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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 3/31/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text










ATTENTION, ITTY

BITTY ARTISTS

... Story 5A


Is It Odd?

Call Police

... Column 8B


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 17
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Thursday, March 31,2011


460
plus 4 sales tax
I


11 Candidates File For Wauchula Commission


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There are 11 candidates for
five vacant Wauchula City
Commission seats.
One, Patty Detwiler, is the
only candidate for Seat 1 and
will automatically take that seat
(See related story on quorum.)
There are four candidates for


Seat 3. Dan Graham was re-
moved from this seat in
February by Gov. Rick Scott
has applied for the vacancy cre-
ated by his own ouster. Other
.candidates are Richard Keith
Nadaskay Jr. of Mosaic Fer-
tilizer, who goes by the name
Keith to differentiate from his
father; Donna Steffens, a real


estate salesperson with Keller
Williams Realty; and Clifton N.
"Nick" Timmerman, a former
Hardee County commissioner
and local optometrist.
Vying for Seat 4 are Kenny
Harold Baker, a Wauchula min-
ister and insurance man; and
Scott D. Lang, a Wauchula
business owner at Lang's


Service Center.
Seeking Seat 5 are Robert
Duane "Bob" McAllister of
Wauchula, who works with cat-
tle and in industrial construc-
tion; and Gary Smith, owner of
Smith Automotive sales and
rental.
Finally, seeking the At-Large
Seat 7 are Pam Belflower, co-


owner of Belflower's Floors
Direct Inc.; and Frederick M.
"Rick" Knight, in real estate
with Jim See Realty Inc.
Two of the candidates could
be affected by Florida's dual
office-holding portion of the
Florida Constitution, Article II,


section 5 (a). Baker and Knight
are both members of the coun-
ty's 15-member Economic
Development Council.
The law prohibits a person
from simultaneously holding
more than one office, and
See SEATS 2A


Should Wauchula Switch

To A 5-Member Board?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Wauchula City Com-
mission could begin, tackling its
long overdue projects today.
If, and only if, the commis-
sion had taken the opportunity
it had in 2004 to revise the City
Charter to become a five-mem-
ber board instead of remaining
the only seven-member board
in the area.
When qualifying ended Fri-
day and Patty Detwiler faced no
opposition in her bid for the,
Seat 1 vacancy on the commis-
sion, she was automatically
named to that seat. And, it
would have given a five-mem-
ber commission a quorum to
proceed with city business that
has come to a halt since the Feb.
11 ouster of five commissioners
forced the need for a Special
Election.


When a commission does
convene, in at least another six
weeks, it has several significant
issues to resolve, including:
choosing a bulk electric power
provider; airport land purchases
to meet federal mandates;
choosing a new city manager;
ordinances on Community
Redevelopment Agency issues;
rezones delaying business
openings; renewing or choos-
ing new auditing, engineering,
airport and water/sewer con-
sultants; and employee and
police pension board decisions.
An East Bay Street sidewalk,
which has been in the works
since at least 2003, is still
awaiting final action.
There are at least two candi-
dates for the four other commis-
sion vacancies, seats 3, 4, 5 and
7 (see related article on candi-
See 5-MEMBER 2A


Crashes Claim


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
A two-seater open-cockpit gyrocopter comes in for landing during Bensen Days 2010, showing the width of rotary
blades enabling it to glide in. This year, Bensen Days is April 6-10 at Wauchula Municipal Airport.


Annual

By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The annual Bensen Days Fly-
In is coming to Wauchula.
Billed as "the premier gyro-
plane gathering in the U.S.,"
Bensen Days is a celebration of
specialty aircraft called gyro-
planes.
And, it's happening here,
beginning next Wednesday,
April 6, and continuing through
April 10, at Wauchula Muni-
cipal Airport, 1202 Maurice
Sonny Clavel Road, off Van-
dolah Road five miles west of
Wauchula.
Scott Lewis, president of the
Sun State and Rotor Club which
hosts the event, said the 38th


WEATHER
DAME HIGH LOW RAN
03/23 84 51 0.00
03/24 84 58 0.00
03/25 86 60 0.00
03/26 86 57 0.00
03/27 89 56 0.00
03/28 81 64 2.85
03/29 86 60 0.01
IAL Rainfall to 03/29/11 6.60
Same period lest year -10.47
Ten Year Average 54.30
Source Univ. of FIaL Ona Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Courthouse Report ... 6C
Crime Blotter ....... 5C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup .4A
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menu .4C



1 IIIIll IIII
7 18122 07290 3


/ F/ly-li
annual event has been sold out
since January. There will be
over 80 operating gyroplanes,
instructors and displays to
expose' visitors to a variety of
designs and options. There will
be vendors and instructors to
offer rides to "guests." Flying is
from sunup to sundown.
Although Sun State is based
in Fort Myers, gyroplane enthu-
siasts come from all over the
nation and overseas. Many will
have been at the Sun 'n Fun
International Fly-In which
began in Lakeland on Tuesday


7 Next Week


and ends Sunday.
They love coming to Wau-
chula because of the rural set-
ting of its airport, low-cost,
automatic fueling station, air-
port lounge and primitive
camping. Some come several
times a year.
A combination of an airplane
and a helicopter, gyroplanes are
much more. The fixed wing or
open cockpit rotorcraft began
its modern era when Igor Ben-
sen made gyrocopter construc-
tion available to enthusiasts.
Many people now build their


own affordable, nimble gyro-
copters, one-seater, two-seater,
fixed wing or ultralight, closed
or open cockpit aircraft which
usually fly 1,000 feet or lower
and at speeds up to 65 miles per
hour. Enthusiasts call them the
safest type of aircraft for recre-
ational flying.
They are towed on equipment
similar to a boat trailer. Al-
though they can stay aloft up to
three hours unless extra fuel
tanks are aboard, most gyro
pilots just enjoy the exhilaration
See ANNUAL 2A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 16-year-old girl and an as
yet unidentified man lost their
lives following two separate
crashes in the past week.
Cassidy Knight of Wauchula
died after an all-terrain vehicle
she was .driving Sunday night
flipped over, trapping her un-
derneath, the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office said. In a sec-
ond crash Monday afternoon, a
farm worker was killed when a
van overturned.
Maj. Randy Dey said 16-
year-old Cassidy was outside
with her sisters at about 8 p.m.
on Sunday when they thought
they saw someone in the pas-
ture behind their 1445 N. Ed
Wells Road home.
Cassidy went to get the fami-
ly's Rhino ATV, he said. A sister
heard the motor start and
looked back to see the ATV
overturned on its side, the major
described.
Dey said the 911 emergency


line was called, with deputies
and Hardee County Fire-Rescue
workers responding. Cassidy
was transported by medical hel-
icopter to Tampa General Hos-
pital, where she underwent sur-
gery.
She was pronounced dead at
12:45 p.m. on Tuesday.
Cassidy became the second
16-year-old Hardee Senior
High School junior to die in a
crash in a short two weeks'
time. Shawn "Cody" Svendsen
was killed March 16 when his
vehicle overturned on Hobb
Road.
He became the first fatality
on Hardee County roadways for
2011. Cassidy's crash occurred
on private property.
In the second fatality this past
week, a crash was reported at 5
p.m. on Monday on County
Road 663, one mile south of
State Road 64, Dey of the
Sheriff's Office said.
The crash was within the
See CRASHES 2A


Corps Begins Phosphate-Mining Probe


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers has begun an 18-
month probe into the effects of
all past, present and future
phosphate mining activities
located in the 1.32-million-acre
Central Florida Phosphate
District.
The Areawide Environmental
Impact Statement (AEIS) will
consider the potential for signif-
icant cumulative effects of the
existing and proposed phos-
phate mines and mine expan-
sions within the Central Florida
Phosphate District.
That district covers 2,100
square miles in Hardee, Hills-
borough, Manatee, Polk, De-
Soto and a 1,000-acre piece of
Sarasota counties.
Mining has taken place in the
region since the early 1890s.
Reclamation became mandato-
ry in 1975.
The Corps initiated the as-
.sessment after receiving appli-


cations for Department of Army
permits under Section 404 of
the Clean Water Act for CF
Industries' South Pasture Ex-
tension and from Mosaic Fer-
tilizers' Four Corners Surface
Tract and its Ona Mine.
Section 404 of the Clean
Water Act involves the dis-
charge of fill material into
waters of the United States,
including jurisdictional wet-
lands.
The Corps determined when
viewed collectively, the sepa-
rate proposed mining projects
have similarities that provide a
basis for evaluating the envi-
ronmental consequences to-
gether into one comprehensive
impact statement.
After finishing the AEIS, the
Corps will determine one of
three options moving forward:
issue the permit, issue the per-
mit with modifications, or deny
the Department of the Army
permits for the proposed ac-
tions.


The AEIS is intended to
address federal, state and local
requirements and environmen-
tal issues, and will be sufficient
to render a final decision on the
permit applications, according
to the Corps.
The U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency has agreed
to be a cooperating agency on
the study.
The EPA issued the last
Areawide Environmental Im-
pact Statement on the Central
Florida Phosphate District in
November 1978.
Additionally, the Corps will
look into any. and all alterna-
tives for mining that would
avoid, minimize or mitigate
impacts to water resources
within the phosphate district.
The Corps recognizes that
there is a public and private
need for phosphate, it says.
At the present time, the pri-
mary areas of .environmental
concern for the Corps are the
See CORPS 2A4


i,'1


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Hardee County Planning Director Kevin Denny (left) talks
with John Fellows, lead project manager for the Area-
wide Environmental Impact Statement, during the first
scoping meeting last week in Lakeland.


E Local Man In

National Event

S... Story 7A


2


'








2A The Herald-Advocate, March 31, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor
JOAN M. SEAMAN RALPH HARRISON
Sports Editor Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
S" Asst. Prod. Manager

115 S. Seventh Ave. A ortn Phone: (863) 773-3255
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873 Fax: (863) 773-0657
Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


f/ DEADLINES: \
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads -Tuesday noon .


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18; I yr.-S31;2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2 yrs. S79
Out of State
6 months S27; I yr. 549-; 2 yrs. $95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes .letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Pressress releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items'are sub-
ject to editing.







Kelly's Column



Hardee County got a much-needed rain Monday. The county
was several inches behind normal rainfall for the first quarter.

Dr. Barbara Carlton of Wauchula killed an annual Spring gob-
bler, this one named Lady Ga Ga. To fill her limit she is now hunt-
ing a tom named Bin Laden.

The Major League Baseball season is about to open. The
Tampa Bay Rays have a couple of former Boston Red Sox play-
ers-Manny Ramirez and Johnny Damon. The Red Sox have for-
mer Ray Carl Crawford, making about $20 million a year.

Congratulations to the Florida Gators for making the men's
Elite Eight and to the FSU Seminoles for reaching the Sweet
Sixteen in the NCAA basketball March Madhess playoffs.

The Valencia orange harvest is underway in the Heartland.
Current market prices are about $2 a pound solids, and pick and
haul is about $2.15 to $2.40 per box.

The federal income tax deadline of April 18 (changed from
April 15 due to holiday) is lurking around the comer.
Uncle Sam is spending money like a drunken sailor, but there
are efforts underway to reduce the budget deficit.

Last week the Dow Jones Industrials Average dipped below
12,000 but quickly climbed back to slightly exceed that level.

Quite a few Hardee Countians are planting a small Spring veg-
etable garden.
Several commercial farmers have watermelon fields hoping
for a good harvest and prices for the Memorial Day weekend May
28-30.

Will there be a National Football League season this fall? The
billionaire owners have a lockout, and the millionaire NFL players
have decertified their union. It's mainly about how to split up the
pie of about $8 billion. Surely there will be some type of settlement
agreement by summer.

As the Middle East political situation remains shaky, gasoline
prices this week have climbed to about $3.59 a gallon. Surely they
won't reach $4, will they? One obvious antidote is to drive less.

The city of Wauchula has some good candidates for the
upcoming May 10 City Commission Election. There are some big
decisions to be made soon, such as hiring a new city manager and
selecting an electricity supplier such as TECO or Progress Energy
for the next several years.

The preliminary 2010 U.S. Census report indicated Hardee
County has 27,731 residents, compared with 26,938 in 2000. This
is an annual growth of 79.3 people.
These figures do not include our seasonal Northern visitors
and short-term agricultural workers.




CORPS
Continued From 1A


loss of wetland functions and
value, mitigation of such losses,
the effect of proposed mining
on groundwater and surface
water quality, and potential
cumulative effects.
In making a decision, the
Corps will consider: the effects
on federally listed threatened
and endangered species, health
and safety, socioeconomics,
aesthetics, general environmen-
tal concerns, wetlands and other
aquatic resources, historic prop-
erties, cultural resources, fish
' and wildlife values, land use,
transportation, recreation, water
supply and conservation, water
quality, energy needs, mineral
needs, considerations of proper-
ty ownership, and in general,
the needs and welfare of the
people


The Corps invites federal
agencies, state and local gov-
ernments, and other private
organizations and interested
parties to attend public scoping
meetings and provide comment
in order to ensure all issues are
identified and the full range of
issues related to the permits are
addressed.
Information on the AEIS and
meeting dates can be found at
the website www.phospha-
teaeis.org.
Questions and comments can
be submitted up to April 25 by
e-mail to teamaeis@ phos-
phateaeis.org or by. calling 863-
281-7954.
The study is planned to be
completed the end of August
2012.


Before the Civil War, Oberlin and Antioch Colleges were
the only coed colleges to allow women to matriculate,
but only in a special program separate from men.

Honesty is the cornerstone of all success, without which
confidence and ability to perform shall cease to exist.
-Mary Kay Ash


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Gyrocopters of all types were lined up for display at the beginning of Bensen Days 2010. Pilots have to attend a rules
review and briefing every morning before gyrocopters take to the air. They fly from sunup to sundown.

ANNUAL
--


of gliding over the countryside.
They cannot stall or spin. They
land with little or no ground
roll. They can have engine-
powered propellers and unpow-
ered rotorblades which allow
them to glade safely to ground
without engine power.
A world record was set here
during Bensen Days 1998 by
Denver physician Bill Clem,
who specializes in high altitude
rescues. Clem set a high altitude
record of 24,463 feet in his
open-cockpit rotorcraft.
An official from the National
Aeronautic Association was on
hand to witness it and it was
later certified as a world record,
by the international aeronauti-:
cal board, headquartered in!
France.




SEATS
Continued From IA'
applies to both elected and
appointed offices, whether of
the same. or different govern-
mental bodies.
A community redevelopment
board falls within that law,
when established by general
law, and appointed by the gov-
erning board of the county,
which has the authority to
remove the members and abol-
ish the authority, has been con-
sidered an instance of dual
office-holding, according to the
Attorney General's Office.
In fact the county dissolved
its IDA/EDC and took back the
economic development respon-
sibility in 2005. It added an
assistant county manager/eco-
nomic development director
position in its place. When the
IDA/EDC was restored less
than two years later, that por-
tion of the assistant county
manager description was no
longer needed. It was removed
from that job description ordi-
nance at a recent commission
meeting.
Attorney General Opinion
84-90 considered whether a
member of a county health
authority was an officer of the
county, and determined he was.
It said, "The governing body
of the county appointed the
authority members, was em-
powered to remove the mem-
bers, and was authorized to
abolish the authority at any
time. This office, therefore,
concluded that the authority
was an instrumentality of the
county and its officers were
county officers. -
"Thus," it finalized, "the con-
stitutional prohibition against
dual office-holding prohibited
the (elected official) from also
serving on the governing body
of the county health facilities
authority."
A 1970 Florida Supreme
Court decision set forth the gen-
eral rule that "acceptance of an
incompatible office by one
already holding office operates
as a resignation of the first. ... It
also recognizes that in such a
situation, the officer becomes
de facto officer as to the first
office."
It continues, "Ordinarily,
acceptance of one office while
holding another office results in
a vacancy of the first office."
If either of these candidates
chooses to withdraw his candi-
dacy in order to remain on the
EDC, that would leave only one
candidate for the seat, Seat 4 or
Seat 7.
In any case, early voting will
be held at the county Elections
Office from Monday through
Saturday, May 2-7, from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. The Special Election
is scheduled for May 10. A
Special Meeting may be set that
night or within the week to
swear electees into office. They
will hold office until the 2012
election


Gyrocopters were initially
designed by Spanish nobleman
Juan DeLaCierva in the 1920s
to replace the unsafe World War
I fixed wing bomber. The
Pitcairn was developed in the
USA in the late 1920s to deliver
the mail, as pilots could land
and take off from the tops of
post offices.
Amelia Earhart was one of
the early pilots who flew these
craft and set an auto-gyrocopter
altitude record of 18,300 feet
which stood for years.


From 1A
In the 1960s Igor Bensen
began the gyrocopter construc-
tion, which has been more and
more modernized. He increased
the high-altitude record to
19,100 feet in the 1970s. People
can now buy kits to construct
their own.
Gyrocopting comes with its
own set of flying rules. They
must have a pilot's license or
other certification to fly ultra-
lights or powered parachutes.
Pilots at Bensen Days are re-
quired to attend safety rules


5-MEMBER
Continued From 1A


dates.) The Special Election is
* on May 10.
Those elected will serve only
until the next regular election in
August 2012. But, in the mean-
time, they could change the
charter to become a five-mem-
ber board. The Hardee County
Commission, Bowling Green
and Zolfo Springs commissions
and the School Board all are
five-member boards. So are
Lake Placid, Avon Park, Ar-
cadia and Bartow. Sebring has
six, including a president/-
mayor.
There were many commis-
sion discussion~, in 2003 and
2004 leading up to the Aug. 31,
2004, referendum amending the
City Charter to change to a city
manager/commission form of
government.
Ken Lambert, then mayor,
willingly gave up his $6,700
salary because a mayor was no
longer needed to be involved in
city government. Most of those
duties were taken up by the city
manager or departments in-
volved. For instance, the mayor
no longer needed to be head of
the police department, choosing
its chief. All department heads
would be under the new posi-
tion of city manager.
Two main issues bogged the
commission down in amending
the charter. The seven commis-
sioners, Opal Saunders, Connie
Spieth, Charles Smith, David
Royal, Clarence Bolin, Amy
McClellan and John Baxter,
agreed on changing to the city
manager form of government
and doing away with the mayor
position.
They, however, split on two
other issues.
One was changing from dis-
trict elections to citywide elec-
tions. Saunders, Spieth and
Smith did not wantto have vot-
ing go citywide. Saunders and
Spieth wanted to stay in seats 1
and 2, then in Ward 1, and not
have to campaign citywide.
Smith, in seat 3 in then Ward 2,
wanted the ability to concen-
trate on needs within his own
district.
The other four commission-
ers overruled and the charter
changed to citywide elections,
where every city voter could
choose all seven commission-
ers, not just those in their ward




CRASHES
Continued From 1A
jurisdiction of and was investi-
gated by the Florida Highway
Patrol. Despite requests, how-
ever, the FHP failed to provide
a crash report by press time.
Dey noted the crash was
reported as involving a single
vehicle, a van which had
flipped over.
One occupant reportedly was
killed, he confirmed. Two oth-
ers were seriously injured.
No identities are available
without an FHP report.
The unidentified man, how-
ever, became the second person
to die on county roadways for
2011.


and the at-large commissioner.
The commission also changed
wards to districts.
The second issue discussed
during charter workshops was
changing to a five-member
board. Under consideration was
one person in each district and
two at-large commissioners.
All the commissioners balked
at this one, saying it was "not
fair to disenfranchise anyone on
the commission." Commission-
ers did not want any one of
them to have to give up the
$430 monthly, $5,160 annual
income a commissioner re-
ceives.
In effect, that decision has
cost taxpayers $10,360 a year
since 2005, a total of more than
$62,160 in the five-plus years
since that Aug. 31, 2004, refer-
endum in which voters were not
even given the option to decide
if they wanted to go to a five-
member board.
In that first year, 2004, there
were elections for seats 1, 3, 5
and 7. Saunders was replaced
by Troy Brant and Smith by
Lambert. Bolin and Baxter
were retained.
There were other commission
turnovers as well. Jerry Conerly
had been a commissioner be-
tween 1986 and 1993 when he
became city administrator. He
resigned that job in late 2004,
and was chosen by the commis-
sion to fill the at-large seat
vacancy created when Baxter
moved out of the community in
July 2005.
Seat 6 has had many changes.
When the McClellan family
moved away, Mavis Best was
selected to fill that seat. When
she married and moved away a
little more than a year later,
Heather Lee became her re-
placement. Lee was defeated in
the 2008 elections by Delois


meetings each morning and
obtain a colored dot to place on
their aircraft's tail to show they
have been briefed. There is no
flying over camping areas and
at least 500 feet from people,
animals, cars and buildings. All
aircraft are pushed or towed to
the tarmac. Landing aircraft has
the right of way.
Everyday folk are encour-
aged to bring their families and
enjoy the day. Cost is $5 per
person per day. Children under
12 are free.





Johnson, who has since been
replaced by John Freeman, who
won the 2010 election for that
seat.
Val Patarini was appointed to
seat 1 in September 2008, when
Brant moved out of District 1.'
And, Dan Graham was chosen
by the commission in Septem-
ber 2009 to replace Lambert,
who had stepped down from his
seat 3 position.
In mid-2010, all seven com-
missioners were charged with
second-degree misdemeanors
for violating the Florida open
government law. They all went
to court to- face Circuit Chief
Judge David Langford, each
commissioner, was sentenced to
fines and investigating costs
ranging from $500 to $800.
Patarini, Graham, Royal, and
Conerly were re-elected in
2010, despite the court's action.
Spieth was outvoted by political
newcomer Russell Smith, and
Freeman was elected to replace
Johnson who did not seek re-
election. Bolin's seat was not up
for election in 2010.
Gov. Rick 'Scott, following
state law mandates, ousted all
the commissioners except the
newly elected Smith and
Freeman, who were not in-
volved in the Sunshine Law
violations. The two-member
commission was unable to act
without a quorum and chose not
to appoint at least two more
commissioners just so there
would be a quorum, leaving that
decision to voters.
A commission could act now.
with a three-member quorum, if
the city had a five-member
commission as nearly every city
and county board in this area
does. Although a capable city
staff keeps the day-to-day activ-
ities rolling, some important
decisions are delaying major
projects.


Audrey Hepburn's given name originally was Andrey.
"Andrey" is a feminine form of "Andrew." Belgian-born
Hepburn changed the "n" to a "u" to become Audrey.

The words to the "Battle Hymn of the Republic" were
written by Julia Ward Howe in 1861 after visiting army
camps around Washington D.C.


YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be
this newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature whlr l
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear In
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Po
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL .%873.
or fax 773-0657. .. :




YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!,
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


Cf f d








March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


rNutrition Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
L AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: What's the best kind of for those with high blood
exercise to help reduce high sure, that is the smart thi
blood pressure? do.
A: Aerobic activity will have
the biggest impact on your Q: Can I substitute oli
blood pressure. Depending on canola oil for butter in re
your starting level of fitness, to avoid saturated fat?
you might begin with walking A: These oils can easily be
three days a week for 10 or 15 stituted in sauteing or se
minutes. Every couple weeks ing; for baking there are
add another five minutes a day caveats. The good news i
until you are walking or doing by using olive or canol
other aerobic activity five to instead of butter you can c
seven days a week for 30 min- cholesterol-raising saturate
utes or more. It would be terrif- content of your food; if
ic to.accumulate 60 minutes of replace salted butter, sc
aerobic activity each day, which will drop slightly, too. An
could come from several blocks and delicious substitute
of 15 to 20 minutes. Besides using olive oil to saute ve
walking, other aerobic activities bles or in preparing potato
include biking (inside or out), rice. Olive and canola oi
dancing, swimming and active also be used in place of bui
yard work. Once your fitness baking, but make sure yo
begins to improve, add strength the extra light type of oli
training to keep from losing to avoid an "olive" flavor
muscle, important for overall you don't want it. When s
well-being. You can use inex- tuting oil for butter in ba
pensive hand-held weights, use one-fourth less thai
elastic resistance bands, or recipe requires. For exam|
machines at a Y or fitness cen- a recipe calls for a quarter
ter. For those with high blood of butter (four tablespoons
pressure, most experts say that three tablespoons of oil.
low and moderate activity is people report that even wit
more effective (and safer) than adjustment in amount, co
vigorous exercise. Those who or cakes come out with a
take beta-blocker medicines to ier and less desirable te
control their blood pressure when made with oil; ci
can't gauge their activity by back on other liquids may
their heart rate, so using a scale Other options for b.
of how hard it feels like you are recipes that call for butter
working, something that feels use tub margarine (not spi
"light" to "somewhat hard" is use the butter but reduc
the recommended range. When amount by one-fourth to
strength training, lighter third, or use some pi
weights with more repetitions banana or applesauce for p
are better than straining to hoist the butter. Piecrust and
very heavy weights. The combi- pastry can be made with oi
nation of regular moderate the flaky texture most p
activity with healthy eating seek is usually not pos
habits and working to reach and Since the butter-laden cr
maintain a healthy weight can usually not the only less-
lower your blood pressure and tious thing about these d
reduce your need for medicine some people might pref
to control it. Experts says that save them for rare occa
most healthy people don't need and then make them with b
to check with their doctor Remember that although
before increasing exercise, but and canola oil make a he





Gulf Grouper


Season Opens


The recreational harvest of
shallow-water grouper in state
and federal Gulf of Mexico
waters off Florida reopens on
Friday.
The lone exception is all
waters of Monroe County.
However, the recreational har-
vest of gag grouper is still pro-
hibited in Gulf federal waters
off Florida. Federal waters are
beyond nine, nautical miles
from shore. Also, persons on
federally permitted for-hire
reef-fish vessels may not har-
vest or possess gag grouper in
both federal and state Gulf
waters. '
The Gulf recreational shal-
low-water grouper fishery (gag,
black, red, yellowfin, scamp,
yellowmouth, rock hind and red
hind) has been closed since Feb.
1 to protect gag grouper, which
are often found and caught with
the other grouper species.


pres-
ing to


ve or
recipes

e sub-
;ason-
a few
s that
la oil
ut the
ed fat
f you
odium
i easy
on is
egeta-
oes or
il can
tter in
u use
ve oil
where
ubsti-
iking,
n the
ple, if
;r-cup
), use
Some
h this
Cookies
heav-
;xture
cutting
help.
making
are to
read),
e the
one-
ureed
part of
other
il, but
people
sible.
rust is
nutri-
ishes,
er to
asions
butter.
olive
;althy


This two-month closure dur-
ing Gulf grouper spawning sea-
son helped to reduce overfish-
ing of gag grouper and to
rebuild its populations so that
larger annual harvests may be
possible in the future.
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission also
reminds fishermen that the
recreational and commercial
harvest of shallow-water
groupers (including gag, black
grouper, red grouper, scamp,
red hind, rock hind, coney,
graysby, yellowfin grouper, yel-
lowmouth grouper, and tiger
grouper) remains closed until
May 1 in all Atlantic Ocean and
Monroe County waters.
More information, including
size limits, bag limits and fish-
ing seasons, is available online
at MyFWC.com, click on
Fishing.


substitute for butter, all tats are
significant sources of calories.
So unless you need lots of extra
calories, don't let that 'halo
effect" of olive and canola as
healthy choices lead you to use
large amounts.
Q: I know that spinach is
loaded with vitamins, but how
can I fix it so people will enjoy
eating it? Is the spinach souf-
fle that comes frozen a
healthy option?
A: There are loads of delicious
ways to include spinach in your
meals. Whether you start with
fresh or frozen spinach, you can
add it to soups, casseroles, eggs
and pasta. Steam or saute
spinach with onions and pep-
pers, and use it as a bed or stuff-
ing for chicken or seafood. For
a simple treat that complements
many meals, simply saut6
spinach in a little olive oil with
some fresh garlic (the more, the
better for garlic lovers!); if you
want, add to this basic formula
some pine nuts, walnuts, mush-
rooms or either fresh or sun-
dried tomatoes. Spinach is a.
great source of the B vitamin
folate, which promotes healthy
DNA. It's also a powerhouse of
antioxidants, providing both
beta-carotene (which forms
vitamin A in our bodies) and a
pair of other carotenoid com-
pounds called lutein and zeax-
arithin. These latter two are
most well-known for eye health
benefits, but they are a plus for
overall health, too. Frozen
spinach can be a great option to
keep on hand for many of these
dishes, but with all these
options, there's no need to turn
to prepared dishes like spinach
souffle. It contains almost half a
day's recommended limit for
sodium and 30 to 50 percent of
the recommended limit for satu-
rated fat in a one-cup portion.
Frozen spinach is a great basic
to keep on hand, but choose the
plain version that leaves you
flexibility to use it in a variety
of tasty and healthy dishes. You
can find spinach recipes in the
AICR Test Kitchen.

Q: I ve been reading and
hearing news that "sedentary
behavior" is bad for your
health. Is being sedentary the
same as being inactive?
A: Probably not. Most studies
linking sedentary lifestyles with
greater risk of cancer, heart dis-
ease, diabetes and other health
problems are looking at how
often peopTli Are involved in
moderate anifvigorod's;physical
activities, such as brisk walk-
ing, jogging, gardening, danc-
ing, biking and other sports in
blocks of 10 minutes or more.
Accumulating at least 30 min-
utes of moderate activity daily
is recommended to lower risk
of our most common chronic
diseases, although accumulat-
ing 60 minutes seems to pro-
vide even more protection, and
getting even 30 minutes a few
days a week offers some benefit
compared to the many people
who get hardly any. However,
even people who get 30 to 60
minutes of moderate activity
daily often spend most of their
waking hours sitting when at
work, in recreation and in mov-
ing from one place to another.
Emerging research shows that
this large amount of sedentary
behavior-general inactivity-
throughout the day may have as
great or greater impact. on
weight and certain metabolic
markers of health than the time
we spend in designated exer-


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cise. Scientists suggest that
people whose day includes a lot
of sitting try to include some
standing or brief walking every
hour or so throughout the day.
We are looking at two separate
goals that are important: spend
less time sitting and accumulate
30 minutes or more of moderate
activity each day. A pedometer
can help you tackle both goals,
especially if you set daily tar-
gets that gradually increase
each week.
Q: Is it true that the
Mediterranean diet can lower
risk of cancer? If so, how do 1
fit in the American foods I
like?
A: The Mediterranean diet is
one of several different ways to
create the mostly plant-based
eating pattern linked with lower
cancer risk. The Mediterranean
diet is not really a specific diet,
but a style of eating that is tra-
ditional in populations around
the Mediterranean, including
southern Spain and France and
coastal areas of Italy, Greece
and northern Africa. Many
Italian restaurants in the United
States don't follow the tradi-
tional Mediterranean dietary
approach. In the traditional diet,
vegetables are celebrated, not
merely tolerated. The other
keys to a Mediterranean diet are
abundant use of fruit, beans
(lentils, garbanzo beans, kidney
beans and more) and nuts; olive
oil as the primary fat; frequent
fish consumption; and limited
use of red and processed meat.
A recent study used point scor-
ing systems to evaluate how
closely the participants fol-
lowed a Mediterranean-style
diet. For each two-point
increase in the score there was a
six percent drop in cancer risk
and a ten percent drop in heart
disease risk. This analysis of 18
population studies involved
more than 2 million people.
Most scoring systems include
points for one or two glasses of
wine with meals most days,
though it's not clear that this is
necessary for the health benefits
seen. Scoring systems generally
don't give points for using gar-
lic, onion and herbs abundantly
to flavor food, but this is a tra-
ditional part of Mediterranean
eating and may add antioxidant,
anti-cancer protection. Regard-
less of the particular types of


vegetables and flavors you pre-
fer, you can follow these princi-
ples to create a mostly plant-
based diet that works for you.
Q: I've seen recommenda-
tions for 30 to 60 minutes a
day of moderate exercise.
How much of that time should
be spent on strength training?
A: Strength training refers to
muscle-strengthening activities
with weights, elastic bands or
working against your own body
weight as in push-ups and
abdominal crunches. The
amount of time you need
depends on the type of muscle-
strengthening exercises you do
and your goals. The Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC) recommend that at least
twice a week you work each of
the major muscle groups in
your body (chest, back, legs,
arms, shoulders and abdomi-
nals). Since some of these areas
have a couple of muscle groups,
this may take a total of eight to
ten exercises, each done eight to
twelve times ("reps"). Actually
doing those exercises might
take only 10 to 12 minutes, but
if you're using anything more
than your own body weight,
you have to allow for the added
time of getting in position and
picking up-or in some cases,
setting up-your equipment. So


overall, this could take 15 to 30
minutes. Some people prefer to
work all muscle groups on the
same day, with perhaps a small-
er amount of time on aerobic
exercise (like walking or swim-
ming) and flexibility training,
but then the other days of the
week spend more time on aero-
bics. Others might include
strength training for different
parts of the body on different
days. The important thing is
that you find some way to work
muscle strengthening into your
overall activity pattern, and that
you don't do strength training
on the same muscles two days
in a row. It's the time between
workouts that muscles recover
and grow stronger. If you are
new to strength training or want
to explore new ways of doing it,
to get best results and decrease
chances of injury, I encourage
you to make sure you learn
proper technique from a certi-
fied personal trainer (through
media or online, or at your local
Y or fitness center).

There must be more to life
than having everything!
-Maurice Sendak

Wit is the salt of conversa-
tion, not the food.
-William Hazlitt


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4A The Herald-Advocate, March 31,2011


DOROTHY E. KNIGHT
Dorothy E. Knight, 86, of
Roaring River, N.C., died on
Friday, March 25, 2011, at her
home.
Born Oct. 8, 1924, to the late
Joseph Franklin Shedd and Lil-
lie Marie Morrison, she was a
guardian ad litem for the Polk
County justice system in Lake-
land, and a hospice volunteer
for the Mountain Valley Hos-
pice in Elkin, N.C. She was a
member of Traphill (N.C.)
Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by
an infant daughter Marie
Jeanine McLellan.
She is survived by daughters
Winifred Smith of San Angelo,
Texas, Diane Trott and husband
the Rev. Bobby Trott (who min-
istered in Hardee County) now
of Roaring River, N.C., Kath-
leen M. Santiago of Traphill,
N.C., Peggy Freeman and hus-
band Cliff of Piney Creek,
N.C., and Ivy Fitzgerald and
companion Mike Wilson of
Palm Springs, Calif; brother
,Fred W. Morrison and wife
Martha of Crystal River; nine
grandchildren; 13 great-grand-
children; and three great-great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service was had
on Wednesday, March 30, at 2
p.m. at Traphill Baptist Church
with the Rev. Bobby Trott offi-
ciating. In lieu of flowers, me-
morials may be sent to Moun-
tain Valley Hospice, 688 N.
Bridge St., Elkin, N.C. 28621.
Watkins Cooper Lyon
Funeral Home Inc.
Clarksville, Va.


ROBERT JAMES
"BOB" EBI
Robert James "Bob" Ebi
died on Friday, March 11, 2011
in Gibsonton.
He was born Feb. 28, 194S
and was a lifetime resident o
Wauchula. He was a Harde
High School graduate and was
employed at Sears & Roebuck.
Survivors are one son, Rob
ert James Ebi of Fort Meade
and two grandsons; and daugh.
ter Andrea Louise Ebi, current-
ly serving in the U .S. Army.
Private services were previ-
ously held.
Florida Crematory
Tampa


MARY JANE
MOHUNDRO CONRAD
Mary Jane Mohundro Con-
rad, 63, of Jacksonville, died
on Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011, at
Shands Hospital in Jackson-
ville.
She was born on July 29,
1947, in Mississippi, and
came to Hardee County in
1960 from Mississippi at the
age of 13. She attended
Hardee Senior High School
and later returned to receive
her GED. She attended
church all her life and was of
the Apostolic Pentecostal
faith. She worked in many
fields but considered her most
important one was housewife
and mother.
She was preceded in death
by husband, M. Derrell Con-
rad; father Mark Lewis "Bull-
dog" Mohundro; mother Let-
tie Cannon Mohundro; and
nephew James D. Muhundro.
She is survived by son
Kevin M. Conrad and signifi-
cant other Christina McHugh,
both of Wauchula; daughter
Tammy Michelle Conrad of
Middleburg; sister Shirley
Smith of Middleburg; three
grandchildren, Mark Conrad,
Bryan Conrad and Sarah
Conrad, all of Wauchula;
niece Susan Richardson and
husband Ryan of Middleburg;
great-niece Reba Eures of
Middleburg; great-nephews
Ryan C. Richardson Jr. and
Raymond E. Richardson,
both of Middleburg; and
many other friends and fami-
ly members. She will be
greatly missed by all.
A graveside service will be
held on Saturday, April 2,
2011, at 12:45 p.m. at Lake
Dale Baptist Cemetery, 3102
Heard Bridge Road, Wau-
chula, with James E. Fox Sr.
officiating.
National Cremation &
Burial Society
Jacksonville


SObituaries

PAULINE ALBRITTON
Pauline Albritton, 82, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
March 7, 2011, at Pisgah, Ala.
Born in Fort Meade, on Jan.
2, 1929, she came to Wauchula
from Bradenton in 2000. She
was a homemaker and member
of the Church of God for 63
years.
She was preceded in death by
husband Buck Albritton; son
Dwayne Albritton and wife
Terry Albritton; and grandson
Kelly Albritton.
Survivors include daughter
Paula Miller of Wauchula; sons
Michael Albritton and wife
Carolyn of Ona, and Zyndale
Albritton and wife Susan of
Bradenton; 13 grandchildren;
17 great-grandchildren; and one
great-great-grandchild.
A memorial service will be
held Saturday, April 2, 2011, at
2 p.m. at Faith Temple Church
of God, 701 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula with Pastor Wendell
Smith officiating. Interment
was in Eden Cemetery in Frost-
proof.
Kerby Funeral Home
Henagar, Ala.


Despite the obvious benefits,
there are still many people who
do not follow good hand- wash-
ing habits.
"If we all simply wash our
hands frequently and correctly,
we can play a huge role in
reducing the spread of germs
from one person to another,"
said Paul Santoro, CRNA, pres-
ident of the American Associa-
tion of Nurse Anesthetists
(AANA). "From a healthcare
perspective, the AANA views
hand-washing negligence as a
critical patient safety problem
and promotes requiring all
health- care professionals 'to
comply with proper hand
hygiene standards for their own
safety and the safety of their
patients."
To help promote hand hy-
giene, the healthcare experts at
the AANA recommend that
everyone follow these simple
tips on proper hand-washing
from the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC):
How to wash: Wet hands
with clean running water and
apply soap. For 20 seconds, rub
hands together to make a lather
and scrub all surfaces. To
ensure that this is being done
for 20 seconds, try humming
the "Happy Birthday" song
from beginning to end two
times. Afterward, rinse hands


Free Training
For Volunteers
Good Shepherd Hospice
will hold a 90-minute orienta-
tion session on April 12 for
volunteers to help families
facing end-of-life challenges.
Volunteers can provide office
help, provide companionship
for a hospice patient and
relieve the caregiver, help a
children's grief support group
or run errands for families.
No experience is neces-
sary. For more information,
or to register for the Wau-
chula session, call Regina
Merrick at 863-551-3943 or
e-mail merrickr@goodshep-
herdhospice.org.


If a nation values anything
more than freedom, it will
lose its freedom; and the
irony of it is that if it is
comfort or money that it
values more, it will lose
that, too.
-W. Somerset Maugham


well under running water before
drying them with a paper towel
or an air dryer. If possible, use a
paper towel to turn off the
faucet.
When to wash: Hands
should be washed before and
after preparing food, eating,
touching people, treating
wounds or giving medicine, and
treating a sick or injured person.
It is equally important to wash
hands after activities such as
using the toilet, changing a dia-
per, touching an animal, blow-
ing your nose, coughing, sneez-
ing or handling trash.
In healthcare facilities, adher-
ing to proper hand-washing
techniques is essential in reduc-
ing the risk of exposing patients
to the possibility of infections
that are transmitted through
touch and consequently could
lead to dire consequences.
Historically, the AANA has
taken a strong stance in advo-
cating for patient safety and
preventing unsafe health care
practices. The association
works closely with the CDC to
aggressively address vital
issues such as infection control
and safe injection practices.
Learn More
For more information, visit
www.aana.com or call (847)
692-7050.


People didn't always say "hello" when they answered the
phone. When the first regular phone service was estab-
lished in 1878, people said "ahoy."


10 HOURS A
MONTH!
That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Utem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


A SACRED TRUST


* *


We know that when you
request our service it's a
matter of trust. At Robarts


Family


take your trust and


9-i
.
* f 1


our


responsibility to you very
seriously.

Over the years we have
worked very hard to provide
you with quality care and earn
our reputation for honesty
and fairness. Now, we're
proud to say we serve more
Hardee County families than
any other funeral home.


2)nni lO o ar t
~ Owner -


529 West Main Street


We just want to thank you
for your support and let you
know that you can always
count on us to provide the
quality care we are known
for. After all, we're a family
just like yours. We know
what it feels like to lose
someone you love.

Superior Service -

Affordable Cost




ROBARTS
' FAMILYFUNERAL HOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906
* Wauchula, Florida 33873 863-773-9773


View Obits at robartsfh.com
CO


Lobster

Season Set

To Close
The recreational and com-
mercial harvest season for spiny
lobster in Florida waters closes
tomorrow (Friday).
The regular season will
reopen on Aug. 6.
The special two-day sport
season for the recreational har-
vest of spiny lobster will be
July 27 and 28 this year.
More information from the
Florida Fish & Wildlife Con-
servation Commission about
spiny lobster regulations is
available online at MyFWC.-
com, click on Fishing.


- From hum
r. affordable
have grow
yo ur family
in our trad


, trustworthy service, we
,n into a reliable resource
\V can depend on. Rooted
litions, we stay firmly


connected to the families we serve
and the care we provide. We continue
serving all faiths and all families in
the only way wve know how -
by staying true to our heritage.

I d .


0Polefk-nclj- q tqody

Funeral Homes


404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com
3:31c


945 East Broadway
Fort Meade, FL 33841
(863) 285-8171 3:31c


Funeral Home we


Listen To Your Mother:

Wash Your Hands


YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


tr.








March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


'Arts In The Park'


Calls For Artists!


Do you feel creative? Do
you feel artsy?
Main Street Wauchula Inc. is
looking for painters, sketch
artists. sculptors and photogra-
phers interested in displaying
and selling their artwork during
the April Friday Night Live
event, "Arts in the Park."
Friday Night Live will be on
April 15. The deadline to
reserve your booth space is
Monday. April 11.
And that's not all!
The event also includes the
second annual Itty Bitty Art
Contest. Yes. that's right. Itty
Bitty Art.
This part of the evening is fun
for all ages! To enter, artwork
must be created on a 3" x 3"


COURTESY PHOTO
Cliff Brinson, a World War II veteran, was the guest
speaker for first-grade classes at Wauchula Elementary
School on Veteran's Day. After he explained to the stu-
dents what it means to be a veteran, they sang a song of
thanks to Brinson and all veterans for serving this coun-
try. Above, Brinson is holding a replica of the plane he
flew in during World War II in search of German sub-
marines off the eastern coast of the United States. With
him is his great-grandson, Brinson "Brin" Conerly.


HIV/AIDS Awareness


Black Americans continue to
be disproportionately affected
by HIV/AIDS, according to the
U.S. Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention (CDC). In
fact, in their lifetime, one in 16
black men and one in 32 black
women will be infected with
HIV.
This National Black
HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, as
the nation approaches the 30th
year of the HIV epidemic, we
are faced with the stark remin-
der that HIV prevalence in
blacks is almost eight times that
of whites.
"These alarming statistics re-
mind us that all communities-
particularly communities of
color-need new biomedical
tools, including a vaccine to
prevent further spread 'of the
virus," says S. Wakefield, direc-
tor of external relations at the
HIV Vaccine Trials Network.
"It is also essential that we iden-
tify culturally appropriate ap-
proaches to engage all individu-
als in using proven HIV preven-
tion tools and in the search for
new ones.
"This is critical as we contin-
ue to search for ways to over-
come the health inequities cur-
rently impacting black commu-
nities. A commitment to engag-
ing those most affected is the
only way we can truly make a
significant difference in HIV
research."
CDC data show that more
people are living with HIV in
the United States than ever
before, and while there is no
cure for HIV/AIDS, advances
in treatment can help the major-
ity of those who are infected
live longer, fuller lives. But
treatment is costly and remains
out of reach for many people in
the United States. The best hope
in the fight against AIDS is to
find a preventive HIV vaccine,
and recent studies are bringing
us closer than ever before to
that discovery.
Scientists are gaining new
insights into how vaccines,
microbicides and other HIV
prevention strategies may work.
These studies would not have
been possible without the sup-
port and participation of volun-
teers of all races and ethnicities,
including African Americans.
However, more volunteers are
still needed to find a safe and
effective vaccine that prevents
HIV infection for everyone.
Because community 'involve-
ment and education are essen-
tial to the success of HIV vac-



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


cine research, initiatives are
under way across the country to
help people understand why
HIV vaccine research is rele-
vant to them and how they can
support these efforts.
About HIV Vaccine Research
HIV/AIDS is the third-
leading cause of death for black
men and women aged 35 to 44.
Historically, vaccines have
been the most powerful weapon
against infectious diseases such
as polio, measles and hepatitis
B.
The HIV vaccine candi-
dates being studied in humans
do not contain the actual HIV
virus, so they cannot cause any-
one to become infected with
HIV.
To learn more about HIV vac-
cine research in the United
States, visit www.bethegenera
tion.nih.gov.


RhoiQ ActSBnHseB
373Hrwy 17 SOUTH0ZOFS SPRING
^MIMBr(863) 328-0118^^^^


Post-it Note. The tiny "canvas"
can be in any color.
There is a S5 entry fee. with
entries accepted in categories of
Adult (16 and older) and Youth
(15 and younger).
Art will be judged for creativ-
ity and quality. First-place win-
ners of each category will
receive 50 Downtown Dollars
and runners up will receive 25
Downtown Dollars.
More than one entry is
allowed per person. The entry
deadline for the Itty Bitty Art
Contest is Thursday, April 14.
For more event information,
contact Main Street Wauchula
at 767-0330 or visit www.Main-
StreetWauchula.com.


The reading of all good books is like a conversation with
all the finest men of past centuries.
-Rene Descartes


PUBLIC NOTICE
The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners
will have a planning session on Friday, April 08, 2011,
at 8:30 a.m.


The workshop will be held in the County
Chambers, 412 W. Orange Street,
Wauchula, Florida.


For more information, please
Manager's Office at 863/773-9430.
Terry Atchley, Chairman


Commission
Room 102,


call the County

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REGISTRATION
NOTICE

The registration books will be OPEN for the City of
Wauchula Special Election through 5:00 PM., April 11,
2011.
If you will become 18 years of age on or before May 10,
2011 9ou may Pre-Register before 5:00 PM. on April 11,
2011 and be qualified to vote.
Jeffery Ussery
Supervisor of Elections


AVISO DEL REGISTRO

La MATRICULA/NOTA de

CAMBIO de PARTIDO
Los libros de la matricula estaran ABIERTOS para la
Ciudad de Wauchula la Elecci6n Especial por 5:00 DE LA
TARDE, el 11 de abril de 2011. Si usted Ilegara a ser 18
afros de la edad en o antes el 10 de mayo de 2011 usted
puede de Registro Pre antes 5:00 DE LA TARDE en el 11
de abril de 2011 y es calificado para votar.
Jeffery Ussery
El Supervisor de Elecciones 3:31c


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6A The Herald-Advocate, March 31, 2011

QUAIL-EGG PRODUCERS


COURTESY PHOTO
Students in Ella Wolgast's first-grade class at Hilltop Elementary School have received
. a grant from the Florida Farm Bureau to hatch and raise Japanese quail for egg pro-
duction as part of an agricultural study. The youngsters have written a business plan
': and prepared advertising promoting their quail-egg business at the school. In addition
to learning about the agricultural value of these small birds, the kids are putting their
reading, math and science skills to use. After buying feed and paying overhead costs
to the school administration, students will take their profits and put them toward end-
of-the-year activities for all the first graders at Hilltop. Pictured are first graders with
three of Quail-Mart's eight laying hens. Where are the other five? Happily producing
4,1 eggs in Wolgast's barn, in order to minimize the noise and classroom chores.


Medicare Part D:
A Health Care
It may be time for many
./older Americans to take a
healthy look at the new health
care reform law. Some impor-
tant changes are already here
and more are on the way.
For example, one program
that has been around for some
time is working even better
than many envisioned the
Medicare prescription drug
program. This Medicare Part D
is a not-very-well-known
health care success story. With
so much talk around the mas-
sive reform bill, a program
working as well as the Part D
program can be easy to over-
look. A recent survey found
, that nearly 85 percent of en-
rollees are satisfied with their
coverage and the program is
actually saving money for peo-
ple and costing less than ex-


Success Story
pected.
The most recent report from
the Medicare Trustees projects
future Part D spending will be
below previous projections. In
fact, total Part D costs have
declined by 41 percent, or $261
billion, compared to the initial
10-year cost estimate, accord-
ing to the report.
Additionally, the average
monthly beneficiary premium
for Part D coverage is $30 this
year, far below the $53 origi-
nally forecast and an increase of
only $1 over last year's average
premium.
According to Don Berwick,
administrator of the govern-
ment's Centers for Medicare &
Medicaid Services, "These very
modest increases in premiums,
along with the new discounts ...
are going to make medications


more affordable to Medicare
beneficiaries."
The new discounts he's refer-
ring to come in the form of a 50
percent discount on brand-name
medicines for eligible benefici-
aries who fall into the so-called
doughnut hole. The discounts,
provided by biopharmaceutical
research companies, will mean
increased access to needed
medicines by reducing out-of-
pocket costs for eligible
Medicare beneficiaries.
Part D is one element of the
health care system that is work-
ing the way it's supposed to
work. About 30 million benefi-
ciaries have access to afford-
able prescription medicines as a
result. That's important, be-
cause medicines help keep peo-
ple healthy and out of the hospi-
tal, which is a key driver of
health care costs.
For more information on the
Medicare Part D program, visit
www.cms.gov.


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Donations support Hardee Help Center (HHC). -
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Controlling Hypertension Requires A Commitment
From Both Physicians And Their Patients


High blood pressure, or
hypertension, impacts approxi-
mately 75 million Americans
and is the second-leading pre-
ventable risk factor for death in
the U.S. High blood pressure
can go unrecognized because it
often has no warning signs or
symptoms, and many people
don't realize they have it.
People of all ages and back-
grounds can develop hyperten-
sion, and having high blood
pressure can lead to serious or
fatal health problems. Recent
research from the National
Health and Nutrition Examina-
tion Survey 2007-2008
(NHANES) indicates that an
estimated half of all adults with
high blood pressure still have
uncontrolled hypertension.
A recent national online sur-
vey of adults (ages 18 and
older) diagnosed with hyperten-
sion, and primary care physi-
cians and cardiologists, found
patients' attitudes and physi-
cians' perceptions regarding
uncontrolled hypertension don't
always align, specifically in the
areas of patient motivation and
involvement. According to the
survey, nearly all (96 percent)
of the 507 patients whose self-
reported blood pressure indicat-
ed uncontrolled hypertension
feel very motivated to take their
medication as prescribed, and
65 percent feel very motivated
to make changes to diet and
exercise habits. The results
from the physician survey
reveal that, on average, primary
care physicians feel 65 percent
of their patients with uncon-
trolled hypertension are moti-
vated to comply with their med-
ication regimen, and feel that
even fewer of their patients
with uncontrolled hypertension


r^
7:--


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K ** t


(34 percent, on average) are
motivated to make lifestyle
changes to their diet and exer-
cise habits.
"Controlling hypertension
requires a collaborative effort
among patients and physicians,
and includes medication, life-
style modifications and regular
monitoring of blood pressure,"
said Michael J. Bloch, M.D.,
clinical hypertension specialist
at the University of Nevada
School of Medicine. "Given the
serious consequences of uncon-
trolled hypertension, patients
should ensure they are aware of
the blood pressure goals set by
their physician and the neces-
sary steps to achieving control."
The survey findings also indi-
cate differing opinions among
patients and physicians related
to patient involvement. A
majority (85 percent) of all
patients with hypertension
agree they are as involved in
making decisions about blood
pressure control as they would
like to be. Only half (56 per-
cent) of physicians say most of
their patients are as involved in
decision-making about blood
pressure control as they would
like them to be.
The CONTROL Hyperten-
sion (Consequences of Not
Taking Control of Hyperten-
sion) Survey was conducted
from October 25 to November
11, 2010 by Mended Hearts, a
community-based, national
heart patient support organiza-
tion, and Takeda Pharmaceuti-
cals North America, Inc. Data
for the survey were collected
online by Richard Day Re-
search, a national health care
research firm. The sample
included 1,054 adults (ages 18
and older) diagnosed with


hypertension who were current-
ly under the care of a physician
and taking hypertension med-
ication, and 457 health care pro-
fessionals-comprised of 253
primary care physicians and
204 cardiologists. The non-ran-
dom sample of patients with
hypertension was recruited
from an independent online
panel of adults with hyperten-
sion. The non-random sample
of primary care physicians and
cardiologists was recruited via
e-mail and telephone from inde-
pendent national physician
databases.
Sample stratification and
weights were employed to
ensure the patient sample
reflects the gender, age, race
and income of this population
based on data from NHANES.
For more information on the
results from the survey, visit
www.mendedhearts.org.
Important Hypertension
Facts
A health care professional
can diagnose high blood pres-
sure through a simple blood
pressure monitoring device,
such as a blood pressure cuff. A
blood pressure reading moni-
tors the force of blood against
the artery walls as it circulates
through the body.
In reading blood pressure,
the first (or top) number is sys-
tolic pressure, the maximum
pressure in the artery as the
heart contracts, and the second
(or bottom) number is diastolic
pressure, the lowest pressure in
the artery when the heart is
between contractions.
Hypertension is defined as
elevated blood pressure 140
mm Hg or greater systolic or 90
mm Hg or greater diastolic.


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March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Local Firefighter Chosen


For 9/11 Ceremony


Hardee County Firefighter/-
EMT Javier Fernandez was
recently selected to participate
in a ceremony honoring fallen
firefighters and first responders.
The ceremony involved re-
pairing an American flag that
was recovered from the rubble
of the World Trade Center
shortly after the 9/11 attacks.
Attending the ceremony with
Fernandez were his parents,
Gloria and Polo Fernandez.
Fernandez was chosen from
firefighters around Florida to
participate in the ceremony by
placing a stitch in the flag as it
makes Its way around the coun-
try for similar celebrations. lI'
event was held at the Kennedy
Space Center on Florida's east
coast, and included not only
first responders but military
veterans as well.
The participants placed
stitches, guarded the flag, and


retreated the colors at the close
of the ceremony. "It was very
emotional ... hard to explain
really," Fernandez said when
asked about the experience.
"It's something I'm very proud
of as a firefighter," he added.
Fernandez' perspective on
this program is rather unique
because of his "second job."
Firefighter Fernandez is also
Specialist Fernandez, who cur-
rently serves in the Army
National Guard. He is assigned
to the 2nd Battalion, 124th
Infantry Regiment, based in
Orlando. He has been in the
National Guard for over 14
years and has been deployed to
Korea and twice to Iraq.
It was during one of his Iraqi
deployments that he was in-
jured in the line of duty. While
working to help train Iraqi
police forces, Fernandez' vehi-
cle was attacked and he sus-


trained injuries to his leg and
foot. As a result of injuries sus-
tained during combat actions,
he was awarded the Purple
Heart.
While he continues to recov-
er, he has been able to return to
duty with the fire department
and recently completed para-
medic school.
Fernandez went on to say that
the fire service is very similar to
the military in many ways.
"They honor their fallen com-
rades in much the same way,"
he said. "It's a very honorable
job."
Fernandez is assigned to
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
Station 1, where he serves his
community providing fire and
emergency medical coverage
for the citizens of Hardee
County.


COURTESY PHOTOS
An American flag recovered from the rubble of the World Trade Center after the Sept.
11 attacks is making its way across the nation, where it Is repaired stitch by stitch dur-
ing ceremonies honoring the fallen.


National Survey Sheds Light On Top

Concerns Of Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers


A national survey of 524 non-
professional Alzheimer's dis-
ease (AD) caregivers found
that, over time, memory loss
and confusion, which are cogni-
tive symptoms, in addition to
personal safety are their great-
est concerns related to their
loved one's AD. In fact, 67 per-
cent of AD caregivers surveyed
said changes in cognitive symp-
toms were among their main
concerns.
The survey was re-cently
conducted by Harris Interactive
for Eisai Inc. and Pfizer Inc in
partnership with the
Alzheimer's Foundation of
America (AFA). -
The majority of AD care-
givers surveyed are proactive
participants in the dialogue and
decision-making around their
loved one's disease, and 75 per-
cent were either "satisfied" or
"very satisfied" with the com-
munication they have with their
loved one's health care profes-
..sional. However. onefourth of
Scaregivers were. eitg "some-
what" or "not at all satisfied,"
i highlighting there may be room
for improvement in this dia-
logue.
"Family caregivers are typi-
cally the first to notice when


their loved one's symptoms are
changing and whether AD may
be progressing," said Eric J.
Hall, president and CEO of
AFA. "This is why it is critical
for them to proactively engage
in discussions with their health
care professional to help ad-
dress these changes."
Family gatherings provide an
opportunity to observe changes
in a loved one that may stand
out after not seeing them for a
while.
About AD
AD-a degenerative disease
of the brain-is typically charac-
terized by three stages: mild,
moderate and severe. AD grad-
ually gets worse over time and
is the sixth leading cause of
death in the United States.
Right now, as many as 5.1 mil-
lion Americans age 65 and
older have AD, with 3.6 million
of those having moderate-to-
severe disease. AD affects not
only the individual with the dis-
ease but also the caregivers and
the entire family.
As our population ages-
including the first wave of baby
boomers turning 65 in 2011-the
disease may impact a greater
percentage of Americans.


For additional information
about AD and other resources,
visit www.alzfdn.org.
Key Survey Findings
The survey also illustrated
the following:
55 percent of AD care-
givers surveyed said caring for
their loved one has taken a toll
on their own health
60 percent of AD care-
givers surveyed said they feel
overwhelmed
84 percent of caregivers of
loved ones with severe AD sur-
veyed said caregiving frequent-
ly stops them from participating
in activities they enjoy, which is
more than caregivers of loved
ones with mild (67 percent) and
moderate (68 percent) AD
The three greatest caregiv-
er concerns about their loved
one's AD were memory loss (41
percent), personal safety (33
percent) and confusion (27 per-
cent)
67 Racent of AD care-
givers su eyed named at least
one change in cognitive symp-
toms as a main concern about
their loved one's AD
Alzheimer's disease affects
not only the patient but also the
caregivers and the entire family.


Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds.
A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing.
-William James
The real test of a man is not how well he plays the role he has invented for himself but
how well he plays the role that destiny assigned to him.


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Hardee County Firefighter/Emergency Medical Technician Javier Fernandez, a Purple
Heart recipient, was selected to place a stitch in a flag found in the aftermath of Sept.
11.


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PAGE ONE


Hunting Season Dates Modified


-Hunting season dates have
been modified on many FWC-
managed areas.
These new rules become
effective on July 1, and will
apply to the 2011-12 hunting
season.
For more than a year, the
Florida Fish & Wildlife Con-
servation Commission and its
partners and cooperating agen-
cy landowners have worked
with stakeholders to develop
changes to season dates for
these public hunting lands.
These lands include wildlife
management areas, wildlife and


environmental areas, and mis-
cellaneous areas.
Making these adjustments
will align the seasons on these
areas more closely with the
newly adopted zonal season
dates, which took effect on pri-
vate lands last year.
"With the new changes in
dates to hunting seasons on pri-
vate lands, we and our hunting
stakeholders felt that season
dates on several of our manage-
ment areas needed to be modi-
fied to correspond better with
the new zonal seasons and the
timing of deer breeding," said


Diane Eggeman, director of the
FWC's Division of Hunting &
Game Management.
The FWC held nine public
meetings across the state and
gathered input and feedback on
the subject through an online
poll. New changes take into
consideration when deer breed
on each area and other hunter
preferences, such as hunting
during holidays and the desires
of other area users.
"We want to make things as
good as we can for public-land
hunters," said Cory Morea,
FWC biologist and deer-man-


agement program coordinator.
"Adjusting some of these dates
to make the seasons occur clos-
er to peak deer activity or dur-
ing holidays should increase
hunter satisfaction.
"But, at the same time, we
didn't want to fix something
that wasn't broken," Morea
added. "Hunters have told us
that on some of our areas the
seasons are timed just right, so
we didn't make any changes to
those areas."
For information on the spe-
cific season date changes made
for each area, go to MyFWC.-
com/Deer.


4-H Youth: A Force Against HART Gets Grant
Tornadoes, Unemployment And Obesity


After tornadoes ripped
through her small town in
Monroe County, Ky, 4-H'er
Meg Copass decided to help her
town better prepare for emer-
gencies. After talking with local
officials, Meg realized her town
: lacked the funds to pay for an
early-warning emergency sys-
tem that could alert the resi-
dents of approaching storms.
By organizing concerts, silent
auctions, game tournaments
and food sales, Meg single-
handedly raised $11,873 from
her community. With 80 percent
of the total cost covered, Mon-
roe County purchased the emer-
gency response system. Now, a
warning can be heard up to
eight miles away and can be
triggered by 911 emergency call
centers 30 miles away.
At 16 years old, Meg's com-
mitment to her community
made her county safer.
Across the country in
Oregon, Jose Cazares and his
group, the 4-H Tech Wizards,
bridged the digital divide in
their town by training youth and
adults on how to improve their
computer and Internet skills.
In Jose's community, the in-
creasing prevalence of high-
tech workplaces has made it
difficult for people without
computer skills to find employ-
ment. However, the tutorials
that Jose and his team provide
teach how to e-mail, create a
website and effectively search
on the Internet for jobs and
resources.
At the age of 17, Jose is help-
ing his community become
more appealing to employers.
Back on the East Coast in


Wake County, N.C., 16-year-
old Vivian McCarter .made it
easier for people in her commu-
nity to find healthier food and
to live healthier lives.
According to the North Caro-
lina Department of Health and
Human Services, two-thirds of
all adults in North Carolina are
overweight or obese. The state
also ranks llth worst in the
U.S. for childhood obesity.
Using geographic informa-
tion system technology, Vivian
and her 4-H group mapped out
grocery and convenience stores
in their county and tracked the
stores with healthy food op-
tions. They found a virtual food
desert. So Vivian and her group
initiated a campaign to con-
vince store owners to add
healthier food choices for their
customers.
Vivian helped her neighbors
live healthier lives.
Like Vivian and Jose, Meg
credits her confidence and per-
severance to what she learned
in 4-H. "4-H helped me grow. It
gave me the skills I needed and
helped me to know myself bet-
ter."
Stories like these are taking
place all across the nation due
to the activism and ingenuity of
4-H youth through Join the
Revolution of Responsibility, a
multifaceted brand campaign
launched by National 4-H
Council.
The campaign tells today's 4-
H story through the achieve-
ments of its young people. Visit
www.4-h.org/revolution for
more information about 4-H
and Join the Revolution of
Responsibility.


For Dog Vaccine


The Hardee Animal Rescue
Tedm in Wauchula now has
help in protecting dogs against
canine influenza virus (CIV), a
highly contagious disease that
spreads easily from dog to dog,
especially those in close prox-
imity.
The group received a grant
for the vaccines as part of a
Petfinder.com Foundation pro-
gram to build community im-
munity against this respiratory
infection.
Because CIV is relatively
new, most dogs have not built
up immunity to the disease.
Dogs can get the disease by
being exposed to those that
have it, as ,well as by playing
with toys or drinking from
bowls used by other dogs.
People can also unwittingly
spread the germ if they come in
contact with infected dogs.
"Shelters and rescue organi-
zations are often the first places
that new diseases already in the


community become evident,".
noted Liz Neuschatz, director of
the Petfinder.com Foundation.
"Canine flu can be a real prob-
lem for shelters, where one sick
dog can cause an outbreak
through an entire facility. We
are pleased to be part of this
effort to help protect the com-,
munity by providing canine flu
vaccine to Hardee Animal
Rescue Team."
Dog flu is a growing problem
throughout the country. It has
been confirmed in 35 states so
far, but tracking the disease is
hard because it is so difficult to
diagnose. Dogs are contagious
before they show any symp-
toms. By the time the dog starts
coughing, it's too late.
Virtually all dogs exposed to
the virus will become infected,
and some will get more serious
infections, such as pneumonia,
which can be fatal. Information
about canine flu is available at
www.doginfluenza.com.


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Oh, come, let us sing to the
Lord! Give a joyous shout in
honor of the Rock of our sal-
vation. Come, let us sing
before Him with thankful
hearts. Let us sing Him
psalms of praise.
Psalm 95:1-2 (TLB)

FRIDAY
For the Lord is a great God,
the great King of all gods. He
controls the formation of the
depths of the earth and the
mightiest mountains; all are
His. He made the sea and
formed the land; all are His.
Psalm 95:3-5 (TLB)

SATURDAY
Come, kneel before our
Maker, for He is our God. We
are His sheep and He is out
Shepherd. Oh, that you
would hear Him calling you
today and come to Him!
Psalm 95:6-7 (TLB)

SUNDAY
Let the heavens be glad, the
earth rejoice; let the vast-
ness of the roaring seas
demonstrate His glory.
Praise, Him for the growing
fields, for they display His
greatness. Let the trees of
the forest rustle with praise.
Psalm 96: 11-12 (TLB)

MONDAY
Clouds and darkness sur-
round Him. Righteousness
and justice are the founda-
tion of His throne. ... His
lightning flashes out across
the world. The earth sees
and trembles. The moun-.
tains melt like wax before the
Lord of all the earth.
Psalm 97:2, 4-5 (TLB)


TUESDAY
The heavens declare His
perfect righteousness, every,
nations sees His glory. Let
those who worship idols be
disgraced all who brag
about their worthless gods
- for every god must bow to
Him.
Psalm 97:6-7 (TLB)

WEDNESDAY
The Lord loves those who
hate evil; He protects the
lives of His people, and res-
cues them from the wicked.
... May all who are godly be
happy in the Lord and crown
Him our holy God.
Psalm 97:10, 12 (TLB)

All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.



ABOUT...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included..
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.
!L .^ -' "- ** ^ ^ *


Baseball is like a poker game. Nobody wants to quit
when he's losing; nobody wants you to quit when you're
ahead.
--Jackie Robinson




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The Herald-AdvocateR W
HareeContys .omtow Cveag


The Herald-Advocate
S (SPS 57s0 )

Thursday, March 31,2011


I







2B The Herald-Advocate, March 31. 2011


-Hardee


Living-


GREENHOUSE GRATITUDE


COURTESY PHOTO
Bo Idsardi & Lauren McClain

Lauren McClain Becomes

Engaged To Bo Idsardi


Lisa McClain and Glenn and
Leeann McClain of Jackson-
ville announce the engagement
of their daughter, Lauren Mad-
ison McClain, to Robert
Christopher "Bo" Idsardi Jr.,
the son of Chris and Mary
Idsardi of Wauchula.
The bride-elect, of Gaines-
ville, is a 2008 graduate of
Terry Parker High School in
Jacksonville. She is currently


majoring in elementary educa-
tion at the University of Florida.
The prospective groom, of
Gainesville, is a 2008 graduate
of Coral Shores High School in
Key Largo. He is majoring in
biology at the University of
Florida.
Plans are being made for a
May 21 wedding at the Gator
Wesley Foundation in Gaines-
ville.


He that is of the opinion money will do everything may
well be suspected of doing everythiir for money.
.....


New Zion Baptist Church
will be hosting a revival begin-
ning this Sunday and continu-
ing on through Friday, April 8.
Featured will be the Rev. Rick
Giles from the First Baptist
Church of Frostproof. Sunday
services will be at 11 a.m. and 6
p.m., with the weeknight serv-
ices at 7.
Also this Sunday, the
church's pastor will kiss a pig
following the morning service,
in celebration of the church
reaching its goal of having 50
people in Sunday School.
Church members invite every-
one to come and worship with
them.
First Christian Church of
Wauchula is holding a food
drive on April 10 from 10:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the parking lot
at the intersection of West Main
Street and U.S. 17 South.
Everyone is helped to fill the
truck bed of a pickup provided
by Alan Jay Ford. Bring your
donated of canned and boxed
protein items such as tuna,
chicken, Spam, stews, soups,
beans and similar items. You
will get a hot dog and chips. All
donations will go to the Hardee
Help Center for families in
emergency or hardship.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.
I have enough money to
last me the rest of my life,
unless I buy something.
-Jackie Mason
A beaver can hold its
breath for about 45 min-
utes.
A man is incomplete until
he is married. After that, he
is finished.


My name is Skippy.
I miss my mom & dad. I
was helping my dad on
Ramon Petteway Road
on Thursday, March 10,
when I went to visit
with my friends. Please
help me find my way
home. I have to have
special medicine and I
don't like to have to be
L outside.

If you see me please call Milton or Stacy Locklar

863-245-2749 863-235-1636 863-375-2222
soc 3:31p

16; ^^^ ^*^^^^ "^^ ^^^*^^*"^^^ ^**^^^ ^^*^^"^^ ^^^"^


Mr. and Mrs. Waylon Scon-
yers, Dunnellon, an eight-
pound daughter, Rylie Isabelle,
born Feb. 16, 2011, Munroe
Regional Medical Center,
Ocala. Mrs. Sconyers is the for-.
mer Emily Moore. Maternal
grandparents are Glenn and
Brenda Moore of Dunellon.
Paternal grandparents are Jack
and Lynn Sconyers of Bowling
Green.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant-as
a newborn only-may be added
.at no cost. Any other photo of
the baby will cost $15.


MICHELLE DELEON
Navy Seaman Michelle R.
Deleon recently completed U.S.
Navy basic training at Recruit
Training Command, Great
Lakes,ll. ,
She is the daughter of
Charlie Godwin of Wauchula
and Bessie M. Warner of Fort
Myers and a 1998 graduate of
Lehigh Senior High School in
Lehigh Acres.
During the eighth-week pro-
gram, Deleon completed a vari-
ety of training which included
classroom study and practical
instruction on naval customs,
first aid, firefighting, water
safety and survival, and ship-
board and aircraft safety. An
emphasis is also placed on
physical fitness.
The capstone event of boot
camps is "Battle Stations," an
exercise which gives recruits
the skills and confidence they
need to succeed in the fleet.
"Battle Stations" is designed
to galvanize the basic warrior
attributes of sacrifice, dedica-
tion, teamwork and endurance
through the practical applica-
tion of basic Navy skills and the
core values of Honor, Courage
and Com-mitment.
Its distinctly "Navy" flavor
was designed to take into
account what it means to be a
Sailor.


Most lipstick
.scales!


contains fish


COURTESY PHOTO
PhosChem Supply Co. in Wauchula was recently pre-
sented with a plaque of appreciation for its support of the
greenhouse project at Hardee Junior High School.
Receiving the plaque is Jama Abbott of PhosChem (left).
School Board Chairman Teresa Crawford presented the
plaque on behalf of the board and Schools Superinten-
dent David Durastanti.


2


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buffet & Lounge
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Chinese Cuisine


Over I 00 items on the 5.uiff t-: Karaoke
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Open 7 Days a Week
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(South Bound Hwy. 17)
773-3015


APRIL 2. 2011
Amanda Abbott & Guy Carlton
Kara Keen & Christopher Lucas
APRIL 9, 2011
Jaime Platt & Jason Carnley
APRIL 30, 2011
Caitlin McHargue & Roy Petteway
MAY 7, 2011
Kelsby Williams & Tyler Johnson


MAY 21, 2011
Lauren McClain & Bo Idsardi
IUNE 18. 2011
Angie Hines & Mike loannidis
Jamie Revell & Kenny Futch
JUNE 25. 2011
Kaylyn Crawford & Dustin Walton
IULY 16, 2011
Erin Longshore & Eric Goudge
Courtney Thomas & Cameron Durham


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9n Wemorg Of 6bAt Cres 9deOw
November 29, 1915 MaFch 6, 1993
Million Times
A million times we've needed you,
A million times we've cried.
If love alone could've saved you,
You never would have died.
In life we loved you dearly,
In death we love you still.
1In our hearts you hold a place
No one else will ever fill.
It broke our hearts to lose you,
But you didn't go alone.
Part of us went with you,
" \ The day God took you home..
We love & miss you,
Your Children
Diane & Donna soc3:31c


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New v

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(
(.







March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


This week in history, as
researched from the. archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate...
75 YEARS AGO
The first hampers of Hardee
County cucumbers have been
brought to market last week,
where they brought good prices
from buyers. The first hampers
brought in were from Walter
Mozdier, whose farm is near
town. He was paid $5 a crate for
choice and $3 for culls or jum-
bos. Plain brought $4 a crate.
"Woco Pep," the world's
championship jumping frog, is
dead; and her famous hind legs
are stilled, never to jump again
in defense of her title. She died
in her pen in the frog market of
J.C. "Spud" Harp, local frog
commissioner, where she has
been since setting the world's
record on July 4th, 1934, at the
local athletic field.
The Central Florida Canners
Inc., Wauchula's newest enter-
prise, will ship its first solid car-
load tomorrow of goods canned
in the local plant. Motors at the
plant hummed last night as the
cannery began its operation-try-
out in the Anderson Building at
South Eighth Avenue. Today
the plant plans to begin canning
grapefruit juice. The first car-
load to move out of here will
contain 24,000 cans of the "liq-
uid sunshine," as it is often
called.

* J.W. Earnest has a pre-Easter
sale of beautiful pastels and


prints that are the latest word in
stylish suits, swaggers and
dressy dresses for Easter, for
$9.98. Adorable dresses for the
young miss and the lady who
needs the larger size, are in the
$6.98 range. For men, dress
straw hats are $1.50 to $3.95 in
Panamas, Yachts, Sennits, and
novelty waterproof straws.

50 YEARS AGO
The Wauchula City Council
went on record this week as
"strongly" opposing a proposed
one and one-half percent tax on
utilities, as proposed by Gov.
Farris Bryant. Sen. G.W.
Williams, of this district, is dalso
opposed to the tax. Mayor Paul
Thomas said the tax would
mean no additional revenue for
the city, only more money city
power customers would have to
pay. "We don't think it's right,
when the city is begging for
financial help, for the state to
add a tax which will help us not
at all," said Thomas.

The spring vegetable deal is
expected to swing into full gear
next week. Wauchula Farmers
Market and the Wauchula Cu-
cumber & Tomato Cooperative
have begun daily. operations.
Daniel Produce Co. began
packing cucumbers this week.
Wauchula Packing and Mo-Bo
Produce Co., a new concern, are
expected to begin next week.
Fort Myers Packers and T.W.
Davis & Co. are expected to
wait a week to begin.

Hardee County schools
should not be caught short
financially next year, even if the
county is required to pay more


money into the state minimum
foundation program, Super-
intendent Wilton Stephens said
this week. The schools' share of
county tax money will be more
than sufficient to pay Hardee's
contribution to the state pro-
gram, unless statewide land val-
ues increase more than expect-
ed, said Stephens.
Wauchula Hills Super Market
offers Easter specials: smoked
picnic hams for 29 cents a
pound; a 12-oz package of
wieners, three for $1; chuck
roast 59 cents a pound; sirloin
or club steak for 79 ceuts a
pound; or round steak for 89
cents a pound.
25 YEARS AGO
Roughly 40 people attended
an early morning breakfast last
Thursday morning to discuss
plans and assignments for
Hardee County's attempt at
achieving "Florida's Blue Chip
Community" status. Bill Crews
is chairman of the local effort
and Jewel Harper serves as his
vice chairman. Six committees
were appointed to tackle each
aspect of the rigorous applica-
tiop.

Photos show classes of the
Little Red Schoolhouse with
teacher Mrs. O.B. Stansell as
they celebrated an Easter Egg
Hunt, one of many activities she
plans for her pre-schoolers each
year. The children were divided
into two groups, those 4 and 5
years old and about to graduate
and then the younger children.
Furniture Warehouse on U.S.
17 North has a grand opening


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I Way a ,We


Letter To The Editor

5-Year-Old Niece Died

From 2007 Child Abuse


with a prize hi-back rocker to
be given at a Saturday drawing.
There will be 10 percent off for
cash customers, bedroom suites
on sale, a large waterbed sec-
tion and oak glass-front china
cabinets among other items.
There will be free plants to the
first 100 customers.
10 YEARS AGO
Chickens, accumulated trash,
inoperative vehicles and dilapi-
dated buildings face a new
judge and new stance for viola-
tors of the county's code
enforcement standards.
Recently elected County Judge
Marcus Ezelle said, "The code
ordinances are an important
expression of the way we want
to live in Hardee County, and
I'm willing to exercise my dis-
cretion consistent with that pub-
lic concern and interest."
Bowling Green approved an
alcohol ordinance on a 3-0 vote
on Monday afternoon. It allows
alcohol sales on Sunday from I
p.m. until 1 a.m. the next morn-
ing. On other days, alcohol
sales are permitted from 7 a.m.
until 1 a.m. the next morning.
Approving the ordinance were
Fern Gibson, Perry Knight and
David Dura-stanti. Randy Meek
arrived after the public hearing
was. over and Mayor Gary
Albritton was in the hospital for
foot surgery.
Hardee County residents and
businessmen and others are
invited to speak up about
planned water restrictions.
Major water-related issues are
probably of most interest to
agricultural interests, people
who have wells, and nearly any-
one else affected by the three-
year drought which has made
Peace River water levels the
lowest in recorded history.

Real estate listings this week
include: a 2BR, 2B mobile
home in Charlie Creek Estates
with utility room and -carport
for $35,000; a 3BR, 2B fully
furnished mobile home in
Pioneer Heights, only $55,500;
and a spotless 2BR, 2B mobile
home in Peace River Park for
$49,000.

Smelling bananas and/or
green apples (smelling,
not eating) can help you
lose weight!


Dear Editor,
Most of you know who I am.
You know what happened to my
5-year-old niece Brooklyn on
Jan. 15, 2007. For those of you
who don't know me or my fam-
ily, here is my story.
I was there the day Brooklyn
was born. I was also there the
day Brooklyn was taken off life
support, not such a great feel-
ing!
I remember sitting at home
feeding my son Cameron. He
was born 11 days earlier. I
remember the phone call that
my dad answered. It was from
the hospital in West Virginia.
The doctor said Ron
(Brooklyn's father) had beat
Brooklyn and she wasn't going
to make it. We quickly packed
our bags and headed to West
Virginia. The whole way there I
thought to myself she will be
okay, she's probably going to be
hurt pretty bad but we will get
there and take her home with
us, she could live with us.
I remember walking back to
her room and seeing the nurses
and detectives crying as they
left her. I walked in and saw her.
She looked at peace:
The nurse asked us not to lift
her gown. They didn't want us
to remember her that way, so I
didn't.
I held her hand, it was cold. I
talked to her and told her that
we were here, we had made it.
I kissed her head and told her
how much I loved her. I wasn't
really sure what to say but I
kept talking and holding tight to
her little hand.
I was still thinking she was
coming home with us but the
truth is she was already gone.
She couldn't hear me talking.
She couldn't feel me holding
her hand or when I kissed her
head.
Brooklyn was kept on life
support so we could say good-
bye and so her organs could be
donated. There isn't a day goes
by that I don't think of her and


Badlands are regions that have been worn into steep
hills and deep gullies by the action of wind, rain dnd
floods. Badlands are common in semidesert regions of
the western U.S.


In Concert







First Baptist Church

4531 US Hwy 17 N, Bowling Green, FL

863-375-2253



Sunday, April 10




6:30 p.m.



A love offering will be taken.




soc3:31c


wonder why she had to go
through so much pain before
'the Lord would take .her. How. I
wish I could hold her in my
arms and tell here how much
we love her.
Brooklyn was murdered Jan.
15, 2007, a the hands of her
father, someone who was sup-
posed to protect her. Instead he
took her life.
Ronald Holcomb recently
began his 80-year sentence for
death of a child by parent with
child abuse and second degree
murder. His wife Tracy
Holcomb (Brooklyn's step
mother) was sentenced to five
years probation.
April is Child Abuse
Awareness month and since her
death I have made blue aware-
ness ribbons that my family and
I have passed out in hopes that
people would wear then during
April not only in memory of our4
Brooklyn but all the other vic-
tims of child abuse.
This year in place of the rib-
bons I have silicone child pre-
vention wristbands. They are $2
each, and the money will be
donated to Mercer Codnty
Early Learning Center in West
Virginia, a school where
Brooklyn attended while she
was there.
The school began a
Brooklyn's Bridge project
which is the name of a play-
ground in the process of bing
built. "Brooklyn's Bridge, a
place to play in memory ofi
Brooklyn Holcomb" is what the
entrance sign will read. The
project is still in need of dona-
tions.
If anyone is interested in
making a donation to the school
or would like to purchase a
wristband for $2, please contact'
me at (863) 781-7370.
For more details Google',
Brooklyn Holcomb.

Sincerely,
Ashly Neal
Wauchula








4B The Herald-Advocate. March 31, 2011


Letter To The Editor Orange

Wauchula Inmate Gives

Advice To Young People Forecast


Dear Editor,
First of all I want to thank
you for taking time to send me a
hand-written letter with your
condolences. That meant so
mqch to me you cannot imag-
ine.
Secondly, I appreciate recog-
nition of the fine people my
parents were. They truly were
grand people and will be
missed.
Which brings me to the third
issue, of advice for today's
young people. I am honored
that you would believe in me
and to ask for my words of
advice,, coming from inside
these prison walls.
The most important thing that
young people today should
strive for is to live a life of
excellence by listening and
being obedient to their parents'
teaching. I can tell you now that
had I listened to my mother and
father, I would not have come to
this place.
Even though I have fallen I
could always depend on my
parents' love. Now, I depend on
he love of my heavenly Father,
who will never leave or forsake
me. And I can find comfort that
when the day comes ... I will
meet my parents in the sky!
Most of my life I have been
caught in the grip of a terminal
disease. That disease is addic-
tion. Drugs took me to places
that I never thought my well-
educated life would lead.
Living from day to day and
drug to drug is like living in
your own private hell! It slowly
becomes a way of life.
That way of life is a dead-


end! As the program says-
equals jails, institutions and
death. Don't get caught up in
that way of life.
If you are on drugs ... don't
be afraid to tell someone you
need help. Don't be ashamed of
anything you may have done in
order to get drugs. Most of all,
don't be afraid to let your par-
ents know!
I am a mother. I know I wish
I could make up all the years
that I missed when my son was
growing up. I was blessed
because my mother and father
raised my son and did a fine
job.
However, he still had no
Mom because Mom was always
on drugs. I missed out on the
best years of his life.
Mother's love is something
that covers a multitude of
wrongs. Kids, let me tell you,
you can always depend on you
Mom to love you, regardless of
what you have done! So, don't
be afraid to let her know you've
messed up.
Finish school ... get your edu-
cation. Work hard and love each
other. Never give up on your
dreams because your dreams
are what give your life purpose.
And always know that God had
control over everything.
God always has your best
interests in mind. When you
think you have nowhere to turn,
turn to Him. He will direct your
path. I know He is guiding me
now, and I cannot fail with him.
Love in Christ,
Barbara Ratliff
-Broward Correctional
Institution, Fort Lauderdale


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate



2011
SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS FOR HARDEE COUNTY
COMMISSION AND APPOINTED BOARDS
Meetings to be held In County Commission
Chambers, Room 102
Courthouse Annex, 412 W. Orange Stteet, Wauchula,
Florida )n
unless otherwise noted

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Regular meetings every other Thursday at 8:30 a.m. &
6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF April 14th at 8:30 a.m. & 28th at 6:00 p.m.
Planning Session April 08, 2011 at 8:30 a.m.
County Offices Closed April 22nd Good Friday

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY "INDEPEN-
DENT BOARD"
MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled.

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD meets first
Thursday night of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF April 07th

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD
Meets on the second Monday night of each month at
6:00 p.m. in Building Department Conference Room,
401 West Main Street
MONTH OF April 11th

COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD
Meets first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF April 04th

LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD
Meetings called as needed at Library in Annex II
MONTH OF April 04th at 5:30 p.m. (Regular-Friends)

HOUSING AUTHORITY
Meets second Friday of each month at 11:00 a.m. at
701 LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula
MONTH OF April To be announced.

HEALTH CARE TASK FORCE
Meets quarterly at Hardee County Health Department
Auditorium at Noon
MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled.

HARDEE COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE BOARD
Usually meets third Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m.
MONTH OF April -19th

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled
person needing to make special arrangements should
contact the County Commissioner's office at least
forty-eight (48) hours prior to the public meeting.
This notice is published in compliance with, Florida
Statutes 286.0105.
Interested .parties may appear at the public meeting
and be heard. If a person decides to appeal any deci-
sion made by the members,, with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

Terry Atchley, Chairman 3:31,


Upped

The U.S. Department of
Agriculture has released its
March orange crop forecast for
the 2010-11 season, increasing
its earlier estimate by four mil-
lion boxes to 142 million boxes.
"The late maturing crop and
the freeze has complicated the
forecasting," said Michael W.
Sparks of Florida Citrus Mu-
tual. "This should put us closer
to the final season number, but
the crop estimate is an ongoing
process."
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
This entire increase is due to
an uptick in early and midsea-
son varieties which grew by
four million to 70 million, while
the projection for valencias
remained at 72 million boxes
this season.
For Florida specialty fruit,
the USDA's tangelo estimate
increased by 100,000 boxes to
1.1 million boxes, while the
tangerine forecast held steady at
4.4 million.
The USDA estimate for
grapefruit remained unchanged
at 19.6 million boxes.
The all-variety yield for
frozen concentrated orange
juice remained at 1.57 gallons
per 90-pound box. The valen-
cia yield dropped to 1.62 from
1.64 per box.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9 billion annual eco-
nomic impact, employing near-
ly 76,000 people, and covering
about 560,000 acres.




A Safe Place

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119

End The Abuse!
tfc-dh



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY
CASE NO. 252011 CP000024
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERNARD H. CHAPMAN,
also known as BERNARD
CHAPMAN, deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of BERNARD H.
CHAPMAN, also known as
BERNARD CHAPMAN, deceased,
whose date of death was
February 13, 2011, and whose
social security number is xxx-xx-
xxxx, is pending In the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873-1749.
The name and address of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's Attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other per persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against the dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is 03/31/11.
Personal Representative:
DALE OSBORN
1085 Ridge Road
Horseheads, NY 14845


Attorney for Personal -
Representative:
John W. H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (866) 591-1658
Florida Bar Number: 0650137
3:31;4:7c


Greetings from Fort Creen!
People don't like to talk
about the weather and probably
don't care to read about it
either, but this is the most beau-
tiful time of the year. The pollen
is bad, but it is cool enough you
do not need air and warm
enough you do not need heat! I
guess it is one of the cheaper
times of the year, considering
the a/c!
Our sincere sympathy is ex-
tended to the family of Dorothy
Knight. She made her final
journey last Friday morning.
Dot was ready and enjoyed her
last few months on this earth.
She nearly lived the entire six
months the doctors had advised
she would, and was not bedrid-
den except the last couple of
weeks. I got to know Dot when
she and I worked at First Fed-
eral. Back then, Kay and Buell
worked' together selling those
cars!
I saw Britany Frey at Wal-
Mart last week and she told me
she had surgery and was still
sore but feeling better. I knew
she was having problems but
did not know she had the sur-
gery. Thanks to the Lord for her
speedy recovery.
Betty Ruth Walker was not
feeling well enough to make it
to church last Sunday. Chrysta
said she called her when she did
not show up and Betty said she
was just too tired to come to
church. She has had a busy cou-
ple of weeks. Please continue to
pray for her.
Mrs. Mildred was able to at-
tend church but her daughter,
Gwen, is not feeling well. Her
blood pressure medicine has
been changed and sometimes it
is hard for our bodies to adjust.
Essie Deer's brother, John
Foskey, is not doing well. Essie
said he is her last immediate
family member but has enjoyed
a good life. He is 83 years
young. Sherry Smith is still
under the weather. Please pray
for all of these.
Betty Carlton, a former
neighbor in Fort Green, is in
Hardee Manor. She and I
worked at the hospital together


when it was known as Hardee
Memorial! Quite a few of Fort
Green's finest are in Hardee
Manor: Lillian Moye, Bim
Davis, Harriet Hendry and Mrs.
Hughes, the mother of Donald
Samuels. Stop in and visit them.
Now on a happier note:
Randy and Faye Davis enjoyed
the weekend by taking a trip to
Orlando to celebrate their wed-
ding anniversary. Norma and
Edith kept the home fires burn-
ing while they had a little time
to themselves! Evelyn and
Wayne, a couple which come to
church, have moved back to
their summer home. During the
cold months they live in Estelle
Albritton's homeplace. They
are a nice couple and their
names are easy to remember
because one of my dear friends
is Evelyn Thomas, who was
married to Wayne Thomas. Of
course he has made his final
journey and she has a different
last name, but the original ones
sorta stick with you.
Carol and Johnny Brown had
a good trip to DeFuniak and
then on up to Tennessee to visit
another son. Johnny preached
a revival in DeFuniak before
going further.
Kasie Powell told me she
enjoyed going to the beach dur-
ing spring break. She did not
get sunburned but K-Lynn did.
Elizabeth said the water was
still too cold for us natives to
enjoy!
Byron Allison sang a pretty
song Sunday morning, "Drink-
ing from my Saucer." This
might not be the correct title but
the song tells a story. Betty
Abbott was not in attendance
but she sure loves to hear Byron
sing this song.
Bethany Baptist Church had a
chili cookoff last Saturday night
and afterward Gulf State Quar-
tet sang. They also had a silent
auction, all to make money for
their youth. John and Essie
Deer, Tom and Sharon Lynn,
Earl and Mary Bargeron, Sam
and Arden Rawls, Evelyn Dur-
rance, Brother Steve and Tara
McGaughey and Sherman and I
enjoyed the chili and the


singing.
I bought two things at the-
silent auction that I needed like
I need another hole in my head!
But then, it was for the youth!
Evelyn Durrance doesn't
drive anymore at night and
came with Sam and Arden.
She always looks pretty and it is
a pleasure to visit with her.
Pray for our nation, the mil-
itary and one another.
Most lipstick contains fish
scales!

Don't worry that children
never listen to you; worry
that they are always watch-
ing you.
-Robert Fulghum

What counts in a happy
marriage is not so much
how compatible you are,
but how you deal with
incompatibility.
-Leo Tolstoy




II


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


Lady-Bee

Precious

Loving

Faithful

Protector

Watchdog
owner
Verna Whitfield
Bowling Green
3:31c


sara blaine
0@00**000


Brought to you by ...


r)ege4










March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Oasis RV News
By Georgianna Mills

AROUND THE PARK BINGO
We were sorry to see many Yes, that favorite among
head North these past few many. The anticipation of wait-
weeks. Brrrrrr. is all I can say, ing for someone to yell BIN-
it is still to cold for the most of GO! This past week saw Carl
us. Dreyer win the 50/50, and Jane
Just know they will wonder Barrett winning the jackpot.
why, they left so early in the Tuesday, saw Connie Akelian
season. For already they have winning the 50/50 and Sandy
had snow when they got home. Lipgens winning the jackpot.
Several merchant certificates
BIRTHDAYS were given out as well.
Those celebrating their birth-
days in March were Fred Lewis, PO KENO
Floyd Roberts, Dave Mills, The numbers have dwindled
Allen Blodgett, Joe Brisson, :for the pokeno players, but they
) Forrest Grooms and Jim 'still keep the game going.
Walton. We celebrated with Monday, March 21st, there
cake and ice cream. The cakes ;were only four playing with Pat
were rhade by Georgianna Stacy bagging more pennies
Mills, Patty Lewis, Carol Yaw, !than she knew what to do with.
and Shirley Kruys. We had 45 The players like it when they
in attendance. each go home with as many




IA.


COURTESY PHOTOS
There was a good turn-out for the shuffleboard tourna-
ment.


usiasm was high for the horseshoe tournament.


pennies as they started with and
that happens every once in a
while.

HORSESHOES
Or horseshoe tournament was
quite a success this year. Bill
Lockwood headed up our 5th
horseshoe tournament with
seven teams. The players were,
George Semler, Menno Eel-
kerma, Jerry Riggs, Don Philps,
Mike Yaw, Ed Souligne, Wayne
Barnes, Jack Moore, Bob
Stewart, Stanley Sommers,
Charles West, Charlie Witham,
Jim Pohorzynski and Harold
Lake.
Jack Moore threw 19 ringers,
while Jim Pohorznski threw
four double ringers.
Trophies were given out by
manager, Bob Christie. Third
place went to, George Semler
and Harold Lake, 111 points.
Second Place went to, Jack
Moore and Bob Stewart, 130


points. First place went to,
Charles West and Charlie
Witham,135 points.
Congratulations guys.
Thanks goes out to the score
keepers, Mary Marr and Dave
MIlls. After the games were
played, a luncheon was pre-
pared by the ladies of the park,
headed tip by Audrey Semler.


Our next game on March 18,
we had 12 shufflers, with a
three way tie for the win.
Now everybody is happy:
especially Grover Wethington,
as he was playing with his wife
as his partner, Velma Wething-
ton. She made him happy that
day. Nancy Pennie and Ray
Mnnre Ed Moore and Joe


Thanks to all who prepared : Bisson were all sharing the hon-
food. Delicious! .ors of winning.

SHUFFLEBOARD I want to thank Audrey
Our first shuffleboard tourna-. Semler, who has been providing
ment was held with 18 players.; the names and activities here at
Joe Brisson, Mike and Carol
Yaw, Glenn Barrett, Velma and


Grover Wethington, Jerry
Kruys, Ray and Josephine
Moore, Winnie Dewitt, Connie
and Trent Swanson, Nancy
Pennie, Jim Pohorzynski, Stan
Sommers, Jeff Riggs, Les and
Ann Day. And the Winners
were: Mike Yaw and Jerry
Kruys. Congratulations.


Letter To The Editor

Suicide Is Not The

Answer To Problems


Dear Editor,
There have been two suicides
in the news recently.
I feel very badly for their
families. The trouble with both
of them is they wanted to leave
a message to those who hurt
them. The trouble is these two
guys who died are the ones that
suffered.
These two guys, in their 40s;
and 50s, thought they would get
out of their legal problems, and
one wanted to get revenge for'
having-' an out-of-state school
board fire his wife in 2008.
Well, this is not the way to
live or die. A lot of people in
our society do not know one
thing about God or Judgement
Day. They have a higher judge
to answer to than to a day in
court.
Some of these people who
commit suicide are busy taking
care of themselves, going to the
doctor, eating right, and in a
moment of rash decision choose
to end their lives.
It seems a total waste to live a
normal life and in an instant all
the work they put into caring
for themselves is gone. They


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seem to want to escape from the
!problems in this life whereas
they do not think one bit of the
hereafter.
This is very disconcerting
and a total shame.
Sincerely,
Connie Rowe
Wauchula


the Oasis RV Park.

CHURCH
Our church service had 33 in
attendance Sunday. Music was
provided by Nancy and Will,
Pennie, Lew Mothersbraugh,
Les Day. Rev. Trent Swanson I
had open discussion and the-
questions that came up were
ones that you wonder about
and were glad to get some clar-
ification on.
Thanks Rev. Swanson.
Till we meet again may God's
Blessings be with you.


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-Use of the Agri-Civic Center as emergency shelter, Rich
Shepard, 8:35 a.m.
--Change order on water/sewer services in Wauchula Hills,
Park Winter, 8:50 a.m.
-Update on Legislative Day, Chairman Terry Atchley, 9:05.
a.m.


-Water conservation grant, Janet Gilliard, 10 a.m..


This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.

Of all crops planted annually in the U.S., cotton has the
longest growing season. Its growing season lasts from
150 to 180 days.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the Town Commission of Zolfo Springs, Florida will hold a
Public Hearing on Monday, April 18, 2011, 6:00 PM as the proposed Ordinance can be
heard. Following the Public Hearing, the second and final reading of Proposed Ordinance
2011-02 describe below only by Title. It can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town
Clerk, Town Hall, Zolfo Springs, Florida during regular business hours. All interested par-
ties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.'

ORDINANCE 2011-02

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA,
TO REZONE THE PARCEL OWNED BY TRIPLE M EQUIPMENT, INC., WITH
THE ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL HIGHWAY (C-H) TO
COMMERCIAL SERVICE (C-S); PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
: VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to.
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is
made and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per
Florida Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts. Any person
with a disability requiring reasonable accommopjption,ijg9rder;to participate in this meet-
ing should contact the Town Clerk's Office with their request at Telephone (863) 735-0405,
Fax (863) 735-1684.


Attest: June Albritton
Town Clerk


Attest: June Albritton
Town Clerk


Attest: June Albritton
Town Clerk


George Neel, Mayor


George Neel, Mayor
3:31c


George Neel, Mayor
3:31c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the Town Commission of Zolfo Springs, Florida will hold a
Public Hearing on Monday, April 18, 2011, 6:00 PM as the proposed Ordinance can be
heard. Following the Public Hearing, the second and final reading of Proposed Ordinance
2011-03 describe below only by Title. It can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town
Clerk, Town Hall, Zolfo Springs, Florida during regular business hours. All interested par-
ties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.

ORDINANCE 2011-03

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, SAID AMENDMENT BEING KNOWN
AS "AMENDMENT #CPA 2011-1 "; SPECIFICALLY, TO CHANGE THE FUTURE
LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF THE TRIPLE M EQUIPMENT PROPERTY
FROM LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL TO COMMERCIAL; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is
made and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per
Florida Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts. Any person
with a disability requiring reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this meet-
ing should contact the Town Clerk's Office with their request at Telephone (863) 735-0405,
Fax (863) 735-1684.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the Town Commission of Zolfo Springs, Florida will hold a
Public Hearing on Monday, April 18, 2011, 6:00 PM as the proposed Ordinance can be
heard. Following the Public Hearing, the second and final reading of Proposed Ordinance
2011-04 describe below only by Title. It can be read in its entirety in the office of the Town
Clerk, Town Hall, Zolfo Springs, Florida during regular business hours. All interested par-
ties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.

ORDINANCE 2011-04

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA,
TO REZONE THE PARCELS OWNED BY TRIPLE M EQUIPMENT, INC., WITH
THE ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL (R-1A) TO
COMMERCIAL SERVICE (C-S); PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is
made and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per
Florida Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts. Any person
with a disability requiring reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this meet-
ing should contact the Town Clerk's Office with their request at Telephone (863) 735-0405,
Fax (863) 735-1684.


I








6B The Herald-Advocate, March 31, 2011


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted


Miscellaneous Yard Sales



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JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.iimseerealty.com


mI James V. See, Jr., Broker *
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED to $205,000!
5 acres. Completely fenced and in the country!
Perfect building site. REDUCED to $20,000!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath block home on 2+ acres. Close
to town. Asking $169,500.
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors under carpet in bedrooms.
Central air/heat. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000
5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great place for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72,500
Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000


S Ben Gibson
hIg Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


James V. See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Classifieds


Automotiv


IHelpWaSt


I o u Ie O


-35 ROLLS HERMOTHIS HAY $25 -93 DODGE DYNASTY $800 OBO-EXPERIENCED DREDGE help -3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.:--
a roll, make offer for all, delivery 245-6948, runs good. 3:31dh needed. Local and out of town. Hollandtown Road. $190,000.
available. 245-1903. 3:24-4:21p 1999 MERCURY GRAND MAR- MISHA training a plus. 813-634- 863-24-9582. 10:14-5:
NEED YOUR HELPI Young cattle- QUIS excellent condition, power, 2517. EOE DFW 3:31p
man needing 10+ acres pasture leather, low mileage, 20 mpg, BILINGUAL SITE MANAGER for a L o Fu
to graze cattle for your ag exemp- $5,000. Swamp buggy $4,000. 57 unit affordable rental commu- I
tons. Will maintain fences/bush 781-1639. 3:24,31p nity. Must be computer literate. FOUND @ Bowling Green Post:
hog when necessary. 863-494- Experience in light bookkeeping Office, Nextel phone. Call to
5991. 3:17-4:14p and basic office equipment bene- claim, must give description 773-1
DIESEL INJECTION repairs, ficial, along with any property 3255. 3:31dh
pumps, turbo, injectors, can management experience. Send
remove and install. 863-381-0538. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT resume to: The Palms, P.O. Box
1:27;8:18p Non-proflt organization seeking 10293, Clearwater, FL 33757 Fax
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing dedicated, responsible team pro- (727) 447-2252 or Email: .
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season fessional to assist In providing bachwartz@southwlnd.us.com. NASCAR MAGAZINES from 19941



CASH..._____.. a SOMEONE to stay with elderly- $2500 (originally $8,000), 42
CASH NOW! Crooms Used Cars lady, 832-0891. 3:31 3/2 CHAMBERLIN BLVD., Wau. bulbs, 3 high pressure facial tan-
and Salvage picks up your junk chula. $30,000 OBO 863-773- ners, 781-2237, leave message.
cars and pays top dollar. Call to .. - -_ 6169. 3:2431P 3:24.31c
dl~nun- any tvoe of vehicle. 863- l~-7!4-' l I 2BR. 2 BATH. New carpet & aid- U.MRILITY SCOTIER Go-fGno Fit i


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found


Rick Knight


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


cl3:31c


U.--~~~--~- =


Ing, large living room, enclosed
laundry room $68,000. 773-5054.
3:3tfc


,..iOw J I..... WW . I U ." .. ....W
model, never been used, will
deliver & set-up $900. 941-757-!-
9049. 3:3-31p


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines


I F...... I ..vi .e. l .....
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Inured


"No jobs t big.."


RgM.#4=U


S5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager


L A M B ER Bus. (863) 77
Fax: (863) 77
L REALTY INC. www.Iambertre
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool- SPACIOUS 4B/3BT
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed kitchen, living room
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000 garage, spacious yar
$165,000
ESTATE HOME in Wauchula; 4B/2Bth, Make this 3B/2Bth I
screened front porch, carport. OWNER WILL tile and carpet floors
FINANCE FOR QUALIFIED BUYER! Call cious bedrooms, lo1
Delois for more information. $68,900 hood. $115,000
STORAGE UNITS 30 units in excellent con- 16.5 Acres with 3B/2
edition; very good rate of occupancy. Call Delois. wells on this beautify
$55,600 ,: large oaks. $195,000
2B/1Bth M/H with n
M'TdE-IN READY updated C/B home, porch; completely fu
3B/1.5Bth, almost new A/C and roof. Listed at
$115,000 5 Acres with large
secluded. $40,000
f SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON


DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


773-9743


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LISTING!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home
with central heat & air, stove, refrigerator,
one car garage, wood, tile flooring, in a well
kept neighborhood and close to Peace River
and park nearby. $137,900
NEW LISTING!! Nice residential lot in well
kept neighborhood. Priced @ $11.900
THE BLUFFS!! Retirement Community! 1
Bedroom, 2 Bath Mobile Home & Lot, central
H/A, one car carport, golf cart too, relax in
the family room or use it as a second bed-
room. This home is totally Inove-in ready
and waiting for you. Only $53,000.
NEW LISTING!! Charming two story home
with 5 Bedrooms, 1.5 Bathrooms, close to
shopping and schools, wood floors and
large carport and workshop. $75.000
PRICED (@ $119,900!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB
home with central heat/air, located within
City of Wauchula. Call today!
ESCAPE!! To the quiet living in this 3 bed-
room, 2 bath double wide mobile home and
5 Acres. Only $92.900.
REDUCED!!! $82,500 2B / 2B Home with
central heat and air, one car garage, appli-
ances, work-shop and storage area, extra lot
included, all in quite neighborhood and
close to shopping and schools.
$72.500 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home with cen-
tral heat and air, private well, utility shed,
and more that sits on 2.4 Acres.
DOUBLE LOT!! Nice 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home in City-Zolfo, close to elementary
school and Priced S $34.900
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties. c13:31c


KENNETH
ASSOCIATES


73-0007
73-0038
ealty.net


Dons LamDen
H, CB/Stucco home; large
with w/b fireplace, double
Ad for outside entertaining.

house your home! Ceramic
s, large eat- in kitchen, spa-
cated in family neighbof-

!Bth M/H built; a total of 5
ul property surrounded by

iceyard and large screened
rushed. $38,000
oaks and open field; very


A. LAMBERT, Broker 5
. .


STEVE JOHNSON


- JL.


702 SOUTH th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Victor Salazar
245-1054


NEW LISTING! Lakefront property on Lake
Jackson. This 3 bedroom, 3 bath home has
carport, detached garage, large Family room
and two screened porches. 90 Feet of
Lakefront with Dock. $199.900
JUST REDUCED!! WASI $38.000 -
NOW!!-$34,500!! 2 BR, 2 Bath-Mobile
home in Good condition, w/ central heat and
air, partially furnished, 10X23 screened
porch, 2 car Carport, all with Insulated roofs,
2 outdoor sheds for workroom and storage,
all sitting on a 100 x 110 size lot. NICE AREA
and must see to appreciate. Call Nancy -
863-832-0370.
NEW LISTING!! 1 bedroom, 1 bath Mobile
Home / Owned Land. Central heat and air,
screened porch, MH has skirting all around,
appliances, utility shed, much more. Adults
Over 50 Only. $75,000
$69,900 Older Home with Charm. Loft can be
used for 2nd Bedroom, Small Studio with
bathroom located in back. Large back yard.
NEW LISTING!! Residential Mobile Home Lot
located in a nice, clean retirement Mobile
Home Park. Priced () $30.000
BRING YOUR ICE TEA!! Prop up your feet
and enjoy nature at it's finest In this 4
Bedroom, 2 Bath Double Wide Mobile Home
located on 4.81 acres. Priced 0$110.000.
REDUCED!! $139.900 3 B/2 Bth CB home
built in 2007 has central heat/air stoye,
refrigerator, two car garage, and much more.
Call today!!!
REDUCED!! $79.90011 SEBRINGI! Nice 2
Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home with central
Heat/air, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer/
dryer, screened rear porch, view of golf
course, one car carport.


The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
JDEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


781-3767. 3:3tfc


2000 FORD
VIN: 1FAFP52U1YA146275
2008 HD
VIN: 1HD1FC4168Y709101 1
8:00 A.M. APRIL11, 2011 1
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL

DESOTO COUNTY




OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 '
50%--FF


Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot .
863-382-0600


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397


Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


I


New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!


'PLANT UITY HOUSING uc
FEATURING NEW & USED

JACOBSEN MOBILE HOMES






Beautiful Homes At Great Prices

Located Rt. 60 & 39, Plant City

BUT DiFINATLY WoRTH THE DRIVE

813-650-8100
cl3:31 c


REDUCED! Spacious home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. $379,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000
Price Reduction! 15 acres located West of
Wauchula on Vandolah Rd. Beautiful building
sites with small creek meandering across proper-
ty & it's across from the Wauchula Airport
entrance. $150,000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.


I


I Agriclture


I loi- a


C I


, ,,


I


II


781-0518


a







March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


. I go

2 LOTS, BOWLING GREEN
Ctnetery, 334-585-0059.
3:17-4:7p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
send scrap gold in the mall. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
1:6tfc



2 BR, 2,B DWMH, Sebring Village
Adult Park or Spanish Village
Adult Park, Leesburg. 781-1639.
3:24,31 p


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Wayne
Baucom, Elena Villarreal, Brianna
Owens, Lynn Roberts, Sherry
Patton, Debra Morris, Lori Molina,
Estella Villarreal, Don Hunt,
Barbara Rupert, Katrina Daniels
will be sold by warehouseman's
lien at B&J Self-Storage, 667
South 5th Ave. In Wauchula, FL at
11:00 am April 18, 2011. 3:31;4:7p
PERSONAL PROPERTY of John
Thompkins, Chiquita Robinson,
Steve Malone, Angel Zamarripe,
Clans Elmeas, Labor Gunn, D.W.
Tatis, Arron Lanier, Felix
Hernandez, Wally Gray will be
sold by warehouseman's lien at
Bowling Green Storage 5018
North Hwy. 17, Bowling Green,
Florida, April 18, 2011 at 9:00 am.
3:31-4:7



FEMALE CHIHUAHUA, 2 mons.
old, light brown, $125, 407-929-
6491. 3:31;4:7c
ATTENTION State Statutes
,828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


FREE TO GOOD HOME 1 1/2 year
old German Shepard. 863-245-
1250. 3:31nc
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh



FLORIDA SWEET & STRAWBER-
RY sweet onions, 10 Ibs. for $3,
20 Ibs. for $5. Available now, open
every day. 7:30-6:00, 2949 Center
Hill Road, Bowling Green, (Hwy
62, 4.5 miles west of US 17, 863-
223-5561. 3:31 p



AVION PALMS RV Lot park model
ready, landscaped, sprinklers,
shed, water softener, $35,500.
330-631-1186 or 330-631-8202.
3:31-4:28p



2 BR 2 BATH, Large living room,
kitchen, dinette, $650 month,
security deposit required. 773-
5054. Water softener required.
3:3tfc


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo. up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habia espanol 863-698-4910 or
698-4908. 8:20tfc


4/3 3 ACRES on Cracker Lane
$900 month plus Insurance. Rent
to own possible, owner financing
available 863-781-7881.
3:31-4:28p
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT R.
Kazen Road $400 monthly, $200
deposit. No pets. 417-867-3234.
3:31c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations?
1996 Ford-4D Id. 1FALP52U3TA241030
Contact Linda or Shannon for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Friday April 1, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. at the Wauchula
State Bank parking lot located at 106 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL. c13:24,31c








863-397-9840
354 Bostick Road Bowling Green. FL
. .- "
".. " ---e, -




www.gatorheatingandair.com
Gator Heating-Air-Mold Inspections LLC
f tWfM t~~tH^ M i


DUPLEX IN ZOLFO SPRINGS,
close to school, 4 BR, 2 BA first
and last months rent $700/month,
plus security deposit. Call (863)
781-4529 for Info. 3:31tfc
APARTMENTS for rent 773-6667.
3:31c
NICE CLEAN 2 BR 1 bath house.
Central AC/Heat, new carpet and
a walk-in closet, washer & dryer
hook-up. $150 per week or $600
per month, damage deposit and
reference required. 773-9793 or
863-832-0676. 3:24,31 p
- TWO BEDROOM APT. No pets.
$550 plus deposit. 832-1984.
3:3-31 p
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on. race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or.
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh
-

OFFICE FOR RENT-close to
courthouse and city center, plenty
of parking. Call 773-4800 for
Information or to view property.
3:17-4:7c



VICKER'S LAWN CARE. Free esti-
mates. No job to big/small. 863-
448-7491. 3:31-5:1 p


I YrE--s


Services

I WILL SIT with your loved ones
anytime, 773-2267. 3:24,31p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY--
MOUS meeting In Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders Is the facilitatory.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with,
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
. lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh


NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


863-773-3573

Fax 863-773-0521 108 Carlton Street
desotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchula, FL 33873 1




Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAROL














S China e Quality Merchandise Op
S Here!l Behind Heaven Sents )[N



0n2-4 Sa.m4p 73e-34 *2sslton Sreae










Heaven sent Cleaning service

Now offered by Sherry White Ministries
Carports Garages Homes* CryLawns
.Chinai Qualigty Merchandise Q AlO"'








Comrca &-Resientia Cllfo stiae


773-0523 *


245-1184


? THE PALMS

( Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through February 28t1
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.

Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
fS= (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 /L
E-:.-. Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c3:10-31 c


HARDEE RESIDENT looking for SAT. 8-1, 1194 Dansby Rd.,
part-time employment, flexible Furniture, household, clothing.
hours and reasonable rates. Moving Sale. 3:31p
Please call 941-716-1411. SAT. 8-4. 3040 Lawndale Drive,
3:31 p ZS. Furniture, fitness machines, __
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION dolls, dehumidifiers, over the
additions, screen rooms, car- stove microwave and more. 3:31p
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo- FRIDAY, 8-?, 539 Terrell Road,
sures, rescreening, decks, con- spring cleaning sale, Playsta-
crete. Harold Howze Construction tlon3, collectible, children's &
735-1158. RR0050181.3:17-5:19p women's clothes, household


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate'
your generous support. 863-773-:
9777. 12:16tfc
GAS COOK STOVE, king size pil-
low top beds, lots of good cloth-
Ing for 25. Edna's Place. 3:31 c
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.-
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-'
3069. 3:24tfc
THURSDAY & FRIDAY 7-12 2324
Gebhart Rd. off of 62. 3:31 p
FRIDAY, SAT., 8-2, 709 Oak
Forrest Drive. Multi family. 3:31 p


SAT. MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE.
Men's, women's and children's
clothing, household items, x-
mass decorations and more. 210
S. 8th Ave., Wauchula. 3:31p
3644 PEEPLES LANE go east on
64, turn right on Hollandtown
Road, left on Peoples Lane king
size mattress, sheets, dishes,
women's & men's clothes, house-
hold goods & misc. 8:30-?
Saturday. Cancelled with rain.
3:31 p


. FRIDAY ONLY 8-? 189 Myrtle
^ Drive (just south of North
Wauchula Elem.) Baby bed with
L mattress, comforter set, Easter
clothes. 6 in 1 air hockey/pool
table, Playstation game system &
I games. 3:31p


GARAGE SALE Sat 7-12. Clothes,
furniture, etc. 1027 Griffin Road.
3:31p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8am-? 2680
Merle Langford Rd., Zolfo. 3:31 p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8:30-? 210 E.
County Line Rd. & Willow Ave.
Moving Sale. 3:31p
SAT ONLY Multi family yard sale.
834 Redding St., Zolfo Springs.
3:31 p


Items, great prices. 3:31p
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, 8am-
3pm, Friday 8am-Noon, St.
Michael Catholic Church Parish
Hall, 408 Heard Bridge Rd. 3:31p
LIQUIDATION SALE Friday,
Saturday, 310 North Florida Ave.,.
Wauchula, park In rear. All new
baker's rack, wooden shelves,
marble tables, apple cabinets,
benches, clothes, lamps, canis-
ters, John Deere, Mary Moo Moo,
Precious Moments, Coca Cola,
Nascar and Disney collectable.
Fishing equipment, knives, rugs,
blankets, pillows, sheet sets,
hats, T-shirts, purses, book bags,:
kids swimming pools, tents, toys,
large beach umbrellas, lawn orna-
ments, angel waterfalls, cast Iron
bells, cows, pigs, roosters,
angels, gators, ABC Items and
much, much more. Everything
must gol 3:31p


FRIDAY & SAT. homemade
swingsets, swings, furniture,
clothes, 208 Park Drive,
Riverview. 3:31 p


Confidence is the hinge on
the door to success.
-Mary O'Hare Dumas

If you don't think every day
is a good day, just try miss-
ing one.
-Cavett Robert

Don't rule out working with
your hands. It does not
preclude using your head.
-Andy Rooney

Clever people are always
the best conversations lex-
icon.
-Johann Wolfgang von
Goethe


*

Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Haidicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
S Monday Friday 9
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
OUAL DOUN Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider c13:10-31







Joe Lm'is


I N.C.


Karen O'Neal
(863)781-7633


R EA
m


L T 0 R 8
(863) 773-2128


L* I REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.


5 lots in Wauchula w/over 975'
total rd frontage. Close to hospi-
tal, schools & shopping. Will
divide or all for $95,000!
3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new carpet & lami-
nate, partial fencing, new A/C
unit. $68,000!
25+ ac fenced pasture, Green-
belt qualified, on US Hwy 17 S
w/well, septic & electric.
$192,900!
One acre wooded building site
near high school. $27,500!
Goodbye, traffic...Hello, peace
& quiet! 20 ac fenced pasture
w/pond, 288SF cabin, 4" well
inside 60SF shed. NOW
$160,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!
12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!


PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
home on 4 lots w/bebutiful oaks,
fenced in backyard. Close to
schools. $75,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Looking
for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
septic!
Wooded wonder! 5 ac w/beau-
tiful trees, paved road. $50,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Two beau-
tiful building lots in Zolfo zoned
R-1A, each 155'x110'. City
water available, septic
allowed. $7,000 each!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
farmland w/well, pump, fencing
on private road. $75,000!
Lovingly maintained/updated
4BR/2.5BA brick home in
Knollwood w/updated kitchen,
fireplace, back patio! $218,000!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFIER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS- 71-0153 SANDY LARRISON.... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL. 781-7633 MONICA REAS....781-088
DAVID ROYAL.........781-3490
]HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 cl33tc


De oto Appliance

a Repair
Established Since 1987
SALES SERVICE


I Services


I







8B The Herald-Advocate, March 31. 2011


-The




Wauchula Watch
By Ofc. Amy Drake
Wauchula Police Department


REPORT SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY!
What is suspicious activity?
Suspicious activity is any event which seems out of the ordi-
nary, or any activity you feel should not be occurring.
Knowing your community and its habits will make it easier for
you to recognize and report suspicious activity. You know better
than anyone else (including the police) what is normal for your
business or neighborhood.
Unfortunately, it is difficult for many residents to call the
police based on feelings, instinct or intuition;
Residents' instincts generally "kick in" when they observe
something unusual, but it may be difficult for them to explain. The
inability to clearly express or articulate what is suspicious or
unusual is the reason many people will not call the police.
Residents must realize they are rarely going to see an entire
crime committed from start to finish. Instead, they should look for
clues that would be consistent with criminal activity. Body lan-
guage and mannerisms combined with the environment can com-
municate suspicious or criminal behavior.
Residents should not suppress their instincts or intuition
because they cannot articulate or describe an actual crime to the
police.
When there is a communication gap between residents and the
police, criminals have a much easier time working their chosen
profession. By working together, and sharing timely information,
residents and police officers can disrupt the plans of criminals and
aid in their apprehension.
No law enforcement agency can function effectively without
the assistance of responsible residents. Law enforcement asks that
you stay vigilant of people or events in your community that appear
suspicious. By reporting suspicious activities, a resident may pre-
vent a traumatic event or help police arrest a criminal.
Residents should report suspicious activity and avoid the ten-
dency to ignore or disregard their instinctive feelings. Don't worry
about "bothering" the police, and don't worry about being embar-
rassed if your suspicions prove unfounded.
The most important thing you can do is call the police to report
a crime or suspicious activity. You have to be the eyes of your
neighborhood, and remember you can always remain a pair of
anonymous eyes!

Toucans are found only in tropical areas of Central and
South America. Some toucan species have bills more
than half as long as their bodies.


Calvin McLeod's


4-C ConstructioILC


Free
Estimates


Licensed & Insured
CBC1256749


Realtor
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


Remodels

Additions

David Cole ;
863-214-1471


John D. Freeman
(863) 781-4084


NEW LISTING


WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA Frame home with central
air & heat. Close to schools and hospital fresh paint -
new carpet. Move-in ready at $85,000
NEW LISTING IN BOWLING GREEN 2BR/2BA 1986 MH on
1+/- acres 924 living sq ft Offered at $47,500
FORECLOSURE IN WAUCHULA HILLS 3BR/2BA CB home
with central air & heat, 1388 total sq ft, and built in 2007. Offered
at $80,000
FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY Price Reduced on this 2BR/1BA
MH on 20 +/- acres with easy access to Wauchula, Zolfo Spring &
Avon Park. Property includes fencing, sheds and horse stalls.
Motivated seller is offering this property for $175,000 for a limited
time only,
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
| Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours -
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 c13:24c
I I


Classifieds


Americans Turning A

Blind Eye To Vision Loss


More than two thirds of
Americans aged 55 or older
have had an eye exam in the last
year to maintain their vision,
yet 80 percent do not know that
age-related macular degenera-
- tion, or AMD, is a leading cause
of vision loss in people over 60,
according to a new national sur-
vey. The survey, conducted by
Opinion Research Corporation,
found that only 46 percent of
the 1,169 respondents could
correctly identify the risk fac-
tors for this serious, progressive
eye disease and just half could
identify any one symptom. Of
the 24 percent who are familiar
with AMD, only 31 percent
were aware that treatment
options exist for the disease.
AMD occurs when the macu-
la-the central portion of the reti-
na that is important for reading
and color vision-becomes dam-
aged. There are two forms of
AMD-wet and dry. All cases
begin as the dry form, but 10
percent to 15 percent progress
to the more serious wet form,
which can result in sudden and
severe central vision loss.
Without treatment, central
vision can be lost over time,
leaving only peripheral, or side,
vision.
In its early stages, AMD may
not cause any noticeable symp-
toms. As the disease advances,
symptoms may occur in one eye
or both, and can include blurred
vision, difficulty reading or rec-
ognizing faces, blind spots
developing in the middle of the
field of vision, colors becoming
hard to distinguish and distor-
tion causing edges or lines to
appear wavy, according to
research by the AMD Alliance





Prisons

To Ban

Smoking

To reduce health-care costs
and to make prisons safer, all
Florida Department of Correc-
tions facilities will be tobacco-
free in six months.
Smoking bans have long
been in place in Florida's pub-
lic buildings and offices, over
half of the nation's state prisons
already have similar bans, and
the federal prison system has
banned smoking on prison
grounds.
"Inmate smoking and sec-
ondhand smoke is costing mil-
lions in health-care costs each
year," said Florida Department
of Corrections Secretary Edwin
Buss. "Eliminating smoking is
a win for taxpayers, but it's also
a win for employees and in-
mates, making our facilities
healthier places to work and
live in, and making them a lit-
tle safer too."
In the past year, inmates hos-
pitalized for tobacco-related ill-
nesses have cost Florida tax-
payers nearly $9 million.
Snuffing out cigarettes will
also result in cleaner prisons
and, by removing lighters,
reduce the chance of arson.
The DOC is giving 180 days'
notice to inmates, and will offer
smoking cessation assistance
to inmates requesting help.
Designated smoking areas
will be set up for employees
outside the prison fence.


The
Conse
passed
hunting
wildli
The
turkey
aged
adequ
and
quota
78 are


FWC Adds 2012

)uth Turkey Hunts
Florida Fish & Wildlife Chairman Rodney Barreto.
-rvation Commission has "The more our youth experi-
d a new rule that affects ence wildlife and nature, the
ig on many of the state's more likely they are to grow up
fe management areas. to appreciate these resources
rule establishes youth and to pass along outdoor tradi-
y hunts on 78 FWC-man- tions to future generations."
areas, all of which support These hunts will be available
[ate turkey populations, for youths younger than 16
creates a youth turkey years old who are supervised by
permit. Forty-nine of the and in the presence of an adult,
eas will require a youth but only the youth will be


and the University of Michigan
Kellogg Eye Center.
If a person develops any of
these symptoms, an eye exam is
crucial and early diagnosis and
treatment is essential to help
avoid severe vision loss. A reti-
na specialist should be consult-
ed if there is a diagnosis of wet
AMD, to ensure the most
appropriate care.
Approximately 15 million
people in the United States have
AMD, and more than 1.7 mil-
lion Americans have the ad-
vanced form of the disease.
About 200,000 new cases of
wet AMD are diagnosed each,
year in North America. Due to
the aging baby boomer popula-
tion, the National Eye Institute
estimates that the prevalence of
advanced AMD will grow to
nearly 3 million by 2020.
The greatest risk factor for
AMD is age. Other risk factors
include gender (women tend to
be at greater risk), race (Cau-
casians are more likely to lose
vision from AMD) and family
history. Living a healthy life-
style can help reduce the risk of
developing AMD. Several risk
factors can be managed with
your healthcare provider's help,
including obesity and smoking.
Eighty percent of adults are
not aware that age-related mac-
ular degeneration, or AMD, is
one of the leading causes of
vision loss in people over 60.
Early diagnosis of AMD can
help preserve vision and slow
the progression of AMD. If you
are over 60, be sure to schedule
regular eye exams.
For additional information
about AMD visit www.eyeon-
amd.org.


Roman statues were often
made with detachable
heads, so that one head
could be removed and
replaced by another.


allowed to harvest a turkey.
Adult supervisors who don't
have the required hunting
license, turkey permit and man-
agement area permit won't be
allowed to participate in the
hunt. They will be allowed to
supervise only. However, adult
supervisors who do have the
required license and permits
will be allowed to "call" and
otherwise participate in the
hunt. But only the youths are
allowed to harvest a turkey.


1 GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


-N 1


HO RS M N.- RI 830-*:0 7 7 = 4 1
STRA Y 66 s o


,SERVICE WITH A SMILE
863-233-2002
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
WEEKLY DIscoUNTs FOR
SENIORS VETERANS DISABLED PERSONS
Free Estimates Licensed and Insured


0.1
C" I


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
S773-4478




SFree Estimates

insured 30+ years experience cO:2f


Handyman

Concrete


o y

781106 ,,.


I


lFaof ForsInc.


-----~-~~~-------~


turkey quota permit, and only
those youths who will be less
than 16 years old on the last day
of the youth turkey hunt may
apply for this opportunity.
The youth turkey hunts on
these WMAs will be Saturday-
Sunday hunts and will occur the
weekend prior to the opening of
spring turkey season on each
particular WMA, beginning
with the 2012 season.
"We know the importance of
exposing young people to hunt-
ing opportunities," said FWC







March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9B


Week Ending March 27, 2011
Weather Summary: During the week of March 21 through 27,
temperatures were above average. Extremes ranged from the lower
40s to highs in the lower 90s. Daily highs were in the high 80s.
Nearly all weather stations reported no rainfall or insignificant
amounts for the week. Warm, windy weather dried out soils and
pastures. Some planting was suspended until soil moisture
improves. The need for irrigation was widespread. In St. Lucie
Coutbty, surface water supplies for irrigation were quickly being
depleted.

Field Crops: Field preparations for planting crops were on sched-
ule as producers prepared to plant corn, cotton, and peanuts. Some
field corn had emerged. Rice planting was underway in Palm
Beach County. In Miami-Dade County, producers were busy har-
vesting sweet potatoes.

*Vegetables: Vegetable production increased in volume as growers
harvested crops not affected by the winter freezes. In Hendry
County, producers started harvesting cantaloupes. In Charlotte,
Collier, Hendry, and Lee counties, there were increased quantities
harvested for tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, and other specialty
crops. Miami-Dade County reported sweet corn, squash, and toma-
toes harvest ongoing. The weekly market movement included a
light supply of endive, escarole, squash, sweet corn, and cherry
tomatoes. Other vegetable market movement included snap beans,
broccoli, cabbage, celery, radishes, and plum and grape-type toma-
toes.

Livestock and Pastures: The pasture condition Statewide was
very poor to excellent with most in fair condition. Below normal
rainfall continued to hold back pastures. Soil temperatures were
rising and green-up of summer perennial pastures was beginning.
The cattle condition was mostly fair to good, slightly lower than
the previous week. In the Panhandle area, pasture and cattle ranged
from poor to excellent condition with, most fair to good. Ryegrass
and cool season forages were beginning to suffer. Although Bahia
grass greened-up, no significant growth took place due to cool soil
conditions. Feeding of hay and supplements continued. In the
northern area, pasture and cattle ranged from poor to good condi-
tion with most in fair condition. There was an increase in the num-
ber of dry stock ponds. In the central and southwestern areas, pas-
ture condition ranged from very poor to excellent with most in fair
condition. Temperatures in the high 80s and low 90s have dried out
pastures and dropped water levels in stock ponds. The cattle ranged
from poor to excellent condition with most in fair condition.

Citrus: Lows were in the upper 40s and lower 50s with highs in
the 90s across most of the citrus area. This week, trace amounts of
precipitation were recorded by five FAWN stations. Indian River
and Kenansville reported the most, with 0.03 inch of rainfall
recorded at each station. Overall, there were moderate to severe
drought conditions in most of the citrus area according to the U.S.
drought monitor, last updated on March 22nd. Indian River,
Brevard, St. Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach, Broward, and parts of
Collier, Hendry, Glades, Highlands,' Okeechobee, Osceola, and
Orange counties experienced extreme drought conditions. Forty-
five packinghouses and 19 processors were opened, although many
had halted production until the Valencia maturity reaches desired
levels. Harvest of Valencia oranges and grapefruit continued with
the open processing plants running grapefruit and Valencia. Pea
and smaller sized fruit were visible on citrus trees throughout the
citrus area. Grove activity included mowing, hedging and topping,
brush removal, fertilizer application, and ditch cleaning.



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate



PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE
Heartland Workforce will hold committee meetings as fol-
lows: April 5: joint Business Enhancement and Career
Enhancement Committees @ 1:45pm; April 6: Youth
Development Council @ 10am; and April 7: Executive
Committee @ 9:30am. All meetings will originate at the
Heartland Workforce Administrative office, 5901 US Hwy
27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. Interested individuals should
arrive no later than 5 minutes prior to the start of the
meeting. Topics of the meeting are various. For more
information see agendas posted on the Heartland
Workforce website at www.hwib.org 3:31c



PUBLIC NOTICE
The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the local planning agency will hold a
PUBLIC HEARINGon
THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2011, 6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter in the BCC Board Room
412 West Orange St., Courthouse Annex
Room 102, Wauchula, FL
to hear and to receive public input for
Agenda No. 11-02
Hardee County Industrial Development Authority by
and through the Authorized Representative requests approval of a
Site Development Plan/Site Construction Plan
to construct a 23,000-sq-ft structure including 1,500-sq-ft for
officellab area on 8.50+/-acres zoned
CIIBC (Commercial/Industrial Business Center) in the Highway
Mixed Use Future Land Use District
On or abt the W side of Commerce Ct
S of Commerce Ln 20 33 25 0500 00001 0011
3.95+/-acres Lot 11, Hardee County Commerce Park
S20, T34S, R25E
AND 20 33 25 0500 00001 0012
4.55+1-acres Lot 12, Hardee County Commerce Park
$20, T34S, R25E
Mike S. Thompson, Chairman


Letter To The Editor

Daughter Gives Tribute

To Her Godly Mother


Dear Editor,
Precious memories .. I have
written four drafts of this tribute
to my mother, Pauline Rhoden
Albritton. I have discarded
three.
She would not want emphasis
put on her. Momma was very
quiet, until you messed with
one of her kids.
She would say "tell them to
love Jesus and go to church.
Read their Bible. Get ready so
we can be together in Heaven
when He splits the clouds of
glory. Please don't be left
behind. Love my memory at
least enough to try with all your
heart to do this."
That was her only heart's
desire ... to be reunited in
Heaven with every one of her
family and, friends.
She would say Zyndale son
and Susan my precious daugh-
ter-thanks for all you did for
me during my transition from
earth to glory. I hear your words
of love, felt your aching sad
hearts and as you have me your
everything. You suffered for me
and I am grateful and so very
proud. Be at peace.
Son Michael and precious
daughter Caroline-I know
how your hearts were broken
from circumstances you had no
control over. I am content in the
knowledge of your love for me
and how much you miss me. If
you stay true to Jesus it won't
be much longer. He is coming,
and I'll be with Him!
I can hear my Momma speak-
ing to me. Girl, tell them to
forgive each other and them-
selves. You, too! Don't let bit-
terness grow until it festers. I
love you all, my precious
babies."


ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m, on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, RO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


I have prayed and I asked my
Mom what would you want me
to say? This is what I heard in
my spirit, and my heart is at
peace.
Jesus, it's me again Lord. I
pray for your strength in this
most trying of days. Go before
me, give me your peace and joy
to stand. You have given me
one more reason to strive as
hard as I can to run this race
with courage and patience so I
can be a light to my neighbors
instead of a hindrance. Keep me
on my knees before the cross
where you bled and died. For
me I promise I will make it all
the way Home.
My wonderful friends at
Faith Temple Church of God
where we both loved and attend
is giving her a "going home
party celebration" on Saturday,
April 2, at 2 p.m. The memorial
to our mother will be a joyful
expression of thanks and grati-
tude to Jesus for our daring pre-
cious mother's love, care and
Godly life that she always lived.
She was such a faith-filled child
of the Most High King of Glory
and will be greatly missed.
Her joyful-hearted children,
Your loved grateful child,
Paula Miller

Chickens can't swallow
while they are upside
down.


RCMA Bowling Green CDC
404 Orange St, Bowling Green
Tel: (863) 375-4881
Ask for Pregunten por
Gloria Hernandez/Beatrice Zamorano
Monday-Friday
Lunes-Viernes
7:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m.


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


Best wishes to everyone cele-
brating a birthday or anniver-
sary in April.

KOFFEE KLATCH
Jack Elofson led the U.S.
Pledge on March 23, I led the
Canadian Pledge and Steve
Gray led the prayer. The 50/50
winners were 2493 Morning
Glory, Lot 76, Jeri and Don
Plumley and Bernice and Dave
English.

BINGO
Betty Staley won the large
jackpot on March 18 and Jean
Willis won the small jackpot.
Pat Kelley won the large jack-
pot on March 21 and Norm
Batchelor won the small jack-
pot.

ST. PATRICK'S
DAY PARTY
Pat Kelley hosted the party
on March 17. The Gorskis
would be proud of Pat carrying
on the Mountain Laurel St.
Patrick's Day tradition. Moun-
tain Laurel was closed off so
those who wished to dance
could do so.
The party started with a
potluck. Music was provided by
Betty Ackermann, Dave En-
glish, Cal Gadsby, Joerg Gorgas


and Walt Wilson. During the
band's intermission, Pam
Norris played tapes and had a
lot of people up line dancing.

SCORES
Golf March 17: This was the
golf banquet. The morning
started with a four-person
scramble with the mixed
league, ladies league and men's
league all playing together.
The winners were Ray Baker,
Joe Bennitt, Barb Newman and
Gerald Tremblay. After golf,
everyone met at the rec hall for
the golf banquet.
Mixed Golf March 21:
*Winners were A's, Lee Roy
Behymer; B's, Mary Kessler;
C's, Mick Adams; and D's,
Charlie McKnight.

CHURCH NEWS
By Diane Burget
Pastor Winne's message for
us on March 20 was "Visions of
the Almighty." Scripture refer-
ences were from Psalms 147
and 18, Romans I and 2, Isaiah
40 and Jeremiah 29.
Our choir, led by Nancy
Morrison, sang "Change My
Heart, 0 God." The service
was concluded with the congre-
gation singing "God Be with
You Till We Meet Again."


One advantage of marriage, it seems to me, is that when
you fall out of love with each other, it keeps you togeth-
er until maybe you fall in again.
-Judith Viorst


RCMA Fred Dennis CDC
320 N 9th Ave., Wauchula
Tel: (863) 767-0222
Ask for-Pregunten por
Lucy Garcia/Aracelis Mejia/Angela Hernandez
Monday-Friday
Lunes-Viernes
7:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m.


*Is your child age 6 weeks -5years old?
,Tiene un nifio de 6 semanas a 5 afios?


*Does your child have a disability or special needs?

,Tiene un niflo(a) con un impedimento o necesidades especiales?


*Are you a High Risk Pregnant Mom?

LEs' usted una madre con un embarazo de alto riesgo?


Come sign your child up for Early Head Start/Head Start!

Vengan a inscribir su nino(a) para Early Head Start/Head Start!
3:31-4:14c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the Zolfo Springs Planning and Zoning Board of Adjustment
held a Public Hearing in the Zolfo Springs Commission Chambers on Tuesday, March 15,
2011 at 6:00PM. The purpose of the hearing was to consider the request of, Roy and Carol
Carranco to close and abandon alleyway between Third Street West and US Hwy 17 and
Suwannee Street, Block 11 of Williams Addition Zolfo Springs, Florida.

Notice is hereby given that on Monday, April 18, 2011, at 6:00PM, the Town Commission
will hear the Planning and Zoning Committee's recommendation for the Town Commission
to approve the request of Roy and Carol Carranco. Resolution 2011-03 to close and aban-
don the alleyway will be read following the public hearing.

RESOLUTION 2011-03
A RESOLUTION BY THE TOWN COMMISSION OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, TO
CLOSE AND ABANDON ALLEYWAY

Anyone wishing to appeal and decisions made at this hearing will need a record of prd-
ceedings, and for such purpose they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made which record includes the testimony and evidence upon the appeal
is based.

Interested parties are encouraged to attend.

June Albritton
Town of Zolfo Springs
3210 US Highway 17 South
Zolfo Springs, Florida 33890 3:31c
(863)735-0405


Give Your Child A "HEAD START" by Applying Nowl

Dele a su Ninio(a) un buen comienzo


Fred Dennis CDC License #A25-001
Bowling Green CDC License #C10HA0513


RCMA IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR CHILDCARE
THIS SEASON 2011-2012 Early Head Start/Head Start Programs

RCMA ESTA ACEPTANDO APLICACIONES PARA CUIDO DE NINOS
PARA LA TEMPORADA 2011-2012 en los programs Early Head Start/Head Start


Children 6 weeks- 5 years old
Nifos de 6 semanas- 5 aftos


This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the Planning and
Development Department at least two (2) working days prior to the
P/Z Public Hearing.
This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents
relating to this proposal are available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the
Planning and Development Department, 110 S. 9"' Ave., Wauchula,
Florida.
All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering
any decision the Boards shall rely solely on testimony that is
relevant and material.
Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will need
to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a court
reporter. 03:31c


'- T

pit








10B The Herald-Advocate, March 31, 2011


Museum Musings
By Sandy Scott
Cracker Trail Museum Curator


This month marks the fourth year that this column has
appeared in The Herald-Advocate newspaper and throughout the
week ideas for the next week's entry are jotted down in a notebook.
This week's idea came quite by accident and coincidentally it
involves research provided by none other than the Herald Advocate
newspaper!
For a number of years research has been done at the Hardee
County Library perusing the rolls of newspaper films in order to
extract interesting and historical tidbits that help to piece together
parts of Hardee County history. After threading the film through
the microfilm reader and scanning each page, one can obtain a
copy of a particular item or maybe just hand written notes will suf-
fice. In either event, an hour's worth of research will produce
about six month's worth of reading of a particular year of The
Herald-Advocate or its predecessor, "The Florida Advocate."
Quite often time does not permit the number of hours neces-
sary to adequately spend accomplishing the end result of this type
of research or a "crick" develops due to the position of your neck
while attempting to read these old files. So, what's the alternative?
It is true that all of The Herald-Advocate newspapers are bound in
large books, but they are so fragile it is not possible for the gener-
al public to use these original editions for casual research. Well,
enter the computer age and Google again comes to the rescue of
nosey people like me!!!
The word "digital" was not readily known when I was grow-
ing up. We had no digital watches we wound the stems daily
(but not too tight), nor did we have digital cameras so we saved our
babysitting money to pay for the developing of the film (that was
sent off to another location) at either Beeson or Dasher's Drug
Store.
For those of us who would like to research our local newspa-
per while in the comfort of our homes, digital copies are now avail-
able at the "Florida Digital Newspaper Library." It takes time for
these editions to be scanned and prepared for the general public to
read so all of them are not currently available. However, as time
progresses additional copies will be available at this website which
now houses all weekly editions from 2005 through the first six
months of 2010 in addition to the complete year of 1964 repre-
senting 327 pages in all.
Being interested in the oldest of these editions now available
online, I quickly clicked on the 1964 year and with another click to
Dec. 25, the front page of The Herald-Advocate was staring at me
at 8 p.m. while my legs were comfortably positioned on the couch
in my living room and at the same time I was able to watch
N.C.I.S.!
Two pieces of information was discovered in the comfort of
my home. The first was discovering this very useful website that I
no doubt will spend hours researching information concerning
Hardee County and the second was found within that front page
article.
Have you ever noticed the cement picnic tables located
throughout the lower section of Pioneer Park? The front page arti-
cle of Dec. 25, 1964 explained to The Herald-Advocate readers that
Park Board Chairman Mabry Carlton was advising the public for
the need of more picnic tables in the park. Further reading ex-
plained that several dozen concrete tables had now been construct-
ed and that they had been for the most part donated by pioneer fam-
ilies in Hardee County at a cost of $47.50 each. Another item with-
in this column referred to renovations that were necessary to the
Zolfo Pool and that a designer had suggested that the pool be divid-
ed into two swimming areas one for the adults and one for the
"small fry".
The newspaper pages located on this site can be saved to your
computer as necessary and while the reproduction is not the best in
the world, it is readable for the necessary research that one may
desire.
Cracker Trail Museum not only is the keeper of your precious
possessions, it is the repository for your research queries. Won't
you help add to our collections with your donations and to our
interest in Hardee County with your memories?



Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or TrayceDaniels'
At The Herald Advocate


\ /-
X if N
'\\ ~

(~V $~. --


By Rachel St. Fort
age 9, daughter of Jacklyn Smith, Wauchula


KIDS! YOUR WORK COULD BE PRINTED
HERE!
"kid's corner" is a weekly feature which relies solely on reader input.
Children 12 and under may send their pencil or ink drawings, short
stories, poems, riddles or jokes for consideration. DO NOT USE
NOTEBOOK PAPER OR LINED PAPER. Please include the name,
age, parents' names and place of residence on each entry, printed
legibly. Items must be the child's ORIGINAL work. Submissions can-
not be returned. Send to: kid's korner, The Herald-Advocate, RO.
Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.





H nigFs hing F recas


3/31/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:42 AM
Set: 7:13 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 31 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:59 AM
Set: 4:58 PM
Overhead:10:56 AM
Underfoot:11:17 PM
Moon Phase
7%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:56 AM-12:56 PM
11:17 PM 1:17 AM
Minor Times
4:59 AM 5:59 AM
4:58 PM 5:58 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -7
4/1/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 7:44 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 26 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:57 AM
Set: 6:19 PM
Overhead: 12:06 PM
Underfoot: --:--
Moon Phase
3%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:06 PM 2:06 PM
Minor Times
5:57 AM 6:57 AM
6:19 PM 7:19 PM
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


4/2/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:17 AM
Set: 7:45 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data.
Rise: 6:27 AM
Set: 7:11 PM
Overhead: 12:45 PM
Underfoot:12:27 AM
Moon Phase
1%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:27 AM- 2:27 AM
12:45 PM 2:45 PM
Minor Times
6:27 AM 7:27 AM
7:11 PM 8:11 PM
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
4/3/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:16 AM
Set: 7:45 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 29 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:58 AM
Set: 8:02 PM
Overhead: 1:29 PM
Underfoot: 1:08 AM
Moon Phase
0%
NEW MOON
Major Times
1:08 AM 3:08 AM
1:29 PM 3:29 PM
Minor Times
6:58 AM 7:58 AM
8:02 PM 9:02 PM
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4


4/4/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:14 AM
Set: 7:46 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 32 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:31 AM
Set: 8:55 PM
Overhead: 2:12 PM
Underfoot: 1:50 AM
Moon Phase
1%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1:50 AM 3:50 AM
2:12 PM 4:12 PM
Minor Times
7:31 AM 8:31 AM
8:55 PM 9:55 PM
Prediction
Better
.Time Zone
UTC: -4
4/5/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:13 AM
Set: 7:47 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 34 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:06 AM
Set: 9:50 PM
Overhead: 2:57 PM
Underfoot: 2:34 AM
Moon Phase
4%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:34 AM 4:34 AM
2:57 PM 4:57 PM
Minor Times
8:06 AM 9:06 AM
9:50 PM 10:50 PM
Prediction
Better++
Time Zone
UTC: -4


4/6/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:12 AM
Set: 7:47 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 35 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:46 AM
Set: 10:44 PM
Overhead: 3:44 PM
Underfoot: 3:20 AM
Moon Phase
8%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
3:20 AM 5:20 AM
3:44 PM -5:44 PM
Minor Times
8:46 AM 9:46 AM
10:44 PM-11:44 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
4/7/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:11 AM
Set: 7:48 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 37 mins.
Moon Data
lRise: 9:30 AM
Set: 11:39 PM
Overhead: 4:34 PM
Underfoot: 4:09 AM
Moon Phase
15%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
4:09 AM 6:09 AM
4:34 PM 6:34 PM
Minor Times
9:30AM 10:30 AM
11:39 PM-12:39 AM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


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March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11B


SPRING SUCCESS

r!"", 1.4


COURTESY PHOTO
Dr. Barbara Carlton of Wauchula has struck again, getting the nice gobbler named
"Lady Gada" on March 25. Carlton said it was one of her most difficult hunts in recent
memory as she chased the elusive tom for three days before finally getting him. She
had to cross two barbed-wire fences and scurry through the thick fog to get in front of
the turkey after it flew off the roost and went the other direction. She Is hunting anoth-'
er gobbler she named Bin Laden.


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should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
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2010 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
City of Wauchula
PWS # 6250329
Were pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and
services we deliver to you every day. Our water source is the Floridan Aquifer. The water is filtered by reverse osmosis, then chlorinated for
disinfection.
If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Andy Maddox at 863-773-6686. The City of Wauchula
routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated
otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January I to December 31, 2010. Data obtained before January 1,
2010, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.
In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following
definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLOs as
feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLO: The level of a contaminant in drinking water belbo which there istno known or expected rsk to
health. MCLGs allow for a margin ofsafety. :"' la' ..
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
Parts per million nppnm or Milligrams ner liter Imtl): one part by weight of analyte to I million parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts ncr billion fpob) or Micrornamsner liter luf: one part by weight of analyte to I billion parts by weight of the water sample.
Picocurie r liter ( 1=/L: measure of the radioactivity in water.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level ofa disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that
addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control ofmicrobial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level anal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to
health.
In 2009, a source water assessment was conducted for our water system. The assessment found 16 potential sources of contamination near
the wells. These included petroleum storage tanks and a wastewater treatment plant The levels of risk range from low to moderate. Source water
assessments are posted at http://www.dep,state.fl.us/swapp/.
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Rangeof MC
Unit of Sampling Violation Detected ResuMCL Likely Source ofConta tin
Detected Results G
Measurement (moyr.) Y/N
Radioactive Contaminants
Alpha emitter 3/08 N 7 NA 0 15 Erosion of natural deposits
(pCi/l)
Radium 226 or
combined radium 3/08, N 0.9 NA 0 5 Erosion of natural deposits
(pCill)________________
Contaminant and Dates of MCL a
Unit of sampling Violation D MCLG MCL Likely Source ofContamluatioa
SDetected Result
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N
Inorganic Contaminants
SBai (pp) 38 N 03 2 2 Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from
Barium(ppm) 3/08 N 0038 2 2 metal refineies; erosion of natural dosts
Erosion of natural deposits; water additive
Fluoride (ppm) 308 N 0. 4 4 which promotes strong teeth wheat optimum
Fluorde(ppm) 310 N 0.levels between 0.7 and 1.3 ppmdischarge
____ _from fertilizer and aluminum
Sodium (ppm) 3/08 N 9.3 N/A 160 Salt water intrusion, leach from soil
Nitrate (as Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from
Nitrogen) 1/10 N 0.74 10 10 septic tanks, sewage; erosion ofnatural
(ppm) deposits
No. of
Contaminant sad Unit Dates of AL 90th sampling AL
osamurt a t sampling Violation Perccttile sites MCLG (Action Ukly Soure of Costanaion
ortasuret (Bmolyr.) Y/N Result exceeding Level)
theAL
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Copper(p water) Corrosionofhousehold plumbing systems;
Copper(tapwater) 8/08. N 1.02 0 1.3 1.3 erosion of natural deposits; leaching from
(ppm) wood preservatives
Lead (tap water) 808 N 4 0 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems.
(ppb) erosion of natural deposits
For chlorine, the level detected is the highest running annual average (RAA). computed quarterly, of monthly averages of all samples collected.
For haloacetic acids or TTHM, the level detected is the average of all samples taken during the year if the system monitors less frequently than
quarterly. Range of Results is the range of individual sample results (lowest to highest) for all monitoring locations.
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Lvl Range MCLG or MCLor
Unit of amplig Violation tt of MRDLG MDL ULikly Sorce ofContamliation
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N Results
Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Chlorine (ppm) 1/10 N 1.28 0.7-2.0 MRDLG MRDL-4 Wateradditiveusedtocontrolmicrobes
12/10 N4
HaloaeticAcid" 7/10 N 9.8 NA NA MCL-60 By-productofdrinkingwaterdisinfection
(five) (HAAM) (ppb)
TTHM (Total
trihalomethanes] 7/10 N 21.05 NA NA MCL- 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is
primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The City of Wauchula is responsible for providing high
quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours,
you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you
ua concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps
you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at httAl//www.eDa.ov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can
pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and.wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff industrial or
domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and
petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
' In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided
by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must
provide the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of
contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can
be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-ompromised persons such as
persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system
disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their
health care providers. EPA/CDC ,uidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological
contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 3:31 c


OVER 100 USED CARS AND TRUCKS ToCHOOSE FRom


--


I -- I






12B The Herald-Advocate, March 31, 2011


By KEN MCINTOSH
STAFF WRITER
ICCA will be placing ads in newspapers,
radio and running television spots next week
asking people to bring in any old silver and
gold coins made before 1965. Those that
bring in their coins will be able to speak
with collectors one on one and have their
coins looked at with an expert set of eyes.
With the help of these ICCA members, offers
will be made to those that have coins made
before 1965. Offers will be made based
on silver or gold content and the rarity of
the coins. All coins made before 1965 will
be examined and purchased including gold
coins, silver coins, silver dollars, all types of
nickels and pennies. Those that decide to
sell their coins will be paid on the spot.
If you are like a lot of people you might
have a few old coins or even a coffee
can full lying around. If you have ever
wondered what they are worth now might
be your chance to find out and even sell
them if you choose. They could be worth
a lot according to the International Coin
Collectors Association also known as ICCA.
Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins
and currency for their collections. If it is
rare enough, one coin could be worth over
$100,000 according to Eric Helms, coin
collector and ICCA member. One ultra rare
dime, an 1 894S Barber, sold for a record
$1.9 million' to a collector in July of 2007.
While that is an extreme example, many
rare and valuable coins are stashed away
in dresser drawers or lock boxes around the
country. The ICCA and its collector members
have organized a traveling event in search
of all types of coins and currency. Even
common coins can be worth a significant
amount due to the high price of silver and
gold, says Helms. Washington quarters
and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many
times their face value. Recent silver markets
have driven the price up on common coins
made of silver. Helms explains that all half
dollars, quarters and dimes made before
1965 contain 90% silver and are sought
after any time silver prices rise. Right now
it's a sellers market he said.





COINS
Any and all coins made before 1965, rare
coins, entire collections, Silver Dollars,
Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,
Nickels, Three Cent Pieces, Two Cent Pieces,
Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and all others.
PAPER MONEY
All denominations made before 1934.
GOLD COINS
Including $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5,
$1, Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.
INVESTMENT GOLD
Kruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs,
Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and
Buffalos, etc.

SGOLD
i ,IN9 AT ALL TIME'


SCRAP GOLD
Broken and unused jewelry, dental gold.
JEWELRY
Diamond rings, bracelets, earrings, loose
diamonds, all gem stones, etc. /
PLATINUM
Anything made of platinum.
SILVER
Flatware, tea sets, goblets, jewelry, etc. and


The rarest coins these collectors are
looking for include $20, $10, $5 and $2
1/2 gold coins and any coin made before
1850. These coins always bring big
premiuTms according to the ICCA. Silver
dollars are also very sought after nowadays.
Other types of items the ICCA will be
purchasing during this event include U.S.
currency, gold bullion, investment gold,
silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc.
Even foreign coins are sought.after and will
be purchased.
Also at this event anyone can sell their
gold jewelry, dental gold or anything made
of gold on the spot. Gold is currently trading
at' over $1,100.00 per ounce near an all
time high. Bring anything you think might
be gold and the collectors will examine,
test and price it. for free. If you decide to
sell, you will be paid on the spot it has
been an unknown fact that coin dealers
have always paid more for jewelry and
scrap gold than other jewelers and pawn
brokers.
So whether you have one coin you think
might be valuable or a large collection you
recently inherited, you can talk to these
collectors for free. If you're lucky you may
have a rarity worth thousands. Either way
there is nothing to lose and it sounds like
fun!
For more information on this event visit
the ICCA website at
WWW.INTERNATIONALCOINCOLLECTORS.COM






















-I :S I


I Oen Finds: I,


* Gather items of interest from your
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No appointment necessary
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'AGE ONE


March 31 Tennis
HJHS Volleyball
JV Baseball
V. Softball


April 1


Track
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JV Baseball
V. Baseball


April 2 Weightlifting

April 4 JV Softball
HJHS Volleyball
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April 5 V. Baseball

April 7 HJHS Volleyball
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April 11 HJHS Volleyball

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Booker
DeSoto
Fort Meade
Lemon Bay

Palmetto
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10 a.m.

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HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.


SportsSclMrh3-pi1


focuses On Kids


April F

By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
We might all agree that chil-
dren deserve a safe. happy and
loving environment.
We might also know that this
just doesn't happen. A lot of
people have to help make it
happen. Of course, there's the
people required by law to report
child abuse or neglect.
But, what about John Q.
Public? What does the average
person on the street care about
other people's children?
A proclamation approved by
the Hardee County Commission
recently joins those around the
state and nation is celebrating
April 3-9 as Children's Week
and the month of April as Child
Abus6 Prevention Month.
Leslie Bond, Healthy Start
program manager at the Hardee
County Health Department and
two members of Heartland for
Children came to the most
recent commission meeting,
asking 'for the proclamation and
support of the blue-and-white
Pinwheels For Prevention pro-
gram'.
Abuse and neglect can be
physical, emotional, sexual or
not nurturing any child under
18. It can range from Shaken
Baby Syndrome, excessive cor-
poral punishment and name-
calling to withholding food or
attention necessary for a child
to grow healthily.
As children get older, it can


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


be apparent by bruising. acting
out or withdrawn behavior, or
even running away or attempted
suicide.
Average people can make a
difference in a child's life.
Offering a parent support and
encouragement when you see
her having difficult time in the
store with her child or children
can reduce her stress. Say
something kind to the children.
distract them,.. help her find
things she needs, say something
positive, don't criticize.
Coaches from T-Ball or Flag
football to teen sports can also
play an important role in a
child's life, offering positive
models, encouraging teamwork
and children's support of each
other.
Parents who are having a
hard time raising their children
can get support in a number of
ways. One is by contacting
Bond at 773-4161 or Kylia
Carswell at www.heartland-
forchildren.org or 863-519-
8900 Ext. 292.
Stop by the Health Depart-
ment and pick up the 2011 par-
ent resource books, which
includes guides to child devel-
opment at each age level, posi-
tive parenting techniques and
community resources.
Both parents need to be
involved in the child's develop-
ment. Fathers can nurture, play
and instruct children, who are
more apt to follow what he


'Uust Stuff"
133 E. Townsend St. Wauchula 832-5759




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does, not what he says. If he is
fair, gets along well with others,
and participates in community
activities, the children will that
way as well. If their mother is
treats them with kindness
mixed with discipline, equality
instead of preference, hugs not
hits, and sharing instead of self-
, ishness, the children will learn
that as well.
Another area to consider is
safety for children. Parents need
to keep medications out of chil-
dren's reach, guns and ammuni-
tion locked away, pools proper-
ty fenced and locked, use safe
cribs free from stuffed animals
or blankets a child could suffo-
cate under. Knives, plastic bags,
exposed electrical cords or out-
lets, unguarded stairways, sharp
corners on furniture, chemicals,
ashtrays, and even houseplants
can be attractive to a child.
If you're a grandparent, god-
parent or someone else who has
children visit, childproof the
house and protect your valu-
ables (cut glass, china, knick-
knacks) from little hands. Don't
give them small candies they
can choke on.
The proclamation says there
are over 7,450 children in
Hardee County, who should be
safe from threats of violence
and harm to live, grow and
learn to be our future leaders.
Won't you help them do so?


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, March 31, 2011


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


*p~


Er


Federally
insured by
NCUA.


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2C The Herald-Advocate, March 31, 2011





-Schedule of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
by.
. The. Ierald-Advocate
H- Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................ 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .... ............ 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Ilwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. HIwy. 17 375-2253 ,
SUNDAY:
Bible Study .......................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................ 6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CIIURCII
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................ 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .........:........7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCII
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ................ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. I 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ...................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375.4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. I11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training........... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast...............1I 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting, Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico................ 6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship.................. 7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
English Service ...............1... :30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIIURCII
322 6lanchey Rd.
S863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ............7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call fur locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678 "
Bible Study ....................... ..9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men e Leadership & Training Class. -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CIIURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................1.......10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ...........................1 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 am .
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. ..............7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ..........................1...11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servicio ...........:.....7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ....................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio.................... 7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ..................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio..............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................. 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ...............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ...... .7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ...... ........... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ............... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra............ 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's M ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
Worship ................................ 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ........................ 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) .........................10:45 a.m .
Worship Service .. ............. 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY.:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ................ 6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave..
773-6556
Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday Schrol .................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship .......11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ..............7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service .............. ....10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ....... .....6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. MNain St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts..............9:00 a.m.


Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
W orship... .......................10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ..............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse M in. ................7:00 p.m.

IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship .... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ......6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESLA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes ............................... 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ..................... ......7.... 7:30 p.m .
Domingo............................ 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ........................... 6:00 p.m .
M iercoles............................. 7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service .................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ..................10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ....................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................ I 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m.


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service................... 0:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ................ 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .... ........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
'I & 31 Sun.
Communion ....................10:00 a.m .
2" & 41 Sun.
Divine Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ..........................1 1: 15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
M morning Service .................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...... ... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday ..................................9:00 a m .
Holy Days ......... ................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ...... 730 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish)........... 11:00 a.m.
(C reole).....................1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English .. .......8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ................... 9:30 a m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ... ......7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ ... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... ........ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road "
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7.30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study .............. 7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ........... ....10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .... .......... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship. ....... ...... 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .................. 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... ....11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ...... ....... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service .................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS-
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship :.................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.
M en's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .........:..........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m .-

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m .
Worship Service ................11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m..
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship .................. 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
W orship .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Evening.................................. 1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735.
8586
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..... .......7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.............................................. 7 :00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ... ................ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .......................... 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones........................ 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina.............................1... 1:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION.
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .......10:00 a,m.
Servicio ............................... 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................... 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


Three-year-old Carla was help-
ing her mother deliver newspapers.
"Let me do one," she begged.
So the mother drove her pickup
to a box on Caria's side, and Carla
leaned out of the window. But she
leaned too far, and fell to the
ground.
Terrified, the mother jumped out
of the cab and picked her up. And
she cried, "Mom, you didn't get
close enough!"
You and I live in two worlds. We
get so busy making a living thatwe
don't make any overtures to the
Lord. And we fall. Why?
Like the girl said, "You didn't get
close enough."
The Bible says, "Let us draw
near to God with a sincere heart."


Our Chansing Lives
^y


ach new season reminds us that we can't hold onto
time... how do we let go of one season and successfully
move onto the next? We can share the joys and sorrows
with others on the same journey. With help, we can
embrace each phase of our life and prepare for the next.
God's wisdom can guide us through our seasons and help
us be prepared. Worship at His house this week and find
fellowship and faith to help you on your way.

ISvda RMby Tsdty Wbubty T1amay MbFry Si
Pat 1 CadMlls 1 lmCaWMs 1 Crilans ImCmuibia Lie i U
1i 1.1-17 1.1-1 2.1-16 3.1-23 12.1-12 12.1- 1
Sc'rwe edasd ST Nemnerca- BCe ScCiely
Copp't 21S ear.'iKa-si ewspa:- Se ceB5P C Bc, 'a7 Ciafeneaille VS 2S irm ken tss


S-PeTace ive r Cr6 rs

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL








March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


His FAVORITE PASTIME Is



SPREADING THE GOOD NEWS


Kids: How Many Birds



Can You Find & ID?


By ALDO CONSUEGAR
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Dennis Storts is a true American.
He is a person with wholesome val-
ues and great character. He is a religious
man, going door-to-door spreading the
Good Word to all who will welcome it.
He is a passionate man, hearing the
problems of others and doing his best to
help others.
Dennis Storts was born in Fostoria,
Ohio.
His favorite part of his childhood
was the summer vacations, when he
could go to the old river and fish with-
out a care in the world. He lived in a
rural town, out in the country, where
people all -
knew each le':
other and i(t. 1(,' -l "
cared for ,. I'
one anoth-
er.
Back then, things cost little. Twenty-
five cents was all you needed to go out
and have a good time. He could go to
the movies for 25 cents or buy a gallon
of gas for just as much. He also could
have gotten his driver's permit at 14.
As grew older, Storts saw the crueler
things in life. He was devastated when
Hurricane Charley had passed. He was
sad to see all the people who had lost
their homes, and some, their lives. But
he never gave in to all the drama. He
helped people by comforting them and
helping them rebuild their homes.
As an adult, he became a Jehovah's
Witness, and got a job at the phone
company. He worked as an "install and
repair" man, and he loved his job. He
liked it because it gave him a chance to
meet new people and make new friends.
He moved to Hardee County because


COURTESY PHOTO
Dennis Storts, true American.
he heard that there were several work
opportunities. Soon, the amount of work
available decreased, and he spent more
time with his favorite pastime -
spreading the Good News.
Dennis Storts is good example of
what life used to be like, back in the
good old days. He never lost faith in
God, and through that, he brightened
peoples lives.
In truth, Storts is a perfect classic
example of an honest, hard-working
American.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked.to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Samuel Colt, inventor of the Colt revolver "the gun that won the West," worked on the
prototype in his father's textile plant. Colt once earned a living touring the country per-
forming laughing gas demonstrations.
Earl Tupper, of Tupperware fame, is believed to have gotten the design for
Tupperware's liquid-proof, airtight lids by duplicating the lid of a paint can.


By JESSICA BASHAM
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Chilly weather throughout Florida
kept residents inside and close to
heaters, under blankets and in their
sweats, long sleeves and socks during
this past winter. But spring now is here,
and there is wildlife to discover in
your back yard!
Get your binoculars ready,
because there many colorful
and fun birds to see! Look
closely and see how many BACI
you can find and identify.- t \I
Counting birds is important.
It helps scientists learn things,
like how winter weather influences bird
populations, how this year's migration
compares with last year's and what
kinds-of birds are in cities versus rural
areas.
There are many birds to view in your
back yard during this time of year.
Some of the well-known species of
birds seen and counted during the 2010
Backyard Bird Count were Canada
geese, ospreys, turkey vultures, red-bel-
lied woodpeckers, American robins and
Northern cardinals.
Last year's bird count was
11,233,309 birds from 602 different
species.


Birds are ancient creatures related to
dinosaurs as well as reptiles. They have *
adapted and survived for millions of
years.
Birds are important species in nature
and to humans. They are not just pretty
animals to watch while they're flying
high in the sky or hopping from
bus-h to bush. They are impor-
' tant when it comes to forest
",<', regeneration and other plant
', growth. Birds spread seeds.
,ARD -Seeds sprout, and then grow
lrg into trees, providing homes
for all kinds of wildlife in the
forest. Birds also eat insects that
humans find pesky, such as mosquitoes
and flies.
Birds are fun to watch. They sing,
flitter, play and feed. They are in con-
stant motion.
To become a junior birder, visit florid-
abirdingtrail.com and select "Birding
Resources" in the left-hand menu. Also,
visit MyFWC.com for other fun
wildlife activities.
Kids, Jessica Basham knows.all about
animals! She works for the state Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Look for her Backyard Safari every
month. You can ask her questions at
Jessica.Basham @MyFWC. com.


Gallaudet University was the first school for the educa-
tion of the deaf and hard of hearing in the world. Since
its first commencement in 1869, all of its diplomas have
been signed by the current U.S. president of the time.


Stop by and see why so "- g -
many neighbors from -
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com Gene Davis
o:t u 800-22Sale3 anrd Lesa. mI
,. 30c 800-226-3325 SCacinrdaCnsulrata
i 4ia >*


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.









4C The Herald-Advocate, March 31. 2011


Tea did not arrive in Japan
until the ninth century and
did not become popular
until the 12th century.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 25-2011-CP-000018

IW RE: ESTATE OF
LACY WOODARD,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of LACY WOODARD,
deceased, whose date of death
was November 30, 2009, and
whose social security number is
xxx-xx-xxxx, file number 25-2011-
CP-000018, is pending in the
Circuit.Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 417 West
Main Street, Suite 202, Wauchula,
Florida 33873. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is March 24, 2011.

Personal Representative:
Fathe Woodard
3139 Edwards Peace
Drive
Wauchula, FL 33873

Attorney for Personal
Representative
Stephen W. Screnci, Esq
Florida Bar No. 0051802
Stephen W. Screnci, PA.
3301 NW Boca Raton Blvd.,
Suite 201
Boca Raton, FL 33431
Telephone: (561)300-3309


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY

CASE NO. 252011CP000021

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
MARILYNN ESCHENBERG,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of MARILYNN ESCHEN-
BERG, deceased, whose date of
death was February 8, 2011, and
whose social security number is
xxx-xx-xxxx, is pending In the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Post Office
Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida
33873-1749. The name and
address of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is March 24, 2011.

Personal Representative:
Val R. Patarini
216 Lake Drive Blvd.
Sebring, FL 33875

Attorney for Personal
Representative
John W.H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863)773-3241
Telecopier: (866)591-1658
Florida Bar No: 0650137
3:24,31 c


The chief value of money
lies in the fact that one
lives in a world in which it
is overestimated.
-H. L. Mencken


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

Case No. 252011 DR000077

MEGAN WASHINGTON,
Petitioner,
and
DEMETRISE WASHINGTON,
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

TO: DEMETRISE WASHINGTON
612 Bronty Rd
Greenville, NC 27834

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Megan Washington
whose address Is P.O. Box 1567,
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 on or
before 04-29-11, and file the orig-
inal .with the clerk of this Court at
PO Drawer 1749, Wauchula FL
33873 before service on
Petitioner or immediately there-
after. If you fail to do so, a default
may be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the peti-
tion.

Copies of all court documents
In this case, Including orders, are
available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record
at the clerk's office.

Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.

Dated: March 23, 2011
B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

BY: DIANE V. SMITH
DEPUTY CLERK
3:31-4:21p

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 25-2011-CP-000019


3:24,31c IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUAN REYNA a/k/a
JUAN REYNA, SR.


Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of JUAN REYNA a/k/a
JUAN REYNA, SR., deceased,
whose date of death was June 16,
2010; Is pending in the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division; File Number 25-
2011-CP-000019; the mailing
address of which s P.O. Drawer
1749, Wauchula, Florida 33873.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must
file their claims with this court ON
OR BEFORE THE LATER OF THE
DATE THAT IS THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons who have
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS: March
24, 2011.

Personal Representative:
SANDRA VELASQUEZ
c/o Rosalinda Reyna
604 5"1 Avenue SE
Ruskin, FL 33570

Attorney for Personal
Representative
MARLA E. CHAVERNAY, ESQ.
Law Offices of George R.
Brezina, Jr., P.A.
1915 N. Dale Mabry Highway
Suite 300
Tampa, FL 33607
(813) 870-0500
Florida Bar No: 143138
3:24,31 c


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLSI


MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Graham Crackers, Glazed Do-
nut, Bagel Bars, Orange Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Hamburger on a Bun, Alter-
native Meal, Salad Tray, Baked
Beans, Cherry Juice Bar, Con-
diments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Mandarin
Oranges, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Hotdogs, Alternative Meal,
Green Peas; Salad Tray, Yellow
Cake, Ice Cream, Condiments
and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix, Breakfast
Pocket, Pears, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Macaroni and
Cheese, Burrito, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Pinto Beans,


-The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Peace River Basin Board
Meeting: Consider Basin busi-
ness including 'Basin Board
review of Cooperative Funding
proposals and associated bud-
getary implications for fiscal
year 2012. Some Board mem-
bers may participate in the
meeting via communications
media technology.

DATE/TIME: Friday, April 8, 2011;
9:30 a.m.

PLACE: SWFWMD Bartow Ser-
vice Office, 170 Century Boul-
evard, Bartow FL 33830 (Note:
this is a change of location from
the published calendar)

A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water-
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; 1 (800) 423-1476
(FL only) or (352)796-7211

For more information, you may
contact: Phyllis.Young@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4615
(Ad Order EXE0129)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.

Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
e-mail to ADACoordinator@swfw-
md.state.fl.us 3:31c


Grape Juice, Apples Criso,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Oatmeal, Cinnamon
Toast, Orange Juice. Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Rib-B-Que on Bun,
Deli Turkey Sandwich, Alter-
native Meal, Potato Rounds,
Pears, Salad Tray, Condiments
and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Stick, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Toasted Ham
& Cheese, Alternative Meal,
Salad Tray, Mexican Rice,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk

JUNIOR HIGH


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Super Donut, Bagel Bars, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Hamburger on a Bun, Lettuce &
Tomato, Baked Beans, Juice
Bar, Trail Mix, Carrots, Condi-
ments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
French Toast, Sausage Patty,
Mandarin Oranges, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Pepperoni Pizza, Hotdogs,
Lettuce & Tomato, Garden
Peas, Yellow Cake, Ice Cream
Cups, Juice, Condiments and
Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Breakfast Mini Pocket, Pears,
Condi-ments and Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Burrito, Sausage Pizza,
Cornbread, Lettuce & Tomato,
Blackeyed Peas, Apple Crisp,
Juice, Condiments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Cinnamon Toast, Oatmeal,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Rib-B-Que, Deli-
Turkey Sandwich, Pepperoni
Pizza, Salad Bar, Lettuce &
Tomato, Potato Rounds, Pears,
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Breakfast Stick, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Toasted Ham
& Cheese, Sausage Pizza,
Lettuce & Tomato, Mexican
Rice, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk

SENIOR HIGH


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal,
Donut, Orange Juice,
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni


Super
Condi-

Pizza,


Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Battered Fried
Fish, French Fries, Cheese


hkatJs f


Grits, Garden Peas, Tossed
Salad, Juice Bar, Condiments
and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie
on Bun, Chicken Breast Fillet on
Bun, French Fries, Fresh
Potatoes, Broccoli, Tossed
Salad, Macaroni Salad, Juice,
Yellow Cake, Ice Cream, Con-
diments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scram-
bled Eggs, Breakfast Pocket,
Pineapple Chunks, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Hamburger Gravy, Mashed


Feeder Steers:
200-300 Ibs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs

Feeder Heifers:
200-300 lbs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
165.00-235.00
149.00-185.00
135.00-170.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
132.50-180.00
126.00-150.00
114.00-144.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs
62.00-72.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2
84.00-94.00


85-90 percent

1000-2100 lbs


.ATTENTION SENIORs

SQTA LITY -~ AFFORDABLE PRINTING

FOR ALL YOUR

GRADUATION SUPPLIES




















PACKAGE #1 PACKAGE #2 PACKAGE #3

25 INVITATIONS 25 INVITATIONS 25 INVITATIONS
with Envelopes with Envelopes with Envelopes

25 THANK YOU CARDS 25 NAME CARDS
with Envelopes 2 NAME ARDS

25 NAME CARDS
PLUS PLUS PLUS
$55 MT "45 $35s


ANUNCIO PUBLIC
DEL CONDADO DE HARDEE

Las Autoridades de Desarrollo Econ6mico del
Condado de Hardee aceptaran solicitudes para
grandes proyectos que proven desarrollo econ6mi-
co y de infraestructura dentro de las fronteras
geograficas del Condado de Hardee. Las autoridades
situaran solicitudes hasta el punto de estimar un pro-
grama de fondos disponibles basados en el criterio
relacionado a la capacidad administrative, beneficios
publicos, econ6micos y de uso public.

Las solicitudes y la Guia del Programa estan
disponibles en la Oficina de los Comisionados del
Condado de Hardee, ubicada en el 412 W. Orange
Street, Room 103, Wauchula, FL 33873; Tel6fono: 863-
773-9430; Fax: 863-773-0958; Correo electr6nico:
bcc@hardeecounty.net.

Las solicitudes seran aceptadas desde el 02 ro Mayo
hasta el 03 de Junio del 2011, de 8:00 a.m. a 5:00 p.m.

Favor de Notar: El sitio de los negocios beneficiados
por consideraci6n de estos fondos debe ser localiza-
do completamente dentro del Condado de Hardee.

Para mas informaci6n, por favor Ilame al
863.773.9430.

Lexton H. Albritton, Jr., County Manager 3:31c


Potatoes, Green Beans, Tossed
Salad, Peaches, Rolls, Salad
Bar, Condiments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon
Toast, Oatmeal, Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni. Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Rib-B-Que on
Bun, French Fries, Potato
Rounds, Baked Beans, Pears,
Tossed Salad, Condiments and
Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Tacos, Whole Kernel Corn,
Mexican Rice, Tossed Salad,
Jello, Fruit Cocktail, Condi-
ments and Milk


For the week ended March 24, 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 6,307 head,
compared to 5,470 last week, and 6,626 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady,
feeder steers and heifers were unevenly steady to 2.00 lower.









March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


COURTESY PHOTOS
Erista Albritton, 7,
daughter of William
and Kristen Albritton
of Zolfo Springs, killed
her first turkey Satur-
day, March 19th. The
gobbler had an 8 3/4"
beard and half-inch
spurs. Erista shot the
bird with her 20
gauge. Her father was
her official turkey
caller working three
calls at one time to
bring this bird close
enough as 33 yards.
Erista killed the turkey
at her Pa-Pa and Sha-
Sha's Bowling Green
property (Myles and
Anitia Albritton) with
her paw Myles Sr. wait-
ing close by to hear if
his "Punky" was able
to bag that bird on
opening day.


FIRST GOBBLER


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
March 27, Amanda Lee Martinez, 22, of 810 E. Fifth St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson and charged with
battery.
March 27, Cipriana Castillo, 53, and Micas Lozano, 28, both
of 572 Stenstrom Road, Wauchula, were arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart
and each charged with resisting an officer without violence.
Lozano was also charged with fraud by giving a false ID to an offi-
cer.
March 27, Phillip Dale Edenfield, 42, of 2501 W. Jetton St.,
Tampa, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on an out-of-county war-
rant.

March 26, Jesse Paul Batts, 65, of 204 Pineapple Ct., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with pos-
session of marijuana with intent to sell/manufacture and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
March 26, Angela Frankie Scheel, 37, of Zolfo Springs, was
arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with battery.
March 26, a residential burglary on Hardee St., burglary of a
conveyance on Louisiana Streets and vehicles stolen on Peterson
Street and on East Main Street were reported.

March 25, Jesus Lorenzo Torres, 60; of 2965 Old Crewsville
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a
charge of withholding support of children and three traffic charges.
March 25, Miguel Jesus Torres, 28, of 1053 Cohassett Ave.,
Lake Wales, was arrested on a charge of third degree vehicle theft.
March 25, a residential burglary on CR 664A, criminal mis-
chief on SR 64 East and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

March 24, Stanley Scott Stokes, 38, of 3550 Stokes Road,
Fort Meade, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with retail
theft.
March 24, John Richard Dunlap, 41, of 7390 Lily County
Line Road, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF)
and charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of
drug paraphernalia and a traffic offense.
March 24, a tag stolen on U.S. 17 North, and thefts on Heard
Bridge Road and on U.S. 17 North were reported.

March 23, Edu Escobar, 22, of 548 Alabama Road, West
Palm, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson and charged with fraud
by giving a false ID to an officer and a traffic charge.
March 23, Wilfredo Santos Jr., 39, of 22034 Catherine Ave.,
Port Charlotte, was arrested by Sgt. John Shivers on two counts of
withholding support of children.
March 23, Billy Gene Evans, 21, of 1071 S. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with bat-
tery.
March 23, criminal mischief on Pine Level Road was report-
ed.

March 22, Francisco Moreno, 44, of 818 E. Bay St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with larce-
ny-petit theft, fraud by possession of a simulated ID card, and
violation of probation.
March 22, Jose Maria Garcia, 42, of 310 N. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged with
larceny-petit theft and DUI.


IT R


I.


~l~t


March 22, criminal mischief on Snell Street and theft in two
locations on U.S. 17 North were reported.

March 21, Leroy James Abram, 22. of 5434 Hendley Dr.,
Lakeland, was arrested by Det. David Drake on a charge of viola-
tion of probation.
March 21, Jose Antonio Bermudez, 42, of 318 N. Fourth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. David Drake on a charge of failure
to appear in court.
March 21, Corey Tyrone Jorden, 27, of 128 N. CR 663, Ona,
was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge of failure to appear in.
court.

WAUCHULA
March 27, Maria Jean Munro, 54, and Ray Larry Driver, 49,
both of 408 N. Seventh Ave., Wauchula, were arrested by Cpl.
Chris LeConte and each charged with disorderly intoxication.
Munro was also charged with disturbing the public peace by mak-
ing false 911 calls.
March 27, a residential burglary on North Eighth Avenue and
criminal mischief at Bay Street and U.S. 17 were reported.

March 26, a vehicle stolen on East Oak Street was reported.

March 24, a vehicle stolen on U.S. 17 South was reported.

March 23, a residential burglary on South Ninth Avenue,
criminal mischief on East Townsend Street and thefts on Green
Street and North Seventh Avenue were reported.





Freezing Winds

Growth of new, tender green so beautiful
Sunshine shining brightly, like 'spring' it seems
No big tractor sounds ... resting if you please
All is well, the world be mine, 'wealth' in spring!


Then 'North Wind' blew ... freezing, gusting ... 'Pain!'
Midnight's coldness, silently approaching
Creeping-stealth, winter's deathly scourge encroaching
Hopes and dreams... disastrous fate's unfolding.


Morning's light ... bright and clear; cold tender shoots ...
Blowing ... wilted-limp, down to hardened ground,
Holiday sounds quietly stilled ... only frowns ...
'Back-to-the-Shed,' tractor sounds; 'Pistons Pounding!'.


Disking, planting; new-growth soon be sprouting,
'Sunshine Shining Bright!'... troubled frowns in flight!

-Thomas Graham
Fort Myers

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input..
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


It is wise to remember that you are one of those who can
be fooled some of the time.


"1









6C The Herald-Advocate, March 31, 2011



CourthouseRports'


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Richard Ocie Wiggins, 22,
Wauchula, and Brittany Glenn
Abbott, 18, Wauchula.
Albertano Zuniga-Hernan-
dez, 25, Zolfo Springs, and
Edith Leon Perez, 22, Zolfo
Springs.
Billy Hall, 62, Wauchula,
and Judith Haynes Shultis, 58,
Wauchula.
Ronald Lewis Bennett, 33,
Atlanta, Ga., and Jessica
Candice Clark, 29, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Midland Funding vs. Rita
Rodriguez, stipulated settle-
ment approved.
Burrus Enterprises LLC vs.
Ronnie Mendoza and Pamela
Bando, judgment for tenant
eviction.

There was no misdemeanor
court last week as it was trial
week.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Florida Fertilizer Co. vs.
Jose Gracia, damages-con-
tracts and indebtedness.
Debbie Murray and William
F. Murray, divorce.
Deborah Keen vs. Horace
Keen Jr., petition for injunction
Sfor protection.
Michael Carte and Tiffany
Carte, divorce.
Albert F. Barber vs. J.
Marion Moorman, inmate peti-
tion for sentence review.
Pamela Nicole Johns vs.
Samuel Lee Johns, petition for
injunction for protection.
Ada Lorine Dees and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Andrew Bernard
White, petition for enforcement
of administrative child support
order.
Roland Yoder Construction
vs. Joseph Bernick, damages-
contracts and indebtedness.
IC Industries Inc. vs. Parker
Farms and Jimmy Parker, dam-
ages-contracts and indebted-
ness.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Reyes Lopez and Michelle F.
Lopez, divorce.
Roberto Servin and Margari-
ta Hemrnandez, divorce.
Bank of America NA vs.
Wendy M. Licking-Bucking-
ham et al, judgment in garnish-
ment.
Sarah Lee Lazo and DOR vs.
Jose Alejandro Lazo Sr., order.
Amanda Cruce vs. Adan
Cruz, voluntary dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.


APRIL 2. 2011


Thomas Rivera and DOR vs.
Sonia Gonzalez-Vargas, order.
Kara Spencer and DOR vs.
Randal Simpson, order on child
support arrearages.
Gulf Coast Business Finance
Inc. vs. Mario A. Trevino, vol-
untary dismissal.
Florida Department of
Financial Services vs. Brant
Funeral Services LLC, volun-
tary dismissal.
Shelly Ezell vs. Steven
Salter, dismissal of injunction
for protection.
Rosa Marie Bautiste and
DOR vs. Ruben Bautiste, order.
Ophnie Auguste and Latika
Williams, child support order.
Bank of N.Y. Mellon vs.
Camil Camili, dismissed for
lack of progress.

Court-ordered certificates
of child support delinquency
were filed recently in the
office of the clerk of court:
Octavia N. Johnson vs.
Emerson Fils Aime.
Delores Belmares vs. Aaron
Cook.
Linda D. King vs. Joe Lopez.
Kayla D. Miller vs. Corey D.
Fowler.
Kelly L. Purser vs. Benjamin
W. Barber.
Daina M. Smith vs. Alex-
ander Poole Jr.
Kevin Richardson vs. Stacy
J. Richardson.
Laina M. Perez vs. Ruddie L.
Lopez.
Heather E. Sconyers vs.
Robert B. Sconyers.
Austin Tish vs. Cristian R.
Tish.
Gloria Elisondo vs. Nick
Aguilar.
Rachel L. Lanham vs. Travis
J. Lanham.
Michelle L. King vs. Roberto
Martinez.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as it was
trial week.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Jim and Carol Manwell to
Jose L. Gomez, $50,000.
Stanley Webb and Vicki
Marie Adcox Martin to Gladys
Esther Rodriguez, $35,000.
Federal National Mortgage
Association .,to. Miguel De-
Loera, $33,000.
Mario San Juan to Salvador
Arellano and Thelma I. Garza,
$10,000.
Myron L. Spilde to Karl
Hoffman and Marilyn Hoffman
as trustees.
Patrick H. and Marie
Christine Hickey to Nathaniel
R. Braddock and Faith Dizon,
$59,500.
Amy S. Crews as trustee to
ATP Groves LLC, $150,000.
Melvin H. and Marlene H.
Taylor to Robert A. and Alicia
D. Ross, $115,000.
James B. and Clara Jeanette
Rose to Jeffrey Raymond and
Tammy Wylie, $39,000.


11:00 A.M.


Personal property in the following units will
be sold to the highest bidder to satisfy rental
liens in accordance with Florida Statute
Section 83.801-83.809. Contents may include
household items, furniture, clothing, closed
cartons, etc. The sale will take place. at
Convenient Mini Storage, 5106 U.S. Highway
17 N., Bowling Green, FL on April 2, 2011 at
11:00 A.M.


Unit #17 James Mitchell
Unit # 30 Kara Spencer


Unit #18 Unknown .
Unit #41 Annie Talio


3:17,-31c


PUBLIC NOTICE
HARDEE COUNTY

The Hardee County Economic Development Authority
will accept grant applications for projects that provide
economic development or infrastructure within the
geographic boundaries of Hardee County. The
Authority shall rank applications to the extent of esti-
mated available program funds based on criteria
relating to administrative capacity, public benefit,
economic benefits, and public use.

Applications and Program Guidelines are available at
the Hardee County Board of County Commissioners
Office, 412 W. Orange Street, Room 103, Wauchula,
FL 33873; Phone: 863-773-9430; Fax: 863-773-0958;
e-mail: bcc@hardeecounty.net.

Applications will be accepted from May 02, 2011,
through June 03, 2011, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Please Note: Site of benefiting business for consid-
eration of these funds must be located entirely within
Hardee County.
For more information, please call 863/773-9430.

Lexton H. Albritton, Jr., County Manager 3:31c


Back To Basics
By lan Rice
Gospel Preacher


PART 2: WHAT ARE YOUR MOTIVES?
Starting in Matthew 7:7, we read that Jesus said, "Ask, and it
will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be
opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and he who seeks
finds, and to him who knocks it will be opened."
Look at what Jesus said in Matthew 6:31-34: "... do not worry,
saying, 'What shall we eat?' or 'What shall we drink?' or 'What shall
we wear?' For after all these things the Gentiles seek. For your
heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. But seek first
the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things
shall be added to you."
These should be very comforting words for us. Jesus taught in
the context here that we should not worry about the cares of this
life. These words should inspire us to put our full trust and faith in
Him.
Jesus tells the believer not to worry about his needs, because
God will supply them if we first seek the Kingdom.
But what if I told you that we too often focus on our needs
when talking with God in prayer anyway? Consider these requests
that most of us make:
"God, please help me to be better at X, Y, and Z."
"God, please help me to get ."
"God, please give me a better_____."
The point isn't that we shouldn't make our petitions known to
God. The point is that we too often focus on ourselves!
We meditate and focus on how Jesus said that "all these things
shall be added to you," instead of focusing on what Jesus com-
manded.
How often do we actually meditate on God's Kingdom? How
often do we meditate on His Kingship? How often do we meditate
onr His dominion? How often do we focus and meditate in His
Righteousness?
Jesus said to "seek first the kingdom of God and His right-
eousness."
Seek after God and pursue righteousness! Get Back To Basics
and consider what the Bible says about seeking after the Lord God
Almighty and thus receiving His blessings. Read God's Word.
Study God's Word. Obey God's Word!


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Jolene Funding LLC,
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 159 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

Description of Property:

LOT 16
BRANCH PARK MH ESTATES 1ST ADD
AD-461 P331 551P102

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: Daniel and Silvia Lozano

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall'
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
20 day of April, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 11h day of March, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Laura L. Barker, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD001XXXX 317-7c



PUBLIC NOTICE
The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the local planning agency will hold a
PUBLIC HEARING on
THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2011, 6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter in the BCC Board Room
412 West Orange St., Courthouse Annex
Room 102, Wauchula, FL
to hear and to receive public input for
Agenda No. 11-02
Hardee County Industrial Development Authority by
and through the Authorized Representative requests approval of a
Site Development Plan to construct a 23,000-sq-ft structure
including 1,500-sq-ft for office/lab area on 8.50+1-acres zoned
CIIBC (Commercial/llndustrial Business Center) in the Highway
Mixed Use Future Land Use District
On or abt the W side of Commerce Ct
S of Commerce Ln 20 33 25 0500 00001 0011
3.95+/-acres Lot 11, Hardee County Commerce Park
S20, T34S, R25E
AND 20 33 25 0500 00001 0012
4.55+1-acres Lot 12, Hardee County Commerce Park
S20, T34S, R25E
Mike S. Thompson, Chairman
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the Planning and
Development Department at least two (2) working days prior to the
P/Z Public Hearing.
This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents
relating to this proposal are available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the
Planning and Development Departmept, 110 S. 9"' Ave., Wauchula,
Florida.
All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering
any decision the Boards shall rely solely on testimony that is
relevant and material.
Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will need
to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a court
reporter. 03:31c


Letter To The Editor
-" Hardee County Should Promote
Agriculture, Natural Resources


m


Dear Editor,
During the past 11 weeks of
the public involvement of the
Hardee Visioning process,
many people expressed their
preference to see the county
attract eco-tourism.
The special appeal to out-
siders to visit Hardee County is
the agricultural environment
and natural resources in this
location.
What would eco-tourism look
like?
-Developing bicycle trails
next to orange groves and Peace
River.
-Canoeing, kayaking on the
Peace River with growth for
offering cabins and restaurants.
-Tours of the citrus farms.
Show people the varieties and
sell them fruit, jams, mar-
malades, etc.
-Historical home tours in
Wauchula. They are available
now and hold a strong appeal to
many people. Example: Azalea
Hill.
-Pioneer Days attracts many
people. The Story of Jesus
brings people to Hardee
County.
-Possible tours of small
ranches so people, can learn
about cattle, watch a cowboy
rope a calf, even get a riding
lesson on a safe horse. This is a
popular family outing in the
cowboy locations of the west-
ern states. Hardee County could
attract a lucrative business


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDING
LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 360 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

Description of Property:

LOT 2 BLK 1 HEARTLAND ESTATES
PHASE THREE 401 P1 686P1189
PB-B41P1 692P1005 696P750

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: WILLIE LUBIN AND MARI-
LYN LUBIN

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
20 day of April, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 14" day of March, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Norma M. Juarez, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD002XXXX 3:17-4:7c




NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDING
LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 276 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

Description of Property:

1 AC BEG NW COR OF NE1/4 OF
SE1/4 OF SW1/4 RUN S 291 FT E
150 FT N 291 FT W 150 FT POB
17 33S 25E
439P382

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: ROBERTA SPEARS
WILLIAMS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
20 day of April, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 11th day of March, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Laura L. Barker, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD004XXXX 3:17-4:7c


NOTICE OF SALE


offering a view of Florida cow-
boys.
-Tours of phosphate land,
before and after mining.
-Mexican/Ametichn Fest-
ival with music, dance, food,
and crafts, reflecting the Mei-
ican cultural interests.
All of these opportunities can
be connected for tours so that
visitors learn about the agricul-
tural/natural resources of
Hardee County and the special
culture here.
At present Solomon's Castle
attracts thousands of visitors
annually to this county. They
drive here from Sarasota, Lake
Wales, Haines City, Bradenton,
Tampa, Orlando, Fort Myers,
Naples and further south. Such
people are seeking the opportu-
nity to visit a special location
and would certainly enjoy see-
ing more of this county if other
attractions were available.
We are not offering the glitz,
of Disney World but the agrari-
an charm of Old Florida-a
chance to see the woods and
waterways of this beautiful
county.
Eco-tourism can continue to
support future generations of
Hardee residents if we preserve
the land and water, and if we
creatively connect the many
opportunities for outside visi-
tors to enjoy this treasure of
Florida.
Julia Mader
Wauchula








March 31, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Park's Parade Boasts


90 Cancer Survivors


The parade boasted nearly four dozen vehicles and about two dozen marchers.


By REGGIE DeSMET
& SHARON MAGEE
Special To The Herald-Advocate
The annual Cancer Survivor
Celebration Parade took place
on Feb. 18 at Pioneer Creek RV
Park.
Organized by Queen Gerry
Wilhelm and her committee, the
day started at 10 a.m. and
included ticket sales for a
Chinese raffle and for three
larger items.
The Chinese raffle had 12
groupings of hand-crafted items
made by park residents. Tick-
ets were sold and placed in bags
according to which items the
purchasers hoped to win, with:s
all proceeds given to the'
American Cancer Society.
The other three items were a
large stained-glass, with a dia-
mond shape in the center, sun
catcher in clear glass created by
Fran McIntire and won by Mary
Kay Hite; an oil painting of a
lighthouse scene by Cathy
Renwick, won by Ron White;
and a large fretwork basket with
flowers, hand-crafted by Alf
Schafer with Ginnie Merriman
the winner.
The survivors, totaling close
to 90, were recognized with
flags bearing the cancer symbol
placed in front of their units.
Many wore a .survivor ribbon
supplied by the park, along with
purple shirts with "Survivor"
written on the back and "Relay
For Life" on the front. Care-
givers were given white shirts
with "Caregiver" on the back.
The shirts were donated by the
American Cancer Society.
Decorators gathered at 1 p.m.
to inflate pink and purple bal-


loons and decorate parade
entries with pink and purple
crepe paper. Soda cans were
tied to golf carts, to "make
noise" for survival.
This parade was the largest of
any of the past celebrations, and
was headed by Dick Johnson.
The King and Queen, Norb and
Gerry Wilhelm, were the digni-
taries who led the parade, wear-
ing crowns and matching em-
broidered shirts.
The parade consisted of 42
golf carts, two antique cars, two
bicycles and at least 20 walkers.
The highlight was all the sur-
vivors sharing in their victories.
"We Are The Champions"
was the music played at both
the start and the end of the
parade.


The celebration followed in
the community building with at
least 200 in attendance, sharing
cookies and punch donated by
residents. Gerry Wilhelm wel-
comed everyone and introduced
Denise Benavides, executive
director for the Hardee Unit of
the American Cancer Society.
Proceeds for the day totaled
$1,164 for the American Cancer
Society..
Plans are under way for the
park's next celebration in Feb-
ruary of 2012.
Be aware that the 2011 Relay
For Life in Wauchula is set for
April 30 at
Wildcat Stadium. Attend and
share hope and love with those
who have been given the gift of
life.


The annual parade raises more than hopes; it raised over $1,100 for the Hardee Unit
of the American Cancer Society, which will host its annual Relay For Life on April 30.




I rll. ,"^ .'s,_ g i


COURTESY PHOTO
Wearing their crowns, Queen Gerry and King Norb
Wilhelm led the parade vehicles and marchers.


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STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FIND THE
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS) IN COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 10-CIE1 -NOI-2504-(A)-(I)
The Department gives notice of its intent to find the Amendment(s) to the
Comprehensive Plan for Town of Zolfo Springs, adopted by Ordinance No. 2010-09 on
December 20, 2010, IN COMPLIANCE, pursuant to Sections 163.3184, 163.3187 and
163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Town of Zolfo Springs Comprehensive Plan Amendment(s) and the
Department's Objections, Recommendations and Comments Report, (if any), are avail-
able for public inspection Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, during nor-
mal business hours, at the Town of Zolfo Springs Town Hall, 400 Orange Street, Highway
17, Zolfo Springs, Florida 33890.
Any affected person; as defined in Section 163.3184, F.S., has a right to petition for
an administrative hearing to challenge the proposed agency determination that the
Amendment(s) to the Town of Zolfo Springs Comprehensive Plan are In Compliance, as
defined in Subsection 163.3184(1), FS. The petition must be filed within twenty-one (21)
days after publication of this notice, and must include all of the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C. The petition must be filed with the Agency
Clerk, Department of Community Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-2100, and a copy mailed or delivered to the local government. Failure to
timely file a petition shall constitute a waiver of any right to request an administrative pro-
ceeding as a petitioner under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If a petition is filed, the
purpose of the administrative hearing will be to present evidence and testimony and for-
ward a recommended order to the Department. If no petition is filed, this Notice of Intent
shall become final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other affected persons may petition for leave to intervene in the
proceeding. A petition for intervention must be filed at least twenty (20) days before the
final hearing and must include all of the information and contents described in Uniform
Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A petition for leave to intervene shall be filed at the Division of
Administrative Hearings, Department of Management Services, 1230 Apalachee
Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3060. Failure to petition to intervene within the
allowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such a person has to request a hear-
ing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to participate in the administrative hear-
ing.
After an administrative hearing petition is timely filed, mediation is available pursuant
to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a), FS., to any affected person who is made a party to the
proceeding by filing that request with the administrative law judge assigned by the
Division of Administrative Hearings. The choice of mediation shall not affect a party's right
to an administrative hearing.
-s- J. Thomas Beck, AICP
Director, Division of Community Planning
Department of Community Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100 3:31c


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Soon a year will have passed since the Deepwater Horizon accident in the Gulf. From the beginning,
we have taken responsibility for the cleanup., Our commitment to the Gulf remains unchanged, as
does our responsibility to keep you informed.

Committed to the Gulf
No oil has flowed into the Gulf since July 15th. As our efforts continue, nearly 100% of the waters
are open and the beaches are clean and open. To ensure its safety, Gulf seafood has been more
rigorously tested by independent researchers and experts than any other seafood in the world.
To date, BP has spent more than $13 billion in clean-up costs.

Restore the Environment
An additional $282 million has been spent on environmental issues, including wildlife rescue and
restoration of wildlife refuges across the region. We have also committed $500 million to the
Gulf of Mexico Research Institute to fund scientific studies on the potential impact of the spill.

Help to Rebuild the Economy
$5 billion in claims have already been paid. We've committed $20 billion to an independent-fund
to pay for environmental restoration and all legitimate claims, including lost incomes. More than
$200 million in grants have been made to the Gulf Coast States to promote tourism and seafood.

Learn and Share the Lessons
This was a tragedy that never should have happened. Our responsibility is to learn from it and share
with competitors, partners, governments and regulators to help ensure that it never happens again.

We know we haven't always been perfect but we are working to live up to our
commitments, both now and in the future.

For more information, please visit bpamerica.com.


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