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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00376
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 4/14/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
sobekcm - UF00028302_00376
System ID: UF00028302:00376
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text


















The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


46
plus 40 sales tax


111th Year, No. 19
3 Sections, 32 Pages
ons, gI


Thursday, April 14, 2011


Appellate Court Rules In Favor Of Mosaic


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
A federal appellate court in
Atlanta has dismissed an in-
junction against Mosaic's South
Fort Meade Mine extension and
returned the lawsuit to the U.S.



Mortgage


Assistance


Available
By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Applications for a pair of
mortgage assistance programs
begin Monday morning at 9
a.m.
The Florida Housing Finance
Corp. has announced that there
is $1 billion in federal funds to
help- needy Florida residents
make up their mortgage pay-
ments.
To qualify, people have to be
behind on their mortgage pay-
ments because of unemploy-
ment or underemployment
(they are not making what they
did in their former jobs), or fac-
tors such as disability, divorce
or the death of a family mem-
ber, which has changed the
available income.
Applications can be obtained
at the Office of Community
Development, Room 201,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula (phone
773-6349) or at line
www.Floridahousing.org.
While the available dollars
are estimated to help up to
40,000 Florida residents, it will
be first-come, first served, so
getting applications in early is
important.
For the unemployed, the
Unemployed Mortgage Assis-
tance Program can provide up
to $12,000 to pay monthly
mortgage and escrow mort-
gage-related expenses for up to
six months or until the home-
maker 'can resume making
mortgage payments.
The Mortgage Loan Rein-
statement Payment Program is
to help people who have gotten
behind on their mortgage pay-
ments. It is for people who are
in arrears not more than six
months from the date of appli-
cation. It can provide up to
$6,000 to bring the homeown-
er's mortgage current.
Both programs require home-
owners to do what they can,
contribute at least $70 or 25
percent of their monthly income
toward their indebtedness.

WEATHER
DAIE HIGH LW BArl
04/06 81 46 0.00
04/07 87 58 0.00
04/08 89 64 0.00
04109 91 64 0.00
04/10 90 64 0.00
04/11 90 63 0.00
04112 85 64 0.00
rTTL Rainfall to 04/12/11 9.09
Same period last year 10.50
Ten Year Average 54.30
Source: Unv. of Fin. One Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Community Calendar .4A
Courthouse Aeport ... 6C
Crime Blotter ....... 5C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Rounddp .9A
Obituaries ... . . 4A
School Lunch Menu .12B



I Il81 2 IIl IIi
7 18122 07290 3


District Court in Jacksonville,
where the proceedings began
last June.
The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 11th Circuit set aside the
preliminary injunction on Fri-
day, ruling that Judge Henry


Lee Adams Jr. had based his
decision on letters from the
Environmental Protection
Agency without having a full
report, from the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers.
"Based on the limited record


before us, and the lack of
response from the Corps on
appeal, we are presently no bet-
ter equipped to resolve this dis-
pute than was the district
court," the federal appellate
judges said.


The current injunction will
remain in effect for 90 days,
however, to give Adams a
chance to gather more informa-
tion and possibly hold another
hearing between the Corps and
Mosaic and the three plaintiffs,


COURT
A woman who volunteers for the Hardee County Unit of the American Cancer Society extends a hand to he
cer patient get to her treatment session. Those without the time to volunteer can still lend a hand by sign
be a part of the Cancer Prevention Study-3. Hardee County is one of only six sites in the state chosen for
term research project.


Hardee Site Of Cancer Stu(


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County has been chosen.
It is one of only six locations among the 359 in Florida'
hosting American Cancer Society Relay for Life events.
Residents between the ages of 30 and 65 have a unique op-
portunity to help find out what causes cancer by being part of
a long-term cancer research study called CPS-3 (Cancer
Prevention Study-3.)
People of every racial or ethnic background who have
never been diagnosed with cancer are welcome and, in fact,
encouraged to sign up. Do it in honor of someone lost to can-
cer, or so you or someone else may not get cancer.
All it takes is a commitment.


Passion CRASH COURSE!

Play

Continues
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There are only two weekends -
left.
Tickets are still available for
"The Story of Jesus."
The nationally known drama
continues this weekend and
next in its annual five-weekend
production. It won't be avail-
able next year as the cast and
crew will be doing "The Story
of Noah," in its place.
The three-hour Passion Play
features a cast of 250 and over
100 animals as they portray the
life of Jesus Christ since before
his birth through His ministry,
crucifixion, burial, resurrection
and triumphant Second Com-
ing. All is interpreted for the
deaf by someone on stage amid, '
the action so it can be both seen
and "heard."
The performance, well
known throughout Florida and '
many other states, is done by
volunteers from Hardee County
churches and others throughout The descending aircraft and
the Heartland area and beyond. Fly-In at the Wauchula Muni
Volunteers send hours chang- tos on 12A.
See PASSION 2A


Residents will be asked to stay involved by c
surveys every few years for the 20 to 30 years of
one will that will include half a million people al
nation.
There are two steps to get involved.
The first is on April 30 between noon and 4 p.m
cat Stadium, at the end of the driveway behind the
high school on South Florida Avenue in Wauchula
People are asked to come during the Relay for L
end, but don't have to be part of the weekend or n
a relay team in order to participate.
For four hours that Saturday afternoon, a local
Cancer Society member will be on hand to sign yo
See HARDEE 3A


the Sierra Club, Manasota 88
and People Protecting Peace
River (3PR).
Adams must now determine
whether the Corps of Engineers
came to a rational permit deci-
sion by reviewing the full
record, as mandated by the
Administrative Procedure Act,
before making a decision.
-"We appreciate the timely
ruling and are pleased with the
outcome and directions provid-
ed by the llth Circuit," said
Richard Mack, Mosaic's execu-
tive vice president and general
counsel.
"We look forward to present-
ing our case to the District
See APPELLATE 2A



Trucker


Dies In


Crash
"o; By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A trucker who died after
crashing into a tree was not dis-
covered until the next morning,
the Florida Highway Patrol
said.
Robert Lee Eldridge, 54, of
I Sebring, was driving a 2008
TESYOT International Tanker eastbound
?Ip a can- on State Road 66 on Wednesday
ing up to of last week when he crossed
the long- over the center line and onto the
north shoulder, crash investiga-
tor Tpr. Patrick J. Roberts and
Y homicide investigator Cpl.
S Larry H. McClellan Jr. said.
Once on the shoulder of the
roadway, the tanker continued
completing on until it struck a large oak
the study, tree, the FHP said. Eldridge,
11 over the who was not wearing a seat
belt, was killed.
Investigators said the crash
occurred just west of Whistler
i. at Wild- Woods Way at an estimated
old junior 7:40 p.m.
The scene was not discovered
Life week- until 7:53 a.m. on Thursday
member of morning. The Hardee County
Sheriff's Office found the crash
site.
American site.
American Eldridge became the fourth
)u up. The person to die on county road-
ways so far this year.


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
f the ascending aircraft appear to be on a collision course Saturday at the Bensen Days
cipal Airport. It's all a matter of perspective. For yours on the annual event, see the pho-


It's 'Arts In The

Park' On Friday!
... Story 2A


S- She Danced

SJ, With Elvis
Ir ; ... Story 11B


I








2A The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


SThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


1r .J


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster,' send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads -Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months 18; I yr.-S31;2yrs. -60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. 41; 2 yrs. S79
Out of State
6 months S27; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. 595


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nunimber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Wilbur Robertson, 78, has farmed all his life. "When you farm
you are living on the edge of being broke all the time."
He and his family are growing about 100 acres of watermelons
in addition to a U-pick vegetable farm. The last two years have
been bad for watermelons.
In 2009 a broker stiffed him for most of the crop. In 2010 a.
series of freezes resulted in his watermelon harvest beginning at the
same time as north Florida and south Georgia, resulting in low
prices.
On Friday, April 29, at 7 p.m. the Robertson family will host
the 7th Annual Music At the Melon Barn on Johnston Road three
miles south of Hwy. 66 east of Zolfo Springs. Admission is free.
Bring a lawn chair.
There will be patriotic, gospel, and country and western music.
Cracker cowboys sitting around a fire will be honored. There will
be special guests, a tribute to the American military forces, and a
bounce house for the children.
"This is family-oriented and God-centered. We will honor
America, the military, Florida cattle history and Christianity."
Wilbur said the Robertson Farm's project is for'the communi-
ty to come together and enjoy fellowship'as friends and neighbors.
Last year's event drew about 600 people. "'
Last Friday night at the First Christian Church which hosted
Sherry Miller's Heartland Chorale Precious Memories event Rob-
ertson compared his crop size with Bowling Green's Jimmy Parker,
another farmer who has had hard luck the last two or three years.
Robertson said his melons are now the size of cantalopes and
Parker said his are the size of grapefruit. Sounds like an even race
to hit the market in early May.

Former Wauchula resident Carol Brush Cowling will display
her acrylic paintings Friday at the annual arts and crafts show at
Heritage Park in Wauchula as part of Friday Night Live. Some of
her paintings depict the Florida Cracker Trail cattle drives.
Carol was a writer and reporter for The Herald-Advocate for
about 10 years. The Winter Haven resident paints under the name
of Scarlet. She often uses recycled canvas and frames to keep costs
down.

The Florida Baptist Children's Homes based in Lakeland
reports a child's first five years.of life are the most important in his
or her physical, mental, emotional and spiritual development.
"In fact, a child's foundational beliefs about themselves, fam-
ily, friends, authority, the world, and God are significantly formed
before they even enter school."
The foundation of faith begins when a baby's cries of hunger
are satisfied by the mother. A child learns trust by the provider fur-
nishing food, comfort, loving touch and security. Learning to trust
people in their world is important for a child to later develop trust
in God. Children have many teachable moments, reports FBCH.
John and Eileen Sala, who have a prison and teaching ministry
based in Sebring called Little Lambs Inc., report some children
grow up with a false belief system of self-hate. Some are neglect-
ed and abused and believed they were defective, no good, failures,
dirty and deserved ill treatment.
These children bought into the lies of the enemy and accepted
false beliefs about themselves. Voices' in their head replay the
script: "I am what I am, I cannot change, I am bad, I am unlovable,
no one will love me enough to meet my needs, and because my
addiction is my greatest nepd, I am really unlovable."
These false belief systems are at the root of many various
addictions and life-controlling problems. The persons God intend-
ed them to be is covered with a mask of who Satan is telling them
they are and need to be to meet their needs, write the Sala couple.
John Sala is a former alcoholic and drug addict who spent time
in jails and prisons before turning his life over to Christianity and
beginning his ministry of helping people in trouble.



PASSION
Continued From 1A


ing the Cattleman's Arena west
of Wauchula off Altman Road
into the dusty streets of Beth-
lehem and Jerusalem, Herod's
Palace and Solomon's Temple.
It's an exciting and awe-
inspiring way to spend a Friday
or Saturday evening.


Tickets are S18 for adults.
They are $16 for children, sen-
.iors and groups of 25 or more.
'"End section tickets are $14.
Tickets can be obtained at
www.storyofjesus.com or by
calling 375-4031.


FNL Presents Arts In The Park


April's Friday Night Live
event brings a little art to down-
town Wauchula, figuratively
and literally.
Join in on Arts in the Park
this Friday in and around Main
Street Heritage Park from 5 to 9
p.m. There is something for
everyone!
Enjoy viewing artwork of dif-
ferent styles and tastes from a
variety of talented local artists.
You just might even find a piece


to take home!
And you won't want to miss
the display of "Itty Bitty Art,"
or finding out whose Post-it
Note-size drawing wog the con-
test. These itty bitty master-
pieces are a must see to believe!
Then, what would a Friday
Night Live be without live
entertainment? Bring your lawn
chair and stay awhile to enjoy
music from Signal 20.
The kids will have a good
0


time, too, with inflatables and
art activities.
Don't miss this chance to
enjoy and support our local
artists, combined with great en-
tertainment and shopping and
dining all in downtown Wau-
chula!
"This event was well-re-
ceived last year, and people
were amazed to find out just
how many very talented artists
we have living right here in our


own county," says Jessica
Newman, director of Main
Street Wauchula Inc.
"And, of course," she adds,
"the Itty Bitty Art was a hit, just
as I am sure it will be a*in this
year!"
This month's Title Sponsor is
PhosChem Supply Co.
For more evhtr information,
contact Main Street Wauchula
at 767-0330 or e-mail jnew-
man@cityofwauchula.com.


IutigFsI


4/14/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:04 AM
Set: 7:51 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 47 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:21 PM
Set: 4:17 AM
Overhead: 10:43 PM
Underfoot:10:17 AM
Moon Phase
83%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:17 AM-12:17 PM
10:43 PM-12:43 AM
Minor Times
4:17 AM 5:17 AM
4:21 PM 5:21 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
4/15/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:03 AM
Set: 7:52 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 49 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:28 PM
Set: 4:57 AM
Overhead: 11:36 PM
Underfoot:11:10 AM
Moon Phase
91%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:10 AM- 1:10 PM
11:36 PM 1:36 AM
Minor Times
4:57AM 5:57 AM
5:28 PM 6:28 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4


4/16/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:02 AM
Set: 7:52 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 50 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:35 PM
Set: 5:37 AM
Overhead: --:--
Underfoot: 12:03 PM
Moon Phase
97%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:03 PM 2:03 PM
Minor Times
5:37 AM 6:37 AM
6:35 PM 7:35 PM
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4
4/17/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:01 AM
Set: 7:53 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:44 PM
Set: 6:18 AM
Overhead:12:31 AM
Underfoot:12:59 PM
Moon Phase
100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
12:31 AM -2:31 AM
12:59 PM 2:59 PM
Minor Times
6:18 AM -7:18 AM
7:44 PM 8:44 PM
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4


4/18/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:00 AM
Set: 7:53 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:53 PM
Set: 7:04 AM
Overhead: 1:27 AM
Underfoot: 1:56 PM
Moon Phase
100%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
1:27 AM 3:27 AM
1:56 PM 3:56 PM
Minor Times
7:04 AM 8:04 AM
8:53 PM 9:53 PM
Prediction
Best++
Time Zone
UTC: -4
4/19/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:59 AM
Set: 7:54 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 55 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:01 PM
Set: 7:53 AM
Overhead: 2:26 AM
Underfoot: 2:56 PM
Moon Phase
96%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
2:26 AM 4:26 AM
2:56 PM 4:56 PM
Minor Times
7:53 AM-- 8:53 AM
10:01 PM-11:01 PM
Prediction
Better++
Time Zone
UTC: -4


4/20/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:58 AM
Set: 7:54 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 56 mins.
Moon Data
Rise:11:06 PM
Set: 8:47 AM
Overhead: 3:26 AM
Underfoot: 3:57 PM
Moon Phase
91%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
3:26 AM 5:26 AM
3:57 PM 5:57 PM
Minor Times
8:47 AM 9:47 AM
11:06 PM-12:06 AM
Prediction
Good
Tune Zone
UTC:-4
4/21/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:57 AM
Set: 7:55 PM.
Day Length
12 hrs. 58 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: --:-
Set: 9:45 AM
Overhead: 4:27 AM
Underfoot: 4:56 PM
Moon Phase
83%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
4:27 AM 6:.2 AM
4:56 PM 6:56 PM
Minor Tunimes
9:45 AM -10:45 AM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


Court as mandated by the Court
of Appeals," he said.
The environmental groups
sued Mosaic and the Corps last
year over the issuance of min-
ing permits.
Environmentalists claim ir-
reparable harm will be done to
the Peace River and wetlands,
while Mosaic contends the per-
mits were issued correctly and
were in full compliance with
the Clean Water Act.
Dennis Mader, president of
3PR, said the ruling would not
deter the environmental groups.


He compared the legal proceed-
ings to a boxing match, and said
each side has now won one
round.
Mosaic began mining a small
portion of the 10,583-acre ex-
tension into Hardee County in
SDecember, after reaching a par-
tial settlement with the environ-
mental groups.
The settlement allowed Mo-
saic and its subcontractors to
bring back employees who
were laid off shortly after the
injunction was issued.


London's Big Ben is named after Sir Benjamin Hall, the
chief commissioner of works when the bell was cast.

John J. Loud, an American inventor, patented a ballpoint
pen in 1888.

More pencils are made in the U.S. than in any other
country.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD


APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At-The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula


773-3255


APPELLATE
Continued From 1A


115S.AFL Th 8


Quality pr intingservces t-co pettvepics


LLove HALL invites all
his friends and neighbors
r ^ 1 to come see him at


-R- EENWOO

SI 205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512 *
www.lreBtche.com i







April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


I want to fight back against
cancer by participating in
Cancer Prevention Study-3


Please read criteria and check each box to acknowledge he e trms of participating.
O 1 will commit to the study long term (which means completing surveys periodically for the next
20-30 years)
3 I am between 30-65 years old
O 1 have NEVER been diagnosed with cancer (no personal history with cancer)
(basal or squamo cell skin cancers are not included in the deflinto of "personal history with cancer"
became they are not considered malignant, so you may participate ifthat wm your diagnros) : s
* ,. 1. '.,-
T'' I understand that must complete the first part of enrollment at Re i'r Ha d..
Apd)1;2011:f200 PMto 400 PM.
o 1 am willing to complete a more-detailed survey at my home after Relay, which will finalize my
enrollment in the study. This survey will ask detailed questions regarding medical history,
lifestyle, and behaviors.
0 I am willing complete periodic follow-up surveys that will be mailed to my home for the next
20-30 years.
0 I am willing to provide a confidential waist measurement.
o I am willing to give a small amount of blood (7 teaspoons), collected by a certified, trained
phlebotomist.
Name


Address


City __Zip____


Phone ___Email Address
Would you like a reminder sent to you closer to Relay? Please check your preferred method of
communication: 0 Phone O Email 0 Mail


Please return this interest tracking form by mail.


American Cancer Society (nttn: Denise Benavides)
P.O. Box 1268
Wauchula. 1:1. 33873


4

letter to the editor
March, 2011
Dear Editor:
It's often far too easy to underestimate the importance of cancer research...until you hear
the words "you have cancer."
Those three words can make all the difference between simply absorbing news about
developments in cancer research and truly appreciating the power of what scientists like
those funded by the American Cancer Society do each and every day.
This summer scientists aren't the only ones who will be making a difference. At this
year's Relay For Life of Hardee County, residents of our community will have a once-in-
a-generation opportunity to enroll in the American Cancer Society's third Cancer
Prevention Study which seeks to help us better understand the factors that cause or
prevent cancer.
Individuals between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never been diagnosed with cancer
and who are willing to make a long-term commitment to the study will be able to enroll
at the Relay For Life of Hardee County on Saturday, April 30t, 2011 from 12:00 noon to
4:00 pm only.
I encourage all eligible men and women in our community to consider taking part in this
important study.
I also call on my fellow cancer survivors to spread the word by asking friends and family
to enroll in your honor.
Remember: Research being done today will help ensure future generations never have to
hear those dreaded three words.
Sincerely,
Sheila Johns
Wauchula, FL
Hardee County
FOR VERIFICATION PURPOSES ONLY toll-free 1-888-604-5888. and/or
cancer.orgcs3


HARDEE
Continued From 1A
sign-up includes an informed consent form, a brief written
survey, a waist measurement and a blood sample (taken by a
person trained to do this).
A longer survey will go home with you for step two, infor-
mation on lifestyle, family history, activities and other fac-
tors related to your health. You will be asked to update these
surveys every few years.
The idea is to find connections between how people live
and whether they get cancer. Already, scientists know the
effects of cigarette smoking and/or second-hand smoke on a
peoples' health and their risk of cancer.
Other considerations under study are on air pollution,
genetics (your family connections) and whether overweight
people are more prone to get cancer.
Some studies began in the 1950s, and others have taken
place periodically through the years since then. This new
study will involve a whole new group of people, you includ-
ed, whose information will help lead to more answers in
ways to prevent cancer.
Relay for Life is an annual American Cancer Society event
and overnight campout, because "cancer never sleeps."
There are fun activities and competitions between teams, and
ceremonies honoring cancer survivors, and those who have
lost their lives to cancer.
Begun as a way to get people involved, the grassroots
movement now involves over 5,000 communities nation-
wide, raising millions of dollars for cancer research and
assistance to people battling cancer.
Research aims to help people stay well, get well after a
cancer diagnosis, find cures and fight back by joining in
research, such as this study, that will eventually wipe out the
disease.
\ For more information, contact Denise Benavides at 866-
739-5288 Ext. 5802, call toll-free at 1-888-604-5888 or e-
mail cps-3@cancer.org.
The smallest bird of prey is the white-fronted falconet,
which is the size of a sparrow.


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I
I


It was two Algonquin tribes, the Michi Gama and the Michi Sepe, that gave the names
to the states of Michigan and Mississippi.
Exactly who started using curling irons remains a mystery but records indicate that the
Romans in the reign of Emperor Titus, A.D. 79 to 81, employed little hollow tubes filled
with boiling water for that chore.



SThe 11th Annual Ball Drop


Thursday, April 28, at 4:00 p.m.
Torrey Oaks Golf Course
Tickets: $10.00 each


1" prize: $500.00
2nd prize: $300.00
3rd prize: $200.00
You do not have to be present to win.
We will be happy to deliver your cash prize!
jThis fund-raiser is to help with camp costs for the JV and Varsity Cheerleaders at Hardee
Senior High School. If you wish to purchase a ticket, ask your favorite cheerleader!
Contact Jodie Skitka or Amy Jernigan at 773-3181 If you have any questions.
We would also like to give a special thanks to Torrey Oaks Golf Course for the use of
their facilities, Mr. Van Crawford with Preco for the use of the truck, and all of our
ticket-purchasers from last year for making our fund-raiser such a success!

Please help us make this year a success.
Buy your ball drop ticket today!
oc:14 2tec


I This coupon entitles you to twenty dollars oti any return I
I filed in our office. Thank you for being a valued client. *
I I
SEste cup6n le permit a veinte d6lares de cualquier regre
son archivado en, Nuestra oficina. Gracias por es un
S client valorado.
I TNT Bookkeeping Service, Inc I
I 1329,US Hwy 17 N, Wauchula, FL
1 --(863)773-3754 I 4
- - ---- - - - - - - - d


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include'first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-'
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships,
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par-
ents, siblings, children and
children's spouses and
grandchildren, and the num-
ber of great-grandchildren.
If there are 'no immediate
survivors, consideration of
other relationships may be
given.


RELAY
FOR LIFE








4A The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


Obituaries

MARY DEAN CULPEPPER
Mary Dean Cullpepper, 72,
of Wauchula, died on Sunday,
April 10, 2011, at Lake Placid.
She was born Aug. 25, 1938,
at Hazelhurst, Ga., and came to
Hardee County from Georgia
54'years ago. She was a home-
maker.
She is survived by her hus-
band, James B. Culpepper of
Wauchula; two sons, Robert
Rowland and Marvin Rowland,
both of Wauchula; three daugh-
ters, Dorothy Cheraz, Peggy
Thomas and Judy Merchant, all
of Wauchula; 10 grandchildren;
and eight great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 1' to 2 p.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel with services at
2 p.m. with the Rev. Albert
Blum officiating. Interment fol-
lowed in Wauchula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchtla


1.


4--
. 'A-*


ROY GENE GAY
Roy Gene Gay, 50, of Tal-
lahassee, died on Friday, April
1, 2011, at the Margaret Z.
Dozier Hospice House of Big
Ben Hospice.
Born in Chicago, Ill., he
lived in Wauchula and graduat-
ed from high school here. He
moved to Tallahassee 25 years
ago and was a journeyman line-
man for the City of Tallahassee
for 24 years.
He is survived by Susan
Foulke Gay, his wife of 23
years; son Marshall R. Gay; and
two brothers, David Gay and
wife Susan of Wauchula, and
Wayne Gay and wife Flo of
:Lake Wales.
Visitation was Tuesday, April
.5, at the funeral home. Services
were held in the chapel there on
Wednesday, with interment at
Tallahassee Memory Gardens.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to Shands Hospital
in Gainesville, Big Ben Hos-
pice or the charity of your
choice.
Culley's MeadowWood
Funeral Home
Tallahassee

.n moving Akemo0/y

MARY DEAN
CULPEPPER
Mary Dean Cullpepper, 72,
of Wauchula, died on Sunday,
April 10, 2011, at Lake
Placid.
She was born Aug. 25,
1938, at Hazelhurst, Ga., and
came to Hardee County from
Georgia 54 years ago. She
was a homemaker.
She is survived by her hus-
band, James B. Culpepper of
Wauchula; two sons, Robert
Rowland and Marvin Row-
land, both of Wauchula; three
daughters, Dorothy Cheraz,
Peggy Thomas and Judy
Merchant, all of Wauchula; 10
grandchildren; and eight
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 1 to 2 p.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel with services
at 2 p.m. with the Rev. Albert
Blum officiating. In-terment
followed in Wauchula Cem-
etery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


LifeLinks ...
By Carolyn Hendry Wyatt
Extension Agent


HEALTHY EATING & DIABETES
Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects people's lives on a
daily basis. It is the most expensive of the chronic diseases.
With rising obesity rates, the number of people with diabetes
continues to grow, but lifestyle choices can help people reduce
their risk for diabetes. One of those lifestyle choices is learning to
eat healthy by making some dietary changes. Here are a few to
choose from:
1.) Choose low-fat foods. Limit the amount of fat you eat by
choosing more low-fat foods such as:
Beans (pinto, black and kidney)
Fruits and vegetables
Low-fat milk, cheese and yogurt
Lean meats (round, sirloin and loin), fish and skinless
poul try
2.) Limit salt and sodium. Reduce your consumption of salt
and high-sodium foods such as canned and other processed foods.
Here are a few easy steps you can take to limit your sodium intake
from food.
Buy vegetables that are fresh, plain frozen, or canned with
no salt added.
Use fresh poultry, fish and lean meats instead of the
canned or packaged options.
Cut back on frozen dinners, canned soups and salad
dressings.
Rinse canned beans and vegetables to wash away some
of the added salt.
Limit the amount of salt you add to your food. Instead,
use lemon and herbs and spices such as garlic, dill,
rosemary, basil, chives and red pepper flakes to give
your food zest!
3.) Add fiber. To keep "regular" and reduce your risk for some
of the complications associated with diabetes, choose more high-
fiber foods. The following are just a few examples of high-fiber
foods. Be sure to choose healthy foods that you and your family
enjoy!
Fruits and vegetables such as pears, apples, grapes,
berries, peas, carrots, greens and sweet potatoes.
Whole-grain foods such as oatmeal, brown rice,
whole-wheat breads and pastas.
Beans such as black, red, pinto, lima and lentils.
4.) Control the carbohydrates. Limit your intake of foods high
in sugar such as cakes, pies, cookies, doughnuts, honey, chocolate
and sugary beverages. These are all simple carbohydrates.
Choose your carbohydrates from the fruits, vegetables and
grains groups, plus beans and nuts. Spread your carbohydrate
intake across the day. This will help you control your portion sizes
and give you more flexibility when planning your meals. Consult a
registered dietitian to learn more about foods that contain complex
carbohydrates and how to include them in your meal plan.
5.) Choose healthy and tasty snacks. Choose snacks that con-
tain only small amounts of added fats and sugars. Foods that are
rich in protein and those that have complex carbohydrates such as
fruits, nuts, vegetables and whole-grain foods will leave you feel-
ing satisfied and fuller longer. Here are some snack ideas:
Low-fat cottage cheese and fruit
Low-fat yogurt with granola and fruit
Vegetables and hummus
Unbuttered air-popped popcorn
One hard-boiled egg and whole-grain crackers
6.) Alcohol in moderation. If you drink alcohol, consume no
more than one drink (for women) or two drinks (for men) per day.
One drink is: ...
5 ounces of wine, or
12 ounces of regular beer, or
1-1/2 ounces of liquor
It's best to drink alcohol with food, not by itself. Always
check with your pharmacist about possible interactions alcohol
may have with your medications.
In summary, remember to enjoy a variety of foods from each
food group every day. This allows you to consume a balanced diet
full of the essential nutrients your body needs. Variety is the spice
of life!
Also, work with a registered dietitian (RD) to create a flexible
meal plan for you.
Next month's column will be about taking care of yourself
from head to toe if you are diabetic. You can contact the American
Diabetes Association at 1-800-342-2383 (1-800-Diabetes) for more
information or the Hardee County Extension Office at 773-2164.


THURSDAY. APRIL 14
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.
MONDAY. APRIL 18
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.


A SACRED TRUST .

We know that when you
request our service it's a
matter of trust. At Robarts


Family


Funeral


Home we


take your trust and our
responsibility to you very
seriously.

Over the years we have
worked very hard to provide
you with quality care and earn
our reputation for honesty
and fairness. Now, we're
proud to say we serve more
Hardee County families than
any other funeral home.


529 West Main Street Wauchula, Florida 33873


. .

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We just want to thank you for your support and let
you know.that you can always count on us to provide
the quality care we are known for. After all, we're a
family just like yours. We know what it feels like to
lose someone you love.

Superior Service-Affordable Cost


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President -


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~ Vice President ~


* 863-773-9773


View Obits at robartsfh.com 5


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FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906


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1 (800) 500-1119
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or as elaborate as you wish.

If you've decided on cremation, you
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945 East Broadway
Fort Meade, FL 33841
(863) 285-8171 4:14c


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April 14,2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A -'

|L ,-


ATHLETIC FOUNDATION

FUND- RAISER
Come by and help 7LFYNorY&
Hardee Athletic Foundation
WE raise 120 for every test drive of a
NEW DODGE JOURNEY or the
EVERYfTest Drive arns ALL NEW DODGE DURANGO!
20 For Hardee Athletic
HARDER SENIOR HIGH BASEBALL FIELD
HARDEE SENIOR HIGH BASEBALL FIELD


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APRIL 15


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5 YEAR/100,000 MILE
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M.S.R.P. ... 24,990
NLafaNrDiscount 1,590
Factory Rebate 3,000
or 0.00% for 60 Months WA.C.
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M.S.R.P.
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$29,220
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FLf 1Y 7 PRICE

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6A The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


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April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A




Eight-And-Under Softball Girls

I II I


4W`


Helping to score runs for the Harvest Aviation Babes are (front row, left to right) Gisele
Garcia, Natalia Garcia and Emma Eures; (middle row) Genesis Silva, Nicole Martinez,
Baleigh Herrera and Kaylee Gibson; (third row) Rebekah Erekson, Skylar Tatum, Trinity
Her and Elizabeth Herrera; (back) coaches Melinda Silva and Manuel Herrera; not pic-
tured coach Brent Gilliard and Josephy Adams.
I


COURTESY PHOTOS
Taking the field for the Sevigny & Timmerman Eye Care Heartbreakers are (first row,
from left) Mia Cabrera, Josie Nichols and Valerie Martinez; (second row) Sailor Ullrich,
Haven Rimes and Mady Tyson; (third row) Macy Grace Tyson, Madison White, Chloe
Martinez and Lahna Christian; (back) coaches Shawn Rimes, Ashley Nichols and Jill
Tyson; not pictured Myia Lamy and Ebony.Lamy.
-


n,


r' )


Putting the ball in play for the AG Comp Solutions Power Puffs are (first row, from left)
Lilianna Plata, Olivia Rice and Saige Ward; (second row) Petra Gaitan, Tori Durden,
Zyann Parker and Shaniah Hodges; (third row) Treasure Camel, Riley Kate Albritton,
Joe Harned and Michelle Patterson; (back) coaches Robbie Ward, lan Rice, Shane
Harned and Logan Harned.


Darlings Race Tightens


Catching the ball for the Little Cypress Golf Sweet Tarts are (front, left to right) Callie
Eisenhower, Samantha Montes, Anna Bell Servin and Kaylie Grice; (second row) Gracie
Lopez, Samantha Hardin and Valeria Montanez; (third) Kya Baptiste, Tulsi Patel, Leah
Hall and Lucia Galvez; (back) coaches Tonya Grice, Tommy Taylor, Jodi Oakes and
Casey Johnson.




"1


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There's a tightening of the
belt in the 8-and-under girls
softball division.
The Little Cypress Golf
Sweet Tarts lost their only game
and dropped to 5-2 (.714), hold-
ing a slim lead over the Harvest
Aviation Babes, who are 4-2
(.667). The AG Comp Solutions
Power Puffs are making a
move, now at 4-3 (.571). The
Sevigny & Timmerman Eye
Care Heartbreakers are also on
the move, picking up a couple
of wins last week. The CF
Industries Peaches lost by one
run and are improving.
Sevigny took a 12-9 victory
over CF last Monday. The game
began with Seveigny putting
five runs on the board as
Madison "Mattie" White, Sailor
Ullrich, Ebony Lamy, Macy
Tyson and Valerie Martinez
came home. White, Ullrich and
Lamy added two more runs
apiece and Chloe Martinez
added as solo score. Other
Sevigny players are Haven
Rimes, Mady Tyson, Myia
Lamy, Josie Nichols, Mia
Cabrera and Lahna Christian.
Katie Brandeberry paced CF
with a trio of tallies. Emilee


Worden and LeeAnna Reas
each added two runs and
Yesaily Martinez and Faith
Davis also scored. Other CF
players are Savannah Conerly,
Hailey Bryant, Alexis Hagood,
Jayden Hays and Drew Beattie.
On Tuesday night, AG Comp
nicked CF 5-4. It was close all
the way as AG had to score the
winning run in the sixth inning.
For AG, Michelle Patterson
scored in the first and third
innings. Riley Kate Albritton
and Petra Gaitan added runs in
the third and Joe Harned scored
in the sixth. Other AG players
are Treasure Camel, Tori
Durden, Shaniah Hodges,
Olivia Rice, Lilianna "Lilly"
Plata, Zyann Parker and Saige
Ward.,
Hays scored in the third
inning for CF Reas and Hagood
added runs in the fourth and
Worden the final run in the
fifth.
On Thursday night, Sevigny
& Timmerman came back for a
20-12 win over Harvest
Aviation.
Chloe Martinez, Ullrich,
Ebony Lamy and Macy Tyson
all put three runs on the board
for Sevigny. White and Nichols
added twin tallies and Valerie


Martinez, Rimes, Myia Lamy
and Christian each chipped in
with a run.
For Harvest, Rebekah Erek-
son and Renell Elizabeth Her-'
rera each took three trips
around the bases. Trinity Her
and Nicole Martinez added twin
scores and Skylar Tatum and
Baleigh Herrera added solo
scores. Other Harvest players
are Genesis Silva, Kaylee
Gibson, Emma Eures and
Gisele Garcia.
On Friday night AG Comp
Solutions scurried past the
Little Cypress Golf course
Sweet Tarts 16-3.
Patterson and Durden each;
circled the bases four times for
AG. Hodges had-three trips to
home, Camel, Gaitan and
Albritton crossed home twice
each and Parker andPlata each
put a run on the board.
Valerie Montanez put a pair
of runs on the board for Little
Cypress. Lucia Galvez added
one more. Other Little Cypress
players are Abby Johnson, Tulsi
Patel, Kaylie Grice, Leah Hall,
Annabell Servin,- Kya Batiste,
Samantha Montes, Gracie
Lopez, Samantha Hardin and
Callie Eisenhauer.


Coming in to score for the CF Industries Peaches are (seated, from left) Savannah
Conerly, Emilee Worden and Hailey Bryant; (kneeling) Jayden Hays, Faith Davis and
Yesaily Martinez; (standing) Alexis Hagood, Katie Brandeberry, Lee Anna Reas and
Drew Beattie; (back) coaches Walt Beattie, Rob Davis, Justin Worden and Jennifer
Bryant.


Confidence is that feeling by which the mind embarks in great and honorable courses
with a sure hope and trust in itself.
-Marcus Tullius Cicero.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


,,


q







8A The Herald-Advocate, April 14.2011


rNutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: Is it true that it is more
beneficial for older people to
walk at a brisk pace than at a
regular walking pace?
A: ,Your question relates to
news reports about research that
links longer life expectancy
with faster walking speed.
These large studies of adults -
mostly those age 65 and older -
do link faster speed while walk-
ing a short test distance with
longer life. Other indicators of
physical function, such as grip
strength and ability to rise from
a chair, also show this link. But
researchers say faster walking
and these other physical func-
tions are a marker that can help
to separate more frail elderly
from healthier elderly, which
can be important in making var-
ious healthcare decisions.
Walking speed is affected by
muscle strength, heart furiction,
balance and more, all of which
relate to various aspects of
health. Optimal walking speed
varies with individuals, espe-
cially as we age and we know
that people "age" at different
rates. Walking is a good exer-
cise for all of us, promoting
weight control and providing
direct benefits to lower risk of
heart disease and cancer.
Walking at a brisk pace means


that in the same amount of time
you burn more calories than
walking at a slower pace, and
thus does more to assist weight
control. A pace brisk enough for
an individual to feel their heart
rate a little elevated may bring
additional health benefits, too,
though how fast that pace is
will vary among individuals.
One study of older adults
showed that over 10 years,
those who improved their phys-
ical fitness with regular exer-
cise were less likely to show
increases in blood pressure,
blood triglycerides or insulin
levels.
For now though, researchers
note that walking speed is more
clearly one indicator of health
status, rather than a target to
improve health. Whatever their
pace of walking, federal guide-
lines advise older adults to
"avoid an inactive lifestyle:" the
less we do; the less we become
able to do.
Q: Can the plant-based diet
you so often recommend real-
ly provide enough protein?
A: Yes, people sometimes think
of protein as only coming from
meat and dairy products, but we
also get protein from plant
foods. Beans, nuts and seeds are
the most concentrated sources


of plant protein, and they pro-
vide fiber, magnesium, potassi-
um and natural protective phy-
tochemicals. Grains and vegeta-
bles also supply small amounts
of protein that add up when you
make them a major part of your
meals. As you eat less of the
animal sources of protein, keep
in mind the need for balance. If
you eat very little meat, you
can't just eat a rice cake and
plain salad and assume you've
met nutrient needs. As you shift
the balance of plant and animal
foods on your plate, look for
places you can include beans
(in salads, soups, casseroles and
more). And it's one of many
reasons to switch from snacks
of chips or cookies to protein-
and nutrient-rich nuts and
seeds. A mostly plant-based diet
that includes five to six ounces
a day of lean poultry, fish or
meat and three servings of dairy
products or alternatives will
meet the protein requirements
of most adults. Analysis of eat-
ing patterns suggested in the
2010 Dietary Guidelines for
Americans shows that if you
prefer to omit or further mini-
mize meat or dairy products,
you will also get protein well
above the Dietary Reference
Intake (RDI) if each day you
include about three servings of
vegetarian sources of protein
like beans, nuts and seeds. One
serving of beans is 1/2 cup;
seeds and nuts are 1 ounce each.


In hard times, early col-
leges in the U.S. were
forced to accept payments
such as cotton, sheep,
pewter, and food rather
than hard currency.


,_.Zr < 7 7., I -.,I.. o r. -- -T5 9 F


YOU'RE INVITED



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Thursday April 21st

7:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.


All merchandise will be on SALE
Come in and take advantage of these savings
Cake and Punch will be served
JAN PLATT JULIE PLATT COOK
TANNING NAILS

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, 215 W. Orange St., Wauchula


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IGREENWOOD
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April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Track Stars Prepare For Districts


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Several Hardee athletes have
been working all season to bet-
ter their times and distances in
preparation for the District meet
today (Thursday) and tomor-
row.
.Districts are at Bradenton
Southeast, which doesn't have a
pole vault venue, so that event
will be held today at Sarasota
Cardinal Mooney, which will
involve senior Tony Rodriguez
and junior Reimundo Garcia for
the boys and sophomore Febe
Murillo.
Seniors Yesenia Vargas and
Ashley Louis, Carl Brown and
Rodriguez will have a last
opportunity to put it together in
their favorite events, hoping to
move on to regional and state
competition.
Recent events backtrack to
the March 18 huge meet at
Northport to March 22 at Avon
Park, April 1 at t he Palmetto
relays and April 7-8 at DeSoto.
NORTHPORT
Renamed the Marcus Free-
man memorial after an athlete
who died two days earlier in an
accident, this event saw some
personal records set by Hardee
track and field participants.
Junior Julian Varela set a per-
sonal best in the discus, rivaling
junior Dillon Skitka. Freshman
Brandon Beatty had a personal
record of 1:13.5 in the 1,600-
meter run and ran the 3,200 in a
time of 2:1'1.64. Junior Rei-
mundo Garcia was two seconds
behind. Senior Kareem Rich-
ardson set a new time of 12:49
in the 100 dash.
Several girls also set new
times, as seniors Ashley Louis
and Yesenia Vargas vied for
position in the discus and shot
put. Murillo set a new time of
1:30.5 in the 1,600.


AVON PARK
The girls were third and boys
fourth in this meet despite sev-
eral first place finishes.
Vargas led off with first place
in the shot put with a throw of
27-04. Freshman Merislene
Cimeus was sixth at 21-10.
Vargas also won the discus at
81-09 feet, just ahead of the 79-
06 of teammate Louis who
placed second.
Senior Mylekia Stevensop
placed third in the long jump,
while soph Adna Metayer was
third in the triple jump. Louis
tied for second in the high jump
at 4-06 feet.
In running events. Louis was
second in the 100 hurdles at
18.18 and second in the 300
hurdles at 53.82. Stevenson
won the 400 meter run and was
fourth in the 200 meter dash..
Murillo was second in the 800
meter run.
For the Wildcats at Avon
Park, Skitka placed fourth in the
discus, Brown was sixth in the
long jump and Tre' Anderson
tied for fourth in the triple
jump.
In the running events Octavio
Alvarez and Angelo Parkinson
joined Beatty and Garcia for
first place in the 4x800 relay in
a time of 9:05.26. Brown won
the 110 hurdles in 15.47 and
junior Maxon Delhomme was
third in the 100 dash.
Beatty won the 1,600 meter is
a time of 5:16.02 and was a
close second in the 3,200 with a
time of 11:39. Brown, Del-
homme, Richardson and Ander-
son combined to win the 4x100
relay at 47.71. Lucious Everett,
Parkinson, Richardson and Gar-
cia were second in the 4x400
metet in a time of 3:48.71, just
37 hundredths of a second.
PALMETTO
Hardee girls were fourth of
the six teams and the boys


placed fifth of eight squads.
The Hardee girls were third
in the 4x200 relay with sophs
Adna Metayer and Janet Lopez
and frosh Angela Herron and
Dee Dee Metayer. In the 800
sprint relay, it was Vargas,
Louis, Stevenson and Cimeus
placing third. Stevenson was
third and Cimeus fourth in the
long jump, while Louis was
second and soph Andrea Cas-
taneda sixth in the high jump.
Vargas was third in the shot put.
Boys highlights include third
place in the 4x400 relay, with
Parkinson, Beatty, Garcia and
soph Christian Moralez. The
same foursome was also third in
the 4x800 relay and third in the
distance medley. In the 800
spring medley,. it was Brown,
freshman Kevin Borjas, soph
Octavio Alvarez and senior
Rodriguez placing second.
Brown, freshman Morgan Gar-
cia, Alvarez and Rodrigues
were second in the 1,600 sprint
medley. Rodriguez placed fifth
and Brown sixth in the long
jump.
DESOTO
Hardee boys and girls both
placed first in this meet against
Sebring and DeSoto.
Highlights included girls first
place by Louis in the 100 hur-
dles, Murillo in the 1,600, Louis
in the 300 hurdles, Lopez in the
800, Stevenson in the discus
and Louis in the triple jump.
For the boys, there were first-
place finishes by Beatty in the
1,600 and also in the 3,200,
Reimundo Garcia in the 800
and Rodriguez in the long jump.
There were a lot of second-
and third-place points as well,
as Hardee coaches Rob Beatty,
Rod Smith, James Carpenter
and Gloria Solis tried some in
different events and found addi-
tional strengths and weakness-
es.


Yard Sales
For Cancer
There will be two yard
sales on Saturday to raise
funds for Relay For Life
. teams to benefit the Ameri-
can Cancer Society. Both will
be in Wauchula.
The Wauchula Elementary
School yard sale is 8 a.m. to
noon at 400 South Florida
Avenue and the First Na-
tional Bank sale will be in its
parking lot at 406 N. Sixth
Ave. (U.S. 17) from 8 a.m. to
1 p.m.


Listening Session
Plans For Future
The Hardee County Ex-
tension Service is in the
process of developing a
long-range plan to guide its
educational programs for the
next decade. They want to
hear from people about the
challenges and issues they
face so they can get the
information people need.
To share your ideas and
challenges with Extension
Service staff join the listen-
ing session next Thursday,
April 21, from 6:30 to 8:30
p.m. at the Extension Office,
507 Civic Center Drive,
behind the Agri-Civic Center
at Altman and Stenstrom
Roads west of Wauchula.


Car Wash To
Help Japan
The South Florida Com-
munity College Hardee
Campus will host a car wash
on Saturday from 10 a.m. to
2 pm. to benefit the Jap-
anese-American Red Cross
Society following the recent
catastrophe in Japan.
The college Panther Am-'
bassadors student organiza-
tion will host the car wash at
Advance Auto Parts, 905 S.
Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17 South),
Wauchula. Cost is $5 per
car.


No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself and another to the
multitude without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true.
-Nathaniel Hawthorne


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10A The Herald-Advocate, April 14,2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HARDEE, FLORIDA
Case No. 252011 CA 000188

GERMAN FLORIDA CITRUS, L.C.
Plaintiff,
vs.
EDWARD S. SCHONTAG, SR.;
Individually; STEVEN D. SCHON-
d TAG, Individually; CYNTHIA MAN-
LEY, Individually; ERWIN HOE-
FLING, Individually; GUENTHER
DILL a/k/a GUNTER DILL, IndMd-
ually; MARIA ANNA DILL a//a
MARIANNE DILL, Individually;
MATTHIAS DILL, Individually; and
IDOB, INC., a dissolved Florida
corporation
Defendants

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:Guenther Dill a/k/a Gunter
Dill, address unknown
Maria Anna Dill a/k/a Mari-
anne Dill, address unknown
Matthias DIIl, address un-
known

Erwin Hoefllng, address
unknown

IDOB, INC., a dissolved Florl-
da corporation, address
unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Quiet Title on the fol-
lowing property In HARDEE
County, Florida:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN
SECTION 10, 11, 14 AND 15,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
24 EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTIC-
ULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:

BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF SAID SECTION 10,
SAID POINT BEING THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, AND RUN
NORTH 0024'440 EAST AND
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SECTION 10, A DISTANCE OF
2831.38 FEET1 THENCE NORTH
8412'19" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
2546.16 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOME CREEK; THENCE SOUTH
53V3914" EAST AND ALONG THE
CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOME CREEK, A DISTANCE OF
446.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
41"59'54" EAST AND ALONG THE
CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOME CREEK, A DISTANCE OF
437.91 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
18003'13" EAST AND ALONG THE
CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOME CREEK, A DISTANCE OF
361.44 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
53050'150 EAST AND ALONG THE
CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOM, CREEK, A DISTANCE OF
753.3 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
763W0" EAST AND ALONG THE
CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOME CREEK, A DISTANCE OF
902.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
7333*55" EAST AND ALONG THE
CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOME CREEK, A DISTANCE OF
522.36 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 10;
THENCE SOUTH 79"26'46" EAST
AND ALONG THE CENTER LINE
OF TROUBLESOME CREEK, A
DISTANCE OF 548.59 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 61 013'07 EAST
AND ALONG THE CENTER UNE
OF TROUBLESOME CREEK, A
DISTANCE OF 740.24 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 52037'02" EAST
AND ALONG THE CENTER UNE
OF TROUBLESOME CREEK, A
DISTANCE OF 626.38 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 88042'02" EAST
AND ALONG THE CENTER UNE
OF TROUBLESOME CREEK, A
DISTANCE OF 286.12 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 0021'16" WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 585.54 FEET TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 11; THENCE SOUTH
8855'14" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
659.59 FEET TO THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 14;
THENCE SOUTH 0032'32 WEST
ALONG THE QUARTER-SECTION
LINE OF SAID SECTION 14, A
DISTANCE OF 1329.93 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 8901'45" WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 661.58 FEETr
THENCE SOUTH 037'40" WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 1048.99 FEET TO
THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF VANDOLAH ROAD;
THENCE SOUTHH 800-37'43 WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 673.51 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 0042'47" EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 1169.90 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89"01'45" WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 1323.13 FEET TO
STHE WEST UNE OF SAID SEC-
TION 14; THENCE NORTH
89040'36" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
2645.39 FEET TO THE QUARTER-
SECTION LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 15; THENCE NORTH
8940'37" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
1322.67 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
0-43'30" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
1332.23 FEET; THENCE NORTH
8938'32" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
1321.43 FEET TO THE WEST LINE
OF SAID SECTION 15; THENCE
NORTH 040'18" EAST ALONG
THE WEST UNE OF SAID SEC-
TION 15, A DISTANCE OF 2662.85


FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOL-
LOWING:

TRACT B-12,-IDOB, INC. CITRUS
GROVES, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 15,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
24 EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH
89*42'41" EAST ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION
15, 73.91 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
0"43'30" WEST, 1679.95 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;


- THENCE CONTINUE SAME LINE,
385.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
8938'32- EAST 86.0 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 004330" WEST
55.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
893832" EAST 744.0 FEET;,
THENCE NORTH 0043'30 EAST,
385.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH
89"3832" WEST 682.0 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 0"4330" EAST
55.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH
8938'32" WEST 148.0 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT
TO A 10 FOOT ROAD AND MAIN-
TENANCE EASEMENT ALONG
EAST SIDE, AND LESS TRACT BI,
CI-14, IDOB, INC. CITRUS
GROVES, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 15,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
24 EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH
89"42'41" EAST ALONG NORTH
LINE OF SAID SECTION 15, 73.91
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0"43'30"
WEST 2449.95 FEET TO POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE SAME LINE, 165.0 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 89O3832" EAST
830.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH
0"43'30" EAST 110.0 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 8938'32" WEST
806.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH
0043'30" EAST 55.0 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89038'32" WEST
24.0 FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT
ROAD AND MAINTENANCE
EASEMENT ALONG EAST SIDE.
AND ALSO,
BEGIN AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 15,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
24 EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH
89042'41" EAST ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION
15,923.92 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
043'30" WEST 2010.98 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE SAME LINE 605.0
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 893832"
EAST 390.0 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 0043'30" EAST 550.0
FEET; THENCE NORTH 89"3832"
WEST 102.0 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 0"43'30" EAST 55.0 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 8938'32" WEST
288.0 FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT
ROAD AND MAINTENANCE
EASEMENT ALONG WEST SIDE,
AND LESS

TRACT B-13, IDOB, INC. CITRUS
GROVES, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SECTION 15,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
24 EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH
89042'41" EAST ALONG NORTH
LINE OF SAID SECTION 15, 73.91
FEET THENCE SOUTH 0*43'30"
WEST, 2064.95 FEET TO POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE SAME LINE, 385.0 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 89038'32" EAST
24.0 FEET; .THENCE SOUTH
"P43'30" WIT 55.0 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 89038'32" EAST
806.0 FEElT THENCE NORTH
fl42a30' .EAST 385.0 FEET:
THENCE NORTH 89038'32" WEST
744.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH
0043'30" EAST 55.0 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89`38'32" WEST
86.0 FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT
ROAD AND MAINTENANCE
EASEMENT ALONG EAST SIDE.

LESS AND EXCEPT:
BEING A PART OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 11 AND A
PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4
OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST, HARD-
EE COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SAID SOUTHWEST
1/4 AND RUN NORTH 8855'14"
WEST AND ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4
659.59 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE
NORTH 021'16" EAST AND
ALONG THE WEST UNE OF SAID
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF SOUTHWEST 1/4 585.54
FEET TO A POINT ON THE CEN-
TER LINE OF TROUBLESOME
CREEK; THENCE SOUTH
8842'02" WEST AND ALONG THE
CENTER LINE OF TROUBLE-
SOME CREEK 286.12 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 5237'02" WEST
AND ALONG THE CENTER LINE
OF TROUBLESOME CREEK 80.26
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 102'43"
WEST AND RUNNING FROM
SAID SECTION 11 INTO SAID
SECTION 14 A DISTANCE OF
2313.21 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE CENTER LINE OF A CREEK;
THENCE SOUTH 7340'34" EAST
AND ALONG SAID CENTER LINE
384.26 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID
NORTHWEST 1/4;
THENCE NORTH 037'40" EAST
AND ALONG SAID WEST LINE
461.99 FEET TO THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE
SOUTH 89`01'46" EAST 661.58
FEET TO THE NORTHEAST COR-


rNutrition Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH

*Q: Springtime candy is every- fewer calories, but nit
where now. Can I avoid gain- piece after piece adds up.
ing weight by choosing jelly people fool themselves b
beans, marshmallow candies eating a bite here and
or other low or no-fat sweets? without paying attention
A: The most important step for But in the end, whether y
keeping candy, whether high in it all at once or mindlessl
fat or not, from causing unwant- ble a bit at a time, whe
ed weight gain is portion con- polish off a seven-ounce
trol. A quarter-cup of jelly chocolate bunny, you've
beans (a portion the size of a more than 1000 extra ca
golf ball or egg) or a serving of As with all treats, when s
five marshmallow chicks has time candy comes out,
about 160 calories. Even portions, substitute it for
though there's no fat added, other higher calorie trea
these candies have as much eat it when you can sit
sugar as a 12-ounce can of reg- and really taste and fully
ular soda, so calories add up. A it. Behavior researchers
small one-ounce piece of us to limit how much we
chocolate contains slightly home, because the odds a
once it comes home with
NER OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF may disappear faster tha
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID planned.
NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE Q: Is it true that barrai
NORTH 0"32'32" EAST'1329.93 fisr is high in omega-3 I
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. A: Barramundi (also kno
Giant Perch or Asian Sea
has been filed against you and is not quite as high in on
you are required to serve a copy fat as salmon, Atlantic m
of your written defenses, if any, to el, sardines or farmed ra
it on J. STEVEN SOUTHWELL, trout, but it is a source c
Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address Is Post Office Box 1748, stantial omega-3 fat, with
Wauchula, Florida, 33873, on or 500 milligrams (mg)
before May 1, 2011 and file the cooked 3-ounce serving
original with the Clerk of this size of a deck of card
Court either before service on.
Plaintifsr attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
be entered against you for the FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FL(
relief demanded In the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and the seal CASE NO.: 25201 CAOOO
of this Court on the 12 day of BETTY ANN EASON, IndMi
April, 2011.
HUGH BRADLEY And 4- GROVES, INC.
B. HUGH BRADLEY PlaintIffs,
As Clerk of the Court

By:Connie Coker vs.
As Deputy Clerk WL-1, LLC, a Florida Umltei
4:14,21C I I|

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 252011CP000025

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MICHAEL J. CROWLEY
a.k.a. MICHAEL JAMES CROW-
LEY,
Deceased.
/I

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You'are hereby notified than an
Order of Summary Administration
has been entered In the estate of
MICHAEL J. CROWLEY a.k.a.
MICHAEL JAMES CROWLEY,


deceased, File Number
252011CP00n25; by the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is P.O. Drawer 1749.
Wauchula. Florida 33873: that the
decedent's date of death was
February 15. 2011; that the total
value of the estate is 28.041.74
and that the names and address-
es of those to whom it has been
assigned by such order are:
Name
Patricia F. Crosby
Address
25 E. Orange Street
Avon Park, Florida 33825
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the
decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than
those for whom provision for full
payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERI-
OD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is April 14, 2011.
Person Giving Notice:
PATRICIA F. CROSBY
25 E. Orange Street
Avon Park, Florida 33825

Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
DAVID F. LANIER
E-Mail Address:
lanier30@embarqmall.com
Florida Bar No. 045399
DAVID F. LANIER
P.O. Box 400
Avon Park, Florida 33826-0400
Telephone: (863) 453-4457
4:14,21c


-


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I AND
ORIDA
1532

lually,


POTOMAC-WAUCHULA, LCC.,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant
to Final Default Judgment and
Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure 'ahd for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on March 21, 2011, In the
above-styled cause, I will sel to
the highest and best bidder for
cash on the Second Floor
M.allay Outsde otRoom. 202 of
4he Mardee iCo4nty CoiMthpuw.
catjd a47 WestsMain Street,
"Wauchula, Florida, on the 4th day
of May, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., the
following-described property:
Tract 1
W 1/4 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4
of Section 21, Township 33
South, Range 25
East
AND
Parcel 2
E 3/4 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4
and NW1/4 of NE1/4 and
NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of NE 1/4
In Section 21, Township 33
South, Range 25 East

Dated this 11 day of April, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY. CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
4:14,21c


sweet, mila tlavor makes it a
popular choice, even with peo-
ple who don't like the stronger
taste of some of these other
high omega-3 fish. According
to the Monterey Bay Aquarium,
when you get barramundi from
U.S. or Australian sources, it is
generally farmed in environ-
mentally sound systems, and
contaminants like mercury tend


not to be a problem. It's avail-
able both fresh and frozen and
can be served with a simple
squirt of lemon juice to accent
its flavor. Or try it baked,
broiled or sauteed with flavors
of the Mediterranean (like
tomatoes, basil and garlic), Asia
(like ginger and mathrooms) or'
Latin America (like lime,
cilantro and jalapeno peppers).


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


KATIE & I ARE HUNTING THIS WEEKEND!
Back in November, my girlfriend, Katie Hughes, and I each
applied for 2011 spring turkey quota hunt permits. Katie has never
bagged a turkey before, so I really want her to have an opportuni-
ty to get one.
I was hoping the "guest permit" would increase the odds of us
being able to hunt together. If I got drawn, we would obtain a guest
permit in her name, and if she got drawn, she would take me as her
guest. .,
I was not successful this year in drawing a spring turkey quota
permit, but I am happy to report that Katie was, drawing the week-
end of April 15-17 on L. Kirk Edwards Wildlife and Environmental
Area in Tallahassee.
For those who didn't get drawn, missed the application period
or want even more hunting opportunities, the Florida Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has 42 wildlife man-
agement areas where you don't need a quota permit to hunt during
all or parts of the spring turkey season. All you need in most cases
is a hunting license ($17 for residents), a management area permit
.($26) and a turkey permit ($10 for residents). On a few of them,
you also need a daily quota or daily use permit, both of which are
free and given out at the management areas' check stations on a
first-come, first-served basis. For a list of these 42 WMAs, go to
MyFWC.com/Hunting.
Hunting spring turkeys on WMAs.is much like hunting them
on private property, except for a couple of things. The first excep-
tion is that you may not shoot a turkey past 1 p.m. on a WMA. On
private lands, you may hunt them until sunset. The other thing I
need to mention doesn't have anything to-do with legal require-
ments, but is arguably more important,.and that is that you don't
know who else is hunting around you on a WMA.
On private property, you may be the only person hunting a par-
ticular small tract of land. In the case of a hunting club or large
piece of leased property, you might have to stay within a designat-
ed area or you mark where you're going to be hunting that day on
the camp's check-in map. That way, everyone knows where every-
one else is going to be.
On WMAs, however,; you don't have that luxury, so you
should take even more proactive steps to ensure safe hunting. The
FWC and National Wild Turkey Federation stress to hunters to
always positively identify your target before pulling the trigger.
Here are a few things you can do to help prevent such unwant-
ed incidents:
Some of the turkey hunters you're likely to Aun into out there
are so good at their "calling" that it's sometimes hard to tell'f it's
a nearby hunter making those sounds or if it's the real thing.
Always assume such questionable sounds and movements are
being made by another hunter, until you can positively identify the
source.
SAnd if you do come across another turkey hunter, and you're;
not sure if he sees you, wave your arms qnd whistle,jor say some-
thing loud enough for him to hear you, tb announce your presence.
Speaking of turkey calling, there's one turkey call I plan on leav-!
ing at home, and that's my gobble tube. I don't mind other hunters
thinking there may be a crow, owl or hen turkey nearby, but I sure
don't want to be shaking a gobble tube (imitating a gobbler) in the
brush and have any hunters within hearing distance start heading
my way or, worse yet, make a hunter within gunshot range think
there's a big tom in the bushes.
While I might be leaving that gobble tube behind, one other
thing we will be bringing and using, even though it's not required,
is hunter-orange vests. We plan to wear them when we walk to and
from the truck and any set-up points. As soon as we settle in and
get in position, we'll remove them and place them out of sight of
any approaching turkey.
As a safety precaution, the NWTP urges hunters not to stalk
turkeys. But, if Katie and I decide to pick up and go after a bird we
hear that may be "henned up" and not responding to our calls -- in
order to get better position on him you can bet we'll both be
wearing our orange vests.
Good luck and be safe out there, y'all.
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him,
with questions about hunting at Tony. Young@MyFWC.com.


NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Notice is given that the District has determined that no ERP is required on <1 acres
to serve Agricultural Barn and Low Water Crossings known as Sweetwater Preserve.
LLC. The project is located in Hardee County, Section(s) .25
Township 35S South, Range 25E East. The permit inquiry was submitted by GPSI on
Behalf of Andrew Pace whose address is 1906 Mel Bryan Road. Zolfo SDrings. FL
33890 .
The permit No. is 646413.

The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday
through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District (District) Bartow Service Office. 170 Century Boulevard.
Bartow. FL 33830.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding an
administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes
(FS.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), of the Uniform Rules of
Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the substantial interests of
each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the District's action, or final action;
(2) state all material facts disputed by each person requesting thehearing or state that
there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, FAC. A
request for hearing must be filed with and received by the Agency Clerk of.the District at
the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within
21 days of publication of this notice. Failure to file a request for hearing within this time
period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing
under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS.

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the
position taken by it in the notice of final agency action. Persons whose substantial
interests will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the application have
the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the
requirements set forth above.

Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, FS., to settle an administrative dispute
regarding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing. 4:14c


YOUR' BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255
IIl l I


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April 14,2011, The Herald-Advocate 11A


Mountain Moment
By Karla Patarini


THE GUARDIAN ANGEL
The sun shone brightly on the silky black hair that lay softly
against the frame of her small gentle face. She walked slowly and
stopped often to gaze at the intriguing machinery and aircraft that
surrounded her, entrancing her into a world of giddy excitement.
The rainbow of colors that surrounded her caught her attention
as bright yellow, orange and blue,"garnet and gold, and fluorescent
pinks sparkled in the bright sunlight.
Her awestruck eyes fixed upon a set of propeller blades as they
spun and whirred with great speed, watching it in wonder as it pre-
pared for its initial takeoff. The rattle of noisy engines filled the air
with a loud roar as several pilots made their entrance oiito the taxi-
way as they prepared for their departure into the crisp' blue of the
afternoon sky.
The rattling propellers and noisy engines of the aircraft could
have easily frightened most young children, causing them to secure
the tight grasp of a parent's haWd; Yet this small creature'appeared
^a''


My, but these are exciting times as district competition i over
for some HHS athletes and looming for some others.
Congratulations to senior Kyle Bodeck for his number fo r sin-
gles district championship performance in the Class 2A-Dis rict 8
playoffs. Junior Summer Palmer also did very well with her ham-
pionship runner-up performance in the number one singles. !
Track districts are today (Thursday) and tomorrow, thp pole
vault at Mooney today and the rest of the events at Sodtheast
tomorrow. Hopefully, they'll be a lot of guys and gals going on to
regionals at Titusville.
In weightlifting, senior Jarrius Lindsey goes for the gold in
Saturday's state meet at Kissimmee. He had a 600 total, with 310
in the bench and 290 in the clean-and-jerk in the 183-pound divi-
sion. Junior Carlos Marquez did well in being sectional runner-up
in the 219-pound division.
Hardee girls softball hosts their district playoffs next week. The
four-five seed game is Monday at Southeast. On Tuesday, DeSoto
plays th~iwinner of the 4-5ganie and Hardee clashes with Cardinal
Mooney at 7:30. They both ended with 5-3 records ( dual losses to
Desoto and one to each other). Mooney won the coin toss to be sec-'
ond seed and home team for this game. The Tuesday winners play '
next Thursday at 7 p.m. for the district championship.
The Hardee varsity Wildcats won two and lost one last week,
while the JV boys won all three of their games. The varsity beat
Booker and Mulberry but fell behind at Southeast and never caught
up. The boys districts are at Southeast April 26-29.
Men's Church Leaguengot started last week. There are five
teams in the boys youth baseball division and three in the girls
youth softball division. They play on Mondays, Tuesdays,
Thursday and Fridays. The girls are now playing on the fields off
South Florida Avenue, while the boys are on the four new fields off
Doyle Carlton Road behind the Armory.
Information from school and community events is always wel-
come. Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heraldad-
vocate@embarqmail.com with news for this biweekly column. The
sports news deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday, except for events which
happen over the weekend. These are due by Monday at noon.
Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heral-
dadvocate @embarqmail with news for this biweekly column. The
sports news deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday, except for events which
happen over the weekend. They are due by noon Mondays.




Wauchula Elementary School
400 South Florida Ave.

Sl'ardSa/e
Misc. Items
gI Saturday, April 6'
sa 8 a.m. -Noon
j proceeds will go to the Hardee County
": Relay for Life" Event to benefit the.
SAnerican Cancer Societ1


sac4 14l


not to be startled by the sudden roars that surrounded her as she
wandered to and fro.
Doting adults spoke to her as she stared with wondrous eyes at
the various aircraft, but few questioned her unresponsive behavior
or the slight tilting of her head as she watched their moving lips for,
after all, they were complete strangers to her.
The attention of the crowd was suddenly drawn toward the
beautiful Cirrus SR22 airplane that had made its entrance onto the
taxiway. The pilot, having settled back in the luxurious leather seat-
ing, fixed his eyes on the instrument panel before him and then
focused on the busy traffic ahead. And then, without warning, it
happened ....
Despite all the shouts and cries, the small child continued to
- walk into the path of the oncoming plane in an eager attempt to get
a closer look. She heard none of the fearful and desperate pleas of
the onloolt s, for her world was not filled with the normal sounds
of everyday life but consisted only of muffled and muted sounds.
Unbeknownst to the spectators, the child had a sensory hear-
ing impairment which made her totally oblivious to the danger
ahead as she traveled straight toward the approaching plane.
Strong arms suddenly wrapped around the fragile creature as
she was pulled swiftly to safety. Gasps and loud sighs of relief were
heard from the crowd, followed by applause for the hero who
seemed to appear from nowhere to pull the unsuspecting child out
of harm's way. The women dried tears from their eyes as the men
shook hands and clapped one another on their backs, and with
grateful hearts the crowd broke apart and returned to what they
were doing before the excitement erupted.
Later in the afternoon the question arose as to the identity of
the hero. Who was the man who saved the day and prevented a near
tragedy? Perhaps it was a spectator who chose to visit the aircraft
event or maybe even a visiting pilot who had stopped to refuel his
plane. No one seemed to have the answer. It is still a mystery to this
day.
Guardian Angels we may never know when they come our
way to protect and save us from oncoming tragedies in our person-
al lives.
Sometimes they come to pull us out of harm's way and, just as
in the case of the hearing-impaired child, we remain oblivious to
the danger as we continue on life's journey. Other times, we can see
His hand of protection at work as we reflect back on near tragedies.
Whether these Guardian Angels be in the form of a family
member, a friend, a stranger or perhaps even an angel sent from
Above, we can take comfort in the fact that they were sent by the
One who not only looks out for His children at all times and in all
circumstances, but does so with a love so great that it is beyond our
grasp to understand.
Psalm 91:11 reads: "For He will command His angels con-
cerning you to guard you in all your ways."
Take a moment today and reflect on the many times in your
life in which His strong arms of protection wrapped around your
fragile life and pulled you swiftly to safety!

Nature provides a free
lunch but only if we control
our appetites. | HE HBS HEERL
-William Ruckelshaus


The Real Florida
By Dorothy Harris
State Park Ranger

FLORIDA FOLK MUSIC CONCERT SATURDAY
Spring has arrived, and the park is bursting with life.
Gaze into the lush green canopy of the Hammock or come
delight over wildflowers springing up in the flatwoods. Spring
birds are abundant now. Look for swallow-tailed kites, yellow-
billed cuckoos, red-headed woodpeckers, great crested flycatchers
and northern parulas. White-tailed deer are seed nearly every day,
and alligators laze about in the swamps.
What a wonderful time to visit the park!
It's not too hot and there's no worry about afternoon thunder-
storms for another six weeks or so. Come take advantage of the
extra daylight hours. Bring the kids out in the late afternoon and
toss a football or ride your bikes. Take a cruise around Loop
Drive's bike path or enjoy the off-road bicycle trail.
Haven't been camping in a while? Make a reservation to relax
by the campfire while the kids enjoy the playground and make new
friends. This time of year is perfect, no pesky bugs to bother you
and weekdays are quiet and peaceful. Weekends remain busy until
the end of May.
It's also a great time of year for enjoying an evening concert.
This Saturday, Billy Glades performs his Florida Folk music begin-
ning at 7 p.m. Concert tickets are just $5 per person and accompa-
nied kids age 12 and under are admitted free of charge. Park admis-
sion is waived after 6 p.m. on concert nights, making this an afford-
able evening out. Why not camp that weekend so you can relax all
day, enjoy the concert and still have time for smores before bed?
The park offers nine different nature trails to explore, and I bet
it's been a long time since you've walked some of them. Do you
remember the 1,000-year-old tree at the Big Oak Trail? Chances
are it looks quite a bit different than you remember. The huge-oak
on the Hickory Trail with the burned-out bottom is still there wait-
ing for you to step inside. Have you seen the Fern Garden Trail now
that the historic waterway's been restored? Fern the alligator is
back, and maybe you'll even see the otters swimming around.
Don't forget that you are always welcome to borrow a pair of
binoculars at the Ranger Station to see what's out here in The Real
Florida.
'
It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the estab-
lished authorities are wrong.
-Voltaire



LEADERS ARE READY TO GATHER THEIR HERD!!

It's the 2011 Root'n-Toot'n Cat Cheer Clinic!e!
When: May 2nd May 5th Where: HHS Gym
Time: 3 yrs Kindergarten 3:45-4:30
1'Grade 6thGrade 3:45-5:15
Cost: 3 yrs Kindergarten $35
1st Grade 6th Grade $40


There will be a MANDATORY registration held on Thursday, April 21" from 5-7pm.
Registration will be held at the HHS gym. Anyone interested in Cat Cheer Clinic
MUST register their child on this day!
YOU MUST HAVE A COPY OF YOUR INSURANCE CARD AT REGISTRATION!
-----cut along this line and bring the bottom half with you to registration-----


F Policy Number


Grade


L 14-16 XL 18-20


Halter Breaking Clinic

For All Interested in Showing a Steer or Heifer

Selecting That Calf

Proper-Nutrition-

Halter Breaking

We will have a halter breaking demonstration ,
by Matt Warren on d fferent techniques on
getting that steer or heifer broke. This is for
beginners as vell as novice. There will be
information on selecting that next show calf
and proper nutrition 4s well.

Come join the fun and learn something new!'


April 16 at 8:30am /


HARDEE RANCH SUPPLY, INC.
1309 Hwy. 17 South Wauchula

Store Hours: 773-4322
Store Hours: Monday Friday 7 am 5:30 pm
Saturday 7 am 12 pm

4:14c


AS
soc4:14,21c


YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


Child's Name_
Parent's Name
Insurance Company
Child's Age______


Emergency Contact
Cheerleader To Be Credited
Allergies
Please circle your child's shirt size:
XS 2-4 S 6-8 M 10-12


'--------------------------- ------


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12A The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


-- Light One Candle
By Tony Rossi
The Christcqphers

ATTRACTING YOUNG PEOPLE ITO CHURCH
Chances are that the leaders in your parish have asked the
question, "How can we get young people more involved in the
church?"
As part of a Catholic Young Adult group myself, I know that
question doesn't have a one-size-fits-all answer. However, two
guests I've interviewed on my radio show had suggestions they've
seen work.
The first is Bob Lesnefsky, also known as the award-winning
Christian rapper Righteous B. Though he enjoys making music, his
real passion is a youth program he co-founded called Dirty Vaga-
bond' Ministries. Describing its approach as "incarnational min-
istry," the program places missionaries in an urban area to live
among the people and meet them wherever they are.
Lesnefsky said, "We show up at a park with a grill and start
grilling hot dogs and feeding people. The first time, we just see
them and get to know their names. Over weeks or years, it eventu-
ally builds relationships and develops into a friendship.
"It's much more effective for me to share Christ with someone
who considers me their friend than someone who I knock on their
door and try to give them a five-minute plug. These are people we
have an authentic relationship with. There's an element of trust that
happens before we even tell them about God. They begin to see we
care for them outside of whether or not they ever come to the
church," he explained.
Another person who's had great success in this area is author
and speaker Mark Hart, who's also known as "The Bible Geek."




PALMN% SUNDAY
ALL SING SERVICE

Sunday April 17

11:00 a.m.
CHOIR SPECIALS SOLOS
CONGREGATIONAL SINGING
Directed By
Mr. Duck Smith
Nursery Provided




EVERYONE WELCOME


throughh his work with the program Life Teen, he is helping young
people "form their Catholic identity in authentic and joy-filled
ways."
Hart acknowledged that one of the challenges of getting young
people to Mass is that they're a screen-based culture that's always
texting or online. He told me, "We (shouldn't) wonder why young
people are bored at Mass when they're constantly stimulated the
other 167 hours a week."
Hart's solution, however, isn't to make Mass entertaining but
to help our "individualistic culture ... appreciate how communal
God designed us to be."
Hart has discovered that "modern teenagers ... want depth.
They want deep relationships; they just don't know how to have
them. They're really drawn to the mystical. When you start walk-


ing them into the mystical elements of the sacraments and the depth
and breadth of the mysteries of the church, their hearts become
enlivened."
Hart sees part of the problem as adults who talk at teens, not
with them. He points out, "We should take a lesson from Christ on
the road to Emmaus. He walked and listened before He taught."
It's easy to lament the lack of young faces at Sunday Mass, but
complaining doesn't accomplish anything. Instead, consider the
insights of Bob Lesnefsky and Mark Hart and try to build on what
they've shown can work.
For a free copy of "Teens: Find Your Inner Strength," write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
mail@ christophers. org.


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PAGE ONE


Softball

,By JOAN SEAMAW
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee girls softball
team is hosting the 3A District
11 playoffs next week.
Local fans will be able to
cheer their team to victory as
games are held at the Rec-
reation Complex field just north
of the high school.
The first game is actually at
Bradenton Southeast on Mon-
day,evening, as the number 5
seed, Sarasota Booker takes on
number 4 seed Southeast. The,
winner of that game will come
to Hardee on Tuesday to play
top-seed DeSoto in the early
game at 5:30 p.m. Hardee, seed-
ed third by the flip of a coin,
will play second-seed Sarasota
SCardinal Mooney at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday. The teams split games
During the season. Both ended
up with 5-3 records.
The Tuesday night winners
will advance to play in the dis-
trict championship game, next
Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m.
Whoever wins will host the first
regional game, while the loser
will have to travel for the
regional quarterfinal game.
Hardee had a pair of games
last week, playing at DeSoto on
Monday evening and hosting
Palmetto on Thursday for
Senior Night.
DESOTO 15, HARDEE 5
The Lady Wildcats were
leading 5-4 in this game after
the first three innings, before
errors cost Hardee the game.
"We have a young team, lack-
ing the experience of an older
DeSoto squad; however, we
have the ability to play with
them. The girls need to play
seven innings of defense. Errors
and 'freezing' during the game
is what beat them," commented
Wildcat coach Shari Knight.
Hardee started well. Bailey
Carlton singled and Kayla
Knight followed that with a
double. A long singled by senior
Elvira Servin brought both
teammates home with the first
runs of the game. DeSoto went
down one-two-three.
Hardee did the same in the
top of the second, while DeSoto
began to score, plating four runs
on a couple of walks and hits.
Hardee forged back in front
in the top of the third. Ana
Galvez singled to left field and
Carlton singled again. Knight
brought them both home with a
double. Courtney Parks singled
to score Knight and make the
score 5-4.
It continued that way until the
home half of the fourth, when
DeSoto scored four runs on six


Girls Host Districts


,I 7 :' 4


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Head Coach Shari Knight (middle) congratulates her two
seniors, Elvira Servin (left) and Caylah Coker.


hits and errors. Another seven
Bulldog hits and errors pro-
duced seven more runs for the
Lady Bulldogs in the bottom of
the fifth and won the game.

HARDEE 10, PALMETTO 0
Hardee girls celebrated
Senior Night in a big way, with
a shutout of the rival Palmetto
Lady Tigers. Seniors Elvira
Servin and Caylah Coker were!
honored in pre-game cere-i
monies.
After stranding one Tiger in
the top of the first, Hardee went
to work. With one down,
Knight tripled to deep right
field and trotted home on a
Servin hit to leftfieLd._Serin.
stole second and advance to
third on a Brooke Tyson sacri-
fice. Parks singled to score
Servin.
With a pair of strikeouts and a
ground-out Palmetto went
down quickly in the top of the
second. Hardee went back to
work and added three more
runs. Addison Aubry started it
with a singled to left field.
Galvez was hit by a pitch but
erased by a fielder's choice hit


by Carlton. An error and double
by Knight kept runners moving.
Knight stole third and slipped
home on a passed ball. It was 5-
0 at the end of two innings.
Four up and three down took
care of Palmetto in the third
inning. Hardee got another run.
Parks singled, stole second,
advanced on a Coker sacrifice
and home on a Kate Thomas
sacrifice.
The fourth inning kept Pal-
metto at bay and added yet
another Lady Wildcat run. Carl-
ton singled and stole her way to
third, coming home on a Servin
RBI hit.
Knight struck out the Pal-
metto side in the top of the fifth.
The Lady 'Cats proceeded to
end the game with the final four
runs needed for the 10-run
mercy rule. Coker took a walk.
On a ground-out, she took sec-
ond and scored when Aubry
singled to deep right center.
Arissa Camel drew a walk and
Carlton singled. When Knight
doubled to right field to bring in
the 10 run, Hardee had a well-
earned victory against a team
that has beaten it many times in
the past.


'. .. .- gg_'_"-"-.--iTH
Sophomore pitcher Kayla Knight struck out seven of the 16 batters she faced In the
five-inning Senior Night game.

2011
FHSAA CLASS AAA DISTRICT 11
GIRLS SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT
BRACKETS
HOST
HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL


viiir,
DONNA STEFFENS
FOR
District Seat 3 City Commission
YOUR VOICE 4R YOUR CHOICE


8


5, L/, 'Z tf e.- Early Voting begins April 25. Election day May 1th.


Your concerns are my colehrns!
863-781-3627 Call me Follow me o n i
Donna Stelfens NU
Email: dsteffens@embarqmail.com Dona St s
Pulihical ~dvroiscmnt paid for and approved by Donna Steffenu.non-partisan. for City Cnmmission. .






VOTEI


The Herald-Advocate
CUS& S 578-780)

Thursday, April 14, 2011


# 1 DESOTO


5:30 P.M. 4/19/2011

# 4 vs # 5 WINNER PLAY IN

#2 CARDINAL MOONEY

7:30 P.M. 4/19/2011

# 3 HARDEE


4/21/2011
7:00 P.M.


SEEDING ACCORDING TO DISTRICT RECORDS:
1. DeSoto 8-0
2. Cardinal Mooney 5-3
3. Hardee 5-3
4. Southeast 2-6
5. Booker 0-8


The highest seeded team will be the home team and will wear the home uniforms.


Your Business Could Appear Herel
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
------.,j^,---------'s


E3)


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a.








2B The Herald-Advocate, April 14.2011





-Hardee


Living


Cowboy-
Cheryl Stahler of Fort Myers
got a great surprise while riding
in the Florida Cracker Trail
Ride which passes through
Hardee County.
This annual trail ride starts on
the West Coast and travels
across the state to the East
Coast. On the second day of the
trail ride, Stahler found herself
camping at Duck Smith's ranch
house in New Zion with about
150 other riders.
It was there that she met
Skipper Calder, who had pre-
sented a horse-training demon-
stration that afternoon for the
group. Stahler told him how
good her horse was, with over
500 miles of trail riding, but
that there was one problem she
could not fix, her horse would
not stand still when she tried to
saddle or when she was riding.
Her horse was great at going,
bad at standing still.
Asking Calder for help, he
scheduled Stahler and her horse
for a Sunday morning service at
Cowboy-up Ministry, located at
Cracker Trail Arena off State
Road 66, owned by Mike and
Betsy Damboise.
Calder was doing a sermon
series on "Fruit of the Spirit,"
and that particular week was on
"Patience."
Calder teaches people how to
put their horse in "Park" not
"Neutral." As Calder trains the
horse he quotes Scripture, such
as Psalms 46:10, "Be still and
know that I am God," and
Galatians 5:22, "But the fruit of


Up Ministry Teaches Patience


the Spirit is love, joy, peace,
patience, kindness, goodness,
faithfulness, gentleness and
self-control."
Calder reminds people that
it's not called the "fruit of the
Christian," it's the "fruit of the
Spirit." As Calder taught
Stahler and about 60 others the
training technique he uses on
horses to stand still, he also
talked about the patience that
comes from God.
In about one hour, Calder
demonstrates the connection,
trust and confidence in the
horse as he throws the reins on
the ground. With no way to con-
trol the horse, she stands per-
fectly still. Calder calls it
"Park."
Demonstrating a horse under
his control, Calder speaks of
being controlled by the Holy
Spirit. If Christians surrender to
the Holy Spirit, they will have
patience. It's not what people
can do; it's what God can do
through them that counts.
A sermon people can see!
That's just what Calder of
Cowboy-up Ministry does each
week with the use of horses.
Skipper Calder, born in
Wauchula 58 years ago, has
been around horses all his life.
In 2007 Calder started Cowboy-
up Ministry, described as Horse
Training with a Biblical
Message. For information or
booking a horse for training, e-
mail Skipper at horsemi-
nistry@yahoo.com or call 781-
2281.


COURTESY PHOTO
Skipper Calder shows his "horse patience line," a rope
tied overhead with a swivel in the middle and a lead rope
hanging down about two feet from the ground. Calder
says, "I tie every horse to the patience line after I ride or
train. It gives them time to think about the training
instead of the feed or play time. This will stop most hors-
es from pawing when tied to a trailer or fence."


If you see me please call Milton or Stacy Locklar

863-245-2749 863-235-1636 863-375-2222
soc4:14p


Carter Gordon
Celebrates His
2nd Birthday
Carter John Gordon, the son
of Chris and Jessica Gordon of
Wauchula, turned 2 years old on
March 4.
Carter celebrated the occa-
sion with a birthday party on
Saturday, March 5, at the home
of grandparents Greg and Reg-
gie Gordon. Theme for the
party was Tractors.
Guests were served hamburg-
ers, hot dogs, baked beans,
chips and birthday cake.
Joining in on the fun were
grandparents Ronnie and Pris-
cilla Kelley and Loran and
Shirley Cogburn, great-grand-
mother Winnie Gordon and
many other family members
and friends.


Cowgirl Party
Held For
5-Year-Old
Ravin Elise "Ray Ray" Mc-
Coy, the daughter of Mark and
Paige McCoy of Wauchula,
turned 5 years old on March 20.
She celebrated early, with a
birthday party on Saturday,
March 12, in the back yard of
her home. Theme for the occa-
sion was Cowgirl, and it includ-
ed horse rides.
Guests were served cowgirl
cake and ice cream.
Helping Ray Ray celebrate
were brother Caleb and sister
Dakota, Kayleigh Harris,
cousins Kayle Jennings, Lizzie
Beth McCoy and Parker
McCoy, Elijah Valletutti, Mac-
kenzie Thompson, Eric Har-
rison Jr., Caylee Franks, Mat-
hew Albritton and many more
family members and friends,


Carter


Ray Ray McCoy


Success usually comes to those who are too busy td be
looking for it.
-Henry David Thoreau



'Just Stuff"
133 E. Townsend St. Wauchula 832-5759




Tues. Fri. Sat.
10 am 5 pm 10 am 2 pm


COME EXPERIENCE THE AWESOME POWER OF GOD

S Dr. Larry Hutton will be visiting us this
Sl,) Saturday and Sunday. Dr. Hutton is a
3L graduate of Rhema Bible Training Center
and Life Christian University and is truly
an anointed preacher and teacher of God's
Word. known for the clear and simple way
he delivers God's Word.
Dr. Larry Hutton

Service Times
Saturday: 7 pm Sunday: 10 am & 6 pi


NE WL e Kenny Baker, pastor
1 117 West Palmetto St. Wauchula
CHURCH OF WALICHULA @The American Legion Building
SOC4 14C



MESSIAH IN THE PASSOVER

DEMONSTRATION & BANQUET
A VIVID AND EXCITING DEMONSTRATION SHOWING HOW
JESUS FULFILLED THE ANCIENT FEAST OF PASSOVER
Conducted By
CAROLE BAHM
of Chosen People Ministries

STHUR. APR.. 21

6p.m.

Everyone Welcome
A Love Offering Will Be Received




2 N Ai h An e -7


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)







April 14,2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


RETIREMENT PARTY!


BALLET COMPETITION


COURTESY PHOTO
A retirement party was held for Alvin English on March 31 at the Range Cattle Research
& Education Center in Ona. Colleagues and well-wishers celebrated English's 36 years
of service to the University of .
Florida/IFAS. He was pre-
sented with a plaque com-
memorating his service, a
photo collage of career
memories and a special re- iV. '
tirement cake. Farm Man- / f. '
ager Dennis Kalich (left) is "
shown above with Teresa -f- "' .
and Alvin English. Below, a,
Jeep-shaped cake complete'
with rifle on the dash, hunt-
Ing gear in the back and an .
inscription on the hood' .
reads, "Alvin, May all your
retirement days be healthy, .
happy, & plentiful!" .


Faith Temple Church of God
continues with its weekly meet-
ings with evangelist Glenn
Bleakney. In a four-part weekly
series, for Awake: Experience
the Power will conclude on
April 13 and 20 with meetings
at 7 p.m.
Everyone is invited to share
the experience at the church at
701 N. Seventh Ave, Wau-
chula, and hear how God is
.transforming lives around the
world.
Victory Praise Center will
host an Easter puppet play by
John and Linda Gray on Thurs-
day, April 21, at 7 p.m.
Families are invited to come
enjoy it at the church at 132 E.
Main Street, Bowling Green.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.


COURTESY PHOTO
The 22" annual Florida Federation of Music Clubs ballet auditions were held April 2 at
Highland School of Dance in Lakeland. Ballet students from throughout the state com-
peted for cash awards. Chairman of the Frances Rands Beery Memorial Award
Classical Ballet Auditions is Dr. Isabella Laude of Babson Park. Assistant chairman was
Bay Ridge District President Bess Stallings of Wauchula's Wednesday Musicale.
Adjudicators were Maria Laude of Tampa and Anna Preston of Port St. Lucie. The latter
is the sister of Peter Preston of Wauchula. Pictured (in front) are honorable mention
winners Alexis Low of Palm Bay and Makenna Ortiz of Lakeland, second-place winner
Kristen Standridge of Lakeland, and first-place winner, Jeanette Fiallo of Lakeland. The
18-year-old winner, a high school senior, plans to attend the University of South Florida
and major in dance. Shown in back (from left) are Stallings, Isabella Laude, Maria
Laude and Preston.


On The Agenda
HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
Change orders for Florida Avenue paving projects, 8:35
a.m.
Board Room audio and laptop upgrades, 9 a.m.
Update on mining environmental impact statement, 9:15
am.
Proclamation of Young child Week in Hardee County, 9:20


a.m.
Ranking economic development applications.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.



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If so, we saw it the re.
Perhaps you spoke the kindest words,
As any friend could say,
Perhaps you were not there at all,
Just thought of us that day.
Whatever you did to console our hearts,
We thank you so very much, whatever the part.
SOn behalf of the Knight family we would like to
say Thank You for the overwhelming support ,
we received after the tragic passing of ours,
( beloved Cassidy Knight.


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4B The Herald-Advocate, April 14,2011


GARDENING TIPS


COURTESY PHOTO
Anne Pidgeon of Color Field Farms in Wimauma was the
speaker at the March 16 meeting of the Wauchula
garden Club. She brought numerous plants and shared
fips on their growth, as well as showing examples of
plants that grow well In sun versus shade. Members pur-
phased the plants, with a portion of the monies going to
the club. Hostesses were Dr. Jo Thompson, Lynn Hebert
and Liby Corpus. The club Is making plans for its April 20
pneeting, when David Royal of Clear Springs to speak on
blueberries. Hostesses will be Sylvia Ann Barrows, Kay
Patarini and Evelyn Blackman. The meeting will be held
in the club's new building located at 131 N. Eighth Ave.
Members and guests are encouraged to attend and see
the renovations. For more Information, call 773-6026 or
773-3594.



Angels Softball Tight


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
By the slimmest of margins,
the Bunch AGCO Cowgirls
lead the Angels 10-and-under
softball division.
But, that's without knowing
the results of the Thursday
night game between the Java
Caf6 Lady Bugs and the High-
lands Citrus Pink Sox for which
the scoresheet was missing at
press time.
Based on available informa-
tion, Bunch leads the division
with a 5-3 (.625) record. The
Java Caf6 Lady Bugs are at 4-3
(.571) and the American Fruit
Co. Diamonds at 5-3-1 (.556).
The Friendship Foliage Pride
and Highland Citrus follow
along..
In last Monday's game,
American won 5-2 over
Friendship.
Heather Coronado, Stephanie
Derringer, Brianna Valadez,
Marisa Rodriguez and Mallory
Gough each put a run on the
board for American. Other
American players are Valerie
Lopez, Makayla Benavidez,
Adrianna Perez, Kareli Plata
and Viviana Flores.
Amari DeLeon and Denali
Briones were the only Friend-
ship players to get all the way to
home plate. Other Friendship
players are Destiny Scheel,
Adelina Villafranca, Alyssa
Gibson, Alexis McBride, Jas-
mine Otero, Elizabeth McBride,
Michaela Klein, Sophie Allen
and Makayla Otero.


On Tuesday night, Bunch
beat Java Caf6 11-1.
Ashlee Patterson and Lilanna
"Lilly" Ponce each circled the
bases twice for Bunch. Solo
scores came from Taylor Bone,
Alayna Carranco, Lillian Sal-
azar, Kyra Wilson, Miranda
Pearson, Abigail Erekson and
Jocelyn Villarreal. Avery Bunch
and Chastady Flores didn't get
home.
Sarah Carlton was the only
Java Cafe batter to get all the
way home. Other players are
Gracie Albritton, Lyndsey
Welch, Tara Hines, Shelby
Spencer, Taleia Moreno, Madi
Magee, Anahi Cano, Aubrey
Stark, Laura Ordehi and Jaycen
Batiste.
There is no record of
Thursday's game between Java
and Highland Citrus.
Players for Highland Citrus
are Summer Bond, Alexandra
Brant, Rebekah Hinojosa, Han-
nah Revell, Arielle Sanchez,
Darby Sanders, Amber Ussery,
Anabael Ramos, Shelby
Groene, Jasmine Gonzalez and
Llilyana Franco.
In the week's finale on
Friday, American upset Bunch
8-4.
Coronado and Derringer were
again twin-tally batters for
American. Lopez, Gough,
Flores and Valadez added solo
scores.
Patterson, Ponce and Car-
ranco scored in the third inning
for Bunch, while Pearson added
a run in the fourth inning.


The difference between what the most and the least
learned people know is inexpressibly trivial in relation to
that which is unknown.
-Albert Einstein


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Then Jesus said to them, "I
am the bread of life; he who
come to Me shall not
hunger, and he who be-
lieves in Me shall never
thirst. ... For this is the will of
My Father, that everyone
who sees the Son and
believes in Him should have
eternal life; and I will raise
him up at the last day.
John 6:35, 40 (NCV)
FRIDAY
Jesus once again addressed
them, "I am the world's
Light. No one who follows
Me stumbles around in the
darkness. I provide plenty of
light to live in."
John 8:12 (ME)
SATURDAY
Jesus said, "I am the Good
Shepherd. The good shep-
herd lays down his life for his
sheep- ... I am the Good
Shepherd. I know My own
sheep, and they know Me,
... and I lay down My life for
the sheep. ... My sheep rec-
ognize My voice, I know
them and they follow Me. I
give them eternal life, and
they will never perish."
John 10:9,14,15b,27 (NLT)
SUNDAY
Jesus said (to Martha), "I am
the Resurrection and the
Life; he who believes in Me,
though he die (physically),
yet shall he live (eternally),
and whoever believes in Me
shall never die."
John 11: 25-26 (RSV)
MONDAY
Jesus said, "A new com-
mandment I give unto you,
that ye love one another. As
I have loved you, that ye also
love one another. By this
shall all men know that ye
are My disciples, if ye have
loved one to another."
John 13:34-35 (KJV)
TUESDAY
Jesus replied (to Thomas), "I
am the Way, the Truth and I
am Life; no one comes to
the Father except by Me. ..
If you love Me, you will obey
My commands."
John 14:6, 15 (NEB)
WEDNESDAY
"I am the real vine; My
Father is the vine-dresser; ...
I am the vine itself: You are
the branches. It is the man
who shares My life and
whose life I share who is
fruitful. For the plain fact is
that apart from Me you can
do nothing at all. ... But if
you live your life in Me, and
My words live in your heart,
you can ask for whatever
you like, and it will come true
for you you must go on.
living in My love.
John 15:1,5,7,9b (PME)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.

10 HOURS A
MONTH!
That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


Save 50-75% on pet Vaccinations

Thursday, April 21st
S At

| Vision Ace Hardware

' 225 East Oak St., Wauchula 5:00 to 6:00 pm 773-3148


DIT


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Youth Baseball Machine
Pitch division got all its games
Splayed last week.
There were no games on
Monday or Tuesday of this
week due to FCAT testing. Play
resumes today (Thursday) and
tomorrow.
By the end of last week, the
Rapid Tech Lugnuts had
increased the margin of their
lead with an 8-0 record. The
Peace River Electric Co. Muck
Dogs are at 4-2-1, and followed
by the Bar Crescent D River
Dogs, Alan Jay Automotive
Storm and Nickerson Dairy
Mud Cats.
Last Monday's began a week
of close encounters with the
Storm nipping the Mud Cats 8-
6.
Owen Schraeder, Elias
Ramirez, Presley Gilliard and
Derek Gilliard started the Storm
with four runs in the first
inning. Greysen Weeks, Sch-
raeder and Gilliard scored in the
third inning and Jason Walker
added a final run in the fourth
inning. Other Storm players are
Brinson Conerly, Dawson


Bryant, Brandon Wilson, Austin
Alamia and Chace Ross.
Vicente Cabrera was the only
Mud Cat to cross home plate
twice. Alex Fenton, Isaac
Badillo, Hayden Mushrush and
Joel Alvarez each chipped in
with a run. Other Mud Cats are
Dylan Lambert, Cayden John-
son, Coy Gough and Ethan
Willis.
Tuesday's game was even
closer as the River Dogs and
Muck Dogs ended in a 9-9 tie.
Palmer Klein, Oscar DeLeon
and Fidencio Davillo each put a
pair of scores in the book for the
River Dogs. Kipp Cooper;
Daniel Cantu and Gage Garza
put a run each in the book.
Other River Dogs are Nick
Gainous, Emery Smith, Lane
Revell and David Navarro.
The Muck Dogs answered
with a trio of tallies by Cason
Gough and Vicente Chaidez.
Oscar DeSantiago, Joseph
Wood and Bryan Flores added a
run apiece. Other Muck Dogs
are Jace Bryan, Clayton Harris,
Clay Hancock, Adam Montes,
Ari Soles and Bobby Flores.
On Thursday evening, it was
the Lugnuts 12, the River Dogs


1 1
Caleb Block circled the bases
three times for the Lugnuts.'
Kaden Bryan, R. J. Cabrera,,
Colton Block and Tyler Jackson
were twin-tally batters, with .
Hunter Davis 'adding a solo
score. Other Lugnuts are Tyler.
Hooten, Jake Stephens, Caleb,
Macias, Alex Gonzalez, Isaac
Kuen and Jose Rivera.
Klein, Cooper and Revell
were the only River Dogs bat-
ters to get all the way to home
plate. Davila was stranded
twice and other batters left on
base as well.
Friday night featured the Muck
Dogs and Mud Cats in a battle
royal, with the Muck Dogs win-
ning 14-11.
Chaidez stepped on Jiome,
plate three times for the Muck
Dogs. Gough, Wood, Bobby
Flores and Hancock added twin
scores and DeSantiago, Bryan
Flores and Soles each chipped
in with a run.
Gough topped the Mud Cat
with three trips around the
bases. Johnson and Fenton
added twin tallies and Badillo,
Alvarez, Cruz and Hubbell each
added a run.


Hey
It's Springtime Again
How would you like to take your family out for a
good clean fun filled evening, with good fellowship,
all kinds of music and entertainment.

MUSIC AT THE MELON BARN

f Friday April 29 7 pm

7 Beginning with a light meal.
Don't forget your lawn chairs.
Ladies a covered dish or desert
would be appreciated.

3 Miles South on Johnston
Road off of Hwy. 66
4:14-28c Sponsored By: Robertson Farms


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April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It was like two different
teams. One beat Sarasota Book-
er 12-5 and won 20-0 at Mul-
berry and the other lost 11-1 at
Bradenton Southeast.
The Hardee Wildcats contin-
.ue the season with a home
streak, hosting Lakewood
Ranch Tuesday, and DeSoto
tomorrow (Friday) night. Mon-
day's home game against Mul-
berry is Senior Night for a half
dozen players, Kalan Royal,
Lincoln Saunders, Jake Mayer,
Scott Donaldson, Justin Brom-
ley and Kyle Ward.
Then its' a trip to Fort Meade
on April 19 and a visit from



7






The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
April 4-8. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Wynn M. Phillips, Sumner
Road, renovations, $3,600.
James M. Cobb, SKP Way,
roofing (2), each $1,400.
Benjamin R. Hash, North
Ninth Avenue, alterations,
$9,697.
Barry Edgley, Eighth Avenue,
renovations, $2,287.
Douglas Battey, Heard
Bridge Road, renovations,
$3,600.
Terry L. Franko, Still Court,
mobile home installation,
$9,500.
Kenneth R. Long, Orange
Street, alterations, $4,750.
Gary L. Giddens, Mel Smith
Road, renovations, $3,175.
Kevin R. Lethers, North
Eighth Avenue, renovations,
$24,000.
Gary L. Giddens, Walker
Avenue, alterations, $3,000.
Gary L. 'Giddens, .-North
Eighth Avenue, alterations,
$3,125.
James B. Braxton, Riverside
Drive, alterations, $2,500.

BUILDING BLOCKS
A building permit is a legally
binding document by which the
builder agrees to comply with
the provisions of the code. A
permit is a license to build. If
the terms of the agreement stat-
ed in the permit application are
not met, action may be taken to
suspend or revoke the permit.
Provisions state the work must
be done exactly according to
the approved construction doc-
uments; any deviation requires
approval from the building offi-
cial.


Avon Park on April 21 to end
the regular season. District
playoffs are at Southeast April
26-29.

HARDEE 12, BOOKER 5
Freshman Garrett Albritton
went the distance in this one,
held in Sarasota.
Mayer singled, stole second
and third and scored on a
Saunders doubled to start this
game. Booker responded with
three runs on walks, a hit bats-
man and hits before the Wildcat
freshman hurler settled down.
Hardee got the runs back in
the top of the second. Dawson
Crawford was safe on an error
and Kalan Royal tripled. Mikey
Retana singled and Kramer
Royal singled. Mayer doubled,
Saunders singled and Donald-
son tripled. It was 8-3.
It rolled along that way until
the top of the fifth, when Justin
Knight tripled and scored on a
Kalan Royal sacrifice.
Kramer Royal started more
scoring in the sixth inning. He
drew a walk and Mayer fol-
lowed with a triple. With two.
down, Justin Knight walked
and Wintz Terrell was hit by a
pitch. When it settled, it was 12-
3.
Booker got a pair of scores in
the home half of the sixth on a
hit batsman, walk and triple,
making the final score 12-5.

HARDEE 20,
MULBERRY 0
Hardee went to Mulberry and
had its bats going. The 'Cats
opened with six runs. Mayer led
it off with a triple to right center
and trotted home on a Saunders
double. Donaldson doubled and
Knight singled. Terrell drew a
walk and Crawford singled to
right field. Hits by Dylan Farr
and Deonte Evans, a walk to
Dalton Hewett and a fielder's
choice by Mayer moved play-
ers. The first six batters scored.
Murrell Winter took the
mound and retired three of the
four batters he faced.
Hardee carried on, with five
more runs on the board in the
top of the second. Knight was
safe on an error and Terrell hit
his first homer. Crawford dou-
bled, Hewett walked and Farr
doubled. It kept going with sin-
gles by Evans and Mayer and
an error on a Saunders hit.
When it ended Hardee was up
11-0.
Winter sat three batters down
quickly in the home half of the
second. Knight singled up the
middle and Terrell homered
again. Dawson, Farr and Kalan
Royal singled. It was another
trio of tallies and a 14-0 lead,
only in the third inning.
It was a quiet fourth, but in
the top of the fifth, Hardee used
subs as frequently as it could,
but singles and doubles kept
coming. It ended with another
Terrell home for the final two of
a six-run inning. When Mul-
berry went down in order in the
home half of the fifth, the
mercy rule took effect and
Hardee had a 20-0 win.
Winter pitched four-plus
innings, facing 14 batters and


getting four strikeouts and one
walk. Bromley finished it with
three batters, including a pair of
strikeouts. Terrell has four at-
bats, with three homers and
seven RBIs. Crawford had four
hits and Knight three.

SOUTHEAST 11,
HARDEE 1
This was an afternoon game,
as it was prom night for
Southeast. It was the opposite
of the Mulberry game, as the
Seminoles were the team to col-
lect runs inning by inning,
while Hardee batters went
down quickly.
Hardee's only run came in the
top of the fourth. With one
down, Saunders doubled. He
went to third on a Donaldson
sacrifice fly and home on a
Knight single. Meanwhile,
Southeast had added up scores
for the 11-1 in the bottom of the
sixth.

The month of April gets its
name from the Latin
"aperire," meaning "to
open," as do the flower
buds that month.


Wildcats Win 2 Big, Lose Bad


WAUCHULA MOOSE LODGE* #487
117 King Rd.* Wauchula -773-3820



SATURDAY APRIL 16




EASTER PARTY

FOR CHILDREN


a 2-4p.m. g


LIVE BAND wr "COLT 45"


7-1p.m.

12 Cover Charge


HANCHEY'S CARPETS

Commercial & Residential

SCarpet Vinyl

*Wood Laminate *

"We Install What We Sell"
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1968
110 East Main Street Wauchula
(863) 773-4792 (863) 773-4738


pd








6B The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg.#MV-40625
"No job's too big."


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager



Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
rBuy Here"! I DisountsIN. NIerI
|Pay Here! Finance cp s



S 0 sss



Fstard elabeI


New Tires Include 4
Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!


Semi & Trailer Tir


BIG SRLE ON

RLL TIRES.
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
S VISA ";(across from
S Wal-Mart)


es





/ I
Billy Ayers
Tire Technician
c14c:14c


35 ROLLS HERMOTHIS HAY $25
a roll, make offer for all, delivery
available. 245-1903. 3:24-4:21 p
NEED YOUR HELP! Young cattle-
man needing 10+ acres pasture
to graze cattle for your ag exemp-
tions. Will maintain fences/bush
hog when necessary. 863-494-
5991. 3:17-4:14p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, Injectors, can
remove and Install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc
2005 CHEVY 1-Ton 4 x 4 Duramax
Diesel, 12 ft. flatbed, well-main-
tained, $13,000. 863-832-2084.
4:7-5:5p


2002 FORD F150, 4WD, 4.6 liter,
auto, air, AM/FM disc, bedliner,
tool box, $4,800, 586-531-6324.
4:14p


1995 16' ALUMACRAFT boat.
50HP Force motor, low hours,
foot controlled trolling motor,
extras, runs great $1,600 OBO
832-1197, 832-9355. 4:14dh


LARGE WOOD entertainment
center $300; large round glass
table with six chairs $50; wood
dining table with chairs $250;
OBO. 781-2909. 4:14-5:12p
a S -ea
WANtED RELIABLE PERSON,
non-smoker, non-drinker to do
housework full-time. Good pay, 3
private rooms, boarding avail-
able. Background check required.
863-368-1457. 4:14p


** Charles N. Flesher II, Inc
0 TILE & FLOORING SPECIALIST
TILE LAMINATE
7 l WOOD ENGINEERED WOOD
Bathtubs Showers Backsplashes & More
When a product is installed with care and know-how, you'll receive
a service that I am willing to stake my name on! Charley
FREE ESTIMATES
863-781-2867 701 BUMBY LANE, WAUCHULA


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Aplicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
S Monday Friday *
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
pEQUYL nHOUSa Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider c4:7-2
OPPORTUNITY cl4:7-28c


Don't be an art critic, but
paint; there lies salvation.
-Paul Cezanne



Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


BILINGUAL SITE MANAGER for a
57 unit affordable rental commu-
nity. Must be computer literate.
Experience in light bookkeeping
and basic office equipment bene-
ficial, along with any property
management experience. Send
resume to: The Palms, PO. Box
10293, Clearwater, FL 33757 Fax
(727) 447-2252 or Email:
bschwartz@southwind.us.com.
Equal Opportunity Provider &
Employer 3:31-4:14c
PROGRAM COORDINATOR full
time for local ministry. Must be
experienced with Microsoft pro-
grams and able to multi-task.
Send resume to Executive
Director PO Box 422 Wauchula,
FL 33873. 4:7.14c
NURSERY LABOR. Experienced,
ornamental plant nursery. Apply
Peace River Growers, Inc. 3521 N.
Nursery Road, Zolfo Springs, FL
33890. EOE 4:14,21c


I


CHRISTIAN DAYCARE looking for
qualified teachers. Apply In per-
son, 1999 St. Rd. 64, Wauchula.
4:14p
BILINGUAL SITE MANAGER for a
40 unit affordable rental commu-
nity. Must be computer literate.
Experience In light bookkeeping
and basic office equipment bene-
ficial. HUD housing program
experience preferred. Send
resume to: Azalea Apts. P.O. Box
10293, Clearwater, FL 33757 Fax
(727) 447-2252 or Email:
bschwartz@southwlnd.us.com.
Equal Opportunity Provider &
Employer 4:7,14c


3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. $190,000.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p'


De'o0o AppliaIne
a Repair
Established Since 1987 &Repair
SALES SERVICE
S .863-773-3573
Fax 863-773-0521 108 Carlton Street
Sdesotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchula, FL 33873)


Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
.(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


Noey A. Flores
(860) 781-4585


TIME IS ALMOST UP
I,.o..,


FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY Price Reduced on this
2BR/2BA Modular Home on 20 +/-acres with easy access to
Wauchula, Zolfo Spring & Avon Park. Propertyincludes fenc-
ing, sheds and horse stalls. Motivated seller is offering this
property for $175,000 for a limited time only.


J.

REDUCED $15,000 3BR/1BA CB home with central air &
heat fenced-in yard 10+/- acres. Reduced to $125,000
New Short Sale in Wauchula 4BR/2BA CB Home New windows
- New A/C 2 years ago Large family room Large carport Sits
on 1.25+/- acres Offered at $75,000
Short Sale in Wauchula 3BR/1BA CB Home Fenced-in yard -
Need some repairs Offered at $39,900
Ask us about the HUD Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are an authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863)781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863)781-4380 cl4:14c


Petteway growers ,f


GROWERS Qalit Citrus
__.- 'rees


@ffij1@ G^LUa3 y
Qiyi5j


Slice' Ic)7;L


Now TAKING ORDERS FOR 2011

Hamlin 1-4-1 Valencia 1-14-19 Swingle & Carrizo Rootstocks


Roy 'Petteway


863-781-0099


3 314 21C


[I


I


DESOTO COUNTY




OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com V
1-941-778-7980/7565


ECMHSP JOB ANNOUNCEMENT WAUCHULA, FL
Family Service Coordinator- Seasonal Position (6 to 9 months)- Closing Date 04/21/11
ECMHSP is now accepting applications for Family Service Coordinator in a Migrant Head
Start Program. Responsible for the on-going recruitment and enrollment of center children
and for the implementation of Social Services and Parent Involvement areas of the pro-
gram. Preferred: Associate's degree in Human Services, Social Work or related field and
documented years of relevant experience working with children and families. Experience
generating community resources and providing basic family case management.
Supervisory experience preferred. Accepted: High School Diploma/GED, approved
Family Development Credential or equivalent, documented years of relevant experience
working with children families and active enrollment in Associates Degree program in
Human Services, Social Work or related field. Experience generating community
resources and providing basic family case management, Billingual (Sp/Eng) required.
Starting salary $12.23-12.85 per hour. Personal Leave and employer-matched retirement
plan.Send resume/letter of interest or apply at:ECMHSP- Leti Enriquez 604 martin
Luther King Jr. Ave. Wauchula, FL 33873 Email: lenriquez@emchp.org Telelphone:
863-773-2815 EOE, ADA, License# C10HA0511 c14:14c
c14:14c


www.citnLsandcattle.com


19^----H----- 1
lIoe & Flores,^ a TSHInc
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ M^^^^M^^q


I -


-,, -- r


1


-- -- I~


B^.







April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


MAKE OFFER MUST SELL
3 BR, 2 1/2 Bath, new kitchen and
appliances, large laundry room,
huge family room w/fireplace, 2
utility/storage rooms, 3 car cov-
ered carport. Good family neigh-
borhood. $110,000 OBO. 863-832-
2084. Located Rivervlew subdivi-
sion. 4:7-5:5p



FOUND SOUTH END OF Wauchu-
la by Pioneer Park, male dog,
around t5 Ibs., brown with white
paws and chest. Well mannered,
no collar, appears to be a house
dog. 863-441-4144. 4:14nc

=Il I


NASCAR MAGAZINES from 1994
to present. Big E Tribute
Mags/Books. Computer, printer,
desk, circuit breaker. All paper
work $150. 773-4801. 3:31-4:28p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
send scrap gold in the mail. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
1:6tfc


FREE ANIMAL SCIENCE JOUR-
NALS (hardback) call 863-735-
1314. 4:14nc

1a-
4 MONTH OLD PUPPIES with
shots 239-425-7209. 4:14p
AKC CHOCOLATE LAB Puppy,
$450 ; Yorkle mix puppies, $300.
Ready now. 863-832-0680. 4:14p
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold In Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh



AVION PALMS RV Lot park model
ready, landscaped, sprinklers,
-shed, water softener, $35,500.
330-631-1186 or 330-631-8202.
3:31-4:28p


d GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


HELP WANTED
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS

Full Time $22,36000
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking
applications for full time Telecommunication
Specialists. You must be at least 19 years of age,
have a high school diploma or equivalent, never
been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor,
be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test
and work shifts. Applications may be obtained
and returned by 4 p.m., April 15, 2011, at the
Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula,
FL. If other arrangements are necessary, call
863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE c14:7,14c




THE PALMS

Available for

Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through April 30'h
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
:: (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 (
.-. Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c14:7-28c


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
NEW PRICE FOR THIS SPACIOUS
4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco home; large kitchen, liv-
ing room with w/b fireplace, separate mother-
in-law suite, double garage. $155,500
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000
ESTATE HOME in Wauchula; 4 B/2Bth,
screened front porch, carport. OWNER WILL
FINANCE FOR QUALIFIED BUYER! Call
Delois for more information. $68,900
MAKE OFFER ON 5 ACRE TRACT beauti-
ful home site, paved road frontage. $65,000


1 SERVICE
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


"E YOU


WINNEBAGO VECTRA Model, 31'
1994, mint condition, recent
$6,000 spent overhauling genera-
tor, cooling system, cosmetics.
Contains complete new towing
package with lights. Purchased
August 2010, developed micro-
degeneration in one eye, can't
drive at night. Invested $25,000,
sell $15,750 cash, gold, silver or
coins. 904-222-4607. 4:14tfc



ONE BEDROOM $150 weekly,
electric included, no pets, BG.
863-712-1126, 863-224-4790.
4:14p
3/2 HOME, REAL NICE, complete-
ly remodeled. Good neighbor-
hood. Large yard. $750 monthly.
863-781-2708, 863-735-1158.
4:14-5:12p
3 BR, 2 BA SWMH 1/4 acre,
shady, $175 weekly, electric &
water Included. Ft. Green. 772-
418-2876. 4:14p
APT & HOUSES for rent. 773-
6667. 4:14p
3 BR 1 BATH CENTRAL air & heat,
carport, utility room, fenced. Very
spaolous. 735-2626. 4:14c
3/1 1/2 CB HOME, CHA, fenced
yard. 1st and last. 781-0982.
4:7-5:5p
1 & 2 BR Apartments. 863-245-
1545. 4:7,14p


DUPLEX IN ZOLFO SPRINGS,
close to school, 4 BR, 2 BA first
and last months rent $700/month,
plus security deposit. Call (863)
781-4529 for Info. 3:31tfc
NICE CLEAN 2 BR 1 bath house.
Central AC/Heat, new carpet and
a walk-in closet, washer & dryer
hook-up. $150 per week or $600
per month, damage deposit and
reference required. 773-9793 or
863-832-0676. 4:14p


4/3 3 ACRES on Cracker Lane
$900 month plus Insurance. Rent
to own possible, owner financing
available 863-781-7881.
3:31-4:28p
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo. up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
698-4908. 8:20tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh



I WILL CLEAN AND MOW your
yard, no job too big or small.
Roger 863-307-5444. 4:14,21p
FT. GREEN GRASS CHOPPERS,
lawn care, pressure washing,
Insured. 863-781-0902 or 863-
781-0900. 4:7-5:5p
VICKER'S LAWN CARE. Free esti-
mates. No job to big/small. 863-
448-7491. 3:31-6:1p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more Info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sandersis the facilitatory.
More Information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc.


863-397-9840
354 Bostick Road Bowling Green. FL


Ib
.. . _
.r--




www.gatorheatingandair.com
Garor Heating-Air-Mold Inspections LLC
.\ .. 1.-." .11 ;.j HC '- 1' -'-.H .4 ,




ijKs Howvs Thre store

Od Furniture Home Decor Crystal NO,
bpi China Quality Merchandise Op



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
(Directly Behind Heaven Sent)





geavoen dcent Cleaning Service
Now offered by Sherry White Ministries
Carports Garages Homes Lawns
-, O lMMI : B -e'- 'I


773-0523 *


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net

Doris Lambert
Make this 3B/2Bth house your home! Ceramic
tile and carpet floors, large eat- in kitchen, spa-
cious bedrooms, located in family neighbor-
hood. $115,000
16.5 Acres with 3B/2Bth M/H built; a total of 5
wells on this beautiful property surrounded by
large oaks. $195,000
2B/1Bth M/H with nice yard and large screened
porch; completely furnished. $38,000
5 Acres native "Old Florida"; secluded and lots
of wildlife. $22,500


CAN CO


UNT ON
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


STEVE JOHNSON


781-0518


u~ilLB


245-1184


LAWN AND SMALL PASTURE
maintenance and fertilizing. Brian
941-391-1277. 4:7-5:5p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze Construction
735-1158. RR0050181. 3:17-5:19p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414..
Several weekly meetings.
dh
S**
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh



HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
SAT 8am-? Corner of 10th and
Bay Street. Lots of stuff including
computer and girl clothes 0-6x.
4:14p
MULTI-FAMILY Saturday, 7-?,
Belflower Floors, 325 S. 6th Ave.,
Wauchula. 4:14p
WAUCHULA ELEMENTARY
School. 400 S. FL Ave. Saturday
8-Noon. Misc. items. All proceeds
go to benefit Relay for Life (ACS).
4:14p


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-2 2765
Hall's Place off Steve Roberts
Special. Cheap everything must
go! 4:14p
SAT. 8-1. 1ST NATIONAL BANK
parking lot. All proceeds for Relay
for Life. 4:14c
FRIDAY ONLY. Multi-family, too
much to list, 712 N. 8th Ave.
Wauchula. 4:14p
FRIDAY 8-?, 1060 Knollwood
Circle. Furniture, electronics,
xbox 360 games, much more.
4:14p
FRIDAY & SATURDAY. Lots of kids
clothes, furniture, outside items.
Corner of Mason Dixon, Bowling
Green. 4:14p
SAT. 8-12, 1094 Downing Circle.
Misc, even bathroom sink combo.
4:14)
SATURDAY 8am-lpm. 2 family
yard sale. 148 Hanchey Rd.,
Wauchula. 4:14p
SATURDAY 7am till 12 noon. 1027
Griffin Rd. Furniture, clothes, toys
& misc. 4:14p
BOWLING GREEN ELEMENTARY
bus loop April 16 8-11:30am. All
proceeds go to American Cancer
Society. 4:14p


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


STEPHEN A \VINCGO
SAW COMPUTERS
10 YEARS EXPERIENCE
PC REPAIR SERVICES SOFTWARE INSTALLATION
CUSTOM BUILT COMPUTERS VIRUS AND AWARE REMOVAL
HOME AND SMALL BUSINESS NETWORKING
Free Estimates stephen.wingo@yahoo.com *863-832-9556
"


- l H N


4-C Construcion,


Handyman

Concrete

Free
Estimates


Licensed & Insured
CBC1256749


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www. imseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


1 Ben Gibson
Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Remodels

Additions


David Cole
863-214-1471


Robert Jones


(863)781-1423 |J
(863)273-1017 I
(863)781-1396 cl4:14c


LONESTAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.
CUSTOM HOMES STEEL BUILDING
REMODELING __ CONCRETE


GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lice # 291103615
863-773-4779
"QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE


10 HOURS A
MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505


^;lr


3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED to $205,000!
5 acres REDUCED to $20,000!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath block home on 2+ acres. Close
to town. Asking $169,500.
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors under carpet in bedrooms.
Central air/heat. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000
5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great plate for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72,500
Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000


REDUCED! Spacious home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. $379,000

4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000

320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000

Price Reduction! 15 acres located West of
Wauchula on Vandolah Rd. Beautiful building
sites with small creek meandering across proper-
ty & it's across from the Wauchula Airport
entrance. $150,000


773-9743


ASSOCIATES


c14:14c


-


S








8B The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


The


Classifieds


You can discover what your enemy fears most by observ-
ing the means he uses to frighten you.
-Eric Hoffer

Johann Sebastian Bach was not just considered "the
greatest genius of baroque music," he was also a father
to 20 children, several of whom became musicians.




KELLER WILLIAMS
l R; E7" A --- L. .-T Y
SBuying or Selling? I can help!
Free Credit Checlkfor Fi ancing
3 BR, 2 Bath Double ide, niove-in
S'ready $57,000. -5
4 BR, 2 1/2 Bath $95,000. .
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Donna Steffens acres price reduced $170,000
(863)781-3627 RV/Mobile Home Park $450,000.



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Insured 30+ years experience cll:2tfc


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Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


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Featured Properties


Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
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5 acres with 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage home, fenced yard, large
oaks, peaceful setting in east Hardee county. $139,900.
Call Jeri Wohl @ 381-8595.
Other Properties Available!
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L. DiDvIs


REALTORS
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


-------- --.--I- ,II


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.

Charming and priced to sell! 10 ac w/paved rd frontage.
2BR/BA 1060 SF home w/lots Great for pasture, farming or
of updates: new A/C, insulation, homesite. $63,000!
carpeting, wiring. Den can be
3rd BR. $80,000! Make an PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
offer! home on 4 lots w/beautiful oaks,
fenced in backyard. Close to
5 lots in Wauchula w/over 975' schools. $75,000!
total rd frontage. Close to hospi-
tal, schools & shopping. Will PRICE REDUCED! Looking
divide or all for $95,000! for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
25+ ac fenced pasture, Green- high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
belt qualified, on US Hwy 17 S vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
w/well, septic & electric. acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
$192,900! septic!
One acre wooded building site Wooden wonder! 5 ac w/beau-
near high school. $27,500! tiful trees, paved road. $50,000!
Goodbye, traffic...Hello, peace PRICED REDUCED! Two
& quiet! 2 ac fenced pasture beautiful building lots in Zolfo
w/pond, 288SF cabin, 4" well zoned R-1A, each 155'x110'.
inside 60SF shed. NOW City water available, septic
$160,000. allowed. $7,000 each!
PRICED REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4', 10+ ac farmland w/well, pump,
258' deep well, 1 HP sub- fencing on private road.
mersible pump on quiet, private $75,000!
rd. $45,900!
Lovingly maintained/updated
CB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling 4BR/2.5BA brick home in
Green w/new flooring, cabinets, Knollwood w/updated kitchen,
countertops, being sold as is. fireplace, back patio! $218,000!
$65,000!
REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS..-, 781-0153 SANDY LARRISON.... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL- 781-7633 MONICA REAS......781-888
DAVID ROYAL..........781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c4:14c


From The Heart
By David Kelly


. 1
^
t \
*^P


TAKE A LOOK AROUND!
Driving with me could be an adventure.
If you have ever read this column before, you already know
that.
So what's new? Well, one thing I may have never divulged
publicly is that I spend way more time looking in the air, fields and
surrounding landscape when I'm driving than I do looking at the
road.
My 9-year old daughter graciously pointed that out to me the
other day, saying, "Dad, aren't you supposed to look at the road
when you'drive?"
I told her, "I know where the road is; it isn't going anywhere!"
So you might be wondering what in the world am I looking for
while I'm driving?
Pretty much anything that most people pass by every day, you
know, cool things that unless you are looking for them you will
surely miss. For example, one might see a flock of turkeys walking
through a field, an alligator sunning on the side of the road, a four-
point buck hiding behind an oak tree, an eagle carrying dinner back
home, a hawk being harassed by a mockingbird or various other
sights.
Now, don't just think that this only applies to driving a car or
truck. Actually, I'm just as distracted, uh, focused as a boat driver.
Last month we celebrated Spring Break over at Lake June in
Winter in Lake Placid. For most of us Floridians it was too cold to
swim or tube, but not for my two. They could not get enough tub-
ing in during the week.
I've learned through many years of boat driving that there is
quite the show you can watch while carrying on conversations and
pulling people on the tube. My ability to spot birds, fish or other
animals at great distances is a skill I take great pride in. I love being
able to say, "Look at that!" before anyone else sees what I see.
My favorite activity this time of year through late July is to
look for largemouth bass that have taken on a meal a bit big for
their bite. At least five times that I have witnessed, I've found a
fresh floundering feeding fish that is nearly expired from attempt-
ing to eat a smaller fish. The smaller fish gets lodged in the mouth
of the bigger fish and causes the mouth of the bigger fish to stay
open and the larger fish is unable to go under the water. So in
essence I'm a fish saver, except for the fact I usually keep them and
eat them.
This March was no exception. 1 was tubing my kids when I
spotted a large object up ahead. I slowed the boat, much to the cha-
grin of my passengers. I've found trash, hats and large fish. This
day it was about a seven-pound bass trying to eat an 11-inch
bluegill. I leaned over the side reached in the water and lifted in
dinner, all to the cries of impatience, "Dad, not again! Do you
always have to pick fish up out of the water?"
As we started to tube again off in the distance I pointed out to
my wife, look! An osprey had just swooped down, grabbed a huge
fish and was flying back to its nest with lunch. Simultaneously
across the lake I saw another osprey make a u-turn and immediate-
ly follow the osprey that had caught a fish back to the nest. I could
almost hear the second osprey say, "Yes! She caught something! I
don't have to fly around anymore. I'm starving. Way to go, honey,
I'll be right there!"
These questions and lack of interest in my pastime only make
me all the more fervent. So the next time you see my truck slow
down or the boat I'm driving come to a stop, don't worry. I'm most
likely just seeing something that you would have passed right on
by.
Next time you're out for a drive, whether by land or sea, take
a look around. You'll most likely see a show you've never seen!


A Safe Place

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119

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Westmorland -
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HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


. l8 -1 6 2. ,,-,
II


. Americans Support Smoke-

Free Parks And Beaches


A recent survey shows a siz-
able number of Americans want
to breathe fresh air when they
are outdoors-not secondhand
smoke.
According to the National
Social Climate Survey of To-
bacco Control, more than two-
thirds of Americans feel that
smoking should not be allowed
within 20 feet of a doorway-a
finding that is increasingly rele-
vant as more indoor spaces
have gone smoke-free.
The survey also found that 43
percent of Americans feel that
beaches should be smoke-free,
and 36.5 percent are in favor of
smoking bans in parks. "This
annual survey is a consistent
reality check on how America
perceives tobacco use and
exposure to secondhand
smoke," said Cheryl G. Heal-
ton, president and CEO of
Legacy, a national public health
organization. "This year's sur-
vey focus on outdoor spaces
reminds us that passive smok-
ing is a public health threat,
whether in a bar, restaurant,
office or even at the beach or in
a park."
According to the Americans
for Nonsmokers' Rights, 100


municipalities and the state of
Maine prohibit smoking on
public beaches and 470 have
enacted smoking bans in city
parks. According to Legacy,
secondhand smoke (SHS) is a
mixture of smoke given off by
the burning end of cigarettes,
pipes or cigars, and smoke
exhaled from the lungs of
smokers, which can involuntar-
ily be inhaled by nonsmokers.
The U.S. Surgeon General
has concluded that SHS is a
major health risk to nonsmokers
and in 1992 the U.S. Envir-
onmental Protection Agency
classified SHS as a Group A
carcinogen, meaning it is
known to cause cancer in
humans. There is no safe level
of exposure.
SHS contains over 4,000
chemical compounds including
formaldehyde, cyanide, arsenic,
carbon monoxide, methane and
benzene. Among the chemicals
identified in cigarette smoke, 11
are known human carcinogens.
Exposure can be particularly
damaging for infants and chil-
dren, whose respiratory rates
are higher than those of adults.
For more information, visit
www.LegacyForHealth.org.


Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is
the only thing.
-Albert Schweitzer


$500 OFF
any Vehicle with Coupon
Must Bring Coupon

Wauchula.
lac. t I lrm First National Bank)
Monday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm Wauchula Hills
i 773-6667 (Cornerof Hy 17 ndREARd.)
L Friday & Saturday
Billy Hill 10 am to 7:30 pm Ruby
Owner 773-2011


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


S.
k "1 t


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LISTING!! 3 Bedroom/ 2 Bath One
Owner Home, well maintained, could be
used for office, across from County
Courthouse, walking distance to both
schools and downtown. Extra lot including
with price. $110.000
RIVERVIEW!! 3 bedroom, 2 bath CB home
with central heat & air, stove, refrigerator,
one car garage, in a well kept neighborhood
and close to Peace River. $137.900
REDUCED!! $139.900 3 B/2Bth CB home
built in 2007, total SF 2,022, vaulted ceilings,
central heat/air, stove, refrigerator, two car
garage, and much more. Call today!!!
THE BLUFFS!! Retirement Community! Cute
and Versatile-everything you need and a golf
cart too! Relax in the family room of this
home or use it as a second bedroom with it's
own bath. Totally move-in ready and waiting
for you. $53.000.
ONLY $75.000 for this charming two story
home with 5 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, wood
floors throughout with screened front and
back porches two car carport and large
workshop.
REDUCED!!! $82.500 2B / 2B Home with
central heat and air, one car garage with
garage door opener, appliances, work-shop
and storage area, extra lot included, all in
quite neighborhood.
$72.500 2 Bedroom, 1 bath home with cen-
tral heat and air, private well, utility shed,
and more that sits on 2.4 Acres.
NEW LISTING! 5 Acres on Terrell Road. Has
been Re-Zoned R-1 for multifamily-Single
Family Homes. $75.000


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


Lakefront Property on Lake Jackson. This 3
bedroom, 3 bath home has carport,
detached garage, large family room and two
screened porches. 90 Feet of Lakefront with
Dock. $199.900
JUST REDUCED!! WAS! $38.000-
NOW!!-$34.500!! 2 BR, 2 Bath-Mobile
home in Good condition, w/ central heat and
air, partially furnished, 10X23 screened
porch, 2 car Carport, all with insulated roofs,
2 outdoor sheds for workroom and storage,
all sitting on a 100 x 110 size lot. NICE AREA
and must see to appreciate. Call Nancy -
863-832-0370.
AVION PALMS RESORT !! 1 Bd, 1 Bath
Mobile Home / Owned Land, central H/A,
screened porch, appliances, utility shed,
M/H has skirting all around and move-in
ready. $75.000
$69.900 Older Home with Charm. Loft can be
used for 2nd Bedroom. Small Studio with
bathroom located in back. Large back yard.
NEW LISTING!! Residential Mobile Home Lot
located in a nice, clean retirement Mobile
Home Park. Priced (~ $30.000
DOUBLE LOT!! Nice 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home in City Zolfo, close to elementary
school and Priced @ $34.900
REDUCED!! $79.9001! SEBRING!! Nice 2
Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home with central
Heat/air, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer/
dryer, screened rear porch, view of golf
course, one car carport.
Prop up your feet and enjoy nature at it's
finest in this 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath Double Wide
Mobile Home located on 4.81 acres. Priced
(a)$110,000.


GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie Nice residential lot in well kept neighbor-
Mae Properties. hood. Priced @ $11.9004
cl4:14c


IFr


I


--m"


I --


11










April 14,2011, The Herald-Advocate 9B


Take The Challenge: Learn Sweet News About Sugar


According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion, two out of three adults (68
percent) are affected by excess
weight or obesity.
This statistic is a cause for
alarm because with excess
eight and obesity comes a
host of health implications.
Individuals affected by excess
weight and obesity are at a
much greater risk of developing
major conditions, such as dia-
betes, hypertension, sleep apnea
and many more. Statistics show
that individuals typically do not
address their weight, if at all,
until they are diagnosed with
one of the above- related condi-
tions.' The Obesity Action
Coalition (OAC) is leading the
charge to reverse this trend
through the "Your Weight
Matters" campaign and get indi-
viduals to start talking about
their weight before they are
diagnosed with one of the many
weight-related diseases.
Why Does Weight Matter?
Weight matters to people in
many different ways. For some,
weight might matter to them
because of how they look. Or
maybe it's that number on the
scale that's been haunting them
for years. There are different
reasons why weight matters to
each of us; however, the most
important reason is health.
Research has shown that
there are many serious health
implications accompanying ex-
cess weight. Weight can even
affect emotional health as well.
It is not uncommon for some-
one dealing with weight issues
to be affected by depression or a


protein and complex carbohy-
drates.
Health professionals recom-
mend that people who consume
sugar do so in moderation as
part of a healthful diet that pro-


lack of self-confidence.
Yet, it's not always easy to
recognize when excess weight
is jeopardizing health. In fact,
most Americans do not realize
that they are overweight or even
at risk for weight-related condi-
tions until faced with a serious
health risk.
Is Your Weight Impacting
Your Health?
The best way to determine if
your weight is impacting your
health is to get involved in the
"Your Weight Matters" cam-
paign, a national awareness ini-
tiative aimed at getting the
American public talking about
their weight as it pertains to
their health. The campaign
challenges all Americans to
measure their weight and open
the often-avoided discussion
with their health care profes-
sional about it.
The campaign website, www.
yourweightmatters.org, con-
tains a wide variety of weight-
and health-related in-formation
and offers you the tools to
assess your weight and learn
more about weight-related con-
ditions. By taking the campaign
challenge, visitors re-ceive a
free "Your Weight Matters" e-
toolkit; including a food log,
exercise tips, helpful resources
and much more. Knowing how
weight impacts you and achiev-
ing a healthier weight are vital
to your health and well-being.
Challenge Yourself Today
Take the "Your Weight
Matters" Challenge by visiting
the website at www.your-
weightmatters.org or by calling
800-717-3117.


Why Weight Matters


The Right Anchor Can

Help A Business Grow


A ship isn't the only thing
that can benefit from having an
anchor. It turns out that there
are anchors that can actually
help inner-city communities
and small businesses rise up.
The anchors, in this case, are
large organizations-such as a
college, university or hospital-
that are deeply rooted in the
community and can play an
integral role in fostering the
community's economy by
spending on goods and servic-
es.
By building a relationship
with such anchors, a small
business can often reap big
benefits and set a course for
increased prosperity. The Ini-
tiative for a Competitive Inner
City (ICIC) and Staples, Inc.
offer three tips on how a busi-
ness can begin to develop such
a relationship.
Become a trusted suppli-
er of goods and services to
local anchor institutions.
Many anchor institutions ac-
tively direct their institutional
purchasing to community busi-
nesses.
To successfully supply these
purchasers, research anchor
institutions' procurement poli-
cies and goals for local and
diverse businesses and then
make the business case for why
an anchor should work with
your business.
Use anchors to help iden-


tify and train your employees.
For any small business, having
the right talent is critical.
Educational institutions, in par-
ticular, develop local skills as
part of their core mission, and
they can help small businesses
find and build talent.
To leverage these resources, a
business can use educational
institutions, such as a university
or a community college, to
identify qualified job candi-
dates, find job-training opportu-
nities for its existing workforce
and create specialized job-train-
ing programs.
Use anchor institutions
for advisory and consulting
services. Anchor institutions
often look for ways to use their
employees' expertise to help a
community grow. Many an-
chors offer advising, consulting
or mentoring services to small,
local businesses seeking advis-
ing, networking and mentorship
opportunities from local facul-
ty, students and executives.
The Initiative for a Com-peti-
tive Inner City is a national not-
for-profit organization founded
in 1994. Its mission includes
highlighting the competitive
advantages of inner cities and
the thousands of thriving com-
panies that are already capital-
izing on these advantages.
For more information, visit
www.icic.org and click on
Resource Guide.


vides the appropriate amount of
daily calories. For people trying'
to manage their weight, regular
exercise and keeping an eye on.
calories are essential-and that
includes calories from dietary
fats, protein and carbohydrates'
such as sugar. People who are
very physically active burn


more calories, so they can addi
more calories to their diet in
any form they choose-from
dairy products, meats, vegeta-'
bles, fruits and the occasional
sweet treat.
To sum it up, it's generally
best to enjoy all things in mod-'
eration, including sugar.


If, like many people, you've
begun to wonder whether eating
sugar affects health, there may
be good news for you.
First, you're far from alone.
Almost everyone enjoys sugars
and the occasional sweet treat.
In fact, a fondness for sweet
taste is present from birth and
liking sweet tastes is in part
determined by your genes.
Next, you should know that
there are many types of sugars
and the terms used to describe
sugars can be confusing. Sugars
are carbohydrates, which serve
as the main energy source for
the body. They occur both natu-
rally and as ingredients in many
foods. The most familiar sugar
is sucrose (what's called "table
sugar"), which is made of two
simple sugars, fructose and glu-
cose. Fruits and vegetables nat-
urally contain fructose and glu-
cose. Other sugars used in foods
include agave nectar, corn
syrup, high-fructose corn syrup,
honey, invert sugar, lactose
(that is, milk sugar) and other
syrups.
Research suggests that the
body does not distinguish
between sugars added to foods
(the sugar found in a sweet roll)
and naturally occurring sugars
(the sugar found in fruit, fruit
juice or milk). Regardless of the
name or source, sugars con-
tribute about the same 4 calo-
ries per gram to the diet as do


Hardee County Health Department




Journey For Control:


A Conversation About Diabetes



Monday, April 18th & Thursday April 21st

4:00 pm 6:00 pm



Hardee County Health Department

115 K.D. Revell Rd. Wauchula



A Community Service of Parish Nursing No Charge



Call 863-773-4161 Ext. 148 to REGISTER


Pre-registration required for all class members

Suzanne Crews, RN, BSN, NCSN
Parish Nurse Coordinator
Highlands & Hardee County
QUESTIONS 863-386-6420/6421 INTERACTIVE
ANSWERED Fax: 863-386-6344
Email: suzanne.crews @ ahss.org
4:14c
^ **







10B The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


JLC Leads Belles


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The oldest girls Youth Soft-
ball division has one outstand-
ing team.
The JLC.Harvesting Thrash-
ers have 3-1 records. Close
behind is the George Wads-
worth Farm Bureau Insurance
Blaze at 2-1, followed by State
Farm Insurance Thunder, the
SUllrich's Pitcher Pump Storm,
the City of Wauchula Lightning
and the Central Florida Pump &
Irrigation Slammers.
In game one last Tuesday, the
Wauchula Lightning shut down
the Central Slammers 4-0.
Gabby Allen scored twice for
Wauchula, with Brooke Dixon
and Ch~eyanne Gough each
adding a run. Other Wauchula
players are Ruth Erekson, Sarah
Welch, Josie Moore, Tori
McCoy, Taylor Graham, Nubia




Lindsc

To State
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
He qualified for state last
year, and set a goal, to return for
another opportunity for a state
championship.
Senior Jarrius Lindsey is
already the sectional weightlift-
ing champion in the 183-pound
class. After the state meet at the
Kissimmee Civic Center on
Saturday, he hopes to be the
state champ. No one locally has
come near his numbers. At the
sectional meet, he benched 310
and clean & jerked 290 for a
600 total, higher than those in
higher weight classes.
Lindsey, a Wildcat fullback
all four years of high school,
would like to leave high school
with that elusive state title.
Junior Carlos Marquez came
close in his 219-pound division,
having to settle for the sectional
runner-up. Marquez benched
300 and jerked 235 for a 535
total, a new record for him.


-Gomez, Brook Aleman arind
Illeana Flores.
Players for Central are Brean-
na Godwin, Tiffany Flores,
Kaela Villegas, Michaela Vil-
lareal, Cori Ann Rosales, Yas-
min Ramirez, Victoria Brad-
dock, Aabigail Vargas, Halley
Addison and Ana Delia.
The JC Harvesting Thrashers
won the second game 7-2 over
the State Farm Insurance
Thunder.
Leadoff batter Jakaysha
Lindsey circled the bases three
times for JLC. Shayna Harned,
Hannah Carlton, Makayla Deu-
berry and Shelby Caimichael
each scored once. Other JLC
players are Melissa Perez, Tara
McNabb, Briana Aleman, Blake
Carmichael, Ariana Ramos,
Jarissa Lindsey and Emily
Patarini.


hy Goes

Saturday
Other Wildcats doing well
recently include: junior Uvaldo
Sanchez in the heavyweight
division with a 505, 265 in the
bench and 240 in the clean &
jerk; and junior Maxon Del-
homme in the 169-division with,
a 505 total, 280 in the bench:
and 225 in the clean & jerk.
At 129, Caleb Purser and
Tristan Lanier, both freshmen,
have done well. Add soph Uber
Calvillo in the 169 division,
Dalton Rabon in the 154-divi-
sion, Colby Baker and Waylan
Pleger both at 169, senior
Quinton Carlton at 219, Adson
Delhomme in the 238 division
and soph Jesus Zuniga in the
heavyweight.
Most of the two dozen lifters
out regularly are just keeping in
shape for football and are not
interested in being competitive.
But, for those who do, it's a
challenge to pit themselves
against the best from other
schools.


MEETING NOTICE
In accordance with Section 218.391, Florida State
Statutes, Hardee County has formed an Auditor
Selection Committee to establish factors to be used
for the evaluation of audit services, ranking of pro-
posals, and making recommendations as to the hiring
of a qualified firm.
The committee will meet Wednesday, April 20, 2011, at
2:00 p.m. and Wednesday, June 01, 2011, at 2:00 p.m.
in the County Commission Chambers, 412 W. Orange
Street, Room 102, Wauchula, Florida.
For more Information, please call the Hardee County
Office of Budget & Finance at 863-773-8199. 4:14c



HARDEE COUNTY
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
A Qualification Ranking Committee has been formed
to review and rank qualifications of respondents to the
Request for Proposals for Professional Consulting
Services for Developing a Feasibility Study of Solid
Waste Infrastructure Needs as required by Chapter
163, Part II, Florida Statutes.

This committee will meet on Monday, April 18, at 2:00
RM. at 412 W. Orange Street, Room 203, Wauchula,
FL, and is open to the public.
For more Information, please contact Jack Logan,
Purchasing Director, at (863) 773-5014. 4:14c



ELECT

PAM

BELFLOWER
for
SWAUCHULA CITY COMMISSION -
District Seat 7
V JUST A FEW OF MY PROMISES V
f Each and every decision will be made with the n
residents of the city in mind. If it will not benefit
T a majority of you, I will cast a "NO" vote. T
E No more property purchases without a specific E
purpose in mind, and absolutely no purchases
S without the proper appraisals being done.
47* A charter review committee will be appointed /
and directed to review the 2004 charter as soon
as possible. The recent events must be avoided in
the future.


Caryssa Johnson and Gemi
Saunders scored for State Farm.
,Other State Farm players are
-Alyssa Tatum, Kayla Garay,
-Yessenia Cruz, Cristina Rod-
riguez, Tainiqua Blandin, Mary
Young and Paige Harbarugh.
In the third game, it was the
Farm Bureau Insurance Blaze
7, Ullrich's Pitcher Pump
Storm 2.
Claudia Klein scored twice
for Farm Bureau, while Morgan


Walters, Lacey Cumbee, Senida
Garcia, Kim Derringer and'
Daniela Moran. Other Farm
Bureau players are Selena
Macias, Amber Dayfert, Josie;
Hancock, Kirsten Ramirez and,
Tamara Griffis.
Alex Ullrich and Isabel Abel
were the only Ullrich's players
to get all the way home. Other
Ullrich's players are Anna
Erekson, Lindsey Cooper,
Courtney Henderson, Allison


Farr, Mara Goodwin, Mireya
Mondragon, Samantha Velez,
Hope Elliott and Darby Farr.
Game four was a thriller as
State Farm outlasted Wauchula
9-8.
Saunders, Blandin and Young
each put a pair of scores on the
board for State Farm. Johnson,
Garay and Rodriguez each
Added a run.
For Wauchula, it was Welch
and Moore with twin tallies and


Erekson, Allen, Gough, and
Aleman adding solo scores.
In the week's finale, JLC
Harvesting beat Ullrich's 9-6.
Jakaysha Lindsey, Carlton,
Harned and Deubaerry each
crossed home plate twice for
JLC. Perez added the extra run.
Ullrich circled the bases
twice for Ullrich's. Erekson,
Henderson, Velez and Elliott
each came around to score
once.


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DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.
.. 1' _;


Julian Garcia, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Crystal Contreras & Red Camp Pharmacist
Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm .
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Arts fn fthi Park


Friday, April 15th

5:00pm 9:00pm













JV Juggle 3 For Wins


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The JV Wildcats sandwiched
a shutout with a pair of close
encounters in three victories
last week.
They nipped Frostproof 6-5,
,shut down Mulberry 10-0 and
held off Avon Park for a 5-4 win
in a long week of home games.
They finish up the season this
week, with two and possibly
three in a rainout game can be
added.
"We've faced some adversity
and kept playing through it. Our
pitching has stepped up and
we've started swinging the
bat," said Head Coach John
Sharp.
HARDEE 6, MULBERRY 5
The week began with a-,
Wednesday makeup game
against Frostproof. Freshman
Luke Palmer began and class-
mate Tyler Hewett finished it
up.
Holding the Bulldogs to three
batters in the top of the first,
Hardee went to work. Armando
Alamia singled to left, stole sec-
ond and third and came home
on a Jacob Altman sacrifice.
Frostproof came back with a
pair of runs on a hit, walk, error
and double to take a 2-1 lead.
Hardee went back to work in
the home half of the second
inning. Vince Grimsley sin-
gled, went to second on a wild
pitch. He went to third on a
Jeremy Rowe sacrifice and
came home when Justin
Forrester singled. He also got to
third on a stolen base and
passed ball. Ramiro Briones
and Jacob Bolin both walked.
Forrester and Briones scored on
a Altman double. It was 4-2.
A single, balk and double
plated one run for Frostproof in
the top of the third, Hardee
went down in order. The
Bulldogs tied the tied with a
another run in the fourth, while
Hardee bats were silent.
Frostproof took a 5-4 advan-


tage in the top of the fifth, on a
walk, error and sacrifice. Har-
dee left Kris Johnson stranded
as he singled. Both teams were
quickly up and down in the
sixth inning and Frostproof had
just three batters in the top of
-the seventh.
Bolin started the home half of
the seventh with a single. Alt-
man doubled. Bolin came home
on a Johnson sacrifice. Hewett
lofted a shot to center field. It
was caught, but Altman trotted
home with the winning run.

HARDEE 10, MULBERRY 0
Rowe picked up this shutout
win over the visiting Panthers.
After a pair of strikeouts and a
ground-out stopped Mulberry,
Hardee picked up its first run
when Alamia singled to left,
stole second and third and
crossed home on an Altman
sacrifice. Palmer sliced one up
the middle but was stranded
when the third out occurred.
Mulberry stranded a pair of
runners in the top of the second
and Hardee plated three more
runners. Garrett Albritton and
Forrester had leadoff walks.
Briones singled and Bolin sacri-
ficed. Alamia was safe on an
error and Altman hit to deep
center. When the dust settled a
few minutes later, Hardee had a
4-0 lead.
It was five up, three down for
the Panthers in the third, when
Hardee added another trio of
tallies, by Albritton, Forrester
and Bolin, helped by an Alamia
double. It was 7-0.
The final Hardee runs came
in the fifth inning and ended the
game on the 10-run mercy rule.
Wyatt Maddox singled, Dus-
tin Goodwyn doubled as did
Bolin. An Alamia sacrifice and
single by Jacob Neuhofer
brought in the last runs for the
win.

HARDEE 5, AVON PARK 4
Soph Cole Choate was strong


on the mound in the beginning
of this game. He struck out the
first batter, got the next to
ground to short and struck out
Caleb Reeves after he had
fouled off three pitches.
Altman send a shot up the
middle to get Hardee going.
Johnson was safe on a high
throw to first and Palmer drew a
walk. A Grimsley high fly to
right field .got Altman home
with the first run of the game.
Red Devil Steve Flowers was
safe on a wild throw from the
third baseman and ended up on
third base before the ball got
back to the infield. Ryan Dick
singled to score Flowers and tie
the game 1-1.
Both teams left runners
stranded until the bottom of the
third. Altman worked for a walk
and a Johnson single put run-
ners on the corners. Palmer
doubled to the gap in right cen-
ter, scoring both teammates and
making it a 3-1 game. A Grim-
sley high hopper got Palmer to
third and an error on a Forrester
hit allowed him to score. Errors
on h its by Briones and Bolin
moved him along until he
reached home. It was 5-1.
Avon Park threatened in the
top of the fourth, but Johnson
relieved Choate and put out the
fire.
It was relatively quiet, with
both teams stranding runners
until the top of the sixth when
the Red Devils got one runner
home on an error and a couple
of singles. Avon Park left the
bases loaded when back-to-
back strikeouts and a ground-
out stopped the threat.
The Red Devils tried to rally
again in the top of the seventh.
A single and an error brought
one runner home. A dropped
third strike left runners on the
comers. A passed ball on a walk
allowed another runner to come
home before Johnson struck out
the last batter to preserved the
5-4 win.


115S.7t Av. W ucula F 387


April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 1IB



Danced With The



King,' Elvis Presley!


By LUKE PALMER
Special To The Herald-Advocate
On Oct. 10, 2010, I interviewed my
grandmother, Gayle Palmer.
She grew up in Memphis, Tenn.,
with her parents and sister, Betty. Her
father was the service manager at a big
equipment store and her mom was a
stay-at-home mom.
She graduated from Messick High
School in Memphis, where she was a
cheerleader, a member of the Speech
Club and Youth For Christ club. She
also ran track. She really enjoyed
English class. Her favorite teacher was
Mr. Hunt, who taught her sophomore
English class.
She was voted Most Witty by her
senior classmates.
Ga, as she is lovingly referred to by
me, really liked to hang out at the
Berrita Drive-In with her best friend,
Connie
Eaton. She "' v
also enjoyed lit ,
painting and
fishing. l
Like most young girls of that era,
they thought Elvis Presley was the
greatest. The highlight of her teenage
years was getting a personal dance with
"The King."
Ga grew up when a Coke cost a
nickel and a gallon of gas cost 29 cents.
She shared a car with her sister, Betty. It
was a Crosley and cost approximately
$5,000. She and her sister liked to drive
to their favorite place to eat, Leonard's
BBQ. Ga still thinks Leonard's has the
best barbecue in the world.
She earned gas money by doing
chores such as washing the dishes, iron-
ing and making the beds. Her first pay-
ing job was babysitting.
Ga met her husband, my grandfather,


COURTESY PHOTO
Gayle Palmer and grandson.

when she was just a child. He lived four
houses down from her. After marrying
my grandfather, Ga lived in New
Orleans and Miami while he went to
medical school. They finally settled in
Wauchula, where she has lived for 46
years.
Now, my grandfather has retired
from being a doctor and Ga owns apart-
ments and has many tenants that live in
them. She enjoys growing a garden,
raising chickens and supporting her 11
grandchildren.
When asked what her most memo-
rable moment in life was, my grand-
mother stated that becoming a Christian
was the most memorable occasion.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview anmolder
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Having once decided to achieve a certain task, acnieve it at all costs of tedium and dis-
taste. The gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labor is
immense.
-Thomas A. Bennett


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12B The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


What's For


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Graham Crackers, Glazed Do-
nut, Bagel Bars, Orange Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Pepperoni Hot Pocket,
Alternative Meal, Salad Tray,
Mixed Vegetables, Blue
Raspberry Juice Bar, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Sausage
Pizza, Biscuit, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk


Lunch: Cheeseburger,
Cheese Stix w/Dip, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Corn, Mixed
Fruit, Sugar Cookies, Condi-
ments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix, Breakfast
Pocket, Pears, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni,
Deli Turkey & Cheese Wrap,
Alternative Meal, Salad Tray,
Green Peas, Peaches, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Graham Crackers,


Waffle, Sausage Patty, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Baked Turkey
w/Gravy, Corndog, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Mashed
Potatoes, Pears, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Bar-B-Q Chicken on
Bun, Fish Sandwich, Alternative
Meal, Potato Rounds, Salad
Tray, Broccoli, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Super Donut, Bagel Bars, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Pepperoni Hot Pockets, Rolls,
Lettuce & Tomato, Mixed
Vegetables, Juice Bar, Condi-
ments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Breakfast Pizza, Applesauce,


Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Sausage Pizza, Mozzarella
Stix w/Dip, Lettuce & Tomato,
Whole Kernel Corn, Sprinkle
Butter Cookies, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Breakfast Mini Pocket, Diced
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Deli Turkey & Cheese
Wrap, Cowboy Macaroni, Rolls,
Pepperoni Pizza, Salad Bar,
Lettuce & Tomato, Garden
Peas, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Waffle, Sausage Patty, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Corndog, Sausage
Pizza, Turkey Deli Roast, Turkey
Gravy, Rolls, Salad Bar, Tossed
Salad, Mash Potatoes, Diced
Pears, Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Breakfast Stick, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Fish Sandwich,
Pepperoni Pizza, Bar-B-Q


Chicken on a Bun, Salad Bar,
Lettuce & Tomato, Broccoli,
Potato Rounds, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HI H
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Ham, Chicken
Pattie On Bun, Chicken Breast
Fillet On Bun, Chicken & Rice,
French Fries, Turnip Greens,
Black-Eyed Peas, Tossed
Salad, Beets, Juice Bar, Corn-
bread, Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Corndog,
French Fries, Potato Rounds,
Baked Beans, Tossed Salad,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast


Mini Pockets, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Cowboy
Macaroni, French Fries,
Broccoli Normandy, Summer
Squash, Tossed Salad, Fruit
Cocktail, Rolls, Condiments
and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffles,
Sausage Patty, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken
Gravy, French Fries, Mashed
Potatoes, Green Beans, Tossed
Salad, Pears, Yellow Cake,
Rolls, Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Sticks, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Bar-B-Q Chicken on a Bun,
Peas & Carrots, Potato Salad,
Tossed Salad, Pineapple
Chunks, Condiments and Milk


Week ending April 10, 2011
Field Crop Planting Underway, More Rain Needed
Weather Summary: Last week most Florida Automated
Weather Network (FAWN) stations received between 0.50 and 1.00
inches of rainfall. Weather stations in Jefferson, Hillsborough, and
Suwannee counties recorded the most at about 1.3) inches.
Temperatures mostly ranged from the mid-40s to upper 80s, and
averaged two to five degrees above normal. Lowest temperatures
were recorded at Alachua County (36 degrees), Baker County (37
degrees), and Jefferson County (38 degrees). Highest temperatures
were recorded at Marion and Highlands counties (93 degrees).

Field Crops: Widespread showers and above average season-
al temperatures helped the growth of early-planted crops, but it was
still fairly dry throughout the State. Corn was planted in Jackson
County and final field preparations were underway for planting
cotton and peanuts. Rice continued to be planted in Palm Beach
County. Peanut planting was underway in Gilchrist and Levy coun-
ties.

Vegetables: Producers marketed beans, broccoli, cabbage,
celery, cucumbers, eggplant, peppers, radishes, squash, sweet corn,
and tomatoes. There were lighter amounts of endive and peppers
other than bell peppers available. In Collier, Glades, Hendry, Lee,
and Volusia counties, the vegetable harvest reached normal sea-
sonal volumes. In Palm Beach County, producers were harvesting
sweet corn and green beans. Leafy vegetable crops were declining
as seasonal temperatures rose. In Miami-Dade County, tomato har-
vest was in full swing. The producers were planting beans and
sweet potatoes, and harvesting squash. Water restrictions remained
in effect. Watermelon planting was underway in Gilchrist and Levy
counties. The strawberry harvest continued in Bradford County.

Livestock and Pastures: The pasture condition Statewide
ranged from very poor to excellent with most in fair condition. The
pasture condition improved only slightly from the previous week.
The cattle condition was mostly fair. In the Panhandle area, the pas-
ture ranged from very poor to excellent condition with most fair to
good. Summer grasses were starting to grow given the warmer
temperatures, but grass feed volume was still low. The feeding of
hay and supplements continued, but at a reduced level. In the north-
ern areas, the pasture and cattle ranged from poor to good condi-
tion, with most cattle in good condition. In the central and south-
western areas, the pasture condition ranged from very poor to
excellent with most in fair condition. The pasture grass condition
improved slightly following limited rainfall during the week but
hot, dry weather rapidly depleted the additional soil moisture.
Cattle condition ranged from poor to excellent with most in fair
condition.

Citrus: Lows were in the 40s with highs in the 80s and 90s
across most of the citrus area. All of the 25 FAWN stations record-
ed some precipitation, but only two of them recorded more than an
inch. Dover reported the most with 1.30 inches of rainfall record-
ed. Belle Glade reported the least at 0.27 inches. Drought condi-
tions in the citrus-producing area ranged from none in the west to
extreme in the southeast, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor,
last updated on April 5th. St Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach, and parts
of Collier, Hendry, Glades, Indian River, and Okeechobee counties
were experiencing extreme drought conditions. Thirty-eight pack-
inghouses and 19 processors remained opened, although some tem-
porarily paused production. Harvest of Valehcia oranges and grape-
fruit continued, with the op6i processing plants running grapefruit
and Valencia oranges. Grove activity included young tree care,
applying herbicides, hedgingand topping, brush removal, and fer-
tilizer application.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Jolene Funding LLC,
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 773 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007

Description of Property:

10 AC NE1/4 OF SE1/4 OF NW1/4
26 34S 26E

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: G.C. RANSONE AND
FRANK GUESS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
20 day of April, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 11" day of April, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Laura L. Barker, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD003XXXX 414-5
4:14-5:5c


HARDEE COUNTY SCHOOLS.


KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION






Registration for Kindergarten students will begin according to the schedule below. Students can also be
registered throughout the day beginning Thursday, May 17, 2011.

Bowling Green Elementary School .............May 10, 2011 5:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

Hilltop Elementary School...........................May 16,2011 6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

North Wauchula Elementary School............ May 5, 2011 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Wauchula Elementary School.......................May 3,2011 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

Zolfo Springs Elementary School................. May 3, 2011 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.



Kindergarten students must be five years old on or before September 1, 2011.

Parents are required to bring the following documents:
An original birth certificate
Current physical
Shot record

Students who have not met the above requirements will not be permitted to enter school in the fall.
According to Florida Law, no student will be permitted to enter first grade unless he/she has completed
an approved public or private kindergarten program.



4:14,21,28c







Escuelas de Condado de Hardee


Registro de Kinder




Registro para estudiantes de Kinder comenzari con la fecha que aparece a continuaci6n.
Los estudiantes tambi6n pueden ser registrados durante todo el dia comenzando el
Jueves, 17, de mayo de 2011.


Bowling Green Elementary School ......10 de mayo de 2011 5:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.


Hilltop Elementary School................16 de mayo de 2011 6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.


North Wauchula Elementary School......5 de mayo de 2011 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.


Wauchula Elementary School............3 de mayo de 2011 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m.


Zolfo Springs Elementary School.........3 de mayo de 2011 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.


Los estudiantes de Kinder deben tener cinco aflos de edad en o antes del 1 de septiembre
de 2011.


Los padres deben Ilevar los documents siguientes:
un certificado de nacimiento original
fisico corriente
registro de vacunas


No se permitira a los estudiantes que no han cumplido los requisites anteriores a entrar a
la escuela en el otoflo. Segun en acuerdo con la ley de Florida, no se permitira ningun
estudiante para entrar en primer grado a menos que ha completado un program aprobado
de Kinder puiblicos o privados.
4:14,21,28c


































COURTESY PHOTO
Taking top ratings at a regional solo and ensemble festival were band members (front
row, from left) Terry Yanes, Brandi Swearingen, Courtney Cumbee and Johnathan
Martin, (back row) Emelie Wolaast. Valerie Hernandez. James Gibson and Alex Lopez;


SSports.ScheduleAp1r I l 142


April 14 HJHS Volleyball

April 15 JV & V. Softball
V. Baseball

April 16 Weightlifting

April 18 HJHS Volleyball
V. Baseball

April 19 V. Baseball
Softball Tourney 19-22

April 21 V. Baseball
Regional Track

April 22-28 Baseball


Lake Placid

Avon Park
DeSoto

Kissimmee

Hill-Gustat
Mulberry

Fort Meade
TBA

Avon Park
Titusville

Southeast


HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.

Away 6/7 p.m.
HOME 7 p.m.


Away


TBA


Away 5:30/6:30p.m.
HOME 7 p.m.

Away 7:30 p.m.
HOME TBA

HOME 7 p.m.
Away TBA


Away


TBA


(not pictured) Danie/Ie Weeks, Erica Castillo, Faith Hodges and Adrianna Jenkins. Me'
T--TT- B d Sh nc A t Re oor nal Festiva~le


1 IJ aL LIaU nll kJlllAV3 -kL IX.,6AkVJIAC IA tL L V (LC


Twelve band members at
Hardee Junior High School
took a trek to Bradenton recent-
ly to participate in the Florida
Bandmasters Association's Solo
& Ensemble Festival.
The event was held at Braden
River High School, as band stu-
dents from all over the region
converged to perform solo or
group pieces in front of a judge.
They earned one of five ratings:
superior, excellent, good, fair or
poor.
The Hardee Junior High
Band, under the direction of
Shayla Bryan, represented


themselves, their band, and the
school with distinction by earn-
ing six superiors, three excel-
lents, and one good rating.
"I was very happy with the
results," said Bryan. "The stu-
dents worked so hard, and to
see their efforts rewarded is just
wonderful." j
Earning superior ratings were
James Gibson, who performed
a solo on a snare drum; Alex
Lopez, solo, snare drum;
Danielle Weeks, solo, clarinet;
Emelie Wolgast, solo, clarinet;
Terry Yanes, solo, flute; and the
percussion ensemble of James


Gibson, Alex Lopez and
Jonathan Martin.
Excellent ratings went to
Valerie Hernandez, solo, alto
saxophone; Brandi Swearingen,
solo, alto saxophone; and Erica
Castillo, Courtney Cumbee and
Faith Hodges with a flute
ensemble.
The trumpet solo by Adrianna
Jenkins garnished a good rat-
ing.
The Haidee Junior High
Band continues to grow, and
with performances like this will
certainly continue to shine
brightly, according to Bryan.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
By the end of the first week
of play, there were three leaders
for the Men's Church Softball
League.
First Christian and Florida
First Assembly Team 1 were
each at 2-0 and Holy Child was
at 1-0.
Play continues on Tuesday
and Thursday evenings at the
Recreation Complex fields 3
and 4. Visitors are welcome to
come cheer their favorite
squads..
On Field 3 on Tuesday last
week, San Alfonso Catholic
beat St. Michael Catholic 25-
13.
Eric (last name unknown) led
San Alfonso with five hits and
five runs. He and Willie Dick-
erson hit home runs and Dale
Roberts and W. T. Redding each
tripled. Valentin Rosales tripled
among his hits and twin runs for
St. Michael.
In the Tuesday nightcap, New
Vision Worship Center won 18-
4 over Florida First Assembly
Team 2.


Leadoff batter Jasper had
three hits and Mario tripled for
New Vision. Nathan had three
hits for First Assembly 2; he
and Rich Taylor each doubled.
The early game on Thursday
on Field 3 was a forfeit win for
First Christian, when San Al-
fonso failed to field a team.
In the Field 3 late game, First
Assembly 1 won 21-18 over
New Vision.
Ralton Albritton and Brandon
Holton homered and Jeffery
Albritton and Lavon Cobb each
tripled for First Assembly. Mike
homered for New vision and
Ryan R. tripled.
Meanwhile, on Field 4, the
week began with the Tuesday
opener when First Assembly 1
won 20-10 over First Christian.
Abel Hernandez homered and
collected five RBIs on three hits
for First Assembly, while Lewis
Martin also homered. Yogi
Lozano had four hits. Alan
Tubbs, Mike Carte and Chris
Knight each scored twice for
First Christian.
In the Field 4 Tuesday closer,
Bowling Green Baptist nipped


Northside 13-12.
Austin Helms had four scores
on three doubles and a single
for Bowling Green. Joe Adams
added three runs. Michael
Choate scored three runs to lead
Northside. Travis Wiggins and
David added two runs apiece.
The Thursday early game on
Field 4 was another close en-
counter, with Holy Child win-
ning 16-15 over Bowling Green
Baptist.
John McBride hit a triple and
two doubles, scoring three
times and getting five RBIs for
Holy Child. Jesse Reyes also
had three runs and Jose Gomez
had three hits. Doug, Russell
and Josh each homered for
Bowling Green. Nathan was the
only three-score batter.
In the Thursday finale on
Field 4, St. Michael beat First
Assembly 2 by a score of 26-16.
Rosales homered twice and
Roy Santoya and Jaime also
homered for St. Michael. Tony
Miller and Keith tripled for
First Assembly. Keith scored
four runs.


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The Herald-Advocate
(UPS 78-7O)
Thursday, April 14,2011


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2C The Herald-Advocate, April 14,2011





-Schedule of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
by'.
TheJ.erald-Advocate
Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................1000 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service .................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375.2231
375-3100
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship.................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Central.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. IIwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ....................... ...9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .. ............10:45 a.m.,
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection .................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .:..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Juevcs De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIHURCIH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ...................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Commnunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship .................. :00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast.................. I 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........ 12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................10:30 a.m
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m
Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship. .................7:00 p.m
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Worship Service ..................1:00 a.m
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 LiiyChurch Rd.* 494-5622
-Sunday Scheol-:..;........... 10:00 a.m
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ................6.:00 p.m
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
English Service .................. 1:30 a.m
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m
Tuesday Prayer ...................7:00 p.m
Wednesday Service ................7:00 p.m

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 lHanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celcbration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....I11:00 a.m
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m
Youth Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Calllfor locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ I:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men :v Le'adershlip & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:00 a.m.


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
7734576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Servicio.............................. 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ..................... :00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA'CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .......7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry...................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W orship ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .........................10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S!T.
(K-5th) .......................... 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6;15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
TIE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
SEvening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ....................... :00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........ I1:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
W orship ............................... 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min. ............7:00 p.m.


IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M acres ...... ............ ........ 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ......................... ......... 7:30 p.m .
Domingo.............................. 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos .............................. 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service..............7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... I1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ........................ 7:00 p.m.


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries:for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) .................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3" Sun.
Communion ....................10:00 a.m.
2'" & 4' Sun.
Divine Worship................ 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .........................1 1:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...............11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................1... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCII


204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ................................. :00 a.m .
Holy Days ............... .................. .....

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CIIURCII
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ................. 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) .................1 1:00 a.m .
(C reole)...................... 1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8-30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. Illth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ....... ....7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .... ......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........ 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .................. 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1 1:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ..................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
M en's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .....................;......7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m .
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ...... ..........5:00 p.m.
Evenihg Worship ..... ....6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship.............................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening........ ......... .............. 1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.TH. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship .............:...7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.......................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ................... 1:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship...................... I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones........................10:00 a.m.
D6ctrina........................ 1:30 a.m.
.61 1. ''-
SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .........10:00 a.m.
Scrvicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Scrvicio................................8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Joveres ........5:00 p.m.


A Hindu mother walked down a
dusty road with two sons, a
healthy one and a sickly one.
About an hour later she returned
from the Ganges River with only
one son.
"Where's your other child?"
asked the missionary.
"I sacrificed himin the Ganges."
she answered.
"If you had to sacrifice a son,
why didn't you sacrifice your sickly
child?" he asked.
She answered, "We give. our
gods our best."
Why don't you give God the best
of your time, the best of your
talents, and the best of your
treasure? *
God gave His best for you when
He gave His Son.
Shouldn't you give Him your
best?


Books Are Noble



















Books have the power to change lives; without them our
knowledge of the world is limited. One immortal book
offers beauty, hope and inspiration more than any other.
It is the story of both what has been and what will be. This
book is God's Word, the Bible. In Job 12:13 we read, "To
God belong wisdom and power; counsel and understanding
arc his." Read this book, it will change your life!





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April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Bodeck District


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Senior Kyle Bodeck was the
only Hardee tennis player to go
all the way through the Class
2A District 8 playoffs.
Junior Summer Palmer nearly
wept the distance, losing in the
championship round to be run-
ner-up in her number one girls
division.
It was three days of tense
competition among the nine
teams in the district, including
Auburndale, which won the
girls division; Lake Wales,
which took the boys title;
Mulberry and Teneroc, all from
Polk County; Poinciana in
Osceol# County, Avon Park,
Lake Placid and Sebring in
Highlands County; and Hardee.
The Hardee girls played at
Winter Haven and the boys at
Bartow. The girls finished
fourth, while the boys were fifth
overall.
Boys
Bodeck was playing at num-
ber four singles. He got a bye in
the first round, beat Steven holt
of Poinciana 6-3, 6-1 in the
quarterfinal round, took Robert
Faison of Mulberry 6-1, 6-1 in
the semi-finals and went on to
beat Kirk Holladay of Lake
Wales 7-6 (4) 6-4.
At boys number 1, Juan Mier
had an early round bye and lost
0-6, 7-6, 6-3 to Adrian Miranda
of Teneroc.
At the number two singles,
Dylan Justice went from an
early-round bye to a 6-2, 6-3
loss to Andrew Midence of
Sebring.


At number three sil
Justin Fones had a bye
beat Kyle Lindeman of
berry 6-1, 6-0, before los
Jackson Reddick of Lake
6-0, 7-5 in
Finally, at number five
gles, junior Matt Godwin
bye, then battled Daniel I
of Lake Wales in a 7-6 (4
loss.
In number one dot
Justice/Bodeck went from
to a 6-3, 6-4 loss to
Miller/Midence of Sebring
In the number two do
Fones/Godwin had a bye.
beat John Connor/Joshua
son of Auburndale 4-6, &-
7-5, before losing in the s
nals to Reddick/Hollad
Lake Wales.
Girls
At number one si
Palmer, a junior, nearly
the table. With a first roun
she went on to defeat Jac
line Renteria of Poincian
6-0, and Ashley Scott of
berry 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 to get
championship round befoi
ing to Alexis Basgil of
champion Auburndale 5-7
6-0.
At number two singles
ior Kate Krause lost in the
terfinals to Kristyn Kna
Auburndale 6-1, 6-3.
Junior Taylor Pohl ha
opening-round match a
Nisha Patel of Sebring ar
the number three singles
6-1.
Freshman Caroline Du
played in the number foi
gles, losing in the quarter


Champion
ngles, round to Kelly Broen of
then Sebring.
Mul- Finally, at number five sin-
ing to gles. freshman Lacey Mc-
Wales Clenithan won her quarterfinal
match 4-6. 6-2. 6-3 over
e sin- Shakira Ebrahim of Lake
had a Wales, before losing in the
earlierr semifinals to Kelsey Ashbrook
1), 6-4 of Auburndale 6-0. 6-0.
At number one doubles.
ubles, Palmer/Krause drew an early
a bye round game against Kelsey
Brian Harris and Kenzie Harris of
g. Teneroc and won 6-1, 6-3.
ubles, Hardee went on to defeat Julie
They Smith/Alexandra Cornell of
Hen- Lake wales, 6-2. 6-2, before
-6 (5), losing in the semifinals 6-1, 6-1
emifi- to Basgil/Knapp of Auburndale,
ay of the event winner.
In number two doubles,
Durrance/Pohl, won a quarterfi-
ngles, nal match 6-0, 6-0 over Ashley
swept Spring and Jourden Daly of
d bye, Teneroc, before losing 6-4, 6-3
c-que- to Stephanie Rodriguez and
a 6-2, Hannah Waller of Lake Placid.
Mul- Boys coach Ken Leupold will
to the lose Mier, Justice, Fones and
re los- Bodeck to graduation and will
team use Godwin to anchor next
7, 6-1, year's squad, with returnees
juniors jared Jernigan, Matt
;, sen- Burrus, Austin Scheipsmeier
quar- and sophomore Skylaar Sim-
.pp of mons seeking a sport in the
starting lineup.
ad an Krause is the only graduate
against for girls coach Barbara
id lost Leupold, with juniors Palmer
;, 6-0, and Pohl expected back along
with freshmen Durrance, Mc-
rrance Clenithan, Susana Oceguera,
ur sin- Kaitlyn Shaw, Araceli Ramos,
erfinal Katie Smith and Ashley Baker.


T-Ball Tots Play Four More


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Past the midway point for the
T-Ball season, the ATP Agri
Service Inc. Bees have locked
up the division.
The Bees are at 7-0 with five
games left in the season, includ-
ing a March 31 rainout. Behind
them are the Conley Grove
Scrappers, Vision Ace Hard-
ware Hooks, City of Wauchula
Diamond Jaxx and Giovanni's
Rockhounds.
Some of last week's game
were quite diverse while others
were much closer.
It began with a close en-
counter on Monday where the
Hooks edged the Scrappers 24-
22.
Blake Rucker, Matt Webb
and Wyatt Rowland paced the
Hooks with four tallies apiece.
Luke Roberts, Juan Gaitan,
Carson MontsDeOca and
Christian Avalos had triple tal-
lies. Other Hooks players are
Rafael Zamora, Chase
Albritton, Billy Willis and
Andrew Reschke.
Boone Pazzaglia was the only
Scrapper to get home four
times. Joshua ABlock, Sean
Southers, Rudy Arizmendi and
Christpher Quiroz came home
three times each and Nicholas
Jackson, Josiah Lozano and
Madison Schraeder each added
a run. Ty Woods, John Nord and
Andrew Kuen also play for the


Scrappers.
On Tuesday night, the divi-
sion-leading Bees stung the
Rockhounds 24-3.
Dean Clark circled the bases
four times for the Bees.
Taijaeous "TyJay" Blandin ,
Cody Halstead, Dallas Grice,
Roman Hubbell and Tony
Rodriguez were three-score bat-
ters. Kellon Lindsey and Tyson
Pace each scored twice and Jose
Franco added a run.
Johnathan Guardiola, John-
athon "Bo" Bishop and Dane
Risher scored in a second-
inning rally for the Rock-
hounds. Other players on the
squad are Eric Mushrush,
Zander Yeomans, Cody Knight,
Codee Walker, Mason Shepard,
Gavain Evers, Johnny Tram-
mell and Riley Trammell.
On Thursday night, the
Scrappers came back to win 23-
19 over the Diamond Jaxx.
Leadoff batter Block crossed
home plate four times for the
Scrappers. Jackson, Lozano and
Schraeder added three runs
each, Souther,' Pazzaglia, Kuen
and Woods each scored twice
and Nord added a run.
Leadoff batter Arianna
Olmos and Aiden Thomas each
circled the bases three times for
the Diamond Jaxx. J. R. Red-
ding, Damien Olmos, Justin
Smith, Chris Nickerson and B.
J. Johnson chipped in with a
pair of scores apiece and Kaden


Bryant and Joe Hamilton each
added a run. Other Jaxx players
are Eric Rivera and Brian
Murphy.
In the Friday night finale, the
Bees claimed another victim in
the 18-8 win over the Hooks.
Rodriguez, Clark, Blandin
and Halstead each put a trio of
tallies on the board for the Bees.
Seth Pautz and Lindsey added
twin tallies and Pace and
Franco had solo scores.
Willis scored twice for the
Hooks, while. Roberts, Rpcker,
Rowland, MontsDeOca, Zam-
ora and Reschke each crossed
home plate once.

Some of the more intrigu-
ing names that the
Pilgrims gave to their
babies included Ashes,
Dust, Earth, Delivery,
Increase and Weep-not.


Junior Boys Start Season


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The oldest of the Youth
Baseball teams got their games
going after Spring Break.
The four teams only got a
pair of game in the first week
because of rainouts. Last week,
they got all four games com-
pleted. By the end of last week,
the Pirates were undefeated
with a 2-0 record. The Yankees
and Rays were each at 2-1 and
the Diamondbacks are looking
for their first victory. We don't
have names for all the players
but hope to get rosters soon.
The first game of the season
turned out to be on March 29,
when the Rays edged the
Yankees 7-6.
Cody Spencer, leadoff batter
for the Rays came around to
score twice for the Rays.
Adding solo scores were Hunter
Bryant, Devin Pearson, Russell
Weems, Andy Manley and Wil-
liam McClelland. Other players
for the Rays are Tanor Durden,
Julian Galvez, Jose Gonzalez,
Adam Salas, Daniel Parmenter
and Chris Hull.
For the Yankees, Freddy Tor-
res scored in the third inning.
Bradley Brewer, Isiah Palacios,
David Badillo and Austin


Walker added fifth-inning tal-
lies and Frank Farias added a
run in the sixth. Other Yanks
are Omar Alamia, Jordan Jones,
Dale Lovering, Cody McVay,
Kefer Kedzior and Chris Flores.
On April 1, the Rays out-
scored the Diamondbacks 7-2.
Spencer, Durden, Gonzalez
and Bryant scored in the first
inning for the Rays, and Mc-
Clelland, Hull and Pearson
added a trio of tallies in the fifth
frame.
Austin Vickers and Andrew
Hinojosa were the only scorers
for the Diamondbacks, al-
though several runners were
stranded on .the base paths.
Other Diamondbacks are Mi-
chael Tomlinson, Tyler Braagg,
Matthew Hamilton, Cesar Fim-
bres, Cage Harbaugh, Ty Tram-
mell, Quinton Stone, Adam K.,
Ruben D. and Adam R.
Last Monday's game was a 9-
2 win for the Pirates over the
Rays.
Marco DeLeon, Zack Car-
ranco and Roby ,Paris were
twin-tally batters for the
Pirates. Seth McGee, Alex
Clarke and Marcof -riones--
added solo scores. Other Pirates
are Tyler Helms, Tomas Go-
mez, Blake Crawley, Dalton


Tubbs and Rodrigo Rodriguez.
Spencer and Gonzales were
the only Rays to score.
On Tuesday, the Yankees shut
down the Diamondbacks 9-1.
Farias circled the bases- twice
for the Yankees. Alamia, Jones,
Brewer, McVay, Walker, Torres
and Lovering each chipped in
with a run.
Harbarugh was the only
Diamondback to get all the way
to home plate.
On Thursday, the Yankees
nipped the Rays 8-6.
Alamia and Jones each put a
pair of runs on the board for the
Yankees. Palacios, Farias,
Brewer and Torres added a run
apiece.
For the Rays, it was solo
scores from Bryant, Spencer,
Gonzalez, Durden, Manley and
Pearson.
The Friday game was a 13-0
shutout for the Pirates over the
Diamondbacks.
DeLeon, McGee, Clarke and
Carranco rounded the bases
twice apiece for the Pirates.
Helms, Gomez, Paris, Tubbs
and Rodriguez each chipped in
with-arun.
No one was able to get all the
way home for the Diamond-
backs.


Franklin D. Roosevelt was the first American President to use a private polling service
to advise him on both election strategy and public policy.

Many historians consider Japan's ruling dynasty to be the oldest in the world. Legend
assigns the date 660 B.C. to the reign of the first emperor.


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RCMA Bowling Green CDC
404 Orange St, Bowling Green
Tel: (863) 375-4881
Ask for- Pregunten por
Gloria HernandezlBeatrice Zamorano
Monday-Friday
Lunes-Viemes
7:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m.


R


HA


RCMA Fred Dennis CDC
320 N 9th Ave., Wauchula
Tel: (863) 767-0222
^ Ask for-Pregunten por
. -Lucy Garcia/Aracelis Mejia/Angela Hernandez
Monday-Friday
Lunes-Viernes
7:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m.


*Is your child age 6 weeks -5years old?
S;,Tiene un nifio de 6 semanas a 5 aflos?


*Does your child have a disability or special needs?

i,Tiene un nifio(a) con un impedimento o necesidades especiales?


*Are you a High Risk Pregnant Mom?

LEs usted una madre con un embarazo de alto riesgo?.


Come sign your child up for Early Head Start/Head Start!


Vengan a inscribir su niiio(a) para Early Head Start/Head Start!
3:31-4:14c


Give Your Child A "HEAD START" by Applying Now!

bele a su Ninio(a) un buen comienzo


Fred Dennis CDC License #A25-001
Bowling Green CDC License #C 10HA0513


RCMA IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR CHILDCARE
THIS SEASON 2011-2012 Early Head Start/Head Start Programs

RCMA ESTA ACEPTANDO APLICACIONES PARA CUIDO DE NINOS
PARA LA TEMPORADA 2011-2012 en los programs Early Head Start/ Head Start


Children 6 weeks- 5 years old
Niflos de 6 semanas- 5 aflos


PUBLIC NOTICE
You are hereby notified that on
Thursday, Thursday, May 12th, at 9:00 a.m., the
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners
will hold a public hearing for the adoption of a
Resolution vacating and closing the road/easement
known as
Bryant Road
being legally described as: The maintained right of way of
Bryant Road in it's entirety located in Section 30, Township
34 South, Range 23 East, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
105, also known as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A, of the official
records of Hardee County, Florida.
The public hearing will be held in the Hardee County
Board of County Commissioners Board Room, 412 West
Orange Street, Room 102, Wauchula, Florida.
This procedure shall be in accordance with the provisions
of Section 336, Florida Statutes.
A petition for the closing and vacating, of the above-refer-
enced shall be considered by the Board of County
Commissioners after required publication of this Notice.
Copies of the documents relating to this proposal are
available for public inspection during weekdays between
the hours of 8:30 A.M. and 3:00 PM. in the Hardee County
Public Works Department, 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula,
Florida.
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
Board of County Commissioners' office at least five (5)
days prior to the public hearing.
All persons are invited to attend and be heard. Although
minutes of the Public Hearing will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearing
will need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made by a court reporter.
Terry Atchley, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners
4:14c









4C The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


Greetings from Fort Green!
This weather is already hot!
The weather announcer said we
had already broken-records for
the heat!
I*try and walk every day and
my walk is mainly on the dirt
road. One of the beauties of
walking on a dirt road is you
see so many animrkracks, and
if you are early yi can hear all
the birds. This past week I have
seen snake trac...wais always
told they move Trom their win-
ter home to their summer home
in March, but they must think
we are still in MarchiAnyway,
everyone needs to be _n the
lookout. You do not see near as
many snakes now as you used
to, and the rattlesnakes are prac-
tically extinct!
Chris-Thompson is in the
hospital in Sebring. Slick went
to Tennessee recently for a
funeral and on the way home
his blood sugar got out of con-
trol. He had to stop several
times for medication. Little
Stevie Brooke, Melissa Daven-
port's daughter, is in ATI Chil-
dren's Hospital. She had sur-
gery but is still running a fever
so they will not release her until
all infection is gone. Please
pray for all of these.
David McQuaig left for an-
other tour irrAfghanistan last
Monday morning. Please pray
that he will return safe. He and
all the military need our earnest
prayer.
Sarah and Charlie Cornish
from Brookside Bluff RV Park
visited our church last week.
We were happy to meet them.
Virginia Oden also visited us,
and she certainly has beautiful
hair. Some people are blessed
with beautiful silver hair.
Alex McGaughey is visiting
his parents for a week. He lives
in Kentucky and does not get to
visit as often as he and they
would like!
Fort Green is growing. Art
and Teresa Long and the Mar-
vin Walker families have re-
cently moved to our area. It is
amazing, but I still live in the
old Merle Abbott homeplace,
even though I moved here in
1965. I said that to let you know
about another new family,
Leonard Frame, and they
moved into Aunt Lettie and
Uncle Juddy's old homeplace.
We are happy they have all cho-
sen Fort Green!


The campout last Friday
night for the RAs was super.
There were about 30 youth and
older men. It was a time of
great fellowship, fishing and
playing music on the guitars for
some singalong. Then Saturday
night, the junior-high youth
went to Lakeland to watch a
Christian movie. They stopped
on the way to eat in Mulberry.
They all had a good time.
Sandy Hash called me last
week and asked me to go to the
program at the First Christian
Church. She called me Saturday
morning to tell me I had really
missed the boat in not going.
She said it was the best program
she had seen in some time. I
hope you all went!
On a happy note, Christine
Murdock is cancer free! She
completed her treatments some
time back, but this was the-last
word from her doctors.
Dennis Sasser's dad, Jim,
lives in Blairsville, Ga. The bad
weather they experienced last
week did not leave him un-
scathed. Fifteen large trees blew
down, but all away from his
home. His porch furniture all
blew over the railing and out in
the yard, instead of through
windows and into his house.
The Lord is sure good!
There is always lots going on
but it seems an extra amount
this time of the year. This
Saturday is the Methodist
Cemetery workday. Then that
night a group from the church is
going to see "The Story of
Jesus." There will be a men's
breakfast at 8.this Sunday, and
then the Lord's Supper will be
observed during the morning
service.
On Friday, April 22, begin-
ning at 7 p.m., the movie "The
Passion of Christ" will be
shown at the church, and then
on Saturday, the 23rd, will be
the Easter egg hunt beginning at
10 a.m. To climax it all is Easter
Sunday on the 24th.
This is a lot planned for our
community! Please come on
over and join us in any and all
of these opportunities.
My grandpa's birthday was
April 23. He was born in 1881.
My grandson, T.K., will get to
celebrate his birthday on Easter
Sunday!
Please pray for each other,
our military and our nation.


HHS Band Busy

With Many Events


Under the leadership of band
director Michael L. Hill,
Hardee Senior High School's
Blue Star Brigade and Winter
Guard are continuing to work
toward the end of the school
year.
The students volunteers of
this organization have just com-
pleted participation in Wauch-
ula's Friday Night Live Mardi
Gras events, which took place
on March 18. The students pro-
vided home-baked goods from
brownies and cookies to pine-
apple, carrot and German cho-
colate cakes as well as tradi-
tional king cake.
The evening's favorites were
the many varieties of cheese-
cakes that were offered and
served. Also sold were colorful
necklaces and helium balloons
for the band's fund raiser.
Other. promotional items
were the sale of advertisements
for the upcoming football pro-
grams and the commercial
advertisements that will be on
the equipment trailer that
accompanies the Blue Star Bri-
gade whenever it performs.
The Brigade was honored to


entertain those who were in
attendance with a sampling cf
lively pep music, a percussion
exhibition and, later in the
evening, a jazz solo by senior
Jamie Bashore, baritone saxo-
phonist.
As the school year moves
toward its end, the Blue Star
Brigade will be using its musi-
cal abilities on an upcoming
Band Day. May 12th will bring
the Spring Concert, in conjunc-
tion with Hardee Senior High
School's Chorus, which is un-
der the leadership of David
Radford. Plans are being made
for the band's annual awards
banquet.
Following these events, the
band and chorus will complete
the spring season with a trip to
Universal Studios in Orlando.
where both groups will share
their musical talents.
Hill will be completing his
first year as bandmaster for
Hardee, and has been excep-
tionally pleased with the musi-
cal abilities of his students and
is looking forward to the year
that lies ahead in 2011-12, he
says.


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New Guideline Helps Doctors

Diagnose Breast Cancer


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


best possible care: new evi-
dence-based recommendations
from the College of American
Pathologists (CAP) and the
American Society of Clinical
Oncology (ASCO) that will
improve the accuracy of ER and
PgR testing in breast cancer.
As many as two-thirds of
breast cancers are ER and/or
PgR-positive with their growth
influenced by activation of the
estrogen receptor pathway. Ac-
curate determination of tumor
phenotype is critical to properly
select therapy options and indi-
vidualize treatments.
In particular, the new guide-
line recommends that breast
cancer patients should have
their tumor tested for estrogen
and progesterone receptors, and
that the testing should be per-
formed by an accredited labora-
tory that follows specific testing
procedures and handles the
samples in a consistent way.


According to Elizabeth Ham-
mond, M.D., FCAP, co-chair of
the CAP/ASCO Hormone Re-
ceptor Testing in Breast Cancer
Panel, a board-certified pathol-
ogist at Intermountain Health-
care, and professor of patholo-
gy at the University of Utah
School of Medicine, "Increased
attention to simple measures
such as the handling of tissue
specimens from the moment
they are taken from the patient
to when they reach the patholo-
gist, the uniform fixation of
specimens, the standardization
and validation of lab assays,
rigorous reporting procedures
and greater access to treatment
interventions have the potential
to significantly improve breast
cancer outcomes around the
world."
The CAP/ASCO Panel also
expects that the new ER/PgR
guideline will foster improved
communications among cancer


Plastic/Glass
Aluminum/Metal
Cardboard/Newspaper


I ---------



HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM







rrrir5 (Rfl AX

Hardee County announces the availability of grant funding for housing repairs. The funds
can be used for repairs or rehabilitation of owner-occupied, single-family, detached
homes (no mobile homes) to ensure that they are decent, safe and sanitary. Some eligible
usages of funds include, but are not limited to:

Weatherization Activities
Home Repairs, as well as necessary repairs to correct substantial code violations
Repairs/Alterations to improve health, safety and well-being of the occupants
Repairs to contribute to the structural integrity and preservation of the home
Modifications to provide accessibility for elderly/physically impaired occupants


ELIGIBILITY
Applicants are required to contractually agree to program
guidelines and certify that they own the home to be assisted and
that it is their principal residence. Additionally, first mortgages,
property taxes and/or assessments must be current. The property to
be assisted must be free from any liens or judgments. Preference
will be given to lower income, elderly and/or physically impaired
homeowners. The total household income, adjusted for family
size, must be within program limits.

The program provides an interest-free forgivable loan to qualified,
eligible applicants. All loans are deferred until point of sale,
transfer of title, moving refinancing with a cash pay-out,
refinancing with higher interest rate, failure to maintain
homeowner's insurance or failure to occupy the home. At the end
of the lien period, the forgivable loan is forgiven and does not
require repayment, if all program requirements are met.


APPLICATIONS


SApplications are
now available
on-line at:
Swww.hardeecountv.net
or at the
S Hardee County
Office of
Community
Development,
Courthouse Annex,
S 412 W.Orange St.,
Room 201,
Wauchula, FL


s \,v.v v v


specialists and also between
patients and their doctors. "It is
our hope that the CAP/ASCO
ER/PgR guideline will facilitate
processes at each health system
and institution, so that appropri-
ate measures to ensure accurate
predictive biomarker testing
[including ER/PgR] are in place
and that breast cancer patients
receive the highest quality care
possible," says Dr. Hammond.
Chermok agrees. "My skilled
team of a radiologist, surgeon,
and pathologist had brought me
this far, and I had great confi-
dence that my pathologist had
correctly identified the nature
structure of the tumor cells, and
given the oncology team the
information necessary to create
a plan of treatment."
The College of American
Pathologists offers two web-
sites, www.MyHealthTestRe-
minder.org and www.MyBiop-
sy.org. These sites can help a
woman remember to schedule
her next mammogram, as well
as provide her a patient guide if
she is diagnosed with breast
cancer, including breast cancer
that is ER/PgR-positive.


About one in eight women
will be diagnosed with breast
cancer, but the disease is much
more than a statistic to Ruth
Chermok.
Chermok is a breast cancer
survivor who was diagnosed
with ER/PgR-positive breast
cancer at age 46. "I was on top
of the world. Rick, my high
school sweetheart, and I had
just celebrated our 25th wed-
ding anniversary and had start-
ed our lives as empty nesters.
Life throws you for a loop
sometimes. Shortly after, I was
diagnosed with ER/PgR-posi-
tive breast cancer."
Thanks to her medical team,
Chermok can count herself as a
survivor.
That team included a patholo-
gist-a physician who examines
cells, bodily fluids, and tissues
to diagnose disease. And now,
pathologists have a new tool to
help them give their patients tFie


ATTENTION.


Hardee County


Disposal Customers



We will be closed April 22 for





good friday


Friday's route will be picked up on Tuesday, April 26.

All other routes remain the same.


MARCH 20-MAY 31 ONLY

Offering Our 10 & 20 Yard Roll-Off Containers


150 Off


The Rogular Haul Charge!!

PLU.
wo will waive all rental and
environmental fooesI!

Don't Wait!
Call Today For Detailsll
-iome restrictions apply
Deposit Required


.TheHerad-Adocat
HadeCut' oeonCvrg
115Souh 7h Aenu WACHUA, L 387








April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
No rainouts last week. The
2011 Ozone or Majors division
.got all its games played last
week.
By week's end, the Country-
side Growers Rays were the
undisputed leader of the pack
with its 6-0 record. The
Chapman Fruit Co. Red Sox
were at 7-2. Following along
were the Joe L. Davis Braves,
the All Creature Animal Hos-
pital Reds and the Joe Albritton
Insurance Giants.
There were no games on
Monday or Tuesday this week
because of the FCAT testing.
Games resume today (Thurs-
day) and tomorrow.
Last Monday, the Country-
side Growers Rays went wild
and rushed past the All Creature
Animal Hospital Reds 21-6.
Leadoff batter Cody Cumbee
was the only Ray to get around
the bases four times. Carlos
Camacho, Tucker Albritton,
Jacob Barton and Danny Owens
each crossed home plate three
times. Jhett See had twin tallies
and Jason Alamia, Cade Rob-
erts and Jacob Hebert each
added a run. Other Rays are J.
T. Bryant and Jimmy Lane.
Hunter Scranton and Jesse
Santoyo each circled the bases
twice for the Reds. Kyle Hewett
and Jaylon Ramirez chipped in
with a run apiece. Other Reds
are Jax Ullrich, Frankie Cor-
onado, Larrett Smith, Marquis
Delgado, Benjamin Staton,
Elias Montoya and Aaron
Harrison.
On Tuesday night, the Chap-
man Fruit Red Sox got the 12-2
best of the Joe Albritton In-
surance Giants.


Isaac Flores, Keith Choate,
Alex Rodriguez, Pablo Salgado,
Tony Servin and Zach Macias
all put twin scores on the board
for the Red Sox. Daniel Everett
scored one. Other Red Sox are
Wyatt Zeigler, Mason Block,
Kyle Choate and Johnny
Shelton.
Joseph Crawford and Landon
Albritton were the only Giants
to get all the way home. Several
others were stopped short of
home plate. Also playing for the
Giants are Brandon Franks,
Thomas Atchley, Ryan Moore,
Kole Robertson, Brad Collum,
Ivan Badillo, Kai Shakir-
Washington, Tirease Morris,
Edgar Lucatero and Daniel
Ortiz.
Thursday's game was a
thriller as the Joe L. Davis
Braves nipped the Red Sox 3-2.
Boone Paris scored in the
first inning and again in the
sixth to win the game for the
Braves. Parker Carlton also
scored in the first inning. Other
Braves are Hayden Lindsey,
Joshua Carlton, Tanner Carlton,
Will Roberts, Joc'Quez Thom-
as, Augustine Flores, Nick
Nichols, Jesse Pilkington,
Ricardo Aleman and Zack
Richardson.
Flores was the only Red Sox
batter to score, coming home in
the first and sixth innings.
On Friday night, the Reds
gouged the Giants 12-1.
Harrison, Ramirez, Smith and
Coronado each came across
home plate twice for the Reds,
while Santoya, Hewett, Scran-
ton and Montoyo each added
solo scores. Moore was the lone
Giant to get all the way to home
plate.


Majors Get


Full Week In


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
April 11, Froiland Ruiz-Perez, 41, of 212 East Main St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Manuel Zuniga and charged with
DUI and no valid license.

April 10, Jessie Garza Jr., 41, and Jose Fidencio Garza, 39,
both of 2599 Garza Road, Zolfo Springs, were arrested by Dep.
Paul Johnson and each charged with battery.
April 10, Richard Lee Hines, 41, of 4668 SR 64 West, Ona,
was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. William Delaney and
charged with DUI, and three counts DUI with property damage.
April 10, a vehicle stolen on SR 64 East, a fight on Garza
Road, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North and on Fussell Road,
and a theft on Mockingbird Road were reported.

April 9, Avimael Cruz, 19, of 4107 Denver Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson and charged with bur-
glary with assault or battery.
April 9, a residential burglary on Blair Lane and a business
burglary on Washington Street were reported.

April 8, Janet Lee Shorrock, 51, of 817 E. Main St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on.a charge of failure to appear
in court.
April 8, Samuel Mendoza, 49, of 2128 Polk Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with battery.
April 8, Amado Garcia, 21, of 4060 Captiva Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on two counts of with-
holding support of children.
April 8, Regina Allmon, 41, of 977 SR 64 East, Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley and charged with trespass on
other than a structure or conveyance.
April 8, Cathy Lynn Halpain, 38, of 21220 Morgan Grice
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge
of failure to appear in court.
April 8, a business burglary on SR 64 West, and a theft on Will
Duke Road were reported.
April 7, Ricardo Juarez-Colorado, 31, of 3474 Marion St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters and charged with
battery.
April 7, David Neil Carr, 44, of 7009 NE CR 660, Arcadia,
was arrested by Dep. John Cortez on a charge of violation of pro-
bation.
April 7, Juan Alvarez Salgado, 39, of 127 College Lane, was
arrested by Dep. Manuel Martinez and charged with sexual assault.
April 7, Amanda Leigh Griffin, 33, of 219 Cracker Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Juan Castillo on an out-of-county
warrant.
April 7, criminal mischief on Alderman Road was reported.

April 6, Alex Lazo, 43, of 2329 Oxendine Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Danny O'Bryan on an out-of-coun-
ty warrant.
April 6, John Alexander O'Bryan, 44, of 1557 Appaloosa
Lane, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Carree Williams and
charged with armed trespass on property.

April 5, Josie Ann, Montoya, 45, of 2541 Morning Glory
Loop, Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.


BOWLING GREEN
April 8, a theft on East Main Street was reported.

April 7, a fight on Church Avenue was reported.


For the week ended April 07, 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 6,434 head,
compared to 6,080 last week, and 7,121 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to
1.00 higher, feeder steers and heifers were steady firm.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:




Slaughter Cows:
55.00-75.00

Slaughter Bulls:
85.00-98.00


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 Ibs 170.00-215.00
300-400 lbs 154.00-187.50
400-500 lbs 136.00-172.50

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 147.50-197.50
300-400 lbs 126.00-165.00
400-500 lbs 120.00-148.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs '85-90 percent


Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs


April 5, a vehicle stolen on Keeton Road, and thefts on
Suwanee Street and U.S. 167 North were reported.

April 4, Brenda Roberts, 47, of 321 North Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with larceny-
petit theft and resisting an officer without violence.
April 4, Jose Antonio Lobato, 29, of 3066 Hickory Court,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson on a charge of
violation of probation.
April 4, a residential burglary on Steve Roberts Special, a
vehicle stolen on Hardee Street, and thefts on two locations on U.
S. 17 North were reported.

WAUCHULA
April 10, criminal mischief on Grapefruit Street was reported.

April 9, Edgar Vasquez Delgado, 27, of 100 SE 10th Ave.,
Okeechobee, was arrested by Ofc. Frank Yodonis and charged with
DUI and driving with knowledge of a suspended license.
April 9, criminal mischief on East Bay Street and thefts on
Pennsylvania Avenue and on Honolulu Drive were reported.

April 8, a theft on North Second Avenue was reported.

April 7, Elbert Calvin Griffin, 51, of 212 S. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Victoria Thompson and charged
with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

April 5, David Willie Coughlin, 38, and Elizabeth Jean Pautz,
33, both of 325 S. Seventh Ave., Wauchula, were arrested by Ofc.
William Smith and each charged with battery.
April 5, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.

April 4, criminal mischief on North Ninth Avenue was report-
ed.


YOU Can Appear In ...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published in
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear in this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate. PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.


-rj










6C The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011


Courthuse Rport-


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Alex Ruben Tzoy Itzep, 24,
Arcadia, and Annie Myshelle
Wells, 31, Douglas, Ga.
Abel Taviras Esquvel, 15,
Wauchula, and Sarai Angelita
Camarillo, 15, Wauchula.
Kevin Eugene Richardson,
36, Zolfo Springs, and Sarah
Ann Newman, 18, Tonawanda,
N.Y.
Timothy Wayne Breedlove,
27, New Brockton, Ala., and
Genell Alene Richey, 24,
Bowling Green.
Ramon Romero III, 43,
Wauchula, and Audrey Renita
Haynes, 45, Bowling Green.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Highvest Corp. vs. Chris
Wilson et al, judgment of fore-
closure.
Diversicare-d/b/a Hardee
Manor Healthcare Center vs.
Lois I. Willis, judgment.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Janet R. Beckham, voluntary
dismissal.
Chase Bank USA vs. Karla J.
Hilario, judgment.
HSBC Bank Nevada vs.
Carmen Serrano, judgment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Ryan Blair, possession of
marijuana, adjudication with-
held, probation one year, no
alcohol or bars, random
screens, warrantless search and
seizure, substance abuse evalu-
ation/treatment, no trespassing
at elementary or junior high
schools, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees
and $50 cost of prosecution
(COP); two counts contributing
to the delinquency of a minor,
not prosecuted.
Jesus Pantoja, giving false
information to a law enforce-
ment officer, not prosecuted.
Domingo Castellon Jr., pub-
lic consumption of an alcoholic
beverage, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 COP.
Elias Damian-Nicanor, dis-
orderly conduct and resisting
arrest without violence, adjudi-
cation withheld, time served,
$325 fine and court costs, $150
public defender fees, $100
COP.
Charlene Frances Gross,


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252011 DR 000169

DAVID COUGHLIN, JR.,
Petitioner


JO ANN COUGHLIN,
Respondent.


NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

TO:
JO ANN COUGHLIN
219 33rd St. West
Palmetto, FL 34221

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on DAVID COUGHLIN,
JR., Petitioner, whose address is
325 S. 7th St., Wauchula, FL
33873 on or before May 6, 2011,
and file the original with the clerk
of this Court at 417 W. Main Street
Room 202 Wauchula, FL 33873
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail
to do so, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record
at the clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.

Dated: 4-5-11

B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
4:7-28c


petit theft, probation six
months, ACF Mile Post Class,
S325 fine and court costs, $50
COP, 25 hours community ser-
vice.
Artenio Antonio Manuel, loi-
tering and prowling, not prose-
cuted.
Randi L. Sackett, petit theft,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion six months, ACF Mile Post
Class, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 COP, 20 hours com-
munity service.
Stephen Wayne Smith, pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP. -
Marco Torres, resisting an
officer without violence, $325
fine and court costs, $50 COP.
Fidencio Davila, domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Franklin Daniel Fox, posses-
sion of marijuana and harass-
ing, teasing or interfering with a
police animal, adjudication
withheld, probation one year,
no alcohol or bars, substance
abuse, warrantless search and
seizure, evaluation/treatment,
$325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP.
Jakkare Marcella Thompson,
resisting an officer without vio-
lence, possession of marijuana
and possession of drug para-
phernalia, adjudication with-
held, 270 days-suspended,
probation two years, no alco-
hol/bars, alcohol and drug
abuse evaluation/treatment,
warrantless search and seizure,
random screens, $325 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, 50 hours
community service.
Christopher Mark Tindell,
trespass on a structure or con-
veyance, 10 days in jail, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP,
restitution to be set; petit theft,
not prosecuted.
Timothy Joe Baker, domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Guillermo Garcia, violation
of probation (original charge
improper exhibition of a fire-
arm), affidavit withdrawn,
closed.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
John Gibney and Cathe
Gibney, divorce.
U.S. Bank NA vs. Joseph A.
Iorio et al, petition for mortgage
foreclosure.
Denise Everett vs. Lucious
Everett, petition for injunction
for protection.
City of Bowling Green vs.


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 25-2009-CC-000051


HIGHEST CORP., a Florid
portion,
Plaintiff,

v.

CHRIS WILSON, THE UNKI
SPOUSE OF CHRIS WILSC
etc., et al.,
Defendants.


CLERK'S NOTICE OF S.
UNDER F.S. CHAPTER

NOTICE IS GIVEN th
accordance with the
Summary Judgment
Foreclosure dated the 29
March, 2011, in the above
cause, I will sell to the I
and best bidder for cash,
Clerk's Sale at Hardee
Courthouse, at the second
hallway outside of Room 21
West Main Street, Wauchi
33873, at 11:00 A.M. on th
day of April, 2011, the fol
described property:

Lots 15 and 16, Block'
all being in Charlie Cr
Mobile Estates, as per I
recorded In Plat Book
Page 37, in the Pul
Records of Hardee Cou
Florida

Real Property Address:
Mockingbird Road, Wau
Florida
Real Property Tax ID Numt
33-27-0860-0000H-0015

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
INTEREST IN THE SUI
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, I
THAN THE PROPERTY C
AS OF THE DATE OF TI
PENDENS MUST FILE A
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS
THE SALE.

Dated 03/31/11

CLERK OF (
B. HUGH BR

BY: B
Deput


a cor-


Javier Maldonado, petition for
forfeiture of money and
firearms.
Lee Barberee vs. Universal
Property & Casualty, dam-
ages-contracts and indebted-
ness.
Lisa Cisneros and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Ernesto Cisneros, petition
for administrative child support
order.
Terrell Cecil Green and DOR
vs. Diane Lois Santo, petition
for child support.
Richard Anthony Martinez
and DOR vs. Maria Maryann
Montoya, petition for child sup-
port.
Richard Gonzales Jr. vs.
Berta A. Gonzales, petition for
injunction for protection.
Chelsea L. Cruz vs. Berta A.
Gonzales, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Daina Michelle Smith and
DOR vs. Alexander Poole Jr.,
petition for enforcement of
child support administrative
order.
Melissa Montanez and DOR
vs. Joshua A. Gause, petition
for enforcement of administra-
tive child support order.
Joy D. Harrison and James
W. Harrison III, divorce.
Berta A. Gonzales vs.
Richard Gonzales Jr., petition
for injunction for protection.
Candida Cruz-Lopez vs. Jose
Pulido Saavedra, petition for
injunction for protection.
Kiley S. Barclay and DOR
vs. Jesus Obregon, petition for
child support administrative-
order.
Rebecca A. Stephens' and
Vernon N. Stephens, divorce.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Benjamin Willis and Melanie
Willis, damages-contracts and
indebtedness.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Carol M. Clark and Terry
Clark, order.
Wells Fargo Bank NA vs.
Stephen H. Weisman, Mary Jo
Weisman et al, judgment vacat-
ed, action dismissed.
Deborah Keen vs. Horace
Keen, amended injunction for
protection.
Carolyn Hampton vs. Board
of County Commissioners, joint
dismissal.
Samantha Carrion vs. An-
thony Briseno, dismissal of
injunction for protection.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

Case No. 252011 DR000077

MEGAN WASHINGTON,
Petitioner,
and
DEMETRISE WASHINGTON,
Respondent.
I/


NOWN NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
)N, DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: DEMETRISE WASHINGTON
/ 612 Bronty Rd
Greenville, NC 27834
ALE
45 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
iat, in and that you are required to serve
Final a copy of your written defenses, If
of any, to it on Megan Washington
day of whose address is P.O. Box 1567,
*-styled Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 on or
highest before 04-29-11, and file the orig-
at the inal with the clerk of this Court at
County PO Drawer 1749, Wauchula FL
d floor 33873 before service on
02, 417 Petitioner or immediately there-
ula, FL after. If you fail to do so, a default
he 20th may be entered against you for
allowing the relief demanded in the peti-
tion.

'H", Copies of all court documents
eek in this case, including orders, are
Plat available at the Clerk of the
S3, Circuit Court's office. You may
blic review these documents upon
nty, request.
You must keep the Clerk of
1363 Circuit Court's office notified of
uchula, your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
)er: 31- Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
G AN mailed to the address on record
RPLUS at the clerk's office.
OTHER
)WNER Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida
HE LIS Family Law Rules of Procedure,
CLAIM requires certain automatic disclo-
AFTER sure of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply dan result
in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.

COURT Dated: March 23, 2011
ADLEY B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
I. Reed
y Clerk BY: DIANE V. SMITH
DEPUTY CLERK
4:7,14c 3:31-4:21p


withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Jami Irene Santos, motion to
amend sentence (original
charge possession of hydro-
codone), probation modified to
one year without drug offender
conditions.
Luis Banda, home invasion,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion five years, $520 fines and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, $860 restitu-
tion.
Patricia Denise Denton,
criminal use of personal identi-
fication information, probation
18 months, $520 fine and court
costs, $200 public defender fees
and $100 COP placed on lien,'
25 hours community service;
obtaining a driver's license or
ID card by fraud and perjury
when not an official proceed-
ing, nofprosecuted.
Bernandino Felipe Galindo,
unarmed burglary to a structure
or conveyance and resisting an
officer without violence, trans-
ferred to county misdemeanor
court.
Cody James Rawls, uttering
a forged check, not prosecuted.
Derek Dempsey Alday,
armed trespass and taking deer
or turkey by use of gun or light,
probation nine months, relin-
quish firearms, no hunting for
one year, $525 fine--and- court
costs, $100 COP, 25 hours com-
munity service.
Armando Guttierrez, motion
to reduce sentence (original
charge attempted second degree
murder), restitution ($25,859)
placed on lien with unpaid fines
and fees, probation terminated.
Judy Darlene Rowe, viola-
tion of community control-
house arrest (original charge
aggravated child abuse and
grand theft), community control
modified to include not going
around victim's family and
staying out of bank where one
works.
Kenneth Allen VanSickle,
motion to terminate probation
early (original charges two
counts possession of metham-
phetamine), probation terminat-
ed.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Mary Katherine Hanchey


and Patsy Ward to Joseph A.
Brennick, $86,259.
Federal Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) to Kim-
berly Darty, Lawrence Crow
and Wanda Crow, $42,400.
HUD to Larry and Catherine
Reynolds, $34,050.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust as trustee to Guadalupe
Sanchez. $42.500.
Arthur S. Womack as trustee
to Calvin B. and Pamela Jo
Roberts, and Milton L. and Kim
S. Roberts, $385,000.
Amy S. Crews as trustee to
Ashleigh Logan Harned as
trustee, $200,000.
BankUnited to Daniel J.
Smith, $120,000.
Charles M. Grimsley as


trustee to Kenneth Franklin
Walker, $125,000.
Fiorella Fiorani to Patricia C.
Grimsley as trustee, $141,000.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort LLC to Jacob F. and
Judy A. Grigg, $30,000..
Homes of Wauchula Inc..to
Javier and Maria C. Salgado,
$85,000.
Alonzo Whitehead to Joseph
A. Brennick, $54,520.
Buford W. Ross to Martin
and Maria Davila, $27,075.
Clarence J. Jr. and Vanette S.
See to Wauchula State Bank,
$12,700.
Robert and Geni R. Gilbreath
to Federal National Mortgage
Association, $57,800.


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


KOFFEE KLATCH
The hosts on April 6 were
-fecl-Leeneand Nancy and
Dewey Morrison.MidgeSaf-tn-
ders led the U.S. Pledge, I led
the Canadian Pledge and Lee
Roy Behymer led the prayer.
Sandy and Rudy Lapp, our
tour coordinators, have decided
to retire. They were presented
with a Certificate of Apprecia-
tion and a card that was signed
by most in the park. They will
be sadly missed, and they have
shown us places in Florida we
would never have seen. They
-will still remain residents of
Crystal Lake but now will have
some time to themselves.
The 50/50 winners were
Betty Ardis, Carol Lawrence
and Frankie Walters.

BINGO
Sherry Chamberlain won the
large jackpot on April 1 and
Sharleen Arola won the small
jackpot.
On April 4, Shirley Johnson
No. 2 won the large jackpot and
Kay McKnight won the small
jackpot.

SCORES
Mixed Golf April 4: Winners
were Les Ascott, Bill R.
Johnson, Mick Adams and
Charlie Mcknight.


WELCOME TO PARADISE
Well, another season has
come and gone. It seemed like
the weather just turned really
nice and then it is time for most
of us to return to our homes in
the North. Safe traveling to
those who have a few more
weeks here.
Don't forget to keep your
park directory with you this
summer if you are traveling. It
is always nice to have some
unexpected guests drop by. The
ninth annual Crystal Lake Re-
union in Ontario this summer is
Aug. 6. It is for current and for-
mer residents. We hope to see a
lot of you then.
I would like to thank Diane
Burget for her contribution with
the Church News.
Keep me updated on all our
winter friends whether it is
health issues or a special birth-
day or anniversary. It is always
nice hearing from everyone
over the summer, telling me
what you are up to or where you
are traveling to over the sum-
mer.
Doug and I would like to
wish everyone a happy, healthy
and safe summer. Until No-
vember,
May God bless you and your
family.


When marrying, ask yourself this question: Do you
believe that you will be able to converse well with this
person into your old age? Everything else in marriage is
transitory.
-Friedrich Nietzsche


NOTICE
NOTICE AND APPLICATION FOR
ALTERNATIVE PAYMENT OF 2011
REAL ESTATE TAXES BY INSTALLMENT

Section 197.222, F.S. allows an alternative plan for payment of real estate taxes. A taxpayer who
elects to pay taxes by the Installment method shall make payments based upon an estimated tax
which shall be equal to the actual taxes levied upon the property in the preceding year.
THE PAYMENT SCHEDULE SHALL BE AS FOLLOWS:


First Installment Payment:




Second Installment Payment:


Third Installment Payment:



Fourth Installment Payment:


One quarter of the total estimated taxes discounted 6%.
Payment shall be made not later than June 30, 2011. A taxpayer.
must make the first Installment payment in order to participate in
this plan.

One quarter of the total estimated taxes discounted 4 o%.
Payment shall be made not later than September 30, 2011.

One quarter of the total estimated taxes plus one-half of any
adjustment pursuant to a determination of actual tax liability
discounted 3%. Payment shall be made not later than December 31,
2011.
One quarter of the total estimated taxes plus one-half of any
adjustment pursuant to a determination of actual tax liability. No"
discount. Payment shall be made not later than March 31, 2012.


if you have not received an application to pay 2011 taxes by Installment and It is your intent to exercise your
rights under this law, then please complete the application below and mail or file with your county tax
collector prior to May 1, 2011. The absolute deadline for filling the application is April 30, 2011. Any
application filed after April 30 will not be considered. The postmark on applications mailed to the tax collector
shall determine if the application was mailed timely. Additional application forms may be obtained frqm the
tax collector's office as listed below:


Mail completed application to:


Zee Smith, Tax Collector
PO Box 445
Wauchula, Florida 33873


-- detach

IF YOU DESIRE TO PAY 2011 TAXES BY INSTALLMENT, PLEASE SIGN, DATE, COMPLETE PROPERTY.I.D.
NUMBER AND RETURN THIS APPLICATION TO YOUR COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR PRIOR TO MAY 1, 2011.
UPON RECEIPT, THE TAX COLLECTOR SHALL MAIL YOUR FIRST NOTICE OF PAYMENT DUE, WITH
INSTRUCTIONS. IF YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED YOUR FIRST NOTICE BY JUNE 10, 2011, CONTACT THE TAX
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE.
TO BE COMPLETED BY TAXPAYER


I hereby make application to participate In the
Installment payment plan for the 2011 tax year.

Sign_ Datea
Name
Address


Property I. D. No.
Legal Description as it appears on the 2010 Tax
Notice Receipt


4:7,14c


Phone Number

Please Print

Florida Law required that your estimated taxes must be more than $100.00 in order to participate in the Installment
Payment Plan. tf your estimated taxes for 2010 are $100.00 or less, you do not quality for this plan. You must make the first
Installment payment not later than June 30 in order to participate In this plan. Once you have elected to participate in the
Installment payment plan by timely paying the first payment you are required to continue participation for the tax year. If
you elect to discontinue participation you will not be entitled to receive the discounts provided by law. Installment
payments that become delinquent shall be paid with the next Installment payment. Discounts shall not be allowed on
delinquent payments.


If you have questions, please contact the Tax Collector's Office at the following location.


ADDRESS: Courthouse Annex II
110W. Oak SL, Room 102
Wauchula, Florida 33873
PHONE NUMBER: 863- 773-9144
EMAIL ADDRESS: zsmith.hardeetc@embarqmall.con









April 14, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
The Wauchula primary de-
partment and grade school pre-
sented its annual program on
Friday evening. The Baptist
Church orchestra provided the
music as the children performed
an operetta in which fairies,
butterflies, very animate blos-
soms and Old Sol himself sang
and danced the colorful story of
flowers.

Dark nights find ma
hunters in quest of the hus
croakers as the local frog legs
market soars. A thousand
pounds of frog legs were
shipped. That brings the season
total so far to 33,000 pounds.
Hunters are paid 11 cents per
pound for the whole frog and
dressed frogs bring 25 cents per
pound.

"The Singing Kid," starring
Al Jolson in the stellar role and
including numbers by Cab
Calloway, will be at the Royal
Theatre Sunday and Monday.
On Tuesday and Wednesday,
Miss Bette Davis will co-star
with Leslie Howard in "The
Petrified Forest."

The opening of Stan's Place,
between the bank and Ferg-
uson's Store, has been an-
nounced. Manager Loyce Tim-
mons and helpers will offer
sandwiches of all kinds, beer,
cigars, cigarettes, coffee, can-
dies and cold drinks.

50 YEARS AGO
The Wauchula City Council
has agreed to cancel two bills,
totaling $1,083.84, against
Trexler Construction Co. in
exchange for a bill of sale from
the company for all the sewer
and water lines and fire
hydrants in the Riverview-
Subdivision east of Wauchula.
At present only one of the 35
homes in the subdivision is con-
nected to the system.


Lance Lanier struck out 14
batters as the Hardee Wildcats
edged the Pasco Pirates in a
conference game in Dade City
Monday night. Other members
of the high-flying Hardee base-
ball team shown in a Page One
photo are John Roy Gough,
Wayne Judah, Alonzo White-
head, Tommy Dillard, Coach
Rudy Bretherick, Gene Albrit-
ton, Jimmy Youmans, Butch
Cotney, Gerald Carlton, Larry
Gilliard, John Anderson, Bob
Gough, Lynn Revell, Danny
Albritton, Carroll Albritton and
Kenneth Shackelford.

High winds in the past week
have damaged cucumber plants
and small fruit from the vines,
making prices higher for the 50
percent remaining. Around
2,000 bushels of table cukes
and an additional 285 bushels
of pickle cukes were brought in
last week, brining an average of
$4 a bushel. Tomato picking is
still a couple of weeks away,
but they also suffered from the
whipping wind and driving
sand.

Grady's Super Market has a
basketful of savings: instant
coffee, 69 cents for a 6 oz. jar;
eggs, 2 dozen for 89 cents; slab
bacon, 29 cents a pound; and
fruit cocktail, 33 cents a can.

25 YEARS AGO
The city of Wauchula has
won a $139,092 grant for sewer
system improvements from the
state Department of Environ-
mental Regulation under the
Small Community Sewer Con-
struction Act. It will fund infil-
tration and inflow repairs to the
city's aging sewer system.

State Commissioner of Ag-
riculture Doyle Conner visited
the CF Mining research center
funded by the FIPR (Florida
Institute for Phosphate Re-
search) to view first-hand the
vegetable crops, such as zucchi-
ni squash and tomatoes, being
grown on four soil mixtures
from phosphate mining wastes.

The Wauchula City Council
on Monday established a $10
monthly user fee for persons


WayBak Wen


storing planes at the local air-
port and not purchasing fuel
there. "They are storing their
planes for free. not contributing
to the overhead costs of the air-
port," said Public Works Su-
perintendent Warren May.

Real estate ads this week
include: a 5BR. 3B home in
Bowling Green for 555,000; a
3BR, 2B beautiful country
home with 10 acres of pasture,
pond and creek for $100,000; a
3BR, CBS home in the Torrey
Community for 533,000; and a
lovely 3BR, 2B CB home in
Golfview with back patio and
two-car garage for $68,000.

10 YEARS AGO
The Hardee County Com-
mission will vote on alcohol
sales and nudity in considering
a pair of ordinances this morn-
ing (Thursday). It would limit
the hours of sale of alcohol and
prohibit 'live entertainment
where alcohol is sold.
Meanwhile, in Zolfo Springs,
Mayor Lois Dandridge has
asked the Town Council to
review its alcohol ordinance
approved on a partial council
vote last month. She said mem-
bers of the business community
need to be reconsidered in a
vote before the council.

Club Forty 31 opened last
weekend, offering activities for
teens. Parents are welcome to
drop by and see what's going
on. There will be Christian
music, human checkerboard,
local bands and lots of pizza.
The chaperoned evening will be
"wild, loud, noisy, everything
from serious to loose, let-your-
hair-down."

S&S Suprex Market sales this
week include D'Anjou pears for
69 cents a pound, yellow crook-
neck squash for 59 cents a
pound, Butterball turkeys for 99
cents a pound, boneless sirloin
roast for $1.99 a pound and
boneless sirloin tip steak for
$2.29 a pound.

Animals chosen as pets
differ around the world.
Japanese children tame
mice and teach them to
dance to music, while in
Australia, children some-
times make pets of kanga-
roos.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It was a full week of play.
With the full games last
week, the standings changed
significantly in the Minors
youth baseball division. The
Sheriff's Posse Bulls picked up
a win to solidify first place with
its 8-1 record. The second-place
Sand Gnats lost twice to drop
back to 5-2. The Triple M.
Equiment Red Wings and S&S
Irrigation River Cats are tied
and the Lilly, O'Toole and
Brown Thunder are fifth.
The game last Monday be-
tween the Thunder and the
River Cats was a 5-2 win in the
start of a week of fairly close
games.
Tony Webb was the only dual
scorer for the River Cats, while
Matt Tyson, Victor Aleman and
Rawson Aubry each crossed
home plate once. Other River
Cats are Ben Clarke, Stanley
Adcox, Roy Revels, Dylan
Bozeman, Damon Caraway,
Hunter Waters and Teron
Salyers.
Kaleb Floyd and Caleb Mc-


Coy circled the bases for the
Thunder, with several other
plays stopped short of home
plate. Other Thunder players
are Aaron Maldonado, Zack
Durastanti, Sammy Delatorre,
Dustin Willis, Jacob Smith,
Chris Velez, Weston Roberts,
Caleb McCoy, Cruz Avalos,
Justin Long, Tyler Lambert and
Mitchell Allen.
Tuesday's game was a 7-4
win for the Red Wings over the
Sand Gnats.
Will Redding and Hardee
Pace each crossed home plate
twice for the Red Wings.
Garrett Williams, Bryce Her-
nandez and Fabian Garza came
home once each. Other Red
Wings are Tyson Sutton, Jared
Rickett, Ryan Spears, Justus
Clanton Jacob Brandeberry,
Scotty Meeks, and Jesston
Collom.
Cain Thornton, Adrian De-
Leon, Billy Courtright and
Caleb Thornton each put a run
in the book for the Sand Gnats.
Other players for the Sand
Gnats are Kein Knight, Bo
Villarreal, Isaac Moreno, Chris-


Minors Get All Games In


Navigating the IEP Process

A workshop for Parents and Caregivers of students with an
IEP (Individual Education Plan)

Thursday, April 21, 2011
ESE Training Room
200 S. Florida Avenue, Wauchula


Choose from a morning or evening workshop whichever
is convenient for you:

10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
6:00 PM to 7:00 PM


The following information will be presented at the workshop:

How the IEP process works
Rights and responsibilities of parents and caregivers
The importance of parent involvement
The importance of parents working with the school
district as part of the IEP team during the IEP process


If you need more information please call the ESE office at 773-2600.


tian Brant, Jesaiah Delgado,
Trey Stephens and Dalton
Cantu.
On Thursday night, the Bulls
downed the Sand Gnats 8-2..
Zach Deuberry was a triple-
tally batter for the Bulls. Miguel
Ruiz and Drew McGuckin each
scored twice and J.C. Kulig
added the final tally. Other
Bulls players are Aaron Bunch,
Trenton Roberson, Jose Ale-
man, Lane Parks, Ethan Hol-
linger, Kyle Gilliard and Daniel
Sockalosky.
Villarreal and Moreno were
.the only Sand Gnats to come
around to score.
Friday's finale was a 9-6 win
for the River Cats over the Red
Wings.
Tyson, Aubry and Bozeman
each put a pair of runs on the
board for the River Cats.
Clarke, Webb and Waters each
added a run.
For the Red Wings, it was
Sutton, Williams, Redding,
Hernandez and Garza scoring in
the first inning and Clanton
scoring in the second inning.








8C The Herald-Advocate, April 14, 2011
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Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf. From the beginning,
we have taken responsibility for the cleanup. Our commitment to the Gulf remains unchanged, as
does our responsibility to keep you informed.

Committed to the Gulf
No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100% of the waters
are open and the beaches are clean and open. To ensure its safety, Gulf seafood has been more
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To date, BP has spent more than $13 billion in clean-up costs.

Restore the Environment
An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife rescue and
restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed $500 million to the
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For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.






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