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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: February 24, 2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text
















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 12
3 Sections, 28 Pages


46
plus 4c sales tax


Thursday, February 24, 2011


Hardee County Fair Crowns Royalty


By MESQUA FIELDS
For The Herald-Advocate
The 70th running of the Har-
dee County Fair is well under
way, with pageants a part of the
highlights.
This year's crown for the
2011 Miss Hardee County was
awarded to Kara Norris. She
also won Miss Photogenic. Her
courts consists of First Runner-
Up Danielle Nicholson, Second


Runner-Up Amanda Rigney,
Third Runner-Up Courtney
Buckley, Fourth Runner-Up
Brittany Hines, Miss Con-
geniality Lauren Moore and
Miss Internet Photogenic Me-
lissa Hartley.


The pageant began with an
opening number, followed by
an announcement of the County
Fair's events, then the introduc-
tion of the emcee, who was
Willie Gilliard. Gilliard then
introduced 2010's royalty and


the judges.
There were five judges this
year, George Louk from Fort
Lauderdale; Anna Tataris
DeJesus, from Tampa Bay; Roy
DeJesus, from Tampa Bay;
Leticia Pavan, originally from


Rio Grande Valley in South
Texas but now in Tampa Bay;
and Kristy Spiegel.
The judges based their deci-
sions on poise, personality,
sense of humor, the ability to


carry on a conversation in an
interview, and the contestants'
overall appearance in swim-
suits, casual wear, and their
evening gowns.
After the swimsuit contest,
entertainment was provided by
Kate Krause, a senior at Hardee
High School, and John Andrew
Miller, a freshman at South
See FAIR 2A


Wauchula Voters



Will Select 5 New



Commissioners


Photos by RALPH HARRISON
The new reigning Miss Hardee County is Kara Norris, age
17, daughter of Ben and Robyn Norris.


The 2011 Junior Miss Hardee County title was awarded to
Dana Terrell, daughter of Dane and Charlotte Terrell of
Wauchula.


Tax Exemption Deadline Is Tuesday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There are ways to save on
property taxes.
But, the time to do so ends on
Tuesday.
That's the deadline for filing
for all kind of property tax
exemptions. Filing must be
done in person at the Hardee
County Property Appraiser's
Office, Room 103, Courthouse
Annex II, 110 W. Oak St.,
Wauchula. It's the big white
building at the intersection of
U.S. 17 South and Oak Street.



WEATHER
DAmE HItH WlE W RA
02/16 78 44 0.00
02117 81 SO 0.00
02/18 82 52 0.00
02119 82 5O 0.00
02/20 81 580 OO
02121 8 so 0.00
02/22 82 55 0.00
ITOAL Rainfatl to 02/22/11 -2.53
Ten YarAverage 54.
Soure. Univ. of F. On. Research Cnter

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Community Calendar .5A
CourthouSe Report... 6C
Crime Blotter ....... 8C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup .7A
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menu ...5A



lmlII I I Ill llll j
7 8122 0729 3


Enter by the south exit off Oak
Street.
Tax exemptions are based on
the property owner, residency,
ownership, value and use of the
property as of Jan. 1, 2011. If a
person had an exemption last
year, he should have already
received a card about it. If the
situation is the same as last
year, it did not need to be
returned. If there was a change


since last year, the Property
Appraiser's Office must be
notified.
For instance, if a person
moved out of their home before
Jan. 1 and rented it, he would
no longer be able to claim
homestead exemption. On the
other hand, if you bought a
home and were living in it by
Jan. 1, you could now be eligi-
ble for homestead exemption.


SThere are a host of possible
exemptions. The basic home-
stead exemption, for a home in
which you resided on Jan. 1, is
$50,000. For certain seniors,
those with limited income,
there is an additional $25,000
exemption.
There are widow and widow-
ers, disability and disabled vet-
erans exemptions. There is an
See DEADLINE 2A


By JOAN SEAMAN
Wauchula will fill its com-
missioner vacancies by elec-
tion.
Tentatively, it will be on May
10. Qualifying will be the week
of March 21-25. Early voting
will be in late April and the first
week of May. Whoever is elect-
ed will remain in office until the
2012 regular election, when
they can qualify for re-election.
"In the meantime, city 'gov-
ernment will continue to oper-
ate as it always has. Payroll and
accounts payable checks will be
done the same way they always
have", said Acting City Man-
ager Olivia Minshew. She and
Finance Director James Brad-
dock co-sign checks. "Staff has
always handled purchase or-
ders, accounts receivable or
payable and other day-to-day
matters," said Minshew on
Tuesday.
As Commissioner Russell
Smith noted last week, "The
police are still patrolling, the
garbage is being picked up. Life
goes on."
Minshew said the only thing
that will be lacking is official
action on any proposed ordi-
nances, the city manager hiring
process and other matters
decided solely by the commis-
sion.
Supervisor of Elections Jeff
Ussery responded to the chal-
lenge as soon as he got to work
on Tuesday, learning that the
remaining two Wauchula com-
missioners wanted to go with
the election process to replace
the five ousted members.
Considering time required by
statute and needed for official


advertisements, preparing bal-
lots and other details, Ussery
worked with the city in deter-
mining the dates for the upcom-
ing qualifying and election.
Candidates need to be at least
18 years old, a city resident and
registered voter for at least a
year before qualifying. Most
need to reside in the district
they will represent, U.S. 17
South (Sixth Avenue) being the
dividing line. Up for grabs are
seats 1, 3, 4, 5 and the at-large
seat, 7.
Seat I is in District 1, all the
city territory east of U.S. 17
South. Seats 3 and 4 are in
SDistrict 2, within the city limits
north of Main Street and west
of U.S. 17. Seat 5 is in District
3, south of Main Street and west
of U.S. 17. Candidates for the
at-large seat can reside any-
where within the city limits.
Florida Statutes allow the
governor to remove municipal
officials for any actions in the
course:of their duties in the four
years preceding their election.
Five commissioners either re-
signed or were removed from
office on Feb. 11.
All of the ex-commissioners
were in the audience at Monday
night's brief meeting. That in-
cluded Jerry Conerly, Clarence
Bolin, David Royal, Dan Gra-
ham, Val Patarini and Connie
Spieth, who lost her bid for re-
election to Smith. Spieth and a
seventh commissioner Delois
Johnson were among the group
charged last year with violation
of the Sunshine Law and paying
fines and court costs. Johnson
chose not to run for re-election
See WAUCHULA 3A


Cancer Patient: Attitude


Has A Lot To Do With It!


By HAILEY SELPH
For The Herald-Advocate,
A pink mohawk?
Joann Grantham kept her sense of
humor after being diagnosed with inva-
sive ductal carcinoma, the most com-
mon type of breast cancer, last July.
Before she could lose her locks to
chemotherapy, she took the last laugh
and went to a local salon to have her
head shaved into a mohawk-and then
colored it pink!
Grantham had not gotten a mammo-
gram in years when she felt a lump in
one of her breasts. When she went to
the doctor, she already had a feeling it
was breast cancer but the news still
made her stomach drop.
Except for an aunt, it is not in
Grantham's family history to have
breast cancer. A radiation collagist told
her that her cancer was caused by the


radiation treatments she had received
when she was 13, due to the removal of
a tumor that had been wrapped around
her spine.
Grantham is now cancer free.
She has already finished chemo but
will be going through radiation treat-
ments every day at Moffitt Cancer
Center in Tampa until mid-March.
Even with everything that has hap-
pened to her, Grantham has always tried
to be optimistic.
"It felt like I got punched in the ston-
ach when all of this began. But I stayed
strong to my faith. I knew that the worst
case would be that I would die and go
to heaven. I wanted to keep a positive
attitude and not drag my family down,"
Grantham said.
Her friends, family and church mem-
bers were her main support.
See CANCER 3A


SNew! Fulfill

Your Faith

a ... Column 11B


SENIOR APARTMENTS

READY FOR OCCUPANCY
... Story 1B


Scenes From

Playoff Shot
... Photos 3C


Events Continue Through Saturday


COURTESY PHOTO
Rebelling against the impending hair loss of chemother-
apy, cancer patient Joann Grantham had her hair shaved
into a mohawk and, yes, then colored it pink!


46
plus 4 sales tax









2A The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


S DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living -Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions sltould be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
>- '


Photo by RALPH HARRISON
This year's Queen and her Court are (from left) Lauren Moore, Miss Congeniality; Brittany Hines, fourth runner-up;
Amanda Rigney, second runner-up; Kara Norris, Miss Hardee County and Miss Photogenic; Danielle Nicholson, first
runner-up; Courtney Buckley, third runner-up; and Melissa Hartley, Miss Internet Photogenic.


FAIR
Continued From 1A


Florida Community College.
The night continued with the
casual-wear contest, an inter-
mission, the evening-gown con-
test, on-stage interview, and
more entertainment-which
was provided by Elizabeth
Deloera, a junior at Hardee
High and runner-up for the
2010 Wauchula Idol.
The contestants were then
given a final question, there was
more entertainment, and then
the 2010 Miss Hardee County
had her final walk, after which
the 2011 royalty was intro-
duced.
Queen Kara Norris is the
daughter of Ben and Robyn
Norris. She is 17, and has been
a member of the National
Honor Society for three years.
She is on the Student Council, a
member of the Fellowship of
Christian Athletes, and also the
Key Club.
'Norris sings in the First
Baptist Church praise band. She
was elected "Best All Around"
as well as president of her sen-
ior class. She won Junior Class
Sweetheart in the 2009-10 aca-
demic year, and has also
received the Overall Academic
Achievement Award.
Norris lettered in track and
field, achieved the "Lowest
Stroke Average Award" for four
years in golf, and won the first
girls golf district championship
for Hardee Senior High along
with her teammates. Norris
plans to attend Florida State
University and major in ele-
mentary education.
Danielle Nicholson was the
first runner-up, is 17, and the
daughter of John and Leigh Ann
Nicholson. She's been a varsity
cheerleader for two years, and
is the president of the Lionette's
Service Club. Nicholson was
voted as a 2010 Homecoming
Queen candidate by her senior
class. She .plans to attend
Edison State College for a
bachelor's degree in elementary
education, with a focus on spe-
cial education.
The second runner-up was


COUNTY MANAGER
A Page One story last
week in one instance inad-
vertently gave a county
commissioner the wrong
last name. First-term Com-
missioner Grady Johnson
was instead referred to by
another individual's sur-
name. The Herald-Advo-
cate apologizes for the
mixup.

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


Amanda Rigney, age 18, daugh-
ter of Andrew and Amy Rigney.
She has been in National Honor
Society for three years, and is
currently the president of the
group. She's been on the varsity
cheerleading squad and in the
Lionette's Service Club for four
years. Rigney was accepted to
the University of South Florida
where she plans to major in pre-
veterinary medicine.
Courtney Buckley was the
third runner-up, is 18, and the
daughter of Jace and Dawn
Stark and Tim Buckley. She is
the captain of the varsity cheer
squad and has cheered through-
out junior high and high school,
for six years. She's been a
Hardee Chorus member for two
years, and is currently in the
Varsity Choir. She plans to
complete her associate of arts
degree ja tSouth Florida
Community College, then
transfer to the University of
Florida and earn a bachelor's in
animal science.
Brittany Hines came in as the
fourth runner-up. She is 18, and
the daughter of Mikey and
Sandy Driskell and Ricky
Hines. She is in the National
Honor Society, on Student
Council, and the varsity cheer-
leading squad. Hines is plan-
ning to go to the University of
Florida to major in communica-
tion sciences and disorders.
Lauren Moore won Miss
Congeniality. Moore is 17 and
the daughter of Kevin and
Leanne Moore. She is in
National Honor Society, and
plans to complete her AA at
South Florida Community Col-
lege then transfer to Florida'
State. University for a master's
in communications/public rela-
tions and political science.
Melissa Hartley gained the
title of Miss Internet Photo-
genic. She is 18 years of age,
and is the daughter of Jimmy
and Cindy Hartley. She is the
chaplain of the National Honor
Society, and plans to earn a
four-year degree at the Univer-
sity-of Florida in veterinary
medicine.
The other contestants in the
.pageant were Delia Ward, age
17, daughter of Patrick and
Michelle Adams; LaCresha
Carlton, age 17, daughter of
Norma Jones and James
Carlton; Christina Milby, age
17, daughter of Mike and
Melanie Milby; Caylah Coker,
age 18, daughter of Amy
Blackmon and Stephen Coker;
Eryn Mahoney, age 18, daugh-
ter of Patrick and Tracy
Mahoney; Christie Selph, age
18, daughter of Deanna Baker
and Donnie Selph; Yvonne
Aguilar, age 17, daughter of
James Williams and Cynthia
Aguilar; and Ann Garcia, age
18, and daughter of Mark
Mercer and Norma Garcia.
This year's new Hardee
County Junior Miss'is none
other than Dana Terrell. Her
Court consists of Allison Farr,
first runner-up; Danielle Smith,
second runner-up and Miss
Congeniality; the third runner-
up, Shaina Cummings; fourth
runner-up, Milli Jones; Miss
Photogenic Brooke Dixon;
Miss Internet Photogenic Lin-
dsay Cooper; and, finally, essay
winner Meagan Shivers.
The Junior Miss Pageant
began with the opening number,
following the introduction of


The 2011 Junior Miss Hardee County and her Court (from left) are Miss Photogenic Brooke Dixon, essay winner,
Meagan Shivers, Fourth Runner-Up -Milli Jones, Miss Congeniality and Second Runner-Up Danielle Smith; Junior
Miss Dana Terrell; First Runner-Up Allison Farr, Third Runner-Up Shaina Cummings, and Miss Internet Photogenic
Lindsay Cooper. ...- ,,
.i-i.t.--.
.-..mi ***. ..-.-, -


emcee Millie Bolin and her jun-
ior emcee, as well as son,
Patrick Bolin. Bolin then intro-
duced the 2010 Royalty and the
five out-of-county judges who
took part, in the pageant; after
which entertainment followed.
The casual-wear competition
then commenced, and soon
after the next entertainment was
the formal-wear competition.
The girls then came out onto
the stage where the Top 10
finalists were decided. Those
selected were then given their
on-stage interview and soon
after Hardee County's Junior
Miss of 2010, Farrah Muntz,
made her "Final Walk." The
emcees then announced the
Royalty of'2011.
Dana Terrell, the new Junipr
Miss, is the daughter of Dane
and Charlotte Terrell. She is the
captain of the junior high cheer-
leading squad and is also a
member of National Junior
Honor Society, the Student
Council, and P.E.A.R.L.S., a
service club whose names
stands for Pride-Excellence-
Awareness-Respect-Loyalty-
Success.
Terrell is also a peer mediator
at her school, which is a job that
entails bringing conflicts
between her fellow students to a
halt; in other words, she, acts as
a peacemaker. Terrell is also a
musical sign language inter-
preter. She plans to go to the
University of Florida with an
emphasis in sign language
interpreting. After receiving her
bachelor's degree, she wants to
continue her education for a
master's in audiology.
Allison Farr, the first runner-
up, is the daughter of Scott and
Julie Farr. She is the president
of National Junior Honor
Society, and is a member of the
Art Club, Student Council and
the Yearbook Staff as well. Farr
plans to graduate high school
with honors and pursue a
degree in veterinary medicine.
.Danielle Smith, daughter of
SDan and Linda Smith, had the
grace of placing as second run-
ner-up and Miss Congeniality.
Smith is involved in' the
P.E.A.R.L.S. service club,
National Junior Honor Society,
and the National Youth
Scholars Leadership program.
She is also the secretary of the
Student Council. Smith plans to
attend the University of Florida
and study journalism so that she
can write inspiring books for


others.
The third runner-up of the
2011 Junior Miss Pageant was
Shaina Cummings, daughter of
Dr. Sophia and Jerry Cum-
mings. Cummings is involved
in National Junior Honor
Society, the Fort Green 4-H
Club, the Juniors Tennis
,League, and on the Hardee
Youth Football cheerleading
squad. She plans to graduate
from the University of Florida
and then attend its law school.
Milli Jones was the. fourth
runner-up in the pageant. She is
the daughter, of Robert Jones
and Blue Marshal.l. Jones is in
National Junior Honor Society,
Student Council, a junior high
cheerleader, and on the volley-
ball team. She wants to attend
the University of Florida for a
career is sports medicine.
Miss Internet Photogenic is
Lindsay Cooper, daughter of
Garit and Krystie Cooper. She
is in the P.E.A.R.L.S. service
club, and plans to attend the
University of Florida to become
a veterinarian. Miss Photogenic
is Brooke Dixon, daughter of
Gordon and Joleyna Dixon.
She, too, is in the P.E.A.R.L.S.
service club, and plans to grad-
uate high school and college
with honors.
Meagan Shivers won the
essay contest. She is the daugh-
ter of Johnny and Sandy
Shivers, is in National Junior
Honor Society, on the Student
Council and is a junior high
cheerleader as well. Shivers
plans to graduate from the
University of Florida with a
degree in the field of archaeolo-
gy.
The other participant in the
pageant were Cheyanne
Skinner, daughter of Leslie and
Shane Forrester; Makayla
Chancey, daughter of Lee and
Chrysta Chancey; Kristen
Ramirez, daughter of Cynthia
Rangel; Mariah Edenfield,
daughter of Sharon and Todd
Aigotti; Alexandria Ullrich,
daughter of Max and Krista
Ullrich; Krissy Hall, daughter
of Jim and Maria Hall; Kel!cey
Cunningham, daughter of
Kelley and Teresa Cunning-
ham; Bridgett Whidden, daugh-
ter of Tammy and Shon Whid-
den; Hayley Derby, daughter of
Deborah and John Derby;
Brook Aleman, daughter of
Rosa and Fred Aleman; Gemi
Saunders, daughter of Tami and
Scott Saunders; and Sarah


Albritton, daughter of Laura
Gilliard and Chris Albritton.
Also, Amy Rogers, daughter
of Derrick and Carol Rogers;
Maria Morales, daughter of
Sylvia Aleman; Tara McNabb,
daughter of Keith and Debbie
McNabb; Hayley Edenfield,
daughter of Todd and Sharon
Aigotti; Lacey Cumbee, daugh-
ter of Lamar Cumbee and
Jackie Bandy; Caitlin Dufresne,
daughter of Will and Donna
Dufresne; Emily Albritton,
daughter of Jerry and Mlachele
Albritton; Caryssa Johnson,'
daughter of Christopher and
Cherie Johnson; Destiny
Snyder, daughter of Lydia and
Daron Snyder; Rayna Parks,
daughter of Chris and Donna
Parks; Kendall Gough, daugh-
ter of Kristie Gough; Brinkley
Yeomans, daughter of Kelly
and Chris Yeomans; Tiffany
Owens, daughter of Kathleen
Whaley; and Gabriella Garzas,
daughter of Erica Solis.
Though these two pageants,
and the Kindergarten Princess
Pageant, are now finalized,
there are two more left. Friday
commences the Prince &
Princess Pageant and the last
fair day, Saturday, holds the
Little Miss Hardee County
Pageant-both pageants will be
in the Agri-Civic Center.
Tonight (Thursday), Farm
Credit will have host a buyers
dinner in the Agri-Civic Center,
after which the Future Farmers
of America and 4-H will hold



DEADLINE
.Continued From 1A
exemption for those legally
blind, Florida resident exemp-
tion for veterans age 65 and
older with a combat-related dis-
ability. There are also exemp-
tions for those on active duty
.and similar exemptions.
Finally, for those who lease
or use their land primarily for
agricultural purposes, there is
the Greenbelt or Ag exemption.
Some people who have busi-
ness, commercial, venture or
rental business equipment will
have to pay tangible taxes on it.
If its value is over $25,000, or
even close, check with the
Property Appraiser's Office, as
there is a penalty for not filing.
For questions, call the
Property Appraiser's office at
773-2196.


their livestock sale in the arena.
After the Prince & Princess
Pageant tomorrow, the arena
will hold the Ranch Rodeo-
complete with bronc riding,:
team sorting, barrel racing, dou-!
ble mugging, calf doctoring,'
and mutton busting as well.
Finally, on the last blast of
the fair, the Mexican bull riding
and mutton busting will begin
after the Little Miss Hardee
County Pageant.
There are only a few days left
in which to enjoy the fair. Don't
miss the chance to go this year,
for it only comes once!


ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The- Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.




YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At

773-3255
llmml mall5


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18; I yr. $31; 2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months 522; 1 yr. $41; 2 yrs. $79
Out of State
6 months $27; 1 yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95






February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Chamber Recognizes People of The Year


-By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Ronnie Durrance is the 2010
Hardee County Chamber of
Commerce business person of
the year.
Durrance is the general man-
ager of Hardee Ranch Supply
and has worked there since it
opened in 1984.
He recently went through the
task of moving into a brand new
building just south of the origi-
nal building on U.S. 17.
Durrance said he could not
have made it all the years with-
out the valuable employees
working around him.
Many of his customers have
stayed loyal to buying from a
local business and that has been
a real help, he said.
In 2007 Hardee Ranch
Supply was the seventh largest
Purina dealer in the country.
Hardee Ranch Supply serves
and helps a lot of people in the
community.
It is an important partner with
Habitat for Humanity in Hardee
County, helping to provide
needy families with a home.
Every year it donates all of
the feed for the 4-H and Future
Farmers of America steers that


are sold during the fair.
Walter Farr is the 2010 citi-
zen of the year for the Hardee
County Chamber of Commerce.
Farr moved to Wauchula in
1976 to work for Doyle E.
Carlton Jr. and family.
He first met the then State
Senator Carlton when he was in
the ninth grade at Sebring High
School.
Farr said he was chosen to
call the senator and ask him to
come to an FFA event at the
school, which he did.
After attending college, Farr
began working for a CPA firm.
After working with the firm
for a couple of years, Carlton
asked him to leave the firm and
work for him full-time. Farr
accepted the offer.
After 35 years, he still works
as an accountant for the Carlton
family and oversees two chari-
table trusts in Hardee County.
Doyle E. Carlton Ill said Farr
does a lot of work for the com-
munity and often does not get
recognized for it.
Farr said he is proud to call
Hardee County home. Farr
raised three sons and one
daughter and now has 11 grand-
children.


Courtesy Photo
Walter Farr accepts the citizen of the year award from
Casey Dickson and Doyle E. Carlton Ill.


Ronnie Durrance accepts business person of the year
award from Millie Bolin and Ron Hall.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Richard Nicholson, a Wauchula native, has worked for the
U.S. Department of State since 2006.
His first two assignments were to Kenya and Jerusulem. His
next assignment will be in Ethiopia. This is quite a change from his
previous jobs with IBM and Nicholson Supply/Ace Hardware, the
latter job in Wauchula.
The outstanding Hardee County Fair continues through this
Saturday. There is something for everyone at the fair.
Pioneer Park Days is coming up March 2-6 in Zolfo Springs.
The Florida State Fair in Tampa recently concluded.
There has been talk recently about trying to re-open the
Hardee Livestock Market in Wauchula by forming an organization -
to sell 300 shares of stock at $1,000 each.
The market closed at the end of December 2010, having been
open to sell cattle at auction since 1946. Hopefully it can be re-
opened soon.
The Hardee High boys basketball team played with a lot of
hustle and desire but. lost in the playoffs Tuesday night to the
Vikings at Bishop Verot High School in Fort Myers.
The 21-7 Vikings were much taller and greatly outrebounded
the Cats on the boards. The shortest player for the private Catholic
school was 6-0 and the tallest 6-7. The Wildcats deserve congratu-
lations for winning the district title plus their first playoff game.
The city of Wauchula will have a special election May 10 to
fill five vacant city commission seats. The incumbents were
ordered by Gov. Rick Scott to resign or be removed for previous
violations of the Florida Government in the Sunshine Law.


CANCER
Continued From 1A
"My husband was my rock. He is something doesn't feel right, get it
always there for me. He was there with checked out."
me when I got the news, and he took Grantham went on to say that those
family leave," she said. "My kids, who are dealing with cancer now should
Jessica and Audie Lee, and my best not give up!
friends were also a big help and very "Stay strong, and stay up on check-
supportive." ups. The attitude you have has a lot to
Grantham had always wanted to take do with how you get through things-
part in the annual Relay For Life cancer including cancer," she said.
fundraising event, but something always Grantham strongly believes that tech-
got in the way. Now, she plans on being nology is changing for the better. The
involved in the Relay For Life and knowledge about cancer is greater now
wants to help raise awareness-about than it has ever been before. This newly
breast cancer. found knowledge has resulted in a high-
"No one should stop getting mammo- er cure rate.
grams," stated Grantham. "Women need "Just because you have cancer doesn't
to get them often, should start getting mean it is the end of the world," con-
mammograms at a young age, and if cluded Grantham.


rNutrition
Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR 1l
CANCER RESEARCH

Q: Could keeping a food
record really help me improve
my eating habits?
A: Studies often show that peo-
ple who keep track of eating
behaviors tend to be more suc-
cessful at changing them. If
you're considering using some
kind of paper or online food
diary, think about what you're
trying to achieve. Some people
realize they overeat or lack bal-
ance in their food choices, but
aren't really sure when, why,
and how much they eat. Experts
often recommend that they
record what they eat all day
long, with notes of time, portion
sizes, where they are eating
(restaurant or home, kitchen
.table or sofa with TV), how
hungry they are (1 to 10 scale)
and whatever thoughts or emo-
Stions they can pinpoint. All this
yields crucial information i
identify specific problem areas
and give hints about what needs
Sto change. Don't just track your
meals; many people gain the
Greatest insights about how
unplanned eating here and there
adds up. If you're not sure what
to do with the information you
get, consider using an Internet
website that automatically com-
pares your eating to calorie- and
nutrient-based standards, or
sending your records to a
Registered Dietitian (RD) who
.agrees to provide you with
feedback. On the other hand, if
you already know what habits
you want to change, you may be
just as successful, and perhaps
find it easier to consistently
keep, a simpler record focused
Specifically on one or two par-
ticular behaviors you want to
. change, such as evening snacks,
soft drinks or second portions.
A log that keeps track of suc-
cesses (like how many times
you work fruits and vegetables
into the day,. choose whole
grains or relieve stress in non-
food ways) rather than failures,
fosters a positive attitude.
Attitude is crucial: you need to
expect gradual improvements,
not immediate perfection.
Q: Do .eating habits affect
polycystic ovary syndrome
(PCOS)?
A: Yes, weight o6ssif-over-
weight, regular exercise and


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.. ......




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4*.- &^^I--


COURTESY PHOTO
The tresses fall at Klassix salon in Wauchula as Joann
Grantham tackles cancer with a smile, and a lot of faith
and support.


healthy eating patterns are con-
sidered vital elements in treat-
ment. Polycystic ovary syn-
drome (PCOS) is a relatively
common disorder that involves
abnormal levels of insulin and
reproductive hormones. It can
cause irregular menstrual cycles
and lack of ovulation and is the
most common cause of infertil-
ity in women. PCOS is also
linked with greater risk of
developing diabetes, heart dis-
ease and some types of cancer.
Insulin resistance is now con-
sidered central to the problems
involved and treatment may
include medications in addition
to weight loss if appropriate.
Fortunately, even modest


weight loss of about five to ten
percent may be enough to affect
hormones and fertility. In a sur-
vey of women in the UK with
PCOS, 84 percent of thosc who
increased their physical act. 'ity
reported improvement in ts 'ir
symptoms. As for eating hab, ,
besides focusing on change
that allow you to comfortable,
decrease calories for weight
loss, avoiding excessive por-
tions of carbohydrate (especial-
ly large amounts at one time)
and choosing primarily high-
fiber carbohydrates such as
whole grains, beans, vegetables
and fruits may also help
improve insulin levels.


WAUCHULA
Continued From 1A
last year and Freeman was
elected to fill that vacancy.
City attorney Cliff Ables
opened Monday's nights meet-
ing by reminding the audience
that a quorum was needed to
conduct city business, The
remaining two commissioners
could appoint two people to the
commission, but would have to
agree on those persons. If they
did not come up with two peo-
ple on whom they agreed, a
Special Election would have to
be scheduled within 30 days
and held within 90 days.
Commissioner John Freeman
then read the following pre-
pared statement: "Mr. Ables,
fellow commissioner and the
general public:
"After personal consideration
of this matter, and after seeking
much input from the communi-
ty, I have come to the following
conclusion:
"First, this is an event of great
magnitude within our commu-
nity. While our city charter pro-
vides a replacement process, I
do not believe the spirit and
intent was ever for two individ-
uals to have the power to create
an entirely new board. In fact, it
is my opinion, perhaps the rea-
son it specifically outlines a
second remedy of a special
election, is that there was some
thought given to situations just
as this one.
"Furthermore, the selection


of public officials is a sacred
right that must rest with the
people through an election
process. To change the entire
face of a governmental body
without the people doing so just
simply can't be right.
'Therefore, I am not willing
to nominate nor accept nomina-
tions for these vacancies and
,immediately request that the
Hardee County Supervisor of
Elections call for a special elec-
tion to fill the five vacancies on
the Wauchula City Commission
and that such election be held as
soon as is practically and legal-'
ly possible.
"Above all, the 'will of the
People' must be restored. To
have an avenue to circumvent
this process and to do so for the
sake of expediency (even if
there is a provision to allow
such) is not in the best long-


term interest of our electorate,
our employees or our business
partners.
"This is my official position
and I am unwilling to waiver.
Thank you'."
When he finished his state-
ment, the audience broke out in
loud clapping.
Ables adjourned the meeting
as there would not be a quorum
to conduct official business.
Smith did not have an oppor-
tunity to speak publicly. Asked
after the meeting for comments,
Smith said, "I can't disagree
with him. I don't want to disen-
franchise the people and their
right to speak on what will hap-
pen.
"I am concerned about how.
quickly this (an election) can
happen, but I wouldn't want to
overrule Mr. Freeman. I respect
his opinion," said Smith.


Young eagles don't have feathers that match their par-
ents' until they are about four years old.
Order is the shape; upon which beauty depends.
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115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

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4A The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011



Obituaries


ESTHELA MORALES
Esthela Morales, 76, of Eagle
Lake, died on Thursday, Feb.
17, 2011, in Auburndale.
Born in Carristias, Texas, on
May 23, 1934, she moved to
Eagle Lake in 1960 from Texas.
She was a homemaker and
member of the Templo de la fe
Pentecostal Church in Zolfo
Springs.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, Antonio and Maria
Del Refugio; and a brother
Robert Villarreal.
Survivors are six sons, Jose
L. Villarreal and wife Patty of
Eagle Lake, Lizandro Villarreal
of St. Louis, Mo., Rickey
Villarreal and wife Eva of
Bartow, Greg Morales and wife
Rosa of Bartow, E.V. Morales
of Eagle Lake, and Elizardo
Morales of Kansas City, Kan.;
three daughters Nancy Morales
and husband Francisco, and
Marisela Morales and husband
Miguel, all of Grand Rapids,
Mich., and Diana Zamarano of
Clewiston; and two brothers
Gerald Devila and Agumedo
Devila, both of Mexico.
Visitation was 10 to 11 a.m.
on Monday, Feb. 21, at Templo
de la fe Pentecostal Church in
Zolfo Springs, where services
were held at 11 a.m. Interment
followed in Wauchula Cem-
etery.
Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home
And Cremation Services
Wauchula


The yo-yo is believed to be
the second-oldest toy in
the world. The name yo-yo
comes from a Filipino
expression meaning "come
come."


0n 0ovitg iUe0iohy


WILBUR KENNETH
"KENNY" WEIS
Wilbur Kenneth "Kenny"
Weis, 64, of Wauchula, died
on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, at
Bartow.
He was born on Dec. 16,
1946, at Bowling Green and
was a lifelong resident of the
county. He served in the U.S.
Army and was a technician
with United Telephone Co.
He was a member of the First
United Methodist Church of
Wauchula.
He is survived by his wife,
Janet Weis of Wauchula; son
Preston Weis of Orlando;
daughter Nicole Albritton and
husband Chris of Cocoa; two
brothers Carl Weis and wife
LaDonna of Wauchula, and
David Weis and wife Louis of
Wauchula; three grandchil-
dren, Deacon and Logan Weis
and Reagan Albritton; and
several nieces and nephews.,
Visitation was Sunday,
Feb. 20, 2-3 p.m. at First
United Methodist Church of
Wauchula, where services
were held at 3 p.m. with the
Rev. Doug Stanfield and the
Rev. Danielle Upton officiat-
ing. In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials may be sent to the
American Cancer Society,
P.O. Box 1268, Wauchula, FL
33873.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


WILBUR KENNETH
"KENNY" WEIS
Wilbur Kenneth "Kenny"
Weis, 64, of Wauchula, died on
Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, at
Bartow.
Born on Dec. 16, 1946, .at
Bowling Green, he was a life-
long Hardee County resident.
He served in the U.S. Army and
was a technician with United
Telephone Co. He was a mem-
ber of First United Methodist
Church of Wauchula.
Survivors include his wife
Janet Weis of Wauchula; son
Preston Weis of Orlando;
daughter Nicole Albritton and
husband Chris of Cocoa; two
brothers Carl Weis and wife
LaDonna of Wauchula, and
David Weis and wife Louise of
Wauchula; and three grandchil-
dren, Deacon Weis, Logan Weis
and Reagan Albritton.
Visitation was Sunday from
2 to 3 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church of Wauchula,
where services were held at 3
p.m. with the Rev. Doug
Stanfield and the Rev. Danielle
Upton officiating. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be sent
to the American Cancer Society,
P.O. Box 1268, Wauchula, FL
33873.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula
EVELYN OCENIA SMITH
ARBUCKLE
Evelyn Ocnenia Smith Ar-
buckle, 86, of Saratoga, Calif.,
died on Sunday, Feb. 6, 2011, at
her home.
Born in Avon Park, on Feb.
5, 1925, she was the daughter of
Henry Harrison "Harry" and
Ethel Durrance Smith. She
worked at Massachusetts Mu-
tual for many years and was a
friend of Saratoga Library.
She is survived by two sons;
a daughter; sister Jeri Smith of
Winter Park; and two great-
granddaughters. Local relatives
include niece Andrea Dunlap of
Ona, Dr. Ross Hendry, and
members of the Durrance and
Shackelford families.
There is a celebration of her
life, and reception, at 11 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 27, in Saratoga.
Smart Cremation
Roseville, Calif.


'n ,l vipng oUemo/hy


W.C. MORAN
W. C. Moran, 89, of
Wauchula, died on Wednes-
day, Feb. 16,2011, at Sebring.
Born on Feb. 6, 1922, in
Palmetto, he came to Wau-
chula in 1946. He was a tele-
graph operator with the rail-
road for 41 years. He was a
member of Northside Baptist
church.
He was preceded in death
by his wife Willean Moran;
and daughter Barbara Wil-
kins.
He is survived by daughter
Sharon Byrd and husband Jed
of DeFtniak Springs; son-in-
law M. E. Wilkins of Wau-
chula;.four grandchildren; and
four great-grandchildren.
Graveside services and
burial were held on Saturday,
Feb. 19, at 11 a.m. at Wau-
chula Cemetery with Ray
Graham officiating.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


W.C. MORAN
W. C. Moran. 89, of Wau-
chula, died on Wednesday, Feb.
16, 2011, at Sebring.
Born on Feb. 6, 1922, in
Palmetto, he came to Wauchula
in 1946. He was a telegraph
operator with the railroad for 41
years. He was a member of
Northside Baptist church.
He was preceded in death by
his wife Willean Moran; and
daughter Barbara Wilkins.
He is survived by daughter
Sharon Byrd and husband Jed
of DeFuniak Springs; son-in-
law M. E. Wilkins of Wauchula;
four grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Graveside services and bur-
ial were held on Saturday, Feb.
19, at 11 a.m. at Wauchula
Cemetery with Ray Graham
officiating.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


CHARLES GERALD
"SONNY" CREWS
Charles Gerald "Sonny"
Crews, 74, of Bartow, died on
Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011, at his
home.
He was born April 5, 1936, in
Ona, and moved to Bartow
from Fort Meade in 1991. He
was a U.S. National Guard vet-
eran, serving from 1954 to
1958. He was a maintenance
supervisor for IMC Mining in
Fort Meade and a member of
First Baptist Church of Fort
Meade.
SSurvivors include his wife,
Jeanette Carter Crews of
Bartow; three sons, Charles G.
"Jerry" Crews and wife Martha
of Fort Meade, Keith Crews and
wife Laura of Sebring, and
Scott Crews and wife Jennifer
of Fort Meade; brother Robert
Eugene Crews of Willow Oak;
and grandchildren Keith, Eli,
Ryan and Kayla Crews; and one
great-grandson Emery Crews.
Visitation will be held 10 to
11 a.m. on Saturday at Hancock
Funeral Home, Fort Meade
with memorial services at 11
a.m. at the funeral home chapel
with the Rev. Donald Holton
officiating. In lieu of flowers,
memorials may be sent to Good
Shepherd Hospice, 105 Arne-
son Ave., Auburndale FL
33823.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade




SANDRA JOAN IVY
Sandra Joan Ivy, 62, of
Sebring, died on Thursday,
Feb. 19, 2011, in Sebring.
Born Feb. 26, 1948, to
Eldon Ray and Hazel
(Thompson) Farwell in
Arcadia, she lived in Hardee
County before moving to
Sebring in the mid-1980s. She
was a 1965 graduate of
Hardee Senior High School,
where she was active in band
and 4-H. She was a Licensed
Practical Nurse and worked
for Sebring Nursing Services
and Kenilworth Care & Rehab
Cen-ter. She was a member of
Gard-ner Baptist church, the
Gem & Mineral Club, Ki-
wanis and American Kennel
Club.
Survivors include her sons,
David Ray Ivy of Sebring and
Robert Ivy of Houston, Texas;
mother, Hazel Farwell of
Gardner; brother Richard Far-
well of Gardner; and one
grandchild Nolan Ray Ivy.
Memorial services will be
at 2 p.m. today (Thursday) at
Gardner Baptist Church. In
lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to
Hope Hospice, 4840 Sun 'n
Lake Blvd., Sebring, FL
33872.
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home
Sebring


^. -~z .



`--- -



BETTY JO "BJ"
WIGGINS BREWER
Betty Jo Wiggins Brewer, 77,
of Holt and formerly of Wau-
chula, died on Saturday, Feb.
12, 2011, at Shoal Creek Reha-
bilitation Center in Crestview.
Born on Jan. 17, 1934 in
Wauchula, she worked for
Walter Bailey at State Farm
Insurance in Wauchula for
many years. She retired and
moved to Crestview in 2003
and was a member of New
Beginnings Church in Crest-
view.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; three sisters; three
brothers; and one great-grand-
child.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 30 years, Jack Brewer
of Holt; two daughters Cindy
Ansley and husband Wayne of
Cairo, Ga., and Kathy Reynolds
of Wauchula; two sons, Randy
Gilliard and wife Ann of Zolfo
Springs; and Scott Gilliard and
wife Janet of Wauchula; seven
grandchildren; and eight great-
grandchildren.
Graveside services will be
held on Saturday, Feb. 26, at
10:30 a.m. Memorial services
will be held today (Thursday) at
6:30 p.m. at Real Life Church
in Bowling Green with Pastor
Mike Graham officiating.
Heritage Gardens
Funeral Home
Crestview



DANIEL ASHMAN
Daniel Ashman, 85, of Con-
neaut, Ohio, and winter visitor
in Hardee County, died on
Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011, at
Heartland Medical Center,
Sebring.
Born Nov. 15, 1925, in
Rochester, N.Y., he was a U.S.
Merchant Marine veteran, serv-
ing in WWII and Operation
Desert Storm. He was em-
ployed with U.S-.Steel as an
engineer" on thd'Great Lakes
Steamer Anderson from 1948 to
his retirement in 1986. He was a
member of New Leaf United
Methodist Church and Amer-
ican Legion Cowle Post #151.
He was preceded in death by
his parents; daughter Susan
Cox; son Daniel Ashman; and a
sister Hilda Breckenridge.
He is survived by his wife of
64 years, Beverly Ashman of
Conneaut, Ohio; one daughter,
Bunny Muchiarone and hus-
band James of North Kings-
ville, Ohio; son Sam Ashman of
Woodland Park, Colo.; sister
Beulah Austin and husband
Floyd of North Syracuse, N.Y.;
five grandchildren; and five
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held on
Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 2 p.m.
at New Leaf United Methodist
Church with the Rev. Jan Walsh
officiating. Interment followed
at Greenlawn Memory Gardens
with military rites by the
American Legion Cowle Post
#151.
Thompson-Smith
Funeral Home
Conneaut, Ohio



The pretzel was first made
by monks in southern
Europe as a reward for
children who learned their
prayers. It is shaped to
represent the crossed
arms of a child praying.


Letter To The Editor

Reformation, Not Rehabilitation
Needed For Florida Prisoners


Dear Editor,
Recently, an accurate account
was given regarding Florida's
troubled prison system. Read
Lloyd Dunkelburger's article,
Cuts May Be End of "Get
Tough" Mindset, The Lakeland
Ledger (January 31, 2011). As a
Florida inmate, I wish to share
my views.
Reportedly, Sen. Mike Fa-




BRENDA LYNN KEARNS
Brenda Lynn Kearns, 54, of
Zolfo Springs, died on Sunday,
Feb. 20, 2011, in Sebring.
Born on Sept. 8, 1956 at
Sioux Falls, S. D., she came to
Hardee County in 1960. She
was a member of Peace Valley
Lutheran Church.
She was preceded in death by
her father Elmer Fred Graese.
Survivors include her mother
Charlotte Graese of Zolfo
Springs; two brothers Barry
Graese of Zolfo Springs, and
Byron Graese and wife JoAnn
of Tampa; and sister Beth
O'Sullivan and husband Patrick
of Washington, D.C.
A memorial service will be
held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
26, at Peace Valley Lutheran
Church, 1643 Stenstrom Road,
Wauchula, with the Rev.
George Summerfield officiat-
ing.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


Oi ovting Uemohy




(--









BRENDA LYNN
KEARNS
Brenda Lynn Kearns, 54,
of Zolfo Springs, died on
Sunday, Feb. 20, 2011, in
Sebring.
She was born on Sept. 8,
1956, at Sioux Falls, S. D.,
and came to Hardee County in
1960. She was a member of
Peace Valley Lutheran
Church.
She was preceded in death
by her father Elmer Fred
Graese.
She is survived by her
mother, Charlotte Graese of
Zolfo Springs; two brothers,
Barry K. Graese of Zolfo
Springs, and Byron Graese
and wife JoAnn of Tampa and
their children Tara and Jerry;
and one sister Beth O'Sul-
livan and husband Patrick of
Washington, D.C., and their
children Michael, Katie,
Madelyn and Megan.
A memorial service will be
held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
26. at Peace Valley Lutheran
Church, 1643 Stenstrom
Road, Wauchula, with the
Rev. George Summerfield
officiating.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


sano stated Florida's crime rate
is down. However, with approx-
imately 91,000 of Flor-ida's
102,000 inmates to be released
at some point, how safe will
Florida be without interven-
tion?
Florida's mandated goal of
punishment and rehabilitation
has proven ineffective. Rehab-
ilitation means "to restore to a
former condition." Why "re-
store" offenders to their former
lifestyle? Refor-mation is the
key!
Other states seem to have the
right ideas: curb prison costs
and reduce prison population
through "risk analysis" to iden-
tify inmates suitable for release,
more innovative sentencing,
and effective programs.
There are many Florida
inmates who are remoreseful
for their actions, have sought
genuine change, and are
deemed safe for release. For
examples, view my profile and
other inmate profiles at
www.thepetitionsite.com.
Questionable, however; are
so-called "rehabilitative pro-
grams" mandated by Florida's.
former administration: reentry
programs, transition programs,
etc. How effective can such.
programs be that force inmate
participation? Moreover, many
of these programs are antiquat-
ed.
On the other hand, the admin-
istration here at Sumter C.I.
seems to have the proper focus
and intent to bring about inmate
reformation by offering volun-
tary programs. E.g., the self--
improvement courses of the,
"LIFERS' Program", a state-
certified program sponsored by
volunteers at no cost to Flor-
ida's taxpayers. Several volun-
tary educational programs are
also offered.
Notably, the Sumter adminis-
tration is currently forming a
voluntary reentry program.
Many Sumter administration is'
currently forming a voluntary
reentry program. Many Sumter
inmates are volunteering for
these programs; as such, should
your tax dollars be utilitzed on'
inmates voluntarily seeking
reform, or wasted on those with
no such interest?
Along with Governor Scott's
worthwhile plan to effectuate a
productive government, hope-
fully he will focus on sensible
and effective programs result-
ing in inmate reformation.
Rehabilitation equals re-offend-
ing; reformation equals reduced
recidivism while saving Flor-
ida's taxpayers millions of dol-
lars.

Respectfully submitted,
Steven Craig Best
DC #166114
Sumter Correctional
Institution
Bushnell

Not being able to govern
events, I govern myself.
-Michel De Montaigne

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME ACT
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned, pursuant to
the provisions of the Fictitious
Name Act, Section 865.09,
Florida Statues, as amended,
intends to register with the.
Secretary of State of the State
of Florida, the fictitious name of
SME Learning Center under
which the undersigned is
engaged or will engage in busi-
ness at: 4837 Dixiana Ave., in
the City of Bowling Green,
Florida 33834.
That the party interested in
said business enterprise is as
follows: Verna Faulse Graham
4220 Sunny Land Dr.'Lakeland
FI. 33813
Dated at Wauchula, Hardee,
Florida 33873. 2:24p


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February 24,2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A





What's Fo


SUNDAY STROLL


K 7 -rr-.-.- J y -,
COURTESY F
Melissa Hernandez of Wauchula participated in the ;
Walt Disney World Half Marathon on January 9. She
the 13.1 miles in 1:59:03 and placed 2,953 out of
21,988 participants. She was the 833 woman to cross
finish line out of 12,421. Hernandez exercises regu
and works at the Hardee County YMCA in Wauchula


HnnFsnFra


2/24/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:56 AM
Set: 6:24 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:32 AM
Set: 11:16 AM
Overhead: 5:56 AM
Underfoot: 6:25 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter
Major Times
5:56 AM 7:56 AM
6:25 PM 8:25 PM
Minor Times
12:32 AM -1:32 AM
11:16 AM-12:16 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/25/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:55 AM
Set: 6:25 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 30 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:34 AM
Set: 12:09 PM
Overhead: 6:53 AM
Underfoot: 7:21 PM
Moon Phase
42%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
6:53 AM 8:53 AM
7:21 PM 9:21 PM
Minor Times
1:34 AM 2:34 AM
12:09 PM 1:09 PM
Prediction
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/26/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:54 AM
Set: 6:25 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 31 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:29 AM
Set: 1:05 PM
Overhead: 7:48 AM
Underfoot: 8:15 PM
Moon Phase
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:48 AM 9:48 AM
8:15 PM 10:15 PM
Minor Times
2:29 AM 3:29 AM
1:05 PM 2:05 PM
Prediction
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/27/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:53 AM
Set: 6:26 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 33 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:20 AM
Set: 2:02 PM
Overhead: 8:41 AM
Underfoot: 9:06 PM
Moon Phase
23%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:41 AM- 10:41AM
9:06 PM 11:06 PM
Minor Times
3:20 AM 4:20 AM
2:02 PM 3:02 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/28/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:52 AM
Set: 6:26 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 34 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:05 AM
Set: 2:59 PM
Overhead: 9:31 AM
Underfoot: 9:55 PM
Modn Phase
15%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:31 AM- 11:31AM
9:55 PM 11:55 PM
Minor Times
4:05 AM 5:05 AM
2:59 PM 3:59 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
3/1/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:51 AM
Set: 6:27 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 36 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:44 AM
Set: 3:54 PM
Overhead: 10:18AM
Underfoot:10:41 PM
Moon Phase
9%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:18 AM -2:18PM
10:41PM -12:41AM
Minor Times
4:44 AM 5:44 AM
3:54 PM 4:54 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5


3/2/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:50 Al
Set: 6:28 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 38 mit
Moon Data
Rise: 5:20 Al
Set: 4:48 PMl
Overhead: 11:03
Underfoot: 11:24
Moon Phas
4%
Waning Cresc(
Major Time
11:03 AM 1:03
11:24 PM 1:24
Minor Time
5:20 AM 6:20
4:48 PM 5:48
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5
3/3/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:49 At
Set: 6:28 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 39 min
Moon Data
Rise: 5:53 At
Set: 5:41 PM
Overhead: 11:45
Underfoot: --:
Moon Phase
1%
Waning Cresce
Major Times
11:45 AM 1:45
Minor Times
5:53 AM 6:53
5:41 PM 6:41
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5


'HOTO
2011
ran
f the
s the
ilarlv


My Sign

Frozen Tears, whisper against the wind.
Glistening madness, Autumn's chilly end.
A wonder? Hmmm ... maybe, but beauty, oh yes.
It's like heaven fell down into earth's caress.
Calm, cool, as if coated in silence.
"Last forever please," that's my one wish,
The animals gone in quiet cold slumber,
My fair sir in the distance at the sound
of chopping lumber.
A warm mug of coacoa clutched in my fingers.
The children asleep upstairs, warm and eager.
I turn to go inside, but something makes me see.
Icicles hanging gently on nature's own Christmas tree.
The fire beckons me closer, but I see something strange.
Up, in the sky, the way the clouds are arranged, the cold air
burning my lungs,
I see a baby lamb, so tender, so young.
And as the sun starts rising, it leaves one star,
Above the lamb, brightest by far.
Chance... coincidence... fate, perhaps.
But this glorious winter memory will last and last.
-Candice Torres,15
Bowling Green

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.





Ballet Students Invited


To April 2 Auditioins


S The Wauchula Wednesday
Musicale and Florida Federa-
tion of Music Clubs (FFMC)
have extended an invitation to
any ballet students, ages 12-18,
to audition for the Annual
FFMC Ballet Audtion to beheld
April 2, at 10 a.m. at Highland
School of Dance in Lakeland.
The first prize will be $500,
and second prize is $250.
Winners also receive a plaque
and a sketch of the career of
Frances Rands Beery, for whom
the auditions are named.
S Honorable mention awards are
;AM $25.
,PM Winners may be invited to
:later perfomi at local and state


ernt
s
IPM
AM
s
AM
PM






4


iS.


AM



nt


PM

AM
PM


THURSDAY. FEB. 24
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.

MONDAY. FEB. 28
VVisioning focus group on
economic development,
commission boardroom,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY. MAR. 3
cVHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse An-
nex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.


If we did all the things we
are capable of doing, we
would literally astonish
ourselves.
-Thomas A. Edison


events.
Students must be prepared to
perform two dances: basic tech-
niques in leotard, en pointe
combination from classical bal-
let, and in costume, a variation,
original or contemporary. Stu-
dents must bring their own
music. Audio equipment will be
available.
Professional judges will use
criteria including appearance,
stage presence, dynamics, inter-
pretation and technique.
Further information is avail-
able online, ffmc-music.org, or
by calling FFMC Bay Ridge
District President Bess Stallings
at 773-3594.



ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS]
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Graham Crackers, Glazed Do-
nut, Bagel Bars, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice,
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Green Peas,
Orange Juice Bar, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Sausage
Patty, Biscuit, Applesauce, Con-
diments and Milk
Lunch: Macaroni and
Cheese, Burrito, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Black-Eyed
Peas, Grape Juice, Apples
Crisp, Cornbread, Condiments
and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Corndog, Alternative Meal,
French Fries, Salad Tray,
Applesauce, Rolls, Condiments
and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Cheese Grits, Buttered
Toast, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Lasagna with Ground
Beef, Stacked Ham Sandwich,
Alternative Meal, Green Beans,
Salad Tray, Peaches, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Cookie, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot
Pocket, Combo Sub, Alternative
Meal, Salad Tray, Corn, Mixed
Fruit, Condiments and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Super
Donut, Bagel Bars, Juice, Con-
diments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice,
Rolls, Pepperoni Pizza, Salad
Bar, Tossed Salad, Garden
Peas, Juice Bar, Condiments
and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Bj cits,
Sausage Patty, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Burrito, Sausage
Pizza, Tossed Salad, Blackeyed
Peas, Apple Crisp, Juice,
Condiments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Chicken Nuggets, Rolls, Corn-
dog, Lettuce Tomato, French
Fried Potatoes, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal VarietyF
Cheese Grits, Buttered Toast,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Lasagna, Rolls, Stacked Ham
Sandwich, Salad Bar, Lettuce &
Tomato, Green Beans, Peach-
es, Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Rounds, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot
Pockets, Combo Sub, Meatloaf,
Cornbread, Lettuce & Tomato,
Whole Kernel Corn, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Hamburger on a Bun, Chicken
Pattie on a Bun, Chicken Breast
Fillet on a Bun, Chicken & Rice,
French Fries, Turnip Greens,
Blackeyed Peas, Tossed Salad,
Beets, Juice Bar, Cornbread,
Condiments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Ham,
Macaroni & Cheese, French
Fries, Blackeyed Peas,
Steamed Cabbage, Tossed
Salad, Apple Crisp, Juice,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Sausage, Pears, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken
Pattie on a Bun, Chicken Breast
Fillet on a Bun, Chicken
Nuggets, French Fries, Savory
Rice, Mixed Vegetables, Tossed
Salad, Pears, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Juice,
Condi-ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Lasagna with
Ground Beef, French Fries,
Green Beans, Tossed Salad,
Waldorf, Fruit Cocktail, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Graham Crackers, Peach-
es, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Combo Sub, Baked Beans,
Potato Salad, Tossed Salad,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk


All progress is based upon a universal, innate desire on
the part of every organism to live beyond its income.
-Samuel Butler


* HORSE DONKEY TACK FARM ANIMAL SALE *


Sat. Feb. 26 10a-2pm


HOSTED ByPioneer Vilage


770 Alton Carlton Rd Wauchula

If you would like to donate farm related
items for this sale, please call Sherry
White at 863-245-1184. Proceeds go
toward the development of
Pioneer Village.





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Open Mon. Fri. 7:00 am 5:00 pm

Sat. 8:00 am 12:00 pm


863-773-9466
156 Will Duke Road, Wauchula
2:24c








6A The Herald-Advocate, February 24,2011


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
A night of fun with a friend in
Highlands County on Jan. 9,
2008. A single vehicle accident
shortly thereafter at 12:23 a.m.
was caused likely by speeding,
alcohol, and careless driving by
a friend.
The SUV, traveling over the
speed limit along U.S. 27 in
Sebring, drifted just off the
pavement. An overcorrection
and the vehicle started sliding
sideways across the highway,
then began overturning. The
Friend was ejected on the grass
median, sustaining only minor
injuries, and was charged with
driving under the influence with
bodily injury. Not his first driv-
ing offense, he is now serving a
five-year prison sentence.
The vehicle rolled across the
other lanes as well into a ditch,
which sent the windshield and
passenger airborne for an esti-
mated 30 yards. He landed on
his head in a bowling alley
parking lot.
A doctor at Tampa General
Hospital described the head
injury to Chris Owens, then 28,
of rural Zolfo Springs as similar
to falling on his head onto con-
crete from a five-story building.
His survival chance was one in
a thousand, his neurosurgeon
said. The big injury was to the
head, along with assorted
bumps and bruises and a frac-
tured rib or two.
Over three years later Owens,
now 31, is still alive thanks to
doctors and a loving family and
has shown a slight improve-
ment. He is bedridden and can-
not talk. His seven specialized
nutrients and eight medications
are administered through a
feeding tube into his stomach
several times a day.
His mother Vicky Owens,
tells her son, "You're my main
man, my lifeline to sanity. You
have been my little super hero
since you were a toddler." I
Chris at age 9 had saved the
life of D.J. Crosby, 4, who had
fallen into a fish pond covered
with duckweed. Chris went into
the pond and pulled out the
young boy. D.J. later said, "I
drowded. Chris saved me."
Chris had played soccer with
his two daughters the afternoon
before the crash. He was sick
that day--doctors said later he
had walking pneumonia-but.
went out with his friend that
evening anyway. The friend
said Chris was asleep at the
time of the accident.
The doctors at Tampa Gen-
eral Hospital removed a large
part of his skull, which was
cracked, to cope with brain
swelling. The skull piece was
put into a freezer for later trans-
plant.
Unfortunately, the freezer
failed and the skull piece was
ruined. A later transplant with
an artificial skull piece resulted
in a rejection and infection. The
piece was removed and has not
been replaced. Part of his head
remains sunken from lack of
skull support.
At the time of the accident
Chris was an employee at Four
Corners Mine for Mosaic,
working with trains carrying
phosphate pebbles.
In April 2008 Chris was
released to the home of his sis-
ter, Ruchelle Owens, an eighth
grade English teacher at a mid-
dle school in Plant City. She is
working on a doctorate degree
at University of South Florida.
Ruchelle and her mother took
care of Chris there until May,
2009, when he was moved into
the 16 by 85-foot home of his
grandmother, Lizzie Crosby
who lives at 3001 Doss Road
south of Steve Roberts Special.
Her living room was converted
into a hospital room. Two truck-
loads of furnishings had to be
hauled off to create the needed
space.
Chris' mother Vicky Owens
and his "Dad," Bill Owens, a
meat cutter at Winn-Dixie in
Avon Park, have a home next
door, but Vicky stays with Chris


COURTESY PHOTO
Chris Owens and his sister Ruchelle Owens at
Thanksgiving 2007.


Ruchelle Owens kept Chris for about a year in her home
and handles finances and records for her brother, visiting
him weekly.


as his main caregiver.
Other major caregivers are
grandmother Lizzie Crosby and
his natural father, Butch Wha-
ley who drives from Lakeland
twice a week to give Chris
extensive physical therapy, ex-
ercising his arms, legs and
many other muscles and joints.
His two best friends, Joe
Schultz accompanied by his
mother Susan and Pedro San-
tos, come by often. Miranda
Lee comes by often to read to
him. "Dad" Bill Owens visits
Chris everyday. Grandmother
Tina Owens visits regularly.
Sister Ruchelle Owens keeps
track of all the bills and paper-
work and drives from Plant City
once a week to spend time with
him.
Chris' two daughters show
him much love and often read
Bible stories to him. They are
Kaydance, 12, a seventh grader
at Hardee Junior High School,
and Mercedes, 11, a fifth grader
at Wauchula Elementary
School.
The family purchased a
$5,000 special hospital bed that
uses air pressure and turns him
over every two hours to prevent
bedsores. The bed has a cooling
system and a pressure point
release feature.
Socks are over Chris' hands
to keep him from scratching his
chest and pulling out his feed-
ing tubes. His front teeth were
removed to stop him from bit-
ing his lips.
Chris cannot talk, but his


"Dad" Bill Owens has raised Chris since the age of 1.


mother Vicky said he communi-
cates by blinking his only good
eye-his left one-twice for
"no," three times for "yes," and
four times for "I love you, too."
His right eye has nerve damage.
Doctors at the Tampa General
Neurosurgery' unit said Chris
was a "poster child" for surviv-
ing his accident.
Expenses have gone well
over $1 million, said his moth-
er. The Mosaic medical policy
covered initially, then Cobra,
and today's expenses are cov-
ered by Medicare Disability.
The family moved to Hardee
County when Chris was 14.
They were tropical fish farmers
in Riverview in Hillsborough
County and later moved the
business to Hardee.
After the accident the busi-
ness was closed. Without Chris,
it meant nothing.
Chris earned his high school
diploma at adult school in
Hardee County.
He loved his new job at
Mosaic working with trains car-
rying phosphate.
- Chris was good at construc-
tion, fixing cars and pumps, and
doing many other chores. He
replaced roofs and did electrical
work at the family home and
fish farm after the 2004 hurri-
canes.
His mother said Chris made
friends easily. He often brought
food and clothes to homeless
people in Wauchula. He would
sit and talk with them.
A homeless man named
Charley Taylor said Chris made
them feel important.
His mother said, "Chris has a
passionate heart. He would be
your friend and be there if you
needed him."
His local physician is Dr.
Diego Fallon.
His mother said several peo-
ple have had spiritual experi-
ences since Chris' accident. She
is expecting a divine healing for
her son.
"Pastor Wendell Sfnith said
before the accident that he felt
God had special plans for Chris.
The family needs a van so
Chris in his wheelchair can be
transported to various appoint-
ments. Donations could be sent
to Chris Owens, P.O. Box 1137,
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890.


Editor's Note: This article writ-
ten by Ruchelle Owens ap-
peared in the October 2008
"Pro-claim, a magazine of the
Plant City Church of God.
The time and day are forever
etched into my memory: Jan-
uary 9, 2008, 3:14 am. That's
when mom's call woke me from
a deep sleep. She had just
received word from a Tampa
General Hospital chaplain that
her son, my brother Chris
Owens had been injured in a car
accident and she had better
'Come quickly, with someone."
I was that someone.
Five months later, that night
is now a blur; a surreal dream
meant for someone else. The
wait for the chaplain was cruel
and long. Walking in the
Neurology ICU room was a
shock to the senses. There lay
my normally personable and
excitable brother, now coma-
tose and swollen, eyes purple
from the fractured skull after
ejection through the wind-
shield. Before reality could set-
tle in our minds, we were
escorting him to surgery for
removal of his skull's right por-
tion. This would allow his brain
room to swell without forcing
its way into the spinal cord,
causing suffocation and death.
One month in the ICU
seemed like one year. Never
was there a night or moment he
was left alone. The make-shift
window bed was too short for
an average person, yet was
more comfortable than a regular
bed 45 minutes away. Our
names became familiar to the
ICU staff, some with fondness,
others with annoyance. The
head nurse of the entire hospital
knew my name through contin-
uous e-mail communication.
Our family became proxy nurs-
es, cutting his nails, keeping
him clean, and helping any way
we could to feel productive.
Another month in a step-
down unit and one month in
another facility and Chris was
ready to either come home or
go to a nursing home. We
demanded he come to my
house,a town home I had closed
on only weeks before. My liv-
ing room became his hospital
room, complimented and
admired by medical personnel
and EMS workers alike. The
dining room beedfrhe storage
space for extra suglies, equip-
ment, oxygen tanks, and a
wheelchair.
Despite the pessimistically-
cautious doctors, I hold onto
hope that one day he will
emerge into the next state of
consciousness. Right now, he is
technically in a persistent vege-
tative state, opening his eyes
and responding to all stimuli.
Mom and I take full care of
him, from mixing and adminis-
tering medicines in his abdomi-
nal feeding tube, to suctioning
extra sputum from his tra-
cheotomy.
Usually, it's going through
the motions of the work, in near
exhaustion and, at times, frus-
tration. But reality likes to creep
in and those moments of clarity
stop me in my tracks. It could
be from a trite commercial, or
seeing his picture, but the tears
become uncontrollable and the
severity of the situation grabs
my heart with steel grips until
I'm begging for mercy which
seems nowhere in sight. A good
cry and one solid prayer later,
and I resume the mundane
activities of before, wishing my
beautiful brother would be
"alive" once more.
Ironically, the very moments
that bring the most joy bring the
most pain. Recently, Chris has
started gazing into my eyes,
never wavering or breaking
contact. It's that moment where
he's so close, yet so far away,
that hurts most. The bright
green eyes, so familiar, now
send unknown messages and
sometimes, I wonder if they
register my presence at all. I
speak to him as though he
understands all. I ask for him to
squeeze my hand, waiting with
bated breath for the day he
does. My family and I have
placed him in God's hands,
trusting that divine purpose will
manifest itself to us in a com-
prehensible way.
As I type this, Chris, Mom
and I are in a trauma room at
TGH's ER, waiting to see
where he will be moved. The


new port placed in his chest has
burst open because Chris keeps
pulling his arms up. The hall-
ways, and even names, are
becoming familiar, but we feel
no fear. Mom is reading a book,
and Chris is sleeping like an
angel.
Do I wish life was different?
Of course. Has the thought ever
come that his death would have
been easier? Absolutely, but


then followed by extreme guilt.
My brother may not be here, but
he's here. To be lying in a bed
under my roof is comforting
and being away too long stirs
my soul to discomfort. Chris is
my brother, my only sibling. I
wish I could whisk away on a
Friday night and not worry. I
long for the days of sleeping in
until I awake naturally. But for


now, this is my life and where
God has placed me. I will
accept it and handle it with all
the grace and dignity He pro-
vides me. Numerouspeople
have praised me and my family
for this, stating over and over.
that I'm such a good sister. My
repetitive response is simple
and true: "No, he's a good
brother."


Grandmother Lizzie Crosby is a main caregiver and con-
verted a large part of her mobile home to keep Chris.


Mother Vicky Owens has been with Chris every day since
the auto mishap Jan. 9, 2008. He has never been left
alone night or day, even at the hospital.


Tina Owens, Vicky Owens and Lizzie Crosby shown w
Chris in February 2011.


Daughters Kaydance and Mercedes see their father reg-
ularly and read him Bible stories.


Surrounded By Love


My Good Brother







February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Chris with daughters Mercedes and Kaydance in October
2004.


Chris with daughters Mercedes and Kaydance in
December 2007 one month before the accident.


Chris at about age 8 loved his go-cart.


Learn To Help
Hospice service
Good Shepherd Hospice
needs volunteers at all lev-
els, providing companion-
ship for a hospice patient or
family member, helping with
office duties or with support
groups.
Good Shepherd will hold a
free 90-minute volunteer ori-
entation session in Wau-
chula on March 8 at 3 p.m.
To register, call Regina
Merrick at 863-551-3943 or
emailmerrick@goodshep-
herdhospice.org.

Chamber Hosts
Risk Seminar
The Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce is
hosting a Lunch & Learn
seminar, "Risk Management
101" for chamber members
and their guests on Monday
at noon at the Hardee
County YMCA Burton Build-
ing, 132 S. 10th Ave., Wau-
chula.
Joe Albritton, present of
Albritton Insurance Services,
will talk about types of risk in
insurance and business. To
register; contact Casey Dick-
son at casey@hardeecc.-
com or call 773-6967.

Reunion For HHS
Classes of the '80s
All Hardee High School
classmates during the de-
cade of the 1980s are invited
to a block party and reunion
March 4-5. There will be
music, fun and food in down-
town Wauchula starting at 5
p.m. that Saturday.
For more information,
check out the website
http://hardeehs80sdecadere
union.embarqspace.com
ore-mail hhs80sreunion@-
yahoo.com.

Library Talk
S About Bees
Children and adults are
invited to a program on the
honey, pollen, royal jelly, wax
and skin care products pro-
duced by bees, with Robin
Boni of Ppqce River Bees.
The program isfrom 5 to
6:15 p.m. on Monday at the
Hardee County Public Li-
brary, Courthouse Annex II,
315 N. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17 at
Oak Street), Wauchula. For
more information, call 773-
6438.

Class Set For
Homebuyers
Pre-registration is under
way for the March 18 ses-
sion of the Homebuyer Edu-
cation Workshop, where par-
ticipants can learn all about
buying and maintaining a
home.
. There is a non-refundable
cost of $25 for registration.
The session is from 9 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. at the Hardee
County Commission board-
room, Room 102, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula. To
register, visit hardeecounty.-
net or drop by the Office of
Community Development in
Room 201, Courthouse An-
nex I, above the boardroom.
Free Amplified
Phones March 10
Hardee County residents
with a hearing or speech loss
can get a free amplified tele-
phone on March 10 from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. by sched-
uling an appointment.
A representative from
Hearing Impaired Persons of
Charlotte County, the phone
distributor for the area, will
be at the Catheryn Mc-


Donald Senior Center, 310
N. Eighth Ave., Wauchula. To
make an appointment, call
941-743-8347.

To find yourself, think for
yourself.
-Socrates
Many a man fails to
become a thinker for the
sole reason that his memo-
ry is too good.


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011
5:30 RM.


CASES


09-117-M
09-131-M
10-071-UDB
10-073-M
10-075-M
10-079-M
10-079-L
11-001-N
11-005-N


Salazar
McClelland
Reynolds
Phipps and Shelton
Sec of Housing & Urban Dev
Billy and Janice Hill
Billy and Janice Hill
Romero
Romero


588 MLK Jr Ave
202 S 8th Ave
823 N Florida Avenue
824 S 10th Ave
505 Pennsylvania Ave
426 S 10th Ave
426 S 10th Ave
214 W Townsend St
708 N 8th Ave


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. 2:24c




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Chris Owens posed with a Mosaic phosphate train. He
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list.
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Envelopes
Calendars
Magnetic Signs
ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS IN ONE CONVENIENT
LOCATION!








PAGE ONE


'Cats Beat Gators; Vikings Next Senior Apartments Opening


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcat boys
basketball squad continues to
play basketball.
The Class 3 A District 11
champions swept the Island
Coast Gators of Coral Gables
on Friday night 57-50 in the
regional quarterfinals.
That earned Hardee the right
to travel to Fort Myers on
Tuesday evening to face the
District 12 champion Bishop
Verot Catholic Vikings in a
semi-final matchup at Nevis
Gym. Coach Matt Herting has
four seniors, four juniors, a pair
of sophs and one freshman on
his squad. Results were not
available at press time.
If Hardee upset the home
team Vikings, the Wildcats
would have to play the regional
final against the District 9-10
winner, Tampa Catholic or
Tampa Berkeley Prep. The
good news is that Hardee would
host that game, on Saturday,
Feb. 26 at 7 p.m.
The Vikings had a hard time
playing against District 11 run-
ner-up, Bradenton Southeast
last Friday night, eking out a
59-54 victory. The Vikings. had
swept District 12 with dual
wins over the Island Coasat
Gators, LaBelle Cowboys,
Gateway Charter Griffins and a
win over the Fort Myers
Dunbar Tigers. The second
game between the Tigers and
Vikings was cancelled because
of storm warnings.
Hardee played the Island
Coast Gatois in a Friday
evening matchup that was a
close game until the third quar-
ter.
The Gators put three seniors
and two juniors on the court to
start the game, and had the
obvious height advantage as the
shortest of them was 6-0.
Hardee's backcourt of juniors


ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


Andrew Hooks, Jajuan Hooks
and Keshun Rivers are 5-9, 5-6
and 5-5 respectively. Senior for-
ward Tony Rodriguez goes 6-1
and freshman center Keyon
Brown is 6-5.
Brown won the toss, with
Andrew Hooks getting the first
deuce of the game. Senior Kyle
Harding answered with a trey
for the Gators and the game was
on. It was a defensive, feeling
out process over the next few
minutes, with Jajuan Hooks
putting Hardee up 7-6 with a
trey at the 3:30 mark. By the
end of the first period, the
Gators led 12-9.
Hardee stole the inbounds
pass to start the second stanza.
Senior D'Vonte Hooks fed to
classmate Tre' Anderson, who
relayed it to Jajuan Jones to cut
the lead to 12-11. By midway
through the period, Hardee had
a 17-16 advantage' when
D'Vonte Hooks rebounded a
Rivers' shot. Rivers hit the next
shot to give Hardee a little
breathing room. By halftime,
Hardee was still in front, but by
only two points, 22-20.
Island Coast knotted the
score to start the third period. A
Brown rebound broke that tie
and he also nailed the foul shot.
Hardee never trailed again.
Shortly, Jajuan Hooks drove to
the hole and dished to Brown,
who was fouled and hit both
free throws. When Brown re-
bounded a Rivers shot Hardee
had a 29-23 lead and the partial
crowd came alive, stomping
and cheering.
Encouraged, Hardee kept up
the hectic pace, subbing fre-
quently to keep fresh bodies in
the game. By the end of the
third period, Hardee led 41-29.
The Gators scored first in the
final quarter. Junior Timothy
Dal Bon sank a three-spot to cut
the lead to 41-31. By the six-
minute mark, Gators coach
Greg Coleman Jr. was frustrat-
ed and expressed it to the offi-
cials too forcefully, drawing a
technical foul. Jajuan Hooks hit
both free throws and upped
Hardee's lead to 45-32.
Hardee began to pour it on
over the next minute, but Island
Coast would not surrender and
began hitting treys. From a high
of 47-32, Hardee's lead was cut
to 47-37. The Gators had to
fight Hardee and the clock,
forcing them to foul. Hardee
made its free throws and kept a
10 to 7-point lead. At the 13-
second mark, it was 57-47,
when senior Mickey Rosado hit
the final three-pointer for Island
Coast to leave the score 57-50
as the final buzzer sounded.
Griffin led all scorers with 17
points. Dal Bon had 10 to make
two Gators in double digits.
For Hardee, Andrew Hooks
was tops with 15 points, and


ATTENTION:
CHAMBER MEMBERS
HIARDE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Lunch and Learn Seminar
"RISK MANAGEMENT 101"
How to understand risk in your business
and how insurance should fit.
Speaker: Joe Albritton
President, Albritton Insurance Services, LLC
Who: Open to Chamber Members and their
guests ONLY


Monday, February 28, 2011
12:00 p.m.


Location: Hardee County Family YMCA
Burton Building
132 South 10th Avenue Wauchula
RSVP: casey@hardeecc.com or (863) 773-6967


ALBRITTON 204 N. 6th Ave
ALBRITTON 1Wauchula
Z ,m,, .mm r (863) 773-4101


Date:
Time:


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Jajuan Hooks added 10. Brown
had nine points, D'Vonte Hooks
eight,Anderson, Rivers and
Rodriguez each four, and soph-
omore reserve a three-spot.
"We won, that's the bottom
line," said exhausted Hardee
Head Coach Vance Dickey. "It
was a team game, with balanced
scoring. Their No. 12 (Griffin)
got us with a couple of three's.
They worked the screens well,
curling in toward the basket,"
said Dickey.
"Our defense was the key to
the game. Free throws win
games, too. It wasn't pretty, but
it was good to get the pace in
our favor and put pressure on
them. The Verot game will be
tough; they've got some good
shooters," concluded Dickey.


Flowers

& Plants

up to

50% off









Used

Furniture

up to

70% off


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 67-unit senior apartment
facility is opening shortly.
First called Stenstrom Vil-
lage, the affordable community.
is officially opening as Chat-
ham Pointe Senior Aparments,
at 338 Stenstrom Road, Wau-
chula.
The 1- and 2-bedroom units
are for people 55 and better
with limited income, $14,000 a
year for a single person and
slightly more for a couple.
Rents are in the $400-$500
range.
In addition to the apartments,
there is a spacious clubhouse
and community room, a fitness
center, walking paths, shuffle-


STORE


First Come, First Served


board and bocce court, and res-
ident computer center with
internet access.
Each apartment has a fully
equipped kitchen with stove,
dishwasher, refrigerator and
pantry, and a large accessible
bathroom. The facility has a
building elevator, community
garden with potting shed, onsite
laundry facility, onsite profes-
sional management, 24-hour
emergency maintenance, resi-
dent services and social activi-
ties.
Pets are welcome.
The facility can be reached
from U.S. 17 South or South
Florida Avenue (SR 35A)
"These functional and spa-
cious apartment homes are des-


~L I v---f'-


SPACE IS LIMITED. RSVP To RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY!


APPLIANCES & BEDDING


tined to be the neighborhood of
choice for many of Wauchula's
senior residents who are seek-
ing affordable housing. Our
goal is to create a sense of com-
munity that will develop posi-
tive neighborly spirit through
an awareness of common
needs, and enhance individual
support systems and increase
awareness of local programs
and service," said Joe Largey,
regional vice president of The
NRP Group LLC, which has
built and will manage the facil-
ity.
For more information, visit
the website www.Chatham-
PointeSenior Apts.com or call
866-995-5886.


CLOSING


Our Lowest Prices Ever!


Floor

Sample

Bedding

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CLEARANCE






Used

Appliances

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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, February 24,2011


New & Used


Floor Samples

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All Lamps &

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At these prices items won't last long


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2:24c








2B The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011





-Hardee


Living


STATE GRAND CHAMPION
"e- i- 1 -.1F,


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Cruz Hernandez

Kara Williams Becomes

Bride Of Cruz Hernandez


Kara Nicole Williams of
Wauchula became the bride of
Cruz Kenneth Hernandez of
Wauchula on .the afternoon of
Saturday, Jan. 29, in Zolfo
Springs.
The bride is the daughter of
John and Donna Williams of
Wauchula. The groom is the son
of Daniel and Betty Hernandez
of Wauchula.
The couple exchanged mar-
riage vows at a 2 o'clock cere-
mony at New Vision church,
with Rod Cannon officiating.
The bride was given in mar-


riage by her father. Attending to
the bride as maid of honor was
Marina Martinez.
Flower girl was Macy King-
don, the bride's cousin. Ring
bearer was Will Ferimond.
Serving as the groom's best
man was Cody Hernandez.
Following the ceremony, a
wedding reception was held for
the couple at Cowgirl's in
downtown Wauchula.
The bride is a 2003 graduate
of Hardee Senior High School
and is currently employed at
Paul's Kitchen in Wauchula.


YOU Can Appear In .. .
Poet's Placdb
Are you a poet? Let us show it Your work could be published In
this newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relpes
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your owaoriginal
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear inthis fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and-town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or tax 773-0657.




'Uust Stuff"
133 E. Townsend St. Wauchula 832-5759

BIG SALE

EVERYTHING 20% OFFM
'Tes. Fri. Sat.
10 am 5 pm 10 am- 2 pm


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HelpsIE^ ^^~f al prbem o ate o
EXTEME.Iyo'e been working


SSG JOSE RETANA
A 2003 Hardee High School
graduate, Jose Retana, is return-
ing to Iraq for his second
deployment there.
Jose Retana, son of Enrique
and Alexandra Retana of Wau-
chula, left Fort Leavenworth,
Kan.', in January as part of Op-
eration Iraqi Freedom New
Dawn.
Three weeks after leaving
Hardee High, Retana was in
basic training aFot FortLeaven-
worth. He has been stationed in
Mannheim, Germany for three
years, then spent three years at
Schofield Barracks in Hawaii.
He has been back at Fort
Leavenworth for the past year.
He and his wife Auri Retana,
are parents of Rosalia Alex-
andra, age 2 and Jose Gabriel,
born on Dec. 17. He has two
brothers Enrique "Ricky"
Retana Jr. and Mikey Retana,
and two sisters Delores Retana
and Annavell Retana.
He was promoted to staff ser-
geant on Oct. 1. Letters may be
sent to him at SSG Jose Retana,
HHC 40th MP BN APO AE
09342. The family also asks
everyone to keep him in their
prayers.


"K -
ffw w


AIRMAN LUCY RUIZ
Air Force'Airman Lucy Ruiz
recently graduated from basic
military training at Lackland
Air Force Base in San Antonio,
Texas.
She is the daughter of Jose
Ruiz and Maria Ruiz of Ratliff
Road, Wauchula, and a 2009
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School.
The airman completed an
intensive eight-week program
that including training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical fit-
ness, and basic warfare princi-
ples and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits
toward an associate in applied
science degree through the
Community College of the Air
Force.
MAJ. MICHAEL ADLER
Michael Calvert Adler was
promoted to the rank of Major
on Dec. 17, 2010.
He is the son of Charles and
Linda Adler and grandson of
Herman Boyette, all of Bowling
Green. He presently resides in
Jacksonville with his wife
Michelle, a U.S. Army National
Guard sergeant who has served
one 12-month term in
Afghanistan. They are the par-
ents of Grace, Madi and Cody.
Maj. Adler is currently serv-
ing as the S3 Operations Officer
for the 1-111 Aviation Battalion
in Jacksonville. He joined the
Army National Guard on a full-
time basis in 1999, is a helicop-
ter pilot, and has served two 12-
month terms in Afghanistan.
During his career, he has
received the Combat Action
Badge, two Bronze Stars, three
Air Medals, the Army
Commendation Medal for
Valor, five Army Commenda-
tion medals and the NATO
Award-International Service
and Assistance Force.

The three great essentials
to achieve anything worth-
while are first, hard work;
second, stick-to-itiveness;
third, common sense.
-Thomas A. Edison


COURTESY PHOTO
Destiny McCauley of Bowling Green won top honors on Feb. 10 at the 2011 Florida
State Fair in Tampa. BCF 4915 Expectation T286 won grand champion cow-calf pair at
the Angus Show. Destiny owns the October 2007 daughter of G A R Expectation 4915.
A December 2010 bull calf sired by Gambles Hot Rod completes the winning pair.
David Husfeld, of Texas, evaluated the 137 entries. Destiny and the pair are shown
here in a scene captured by Shelia Stannard of the American Angus Association.


ONE BLUE, NO PINK
.. '




S,a






Mr. and Mrs. James Kingdon,
Bartow, a seven-pound 10
ounce son, James Edward, born
Jan. 17, 2011, Regency Medical
Center, Winter Haven Mrs.
Kingdon is the former Amanda
Justus. Maternal grandparents
are Randy and B. J. Shannon of
Lake Wales. Maternal great-
grandmother is Jackie Abshire
of Brevard, N.C. Paternal
grandmother is Charlotte
Kingdon of Wauchula.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant-as
a newborn only-may be added
at no cost. Any other photo of
the baby will cost $15.

You don't stop laughing
because you grow old. You
laughing.


Jaxon Moye

Has Turned

2 Years Old
Jaxon Moye, the son of Bret
and Jennifer Moye of Wau-
chula, turned 2 years old on
Wednesday, Feb. 9.
He celebrated the occasion
with a birthday party at his
home on Sunday, Feb. 6. The
theme for the party was Dogs.
Guests were served hamburg-
ers, hot dogs, baked beans and
chips.
Joining in the celebration
were grandparents Paul and
Denise Moye and Jack Clifton;
great-grandmother... Barbarsa


Jaxon


Williams; aunts and uncles
Chris and Christa Wolfe, Judy
Clifton, Sherry Clifton, and
Chance Moye; and cousin
Christopher Wolfe.


U-PICK STRAWBERRIES

$ 00 Pound(Quart)



2949 Center Hill Road Bowling Green
(Off Hwy. 62 4.5 miles West of US17)
863-223-5561 soc2:24p


TDY- TALK- KFRAY
If IfNou would like to STUD)' THE
BIBLE and/or if you want
SOMEONE TO TALK TO
or PRAY u'ITH YOU, please call
PASTOR ROBBIE at 305-766-3182.
Wauchula Seventh-Day Adventist Churc
205 South 11th Avenue Wauchula
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Think gain.


-I


Military

N ews I


-- m






February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Weddir
Kimberly "Kim" Martelle
Bode of Tampa has announced
the plans for her upcoming mar-
riage to Frederick "Rick" Lyle
Alberts Jr. of Tampa.
The bride-to-be is the daugh-
ter of Bob and Teri Becraft of
Land O' Lakes and Robert
Stephen Bode of Lakeland. The
prospective groom is the son of
Frederick Lyle and Sharon


'80s-Decad

Coming Up
Everyone who graduated
from Hardee Senior High
School during the decade of the
1980s is invited to the reunion
set for March 4-5 in Wauchula.
The event promises a chance
to reconnect with friends and
classmates spanning all years of
a graduate's time at Hardee
High.
Highlight of the reunion will
be a block party in downtown


ig Plans
Alberts of Wauchula.
The couple will exchange
wedding vows on Saturday,
March 5, at Northside Baptist
Church in Wauchula. A recep-
tion will follow in the
Fellowship Hall.
Friends and relatives of the
couple are invited to attend.
Call for times.



de Reunion

March 4-5
Wauchula on Saturday, March
5, beginning at 5 p.m.
'here will be music from the
'80s, fun activities and reminis-
cences, and lots of food.
For those graduates who have
moved away and must travel to
the event, reunion organizers
have arranged for hotel dis-
counts. Just e-mail hhs80sre-
union@yahoo.com.


RETIREMENT RECEPTION


COURTESY PHOTO
The clock's been punched for the very last time, the daily
grind has been left behind, no more meetings or pages
to fax, now it's time to kick back and relax! The public is
invited to a retirement reception for Vernon Benbow of
the Hardee County Property Appraiser's Office on Friday
.from 4 to 6 p. m. at the Wauchula Woman's Club, 131 N.
Seventh Ave. ....,-A


COURTESY PHOTO
Stephen Hill will join Bowling Green artists Gulf State
Quartet in sharing the Gospel in song.
Gaither Homecoming Alum

Joins New Hope Performance


Gaither Homecoming guest
vocalist Stephen Hill and Gulf
State Quartet will combine
efforts for a local concert on
Sunday at New Hope Baptist
Church.
The concert will begin at 6
p.m., and a love offering will be
taken.
Gulf State Quartet, from
Bowling Green, was formed in
March of 1999, and has traveled
extensively throughout Florida
spreading the Gospel through
song and ministering in over
100 churches of all denomina-
tions each year. Gulf State
recently hosted the annual
Homecoming service at Fort
Green Baptist Church, and reg-
ularly hosts old-fashioned barn
sings at the Rawls' barn on
State Road 62, bringing in some
of Southern gospel music's best
artists throughout the South-
east.
I'm beginning to under-
stand myself. But it would
have been great to be able
to understand myself when
I was 20 rather than when I
was 82.
-Dave Brubeck


Christian singer/songwriter
Stephen Hill, best known for his
appearances on the Gaither
Homecoming TV series, sings
from the heart about issues that
confront everyone. With a
wide-ranging vocal style and
straightforward, heartfelt deliv-
ery, his goal is to present the
Gospel'simply and directly.
"I want people to know there
is Someone who cares for them.
That person is Christ Jesus. No
matter what the question or
problem, Jesus is the answer,"
says Hill. His presentation of
the message of love, faith and
trust in the Lord has touched
hearts across America, Canada,
the British Isles and South
Africa.
New Hope Baptist Church is
located at 1999 SR 64 E. in
Wauchula. For more informa-
tion, call 773-2101 or visit
www.newhopewauchula.org.


Pioneer Creek RV ews
By Reggie DeSmet and Sharon Magee


CHAPEL
Curtis and Jean Chaffin and
Ray and Ruth Gunn greeted 200
while Cheryl Conkle played the
piano. Joanne Armour gave the
opening prayer, and special
music was by Mark and Debbie
Boyer. The choir's anthem was
"'Yesterday. Today and Tomor-
row." Pastor Jason spoke from
Hebrews 1 on "How Important
Is God's Word In Your Life?"
COFFEE
Janet welcomed 285 for cof-
fee and doughnuts and led "Oh
Canada" and the prayer. King
Norb Wilhelm led the pledge.
Our guest speaker was Jay from
Comfort Cover. Raffle tickets
were sold with all monies going
to the Cancer Society. King
Norb and Queen Gerry were
given shirts to wear as digni-
taries leading the Cancer Sur-
vivor Celebration Parade.
Janet said job well done to
Ginnie Merriman for movie
night, with 163 attending to see
"Secretariat."
ACTIVITIES
Horseshoes: Pioneer Creek
pitched horseshoes at Good
Life RV for the final tourna-
ment, with Good Life winning
20-12.
On a sadder note it is hard to
believe that our dear friend,
Calvin Chadd, passed away a
year ago after competing in a
meet with Good Life. Calvin
was a fierce competitor but was
well liked by all who competed
against him. He had many
friends here at Pioneer Creek,
but over the years developed
and harvested many friendships
with the competitors from other
parks.
We remember him for his
fine play and his many antics
around the pits. Many remem-
ber him for his razor-like wit.-


He was one of those people
who was fun to be around. Yes,
we have a few more doughnuts
left after the matches this year
but I would gladly give them all
up to have Calvin back in the
fold. Hope you are continuing
to ring the bell on those horse-
shoe pits in heaven.
Bowling: George DeSmet
had high game 192, Frank Drust
was high series with 490. For
the women, Bev Skelding had
high game of 158 and high
series of 446, she also picked up
the five-10 split.
Shuffle: Central District Pro
Tournament first-place winner
is. Max Tate; third place, Bob
Hoskins; and fourth, Ruth
Brown, in main event. In con-
solation, Nancy Singleton took
second place. Valentine's
Tournament winners were Bob
Hoskins and Mamie Morton.
Second went to Herb Tessier
and MaryAnn Fisher.
Golf: First-place winners of
Guess Your Score were Bob
Gregorie and Cheryl Conkle.
SPOTLIGHT
Garry and Diane Delves have
been married for 41 years "and
come from Verona, Ontario,
Canada, and have three children
and six grandchildren.
Diane was a financial plan-
ner for World Bank and retired
after 32 years of service.
Presently, she is the chairman of
painting, enjoys stained glass
and quilting. Garry retired from
General Motors after 34 years
as a planning coordinator. He is
chairman for the jam session,
enjoys wood shop, carving and
takes care of the sound equip-
ment. Both are co-chairmen of
the Canadian picnic.
They love our park because
of the activities offered, as well
as the friendliness of everyone.


As the traveler who has once been from home is wiser
than he who has never left his own doorstep, so a knowl-
edge of one other culture should sharpen our ability to
scrutinize more steadily, to appreciate more lovingly, our
own.
-Margaret Mead


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QUICK & EASY SERVICE

518 S. 6th Ave., Wauchula
Ph: 863.774.3536 Fax: 863.774.3538


4


Ranch Rodeo

Friday, February 25

7:00 pm
at the Hardee County Fair \

Wild Cow Milking, Bull Riding,
Team Sorting, Barrel Racing,
Old Timer's Roping, Calf Doctoring,
Mutton Busting* '(6yrs. and under)

*Participants for Mutton Busting need to preregister by
calling Gary Jones at 375-4074
Limited to 20 participants


I


Immigration Filing Notary Services ;
Crew Leader Card Filing ITIN Number Applications i

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Payrolls Bill Paying Services Harvesting Payrolls


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g REFERRAL DISCOUNT
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I TAX PREPARATION FEES I*
:,' '"Must MENTION AD TO RECEIVE DISCOUNT
- - - - --.mm-- - - --m - m -
SI PARA NUESTROS CLIENTS NUEVOS
K RECIBA $10
DE REBAJO PARA PREPARATION DE TAXAS*
>, PARA NUESTROS CIENTES EXISTENTES
DESCUENTO DE REFERENCIA
N TRAIGANOS UN CIENTE NEVO YLOS DAS RCEIBIRAN
I RECIBA $10 OFF I
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SHAGA SU INCOME TAX AHORA
SIN PAGO POR ADELANTADO!!!
Clasificaci6n de Immigraci6n Servicios de Notaria
Clasificaci6n de Targetas de lider de tripulaci6n
Aplicaci6nes de numero de ITIN

NOS ESPESCIALIZAMOS EN:
Impuestos Federales y Estatales Contabilidad Mensual
N6minas de Pagos Servicio de Pagar sus Facturas


Mensuales N6mina de pago para Cosecha
72:10-24c "
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Bode/Alberts


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ASSOC I ATES/ASSOC I ADOS
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4B The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011



Softball Girls Split


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two weeks into the season,
the Hardee girls softball team is
playing at .500.
The girls handily won their
first two games, then lost tough
games to Sarasota Cardinal
Mooney and Haines City.
Results from Friday's games
against DeSoto were unavail-
able at press time.
This week's Friday games
against Bradenton Southeast
have been changed to March
30. Next week, there is a dou-
ble-header at Sebring on
Tuesday, with the JVs playing
at 6 and varsity about 7:30.
Next Friday, March 4, Hardee
will travel to Bradenton for a
double-header against South-
east.

Avon Park
The Lady Wildcats opened
the season on Feb. 8 at home
against Avon Park. Hardee won
both the JV and varsity games.
Coached by Sharri Knight
and Julian Garcia, the varsity
spotted the Lady Red Devils the
first score and went on to win 7-
1.
A walk opened the game,
with the Avon Park player steal-
ing second and third and cross-
ing home plate on an RBI single
for the Lady Devils' only score
of the game.
In the home half of the first,
Hardee evened the score.
Leadoff batter Kayla Knight
singled and scored on a single
by Brooke Tyson and double by
Elvira Servin. It was 1-1.
The game rocked along until
the bottom of the third, when
Knight led off again, this time
with a triple. With one away,
Courtney Parks was hit by a


pitch. A Servin homer cleared
the bases and upped the score to
4-1. Penny McGuire singled to
start another rally, but was
stranded when the third out
occurred.
It was four up, three down for
Avon Park in the top of the
fourth. With down, Knight sin-
gled and raced home on hits by
Tyson and Parks. It was 5-1.
Hardee got its final pair of
tallies in the home half of the
fifth. Servin singled and Karlee
Henderson was safe on an error.
A hit by McGuire and sacrifice
by Addison Aubry brought the
first two runners home. There
was no further scoring and the
game ended at the middle of the
seventh inning.

Booker
In the first road game of the
season on Feb. 11, Hardee went
to Sarasota to face the Booker
Lady Tornadoes, whose starting
pitcher had difficulty at first.
Kaitlin "Kate" Thomas
walked and Tyson was hit by a
pitch. Parks walked. Hardee
began hitting, with McGuire
getting a two-RBI smfgle and
Henderson following it with a
triple. A walk, strikeout,
ground-out and another strike-
out ended the inning, but
Hardee had a 6-0 advantage.
It was three up, three down
for Booker in the home half of
the first. Hardee went back to
work, Thomas tripled, Tyson
doubled and Parks singled. A
Henderson single to right field
started the scoring and the last
two came in on overthrows. It
was 10-0.
Things were quiet again until
the fourth frame. Parks singled
and Henderson drew a walk.
Both came in on an Aubry hit.


Booker got its only score on a
triple and sacrifice in the bot-
tom of the fourth.
Hardee got its final trio of tal-
lies in the top of the fifth, when
Karina Fernandez walked, and
Thomas and Parks both singled.
All three scored on a Henderson
triple. When Booker failed to
score in the bottom of the fifth.
Hardee won 15-1 on the 10-run
rule.

Mooney
Hardee hosted Sarasota
Mooney on Feb. 14. The Lady
Cougars scored first on a single
and triple up the middle by
Kiley Pritchard. In the home
half of the inning, Bailey
Carlton grounded out and
Knight was out on a popup to
third. Parks singled but was
stranded.
Mooney added another run in
the top of the second on back-
to-back singles and finished in
the top of the fifth with a pair of
scores on a pair of singles and
another Pritchard triple. It was
4-0.
Hardee got its only scores in
the home half of the sixth.
Knight drew a walk and Parks
doubled. A Henderson hit
scored both teammates, but
Hardee lost 4-2.

Haines City
Despite seven strikeouts by
pitcher Kayla Knight, Hardee
lost this game 3-0 as the Lady
Hornets picked up a run in the
first, another in the third and a
final on in the fifth inning.
"Haines City is good, but I
felt we could have beaten them.
We have a'young team overall,
it's promising," said Coach
Sharri Knight, who has two sen-
iors, one junior, three sophs and
seven freshman on her squad.

JV Game
The junior varsity team under
Melanie Henderson and Linda
Arredondo has had only one
game, playing at home against
Avon Park on Feb. 8.
Walks and hit batters were
the norm as Hardee plated 15
runners in a long home half of
the first inning. Arissa Camel,
Isabel Abel, American San-
doval, Karina Fernandez,
Noemi Navarro, Latiesha Allen,
Rachel Coker, Viridiana Cha-
vez and McKenzie Staton
scored, several twice.
Five runners scored in the
second inning, adding Jessica
Johnston and Maixee Khang to
the scoring column. Hardee got
a final run in the third inning.
Avon Park got its only runs in'
the top of the fourth, but Hardee
won 21-2 on the 10-run mercy
run.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula 16-year-old Rigo
Ramirez will box for the area
Junior Olympics 145-pound
title.
SHis will be among the bouts
on. the card at The Rural
Rumble, on Saturday at the
Turner Agri-Civic Center, 2250
NE Roan St., Arcadia (across
from Desoto High School).
Doors open at 5 p.m. and bouts
begin at 6.
The evening of action is a
combination USA and Junior
Olympics boxing/entertainment
extravaganza, featuring
Screaming Rock, Ray "D" and
.Alachi 4000. General admis-
sion is $15.
There will also be appear-
ances by the U.S. Marine
Corps Color Guard, world
champion Hector Camacho,
WBAN champion Laura Ram-
sey, Bowling Green pro Daniel
Lozano and OMEEZ.
Ramirez and his brother
Arturo, 15, were in Junior
Olympics area action last
Saturday in Tampa, but the
bouts weren't concluded.
Arturo Ramirez lost a close
decision in the 114-pound divi-
sion, while Rigo won his first
fight when his corner stepped in

In 1985, astronaut David
Griggs used a Duncan
Imperial Yo-Yo on live TV
from the deck of the space
shuttle.

North Carolina produces
more sweet potatoes than
any other state. Illinois
tends to lead the country in
pumpkin production.



YOUR

BUSINESS

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APPEAR

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TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At

773-3255


and stopped the bout at the end
of the second round.
A victory would send Rigo
Ramirez to the regional Junior
Olympics.
Also on the Saturday card is
WVauchula youngster Isaac
Frederickla nephew of pro
Dillet Frederick, who fights in
the 95-pound division. He is
among several area youngsters
training under Troy Carter at his
gym in Arcadia.
All proceeds will benefit
Screaming Rock Ministries,
DeSoto County High School
football and the DeSoto Road
Warriors.


We need people in our lives with whom we can be as open as possible. To have real
conversations with people may seem like such a simple, obvious suggestion, but it
involves courage and risk.
-Thomas Moore

Roy Jacuzzi, who is credited with inventing and marketing the first integrated
whirlpool bath in 1968, came from a family of inventors who are credited with inven-
tions in both aviation and agriculture, including an agricultural pump.


At CenturyLink we care about technology. More importantly,
we care about reaching across the nation to connect us all to
what matters'most. Each other. So our advanced technologies
deliver broadband, entertainment and voice for your life.


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centurylin k.com/strongerconnected


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2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc


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2:24c







































On February 5, 2011, at the Square One Sporting Clays Club, located off
Highway 70 in Lake Placid, 200 shooters participated in the 15h Annual Kiwanis
Sporting Clays Shoot. Each participant shot 100 clay pigeons at 14 different
stations either by shooting on a 4 member team or as an individual.
Refreshments and lunch were furnished in the ticket price.

Trophies were presented to the following winners:


4 Person Team:

Men's Individual:
Women's Individual:
Youth Individual:


Jokers Dirk Kryzan, Michael Krust, Bruce Caudill,
and Tommy Greenwood
William Lamendola
Autumn Blum
TuckerAlbritton


7THWANx / f011o f4 iong Sponorns r ou confribun:

2011 Corporate Sponsors


CF Industries, Inc.
David Singletary, State Farm -
CenturyLink
Florida Hospital-Heartland Division
Johnson Harvesting, Inc.
Kimley-Hom and Associates, Inc.
Sevigny & Timmerman Eye Care


Alan Jay Automotive of Wauchula
Benchrest Shooters Supply, Allen Widi
Charles Cannon, Sr.
Conley Grove Service, Inc.
Coldwell Banker Am-South Realty
Emerson & Mary Jones
Florida Fence Post Co, Inc.
Jan's
Jim See Realty, Inc.
Mancini Packing Company
Morrell, Watson & Southwell, PA
Petteway Grove Service
Safeguard Security Inc.
Wauchula Abstract & Title Co., Inc.


Clifford M. Ables, III PA
S Dr. Barbara Carlton & Family
First National Bank of Wauchula
Florida Fuel of Hardee County
Krause Grove Service, Inc.
Peace River Electric Coop., Inc.
Vandolah Power Company

2011 Station Sponsors
Albritton Insurance Services
ener Benny Albritton Grove Service'
Charile Matheny
Cooper's Wayside Flowers
Culligan Water Conditioning
Farm Bureau Insurance
Florida Fertilizer Company
Jan L. DeBoom, CPA
Joe L. Davis
Manley & Associates, CPAs, PA
Max Water Systems Inc.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Superior OK Tire Store, Inc.
Swaine & Harris, PA


Gun Raffle Winner: David Smedley


D & S Cattle Company
Doyle E. Carlton, III
FINR
John Stephens, Inc.
Mosaic
PhosChem Supply Co.
Wauchula State Bank


ATP Agri-Services, Inc.
Chapman Fruit Company
Citrus Solutions-Matt Moye
Crop Production Services
DeSoto Home Health Care
Fields Equipment Co., Inc.
Heartland Growers Supply
JLC Farms
Kenneth B. Evers, PA
Manuel Citrus, Inc.
New Life Chukh of Wauchula
Reality Ranch
Staton, Inc.
Torrey Oaks Golf Course


EZ Golf Cart Winner: Coy Rucker


50/50 Cash Raffle Winner: Damon Hughes

A special thank you to the following:.


"Participants ,Kiwanians 4-H Foundation
*FINR (Donated Gun) ,Vandolah Power (Donated Golf Cart)


February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


2:24c


Kw** CySo



XI *







6B The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


CHURCH WORSHIP LEADER
First United Methodist Church of Wauchula
First United Methodist Church of Wauchula is a congregation that
strives to "Know God, Love Others, and Serve the World." It is
through this mission statement that we see the need to reach a
larger demographic and wish to begin greater opportunities both
for worshipping God and growing in God. From this need we
have decided to hire a part time worship leader. We are seeking
through God's direction, an individual who would be able devel-
op some of the opportunities mentioned above as well as begin
to bring contemporary elements into our current worship service.
For further information in reference to this ministry opportu-
nity please contact the Church Office at 863-773-4267 or at
wauchulal stumc@embarqmail.com. ci:20,27c


Elder Affairs SHINE Program
Seeks Volunteers
-Volunteers help improve the lives of Florida's elders-

Tampa The Florida Department of Elder Affairs, along
with the West Central Florida Area Agency on Aging,
invites you to join the award-winning SHINE team of
volunteers. This program helps elders make informed
decisions about Medicare, health insurance and
prescription drug plans.
SHINE volunteers provide individual counseling and
assistance to elders and their caregivers about Medicare,
Medicaid, Medicare plan choices, long-term care planning
and prescription discount drug programs. Volunteers may
also make educational presentations to community
groups and participate in local health fairs-senior fairs and
other outreach and educational events.
If you would like additional information about this exciting
opportunity and would like to become a SHINE volunteer
in Hillsborough, Hardee, 'Highlands, Manatee and Polk
Counties, please call the West Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging at 813-740-3888, ext. 5593.
WEST CENTRAL FL. AREA AGENCY ON AGING
Attn: Robin Watt, Volunteer Manager
5905 Breckenridge Pkwy, Suite F
Tampa, Florida 33610
(813) 74u-3888 Fax (813) 623-1342
Website: www.AgingFlorida.com 23-24
cl2:3-3:24c


. Topsy See
|REAL ESTATE
-773-5994e
Topsy See
3BR 2B 2005 DW Mobile Home Very Modern all appliances
set on 5.4 acres all fenced w/pond $130,000.
1 ac. high & dry. Approx. 269 ft. road frontage-deed restricted.
$29,900.
Very nice 1980 M.H. 1982 sq. ft., fully furnished, move in ready,
includes linens, dishes, cookware, TV, most anything you will need.
This is a great buy at W&O8 REDUCED $42,000.
3BR 2 Bath DW. All appliances, window treatments, ceiling fans
included. Very nice home in excellent condition. Sets on 5.2 ac.
$13, 0. REDUCED $127,500.
Beautiful secluded property in Golf View. 8.8 ac with 2 building sites.
$75,000
3 BR 2 Bath 1987 DW 1890 sq. ft. all the extras including security
system. 5 acres with beautiful oaks and stocked pond. $115.000.
Hwy 17 frontage-1BR 1 Bath home sits on 50 x 152 lot in Bowling
Green. $84,500. c12:24c
I ^^^B^^^^B^^^f~'cl2:24c ~


L AMBER ET
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
MAKE AN OFFER! CB/Stucco, 3B/2Bth,
home built in 2004, tile and carpet floors, large
bedrooms, utility and eat-in kitchen. Asking
$115,000
SPACE GALORE in this 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco
home; large kitchen, living room with fireplace,
double garage, spacious yard for outside enter-
taining. $165,000
5 acres prime land located on Merle Langford
Road. $65,000


I.


_ ROUND BAIL HAY for sale $30 per _
bail. Call Donald 781-0554.
2:10-3:10p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
75 HP 1997 4x4 open cab tractor
with ROPS, 2,200 hours, $9,500.
321-284-7632. 1:20-2:24p
BW LAND & CATTLE Ag property
fertilization management. Fences,
pastures, groves. Brian 941-391-
1277. 2:17-3:17p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


1993 CADILLAC
VIN: 1G6KY5291PU805599
8:00 A.M. March 07, 2011
CLIFF'S WRECKER
SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL


I A t m t v


I HousesI


Micl 4s


94 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE _3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N. NEXTEL 180 PHONES for sale.
Laredo, 4WD, converted mail jeep Hollandtown Road. $190,000. Chargers, clips $75 each. 781-
with table. Runs good. Route 863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p 9144. 2:24-3:3p
ready. New radiator and starter. 3BR/2-1/2 BATH In Wauchula, 2 CEMETERY PLOTS $1,000 for
Just needs a little TLC inside. Rivervlew subdivision. New both. Call 735-0285. 2:10-3:10p
863-473-1299. 2:24p kitchen and appliances. huae -l-- -. ,_.


04 CHEVY SILVERADO $6,000
cash. 781-1062. 2:24c
1952 FORD RESTORED $10,000
negotiable. 863-835-2034.
2:17-3:17p
05 CHEVY 1-TON 4X4 Duramax
Diesel 12' flat bed, underbox stor-
age. Excellent condition $15,500.
863-245-8911. 2:10-3:10p
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
cars. Pickup available. Crooms
Salvage. 781-3767. 2:7tfc

Help ante


AUTO BODY COLLISION TECH
wanted for dealership. Exper-
ienced only ASE or I-CAR certifi-
cations needed. Apply in person
8:00 am 4:00 pm. See Skip in
bodyshop. Alan Jay Chevrolet/
Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep Hwy. 17
South, Wauchula. 2:24tfc
NEEDED FEMALE CARETAKER
for elderly lady 832-0738. 2:24p


LOVE TO HUNT, FISH?? 1.5 a/c adjoins the 13,500 acre
Arbuckle Lake Wildlife management area. Modern 3 BR, 2+ bath
home, attached garage, large "L" shaped decked with views of
lake and adjoining wildlife area. Detached 2 car/2 story garage
with exercise room or apartment? Motor home parking, dock, 160
ft. lake frontage. Beautifully shaded with mature Oaks and much
more. Asking $575,000.
24 a/c LAKEFRONT (Lake Annie) Large tree nursery with inven-
tory, nice 3 BR, 2 B home, "cook" house, 2 apartments 2 wells, all
under irrigation. Asking $735,000. For the package' Possible
owner finance.
1600 ACRE LAKEFRONT RANCH Package includes modern 5
BR home, 2 employee houses, cattle herd, exotic animals, citrus
and over 1 3/4 mile lakefront and paved road frontage. Adjoins
State lands. $7999. Per acre entire.
154 and 212 Acre Pastures with Paved Road Frontage. Both
fenced, shade for animals, some game, $6000. Acre.
Several citrus.groves including 52 acres near Limestone.
Just a few of my listings. Check web site for full detail.


Find details as well as other listings at
www.marvadsit.com.


Foryou sot al

78110g-I 21,


Bus. (863) 773-0007 -
Fax: (863) 773-0038 '
www.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert
5 acres Lonnie Shackleford Road. $85,000
AFFORDABLE and CONVENIENT! This
2B/1Bth M/H has nice yard and large screened
porch; completely furnished. $38,000
5 SECLUDED Acres of natural Florida; large
trees, and plenty wildlife. $22,500
5 ACRE TRACTS AVAILABLE CALL "OR
COME BY TODAY FOR MORE INFORMA-
TION!


SERVICE YOU CAN COL


DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
DELOIS JOHNSON 773-9743


ASSOCIATES


JNT ON r1
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


JJL L 1 m
.5... U


c12:10-24c


family room with fireplace large
laundry room, 2 utility/storage
rooms. Moving, must sell, 100k
OBO. 863-245-8911. 2:20-3:10p
PARK MODEL 1BR/1-1/2BA fur-
nished, w/FL room & screened
porch-Little Charlie Creek RV
Park Lot 166. 828-775-9639.
2:10-3:10p


REWARD for the return of refrig-
erator/freezer and handcart taken
from house on Griffin Whidden
Road. 735-1640, 445-0413.
2:24p


1959 rVFORu UDA Iracutr.
Partially rebuilt. Make and offer.
863-735-0792. 2:3;3:3p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
send scrap gold In the mail. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
1:6tfc
60 LOADS FILL DIRT. Has some
grass, digging more ponds. You
dig ponds, you keep dirt. 863-
990-6489. 1:6tfc
DEHUMIDIFIER $178 new, $75.
904-222-4607. 1:6tfc


r-

B right essential 6

beginnings Commercial
Painting Service, Inc.
No Job Too Small or Too Large!
Steve Christmas Cell 863-781-4001
With GodAll Thins Are Possible ~ Matthew 19:26




Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
O Monday Friday
1S 9:00 A.M. 12:00.Noon
3 Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider 2:3-24c
OPPOPTUMNTY cI2:3-24c


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood. Won't
last long at $220,000!
Nice lot in Torrey community with frontage on
Hole Number 6 of Torrey Oaks Golf Course. Lot
$14,900 Owner will build to suit for just
$159,900!
CHECK OUT THIS PRICE! Great 5 acre tract
fenced and ready to build on! $35,000
Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $98,500!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $229,000


I Ben Gibson
Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Rick Knight


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


cl2:24c


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478




Free Estimates

Insured 30+ years experience c0:2tfc


DESOTO COUNTY




EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 Z


~r~-~----~--~--,---.i.-


PRICE REDUCED! Beautiful home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. Was
$475,000.....Now $379,000!
Lake June House! 4 Bedroom. 4 1/2 Bath with
over 200 feet on Lake June. Includes Jacuzzi,
Sauna, Dock & Boathouse. $780,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access; next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool.
Land also has 7 1/2 acres of producing nursery.
$430,000
A Little Bit Country! Three Bedroom Two Bath
Home on Over Two Acres. Great Area for Horses
or Other Animals or Just Enjoy the Serenity and
Calm of This Popular Part of the County!
$169,500
POOL Home! 3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath home.
Double French doors open up to the huge porch
and pool area. $178,900.


j ..............


I- -






February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


U-
GERMAN SHEPARD female. 4
ys. old, good disposition, loves
children. $100. 863-245-8804.
2:24p
FREE TO A GOOD HOME 1/2
American Bulldog, 1/2 Cur, 8
months old, male, great family
pet. 445-0430. 2:24nc
FREE TO A GOOD HOME black
male cat netured. I will pay to
have shots up to date. 773-4638.
2:24;3:3p
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh




Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


S

K F;


U-
ATTENTION! State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


30' TRAILER WITH 30' sunroom
attached. Reduced $3,000.
Crystal Lake Village. New bath-
room, patio. 863-773-6351.
1:27:2:24p


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo. up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
698-4908. 8:20tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh
$400 MONTHLY. Electric included.
Lovely large furnished country
apartment on 64. 863-781-3298
2:24c
3/1 A/C NICE Neighborhood.
$700 monthly, $200 security. 863-
781-7061. 2:10-3:10p
APT. & HOUSES 773-6667. 2:24c


IIEARTIAND
YOUR TO
REAL ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties
* Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
PRICE REDUCED to $199,000. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.
* 5 acres with 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage home, fenced yard, large oaks,
peaceful setting in east Hardee county. $149,900. Call Jeri Wohl @
381-8595.
* 3 BR, 1 BA lake cottage on highly desired Lake Byrd in Avon Park.
Beautiful views from living room, lakeside gazebo, storage unit, boat.
$99,900. Call Jeri Wohl @ 381-8595.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net
c12:24c



I THE PALMS ^

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through February 281h
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martip
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 c.
-.- Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c2 324c


U
3/2 FENCED IN YARD, Riverview,
$840 monthly, $840 security. 863-
735-1953. 1:27-2:24p
NICE CLEAN 2 BEDROOM 1 bath
house. Central heat/cool, new
carpet and a walk-in closet, wash-
er & dryer hookup. $150 per
week, damage deposit and refer-
ences required. 773-9793 or 863-
832-0676. 2:24p


VICKER'S LAWN CARE. Free esti-
mates. No job to big/small. 863-
448-7491. 2:24-3:24p
HARDEE RESIDENT looking for
part time employment. Anything
from manual labor, pet sitting to
accounting/sales. 941-716-1411.
2:24p
CARING HANDS MINISTRY,
assisted living facility/respite
care. 863-781-6680, 863-773-
6128. 2:3;3:3p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh


OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitatory.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


QUEEN, WASHINGTONIAN,
Roebelenii, Sabal, Royal and
Bismark Palms in following coun-
ties, Hardee, Okeechobee and
Charlotte. Large quantity only.
We dig! Please call Dave 352-281-
0235. 2:24p
CHILDREN'S WORLD DAYCARE.
Wanted toddlers, please call 773-
4701. 2:24;3:3c


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc


/ Foreign and, Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg.#MV-40625
"No jIcob's tcoco big-"


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
1 Mike Adcox Manager


IT 1 11 h
APABTMENTS%1ff




GE LOT i M



2 BR/ Bath $50011 MonthI









KiXPARTMENTS


719Wanamaer ve.-1Ft. Mead


F~lores &FloreInc
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 700-m^^^^1


Just listed! 3BR/1.5BA CB home with central air & heat, built in
1992, 1376 sqft total, and minutesfrom North Wauchula
Elementary. Property offered at $79,000
Building Lot! 2.03 Acres on Kazen Rd. Just minutes from
Wauchula. Priced at $34,900
2.76 Acres outside of Zolfo Springs. Lots of Oaks. Great building
site. Offered at $24,900
8 +/- acres south of Zolfo Springs. Great for camping, cattle or
atv's. Property sits at the end of a dead-in private road.
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area. We are a
HUD authorized agent!


WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
L' Remember, Our listings are on the Internet. I
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
ruoAfter nA S.r


Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380


(863) 781-4084
(863) 245-6891
cl2 24c


MISSION THRIFT STORE, INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available.
2:17tfc
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-2. 2215
Ralph Smith Rd., Wauchula.


MULTI-FAMILY 118 S. 2nd Ave.,
Furniture and everything frorrn
infants to mens tools. Mail Jeep
also. Don't miss this! Fri Sat;,
7 am ? 2:24p


Doeoto Appliance

*8 Repair
Esrablitshed Since 1 987 S &Rir
SALES SERVICE


* 863-773-3573

Fax 863-773-0521 108 C
x desotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchul


arlton Street
a, FL 33873^


New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires


BIG SALE ON

ALL TIRES.
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
1 E VS A (across from Billy Ayers
VISA Wal-Mart) Tire Technician2:
cl2:24C


$500 OFF
any Vehicle with Coupon
: Must Bring Coupon


Monday Thursday Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7 pm 10 am to 7:30 pm
Wauchula Wauchula Hills
(across from C..ne, o
First National Hwy 17 -
Bank) Billy Hill and REA Rd.
77B'CCC7 Billy Hill oS
773-6667 Mari Owner Ruby 773-2011







Joe tDaviA


I N C.,







Monica Rease
(863) 781-0888


REALTY RS
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.


333 ac ranch has pasture, irri-
gation system, 12" well,
3BR/3BA two-story home, 3,000
ft landing strip. $1,498,500!
34 ac fenced pastureland on
private, graded rd in Zolfo
Springs, Two wells, Greenbelt
qualified. $238,000!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!
3BR/1BA home in BG on corner
lot w/fenced yard, workshop,
shed. $68,900!
5 acs fenced on Mel Smith Rd
zoned Agriculture. $45,000!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
Imagine your new home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Fenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
Ideal for farming! 21.86 ac
pasture is fenced, has well, close
to town. $186,500!


Roomy 4BR/2BA CB home in
Wauchula on corner lot!
Remodeled bath, solid surface
kitchen countertopS, large
screened porch, new carport!
$158,000!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!
High & dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$120,000!
40 acs farmland,. 8" well,
paved rd frontage, near
Wauchula. $360,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Pack your
overnight bags & head to this
peaceful retreat! 5 ac fenced
w/lots of oaks, pond, creek,
12'x20' shed. $66,500!
38.5 ac on the Peace River
w/lots of beautiful oaks, pines
and palmettos! Pole barn &
2BR/2BA MH. $524,900!
Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil hunt,
relax! $90,000!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS...-781-0153 SANDY LARRISON.... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL...... 781-7633 MONICA REAS...-... 781-0888
DAVID ROYAL............781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c1224
^^*^^ d&. 4C


BEAUTIFUL

FOREST GLADE

APARTMENTS
at
700 East Townsend Street
Wauchula, FL 33873



1 Bedroom Starting at $391 2 Bedroom Starting at $422
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Central heat & air, refrigerator, range. Close to shopping.
Office Hous: 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

TDD: 711 863-773-0592
Committed to the future of rural communities I,
This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer cl2:24c


II --


I


a


0


J


0 L-


11







8B The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


The


YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published in
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear In this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.



ii liii
^ GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Handyman Remodels

Concrete Additions

Free David Cole
Estimates Licensed & Insured 863-214-1471
CBC1256749





U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAFOL

Buy Here!$Hu, I scoIunts$' o N.oee or
Pay Here! fo C .. sinanceChares












863-397-984
354 Bostick Road Bowling Green. FL
J<
.,t,,f -- --'




www.gatorheatingandair.com
Gator Heating-Air-Mold Inspections LLC
I \l |c .i.' |2112 l'tl, t' I '' l -'-4 ',




Ldoa's HowSe Thrlft store

3O Furniture Home Decor Crystal NO0
\g China Quality Merchandise Op*



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
(Directly Behind Heaven Sent)





9/eaven cen/ Cleaning croice
Now offered by Sherry White Ministries
Carports Garages Homes Lawns
l-I .] 0: -f.l [ B I ] SJt


773-0523 *


245-1184


RIVER CHASE APARTMENTS


316 RIVER CHASE CIRCLE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873

Central heat & air, refrigerator, range.
Close to shopping.

.1 Bedroom Starting at $404
2 Bedroom Starting at $441

Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Office Hours 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
TDD: 711
M 863-773-0592


Committed to the future of rural communities..
This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. c2 24c


Cluassifieds

County Finances In Good Shape


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Count.'s financial
statements received the highest
possible rating after an inde-
pendent audit \ as performed by
the NCT Group.
Michael Carter. a partner
with the NCT group. went be-
fore the Hardee County Com-
mission on Thursday night to
present the findings of the audit.
He said his firm uses a rating
of one through four, with four
being the highest. Hardee
County received a four.
"The county is in very good


shape as of Sept. 30. 2010."
Carter said. September 30 is the
end of the fiscal year for the
count%.
Hardee County has assets
totaling S93.057.000. That
includes S16.8 million in cash
and investments. $2.7 million in
accounts receivables. S3.08
million in restricted assets.
S69.75 million in capital assets
and S619.000 in other assets.
The restricted assets are
money designated for the land-
fill closure, which is expected
to cost more than S10 million.
Capital assets include all


land. equipment, roads, build-
ings. etc. that are owned by the
county.
Liabilities total S16.17 mil-
lion. That includes S1.14 mil-
lion in accounts payable and
accrued liabilities. S1.08 mil-
lion in deferred revenue. S2.52
million in long-term debt.
S768.000 in compensated ab-
sences and S10.65 million for
landfill closure.
Net assets totaled
S76.881.000. Revenues for
2010 were $31.32 million and
expenditures were S30.3 mil-
lion.


LOVELY LUNCH


COURTESY PHOTOS
Students at Hardee Junior High School enjoyed a Literacy Lunch in the media center
on Valentine's Day. Students were asked to select a poem and bring it to the lunch-
eon, where they then read it to the group. The event helped kids "put their hearts into
reading." Shown in the media, center are (top photo) sixth graders, (middle) seventh
graders and (bottom) eighth graders.


1999 FORD
VIN: 2FMZA5140XBA19073
8:00 A.M. March 10, 2011
CLIFF'S WRECKER
SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and Write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.




Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Iome Depot
863-382-0600


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.







Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


REDUCED!! $199.900 Near Avon Park on
Hwy 64. Recently remodeled and interior
painted. Property sits on 4.7 acres with pole
barn and new well.
HANG SADDLE HERE!! Room for horses and
relaxed country living in this 3 Bedroom/2
Bath double wide mobile home and 5 Acres
with beautiful oak trees. Priced @ $92.900
REDUCED!!! $82.500 2B/2B Home with cen-
tral heat and air, one car garage, appliances,
work-shop and storage area, extra lot includ-
ed, all in quite neighborhood and close to
shopping and schools.
CALM YOURSELF in the peaceable setting
of this 2 Bedroom 1 Bath home with central
heat and air, private well, utility shed, and
more sits on 2.4 Acres. $72,500
FIRST HOME ITCH? Scratch it with relieving
deal on this 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath and extra lot.
Priced @ $34.900
Charming Historic home with loft and studio
'apartment on 1 acre in City limits. $69.900
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.
PRICE. PRICE, PRICE !! Simply put, it's the
PRICE that makes this 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
very noticeable!! Not to mention it's in the
City Limits. Priced (S $69.900


"Hardee County is in a very
good position with its fund bal-
ances." Carter said.

In other news, the commis-
sion:
-Heard a request from
Teresa Carver. director of the
landfill and animal control, to
approve a proclamation declar-
ing Feb. 22 as "Spay Day USA"
for Hardee County.
Carver said in years past up
to.98 percent of animals picked
up by Hardee County Animal
Control are euthanized.
Last year 607 out of the 849
animals picked up were put
down.
State statutes requires the
animal be held for at least three
days but Carver said Hardee
County holds the animals for a
minimum of five days.
-Authorized Janet Gilliard,
director of community develop-
ment and general services, to
withdraw the Florida Recrea-
tion Development Assistance
Program grant application for
the new baseball/softball com-
plex.
The grant is being withdrawn
because the elements requested
in the grant application have
been completed with in-house
staff and general revenue dol-
lars. There was a hurry to get
the fields done as Youth Base-
ball season starts on Monday.
-Awarded the bid for adver-
tising the 2010 delinquent taxes
to The Herald-Advocate. The
Herald-Advocate was the only
bidder and submitted a bid price
of $.219 per line.
-Appointed John Deer to
the Parks and Recreation Board
to replace Scotty Leigh.
-Entered into executive ses-
sion and began negotiations
with the Fire Department Union
for the upcoming year.



ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


WHAT A BUY!! JUST LISTED ONLY $38.000
-MAKE AN OFFER! 2 BR, 2 Bath-Mobile
Home in good condition, w/central heat and
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February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9B


1 T


RE'


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My name is Merlin, and I am a lost Basset Hound. I snuck out of my yard on Melendy St. when a pizza
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mistake, but my family really wants me to come home. I am quite friendly, and am likely to approach you or
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10B The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


w.-,qp


S-. Light One Candle
By Tony Rossi
The Christophers

CHANGING POPULAR CULTURE
A lot of attention gets directed at complaints about movies. TV
programs and other forms of media that offend large groups of
Catholics or other Christians. Notable examples would be the
responses to the movies "'The DaVinci Code" and "Angels and
Demons."
Alerting the public to this kind of material, which often com-
pletely misrepresents the history or beliefs of the Church. is a noble
endeavor, but opposition alone isn't enough to improve things.
So let me ask you this: When was the last time you sent a let-
ter of praise to a network, producer or writer after seeing something
you liked? It's easy to fire off angry e-mails when something gets
your blood boiling, but why not express yourself when you find
something good, too'?
In his book "You Can Change the World," Father James
Keller, the founder of The Christophers, wrote, "There is some
value, of course ... in turning off vulgar, boring or subversive radio
and TV programs . .But the cure does not lie there, for it is like
objecting to bad food without providing anything better . New
and better writers can be found. They will come from among you
... the vast group of Americans who constitute the backbone of our
nation and of our Christian civilization."
Father Keller also rejected the idea that the powers that be
"don't want worthwhile people in the writing field." He believed
that if we get more people "who are articulate in supporting their
beliefs . ., the whole trend toward materialism in this field cannot
only be stopped but-changed for the better."
The advice Father Keller was offering is twofold.
First, he didn't believe in writing off popular culture. Instead,
he encouraged people to find what's good, then praise it and sup-
port it. By doing so, you'd be showing the people who produce this
kind of material that the audience wants more projects like it. And
in terms of the creative talent, you'd also be making them feel their
effort was worthwhile.
For instance, an upcoming "Christopher News Note" shares
the story of a magazine writer named Teresa who was stressed out
by numerous deadlines. Then she came across a letter from a read-
er that said, "I just wanted to write to encourage you in your efforts
because your writings always bring me such hope." The story
states, "Teresa placed the note ... on the shelf above her desk as a
daily reminder of the light always trying to peek through the dark-
est of moments." So there's proof that praise and gratitude have a
positive effect-and anyone can do it!
The second of Father Keller's suggestions is equally impor-
tant.
The quality of our entertainment and media will only change
through constructive action. Therefore, if your kids, grandkids,
nieces or nephews display media-related talents, encourage them to
pursue those talents as a career-to learn the craft and then take
those talents and values into the world. Maybe you could even
develop those talents yourself! The goal, though, shouldn't be to
proselytize, but to share stories that offer witness to truth.
The bottom line is: If we knock the folks who work in televi-
sion and movies and other media when they do something wrong,
we should also praise them when they do something right.
The success of that endeavor lies in all our hands.
For a free copy of "What's Your. Purpose?" write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
imail@christophers.org.


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Week ending February 20, 2011
Weather Summary: Precipitation was minimal during the
reference \week. The few Florida Automated Weather Network
(FAWN) stations that reported precipitation had amounts of less
than a quarter of an inch. Temperatures did not greatly differ from
the norm. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor last updated
February 15. drought conditions w ere present in all of Florida and
%were extreme along the East Coast. Temperatures dipped below
freezing in the northern counties. Highs were in the 70s and 80s
throughout the State.
Field Crops: In the northern region of Florida. farmers were
preparing fields for spring row crops. In Okaloosa County. farmers
were tilling cotton and peanut fields. Wheat was in good condition.
In Suwannee County. soil preparation for field crops and potato
planting was underway. In Putnam County. potatoes had emerged.
In the southern region, one plant completed sugarcane harvesting
while others are still harvesting. Farmers prepared fields for rice
planting in Palm Beach County.
Vegetables: Cabbage supplies were light in north Florida.
Growers were gearing up for the Saint Patrick's Day holiday. In
Putnam County, white mold was reported in cabbage fields. In
Suwannee County, soil preparation for watermelon was complete.
Market movement included snap beans. celery, sweet corn, endive.
escarole, bell peppers, radishes. squash, tomatoes, and strawber-
ries.
Livestock and Pastures: The pasture condition Statewide was
relatively unchanged from the previous week. with the overall con-
dition mostly poor to fair limited primarily by drought. Winter pas-
tures improved with the warmer weather. The cattle condition was
mostly fair to good, unchanged from the previous week. In the
Panhandle areas, pasture condition ranged from very poor to excel-
lent with most poor to fair. Winter pastures improved. Clover
showed notable improvement this past week. Hay and supplements
were fed to livestock as grazing was in poor condition. Hay sup-
plies were getting low. In the northern areas, pasture condition
ranged from mostly fair to good. Cattle grazed on small grain for-
ages. Nighttime temperatures in the low 30s were too cool for per-
manent pasture to break dormancy. The cattle condition was most-
ly fair. In the central areas, pasture condition ranged from very poor
to good with most in fair condition. Warmer weather helped forage
growth but was limited by dry conditions. In the southwest areas,
pasture condition ranged from poor to good with most in fair con-
dition. Pasture grass greened up from the warmer temperatures.
The cattle condition ranged from poor to good with most in good
condition.
Citrus: Lows were in the upper 30s and 40s with highs in the
70s and lower 80s across most of the citrus area. This week, three
of the 25. FAWN stations in the citrus area recorded trace amounts
of precipitation. Sebring reported the most, with 0.03 inch of rain-
fall recorded. Overall, there were moderate to severe drought con-
ditions in most of the citrus area according to the U.S. drought
monitor. Indian River, Brevard, and part of St Lucie, Martin, and
Palm Beach counties were experiencing extreme drought condi-
tions. Forty-eight packinghouses and 18 processors were open.
Harvest of early and midseason oranges and grapefruit continued,
with processing plants running early and midseason oranges. New
growth and buds were noted across the region. Cultural practices
continued, including irrigation and application of lime.


FOOD CHECK-OUT WEEK
Food Check-Out Week. sponsored by Farm Bureau, is Feb. 20-
26. This is when Farm Bureau highlights ways for families to
stretch their food dollars and continue purchasing healthy, nutri-
tious food. American farmers and ranchers produce safe, abundant
and economical food.
During this week. Farm Bureau and many other groups make
donations to area food banks to help those in need and to Ronald
McDonald Houses.
When shopping for food. don't go when you .are hungry. We
always overbuy at those times. Be sure not to buy a lot of food with
short keep-time. Look at the cost per ounce of serving. There can
be a large difference between brands and quantity sizes.
A healthy diet includes varieties of fruits, vegetables, low-fat
or fat-free dairy products, lean meats, beans, eggs and nuts in quan-
tities. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, all forms
of fruit and vegetables provide a good diet (fresh. frozen, dried or
canned).
Local farmers' markets often have fresh vegetables, fruit,
meats and other items that have been produced in the surrounding
area. Fresh produce will remain fresh longer by keeping it refriger-
ated in a perforated bag. It reduces condensation and shriveling.
The USDA has reported that the prices of unprepared fresh
fruits and vegetables such as carrots, bananas, tomatoes, broccoli,
red delicious apples and iceberg lettuce have remained stable com-
pared to dessert and snack foods.
According to the USDA. farmers and ranchers receive 19 cents
out of every dollar spent on food. Off-farm costs-processing,
packaging, wholesaling and retailing-account for 81 cents. In
1980 the farm producer received 31 cents of every dollar spent on
food. This indicates how our economics have changed. Agriculture
input-cost keeps rising with income-prices falling. The middleman
keeps getting more and more of the farm product dollars.
Farmers and ranchers recognize that superior animal welfare
practices result in high-quality safe and wholesome meat, poultry,
milk and eggs. They are constantly seeking ways to reduce costs
and improve the comfort and well-being of animals. Both crop and
animal food production are guided by Best Management
Practices-state-of-the-art techniques designed and tested by
experts at research universities.
According to USDA researchers, in 2009 consumers in the
United States spent less than 10 percent of the average household
disposable income on food each year. Households in more than 40
nations studied devoted more than 20 percent. The figure for 24
nations was 30 percent or more.
Recent increases in retail grocery store prices are the result of
higher costs for energy to process, haul and refrigerate food. The
wholesale prices of foods have remained constant or decreased.
Since the beginning of the Food Check-Out Week in the mid-
1990s, Farm Bureau members have donated more than $2.6 million
in food and money to Ronald McDonald Houses and other worth-
while charities.
Setting a good example for children takes all the fun out
of middle age.
-William Feather
If you don't think every day is a good.day, just try miss-
ing one.
-Cavett Robert







February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11B


Anglers Catching Super-Big Bass


"Whoosh! Then another
whoosh."
That is how Stacy Twiggs,
the senior manager of B.A.S.S.
Federation Nation and Youth
B.A.S.S.. described the sound
of a huge bass grabbing and
running with the spinner bait.


I


He was sure the anglers he'd
just met and encouraged mo-
ments before had snagged a
gator, so he motored over to
help.
What he saw was much more
exciting.
His longtime fishing buddy,


Wauchula Watch
By Ofc. Amy Drake
Wauchula Police Department
-


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE & STALKING
February-the month of love and happiness.
This is how most of the word views the month of February, as
it is the month of Valentine's Day. You can just feel the love in the
air, but is this always the case?
More than we know, there is a growing number of dating vio-
lence, domestic violence and stalking cases occurring every day in
America.
Most people involved in this don't even realize they're a vic-
tim, or they've just convinced themselves it's their fault it's occur-
ring. The truth of the matter is no one should have any say in anoth-
er living person's self-worth. Also remember no one is justified in
attacking you just because he is angry.
A relationship should have no partner dominating by using
physical violence. Everyone has the right to be an equal partner in
her relationship.
Victims of domestic violence also need to take into considera-
tion that as long as they continue to deal with the violence, they're
only opening themselves up for additional problems that can affect
other aspects of their lives.
Domestic violence witnessed by your children can be very
destructive in the future of a child. Children learn by example.
Anger and violence demonstrated in domestic violence is provid-
ing bad examples to children.
Domestic violence also can affect victims at their jobs. Do-
mestic violence is one of the primary causes of workplace violence.
If you feel that you are currently in a violent relationship and
feel you can't get out, there is help.
You first have to understand that you are the victim and you
have done nothing wrong. It's not your fault. Know the longer you
stay in an abusive relationship, the more intense the violence will
become. Take a stand against domestic violence and take back your
life!
If you are in an abusive relationship and need help getting out,
your local Police Department and Sheriff's Office have victim's
rights advocates that can speak with you about your options.


Zack Mack from Murfreesboro.
Tenn.. hooked a 14-pound. two-
ounce Florida largemouth bass
on Lake Kissimmee. close to
the mouth of the Kissimmee
River. Mack and his fishing
partner were on their sixth fish-
ing trip in five years to Florida.
the Fishing Capital of the
World.
They love fishing the shal-
low, grassy flats and landed this
behemoth bass on Feb. 2 with a
half-ounce spinner bait and
casting reel. Mack had 50-
pound-test braided line and had
set the drag tight, but he said the
first run stripped 20 yards of
line as the bass came out of the
water three times trying to toss
the lure.
The previous day. they had
fished Lake Tohopekaliga and
weren't satisfied. However,
Twiggs told them he'd had a
great day on Lake "Toho," so
they were wondering about
their technique. Twiggs assured


D


NI U


them they were in an excellent
spot and the weather and lunar
cycle were just right for a mem-
orable day of fishing.
Moments later, he was snap-
ping a photo of them releasing
the 14-pounder.
"We release all of our bass."
Mack said. "'We are serious
about taking care of the re-
source and keeping trophies in
the gene pool."
Mack will receive a "Big
Catch" angler recognition cer-
tificate and 10-pounder club
"Trophy Award" pin from the
Florida Fish & Wildlife Con-
servation Commission, with a
"released" endorsement.
The Big Catch program rec-
ognizes anglers who catch qual-
ity-size freshwater fish in
Florida. Anglers receive a cus-
tomized certificate featuring
any of 33 different species of
freshwater fish that exceeds
either minimum qualifying
weights or total lengths (see


MyFWC.com/Fishing). The
program also features
"Specialist." "Master" and
"Elite Angler" awards for those
earning multiple Big Catch
awards.
The FWC is finalizing its
Long-Term Black Bass
Management Plan. incorporat-
ing public input with advice
from a group representing a
variety of freshwater-related
businesses and interests. One of
the most popular aspects is cre-
ating a new program to better
document catches of trophy
bass and encourage catch-and-
release by offering anglers
incentives. The trophy bass
reporting program will provide
additional information to biolo-
gists and help the management
and conservation of trophy bass
fisheries.
Lake Kissimmee has been the
scene of many innovative fish-
ery management efforts over
the years. Mack's big fish and
the 30 fish he and his partner
released the next day exemplify
the quality of Florida bass fish-
eries.


NEW FOR 2011


This wasn't a fluke. Just a
week before, Gerald Swindle
earned his first B.A.S.S. tourna-
ment win by catching 80
pounds, 13 ounces of bass at the
three-day Bass Pro Shops
Southern Open on Lake
Tohopekaliga.
"My partner caught a nine-
pounder on his second cast and.
another nine-pounder on his
fifth cast." Swindle said.
In writing about the tourna-
ment for BassMaster.com.
Charlie Hartley concluded, "So
if your goal is a giant bass, one
you can brag about for years,
put Florida on your list of
places to visit. It's back!"
If you want to hear that magic
"whoosh," maybe it's time to
wet a line in the Kissimmee
Chain, or try out Orange Lake.
Anglers catching Orange Lake
bass weighing 10 pounds or
more for the next few months
not only receive a Big Catch
certificate and Trophy Award
pin, but also earn a chance to
fish with TV celebrity and
renowned tournament angler
Shaw Grigsby.


Back To Basics
By lan Rice
Gospel Preacher


I I
-YOUR WORK U ,ONLY JUST BEGUN
It seems as though some folks who profess to be Christians
hive the idea that they have obtained a plateau of faith and, there-
fore, stop growing.
I suppose they feel the rest of society is much worse off than
them, and that they are in a much better condition. Maybe some are
simply consumed with pride, or feel that they know enough to get
to heaven.
Regardless of what the reason, many Christians neglect efforts
to grow spiritually. Many writings are set before us in Scripture to
ward off any feelings of this sort.
Paul was writing to Christians in Colosse when he told them
to "seek those things which are above" (Col. 3:1). Within the rest
of that chapter, Paul would instruct those Christians in how to con-
tinually seek after God with regard to their attitudes, actions, emo-
tions and priorities.
Paul made it very clear that the work of a Christian has only
just begun once he's committed his life to Christ. We expect those
who are lost in sin to realize this truth, don't we'?
Once one realizes that life without Christ is not really a life-at
all, then he must submit to God through obedience to His Word.
This is true, as Jesus taught that we must do the will of His Father
in heaven (Matt. 7:21-23). We must also do what He Himself has
said (Luke 6:46; Matt. 28:20).
If you truly believe in Christ and seek after "those things
which are above," then you will obey the commands revealed in
the New Testament. That being said, also consider that Paul was
talking to the brethren when he said to "be transformed by the
renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is that good and
acceptable and perfect will of God" (Rom. 12:2).
Again, he was talking to "brethren" here-Christians! He
warned them to "not be conformed to this world."
The concept here-driven home-is that we all have much
work to do.
This renewing of our mind should be a continual assessment
of our motives and actions, so as to make sure that our life is in
accordance with God's Will. No matter where we are in this life.
we can all do a better job in our efforts to please Him.
Christ warned the church members in Sardis (again.
.Christians) and told them to change their ways or else He would
blot out their names from the Book of Life (Rev. 3:5). This was in
regard to them being dead spiritually.
Let us all more earnestly continue in seeking after the knowl-
edge and application of God's Truth.
lan Rice is the fill-time evangelist t Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
a( ww. wauchulaclh rchofchrist.com.


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12B The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


PAID ADVERTISEMENT



World's Top Coin Collectors in Town Next Week


to Purchase All Types of Coins!


By KEN MCINTOSH
STAFF WRITER

ICCA will be placing ads in newspapers,
radio and running television spots next week
asking people to bring in any old silver and
gold coins made before 1965. Those that
bring in their coins will be able to, speak
with collectors one on one and have their
coins looked at with an expert set of eyes.
With the help of these ICCA members, offers
will be made to those that have coins made
before 1965. Offers will be made based
on silver or gold content and the rarity of
the coins. All coins made before 1965 will
be examined and purchased including gold
coins, silver coins, silver dollars, all types of
nickels and pennies. Those that decide to
sell their coins will be paid on the spot.
If you are like a lot of people you might
have a few old coins or even a coffee
can full lying around. If you have ever
wondered what they are worth now might'
be your chance to find out and even sell
them if you choose. They could be worth
a lot according to the International Coin
Collectors Association also known as ICCA.
Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins
and currency for their collections. If it is
rare enough, one coin could be worth over
$100,000 according to Eric Helms, coin
collector and ICCA member. One ultra rare
dime, an 1 894S Barber, sold for a record
$ 1.9 million to a collector in July of 2007.
While that is an extreme example, many
rare and.valuable coins are stashed away
in dresser drawers or lock boxes around the
country. The ICCA and its collector members
have organized a traveling event in search
of all types of coins and currency. Even
common coins can be worth a significant
amount due to the high price of silver and
gold, says Helms. Washington quarters
and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many
times their face value. Recent silver markets
have driven the price up on common coins
made of silver. Helms explains that all half
dollars, quarters and dimes made before
1965 contain 90% silver and are sought
after any time silver prices rise. Right now
it's a sellers market he said.






COINS
Any and all coins made before 1965, rare
coins, entire collections, Silver Dollars,
Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,
Nickels, Three Cent Pieces, Two Cent Pieces,
Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and all others.
PAPER MONEY
All denominations made before 1934.
GOLD COINS
Including $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5,
$1, Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.
INVESTMENT GOLD
Kruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs,
Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and
Buffalos, etc.


GOLD


The rarest coins these collectors are
looking for include $20, $10, $5 and $2
1/2 gold coins and any coin made before
1850. These coins always bring big
premiums according to the ICCA. Silver
dollars are also very sought after nowadays.
Other types of items the ICCA will be
purchasing during this event include U.S.
currency, gold bullion, investment gold,
silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc.
Even foreign coins are sought after and will
be purchased.
Also at this event anyone can sell their
gold jewelry, dental gold or anything made
of gold on the spot. Gold is currently trading
at over $1,100.00 per ounce near an all
time high. Bring anything you think might
be gold and the collectors will examine,
test and price it for free. If you decide to
sell, you will be paid on the spot it has
been an unknown fact that coin dealers
have always paid more for jewelry and
scrap gold than other jewelers and pawn
brokers.
So whether you have one coin you think
might be valuable or a large collection you
recently inherited, you can talk to these
collectors for free. If your lucky you may
have a rarity worth thousands. Either way.
there is nothing to lose and it sounds like
fun!
For more information on this event visit
the ICCA website at
WWW.INTERNATIONALCOINCOLLECTORS.COM











..



., ;
NE TT-'A- P
SAT 9AM.-P
QUALITY INN
CONFERENCE CENTE
6525 US 27 NORT
SEBRINGFL.,387

DIRECTONS: 863) 35-450
SHOW IFO: (17) 77-776


i
PAID- $10
r,.
PAID $1,800


* Gather items of interest from your
attic, safe deposit box, garage,
basement, etc. There is no limit to
the amount of items you can bring
* No appointment necessary

* If interested in selling, we will
consult our collector's database to
see if a buyer exists. 90% of all
items have offers in our database

* The offer is made on the spot on
behalf of our collectors making
the offer
* If you decide to accept the offer,
we will pay you on the spot!
* You get 100% of the offer
with no hidden fees


DllnU AT ALL TIMI
IS THE TIME TO CA


' SCRAP GOLD
Broken and unused jewelry, dental gold.
JEWELRY
Diamond rings, bracelets, earrings; loose
diamonds, all gem stones, etc.
PLATINUM
Anything made of platinum.
SILVER
Flatware, tea sets, goblers, jewelry, etc. and
anything marked sterling.


PAID $8,500ar
PAID $8,500


PAID $2,800


PAID $250


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$10 Gold
PAID $14,000


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Tennis Teams Sweep Avon Park


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Both Hardee tennis squads
beat Avon Park on its courts.
For the Lady Wildcats, it was
the only win in the first four
matches, while the Wildcats
have won over both Avon Park
and DeSoto.
The only matches this week
are today (Thursday) when the
Hardee boys host Sebring at 4
p.m. There's only one outing
next week, too, as both the girls
and boys play in the Heartland
Invitational on Friday afternoon
and Saturday all day, March 4-
5. The girls will be at Avon Park
and the boys at Sebring.
Hardee will meet several dis-
trict opponents in the Heartland
event. Class 2A, District 8
includes Avon Park, Lake Plac-
id and Sebring from Highlands
County, Auburndale, Lake
Wales, Mulberry and Teneroc
from Polk County and Poin-
ciana of Osceola County as well
as Hardee.

SEBRING
Hardee opened the season on
Feb. 8 at Sebring, where Hardee
ran into strong opposition. The
boys lost 2-5 and the girls lost
0-7.
In the boys division, senior
Juan Mier lost his number one
match to Brian Miller 6-4, 6-3,
while at number two senior
Dylan Justice lost to Andrew
Midence 6-3, 6-0. Senior Justin
Fones played in the number
three slot against Andrew Keith
and forced him to the distance
before losing 7-5, 6-1.
Hardee's only single win
came from senior Kyle Bodeck
at number four against Blue
Streak Sam Galati. The set went
the full three games before
Bodeck won 5-6, 6-3, 6-1. At
number five singles, junior
Matt Godwin pushed Abhi
Shaw before losing 6-4, 4-6, 7-
5.
Junior Jared Jernigan and
soph Skylaar Simmons didn't


get to play their extra singles
match, but did go at number
three doubles, losing to Andrew
Baldridge and Joe Digenaro, 6:
0, 6-2. In other doubles,
Fones/Bodeck won number two
by default, and Mier/Justice lost
8-1 to Miller/Midence.
On the girls side of the
ledger, junior Summer Palmer
had several long rallies in her 6-
3, 6-0 loss to Kaley Walter.
Senior Kate Krause played at
number two and lost 6-1, 6-0 to
Joy Donglason. Junior Taylor
Pohl had several good volleys
in her number three match
against Nisha Patel before los-
ing 6-2, 6-4.
Junior Robyn Tanksley also
had some long volleys in her
number four loss to Kelly
Broen 6-1, 6-0. And, at number
five, freshman Caroline Dur-
rance went 6-1, 6-0 against
Morgan Heston. Frosh Lacey
McClenithan, Ashley Baker and
Susana Oceguera did not get to
play in extra singles.
In doubles, Palmer/Krause
pushed Walter/Donglason to 7-
3 in losing the first game 7-6
and the second game 6-0.
Pohl/Tanksley lost several
long volleys to Patel/Broen in a
6-1, 6-0 match loss. McClen-
ithan/Oceguera played in an
extra doubles, losing 6-4, 6-1.

LEMON BAY
Both teams went to Engle-
wood-Lemon Bay on Feb. 10.
Only two boys finished singles
before misty rain made the
court slippery. The match will
be finished on March 28 when
the Manta Rays come to play at
.Hardee.
Hardee girls lost their singles
matches, giving the Lady Rays
an insurmountable 5-0 lead and
the match. Palmer played
against Linda Antonova in a 6-
3, 6-1 loss, while Krause was
swept by Anita Vorlicek 6-0, 6-
0. Poalh lost to Andrea Vorlicek
6-1, 6-1, while Tanklsey lost to
Amber Peretz, 6-0, 6-0. Dur-


rance lost 6-0, 6-0 to Caitlin
Powell.

AVON PARK
Both teams got on track at
Avon Park on Feb.15. The boys
had the hardest time, winning
the match 4-3. Avon Park won
at number one and two singles
and number two doubles.
Mier battled Mitchell Guer-
nedt in a 6-4, 6-3 loss, while
Justice went down 6-0, 6-2 to
Dawson Calero. Fones got
Hardee on the winning side of
the ledger with a 6-0, 6-0 sweep
of Kyle Jahna, while Bodeck
took Javaughn Wells 6-2, 6-0.
Godwin won 6-2, 6-3 over
Rhett Tyler.
In the boys doubles, Fones/-
Bodeck combined for a 6-0, 7-5
win over Guerndt/Jahna, while
Justin/Godwin lost 7-6 6-1 to
Calero/Wells.
Hardee girls won five of the
seven matches. Palmer had to
work for a 4-6, 6-1,. 6-0 win
over Kayla Lockhart at number
one singles, while Krause won
6-0, 6-2 over Noor Aboul-Hosn.
Avon Park's Jessica Leitch
won 7-5, 7-6 (on a 9-7 run) over
Tanksley at number three.
Hardee came back in number
four singles, when Durrance
downed Shontonia Williams 6-
4, 6-4. McClenithan played at
number five and lost 6-2, 6-1.
Hardee won both doubles .
Palmer/Krause combined for a
6-2, 6-2 win over Lockhart/-
Aboul-Hosn, while Ranklsey/-
Durrance won 8-1 over Leitch/-
Kathryn Welch.

DESOTO
Last week ended with the
rescheduled Feb. 18 matches
against DeSoto, which had been
scheduled for Thursday. Hardee
boys won 5-2, losing only num-
ber one singles and number one
doules in a series of pro-set
matches. Mier lost to Ryan
Blackledge 8-6. Justice led the
wins in the rest of the singles
sets. He warred hard to beat


Gary Gammad 9-8 (7-1). while
Bodeck took Tyler Brown 8-0.
Fones played Dadon Mott is
an 8-6 win and Godwin also
went 8-6 over Juan Barragan. In
the doubles, Justice/Bodeck lost
8-5 to Blackledge/Brown, while
Justice/Godwin won 8-6 over
Gammad/Barragan.


Feb. 24 Boys Tennis

Feb. 25 Track
V. Baseball

Feb. 26 Track

Feb. 28 JV/V Softball


March 1 Track


March 3 JV Baseball
V. Baseball

March 4 Heartland Tennis
V. Baseball

March 5 Heartland Tennis

March 7 HJHS Volleyball

March 8 Girls/Boys Tennis
JV/V Softball

March 10 Track
HJHS Volleyball
JV Baseball
V. Baseball


The Hardee girls weren't so
fortunate, also playing proset
matches. Tanksley picked up
Hardee's only win, at number
8-4 over Nancy Gamez. Hardee
lost the first three matches by
scores of 8-6. 8-4, 8-4. Dur-
rance played number five in an
8-1 loss to Etrinity Packett,


Sebring


Northport Relays
Mooney

Cardinal Mooney Relays

Sebring


Sebring Invitational


Sebring
Sebring

Sebring
Booker

Sebring

Lake Placid


Sebring
Hill-Gustat
Fort Meade
Fort Meade


while McClenithan got in an
extra singles in an 8-5 loss to
Brianna Sincic.
In doubles, Palmer/Krause
lost a tough 9-7 game to Kayla
Muse/Alejandra Plymale, while
Durrance/Tanksley lost 8-3 to
Carolina Garcia/Heide Guer-
rero.


HOME 4 p.m.

Away 4 p.m.
HOME 7 p.m.


Away

Away

Away

Away
Away


8 a.m.

5:30/7:30 p.m.

4 p.m.

4:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Away 1 p.m.
HOME 7 p.m.


Away

Away


9a.m.

5:30/6:30


Away
HOME
Away
HOME


4 p.m.
5:30/6:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
7 p.m.


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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, February 24,2011


SportSchedul Feb.24-March 10


Avon Park HOME 4 p.m.
Palmetto Away 5:30/7:30


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2C The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011





--Schedule of Weekly Services


'Printed as a Public Service
by'.
The Herald-Advocate
:' Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN'
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CIIURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ...................:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................8:00 a.m.-
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CIIRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
lIwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ..........7:00 p.m.

FAITI ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Iwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Ilwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ...........................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade)....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CIURCII
(rape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday. School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CIURCII
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ i1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

IIOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATIOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..........:.......7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIIURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School .....................9:30 a.m.
MEoring Serrvice .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Scrvice ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
('omnmuinion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAII BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ............. 1:00 a.m.
I)isciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday W orship .................. 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11 :00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast............... I1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
THE Meeting T'uesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service...................... :00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom.. ....9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion....... .. 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ..5.....5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. J6HN A.M.E. CHURCH
513-W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....l11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Counm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I I:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ............ ..:.10:00 a.m.
Mlyorning WorFhip ...........:...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids .............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service ..................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CIIURCII
322 Ianchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.cclebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
W'ednes.dayl Eveniing Ce(I Group.
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call.for Inlatiqis

CIARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCII
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday .........................7:00 p.m.
CIIURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class .......7:00 p.m.
Me,'. Leadership & Training Cla.\.\ -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CIIURCHI OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 IHanchcv Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting.............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA


COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ...........10-00 am.
Sunday Morning Worship II 00 a m
Sunday Evening Service........ 700 p.m
Wednesday Ser ice .. .... 7 00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................. ......... 1 :00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion .....................:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio...............:......7:30 p.m.
Vieres Servicio .................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio ..............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773,3800
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study .........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry ............. ... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
Worship .......................... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service .................. 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
I'reK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
TIE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ... .....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... I1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ...............1... 0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6.00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coflfe & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ................... ...... 30 a.m.
W orship ..................... .......... 10:30 a.m .


Wed. Night Dinner......... 6:00 p.m.
Wed Bodybuilders Adult C.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min........... 7:00 p m.

IIIGIIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship...11 00 a.m
Wed. Night Bible Study .. ....6 30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9' Ave.
lartes ....... .. .... ...........7: 30 p.m.
Jue es ............. .......... 7:30 p.m .
Domingo ............... ....... 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palahra de Dios
Domingos ............................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................. 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ...................10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship, ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m.


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Lutlier King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
'2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ........ .......7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3" Sun.
Communion ...................10:00 a.m.
2"" & 4"' Sun.
Divine Worship................ 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ....................... 1:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 am.
Evening Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service............. ..7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday ............................... 9:00 a.m .
H o ly D ays ...................................

ST. MICIIAEL'S
CATHOLIC CIIURCII
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) 5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ....7:30 p m
Sunday (Spanish) ...............7:00 a.m
(English) ................... :30 a.m .
(Spanish) ................. I 1:00 a.m.
(Creole) ................... :00 p m.
Daily Mass in English ..... .'30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave., 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... ..11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ...........7:00 p.m

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CIIHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 am.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ...............7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ...7...............7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m:
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00"a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ..................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Training Union ...................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST.CHURCH.
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m,
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
326 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship................................ 1:00 a.m .
Evening..................................1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & FT.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.. ....................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night ......................7:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship...................... a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina.............................. 11:30 a.m.
a.
SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ... ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio.............................. 1:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club .......................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Micrecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio.................................................. 8:00p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.

SEEDS
FROM
THE
^ SOWER'

Michael A.Guido
Mener, Georia


He's a fellow that's going far -
always one step ahead of his
creditors.
One day the doctor said to him,
"I'm sorry to tell you, but you have
a contagious disease scarlet
fever."
"Great," he answered. "Now I
have something to give my
creditors."
But the Living Bible says, "Pay
all your debts except the debt of
love for others- neverfinish paying
that. For if you love them, you will
be obeying all of God's laws.
fulfilling all of His requirements."
"If you love your neighbor as you
love yourself you will not want to
harm or cheat him, or kill him or
steal from him. Love does nowrong
to anyone."


Even the best putt can stop at the edge of
the hole. It's only a game, hut life's setbacks
aren't always so trivial. What if you miss out on
something really big? Where do you find strength .
to endure disappointments? Spiritual values are
constant. Fortunes may change, but God's House
stands firm. The truths and inspiration you find
there give meaning to life. Be inspired this week.



Sunday Monday Tuesday Wedtiesday Ihurtday Friday Saturday
1 Theaalonians 1 TesaloaianTs 1 Tessaloaians 2 khesalonia s2 alonians 2 essalonians 1 Timollhy
2.17-3.13 4.1-18 51-28 1.1-12 2.1-17 3.1-18 1.1-2

s vrre' : S3- e'. ty E"'s A-wesa" r BS Sicie
Cp 1 iC. k.?.E WI"ars NAw"s; Sv'.'e s. P C S ? C,-7 y3lo'e8 .l7ei VAL2 :6 'nen cCr


Peace iver gr5wOers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL






February 24, 2011. The Herald-Advocate 3C


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4C The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 252010CP000012
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WYATT SCOTT TYLER
Deceased.


For the week ended February 17. 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions. receipt totaled 6.287 head.
compared to 5.348 last week, and 5.616 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market Newrs Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steadV to
2.00 higher, feeder steers and heifers were 2.00 to 6.00 higher.


NOTICE TO CREDIT
The administration
estate of Wyatt Sco
deceased, whose date
was May 30, 2010, is pe
the Circuit Court for
County, Florida, Probate
the address of which is
Main Street, Wauchula, F
The names and address
personal representative
personal representative
ney are get forth below.
All creditors of the
and other persons havir
or demands against di
estate on whom a cop
notice is required to b
must file their claims
court WITHIN THE LAT
MONTHS AFTER THE
THE FIRST PUBLICAT
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAY
THE DATE OF SERVICE
COPY OF THIS NOT
THEM.
All other creditors of t
dent and other person
claims or demands agali
dent's estate must file the
with this court WI
MONTHS AFTER THE 1
THE FIRST PUBLICAT
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILE
IN THE TIME PERIO
FORTH IN SECTION 73:
THE FLORIDA PROBAT
WILL BE FOREVER BARI
NOTWITHSTANDING
TIME PERIODS SET
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FIL
(2) YEARS OR MORE AF
DECEDENTS DATE OF D
BARRED.
The date of first publl
this notice is February 2'
Personal Repres
_/s/
Ethelind S. Presc
P.O. Box 52
Wauchula, FL 33
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Clifford M. Ables, III, P.A.
202 West Main Street, Su
Wauchula, FL 33873
Telephone: (863) 773-050
Facsimile: (863) 773-0501
_/S/
CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III
Florida Bar No.: 178379
JANE M. HANCOCK
Florida Bar No. 341002


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
HARDEE COUNTY, FL(
PROBATE DIVISIC
FILE NO. 252011CPO0
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERTA C. ALBRITTON
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDIT
The administration
ESTATE OF ALBER
ALBRITTON, deceased
date of death was Jai
2011, is pending in the
Court for Hardee County
Probate Division, the ad
which is P.O. Drawe


ORS
of the
itt Tyler,
of death
ending in
Hardee
Division,
417 West
:L 33873.
es of the
and the
e's attor-

decedent
ig claims
ecedent's
y of this
e served
with this
ER OF 3
TIME OF
*ION OF
'S AFTER
;E OF A
ICE ON

the dece-
s having
nst dece-
eir claims
THIN 3
DATE OF
ION OF

ED WITH-


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:



Slaughter Cows:


Slaughter Bulls:


The Florida Department of
Citrus has launched the
"Creative Juices Challenge," a
contest for children 5 to 11
attending school in Hardee,


DS SET Wauchula, Florida 33873. The
3.702 OF names and addresses of the per-
'E CODE sonal representative and the per-
RED. sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
THE All creditors of the decedent
FORTH and other persons having claims
-ED TWO or demands against decedent's
TER THE estate on whom a copy of this
)EATH IS notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
cation of MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
4,2011. THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
tentative: THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
cott THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
873 dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
quite 103 THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
D0 ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
5 WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
2:24;3:3c YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
RT FOR The date of the first publication
ORIDA of this Notice is February 17,
)N 2011.
00011 Personal Representative:
MERILYN ALBRITTON
STRICKLAND
, cc/P.O Box 3018
Sarasota, Florida 34230
Attorney for Personal
ORS Representative:
JAMES O. FERGESON, JR.
of the Florida Bar No. 171298
ITA C. FERGESON, SKIPPER, SHAW,
,whose KEYSER, BARON & TIRABASSI, RA.
nuary 7, 1515 Ringling Boulevard, 10' Floor
a Circuit PO. Box 3018
,Florida, Sarasota, Florida 34230-3018
dress of (941) 957-1900


r 1749,


2:17,24c


NORMAL/NORMALENTE
$250 DOUBLE/DOBLE

$400 MAX/MAXI

$600 LARGE/GRANDE

S700 SUPER/GRANDE


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 148.00-205.00
300-400 lbs 136.00-180.00
400-500 lbs 120.00-167.50

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 128.00-180.00
300-400 lbs 118.00-152.00
400-500 lbs 114.00-140.00

Lean: 750-1200 Ibs 85-90 percent
58.00-68.00

Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs
79.00-88.00'


Highlands and Polk counties.
Students can submit a poster,
painting, poem, story, song or
video featuring oranges and
orange juice to win a $500
American Express gift card.
Contest details are available
at www.captaincitrus.com.
Entries can be submitted
through April 15.
One grand prize winner will
receive a $500 American Ex-
press card. Four runners-up will
receive a $200 card and 15
semi-finalists receive a $100
card.
"Florida citrus provides es-
sential nutrients and physical
fuel to help kids take on the
day," said Leigh Killeen, direc-
tor of marketing, Florida
Department of Citrus. "We
want local students to know
more about this important
industry that operates in their
own backyard. We're excited to
see how kids use information
they learn about citrus in school
to express their creativity."
The Creative Juices Chal-
lenge is part of a multi-faceted
school program called "The
Adventures of Captain Citrus"
for kindergarten through fifth
grades in Hardee, Highlands
and Polk counties. Teachers
receive educational curriculum
to incorporate information
about citrus into lesson plans
and can schedule a classroom
visit from a local citrus grower.


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$125

$200

$300

$350


I Z EX/G^V RUDEXf *

Saturday February 26


* Mexican Bands

at 4pm L-Pi ,
.


*. .

Mexican Bull Riding


SHardee Counat pm
at the Hardee County Fair


Kids: Citrus Contest

Offers Big Prizes!


Need Help
Getting Out Of An
Abusive Situation?

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
HOTLINE

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh


SUPER MATTa


Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 Ibs. Washers



SPECIAL /ESPECIAL


MONDAY-FRIDA Y


6AM-6PM 50% OFF


10 0 .S 1x .'d cenr 7.,F, h 2009


Storts Taxes
B^U kk*e i ---

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TORTS TAXEs


S.OOKKEEPING, INC

63) 773-2200


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Fast Electronic Filing Get your money 24-48 Hours ( / -ir--
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S ************ .
-'- i BRING IN
THIS AD FOR
b" ":$15.00 OFF:





120 W. Orange Street
(next to Great Florida Insurance)

S773-2200 1:27-3:31c


Hwy 17 South Across from Nicholas Restaurant


IPgsFo ThPat


I \--YI~-L_-C-W-~Y







February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


A Daily Thought

THURSDAY
And the Lord said to
Abraham ..."Is anything too
hard for the Lord?"
Genesis 18:14 (NIV)

FRIDAY
And I (John) heard a loud
voice in heaven, saying,
"Now the salvation and the
power and the kingdom of
our God and the authority of
Christ Jesus have come."
Revelation 12:10 (RSV)

SATURDAY
The Lord hears good people
when they cry out to Him,
and He saves them from all
their troubles. ...People who
do what is right may have
many problems, but the Lord
will solve them all.
Psalm 34:17,19 (NCV)

SUNDAY
Praise be to the God and
Father of our Lord Jesus
Christ, who in His great
mercy gave us new birth
(salvation) into a living hope
by the resurrection of Jesus
Christ from the dead. ... that
salvation is one that nothing
can destroy ... kept for you in
heaven because you put
your faith in God.
I Peter 1:3-5 (NEB)

MONDAY
The name of the Lord is a
strong fortress; the godly run
to Him and are safe.
Proverbs 18:10 (NLT)

TUESDAY
Let us therefore approach
the throne of grace (pray)
with fullest confidence, that
we .may receive mercy for
our failure and grace to help
in the hour of need.
Hebrews 4:12 (PME)

WEDNESDAY
Hezekiah wrote, "Yes, now I
see it all-it was good for me
to undergo this bitterness,
for You have delivered me
from death. You have forgiv-
en all my sins. ... The dead
cannot be filled with hope
and joy. The living, only the
living, can praise you as I
can today.
Isaiah 38:17,18b,19a (TLB)

All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)'
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


Almost all our faults are
more pardonable than the
methods we resort to' hide
them.
-Frangois de La
Rochefoucauld

Let your capital be simplic-
ity and contentment.
-Henry David Thoreau


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
The State Bank of Bowling
Green will sponsor a hog-rais-
ing contest for the boys of the
Wauchula Chapter, Future
Farmers of America. It begins
today and ends Dec. 31, 1936.
Contestants must have at least
one pure-bred gilt or brood sow.
The contestant making the
largest percentage of profit on
his herd will be given first and
second prizes.

The Center Hill and Torrey
communities held a joint meet-
ing on Friday night and made
plans for starting immediately
to build a joint community can-
ning kitchen on midway
grounds. They will make a bill
of materials needed and submit
it to Mr. M.V. Alton, commis-
sioner for those communities.

Clerk of Circuit Court R.
Clyde Simmons has made an
accomplishment worthy of pub-
lic notice in that in that he has
re-indexed thousands upon
thousands of old public records
with the Cottco Universal
Indexing system, generally
known to be the best and finest
system ever devised for index-
ing public records. Whether it
be a deed, mortgage, judgment
or chattel mortgage, it can be
located within minutes.

Kimbrough's All-American
has sales on white bacon plates
for 13 cents a pound, early gar-
den peas for 17 cents and vacu-
um-packed corn for 25 cents.
Great northern beans are four
pounds for 25 cents. Cigarettes
are eight packages for 96 cents.
At Page's Market, shoulder
roast lamb is just 15 cents a
pound and sugar-cured ham,
two slices for 25 cents.

50 YEARS AGO
Hardee County schools
appear to be winning the battle
of the termites after losing sev-
eral engagements to the winged
invaders last week. Extermina-
tion efforts are under way at
Bowling Green Elementary
after termites routed one class-
room and made classes difficult
in others. Termites swarmed
out of the woodwork in Mrs.
Jones' third-grade classroom.
Wauchula Elementary also suf-
fered from the invasion.

Charles Patton has been re-
elected president of the
Wauchula-Hardee Chamber of
Commerce for another year.
Others officers re-elected in the
directors' meeting at Knight's
Restaurant were Lawrence
Jaudon, Lawrence Roberts,
Annabel Mathis, L.M.
Shackelford, Clyde Wheeler,
Robert Ratliff, Charles Shack-
elford, Charles Heath, Charles
Reif Jr. and George Burris.

The county's new health cen-
ter project, in financial difficul-
ties recently, may be out of the
woods. The Board of County
Commissioners agreed unani-
mously to borrow $7,500 to
make payments on the $55,555
project now under way. The


project ran into problems finan-
cially when tax money for the
project was sent to the State
Board of Health and not
returned. The State Board
agreed to pay half the expense.

Real estate ads this week
include: a 3BR home 20 acres
citrus land ready to set. in Fort
Green, S15,000; a 3BR CB
home in Bowling Green, with
built-in kitchen, hardwood
floors and tile kitchen, $13,500;
and a six-room block construc-
tion home with garage and util-
ity, air-conditioned, carpet,
blinds and drapes for $14,200.

25 YEARS AGO
A contractor's crew moving
the historic Kimbrough house
from Wauchula to Limestone
for Carter Lord had to add to the
narrow county bridge on
Murphy Road to reach their
destination. The sound .old
house, moved from Palmetto
Street and North Seventh
Avenue, was cut in half for the
move.

A photo caption shows Oscar
and Ella Hanchey in front of the
last of their 110 seedling orange
trees which were growing in
1900 when Oscar's father,
Leejunie Hanchey, bought the
65-acre grove on Hanchey
Road. The house next to the
grove, where Oscar grew up,
was built in 1875.

Florida Gov. Bob Graham
visited Wauchula last week to
talk about the need for federal
help in fighting citrus canker.
He is shown with Florida Citrus
Commission member Joe L.
Davis, Wauchula State Bank
President Bill Crews, Hardee
County Tax Collector Curtis
Ezelle, Mrs. Hardee County
Diana Smith and others.

Beall's at Hardee CquD y
Centre has ladies seersucker
suits from $6.97 to $10.97;
pants, crop pants, split skirts,
shorts, skirts and two-pocket
jackets also in polyester knit
seersucker are $5.97 to $9.97.
Rompers and shifts are $8.97
and $9.97.

10 YEARS AGO
Drought reignites fire con-
cerns. Fire-Rescue Chief Billy
Wingate has urged residents not
to burn rubbish, clear groves or
do anything else that could
cause a fire. Fire-Rescue has
battled 66 brush fires in the first
49 days of the year, in addition
to responding to accidents,
medical calls, house fires and
the like. One brush fire on
Friday night, off Bentley Road
south of Crewsville, consumed
650-900 acres. It was the fourth
brush fire of the day.

A Page 1 photo shows Hardee
County ballots in the Nov. 7


election being checked by a
researcher designated to check
uncounted ballots in all 67
Florida counties. Elections
Supervisor Dean Cullins and
assistant Cathy King show the
researcher the 84 ballots which
showed no marks or more than
one mark for president.

A local rancher was among
the first to install a solar water-
in'g facility on his property.
Richard Dasher converted an
old windmill for the new solar-
pumping unit, aided by a grant
obtained through the local
USDA Natural Resources
Conservation office.

Ferman Ford of Wauchula
offers a new 2001 Taurus LX
for $16,792 with 0.9 percent
financing. Other vehicles in
sales included a 2001 Chrysler
Concorde for $21,642, a 2001
Chevrolet Silverado extended
cab for $18,477 or Chevy
Cavalier for $10,562.
Aphra Behn (1640-1689),
the first woman in England
to become a professional
writer, also worked as a
spy for King Charles II of
England.


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area for universal service purposes. The goal of universal service is
to provide all Florida citizens access to essential telecommunica-
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CenturyLink provides single party residential and business services
for rates from $16.40 to $17.00 per month for residential custom-
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these services may result in added charges. Specific rates for your
areas will be provided upon request.

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Service if they meet certain low-income eligibility requirements.
Lifeline Service includes a monthly discount up to $8.25 for basic
phone charges (including a waiver of the Federal Subscriber
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Oasis RV News
By Georgianna Mills

HORSESHOES could relax for the day. A
Horseshoes has been going wonderful dinner, guys.
great this year with a lot of par-
ticipation. There have been MUSIC...
many double ringers thrown. We still have music on Sun-
which causes a lot of whooping day afternoon at 2 o'clock in the.
and hollering. recreation hall.

SHUFFLEBOARD BINGO
Friday's game was canceled Tuesday's bingo saw the
due to many illnesses, and the 50/50 being won by Emma
cold weather didn't help. Tues- West. Mike Akelian won the
day had 10 shufflers and sever- jackpot. Pat Stacy cleaned
al spectators on a picture-per- house with winning the jar and
feet day. Trent Swanson and a couple of other games.
Grover Wetjhington were the
winning champs. POKENO
Monday Sandy was the big
VALENTINE DINNER winner. On Wednesday they
Valentine's Day is the day for cleaned out Audrey Semlers'
love. The recreation hall was bucket, and then she started
beautifully decorated with love. winning and won everything
The men cooked with all their back plus filling her extra bag.
love, so that all the women That Audrey!




Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels'
At The Herald Advocate


r"-- r n II


-n:


-1


I







6C The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


Courthous Repor


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Jaime Palacios, 35, Bowling
Green, and Amy Marie Forbes,
27, of Bowling Green.
Pablo Vargas-Torres, 30,
Wauchula, and Porfiria Molina-
Hernandez, 33, Wauchula.
Joshua Eric Kasubaski, 21,
Wauchula, and Tameka Terrell
Sullen, 26, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
CACH LLC vs. Maria A.
Gomez, amended judgment.
Capital One Bank USA vs.
Linda C. Fletcher, voluntary
dismissal.

The following misdemean-
or cases were disposed of re-
cently in county court:
Luis Gonzalez Jr., possession
of marijuana, adjudication
withheld, probation one year,
substance abuse evaluation/-
treatment, random drug screens,
warrantless search and seizure,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
'cost of prosecution (COP).
Jimen Jimenez, domestic
battery-amended to simple
battery, time served, $677 fine
and court costs, $50 COP and
$50 investigative costs placed
;on lien, release to immigration.
Francicso Molina Jr., carry-
ing a concealed weapon, forfeit
brass knuckles, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Efrain Velzsquez, disorderly
intoxication, 18 days in jail with
,.credit for time served (CTS),
'$325 fine and court costs, $100
'public defender fees, $50 COP,

I


$50 investigative costs.
Timothy Daniel Yost, battery,
two months CTS, $677 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $50 COP, restitution to
be set.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Katherine S. Valdez Esquivel
vs. Christine N. Kersey, petition
for child support.
Chia Mee Lee vs. Vong
Yang, petition for child support.
Blanca Ordonez and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Cirilo Perez, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Jessica Garner vs. Richard
Whidden, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
MidFlorida Credit Unit vs.
Tomas Maya and Martha Maya,
petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Sidney Criss vs. Earnest W.
Criss, petition for injunction for
protection.
Sidney Criss vs. Jena Criss,
petition for injunction for pro-
tection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Rudy Casso Jr. and DOR vs.
Taberthy Denise Paige, volun-
tary dismissal.
Dawn Elizabeth Pelham and
DOR vs. Christopher Wayne
Drew, voluntary dismissal.
Carlos Aleman and DOR vs.
Wendy R. Toledo, voluntary
dismissal.
Rebecca J. Sanchez and
DOR vs. Theresa Lee Rod-


riguez, voluntary dismissal.
Jesus Adan Mendoza and
DOR vs. San Juana Mendoza,
voluntary dismissal.
Ginger Gallejos and DOR vs.
Roberto Gallejos. voluntary
dismissal.
Maria Antonia Rosales and
DOR vs. Adolfo Rosales Jr.,
voluntary dismissal.
Tanya Renee Svendsen and
DOR vs. Catarino Dario Borjas,
child support order.
Ashley Moore vs. Chris-
topher Lee, dismissal of tempo-
rary injunction for protection.
April L. Delarosa and Jose
M. Garza, order.
Catherine E. Williams and
DOR vs. Taberthy Denise
Paige, child support order.
Jesus Mendoza vs. San Juana
Calderon, order.
Amanda Urbana Santellan
and DOR vs. Shaddai Mendez-
Buenrost, child support order.
Latoya Tucker Jones and
DOR vs. Torence J. Simpson,
child support order.

Court-ordered certificates
of child support delinquency
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court.in
the following cases:
Stephanie Adams vs. Travis
E. Adams.
Doris Y. Hernandez vs.
Veronica A. Torres.
Kayla M. Herrera vs.
Benjamin J. Herrera.
Maricela Hernandez vs.
Arturo C. Marquez.
Linda D. Calvillo vs.
Francisco Calderon-Juarez.
Jamie L. Thompson vs.
Macjaveus O. Thompson.
Anita D Thomas vs. Britni
D. Gamble.
Roger Baker vs. Jamie
Baker.
Paula Delacruz vs. Thomas
Alvarado.
Diane Thomas vs. Scott
Bond.
Victoria M. Sanchez vs. Carl
S. Atkins.
Sofia Cavazos vs. Brenda
Alvarado.
Maria A. Davila vs. Randy
Rodriguez.
Romell C. Parks vs. Step-
hanie D. Richardson.
Mary A. Rodriguez vs.
Carlos Martinez.
Anita Guerrero vs. Raymond
Guerrero.
Stacy Roberts vs. John M.
Roberts.
Lydia Borjas vs. Adam R.
Acuna.
Mary I. Ramirez vs. Ramiro
Ramirez Jr.
Sebastian Juarez Jr. vs.
Cynthia S. Short.
SanJuana Cisneros vs. Ariel
Vallejo
Shaun Mitchell vs. Marcus
A. Carter.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by .the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant


to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Samuel L. Mitchell, sale of
cocaine within 1.000 feet of a
church, five years Florida State
Prison, suspended, two years
community control-house ar-
rest, $520 fines and court costs.
$350 public defender fees, $100
COP.
Mayra Alejandra Castillo.
violation of probation (original
charges grand theft and fraudu-
lent use of a credit card), viola-
tion affidavit withdrawn, proba-
tion terminated, outstanding
fines and fees placed on lien.
Levi Luke Finley, burglary of
a structure, adjudication with-
held, probation'two years, $520
fine and court costs, $350 pub-
lic defender fees, $100 COP;
grand theft and trespass on
property other than a struc-
ture/conveyance, not prosecut-
ed.
Archie James Hines, viola-
tion of community control
(original charges burglary while
armed' with assault or battery,
and two counts felony battery),
sentenced modified to include
time served, reinstate commu-
nity control, $300 public de-
fender fees and $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and'
fees.
Ronald Wayne McCormick,
forgery, uttering a forgery,
grand theft and burglary of
structure, 18 months Florida
State Prison, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees and $100 COP placed on
lien; two counts uttering a
forgery and dealing in stolen
property not prosecuted.
Herman Eugene Patterson,
violation of probation (original
charge burglary of a dwelling),
probation revoked, 24 months
Florida State Prison CTS and
concurrent with Polk County
sentence, outstanding fines and
fees placed on lien.
Manuel Rios, felony DUI,
leaving the scene of a crash
with property damage and pos-
session of methamphetamine,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, license suspend-
ed one year, DUI school, men-
tal evaluation/treatment, cur-
few, no alcohol or drugs, war-
rantless search and seizure,
$1,343 fines and court costs,
$200 public defender fees, $100
COP, 50 hours community ser-
vice.
Rno\m tn Sartgez,; .grand
theft auto, grand theft and no
valid license, 11 months 29
days in jail, $520 fines and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees and $100 COP placed on
lien.
Harry Sheritt, domestic bat-
tery and possession of a pre-
scription medicine without a
prescription, adjudication with-
held, probation 18 months, sub-
stance abuse/mental health
evaluation and treatment, $520
fine and court costs, $350 pub-
lic defender fees, $100 COP;


smuggling contraband into a
prison, not prosecuted.
Douglas P. Westmoreland,
violation of probation (original
charges possession of a con-
trolled substance with intent to
sell and sale of a controlled sub-
stance), probation revoked, two
months in jail.
Edward Brian Benton, pos-
session of methamphetamine,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, no alcohol or
drugs, random drug screens,
substance abuse evaluation/-
treatment, warrantless search
and seizure, $520 fine and court
costs, $100 COP; possession of
drug paraphernalia, possession
of a firearm by a felon and pos-
session of ammo by a convicted
felon, not prosecuted.
Luis Juarez Garcia, grand
theft auto, four months in jail
CTS, $520 fine and court costs,
$350 public defender fees and
$100 COP placed on lien,
release to immigration.
Brad Elliott Rimes, three
counts possession of metham-
phetamine, possession of met-
hamphetamine with intent to
sell and resisting arrest without
violence, five years Florida
State Prison CTS, license sus-
pended two years, $520 fine
and court costs, $350 public
defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien; four counts pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
not prosecuted.
Ruben Rivas, grand theft,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, $520 fine and
court costs, $200 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, $90 restitu-
tion, 50 hours community ser-
vice.
Frank Romeo III, violation
of probation (original charges
possession of cocaine and sev-
eral traffic charges), probation
revoked, community control
two years with enrolled in treat-
ment center, $100 COP and
$100 public defender fees
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Jobie Michael Skitka, bur-
glary with assault or battery,
one year one day Florida State
Prison CTS, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender fees
and $100 COP placed on lien;
assault of a person over 65 and
violation of a domestic violence
injunction for protection, not
prosecuted.
Jonathan Whitted, violation
of probation (original charge
burglary of a conveyance), pro-
bation modified to add two
years, including two months in
jail, $150 public defender fees


and $100 COP added to out-
standing fines and fees.
Mark Dwayne Williams, bur-
glary of a structure, grand theft
and violation of probation
(original charges dealing in
stolen property and uttering a
forged instrument), probation
revoked, three years Florida
State Prison CTS, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees and $100 COP added to'
outstanding fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Adrian Isaguirre Rodriguez,
violation of environmental rules
and regulation, violation of
Florida litter law-felony
dumping and violation of pro-
bation (original charge grand
theft), new felonies not prose-
cuted, violation affidavit with-
drawn, probation terminated.
Juanita Jackson Wright, three
counts unlicensed operation of
an assisted living facility, not
prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Noey Adam Flores and
Guadalupe Ochoa to Lawrence
A. Roberts, $20,000.
Donnie and Teresa K.
Morgan to James P. Hill,
$86,791.14.
Dennis Melton to Noey-A.
and Jennifer Flores, and
Guadalupe Jr. and Pauline M.
Ochoa, $50,000.
Marie H. Boley to Marcos
Chantes-Flores, $35,733.05.
Israel Cortez to TNT
Childcare Center Inc., (two
properties), $230,000.
First National Bank of
Wauchula to Maria D. Tapia De
Gutierrez, $35,000.


NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNERS

March 1, 2011 is the DEADLINE to file for:

up to $50,000 Homestead Exemption

$25,000 Senior Exemption

$5,000 Disabled Veteran's Exemption

$500 Widow's Exemption

$500 Widower's Exemption

$500 Disability Exemption

$500 Exemption for Blind Persons

Property Tax Discount for Veterans Age 65 and Older with a

Combat Related Disability

(Florida Residency and Other Requirements)

Disabled Veteran Tax Exemption

(At least 10% war or service connected)

Active Duty Military Tax Exemption

All Other Exemptions

And Agricultural Classification

If you have questions concerning the qualifications for these exemptions,

please call the Property Appraiser's Office at (863) 773-2196.

Applications for exemptions and discounts

MUST be made IN PERSON at

Hardee County Property Appraiser's Office Administration Bldg.,

110 W. Oak St., Rm 103


MEETING NOTICE
The HARDEE COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
invites the Public to the
SUSTAINABLE HARDEE:
VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE

Quality of Life

(Housing)

WORKSHOP*

MONDAY, MARCH 07, 2011
6:00-8:00 P.M.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
412 W. Orange St., Rm. 103
Courthouse Annex. 1' floor. Wauchula



Land Use/Environment/

Open Space

WORKSHOP

TUESDAY, MARCH 08, 2011.
6:00-8:00 P.M.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
412 W. Orange St.. Rm. 103
Courthouse Annex. 1" floor. Wouchula



Education

WORKSHOP

THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011
6:00-8:00 P.M.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
412 W. Orange St.. Rm. 103
Courthouse Annex. 1" floor. Wauchula


Infrastructure

WORKSHOP

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011
6:00-8:00 P.M.

CITY OF WAUCHULA AUDITORIUM
225 E. Main St.. Wauchula

Please come share your thoughts and ideas
of what is needed in your community


Please contact the Planning Department
at 863 767 1964 or
visioning@hardeecounty.net
with any questions
02:24c


2:17,24c


ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


FREE GUITAR LESSONS

If interested call PASTOR ROBBIE
of the Wauchula Seventh-Day
SAdventist church at 205 South 11th
SAve., Wauchula, near the YMCA.


305-766-3182 mL t,
2:17-3:3c


8:00 AM to 5:00 PM


Monday through Friday


''







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c



i:


j;



I















:i



r


I











School Days Meant


1 Room And 3 R's


By TYLER CLOUD
Special To The Herald-Advocate
The person I chose to interview was
my great-grandfather, Clinton Manley,
who is 83 years of age. This is what I
asked him and his responses to my
questions:
Q: When and where were you
born?
A: Feb. 25, 1927, in Homeland.
Q: Did you have any brothers or
sisters? If so, how many and what
were their names?
A: Yeah, I had two brothers and one
sister. My brothers' name% were Richard
and Earnest. My sister's name was
Doris.
Q: Did you go to school? If so,
where did you go to school and how
many grades did you complete?
A: I went to school and completed 12
grades, but I went into the Army in 10th
or llth grade then came back and fin-
ished high school.
Q: When you went to school, what
kind of school did you attend, a one-
room school or a large school?
A: A one-room school.
Q: What kind of work did you do
in school?
A: Reading, writing and arithmetic.
Q: Did you ever have homework
when you were in school?
A: Yeah.
Q: How long did the school day last
when you were in school?
A: About seven hours.
SQ: How many grades were there in
school?
A: Twelve.
Q: Did they have colleges when you
were young? If so, did you go to col-


lege?
A: Yes, there were colleges, and I
went to college for two years.
Q: Did you play any sports as a
child? If so, what kind of sports did
you play?
A: My daddy wouldn't let us play any
sports.
Q: What kind of work did you do
as a child?
A: I fed the chickens, hogs; and I
helped with the farm labor.
Q: How did you, your brothers and
you sister split your daily chores?
A: My sister helped Mama in the
house and worked in the field when she
had spare time. Richard tended to the
horse and the cow. Earnest worked
whenever Daddy could make him. I
tended to the chickens and the hogs. All
of us worked in the field.
Q: Did your family farm or did
they buy what they needed?
A: About half of my life my daddy
owned the grocery store, so we had
what we needed; and the other half, we
lived on the farm and grew what we
needed for food.
Q: Did
your fami- 11
ly live in ;
the city or
in the
country when you were a child?
A: While Daddy owned the store we
lived in town, and we lived in the coun-
try when we moved to the farm.
Q: What kind of entertainment did
you have as a child?
A: I went to my uncle's to play with
my relatives, and I got together with the
other country boys and had horse races.


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SCHOOL BOARD OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1009 North 6" Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873

HARDEE COUNTY SCHOOLS SEEK "HALL OF FAME" NOMINEES
Superintendent David Durastanti requests that members of the public submit names for potential
inductees into the Hardee County Schools Hall of Fame. Nominees should be people who have made
significant contributions to their professional fields and who have attended public school in Hardee
County.
Letters of nomination will be accepted through March 31, 2011. The letter should include the:
nominee's name and address (or address of the nearest living relative if the nominee is deceased)
the approximate dates of enrollment in Hardee County Schools
a description of the nominee's accomplishments
the name and address of the person or organization making the nomination.
Letters should be addressed to:
Hardee County School Board
ATTENTION: Hall of Fame
P.O. Box 1678
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Persons previously nominated are kept on file for reconsideration each year.
There is no need to renominate anyone.
The program initiated in 1991 has recognized Mr. Merle L. Albritton, Mr. Shelley S. Boone, Mr.
Doyle W. Bryan, Mr. John Burton, Governor Doyle E. Carlton, Sr., Dr. Leffie M. Carlton, Jr., Mr. Jesse S.
Carter, Mrs. Exie Cathcart, Mrs. Catheryn McDonald Coker, Dr. Sylvia M. Collins, Mr. J.W. (Bill) Crews,
Jr., Mr. Michael Crews, Mr. Standish L. Crews, Mr. Joe L. Davis, Brig. Gen. Frederick H. Essig, Mr. W.
Curtis Ezelle, Colonel John Cecil Fralish, Mr. Charles Frazier, Mrs. Annie W. Hart, Dr. Harold E. Henderson,
Miss Valda E. Long, Mr. John W. Maddox, Col. Donell Matthews, Mr. Tom McEwen. Judge Shirlyon J.
McWhorter, Col. William Moran, Mr. Lawrence A. Roberts, Mr. Bartley Sapp, Mr. L. M. Shackelford, Miss
Ruth V. Southerland, Mr. Leon T. Stephens, Mrs. Myrtie W. Strickland, Mr. Dunning Terrell, and Reverend
R. Perry Tomlinson
The recipients will be inducted at the Senior Honors Banquet where Hardee Senior High School's
graduating seniors with a 3.50 grade point average or higher are recognized for their accomplishments.
The seniors and their parents will be guests of Mosaic and the Hardee County Education Foundation,
sponsors of the awards event. 2:17,24c


Q: Did you have any pets as a
child? If so, what kind of pets did you
have?
A: Yes, we had dogs and cats.
Q: What was your main means of
transportation when you were a
child?
A: Car.
Q: Did your family travel very
much? If so, where did you travel?
A: We didn't do much traveling. We
just traveled to my uncle's house and
back to visit our relatives.
Q: What was your first job and
how old were you when you got it?
A: I started working in orange groves
when I was about 12 years old.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two months of track meets
begin tomorrow (Friday).
The season begins with a trip
to thte Northport Relays on
Friday and another to the
Sarasota Cardinal Mooney
Relay Invitational Meet on
Saturday.
Scattered among the next 10
meets are special ones to the
Disney Track & Field Show-
case and the Pepsi Florida
Relays, events which tracksters
have to earn the right to enter.
Actually, it is track and field,
with running, pole vault, discus,
shot put, long jumps, hurdles
and all in which to compete.
Some of the participants are
still involved in winter sports
and will be available shortly.


February 24, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C

Q: What was your first car?
A: A 1928 Chevrolet cut-down.
Q: How old were you when you got
married?
A: I got married when I was 20.
Q: What was your favorite thing to
eat as a child?
A: Mashed potatoes.

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


Girls Coach Rod Smith and
Boys Coach Rob Beatty are
assisted by James Carpenter,
who also heads up a youth track
program.
On the girls roster at this time
are seniors LaCresha Carlton,
Lacey Garza, Ashley Louis,
Mylekia Stevenson and Yesenia
Vargas, and juniors Sasha
Castanon and Jessica Hunt.
Underclass competitors are
sophs Andrea Castaneda, Janet
Lopez, Adna Metayer and
Desiree Smith, and freshmen
Alyssa Casso, Merislene
Cimeus, Sonya Fowler, Briana
Gardner, Angela Heuckeroth,
Dieunide Metayer and Nedjie
Severe.
To date, on the boys squad
are seniors Johnathan Jones,
Jarrius Lindsey, Luis Mata,


Angelo Parkinson, Austin
Prestridge, Tony Reyna, Ka-
reem Richardson, Victor Sal-
azar and manager Nelsaint
Metayer.
Juniors are Agustine An-
celmo, Jesse Belcher, Jorge
Conejo, Maxon Delhomme,
Antonio Galvan, Reimundo
Garcia, Rito Lopez, Dillon
Skitka and Julian Varela.
Sophs are Octavio Alvarez,
Aaron Barker, Anthony Burks,
Emilio Delarosa, Sean Holmes,
Freddie Juarez, Dorian Mejia-
Flores and Andrew Reyna, with
freshmen Brandon Beatty,
Kevin Borjas, Adrian Briones,
Adson Delhomme, Marco
Ehrenkaufer, Lucious Everett,
Morgan Garcia, James Greene
and Filistin Louis-Michel.


Come Support The Youth

of Hardee County At The

FFA & 4-H Livestock Sale!



Thursday, Feb. 24, 2010

In The Arena at



7:00 pm


Note: All buyers must be preregistered prior
to sale to receive their bid packet and sale
information. Contact Monica Reas at
863-781-0888 for more information. 2:17,24


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO FIND
CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS)
IN COMPLIANCE
DOCKET NO. 10-CIE1-NOI-2503-(A)-(I)
The Department gives notice of its intent to find the Amendment(s) to the
Comprehensive Plan for the City of Wauchula, adopted by Ordinance No. 2010-08 on
December 13, 2010, IN COMPLIANCE, pursuant to Sections 163.3184, 163.3187 and
163.3189, FS.
The adopted City of Wauchula Comprehensive Plan Amendment(s) and the
Department's Objections, Recommendations and Comments Report, (if any), are avail-
able for public inspection Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, during nor-
mal business hours, at the City of Wauchula, City Hall, Clerks Office, 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, Florida 33836.
Any affected person, as defined in Section 163.3184, FS., has a right to petition for
an administrative hearing to challenge the proposed agency determination that the
Amendment(s) to the City of Wauchula Comprehensive Plan are In Compliance, as
defined in Subsection 163.3184(1), FS. The petition must be filed within twenty-one
(21) days after publication of this notice, and must include all of the information and
contents described in Uniform Rule 28-106.201, FA.C. The petition must be filed with
the Agency Clerk, Department of Community Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100, and a copy mailed or delivered to the local govern-
ment. Failure to timely file a petition shall constitute a waiver of any right to request an
administrative proceeding as a petitioner under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If a
petition is filed, the purpose of the administrative hearing will be to present evidence
and testimony and forward a recommended order to the Department. If no petition is
filed, this Notice of Intent shall become final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other affected persons may petition for leave to intervene in the
proceeding. A petition for intervention must be filed at least twenty (20) days before the
final hearing and must include all of the information and contents described in Uniform
Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A petition for leave to intervene shall be filed at the Division of
Administrative Hearings, Department of Management Services, 1230 Apalachee
Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3060. Failure to petition to intervene within the
allowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such a person has to request a
hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS., or to participate in the administrative
hearing.
After an administrative hearing petition is timely filed, mediation is available pursuant
to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a), FS., to any affected person who is made a party to the
proceeding by filing that request with the administrative law judge assigned by the
Division of Administrative Hearings. The choice of mediation shall not affect a party's
right to an administrative hearing.
-s- Charles Gauthier, AICP
Division of Community Planning Director
Department of Community Affairs
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100
2:24c


Track Starts Tomorrow


I








8C The Herald-Advocate, February 24, 2011


CRAFT FAIR & LUNCHEON
Our annual Craft Fair &
Luncheon will be held on Mon-
day. March 7, starting at 9 a.m.
in the Rec Hall. There will be a
bake sale and lots of crafters
selling their craft items. The
Luncheon will start at 11. All RV
parks are welcome to attend.

KOFFEE KLATCH
Richard Brayton led the U.S.
Pledge, Barb Ellis led the
Canadian Pledge and Don
Merillat led the prayer.
The 50/50 winners were
2523 Morning Glory, Ron and
Betty Ackermann, Bob and
Nonie Barr, Lot 431 and Phil
and Irene Scherzer.

SATURDAY DANCE
Door prizes for the Feb. 12
dance with Doin' It Rite were
donated by Steve and Maureen
Martin, Midge Saunders, Paul-
ine and Hank Dupuis, Shirley
and Dave O'Neal, Chuck and
Barb Ellis, Sheila and Ron
Lapier, Sheila and Tony Smith,
Don and Monique Harkin and
Giselle and Pete Tremblay.
The prizes were won by Les
Ascott, Linda Harrison, Gary
Shewan, Gary Breyer, Sheila
Lapier, Bob Noble and Jack
Morrell.

BINGO
Verna Dawson won the large
jackpot on Feb. 11 and I won
the small jackpot. On Feb. 14,
Jane Molett won the large jack-
pot and Theresa Montgomery
won the small one.

SCORES
Men's Golf, Feb. 10: A's,


Fred Kessler: B's. Don Harki
C's. D. Miller: and D's. Nor
Batchelor.
Mixed Golf, Feb. 14: Tea'
Net winners were Barb Krame
Art Cathill, Margaret Walt
and Arlie Wooters.
Shuffling. Feb. 15: Thre(
game winners were Bo
Beshel, Jane Christopher, Do
Harkin, Fred Kessler, Te
Longnecker, Sharon Potter. Ro
Storm, Doug Taylor, Mert Wo
and Arlie Wooters.

CHURCH NEWS
By Diane Burget
Pastor Bob Winne open
our service on Feb. 13 by leach
ing us in singing "Jesus Love
Me."
We also sang "Love Lifte
Me," "My Savior's Love" ar
"My Jesus, I Love Thee
Linda Gray and Wilma Beh3
mer on the piano and organ pr(
vided the accompaniment
Nancy Morrison led our cho
in singing "I've Never Bee
This Homesick Before," wi
accompaniment by Linda Gra
on the piano.
Pastor Bob played "Th
Love of God" on his trombon
This being Valentine's Da
Sunday, "Love" was Past(
Bob's subject. He closed cha
lenging us to make a diffe
ence while we are here and
'love this world through o0
actions.
The service was conclude
with the congregation singir
"God Be with You Till We Me
Again." Chocolate kisses we:
given out to each person at tl
close of services, complimen
of Pastor Bob.


Stop by and see why so
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com Gene Davis
9 30tfc 800-226-3325 consultant


n: During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
m officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
m
er. COUNTY
er Feb. 20, Antonio Galdino Gomez-Cruz, 19, of 3308 Suwannee
St., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White and charged
e- with larceny-petit theft.
)b Feb. 20, Jose Merced, 22, of 39 Pine Cone Trailer Park Road,
)n Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters and charged with
:d battery.
mn Feb. 20, Jason Michael Swain, 30, of 446 Metheny Road,
If Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White and charged with
aggravated battery.
Feb. 20, criminal mischief on Wilbur C. King Boulevard and
a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.
ed Feb. 19, Jose Robeli Bartolon-Morales, 21, of 1409 Lost Acres
d- Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison on a charge of
es failure to appear in court and also charged with no valid license.
Feb. 19, a fight at Pine Cone Park and criminal mischief on
ed Denver Avenue were reported.
nd
Feb. 18, Marcus Darrel Hodges, 23, of 4770 Dixiana Dr.,
Y- Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged
o- with resisting an officer without violence.
it. Feb. 18, Randal Dean Simpson, 24, of 2405 SR 60, Lot 208,
ir Bartow, was arrested by Dep. Maria Hall on a charge of withhold-
en ing support of children.
th Feb. 18, Vivian Oviedo-Martinez, 36, of 18975 Collins Ave.,
ay Sunny Isles, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with
larceny-petit theft.
he Feb. 18, residential burglaries on Prescott Avenue and on Dena
e. Circle, criminal mischief on Walking Horse Drive and on Golden
ay Oaks Road, and thefts on Prescott Ave., and on U.S. 17 North were
or reported.
l-
r- Feb. 17, Eric Daronne McClain, 26, of 1618 Martin Luther
to King Jr. Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and
ur charged with possession of cocaine, possession of cocaine with
intent to sell or manufacture and possession of drug paraphernalia.
ed Feb. 17, Leo Joseph Bradley, 46, of 1009 Billy Lane, Holifax,
ig Va., was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson on an out-of-county war-
et rant and also charged with driving with knowledge of a suspended
re license.
he Feb. 17, Scott Colin Fields, 35, of 1842 Dishong Road, Wau-
ts chula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette on a charge of violation
of probation.
Feb. 17, Yesenia Sanabria, 24, of 1300 NE Oak St., Arcadia,
was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with resisting an offi-
cer without violence and driving with knowledge of a suspended
license.
Feb. 17, Luis Enrique Ibarra-Uriaz, 37, 1300 NE Oak St.,
Arcadia, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF)
and charged with unarmed burglary of a structure or conveyance,
fraud by giving false ID to an officer and resisting an officer with-
out violence.
Feb. 17, a vehicle stolen on Moncrief Road, burglary of a con-
veyance on Dixianna Drive, and a theft on Third Street East were
reported.


ii


Feb. 16, Jeannine Ann Sparno, 41, of 129-11th Wahneta St.,
West, Winter Haven, was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers and
charged with withholding support of children.
Feb. 16, Ector Lopez, 21, of 2460 Pine Cone Park Road,


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


Cl


Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with
retail theft.
Feb. 16, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.

Feb. 15, Tocory Nyron Daniels, 22, of 744 Chamberlain Blvd.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with
domestic battery.
Feb. 15, Danny Wayne Day, 40, of 2905 Platt Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with
DUI and driving with knowledge of a suspended license. At the
jail, Dep. Eric Harrison also charged him with battery on a deten-
tion facility employee.
Feb. 15, Frankie Reyna, 20, of 3514 Poplar St., Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Det. Russell Conley on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
Feb. 15, burglary of a conveyance on Lang Drive, criminal
mischief on Rigdon Road and a theft on CR 664 was reported.

WAUCHULA
Feb. 20, Winston Neizil, 29, of 157 Will Duke Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and charged with
larceny-petit theft.
Feb. 20, Tamara Lynn Nelson, 42, of 804 N. Sassafras, Dexter,
Mo., was arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and charged with larce-
ny-first degree petit theft and resisting a merchant.
Feb. 20, a business burglary at Green Street, criminal mischief
on U.S. 17 North and thefts on U.S. 17 South were reported.

Feb. 19, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.,

Feb. 18, Andrew James Merchant, of 11806 Gordon Dr.,
Riverview was arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza and charged with pos-
session of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 18, Samuel Peter Tepakeyah, 24, of 835 Hannah Ave.,
Traverse City, Mich., was.arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza and charged
with possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 18, residential burglaries on South Seventh Avenue and
on U.S. 17 South were reported.
Feb. 17, a residential burglary on North Seventh Avenue was
reported.

Feb. 16, a residential burglary on South Florida Avenue and a
theft on East Main Street were reported.

Feb. 15, criminal mischief on North Third Avenue, and thefts
on West Orange Street, Bay Street and Green Street were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Feb. 20, a theft on West Main Street was reported.

Feb. 18, Enrique Velazquez, 29, of 410 Palmetto St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Chief John Scheel and charged with three
counts of selling cocaine within 1,000 feet of a specified location,
possession of cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 18, a theft on East Banana Street-was reported.

Feb. 17, thefts on South Avenue and on Sally Boulevard were
reported.

Feb. 16, Javier Maldanado, 22, of 4405 Dixianna Drive,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and
charged with trafficking in amphetamine or methamphetamine,
selling methamphetamine within 1,000 feet of a specified location,
possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

The ability to see beauty is the beginning of our moral
sensibility. What we believe is beautiful we will not wan-
tonly destroy.
-Reverend Sean Parker Dennison