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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 3/24/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
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sobekcm - UF00028302_00373
System ID: UF00028302:00373
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 16
4 Sections, 40 Pages


Thursday, March 24, 2011


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Volunteer workmen carefully plant one of many palm trees amid the scenery of the 100-foot stage set for the upcom-
Ing five-weekend performances of the nationally known drama, "The Story of Jesus," which begins on Friday and
Saturday evenings at the Cattleman's Arena west of Wauchula. Notice the flags tracing the route of underground
cables providing the stage and backstage with lighting for the cast of 250 working on the play, along with seam-
stresses, make-up and a lot of other behind-the-scenes workers taking part in the huge production.


'Story Of Jesus' Opens Friday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There are tickets still avail-
able, especially for this first
weekend.
Rev. Mike Graham reports
exciting and exhausting prepa-
ration for the premier, national-
ly known Passion Play, "The
Story of Jesus," is on schedule
for this weekend's opening of
the production which portrays
the birth, childhood, ministry,
miracles, trial and crucifixion,
and the resurrection and tri-
umphant Second Coming of the


Christ.
Graham learned early this
week that a New York Times
reporter and photographer
would be on hand on Friday
night, completing an article to
be included in a Times feature
section "Our Land," which
talks about events in cities and
towns around America. Graham
said they spent a day and a half
here getting preliminary infora-
tion.
There's been a larger than
ever cast and crew turnout this
year for the five weekend play


which starts its annual run on
Friday and Saturday. It is at
7:30 p.m. on March 25-26, and -
continues April 1-2, 8-9, 15-16,
and 22-23. All performances
are interpreted for the deaf by
someone on stage amid the
action so it can be both'seen and.
"heard."
Tickets are $16 for children,
seniors' and groups of 25 or
more. Adults are $18 and end
section seats are $14. They can
be obtained at www.storyofje-
sus.com or by calling 375-4031.
This is the last year to see this


Crash Takes Teen's Life


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 16-year-old Bowling Green
boy was killed last week in a
single-vehicle crash on a coun-
try road.
Shawn "Cody" Svendsen was
partially ejected after losing
control of the 2001 Kia he was
driving on Hobb Road, the
Florida Highway Patrol said.
He was not wearing a seat belt
at the time.
His passenger, Mark Chap-.
man, 16, also of Bowling
Green, was wearing a seat belt
and suffered only minor in-
juries, the FHP said. He was
treated at the scene and
released, a report filed by crash
investigator Tpr. William J.
Delaney and homicide investi-

WEATHER
ATHE HIf LPOW BAM
03/16 83 51 0.00
03117 84 51 0.00
03118 85 54 0.00
03/19 85 46 0.00
03/20 86 51 0.00
03/21 84 57 0.00
03/22 84 48 0.00
TOTAL Rainfall to 03/22/11 -3.74
Same period last year 8.21
Tn Year Average 54.30
Source Unv. of Ra. Ona Rneearch Ceniur

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Community Calendar .6A
Courthouse Report ... 6D
Crime Blotter ....... 5D
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup .6A
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menu .. .3A



7 18122 07290 3


gator Cpl. Kimberly Benavidez
said.
According to the report, the
crash occurred on Wednesday
of last week at 1:55 in the after-
noon. The boys were traveling
southbound on Hobb Road,
about 2,000 feet south of
County Road 668.
Svendsen drove to the left to
go around a farm tractor, but
lost control of his Kia in the soft
sand, the FHP said. The vehicle
started to rotate clockwise and
traveled across the roadway
over to th'e west shoulder.
Svendsen overcorrected, the
investigators said, causing the
vehicle to go into a counter-
clockwise spin. It struck a ditch


embankment on the east shoul-
der and overturned, they said.
Svendsen was transported to
Florida Hospital Wauchula,
where he was pronounced dead,
He became the first person to
die on Hardee County roadways
this year.
The teen was a junior at
Hardee Senior High School and
was 4 member of Florida's First
Assembly of God church in
Wauchula.
He is survived by his parents,
Kelly D. and Ginger L. Rogers
Svendsen, and three brothers
and two sisters, along with
grandparents, aunts, uncles and
cousins.
Services were Monday.


Family Sues



Youth Sports


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
A local family has sued
Hardee County Youth Sports
Inc. because their two sons are
not playing baseball. The law-
suit was filed Oct. 15, 2010, in
the 10th Judicial Circuit Court
as a civil action.
The plaintiffs are Wayne
Crosby and Tammy Hall-
Crosby, parents of minors Josef
Crosby and Jonathan Crosby.
The group's president is
Andrew McGuckin.
The defendants, a not-for-
profit corporation, filed its
response on Nov. 15, 2010. the
case is still pending.
The Crosby family lives in
,the Oaks area south of Zolfo


springs. They moved to Hardee
County in 2005 and their sons
are home-schooled.
Jonathan Crosby, 10, played
baseball for the local Sand
Gnats in 2010. Josef Crosby,
13, played baseball for three
years through 2009. His teams
were the Cubs, Tigers and
Dodgers.
In 2010 the mother Tammy
Crosby said Josef was kicked
off the Dodger team on the third
day of practice.
McGuckin recently told The
Herald-Advocate he would like
the two boys to be playing now
but the mother is not allowed on
the premises due to her past
behavior.
See FAMILY 3A


spectacular production, at least
until 2013, as 2012 will change
to the story of Noah, a produc-
tion Graham has been working
on for several years.
Meanwhile, "The Story of
Jesus," has several changes this
year as it has every year. There
is a new opening, plus a prophet
proclaiming the coming of the
Messiah and an interactive
Jesus and the children scene. As
always, it remains scripturally
accurate in every detail.
Work in preparing the Cat-
tleman's Arena for these per-
formances began as soon as the
Hardee County Fair was over.
Many volunteers have gathered
almost daily, or nightly really,
since then to prepare the dusty
streets of Palestine, the courts
of Herod, the Temple and other
huge scenery used in the three-
hour drama.
"We've had a lot of extra help
this year, especially a couple of
electricians from town, who
have given hours remaking all
the wiring lost last fall. Thieves
stole thousands of dollars of
wiring late last fall from the
storage where the scenery is
See STORY 3A


INDIAN ATTACK!


CENSUS: Few




Changes Here


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
In contrast to a decade's
worth of predictions and esti-
mates for 10 percent growth
here, the 2010 U.S. Census
shows less than a three percent
gain in Hardee County's popu-
lation over the past 10 years.
There were 26,938 residents
in the county as registered by
the 2000 Census. In 2010, the
number rose to 27,731, an
increase of 793 citizens, accord-
ing to figures released last
Thursday by U.S. Census offi-
cials.
The new population number
is far short of anticipated
growth, which had paced the
county's at about 10 percent for
a -total of nearly 30,000 resi-
dents. Instead, growth was well
under half that.
The greatest growth segment


here came in the Asian popula-
tion, which came close to quad-
rupling 2000 numbers, skyrock-
eting from 81 to 298.
All other races identified in
the census lost ground, with the
exception of whites.
Blacks went from 2,244 in
the 2000 Census to 1,936 in
2010, a reduction of 308 citi-
zens. American Indians de-
creased from 184 to 172. Pa-
cific Islanders went from 15
down to 12.
Whites in the county, howev-
er, increased from 2000 totals
of 19,035 to 2010's 20,013, for
little more than a five percent
hike of 978 residents.
The census correctly reports
Hispanic or Latino as an ethnic-
ity, not a race. Here, the second-
largest segment growth was
reported. Residents who identi-
See CENSUS 2A


5 Open Seats


Draw 6 So Far

Deadline For Wauchula

Candidates Is Friday Noon


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advbcate
There's still time to qualify
for one of five seats open on the
Wauchula City Commission.
A half dozen candidates had
signed up by late Tuesday for
four of the five available seats.
The deadline is noon tomorrow
(Friday). The Special Election
is May 10.
A check with City Clerk
Holly Collins indicated a candi-
date can change the seat he or
she wants by simply going in
and withdrawing the first appli-
cation packet and replacing it
with another as the filing fee
has already been paid.
The five seats are available
because of the ouster of five
commissioners: District l's Val
"Patarini-Seat 1; District 2's
Dan Graham-Seat 3 and David
Royal-Seat 4; District 3's


Clarence Bolin-Seat 5; and
the At-Large Seat 7 of Jerry
Conerly.
Already in the running are
Patty Detwiler-Seat 1; Dan
Graham and Nick Timmerman-
Seat 3; Kenny Baker-Seat 4;
and Gary Smith and Robert
McAllister-Seat 5. No one has
yet qualified for Seat 7.
It is an easy matter to qualify.
The filing fee is $61.60. Com-
missioners are paid $400 a
month in salary and expense
monies plus a $30 utility credit.
A person must be at least 18,
a registered voter and a resident
for at least one year in the dis-
trict which he or she will repre-
sent, with the exception of the
at-large seat, for which a candi-
date may reside anywhere with-
in the city limits.
District 1 is all the city terri-
See SEATS 2A


COURTESY PHOTO
Paynes Creek Historic State Park will host its fourth annual Fort Chokonikla
Encampment this Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event features
Seminole Indian and U.S. soldier camps, re-enactments, arts and crafts displays and
exhibitions, and various foods. Of particular interest this year will be the event's first-
ever re-enactment of the massacre at the Kennedy-Darling Trading Post, which once
stood on park grounds. See and do all this for free with a park admission of $3 per vehi-
cle. The state park is located at 888 Lake Branch Road in Bowling Green. Above, Indian
re-enactors at a previous event work around their campsite.


Friday Night

Live Fun

... Photos 9B


LIVESTOCK SALE

SECTION INSIDE!


Bass Fishing

,,,-,,Super Hot

' ... Column 5A


460
plus 44 sales tax










2A The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


'I IO


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads -Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18; 1 yr.- S31; 2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $41; 2 yrs. S79
Out of State
6 months S27; 1 yr. S49; 2 yrs. S95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


The Story of Jesus will be held at the Hardee Cattlemen's
Arena for five consecutive Friday-Saturdays, starting March 25-26.
The passion play will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will have a cast of
about 200 people and 150 animals. Tickts range from $14 to $18.
The 22nd annual play is spearheaded by Rev. Mike Graham.
Call 375-4031 for more information. Graham on March 15-16
hosted two representatives from the New York Times. This is get-
ting to be nationally acclaimed. The representatives will return to
watch the first performance on Friday night. The arena can seat
1,600, and advance ticket sales are doing well.

Wendy Petteway of the Popash community is president of the
Florida Cattlewomen. This is the. first president from Hardee
County of the association.
She and her husband Roy Petteway, a fifth generation Hardee
Countian, have a commercial and registered Angus herd plus a cit-
rus grove and citrus nursery.

A Wauchula couple in their mid-60s live at Forest Glades
Apartments and make do with their Social Security checks, each
receiving $694 a month. Their rent is $284 a month and utilities are
$136 to $150. If they made $2 less a month, they would qualify for
food stamps.


F h qff I
Ethel Allen grew up in Wauchula and was murdered at age 19
on Nov. 18, 1934, in the Melbourne area. Her murder was never
solved. Gail Sheldon of Micco in south Brevard County is doing
research on the case and would like information at 1-321-243-
7483.
Ethel's mother was Nancy C. Allen (1878-1966), who is
buried at the New Hope Baptist Cemetery. Nancy was listed in the
Wauchula Census in 1935 as single. Ethel's body was found north
of Melbourne on Nov. 22, 1934, partially nude, badly decomposed
and mutilated. Her throat had been cut. She was stabbed in the fore-
head and at the base of her skull. The right side of her face had been
crushed. She had been burned and thrown in the Indian River
Intercoastal Waterway.
She had a tatoo of a rope and the initial B.K. on her upper
thigh. Truck drivers from Arab, Alabama, discovered her body
from buzzards flying overhead.
The murder scene was not discovered. A coroner's jury ruled
the death a murder.
Ethel was living and working at the Finney Boarding House in
Cocoa at the time of her death. Her landlord Mrs. Gerald Finney
identified the body by her tattoo and the yellow gold ring with a
ruby which she wore.
*e There is a legend of her ghost haunting a local restaurant
named Ashley's in Rockledge.
No one was ever charged in her death. There were two persons
of interest. One suspect died in a California prison' where he was
serving time for theft.
Sheldon is gathering information to write a story of Ethel's life
and untimely death. In 1934 near the end of the Great Depression
many people came from all over the South to work in farming and
packing houses for fruits and vegetables.
Ethel Allen's dad was James W. Allen, a Georgia man who met
Nancy in Wauchula. They worked in agriculture.

The Christian Life And Witness Course will be held Monday
and Tuesday, March 28-29, at 6 p.m. in Harden Hall at Whispering
Pines Baptist Church at 303 White Pine'Drive in Sebring. The
course is sponsored by Roger Jaudon Evangelistic Ministries. He is
a Wauchula native. Call 863-471-3315 for information. Cost for
materials is $7.


Who Were My Birth Parents?


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Who's my Daddy? Who's my
Momma?
Robert E. Douglas Jr. 65, was
adopted. He was born at Wau-
chula Infirmary Nov. 19, 1945.
A birth record says he was born
as Curtis Lee Stanford.
His adopted parents, Robert
E. Douglas and wife Ethell are
both deceased. "Bob" now
wants to know who his birth
parents are. Is he a World War II
baby? Even if deceased, he
wants to visit their graves. This
is a yearning for his roots.
He was a police officer and
Christian minister for many
years. He and his wife Carolyn
of 45 years raised four children,
one of them adopted.
In 1997 the couple founded
the National Police Suicide
Foundation Inc. He is the exec-
utive director. The couple live
in Seaford, Delaware.
If you have information about
his birth parents he can be
reached toll-free at 1-866-276-
4615, by e-mail at
Redoug2001@aol.com or by
mail at 7015 Clark Road,
Seaford, DE 19973. His cell
phone number is 302-536-1214.
He grew up in Winter Haven
and Tampa. He served in the
Marines from 1964-67.
Bob was a police officer from
1969 to 1974 in Temple Terrace
near the University of South
Florida, where he earned a
bachelor's degree in criminal
justice. Later he earned a mas-
ter's degree in police adminis-
tration from University of Balt-
imore and a master's degree in
theology from St. Mary's Sem-
inary and University.
He worked for the Baltimore
City Police department for 20
years until 1994.
Bob was pastor of Jenkins
Memorial Church, a non-den-
ominational Christian church,
serving for 24 years and retiring
Jan. 1, 2010. The church is in
Riviera Beach, MD. He was
police chaplain for FOP Lodge
No. 3 in Baltimore City for 14
years and serves as Chaplain for
Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms
(ATF) in Washington, D.C.


SEATS
Continued From 1A
tory east of Sixth Avenue (U.S.
17 South). District 2 is west of
Sixth Avenue and north of Main
Street and District 3 is west of
Sixth Avenue and south of Main
Street.
Only registered voters may
cast a ballot in this Special
Election. Registration books are
open through 5 p.m. on April 11
for any city resident, including
anyone who will be 18 by the
May 10 election. Voting regis-
tration is at the Supervisor of
Elections Office in Courthouse
Annex II, at Oak Street and
U.S. 17 South (315 S. Sixth
Ave.).
Early voting will be held at
the Elections Office from Mon-
day through Saturday, May 2-7
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Gov. Rick Scott, because of
their violation by state law gave
the five commissioners a choice
of resigning or being removed
from office by 5 p.m. on Feb.
11. Four resigned and Graham
was removed by order of the
governor.
Graham is perhaps the least
guilty of the five commission-
ers as he had just been appoint-
ed in early September 2009 to
replace Ken Lambert, who had
resigned from Seat 3. The first
of two violations of the state's
Government in the Sunshine
Law was violated by a closed
meeting on Sept. 14, 2009.
Another occurred on March 1,
2010.
State Statutes mandate "when
a municipal official is charged
with a misdemeanor related to
the duties of office and is con-
victed," whether adjudication is
withheld or not, "the governor
shall remove such municipal
official from office."
Scott has said that if the city
voters, knowing all the facts of
the ex-commissioners' wrong-
doing, and choose to re-elect
any of them, he would not again
remove them. His spokesman
has said, however, that he
knows of no precedent where
any ousted official then turned
around and ran to fill his own
vacancy.
Commissioners have also
repeatedly violated the City
Charter in several substantial
matters.
Candidates to fill the vacant
City Commission seats have
until tomorrow noon to decide
if they want to fill one of those
seats.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Robert E. (Bob) Douglas Jr. was born in Wauchula on
Nov. 19, 1945, as Curtis Lee Stanford.


The couple moved in 2010 to
Delaware where they operate
his foundation.
On Oct. 8, 1951, he was offi-
cially adopted by Robert
Eugene and Ethel Douglas who
lived in Avon Park. The attor-
ney was Wilbur Whitehurst,
who listed the natural father as
Leo Lavon Stanford. The circuit
court judge was D.O. Rogers.
Douglas has written four
books, "Death With No Valor"
published in 1997, "Hope
Beyond The Badge" in 2001,
"Healing For A Hero's Heart"
in 2001, and "The Art Of Being
You" to be published this fall.
Douglas said in the U.S. a
law enforcement officer com-
mits suicide every 17 to 21
hours. Causes include domestic
violence, infidelity, alcohol
abuse, or from prescription or
non-prescription drug abuse.
He said there is a higher than
normal rate of suicide among
law enforcement officers, fire-













ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Graham Crackers, Glazed Do-
nut, Bagel Bars, Orange Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice,
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Green Peas,
Orange Juice Bar, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk



CENSUS
Continued From 1A_
fy themselves as Hispanic
jumped by over 23 percent,
from 2000's total of 9,611 to
2010's 11,895.
That new figure places
Hispanics at nearly 43 percent
of Hardee County's total popu-
lation.
And of the county's total res-
idency numbers, 7,675 are chil-
dren under the age of 18. That
makes 20,056 of the citizenry
18 and over, an important num-
ber for redistricting purposes.
In fact, the data released last
week by the U.S. Census
Bureau targeted only those
numbers needed for political
redistricting. Officials said
there will be two more 2010
Census releases to come, one in
late May and another sometime
this summer.
It will be those releases
which will include economic,
housing, education and other
social data.
The current release gives the
Florida Legislature the informa-
tion it needs to begin redrawing
district lines within the state as
well as lines for Florida's seats
in the U.S. Congress, which
because of the state's total pop-
ulation growth will go from 27
to 29.
Floridians as a whole now
number 18,801,310.
As for Hardee County's dis-
bursement of its 27,731 citi-
zens, 5,001 live in the city of
Wauchula, 2,930 reside in
Bowling Green, and 1,827 live
in the town of Zolfo Springs.
The remainder of Hardee
Countians call' the unincorpo-
rated areas home.


fighters and in the military than
in the general population.
He travels across the country
providing educational training
seminars for emergency respon-
ders on the issue of police sui-
cide. He is considered a leading
expert on police suicide by
Dateline, CNN, Time Magazine
and USA Today. He does sui-
cide-related counseling and
support for families and emer-
gency responders. He gives
encouragement and hope to
families of suicide victims and
helps them understand and deal
with their anger and guilt.
He does seminars to educate
the general public and govern-
ment employees on suicide
awareness and prevention and-
helps provide a network of
communication among suicide
survivors.
The foundation's mission is
"to provide suicide awareness
and prevention training pro-
grams and support services that


TUIb5UAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Sausage
Patty, Biscuit, Applesauce, Con-
diments and Milk
Lunch: Macaroni and
Cheese, Burrito, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Black-eyed
Peas, Grape Juice, Apple Crisp,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Corndog, Alternative Meal,
French Fries, Salad .Tray,
Applesauce, Rolls, Honey
Mustard Dip, Condiments and
Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Cheese Grits, Buttered
Toast, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Lasagna with Ground
Beef, Stacked Ham Sandwich,
Alternative Meal, Green Beans,
Salad Tray, Peaches, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Cookie, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot
Pocket, Combo Sub, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Corn, Mixed
Fruit, Condiments and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Super
Donut, Bagel Bars, Juice, Con-
diments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice,
Rolls, Pepperoni Pizza, Salad
Bar, Tossed Salad, Garden
Peas, Trail Mix, Juice Bar,
Condiments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Biscuits,
Sausage Patty, Pineapple
Tidbits, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Burrito, Sausage
Pizza, Tossed Salad, Black-
eyed Peas, Apple Crisp, Juice,
Con-diments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Chicken Nuggets, Rolls
dog, Lettuce & Tomato, French
Fries, Applesauce, Condiments,
and Milk


will establish a standard of care
for emergency responsders and
promote employee wellness."
He said even Christians com-
mit suicide. Brain chemistry
can get out of balance, with
serotonin levels too low. Some
severe life events can cause a
person to contemplate ending
their life.
The first step of a severely
depressed person is to consider
suicide. The second, and more
alarming step, is to consider the
method of suicide. The most
alarming step is to consider
when. "That person should not
be left alone." A number of peo-
ple have credited Douglas with
helping prevent their thought-of
suicide.
Suicide is often an act to end
a person's pain. "It's all about
me." A suicide only extends
pain and suffering to that per-
son's survivors, said Douglas.
He said warning signs of sui-
cide include increased alcohol
consumption, emotional (cries
easily), withdrawn, talks of sui-
cide, writes or rewrites will, is
disillusioned, lack of energy or
motivation, accident-prone, loss
of love for profession, no longer
concerned about physical ap-
pearance, plays with gun, and
hopelessness.-
Risk factors can include
depression, marital problems or
a bad relationship, loss due to
death or divorce, terminal ill-
ness, indictment, disability/-
retirement, feeling responsible
for a partner's death, involved
in a shooting, or being arrested.
Douglas recommends calling
his foundation if a law enforce-
ment officer is thinking about
killing himself (concern).
If a person has considered
how he is going to commit sui-
cide, confidentially talk with a
supervisor and family member
(danger).
If a person is thinking about'
when, take the individual im-
mediately to get help. Do not
leave him or her alone at this
point (risk).
Robert E. Douglas Jr (aka
Curtis Lee Stanford) grew up to
a be a fine man and productive
citizen. His birth parents would
be proud.


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Cheese Grits, Buttered Toast,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Lasagna, Rolls, Stacked Ham
Sandwich, Salad Bar, Lettuce &
Tomato, Green Beans, Peach-
es, Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot
Pockets, Combo Sub, Meatloaf,
Cornbread, Lettuce & Tomato,
Whole Kernel Corn, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH,(
MONDAY
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Hamburger on a Bun, Chicken
Pattie on Bun, Chicken Breast
Fillet on Bun, Chicken & Rice,
French Fries, Turnip Greens,
Pinto Beans, Tossed Salad,
Beets, Juice Bar, Cornbread,
Condiments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, ham,
Macaroni & Cheese, French
Fries, Black-eyed Peas,
Steamed Cabbage, Tossed
Salad, Apple Crisp, Juice,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Syrup, Sausage Patty, Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken
Nuggets, French Fries, Savory
Rice, Tossed Salad, Mixed
Vegetables, Fruit Cocktail,
Rolls, Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Lasagna with
Ground Beef, French Fries,
Green Beans, Tossed Salad,
Waldorf Salad, Peaches, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Graham Crackers,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger or. a Bun, French Fries,
Combo Sub, Baked Beans,!
Potato Salad, Tossed Salad,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk.









March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Is Fleet Management Wise?


From left are Wayne Crosby, Jonathan, Josef and Tammy Hall-Crosby.


Representing the Crosby
family legally is Lakeland attor-
ney James Domineck Jr.
Representing Hardee Youth
Sports is Wauchula attorney
Ken Evers.
Domineck wrote the organi-
zation on March 24, 2010, that
he understood McGuckin
coached the Dodgers in 2010
and removed Josef from the
team. Domineck also wrote
March 24, 2010, a second letter
indicating that Jonathan had
been banned from participating
or attending any of the baseball
league games or events. The
attorney demanded that Youth
Sports cease and desist the
"unwarranted actions against
Mr. and Mrs. Crosby and their
family and reinstate Josef as a
participant in the youth baseball
league and allow them an equal
and fair opportunity to partici-
pate in and attend the baseball
league games and events.
(Please note that the Crosbys
requested that Josef be removed
from Andrew McGuckin's team
and be placed on a different
team due to past verbal abuse
and unethical coaching con-
duct)."
Domineck demanded that
Youth Sports "immediately
cease and desist its unwarranted
actions against Jonathan and
provide him an equal and fair
opportunity to participate in and
attend Hardee County Youth
Sports Inc.'s youth baseball
league games and events."
Domineck further wrote the
Crosbys had authorized his
-office to take whatever legal
,'steps are necessary, including
initiation of legal proceedings
seeking relief and other legal
remedies. He wrote a lawsuit
would seek any and all mone-
tary damages to which they are
entitled, as was as reasonable
attorney fees and court costs
incurred.
The Oct. 15, 2010, lawsuit
stated, "around February 2010
the defendant refused to allow
plaintiffs to actively participate
in its organization and threat-
ened them from admittance to
the county facilities and which
is continuing to the present
time."
Last year the Crosbys were
invited to attend a Youth Sports
board meeting to air their case
and the family refused to attend.
The defendant in its Nov. 15,
answer admitted "plaintiffs
were banned for life by the
organization and barred from.
entry and admission to facili-
ties, which continues at the time
of the filing of this answer."


FAMILY
Continued From 1A
The answer admitted that pla
tiffs have sought reinstatem
but denied that notice and d
process have not been provide
The defendant's Nov.
answer also asked the court
deny the relief sought by
plaintiffs, saying the "plaint
have unclean hands. The a
justifying the ban and prohi
tion from participation a
exclusion from facilities
clude, but are not limited
interference with coaching si
and the official performance
duties by coaching staff,
hibiting behaviors inconsist
with and contrary to the adc
ed policies of the league w
respect to degradation
humiliation of participants, a
physical contact by the indiv
ual plaintiffs, Tammy H9
Crosby's mother (provoked
plaintiff Tammy Hall-Cros
with minor participant on
least one occasion. Plain
Tammy Hall-Crosby v
placed on probation last y
and afforded the opportunity
resolve her issues, to no av
Plaintiffs were afforded
opportunity to present th
position before the leag
board. They were notified of
meeting and refused to part
pate claiming that any presei
tion of their side would be fu
and not worth the effort. HC
is a private, not-for-pro
organization, and is not helk
the same standards as a pul
entity might be with respect
due process requirements; he
ever, due process was provic
to plaintiffs."
The Crosby family came
The Herald-Advocate in 2(
and 2011. Tammy Hall-Cro;
said, "We were threatened v
arrest if we showed up at
field. We have been treated 1
a cow patty. This has been d
stating emotionally and fc
like social rape. They are de
ing our pursuit of happiness.
Tammy Hall-Crosby d
most of the talking for the fi
ily. Her husband Wayne Cro
works at Mosaic's New Wa
chemical plant. He has wor]
in the phosphate industry for
years.
The mother told The Hen
Advocate, "We did not do a
thing wrong. Our goal is to
the boys play, let the fan
.watch and leave us alone. D(
mess with my cubs."
McGuckin, who recer
became president of the organ
zation, said he had Jc
removed from the Dodgers I
he coached to protect him:
because Tammy Hall-Cro:


in- told assistant coach Keith
ent Weems that McGuckin might
due molest her son if they were left
ed. alone.
15 McGuckin is a detective with
to the Hardee County Sheriff's
the Office. "I had to protect myself
iffs and others in the league."
Icts McGuckin said the league
ibi- decided the boys could play ball
nd if they were accompanied by a
in- guardian' and the mother was
to: kept off the premises.
taff The 2011 season had already
of started. McGuckin said the
ex- boys are welcome to play next
ent year but their mother is not wel-
>pt- come.
vith "There would be no problem
and if she was not involved. I
and coached those boys for three
rid- years. Our families attend
all- church together at First
by Christian Church of Wauchula.
by) I invited them to church.
at McGuckin said he gets along
tiff fine with the two boys and their
was father Wayne Crosby. He said
ear there are about 600 kids in
y. to Hardee County Youth Sports.
ail. McGuckin said the league
an would prefer spending money.
meir on ball-related expenses such as
gue equipment rather than defend-
the ing a lawsuit.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
After nearly an hour's discus-
sion, the Hardee County Com-
mission could not agree.
A request to award a fleet
leasing program to Enterprise
Fleet Management drew a mul-
titude of comments and a split
vote. The request was approved
3-2, with Dale Johnson and
Grady Johnson against the pro-
posed program.
Kevin Atchley, county engi-
neer and director of public
works and Karole Fitzgerald,
business development manager
for Enterprise, presented a short
video. Enterprise was the only
respondent to the county's
request for proposals on a fleet
management system.
Enterprise is a family-owned
business which began in St.
Louis, Mo., in 1957 and began
the commercial rental business
in Florida in 1975. It can offer a
10 to 30 percent reduction in
expenses, by replacing vehicles
before they incur high mainte-
nance costs. Hardee County has
62 light and medium general
purpose vehicles, which are on
a 17-year replacement cycle,
more than twice the govern-
ment's recommended best prac-
tice of 5 to 7 years.
Average maintenance costs
average $301 per month per
vehicle and many of the vehi-
cles get only 10 miles per gal-
lon. The goal is to reduce that to
$34.64 monthly average main-
tenance and more than 20 per-
cent fuel economy. Mainten-
ance would be outsourced to
local dealers and automobile
shops.
The county's maintenance
shop would still be needed for
work on large vehicles, such as
graders, dump trucks, heavy-
duty mowers and the like,
police vehicles and emergency
management ambulances and
engines.
It would save on the county's
capital outlay budget as well as
maintenance. Although it is a
seven-year contract, it can be
cancelled at any time without
termination penalties, except


the county would have to pay
for any debt outstanding on
vehicles.
Grady Johnson said on the
basis of his years of law en-
forcement administration on
over 100 vehicles, he thought
outsourcing maintenance could
be a good idea, but could be
done in agreements with local
vendors as needed, without a
fleet leasing agreement. Dale
Johnson said he didn't think it
would work to the county's
advantage.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-approved a three-year ex-
tension of the Major Special
Exception and Variance granted
in May 2008 to Clean Energy
LLC for construction of an
electric power plant. There are
no significant changes in the
original application, just the
economic downturns have de-
layed it.
"It's a good project. I under-
stand the economy. It's not hurt-.
ing any to postpone or extend
it," said Bryant.
-approved on a 4-1 vote a
change in the ordinance creat-
ing a county manager position.
Ordinance 1990-01 created the
county manager form of gov-
ernment. The only change is in
Section 6 (p) on the powers and
duties of the position. It now
reads he should "attend all
meetings of the Board with
authority to participate in the
discussion of any administra-
tive matter upon request by any
member of the Board."
Commissioner Dale Johnson
still opposed the change, saying
if the commission was about to
make a decision, the county
manager may have information
which would keep the Board
from going down the wrong
path. Grady Johnson countered
that "if we're going down the
wrong direction, he can ack-
nowledge it by a raised hand
and be requested to speak."
Commission Chairman Terry
Atchley noted that it would give
him greater responsibility in
engaging the county attorney
and county manager in discus-


sion of any issues.
-approved a change in Ord-
inance 2001-05 on the descrip-
tion of the assistant county
manager description, which
had a dual job including eco-
nomic development director.
Under the change, the assistant
county manager will be hired
by the commission. His job will
no longer entail economic de-
velopment direction as the
Economic Development Coun-
cil, a private corporation, hires
the Economic Development
Director and sets his salary. The
Board appoints the members of
the EDC and the related Indus-
trial Development Authority.
-On a 4-1 vote, with Com-
missioner Grady Johnson op-
posing, approved a request to
waive invitation to bid require-
ments and approve purchase of
the elements for the data control
system for the utility depart-
ment.
Park Winter, director of utili-
ties and Max Baker, informa-
tion technology specialist, ex-
plained that to save money
Baker had designed the data
acquisition system. Since it was
done in-house to eliminate
architect/engineer costs, there is
no need to bid out the system
design. The system will remote-
ly and automatically send data
and notify the-system if any-
thing is wrong (on filtering
pumps, treatment or other
measures) and initiate emer-
gency procedures to correct it.
The only problem is that the
cost of the components exceeds
the $25,000 purchase maximum
without bids. Only the commis-
sion can waive this. Bryant ini-
tially opposed waiving the pur-
chase maximum but agreed
when the savings were ex-
plained. Grady Johnson op-
posed waiving the requirement.
In comments from the audi-
ence, Frank Kirkland wondered*
i* there were any compatibility
issues in getting software or
hardware as technology
changes. Callie Skipper lauded
county staff for "its efficient use
of my tax dollars."


The holy passion of friendship is so sweet and steady and loyal and enduring in nature
that it will last through a whole lifetime, if not asked to lend money.


STORY
Continued From 1A


kept in the off-season. Reas-
sembling the wiring for the var-
ious parts of the 100-foot
scenery involved spacing, sizes
and outlets.
"But, we've caught back up,
:and are on schedule to open on
Friday night," said the always
upbeat Graham.
He said he's received help
from a lot of sources. Bob
Jarriel will provide sheep local-
A ly this year, making it less of a
task to get them and maintain,
them during the five weeks of'
the show. There are also camels,
horses, doves and pigeons, oxen
'AnA dogs. *
Word has gone out on over a
dozen radio stations, some TV
spots and billboards in Lake-
land and along 1-4, courtesy of
Graham providing photos for
.Gathering Ministries.com, a
group of Christian churches in
Polk County opposing the work


of atheists there.
All the support has Graham
enthused, but still realistic
, aboutthe massive Passion Play,
he directs each year. "We've got
one of the largest casts ever,
some new scenes and are filling
up ticket spots for later in the
run. This weekend is a good
time for local folks to take it in.
This is the perfect time for
Hardee County to get first view
of it."
One day, he hopes to develop
the 40-acre retreat center off SR,
66 for a place where there won't
be the hassle of reconstructing
scenery each year and more
than one production a year
could be done. The center
would also offer the public a
place for church or civic activi-
ties, camps, concerts and other
activities. Designs show a
2,000-seat main floor, balcony,
stage, restrooms, food service,
sports fields and more.


The trouble with baseball is that it is not played the year
round.











4A The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


JOHN CLAYTON
BRANNON
John Clayton Brannon, 72,
of Bowling Green, died on
Wednesday, March 16, 2011, at
Sebring.
He was born Nov. 22, 1938,
at Newville, Ala., and served in
the U.S. Air Force. He came to
Hardee County from Texas in
1964.
,He is survived'by his wife
Barbara Brannon of Bowling
Green; one son, John E. Bran-
non and wife Connie of Rich-
land, N.C.; three daughters
Cindy Walker and husband
Darrell of Lake Wales, Debbie
Newman and significant other
David Carrier of Deland, and
Debra Dickerson of Flagstaff,
Ariz.; sister Betty Ruth Walker
of Bowling Green; seven grand-
children; and one great-grand-
child.
Friends and family gathered
at the Brannon home, 5026
Poplar Ave., Bowling Green on
Saturday, March 19, from 4 to 6
p.m. In lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be made to the Diabetes
Foundation or the local Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars, at 322
Hanchey Road, Wauchula.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


ROSA JEAN PINKSTON
Time to Be Born
Jean was born on Oct. 5,
1937, in Wauchula to proud
parents James and Ruth Felix.
She was the youngest in the
household with Ruby, Junior,
Hortense and Sammy as the
older siblings. All preceded
her in death.

A Time to Be Taught
Jean's early education be-
gan in Hardee County, but she
was sent to Lakeland to live
with Ruby, thereby enabling
her to finish from Rochelle
High School. Later, she mat-
riculated at Edward Waters
College in Jacksonville, and
completed her Bachelor of
Science degree in Elementary
Education.

A Time to Love
Jean was joined in Holy
Matrimony to Anthony Red-
den and, to this union, two
sons were born. Years later,
she married Rev. Charles
Pinkston, and they served
faithfully in their churches
until their health failed.

A Time to Work and
Build Up
Jean grew up in the New
Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church in
Wauchula, but she also joined
Greater Mt. Zion A.M.E.
Church in Arcadia, serving as
musician for these churches
in addition to many other
churches and soloists. She
was an accomplished singer
as well. Jean taught school for
many years in the Hardee
School System, where she
was loved and respected by
students, parents and col-
leagues.

A Time to Die
After a lengthy illness, the
time came to make her spiri-
tual transition. She heard and
answered her Master's call on
Monday, March 14, 2011.
Now, she can join that Heav-
enly Choir.

A Time to Mourn
Memories will be cher-
ished by two sons, Terry
Redden and Timothy Redden
and wife Becky; five grand-
children; two great-grandchil-
dren; one sister-in-law Al-
berta Clark; a special and
devoted niece" Barbara Col-
lins; a supportive and caring
acquaintance Kelly Smith, the
Redden family; and a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins,
friends and acquaintances.
Funeral services will be
Saturday, March 26, 2011, at.
3 p.m. from New Mt. Zion
A.M.E. Church, 1615 Martin
Luther King Jr. Ave., Wau-
chula. Burial will be in
Magnolia Manor Cemetery in
Wauchula.
Hickson Funeral Home
Arcadia


FLORENTINO OBREGON
Florentino Obregon, 79, of
Zolfo Springs, died on Monday,
March 21, 2011, at home.
Born Nov. 3, 1931, in Mex-
ico, he came to Hardee County
from Texas in 1973. He was a
farm laborer and member of
Iglesia Metodista Unida Luz y
Vida in Zolfo Springs.
He was preceded in death by
his wife Emma Obregon; son
Daniel Obregon; daughter
Torivia Obregon; and two
grandchildren, Angel Patino Jr.
and Tomas Mata Jr.
Survivors include three sons,
Pedro Obregon and wife
Micaela of Bowling Green,
Florentino Obregon Jr. and wife
Ernestina of Wauchula, and
Juan Martin Obregon and wife
Priscilla of Zolfo Springs; six
daughters, Irene Reyes and hus-
band Jose Angel of Texas,
Reyna Mata and husband
Tomas of Michigan, Aurora
Patino and husband Angel of
Zolfo Springs, Guillermina
Pantoja of Wauchula, Norma
Juarez and husband Alfredo of
Zolfo Springs, and Martina
Zuniga and husband Jose Angel
of Wauchula; 36 grandchildren;
and 35 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday,
March 23, from 6 to 8 p.m.at
Iglesia Metodista Unida Luz y
Vida. Services are today
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. at the
church with the Rev. Raul
Cintron officiating. Interment
follows in Wauchula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

Curiosity . endows the,
people who have it with a
generosity in argument
and a serenity in cheerful
willingness to let life take
the form it will.


I'n Memory



Ott.11 j W___1-I


SHAWN "CODY"
SVENDSEN
Shawn "Cody" Svendsen,
16, of Bowling Green, died
on Wednesday, March 16,
2011, in Wauchula.
He was born June 22,
1994, in Avon Park, and was a
lifetime Hardee County resi-
dent. He was a member of
Florida's First Assembly of
God in Wauchula.
Cody was a junior at Har-
dee Senior High School in
Wauchula. He will be remem-
bered as a good student and
friend. He enjoyed fishing
with his dad. He had a won-
derful imagination; he took
his ideas and created things.
He was a Renaissance man.
Cody was loved by his family
and friends and will be great-
ly missed by all that knew
him.
He was preceded in death
by his grandfather Robert
Rogers.
He is survived by his par-
ents, Kelly D. and Ginger L.
Rogers Svendsen of Bowling
Green; three brothers, Jeffrey
Svendsen of Wauchula, Justin
Svendsen and wife Ashley of
New York, and Joey Svend-
sen of Fall River, Mass.; two
sisters, Tiffany Fancher of
Tampa and Kristine Svendsen
of Wauchula; maternal grand-
mother Barbara Rogers of
Bowling Green; paternal
grandparents, Connie Newton
and Mel Svendsen of Wau-
chula; and several aunts,
uncles and cousins.
Visitation was held on
Monday, March 21, from 10
to 11 a.m., at Florida's First
Assembly of God, 1397 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula. Fun-
eral services will 'follow the
visitation at 11 a.m. at the
church with the Rev. Chris-
topher Rutledge officiating.
Online condolences can be
made at pongerkaysgrady.
com.
cPongex-'Yays-g -(adq
Funeral Homes
Wauchula

P3


DOMESTIC

VIOLENCE

Don't Know Where
To Turn For Help?

CALL THE CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh





















3OHN CLAYTON
BRANNON
John Clayton Brannon, 72,
of Bowling Green, died on
Wednesday, March 16, 2011,
at Sebring.'
He was born Nov. 22,
1938, at Newville, Ala., and
served in the U.S. Air Force.
He came to Hardee County
from Texas in 1964.
He is survived by his wife
Barbara Brannon of Bowling
Green; one son, John E.
Brannon and wife Connie of
Richland, N.C.; three daugh-
ters Cindy Walker and hus-
band Darrell of Lake Wales,
Debbie Newman and signifi-
cant other David Carrier of
Deland, and Debra Dickerson
of Flagstaff, Ariz.; sister Betty
Ruth Walker of Bowling
Green; seven grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild.
Friends and family gath-
ered at the Brannon home,
5026 Poplar Ave., Bowling
Green on Saturday, March 19,
from 4 to 6 p.m. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be
made to the Diabetes Foun-
dation or the local Veterans of
Foreign Wars, at 322 Hanchey
Road, Wauchula.




FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula '




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Obituaries


Humnting/FishingoSrat


Alligator

Hunt Hours

Longer?

The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
directed staff to advertise a rule
amendment to extend alligator
hunting hours. Commissioners
will vote on it at their June
meeting.
The FWC gave preliminary
approval for an additional four
hours of daylight hunting to the
state's recreational alligator
hunting season, which runs
Aug. 15 to Nov. 1 each year.
Currently, the rule primarily
allows for only nighttime-hunt-
ing of alligators, between one
hour before sunset and one hour
after sunrise. The change
would extend alligator hunting
hours, establishing the legal
hours from 5 p.m. until 10 a.m.
during the annual 11-week sea-
son.
In developing the recommen-
dation, FWC staff weighed bio-
logical considerations, people's
desire for additional daylight
opportunities to hunt alligators,
the concerns expressed about
potential conflicts between alli-
gator hunters and other users of
lakes and rivers, and the unique'
and diverse views citizens have
about alligators and their man-
agement in Florida.

What a delightful thing is
the conversation of spe-
cialists! One understands
absolutely nothing and, it's
charming.


3/24/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:27 AM
Set: 7:40 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 13 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:21 AM
Set: 11.02 AM
Overhead: 5:43 AM
Underfoot: 6:12 PM
Moon Phase
69%
Waning Gibbous
Major Tunes
5:43 AM 7:43 AM
6:12 PM 8:12 PM
Minor Times
12:21 AM -1:21 AM
11 02 AM-12:02 PM
Prediction
Average
Tunime Zone
UTC: -4
3/25/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:50 AM
Set: 7:09 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 19 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:11 AM
Set: 11:14AM
Overhead: 6:13 AM
Underfoot: 6:41 PM
Moon Phase
57%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
6:13 AM 8:13 AM
6:41 PM 8:41 PM
Minor Times
1:11 AM- 2:11 AM
11:14 AM-12:14 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -7


r


-I r-


3/26/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:49 AM
Set: 7:09 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 20 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:03 AM
Set: 12:13 PM
Overhead: 7:08 AM
Underfoot: 7:34 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter
Major Times
708 AM- 9:08AM
7:34 PM 9:34 PM
Minor Times
2:03 AM 3:03 AM
12:13 PM 1:13 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -7
3/27/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:47 AM
Set: 7:10 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 23 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:48 AM
Set: 1:13 PM
Overhead: 7:59 AM
Underfoot: 8:24 PM
Moon Phase
37%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:59 AM 9:59 AM
8:24 PM 10:24 PM
Minor Tunmes
2:48 AM 3:48 AM
1:13 PM 2:13 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -7


S"They were


Wonderfull"

We hear kind words consistently.
". We're proud that people feel
1^ comfortable enough with us to
openly tell us how much they
-appreciate what we did for them.
In fact, it's this appreciation
that drives us to offer the very
est in comfort, compassion and
service.




@1\


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FAMILY FUNERALHOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906
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3/28/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:46 AM
Set: 7:11 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:27 AM
Set: 2:11 PM
Overhead: 8:47 AM
Underfoot: 9:10 PM
Moon Phase
28%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:47 AM -10:47 AM
9:10 PM 11:10 PM
Minor Times
3:27 AM 4:27 AM
2:11 PM 3:11 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -7
3/29/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:45 AM
Set: 7:12 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 27 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:00 AM
Set: 3:08 PM
Overhead: 9:32 AM
Underfoot: 9:54 PM
Moon Phase
20%.
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:32 AM -11:32 AM
9:54 PM 11:54 PM
Minor Times
4:00 AM 5:00 AM
3:08 PM 4:08 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -7


3/30/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:43 AM
Set: 7:13 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 30 nuns.
Mqgp.Data
Rise: 4:30 AM
Set: 4:03 PM
Overhead:10:15 AM
Underfoot:10:36 PM
Moon Phase
13%
Waning Crescent
Major Tiunes
10:15 AM-12:5 PM
10:36 PM-12:36 AM
Minor Times
4:30 AM 5:30 AM
4:03 PM 5:03 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -7
3/31/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:42 AM
Set: 7:13 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 31 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:59 AM
Set: 4:58 PM
Overhead:10:56 AM
Underfoot:11:17 PM
Moon Phase
7%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:56 AM-12:56 PM
11:17 PM 1:17 AM
Minor Times
4:59 AM 5:59 AM
4:58 PM 5:58 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -7


L


. ....... -


.',,: .. f


,11
*'*.."








March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


What do we live for, if it is
not to make life less diffi-
cult for each other?
-George Eliot


in 0Eonig d4 0emo/y

FLORENTINO
OBREGON
Florentino Obregon, 79, of
Zolfo Springs, died on Mon-
day, March 21,2011, at home.
Born Nov. 3, 1931, in Mex-
ico, he came to Hardee Coun-
ty from Texas in 1973. He
was a farm laborer and mem-
ber of Iglesia Metodista
Unida Luz y Vida in Zolfo
Springs.
He was preceded in death
by his wife Emma Obregon;
son Daniel Obregon; daughter
Torivia Obregon; and two
grandchildren, Angel Patino
Jr. and Tomas Mata Jr.
Survivors include three
sons, Pedro Obregon and wife
Micaela of Bowling Green,
Florentino Obregon Jr. and
wife Ernestina of Wauchula,
and Juan Martin Obregon and
wife Priscilla of Zolfo
Springs; six daughters, Irene
Reyes and husband Jose
Angel of Texas, Reyna Mata
and husband Tomas of
Michigan, Aurora Patino and
husband Angel of Zolfo
Springs, Guillermina Pantoja
of Wauchula, Norma Juarez
and husband Alfredo of Zolfo
Springs, and Martina Zuniga
and husband Jose Angel of
Wauchula; 36 grandchildren;
and 35 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday,
March 23, from 6 to 8 p.m.at
Iglesia Metodista Unida Luz y
Vida. Services are today
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. at the
church with the Rev. Raul
Cintron officiating. Interment
follows in Wauchula
Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


L ,~


Fish Busters
By Bob Wattendorf
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


FLORIDA BASS FISHING IS ON FIRE!
The pre-spawn period for Florida largemouth bass can produce
some of the most exciting fishing of the year, and 2011 has cer-
tainly started out exciting!
Since bass tune into environmental triggers such as day length,
lunar cycle and, especially, water temperature, timing of the actual
spawn can vary. Generally, once water temperatures rise above 58
degrees, the bedding process begins and may continue until tem-
peratures are in the mid- to upper-70s.
A couple of days before full or new moons are often premier
spawning times for Florida bass. Remember, triggering water tem-
peratures vary significantly based on depth, sun exposure and cur-
rents.
Individual anglers, guides and tournaments statewide are
reporting incredible catches. Check these examples:
Lake "Toho" Tohopekaliga Gerald Swindle of Warrior,
Ala., caught 80 pounds, 13 ounces of bass during three-day tour-
nament. To accomplish that, he averaged over five pounds per bass
in his five-fish bag limits each day, coming close to the all-time
record of 85 pounds.
Lake Kissimmee Tom Rewis of Orange City and Doug
Chance of Deleon Springs combined for a five-bass stringer that
topped 40 pounds a mark considered hallowed ground to win
the Capt. Tony Strickland Memorial Bass Tournament out of Camp
Mack inFebruary. That is more than an average of eight pounds per
bass, with their largest being 10.71 pounds. The team of Dustin
Bozeman of Lakeland and Chris Maxwell of Winter Haven had the
big fish, with a 10.76-pounder.
That is not all!
Zack Mack from Murfreesboro, Tenn., hooked, fought, landed,
weighed and released a 14-pound, 2-ounce Florida largemouth bass
on Lake Kissimmee, close to the river's mouth, on Feb 2. Mack has
witnesses and pictures.
Lake Toho Mark Detweiler, who operates a marina there,
recently reported consistent 24- to 26-pound stringers of fish just
about every weekend.
Tim Coughlin, an FWC biologist involved in habitat restora-
tion and enhancement in the Kissimmee chain, noted that some of
the agency's earliest and most persistent efforts took place on these
lakes, from drawdowns and tussock removal to transplanting native
vegetation and scraping spawning areas. Chemical treatments are
routinely necessary to maintain plants at desirable densities so
they provide areas for fish to feed and spawn.
It is immensely satisfying when you see efforts like this pay
off for anglers and the local business community.
Lake Okeechobee Brandon McMillan of Belle Glade won
the FLW-Outdoors Tournament and set a tour record in February
with a 106-pound, 10-ounce, four-day winning weight.
Lake Okeechobee is coming back, after the FWC came to its
aid with special regulations, habitat improvement projects and even
a restocking effort, according to FWC biologist Don Fox, who has
spent nearly 30 years working on the lake.
Rodman Reservoir Fishing guide Sean Rush of Ocala
reported, .'Rodman may be the hottest trophy bass lake anywhere
right now!" He recently documented a one-day trip for two clients
who caught and released 50 bass, including one over 12 pounds.
Orange Lake The FWC modified the existing slot limit here to
promote future supplies of trophy bass, by allowing harvest of just
one bass per angler, per day, if longer than 24 inches.
However, anglers who return their catches to the water can still
record them for posterity. The FWC encourages bass anglers to
,.--


apply for a "Big Catch" recognition certificate online for any bass
longer than 24 inches or over eight pounds caught in Florida.
Coupons and the opportunity to win a fishing trip with Shaw
Grigsby, tournament angler and host of "One More Cast," encour-
age anglers to document trophy bass caught in Orange Lake.
The water level on Orange Lake is low, concentrating bass but
making fishing patterns challenging. To help increase your success,
check with locals, review FWC quarterly fishing forecasts at
MyFWC.com/Fishing or listen to the Wildlife Foundation of
Florida's audio updates at WildlifeFlorida.org.
The FWC has always considered largemouth bass a premier
draw for local anglers and tourists and worked to ensure safe and
sustainable quality bass fishing opportunities. This past year, how-
ever, we redoubled our efforts to reach out to the public, to work
with stakeholders involved in the fishing industry, and to review all
aspects of our bass fishery management efforts.
The result is an evolving Long-Term Black Bass Management
Plan for Florida to make Florida the undisputed bass fishing capi-
tal of the world.
If fishing success stories like those reported here continue to
pile up, we are well on our way!


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Photos and .. write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first arld
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
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6A The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


PRECO Meeting Draws


Another Record Crowd


A gorgeous day, food, tun,
prizes, and a parachute demon-
stration combined to draw in
the largest crowd to ever attend
a Peace River Electric Cooper-
ative annual membership meet-
ing.
The meeting was held at
PRECO Park in Wauchula on
Saturday, March 12. Head-
quartered in rural Hardee
County, PRECO extends elec-
tric service across 10 Central
Florida counties, coast-to-coast.
Formed by local residents in
1940, the cooperative has con-
ducted .annual meetings for
member-owners for the past 71
years.
This event drew 823 regis-
tered members, topping 2010's
record of 797.
They and their families cele-
brated the day with free hot
dogs, ice cream, snow cones,
soft drinks, and more.
Children's activities included a
climbing wall, bounce house,
inflatable slide, and horse rides.
Attendance figures are esti-
mated upward to nearly 3,000
when each member's family is
considered in totals.
"A Salute to the Military,"
PRECO's first theme for an
annual meeting, featured a Wall
of Honor with photos of veter-
ans supplied by the member-
ship. The highlight of the event
featured a live parachute dem-
onstration provided by U.S.
Special Operation Command's
Para-Commandos from Mac-
Dill Air Force Base in Tampa.
"Two paratroopers, backed
by a support team, thrilled the
crowd with in-air maneuvers
before landing at PRECO
Park," noted meter-reader su-
pervisor Mike Rouse, who
worked closely with the group
to bring them to Wauchula.
"Children and adults shouted
and applauded as they tracked
the parachutes and smoke trails
across the sky," he added.
Rouse worked for months with
MacDill AFB and the Pentagon


:A1.~ A


Sponsored By:




P3HOSlCHEMW
HJIJ 1.V


Paratroopers thrilled the crowd as part of the meeting's
theme of "A Salute to the Military."


in order to complete the paper-
work required to book the Para-
Commandos.
For the second time in as
many years, the meeting's
grand prize was a retired
PRECO vehicle. "Last year's
truck giveaway got a lot of'
attention," said Chief Mark-
eting and Member Services
Officer Nell McCauley. "At the
end of the day, we gave away a
'97 Ford F-150 pickup truck to
one of our members."
Dennis Brown, seasonal Lake
Wales resident, was the lucky
winner.
A brief business meeting
allowed members to hear from
Bill Mulcay, the chief executive
officer, and from Board of
Directors officers regarding the
state of the cooperative.
During the meeting, PRECO's
directors were officially seated
and co-op members participated
in a question-and-answer ses-
sion,
At the conclusion of the busi-
ness session, over 200 door
prizes, including vacation pack-


ages, TVs, appliances, power
tool, and much more, were
awarded to members by a ticket
drawing.
PRECO serves nearly 35,000
member/consumers in Brevard,
DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands,
Hillsborough, Indian River,
Manatee, Osceola, Polk and
Sarasota counties, through
almost 4,000 miles of power
lines.





THURSDAY, MAR. 24
VRescheduled Zolfo
Springs Town Commission
monthly meeting, Town Hall,
3210 U.S. 17 North, Zolfo
Springs, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY, MAR. 31
*Hardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.





Talent Show
On Saturday
"Coming Out Act I," a talent
show with local entrants will
be held on Saturday at 7
p.m., at Wauchula City Hall
Auditorium, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula.
There will be two featured
appearances, by Iren "Star"
Brown, and N'Kosi "Saint
Nik" Jones. Admission is $3
and will benefit the Endtime
Crossroad Ministry Inc.. of
Pastor Ralph and Deloris
Williams.


~;


COURTESY PHOTOS
Dennis Brown (left) of Lake Wales won a "retired" 1997 Ford F-150 pickup truck. He Is
congratulated by cooperative head Bill Mulcay.


TIRED OF POURING WATER

AND MONEY DOWN THE DRAIN?





Join our "Water Conservation Workshop"

to learn simple ways to conserve water.

It will benefit you, your wallet

and our community's water supply!


Thursday, March 31st at 10 a.m.

Hardee County Board of County Commissioners'
Board Room
412 West Orange Street, Wauchula


All workshop participants will receive

a FREE water conservation kit !

Sponsored by a grant from the Peace River Basin Board of the
Southwest Florida Water Management District. .3:24c


* 'k. .
.: .'-.,. /'' *:


sara blaine"



Brought to you by ...


A4 E


-' 1


Arts In the Park'

Friday, April 15th

5:00pm 9:00pm


Display and sell your artwork!
~ Painting/Sketching, Sculpting, & Photography ~




Create a work of art on a 3 x 3 Post It!
~ Adults (16 & Older) & Youth (15 & Younger) *
I ,,$5 Entry Fee (per entry) ~
~ 1st Place $50 Downtown Dollars (per category) ~
~ 2nd Place $25 Downtown Dollars (per category) ^

Call 863.767.0330 or visit www.MainStreetWauchula.comrn
I I I Ilm


...:






March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Kevin Hanchey has simply lost his

cotton-pickin' mind with THESE deals!

They're WAY too low, but he

figures/hopes/prays that he -

can make it up by selling ]

TWELVE of these before the,

end of the month!


HURRY IN THIS WEEKEND

while he's still gainfully employed!


LOADED WITH ALL THE TOYS INCLUDING- POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD, AUTO,
POWER MOONROOF, REVERSE SENSING SYSTEM,
18" ALUMINUM WHEELS, REAR SPOILER
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IL Z W,% T, _4_ -r


M.S.K.P.
Factory Rebate
qLlN JOYDiscount


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s21,991 .




NEARLY EVERY IMAGINABLE OPTION-POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD,
TRAILER Tow, POWER DRIVER SEAT
18" CHROME CLAD WHEELS, CHROME STEP BAR!
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
M.S.R.P. $34,615
FMCC Rebate -1,000
Factory Rebate -3,500
LONJOYRDiscount -2,663
LRN J'Y PRICE
$27,452


PACKED WITH OPTIONS-POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD, KEYLESS REMOTE ENTRY
MP3, TILT, CRUISE, PRIVACY TINT,
MY FORD, 3- ROW SEATING, REAR A/C
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
M.S.R.P. 29,190
Factory Rebate 1,000
mLNHJOYDiscount -1,192 "
RLRmNJYPRICE
$26,998




PACKED WITH OPTIONS INCLUDING-POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD,
REAR VIEW CAMERA, ROOF RAILS, LEATHER
AMBIENT LIGHTING, MY FORD TOUCH FI I o l
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY _


M.S.R.P. $33,930
FMCC Rebate -1,000
Factory Rebate -1,500
LofiJarYDiscount -1,933
RLRmN jYPRICE
$29,497


..-ra


c Saleso ur : M n Fr0 -" S at o 4;-


NEI21'FR
FUSIOI' S E


OI SeOvO: iic llHor:Mn- Fr iOpCloeS


I








8A The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


Donations Accepted For


Ride For Fallen Heroes


Bobby Respress and Todd
Barton are firefighter/para-
medics who will be joined by
over three dozen fellow fire-
fighters, law enforcement offi-
cers and rescue personnel from
around this state and Texas to
represent Hardee County in the
2011 Brotherhood Ride.
These bicyclists will ride
more than 1,600 miles in 22
days, beginning on Aug. 20 in
Naples and ending at Ground
Zero in New York on Sept. 10.
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
Chief Michael Choate said of
the Brotherhood Ride, "It is
such'an honor for two of our
firefighters to be selected. I
have no doubt that they are
committed and dedicated to this
cause.
"Brotherhood is very impor-
tant to the fire service, as it is to
law enforcement and the mili-
tary as well," he continued. "I
am certain that they will repre-
sent Hardee County Fire-
Rescue with respect and integri-
ty. It makes me very proud to
work alongside these two pro-
fessionals."
The grueling ride schedule is


Wildlife View
By Rodney Barreto
Fish & Wildlife Commission Chairman


as follows: Aug. 20, Naples to
Arcadia; Aug. 21, Arcadia to
Winter Haven, with a stop in
Hardee County; Aug. 22,
Winter Haven to Tavares; Aug.
23, Tavares to Daytona Beach;
Aug. 24, Daytona Beach to
Jacksonville; and Aug. 25,
Jacksonville to Brunswick, Ga.
Having reached Georgia, the
ride schedule continues as fol-
lows: Aug. 26, Brunswick to
Savannah, Ga.; Aug. 27,
Savannah to Walterboro, S.C.;
Aug. 28, Walterboro to
Charleston, S.C.; Aug. 29,
Charleston to' Sumter, S.C.;
Aug. 30, Sumter to Rock Hill,
S.C.; Aug. 31, Rock Hill to
Salisbury, N.C.; Sept. 1,
Salisbury to Greensboro, N.C.;
and Sept. 2, Greensboro to
South Boston, Va.
Now in Virginia, riders press
on as follows: Sept. 3, South
Boston to Farmville, Va.; Sept.
4, Farmville to Charlottesville,
Va.; Sept. 5, Charlottesville to
Dale City, Va.; Sept. 6, Dale
City to Severn, Md.; Sept. 7,
Severn to Emmitsburg, Md.;
Sept. 8, Emmitsburg to Coates-
ville, Pa.; and Sept. 9, Coates-


2011 A FISHING EXTRAVAGANZA
Thus far in 2011, the stars are aligned for bass anglers and fish-
ing in general.
Tournaments have showcased record- and near-record-break-
ing catches, and we're hearing from around the state about big bass
and impressive catch numbers.
On Lake Kissimmee, Tom Rewis and Doug Chance produced
a five-bass stringer totaling more than 40 pounds to win the Tony
Strickland Memorial Tournament. While on Lake Tohopekaliga,
Gerald Swindle's 80-pound, 13-ounce accumulation of, 15 bass
over three days came close to setting a B.A.S.S. record.
Okeechobee produced a four-day total of 106-pounds, 10-
ounces for FLW Tournament winner Brandon McMillan a new
tour record. Zack Mack, from Tennessee, caught a 14-pound, two-
ounce Florida largemouth bass on Lake Kissimmee in early
February.
Even though evidence points to a stellar year, the Florida Fish
& Wildlife Conservation Commission encourages bass-fishing afi-
cionados to consider catch-and-release for the long-term good of
the stock.
The FWC's "Big Catch" angler-recognition program enables
anglers of all ages to submit an application for a full-color certifi-
cate suitable for framing and a window decal to memorialize their
fishing trips.
The program allows people to submit information about mem-
orable catches of any of 33 species of freshwater fishes for recog-
nition, based on qualifying lengths or weights. Just go to
MyFWC.com online and click on Fishing.
As part of the public input the FWC received in developing a
new Long-Term Black Bass Management Plan, one goal was mak-
ing Florida the undisputed bass fishing capital of the world. That
title is heavily influenced by communicating news about outstand-
ing fishing opportunities.
One component of the plan is a "Trophy Catch" program that
recognizes anglers who catch really large bass. It provides incen-
tives for them to report and release their catch.
Another opportunity is for the fishing communities. They can
tout themselves in the World Fishing Network's "Ultimate Fishing
Town USA" competition by going online to WFNFishing-
Town.com. Folks can nominate their town, then people across
America will vote for the winner.
The winning town receives a $25,000 grant for a fisheries
improvement project, and a half-hour television show dedicated
entirely to fishing in its community.
The World Fishing Network made Florida its own region
because we have such numerous and diverse resources. Since each
of the seven regions will have their top two vote-getters in the
runoff, Florida will have two finalists. Nominate your favorite
town now and publicize the value of its unique fishery resources.
We should be proud of all the jobs the fishing industry creates,
and we should marvel at how fishing can move you from sighs of
relaxation as you unwind, to shouts of elation as you catch another
Florida trophy, to smiles of satisfaction as you release it to perpet-
uate the experience.
The ability to concentrate and to use time well is every-
thing.
-Lee lacocca


Crunch your numbers.


ville to Princeton, N.J.
Finally, on Sept. 10, riders
will pedal from Princeton into
New York City.
The charity ride benefits fam-
ilies of fallen heroes.
Donations are being accept-
ed. According to the Brother-
hood Ride website, other than
the cost of conducting the ride,
all donated proceeds go directly
to the beneficiaries of the
National Fallen Firefighters
Foundation and Concerns of
Police Survivors Inc.
(C.O.P.S.).
For more information or to
make donations, contact Lisa
Respress at firewife329@-
yahoo.com or call 521-3728.
Donations also can be mailed
to Brotherhood Ride, P.O. Box
110862, Naples, FL 34108.


COURTESY PHOTO
Bobby Respress (left) and Todd Barton will represent Hardee County Fire-Rescue in
the fourth annual "Brotherhood Ride 2011." The bike ride will honor the 411 fallen
heroes of Sept. 11 at Ground Zero.


3:24c


'~JY


4th ANNUALFLOR



FORT CHOKONIKLA ENCAMPMENT




PYNES CREEK HISTORIC STATE PA0








4'14







-- "r I-T- ,







--". I'. I "



FO March 27 M

11am to 4pm
Free Event with Park Admission $3
Fl' 888 Lake Branch Rd Bowling Green

863.375.4717








PAGE ONE


Youth Football Plans For 2011


I I.Sp t S e lM arch 2


March 26 Weightlifting

March 28 Tennis
Weightlifting
JV Baseball

March 29 Tennis
V. Softball

March 30 JV/V Softball
JV Baseball
V. Baseball

March 31 Tennis


HJHS Volleyball
JV Baseball
V. Softball

Track
V. Softball
JV Baseball
V. Baseball

Weightlifting

JV Softball
HJHS Volleyball
V. Softball

V. Baseball


April 7 HJHS Volleyball
JV Softball
V. Softball
V. Baseball


Lemon Bay

Lemon Bay
DeSoto
Frostproof

DeSoto
Haines City

Southeast
Haines City
Frostproof

Booker
DeSoto
Fort Meade
Lemon Bay

Palmetto
All Saints
Southeast
Southeast

Booker

DeSoto
DeSoto
DeSoto

Booker

Sebring
Palmetto
Palmetto
Mulberry


Away

HOME
Away
Away


9 a.m.

4 p.m.
4 p.m.
6 p.m.


Away 4 p.m.
HOME 6 p.m.


Away
Away
Away


5/7:30
6 p.m.
7 p.m.


HOME 4 p.m.
Away 5:30/6:30 p.m.
HOME 6 p.m.
Away 7 p.m.


Away
HOME
Away
Away

Away

Away
HOME
Away

Away


4 p.m.
7 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.

10 a.m.

5p.m.
5:30/6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.

7:30 p.m.


HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.


HOME
HOME
Away


5:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Tennis Boys Win Two


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee boys tennis
teams pocketed a pair of wins
before Spring Break.
Hardee girls beat Avon Park
but were then decimated by
cheerleading tryouts and lost to
Okeechobee and Sebring.
There is a series of matches
next week. Hardee returns from
Spring Break to face three
matches in four days. On
Monday, Lemon Bay visits, on
Tuesday it's a trip to DeSoto
and on Thursday it's a visit
from Sarasota Booker to finish
up the regular season.
Hardee is in district playoffs
April 4-6. The girls will be at
Winter Haven and the boys at
Bartow. Hardee's large Class
2A District 8 covers four coun-
ties, Poinciana from Osceola;
Avon Park, Lake Placid and
Sebring from Highlands; Au-
burndale, Lake Wales, Mul-
berry and Teneroc from Polk;
and Hardee.
HARDEE 6, AVON PARK 1
Back on March 7, the Hardee
girls downed Avon Park at
home 6-1. Hardee won the first
three singles. Summer Palmer
took Kayla Lockhart 6-4, 6-1 in
number one singles. Kate
Krause won 6-1, 6-0 over Noor
Aboul-Hosn, and Taylor Pohl
defeated Jessica Leitch 6-1, 6-0.
At number 4 singles, Caro-
line Durrance pushed Ashley
Harris to three games before
losing 7-5, 1-6, 6-3. At number
5 singles Lacey McClenithan
also had a marathon before los-
ing to Kathryn Welch 7-5, 4-6,


6-2. In extra matches, Ashley
Baker and Susana Oceguera
both played pro-sets against
Shontonnia Williams, both
Hardee girls winning 8-5.
In doubles, Palmer/Krause
won 6-2, 6-2 over Lockhart/-
Aboul-Hosn and Pohl/Durrance
won an 8-6 pro-set over
Leitch/Harris.
HARDEE 5, AVON PARK 2
The Hardee boys hosted
Avon Park on March 8. Hardee
won the first four singles
matches. Juan Mier dropped
Dawson Calero 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-
2, while Dylan Justice won 2-6,
6-2, 7-5 over Mitchell Guerndt.
At number three singles,
Justin Fones won 6-2, 6-2 over
Kyle Jahna, while Matt Godwin
won number four singles over
Rhett Tyler, 6-2, 5-7, 6-2. Soph
Skylar Simmons lost to Jav-
aughn Wells 6-1, 6-2.
The teams split the doubles in
pro-sets. Mier/Justice lost 8-5
to Calero/Guerndt, while
Fones/Godwin won 8-3 over
Jahna/Wells.
HARDEE 5,
OKEECHOBEE 2
The Hardee boys brought vic-
tory home from Okeechobee.
Mier started it with a win over
Cody Walker 7-6 (7) 6-1.
Justice lost 1-6, 6-1, 6-4 to Max
Norman and Fones lost 7-5, 6-3
to Bredon Janassaint.
Kyle Bodeck got Hardee
back on the winning track with
a 6-4, 6-1 win over Tyler Platt.
Godwin came back tb Win over'
Tanner Homer 4-6, 6-0, 6-4. In
an extra singles, Simmons won


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6-4, 8-6 over Kyle George.
In doubles, Justice/Bodeck
won 8-4 over Walker/Janas-
saint, while Fones/Godwin won
8-4 over Norman/Platt.
Only two of the top five girls
went to Okeechobee, joined by
freshmen Susana Oceguera and
Araceli Ramos. Okeechobee
won all of the matches.
The Hardee girls-regrouped-
to host the Sebring girls on
March 17. Sebring swept the
match 7-0.


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By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
At the end of last season,
directors were already working
on plans for the upcoming sea-
son.
They began in earnest last
weekend with the first round of
signups for the league divi-
sions. There were more than
100 signups, already filling the
three younger divisions, report-
ed Donna Parks, this year's
president of the Hardee Youth
Football League. Additional
signups will be on April 1 from
5 to 7 p.m. and April 2 from 9
a.m. until noon.
They will also be at the Youth
Football headquarters, the small
building behind the old junior
high school along the drive
which leads to the football sta-
dium. That's where league
meetings are held on the first
Monday of each month at 6:30.
The next is on April 4. Visitors


are always welcome as are vol-
unteers of all ages.
During the off-season, Har-
dee re-aligned itself with the
Pop Warner League and will
start practices officially on Aug.
1. There will be four home and
four away Saturdays, with one
by some time during that sea-
son. The jamboree will be Aug.
20.
For this season, Hardee will
play in the Division 2 south dis-
trict, which includes Palmetto,
Fish Hawk at Pinecrest, East
and West Manatee, Lakewood
Ranch and possibly the
Brandon Seminoles, which
should actually be in Division I.
There are openings in all
cheerleading divisions ages 5 to
15, and most of the six football
divisions. There will not be a
flag division this year as most
of the teams are going without
them due to the more frequent
injuries in the division without


helmets and other protection.
Divisions overlap in ages
because of weights expected in
each division to equalize the
players, none playing with
those much heavier than they
are. The Tiny Mites are ages 5-
7; Mighty Mites 7 to 9; Junior
PeeWee ages 8-10; PeeWees 9-
11 and older lites (12's who are
less than 100 pounds); Junior
Midgets, 10-12 and 13 older
. lites; and Midgets 13-15 and
older lites.
By next year, Hardee hopes
to belong to the recently formed
Orange Blossom Conference,
which will include teams from
Highlands, Polk and DeSoto
counties, which are still being
cleared for re-entry to Pop
Warner. They will put Hardee
with teams much closer and
with much less travel.
For more information, stop
by the next league meeting, or
call Parks at 245-1579.


My name is Skippy.
I miss my mom & dad. I
was helping my dad on
Ramon Petteway Road
on Thursday, March 10,
when I went to visit
SL with my friends. Please
help me find my way
home. I have to have
special medicine and I
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outside.

If you see me please call Milton or Stacy Locklar

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Most Insurances Accepted Including Medicaid


Hardee County HealthA
'Department.
115 K.D. Revell Rd
Wauchula, FL 33873


The Herald-Advocate


Thursday, March 24,2011


April 1



April 2

April 4



April 5


HARDEE COUNTY HE

DEPARTMENT


3i OffVl jlc


__ __ I __


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~i?~ui8~


I







2B The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011





Hardee


Forbes/Palacios

Wedding Plans


Living


TIME CAPSULE


Amy Marie Forbes of Bowl-
ing Green has announced the
plans for her marriage to Jaime
Palacios of Bowling Green.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
. ter of Bobby Forbes of Lavonia,
Ga., and Mary Helen Trammell
of Bowling Green. The pros-
pective groom is the son of
Leonardo Palacios of Quincy
and Maria Cruz Rodriguez of
Houston, Texas.


The couple will exchange
wedding vows this Saturday
afternoon at First United Meth-
odist Church in Bowling Green.
Music begins at 1:30 p.m., with
the ceremony commencing at 2
o'clock.
Following the ceremony, a
wedding reception will be held
at the Carver Center in Bartow.
Friends and relatives of the
couple are invited to attend.


New St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church invites every-
one to join them for the installa-
tion service of their new pastor,
the.Rev. Howard E. Clarke.
The installation will be at the
church, 5095 Washington St.,
Limestone, at 4 p.m. Sunday. A
reception and fellowship will
follow the service.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition. -*


Homeland Reunion Saturday


Former residents and friends
of anyone who ever lived in
Homeland in southern Polk
County are invited to a reunion
set for this Saturday.
The reunion will be held at
the First Baptist Church Fel-
lowship Hall at 208 Church
Ave. Historic Homeland Heri-
tage Park is across the street,
and tours of it will be given


from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The reunion itself begins at
11, with a covered-dish lunch-
eon planned for noon. Bring
enough to share. Drinks, plates
and utensils will be provided.
After lunch, an old-fashioned
singalong will be held at ihe
Old Methodist Church in Heri-
tage Park.


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A SAVINGS OF' l 5
Full Upper or Lower Denture ui'- $260
A SAVINGS OF S15 per arch
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A SAVINGS OF Si 5 per partial
SL Fees eftecMve Januar.y 10. 2011
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Highlands Plaza Marc A. Sander, DDS, FAGD
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Reine (each)(D6710.D5711) .. ... ...... .. $130
Simple Extraction (each) (D7140) ..... .......... ........................... $75
FuItmouth Xay requiredd ftor extractons) (D330) ........ ......... .. $70


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To rvisaitEoFCTMrF .aESCgba RBw.ORffJdCablFEdSCEntMres0cNmOsT 24


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Mar. 13-19. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.
ISSUED
Douglas Battey, SKP Way,
four air conditioning units,
$20,000,
Michael E. Gillispie, Louis-
iana Street, install air condition-
ing, $4,500.
Douglas Battey, Schontag
Road, air conditioning, $4,500.
Jason Remmel, Broward
Street, renovations, $6,550.
Owner/Builder, SR 64 East,
demolition, $1,000.
Harry Purvis, Steve Roberts
Special, mobile Hall, $2,000.
Richie Evans, South Road,
roofing, $4,000.
Harold Howze,, Cactus Ave-
nue, renovations, $3,900.
Mark Moye, Riverside Drive,
air conditioning, $4,900.
BUILDING BLOCKS
Always check with the local
building department whether a
permit is required for you build-
ing project.
Verify that your contractor
obtained the necessary permits
before he began doing the proj-
ect.
Get a complete detailed
agreement in writing, with the
contractor's name address,
phone number and license num-
ber; precise details of all work
to be performed and materials
to be supplied; total cost for the
work; and completion date and
warranties.


Ubn't look back. Some-
thing might be gaining on
you.
-Satchel Paige
Criticism should be a
casual conversation.
-W. H. Auden
A good conversationalist
is not one who remembers
what was said but says
*what someone wants to
remember.
-Johh Mason Brown


KOFFEE KLATCH
On March 16, Gaylord Wil-
liams led the U'.S' Pledge; I led
the Caihadian Pledge arid'Steve
Gray ledfthe prayer.-The 50/50
winners were Fred and Elaine
Leverone, Bubbles and Ray-
mond Powell, Wilma and Lee
Roy Behymer, and Linda
Durham.
BINGO
Kay McKnight won the large
jackpot on March 11, with
Peggy Gushue winning the
small jackpot and Frankie
Walters winning the special
jackpot. On March 14, Earl
Folnsbee and Madeline Hol-
lenbeck split the large jackpot,
with Winnie Morrell and Sylvia
Baker splitting the small jack-
pot. Cal Gadsby won the special
jackpot.
SATURDAY DANCES
There was a small turnout for
our St. Patrick's dance on
March 12. The winners of the
door prizes were Gerry Esz,
Sherry Vaughan, Gaylord Wil-
liams, Elma Gunning, Pam
Norris and Midge Saunders.
The next dance is our Spring
Dance this Saturday at 8 p.m.
with Chrissy Harriman. Our last
dance will be April 9 with
Doin'it Rite. ,
SCORES
Mixed Golf March 14: Win-


ners were Jan Brinker, Barb'
Kramer, Bernie Edwards and
Arlie Wooters.
Bocce: Winning team for the
season was the Multi team,
whose members were Guy and
Helene Lavigne and Liette An-.
derson and Jean Aubin.
Shuffling: Men's winners for
the season were Bob Beshel,
Bob Bundy and Bob Kramer.
The women's winners were:
Eleanor Dice, Sharon Potter
and Barb Kramer. Eleanor
Dice accepted her 18th shuf-
fling award this year.
CHURCH NEWS


By Diane Burget
Holy Communion was cele-
brated on March 13., Pastor
Winne's message was on
"Earthquake and Judgment,"
\with some of the Scripture ref-
erences taken from Psalms,
Revelation, Acts, John and.
Luke.,
Our choir, led by Nancy
Morrison, sang a "Calvary
Medley." The congregational
hymns were "Glory to His:
Name," "At the Cross" and
"Jesus Paid It All."
The service was concluded
with the congregation singing'
"Hallelujah."


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UCHULA MOOSE LODG j


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


In Loving Memory of
John Ronald "Rooster"Roberson
November 30, 1950 March 25, 2001
Your life was so thoughtlessly taken by the hand of another.
You may still walk the streets "a so-called free man," but
according to our Heavenly Father's Holy Word, There is no
creature hidden from His sight, but all things are naked and
open to the eyes of Him to whom we must give account,
Hebrews 4:13. We know our Heavenly Father will take care of
this only if we abide by His word and forgive. St. Mark 11:25,26
says, And when you stand praying, forgive, if you have
aught against any (harboring unforgiveness): that your
Father also which is in Heaven, may forgive you your
trespasses. But if you do not forgive, neither will your
Father which is in heaven forgive your trespasses.
Our family forgives you and prays for your soul.
Ronnie we miss you and love you, Your Family.


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March 24,2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Track Keeps Winners


VALENTINE DANCE


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In a couple of track meets last
week, Hardee track and field
girls and boys showed excep-
tionally good results.
Track has one meet over
.Spring Break. They went to
Avon Park on Tuesday, results
were unavailable at press time.
Next up is the April 1-2 Pepsi
Florida Relays, or a Palmetto
Relay meet on April 1. District
competition is April 11-16.
At the Sebring meet on
March 15, coaches Rob Beatty
and Rod Smith, and assistants
James Carpenter and Gloria
Solis, continued to see times
drop, Ashley Louis placed first
in the girls discus, with Yesenia
Vargas first in the girls shot put.
For the boys Christian Moralez
won the 800 and Carl Brown
the 110 hurdles.
At the vast Disney Track and
Field Showcase on March 17,
Louis had Hardee's best results
with third overall, with other
achievements by Morales, Febe
Murillo, Brandon Beatty,
Brown and Anagelo Parkinson.

SEBRING
Overall, Hardee girls and
guys placed third in both the
girls and boys events at Se-
bring. Sebring won the girls
competition, with Avon Park
second, Hardee third (one point
behind Avon Park) and Haines
City fourth. Avon Park took the
boys title, with Sebring second
1.68 points, Hardee third and
Haines City fourth.
At Sebring, senior Louis
placed first in the discus with a
toss of 87-02. Soph Andrea
Castenada was sixth, just out of
points awarded to the top five
positions. Louis was also sec-


ond in the 100 hurdles, third in
the 300 hurdles and fourth in
the high jump.
Another senior, Vargas won
the shot put with a throw of 28'
11". Freshman Merislene Ci-
meus was fifth. Vargas also
combined with sophs Murillo
and Janet Lopez and freshman
Angela Herron for second place
in the girls 4x400-meter relay.
Other girls participating for
Hardee included senior Mylekia
Stevenson. She and Lopez went
fourth and fifth in the 400-
meter dash. Stevenson was also
fourth in the 200-meter dash
and third in the 100 hurdles.
Murillo placed second in the
800-meter and third in the
1,600-meter. Soph Adna Me-
tayer was third in the triple
jump.
Joining the other girls were
junior Jessica Hunt, freshmen
Dieunide "DeeDee" Metayer,
Nedjie Severe and Brianna
Gardner.
For the boys, senior Brown
won the 110 hurdles, joined
Aaron Barker, Tre' Anderson
and Maxon Delhomme for first
in the 4x100 relay add was fifth
in the long jump.
Soph Moralez won the 800
meter, placed third in the 1,600-
meter, fifth in the long jump and
joined Parkinson, D'Vonte
Hooks and Beatty for second
place in the 4x800 relay.
Beatty placed second in the
1,600, and the 3,200 and fifth in
the triple jump.
Junior Maxon Delhomme
was fourth in the 100 dash and
third in the 200 dash. Junior
Agustine Ancelmo was third in
the 800 meter. Freshman Lucius
Everett tied for second in the
high jump, placed third in the
110 hurdles, fourth in the 300


Beat The Leak This Week


Drip. Drip. Drip. That's the
sound the average American
household makes as it wastes
more than 10,000 gallons each
year from leaks-enough to fill a
backyard swimming pool. If
that doesn't seem like a lot of
water, consider that across the
country, easy-to-fix household
leaks add up to more than 1 tril-
lion gallons of water lost annu-
ally nationwide.
That's why the U.S. Erifiron-
mental Protection Agency
(EPA) is encouraging home-
owners to find and fix leaks
during the third annual Fix a
Leak Week. Sponsored by.
EPA's WaterSense(r) program
as part of the ongoing We're for
Water campaign, Fix a Leak
Week reminds homeowners of
the steps they can take to save
water in their community now
and for future generations. Be


for water and start saving today
with three simple steps: check,
twist, replace.
1. Check. First, check your
home for leaks. You can detect
silent toilet leaks, a common
water-wasting culprit, by ad-
ding food coloring to the toilet
tank and waiting 10 minutes
before flushing. If color appears
in the bowl, your toilet has a
leak. Visit www.epa.gov/water-
sense/fixaleak for do-it-yourself
toilet repair tips and videos.
2. Twist. Give leaking faucet
and showerhead connections a
firm twist with a wrench or
apply pipe tape to ensure that
pipe connections are. sealed'
tight. If you can't stop those
drops yourself, contact a
plumbing professional. For
additional savings, twist Wat-
erSense-labeled aerators onto
bathroom faucets to use 30 per-


'Thank Jou
We would like to thank all of thefriends & family,
and people who brought food, flowers or came byfor
prayer and support during our time of loss.
To Robarts Funeral Home
Thank You, also, q
for all your care and support.
THE BARNWELL, BIRGE & SAMS FAMILY




"Just Stuff"
133 E. Townsend St. Wauchula 832-5759





Tues. Fri. Sat. C
10 am 5 pm 10 am 2 pm


hurdles.
Other Hardee boys participat-
ing were senior Sean Holmes,
Luis Mata, Anderson, Hooks,
Tony Rodriguez, Tony Galvan,
Kareem Richardson and Victor
Salazar, juniors Parkinson, Dil-
lon Skitka, Juan Varela, Re-
imundo Garcia Rito Lopez and
Jesse Belcher, sophs Octavio
Alvarez, Dorian Mejia-Flores
and Anthony Burks and fresh-
man Keyon Brown, James
Greene Filistin Louis-Michel,
Marco Ehrenkaufer, Adson
Delhomme and Morgan Garcia.
DISNEY
At the Disney Showcase,
Hardee men had to contend
with opponents from 29 other
schools, while the girls faced
opponents from 28 other
schools. The boys placed 23rd
overall and the girls 22nd.
There were schools from other
states and Nova Scotia and all
over Florida.
Louis outdid her previous
discus record, throwing 88'11"
for a third overall. Vargas was
10th Castenada was 12th in that
event. She placed tied with two
others for 12th in the high jump.
In the girls steeplechase,
Murillo placed sixth overall. In
the unseeded, 1,600, she placed
eighth.
Adna Metayer took fourth in
her heat of the 100 dash, with
Cimeus seventh in her heat and
Dee Dee Metayer fifth in hers.
On the boys side, Morales
broke the five-minute mark to
place second in the unseeded
1,600 at 4:59.76. Beatty placed
sixth in the unseeded 3,200, and
seventh in the boys steeple-
chase, a step ahead of teammate
Parkinson, who was eight.
Brown was seventh overall in
the 110 hurdles at 15.94.


cent less water without noticing
a difference in flow.
3. Replace. If you just can't
nip that drip, it may be time to
replace the fixture. Look for
WaterSense-labeled models,
which use at least 20 percent
less water and are independent-
ly certified to perform as well
as or better than standard mod-
els.
Replacing your home's old,
inefficient showerheads ,with
WaterSense-labeled models lets
you shower. with power while
shrinking your household's
water footprint by 2,300 gallons
annually and saving enough
energy to run a television all
year long.
Want to do more? Join thou-
sands of your neighbors by sup-
porting the We're for Water
campaign, organized by Water-
Sense. Visit www.epa.gov/-
watersense and take the I'm for
Water pledge or "like" Water-
Sense on Facebook and share
why you're for water at
www.facebook.com/EPAwaters
ense.


PHOTOS BY TRACE DANIELS
The' Zolfo Springs Neighborhood Watch organization and the town of Zolfo Springs
joined together on Saturday, Feb. 19, to host a Senior Citizens' Valentine Dance &
.Fellowship. Held at the town's Civic Center, the party featured homemade foods and
plenty of music. Top photo shows (from left) Lottle Mae White, 86; James White; and
mogene Gilliard, 96. Pictured below are some of the talented seniors who provided
entertainment.


- . ..


Protecting The Protectors


Americans of all sorts are
safer thanks to a trio of types of
heroes. While the first kind is
one most people would recog-
nize as such-the nation's mili-
tary men and women-the others
may come as somewhat of a
surprise.
That's because they're dogs
and people who can't see them.
Many people aren't aware of the
amazing role Military Working
Dogs play in supporting mili-
tary and law enforcement per-
sonnel. There are an estimated
2,300 working dogs in the
force. We've come a long way
from the Revolutionary War, in
which working dogs were first
used to carry packs, and World
War I, when they protected sol-
diers from rats in the trenches.
Today, Military Working
Dogs are usually German or
Dutch Shepherds or Belgian_
Malinois with high intelligence.
They are strong, athletic and
very loyal to their handlers.


.They save lives in many ways
including tracking captured
U.S. military personnel and
sniffing out IEDs (improvised
explosive devices).
Just as human troops require
protective clothing and gear
when they deploy into the field
for active duty, so do the dogs.
That's where the employees
who are blind that work for the
AbilityOne Base Supply Center
Program come in. Employees at
all 140 stores nationwide help
provide mission-critical prod-
ucts and services to the U.S.:
military and federal govern-:
ment. The Focusworks BSC
store at Luke Air Force Base in:
Arizona also provides the
equipment that military dogs*
need, including booties, har-
nesses, goggles, collars, leashes
and collapsible water bowls.
The harnesses have Velcro
strips, allowing the dogs to
carry packs with their own food
and water. When the dogs are


deployed worldwide to support
the war on terror, they wear
infrared lights that let helicop-
ters and planes identify where
they are on the ground.
Focusworks' unique item
supplied by the Base Supply
Center is a harness that the han-
dler can use to carry the
Military Working Dog during
climbs or in the case of the dog
becoming injured. No man (or
dog) need be left behind.
No one knows whether the
dogs like to "look cool" with
their protective eyewear and
striped vests, but the equipment
certainly protects them in the
field.
You can learn more about the
AbilityOne Program, what it
does and how you can be a part
of it, from National industries
for the Blind. They're online at
www.nib.org or you can call
(800) 433-2304.
You can learn little from
victory. You can learn
everything from defeat.
-Christy Mathewson


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1123 U S17S W h I (863)76iv-92

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


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keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


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Hours: i
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4B The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO.: 25-2009-CA-000729

PREMIER AMERICAN BANK,
N.A., as successor In Interest to
PENINSULA BANK,

Plaintiff,

Svs.

FRANK E. MENKE III, as
Successor Trustee of the D.B.T.
LAND TRUST u/a/d April 12,
2006; FRANK E. MENKE III, Indi-
.vidually; SWEETWATER RANCH
ePARTNERS, LLC, a Florida limit-
'ed liability company, LEFTWICH
,CONSULTING ENGINEERS, INC.,
,a Florida corporation; ENTRIX,
'JNC., a foreign corporation,
.PICKETT AND ASSOCIATES,
'INC., a Florida corporation, and
CANIN ASSOCIATES, INC., a
Florida corporation,

Defendants.


* NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuantt to a Summary Final
Judgment dated Feb. 23, 2011,
,and entered In Civil Action
Number 25-2009-CA-000729 In
'the Circuit Court of the Tenth
.Judicial Circuit In and for Hardee
PCounty, Florida, wherein PRE-
MIER AMERICAN BANK, N.A. Is
.the Plaintiff and FRANK E.
,MENKE III, as Successor Trustee;
D.B.T. LAND TRUST u/a/d April
12, 2006; FRANK E. MENKE III;
SWEETWATER RANCH PART-
.NERS, LLC; LEFTWICH CON-
SULTING ENGINEERS, INC.;
ENTRIX, INC.; PICKETT AND
,ASSOCIATES, and CANIN ASSO-
CIATES, INC. are the Defendants.

I WILL SELL to the highest bid-
-der for cash beginning at 11:00
:a.m. at the Hardee County
-Courthouse, 417 West Main
:Street, Second Floor Hallway
(outside of Room 202) Wauchula,
-FL 33873, on March 23, 2011 In
accordance with Chapter 45
:Florida Statutes the following
described property as set forth In
,said final judgment, to wit:

A parcel of land lying In
Section 23; Township 35
South, Range 25 East,
Hardee County, Florida
described as follows:

Begin at the SE corner of
said Section 23 for POINT
OF BEGINNING; Thence S
88* 45' 54" W along South
line of said Section 23,
231.26 feet; Thence N. 01
22' 24" W, 2223.10 feet;
Thence N. 02* 22' 51" W,
416.85 feet; Thence N 88*
38' 58" E, 235.97 feet to
East line of said Section
23; Thence S 01O25' 49" E
along said East line;
2640.35 feet to POINT OF
BEGINNING.

The NE 1/4 and the South
1/2 of Section 24,
Township 35 South, Range
25 East, Hardee County,
Florida.

The E 1/2 of S 1/4 of NW
1/4; The W 1/2 of S 1/4 of
NW 1/4; The NE 1/4 of SW
1/4 and the NW 1/4 of SW
1/4. All being In Section 19,
Township 35 South, Range
26 East, Hardee County,
Florida. Less County Road
RIGHT-OF-WAY (Dallas
McClelland Road) along
East side, as described In
Quit-claim Deed recorded
In O.R. Book 612, Page
294, of the Public Records
of Hardee County, Florida.

Any person claiming an Interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner, as of the date of the Isl
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated Feb. 23, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley,
Clerk of The Court
BY: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

3:17,24c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 252011CP000009

IN RE: ESTATE OF
YU CHUN WILLIS,
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of I
estate of YU CHUN WILL
deceased, whose date of dei
was November 14, 2010, F
Number 252011CP000009,
pending In the Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida, Probe
Division, the address of which
Post Office Box 1749, Wauchu
Florida 33873. The names a
addresses of the personal rep
tentative and the personal rep
tentative's attorney are set fo
below.
All creditors of the decedi
and other persons having clai
or demands against deceder
estate, on whom a copy of t
notice Is required to be serve
must file their claims with t
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFT
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF


COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice Is March 17, 2011.

Personal Representative:
BOBBY GENE WILLIS
5191 Deer Run Drive
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890

Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire
FBN: 114278
dba@gendersalvarez.com
Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire
FBN: 146528
afd@gendersalvarez.com
GENDERS*ALVAREZ* DIECIDUE,
P.A.
2307 West Cleveland Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Phone: (813) 254-4744
Fax: (813) 254-5222


3:17,24c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY. FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 25-2011-CP-000018

IN RE: ESTATE OF
LACY WOODARD,
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of LACY WOODARD,
deceased, whose date of death
was November 30, 2009, and
whose social security number is
xxx-xx-xxxx, file number 25-2011-
CP-000018, Is pending in the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 417 West
Main Street, Suite 202, Wauchula,
Florida 33873. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is March 24, 2011.

Personal Representative:
Fathe Woodard
3139 Edwards Peace
Drive
Wauchula, FL 33873


Attorney for Personal
Representative
Stephen W. Screnci, Esi
Florida Bar No. 0051802
Stephen W. Screnci, P.A
3301 NW Boca Raton BI
Suite 201
Boca Raton, FL 33431
Telephone: (561)300-331


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 252011CP000014

IN RE: ESTATE QF
PHILIP HOWARD PARMELEE
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS


The administration of th
estate of PHILIP HOWAR
j PARMELEE, deceased, whose
date of death was February 1'
2011, Is pending in the Circu
Court for HARDEE Count
the Florida, Probate Division, th
IS, address of which Is 417 We
ath Main St., Suite 202, Wauchula, F
lie 33873. The names and address
Is of the personal representative
for and the personal representative
ate attorney are set forth below.
I Is All creditors of the decedei
la, and other persons having claims
nd or demands against decedent
re- estate, on whom a copy of th
re. notice Is required to be serve
rth must file their claims with th
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
ent MONTHS AFTER THE TIME C
ms THE FIRST PUBLICATION C
it's THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTE
his THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
red COPY OF THIS NOTICE C
his THEM.
F 3 All other creditors of the dec
OF dent and other persons havir
OF claims or demands against dec
ER dent's estate, must file the
A claims with this court WITHIN


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Alorida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
News which will be gladly
hailed by Wauchulans was re-
leased yesterday in regards to
the proposed government mar-
ket shed. Some of the lumber
for the project is already on the
ground in South Wauchula, near
the railroad on South Sixth
Avenue. The project, being built
under WPA (Works Progress
Administration) will begin
Monday with the first phase,
stalls where farmers will take
their produce for sale to buyers.

Wilson "Hack" Moore, well-
known local athlete, saw ser-
vices for three innings in the
Indianapolis-Albany baseball
game played at the local park
Tuesday afternoon before a
large crowd. He went into the
game in the seventh inning in
left field and led off batting in
the bottom of the stanza.


MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice Is 03/17/2011.

Personal Representative:
George Fowler
15874 Hancock Road
Sarasota, Florida 34240

C. PARKE SUTHERLAND,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for George Fowler
Florida Bar Number: 0870781
900 W. Main St
Avon Park, FL 33825
Telephone: (863) 452-6900
Fax: (863) 452-5200


IN THE CIRCUIT COUR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLO

PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 25-2011-CP-0I

IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUAN REYNA a/k/a
JUAN REYNA, SR.
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDIT

The administration


3:17,24c

T FOR
)RIDA

N
00019




-J

)RS

of the


estate of JUAN REYNA a/k/a
JUAN REYNA, SR., deceased,
whose date of death was June 16,
2010; Is pending in the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division; File Number 25-
2011-CP-000019; the mailing
address of which is P.O. Drawer
1749, Wauchula, Florida 33873.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have
claims or demands against dece-
dIUI fl 0 I Uin n in


uentii s estate, IIIncluulingy unmllla-
tured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must
q file their claims with this court ON
OR BEFORE THE LATER OF THE
vd. DATE THAT, IS THREE (3)
Ivd., MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
9 c DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.


All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons who have
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliqul-
dated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
he WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
D
se NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
7, PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ult ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
y, YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
he DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
st BARRED.
FI,
s THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
ve TION OF THIS NOTICE IS: March
's 24,2011.

nt Personal Representative:
ns SANDRA VELASQUEZ
's c/o Rosalinda Reyna
is 604 5th Avenue SE
ed Ruskin, FL 33570
is
3 Attorney for Personal
OF Representative
OF MARLA E. CHAVERNAY, ESQ.
ER Law Offices of George R.
A Brezina, Jr., PA.
)N 1915 N. Dale Mabry Highway
Suite 300
e- Tampa, FL 33607
ng (813) 870-0500
e- Florida Bar No: 143138
>ir 3:24,31c
3


Batting from the port side,-
Moore belted a two-base hit and
scored when ace Indian hurler
and next man up, Logan, poled
a double into left field. It was
the start of a four-run rally
which aided in downing Albany
11-8.

The local volunteer fire de-
partment was called to the
municipal electric light plant
Tuesday shortly before the noon
hour, when a fuel pump was
ablaze. The blaze started when
carbon being burned from the
smoke stacks settled in the pen
holding the fuel pumps. The
destruction was light, the effi-
ciency of the fire department
restricting the blaze to small
damage.

A three-day weekend sale,
Friday, Saturday and Monday,
at Kimbrough's All-American
Store features cucumber pick-
les 25 cents ajar, sifted peas, 15
cents'a can, a 50-pound can of
lard for $5.98, Georgia syrup
for 50 cents a gallon, and shred-
ded coconut for 25 cents a
pound.

50 YEARS AGO
State Sen. G.W. Williams this
week called a state sales tax of
two percent "the only solution"
to the heavy burden carried by
local taxpayers. Williams, a
Hardee County native, said the
homestead exemption law was
here to stay. The only solution
is a broader tax base and an
across-the-board sales tax.

Mrs. Helene Conner, county
health nurse, is shown in a Page
One photo showing the new
$66,000 Hardee County Health
Center at Ninth Avenue and
Main Street. The modern build-
ing will be dedicated next
month and the county health
unit expects to move in the first
of April, as soon as all the fur-
niture and equipment arrives.

A request for a donation fiom
the city of Wauchula to a pro-
poeed football stadium has been
referred to the city' s planning
committee to return at the April
10 meeting of the City Council
for a decision. The request was
presented Monday by H.F.
Johnson, representing the





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HARDER
COUNTY

CASE NO. 252011 CP000021


IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
MARILYNN ESCHENBERG,
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of MARILYNN ESCHEN-
BERG, deceased, whose date of
death was February 8, 2011, and
whose social security number is
xxx-xx-xxxx, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Post Office
Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida
33873-1749. The name and
address of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is March 24, 2011.

Personal Representative:
Val R. Patarini
216 Lake Drive Blvd.
Sebring, FL 33875

Attorney for Personal
Representative
John W.H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, RA.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863)773-3241
Telecopier: (866)591-1658
Florida Bar No: 0650137
3:24,31 c


a. I


Catspaw Club. It is estimated
the stadium will cost $20,000
for concrete stands.

Real estate sales this week
focused on lots; a good home-
site on three lots on the south
side of Wauchula for $600;
nice, large shady lot on high
elevation, paved road, one mile
to post office and general store,
walk to good fishing, $850 cash
or $1,000 with terms; and 20
lots, grove and good frame
home, close to town, $10,500.

25 YEARS AGO
Sheriff Doyle Bryan is show
with log-shaped "rock" cocaine
packets which would bring
$8,000 on the street. Fourteen
people were arrested in a week-
end drug roundup conducted by
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office and Bowling Green
Police Department. They faced
56 criminal charges, 52 of them
felonies. Bryan said the arrests
came after eight weeks of
investigation.

Hardee Memorial Hospital
board members voted Tuesday
night to hire an Atlanta public
relations firm to improve the
image of the hospital, increase
its census and help set up pro-
grams to recruit physicians.
Board member Dr. James
Whitehurst, chairman of the ,
committee, recommended hir-
ing the firm for six months. The
firm will be paid $26,250 plus
traveling expenses.

Ads supporting the Easter
Coloring Contest this year were
Nicholson Supply, Cooper's
Wayside Flowers, Beall's at
Hardee County Centre, Wein-
er's Department Store, English
Chevrolet, Harvey St. John and
Sears, Gerald Delaney and


It's Spring Break week and not much is happening. Ha, Ha.
The boys varsity and JV baseball teams had games on Monday
and Tuesday and girls softball played on Monday. The varsity was
at 3-4 after Friday night's 5-1 loss to Sebring. The JV also lost to
Sebring, but are 4-2 overall. By the way, the JV game on Tuesday
was at Lake Placid, not at Southeast with the varsity. My bad!

Football schedules have come out. 4ardee is in 3A under the
new reclassification system and will be in a district with Bradenton
Bayshore, Palmetto and Bradenton Southeast. The 'Cats will still
play DeSoto, this year at home on Nov. 4 for Senior Night.
Homecoming is the Oct. 14 game against Frostproof.
Hardee's Spring Classic will be at Bartow on May 27 at 7 p.m.,
and the fall Kickoff Classic is at Lake Placid on Aug. 26. The reg-
ular season starts with a home game Sept. 7 against Fort Meade,
then three road games, Avon Park, Sebring and Bayshore before
coming home Sept. 30 for Mulberry. Oct. 7 is an open date, lead-
ing up to Homecoming, a game at Palmetto and home for
Southeast. After the DeSoto home game on Nov. 4, the regular sea-
son ends at Fort Pierce Central on Nov. 4.

Back to Spring sports, softball got a setback in two losses just
before Spring Break. The results of the March 18 game at Mooney
and March 21 visit from Booker were unavailable at press time.
The young team is doing well, but prone to mistakes, both mental-
ly and actually. There are only two seniors and one junior on the
varsity team. Three sophs and eight freshman round out the squad.
Coach Sharri Knight is doing well with the young squad.

Track guys and gals are getting all kinds of accolades. Senior
Ashley Louis leads the girls, placing third overall in the huge
Disney Classic against opponents from 28 other schools from
instate and out of state as far as Nova Scotia. Soph Febe Murilla
placed sixth in the girls steeplechase. Senior Yesenia Vargas is
making her way handily. Soph Christian Moralez, senior Carl
Brown and freshman Brandon Beatty are setting marks in the boys
division.

In tennis, the boys team, which has four seniors is doing quite
well. The girls team, with one senior and two juniors is improving
as the underclass girls get more and more competitive. They were
hampered recently by girls cheerleading tryouts and need to regain
their form with a couple of practices over Spring Break.

In weightlifting, senior Jarrius Lindsey is the man to watch. He
is undefeated this season and looking to return to the state compe-
tition this year stronger and better. His combined life of 565, 310
in the bench and 255 in the clean 'n jerk, are impressive, especial-
ly in his 183-pound division.

Junior high volleyball is under way. The eighth graders were 2-
2 going into Spring Break. The seventh graders are learning in
every outing. They are at home on April 4 and 7 against DeSoto
and Sebring respectively. Come out and encourage them every
chance you get. The seventh play at 5:30 and the eighth immedi-
ately afterward, about 6:30.

Youth sports are very active. The girls softball fwo youngest
divisions and boys baseball four youngest groups-are going great
guns. After the Spring Break, the older girls and boys divisions also
get under way.
Youth football had its first signups already and will have others
on April 1 and 2 at the league headquarters in the small building
behind the old junior high on the drive used to enter high school
football games. Youth football meetings are the first Monday of
each month, the next on April 4 at 6:30 p.m. Drop by and learn
more and how you can help.
Information from school and community events is always welcome.
Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heraldadvo-
cate@embarqmail.com with news for this biweekly column. The
sports news deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday, except for events which
happen over the weekend. These are due by Monday at noon.


Honest differences are often a healthy sign of progress.
-Mahatma Gandhi

Those who do not want to imitate anything, produce
nothing.
-Salvador Dali


Automotive Repairs, Gifts &
Things, Doyle Carlton Jr.,
Hazel's Flower & Gift Shop,
Carol's Country Ice Cream
Store, Nicholas' Family Res-
taurant, The Red Apple, Conley
Grove Service, Wauchula
Drive-In Restaurant, Pioneer
Ford and Doyle Carlton III.

10 YEARS AGO
An independent auditor has
declared the city of Bowling
Green no longer in the state of
financial emergency it has been
for the last three years.
Although the community still
overspent its general and enter-
prise funds, continuing its
deficit, this year's deficit is
noticeably less, said the auditor.

A Page One photo shows dri-
vers on the new northbound
portion of U.S. 17 from Zolfo
Springs to Wauchula. Drivers
continue to use it as a two-lane
road while the old U.S. 17 is
converted to a southbound U.S.
17 pair. The four-laning project,
which began on July 5, 2000, is
on schedule to be completed by
mid-November, said- a state
Department of Transportation
representative.

A Bowling Green man has
been accused of trying to .run
down two children on the
school playground. He later
said he just wanted to talk to
them because they had been
bullying his children. No one
was injured in the incident.

Spot auto ads this week
include a 2001 Taurus LX for
$16,792, a 2001 Crown Victoria
for $20,691, and every 2001
Ford Mustang to Windstar just
$1 over invoice.












Feeding The World Requires

A Second Green Revolution


At current growth rates, the
world's population will increase
from 6 billion people today to 9
billion by mid-century. To feed
this growing population, the
world's farmers will have to
grow twice the amount of food
they do today, even as arable
land and freshwater become
scarcer. How will they do it?
Feeding a growing global
population is not a new prob-
lem. In the early 20th century,
the developing world was fac-
ing issues similar to those we
face today. Disaster was averted
thanks in part to the develop-
ment and introduction in the
1950s of high-yield, disease-


4*


k--


resistant varieties of wheat, first
in Mexico and later in Pakistan
and India. The introduction of
these new high-yielding vari-
eties and modern agricultural
production techniques foment-
ed a "Green Revolution" that
saved millions from starvation.
, To meet looming global food
security challenges will require
a second Green Revolution.
Thankfully, the technology to
enable a second Green Revolu-
tion is at hand. Leading agricul-
tural companies such as
Syngenta are already helping
farmers grow more from less by
developing new corn hybrids
and soybean varieties that are


disease and insect resistant, as
well as seed care and crop pro-
tection products that further
improve a plant's ability to
thrive in the face of pressures
from insects. weeds, disease
and environmental factors. For
instance, the company has
introduced a seed care product
that enables wheat to use 35
percent less water. In corn, its
Agrisure Artesian(tm) corn trait
has demonstrated the potential
to deliver 15 percent yield
preservation under drought
stress.
Such advances can help pro-
duce enough .food to feed a
growing population, conserve


on continues to grow.

\ i TAl


/


Made mi the USA


% ater resources and protect the
environment. "Agricultural bio-
technology can improve crop
productivity. secure and im-
prove yield and produce higher-
quality crops. and offers envi-
ronmentally friendly solutions
to the challenge facing farmers-
to grow more from less. It is
critical to the sustainability of
agriculture." said David Mor-
gan. president. Syngenta North
America.
Modern agricultural technol-
ogy's ability to do precisely that
has been demonstrated best in
the United States, where farm-
ers have long reaped the bene-
fits. From 1987 to 2007, corn
yields averaged gains of 2.2
bushels per acre per year-a 41
percent increase in productivity.
Soybean yields climbed an
impressive 29 percent.
At the same time as these dra-
matic increases in productivity,
stress on the environment fell.
Soil runoff, which the Environ-
mental Protection Agency iden-
tifies as the primary cause of
water pollution, has declined
approximately 69 percent per
bushel of corn since 1987.
Irrigation water use in corn
farming has declined 27 percent
and energy use has decreased
by 37 percent.
Using these advances in de-
veloping countries could signif-
icantly boost world productivi-
ty.
Experts estimate that practic-
ing modern farming methods
and technologies in Asia could
boost productivity some 20 per-
cent in just 10 years. In the past
10 years, Brazil has nearly dou-
bled soybean production on the
same amount of land. In Russia
and Ukraine, winter wheat
yields rose 75 percent in one
program following the adoption
of modern crop protection tech-
nology.
The challenge to double food
production may seem daunting,
but history shows that, with
sound science, agricultural pro-
ductivity can outpace a growing
population.



ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships,
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par-
ents, siblings, children and
children's spouses and
grandchildren, and the num-
ber of great-grandchildren.
If there are no immediate
survivors, consideration of
other relationships may be
given.


March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B



SPRING SPECIAL



$A10


RO INSTALLED


A Simple, Basic,

Pure, Necessity Water.


Because water is vital...
Water is a daily, life-sustaining
requirement. It is one of the pure and
basic necessities in life.
Ensuring that the water we drink
everyday is the safe, natural water that
our bodies demand is as: vital as the
water itself.
Unfortunately, not all of the water we
use from our taps is the pure, fresh
water that our bodies desire.
The Microline R.O. Drinking Water
System effectively reduces harmful
impurities,* turning ordinary tap
water into the water that nature
intended for us to drink...fresh,
natural, life-sustaining water.


Microline R.O.

Drinking Water Systems


TAXES NOT INCLUDED


UIIrich's Water Conditioning Service
409 Goolsby Street
Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-6448
Fax: 863-773-2339
UIIlrichswater.com
3:17,24


-W










6B The Herald-Advocate, March 24,2011





-The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales .


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech
SPhone (863) 781-9720
s.augleOgualescomputerservices.com www.Gu9lesComputerServices.com


Elder Affairs SHINE Program
Seeks Volunteers
-Volunteers help improve the lives of Florida's elders-
Tampa The Florida Department of Elder Affairs, along
with the West Central Florida Area Agency on Aging,
invites you to join the award-winning SHINE team of
volunteers. This program helps elders make informed
decisions about Medicare, health insurance and
prescription drug plans.
SHINE volunteers provide individual counseling and
assistance to elders and their caregivers about Medicare,
Medicaid, Medicare plan choices, long-term care planning
and prescription discount drug programs. Volunteers may
also make educational presentations to community
groups and participate in local health fairs, senior fairs and
other outreach and educational events.
If you would like additional information about this exciting
opportunity and would like to become a SHINE volunteer
in Hillsborough, Hardee, Highlands, Manatee and Polk
Counties, please call the West Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging at 813-740-3888, ext. 5593.
WEST CENTRAL FL. AREA AGENCY ON AGING
Attn: Robin Watt, Volunteer Manager
5905 Breckenridge Pkwy, Suite F
Tampa, Florida 33610
(813) 74u-3888 Fax (813) 623-1342
Website: www.AgingFlorida.com cl2:3-3:24c


Locally Owned And
Operated Since 2005
A Full Service Provider-
Commercial, Residential and Industrial

My Florida

Landscape

Services Inc I/













Call Trey Flemer for a free price quote at
863-832-2102


Visit us at: www.myfloridalandscapes.com


cl3:10,24c


- I-


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
GET READY FOR THE SUMMER! 6B/3Bth
home on Lake June, dock and boathouse, 100'
deep lot. $700,000
45 Acre top producing Hamlin and Valencia
mix grove, 8" well, excellent location. $12,000
per acre
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000
YOU CAN'T BEAT THIS DEAL! One of older
homes in Wauchula with an air of elegance; 4
B/2Btli, screened front porch, carport.
OWNER WILL FINANCE FOR QUALIFIED
BUYER! Call Delois for more information.
$68,900
STORAGE UNITS 30 units in excellent con-
dition; very good rate of occupancy. Call Delois.
$55,000


tIt


Classifieds


I Agricul


FARM FRESH Free range brown- -35 OLLS HERMOTHIS HAY $25
eggs, $2 dozen. 245-9606, 281 N. a roll, make offer for all, delivery
Bailey Rd., Wauchula. 3:24p available. 245-1903. 3:24-4:21p


ROAD READY 1990 Ford 700
flatbed truck $3,800. 2007 36 ft.
flatbed gooseneck trailer $6,500,
14 ft. gooseneck hydraulic dump
taller $4,500. 781-9336. 3:24p
NEED YOUR HELP Young cattle-
man needing 10+ acres pasture
to graze cattle for your ag exemp-
tions. Will maintain fences/bush
hog when necessary. 863-494-
5991. 3:17-4:14p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, Injectors, can
remove and Install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p


1978 FORD
VIN: R80DVCG5645
8:00 A.M. APRIL 1, 2011
CLIFF'S WRECKER
SERVICE -
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL


L. DICKS INC. Is now purchaslngi
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc

Appliaces


WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC Range,
frig/freezer, dishwasher. 4 years
bid. Best offer. 863-448-3060.
3:24p
F Autmoiv


2001 FORD 15 Passenger E350
van. Great shape, runs good.
$6,500 OBO. Please call Mario at
- 245-3052. 3:17,24p
CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars 'and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767. 3:3tfc
05 CHEVY 1-TON 4X4 Duramax
Diesel 12' flat bed, underbox stor-
age. Excellent condition $15,500.
863-832-2084. 3:17,24p


| GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.


* Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
,cl:2fc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


$500 OFF
any Vehicle with Coupon
SMust Bring Coupon


Monday Thursday Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7 pm 10 am to 7:30 pm
Wauchula Wauchula Hills
First National BHllyHi wy 17
6k)7 and R EA Rd.v
773-6664 Maria Owner Ruby 773-2011


Bring All

Of Your

Unwanted

Items

Fo yus pt

8 _Ii0 2,


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Steve Johnson
OWNERS SAY SELL THIS MOVE- IN
READY updated C/B home, 3B/1.5Bth, almost
new A/C and roof. List Price $115,000

Make this 3B/2Bth house your home! Ceramic
tile and carpet floors, large eat- in kitchen, spa-
cious bedrooms, located in family neighbor-
hood. $115,000

16.5 Acres with 3B/2Bth M/H built; a total of 5
wells on this beautiful property surrounded by
large oaks. $195,000

5 SECLUDED Acres of natural Florida; large
trees, and plenty wildlife. $22,500

MOTIVATED SELLER! 5 Acres with paved
road frontage, partially fenced, good location,
beautiful homesite. $65,000


SERVICE YOU CAN CO


DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


DELOIS JOHNSON


773-9743


ASSOCIATES


UNT ON [
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


1999 MERCURY GRAND MATR-
QUIS excellent condition, power,
leather, low mileage, 20 mpg,
$5,000. Swamp buggy $4,000.
781-1639. 3:24,31 p
1992 FORD EXPLORER, Good
running work truck. 781-4825.
3:17,24p

:0.


1996 16' ALUMACRAFT boat. 50
_ Hp Force motor, w/low hours, foot
controlled trolling motor, runs
great and extras. $1,600 OBO.
863-832-1197 or 832-9355. 3:24dh
Help W^^sy a nted^s~^^s3!S


ALF HAS 3-11 Kitchen (experi-
ence required) and 3-11/weekend
floor positions. Clean back-
ground required. Apply at 298
Resthaven Rd., Zolfo. 3:24c


AUTO BODY COLLUSION TECH
wanted for dealership. Exper-
ienced only ASE or I-CAR certifl-
cations needed. Apply In person
8:00 am 4:00 pm. See Skip In
bodyahop. Alan Jay Chevrolet/
Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep Hwy. 17
South, Wauchula. 2:24tfc


-EXPERIENCED DREDGE help--'
needed. Local and out of town.
MISHA training a plus. 813-634-
2517. EOE DFW 3:24p
SOMEONE to stay with elderly


3/2 CHAMBERLIN BLVD., Wau-
chula. $30,000 OBO 863-773-
6169. 3:24,31 p
OPEN HOUSE 1104 N. Holland-
town Rd., this Saturday 10am-
2pm. 3/2 CB home on fenced 5,
acres. 863-781-3627. 3:24c


2BR, 2 BATH, New carpet & sid-
- Ing, large living room, enclosed
laundry room $68,000. 773-5054.
3:3tfc


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE"
MR E PREOWNED AUTOS AND
TOWING gives Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell this vehicle
2001 FORD.
VIN#1FMZU67E81UA71064
10 a.m., April 5,2011
Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towing
1093 Hwy. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 338734751
Pursant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. MR E PREOWNED AUTOS AND
TOWING reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or all bids.


W B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773-4478




Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience cll





Handyman Remodels

Concrete Additions

Free David Cole j
Estimate nsed & Insud 863-214-1471


THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through February 28th
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
1(3 (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
s--. Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c13:10-31c


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


S Ben Gibson
Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


Ben Gibson


PRICE REDUCED! Beautiful home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. Was
$475,000.....Now $379,000!
Lake June House! 4 Bedroom, 4 f/2 Bath with
over 200 feet on Lake June. Includes Jacuzzi,
Sauna, Dock & Boathouse. $780,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
A Little Bit Country! Three Bedroom Two Bath
Home on Over Two Acres. Great Area for Horses
or Other Animals or Just Enjoy the Serenity and
Calm of This Popular Part of the County!
$169,500
Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $98,500!


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396 c13:24c


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Howe Depot e
863-382-0600


Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED TO $205,000!

REDUCED!!! Great 5 acre tract fenced and
ready to build on! $20,000

Nice lot in Torrey community with frontage on
Hole Number 6 of Torrey Oaks Golf Course. Lot
$14,900 Owner will build to suit for just
$159,900!

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.

Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $229,000


~~4~e~e I I,


I Agriculture I


I-, I


- ---;


I


-I!


o -


I'


I-


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I I














The


March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


Classifieds-


3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. $190,000.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p


3BR/2-1/2 BATH In Wauchula,
Riverview subdivision. New
kitchen and appliances, huge
family room with fireplace large
laundry room, 2 utility/storage
rooms. Moving, must sell, 100k
OBO. 863-832-2084. 3:17-24p


FOUND Beautiful male golden
Lab mix in Ft. Green. 245-9378.
3:24p
LOST White Chihuahua,
Whippoorwill Lane, since Sunday,
March 20, 832-1260. 3:24p


2 LOTS, BOWLING GREEN
Cemetery, $100 each, 334-585-
0059. 3:17-4:7p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
send scrap gold In the mail. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
1:6tfc


COMMERCIAL TANNING bed
$2,500 (originally $8,000), 42'
bulbs, 3 high pressure facial tan-
ners, 781-2237, leave message.
3:24,31 c
MOBILITY SCOOTER, Go-Go Elite
model, never been used, will
deliver & set-up $900. 941-757-
9049. 3:3-31 p


2 BR, 2 B DWMH, Sebring Village
Adult Park or Spanish Village
Adult Park, Leesburg. 781-1639.
3:24,31 p


ADULT CAT & KITTEN, 2 small
dogs, need home. $15 for rabies
shot. Come by All Creatures ani-
mal Hospital. 3:24c
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


STEPHEN A WINGO-
SAW COMPUTERS
10 YE.AR E\T'EFJEN,-E
PC REPAIR SERVICES SOFTWARE INSTALLATION
CUSTOM BUILT COMPUTERS VIRUS AND ADWARE REMOVAL
HOME AND SMALL BUSINESS NETWORKING
Free Estimates stephen.wingo@yahoo.com 863-832-9556


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOLI

Pay Here! F.inanceCharges








NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
1996 Ford 4D Id. 1FALP52U3TA241030
Contact Linda or Shannon for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Friday April 1, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. at the Wauchula
State Bank parking lot located at 106 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL. c13:24,31c






I New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

I Brand Name Tires! g


I Semi & Trailei
BIG SRLE ON

RLL TIRES.
I 773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
VISA w ,- (across fro
i .._, Wal-Mart)


r Tires


m


ATTENTION! State Statutes-
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh
U ---


PREVATT FARMS U-pick straw-
berries. 8-4 daily, open Friday,
March 19. 4 quarts for $1. Bring
containers. St. Rd. 674 to 2nd
Grange Hall Loop, left and follow
signs. 813-634-1162 Wimauma.
3:17,24p


ONE BEDROOM $300 deposit,
$150 weekly, utilities Included,
BG. 863-712-1126, 863-224-4790.
3:24p
HOUSES & APARTMENTS for rent
773-6667. 3:24c
3 BR 2 BATH in the country. 4544
Seminole Trail. 863-781-5828 or
863-473-2039 after 10 am.
3:17,24p
3BR/1BA, NICE Neighborhood,
Wauchula. $675/month, $200/
deposit. 863-781-7064. 3:17-4:14p
NICE CLEAN 2 BR 1 bath house.
Central AC/Heat, new carpet and
a walk-in closet, washer & dryer
hook-up. $150 per week or $600
per month, damage deposit and
reference required. 773-9793 or
863-832-0676. 3:24,31 p
TWO BEDROOM APT. No pets.
$550 plus deposit. 832-1984.
3:3-31p
2 BR 2 BATH, Large living room,
kitchen, dinette, $650 month,
security deposit required. 773-
5054. Water softener required.
3:3tfc


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo. up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
698-4908. 8:20tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


OFFICE FOR RENT-close to
courthouse and city center, plenty
of parking. Call 773-4800 for
information or to view property.
3:17-4:7c


I WILL SIT with your loved ones
anytime, 773-2267. 3:24,31 p
VICKER'S LAWN CARE. Free esti-
mates. No job to big/small. 863-
448-7491. 2:24-3:24p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders is the facilitatory.
More information call 773-5717.
6:1Otfc


SALES SERVICE

863-773-3573

Fax 863-773-0521 108 Carlton Street
desotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchula, FL 33873







863-397-9840
354 Bostick Road Bowling Green. FL

-- -- _
_ . .: .
.t-,-: .,,=r -lV "' .




www.gatorheatingandair.com
Gator Heating-Air-Mold Inspections LLC
1 C.. rtc i .2'1 4. ,,'-1


HiARDEE RESIDENT looking for-
part-time employment, flexible
hours. Please call 941-716-1411.
3:24p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze Construction
735-1158. RR0050181. 3:17-5:19p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI SState Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


HANDYMAN TO PUT "Build It
Yourself" shed together in Wau-
chula. Reasonable price, serious
inquires only, 813-267-1730.
3:24p


L FRIDAY, SAT. 8-? 326 Turner,
Wauchula. Vera Bradley, Fossil,
L Dooney & Burke purses, clothes,
L |TV, Playstation2, games, misc.
C 3:24p


GAS COOK STOVE, king size pil-
low top beds, lots of good cloth-
Ing for 250. Edna's Place. 3:24c
SATURDAY, 8-?, 205 Southerland
Street, Wauchula. Baby clothes,
TV, misc. 3:24p
FRIDAY 8-4 & SATURDAY 8-12.
New & used items. 17 North
across from Wauchula Super-
market. 3:24p


HURRY... LIMITED SPACES AVAILABLE




JOIN OUR





L 6&6




PROGRAM


CALL FOR COMPLETE DETAILS


NO RENT UNTIL NOVEMBER 2011

PLUS


'1200 RENTAL CREDIT

Requires 2 Year Rental Agreement

Avoid the unknown cost of towing your rig south every year...

Leave It Here-Come & Go As You Please!



TH Ei IOAS IS *! 1 1 a -OL O**I
e of S Jlh Ll l d Ro -tr


ilianeo

S Repair


Established Since 1987


Azalea Apartments
2, j'1& 4 bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
1 Monday Friday *
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
EQUAL HOUSING Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider
OPPORTUNITY c[3:10-31c


L old's HIoLuse Thrl store

O, Furniture Home Decor Crystal A.ot
F9 U China Quality Merchandise Op



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
(Directly Behind Heaven Sent)





9leaven Sent Cleaning crovice
Now offered by Sherry White Ministries
Carports Garages Homes Lawns


773-0523 245-1184


-HUGE YARD SALE: Thurs.-Sat.,
Mar. 24-26. Too much to list. 2822
Bailes Rd., corner Steve Roberts
Spil. & Merle Langford, follow
signs. 3:24p
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
* HUGE 4 FAMILY YARD SALE FrI. &
Sat. T.I.G. (till its gone). Unique
items (antique ironing board, old
wood frame windows, cow heads)
toys, child & adult clothes &
shoes, furniture, all craft supplies'
going! W. on Louisiana, R. on
Kiella Rd. 3:24p
THURSDAY, FRIDAY 8am-7pm.
4806 Church Ave., BG.
Household items, furniture, Baby
Grand piano, lots of antique col-
lections, china, tea pots, rolling
pins, coffee cups, Christmas dec-
orations, much, much more. 865-
310-9545. 3:24p
HUGE YARD SALE. Thurs., Fri.,
Sat., 8-? 450 Boyd Cowart Rd.
3:24p
THURS.- MON. 8-? 2616 Boyd
Cowart Rd. Inside moving sale
3:24p
FRI., SAT. 7-? 318 Riverside Drive,
Wauchula. Big moving sale.
Furniture, appliances, household
Items, clothes. 3:24p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 409 S. 10th
Ave., Wauchula. Tomatoes,
plants, furniture, knick-knacks,
clothes. 3:24p
HARDEE HOMES ADULT Day
Training. Huge sale. Furniture,
office supplies, holiday decora-
tions, clothes, pictures and all
kinds of goodies. 406 South Hwy.
17, across from Burger King.
3:24p
SAT. 8-12 Noon. 1190 East
Hibiscus Drive, Bartow. Giant
moving sale! Antiques, furniture,
tools! Everything must gol 3:24c
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available.
3:24tfc

Curiosity .. endows the
people who have it with a
generosity in argument
and a serenity in cheerful
willingness to let life take
the form it will.


kamuu.-.








8B The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011






The


Visit And Protect Your

Conservation Lands


Whether you're an avid envi-
ronmentalist. a Western movie
fan looking for a little tranquili-
ty. or just someone who's seek-
ing a fun vacation for your fam-
ily, you can experience the
undisturbed beauty of the
American West at hundreds of
places around the country. Over
28 million acres of National


Conservation Lands are perma-
nently conserved by the federal
government for the public to
enjoy.
Here are a few facts and fig-
ures:
These lands, especially
those around the Empire Ranch
in Arizona, have been a calling
card for Hollywood Westerns.


rBLmiN GENm Quia LUBEI


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/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
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Mike Adcox Manager


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863-233-2002
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
WEEKLY DISCOUNTS FOR
SENIORS VETERANS DISABLED PERSONS "
Free Estimates Licensed and Insured






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I N C.,


R E A


L T O R -8
(863) 773-2128


SLM REALTORS
SJ JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
S REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
Kenny Sanders www.joeldavis.com
(863)781-0153 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.


NEW LISTING! CB 3BR/IBA
home in Bowling Green w/new
flooring, cabinets, countertops,
being sold as is. $65,000!
38.5 ac on the Peace River
w/lots of beautiful oaks, pines
and palmettos! Pole barn &
2BR/2BA MH. $524,900!
PRICE REDUCED! Pack your
overnight bags & head to this
peaceful retreat! 5 ac fenced
w/lots of oaks, pond, creek,
12'x20' shed. NOW $59,000!
High & dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$120,000!
Roomy 4BR/2BA CB home in
Wauchula on corner lot!
Remodeled bath, solid surface
kitchen countertops, large
screened porch, new carport!
$158,000!
Ideal for farming! 21.86 ac
pasture is fenced, has well, close
to town. $186,500!
5 acs fenced on Mel Smith Rd
zoned Agriculture. $45,000!


34 ac fenced pastureland on
private, graded rd in Zolfo
Springs, Two wells, Greenbelt
qualified. $238,000!
Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil hunt,
relax! $90,000!


40 acs farmland, 8" well,
paved rd frontage, near
Wauchula. $360,000!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!
Imagine your new home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Fenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!
333 ac ranch has pasture, irri-
gation system, 12" well,
3BR/3BA two-story home, 3,000
ft landing strip. $1,498,500!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS-...781-0153 SANDl LARRISON.... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL--..... 781-7633 MONICA REAS.... ....781-0888
DAVID ROYAL........--781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH. WAUCHUL A. FL 33873 C13:24c


Classifieds


With a plain of saguaro
cacti beneath it. nearby, Ragged
Top Mountain in Ironwood For-
est offers a striking reminder of
the Old West.
Historic Fort Stanton in
New Mexico is one of the few
intact frontier forts, with many
of its original buildings and sur-
rounding lands looking just as
they did when the fort hosted
such legendary personalities as
Billy the Kid. Colonel Kit
Carson and the Buffalo
Soldiers.
The Santa Rosa/San Jac-
into Mountains in southern
California has an old brush cor-
ral and views from the highway
that harken back to the southern
California of a century ago.
* Rock caves and formations in
Red Rock Canyon of Nevada
dominate the landscape once
crossed by cowboys and Native
Americans.
Since they were established a
decade ago, the National Con-
servation Lands have not gotten


the le\ el of funding, protection.
recognition or support that they
need from the federal govern-
ment.
The\ face other challenges
such as recreational target
shooting,. reckless off-road
vehicle use. vandalism. en-
croaching development and
trash dumping.
The Conservation Lands
Foundation is the only organi-
zation dedicated solely to con-
serving,. restoring and expand-
ing the National Conservation
Lands through education, advo-
cacy and partnerships.
To that end, the Foundation:
Provides grants, training
and networking opportunities to
build a constituency of grass-
roots advocates;
Works with Congress and
the Bureau of Land Manage-
ment to help shape the future of
the National Conservation
Lands;and
Promotes greater public
-awareness of and appreciation


S Charles N. Flesher II, Inc
P A pi TILE & FLOORING SPECIALIST
STILE LAMINATE
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When a product is installed with care and know-how, you'll receive
a service that I am willing to stake my name on! Charley o
FREE ESTIMATES
863-781-2867 701 BUMBY LANE, WAUCHULA





REAL ESTATE

Topsy See
3BR 2 Bath DW. All appliances, window treatments, ceiling fans
included. Very nice home in excellent condition. Sets on 5.2 ac.
U3,tftl. REDUCED $127,500.
3 BR 2 Bath 1987 DW 1890 sq. ft. all the extras including security
system. 5 acres with beautiful oaks and stocked pond. $115.000.
3BR 2B 2005 DW Mobile Home Very Modern all appliances
set on 5.4 acres all fenced w/pond $130,000.
Hwy 17 frontage-1BR 1 Bath home sits on 50 x 152 lot in Bowling
Green. $84,500.
1 ac. high & dry. Approx. 269 ft. road frontage-deed restricted.
$29,900.
Very nice 1980 M.H. 1982 sq. ft., fully furnished, move in ready,
includes linens, dishes, cookware, TV, most anything you will need.
This is a great buy at %0ff. REDUCED $42,000.
Beautiful secluded property in Golf View. 8.8 ac with 2 building sites.
$75,000 cl3:24c


DESOTO COUNTY





OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 |




Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot a
863-382-0600


AM-SOUIH KLALI Y
Each office independently owned and operated.

t 4

I -."


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


for the National Conservation
Lands and the irreplaceable
human and natural history they
contain.
You can discover more about


the Foundation and the sites aind
monuments it protects, how to
visit them and how to help prd-
tect them at www.conservation-
lands. org or (970) 247-0807.


Realtor
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


Noey A. Flores
(863) 781-4585


LIMITED TIME ONLY









FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY Price Reduced on this
2BR/1BA MH on 20 +/- acres with easy access to Wauchula,
Zolfo Springs & Avon Park. Property includes fencing, sheds
and horse stalls. Motivated seller is offering this property for
$175,000, down from $199,900, for a limited time only.
Call us to set an appointment.

NEW LISTING


SHORT SALE! Set an appointment to see this 3BR/2BA CB
home with 1801 total sq ft and a 36x24 carport. Property is
being offered through a Short Sale at $56,000

NEW LISTING IN WAUCHULA 2BR/1BA CB home with cen-
tral air & heat, city utilities, metal roof and large bedrooms.
Offered at $75,000
FORECLOSURE IN WAUCHULA HILLS 3BR/2BA CB home
with central air & heat, 1388 total sq ft, and built in 2007. Offered
at $80,000
DOWNING CIRCLE 3BR/2BA 1985 MH in Downing Place
Subdivision with 1440 Sq ft living, large carport and city utilities.
Asking $49,000
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
T Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl3:24c


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LISTING!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home
with central heat & air, stove, refrigerator,
one car garage, wood, tile flooring, in a well
kept neighborhood and close to Peace River
and park nearby. $137,900
JUST LISTED!!! THE BLUFFS!! RETIREMENT
COMMUNITY!! 1 Bedroom, 2 Bath Mobile
Home & Lot, central H/A, One car Carport,
everything you need and a golf cart too,
relax in the family room or use it as a second
bedroom. This home is totally move-in ready
and waiting for you. Only $53.000.
NEW LISTING!! Charming two story home
with 5 Bedrooms, 1.5 Bathrooms, close to
shopping and schools, wood floors and
large carport and workshop. $75.000
PRICED ( $119.900!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB
home with central heat/air, located within
City of Wauchula. Call today!!
$92.900 Enjoy country living in this 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath double wide mobile home
and 5 Acres with beautiful oak trees.
REDUCED!!! $82,500 2B / 2B Home with
central heat and air, one car garage, appli-
ances, work-shop and storage area, extra lot
included, all in quite neighborhood and
close to shopping and schools.
$72.500 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home with cen-
tral heat and air, private well, utility shed,
and more that sits on 2.4 Acres. Call Today
for more information.
$69.900 Older Home with Charm. Loft can be
used for 2nd Bedroom, Small Studio with
bathroom located in back. Large back yard.
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.
c13:24c


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


NEW LISTING!! 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath Mobile
Home / Owned Land. Central heat and air,
screened porch, MH has skirting all around,
appliances, utility shed, much more. Adults
Over 50 Only. $75.000
NEW LISTING!! Residential Mobile Home Lot
located in a nice, clean retirement Mobile
Home Park. Priced ( $30.000
WHAT A BUY!! JUST LISTED ONLY $38.000
-MAKE AN OFFER! 2 BR, 2 Bath-Mobile
home in Good condition, w/ central heat and
air, partially furnished, 10X23 screened
porch, 2 car Carport, all with insulated roofs,
2 outdoor sheds for workroom and storage,
all sitting on a 100 x 110 size lot. NICE AREA
and must see to appreciate. Call Nancy -
863-832-0370.
NEW LISTINGS!! 2009 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Double Wide Mobile Home in a nice country
setting located on 4.81 acres. Priced
@ca$110,000.
NEW LISTING!! Nice residential lot in well
kept neighborhood. Priced @ $11.900.
REDUCED!! $139.900 3 B/2 Btli CB home
built in 2007 has central heat/air stove,
refrigerator, two car garage, and much more.
Call today!!!
DOUBLE LOT!! Nice 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home in City Zolfo, close to elementary
school and Priced @0 $34,900
PRICED REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
home with extra lot, walking distance to
school, and town. House in good condition-
owner ready to negotiate Only $100,000
REDUCED!! $79,900!! SEBRING!! Nice 2
Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home with central
Heat/air, refrigerator, dishwasher, washer/
dryer, screened rear porch, view of golf
course, one car carport.


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10B The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


NWES Presents Awards For Student Achievement


COURTESY PHOTOS
The kindergarteners who received the Cool Cats award for the second quarter at North
Wauchula Elementary School were (front row, from left) Roxanna Arvizu, Genesis
Chavez, Alondra Luna, Brendan Holton, Serenity Walters, Lillian Edwards, Samara
Arreola and Makayla Kersey; (second row) Zander Yeomans, Aiden Thomas, Kaelea
Bryant, Andrea Garcia-Lopez, Ethan Tracey, Martin McClenithan and Jaidyn Newman;
(back row) Haylee Elisondo and Trinity Vansickle.


Jk. '-~ ~
~ ~ A il~ ___-
-.-~V


Second graders noted as a Cool Cat at the school were (front row, from left) Jamal
Holley, Alessa Valerio, Tulsi Patel, Leigha Alderman, Daniel Campos, Breana Reynolds,
Acheline Delhomme and Oscar DeSantiago; (second row) Zachary Estrada, Trey
Canary, Kenise Norton, Jelissa Torres, Adrianna Consuegra, Nathaniel Bacon and
Brianna Rivers; (back row) Kedrick Williams, Caleb Arana, Landon Newman and
Richard Torres; not pictured is Jade Hahn.


The fourth graders recognized for their citizenship were (front row, from left) Yenny
Salgado, Beyonce Mosley, Adamaris Garcia, Vivian Flores, Marisa Molina Santibanez
and Allen Thomas; (back row) Patricia DeLoera, Betsy Mejia-Flores, Laura Reynolds,
Eddie Rivera, Marcus Sambrano and Stephanie Gutierrez.


I . -- i .
First-grade Cool Cat award winners for their outstanding achievements are (front row,
from left) Angelica Lopez, Sonia Macedo, Lahna Christian, Kaylie Grice, Brianna
O'Bryan, Mollie O'Bryan, Cassandra Jaimes and Stephanie Perez; (second row) Leonel
Zapata, Petra Gaitan, Khloe Smith, Carter Birge, Roger Hipolito, Dora Santoyo, Cecilia
Alvarez and Eve Quintana; (back row) Gabby Barcia and Brianna Downey.


Third-grade students recognized for their good conduct were (front row, from left)
.Christopher Castaldi, Hunter Presley, Jonathan Orta, Trista Miller, Sandra Gomez, Omar
Gutierrez and Bryce Rucker; (second row) Rosa Guerrero, Hallie Atchley, Misael Arana,
Robert Cavazos, Jasmine Consuegra and Weston Roberts; (back row) Cristina Lopez
and Lyndsey Welch.


The fifth graders recognized for their scholastic achievements were (front row, from
left) Mallory Gough, Jesula Charles, Elena Briones, Ricardo Rodriguez, Adelina
Villafranca and Michel Gallardo; (back row) Taylor Bone, Salvador Herrejon-Madrigal,
Rouke Madronal, Caleb McCoy, Emily Patarini and Elizabeth Weeks.


COUR
North Wauchula Elementary School recently recognized its Positively
Workers with the RA.W. Award for outstanding achievement in citizenship or
ics. Kindergarteners were (front row. from left) Alex Mendieta, Cassie Higgi
Aracely Antonio, Eduardo Mata, Fedner Delhomme and Dallas Grice; first gra
(second row) Malachi Hines, Joey McVay, Maria Medrano, Eliana Enrique, Hai
and Luis Santiago; second graders were (back row) Oscar Lopez, Asucen
Brennan Arguelles, Abel Servin and Phillip Kue.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Mosaic's "Spirit of the Community Award" is given for
outstanding scholarship, service and citizenship.
Pictured are second-quarter award winner Alyssa Beers,
a third grader, and Assistant Principal Dale Wolgast.
Alyssa received the award for not only being a fantastic
TESY PHOTOS student academically, but also for being a prominent part
Awesome of her community. She ran a campaign independently for
racadem- the March of Dimes, writing her own public service
inbotham, announcements and launching an informational cam-
ders were paign during her school's morning announcements.
ven Rimes Alyssa's efforts raised hundreds of dollars for support to
a Gomez, the work of the March of Dimes, which prevents birth
defects and promotes healthy babies.


Elizabeth Weeks, fifth
grader at North Wauchula
Elementary School and
daughter of Danny and
Jacque Weeks, was re-
cently recognized for
scoring a Level 6 on the
FCAT Writes.


JF




























COURTESY PHOTOS
Students at North Wauchula Elementary School who were recognized for earning a
Level 5 on the FCAT Writes were (front row, from left) Taylor Bone, Elena Briones, Joc
Quez Campbell, Nubia Gdjiez, Cierra Jones and Sydni Lopez; (back row) Adelina
Luna-MunIz, Zachary Mactks, Rouke Madronal, Shauna Norwood, Alexis Paulino, Ruby
Rivera and Cori-Ann Rosales; not pictured is Lucero Paz.


North Wauchula Elementary acknowledged its Positively Awesome Workers with the
PA.W. award. Third-grade students were (front row, from left) Victor Saldana, Michael
Rodriguez, Johnny Shelton, Sandra Salgado, Dalton Cantu and Brian McQuaig; fourth
graders were (second row) Ruben Lopez, Rut Arzate, Kevin Kue and Anahi Cano; fifth
graders were (back row) Marisol Sanchez-Silos, Casey Juarez and Anthony Perez.


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A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Lord, You have been our
home since the beginning.
Before the mountains were
born and before You created
the earth and the world. You
are God, You have always
been and You will always be.
Psalm 90:1-2 (NCV)
FRIDAY
If possible, so far as it
depends on you, live peace-
fully with all. Beloved, never
avenge yourselves, but
leave it to the wrath of God.
... Do not be overcome by
evil, but overcome evil with
good.
Romans 12:18,19 21 (RSV)
SATURDAY
A cheerful disposition is
good for your health; gloom
and* doom leave you bone-
tired. ... The one who knows
says little; an understanding
person remains calm. Even
dunces who keep quiet are
thought to be wise; as long
as they keep their mouths
shut, they're smart.
Proverbs 17:22, 27-28 (ME)
SUNDAY
The preaching of the cross
(of Jesus) is, I know, non-
sense to those who are
involved in this dying world,
but to us who are being
saved from that (eternal)
death, it is nothing less than
the power of God.
I Corinthians 1:17-19 (PEM)
MONDAY
Don't you know that the Lord
is the everlasting God, the
Creator of all the earth? He
never grows faint or weary.
No one can measure the
depth of. -His understanding.
He gives power to those who
are tired and worn out; He
offers strength to the weak.
Isaiah 40:28b-29 (TLB)
TUESDAY
"If it is at all possible for You,
take pity upon us and help
us," said the boy's father. "If
it is possible!" said Jesus.
"Everything is possible to the
one who has faith."
Mark 9:22b-23 (NEB)
WEDNESDAY
God said to Jacob, "All the
peoples of the earth will be
blessed through you and
your offspring. I am with you
and will watch over you
wherever you go, and I will
bring you back.to this land. I
will not leave you until I have
done what I promised you."
Genesis 28:14b-15 (NIV)
My motto was always to
keep swinging. Whether I
was in a slump or feeling
badly or having trouble off
the field, the only thing to
do was keep swinging.
-Hank Aaron
A work of art which did not
begin in emotion is not art.


March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11B




Week ending March 20, 2011
DRY WEEK
Weather Summary: During the week of March 14 through
20, temperatures were seasonal with extremes of lows in the mid
30s and highs in the upper 80s. Pleasant daily highs were'in the mid
80s. Nearly all weather stations reported no rainfall or insignificant
amounts for the week. Warm, windy weather was drying out soils
and pastures.
Field Crops: Field preparations for planting field crops
remained on schedule with some, planting underway in the
Panhandle. Jackson County producers were preparing to plant
corn, cotton, and peanuts. Madison County producers were plant-
ing corn. Suwannee County producers were planting corn and pre-
pared fields for planting peanuts. Rice producers in Palm Beach
County were busy preparing their fields and anticipated planting to
be well underway within a week. The sugarcane harvest in Hendry
County was nearing completion, therefore ending Florida's sugar-
cane harvest. Topsoil and subsoil moisture supplies were rated very
short to adequate.
Vegetables: Gulf County producers were getting ready to
plant watermelons, corn, and peas, but some growers will wait for"
warmer weather before planting. Producers in Jackson County
were preparing to plant watermelons. Highlands County vegetable
-growers were planting watermelons, snap beans, and other vegeta-
bles. Vegetable crops were responding favorably to the warm tem-
peratures. Flagler County producers were harvesting potatoes and
cabbage. The vegetable harvest was increasing in volume as grow-
ers were harvesting crops less affected by the winter's freezes. The
market movement of vegetables was fairly light for eggplant,
endive, peppers, sweet corn, and tomatoes. The market movement
for broccoli, radishes, and squash was steady. The market move-
ment for cabbage was lower.
Livestock and Pastures: The pasture condition Statewide
ranged from very poor to excellent with most in fair condition.
Drought was the first limiting factor to pasture condition though
cold nighttime temperatures also restricted forage growth. The
overall condition of pasture continued to be low due to poor grow-
ing conditions earlier in the year. The cattle condition was mostly
fair. In the Panhandle area, pasture condition ranged from very
poor to excellent with most fair to good. Permanent pasture started
to come back following recent rains. Warmer temperatures moved
winter pastures along and permanent pastures greened up. The cat-
tle condition ranged from poor to excellent with most in fair to
good condition. Culling of cattle was active due to favorable cattle
prices. In the northern areas, both the pasture and the cattle were in
poor to good condition with most in fair condition. Drought, cold,
and some damage from pests limited the pasture condition. In the:
central areas, pasture and cattle conditions ranged from very poor
to excellent with most in fair condition. In the southwestern areas,
pasture condition ranged from very poor to excellent with most in.
fair condition. The cattle condition ranged from very poor to excel-
lent condition with most in fair condition.
Citrus: Lows were in the 40s with highs in the 80s across
most of the citrus area. This week, trace amounts of precipitation
were recorded by four FAWN stations. Balm and Sebring reported,
the most, with 0.03 inch of rainfall recorded at each station.
Overall, there were moderate to severe drought conditions in most
of the citrus area according to the U.S. drought monitor, last updat-
ed on March 15th. Indian River, Brevard, and part of St. Lucie,
Martin, and Palm Beach counties experienced extreme drought
conditions. Forty-five packinghouses and 19 processors were
opened, although many had stopped running fruit until the Valeocia
maturity reaches desired levels. Harvest of Valencia oranges and
grapefruit continued as harvest of early-midseason oranges winds
down. Pea and smaller sized fruit for next year's crop were visible
on citrus trees throughout the citrus area. Grove activity included
mowing, hedging and topping, brush removal, fertilizer applica-
tion, and ditch cleaning.
The tallest fountain in the U.S. is found in Fountain Hills,
Arizona. Built at a cost of $1.5 million for McCulloch
Properties Inc., the 564-foot tall column of water weighs
more than 8 tons.


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Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or. Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


I










12B The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


Chip Ballard Publishes Second Book


Hardee County author Chip'
Ballard's second book, "The
Snapshot & Other Stories: Tales
of Flowing Wells," has been
released by RoseHeart Pub-
lishing in Chiefland.
This collection of Ballard's
short stories offers an insightful
view into small-town living, all
set in the fictitious town of
Flowing Wells, in the rural
county of Pinewood in Central
Florida. It takes readers on a
journey through its pages into
the rugged interior of Florida to
discover a way of life in the
Sunshine State few outsiders
realize still exists.
In "Waiting for God," a
young boy's faith is tested when
a bully takes his BB-gun and
kills a redbird. It's his belief
that God will come for the bird
and take it to Heaven.
"Moonlight Is Forever" deals
with a bittersweet love affair.
Promises are made but a heart is
broken when one of them walks
away.
With "Snapshot," readers see
a young boy longing for his
father who runs away from
home with just a snapshot for
company.
"Johnny's Angel" is about a


- guitar-picker whose intentions
may be in the right place but,
when the truth is told, ends up
on the wrong end of a pair of
fists.
"Endless Summer" presents
the Bahamas, two young lovers,
a father who has close ties to the
Mafia and a summer that won't
be forgotten.
The book offers many more
tales such as these, which are
woven with humor and emo-
tion. Some will even make the
reader stop and think.
RoseHeart Publishing prom-
ises the'6ook will make readers
la gh and cry and shake their
Aeads. But whatever the case,'
they will keep reading until the
very end.
It follows Ballard's first
novel, "Peace River," a murder
mystery, which introduced the
fictitious setting of Pinewood
County in rural Central Florida.
Each story in 'The Snapshot &
Other Stories: Tales from
Flowing Wells" retains the
same locale as his novel.
Leland Durrance "Chip" Bal-
lard was born and raised in
Hardee County. After dropping
out of Hardee High School in
the llth grade, he enrolled in


AL


An Image of the new book's cover, featuring tales in the
setting of the fictitious town of "Flowing Wells."


Softball Girls


Slow Down


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A pair of games before
Spring Break were disastrous
for the Hardee girls softball
team.
The team, which features
only two seniors, one junior and
a host of underclassmen,
showed its youthfulness in
games March 14 and 17.
Results from the game on
March 18 and March 21 were
unavailable at press time.
In the two games they played
recently, Hardee lost both by
errors, frustrating head coach
Sharri Knight because many of
the girls had played travel ball
or youth and junior high ball.
They resume play next week
with a quartet of games, home
Tuesday and Wednesday for
games against Haines City and
Bradenton Southeast respec-
tively, and at Lemon Bay on
Thursday. The week ends with
the April 1 game at home
against All Saints Academy for
Senior Night.
At home against Sebring on
March 14,"the Lady 'Cats spot-
. o ted the visitors four runs in the
opening inning. Hardee got one
back in the bottom of the sec-
ond inning. Brooke Tyson sin-
gled, advanced on a Kate
Thomas hit, and came home on
a Karlee Henderson hit. Thom-
as was doubled off third when
Courtney Park lined to third.
Hits by Addison Aubry and
Anna Galvez led the bases
loaded, but the score was 4-1.
Hardee picked up another run
in the third inning on a Tyson
over-the-fence homer, the first
varsity homer for the freshman.
Sebring got a run in the top of


the fourth and Hardee matched
it. Parks doubled and raced
home on an Aubry double. It
was 5-3. Holding Sebring three
up, three down in the top of the
fifth, Hardee narrowed the
score to 5-4 in the home half of
the inning.
Kayla Knight led off the bot-
tom of the fifth with a single
and stole second. Elvira Servin
drew a walk, during which
Knight slipped home.
In the sixth inning, Hardee
missed an opportunity to add
runs. Aubry and Caylah Coker
both singled but were stranded.
Sebring picked up a pair of
runs in the top of the seventh on
three hits, making the final
score 7-4, when Hardee didn't
score in the bottom of the last
inning.
Against Lemon Bay on
March 17, Hardee gave up "11
unearned runs in the first inning
on a triple, double, hits and
walks. Lemon Bay got two
more runs, one in the second
and one in the fourth inning.
Hardee got its only runs in
the second inning. Henderson
doubled, Galvez singled, Bailey
Carlton singled and Knight
doubled. The final score was
13-2.

Little League baseball is a
very good thing because it
keeps the parents off the
streets.
-Yogi Berra


A successful marriage re-
quires falling in love many
times, always with the
same person.
-Mignon McLaughlin


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TH 211CHRYSLERLIEU


Sm I s -


adult classes at night and
received his diploma there.
After bumming for a couple
of years and working at numer-
ous odd jobs, Ballard enrolled
at South Florida Junior College
in Avon Park to earn an associ-
ate of arts degree. He was editor
of the school newspaper and
graduated with honors. He was
chosen for "Who's Who Among
Students in American Junior
Colleges."
Ballard had a penchant for
writing and storytelling. At the
University of South Florida in
Tampa, he took a creative writ-
ing class taught by a wise old
professor named Robert Spen-
cer Carr, who had published his
first bestselling novel, "The
Rampant Age," at the age of 17.
Carr took Ballard under his
wing and encouraged him to
write. Ballard graduated, again
with honors, earning a degree in
English.
Over'the years, Ballard's fea-
ture stories and personal col-


umn "Inside Out" have run in
such newspapers as The Brad-
enton Herald, The DeSoto Sun,
The Herald-Advocate, The
Franklin Chronicle, Highlands
Today, The Polk County Dem-
ocrat, The Charlotte Sun, The
Lake Placid Journal, and The
Fort Meade Leader.
His short stories have won
local, state and national awards
and have been published in
magazines including "The State
Street Review," "Fiction Quar-
terly," "The Tampa Bay Re-
view," "The Pentangle," "Land
& Living in Southwest Flor-
ida," "Florida Living," "Spec-
trum Magazine" and "The
Garden Doctor."
He resides in Zolfo Springs,
and is a teacher at Hardee
Senior High School.
For more information on the
author or this book, visit
Ballard's website at www.chip-
ballard.com or the publisher's
website at www.roseheart-
books.com.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Local author Chip Ballard has published a second book,
a collection of short stories.


I m :7 .


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2011 HARDEE COUNTY FAIR


4-H AND FFA LIVESTOCK SALE


RABBIT


GRAND CHAMPION STEER


Exibitor: Taylor Pohl


Buyer: Vandola Power


Sale Price: $5.00


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Madison White (center) holds her English Lop, which
wag awarded Best of Show at the 2011 Hardee County
Fair; she stands with the DeSoto County judges.


GRAND CHAMPION SWINE


Exibitor: Jarrett Stevenson


Buyer: State Farm Insurance


Sale Price: $4.00 Per Lb.


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Pictured is Michael Lambert (center) flanked by the two
DeSoto County judges who awarded him the Grand
Champion honor for his Broken-Color Holland Lop.


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, March 18, 2010









2C The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


FOWL


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Elizabeth Weeks (left) proudly holds her Grand
Champion Water Fowl. Holding her winning ribbon is
event judge William Stanfield.


Exibitor: Griffin C


RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION STEER
lark i
Buyer: Arcadia Stock Yard


Sale Price: $4.25


PHOTO B'RALPH HARRISON
William Stanfield (left) congratulates Kacey Bryant, who
won both Grand Champion and Best of Show for his
standard poultry.


a


RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION SWINE
Exibitor: Taylor Lambert Sale Price: $3.75 Per Lb.
Buyer: Arnold Amusements


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Cade Roberts (right) won not only Grand Champion for
his bantam poultry, but also Reserve Grand Champion as
well as Best of Show. Event judge William Stanfield holds
one of his award ribbons.


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Dalton Bryant (right) was awarded Reserve Grand
Champion for water fowl. Holding his winning ribbon is
event judge William Stanfield.


~.--~~r~ ~-:
-ii ~p~


P










March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


PHOTOS BY RALPH.HARRISON Mini Poultry Showmanship winners standing with event Event judge William Stanfield stands behind Junior
Justin Smith (right) proudly holds his Reserve Grand judge William Stanfield are (from left) Daniel Cantu, first Poultry Showmanship winners (from left) first place,
Champion standard poultry. Event judge William place; Palmer Klein, second place; and Justin Smith, Avery Bunch; and third place, Aaron Bunch; not pictured
Stanfield hold his ribbon, third place. was second-place winner Cade Roberts.


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Winners of the Senior Poultry Showmanship are (from left) first place, Dalton Bryant;
second place, Garrett Ham; and third place, Ryan Ham. With them is event judge
William Stanfield.


I








4C The Herald-Advocate, March 24. 2011


Steers


Exhibitor: Hayden Lindsey
Buyer: Veg-King


Sale Price $3.25 Exhibitor: Korin Roehm
Buyer: TNT Child Care


Sale Price $2.75 Exhibitor: Quintin Undsey
Buyer: Veg-King


Sale Price $3.50


Exhibitor: Abby Clark Sale Price $2.75 Exhibitor: Ellie Palmer Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: Morgan Crews
Buyer: Wauchula State Bank Buyer: Okeechobee Livestock Market Buyer: Miles Judah


Sale Price $2.75


Exhibitor: Colt Hancock
Buyer: TNT Bookkeeping


Sale Price $2.25 Exhibitor: Makenna Fite Sale
Buyer: L. Cobb Construction


Price $2.50 Exhibitor: FFA/Jared Lanier
Buyer: Mosaic


Sale Price $3.25


Exhibitor: Laina Durrance
Buyer: CF Industries


Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: Savannah Miller
Buyer: Hardee Petroleum


Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: Daniel Miller
I Buyer: Doyle Carlton, III


Sale Price $2.75


Exhibitor: Danny Owens Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Murrell Winter
Buyer: FINR Buyer: Florida Fertilizer


Sale Price $3.25 Exhibitor: 4-H Foundation Sale Price $3.50
Buyer: Chapman Fruit Co.


__


I








March 24. 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Steers


Exhibitor: Dylan Farr
Buyer: Farr Groves


Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: Avery Bunch Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: Chase Deboard Sale Price $3.00
Buyer: Hardee Ranch Supply Buyer: Albritton Insurance


Exhibitor: Steven Crews Sale Price $2.75 Exhibitor: Kalan Royal
Buyer: M&R Cattle Buyer: Mosaic


Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: Caroline Durrance
Buyer: D&S Cattle


Sale Price $3.25


Exhibitor: Kole Robertson Sale Price $3.25 Exhibitor: Hailey Andrews Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: Tyler Pella
Buyer: Graham Farms Buyer: Florida Fence Post Buyer: Best Farms


Sale Price $2.50


Exhibitor: Josie Hancock
Buyer: Mosaic


Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Kyndall Robertson Sale Price $2.50 Exhibitor: Aaron Bunch Sale Price $3.00
Buyer: Kelly Durrance Livestock Buyer: Lincoln Properties


Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Brook Aleman
Buyer: Mosaic


Sale Price $3.00 Exhibitor: McKenna Hellein Sale Price $2.75
f Buyer: Bar Crescent S Ranch


Exhibitor: Conner Crawford
Buyer: FINR








6C The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


Steers


Exhibitor: Tiffany Owens Sale Price $2.25 Exhibitor: Colton Albritton Sale Price $3.25 Exhibitor: Dawson Cantu Sale Price $2,500.00
Buyer: Best Farms Buyer: Everglades Farm Equipment Buyer: 7 S Bar


Exhibitor: Andy Hunt Sale Price $1,600.00 Exhibitor: Jessica Hunt Sale Price'$1,100.00


Buyer: Marcus Shackelford


Buyer: Marcus Shackelford


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Willie Hall (left) was honored for his 40 years of service to the community'" youth each
year at the County Fair. Presenting him with a plaque of appreciation wasTavid Royal.










March 24. 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Swine


Exhibitor: Daniel Sockalosky Sale Price $3.25
Buyer: Mosaic


Exhibitor: Halley Addison Sale Price $3.25 Exhibitor: Kailyn Shaw Sale Price $3.75
Buyer: Heartland Grower's Buyer: State Farm Insurance


Exhibitor: Amanda McNabb Sale Price $3.25
Buyer: S&S Irrigation


I- .. -- g i-'I "- "- Jr- iJ
Exhibitor: Dylan Bozeman Sale Price $3.50 Exhibitor: Taylor Roberts Sale Price $5.00 Exhibitor: Blake Tinsley Sale Price $5.00
Buyer: Sweetwater Farms Buyer: Vandolah Power Buyer: Veg-King


Buyer: Best Farms


Exhibitor: Ty Trammell Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Danielle Weeks Sale Price $3.75 Exhibitor: Erica Roberts Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Tamara Griffis Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: Big T Tire Buyer: Sweetbay Buyer: Mosaic Buyer: Mosaic


Exhibitor: Courtney Buckley Sale Price $3.75 Exhibitor: Cacee Keller Sale Price $3.25 Exhibitor: Bradley Brewer Sale Price $3.75 Exhibitor: Willie Bennett Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: CF Industries Buyer: Wauchula Absract Buyer: Alan Jay Buyer: TNT Child Care


Exhibitor: Jansen Walker Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: Alan Jay


Exhibitor: Cheyenne Pohl Sale Price $3.75 Exhibitor: Wyatt Maddox Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Holly Brown Sale Price $3.75
Buyer: CF Industries Buyer: Roy Petteway Citrus & Cattle Buyer: Eli's Western Wear


1 -- -- ""-i11,-." -" J I '--> ^ *-ir Ir" ll~i ,, .- -J- -1
Exhibitor: Brea Farrer Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Kevin Borjas Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Megan Shivers Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Wyatt Kofke Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: CF Industries Buyer: Cat's on Main Buyer:TNT Bookkeeping Buyer: Publix


Exhibitor: Timothy Steedley Sale Price $3.50 Exhibitor: Aubrey Stark Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: J.C. Kulig Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: Mid-State Machine & Fabrications Buyer: Betty & Herbie Kay Estate Buyer: Tree Air Cattle


I"'---'-- "-- --I
Exhibitor: Melissa Hartley Sale Price $4.75
Buyer: Superior Livestock Auctions








8C The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


Swine


Exhibitor: Shelby Maness Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Rachel Garland Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: Walter & Carol Farr Buyer: TECO


Buyer: Wauchula State Bank


Exhibitor: Cheyanne Gough Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: Main Gate Interprises


Exhibitor: Kaylee Hogenauer Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Rayann Kulig Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: Alan Jay Buyer: CF Industries


Exhibitor: Atasha Johnston Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: John Chason Jr. Sale Price $3.75
Buyer: Nickerson Brothers Buyer: TNT Reclaimation


Exhibitor: Christopher Paugh Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Paul Gough III Sale Price $3.50
Buyer: Torres & Son Rental Buyer: Farm Credit


Exhibitor: Hallie Atchley Sale Price $5.00
Buyer: Chapman Fruit Co.


Exhibitor: Savannah Albritton Sale Price $5.00
Buyer: James Hill Albritton



h .%A Sr\.^ ',- ^,,


Exhibitor: Roby Paris Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: Alan Jay


Exhibitor: Travis Britt Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: Mecca Citrus Buyers


Exhibitor: Kendall Winter Sale Price $4.75
Buyer: Dr. Barbara Carlton


Exhibitor: Austin Wallace Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: First National Bank


Exhibitor: Katie Smith Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Madison McCoy Sale Price $3.75 Exhibitor: Carleigh Coleman Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Branden Douglas Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: Okeechobee Livestock Market Buyer: TNT Child Care Byer: Coldwell Banker Buyer: CF Industries


Exhibitor: Esteban Anton Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: Publix


I--L ..,---.-____________
Exhibitor: Andrea Ameres Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Rachel Shaw Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Mason Waters Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: Joe L. Davis Groves Buyer: Pioneer Restaurant Buyer: Conley Grove Service


Exhibitor: Colton Howell Sale Price $4.00
Buyer: FINR


Exhibitor: Dillard Albritton Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Hannah Revell
Buyer: Graham Farms Buyer: Highland C


Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Michael Forrester Sale Price $4.00
itrus Buyer: CF Industries


TSI


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March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9C


Swine


Exhibitor: Brooke Conley Sale Price $11.50 Exhibitor: Boone Paris Sale Price $4.50
Buyer: TNT Bookkeeping Buyer: Conley Grove Serivce


Exhibitor: Victor Aleman Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Bryce Rucker Sales Price $4.25
Buyer: Mosaic Buyer: CF Industries


Exhibitor: Dalton Rabon Sale Price $4.75 Exhibitor: Tucker Albritton Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Sidney Crews Sale Price $4.75
Buyer: Big T Tire Buyer: Gorley Plastering Buyer: Cat's On Main


Exhibitor: Chelsea Wallace Sale Price $4.50
Buyer: CF Industries


Exhibitor: J-T Bryant Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Brandi Westberry Sale Price $4.75 Exhibitor: Tanor Durden Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Kaylie Carver
Buyer: Mid-State Machine & Fabrications Buyer: Farm Bureau Buyer: Keith & Mary Farr Buyer: FINR


Sale Price $7.50


Exhibitor: Kailah White SalPre Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Joshua Smith Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Dillon Rabon Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Wyatt Keller Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: Joe L. Davis Real Estate Buyer: CF Industries Buyer: Florida Fuel Buyer: Mid-State Machine & Fabrications


Exhibitor: Tara McNabb Sale Price $4.75 Exhibitor: William Baker Sale Price $5.00
Buyer: Rapid Systems Buyer: Lambert Realty


Exhibitor: Austin Jones Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Dalton Tubbs Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: Mosaic Buyer: Mosaic


. ..... _____i.i_ ......i....i
Exhibitor: Gracie Albritton Sale Price $6.50 Exhibitor: Hunter Gibson Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Cheyanne Skinner Sale Price $4.00 Exhibitor: Isabella Adams Sale Price $8.00
Buyer: Jim See Realty Buyer: Farm Bureau Buyer: CF Industries Buyer: Vandolah Power


Exhibitor: Shayna Harned Sale Price $5.00
Buyer: State Farm/Smith Automotive


Exhibitor: Sarah Albritton Sale Price $4.75 Exhibitor: Dalton Richey Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Luke Winter Sale Price $5.25
Buyer: Alan Jay Buyer: Highland Citrus Buyer: Dr. Barbara Carlton








10C The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


Swine


Exhibitor: Jamee Keller Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Caleb Thornton
Buyer: Unda & Dan Smith Buyer: FINR


Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Cain Thornton
Buyer: FINR


Sale Price $4.25 Exhibitor: Emily Albritton Sale Price $4.75
Buyer: Farr Groves


Exhibitor: Dana Terrell Sale Price $5.25
Buyer: Cooper's Flowers


Exhibitor: Blake Richardson Sale Price $62.00 Exhibitor: Tyler White Sale Price $4.75 Exhibitor: Emily Bennett Sale Price $4.50
Buyer: Sheila Kuirkendall Buyer: Peace River Growers Buyer: CF Industries


Exhibitor: Darby Sanders Sale Price $4.50 Exhibitor: Dana Douglas Sale Price $5.25
Buyer: Publix Buyer: Veg-King


Exhibitor: Meghan Graham Sale Price $4.75
Buyer: TNT Reclaimation


Exhibitor: April Garland Sale Price $4.75
Buyer: TNT Reclaimation


'.u E l -O'T


Exhibitor: Jacob Smith Sale Price $4.25
Buyer: TNT Reclaimation


Exhibitor: Dylan Roberts Sale Price $5.00
Buyer: Mosaic


Exhibitor: Kyle Ward Sale Price $5.25
Buyer: CF Industries


Exhibitor: Cleston Sanders Sale Price $6.25 Exhibitor: Lance McCrary Sale Price $5.00 Exhibitor: Amber Westberry Sale Price $8.50
Buyer: TNT Reclaimation Buyer: Johnson Harvesting Buyer: Highland Citrus/Alan Barber


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March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11C


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12C The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


Little Cypress Leads Darlings Division


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Little Cypress Golf
Course Sweet Tarts head the
Darlings softball division.
Little Cypess had a 5-1
record (.833) after three weeks
of play, slightly ahead of the
Harvest Aviation Babes, which.
are at 4-1 (.800). Behind them
are the CF Industries Peaches,
Sevigny & Timmerman Eye
Care Heartbreakers and the AG
Comp Solutions Power Puffs.
In last Monday's game, Har-
vest downed Sevigny & Tim-
merman 9-3.
Elizabeth Herrera, Trinity
Her, Baileigh Herrera and
Genesis Silva were all twin-
tally batters for Harvest. Re-
bekah Erekson added a solo
score. Other Harvest players are
Kaylee Gibson, Skylar Tatum,
Nicole Martinez, Gisele Gar-
cia, Emma Eures and Natalia
Garcia.
Sailor Ullrich and Chloe
Martinez put a pair of runs on
the board for Sevigny & Tim-
merman in the second inning
and Lahna Christian added
another in the third. Other play-


ers for the squad are Madison
"Mattie" White, Mady Tyson,
Ebony Lamy, Haven Rimes,
Mia Cabrera, Macy Tyson and
Myia Lamy.
On Tuesday night, Little
Cypress took the measure of
AG Comp 5-3.
Valeria Montanez put a pair
of runs in the book for Little
Cypress. Kaylie Grice, Leah
Hall and Callie Eisenhauer each
added a score. Other Cypress
players are Abby Johnson,
Lucia Galvez, Tulsi Patel,
Samantha Montes, Gracie
Lopez, Kya Batiste and
Samantha H. and Annabell (last
names are unknown)
For AG Comp, Treasure
Camel scored in the first inning,
and Michelle Patterson and Joe
Harned scored in the sixth.
Other players are Olivia Rice,
Tori Durden, Shaniah Hodges,
Zyann Parker, Lilianna "Lilly"
Plata, Riley Kate Albritton,
Petra Faitan and Sage Ward.
On Thursday night, Little
Cypress pocketed another win,
6-3 over Sevigny & Timmer-
man.
Grice and Galvez scored in


the first inning for Little Cy-
press, while Montes and Sa-
mantha H. added runs in the
third and Montes and Johnson
scored in the sixth.
Ullrich put the first run on the
board for Sevigny & Timmer-
man in the first inning. White
added another in the fourth and
Myia Lamy added the final
score in the fifth.
In the week's finale on Friday
night, Harvest dropped CF 12-
9.
Erekson rounded the bases
three times for Harvest. Eliz-
abeth Herrera, Her, Silva and
Tatum chipped in with twin
scores apiece and Martinez
added a solo score.
Jayden Hays and Lee Anna
Rimes each scored a run in the
second inning for CF. Emilee
Worden and Katie Bradeberry
put up two more runs in the
third inning and Faith Davis
and Drew Beattie scored in the
fourth. The final trio coming
home in the fifth were Yesaily
Martinez, Hays and Savannah
Conerly. Other players are
Hailey Bryant and Alexis
Hagood.


Java Leads Angels Softball


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
By the narrowest of margins,
the Java Caf6 Lady Bugs lead
the 10-and-under girls softball
division.
By the end of week three,
Java had a 4-2 record or .667,
while the Bunch AGCO Cow-
girls had a 3-2 record or .600.
Behind them were the Amer-
ican Fruit Co. Diamonds, the
Friendship Foliage Pride and
the Highland Citrus Pink Sox.
There were a pair of games
each on Monday and Tuesday
before breaking early for Spring
Break. Games will resume on
Monday, with the 14-and-under,
10-and-under and 8-and-under
teams going at it.
In the opening game last
Monday, Bunch won 7-2 over
American.
Lilanna "Lily" Ponce, Alayna
Carranco and Lillian Salazar
each put a pair of runs on the
board for Bunch. Kyra Wilson
and Abigail Erekson added a
run apiece in the fifth inning.
Others playing for Bunch are
Ashlee Patterson, Taylor Bone,
Avery Bunch, Chastady Flores,
Jocelyn Villarreal and Miranda


Pearson.
Stephanie Derringer and
Valerie Lopez scored for
American in a fourth-inning
rally. Makayla Benavidez and
Marisa Rodriguez were each
stranded twice. Other American
players are Heather Coronado,
Adrianna Perez, Shelby Zeigler,
Brianna Valadez, Mallory
Gough, Kareli Plata and
Viviana Flores.
In the Monday night closer,
Java outscored Highland 7-2.
Leadoff batter Gracie Albrit-
ton and Sarah Carlton both
crossed home plate twice for
Java. Tara Hines, Shelby
Spencer and Laura Ordehi each
came home once. Other Java
players are Lyndsey Welch,
Taleia Moreno, Madi Magee,
Aubrey Start and Jaycen
Batiste.
Lilyana "Lily" Franco and
Rebekah Hinojosa were the
only Highland players to step
on home plate. Several others
were stopped short of scoring.
Playing for Highland were
Anabel Ramos, Darby Sanders,
Shelby Groene, Hannah Revell,
Alexx Brant, Amber Ussery,
Jaasmine Goqzalez, Summer


Bond and Arielle Sanchez.
Both Tuesday night games
were one-run thrillers. In the
early game, Friendship fash-
ioned a 7-6 win over Highland.
Amari DeLeon scored in the
second inning for Friendship.
Destiny Scheel, Elizabeth
McBride and Denali Briones
added a trio of tallies in the
third inning, and Sophie Allen,
Michaela Klein and Alexis
McBride added three more in
the fourth inning.
Groene circled the bases in
the first inning for Highland.
She also started a fourth-inning
rally in which Revell, Brant,
Franco and Hinojosa also
crossed home plate.
In the nightcap, Java won 5-4
over American.
Java's Albritton, Magee,
Ordehi and Batiste came around
to score in the second inning
and Spencer scored the winning
run in the home half of the third
inning.
American scored all its runs
in the third inning to tie the
game at 4-4. Valadez, Gough,
Coronado and Derringer came
home, aided by hits by Lopez-
and Benavidez.


Do not trouble yourself much to get new things, whether clothes or friends. .. Sell
your clothes and keep your thoughts.
-Henry David Thoreau

Racial injustice, war, urban blight and environmental rape have a common denomina-
tor in our exploitative economic system.
-Channing E. Phillips


NOTICE
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING

The Hardee County Value Adjustment Board, consisting of two County
Commissioners, one School Board member, and two citizens, will hold a meeting on
Tuesday, April 05, 2011, beginning at 9:00 a.m.

The meeting will be held in the Hardee County Commission Chambers, 412 W.
Orange Street, Room 102, Wauchula, Florida.

The purpose of the organizational meeting is to provide procedural and operational
information concerning the function of the Value Adjustment Board.

Pursuant to Florida Statute 286.0105, if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, he or she
will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

For more information, please call (863)773-9430
Lexton H. Albritton, Jr., County Manager
3:24c


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, MARCH 28, 2011
5:30 RM.


CASES:
10-046-L
10-046-NA
09-154-L


Mario A Perez & David Mendoza
Mario A Perez & David Mendoza
Brian K & Betty C Larimer


818 N Florida Ave
818 N Florida Ave
508 S 7th Ave


OLD/NEW BUSINESS:
Adela Chancey Discussion by Don Chancey
Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a
verbatim record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is
made.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26,
Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
3:24c


Greetings from Fort GreenT TW mentioned but Macon is a lot
I feel sure everyone is enjoy- nearer and they have over
ing this beautiful weather, and 300,000 trees. It was well worth
the ones the most happy are the the drive, as the stunning blos-
school students and the teach- soms were unbelievable.
ers! This is that wonderful time We visited with my niece and
of year called Spring Break. her husband, Kaye and Dale.
Everyone as old as me never Kaye is Mark Silverman's
had the pleasure of a spring daughter. On our way home, we
break when we were in school. detoured to Albany, Ga., to visit
We were lucky if we got off cousins and then by Valdosta
Good Friday! These are the for a trip to the nursing home to
signs of the time and progress! visit my only remaining aunt.
Our sincere sympathy is Of course, any time you are in
extended to the family of John the town where your parents,
Brannon. Betty Walker called grandparents, etc. are buried,
me on Tuesday to request pray- you have to take flowers to the
er as he was at the Sebring hos- cemetery.
pital having hip surgery. He had We arrived home on Tuesday.
fallen and this was the result.
The report I had Tuesday night
was he was doing good, the sur-
gery went well, etc., but
Wednesday morning he made
his final journey and our
thoughts are with the family.
Bettysaid she always thought
she would go first as he was her
younger brother. I had this ex-
perience with my younger 0j j
brother, as he went to his heav-
enly mansion when only 62 and
my older brother at 45. We all ww.hu11'.owiesr
need to be ready! mLiited time offer. At participating Iocatioi
We didn't win anything but
we spent a lot of time at the new
Hardee Ranch Supply. It is a A
beautifully decorated building
with everything just about you A ,UALUT1
could possibly want to use on a A
farm or ranch. I was standing by G
Lynn Bennett when they called a GR
her husband's name that he had
won tickets to the Bucs game. ,
She yelled, "He's here!" as you
had to be present to win and she Fo0&44
told me, he can't hear! This ;7.
seems to be the malady of most
men!
We, enjoyed the traditional
corned beef and cabbage for St. PACKAGE #1 PACK
Patrick's Day. Hope you all had 25 INVITATIONS 25 Ii
a good time. "'E *,p..
Lee, Chrysta and Makayla 25 iTHANK Y CA 25NA
Chancey and Brad, Amy Wil- 25 NAME CARDS
son and girls enjoyed part of $55M,-P $4
their spring break in Orlando
touring the different sights. E
They all had a good time.
Sherman and I went to Ma- HardeeCont
con, Ga., to see the cherry blos- n
soms. Most people think of Tlhe
D.C. when cherry blossoms are


L'


Te oInly drawback to the trip is
we went in our vehicle, so
Rascal spent a few days with
Becky Henderson and he does
love to go on trips!
Faye Davis is not feeling
good. Sinus problems are hard
to shake, even in this great
weather.
The next thing on the church
calendar is April 2, a VBS plan-
ning session. Then April 9 is
county events for the 4-H
youth.
Please pray for one another
and our nation.

Modest egotism is the salt
of conversation.


Id-Advocate
Hometown Coveirg
WAUC HULA, FL 33873
(83 7335


I


HAIIDEEI 2011


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6pm- 9pm


HARDEE COUNTY

AGRI-CIVIC CENTER

515 Civic Center Drive


50 Per Person

ATTIRE: FATIGUES OR PATRIOTIC
Purchase Tickets Online at
www.american.redcross.org/HardeeBootCamp
or call 773-9097












To BENEFIT AMERICAN RED CROSS


THANK YOU To OUR SPONSORS:


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Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


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PAGE ONE


Streaks Slip



Past Wildcats


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In their only games last week,
both the varsity and JV
Wildcats lost in a Friday night
double-header against Sebring.
despite Spring Break, there
were games this week. It began
with a double-header at Avon
Park on Monday, the JVs play-
ing at 4:30 and the varsities
about 7:30.
Both each had a trip to Sara-
sota to play Cardinal Mooney
on Tuesday.
After the balance of Spring
Break, play resumes on Mon-
day, where the JV host Frost-
proof at 6 p.m. The varsity
plays at Frostproof on Wednes-
day and the JV close out March
with a Thursday home game
against Fort Meade. Both teams
open April with a double-head-
er at Bradenton Southeast on
April 1.
Sebring 5, Hardee 1
Sebring led off the varsity
game between the Streaks and
Wildcats by plating a pair of
runs in the first inning. Seth
Abeln started it with a shot to
right center. Matt Randall fol-
lowed with another hit to right
center, leaving runners on the
corners. With one away Jesse
Baker singled to left field,
bringing Abeln home and leav-
ing runners still on the corners.
With Corbin Hoffner at bat, an
error allowed Baker to come
home and put the Streaks in
front 2-1.
Hardee was three up, three
down in the home half of the
first and Sebring was too in the
top of the second. In the home
half of the second, Wintz
Terrell was hit by a pitch. Justin
Knight fouled it off until a high
fly to right field was caught.
Lincoln Saunders singled up
the middle and ended up at sec-
ond on the overthrow, which
caught Terrell coming home
without a slide, bowling over
catcher Baker. (Terrell was
ejected for not sliding and will
miss two games.) When Daw-
son Crawford was up, a passed
ball brought Saunders to sec-
ond. When Crawford doubled
down left field, Saunders hus-
tied home with the only Wildcat
run of the game.


ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.



The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following work-
shop to which all interested per-
sons are invited:
Wonders of the Salt Marsh
event: Governing and Basin
Board members may attend to
tour the preserve and learn
about the ecology, manage-
ment and conservation of salt
marshes.
DATE/TIME: Saturday, April 2
and Sunday, April 3, 2011; 10:00
a.m.
PLACE: Withlacoochee Gulf
Preserve, 1001 Old Rock Road,
Yankeetown FL 34498
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
Toi.Basso@watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211. x4756 (Ad Order
EXE0127)
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@-
swfwmd.state.fl.us
3:24c


It was quiet again until the
fourth inning, when Sebring put
another pair of scores on the
board on hits by Johnny Knight
and Alex Griffin and a walk to
Gunnar Westergam. It was 4-1.
In the bottom of the fourth,
Wildcat senior Scott Donaldson
missed a homer by inches, as
his shot to the right center field
fence was caught by Knight at
the wall.
The Streaks left the bases
loaded in the fifth inning but
picked up a final score in the
top of the sixth. Westergam
walked, stole second, went to
third on a Randall hit. Evan
Lewis walked to put runners on
the corners. A passed ball while
Baker was at bat brought home
the final run.
"We didn't play bad. They
just played better. I thought we
played really good and our
pitching was good. They went
at it and deserved the win," said
Hardee head coach Steve
Rewis.

Sebring 5, Hardee 2
The JV game was another
study in frustration. J'They
made less errors thaq we did,"
summed up head coach John
Sharp.
A nifty double play nullified
Sebring efforts in the top of the
first. Hardee took the lead in the
home half of the inning.
Armando Alamia started it with
a hit to deep right center. A
Jacob Bolin sacrifice bunt
moved Alamia to third after he
had stolen second earlier. Kris
Johnson looped a shot over sec-
ond and Luke Palmer had a
base hit to left field to bring
Alamia across home plate.
Garrett Albritton hit into a dou-
ble play to end the effort.
Sebring knotted the game in
the top of the second on a hit,
error and sacrifice.
,The junior Streaks went in
front in the third inning on a
bouncer over third, single, and
error, which allowed a runner to
cross home plate. Both teams
stranded runners until the top of
the seventh, when Sebring
picked up its final pair of tallies
on a pair of hit batsmen, two
walks, and a pair of errors, to
make the final score 5-2.


COURTESY PHOTOS BY ALEX GILLIARD
The Hardee Wildcats are stealing victories where they can; (first row, from left to right) manager Caleb Boyette,
Deonte Evans, Dalton Hewett, Kramer Royal, Kris Johnson, Justin Knight, Jake Mayer and Mikey Retana; (second
row) Coach Travis Tubbs, Dawson Crawford, Kalan Royal, Kyle Ward, Justin Bromley, Murrell Winter, Carter Lambert
and Coach Ryn Heine; (third row) Lincoln Saunders, Scott Donaldson, Coach Bryan Alexy, Head Coach Steve Rewis,
Wintz Terrell and Dylan Farr.


The JV 'Cats have a 4-2 record with players (first row, from left) Jacob Bolin, Armando Alamia, Tyler Hewett, Ramiro
Briones, Eric Klein, Jacob Altman, Dustin Goodwyn and Jacob Neuhofer; (second row) Luke Winter, Cole Choate,
Justin Forrester, Jeremy Rowe, Garrett Albritton, Luke Palmer and Felilx Esquivel; (third row) Vince Grimsley, Head
Coach John Sharp, Coach Todd Bolin and Wyatt Maddox.


Samuel Colt, inventor of the Colt revolver, "the gun that won the West," worked on the
prototype in his father's textile plant. Colt once earned a living touring the country per-
forming laughing gas demonstrations.


At CenturyLink we care about technology. More importantly,
we care about reaching across the nation to connect us all to
what matters most. Each other. So our advanced technologies
deliver broadband, entertainment and voice for your life.



Broadband Entertainment Voice

centurylink.com/strongerconnected


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Technologies described are examples only and not necessarily offered by CenruryLink or available in all areas if offered.
@ 2011 CenturyLink, Inc All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-7.0)

Thursday, March 24, 2011


Sebring
311 US Highway 27 N. I 863.471.0272


CenturyLinkTM

Stronger ConnectedTM


3:24c











2D The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011





-Schedule of Weekly Services


SPrinted as a Public Service
Sby'.
Thelit erald-Advocate
t Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CIIURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning.................. 0:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
I st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship............... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ..........................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ...........7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 lIwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Ilwy. 17 375.-2253
- -SINDAY:
, ible Study .......................... 9:30 a.m.
qrMorning Worship ..............10:45 a.m..
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNF~DAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCHl
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CIIURCII
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ................ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday .......7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Manes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Esludior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jucves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .... .. ............ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHIURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ...............1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAII BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00a.m.
Disciples Training........... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 am.
5th Sunday Feast..................11:00 am .
Bread of Life Smunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting. Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................. 10.00 a.m.
Sunday Service .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7.30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 am.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship.................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ... ............. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCII
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .....:............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNIONIOI BAPTIST CIIURCII
'5076 Lill church Rd. 494-5622
SOntt ay School ............. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.inm.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
English Service............11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIIURCII
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....I 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday 'Youth Service ....5:30 p.m..
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
We'dnei'.'t*y Evening Cell Grotnups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Callfnr locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTISt CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m .
Worship Senrice ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men s' Leadership & Trainiiing Cla.s -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCHII OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHiURCHII OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Ilanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m
Sunday School ....................10:00 am.
Priesthood .......................... 1 1:00 a.m.


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ........... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .11:00 a.m.
Sunday Esening Service ........7:00 p.m
Wednesday Service........... 7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................... ............ 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ....................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio .............. 7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ................... 7-00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio..................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio..............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................. 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .......... ...10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ................. 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ..... .......... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry................ 6:00 p.m.
Children's M ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W orship ................................ 6:00,p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243

Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery,5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ........................ 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) .......................... 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service .............10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ................ 6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK- 12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ........,.:.... 7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ...........7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m
Evening Worship......... ... 6:00 pm.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts..................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School .................... 9.30 a.m.
W orship ............ .. .. .. ... 10-30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dl)inner ............ ..G:00 p.m.
Wed. Blod builders Adult (Cl
Crossroads &
Lighhousc Mm ...........7:00 p.m.

IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
'WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship .... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M artes ........... ... ........ ..7- 30 p.m .
Jueves .............. ...... ...........7:30 p.m .
Domingo ... ..... ... .. 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ............................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service....................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
- SPANISH
Sunday Service ..... ............. 0:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......... .......... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m.


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................1... 0:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3'1 Sun.
Communion ....................10:00 a.m.
2" & 4"' Sun.
Divine Worship...............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ....................1... 1: 15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 S6uth, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. :00 a.m.
Evening Service .............. 6:00 pm.
Wednesday Service................7:00 pm.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCIIH
204 N. 9th Ave.- 773-6418


Sunday ...........................9:00 am.
H oly D ays .......... .........................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CIIURCII
408 IHeard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5 00 p.m.
(Spanish) 7 30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish)............ . 7:00 a.m .
(English) ................... 8:30 a n.
(Spanish) ................... 11.00 a.m .
(Creole) .......... ..... ..... :00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .......:. ........ ..9:30 a m.
Morning Worship ................11: 00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting .......... 7:00 p m

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ..................... 9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ............ ...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..... ..........7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m
Evening Worship ...... ....... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ... .......... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... ........ 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ..................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ...... ....... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ..............1...10:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..... ...........7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1....11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ................................ 0:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ..........................7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ... ............... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1...1:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.-
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship .................. 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
W orship ... ............................ 11:00 a.m .
Evening............................... 1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................ 0:00 a.m.
Children's Church.................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ................ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................ 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.............................................. 7 :00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday . ............. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .......................... 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ....................11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of. Each Month
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship................... 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION .
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones........... .............. 0:00 a.m.
Doctrina.............................. 11:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ...........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .......................... 11... I :00 a.m .
Pioneer Club........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................ 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


When John D. Rockefellerwasa
boy, a medicine man visited the
town with a cure all.
He took out a silver dollar and
asked, "How much am I bid for
this?"
No bids were made.
"Come," he pleaded, "how much
am I bid?"
"A nickel," said little John D.
"It's yours," said the man. "Hand
up your nickel."
"Take it out of the dollar," he
answered.
There was a man who made
money. But money never makes a
man. Neither does it make him
happy. The more he has, the more
he wants. Instead of filling a
vacuum, it makes one.
The Bible says, "Better is little
with the fear of the Lord, than great
treasure and trouble therewith."


Our moods, our interests, our longings... all play a part
in determining our happiness. What we believe makes a
difference, too. There are those for whom happiness arises
from faith, believing and trusting in God. There are others
who lack this faith and wonder why they aren't happy.
You don't have to search for faith alone. At your house of
worship you can find a community of love and support. Go
and find faith this week!
-S Mmty -esq W-mp" timday Frt y Sat
Job Job Job Job Jab Job PsaM
32.1-22 33.1-33 34.4-37 35,1-36 4 36.533 37.1-24 1
r r s 3 ,d hy e A'-cs, B h 'x1 p "c Sh xier '
'yr e nr n5 ".Ts1 "c ?or r itps P C R:,x M i hW. C rhervtgr,01. %'A ? 6 sw. t |


c7 ecce iioer Qrc evrs

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL
P 0 Bo 710 ZlfoSprngsIII










March 24. 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3D


HJHS Volleyball Wins 2, Loses 2


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In the first two weiceks of
action, the Hardee Junior High
School eighth grade volleyball
squad has split its games. The
seventh graders are at 1-3 but
improving in every facet of the
(ame.
Action after Spring Break
won't start until March 31
matches at DeSoto. On Mon-
day, April 4. DeSoto returns the
favor in a trip to Hlardee and
Hardee host Sebring on April 7.

LAKE PLACID
The Lady Wildcats opened
their season w ith a trip to Lake
Placid. In the first-ever match
for some of these younger girls,
there were initial game jitters
and a loss, 25-6,.25-19.
Captains Claudia Klein and
Cheyenne Pohl led the young
squad at Lake Placid. Klein had
one service point, while Pohl
added three, Brenda Mira-
montes one and Alyssa Tatum
one each. Victoria McGhin and
Alexis Melendez didn't score in
this one. Other seventh graders

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following work-
shop to which all interested per-
sons are invited:
Wellfield Tour: Governing
Board members will tour
regional wellfields including
Section 21, Starkey, and
Cypress Creek to learn about
monitoring activities and
observe environmental condi-
tions.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, April 5,
2011; 9:00 a.m.
PLACE: Lake Park, 17302 North
Dale Mabry, Lutz FL 33549
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
Lou.Kavouras@watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order
EXE0125)
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@-
swfwmd.state.fl.us 3:24c


are Katey Crawford. Katlyne
Forrester. Josie Hancock,
Atasha Johnston, Cecilia
Lucatero-Huerta and Karley
White.
Game two for the seventh
graders was much closer. Klein
aot the first two points and two
others, while Tatum and
Lacatero-Huerta each also had
four service points, and Han-
cock added three. Miramontes
and Crawford each had a pair of
service points.
The eighth graders forced
play to the best of three before
giving in 25-18, 22-25, 15-6.
Captain Gemi Saunders and
Destiny Thompson led the older
squad with four service points
apiece. Alex Ullrich and Ma-
kayla Dueberry picked up three
service points each and Haneen
Ottallah and Tamara St. Fort
added two apiece.
In the second game victory,
Emily Albritton got the first
four points and three others.
Kendall Gough had three and
the final two points. Jakaysha
Lindsey, Brooke Dixon and
Courtnee Richardson chipped
in with three apiece and Tiffany
Flores had two points. Other
eighth graders are Milli Jones,
Dasmine McMillian and
Georgeanne Paris.
In game three, Gough was the
scoring leader with three points,
while, Dixon, Thompson and
St. Fort each added one.

HILL-GUSTAT
Both squads were winners in
the first home match of the sea-
son. The seventh graders took it
to three games before winning
25-22, 12-25, 15-3.
Pohl paced the younger team
with a half dozen service points
in game one. Lucatero-Huerta
and Forrester added five apiece
and Klein had four. Hancock
had three and Melendez two
points.
In game two, White was the
scoring leader with five service
points. Klein had three and four
other players had one each. In
game three, Forrester led with
three service points.
The eighth graders won in
straight sets, 25-11, 25-12.
Lindsey led off with the first
two points and got five of the
final six points. Albritton added
points three and four and the


,sinning point. Gough had an
exciting eight consecutive
points., while Richardson had
three and Thompson and Flores
each one service point.
In game two. Albritton put
five service points in the book
and Gough added five more.

AVON PARK
Against Avon Park at home.
the seventh graders were over-
whelmed, losing 25-11. 25-19.
None of the girls scored more
than three service points.
The eighth graders forced
three games, but ended up on
the short ends of things. 25-10.
23-25, 15-9.
In the ,winning game two,
Dixon led the squad with seven
service points, while Albritton
and Jones each had three.

SEBRING
The last games before Spring
Break were last Thursday at
Sebring, where the seventh
graders lost and the eighth
graders won.
The seventh lost in straight
sets 25-16, 25-13, despite good
service by Hancock with six in
the first game and Melendez
and Miramontes each five in the
second game.
The eighth won in straight
sets, 25-15, 25-17.
In .game one, McMillian
paced the team with a dozen
service points, while in game
two, it was Dixon, St. Fort and
Albritton with five service
points apiece.

Home is a shelter from
storms-all sorts of
storms.
-William J. Bennett

I had rather be on my farm
than be emperor of the
world.
-George Washington

It is not flesh and blood but
the heart which makes us
fathers and sons.
-Johann Schiller

Families are like fudge . .
mostly sweet with a few
nuts.
Over 30 percent of the land
in the United States is
owned by the federal gov-
ernment.


'If I Could Go Back,


I Would Finish School'


By AUSTIN MARTINEZ
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview was with Jose Antonio
Martinez.
Q: When were you born?
A: Dec. 22. 1941.
Q: Where were you born?
A: Salina. Puerto Rico.
Q: How was school back when you
were younger?
A: Strict. Otherwise pretty much the
way it is now.
Q: Did you finish school? If not,
what grade did you go to?
A: No. Sixth grade.
Q: What were the reasons you quit
school?
A: I felt like I was never learning
anything, and I would always get into
fights.
Q: How old were you when you
moved to Florida?
A: Twenty-two years old.
Q: Have you lived out of Puerto
Rico and Florida?
A: Yes, in Brooklyn, Philly,
Pennsylvania, North and South
Carolina, Texas, Ohio, and Michigan.
Q: What were the reasons you
moved to Florida?
A: Because of the climate and lots of
work.
Q: How old were you when you
decided to get a job?
A: Eighteen years old.
Q: What was your first job?
A: Picking apples and peaches.;
Q: Did you' enjoy having that job?
A: Yes, because I enjoyed the fields
and the farms.
Q: What was your age when you

Experts on Elizabethan cuisine contend
much of were meat pies.


got married?
A: Twenty-five.
Q: What is your wife's name?
A: Delfina Martinez
Q: Did you have any children?
A: Yes, four girls.
Q: If you could go back to your
past, what would you change?
A: I would change what I did as a
child and I would finish school.
Q: Do you have any brothers or sis-
ters?


1:.~jL) p~ .j1wi~e;


A: Yes.
Q: How
was it


growing
up with them?
A: It was good because I respected
my siblings, and they respected me.
Q: What kind of music did you like
to listen to as a child?
A: Salsa, merengue, and pretty much
anything.
Q: Did you play any sports?
A: Yes. Baseball and boxing.
Q: Where did you go to school?
A: Puerto Rico.
Q: Did you enjoy school?
A: No!
Q: Did you doubt quitting school?
A: Yes, because without a diploma
there were not many jobs for me to
work in. People doubted me very much.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.

the "funeral baked meats" Hamlet makes so


To see the earth as we now see it, small and beautiful in that eternal silence where it
floats, is to see ourselves as riders on the earth together, brothers on that bright love-
liness in the unending night.
-Archibald MacLeish


Attention: All Parents of Elementary School Age Children

Parents who want your child or children to attend a school outside your assigned
school zone for next school year must complete a waiver request application. Note that
you must provide your own transportation.

You can obtain a waiver application at either the School Board office or the Student
Academic Services and Federal Programs office located at 230 S. Florida Ave. These
waiver requests are not approved on a first-come-first-served basis, but will be approved
according to space available and other established criteria.

Parents who have children attending a school other than their zoned school are
reminded that all school waiver approvals are only good for one school year at a
time.

Decisions on all waiver applications will be made in late 'July after the state
announces AYP for schools. If we can be of any further assistance, please contact our
office at 773-9756. We will do our best to assist you or answer your questions.

All waiver applications must be turned in by April 29, 2011.

Waiver Contacts


Atenci6n: Todos Padres de Nifios de Edad de la Escuela Primaria
Padres que quieren a su nino o ninos para asistir a una escuela fuera de su zona de
la escuela asignada para el proximo afo escolar, debe complir una aplicaci6n de solic-
itud de exencion para otra escuela. Nota, que usted debe proveer su propio transporta-
cion.
Puede obtener una aplicaci6n de exencion en la oficina del School Board o oficina
de Servicios Academicos de Estudiante y Programas Federal. Ahora ubicada en la calle
230 S. Florida Ave. en Wauchula. Estas solicitudes de exencion no se aprueban por el
base que Ilega-primera-atiende, pero sera aprobado de acuerdo al espacio disponible y
otro creterios establecidos.
Padres que tienen nifos que atienden otra escuela que no es su escuela de zonas
es recordada que todos aplicaciones de exencion que aprueban sera bueno durante
un ano escolar en un tiempo.
Las decisions sobre todas aplicaciones de exencion seran hechas en fines de julio
despues del anuncio public de AYP para las escuelas. Para mas asistencia, por favor
contactese con nuestra oficina en 773-9756. Haremos nuestro mejor esfuerzo para ayu-
dar y responder sus preguntas.
Todas aplicaciones de exencion deben deolver antes de 29, de Abril de 2011.
Contactos de exencion


Jennifer Watson


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4D The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


WES Names Its 'Top Cats'


For 2nd Quarter


COURTESY PHOTOS
First Steps pupils who were acknowledged were (front row, from left) Esther Velasco,
Kaitlyn Howell, Adrian Chavez and Anabel Chavez; (second row) Juan Alec Castillo,
Jestian Valdiriez, Andres Molina and Esteban Olmos; (back row) Erica Eisenhaur holds
Marissa Cantu and Marie Schwartz is with Vivian Smith. Not pictured were Christine
Brown and Alex Paulino-Mendieta.


Kindergarteners who received the Top Cat Award at Wauchula Elementary School are
(front row, from left) Taylor Hays, Marlen Rosas, Emilee Worden, Kross Sandoval,
Samantha Valerio, Juan Carlos Mares, Marco Montanez and Lynda Centeno; (second
row) Jensey Hays, Madi Hall, Averee Hanks, Addy Ellis, Kimberly Reas, Alora Garcia-
Gonzales, Mariah Perez, Ma'Ryah Trevino, Martin Cardoza, Gavin Sharp and Jimnson
Cimeus; (back row) Obed Gonzalez, Ella Stockton, Briana Navarro, Ashley Ramos,
Wyatt Rowland, Drew Beattie, Nathan Hughes and Kaydence Lozano. Not pictured
were Kentrick Patton and Taijaeous Blandin.


First graders earning Top Cat status for outstanding achievement were (front row, from
left) Jerimiah Herrera, Jessica Patino, Sonia Hernandez, Gabriela Jose-Perez, Clay
Hancock and Samuel Cavillo; (second row) Suth Perez, Ariana Sanchez, Rodolfo Diaz,
Serena Thompson, Maria Moreno, Amber Harrison, Saul Guijon and Liliana Campos;
(back row) Sylvia Preston, Sean Souther, Courtney Vickers, Caeden Richardson, Nick
Thompson, David Navarro and Abby Burnett. Not pictured were Julie Tomas-Lagunas,
Gabriela Arana, Juan Martinez, Mariah Perez, Ashlyn Willis and Osbaldo Urbina.


The second graders who showed responsibility were (front row, from left) Madison
White, Gerardo Valerio, Jovanie Paniagua, Vicky Lopez and Gabriela Velasquez; (sec-
ond row) Katelynn Bolin, Karson Goodwin, Laynee Henry, Hunter Harris, Mercedes
Hernandez, Lizberth Ramirez-DeJesus, Lindsey Garner and Makayla Banda; (back row)
Nevaeh Gonzales, Abby Duke, Bryan Paniagua, Emma McGuckin, Bictor Molina, Parker
Sasser and Alexis Deleon; not pictured was Riana Sutton.


Third graders recognized for their conduct were (front row, from left) Jack Driskell,
Meagan Strickland, Brian Herrera, Oscar Mota, Isaac Normil and Celso Zamora; (sec-
ond row) Griffin Clark, Quintin Lindsey, Andy Lopez, Joella Garza, Mariela Badillo,
Sandra Paniagua, Cristal Miranda and Lucia Galvez; (back row) Ricardo Urbina,
Damien Hernandez, Andy Moreno, Jolie Brown, Renell Herrera, Enrique Chaires and
Brandon Rimes; not pictured, Logan Cartwright.


The fourth graders who were recognized were (front row, from left) Jennifer Zapote,
Waylen Richardson, Ricky Salgado, Riley Boyett, Bo Villarreal and Mercedes Deleon;
(second row) Savannah Abbott, Esmerelda Cruz, Marvin Cook, Shelby Zeigler, Valeria
Lopez, Isabel Avalos and Russell Long; (back row) Bladmir Perez, Jean Youte,
Jeremiah Mancillas, Dustin Willis, Conchita Torres, Zaria Luna and Mike Trevino.


ATTENTION SENIORS
QUALITY ~ AFFORDABLE PRINTING


Fifth graders who received the Top Cat Award were (front row, from left) Pricilla
Cisneros, Nubia Hernandez, Alejandra Salgado, Sierra Strickland and Destiny Borjas;
(second row) Nickolas Ramirez, Destiny Scheel, Kaylee Barberee, Mercades Cisneros,
Maribel Rodriguez and Adrion Rodriguez; (back row) Maria Paniagua, Alexia Hodges,
Lizzy Perez, Alexis Piedad, Jara Cummings and Lindsey Barwick; not pictured was Ellie
Palmer.


"^ FOR A LL YOUR
GRADUATION SUPPLIES








PACKAGE 1 PACKAGE #2 PACKAGE #3
25 INVITATIONS 25 INITATIONS 25 INVITATIONS
with Envelopes Kith Enrelopes with Envelopes
25 THANK YOU CARDS 25 NAME 'oRDS
wih Envelopes 2 E ARDS
25 NAME CARDS
5 # 45 P35US


1










March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5D


CHAPEL
Jim and Jennie Harman and
Butch and Betsy Degroff greet-
ed 151 as Cheryl Conkle played
the piano. Sara Heller played a
keyboard solo, "Come Thou
Fount." The Glee Club sang
the anthem "Kumba Asante,
led by Sandy Feeser and fol-
lowed by a special Octet num-
ber. "He Grew The Tree."
Pastor Jason then spoke from
Hebrews 10 on "Know Who
You Are In Christ." Closing'
hymn was "God Be With You."

COFFEE
Even with many heading
back North, we still had 204 at
coffee hour enjoying coffee and
doughnuts. Lois Coutcher led
the pledge and Janet the prayer.
She then introduced Bill and
Russell from Alan Jay Ford and
Dodge dealerships, who donat-
ed several coupons.
Janet then introduced Barb
and Dave Zellers, who are our
new chairmen for day trips.
The last Sunday of this
month will be our Ice Cream
Social, with the Chapel provid-
ing banana splits and the
evening entertainment for all
residents. What a great park we
have!
Many coupons were given
away, as well as the 50-50.
Congratulations to Rene Bras-
seur for winning the strawberry
cheesecake from Perkins.

ACTIVITIES
Bowling: Ron Drumm had
high games of 215 and 211 and
high series 573. For the women,
Kay Glover had high game 181
with high series 444. Caye
Parolori picked up a 5-7 split.
Congrats to the winners!
Golf: Hidden Scores first-
place winners were Bill Se-
bright and Ken Coant. Taking
second were Jim Helgren,


Arlene Sebright, Norb Wilhelm,
Dee Martin, Bill Johnson, Max
Tate and Stan Shepard. Chip-
in winner was Joan Bell. Great
job, golfers.
Shuffle: A Championship
Tournament sponsored by Larry
and Ruth Brown was played in
the park for four days. Winners
in the Main Event were Larry
Brown first, Bob Hoskins sec-
ond, Wayne Shick third and Jim
Van Duke fourth. In the Con-
solation Event, first Joan Bell,
second Rosemary Comeau,
third Emerson Cross and fourth
Ray Hayes.
Several shufflers played in
the Hall of Fame Classic Event
in Winter Haven. Many won the
group they played in and all had
a great time. Ruth was inducted
into the Central District Hall of
Fame and had the honor of
being inducted in the Florida
Hall of Fame this year.

SPOTLIGHT
The Women Veterans lunch-
eon was held March 5 at a
Wauchula restaurant.. This has
become a yearly event and an
opportunity for the women who
served in the military to have
this special time to share their
experiences while serving their
countries..
In attendance were Dora
Morgan, Marines, Myrtle
Reese, Terry Stamm, Navy,
WAVES, Connie Combs, Lorrie
Coleman, Linda Grey, Air
Force, Jackie Gauger, Army,
Joan Kenny Canadian Navy,
and Bernice English Canadian
Air Force.
Starting with World War II,.
most have served during wars
or military conflicts. The group
is always ready to welcome
more Women Veterans, either
local or snowbirds. Just contact
Terry Stamm, the organizer for
this group, at 419-603-0580.


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet and Sharon Magee


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
March 20, Samual Mendez-Lopez. 19. of Lang's Trailer Park
Drive. Wauchula. was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with
fraud-possession of a similitude ID card.
March 20, Nelson Mauricio Sanchez-Velasco. 28, of 1801
Flagger St., Miami. was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged
with DUI and no valid license.
March 20, a residential burglary on Merle Langford Road. and
criminal mischief on SR 62 were reported.

March 19, Efrain Mateo-Ruiz, 25, of 2034 Rigdon Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Everett Lovett on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.
March 19, a .theft on North Florida Avenue was reported.

March 18, Elias Damian-Nicanor, 29, of 610 N. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on charges of failure to
appear in court and resisting an officer without violence.
March 18, Alexander Elijah Sanders, 33, of 716 S. Seventh
Ave., Wauchula, was'arrested by Dep. John Cortez on a charge of
violation of probation.
March 18, Antonio J. Toscano, 20,.of 1052 Magnolia Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley on three counts of
violation of probation.
March 18, Angela Newman, 25, of 704 S. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF)
and charged with two counts possession of methamphetamine and
two counts possession of drug paraphernalia.
March 18, 'Jennifer Lynn Nichols, 33, of 713 Green St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
March 18, Edward Allen Makowski, 31, of 704 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession
of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of
probation.
March 18, thefts at College Hill Road and U.S. 17 North were
reported.

March 17, Guillermo Luna Garcia, 53, of 816 N. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
March 17, Justo. Perez Cruz, 54, of 810 S. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina on a charge of con-
tempt of court.
March 17, Juventino Cisneros, 37, of 3481 Acorn Dr., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested and charged with using a false ID for a
Worksmen's Compensation claim and fraud-use or possession of
another person's ID.
March 17, Cipriano Ibarra, 27, 27, of 2446 Taylor Dr., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of a
weapon/ammo by a convicted felon.
March 17, a theft on Manuel Road was reported.

March 16, Ryan Andrew Blair, 18, of 1424 Blair Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Daniel Gibson and charged with
possession of marijuana.
March 16, Mark Alan Andress, 46, of 1530 SR 64 East,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
methamphetamine, aggravated battery using a deadly weapon, pos-
session of listed chemicals for manufacture of drugs, possession of
weapons/ammo and possession of drug paraphernalia.


March
reported.


16, a vehicle stolen on South Florida Avenue was


BOWLING GREEN
March 17, criminal mischief on West Main Street was report-
ed.

March 15, a theft at Pleasant Way was reported.






For the week ended March 17, 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 5,470 head,
compared to 6,509 last week, and 6,180 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service.:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were 3.00 to
6.00 higher, feeder steers and heifers were 1.00 to 3.00 higher.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 166.00-230.00
300-400 lbs 147.00-182.00
400-500 lbs 136.00-167.50


Medium & Large
200-300 lbs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs


Frame No. 1-2.
135.00-185.00
130.00-156.00
121.00-145.00


Protecting our natural environment for future generations


4,"


LISA
LANNON
soil & water
sci en ce


ij4~4


41
b ,, "
. -.:-',.-^


- ).


w34 .
11 1-


Florida


So America Grows


"For three generations my family has worked in Florida
Phosphate-my father, his father and now me. And, I hope
my kids will too. I study the natural balance between the
water and land. I'm proud that we recycle 95 percent of the
water we use and plant nearly a million trees each year.
It's a good way of life, with respect for the land. You might
just say it's a family tradition."


March 16, Regina Darlene Allmon, 41, ot 977 SR 64 East,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
listed chemicals to manufacture drugs.
March 16, Jeffrey Scott Stringer, 49, of 2228 Crow Lane,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with
larceny-petit theft.
March 16, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.

March 15, Theresa Lee Rodriguez, 34, of 407 Manatee- St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Juan Castillo on a charge of
violation of probation.
March 15, Omar Avellaneda, 24, of 702 S. Seventh Ave.,.
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with distribu-
tion/delivery of a hallucinogen to a person under 18 and contribut-
ing to the delinquency of a minor.
March 15, a theft on North Road was reported.

March 14, Azuncena Castillo, 24, of 3046 Vermillion St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley on a charge of
failure to appear in court.
March 14, Jesus Adrian Calvillo, 22, of 5121 Dixiana Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Det. John Shivers and charged
with battery.
March 14, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.

WAUCHULA
March 20, burglary of a conveyance on Bell Street was report-
ed.

March 18, Adan Cruz Sr., 41, of 315 SR 62, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with battery.
March 18, Robin Laurie Smothers, 46, of 505 High St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with dis-
orderly conduct, disorderly intoxication and violation of probation.
March 17, Maria Jean Munro, 54, of 407 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Kevin Brock on a charge of maik-
ing false 911 calls.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


3:24c


.:II









6D The Herald-Advocate, March 24. 2011


Courtouse eport


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Andrew Taylor Dewolfe, 23,
Zolfo Springs, and Jessica Lee
Rodriguez, 27, Zolfo Springs.
Don Alan Eckard, 72, Brad-
ford, Ill., and Sandra Lea
Demar, 68, Bradford, Ill.
Enrique Andres Gomez, 46,
Bowling Green, and Hope
Chavira, 38, Bowling Green.
Jose Yedid Castillo Perez,
23, Wauchula, and Guadalupe
Maria Flores, 18, Wauchula.
' Matthew Brent Driskell, 27,
Wauchula, and Carolyn Marie
Lewis, 27, Arcadia.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Citibank South Dakota vs.
Rossanna Rizo-Patron, judg-
ment.
Capital One Bank vs. Jerry
L. Goodwyn, judgment.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Michelle L. Smith, stipulated
agreement approved.
Citibank South Dakota vs.
Randy D. Petty, voluntary dis-
missal.
American Express Centurion
Bank vs. Brian Larimer, judg-
ment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Jonathan Williams, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, substance abuse
evaluation/treatment, warrant-
less search and seizure, random
drug screens, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 public defender
fee, $50 cost of prosecution
(COP), $50 investigative costs;
possession of marijuana, not
prosecuted.
Donna Sue Williams, ob-
struction of execution of a
search warrant, adjudication
withheld, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 public defender fee,
$50 COP.
Shaun Blackney, domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Antonio Galindo Gomez-
Cruz, retail theft, 10 days in jail,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COP, $35.27 restitution.
Luis Enrique Ibarra-Urias,
giving false identification to a
law enforcement officer, one


month in jail with credit for
time served (CTS), $50 COP,
released to immigration.
Tamara Lynn Nelson, resist-
ing a merchant and retail theft,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, ACF Mile Post
Class, stay out of store, $325
fine and court costs, $50 COP,
,$50 investigative costs, 40
hours community service.
Vivian Oviedo-Martinez, re-
tail theft, adjudication withheld,
probation six months, ACF
Mile Post Class, stay out of
store, $325 fine and court costs,
$50 public defender fee, $50
COP, 25 hours community ser-
vice.
Adolfo Rosales Jr., criminal
mischief, probation six months,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COP, $50 investigative costs,
$170 restitution, 20 hours com-
munity service.
Yesenia Sanabria, resisting
an officer without violence, not
prosecuted.
Wade Joseph Aubry, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, substance abuse
evaluation/treatment, no alco-
hol or bars, random screens,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COP
Roger Clark Ayers, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
public defender, $50 COP.
Marcus Allen Carter, trespass
other than structure/convey-
ance, probation six months, not
contact on property, $325 fine
and court costs, $50 public
defender fee, $50 COP, 20
hours community service.
Yoel Fernandez-Cupull, pos-
session of a gun while using a
light and trespassing on proper-
ty other than a structure or con-
veyance, adjudication withheld,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COP.
Willie Lee Grey, two counts
retail theft, petit theft, criminal
mischief and two counts inde-
cent exposure, one year in jail
CTS, $325 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender and $100
COP placed on lien.
Shaylin Kristopher McKen-
zie, possession of marijuana,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, substance abuse
evaluation/treatment, no alco-
hol or bars, random screens,
warrantless search and seizure,
$325 fine and court costs, $50


NOTICE OF SALE


APRIL 2, 2011


11:00 A.M.


Personal property in the following units will
be sold to the highest bidder to satisfy rental
liens in accordance with Florida Statute
Section 83.801-83.809. Contents may include
household items, furniture, clothing, closed
cartons, etc. The sale will take place at
Convenient Mini Storage, 5106 U.S. Highway
17 N., Bowling Green, FL on April 2, 2011 at
11:00 A.M.


Unit #17 James Mitchell
Unit # 30 Kara Spencer


Unit #18 Unknown
Unit #41 Annie Talio
3:17,-31c


COP.
Yunisdel Perez-Gonzalez.
possession of gun while using
light and trespassing on proper-
ty other than a structure or con-
veyance, forfeit rifle, scope,
ammo, light and sling, adjudi-
cation withheld, S325 fine and
court costs, S50 COP.
Jesus Pineda-Arabis, posses-
sion of gun while using light
and trespassing on property
other than a structure or con-
veyance, adjudication withheld,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COP
Anita Belcher Platt, domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Christina Rodriguez, crimi-
nal mischief and trespass on
property other than a structure
or conveyance, 10 days in jail
CTS, $325 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $50
COP; domestic battery, not
prosecuted.
Robin* Laurie Smothers,
domestic battery, two months in
jail CTS, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs.
Brian Keith Staton, trespass
on structure or conveyance,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion six months, stay off proper-
ty, $325 fine and court costs,
$50 COP, $50 investigative
costs, 30 hours community ser-
vice.
Tomas Suarez, domestic bat-
tery, probation one year, 12-
week domestic violence class,
no violent contact with victims,
$677 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP.
Antonio J. Toscano, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia, not
prosecuted.
Ervin Roderick Williams,
retail theft, probation six
months, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 COP, 20 hours com-
munity service.
Marion Williams, retail theft,
probation six months, $325 fine
and court costs, $50 public
defender fee, $50 COP, 20
hours community service.
Mark Alan McClellan; pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the of-
fice of the circuit court:
Bee Xiong and Melody Jean
Xiong, divorce.


Jesus Delread vs. City
Electric Supply Co. and James
Henderson, complaint for com-
pensation.
Joseph Ussery and Angel
Ussery, divorce.
Julia Anne Laing and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Donald Steven
Hedgecock, petition for child
support administrative order.
Jamie S. Hrabal and DOR vs.
Alexus C. Esquivel, petition for
child support administrative
order.
Mark Harvey vs. Mancini
Packing Co., damages-negli-
gence.
Brianna Diane Nellis vs.
Leavie Joseph Owens II, peti-
tion for injunction for protec-
tion.
Debra Lynn Morris vs. James
Morris, petition for injunction
for protection.
Fidelity Bank of Florida vs.
Raul Juarez Jr and Victor
Juarez, petition for mortgage
foreclosure.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Kimberly Brunson and DOR
vs. William Aull, order accept-
ing transfer from Holmes
County and child support order.
Letarsha Nicole Camel and
DOR vs. Jatarus Tijuan Stro-
man, modification of child sup-
port.
Virginia Louis Driver and
DOR vs. Daniel L. Wilson, vol-
untary dismissal.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Eric Collins, judgment.
Florida Fertilizer Co. Inc. vs.
Dale Hamilton, judgment.
Kathleen D. Roehm and
DOR vs. Jack K. Oakes, order
on arrearages.
Cynthia Marie Deanda
Gavigan and DOR vs. Chris-
topher Brent Saldivar, child
support contempt order.
David Rodriguez and Jose-
fina Rodriguez, child support
order.
Arturo Hernandez and
Kristina Santos, child support
order.
Ruth Romero-Martinez and
Gustavo Cruz-Garcia, divorce.
Misty Phillips and DOR vs.
Adam Daniel McKenzie, child
support contempt order.
Kaylan Miller vs. Shane
Shepard, dismissal of tempo-


rary injunction for protection.
Shannon Knarr vs. Melissa
Terry, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Jennifer Riley Medrano and
DOR vs. Enrique Garza III,
child support order.
Salina L. Moreno and DOR
vs. Silvestre Marin Jr., child
support order.
Elizabeth L. Cherry and
DOR vs. Jean Celeste McCall,
order.
Teresa Kay Teets Hamilton
and DOR vs. John Merle Teets
III, modification of child sup-
port.
Randall L. Ownby and DOR
vs. Michelle Marie Dean Coats,
modification of child support.
Mandy Leeanne Richardson
and DOR vs. Jaime Pantoya,
child support order.
Brianna Nellis vs. Oscar
Soto, voluntary dismissal of
injunction for protection.
Amy Cherie Evans and DOR
vs. Ricky Leo Gillis, order.
Peggy Luna and DOR vs.
Cesar Garcia, order on child
support arreages.
The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
James Riley Driver, domestic
battery by strangulation, not
prosecuted.
Michael Esposito, violation
of probation (original charge
grand theft), probation termi-
nated, part of $2,242.11 restitu-
tion paid from bond and rest
placed on bond with $50 COP
and outstanding fines and fees.
Scott Colin Fields, violation
of community control-house
arrest (original charges grand
theft and burglary of structure),
community control revoked,
three years Florida State Prison
CTS, $200 public defender fees
and $100 COP added to out-
standing fines *and fees and
placed on lien.
Brandon George, sale of
oxycodone within 1,000 feet of
a specified area, three years
Florida State Prison CTS, $520
fine and court costs, $350 pub-


lic defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien.
Mary Harris Hines, abuse of
disabled person-amended to
battery, adjudication withheld,
eight anger management class-
es, $325 fine and court costs,
$100 COP.
Ashley Nicole Maxwell, pos-
session of alprazolam and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion 18 months, substance
abuse/mental health evalua-
tion/treatment, curfew, random
screens, warrantless search and
seizure, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender fees
and $100 COP placed on lien.
Antonio J. Toscano, posses-
sion of marijuana and uttering a
forged check, adjudication
withheld, probation two years,
substance abuse/mental health
evaluation/treatment, no alco-
hol or drugs, warrantless search
and seizure, random screens,
curfew, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender
fees, $100 COP, 50 hours com-
munity service; possession of
drug paraphernalia, not prose-
cuted.
Enrique Velazquez, posses-
sion of cocaine and possession
of drug paraphernalia, trans-
ferred to county misdemeanor
court.
Samuel L. Winburn, lewd or.
lascivious behavior, criminal
mischief and disorderly con-
duct, not prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Jacqueline C. Hendry as
trustee to Elliot A. Roberts,
$105,000.
First National Bank of
Wauchula to Adan Hernandez-
Molinor and Margarito Her-
nandez-Molinar, $85,000.
First National Bank of Wau-
chula to Chad W. Anderson,
$136,000.

All great things are simple,
and many can be
expressed in single words:
freedom, justice, honor,
duty, mercy, hope.
-Sir Winston Churchill

I paint for myself. I don't
know how to do anything
else, anyway. Also I have'
to earn my living, and
occupy myself.
-Francis Bacon


Contact us for your life,

auto, home, annuity or long

term care needs.


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a farmer to purchase

our insurance.



773-3117
1017 US HLugy 17 No. Wauchula


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDING
LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 360 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

Description of Property:

LOT 2 BLK 1 HEARTLAND ESTATES
PHASE THREE 401 P1 686P1189
PB-B41P1 692P1005 696P750

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: WILLIE LUBIN AND MARI-
LYN LUBIN

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
20day of April, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 14th day of March, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Norma M. Juarez, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD002XXXX 317-4:7c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Jolene Funding LLC,
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 159 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

Description of Property:

LOT 16
BRANCH PARK MH ESTATES 1ST ADD
AD-461 P331 551 P102

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: Daniel and Silvia Lozano

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according-
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
20day of April, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 11h day of March, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Laura L. Barker, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD001XXXX 3:17-4:7c
3:1-~4.:7c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDING
LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 276 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

Description of Property:

1 AC BEG NW COR OF NE1/4 OF
SE1/4 OF SW1/4 RUN S 291 FT E
150 FT N 291 FT W 150 FT POB
17 33S 25E
439P382

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: ROBERTA SPEARS
WILLIAMS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such Certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall,
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
20 day of April, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 11th day of March, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Laura L. Barker, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD004XXXX3:17-4:7c
3:17-4:7c


George L. Wadsworth, Jr.
Ageltf


I


-


FAR


BUR


ct ~ I I ~u


LM









BEDROCK BUSINESS
Red Hendorson: Always 'Right Hero On The Corner


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
TBA, OJT, ball-bearings, shocks and
clutch.
To the average person, these terms
may not all be recognizable, but to any-
one within the field of mechanics, they
hold meaning. They do for Red Hender-
son, who has been the owner and opera-
tor of Henderson Tire Center since 1971.
Tires, Batteries and Accessories can
be found at his store. He and his employ-
ee have had On the Job Training.
The son of Philip and Myrtle Hender-
son, Red Henderson is a lifelong resident
of Hardee County and a 1959 graduate of
Hardde Senior High School.
His first experience with this line of
work was when he was 16 years old.
"During high school I would come
work weekends, right here on the comer.
Once I graduated, I began to work full-
time," Henderson recalls.
"Apparently I like this job," he adds.
"I've been in the Army for two years
during the Vietnam War, as well as work-
ing for the phosphate mines, but I always
end up coming back."
Some of the skills acquired by Hen-
derson include repairing vehicles, deter-
mining the cause of a problem, and per-


forming routine maintenance work. ButN
there is one skill in particular he feels is
required in achieving his daily success.
"You have to be a people person," he
says. "I've always felt that I've achieved
as much as I have because I've always
been a salesperson. I do my job for the
public; talking with them and helping
them figure out what is in their best
interest."
Although transportation is a large part
of everyone's daily routine, with the cur-
rent economy and the need for work,
mechanics have suffered as well.
"Yes, I've seen better than I have the
past couple of years, but I've still been
able to keep my business going and my
bills paid, and I attribute:that to hard
work and my loyal customers," says
Henderson.
It's the good, trustworthy service that
keeps them coming back.
With his store located at 201 N. Sixth
Ave., Wauchula,.and working 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday, Henderson
plans to continue with his career, success
and accomplishments as long as he is
able to get up and go.
"I'm not the type of person who can
just sit in my rocking chair on the porch
and think about 'what if.' I will continue


PHOTOS BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Red Henderson has never been satisfied with any other job, always returning to work
with his hands and with his customers.


to work until it kills me. I don't know
anything else, and am not satisfied any-
where else than when I'm here," con-
l-II- d H ni-rn


March 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7D
Bedrock Business is a new feature high-
lighting those stalwarts of the business
community who have dedicated their
lives to filling the needs of Hardee
County residents.


Located right on U.S. 17, Henderson Tire Center has been able to remain a part of the
community even during times of economic struggle.
Samuel Colt, inventor of the Colt revolver, "the gun that won the West," worked on the
prototype in his father's textile plant. Colt once earned a living touring the country per-
forming laughing gas demonstrations.

For depenvAdable hoivetownv service,



f orda

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2






8D The Herald-Advocate, March 24, 2011


At these prices items wont last long!


Server
Reg. $539.95
Sale $429.00
-50%
$214.50


3pc.
Table Set
Reg. $349.95
Sale $249.50
-50%
$124.50


10pc.
Comforter
Reg. $359.95
Sale $180
-50%
$90.00


Blended Leather
Sofa & Loveseat
Reg. $1149.90
Sale $879.00
-50%
$439.50


Western Picture
Reg. $229.95
Sale $119.00
-50%
$59.50


Table Lamp
Reg. $119.95
Sale $68.00
-50%
$34.00 per pair


Console
Reg. $429.95
Sale $288.00
-50%
$144.00


Area Rug
Reg. $299.95
Sale $149.50
-50%
$74.75


Leather
Chair
Reg. $759.95
Sale $519.00
-50%
$259.97


Leather
Recliner /
Reg. $699.95
Sale $388.00
-50%
$194.00


Curio China
Reg. $749.95
Sale $325.00
-50%
$162.50


Loveseat
Reg. $679.95
Sale $320.00
-50%
$160.00


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