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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 08/19/2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text


















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


110th Year, No. 40
A wc1,, A,,Qm AR DPat


oe n Primar y Election Tueus 4salessdaytax



Vote In Primary Election Tuesday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
V-Day, the final day to vote
in the 2010 Primary Election, is
fast approaching.
Everyone 18 and over, who
has registered, should take
advantage of the opportunity to
cast their votes in this year's
election of national, state, coun-
ty and local officials. Early vot-
ing began on Aug. 9 and has
been 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays
and Saturdays. Folks have until
this Saturday at 5 p.m.to go to
the elections office in Court-
house Annex II, and vote or


return an absentee ballot.
After that, all voting moves
to the official Primary Election
date on Tuesday between 7 a.m.
and 7 p.m. at one of the 12
precincts around the county.
Find out where the one nearest
to y our home, the one to which
you've been assigned, and
VOTE.
Voters have different choices
depending on their party.
Democrats can only vote for
Democrat or non-partisan can-
didates. Republicans can only
vote for Republican candidates
or non-partisan candidates.


Independents can only vote for
Independents or non-partisan
candidates.
DEMOCRATS
There are Democratic choices
for two national, two state, one
county and two non-partisan
races.
For U .S. Senator, the Dem-
ocratic ballot has a choice of
Glenn A. Burkett, Maurice A.
Ferre, Jeff Greene or Kendrick
B. Meek. In the U.S. Represen-
tative, it is a choice between
Rick Eaton or James T. Golden.
In the two state races,


Democrats have a choice of
Brian P. Moore or Alex Sink for
governor. Neither has yet
selected a lieutenant governor
candidate to join them on the
ballot. For attorney general, the
Democratic choices are Dave
Arongberg or Dan Gelber.
The only County Commis-
sion race on the Democratic
ballot is in District 2, where the
candidates are Rafael A. Arce
Jr., Gary Oden or Bess A.
Stallings.
, Finally, there are a pair of
non-partisan School Board
races in which to make a


choice. In District 4, it is a
choice between Glenn Bergens,
Garry M. McWhorter and
SJanice M. "Jan" Platt. In Dis-
trict 5, it is Loraine Braddock,
Rocky Kitchens, Thomas Tre-
vino or Jack Webb Sr.
REPUBLICANS
On the Republican ballot,
there are two national, three
state, two county, and two non-
partisan races to consider.
For U.S. Senator, Republican
candidates are William Escof-
fery III, William Billy Kogut
and Marco Rubio. For U.S.
Representative, it is either Don
Baldauf or Vern Buchanan.
There are three candidates for
governor on the Republican
ballot, a choice between Mike
McCalister, Bill McCollum and


Rick Scott. Again, none has yet
designed a lieutenant governor
to partner with. The second
state race is for attorney gener-
al, with Holly Benson, Pam
Bondi and Jeff Kottkamp all
wanting the position. Repub-
licans also have a state repre-
sentative vote, choosing be-
tween Ben Albritton and
Chevon Baccus.
At the county level, Repub-
licans have choices in both
County Commission races. For
District 2, the choice is between
Sue Birge and Clifton "Nick"
Timmerman.'In District 4, there
are three candidates, Richard G.
Farwell, Grady Johnson and
Mark Luckenbach.
Finally, Republicans get. the
same non-partisan School
See VOTE 3A


PHOTOS BY MAQHELLE DOLLAR
Shapes such as cars, owls, kangaroos and dogs can be
seen in the collections of avid Silly Bandz lovers.


Children, teenagers and even adults can be seen sport-
S T ing the latest trend. While it may seem like a normal
A LL R A bracelet on their wrists, these coveted bands transform
into shapes of all sorts.

Schoolchildren Collect Rubber Bracelets


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Beanie Babies, Webkinz and
slap bracelets all have been
raves in the past. This summer,
Silly Bandz have taken over
Hardee County.
The bracelets are all the rage
in schools throughout the na-
tion, with children collecting
and trading various shapes, and
the trend has spread here.
A year and a half ago Silly
Bandz made their debut as a
rubber-band bracelet in the
shape of animals or objects, a
bracelet that continues to hold
its form even after it has been
stretched, worn and taken off
again.
Three years ago, the birth of
this worldwide phenomenon



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INDEX
Classifieds ........ ..6B
Community Calendar ..3A
Courthouse Report ... 7C
Crime Blotter ....... 5C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup ..4A
Obituaries .......... 4A




IIii II l All 1111
7 *18122 072990 3


occurred when.creator Robert
Croak was at a product show in
China. There, he was inspired
by the shaped rubber bands
designed by a Japanese artist.
Before they became a fashion
trend, the shaped rubber bands
began as a means to help the
environment. The Japanese cre-
ators were concerned with the
amount of littering and tried to
make the product more appeal-
ing, to promote recycling of
rubber bands rather than tossing
them.
The newest fashion rage hit
its fans through Facebook,
Myspace and Twitter. The com-
pany never advertised the prod-
uct, the customers did by creat-
ing a viral marketing strategy.
Consumers from the age of 4


up to 40 have been seen sport-
ing Silly Bandz. Dollar-sign,
princess, frog, palm-tree bands
and more can be seen in glitter,
tie dye or glow-in-the-dark col-
ors.
They are sold in packs of 24
for $5 and bought, worn and
traded for those coveted shapes,
growing and expanding a
child's "collection." Silly
Bandz also got into the back-
to-school spirit by offering
backpacks and notebooks as a
new collection item.
Throughout the country,
schools have been banning the
Silly Bandz due to distractions
and quarrels. Hardee County
has yet to have a problem, as
many of the principals aren't


even aware of the newest rage
in collecting. One local elemen-
tary school even passed out the
Bandz as a reward.
"We really started seeing
them the last couple months of
school, but haven't had any
problems yet," noted Zolfo
Springs Elementary School
Principal Melanie Henderson.
"Our kids are very respectful,
and the teachers have great
classroom management. We
even had a few teachers hand
them out at the end of the year
as prizes."
Whether on the wrist of a
child or in a basket at a store,
Silly Bandz will be a fad to go
down in history, for certain. The
only question being, how long
will it last?


School Report


Cards Released

All Elementary Schools

But 1 Lose 'A' Status


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Grades are in for Hardee
County's five elementary
schools-and down.
All ranked as "high-achiev-
ing" last year and earned the top
mark of A. This year, only one,
Hilltop Elementary School,
retained that A grade.
One, Zolfo Springs Elemen-
tary, even plummeted from an A
to a D.
Though Florida Comprehen-
sive Assessment Test results-
the basis for determining a
school's annual grade-were
marred by long delays this year,
state Education Commissioner
Eric Smith stands by the accu-
racy of the final tally.
Hardee County Schools Su-
perintendent David Durastanti
does not.
SA new contractor, Pearson,
was paid $254 million to score
the exams and report the results
back to the state Department of
Education. Pearson failed to
meet deadlines, and noted diffi-
culties and delays in matching
individual results to students
and their schools.
In fact, grades are not yet
available for Hardee Junior
High School or for Hardee


City Manager Works His Last Day


By JOAN SEAMAN
SOf The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula City Manager Rick
Giroux spent his last day on the
job yesterday (Wednesday).
The City Commission has
scheduled a special meeting for
this evening (Thursday) at 6 at
City Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
specifically to appoint an inter-
im city manager and confirm
the final version of the separa-
tion agreement the commission
approved at last Thursday's.
special meeting.
That meeting was moved to
the City Auditorium because of
the large crowd, which were at
a disadvantage as microphones
were not working. City labor
attorney Reynolds Allen, who
presided over most of the meet-
ing, spoke loudly, but com-
ments from commissioners and
Giroux were barely audible in
the first row.
Allen, city attorney Cliff
Ables, the commission and


Giroux spent over two hours
discussing and voting on
changes to the separation agree-
ment Giroux presented to the
attorneys a month ago.
Giroux said he had been
negotiating in good faith with
city attorneys and, on Wednes-
day felt he had worked out all
the final details with Ables, who
forwarded the revised agree-
ment to Allen, who put back
several items which had been
deleted. Giroux said he'd had
about six hours to look at it
amid his workday duties. He
asked for more time to study it
with his attorney (himself).
Allen asked the commission
to proceed as he understood that
the commission wanted to get
the matter concluded. He said
everyone had made effort to
reach an amicable settlement
and that Giroux had made "a lot
of concessions. In turn, the city
agreed to pay his salary for up
to a year."


Allen presented a three-page
chart of the negotiation points.
The salary, a maximum of
$82,968, will be paid up to a
year but stops when he is
offered a job as city manager or
assistant city manager. He must
seek employment within 90
days, giving him transition time
to re-locate and begin a job
search.
Giroux will continue on the
city's group insurance, at a cost
to the city of up to $13,000,
until he becomes eligible for
insurance in hip new employ-
ment. He will be reimbursed
what has been paid for him in
the city pension plan, and be
paid accrued vacation up to
$6,500 and one-half of accrued
sick leave up to $9,922.
The final financial point was
a $150,000 term life insurance
in case he dies within the next
year. Allen said he could locate
only a 10-year policy and Gi-
roux would be responsible to


pay premiums once he found
other employment.
The rest of the separation
agreement was a lot of clauses,
each one resulting in a vote by
the commission. Some went in
favor of Giroux's request and
some didn't. Most of the com-
mission votes were unanimous,
with one exception. In the dis-
cussion of neither party dis-
paraging or criticizing the other,
Allen said that the city needed
that protection, but Giroux had
recourse to the courts. The
agreement calls for Giroux not
to disparage city officials, staff
or employees. Yet, the city can-
not control all of its 150
employees and what they say
when they are off the job, only
when in their official capacities,
said Allen. The commission
somewhat reluctantly agreed,
except Commissioner Val Pat-
arini, who said Giroux should
have equal protection.
See CITY 3A


Senior High School.
And because of the problems
with FCAT scoring, two inde-
pendent auditors reviewed all
the results, leading Commis-
sioner Smith to say "the results
are accurate and the learning
gains fluctuations that many of
our districts have experienced
are within historical ranges."
Further, he noted, "The
results also show us that
declines in the number of A
grades compared to last year
See SCHOOL 3A




Fire


Destroys



House
By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Herald-Advocate Intern
A family arrived home from a
short trip into town Saturday
night to find their house en-
gulfed in smoke and flames.
It was the second house fire
in Wauchula in a single week.
The Saturday call came in at
10:32 p.m. for the home of Levi
Lambert at 514 Boyd Cowart
Road, Hardee County Fire-
Rescue said. After less than an
hour of shopping, Lambert and
his wife and daughter had
returned home to find the back
portion of the house up in
smoke.
Two engines and one tanker
along with a total of eight fire-
fighters arrived on the scene in
a response time of eight min-
utes, said Fire-Rescue Chief
Mike Choate. The'units had the
situation under control at 11:09
p.m., using 8,000 gallons of
water to extinguish the blaze.
The home was considered a
total loss, Choate said.
Although the state Fire Mar-
shal's Office has not deemed
the blaze as suspicious in na-
ture, the cause of the fire re-
mains under investigation.
The Lambert family is now
receiving assistance from the
Red Cross. Although the family
does have a temporary place to
stay, they lost all personal
belongings in the fire.


_

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46







2A The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Pn.rnA ..^*: ^ lt r ..n....


LrOR dUUUctuU Io anageri
NOEY DE SANTIAGO
i Asst..Prod. Manager
TIos J Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Flonda. by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co Inc Penodical Postage paid at U S Post Office. Wauchul, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster." send address
changes to. The Herald-Adocate. PO Box 338. Hauchula. FL 33873


/- DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5pm
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p m
General News Monday 5 pm
S Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 monihl $18. I yr.- $31. 2 rs $60
Florida
6 mornhs $22. I yr. $41; 2 yrs $79
Out of Slate
6 months -,$27; I yr $49. 2 yrs $95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Adocate welcomes leners to the editor on matters of public
interest Lecteri should be bnef, and must be wniten in good late, signed
and include a daynme phone number
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community maters are welcome Submissions should be
tiped. double-spaced and adhere to the abo.e deadlines. All items are sub.
jel to ediung
L. A^^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^


Kelly's Column
By Jim


The Wauchula Lions Club this past year spent $6,613 on vari-
ous community projects. They included Future Farmers of
America, $100; Hardee Help Center, $250; Florida Lions Camp,
$888 including a barbecue; Haiti International Fund, $500; Haiti
missionaries, $200; Conklin Center for blind services, $500;
Lionettes scholarships, $1,500; BBQ scholarship $500; Hardee
Swim scholarships, $300; and over 25 eye exams and eyeglasses.
Officers include Talmadge Albritton, president, and Kathleen
.Roehm, ..treasurer and sight chairperson. The club. meets on
Thursday noon at the Java Cafe. The club recently helped a local
resident get cataract surgery.

The August issue of Citrus Industry magazine has a lot of good
information about Florida citrus.
New trees cost growers $9. Planting costs are $3.50 a tree,
generally. Irrigation and bed preparation for planting trees can cost
$1,000 to $1,300 an acre.
Young tree management costs can be $2,320 an acre (150
trees) to $4,875 per acre (360 trees), wrote Fritz Roka and Ron
Muraro. Mature grove care can be $1,400 an a~re, and pick and
haul $2.10 a box.
They wrote that the costs of Florida citrus production in the
past five years has jumped nearly $1,000 an acre, with canker and
greening causing two-thirds of the increase.
A typical mature tree can yield two boxes of oranges (in a 360-
tree per acre grove) and 3.5 boxes in a 150-tree per acre grove.
A mature grove can yield 525 boxes an acre (150 trees) and
700 boxes an acre (350 trees). High tree density groves generally
produce a lot more income than low tree density groves.
Growers generally need $1.20 a pound solids to be fairly prof-
itable. Florida citrus growers historically lost between 3 and 4 per-
cent of their trees annually due to various pests and diseases. The
loss has increased recently due to greening, wrote Stephen Futch
and Shawron Weingarten.
Greening is spread by insects called psyllids. Florida Citrus
Mutual executive director Michael Spraks has called for a region-
al, coordinated spray program to combat psyllids.
Ken Keck wrote that current dietary guidelines encourage con-
sumers to eat a variety of fruits and to recognize 100 percent fruit
juice as a fruit serving. Fruit juice is also a nutrient dense food and
contains natural, not added sugars.

J.A. Clark has recently been appointed by Gov. Charlie Crist
to the Florida Citrus Commission to replace Ben Albritton, who
resigned to run for state representative.
Hardee County has about 47,130 acres of citrus groves and
produces just over 20 million boxes of oranges annually, reports
the Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association. Hardee ranks
No. 4 in the state in citrus production. Polk is No. 1.

Dr. Regina Benjamin, 53, the nation's 18th surgeon general,
had a family practice in rural Alabama. She has now gained 300
million patients..
She said America's biggest health crisis is "obesity. Two-thirds
of- all-adults. and.nearly -on in-three children are overweight. or..
obese. The good news is that we can be healthy and fit at any size
and weight." She keeps fit by hiking, jogging and dancing.

In 2008 agriculture and natural resources in Florida had sales-
revenues of $134 billion, value-added impatcs of $77 billion, and
about 1.6 million jobs, Florida Farm Bureau Federation John
Hoblick reported recently.
Agriculture and tourism are two major pillars of Florida's
economy. Another pillar-construction-has become smaller since
2008.

Richard Dandridge, 80 of Zolfo Springs retired after a meat-
cutting career with A&P for 10 years and Winn-Dixie for 20 years.
He later worked at Coca-Cola Bottling Company in Wauchula for
five years. The bottling company owner was T. C. Hornsby.
As a boy Dandridge earned money by buying 25 cents worth
of raw peanuts at the A&P. His grandmother would parch them in
the oven. He would go to the Wauchula State Farmers market and
sell 20 small bags of peanuts for a nickel each. His profit was 75
cents.
Back then he said admission to the movie theatre in Wauchula
was a dime. Popcorn and Cokes were each a nickel.
At one time Hardee County was a major player in growing
strawberries, having an .annual Strawberry Festival in Bowling
Green. Later Hardee became informally known as the Cucumber
Capital of the World. There were hundreds of small farmers then.

The Ronald McDonald Houses of Tampa Bay have operated
since 1980 and helped over 37,000 families of pediatric patients.
There is a new 14-bedroom house within the new All Children's
Hospital in St. Petersburg.
A number of Hardee County families, including mine, enjoyed
and appreciated the hospitality of a Ronald McDonald House serv-
ing All Children's Hospital. This service for family members of
hospitalized children was begun by McDonalds Restaurants.

Reed Larson is chairman of the National Right To Work
Committee. He said the city of Vallejo, Calif., went bankrupt after


rNutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: Is lemonade a lower-calo-
rie alternative to regular
soda?
A: Lemonade options have
expanded markedly in recent
years. Regular lemonade is not
necessarily any lower in calo-
ries than an equal portion of a
regular carbonated soft drink.
Lemonade from frozen concen-
trate and most powdered mixes
contains about 100 calories in
each eight-ounce portion, not
surprising due to the approxi-
mately six-and-a-half teaspoons
of sugar it contains. Some pow-
dered mixes, however, have less
added sugar so they may be
about thirty percent lower in
calories. Of course, the mixes
and "light" bottled ready-to-
drink lemonades sweetened
with zero-calorie sweeteners
contain ten or fewer calories,
comparable to diet soft drinks.
Unlike soda, some lemonade
options may contain from 10 to
100 percent of recommended
daily vitamin C. In some cases
this comes from the lemon juice


content, in 6ther cases, espe-
cially when high amounts of
vitamin C are present, it's
because of added vitamin C and
is not a sign of actual fruit juice
content. If you're looking for a
naturally low-calorie alternative'
to regular soda, consider ice tea
(unsweetened or very lightly
sweetened) instead. You may
also see "lite" bottled lemon-
ade-ice tea blends;cAlorie con-
tent is reduced compared to reg-
ular soft drinks, but some bot-
tles are large enough that the
calorie information listed per-
tains to just a third or half of the
bottle. For any of these sugar-
containing beverages, finishing
a large bottle or drinking glass
after glass on a hot day can
make calorie and sugar con-
sumption add up quickly.

Q: My fatnily loves frozen
waffles. How do they rate
nutritionally, compared to
toast?
A: Compared to having a piece
of toast, waffles tend to be high-


nearly 75 percent of its budget was spent on unionized police and
firefighters. Hardee County firefighter-EMTS and road and bridge
employees are represented by unions.

Only Republicans can vote for District 66 state representative,'
featuring Republicans Ben Albritton of Wauchula and Chevon
Baccus of Lake Wales. About 60 percent of the registered voters in
the district cannot vote for this post.
Two reasons-1. The Democratic Party failed to sponsor a
candidate. 2. A grown daughter of a Polk County citrus family
qualified on the last day as a write-in candidate and is not cam-
paigning at all. If she had not qualified, everyone could have voted
on this race.
The district covers all of Hardee, south Polk and northwestern
Highlands County. Republican Baxter Troutman is retiring because
of term limits.
The Democratic Party in Hardee and Polk counties is appar-
ently not well organized.
The Republican Party in Hardee is very active and continues
to register new voters. As of Aug. 16 Hardee had 12,110 registered
voters -6,528 Democrats, 4,072 Republicans and 1,510 other.
Troutman, 43, who owns Labor Solutions, is a Republican and
recommends Albritton for the post. He said the Wauchula resident,
who turned 42 Aug. 17, has shown great leadership skills in the
past five or six years, has good values and principles, and will go
to work and do a great job. "He is one of us."
Troutman said eight years ago, there was also a write-in can-
didate to limit the voting. He does not know who is behind the
write-in candidate but said it is an obvious but legal attempt to limit
the voting.
Albritton said he does not know who was behind-the write-in
candidate that prevents Democrats and other non-Republicans
from voting in the race.
I feel Ben Albritton is the clear choice for the job.

Troutman, married with a 10-month old daughter, plans to run
his Labor Solutions business but might consider a run for the
Florida Senate in 2012. Sen. J.D. Alexander has to step down in
2012 because of term limits. State Rep. Denise Grimsley plans to
run for the Florida Senate in 2012. She is a Wauchula native who
lives in Highlands County. Troutman lives in Winter Haven.

The primary election is Tuesday. There had been over 500
Hardee voters cast their ballots as of Tuesday afternoon in early
voting.
Raphael Arce Jr., Gary Oden and Bess Stallings are running as
Democrats for County Commission District 2. Sue Birge and
incumbent Dr. Nick Timmerman are running as Republicans for
County Commission District 2.
Republicans Richard Farwell, Grady Johnson and Mark
Luckenbach are running for County Commission District 4.
Incumbent Bobby Ray Smith is not seeking re-election.
All voters can cast their preference in the two local School
Board races. Glenn Bergens, Garry McWhorter and incumbent Jan
Platt are running in District 4. Loraine Braddock, Rocky Kitchens,
Thomas Trevino and Jack Webb are seeking the District 5 seat.
Incumbent Wendell Cotton is retiring.

Ben Albritton has many endorsements in his race, including
Troutman, Polk Sheriff Grady Judd, Florida Citrus Mutual, Florida
Medical Assn., Florida Right To Life PAC, Polk County
Commissioners Bob English, Ed Smith, and Sam Johnson, Polk
County Farm Bureau, Rep. Denise Grimsley, Florida Nurses Assn.,
Associated Builders and Contractors, Florida Dental Assn., Polk
County Builders Association, Associated Industiies of Florida
PAC, Florida Chamber of Commerce, WTBN Christian Radio
Station, U.S. Rep. Adam Putnam, and The Herald-Advocate.


The word "philippic,"
meaning "a bitter attack in
words," comes from the
Philippics, speeches by
the ancient Greek orator
Demosthenes against
Philip II of Macedonia.



ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available, at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


!fa'


Ir


er in fat; however, some are
available that are low in fat (and
whole grain!). Compare nutri-
tion information on labels to see
how much waffles can vary.
The vitamin content is quite
similar, but if you choose waf-
fles with whole-wheat flour
first on the ingredient list,
you'll see that fiber content is
higher. Remember that more
whole-grain flour means there
are also more cancer-fighting
phytochemicals, as well 4s
more vitamin E, B-6 and mag-
nesium even if these nutrients
are not on the label. Also com-
pare the fat content of different
waffle options. Finally, a major
influence on the nutrition quali-


ty of those waffles will be how
they are served. Don't make
them just a vehicle for fat and
sugar-loaded syrup. Waffles are
delicious when spread with
peanut butter and topped with
apple or banana slices for
breakfast or a snack. Or top
waffles with vanilla yogurt and
applesauce, pureed bees or
sliced fruit. Then you're getting
a real nutrition boost from the
waffles. Added yogurt or peanut
butter will kee energy levels
even and hunger satisfied
longer than the energy spike
and fall you may experience
when they're topped with noth-
ing but sugar.


The blue-footed booby is so called because it lands on shops
and often lets itself get caught. Booby comes from "bobo,"
Spanish for stupid.

The average cruise ship burns about a gallon of fuel when it
moves six inches.

In French universities, freshmen are sometimes called bec
jaune, or yellow beak, for their similarity to fledgling birds.


























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OR E-MAIL hardeeathleticfoundation@gmail.com


8:19c


0


I






Augst 19, 2010, The HeraldiAdvocate 3A


Board choices. In District 4, it
is Bergens, McWhorter and
Platt, while in District 5, it is
Braddock, Kitchens, Trevino or
Webb.
INDEPENDENTS
Independents have only two
races to consider in the Primary
Election. An Independent can
vote in both non-partisan
School Board races, for
Bergens, McWhorter or Platt in
District 4, and for Braddock,
Kitchens, Trevino or Webb in
District 5.
WAUCHULA
Folks in Wauchula have an
extra ballot to consider, as there
are choices for five of the seven
Commission seats. The extra
ballot is for voters in Precinct 4,
the First United Methodist
Church at 207 N. Seventh Ave.;
Princinct 6, County Commis-
sion Chambers in Courthouse


Dear Editor:
To: Mr John Pillard: To
address your comments that
comes form a loyal Mosaic
employee. Why. should we
expect you to bring up the
(diverse negative impacts) that
comes from Mining?
Would you like to take a tour
of the area up through Fort
Meade, Bartow, Mulberry,
Bradley Junction, even Lake-
land with me. I seem to be see-
ing things you weren't paid to
talk about in your letter August
12, 2010.
After mining as long as you
say I certainly see no hope
for you being converted
from Mosaicism. Definition;
(Mosaicism): is to love, to wor-
ship, have close relations and
praise.
Maybe you should worship a
God that doesn't hold your job
as hostage to act as a rich
spoiled child as seen in the fed-
eral court where Sierra's brief
and verbal testimony as the
court to give the injunction
under the condition that Mosaic
keep their employees at work
by allowing Mosaic to mine the
Hardee Tract highlands while
avoiding the wetlands and
creeks.
Sierra never asked to stop the
mine completely but only to not
alter (U.S. jurisdictional
waters), which has been illegal
since 1979, but Florida has
allowed enormous variances
through Florida's flimsy laws
that undermine the federal laws
(See Sierra's 10-page brief to
Jacksonville Judge).
After Florida's disregard of
Federal EPA'a 2007 letter
telling the Army Corps of
Engineers to deny the applica-
tion for South Fort Meade
Hardee tract because of the
impacted wetlands and many
separate impacts to local and
downstream waters and ecosys-
tems. (See Jan. 2010 & Mar.
2010 letters from EPA to Army
Corp telling them they must
cooperate with Federal EPA).
If you would only take a
look at the facts and leave
-off Mosaic's dollar-motivated


Annex I on West Orange Street;
and Precinct 10 at Wauchula
City Hall, 225 E. Main St.
Voters in these precincts can
choose a candidate in any of the
five races, regardless of where
they or the candidate reside.
The candidate must reside in
the district which he/she hopes
to represent, but voting is city-
wide.
The Seat 1, District 1 choice
is between Patricia Detwiler
and Val R. Patarini III. The Seat
2, District 1 choice is between
Russell Graylin Smith and
Connie Spieth.
The Seat 4, District 2 seat up
for grabs is between Angel
Lang and David Brooks Royal.
The Seat 6, District 3 seat
candidates are Dawn M.
Atkinson-Jones and John D.
Freeman.
Finally, the at-large Seat 7 is
a choice between Pamela M.
Belflower and Jerry J. Conerly.


propaganda which varies as to
whom they are addressing at the
moment and the outcome they
desire, I would say that if
Mosaic makes a comment that
you could expect the opposite
to be the fact or truth.
It is Mosaic demanding that
they get their way with every
inch of land and water which
has led to the court intervention.
They have to my knowledge not
been told they can't mine the
high lands in this tract. Even we
have asked through the Sierra
lawyers that they continue
keeping you all at work, while
the court looks at the case.
Mosaic at this point is the
enemy of your employment, not
Dennis Mader or the three
groups that have filed this com-
plaint. Again the villain here is
none other than your employer
and their greed, also Mosaic's
disregard for neighbors has
brought much anti-mining out
in many of us. So how can you
condemn us for, standing
against a goliath that wants to
chop our head off and laugh as
we flounce around under their
thugs (our government).
I would tell you that Mosaic
is the newest father of twisted
facts and figures that I have
ever seen in over four years
studying, and at my age and
health that was not my goal in
life but it was forced on my by
being a neighbor of this corp-
oration. (See applications, laws
local, state and federal also
many documents I have on
hand for your inspection or are
public records.)
Ask Mosaic why they are so
greedy that they will not settle
for what they can do for the
moment (around 2 years work)
while the court continues its
work on the issues.
Why can't Mosaic create jobs
in reclamation that they are
many years behind on in more
than one site. (See latest recla-
mation reports and multi
variances plus the fact that they
are obligated to reclaim.)
Frank Kirkland
Bowling Green


In 1995, residents at Okhura Village, Japan, built a snowman
that measured 96 ft., 7 in. in height. The project took 10 days to
complete.


VOTE
Continued From 1A


CIY
Continued From 1A
Another factor was a require-
ment to return to cooperate in
any lawsuit brought against the
city by anyone involved in proj-
ects which had been done dur-
ing his tenure. Giroux didn't
want an open-ended time frame
for the requirement. "I don't
want to come back when I'm 90
years old." He conceded the
point when Ables noted there is
a statute of limitations on the
filing of lawsuits.
It was decided also that if ref-
erences were requested for
another job, the city clerk
would say that he had secured
over $10 million in grants and
completed all capital improve-
ment projects assigned to him.
A list of 30 accomplishments
during his tenure was attached
to the agreement of what would
be said about him.
When it was all said and
done, Allen said he would have
a final draft to Giroux by late
morning on Friday. After more
discussion, it was decided that
he would have until Wednes-
day, Aug. 18, at 5 p.m. to sign
the agreement, turn in his keys,
security access codes and busi-
ness records, and prepare a
summary of any ongoing city
projects on which work needs
to continue.
Giroux was chosen as city
manager in March 2005, after a
change to the city charter voters
approved on Aug. 31, 2004,
accepting a city manager-com-
mission form of government
which gives the city manager
sole authority to run the city. He
was never allowed that full
authority and it eventually led
to unresolvable problems.
Giroux signed the agreement
on Monday. And, so, his five-
and-one-half year employment
has ended.






THURSDAY, AUG. 19
&/Hardee County Com-
mission, monthly evening
meeting, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.
VWatlchula City Commis-
sion, special meeting to
appoint a temporary city
manager, City Hall, 225 E.
Main St., Wauchula.

THURSDAY. AUG. 26
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave, Wauchbla, 5 p.m.

Man is what he believes.
-Anton Chekhov


who the scores belonged to and
all of a sudden they did!" he
exclaimed. "Pearson is being
paid $254 million. They're not
going to say 'We screwed up.'
They don't want to say there is
any problem,
"Commissioner Smith does-
n't want to lose his job,"
Durastanti continued. "He's not
going to say there is a prob-


lem."
Durastanti feels the state
should use national exams over
its FCAT. "There are national
norm exams that could be
used," he said. "It would save
us $254 million, and we would
know how we're doing com-
pared to everybody else nation-
ally. With FCAT, we don't."


SCHOOL
Continued From 1A
did occur, highlighting the need
to redouble our efforts and
rediscover the strategies that
have helped us to be so success"
ful."
In Hardee County, both
Bowling Green Elementary
and North Wauchula Elemen-
tary schools went from an A to a
C. Wauchula Elementary went
from an A to a B. Zolfo Springs
plunged from A to D, while
Hilltop kept its A grade.
"I don't have any confidence
in the scores or in the grades,"
Durastanti said following the
release of school grades last
week. "We don't know if any of
these scores are ours. I don't
even have confidence these are
even our kids."
Durastanti points to Pearson's
acknowledgement that it expe-
rienced problems in tracking
the "demographics" of the tests
it scored, matching tests to stu-
dents and students to schools.
He noted that DeSoto
County,' which had one A ele-
mentary last year, had none this
year. And Highlands County,
with nine elementary schools,
had but one achieve an A. Last
year, four did so.
The Florida Association of
District School Superintendents
calls this year's FCAT "fatally
flawed" and school grades
"unfairly lowered." It says the
number of Florida elementary
schools receiving an A grade
declined by 33 percent this
year, a decrease that is five
times greater than in the previ-
ous year.
"It can't be reliable when 33.
percent of (A) schools dropped
at least one letter grade,"
Durastanti said. He repeated
that the drop is five times
greater than the historic norm.
The superintendent faults
Pearson, and has strong words
for Commissioner Smith as
well.
"One week they didn't know


idla


4ico to live


LE


JERRY CONERLY

Wauchula City Commissioner
At Lar6e Seat?


Elect




Garry




McWhorter


FOR SCHOOL BOARD DIST. 4



I will put all children, teachers and

school employees at the forefront of

all decisions made by the Board,

while trying to keep taxes in

perspective for you, the community.

iP ersect ve sS I.da

a"FEHOt

-and ook ,. a=


8:19p


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


VOTE ANGEL LANG FOR

CITY COMMISSION DISTRICT 4





Political advertisement paid for and approved by Angel Lang for City Commission.
8:19






VAL PATARINI
For

CITY COMMISSIONER
District 1


Paid for and approved by Val Patarin for City Commissioner, District 1, Non-Partison


Letter To Editor:
Mosaic Could Mine 2 Years
While Issues Are Resolved


"T'S KE. 4 THAT WAY

WauchulaCit Administrator 12Year


City Commissioner 10 Yeas.
UP Business ManaementDe~ee
Licensed Real EstateSalesman
Owner, J.Conerly Associates, LC
Questions? CalTme at 773-9571
Pol. Adv. pd. for and approved by Jerry Conerly
For City Commissioner At Large Seat 7


I TANFASIA
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f







4A The Herald-Advocate, August 19,2010


GEORGE BUFORD
BROWN
George Buford Brown, 80,
died on Saturday, Aug. 14,
2010, at Tampa General Hos-
pital.
Born to the late Jimmie
Hines Brown and Ada Belle
Poole Brown on March 30,
1930, in Cobb Town, Ga., he
moved to Fort Meade from
Wauchula in 1955. He was a
U.S. Army Korean War veteran.
He worked at IMC Mining &
Minerals for 45 years as a loco-
motive diesel mechanic. He
was a member of First Baptist
Church of Fort Meade, Fort
Meade Masonic Lodge#160 F&
AM, and a member of the Fort
Meade Historical Society.
He was preceded in death by
'his wife of 54 years, Emily
"Zondra" Grant Brown; and a
brother Dwaine Brown.
Survivors include daughter
April Brown of Fort Meade;
brother Lynwood Brown of
LaBelle; and sisters Kathleen
"Kat" Morris and Myrl Roberts,
both of Zolfo Springs, and
Avalon Fontan of Kissimmee.
Visitation was held from 10
to 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug.
18, at First Baptist Church of
Fort Meade, where services
were held at 11 a.m. with the
Rev. Kenny Slay officiating.
Interment followed in Ever-
green Cemetery, Fort Meade.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade


Ot skOal9ng UtMehlOl


JOHN MALCOLM
KEMEN
John Malcolm Kemen, 70,
of Wauchula, died on Sunday,
Aug. 15, 2010, at his home.
He was born on Oct. 8,
1939, at Hackensack, N. J. to
the late James and Elouise
Kemen. He moved to Jack-
sonville at the age of four. He
was a 1957 graduate of Bis-
hop Kenny High School and a
1963 graduate of Jacksonville
University, where he received
a bachelor of science degree
in business.
He came to Hardee County
from Jacksonville in 1974. He
was owner of Kemen's Auto
Parts Inc. He was a member
of St. Michael Catholic
Church and the Wauchula
Elks Lodge.
In addition to his parents,
he was predeceased by two
brothers, Charles Kemen and
Dick Kemen; and one sister
Shirley Doherty.
He is survived by his wife
of 36 years, Claudette Ke-
men; son Jason Kemen of
Chicago, Ill.; daughter Mary
Kiella and husband Lewis of
Zolfo Springs; two grandchil-
dren, Dalton Kiella and Tayler
Kiella, both of Zolfo Springs;
mother-in-law Mary Howard
of Gibsonton; three brothers-
in-law Ed Doherty of Jack-
sonville, Richard Howard of
Gibsonton and David Howard
of Ruskin; sister-in-law Pris
Klimchak of Jacksonville;
five nieces Susie Putnam of
Indialantic, Karol Higgn-
botham of Green Cove
Springs, Kelly Smith of
Fleming Island, and Sally
Hendricks and Kathy Daniel,
both of Jacksonville; and two
nephews Michael Doherty
and Jimmy Doherty, both of
Jacksonville.
* Visitation was Tuesday,
Aug. 17, 6 to 8 p.m. at Ro-
barts Garden Chapel. A Mass
of Christian Burial was held
on Wednesday at 11 a.m.
Interment followed in Wau-
chtila Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be
sent to the American Heart
Association, P.O. Box 21475,
St. Petersburg, FL 33472 or
Catholic Charities, Diocese of
Venice, 1000 Pinebrook
Road, Venice, FL 34292.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


JOHN MALCOLM KEMEN
John Malcolm Kemen, 70, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
Aug. 15, 2010, at his home.
Born on Oct. 8, 1939, at
Hackensack, N.J., to the late
James and Elouise Kemen, he
moved to Jacksonville at the
age of four. He graduated from
Jacksonville University in 1963
with a bachelor's degree in
business. He came to Hardee
County in 1974 and was the
owner of Kemen's Auto Parts
Inc. He was a member of the
Wauchula Elks Lodge and of
the St. Michael Catholic
Church.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by broth-
ers Charles Kemen and Dick
Kemen; and sister Shirley
Doherty.
Survivors include his wife of
36 years, Claudette Kemen;
one son Jason Kemen of
Chicago, Ill., one daughter
Mary Kiella and husband Lewis
of Zolfo Springs; and two
grandchildren, Dalton Kiella
and Tayler Kiella, both of Zolfo
Springs.
Visitation was Tuesday, Aug.
17 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funer-
al home. A Mass of Christian
Burial was held Wednesday at
11 a.m. Interment followed in
Wauchula Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be sent
to American Heart Association,
P.O. Box 21475, St. Petersburg,
FL 33472 or Catholic Charities,
Diocese of Venice, 1000
Pinebrook Road, Venice, FL
34292.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


CHARLES McEDWARD
LAMAR
Charles MoEdward Lamar,
64, of Zolfo Springs, died on
Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, at Zolfo
Springs.
He was born on April 11,
1946, at Dixie, Ga., and came to
Hardee County in 1990 from
Plant City. He was a concrete
and steel worker.
Survivors include his com-
panion of 19 years, Betty Taylor
of Wauchula; sons Chuck La-
mar and Michael Lamar; sisters
Louise Doiglas of Fort Meade
and Essie Mae Haroldson of
Zolfo Springs; brother Robert
Lamar of Sebring; and five
grandchildren.
A memorial service will be
held later at his home. Inter-
ment will be at Mt. Pisgah
Cemetery at a later date.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


Oi owing ul 0emoxg














CHARLES
McEDWARD LAMAR
Charles McEdward Lamar,
64, of Zolfo Springs, died on
Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, at
Zolfo Springs.
Born April 11, 1946, at
Dixie, Ga., he came to Hardee
County in 1990 from Plant
City. He was a concrete and
steel worker.
Survivors include his
sweetheart of 19 years, Betty
Taylor of Wauchula; her sons
Robert Taylor and Curtis
Taylor, both of Wauchula; his
sons Chuck Lamar and
Michael Lamar; sisters Louise
Douglas of Fort Meade and
Essie Mae Haroldson of Zolfo
Springs; brother Robert
Lamar of Sebring; five grand-
children; many nieces and
nephews; and his precious
"Baby."
A memorial service will
held later at his home, 'The
Palmetto Patch." Interment
will be at Mt. Pisgah
Cemetery at a later date.


MARIA V. MALDONADO
Maria V. Maldonado, 86, of
Bowling Green, died on Sat-
urday, Aug. 14, 2010, at Hardee
Manor Care Center in Wau-
chula.
Born on Oct. 3, 1923, in San
Antonio Texas, she was a
housewife and a member of St.
Michael Catholic Church in
Wauchula.
She was preceded in death by
three sons, Eddy Maldoriado,
Ricardo Maldonado and Rog-
elio Maldonado.
Survivors include daughter
Andrea Cooper of Ocala; four
sons, Raymond Mald9nado of
Loxahattchee, David Maldo-
nado of Bowling Green, Daniel
Maldonado of Wauchula and
Carlos Vasquez of Naples; 24
grandchildren; 32 great-grand-
children; and three great-great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were at 3
p.m. on Tuesday at St. Michael
Catholic Church with the Rev.
Vincent Clemente officiating.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


NELMA E. STONE
Nelma E. Stone, 93, of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
Aug. 14, 2010, in Wauchula.
She was born May 16, 1917,
in Struthers, Ohio and was a
graduate of Ohio State Univer-
sity. She moved to Arcadia in
1952, and was a school teacher
at West Elementary and Desoto
Middle schools. She later re-
sided in Wauchula.
She is survived by two
daughters, Mary L. Jones of
Wauchula and Carol Miller of
Winter Haven; four grandchil-
dren Mary Lynne Driskell of
Wauchula, Robert Jones of
Wauchula, Julie Crews of
Brownville and Richard Miller
of Winter Park; and six great-
grandchildren Milli Jones, Shea
Jones and Trey Jones of
Wauchula, Jack Driskell of
Wauchula, and Ian Crews and
Nate Crews of Brownville.
A memorial service will be
held today (Thursday) at 11
a.m. at Faith Presbyterian
Church, 114 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula. In lieu of flowers,
memorials may be sent to Faith
Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box
1480, Wauchula 33873.
Sarasota National
Crematory Services
Sarasota



9P 0Coing &1Aemot


CAYDEN ALEX
HERNANDEZ
Cayden Alex Hernandez,
newborn son of Cody Her-
nandez and Marina Martinez
of Wauchula, died on Mon-
day, Aug. 9, 2010, in Arcadiat
shortly after birth.
Besides his parents, he is
survived by grandparents,
Daniel and Betty Hernandez
of Wauchula, and Miguel and
Martina Martinez of Wau-
chula; great-grandparents
Calletana Roberts of Wau-
chula, Joanna Llewellyn of
Lakeland, Maria P. Gaona of
Zolfo Springs, and Miguel
Martinez of Wauchula; and
aunts and uncles, Martina
Martinez, Miguel Lee Mar-
tinez, Cruz Hernandez, Cyn-
this Hernandez and Crystal
Hernandez, all of Wauchula,
and Frances Johnson of
Clearwater.
Services were at Robarts
Garden Chapel at noon on
Friday with the Rev. Vincent
Clemente officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Wauchula
Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Obituaries


CAYDEN ALEX
HERNANDEZ
Cayden Alex Hernandez,
newborn son of Cody Hernan-
dez and Marina Martinez of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Aug. 9, 2010, in Arcadia, short-
ly after birth.
Besides his parents, he is sur-
vived by grandparents, Daniel
and Betty Hernandez of Wau-
chula, and Miguel and Martina
Martinez of Wauchula; and
great-grandparents Calletana
Roberts of Wauchula, Joanna
Llewellyn of Lakeland, Maria
P. Gaona of Zolfo Springs and
Miguel Martinez of Wauchula.
Services were at Robarts
Garden Chapel at noon on Fri-
day with the Rev. Vincent
Clemente officiating. Interment
followed in Wauchula Ceme-
tery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


EVELYN MARIE STOKES
Evelyn Marie Stokes, 85, of
Fort Meade, died on Wednes-
day, Aug.'l11, 2010, at Lakeland
Regional Medical Center.
She was born Feb. 2, 1925,
in Long Beach, Calif., and was
a longtime resident of Fort
Meade. She was a homemaker
and member of the First Pres-
byterian Church of Fort Meade.
She was preceded in death by
husband Marion Stokes; brother
Robert Waggoner; and step-
daughter Pamela Brinkerhoff.
She is survived by son
Michael Stokes of Panama;
daughters Linda Powers of
Fairfax, Va. And Elaine Connell
of Tampa; seven grandchildren;
and four great-grandchildren.
Visitation was 2 to 3 p.m. on
Sunday at the funeral home,
where services were at 3 p.m.
with Marvin Pittman officiat-
ing. Interment followed in'
Homeland Cemetery.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade





Chamber Hosts
Blood Drive
The Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce is
playing host next Wednes-
day to the blood mobile.
Florida's Blood Centers'
Big Red Bus will be in the
parking lot just north of Main
Street on the east side on
U.S. 17 South.
The center is the only
provider for blood to people
in Hardee County, providing
red blood cells, platelets or
plasma for those in need.
The bus will be in the parking
lot from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.


n voting o iAeVoy














JO-ANN GAY
Jo-Ann Gay, 73, of Wau-
chula, died on Wednesday,
Aug. 11, 2010, at Sebring.
She was born on Sept. 6,
1936, in Port St. Joe. She
came to Hardee County from
Kingsland, Ga., in 1963. She
was a homemaker and a
Jehovah's Witness.
She was preceded in death
by husband Hillsmon "H.K."
Gay.
She is survived by three
sons, David Gay and wife
Suzanne of Zolfo Springs,
Wayne Gay and wife Flo of
Lake Wales and Roy Gay and
wife Susan of Tallahassee;
five grandchildren,. Tonya
Richardson, Dawn Pelham,
Dollene Fields, Kara Bodi-
ford-Gay and Marshall Gay;
and 11 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Sunday,


2010-2011
Varsity Cheerleaders
Captain-
BuckleyCassandra Reyna
Co-Captain
Taylor Pohl
Briana Albritton
Savannah Albritton
Taylor Bolin
Sierra Coronado
Meghan Graham
MaryKate Harris
Melissa Hartley
Brittany Hines
Jenny Ligon
Lindsey Martin
Danielle Nicholson
Amanda Rigney
Chelsea Wallace
Jenna Williams


JO-ANN GAY
Jo-Ann Gay, 73, of Wau-
chula, died on Wednesday, Aug.
11, 2010, at Sebring.
She was born on Sept. 6,
1936, in Port St. Joe. She came
to Hardee County from Kings-
land, Ga., in 1963. She was a
homemaker and a Jehovah's
Witness.
She was preceded in death by
husband Hillsmon "H.K." Gay.
She is survived by three
sons, David Gay and wife
Suzanne of Zolfo Springs,
Wayne Gay and wife Flo of
Lake Wales and Roy Gay and
wife Susan of Tallahassee; five
grandchildren, Tonya Richard-
son, Dawn Pelham, Dollene
Fields, Kara Bodiford-Gay and
Marshall Gay; and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Sunday, Aug.
15, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel, where
services were held at 2:30 p.m.
with Dee Moore officiating.
Interment followed in Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


2010-2011
IV Cheerleaders
Captain Courtney

Co-Captain
Krista Pilkington
Kiana Johnson
Kaylee Mancillas
Sonya Fowler
Arissa Camel
Brooke Conley
Caroline Durrance
Farrah Muntnz
Katie Smith
Ashley Baker
Deanna Sanchez
Lark Lukawski
Alexan Maddox
Meagan Arraujo
Lacey McClenithan


ROBARTS
FAMILYFUNERAL HOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906


529 W. Main St., Wauchula 8:19nc 863-773-9773


ROBERT HERMAN
WALKER
Robert Herman Walker, 74,
of Brandon, died on Saturday,
Aug. 7, 2010.
Born July 13, 1936, he was
an employee of Wal-Mart for
the past eight years.
Survivors include his wife of
26 years, Melda Walker of
Brandon; son Robert Dale
Walker and wife Sharie; two
daughters, Reba Mae Douglas
and husband Timothy, and Sara
Ann Schofield and husband
Howard; three stepsons, David
Harrison and wife Del, Roy
Harrison and wife Laura, and
Claude Harrison; two step-
daughters Reba Carlene Schell
and husband David, and Sheryl
Payne and husband Thomas;
19 grandchildren; and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Aug. 11 from
10 a.m. to noon at the funeral
home, where services were
held at noon. Interment fol-
lowed at Hillsboro Memorial
Gardens.
Hillsboro Memorial Funeral
Home and Gardens
Brandon


YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are you a poeit? i~ us show tll Your work could be published In
this newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by.you,-not someone else. To appear In this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
P lace, The:HeraldAdvocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.




DEPENDABLE/TRUSTWORTHY

COMPASSIONATE CARE





ROBARTS
FAMILYFUNERALHOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906
529 WEST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873
863-773-9773
View Obituaries at robartsfh.com 7:29tfc



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FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy.of
'bMtfs Faiflfy funeral Home


Aug. 15, from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
at Robarts Garden Chapel,
where services were held at
2:30 p.m. with Dee Moore
officiating. Interment fol-
lowed in Wauchula Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


dr
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August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5A


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6A The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010


rNutrition WiseiS
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: As long as the activities I
do all day add up to at least 30
minutes, does that mean I'm
getting enough physical activ-
ity?
A: The recommendation to get
at least 30 minutes of moderate
physical activity daily (and to
aim for 60 minutes or more
daily) to reduce cancer risk and
promote overall health can
include shorter bits of activity
scattered throughout your day,
beyond your normal daily activ-
ities. The activity that research
has linked to better health
counts in blocks of ten minutes
or more and involves a "moder-
ate" pace that raises your heart
rate or breathing slightly.


Getting off public transporta-
tion one stop early and walking
briskly or ten minutes of vacu-
uming at an invigorating pace
are good examples. Smaller bits
of activity are still definitely
worth including as much as you
can throughout the day and do
add up to make a difference in
the total calories you burn.
Some evidence suggests that
the total of these activities, such
as walking up one flight of
stairs at work or at home, mov-
ing around while you cook, and
walking from a far space of the
parking lot into work or shops
may be part of what makes the
difference between people who
gradually gain weight each year


Living Well
By Linda B. Adler
Florida Hospital Wauchula Administrator


GET A HOBBY!
Want to live longer? Always have a purpose or goals in your
life.
Lofty or not, ambitious or modest, definite goals or purpose
can help you live longer. Recent studies found that having a pur-
pose in life is crucial to maintaining psychological wellness and
can be important for physical health also.
Retirees older than 65 who volunteered had less than half the
risk of dying during a four-year period than did their peers who did
not volunteer. It could be that having a greater sense of purpose
helps multiple systems of the body function better, conferring pro-
tection in the face of illness. A great defense to have!
Volunteering is only one of many choices. Reading a series of
books, hobbies such as photography, scrapbooking, writing, col-
lecting food and clothing for a donation center, traveling, cooking,
teaching a church group, organizing a study group or book club, or
helping family and friends all are examples of activities that can
keep us going.
Anything that tends to help us derive meaning from our life
and to feel that we are working toward a purpose engages our
mind, body and spirit and helps us experience personal growth and
satisfaction.
While materialistic goals can meet our-financial needs, it's the
goals that focus on relationships, personal growth and community
involvement that give us positive feelings and a deeper sense of
well-being and happiness.
Find a hobby if you don't already have one. Or become a vol-
unteer at your church, school, hospital or community service
organization-and maybe live longer, happily!


and those who maintain their
weight. Most people find that
these small bits of physical
activity don't necessarily pro-
vide the energizing, stress-
reduction benefits of moving
for at least ten minutes at a
time. So I urge you to work at
creating time for some longer
Activity, too.
Q: Is red wine exempt from
the recommended limits on
alcohol consumption?
A: No. Although red wine con-
tains antioxidant compounds
such as resveratrol and flav-
onoids that demonstrate anti-
cancer effects in laboratory
studies, wine's alcohol content
remains a risk for breast, col-
orectal and several other can-
cers. Alcohol increases breast
cancer risk by raising estrogen
levels, as well as producing
alcohol-induced oxidation dam-
age to cells and disrupting the
body's ability to handle folic
acid (a B vitamin necessary for
maintaining healthy DNA).
Furthermore, alcohol is broken
down to acetaldehyde, a com-
pound that is carcinogenic in
animals. Research suggests
there may be genetic differ-
ences in formation of this com-
pound from alcohol, but for
now we don't know how to
identify who may be at greater
and lesser cancer risk from
alcohol. Red wine's link to
lower risk of heart disease is
reached within recommended
limits; going beyond is not sug-
gested. And it's safer to focus
on strategies that lower risk of
both heart disease and cancer,
such as weight control, regular
physical activity and a mainly
plant-based diet. If you choose
to drink red wine, fit it within
the recommended limit of no
more than one standard drink
(five ounces of wine) per day
for women and no more than
two drinks for men. Population
studies vary, but several show
that even a few drinks a week
pose some breast cancer risk.
Red wine may be a good choice
if you're going to drink alcohol,
but the'tecommended limits
seem especially important to
control risk of colorectal and
breast cancers. More is clearly
not better in this case.
Clever people are always
the best conversations lex-
icon.


VOTE
PAM BELFLOWER
for
City Commission, District 7




Political advertisement paid for and approved by p
Pam Belflower for City Commission. :iP


You're Invited to Our 1st Birthday Party!

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*Saturday, August 28th


*9:00 am 3:00 pm


Refreshments, Door Prizes,

Discount Scratch Off Tickets, & lots of fun!




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. 313 W. Main St. 767-0065

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Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for and approved by Connie Spieth for Wauchula City Commission Campaign


THERE IS
HELP!

Spouse Abuse
Crisis Line

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh


Lifelong Hardee County Resident

Public Bookkeeper & Income Tax Professional

since 1967

Business Owner in Wauchula from 1977-2009

Dedicated Public Servant and Member of the

l Wauchula City Commission since 1986

Honest, Committed and Always Considering

ik Wauchula's and the Taxpayer's Best Interests











l _____ ____ ______ 11. ... .I










Wauchula City Commission


District Seat 2


-,


I







August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Recognize A Dynamic Young Hero


If you know a selfless child
or teenager who has made a dif-
ference in the lives of others,
there's a way to reward his or
her dedication and determina-
tion.
Young people who have
accomplished amazing things-
bath large and small-can win
the ultimate summer celebra-
tion in their honor. Adults can
nominate outstanding kids as
part of the Nestl6(r) Drum-


stick(r) brand Heroes Contest.
Fifty winning kids will be
awarded a celebration complete
with enough Nestl6 Drumstick
sundae cones and a fun-filled
party package to host an unfor-
gettable event for up to 50 fam-
ily and friends.
"Entries will be judged on the
child or teenager's accomplish-
-ments, as well as the originality
and creativity used to achieve
their goals," said John Harrison,


aii Cartons of

Cigaretes







7 8 Ave. la






ABOUT ...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each
additional word is 20 cents. Ads in all cap-
itals are 32 cents per word. Headlines are
$2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $3
extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets,
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales.


NOTICE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA
REQUESTING APPLICANTS FOR THE
HISTORIC PRESERVATION BOARD
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the City of Wauchula
will be accepting applicants who would like to serve on
the City of Wauchula's Historic Preservation Board. This
Board has the authority to review applications for
certificate of appropriateness and approve or deny them,
review proposed alterations to properties within the
historic district in the' City, perform historic preservation
activities as an official agency of the City historic
preservation program and any other function that may be
designated by the City Commission. All members are
appointed by the City Commission and must be a resident
of the greater Wauchula area. The Board meets on an as-
needed basis and therefore meeting times and days will
vary and depend on the availability of the Board members
in order to reach a quorum.
All interested individuals must have a resume to the City
Clerk, 126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 by Friday,
September 3rd at 5:00 pm. All applications received by
the deadline will be presented to the City Commission at
the September 13, 2010 City Commission Meeting at 6:00
pm for their review and possible selection.
Questions may be directed to:
City of Wauchula
Olivia Minshew,.Director of CommruTirnty Development
225 E. Main Street, Suite 106
Wauchula, FL 33873
863-773-9193
ominshew@cityofwauchula.com 8:19c


INVITATION FOR PROPOSALS
The City of Bowling Green is now accepting
proposals for coating the wastewater plant
metal tank with coal tar epoxy. Job includes
labor, materials and equipment to abrasive
blast and coat the interior and /or exterior of the
metal tank, and its walkways, structural steel
and stairs. The City has previously advertised
"grit removal" project for the wastewater plant.
The "tank painting" project will take place
immediately following "grit removal". Other
details will be discussed to best serve the city.
Please call 863-448-7770 for appointments/
inquires. Two copies of each proposal are to be
submitted on or before 4:00 p.m., Friday,
August 27, 2010, to the City Clerk, Bowling
Green City Hall, P.O. Box 608, Bowling Green,
FL 33834. Proposals will be opened at next city
commission meeting. Envelopes must be
sealed and clearly marked "Proposal:
Wastewater Plant Tank Painting". The City of
Bowling Green reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all proposals.
City of Bowling Green
8:19c


Official Ice Cream Taster for
the brand.
Last year's winners expressed
kindness beyond their years.
For example, Hannah Tachouet,
age 13, from Sebastopol, CA,
collected over 25 bags of cloth-
ing and $1,100 for a women's
shelter. When delivering the
donation, she learned that the
shelter had no money to pur-
chase, breakfast for the week
and that many women were
going hungry. Struck by the fact
that members of her own com-
munity were going without this
basic need, Tachouet continues
to donate to the organization,
and to speak to her peers about
the importance of giving.
Contest entry forms are avail-
able to download at www.drum
stick.com. Submit your story
(150 to 500 words), along with
the completed entry form, de-
scribing why the child deserves
to be honored. Adults over the
age of 18 may nominate chil-
dren between 6 and 17 years of
age who are residents of the
United States. Official contest
rules are online. All entries
must be received by September
15, 2010. Winning children will
be notified by phone and/or
mail each month throughout the
contest.


I.


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 2010
5:30 RM.
FINE FORGIVENESS REQUEST


09-156-NA
09-156-Z,
CASES
10-034-NA
10-034-M
10-022-L
09-131-M
09-164-M
09-164-NA
08-038-M
10-028-M
10-044-L, TL
10-023-M
10-045-L
10-048-L, NA


Donnie Selph
, Donnie Selph.


Pamela J Ellis
Pamela J Ellis
Ahmad Rafik Abdelhalim
A Kay McClelland
Jessica Shoop and Others
Jessica Shoop and Others
Adela Chancey
Rodrigo & Guadalupe Prieto
Tangela Guerrero
US Bank NA
Joseph E & Pamela Cobb
Lettie Bishop & Lila Eures


302 Diana Ave
302 Diana Ave


515 N 6th Ave
515 N 6th Ave
229 Indiana Ave
202 S 8th Ave
810 Louisiana St
810 Louisiana St
714 N 9th Ave
820 S 9th Ave
609 S 9th Ave
712 W Palmetto St
401 Polk Rd
822 N Florida Ave


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities. 'Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26,
Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. 8:19c


MARGARET'S SPECIAL DINNER

FRIDAY AUGUST 20 4:30pm 8:00pm

s3O PRIME RIB w/THE WORKS
ADVANCE SIGN-UP AT THE BAR

SING AND DANCE to KARAOKE with JERRY & EDNA 6:00pm- 10:00pm


Fellow citizens...


What's wrong with this picture?


For years, our students have graduated, then waved good-bye as
they left for college or employment- often to never return,
except for all-too-brief visits.

My desire is for our young people to have
job opportunities awaiting them upon their
return.

This is ali important challenge upon which
the future of Hardee County depends.
These young people are our heritage! l


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Bess A. Stallings, Democrat, for County Commission
I i


& i &







8A The Herald-Advocate, August 19,2010


County, City Candidates Speak At Forum


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Herald-Advocate Intern
Voters came together once
again for the annual political
forum sponsored by the Hardee
County Builders Association on
Tuesday night of last week.
The event was held at the
Faith Presbyterian Church of
Wauchula's Fellowship Hall.
About 150 people attended all
or part.
Leading the meeting was
Builders Association President
Benny Hash who was thankful
for the presence of every candi-
date and citizen who came.
"This right here is what makes
this country so great," said
Hash. Starting the forum with a
few laughs, Hash said that
"since their were no babies to
kiss," the forum could begin.
All the candidates received
an invitation and agenda in the
mail, inviting them to the
forum. Of the 28 candidates, 22
were present at the session.
Candidates for County Com-
mission, School Board and City
Commission each had five min-
utes to give a brief biography of
themselves and to express their
concerns to the public.
First up were the candidates
for County Commission Dis-
trict 2. which include Rafael
Arce Jr., Sue Birge, Gary B.
Oden, Bess Stallings and in-
cumbent Nick Timmerman.
Arce and Timmerman both
expressed their concern for the
reasons behind the youth leav-
ing Hardee County. "We don't
need to just worry about adults;
we must be concerned with our
future as well. There is nothing
here for them. We need to work
hard to bring in a theatre, or
some forms of entertainment,
for these kids," said Arce.
All the candidates spoke
about the lack of jobs for resi-
dents in Hardee County and
how to bring in more business-
-s. Birge hopes that her proven
leadership skills and vision for
the county will help Hardee
"think outside the box" and
"pursue opportunities for good
jobs in the county."
Timmerman shared a similar
belief, saying, "We want to find
people good jobs, not take their
money. Raising taxes is not an
option. We need answers. Why
are 42 percent of the people
paying 100 percent of the
taxes?"
Stallings, also concerned
with job availability, hopes to
reduce tax rates, find affordable
housing, reduce teen pregnancy
and divorce, and expand parks
and other recreational places in
Hardee County.
Oden believes that the road
system is the biggest single in-
vestment for the county. Being
an employee of the Road &
Bridge Department for 27
years, Oden said he spoke from
experience about the impor-
tance of maintaining roads, say-
ing, "We need to make a change


to our road systems. We can
accomplish this."
Up next for District 4 were
Richard Farwell, Grady John-
son and Matt Moye. Absent
from the meeting was Mark E.
Luckenbach. Farwell believes
that all functions of the county
need to be maintained and that
it can do so by finding in-
vestors. "If we don't have the
money, there are investors that
would be happy to invest in this
county."
Johnson told the audience of
his concern for taxes, business,
no growth, and the lack of trust
in the community. "There is a
great divide in the community
right now. I serve at the will of
the people. I stand alone; my
voice is your voice."
Moye touched base on simi-
lar subjects, such as business
growth and making Hardee
more family-friendly in hopes
of "preserving the future."
Moye, a Democrat, faces no
opposition in the primary. His
campaign will begin in full
force after the Aug. 24 primary
election.
Representing the School
Board District 4 race were
Glenn Bergens, Garry M.
McWhorter, and incumbent
Janice Platt. Along with provid-
ing a safe learning environment
in schools, Bergens also hopes
to find funds for school re-
sources for both students and
teachers. "My concern is for
every student's future, because
they are the future."
McWhorter named himself a
concerned and dedicated citizen
rather than a politician during
his speech, adding that "God
has a great plan for my life." He
hopes to create more after-
school activities, make the best
use of budget funding, and
increase teacher/student/parent
involvement.
Platt, a School Board mem-
ber for the past 12 years, spoke
of the good memories she has
had working at everything from
the classrooms to the lunch-
rooms. "I love to be in a class-
room and see the light bulb go
off in a student's head when
they learn something. I can't
imagine what it would be like to
be a teacher and experience that
every day. It is so fun, it doesn't
even feel lif work," said Platt.
Fo4owinif after were candi-
dates for District 5, Loraine C.
Braddock, Rocky Kitchens,
Thomas Trevino and Jack J.
Webb. Braddock promised the
public to speak on their behalf
and to be proactive about every
issue or concern. She also spoke
about the Box Tops for Edu-
cation fundraiser and how she
hopes more people in the com-
munity will become involved.
She explained that if half of the
8,000 families in Hardee would
save 14 tops a month for nine
months, more than $50,000
could be raised for the school
system.


1.
A4.




-.. '


Citizens talked politics at Heritage Park before the annu-
al political forum began. Hardee County Builders
Association President Benny Hash acted as the modera-


tor for the political forum.

Kitchens, an educator and
school district administrator for
38 years, stated his desire for a
safe school environment. He
wants to see a school system
free of bullying and gang activ-
ity, and where fair discipline is
taken. He also said that there
needs to be 21st-century learn-
ing going on in local class-
rooms, so that "when a child
graduates they can succeed in
not only Hardee County, but in
a global economy."
Up next was Trevino, who
spoke of his three main focuses
for this community: faith, safe-
ty, and education. On the issue
of family, Trevino explained his
belief that faith is the founda-
tion for a family. With safety
being a main concern in school
systems, he believes that both
safety and education are key to
accomplishing more in this
county. "Our schools are facing
challenging times. I want to
assist in making wise decisions
to make our schools prosper."
With 37 years under his belt
as an educator, Webb spoke
from experience on issues such
as discipline, funding, and a
respectful and safe school envi-
ronment. Webb hopes to spend
funding more wisely in order to
provide resources that are rele-
vant to the Sunshine State
Standards. He also would like
to target discipline in schools,
as well as making Pioneer
Career Academy more accessi-
ble for eligible students. "I want
to help provide a safe environ-
ment where everyone gets treat-
ed fairly and with respect. I care
deeply about every child's
future."
After a 10-minute break,


Hardee County native Ben
Albritton stopped by and was
given permission to say a few
words about his campaign for
state representative for District
66.
Albritton spoke about his
desire to go to Tallahassee and
strengthen families, lower taxes
and make Florida top in busi-
ness. After knocking on 6,000
doors, making hundreds of
phone calls and covering much
ground over the past 18 months,
Albritton believes that the polls
are looking good.
Wauchula City Commission
candidates were the last to
speak at the forum. For District
1, Patricia Detwiler spoke;
incumbent Val Patarini was
absent. Detwiler hopes to unify
merchants and attract new busi-
nesses. and families to Hardee
County. She hopes to represent
the people by being diligent and
fair.
For District 2, Russell G.
Smith was present; incumbent
Connie Spieth was absent.
Smith desires to attract new
businesses and residents.
Although Smith- realizes that
Central Florida is known for
phosphate and agriculture, he
also realizes there is a retire-
ment attraction.
Because of this, Smith hopes
to bring in more entertainment
facilities such as a theatre,
shopping center or mall.
Despite no opposition for
District 3 candidate Daniel
Graham, he decided to speak
for a few minutes as well. He
promised to lead with honesty
and integrity, saying
"We all want growth, but we
need good leadership to get us


there." He then went on to jok-
ingly thank all those who didn't
. run against him.
Up for District 4 are Angel
Lang and David Royal. Lang
hopes to bring in a recycling
Program that both students and
the community as a whole can
get involved in. She would also
like to see more youth groups
coming together to help the eld-
erly whose houses are still dam-
aged from Hurricane Charley.
Royal promised to make a
difference in the community if
re-elected. He hopes to see
growth come to all aspects of
the community, including the
treatment plant, well and sub-
station expansion. Royal com-
mented on what it means to
serve, saying, "If you don't
have passion, you aren't there
for the right reason."
For District 6, John Freeman
was absent from the meeting
and Dawn Atkinson-Jones had
to leave during intermission.
The last candidates to speak
were Pamela Belflower and
Jerry Conerly of District 7.


Belflower told the public that
she will serve, listen, and solve
whatever problems she is faced
with. One of her main goals is
to lessen TECO electric rate'
increases on city residents. She
also says that she promises that
all of the decisions she makes
will not be personal, but will be
centered around what is best for
the community as a whole.
Conerly spoke about the dif-
ficulty of being a public servant
and the criticism that can come
with it. He encouraged the pub-
lic to "not get side-tracked by
things that have been happening
and to understand that any large
corporation will have internal
management issues." Conerly
believes Wauchula is a great
place to raise a family and
wants to keep it that way.
At the end of the forum Hash
thanked those who came out to
hear what the candidates had to
say. "As long as we have these
forums going on, the people of
Hardee County are invited," he
said.


During the intermission, folks had a chance to discuss
their opinions over a variety of refreshments.


.=--.,---:-:-~--. --_-__ -- -- --gl -- -
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r,._- -.'- -
.. __,. . ...... .


PHOTOS BY TRAYCE DANIELS
Folks were lining up at the Republican Candidate Meet-and-Greet last week for free hot dogs and drinks. The brief
event preceded the candidate forum.


A surprise visit was made by state representative candi-
date Ben Albritton, a native of Hardee County.


I-


About 150 guests filled the Faith Presbyterian Fellowship Hall to hear the candidates
speak.


Citizens talked politics at Heritage Park before the annual political forum began.


7p";-"


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~L~B~L!1









Stop Texting,
The urge to text while driving
has become a commonplace in
the United States. In fact, more
than 25 states have signed or
implemented texting-while-
driving laws. That's good news,
since a distraction ofany type-
whether you are taking your
eyes off the road, your hands
off the wheel or your mind off
your driving-can have very seri-
ous consequences. According to
the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration, as re-
cently as 2008, nearly 6,000
people died in crashes involv-
ing a distracted driver, and
more than half a million were
injured.
Although the spotlight's on
cell phones and texting, dis-
tracted driving encompasses
many other activities-from tun-
ing the radio, eating, putting on
makeup, reading, looking for
something on the floor or in the
glove box, and talking or refer-
eeing disagreements in the car.
You can do a number of things
to break the habit and cut down
on your own distracted driving
incidents, such as:
Be prepared before you
start your car-If you put on
makeup, eat, or program your
GPS before you hit the road,
you'll cut down on some dis-
tractions. If you organize what
you need for your final destina-
tion before you leave, you won't


Start Driving
need to search while driving.
Go hands free-If you
must use the cell phone when
driving, invest in technology
that will help you keep your
eyes on the road. Several instal-
lation-free kits are available
that can help you go hands free
for less than the cost of a ticket.
Take a break-Even with a
hands-free device, the best idea
is to pull over if you must make
calls, answer texts or deal with
issues involving other .passen-
gers.
One way to go hands free is
the Parrot Minikit Slim. The
speakerphone clips onto your
car's sun visor, and once paired
via Bluetooth with your mobile
device, it automatically down-
loads your contact list. Using
voice commands, it can dial up
anyone in your phonebook and
can be turned off and on with
the push of one button.
In addition to portable op-
tions, another way to go hands
free is with an installed product
such as the Parrot MKi9200.
Installed products are fully inte-
grated into the vehicle's existing
stereo system so phone calls
can be heard with the same
sound quality as music. In addi-
tion, music players such as
iPods can be played through the
vehicle stereo system via an
installed solution.


New Approach Can

Help Overcome Addiction


Alcoholism is a difficult
addiction to beat, but a newly
available, multifaceted ap-
proach offers a less stressful
and potentially more successful
way to beat the craving.
The medically proven treat-
ment, although new to the U.S.,
has had an 85 percent success
rate in more than 4,000 patients
overseas.
The approach has been so
successful because it treats the
addiction on both a physical
and psychological level. Most
rehab and treatment centers
treat only the psychological part
of the addiction and not the
physical side of the addiction.
Experts at Fresh Start Private
(FSP) Alcohol Recovery Cen-
ters find that it is most effective
to treat the physical addiction
first and then work on giving
alcoholics the tools they need in
the future to stay sober and
happy with their customized
alcohol recovery coaching pro-
gram.
Such treatment involves giv-
ing patients naltrexone, a med-
ication that coats the receptors
of the brain, taking away the
cravings produced by alcohol.


This gives the alcoholic on up
to 12-month window of oppor-
tunity to get a fresh start on life.
While patients can take naltrex-
one as a pill or through injec-
tions, Dr. George O'Neill of
Perth, Australia came up with
the idea of using an implant to
deliver the drug. In tablet or
injection form, there is always
the possibility of noncompli-
ance.
With the implant, the patient
maintains the same therapeutic
levels in the bloodstream for
long periods of time, up to 12
months.
Once the craving is under
control, counseling has a better
chance of success, especially
when undergoing FSP's recov-
ery coaching program, which is
tailored specifically for alco-
holism.
At Fresh Start Private, the
treatment program lasts eight
weeks and is done on an outpa-
tient basis.
Experts there recommend
that anyone with alcohol
dependency who wants to quit
should use a program that is
specifically tailored to alco-
holics.


August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 9A

Shop Smart For Insurance
When you're tackling some- of physical damage coverage.
thing unfamiliar-booking a trip, Your agent can adjust your pol-
doing your taxes-and you want icy accordingly. He or she
to make sure it's done right, you might also suggest raising your
hire a professional. The same is deductible to save more money.
true with car insurance. What's changed in your life
A local agent talks with you lately? If you've recently
about your vehicle and your life moved, gotten married or had a
and recommends options that birthday, you might be eligible
match both. for discounts.
Some local agents sell poli- Do you need coverage for a
cies from only one company, different kind of vehicle? Your
others sell policies from multi- agent can help you get a dis-
ple companies. An agent who count for insuring multiple
sells policies from more than vehicles, and they don't have to
one company can offer you be cars. If you have a motorcy-
more options because there are cle, boat, RV, ATV or snowmo-
more companies and insurance bile, it needs insurance, too.
products to choose from. Do you need to insure some-
When you're ready to talk to thing other than a car? One of
an agent, here are questions that the main advantages of an agent
might be asked to create a poli- who sells more than one com-
cy that's right for you: pany's policies is the ability to
Do you have an older, car? pick the best matches for all
Once your car reaches a certain your insurance-home, business,
age, you can lower the amount life and so on.

YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published In
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear in this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.


7..


." :" '- :; ...


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For More Information Call 773-0550 or 773-0034
or visit our website at www.hardeehelpcenter.com

THANK YOU LOYAL CUSTOMERS, DONORS & VOLUNTEERS
Donations benefit Hardee County residents items are sold to fund the
. continuation of the ministry OR given to those in crisis or with verifiable
emergency need. Please do not drop off donations
after hours or they may not be there when we open.
Numbers are posted at the store for after-hours
donations-we will meet you at the store
at your convenience 8,19c


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August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 11A


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg
HARDEE COUNTY RANCH RODEO
Hot and humid cannot begin to describe what it was like at the
Hardee County Cattlemen's Association Ranch Rodeo on the
evenings of July 23 and 24!
We had been without rain for several days beforehand, when
the second named storm of the season decided to grace the south-
ern part of Florida, leaving Wauchula to receive bands of dark skies
and rain every so often during the rodeo. Usually a summer rain is
a blessing, bringing the temperature down a few degrees and low-
ering the humidity, but not this time. It was so humid that my eye-
glasses kept fogging up just from holding my camera to my eye.
But that didn't stop, or even slow down, this Florida
Cattlemen's Association qualifying event, hosted by our own
Hardee County Cattlemen's Association. HCCA President Darin
,Hughes organized this event, hosting 20 teams from all over the
state. My appreciation goes to him for allowing me to pester him
for all that information that helps me keep the teams, and their
members, in order. Good job, Darin, and also to your lovely wife,
Misty, and twin daughters Holly and Emily, all three of whom were
helping immeasurably on both nights. Son Nathan was signed up
for the mutton bustin', o6 he',hai more important things on his
mind!
OK, no more gabbing.
The event was won by our very own Carlton Ranches team,
which won a nice monetary prize but, more importantly, gets to
represent Hardee County at the FCA State Finals in Kissimmee on
Oct. 1-2. This team took second place at the Okeechobee ranch
rodeo Saturday afternoon, but Dale Carlton told me it was the
honor of representing their own community was what made win-
ning our rodeo so valuable to him and his team members, Matt
Carlton, Trae Adams, Jamie Rewis, and Clint Boney.
Third-place honors went to Limestone Ranch (also known as
Audubon Ranch), with locals Josh McKibben and Jay Belflower,
along with Dennis Carlton. That team will also be at the finals, hav-
ing qualified earlier in the year in Manatee County.
There are a variety df ranch rodeo events that can be used, so
each one of these rodeos can offer different activities. Ours includ-
ed double mugging, team branding, trailer loading, team sorting,
and the wild bronc riding.
Saturday night offered a real "treat" for some fun-lovin' friends -
veteran cowboy Alton Langford (who was featured on the front
page of that week's Herald-Advocate) fell off his horse while
assisting the Flying L team member in dismounting the bronc.
Talk about embarrassed! And several cowboys (including his
nephew) offered me piles of cash to put that photo on the front
page! (Sorry, Alton, I could not resist!)
And there was the oh-so-popular mutton bustin'. Our very
own Bob and Shirley Jarrell provided those great sheep! Friday
night saw Ryan Sunday of Zolfo Springs and Zack Carlton (Dale's
youngest son) tackle the woolly buggers. Nathan Hughes decided
it was better to have signed up than to actually ride, so maybe next
year for him.
Saturday night brought out Luke Roberts of Wauchula and, of
course, champion Cody Lane Vina-do I really need to announce
the winner? It was Cody Lane Vina. This is Cody's last year rid-
ing sheep, as they are forced to retire that event at age 6.
Both nights began with announcing the teams as they entered
the arena. Last year Gary Jones was the flag-bearer, but this year
beauty prevailed as Jocelyn Skipper, of the D&S Cattle Co. and the
Hardee County Cattlemen's Sweetheart this year, carried the
American flag in the Grand Entry. (Sorry, Gary, but you do have to
admit that Jocelyn is prettier than you are!) Saturday night we
were also visited by Florida Cattlemen's Sweetheart Kelly Davis of
Myakka City.
Appreciation goes to all those hard-working behind-the-scenes
people, without whom no rodeo would be possible: Garyand Linda
Jones. Kara Coates, Greg Gordon, pickup men Gary Larsen and
SAlton Langford, along with Josh Moore and Logan Perry on Friday
night, Randall Albritton, and announcer Jimmy Carter. My apolo-
gies to anyone whose name I've left out.
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!


Letter To Editor:

South, Central Florida

Wetlands Harmed By Greed


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Hardee County Cattlemen's Association Sweetheart
Jocelyn Skipper presents the American Flag during the
Grand Entry.


Zack Carlton rides his sheep out of the chute, with Aunt
Millie Bolin cheering him on-the team's future bronc
rider?
4. .'h


Luke Roberts holds on tight!


Cody Lane Vina receives his winner's buckle from
Hardeei County Cattlemen's Association President Darin
Hughes.

NOTICE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA
REQUESTING APPLICANTS FOR
THE PLANNING & ZONING BOARD
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the City of Wauchula
will be accepting applicants who would like to serve on
the City of Wauchula's Planning & Zoning Board. This
Board reviews and makes recommendations to the City
Commission on matters relating to the planning of the
City. All members are appointed by the City Commission
and must be a resident of the City. The Board meets the
third Monday of each month at 5:30 pm.
All interested individuals must have a resume to the City
Clerk, 126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 by Friday,
September 3rd at 5:00 pm. All applications received by
the deadline will be presented to the City Commission at
the September 13, 2010 City Commission Meeting at
6:00 pm for their review and possible selection.
Questions may be directed to:
City of Wauchula
Olivia Minshew, Director of Community Development
225 E. Main Street, Suite 106
Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-9193


Sominshew@cityofwauchula.com


Dear Editor:
If we go back in time to when
Florida was in the discovery or
start up time, the southern end
of Florida was a completely dif-
ferent world than today (and
will be from here on out).
It could have turned out dif-
ferent had. not men seeing the
opportunity to exploit the area
for their personal financial gain.
The exploitation was seen as
money-making scheme to these
actuators who for the love of
money and greed, invested in
drainging the land to sell as
parcels of paradise in the sun to
be developed and attract people
to the area.
There were signs posted on
the dewatered land (that said
reclaimed land for sale, and to
the most part the advertise-
ments were in reality a smoke-
screen invented by the greedy
few exploiting a precious
resource.
Whether these particular peo-
ple knew the truth or not is in
question to me, but I assume
these people took time to inves-
Stigate the situation before tak-
ing the plunge and investing in
this venture.
If so it should not take much
common sense to realize at least
some of the downfalls of their
actions (So we should place
blame where it is due).
Today much money and time
are being invested in restoration
efforts which may even make
things worse in the long run.
(Remember the government
officials and U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers still have a redicu-
lous track record).
Time has passed and man has
not got the message, yet they
are just beginning to think
about not dewatering wetlands
for a host of legitimate reasons.
Every form of government
has strong written rules against
intrusion of important water-
ways, wetlands, or other envi-
ronmental sensitive land.
The problem is the greed for
profit outweighs common sense
in high places, which motivate
corporations to propagandize
their true agenda which is rape
Florida while being blessed by
our government who has so far
partnered with corporations like
Mosaic.
I use the name Mosaic
because they are the Goliath of
the industry since they have
taken several smaller corpora-
tions over in more recent years
and have taken previous and
newer learned tactics to blow
smokescreens including their
ridiculous TV ads. They may
have partners in the industry,
ads but they are the leaders.
The industry has taken the
word reclamation to new
heights that are plain to see as
we move about or look out our
windows.
When pressure was put on


mining to reclaim back in the
1970s they began such as in
Fort Meade where I watched
them over the last 40-plus years
as they proceeded to fill some
areas within the city limits and
local highways.
I notice most areas are no
where near the elevations they
were originally as I was there
before and after.
If you drive north from
Bowling Green on Highway 17
you can see on both sides of the
road. The real thing first on
your right you see a low area
with ahole int he middle.
Downhill from the road and on
your left a row of fast growing
tree which appear to me to be of
foreign nature. Either way they
are planted to block your view
of big open pits backed by high-
er sloped waste areas or -big
mounds which were once
wooded area and orange groves%
As you move north you pass
multitudes of their discards
including the local famed sand
mountain then more raped land
filled with sand.
Any direction you go off 17
you see vast areas of wasteland
including waste areas left
behind. Some are pits, sand-
piles, clay dams and the gyp-
sum stacks.
These gympsun stacks are
normally bald and light grey in
color and very toxic to most
forms of life, and now some of
these gyp stacks are caving in
directly to aquifers to the. tune
of 88 million gallons initially.
The newest trend is for the
industry to apply a thin layer of
good soil which they had to
steal from nearby land.
And as they place the cover-
ing they plant grass. This is just
part of their tactics and tricks to
create a smokescreen. (At least
your cat will cover his waste
immediately without of an act
Congress).
If the land rape was on some
limited basis we may never
really notice the impacts from
mining, but even back in the
'70s, the damage had gone
above and beyond comprehend-
sion of the smallest IQ's of even
laymen.
When are we, going to
remove the government offi-
cials who while knowing the
facts continue to allow this
industry to receive permits,
variances or acceptation to the
law with no regards for our
water and other assets for prom-
ised money or other propagan-
da?
Some of these local politicians
have received the name Judas
from some of us. Do some
receive financial gain for the
support? Judas received 30
pieces of silver.

Fed up cracker
Frank Kirkland
Bowling green


Reduce the complexity of life by eliminating the needless wants
of life, and the labors of life reduce themselves.
-Edwin Way Teale

Nothing is so contagious as example. Never was any consider-
able good or evil done without producing its like.
-Francois de La Rochefoucauld

The follies which a man regrets most in his life are those which
lie didn't commit when he had the opportunity.
-Helen Rowland


RE-ELECT


CAPABLE


* EXPERIENCED


*


DR. NICK TIMMERMAN

COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 2


12 years continuous service as County Commissioner, District 2
35 years American Optometric Association
33 years Lions Club member
28 years Vice President Alpha-Omega Ministries
27 years member Florida's First Assembly of God
29 years private practice of optometry in Hardee County
Health Care Task Force Member Hardee County Recreation Board Member


During the past three years, we have seen a dramatic decrease in revenues for
Hardee County. Legislative and referendum mandates have resulted in a severe
drop in the county budget. It has been difficult to continue services and maintain
county employee jobs, but your County Commission has done an excellent job.
Our county has changed dramatically due to a declining agriculture base. Pursuing
companies with good paying jobs is and has been my main focus as County
Commissioner. This will continue to be a top priority, if re-elected.
Pd. political advertisement approved by Nick Timmerman campaign fund REPUBLICAN 8:19p


L I_


8:19c1


-I







12A The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010


Human jaw muscles can generate a force of 200 pounds on the
molars.

If you could drive to the sun at 55 miles per hour, it would take
about 193 years.

The peregrine falcon is the fastest animal on earth; it can dive
up to 200 miles per hour.


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will
hold a Special Meeting on Thursday, August 19, 2010
at 6:00 p.m. to appoint a temporary City Manager, and
any other business that may come before the
Commission.
The meetings will be held at the Commission
Chambers located at 225 East Main Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as
amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any
interested person, decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Commission with respect to any matter consid-
ered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to
insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida
does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's
disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves
every aspect of the Commission's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in
its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should
contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
s/Holly Collins
HOLLY COLLINS,
City Clerk
City of Wauchula


rNutrition Wise
KAREN COLLINS. MS. RD. CDN


AMERICAN I
CANCER
Q: Can someone be in a
healthy weight range and still
have too much body fat?
A: Yes. Recommended weight
ranges and the classification
system to asses it with body
mass index (BMI) are based on
assumptions of what proportion
of your weight is made up of
fat, muscle, bone and water.
Some people, athletes for
example, may be classified as
overweight, yet have so much
muscle that their body fat is
quite low; thus their weight
does not seem to put them at
health risk. Studies show that
far more people have the oppo-
site problem: their weight is
normal, but they've lost lean
muscle and gained excess body
fat. Emerging research shows
that this "normal weight obesi-
ty" may affect at least 20 to 30
percent of U.S. adults. This is a
serious problem, because this
excess body fat can be causing
the same health risks we see in
overweight and obese people:
high levels of insulin that may
promote cancer development
and signal increased risk of dia-
betes, and proteins called
cytokines produced in fat tissue
that circulate through the body
promoting inflammation.
Metabolic signs of excess body
fat can include high blood pres-
sure, high blood triglycerides,
low HDL ("good") cholesterol,


S "MlEETING THE CHALLENGES, FACING THE ISSUES"
S-- Takes EXPEREINCE and ENERGY. I will be INNOVATIVE
and CREATIVE, PURSUING OPPORTUNITIES that will
'QUALII take Hardee County in a POSITIVE DIRECTION.
THAT- I will be DILIGENT, CONSERVATIVE and
MATTER" a GOOD STEWARD of YOUR MONEY!



*., .' .* ** 2 4 '


INSTITUTE FOR
RESEARCH
and increased markers of
inflammation, such as C-reac-
tive protein (CRP) in blood
tests. Most often this excess
body fat is distributed around
the waist. Aim for a waist that
measures no more than 37 inch-
es in men and no more than
31.5 inches in women. Focus on
getting some moderate physical
activity every day, eat healthful-
ly with meals centered around
vegetables, fruits, whole grains
and beans, and aim for a steady
weight without frequent yo-
yoing up and down.
Q: Is it really possible to get
recommended amounts of
dietary fiber without supple-
ments?
A: Yes, when you choose most-
ly vegetables, fruits, whole
grains and beans at every meal,
the dietary fiber adds up.
Simply eating the bare mini-
mum of 5 servings (about 2 1/2


- 3 cups) of vegetables and
fruits plus 3 servings of whole
grains should easily get you to
the 21 grams of dietary fiber
recommended for women over
50. Depending on overall calo-
rie needs, most adults should be
targeting 25 to 35 grams of fiber
per day. Each added step, such
as working up to 7 to 10 serv-
ings (about 3 1/2 5 cups) of
vegetables and fruits, replacing
additional refined grains with
whole grains, choosing a cereal
with 5 or more grams of dietary
fiber per serving for breakfast
or as a snack, including dried
beans (like kidney beans, gar-
banzo beans and lentils), or
snacking on a handful of nuts
instead of low-fiber chips or
crackers, brings you closer to
that target. Add fiber supple-
ments if necessary to reach the
level your doctor recommends,
but start with these foods,
because along with the fiber
you get many valuable nutrients
and health-protective phyto-
chemicals.

Q: Is it safe to lose weight
while breastfeeding?


A: Certainly, in fact the extra
calories you use in producing
breast milk may even help.
Exclusive breastfeeding, mean-
ing giving your baby nothing
else, is recommended as the
optimal choice for baby's and
mother's health for the first six
months. In addition, it is associ-
ated with greatest weight loss.
To maintain successful milk
production, the key is to make
sure you are losing weight grad-
ually and with healthy food
choices. Limit consumption of
high-sugar drinks and watch out
for high-fat or high-sugar snack
foods and desserts without
totally depriving yourself. Por-
tion control can be important as
well; if you've gotten used to
larger portions during pregnan-
cy, taking three-quarters of your
usual portions of meat and
starchy foods (pasta, cereal,
potatoes) can make a significant
difference. Remember, too, that
adding in physical activity, such
as taking your baby for a walk
every day, also helps to create
the difference between calories
consumed and calories burned
that leads to weight loss.


Environmental Integrity


p


.*) ;; s~

Arp-


e ,


Evangelist Mark Hemm

SWednesday thru Friday

SAugust 18 thru 20

7 pm Nightly

Come Expecting Your Life To Change!

FAITH TEMPLE MINISTRIES
CHURCH OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave. WVauchula
(863) 773-3800
info@faithfilledchurch.com

8:19c Pastor Wendell G. Smith Welcomes You!
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PAGE ONE
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/EYE CARE
MERM
MARK D. SEVIGNY, O.D.
C. N. TIMMERMAN, O.D.
RONALD 0. SEVIGNY, O.D.
DAVID M. LOEWY, M.D.


COURTESY PHOTO
There is a new doctor in town! Dr. Julia King has now
made Sevigny & Associates Eye Care her home.

New Doctor Joins

Eye Care Center


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Herald-Advocate Intern
Can you see what I see?
A brand-new doctor has been
added at Sevigny & Associates
Eye Care in Wauchula.
Dr. Julia King has been work-
ing at the Eye Care center for
more than three weeks now, and
is enjoying every minute of it.
"My experience here so far
has been really good," says
King, adding, "All the cus-
tomers are so nice, and the staff
is friendly."
King received her undergrad-
uate degree at the University of
Central Florida, where she
earned a bachelor of science in
biology. She then went on to
Nova Southeastern University,
where she obtained her doctor-
ate of optometry.
This new doctor is more than
qualified for the job, with over
10 years of experience. After
working at a private practice in
Colorado for six years, she went


on to work at a retinal practice
in New York City for over four
years.
King specializes in medical
eye examinations for diagnosis
and management of eye dis-
eases such as diabetes, hyper-
tension, age-related macular
degeneration, and glaucoma.
Not only is this doctor busy
at her new job, but she also has
recently welcomed a little one
into her family. Thinking that
the big city was too busy for
two small children, King decid-
ed to move her talents down to
Florida.
"We have two small children
and New York City isn't exact-
ly the place to raise a child.
Now I am closer to my family,"
says King.
To welcome King to the
neighborhood or to schedule an
appointment, call 773-3322 or
head on down to 735 N. Sixth
Ave. (U.S. 17) in Wauchula.


The Mardi Gras celebration goes back to an ancient Roman
custom of merrymaking before a period of fast. In Germany it
is called Fastnacht and in England, Pancake Day.


Wauchula Has


Busy Year


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A balanced budget with no
tax increases will allow the city
of Wauchula to maintain the
progress it made in the last year.
New year projects will most-
ly be funded by a combination
of Community Redevelopment
Agency funds, state and federal
grants and leases/loans. Of the
$23.845 million budget for
2010-11, including a possible
$5.355 million bond project to
fund CRA projects this year and
in years to come, the majority is
still grants and loans. Only
about $2 million is current
operating revenue.
Another $11 million in proj-
ects are planned for the five-
year span 2010-2015. Short-
term projects for the 2010-2011
fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1,
include land purchase for
increased runway easements at
Wauchula Municipal Airport
five miles west of town off
Vandolah Road.
There will be rehabilitation of
the Coker Building and an adja-
cent parking area. The tentative
plan is to make the main part of
the Coker Building into smaller
startup business opportunities.
Completing the water well


storage, take and water plant
digester replacement round out
the main city projects for the
upcoming year.
In contrast, the past year has
seen the completion of several
key projects. There was final-
ization of the $2.1 million
Electric Substation expansion,
the $42 million water well plant
and $1 million airport hangar
project. As projects get done,
the city can turn its attention to
marketing and new revenue
options to prevent increasing
taxes by bringing more business
and residents to bolster the
city's income.
In the last five years, under
outgoing city manager Rick
Giroux, the city has secured
over $10 million in grants and
completed nearly two dozen
major projects from aviation to
parks to utilities.
It all puts the city in good
financial shape, with a series of
first-rate audits and includes
net capital assets of $20 million,
its investment in land, build-
ings, improvements on infra-
structure, machinery and equip-
ment, minus what is owed on
them or remains to be complet-


Experts on Elizabethan cuisine contend the "funeral baked
meats" Hamlet makes so much of were meat-pies.


Your Child Will
Learn to Read!
Free Evaluation
trnI nti llM A n 7 i d oh* M h d


'LI


. r e anMaeA Dfeec


JERRY COtNERL

Wauchula City Comnuslone
At Lwre Seat7


Wauci.ula


A grdi ac to ive

LET'S KE THAT WAY !

Wauchula Cty Administrator 12Years
Citig Commissioner 10 Years
UF Business Management Deiree
Licensed Real Estate Salesman
Owner, J. Conerly Assoates, LLC
Questions? Callme at 773-9571
Pol. Adv. pd. for and approved by Jerry Conerly
For City Commissioner At Large Seat 7


8:19p


',neCI nLU ILUWy iALL.cc Lu ivime lu Letn
Children, Teens & Adults '
Rose Mitchell-Freeman
Reading Instruction
Specialist
Learning Centers" (863)773-6141
S soc8:19c


On The Agenda
HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 6 p.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol.
lowing is a synopsis of topics that may be of public interest.
Times are approximate except for advertised public hearings. -
--Commission/ Zoning public hearing. One request is for a
variance to the setbacks of Peace River for a single-family dwelling
on the west side of Cross Creek Lane. Another is a Special
Exception on 36.37 acres to develop an Outdoor Commercial
Recreation Motorsports Park at the east end of Roy Moore Road.
The third is for Planned Unit Development amendment for Torrey
Groves off Sauls Road east of U.S. 17 North, 6 p.m.
-Public Hearing-ordinance on permit requirements, driveways
installed without a permit and construction requirements, 6:30 p.m.
-Award bid for Water Treatment Plant headquarters construc-
tion, 8:45 p.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.


VAL PATARINI

For

CITY COMMISSIONER
District 1


Paid for and approved by Val Patarini for City Commissioner, District 1. Non-Partison


,,I


-- --


- -







2B The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010





Hardee


Living-


Rebecca Bradley And Billy

Alexy Are Engaged


Blair and Angela Bradley of
Wauchula announce the en-
gagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter, Re-
becca Ann Bradley, to William
Charles "Billy" Alexy III, son
of William and Donna Alexy of
Wauchula.
The bride-elect is an2003
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School and 2007 graduate of
Traviss Career Center. She is


employed at Hardee Manor
Care Center as a licensed prac-
tical nurse.
The prospective groom is a
1998 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School and graduate of
South Florida Community Col-
lege. He is a lineman for Peace
River Electric Cooperative Inc.
Plans are being made for an
Oct. 28 wedding on a Carnival
cruise ship at Port Canaveral,


Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Mann today.

Manns Celebrate

50th Anniversary
A golden anniversary party Columbia College. She gradu-
was held for Raymond and ated from Hardee High School
Charlotte Mann on June 26, and Lakeland Business College.
2010, in Saginaw, Texas. The couple has resided in the
Raymond Mann of Lakeland Fort Worth, Texas area for the
and Charlotte Winegard of past 35 years.
Wauchula were married on They were feted by their son
June 19, 1960, in the Bereah John Mann, and daughter Cyndi
community of southeast Polk Calvert, her husband Ron and
County, with the Rev. R. L. grandson Andrew Calvert. Ap-
O'Quinn officiating. proximately 100 family mem-
He was a graduate of Lake- bers and friends were able to
land High School and later join them in the celebration.
earned a bachelor's degree from


.COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Queen

Kim Taylor Becomes The

Bride Of Matt Queen


COURTESY PHOTO
Billy Alexy and Rebecca Bradley


ONE PINK, ONE BLUE
ONE PINK, ONE BLUE


The Manns on their wedding day in 1960.


COURTESY PHOTOS


Mr. and Mrs. Derek
Sconyers, Dunnellon, a seven
poupd, four ounce son, Brody
Cleveland Sconyers, born July
31, 2010, Monroe Regional
Medical Center, Ocala. Mrs.
Sconyers is the former Crystal
London. Maternal grandpar-
ents are John and Trish London
of Kissimmee. Paternal grand-
parents are Jack and Lynn
Sconyers'of Bowling Green.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.


One of the beautiful things about baseball is that every once in a while you come into
a situation where you want to, and where you have to, reach down and prove some-
thing.



2NP ANNUAL HALLOW M BASH
FOOP, FTUM & PARTY GAMF.
7PM PUMPKIN CARVIM' CQON ST
5 Donation Cas Prize
Costfm Contest 10 pm
Most Original, Best Exotic, Mostest Scarrrrriest,
Best Impersonator of Famous or Not so Infamous Person

MUSIC 8V FINAL CUT

Saturday, October 51, apm-12am



Vendors Welcome And As Always Free Camping
Charlotte's Backyard Venue Available For Private Parties BBQ *
Weddings & More For More Info 863-735-8887
MONDAY-Happy Hour Prices All Day
TUESDAY-Free Pool-Drink Specials
WACKY WEDNESDAY-Happy Hour 4 to 7PM, $1 Natty, $1.25 Bud Lite
STHURSDAY-Guys Night 8pm-lpm, Free Natty & Select Drafts, $2 Domestic Beer
FRIDAY-Ladies Night 8pm-llpm, Free Natty & Select Drafts,
$2 Domestic Beer, & Guys get $1 Natty & Select Drafts
SSATURDAY-Live Music, 1st and 3rd Karaoke
SUNDAY-Bike Day, Ride In Drink Specials, $1 Natty's, $2 Bloody Mary or Screw Drivers


Charlotte's Webb Pub
3315 SR64i West Wauchula


PleIJa.i 2 e


j;
Nicole L. Brown and William
Grimmette, Zolfo Springs, a
nine-pound seven ounce daugh-
ter, Allison McKenzie Brown,
born July 12, 2010, Florida
Hospital, Sebring. Maternal
grandparents are Mary L.
Brown and Robert Brown of
Zolfo Springs. Paternal grand-
mother is Lois Grimmette of
Wauchula.


Kimberly Lynn Taylor
became the bride of Matthew
Dennis Queen on Saturday,
April 17, 2010, at the Avon Park
Community Center.
The bride is the daughter of
Barry and Judy Taylor of Avon
Park, pastors of Grace Fellow-
ship Church in Wauchula. The
groom is the son of Dennis and
Jan Queen of Sebring.
Officiating at the ceremony
was Joe McCutchen. The song
"You and I," by Michael Buble,
was featured in the ceremony.
Given in marriage by her par-
ents, the bride wore a Jason
Alexander mermaid-cut gown
with a sweetheart neckline,
champagne in color. Her hair
was half up and half down with
soft curls. Her veil was accent-
ed with pearls and crystals, with
a matching comb. She carried a
bouquet of fresh white hydran-
geas, purple tulips and maroon
calla lilies.
The church was decorated in
a garden theme, with several
different colors of purple.
Maid of honor was Jennifer
Taylor of Avon Park, the bride's
sister. Bridesmaids were Karyn
Clements and Traci Smith of
Sebring, the groom's sisters.
Jennifer wore a dark-plum tea-
length dress, Traci wore a
Victorian-lilac tea-length dress,
and Karyn wore a light-lilac
tea-length dress. All flowers
were a mix of silk spring, with
hydrangeas as a base.
Kassidy Clements, the
groom's niece, was the flower
girl and wore a champagne-
colored tea-length dress accent-
ed with a dark-plum bow and
dark-purple petals floating at


the hem. Andrew Smith, the
groom's nephew, was the ring
bearer.
The best man was Kadir
Carruthers, of Cleveland, Ohio,
and formerly of Sebring.
Groomsmen were Ryan Croteau
of Miami and Andrew Garcia of
Tampa.
The bride's mother chose a
dark-purple top with three-
quarter sleeves paired with a
black floor-length skirt. The
groom's mother wore a fuchsia
knee-length dress with spaghet-
ti straps.
The reception was held in the
lower level of the community
center. Continuing with the
spring theme, the reception was
decorated with a water fountain
and gates. The stage where the
bridal party was seated had four
window panels with dark-pur-
ple linen draped over the top.
The cake was four tiers with
dark-purple. ribbon around the
bottom.
Jeffery Edwards of Bartow,
Patsy Joyner of Frostproof and
Mary Hegwood of Wauchula
assisted with hospitalities.
The honeymoon trip was a
Caribbean cruise. Following
their honeymoon, the couple
reside in Grovetown, Ga.
The bride obtained an associ-
ate of arts degree in nursing at
South Florida Community
College.
The groom is a 2004 graduate
of Sebring High School and a
2008 graduate of the University
of Central Florida, with a
degree in mechanical engineer-
ing. He is currently employed
with Georgia Iron Works in
Grovetown, Ga.


FALL LEAGUES WILL BE STARTING SOON TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL SPOTS AVAILABLE


DAY


LEAGUE


TIME


STARTS


Monday Monday Night Mens 7:00 PM, Starts August 23
5 Man Teams
Early Birds Ladies 9:00 A.M. Starts August 24
Tuesday 4 Ladies on a Team
Guys & Dolls Mixed League 7:00 RM. Starts August 31
4 Person Teams
Wednesday Wed. Night Mens 7:30 RM. Starts August 25
4 Man Teams

Thursday Nite Owls Ladies League 6:30 RM. Starts August 26
5 Ladies on a Team
TGIF League Mixed League
Friday TGIFLeaue Mixed Le7:30 PM. Starts August 27
4 Person Teams


Saturday


Juniors Ages 6 & Up
Registration August 21
12 Noon


12 NOON


Starts Sept. 11


1 ~ ~~ '-- t FS~t"" ~- ~ ~- - ----- ----

BowIl-Of-Fun n

Lanes
Call Joan at 773-6391
for more information
943 South 6th Ave
Wauchula. FL 33873 I


I I I


-






August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3R


Kaylyn Crawford & Dustin
Walton Are Engaged
Vent and Teresa Crawford of with dual degrees in political
Wauchula announced the en- science in communications. She
gagement of their daughter also has attained a 2010 Florida
Kaylyn Rene' Crawford of State University cum laude
Marietta, Ga., to Dustin Walton, master's degree in integrated
of Marietta, Ga., son of Roy communications and market-
and Wannie Walton of Valdosta, ing. She is employed as account
Ga. manager at Dodge
Plans are being made for a Communications.
June 25, 2011, marriage at the The prospective groom is a
Acylone Plantation in Lake student at Life University,
Park. where he is pursuing a doctor-
The bride-elect is a 2005 ate in chiropractic medicine
graduate of Hardee High with an emphasis on athletic
School and a 2009 Florida State rehabilitation.
.University graduate cum laude


Kaylyn Crawford & Dustin Walton


COURTESY PHOTO


;i Save money on your favorite Heartworm
and flea products such as
Revolution, Heartguard, Comfortis & Frontline


Casen
Monster Jam
Party Fetes
4-Year-Old
Casen Brian Smith, the son of
Andrew and Stephanie Smith of
Wauchula, turned four years old
on July 14, but had to wait until
Aug. 1 for his party.
He celebrated with a trip to
Backyard Adventures in
Lakeland for a Monster Jam
party, where guests shared
pizza, chips, fruit, cookies,
cheese and crackers and, of
course, birthday cake.
Among the special guests
were grandparents Steven and
Annette Zuniga, and Gary and
Sophia Smith; great-grandpar-
ents Manuel and Beatrice
Zuniga, and Hariett Watkins;
and Aunt Danielle and Uncle
Tyler, along with many other
friends and family.


pei taIIi


Save 50-75% on pet Vaccinations
Wednesday, August 25th
At
SVision Ace Hardware


w


POLIO REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, July 28, heard a report on Rotary's mission to
eradicate polio throughout the world. The effort has gained over $300 million in grants
from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Polio is an intestinal virus that enters the
environment through feces. It is spread through person-to-person contact, especially.
in situations for poor hygiene, and enters the body through the mouth. Polio has been
around for thousands of years. In 1955 scientists Jonas Salk and Thomas Francis
developed a safe polio vaccine. Most people do not have any complications from expo-
sure to polio virus and do not realize they were infected. Some people feel mildly ill,
but their bodies fight off the virus. In a small percentage of cases, the virus spreads to
the central nervous system. Fewer than one in 100 infected people get a paralytic form'
of the disease. When this happens, the virus destroys motor neurons, the nerve cells
that control muscles. Albert Sabin in 1960 developed a polio vaccine that can be taken
orally. The World Health Organization declared U.S. polio-free in 1994. Polio is still crip-
pling children in four countries-Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. Rotary
International in 1985 launched a PolioPlus Initiative and by 2008 had contributed over
$700 million and immunized over two billion children in 122 countries. Shown (from
left) are George Robertson-Burnett, assistant Rotary governor; Nellie Garcia; Sue
Birge, club president; and Ed Odom, district governor.


POLITICAL CANDIDATE


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HEARTLAND GOLD
'FROM OLUR HEARTS TO YOURS*


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 9-5
Sat. 9 2


1102 S. 6th Ave. Wauchula 773-4466


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Ben Albritton, a Hardee County citrus businessman running for the Florida House of
Representative from District 66, spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, Aug.
3, at the Panda Restaurant. The Republican said his campaign center on faith, family
and servant leadership. He and his wife, Missy, have three children. He said he would
work to help make Florida more attractive for new businesses, to be energy independ-
ent and to work on three-year state budget plans. The election is Aug. 24. There are
almost 120 members in the Florida House of Representatives and 60 members of the
Florida Senate. Pictured (from left) are Cliff Ables, Gary Delatorre, Albritton and
Thomas Trevino.


Important Reminder!

While you're busy filling out all that back to school
paperwork remember another important form to renew!

U Your 4-H Member Enrollment Form!

L Make Plans Now To Attend Our
4-H Open House

Thursday, August 26
3:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
SAgri-Civic Center
Altman Road

A special time for returning members U
U to renew their enrollment and
| NEW members to see what we
S have to offer in the 4-H Program!

For more information call your club leader

* or the 4-H office at 773-2164
*Youth planning to show livestock in the 2011
Hardee County Fair MUST be registered in a 4-H
l Club before Sept. 3, 2010!*
The Florida cooperative Extension Service programs are available to all without regards to race,
color, sex, age, religion, national origin or handicapping conditions. soc8:19,26c

Esi tEe^EH f e^En f E#EeH^


225 East Oak St., Wauchula 5:00 to 6:00 pm 773-3148
'I" Dog & Cat Packs start at $45 With heartworm test $55
l, Kitten and puppy packs $36 ff-


"~ `Y~PID


~i n






4B Thee Hlerald-Advocate, August 19, 2010


REPUBLICANS GATHER


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Jan Jackson, a fifth-grade teacher at Bowling Green Elementary School, spoke to the
Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, Aug. 4, at Java Cafe about an educational travel
tour called People to People. Shown (from left) are the Rev. Harold Davis, Jackson and
School Board member Joe Jones.


PHOTO BY JEAN KELLY
The Hardee County Republican Party held its regular monthly meeting on Aug. 3 at the
Coldwell Banker Am-South Realty office in Wauchula. Several local Republican candi-
dates gave updates on their campaigns and plans were finalized for the upcoming
"Meet & Greet" at Heritage Park on Aug. 11. A special guest was Chris Siercks, region-
al field manager for U.S. Senate candidate Marco Rubio. From left, are Sam Fite,
Russell Smith, Grady Johnson, Siercks, Dan Graham, vice-chairman Chet Huddleston
and chairman Gary Delatorre.


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: HANCHEY'S CARPETS

"We Install What We Sell"
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1968
( 110 East Main Street Wauchula
S (863) 773-4792*(863) 773-4738
** 'Financing available with approved credit.


C




.ti
,lE


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Aug. 8-14. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.


(i







I.,
*1,'


I







&o8


ISSUED
Streeter, U. S. 17 South, new
construction-two warehouses,
$44,130.
Harrison, Baptist Church
Road, renovations, $1,250.
Perez, Baker Street, renova-
tions, $2,200.
Perez, Platt Road, renova-
tions, $2,100.
S Long's, South Eighth
S Avenue, install air conditioning,
S$5,490.
Jung, Rose Lane, renova-
tions, $4,549.
Driskell, Popash Road, new
construction-add-on, $89,000.
Owner/builder, North First
Avenue, renovations, $7,000.
S Bevis, Kazen Road, single-
family residence, $167,000.
Battey, Mockingbird Lane,
renovations, $2,835.
Battey, Magnolia Street, ren-
S ovations, $3,800.
Liskey, Kelly Roberts Road,
renovations, $4,500.
n Williams, King Road, roof-
Sing, $17,195.
Field, Johnston Road, reno-
vations, $1,000.


Test Drive For
WES Dollars
During Wauchula Elementary
School's Open House on Friday
from 4 to 7 p.m., parents and
guests will have the opportunity
to test drive Chrysler's award-
winning mini-van.
Any licensed driver over age
18 may drive the mini-van and
earn a $10 contribution for the
school, courtesy of Alan Jan
Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep of Wau-
chula. There is no limit to the
number of drives or the
Chrysler contribution. All funds
are used for student enrichment
activities.
"We really enjoy the opportu-
nity to support the school and
showcase our product," said
Kevin Hanchey, general man-
ager for the dealership. "Parents
seem to appreciate the chance
to talk about the new technolo-
gies and try the innovations for
themselves-in a comfortable
environment. The school fund-
raisers are a lot of fun. We all
work together to help the kids.
Everyone has a great time! We
hope to see you at the school."



10 HOURS A
MONTH!
That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


BUILDING BLOCKS
Renovations or rebuilding after
a disaster should include code-
approved or code-plus tech-
nologies.


0 0
I.: 'i


Open 7 Days a Week
Sun loon 10 pm foffn,. ues. Ited., noon 10 pm
Jhurs. Hoon midnigh friiday & Saturday Noon 2am


No COVER CHARGE No ONE UNDER THE AGE OF 21 MUST HAVE ID U


One Day Only
Come to class
& get the rest of the year for



only$99

Jazzercise class- 4:00pm-5:00pm
(bring water/mat/hand weights)
First Florida's
Assembly of God Life Center
1397 S. Florida Ave. Wauchula
For info. 863-767-0613
Valid only on August 23, 2010 and for those who have
not attended Jazzercise in the last 6 months. Regular
joining fees apply. January auto-payment sign-up
required. At participating locations.
Other restrictions may apply.
jazzercise.com (800)FIT-IS-IT H


Shrubs and Stuff
Lawncare and Landscaping
KNOCK OUT ROSES CREPE MYRTLE *
THRYALLIS TIBOUCHINI *
LOTS MORE
Call us or stop by for all your Lawncare,
Landscaping & Planting Needs.
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC


'3496 PEEPLES LANE, WAUCHULA
781-3584 MELISSA 773-3557 OFFICE '


Tuesday AU Day 75c Draft Beer Pong Fri. & Sat.
MNonday Moonshine
Cricket & Wednesday Karaoke 6pm 10 pm Karaoke
301 Darts Thursday Ladies Night 7 pm 11 pm (First time at the
Ladies Drink Free (Well or Draft) Countr) Club.
7 pm Top or Premium Buy 1 Get 1 Free Come Welcome
Texas Hold em Them!)


BOWLING GREE COUNTRY CLU


I Wanted:- Dart Players Sunday at 0


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Sports Update
By Joan Seaman


Well, the preliminary political fight is nearly over and we can
turn to actual sports for consideration.
Alrsports are gearing up in a big way, with practices in most of
them already well under way.
Some of last year's seniors start or continue their collegiate
careers. New to the college scene this year are Chelsey Steedley
and Ezayi Youyoute.
Chelsey left yesterday for Chipola College, where one of the
first fall events will be at the University of Georgia in Athens,
where a tournament will include Troy State, Louisiana State,
Florida State and the University of Florida. Quite a heady experi-
ence for an 18-year-old, but Chelsey has spent several years play-
ing travel ball throughout Florida and elsewhere.
Youyoute has already made the newspapers, in a special on him
and his Georgia Southern Eagles teammates in the Savannah
Morning News on Aug. 10. Youyoute is vying for the quarterback
backup role. The fall schedule begins Sept. 4 against Savannah
State.
Locally, fall sports begin in earnest with next Friday's varsity
football's home Fall Classic against Lake Placid. Game times this
year are mostly 7 p.m., so get ready for the change. They will again
be broadcast by Heartland Broadcasting Corp.'s WZZS-The Bull
on FM radio 106.9 Junior Colby Baker or senior Tre' Anderson
will lead the charge for first-year coach Buddy Martin.
Boys golf and girls volleyball are next to get going. Both begin
on Aug. 30 on the road, golf at Port Charlotte and volleyball at
Sebring. George Heine will be back at the helm of boys golf, with
a lot of his team coming off the summer Sertoma season. Jessica
Leupold will take the reins at girls volleyball.
Swim teams get started on Aug. 31 with a trip to Lakeland
George Jenkins. JV Football opens at home against Avon Park on
Sept. 2.
We don't have cross country or girls golf schedules yet, but
hope to have them shortly.
At the junior high level, sports start a slight bit later. Girls soft-
ball starts at home Sept. 20 against Lake Placid. Softball games are
at 4:30 p.m. and usually are Mondays and Thursdays, with an
occasional open date in the Heartland Conference schedule.
Football games are at 5:30 p.m. in Wildcat Stadium on Tuesdays,
starting with a visit from Lake Placid on Sept. 21.
In the softball leagues, the Women's Church League ended
recently, with Holy Child Catholic prevailing in both the regular
season and post-season tournament. Congratulations to this fine
group of ladies.
In the Men's Community League, Mosaic I took over the lead,
when previously unbeaten Peace River Electric Cooperative
(PRECo) lost a game to Hardee Merchants. Several of the games
have been wide open, but others are decided by only one or two
runs. Come out to the Recreation Complex fields just north of the
high school and enjoy the action in its final weeks.
Bowling Green boxer Daniel Lozano remains undefeated after
his win on Friday night, which was shown on Telemundo TV on
about an hour's tape delay. The TV exposure in the U.S. and
Mexico cannot but help him climb up the professional lightweight
ladder.


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well, football fans, it's finally here! The Best Time of the
year-FOOTBALL SEASON. It's time to get out the car flags,
clean the BBQ Grill and buy some new team apparel. So, what will
2010 bring to your team this year? Is it a championship year? A
rebuilding year? A transition year? Whatever it is, every year is one
filled with new hope and anticipation. 2010 will be the same.
College football finds the Crimson Tide of Alabama ranked
number one in preseason for the first time since 1978. Nick Saban,
the former all state QB from Monongah, W. Va., is back to attempt
to lead the Tide to back to back titles.
Florida starts over at QB with Scott Brantley. Will he ever
replace Tim Tebow? By the end of the third game, Gator fans will
be shaking their heads yes. The defense will need to step up with
only five starters back but the talented Gators reload not rebuild.
Look for an 11-1 season with a rematch in Atlanta with Alabama.
FSU begins a new era with Jimbo Fisher replacing Bobby
Bowden who had walked the Seminole sidelines since 1976 when
he arrived from West Virginia. Fisher takes over after being the
offensive coordinator/Head Coach-in-waiting. The former Salem
Tiger from Clarksburg, W. Va., has a long successful resume as an
assistant coach. His first year in Tallahassee as the head man could
see a 9-3 regular season. Florida, North Carolina and Clemson are
home games while Oklahoma will be met in Norman, Okla., early
in the season. These games appear to be the four tough games that
will define Fisher in his debut.
Speaking of FSU, retired Coach Bobby Bowden will not be in
his rocking chair watching games on television this fall. He will be
road tripping the country watching games. He will be in
Huntington, W. Va., on Friday night Sept. 10 attending the West
Virginia-Marshall Friends of Coal Bowl on ESPN. The following
day, he will attend the Alabama-Penn St. game. Bowden coached
at West Virginia in the late 60's to 1975. In the movie "We are
Marshall," Bowden was portrayed (accurately) with giving the new
Marshall staff all the help he could after the devastating plane crash
that took the lives of 75 Marshall football players, coaches and sup-
porters in 1970. His WVU team of 1970 had one game to play after
the plane crash. WVU was at Maryland. The Mountaineers won the
game 20-10 while sporting green crosses and the letters MU on
their helmets in tribute. The irony of that era was Bowden had been
offered the head coaching job at Marshall in 1969. He turned it
down and became the head coach at WVU in 1970.
It's always too early for the Heisman Trophy race but I have
my Top 5 anyway. Who will win it in 2010? Let's take a look at the
field.
1. Mark Ingram, Alabama running back, deserves to be on the
top considering he is the reigning Heisman Trophy holder. It will
take a sub-par year from him or a great year by another for Ingram
not to repeat.
2. Noel Devine, West Virginia running back, came back for
his senior season to take care of unfinished business. He has rushed
for 3,381 yards in three seasons. This summer he was called "The
Most Explosive Back in College Football" by one publication.
Noel has said he wants to shoot for a 2,000-yard season in 2010 but
did put team goals first in a recent interview. WVU calls itself
"Running Back U." The Mountaineers have had a 1,000 rusher 13
of the last 14 seasons backing up that statement.
3. Ryan Mallet, QB Arkansas, passed for 3627 yards with 30
touchdown throws in 2009. If he returns 100% from a foot injury,
he could light up the SEC from the air.
4. Case Keenum, QB Houston, threw for 5,671 yards and 44
touchdowns in 2009. Yes, it is Houston from Conference-USA.
Maybe not the SEC or PAC 10 but don't discount this guy. The
Cougars have many top-notch players around him as well.
5. Kellen Moore, Boise St. QB, returns after leading his team


WE'RE HERE TO HELP YOU RECOVER.

New Contact Information and Procedures for Individuals and Businesses

to File Claims for Costs and Damages resulting from the

Deepwater Horizon Incident of April 20, 2010

The Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF), administered by Kenneth R. Feinberg, has been established
to assist claimants in filing claims for costs and damages incurred as a result of the oil spill resulting
from the Deepwater Horizon Incident of April 20, 2010. Claims previously filed with the BP. Claims
Process have been transitioned to the new GCCF Claims Facility for review, evaluation and determination
by the GCCF.

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0 0 0I o 0 o
fT9Mt!9-StViM 2Li OIQ


Contactenos para obtener
informaci6n en espafiol.


H~y lien he v6i chung t6i de c6
thong tin baing tieng Viet.


August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5B
to an undefeated season in 2009. He passed for 3,536 yards with 39
touchdowns and ONLY three interceptions. It would be a stunner if
a player from Boise won the Heisman but he deserves the mention.
Now, let us look at the Top 10 Teams in 2010. Next week, we will
look at teams from 11-20 and make the conference championship
predictions for 2010. We will also look at the Tampa Bay Bucs
2010 season along with conference expansions and NCAA crack-
downs across the country. Here is the Top 10 going into 2010.
1. Alabama-Nick Saban welcomes back a stocked offense
led by a Heisman winner and a QB who has not lost a game since
middle school. The defense lost about all the starters but Saban has
recruited well and not much of a drop-off is expected. Until some-
one knocks them off the top of the mountain, Alabama will stay
right there. Key Games are Florida and Penn St. at home and LSU
and Arkansas away.
2. Florida-Urban Meyer too has recruited very well and will
restock the Gator defense as well as the offense as both return just
5 starters. Key Games are Alabama and FSU away. LSU is home.
UF has many players who started part time in 2009. It would be
misleading to think the Gators are lacking experience.
3. Boise St.-If BSU can beat Virginia Tech in Landover,
Maryland and Oregon St. at home, there is no reason to believe the
Broncos will not go undefeated again. If you are one who loves the
underdog to throw monkey wrenches into the system, this is your
team to follow.
4. Texas-Mack Brown is always in the hunt. 13 starters
return from the National Championship Game loser but the real
story is the play of QB Garrett Gilbert. There will not be much of
a drop-off in Austin.
5. Iowa-Somebody has to be the best in the Big 10. Why not
the Hawkeyes? They have 14 starters back from an 11-2 bowl win-
ner. They play Penn St., Ohio St. and Wisconsin at home. This team
is very fundamentally sound and is my pick to surprise the Big 10.
6. TCU-Mountain West leader should be as good as the 12-
1 2009 team. If they can take care of Oregon St. in the opener and
BYU at home, they should run the table with 16 starters returning.
Gotta love the Hored Frogs.
7. Oregon-The Pac 10 Ducks return 19 starters from a 10-
win team in 2009. The offensive line returns intact and the run
game should take pressure off a new QB.
8. West Virginia-The Beast of the Big East returns 18
starters, including All-Americans Noel Devine and Robert Sands in
the secondary (The Nation's Hardest Hitter). The defense is like the
cable station Chiller. It's not good, it's SCARY good. 1996 saw
WVU have the nation's top defensive team. The 2010 version
could be just as good. The offense should be good for 450-plus
yards per game as well.
9. Wisconsin-Badgers return 16 starters from a 10-win team
that defeated Miami in the Champs Sports Bowl. Big John Clay is
one of the top backs in college football. Reminiscent of RonDayne
is the big man. Iowa has Ohio St. at home but plays Iowa on the
road.
10. Nebraska-Huskers will be moving on to the Big 10 but
2010 should see them improve on last season's 10 wins as 17
starters return. I will miss those Oklahoma-Nebraska games.




Frank ie's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now AcceptingH
Hours:
S i Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
A8i9c


1.800.916.489 3 (T o c-Free o Multilingual~r1Iwww. GULFCOAS TCL M i s I LITY.CO


I---.-----.INFO@GCCF-CLAIMS.CO MPI- TTY: 1.866.682.1758 8:19c '- ls II I







6B The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010


The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted


Classifieds


Agriculture
PASTURE FERTILIZING specializ-
ing In small acreage. BW Land
and Cattle. 941-391-1277.
8:12-9:16p
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


04 CHEVY SILVERADO $5850.
Cash. 781-1062. 8:19c
2004 FORD TAURUS $3,750.
Cash, must sale. 781-1062. 8:19c
1993 CAPRICE CLASSIC. All
power, runs great. 773-4192 leave
message or cell 863-273-9219,
don't leave message on cell.
7:22-8:19p
WE BUY JUNK CARS. 863-781-
4460. 1:14tfc
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
cars. Pickup available. Crooms
Salvage. 781-3767. 2:7tfc


Miscellaneous Yard Sales








Seeking full time farm/production
manager for Hardee County blueberry
farm. Must be willing to learn and ask
questions. Prefer someone with 3 plus
years management and agricultural
production experience. Candidate
must be able to lead and manage
people. Bilingual preferred but not
necessary. College degree and basic
computer skills. Competitive salary
and benefits with the potential for
improvement. Call 863-324-2100 to
inquire about position. Ask for Bo. c8:1p


1 ac. high & dry. Approx. 269 ft. road frontage-deed restricted.
$29,900.
3BR 2 Bath DW. All appliances, window treatments, ceiling fans in-
cluded. Very nice home in excellent condition. Sets on 5.2 ac.
$129,000.
Very nice 1980 M.H. 1982 sq. ft., fully furnished, move in ready,
includes linens, dishes, cookware, TV, most anything you will need.
This is a great buy at $48,000.
3 BR 2 Bath 1987 DW 1890 sq. ft. all the extras including security
system. 5 acres with beautiful oaks and stocked pond. Reduced
$120,000.
3BR 2B 2005 DW Mobile Home Very Modern all appliances
set on 5.4 acres all fenced w/pond $130,000.
Hwy 17 frontage-1BR 1 Bath home sits on 50 x 152 lot in Bowling
Green. $84,500.
2BR, 2B 1498 sq ft home sets on 4 1/2 acres in very quiet setting
halfway between Wauchula and Avon Park. $85,000. cl8:19c

Elva* h idden*BAsoia
211 OranqeAve. W- lla, FL 33873


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker i James V. See, Sr., Broker


REDUCED! Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath
home with 2 car garage and large fenced lot.
Located 1 block from YMCA. $93,500
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home
recently remodeled including in-ground
pool. Located on a dead end street in a great
neighborhood. Won't last long at $220,000!
Nice lot in Torrey community with frontage
on Hole Number 6 of Torrey Oaks Golf
Course. Owner will build to suit. Lot $14,900
Great home on several large lots In
Wauchula. Never been for sale before.
Hardwood floors under carpet in bedrooms.
Central air/heat. Massive brick fireplace. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking
$229,000
45 ac citrus grove. Valencias & Hamlin.
Double wide mobile home. Fruit proceeds
included (subject to FOM contract). Located
in NE Hardee County. $427,500
Beautiful home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath house
with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. $475,000
1/2 acre Commercial business lot in
Wauchula. 6' security fence & gates. Office
& storage shed. All utilities ready for your
business. $92,500.


Realtor Associates
m Ben Gibson (941)737-2800 Robert Jones
1 1 Calvin Bates (863)381-2242 John H. Gross
Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161 Rick Knight


$20 EACH-COMFY SOFA, dining
table, 32" TV, leather recliner, tod-
dler bed. 781-5282. 8:19p
MAPLE DINETTE SET with 4
chairs $100.863-735-0757. 8:19p


LOOKING FOR A ALF ADMIN.
level 2 (FBI) background training
and high school diploma. 863-
781-0982. 8:19p
SERVICE TECHNICIAN with
mechanical knowledge, a strong
background in heavy equipment
and auto.mechanics a plus. Also,
would like individual to have
knowledge of electrical circuits/
electronics. Experience in at least
one of theabove is necessary.
Pay is based upon experience
and qualifications. For appoint-
ment/application call (863) 773-
2213. EOE DFW 7:29tfc


9 GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depotg
863-382-0600


Rick Knight


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


RI
c18:19c


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2ttc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


3BR/1BA LAKE ACCESS to Lake
Buffum, $90.000, 863-781-3090.
8:19,26c
HOUSE AS IS $45,000.
Chamberlain Blvd., Wauchula. if
no answer, leave message, 863-
773-6169. 8:19,26p
309 GOOLSBY ST. 3BR, 1B cen-
tral A&H. $49,900. 781-1062.
8:19c
HOME IN TENNESSEE on 1 1/4
acres. Great community (includes
second house on property).
Three story, plus basement. 5 BR,
2 B, wrap around porch, 2 fire-
places, recently remodeled, new
roof, 3 out buildings, fencing.
Knoxville area. Furnished
$119,000. 423-754-6979, 423-921-
0307, Captain Ed. Price nego-
tiable. See at sharits.com.
8:19-9:1p


MUST SALE $152,000 2006 MFH,
2100 sq.ft;, 5 Acres, 5BR/3BA,
major appliances, great condi-
tion. By appointment 941-426-
2161. Leave Message. 7:1-8:19p


WILL TRADE 23' ENCLOSED
three axle horse trailer for con-
struction work. 863-773-9122..
8:19p
LOVESEAT $50 OBO; 2
microwaves $10 each; computer
monitor $30.735-0611. 8:12,19p
1 CEMETERY LOT, Wauchula
Cemetery. $600. 256-732-3514.
7:29-9:20p


iEARTLAN)
REAL ESTATE CORP.

Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
` *Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


Featured Properties
* Great development potential! 9.5 acre tract with a creek running
thru it, fully fenced & cleared. Call!
* Immaculate, Newly remodeled 3BR, 2BA. Sits on 2.16 acres in a very
desirable country setting, minutes from town!
* 8.5 acre parcel, zoned commercial, corner of Hwy 17 & 62 in
Wauchula! Road frontage, city utilities.
* 127 Acres Improved pasture land, scattered Oaks-has been split
into 20 acre tracts.
* 196 Acre w/ 3br/2ba Cypress Log Home-Annual income from the
sale of oranges, cattle, and hay. Call!
Mikey Colding (863) 781-1698
Other Properties Available
Lakefront Listings
* Spectacular 7 acres on Lake Letta, 6400 + Sq Ft home, 5 acres
citrus, covered dock, many extras! Call Jeri Wohl (863) 381-8595
S5000+ SQ FT Brick home, 8.39 acres on Lake Placid, 230' lake front-
age, Dock! Call Marty Wohl (863) 381-2179
* 13.5 Lakefront acres! Private estate or develop up to 15 home sites,
boat basin, concrete boat ramp, 2 BR cottage, fenced, city utilities!
Call Jeri Wohl (863) 381-8595
* Build your estate home or divide, 2.92 acres on Dinner Lake,
Close to Sebring, High & Dry with large oaks. Call Jeri Wohl
(863) 381-8595
Please visit our website at o
www.HeartlandRE.net c


MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIAN
CF Industries, Inc., a major phosphate fertilizer producer, is current-
ly seeking an experienced electrician for its mining operation in
Hardee County.
The successful candidate should posses 5-10 years experience as an
industrial electrician specifically in troubleshooting, medium voltage,
automation/control, and telemetry. Electrician certification & CDL
licensure would be a plus.

CF offers a very competitive wage and benefits package. For consid-
eration, apply at:
Heartland Workforce
205 Carlton Street
Wauchula, FL
Equal Opportunity Employer cl8:12,19c

y-,


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
EXCELLENT CONDITION! Very neat and
clean, newly painted home in Wauchula, close to
schools, shopping and medical facilities,
3B/2Bth, good floor plan, plenty of closet and
storage space, updated in 2004, wheel chair
accessible. $155,000
LOCATED IN FAMILY NEIGHBORHOOD
this 4B/3BTH CB/Stucco home has a large
kitchen, living room with w/b fireplace, double
garage, 3324 heated space, mother-in-law suite
and much more. $165,000
BARGAIN PRICED! D/W Mobile Home locat-
ed in Wauchula; 3B/2Bths, all appliances and
some furniture, 10x12 outside storage, complete-
ly sodded St. Augustine lawn with automatic
sprinkler system. $40,000
HERITAGE HOME 3B/2Bth, 2 gas fireplaces,
recently updated inside, nice yard with gazebo.
Call to see! $120,000


1 SERVICE Y(
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
SEE MORE LISTINGS AT
www.lambertrealty.net
Lovely inside and out this updated and spacious
honfe has it all! 3252 sq. ft., 4B/3Bth, all stainless
appliances, washer & dryer, fantastic curb
appeal, underground sprinklers. $259,000
See this 2B/1Bth M/H with nice yard and large
screened porch; completely furnished. $38,000
EASTERN HARDEE 10 Acres, fenced, 8" well
and pond located on property. $85,000
Highway 64 home and 6.04 acres; 3B/2Bth mod-
ular home built in 2001, carpet and tile floors,
garage, screened porch, washer/dryer, shed for
storage. $225,000
MAKE AN OFFER on this 3B/1.5Bth C/B home
with new kitchen appliances, like new A/C and
roof. Listed at $125,000
We have several 5 ACRE TRACTS priced from
$45,000 to $85,000
252.52 Acres listed at $4300 per acre
14.74 Acres @ $135,000


)U CAN COUNT ON U
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132 FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida. edu


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


LEAD CASE MANAGER,
FLORIDA FARMWORKER JOBS AND EDUCATION PROGRAM
Full-time, year-round, grant-funded position to assist in
recruiting, evaluating, counseling, training and job attainment
assistance for qualified participants in the Florida Farmworker
Jobs and Education Program in Highlands, Hardee and DeSoto
counties. Bachelor's degree required in Counseling, Education,
Business, or related field. Master's degree preferred. Case
management experience preferred. Experience in student
recruitment, counseling, and placement preferred. Experience in
coordination of state and Federal grant projects is preferred.
Florida Farmworker Program experience strongly preferred.
Bilingual (English/Spanish/Creole) communication skills
required. Starting salary range: $32,000-$35,000 plus a
comprehensive benefits package, including retirement,
health/life insurance, and sick leave. Application deadline:
8/24/10. Please visit our website for more information.1
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cl8:19c


DESOTO COUNTY




EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 5


2 BR/2 BA mobile home in Punta Gorda.
Located on a deep water canal that leads
into Charlotte Harbor. Buyer concessions
possible. $125,000!
Lake June House! 4 Bedroom, 4 1/2 Bath
with over 200 feet on Lake June. Includes
Jacuzzi, Sauna, Dock & Boathouse.
$780,000
GOLF COURSE HOME! Beautiful 3 bed-
room, 2 bath with upstairs game room or
den. On golf course. Stainless steel appli-
ances with solid surface countertops.
Carpet & tile floors. 3 car garage.
Approximately 2,500 sf living with 10' ceil-
Ings and crown molding. Asking $227,500.
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9
1/2 acres. County road access, next to
Wauchula. Home is complimented with
screened back porch and in-ground pool.
Land also has 7 1/2 acres of producing nurs-
ery. $430,000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute
house with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
POOL Homel 3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath home.
Double French doors open up to the huge
porch and pool area. $178,900.


- ----- '"







August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7B.


The


Classifieds


FOR .SALE SINGLE WIDE
furnished newly renovated inside,
large covered front porch, above
ground pool, deck, 2 utility sheds,
on an acre of land, located on
Steve Roberts Special.
863-735-1701. 8:5-9:2p

U-
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on
9/17/10 at 10:30 AM the following
vehicles will be sold for towing
and storage charges pursuant to
F.S. 713.78.
1994 PONT 4 DOOR
VIN# 1G2NE5538RC746106
1992 FORD PK
VIN# 1FTEX15H5NKB56665
1998 CHEV 2 DOOR
VIN# 1G1JC1243W7176454
Sale will be held at Roberts
Towing 377 Old Dixie Hyw.,
Bowling Green, FL 33834.
863-375-4068
Lienor reserves the right to bid.
c18:19c


FREE TO GREAT Animal-loving
family. Brother and sister kittens,
863-382-9259 (local call). 8:19nc


AUGUST PLANT SALE. Three gal-
lon lavender crape myrtle bushes
and confederate jasmine $6.
White and lavender crape myrtle
trees, 5-6 feet tall, $20. Center Hill
Nursery, 2949 Center Hill Road.
Off Hwy. 62, 4.5 miles west of US
17. 863-223-5561. 8:19nc


3 LOTS CORNER OF Peterson St.,
Wauchula. $10.000. 863-773-6169
after 5pm. 8:19,26p
JUST REDUCED. 1 1/3 ACRE just
outside Wauchula city limits. 2"
well and power pole. Suitable for
house or mobile home. $ 29,900.
863-328-0325. 7:22-8:19p


3BR/1 1/2BA house in Wauchula.
863-773-0166. 8:19p


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
2007 KYOO Vitality 50 4T Blue
VIN# RFBU3A0307B130256
10:30 A.M., SEPT. 2"', 2010
HILL'S TOWING, INC.
4205 US HWY 17 N. s
BOWLING GREEN, FL 33834


oDeoto Applianceo

S Repair
Established Since 1987 & Repair
SALES SERVICE

* 863-773-3573

Fax 863-773-0521 108 Carlton Street
desotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchula, FL 33873





Serving the State of Florida
SPECIALIZING IN
FILL DIRT SITE WORK PREP
DOT FILL PONDS
ROCK DITCHING
KILLINGS DEMOLITION
HEAVY AND LIGHT TRANSPORT HAULING
We have 2-Lowboys


Hardee










I any Ve

Monday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm
Wauchula
(sacoa Irom
Firt atllanai lLi
Bank)7 7
773-6667 Maina


Car




-- -



500
hide wi
ust Bring
Immure
( -n



Billy Hill
Owner


2BR, 2 1/2 B MH, $550 month plus
deposit. 863-781-3584 or 863-781-
0158. Ask for Melissa or Will.
8:19p
3 BR, 1 BATH NEW paint & floor-
ing, central A&H. $650 month,
$450 dep. pets ok with $200 pet
dep. 720 E. Bay St., Wauchula.
Contact Mike 816-206-9483.8:19p


3 BR FENCED yard, city limits,
$650 month, no pets. 863-781-
2360. 8:19,26p
NICE CLEAN ONE Bedroom
apartment. Screened porch and
washer/dryer hookup. $120 per
week, damage deposit and refer-
ence required. 773-9793 or 863--
832-0676. 8:19p
1 BR, 1B DUPLEX, 316 S. 11th
Ave., Wauchula. $400 month, first
and last. 245-6304. 8:19p
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, Double-
wide, garage on 10 acres.
$600/month, first, last and $200
deposit. Call Tom 863-735-1801.
8:19,26p
3BR/1BA, LAKE ACCESS to Lake
Buffum, $600/month, $400
deposit. Available furnished or
unfurnished. 863-781-3090.
8:19,26c
3BR/2BA, DOUBLEWIDE MH, 1
mile from Wauchula, no pets, no
smoking, $500 deposit, $650
monthly, 781-3570. 8:12,19c
2BR, 1B UPSTAIRS apartment
$700 per month, utilities inc. No
pets, no smoking. 773-6255.
8:12,19c
THREE BEDROOM House In
Wauchula, AC, $800 plus deposit,
832-1984. 8:12-9:9p
ROOMS OR HOUSE FOR RENT
4544 Seminole Trail, Wauchula.
863-781-5828. 8:12,19p
TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX AC
$550 plus deposit. No pets. 832-
1984. 8:12-9:9p


BOWINm G GEE Qua UB


Company





i I I l


OFF

ith Coupon I
Coupon
Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7:30 pm
Wauchula Hills
~rd 7 F & R 0d
Ruby 773-2011


Carol's
Pool Service

Back Under

Original

Ownership &


SManagement


Serving Hardee

County


Licensed & Insured


1;s9 Ll TO


C18:19C
~.._.. I....~- /-- -A..


APTT -H-OUSES FOR RENT or
Sale. 773-6667. 8:19p
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo-up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol (863) 698-4910
or 698-4908. 8:20tfc


WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack Ullrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh




Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Heam's Auto Cleaning Service


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleam
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs


Licensed and Ins


c,:9C (863) 735-1495


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
sured Re.#MV.40625


"No job's too big."

Yourtirlt qu


S5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager Carl Kelly -ASE Certified Mechanic






New Tires Include
Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires


BIG SALE ON

ALL TIRES.
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
I VISA "(across from
A ... Wal-Mart)


THE PALMS

SAvailable for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through August 31st
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 /
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider d8:5c26,


1 BR 1 BATH DUPLEX. Very clean,
no smoking, no pets. $550
month, $500 sec. 773-9291, 781-
1528. 4:22tfc
NICE LARGE 1 BR APT., 505 High
Street, Wauchula, $450 month.
781-9129. 8:19,26p
HOUSES AND APARTMENTS for
rent. 773-0123. 7:29-8:26p
MOBILE HOME 2/2 Charlie Creek,
$500 monthly, $300 security. 781-
4460. 7:15tfc



NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:1 8tfc


---- ---
HEARTLAND POOL Maintenance
and Supplies. Serving the area 20
years. Commercial and Resid-
ential. heartlandpools@-embarq-
mail.com Free estimates. Lewis
Wells II, owner. 863-990-6658.
8:12,9:2p
RJ LAWN CARE. Free estimates.
NO CONTRACTS! 863-448-3255.
8:5-9:2p
AFFORDABLE SMALL ENGINE
repair service and repair of mow-
ers, atv's, outboards, etc. Quality
work with reasonable rates. Over
10 years experience. References
available. Call Derek @ 863-474-
1281. 7:22-8:19p
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel'
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.,
More Information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc


II
Foryou sot al


W/ ash & Wax
L X Vacuum, Shampoo,

*t TfllLlf Wi| *- || Air Freshener
Complete Outside &
(8631 381-3523 Inside
CARS, TRUCKS & RV'S
OPEN (7) DAYS A WEEK

We Are Mobile We Come To You!


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773-4478




Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experiencenon







Joe L.Davis
lo
~JO~eI~;-i~iiPj~i"lei~


IN C.,


Kenny Sanders
863-781-0153


REA


L T 0 R 8
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
JOHN JI. O'NEAL


See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.


14 acs on private rd, creek,
pasture & woods, zoned A-1.
$112,000!
Never lived in! New 3BR/2BA,
1700SF CB home in Zolfo
Springs w/carport, large yard,
tile/carpet floors! $131,000!
The gorgeous Peace River
awaits you! 1.14 acs w/over
200' of frontage on the river,
city of Wauchula utilities!
$45,000
Your piece on the Peace River!
2 adjacent parcels, 7.8 acs for
$219,000, 8.6 acs for $225,000!
Buy both for $398,000! Possible
owner financing!
Dble rd frontage on SR
62/Moye Rd! 10 ac Val grove
has 6" well, diesel power unit,
drain tile, micro-jets! $130,000!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!
Grab your canoe, paddle, tent!
5 acs of native Florida has
deeded access to Peace River!
Culvert in place! $100,000!
4BR/2.5BA home w/0.31 ac lot
on Fl Ave. $165,000!
3BR/2BA CB home in
Wauchula remodeled w/new
windows, floors, cabinets, coun-
tertops, paint. $85,000!


Two beautiful building lots in
Zolfo zoned R-1A, each
155'x110'. City water available,
septic allowed. $15,000 each!
Ideal for farming! 21.86 ac
pasture is fenced, has well, close
to town. $186,500!
3BR/2BA brick home w/1238
SF has privacy fenced backyard
& spacious kitchen/dining
room. $99,800!
Attention Farmers! Custom
3BR/2BA home on 12 acs
w/barn, horse stalls, fencing,
certified organic irrigated
fields. $375,000!
Looking for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5
ac high/dry fenced parcels on
private rd! $45,000 for vacant
5 acs! $65,000 for 5 a;s w/well
& septic!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!
5 lots in Wauchula w/over 975'
total rd frontage. Close to hospi-
tal, schools & shopping. Will
divide or all for $95,000!
Beautiful country setting & lots
of wildlife on 22 acs. 2-story
3BR/2.5BA CB home, fireplace
& large screened back porch.
Located halfway between
Wauchula & Avon Park.
$389,900!


S REALTORASSOCIATESAFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS..........781-0153 SANDY LA RRISON..... 832-0130
JUAN DELATORRE......781-1128 MONICA REAS ..........7810888
DAVID ROYAL.......-..781-3490 KAREN O'NE.L............781-7633
'ifdlG~AY 17 SOUTTH, WAUCIHUlA, FL 33873 cB:19


Licensed and Ins


,


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- -~I-SSBb~-YB- 1_1


Mon Sat
ain 6 pml


I


vows






8B The Herald-Advocate, August 19,2010





-The


DO YOU NEED A WEBSIT
BUILT? Call Doug 863-397-9840.
5:Ttfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the comer
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS.ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


DRIVER, PHYSICALLY fit worker.
With double cab truck. 3 hr. return
trip. $150 plus gas. Load +
unload. Possible 3 day stay. Other
jobs. 954-629-4486. 8:19p


SAT. ANTIQUE STOVE, clothe
toys, le tof oher stuff. 408 th
Ave. across from Burger King.
8:19p
SATURDAY, 8-7, 614 East
Saunders St., Wauchula. Lots of
everything. 8:19p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-?, 301
Georgia St., Wauchula. Bunk bed
with mattress, electric stove,
clothes, misc. 8:19p
712 EAST OAK ST., WAUCHULA.
Saturday, 8am-?. 8:19p
SATURDAY, 8-?, 1725 SR 64 W. 2-
seat go cart with roll bar, needs
work. Stair-climber, weight set,
lots of misc. 8:19p
MULTI FAMILY, SATURDAY 8:30
am. Furniture, other misc. Items.
Florida Ave. across from ball
field. 8:19p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-?, 3208
Perdue Rd. Some furniture, misc.,
plants. So much to list come
take a look. 8:19p
FRIDAY, SAT. TOOLS, furniture.
224 East 4th St., Zolfo Springs.
8:19p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-?. 607
Saunders Street, Wauchula. Lots
of everything. 8:19p


II 1
Stenhanie Guale Computer Tech 11


Phone (863) 781-9720


Ss.guglet(guglescomputerservices.com www.GuolesComputerServices.com




YARD SALE
HOUSE FULL OF FURNITURE
Plus Household Misc. Excercise Equipment
SATURDAY ONLY 8am-?
1161 Downing Circle Wauchula
(863) 448-3255
Dealers Welcome t



HWil's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAROI
Buy u

0 VE^B5IB9^^B5c^EBA uB9E1 u
B.411orSrice estR1Cj3


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F-L IH -Y- .


DAVE HALL


-..- WHE

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Classifiseds


Letter To Editor:
125,000 Acres in Hardee
Is Too Much To Mine
Dear Editor: privileged sons of the execu-
I would like to thank Mr. tives and engineers of IMCC
Pilliard for his response to my and W.R. Grace. We had free
lengthy letter to The Herald- rein on phosphate lands and
Advocate of July 29 titled "3PR there were abandoned pits
President Explains S. Fort everywhere so I've seen it all.
Meade Mine Lawsuit." I wel- More than I ever wanted to see
come his remarks. I think that when some of my peers
dialogue on this topic in a pub- began bringing mutant frogs to
lic forum is long overdue, class frogs that they had cap-
I have said previously that tured in old mine pits with an
offering up 125,000 acres of extra appendage (leg) in back!
Hardee County to the mining I am well aware that today
industry (like a lamb to the some of those old mine sites
slaughter) is not something we have been developed for resi-
can sleep through and wake up dential housing. I am also aware
later to find the sun shining. I that according to EPA insiders
am always surprised that there 40,000 people in the Lakeland
is virtually no expression of area could be living in danger-
opinion, no debate on the sub- ously radioactive home envi-
ject, in our community, not ronments. The 2001 "Expanded
even among our elected offi- Site Inspection" or Tenoroc
cials. Report (2001) states: "Elevated
To me it is an issue of huge levels of radiochemical and
proportion which will deter- inorganic constituents have
mine the very existence of life been detected in soil samples
in this county as it has been collected from former tailings
known, forever changing the areas, clay settling ponds, and
landscape, the hydrology, the the former processing ("benefi-
economic base, and the agricul- ciation") operations area locat-
tural heritage. Everyone's life ed on TFMA (Tenoroc) proper-
here will be affected by it if the ty. Inorganic elements and
mining industry's designs radionuclides are concentrated
unfold without impediment. through the beneficiation
I can understand Mr. process that extracts the phos-
Pilliard's sentiments since he phate material. These materials
has earned his livelihood as an are then released into the envi-
employee in the phosphate ronment in the tailings and clay
industry for the past 33 years. pond sediments."
His arguments do not differ I believe Hardee County
front what his employers have would be a better place without
nade their gospel in all public phosphate mining because of
relations media (e.g people the long-term impacts on our
=an't grow food without mining agricultural and water re-
geologic phosphorus). I guess sources, the toxic pollution it
JSDA Certified Organic prod- inevitably brings and the irre-
lets are a scam. versible imprint it will leave on
By way of introduction I the landscape (i.e. CSA's).
would like him to know that I Perhaps the county could
mo not a stranger to the phos- absorb some limited mining,
hate mining industry either. I but 125,000 acres is completely
ived in south Lakeland from unacceptable, and I see no evi-
946 till 1964, when I graduat- dence that the current genera-
d from high school. My tion of community leaders are
father's first job in Florida was doing anything to prepare for
s an engineer for IMCC. That this onslaught. I agree with cur-
Ab lasted one year and he sub- rent candidates who envision a
equently went into business for revitalization of oulr agricultural
himself never looking back economy.
nd happy to be shed of the By the way, Mr. Pilliard, my
hosphate industry, business is not "a resort" which
Mulberry in those days was a makes it sound as though it is
athletic sight the industry was an enclave for the wealthy. It is
regulated, everything was a retreat where people of mod-
oated with toxic dust, and est means can come and spend
hcre was no attempt at recla- some time peacefully in the
nation. I grew up among the Florida woods to try to regain a
healthier perspective on their
otherwise busy lives.
S (As regards the current debacle
C H v Rw1E 1,a r over the South Fort Meade
SmMine Extension, please see the
Remarks we have published in
iv Jweepu. our paid advertisement in this
newspaper.)


DAVE'S SPECIAL OF THE WEEK


DIESEL, LEATHER, TRAILER ToW,
NAVIGAtON, FULL POWER,
ExRA CLEAN
WAS

THIS WEEK ONLY
$38,750
1 405 U.S. Hw~y 17 S., Wauohula


S Prices exclude taxes, tag & $699 dealer fee. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Dealer not responsible for typographicalq ern. SA tie'



). ANDREW GIRoux, D.M.D.

FAMILY DENTISTRY

773-9344
322 S. 6th Ave. Wauchula



Now IN NETWORK
i: for
BC/BS FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE
Insurance Provider for
SHARDEE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
CITY OF WAUCHULA
r -' & FINR


. PLEASE CALL TODAY
.N FOR YOUR DENTAL CHECK-UP!
a' The patient and any other person responsible for pymo tle has a righl lo
,i' ; ' t refuse to pa, cancel pa)mernl, r he rebmlmra d fir payment for a' other
i Iernice, eruminslton, or treatment hll ib ~r a a resmll o and
S within ,2 hours or responding to the adtert menn or the fr dlscounled
fia I'-II ee,. or reduced fee service, examlation, or treatment.


Yours truly,
Dennis Mader
Lily


I


Hg il--B il- I--

Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net Re
Specials Of The Week

Specials Of The Week


ia~P"cw -..-; r "a,' -.. _..ir.i
REDUCED-3BR 1.5 BA CB home with carport, central
air and heat. Large high dry lot-1120+- heated area-
1500+- nder mf. Allfor $85,000.00
2BR cruld 3 CB home on corner lot 1400+.- heated -
over 2 D0 sq, ft under roof. REDUCED to $75,000.00
Large SBR home with 1.7 acres in Bowling Green. Chain link
fence, around entire property over 2600 sq ft of outside storage
$69,000.00

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS Wmi HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our stiS B are on the Internet
Anyone with a computer an access them anytime!
After Hours -.:-
OraSla D. Flores (863)781-2955 JohnFreeman (886)781-4084
Nosy A.Flores (83) 781-4585 8:19c JessieSambrano (803)245-6891
r piii ilill I


,Sxch to Seacoas


Friday, August 20










Get a $25 Gift Card

Have Dinner On Us!

Local bankers with local phone numbers.
Click, call or stop in for a taste of local flavor.
Your Choice Free Checking with no strings attached
Free online banking, bill pay, e-statements & images
Free first order of checks
No monthly fee Visa' Check Card

Q9Seacoast
NATIONAL BANK
Feel Good About Your Local Bank!


202 N. 6th Avenue, Wauchula, 773-4141


www.seacoastnational.com
mmuo Limit one gift card per household. Offer may be withdrawn at any time. 8:19c


IN HoME SERVICE


HOBBY & SHERRY ALBRITTON
L-ABOCR SERVICES & SOLUTIONS





(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
robbie @ strato.net



INVITATION TO BID
The City of Bowling Green will be accepting
sealed bids for miscellaneous equipment and
one used Ford pick-up truck (not-running).
Equipment includes a used Dixie Chopper, an
edger, a weed-eater and a pick-up truck topper.
All items cai be viewed at the Public Works
Department located at 596 Lake Branch Road,
Bowling Green on work days between 7 a.m.
and 4 p.m. Please contact Amy O'Bryan, Office
.Manager, at 863- 781-3275 for appointments.
Interested bidders can bid on each item or all
items. Envelopes must be sealed and clearly
marked "Bid: Public Works Equipment (name
of the equipment)". Bids will be submitted to
the City Clerk, City Hall, 104 E. Main Street, PO.
Box 608 Bowling Green, FL 33834 on or before
4:00 p.m., Friday, September 10, 2010. All bids
will be open at September's regular city
commission meeting. The city reserves the
right to accept or reject any or all bids.
City of Bowling Green 8:19









GE ONE


3-01r T 326
16P 4S
935 05-06-0
Ty OF FLORIDP'
VERS I F LO R jo vilsORY
404 iBRAR'P OFSF
41, LLE ,261-0001
GAIEESVtLL L


Football Season Starts Aug. 27


BO JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's barely a week away.
Hardee Wildcat football takes
the field next Friday.
The 'Cats open in the Pre-
Season Classic at home against
the Lake Placid Green Dragons
in a 7 p.m. game. Most of the
games this season are at 7 p.m.,
instead of the familiar 7:30.
The Wildcats may have a new


look this season, with quarter-
back Ezayi Youyoute now
playing for Georgia Southern
University, and several other
key graduates now missing
from the lineup.
However, Hardee has a
baker's dozen of up-coming
seniors, 18 juniors, four sophs
and a lone freshman to fill the
2010 roster.
The 'Cats also have a new


Sports Schedule Aug. 19-Sept. 2
Aug. 23 Schools reopen, practice schedules posted.
Aug. 27 Varsity FB Lake Placid HOME 7 p.m.
Aug. 30 Boys Golf Pt. Charlotte Away 4:30 p.m.
Volleyball Sebring Away 6/7:30p.m.
Aug. 31 Boys Golf DeSoto Away 4 p.m.
Swimming Jenkins Away 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 2 Swimming Tri-Meet HOME 5:30 p.m.
JV Football Avon Park HOME 7 p.m.


2010 HARDEE VARSITY FOOTBALL
SCHEDULE


Aug. 27
Sept. 3
Sept. 10
Sept. 17
Sept. 24
Oct. 1


Lake Placid
Fort Meade
Sebring
Palmetto
Frostproof
Avon Park


Oct. 8 Immokalee *
Oct. 15 Open
Oct. 22 Estero *
Oct. 29 Okeechobee #
Nov. 5 DeSoto *
Nov. 11 Lakewood R. **


Home 7:00
Away 7:00
Home 7:00
Away 7:30
Away 7:00
Home 7:00
Away 7:30


Home 7:00
Home 7:00
Away 7:30
Home 7:00


Head Coach: Buddy Martin
District Games *
Homecoming #
Senior Night **


head coach in Buddy Martin,
and a change in the other coach-
ing personnel as well. Steve
Rewis moves to offensive coor-
dinator, with Ray Rivas now as
offensive coordinator, and as-
sistants Rashad Faison and Lee
Thomas helping out. On hand
on most Friday nights will also
be JV head coach Rod Smith
and his assistants Barry White,
Todd Bolin and Shawn Rivers.
Suiting up for the Wildcats in
their final season are 13 seniors:
backs Tre' Anderson, Quinton
Carlton, Jarrius Lindsey, Jake
Mayer and Kareem Richardson;
receivers Brandon Darley and
Tony Rodriguez; and linemen
Jorge Ayala, Andy Hunt, John-
athan Jones, Herbert Pace,
Michael Pilkington and Austin
Prestridge
Joining them is a large junior
contingent, including backs
Colby Baker, Maxon Del-
homme, Deonte Evans, Andrew
Hooks Justin Knight and Mikey
Retana; receivers D'Vonte
Hooks, Carter Lambert and
Murrell W inter; and linemen
David Chapa, Dawson
Crawford, Manuel Delarosa,
Dylan Farr, Rito Lopez, Uvaldo
Sanchez, Dillon Skitka, Wintz
Terrell and Julian Varela.
Rounding out the roster are
sophs kicker Octavio Alvarez;
backs Aaron Barker and Vince
Grimsley; and lineman Jessie
Zuniga, along with freshman
running back Keyon Brown.
Starting almost on their heels
are the junior varsity Wildcats,
whose schedule begins with a
Sept. 2 home game against
Avon Park. All JV games are
also at 7 p.m.
Smith has a large group for
his squad of underclassmen
seeking to. improve to get to the
: varsity level.
Sophs back for a second sea-
son are Ledarius Camel, Kane
Casso, Rufino Gabriel, Miguel
Garcia, Tyshaun Hilliard, Rich-
ard Kirk, Victor Lopez, Joseph
McQuaig, Michael Moreno,


2010 Varsity Wildcats


Name
Tre' Anderson
Jorge Ayala
Quinton Carlton
Brandon Darley
Andy Hunt
Johnathan Jones
Jarrius Lindsey
Jake Mayer
Herbert Pace
Michael Pilkington
Austin Prestridge
Kareem Richardson
Tony Rodriguez

Octavio Alvarez
Aaron Barker
Vince Grimsley
Jessie Zuniga


Grade Position
12 QB/OLB
12 OL/DT
12 RB/ILB
12 WR/DE
12 OL/DT
12 OL/DT
12 RB/DB
12 RB/DB
12 OL/DE
12 OL/DT
12 OL/ILB
12 RB/DT
12 WR/DB

10 K/OLB
10 RB/LB
10 RB/ILB
10 OL/DT
Keyon Brown


Name
Colby Baker
David Chapa
Dawson Crawford
Manuel Delarosa
Maxon Delhomme
Deonte Evans
Dylan Farr
Andrew Hooks
D'Vonte Hooks
Justin Knight
Carter Lambert
Rito Lopez
Mikey Retana
Uvaldo Sanchez
Dillon Skitka
Wintz Terrell
Julian Varela
Murrell Winter
9 RB/DE


Head Coach: Buddy Martin
Defensive Coordinator: Steve Rewis; Offensive Coordinator:


Grade Position
11 QB/DB
11 OL/ILB
11 OL/DE
11 OL/DT
11 RB/LB
11 RB/DB
11 OL/DE
11 RB/DB
11 WR/DB
11 RB/LB
11 WR/DE
11 QL/DT
11 RB/DB
11 OL/DT
11 OL/DT
11 OL/DT
11 OL/DT
11 WR/DE


Ray Rivas; Assistant


Coaches: ARashad Faison and Lee Thomas
i '1 i


Noe Navarro, Ramiro Ramirez,
Andrew Reyna and Christian
Sustatia.
Moving up from the junior
high Heartland Championship
team of a year ago are freshmen
Armando Alamia Garrett Al-
britton, Joshua Aimaraz,. Gabe
Balderas, Sherman Bethea,
Jacob Bolin, Kevin Borjas,
Jacob Coronado, Felipe Cortez,
Adson Delhomme, Tyler Dun-
lap, Marco Ehrenkaufer, Lu-
cious Everett, Jesus Flores,
Juan Francisco, Isaac Garza,
Jacob Garza, David Gibson,
Joshua Gonzales, Xavier Gon-
zales, Dustin Goodwyn and
James Green.
Also Kris Johnson, Dallas
Juarez, Tristen Lanier,, Fillistin
Louisi-Michel, Wyatt Maddox,
Andrew Martinez, Miguel
Mata, Steve Metayer. James
Minton, Rufugio Moreno, Luke
Palmer, Tyler Pella, Waylan


Pleger, Caleb Purser, Steven
Rodriguez, Jose Rojas, Ruben
Sandoval, Timmy Steedley,
Gustavo Toledo, Rayquen
Williams and Luke Winter.
And, it won't.be that long
until the junior high Wildcats
start another run for the
Heartland Conference title. The
first game is Tuesday, Sept. 2.1
at home against Lake Placid,


the only team Hardee plays
twice this season. Each year, the
five teams in the Heartland,
including also Avon Park, Se-
bring and Hill-Gustat have to
schedule an odd-out game so
each gets six games in. All jun-
ior high ganes are at Wildcat
Stadium on Tuesdays at 5:30
p.m.


0 HDFLOREL


Here's the starting line up

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Alan Jay Chevrolet
Buick Pontiac
GMC Cadillac
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Brandon Ford Jarrett Ford Mercury Patriot Chevrolet
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Branaon Honda

Cannon Automotive

Central


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Alan Jay Ford
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Chrysler Dodge Ram
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Alan Jay Nissan


Alan Jay Toyota Scion

AllStar Car Sales

Bartow Chevrolet


Bartow Ford


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bft s NEfta sm OR wuyb We Cnpub re wb


Jenkins Ford
of Fort Meade

Jenkins Uncoln-Mercury
of Lakeland

Jenkins Nissan


Regal Automotive Group

Sorensen Schade
Chevrolet

Sorensen Schade
Chrysler Jeep Dodge


TC s C Tom Edwards
Citrus rysler KelleyBuick Chrysler Dodge Jeep
Jeep Dodge GMC of Bartow
Toyota of Winter Haven
Courtesy Toyota Lakeland Automall
Wells Dodge Chrysler
Dodge Chrysler Jeep Lakeland
of Winter Haven Chrysler Dodge Winter Haven Honda

Fields Huston Cadillac Lakeland Toyota Warrent Auto Sales
Buick Pontiac GMC
Buk Pontiac GMC North Tampa Wesley Chapel Nissan
Greenwood Chevrolet Chrysler Jeep Dodge Witham Chevrolet

Hill Nissan

Huston Motors Apply and get approved online, by phone or at any branch.

Jarrett Ford Lincoln www. midflorird :.:::,
Mercury Winter Haven (863) 284-LOAN



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5211 wy 17 N. Inside BP
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2C The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010





-Schedule Of Weekly Services-


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.i
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.l
Thursday Service ...............:..7:30 p.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.i
Sunday Worship ..................8:00 a.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd .........
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study .....6:00 p.r

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.r
Youth Group Sundy. ..........6:00 p.r

CHURCH OF GOD.,
121 West Broward St. 375.2231
375-3100
Sunday School ...............:...10:00 a.r
Morning Worship .......:....... 11:00 a.r
Evening Worship ................. 6:30 p.r
Wednesday ..............:..............7:30 p.n

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ................. 9:45 a.n
Morning Worship ................11;00 a.n
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.n
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ......................5:00 p.n

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.n
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.n
Wed.. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.n

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.n
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.n
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.n
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m
Wednesday Supper ..............5:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m

FIRSTUNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
Wed. Bible Study ..:................7:00 p.m

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:43 a.m
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m
Sunday Evening .......t............ 6:00 p.m
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday .....:..7:00 p.m


IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ............. ..11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.n


MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m
Morning Service ................ .11:00 a.m
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m
Communion-2nd'Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m


MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375.4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m
Disciples Training.... ..............5:00 p.m
Evening Worship ................:..7:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer Time .......7:00 p.m

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of Mason Dixon & County
Line
781-5887
Sunday Worship ............11:.....:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
RO. Bbx 780


BOWLING GREEI
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00
Sunday Service ......................6:00
Wednesday Service...............7:30

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTIST
S.' Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 1:00
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00
m. Miercoles Servico....................6:30
m.
m. REAL LIFE CHURCH.
am. 3365 Souith US Hwy 17
Morning Service ...........1.0:30
H ; Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30

m. ST. JOHN A.M.E,.CHURCH
n. 5 13 W. Orange St
375-2911
m. Sunday Church School ......;...9:30
m. Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 I

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
S18 E.Main St.
m. Sunday School ...................i10~00
Morning Worship ...............00
Evening Worship ..................600 p
Thursday Night Services, .
Evening Worship. ........7:00 [
Kidz Club. ...................7:00 i
m.. ONA
Mn.
"' : LIMESTONE BAPTiST CHUR
4868 Keystone Ave. Limeston
Comm.
Sunday School ......:...........9:45
Morning Worship ............... 11:00
Evening:Worship ..:...............6:00 i
Wednesday Prayer ..........7:00 [
M.
a. NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
B adger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p

S NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
M. 202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ...................10:00 a
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a
Disciples Trainiing................. 6:00 p
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p
Wednesday Prayer ...........:....6:00
M.
. ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
S 131 Bear Lane 773.2540
Sunday School. ...................10:00 a
.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
. 5076Lily Church Rd. 494.562
S Sunday School ......................10:00 a
. Morning Worship ............11:00 a
Evening Worship ................6:00 p
S Wednesday AWANA for Kids'
......................... ......:.........6:30 p
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p


S WAUCHULA
-.
". APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
. Martin Luther King and Apostol
n. Rd.
. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a
English Service .................. 11:30 a
General Worship Service .:....1:30 p
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p

.. CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd,
. 863-781-1624
n; hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.
n. Childcare provided at all seivi,

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel
773-0427
. Celebration Service..............10:30 a.
. Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
. Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p:
Youth Cell Group ..:...............7:00 p.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.
Call.for lIo'ations

.CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
. 6885 State Road 64 East 773-344
SPastor- James Bland
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.
Evening Worship ...........6:00 p.]
Wednesday Worship .............6:30 p.i
ChURCH OF CHRIST-
201 S. Florida Ave.,& Orange St
773-9678.
Bible Study ...........,.............. 10:00 a.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.
W wednesday ............................7:00 p.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Roadl
773.2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.i
Sunday Bible Class ............... 1:30 a.i
Sunday Evening Worihip.....6:00 p.l
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.
Men's Leadership & Trainins.Chas.
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.l
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHiRCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.


(83) 785-0470:
2olfo Springs, FL


N WAUIULA
L COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
a.m. 615 Rainey Blvd.
p.m. 257-3950
p.m. Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m
Sunday Morning Worship....1 1:00 a.m
rA Sunday Evening Service ........7:00 p.m
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m

a.m. DIOSES AMOR
a.m.
am. 807 S. 8th Ave.
p.m. E 7734576
p.m. Domingos Escuela
Dominica........... .............10:00 a.m
Servicio ..... ..........................11:00 a.m
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m
a.m. Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m
p.m.
.EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Mates Oracion ......................7:00 p.m
a.m. Jueves Servicio................:.....7:30 p.m
a.m. Viemes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m
p.m.. Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m

. ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
a.m. 501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
a.ip. Sunday School .................:. 10:00 a.m
P.M. Morning Service ................ 11:30 a.m
Evening Service.................7:30 p.m
p.m. Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.nm
p.m.. Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
CH 114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
e Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Sunday Worship :;................ 11:00 a.m
T:m. Sunday Worship ................-...6:00 p.m
a.m. Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m
.m. Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m
p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ....:...7:00 p.m
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m
m Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m
tm. Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m
P.m. Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m
P.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m

H FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. -773-4182
i.m.
a.m. SutDAY:
.. A Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m
.m. Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
).m. WEDNESDAY:
Sr..Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra ................ 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry .................... 6:00 p.m.
im. Children's Ministry ............ 6:00 p.m.
.m. Discipleship Classes............ 6:00 p.m.
.m. Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
Worship .............................. 6:00 p.m.
S Adult Choir Rehearsal ........ 7:00 p.m.
.m.
.m. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
S 1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
.m. SUNDAY
Generations Cafd Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast..........................10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
S(K-5th) ..........10:45 a.m.
S Worship Service ..........10:45 a.m.
HC WEDNESDAY,
Check-In begins for Nursery-5th
.m. grade ...................6:15 p.m.
.m. Classes for children ages PreK- 12th
.m. grade.......i..........6:30-8:00 p.m.
.m.
.m. FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Service ................. 11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ...................6:00 p.m.
.m. Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
.m. FIRST MISSIONARY
.m. BAPTIST CHURCH
ces .1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
p Sunday School .......................9:30 a.m.
I) 'Morning Service ..............1.1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
m. Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study .........................6:00 p.m.
m. Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
m.
m. FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
17 Casual Sunday Worship........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
m. Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.
m.
m. FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
m. OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
: 773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
m. Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
. Late Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
m. Wed. Family Night ...............7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
m. 223-5126
m Sunday Morning Worship....I 1:00 a.m.
m. Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
S- THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
m. Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..........:.....7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND


COMMUNITY CHURCH
. 1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
m Coffee.& Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
S Sunday School ........................ :30 a.m.
Worship ................................ 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min...........7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHIJLA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA
SIGLESIA HISPANA
S FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 91 Ave.
Martes .............. .7: 30 p.m.
Jueves ................ 7:30 p.m.
SDomingo ... .......... 10:30 p.m.
IGLESIA HISPANA
SPRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
,Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
SDomingos ..........................6:00 p.m.
Mliercoles............................7:00 p.m .

S IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
.Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
S Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service'....................2:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School .......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7.:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7;30 p.m.

S NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities (All Ages)
............. 7:00 p.m .

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.-
Wednesday Service............ ...7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services


NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship ..................(.. st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I 1:00a.m.
Evening Worship ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3" Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
S2" & 4"' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ........................ 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service


PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. :00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00,p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.


RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
.1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1...1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.'

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday .................................9:00 a.m ..


Holy D ays ........................................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ............7:00 a.m.
(English) ..................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ..................1 :00 a.m.
(Creole)....................1:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m

SQUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m
Evening Worship :.................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .... ...............10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 i.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m,
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship........ ...7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
' WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ............ .....7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m,
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ....................... 0:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ...............1.... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1...1:00 a.m
Training Union ........:............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p:m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456''
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524 773-0989
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W worship ..............................11:00 a.m .
Evening.............................. 1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet...,7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church.............1..0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & FT.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
STuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
'PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
.518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
................................................7 :00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .. ............ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ............6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ......................... 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .................... 11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night...................... 7:00 p.m.
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................. :30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................1 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones....................1.1.. 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina.............................. 1:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club.......................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio..................................8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


SEEDS
FROM
THE I
SOWER"
Michael A.Guido
MenertGeorgia


A man took his girlfriend to a
SChinese restaurant for dinner.
Looking at the menu, he asked,
"How would you like your rice -
fried or boiled?"
"Thrown," she answered.
Many are anxious to get
married. But it's better to be
happily unmarried than to be
unhappily married.
So take the Lord into your plans.
Then after marriage you won't be
bothered about alibis and alimony.
Many a marriage would be
happy if the couple remembered
this: their hearts belong to each
other but their souls belong to the
Lord.
The Bible says, "Each one of
you must love his wife as he loves
himself, and the wife must respect
her husband."

Visit us at: www. TheSowercom


Faith is the foundation of God's house; love and
forgiveness are important building blocks. God can
work through us to build and repair His kingdom...
when we shine with the love of God it is reflected
onto everyone we meet. With God's spirit dwelling
in us, we can construct and restore His kingdom on
earth...one soul at a time. Invite a friend to church
this week so that they can experience the peace,
hope and love that are found there.





Sla e SSectWdbye P nem canBiSDdo, V22906
Copygit201% KteisWllhis New NspapeW S&s, P. a Bor8187.0aelow;lsVA229M6


Priesthood ............................ 00 a.


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I






August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Men's League Has New Leader


Holy Child Wins Tournament


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
By the narrowest of margins,
Mosaic 1 now leads the 2010
Men's Community Softball
League.
A Mosaic 1 win over Mosaic
II pushed it to 10-1 (.909) while
Peace River Electric Coopera-
tive Inc. (PRECo) lost its only
game and dropped to 9-1 (.900).
Hardee Merchants, which beat
PRECo 16-14 is at 10-2 (.833)
Behind the leaders are Half-
Time Pub, Nemesis, Mosaic II,
Charlotte's Web Pub, Scared
Hitless, III Ranches and La
Ploresita.
There are two weeks of
games to catch up on, although
there were only games on Aug.
3, none on Aug. 5 because of
thundershowers. Also, the men
are now playing one game each
evening on Field 2 since the
Women's Church League fin-
ished its season.
On Aug. 3, on Field 3, Bowl
of Fun swept past La Floresita
25-18 in the early game.
David Beumel homered and
doubled and Brad Dixon raced
home on an infield homer for
Bowl of Fun. Earl Jacobs went
a perfect six-for-six at the plate.
He and Ryn Heine scored four
times apiece.
Valentin Rosales homered
three times, twice on in-the-
park homers. Sam Arreola
homered and doubled twice for
La Floresita. Arreola was the
only triple tally batter.
In the Field 3 late game,
Merchants upset PRECo 16-14.
Mario Tamayo homered and
doubled twice, and Nate Lee
also homered for Merchants.
Glenn Bergens and Brad Gil-
liard both tripled..Brent Gilliard
and Tamayo were the only
three-score batters.
Matt Provant countered with
a homer and pair of doubles for
PRECo. Billy Alexy, Josh Con-
erly and Bill Alexy each dou-
bled. Brian Alexy, Billy Alexy
and Provant circled the bases
three time each.
On Field 4, Mosaic II won
15-10 over Charlotte's Web in
the 6:45 game.
Nathan Fuller doubled three
times among his four hits and
Chris Altieri also went four for
four for Mosaic II. Hank Butler
tripled and doubled. Raul Gar-
cia and John McBride scored
four time apiece.
Mike Mimbs had the .only
long-ball hit, a double, for
Charlotte's Web. Reid Benton
.and Will Cartwright were the
only twin-tally batters. Six oth-
ers added a run apiece.
In the 8:15 game on Field 4,
Nemesis ,scooted past Scared
Hitless 33-8.
Jessie Reyes and Ruben
Rivas both nearly hit for the
cycle, with a homer, triple and
double apiece for Nemesis.
Rodney also homered. Roy
Briones and Elias Ramirez each
scored four times.
Michael Baker and Shawn
Rivers each doubled for Scared
Hitless. Bruce Judah scored
twice and Mike Garcia, Jon-
athan Pleger, Adam Kottwitz,
Weylan Pleger, Austin Judah


and Baker each added a run.
Moving to the Aug. 10
games, the early game on Field
4 was the marathon between
Mosaic I and Mosaic II, which
Mosaic I won 23-20.
Weston Johnson homered and
tripled and Hagan B. homered
and doubled twice for Mosaic I.
Jason Johnson, who doubled
and tripled, and Doug Sutton,
who homered and doubled,
each scored four times.
Hank Butler hit for the cycle
for Mosaic II, homer, single,
double, sacrifice and triple for
Mosaic II. Cody Rawls tripled
and doubled, and was the only
four-tally batter. Fuller and
Butler added three runs each.
The Field 4 late game was
another thriller, with La
Floresita winning 23-21 over
Nemesis.
Arreola homered twice, and
Rosales homered, tripled and
doubled twice for La Floresita.
Arrreola scored four times and
DinoTorres, Rivers and Rosales
were three-score batters.
Roy Briones and Ramirez
each homered for Nemesis.
Jose Gomez, Briones and
Lalito each put three runs on the
board. Joe Lucho, Elias Ra-
mirez, Ram Briones and Ra-
miro Ramirez added two runs
each.
On Field 3, Scared Hitless
nipped III Ranches 20-19 in the
6:45 game.
Baker doubled three times
and Jonathan Pleger, Kottwitz
and Rivers also doubled for
Scared Hitless. Pleger was the
only four-score batter, while
Baker scored three times of his
five times on base.
Teddy Svendsen and Mike
Garcia added three runs apiece.
Doyle Tyson homered twice
and doubled for III Ranches.
Mark McGee rounded the bases
five times, with Fred Hodges
adding triple tallies, and Mark
Timmerman, Tyson and Justin
T. adding two runs each.
The 8:15 game was also a
close encounter, as III Ranches
came back for a 13-9 win over
Charlotte's Web.
Keith Revell tripled and dou-
bled twice and Tyson also dou-
bled twice for III Ranches.
Bucky Leonard and Dale
Carlton both tripled and dou-
bled. A half dozen batters each
scored twice.
A Benton two-run homered,
Mimbs triple and pair of dou-
bles by Troy Brant paced
Charlotte's Web. Walt: Beattie
and Mimbs scored twice each
and Benton, Brant, Randy
Sonnier, Mark Jones and ,Cody
each added a run.
Last Thursday's only'Field 2
game was a 25-12 win for
Charlotte's Web over Scared
Hitless.
Mimbs homered and Will
Tyson each homered and tripled
and. Svendsen homered for
Charlotte's Webb. Beattie,
Benton, Jasper and Mimbs were
all triple-tally batters.
Drew Schock homered and
Rivers doubled twice for Scared
Hitless. Garcia tripled and
Baker doubled. Garcia and
Baker were the only batters to


cross home twice. On Field 3,
Mosaic I trounced Half-Time
Pub 26-7 in the opener.
Mike Carte homered and
doubled twice and Weston
Johnson homered and tripled
for Mosaic I. Austin Helms
tripled and doubled twice.
Carte, Helms, Johnson and
Mike Mahoney each came
home three times, while Jerry
Albritton scored four runs.
A Beumel homer and Travis
McClenithan double were the
long-ball hits for Half-Time
Pub. Leadoff batter Heine had
three hits and twin scores..
McClenithan, Beumel, Dale
Roberts, Brandon Sellers and
Justin Goss each added a run.
The Field 3 closer was a
thriller, with Half-Time edging
Charlotte's Web 13-12.
McClenithan and Jacobs both
tripled and doubled for Half-
Time. Yogi Lozano homered
and Sellers doubled twice.
McClenithan was the orily
three-score batter. Beumel and
Sellers scored twice apiece.
For Charlotte's, it was a triple
and double for Mimbs Jasper
scored three times. Beattie and
Sonnier each scored twice and
Mimbs, Ted Svendsen, Jones,
Heath and Jonathan each added
a run.
On Field 4, Merchants handi-
ly won the early game 18-1
over La Floresita.
Lester Hornbake homered
and Lamar Gilliard doubled
twice for Merchants. Brad
Gilliard' circled the bases five
times, Lamar Gilliard three
times and Harold, L.P. Horn-
bake, Nick Bergens and Glenn
Bergens each put two runs on
the board.
Arreola scored the lone run
for La Floresita. Torres, Lucho,
Rosales, Mike Davila and
Michael Holt were each strand-
ed short of getting to home
plate.
In the week's finale on Field
4, III Ranches won 29-19 over
Nemesis.
Carlton and Timmerman each
doubled twice for III Ranches.
Leonard, Brett Johnson, Carlton
and pickup player Billy Alexy
crossed home plate three times,
while Justin T. put four runs in
the book.
Isauro Figueroa homered and
doubled and Elias Ramirez
tripled and doubled for
Nemesis. Ram:Briones doubled
twice. Ramirez circled the
bases four times and leadoff
batter Lucho added three
scores.

Don't rule out working with
your hands. It does not
preclude using your head.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Three straight victories gave
Holy Child Catholic the tourna-
ment title in the 2010 Women's
Church Softball League.
Holy Child also swept
through for a narrow regular-
season title with an 12-2 record.
Wauchula First Methodist lost
to First Christian 14-6 in the
final game between these two
teams, who ended the season
with tie record, each at 11-3
Behind them were San Al-
fonso's Mission, St. Michael's
Catholic, Northside Baptist,
New Hope Baptist and Florida's
First Assembly of God. New
Hope opted riot to play in the
post-season single elimination
tournament.
The tournament was played
on Aug..9 and 10 with a pair of
games on each field on Aug. 9.
On Field 1, First Christian
dropped St. Michael's 15-4.
Chelsea Owens each tripled
and both. Amber Steedley and
Kimberly Miller doubled for
First Christian. Leadoff batter
Brittany Hines circled the bases
three times, while Steedley,
Owens and Miller had twin
trips to home plate.
Aurora Santiago was the only
two-hit batter for St. Michael's.
Melinda N., Carnen Silva, Lori
Dees and Dalia Flores all came
around to cross home plate.
The Field 1 late game was a
thriller as First Christian and
First Methodist met again. This


time, the Methodists won 7-4.
Shauntee Hines homered and
Heather Refoure and Aimee
LaRue each doubled for First
Methodist. Hines and Mary
Morgan scored twice each and
Meagan Smith, Kris, Refoure,
Halley Marshall and LaRue
each added a run.
Steedley doubled twice
among her four hits and Hines
and Stacy Smith also doubled
'for First Christian. Hines, Me-
lissa Albritton, Jessica Hays
and Steedley each scored once.
Meanwhile, on Field 2, Holy
Child won the early game 27-2
over First Assembly.
Vira Servin homered twice to
lead Holy Child. Darlene
Torres, Karina Fernandez, Lucy
Garcia, Lacey Lambeth and
Servin all crossed home plate
three times. Tara Santoya, Zita
McBride, Rosa Villegas, Beth
Garrett, Nora Compos and
Sabrina Hernandez each scored
twice.
Only Melinda Nickerson and
Vanessa Hernandez circled the.
bases for First Assembly. Teresa
Gaitan was stranded twice and
Valerie Kline and April Lozano
were also left on base.
San Alfonso won the Field 2
late game 21-6 over Northside.
Emily Starrett, Liz Woods,
Aleeza Arguijo and Stephanie
Lang all put three runs on the
board for San Alfonso. Meagan
Henderson, Kourtney Hender-
son, Penny Strange and Lori
Henderson each chipped in with


twin tallies.
Leadoff batter Caylah Coker
circled the bases twice for
Northside. Aislynn Holt, De-
sarea Newcomb, Joleyna and
pickup player Rishonea Lam-
pley each added a run.
The tournament ended on
Field 2 on Tuesday night.
In the opener Holy Child
defeated San Alfonso 19-4.
Torres put three runs up for
Holy Child, while Jamie Buck-
ley, Fernandez, Servin and
Andrea Howard had two runs
apiece.
Starratt, Donna Smith, Ar-
guijo and Angel Ussery scored
for San Alfonso.
Holy Child carried its
momentum into the champi-
onship game against First
Methodist, winning 26-14.
Howard came around to score
all four times she got on base
for Holy Child, while Torrres,
Buckley, Hernandez and San-
toyo each scored three times.
Kristina Garcia, Garrett, Lam-.
beth and Compos added twin
scores, and Fernandez, Servin
and McBride each added a run.
Leadoff batter Jennifer
Bryant crossed home plate
three times for First Methodist.'
Smith. Diane Brummett and
Refoure added twin tallies, and
Hines, Morgan, Rebekah, Kim
Tyson and Kris added a run
apiece. Jamie Rivas and Mar-
shall were stranded.


It was once believed the Leaning Tower of Pisa lost its
perpendicularity be-cause a giant rested against it.'


Re-Elect


Janice (JAN)



PLATT
Hardee County School Board, District 4

It has been a PRIVILEGE to SERVE the CITIZENS
of Hardee County for the past 12 years.

When Re Elected
, BE CONFIDENT THAT MY DECISIONS WILL CONTINUE
STO BE BASED ON THE BEST INTERESTS OF OUR :-
CHILDREN, SCHOOL EMPLOYEES AND HARDEE COUNTY

ON THE JOB 24/7 HOME 735-0730 WORK 773-3033
Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Janice (Jan) Platt, for Hardee County School Board-District 4 8:5,12,19p
S;.


S FEETDA ONY OMSINR YDT I SS T EYU UBI EVNIu
I. S S S


MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD


Mark




HONETLUCKENBACH

f for

C COUNTY COMMISSION DISTRICT 4 (R)

HONEST HONORABLE I DEPENDABLE




- -. '. Paid political advertisement, paid for and approved by Mark Luckenbach for County Commission District 4, Republican. 8 19


*** VOTE ***










City Commissioner, District #1

Let's Build A Better Wauchula
Paid for and approved by, Patricia Detwiler, for City Commissioner, Dist. 1 Non-Partisan
8:12,19p







4C The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010


His DREAM WAS To BE A


PROFESSIONAL BALL PLAYER


By BRITTANY GOUGH
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview was with Mabry Lee
Gough.
Q: Where were you born?
A: I was born in Ona.

Q: When were you born?
A: I was born Dec. 1, 1943.

Q: Did you go to school?
A: Yes, I went to Hardee County


schools.


'~ 'ii


Q: What grades ..
and subjects were *
taught? i .
A: We were taught
12 grades and they taught us science,
social studies, art, math, physical edu-
cation, and FFA (Future Farmers of
America) for four years.

Q: What kinds of chores did you
have?
A: We had many chores, but my par-
ents owned an orange grove, so mostly
I just worked on the grove every
evening when I came home from
school.

Q: In your spare time, what did
you do for fun?
A: Me and my siblings, and sometimes
friends, liked to go hunting, swimming
and fishing when we weren't busy.

Q: What was the economy com-
pared to now?
A: It was much better back then. We
had much better gas prices, and better
presidents.

Q: Have you ever been in a war?
A: After high school I went into the
Army. I was on at the South Korean


station. I worked at the DMZ, a line
that separates North Korea from South
Korea.

Q: What are your parents' names?
A: Charlie and Corine Gough.

Q: What was your fondest
moment?
A: It was having my first child, Bridget
Ward.

Q: What was your favorite year in
school and why?
, ,. A: Twelfth grade, because it
. ,was the year I got out of school.

S Q: What was your first job
and how old were you?
A: I was 22 years old when I got my
first job, at a phosphate mine.

Q: What were your dreams as a
teen?
A: I always wanted to be a profes-
sional baseball player.

Q: What were your parents like
when you were growing up?
A: My parents were always hard-
working.

Q: As you were growing up, what
was most important to you?
A: There was too much to name
only one thing that was the most impor-
tant.

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 25 2009 CA 000732
CITIMORTGAGE, INC,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANNA MAYER; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ANNA MAYER; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFEN-
DANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT
#1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants.


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
J.G. Anderson Realty has
purchased a 2-1/2-acre tract
bordering the new Dixie High-
way to remodel 11 houses and
erect one new one. The area,
known locally as the "Tin Top"
section of Wauchula, will be
renamed "Cottage Park," with a
graded and paved double drive.
Anderson is also investing in
the remodeling in the Sunset
Park subdivision off South
Florida Avenue to make it one
of the most desirable homesites
in the county.

Assets of the Carlton Bank
are to be offered for sale on
Aug. 30. When all assets are
sold, a .final dividend will be
paid to creditors and the
receivership terminated.

The director of the Hardee
County ERA will have a repre-
sentative in the courthouse on
Aug. 22, to accept applications
for the Civilian Conservations
Corps. Those eligible must be
single boys between 18 and 28.
Several Wauchula boys are
already in camp and others are
expected to enlist.

District officials of the Works
Progress Administration met
last week to set projects, includ-
ing a group of men working on
the aviation field. There will be
work at the county park, the
new Dixie Highway through
Wauchula, opening up new
streets, erection of a new water
tank, an additional deep well
and a bathing pool.

50 YEARS AGO
The first career increments,
salary raises based on outstand-
ing service to school and com-
munity, will go to eight teachers
at Hardee Junior High School
and two at Wauchula Elemen-
tary. The salary increases of
$400 a year represent the high-
est honor which can be awarded
to a teacher in the school sys-
tem. To qualify, a teacher must
have been in the Florida school
system for at least 10 years,
have a continuing contract and
pass evaluation. Superintendent
H.B. Dominick pointed out that
this honor "is superior to any
ever bestowed on a member of
the county's school faculty."

The new Zolfo Springs
Volunteer Fire Department de-






1 YOUR


ported to its first fire at noon
Tuesday and arrived in time to
stop a tractor fire from spread-
ing to a nearby barn at the M.E.
Brown farm 10 miles east of
town. The burning tractor set an
open drum of diesel fuel afire,
but firemen, using the city's
new pumper, halted the fire
before it reached the barn. The
tractor was a total loss.

25 YEARS AGO
For the 1983-84 season,
Hardee County was No. 2 in the
state in orange production.
During that season, Hardee sur-
passed Lake and Orange coun-
ties, damaged by hard freezes,
and trailed only Polk County.

More than 600, 650 to be
exact, school employees kicked
off the new school year on
Monday. Teacher contract
negotiations were nearing their
final stages, with teacher
salaries increasing up to eight
percent. Beginning teachers go
from $14,615 to $16,000 and
teachers with 16 or more years'
experience will go from.
$22,010 to 24,000.

Don Miller, 43, was hired as
Hardee Memorial Hospital
administrator last week. Hos-
pital Board attorney John
Burton was directed to work out
a contract. Miller presently
works for Shared Services for
Southern Hospitals in Orlando,
and wants to move to a small
town.

Spot ads this week included
Peace River Valley Automotive,
Wauchula Farmers Supply Co.,
Hazel's Florida & Gift Shop,
Peninsular Equipment Co., Ed
Lee Aluminum Contractor,
Scaffe's Truck Stop, Bill Taylor
Truck Stop and Wilson Pumps.

10 YEARS AGO
Crumbling of the architectur-
al molding at the Hardee
County Courthouse has delayed
plans to lock down the facility
for security reasons. Access is
now limited to the east ramp
entrance or front steps. The


county has $825,000 to restore
the 1920s courthouse, placing
both the circuit and county
courtrooms on the third floor
and replacing the historiC
columns out front and the
antique windows.

A feedback session was held
on Monday night for the public
to voice its opinions about a
new South Florida Community
College campus in Hardee
County. The public voted that
there needed to be more day
classes, the college would need
to be within a 10-mile radius of
Wauchula, availability of voca-
tional/technical programs,
expanded student-life activities
and more campus environment.

A wireless antenna which
would allow the Hardee YMCA
to expand Internet services for
its after-school programs and
reduce costs by interconnecting
with YMCAs in four adjacent
counties was approved at the
Wauchula City Council meet-
ing. The connector will be put
on the city's water tower. The
city is also planning its own
high-speed network, said City
Administrator Jerry Conerly.

Realty ads this week included
a 3BR, 1.5BA CB home in
Bowling Green for $45,000; a
3BR, 2BA, CB/frame home
with six acres, four in grapefruit
groves, a carport and fireplace
for $79,500; a 2BR, 1BA frame
home in Wauchula for $29,500;
and a 3BR, 2BA CB home with
garage, paved driveway for
$71,500.



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NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that,
pursuant to a Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure entered
in the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Hardee Couny,
Florida, I will sell the property sit-
uated in Hardee County, Florida,
described as:
LOT 19 AND 20 BLOCK 1,
WAUCHULA VILLAS SUB-
DIVISION, CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 10, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA AND LOCATED IN SEC-
TION 3, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST.
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, second
floor hallway outside Room 202 in
the Hardee County Courthouse,
417 WEST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FL 33873 at 11:00
a.m., on August 25, 2010.
DATED THIS 4 DAY OF August,
2010.
Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of
this court on the 4 day of August,
2010.
CLERK OF THE COURT
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
In accordance with the American
with Disabilities Act of 1690, per-
sons needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the
ASA Coordinator no later than
seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceedings. If hearing Impaired,
please call (800) 955-8771 (TDD)
or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via
Florida Relay Service.
8:12,19c


State of Florida
Department of Environmental Protection
Notice of Application

The Department announces receipt of an application
for permit from the Hardee County Solid Waste
Department for a permit to modify the sequence of fill
for the active portion of the existing Class I landfill,
subject to Department rules, at the Hardee County
Regional. Landfill located at 685 Airport Road,
Wauchula, Hardee County, Florida.

This application is being processed and is available
for public inspection during normal business hours,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at the Department of
Environmental Protection, Southwest District Office,
13051 North Telecom Parkway, Temple Terrace,
Florida 33637-0926. :19,26
8:19,26c


I Wa Bac Whe


I VALUABLE COU








August 19, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5C


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Aug. 15, criminal mischief on Steve Roberts Special was
reported.

Aug. 14, James Raymond Richardson, 23, of 1867 Kazen
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged
with possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
S Aug. 14, Daphne Carolyn Batts, 54, of 3286 Perdue Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged with
battery.
Aug. 14, Elizabeth Barbara Purser, 32, of 5011 Chester Ave.,
lJowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of
violation of probation.
Aug. 14, burglary of a conveyance on West Main Street, crim-
inal mischief on Parnell Road, and thefts on Baker Street, Hyde
Street and Wilbur C. King Boulevard were reported.

Aug. 13, James Edman Carroll, 35, and Cathy Lynn Halpain,
37, both of 876 SR 64 E., Zolfo Springs, were arrested by Dep.
Michael Lake and each charged with fraud/theft by tampering with
utilities and withholding support of children. Carroll was also
charged with resisting an officer without violence.
Aug. 13, Corey Deshawn Fowler, 27, of 810 S. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.
Aug. 13, Samuel Lee Mitchell, 39, of 406 W. Jones St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged
with possession of cocaine and selling cocaine within 1,000 feet of
a specified area.
Aug. 13, Jesus Alamia Rodriguez, 41, of 727 LaPlay Dr.,
,Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of
withholding support of children.
Aug. 13, a fight on Third Street East, and a theft on Thornton
Road were reported.

Aug. 12, a business burglary on U.S. 17 South, a vehicle stolen
on Maxwell Drive and criminal mischief on U.S. 17 South were
reported.

Aug. 11, Joel Wayne Windham, 38, of 206 S. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force and
charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of mar-
ijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Aug. 11, Kerry Dan Rogers, 49, of 3433 Hickory St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
Aug. 11, a residential burglary on Allman Street, burglary of a
business on Alamo Drive, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North, and
thefts on Deer Run and on South Florida Avenue were reported.

Aug. 10, Jordy Lee Mendoza, 25, of 3551 Poplar St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with
resisting arrest without violence, fraud-giving a false ID to an offi-
cer, violation of probation and withholding support of children.
Aug. 10, Amado Garcia, 20, of 4060 Captiva Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on two counts of with-
holding support of children.
Aug. 10, Alice Maria Southward, 60, of 814 N. Kentucky
Ave., Lakeland, was arrested by Det. John Shivers on a charge of
withholding support of children.


Aug. 10, Ray Graddy Jr., 65, of 301 S. 10th Ave., Haines City,
was arrested by Det. John Shivers on a charge of failure to appear
in court.
Aug. 10, a residential burglary on Willliams Avenue, a vehicle
stolen on Redbird Lane and criminal mischief on Ohio Avenue
were reported.

Aug. 9, Lendy May Graham, 44, of 628 Peterson. St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Daniel Gibson on three counts of
withholding support of children.
Aug. 9, Arthur D)ee Carpenter, 60, of 634 Snell Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina on a charge of
parole violation.
Aug. 9, Travis Lavon Anderson, 23, of 718 Homer Ave. S.,
Lehigh Acres, was arrested by Det. John Shivers on a charge of
violation of probation.
Aug. 9, Edward James Schwartz, 38, of 1154 Steve Roberts
Special, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Manuel Zuniga and
charged with simple assault, threat to do violence.
Aug. 9, residential burglaries on Meadow Lane and on
Vermillion Street, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North, and thefts
on U.S. 17 South and on Makowski Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
Aug. 15, a theft on South Eighth Avenue was reported.

Aug. 14, David Oviedo, 23, of Orange St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with disorderly intox-
ication.
Aug. 14, Aaron Lee Nicholas, 25, of 3047 Parkview Terrace,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with
DUI.
Aug. 14, Robin Laurie Smothers,.45, of 311 Louisiana St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte and charged with
disorderly intoxication.
Aug. 14, a residential burglary on Short Street, and thefts on
East Palmetto Street, U.S. 17 South and Georgia Street were
reported.

Aug. 12, Brad Elliott Rimes, 28, of 2405 SR 60, Bartow, was
arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charge with loitering/prowling and
possession of burglary tools.
Aug. 12, a residential burglary on Hogan Street, a vehicle
stolen on U.S. 17 South, criminal mischief on Carlton Street and
thefts on North 10th Avenue and on Turner Avenue were reported.

Aug. 11, Jerry Rich, 57, of Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl.
Paul Bohanan and charged with battery.
Aug. 11, Jamie Pantoja, 23, of 2414 Ralph Smith Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with sell-
ing/giving alcohol to a person under 21..
Aug. 11, a residential burglary on East Main Street, criminal
mischief on U.S. 17 North and a theft on Georgia Street were
reported.

Aug. 10, Eddie White, of 4806 Panora Place, Plant City, was
arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with possession of mar-
ijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Aug. 10, a business burglary on U.S. 17 South.was reported.

Aug. 9, Barbara Lee Hassell, 29, of 520 W. Main St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and charged with
six counts of possession of a weapon/ammo by a convicted felon.
Aug. 9, Evelyn Louise Madison, 30, of 1550 Martin Luther
King Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Lt. David Stimson and
charged with passing/altering a forged bank note and larceny.
Aug. 9, Timothy Rodney Carter, 44, of 114 Downing Circle,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with bat-
tery.


Aug. 9, Jonathan Wayne Merchant, 22, of 1003 Steve Roberts
Special, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and
charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Aug. 9, Luis Eduardo Banda, 25, of 4060 Captiva Ave,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged
with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Aug. 9, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 South and a theft
on U.S. 17 South were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Aug. 14, burglary of a conveyance on West Main Street was
reported.

Aug. 13, Christine Laura Merritt, 52, of 512 Jones St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Sean Guthas anc charged
with possession of drug paraphernalia. At the jail, Dep. Steven
Ahrens also charged her with possession of cocaine and sale of
cocaine within 1,000 feet of a specified area.

Aug. 10, a vehicle stolen on U.S. 17 North, Bowling Green,
was reported.


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE
For the week ended August 12, 2010

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 10,276,
compared to 9,638 last week, and 10,342 a year ago. According
to the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to
.1.00 higher, feeder steers and heifers were unevenly steady.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 133.00-185.00
300-400 lbs 122.00-170.00
400-504 lbs 107.00-139.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 116.00-165.00
300-400 lbs 104.00-137.00
400-500 lbs 100.00-120.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs
56.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2
74.00


Stop by and see why so
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD


3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com
7 10c 800-226-3325


85-90 percent 48.00-

1000-2100 lbs 66.00-


Gene Davis
Sales and Leasing
Consultant


DLL SONY FRIGIDAIRE SHARP SYLVANIA ,i JVC Am" M PHILIPS


'WO)ODHA\~rN'


110 WILLIAMS RD WAUCHULA, FL 33873


863-773-0587







6C The Herald-Advocate, August 19, 2010


WEATHER SUMMARY
Week ending Augustl5, 2010
Weather Summary: Temperatures in Florida averaged one to
two degrees above normal with highs reaching the upper 90s and
low 100s. Nighttime temperatures had lows in the upper 60s and
low 70s. Scattered rains persisted throughout the reference week.
Miami-Dade County had over four inches of rain with Broward,
Baker, Franklin, and Orange counties recording over two inches of
rain. Twenty-three percent or less of the reported soil moisture lev-
els was short or very short.

Field Crops: Rainfall during the latter part of the week
relieved stress on crops and forage. Growth regulators were applied
to cotton fields in Okaloosa County. Some operations in the
Panhandle combined corn. White mold in peanut fields, in the north
continued to be problematic. Hay cutting was delayed due to mois-
ture. Peanut digging took place for green peanuts. Ninety-seven
percent of the peanuts had pegged, above the 92% from the previ-
ous week, 94% from last year, and the five-year average of 96%.
Peanut condition was reported as 3% poor, 12% fair, 67% good,
and 18% excellent.

Vegetables: Producers prepared fields for fall vegetables and
laid plastic mulch. In south Florida, avocadoes and okra were mov-
ing through the market.

Livestock and Pastures: In the Panhandle and northern areas,
the condition of the pasture was slightly lower than the previous
week, but most continued in good condition. Pasture suffered from
extended high temperatures and insufficient showers. Armyworms
have caused some damage. Some iron clay peas were being plant-
ed for fall forage. The cattle condition was poor to excellent with
most in good condition. Heat and humidity challenged animal per-
formance. Ranchers were marketing calves and some were culling
herds in anticipation of reduced fall hay supplies. In the central
areas, the pasture condition was poor to excellent relatively
unchanged from the previous week. Forage growth was hampered
by drought. The cattle condition was fair to excellent with most in
good condition. In the southwestern areas, the range and cattle
were in fair to excellent condition with most in good condition.
Statewide, cattle were in poor to excellent condition with most in
good condition.

Citrus: Highs this week were in the lower to mid 90s, with
early morning lows in the low to mid 70s. Avalon received the most
precipitation with 2.42 inches. Twelve of the twenty-five stations
reported less than an inch of rain. Umatilla received the least, with
0.11 inches of precipitation recorded. The drought condition wors-
ened to moderate in Indian River County and the surrounding
counties remained in a mild drought condition. Growing conditions
continued to be good across the remainder of the citrus 'region.
Cultural practices continued, including limited fertilizations, hedg-
ing, irrigation, and the resetting of young trees. Some summer
sprays were applied as rainfall permitted. Growers continued using
both aerial and ground spraying for citrus psyllid control.







Rocky



Kitchens


Greetings from Fort Green!
Doris Thornton is recovering
nicely from her knee surgery.
Randy Davis is back home
recuperating from his recent
bout with his heart. He was
taken to the local emergency
room on Tuesday of last week,
and on to Sebring for another
stent. The area was 85 percent
blocked and was overlooked
when he previously was in the
hospital. He is one person who
is really following his doctor's
orders, no salt and losing
weight! Please continue to pray
for them.
I saw Herman Moye at the
restaurant last Friday and he is
in need of prayer. Please con-
tinue to. remember him. He
now lives in Fort Meade but is
still a member of Fort Green
Baptist. He and I used to work
for Gardinier Big River, which
went the way of so many busi-
nesses.
I am fortunate enough 'to
work at the voting polls. When
I say "fortunate" it is because
you get to see so many people.
Once you retire, you just don't
see as many people unless they
go to your church or you see
them in the grocery store or at
funerals! Believe it or not,
once you retire, you miss peo-
ple! Henrietta Benson was at
the training I attended and was
getting around with the aid of a
cane since her knee surgery.
She was my assistant 4-H
leader way back in the '70s.
Our deepest sympathy is
extended to Dollene Fields and
her family on the home going of
her grandmother, Joann Gay.
She made her final journey on
Wednesday morning, Aug. 11.
Randy Davis and David
Simmons won the Fort Green
Classic fishing tournament on
Aug. 7. Congratulations!
A group of 12 from Fort
Green Baptist went to the Rays
game on Saturday. At first it
looked like we had picked
another bomber, as the oppos-
ing team had three runs in the
first inning, but then the Rays
came alive and really scored in
the fourth and fifth. One mag-
nificent part was when the
bases were loaded and a home
run ball was.hit into the stands.
It.was great fun and after the
game we all went to the Cracker
Barrel. Sherman drove one
vehicle and Rex Ritchey also
had a carload. Hunter Reid,
Kaylee Hogenauer and Dalton
Richey sat beside each other
and they really had a good time,
getting into the clapping, etc.
Eddie Kennedy celebrated a
birthday on Tuesday and Faye
Chancey will celebrate today
(Thursday). Renee Wyatt cele-
brated her birthday on the same
day as my granddaughter, Aug.
4. Happy birthday wishes are


pllaG -reen News

^i: Cooper
S:- 773.6710


""oete We CanMae. Dffrece


Garry '



McWhorter


,,q want schools that are center
for afelearing

Rok ithn











Learning.* 1







I wat shool whre 1 s cetur


QualiftiLeE[ed nd Experiencuiled


1c


extended to all of these. Eddie
is still not able to attend church,
so please remember him in
prayer. Addie Walker turned 3
on Tuesday. She had a party
Sunday afternoon and had a
super time.
Mary and Earl Bargeron will
celebrate 56 years of marriage
on Friday. Mary said her
mother told her it would not last
a year! They can thank the good
Lord for both of them living to
make it this many years.
Mildred Cooper was able to
attend church services Sunday
morning. Betty Walker was in
her wheelchair and Mrs. Mil-
dred sat behind her, also in a
wheelchair! They were both
happy to be there.
Tina Owens, who was men-
tioned in "Kelly's Column" last
week, comes to our church and
is an avid baseball fan. She has
rooted for the Yankees since
1948. Her son is taking her to
the game when the Yankees
play the Rays. They have seats
right behind the catcher and she
is looking forward to this.
It was interesting to read she
has worked for the same com-
pany for 59 years. Most people
do not get this privilege. If a
person is able to work, quite
often as they approach retire-
ment years, the company will
downsize their position! She
truly enjoys her work and greet-
ing everyone who comes
through her line.
Fort Green Baptist will have
a workday this Saturday. Please
meet at the church as early as
possible and help clean. Our
revival begins on Aug. 29.
Please remember to pray for
each other and our country.


Don't rule out working with
your hands. It does not
preclude using your head.
-Andy Rooney

The country with the great-
est number of telephones
is the United States, with
an estimated 130,110,000.


I6unig/ihigFoeas


8/19/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:00 am
Sets: 8:01 pm
Day Length
13 hrs. 01 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 4:43 pm
Sets: 2:22 am
Up: 10:01 pm
Down: 9:35 am
Moon Phase
78%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:01 pm-12:01 am
9:35 am-ll:35 am
Minor Times
4:43 pm-5:43 pm
2:22 am-3:22 am
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/20/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:00 am
Sets: 8:00 pm
Day Length
13 hrs. 00 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 5:29 pm
Sets: 3:18 am
Up: 10:51 pm
Down: 10:26 am
Moon Phase
86%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:26 am-12:26 pm
Minor Times
5:29 pm-6:29 pm
3:18 am-4:18 am
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


8/21/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:01 am
Sets: 7:59 pm
Day Length
12 hrs. 58 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 6:08 pm
Sets: 4:13 am
Up: 11:38 pm
Down: 11:14 am
Moon Phase
92%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:14 am-l:14 pm
Minor Times
6:08 pm-7:08 pm
4:13 am-5:13 am
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/22/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:01 am
Sets: 7:58 pm
Day Length
12 hrs. 57 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 6:44 pm
Sets: 5:08 am
Up: --:--
Down: 12:00 pm
Moon Phase
96%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:00 pm-2:00 pm
Minor Times
6:44 pm-7:44 pm
5:08 am-6:08 am
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


8/23/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:01 am
Sets: 7:57 pm
Day Length
12 hrs. 56 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 7:17 pm
Sets: 6:02 am
Up: 12:22 am
Down: 12:43 pm
Moon Phase
99%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
--:-----:---
12:43 pm-2:43 pm
Minor Times
7:17 pm-8:17 pm
6:02 am-7:02 am
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4'
8/24/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:02 am
Sets: 7:56 pm
Day Length
12 hrs. 54 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 7:48 pm
Sets: 6:55 am
Up: 1:04 am
Down: 1:25 pm
Moon Phase
100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
1:25 pm-3:25 pm
Minor Times
7:48 pm-8:48 pm
6:55 am-7:55 am
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4


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HERITAGE PARK IN DOWNTOWN WAUCHULA


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Give me odorous at sunrise a garden of beautiful flowers
where I can walk undisturbed.
-Walt Whitman



VOTE ANGEL LANG FOR


CITY COMMISSION DISTRICT 4






Political advertisement paid for and approved by Angel Lang for City Commission.
8:19p


8/25/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:02 am
Sets: 7:55 pm
Day Length
12 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 8:17 pm
Sets: 7:46 am
Up: 1:45 am
Down: 2:05 pm
Moon Phase
99%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
1:45 am-3:45 am
2:05 pm-4:05 pm
Minor Times
8:17 pm-9:17 pm
7:46 am-8:46 am
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/26/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:03 am
Sets: 7:54 pm
Day Length
12 hrs. 51 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 8:46 pm
Sets: 8:37 am
Up: 2:25 am
Down: 2:46 pm
Moon Phase
97%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
2:25 am-4:25 am
2:46 pm-4:46 pm
Minor Times
8:46 pm-9:46 pm
8:37 am-9:37 am
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


----------


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Auut 19,2010, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Letter To Editor:

City of Wauchula Needs

Experienced Leadership
Dear Editor: "violating the law" as it relates
Next week, the voters of the to the recent public meeting
City of Wauchula will be going snafu in which they found
to the polls to vote for their rep- themselves. Well, those who
resentatives on the Wauchula live in glass houses should not
City Commission. This could cast stones. There have' been
very well be the most important fliers distributed urging voters
election for Wauchula's future to vote against the current city
for a very long time. commissioners and endorsing
Voters are faced with keeping and supporting the list of their
experience and institutional opponents.
knowledge on the commission These fliers do not contain
to help continue to lead the legally required disclaimer
Wauchula through troubled stating who was responsible
. times. Now is not the time to and who paid for the political
put people into power who have advertisement. This is a viola-
no knowledge of how a multi- tion of state law itself, Florida
million dollar business has been Statute 106.143 to be exact.
or should be run. Not in this So, these candidates who have
.economy and not when we are been critical of elected officials
facing continued dwindling of breaking the law are doing it
revenue and potential cuts in themselves.
services. I will not be negative in my
The' future viability of my comments about the folks run-
hometown is at stake and now ning against the current city
is not the time to elect people commissioners. I'm sure
who are running with a single they're fine people, many of
agenda and axe to grind, whom I don't know because
The current commissioners most are not from Wauchula
have done a fine job and have originally. However, I cannot sit
struggled and prayed over idly by and think that a majori-
doing the right thing that they ty of candidates may get elected
felt needed to be done for and none of whom have the
the taxpayers and future of experience needed to get
Wauchula. Having served Wau- Wauchula out of the morass it is
chula for 12 years, I know first- in currently.
hand the intricacies of learning I ask my fellow Wauchulans
what is required to provide all to think of the stability and
the services taxpayers pay for future of our great city.
and expect to receive. Fortun- Wauchula is in dire need of
ately for me, I was elected and leadership that understands the
served during a time of prosper- in's and out's of running a full-
ity where I had the time to edu- service city, not a majority of
cate myself on what was people who will need on-the-
required of running a multi-mil- job training. Please do not
lion dollar business, allow a few, disgruntled resi-
If voters elect all newcomers, dents running on a single issue
none of whom have any under- upend the strength of the city
standing of or experience in we all love.
taking care of the needs of the
taxpayers, it could have a dev- Sincerely,
stating effect on Wauchula, her Charles T. Smith
citizens and everyone's future. Former Wauchula City
There are 'candidates con- Councilman (1992-2004)
demning commissioners for Orlando, FL

The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life,
by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred
years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again,
since it is life.


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
William Arthur Pippin, 33,
Zolfo Springs, .and Angelica
Padron, 35, Zolfo Springs.
Nathan Jerad Ebersole, 18,
Fort Meade, and Robin Marie.
Reynolds, 19, Fort Meade.
Efrain Justo Antonio Pac-
heco, 24, Wauchula, and Sandra
\Lee Hernaidez, 39, Wauchula.
Ivy Buel Knight, 88, Wau-
chula, and Maria Antonia
Knight, 38,.Wauchula.
Roger Allen Payne, 43, Zolfo
Springs, and Debra Lynn
Dorough, 35, Zolfo Springs.
Richard Allan Jansen II, 21,
Zolfo Springs, and Sharon
Denise Pruett, 20,- Zolfo
Springs. .

The following small claims
cases were dis posed of recent-'
ly by the county judge:
American Express Bank vs.
Jeffery Giles; Wauchula State
Bank et al, judgment in garnish-
ment.
Bank of Anrerica NA--vs,.
Terry W. Harrison, defaultjuidg-'
ment.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Roel Juarez
Avel, judgment.
The following misdemean-
or cases were disposed of re-
cently in county court:
Jose Humberto Gonzalez,
criminal mischief and domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Christina Rodriguez, posses-
sion of marijuana-amended to
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, time served, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 cost of prosecu-
tion (COP).
Valentin Lopez' Santiago,
domestic battery, one month in
jail with credit for time served
(CTS), $677 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 COP and $50 inves-.
tigative costs placed on lien,
released to immigration.
Charles Nicholas Skitka, vio-
lation of a domestic violence'
injunction for protection, one


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DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our J into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.

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Courthouse Report
):1


month 15 days CTS, $325 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP.
SRuby Woods, cruelty to ani-
mals and:confipement of ani-
mals without food or water, not
prosecuted.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civl actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Santana M. Rodriguez vs.
Delia Rodriguez, petition for
injunction for protection.
Santana M. Rodriguez vs.
Petra Rodriguez, petition for
injunction for protection. .
Otis Sterling vs. Amanda
Ruth Jones,.petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Fifth Third Mortgage Co. vs.
MarilynLubin, damages-con-
tracts and indebtedness.
Samantha Michelle Mclvery
:.nd 'the- state.,Department of
Revwtue'(DOR) vs. Anthony
Chailes.Sihgleton, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Amanda Roberts and Dale
Roberts; divorce.
Veronica Solorio and DOR
vs. Joaqiin Solorio, petition to
register child support order.
Barbara J. Stevenson and
Andrea L. Stevenson, divorce.
Alf Catholic vs. Walter
McNeil and the state Depart-
ment of Corrections (DOC),
petition to review inmate situa-
tion;
Green Tree Servicing LLC,
vs. Teddy Ray Adams, Brandy
Jo Adams .et al, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Lanie L. Jackson- vs. Ben-.
jamine R. Jackson, petition for
injunction for protection.
Home Partners Finance LLC
vs. Joe T. Contreras et al, peti-
tion for mortgage foreclosure.
Tanya Sue Sexton-Webb and


Hardee District Schools


Announces its policy for Free and Reduced-Price Meals for students under the

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND BREAKFAST PROGRAMS

Any Interested person may review a copy of the policy by contacting

George Kelly, 1009 N. 6th Avenue WasUeltt, FL 33873 Phone 863-773-9058

Household size and Income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. An application can
not be approved unless It contains complete eligibility Information. Once approved, meal
benefits are good for an entire year. You need not notify the organization of changes In Income
and household size.

Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply
for Free or Reduced-Price Meals, households must complete theapplication and return it to
the schooL Additional copies ate available at the principal's office in each school. The
information provided on the application will be used for the purpose of determining
eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year.:Applications may be
submitted at any time during the year.

Households that re4elve SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) or TANF
(Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) are required to list on the application only the
child's name, SNAP / TANF case number, and signature of adult household member.

Foster children will receive benefits (I.e., free, reduced-price, or paid) based on the child's
personal Income regardless of the income of the household.

Households with children who are considered migrants, homeless, or runaway should
contact the district liaison Sherri Albritton at 863-767-0662.

For the purpose of determining household size, deployed service members are considered a
part of the household. Families should Include the names of the deployed service members
on their application. Report only that portion of the deployed service member's Income made
available to them or on their behalf to the family. Additionally, a housing allowance that is part
of the Military Housing Privatization Initiative is not to be included as Income.

All other households must provide the following Information listed on the application:

Total household Income listed by gross amount received, type of income (e.g., wages, child
support, etc.) and how often the Income Is received by each household member;
Names of all household members check the "no income" box If applicable; If household
members a child, list school name for each;
Signature of an adult household member certifying the information provided is correct; and
Social security number of the adult signing the application or the word "NONE" for this
household member if he or she does not have a social security number.

If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school
should be contacted. Children of parents or guardians who become unemployed should also
contact the school.

Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced-Price meal policy

[The Director of Food Service. .

will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with
the ruling of the official, he or she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining
official on an Informal basic. If the parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he orvshe may
make a request either orally or n writing to

David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools.
1009 N. 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 863-773-9058

Unless indicated otherwise on the application, the Information othe Free and Reduced-Price
Meal application may be used by the school system In determining eligibility for other
educational programs.

To determine annual Income:
If you receive the Income every week, multiply the total gross Income by 52.
*.I you receive the Income every two weeks, multiply the total gross Income by 26.
If you receive the income twice a month, multiply the total gross income by 24.
If you receive the Income monthly, multiply the total gross Income by 12.

Remember: The total Income before taxes, social security, health benefits, union dues, or
other deductions must be reported.
"In cordance with Federal law, d US Department of Agriculture policy, this Institution Is prohibited from
discriminting on te basis of color, national ogin, age, or dilbity. To file a complaint of dscrimlmnaton
wri USDA, l n ctor, o fficem o CRl et1400 1pe AvMnu, 8W, Whlngton, DC 2020-9410 or call
(00) 796-3272 (oce) or (202) 72032 TY).. U8A Is an equal oppor tuniy provdr end empoyer. 8:19c


Pauline Ochoa, Sue Lobato, Red Camp Pharmacist and Crystal Contreras
Hours:
SMondav-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to l:00pm
ModayFriay 900 m t 6:0 pm* Sturay :00 m t 1:0pm


DOR vs. Heath William
SRechke, petition for enfrce-
ment of administrative child
support order.
SLisa Cisneros and Emesto
Cisneros, divorce.
.Kalvin Ware vs. Hardee
Correctional Institution, peti-
tion for review of inmate situa-
tion..
The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
Judge:
Mayvett Benavides vs.
SDavid Benavides, voluntary
dismissal of temporary injunc-
tion for protection.
Mona Lisa Gonzalez vs.
Javier Delarosa Rojas, injunc-
tion for protection.
Nabiha Inc. vs. Fortino
Garcia, Fortino Garcia Jr.,
David Garcia and Bobby
Garcia, all d/b/a FG.Trucking
Corp., default judgment.
Ramiro Trevino vs. Kelly
Vang, order.
Carla S. Sperry and Lee
Allen Sperry Jr., order.
Citimortgage Inc, vs. Anna
Mayer et al, judgment of mort-
gage foreclosure. ..;
SWauchula State Bank vs.
Steve Borland et al, voluntary
dismissal.
Tomasa Selph and Timothy
M. Selph, order. .
Audra L. Hernandez and
DOR vs. Wilner S. Wilson,
child support suspended.
SCrystal G. Barnwell and
DOR vs. Randy L. Gillis, order.
April Desiree Oakes ,and
DOR vs. Simon Lorenzo
Brown, child support contempt
order.
Jeanne Newsome and DOR
vs. Rodney C. Johnson, child
support contempt order.
Frances Alford and DOR.vs.
Stevie Marie Cantu, child sup-
port contempt order denied.
Melissa Summerville vs.
Michael King, voluntary dis-


missal of temporary injunction
for protection.

There was no felony crimi-
ms court last week as the
Judge was on vacation.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 o.
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Rafael Ahmfiad Abdel-Halim
to Lydia Alvarez and Maria
Garcia Alvarez, $28,000.
First National Bank of
Wauchula to Pedro Granados,
$99,000.
First National Bank of
Wauchula to Paul S. Hayman,
$41,000.
Sharyn K. Salter to
Wauchula State Bank,
$279,502.03.
Miriam K. Hopper to Hector
Manuel and Stephanie L.
Montanez Mier, $55,000.
Calyx Investments LLC to
Mosaic Fertilizer LLC,
$50,000.
Chad William Anderson to
Charles Travis' and Amber
McClenithan, $150,000.


ABOUT...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.







SC 'The Uierald-Adivoctke, August 19, 2010


I grew up on the Gulf Coast. I know these waters. And I'm
doing everything I can to clean them up.
Fred Lemond, BP Cleanup Operations


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And that includes keeping
you informed.

Searching For And Cleaning Up The Oil
You may have heard that oil is no longer flowing into the Gulf. But every morning
our spotter planes and helicopters continue to search for oil off the coast, heading
to areas previously mapped with satellite imagery and infrared photography. If oil is
found, they radio down to the ships and boats of all sizes that are supporting the
cleanup effort and working to collect the oi. iThese are local shrimping and fishing
boats organized into task forces and strike teams, plus specialized skimmers
mobilized from around the world.

We have recovered more than 35 million gallons of oil-water mixture from the Gulf.
Other methods have also helped remove millions of additional gallons of oil from the
water. We've deployed millions of feet of boom to protect beaches and sensitive
wildlife areas.

Hurricane Preparedness
In the event of a hurricane, our first priority is keeping people safe. In coordination with
the Coast Guard and local officials, we may suspend operations temporarily but have
organized to resume them as soon as possible.

Our Responsibility
We have already spent more than $3.9 billion responding to the spill and on the
cleanup, and none of this will be paid by taxpayers. We will work in the Gulf as long
as it takes to get this done. We may not always be perfect but we will do everything
we can to make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP E&P


bp


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