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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 6/9/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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System ID: UF00028302:00384
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text






















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


46
plus 4. sales 13


Who Ya Gonna Call?

Dispatch Debate Rages On


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
After a contentious workshop
Friday morning, the County
Commission is still unsure of
what to do about the fire and
rescue dispatching situation.
Polk County Sheriff Grady
Judd sent a letter to the com-
mission on May 4 informing it
of his decision to stop dispatch-
ing for Hardee County Fire-
Rescue "no later than" Oct. 1.
Hardee County Sheriff Arn-
old Lanier presented commis-
sioners with a budget estimate
for his office to assume the dis-
patching duties and a timeline
of how long it would take.
The price would be between
$323,088 and $367,323, de-
pending on software packages.
Lanier would need a few
months to hire and train em-
ployees and purchase needed
equipment and software, he
said.
The recurring salaries for


four additional dispatchers
'would be $142,000 per year.
The county pays Polk County
' about $75,000 a year for dis-
patching Hardee County Fire-
Rescue calls.
The Hardee County Sheriff's
Office currently dispatches for
itself and for the Wauchula and
Bowling Green police depart-
ments.
Fire Chief Michael Choate
told the commissioners he. is
happy with the current dis-
patching system and that the
software Polk County uses is
second to none. "The citizens of
this county deserve the same
level of service they are cur-
rently getting," Choate said.
Dr. Gregory White, medical
director for Hardee County, said
moving the dispatching to the
system in Hardee County
"would be a colossal step back
for you."
White also said qualified
people were needed_to do the


dispatching.
Commissioner Sue Birge and
Lanier took offense to that
statement, believing that Dr.
White was implying Hardee
County does not have compe-
tent people to dispatch.
Lanier replied he isn't going
to hire a bunch of first graders
as dispatchers.
White also said Judd made
the decision on his own, and the
Polk County Commission or
county manager could overrule
him.
Commissioner Grady John-
son has been campaigning to
bring the dispatch duties back
to Hardee County, and said dis-
patchers need to be local people
and familiar with local geogra-
phy and places.
Johnson said Hardee County
is the only county in the state
that does not dispatch fire and
rescue for itself.
Perry Knight, the mayor of
SSee DISPATCH 2A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON


Hardee Senior High School's Class of 2011.



HHS Graduation Ceremony Saturday


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Commencement exercises
will be held this weekend to
honor roughly 250 seniors in
Hardee Senior High School's
Class of 2011.
Finishing up their classes last
week and taking their first grad-
uation steps, the 2011 Senior
Awards & Scholarship Cere-


WEATHER
DATE HIGH LeW RAIN
06/01 86 62 0.38
06/02 91 64 0.00
06/03 92 64 0.00
06/0 92 64 0.00
0o/05 93 63 0.00
06/06 92 64 0.00
06/07 91 68 000
TABL Ralnfao to 06/07/11 11.14
Sampe road ist yw 20.54
n arAwrsn 54530
Soc. Utv. oa R.. On an..*re Cwtr

INDEX
Classifieds ..............6B
Community Calendar ..3A
Courthouse Report ...11B
Crime Blotter ........... 7C
Hardee Living........... 2B
Information Roundup ..3A
Obituaries ............... 4A




III IIi llI
71118122 0 7290 3


mony was held Tuesday, May
31. Baccalaureate was held
Monday night at First Baptist
Church of Wauchula. Their
final awards ceremony, the
Senior Honors Banquet, was
held Tuesday at the Agri-Civic
Center.
The baccalaureate service
began with the prelude offered
by Dot Bell, retired director, on
the piano and Frank Gibbs,
organist for First Baptist,
accompanying on the organ.
The welcome and invocation
was offered by Pastor Jim
Davis of Oak Grove Baptist
Church. Following, Schools
Superintendent David Dura-
stanti offered his remarks, after
which the congregation sang
"Joyful, Joyful, We Adore
Thee."
Hardee Senior High School's
Chorus presented "A Mother's
Prayer," with a solo from senior
Kara Norris. The entire chorus
then sang "Friends." Continu-
ing the "Worship Through
Music," the congregation sang
"Holy, Holy, Holy," leading
into school principal Dr.
Michele Polk's "Challenge" to
the seniors.
Special music was presented
by senior Lauren Moore as she
sang "Hosanna" by Brooke
Fraser.
The "Baccalaureate Mes-
sage" offered to the seniors was
given by the Rev. Rod Cannon,
of New Vision Worship Center


in Zolfo Springs. Following his
message the benediction was
offered by the Rev. Darin
Canary, of First Christian
Church in Wauchula.
The recessional and postlude
were accompanied by Bell and
Gibbs.
The much-awaited event will
be held Saturday morning at 10
at the Hardee County Cattle-
men's Arena.
To begin the graduation cere-
mony, the processional of sen-
iors will be accompanied by
"Pomp & Circumstance,"
played by Bell.
Following, the high school's
Air Force Junior Reserve
Officer Training Corps will
present the colors, along with
the Pledge of Allegiance led by
Student Body President Kate
Krause, after which Student
Body Treasurer Kalan Royal
will offer the invocation.
Principal Polk will welcome
the students,' parents, teachers
and friends attending the spe-
cial ceremony. One exciting
part seniors have been *antici-
pating will soon follow. Alan
Jay will present the "Wheel's
for A's" winner, and one lucky
senior will leave Saturday
morning with a brand new car.
Following the special presen-
tation, the Salutatorian Address
given by Amanda Rigney will
pave the way for Blanca Cha-
vez' Valedictorian Address.


Following Chavez, Kara Norris,
class president, will address the
graduates as well.
Senior American Sign
Language students have been
practicing for weeks to offer a
special performance to their fel-
low graduates. They will be
signing "Whenever You Re-
member" by Carrie Under-
wood, to which Polk will then
announce Class Certification.
Superintendent Durastanti
will then take his time to
address the students as well,
leaving a bit of encouragement
and words of wisdom for them
to carry throughout their future
careers.
The seniors will then receive
their diplomas as Hardee Senior
High's assistant' principals,
Todd Durden and Mary Farr,
present the graduates while
Durastanti and Polk hand out
the diplomas.
Once the Class of 2011 has
officially graduated, "Pomp &
Circumstance" will be played
again as they walk out, only to
meet their families no longer as
students but as new members of
society.
To continue the day of cele-
bration, Project Graduation will
be held at Wet N' Wild.
Throughout the year the Project
Graduation committee has
worked to raise money to allow
the senior class to have a safe
alternative to celebrate after
graduation.


3rd-Grade FCAT


Scores Drop


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Nine of 10 scores on the
Florida Comprehensive Assess-
ment Test came in lower this
year for Hardee County's third
graders as they switched to the
more difficult "2.0" version of
the exam.
Only Bowling Green's math
score of 76 remained the same
as last year's.
Statewide, "Student perform-
ance is essentially the same in
2011 as it was in 2010,"
Education Commissioner Eric
Smith said. "This is expected
since the method used to link
the score scale of the older
FCAT assessments to the new
FCAT 2.0 assessments results in
the same percentage of students
statewide scoring at each
achievement level in 2011 as
they did in 2010."
For instance, the percentage
of third graders statewide who
passed the reading portion of
the exam in 2010 was 72. For
2011, that percentage remains
at 72. In Hardee County, 64 per-
cent passed.
By school, Hilltop Elemen-
tary dropped from last year's 80
to this year's 72, the highest
percentage for all five Hardee
County elementary schools.
Bowling Green Elementary


went from a 64 to a 58, the low-
est of the five.
In between were Zolfo
Springs, from 73 to 68;
Wauchula, from 78 to 65; and
North Wauchula, from 78 down
to 60.
On the mathematics portion
of the FCAT 2.0 exam, the state
percentage of students passing
remained at 78. Hardee County
came close to meeting that
number, with its score of 76.
Still, every school but Bowl-
ing Green came in lower than in
2010.
Hilltop went from 89 to 81,
Zolfo Springs from 82 to 75,
Wauchula from 84 to 82 and
North Wauchula from 78 to 68.
Bowling Green kept its 76.
This time, Wauchula Elemen-
tary was the high performer and
Zolfo Springs low.
Commissioner Smith noted
the new FCAT 2.0 is "more
demanding" as it is "based on
Florida's updated, more rigor-
ous curriculum standards that
were adopted by the state Board
of Education several years
ago."
He said linking old FCAT
scores to the new FCAT 2.0
"does not change the statewide
results for this year," but "does
provide different results for dis-
See FCAT 2A


Hardee Loses

Water Input

... Story 2A


Hook Gator

Permits Now
...Story 4A


TECO Bills

Up 33 Percent
... Story 1B


111th Year, No. 27
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Thursday, June 9, 2011


Famed 'Hardee Son' Dies
Legendary Sportswriter Tom McEwen Was 88

By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Tom McEwen perhaps was Hardee
County's most famous native son. He was
known throughout the South and in other parts .
of the nation as one of the best sports writers
in American history.
The 1941 graduate of Wauchula High '1:
School was sports editor of The Tampa
Tribune for 30 years until 1992 and wrote over. ,
10,000 columns and four books. For decades
he covered and wrote about University of
Florida football games, most Super Bowls and
numerous other major sporting events includ-
ing Final Fours, the Masters, World Series,
Wimbleton, World Olympics, the Kentucky '
Derby, World Cup Soccer, Indianapolis 500,
and over 200 Tampa Bay Buccaneer games.
More importantly McEwen is credited with.
putting Tampa on the national major sports
map, being the most influential person to
bringing the Tampa Bay Bucs, Tampa Bay r -
Lightning and Tampa Stadium into existence.
He was instrumental in attracting NFL Super
Bowls to Tampa and the Tampa Bay Rays to i
the Tampa Bay area. He preferred the Rays be
located in Tampa but Tampa lost out to St.
Petersburg which had already built the
See FAMED 3A PHOTO COURTESY OF TAMPA TRIBUNE


I













2A The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011


rThe HeralFA-avvcate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor
JOAN M. AMARALPH HARRISON
Sports Editor ot o-
., NOEY DE SANTIAGO
A Asst. Prod. Manager

115 S. Seventh Ave. 7ort Phone: (863) 773-3255
P.O. Box 338
O Box 338 Fax: (863) 773-0657
Wauchula, FL 33873
,Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida. by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


S DEADLINES:
Schools -Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports- Monday noon
Hardee Living -Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months 18; 1 yr. -S3 1;2 yrs. -560
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2 yrs. S79
Out of State
6 months 527; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.


/.




Kelly's Column
By Jim


Hardee County rancher and citrus grower Milton Lanier, 86, a
former Hardee County commissioner, passed away Tuesday morn-
ing. He is the-father of Hardee Sheriff Arnold Lanier. Milton rep-
resented outstanding values and was a leader at First Baptist
i Church in Zolfo Springs.
He is also survived by his wife Florence of 63 years, sons
Dennis and John, daughter Sheryl lanier, two sisters, 12 grandchil-
dren, and eight great-grandchildren.

Hardee native Tom McEwen, 88, the former Tampa Tribune
sports editor who brought big-time sports to the Tampa area, passed
away Sunday at age 88.

Another icon James Arness, famous as U.S. Marshall Matt
Dillon of the TV series "Gunsmoke," died Friday in Los Angeles at
88. The series ran 20 years until 1975, and reruns are still shown on
the Western channel.
His cohorts included Dennis Weaver as Chester, Amanda
Blake as Miss Kitty who owned.,the Lo*7,Branch Saloon, and
Milburn Stone as Doc Adams.

The state is required to have a balanced budget. With less rev-
enue in recent years the new Florida budget is $69 billion. Some
4,500 positions are expected to be eliminated. Education funding is
cut eight percent.
About $150 million has been shifted from the state's trans-
portation budget. Could this delay four-laning of parts of U.S. 17?
The juvenile correctional facility in DeSoto, formerly a state
mental hospital, is expected to close by the end of August, elimi-
nating 450 jobs as the county's third largest employer, reported
Lloyd Dunkelberger of the Lakeland Ledger.

The Hardee County Livestock Market closed in mid-May after
reopening on April 4. Cattle sales were not high enough to break
even. Initial sales reached 100 or more but the last sale was in the
40s. The needed volume was about 400 to 450 head weekly.
Hardee Livestock Market opened in 1946 and closed in
December 2010. The county does not have as many cattle as years
ago. Many calves today are sold through the Internet or by video,
plus the livestock market in DeSoto County sold some Hardee cat-
tle.

SEddie Whidden on Tuesday night was inducted into the
Hardee County Schools Hall of Fame. On hand to accept the award
was his mother Natalie Whidden and his brother and sister, Joel
S and Ruthie.
: Eddie thanked the school system in a video. He has taught spe-
S cial education, been a homebound teacher for students with behav-
ioral problems, greenhouse manager-at a sheltered workshop for
...l. a nt11., :larl nl mnnn i r at, t eatr fr inde


developmentally isa iucu, a case manager at a cenerr u -
pendent living for disabled adults, and is a consultant with West
Virginia University for the Job Accommodation Network concern-
ing Americans With Disabilities Act.
Eddie is a 1962 graduate of Hardee High where he was class
president two years and president of the student body and has a
bachelor's.dggree.in.English from USF in Tampa apd Am.iaster's
degree in behavior disorders from West Virginia University. He
was born without arms and has had a successful and productive
life. He had high praise for his first grade teacher Peggy Sapp. Jerry
Medlock, his ninth grade civics teacher, nominated Eddie for this
award.
I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening
carefully. Most people never listen.
-Ernest Hemingway
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By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"From the local standpoint,
it's unfortunate. Local represen-
tation goes away."
Paul Samuels, the Hardee
County representative on the
Peace River Basin Board, re-
sponded Tuesday to the recent
announcement that the seven
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District unpaid volun-
teer basin boards had been
dropped.
"Streamlining government is
more important that local repre-
sentation," said Samuels, as he
explained the move initiated by
Gov. Rick Scott, who directed
SWFWMD to-reduce its budget
30 percent. One way was to re-
move $400,000 (cost of travel,
etc.) from the $279 million
budget.
"That's a drop in the bucket. I
think eliminating the basin
boards will have drastic impli-
cations. The governor is making
some ridiculous changes. He
vetoed funding for Regional
Planning Councils, but did not
take away any responsibilities;



DISPATCH
Continued From 1A
Bowling Green, said it does not
matter where the room is the
dispatcher is sitting in. "Bowl-
ing Green will participate in
any program as long as there is
accountability that our tax dol-
lars are being spent wisely," he
said.
Wauchula Police Chief Bill
Beattie tried to get beyond the
controversy over how and
where the dispatching will be
done. "Let's move on and work
together wherever that may be,"
he said.
Lanier said he is willing to
take on the responsibility and
liability of dispatching for Fire-
. Rescue and has confidence in
his dispatchers. He said he
makes sure his dispatchers
know where Bloody Bucket,
Limestone, Crewsville and
other areas are located.
Lanier even said he would be
willing to help pay for some of
the cost out -of his budget if
commissioners decide to dis-
patch through his office.
Commission Chairman Terry
Atchley pointed out that the cit-
izens of Hardee County will
have to pay an additional
$144,000 per year if dispatch-
ing is brought back here.
Commissioner Dale Johnson
said he is concerned about the
spending increase. "The capital
cost can be covered," he said. "I
am worried about the recurring
cost."
Commissioner Minor Bryant
wants to see if anything can be
done to keep dispatch in Polk
County. "We need to meet with
Sheriff Judd and try to extend it
another year," Bryant said.
Grady Johnson said Judd
could not be clearer, and has
stated it in writing that he does
not want to continue dispatch-
ing for Hardee County Fire-
Rescue.
Birge agreed with Grady
Johnson. "We need to move for-
ward," she said. "We can see
what Sheriff Judd can do to
work with us."
It was decided that Lanier
t and Atchley will meet with
Judd soon and discuss what the
options, if any, are for dispatch-
ing Hardee County Fire-
Rescue.


FCAT
Continued From 1A
tricts, schools and students." A
new score scale and achieve-
ment level standards will not be
established until this fall, he
added.
"Therefore, student scores
represent performance on this
new test reported on the old
FCAT score scale," Smith said.
Hardee Schools Supeririten-
dent David Durastanti exam-
ined district scores statewide
and found several bright spots
for this county's third graders.
Local youngsters scored an
average 64 for the county in
reading, beating DeSoto's 63
and Polk's 61, and equaling


Hendry and Okeechobee's 64s.
Only nearby Highlands scored
higher, at 71.
In math, third graders here
averaged 76, trumping De-
Soto's 70, Polk's 74, Hendry's
72 and Okeechobee's 73.
Highlands, however, came in at
80.
"I am very proud of the
Hardee County third-grade stu-
dents' efforts and the dedicated
work of our students, faculties,
staff, parents and administration
of the schools on this year's
""more rigorous FCAT 2.0,"
Durastanti said.


they still have to review all
Comprehensive Plan amend-
ments," said Hardee County
Commissioner Minor Bryant,
board liaison to SWFWMD and
vice-chairman of the Central
Florida Regional Planning
Council which covers Hardee
County.
He pointed out that
SWFWMD executive director
Dave Moore has resigned and
several of the 13 governing
board members have resigned.
"There's a lot of turmoil. We'll
just have to se-l'ow this all
plays out," said Bryant.
Hardee's lone representation
now will be Bryan Besnick of
Arcadia, the governing board
member representing DeSoto
and Hardee counties.
SWFWMD covers about
10,000 square miles in all or
-part of 16 counties and is ruled
by a 13-member volunteer
board appointed by the gover-
nor and confirmed by the state
Senate to four-year terms. It is
responsible for water supply,
water quality, flood protection
and natural systems.


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
"It's not really going to affect
us."
That's how Hardee County
Elections Supervisor Jeff Us-
sery summed up the election
law changes recently handed
down by the Legislature and
Gov. Rick Scott.
That is, of course, if the
changes are even cleared by the
U.S. Department of Justice.
SHardee County is one of only
five of the state's 67 counties
which must acquire prior
approval, or "pre-clearance,"
under the federal 1965 Voting
Rights Act before making any
changes to its voting processes.
Still, if the changes from
Tallahassee are cleared by the
Department of Justice, "there is
not a whole lot. there that we


The governing board will take
over the basin boards' local
water management perspective
and focus on water-related
issues and projects in each
county. Paul Senft of Haines
City is its new chairman and
Hugh Gramling of Plant City
the vice-chairman.
The governing board will
now approve distribution of
about $40 million in water proj-
ects formerly handled by the
basin boards, especially those
related to recycling, desalina-
tion, conservation, aquifer stor-
age and recovery and flood con-
trol.
The Peace River Basin
Board, largest of the seven
boards, covered 3,030 square
miles in portions of Polk,
Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands and
western Charlotte counties,
including the Peace River and
its tributaries to Charlotte
Harbor, where the Peace River
flows into the Gulf of Mexico.
The other basin boards are
Alafia River, Coastal Rivers,
Hillsborough River, Manasota,
Pinellas-Anclote and Withla-


have to try to enforce," Ussery
said.
The new election law has
three main elements: restric-
tions on third-party voter regis-
tration drives, reduction of
early voting days, and a restric-
tion on address changes made at
voting precincts.
Ussery said, "We don't really
have third-party registrations.
We've never had a group con-
duct any, other than the parties,
and they already are registered
with the state."
'He said sometimes candi-
dates themselves have taken
registration forms out on the
campaign trail, and they can
still do so. They will not be able
to collect any completed forms,
though, without first registering
with the state. Whoever fills out
such a form will have to bring it


Mosquitoes,
Eastern Equine Encephalitis About one-th
Virus occurs in a cycle between clinical encep]
birds and mosquitoes in the disease, usi
swampy areas. days after s
Activity in Florida usually Many of those
peaks between June and Au- fer long-term n
gust, with typically 0-5 human ranging from
cases per year. dysfunction to
Human and animal cases are al impairment,
relatively rare, because the vec- orders, seizure
tor tends to remain in swamps cranial nerve
and prefers to feed on birds. Many of these]
The virus is transmitted to in a few years.
humans through the bite of an Most cases
infected mosquito. Most cases reported from
occur in the Atlantic and Gulf Massachusetts
Coast states. Transmission
However, when human cases mon in and ar
do occur, they are often severe, hardwood swa
Symptoms begin 3-10 days United States.
after the bite of an infected reported annua
mosquito and can result in one No human v
of two types of illness: system Eastern equir
or encephalitic. nor is there an
Systemic infection has an ral treatment. F
abrupt onset and is character- evaluated by a
ized by chills, fever, malaise, vider and api
joint pain and muscle pain. should be don
Illness lasts one to two weeks, posure to mosc
and recovery is complete when defense against'
there is no central nervous sys- To prevent
tem involvement, diseases, the
Encephalitic illness is charac- ment of Heal
terized by fever, headache, irri- practicing "Dr
ability, restlessness, drowsi- er":
ness, anorexia, vomiting, diar, D1
rhea, cyanosis, convulsions and Drain sta
coma. stop mosquitoes


coochee River boards. An
eighth board, for the Green
Swamp, headwaters for the dis-
trict's rivers, has always been
managed by the SWFWMD.
governing board becauseof its
hydrologic significance to the
entire region.
Part of the governing board
and staff responsibilities is
management of tin district's 50
public conservation lands to
protect Florida's water re-
sources. Among the 50 protect-
ed properties are the Deep
Creek Preserve and the RV
Griffin Reserve in DeSoto
County; the Jack Creek in
Highlands and Charlotte Harbor
Preserve State Park, and
Prairie/Shell Creek in Charlotte
County.
It also includes the Alafia
River Reserve, Circle B. Bar
Reserve, Green Swamp Wil-
derness Preserve, Colt Creek
State Park, East Tract, Hampton
Tract, Lake Marion Creek
Horseshoe and Upper Hillsbor-
ough Preserve which are all or
partially in Polk County.


in himself, Ussery noted.
As for fewer early voting
days, Ussery says it would
amount to about four less days
here, as Hardee County never
did hold polling on Sundays.
And, lastly, people from out
of county rarely make an
address change at any precincts
here, Ussery said. "That affects
larger counties, really," he said.
"In our county, we've not really
had people from another county
move here and-want to make-an
address change at what would
be their precinct here."
Concluded Ussery, "Regard-
less, even though the governor
signed off of these* changes,
until we get notice from the.
Justice Department that the
changes have gotten clearance,
we are not implementing any of
it'"


Encephalitis


lird of those with
halitis die from
ually within 2-10
ymptom onset.
who recover suf-
leurologic issues,
minimal brain
severe intellectu-
personality dis-
es, paralysis and
e dysfunction.
patients die with-

of EEEV are
Florida, Georgia,
and New Jersey.
n is most com-
ound freshwater
mps. Across the
, 5-7 cases are
lly.
'accine exists for
ie Encephalitis,
y specific antivi-
'atients should be
i healthcare pro-
propriate testing
ne. Reducing ex-
luitoes is the best
t infection.
mosquito-borne
Florida Depart-
Ith recommends
ain" and "Cov-

rain
nding water to
:s from multiply-


ing.
Discard old tires, drums,
bottles, cans, pots and pans,
broken appliances and other
items that aren't being used.
Empty and clean birdbaths
and pet water bowls at least
once or twice a week.
Protect boats and vehicles
from rain with tarps so that they
don't accumulate water.
Maintain the water-balance
(pool chemistry) of swimming
pools. Empty plastic swimming
pools when not in use.

Cover
Cover your skin with cloth-
ing and use mosquito repellant.
If you must be outside
when mosquitoes are active,
cover up. Wear shoes, socks,
long pants and long sleeves.
Apply mosquito repellent
to bare skin and clothing. Al-
ways use repellents according
to the label. Repellents with
DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon
eucalyptus, and IR3535 are
effective. Use mosquito netting
to protect children younger than
two months.
Cover doors and windows
with screens to keep mosqui-
toes out.
Repair broken screens on
windows, doors, porches and
patios.


No Local Representation On Water Boards


New Voting Law



Of Little Affect Here


Protect Yourself From


.'--he




114eral -Advocate


Harde Couty's ometwn Coerag



PRINTERSe PULISER

115 S. th Ave is Wauhula, L 3387


Telephone (863) 773-3255^^^


T.. .7~ - .-(- ~_--1.- .- ~ _~ej











June 9,2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


FAiM
Continued From 1A
Tropicana Dome on hopes to
land aMajor League Baseball
franchise.
McEwen was salutatorian of
the WHS Class of '41, was
named Florida Sportswriter of
the Year 19 times, and won the
193 Associated Press Sports
Editors' Red Smith Award for
lifetime achievements.
He died Sunday at his Davis
Island home in Tampa at age
88. He had been in declining
health in recent years, losing a
leg in 2009 from poor circula-
tion and later an eye to cancer.
Until last month he continued
to write under the heading
HeyTorqMcEwen.com.
"He said he was the only one-
legged, one-eyed sportswriter
in America," said his second
cousin, Dr. Barbara Carlton of
Wauchula.
"I read every word he wrote,"
said Bill Crews, board chair-
man of Wauchula State Bank.
During McEwen's heyday the
Tampa Tribune was read daily
by thousands of Hardee County



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 252011CA000087
WAUCHULA STATE BANK
Plaintiff,
Vs.
CRUZ C. LARA, ET AL
Defendant(s)
_____ _________


NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO FLORIDA
STATUES CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to a SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS dated June 6,
2011, In the above styled cause, I
will ell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the Hardee
County Courthouse, on the sec-
ond floor hallway outside of
Room 202, 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873, at 11:00
A.M. on June 29,2011, the follow-
ing described property as set
forth In said SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS, to wit:
Legal 1:
Commence at the South-
west corner of Northwest
1/4 of Southeast 1/4 of
Section 10, Township 34
South, Range 25 East,
Hardee County, Florida
and run North 89*40'57"
East along the South line
of said Northwest 1/4 of
Southeast 1/4 .and along
Ihe North right of way line
of Revell Road 235.50 feet
to Point of Beginning;
thence continue North
W4057" East 158.00 feet;
thence North 0*20'53"
Wet 291.05 feet to a small
creek; thence South
82W33'25" West along said
creek, 94.23 feet; thence
South 63002'00" West
along said creek, 72.15
feet; thence South 020'53"
East 247.00 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
AND
Legal 2:
Lot 98, Peace River
HeIghts, Unit No. 3, as
shown by map or plat
thereof recorded in the
office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court in and for
Hardee County, Florida in
Plat Book 3, Page 48.
Parcel Id: 10-34-25,0000-
077900000 and 10-34-25-
0837-0001-0098
Commonly known as: 625
Honeysuckle Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873 and
704 Sally Place, Wauchula,
FL 33073
Dated this 8 day of June 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Court
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACt f you are a person with a
S (kablly who needs any accom-
m odatiom n order to participate in
S (Me proceeding, you are entitled,
t no cot to you, to the provision
" of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, 255 N. Broadway
Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830,
(6 3) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or. Immediately upon
resolving this notification if the
t time before the scheduled
appearances I less than 7 days;
f you are hearing or voice
Impeded,cadl 711.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
i. :9,1ec


Seniors To learn
Computers
A free eight-week comput-
er class for adults 60 and
older will begin on Tuesday
and continue on Tuesdays
through Aug. 2. The class is
from 10 to 11 a.m.
The class is offered by
Nu-Hope Elder Care Ser-
vices and will be at the
Catheryn McDonald Senior
Center, 317 N. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula. To learn more
about this and other pro-
grams, call Ruth Long at
773-2022.


COP CRASH


residents. He wrote a column
six days a week entitled "The
Morning After." He also wrote a
Sunday column named "Hey
Tom" where he answered ques-
tions from readers.
He began his newspaper
career in high school in Wau-
chula writing sports and deliv-
ering newspapers for the Har-
dee County Herald and/or The
Florida Advocate.
McEwen earned a journalism
degree with honors from the
University of Florida and was
executive editor of the Florida
Alligator student newspaper.
He worked for the Fort Myers
News Press, the St. Petersburg
Times and the Tampa Times
afternoon daily newspaper be-
fore joining the Tribune, where
he directed a staff of up to 61.
"Even in high school Tom
wanted to be a sports writer,"
said Avis Sasser, 90, WHS
Class of 1939 and former
Wauchula city clerk. "He did it
in a great way," said Sasser,
who still plays golf.
His father was John Mc-
Ewen, who worked at the
Wauchula State Farmers Mark-
et and was later Hardee County
tax assessor, now called proper-
ty appraiser.
McEwen was best friends
with New York Yankee princi-
pal owner George Steinbrenner,
who also lived in Tampa. He is
credited with influencing Stein-
brenner to move the Yankees'
spring training to Tampa from
Fort Lauderdale.
Crews recalled that McEwen
often referred to his readership
area as Tampa-St. Petersburg-
Wauchula. His columns once a
week would begin with a big
breakfast menu that would fea-
ture fresh Florida orange juice,
Plant City strawberries, cold
sliced watermelon, Ruskin
sliced tomatoes, a half grape-
fruit or other local fruits in
addition to the standard eggs,
bacon, grits, etc. He came ac-
ross as a one-man chamber of
commerce for the Tribune cir-
culation area.
McEwen was a popular after-
dinner speaker known for his
knowledge and wit. In recent
years Crews flew his helicopter
to Tampa to bring McEwen to
events in this area.
Crews, Sasser and Carlton
noted McEwen never forgot his
roots in Hardee County.
The Malcolm Glazer family
issued a statement there would









School Board
Meetings Change
The Hardee County
School Board meetings for
the month of June will be at
different times.
The first meeting of the
month will be today
(Thursday) at 5 p.m. and the
second will be on Tuesday,
June 21, at 5 p.m. Both will
be in the School Board meet-
ing room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula.

Seniors Can Get
Help On Food
The West Central Florida
Area Agency on Aging has a
team of specialists to help
local senior citizens com-
plete an application for
Supplemental Nutrition As-
sistance Program (SNAP),
formerly called Food
Stamps.
The help completing a
food assistance application
is for citizens age 60 or older.
To do so, call 1-800-963-
5337.

Food Given Out
On Tuesday
The regular U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture food dis-
tribution will be tomorrow
(Friday).
People can come to the
center at 3059 Elm St., Zolfo
Springs between 10 a.m.
and 3 p.m. to pick up the
available foods.


be no Tampa Bay Buccaneers
without McEwen. "If Tampa
Bay had its own Mount Rush-
more, Tom McEwen would be
etched on it."
"Tom McEwen was a leader
in his industry and a leader in
sports," said Jeremy Foley,
University of Florida athletic
director.
He and his wife Linda were
married in 1970. She owned
and operated a travel agency,
and they went on many trips. "I
entered a life of laughter and
adventure. We were pals and
best friends."
"Tom McEwen mixed com-
fortably with the rich and pow-
erful, but never forgot that he
once was a barefoot boy from
Wauchula who delivered news-
papers on horseback. He culti-
vated personal relationships
with the most famous coaches
and athletes but prided himself
on maintaining the common
touch," wrote the Tribune's
sportswriter Joey Johnson.
"Tom has been more impor-
tant to Tampa than cigars," said
Pulitzer Prize-winning Los
Angeles Times sports columnist
Jim Murray when presenting-
McEwen with the Red Smith
Award in 1993.
Baseball great Ted Williams,
who used to own orange groves
in Hardee County with Joe L.
Davis, once said, "I don't like
sports writers but I like Tom
McEwen." The Boston Red Sox
Hall of Famer is the last Major
Leaguer to hit .400, notching a
.406 average in 1941.
"He was the mold and now it
is broken," said Eddie DeBar-
tolo, former owner of the NFL
San Francisco 49ers and now
living in Tampa.
A street next to Raymond
James Stadium that hosts the
Bucs is named for McEwen.
The press box at the St. Pete
Times Forum, home of the
Lightning, and the old Tampa
Stadium were named in
McEwen's honor.
"As a columnist, he could
take his shots," said former
Bucs general manager Rich
McKay and son of first Buc
head coach John McKay and
current Atlanta Falcons presi-
dent. "Tom McEwen was a fair
journalist who earned every-
one's respect. Above all, he
talked up his community."
"Tom McEwen was the salt
of Hardee County," said Ken
McLeod, 75, a Wauchula ranch-
er and former Hardee High
School star football quarter-
back/defensive back under head
coach Ralph Fritz.
"Tom was one of a kind. I
was told, after coming to
Tampa, Tom McEwen is the
man you need to get to know ...
he's the man around here," said
former Bucs' defensive end Lee
Roy Selmon and the team'ss
only NFL Hall of Famer.
'Tom was Tampa sports-
period," said civic leader and
friend Leonard Levy.
UF grants a football scholar--
ship every ycar in McEwen's
name. A mass communications
scholarship is awarded annually
in McEwen's name at the Un-
iversity of South Florida.


McEwen and his wife Linda
often entertained well-known
people at their Davis Island
home. Guests included Paul
Brown, Angelo Dundee, Stein-
brenner, Pete Rozelle, Arnold
Palmer and Gen. Norman
Schwarzkoph, wrote Tribune
sportswriter Joe Henderson.
"You mean to tell me a
sportswriter owns this place?"
once commented former Oak-
land Raider head coach and
sports broadcaster Tom
Madden.
McEwen was proud of
Tampa residents Lou Piniella
and Tony LaRussa for their
achievements in Major League
Baseball.
He was a guest many times of
his cousin Dr. Barbara Carlton.
McEwen came to Hardee for
cookouts and dove hunts. Dr.
Carlton went on a trip to Africa
with the McEwens.
His aunt Martha McEwen
married Albert Carlton. They
had 10 children, including 9
sons. Tom's grandfather was
Rev. William Penn McEwen.
Tom McEwen grew up with
Albert Carlton who married Dr.
Barbara. Albert was the son of
Carl Carlton, one of the nine
sons of Albert and Martha
Carlton.
A funeral service for
McEwen will be held Friday at
2 p.m. at St. Lawrence Catholic
Church at 5525 North Himes
Ave. in Tampa with long-time
friend and priest Lawrence
Higgins giving the eulogy. A
reception will follow from 3 to
5 p.m.
McEwen's ashes will return
to his roots in Hardee at Carl
Carlton's home place at Glen-
okra west of Wauchula where
Albert Carlton is buried.
"Tom is at peace. He's gone to
the Happy Hunting Grounds."
said Dr. Carlton, who will fly in
from her summer retreat in
North Carolina to attend her
counsin's service.


Light One Candle
By Gerald M. Costello
The Christophers


DODGERS PITCHER 'FOREVER CHANGED'
Travel is broadening, they say, often in ways that are quite
unexpected.
Take the case of Clayton Kershaw, the gifted young left-han-
der and starting pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Kershaw
returned from a visit to the African nation of Zambia as a man for-
ever changed.
"You come home," he said, "and you see people striving to get
more money, more cars, bigger houses and more possessions,
thinking that will make them happier. You go to Zambia, it helps
put things in perspective. You realize where happiness comes from,
and it's not from material goods."
Kershaw can thank his wife, Ellen, for the trip. As a college
student, she had been to Zambia before, and was taken by the plight
of the orphans she met, all victims of the AIDS epidemic that has
devastated the country. She made their cause her own, working
with an organization called Arise Africa. She often talked of return-
ing to the country.
"He knew how important it was to go to Zambia with me," she
told the New York Times in a story it did about Kershaw. "Clayton
had heard me talk about it so much that it was to the point he kind
of couldn't go any longer without seeing what lights a fire under
me."
Kershaw undertook the journey with some reservations; he
wanted to be sure he'd be able to get in the daily workouts that
went with his training regimen. No problem, as it turned out. And
when he worked in his regular routine of throwing a baseball (to
some of the men who were also on the trip), the scene became elec-
tric for Zambian audiences.
"They had never seen a baseball before," Kershaw said. "The
kids would see us throwing and they'd gather around. They thought
it was great."
Ellen Kershaw thought it was great, too, but she saw beyond
the excitement.
"I kind of saw the perfect picture of my and Clayton's passions
colliding," she said.
She also remembers the way Kershaw responded to one of
their young charges, a 3-year-old girl he held in his arms for almost
an hour. She continued clinging to him when he rose to go, leaving
him "overwhelmed," she recalled.
The Kershaws are determined to do more for all the orphans
they met, and the countless others they didn't.
They'll probably return to Zambia, in part because as noted
above travel is broadening.
"It changes you," the pitcher said. "And that's good."
For a free copy of "Volunteering," write: The Christophers, 5
Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail: mail@christo-
phers.org.


Thank You To All The Sponsors

Of The Hardee YMCA

Annual Golf Tournament

NAMING SPONSOR:

CF INDUSTRIES

PRESENTING SPONSOR:

VANDOLAH POWER

SUPPORTING SPONSOR:

MOSAIC

MCDONALD CONSTRUCTION

EXHmIBING S"P"R:

PET CARE CENTER VET, ROSS HENDRY D.V.M.

Ihjg \Ho Ni SPo :b
] ALAN JAY OF WAUCHULA

THE HARDEE YMCA 610 W. ORANGEAVE WAUCHULA 773-6445


PHOTOS BYf UACHELLE DOLLAR
-A Hardee County sheriff's deputy was Involved In a crash
KI bTueasday morning at the Intersection of U.S. 17 and Bostick
Road. No serious Injuries were reported, according to sheriff's
SMal. Randy Dey. The crash occurred at about 7:30 a.m. as
Dep. Nathan Woody was stopped on Bostock Road In his 2010
Ford waiting to cross over onto northbound U.S. 17. Woody
waited for a southbound vehicle which was turning onto
Bostick Road, but failed to see the car behind IH, which
changed lanes to go around the turning car, Dey said. Woody's
patrol car struck the passenger side of the 2004 Toyota driven
by Esmeralda Harris of Bowling Green. A Florida Highway
Patrol trooper charged the deputy with failure to yield the right
of way. Dey said an accident review board will examine the
crash and recommend any disciplinary action. "f you drive a
car, you're going to have a wreck," the major said. "We're
going to make mistakes like everybody else, and we're held to
the same standards as everybody else."

















Through Monday
Anyone seeking a harvest per- through Nov. 1) and pay the fee
mit must be at least 18 years of for two harvest tags. No other
age by Aug. 15. A permit allows hunting licenses are required.
the harvest of two alligators on The cost for a resident alliga-
a designated area. tor trapping license and alliga-
People can submit applica- tor harvest tags is $272. All fees
tions at any county tax collec- are nonrefundable. Tags and
tor's office, any retail outlet that permits are nontransferable.
sells hunting and fishing licens-. An alligator trapping agent
es, or online at fl.wildlifeli- license is available for $52; it
cense.com. allows the license holder to
- Successful applicants must assist permitted trappers in tak-
submit payment for an alligator ing alligators.
trapping license and two alliga- The alligator hunting season
tor harvest tags, or provide will run for 11 consecutive
proof of a valid alligator trap- weeks, from Aug. 15 through
ping license (must be valid Nov' 1.


Obituaries


MILTON LANIER
Milton Lanier, 86, of Zolfo
Springs, died Tuesday, June 7,
2011, at his home.
Born on May 21, 1925, in
Hardee County, he was a life-
long resident. He served in the
U.S. Coast Guard. A former,
Hardee County Commissioner,
he was also a citrusman and cat-
tle rancher. He was a member of
the First Baptist Church of
Zolfo Springs.
He was preceded in death by
his parents T. L. and Virgie.
Lanier; brother Shelton Lanier;
and infant daughter Constance
Marie Lanier.
Survivors include his wife of
63 years Florence Lanier of
Zolfo Springs; three sons,
Dennis Lanier and wife Mary
Lou of Zolfo Springs, John
Lanier of Naples; and Hardee
County Sheriff Arnold Lanier
and wife Amy of Zolfo Springs;
daughter Sheryl Lanier of Zolfo
Springs; two sisters, Dorothy
Rose Holton of Jacksonville
and Nila Vae Morris and hus-
band Max' of Winter Park; 12
grandchildren; and eight great-.
grandchildren.
Visitation is today (Thurs-
day) from 6 to 8 p.m. at First
Baptist Church of Zolfo
Springs. Services are tomorrow
at 3 p.m. at the church, with the
Rev. Trent Swanson and the
Rev. Jack White officiating. in-
terment will be .at Wauchula
Cemetery with military honors
provided by the DeSoto County
Home Guard.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula



3n moving Aeloity













HELEN MARIE
POTTER
Helen Marie Potter, 74, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
May 24, 2011, at Sebring.
She was born on Nov. 5,
1936, in Tin Sin, China and
came to Hardee County from
Michigan in 1984. She was a
nurse with the Hardee County
Health Department : and
attended the Missionary
Church.
Survivors include her hus-
band Harry Potter of Wau-
chula; three sons, Timothy
Potter of Hanover, Mich.,
Philip Potter of Peck, Mich.,
and David Potter of Lakeland;
daughter Deborah Potter of
Goshen, Ind.; two sisters
Carol Traschel and Joy May,
both of West Virginia; 14
grandchildren; and one great-
grandchild.
A memorial service will he
held on Saturday, June 18 at
11 a.m. in the chapel of First
Baptist Church of Wauchula,
with the Rev. Tim Davis offi-
ciating.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a couesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


LOIS MARIE SUMMERS
Lois Marie Summers, 84, of
Wauchula, died on Wednesday,
June 1, 2011, at Sebring.
Born July 1, 1926, in Cleve-
land, Ohio, she came to Hardee
County from Painesville, Ohio,
in 1989. She attended St.
Michael Catholic Church.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Robert W. Sum-
mers; son Robert W. Summers
Jr.; and sister.Jean Snitzky.
Survivors include a daughter,
Kathleen M. Wondracek and
husband John of St. Augustine;
two grandchildren, John Won-
dracek Jr. and wife Theresa of
Jacksonville, and Jennifer
Wondracek of Gainesville; two
brothers, William Stepanek and
wife Connie of Gates Mills,
Ohio, and James Stepanek and
wife Pat of Reminderville,
Ohio; and four great-grandchil-
dren.
A memorial mass will be
held at a later date.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

EVELYN MOON EBERT
Evelyn Moon Ebert, 91, of
Winter Haven, died on Monday,
June 6, 2011, in Sebring.
Born on June 14, 1919, in
Bereah, I- she moved to
Winter Halh from Lake Wales
in 2001. She was a nursing
assistant at Walker Memorial
Hospital in Avon Park, and was
a member of the Seventh Day
Adventist Church in Winter
Haven.
She was preceded in death by
her husband William L. Moon.
Survivors include a daughter,
Gayle Matheson of Winter
Haven; a son, Mark Lakes of
Winter Haven; brother Albert
Lakes of Hillsboro, Ohio; and
grandson Michael Barnett of
Sebring.
Graveside services will be
held at 10:30 a.m. today
(Thursday) in Evergreen Cem-
etery in Fort Meade.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade


Oi SkOEi1ing L^U-e11o1iy

LOIS MARIE
SUMMERS
Lois Marie Summers, 84,
of Wauchula, died on Wednes-
day, June 1, 2011, at Sebring.
Born July 1, 1926, in
Cleveland, Ohio, she came to
Hardee County from Paines-
ville, Ohio, in 1989. She
attended St. Michael Catholic
Church.
She was preceded in death
by her husband Robert W.
Summers; son Robert W.
Summers Jr.; and sister Jean
Snitzky.
Survivors include a daugh-
ter, Kathleen M. Wondracek
and husband John of St.
Augustine; two grandchil-
dren, John Wondracek Jr. and
wife Theresa of Jacksonville,
and Jennifer Wondracek of
Gainesville; two brothers,
William Stepanek and wife
Connie of Gates Mills, Ohio,
and James Stepanek and wife
Pat of Reminderville, Ohio;
and four great-grandchildren.
A memorial mass will be
held at a later date.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


On Sale
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
begun the second application
phase for a chance to obtain
highly coveted permits to par-
ticipate in the statewide alliga-
tor harvest.
Alligator harvest permits are
issued during this phase on a
first-come, first-served basis. It
began yesterday (Wednesday)
and runs through 11:59 p.m. on
Monday.
Applicants in Phase II are
limited to one permit apiece.
Those who purchased a permit
during Phase I may not apply.


------ -- -
ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published .
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15. -
Obituaries contain' the i t ? Ia
name, age, place of resi- | -e ,li A arv ee mtn lnart, 1
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships, President ~ ~ Vice President -
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par- -JJ
children's spouses and
grandchildren and the num-ed F ily Nm S e 1906
ber of great-grandchildren. A Trusted Farnily Name Since 1906
If there areno immediate
survivorsconsideration of 529 West Main Street Wauchula 863-773-9773
other relationships may be View Obits at robartsfh.com
given.


WQl/come Cloyd 0


Jic, c7r


Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Homes is
pleased to announce the return of Floyd 0.
Rice, Jr. to our staff. Floyd was born and
raised in Desoto County and has worked in
the funeral service industry for the past six-
teen years. He started his career in the
funeral business at Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home in Arcadia. In 2008 Floyd
and his family moved to Conyers, GA
where he continued his education, and in
2010 he graduated from Gupton-Jones
College of Funeral Service in Atlanta, GA.

Floyd and his wife Ginger Skinner Rice
have three children, Floyd III. (11),
Savannah (8) and Christopher (4). Floyd
is an avid outdoor enthusiast enjoying
activities such as jeeping, four wheeling,
shooting, canoeing, camping and golfing.
He is also a NAUI SCUBA and ASHI First
Aid & CPR Instructor.

Floyd will be working fulltime in the
Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Homes,
Wauchula office which is located at 404 W
Palmetto St. to serve the families of Hardee
County.


I -J


4A The Herald-Advocate, June 9. 2011


Alligator Hunting Permits


If permits are available after
Phase II, the FWC will offer
them during Phase III on a first-
come, first-served basis, while
they last, beginning at 10 a.m.
on June 15.
To educate participants on the
how-to's and rules and regula-
tions of the hunts, the FWC
offers a no-cost, three-hour
training and orientation pro-
gram, which will be held at var-
ious locations throughout the
state. Permit recipients are not
required to attend, but the FWC
strongly encourages first-time
participants to go.
Courses will be offered in
July and August, and permit
holders will receive, by mail,
permit packages listing dates
and locations.


Funeral Notice
Alicia Jaramillo, 78, of Wau-
chula, died on June 7, 2011.
The family will receive
friends today (Thursday) from 5
to 8 p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel. Services will be Friday
at 11 a.m. at St. Michael Cath-
olic Church, followed by inter-
ment at Wauchula Cemetery.


HARDEE BEEF & BACON 4H CLUB
-E Members of the 4H Beef& Bacon
Club did community service at
Pioneer Village. Pioneer Village is
ran by Mark & Sherry White of
Sherry White Ministries. The kids
e ?lhgIo i ,TA Im.l b did some weeding around the
sB |facilities and got a tour and hear
-"= how it is used for the work of God.
773-0523 The kids enjoyed donating their
time and learning how God is
working through this ministry.
Pictured (from left) Matt Fite, Makenna Fite, Randy & Stacy Crews, Leaders
Megan Grills, Steven Crews and Alexis Crews soc6:9p,


Floyd O. Rice, Jr., FD&E


Co0geik- ayg-Qkady

Funeral Homes

.




404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com


IL


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v






June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


A


CONGRATULATIONS


CLASS OF
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of


Power Windows & Locks, lilt, Uruise,
CD, Automatic, Remote Keyless Entry
5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty


M.S.R.P s23,495
Factory Rebate 3,000
rLiqNJr Discount 1,106
LRHNJrY PRICE
s19,389


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, Automatic,
4 Wheel ABS, Remote Keyless Entry
5 Year/I00,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
le __i________


M.S.R.P $21,620
Factory Rebate 1,000
R/LNJOrDiscount 1,090
LRN9JRY PRICE
$19,530


Iii '


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, 7 Passenger Seating,
SDual A/C, CD, Automatic, Remote Keyless Entry
L? 5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty


M.S.R.P '23,990
Factory Rebate 1,500
llv Finance Cash 1.000
LNJ]RY DisL unI 528
FRLRNJY PRICE
s20,962


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M.S.R.P s25,980
Factory Rebate 2,000
RLRfJRYYDiscounl 987
RLRNJOY PRICE
'22,993


IF


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SLT Trim Package, Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise,
SCD, Automatic, Trailer Tow, Remote Keyless Entry
S 5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
I.S.RP -32,295
Factor Rebate -3.750
\JI% Finance Cash 1,000 i .
RIRYNJYDiscounI 3,298 -
LRN JrY PRICE S


247


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Laredo Trim Package, Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
SPower Driver's Seat, Trailer Tow
S 5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty


MN.S.R.P S31,590
Factory Rebate 1,000
RLON]RYDiscounl 2,596
RLRN JRY PRICE
s27,994


SIERRA CLARK
Hardee Senior High
HONORS GRADUATE
FATHER, SCOTT CLARK
Parts Manager

Chevy/Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep
CONGRATULATIONS
SIERRA!!!


a -
~-1 CC d


'4


MITCHELL
WRIGHT
Hardee Senior High
FATHER,
ROBERT WRIGHT, SR.
Mechanic

Chevy/Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep
CONGRATULATIONS
MITTi-rT T T


J6Yu


Jeep


*c


S(863) 314-5370


S O O Hs S at


*


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Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Dual A/C, 7 Passenger Seating
5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty


StkE602640


$24,


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1401 U.S. HIGHWAY 17 S.. Wauchula
*i-L1Ni ] Y f.coM


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6A The Herald-Advocate, June 9,2011


Back To Basics
By lan Rice .-
Gospel Preacher


WHAT ABOUT THE LOST?
'While reading/studying Luke 15, we're often in the habit of
separating the parables that Jesus told.
This is not a bad thing to do, as there are many valuable les-
sons to glean from all three of these parables. You may be familiar
with the "Parable of the Lost Sheep" (Luke 15:4-7). You might also
be acquainted with the "Parable of the Lost Coin" (Luke 15:8-10),
and/or the "Parable of the Prodigal Son" (Luke 11-32).
These are all parables that give us valuable lessons within
themselves, but they all share a common thread, and that's God's
concern for those who are spiritually lost!
Through the telling of the parable concerning the lost sheep,
Jesus concludes with the statement, "I say to you that likewise
there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than
over 99 just persons who need no repentance" (Luke 15:7).
With the lost coin, Jesus proclaims, "Likewise, I say to you,
there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner
who repents" (Luke 15:10).
With the lost son, Jesus says that the father spoke, "It was right
that we should make merry and be glad, for your brother was dead
and is alive again, and was lost and is found" (Luke 15:32).
All of these parables were delivered in response to the
Pharisees and scribes, who complained that Jesus "receives sinners
and eats with them." Surely all of these parables, even though there
are different elements to them, are all tied together by one common
thread: God's care for the penitent sinner.
Another important element is present here that we should be
mindful of as we strive to seek after the lost. With the parables of
the "lost sheep" and "lost coin," diligent efforts were made to seek
after that which was lost!
Jesus said, "What man of you, having 100 sheep, if he loses
one of them, does not leave the 99 in the wilderness, and go after
the one which is lost until he finds it?" and "Or what woman, hav-
ing 10 silver coins, if she loses one coin, does not light a lamp,
sweep the house, and search carefully until she finds it?" (Verses 4
and 8.)
That being said, with the "lost son," the father didn't go seek-
ing after the son! The parable details the son's wasteful living and
thus his attitude after he comes to his senses, culminating to our
reading about his realization within himself of his wrongdoings.
The father didn't seek after the lost son, but his love was still con-
veyed upon his return.
We should all be more deeply concerned for those who are lost
spiritually. That is the lesson which Jesus ultimately expressed.
We also glean from this text that we should strive with all of
our might to reach out to the lost. But, there ultimately comes a
time where the onus of responsibility falls on the one who must
"come to his senses."
After all efforts of reconciliation are exhausted on our part, we
must sometimes prayerfully await the return of our wayward
brethren. God the Father is eagerly awaiting those who will will-
fully turn back to Him, won't you heed His Word?
Ian Rice is the full-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist.com.



Fort Green News
By Rilld Cooper
773-6710


Greetings from Fort Green!
We finally received some
rain, about 3/10th of an inch last
week. It sure was nice, and you
all know the yard and the flow-
ers would much rather have rain
than the water hose.
Brother A.O. Hendry said last
Sunday night that they had a
reunion the previous Saturday
and how much he enjoyed it.
His daughter, Carol, and hus-
band attended church services
and they were from Enterprise,
Ala. Brother Hendry sang a
beautiful song as did his sister,
Alice Faye. Of course, many of
Fort Green's own also sang.
John and Essie Deer are back
from a wonderful vacation.
They visited their daughter,
Valerie, and family in Alabama
and then went on to Gatlinburg
to attend the Gaither concert.
He thought it wonderful, but
Gatlinburg was so crowded he
did not think he would ever go
again.
The last time I was in Gatlin-
burg I felt like there was too
much traffic, vehicle as well as
human, and we haven't been
back! We get used to our own
niche in the world, but we are
beginning to have too much
traffic!
On Sherman's birthday the
mail lady started delivering the
mail to our house. Always be-
fore I had to walk down to Ollie
Roberts Road to get the mail
and it is unbelievable what a
pleasure it is just to be able to
walk out to the road to your
mailbox! We moved here on
July 4th weekend in 1965.
After getting the mail, I stopped
in the yard and picked a Florida
peach; it is the simple things
that give us pleasure!
Lynda Abbott was telling me
how much she enjoyed the
lightning bugs in North Geor-
gia. It brings back childhood
memories of when we used to
catch and put them in a jar and
then release before they died,
and would rub them on our
clothes so we glowed! The
youth are missing a lot these
days! B.J. Haney said Steve
had thought the egrets, or "cat-
tle birds," had eaten them and
this is as good a guess as any,
but we just don't have them
anymore.
Karson Goodwyn is now 8.
Her nina, Betty Waters, baked
her cake. Karson also made the
A/B honor roll for the year.


Congratulations, Karson. Nor-
ma Alejandro turned another
year older on Wednesday, and
Kasey Powell celebrated last
Saturday with a trip to Lakeland
to a fun park. Happy birthday
wishes to all these girls.
Debra Gillum visited her
mother, Betty Walker, this past
Saturday. Betty has been a little
under the weather and has
missed church. Faye Davis is
still sick and is having difficul-
ty breathing and talking. Arthur
and Maxine are home from the
hospital and rehab. Buck Toole
is having a time regaining his
strength. Please pray for all the
sick.
We were all happy at church
Sunday morning because Dawn
Watson was able to attend. Her
daughter, Sara, brought her, and
Dawn is able to talk and get
around a little. Her main mode
of transportation is the wheel-
chair but she has improved
remarkably. She is prayer
answered but we need to con-
tinue to pray.
The Cooper reunion was very
nice and Junior Cooper was
there. He recently had cataract
surgery and is amazing. He is
82 years young now and really
looks good. Mrs. Mildred was
also able to attend and was the
oldest.
Ronnie Thomas is living in
North Carolina, and hospice has
been called in to help with his
care. Please remember Ronnie.
Thankfully his cancer was in
remission when. his wife got
sick with it, and after several
months she made her final jour-
ney. Now Ronnie is sick again
but is living in North Carolina,
which was his life dream. He
loves the mountains.
Kaylee Hogenauer went back
to the doctor Friday because she
can't shake her cough. They put
her on breathing treatments and
additional prescriptions. She
was happy she won the Citi-
zenship Award last Friday at the
Hardee Junior High School
sixth-grade awards program.
Burton and Wilma Wilkins
celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary on June 2. He also
turned another year older, so
congratulations to them both.
Don't forget Leo Blink's 99th
birthday dinner this Sunday
after the a.m. service at Fort
Green.
Please pray for each other,
our nation and military.


From The Heart
By David Kelly


I t

i C'


SERMON PART 2
Listen to this description of what the ministry of the Spirit is
doing:
2 Corinthians 3:7-18, "Now if the ministry that brought death,
which was engraved in letters on stone, came with glory, so that the
Israelites could not look steadily at the face of Moses because of its
glory, fading though it was, will not the ministry of the Spirit be
even more glorious? If the ministry that condemns men is glorious,
how much more glorious is the ministry that brings righteousness!
For what was glorious has no glory now in comparison with the
surpassing glory. And if what was fading away came with glory,
how much greater is the glory of that which lasts!
"Therefore, since we have such a hope, we are very bold. We
are not like Moses, who would put a veil over his face to keep the
Israelites from gazing at it while the radiance was fading away. But
their minds were made dull, for to this day the same veil remains
when the old covenant is read. It has not been removed, because
only in Christ is it taken away. Even to this day when Moses is
read, a veil covers their hearts. But whenever anyone turns to the
Lord, the veil is taken away. Now the Lord is the Spirit, and where
the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. And we, who with
unveiled faces all reflect the Lord's glory, are being transformed
into his likeness with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the
Lord, who is the Spirit."
As we look back at Part 1, we know that there is only one true
God, that without His Love, without His Son leaving us the Spirit
of God to comfort us, we wouldn't know love, feel love or give
love.
"Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and
whoever loves has been born of God and knows God. Anyone who
does not love does not know God, because God is love. In this the
love of God was made manifest among us, that God sent his only
Son into the world, so that we might live through Him. In this is
love, not that we have loved God but that He loved us and sent His
Son to be the propitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so loved us,
we also ought to love one another. No one has ever seen God; if we
love one another, God abides in us and His love is perfected in us."
But with the Spirit we are able.
3.) What "the" are you talking about? How are you loving?
When you love, you are talking about the God!
a) Know God loves you
b) Let God's love shine through you
c) Love one another with God's love
It's pretty obvious and simple. I know God loves you, but do
you know it, accept it, believe it, are you abiding in God? Are you
spending quality time with The God and not a god that you like to
worship Well, my God wouldn't do this or that. Well, my God
doesn't care if I do this or that. Or, I have to do this or that or my
God won't love me.
Know this: God loves you! The God. God the Father, the Son
and the Holy Spirit. He loves you more than you will ever com-
prehend.
Let God's love shine through you. How do I do that? This is
the part that seems easy but is extremely hard! Love one another
with God's love that He has given you. You can't hoard God's love;
you have to give it away.
You have to glorify Him with your life and enjoy Him with
your thoughts, words and deeds. By doing this others will see
God's love shining in this dark world.
It is uncommon to love unconditionally, it is uncommon to
care about others when they have persecuted you, it is uncommon
to love people who have slandered your reputation and have beat-
en and spat upon you, it is uncommon to die for the sins of people
who mock your very existence. It is uncommon to-forgive people
who are cold and dead to you, and not only forgive them but restore
them into a right relationship with you, and not just any relation-
ship but a relationship that is unending, one that gives them a king-
dom, one that offers them no more pain and suffering, one that
promises a hope of holiness.
Yes, this love is worth sharing! Love one another with God's
love.
Let's end the sermon by reading 2 Corinthians 13:11 together:
"Finally, brothers, rejoice. Aim for restoration, comfort one anoth-
er, agree with one another, live in peace; and the God of love and
peace will be with you."

The gambler and gun fighter Doc Holliday received the
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery from the
Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery in 1872.


The Squeezin's
By Barbara Carlton
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers


GROWER ROUNDTABLE TODAY
It is time for the Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Associa-
tion's semiannual Grower Roundtable Meeting.
It will be held today (Thursday) at Bobby Krause's Barn
beginning at 11:30 a.m. The topic will be coordinated psyllid con-
trol. Krause Grove Service will sponsor the luncheon meeting.
All around the state, Citrus Health Management Areas are
being organized by neighboring growers. Hardee County has some
of the newest CHMAs formed. There is much to be organized to
assure they become more than lines on a map. It is time for grow-
ers to become involved, interacting with CHMA captains, caretak-
ers and other growers.
Regional Citrus Agent Steve Futch is working diligently to
organize Hardee County before moving into neighboring counties.
The faster growers become aware and participate in the process,
the faster psyllid populations can be reduced. Results of organized
control are very positive, reducing pest populations.
The CHMA program has become the focus of the research
community, industry leadership and the Florida and U. S. depart-
ments of agriculture (FDACS and USDA, respectively).
The University of Florida's Institute of Food & Agricultural
Sciences has taken a leading role, creating a website for growers to
find needed information, providing County Extension personnel,
and much more. USDA and FDACS are stepping up to play an
important role in the process utilizing their personnel for pest
scouting and documentation.
The four Hardee County Citrus Health Management Areas are
actively working toward psyllid control in area groves during the
month of June. Additional actions will be targeted for the fall.
Groves in the northern half of the county will be targeted during the
earlier part of June and then groves in the lower half in the later
part of June.
All commercial citrus growers are invited to participate in
today's meeting to learn the latest developments in this quickly
evolving process. Contact the association office for more details at
773-2644.
Meeting Agenda
1.) How can psyllid control coordination help you? What are
growers, who have been coordinating, seeing in their groves?
Steve Farr, Ben Hill Griffin Inc. & Highlands Co.
CHMA Area Captain
2.) Newly Formed Local Efforts
Steve Futch, Regional Citrus Agent
3.) Psyllid Survey Efforts: Who's in your grove?
Paul Mears, Field Station Supervisor, FDACS, Bureau
of Pest Eradication
4.) Where do we go from here? The Future of CHMAs
Greg Carlton, FDACS/Chief, Bureau of Pest
Eradication


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals


Livestock Services
Lost & Found Wanted
Miscellaneous Yard Sales


*- . ,

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD

2011 SUMMER


SCHEDULE

JUNE 5 THRU SEPTEMBER 25


9:00A.M.

SUNDAY SCHOOL

COFFEE & DONUTS AVAILABLE FOR
YOUR ENJOYMENT AT 8:45A.M.



S10:OOA.M.

WORSHIP SERVICE

** REGULAR SERVICE SCHEDULE WILL
RESUME SUNDAY OCTOBER 2, 2011


lo day's


First
.As'cm49ofCGod


- FLORIDASFIRSTASSEMBL


1397 S. FLORIDA AVE.
WAUCHULA ",.
(863) 773-9386;

.Y.COM 6.1. -


rg
I~;e~
t:? s~
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1












June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate...
75 YEARS AGO
The Farmers Home Admin-
istration has changed its regula-
tions to include medium income
residents wanting to build a
home in the $2,000 range out-
side the municipal limits. The
housing administration is taking
the lead in the Roosevelt pro-
gram to make this time of home
ownership available, said Dr.
Fons Hathaway, state director.
Mortgages will be for 10, 15
and 20 years.
The Wauchula Kiwanis Club
is making plans for the Major
Doze Amateur Hour on June 26.
All residents of the county who
are indeed amateurs are wel-
come to come. Check with any


Kiwanian at several local busi-
nesses. Admission will be 20
cents for adults and 10 cents for
children.
Spot ads include the new
-,Ford V-8 with its "dollar
mileage" (more miles per gal-
lon), safety glass all around and
welded steel body. At Emerson
Glavel Dodge-Plymouth, any
veteran buying a used car of
$250 or more will get a free 100
gallons of gas. Those under
$250 will get 50 gallons of free
gas. 1930 to 1935 vehicles, are
selling for $135 to $425. At the
Chevy Station, lubrication is
just 50 cents, and a wash and
wax is $1.
50 YEARS AGO
Top priority for the four-lan-
ing of U.S. 17 from SR 62 to
Wauchula has been requested
by the Board of County Com-
missioners in the wake of a fatal
accident at the intersection of


Wa BckWen


these two routes. Commis-sion
Chairman Lee Hanchey said a
recent traffic count showed
4,000 vehicles use that stretch
of road in 24 hours.
The Board of Public Instruc-
tion is sporting a red face
because the new junior high
school under construction was
nearly sold for about $200 in
delinquent taxes. The deed for
the property's purchase from
the Beeson estate was apparent-
ly never recorded. The new
junior high'should be ready for
use this fall as construction is
running three to four weeks
ahead of schedule.
A-speedup in the reconstruc-
tion of two old county bridges
has been ordered by county
commissioners after someone
tried to help matters by setting
fire to one Sunday night. A
"proceed at your own risk" sign
was placed at both the bridge
over Peace River south of
Bowling Green, and the one just
south of Wauchula on the old
Popash Road. Reconstruction is


awaiting deeds for the neces-
sary right of way from the state
Road Department.
Crews Grocery has ham, half
or whole, at 39 cents a pound
and boneless chuck roast at 69
cents a pound. A six-ounce can
of light tuna is 19 cents, and a
three-pound jar of peanut butter
is 89 cents. Watermelons, 25
pounds or larger, are 69 cents.
25 YEARS AGO
Wauchula's last train left on
June 6 as CSX has abandoned
its route here. Coker Fuel had
been receiving tanker bulk
loads of 30,000 gallons of fuel,
but will now have to get it in
9,000-gallon truckloads. The
railroad says it will service the
phosphate industry at the west
end of the county but discontin-
ue its route along U.S. 17.
Construction for the new
Golden Corral on U.S. 17 South
is under way. The total con-
struction cost is $260,000 and it
should be done by mid-July,


said construction supervisor Joe
Van Horn.
This week's issue included an
article on the 19 buffalo on the
John Smoak Ranch off SR 66
well east of Zolfo Springs. The
buffalo have the run of the pas-
ture and graze right with the
cattle. They can often be seen
from the highway.
Circle 3 Western Wear sales
for Father's Day include: belt
selection, leathers, skins,
exotics for $11.98; buckles of
all types are $6.98 to $11.98;
western shirts start at $10.98 to
$12.98; and boots vary from
$49.98 to $239.98, with a large
group at $34.98.
10 YEARS AGO
Zolfo Springs has raised min-
imum and per-gallon water and
sewer rates for town residential
and commercial users. The new
rates follow a lengthy study by
the Florida Rural Water Service
into meeting town bond coven-
ants via rates. Continued oper-


MINORS CHAMPS


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Minors All-Stars played in a three-day tournament in Winter Haven. in late
May, ending up withra 5-0 record and the championship. The groupris basically the
same team that went to Alabama two years ago for the Machine Pitch national cham-
pionships. On the team are (in no particular order) Bo Villarreal, Cody Helms, Adrian
Deleon, Tony Webb, Zack Durastanti, Kaleb Floyd, Miguel Ruiz, Isaac Moreno, Zack
Deuberry, Matt Tyson, Drew McGuckin, Dustin Willis; coaches are Robert Deuberry, Ted
Svendsen and Andrew McGuckin. Villarreal and Moreno paced the team with a homer
apiece. Helms, Ruiz, Deuberry and McGuckin and coaches Deuberry and McGuckin
are from the season-winning Bulls; Villarreal, Deleon, Moreno and coach Svendsen are
from the Sand Gnats; Tyson and Webb represent the River Cats; and Durastanti, Willis.
and Floyd are from the Thunder.


CHAMBER DOUBLES MEMBERSHIP
* __ -


If you buy gold or silver, do NOT take promises or paper
receipts for depository accounts most are scams take
physical possession! Legitimate dealers will deliver to you at
your bank. You take the gold or silver you pay them!

We Buy & Sell

Gold-Silver-Bullion-Coins-Bars-Scrap
$500 Bills $575 up to $10,000
$1,000 Bills $1,150 up to $25,000
Old Paper Money, Confederate Money, etc.

Captain Ed

904-222-4607 _c





VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL


When: June 21- 2-4,2011

6pm 8:30pm including Dinner


Where: Higher Ground International Ministry

1258 West Main St. Wauchula, Fl


EARLY REGISTRATION

Friday, June 10,2011 @ 11am lpm & 5pm 6pm

Mon. thru Fri., June 13-17, 2011 @ 11am pm & 5pm 6pm

For further information call:
Island Of Adventure Child Care Center @ 767-0800
Forms can be Faxed or Emailed to you.6:9c


LE1T' GO BOWLING-IT'I COOL INSIDE


Junior Leagues ages 6-11
Start June 16 1:00 pm


Junior Leagues ages 12 & up
Start June 17 1:00 pm


Battles of the Youth Groups
Start June 15 8:30 pm


No-Tap Bowlers
Wednesday Morning 9:00 am


Mixed No-Tap League

SThursday 7:00 pm


Bowl-Of-Fun Lanes

For More Info Call Jean 773-6391


artU


1


ating losses mandated the rate
increases.
There are already nine candi-
dates for the newly created post
of assistant county manager/-
economic development direc-
tor. These and any others will
come before the Hardee County
Commission at its next regular
meeting today (Thursday).
Real estate specials this week
include: a 3BR, 2B CB home on
a quiet street, with Jacuzzi and
large living room, $79,500; a
beautiful shaded corner, lot with
a 3BR, 2B CB home with fire-
place, patio, large carport and
storage area, $79,900; and just
reduced, 2BR, 2B frame home
with beautiful landscaping and
picket fence, $68,500.


It wasn't until quite late in
life that I discovered how
easy it is to say "I don't
know!"
-Somerset Maugham












8A The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


NOW'S THE TIME TO APPLY FOR QUOTA PERMITS
Well, I want to start off by letting everyone know that my girl-
friend (now fiancee, Katie Hughes, got her first turkey on her
quota hunt. We enjoyed a great hunt together on public land, and
I thank fellow outdoor writer Jamie Adams for sending me the slate
call that helped bring two big gobblers running in on that foggy



On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
Amending camping fees at Pioneer Park, 8:35 a.m.
Owner/builder affidavit for building department, 8:50 a.m.
Extension of Charlotte's Webb license, 9:05 a.m.
Recommendation for building official, 9:25 a.m.
Contracts for work on College Hill Road, Steve Roberts
Special and traffic light maintenance, 9:45 a.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Wauchula City Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.

WAUCHULA CRA
The Wauchula Community Redevelopment Agency will meet
with the Wauchula City Commission on Tuesday, beginning at 6
p.m., at commission chambers, City Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula. The following is a synopsis of agenda topics that may
be of public interest.
Governing tax findings.
Resolution on engineering and planning services.
Three commercial and one residential grants.
Introductory workshop and Brownfield grant.
Presentation by Peace River Explorations Inc.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Wauchula City Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.

WAUCHULA CITY COMMISSION
The Wauchula City Commission will hold its regular
monthly meeting on Monday, beginning at 6 p.m. at commis-
sion chambers, City Hall, 225 E. Main St, Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest.
Swearing in on newly elected commissioners; selection of
mayor and mayor pro tem.
Ordinance-Public hearing-final reading on approving
amendments to Comprehensive Plan.
Recommendation for electric supplier bids.
First reading on ordinances for two rezones.
Three resolutions on airport stormwater project.
City manager hiring process.
Foreclosures and litigation.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Wauchula City Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.


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9/fmily anfdfriends as blDm/led
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wilh a cooerMda db nch


Saturday morning.
But enough reminiscing. Time to get on with the business at
hand.
Every hunter knows you have the best chance of catching a
monster buck off-guard during the first part of hunting season.
That's why many of us enjoy hunting the archery and muzzleload-
ing gun seasons and why we can't miss opening weekend of the
general gun season.
If you hunt public land, you should know that many of
Florida's wildlife management areas require a quota permit to hunt
during archery, muzzleloading gun and all or part of the general
gun seasons.
A quota is the maximum number of hunters allowed on a par-
ticular WMA. The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion's Quota Hunt Program prevents overcrowding on such areas
and provides quality hunts. Quotas also help control game harvests.
The FWC sets quotas based on an area's size, habitat, game popu-
lations and regulations.
There are several types of quota permits, and most are issued
by random drawing. The first-phase application period for archery,
muzzleloading gun, general gun, youth, family, track vehicle, air-
boat and mobility-impaired quota hunt permits runs through June
30, so you've got all month to get 'em in.
No costs are involved with quota permits, and during this peri-
od, you may turn in only one worksheet for each type of quota
hunt. One thing to remember though: Unless exempt, you must
have an up-to-date management area permit, or a license that
includes one, when applying for a quota permit or the system won't
accept your application.
Two of these quota hunts are unique to the FWC's South
Region. An airboat quota permit is required for anyone wishing to
hunt out of an airboat on Everglades and Francis S. Taylor WMA
in Broward and Miami-Dade counties. But, if you'd rather hunt off
a track vehicle there, or on Rotenberger or Holey Land WMAs in
Palm Beach County, you'll need a track vehicle quota permit.
The FWC offers youth deer hunts on Camp Blanding WMA in
Clay County and Andrews WMA in Levy County. If you have chil-
dren age 8-15, and you want them to have the chance of experi-
encing one of these great hunts, apply for a youth quota hunt per-
mit.
To increase hunting opportunities for youth, youngsters under
16 may accompany an adult quota permit holder on any WMA -
even if the area doesn't allow for exemptions. However, in that
case, adults and youngsters must share a single bag limit.
This coming season, there will be family hunts on 20 different
WMAs. Those areas are: Matanzas, Andrews, Devil's Hammock,
Dinner Island Ranch, Lafayette Creek, Allapattah Flats, Perdido
River, Cary, Okaloacoochee Slough, Blackwater, Belmore, Four
Creeks, Hatchet Creek, Thomas Creek Kings Road Unit, Hilochee
Osprey Unit, Lafayette Forest, Babcock Ranch Preserve, Aucilla
Pinhook Area, Chipola River Altha Tract and L. Kirk Edwards.
You must have a family quota hunt permit to hunt these areas
during specific time periods. Should your name be drawn, the per-
mit requires one adult to take one or two youths hunting. The adult
may not hunt without taking a kid along.
Hunters certified by the FWC as mobility-impaired may apply
for mobility-impaired quota permits. These permits allow exclu-
sive access to general-gun hunting opportunities on nine of the
state's better public hunting areas.
If any of this is starting to sound exciting to you, you'll want
to get the correct quota hunt worksheet so you can apply for one or


THURSDAY. JUNE 9
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting, 230
S. Florida Ave., Wauchula, 5
p.m.

MONDAY, JUNE 13
VWauchula City Commis-
sion, regular meeting, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY. JUNE 14
VWauchula City Commis-
sion, meeting on Community
Redevelopment Agency
issues, City Hall, 225 E.
Main St., Wauchula, 6 p.m.
VBowling Green City
Commission, regular meet-
ing, City Hall, 104 E. Main
St., Bowling Green, 6:30
p.m.


more of these great opportunities. All worksheets can be found at
MyFWC.com by clicking "Hunting" then "Limited Entry Hunts."
Once you've completed the worksheet, you may submit it to
any license agent or tax collector's office, or you may apply online,
at fl.wildlifelicense.com.
The random drawings to decide who gets these quota hunt per-
mits will be posted in mid-July.
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony. Young @MyFWC.com.





Summer Hours

(Closed Sundays, Mondays & Tuesdays)
Wednesday & Thursdays 10 am 11 pm
Friday & Saturdays 10 am Midnight

Don't Forget To Join Us
cFor Lunch!
S(Dine In or Carry Out)
\'^w 943 Hwy. 17 South Wauchula


Limestone

BaptistChurch


June 12-17 6:30P.m.


Wh Jesus

- 8:00p.m.


863-494-3918
4868 KEYSTONE AVE., ONA LIMESTONE COMMUNITY


NOTICE
REQUEST FOR REZONE AND FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENT .
All interested persons are hereby notified that Hardee County Board of County
Commissioners is requesting a rezone to change the Zoning and Future Land Use Map
classification of their properties, located at 210, 212 and 220 S 9th Avenue. The zoning
request is from R-1 (Low Density Residential) to P/SP (Public/Semi Public) and the FLUM
request is from Low Density Residential to Public Buildings. The requests are for the
purpose of the construction of a records retention facility. The properties are legally
described as:
Lots 5 and 6, Block 33, Carlton and McEwen Addition to Wauchula, Florida, as
per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 2-11 and Plat Book 1, Page 2-36
(Hardee County Plats recorded in DeSoto County), and Plat Bar 32, all in the
Public Records of Hardee County, Florida
Parcel #04-34-25-0260-0033-0005
a/k/a 210 9th Avenue South, Wauchula, Florida
AND
Lots 7 and 8, Block 33, Carlton and McEwen Addition to Wauchula, Florida, as
per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 2-11 and Plat Book 1, Page 2-36
(Hardee County Plats recorded in DeSoto County), and Plat Bar 32, all in the
Public Records of Hardee County, Florida
Parcel #04-34-25-0260-0033-0007
a/k/a 212 9th Avenue South, Wauchula, Florida
AND
Lots 9 and 10, Block 33, Carlton and McEwen Addition to Wauchula, Florida, as
per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 2-11 and Plat Book 1, Page 2-36
(Hardee County Plats recorded in DeSoto County), and Plat Bar 32, all in the
Public Records of Hardee County, Florida
Parcel #04-34-25-0260-0033-0009
a/k/a 220 9th Avenue South, Wauchula, Florida
The proposed request will be considered by the Wauchula Planning and Zoning Board
on Monday, June 20, 2011 at 5:30 p.m. and the Wauchula City Commission on Monday,
July 11, 2011 at 6:00 p.m., at the Commission Chambers, 225 E. Main Street, Suite 105,
Wauchulal Florida. Any interested persons) will be heard at these meetings. If any per-
son decides to appeal any decision made by the Board or Commission with respect to
this request for which he will need a verbatim record of the proceedings, he will need to
ensure that such verbatim record is made.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
s/Olivia Minshew
Acting City Manager

ATTEST:
s/Holly Collins
City Clerk


I 6:9c


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular scheduled meet-
ing Monday June 13 & 14, 2011 at 6:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably
can be held. Items on the agenda are as follows: Ordinance 2010-11 (Second
Reading) Ear Amendments, Ordinance 2011-01 (First Reading) Cannon Rezone,
Ordinance 2011-02 (First Reading) TNT Childcare Rezone, Resolution 2011-05
FDOC Work Squad Contract, Resolution 2011-07 FDOT JPA for Airport Master
Storm Water Pond System Project, Resolution 2011-08 Avcon Contract
Amendment, Resolution 2011-09 Supporting Vern Buchanan's Pill Mill Crackdown
Act, Resolution 2011-10 FDOT JPA Airport Master Agreement Renewal,
Recommendation for Electric Bids, Task Order with Bill Herrington, Appoint Audit
Committee, City Manager Resumes, Approval of October-December 2010 and
January- February 2011 Minutes, D'Agostino Litigation, Underwood/East Bay Street
Sidewalk, Makowski Foreclosure, Appointment to the Planning and Zoning Board,
and any other business that may come before the Commission. The CRA will meet
June 14th at 6:00pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held and the
Commission will reconvene after the CRA Meeting to consider Resolution 2011-01
CRA Finding of Necessity Report and a Presentation by Peace River Explorations,
Inc.
The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City
Commission hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision
made by the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings,
he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to
insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate
upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy
involves every aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, partici-
pation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reason-
able accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section
286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Olivia Minshew
Acting City Manager
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
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PAGE ONE


Wauchula To Choose New Electric Provider


By'JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
At its first official meeting on
Monday, the new Wauchula
City Commission will be asked
to approve a bulk electric power
supplier for the city.
Selection on Monday is
important to allow time to com-
'plete negotiations and transfer
transmission lines before the
current bulk power provider
contract' with Tampa Electric
Co. (TECO) expires on Sept. 30
and the city is left without elec-
tricity.
TECO raised its rates 33 per-
cent a month in March. A feder-
al electricity rate decision has
not yet been issued on TECO's
proposed new rates, but the
company has issued them any-
way. TECO may have to reim-
burse Wauchula for some of the
cost, if the federal board ap-
proves a lower rate than
requested.
In the meantime, Wauchula
electric customers can do sever-
al- things to reduce usage and
help lower their bills.
Recommendations are: to turn
the thermostat up to 79 degrees;
close drapes and blinds to mini-
mize heat from the sun; lower
the thermostat on the water
heater (water heaters can be up
to 25 percent of a utility bill);
turn off lights not being used;
and unplug appliances which
use electricity even while
turned off (such as an electric
toothbrush, cell phone charger
or flat screen TV, which can use
another 25 percent of the utility
expense).
How did the electric rates get
so high? Has the city done any-
thing to keep them down?
Following is a bit of the history
of the Wauchula electricity situ-
ation and recent events.

HISTORY
Wauchula and TECO began
negotiating a contract in 1994


in which TECO agreed to send
electricity from its Big Ben
plant to the Wauchula substa-
tion, which would then distrib-
ute it to its about-3,000 cus-
tomers.
TECO ran into a problem
because part of its power had to
come on Florida Power (now
called Progress Energy) lines.
There were separate cost, called
wheeling, to use power lines
from. Big Ben to the Florida
Power lines, and for use of the
Florida Power lines into
Wauchula.
To get Wauchula to agree to
the contract, TECO agreed to
pay wheeling costs. (By the
way, Fort Meade had the same
contract terms). The 20-year
contract had a clause allowing
the city to go out for bids after
15 years if a one-year notice to
terminate the contract was
given.
Wauchula gave notice in
December 2007 and went out
for bids. Since TECO was pay-
ing the wheeling costs, it was
the lowest bid and the contract
continued.

INTERIM EVENTS
In early 2010, the city under-
took a $2 million renovation of
its electric substation to in-
crease it from 16.2 to 49.5 meg-
awatts, allowing it to relay elec-
tric power to customers effec-
tively, even during hours of
peak usage. Most of the $2 mil-
lion came from federal, state
and severance tax grants.
In the summer of 2010,
TECO announced that it was
seeking a substantial rate in-
crease (16.28 percent) from the
Federal Electricity Regulatory
Commission (FERC), which
handles commercial rates such
as municipal utilities. Wauchula
was one of five TECO commier-
cial accounts filing a notice of
standing with FERC.-
Wauchula was in its 17th year


of the contract with TECO,
which would run out on Dec.
31, 2013. With several others,
the city entered into negotia-
tions to delay and to try to
reduce the rate increase. Bill
Herrington of WHH (William
H. Herrington) Enterprises Inc.
represented the group and
Wauchula paid a portion of his
expenses.
The city also piggy-backed
on the Orlando Utility Com-
mission's brief filed with FERC
challenging the TECO rate
increases and implementation.
FERC did grant a five-month
delay in TECO implementing
any rate increase, but has not
made a decision on the rate
increase requested.
TECO asked that negotia-
tions continue and said it would
honor Wauchula's notice of ter-
mination effective Sept. 30,
2011, whenever it was submit-
ted. Up to the week of Thanks-
giving 2010, it appeared negoti-
ations to lower rates would be
successful. By the next week,
they had fallen apart. TECO
said it could not afford to meet
the terms requested. Wauchula
issued its notice of termination,
effective Sept. 30, 2011.

MORE RECENT ACTION
At the Dec. 13 meeting, the
Wauchula City Commission
agreed to a $13,000 contract
with Bill Herrington (WHH
Enterprises) to issue Requests
For Proposals (RFPs) for a new
bulk electric provider. He sent
the announcement to 10 poten-
tial providers. He sent notices to
all 10 providers and received
proposals from five: Florida
Municipal Power Agency (a 30-
year contract like Fort Meade's
and a three-year contract);
Florida Power & Light Co.;
Gainesville Region Utilities;
Seminole Electric Co. (parent
company of Peace River Elec-
tric Cooperative and 10 other


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cooperatives); and TECO.
Herrington short-listed them
to FMPA-three-year contract,
FPL and Seminole and will
make his recommendation at
Monday's meeting, hoping to
be able to complete negotia-
tions for a new contract and
changeover by September.

CURRENT SITUATION
When the five-month delay
was over, TECO immediately
raised its rates to Wauchula the
full amount although it is ex--
pected that FERC may ap-
proved a lesser amount. The
TECO bill is divided into four
parts. First is a demand cost,
based on the highest 30-minute.
usage in the previous month.
That cost went from 9.42 to
16.28.
Next is the non-fuel base rate.
The third is the fuel purchase
cost, which went from .0331 to
4.6 cents per kilowatt.
Finally, new personnel at
TECO realized that it had never
begun assessing the wheeling
charges to Wauchula, which it
could have after 1997. So the
$15,255 for TECO lines plus.
$17,172 for Progress Energy
lines) was added to the Wau-
chula bill.
The Wauchula bill from
TECO has gone from
$295,507.51 a month in
February to $372,582.01 in
March. About the same 33.94
percent increase was experi-
enced in April.
If FERC approves a lesser
increase, TECO will owe the
city the difference and it will be
passed on to Wauchula cus-
tomers, said Wauchula Finance
Director James Braddock on
Monday.
Hopefully, the new Wauchula,
Commission will act quickly to
allow Herrington to negotiate
the best contract possible for
future electricity provision.

There is only one pretty
child in the world, and
every mother has it.
-Chinese Proverb

Woman knows what man
has long forgotten, that the
ultimate economic and
spiritual unit of any civi-
lization is still the family.
-Clare Boothe Luce


Help Clean




Up County


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Most often anonymous com-
plaints spur the county code
enforcement division into ac-
tion.
Sometimes, however, they're
too anonymous and too vague
to be of much help.
LaDonna Perry, who heads
up code inspection and other
aspects at the Hardee County
Building Department office,
recently explained the problems
in code enforcement.
Code enforcement means dif-
ferent things to different people.
Actually, it's simply a way to
protect people from unlicensed
contractors and allow them to
live in a neighborhood free of
hazards and eyesores.
Is your neighbor's yard clut-
tered,, uncared for? Are there
abandoned, unlicensed, un-
working vehicles, abandoned
refrigerators or other appli-
ances? Do dogs, chickens and
other animals run loose and cre-
ate havoc?
Have you or someone you
know paid good money for
minor repairs, additions, re-
models, upgrades or other work
done on their home or yard and
found it was a poor job?
Reporting code violations of
all kinds is easy. You can pick
up a complaint form at the
Building Office at 401 W. Main
St., Wauchula or go to the coun-
ty website hardeeco.com, fol-
low links to departments and
scroll down to code enforce-
ment. At the end of that section
you can print a copy of the
complaint form.
If requested, a complainant
will be considered anonymous,
but it is important to leave a
name and phone number in case
more information or directions
are needed. It will be consid-
ered confidential.
Next is a place to list the
property owner. If that isn't
known, the address or specific
directions corerr of such-and-
such intersection, one mile


from ...) is needed.
There is a place to tell what
the complaint is. ... unlicensed
contractor, accumulated debris,
yard not cleaned, unsafe hous-
ing, whatever is considered a
hazard or a nuisance.
The rest of the form is com-
pleted at the building office -
how it was handled, what action
was taken.
Of particular concern is unli-
censed contractors, who not
only take jobs away from
licensed providers who bother
to pay their insurance and
license fees, but also could
result in fines and fees because
the proper permits and work
weren't done.
The building office has lists of
those licensed in the county, 28
building contractors, 12 me-
chanical (air conditioning etc),
five roofing, four plumbing and
13 electrical contractors. The
office will not recommend a
particular person or group, but
will make the lists available.
If the contractor wanted by
the homeowner/business owner
is from out-of-county, a check
on the state list will ensure
he/she is properly licensed and
carries liability insurance. At
any rate, his vehicle, work or-
ders and advertisements should
always include the county/state
licensing number. A quick
check with the building office
could prevent injury or loss
from having an unlicensed per-
son do work for you.
It may seem that it's a small
job and not worth the cost and
effort for a permit. Sometimes,
however, a small job turns into
a big one. Changing a faucet
could result in a broken pipe
and major plumbing changes.
Changing a light fixture could
result in a re-wiring job if
there's not enough capacity on
the line. Reflooring could
unveil termite damage, and on-
and-on. The possibilities are
endless.
For any questions, contact
Perry at 773-3236.


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Thursday, June 9,2011


LO_VER 100 USED CARS ANDTRUCKSToCHOOSEFROM









2B The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011




-Hardee


50th ANNIVERSARY!


Living-

ON TV!


COURTESY PHOTO
Donald and Judy Albritton celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary on May 14. The couple have two children:
Mike, and wife Tonya; and Krista, and husband Ricky.
Grandchildren are Michael, wife Renee; Joshua, wife
Temple; Samantha; Michael; and Andy, deceased. They
also have four great-grandchildren, Brooke, Andrew,
Lexie and Emalyn. The couple are looking forward to
many more years of marriage and family.


THANKS!


COURTESY PHOTO
President Sylvia Thornton was honored by her fellow
Wauchula Garden Club members on May 18 for her serv-
ice to the club the past two years. Thornton, who is a life
member of the General Federation of Garden Clubs, has
been president of the local club 1993-1995, 1,996-1997
and 2009-2011. She is pictured (above, right) receiving a
floral bouquet from Treasurer Carol Saunders. The club
will not meet again until September.
Profits, like sausages ... are esteemed most by those
who know least about what goes into them.
-Alvin Toffler


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steel drum beat of

Caribbean Crew


Shop Dine ~ Play
Downtown Wauchula
For More Information Call 863.767.0330


Graham
William Graham
Graduates From
Florida Southern
William Keith Graham of
Wauchula graduated on April
30 from Florida Southern
College in Lakeland.
He earned a bachelor of sci-
ence degree in biology.
Graham attended Hardee
County schools, but graduated
from Liberty County High
School in Bristol in 1984. He
then served in the U.S. Navy,
retiring after 22 years.
Following his retirement,
Graham began his studies at
Florida Southern College.
He will be employed as a
biologist for Everglades Na-
tional Park.
Graham is the son of Ray and
Pat Graham and the grandson of
Juanita and the late Henry
Graham, all of Wauchula.


Local Air Force
Chapter Meets
Today In Sebring
The local chapter of the Air
Force Association, which
includes Hardee County, will
meet today (Thursday) at 4:30
p.m. in the Governor's Room at
the Kenilworth Lodge in
Sebring.
Plans for the coming months
include restoration of a Cold
War target drone, which will be
the first item on the meeting's
agenda.
Also on the agenda is a report
on Maj. Tommy McGuire's P-
38, of World War II fame.
McGuire, a 1938 graduate of
Sebring High School, was the
second-leading ace of that war,
-with 38 aerial victories over the
Japanese.
Other topics will be Junior
Reserve Officer Traning Corps
awards recently presented in
Wauchula and other area
schools and restoration of
WWII plaques.
For more information, call
Roy Whitton at (863) 465-7048.
Those who. think it is per-
missible to tell white lies
soon grow color-blind.
-Austin O'Malley
A truth that's told with bad
intent beats all the lies you
can invent.
-William Blake


soc5.aIscj


COURTESY PHOTO
Tirease Morris (front, second from left) celebrated his birthday on May 15 with a trip to
Tropicana Field to watch the Tampa Bay Rays play. While there, he and friend Daniel
Ortiz (front, left) were selected to be on national television, helping Rays player
Brandon Franks answer a trivia question. The boys are shown with Franks, Rays cheer-
leaders and a Rays media specialist.


GARDENING OFFICERS


COURTESY PHOTO
At the final meeting of the 2010-11 club year, members of the Wauchula Garden Club
met for an indoor beach party hosted by Jeanette Perrine, Ann Hall and Chaplain Bess
Stallings. Officers for 2011-13 were installed by Stallings, using the theme of herbs.
Pictured above (from left) are Jo Thompson, standing in for Secretary Carolyn
McConnell; President Perrine, Treasurer Carol Saunders, Stallings and Vice President
Lydia Neff. They will meet during the summer to plan the new club year, which begins
in September. For more information on the club and its activities, call 773-6026 or 773-
3594. -





Save 50-75% on pet Vaccinations
Thursday. June 16th


,
At
? Vision Ace Hardware
.
225 East Oak St., Wauchula 5:00 to 6:00 pm 773-3148
O Dog & Cat Packs start at $45 With heartworan test $5


.................. .*#am ww


* Kitten and puppy packs $36


Save money on your favorite Heartworm
and flea products such as
Revolution, Heartguard, Gomfortis & Frontline


1-888-673-8838
ALI MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACEPTED


o .--------------- .. ." ---- --- ----


Sincere Thanks For Your Support

At The 12th Annual

Zajicek's Golf Tournament
AT TORREY OAKS ON MAY 14, 2011!
IT WAS A GREAT SUCCESS!

WINNERS
lst Place Team-Steve Polk, Miles Judah
Charles Cannon and Bob Clamon

2nd Place Team-Robbie Meade, Todd Rogers,
Mike Thomas and Tim Wells

3rd Place Team-Angie Coker, Kendell Coker,
Jack Soles and Byron Jarnagin

We appreciate all of the golfers, sponsors, food
preparers, cake bakers, Torrey Oaks employees and,
everyone who helped make this year's tournament
the most profitable!!!
The Methodist Men of Bowling Green
and Wauchula Thank You!
If you were not contacted, and would like to be a supporterfor our
Hardee County South America Missions missionary, please send
contributions to United Methodist Men "Zajicek Mission",
207 N. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, F/L 33873
....soc6:9
-------- -- -----------------


* -


STADIA E LE Dr IC
TAMPA ELECTRIC


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June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


HARDEE LIBRARY HOSTED CHOCOLATE TASTING APRIL 11


:- :.-' .- _.*I +++ 1!- ."_ ', -, ) *-_ .- -"l _*. <-1 '*tU


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
From left are library director Patti Lang, volunteer Gari Ann Bowling, library assistant
Dee Shackelford, and Friends of the Library members Gloria Davis and Diana Youmans.

( .


Displaying chocolates are Patti Lang, library director; Brooke M. Shaw, 2011 Little Miss
Hardee County; and Bonnie Kiger, chairperson, Hardee County Library Advisory Board.
Library hours are 10 to 6:30 Monday, 9 to 5:30 Tuesday, 9 to 5 Wednesday and
Thurcsrla and Q tn 4 Fridalv


I1
;.i


F "- -- ,
Posing with chocolates are 2011 Miss Hardee County
Kara Norris and 2011 Hardee County Junior Miss Dana
Terrell. The library is open 40 hours a week and has over
70,000 volumes. There are four full-time employees and
one part-time employee.




^Y Priscella
(^, Owner/Stylist
S Allen Johnson
Barber/Stylist
(863) 285-6300
302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL


Your Child Will
Learn to Read!
Free Evaluation
Internationally Acclaimed Method
Children. Teens & Adlllts

AmdemicAssoaetes
4WLearning Centers"


Rose Mitchelb-Freeman
Reading Instruction
Specialist
(863)773-6141
soc6:9c


This male cat, Katie Boy, belongs to a 7 year old
girl. She misses him and hopes someone has
seen him. He has been missing since May 19.
Call 863-261-0946 or 941-270-7542 leave
message if you have seen him.
REWARD IF FOUND 6:9

SOLAR SUMMER TUTORING '
"Keep your kid energized and l
ready for next school year
Small group tutoring targeting students in ithe
3rd and 4th grade. We will be working an -
reading comprehension, math computation.
and writing skills based on the Next
Generation Sunshine State Standards.



414
Jodie Skitka ZS[ 5" Grade Teacher "
0 Bo See NWE 4'" Grade ESE Teacher
832-0715 -
ONLY 12 Stoi AVAuIABLE ... DON'T MIss YOUR CHANCE!


First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green is sponsoring a
fund-raiser to help pay for mis-
sion trips to Argentina. Anti-
quities will prepare hand-tinted
color children's portraits with
vintage attire and backdrop.
A parent must accompany the
child for the photo, which will
be taken in mid-June. It $10 and
a reserve coupon for a 10x13
color portrait. Time slots must
be reserved by June 13. For
more information, call the
church at 375-2253.
The Faith Temple Church of
God invites everyone to partici-
pate in the Church of God 2011
Florida Summer Camp Meeting
at Wimauma Convention Cen-
ter on SR 674 from June 13 to
17 and will coordinate carpools
for each of the 7 p.m. events.
For adults, speakers are Mon-
day Perry Stone; Tuesday -
Tim Hill; Wednesday and
Thursday Bryan Cutshall;
and Friday Tommy Bates.
There will also be a kids camp
meeting for ages 3 to 10 each
evening from 7 to 9. For more
information, call 773-3800.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.

I don't answer the phone. I
get the feeling whenever I
do that there will be some-
one on the other end.
-Fred Couples


Iflurbuoy, 0 W- -P w .
Every day I get up and look
through the Forbes list of
the richest people in
America. If I'm not there, I
go to work.
-Robert Orben
Whenever you are asked if
you can do a job, tell 'em,
"Certainly, I can!" Then get
busy and find out how to
do it.
-Theodore Roosevelt


IUNE 18 2011
Angie Hines & Mike loannidis
IUNE 18 2011
Jamie Revell & Kenny Futch
JUNE 25, 2011
Kaylyn Crawford & Dustin Walton
ULY 2, 2011
Kimberlyn Cason & Weston Johnson


lULY 16. 2011
Erin Longshore & Eric Goudge
luty 16, 2011
Courtney Thomas & Cameron Durham
IULY 30, 2011
Sarah Cowart & Jonathan Stephens
SEPTEMBER 10, 2011
Chass Bronson & Dennis Carlton, Jr.


IULY 16, 2011 OCTOBER 15. 2011
Mandy Cobb & Donnie Thompson Savannah Locklar & James (Buby) Chancey



Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6565
I Lg) www.catsonmain.com so:cs


S Need Something to do on those lazy days of summer?

Let 4-H help you plan your summer activities!


ANNOUNCING


"Back To Basics"

Summer Day Camp

Workshops will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
mornings from 9:00 a.m. until 12 noon, starting on Tuesday, June 14th
through Thursday, July 21st. The cost for the six week program is only
$20 per person and will cover all supplies needed. Some of the classes
to be offered are:






Youth 8 to 18 are invited to participate. If you have friends who are
not enrolled in 4-H they are welcome to come also. All classes will be
held at the Agri-Civic Center and the 4-H Office.
You must be pre-registered.


For more information call Mary Mitchell
at the 4-H Office 773-2164.

This exciting summer camp program is a joint effort between the
Home and Community Education Council and the 4-H Office.


*


REPUBLICAN
REPUBLICANS BELIEVE
seniors' safety net must be
preserved for today's
beneficiaries and for
the millions who will
POTLIGHT need it tomorrow.
Pol. adv. paid for and approved by HC Rep. Party 6:9c "


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4B The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011


CONSERVE WATER


NEW LIONETTE OFFICERS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Janet Gilliard on May 25 and May 26 spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club and Wauchula
Lions Club about conserving water. This is a program entitled "Every Drop Counts" and
is sponsored by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. In 2013 some 36
states including Florida are expected to have water shortages. A leaking faucet can
waste up to 3,000 gallons a year. The average person in this area uses 111 gallons a
day. Three-fourths of the earth's surface is covered by water, but 97 percent is salt
water and 2 percent is frozen, leaving 1 percent for consumption. The best time to
water is from 4 to 7 a.m. SWFWMD encourages the use of low-flow faucets and show-
erheads. From left are Sheriff Arnold Lanier, Lorie Ayers, Janet Gilliard, and Richard
Farwell.


HEALTHY EMPLOYEES


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce on March 28 sponsored a Healthy
Employees luncheon at the Burton Building at the Leon Sharp Youth Center. Guest
speaker was Calvin Bates, director of the Hardee YMCA. Businesses were encouraged
to promote wellness and healthy habits for employees. From left are Daniel Patterson,
chamber executive director Casey Dickson, Calvin Bates, Wauchula attorney Steven
Southwell, and Nellie Garcia, branch president of Seacoast National Bank.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
New officers for the 2011-12 Hardee High School Lionettes Club are Meghan Graham,
Lion tamer; Emma Marshall, mane puller; Korin Roehm, vice president; Savannah
Valdez, president; Chelsea Wallace, secretary; and Taylor Pohl, chaplain. The service
and leadership club is sponsored by the Wauchula Lions Club, which meets every


Thursday noon at Java Cafe.


Colton Albritton
New Member Of
Angus Association
Colton Albritton of Zolfo
Springs is a new junior member
of the American Angus Associ-
ation.
Junior members are eligible
to register cattle in the Amer-
ican Angus Association, partici-
pate in programs conducted by
the National Junior Angus As-
sociation and take part in asso-
ciation-sponsored shows and
other national and regional
events.
The American Angus As-
sociation is the largest beef
breed association in the world,
with nearly 30,000 active adult
and junior members.








The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
May 31-June 3. Listings include
the name of the owner or con-
tractor the address for the proj-
ect, the 'tpe of work to be done,
and the cost involved. Only
projects valued at $1,000 or
more are listed.
ISSUED
Douglas Battery, Saunders
Street, air conditioning, $3,100.
Susan Williams, Broward
Street, air conditioning, $3,295.
Gary Giddens, Seminole
Trail, air conditioning, $3,200.
Michael Jarvis, U.S. 17
South, remodel, $20,000.
Walter Graves, U.S. 17
South, new construction sin-
gle family home, $99,564.
Thomas Bostick Const.,
Theater Road, rehabilitation.
$14,000.
BUILDING BLOCKS
Building codes are the means
to reduce acceptable risks of the
public health, safety and wel-
fare by ensuring safe construc-
tion, whether it is building con-
struction, property mainte-
nance, fire prevention equip-
ment, or electrical, mechanical
or plumbing installation and
upgrades.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim eeas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate



Stop by and see why so
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com Gene Davis
9:30tfc 800-226-3325 Salesand Leasing


Hardee County School Board
School Financial Report FY 2009-10
Pursuant to Section 1010.215, Florida Statutes, Hardee
County School Board has prepared school. financial
reports for fiscal year 2009-10. The school financial
reports are posted at each school, at the District Office,
and at the School Board web site www.hardee.k12.fl:us.
Upon request, schools will also send a report to parents,
guardians, and community members.
6:9c

I L.......... n


Large Washers & Dryers
Up To 125 lbs. Washers

SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDA Y-FRIDA Y

6AM-6PM 50% OFF


NORMAL/NORMALENTE
$250 DOUBLE/DOBLE
$o00 MAX/MAXI
s600 LARGE/GRANDE
'700 SUPER/GRANDE


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$125
$200
$300
$350


HwY 17 South Across from Nicholas Restaurant i


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Dr. Slade Hayman, a veterinarian in Hardee County for 29 years, spoke to the Wauchula
Kiwanis Club on May 24 at the Panda Restaurant. Dr. Hayman owns All Creatures
Animal Hospital on Hanchey Road in Wauchula. He treats small and large animals,
including a boa constrictor, a buffalo and a dog that ate a gold ball. He has three
degrees from the University of Florida. From left are Charles Cannon, Dr. Slade
Hayman, Mark Manual, and club president Thomas Trevino.


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Danchg wit the Star
NE!LWIPATcass





ModyWdesa :0a


eL will laC EM




StatigWdnsdyJ


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V


Kickboxing

4:30 pm

1 Everyone Welcome!


863-990-8986










June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Career Expo Shows Kids Variety Of Occupations


Hilltop Elementar, School
was the host site for thi, year's
Career Expo on Thursda,. Mav
19.
Guidance counselors from


the county's five elementary
school Kim Davis. Bowling
Green Elementary: Nicole
Keen. North Wauchula Ele-
mentary: Tamara Taylor. Wau-


Hardee County Fire-Rescue provided some diagnostic
equipment for students to try out.


chula Elementary: Leigh Beu-
mel. Zolfo Springs Elementary:
and Karen Hartman. Hilltop
Elementary worked together
to bring 24 businesses to the
campus.
Then. fifth graders from the
five schools had the opportuni-
ty to come and ask questions
about the different possible jobs
and careers.
Vendors who were present at
the Career Expo were State
Farm Insurance. First National
Bank of Wauchula, Wauchula
State Bank, the YMCA, Florida
Hospital. Albritton Insurance,
the Supervisor of Elections
Office. Vandolah Power Co.
and Paynes Creek Historic State
Park.
Also, CF Industries, Mosaic,
O.N.E. Student Ministry, the
Sheriff's Office K-9 Unit,
South Florida Community Col-
lege, Hardee Animal Clinic,
Hardee High School's Air Force
Junior Reserve Officer Training
Corps and Faulkner Tree
Service.
Additionally, Keller-Wil-
liams Realty, the Alan Jay
Automotive Network, Hardee
County Fire-Rescue, Peace
River Electric Cooperative, the
Florida Fish & Wildlife Con-
servation Commission and
Krause Grove Service.


Representatives of First National Bank of Wauchula explained their job duties to a
group of interested students.


Emergency Medical Technicians from Hardee County Fire-Rescue
different responsibilities in serving the public.


An employee of Vandolah Power Co.
demonstrated some work equipment.


Rangers from Paynes Creek Historic State
Park answered some questions about
working outdoors with nature and
wildlife.


Putting food on the table


Florida


So America Grows


"Being a farmer is a pretty big responsibility. But
there's a lot of satisfaction in providing families with
food products like the oranges we grow. Phosphate,
found right here in Florida, helps them grow better. It's
a natural product, so that's why it works so well. In
fact, Florida provides 75 percent of the phosphate
needed by farmers across America. The folks who
send us phosphate have a big responsibility too the
land. They return it to nature for future generations, they
plant trees and they build parks. I can respect that."


____ __I _










ite. June 9. 2011





SThe


Classifieds-


A Classifieds
DEAL ... -. y noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


OJE COMPUTER REPAIR
S r arry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
IValware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available


Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available! -7


LONESTAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.
CUSTOM HOMES STEEL BUILDING
REMODELING CONCRETE
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lice # 291103615
863-773-4779
"QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE c6:9c


IiI
INVESMENT ENTAL
Two'
FURNISHE

MOBILES


S773-051


COMPTON REALTY

George Cheshier
REALTOR'
863 202 6325
georgec@vistanet.net T
SO


,, YOUR K1 TO
> REAL ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


I


WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties


I.--- - - -- -. -. ,
Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
MOTIVATED SELLER-BRING OFFERS! PRICE REDUCED to
$189,999. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.
REDUCED! 182 acres of rolling pasture for cattle, sod, farm, or
develop. Zoned farm residential, 90% improved, cow pens, cross
fenced, 3 ponds, 6" well with John Deere power unit. Also included is
a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage home with fenced yard and well.
Call Jimmy Wohl @ 863-381-2437.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net
c1:9


BUSH HOG hydraullc/PTO post
hole digger/auger $1,400 OBO,
863-781-7868. 6:9-7:7p
#1700 JOHN DEERE 8 row
planter with liquid unit $1,500,
cultivator $350, 863-735-1801.
6:9,16p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


2004 CHEVY SILVERADO $5,500
cash, 781-1062. 6:9c


2001 CHRYSLER Town & Country
$3,500, Tim, 863-245-9030. 6:9p
CASH NOW! Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc


SOMEONE TO HELP and stay
with elderly lady, 863-832-0891.
6:9p


ORAL COMMUNICATIONS In-
structor P/T evening classes at
SFCC's campuses in Highlands,
Hardee and Desoto counties. Min.
Master's, exp. pref. Visit our web-
site, www.southflorida.edu/hr for
complete info. 863-784-7132
EA/EO 6:9,16c
SEASON RETAIL help needed.
Background check required, dri-
ver's license a must. Good pay for
qualified individual, 863-446-
0668. 6:9p
CITRUS CARETAKER. Tractor
work and some manual labor.
Typically 40 hrs per week. Must
have transportation and be
dependable. 813-478-2093. 6:9p
LOVE TO CLEAN? We need you.
Florida Fertilizer is looking for a
self-motivated person to sweep,
mop and clean our facility. We are
a drug-free workplace. 6:2tfc

:mS -


VERY LARGE 4 BR/2 Bath
Doublewlde located In Charlie
Creek subdivision $4,000 down,
$711.39 monthly. Bad credit or no
credit accepted. Call LouAnn at
863-832-3024 or Kenny at 863-
675-8888. 6:9,16p


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
O Monday Friday
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
'PA Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider
OppUAL O"Upp cl6:2-30c
OPPORTUNITY________C -J C _


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
SPECIALIST
Salary: $38,350.89/$18.44hrly -
$52,867.12/$25.42hrly
Wanted for the Hardee County Planning Department.
Performs technical work relating to computer data devel-
opment, and computer software and hardware mainte-
nance. Update, troubleshoot, and repair client/server soft-
ware and hardware problems. Monitor wireless LAN/WAN
for problems, test for security violations, and update and
expand the system as necessary. Performs other general
computer-based operations and services. Knowledge in
data backup, maintenance, recovery, and export/import
procedures and experience with Window 98/2000/XP
operating systems. (5)Five-years of professional experi-
ence interfacing and interacting in a business environ-
ment, equivalent professional training or relevant college
degree. Complete job description posted on County web-
site: www.hardeecounty.net. Applications accepted in the
Human Resources Department, 205 Hanchey Road,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Phone: (863) 773-2161. Position is
open until filled. EOE F/M/V c6:9c


0
00 a


4Oe .


I N C,


John H. O'Neal


REALTORS
S1 (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


10 acs cleared land on paved
rd w/4" well in western Hardee
Co. $65,000!
12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
traffic...Hello, peace & quiet!
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. $130,000!
Lovingly maintained/updated
4BR/2.5BA brick home in
Knollwood w/updated kitchen,
fireplace, back patio! $218,000!
Wooded wonder! 5 ac w/beau-
tiful trees, paved road. $50,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Looking
for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
septic!


PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
home on 4 lots w/beautiful oaks,
fenced in backyard. Close to
schools. NOW $69,000!
25+ ac fenced pasture,
Greenbelt qualified, on US Hwy
17 S w/well, septic & electric.
$192,900!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!
10 ac w/paved rd frontage.
Great for pasture, farming or
homesite. $63,000!
5 lots in Wauchula w/over 975'
total rd frontage. Close to hospi-
tal, schools & shopping. Will
divide or all for $75,000!
CB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new flooring, cabinets,
countertops, being sold as is.
$65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Charming
and. priced to sell! 2BR/1BA
1060 SF home w/lots of updates:
new A/C, insulation, carpeting,
wiring. Den can be 3rd BR.
$80,000!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.--781-0153 SANDY LARRISON.. 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL.-- 781-7633 MONICA REAS,......781-0888
DAVID ROYAL.-- .781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c16:9c


2 BR/ 2 BATH Singlewlde mobile
home in very good condition
located In Charlie Creek subdivi-
sion $49,900. $2,500 down,
$449.61 monthly. Call Kenny at
863-673-4325.
HOUSE FOR SALE. Must see. 4/2
2800 sq/ft, central A/C, corner lot,
large rooms, Indoor laundry, big
front porch, 1,000 sq/ft master
suite w/jacuzzi tub and walk-in
closet, $92,500. 201 N. 8th Ave.
832-0957. 6:2-30p
3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. $167,000.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p


COW HORSE 4 yr. old philly, 16
hands, no papers $2,500, 863-
781-7868. 6:9-7:7p

When someone sings his
own praises, he always
gets the tune too high.


FOUND BLACK AND WHITE Shlh-
tzu or Lhasa Apso 773-4912.
6:9nc
LOST YELLOW LABRADOR
Retriever with black muzzle.
Please call 863-263-6863 If found.
6:9,16p


XEROX COPIER, stove, small
refrigerator, Bowflex climber,
beds, 773-5776. 6:9p
IBANEZ Five-string Banjo. Also
Yamaha Flat-Top Guitar with elec-
tric pickup, 773-3123. 6:2,9p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver, diamonds. Do not sell to
hotel buyers. They buy for melt
value. Do not send scrap gold In
the mail. You get stung. Buying
and selling 40 years. Capt. Ed
904-222-4607. 1:6tfc


HELP WANTED
DEPUTY
$34,660 $38,110

The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is seeking Florida
Certified Law Enforcement Officers. Applicants must
possess a current certification in Law Enforcement
and meet the requirements set forth by the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement Training and Stand-
ards Commission. Applicants must successfully com-
plete the personnel selection process set forth by the
Sheriff's Office.
Applications may be obtained and returned to the
Sheriff's Office by noon, June 17, 2011, at 900 E.
Summit St., Wauchula, FL, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. If other accommodations are
necessary, call the Sheriff's Office, 863-773-0304 tQ
make arrangements. EOE cle16:9,



HELP WANTED
Florida Department of Transportation i
Arcadia Operations

SPECIALTY CREW LEADER
Position Number: 55003269
Work Hours: 7:00 a.m.-5:30p.m. Mon.-Thur.
Bi-Weekly Hiring Salary: '975.00-'1100.00
**MUST HAVE VALID CLASS B CDL AND
PESTICIDE APPLICATOR LICENSE WITH
RIGHT OF WAY AND AQUATIC
ENDORSEMENTS**
This is a crew leader position for the herbicide crew.
Duties and responsibilities can be found on the vacan-
cy listing at People First. All applicants must apply on-
line via the People First website (1-877-562-7287) by
completing a State of Florida online job application at
www.myflorida.com by 5pm EST 6/15/11. ci6:9,1c



ralore &Flores, nc.,
M^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


Noey A. Flores
(863) 781-4585


REDUCED








Zolfo Springs 3BR/IBA CB home with central air & heat. Big
trees with lots of shade, on a corner lot. Reduced to $89,900
New Listing 2BR/1BA frame home sits on a 1+/- acre on
Hanchey Rd. Priced at $55,000
Wauchula 3BR/I BA CB home Central Air & Heat Outside the
city limits of Wauchula Priced at $79,900.
Perfect home for a growing family 3BR 2BA with two-car garage,
family living room, dinning room and large game room with door
exiting pool area. 3,300+- under roof 2,600+- heated. Large corner
lot. Price Reduced to $129,000
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours "
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl6:9c


HELP WANTED
BOOKKEEPER/PAYROLL CLERK
Part Time $12/hr
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking applica-
tions for a part time Bookkeeper/ Payroll Clerk. You
must be at least 19 years of age, have a high school
diploma or equivalent, never been convicted of a
felony or a misdemeanor, be willing to be fingerprint-
ed, and pass a drug test. Bookkeeping and payroll
experience is required.
Applications may be obtained and returned by noon
June 17, 2011, at the Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit
St., Wauchula, FL. If other arrangements are neces-
sary, call 863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE cl6:9,16c


t-I


- i


L


nc- a


448-2561


I AA^


-IR:Q 1fin


I.I











June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


FOUR WAUCHULA CEMETERY
plots, $1,900, 813-784-6742 or
813-704-3201, Herb Wilson.
5:12-6:9p



FOR SALE: 2BR, 2BA, Ig. kit./dln.
dblwide w/wood floors, central
AC/heat, enclosed porch, carport,
shed, screen room, golf cart in
gated adult park, 863-767-6238.
6:9,16p



ACA YELLOW LAB puppies, $350,
773-4308. Shots and health cer-
tificate. 6:9p
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


2 CHIHUAHUAS, male and
female, first shots, $250, 863-767-
8822. 6:9c
AKC REGISTERED Cocker
Spaniel puppies, buff, $300, 375-
4001, 448-3996. 6:9p
ATTENTION! State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh



THANK YOU to all spring pea
pickers. We will have summer
peas and squash in August.
Watch for our ad. Center Hill
Produce, 2949 Center Hill Road,
Bowling Green, FL 863-223-5561,



FARMLAND FOR SALE. 40 acres,
10" well, new turbine, gear head,
power unit and mainline; com-
pletely hog fenced, 2006 3/2 fully
furnished mobile home, 60' x 30'
metal building, small pond, coun-
try road frontage on 2 sides, set
up for grove or farm operation, 7
ml. from Wauchula, $299,000.
863-781-1318. 6:9,16c


3024 STEVE RD., ZOLFO $160,000
20 Acres of fenced, prime pasture land, double-wide
2 bedroom, 2 bath home with screened front porch and huge
bonus room, 2 stall horse barn, storage shed, pond and creek.
Call 813-967-2568 c15:26-6:16p




THE PALMS

Available for |

Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through June 30th
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.

Open, quiet country setting.

Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
S(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 (
'.-* Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c16;230c


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
A MUST SEE! This move in ready home has
3B/2.5Bth, large rooms, new kitchen, plenty of
storage inside plus 12x18 detached utility, dou-
ble garage and screened 12x16 porch. $169,000
Located in a family neighborhood, this 3B/2Bth
house could be your home! Ceramic tile and
carpet floors, large eat- in kitchen, spacious
bedrooms. $115,000
Family Neighborhood 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco
home; large kitchen, living room with w/b fire-
place, separate mother-in-law suite, double
garage. $154,000
5 Acres "Native Florida" tract; plenty of
wildlife. $22,500


2 SERVICE
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location In
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
for information. 4:28tfc



APT FOR RENT, 308 Peace Dr.,
2BR, 1B $450 month, $450 securi-
ty dep. Call 863-445-0663 9-5
daily. 6:9p
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo. up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc
3 BR/2 BA furnished dblwide,
central AC/heat, LR, DR, Ig. kit.
$800 monthly w/options in gated
adult park. 863-767-6238. 6:9,16p
ZOLFO 4 BR/1 BA, central air
and heat, utility room, very spa-
cious, large lot, 863-735-2626.
6:9c
3 BR/2 BATH Singlewide mobile
home located In Charlie Creek
subdivision only $475 monthly
with $250 deposit. Call LouAnn
863-832-3024 or Kenny at 863-
673-4325. 6:9,16p
VERY LARGE 4 BR/2 Bath dou-
blewide located in Charlie Creek
subdivision $750 monthly. Ready
to move in. Call LouAnn at 863-
832-3024 or Kenny at 863-675-
8888. 6:9,16p
APT & HOUSES for Rent, 773-
6667.. 6;9c
2 APARTMENTS. 1 bedroom, 1
bath each, furnished. Nice area N.
Hwy. 17. 863-245-3321.
5:19-6:16p


QUAITY BIC'i
VElYRESNAL
LARGESELECIO

F IDAY& STURAY


4 BR/2 Bath doublewide located
in Charlie Creek subdivision $600
monthly. CO- LouAnn at 863-832-
3024. 6:9,16p
ONE BEDROOM apartment $150
weekly, utilities Included, Bowling
Green, no pets, 863-712-1126.
6:2-9p
2BR/1BA, central A/C, large lot,
Wauchula Hills, $575 monthly
plus deposit, 407-929-6491.
6:2,9c
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh



OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
1840 sq. ft., flexible design, front
lobby, reception area, + 4-5 indi-
vidual rooms. $900 mthly, OBO,
406 S. 6th Ave., Wauchula. Call
863-773-6162. 6:9p
OFFICE SPACE for rent. Great
location, $450 plus deposit, 863-
832-1984. 5:26-6:23p





Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


GILL ARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell

* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2tf Mobile: (941) 456-6507


New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires

BIG SALE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
S SA Billy Ayers
S"--- c16:9c Tjre Technician


DESOTO COUNTY





OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 i


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert
NEW PRICE for this 2B/lBth M/H with nice
yard and large screened porch: completely fur-
nished. $29.000
NEW PRICE! 16.5 Acres with 3B/2Bth M/H
built: a total of 5 wells on this beautiful proper-
ty surrounded by large oaks. $175.000
MAKE OFFER ON 5 ACRE TRACT beauti-
ful home site. paved road frontage. $65.000
5 Acres with large oaks and open field; very
secluded. $40.000
STORAGE UNITS 30 units in excellent condi-
tion: very good rate of occupancy. Call Delois.
$75,000


:E YOU CAN CO


UNT ON
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


ASSOCIATES
773-9743 STEVE JOHNSON


781-0518


,Jtt
El


TRACTOR WORK, loader bucket,
bush hog, disc, backblade or
boxblade $30 per hr., 2 hr. min. or
$20 per hr., 5 hr. min. Free est.
863-735-9284. If no ans. please
leave message. 6:9,16p
I'M A DEPENDABLE, honest,
local man looking for good job.
Please call Tom, 863-448-2245.
6:9nc
CHRISTIAN LADY available for
home care for senior citizens,
personal assistant, companion
care. Call 863-245-0062. 6:2-30p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillesple) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
MR E PREOWNED AUTOS AND
TOWING gives Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell this vehicle
1995 FORD VAN
VIN#1FBJS31H1SHA78185
10 a.m., JUNE 22, 2011
Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towing
1093 Hwy. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 33873
Pursant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. MR E PREOWNED AUTOS AND
TOWING reserves the right to o
accept or reject any and/or all bids.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
MR E PREOWNED AUTOS AND
TOWING gives Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell this vehicle
2004 SATURN
VIN#1G8AY12P14Z199360
10 a.m., JUNE 22, 2011
Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towing
1093 Hwy. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 33873
Pursant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. MR E.PREQWNEDAUTOS AND
TOWING reserves twleight to AUr ,
accept or reject n oyandor all bvr


***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh



HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE,
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
SATURDAY 8-? 314 Riverside
Drive, Wauchula. Clothes for
everyone, toys, baseball cards,
comics, dressers, gym workout
equipment. 6:9c
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 7-2. Fabric,
lots of misc. items. 539 Terrell
Rd., Wauchula. 6:9p
4 FAMILY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-?
5012 Willow Ave, B.G. 6:9p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-12 711
Altman Rd., Wauchula. 6:9p
KING BEDS, TABLE and chairs,
new set of bunk beds, new trun-
dle bed & new baby bed.
Everything 10% off Friday &
Saturday! Edna's Place. 6:9p
SATURDAY, 7-? 4953 Central Ave.,
B.G. Misc items. 6:9p


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items, will be published as
,space allows.


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

S, 773-4478


.' '- a


1 Free Estimates

Insured 30+ years experience
cl10:2tfc



p 4' Charles N. Flesher II, Inc
4po TILE & FLOORING SPECIALIST
TILE LAMINATE
/S f WOOD ENGINEERED WOOD
Bathtubs Showers Backsplashes & More
When a product is installed with care and know-how, you'll receive
a service that I am willing to stake my name on! Charley e
FREE ESTIMATES
863-781-2867 701 BUMBY LANE, WAUCHULA


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com


I James V. See, Jr., Broker
GREAT CASH FLOW! 3 duplexes on Hwy 66 in
Zolfo Springs. Each with approx. 2,000 sf of liv-
ing area. Each is rented and ready to go. This
won't last long....$275,000
NEW LISTING! 18 acres. House & Grove.
Close in approximately 1,850 sf of living. Nice
screened porch. 3 Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of
grove, mostly earlies. 6" deep well, microjet &
diesel power unit. Only $295,000
2 acres zoned Commercial. Desoto County,
Highway 31. Subdivided. High and Dry. Double
paved road frontage. $89,900
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED to $205,000!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath block home on 2+ acres. Close
to town. Asking $169,500.
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000


| Ben Gibson
Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


* James V. See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Rick Knight


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


cl6:
c16:9c


Store Wide Sale
Dining rootn start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot a
863-382-0600


F yus ta


- .1


5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great place for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72,500

Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000

Spacious home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. $379,000

4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000

320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000


i


f~J~:fi
r










8B The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011


You've probably heard the
wise old saying. "Practice
makes perfect."
This holds true for piano
recitals and public speaking,
but what about "practicing" for
a hurricane? While no one has
the "perfect" plan to deal with
these unpredictable storms,
families and businesses should
have a plan and review it peri-
odically.
The 2011 hurricane season is
here, and to get prepared for it
Peace River Electric Coopera-
tive, headquartered in Wau-
chula, recently conducted a hur-
ricane exercise to test its emer-
gency response plan.
PRECO contracted with Surf
Technologies of Atlanta to craft
and present a hurricane scenario
for the test.
Employees were required to
use their skills and experience
to deal with unexpected
changes in the scenario, while
keeping true to the tenets of
PRECO's plan. Participants
successfully worked together to
solve problems such as road
closings, materials shortages,
and a shortage of electric gener-
ation. Many of the participants
benefited from lessons learned
in 2004 when hurricanes
Charley, Frances and Jeanne
devastated a broad swath of
PRECO's service area.


The


"In 2004. PRECO's hurricane
plan worked beautifully when
three major storms left 1.500 of
our poles on the ground." said
Bill Mulcay. general manager.
'-Since then. new technologies
and practices have been added
to keep the plan current.
"The result is that our emer-
gency response plan continues
to work well." he added. "The
hurricane drill introduced some
obstacles we've never encoun-
tered before. yet our plan held
up and we resolved the issues
quickly and efficiently."
PRECO strongly encourages
its nearly 35.000 member/con-
sumers to create a personal hur-
ricane plan, including an emer-
gency food and supply kit.
Members are also asked to
verify and update personal con-
tact numbers with the coopera-
tive. This enables the co-op to
quickly locate and repair storm-
related outages.
For your own personal safety
and that of line workers, only a
licensed electrician should con-
nect an emergency backup gen-
erator to your home's electrical
system.
For more hurricane tips or to
update member account infor-
mation, contact Peace River
Electric toll-free at '1-800-282-
3824.


He who joyfully marches in rank and file has already
earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by
mistake, since for him the spinal cord would suffice.
-Albert Einstein


Lodwa's Hotse Thrf Stonre

QUALITY MERCHANDISE



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street



9eeaven c5nt Cleaning service
By Sherry White Ministries
[ ]i i I -[ -ll i lMhi .


773-0523 *


773-0877


HARDEE CAR COMPANY








SWauchula
F iaor I ,, Firs tNational Bank)
Monday- Thursday
10 am to 7pm
'. 773-6667 Wauchula Hills
S(Comer of Hwy 17 and REA Rd.)
I Friday & Saturday
Billy Hill 10 am to 7:30 pm Ruby
Owner 773-2011



Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAROL

Buy Here!1; Nonteres
Pay Here!] FinanceCeharges





Wetire

Proud Of Voul

TERRV HiLL

2011 1
HARDEE

SENIOR HIGH
GRADIrTE



5' I Iz,


"No job's too big."


4


b tr oS I


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager


Classifieds


PRECO Preps For

Hurricane Season


INCREDIBLE KIDS


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Don't praise yourself; let oth-
ers do it. ... Ambition and
death are alike in this; nei-
ther is ever satisfied. The
purity of silver and gold can
be tested in a crucible, but a
man is tested by his reaction
to men's praise.
Proverbs 27:2,20-21 (TLB)

FRIDAY
You can be sure that no
immoral, impure or greedy
person will inherit the
Kingdom of Christ and of
God. For a greedy person is
really an idolator who wor-
ships the things of this
world. Don't be fooled by
those who try to excuse
these sins, for the terrible
anger of God comes upon
all those who disobey Him.
Ephesians 5:5-6 (NLT)

SATURDAY
The Lord All-Powerful has
made this promise: "These
things will happen exactly as
I planned them; they will
happen exactly as I set them
up. ..." When the Lord All-
Powerful makes a plan, no
one can stop it. When the
Lord raises His hand to pun-
ish people, no one can stop
it.
Isaiah 14:24,27 (NCV)

SUNDAY
We who have strong faith
ought to shoulder the bur-
den of the doubts and
qualms of others and not
just go our own sweet way.
Our actions should mean
the good of others help
them build up their charac-
ter. For even Christ did not
choose His own pleasure.
Romans 15:1-3a (PME)
MONDAY
God always does what He
says, and is gracious in
everything He does. God
gives a hand to those down
on their luck, gives a fresh
start to those ready to quit.
... Everything God does is
right the trademark of all
His words is love.
Psalm 145:14,15,18 (ME)

TUESDAY
The Lord is near; have no
anxiety, but in everything
make your requests known
to God in prayer and petition
with thanksgiving. Then the
peace of God, which is
beyond our utmost under-
standing, will keep guard
over your hearts and your
thoughts, in Christ Jesus.
Philippians 4:5b-7 (NEB)
WEDNESDAY
"I will put My law in their
minds and write it on their
hearts. I will be their God,
and they will be My people.
No longer will a man teach
his neighbor or a man his
brother, saying, 'Know the
Lord,' because they will all
know Me, from the least to
the greatest," declares the
Lord. "For I will forgive their
wickedness and will remem-
ber their sins no more."
Jeremiah 31:33b-34 (NIV)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.




ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first .and
last names for both students


CA,
I44

---


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.

rDi n-n


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


PRICE REDUCTION!!! Vacant canal lot on
Lakeside Drive In Sebring. Canal to Orange
Blossom Lake, Includes 19 x 20 metal build-
ing with bathroom. $14.000
PRICE REDUCTION!! $72.900!! Possible
owner financig!! 5.3 Acre tract zoned F-R,
with a 52 x 101 ft. slab ready for building.
Pond in back of property.
AVION PALMS RESORT!! 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Mobile Home and Lot. Central heat and air,
screened porch, appliances, utility shed,
M/H has skirting all around And move-in
ready. $75.000
RETIRED !! AVION PALMS RESORT!! M/H


LOT PRICED a $30.000


QUIET FAMILY HOME!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Brick home, outside of city limits, on a no
traffic road with large oaks, outbuilding and
alarm system. $175.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multi-family-Single Family Homes.
$75.000
ONE OWNER HOME!! 3 Bedroom/2 Bath
home well maintained, could be used for
office, across from County Courthouse,
Extra lot included with price. $110.000
PRICED TO SELL!! 2 BR/2Bth House with
extra lot, central heat/air, one car garage
with door opener, many extras. $65.000 Call
Nancy for more information.
JUST LISTED!!! 10 AC fenced, 4 inch well,
house well casing. Great location for home,
farming, multi-business. Only $7,500 per
Acre. Ask for Nancy!!


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 245-1054


150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, Home or both. $6.000
Per Acre-Negotiable!!
THE BLUFFS! Retirement Community! Cute
and versatile everything you need and golf
cart too! Relax in the family room of this
home or use it as a second bedroom with it's
own bath. Totally Move in ready and waiting
for you!! Only $53,000
NEW LISTING!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home in
Bowling Green, Nice corner lot with total sq
ft. 1,292. Priced @ $38.000
MUST SEE TO BELIEVE!! If your family
enjoys the outdoors, you must see this
unique listing that brings outdoor living to
you. Features 6 outbuildings includes 2,000
SF Barn w/23ft ceilings, work Shop, storm
room, outdoor kitchen w/stainless steel fix-
tures, fire pit, potting shed, large gazebo
overlooks pond-well stocked w/fish,
includes aerator, outbuildings w/pens and
fenced. Also 14 x 60 MH sealed in rough cut
pine, front and back porchs. Trees and main-
tained lawn. MUCH MORE, Call Nancy for
Appt. Priced at $175.000
Love The Country? Look No More!! 4
Bedroom, 2 Bath Double Wide Mobile Home
located on 4.81 acres. ONLY $110.000
ONLY $75.000 Charming two story home
with 5 Bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Includes origi-
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for antique lovers. Wood floors throughout,
Many extras and walking distance to main
street.
Riverview! Residential lot, Priced (a $11.900
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties. c16:9c


COURTESY PHOTOS
Fourth-grade teachers
demonstrated to their
students at Zolfo
Springs Elementary
School just how incredi-
ble they were by having
an "Incredible Kid Day."
On Friday, May 27, stu-
dents participated in var-
ious self-esteem-build-
ing activities that cen-
tered on just how spe-
cial each child truly is.
Letters also were written
to them from teachers
and administrators, and
each child beamed with
smiles throughout the
day. In the bottom photo
are participating teach-
ers (from left) Nicole
Moreau, Cathy Tish,
Cynthia Yoniak and
Sheena Hays.


and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


---


Mon Sat
^^^0m







June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9B


TEAM CHAMPIONS


COURTESY PHOTOS
The season is over and each Hardee County Youth Sports baseball division has its
champion. The Pirates won the Junior Boys division. Players are (in no particular
order) Marco DeLeon, Tyler Helms, Zack Carranco, Seth McGee, Roby Paris, Alex
Clarke, Tomas Gomez, Blake Crawley, Dalton Tubbs, Marco Briones and Rodrigo
Rodriguez. Their head coach is Wally Helms.


The Joe L Davis Braves won the Ozone or Majors division. On the squad are Augustine
Flores, Joshua Carlton, Parker.Carlton, Tanner Carlton, Boone Paris, Hayden Lindsey,
Nick Nicklaus, Zack Richardson, William Roberts, Ricardo Aleman, Jessie Pilkington
and JocQuez Thomas. They are coached by Dale Carlton, Matt Carlton and Jason
Carlton.


Taking the Machine Pitch title was the Rapid Tech Lugnuts, whose players are Caleb
Block, Caleb Macias, Colton Block, Steven Jackson, Tyler Hooten, Jake Stephens,
Kaden Bryan, Hunter Davis, R. J. Cabrera, Jose Rivera, Alejandro Gonzalez and Isaac
Kuen. They are coached by Brent Stephens, Scott Bryan and Mike Davis.


vi-


The ATP Agri-Services Inc. Bees won the T-Ball division. On the team are Cody
Halstead, Dean Clark, Kellon Lindsey, Tyson Pace, Jose Franco, Taijaeous Blandin,
Roman Hubbell, Seth Pautz, Dallas Grice and Tony Rodriguez. They are coached by
Jason Clark, Gerry Lindsey and Jeremv Pace.


.1.


BOX TOPS


COURTESY PHOTO
The Student Council at Zolfo Springs Elementary School is shown presenting Principal
Melanie Henderson with a check for $685.80 from the Box Tops for Education program.
The Student Council is in charge of collecting, preparing and submitting the box tops
or their school. Pictured are (up front) James Vue; (second row, from left) Ashley
Gonzales, Marco Villava and Cody Van Sickle; (third row) teacher Sue Boyette, Nia
Mendoza, Carol Allison, Henderson, Aaron Zuniga and teacher Kay Crews.


You're Invited To The


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For every '10.00 you spend, you get your name put into a raffle to win a Costa Gift Package. ,
Includes: a pair of glasses, hat/visor, strap, shirt

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Pre sales for BBQ dinner tickets start at 10.00/ticket
Purchase 4 tickets and receive a $5.00 discount on one ticket
(4 tickets for $35.00)

COSTA DEL MA4 *e*e what's out there


Winning the Minors Division was the Sheriff's Posse Bulls, with players Lane Parks,
Zack Deuberry, Cody Helms, J.C. Kulilg, Jose Aleman, Drew McGuckin, Miguel Ruiz,
Kyle Gilliard, Aaron Bunch, Trenton Roberson, Ethan Hollinger and Daniel Sockalosky,
who are coached by Robert Deuberry and Andrew McGuckin.


~Q~\
rl,.










10B The Herald-Advocate, June 9. 2011


ALL-STARS IN ACTION


.1~


r .....n
~ ii --------------------


COURTESY PHOTOS
Hardee County Youth Sports has chosen its baseball all-stars and they have been busy
representing the county in tournaments around the region. Selected for the Juniors all-
Stars were Tyler Helms, Marco DeLeon, Tomas Gomez, Seth McGee, Roby Paris and
Alex Clarke of the division-winning Pirates; Jose Gonzales, Cody Spencer and Tanor
Durden of the Rays; and Frank Farias, Omar Alamia and Jordan Jones of the Yankees.
They are coached by Wally Helms and Marco DeLeon Sr. of the Pirates and Chris
Spencer of the Rays.


Playing for the 7-and-under Machine Pitch All-Stars are Michael Lambert and Vincente
Cabrera of the Mudcats; Presley Gilliard and Derek Camilo of the Storm; Cason Gough
and Clayton Harris of the Muckdogs; Jake Stephens, Kaden Bryan and Hunter Davis of
the Lugnuts; and Michael "Lane" Revell, Oscar DeLeon and Palmer Klein of the River
Dogs. Their head coach is Brent Stephens.


Batting for the T-Ball division All-Stars are Luke Roberts, Matt Webb and Blake Rucker
of the Hooks; Josiah Lozano, Boone Pazzaglia and Madison Schraeder of Scrappers;
Eric Mushrush of the Rockhounds; Joseph Hamilton of the Diamond Jaxx; ahd
TaiJaeous Blandin, Kellon Lindsey, Dean Clark, Tony Rodriguez and Cody Halstead of
the Bees. They are coached by Jason Clark and Gerry Lindsey of the Bees and Tony
Pazzaglia of the Scrappers.


Playing for the Majors All-Stars are Hayden Lindsey, Parker Carlton and Boone Paris of
the Braves; Tucker Albritton, Cody Cumbee, Jhett See and Carlos Camacho of the
Rays; Kyle Hewett of the Reds; Brandon Franks and Landon Albritton of the Giants; and
Alejandro Rodriguez and Isaac Flores of the Red Sox. Their head coach is Dale Carlton.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


Taking the field for the Majors/Ozone division All-Stars are Miguel Ruiz, Zack Deuberry,
Drew McGuckin and Cody Helms of the Bulls; Isaac Moreno, Bo Villarreal and Adrian
DeLeon of the Sand Gnats; Matt Tyson and Tony Webb of the River Cats; Will Redding
of the Raptors; and Dustin Willis and Zack Durastanti of the Thunder. They are coached
by Robert Deuberry and Andrew McGuckin of the Bulls and Ted Svendsen of the Sand
Gnats.


S. -









There are two Machine Pitch division All-Stars. On the 8-and-under group are Steven
Jackson, Tyler Hooten, Caleb Block and Colton Block of the Lugnuts; Vincente Chaidez
of the Muck Dogs; Kipp Cooper and Fidencio Davila of the River Dogs, Seth "Cory"
Gough, Cayden Johnson and Vicente Cabrera of the Mud Cats; and Owen Schraeder
and Dawson Bryant of the Storm. They are coached by Efran Schraeder, Ben Krause
and Will Krause of the Storm.


CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold the regular scheduled meeting Tuesday, June 14, 2011
at 6:00pm. Items on the agenda are as follows: CRA Commercial Grants; CRA
Residential Grants; Notice of Public Hearing and Adoption of Resolution 2011-01
CRA Expansion & Extension; Resolution 2011-06 Review and Approval of Kimley-
Horn and Associates, Inc.'s contract for Engineering and Planning Services; and any
other business that may come before the Board.
The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby advis-
es that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with
respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
-ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863)
773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 6:9c


''













June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11B


courthlel UR]p]r
Ig~jiilm~ia-U


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Willie James Cedric Lee, 24,
Bowling Green, and Tammy
Ellen Richey, 22, Bowling
Green.
Larry Lee Jackson, 62,
Wauchula, and Heather Leigh
Rickels, 42, Wauchula.
William Lee Gibson Jr., 38,
Bowling Green,and Robin
Michelle Knarr, 30, Bowling
Green.
Marco Antonio Sanchez, 18,
Zolfo Springs, and Maria
Nancy Olguin, 20, Zolfo
Springs.

The following small claims,,
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
W. S. Badcock Inc. vs.
Jeffery Shrieves, judgment for
possession of property.
Michael Sanders vs. Ted
Tardiff, judgment set aside,
rehearing set.
Chase Bank USA vs.
Thomas T. Davis Sr., voluntary
dismissal.
Troy B. West vs. Theodore
H. Middleton, voluntary dis-
missal.
AT&T vs. Junior L. Daniels,
voluntary dismissal.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Chrystal M. Ham, judgment,
execution withheld.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Linda McCormick Taylor, judg-
ment, execution withheld.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Wayne Newman and Lisa
Newman, judgment, execution
withheld.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Catessa Bennett Holt, judg-
ment, execution withheld.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Teng Yang, judgment, execu-
tion withheld.
Target National Bank vs.
Amy D. O'Bryan, judgment.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Carlton D. Dyal, stipulated set-
tlement approved.

The following misde-
meanor cases was disposed of
recently in county court:
Adan Cruz, domestic battery,
not prosecuted.


Wells Fargo Bank vs. Ray-
mond E Taylor, judgment.
Richard Shepard and Mi-
chelle Shepard, divorce.
Stacy Jean Gough vs.
William Maxcy Gough, dis-
missal of injunction for protec-
tion.
Garden State Fireworks Inc.
vs. Hardee Youth Coalition Inc.,
judgment.
City of Bowling Green vs.
Javier Maldonado, judgment of
forfeiture.
David Cox vs. Edwin Buss,
DOC, transfer to Leon County.
Linda Alvarez vs. Sophy
Alvarez, dismissal of injunction
for protection.

ci, The following felony'crimi-
- nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Danny Wayne Day, battery
on a detention employee with
fluids, felony driving while
license suspended and DUI,
probation 18 months with con-
dition of 10 days in jail sus-
pended, license suspended five
years, alcohol abuse evaluation
and treatment, ignition inter-
lock for two years, $2,503 fines
and court costs, $350 public
defender fees, $100 cost of
prosecution (COP), restitution
placed on lien.
Dereus Defrand, maintaining
a place where controlled sub-
stances are illegally kept or
sold, transferred to county
court.
Timothy B. Frazier, posses-
sion of cocaine and possession
of drug paraphernalia, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation two
years, no alcohol or drugs, ran-
dom screens, warrantless search
and seizure, substance abuse/-
mental health evaluation/treat-
ment, curfew, $520 fine and
court costs, $200 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, 75 hours


community service.
Gerardo Garcia, burglary of
structure, grand theft, dealing in
stolen property, possession of
methamphetamine and sale of
methamphetamine, adjudica-
tion withheld, two years com-
munity control, substance
abuse/mental health evalua-
tion/treatment. no alcohol or
drugs, random drug screens,
warrantless search and seizure,
$520 fine and court costs. S100
COP; two counts grand theft of
a firearm,, two counts posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and
dealing in stolen property, not
prosecuted.
Christina Aurea Harrelson,
violation of probation (original
charges four counts aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon),
probation modified to include
alcohol abuse evaluation and
treatment, $100 COP added to
outstanding fines and fees.
Kevin Hernandez-Vasquez,
burglary of dwelling and grand
theft, one year three months
Florida State Prison with credit
for time served (CTS), $520
fine and court costs, $200 pub-
lic defender fees, $100 COP
and $450 restitution placed on
lien; dealing in stolen property,
not prosecuted.
Betty Danielle Hester, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge grand theft), probation
revoked, two months in jail
CTS, $150 public defender fee
and $100 COP added to out-
standing fines ani' fees and
placed on lien. (:
Jessica N. Lowery, felony
driving while license suspend-
ed, transferred to county traffic
court.
Lorenzo Sanchez Ramos,
sexual battery, adjudication
withheld, probation four years,
no contact with victim or prop-
erty, $520 fine and court costs,
$350 public defender fees and
$100 COP paid from cash bond.
Jose Antonio-Islas Vazquez,
sexual battery, not prosecuted.
Anthony Jerome White, fugi-
tive warrant of extradition,
transferred to Wisconsin.
Terry Victor Williams, pos-
session of methamphetamine
and possession of drug para-
phernalia, two years Florida
State Prison CTS, license sus-
pended two years, $520 fine
and court costs, $350 public
defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien; domestic battery


and harassing a witness, not
prosecuted.
Amy Lynn Grosstephan, sale
of methamphetamine within
1,000 feet of a convenience
store amended to sale of
methamphetamine, three years
Florida State Prison--suspend-
ed, three years probation, sub-
stance abuse/mental health
evaluation/treatment, license
suspended two years, warrant-
less search and seizure, no alco-
hol or drugs, random screens,
$520 fines and court costs, $100
COP; possession of drug para-
phernalia, not prosecuted.
Antonio Edgar Maldonado,
cultivation of marijuana, pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, three
years Florida State Prison -
suspended, three years proba-"
tion, no alcohol or drugs -
including prescription drugs,
drug abuse evaluation/treat-
ment, $520 fine and court costs,
$100 COP.
Thomas Christopher Good-
win, violation of probation
(original charges robbery and
aggravated battery causing bod-
ily harm), probation revoked,
three years Florida State Prison
CTS, unpaid fines and fees
placed on lien.
Nicole Marie Castillo, pos-
session of cocaine, engaging in
criminal offense with a weapon,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia and allowing an unautho-
rized person to drive, not prose-
cuted.
Rafael Juarez Jr., violation of
probation (original charge bur-
glary of structure), probation
revoked, two years 'Florida
State Prison CTS and concur-
rent with Charlotte County sen-
tence, $150 public defender
fees and $100 COP added to
outstanding fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Devan Lampley, violation of
community control house ar-
rest (original charge shooting
into a building or vehicle), com-
munity control revoked, 90
days in jail with no credit for
time served, resume two years
community control, $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees.
Samuel Mendez-Lopez, pos-
session of a fraudulent ID card,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, $520 fine and
court costs, $150 public defend-


er fee and $100 COP.
Nicholas- Andrew Vasquez,
violation of probation (original
charge aggravated assault), pro-
bation revoked, three years
Florida State Prison-suspend-
ed, 18 months community con-
trol. $150 public defender fee
and $100 COP added to rut
standing fines and fees.
Tyjuan Terrel Williams,
escape, possession of marijuana
and resisting an officer with
violence, bond estreated, two
years community control, $520
fines and court costs, $350 pub-
lic defender fees, $100 COP
and $150 investigative costs.
Edward Brian Benton, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge possession of metham-


phetamine), probation revoked,
two years community control
with same other conditions.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the circuit court
clerk in the following cases:
James W. Kelly as trustee to
Howard Chad Pritchett and
Roger D. Gurganus, $87,500.
Frank Vasquez Realty inc. to
Wauchula State Bank, $95,625.
Jerry Clifford Welch Sr. and
Genifer Dianne Welch to Yuri
Martinez, $75,000.
Mollie Ann Hullender Joiner
to Carolyne S. VanSickle,
$12,000.


HnigFshingForcas


6/9/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:21 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 50 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:06 PM
Set: 1:30 AM
Overhead: 8:11 PM
Underfoot: 7:46 AM
Moon Phase
57%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
7:46 AM 9:46 AM
8:11 PM 10:11 PM
Minor Times
1:30 AM 2:30 AM
2:06 PM 3:06 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/10/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:22 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 51 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:10 PM
Set: 2:08 AM
Overhead: 9:02 PM
Underfoot: 8:36 AM
Moon Phase
68%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:36 AM -10:36 AM
9:02 PM 11:02 PM
Minor Times
2:08 AM 3:08 AM
3:10 PM 4:10 PM
Prediction
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/11/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:22 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 51 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:14 PM
Set: 2:47 AM
Overhead: 9:56 PM
Underfoot: 9:29 AM
Moon Phase
78%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:29 AM -11:29 AM
9:56 PM 11:56 PM
Minor Times
2:47 AM 3:47 AM
4:14 PM 5:14 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/12/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:22 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 51 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:21 PM
Set: 3:31 AM
Overhead: 10:53 PM
Underfoot:10:24 AM
Moon Phase
87%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:24 AM-12:24 PM
10:53 PM-12:53 AM
Minor Times
3:31 AM 4:31 AM
5:21 PM 6:21 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/13/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:23 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:27 PM
Set: 4:19 AM
Overhead: 11:52 PM
Underfoot: 11:22 AM
Moon Phase
94%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:22 AM 1:22 PM
11:52 PM- 1:52 AM
Minor Times
4:19 AM 5:19 AM
6:27 PM 7:27 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/14/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:23 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:31 PM
Set: 5:13 AM
Overhead: --:-
Underfoot:12:22 PM
Moon Phase
98%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
--:-- --:--
12:22 PM 2:22 PM
Minor Times
5:13 AM 6:13 AM
7:31 PM 8:31 PM
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/15/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:23 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:29 PM
Set: 6:11 AM
Overhead: 12:52 AM
Underfoot: 1:22 PM
Moon Phase
100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
12:52 AM -2:52 AM
1:22 PM 3:22 PM
Minor Times
6:11 AM 7:11 AM
8:29 PM 9:29 PM
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/16/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:24 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:22 PM
Set: 7:12 AM
Overhead: 1:51 AM
Underfoot: 2:19 PM
Moon Phase
99%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
1:51 AM 3:51 AM
2:19 PM 4:19 PM
Minor Times
7:12 AM 8:12 AM
9:22 PM 10:22 PM
Prediction
Best++++
Time Zone
UTC: -4


CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Huntley Thompson vs. Ed-
win Buss, state Department of
Corrections (DOC) and D. G.
Lawrence, warden, Hardee
SCorrectional Institution, peti-
tion to review inmate situation.
Federal National Mortgage
Co. vs. Dean Lewis Shultis et
al, petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
Amanda Sanchez vs. Hehu
Sanchez, petition for injunction
for protection.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Teodoro
Reyna and Ofelia V. Reyna,
damages contracts and in-
debtedness.
Edward Garcia vs. Debbie
Bryant, petition for injunction
for protection.
Carmen Salazar and Juan
Salazar, divorce.
Regions Bankvs. Lee M.
Fowler, David A. Fowler et al,
petition or mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Heidi McClary vs. Joseph A.
Burson, petition for injunction
for protection.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Florida Vegeta-
tion Management and Byron
Waters, damages contracts
and indebtedness.
Laina Marie Perez and the
state Department of Revenue
vs. Ruddie Lee Lopez, petition
for enforcement of administra-
tive child support order.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Alfred Barber vs. J. Marion
Moorman et al, petition dis-
missed.
Deborah Keen vs. Horace
Keen, amended injunction for
protection.
Jodi Kathleen Oakes and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Ruben J. Figueroa
Jr., voluntary dismissal.
S,Sonya Louise Gonzales and
DOR vs. Frederick Tyrone
Graham, voluntary dismissal.
Alta R. Blalock and DOR vs.
Thomas E. Shelton, voluntary
dismissal.
Jessica Nicole Taylor and
DOR vs. Delmas H. Gough,
voluntary dismissal.
Maura Pacheco and DOR vs.
Gerardo San Juan Mateo, vol-
untary dismissal.
Brenda D. Ray and Andrew
GI Ray, divorce.
a,


Hickey Branch CF Industries Post-Mining Reclamation in Hardee County



We are committed to phosphate operations that support the highest quality POST-

MINING RECLAMATION, CLEAN WATER for our children, families and industry,

HEALTHY HABITATS for fish; game and wildlife, a thriving FLORIDAN AQUIFER for

future generations, and the PRESERVATION of PRISTINE NATURAL RESOURCES.




CF Industries proudly supports Hardee County,

our Phosphate Operations home for more than 30 years!






HELPING FARMERS FEED A HUNGRY WORLD


Sj CF
.. .


I7
.1 .. '


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g *''~
~' ~~
:... ,i








121 The Herald-Advocate. June 9, 2011


May 27, 2011
Dear Hardee County Residents:

We wanted to thank everyone for their efforts on the Hardee County boadband project.
We appreciate your support and wanted to let everyone know we're planning additional
enhancements. Wireless Broadband is just the beginning! We have a proud history and
T"M. a future that we're building together, ever working toward a shared vision of generational
change. We were the first ever to deploy a state-of-the-art broadband network this fast -
in fact in record time, we deployed 15 mono-poles in 15 days an unprecedented event
i due solely to the collaboration between our friends and partners in the local community.

H .Stop by and say "hi" to our team, they would love to hear from you and your experience
with our service! Our Accounting and Scheduling Manager is from Hardee; our Market
'- Manager is from Zolfo Springs and helped us build our Warehouse / Help Desk and
S- Equipment Transit Center in Wauchula (just up the road from the Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce on SR17, ju t north of the Ford dealership). The truck driver that
-' maneuvered the 140 ft. monopolel safely down the streets was from Desoto; local
resources provided the transportation and security services; and the people of Hardee
.-. County joined hands with their new-found friends in West Florida and our partners at
S Motorola to build the first-ever county-wide wireless broadband network.
ardee Market Manager Doug Knight.
We now employ at least a dozen Hardee County residents. And we utilize the products
and services of many local businesses, contractors, and professionals on a daily basis.
Most recently, we completed a major software upgrade across the network, and had a 95% success rate with the re-set-
ting of 140 Access Points. The few customers impacted by the upgrade were immediately identified and brought back on
line the next day. Regarding the technical issues we experienced during this initial deployment stage, we worked diligently
with our internal and vendor engineering teams to provide the highest quality .-.
broadband experience to our customers, and are pleased to report a major break-
through in late April which has resulted in system-wide stabilization, consistent
speeds, and quality of service.

There are people in the industry taking notice. Based on our accomplishments,
the realization is dawning that it takes months and months of "sweat equity" and
relationship building, that it takes a public-private partnership; a local presence,
with local boots on the ground to build a network that goes beyond just Main .
Street and reaches out to rural residents who were never (before now) able to gain
access. It takes a dedication to generational change and a commitment to pro-
vide not just broadband network access, but creating real local jobs, providing for
the future of Hardee County!
For the rest of Florida, Hardee County is just the beginning. Hardee County is the
core of the state-wide network we're building with our partners in the North Florida Local resource coordination with Bowling Green Mayor
Broadband Authority and the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance (FRBA). Our mis- Perry Knight.
sion is to deliver high quality access to communications to the rural communities
in the great state of Florida. We're from Florida, and we want to see our state prosper, to be able to participate in the
opportunities made available by emerging technology serving previously underserved communities.
Those in Hardee County, please supply as much information as possible to us. Call our Help Desk at 863-448-9297: Post
a link on our Facebook page, (http://www.face-book.com/pages/Hardee-County-Rapid-Systems-Broadband-
Initiative/126227970765075) and if you click the Like button on this page, you can receive our periodic updates and alerts
in your News Feed as well as your mobile device. You can even write us a letter to let us know how we're doing.

This is your network Hardee County!
(Individual Subscriber Units not displayed)








We rea can't express our gratitude enough for this opportunity to be of service thank you Hardee County The Rapid Systems Famon
monopole


H


t






















Blue Sky Wauchula Helps


College-Bound, Small Business


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Does your child want to go to
college but has no idea how or
even where to begin?
SA recent addition to Main
Street in downtown Wauchula
can help.
The University of South
Florida Polytechnic's Blue Sky
Wauchula program is an aca-
demic outreach program
designed to cater to junior high
and high school students and
their families. With a mentor
who can help students identify
their interests and set future
goals, there is hope for every-
one.
The program was established
in 2010 at the Lakeland loca-
tion, with one opening in
Winter Haven soon after. After
a successful run, an office was
unveiled in Sebring, then in


Wauchula.
The program's original focus
was to build an environment
where USFP's faculty, staff and
students could work with busi-
nesses to develop innovative
technology. As the program has
expanded, the focus has as well.
"The purpose is really two-
fold: As an academic outreach
center, Blue Sky Wauchula pro-
vides a place for middle and
high school students and their
families to prepare and plan for
college, trade school or the mil-
itary. As a business outreach
center, Blue Sky Wauchula also
offers business development
services to the community,"
said Travis J. Brown, executive
director of the Blue Sky
Incubation program.
The program is also part-
nered with the U.S. Department
of Education's KnowHow2Go


program, a national college
access campaign. KnowHow2-
Go encourages and prepares
low-income eighth through
10th graders to actively pursue
higher education by teaching
four steps to college.
During a time of economic
crisis, an incubation program
such as the one offered by
USFP can help reduce the
amount of stress, worry or
anticipation when students are
preparing for the future.
Blue Sky connects students
with national resources as well
as offering educational pro-
grams, seminars and communi-
ty events to provide small busi-
ness support.
The building is located at 116
W. Main St. For more informa-
tion, go to USFPBlueSky.com
or call 667-7986.


Sarah Keener and Melissa Nickell are the community outreach liaisons for the Blue Sky
Incubation Program here.


A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held during Friday Night Live in February, as the remod-
eled building was opened to the public that evening for tours and refreshments.

-~


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Joining the community at the Blue Sky Wauchula grand opening were (from left)
regional chancellor Dr. Marshall Goodman, Blue Sky Director Travis Brown, USFP
Campus Board member Gene Engle and past USFP faculty president Dr. Dave
Armitage.


The problem with cats is that they get the exact same look on their face whether they
see a moth or an axe-murderer.
-Paula Poundstone

By and large, mothers and housewives are the only workers who do not have regular
time off. They are the great vacationless class.
-Anne Morrow Lindbergh


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, June 9,2011


- I = -~rr~r~3 C I













2C The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011





Schedule of Weekly Services-


BOWLING GREEN
APOSITOIIC LIGHTHOUSE
INITEI) PEN COSTACOSTA
CHUIRCII
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday\ lMorning ............10 00 a.m.
Sunday E\cning .. ... .. 6.00 p.m.
Tuesday P'ra)cr Meeting..... 7-00 p.m.
hui da\ Ser ice .... ...7:30 p.m.

CHIIESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ........... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ......:00 a.m.
Sun Eve Worship
ll& 3rd 400pm 3:00p.m.
'ucs 1'rayer/l ihlet Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHIIRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Ilwy. 17 South
Morning w Mship ............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHIIURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. 6:30 p.m.
W wednesday .. .......................7:30 p.m .

CHIIURCII OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ....... ..............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ I1:00 a.m.
Tues Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
I t Sunday ....................5:00 p.m .

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Central.
Sunday AM Worship...........10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............6:00 p.m.
Wed. I'ray r Mccting ............7:00 p.m.

FAIII ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Ilwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ :30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCII
Bowling Green
S. Ilwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Iible Study ... ...................... :30 a.m.
Morning Worship . ..........10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
I)iscipleship Training
Youth & Adult .................. 6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5Th grade)....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METIIODIST CIIURCII
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00a.m.
Youth Fellowship .................. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............;.. 00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................. 7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCII
Baptist churchh Road 773-9013
Iible C('onn action .................. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ................6:00 p.m.
Wcdnesda) Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.mn.

IIOLY CHIIILD)
SPANISII CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
)omingo De Iredicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Marlcs Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miiercoles Esluditor Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Juc\c. D)e l'ledicacion .......7:00 p.m.

IMMIANUEL BAPTIST CIURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ............ 9:45 a.m.
Morning \Worship .............1 :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
WednesI d) l'rai.cr .................7:00 p.m

NACEI)ONLA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIURCII
607 Palmetto St.
(hurch School .................. :30 a.m.
Mourning S re\ ice ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Sert ice ....... .. ..7:00p.m.
\Wed IIlble Studs)/Pra'r ...... 7:100 pm.
('onmuinion-2niid Suni E\e 600 p.m.

ITL. PISGAII BAPTIST CIIURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday\ School .. ............9:45 a.m.
Mont lng \\orslhip ...........1 1:00 a.m.
Dis)l plcs Training .............5:00 p.m.
E ening \ hip ... ..........7:00 p.m.
\\cdlnesda P'aer Tinme ..... 7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason I)ixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sndl Worship ..... II 1 00 a.m.
2nd Sunda\ Communion ...11 00 a.m.
5th Sunda\ F-cast ......... I:00 a m.
Bread ,t Lifc -Sunday . 1:15 p.m.
TI-I E lMetling Tuesday 7:00 p.m


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 am.
Servicio de Predicacion .. .....5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ...................10:00,a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELJM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CIURCII
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ...:........ 10:00 a.m.
Mor ning Worship ........... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time .......7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service.................. 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIIURCII
322 IHanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wedunsdal*v Evening Cell G(roups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call/n lociatoiin

CIARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCII
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study .......................... :30 a.m.
Worship Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men i Leader.\hip & Training Clan -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CIIURCII OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CIIURCII OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Ilanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.n.
Sunday School .......... .........10:00 a.m
Priesthood ............................ I I:00 a.m.


Printed as a Public Service
by.
T' The.Herald-Advocate
, Wauchuta, Florida
Deadline Thursday 5 p.m.
Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


Sunday School ..................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship ................ ..10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner .. ..........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse M in. ................7:00 p.m.

IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... I:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study .......6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......................... 10:00 a.m .
Servicio ............................. 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion .................... 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servicio .... ...........7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.m .
Viernes Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CIURCI
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ......-7:00 p.m.

FAITI TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry..................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's M ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
Worship ..................... ....... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CIRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafi Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10:45 a.m .
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
TIlE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..........:........ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST'MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School .....................:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m..
Morning Worship ........10:00 a.m..
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m..
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church.

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... l:00 'a.m.
Wednesday Worship ............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ...............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.


Sunday ........................ 9.00 am.
H oly D ays ......... ......... .............

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CIHURCII
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ... 500 p m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p m
Sunday (Spanish) .............. .7:00 a.m
(English) ............... :30 a.m.
(Spanish) ..............1. I 100 a.m
(Creole) ................. 1:00 p n
Daily Mass in English .........8 30 a m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes .................................. 7: 30 p.m.
Jueves ............ ........ ........7.30 p.m .
Domingo ........................... 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ..............................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............... .............. 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ...................10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ..................... :00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNACIONIAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m .


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(Ist & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
" & 3"' Sun.
Communion .................... 10:00 a.m.
2' & 4' Sun.
Divine Worship................ 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .................. ..... 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ...................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ............1... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m
Evening Service ................. 6:00 p.m
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCII
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ................. 9:30 a.in.
Morning Worship .............. 1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ... .....7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CIIHURCII
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...... .......... .45 a m
Morning Worship .............I 1:00 a m.
Evening Worship ....... ..........6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ............7:00 p.m
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday W orship. ... ............. :00 p m.
Wednesday Worship ............. 7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .................... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School :................10:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
'Youth Service ....................... :00 p.m.
Evening Service .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship. .................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
M men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak lills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ................................ 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. :00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ................. 11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...........7:00 p.m.


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
Mu AGai A (mio 0 0
t.ecICi. Geuqnui


A girl had just finished drawing a
picture, when a drop of ink
splashed right in the middle.of it.
"Dad." she cried, "it's ruined."
"No," he said. "Draw a dog
around it."
She did, and took it to her
teacher. She exclaimed. "That
little dog makes a good drawing
even better."
A stain appeared in Joseph's
life. His brothers sold him into
slavery. But God raised him from
the pit to the palace. And he said to
them. "God turned into good what
you meant for evil."
Has a dark stain come into your
life? Don't give up. Trust God. He'll
turn it into good

Visit us at: www. TheSower.com


S Winter is just around the
corner. The potted plants that
sat outside have been carried
in before the first frost.
Now they shine like
emeralds in the sunny
window, thriving in
the warmth. We
experience seasons
: )of "winter" in our
lives, when we
are overcome with
doubt, frozen with fear. We can
come into God's house and warm our
hearts. Psalm 92:12-13 promises "...
the righteous will flouri'h...
planted in the: hou-e t
the Lord."





sonpres Saen7 t s 7eNAnera BoRe Seo"
Ccomb*Die acr

ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426_Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship ............................... 11:00 a.m .
Evening..................................1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEWV VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.TH. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
............. .... .......... ..............7 :00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................... 10:30 a.m .
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .................... 1:00 a.m.


ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ..................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship...................... I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service .............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones.......................... 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina.......................... 11:30 a.m.

,-SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club..........................6:30.p.m .
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Scrvicio.................................. 8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes........5:00 p.m.


Ceace ioer 5r6tvcers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


idl










June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Church League At Tourney Time GOLF TOURNAMENT WINNERS
Church League At Tourney Time I,.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With the season ending last
week. the 2011 Men's Church
League entered into tournament
time this week.
As the regular season closed
last Thursday night. San
Alfonso stood alone at the top
of the pile with a 12-4 record
(.750), while Holy Child and
Bowling Green Baptist tied for
second place, each with a
record of 11-5 (.688).
Behind them were Florida's
First Assembly Team 1, First
Christian and New Vision
Worship Center, St. Michael
Catholic, Northside Baptist and
Florida's First Assembly Team
2.
Play in the last two weeks
was fast and furious, with sev-
eral close games. On Field 4 on
May 24, St. Michael outlasted
New Vision 21-17.
Sammy Arreola homered
twice and Jose Lucho, Roy
Santoyo and Jaime Rojas raced
home on solo homers for St.
Michael. Ryan Roehm doubled
twice and Cody circled the
bases four times for New
Vision.
In the Field 4 late game, Holy
Child nipped San Alfonso 17-
16.
Jesse Reyes homered and
John McBride, Josh Sneider
and Ram Briones all tripled to
lead Holy Child. Mario Reyes
homered twice among three hits
and Justin Painter had four hits
for San Alfonso.
Meanwhile, on Field 3,
Northside won the early game
23-8 over First Assembly #2.
Dalton led Northside with a
triple among his three hits and
four scores. Cole Choate had
four hits. Nathan Fuller triple
and doubled among his here
hits for First Assembly #2.
Shayne also had three hits.
Bowling Green Baptist pre-
vailed 25-22 over First Assem-


bly #1 in the Field 3 late game.
Justin Battles and Austin
Helms both homered for
Bowling Green. Bryan Cook
scored five times. Lewis Martin
homered and Rodger Brutus
homered and tripled for First
Assembly #1. Abel Hernandez
tripled, doubled twice and sin-
gled to score four times.
On May 26, on Field 3, there
were a pair of one-run victories.
In the opener, Filst Assembly
#2 won 21-20 over First
Christian.
Fuller tripled and doubled
and D.J. Chapa tripled for First
Assembly #2. Weston Johnson
hit three homers for First
Christian. Mike Carte joined
Johnson in scoring four runs
apiece.
In the Field 3 closer, First
Assembly #1 edged St. Michael
19-18.
Martin, Brutus and Lavon
Cobb all homered in First
Assembly #1's win. Brutus had
five hits and four scores. Lucho
and Valentin Rosales each
homered for St. Michael. Lucho
circled the bases four times.
Over on Field 4, the 6:45
game was a forfeit win for San
Alfonso over New Vision.
Northside won 16-10 over Holy
Child in the 8:15 game.
Reson Holt homered and
doubled twice for Northside
and Cody also homered. Ruben
Rivas homered and McBride
tripled to lead Holy Child.
Last Tuesday on Field 4, New
Vision came back for a 20-10
win over First Christian. Ryan
B. homered and tripled, and
Roy C. homered for New
Vision. Nathan hit a pair of
triples. Carte homered and
tripled and Eddie Hernandez
homered for First Christian.
In the Field 4 nightcap,
Northside won over First As-
sembly #1 by a 27-25 score.
Michael Choate and Cody
both homered and Walt Beattie


tripled and doubled for North-
side Baptist. Cody had four hits
and four scored four times.
Jeffrey hit a grand slam homer.
triple and double for First
Assembly #1. Abel Hernandez
homered twice and Johnson and
Brutus also homered.
On Field 3 last Tuesday,
Bowling Green slipped past San
Alfonso 32-30 in the opener.
Doue Sutton homered and
doubled twice among his five
hits and scores and Paul
Roberts had four hits for
Bowling Green. Brent Gilliard
tripled and doubled and scored
five times for San Alfonso.
Chad Hayes added four runs
and Lamar Gilliard had four
hits.
Holy Child won the late game
37-24 over First Assembly #2.
Reyes homered, tripled twice
and doubled twice to score five
runs for Holy Child. Elias
Ramirez added a pair of triples,
a double and a single for four
runs. Fuller doubled twice and
Jesse D. had four hits and
scores for First Assembly #2.
Last Thursday's games were
mostly makeups for rainouts
during the season. On Field 3,
New Vision nipped Northside
29-28 in the 6:45 game.
Ryan B., Ryan Roehm and
Cody all homered for New
Vision. Cody and Trey each had
five hits. Holt homered twice
and Michael Choate added
another for Northside. Holt had
five scores and Beattie had
four.
In the Field 4 nightcap, St.
Michael won 31-20 over New
Vision.
Bobby Flores, Lucho and
Robert Martinez each had four
hits for St. Michael. Miguel
Santoyo, Roy Santoyo, Tequila
and Junior Cortez each chipped
in with three hits. Roehm home-
red and Ryan B. tripled for New
Vision. Ryan B., Paul, Kenny
and Jordan each had three hits.
On Field 3, First Assembly
#1 won 25-5 over First Assem-
bly #2 in the only game on that
field.
Albritton homered and dou-
bled among five hits for First
Assembly #1. Johnson also had
five hits and four runs. Cobb
and Chris Rutledge each had
four hits. Fuller led First As-
sembly #2 with a pair of runs,
while Keith Simpson had twin
hits. .. .,. X i ;,


COURTESY PHOTO BY JOSE CANALES
Winners of the 12th annual Frank Zajicek Golf Tournament on top from left are Steve
'Polk, Miles Judah, Charles Cannon and Bob Claman. Taking second place on bottom
from left are Robbie Meade, Todd Rogers, Mike Thomas and Tim Wells. Winning third
place but not pictured dias Angle Coker, Kendall Coker, Jack Soles and Byron Jarnagin.
7~s;~


17


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1 \ 1329 US Hwy 17 N, Wauchula, FL
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Email: kochcon@strato.net


NOTICE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA
REQUESTING APPLICANTS FOR THE PLANNING & ZONING BOARD

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the City of Wauchula will be accepting applicants who
would like to serve on the City of Wauchula's Planning & Zoning Board. This Board
reviews and makes recommendations to the City Commission on matters relating to the
planning of the City. All members are appointed by the City Commission and must be
a resident of the City. The Board meets the third Monday of each month at 5:30 pm.
All interested individuals must have a resume to the City Clerk, 126 S. 7th Avenue,
Wauchula, FL 33873 by Friday, June 10th at 5:00 pm. All applications received by the
deadline will be presented to the City Commission at the June 13, 2011 City
Commission Meeting at 6:00 pm for their review and possible selection.

Questions may be directed to:

City of Wauchula
Olivia Minshew, Director of Community Development
225 E. Main Street, Suite 106
Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-9193
6:2,9c
ominshew@cityofwauchula.com


E. 0. KochConstruc


~941~L~iF(
~i~ri~z~












4C The Herald-Advocate, June 9. 2011



American Legion Honored Memorial Day May 30


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Army Col. Robert Collins. a
Wauchula native now living in
Hillsborough County, was guest
speaker at the American Legion
Memorial Day ceremony on
May 30.
He paid tribute to "all who
served their country with honor'
and dignity and especially those
who made the ultimate sacrifice
on the altar of freedom." He
said Hardee County played a
big role in instilling his patriot-
'ism and passion for service to
America.
Col. Collins quoted President
Abrahani Lincoln, "Any nation
that does not honor its heroes
will not long endure."
He quoted President John F.
Kennedy, "A nation reveals
itself not only by the men it pro-
duces but also by the men it
honors, the men it remembers."
Collins honored men and
women who served the county.
Memorial Day was originally
called Decoration Day and hon-
ors those who have died in the
nation's service, from the
Revolutionary War to the pres-
ent Global War on Terrorism, a
span of over 230 years. He paid
tribute to Soldiers, Sailors,
Airmen and Marines.
A Gallup poll showed only 28
percent of Americans know the
true meaning of Memorial Day.
Many confuse it with Veterans
Day.
The American Revolution
began in 1776, when American
colonies wanted freedom froni
the rule of Great Britain. Over
one million American service
members have died in wartime.
He included the American
Revolution, Civil War, Spanish
American War, World War I,
World War II, and conflicts in
Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm,
and the current Global War on
Terrorism, responding to "an
enemy that had struck our
homeland and changed our
Nation forever."
He paid tribute to Army Sgt.
First Class Lance Vogeler, 29,
from Savannah, Ga., who was
S killed Oct. 1, 2010, serving his
eighth tour in Afghanistan after
serving four tours in Iraq-12
tours of duty in just over nine
years since the 9/11 attacks.
"This husband and father gave
to his country until he simply
had nothing left to give."
Col. Collins said his pre-
ferred version of how Memorial
Day started was in the Civil
War when families in


THE HONORED DEAD


WORLD WAR I
Name Service Name Service
ALI)ERMAN. Edward -rmy _.ALTMAN. Jebtha I. .\rmv
BRYAN. Albert W Army BLRC11. Griad .rmy
COLLIER. Leslie Army DAVIS. Isaac Amnn
DONAHUE. D. E. Army GRICE. .Ahon Army
HOLLAND. Fred -rmy JONES. John Army
MADDEN, Arthur .\rmy MITCHELL. Wm. E Army
ORR, James R Army THOMAS. Henry Army
WEBB. Joseph T Army WEEKS. Nathaniel Army
WI11.IAMS. Herger Armyi
WORLD WAR II
BALLARI), Merle Army BAUCOM, J. B. Army
BREWER. John T Army CEJKA. Henry G Army
CHESSER, Charlie L Marine CHESTNUT. Freddie L Army
CRANE Albert 1, Marine DAVIS. Herman Watson Navy
DAVIS. Robert O Jr. Army DEES, Bradford W Army
DENNIS, Jack K Army EVERS, Robert D Army
FUSSELL, Donald E Navy FUSSELL, Jack H Navy
GILLIAM, Thomas O Amy JONES, Dave Clifton Navy
LAMBERT. Harold 0 Navy L.ANIER, Frank P Army
MADDOX, John Robert .Army MAKOWSKI. Edwin A Navy
MAYS, Jack Navy McCALL, Murrell G Army
McLEAN, Malcolm E Army MINOR, Francis J Army
MONTGOMERY, Chester Army MOORE, Douglas T Navy
MOSELEY, Oscar C Army NORTH. Leavy T Jr. Army
OSKIN. Stanley J Avrmy PATTERSON, James M Navy
PETTEWAY. Roy H Army PRINGLE. J. P. Army
SMITH, Halcott L Army SOUTHERNL AND, W. Edgar Army
STANTON, Arthur Lenmmie Navy TAYLOR, Jessie J Army
TAY1OR, John S \Armny TAYLOR, Marquis B Army
TEW. Charles R Army WHITE, William S Army
WINGAITE Andrew J Avrmy WIT, Leslie B Army
KOREAN CONFLICT
BAREFOOT, Elmer G .rmy HOWZE. Orville C Army
RYAN, Jim J Amy
VIETNAM WAR
ADAMS. B. Tim Marine BOATWRIGHT, Raymond L Army
CARTER, Terrel Elbert Navy DICKEY. Charles C Jr. IArmy
FJLFORD, Varl E rmy LONG, Charles Edward Navy.
DLNG, Warren L .ISAF_: MEANS. Johnny JMarine
PENDLEY, Robert Glenn Army RICKELS, Frederick Dale Marine
SHAW, Roy E Jr. Army _


Columbus, Miss., dedicated a
day to cleaning and placing
flowers on Confederate graves.
"They noticed Union soldier
graves overgrown with weeds
nearby. The Confederate
women, grieving their own fall-
en soldiers, understood that the
dead Union soldiers were cher-
ished loved ones of faraway
families. They cleared the tan-
gled weeds and laid flowers on
those graves as well. That day is
said to mark the first Memorial
Day in America."
Years later in 1868 Gen. John
Logan and his veterans group
called the.;Grand Army of the
Republic Proclaimed May 30 as
Decoration Day. Congress rec-
ognized the holiday as,
Memorial Day in 1967.
Collins said of modem day
times, "It is important that the


American people continue to
support our Soldiers, Sailors,
Airmen and Marines by honor-
ing their service and welcoming
them home. Thank you to the
American Legion for playing a
big part in that. '
"It has been said that for a
nation to be successful, the
nation must be willing to serve.
Those who serve will remain
the centerpiece of our national
security. For over 230 years,
soldiers have followed a
Warrior Ethos and system of
values central to all that we do.
They symbolize the nobility of
Selfless -service, heroism and
sacrifice. ..
The brave men and women in
uniform are "America's most
potent weapon in this war, com-
ing from all across the country,
from small towns like


Wauchula to the largest cities.
They volunteered and answered
their nation's call to duty. Many
of them will go to war and some
of them will not return. We
must never ever forget their sac-
rifice."
Oliver Wendell Holmes
called Memorial Day "our most
sacred holiday."
Collins said "the act of com-
mitting yourself to your country
and being willing to fight for
the freedom of your fellow citi-
zens is among the most noble of
endeavors. We must find ways
to ensure their legacy endures.
The history of these men and
women deserves telling and re-
telling.
"Remembering our fallen
once a year is not enough. The
widows, widowers, fathers,
mothers, brothers, sisters and


Col. Robert E. Collins spoke about the history and signif-
icance of Memorial Day.


children remember every day."
Collins said his wife's grand-
father, Arthur Stanton, died
when his submarine went down
in World War II off the coast of
Japan.
He noted an anonymous
quote, "Poor is the nation that
has no heroes. Shameful is the
one who has them and forgets
them." America is the greatest
nation in the world.


Gen. Douglas MacArthur
said "Old soldiers never die."
Americans must make certain
not to allow them to "simply
fade away."
Col. Collins concluded by
thanking the American Legion
and the approximately 100 in
attendance. "God bless our vet-
erans, our fallen, and God bless
America."


Jack Carlton played "Taps" and helped present the col-
ors.


Post Chaplin John Maddox gave the invocation and Lyndsay Naranjo sang three patriotic songs including
benediction. "The National Anthem" and "God Bless America."


W.H. Harward Jr. helped present the colors (flags).


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY


Laurie Under and Col. Collins placed the wreath next to the monument that has the
names of Hardee County men who have been killed in wars.







June 9, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Military Biography Of Col. Robert E. Collins Jr.


Colonel Collins is the sixth generation on his mother's
side. Dr Sylvia McDonald Collins. to be raised in
Hardee County. He graduated with the HHS Class of
1980 and after graduation he entered the training pro-
gram of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.,
and graduated with the Class of 1985.
He was initially commissioned in the Field Artillery
and had numerous leadership and staff fire support
positions in Germany, Ft. Benning. GA, and Ft.
Benning, GA, and Ft. Campbell, KY
In 1994, Colonel Collins transitioned to the Army Re-
serves and returned to his home state where he began
working in the energy industry. He worked for both reg-
ulated and unregulated utilities and energy service
companies in Florida as principal engineer, account
manager, energy engineer, and federal business devel-
opment manager
Initially in the Reserves, Collins worked as a projects
officer for the University of South Florida Army ROTC
and then as a U.S. Military Academy liaison officer
After completing his graduate degree of Master of
Business Administration Degree at the University of


Tampa and the Command and General Staff Officer
Course in 2000, he changed branches to Civil Affairs
and then served in a number of leadership and staff
positions in the U.S. Special Operations Command
(USSOCOM) and the Theater Special Operations
Command Central.
He was called back to active duty in 2006 to support
the Global War on Terrorism at USSOCOM and com-
pleted an Iraq year tour in 2008. His current role is as
a deputy of USSOCOM's InterAgency Task Force.
He holds numerous awards and badges including the
Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Senior
Parachutist, and Air Assault Badge. He is a qualified
paratrooper and jumpmaster and holds jump wings
from the United Kingdom, Honduras, the Arab
Emirates, and the Dominican Republic.
His overseas assignments include Iraq, Jordan,
Panama, Honduras, South/North Korea, Bahrain,
Bolivia, Kuwait, Qatar, and Germany.
Colonel Collins is married to the former Martha Ree
Stanton of Temple Terrace, and they have two children,
Conner (7) and Olivia (5).


Col. Robert Collins honored American warriors who have
died in war.


Post Commander Jimmy Dickens was emcee.


HEARTLAND PHARMACY


DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


Julian Garcia, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Crystal Contreras & Red Camp Pharmacist
Hours:


Monday-Friday 9:00


am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


1...2
r--


the guest speaker, Army Col.
the guest speaker, Army Col.


Vacation Bible School


Aees 4 vrs


P ~
fl
:i ._i
r
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i


- 8th Grade


JUNE 12-17


SUN.


'A


S6:00 PM


SUPPER SERVED NIGHTLY


/ ~ ~ 'J ,


~2-..


Dr. Sylvia Collins, widow of former attorney and county
judge Earl Collins, poses with their son Col. Robert E.
Collins, Jr.


Laurie Linder introduced
Robert Collins.


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- 8:30 PM


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6C The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-Negotiation for audit services, 8:35 a.m.
-Right turn lane off U.S. 17 North at Maxwell Road. 8:45 a.m.
-Public Hearing-closing a portion of Fussell Road. 9 a.m.
-Prioritize state transportation department road work list for
2013/2017, 9:15 a.m.
-Contingency funds for Resthaven septic tank, 9:25.
-Florida Mosquito control laws. 9:35 a.m.
-Report on meeting with Polk County Sheriff, 9:50 am.
-Recent changes in growth management laws, 10:05 a.m.
-Possible withdrawal from Public Risk Management health
insurance pool.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.


SFish Busters
,-S By Bob Wattendorf
S*- Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


THE GOVERNMENT REALLY HELPED!
For all my 32 years with the Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission, I have dealt with the stigma, "I'm from
the government, a.., I'm here to help.you."
Fortunately, the FWC has an outstanding public reputation,
and most people who care about nature and our resources under-
stand that we provide a valuable service.
Long ago, everyone who benefited from healthy fish and
wildlife and from beautiful natural areas entrusted governments
with the responsibility of protecting and sustaining both. "The
North American Model of Wildlife Conservation" describes how
governments ensure safe and sustainable public fishing and hunt-
ing opportunities and conserve wildlife habitats. That model incor-
porates the "Public Trust Doctrine."
The Public Trust Doctrine is part of common law, and each
state customizes it to establish public rights in navigable waters and
along shores. This is because people use these common areas for
food, travel and commerce and need to share them.
The doctrine has three core principles. First, fish and wildlife
are public resources. Second, they are managed for the common
good. Third, trained professionals hold them in custodianship and
serve as trustees who are accountable to the public.
In Florida, the state Constitution codifies existing common
law, ensuring the state holds title to navigable lakes and streams for
use by the people. The doctrine protects water bodies that were
navigable at the time of statehood.


Building on this, in 1937 President Franklin D. Roosevelt
signed the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act. This act has
been crucial to implementing the North American Model of
Wildlife Conservation. In 1950, sportsmen and businesses teamed
with conservation-minded policymakers to redirect existing feder-
al excise taxes on fishing tackle to a new Sport Fish Restoration
Program.
The concept was to restore sport fish populations and improve
public access, so more people can enjoy fishing and fishing sales
would increase. Sport Fish Restoration came about because anglers
wanted to see more money directed toward restoring the nation's
recreational fisheries, thus ensuring better, fishing opportunities for
themselves and future generations. It has been the best thing for
anglers since mass production of fishing reels.
Today, the program uses a small excise tax on fishing reels and
other fishing tackle, as well as a motorboat fuel tax, to fund sport-
fish restoration and boating access programs. It is working.
There are now 77 percent more anglers than in 1950. More-
over, purchases of tax-related items by anglers have increased by
nearly 200 percent in constant dollars since 1955. The excise-tax-
related return on investment ranged from 1,585 percent in 1970 to
2,643 percent in 1980.
In Florida, the program provided $13 million in 2010, of
which 15 percent went to boating access. Freshwater fisheries con-
servation received $5.5 million, and the rest went to saltwater fish-
eries.
In fresh water, the FWC uses this money to improve fisheries
habitat, stock fish, conduct research and manage fish populations.
The FWC also conducts aquatic education programs and provides
fishing and conservation information to anglers.
The bottom line is that the Public Trust Doctrine, the North
American Model of Wildlife Conservation, your fishing license
fees and Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration all work hand-in-
hand to ensure safe and sustainable use for everyone.
For me, that makes it much easier to say, "I'm from the gov-
ernment, and I'm here to help."


30-MINUTES GUARANTEED Domino's Pizza in Wau-
chula has recently undergone a change in management, with that
national advertising slogan being strongly enforced.
"Already I've had people shocked when their food arrived on
time and hot at the door," says new manager Jeff Janse. "Our.
biggest focus is working on service, guaranteeing our food is good,
the right order, and hot when you get it."
The different Domino's restaurants in this region were all
opened around the same time and networked with each other. Janse


has been a part of this for six
years. Working mostly out of
Auburndale, he was asked to
come down to run Wauchula's
store based on his experience and
expertise on the job.
"I've done everything
involved, from being a driver
and assistant manager to now
being the operating partner,"
-notes Janse. "I also want to make
our store accessible and a com-
fort zone for everyone who
walks in, so I've recently hired
some high schoolers who are flu-
ent in Spanish to reach out to the
Hispanic community here."
Taking over a business can
mean many different things, for
Janse it's a chance to prove him-
self.
"I really want everyone to
realize that I'm all-in on this
business, and my personal., fei,
affected, by.,my,,.work as well.
Because I'm a part-owner, I'm


Photos By MACHELLE DOLLAR
New store manager Jeff
Janse dives into his re-
sponsibilities as plans to
improve the. Domino's Piz-
zas~ WaiJohat~ad realready
well under way.


solely in charge of everything here. The scheduling, orders and
advertisement falls on my shoulders. If the store is successful, then
I'm successful; just like if the store is a failure, I'm a failure," says'
Janse.
Last December, Janse visited the store and began to work with
its employees. This year it was made official and. he took over. the
company.
In search of the community's support, Domino's is associated
with St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital and has a wall show-
ing donations that have been made. The goal in mind is to work
locally with the American Cancer Society in the near future.
The eatery also is helping to sponsor the high school's soccer
team and continues to welcome churches in need of donations,
deals, or help in general.
"We've really put all our effort in this store, in providing great'
pizza and great service, and we would really love the chance to
take back our name and show the. county just what we can do,"
Janse concludes.
The store is located at 1038 S. Sixth Ave. in Wauchula, in the
Wauchula Plaza shopping center, aid is open Sundays through
Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays from
11 a.m. to 11 p.m.

A FRIENDLY ADDITION The gas station and conven-
ience store on West Main Street in Wauchula is now open once
again.
Galal Abdelwahed, current owner of Stop & Shop on Bay
Street, has made a recent addition to his stores. opening the new
Friends Mart Shop in the once-closed location.
Abdelwahed owned several stores in Tampa for 14 years.
before coming to Hardee County.
"It's a good location here and a friendly town. I enjoyed the
atmosphere and wanted to work in it," he explains. "I especially


Gelal Abdelwahed is seen working behind the counter,
greeting his customers and helping in any way possible.
like how everyone treats each other like family."
Although only owning this new store location for a month,
Abdelwahed takes pride in it and all his stores.
"I try to handle my stores the way they should be," he notes.
"Cleanliness is the most important thing to me. We also don't sell
any beer, because I want my stores to be a safe environment that
parents wouldn't mind sending their children to."
Enduring the required hard work and dedication. Abdelwahed
hopes to earn business and to remain the store everyone wants to
visit.
Friends Mart Shop is located at 1301 W. Main St.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Machelle Dollar at 773-3255 with your business news.


Town of Zolfo Springs
2010 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
PWS # 6250332
Este informed contiene information muy important sobre su agua beber. Traduzcalo o hable con alguien que to entienda bien.
We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you
every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is groundwater from
the Floridan Aquifer. The water is chlorinated for disinfection.
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Town Hall at 863-735-0405. We encourage our valued customers to be
informed about their water utility. The Town of Zolfo Springs routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules,
and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January I to December 31, 2010. Data obtained
before January 1, 2010, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.
In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using
the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG:-The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow
for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disin-
fectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs
to not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
"ND" means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/1): one part by weight of analyte to I million parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (pg/1): one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.
Picocurie per liter (pCi/L): measure of the radioactivity in water.
Source Water Assessments: A source water assessment was completed by the Department in 2009. This assessment found 6 potential sources of contamination to be
petroleum storage tanks. The risk level is considered to be moderate. This information is available at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.
Dates of MCL
Contaminant and Unit.of Sampling Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement Detected Results
(mo./yr.) Y/N
Radioactive Contaminants
iAlpha emitters (pCi/L) 12/09 N 7.4 6.86-7.4 0 15 Erosion qf natural deposits
Radiuin 226228' ori' -
ombined radium (i) 12/09 N 2.1 NA 0 5 Erosion of natural deposits
combined radium (pCi/L)
Uranium (ug/L) 12/09 N 0.54 NA 0 30 Erosion of natural deposits

Contaminant and Dates of MCL Leve Range
Level tinge
Unit of sampling Violation Detted of MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N Results
Inorganic Contaminants
Barium (ppm) 1 9 N 0.04 NA Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from
mBarium (ppm) 12/9 N 0 4 NA 2 2 etal refineries; erosion of natural deposits
N Erosion of natural deposits; water additive
Which promotes strong teeth when at optimum
Fluoride (ppm) 129 1.33 NA 4 4 levels between 0.7 and 1.3 ppm; discharge
from fertilizer and aluminum factories
Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) 1210 N 0.07 NA 10 10 septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural
(ppm) deposits

Sodium (ppm) 12/09 N 12.7 NA N/A 160 Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil
For chlorine, the level detected is the highest running annual average (RAA), computed quarterly, of monthly averages of all samples collected. For haloacetic acids
or TTHM, the level detected is the average of all samples taken dunng the year.

Contaminant and Unit Dates of MCL Level Range MCLG MCL or
of Measurement sampling Violation Detected of or MRDL Likely Source of Contamination
ofMeasurement r.) Y/Nected Results MRL MRDL

Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Chlorine (ppm) 1/10-12/10 N 1.57 1.1-2.1 MRDLG MRDL= 4 Water additive used to control microbes
Haloacetic Acids (five) 9/09 N 9.8 NA NA MCL = 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(HAA5) (ppb)
HM total 9/09 N 23.1 NA A MCL = 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
trihalomethanesi (ppb) __ _

No. of
Ct ad Ut Dates of AL 90th sampling AL
Contaminant an Unit sampling Violation Percentile sites MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
ofMeaureent (moyr.) Y/N Result exceeding Level)
the AL
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Corrosion of household plumbing systems;
Copper (tap water) 10/09 N 0.14 0 1.3 1.3 erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood
(ppm) preservatives


Lead (tap water) (ppb)


10/09


If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from mate-
rials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Zolfo Springs is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the
variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing
your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water test-
ed. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface
of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the pres-
ence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and
wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater dis-
charges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and
can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water sys-
tems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not
necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental
Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer under-
going chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be par-
ticularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to
lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 6:9c












June 9,2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
June 6, Ana Beatriz Rodriguez-Aja, 34, of 1541A SW 58th
Terrace, Miami, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on public order
crimes, misuse of wireless 911.
June 6, a residential burglary on Badger Loop and a theft on
Clint Lane was reported.

June 5, a vehicle stolen on Fish Branch Road and thefts on
Murphy Road and on Garza Road were reported.

June 4, Louis Holloway, 64, of 694 Honeysuckle St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on two counts of with-
holding support of children.
June 4, criminal mischief on Griffin Road, and thefts on SR
62 and on Dena Circle were reported.

June 3, Shona Marie Tucker, 31, of 212 S. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with
retail theft.
June 3, Michael Eugene Adcox, 43, of 340 Moffitt Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with
DUI and refusal to submit to DUI tests.
June 3, thefts on Terrier Drive and two locations on U.S. 17


SNorth were reported.

June 2, Nathaniel Keith Toothman, 20, of 5028 Willow Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White on a charge of
violation of pretrial release.
June 2, Calaster Junior Thomas, 63, of 429 South Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with
battery.
June 2, a robbery/holdup on U.S. 17 North, a vehicle stolen on
U.S. 17 South and thefts on Schoolhouse Road and on U.S. 17
South were reported.

June 1, Jose Perez, 71, of Earler Trailer Park Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters and charged with battery.
June 1, Corey Tyrone Outley, 32, of 515 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force and
charged with sale of marijuana within 1,000 feet of a specified
location and possession of drug paraphernalia.
June 1, a vehicle stolen on SR 64, criminal mischief on Baker
Street and thefts on U.S. 17 South and on U.S. 17 North were
reported.

May 31, Gary Allen Bragg, 18, of 1175 Orange Blvd., Polk
City, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on an out-of-county war-
rant.
May 31, David Ford Robinson, 46, of 34500 HWY 70 East;
Myakka City, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on two counts of fail-
ure to appear in court.
May 31, Cedric Jawann Taylor, 34, of 325 Tuskegee St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and charged with
possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
May 31, Christine Laura Merritt, 53, of 512 Jones St.,


Town of Zolfo Springs
Informe annual de calidad del agua potable de 2010
PWS # 6250332
Este informed contiene informaci6n muy important sobre su agua beber. Traduzcalo o hable con alguien que lo ban bien.
Nos complace presentarles esta el informed annual de calidad de agua del afio. Este informed esta disefada para informarle sobre la calidad del agua y servicios le ofrece-
mos todos los dias. Nuestro objetivo constant es proporcionar Naciones Unidas seguro y fiable de suministro de agua potable. Queremos conocer los inyecciones hace-
mos para mejorar el process de tratamiento de agua salmantino y proteger nuestros recursos hidricos. Estamos comprometidos a garantizar la calidad de su agua. Nuestra
fuente de agua es agua subterranea del acuifero Floridan. El agua es clorado for la desinfecci6n. Si tiene alguna pregunta sobre este informed o en relaci6n con la utili-
dad de agua, p6ngase en contact con el Ayuntamiento de 863-735-0405. Animamos a nuestros valiosos clients estar informado acerca de su utilidad de agua. La ciu-
dad de Zolfo Springs supervise rutinariamente de contaminants en el agua potable, de acuerdo un las leyes federales y estatales, normas y reglamentos. Except donde
se indique lo contrario, este informed se basa en los resultados de nuestra vigilancia para el period del 1 de enero al 31 de diciembre de 2010. Datos obtenidos antes
del 1 de enero de 2010 y presentadas en este informed hijo de la mis reciente pruebasN realizadas de conformidad con las leyes, normas y reglamentos. La siguiente
tabla de es, se encuentra familiarizados t6rminos y abreviaturas. Para ayudarle mejor comprender estos t6rminos proporcionamos las siguientes definiciones: nivel mix-
imo de contaminants o LCM: el mis alto nivel de un contaminante se permit en el agua potable. MCLs se establecen lo mis cerca de la MCLGs como possible uti-
lizando la mejor tecnologia de tratamiento disponible. Miximo objetivo de nivel de contaminants o MCLG: el nivel de un contaminante en el agua potable por deba-
jo del cual no hay ninglin riesgo conocido o previsto para la salud. MCLGs permit un margen de seguridad. Nivel de acci6n (AL): La concentraci6n de un contami-
nante que, si se supera, provoca el tratamiento u otros requisites debe seguir un sistema de agua. Nivel mAximo de desinfectante residual o MRDL: el mis alto nivel
de desinfectante en el agua potable. Hay pruebas convincentes de la adici6n de un desinfectante es necesaria para el control de contaminants microbianos. Maximo
objetivo de nivel desinfectante residual o MRDLG: el nivel de las Naciones Unidas desinfectante de agua potable por debajo del cual no hay ningdin riesgo conocido o
previsto para la salud. MRDLGs no reflejar los beneficios de la utilizaci6n de pie para controlar los contaminants microbianos. "ND" medios no detectan y indica la
sustancia no fue encontrada por analisis de laboratorio. Partes por mill6n (ppm) o miligramos por litro (mg/1): una parte por peso del analito una 1 mill6n de parties en
peso de la muestra de agua. Partes por mil millones (MPP) o microgramos por litro (pg/1): una parte por peso del analito una 1.000 millones de parties en peso de la
muestra de agua. Picocurie por litro (pCi/L): media de la radioactividad en el agua. Evaluaciones de agua de la fuente: Una evaluaci6n de agua de la fuente fue com-
pletada por el departamento en 2009. Esta evaluaci6n encuentra 6 fuentes potenciales de contaminaci6n tanques de almacenamiento de petr6leo. El nivel de riesgo se
consider moderada. Esta informaci6n esta disponible en www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.

onta nante Fechas de MCL Nivel Gaa de Probablemente el
unidad de medida Muestoeo v N detectado resultados MCLG LCM orien de n
(Mo/afio). S/N contaminaci6n

Contaminantes radiactivos
Emisores alfa12/09 N 7.4 6.867.4 0 15 Erosi6n de dep6sitos
(pCi/L) naturales
Radio 226 + 228 o .
Radio 226 + 228 o AErosi6n de dep6sitos
radio combinado 12/09 N 2.1 NA 0 5 osn de depasios
(pCi/L) __ I _______ ______naturales
(pCi/L)
Uranio (mg/L) 12/09 N 0.54 NA 0 30 Erosi6n de dep6sitos
naturales

Contaminante Fechas de MCL
Contaminante Fechas de MCL Nivel Gamn de Probablemente el origen de
y unidad de muestreo violaci6n dNvel Gama de MCLG LCM Proba nte el oren
medida (Mo/anos). S/N detectado resultados la contaminaci6n
niedida I (Mo/aiso). 'S/N
Contaminantes inorganicos _
Descarga de perforaci6n de
Bario (ppm) 12/09 N 0.044 NA 2 desechos; descarga de
refinerfas de metals; erosion
de deep6sitos naturals
Erosion de dcp6sitos naturrules;
N aditivo de agua que promueve
Fluor (ppm) 12/09 1.33 NA 4 4 fuertes dientes cuando a
niveles 6ptimos entire 0.7 y 1.3
ppm; descarga de las ffbricas
de fertilizantes y de aluminio
Escurrimiento de la utilizacidn
Nitrato (como de fertilizantes; lixivincion de
nitr6geno) 12/10 N 0.07 NA 1 0 0tanques spticos, aguas
(ppm) residuales; erosi6n de
Sdep6sitos naturales
Sodio (ppm) 12/09 N 12.7 NA N/A 160 Intrusi6n de agua salada.
lixiviaci6n de suelo
El nivel de cloro, detect es el promedio mis alto de funcionamiento annual (RAA), calculado trimestralmente, de los promedios mensuales de todas las muestras recopi-
lado. Acidos haloacetic o ITHM, el nivel detectado es la media de todas las muestras tomada durante el afio.
Fechas de' LCMu:
Cointaninante y muestreo' ViC n Nivel Gama de MCLG o MCL o Probablemente ce origen
unidad de media (Mo/afto.) S/n Detectado resultados MRD;G MRDL de la contaminaci6n

Etapa 1 desinfectante/desinfecci6n subproducto (D/Pad) contaminants
MRDLG, Aditivo de agua que se
Cloro (ppm) 1/10-12/10 N 1.57 1.1-2.1 4 MRDL = 4 utilize para controlar los
= 4 microbios
Acidos Haloacetic Subproducto de la
(5) (IAA5) (MPP) 9/09 N 9.8 NA NA MCL = 60 desinfecci6n del agua
__________ ______ _______ _________ ________ ________ potable
"IHM I totals Subproducto de'la
trihalomctanosl 9/09. N 23.1 NA NA MCL = 80 desinfecci6n del agua
(MPP) potable

eFechas dultado No. sitios de AL.
Contaminante y unidad uecs e Violaci6n de muestreo MCL( (nivel Probablemente el origen de la
de media (Mo/afio) AL S/N percentile superior at de contaminaci6n
(M 90 AL acci6n)
Plomo y cobre (agua del grifo)
Corrosi6n de los sistemas de
Cobre (*agun del grilo)I fontanerfa domesticos;
p )Cobe 10/09 N 0.14 0 '1.3 1.3 erosi6n de dep6sitos
(ppm) naturales; lixiviaci6n de
conservantes de la madera
Corrosi6n de los sistemas
Plomo (agua del grifo) 1 /09 N 2 15 dom6sticos de fontanerfa.
(MPP) erosion de dep6sitos
__________naturales
Si esta present, niveles elevados de plomo pueden causar graves problems de salud, especialmente para las mujeres embarazadas y niiios pequefios. Plomo en el agua
potable es principalmcnte de materials y components asociados con lines de servicios y fontaneria dom6stica. Zolfo Springs es responsible de proporcionar agua
potable de alta calidad, pero no puede controlar la variedad de materials utilizados en los components de plomeria. Cuando el agua ha sido sentado durante varias
horas, puede minimizar el potential de exposici6n al plomo vaciando su grifo durante 30 segundos a 2 minutes antes de utilizar el agua para beber o cocinar. Si le pre-
ocupa plomo en el agua, debe tener su agua probado. Informaci6n sobre el plomo en el agua potable, mdtodos de prueba y pasos que puede seguir para minimizar la
exposici6n estA disponible desde la line de agua potable segura o en http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Las fuentes de agua potable (agua corriente y agua embotellada) incluyen rios, lagos, arroyos, lagunas, embalses, manantiales y pozos. Como agua viaja a trav6s de la
superficie de la tierra o a travis de la tierra, se disuelve los minerales naturales y, en algunos casos, el material radiactivo y puede tomar sustancias resultantes de la
presencia de animals o de la actividad humana.

Entre los contaminants que puedan estar presents en el agua de la fuente se incluyen:

(A) microbianas contaminants, tales como virus y bacteria, que pueden provenir de plants de tratamiento de aguas residuales, sistemas s6pticos, las operaciones agri-
colas de ganado y vida silvestre.
(B) contaminants inorgdnicos, tales como sales y metales, que pueden ser natural o resultado de escurrimiento urban de aguas pluviales, vertidos de aguas residuales
industriales o dom6sticos, producci6n de petr6leo y gas, mineria y agriculture.
(C) plaguicidas y herbicidas, que puede provenir de una variedad de fuentes, como la agriculture, el escurrimiento urban de aguas pluviales y usos residenciales.
(D) los contaminants quimicos orginicos, incluyendo quimicos orginicos sinteticos y volatiles, que son subproductos de process industriales y producci6n de petr61eo
y tambien pueden provenir de gasolineras, escurrimiento urban de aguas pluviales y sistemas s6pticos.
(E) contaminants radiactivos. que puede ser que ocurren naturalmente o ser el resultado de la producci6n de petr6leo y gas y mineria.

A fin de que agua del grifo es potable, la EPA establece normas que limitan la cantidad de ciertos contaminants erragua proporcionada por sistemas ptiblicos de agua.
El Reglamento de alimentos y drogas (FDA) establece limits de contaminants en el agua embotellada, debe proporcionar la misma protecci6n para la salud piblica.

Agua potable. incluyendo el agua embotellada,. puede esperarse razonablemente que contienen al menos pequefias cantidades de algunos contaminants. La presencia
de contaminants no indica necesariamente que el agua planted un riesgo para la salud. Puede obtenerse mas informaci6n acerca de contaminantes y posibles efectos
en la salud liamando a la linea de asistencia de agua potable de la Agencia de protecci6n ambiental segura al 1-800-426-4791.

Algunas personas pueden ser mis vulnerable a los contaminants en el agua potable de la poblaci6n en general Las personas inmunodeficientes, come las personas
con cancer que reciben quimioterapia, las personas que han sido.sometidos a transplants de drganos. personas con VIH/SIDA o otros trastomos del sistema inmuni-
tario, algunos ancianos y los ninos pueden ser particularmente en riesgo de infecciones. Estas personas deben solicitar asesoramiento sobre el agua potable de sus
provecdores de atenci6n medical. Directrices EPA/CDC sobre medios adecuados para dismmuir el riesgo de infecci6n per Cryptosporidium y otros contaminantes
microbiol6gicos estin disponibles en el seguro de agua potable Hotline (800-426-4791).
6:9c


Bowling Green, was arrested on a charge of sale of cocaine within
1,000 feet of a specified location.
May 31, Amanda Leigh Elisondo, 31, of 342 Hill St., Bowling
Green, was arrested on two counts of trafficking in opium or its
derivative and possession of methamphetamine.
May 31, a theft on Dansby Road was reported.

May 30, David Ford Robinson, 46, of 34500 Hwy 70 East,
Myakka city, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on charged of viola-
tion of conservation of animals statute and fleeing to elude police
without regard for safety.
May 30, Anthony Deamaro Briseno, 18, of 980 Church St.,
Bartow, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther on a charge of violation
of probation.
May 30, Michael David-John Sunzeri, 19, .of 1223
Mockingbird Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley
on an out-of-county warrant.
May 30, Janet Marie Malagon, 47, of 831 Lake Branch Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with two
counts of battery.
May 30, Kathy Ray Friel, 26, of 309 Georgia St., Wauchula,
and Halbert Diego, 20, of 2488 Gobble Lane, Zolfo Springs, were
arrested by Det. Andre McGuckin and each charged charged with
unarmed burglary of an unoccupied dwelling and larceny. Friel was
also charged with dealing in stolen property.
May 30, a residential burglary on Merle Langford Road and
criminal mischief on U .S. 17 North were reported.
The Hardee County Sheriffs Office reports that a May 7 listing in
this section was an arrest made in error. Jason Robert Walker, 29,
of Polk Road, Wauchula was charged in a case of mistaken identi-
ty. He was not the wanted suspect and all the charges were
dropped.

WAUCHULA
June 5, Ray Larry Driver, 49, of 408 N. Seventh Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte and charged with bat-
tery.

June 4, a residential burglary on South Eighth Avenue and a
business burglary on U.S. 17 South were reported.

June 3, Caitlin Evan Douglas Corson, 22, of 5289 Sweetwater
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas on an out-
of-county warrant. At the jail, he was also detained on a charge of
violation of probation.

June 2, a business burglary on Carlton Street was reported.

June 1, Corey Tyrone Outley, 32, and Katie Lee Barnett, 25,
both of 515 N. Seventh Ave., Wauchula, were arrested by Cpl.
Chris Le Conte and each charged with battery, possession of mari-
juana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

May 31, Dan Michael Lumley, 21, of 3867 Dixiana Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Kevin Brock on a charge of
violation of probation.
May 31, a residential burglary on East Palmetto Street and a
theft on South 10th Avenue were reported.

May 30, Marvin Junior Williams, 41, of 309 Georgia St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jennifer Stanley and charged with
possession of weapons/ammo by a convicted felon and trespass on
property other than a structure.

BOWLING GREEN
May 31, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.


Success seems to be Most people never run far
largely a matter of hanging enough on their first wind
on after others have let go. to find out they've got a
-William Feather second.
-William James


Big shots are only little
shots who keep shooting.
-Christopher Morley


IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 25-2008-CA-000734
DIVISION

MIDFIRST BANK,
Plaintiff

vs.

JESUS NARANJO aka JESUS L
NARANJO; ANITA NARANJO,
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT;
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS, AND UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pursuant
to Final Judgment of Foreclosure
for Plaintiff entered in this cause
on April 20, 2011, in the Circuit
Court of Hardee County, Florida, I
will seil the property situated in
Hardee County, Florida described
as:

LOT 1, LESS THE NORTH
86.25 FEET THEREOF,
BLOCK 10 OF PACKER'S
ADDITION TO THE CITY
OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA,
AS PER PLAT RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
93, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.

and commonly known as: 713 N
9TH AVE, WAUCHULA, FL 33873;
Including the building, appurte-
nances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for cash. All
sales are held at the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 West
Main Street, Wauchula, Florida,
second floor hallway outside
Room 202, on June 22, 2011, at
11am.

Any person claiming an interest
In the surplus from the sale, If
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the IIs
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated this 21 day of April, 2011.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
:2,9c


NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME ACT
Notice Is hereby given that
the undersigned, pursuant to
the provisions of the Fictitious
Name Act, Section 865.09,
Florida Statues, as amended,
intends to register with the
Secretary of State of the State
of Florida, the fictitious name of
D-Vine under which the under-
signed Is engaged or will
engage in business at: 365
Alton Carlton Road in the City
of Wauchula, Florida 33873.
That the party interested in
said business enterprise is as
follows: Stephen Coker
Dated at Wauchula, Hardee,
Florida 33873. 6:9p


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:

Governing Board Meeting:
Consider SWFWMD business
and administrative matters
including executive director
recruitment. Some Board mem-
bers may participate in the
meeting via communications
media technology.

DATE/TIME: Friday, June 17,
2011; 10:00 a.m.

PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637

A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1
(800) 423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211

For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4604
(Ad Order EXE0150)

If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.

Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us
6:9c









8C The Herald-Advocate, June 9, 2011
.. .___. PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Gold and Silver Coins Selling for Highest Prices

in Over 30 Years Due to Weak Economy and It's

Happening Right Here in Avon Park!


By KEN MCINTOSH
STAFF WRITER
ICCA will be placing ads in newspapers,
radio and running television spots this week
asking people to bring in any old silver and
gold coins made before 1965. Those that
bring in their coins will be able to speak
with collectors one on one and have their
coins looked at by a specialist. With the
help of these ICCA members, offers will
be made-to those that have coins made
before 1965. Offers will be made based
on silver or gold content and the rarity of
the coins. All coins made before 1965 will
be examined and purchased including gold
coins, silver coins, silver dollars, all types of
nickels and pennies. Those that decide to
sell their coins will be paid on the spot.
If you are like a lot of people you might
have a few old coins or even a coffee
can full lying around. If you have ever
wondered what they are worth now might
be your chance to find out and even sell
them if you choose. They could be worth
a lot according to the International Coin
Collectors Association also known as ICCA.
Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins
and currency for their collections. If it is
rare enough, one coin could be worth over
$100,000 according to Eric Helms, coin
collector and ICCA member. One ultra rare
dime, an 1 894S Barber, sold for a record
$1.9 million to a collector in July of 2007.
While that is an extreme example, many
rare and valuable coins are stashed away
in dresser drawers or lock boxes around the
country. The ICCA and its collector members
have organized a traveling event in search
of all types of coins and currency. Even
common coins can be worth a significant
amount due to the high price of silver and
gold, says Helms. Washington quarters
and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many
times their face value. Recent silver markets
have driven the price up on common coins
made of silver. Helms explains that all half
dollars, quarters and dimes made before
1965 contain 90% silver and are sought
after any time silver prices rise. Right now
it's a sellers market he said.





COINS
Any and all coins made before 1965, rare
coins, entire collections, Silver Dollars,
Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,
Nickels, Three Cent Pieces, Two Cent Pieces,
Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and all others.
PAPER MONEY
All denominations made before 1934.
GOLD COINS
Including $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5,
$1, Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.
INVESTMENT GOLD
Kruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs.
Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and
Buffalos, etc.


GOLD
TRADING@ AT ALL TIME
IS THE TIME TO C

SCRAP GOLD
Broken and unused jewelry, dental gold.
JEWELRY
Diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, loose
diamonds, all gem stones, etc.
PLATINUM
Anything made of platinum.
SILVER
,Flatware, tea sets, goblets, jewelry, etc. and


The rarest coins these collectors are
looking for include $20, $10, $5 and $2
1 /2 gold coins and any coin made before
1850. These. coins always bring big
premiums according to the ICCA. Silver
dollars are also very soughtafter nowadays.
Other types of items the ICCA will be
purchasing during this event include U.S.
currency, gold bullion, investment gold,
silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc.
Even foreign coins are sought after and will
be purchased.
Also at this event anyone can sell their
gold jewelry, dental gold or anything made
of gold on the spot. Gold is currently trading
at over $1,400.00 per ounce near an all
time high. Bring anything you think might
be gold and the collectors will examine,
test and price it for free. If you decide to
sell, you will be paid on the spot it has
been an unknown fact that coin dealers
have always paid more for jewelry and
scrap gold than other jewelers and pawn
brokers.
So whether you have one coin you think
might be valuable or a large collection you
recently inherited, you can talk to these
collectors for free. If you're lucky you may
have a rarity worth thousands. Either way
there is nothing to lose and it sounds like
fun!
For more information on this event visit
the ICCA website at
WWW.INTERNATIONALCOINCOLLECTORS.COM





4, .



F1" 5r








-M..S :-
CONTINUES IN AVON PARK


I RcnFid:


* Gather items of interest from your
attic, safe deposit box, garage,
basement, etc. There is no limit to
the amount of items you can bring
No appointment necessary
If interested in selling, we will
consult our collector's database to
see if a buyer exists. 90% of all
items have offers in our database
The offer is made on the spot on
behalf of our collectors making
the offer
If you decide to accept the offer,
we will pay you on the spot!
You get 100% of the offer
with no hidden fees


MILLION
I SPENT!

1000 NATION
EVENTS!


,,


77-
-,, 77


PAID $1,800






PAID $2,800






PAID $250


anything 'marked sterling.


/

P "


PAID $8,500 |






PAID $14,000


~y~a~
3, ~~,IF


I
.