRADE
A
Mason Block

A/B
Carol Allison
Makayla Benavidez
Victoria Borjas
Nicholas Buchanan
Avery Bunch
Ashja Camel
Jesaiah Delgado
Marisela Duran
Milagros Estrada
Guadalupe Garcia-
Cendejas
Rosalba Garla
Adrian Gomez
Ashley Gonzalez
Thalia Hartley
Christian Hernandez
Sylas Kirkland
Lovely Lee
Boon Lor
Cristian Martinez
Sarah McCoy
Giselle Mendez
Gabriela Reyes
Maria Reyes
Ulyssa Rodriguez
Jose "Damian" Rojas
Jasmine Sanchez'
Yatzine Sanchez
Kaela Villegas
Genouchy Vue
Aaron Zuniga








June 23, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Snook Will Reopen

In Lake Okeechobee


Memory Lane


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
decided to reopen the recre-
ational harvest season for snook
in Florida's Atlantic waters on
Sept. 1 and maintain a catch-
and-release snook fishery in
Florida's Gulf waters.
Only catch-and-release fish-
ing for snook has been allowed
statewide since Dec. 15 under
FWC executive orders to pro-
tect snook populations affected
by prolonged cold weather in
Florida during the winter of
2009-10.
Commissioners received a
staff report regarding the latest
information on the status of the
snook population, which sug-
gests that snook on Florida's
Atlantic coast were less severe-
ly impacted by cold weather
than Gulf coast snook. Based on
this information and public
comment it. has received, the
commission agreed to reopen
the snook harvest season this


fall in Atlantic waters.
The Atlantic stock of snook
in Florida's Atlantic coastal and
inland waters, including Lake
Okeechobee and the Kissimmee
River, can return to the regular
season opening Sept. 1. The
regular daily bag limit of one
snook per recreational angler
will apply, as will the 28- to 32-
inch total length slot limit.
In addition, the current har-
vest prohibition of snook in all
of Florida's Gulf, Everglades
National Park and Monroe
County state and federal waters
will remain in effect until Aug.
31. 2012. This will allow the
Gulf snook population addition-
al time to rebound.
Anglers may still catch and
release snook during snook har-
vest closures, and the FWC
encourages everyone to handle
and release these fish carefully
to help ensure their survival
upon release.


F'PHTO SUBMISSION AOLREV' SHI fER SL~ ILES
A photographer from Robertson Studio in Bartow took this class picture in front of Bowling
Green Elementary School. It shows the 1946-47 first-grade class of Mrs. Maples. Note the
variety of clothing from overalls to dress clothes, from no shoes to saddle oxfords, plus
bows in some of the girls' hair. The young girl on the front row, pictured holding her purse,
submitted this picture and still remembers everyone being told by their teacher, "Take off
your coats and leave your purses inside." But Audrey Shiver Swailes and her best friend,
Elaine Cranford Hughes, decided not to follow the rules. Pictured (front row, from left) are
Jim Anderson, Lolita Richardson, Cranford, Shiver, Sandra Jones, Bobby (last name
unknown), unidentified, Wayne McCardle, James Hill Albritton and Wayne Welch; (second
row) Billy Cotton, Polly King, Gail Woods, Peggy Albritton, Peggy Nell Kelley, Sandra Teal,
Douglas Ray, Shirley Cook, Theron Durden, Jimmy Parker and Pyatt Lastinger; (back) Mrs.
Maples, Nelda Deleah, Sue Wiggins, Adrianne Moore, Martha Dotson, Warren Gibbs, Harry
(last name unknown), Charles Nicholson, Dick McCardle, Arvin Anderson, Laurie Gill and
Lonnie Johns.

SHARE YOUR OLD PHOTOS WITH US!
Take readers on a walk down Memory Lane Dv sharing your phoioS from Harldee Counly pait Brnng your SubtTirSsins I't' Ihe news-
paper offttce at 115 S Seventh Ave or mail to The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula., FL 33873. Photos will be returned


S uHerDaif C Ip

Monday Friday
7:30 am 5:30 pm

Ages K 4th Grade

Fun, Academics, Crafts,
Swimming, Outdoor Adventures
and Field Trip Fridays


For More Information Call
Tamara Hendry Melissa Shultz
781-2218 245-721.06
6:26p


'JA'-...


MOTOR COMPANY

o SINCE 1931 .o

FEE www.WellsMC.com FE


MEGA CAB 3500
Low Miles. #TY041B


1500 CREW CAB
Extra Nice, #TYQ55A


$31,888


$24,988


$750 CONSUMER CASH
$750 TOWN & COUNTRY CASH
LEASE FROM 31 9 MO.


W-~ Si


UP TOS2000


Consumer Cash


OR 0% APR for 60mos


OLUNER RRE Standard On All New Vehicles
mOcq --'... Jeepo 2 year / 4 LOF Services 2 Year Roadside Assistance Coverage
A'I . '': Iri.5 I-. :c!~ :


$12,888 s24,888

2009 JEEP 2008 CHRYSLER TOWN
LIBERTY SPORT & COUNTRY TOURING
BJY081A One Owner, #CX146A


$17,988

2008 CHRYSLER
300C
Super Nice, #GYO43A




s23,888


$19,995

2008 CHRYSLER
ASPEN LIMITED
#TY106A


$24,988


WELLS
MOTOR COMPANY


K:,c u c


CHRYSLER


No Dealer Fee, PIus Tax & Tag, State Fee. APR WA.C.fromn Aly. S Deaer For Lease Belatis.Exp. 8M11
AVON PARK & SEBRING 453-6644 LAKE PLACID & OTHER CITIES TOLL FREE 1-888


The All New Chrysler 300


The All New Dodge Durango
/.7-'IP~eim


_i_ _~_


I'











8C The Herald-Advocate, June 23, 2011


CELEBRATION


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee T-Ball team, Giovanni's Rockhounds, held a
party on May 21 at Chuck E. Cheese in Lakeland to cele-
brate the end of the 2011 season. Pictured (front row, left
to right) are Mason Shepard, Riley Trammell and Cody
Knight; (second row) Gavin Evers, Eric Mushrush,
Jonathan Guardiola, Codee Walker and Bo Trammell;
(back) Chuck E. Cheese and Dane Risher; not pictured
Zander Yeomans and Jonathan Bishop.

YOU Can Appear In.. ".
SPoet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it Your work could be published In
hais newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear in-this fea-
,ture, send your poetry, name and-town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.


Stop by and see why so P '.
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me. -y

JENKINS FORD


3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com
9 30r.: 800-226-3325


Gene Davis
Sales and Leasing
Consultant


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
June 20, Herman Bady Smith, 63, of 525 Magnolia Blvd.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley and charged with bat-
tery.

June 19, Timothy Scott Bonney, 48, of 1253 Mockingbird
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley on an out-of-
state fugitive warrant.
June 19, Enedelia Lopez, 31, of 3152 Jack Jones Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with
battery.
June 19, a theft on Will Duke Road was reported.

June 18, Jose DeJesus Tapia, 32, of 615 W. Townsend St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with two
counts resisting/obstructing an officer without violence and two
traffic charges.
June 18, Lucio Mendoza Ruiz, 30, of 1414 Lost Acres Dr.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with
fraud-possession of a similitude of an ID card.
June 18, Patricia Martinez, 27, of 114 Franklin St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with battery.
June 18, burglary of a conveyance on Steve Roberts Special
was reported.

June 17, Nathaniel Maybell Jr., 40, of 4412 SW Jasmine St.,
Nocatee, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on two counts of
withholding support of children.
June 17, Sebastian Hernandez, 22, of 509 Rigdon Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on three counts of
violation of probation and a traffic charge.
June 17, Eliezer Greg Garza, 39, of 216 Carlton St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of con-
tempt of court.
June 17, Michelle Elizabeth Otero, 30, of 2368 Lake Dr. NW,
Winter Haven, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of
violation of probation.

June 17, John David Shoffner, 46, of 3132 Suwanee St., Zolfo
Snr:ncy xxtne nrr-ctei kit T\-- T-L- TI- axt nn tizin -- to ni **.t-


chula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with rest
ing an officer without violence.
June 15, thefts in two locations on U.S. 17 North, SR 62 sad
SR 64 West were reported.

June 13, Bradford Allen Atchley, 34, of 315 SR 62, Bowling
Green, was arrested on a charge of aggravated battery which the
offender should know would cause injury.
June 13, Robert Lee Walton, 44, of 2844 Merle Langford
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and
charged with battery.
June 13, criminal mischief on Glades Street and thefts on U.S.
17 North, Ollie Roberts Road, Griffin Road and Ratliff Road were
reported.

WAUCHULA
An entry that should have been in this section last week was
inadvertently entered in the county section. Robert Henry Lovette,
36, of 635 S. Fifth Ave. (U. S. 17 North) was arrested on June 12
by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with battery.
June 19, Rocky Lee Cisneros, 28, of 3466 S. Hickory St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Aron Thomas and charged with
DUI.
June 19, a business burglary on U.S. 17 South was reported.

June 17, thefts on South 10th Avenue and US. 17 South were
reported.

June 16, Ray Larry Driver, 49, of 408 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer and charged with
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.
June 16, David Earl Wiggins, 43, of 408 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer and charged with
battery on a person age 65 or older and battery causing bodily
harm.

June 15, a residential burglary on North Florida Avenue and a
theft on Rust Avenue were reported.

June 14, David Dewayne Lowe, 30, of 417 N. Ninth Avenue,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin on an out-of-
county warrant.
June 13, Ruben Trinidad Longoria, 36, of 410 Indiana Ave.,
Wauchula,-was arrested by Ofc. Aron Thomas and charged with
domestic-battery.
June 13; thefts on U.S. 17 South and on East Main Street were
reported.-


rp1i1ngs,, was alresteLu y Uep. JOlhn uorsey on two counts o wit l-
holding support of children. BOWLING GREEN
June 17, Shona Marie Tucker, 31, of 212 S. Seventh Ave., June 19, a fight on Pleasant Way was reported.
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of with-
holding support of children. June 18, a residential burglary on Church Avenue was report-
June 17, Aurora Alamia Garza, 31, of 2648 Heard Bridge ed.
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged
with trespassing on a structure or conveyance. June 14, Adam Gonzales, 23 of 4405 U.S. 17 North, Bowling
June 17, criminal mischief on East Main Street and thefts on Green was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged with sim-
Lucky Lonesome Trail, Snell Street and Heard Bridge Road were-- pie assault threat to do violence.
reported.

June 16, Carlos Bautista, 19, of 406 Dade St., Bowling Green,
was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward on a charge of failure to appearr
in court.
June 16, thefts on Nursery Road and on Ralph Smith Road
were reported. Your Business Could Appear Herel

June 15, Chad Daniel Richardson, 26, of 88&-Griffin Road, Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of con-
tempt of court. At The Herald Advocate
June 15, Jose Antonio Oliva, 19, of 931 Fernleaf Dr., Wau-


I "*/

|^/1
12


5'~f~~ :~t.
~.- .1
*):-
"- +--,~
- c''"c~r
.. .......-


say hello


TO 500 REASONS TO SWITCH TO SEACOAST


Enter to win a $500 Visa" gift card when you stop by Seacoast this summer.


Stop by your local Seacoast National Bank today and enter to win a $500 Visa Gift Card. It's a great chance to upgrade your summer with the best choice for
all your banking needs. In fact, the only thing easier and more beneficial than switching to Seacoast, is staying with Seacoast.


Consider Seacoast today and enjoy:


* Free checking
* No monthly fee Visa check card
* Free first order of checks


* Free online banking & bill pay
* Free direct deposit
* Personal & mortgage loans


* Discount loans with auto pay
* Savings plans
* Wealth Management


say hello TO A MORE HUMAN WAY TO BANK


Seacoast
NATIONAL BANK


Open Entry No purchase necessary Must enter to win before July 21st to be eligible to win. Mmbr
a FDIC


.; '
:i
1~~
"""
5


I


I


"
Y
r
r


202 N. 6TH AVE


I 863.773.4141


I SEACOASTNATIONAL.COM


~E~
''
ii