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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00383
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 6/2/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00383
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text








Register Now

For Swim Class

S... Story 10A


The


Bartow Feels

Hardee's Sting
... tory 1B


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 26
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Thursday, June 2, 2011


460
plt 4, sle,a lax


Mother

By CYNTHIA KRAHL 2370 U.S. 17
Of The Herald-Advocate into the Hard(
A Wauchula mother of two 5:18 p.m. on
has been accused of killing her week. Det. Ar
youngest, a 4-month-old baby of the Hardee
girl. Office charged
The infant, Mariah Battey, homicide/mur
died on Sept. 28, 2010, of blunt- degree felony
force trauma to the head, the death.
10th Circuit Medical Exam- Battey, reco
iner's Office has determined, a $15,000 bon
Her mother, 20-year-old ing to gain he
Brandy Elizabeth Battey, of awaits trial


N.
e C
Wed
idre
Co
I he
der
,in
rds
d t
er r
on


Charged
was booked degree murder charge. She was
County Jail at booked out of the county jail at
nesday of last 11:24 a.m Thursday.
tw McGuckin According to sheriff's Maj.
unty Sheriff's Randy Dey, the infant's grand-
-r with willful mother was babysitting her on
Sa second- Sept. 27 while Brandy Battey
Sthe infant's worked. Sometime between
5:30 and 6 p.m. that day, Battey
show, posted picked up her child and took her
he next morn- home for the night.
release as she The grandmother reported the
the second- 4-month-old was "in good


In Infant's Death


health" when she was picked up
and taken home, McGuckin.
said in an investigative report.
But on the morning of Sept.
28, Battey said she awoke to
find Mariah lying unconscious
next to her in bed.
Battey told investigators that
Mariah was fine when picked
up from her grandmother's
house and taken home, but that
the infant became "restless" and
"would not go to sleep" later


FALSE FRONT


that night.
The mother said she laid on
the bed and placed the baby on
her chest, hoping to calm
Mariah down and lull her to
sleep. Battey then fell asleep
and later awoke to find her
daughter unconscious, she said.
Battey also noted she was the
only person with the infant
between the time she was
picked up from her grandmoth-
er's and until the time she was
found dead.
Dey said Battey recently
moved to Wauchula from
See MOTHER 2A


Nadaskay



Wins In



Wauchula


L,'g By JO0AN SEAMAN
S.Of The Herald-Advocate
S.-_.. For a while it was too close to
tell.
- I But, when the final results
were tabulated, Keith Nadaskay
was declared the winner in the
run-off election on Tuesday for
the vacant Seat 3 on the Wau-
chula City Commission.
His opponent, Dan Graham,
captured Precinct 4 on a 31-30
count and Precinct 10 on a vote
of 22-17. Nadaskay, however,
PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR picked up heavy votes in Pre-
this shot from the back shows what is evident looking through the front windows of the old Coker Fuel Building on cinct 6 on a 33-14 count and
West Main Street. There is little standing in half the building but the front windows. City crews have been working took the majority of the absen-
or about three months in demolishing the building whenever their other duties would allow them. For instance, the tee ballots 15-5. The totals
ast few days have been spent in cleanup after the recent storms. The restructuring committee for Main Street showed Nadaskay the 95-72
Vauchula will come before the new Wauchula City Commission at its first meeting on June 13 to finalize plans for winner in a low turnout.
he site. Graham immediately offered



Does County Need An Amphitheatre?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Does the county need an
amphitheatre in or around Wau-
chula?
At least one citizen thinks so.
She envisions a place where
huge events of all kinds could
be held. Mike Graham, who
spearheads "The Story of
Jesus," is not sure it is needed.
Nancy Craft, a Sweetwater
resident, real estate agent and
member of the Hardee County




05/25 91 60 0.02
05126 a3 62 0.16
05/27 0 68 0.16
05/28 93 62 0.00
05/29 93 64 0.00
05130 91 64 0.00
05/31 93 66 0.00
TOTAL Rainfal to 05/1/311 10.76
Sam period last yer- 1.89
bn YeAverage-54,30
Sours. U. o Fl R Ona Resarch CaSe

INDEX
Classifieds .......... 6B
Community Calendar .10A
Courthouse Report ... 5B
Crime Blotter ....... 8C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup ..4A
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menu...88



71 221072!1 11191.2 3
18122 07290


Economic Development Board,
appealed to the Hardee County
Commission recently to take
the lead in bringing an am-
phitheatre to Hardee County.
Craft said the county had
been asked in 1997 to find
property for The Florida Fly-
wheelers and "the Commis-
sioners did nothing to facilitate
and foster a relationship ... and
lost the opportunity to be a part
of something really amazing
which would have brought jobs,
revenue and growth needed to
this community."
The Flywheelers went to Fort


Meade, bought 240 acres and
has grown to 1,500 members,
which hold three events a year
in their club and member build-
ings which display many large
engines of all kinds.
Craft asked commissioners to
"think outside the box" in help-
ing to find a permanent location
for "The Story of Jesus,"
Wauchula's nationally known
Passion Play, which has grown
from a small church production
in 2004'to a massive undertak-
ing recently lauded by The New
York Times, Atlanta Constitu-
tion Journal and the Tulsa


Beacon.
Coming up behind Joe L.
Davis Sr., Craft said there was
someone who could make it
happen. She said "The Story of
Jesus" is hoping to move to a
site off SR 66, which would
lose its Wauchula address and
identity, and take its revenue
more likely to adjacent coun-
ties. Don't let that happen. See
this as a business venture. If
you let this go by and do noth-
ing, it's the county's loss."
Commissioners were prone to
refer it to the Industrial Devel-
opment Agency and/or the


EDC. They agreed that a huge
multipurpose building might be
a benefit but did not feel it was
something for them to handle.
Asked about his contribution,
Davis said he didn't think Craft
was suggesting his property for
a new multipurpose building
site. He owns property across
from the old Wauchula airport
property off East Main Street,
but suggested the 80- to 90-acre
vacant old airport property
could be an ideal location.
Another might be a Jack Eason
40-acre property just south of
See DOES COUNTY 3A


Murderers Sentenced To Prison


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two murderers convicted in
separate killings have been sen-
tenced to time behind bars.
Magdaleno Cervantes Alcala,
41, of 4225 Middle Dr., Trailer
No. 7, Bowling Green, and
David Cervantes Palafox, 28, of
Tampa, each were scheduled for
second-degree murder trials in
Hardee Circuit Court in May,
but both changed their pleas
before jury selection began.
Alcala pleaded no contest to
charges that he killed 21-year-
old Edgar Jimenez-Martinez on
Saturday, Jan. 2, as he sat out-
side 4222 Middle Dr., Trailer
No. 21, with a group of other
men.
Circuit Judge Marcus J.
Ezelle sentenced him to 20


years in Florida State Prison.
Further, the judge assessed
$520 in fines and court costs,
$350 in public defender fees
and $100 in prosecution
expenses. A "hold" also has
been placed on Alcala by the
federal Immigration & Customs
Enforcement department.
Bowling Green Police Chief
John Scheel noted witness
accounts of the Jan. 2 shooting
said Alcala walked up to the
group gathered outside Trailer
No. 21 at about 6:28 that night,
then went over to where the vic-
tim was seated, and fired two
shots.
Jimenez-Martinez, he said,
died of a single gunshot wound
to the head. The second bullet
did not strike him, and was
recovered at the scene, Scheel


Alcala took off running, but
was captured within in 30 min-
utes in a manhunt joined by the
Polk County Sheriff's Office,


Alcala


the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office and the Wauchula Police
Department. In fact, Scheel
said, it was Cpl. Todd Souther
See MURDERERS 3A


Palafox


his congratulations to Nadas-
kay, who said, "I'm excited to
get started working with the
other city commissioners." He
will get that chance at the first
meeting of the new commission
on June 13.
See RUNOFF 3A


Nadaskay



12th Graders

No. 1 In State

On 'Retakes'
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Senior High School
12th graders retaking the read-
ing portion of the Florida Com-
prehensive Assessment Test set
the bar for the other 66 counties
in the state by earning the high-
est score.
Of the 25 local seniors retak-
ing the exam because of poor
marks in earlier attempts, this
time 40 percent passed. State-
wide, only an average of 15 per-
cent of 12th graders passed the
FCAT retake, the state Depart-
ment of Education reported.
Hardee seniors soundly beat
their counterparts statewide,
with only Union County com-
ing in anywhere close with its
35 percent passing rate.
Schools Superintendent Da-
vid Durastanti said Hardee sen-
iors should be encouraged by
their "best in the state" ranking.
"Our seniors did such an amaz-
ing job that the next closest
county, Union, was at 35 per-
cent," he exclaimed.
"Ranking number one out of
67 counties is a testament to the
hard work of parents, faculty,
See 12th GRADE 2A


Battey


T
V1
fi

ti
U


I m













2A The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011


rThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


blished weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
blishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


DEADLINES:
Schools- Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
S Ads Tuesday noon /.


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
h^. A


Maryland, where the baby's
father remained. He is in the
military, Dey added. Mean-
while, Battey resided in a
mobile home located on the site
of the Colonial Arms Motel
with her two children, a 3-year-
old and the infant.
The baby was taken to the
Medical Examiner's Office in
Lakeland for an autopsy. Dey
explained that several tests
were conducted, with weeks
and months required for results.
Some samples, he said, were
even sent as far as Gainesville
for examination.
Ultimately, he noted, the
Medical Examiner's Office
determined the cause of death
was blunt-force head trauma.
The baby, he alleged, was shak-
en, and "at some point, the
baby's head hit something also,
a hard surface," the major
charged.
Dey said the medical examin-
er concluded the injuries would
have caused "an immediate
change in the child, causing the
child to become lethargic, dis-
oriented and nauseated."
Further, based on statements.
made by the infant's grand-
mother, the injury "had to be
inflicted after Brandy Battey
picked Mariah Battey up," Dey
alleged.
Because by her own admis-
sion she was the only person


with the baby, Brandy Battey
was charged in the baby's
death, he said.
"This whole thing is tragic,"
Dey said. "All we can go by is
the medical examiner's findings
and the time line. She was the
only one with the baby."
Battey now awaits arraign-
ment in Hardee Circuit Court.
Dey said the state Depart-
ment of Children & Families
has set a hearing to determine
custody of Battey's 3-year-old
child. ...


Kelly's Column
8y Jim


Hardee High School seniors who retook FCAT Reading were
No. 1 in the state with a 40 percent passing rate, reported Hardee
Schools Superintendent David Durastanti. The statewide average
was 15 percent. Union County placed No. 2 with 35 percent of sen-
iors passing the FCAT Reading retakes.
SOther area scores were Highlands, 5 percent; Glades, 10 per-
cent; Hendry, 14 percent. Durastanti praised the hard work and sup-
port of patents, faculty, staff, students, administrators, business
partners; -churches; 'and civic- organizations in helping Hardee
County. schools continuing their tradition of high academic
achievement.
As a small agricultural county, I believe Hardee County has a
tougher time in achieving high scores in statewide testing than
some other counties with better developed, more diversified
economies with a higher percentage of college graduates. Good test
scores begin at home with encouraging, helping parents. HHS has
been No. 1 several times in statewide Academic Team competition.

Dewey Edward (Eddie) Whidden Jr. will be inducted into the
Bardee High School. Hall of Famewpn Tuesday, June 7, at the
Mlidee Agri-Civic Center.
"; Eddie is a 1962 graduate of Hardee High school and was pres-
ident of the student body,, among other honors. He has spent a life-
time helping people with disabilities to be successful in life. He has
been an inspiration to many people.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott had a state budget signing everit last
week at The Villages in Sumter County. The Villages is a conser-
vative retirement community. The event was supposed to be a pub-
lic event, as reported in the Villages Daily Sun newspaper, at the
town square which is private property.
A governor's special assistant, Russ Abrams, had Sumter sher-
iff's deputies remove some Democrats who were there for the sign-
ing ceremony, saying it was a private event. The state budget is
$69.1 billion. Scott vetoed $615 million of special projects
approved by the Florida Legislature.
Scott's office is not known to be overly cooperative to the
press. I cannot imagine something like this happening in the gov-
ernorships of men such as Reubin Askew, Bob Graham, Lawton
Chiles, Jeb Bush or Charley Crist.

A new state law passed by the Republican-controlled legisla-
ture and signed by the governor will crack down on activities of
third-party voter registration groups, reduce the number of early
voting days, and make Election Day polling precinct changes,
tougher for voters.
It will not be implemented in five counties including Hardee
until it is approved by the U.S. Department of Justice. The other
counties are Collier, Hillsborough, Hendry and Monroe. There is
concern whether it violates, the 1965 Voting Rights Act that protects
minority voters.


Does excessive use of cell phones, microwaves and radar
cause cancer? Possibly, reports the Interhational Agency for
Research on. Cancer after a weeklong meeting of experts who
reviewed dozens of published studies, reported the Associated
Press.
The difficulty of determining an answer is that the studies gen-
erally are for 10-year periods and cancers can take decades to
develop. This agency is an arm of the World Health Organization.
WHO and national health agencies might soon give guidance on
cellphone and microwave use.
One thing is certain-there are a lot of cases of cancer.
Something, or several factors working together, is causing these
cancers. A lot of doctors, clinics and hospitals are making lots of
money off cancer cases.



12th GRADE
Continued From 1A


staff, students and administra-
tors of the school," Durastanti
added.
The superintendent pointed
out that state results show other
counties in the region came in
with a far lower success rate,
only five percent in Highlands,
10 in Glades, 14 in Hendry and
23 in DeSoto.
How Hardee fared in the
mathematics retake will remain
unanswered, however. Only one
senior took the math portion of
the exam, and the state does not
report any results which would
directly divulge the perform-
ance of an individual student.
Statewide, though, 21 percent
of seniors passed the math
retake...
As far as retake results for


Hardee County's 11th graders,
who still have several more
attempts at passing, the state
Department of Education said
22 percent of the state's juniors
were able to pass the reading
FCAT retake.
In Hardee County, that num-
ber was 20 percent. In all, 95
local l1th graders retook the
reading exam.
And in the math portion, 29
percent of Florida's juniors
passed on the retake. In Hardee,
21 percent of the 34 juniors tak-
ing the exam passed it in this
go-round.
State law provides students
must pass the FCAT or an
equivalent exam in order to
receive a high-school diploma.


CRIME BLOTTER
The Hardee County
Sheriff's Office reports that
a recent listing in the Crime
Blotter column reflected an
arrest made in error. Jason
Robert Walker, 29, of Polk
Road, Wauchula, was
charged on May 7 in a case
of mistaken identity, sher-
iff's Maj. Randy Dey said.
He was not the wanted
suspect, and all charges
were dropped.
The Sheriff's Office apol-
ogi;ees for th~e,,rror, and
The Herald-Advocate is
&pleased to set the,,record
straight.
At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


A rTTENTiON SENIORS



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FOR ALL YOUR

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MOTHER
Continued From 1A


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchul:,

773-3255


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months S18; I yr. S31; 2 yrs. S60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2 yrs. $79
Out of State
6 months 527; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95


4rlO .









Janu 2, 211, The HeHrd-Adwca~ 3A


Graham was gracious m con-
sidering the results. "It's been
interesting. The people have
spoken and chosen. They've got
a good man for the job."
When the commission meets
in its chambers at City Hall, 225
E. Main Street, it will have a
new look. The five newly elect-
ed commissioners, Patty Det-
wiler, Nadaskay, Kenny Baker,
Gary Smith and Rick Knight,
will join Russell Smith and
John Freeman, who were elect-


MnES comB
Continued From 1A


the junior college off U.S. 17
North.
Graham, however, in "speak-
ing for myself, not the Power &
Light Productions Board, said
he didn't feel close to town
would be good.
Stnce 2008, when a 40-acre
site off SR 66 was donated by
the Donald Davis family, plan-
ning began for a retreat/concert
center which would include a
2,000-seat handicapped-acces-
sible facility with cafeteria,
restrooms, offices and more. It
could be used for summer camp
,for churches and other commu-
nity groups, as well as for con-
certs. The rural setting would be
ideal for youth group and other


community gatherings, Graham
said.
Tulsa architect Randy Bright,
who also writes for the Tusla
Beacon, told about it in a
January article for his paper, in
which he said he "has begun
designing a permanent theater
on a 40-acre tract of donated
land and looking for about $15-
million in construction funds."
Graham is enthusiastic about
getting a permanent location'
instead of the hours and hours it
takes to reconstruct the dusty
streets of a mini-Jerusalem,
Nazareth and the Jordan River
each year.
He says many of his 225-250
volunteers come from Port


Charlotte, Sebring and other
out-of-county churches or com-
munities. He has had offers to
move to other counties, but con-
siders a commitment to Hardee
County and will retain the
Wauchula address and location
for ticket sales, etc.
"We have to draw people
from more than Hardee County.
People who come from Miami
and the southeast usually stay in
Sebring. Those from the north
and west usually stay in the
Wauchula area.
"I like this property, but in the
years we've had it, no one has
contributed any large sum
toward developing it. But, if
God gave us the property, He


will provide,"said Graham, who
added that he feels Wauchula
would still get the.benefit.
The project, he estimates at a
minimum of $10 million, has
grown because of regulations.
"It's not just a matter of throw-
ing up a building and using
porta-potties. It's not fancy, but
has to meet handicapped rest-
room and seating arrangements;
there has to be a turn lane, a
septic tank and well, other
requirements," continues Gra-
ham.
He insists he's not meaning to
be uncooperative, but the Insti-
tute of Outdoor Drama based in
North Carolina, recommends a
remote location, being isolated
is important to accommodating
an audience not distracted by
events outside the area. (Since
the new ballfields went up near
the Cattleman's Arena, that
lighting and activity have
become a distraction.)
Graham said the county has
to increase its vision, the prison,
power plants and others are a
long way from downtown Wau-
chula, yet broaden the county.
"Ten years from now, out there
will not be as far out as you
think."
Graham noted that he meticu-
lously keeps separate accounts
for the activities he is involved
in: ReaL Life Church on U.S.
17 North; Power & Light
Productions and the website
www.storyofjesus.com. There
is a third account for the Davis
property retreat and its plans.
Anyone who has questions can


ed early last fall and will be the
senior members of the commis-
sion. They continue in office
until the 2014 elections.
The new commissioners are
finishing terms of their prede-
cessors and will run for re-elec-
tion in 2012.
Beginning June 13, the com-
mission table will be: Seat I-
Detwiler; Seat 2-Russell Smith;
Seat 3-Keith Nadaskay; city
attorney Cliff Ables; Seat 4-
Baker; Seat 5-Gary Smith; Seat
6-Freeman; and Seat 7-Knight.


After the new commissioners
are sworn in, they will have a
full slate of topics to get down
to business. Choosing a mayor
and vice-mayor is first.
A new electric supplier con-
tract, final plans for the old
Coker Fuel site on West Main
Street, starting the process to
find a new city manager, con-
sultant agreements and pending
rezones to allow three new
facilities to open are among the
immediate considerations.


The stegosaurus, was a large, plant-eating dino-saur that lived about 150 million years
ago in what is now the western United States. It had two rows of bony plates shaped
like huge arrowheads sticking out of its back.


call him at 375-4031.
Answering a question about
his age, 58, and how long he
can keep producing these major
productions, Graham points to
his sons, Ben and Luke, part of
a musical group which has been
on the secular Top 20 several
times in recent years. The group
has stopped touring as some of


and his K-9 Picus of the Hardee
County Sheriffs Office who,
along with Dep. Michael Lake,
"ran a track" on the fleeing sus-
pect and found him in an orange
grove at the south end of
Chester Avenue.
It was the second murder in
the city of Bowling Green in
just over two months. On Oct.
31, 2010, a man was beaten to
death in what was the first
homicide since 1996.
Palafox pleaded to charges
stemming from a 2008 store
robbery which resulted in a
shootout with police that killed
his accomplice and put a sec-
ond-degree homicide charge on
him.
At his sentencing hearing in
Hardee Circuit Court, Ezelle
imposed a 12-year prison term.
The judge also assessed $520 in
fines and court costs $350 in
public defender fees and $100
for prosecution costs.
Maj. Randy Dey of the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
said the Jan. 12, 2008, robbery
and subsequent shootout and
death were all solved by sci-


them have young chidrd now.
"They are writing the music
for the new production 'The
Story of Noah,' and have a heart
for this ministry. I expect tey
will take my place one day, but
they'll have to fight me for it'"
said Graham, who expects em
to take over producer and dirc-
tor duties sooner than that.


ence, as Palafox' identity was
revealed from DNA evidence
recovered from a jacket he left
behind at the scene
Palafox and his partner had
robbed a now-defumct stos in
Wauchula Hills, fleeing oauth
on U.S. 17. The two were
stopped in Zolfo Sprins for
speeding on State Road 64 and
"got out shooting." te-chief
Chris Baty said.
Officers returned gunfire,
killing the accomplice Palfox,
however, successfully escaped.
His DNA profile, however,
was placed in the crime data-
base. Dey explained. "If his
name was run anywhere in the
nation, the FDLE would be
notified," he said.
And, indeed the Florida
Department of Law Enforce-
ment was alerted whmn Palafox
was picked up on unrelated
charges in Missouri in late
September of 2010.
Palafox waived extradition,
and was brought back to Hardee
County to face trial for the rob-
bery and homicide.


ATTENTION


GRADUATING




SENIORS
Pictures are unavailable for the following seniors.
If you would like your picture included in the 2011
Graduation Tabloid of The Herald-Advocate, please provide
photo by Friday, June 3 no later than 5 p.m.
Patrick Allmon Dan Krell
Madison Anderson Eva Kue
Javier Bautista Jenise Lopez
Diana Belmares Joshua Lopez
Sarah Beyers Jalme Lopez Delacru
Uber Calvillo Vong Lor
Maddy Camill Ariana Maya
Quinton Carlton Kalob McVay
Annabel Castillo Jeremy Mendoza
Robert Cerna Luis Molina
Ivette Cisneros Christiana Nelson
Ashley Clayton Daniel Penaloza
Zackary Crutchfieid Maria Ramirez
Yolanda Cruz Donovan Richardson
Reinaldo Delacruz Monica Rivera
Scott Donaldson Ronald Roberts
David Esquivel Brenda Rodriguez
Karina Estrada Sergio Rodriguez
Aaron Everett Victor Salazar
Ricardo Fermin Paul Salinas
Michael Forrester Okie Sambrano
Wildfredo Freytes Julian Santiago
Josue Fuentes Cody Schoneck
Jimmy Fuller Rebekah Smith
Erick Gaona Myliekia Stevenson
Amy Garcia Brandon Summerville
Emanuel Gonzalez Jimmy Vallejo
Mark Gonzalez Nhia Vang
Ismael Hernandez Eriberto Velasco
Jesus Hernandez Mercedes Velasco
Jurisaral Hernandez Leticia Velazquez
Kassandra Hernandez Pang Xiong
Alexandra Holle Jerry Yang
Ashley Jackson Beatriz Zavala
Dakota Juarez


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

115 S. 7th Ave.

Telephone: 773-3255


Continued From 1A


RUNOFF
Continued From 1A


Wauchula Runoff Election
Precinct 4 Precinct 6 Precinct 10 Absentee TOTAL

Graham 31 14 22 5 72
Nadaskay 30 33 17 15 95










4A The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011


Internet Bragging Leads To

Felony Poaching Charges


A convicted felon who posted
pictures about his poaching
exploits on Facebook got the
attention of the Florida Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's Internet Crimes Unit.
As a result, the Polk County
man now faces seven felony
charges and six misdemeanor
charges related to alleged ille-
gal activities.
An FWC investigation into
Facebook posts by 43-year-old
Darin Lee Waldo, of Davenport,
found that he and his friends
were poaching game on Lake
Marion Creek Wildlife Man-
agement Area in Polk County
during closed season. Ad-
ditionally, Waldo is a convicted
felon who cannot legally pos-
sess firearms.
Waldo was arrested last week
by the Polk County Sheriffs
Office.


ADAN CRUZ
Adan Cruz, 41, of Bowling
Green, died on Sunday, May 29,
2011, in Sebring.
Born on Feb. 17, 1970, at
Brownfield, Texas, he came to
Hardee County from Texas in
1972. He was a phosphate min-
ing laborer.
He was preceded in death by
his father Natividad Cruz.
Suvivors include his mother
Hortencia Cruz of Bowling
Green; companion Amanda
Cruce of Bowling Green; two
sons, Adan Cruz Jr. of Auburn-
dale and Jake Ryan Cruz of
Sebring; three brothers Nativi-
dad Cruz Jr. of Wauchula, Rudy
Cruz Sr. of Wauchula and
David Cruz Jr. of Wauchula;
and six sisters, Mary Traver of
Bowling Green, Irma Garcia of
Wauchula, Julie Martinez of
South Bend,. Ind., Florinda
Galvan of Wauchula, Nora
Rodriguez of Michigan and
Brenda Sandoval of Zolfo
Springs.
Visitation is 2 p.m. today
(Thursday) at Robarts Garden
Chapel, where services will be
held at 3 p.m. with Ray Garza
officiating. Interment follows in
Wauchula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


Oin 0otlng (MUemoty













ADAN CRUZ
Adan Cruz, 41, of Bowling
Green, died on Sunday, May
29, 2011, in Sebring.
Born on Feb. 17, 1970, at
Brownfield, Texas, he came to
Hardee County from Texas in
1972. He was a phosphate
mining laborer.
He was preceded in death
by his father Natividad Cruz.
Suvivors include his moth-
er Hortencia Cruz of Bowling
Green; companion Amanda
Cruce of Bowling Green; two
sons, Adan Cruz Jr. of
Auburndale and Jake Ryan
Cruz of Sebring; three broth-
ers Natividad Cruz Jr. of
Wauchula, Rudy Cruz Sr. of
Wauchula and David Cruz Jr.
df Wauchula; and six sisters,
Mary Traver of Bowling
Green, Irma Garcia of Wau-
chula, Julie Martinez of South
Bend, Ind., Florinda Galvan
of Wauchula, Nora Rodriguez
of Michigan and Brenda San-
doval of Zolfo Springs.
Visitation is 2 p.m. today
(Thursday) at Robarts Garden
Chapel, where services will be
held at 3 p.m. with Ray Garza
officiating. Interment follows
in Wauchula Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


His third-degree felony
charges include four counts of
possession of a firearm by a
convicted felon and three
counts of armed trespass. His
second-degree misdemeanor
charges include two counts of
attempting to take wild turkey
during closed season and one
count each of attempting to take
deer during closed season,
unlawful hunting on Lake
Marion Creek WMA, unlawful
possession of a firearm on Lake
Marion Creek WMA, and
unlawful entry into Lake
Marion Creek WMA.
Additional charges are pend-
ing on his alleged co-conspira-
tors.
Each third-degree felony
charge is punishable by up to a
$5,000 fine and/or five years in
state prison. Second-degree
misdemeanors are punishable


PEDRO "PETE" F.
GALVAN
Pedro "Pete" F. Galvan, 84,
of Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
May 24, at his home.
Born on Oct. 14, 1926, in
Texas, he ,came to Wauchula
from Texas in 1969. He was a
World War II U.S. Army veter-
an and a crew leader.
He was preceded in death by
his parents. Ramon and Maria
Galvan; and daughter Marie
Ureste Taylor.
He is survived by his wife,
Delfina Galvan of Wauchula;
six sons, David Galvan, Gil-
bert Galvan and wife Susie, Joe
Galvan and wife Florinda,
Robert Galvan and wife Angel,
Chris Galvan and wife Hopie,
and James Galvan; seven
daughters Elva Whidden and
husband Joel, Celia Johnson
and husband Blaine, Linda
Ashworth, Elma Joiner, Nora
DelaTorre and husband Gaime,
Elida Elisondo and husband
Ruben, and Nola Galvan; broth-
er Antonio Galvan; sister
Gregoria Limon; and many
grandchildren and great grand-
children. '
Visitation was Saturday, May
28, from 2 to 3 p.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel, with services
there at 3 p.m. with Pastor
Joshua Goodwin officiating.
Interment followed in Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


by up to a $3U) inme ana/or 60
days in county jail.
Waldo and the other suspects
reportedly hid small boats and
guns in wooded areas and
accessed the WMA by water-
way to avoid apprehension.
"Our investigators were able
to gain Waldo's confidence over
the Internet," said Lt. George
Wilson, supervisor of the
FWC's Internet Crimes Unit.
Via the Internet, Waldo ex-
changed photographs of illegal-
ly killed game with FWC inves-
tigators, participated in chat
rooms describing his actions,
and invited undercover agents
to participate in two illegal
hunts, the FWC charged.
"Waldo was also trespassing
and poaching on private ranch-
es before hunting season, steal-
ing Florida's wildlife from
landowners who were maintain-
ing conservation programs,"
Wilson said.
In a technologically advanced
society, Internet websites pro-
vide opportunities for collecting
evidence of wildlife-poaching.
The FWC created its Internet
Crimes Unit to monitor and col-
lect evidence when wildlife is
exploited.
In the unit's first year of oper-
ation, investigators initiated
168 investigations, resulting in
177 arrests and 92 warnings.
"FWC investigators use the
Internet to aggressively target
criminals who are abusing
Florida's natural resources,"
Wilson concluded.







Workshop Fields
Medicare Info
A workshop on June 22 at
10 a.m. will help area resi-
dents find answers to their
questions about Medicare
and the Part D Prescription
Drug Plan, finding low- or
no- cost medications, and
other problems.
A SHINE (Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders)
volunteer will be at the
Hardee County Library,
Courthouse Annex II, 315 N.
Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17 South),
Wauchula. For more infor-
mation call 1-800-963-5337
or Robin West at 813-740-
3888.


The gap in our economy is
between what we have and
what we think we ought to
have-and that is a moral
problem, not an economic
one.
-Paul Heyne


Obituaries


rot
-2a" a?' lIw -...

























s ;.,.






Dennis Russell Robarts III
At Robarts Funeral Home we recognize how much your family
means to you because we're a family too. That's why when there's a
loss in your family, the Robarts family has been there for four genera-.
tions, since 1906, to give compassionate care and dependable serv-
ice at your time of need.
If our old fashioned caring and service is out of style in this fast
paced world today, that's OK. We're going to continue our family tra-
ditions and strive to give your family the same loving care we would
want. And as soon as my grandson, Dennis Russell Robarts III grows
up, he'll be the fifth generation to carry on our tradition. But for right
now, he needs to play with that cat.



ROBARTS
FAMILYFUNERAL HOME

A Trusted Family Name Since 1906

529 West Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-9773

View Obits at robartsfh.com 6:2c
.2


Q o 00tng Jiehotiy

PEDRO "PETE"
F. GALVAN
Pedro "Pete" F. Galvan,
84, of Wauchula, died on
Tuesday, May 24, at his home.
Born on Oct. 14, 1926, in
Texas, he came to Wauchula
from Texas in 1969. He was a
World War II U.S. Army vet-
eran and a crew leader.
He was preceded in death
by his parents. Ramon and
Maria Galvan; and daughter
Marie Ureste Taylor.
He is survived by his wife,
Delfina Galvan of Wauchula;
six sons, David Galvan,
Gilbert Galvan and wife
Susie, Joe Galvan and wife
Florinda, Robert Galvan and
wife Angel, Chris Galvan and
wife Hopie, and James Gal-
van; seven daughters Elva
Whidden and husband Joel,
Celia Johnson and husband
Blaine, Linda Ashworth, Elma
Joiner, Nora DelaTorre and
husband Gaime, Elida Eli-
sondo and husband Ruben,
and Nola Galvan; brother
Antonio Galvan; sister Gre-
goria Limon; and many
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Saturday,
May 28, from 2 to 3 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel, with
services there at 3 p.m. with
Pastor Joshua Goodwin offici-
ating. Interment followed in
Wauchula Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


IT DOESN'T COST US ANY MORE

TO OFFER EXCELLENT SERVICE ...



WHY SHOULD You PAY MORE?



The way we look at it, you

shouldn't have to sacrifice service

to get a lower price. We think of

this as another way we can help.

Visit us, let us impress you both

ways: with service and value.




^PongGl-Fia ys-QkOdy3

Funeral Homes



'-/-
/r



404 W.Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com


Affordable Funeral & Cremation Services
a0







June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


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6A The Herald-Advocate, June 2. 2011




From The Heart d
By David Kelly


On May 8th I started a sermon series titled "The Father's
Love." Each sermon has been split into two parts. Part One of
Sermon One follows here:
lJohn 4:7-12, "What 'The' are you talking about?"
I thought about "theme-ing" this sermon around Mother's Day
and weaving in some type of encouragement for just mothers, but
I didn't do that. This is for everyone.
Let's read 1John 4:7-12:
"Dear friends, let us love one another, for love comes from
God. Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God.
Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love..
This is how God showed His love among us: He sent His one and
only Son into the world that we might live through Him. This is
love: not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son
as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so
loved us, we also ought to love one another. No one has ever seen
God; but if we love one another, God lives in us and His love is
made complete in us."
What "The" am I talking about this morning? As most of you
know, or will shortly, the word the or the is a definite article. It
means a specific one. So which Father am-I talking about this
morning on Mother's Day? Well, most of us assume we know, and
even those of us who are right in assuming what we think, don't
really know.
Yes, I'm talking about the Great I Am, our Heavenly Father,
God the Father, the One and Only true God. But if you have not
been born of God, you do not know who I'm talking about. If you
are born of God then only because of His love are you able to know
Him and love Him and others. And even those of us that know God
don't know Him fully and don't glorify and enjoy Him near
enough, because we start to crowd out what we know about God
with things, idols, cheap desires, thrills, lies. We start to build a
God that isn't real, that isn't biblical and that isn't God.
Listen to what this passage has to say about God:
Love is from God.
Whoever loves is born of God.
God is love.
The love of God was made manifest before us.
God sent His only Son into the world that we might live
through Him.
Love isn't us loving God.
Love is God sending Jesus on our behalf to make propitia-
tion for our sins.
If God has loved us like this, what should our response be?
Love others.
God is unseen.
God abides in us.
His love is perfected in us.
Let's look at verse seven a little closer: "Dear friends, let us
love one another, for love comes from God. Everyone who loves
has been born of God and knows God." The word dear here can
also be beloved, an adjective that means greatly loved, dear to the
heart.
I can relate to John using the word dear or beloved. I think it's
important to understand John loved the people he was sharing this
with, they were dear to his heart. I imagine this made it even more
difficult for him to share, but also so niuch more vital to commu-


June Opens, Closes


Fishing Seasons


nicate clearly the important message of the Gospel.
Please hear me this morning, I love all of you, but more impor-
tant than you knowing that I want you to know that God loves you.
It sounds simple, so simple we often brush it off and refuse to
accept it. I hope today you will know The God, the one and only
God, and that God would allow you to understand more and more
exactly all that He is.
We could take verse seven and preach a whole series on it, but
we will try to look carefully and practically at this passage yet not
stall out in its complexity. The "The" I'm talking about this morn-
ing is, The God.
1.) There is only One God, The God:
a) God the Father
b) God the Son
c) God the Holy Spirit
In our text, when you look at the Greek, each time you see
God, you have the word tou or tov in front of it. This is the definite
article The, it means the one and only! Here in this passage it is
truly correct! Because we know that there is only one true God,
because the Word of God, Jesus, is telling us so, and Jesus is God.
So God is declaring "I Am God." So we see the love of God the
Father in just being Himself, because God is love.
John mentions God 11 times in these six verses. He wants you
to see God, The God!
You know we sing, "God in Three Persons, the blessed trini-




'ChamberMail' Helps

Find New Customers


The Hardee County Chamber
of Commerce is now offering
its new ChamberMail Program
to assist its members in finding
new customers.
ChamberMail targets new
homeowners, new renters, and
winter visitors in the chamber's
multi-town service area and is
currently offered to chamber
members only. The primary
purpose of this program is to
assist members in finding new
business during the current, dif-
ficult economic climate.
"All of our members are dili-
gently working to maintain and
increase their business, as they
always are," says Casey Dick-
son, executive director of the
Hardee County Chamber of
Commerce. "Our ChamberMail
Program's goal is to offer all of
our members and our new
neighbors just moving into our
geographic service area -- a
tangible, useful tool.
"Our chamber members will
ultimately use this program as a
profitable tool by finding them
new customers," she continues.
"While new homeownership
and travel numbers are down
over the last few years, homes
continue to sell and visitors
continue to visit. These new
neighbors are looking to this
chamber for guidance on where


to purchase the products and
services they will inevitably
need."
ChamberMail is a business-
to-customer, direct mail bro-
chure delivered weekly into the
hands of all new homeowners
and new residents in areas cov-
ered by the Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce, includ-
ing Bowling Green, Ona, Wau-
chula and Zolfo Springs.
It includes a welcome letter
from chamber leadership and
ads and promotions from adver-
tising chamber members.
Delivery of the brochure
takes place two to four weeks
after the move-in of the new
residents.
New residents have continu-
ous access to member advertis-
ers through ChamberMail
Links, an e-mail coupon pro-
gram designed to drive new res-
ident traffic to the chamber's
website and provide cost-saving
offers from ChamberMail ad-
vertisers.
For more information regard-
ing the Hardee County Cham-
ber of Commerce ChamberMail
Program or to purchase an ad-
vertisement in the brochure,
contact Casey bickson at 773-
6967 or at casey@hardeecc.-
com.


ty." We also see God the Son. Verse nine says this is how God
showed His love among us: He sent His one and only Son into the
world that we might live through Him.
In John 15:9, Jesus the Son of God says, "As the Father has
loved Me, so have I loved you. Abide in My love."
We also know God the Holy Spirit. lJohn 4:2 says, "By this
you know the Spirit of God: every spirit that confesses that Jesus
Christ has come in the flesh is from God."
So there is only one God, the true God, God the Father, God
the Son and God the Holy Spirit, The God.
2.) Without God's love, without the love of The God, you
won't love:
a) you won't know love
b) you won't feel love
c) you won't give love
Verse eight says, "Whoever does not love does not know God,
because God is love."
Jesus has a conversation with a Samaritan woman, a scan-
,dalous encounter in and of itself, but Jesus didn't care about that,
He cared about the truth, He cared about sharing the Gospel. This
woman didn't know love, she couldn't even feel love and she was-
n't able to give love ... yet!
John 4:19-26: 'Sir,' the woman said, 'I can see that you are
a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews
claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.'
'Woman,' Jesus replied, 'believe Me, a time is coming when you
will worship the Father neither on .this mountain nor in Jerusalem.
You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what
we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. Yet a time is coming
and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the
Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers
the Father seeks. God is spirit, and His worshipers must worship in
the Spirit and in truth.' The woman said, 'I know that Messiah is
coming. When He comes, He will explain everything to us.' Then
Jesus declared, 'I, the one speaking to you, I am He.'"
Without God's love we perceive all sorts of untruths about
God.
If you don't know God's love you won't love Him, nor will
you love others. Also, if you don't know God you won't feel love
and, lastly, you won't be able to give love because you've never
experienced what it is.
When we have been loved by God, amazing grace becomes a
reality, we are able to share the glory of God by sharing Jesus.
Second Corinthians 4:6 says "For God, who said, 'Let light
shine out of darkness,' has shone in our hearts to give the light of
the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ."
So what happens to the Samaritan woman? She saw the,face
of Jesus Christ, her heart was changed by the knowledge of the
glory of God, God had shone the light on her dark unbelieving
heart and she believed, not only that she experienced love, she
knew Jesus loved her, she felt it, she went and shared it to every-
one she came into contact with.
How is this possible? Because there is a new covenant, one
filled with glory! By accepting Jesus and His righteousness we
have a freedom to enjoy it and share it. We aren't bound to follow
the law out of fear of failure, but we are set free to live in Christ's
righteousness and obey Him out of love.
a


The recreational harvest sea-
son for red snapper in the Gulf
of Mexico opened on Wednes-
day.
Also on Wednesday, the
recreational seasons for gag
grouper and greater amberjack
* in the Gulf of Mexico closed.
Gag grouper will remain closed
throughout 2011, except that
there will be a two-month open-
ing in the fall, from Sept. 16
through Nov. 15. Greater am-
berjack will reopen on Aug. 1.
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission will
discuss the closing date for red
snapper in state waters of the
Gulf on June 9 at its meeting in
St. Augustine. Commissioners
will consider adopting a closing
date consistent with the federal
date of July 18.
Gulf gag grouper are consid-
ered to be overfished and un-
dergoing overfishing, and fed-
eral fisheries managers are
preparing a plan to help rebuild

Beliefs Ab

Lifestyle Clash
You're never too young to
reduce your risk of stroke-and
you may need to start by chang-
ing your lifestyle.
According to a recent American
Stroke Association survey:
Nine out of 10 Americans
between ages 18 and 24 believe
they're living healthy lifestyles
and want to live well into their
late 90s. Yet most eat too much
-fast food, drink too many alco-
holic and sugar-sweetened bev-
erages and engage in other
behaviors that could put them at
'risk for stroke.
Most of those surveyed
said they want to maintain qual-
ity health throughout their lives.
Yet one-third don't believe
engaging in healthy behaviors
dow could affect their risk for
stroke in the future.
Eight in 10 people between
ages 25 and 44 years old also
believe they're engaging in
healthy lifestyles' and hope to
live to be 90 and beyond. While
they're more likely to engage in
healthy behaviors than 18- to
24-year-olds, they could also
improve.
"This survey shows the dan-
gerous disconnect that many
young Americans have about
how their behaviors affect their
risks for stroke and other car-
diovascular diseases," said
Ralph Sacco, M.D., neurologist


populations of these fish in Gulf
waters. In the meantime, inter-
im federal rules are in effect
that prohibit the recreational
harvest of gag grouper in Gulf
federal waters (beyond nine
nautical miles from shore). This
federal prohibition is in effect
through the end of 2011, except
for the fall harvest noted above.
The newly implemented an-
nual June 1 to July 31 closed
recreational harvest season for
greater amberjack in Gulf of
Mexico state waters is also con-
sistent with new rules in Gulf
federal waters.
The FWC believes that ap-
plying the same closed recre-
ational harvest seasons for gag
grouper and greater amberjack
in Gulf state waters as in feder-
al offshore waters will maxi-
mize fishing opportunities for
anglers and charter boat opera-
tors along Florida's Gulf Coast
and provide economic benefits
to this region.

out Healthy

i With Behavior
and president of the American
Heart Association/American
Stroke Association. "Starting
healthy behaviors at a young
age is critical to entering middle
age in good shape."
People who make healthy
life-style choices lower their
risk of having a first stroke by
as much as 80 percent com-
pared with those who don't,
according to the American
Heart Association. Healthy be-
haviors include eating a low-fat
diet high in fruits and vegeta-
bles, drinking alcohol and
sugar-sweetened beverages
only in moderation, exercising
regularly, maintaining a healthy
body weight and not smoking.
"Young adults need to make a
connection between healthy
behaviors and a healthy brain
and heart," Sacco said. "People
need to think in terms of striv-
ing for ideal health as well as
surviving and thriving if a
stroke occurs. An easier way to
remember this is: Strive,
Survive, Thrive."
To learn how to strive toward
a healthy lifestyle to reduce the
risk of stroke, visit My Life
Check at www.mylifecheck.-
heart.org. To survive and thrive,
learn the stroke symptoms and
other helpful tips by visiting
www.Stroke Association.org.


City of Wauchula
-,. 126 S. 7th Ave
-- Wauchula, Fl 33873
-"."" Ph (863) 773-3131
Fax (863) 773-0773
/ I ---- '

2nd NOTICE TO CITY OF WAUCHULA ELECTRIC UTILITY CUSTOMERS

The City of Wauchula experienced an increase of thirty-three percent (33%) in the March and April Invoices from
Tampa Electric Company (TEC).

TEC's thirty-three percent (33%) increase is based upon a request TEC filed on July 30, 2010 with the Federal
Electric Regulatory Commission (F.E.R.C.) in Washington D.C. The final outcome of that request is still
pending as of May 31, 2011.

The City was informed by TEC in June 2010 that TEC intended to file for an increase in rates charged to the City
of Wauchula for the bulk purchase of power with F.E.R.C. in Washington, D.C. on July 30, 2010. The City
immediately began discussions with TEC on how much the rate increase would be and when those increases
would go into effect.

The City's twenty-year contract with TEC did not expire until December 31, 2013. An early termination of the
contract by either party required a one-year notice. The City engaged in six months of negotiations with TEC to
reduce the requested increase and continue the twenty-year contract to full term. At the end of November 2010 it
became apparent negotiations with TEC would not be successful. The City issued the required early termination
letter dated 9/30/2010 to TEC.

In October 2010 the City was included in a brief filed with the F.E.R.C. Commissioner in Washington, D.C.
challenging TEC's rate increase as well as requesting a five month delay in TEC's implementation of the
increased rates. February 2011 ended the five month delay granted. The Commissioner's final determination will
likely reduce TEC's request. At that time TEC's monthly invoice to the City will reflect that reduction which will
in turn be passed on to City of Wauchula electric utility customers.

On December 13, 2010 the City of Wauchula Commission authorized the solicitation a new bulk electric supplier
through request for proposal (RFP) process. The City is currently engaged in a bidding process to choose a new
bulk electric supplier with current market rates effective 10/01/2011.

This Notice to City of Wauchula electric customers is the second attempt to explain why customers have likely
experienced an increase in electric utility bills caused by unforeseen changes. Based on consumption by customers
individual results will vary.

Here are some tips to help you reduce your electrical power consumption.
1) Turn up thermostat to 79 degrees
2) Close drapes and blinds to minimize solar heat intrusion
3) Reduce thermostat on water heater (especially while on vacation)
Water heaters can account for up to 25% of electric utility bill
4) Turn off lights except those on timers for security purposes
and
5) Unplug "vampire applications". These applications have been identified as appliances which still use
a measure of electricity even when they are turned off (i.e. electric toothbrush, cell phone charger, flat
screen TV, etc). These appliances can account for 25% of utility bill.

The fewer kilowatts City of Wauchula customers consume, the fewer kilowatts TEC can charge at the current
excessive rates.
6:2c
City of Wauchula














Junior Wins 3 Scholarships


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
A junior at Hardee Senior
High School recently received a
sum total of $950 in scholar-
ships.
Junior Reserve Officer Train-
ipg Corps Cadet Maj. Staci
Macias earned three separate
scholarships after she wrote a
composition and competed with
other JROTC applicants from
all high schools under the
Saramana Chapter of the Sons
of the American Revolution,
which includes Hardee, Man-
atee, Sarasota and Charlotte
counties.
All applicants were judged
for accuracy and neatness as
well as meeting a specific word
count.
When Cadet Macias placed
first for the local award, her
application was then sent to the
Florida State Sons of the


American Revolution, along
with cadets from all over the
state, where she placed third in
the competition.
The Saramana Chapter invit-
ed Macias, her parents and
JROTC aerospace instructor Lt.
Col. Anthony Hingle to their
May 20 membership luncheon
at the Holiday Inn on Lido
Beach, where Macias collected
her awards.
She was presented with a
special medallion, certificate
and scholarship from the
Saramana Chapter, a certificate
and scholarship from the state
group, and a third certificate
and scholarship from the state
group's auxiliary.
The next night was the
Awards Banquet for the local
Junior Reserve Officer Training
Corps, held at Hardee Senior
High School, where she
received other awards as well.


"It became quickly apparent
that Cadet Staci was not aware
of the monetary awards associ-
ated with her application. The
competition for this award was
very close, because less than
one point separated first place
from second," said Billie Lowe,
publicity chair of the Saramana
Chapter.
The JROTC "Best of the
Best" contest is only available
to JROTC students that are in
their junior year of high school,
have achieved and maintained a
high academic rating, and have
excelled in not only their regu-
lar studies but also in their com-
munity and JROTC activities.
During the competition,
Macias was promoted to lieu-
tenant colonel and became the
group commander for her sen-
ior year.
Macias is the daughter of
Stacio and Mary Jane Macias.


June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Local JROTC Named


A
By MACHEL
For The Herald-
A recent a
Hardee Seni
honored the
Reserve '.r'ic
unit.
Over 1,00
given to nearly
The awards
annually to s
the cadets and
join in comme
year and ack
standing stude
ors included
and national-l
The highli
was presented
pal Dr. Mi
Schools Supe
Durastanti, nc
been chosen a
to receive t
Force Junior
guished Unit
kept a secret
until announce
every one of
applaud the hi


'Distinguished
LLE DOLLAR "The ROTC awards banquet Pres
Advocate has become one of my favorite Dean
wards banquet at events of the school year. The Sons
or High School enthusiasm shown by the stu- lution,
Air Force Junior dents and their flights is ener- cer H
er Training Corps gizing and fun for the entire Elaine
audience," said Polk. "The abil- Daugh
)0 awards were ity of the students to balance Revol
y 150 students. discipline and fun is impres- Knigh
s banquet is held sive. This group always makes Force
et aside time for me proud, they are a true reflec- tative
d their families to tion of what 'Wildcat' Spirit' Associ
emorating the past should look like." Order
cnowledging out- Noted JROTC headquarters, Air F(
cents. Varying hon- "This award recognizes Air and w
ribbons, badges Force Junior ROTC units that the A
evel awards. have performed above and Maj. C
ght of the night beyond normal expectations, Foreig
Sby school princi- and that have distinguished Chapl;
chele Polk and themselves through outstanding Chapti
erintendent David service to their school and cor- Serge;
voting the unit has munity while meeting the Air Maste:
.s one of 401 units Force Junior ROTC mission of The
he 2010-11 Air producing better citizens for program
SROTC Distin- America." school
Award. It had been Special guests were present and
from the cadets to help recognize students Europ
ed that night, and receiving awards. Along with Puerto
them stood up to local awards, national-level enroll
igh honor. honors were given as well. 117,0C


Unit


;ent at the ceremony were
of Students Ron Herron;
of the American Revo-
Saramana Chapter, offi-
[arold Crapo and wife
; Patriots Chapter of the
iters of the American
ution officer Carol
t; the president of the Air
Association and represen-
of the Military Officers
iation of America and the
of the Daedalians, retired
force Col. Bill Hutchison
ife Mary; commander of
merican Legion, retired
Carl Saunders; Veterans of
;n Wars Post No. 10285
ain Laurie Linder; and
er 522 of the Air Force
ants Association Senior
r Sgt. Chris Melnick.
Air Force Junior ROTC
im is located in 884 high
s across the United States
at selected schools in
e, in the Pacific and
Rico. Junior ROTC
ment includes more than
X0 cadets.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Cadet Staci Macias (left) was presented with a certificate and scholarship by Harold
Crapo Jr. of the Saramana Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution.


1-.
ill],L ~.I,


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
The much awaited announcement revealed that the Hardee Senior High School's unit
has been selected as one of 401 units to receive the Distinguished Unit Award for the
school year. Pictured above (from left) are school principal Dr. Michele Polk, Lt. Col.
Anthony Hingle, Schools Superintendent David Durastanti, Cadet Lt. Col. Connor
Shepard, Cadet U. Col. and Commander Staci Macias, Chief Master Sgt. and First Sgt.
Andrew Hernandez, and Chief Master Sgt. Robert Waltich.


Macias, her parents and her instructor were invited to the membership luncheon where
she was awarded with scholarships. Pictured (from left) are Lt. Col. Anthony Hingle;
Chuck Barrett, sergeant of arms; Cadet Lt. Col. Staci Macias; and Harold Crapo Jr., vice
president of the Saramana Chapter of the Florida State Sons of the American
Revolution.







J










a.s. *.I Ad I



NOTICE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA
REQUESTING APPLICANTS FOR THE PLANNING & ZONING BOARD

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the City of Wauchula will be accepting applicants who
would like to- serve on the City of Wauchula's Planning & Zoning Board. This Board
reviews and makes recommendations to the City Commission on matters relating to the
planning of the City. All members are appointed by the City Commission and must be
a resident of the City. The Board meets the third Monday of each month at 5:30 pm.
All interested individuals must i;,. a resume to, the City Clerk, 126 S. 7th Avenue,
Wauchula, FL 33873 by Friday, June 10th at 5:00 pm. All applications received by the.
deadline will be presented to the City Commission at the June 13, 2011 City
Commission Meeting at 6:00 pm for their review and possible selection.

Questions may be directed to:

City of Wauchula
Olivia Minshew, Director of Community Development
225 E. Main Street, Suite 106
Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-9193
6:2,9c
ominshew@cityofwauchula.com


[ L L Youir Al .A Conventio n trui o


JUNE REFERRAL PROMOTION

Refer a customer who signs up for service in June

and receive one month of your service free!!

Need high speed Internet?

Prices Start at $19.95

FREE INSTALLATION!


863-448-9297


rs


air
wireless
broadband


1


IMAYCLR


Emomw










8A The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011


ALL-DAY SIGN


Greetings from Fort Green!
We still need rain out here in
sunny Fort Green!
4Hopefully your church serv-
ices were not off as much as
ours, but I feel sure all those
folks missing were enjoying the
first holiday of the long hot
summer. Pat Gugle had decorat-
ed red, white and blue and made
you proud to be an American!
We had just about equal num-
bers of us old folk as we did the
younger ones. Now, I can un-
derstand us older ones don't
like to be on the road on holi-
days, and then we have gotten
to that place in life where
"there's just no place like
home."
Faye Davis is still sick and I
understand the doctor told her if
she didn't take care of herself
she would be in the hospital!
Buck Toole is home but still not
well. I do not know if Arthur
Womack is still in rehab or not.
They added Pershing Platt to
our prayer list as he had hurt his
back. Willie Godwin was over
his broken elbow and, first day
back to the weight room, he
broke his middle finger. You
don't realize how much you use
your fingers until they are hurt!
Please remember to pray for all
of these.
Some good news to report is
Kasey Powell received the
Principal's Award for the fourth
grade at Bowling Green. This is
a coveted award as there is only
one per grade. She also made
the A/B Honor Roll for the
entire year. Way to go, Kasey!
Cierra Smith scored a five on
the two FCATs she recently
took and all the Smith young
ones, Cierra, Austin, Dustyn'
and Tyler, all made the A/B
Honor Roll for the entire year.
Good job!
Lynda and Charles have re-
turned home from a wonderful
vacation at their home in
Blairsville, Ga. Charles said it
is wonderful to sit on the porch
and just enjoy the breeze. When
they returned to Wauchula it
was to hot, hot weather!
Little Destiny Fields had a
good time at the 4-H Banquet.
She received a medallion for
perfect attendance and a blue
ribbon for her record book onr
building birdhouses -She and
Norma Alejandro each received


IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 25-2008-CA-000734
DIVISION


the coveted Spirit Award, and
Norma received a blue ribbon
for her sewing book.
Courtney Alexander received
a blue ribbon for her record
book. Dessi Newcomb received
a red ribbon and a perfect atten-
dance award along with con-
gratulations on being a graduat-
ing senior this year.
Dalton Richey received per-
fect attendance and blue rib-
bons for his archery and swine
record books. Holly Brown
received a red ribbon for her
swine record book.
Brianna Waters received a
certificate for her Treasurer
Report Book and a blue ribbon
and the coveted medal/pin for
her craft project. Makayla
Chancey received the top award
for her Leisure Arts record book
and a medal along with a per-
fect attendance medallion.
Morgan Lanier received a
medal and blue ribbon for her
Food Preparation.
Kaylee Hogenauer received a
medallion for perfect atten-
dance and a medal and blue rib-
bon for her swine book, and
will be given a certificate for
her secretary book. There was a
mix-up and she was not award-
ed this at the banquet. I under-
stand they only give ribbons to
the top four secretary or treasur-
er books, which require a lot of
work.
Congratulations to all the
members of the 4-H Club and
the leaders for the hard work it
takes to participate in 4-H.
They "Learn by Doing" and
they are all growing smarter!
Kaylee Hogenauer and fami-
ly were in Orlando this week-
end for the state bowling tour-
nament. She did good and
bowled over her average on
Saturday but was bowling again
on Sunday. Hunter Davis and
his family are also enjoying
bowling in the big city. He is
also doing real well.
Anyone connected with the
Cooper Family: This Saturday
is the annual reunion. It will be
at Fort Green Baptist Church.
We will begin gathering at 10
a.m. to reminisce, and plan to
eat around 12. Remember to
bring a covejdt dish.. The paper
' goods and tea wI'Yb15'e provided.
" everyonee fS-oahffi coming to
Fort Green on June 12 to cele-
brate Leo Blink's 99th birthday.
His Sunday School class is fur-
nishing the meat, so just bring a
covered dish and come out and
enjoy the day. If you have time
to listen, he has seen a lot of
history!
Please remember to pray for
one another, our military and
our nation.


MIDFIRST BANK,
Plaintiff


vs.
JESUS NARANJO aka JESUS L
NARANJO; ANITA NARANJO,
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT;
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS, AND UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
I

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant
to Final Judgment of Foreclosure
for Plaintiff entered in this cause
on April 20, 2011, in the Circuit
Court of Hardee County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in
Hardee County, Florida described
as:
LOT 1, LESS THE NORTH
86.25 FEET THEREOF,
BLOCK 10 OF PACKER'S
ADDITION TO THE CITY
OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA,
AS PER PLAT RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE
93, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
and commonly known as: 713 N
9TH AVE, WAUCHULA, FL 33873;
including the building, appurte-
nances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for cash. All
sales are held at the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 West
Main Street, Wauchula, Florida,
second floor hallway outside
Room 202, on June 22, 2011, at
11am.

Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Iis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 21 day of April, 2011.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
6:2,9c


Nutrition
Wise
SKAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH

Q: Is it true that chia seeds
are one of the best sources of
omega-3 fat? If so, how do
you eat them?
A: Chia seeds, which come
from a desert plant, are often
compared to flaxseeds, whose
current popularity as a source of
omega-3 fat began years ahead
of chia. seeds. A standard serv-
ing (about two tablespoons) of
either one supplies about five to
six grams of omega-3 fat. Some
have suggested chia seeds and
flaxseeds are better sources of
omega-3 than salmon, but be
cautious of these stories. A serv-
ing of salmon (three-ounce por-
tion) contains about one gram
of omega 3. Although techni-
cally lower than chia seeds and
flaxseeds, omega 3 fats from
animal sources (EPA and DHA)
are more easily used by our
bodies. The body must convert
the plant forms of omega 3
(ALA) into animal forms, and it
loses some in the process. Both
chia seeds and flaxseeds offer
an additional advantage as good
sources of fiber. Chia seeds'
advantage is that they can be
used "as is," without grinding.
And their mild flavor makes
them an easy option to sprinkle
on salads, cereal, yogurt or
when baking. There's no reason
to feel that chia seeds are a must
for good health, but they cer-
tainly are one option.



r He lAI.o
5flfl..rdee C unY* 1 nmeloflryr Coveragef


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
The American Sign Language Club at Hardee Senior High School practices all year to put on its annual program, All-
Day Sign. The program began in 2002 with teacher Nancy Weems and has been a tradition ever since. The club prac-
tices as a group and individually to perform songs for the students and teachers of the high school. Pictured here
are (in front) Connie Gerstorff, American Sign Language teacher; (second row, from left) Jessica Morris, Daniel
Hernandez, Francis Banda and Kim Ellis; (third row) Brittany Giles, Yesi Ortiz, Lauren Page, Marisela Santiago and
Karina Reyna; (fourth row) Jennifer Napier, Christian Richardson, Danielle Milby, Sylvia Rodriguez, Tiffinie Green,
Patience Hall, Sandra Ruiz, Jessica Brewer and Kaylia Browning; and (fifth row) Stuart Spinks, Marcos Santana,
Danely Flores, Donovan Richardson, Travis Bashore and Jonathan Heither.


10 HOURS A

MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME ACT
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned, pursuant to
the provisions of the Fictitious
Name Act, Section 865.09,
Florida Statues, as amended,
intends to register with the
Secretary of State of the State
of Florida, the fictitious name of
Truecare Pharmacy under
which the undersigned is
engaged or will engage in busi-
ness at: 304 Main St. the City of
Bowling Green, Florida 33834.
That the party interested in
said business enterprise is as
follows: Frontline Health
Services LLC.
Dated at Wauchula, Hardee,
Florida 33873. 6:2p


Star -ti n W de avly ,lJu ne 15th, 1 p
'qlE^ L^^^


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710










June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Commissioners Educated

On Youth's Challenges


PROTECTING CHILDREN
-~ ~ -~


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Commis-
sion now knows some of the
challenges facing the youth of
the.county after being informed
by a group of Hardee High
School students.
Last Thursday night, the
Students Against Destructive
Behavior and the Hardee Al-
liance for Substance Abuse and
Pregnancy Prevention (ASAPP)
presented the commission with
some facts from a recent survey
done at the high school.
The study showed 20 percent
of HHS.students have admitted
to drinking while driving and
24.percent have ridden in a car
when the driver has been drink-
ing. Twenty-nine percent of stu-
dents drink on a regular basis
and 42 percent of HHS students
approve of drinking.
The teenagers of Hardee
County list their parents as the


number one source of believ-
able information, according to
John Varady of the Heartland
Education Consortium. Varady
encourages parents to talk to
their children about the dangers
and consequences involved
with underage drinking and
making bad decisions.
ASAPP meets the second
Tuesday of every month in
room 810 at Hardee High
School at 9 a.m.
In other news, the commis-
sion also:
-Heard a presentation on
water conservation from Janet
Gilliard, director of community
development and general serv-
ices.
Gilliard said the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District covers 10,000 square
miles and spans 16 counties.
The average person in the dis-
trict uses 111 gallons of water
per day. A leak of one drip per


second wastes 3.000 gallons of
water per year.
For tips on saving water, call
the community development
office at 773-6349 and attend
one of its workshops..
-Approved rezoning 1.17
acres from agriculture to farm
residential for Lynn Monies
Beard. The property is located
west of Edison Street and south
of Lake Branch road east of
Bowling Green. The change
allowed Beard to put a house on
the property.
The commission approved
the change 4-0, with Commis-
sioner Sue Birge absent. She
had previously told the com-
mission she would be out of
town this week.
-Granted an extension of
one year to Sunshine Towers to
construct a 250-foot cell phone
tower on 9.7 acres at the inter-
section of SR 64 and CR 663.
The extension was passed 4-0.


Photo By MICHAEL KELLY
John Varady and students Eugene Pace, Addison Aubry and Arissa Camal present
information to the commissioners about alcohol consumption among high school stu-
dents.


David "Lil'D" Medrano
November 26, 1989 May 30, 2010

Well it has been a year that God
called your name and took you home.
... Everyone tells me that you are in a
better place, but no one told me it
would hurt so much. I still miss you
so very much, and so do your broth-
11 ers and sisters.
I would give anything to hold


L 'I ...
COURTESY PHOTOS
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office recently held its first Child Information Safety Kit
campaign in observance of
National Missing Children's Day
on May 25, setting up a station
to take fingerprints and a cur-
rent photograph for parents to
keep in a safe place in case
their child is ever abducted or
missing. In all, 116 children
were catalogued, with some
pleased parents even going
back to their neighborhoods
and encouraging other parents
to participate. Sheriff's staff .
hosting the event included (top
photo, from left) Dep. Joe
Marble, Explorer Tyler Gomez,
Catherine Hinerman, Hilda
Norman, Gerald Shackelford .
and Capt. Jim Hall. Also assist-
ing were Dep. Manny Martinez,
who greeted the children when
they arrived and maintained traffic control around the Command Center, and Explorer
Tony Reyna and Maribel Flores, who greeted children and parents at the entrance of
Wal-Mart to explain the purpose of the event.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA
TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
PLANNING BOARD MEETING: TUESDAY JUNE 14, 2011; 6:00 PM
TOWN COMMISSION MEETING: TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 6:00 PM

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS PLANNING & ZON-
ING BOARD WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER AND MAKE A REpOM-
MENDATION TO THE TOWN COMMISSION ON TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS TO
THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED ON THE TOWN'S.
EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR).

A TRANSMITTAL PUBLIC HEARING WILL THEN BE HELD BY THE ZOLFO SPRINGS
TOWN COMMISSION TO APPROVE THE.AMENDMENTS FOR TRANSMITTAL TO THE
STATE. AT THIS HEARING, THE COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER FIRST READING OF
THE AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, TITLED AS FOLLOWS:

PROPOSED ORDINANCE 2011-07: AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE TEXT AND MAPS OF THE
ZOLFO SPRINGS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, BASED ON THE TOWN'S
EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR); PROVIDING FOR SEVER-
ABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

THE AREA COVERED UNDER THIS ORDINANCE IS THE TOWN LIMITS, SHOWN
BELOW:
Town of Zolfo Springs, Florida









r OWN Of
1 ZOLFO SPRIhGS 66 OE

.. .-L.... ||r -


17





BOTH PUBLIC HEARINGS WILL BE HELD AT THE ZOLFO SPRINGS TOWN HALL
COMMISSION CHAMBERS, 3210 US HIGHWAY 17; ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA;
THE PUBLIC HEARINGS WILL BE HELD ON THE DATE AND TIME NOTED ABOVE OR
AS SOON THEREAFTER, AND IF NECESSARY TO BE CONTINUED TO A DATE CER-
TAIN. ANY INTERESTED PERSONS WHO FEEL THEY ARE AFFECTED BY THESE
CHANGES ARE ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND ONE OR BOTH PUBLIC HEARINGS AND
BE HEARD.

ANY PERSONS) WISHING TO VIEW RELEVANT INFORMATION IN ADVANCE OF THE
PUBLIC HEARINGS MAY CONTACT THE TOWN AT (863) 735-0405 AT LEAST 48
HOURS IN ADVANCE OF THE SCHEDULED MEETING.

ANYONE WISHING TO APPEAL ANY DECISIONS MADE AT THE TOWN COMMISSION
HEARING WILL NEED A RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE
THEY MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS MADE.

ATTEST:
June Albritton George Neel
Town Clerk Mayor 6:2c


you in my arms again, and give you a
kiss. I would say "be careful" and
you would say "always". You would
give me a kiss and say "I love you old G".
I still sit in my green chair waiting for you, David. You
have changed our lives in so many different ways. You will


always be in our hearts.
We love you-Mom, Joe, Simon, Lupe, Gilbert,
Johnny, Jennifer & Erando.


PUBLIC NOTICE
The Hardee District Schools, 1009 N. 6th Avenue RO. Box 1678, Wauchula, FL 33873, will
be participating in the Summer Food Service Program during the months of June, July,
and August 2011.

Nutritionally balanced meals will be provided to all children regardless of race, color, sex,
disability, age, or national origin during summer vacation when school breakfasts and
lunches are not available. All children 18 years old and younger, if open site, are eligible
for meals at no charge and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal serv-
ice. The programs are only approved for geographical areas of need where 50 percent or
more of the children qualify for free and reduced price meals during the school year.

Summer feeding sites that are located at schools provide meals to all children in the
immediate vicinity in addition to those enrolled in summer school.
The following sites will be participating in the Summer Food Service Program:

Hardee District Schools
Summer Food Service Program Schedule
Breakfast and Lunch
Location Address Times Dates 2011
Bowling Green 4530 Church Ave,. 7:00-7:30 am June 13 June
Elementary School Bowling Green, FL 33834 11:00-11:30 30
Zolfo Elementary 3215 School House Road, 7:00-7:30 am June 13 June
School Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 11:30-12:00 30
North Wauchula 1120 N. Florida Avenue, 7:00-7:30 am June 13 -
Elementary School Wauchula, FL 33873 11:30 am-12:00 August 11
noon
Lunch Only
Location Address Times Dates 2011


YMCA 610 West Orange Street, 11:30am 12:30 June 13 -
Wauchula, FL 33873 pm August 11

Any person who believes he or she has been discriminated against in any USDA related
activity should immediately write or call:
USDA
Director, Office of Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410
(800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TTY)

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. 6:2c


soc6:2
SOC6:2p J


I









10A The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011

Register Saturday

For Swim Lessons


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
With the approach of sum-
mer, registration for swim les-
sons.will quickly follow suit.
This year's process will be a
little different, as there will be a
$10 fee- for registration. After
turning in the application to
your child's school nurse, be
sure to attend registration in
order to secure a spot.
The next registration will be
,held this Saturday from 1 to 4
p.m. at the Community Recrea-
tion Complex pool.
"We had around 240 students
who were interested, but only
50 showed up for the first round
of registration," noted instruc-
tor Kathy Roe. "It is extremely
important that they come and
sign up or they might not be
able to get into the class!"
In cooperation with the coun-
ty Recreation Department as
well as the Health Department,
four different sessions will be


offered this year.
The morning sessions will be
taught by Carl Coleman and
held from 9 to 10 a.m., 10-11
a.m. and 11 a.m. to noon. There
will also be an afternoon ses-
sion, taught by Roe, from 5:15
to 6:15. Also instructing will be
Sandy Driskell, Beth Jernigan,
Mandy Johnson and Katia
Kaufman.
The group is still in need of
volunteers with the babies and
toddlers.
"Our goal is for everyone to
learn to swim; if not well, that
they at least know how. We will
teach whatever needs to be
taught. We could save a life!"
concluded Roe.
In continuing the "Get Wet"
program from last year, if any
adult is in need of swim lessons,
contact Roe at 773-3147.
The pool is located off of
Altman Road in Wauchula, out
by the high school.


FRIDAY. JUNE 3
VHardee County Com-
mission, planning session
on dispatch, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.
THURSDAY. JUNE 9
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.

The least initial deviation
from the truth is multiplied
later a thousandfold.
-Aristotle
The most dangerous
untruths are truths moder-
ately distorted.


The earliest type of timekeeper, dating from as far back as 3500 B.C., was the shadow
clock, or gnomon, a vertical stick or obelisk that casts a shadow. An Egyptian shadow
clock of the eighth century B.C. is still in existence.
The tallest species of dog is the Irish wolfhound, which grows to be about 32 inches
high at the shoulders.


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
ORIENTATION FOR NEW CITY COMMISSIONERS

The Acting City Manager together with the directors of the various City departments and
the City Attorney will conduct an orientation for all of the new City Commissioners on
Monday, June 6, 2011, at 6:00 p.m., at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accom-
modation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26,
Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 6:2c


Week Ending May 29, 2011
Weather Summary: Cumulative rain for this week was mini-
mal and had little impact on continued dry conditions. Most Florida
Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations reported less than
one inch of rain. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, updated
May 24, 54 percent of the State had severe, extreme, or exception-
al drought ratings. Another 36 percent of the State was rated as
abnormally or moderately dry. Exceptionally dry areas were locat-
ed in extremities of the State within the western Panhandle and the
southern Peninsula. Counties experiencing temperatures above 95
degrees were located in the northern and central part of the State.
Evening lows were in the 50s and 60s. Temperatures averaged two
to five degrees above normal.
Field Crops: In northern Florida, field crops were affected by
drought. In Washington and Holmes counties, corn crops showed
stress. In areas in and around Santa Rosa, Escambia, Okaloosa,
Walton, and Holmes counties, farmers were waiting for increased
soil moisture before planting cotton. In Washington County, some
emerged cotton dried up and will need to be replanted. Peanut
fields in the north required irrigation. Peanut farmers must plant by
June Ist in order to receive crop insurance. In the Hastings area,
some potato crops were damaged due to dry conditions. Potato har-
vesting was underway in the tri-county area and Suwannee County.
Vegetables: Planting of okra was taking place in Manatee Countyl
In south Florida, growers completed spring harvesting for most
varieties. In Polk County, some ripe tomatoes were abandoned due
to dry conditions. In Gadsden County, tomato harvesting began.
Market movement included sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant, okra,
bell peppers, tomatoes, cantaloupes, and watermelons. For cucum-
bers and bell peppers, movement declined as shippers finish for the
season. Movement of cantaloupes was expected to decrease after
the Memorial Day holiday.
Nursery, Floriculture; Fruit: Caladiums in Highlands
County were not sprouting due to lack of rain. In southern Miami-
Dade, orchard workers began harvesting lychee nuts.
Livestock and Pastures: The poor to fair pasture condition
improved only in areas that received scattered rainfall. In the
Panhandle and northern areas, pasture condition continued to be
rated mostly poor. Dry conditions in previous weeks made this a
below average season for grazing. Moderation of temperatures
helped cool season forage growth. Non-irrigated, cool season for-
age was approaching grazing height. The cattle condition was
mostly fair. Supplemental feeding of livestock was on-going. In the
central areas, pasture condition ranged from mostly poor to fair.
The cattle condition ranged from very poor to good with most fair.
More than normal supplemental feed was required due to poor for-
age condition. In the southwestern areas, pasture condition ranged
from very poor to good with most in poor to fair condition. The cat-
tle condition ranged from very poor to excellent with most poor to
fair. Statewide, the condition of the cattle ranged from very poor to
excellent with most fair to good.
Citrus: Temperatures dropped to the mid 60s at night and
reached the mid 90s during the day for the majority of the week.
Three stations received some precipitation, rainfall was light.
Apopka recorded the most with 1.5 inches. Extreme drought con-
ditions exist south and,east of Lake Okeechobee, with the most
severe conditions in Indian River, St Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach,
and parts of Collier and Hendry counties. Most packinghouses fin-
ished running grapefruit with some planning to continue packing
Valencia oranges for a few more weeks. Processing plants were pri-
marily running Valencia oranges and will to continue to operate
through mid to late June. Grove activity included resetting new
trees, young tree care, applying herbicides, hedging and topping,
brush removal, and fertilizer application.


REPUBLICAN






SPOTLIGHT


REPUBLICANS have long
believed government
should not spend more
than it takes in and have
consistently fought for
a balanced budget. i


Pol. adv. paid for and approved by HC Rep. Party


Resthaven Assisted Living would
like to thank Mr. Klaus Kunkel,
Rotary Club Member and owner
of FCI Grove Service for his
donation of hedging and
herbicide services.


H Need Something to do on those lazy days of summer?

Let 4-H help you plan your summer activities!


ANNOUNCING


"BackTo Basics"


Summer Day Camp

Workshops will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
mornings from 9:00 a.m. until 12 noon, starting on Tuesday, June 14th
through Thursday, July 21st. The cost for the six week program is only
$20 per person and will cover all supplies needed. Some of the classes
to be offered are:







Youth 8 to 18 are invited to participate. If you have friends who are
not enrolled in 4-H they are welcome to come also. All classes will be
held at the Agri-Civic Center and the 4-H Office.
You must be pre-registered.

For more information call Mary Mitchell
at the 4-H Office 773-2164.


S


This exciting summer camp program is a joint effort between the
Home and Community Education Council and the 4-H Office.

SUSU*U#U#M


S


1*S


S



S.










June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate HiA


It is important to keep safety
in mind as you begin sour
spring cleaning and gardening.
Many of the products ued.
such as garden chemicals, paint
thinner. bleach and furniture
polish, are poisonous. Alrnmst
anything can be a poison it it's
used the wrong say. hy the
wrong person. or in the ,;.-ong
amount. In case of a possible
poisoning, call the lPo'in Help
line at 1-800-222-1222 to talk
to a poison expert.
You can alo protect yourself


POISON



Hep.

1-800-222-1222

Cut this out and post it by
your phone.
and those around you by exer-
cising a little caution. Here are


Spring Poison

Prevention Pointers


be taken in through the skin or
inhaled and can be poisonous
too. Even leather shoes and
gloves do not offer full protec-
tion, so stay away from areas
that have been sprayed for at
least an hour.
Wear protective clothing
when using any spray products.
If pesticides are splashed onto
the skin, rinse with soap and
running water. Wash your cloth-
ing after using chemicals too.
Tell your children that they
should ask a grown-up if they're
not sure if something is danger-
ous. Tell them to stay away
from things used to clean the


house, clothes, or car.
If you suspect someone has
been poisoned call the Poison
Help line right away at 1-800-
222-1222, to talk to a poison
expert. It does n't have to be an
"emergency" to call.
No matter where you are in
the U.S., the Poison Help line at
1-800-222-1222 will connect
you to your local poison control
center.
Poison centers are not just for
parents of young children. They
are for everyone who needs
advice, including adults and
health care providers.
Nurses, pharmacists, doctors


some simple tips to help you
clean safely:
Keep household cleaning
products and other chemicals in
the containers they came in, and
always store them away from
food and out of the reach of
children.
Read and follow directions
for use and disposal of cleaning
products, and never mix chemi-
cals, including household
cleaners, or detergents.
Turn on fans and open win-
dows when using chemicals or
household- cleaners. Don't sniff
containers to see what is inside.
When spraying chemicals,
direct the nozzle away from
people and pets.
Bug and weed killers can


SNACK ATTACK


COURTESY PHOTO
This kindergarten class at
Zolfo Springs Elementary
School celebrated author
Kevin Henkes on Friday,
May 20. The class enjoyed
punch and snacks in-
spired by the stories read
during the week. Snacks
included Chrysanthe-
mum's Parcheesi Nips,
Chester & Wilson's Never-
Better Peanut Butter
Cookies, Wimberley's
Don't Cry Over Spilled
Punch, and Lilly's Perfect
Cake.


The Way Your Community Is Built

Could Be Affecting Your Family's Weight


Take a look around your city
and neighborhood. Are there
sidewalks? Where is the closest
grocery store? Can you get
there, or anywhere, without a
car?
Does your hometown or
neighborhood make it easy for
you and your children to be
active in your daily lives? In
countless communities across
the nation, the answer is no.
And with one in every three
children considered overweight
or obese-a figure that has more
than doubled in the last 30
years-the need to change this
situation is great.
Research shows that the way
our communities are construct-
ed contributes to weight gain in
our society. Known as the "built
environment," it includes the
way everything from your
home, your neighborhood and
your community to roads, trav-
el and work space are laid out.
Experts say built environ-
ments don't just affect physical
activity-they also affect the


foods we choose and the time
we spend inside (likely in front
of a television or computer
screen), both major influencers
of weight.
For example, many commu-
nities don't have grocery stores,
which can mean reduced access
to fresh and nutritious foods. In
many places, convenience
stores and corner markets offer-
ing packaged, processed snack
foods are the only choices
available.
Some neighborhoods do not
have safe playgrounds or side-
walks, so children are forced to
spend their free time indoors.
Sitting instead of moving
makes it much harder to main-
tain a healthy weight.
So what can you do to change
this?
Start by making a list of the
improvements you could make
in your.community, and then
get together with your neigh-
bors and local leaders to discuss
how you can make those ideas a
reality.


Many communities have started
by improving access to and
maintenance of local parks;
requesting safe and usable bike
paths and sidewalks; asking for
healthier meals and more phys-
ical activity at school; and
exploring how to address a lack
of nutritious food options and
grocery stores.
For other tips on how to live
a healthier lifestyle, go to th'e,'"
We Can! (Ways to Enhance'
Children's Activity and
Nutrition)(r) website: http://-
wecan.nhlbi.nih.gov. We Can!
is a science-based program de-
veloped by the National Insti-
tutes of Health to provide tools
and strategies for parents, care-
givers and entire communities'
to help children-and whole fam-
ilies-maintain a healthy weight.
So open your eyes to the possi-
bilities of how even small steps-
establishing a communitywide
walk-to-school program, for
example-can make a big differ-
ence in your family's and your
community's health.


and other experts specially
trained in poisoning answer the
phone 24 hours a day, 365 days
a year. The call is free and con-
fidential, and you can get help
in 161 languages. Services are
also available for the hearing
impaired. Post the number by
your home phone and program
it into your cell phone for quick.
access.
Keep these tips in mind as
you start your spring cleaning.
If you would like to learn more
about the Poison Help line at 1-
800-222-1222, visit the Poison
Help Web site at www.Poison-
Help.hrsa.gov or www.Poison-
HelpEspanol.hrsa. gov.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255
IW


," r- -






12A The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011

It's Official... Chevy Has The #1 Selling
Cars, Trucks, And SUV's In America
The First Two Months Of 2011!!!
...-,--8. i __


2011 CHEVY SILVERADO HD
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Na s^


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or $3,000 cash back

2011 CHEVY EQUINOX


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Best SUV in America
-USA Today


2011 CHEVY MALIBU


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2011 CHEVY CRUZE


2011 CHEVY SILVERADO CREW CAB
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2011 CHEVY SILVERADO EXT. CAB
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2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE


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2011 CHEVY CAMARO


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ARCADIAUHIHA17ARD
CHEVROLET...


STARTING AT 424,585


~II











PAGE ONE


Wildcats Whip Yellow Jackets


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcat football
team capped off a successful
spring by traveling to Bartow
and beating the Yellow Jackets
41-14 on Friday night.
Hardee players outnumbered
Bartow by almost two to one
and the Wildcat faithful showed
up in full force to cheer them
on.
Bartow got the ball to start
the game and the Wildcat de-
fense stood strong giving up
one first down before forcing a
punt.
Hardee's offense took over.
Rising senior Andrew Hooks
got to work, moving the 'Cats
down the field on a pair of runs
going for 13 yards and 30 yards.
Quarterback Colby Baker
capped off the scoring drive
after dropping back to pass and
then deciding to scramble
around the right end untouched
for a 21-yard touchdown.
The Octavio Alvarez point-
after-touchdown (PAT) kick
was wide left.
The defense rose to the occa-
sion again on Bartow's next
possession as JuJuan Hooks
intercepted an errant pass and
returned it to the Yellow Jacket
25-yard line.
On the next play, soon-to-be
sophomore Keyon Brown burst
through the middle for a touch-
down.
The Alvarez PAT was good.
Bartow was forced to a quick
three and out on its next posses-


sion and Hardee got the ball
back.
Hardee's offense had trouble
moving the ball and Garrett
Albritton was called in for a 32-
yard punt.
Bartow threatened to score
but the Wildcat defense forced a
turnover on downs after Bartow
went for it on fourth down deep
in Hardee territory.
Freshman quarterback Kris
Johnson dropped back to pass
and was sacked and fumbled
the ball in the end zone which
Bartow recovered for a touch-
down, putting the Jackets down
13-7 with three minutes to go in
the second quarter. Neither
team scored again before the
half.
The second half didn't start
out well as Baker couldn't han-
dle the snap and fumbled the
ball which Bartow picked up
and returned for a short touch-
down. The PAT put Hardee
down 14-13.
Bartow's lead didn't last
long, however. Three plays later
Andrew Hooks made a would-
be tackler miss and raced 69
yards for the score. Alvarez'
PAT made it 20-14.
Bartow was held to another
three and out and Hardee took
over at its 4-yard line after a 51-
yard punt by the Yellow
Jackets.
Hardee mounted a lengthy
drive but had to settle for a 37-
yard Albritton punt.
Bartow kept the ball the rest
of the quarter and into the


fourth before turning it over on
downs again at the Hardee 26-
yard line.
Baker started the drive with a
16-yard run and Hooks ended it
on the next play with a 58-yard
burst through the middle for the
score. Alvarez came on for the
PAT and the Cats led 27-14.
Bartow again couldn't move
the ball against the Wildcats'
defense as Uvaldo Sanchez
leaped up and knocked down a
third down pass attempt to force
another punt.
Three plays after getting the
ball back, Baker ran around the
right end untouched for a 30-
yard touchdown. The Alvarez
PAT pushed Hardee's lead to
34-14 with 7:53 left in the
game.
Bartow took over and once
again had a hard time moving
the ball against the Wildcats.
James Greene got a strong
rush from his defensive end
post and clobbered the quarter-.
back as he threw, causing the
ball to fall into the hands of a
waiting Justin Knight who
picked off the pass and returned
it 25 yards to the Bartow 24.
Five plays later Vince Grims-
ley cashed it in with a 7-yard
rumble up the middle for the
last touchdown of the evening.
Alvarez added the PAT to make
the final score of 41-14.
The Wildcats now head into a
long summer of weightlifting
and training before the Kick-
Off Classic in Lake Placid on
Aug, 26.


FOOD DRIVE


PHOTO BY TRAYCE DANIELS
Local post offices sponsored a food drive on Saturday, May 14, collecting food for the
needy from their postal customers. Wauchula collected around 4,000 pounds, Bowling
Green got 1,000, and Zolfo Springs and Ona each collected 800 pounds. All the food
collected went to the Hardee Help Center for distribution. Pictured here (from left) are
Penny Smith and Judith George, executive director of the Hardee Help Center.


Black-And-White TV Was


Sought-After Technology


By LESSE MORENO
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Charlotte Ann Stanford.
Q: When is your birthdate?
A: Oct. 14, 1942.
Q:
Where were *
you born?
A: I was .
born in
Wauchula.
Q: How would you describe your
childhood?
A: I was very close with my family;
we always did everything together.
Q: What was the "popular" stuff
back then?
A: The black-and-white television; it
seemed that everyone wanted one.
Q: How would you compare your
era to today's era?
A: In my era we were taught to be
respectful. Today's era teens have no
respect for adults. They also have more
freedom than back'then.
Q: What have you seen that sur-
prises you?
A: The freedom that teens have
these days. We never had that much
freedom in my time.
Q: How was school for you?
A: I always enjoyed school. I went
to Wauchula Elementary for grades 1-7.
Junior high was eighth only, and high
school was for 9-12. I loved English
and history.
Q: Where have you lived?
A: I have lived in Lakeland for 36
years, but I moved back to Wauchula.
Q: Was it difficult growing up?
A: No, it was not difficult; my father
provided us with only the things we
needed.
Q: Where did your parents work?
A: My father worked for the city of
Wauchula for 26 years; my mother was
a homemaker.
Q: What would you do on a
Saturday night?
A: We would get ready for Sunday
School. We would do grocery shopping
during the day.
Q: Did you have any hard situa-
tions growing up?


A: No, my father and mother were
always together. My father would
sometimes work two jobs, so we could
have gifts on Christmas.
Q: What kind of music did you lis-
ten to?
A: I loved to hear the radio. I would
listen to gospel, country, and children's
programs. I would listen to Big John
and Sparky.
Q: Would you say that money last-
ed longer back then? Why?
A: Yes, because we had to make sure
we used our money wisely; we never
wasted money. On an average, we
would spend about $40 per week on
food.
Q: Where would your family go
when they wanted to spend time
together?
A: We would visit our grandparents,
but all our family lived here locally.
Q: If you could go back in time,
would you change your life?
A: No, my life has been very rich; I
have enjoyed everything it had to offer
me.
Q: Where have you worked?
A: I have worked in Davis &
Roberts Insurance for seven years. I
worked there so I could pay to go to
college. I enrolled in Southeastern
University, where I got a four-year
degree as a teacher. There were not a
lot of job openings for teachers, but my
college offered me a job as a registrar,
where I worked for 32 years.
Q: Did you like your job(s)? Why?
A: Yes, I loved my job. I got to
interact with college people, giving
them academic guidance for what class-
es to choose.
Q: What are some things life has
taught you?
A: We need to consider others more
than self. My father always taught me
to complete and chase all my life goals.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


The large canvases Jackson Pollock used for his Abstract Expressionist action paint-
ings were usually laid flat on the floor while he painted. Pollock was a chain smoker
and would frequently paint with a cigarette hanging from his lips. This led to the Incor-
poration of cigarette ashes into the surface of some of his works.


YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published In
this newspaper In "Poet's Place." a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you. not someone else. To appear in-this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.



ROBBY ELIOTT invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at

|R EENWOO
CHEVROLET Oldernobles _


ATTENTION PARENTS
OF
2011 HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL
Cj I SENIORS g







ADS START AS LOW AS '30
DEADLINE THURSDAY, JUNE 2

The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL 773-3255


FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD

2011 SUMMER

SCHEDULE
JUNE 5 THRU SEPTEMBER 25


9:00A.M.

SUNDAY SCHOOL
COFFEE & DONUTS AVAILABLE FOR
YOUR ENJOYMENT AT 8:45A.M.


10:00A.M.

WORSHIP SERVICE

** REGULAR SERVICE SCHEDULE WILL
RESUME SUNDAY OCTOBER 2, 2011


-. I
...- ,. .


bi rst
1 Asmmbuof God


1397 S. FLORIDA AVE.
WAUCHULA
(863) 773-9386


FLORIDASFIRSTASSEMBLY.COM


6I


8:2C I


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, June 2, 2011


205 N.Charleston FortMeade
1-800-673-9512 *
www.directchevy.com -


I I-- _-ll---r --


I .. .....-I ...- ..... .. . ..


9ma~u~sr~s~3~s~ 31


in-


IC~Q~L










2B The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011





-Hardee


CANCER REPORT


Living


PIONEER PARK DAYS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Denise Benavides, executive director of the Hardee/Highlands Unit of the American
Cancer Society, was guest speaker on Wednesday, March 23, at the Hardee Rotary
Club at Java Cafe. She encouraged Hardee County residents ages 30 to 65 to sign up
for the upcoming Cancer Prevention-3 Study. The annual Relay For Life fundraiser was
held April 30-May1. From left are Denise Benavides, Sheila Johns who is chairman of
the Cancer Prevention Study-3, and Joe Jones.


CANCER SOCIETY REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Sandy Scott, curator of Cracker Trail Museum at Pioneer Park in Zolfo Springs, recent-
ly spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club at the Panda Restaurant about the history of
Pioneer Park days. The annual event, held the first weekend of March, started in 1968
and now has over 489 flea market spaces, along with 25 food venders, free entertain-
ment, and old agricultural equipment. The Hardee County Commission took over the
event in 1988. Admission was free until 1994, when the price was set at one dollar.
Admission was raised to $2 in 1997 which is the same today. A five-day pass is $5.
Attendance in 2010 was estimated at 40,000. From left are Rev. Kenny Baker, Matt
Warren of Hardee Ranch Supply, Sandy Scott and Charles Cannon.


SOWERS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Denise Benavides, executive director~,ffthe Hardee/Highlands Unit of the American
Cancer Society, recently spoke"to thfWauchula Kiwanis Club. The annual Relay For
Life was held in Wauchula April 30-May 1. Volunteers age 30 to 65 are needed for a
Cancer Prevention Study-3 set to begin in 2013. The study will last 20 to 30 years. From
left are club president Thomas Trevino; Sheila Johns, nurse manager at Florida
Hospital Wauchula; Denise Benavides; and Linda Adler, Florida Hospital Wauchula
administrator.


Basey
Carl Basey
Graduates From
Baptist College
Carl Basey has received a
bachelor of arts degree in pas-
toral ministry from The Baptist
College of Florida in Grace-
ville.
College President Thomas A.
Kinchen bestowed degrees on
graduating seniors during com-
mencement exercises held Fri-
day, May 13.
Basey is a 2008 graduate of
Hardee Senior High School and
is a member of First Baptist
Church of Wauchula.
Following graduation. he
plans to go to India on a mis-
sion trip for a month and then
continue his education at
Southwestern Baptist Theolog-
ical Seminary.
Basey is the son of Steve and
Ann Basey of Wauchula. He is
the grandson of Lawrence
Whidden of Wauchula and Carl
and Gladys Basey of Lakeland.
The Baptist College of Flor-
ida is an agency of the Florida
Baptist Convention and is
accredited by the Commission
on Colleges of the Southern
Association 'of Colleges &
Schools to offer certificates and
associate, baccalaureate and
graduate degrees in the areas of
ministry, biblical studies, lead-
ership and Christian counsel-
ing. missions. Christian educa-
tion. elementary education,
English, history and social stud-
ies, business leadership, music,
contemporary worship ministry,
Christian studies, and music
education.


There will be a revival to-
night (Thursday) and Friday at
Higher Ground International
Ministry, 1258 W. Main,St.,
Wauchula, beginning at 7:30
each night. Hear prophetess and
pastor Lillie Jones of NewBirth
Deliverance Ministry in Lake-
land and apostle and pastor
Addie Battle as featured speak-
ers.

There will be gospel singing
with Crimson Flow this Sat-
urday at 7 p.m. at Victory Praise
Center 132 E. Main St.,
Bowling Green. Finger snacks
will be served following the
service.
Northside Baptist Church,
912 N. Eighth Ave., Wauchula,
invites the public to a day of
worship and music on Sunday,
with Warren Elliot at the 11
a.m. service and Tony Stockton
in concert at the 6 p.m. service.

Union Baptist Church, 5076
Lily Church Road, Ona, will be
celebrating homecoming this
Sunday, with special music by
The Advocates beginning at 10
a.m. followed by guest speaker
Ricky Dyal at 11. Dinner on the
grounds will follow.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.



HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


The hardest tumble a man
can make is to fall over his
own bluff.
-Ambrose Bierce

A lie has speed, but truth
has endurance.
-Edgar J. Mohn


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Paul Clark of Troy, Mich. spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on March 29 at the Panda
Restaurant about SOWERS, which stand for Servants On Wheels Every Ready. This is a
501-C3 ministry in which Christian members with RVs provide services to other
Christian ministries such as construction, painting and renovation. A group recently
came to Wauchula to help Pioneer Village of Sherry White Ministries. This is one of 22
Florida SOWERS projects and 182 nationwide. A SOWERS team stays at a location from
three weeks to 60 days. Men work six hours a day and women four hours a day. About
650 retried couples participate in SOWERS, based in Lirindale, Texas. Clark and his wife
Gerda are 76. He is a retired middle manager for General Motors. Pioneer Village is
located on 25 acres on Alton Carlton Road and has Seven Baskets Farm. Sherry White
Ministries has Lydia's House for women and three thrift stores in Wauchula. Pioneer
Village helps men. From left are Mark White, Gerda Clark, Paul Clark, and club presi-
dent Thomas Trevino.


&











June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


STATE ATTORNEY SPEAKS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Autumn Blum, group vice president and founder of Organix South, spoke to the
Wauchula Kiwanis Club recently. She opened the business in 1997 in Pinellas County
and moved to Hardee County Commerce Park in 2007. Sales the first year were
$15,000, then jumping to $34,000, $70,000, $150,000, $320,000, $650,000, $900,000,
$1.3 million, and $2.4 million in 2008. She graduated from Riverview High School in
Sarasota and earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry at Eckerd College in St.
Petersburg. The company sells natural health products, herbal supplements and ther-
apeutic skin care, based on neem oil from neem trees in India, Bahamas and Hawaii.
In December 2009 she sold her company to Nutraceutical Corporation. The Wauchula
branch has 20 employees. Some 85 percent of sales are in the U.S. and 15 percent
international. Most products are sold in health stores, with 8 percent through the
Internet. "I started with a $2,000 loan and a credit card with a $5,000 limit." From left
are Donnie Canary, Michael Kelly, Autumn Blum and club president Thomas Trevino.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Jerry Hill, state attorney for the 10th Judicial Circuit which includes Hardee, Polk, and
Highlands counties, spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, May 17, at the
Panda Restaurant Hill was the circuit's public defender from 1981 to 1984 and State
attorney since 1985. He had opposition in the elections in 1980 and 1984 but none
since then. Hill plans to run for re-election in 2012. He and his wife Sharmon have four
children. His office has 85 lawyers, Including 72 in Polk, 10 in Highlands, and 3 in
Hardee. Four of the assistant state attorneys in Polk are assigned to the approximate-
ly 50 pending first degree murder cases. Four are assigned to child sex abuse cases,
two to major economic crime cases, five to juvenile cases, and two to vice cases. State
employees have not received a raise in the last five years. Hill said State Sen. J.D.
Alexander and State Rep. Denise Grimsley did an excellent job as leaders of the new
state budget. Hill's office starts attorneys at a base salary of $40,000 a year. He inter-
views eight to 10 applicants for each attorney job. A new attorney has an average col-
lege debt of $100,000 to $150,000 and has to agree to a three-year job commitment.
Hill has been a property owner in Hardee for 25 years and has an 80-acre recreation
parcel in southwestern Hardee. From left are Wauchula Police Chief Bill Beattie,
Hardee Judge Jeff McKibben, Jerry Hill and Col. Claude Harris of the Hardee Sheriff's
Department.


1,888 INMATES


REPORT ON SCHOOLS




I),


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Hardee Superintendent of Schools David Durastanti on Tuesday, May 3, spoke to the
Wauchula Kiwanis Club at the Panda Restaurant, saying state revenues for Hardee
schools has declined $12.2 million since 2008. Hardee has a little over 5,000 students
in K-12. He said Florida ranks No. 47 in the U.S. in state funding per child, No. 46 in
teacher salaries but No. 5 in school achievement. The state in 2011 may reduce per
student funding by $500 to $540. Hardee schools have cut staff by 50 in recent years,
with administration cut by 40 percent. Public employees now must pay three percent
into the state retirement fund. State funding will be cut eight percent this year, but
Hardee has built up some budget reserves. He said the FCAT makes it very difficult for
some Hardee students to graduate from high school. Durastanti said he grew up in
Missis-sippi. From left are Sam Fite, David Durastanti and club president Thomas
Trevino.


Freedom to Choose
From the beginning of time,
God created a love so divine.
But in that love He let us choose,
To be faithful to His glory or choose to change the story.
You see, Adam and Eve were created in the perfect form,
But their free will given by God led to a deadly storm.
God is not a God who forces on e to do what's right.
That's the power of His Mercy, His Love, His Might.
Just as Eve chose to eat from the forbidden tree,
It all had to happen to save a wretch like me.
God wanted a perfect world and a perfect place.
But He gave humanity the choice to be saved by His grace.
God is forever present. He is knocking at your door.
You see the evidence around you. What are you waiting for?
Why can't you see past your own selfish ways?
He's waiting so patiently Only He knows the number of days.
For, you see, a day is coming when Jesus will return.
He'll take His children with Him and send the others to bum.
Don't wait until that final hour has appeared.
You'll be devastated when your loved ones have disappeared.
Those who deny Him will be left behind.
To a world led by the Antichrist, whose love is not divine.
The power of humanity has always been in the choice.
To whom will you serve? Who will hear your voice?
You only have Plan Heaven or Plan Hell.
There's not much time left, which story will you tell?
-Amy Bryan
Wauchula

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


I


Warren Elli
Former Past
Northside Baptist


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
David Lawrence, warden at Hardee Correctional Institution on Hwy. 62 west of Fort
Green, spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, May 5, at the Panda
Restaurant. HCI has 1,600 inmates and 288 inmates at the adjacent,work camp. HCI
opened in 1991, is located on 225 acres and is a close management prison. HCI has a
staff of 393, with 20 vacancies, and also supervises 120 female inmates in Manatee
County. HCI has 15 community work squads of 5 to 10 inmates who perform 75,000
work hours a year for various area projects. From 50 to 55 percent of prison employ-
ees live in Hardee County. About 75 percent of the $22 million budget goes for salaries.
Inmates can watch programs on donated 19-inch televisions. Food costs are $1.81 a
day per inmate, or 61 cents per meal. One-third of the inmates are serving life sen-
tences. Salaries start at $31,000 with benefits raising the total to $55,000. HCI is in
Region 4 and is scheduled to be privatized by January 2012. Most employees will keep
their jobs but benefits will be reduced. From left are Scott Hall, club president Thomas
Trevino, David Lawrence and Ken Hunt.


ADAYOOSHPAN


SUNDAY, JUNE 5


MORNING SERVICE

11:00am
WARREN ELLIOT
SGuest Speaker


EVENING SERVICE
6:00pm
-J TONY STOCKTONTo
ot, C Ton
r In Concert


Church


ny Stockton
Musician


A love offering will be taken.


Northside Baptist Church
912 N. 8th Avenue Wauchula


soc6:2c


~I
-- -.


f5~J










4B The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011

ROTARY DRAWING WINNERS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Rotary Club held a drawing Wednesday, May 4, for three pieces of jewelry
from Heartland Gold. Raffle tickets were sold for $10 each or three for $20. Rev.
Wendell Smith drew the winning tickets from a bin of over 800. Julie Watson won a
necklace for first place, Jim Kelly won a pair of earrings for second place, and Joan
Gutierrez won a ring for third place. From left are Vanessa Hernandez, Wes Roe, club
president Sue Birge, Wendell Smith, Rev. Harold Davis and Jim Kelly. The club meets
at Wednesday noon at Java Cafe, and the May 4 attendance was 32.


POLITICAL, CORPORATE FRAUD


COMEDY ACT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Lafour (L.T) Lafferty spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, May 18, at the
Java Cafe about political and corporate corruption in Florida. He heads the White
Collar Crime, Government Investigations and Regulatory Compliance Practice at the
Tamp law firm of Fowler White Boggs. He criticized leadership funds established by the
Florida Legislature and recommends tougher ethics laws to protect Florida taxpayers
and citizens. Troy Brant won $747 in the Rotary Queen of Hearts Contest. From left are
Rev. Harold Davis, L. T Lafferty, club president Sue Birge and Troy Brant.


MUSICAL LEADERS


COURTESY PHOTO
The Wednesday Musicale of Wauchula has new leaders for 2011-13. The 45-member
organization, a part of the national and state Federation of Music Clubs, provides youth
music scholarships and monthly programs to help promote music and music appreci-
ation in Hardee County. Past President Dot Bell installed officers at the May meeting,
which featured four Hardee High School seniors vying for the annual club scholarship.
Pictured above (from left) are President Judye Mercer, Vice President Bess Stallings,
Secretary Jill Southwell (immediate past president) and Treasurer Claudette Kemen.
They will meet throughout the summer to make plans for the 2011-12 club year which
begins in the fall. For more information on the club and its activities, call its president
at 767-6045 or vice president at 773-3594.


ISRAEL TALK


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Rev. Eric Sutton, associate pastor of Lone Oak Baptist Church in Plant City, spoke to
the Hardee Rotary Club recently about his three trips to Israel. From left are Lavon
Cobb, Melanie Carnley, Brenda Sutton, and Eric Sutton.


SOWERS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
B.J. Odom, whose radio and stage name is Bubba James, performed some magic
tricks Tuesday, April 12, for the Wauchula Kiwanis Club at the Panda Restaurant. He
hqstsj~_g morning show from 6 to 10 at Radio Station 106.9 : a called The Bull. He
plans to join a comedy tour soon. From left are club president Thomas Trevino, Bubba
James, Jake Crews, and Rev. Kenny Baker. James lives in Fort Myers.


LYDIA'S HOUSE THRIFT STORE


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Bill and Sandy Ellis of White Lake, Wise., in March did painting work at Pioneer Village
on Alton Carlton Road west of Wauchula. The village and Seven Baskets Farms are
operated by Sherry White Ministries. The couple are members of SOWERS, a national
Christian group of retirees who own RVs and perform charitable work projects through
the U.S. SOWERS stands for Servants On Wheels Ever Ready and is located at 14771
County Road 424, Lindale, Tex. 75771. Volunteers are welcome. The phone number is
903-882-8070.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Furniture and home furnishings are sold at the Lydia's House Thrift Store at 102 Car/ton
Street in Wauchula. Lydia's House also operates a thrift store that sells clothing at 912
Hwy. 17 South and rummage sale/dropoff site at the old Amoco station at 132 Hwy. 17
South in Wauchula. From left are Charlotte Abbott of Leverett, Mass., Rev. Sherry Whitd,
and Gerda Clark of Troy, Mich.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255










June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


CARNIVAL CRAZE


COUNTY COURT
There were no new mar-
riage licenses recorded.
The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Jose Zamarripa, default judg-
ment.,
Capital One Bank vs. Jamie
K. Steele, voluntary dismissal.
There was no misdemeanor
court report available by
press deadline, which was
-earlier due to the Memorial
Day holiday.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Daniel Burs et
al, petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
Barlow Family Partnership et
al vs. John "Bubba" Barlow et
al, petition to clarify partner-
.ship.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust as trustee vs. Joseph W.
Bryant Jr., petition for mortgage
foreclosure.
Ginger L. Gallegos and
Roberto Gallegos, divorce.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Debra Brandon
Collie et al, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Orlando Ramos vs. state
Department of Corrections,
petition to review inmate situa-
tion.
Ariel Lopez and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Erasmo Lopez Jr., petition
for administrative child support
order.
Areca Cotton and George
Cotton vs. State Farm Mutual
Automobile Insurance, dam-
ages/auto negligence.
Pine Cone Holding Co. vs.
Dimitru Grosu and Constanta
Grosu, contracts and indebted-
ness.
The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Rosio Olivarez and DOR vs.


Angel Olivarez, order on modi-
fication of child support.
Monalisa Gonzalez and DOR
vs. Javier Delarosa, child sup-
port order.
Catherine E. Williams and
DOR vs. Edward Francis Paige,
child support order.
Kandyce Waynette Cunning-
ham Coble and DOR vs. Ronnie
Rivers Jr., modification of child
support.
Florida Fertilizer Co. Inc. vs.
Jose Garcia, judgment.
Donald E. Woods and
Lizanna Elaine Taylor Woods,
divorce.
Diane Romero Rivera and
Jose Angel Rivera Jr., divorce.
Mary Helen Rodriguez Silva
and Francisco Silva, divorce.
Dixie Lee Rivers Lee and
Charlie Lee III, divorce.
John Walker Gibney and
Cathe Swinehart Gibney, di-
vorce.
There was no felony crimi-
nal court report available by
press deadline, which was
earlier due to the Memorial
Day holiday.
The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Octaviano Jr. and Oralia D.
Flores to D&D Land Co. LLC,
$10,000.
Cynthia L. Phelps to Gary
Delatorre, $25,000.
Amy S. Crews as trustee to
3N Groves LO, $265,000.
Gene C. Gilbert and Linda D.
Gilbert to Ralph E. Arnold,
Kathleen B. Arnold and Laura
K. Hollister, $25,000.
Nathan J. Bee and Candace
Bee to Central Mobile Homes
Inc., $20,000.
Waterfall Victoria Reo
Transfer I LLC to Marilyn K.
Peterson, $60,000.

Any party which takes
credit for the rain must not
be surprised if its oppo-
nents blame it for the
drought.


Blushing
virtue.


-Dwight Morrow
is the color of
-Diogenes


courthouse Rport-
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ : 1^^^^^


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
May 23-27. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.
ISSUED
Jon Earhart, Riverside Drive,
replace doors and windows,
$2,300.
Alert Plumbing Service of
Arcadia, North Florida Avenue,
plumbing, $1,800.
Douglas Battey, River Lane,
air conditioning, $6,500.
James Peery, Downing
Circle, install mobile home,
$75,000.
Peter Cafaro, West Palmetto
Street, new windows, $4,100.
Jack Hall, South l1th
Avenue, add screen room,
$1,950.
John J. Laborda, South
Eighth Avenue, replace win-
dows/doors, $2,300.
BUILDING BLOCKS
The building code is the min-
imum which should be done; it
is like getting a C- in school. A
permit is a license to build,
whether replacement or new
construction. If the terms of the
agreement stated in the permit
application are not met, action
may be taken to suspend or
revoke the permit. Provisions
state that work must be done
exactly according to the ap-
proved construction documents;
any deviation requires approval
from the building official.
When the builder signs the
building permit application, the
builder is committing himself
or herself to follow its terms.
The man who thinks he can
live without others is mis-
taken; the one who thinks
others can't live without
him is even more deluded.
-Hasidic Saying


MEETING


NOTICE


THE HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
invites the Public to the


SUSTAINABLE HARDEE: VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE





LAND USE MEETING


TUESDAY JUNE 7, 2011


* 6:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.


COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM

412 W. Orange St., Rm. 102, Courthouse Annex, 1st floor, Wauchula

Please come share your thoughts and ideas of what is needed in your community
All meetings are open to the public


For More Information
Call The County Planning Department at

863-767-1964

Email
kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net

Visit
www.hardeecounty.net/visioning


THERE MAY BE ONE OR MORE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS IN ATTENDANCE

WHO MAY OR MAY NOT ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN THE DISCUSSION

6 2c


COURTESY PHOTO
Zolfo Springs Elementary School's recent Spring Carnival was a huge hit! The theme
for the event was "Under the Sea," with games and prizes to match. Community mem-
bers, parents and students had a blast eating great food and winning wonderful door
prizes. The varied activities offered all sorts of fun, challenges and entertainment all
right on the school campus!


II I


t,4 i


. . ?' *











6B The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011





-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
*DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAiOL

Buy Herel l1 No n'Dereso -
PaY Here! rn.a -[re C I






TIESBet ir Soe n ow! "Is


I New Tires

i Free Mount


Include

& Balan


Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires

BIG SALE ON
ALL TI IES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart) ,
"VISA L c62c TBill Ayers
M :I1-'" I -A E cl6:2c Tire Technicia


ce
V


Classifieds-


8N FORD TRACTOR w/bucket,
S$2,000, 781-0277. 6:2c
DIESEL INJECT .. repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


'04 RANGER EXT. Cab, V6,
Automatic, $5,000 cash, 781-
1062. 6:2c
1986 GMC S-15, 4 cylinder, 4-
speed, $1,200, 336-984-7205.
6:2p
CASH NOW! Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc

F- 5 -.

LOVE TO CLEAN? We need you.
Florida Fertilizer is looking for a
self-motivated person to sweep,
mop and clean our facility. We are
a drug-free workplace. 6:2tfc


BARBER City Barber Shop. A
family barber shop. Call Debra or
Shannon, 863-773-6988. 6:2p


HOUSE FOR SALE. Must see. 4/2
2800 sq/ft, central A/C, corner lot,
large rooms, Indoor laundry, big
front porch, 1,000 sq/ft master
suite w/jacuzzi tub and walk-In
closet, $92,500. 201 N. 8th Ave.
832-0957. 6:2-30p
3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. $167,000.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p


HOMEMADE 4 X 6 Trailer, new
lights, 14" tires, 1" side rails,
$200, 336-984-7205. 6:2p
IBANEZ Five-string Banjo. Also
Yamaha Flat-Top Guitar with elec-
tric pickup, 773-3123. 6:2,9p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver, diamonds. Do not sell to
hotel buyers. They buy for melt
value. Do not send scrap gold in
the mail. You get stung. Buying
and selling 40 years. Capt. Ed
904-222-4607. 1:6tfc


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning


Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs


(863) 735-1495


F yus ti l


'FOUR WAUCHULA CEMETERY
plots, $2,200, 813-784-6742 or
813-704-3201, Herb Wilson.
5:12-6:9p


FREE PUPS 5 months old with
shots. Great yard dogs, wonder-
ful with children. 239-425-7209
ask for Joe. 6.2nc
ATTENTION! State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh


AKC-RBI GERMAN SHEPARD 8
weeks, shots and health certifi-
cate, $350, 863-781-0277. 6:2c


FRESH BLACKEYED PEAS $25
unshelled bushel, $35 shelled
bushel, south Sebring, 863-235-
0271. 5:26;6:2p


4BR/2BA AND 3BR/2BA two story
duplex for sale, good location In
Zolfo Springs. Call 863-781-4529
for Information. 4:28tfc
U--

4BR/2BA, central A/C, large lot,
Bowling Green, $750 monthly
plus deposit, 407-929-6491.
6:2,9c
APT & HOUSES for Rent, 773-
6667. 6:2c


SARASOTA PREMIER PROPERTIS, INC.
SUE BIRGE/REALTOR

863-781-3536




-Ill"
-r


Check out this beautiful
4BR/3BA Home on
TORRY OAKS GOLF COURSE!
7TH Fairway, Gated Community,
manicured lawn, lots of upgrades,
office, French doors lead you to
screened-in lanai plus patio
overlooking golf course.
Priced to Sell $213,900.
Call Sue Birge for appointment.
863-781-3536
cl6:2i


*JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.iimseerealty.com


L James V. See, Jr., Broker *
A Little Bit Country! Three Bedroom Two Bath
Home on Over Two Acres. Great Area for Horses
or Other Animals or Just Enjoy the Serenity and
Calm of This Popular Part of the County!
$169,500
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $98,500!
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED TO $205,000!
UNDER CONTRACT! Great 5 acre tract fenced
and ready to build on! $20,000


S Ben Gibson
1 Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


James V. See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Ben Gibson


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


6:2c
c16:2c


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.

[I1 1- ;T


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LISTING!! Vacant canal lot on Lakeside
Drive In Sebrinq. Canal to Orange Blossom
Lake, includes 19 x 20 metal building with
bathroom. $15.900.
PRICE REDUCTION!! $72.900!! Possible
owner financing!! 5.3 Acre tract zoned F-R,
with a 52 x 101 ft. slab ready for building.
Pond in back of property.
NEW LISTING!! Quiet Family Home!! 3 Bd, 2
Bath Brick home, outside of city limits, on a
no traffic road with large oaks, outbuilding
and alarm system. $175.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road. Has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multifamily-Single Family Homes.
$75.000
ONE OWNER HOME!! 3 Bedroom/ 2 Bath
home well maintained, could be used for
office, across from County Courthouse,
Extra lot including with price. $110.000
PRICED TO SELL!! $65,000!! 2BR/2Bth
House with extra lot, central heat/air, One car
garage, with door opener, many extras. Call
Nancy for more information.
RIVERVIEW!! Residential lot. Priced (@
$11.900
RETIRED!! AVION PALMS RESORT!! M/H
LOT Priced (a $30.000
AVION PALMS RESORT!! 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Mobile Home and Lot. $75.000
NEW LISTING!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home in
Bowling Green, Nice corner lot with total sq
ft. 1,292. Priced ( $38,000


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


MUST SEE TO BELIEVE!! If your family
enjoys the outdoors, you must see this
unique listing that brings outdoor living to
you. Features 6 outbuildings includes 2,000
SF. Barn w/23ft ceilings, work Shop, storm
room, outdoor kitchen w/stainless steel fix-
tures, fire pit, potting shed, large gazebo
overlooks pond-well stocked w/fish,
includes aerator, outbuildings w/pens and
fenced. Also 14 x 60 MH sealed in rough cut
pine, front and back porches. Trees and
maintained lawn MUCH MORE, Call Nancy
for Appt. Priced ( $175.000
ZOLFO SPRINGS!! WAS! $38.000 -
NOW!!-$34.500!! 2 BR, 2 Bath-Mobile
home in Good condition, w/ central heat and
air, partially furnished, 10X23. screened
porch, 2 car carport, all with insulated roofs,
2 outdoor sheds for workroom and storage,
all sitting on a 100 x 110 size lot. NICE AREA
and must see to appreciate. Call Nancy -
863-832-0370.
Love The Country? Look No Morell 4
Bedroom, 2 Bath Double Wide Mobile Home
located on 4.81 acres. ONLY$110.000.
ONLY $75,000 Charming two story home
with 5 Bd, 1.5 Baths Includes original claw
foot bath tub and glass door knobs for
antique lovers. Wood floors throughout
Many extras and walking distance to main
street.
THE BLUFFS!! Retirement Community! 1
Bedroom, 2 Bath M/H including lot. Call
today for more Information. $53.000
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties. ci6:2c


ROBBY & SHERRY ALBRITOQN
LABOR SERVICES E& SOLUTIONS






(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
robbie @ strato.net


Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


I


Nice lot in Torrey community with frontage on
Hole Number 6 of Torrey Oaks Golf Course. Lot
$14,900. Owner will build to suit for just
$159,900!
PRICE REDUCED! Beautiful home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. Was
$475,000.....Now $379,000!
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $229,000


I


---9


I

















The


ONE BEDROOM apartment $150
weekly, utilities included, Bowling
Green, no pets, 863-712-1126.
6:2-9p
2BR/1BA, central A/C, large lot,
Wauchula Hills, $575 monthly
plus deposit, 407-929-6491.
6:2,9c
2 APARTMENTS. 1 bedroom, 1
bath each, furnished. Nice area N.
Hwy. 17. 863-245-3321.
5:19-6:16p
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


OFFICE SPACE for rent. Great
location, $450 plus deposit, 863-
832-1984. 5:26-6:23p


CHRISTIAN LADY available for
home care for senior citizens,
personal assistant, companion
care. Call 863-245-0062. 6:2-30p


VICKER'S LAWN CARE. Free esti-
mates. No job to big/small. 863-
448-7491. 3:31-6:1 p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.


* Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
ci:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


S. *A Charles N. Flesher II, Inc
U0 W TILE & FLOORING SPECIALIST
SIS TILE LAMINATE
7 'ffWOOD ENGINEERED WOOD
Bathtubs Showers Backsplashes & More
When a product is installed with care and know-how, you'll receive
a service that I am willing to stake my name on! Charley i
FREE ESTIMATES
863-781-2867 7 1i BUMBY LANE, WAUCHULA





* SPRING SERVICE SPECIALS *
SALL Riding Mowers (including commercial) *
* $35 plus parts
Walk Behind Mowers $10 plus parts
2-cle oil $25-case 12-8oz. bottles


S[FAST Er FRIENDLY SERVICE
- 22 Years of Experience Locally Owned & Operated

S773-4400 =
829 Bostick Rd. Bowling Green
J J Rad Runs beside TT,,rrc Oak Golf Course cl6:2c
*********************






Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St. .,
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
John D. Freeman
www.floresrealty.net (863) 781-4084

Special of the Week


1/ -
Downing Place 3BR/2BA MH on Downing Circle Close
to hospital, shopping and dining No through traffic.
Offered at $49,000
Wauchula 3BR/IBA CB home on a large corner lot 1494 sq ft
living. Priced at $75,000
Wauchula 3BR/2BA CB home with 1211 sq ft living Central air
& heat Corner lot Asking $129,000
10 Acres and Home 3BR/1BA CB home on 10 +/- acres Central
air & heat 6ft chain-link fencing around the house. Priced at
$125,000
Ask us about the HUD Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are an authorized agent!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! -
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
NoeyA.Flores (863)781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863)245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl6:2c


June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


Classifieds


THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number, tfc-dh



GOOD, DEPENDABLE, honest,
local man looking for good job.
Please call Tom 863-448-2245.
6:2p
WANTED SMALL Hot water
heater like in RVs, good running,
reasonable, must run on 120v or
LP gas, 773-9487. 5:26;6:2p


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. 'We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc


HANNA'S HELPERS THRIFT
Store. Check us out and see what
items we have: blinds, lights, cof-
fee table, ceiling fans, couches,
cabinet doors, ladies pants 500,
and much more. 111 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula. Open M-F, 9-4,
Sat, 9-1. 5:12-6:2c
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY.
Small kitchen appliances, chop
saw with stand, printer and com-
puter, garden tools, lighthouse
collection, pictures, books, plants
of all kinds, chairs, lamps, tapes,
electric fans, clothes, shoes and
lots of misc. 1928 South Florida
Ave., Wauchula. 6:2p
2 FAMILY, Friday, Saturday, 5017
Willow Ave., B.G.. White bunnies
$15 each, new glass sinks and
vanities $50, misc. 6:2p
MOVING-LET'S DEAL! 1052
Magnolia Lane, Wauchula,
Saturday 8-2. Furniture, toys,
books and more. 6:2p
BIG YARD SALE. Friday, Saturday,
306 Southerland, Wauchula. 6:2p
SATURDAY, 7-?, 539 Terrell Road,
Wauchula. Lots of new quality
fabric, by the yard'or bolt, misc.
6:2p

With lies you may get
ahead in the world-but
you can never go back.
-Russian Proverb


FA


3024 STEVE RD., ZOLFO $160,000
20 Acres of fenced, prime pasture land, double-wide
2 bedroom, 2 bath home with screened front porch and huge
bonus room, 2 stall horse barn, storage shed, pond and creek.
Call 813-967-2568 c15:26-6:16p



Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
O Monday Friday
S9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
o(1. Equal Opportunit. Employer & Provider 6:2-30c


- -

L ia's Htwse T r "P store

o\ ,Furniture Home Decor Crystal NO,.
bv? China Quality Merchandise p0,



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
(Directly Behind Heaven Sent)
and



9/eaven ent Cleaning ceroice
Now offered by Sherry White Ministries
Carports Garages Homes Lawns
mmercia l& Idntal -]i llfr EI tima-


773-0523 *


245-1184


STHE PALMS i

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through June 30th
*Plus $1200 REE RENT*
(*One year lease 100/mo reduction)

*. Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
1 (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 c
i-.-1 Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c6;2-30


A dog, I have always said,
is prose; a cat is a poem.
-Jean Burden

The cat is the only animal
without visible means of
support who still manages
to find a living in the city.
-Carl van Vechten


IDESOTO COUNTY:


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech
IN S ERVI CEI Phone (863) 781-9720
s.gugleaguglescomouterservices.com www.GualesComouterServices.com





/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg.#MV-40625
"No job's too big."


I Yor! IHle lual


Mii-g
18 am 6 pn


1 N. Hwy


17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
S. 773-4478
*



I Free Estimates

insured 30+ years experience cl


SOUTHERN AUCTION COMPANY
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY NIGHTS AT THE AUCTION
1489 HWY 17 N. WAUCHULA, FL.
ACROSS FROM WALMART
COME JOIN US AS WE START
GENERAL MERCHANDISE AUCTION
EVERY WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY NIGHT-
PREVIEW AT 5:00 PM AND AUCTION AT 6:30 PM
AUCTIONS START MAY 4, 2011
WE WILL HAVE DRY GOODS, DRINKS, FROZEN FOODS AND MUCH MORE
TERMS OF AUCTION
CASH OR CHECKS 10% BUYERS PREMIUM
IF SALES TAX EXEMPT CURRENT COPY REQUIRED
PHOTO ID REQUIRED
CONSIGNMENTS ARE BEING ACCEPTED
JAMES HILL, AUCTIONEER
License #s AB2730 AU3820
FOR MORE INFO
JAMES 863-227-7598 WILLIAM 863-328-0022



F s
*

JO @ 1. @&918


I N C.,


Sandy Larrison
(863) 832-0130


REALTORS


REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil hunt,
relax! $90,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 38.5 ac on
the Peace River w/lots of beauti-
ful oaks, pines and palmettos!
Pole barn & 2BR/2BA MH.
$499,500!
10 acs w/deeded access to
Peace River, well & septic, lots
of mature trees. $130,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Pack your
overnight bags & head to this
peaceful retreat! 5 ac fenced
w/lots of oaks, pond, creek,
12'x20' shed. $59,000!
PRICE REDUCED! High &
dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$110,000!
2BR/1.5BA in Charlie Creek
Estates on large corner lot, 2
sheds, screened porch. Priced to
sell at $28,500!


Imagine your new home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Fenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
Ideal for farming! 21.86 ac
pasture is fenced, has well, close
to town. $186,500!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
farmland w/well, pump, fencing
on private road. NOW $65,000!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 333 ac
ranch has pasture, irrigation
system, 12" well, 3BR/3BA two-
story home, 3,000 ft landing
strip. $1,165,500!
34 ac fenced pastureland on
private, graded rd in Zolfo
Springs, Two wells, Greenbelt
qualified. $238,000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AF E HOURS
KENNY SANDERS-781-0153 SANDY LARRISON- 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL --. 781-7633 MONICA REAS-,- 71..7
DAVID ROYA 781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 ct6.2c


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


5 r OP


OWNER FINANCING'
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565


,e I


-I


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510


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8B The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011


HARDER CAR COMPANY













Wauchula
(acoa from First Nation- l Bank)
Monday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm
773-6667 Wauchula Hills
(Comer of Hwy 17 .nd REA Rd.)
Friday & Saturday
Billy Hill 10 am to 7:30 pm Ruby
Owner 773-2011





~IND
S YOUR ^TO
S' REAL ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
"^Y 3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
SSebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties


Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
MOTIVATED SELLER-BRING OFFERS! PRICE REDUCED to
$189,999. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.

5 acres with 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage home, fenced yard, large
oaks, peaceful setting in east Hardee county. $139,900.
Call Jeri Wohl @ 381-8595.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net


STAY SAFE ON THE ROADWAYS
Getting into a car accident can lead to several unwanted con-
sequences, including broken bones or permanent injuries like hear-
ing and vision loss. and may even result in death.
Not all crashes can be avoided, but the majority can be. Here
are a few of the most common:
Distracted Driving Distracted drivers are the top causes
of car accidents in the United States today. A distracted driver is a
motorist who diverts his attention from the road. usually to talk on
a cell phone, send a text message or eat food.
Speeding Many drivers ignore the speed limit and drive
10. 20 and sometimes 30 mph over the limit. Speed kills, and trav-
eling above the speed limit is an easy way to cause a car crash.
The faster you drive the slower your reaction time will be if you
need to prevent an auto accident.
Drunk Driving When you drink you lose the ability to
focus and function properly. and it's very dangerous to operate any
vehicle. Driving under the influence of alcohol causes car accidents
every day, even though it is something that can be prevented and
avoided.
Rain When the weather gets bad, so do the roads..Car
wrecks happen very often in the rain because water creates slick
and dangerous surfaces. Rain can cause automobiles to skid or
spin out of control while braking.
Running a Red Light When you're driving your car, red
means stop and not doing so may lead to a car accident. To avoid a
collision, look both ways for oncoming cars as you approach a
green light. While at a red light, once you get a green light, wait
a few seconds and look both ways to ensure traffic is slowing or
stopped before proceeding.
Stop at Stop Signs Stop signs should never be ignored,
but when they are, serious car accidents are often a result. You
should always look both ways when proceeding at a stop sign.
Fog Fog is the most common weather occurrence. Driv-
ing is a skill that requires the ability to see, but fog makes it ex-
tremely difficult to see sometimes more than a car length in front
of you. Remember, other drivers can't see you, either. Avoid car
accidents by using your headlights.
With all these things in mind, most individuals don't feel they
will ever be involved in a traffic accident. Many say, "I'm a good
driver" and "I'm a safe driver." The problem with this statement is
for every safe or good driver, there's also one bad driver.
One major safety component needs to be mentioned in our
look at crashes, seat belts!
The fact of the matter is seat belts save lives. A seat belt is your
'key to surviving when those accidents do occur. Seat belts also
include car seats and booster seats for those little joys in our lives,
who depend on you to keep them safe.
The national Click It or Ticket enforcement campaign contin-
ues through Sunday. Day and night, law enforcement officers will
be out enforcing the seat belt law, but it shouldn't be about a cam-
paign or slogan it should be about life. Live it, love it, and enjoy
your summer safely.
w i


MONDAY FRIDAY
Breakfast and Lunch:
Manager's Special


1_ H nin0 / sh 0g F rc st, ."


Wauchula Watch
By Ofc. Amy Drake
Wauchula Police Department


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS


In 1798, Eli Whitney
secured a U.S. government
contract for $134,000 to
produce 10,000 army mus-
kets.


6/2/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: S:1S PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 47 nuns.
Moon Data
Rie: 7:02 AM
Set: 9:16 PM
Overhead: 2:10 PM
Underfoot: 1:43 AM
Moon Phase
I %
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1:43 AM 3:43 AM
2:10 PM -4:10 PM
Minor Times
7:02 AM 8:02 AM
9:16 PM 10.16 I'M
Prediction
Best++++
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/3/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:18 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 47 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:59 AM
Set: 10:06 PM
Overhead: 3:05 PM
Underfoot: 2:37 AM
Moon Phase
3%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:37 AM 4:37 AM
3:05 PM 5:05 PM
.Minor Times
7:59 AM 8:59 AM
10:06 PM-l1:06 PM
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/4/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set. 8:19 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 48 mins.
Moon Data
Rise S:58 AM
Set: 10:53 PM
Overhead: 3:58 PM
Underloot: 3:32 AM
Moon Phase
8%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
3:32 AM 5:32 AM
3.58 PM 5:58 PM
Minor Times
8:58 AM Q:58 AM
10.53 PM-11:53 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/5/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:19 PM

Day Length
13 hrs. 48 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:59 AM
Set: 11:36 PM
Overhead: 4:51 PM
Underfoot: 4:25 AM
Moon Phase
15%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
4:25 AM 6:25 AM
4:51 PM 6:51 PM
Minor Times.
9:59 AM -10:59 AM
11:36 PM-12:36 AM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/6/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set. 8:20 PM

Day Length
13 hrs. 49 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:01 AM
Set: --:--
Overhead: 5:42 PM
Underfoot: 5:17 AM
Moon Phase
24%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
5:17 AM 7:17 AM
5:42 PM 7:42 PM
Minor Times
:-- -1 IN
11:01 AM-12.01 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/7/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:20 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 49 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:02 PM
Set: 12:15 AM
Overhead: 6:32 PM
Underfoot: 6:07 AM
Moon Phase
34%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
6:07 AM 8:07 AM
6:32 PM 8:32 PM
Minor Times
12:15 AM -1:15 AM
12:02 PM 1:02 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/8/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:21 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 50 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:04 PM
Set: 12:53 AM
Overhead: 7:21 PM
Underfoot: 6:56 AM
Moon Phase
50%
First Quarter
Major Times
6:56 AM 8:56 AM
7:21 PM -9:21 PM
Minor Times
12:53 AM -1:53 AM
1:04 PM 2:04 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/9/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:21 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 50 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:06 PM
Set: 1:30 AM
Overhead: 8:11 PM
Underfoot: 7:46 AM
Moon Phase
57%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
7:46 AM 9:46 AM
8:11 PM 10:11 PM
Minor Times
1:30 AM 2:30 AM
2:06 PM 3:06 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


MONDAY FRIDAY
Breakfast and Lunch:
Manager's Special


What kills a skunk is the
publicity it gives itself.
-Abraham Lincoln


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1998 Ford F-250 Maroon
VIN: 1FTHX25G2JKA78558
10:00 A.M., June 15, 2011 a
HILL'S TOWING, INC. S
4205 US HWY 17 N.
BOWLING GREEN, FL 33834


JUNIOR HIGH

MONDAY FRIDAY
Breakfast and Lunch:
Manager's Special

SENIOR HIGH


















of Fun Lanes has held on throughout the
strife, commenting that "Hardee County
has been very supportive during our
years here."
With the time and effort the Barwicks
have put into Bowl of Fun Lanes, there
are future plans for retirement, but until
the right buyer comes along, a definite
plan cannot be had.
"We have spent our lives loving bowl-
ing, and want to make sure we find
someone with the same love for the sport


I- b II-I -.. -
PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Owners Larry, Jean and Dwayne Barwick have spent the past 38 years offering recre-
ation and sport to Hardee Countians.

BEDROCK BUSINESS

A strike Is Good At This Wauchula Business!


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Strike! Throw the ball again, a split,
followed by a gutter ball.
Bowling has made its name and fame
in the community at Bowl of Fun Lanes
for the past 38 years.
Owners Larry and Jean Barwick got
into the sport because of their son's love
of the game. Dwayne was asked to bowl
on a team when he was 7 years old and
continued on through college and profes-
sionally, until he was involved in an
accident which prevented him from com-
peting. Since then, he has worked at the
bowling alley as well.
Born and raised in Hardee County,
Larry is the son of Lee and Essie
Barwick and a 1957 graduate of Hardee
Senior High School. Jean is from
Alabama and moved to Miami in 1954.
Eventually the two met and married,
later visiting Hardee County once again
for vacation.
"We came back to Wauchula on vaca-
tion and saw that the bowling alley was
for sale," says Jean Barwick. "We had no


intentions of buying when we were visit-
ing. With Dwayne's involvement and our
love for it, we decided to buy and moved
back to Wauchula. We took over Novem-
ber 1972."
Beginning the business with eight
lanes and a grill, the bowling alley has
since grown to 12 lanes and a pub pro-
viding an eatery, karaoke and a meeting
place for local businesses, clubs and
reunions.
Throughout the years, many different
customers and families have become
regular visitors to the lanes. Kids and
adults have all found fun, camaraderie,
comfort and challenge in the sport and
other activities offered.
"I love teaching the youth the tech-
nique and precision of bowling," says
Jean Barwick. "I have people come in
who I taught, and I see them teaching
their children as well.
"We have gone through three genera-
tions in the county, teaching and spread-
ing the love of bowling," she notes.
Throughout times of struggle, with
the economic status of the county, Bowl


that we have to take over the place," the
family agrees.
Located on U.S. 17 South in
Wauchula, Bowl of Fun Lanes is open
Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m.
until midnight.

Bedrock Business is a new feature high-
lighting those stalwarts of the business
community who have dedicated their
lives to filling the needs of Hardee
County residents.


Tracksters Receive Awards


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
More than two dozen athletes
who participated in the 2011
Track and Field season were
applauded on Thursday even-
ing.
The awards banquet in the
high school auditorium, was
well attended and began with a
slide show of pictures through-
out the season, said boys head
coach Rob Beatty. Girls head
coach Rod Smith and assistants
James Carpenter and Gloria
Solis took turns in handing out
awards.
The girls Most Valuable Athl-
etic Award went to senior Ash-
ley Louis, who-led the girls in
high achievement and most
points scored for the season.
The boys Most Valuable Ath-
lete award went to senior Carl
Brown and freshman Brandon
Beatty. Brown placed fifth in
the high hurdles at regionals,
missing state by less than one-
tenth of a second. Beatty was
boys high scorer for the season,
taking first place in the 1,600 or
3,200 multiple times and run-
ning the anchor leg in the 4x800
in a new record of 8:57.48.
Coaches appreciation awards
went to senior Yesenia Vargas
and soph Febe Murillo, both of
whom endured through injuries
to make a significant contribu-


tor to their team's success.
Senior Angelo Parkinson and
junior Reimundo Garcia shared
appreciation awards to recog-
nize their leadership and work
ethic.
The Most Improved awards
went to freshman Angela Her-
ron and junior Agustine An-
celmo.
Freshman Merislene Cimeus
was named the girls rookie of
the year, while freshmen Adson
Delhomme and Lucius Everett
shared the boys rookie award.
There were also special
awards in several categories.
Seniors Vargas and Parkinson
had the highest grade point
averages to claim the Aca-
demics Awards.
Sprint coach Carpenter pre-
sented sprint awards to soph
Adna Metayer and junior Max-
on Delhomme.
Coach Solis presented out the
throwers awards to senior Var-
gas and junior Dillon Skitka.
On the jump events, present-
ed by coaches Smith and Beat-
ty, it was senior Louis and jun-
ior Ancelmo claiming them.
For the hurdles, it was senior
Louis on the girls side of the
ledger and Brown on the boys
side.
Each coach named a Team
Spirit Award winner; for the
girls senior Mylekia Stevenson


and soph Janet Lopez; for the
boys seniors Kareem Richard-
son and Parkinson and junior
Garcia.
The final special awards was
for distance, which went to
soph Murillo and frosh Beatty:
Participation letters or certifi-
cates were also presented.
Seniors receiving them were
Louis Stevenson and Vargas for
the girls and Brown, Sean
Holmes, Johnathan Jones,
Parkinson and Richardson.
Representing the junior class
were Jessica Hunt for the girls
and Ancelmo, Jorge Conejo,
Maxon Delhomme, Tony Gal-
van, Reimundo Garcia, Rito
Lopez, Luis Mata, Skitka and
Julian Varela.
Sophs included Andrea Cast-
anon, Janet Lopez, Adna Met-
ayer and Murillo for the girls
and Octavio Alvarez, Anthony
Burks, Dorian Meijo-Flores and
Andrew Reyna for the boys.
There was a large freshman
group. Cimeus, Herron and
Dieunide "Dee Dee" Metayer
were the girls, with Beatty,
Kevin Borjas, Adrian Briones,
Adson Delhomme, Marco Ehr-
enkaufer, Everett, Morgan Gar-
cia, James Greene and Fillistin
Louis-Michel were on the boys
squad.


.rI I Ior 11


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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 5789-80)

Thursday, June 2, 2011


I













2C The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011





-Schedule of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
Sby.
The .Ierald-Advocate
Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ...............1..0:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...... ............ 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
IIwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ...................:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Ilwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. lIwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ..... ..................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
)iscipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CIIURCII
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............I 11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHIIURCII
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .........1..... 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

IOLY CHILD
SPANISII CATIIOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ..................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIIURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evenin Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
('omnmunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAll BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School .. ................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship ...........1.......1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast.................. 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... I1:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ......... ......... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club.:.............................7:00 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday PrayerTime........ 7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11 00 a.m.
Evening Worship :..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service .................. 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.............7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIURCII
322 Hanchey Rd.
'" 863-781-1624
hardee.celebratiothorg
Sunday Morning Service ....I 1:0 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Grorups
Adult Cell Group ..............7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE.CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ I:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ...........................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday ......................... 7:30 p.m.

Will Dulke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.....:........I 1.30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Mfeni s Leadership & Training Class. -
'2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
S' artin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:0C a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............... 11..........I I:00 a.m.


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.. .11:00 am.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ......................... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ............................... 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion .........................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Manes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..:..'.7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ............... 10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1.... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry...................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
Worship ................... ......... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10:45 a.m .
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............:.............. 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service .................. 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade ...........6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
TIE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ............ ... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ...............:.. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.m .
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ...............7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126 .
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 api.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..............7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts..................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School ...............9:30 a.m.
W orship................. ............. 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner .............:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult CI.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min. ...............7:00 p.m.

IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 am.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M arnes ............................... 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ................................. ..7:30 p.m .
Domingo.............................. 0:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos .............................. 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ...................10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ............1..... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service .... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m.


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW M ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3" Sun.
Communion .................. 10:00 a.m.
2" & 41' Sun.
Divine Worship......... ...... 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ...........:........1..... 1: 15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .... ......... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................... 6:00 p.m
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


SSunday ................................ 9:00 a.m
Holy D ays ....... ....... ..........

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATIOLIC CIIURCII
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) .... 500 p m.
(Spanish) ..... 7 30 p.m
Sunday (Spanish) ............. 7:00 a.i
(English) .................8:30 a.m .
(Spanish) .................. 11:00 a.m.
(Creole)................... I:00 p in
Daily Mass in English .......... 830 a.in


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ............ ........:30 a n.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTIISIDE BAPTIST CIURCII
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .................. ...9:45 a m.
Morning Worship ............ . 11:00 am.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship ..................2:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship, ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church...............................1.. .0:00 a.m .
Youth Service .......................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday'Prayer......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

'ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CIIURCII
Gardner
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak IHills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ............... ........ 10:00 a.m.

SCREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ........... .......... 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ...............1... 1:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ...................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ :00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426_0ak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ................... 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship .............................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening.................................. :00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ............... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & FTH. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street,
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ...............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo...........11:00 a.m.
........................................ 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ................... 1:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................II a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service .............. 7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................ 11:30 a.m.

:SPANISH.MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ......................... ...... 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club......................... :30 pm.
Scrvicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio.................................. 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.

5 p


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
i- .. c r -


Venus is the goddess of love and
beauty, and was worshiped by the
Romans.
In art she's shown as a beautiful
woman, and is usually naked or
slightly dressed.
Napoleon commissioned the
famous sculptor, Dannecker, todo
a statue of her. but he refused.
"Why?" asked the emperor.
'My chisel has done the Lord
Jesus Christ," said the Christian,
"and it can never be lowered to do
a Roman goddess."
God has blessed you with
talents and treasures. You owe
everything to Him. Never lower
yourself for godlessness.
The Bible says, "Whatever you
do, do it all for the glory of God."


I Scrprtues 5e.-'ec by -he rs.rEi,- BOde scey
SCcpigt P"11 KV -'e'-W 'lesias \ pS'Sr,. C FSr'I1S7 .;re.-:5.les e.'A ?y. >'<' r I


-Peace jioer rd6wers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


*-e










June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Keep Teens In The Game

By Getting Them Vaccinated


Some of the most common-
everyday activities of preteens
and teens may actually put them
at risk for serious infectious dis-
eases. Even healthy teens are at
risk for meningococcal disease
(including meningitis), influen-
za (or the "flu") and pertussis
(also known as whooping-k
cough). These are all potential-
ly life-threatening diseases that
can spread easily when teens
are in close contact; the good
news is that teens can help pro-
tect themselves through vacci-
nation.
John Kach knows this first-
hand. Now in his 20s, John was
a college basketball player
when he was diagnosed with
meningococcal meningitis, a
rare but serious infection. He
fought for his life for six weeks,
and doctors were forced to
amputate both his legs and all
his fingers.
"I knew there was a vaccine
to help protect me against
meningitis but didn't get it,"
said John. "I'm lucky to have
survived."
To help spread the word
about the importance of vacci-
nation, the National Basketball
Association (NBA) and the
Women's National Basketball
Association (WNBA) are col-
laborating with the Society for
Adolescent Health and Med-


icine and Sanoti Pasteur on
Vaccihs for Teens (vaccines-
forteens.net), a national cam-
paign to increase awareness
among parents and their teens
about the importance of immu-
nization against serious dis-
eases.
Vaccines for Teens urges par-
ents to help keep their teens and
preteens in the game by getting
them immunized against these
serious diseases:
Meningococcal Disease/
Meningococcal Meningitis: Al-
though rare, meningococcal
disease (including meningitis)
is a serious and life-threatening
infection that can lead to death
within-24 to 48 hours of first
symptoms. Up to one in five
survivors are left with long-
term disabilities including limb
amputations, brain damage and
hearing loss. The disease can be
spread by everyday activities,
like sharing drinking glasses,
water bottles and eating uten-
sils.
Influenza, or the "Flu"
Influenza is not the common
cold. It is a viral infection that
can lead to serious complica-
tions like pneumonia or even
death. Vaccination is safe and
effective and the best way to
help protect against influenza
and its complications. Im-


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3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
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Consultant


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CITY OF WAUCHULA .

ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE
2010-11:
TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS
TO THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN

CITY COMMISSION MEETING
MONDAY, JUNE 13, 2011, 6:00 PM

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, CITY COMMISSION, WILL HOLD
A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF
ORDINANCE 2010-11, TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS
TO THE WAUCHULA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BASED
ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE EVALUATION AND
APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR), IDENTIFIED BY ORDINANCE
TITLE AS FOLLOWS:
ORDINANCE 2010-11: AN ORDINANCE OF THE
CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR THE AMENDMENT OF TEXT AND MAPS OF
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, BASED ON THE CITY'S
EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT, SAID
AMENDMENT BEING KNOWN AS "AMENDMENT
10-02-CPA" (COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMEND-
MENT); PROVIDING FOR TRANSMISSION OF
THIS ORDINANCE TO THE FLORIDA DEPART-
MENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS FOR REVIEW
AND A FINDING OF COMPLIANCE; PROVIDING
FOR CODIFICATION; PROVIDING .FOR SEVER-
ABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; AND PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
THE ADOPTION PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD BY
THE CITY COMMISSION ON MONDAY JUNE 13, 2011
AT 6:00 PM, TO BE HELD IN THE COMMISSION CHAM-
BERS, OLD CITY HALL, 225 EAST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, 33873. ANY PERSONS WISHING
TO SPEAK ON THESE ORDINANCES MAY ATTEND THE
PUBLIC HEARING AND BE HEARD.
Copies of the proposed ordinance can be obtained from
the office of the Wauchula City Clerk at 126 South 7th
Avenue, Monday thru Friday between the hours of 8a.m -
4:30 pm. In compliance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA), anyone who needs a special
accommodation for this meeting should contact the City
Clerk at (863) 773-3131 at least 48 hours in advance of the
meeting, excluding Saturday and Sunday
Any person who desires to appeal a decision of the Board
will need a record of the proceedings and may need to
insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings be made
to include the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
6:2c


munization should begin as
soon as vaccine becomes avail-
able in your community in the
late summer or early fall. In
most seasons, influenza virus
activity peaks in February or
March, so vaccination through-
out the entire influenza season
is beneficial and recommended.
Pertussis, Commonly Called
"Whooping Cough": Whoop-
ing cough is more than just a
minor cough-it can last weeks
or months and can lead to
cracked ribs, pneumonia or
trips to the hospital. Teens and
adults can also spread whoop-
ing cough to younger children,
particularly infants, in which it
can become life threatening.
Help Keep Teens Protected
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC)
recommends the following vac-
cinations:
Influenza vaccination: ev-
ery year for everyone 6 months
of age and older
Meningococcal vaccina-
tion: recommended for preteens
and teens
Whooping cough vaccina-
tion: a single dose of tetanus,
diphtheria, and acellular pertus-
sis (Tdap) vaccine for adults
and adolescents, especially
those in close contact with a
baby.
"With teens in such close
contact in classrooms and on
school sports teams, these
infectious diseases can spread
easily from student to student,"
said Larry D'Angelo, M.D.,
M.P.H., president of the Society
for Adolescent Health and
Medicine. "Immunization is a
safe and effective way to help
teens stay protected, yet vacci-
nation rates remain low in this
population."
Consider getting your pre-
teens and teens vaccinated the
next time you're in the doctor's
office. There are many chances
during the year, including back-
to-school checkups, sports
physical, pre-adolescent health
care visits and sick visits for
minor illnesses.
Visit www.vaccinesforteens.-
net for more information.


It's Often A Long Journey For People With Lupus


Educating yourself about
lupus could help those who are
affected get treatment sooner.
For many. it's a long journey.
An estimated 1.5 million
Americans have a form of
lupus, a chronic, severe autoim-
mune disease for which there is
no cure. Every day. these
patients must deal with their
own immune systems turning
against their bodies. resulting in
health effects including heart
attacks, strokes, seizures, organ
failure and miscarriages.
Yet, while many people are
impacted by lupus. greater
awareness of the disease is
needed. Because symptoms
such as fatigue, skin rashes.
joint pain and hair loss mimic
other conditions and appear dif-
ferently in different people,
lupus is very difficult to diag-
nose.
Many people do not suspect
they have a potentially dis-
abling and life-threatening dis-
ease because lupus symptoms
tend to come and go, and differ-
ent symptoms may appear at
different times during the
course of the disease. Nine out
of 10 people with lupus are
female, and the disease devel-
ops most often between the
ages of 15 and 44. African-
American, Hispanic/Latino,
Asian and Native American
women are two to three times
more likely than Caucasian
women to develop lupus.
More than half of people with
lupus visit three or more doc-
tors to find a cure for their
symptoms, and experience
symptoms for four or more
years before finally being diag-
nosed.
That was the case for Karon
Beasley, who saw six different
types of doctors over four years
before visiting an allergist who
suspected that she had an
autoimmune disease.
"I was coming home from
working out one day when the
feeling of fatigue hit me. It was.
overwhelming-I'd feel tired and
short of breath just walking to
my mailbox," said Beasley, who
suffered through a variety of
misdiagnoses including anemia,
thyroid disorders and PMS
before it was determined that
she had lupus.


"I couldn't get answers and
went in circles. A dermatologist
saw a rash on my face that was
consistent with lupus, but told
me, 'Honey, that's just hor-
mones,' and prescribed me a
cream. I went to a neuropsychi-
atrist thinking my fatigue was
depression, because you start to
believe something is mentally
wrong with you," she said.
Beasley, who has now lived
with the disease for more than
12 years, encourages people
with lupus to be their own
advocate. Friends, family and
doctors should also be consider-
ate of what it is like to live with
lupus.
Beasley says, "Most people
with lupus at some point hear:
'But you don't look sick.' We
face the issue of dealing with an
invisible illness. You have to
know you don't feel well and
recognize that you need to talk
to another doctor and keep
going.
"Doctors' appointments can


be consuming unless you are
prepared and can communicate
what is going on with your
body. They only know what you
tell them, so write down every
symptom you have, even if you
think it is not related."
Beasley also advises patients
to get educated about their dis-
ease through trusted organiza-
tions like the Lupus Foundation
of America.
To educate yourself more on
lupus, visit www.lupus.org. To
find out if you may be at risk for
lupus, visit the Lupus Foun-
dation of America's symptom
checklist at www.lupus.org/-
body.



Consider the postage
stamp: Its usefulness con-
sists in the ability to stick
to one thing till it gets
there.
-Josh Billings


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how much you'll miss him, with the gift

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Engraving Now Available

k JUST IN TIME FOR GRADUATION

Saturday June11
BRILLANCE 1,0, DFSERV, sa.I9-


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Woe"










4C The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011


2011 FLORIDA STATE FAIR PHOTOS


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
The Gospel Jubilee from Hardee County sang at the Florida State Fair held in Tampa in
February.


I's -r--
r~~~~- -- n.^ ^^ -^
A

7 j


A donkey pulls sugar cane grinder at Cracker Country at the Florida State Fair in
February. The cane juice was then boiled and reduced to cane syrup, a common annu-
al event in Florida many years ago.
-41


Debbie and Doyle E. Carlton III of Wauchula stand by a picture of Mildred and Doyle E.
Carlton Jr. earlier this year at Cracker Country at the Florida State Fair. Mildred and
Doyle Carlton Jr. founded Cracker Country, a depiction of life in Florida 100 years ago.
I -1I


Doyle E. Carlton III and his wife Debbie stand by a picture at Cracker Country of his
grandfather Doyle E. Carlton, who served as governor of Florida during the Great
Depression era from 1929 to 1933. One of his first acts was to reduce the salary of gov-.
ernor.


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Dave holds a gator at the Kachunga Alligator Show at the 2011 Florida State Fair.


ATTENTION PARENTS
OF

2011 HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL

SENIORS



Ki ld t ewilsonbepublshinou







ADS START AS LOW AS 30

DEADLINE THURSDAY, JUNE 2


The Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


115 S. 7th Ave. *


Wauchula, FL 773-3255


ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships,
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par-
ents, siblings, children and
children's spouses and
grandchildren, and the num-
ber of great-grandchildren.
If there are no immediate
survivors, consideration of
other relationships may be
given.


This sand sculpture was at the 2011 Florida State Fair in Tampa in February.


~;\~----~----~-----~-'U


. I


''~
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.une 2. 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


Light One Candle
By Tony Rossi
\ v. The Christophers

THE 'REAL WORLD' OF MOTHERHOOD
Though Rachel Campos-Duffy began her career in the public
eyt on the MTV reality series "The Real World: San Francisco" in
1994, she admits the network and media in general have traveled
down a troublesome road during the intervening years.
"There is a war, especially on young girls," said the mother of
six during a recent interview. "There is a cultural pattern that is
basically removing girlhood and pushing these kids into adoles-
cence at a rapid rate."
Currently a stay-at-home mom and parenting blogger who
recently wrote the book "Stay Home, Stay Happy: 10 Secrets to
Loving At-Home Motherhood," Campos-Duffy doesn't believe in
isolating yourself from popular culture. In fact, she's a frequent
guest host on the ABC series "The View," where she freely voices
her Catholic pro-life beliefs.
She believes it's important for parents to be aware of what's
going on in popular culture for the sake of their kids.
Campos-Duffy admits it's an uphill battle that often requires
her to tell her children they can't watch a particular movie or TV
show even though other parents allow their kids to do so.
It helps if you "surround yourself with other families that share
your values" and have conversations about why certain things are
off limits, she said. For instance, she doesn't let her kids watch
"Hannah Montana," but used Miley Cyrus's public indiscretions as
a jumping off point to discuss issues like young girls being influ-
enced by a culture that tells them only their bodies are important.
Filtering popular culture isn't enough, though, because even-
tually kids will be confronted with it anyway. Dialogue, education
and faith-formation are, therefore, critical factors because they lay
the groundwork for when that happens.
Campos-Duffy explained, "If the foundation isn't there, if the
confidence in one's faith and one's family is not there, (the kids)
will sink. Often we'll see headlines and think 'I can't believe these
kids did this.' It's really important to have compassion because
these kids are not coming out of a vacuum. There is a culture and
a lack of family life and family values that is creating these situa-
tions. And I think they're screaming out to us that they want a fam-
ily life."
Giving their kids a solid family life is the primary mission of
Campos-Duffy and her husband, recently-elected Wisconsin
Congressman Sean Duffy. In order to pass on the faith to their kids,
the Duffys maintain a Catholic culture in their home and family
prayer is a regular nightly ritual.
Running a household with six children can get chaotic and
even overwhelming at times, so Campos-Duffy once lamented to a
priest during Confession that her prayer life was dismal.
The priest told her that her "very life as a mother is a prayer,"
which completely changed her perspective. "He said that every-
thing I did at home whether it was changing a diaper or wiping
a nose whatever it was that I was doing was a prayer to God."
Campos-Duffy concluded, "For a busy mom, I think it's un-
derstanding that prayer can be very short and immediate. Even
(when) ... we're running out the door, we just stop for a second.
There's a holy-water font right by the door and we bless ourselves
-and say 'Jesus, I trust in You.' And then, out the door. That can
make all the difference."
For a free copy of "Quality Family Moments," write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
mail@ christophers.org.


A BUSY RANCH RODEO WEEKEND DAY 1
The gas stations just loved us the weekend of April 2-3!
We all trucked on over to Fort Pierce (get the pun!) on
Saturday exactly 100 miles from my door to the contestant park-
ing lot of the St. Lucie County Fairgrounds 'or the first annual
St. Lucie Cattlemen's Genuine Ranch Rodeo, a new event in the
list of Florida Cattlemen's Association qualifiers.
This one was sponsored by the Adams Ranch, one of Florida's
oldest cattle ranches, and organized by Billy Adams of our own
Stevens Land & Cattle team. The arena at these fairgrounds bears
the name of Alto "Bud" Adams a name that needs no further
explanation to cattlemen so it was the perfect venue.
Some of the teams, including the ones that Luke Cantu and
Corey Fussell ride on, had gone to the Brevard County ranch rodeo
that day, but Audubon Ranches, Carlton Ranches and Stevens (this
time riding under the name of Adams Cutting Horses phew, I
can't keep up with all these name variations!) competed for the win
against 12 other teams.
The events were saddle bronc riding, double muggin', sorting,
trailer loading, and wild-cow decorating. (At the last minute, wild-


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHYANN GREGG
Dennis Carlton holds the steer's head while Andy
Morgan grabs its back legs and Pat Thomas runs in to
assist. Audubon Ranch completed the double muggin'
event in 52.81 seconds.


Charles Robert Stevens II heads steer No. 9 down the
alley into the trailer, with Bobby Joe Fulford right behind
him. Adams Cutting Horses brought in a time of 57.78
seconds in the trailer-loading event.


cow milking was changed to decorating, due to a question about
the FCA's rules about the number of teams that must compete
simultaneously, so the change was made rather than risk a disqual-
ification of the winner for the finals.)
Adams Cutting Horses and Audubon Ranch rode in the first
round (the slack, as it's called), and Carlton Ranches rode in the
second round (the performance).
The saddle bronc event was scored differently than usual, so
the scores were low, with Dennis Carlton of Audubon at 48, and
Brad Gibson of Stevens/Adams at 49.
My favorites were Josh Moore (a friend of mine) on his first
ride (his teammates had bet that he wouldn't make it 20 feet out of
the chute!) at 46, and Matt Carlton (forgive me, Matt!) for the 10
he received on his flying dismount, saddle and all (unfortunately,
before the horn sounded).
Stevens/Adams completed the double muggin' in 44.06 sec-
onds, Audubon in 52.81 seconds, and Carlton received a no-time.
The Audubon team consisted of Chass Bronson and her fiance,
Dennis Carlton Jr., Pat Thomas, Andy Morgan and Slade Bronson.
(Neither Jay Belflower nor Josh McKibben made this one.)
The sorting event was fun to watch, as this was a large herd.
Stevens/Adams got two out, but then one crossed back into the
herd, so it was a no-time. Carlton posted a 1:1.22 time, while
Audubon took 1:36.94.
The trailer loading came next, with Carlton Ranches complet-
ing it in 42.94 seconds, Stevens/Adams in 57.78 seconds, and
Audubon in 1:12.66. After the steer and horses are loaded, the team
has to run across a line before their time stops. This line was only
a short distance, so all those short-legged cowboys could make it
easily! The Carlton team consisted of Matt Carlton, Trae Adams,
Dale Carlton, Clint Boney and Jessica Landa.
The wild cows that were used in the wild-cow decorating
event looked like Texas longhorns they were beautiful, but big.
Stevens/Adams managed a 52.22-second time, Audubon a 1:13.25,
and Carlton received a no-time.
Overall, Adams Cutting Horses placed second, consisting of
Charles Robert Stevens III, Bobby Jo Fulford, Brad Gibson and
Billy Adams and his daughter, Sage. Audubon Ranch placed third.
Both of these teams have already won an event, and will be in
the Finals.
Note to Billy: If this event is the "Genuine Ranch Rodeo,"
what does that make all the others?
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate





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6C The Herald-Advocate, June 2, 2011


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
Postmaster Jerald Farr ad-
vised yesterday that bonus
money for Hardee County vet-
erans would be received on
June 15. The post office depart-
ment is prepared to give veter-
ans a quick return on cashing
their bonds as quickly as possi-
ble. Of the $22 million to be
distributed in Florida, Hardee
County's share is $154,500.

Kimbrell's Bowling Alley
will open this morning in its
location next to the All-
American Store on East Main
Street. Several played games on
its two alleys last night. L.V.
Douglas will manage it and
James Kimbrell, owner of
Kimbrell's Recreation Parlor, is
also owner of this building.
Ladies will be able to play the
game at any time free of charge.

James Farley, postmaster
general of the United States,


will address the men and
women who participated in the
World War over the National
Broadcasting Station as he
explains the adjutant service
bonds to be received. C.T.
Ratliff reminds servicemen that
he has several real estate bar-
gains from $400 to $1,000 for
buying a home or farm with the
bonus bonds.

50 YEARS AGO
It will be a milestone record
as 128 boys and girls will
receive their diplomas from
Hardee County High School at
the annual commencement ex-
ercises at the Wauchula city au-
ditorium. Graduation speakers
will be seniors Gail McCaleb,
Patricia Best and Kathy
Blanton, chosen by a faculty
committee for their poise,
speaking ability and ability to
prepare a speech.

The Wauchula City Council
in a special meeting Monday
night passed a resolution to
increase the tax roll from three
to four times effective with the
1961 roll. This is being done in
preparation for refunding of the
city's bond issue. The resolu-


For the week ended May 26, 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 6,700 head,
compared to 5,485 last week, and 6,834 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to
2.00 lower, feeder steers and heifers were 2.00 to 4.00 lower.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:



Slaughter Cows: Lean:
62.00-71.00


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 155.00-185.00
300-400 lbs 140.00-180.00
400-500 Ibs 123.00-165.00

Medium & Large Frame No.,1-2
200-300 lbs 130.00-160.00
300-400 lbs 117.00-140.00
400-500 lbs 111.00-133.00

750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent


Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs
85.00-95.00


I


wayBacrWhe


Swim Sessions. .^ .-
2 3


June 13 23
9-10
10-11
11-12
S5:15p 6:15p


June 27 July 8
9-10
10-11
11-12
5:15p 6:15p


July 11 21
9-10
10-11
S11-12
S5:15p 6:15p


L 44 6:2c


tion stipulates that the ad val-
orem tax millage be dropped in
direct proportion to the increase
in the roll.

Two Wildcats were named to
the 1961 All-Conference base-
ball team. Chosen for first team
were pitcher Lance Lanier and
center fielder Alonzo White-
head. Plant City was the cham-
pion, beating Hardee in two
straight games in the playoffs
ending May 19.

H.L. Chambers and Flora
Chambers have real estate spe-
cials this week: an attractive
5BR, 1.5B CB home on an
extra large lot for $9,500; a
5BR home with huge back and
front porches on three fenced
lots for $6,000; and an 8-room
furnished home with screened
front and back porches, electric
range and refrigerator, dining
and living room suites and bed-
room furniture for $6,850.

25 YEARS AGO
A 12-acre site within Wau-
chula city limits has been
selected for the proposed coun-
ty industrial park, according to
Industrial Development Au-
thority Chairman Joe L. Davis
Jr. Davis told county commis-
sioners on Thursday that the
Kervin Revell estate has tenta-
tively agreed to sell 12 acres
next to the Revell Crate Co. on
Pecan Ave.. (This is now the
location of Hardee County Fire-
Rescue and the Hardee County
Health Department.)

In an article on new building
official C.J. "Kach" Mroczka,
he is shown in a 1961 Wyllis
Jeep station wagon he had
owned since 1974. It originally
belonged to Judge "Cooter"
Maddox, then to C.C. Searcy,
then Lloyd Jarnigan. Kach
bought it from Jarnigan's
widow after he passed away.

Hardee Memorial Hospital
approved applications from two
new doctors last week. Car-
diologist Dr. Arthur C. Rosen-
blatt and orthopedic surgeon Dr.
Stan Zemankiewicz were ap-
proved for staff privileges at the
hospital. Both are relocating to
the community in coming
weeks.

Weiner's Department Store
offers men's socks, usually


$1.50, now 2 pairs for $1.50;
boys western boots 30 percent
off; and Buster Brown sports-
wear for infants and children
for 50 percent off.

10 YEARS AGO
Hardee County turned 144
obsolete, unusable or surplus
items into a heap of cash at its
recent auction. Commission
Chairman Nick Timmerman
and County Manager Gary
Oden are seen holding the sym-
bolic $45,633.06 check from
the disposal of chairs, office
equipment, computers, trucks
and tractors and many other
items.

A photo collage shows the
grand opening of the new
$476,000 animal refuge at
Pioneer Park. With Commis-
sion Chairman Nick Timmer-
man cutting the ribbon are com-
missioners Gordon Norris, Bill
Lambert, Milton Lanier and
Walter Olliff Jr., refuge manag-
er Carmen Soles and Park
Board members Diana You-
mans, Julie Watson, Jean
Burton, Patti Ragan, Roger
Haney and Frank Romeo.

S&S Suprex sales this week
include: a dozen medium eggs
for 55 cents; fresh Georgia
peaches, 99 cents a pound; bot-
tom round roast, $1.89 a pound;
or pork roast for $1.39 a-pound.


10 HOURS A
MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the Town Commission of Zolfo Springs, Florida will hold a
Public Hearing on Monday, June 20, 2011, 6:00 PM as the proposed Ordinance can be
heard. Following the Public Hearing, the second and final reading of Proposed
Ordinance 2011-05 describe below only by Title. It can be read in its entirety in the office
of the Town Clerk, Town Hall, Zolfo Springs, Florida during regular business, hours. All
interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance.

ORDINANCE 2011 05

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLQRIDA, RELATING
TO PAIN MANAGEMENT CLINICS; PROVIDING FOR AND IMPOSING AN
IMMEDIATE TEMPORARY MORATORIUM WITHIN THE JURISDICTIONAL
LIMITS OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA UNTIL NOVEMBER
30, 2011, ON THE FILING, PROCESSING OR ISSUANCE OF ANY AND ALL
PERMITS OR OTHER APPROVALS FOR ANY NEW PAIN MANAGEMENT
CLINICS WITHIN THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO
SPRINGS; ADOPTING AND PROVIDING FOR LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS;
PROVIDING DEFINITIONS; PROVIDING PENALTIES; PROVIDING FOR
CONFLICTS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.


Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is
made and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per
Florida Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts. Any person
with a disability requiring reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this meet-
ing should contact the Town Clerk's Office with their request at Telephone (863) 735-
0405, Fax (863) 735-1684.


Attest: June Albritton George Neel, Mayor
Town Clerk 6:2c


Learn to swim


Dear Parents:

Did you realize that drowning is the second leading cause of

accidental death to young children, and that over 7,000

drownings occur each year in the United States.

The Hardee County Community Recreation Center offers an

opportunity for your child to learn personal safety and water

survival skills in a closely supervised environment just in time

for summer vacation. Our program is totally committed to

teaching swimming skills to individuals from the age of

18 months to 16 years of age. We ensure the finest in aquatic

programming by maintaining a trained and qualified staff.

Class registration will be held at the Recreation Complex Pool

next to Hardee High School on the following dates and times.

* Be sure to sign up early to get the class and time you desire.

* Cost for each registration is $50.00.



REGISTRATION DATE


Saturday, June 4, 2010 from 1 pm to 4 pm


Note: Pool will be closed July 4th
Open swim begins Saturday, June 11 at 1:00 p.m.


Este cup6n le permit a veinte d6lares de cualquier regre
son archivado en, Nuestra oficina. Gracias por es un
_- client valorado. .- .


Fw FaI"W^ 3 -1 JFH ="^L" C),1


NEW MILITARY EXEMPTION
The Property Appraiser's Office is pleased to announce that
we are now accepting applications for Deployed Military Exemp-
tions.
Last November Florida voters approved Amendment 2, which
created an additional exemption for certain members of the armed
forces who were deployed on active duty outside the continental
United States. Legislators recently passed legislation establishing
the criteria for this additional military exemption. The bill has not
officially been signed by the governor, however this legislation is
expected to become law.
The criteria for qualifying for this additional exemption are as
follows:
The service member must have a Homestead Exemption;
The service member must have been deployed in one of the
following designated operations during the 2010 calendar year,
o Enduring Freedom
o Iraqi Freedom
o New Dawn;
The service member must provide proof of qualifying
deployment and the dates of service (DD214 or document verify-
ing deployment).
The property tax exemption will be equal to the percentage of
'time the service member was deployed in the prior calendar year.
For instance, if the service member was deployed for 150 days
in 2010, the additional exemption granted to the service member
would be 41 percent (150 + 365 days = .41). If the service mem-
ber's property taxes due for 2011 are $500, the additional exemp-
tion amount would be $205 and the tax bill would be reduced-to
$295.
According to the bill, applications for this exemption are due
by June 1, however the language of the law provides for addition-
al time to apply.
With a little assistance, we have identified two property own-
ers in Hardee County who will qualify for this additional exemp-
tion, but we need your help in identifying others who may qualify.
If you or someone you know was deployed in one of the operations
mentioned above last year, please contact our office at 773-2196.

Look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock, per-
haps a hundred times without as much as a crack show-
ing in it. Yet at the hundred-and-first blow it will split
in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but
all that had gone before.
-Jacob A. Riis


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June 2, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


It's Often A Long Journey

For People With Lupus


Educating yourself about
lupus could help those who are
affected get treatment sooner.
For many, it's a long journey.
An estimated 1.5 million
Americans have a form of
lupus, a chronic, severe autoim-
mune disease for which there is
no cure. Every day, these
patients must deal with their
own immune systems turning
against their bodies, resulting in
health effects including heart
attacks, strokes, seizures, organ
failure and miscarriages.
Yet, while many people are
impacted by lupus, greater
awareness of the disease is
needed.. Because symptoms
such as fatigue, skin rashes,
joint pain and hair loss mimic
other conditions and appear dif-
ferently in different people,
lupus is very difficult to diag-
nose.
Many people do not suspect
they have a potentially dis-
abling and life-threatening dis-
ease because lupus symptoms
tend to come and go, and differ-
ent symptoms may appear at
different times during the
course of the disease. Nine out
of 10 people with lupus are
female, and the disease devel-
ops most often between the
ages of 15 and 44. African-
American, Hispanic/Latino,
Asian and Native American
women are two to three times
more likely than Caucasian



ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships,
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par-
ents, siblings, children and
children's spouses and
grandchildren, and the num-
ber of great-grandchildren.
If there are no immediate
survivors, consideration of
other relationships may be
given. ....:. I.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 252011CP000044
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLARD K. DURRANCE,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
ESTATE OF WILLARD K. DUR-
RANCE, deceased, whose date of
death was April 29, 2011, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is P. 0.
Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida
33873. The names and addresses
of the personal representative
and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is May 26, 2011.
Personal Representative:
WILLARD K. DURRANCE, JR.
c/o P. O. Box 3018
Sarasota, florida 34230-3018


Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JAMES O. FERGESON, JR.
Florida Bar No. 171298
FERGESON, SKIPPER, SHAW,
KEYSER, BARON & TIRABASSI,
P.A.
1515 Ringling Boulevard,
10'" Floor
P.O. Box 3018
Sarasota, Florida 34230-3018
(941) 957-1900
5:26;6:2c


women to develop lupus.
More than half of people with
lupus visit three or more doc-
tors to find a cure for their
symptoms, and experience
symptoms for four or more
years before finally being diag-
nosed.
That was the case for Karon
Beasley, who saw six different
types of doctors over four years
before visiting an allergist who
suspected that she had an
autoimmune disease.
"I was coming home from
working out one day when the
feeling of fatigue hit me. It was
overwhelming-I'd feel tired
and short of breath just walking
to my mailbox," said Beasley,
who suffered through a variety
of misdiagnoses including ane-
mia, thyroid disorders and PMS
before it was determined that
she had lupus.
"I couldn't get answers and
went in circles. A dermatologist
saw a rash on my face that was
consistent with lupus, but told
me, 'Honey, that's just hor-
mones,' and prescribed me a
cream. I went to a neuropsychi-
atrist thinking my fatigue was
depression, because you start to
believe something is mentally
wrong with you," she said.
Beasley, who has now lived
with the disease for more than
12 years, encourages people
with lupus to be their own
advocate. Friends, family and
doctors should also be consider-
ate of what it is like to live with
lupus.
Beasley says, "Most people
with lupus at some point hear:
'But you don't look sick.' We
face the issue of dealing with an
invisible illness. You have to
know you don't feel well and
recognize that you need to talk
to another doctor and keep
going.
"Doctors' appointments can
be consuming unless you are
prepared and can communicate
what is going on with your
body. They only know what you
tell them, so write down every
symptom you have, even if you
think it is not related."
Beasley also advises patients
to get educated about their dis-
ease through trusted organiza-
tions like the Lupus Foundation
of America.
STo educate yourself more on
.lupus, visit www.lupus.org. To
find out if you may be at risk for
lupus, visit the Lupus Foun-
dation of America's symptom
checklist at www.lupus.org/-
body.


Doctors Urge Action

Again st Deadly Infections


America can avoid a scary
future-if we learn to turn things
around soon when it comes to
antibiotic drug resistance.
Government and medical
experts are growing increasing-
ly alarmed about the rapid
spread of deadly infections
caused by "superbugs." bacteria
that have outsmarted the antibi-
otics use to treat them.
Medical advances made possi-
ble by antibiotics-such as sur-
gery, chemotherapy. organ
transplants and care of prema-
ture babies-are in jeopardy.
The World Health Organiza-
tion has ranked antimicrobial


drug resistance among the
greatest threats to human health
on the planet. Drug resistance
costs the U.S. $21 billion to $34
billion every year.
Just one superbug. methi-
cillin-resistant Staphylococcus
aureus. or "MRSA." kills
19.000 Americans each year.
That is more than emphysema.
HIV/AIDS. Parkinson's dis-
ease. and homicide combined.
MRSA has learned how to
defend itself against antibiotics.
This makes it much harder for
doctors to protect people from
serious infections. MRSA is
harming healthy people and


The Herald-


those who are ill from other dis-
eases. Other bacterial infections
are becoming even harder to
treat.
Many factors are to blame,
including overuse and misuse
of antibiotics. New antibiotics
aren't being developed fast
enough to protect everyday
Americans from these danger-
ous superbugs. Experts say this
public health crisis is only
going to get worse. Soon we
will have no antibiotics left to
treat our children and grand-
children-unless we ask Con-
gress to pass laws to protect us.
"The ways we have produced
and used antibiotics for 70
years are failing us. We must act
now. or we will end up back in
the dark ages of health care and


everybody will wonder why
nothing was done," said Jim
Hughes, M.D., president of the
Infectious Diseases Society of
America (IDSA), a national
organization of infectious dis-
eases physicians and scientific
experts. "The good news is we
have a rescue plan, but we need
help convincing leaders in
Congress, the federal govern-
ment and the health care indus-
try."
IDSA's rescue plan, "Com-
bating Antimicrobial Resis-
tance: Policy Recommenda-
tions to Save Lives," supports
both economic incentives to
encourage new antibiotics and
programs to ensure that the
drugs we have are used wisely.
IDSA is aiming for 10 new
antibiotics approved by 2020.


Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL 773-3255


DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE
HEARTLANDj PHRAY






"We put our into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


-julian"Garcia, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Crystal Contreras & Red Camp Pharmacist
Hours:

Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


ATTENTION PARENTS

OF


2011 HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL



SENIORS


The Herald-Advocate will soon be publishing our annual Graduation Keepsake Edition
honoring all Hardee High School graduating seniors.

Place an ad in this keepsake edition, personally congratulating your senior on his/her
accomplishments, with either a recent photo or one from his/her past, or both.


ADS START AS LOW AS 30 CONGREGATION

Stop by our office, 115 S. 7th Ave., Steven
and let us help you with your ad today or call
773-3255 for more information


T" 4
MIah Picture

W. lv& you and o amis po you. Here


ECoy ymor moment & Godi Be& u...

AND GO GATORS!



DEADLINE THURSDAY, JUNE 2


PIciure
Here



'30



We are so proud
of you
Love,
Mom & Dad










8C The Herald-Advocate, June 2,2011

Letter To Editor

Friday Night Live

Is A Big Success


Dear Editor:
Once again on May 20


IN THE CIRCUfT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE
CASE NO.: 25 2011-CP-00-038
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
WILBUR KENNETH WEIS,
deceased

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
Estate of WILBUR KENNETH
WEIS, File Number 25 2011CP
000 038, is pending In the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Post Office Box 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873. The
name and address of the Per-
sonal Representative and the
Personal Representative's Attorn-
ey are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is May 26, 2011.
JANET M. WEIS
1978 Hampton Road
Wauchula, FL 33873
J. STEVEN SOUTHWELL, II, ESQ.
Morrell, Watson, & Southwell, P.A.
Post Office Box 1748
Wauchula, FL 33873
863.773.4449
Florida Bar # 869791
Attorney for Petitioner
5:26;6:2c


Friday Night Live came around,
the third Friday of each month.
This month agricultural prod-
acts were being sold fruits.
vegetables and plants.
The Hardee Help Center
Thrift Store on Main Street
gave away corn on the cob and
bananas. Everything was very
good.
The Doyle Carlton family
sponsored Friday Night Live.
We all had a good time as usual.
The Generation Bluegrass Band
played and was very good.
There was also a.petting zoo for
the kids. and Reality Ranch had
horses for the kids to have a lit-
tle ride on.
Mosaic's trailer was there
also to wander around in and
see agriculture equipment.
There is a different theme
each month. It is a good time to
get together with people in the
community and get reaquainted
with old friends. It is like a big
outside party. There .are park
benches to sit on and also ven-
dors selling ice cream cones.
snow cones, hotdogs, soda and
fritters.
If you all haven't tried Friday
Night Live, you may want to
come out for the third Friday in
June. It is nice to get out in the
sunshine and fresh air.
See you there.
Connie Lee Rowe
Wauchula


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
May 29, Nathaniel Keith Toothman, 20, of 711 Sandpiper Dr.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Mark McCoy and charged with
battery.
May 29, a fight at Pine Cone Park was reported.

May 28, Carlos Perez Rios, 29, of 3442 Marion St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with
DUI, violation of probation and another traffic offense.
May 28, thefts at SR 64 West, Dena Circle and Stephens Road
were reported.

May 27, Whitney Paige Justice, 24, of 478 River Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Carree Williams and charged with
possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and a
traffic offense.
May 27, a residential burglary on Chancey Road, criminal
mischief on Wild Turkey Lane and thefts on Mott Road, College
Lane and Heard Bridge Road were reported.

May 26, residential burglaries on Rigdon Road, Oak Hill Park
and Merle Langford Road and a tag stolen on Brantwood Drive
were reported.

May 25, Carla Denise Mink, 42, of 538 Cypress St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. John Paikai and
charged with DUI and DUI with property damage. At the jail, Sgt.
Lyle Hart added two counts of simple assault on an officer.
May 25, a residential burglary on SR 64 East, a vehicle stolen
on Brantwood Drive, criminal mischief on Murphy Road, and
thefts on Griffin Road, Gilliard Farm Road, Lisa Drive, Watkins
Citrus and Wren Road were reported.

May 24. Jessica Joann Grantham, 32, of 2821 Theatre Road,
Bowling Green, and Sandra Mae Shoffner, 29, of 250 Maxwell
Drive, Wauchula, were arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and each
charged with resisting a merchant and retail theft.
May 24, residential burglaries on Edwards Peace Drive, Polk
Road, Moccasin Lane and John Holt Road, criminal mischief on
SR 64 West, and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

May 23, a residential burglary on Brantwood Drive and crim-
inal mischief on Sparrow Road were reported.
WAUCHULA
May 27, Todd Rolfe Walter, 55, of 157 Will Duke Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with dis-
orderly intoxication and violation of the open container ordinance.

May 25, Damien Richard, 21, of 771 LaPlaya Dr., Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and charged with fraud-giv-
ing a false ID to an officer.
May 25, Kourtney Tawana Thompson, was arrested by Ofc.
Jennifer Stanley and charged with cruelty toward a child that could
result in injury.
May 25, burglary of a conveyance on North Eighth Avenue, a
fight on Carlton Street, and a theft on U.S. 17 South were reported.

May 24, James Earnest Moore, 52, General Delivery, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson on an out-of-county
warrant.


May 24, Daniel Lee King, 41, of 6114 SR 64 E., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson and charged with two
counts of battery.
May 24, a fight on LaPlaya Drive and criminal mischief on
River Chase Circle were reported.
BOWLING GREEN
May 28, Jose Andres Esquivel, 20, of 5109 Howard Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Ryan Abbott and charged
with battery and possession of marijuana.

May 26, criminal mischief on Grove Street was reported.

May 23, a theft on Pleasant Way was reported.


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
These people are nothing
but grass, their love fragile
as wildflowers. The grass
withers, the wildflowers fade,
if God so much as puffs on
them. Aren't these people
just so much grass: True, the
grass withers and the wild-
flowers fade, but our God's
Word stands firm and forev-
er.
Isaiah 40:6b-8 (ME)

FRIDAY
Who has scooped up the
ocean in His two hands, or
measured the sky between
His thumb and little finger;
who has put all the earth's
dirt in one of His baskets,
weighed each mountain and
hill?
Isaiah 40:12 (ME)

SATURDAY
Look at Him! God, the
Master, comes in power,
ready to go into action. ..
Who could ever have told
God what to do or taught
Him His business?
Isaiah 40:10,13 (ME)

SUNDAY
What expert would He have
gone to for advice, what
school would He attend to
learn justice? What god
(idol) do you suppose might
have taught Him what He
knows, showed Him how
things work?
Isaiah 40:14-15 (ME)


MONDAY
So, who even comes close
to being like God? To whom
or what can you compare
Him? Some no-god idol?
Ridiculous! It's made in a
work shop, cast in bronze,
given a veneer of gold, and
draped with silver filigree.
Isaiah 40:18-19 (ME)

TUESDAY
Have you not been paying
attention? Have you not
been listening? Haven't you
heard these stories all your
life? Don't you understand
the foundation of all things?
God sits high above the
round ball of earth. The peo-
ple look like mere ants. He
stretches out the skies like a
canvas yes, like a tent can-
vas to live under.
Isaiah 40:21-22 (ME)

WEDNESDAY
"So who is like Me? Who
holds a candle to Me?" says
the Holy One. "Look at the
night skies. Who do you
think made all this? Who
marches the army of stars
out each night, counts them
off, calls each by name so
magnificent! so powerful -
and never overlooks a single
one?
Isaiah 40:25-26 (ME)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners invites you to join one of

our "Water Conservation Workshops" and do your part to help conserve our

precious water resources both indoors and out!



A few water-saving tips are:

* Operate your dishwasher and washing machine with only a full load

* Turn off the water while brushing teeth & shaving

* Use waiter-efficient faucets, showerheads and toilets

* Use a broom instead of a hose to clean debris & leaves from your driveway

* Install a shutoff nozzle on your garden hose

* Water lawn early in the morning (4-7 am) when temperature and wind speeds

are lowest to reduce evaporation

Maintaining a 2-3 inch layer of mulch in flower/garden beds will help retain

moisture and suppress weeds

Use water-efficient or Florida-Friendly landscaping



The first 200 residents to sign a water conservation pledge will receive a FREE

water conservation kit (limit one per household).


Contact Hardee County

Community Development

412 W Orange Street, Room 201

Wauchula, Florida

(863) 773-6349.


Sponsored by a grant from the
Peace River Basin Board of the


Southwest Florida

Water Management District



WATERMATTERS.ORG 1-800-423-1476


6:2c


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