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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: February 17, 2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


lllth Year, No. 11
3 Sections, 32 Pages


46b
pius 4 s.ls uI.\


Thursday, February 17, 2011


Governor Ousts City Commissioners


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
With one keenly aimed slice
of his cleaver, Gov. Rick Scott
on Friday dissected the Wau-
chula City Commission into
those who had broken the
Sunshine Law and those who
had not-and then disposed of
those who had.
Scott issued an ultimatum to


five of the seven-member
board: resign by 5 o'clock that
day or be removed.
Two commissioners, the
newly-elected John Freeman
and Russell Smith, were not
nicked by the governor's blade.
Neither was in office when the
Government-in-the-Sunshine
Law violations occurred.
But David Royal, Jerry Con-


early. Clarence Bolin. Val Pat-
arini and Dan Graham were,
and each had a choice to make.
All but Graham chose to resign
from office. By 4:49 p.m. on
Friday, an Executive Order of
the governor both suspending
and then removing Graham
from office was filed with the
Department of State in Tal-
lahassee.


Scott's actions stemmed from
the Wauchula City Commis-
sion's "knowing and willful"
violation of the Sunshine Law
by holding meetings which
were closed to the public on
Sept. 14, 2009, and March 1,
2010.
The Governor's Office cited
a copy of the document filed by
the State Attorney's Office


charging the commissioners
with second-degree misde-
meanors and a copy of the
Hardee County Court case dis-
position form showing the sen-
tence handed down in court on
June 30, 2010.
Resignations, provided by
four of the five targeted com-
missioners by noon on Friday,
were, for the most part, short.


FILE PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Gov. Rick Scott forced city commissioners out of public office for their violation of the Florida Government-in-the-Sunshine Law. Seen here du&-
ing their appearance in Hardee County Court this past summer are (from left) Clarence Bolin, Jerry Conerly, Dan Graham, Val Patarini with lawyer
Candace Preston, and David Royal.




County Manager Retains Hot Seat


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
He's still the county manager.
After well over two hours of
discussion, complaints and re-
visions to ordinances, County
Manager Lex Albritton remains
at the helm of the county.
The monthly workshop of the
Hardee County Commission on
Friday focused on all aspects of
the county manager and his
position.
Commission Chairman Terry
Atchley announced at the start
of the meeting that he had asked
Albritton to stay out of the
meeting. Commissioners decid-
ed that it could be helpful to
have him available if he was
willing. He came in a few
moments later and spoke only
once during the meeting.
The meeting was divided into
four segments, an overview of
county manager form of gov-
ernment, the county manager
ordinance, the assistant county
manager job description and the
county manger evaluation done



WEATHER
DAE HIGH LOW RAIN
02/09 78 39 0.00
02/10 73 56 0.07
02/11 61 47 0.00
02/12 65 40 0.00
02/13 69 34 0.00
02/14 72 37 o000
2/15 76 40 0.00
TQJ Rainfl to 02115111 2.53
SmeM period st year 429
Ten Yar Average 54.30
Sourw Un v. of Fla. Ona Raeerch Center

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Community Calendar .6A
Courthouse Report ... 7C
Crime Blotter ....... 5C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup .10A
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menu .. 8B



I IIIIlll 2IIill
7 18122 07290 3


in September. An additional
agenda item was on a commis-
sioner's website and its effect
on other commissioners (see
related article).
Manager Evaluation
The final portion of the ses-
sion on the county manager
brought perhaps the most con-
troversy.
Atchley introduced it inform-
ing commissioners that the first
annual evaluation summary
scores were in commissioners'
packets, and the two new com-
missioners were welcome to
comment on their concerns, his
weaknesses and strengths.
Commissioner Minor Bryant,
who had given Albritton the
lowest scores in the September
evaluation, said his evaluations
were based on what he had



Worksite


Accident


Kills Man

By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 40-year-old heavy-equip-
ment operator was killed early
Saturday morning in a worksite
accident.
Jose Antonio Soto. of Winter
Haven, was an employee of
-M-cDonald Construction Corp..
the earth-moving contractor
used by CF Industries at its
Hardee Phosphate Complex. at
220 Mine View Road in Fort
Green.
According to a death investi-
gation conducted by the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office, the
accident occurred shortly after
workers arrived at their work-
site for the day, deep into the
mine property and about two
miles south of State Road 62
and four miles east of County
Road 663 North.
See ACCIDENT 2A


heard from the public. He said
he felt the main fault was with
the commission, who had want-
ed Albritton to insulate the
board from contact from com-
plainants, but the board was
now heading in the right direc-


First-year Commissioner Sue
Birge commented that she had
been in management for 19
years and was disappointed that
there had not been evaluations
of the county manager all along.


"It's important to make people
accountable, and would have
been to his advantage to have
been done annually. We need to
recognize his shortcomings,
strengths and weaknesses."
See COUNTY 3A


Website Puts Colleagues In Quandary


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"It puts the rest of us in a
position. We're all walking a
fine line."
First-year Commissioner Sue
Birge explained her quandary at
the Hardee County Commission
workshop on Friday.
"If a fellow commissioner
has a website and someone
comes up and asks -about it, is


that a violation of the Sunshine
Law?" asked Birge, referring to
the colloquial name for the state
law which expects public offi-
cials to conduct all their busi-
ness in front of the public.
She was talking about a
recent entry on the website of
the other first-term commis-
sioner, Grady Johnson, which
mentioned her and Commis-
sioner Minor Bryant. Since he


was installed as a commissioner
in November, Johnson has re-
ported to his constituents on his
website, expressing his opin-
ions on various aspects of coun-
ty government in a section
called, "What I Think."
County attorney Ken Evers
explained, "The digitized form
of opinion doesn't violate the
Sunshine Law unless there's
See WEBSITE 3A


One commissioner, ho\\ever,
stated his objections.
In an email to the. "mayor"
and city attorney Cliff Ables,
who had relayed the .governor's
order to all five commissioners
at about 10:30 a.m. on Friday,
Val Patarini wrote, "I am
informing you that I must
See GOVERNOR 11A



Ex-Officials


Challenge


Governor's


Authority

But Governor

Stands Firm!
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Spurred by the city attorney's
legal research, the five ousted
members of the Wauchula City
Commission are challenging
the governor's authority to keep
them from public office.
In fact, one former commis-
sioner, Dan Graham, took a seat
at the City Commission's regu-
larly scheduled meeting on
Monday night, the first since his
removal from office by Ex-ecu-
tive Order of Gov. Rick Scott
on Friday.
But despite'Ables' efforts to
reinstate the quintet, Scott on
Wednesday morning said he
stands firm on his decision.
Calls to that effect were
placed by the governor's staff
late Wednesday morning to all
parties involved, noting Ables'
legal arguments had been re-
ceived and reviewed and that
the governor's "original deci-
sion stands."
It is final. David Royal, Jerry
Conerly, Clarence Bolin, Val
Patarini and Graham arc no
longer city commissioners.
It was unclear early
Wednesday afternoon if Ables
would continue the legal wrestl-
ing, perhaps appealing to the
Florida Supreme Court.
Ables could not be reached
for comment neither on
See CHALLENGE 11A


---- -----
r' :rl
"//////
"7~-
~


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
The Wauchula City Commission's regularly scheduled meeting on Monday night was held in the city auditorium to
accommodate the crowd. Expelled commissioner Dan Graham (center) insisted on a seat at the commission table
in protest of Gov. Rick Scott's action against him. He is shown flanked by the city's two remaining commissioners,
Russell Smith (left) and John Freeman.


Cover-Art Contest

Ends On Friday

... Details 8C


BIG EVENTS

FILL CALENDAR!
... Stories 2A


Hoopsters Shoot

For Regionals

I .. Story 1B


40
plus 4.,: sales tax








2A The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co Inc Periodical Postage paid at U.S Post Office. Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). "Postmaster," send address
changes to The Herald-Advocate. PO. Box 338, Wauchula. FL 33873.


' DEADLINES: h
Schools -Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardec Living -Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads -Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months 518; I yr. S31; 2 yrs. 560
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. S41; 2 yrs. S79
Out of State
6 months S27; I yr. -$49; 2 yrs. S95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing







I Kelly's Column
By Jim


The USDA has reduced its estimate of the 2010-11 Florida
orange crop to 138 million boxes. When the first estimate came out
on Oct. 8 the forecast was for 146 million boxes.
The decrease is due largely to several freezes in December
and January, along with smaller fruit sizes. The new estiriiate for
early and mid-season oranges is 66 million boxes and for
Valencias, 72 million boxes.
The grapefruit estimate remains at 19.6 million boxes.

Marilyn Eschenberg, 76, of rural Zolfo Springs died on Feb. 8.
Burial was in Wooster, Ohio.
For many years she and Leo Davis owned and operated the
Circle 3 Western Store in Wauchula. Marilyn was a former bank
executive in Ohio.

Wauchula Pawn Shop, which had been in business here for 12
years, has moved to Winter Haven at 2709 Havendale Blvd.,
reported manager John Newman.
Newman said housing rents are high in Wauchula and some of
his customers have moved. He loves the people of Hardee County
and would like to re-open here again someday, but for now Polk
Coiiinty has a lot more residents. The pawn'-hop closed here last
month. A

The Hardee High boys basketball team head coached by Vance
'Dickey, after two bad years, has bounced back.this season to win
the district championship with wins over Sarasota Booker and
Bradenton Southeast. The Cats under Dickey also won a district
title three or four years ago.
Hardee has a home playoff game tonight (Thursday) in
Wauchula.

Jack LaLanne of California was a hero of mine. He made a life
out of promoting exercise and healthy eating. He had TV shows on
physical fitness and promoting juicing of fruits and vegetables. The
Grim Reaper finally got him at age 96.

Traditionally white students were the majority in the Hardee
County school system. No more.
As of Feb. 11 in grades K through 12 Hispanics made up 59.8
percent of the county's approximately 5,200 students. Whites made
up 31.5 percent; Blacks, 5.7 percent; Mixed Race 1.6 percent;
Asian, 1.2 percent; and Indian, 0.4 percent.
Hardee's student population has remained about 5,000 for well
over a decade, if memory serves.
At HHS the percentage of students are Hispanic, 53.4; White,
37.1; Black, 6.9; Asian, 2.0; Indian, 0.3; and Mixed, 0.2.
At Hardee Junior High the percentages are Hispanic, 54.4;
SWhite, 35.7; Black, 5.9; Asian,l.3; Indian, 0.8; and Mixed, 2.0.
In 2010 Thomas Trevino was elected to the Hardee School
Board. He is the first Hispanic elected to countywide office.

We hope the crisis in Wauchula city government will be re-
solved soon.
On Friday Florida Gov. Rick Scott ordered five Wauchula City
Commissioners to resign or be removed from office by 5 p.m. that
day, for their involvement in Sunshine Law violations in laWe 2009
and early 2010. They pled no contest and had their day in court,
paying fines and court costs. Several of the commissioners were re-
elected to office last fall.
For a number of years there was a running political soap opera
in Zolfo Springs. which has calmed down now. A couple of years
ago the virus migrated to the north three miles.
There have been several controversies in Wauchula city gov-
ernment in the last two years. When will it end? Stay tuned.
Citizens are wise to attend their local governmental meetings
and be informed and active.


ACCIDENT
Continued From 1A


The men were checking out
the graders and other heavy.
equipment when Soto began to
walk over to' the parking area
workers used -sheriff's Maj.
Randy Dey described. Soto did
not see a grader which was
backing up. nor did the grader
operator see him.
The grader did emit warning
"backup beeps," Dey said, but
the accident happened too
quickly. Soto was pulled under
the grader and killed, he said.
It was about 7:10 a.m.
"We are saddened to learn
that the accident occurred and
resulted in a fatality." Nick
Katzaras. general manager of
the mine. said later Saturday.
"Our thoughts and prayers con-
tinue to be with the family of
the deceased."


McDonald Construction
Corp., too, was stricken by the
death. "We are saddened by this
loss, and our thoughts and
prayers are with the family of
our employee." said company
president Wiley Johnson.
"We are working with offi-
cials and a full investigation of
the accident is under way." he
added.
Dey said Soto died immedi-
ately at the scene. He said the
grader operator went into shock
and was transported to the hos-
pital.
"It's tragic, just a tragic, trag-
ic accident." the major said.
"Here at the Sheriff's Office.
everything goes out to the fam-
ily of the victim and to his co-
workers."


Los-i


I
PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Contestants vying for the title of Miss Hardee County are (front row, from left) Delia Ward, Danielle Nicholson,
Brittany Hines, LaCresha Carlton, Courtney Buckley, Christina Milby, Lauren Moore and Caylah Coker; (second row)
Eryn Mahoney, Melissa Hartley, Amanda Rigney, Kara Norris, Christie Selph, Yvonne Agullar and Anne Garcia.




Hardee County Fair Opens Saturday!


By MESQUA FIELDS
For The Herald-Advocate
It's that time of the year
again! Children running
around, laughing; teens having:
a blast on the scary but not-so-
scary rides; and couples, young
and old, vying against others to
win their loved one that perfect
stuffed animal.
The week-long run of the
annual Hardee County Fair
opens this Saturday.
This year, a few changes
have been made. Children's
Day at the fair has been moved
from Wednesday to Monday-a
result of this coming Monday
being the President's Day holi-
day. Another change, which
many may find friendly to their
wallets, is Dollar Day, set for
next Wednesday. Admission,
parking, rides and select foods
will all be $1!
And don't forget, the FFA
and 4-H Livestock Sale will be
held in the arena at 7 p.m. next
Thursday!
There will be tons of grand
booths set up in tlie midway-
which opens simultaneously
with the gates each day-for all
contenders to stop by and fill up
bags of goodies. Artwork will
be displayed in the fair's art
contest. Ages of the artists'
range from kindergarteners to
adults. So, stop by and witness
the Hardee County talent!
Also, Madness till Midnight
is Friday, Feb. 25
Many shows will be taking
place in the arena this year. The
first, the rabbit show, starts at
5:30 p.m. on Monday. Follow-
ing it, at 6:30 p.m., is the dairy
show. On the next day, Tuesday,
the swine show starts at 7 p.m.
On Wednesday, the breeding
and heifer show begins at 6
p.m. The next hour marks the
start of the steer show; beef
showmanship will follow short-
ly after.
Five pageants will be held at
the Agri-Civic Center as well.
Competitions ranging from the


CRIME BLOTTER
Arrest records provided
by the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office and pub-
lished by this newspaper in
last week's Crime Blotter
column included the name
of a juvenile. The Sheriff's
Office has not charged the
juvenile as an adult or with
a felony, therefore her
name should not have
been included in the arrest
records. The Herald-Ad-
vocate apologizes for pub-
lishing the information.

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


Kindergarten Princess Pageant
all the way to the Miss Hardee
County Pageant will take place.
Miss Hardee County will be
at 7 p.m. this Saturday-the
first fair day. On Sunday, the
Agri-Civic Center will host the
Kindergarten Princess Pageant
at 2 p.m. The next day, Monday,
the Junior Miss Pageant will
start at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 25,
brings the Prince and Princess
Pageant at 7 p.m. The last pag-
eant, the Little Miss, will be on
Saturday, Feb. 26, at 4 p.m.
The Ranch Rodeo begins at 7
p.m. on Friday, Feb 25. So head


over to the arena and watch the
cowboys and cowgirls ride the
broncs or barrel race! Other
events at the Ranch Rodeo will
include team sorting, double
mugging, calf doctoring, and
mutton busting.
The Mexican Rodeo is back
again this year! It's on Saturday,
Feb. 26, the last fair day. There
will be a Mexican Band playing
at 4 p.m., followed by the
rodeo. Come witness the fantas-
tic Mexican bull riding, and
watch the young ones with their
mutton busting. The rodeo
starts at 7 p.m.


The fair days will begin on
Saturday, and gates open at
noon that day. On Sunday, gates
open at 1 p.m.; Monday, at 1
p.n.; Tuesday, at 5 p.m.;
Wednesday, at 5 p.m.;
Thursday, at 5 p.m.; Friday,
Feb. 25, at 5 p.m.; and Saturday,
Feb. 26, at noon.
Armbands, which will allow
a person to have unlimited
access to all rides, will be $20
each day, except for Children's
Day. Only then will they be
$15-so grab a friend and head
on over to the Hardee County
Fair!


Grillin' & Chillin' On



Main Starts Friday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Barbecue, chili, desserts,
music, crafts, playtime!
There's a lot going on Friday
evening and Saturday at the
annual Grillin' & Chillin' on
Main.
"All the barbecue teams will
be from hometown organiza-
tions, giving local folks an
opportunity to enjoy good food
and help their community at the
same time," said Jessica New-
man, Main Street director.
The two-day featured event is
from 5 to 9 p.m. on Friday and
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday.
There will be vendors, chil-
dren's activities and more.
While everyone is eating bar-
becue or other goodies Friday
night, there will also be a chili
cookoff and dessert competi-
tion. There is a $10 entry for
each one. Judging will be done
at the Main Street office at 107
E. Main St. Be sure to drop off


your chili there by 5:45, as the
chili judging is at 6 p.m.
Desserts need to be there by
6:45 for the judging at 7 p.m.
While folks are visiting
Heritage Park at Main Street
and South Seventh Avenue on
Friday evening, they will be
entertained by the musical
group One Night Rodeo.
While enjoying the music, peo-
ple can stroll along and visit
with the various arts and crafts
vendors, sample snacks from
several food vendors or try out
the inflatables, games and crafts
in the children's section.
Saturday morning breaks
early and lasts six hours with
more music and fun. For enter-
tainment, Tip Toes Dance
Studio and Bailey's Dance
Academy will perform between
10 and 11 a.m., One Night
Rodeo will take the stage from
11 a.m to 1 p.m., and Genera-
tions Bluegrass will finish out
from I to 3 p.m.
There will be some favorite


food vendors, homemade ice
cream, kettle corn, boiled
peanuts, perhaps funnel cakes.
Layne Prescott will share a
few of her good recipes in spe-
cial cooking demonstrations
from 11 to noon and 1 to 2 p.m.
Historic downtown tours will
be hosted hourly by Lydia's
House and Cracker Trail
Museum.
There will be more arts and
crafts vendors, a craft area for
children in their special area.
They will also have a petting
zoo along with games.
There's so much happening, a
person could attend Friday
night and come back on
Saturday to catch up with what
he missed the first time around,
including more of that competi-
tion-quality barbecue. Prizes
will be awarded for the best.
For more information, check
the Main Street website
www.mainstreetwauchula.com
or call Newman at 767-0330.


Harlem Ambassadors Will


Hoop It Up On Saturday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Non-stop laughs and basket-
ball, too. It doesn't get any bet-
ter.
For those who may not be
going to the Hardee County
Fair on Saturday night. an
delightful alternative is avail-
able.
At 7 p.m. at the high school
gym, the Harlem Ambassadors
basketball team will treat folks
to a game against a local team
representing Habitat for Hu-
manity Hardee County. which
will benefit from the proceeds
from the game.
Can a group of locals com-
pete against the high-flying
slam-dunks, dazzling ball-han-
dling tricks and hilarious come-
dy routines of the international-
ly-acclaimed Ambassadors.
Kids are a favorite with the
Ambassadors, so they might get
an opportunity to sit with them
on the bench or have a front-
row seat near them. "'We like
them to get involved in all the


fun stuff we do," says Ambas-
sadors coach Lade' Majic.
Not quite like other Harlem
ball teams, the Ambassadors
focus on working with local
non-for-profit and service or-
ganizations like Habitat for
Humanity on fundraisers. This
one will help Humanity's local
chapter in building house No.
10
Locals attempting to play
against the Ambassadors are a
variety of school employees
and others from the community.
Look for Peter Preston, Wally
Helms, Claudio Arreola, Ryn
Heine, Regan Davenport, Sean
Brown, Jamal Jones, Gloria


Solis, Michael Kelly, Ralph
Arce, Jerry Smith and Ryan
Roehm as they take turns on the
court against the gags and skits
coming at them.
Advance tickets are $7 for
students and seniors and $9 for
the general public. At the door,
prices are $9 for students and
seniors and $13 for the general
public. Tickets are available at
Wauchula State Bank, Hardee
Ranch Supply, Heartland
Grower Supply or Florida Hos-
pital by asking for Cathy
Exendine. Or, call Kathleen
Roehm at 781-2874, or Pam
Warren at 781-0051.


-.- '- p


Your Business Could Appear Herel

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate







February 17, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


COUHNI
Continued From 1A


The other first-year commis-
sioner, Grady Albritton took his
turn. "I've made several mo-
tions to dismiss the county
manager. It's not an entitlement
to conduct as you want to. This
board is responsible to open
d(x>r for the county manager.
This commission has been dead
wrong and should not have
relinquished authority. It's my
idea to head that off.
"There needs to be profes-
sional standards. I owe you
complete integrity. I disagree on
the county management and the
direction it is going. It's been
the number one request of citi-
zens to have a change of man-
agement. We need to pull up our
bootstraps and do our job. We
should not abuse anyone ver-
bally. I intend nothing more
than to see transparency in this
room, nothing that would be
disrespectful to the public. I be-
lieve we need a new direction."
Beside him, second-term
commissioner Dale Johnson
noted, "It's been said we
haven't done evaluations on Mr.
Albritton. Maybe not formally,
yet I speak to Mr. Albritton
almost daily and that's how I
evaluate him. I don't want to be
in the political position. It's just
a matter of doing what is right.
I haven't heard from all the cit-
izens that Mr. Albritton's doing
a bad job.
"There's one or two. I have
never heard him be abusive to
anyone. Those that don't agree
with his decisions will say he's
abused them. He stands by our
policies. Part of the problem on
evaluations is not speaking to
the manager. You need to get in
and see what's happening."
Birge replied, "With all due
respect, we should have and do
one. Of course, we evaluate
daily, but there should be an
annual evaluation and correct it
as we go."
Atchley commented, "I
agree. We all do oral/verbal
evaluations. We have been
weak in the public evaluation.
So the citizens know that he is
doing what we tell him to do.
Dale Johnson added, "If the
formal evaluations come back
really high, there could be a
problem terminating him.
There's something to be said for
personal evaluations ... It takes
a little common sense. With the
environment we're working
under now, .t here 'will be a'
mass exodus of employees."
Grady Johnson retorted,
"Give the citizens their due.
They did not get their opinions
overnight. This is the only time
in three decades of public serv-
ice I've ever seen it handled this
way. It's created a lot of ill will.
There's enough blame to go
around for everyone.
"Mr. Albritton has some kind
of a temper, but there's a direct
line that employees don't cross.
We could spend days and hours
of listening to minutes, but I'm
passing on to the board what
my constituents want. It's
important for us to set the stan-
dards and carry on."
After a bit more discussion, it
was opened to the public.
Joe Smith of Bowling Green,
related an incident in 2004,
when he had 30 acres near the
college and met with a Mrs.
Dennison who wanted to put in
a 100,000-square-foot building
for a helicopter business of 30
jobs, plus associated businesses
(suppliers). She called four
days later and said Lex
Albritton had called her, curs-
ing, loud and rude and so she
was not coming to Hardee
County. All that business and
jobs went down the drain.
Nancy Craft of Sweetwater
said. "In no time in the last 10
to 15 years have the citizens of
Hardee County become so disil-
lusioned, with the commission.
That's the reason for the
turnout. Distrust. I urge you to
continue the nightly meetings
and hear their problems and
what they want. Over the past
eight to 10 years, you could pre-
dict what the commission
response would be. If you don't
know that, haven't heard, he
haven't talked to the voters or
are not listening..My concern is
not with Mr. Albrittion, it's with
you five people up there. The
buck stops there. If you don't
want it or don't want to take it,
get out," she concluded to loud
clapping from the audience.


Benny Hash was next and
spoke about the citizens as
stockholders, who pay taxes
and own property. "People are
selling and moving out of the
county They don't know if
they're getting their money's
worth or not. Let's find out.
who being paid what. each
salary, and see if we're getting
our money's worth. People
shouldn't have to rcserrch this.
There should also be a review


board. Maybe you should check
with the Construction Industry
Licensing Board and find more
cost effective ways of doing
things. Utilize your boards.
There's been $7 million spent
on the commerce park and jobs.
What jobs has it created?"
Rilla Cooper said, "This is a
small county. I'm sorry we did-
n't get the helicopter plant.
South Carolina got a Boeing
plant. I've called Lex Albritton
and was put right through to
him. He's answered my ques-
tions and always been pleasant
to me. When I tried to talk to
him about economic develop-
ment. he defended it. I never
saw Grady Albritton out cam-
paigning in my district (Fort
Green). I voted for him because
he wanted to get things done. I
hope Hardee County gets back
on it. It has potential. I like the
county, but you should look at
the entire county.
Sherry and Mark White both
spoke about Albritton and prob-
lems they had with getting a
woman's shelter going. "He
seemed to have a heart for what
I was doing but then almost
chewed me out. Then he was
gracious and waived dumping
fees. As a citizen and a nobody,
I was shocked at how he talked
to me. I met with Lex, he's a
walking encyclopedia, very full
of knowledge. I can understand
why the commission rather he
handles things. I didn't see the
compassion, the heart of a pub-
lic servant. His attitude is a
reflection of the commission.
He's salvageable, but he has a
strong character and it needs to
be checked," said Sherry White.
Mark White added, "When
we started this with the county,
Lex was the obvious place to
go. But it is more apparent that
a large portion of this goes back
to the commission. They feel
they are paid part-time so they
work part-time. There's a dis-
connect between the govern-
ment and the people across the
board."
Bill Staton talked about a
problem with trailers that
exceed the code standards. It
wasn't two inches, it was 18
inches, but he could have given
me 18 inches. It kept five peo-
ple out of a place to stay for
three months. If he doesn't have
the say so to make it happen,
then .he.doesn't need to be
there," said Staton, who said he
has gone out of the trailer busi-
ness because of the hassle.
All this prompted Grady
Albritton to say that there need-
ed to be an outside entity to
look at complaints. "It's a key
time for us to get an outside
evaluation of documented com-
plaints and have an investiga-
tion and be brought back to this
board.
Albritton was asked if he had
anything to say. He said only to
comment that "I have never
cursed a citizen, Mrs. Denning
or anyone else. I'm not going to
argue any other points, but just
that I can assure you that I have
never cursed a citizen."

County manger government
County attorney Ken Evers
began the meeting with a
"brief" overview of the county-
manager form. of government
which the county adopted by
ordinance in November, 1989.
Basically a mirror of the state
statute. "The bottom line is that
the commission is an elected
body to make policy decisions
and not interject themselves
into the day-to-day running of
the county. For instance, the
commission sets a purchasing
policy and the county manager
enforces it. The county manag-
er is like a CEO, who enforces
what the board says."
Evers said it was the modern
form of government across the
nation and the level of involve-
ment of the elected officials.
He said it was difficult to get
anything done any other way
because of the Sunshine Law
requiring commissions to bring
everything up it a meeting. It
would extremely slow every
decision. With the level of
expertise a county manager has
today. it's difficult to run a




Courage is what it takes to


stand up and speak.
Courage is also what it
takes to sit down and lis-
ten.
-Sir Winston Churchill

Most folks are about as
happy as they make up
their minds to be.
-Abraham Lincoln

Eat a little of everything
and a lot of nothing.
-Anonymous


county from the Boardroom.
Evers said.
A former commissioner.
Benny Albntton said they went
to the county manager form of
government because each com-
missioner was a liaison, like a
sounding board, then had to
bring it back to an open meet-
ing. "The whole intent was to
have a county manager run the
day-to-day duty but the county
commission still be responsible.
If a policy or something wasn't
working, he was to bring it back
to be amended."

County Manager Ordinance
The next discussion was on
the ordinance adopted in 2000
outlining the qualifications and
duties of the county manager.
After lengthy discussion, the
only portion to be changed was
on his duties, changing item (p)
from "attend all meeting of the
Board with authority to partici-
pate in the discussion of any
matter" to add a phrase," any
administrative matters upon
request of any member of the
board."
Commissioner Dale Johnson
disagreed, I'm not comfort-
able. We could be discussing
something it's not possible to
do and he can't say a word. We
could go on discussing some-
thing not possible."
Grady Johnson said, "He
should stay silent until request-
ed," which prompted Evers to
comment that the county man-
ager had a non-consent section
on the agenda when he spoke
about particular items. As with
any other person, one of the
commissioners, the public, etc.,
protocol is to turn to the com-
mission chairman to be recog-
nized, said Evers.
Birge noted, "Any of us that
has a question about an agenda
item have the liberty to go see
the county manager and have
him clarify it."
Bryant said one problem he
noted was people getting on the
agenda. "It would make better
relationships with the public,
who I work for," he said.

Assistant County Manager
This discussion didn't last as
long as the others. It was adopt-
ed on Nov. 2, 2005. The main
point was who hired or fired the
assistant manager (that position
is vacant at,this time).
Grady JOhnson said he want-
ed to see information on key
department heads, why they
were terminated, to see if there
was proper justification of
department heads. "It gets back
to us knowing what is happen-
ing and getting involved."
No decision was made on
changing the assistant county
manager description except to'
possibly remove responsibility
for economic development
from his/her duties as there is
an economic development de-
partment now.


communication. If ,ou answer
the website or listen and re-
spond to someone who has read
it. that's communication.
-In mN opinion, it's difficult
for the other commissioners to
discuss what's on that website
and let not appear disinterested
in what people are saying to
them. If that citizen goes back
to Mr. Johnson with a response
from \ou. it's communication.
It's not a violation to read it. but
it is to react to it." said Evers.
"I don't want to give a cold
shoulder to my constituents, but
it puts us both in a possible vio-
lation of the Sunshine Law."
Birge continued.
In his most recent entry.
Grady Johnson comments on
the Feb. 3 commission meeting
about pay raises and job de-
scription changes for staff at the
building department. He agreed
with Bryant that the raises
should wait until staff had com-
pleted the additional schooling
and Birge's comment that she
didn't want to hear another
complaint about that depart-
ment.
He goes on at length to dis-
cuss the department, the county
manager's dismissal of previous
building officials and his think-
ing about the building depart-
ment. Showing his thinking on
a matter, and how he would
vote on it, if and when it comes
up again, could in and of itself
be a violation of the Sunshine
Law.
Grady Johnson responded to
Birge's concern. "I've been cau-
tious about that. In no way,
shape or form would I be derog-
atory to you or Mr. Bryant. I am
cautious to speak in the past
tense, not in the future tense.
The more knowledge people
have, the better, but I realize
that it's a touchy situation. It
was meant as a compliment to
you. I have a long tradition of
county government and would
never demean another commis-
sioner."
Commission Chairman Terry
Atchley commented, "That's a
caution to all of us, to not put
any of our employees in the
position of violating the Sun-
shine Law. We need to be care-
ful that they aren't commenting
on a commissioner to another
commissioner."
Dale Johnson added, "I think
Commissioner Birge should
read that website." Turning to
the attorney, he asked. "But,
what if I had a website, and I
respond to him?"
Evers reiterated, "It's putting
the other commissioners in a
difficult situation. Anything that
could be construed as a re-
sponse to something he's said
could be a violation."
Dale Johnson continued, "If
he. brings up something that
could happen up again. We
have to be careful?"
Bryant then commented on
the new visioning committees


WEBSITE
Continued From 1A


and not talking to them.
Evers said. "It's my belief.
not my recommendation, that
you not have lunch. It's not so
much a violation, depending on
what you talk about, but the
public's perception of it. The
real guts of the statute is not
that long. but crosses into many
areas.
"It's one of the reasons the
steering committee advertise-
ments were rewritten and sent
to the newspaper noting that
one or more commissioners
may attend one of these meet-
ings, and there they could agree
or disagree. Legally, you can
speak to the steering commit-
tee. but remember the reality is
people's perceptions."
Atchley said he agreed with
counsel. "It's a community
plan; we should not be involved
in it. The last thing we want is


for people to think we're run-
ning it. It's their plan."
Birge said, "Getting back to
the website, if I make com-
ments on my website on the
same items as Commissioner .
Johnson, they may be different,
without any intention to dis-
agree or discuss it."
Evers said there were only
two opinions that mattered. One
was how the State Attorney
would look at it, as a non-adver-
tised public debate, especially if
it is on a matter to come up
again before the commission.
"The second opinion that
matters is that guy in the black
robe (the judge), and what he
thinks if it is a debate or not."
Grady Johnson replied. "I've
tried to keep constituents ad-
vised. I don't intend to put any
commissioner in a position."


rNutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: I think of Indian restau-
rants as a great place to get
loads of healthy vegetables. Is
it true that many dishes are
actually high in calories?
A: Indian restaurants offer lots
of plant-based dishes focused
on vegetables. However, some
contain large amounts of ghee
(clarified butter), coconut milk
or cream. Yogurt sauces are
usually made from full-fat
yogurt, not the reduced- or non-
fat type you may buy at the gro-
cery store. These are all high in
both calories and cholesterol-
raising saturated fat. For exam-
ple, appetizers called samosas
may contain only vegetables,
but because they are deep-fried,
they are not at all low-calorie.
Instead, start with a soup like
lentil or Mulligatawny. The lat-
ter soup might contain some
cream, but usually just a table-
spoon or so per serving. You
might even choose to make a
meal out of one of these soups
along with side dishes of dal
(lentils or split peas) and veg-
etables. To keep calories under
control, follow authentic Indian
tradition of having' bread or rice
with a meal, not both. When it
comes to bread, ask for naan
without butter brushed on it or
chapati (a whole grain option),
rather than poori or paratha
breads, which are deep-fried or
have extra oil in the dough.
Vindaloo chicken or fish is usu-
ally made without high-fat
ingredients, so it s a good
option if you like spicy dishes.,
Since recipes for the same type
of dish vary from one restaurant
to another, the best advice is to
ask about those high-fat ingre-
dients that are so concentrated


in calories before you order.
And then remember that, as in
all meals, portion size matters.
If you are served large portions,
ask for take-out containers right
from the start so you can save
some for another meal and aren
t tempted to overeat.


The kind of humor I like is
the thing that makes me
laugh for five seconds and
think for 10 minutes.
-William Davis

Many a true word is spo-
ken in jest.
-English Proverb



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4A The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011


GUILLERMA R. CORTEZ
Guillerma R. Cortez, 76, of
Wauchula. died on Monday,
I-eh. 14, 2011. at home
Born on Feb. 10. in Bryan,
STexas. she came to Wauchula in
1972 She was a farm laborer
and attended the Spanish
Mission in iZolfo Springs.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Ricardo Cortez of Wau-
.chula; three sons, Jose Cortez
and Martin Cortez, both of
Wauchula and Israel Cortez of
Texas; two daughters, Ofelia
Rivera and Sonia Franco, both
of Wauchula; 19 grandchildren;
and six great-grandchildren.
Visitation was from 1 to 2
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 16, at
Robarts Garden Chapel, with
services at 2 p.m. Interment
followed at Wauchula Cem-
etery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula




9n moving JUe 0o/ty














ANSELMO "SAM"
STULICH
Anselmo "Sam" Stulich,
81, of Wauchula, formerly of
Brick, N. J., died on Saturday,
Feb. 12, 2011.
He was born on Sept. 15,
1929, at Hoboken, N.J.
Nicknamed "Sam," he will
be fondly remembered as a
hardworking, honest and gen-
erous man with a great sense
of humor, who loved life and
his family with a fierce pas-
sion. He had a great love of all
people, travel, boating and
cooking. He will be forever
remembered in our hearts as a
great husband, father, grand-
pa, brother and friend.
Happily married to Lucille
for 58 years, he raised his
three children in Brick, N.J.,
where he worked as a heat
and frost insulator, Asbestos
Union #32, until his retire-
ment. He spent the remainder
of his life in Wauchula. He
was predeceased by a son,
Peter Stulich.
He is survived by his wife
Lucille; son Vincent Stulich
and wife Marianne of New
Jersey; daughter Kathlyleen
Sadler and husband Frederick
of New Jersey; brother
Thomas Stulick and wife
Jeanne of New Jersey; sister
Marie Esposito of New
Jersey; brother-in-law and sis-
ter-in-law George and Betty
Brummer of Wauchula; five
grandchildren, Tyler Stulich,
Jason and Samantha Sadler,
Matthew Freed and Vincent
Stulich; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Memorial services will be
held at a later date in New
Jersey.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street .
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


ANSELMO "SAM"
STULICH
Anselmo "Sam" Stulich, 81,
of Wauchula, died on Saturday,
Feb. 12, 2011.
Born on Sept. 15, 1929, at
Hoboken, N.J., he worked as a
heat and frost insulator, and
retired to Wauchula.
He was preceded in death by
a son, Peter Stulich.
Survivors include his wife
Lucile Stulich; son Vincent
Stulich and wife Marianne of
New Jersey; daughter Kathy-
leen Sadler and husband
Frederick of New Jersey; broth-
er Thomas Stulich and wife
Jeanne of New Jersey; sister
Marie Esposito of New Jersey;
and five grandchildren.
Memorial services will be
held at a later date in New
Jersey.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


HELEN B. STOKES
Helen B. Stokes, 93, of
Lakeland, died on Friday, Feb.
11, 2011, at her residence.
Born on April 26, 1917, in
Wauchula, she was a lifelong
resident of the area. She was a
homemaker and member of the
Mount Pisgah Baptist Church
of Fort Meade.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 55 years, Lester
Stokes.
Survivors include four chil-
dren, LuEtta Beach of Hender-
sonville, N.C., Lestenne Daniel
of Eatonton, Ga., LeBryon
Stokes of Lakeland and Leta
Ingrassia of Lakeland; 14
grandchildren; 30 great-grand-
children; and 10 great-great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was held on
Tuesday, Feb. 15, from 2 to 3
p.m. at Mount Pisgah Baptist
Church of Fort Meade with
services beginning at 3 p.m.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


&n ^o=(iMg JUewouj


MARY RUTH
ALLRED
Maryjuth Allred, 79, of
Bowling Green, died on
Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2011, at
home.
Born on Feb. 17, 1931, in
Bowling Green, she was a
lifelong resident of the com-
munity. She was a homemak-
er and a member of First
United Methodist Church of
Bowling Green.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Allen "Park" Allred of
Bowling Green; three sons, G.
David Brown of Colorado, J.
Kevin Brown of Avon Park
and Jonathon Otis Brown of
Arcadia; two daughters, Janet
Brown Alsabrook of Bowling
Green and Susan Brown
Watson of Wauchula; brother
Minor Bryant and wife Mary
Beth of Bowling Green; 12
grandchildren; and five great-
grandchildren.
Services were Saturday,
Feb. 12, at 2 p.m. at First
United Methodist Church of
Bowling Green followed by
interment at Bowling Green
Cemetery.




FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Obituaries


MARY RUTH ALLRED
Mary Ruth Allred. 79. of
Bowline Green. died on
Wednesday. Feb. 9. 2011. at
home.
Born on Feb. 17. 1931. in
Bowling Green. she was a life-
long resident of the community.
She was a homemaker and a
member of First United Meth-
odist Church of Bowling Green.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Allen "Park" Allred of
Bowling Green: three sons. G.
David Brown of Colorado. J.
Kevin Brown of Avon Park and
Jonathon Otis Brown of Ar-
cadia; two daughters. Janet
Brown Alsabrook of Bowline
Green and Susan Brown
Watson of Wauchula; brother
Minor Bryant and wife Mary
Beth of Bowling Green: 12
grandchildren; and five great-
grandchildren.
Services were Saturday, Feb.
12, at 2 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church of Bowling
Green followed by interment at
Bowling Green Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


GERALDINE J. DRAKE
Geraldine J. Drake, 91, of
Ona, died on Feb. 8, 2011, at
Sebring.
Born on July 24, 1919, at
Dearborn, Mich., she came to
Hardee County from Missouri
in 1964. She was a homemak-
er.
She is survived by two sons,
Eugene Drake and wife Linda
of Ona, and Kenneth Hays of
Moultrie, Ga.; two daughters,
Cheryl Westmoreland and hus-
band David of Bowling Green,
and Corie Lukawski and hus-
band Paul of Ona; nine grand-
children; and seven great-
grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to the National
Breast Cancer Foundation,
2600 Network Blvd, Suite 300,
Frisco, TX 75034 or at
www.nationalbreastcancer.org/
donate.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

What is wanted is not the
will to believe, but the will
to find out, which is the
exact opposite.


An 0oilng Ji 0emoiy


GERALDINE J.
DRAKE
Geraldine J. Drake, 91, of
Ona, died on Feb. 8, 2011, at
Sebring.
Born on July 24, 1919, at
Dearborn, Mich., she came to
Hardee County from Missouri
in 1964. She was a home-
maker.
She is survived by two
sons, Eugene Drake and wife
Linda of Ona, and Kenneth
Hays of Moultrie, Ga.; two
daughters, Cheryl Westmore-
land and husband David of
Bowling Green, and Corie
Lukawski and husband Paul
of Ona; nine grandchildren;
and seven great-grandchil-
dren.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be sent to the
National Breast Cancer
Foundation, 2600 Network
Blvd, Suite 300, Frisco, TX
75034 or at www.national-
breastcancer.org/donate.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


A Woman Gets 6


Years, Suspended


Funeral Notice
Ken Weis. of Wauchula. died
Tuesday. Feb. 15. 2011.
The family\ will receive
friends from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday.
Feb. 20. 2011. at First United
Methodist Church of Wauchula.
\ here services will be held at 3
p.m. The family suggests that in
lieu of flowers. memorials be
made in his memory to the
American Cancer Society. PO.
Box 1268. Wauchula. FL
33873.

MARILYNN ESCHENBERG
Marilynn Eschenberg, 76. of
Zolfo Springs. died on Tuesday,
Feb. 8. 2011.
She was born on Nov. 20,
1934, in Wooster, Ohio.
Interment will be in Wooster,
Ohio.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

KENNETH JOEL BENTON
Kenneth Joel Benton, 71, of
Fort Pierce, died on Wednesday,
Feb. 9, 2011, at Lawnwood Re-
gional Medical Center of Fort
Pierce.
Born in Frostproof, on June
26, 1939, he went to Fort Pierce
from Plant City in 1984. He was
a 1957 graduate of Hardee High
School. He served 13 years in
the submarine service of the
U.S. Navy. He retired from
Florida Power & Light as an
instrument control specialist.
He was preceded in death by
his parents George E. and Edna
Eura Riley Benton; brother
Larry Benton; and sister Bobbie
June Benton.
He is survived by his wife of
43 years, Barbara Benton of
Fort Pierce; daughter Heather
Benton Urakawa of Japan; son
Kenneth Joel Benton II of
Portland, Ore.; brother Ed Ben-
ton of Wauchula; sister Linda
Ballard of Traverse City, Mich.;
and three grandchildren, Ken,
George, Kai, and Miranda.
A memorial service will be
held Saturday, Feb. 19, at 11
a.m. at Lake Kissimmee State
Park, Campsite #15. For infor-
mation call, Ed Benton at 863-
773-3606 or 863-214-5569. In
lieu of flowers, memorials may
be sent to the Humane Society
of St. Lucie County, 100 Sa-
vannah Road, Fort Pierce, FL
34982.
Yates Funeral Home
Fort Pierce


5 m oving lUemo/y


GUILLERMA R.
CORTEZ
Guillerma R. Cortez, 76, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Feb. 14, 2011, at home
Born on Feb. 10, in Bryan,
Texas, she came to Wauchula
in 1972. She was a farm
laborer and attended the
Spanish Mission in Zolfo
Springs.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Ricardo Cortez of
Wauchula; three sons, Jose
Cortez and Martin Cortez,
both of Wauchula and Israel
Cortez of Texas; two daugh-
ters, Ofelia Rivera and Sonia
Franco, both of Wauchula; 19
grandchildren; and six great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was from 1 to 2
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 16, at
Robarts Garden Chapel, with
services at 2 p.m. Interment
followed at Wauchula Cem-
etery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A Wauchula woman who sold
drugs to a confidential inform-
ant was handed a six-year
prison term in Hardee Circuit
Court, but then it was suspend-
ed.
Circuit Judge Marcus J.
Ezelle also placed Dawn Lynn
Smith on probation, however.
and set that term at five years.
Should Smith violate the condi-
tions of her probation during
that lengthy time period, she
will be sent to prison.
Then, she will serve the six
years.
Smith, who gave addresses of
797 Stephens Road and 325
River Chase Circle, was arrest-
ed by the Hardee County Drug
Task Force on April 22 of last
year. She was charged with sale
of methamphetamine within
1,000 feet of a public park and
with use of narcotic equipment.
The charges stemmed from a
Dec. 30, 2009, narcotics trans-
action arranged by detectives
with the Drug Task Force and
using the services of a confi-
dential source. Smith sold the
man 1.6 grams of methamphet-
amine for $150.


Golden Nuggets | ,
By Lorraine Gillespie '
Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries \


Fathers, do not irritate and provoke your children to anger, but
rear them in the training and discipline and the counsel and admo-
nition of the Lord!
-Ephesians 6:4
This is a questionnaire to help identify the behaviors you need
to focus on with your child. Does your child:
Take out feelings on others?
Get revenge?
Use the silent treatment?
Say mean or rude things?
Scream at someone?
Run away?
Break something?
Hit someone or something?
Swear?
Drink?
Smoke cigarettes?
Use drugs?
Refuse medication?
Refuse suggestions?
Overeat?
Make suicidal gestures or statements?
Withdraw?
Dwell on negative emotions?
Feel like a victim?
Blame others for his problems?
If you said "yes" to at least three behaviors on this list, your
child is exhibiting inappropriate behaviors that may lead to prob-
lems with self and others. If more than three, your child is exhibit-
ing serious behavior problems and needs more serious interven-
tions now.
A pattern or cluster of these behaviors indicates that something
isn't working well and needs to change.
A Golden Nugget is that the first place to begin that change is
with you, the parent. There is hope always for you and your child.


YOU Can Appear In...
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Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published In
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solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your otn original'
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear In th'sfes-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.











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Smith
At a pre-trial hearing in
Hardee Circuit Court, Smith
opted not to contest the charges
against her.
In passing sentence, Ezelle
also assessed $520 in fines and
court costs, $350 in public
defender fees and $100 in pros-
ecution expenses.
Further, he ordered Smith to
undergo a substance abuse eval-
uation and treatment, to submit
to warrantless searches and
seizures and to random drug
testing, and to refrain from the
use of alcohol or drugs.
Any violations over the next
five years could invoke the six-
year prison term.


I ,




February 17. 2011. The Herald-Advocate 5A


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6A The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011

MISSIONARIES SHARE STORIES


courtesy photo
A group of 17 people from Hardee County went on a five-day mission trip to the
Dominican Republic during November. The trip consisted of street evangelism, door-
to-door witnessing, jail ministry, food distribution and praise and worship at New
Jerusalem Church. After the group returned home, it shared the experiences of the trip
with the residents of Lydia's House. Sherry White Ministries has been sending groups
to the Dominican Republic since 2008 and financially provides for an orphanage and
Casa Lydia in the town of Guerra.


Letter To Editor

Group Accompanies Sherry

White To Dominican Republic


Dear Editor:
At 3 a.m., the morning after
Thanksgiving, 17 people loaded
onto a 25- passenger bus head-
ing for the Fort Lauderdale air-
port to catch a 6:30 a.m. flight
to the Dominican Republic.
Every three months I invite a
diverse group to accompany me
on a short- term mission trip to
the DR.
In 2007 I was invited by mis-
sionary Debbie Alvarez to
speak at a women's conference
in the DR. It was the mission-
ary's hope that I could offer
encouragement to the lady pas-
tor who had been wanting to
start an orphanage in the DR.
I went without hesitation,
convinced God had opened a
door. There were many chal-
lenges I had to overcome. The
first was my dreadful fear of
flying in airplanes. It was a tor-
menting fear that could have
stopped me. I am so thankful
that I chose instead to face my
fears. Not only was I able to
offer encouragement to the lady
pastor concerning the orphan-
age, but after returning home
from that first trip the Board of


Lydia's agreed that we should
take our tithe money and use it
to fund the orphanage.
Since then we have been able
to provide a loving safe home
for 20-25 little girls who would
other wise be in the streets.
Soon afterward Sherry White
Ministries opened a home for
women who wanted to come
out of prostitution and drug
addiction. Like Lydia's House
here in Wauchula that offers a
Christ-based program for wom-
en coming out of destructive
lifestyles, a similar program is
being established in the
Dominican Republic.
Every trip we take is a little
different. We try to respond to
the needs at hand. This trip we
were able to provide beans and
rice for an entire village where
survival is challenging. There is
no water supply because the vil-
lage pump is broken.
Everyone has opinions about
mission trips. Even I was guilty
of thinking that we should only
focus on our local communities.
It is easy to think only of our-
selves. It*ook me going into a
Third World country to see


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what it is like to live in a coun-
try where there is no water sup-
ply for thirsty children. I had to
see what true hunger looked
like.
You see, in a Third World
country there is no government
assistance. There is no welfare,
Medicaid or Medicare. No food
stamps or Social Security.
It changed my life forever.
When we go to the Dominican
we do not stay in hotels with
air-conditioned rooms. We live
among the people with little to
no electricity. It is then we
come to understand their strug-
gles, when we can effectively
offer them directly the things
most needed for their survival.
With this group of 17 people,
we were able to put food into
the hands of hungry people,
water in the hands of thirsty
children. No bureaucracy! Just
meeting needs.
When we returned, the group
was motivated to do more.
Oak Grove Baptist welcomed
us to come and share about the
DR experience. They gave an
offering over $1,300 that was
designated to help fund the
orphans' education.
Afterward, a beans and rice
dinner was held at First Baptist
Church, where donations ex-
ceeded $2,400, also designated
for the school.
Sherry White Ministries in-
vites you to prayerfully consid-
er joining us on a June mission
trip to the Dominican Republic.
The cost is typically around
$500 per person. It continues to
be a life-changing experience.
Call 773-0877 or write Sherry
White Ministries, P.O. Box
2566, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Sherry White
Wauchula



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


K C.r,.i..;i, -p Cough Up Cash" Fh Pioneer Park Days Pass
SPioneer Park Day coordinator Jant Long y ar to offset county costA for the year
a. ys. "This is the part of the job I enjoy," antique car a i engine displays, ente:
as she collects money from county com- tainment, coneasion ttands and flet


THURSDAY. FEB. 17
/Hardee County Com-
mission, regular evening
meeting, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.

MONDAY. FEB. 21
/Wauchula City Commis-
sion, reschedpted monthly
meeting, City Hall, 225 E.
Main St., Waucula, 6 p.m.
/Zolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.
/Visioning Focus Group
on Land Use/Environment/-
Open Space, Commission
Chambers, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6 pm.

TUESDAY. FEB. 22
VFocus Group on Edu-
cation, Commission Cham-
bers, Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY. FEB. 24
B/Hardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 2230 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula, 5
p.m.

Silence is one of the great
arts of conversation.
-Marcus Tullius Cicero


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Green, FL. The bids will be opened at a regularly sched-
uled City Commission meeting. The City reserves the
right to accept or reject any bid.

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February 17, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Letter To The Editor

County Visioning Process

Can Be A Good Thing


Dear Editor,
If you are involved in the lat-
est county focus of planning for
our visions, and add wisdom to
it, you may see things in a
whole new perspective, positive
or negative according to the
subject on the table at time.
By subject referring to the
designated group heading
focused on in that particular
meeting, the groups headings
are not set in concrete as of
now. They are being worked on
by the public which has chosen
to participate. (Simply by going
to the focus meeting you are
automatically invited to take
part.)
The idea of public participa-
tion has come in our opinion,
from government trying to
cover their rear. From conse-
quences related to the actions
by commissioners, and what we
call insiders, who operate as
lobbyists do in higher govern-
ment, with financial motivation.
Our officials make important
decisions without what appears
to be much wisdom or forward
consideration.
Can anyone know what the
outcome or consequences of
their choices will bring? We
humans are limited at some
point and do not understand our
own destiny generally. We seem
to try and lay out our own life
making plans on our own wis-
dom and what we desire. Most
of us will wake up and find
things in life do not work to our
plans. The same applies to gov-
ernment plans.
Opening up to other people's
thoughts can be rewarding in
spite our selfish ideas of how
things should turn out. If the
preconceived ideas of the peo-
ple who arranged this process
and the poeple hired to direct
the process do not overwhelm
your thought process the out-
come could be positive. (We are
not saying these people are all
wet; you weigh things out, con-
sider the outcome that could
occur.) The sales pitches made
by program directors are pre-
conceived, slanted toward
things on the person's agenda
paying them.


On the positive, the focus'
part of the process has a very
positive approach. The public
may participate. The first Focus
Group has met, and the partici-
pating persons were from sever-
al walks of life, age and race.
Congratulations to the people
who came out. May contributed
making that in itself a wonder-
ful thing. It shows a new trend,
people getting involved. The
older of us may not be here to
witness tomorrow but our
descendants will benefit.
We personally think we have
no place trying to manipulate
the business world through any
government to the extent this
program is working toward.
The ideas of more restaurants,
for instance, would come auto-
matically if there were feasible
demand to support them. The
idea of more restaurants coming
in would be a negative impact
on the individual small restau-
rant owners already here doing
their part in our local and
nation's economy,-paying taxes,
creating jobs, etc.
The addition, these local
restaurants give you a lot of
bang for the money; the prob-
lem is the economy in general.
These restaurants have to keep
pricing as low as they can and
compared to home cooking they
do it most of the time, cheaper
than you can buy the food if
you compare apples to apples.
We have a large number to
choose from. Just start counting
them on your fingers and toes.
The economy steadily makes it
harder for us to patronize these
restaurants and other business.
This impacts the complete eco-
nomic system, not just the
restaurants.
We are expecting the govern-
ment to provide things they
have no business promoting in
any manner. Government has
allowed big business to elimi-
nate competition and external-
ize the cost to taxpayers.
All levels of government use
health, education, and welfare
as tools to bleed th taxpayer. We
became aware of this in the
early 1970s. We also found it
true to fact since those days. A


number of different taxation
and things like the Lottery
when installed reportedly
would solve all the woes to edu-
cation. All we hear is schools
are in trouble and need more
money. The gas tax also would
help schools and lower property
taxes along with many other
benefits.
It is perfectly sensible to look
at any avenue when considering
our visions for the community.
However, we believe there to be
an unspoken agenda tied to this
program that is hidden under
the maze of many ideas that
people come up with without
stopping to consider what they
are saying or thinking.
First, we need to narrow the
nubmer of the different visions
brought out so far. Many do not
belong on the table, and just a
hint of wisdom would prove
this fact. We heard many ideas.
Included is a garbage dump.
This is the brainchild of some
locals who apparently stand to
receive benefits from this plan,
and as usual some were paid to
promote the dump.
Our question is why the
garbage dump idea would be
published as a vision, consider-
ing people flocked and filled
the room at the civic center. The
big crowd stood to show their
complete disapproval of it, no
one stood for it. (The answer
given was someone had told the
focus group they wanted it, and
the directors would leave it for
at least the first few meetings.)
The last fire and waste tax
hike that destroyed our property
tax break put in by Gov. Charlie
Christ was another meeting
filled by citizens, including a
variety of people from several
.walks of life. The garbage
meeting and the tax meeting are
examples where the people
made their desires known. The
commissioners voted against
the crowd.
The visioning process could
be promising if people do not
fizzle out before it is over.
People are going to have to be
involved or be asked to build
more bricks for less pay.
Politicians are more like biblical
authorities dictating mere and
more taxes without representa-
tion.
There may be some positives
come out as we look at all the
opinions, facts, history and
future possibilities, but citizens


Sill lose if they leave the offi-
cials to play house without
adult supervision. (We cannot
fairly) judge the new commi-
sioners but we will in time.)
They can represent us much
better if the, know what we
want?
Frank Kirkland
Bowling Green


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADUNE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
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REVISED
CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a special meeting Monday
February 21, 2011 at 6:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held.
Items on the agenda are as follows: Appointments to reach a quorum, and any
other business that may come before the Commission.
The meetings will be held at the City Auditorium located at 225 East Main Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will
need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure
that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Comtnission's functions, including ones access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section
286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
2:17c


m
1



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Emir








8A The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011


\Wauchula Elementary
Second Quarter


KINDERGARTEN
Abby Ellis
Alexis Lopez
Alizabeth Pace
Alvero Desantiago
Amalee Bruno-Perez
Amy Eubanks
Amy Fimbres
Anabelle Servin
Ancelmo Macedo-
Banda
Aidrew Bergens
Ashley Ramos
Austin Garza
Averee Hanks
Boone Pazzaglia
Briana Navarro
Callie Eisenhauer
Corey Hill
Dane Risher
Dean Clark
Diana Jaimes
Diego Mayorido
Donald Ellis
Doraelia Torres-
Martinez
Dorian Porter
Drew Beattie
Eli Duncan
Ella Stockton
Emilee Worden
Emmie Alexy
Esther Avalos
Estrella Torres
Ethan Ramirez
Eva Hernandez
Ezequiel Perez-Gamas
Flor Ruiz
Gatlin Thornton
Gavin Sharp
Gerardo Diego
Guillermina Iracheta
Haylee Norris
Janet Luis-Vasquez
Jensey Hays
Jeremiah Brown
Jonathan Garcia
Joshua Block
Kaden Bryant
Kaydence Lozano
Kimberly Reas
Kross Sandoval
Lacee Ayers
Latavious Faulk
Leah Judah
Logan Albritton
Luis Velasco-Cruz
Maddie Jane Schraeder
Maddison Justiss
Madi Hall
Madisyn Hines
Maria Sierra
Marlen Rozas
Martin Cardoza
Ma'Ryah Trevino
Mason Shepard
Miah Velazquez
Mikayla Metayer
Myia Lamy
Nathan Hughes
Obed Gonzalez
Princess Guerrero
Rilya Battle
Roman Hubbell
Rosa Poucher
Roy Verndell
Salud Villafuerte-
Herrera
Savannah Conerly
Seth Pautz
Shea Jones
Sierra Perez


Soriah Maldonado
Taijaeaus Blandin
Taylor Hays
Tony Will Rodriguez
Trenton Alfred
Ty Woods
Tyme Rimes
Valerie Torres
Wilney Francois
Wyatt Rowland
Zamar Fils-Aime
Zamarion Albritton
Zoie Hill

FIRST GRADE
Aariah White
Abby Burnett
Adan Gonzalez
Addyson Smith
Adrianna Martinez
Alexis Caballero
Alexis Sambrano
Ali Abel
Alyssa Cortez
Amber Harrison "
Ariana Sanchez
Ashlyn Willis
Baileigh Herrera
Brin Conerly
Carlie Knight
Cason Gough
Christopher Nickerson
Clay Hancock
Cody Vina
Cynthia Macedo
Dalton Johnson
Daniel Cantu
David Navarro
Dawson Bryant
Derek Taylor
Desire Medina
Elijah Carlton
Emily Sheffield
Faith Davis
Gabriela Arana
Gabriela Jose-Perez
Gabriela Paniagua
Hayden Galvan
Ismael Mejia
Jaime Villa
Jake Stephens
James Lang
Jasmine Navarro
Jayden Hays
Jessica Patino
Joanna Mier
Johana Ortiz-Diaz
Juan Martinez
Julie Tomas-Lagunas
Kaden Chapman -
Kamari LO&Trre
Lauren Gainous
Lorena Bautista-
Martinez
Macy Grace Tyson
Manuelita Guzman
Maria Moreno
Marissa Valdez
Marvin Cook
Mirella Sanchez
Nabiul Murmin
Nanci Flores
Natali Aguilar
Nick Thompson
Ricardo Martinez
Samuel Calvillo
Saraly Diego
Savannah Svendsen
Sean Souther
Serena Thompson
Shanteya Frederick
Sonia Hernandez


Sylvia Preston
Tori Durden
Treasure Camel

SECOND GRADE
Abby Duke
Alexis Deleon
Alma Sanchez
Alyssa Perez
Andy Medina
Brandi Jackson
Caleb Block
Cali Nguyen
Carlos Ruiz
Carson Terrell
Christian Montanez
Cole Hines
Da'Myah Carlton
Darla Joe Harned
Eboni Lamy
Ellie Juarez
Ellis Hodges
Emma McGuckin
Ethan Sanchez
Haven Gray
Jace Bryan
Javier Figueroa
Jessica Huckaby
Karson Goodwyn
Katelynn Bolin
Kaylee Ybarra
Keyla Romero
Kiara Coronado
Leah Hall
Lindsey Garner
Lizberth Ramirez-
DeJesus
Lucy Stone
Melisa Sigin
Michelle Patterson
Monika Poucher
Morgan Hellein
Nevaeh Gonzalez
Owen Schraeder
Parker Sasser
Rakeim Baker
Riana Sutton
Riley Justiss
Riley Kate Albritton
Sailor Ullrich
Samantha Hardin
Skylar Tatum
Star Parker
Tyler Hooten
Tyler Jackson
Vicky Lopez
Zoe Garza

THIRD GRADE
Adam Pazzaglia
Adriana Perez
Andy Lopez
Billy Diakomihalis
Carolina Ramirez
Cristal Miranda
Dylan Crawford
Dylan Davis
Enriguez Velazquez
Griffin Clark
Hannah Brown
Jack Driskell
Jacob Henderson
Jacob Lee
Jaronda Terrell
Javier Chavez
Jessica Kunkel
Joley Brown
Jonathan Carnley
Kein Knight
Lucia Galvez
Maddy Stockton
Madison Garcia


Madison McGee
Marah Uri
Mariella Badillo
Quintin Lindsey
Rafael Alvarez
Raphael Hubbell
Renell Herrera
Sophie Allen
Summer Bond
Taleia Moreno
Taylor Watkins
Tony Guerrero
Weston Schraeder

FOURTH GRADE
Aliyah Blas
Arnout De Jong
Ashlee Patterson
Aubry Stark
Bibiana Mier
Carrie Taylor
Claire Carlton
Conchita Torres
Daisy Badillo
Dustin Willis
Hardee Pace
Isaac Moreno
Isaiah Torres
Joel Martinez
Kory Giles
Lianna Albritton
Lillian Salazar
Lily Franco
Logan Albritton
Madison Warnock
Makayla Wilson
Matt Tyson
Mercedes DeLeon
Mike Trevino
Noah Torres
Rachel St. Fort
Sarah Carlton
Shelby Spencer
Shelby Zeigler
Tara Hines
Valeria Lopez
Vehessa Valerio
Yasmin Ramirez

FIFTH GRADE
Alexis Piedad
Alexzandra Brant
Alicia Ruiz
Ana Villa
Brooke Shaw
Cole Terrell
Damar Harris
Dawson Ratliff
Dora Cardoza
Ellie Palmer
Gabriella Ruiz
Gaby Montoya
Jara Cummings
Jax Ullrich
Joel Lee
Kara Friers
Liliana Ponce
Lindsey Barwick
Mariela Miramontes
Miguel Cardoza
Miguel Ruiz
Nicholas Sellers
Peyton Roberts
Ricardo Gomez-Molina
Sarai Espinoza
Sarai Santana
Savannah Mullins
Shelby Gibson
Tanner Carlton
Yisselle Mier


FWC Certifies Woman's


Tilapia As State Record


It's official.
Pamela Henrn of Stuart broke
state and world records when
she reeled in a 9.6-pound blue
tilapia last August. The fish
measured 24 inches long. A
taxidermist is mounting the
record-breaking fish.
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
now certified the fish as the
largest caught recreationally in
state waters. Additionally, the
International Game Fish As-
sociation issued the all-tackle
world record for the species to
Henry.
Henry was fishing off her
dock last August in the south
fork of the St. Lucie River in
Martin County when she caught
the big fish. She was using a


bread ball and \\as fishing at
night.
I've been fishing m\ whole
life. so it \was alw\a\s my mis-
sion to catch a record blue
tilapia." said Henr,. "1 had
researched the minimum
weight. so I knew\ what I was
looking for."
Blue tilapia are abundant
throughout central and southern
Florida. The\ feed primarily on
plankton and small organisms
living in or on the bottom. As a
result, blue tilapia are not
known for their angling quality.
However, some urban anglers
catch them in ponds, using
bread balls, small pieces of hot
dogs, dog food or live worms.
They are rarely caught on artifi-
cial lures.


Blue tilapia generally have
white, flaky meat with a mild
flavor and are considered excel-
lent eating. Farm-raised tilapia
are often sold in grocery stores.
The FWC encourages catch-
ing and eating most exotic fish,
including blue tilapia. Because
they are nonnative, there is no
size or bag limit.
"Our goal is to ensure quality
fishing throughout Florida both
now and in the future," said
Tom Champeau, director of the
FWC's Division of Freshwater
Fisheries Management. "Ms.
Henry's support and participa-
tion in the FWC's Big Catch
Angler recognition program
will help us maintain Florida's
reputation as the Fishing
Capital of the World."


USF Polytechnic Will Open


Blue Sky Waucula Feb. 18


The public is invited to join
Marshall Goodman, regional
chancellor, University of South
Florida Polytechnic, for the
grand opening of the universi-
ty's new Blue Sky Wauchula
facility at 116 Main Street in
Wauchula on Friday, Feb. 18
from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The event
is part of Wauchula's monthly
Friday Night Live activities.
Blue Sky Wauchula is an edu-
cational outreach facility that
combines higher education and
economic development in a
comprehensive community pro-
gram. Through the guidance of
USF Polytechnic, Blue Sky
aims to enhance the entrepre-
neurship environment of the


local community while simulta-
neously motivating individuals
to pursue a research-based, uni-
versity degree.
As an academic outreach cen-
ter, Blue Sky Wauchula pro-
vides a place for middle and
high school students and their
families to prepare and plan for
college, trade school or the mil-
itary.
The facility is fully equipped
with the technology students
need to access all the right
information. Mentors will help
students discover what interests
them the most, set goals for
their future and determine the
best methods to achieve their
goals.


Blue Sky Wauchula has part-
nered with the U.S. Department
of Education's KnowHow2Go
program to connect students to
national resources.
Blue Sky Wauchula also
offers business development
services to the community.
Small business support comes
in the form of educational pro-
grams, seminars, and communi-
ty events. The facility bases its
principles on the primary objec-
tive of USF Polytechnic, which
affirms that communities asso-
ciated with the university
should rightly thrive economi-
cally, socially and academical-


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February 17, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9A


r Fish Busters
;t By Bob Wattendorf
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


FLORIDA'S TOP FRESHWATER FISHING SPOTS
Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission freshwater
fisheries biologists from across the state recently weighed in to
suggest fishing sites that novice to expert anglers might want to try
ot in 2011 for a variety of species.
Florida is the "Fishing Capital of the World" due to great
resources and responsible management. Those great resources
include a wide variety of fishing opportunities throughout the state.
Every winter, biologists select some of the larger water bodies they
recommend anglers try out.
To make their recommendations biologists use information
such as creel count (data from actual anglers' on-the-water success
for the previous year); electrofishing data (a sampling method that
uses electric currents to stun fish so they can be netted, examined
and released); tournament data; Big Catch results (the FWC's pop-
ular angler-recognition program); state records; interviews with
local guides and bait-and-tackle shop owners; and their own fish-
ing experiences.
All of the sites selected are large enough and have adequate
public access facilities to accommodate additional fishing pressure
and still provide great fishing opportunities. We also try to take into
account recent or anticipated weather or vegetation trends that
might impact angling success throughout the year.
The results are posted on MyFWC.com/Fishing (see "Fishing
Sites and Forecasts") each January. In addition, that site also pro-
vides quarterly fishing forecasts for major water bodies in each
region of the state, along with fishing tips and information about all
of Florida's recreational freshwater fishes.
Of course, one of these lists features largemouth bass, the most
popular sport fish in North America, and one which has been a
jewel in Florida's crown since the first angler cast a hook alongside
a lily pad.
Another piece of good news is that Lake Okeechobee, the "Big
Waters" in the midst of the renowned River of Grass, is back on the
list. Following a series of environmental calamities, including pro-
longed high water and hurricanes, the lake's resiliency and man-
agement efforts have generated a bass resurgence.
Other featured black bass waters include perennial favorites,
such as the Everglades Conservation Areas; lakes George,
Istokpoga, Kissimmee, Monroe, Seminole, Talquin, Tarpon, Toho
and Walk-in-Water; Mosaic and Tenoroc fish management areas;
Orange Lake; Rodman Reservoir; and the Suwannee River.
Who knows? You might land a trophy fish by trying out these
hotspots. A yellow bullhead caught in the Crystal River on Dec. 17
became the new state record for that species. Tom Flynn of
Homosassa was fishing with minnows he caught at a boat ramp
when he hooked the catfish. The new state record yellow bullhead
weighed 5 pounds, .75 ounces and was 20 inches in length.
Please check out MyFWC.com/Fishing, under "Fishing Sites
and Forecasts," to learn more about these destinations and how
your fishing license dollars help ensure the future of quality fresh-
water fishing throughout Florida, so people can keep catching var-
ious bass species; crappie, bream or bluegill; shellcrackers or
stumpknockers; redbreast sunfish; and catfish or bullheads.
We hope you will try your luck fishing for a new species or
testing some of these outstanding fishing holes this year to expand
your enjoyment, and we encourage you to take a kid fishing. It's
likely a tossup between bluegill and catfish for having generated
most of those awesome "first fish" smiles for millions'of young and
not-so-young anglers in Florida. Regardless, for a kid, fishing is
inexpensive, fun, healthy and a great way to spend quality time
with someone you care about away from the stresses of daily life.




Spring Turkey Hunt

Has 2 New Rule


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission re-
minds hunters that there are
changes this spring turkey sea-
son.
Because of safety concerns
among Florida's turkey hunters,
the FWC passed a rule that lim-
its the methods of take allowed
during spring turkey hunts on
wildlife management areas. The
new rule restricts guns to shot-
guns and muzzleloading shot-
guns (using shot no larger than
No. 2) and allows bows and
crossbows.
All rifles, pistols, buckshot
and slugs are prohibited during
spring turkey hunts on WMAs.
The exceptions are on Joe
Budd, Raiford and Santa Fe
Swamp, where muzzleloading
rifles are still allowed because
spring turkey hunting on these
areas is restricted to primitive
guns only.
This rule does not apply to
turkey hunting on private lands.
The second new rule estab-
lished a special two-day youth
turkey hunt on private lands the
weekend prior to the opening of
spring, turkey season in each
hunting zone.
In Zone A (the southern por-
tion of Florida, south of State
Road 70), this youth turkey
hunting weekend is Feb. 26-27.
In the remainder of the state,
this special youth hunt is March
12-13.
Only those under 16 years old
may harvest a turkey while
supervised by an adult 18 or
older. And as long as the adult
supervisor doesn't actively par-
ticipate in the hunt, no license
or permit is required for either
youth or adult.

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Getting Out Of An
Abusive Situation?

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
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If the adult wants to help
"call in" a turkey, set out decoys
or participate otherwise, he
needs a hunting license ($17 for
residents, $46 for a 10-day non-
resident license) and turkey per-
mit ($10 for residents, $125 for
nonresidents).
Nevertheless, only the youth
can pull the trigger. And any
turkey harvested counts toward
the youth hunter's spring sea-
son limit of two.
This spring, the youth turkey
hunt applies only to private
property, the Kissimmee Chain
of Lakes Area, the Kissimmee
River Public Use Area and Lake
Monroe WMA.


BOOK SIGNING








---









COURTESY PHOTO
RichaW C. "Dick" Mattock of Fort Meade is celebrating
publication of his inspired book of poetry, "Be En-
couraged." A book signing will be held this Saturday
from 8 a.m. to noon at the Downtown Emporium Street
Sale on West Broadway in Fort Meade, FL Reflecting
over his life, he states, "Over my lifetime I've observed
people who were struggling with problems that were
devastating. Have you recognized someone in need of
encouragement? My purpose for writing poetry is to be a
source of encouragement to each reader and to fulfill the
Great Commission through poems. When we give and
receive encouragement it changes lives. My hope is that
these poems will inspire each reader to positively influ-
ence the people they meet along life's pathway." Some of
his poems can be seen on the Xlibris website of Rich-
ardMattock.com. To order a copy of the book, call Xlibris
at (888) 795-4274, extension 7879.

Only if we can restrain ourselves is good conversation
possible. Good talk rises upon much discipline.


Orange Crop Down

By 2 Million Boxes


The U.S. Department of Ag-
riculture has released its Febr-
uary orange crop forecast for
the 2010-11 season, reducing its
earlier estimate by two million
boxes to 138 million boxes.
"We continue to see the
effects of the freeze events that
hit Florida citrus in December
as well as smaller fruit sizes."
said Michael W. Sparks of
Florida Citrus Mutual. "The
reports I'm hearing from the
field is that growers are still
producing a high quality crop
that will translate into great
tasting fresh citrus and juices."
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
The USDA estimate for
grapefruit remained unchanged
at 19.6 million boxes.
The forecast for early and
midseason varieties in Florida
shrunk by one million to 66
million while the projection for


valencias also decreased by one
million boxes to 72 million
boxes this season.
For Florida specialty fruit.
the USDA's tangelo estimate-
remained unchanged at one mil-
lion boxes, while the tangerine
forecast was increased by
200,000 boxes to 4.4 million.
The all variety yield for from-
frozen concentrated orange
juice (FCOJ) dropped to 1.57
gallons per 90-pound box from
January's yield of 1.61. The
valencia yield dropped to 1.64
from 1.70 per box.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9 billion annual eco-
nomic impact, employing near-
ly 76,000 people and covering
about 560,000 acres. Founded
in 1948 and currently represent-
ing nearly 8,000 grower mem-
bers, Florida Citrus Mutual is
the state's largest citrus grower
organization. For more infor-
mation, visit www.flcitrusmutu-
al.com.


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SMonday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to


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10A The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011


From The Heart
By David Kelly


As the season comes to an end for my middle school boy's
basketball team, I think I'm finally feeling comfortable in the sad-
dle.
We started the season 4-0 going into Christmas break. I was
pretty pleased but knew we had a lot of work to do to get better and
also our toughest competition was ahead of us.
Because this is middle school basketball and the guys on my
team don't drive yet, I was told that holding practice over the break
wasn't the norm. After coaching high school basketball that took
some adjusting, since that was a key three-week period in which
my teams would get considerably better via lots of practice and
maybe even a few extra games in a Christmas tourney.
After enjoying my 39th birthday and all the baked goods I pos-
sibly could encounter, it was back to basketball. However, my boys
had zero practices before their first game back, so I knew it would
not be pretty. And, boy, was I ever right about that game! We lost
40-24 and it should have been a lot worse.
So the undefeated season ended and it was on to the next two
games. They both should have been wins but ended up being five-
point losses. Missed free throws, bad substitution from the coach
and poor passes cost us these two games.
The First Academy Eagles were now 4-3 and coach was under
the hot seat; not really, but it sounds better. I was under my own
personal hot seat. I was second-guessing everything, analyzing
every detail and wondering what I needed to do to get these guys
to translate effort into efficiency, energy into excellence and eager-
ness into precision passing, shooting and communication.
Then I reminded myself, these are middle school boys we are
talking about.
The eighth game of the season we played sound, technically.
Boxing out, pump fakes, head fakes and moved our feet and didn't
reach on defense; it was refreshing. But Coach Kelly wasn't con-
vinced because we were playing an inferior opponent and I didn't
know if we were that much better or they were that much worse.
So on to 5-3 we went.
Due to "tornadic" activity, game nine, a sure win against a
first-year school, was canceled. So win number six would have to
Come against the team that embarrassed us at their place to begin
the new year.
We were ready, or so I had hoped before the game.
I was as nervous as a kindergarten kid on the first day of
school. I knew we could beat this team but I didn't know if my
players knew we could beat this team. I wanted them to play with
intensity, with tenacity and at the same time be under control.
Telling that to a middle school boy is like telling me to do some-
thing in Russian. I'd look at you like I understood what you said,
but there would still be a lot of, "Hmmm? I'm not sure what he's
talking about."
So after 19 missed free throws, a poor effort of defensive
rebound in the first half and one of my starters on the bench
because he fouled out, I looked up at the scoreboard to see we had
won 42-29!
One guy on our team scored 29 points but in an unselfish way,
he got a lot of put backs off of misses from his teammates. We
Passed really well, we pressed decent and we made layups. It was
one of our best performances this year, minus the free throw line
'debacle.
S So now at 6-3 we have two games left plus a tournament as I
write this the first week of February.
It seems that all the hard work is paying off and what a great
sense of accomplishment you could see on team faces as they
walked to shake hands with a team that just two weeks earlier had
taken them to the woodshed.


jo t


There are two things to aim
at in life: first, to get what
you want and, after that, to
enjoy it. Only the wisest of
mankind achieve the sec-
ond.
-Logan Pearsall Smith


Ranch Rodeo

Friday, February 25

7:00 pm
at the Hardee County Fair

Wild Cow Milking, Bull Riding,
Team Sorting, Barrel Racing,

Old Timer's Roping, Calf Doctoring,
Mutton Busting* (6yrs. and under)

*Participants for Mutton Busting need to preregister by
calling Gary Jones at 375-4074


Limited to 20
46R d;~


participants
IS d==\ ^^


Week ending February 13, 2011
Weather Summary: Scattered showers preceded a cold front
that swept across the State during the week of Februarl 7 through
13. From the Panhandle down to the southern Peninsula tempera-
tures plunged to below freezing and near freezing levels.
Temperatures at the major stations averaged nine degrees below
normal to three degrees above normal. Frigid evening lows were in
the 20s to 40s. Pleasant daytime highs were in the 60s to 80s.
Rainfall ranged from traces to oer an inch in most localities. Areas
recording over two inches of precipitation included Alachua, St.
Johns, Levy. and Suwannee counties. Baker County received over
three inches of rainfall. Over four inches of rain fell in Duval
County.
Field Crops: Producers in the Hastings area continued to plant
potatoes. Land preparation for the planting of field crops continued
until the rainfall and cold temperatures arrived. Sugarcane harvest-
ing remained active around the Lake Okeechobee area. Topsoil and
subsoil moisture supplies were short to mostly adequate.
Vegetables: Rains hindered fieldwork in some central and
southern Peninsula regions. Harvesting of some vegetables was
curtailed due to wet fields. Shipments were still reported below
normal due to continuous cold weather. Some producers were har-
vesting strawberries in the Plant City area. Harvesting of cabbage,
bell peppers, and eggplant were still down with no shipments being
moved. Light supplies of snap beans, celery, sweet corn, endive,
escarole, radishes, tomatoes, and strawberries were marketed.
Livestock and Pastures: The pasture condition Statewide was
poor to fair due to cold temperatures and drought, while the cattle
condition was mostly fair to good. Both pasture and cattle condi-
tion improved slightly from the previous week. In the Panhandle
area, pasture condition ranged from very poor to excellent, with
most poor to fair due to cold and drought. Grazing conditions con-
tinued to improve slowly with many locations reporting adequate
rainfall. Hay and supplements were being fed to livestock. In the
northern areas, pasture condition ranged from very poor to good,
with most poor to good. Most cool season forage pastures
improved. The cattle condition was mostly fair as cold, wet condi-
tions last week were difficult for livestock. In the central and south-
western areas, pasture condition ranged from poor to good, with
most poor to fair. Dry soil conditions limited forage growth. The
cattle condition ranged from poor to excellent, with most cattle in
fair to good condition.
Citrus: Lows were in the 30s and 40s with highs in the 60s
and 70s across most of the citrus area. This week, all 25 FAWN sta-
tions in the citrus area recorded some precipitation, with eight
recording more than an inch. Alachua reported the most, with 2.45
inches of rainfall recorded. Overall, there were moderate to severe
drought conditions in most of the citrus area according to the U.S.
drought monitor, last updated on February 8th. Indian River,
Brevard, and part of St. Lucie, Martin, and Palm Beach counties
experienced extreme drought conditions. Forty-eight packinghous-
es and 18 processors have opened. Harvest of early and midseason
oranges and grapefruit continued with processing plants running
both oranges and grapefruit. New growth and buds were noted
across the region. Cultural practices continued, including irriga-
tion, hedging and topping of groves, and application of lime.


I. ION



Workshops Help
Change Lives
Workshops are available
to help individuals to build
resources and skills to move
out of poverty.
For information, contact
Shujwana Lamy, Wauchula
Family Development Spe-
cialist for Manatee Com-
munity Action Agency, at
slamy@manateecaa.org or
call 767-8408 or cell 941-
704-7779.

Boy Scouts Now
Collecting Food
Boy Scout Troop 813 and
the Boy Scouts of America
are conducting their annual
Scouting for Food Drive in
Wauchula. This year, Feed-
ing America Tampa Bay has
agreed to match, pound for
pound, box for box, all food
collected. The deadline is
Friday.
Food collected will be
donated to Hardee Help
Center, 713, E. Bay St.,
Wauchula. There is a collec-
tion drum at Real Life
Church on U.S. 17 south of
Bowling Green or they can
be delivered to the Center. If
you are willing to donate and
do not have transportation,
call 863-781-2732.

Golf for Girls
Facing Choices
The Choices Pregnancy
Care Centers is sponsoring
a Golf Scramble on Sat. Feb.
26 at Torrey Oaks Golf
Course, U.S. 17 North and
Bostick Road, Bowling
Green. Registration is 7:30
a.m. and shotgun start is at 8
a.m.
Cost is $55 per individual
or $200 for a foursome.
Registration is by Feb. 20.
Fees include 18 holes of
golf, cart, lunch and awards.
To enter, call 767-0307 or go
online www.cpccpartners.-
com


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Bring Crafts To
Fair Today
Anyone wanting to enter
arts or crafts in the Hardee
County Fair should bring
them to the exhibit hall
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
today (Thursday). Judging
will begin at 8:03 a.m. on
Friday.
For information on any
craft or entry requirements,
contact the Hardee County
Extension Service office at
773-2164.

Taxes Can Be
Done Free
United Way and its Finan-
cial Stability Partnership
offers free tax preparation by
apl5ointment. They will be
done at the Hardee Help'
Center, 713 E. Bay St., Wau-
chula on Mondays from 6 to
8 p.m.
Visit uwcf.org for more
information. You will need an
E-Mail account, which can
be obtained by using your or
the library computer and
going to Yahoo.com and
click sign-up in the upper
right corner to create your
account and password.


YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


L


Ac


~k' ~-~Z. sl4i~r








February 17. 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11A


resign my position by pressure
put on by the Governor's Of-
fice. I do not agree with his
decision but as a person who
was sworn to do what is best for
Wauchula, I will resign effec-
tive noon Feb. 11, 2011."
Wrote Clarence Bolin, "I
hereby tender my resignation as
city commissioner for the city
of Wauchula effective immedi-
ately."
Jerry Conerly said, "I hereby
submit my resignation as com-
missioner at large, Seat 7, of the
City of Wauchula City Com-
mission effective immediately."
And, from David Royal, "As
of Friday, Feb. 11, 2011, I here-
by resign as mayor and as a city
commissioner effective imme-
diately. It has been a privilege ?
to serve our city all these years.
and to try to move it forward to --
prepare for our future. I am very
proud of our staff and employ-
ees of the city and their com-
mitment to this community. We
are a very blessed group of peo-
ple and a community with a
very big heart. I will continue to
support our city and the people
of this community."
The Executive Order remov-
ing Dan Graham from office,
No. 11-28, reads as follows in
its entirety:
"Whereas on May 17, 2010,
an Information was filed by the
10th Judicial Circuit in and for
Hardee County, Florida, charg-
ing Daniel Ashley Graham, city
commissioner for the city of
Wauchula, Florida, with two
counts of violation of Florida's
Government-in-the-Sunshine
Law, violations of Section
286.011, Florida Statutes, both
misdemeanors; and
"Whereas, on June 30, 2010,
Daniel Ashley Graham pled
nolo contender, the state
entered a nolle prosequi on one
count and the court withheld
adjudication on the other count
of violation of Florida's Gov-
ernment-in-the-Sunshine Law,
a misdemeanor violation of sec-
tion 286.011, Florida Statutes;
and
"Whereas, Section 112.51(2),
Florida Statutes, provides that
the governor may suspend from
office any elected municipal
official informed against for the
commission of a misdemeanor;
and


GOVERNOR


Continued From 1A
"Whereas, Section 112.51(5).
Florida Statutes, authorizes the
governor to remove a municipal
official who is convicted of any
charge contained in an Infor-
mation by reason of which the
official was suspended under
the provisions of Section
112.51, a plea of nolo con-
tendere being deemed a convic-
tion pursuant to Section
112.51(5), notwithstanding a
withholding of adjudication.
"Now, therefore, I, Rick
Scott, governor of Florida, pur-
suant to Section 112.51, Florida
Statutes, issue the following
executive order, effective im-
mediately:
"Section 1. Daniel Ashley
Graham is hereby suspended
from public office, to wit: city
commissioner for the city of
Wauchula, Florida; and
"Section 2. Daniel Ashley
Graham is hereby removed
from public office, to wit: city
commissioner for the city of
Wauchula, Florida."
The order is then signed by
Rick Scott's hand.
The city commissioners'
troubles began in March 2010
when they voted to hire an out-
side consulting firm to investi-
gate poor working relationships
within and across city depart-
ments, most notably between
the police chief and the city
manager.
A March 29, 2010, report pre-
pared by the firm instead point-
ed out that city commissioners
routinely failed to comply with
the City Charter by not adher-
ing to the city manager form of
government. It also charged
commissioners with holding
"secret" meetings.
At the Sept. 14, 2009, one,
Royal is quoted as saying, "I
got one thing that I need to talk
to the commissioners about. I
can ask the department heads to
leave, but I can't force anyone
else to leave."
When questioned by a re-
porter, Royal responded that the
meeting was adjourned.
Further, when City Clerk
Holly Collins tried to enter the
room, Patarini stopped her,
using hand gestures to indicate
she was not allowed in the
room.
Conerly is quoted during the
closed session as saying, "It's


been very difficult to deal with
this because of the Sunshine
Law. I try not to get anything
into the public eye or ears."
Added Bolin. "'We have to be
able to communicate because I
may know something that the
rest need to know . and if we
can't talk."
Attorney Ables, it was noted.
cut in at that point and told
commissioners they could
"talk" at'a public meeting, but
not privately. "because you are
violating the Sunshine Law."
At the March 1, 2010, ses-
sion, Ables again instructed
commissioners on the Sunshine
Law, but within 22 seconds fol-
lowing his remarks, Royal
asked everyone to leave the
room.
Another violation of City
Charter provisions came on
Sept. 13, 2010, when commis-
sioners refused to seat newly
elected commissioner Russell
Smith. Despite having qualified
through the city office to run for
a commission seat, his residen-
cy was now in question.
At a hearing on Sept. 27,
2010, Smith's residency and
eligibility for office were
proven.
At an Oct. 11, 2010, meeting,
commissidoffis refused to pay
Smith's legal bill in defending
the commission's allegation.
Patarini noted he had to pay his
own attorney when he went to
court for the Sunshine Law vio-
lations. Graham, however,
pointed out that commissioners
were charged with a crime,
while Smith was not.
Still, the $1,500 legal bill was
left to Smith to pay.




Home is the place where,
when you have to go there,
they have to take you in.
-Robert Frost

Age is a very high price to
pay for maturity.
-Tom Stoppard

Youth, which is forgiven
everything, forgives itself
nothing; age, which for-
gives itself everything, is
forgiven nothing.
-George Bernard Shaw


Tuesday nor on Wednesda., and
did not return a phone message
left on Tuesday.
Some citizens have ques-
tioned Ables' inmol'ement in
the fray follow ing the four res-
ignations and one removal.
alleging his work is now repre-
senting "private citizens" and
inquiring who would be respon-
sible for paying his mounting
legal bill.
Ables' argument, gleaned
from weekend research, had
been based on a 1976 Florida
Supreme Court case which
cited, Albes noted, "a long-
standing precedent and rule in
Florida. and in most of the
states and in the federal govern-
ment, that a public official can-
.noflt-e removed from office
under a current commission for
misconduct in a prior one."
He argued that Royal,
Conerly, Graham and Patarini
had been elected to new terms
in August of 2010, and their
misconduct represented a prior
term. Only Bolin is serving the
same term in office as coincides
with the offense.
Because of his legal chal-
lenge, Ables at Monday night's
monthly meeting advised Free-
man and Smith that any ap-
pointments to fill vacancies that
night would be temporary and
would be with the purpose of
achieving a quorum.
For that, two people would
have to be appointed to the
commission.
He added that if the ousted
commissioners were not rein-
stated within 30 days, a special
election would be held. If
Freeman and Smith chose that
night to appoint two new mem-
bers, however, that would pro-
vide a quorum to conduct busi-
ness and therefore extend the
special election need to 9Q days
instead of 30.
The meeting, being held in
the city auditorium because of
the crowd, was attended by all
five of the ousted commission
members.
Ables indicated that based on
the cases he sent to the gover-
nor's office which he said pre-
sented precedents, he anticipat-
ed a quick resolution of the sit-
uation and a reinstatement of
the commissioners.
Said Smith, "There's nothing


CHALLENGE


Continued From 1A
on the agenda that can't wait
one week. Meeting is set for
Feb. 21 at 6 p.m."
With that. Monday night's
session adjourned as no quorum
was present and Freeman and
Smith opted not to make any
temporary appointments.
Conerly on Tuesday said he
felt Ables' precedents were
"pretty specific." But, he added,
"until the governor's counsel
makes that determination, we
are in a state of flux."
Conerly said he was not
familiar with 2010 Florida
Statute 112.42, which clearly
states, "The governor may sus-
pend any officer on any consti-
tutional ground for such sus-
pension that occurred during
the existing term of office or
during the next preceding four
years."
He did, however, call the
governor's actions "regrettable
and unbelievable based on
something that occurred inno-
cently, and just keeps going on,
but we will see what happens."
Added Conerly, "I'm very
concerned about the welfare of
the city of Wauchula at this
point."
Graham on Tuesday said his
place at the commission table
on Monday night did not repre-
sent defiance of the governor's
order but protest of it. He said
he had been to court, agreed to


the penalty as imposed by the
judge, but then was newly elect-
ed to office.
"For the governor to come
along and totally negate the will
of the people reduces all our
freedoms," he said.
Royal late Wednesday morn-
ing offered similar sentiments,
writing via email, "The events
are disappointing and not repre-
sentative of the will of the peo-
ple within our community. A
more complete understanding
of the actions should be provid-
ed by the Governor's Office.
We continue to make that
request. This is my community
and I will continue to support it
and help in any way possible to
prepare it for the future."
Bolin did not return a phone
message left on Tuesday.
Patatini refused comment, cit-
ing the advice of his attorney.
Meanwhile, city business
goes on.
The City Charter calls for a
city manager form of govern-
ment, and commissioners are
not to be involved in the day-to-
day operations of the city.
The acting city manager and
the department heads remain in
place and, as Smith noted 'on
Monday night, "The city is still
functioning. We have a fantastic
staff. The police are still
patrolling, the garbage is being
picked up. Life is going on."


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first time. The drink consisted of soda water and
crushed celery seed. It also helped to spark a celery
craze in the late 19th century that included celery-fla-
vored soft drinks, celery gum, celery soup and elixir of
celery.



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PAGE ONE


'Cats District Champs; Host Gators Today


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
They won it all!
The Hardee Wildcat hoop
squad stole a pair of games in
last week's Class 3A, District
11 playoffs.
The 'Cats, seeded third, upset
number 2 seed Sarasota Booker.
then turned around and upended
top seed Bradenton Southeast.
That puts Hardee in the dri-
ver's seat for the quarter final
round of Region 3 playoffs.
Hardee hdst the District 12 run-
ner-up and second-seed Island
Coast of Cape Coral, which lost
its district championship to top
Fort Myers Bishop Verot on
Saturday night.
Hardee will host the Gators
tonight (Thursday) at 7 at
Wildcat Gymnasium. Tickets,
set by the Florida High School
Athletic Association, are $6.
The Gators (13-13) have a pair
of outstanding guards, averag-
ing 16 and 10 points a game and
a strong center.
Hardee counters with its trio
of outstanding junior guards,
Keshun Rivers, Jajuan Hooks
and Andrew Hooks, plus senior
center Tony Rodriguez and sen-
ior forward D'Vonte Hooks.
Senior forward Carl "Junior"
Brown has been sidelined with
a strained knee ligament, but
hopes to be available tonight.
Meanwhile, he has specialized
in leading the bench cheers and
keeping all the other players
pumped up.
If Hardee wins tonight, and
District 11 runner-up Southeast
can get past Bishop Verot,
Hardee would host Southeast in
the regional quarterfinals on
Feb. 22. If Verot and Hardee
both win, Hardee would have to
travel to Verot for the regional
quarterfinals. Whoever wins
that game, will advance to face
the District 9-10 winner. In-
volved in those playoffs are
Tampa Catholic vs. Avon Park
and Lakeland Tenoroc vs.
Berkeley Prep. The regional
final is on Feb. 26.

Mooney 53, DeSoto 44
The first round of the District
11 playoffs was on Feb. 14 at
fourth-seed DeSoto vs. fifth-
seed Sarasota Cardinal Moon-
ey. DeSoto led early. The game
was tied 24-24 at halftime and
44-44 at the end of regulation.
Mooney held the Bulldogs
scoreless in the overtime, while
scoring nine points for the vic-
tory. Parker Del Medico led
Mooney with 18 points.

Southeast 61, Mooney 49
This was actually a close
game most of the way. Fourth-
seed Mooney led 18-15 at the
end of the first quarter and 26-
24 at halftime. Top seed South-
east reversed that to lead 38-35
entering the final period and hit
11 of 13 free throws in the last


couple ot minutes to win by 12.
Senior Reggie Samuels led
Southeast with 22 points.
including 8-of-8 at the charity
stripe in the fourth period.
"Free throws made the differ-
ence. Mooney had a good game
plan and kept to it. We came out
a bit more intense after the half.
We just weren't hitting in the
first half, said Southeast coach
Eliot Washington.
Hardee 51, Booker 49
Third-seed Hardee faced sec-
ond-seed Sarasota Booker in
the late game last Wednesday.
Booker came in with a 13-12
record under seventh-year
coach Derrick Kerr, and featur-
ing three seniors, three juniors
and several underclassmen.
Tornado Senior Alex Hunt
faced Wildcat freshman Keyon
Brown for the center jump and
Hardee got possession, A
turnover gave the ball to the
Tornadoes.
Hardee got the first points, as
Jajuan Hooks downed a trey
from the top of the key. Beau
Daniel got a deuce for Booker
and Rivers hit one-of-two for
Hardee. Back and forth it went,
with a half dozen lead changes
or ties in the first period, which
ended with Booker up 12-11.
The Tornadoes got a deuce to
start the second session but,
shortly, Tre' Anderson fed
D'Vonte Hooks inside to make
it 16-13. Booker went on a tear
and was up 28-18 before Ander-
son notched a trey just before
the halftime buzzer.
Hardee mounted a comeback
early in the third period. Jajuan
Hooks got the ball inside to
Keyon Brown. Freshman Aus-
tin Leach countered with a
Booker trey. Andrew Hooks
scored on a pull-up jumper, and
so it went, both teams subbing
fresh bodies from time to time.
By the end of the third period,
Hardee had narrowed the gap to
35-32.
By the 6:15 mark, Hardee
had tied the game, 37-all. The
lead seesawed for the next two
minutes. Booker got another
surge and led 48-41 at the 1:05
mark.
Hardee wasn't done, though.
An Andrew Hooks shot was
rebounded by D'Vonte Hooks.
At the 27-second mark,.Jajuan
Hooks sank a three-spot to cut
the lead to 48-46. With 16.6
second left. Stone Halloway hit
1-fo-2 for Booker. On his way
back up court, Rivers went all
the way and was fouled at the
10.8-second mark. After a
Booker time-out, Rivers his
both free throws. It was now a
49-48 game and the partisan
Hardee crowd was alive,
stomping and clapping.
Halloway missed a pair of
free throws, giving Hardee an
opening. Brown grabbed a de-
fensive rebound, passed it to
Andrew Hooks and long to


Ton, Rodriguez. he got the shot
to put Hardee up 50-49. was
fouled and also hit the free
throw. putting Hardee up 51-49
with 3.3 seconds left. Halloway
tried a last-second shot from
mid-court, but it missed. Har-
dee won 51-49.
"That's two of three we've
taken from Booker this year,
maybe we've broken their dom-
inance. It's been a roller coaster.
We didn't play well enough to
win the game. Our turnovers
were frustrating us, but we did
just enough to stay in the game.
The players followed directions
and focused down the stretch
and it showed," said Wildcat
head coach Vance Dickey.
"Keshun (Rivers) hit 10 of
his 15 points in the fourth quar-
ter. Tony (Rodgriguez) got
seven in the fourth. I feel like
we got a gift and have to take
advantage of it. Carl (Brown)
really helped standing behind
the bench and leading the team
clapping, instead of sitting there
and feeling sorry for himself,"
noted Dickey.
Rivers had 15 points, Jajuan
Hooks had 14 and Rodriguez 11
to put three 'Cats in double-dig-
its. Andrew Rivers added four,
Anderson three, and Keyon
Brown and D'Vonte Hooks
each two points.
Hardee 58-Southeast 52
Hardee blasted ahead from
the get-go in this title game
against the 20-6 Seminoles. The
Wildcats were up 12-2 at the
3:15 mark of the first period
and finished the first quarter up
16-9 as Southeast began to find
the range for its shot.
The crowd continued to dis-
rupt Southeast, allowing Har-
dee to lead 21-14 midway
through the second stanza and
finish the half up 28-19.
Southeast began to climb
back into the game in the sec-
ond half, although Hardee took
judicious time-outs and kept the
pressure on. It was late in the
third quarter when Marcene
Jean nailed a three-pointer to
put Southeast briefly ahead 33-
32.
SThat lasted 20 seconds, be-
fore Jajuan Hooks canned an-
other trey and Andrew Hooks
went all the way for a shot and
free throw to put Hardee up 38-
33. It was a hectic last minute of
the third, which finished with
Hardee up 39-33.
No one scored in the defen-
sive three minutes of the final
period. Finally, Keyon Brown
was fouled and hit both shots.
Antonio Rey hit a long deuce
for the Seminoles to keep it to a
six-point game. D'Vonte Hooks
sank one under the hoop and
Smalls countered with a dish to
Brian Poole to keep Southeast
in the game.
By the three-minute mark,
Hardee was up 48-38. South-
east fought back, but couldn't


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overcome the deficit. Hardee
began hitting free throws as
Southeast fouled to get the ball.
The final minute seemed to last
forever. With 8.4 seconds left,
Andrew Hooks hit another pair
of foul shots. For a 58-49 lead.
Jean nailed his last trey at 2.7
seconds, but that left the
Seminoles down 58-52 at the
final buzzer.
D'Vonte Hooks was chosen
to receive the district champi-
onship trophy from Dr. Michele
Polk, Hardee High principal.
Then they all paused for a team
shot with the winner's trophy.
"My three guards played one
whale of a game and kept their
composure. They handled
everything Southeast threw at
them. Andrew hit 8-of-10 free
throws and Keyon was 2/2. We


were 13-of-16 in the fourth
quarter. "said an excited
Dickey.
"I'll attribute our win to good
ball handling and good free
throws. We did a good job
defensively on their No. 11,
and executed well down the
stretch. J.J. (Jajuan Hooks) had
trouble with his free throws in
the first half, which is unusual
because he leads the team with
83 percent. Our last district
championship was in 2008.
Most of the time, we've been
getting rattled in the end of the
game, but this time we kept our
composure. Rebounding by
Tony and Keyon helped a lot.
They threw a lot of different
defenses at us," concluded
Dickey.
Smalls was high for


Southeast with 15 points.
Hardee had the game high scor-
er in Andrew Hooks with 18
points, 11-of-13 at the free
throw line. Jajuan Hooks added
14 points, Rodriguez nine,
Rivers seven, Keyon Brown six
and D'vonte Hooks four points.

Man will begin to recover
the moment he takes art as
seriously as physics,
chemistry or money.
-Ernst Levy

Humor is merely tragedy
standing on its head with
its pants torn.
-Irvin S. Cobb

Comedy is simply a funny
way of being serious.
-Peter Ustinov


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Thursday, February 17,2011


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2B The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011




Hardee


Living


Shirley Turner Will

Wed Robert Earnest


Shirle\ Turner and Rioert
Earne>t. both ouf auchu.-.
announce their enegaement and
upcoming marriage thit week-
end.
The bride-elect is a commetol-
ogist and o, ner of The Beaut\
Parlour in Wauchula.
The prospective groom is a


COURTESY PHOTO
Ron Bennett and Candice Clark

Candice Clark Will

Marry Ron Bennett


Jay and Linda Clark of Wau-
chula announce the engagement
of their daughter, Jessica Can-
dice Clark of Montgomery,
Ala., to Ronald Lewis Bennett
of Atlanta, Ga., the son of
Randy and Lynn Bennett of
Brandon.
The bride-elect is a 1999
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School, a 2004 graduate of
Auburn University with a bach-
elor's degree in public relations
and communications, and a
2010 graduate of Jones School
of Law with a juris doctorate.
She is currently employed as


legislative director and legal
counsel for the Alabama House
Republican Caucus.
The prospective groom is a
1995 graduate of Bloomingdale
Senior High School in Brandon,
a 1998 graduate of the Univer-
sity of Alabama with a bachelor
of science degree in finance,
and a 2008 graduate of Emory
University with a master's of
business administration. He is
currently president of XGrass.
Plans are being made for a
March 26 wedding at the Linda
Lou Ranch in rural Zolfo
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Shirley Turner and Robert Earnest


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currently ', rki a, a L '.u,, nteer
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123 N. 7h Ave. Wauchula

773-3069 (Store) 773-2287 (Ray)

FreePick-Up Available
soc2 17p


Kim Bode and Rick Alberts

Kim Bode Becomes


Engaged To
Bob and Teri Becraft of Land
O' Lakes and and Robert
Stephen Bode of Lakeland
announce the engagement and
approaching marriage of their
daughter, Kimberly Martelle
Bode of Tampa. to Frederick
"Rick" Lyle Alberts Jr. of
Tampa. the son of Fred and
Sharon Alberts of Wauchula.
The bride-elect is a 1999
graduate of Orange County
public schools, and is currently


Gaither Homecoming guest
vocalist Stephen Hill and Gulf
State Quartet will combine
efforts for a local concert on
Sunday, Feb. 27, at New Hope
Baptist Church. The concert
will begin at 6 p.m., and a love
offering will be taken.
New Hope Baptist Church is
located at 1999 SR 64 E. in
Wauchula. For more informa-
tion, call the church office at
773-2101 or visit www.new-
hopewauchula.org.
First United Methodist
Church of Wauchula is hosting
a free concert with Dan Schall
on Sunday at 6 p.m.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.


Rick Alberts
employed as a pharmacy tech-
nician for Walgreen's in Tampa.
The prospective groom is a
1998 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School, and graduated
from Everest University with a
degree in graphic design. He is
currently employed as a senior
graphic artist at Big Frog in
Tampa.
Plans are being finalized for a
March 5 wedding at Northside
Baptist Church in Wauchula.


Act as if what you do
makes a difference. It
does.
-William James
If knowledge can create
problems, it is not through
ignorance that we can.
solve them.
-Isaac Asimov


NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME ACT
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned, pursuant to
the provisions of the Fictitious
Name Act, Section 865.09,
Florida Statues, as amended,
intends to register with the
Secretary of State of the State
of Florida, the fictitious name of
THOMAS TRUCKING under
which the undersigned is
engaged or will engage in busi-
ness at: 431 CYPRESS ST., In
the City of WAUCHULA, Florida
33873.
That the party interested In
said business enterprise Is as
follows: ALLEN THOMAS III
Dated at Wauchula, Hardee,
Florida 33873. 2:17p


LET'S HELP

CRYSTAL SAUNDERS


.--


-g-










Crystal is a single mom, with major health
issues, and a high insurance deductible.
An account has been set up in Crystal's
name at BB&T Bank in Fort Meade
(Hwy 17 across from John's Drive In) to
help with her medical bills! You may make
a donation to the account or for more
information, please contact Jama Abbott at
(863) 781-3671. BB& T's.mailing address
is 8 North Charleston Avenue. Fort Meade,
Florida 33841. Make checks to the Crystal
Saunders fund and to the attention of
Teresa Porter at BB&T.

Crystal has been the long-time guard at the
main entrance of the South Fort Meade
Mine and her always cheerful attitude and
smile have touched so many over the years.
Now Crystal needs qur help so would you
please make a donation of any amount.


r[A o u 04


N -~- -


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V







February 17, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


CANCER SUPPORT


~- r~


I/


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O


COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchula Moose Lodge No. 1487 held a fund-raising barbecue on Feb. 5 to benefit the
Hardee County Cancer Support Foundation. The dinner raised $383 for the cause. The
foundation's Don Bissette (center) is shown here flanked by (from left) Moose Lodge
members Joe Brown and Dan Linstrum.


ONE BLUE, NO PINK


Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Bo-
linski, of Atlanta, Ga., a six-
pdund seven-ounce son, Cohen
Thomas, born Jan. 25, 2011, at
Northside Hospital, Atlanta.
Mrs. Bolinski is the former
Meredith Beeson Stallings.
Maternal grandparents are Jim
and Bess Stallings of Wauchula.
; Maternal great-grandparents are
the late Mn and Mrs.' J.
Reynolds Allen and the late
Rev. and Mrs. Earl Stallings.
Paternal grandparents are Tom
and Pat Bolinski of Ocala.
Paternal great-grandfather is
Phil Coe of Elyria, Ohio.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant-as
a newborn only-may be added.
at no cost. Any other photo of
the baby will cost $15.


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Show me how You work,
God; school me in Your way.
Take me by the hand and
lead me down the path of
truth. You are my Savior,
aren't You? Mark the mile-
stones of Your mercy and
love, God.
Psalm 25:4-6a (ME)
FRIDAY
Forget that I'sowed wild
oats; mark me with Your sign
of love. Plan only the best for
me God! . Keep up Your
reputation, God; forgive my
bad life; it's been a very bad
life.
Psalm 25:7, 11 (ME)
SATURDAY
God is fair and just; He cor-
rects the misdirected, sends
them in the right direction.
He gives the rejects His
hand, and leads them step-
by-step. From now on, every
road you travel will take you
to God.
Psalm 25:8-10a (ME)
SUNDAY
My question: what are God-
worshipers like? Your an-
swer, God: Arrows aimed at
God's bulls-eye. They settle
down in promising places;
their kids inherit a prosper-
ous farm. God-friendship is
for God-worshipers; they are
the only ones He confides in.
Psalm 25:12-14 (ME)


MONDAY
If I keep my eyes on God, I
won't trip over my own feet.
Look at me and help me,
God! I'm all alone and in big
trouble... Take a hard look
at my life of hard labor, then
lift this ton of sin.
Psalm 25:15-16, 18 (ME)
TUESDAY
Keep watch over me and
keep me out of trouble, don't
let me down when I run to
You. Use all Your skill to put
me together; I wait to see
Your finished product.
Psalm 25:20-21 (ME)
WEDNESDAY
Clear my name, God; I've
kept an honest shop. I've
thrown in my lot with you,
God, and I'm not budging...
so I never lose sight of Your
love, but keep in step with
You, never missing a beat.
Psalm 26:1,3 (ME)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.



Not to be able to grow old
is just as ridiculous as to
be unable to outgrow
childhood.
-Carl G. Jung


---- I-Imp


rF
--


SFCC Recognizes
Local Students
For Academics
South Florida Communit\
College recognizes those stu-
dents wh.h haxe pursued and
achieved academic excellence
during the course of study at the
college.
Students are named to the
President's List for receiving a
semester grade-point average
between 3.8 and 4.0. Bowling
Green student William E. Lunn
%xas named to the Fall 2010
President's List.
Wauchula students named to
the President's List were Ale-
jandra Rodriguez. Amanda N.
Rigney. Araceli Torres, Brandi
J. Basey, Brittany N. Hines,
Christie S. Davis, Dalton H.
Farr. Derek C. Rosenberg,
Grant A. Roberts, Kenneth G.
Bonds III. Lori A. Crouse,
Nathan A. Walkington, Tania P.
Quiroz and Teresa Miranda.
Students are named to the
Vice President's List for receiv-
ing- a grade-point average be-
tween 3.5 and 3.79. Bowling
Green students named to the
Fall 2010 Vice President's List
were Kayla L. Carroll, Ivan
Narvaez and Yesenia Vargas.
Wauchula students named to
the Vice President's List were
Martha G. Arana, Latisha F.
Bogan, Yessenia G. DeLoera,
Biridiana Esparza, Amaris L.
Garza, Melissa D. Hartley,
Robert D. Manley, Ashley B.
Martin, John A. Miller, Eliz-
abeth L. Moore, Kody E. Port-
er, Kalan C. Royal, Kaylyn J.
Stevenson, Savannah M. Valdez
and Brittany M. Wiggins.
Zolfo Springs students named
to the Vice President's List are
Veronica DeLoera, Jared D.
Lanier and Kyndall D. Robert-
son.
Ona student Alyssa R. Schap-
er was named to the Fall 2010
Vice President's List..



Explore and explore. Be
neither chided nor flat-
tered out of your position
of perpetual inquiry.
Neither dogmatize or
accept another's dogma-
tism.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson


Welcomes


DAN SCHALL

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 20 6p.m.

FREE ADMISSION

Dan is from Zelienople, PA. Through his
music and testimony he conveys his love for
Jesus Christ and his concern for his fellow
man's eternity. His ministry focuses on
f encouragement and God's love for man. Dan
stutters when he speaks, but the Lord has
blessed him with a singing voice of praise to
share the Lord's words through music.


Saturday February 19 7pm
HARDEE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL WAUCHULA

Harlem Ambassadors

vs Hardee Homebuilders


T PRICES Advance

1 Admission $9

& Students $7
,n Under 3 Free

DOORS OPEN AT 6:20 P.M.


Door

$11
$9


Tickets Available At

Wauchula State Bank

Hardee Ranch Supply

Heartland Growers Supply


Check out his weekly webcast at
www.DanSchall.org


Hydrc Taste

Hydroponic Growers

STRAWBERRIES

U-PICK
NO BENDING NO KNEELING

NO FROST DAMAGE

LOTS OF VEGEES!!!


Tuesday Saturday 10am 5pm
Sunday 11am -5pm Closed Monday


I






ss


FREE CLASSES ON "HOW TO START YOUR GARDEN"
CALL AND MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW!

Phone (941) 322-0429

7308 Verna Bethany, Myakka City, Fl 34251
TAKE SR 70 EAST 12 MILES FROM 1-75.

www.hydrotaste.com


soc2:17


C


U


I Dan Schall
Dan Schall Ministries


Fort Green
News
By RiUa Cooper
773-6710

Greeting from Fort Green!
Hopefully everyone had a
nice Valentine's Day. Some
people are very sentimental and
always get or give a remem-
brance. The cards for the youth
are nothing compared to the
type we gave as children. They
would stand up or have fuzzy
things that would open up.
This really pleased us but the
youth of today have so much,
they probably wouldn't think
them wonderful!
When we were at the state
park recently, one of the camp-
ers had a big red valentine on
the front window, which was
full of lights that shone red at
night and was pretty.
Fort Green had a good Val-
entine Dinner Sunday with a
nice fashion show and Scripture
recitation by the GA girls. The
youth served the adults and did
a good job. We discovered that
Earl and Mary Bargeron had
been married the longest with
56 years. John and Essie Deer
were only one month behind
them. This is a blessing from
God that people are in good
health and can celebrate this
many years.
Mary Lois Crawley told me
they were having a Valentine
banquet on Saturday night at
Bowling Green Baptist, where
they attend. Evidently quite a
few churches make this a spe-
cial occasion.
When we moved to Fort
Green in 1965 there was an old
seedling orange grove in front
of our home. This went the way
of so many groves and now
there is a beautiful pasture. I
can even see the vehicles on
Ollie Roberts Road from my
porch.
James and Michelle Crawley
Yeoman and Leonard and Mary
Lois Crawley have cows, and
Michelle told me they have
their first baby calf, Emma. I
haven't seen her yet but know
she will be a beautiful black
calf!
The Harper Brothers will be
at Fort Green singing on March
12 at 6 p.m. Everyone is invit-
ed.


r-


Our sincere sympathies are
extended to the family of Mary
Ruth Allred. Her children were
in our Pioneer 4-H Horse Club
many years ago. Then I got to
know Mary Ruth better when
we worked at the voting polls.
She had a beautiful service and
will be missed.
Kaylee Hogenauer told me
her best score was 145 at" the
City Bowling Tournament in
Lakeland. She was also happy
that she made the A/B honor
roll. Sherry Smith was happy
that all of hers made the A/B
honor roll, Austin, Ciara, Dus-
tin and Tyler. That is an accom-
plishment, but Ciara was a little
disappointed as she normally
makes all A's. Congratulations
to all of them.
Betty Abbott's sister, who
lives in Maine, was able to have
surgery on her broken hip and is
doing well. Her brother-in-law,
Harry Hambrick, is in bad
health. Brian Pappas, who used
to live in Hardee County, is in
Texas trying to get cured of his
cancer. His brother, Steve, also
has cancer and is in Texas.
Some people think they have a
better chance of beating this ter-
rible disease out there and we
wish them the best. Please re-
member to pray for all the sick.
Jane Kennedy was able to be
at church last Sunday morning.
Please continue to keep her in
prayer.
The youth of the church are
going to the basketball game
this Saturday night at the high
school gym. It begins at 7 but
they are meeting at the church
at 5 to have time to eat before
the exciting game. Then March
5 they are going to March
Madness in Hudson. They will
leave at 6:30 a.m. and return
sometime that day or night.
This is put on by Word of Life
Ministry and is a Christian
youth rally. This is what the
youth work for in putting on
dinners etc.
This year's fair is a little dif-
ferent in that Children's Day
will be Monday. I do not ever
remember a kids day on Mon-
day. Monday is always the day
Sherman and I and others work
in the 4-H booth, so come on
down and get some good food,
strawberry shortcake or ice
cream!
Please remember to pray for
one another and our country.


p









4B The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011



Way BackWhen


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
*The Hardee County High
School building in this city was
the scene of a gala event Friday
night when the Wauchula Chap-
ter, Future Farmers of America
held the third annual Father and
Son Banquet. Approximately
200 men and boys attended the
event.

It was learned that Wauchula
Airport would be the scene of
an air show Sunday afternoon,
when Don Rae, who has a
nation-wide reputation as a
stunt pilot, will bring his circus
for a stunt exhibition and para-
chute jumping show.

L. Grady Burton, of this city,
state attorney and prominent
Wauchula lawyer who is a can-
didate for governor of the state
of Florida, will speak tomorrow
afternoon at 3 o'clock. He will
address the public over an
amplifier system. He has an
eight-point platform.

J.W. Earnest & Co. is having
a sale, with smart new one- and
two-piece frocks in peasant or
old-fashioned linen for just $2.
The sale begins today.

50 YEARS AGO
Hammers and axes were busy
at the Community Ice & Stor-
age Co. in Wauchula this week
as workmen began rebuilding
the structure which was gutted
by flames early Saturday morn-
ing. The building was an 85


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partntent during the week of
Feb. 7-11. -Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tort the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Kenneth R. Long, Palmetto
Street, electrical work, $2,475.
Douglas Battey, Maxwell
Drive, renovations, $3,700.
Sam Albritton Electrical,
Rest Haven Road, electrical
work, $1,553.
James ,M.- Cobb, Heard
Bridge Road, roofing, $1,500.
Travis A. Fulford, Broward
Street, roofing, $1,900.
Travis A. Fulford, two loca-
tions-U.S. 17 South roofing,
$3,100.
Robert E. White, South Ninth
Ave., roofing, $6,034.
Travais A. Fulford, two loca-
tions-Maxwell Drive, roofing,
$7,771.
Henry Johnson, Broward
Street. roofing. $1,900.


percent loss. Manager Bob
Gibson said he hopes to have
the plant back in operation soon
but, in the meantime, service
will be provided by the ice
house in Bowling Green.

"Dollars for Scholars" drive
to raise at least $9,000 for the
Hardee County Scholarship
Loan Fund was launched last
week. Susan Carlton is chair-
man of the drive, with Jim
Kelly and Sharon Glorious
working with her. Last year, the
first year of the drive, $5,632
was raised. With this money,
loans were granted to five boys
to attend and one girl who
entered business school.

What may be the last word
on the financial part the city
will play in the development of
subdivisions is a plan suggested
by Council Chairman Roy
Grimsley, and approved with
only two abstentions. The city
will furnish labor for installa-
tion of water and sewer lines, if
the developer will pay for the
materials.

Wauchula Motor Sales is
having a clearance sale, with a
1960 Ford Starliner or 1960
Ford Galaxie Town Sedan, both
for $2,395; and a 1960 Ford
Fairlane 500 Tudor for $1,795.

25 YEARS AGO
According to Sen. Pat Neal, the
corridors for the added two
lanes of U.S. 17 from Bowling
Green to Wauchula will be on
the railroad right of way and
construction could begin in two
years. He made the announce-
ment at a luncheon hosted by
Mr. & Mrs. Doyle Carlton at a




Douglas Battey, Clover Hill,
renovations, $3,700.
Robert E. White, Florida
Avenue, roofing, $3,494.
Richard A. Waldron, Shanna
Lane, renovations, $2,125.
Julie Poucher, Terrell Road,
renovations, $1,000.
Stephen J. Mourer, Palmetto
Street, renovations, $13,100.
Stephen J. Mourer, Cham-
berlain Blvd., renovations,
$5,100.
Otha E. Jones, Bamboo Lane,
new construction, $2,600.

BUILDING BLOCKS-
If you pull a permit for an
unlicensed contractor, you are
held responsible for the work,
not the contractor. If you hire an
unlicensed contractor, you may
actually pay more for the job,
than if you had hired a licensed
contractor. Especially, if the
work is done incorrectly or
never finished, you may have to
pay twice or-more for the same
job to be corrected or finished.
If the unlicensed contractor
fails to pay his sub-contractors
or suppliers, you may be re-
sponsible to pay for them, even
though you have already paid
the contractor.

I always felt that the great
high privilege, relief and
comfort of friendship was
that one had to explain
nothing.
-Katherine Mansfield


local restaurant after the !egi!a-
tise hearings Nea! ;i 4 he
abandonment b\ Seaboard
Coastline pro% ided the ,pportu-
nity to redesign the add :ir'.n
corridor.

Peninsular Equipment Co.. a
Wauchula tractor dealer. went
out of business recenfl.. The
original compan.. South Flor-
ida Motor Co.. began in the
1940s. It was located west of
the railroad, one block south of
Main Street between the old
Standard Oil Bulk Plant and the
old Carlton Buick. It was pur-
chased in 1952 b\ L.L. Linder
and H.A. Strickland and
renamed Peninsular. In 1955, it
moved to new headquarters on
U.S. 17 north of Wauchula.

Real estate sales this week
include 3BR, 2BA CBS and
brick home on Heard Bridge
Road for 575,000; a new 3BR.
2BA home in Wauchula in a
quiet neighborhood for
$55,000; and a lovely 2BR,
1BACB home on shaded lot for
$35,000.

10 YEARS AGO
The Hardee County Com-
mission is planning to build a
sewage treatment plant near
Wauchula Municipal Airport to
serve the Florida Institute for
Neurologic Rehabilitation and
potential customers along
Vandolah and Ona-Fort Green
Road. FINR wants to expand,
adding a nursing home for 100
patients that would add 100
new jobs. The site has the best
percolation for the plant, com-
missioners were told.

State Sen. John McKay and
Rep. Lindsey Harrington visit-
ed Hardee County last week for
its legislative delegation meet-
ing. Among the many requests,
roads got a share of attention,
especially finishing the four-
laning of U.S. 17 from Winter
Haven to 1-75 in Punta Gorda.
Harrington dubbed I-2 a pro-
posed east-west extension need-
ed for west coast hurricane
evacuation and inland econom-
ic development.

The Hardee County .School
Board wants to make all ele-
mentary schools K-5. Currently,
only Bowling Green and Zolfo
Springs elementaries serve stu-
dents K-5. North Wauchula
holds classes for kindergarten
through second grade and
Wauchula Elementary houses
children in grades 3-5. The only
holdup is funds, said board
members, who wanted the
change by the 2002-03 school
year.

S&S Suprex Market spe-
cials this week include a five-
pound bag of potatoes for
$1.29, smoked pork shoulder
for 98 cents a pound, grapes
for $1.29 a pound, three cucum-
bers for 99 cents, London broil
for $2.49 a pound or-boneless
top round steak for $2.29 a
pound.


Bowling Green Oks $75,000

Engineering Water Plan


By JIM KELLY
C; T-s Hera:c-Az. :ate
Bowling Green Citi Com-
rni'-ioner Shirle, Tucker wants
;., brinm southh baseball back to
'he Cit\.
F. ,r man\ year! the cat\ had a
Bow ling Green Youth Baseball
program that had games on the
tiwo fields at P\att Park. The
league disbanded about two
\ears ago.
The City Commission on
Feb. S agreed to help support
her proposal but told Tucker to
find leaders to guide the effort
and plan to have baseball games
in the spring of 2012.
"'It was a real good program. I
would also like to see it brought
back. We have two nice fields.
Can you organize and find the
right leadership?" said Mayor
Perry Knight.
Knight told Tucker to coordi-
nate her efforts with City Man-
ager Yvonne Kimball.
In another matter the com-
mission voted to approve En-
visors Inc. engineering firm to
develop a Hardee Street water
line design and to map and
evaluate the city's entire water
'system and make recommended'
improvements. Envisors was
represented by vice president of
engineering Steve Elias.
This plan will be funded by a
$75,000 grant from the Hardee
County Economic Develop-
ment Council which allocates
phosphate severance taxes from
the mining industry. Once the
engineering plans for the Phase
3 water project are completed,
the city could apply for grants
to construct the project. Hardee


Street's water line project
would go from Dixiana Ave. to
Lake Branch Rd.
Improved water service
would enable the city to some-
day develop the Centinino
property that was donated to the
city ears ago to be used for
recreation or an industrial park.
The property is in the southeast
part of the city. Knight is a
member of the county EDC.
The mayor said his recently
voiced his displeasure with the
alignment of the new light poles
along U.S. 17 that were in-
stalled by the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation. Four of
the poles on the south side of
the city are in the middle of a
sidewalk, he said. The FDOT
looked at the project and said
no changes need to be made,
said Knight.


Knight said the city has rent-
ed a track hoe and operator for a
month and is cleaning out
drainage ditches in the south
part of the city. Wauchula do-
nated the use of a dump truck.
Knight said some residents
have dumped tires and bags of
leaves into the drainage ditches
and asked the police department
to catch violators. City Attorney
Gerald Buhr. who has repre-
sented the city for over 10
years, said there are existing
state laws on littering and
dumping to punish violators if
found guilty in court.
City Commissioner Woody
Caligan asked about the city
building an open roofed enclo-
sure to park city police cars.
The matter was referred to the
police department and the city
manager for a recommendation.


For the week ended February 10. 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 5.348 head,
compared to 7,793 last week, and 6,349 a year ago. According'to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were 4.00 to
6.00 higher, feeder steers were mostly steady and heifers were
steady to 2.00 lower.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 150.00-210.00
300-400 lbs 136.00-167.50
400-500 lbs 116.00-153.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 119.00-170.00
300-400 lbs 113.00-140.00
400-500 lbs 112.00-130.00


LIVESTOCK SHOW


SCHEDULE


5:30 pm
6:30 pm
7:00 pm


5:00 pm
7:00 pm


6:00 pm
7:00 pm
(After Ste
Sho


2:17c


Monday. Feb. 21, 2010

Rabbit Show
Dairy Show
Grooming Contest

Tuesday, Feb. 22. 2010

Poultry Showmanship
Swine Show

Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2010

Breeding & Heifer Show
Steer Show
Beef Showmanship


er


w)

(ALL SHOWS ARE IN THE ARENA)


Boys like to





throw rocks



-..* ? f
.',- .7 Z ,F"


.-;2**'k *- "*








Depending on the rocks, girls


encourage such behavior


Phone Discounts Available to CenturyLink customers


The Florida Public Service Commission designated CenturyLink
as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier or ETC ivithin its service
area for universal service purposes. The goal of universal service is
to provide all Florida citizens access to essential telecommunica-
tions services.

CenturyLink provides single party residential and business services
for rates from $16.40 to $17.00 per month for residential custom-
ers and S24.00 to $31.00 per month for business customers. This
includes access to long distance carriers. Emergency Services,
Operator Services, Directory Assistance and Toll Blocking. Use of
these services may result in added charges. Specific rates for your
areas will be provided upon request.

CenturyLink offers qualified customers Lifeline and Link-Up
Ser ice if they meet certain low-income eligibility requirements.
L.itline Service includes a monthly discount up to $8.25 for basic
phone charges (including a waiver of the Federal Subscriber
Line Charge), as well as toll blocking at no charge and a waiver
of the deposit if toll blocking is selected by qualifying customers.
Link-Up Service provides a discount on installation charges and
charges to move service.

If \ou live in a CenturyLink service area, please call CenturyLink at
I -_00-201-4099 or visit www.centurylink.com/lifeline with questions
or to request an application for the Lifeline/Link-Up programs.





CenturyLink-

lifeline NON-SAU 2:17.24c www.centurylink.com


a,


I






February 17, 2011. The Herald-Advocate 5B


Back To Basics
By lan Rice
Gospel Preacher


WOW! There's lot of congratulations to go around!
The Hardee Wildcat basketball team refused to give in to sec-
ond-seed Sarasota Booker or top-seed Bradenton Southeast and
claimed the District 11 championship on Friday night. That gives
them the right to host the regional quarterfinal game tonight
(Thursday) at 7 against the visiting Island Coast (Cape Coral)
Gators, the District 12 runner-up.
If Hardee wins tonight and Southeast (11-runner-up) happens to
overcome Fort Myers Bishop Verot, then Hardee will host the
regional semi-final game Tuesday, again at 7 p.m. If Southeast
loses to Bishop Verot, then Hardee would have to travel to Fort
Myers on Tuesday.
Spring sports have begun among some drizzles last week,
which cancelled some of the tennis and baseball events. The base-
ball boys beat Fort Meade on Friday night 7-6 for a good start to
the pre-season. They are in tournament this week in Lake Wales.
The softball girls won their first two games handily. They have
another two this week and we will catch up on them.
The same goes for tennis, which had an early start and had also
to contend with the weather.
Boys weightlifting will start soon, as will track and field, and
junior high volleyball.
Youth sports on Feb. 28, with the boys playing on the four new
fields at Hardee Park Rec. Complex behind the Cattlemen's Arena
and across from the National Guard Armory.
The girls will move to the fields off South Florida Avenue and
use both George Heine fields and Farr Field as needed.
In boxing, Daniel Lozano picked up his eighth pro victory on
Friday night. He hopes for a tune-up fight in Atlanta in April and
will have a 108-pound light flyweight bout on June 3 in Tampa,
televised on Telemundo.
In local track and field, a late January meet in in Gainesville
was the setting for several youth to achieve at the fourth annual
Jimmy Kerrs indoor games at the huge O'Connell Center. There
were over 2,500 athletes there with over 125 teams. The Hardee
team placed 19 of the 65 teams in its divisions.
Laila Boggs, 10 had an outstanding day with silver in the 800
run in a time of 3:12/7 and bronze in the 400 meter in a time of
1:21. Johnisha Rowe, 11 took the bronze medal in her long jump
division at 11'3" and also had a personal best in the 55 meter.
Jabari Knighten, 10 had a bronze in the 400 meters at 1:10.79.
Leanna Albritton, 10, also hit a personal best.
Three newcomers, in their first ever meet, did well. Terrence
Butler and Dylan Davis, both 9 and Gerrick Rowe, 8, who all start-
ed about two months ago, were not intimidated by the crowd or cir-
cumstances .
Coach James Carpenter attributes their success to the 25-30
parents and supporters who attend and who are supportive in prac-
tices and conditioning. The kids are getting ready for the huge St.
Petersburg meet in in March, then Clearwater, then two more
before the BAYT (Tampa Classic) and the sunshine Games.
Don't forget the big event on Saturday evening. If you're not at
the Hardee County Fair, come out to the high school gym and see
the antics of a team of local hoopsters trying to compete against the
Harlem Ambassadors comedy basketball team. It benefits the local
Hardee Habitat for Humanity. So come enjoy and help out. Early
tickets are $7 for students and seniors and $9 for others. At the door
prices are $9 for students and seniors and $13 for others. You can
get tickets at several local locations (see page 1 article).
Information from school and community events is always welcome.
Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heraldadvo-
cate@embarqmail.com with news for this biweekly column. The
sports news deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday, except for events which
happen over the weekend. These are due by Monday at noon.


On The Agenda
HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its monthly
evening session today (Thursday) beginning at 6 p.m. in Room
102, Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The
following is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-Proclamation of Hardee County Firefighter Appreciation
Month, 6 p.m.
-Audit for fiscal year 2009-10, which ended Sept. 30, 6:10
p.m.
-Citizen request for help on home repairs, 6:40 p.m.
-Proclamation of Spay Day USA for Feb. 22., 6:55 p.m.
-Withdraw application for recreation grant, 7:05 p.m.
-Transportation revenues and first-quarter financial report,
7:20 p.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE
The Heartland Workforce Business Enhance-
ment Committee will hold a teleconference
meeting at 9:30 am on Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011.
The meeting will originate at the Heartland
Workforce Administrative office, 5901 US Hwy
27 S, Sebring, FL 33870. Topic of the meeting is
enhancing committee involvement. Interested
individuals should arrive no later than 9:25 am.
For more information see agenda posted on the
Heartland Workforce website at www.hwib.org
2:17c

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING
FOR FEBRUARY 2011
The Hardee County Industrial Development
Authority will hold a special meeting at 8:30
a.m. February 22, 2011 at 107 East' Main
Street, Wauchula, FI.
=or more information call the Economic
Development office at 863/773-3030.


C"


THE INSPIRED WORD OF GOD
In an effort to reach out to others with regard to spiritual mat-
ters. we're often met with resistance.
Some people seem to think that the Bible is just another man-
made book filled with inconsistencies. To those naysayers I ask.
'-To what inconsistencies are you referring?"
For all of us to iew the Bible alike, then we need to have faith
in what it really is-the inspired Word of God. If you want to have
faith in Jesus as the Christ. then you must believe what you read
within the Holy Bible.
Notice that the Bible itself proclaims its Holy attributes.
In Hebrew s. Chapter One. the writer proclaims that God spoke
at various times and ways to the fathers. The author then goes on
to explain that in these last days God spoke to the writers of
Scripture by His Son. God therefore speaks to us today through His
Son Jesus.
How do we know that?
Jesus acknowledged that God's Word was granted to the apos-
tles (John 17:7). Jesus also told His apostles that they would be
guided by the Holy Spirit in their work. They then provided writ-
ings that detailed their authority (John 16:13, 1 Corinthians 2:12).
Not only did the apostle Paul confess that they spoke what the Holy
Spirit teaches, but he proclaimed that his very writings were
inspired (Ephesians 3:3)!





STORE


First Come, First Served!


Flowers

& Plants

up to

50% off








Used

Furniture

up to

70% off


I. I


Our lowest Prices Ever!


Floor

Sample

Bedding

35% off








Used

Appliances

up to

50% off


At these prices items won't last long!


e 1 Royal's Furniture,
Ss 1 Appliances & Bedding
OyalS' 131 West Main
SWauchula, FL 33873

FURNITURE -


A APPLIANCES & BEDDING


2:17c


New & Used

Floor Samples

One of a Kind


I . II I I. [1 1 I.N I.


Pictures

& Mirrors

up to

50% off








All Lamps &

Accessories

up to

50% off


This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
Economic Development office at least forty-eight (48)
hours prior to the meeting.
Marcus Shackelford, Chairman
Hardee County Industrial Development Authority
Hardee County, Florida
2:17c


ETHIN MUB L


The bottom line is simply stated as follows: God speaks
through His Son Jesus. Jesus speaks through His apostles, and the
apostles spoke and wrote (guided by the Spirit) what we refer to as
the Bible.
Ask yourself this question: "When was the last time I listened
to God?"
If \ou desire to know God's Will for you. then turn to the
Bible. Scripture tells us that the Bible reveals God's Mind and is
how He communicates to us (ICorinthians 2:7-11). Unfortunately,
the same thing holding people back from studying God's Word is
the same thing that causes religious division: a lack of reverence,
for God's Word.
I implore you to consider the Scriptures as your only source of
authority on all religious matters. Get Back To The Basics, and let
God's Word rule your decision- making.
Read God's Word. Study God's Word. Obey God's Word!
lan Rice is the fidl-time evangelist at lWaichula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist.com.


.YOU Can Apea n.... .N
S :Poet's Place
SArem you ap e0t? uwow 1mY1ow wor k couM be
tN newspaper In "Poes Place," a weekly feature wh
solely on reader manstons. Poems must be your onrI
wor, written by you, not someone else. To appear In t4
ture,send your poetry, name and-town of residence to:P
Place, T Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 3387
or fax 773-0657.






CLOSING


StoreZe.

Clsaing

Soon!!


. r


fif VISA .--' I,
unrJsagjerg *- -'"'







6B The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services


Lost & Found Wanted
Miscellaneous Yard Sales



Stenhanie Guale Comouter Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720
m


s.auale(aaualescomouterservices.com www.GualesComouterServices.com


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL

Buy Herel u D iscu .n o Ierest




Pay Here! BILLYe 0arg0sT

TIESBstTieStr I Tw! e


New Tires

Free Mount


Include

& Balance


Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires

BIG SALE ON

ALL TIRES.
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
VISA (across from Billy Ayers
SI Wal-Mart) Tire Techniciai
C


ce









I

12:17c 6


Agriculture
ROUND BAIL HAY for sale $30 per
bail. Call Donald 781-0554.
2:10-3:10p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs.
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
1:27:8:18p
40 ACRE GROVE, 80% earlies.
20% valencias, 3 yr contract min.
$1.30-$1.55, joins to Wauchula
Airport to the east. Owner financ-
ing available. Call Reynolds
Alien. 813-334-9321. 1:20-2:10c
75 HP 1997 4x4 open cab tractor
with ROPS, 2,200 hours, $9,500.
321-284-7632. 1:20-2:24p
BW LAND & CATTLE Ag property
management. Fences, pasture
fertilization, groves. Brian 941-
391-1277. 2:17-3:17p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010'11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


WASHER & DRYER good condi-
tion white $275 set 445-0430.
2:17p


99 DODGE RAM, ext. cab, pw/pl,
ac, tinted, 70,000 miles, $5,000,
863-781-3539. 2:17p
1952 FORD RESTORED $10,000
negotiable. 863-835-2034.
2:17-3:17p
05 CHEVY 1-TON 4X4 Duramax
Diesel 12' flat bed, underbox stor-
age. Excellent condition $15,500.
863-245-8911. 2:10-3:10p
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
cars. Pickup available. Crooms
Salvage. 781-3767. 2:7tfc


WROUGHT IRON BENCH, black
with'poka dot cushion & pillows,
very girly, like new $85. Also
dresser with mirror $75. 445-
0430. 2:17dh


i I GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
c,8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


I I


WR SMITH

ISLAND CLEARING
MOWING FENCING GROVE CARE FERTILIZER *
LAND CLEARING DISCING *
773-3557 I 781-0158


LOCAL CHURCH seeking part-
time worship leader. Please see
display ad in the classified sec-
tion. 2:10,17c


2 BR, 2 BATH, New carpet & sid-
ing, large living room, enclosed
laundry room $68,000, 773-5054.
2:17c
3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. $190,000.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p
3BR/2-1/2 BATH In Wauchula,
Riverview subdivision. New
kitchen and appliances, huge
family room with fireplace large
laundry room, 2 utility/storage
rooms. Moving, must sell, 100k
OBO. 863-245-8911. 2:20-3:10p
PARK MODEL 1BR/1-1/2BA fur-
nished, w/FL room & screened
porch-Little Charlie Creek RV
Park Lot 166. 828-775-9639.
2:10-3:10p


HAMON DOUBLE ORGAN, plays
good, will deliver for $50. 863-
375-3270, Bowling Green. 2:17p
45-70 H&R with scope and hard
case $400 OBO. 12 Gauge pump
Winchester model 1300 $250 firm.
863-781-6153. 2:17p
2 CEMETERY PLOTS $1,000 for
both. Call 735-0285. 2:10-3:10p
1959 FORD DEXTA Tractor.
Partially rebuilt. Make and offer.
863-735-0792. 2:3;3:3p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
send scrap gold In the mail. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
* years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
1:6tfc
60 LOADS FILL DIRT. Has some
grass, digging more ponds. You
dig ponds, you keep dirt. 863-
990-6489. 1:6tfc
GOLDS GYM WEIGHT bench with
weights $185. 445-0430. 2:17p


4-C Constrction, LL
*----^^H^H^BIm--w^
^K^^^^^^H^M^Ig


^Deoto Applianeo

Established Since 1987 Repar
SALES SERVICE
863-773-3573

Fax 863-773-0521 108 Carlton Street
desotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchula, FL 33873L



GHC CONSTRUCTION, INEC

ASPHALT PAVING
COMPLETE SITE WORK
SHELL e TREE REMOVAL

Office: 863-494-4147 r, f
Mobile: 863-990-0059 -
ghcconstruction@embarqmail.com -




/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg.#MV-40625
"No job's too big."
'gllil


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
SI Mike Adcox Manager


fl Flores & Flores, Inc.
MOVED to 308 Court street in Wauchula. "
NOW...we are prepared to LEASE or SELL our building.
$475,000. Lease negotiable. Contact: Oralia D. Flores @

863-781-2955 or 863-773-2840
cl2 17c


AM-SOUTH HEALTHY
Each office independently owned and operated.


S1 ;
'I l Ia y TI


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


REDUCED $199.900!! Near Avon Park on
Hwy 64. Recently remodeled and interior
painted. Property sits on 4.7 acres with pole
barn and new well.
COUNTRY LIVING!! In this 3 bedroom, 2
Bath Double Wide Mobile Home and 5 acres
with beautiful Oak trees. $92.900!!

REDUCED!!! $82,500 2B/2B Home with cen-
tral heat/air, one car garage, appliances,
work-shop and storage area, extra lot includ-
ed, all in quite neighborhood and close to
shopping and schools.

Priced @ $72.500!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home
with central heat and air, private well, utility
shed, and more sits on 2.4 Acres.

WATCH YOUR MONEY GROW!! Excellent
rental home features 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
with extra lot. Call today!! $34.900

Charming Historic Home with loft and studio
apartment on 1 acre in City limits. $69.900


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


WHAT A BUY!! Just listed ONLY $38.000 -
MAKE AN OFFER! 2 BR, 2 Bath-Mobile
Home-Good condition, 10X23 screened
porch with insulated roof, 2 outdoor sheds
for workroom and storage, 2 car Carport,
central heat and air, partially furnished. Must
see to appreciate. Call Nancy.
PRICED REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom-, 2 Bath
home with extra lot, walking distance to
school, and town. House in good condition-
owner ready to negotiate Only $100.000
REDUCED!! $139.900 3 8/2 BTH CB home
built in 2007 has central heat/air stove,
refrigerator, two car garage, and much more.
Call today!!!
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath CB home with central
heat/air, located within City of Wauchula.
Call today!! $119.900
Frontage on US Hwy 17 North and North
Florida Ave. Access from both highways and
across from Winn Dixie. Call for more infor-
mation today. Only $350,000
SEBRING!! Nice 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB
home with central heat/air, refrigerator, dish-
washer, washer/dryer, screened rear porch,
view of golf course, one car carport. Only
$94.600


GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie LOVELY 2 B/1 Bath home with large lot with-
Mae Properties. in city limits. Only $69.900 c12:17c


863-397-9840
354 Bostick Road Bowling Green. FL
-,.s -..
-N




www.gatorheatingandair.com
Gator Heating-Air-Mold Inspections LLC


I I- '-4 .'~4


. : I 'u', F ,.


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot a
863-382-0600


MIA-L-2-Am"Is - -
I I HME ,=RVIE


S I '- ,







February 17, 2011. The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


DEHUMIDIFIER $178 new, $75.
904-222-4607. 1:6tfc


FOR SALE BY OWNER 2 bed, 2
bath Double Wide 55# communi-
ty, Lake Placid, Florida. New rub-
ber roof, large composite deck
overlooks State Perserve, sun
screens throughout, new kitchen
and bathroom floors, nice fur-
nishings and appliances. Boat
locks available. $65,000. 863-
465-1745. 2:17p
MOBILE HOME at Pioneer Creek
RV, Bowling Green. 1BR, 1B,
$1,500, available April 1st. 863-
473-1429. 2:10,17



VERY SMALL Chocolate
Chihuahua 3 1/2 months $300.
863-773-4308. 2:17p
FREE TO A GOOD HOME black
male netured. I will pay to have
shots up to date. 773-4638.
2:17,24p
CHIHUAHUA 10 Weeks old $200.
407-929-6491. 2:10,17c
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


30' TRAILER WITH 30' sunroom
attached. Reduced $3,000.
Crystal Lake Village. New bath-
room, patio. 863-773-6351.
1:27:2:24p



2 BR 2 BATH, large living room,
kitchen, dinette, $650 month,
security deposit required. 773-
5054. Water softener required.
2:17c
3 BR, 2 B, DWMH, ON 5 acreage,
Zolfo Springs, $650 month, plus
deposit. Available now. 651-717-
5049. 2:17p
1 BR MH off Hwy 62, quiet.
References required, no pets.
$400 month Includes water,
garbage & lawn mowed. 773-
4726. 2:17p
3/1 A/C NICE Neighborhood.
$700 monthly, $200 security. 863-
781-7061. 2:10-3:10p
APT. & HOUSES 773-6667. 2:17c
4 BEDROOM BLOCK C/A $800
monthly, Wauchula area. 863-781-
0982. 2:10,17p
3/2 FENCED IN YARD, Riverview,
$840 monthly, $840 security. 863-
735-1953. 1:27-2:24p
TWO BEDROOM Duplex, C/A, no
pets. $550 plus deposit. 832-
1984. 1:20-2:17p
THREE BEDROOM two bath, no
pets. $800 plus deposit. 773-
4740. 1:20-2:17p
NICE CLEAN 2 BEDROOM 1 bath
house. Central heat/cool, new
carpet and a walk-in closet, wash-
er & dryer hookup. $150 per
week, damage deposit and refer-
ences required. 773-9793 or 863-
832-0676. 2:1 O


* GOLF CART BATTERY INSTALLATION SPECIAL

$ 5490O Complete Set (6) of Batteries
9. 0w/Installation, Pick Up & Delivery Included
*r COMPETITIVE PRICING! *



FAST Er FRIENDLY SERVICE
- 22 Years of Experience Locally Owned & Operated -

* 773-4400 C -- *P
829 Bostick Rd. Bowling Green
Roa R u~sd R bs-Idle Torrey O.ak Glf C. ursc c2:17c -




THE PALMS

SAvailable for

Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through February 28th
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 c
Equal Opportunity Employer and Providercl2:3-24c
cl2:3-24c


LOVE TO HUNT. FISH?? 1.5 a/c adjoins the 13.500 acre
Arbuckle Lake Wildlife management area. Modern 3 BR. 2+ bath
home, attached garage, large "L" shaped decked with views of
lake and adjoining wildlife area. Detached 2 car/2 story garage
with exercise room or apartment? Motor home parking, dock, 160
ft. lake frontage. Beautifully shaded with mature Oaks and much
more. Asking $575.000.
24 a/c LAKEFRONT (Lake Annie) Large tree nursery with inven-
tory, nice 3 BR. 2 B home. "cook" house. 2 apartments, 2 wells, all
under irrigation. Asking $735.000. For the package., Possible
owner finance.
1600 ACRE LAKEFRONT RANCH Package includes modern 5
BR home. 2 employee houses, cattle herd, exotic animals, citrus
and over 1 3/4 mile lakefront and paved road frontage. Adjoins
State lands. $7999. Per acre entire.
154 and 212 Acre Pastures with Paved Road Frontage. Both
fenced, shade for animals, some game. $6000. Acre.
Several citrus groves including 52 acres near Limestone.
Just a few of my listings. Check web site for full detail.
Find details as well as other listings at


cl2:10-24c


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo. up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
698-4908. 8:20tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh



HARDEE RESIDENT looking for
part time employment. Anything
from manual labor to account-
ing/sales. 941-716-1411. 2:17p
CARING HANDS MINISTRY,
assisted living facility/respite
care. 863-781-6680, 863-773-
6128. 2:3;3:3p
JEREMY'S handi-works & tree
service. 863-245-6558. 1:20;2:17p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rereening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze
Construction. 781-2708.
RR0050181. 12:16;2:18p


NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 a.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Waucnula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitatory.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh

They can because they
think they can.


APARTMENTS

NOW AVAILABLE

GREAT LOCATION in FT. MEADE!

1 BR/1 Bath $45000 Month

2 BR/1 Bath $50000 Month
Security Deposit Required

Call Sheila (863) 214-5645




HAPPY HOME



APARTMENTS

719 Wannamaker Ave. Ft. Meade


Elder Affairs SHINE Program
Seeks Volunteers
-Volunteers help improve the lives of Florida's elders-

Tampa The Florida Department of Elder Affairs, along
with the West Central Florida Area Agency on Aging,
invites you to join the award-winning SHINE team of
volunteers. This program helps elders make informed
decisions about Medicare, health insurance and
prescription drug plans.
SHINE volunteers provide individual counseling and
assistance to elders and their caregivers about Medicare,
Medicaid, Medicare plan choices, long-term care planning
and prescription discount drug programs. Volunteers may
also make educational presentations to community
groups and participate in local health fairs, senior fairs and
other outreach and educational events.
If you would like additional information about this exciting
opportunity and would like to become a SHINE volunteer
in Hillsborough, Hardee, Highlands, Manatee and Polk
Counties, please call the West Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging at 813-740-3888, ext. 5593.
WEST CENTRAL FL. AREA AGENCY ON AGING
Attn: Robin Watt, Volunteer Manager
5905 Breckenridge Pkwy, Suite F
Tampa, Florida 33610
(813) 74u-3888 Fax (813) 623-1342
Website: www.AgingFlorida.com 3-3:24
cl2:3-3:24c


IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh

YardSal
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE, INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available.
2:17tfc
SATURDAY & SUNDAY. Lots of
rooster stuff. 218 N. 2nd Ave.,
Wauchula. 2:17p
SATURDAY, FEB. 19. 2011, 7:30
am to 2:00 pm. Location is 136
Paldao Acres, Wauchula
Subdivision. 1 1/4 mile on right on
West Main Street, Wauchula.
2:17p
FRI.-SAT. Large ladles, kids
clothes, toys, nicknacks. Lots of
odds, ends. Corner of Lisa &
Hanchey, Wauchula. 2:17p
Sat. 8-12 lots of items. 717 East
Oak Street, Wauchula. 2:17p
939 Evergreen Drive, Wauchula.
Friday and Saturday 7:30-? Kids
clothes and plus size clothing
and household Items. 2:17p
Sat. 2905 Pear St., Zolfo. Across
from BP. 2:17p


FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY.
Clothing, tools, household, misc.
Oak Hill Park off 64W, ZS.
Parkwide Sale. 2:17p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-?, 2581
Polk Road. Grills, washer dryer
set, baby items, toys, clothes,
MP3 player, X-Box w'games,
sandbox, misc.. 2:17p

Nothing endures but per-
sonal qualities.
-Walt Whitman





Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot ,
863-382-0600


CHURCH WORSHIP LEADER
First United Methodist Church of Wauchula
First United Methodist Church of Wauchula is a congregation that
strives to "Know God, Love Others, and Serve the World." It is
through this mission statement that we see the need to reach a
larger demographic and wish to begin greater opportunities both
for worshipping God and growing in God. From this need we
have decided to hire a part time worship leader. We are seeking
through God's direction, an individual who would be able devel-
op some of the opportunities mentioned above as well as begin
to bring contemporary elements into our current worship service.

For further information in reference to this ministry opportu-
nity please contact the Church Office at 863-773-4267 or at
wauchulal stumc@embarqmail.com. cl1:20,27c



Lijlfs Htokse Thlrw Store

o\s Furniture Home Decor* Crystal No ,
1 i China Quality Merchandise O



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
(Directly Behind Heaven Sent)





C9leaven cent Cleaning service
Now offered by Sherry White Ministries
Carports Garages Homes Lawns


773-0523 245-1184






Realtor
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net John D. Freeman
(863) 781-4084

Specials of the Week










Just listed! 3BR/1BA CB home with central air & heat on 10 +/-
acres, property was a qualified assisted living facility. A deal at
$139,900

Wauchula City Limits. 3BR/2BA CB home with central air &
heat, swimming pool, 2 car-garage and a corner lot. Offered at
$129,900
Bowling Green. 2BR/1BA frame home with a detached 2 car-car-
port, back screen porch, patio area, storage sheds and 6ft chain-
link fence for security. All for $65,000
Zolfo Springs. 3BR/1BA CB home with central air & heat. 1,444
Sq ft of living space, all sits on a 105x145 corner lot. Priced at
$97,900
Golfview Estates 3BR/ 2BA CB home with brick, central air &
heat, 2 car-garage, screened back patio, 2 acre corner lot and large
master bedroom. Great price at $120,000

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
r Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! J
After Hours -
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863)781-4380 c12:17c


www.maryadsit.com.







8B The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011






-The


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning


Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs


ct2 17c


(863) 735-1495


I I


Sy TILE LAMINATE
't WOOD ENGINEERED WOOD
Bathtubs Showers Backsplashes & More
When a product is installed with care and know-how, you'll receive
a service that I am willing to stake my name on! Charley
FREE ESTIMATES
863-781-2867 701 BUMBY LANE, WAUCHULA 2:17c



Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)


OPPORTUIITI


Monday Friday
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
Equal Opporunity Employer & Provider


cl2:3-24c ( '


Soe1. Dar


I N C., R E A
i mi FI


I ,7-


Kenny Sanders
(863) 781-0153


L T 0 R 8
(863) 773-2128


I REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.


NEW LISTING! Lovingly
maintained/updated 4BR/2.5BA
brick home in Knollwood
w/updated kitchen, fireplace,
back patio! $218,000!
NEW LISTING! 34 ac fenced
pastureland on private, graded
rd in Zolfo Springs, Two wells,
Greenbelt qualified. $238,000!
5 lots in Wauchula w/over 975'
total rd frontage. Close to hospi-
tal, schools & shopping. Will
divide or all for $95,000!


3BR/1BA home in
Green w/new carpet
nate, partial fencing,
unit. $68,000!


Bowling
& lami-
new A/C


25+ ac fenced pasture,
Greenbelt qualified, on US Hwy
17 S w/well, septic & electric.
$192,900!
Grab your canoe, paddle, tent!
5 acs of native Florida has
deeded access to Peace River!
Culvert in place! $100,000!


Goodbye, traffic...Hello, peace
& quiet! 20 ac fenced pasture
w/pond, 288SF cabin, 4" well
inside 60SF shed. NOW
$160,000!
3BR/1BA, 1633SF CB home in
established neighborhood &
workshop w/electricity, A/C
unit. $88,000!
Looking for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5
ac high/dry fenced parcels on
private rd! $45,000 for vacant
5 acs! $65,000 for 5 acs w/well
& septic!
Two beautiful building lots in
Zolfo zoned R-1A, each
155'x110'. City water available,
septic allowed. $15,000 each!
14 acs on private rd, creek,
pasture & woods, zoned A-i.
$112,000!
10 ac farmland w/well, pump,
fencing on private road.
$85,000!
Dble rd frontage on SR 62/Moye
Rd! 10 ac Val grove has 6"
well, diesel power unit, drain
tile, micro-jets! $130,000!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS...781-01S3 SANDY LARRISON- 832-0130
KARE4 O'NEAL-....- 71-7633 MONICA REAS......78t1-088
DAVID ROYA-...- 781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, 33873 217
I L3387e


Classifieds


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS!
MONDAY
Holiday No School
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal.
Graham Crackers, Sausage
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger, Bean-
ie Wienies, Alternative Meal,
Salad Tray, Corn, Mixed Fruit,
Biscuit, Sugar Cookies, Condi-
ments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix, Scrambled
Eggs, Potato Triangle, Buttered
Toast, Pears, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni,
Deli Turkey & Cheese Wrap,
Alternative Meal, Salad Tray,
Green Peas, Peaches, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Graham Crackers,
Waffle, Sausage Patty, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Turkey w/Gravy,
Corndog, Alternative Meal,
Salad Tray, Mashed Potatoes,
Pears, Rolls, Condiments and
Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Bar-B-Q Chicken on
Bun, Fish Sandwich, Alternative
meal, Potato Rounds, Salad
Tray, Broccoli, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk


I -


LARGE SALE

Lots of New & Used
Clothing

Washers Table & Chairs


I Chirn' ok


I TV's Starting at $10


Lots ofMicl


-r,


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
16.5 acres and 3B/2Bth M/H, built in 2005; 4 -
2 inch wells, 1 -4 inch well; beautiful property
surrounded by large oaks. $195,000
SPACE GALORE in this 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco
home; large kitchen, living room with fireplace,
double garage, spacious yard for outside enter-
taining. $165,000
MAKE A DEAL on this updated C/B home,
3B/1.5Bth, almost new A/C and roof. List Price
$115,000

11 SERVICE YOU (
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
ASSOC
DELOIS JOHNSON 773-9743


Bus. (863) 773-0007 .-
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert
Brick home on corner lot, 3B/2Bth, all appli-
ances, well maintained and located in desirable
area. $160,000
5 SECLUDED Acres of natural Florida; large
trees, and plenty wildlife. $22,500
BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY 262.52 acres, road
frontage, large pines. 100 acres cleared,
$4500 per acre
5 ACRE TRACTS AVAILABLE CALL OR
COME BY TODAY FOR MORE INFORMA-
TION!
CAN COUNT ON [n
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker ,
IATES STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


.JL~ Ju


g'^ Charles N. Flesher II, Inc
, 's TILE & FLOORING SPECIALIST


and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Fruit Cocktail,
Condi-ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Baked Turkey,
Chicken Gravy, French Fries,
Mashed Potatoes, Green
Beans, Tossed Salad, Pears,
Rolls. Condiments and Milk


FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Bar-B-Q
Chicken on Bun, French Fries,
Baked Beans, Potato Salad,
Tossed Salad, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk


uNutrition Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Holiday No School
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Pizza,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on
Bun, Sausage Pizza, Beanie
Wienies w/Biscuit, Lettuce &
Tomato, Whole Kernel Corn,
Peanut Butter Cookies, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Buttered
Toast, Scrambled Eggs w/
Cheese, Potato Triangle, Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Deli Turkey & Cheese
Wrap, Cowboy Macaroni, Rolls,
Pepperoni Pizza, Salad Bar,
Lettuce & Tomato, Garden
Peas, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Waffle, Sausage
Patty, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Corndog, Sausage
Pizza, Turkey Deli Roast, Rolls,
Salad Bar, Tossed Salad,
Mashed Potatoes, Pears, Con-
diments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Stick,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Fish Sandwich,
Pepperoni Pizza, Bar-B-Q
Chicken on Bun, Salad Bar,
Lettuce & Tomato, Broccoli,
Potato Rounds, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Holiday No School
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie
on Bun, Chicken Nuggets,
French Fries, Savory Rice,
Mixed Vegetables, Tossed
Salad, Peaches, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sc ram-
bled Eggs, Buttered Toast,
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Cowboy
Macaroni, French Fries, Pinto
Beans and Ham, Summer
Squash, Tossed Salad,
Peaches, Rolls, Condiments


DESOTO COUNTY





EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www. imseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000
5 acres Completely fenced and in the country!
Perfect building site. Priced to sell at $35,000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath block home on 2+ acres. Close
to town. Asking $169,500.
HUGE Price Reduction! 15 acres located West
of Wauchula on Vandolah Rd.
Beautiful building sites with small creek mean-
dering across property & it's across from the
Wauchula Airport entrance. $150,000
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood. Won't
last long at $220,000!
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors under carpet in bedrooms.
Central air/heat. Massive brick fireplace.
3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking
$229,000
3 Bedroom. 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.


_ Ben Gibson
12 1_ Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Ben Gibson


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


cl2:17c


Q: Does getting enough calci-
um really help people lose
weight?
A: The amount of calcium rec-
ommended for bone health is
1,000 milligrams (mg) per day
for adults ages 19-50 years and
1,200 mg per day for adults
over age 51. In several studies,
calcium consumption has been
linked to higher weight, waist
size or percent body fat when
levels were below 1000-1200
mg per day. However, we don't
know whether low calcium con-
sumption is the cause of the
excess body fat; it could be that
this is just an example of an
overall unhealthy diet with lots
of soft drinks and other foods
concentrated in calories.
Currently, research shows no
reason to add extra calcium for
weight loss for those already
getting adequate amounts.


5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great place for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72,500
Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000
REDUCED! Spacious home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. $379,000 '
58 acres close to town. Great property with tons
of potential! $464,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres ol
producing nursery. $430,000
3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath home. Double French doors
open up to the huge porch and pool area.
Conveniently located in a charming neighbor-
hood right in town. $178,900.
RENTAL! 4-5 Bedroom block home in
Wauchula. Renting As Is. One year lease @ $700
per month. 1st and last month due at signing.
Call Rick @ Jim See Realty, Inc.


What'sF or


Controlled trials in which some
people consume more calcium
- whether from dairy products,
calcium-fortified soy milk or
calcium supplements show
mixed results in whether people
lost more weight or body fat
than those who didn't. Research
is in progress to clarify these
questions. An important note:
the trials suggesting a possible
role for calcium or dairy foods
also use a modest reduction in
calories. Start by cutting your
calories by about 500-1000 per
day and working toward 30-60
minutes of moderate activity
daily. If you aren't able to reach
the recommended amounts for
calcium, adding calcium sup-
plements or dairy products is an
option to consider in addition to
physical activity and reduced
calories.


NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Stylist/Barber



302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL


W . Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478





I. Free Estimates

Insured 30+ years experience I:2




right Residential 6

eginnings Commercial
Painting Service, Inc.
No Job Too Small or Too Large!
Steve Christmas Cell 863-781-4001
With God All Thins Are Possible Matthew 19:26
cl Iiu


m...i ..


____j


ALL WEEK

[P^(enIP,]






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February 17. 2011. The Herald-Advocate 9B


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10B The Herald-Advocate, February 17. 2011


ZSE Recognizes It 2nd Quarter 'Cool Cats'


The exceptional kindergarteners who received an award at Zolfo Springs Elementary
School's Cool Cat ceremony for the second quarter were (front row, from left) David
Garcia, Esteban Rios, Ami Taguja-Garduno, Gaoyoua Vue, Gaozong Vue, Eduardo
Ramirez-Ramos, Muizz Anchur and Veronica Gomez; (back row) Isai Venegas and
Cristal Pena.


First graders who were acknowledged for outstanding citizenship were (first row, from
left) Deisy Garcia-Santiago, Daniel King, Esmeralda Hernandez-Vasquez, Bryan
Lucatero, Tyler Jones and Victoria Perada; (second row) Mattie Wells, Denis Mendieta,
Kolby Sanchez, Catherine Perez, Griselda Duran and Jesus Paniagua.


The second graders recognized for their leadership were (first row, from left) Kaitlynn Third graders who received a Cool Cat Award at Zolfo Springs Elementary were (front
Brandeberry, Anthony Griffis, David Mendez, Shaydan Ward, Colton Block and row, from left) Jorge Perez, Myrka DeLaTorre, Sydnie Steiner, Roy Revels, Juan
Brianna Franks; (back row) Darrell Patton, Arhlet Diego, Lexis Johnston and Cesar Castillo, Sandy Vue, and Ashley Pelham; (second row) Marcos Marquez, Mackenzie
Ramirez. McCoy and Jacob Schultz.
ri If money is your hope for independence you will never have it. The only real security
/ -that a man will have in this world is a reserve of knowledge, experience, and ability.
S-Henry Ford
S' The state of Washington is the only state to be named after a United States president.
SBefore it became a state, the territory was called Columbia, after the Columbia River.


Fourth graders who were given an award for their actions were (first row, from left)
Katie Dayfert, Michaela Blasingain, Doraneli Carbajal, Salvador Aguirre, Brianne
Starnes and Samuel Delatorre; (second row) Jose Tommy Garcia, Anavelia Rodriguez,
Michaela Klein, Adolfo Gonzalez, Anthony Byers, Tatiana Sanchez and Javier Garcia.


Fifth graders who were awarded with a Cool Cat Award were (front row, from left)
Cristian Martinez, Cheyenne Pratt, Rosalba Alvarez, Jose Valdiviez and Avery Bunch;
(back row) Tavis Fakourey, Jose Leonard Rojas, Christian Lowery, Kaela Villegas,
Viviana Ponce and Martin Medrano.

To be an American (unlike being English or French or whatever) is precisely to imag-
ine a destiny rather than to inherit one; since we have always been, insofar as we are
Americans at all, inhabitants of myth rather than history.
-Leslie Fiedler


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255







February 17, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11B


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
He is still undefeated.
Since turning professional
over a year ago, Bowling Green
boxer Daniel Lozano has beaten
every opponent he has faced. It
was the same on Friday evening
as he faced an opponent two
years older and two inches
taller. The fight went the full six
rounds and Lozano won on
decision.
The local pugilist hopes for a
tune-up fight in Atlanta in April,
preparing for a June 3 title bout
in Tampa. It will be the main
event, for the 108-pound title,
in bouts at the A La Carte
Pavilion, and shown on Tele-
mundb television station.
Against 23-year-old Felipe
Castanera on Friday, Lozano
faced the toughest bout of his
young career. The opponent,
born in Mexico and now fight-
ing out of San Antonio, Texas,
had a 5-0 record with 3 KOs.
Lozano came in with a 7-0
record with 5 KOs.
He had to move up a weight
class from his normal 112 to
115 for Friday's bout. "He was
well-trained and he came to
fight," said Lozano, who won
on majority decision. Two
judges gave him the nod and the
third called it a draw. Infor-
mation can be found on
Fightnews.com.
"I hit him with everything I
had. He was tough. He almost
went down once, but the ropes


Peace has to be created in order to be maintained. It is the product of Faith, Strength,
Energy, Will, Sympathy, Justice, Imagination and the triumph of principle. It will never
be achieved by passivity and quietism.
-Dorothy Thompson


PHOTOS BY NANCY DAVIS
Bowling Green boxer Daniel Lozano has his hands raised
in victory for the eighth time.


held him up," said the hard-hit-
ting Lozano. "I never fought
anyone toe-to-toe before. He
caught me with some good
punches but never hurt me,"
said Lozano, who was nursing
bruises on both hands.
The first two rounds went to
Lozano in the feeling out pro-'
cess. In the third round, Cas-
tanera came out strong and
probably got the round, report-
ed Lozano. "In the fourth, I
came out boxing and withstood
him.
"He came out strong again in


the fifth. I stood with him and
he fatigued. I feel I got the sixth
round," said Lozano.
He is building a fan base. In
addition to the 50 or so who
went from Hardee County, he
now has fans from Plant City
and Tampa, who cheer for him.
Lbzano feels the work of his
promoters Shea Bailey and
Aaron Jacobs and coaching of
his father Daniel Lozano have
gotten him where he is. He
hopes to remain undefeated as
long as possible as he climbs in
the pro ranks.


Parents, family and friends help Daniel Lozano (third from left in second row) celebrate
after his Friday night win.


Proud to be part of Hardee County for more than 30 years!


Visit CF Industries at the


Hardee County Fair!


Saturday, Feb. 19, 2011 through Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011


CFIndustries

Helping Farmers Feed a Hungry World. 2:17c


Lozano Wins Again


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a special meeting Monday
February 21, 2011 at 6:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held.
Items on the agenda are as follows: Appointments to reach a quorum, and any
other business that may come before the Commission.
The meetings will be held at the City Auditorium located at 225 East Main Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will
need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure
that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section
286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
2:17c





12B The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011












2011 HARDEE COUNTY FAIR SCHEDULE

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 19 SATURDAY FEBRUARY 26

SCHEDULE F ElETS


12:00
7:00


1:00
2:00


1:00
5:30
6:30
7:00
7:00


5:00
5:00
7:00


Saturday, February 19, 2011
Armbands 12:00 p.m. Closing 120.00
Gates & Midway Open C
Miss Hardee County Pageant Civic Center
Sunday, February 20, 2011
Armbands 1:00 p.m. Closing 120.00
Gates & Midway Open
Kindergarten Princess Pageant Civic Center
Monday, February 21, 2011
CHILDREN'S DAY
All Children High School & Under Admitted FREE
Armbands 1:00 p.m. Closing I15.00
Gates & Midway Open
Rabbit Show Arena
Dairy Show Arena
Grooming Contest Arena
Junior Miss Pageant Civic Center
Tuesday, February 22, 2011
MERCHANTS DAY
Armbands 5:00 p.m. Closing S20.00 $5 Coupon Available
Gates & Midway Open
Poultry Showmanship Arena
Swine Show Arena


"1- Wednesday, February 23, 2011
All Rides *1 Admission 1 Parking *1 Select
Gates & Midway Open
Breeding & Heifer Show
Steer Show
Beef Showmanship (After Steer Show)
Thursday, February 24, 2011
MERCHANTS DAY
Armbands 5:00 p.m. Closing 120.00 '5 Coupon Available
Gates & Midway Open
Farm Credit Livestock Buyers Dinner Invitation Only
FFA & 4-H Livestock Sale


Arena
Arena
Arena


Civic Center
Arena


Friday, February 25, 2011
MADNESS TILL MIDNIGHT
Admission FREE with Purchase of 120 Armband after 8:00 p.m.
Gates & Midway Open
Prince & Princess Pageant 4, --? 0 Civic Center
Ranch Rodeo Arena
Bronc Riding, Team Sorting, Barrel Racing, Double Mugging, Calf Doctoring, Mutton Busting (6 & Under)
Saturday, February 26, 2011
LAST BLAST
Armbands 12:00 p.m. Closing 120.00
Gates & Midway Open
Little Miss Hardee County Pageant Civic Center
Mexican Band Arena
Mexican Bull Riding, Mutton Busting (6 & Under) Arena


5:00
6:00
7:00


5:00
5:30
7:00



5:00
7:00
7:00




12:00
4:00
4:00
7:00


--i~-~ e;k,~a IliEz





















Taking Care Of It


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
This is the final in a series of
articles on county government
and what it accomplished in the
past fiscal year, 2i 'r9.10, which
ended Sept. 30.
Who takes care of the details
about your road, county vehi-
:les, your garbage and utilities
you need in your rural home?
Three county departments
take care of these needs, Road
and Bridge, Maintenance, Solid
Waste and Utilities.

ROAD & BRIDGE
The 40 people in this county
department are-responsible for
everything to do with the
310.53 miles of paved road and
201.08 miles of unpaved roads
in the county, and a lot more.
Public Works Director/Engi-
neer Kevin Atchley coordinates
it all.
The largest department, re-
views all permits for utility and
driveway connections or cul-
verts, right-of-way issues, road
closure requests, replacing
roadway signage and lights.
Atchley also coordinates with
other departments to ensure the
county's infrastructure, build-
ings, etc., are safe and effective.
That includes the state Depart-
ment of Transportation grants
for roadwork within the county
In the last year that included
68 utility permits and 22 cul-
vert/connections, relocation of
313 utility lines, paving and
drainage work on Gebhart
Road, widening and resurfacing
a portion of Steve Roberts
Special, College Hill Road and
Florida Avenue.
There were inspections and


maintenance of all of the timber
bridges, correction of drainage
at Courthouse Annex II, and
several other drainage projects.
There is also weekly bulk waste
pickup in the unincorporated
areas of the county. Last year
that was 150.46 tons of bulk
waste (old appliances, furniture,
etc.) They also supervise week-
ly trash pickup by community
service workers assigned by the
courts.

MAINTENANCE SHOP
The Fleet Maintenance Shop
makes sure that all county
equipment is safe and depend-
able. The 10 employees here
utilize a diagnostic scanner,
Caterpillar and international
software to diagnose mechani-
cal problems with everything
from a fire engine to a dump
truck to a grader.
Last year, that included 496
road calls, six overtime service
calls and 2,162 work orders.

LANDFILL
Teresa Carver and her staff of
nine, including three devoted to
the animal control building and
services housed at the landfill,
are responsible are kept busy
with vehicles large and small
moving over the scale ramps.
They manage the Class I
garbage disposal from individu-
als, municipal and Hardee Dis-
posal Inc. systems and County
Road and Bridge Staff weekly
bulk-waste pickup.
Last year collection included
18,135.08 tons of routine gar-
bage disposal, 1,200.52 tons of
wood and yard waste, 211.71
tons of construction and demo-
lition debris and 154.58 tons of


old tires. Tipping fees collec-
tion last 'ear were S52S.C46.3S
plus a .r:'. of 5' 787.
There were over three ,. '
gallons of leachate hauled :; a:
a cost of 519.181.70 for its
treatment. There were quarter-
ly hazardous waste collection
days, with 21.18 tons of it prop-
erly disposed of and not going
in the precious landfill space.
Unwanted diabetic and other
needles and supplies are safely
disposed of through the land-
fill's Sharps Program. avoiding
infectious materials going into
the landfill.
Solid waste assessments and
other funds maintain a landfill
closure account, which is re-
quired by state law. The landfill
is in the process of closing of
Phase I, using Phase II and
preparing Phase III for future
use.

UTILITIES
The last service unit in this
overall division is utilities,
which means the Vandolah and
Wauchula Hills wastewater/-
water plants, construction of
distribution lines to several
streets in Wauchula Hills, al-
lowing them to close water
wells and septic systems tainted
with nitrates. Several mobile
home parks and the college are
also connected to the Wauchula
Hills system.
Overseeing it all is Director
Park Winter, who directs fee
collections, capital improve-
ments, construction and utility
operations for his five-man
crew and the community. Work
began on the utility operations
center near the Wauchula Hills
plant.


The state of Washington is the only state to be named after a United States president.
Before it became a state, the territory was called Columbia, after the Columbia River.

The essence of philosophy is that a man should live that his happiness shall depend
as little as possible on external things.
-Epictetus


Feb. 17 Girls Boys Tennis
Varsity Softball
JV Baseball

Feb. 17-18 V. Baseball tourney

Feb. 18 JV/V Softball


DeSoto
Haines City
Frostproof

Lake Wales

DeSoto


Feb. 19 Harlem Ambassadors Basketball


Feb. 24 Boys Tennis

Feb. 25 Track
V. Baseball

Feb. 26 Track

Feb. 28 JV/V Softball


March 1 Track


March 3 JV Baseball
V. Baseball


Sebring


Northport Relays
Mooney

Cardinal Mooney Relays


Sebring


Sebring Invitational


Sebring
Sebring


Letter To The Editor

Marion Ratliff Will Be

Missed By Many People


Dear Editor,
I was so sorry to hear about
Marion Ratliff passing on. I
know she was battling cancer,
but I had not seen her for years.
I really liked Marion. She
was a very nice woman, and I
know this is hard for Barbara
and Josh.
Life goes so fast. Even
though we know perhaps a
loved one is ill, death takes us
by surprise every time.
Death is the last sting. A sting
is something that hurts but is
not lingering.
Death is also difficult for the
survivors, because everything
anyone ever puts into a relation-
ship is gone with the person. We
have the memories but once the


person passes into eternity, well
no one knows for sure what
changes take place.
We don't know if the person
is in touch with earth like
Scriptures say. Scriptures say
there is a great cloud of wit-
nesses praying for us. That
brings us great comfort to know
that those safe with the Lord
Jesus Christ are rooting us on in
the hereafter.
Death is very difficult for all
of us.
I give Barbara and Josh my
regards and anyone else who
knew Marion. Sympathy goes
out to all who knew and loved
Marion also.
Connie Rowe
Wauchula


HOME
Away
HOME

Away


4 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.

TBA


HOME 5/7 p.m.

HOME 7 p.m.

HOME 4 p.m.

Away 4 p.m.
HOME 7 p.m.


Away

Away

Away

Away
Away


8 a.m.

5:30/7:30 p.m.

4 p.m.

4:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.


Psephophobia is the fear
of voting.



ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


N eed a loan for any good cause?
At MIDFLORIDA, you can use the
equity in any common or preferred
stock as collateral and qualify for a
fixed, low-interest stock equity loan.

It's fast and easy to qualify,
and you can apply at any
MIDFLORIDA branch.


www.midflorida.com


Federally insured by NCUA.


(866) 913-3733


; ,4 .



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t F*'^ ^ ^ lv,.' ,, 1i ^, ,~.






!' -'. FY r, : i',






;,*;" > *. .,y,.! \ ', : ," : ...

i.. ^ ,' ;- ;. -: ":
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4.99% 5 .... .'99% .'









5.291%,APR 6.213% APR
';..'^ ." ** 'V





. ** ..





also available

7 years 10 years


4.99% 5.99%
5.291% APR 6.213% APR


A minimum share account (55) is required for membership
with MIDFLORIDA Credir Union. Loan is subject to collateral
approval. Maximum loan to value 65%. Rate may vary with
term. Limited time offer which may be revoked at any rime and
without notice Minimum loan amount, $00: maximum loan
amount 5250,000. Physical stock certificates or a Collateral Pledge
Agreement with your brokerage firm will be required. A 510,000
stock loan at 3.99% for 60 months would have payments of
S185.97 and an annual percentage rate of 4.397%. A S10,000
stock loan ar 4.99% for 84 months would have payments of
S142.72 and an annual percentage rate of 5.291%. A 510,000
stock loan (i ".99% for 120 months would have payments of
Si 2 i0 Aud A N uliual percentage race af6.213%.


30LCAINSI P IHLNS N HLSBOROG OUTE
Lkln -HihadCt-Auunae-WneHae -HansCt-Bartow ,.-,. . .. a es.- Ao ark. Sbing Lak Plcid Oecobe- a u- Ara.ia *Tama .ranon


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 5S-b7o0)

Thursday, February 17, 2011


-


~~~~~~ I SpotsScedleFeb 1 -Mach3










2C The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011





-Schedule of Weekly Services


SPrinted as a Public Servi*c








BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................10.00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHIIESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
I st & 3rd ..........4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship.................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Central.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ............. ..........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade)....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Moving Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I :00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Mares Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Cominunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School .................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ......... 11:00 a.m.
DiscI ples Training... ......... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday) Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
< Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887
Sunday Worship ..................11 I:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast .................. 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
TH E Meeting'- Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service........ .......7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1.....1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
-5076 Li*ChurchRd. 494-5622
:Siu day S 1 :................... 10:00 a.m.
'ilt rning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service .................. 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m'
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m .
Worship Service ..................I 11:00 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men,: Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood .........................I 1:00 a.m.


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
- CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Stud .. 1000 a m
Sunday Morning Worship II 00 a m
Sunday Evening Service 7 00 p m
Wednesday Serice ..... 7 00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ..... .. ...... .....10.00 a.m.
Servicio .............. .. ...... ... 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ..............6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ...............7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Manes Oracion...................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio............. ........7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................... 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ......... 10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry...................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W worship ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ....................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K- th) ............................ 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service .................. 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ....................... :00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship I11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........ 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ........ .. 10:00 a.m
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. ..............7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....... ............9:00 a.m.


Sunday School .... ...............9:30 a.m.
Worship.... ..................10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ... .........6.00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min.. .............7 00 p m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship... 1100 a.m
Wed. Night Bible Study .......6.30 p.m


WAUCHULA

IGLESLA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
Manes .......7:30 p.m.
Jue\es ... 7:30 p.m
Domingo .. .. .. 310:30 p m

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCLA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ........... ............6:00 p.m.
M iercoles ..... ...... .. ...... 7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service.................... 10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(A ll Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m .


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries,for all services

NEW-M. ZION:f.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) .................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ..................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3' Sun.
Communion ...................10:00 a.m.
2" & 4' Sun.
Divine Worship................10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 am.
Morning Worship ............1...i 1:00 a.m
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Service ...............7-00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday ................................9:00 a m
H oly D ays ....................................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ..... 5.00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ..................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) .............. :00 a.m.
(Creole) ...................... 00 p.m
Daily Mass in English .... .8 30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. Illth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .............. 9 30 am.
Morning Worship ... ...... 11 00am.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ..... 7 00 pm

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ....... ............9:45 am.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 am .
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ............... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m:
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ..................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST.CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.iji
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m,
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship.............................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening..................................1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735.
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church..............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
.......................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .................... 11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night ....................7:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................i... a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina.............................. 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica.. .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club .................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes........5:00 p.m.


When the West was wild, a
rancher went to town for supplies.
He hitched his team, and went into
the general store to shop.
Suddenly a gunslinger engaged
a stranger in a gun fight, and the
shots caused the horses to bolt inj
terror.
Instantly the farmer ran for hisI
team. He stopped his horses, but!
was trampled under their feet. I
"Was your wagon worth it?"'
asked the doctor.
"Yes." said the dying man. "My,
children were in it."
Should you ask God if it was
worth it to send His Son to die for
our sins. I know He'd say, "It was!"
And the Bible says. "There is joy
in the presence of the angels of
God over one sinner that repents."


|& S fracresmcaI s ty The MAnwcaMBtSooey
cyopPipl203 1Kae!Sitea ms rap-Serves.p0 BPo0ESl.7,ChtbleSvi.cVA 22MJ6.e lkw8mM C Il


F eace ioer grdvrs

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL







February 17, 2011. The Herald-Advocate 3C


COURTESYPHOTO
Some of the models from the Fashion Show.

Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


CRAFTS
We had a great turnout for
our fifth annual Ladies Only
Dessert & Fashion Show, and
we welcomed the ladies who
attended from other RV parks.
All money received will be
donated to Breast Cancer.
During the fashion show,
pink carnations were given to
seven breast cancer survivors.
Bonworth in Winter Haven
again supplied the clothes for
our models. Our models this
year were Sylvia Baker, Deby
Bricker, Ann Hegge, Barb
Koehne, Kay McKnight and
Pam Norris.
We were surprised at the end
of our fashion show by three
New York models Edwina
Mae, Francine and Miss Ruby -
who helped make the show a
great success. Not sure we can
top this next year!
Door prizes were won by
Winnie Morrell, Alta Lauer,
Leona Munsie and Betty Steph-
ens. Everyone enjoyed some
great desserts made by our craft
club ladies.

BINGO
Judy McBride won the large
jackpot on Feb. 4; Rosalie
Folnsbee won the small jackpot
and Michelin Mercier won the
special jackpot. Visitor Allison
Schrobback won the large jack-
pot on Feb. 7 and Sharron
Noble won the small jackpot.

KOFFEE KLATCH
Richard Brayton led the U.S.
Pledge on Feb. 9, Leona
Munsie led the Canadian
Pledge and Lee Roy Behymer
led the prayer. The 50/50 win-
ners were Lot 43, Lot 79, Irene
and George Miller, Winnie and
Jack Morrell and Carrie and
Pete Bashford.
Keith Stephens reported that
over 400 people were served at
the annual Recreation Dinner &
Fun Auction. The auction was


another great success.

SCORES
Horse Collar Shuffling, Feb.
2: Winners were Ted Long
necker and June Storms.
Bowling, Feb. 2: First, No. 7;
second, Flo's Flurries; and
third, His and Hers.
Men's Golf, Feb. 3: Winners
were Ross Law, Travis Terhune,
Joe Bennitt and Joe Newman.
Ladies Golf, Feb. 3: First,
Nancy Morrison; second, Barb
Plunkett; and third, Marilyn
Funkhouser.
Mixed Golf, Feb. 7: A's,
Travis Terhune; B's, Al John-
son; C's, Don McDermit; and
D's, Norm Batchelor.
Shuffling, Feb. 8: Three-
game winners were Dale Baker,
Bob Beshel, Gary Chamberlain,
Eleanor Dice, Bob Funkhouser,
Don Harkin, Terry Johnson,
Bob Jones, Barb Kramer, Bob
Kramer, Don Plumley, Jeri
Plumley, Sharon Potter, Frank
Roy, Shirley Sowatzki and Mert
Wolf.

CHURCH NEWS
By Diane Burget
Pastor Winne opened our
service on Feb. 6 by leading us
in singing a song most of us
grew up with, "I Will Make You
Fishers of Men."
Carole Jones provide the
accompaniment on the piano
and Wilma Behymer on the
organ. Nancy Morrison led our
choir in singing a "Cross
Medley" and featured Jeanie
Carney and Marian Hollings-
worth with accompaniment by
Linda Gray on the piano.
Pastor Bob gave the congre-
gation an opportunity to share
some favorite Bible verses. He
shared Jeremiah 33:3, Daniel
12:3 and Psalms 5:3 as three of
his.
We celebrated Holy Com-
munion today.


Dear Editor,
The Hardee Commissioners
have invited everyone in this
county to participate in a num-
ber of meetings to express
openly what we want for our
future and the future of our chil-


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Ad Hoc
Committee Meeting: Consider
SWFWMD business including
review of proposals and selec-
tion of vendor to conduct Dis-
trict total compensation (salary
& benefits) study. Some Board
members may participate in the
meeting via communications
media technology.
DATE/TIME: Friday, February
25, 2011; 9:00 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Ser-
vice Office, 7601 Hwy 301 North,
Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water-
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar;1(800)423-1476
(FL only) or (352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: LuAnne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0116)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director. 2379
Broad Street. Brooksville. Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
e-mail to ADACoordinator@-
swfwmd.state.fl.us
2:17c


dren. Education, land use, eco-
nomic growth, quality of life,
and improved infrastructure are
five focus topics.
What a vibrant opportunity
for every person living in this
county to express their desires
with the support of unbiased
and experienced consultants
who have assisted other com-
munities to get closer to their
dreams of a thriving communi-
ty.
I am deeply grateful to the
Hardee Commissioners for cre-
ating this opportunity, and I
intend to join in these meetings
with my hopes and dreams for a
better life in Hardee County.
The next visioning meeting is
scheduled for Feb. 21 at the
BOCC Chambers in the back of
the Court House. We will dis-
cuss what we want for our land
and environment. Feb. 22 the
topic is education and Feb. 28 it
is the infrastructure. March 1 is
about our economy: how this
county may thrive so that our
children can find rewarding and
lucrative jobs here.
Please come and join us in
this visioningg" process for a
sustainable Hardee County.

Julia Mader
Lily

The anemometer is used to
measure the force, veloci-
ty, or pressure of the wind.



A Safe Place

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119

End The Abuse!
tfc-dh


CHAPEL
-A Cher'.1 C nk>. pl-; ed the
piano. 192 ..ere gree:ed ",
Wa'% ne and L .n, Shi,:k r,.: J,'e
and Aleita B. .'.er The anthem
song "Doi L:'rd" a\n, played b'.
Carrol Webb. Cher\! C. nkle.
Ardeth Johni. Cr.iri,.n Hetze!.
Ruth Br.\. n and B ,b John, on
dulcimer. dire,:ed b\ Sandi
Feeser. The Communion mu-ic
w'as played bh Ruth on dul-
cimer.
Pastor Jaisn spoke from
Genesis 22: '.Are You Being
Obedient T, God?" The clos-
ing himn as '"God Be With
You."
COFFEE
Janet welcomed and led the
prayer for 271 enjoying coffee
and doughnuts. The pledge w\as
led by Tom Stamm. We had
Tanya from Hardee Health
speak regarding flu shots.
We took up donations and
50/50s and were able to send to
the Wine Family a total of
$2,000 to help defray hospital
costs. We have such generous
and caring residents in our park.
Fun was had by all, with
many jokes being told and
many activities announced at
coffee.
Three new raffles were intro-
duced for the Cancer Survivor
Celebration, with proceeds


going to the Cancer Society.
We ha\e a beautiful oil painting
of a lighthouse scene b\ Cath\
Renw'ick. a large stained-glass
sun catcher b\ Fran McIntire.
and a fretw ork large basket with
flowers by Alf Schafer. Such
beautiful talent and generosity
we hae in this park.
Man\ coupons. 50/50 and
the Perkins pie were won.

ACTIVITIES
Bowling: Jim Noble had
high game with 208 and Steve
Mclntire had high series with
534. For the women. Marilyn
Achard had high game with 175
and high series \with 494. Great
bowling, everyone!
Shuffle: The District Pro
Tournament was in Lakeland.
with Mamie Morton winning
first. Nancy Singleton winning
second and Ruth Tate winning
third in main event. In consola-
tion, Ruth Brown was first and
Max Tate third. Inner Park
Shuffle was played here with
Crystal Lake and the other half
of the team was played at Fort
Meade.


Golf: Alternate shot,
Tate and Carol Susko,
place. Lynn Shick and
Veneski, Jeff Mayo and
Bell tied for second.


Max
first
John
Joan


Pioneer Creek RV News
B, Reggle DeSmet and Sharon NMagee


UPCOMING EVENTS
The third annual Torrey Oaks
Variety Show presents the
making talent of singers,
ancers and actors from within
he resort.
Don't miss an unforgettable
evening of entertainment. This
vent is open to the public
through pre-purchase of a $3
er person general admission


SPOTLIGHT
Bob and Vonnie Bellis. hal-
ing from Kalamazoo. Mich..
have been married for 54 years.
The' have four children. 12
grandchildren and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Bob retired after 26 years
working with computers at
Bronson Hospital and Vonnie
retired after 26 years as a school
bus driver in Comstock, Mich.
Bob enjoys bowling. fishing.
pool and working in the wood
shop. Vonnie enjoys crafts and
quilting as well as volunteering
for the potlucks and building


ticket. Circle Feb. 22 on your
calendar. Showtime is 7 to 8:30
p.m.
Tickets can be purchased
from the office located at the
front entrance or by calling
773-3157 for availability.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Complimentary refreshments
will follow the show.


If girls and boys grow up in an atmosphere of frankness
and fair play and consideration for others, and with a
sense of responsibility toward their own families and
communities, then they are as safe today as they were
when I was young.
-Eleanor Roosevelt


Contact us for your life,

auto, home, annuity or long

term care needs.


You don't have to be

a farmer to purchase

our insurance.


773-3117
1017 US Hwy 1 7 No. Wauchula

George L. Wadsworth, Jr.
Agent


e 7Ith An Friday, February 18th

5pm- 9pm

AND

Saturday, February 19th

9am -3pm
DOWNTOWN WAUCHULA


Friday, Feb. .

Live On ;
.. -.. . . -..,; ., .-. ... - .- .


--" .* "'-c' -' .. *,i
Saturday, FJiU


c
..... i ,

-, =. "* t . ; .
,


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


Sponsored ]


CF


9pm


3pm


stained-glass treasures. Both
enjoy alley and other games.
and are \ery active in their
church in Michigan. Both ha\e
been very active in our chapel.
with Bob serving as the chair-
man.
They became winter snow-
birds after visiting 15 ,ears ago
and returning because of the
friendliness, the activities of-
fered and because of the friends
they have made over the years.
\'e appreciate them as a
great asset to our park and for
the past years as chapel chair-
man.


Torrey Oaks RV News
By Evelyn Boudreau


Letter To The Editor

County Visioning Study

Is Important For Citizens


S. .

.
'








", :" ,'" y ,


For More Information Call (863) 7674 33orvlsit www.MlnStreetWauchula.com

Grillin' & Chillin' Also Supported By Kimley Horn & Associates & PRECO


t- --- --i
FARM


BUREAU


I


a ylilgh


Mo aic
^srrtg








4C The Herald-Advocate, February 17. 2011



HONOR OLLt


S Zolfe Springs Elementary
\Second Quarter


KINDERGARTEN
E
Marisa Alvarez
Muizz Anchur
Isabela Anselmo
Keyara Auguste
Brandon Bailey
Ethan Barber
Ralee Barnett
Alyssa Botello
Kimber Davidson
Jennifer DeSantiago
David Garcia
Veronica Gomez
Hunter Graham
Savana Granado
Haley Grice
Braxton Holt
Jaqueline Jurado
Tayler Kiella
Rose Kirkland
Andrew Lee
Gloria Mendiola
Eric Mushrush
Carolina Paulino-
Mendieta
Carmen Rivera
Arianna Rodriguez
Sandra Ruiz-
Vasquez
Beau Schultz
Isai Venegas
Donovan Weaver
William Willis

KINDERGARTEN
E/S
Brennan Albritton
Charley Anton
Azucena Arista
Preston Barringer
Eduardo Cardenas-
Munoz
Mariah Carrizales
Elizabeth Castillo
Elizabeth Darty
Eduardo Diego-
Santibanez
Morgan Dunlap
Roberto Flores
Cristian Gomez
Pablo Gonzales
Crystal Gonzalez-
Lopez
Xander Hearns
Cody Knight
Sidney Madison
Stephanie McMillan
Briana Molina
Karen Monterrosa
John Nord
Kyla Patton
Eduardo Ramirez-Ramos
Esteban Rios
Alberto Sierra
Ami Taguja-Garduno
Dinora Villa-Munoz


FIRST GRADE
A
Perla Abarca
Adeline Adams
McKenzie Banda
Victor Chavez-Saldana
Katie Henderson
Andrew Lee
Odalis Lopez-Rojas
Valeria Montanez
Lindsey Montero
Ariana Olmos
Kolby Sanchez
Thalia Sanchez
Elicarmen Sargento-
Santiago
James Levi Taylor
Katelyn Vasquez
Mattie Wells

FIRST GRADE
A/B
Michael Adams
Humberto Aguirre
Lucio Aquino
Grace Borjas
Justin Browning
Victor Cosine
Heather Dayfert
Chloe Dean
Karime Diego
Griselda Duran
Leiana Ealom
Alexander Fenton
Alicia Gonsalez
Perla Hernandez- Aguilar
Esmeralda Hernandez-
Vasquez
Damien Johnston
Tyler Jones
Michael Dylan Lambert
Summer Lanham
Diana Lopez
Yeng Lor
Azusena Martinez-Alvarez
Ana Martinez-Herrera
Makayla McCoy
Itzel Mendez
Denis Mendieta
Marisa Mendieta
Rachael Mendoza
Adolfo Morales-Herrera
Uriel Morales-Herrera
Ryan Newman
Claudia Ortega
Brooke Ownby
Jesus Paniagua
Catherine Perez
Julian Reyes-Silva
Sadie Rivera
Joaquin Rojo
Aliya Silva
Ari Soles
Tyler Teuton
Andrew Tootle
John Vallejo
Cierra Yarbrough


SECOND GRADE
A
Kaylen Barringer
Colton Block
Cameron Cantu
Jake Cole
Justin Cole
Alexis Crews
Anthony Griffis
David Mendez
Rosalba Salazar-Barbosa
Shaydan Ward

SECOND GRADE
A/B
Miguel Avilez
Jacklin Alana Barber
Kaitlynn Brandeberry
Vicente Cabrera
Adrian Camili
Joelynn Carver
Daniel Contreras-
Ramirez
Billy Courtright
Brittney Covarrubias
Oscar DeLeon
Jessica Estrada
Brianna Franks
Megan Gannon
Blake Graham
Trinity Her
Palmer Klein
Siera Lozano
Erin Gracie McElroy
Julian Mendoza
Tomy Molina-Navarro
Pablo Molina-Rosales
Raquel Montanez
Jeremy Myers
Diana Rodriguez
Jasmine Rodriguez
Emily Thompson
Alfonso Venegas-Baez
Yacquelin Villalva
Jason Walker

THIRD GRADE
A
Isabella Adams
Kipp Cooper
Jesus Jurado
Sydriie Steiner

THIRD GRADE
A/B
Dylan Bozeman
Aaron Bunch
Karina Carranza
Jacqueline Chagoya
Myrka DeLaTorre
Brayan Diego'
Bailey Harrell
Mackenzie McCoy
Henry McElroy
Briana Montero
Angela Ramirez
Lizbet Ramos-Jaimes


Fernando Santiago
Christian Turner
Sand% Vue
Joseph Wood

FOURTH GRADE
A
Luis Angeles
Amari DeLeon
Javier Garcia
Michaela Klein
David Martinez
Jose Romero-Vazquez

FOURTH GRADE
A/B
Destiny Ballard
Michaela Blasingain
Christian Cardenas
Mary Courtright
Katie Dayfert
Giovanni Diego
Jasmin Ealom
Jose Tommy Garcia
Adolfo Gonzalez
Rebekah Hinojosa-
Montelon
Laura Ramos
Infiniti Randolph
Sanjan Rifty
Jessica Roland
Guillermo Velasco
Daniela Villalva
Gabrielle Willis

FIFTH GRADE
A
Mason Block
Gabriela Reyes
Maria Reyes

FIFTH GRADE
A/B
Ashleigh Adams
Makayla Benavidez
Nicholas Buchanan
Julio Castillo
Hector Cleto
Jesaiah Delgado
Marisela Duran
Tavis Fakourey
Corey Ferrar
Guadalupe Garcia-
Cendejas
Rosalba Garza
Ashley Gonzalez
Lovely Lee
Cristian Martinez
Sarah McCoy
Ulyssa Rodriguez
Jasmine Sanchez
Yatzine Sanchez
Jessie Alex Sconyers
Kaela Villegas
Chuasyeng James Vue
Genouchy Vue


Oasis RV News
By Georgianna Mills


Da e and I are happy\ to be
back to the Oasis. and so are
Sue and Jim Yano
FIc'\d Roberts.. m\ brother. is
'..!ting this eek ith us. We
.elcme Blanche Barnes'
brother. Pink McCo\. and
f-iend Sand\. also Ga, and
Mike Bahr. friends of Don and
Eddie Phillips. We also \el-
come Dale Ducklow. Niel and
Joan Smith. Wilbur and Ma\
Jones. Dave Fletcher and Jerr\
Bogun. Sunday is music from


2 to 4 p.m. Church service with
Rev.Trent SNanson is from 4
to 5 p.m.

Pokeno
Pokeno is in full sing ,with
Audre, Semler running ava\
w ith all the pennies. What a fun
time those gals have.

Bingo
Bingo sa.w Lovwell Stacvy \in-
ning the 50/50. Mike Akelian
',on the jackpot.


Wednesday night we wel-
comed Greg Moore. Ray and Jo
Moore's grandson who has won
many fiddle championships. to
join his grandpa and aunt.Chris
Anderson. in for a bluegrass
night at the recreation hall.

The rock group Fine Young
Cannibals took its name
from the title of the 1960
film All the Fine Young
Cannibals.


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF RULE REVISION or MODIFICATION

Rule No. 1.07 Date: February 10, 2011
SUBJECT: Rule: Board Meetings
Subject Area or Existing Rule: The proposed rule establishes the policy for school
board meetings.
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41; 1001.42, Fla. Stats.
Specific Law Implemented: 1001.372, Fla. Stats.
Chapter 112; 120.525; 120.53, 230.23005(10); 286.0105;
286.011; 286.0111; 286.012; 447.605.13, Fla. Stats.
Preliminary Text:
A copy of the full text of the rule may be obtained from the office of.the
Superintendent of Schools. PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING THE
REVISIONS OR MODIFICATION IS:
David Durastanti, Superintendent of Schools.
Statement of Regulatory costs: The proposed rule will create no additional district eco-
nomic impact in excess of $100 except for the cost of printing and distributions.
Location of Meeting, Time and Date: Hardee School Board Meeting Room, 230 South
Florida Avenue, Wauchula, FL at 5:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be
heard on April 14, 2011.
Notice: Any person who wishes to provide the School Board with information regarding
the statement of estimated regulatory costs or to provide a proposal for a lower cost reg-
ulatory alternative must do so in writing within 21 days after publication of this notice.
Notice: If requested in writing and not deemed unnecessary by the Agency Head, a Rule
Development Workshop will be held at a time and dated to be advertised in the future.
Notice: The procedure for obtaining a public hearing on this proposed rule is to request,
in writing a hearing. The request shall be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools, in
writing, within 21 days after publication of this notice. The request shall specify how the
person requesting the public hearing would be affected by the proposed rule. The School
Board, upon appropriate request, shall give affected persons an opportunity to present
evidence and argument on the issues under consideration.
Notice: Inspection and copying of all written materials constituting public records sub-
mitted to the agency regarding draft rules may be obtained by request, in writing, to the
Superintendent of Schools.
Notice: The School Board may recognize any material which may be judicially noticed
and to incorporate them into the record of the rule making proceeding. The School Board-
may incorporate material by reference into the proposed rule.

Notice: If you need accommodation in order to participate in this process, please notify,
David Durastanti, the Superintendent of Schools at (863) 773-9058 or at the Hardee
School Board, 1009 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873'at least 48 hours prior to
the meeting or workshop.
Notice: If the School Board adopts the proposed rule, one certified copy of the proposed
rule shall be filed in the office of the Superintendent of Schools pursuant to Section
120.54(3)(e), Fla. Stat. 2:17c



SCHOOL BOARD OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF RULE REVISION or MODIFICATION
Rule No. 1.11 Date: February 10, 2010
SUBJECT: School Board Member Compensation
Subject Area or Existing Rule: The proposed rule establishes the policy for School Board
Member Compensation
Citation of Legal Authority: 145.19, Fla. Stat.
Specific Law Implemented: 1001.395, Fla. Stat.
Preliminary Text:
Rule: School Board Member Compensation
Each member of the district school board shall receive a base salary based on
the population of the county the district school board serves as prescribed by
Sections 145.19 and 1001.395, Florida Statutes. The salary of each district
school board member shall be the amount calculated pursuant to 1001.395(1)
FS., or the district's beginning salary for teachers who hold baccalaureate
degrees, whichever is less. District school board members may reduce their
salary rate on a voluntary basis. This annual compensation shall be calculated
for each fiscal year (July 1 June 30).
Specific Law Implemented: s. 1001.395, Fla. Stat.
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed rule establishes the policy for school board
member compensation by adoption of recommendations from the Superintendent of
Schools.
Statement of Regulatory costs: The proposed rule will create no additional district eco-
nomic impact in excess of $100.00 except for the cost of printing and distributions.
Location of Meeting, Time and Date: Hardee School Board Meeting Room, 230 South
Florida Ave., Wauchula, FL at 5:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard
on April 14, 2011.
Notice: Any person who wishes to provide the School Board with information regarding
the statement of estimated regulatory costs or to provide a proposal for a lower cost reg-
ulatory alternative must do so in writing within 21 days after publication of this notice.
Notice: If requested in writing and not deemed unnecessary by the Agency Head, a rule
Development Workshop will be held at a time and date to be advertised in the future.
Notice: The procedure for obtaining a public hearing on this proposed rule is to request,
in writing a hearing. The request shall be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools, in
writing, within 21 days after publication of this notice. The request shall specify how the
person requesting the public hearing would be affected by the proposed rule. The School
Board, upon appropriate request, shall give affected persons an opportunity to present
evidence and argument on the issues under consideration.
Notice: Inspection and copying of all written materials constituting public records sub-
mitted to the agency regarding draft rules may be obtained by request, in writing, to the
Superintendent of Schools.
Notice: The School Board may recognize any material which may be judicially noticed
and to incorporate them into the record of the rule making proceeding. The School Board
may incorporate material by reference into the proposed rule.
Notice: If you need an accommodation in order to participate in this process, please noti-
fy David Durastanti, the Superintendent of Schools at (863) 773-9058 or at the Hardee
School Board, 1009 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873 at least 48 hours prior to
the meeting or workshop.
Notice: If the School Board adopts the proposed rule, one certified copy of the proposed
rule shall be filed in the office of the Superintendent of Schools pursuant to Section
120.54(3)(e). Fla. Stat. 2:17c


SCHOOL BOARD OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF RULE REVISION or MODIFICATION

Rule No. 1.06 Date: February 10, 2010
SUBJECT: Orientation of School Board Members
Subject Area or Existing Rule: The proposed rule establishes the policy for Orientation of
School Board Members
Citation of Legal Authority: 1001.41, Fla. Stat.
Specific Law Implemented: 1001.51, Fla. Stat.
Preliminary Text:
Rule: Orientation of School Board Members
As soon as possible after the election or appointment of a new Board member,
the Superintendent should provide copies of Florida School Laws, State of
Education Rules, School Board Rules and the current budget of the district school
system. It is recommended that each new member attend the state orientation
following each general election.
Specific Law Implemented: s. 1001.51. Stat.
Executive Summary of Rule: The proposed rule establishes the policy for school board
members orientation by adoption of recommendations from the Superintendent of
Schools.
Statement of Regulatory costs: The proposed rule will create no additional district eco-
nomic impact in excess of $100.00 except for the cost of printing and distributions.
Location of Meeting, Time and Date: Hardee School Board Meeting Room, 230 South
Florida Ave., Wauchula, FL at 5:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard
on April 14, 2011.
Notice: Any person who wishes to provide the School Board with information regarding
the statement of estimated regulatory costs or to provide a proposal for a lower cost reg-
ulatory alternative must do so in writing within 21 days after publication of this notice.
Notice: If requested in writing and not deemed unnecessary by the Agency Head, a rule
Development Workshop will be held at a time and date to be advertised in the future.
Notice: The procedure for obtaining a public hearing on this proposed rule is to request,
in writing a hearing. The request shall be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools, in
writing, within 21 days after publication of this notice. The request shall specify how the
person requesting the public hearing would be affected by the proposed rule. The School
Board, upon appropriate request, shall give affected persons an opportunity to present
evidence and argument on the issues under consideration.
Notice: Inspection and copying of all written materials constituting public records sub-
mitted to the agency regarding draft rules may be obtained by request, in writing, to the
Superintendent of Schools.
Notice: The School Board may recognize any material which may be judicially noticed
and to incorporate them into the record of the rule making proceeding. The School Board
may incorporate material by reference into the proposed rule.
Notice: If you need an accommodation in order to participate in this process, please noti-
fy David Durastanti, the Superintendent of Schools at (863) 773-9058 or at the Hardee
School Board, 1009 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873 at least 48 hours prior to
the meeting or workshop.
Notice: If the School Board adopts the proposed rule, one certified copy of the proposed
rule shall be filed in the office of the Superintendent of Schools pursuant to Section
120.54(3)(e). Fla. Stat.
2:17c













IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

FILE NO. 252011CP000011

IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERTA C. ALBRITTON,
Deceased.
______________i_


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
ESTATE OF ALBERTA C.
ALBRITTON, deceased, whose
date of death was January 7,
2011, Is pending in the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which Is P.O. Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice Is February 17,
2011.

Personal Representative:
MERILYN ALBRITTON
STRICKLAND
c/o P.O. Box 3018
Sarasota, Florida 34230

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JAMES O. FERGESON, JR.
Florida Bar No. 171298
FERGESON, SKIPPER, SHAW,
KEYSER, BARON & TIRABASSI, RA.
1515 Ringling Boulevard, 10" Floor
P.O. Box 3018
Sarasota, Florida 34230-3018
(941) 957-1900
2:17,24c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITIN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252011CP000008


IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES P. LOWE, deceased.


I (S E A L)

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of .the
estate of FRANCES P LOWE,
deceased, whose date of death
was January 14, 2011, and whose
social security number is XXX-XX-
XXXX, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873-1749.
The name and address of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's Attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is 02/10/11.


BY: /s/ B. R
Deputy CI
2:10,


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TI
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 25-2009CA-000200

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
ACTING THROUGH THE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE, RURAL
DEVELOPMENT, F, KA FARMER
HOME ADMINISTRATION,

PLAINTIFF,

VS.

KEVIN GLENN JACKSON, A SI
GLE PERSON,

DEFENDANTS.


NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tl
pursuant to a Summary Fli
Judgment of Foreclosure enter
on January 31, 2011, by the abc
entitled Court in the above styl
cause, the undersigned Clerk
Court or any of his duly auth
rized deputies, will sell the pro
erty situated in Hardee Coun
Florida, described as:

LOT 2, BLOCK 7, AVALON
PARK ADDITION TO THE
CITY OF WAUCHULA, AS
PER PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2
75, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA,

at public outcry to the high
and best bidder for cash
02/23, 2011, at 11:00 A. M., at t
courthouse located at 417
Main Street in Hardee County
Wauchula, Florida 33873, seco
floor hallway outside Room 2C
subject to all ad valorem tax
and assessments for the ri
property described above.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
INTEREST IN THE SURPL
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTH
THAN THE PROPERTY OWN
AS OF THE DATE OF THE I
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLA
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFT
THE SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITI
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS A
ACCOMMODATION IN ORD
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PF
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLE
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO T
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASS
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT T
OFFICE OF THE COURT ADM
ISTRATOR, 255 N. BROAD
AVENUE, BARTOW, FLORI
33830, (863) 534-4686, AT LEA
7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHE
ULED COURT APPEARANCE,
IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVE
THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TI
BEFORE THE SCHEDULE
APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN
DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING
VOICE IMPAIRED,,CALL 711,

DATED on 02/02, 2011.

B. HUGH BRADL
Clerk of Circuit Co
Post Office Drawer 17
Wauchula, FL 338


During the past week. sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
SFeb. 13, Samuel E.scbar-Castneda. 30. cf 24c0 Hutchins

RS Road. Fort Meade. as arrested b\ Sgt. L le Hart and charged w ith
DUI and no ,alid license.
Feb. 13, Jamie Santiz. 2. of -S- Lake Branch Road, Bow\ling
Green. was arrested b\ Dep. Cesar Medina on an out-of-count\
warrant.
Feb. 13, Akeem Kalieeq Frazier. 21. of 65S Apostolic Road,
N- Wauchula. .as arrested b\ Dep. Michael Lake and charged 'ith
possession of marijuana. possession of drug paraphernalia and con-
tempt of court.
Feb. 13, a residential burglary on Old Bradenton Road and a
/ theft on U.S. 17 South were reported.

Feb. 12, Brian Keith Aeschliman. 24. of 2750 WN. Metuchen
hat Road, Avon Park, was arrested on a charge of violation of proba-
nal tion.
'ed Feb. 12, Osles Lazarre. 25, of 676 Honeysuckle St.. Wauchula,
wve was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with aggravated
ed battery and kidnap-imprisonment of an adult.
ho- Feb. 12, David Ramirez, 28, of 2460 Pine Cone Road,
op- Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged with
ity, battery.
Feb. 12, a residential burglary on Walker Avenue and criminal
mischief on Dena Circle were reported.

Feb. 11, Alberto Lee Guerra, 42, of 4635 NW Highlands St.,
Arcadia, was arrested on a charge of failure to appear in court.
Feb. 11, Graciela Maldonado, 23, of 2150 Stansfield Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers and charged with
possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia
ost and failure to appear in court.
on
he Feb. 11, a residential burglary on Brookside Drive, burglary of
W. a conveyance on West Broward Street, and thefts on Altman Road
in and on Griffin Road were reported.
*nd
02, Feb. 10, residential burglaries on Griffin Whidden Road and
ees on SR 64 West, and a fight on Peterson Street were reported.
eal

AN Feb. 9, Eliseo Sanchez Jr., 31, of 221 Palmetto Ave., Fort
US Meade, was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers on two counts of
ER failure to appear in court and violation of probation.
ER Feb.'9, Jesse Tommy Tucker, 33, of 1124 Denise Ave., Se-
LIM bring, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged with pos-
IMM
ER session of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 9, Marco Anthony Capetillo, 21, of 4627 Dixiana Ave.,
H A Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis on two counts of
NY violation of probation and fraud-giving a false ID to an officer.
ER Feb. 9, Samantha Rodriguez, 22, of 1924 Kazen Road, Wau-
!0- chula, and Michael James Staton, 18, of 303 Causey Road, Wau-
HE chula, were arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force and each
IS- charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. Rodriguez was also
HE charged with possession of methamphetamine. Staton was also
IN- charged with possession of amphetamines with intent to sell and
'AY driving with knowledge of a suspended license.
DA Feb. 9, a tag stolen on U.S. 17 South was reported.
%ST
ED-
OR Feb. 8, Jermonte Russell Rushing, 28, of 1306 Cleveland
NG Heights Blvd., Lakeland, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and
ME charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of
ED drug paraphernalia.
J7
SO Feb. 8, Cindy Elisondo, 28, of 815 SR 66, Zolfo Springs, was
arrested by"Dep. Michael Lake and charged with dealing in stolen
property ...
Feb. 8, thefts on Altman Road and on Heartland Way were

EY reported.
Durt Feb. 7, Maria Gomez Pina, 39, of 169 Sweetwater Road, Zolfo
749
873 Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of failure
to appear in court.
eid Feb. 7, Thomas Christopher Goodwin, 24, of 4824 Church
erk Ave., Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge
17c of violation of probation.
Feb. 7, a residential burglary on Gebhart Road, tags stolen on


2/17/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:02 AM
Set: 6:19 PM

Day Length
11 hrs. 17 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:53 PM
Set: 6:14 AM
Overhead: --:--
Underfoot: 12:02PM
Moon Phase
99%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:02 PM 2:02 PM
Minor Times
6:14 AM 7:14 AM
5:53 PM 6:53 PM
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/18/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:02 AM
Set: 6:20 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 18 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:01 PM
Set: 6:56 AM
Overhead: 12:29 AM
Underfoot:12:56 PM
Moon Phase
100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
12:29 AM -2:29 AM
12:56 PM -2:56 PM
Minor Times
6:56 AM 7:56 AM
7:01 PM 8:01 PM
Prediction
SEASONS BEST
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/19/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:01 AM
Set: 6:21 PM

Day Length
11 hrs. 20 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:08 PM
Set: 7:36 AM
Overhead: 1:23 AM
Underfoot: 1:49 PM
Moon Phase
97%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
1:23 AM 3:23 AM
1:49 PM 3:49 PM
Minor Times
7:36 AM 8:36 AM
8:08 PM 9:08 PM
Prediction
Better++
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/20/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:00 AM
Set: 6:21 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 21 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:15 PM
Set: 8:15 AM
Overhead: 2:16 AM
Underfoot: 2:43 PM
Moon Phase
92%
Waning GIbB6ua
Major Times
216 AM 4:16 AM
2:43 PM 4:43 PM
Minor Times
8:15 AM 9:15 AM
9:15 PM 10:15 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/21/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6-59 AM
Set: 6:22 PM

Day Length
11 hrs. 23 mms.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:22 PM
Set: 8:56 AM
Overhead: 3:10 AM
Underfoot: 3:37 PM
Moon Phase
84%
Waning Gibbons
Major Times
3:10 AM 5:10 AM
3:37 PM 5:37 PM
Minor Times
8:56 AM 9:56 AM
10:22 PM-1l:22 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/22/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:58 AM
Set:,6:23 PM
Day Length
II hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:28PM
Set: 9:39 AM
Overhead: 4:04 AM
Underfoo,: 4:32 PM
Moon Phase
74%
-Waning Gibbous .
Major Times
4:04 AM 6:04 AM
4:32 PM 6:32 PM
Minor Times
9:39 AM- 10:39 AM
11:28 PM-12:28 AM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/23/2011 -
Sun Data
Rise: 6:57 AM
Set: 6.23 PM

Day Length
11 hrs 26 nuns.
Moon Data
Rise: ----
Set: 10:25 AM
Overhead: 5 00 AM
Underfoot: 5:28 I'M
Moon Phase
64%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
5:00 AM 7:00 AM
5:28 PM 7:28 PM
Minor Times
10:25 AM- 11:25 AM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/24/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 6:56 AM
Set: 6:24 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:32 AM
Set: 11:16AM
Overhead: 5:56 AM
Underfoot: 6:25 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter :.
Major Times
5:56 AM 7:56 AM
6:25 PM 8:25 PM
Minor Times
12:32 AM -1:32 AM
11:16 AM-12:16 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


Personal Representative:
BRENDA JOYCE ALDRIGE
8950 NW Prairie Road
Arcadia, FL 34269

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John W.H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (866) 591-1658
Florida Bar Number: 0650137
2:10,17c



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Crime Botter


IH n i g Fs hin F re a s -


February 17, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C

Peeples Lane and Osprey Lane, a fight on Hickory Street. criminal
mischief on Commerce Lane. Elm St. and Garden Drive and a theft
on Griffin Whidden Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
Feb. 13, Alfredo Cienfuegos Molina, 32, of Griffin Road, was
arrested by Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with disorderly intox-
ication.
Feb. 13, Javier Centeno, 31, of 806 S. Ninth Ave.. Wauchula.
was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with DUI.

Feb. 12, a vehiclee stolen on River Chase Circle and a theft on
East Orange Street were reported.

Feb. 11, Ramiro Hernandez Perez, 29, of 321 N. Florida Ave..
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with
aggravated assault w ith a deadly weapon and battery.

Feb. 8, a residential burglary on Alabama Street and burglary
of a conveyance on Diana Avenue were reported.

Feb. 7, a theft on South Eighth Avenue was reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Feb. 13, a residential burglary on Dixiana Drive was reported.

Feb. 11, Juan Martin Picon, 30, of 4092 Dixiana Dr., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged with car-
rying a concealed weapon, possession of marijuana and smuggling
contraband into a detention facility.


1.








6C The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011


She Grew Up In The


Panama Canal Zone


By JAVIER N. RICHARDS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview was with Patricia
Grimm.
Q: When and where were you
born?
A: Dec. 2, 1950, in San Jose, Costa
Rica.
Q: When you were growing up in
Panama, where did you live in the
Canal Zone?
A: In the district of Balboa.
Q, What was it like growing up in
the Canal Zone?
A: The canal was rented by the
Panamanian government. She grew up
like Americans, spoke English, ate
foods like here in America, food was
American, movie houses, one main
store in area she lived in, basically one
high school, one middle school.
Most of them rode bicycles or
walked. Activities were riding bicycles
and swimming and the beach. They
were always outdoors.
Q: Was it hot in the canal?
A: Yes, either rainy or dry season, but
always hot.
Q: What sports did you play when
you were growing up?
A: Volleyball, basketball, bowling
and a little archery.
Q: Did you have special uniforms
or clothing because it was so hot?
A: No. They wore, a lot of shorts, T-
shirts and tennis shoes.
Q: Because you were surrounded
by so much water living by the canal,
were there special water sports?
Spear fishing or kayaking?
A: No, not really. In high school,
there're a boys kayaking team, scuba
diving.
Q: What schools did you go to?
A: St. Mary's Elementary, then
Balboa Elementary, next Curundu
(Spanish and Indian names). After was
Balboa High, last was the Canal Zone
college.
: Q: Did you have to learn Spanish in
your schools?
: A: No.


Q: Were there islands?
A: On the Pacific side, San Bias
Islands, inhabited by the Cuna Indians.
Q: Were you a good kid at the
canal?
A: Very good kid, never confronted
the principal, shy, never in trouble.
Q: What was it like to have a lot of
soldiers around her area?
A: Pacific side, all the military bases,
she was allowed to do just about every-
thing she wanted except to buy from
their military stores (PX). It was cool to
see the military people in uniform.
Q: What did they sell in a PX?
A: Clothing, furniture, almost every-
thing, but a lot cheaper, no tax.
Q: What kind of housing did you
live in?
A: No mobile homes in the Canal
Zone. Concrete and wood houses; many
were on stilts.
Q: What vehicles did your parents
have?
A: American cars, Fords.
Q: Where did your mother work in
the Canal Zone?
A: She was a homemaker.
Q: Where did your father work in
the canal?
A: At the locks. He was a master
electrician.
Q: What did he do as a master elec-
trician there?
A: He worked on all electrical mat-
ters at the lock.
Q: Did he fight in the war? And
how did that affect you?
A: He was in the merchant marine,
didn't fight.
Q: Did you have a car when you
turned 16?
A: Yes.
Q: If so, '
what lt lit
brand?
A:
Corvair, red and white.
Q: Where did you work in the
canal?
A: A homemaker at first.
Q: Did you like living in the Canal


Zone?
A: Yes. because it was a beautiful
place to grow up and live in.
Q: How did the Canal Zone differ
from the capital city, Panama City?
A: Canal Zone was a lot smaller, one
post office. one main store and every-
thing was done for you. plumbing,
grass, no hiring for repairs: all was paid
by the government. The city of Panama
was like a little Miami. not a lot of tall
buildings, a grow ing city.
Q: When did you move to the
United States?
A: 1978. December.
Q: Why did you move to the United
States?
A: They were going to turn the canal
back to Panama.
Q: Where was your favorite place
to live in the United States and why?
A: Birmingham, Ala. It was beautiful,
good schools, good hospitals, friendly
people and many cultural activities.
Q: What was the happiest moment
of your life?
A' Too many to count; the births of
my children and grandchildren.
Q: What impression did the '70s,
'80s and '90s leave on you?
A: A lot of change, happy family and


Letter To The Editor

Local Prisoner Reports

He Has Found Peace


Dear Editor,
I was sitting on my bunk
reading the Bible early in the
morning, and this poem would
not get out of my head so I put
the Bible down and wrote it out
and then resumed reading.
I would like for you to put it
in the paper to show all the peo-
ple I was around what Christ
means to me so they will know
what He can do for them. Thank
you very much.
Finally At Peace
I got out of prison onejoyous
day.
I went back to the place I'd
always stayed.
I tried to do right, I will say.
It was so hard 'cause I didn't
know the way.
I went back to the way.I'd
always been,


work times, a time of progress.
Q: What inspired you to go to uni-
versity and eventually get your mas-
ter's degree?
A: The desire to learn and help peo-
ple.
Q: Was there someone who-inspired
you to go back to school?
A: Her mother. She wanted her to
learn as much as she could.
Q: What was your favorite job of
all of your jobs?
A: The one she has now, Hospice.
Q: What is it that you like about
your work?
A: Doing some good; meeting won-
derful people.
Q: Did you grow up very religious
and did it play a large role in who
you are?
A: Yes, she grew up religious but it
turned out mostly spiritual.

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


Pictures must not be too
picturesque.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
What art offers is space-a
certain breathing room for
the spirit.
-John Updike

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following event to
which all interested persons are
invited:
Tampa Bay Wholesale Growers
Spring Expo: Governing Board,
Basin Board and Advisory
Committee members may
attend.
DATE/TIME: Friday, February
25-26, 2011; 9 a.m.
PLACE: Florida State
Fairgrounds, 4800 US Hwy 301
N., Tampa FL 33610
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Tammy
Gould, Tampa Bay Wholesdle
Growers, tbwg@tbwg.org or
(813)655-1914
For more information, you may
contact: Lou.Kavouras@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only)' or (352)796-7211 ,x4606 (Ad
Order, EXE01 17)
2:17c


Livin' a life full of sin.
Sex, money, drugs and strife,
Man, I thought that was the
life.
I didn't know, but was soon to
find out
That wasn't the life that God
talked about.
I'm back in prison don't you
see,
But it's alright, 'cause Jesus is
with me.
I'm livin' a life of peace and
love
'Cause I've finally found the
One that's above.
Jesus Christ
Respectfully,
Roy Martin
Child of God
Joint-heir with Christ


Frankie's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting Hours:
| Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3



FREE GUITAR LESSONS
If interested call PASTOR ROBBIE
of the Wauchula Seventh-Day
Adventist church at 205 South 11th
Ave., Wauchula, near the YMCA.

305-766-3182 LB 'A!
2:17-3:3c








We will be closed

Monday,

February 21, 2011
in observance of





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with us with that in mind.



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Mmbe WAUCHULA 1
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mig u. 105 SR 64 East, Inside BP
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MEETING NOTICE
The HARDEE COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
invites the Public to the
SUSTAINABLE HARDEE:
VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE

Infrastructure

WORKSHOP

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011
6:00-8:00 P.M.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
412 W. Orange St.. Rm. 103
Courthouse Annex, 1" floor. Wouchula


Economic Development

WORKSHOP

TUESDAY, MARCH 01, 2011
6:00-8:00 P.M.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
412 W. Orange St.. Rm. 103
Courthouse Annex. 1" floor. Wauchula

Please come share your thoughts and ideas
of what is needed in your community

Please contact the Planning Department
at 863 767 1964 or
visioning@hardeecounty.net
with any questions
02:17c


Stop by and see why so
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com Gi
9:30c 800-226-3325Sale
9:30tfc 800-226-3325


MEETING NOTICE
The HARDEE COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
invites the Public to the
SUSTAINABLE HARDEE:
VISIONING FOR THE FUTURE

Land Use/Environment/

Open Space

WORKSHOP

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2011
6:00-8:00 P.M.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
412 W. Orange St.. Rm. 103
Courthouse Annex. 1t floor. Wouchula


Education

WORKSHOP

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2011
6:00-8:00 P.M.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM
412 W. Orange St.. Rm. 103
Courthouse Annex. 1" floor. Wauchula

Please come share your thoughts and ideas
of what is needed in your community

Please contact the Planning Department
at 863 767 1964 or
visioning@hardeecounty.net
with any questions
02:17c








February 17, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Carlos Ramirez Jr., 20, Wau-
chula, and Esna Mayela Fran-
oisco, 20, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Jones Family Properties LLC
vs. Takesha Coons et al, judg-
ment for possession of property.
Citibank South Dakota vs.
Ketty R. David, voluntary dis-
niissal.
FIT Card Services NAN vs.
Wanda D. Disharoon, voluntary
dismissal.
Melissa Woodhouse vs.
Marvin Cook, judgment for ten-
ant eviction.
Citibank South Dakota vs.
Francisco Arreola, voluntary
dismissal.
FIA Card Services vs.
Cynthia A. Pagan, voluntary
dismissal.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Christopher Flanders, order on
stipulated payments.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Marcus Darrel Hodges, pos-
session of marijuana, trans-
ferred to circuit felony court.
Jose Sanchez Gonzales, do-
mestic battery, not prosecuted.
Jose Sanchez, resisting an
officer without violent force,
six months in jail with credit for
time served (CTS) and concur-
rent with prison sentence, $100


public defender fees and S50
cost of prosecution (COP)
placed on lien.
Jobie Michael Skitka, two
counts violation of a domestic
violence injunction for protec-
tion, domestic battery and crim-
inal mischief, one year in jail
with CTS and concurrent with
felony sentence, $100 public
defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien.
Jorge Ocsas, two counts bat-
tery, not prosecuted.
David Oviedo, disorderly
intoxication, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 public defender
fee, $50 COP, $50 investigative
costs.
Ruben Angel Rivas, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, time
served, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 COP; possession of
marijuana, not prosecuted.
Rhonda Danell Warram, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
time served, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 public defender fee,
$50 COP.
Dite William McCafferty,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, $325 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $50
COP.
Linda Nellis, animal aban-
donment, not prosecuted.
Roy Rodriguez, animal aban-
donment, not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Ashley Marie Moore vs.


PATIENTS COME FIRST-Dr. Robin Wooten and Sarah
Johnson opened Mental Health Associates in December.
Johnson felt that there was a need for more mental health facil-
ities for people to choose from in Hardee County. That, she said,
was the reasoning behind this new business.
Johnson has lived in Hardee County for over 40 years. During
her time here she spent one year at the Peace River Center. Mean-
while, she was in training for her Mental Health Counselor
License. She also gained her master's of science degree from Nova
Southeastern University.
Johnson now has a Mental Health Counselor License, earned
following 1,500 hours of internship. She is trained to help with sev-
eral different types of mental health issues, such as anxiety, grief,
self-esteem, medical disorders, and life transitions. Johnson is not
able to prescribe any medication to her patients, but Wooten is.
Wooten has been a psychiatrist for over 40 years. He was cho-
sen as one of the Top Psychiatrists of America in 2007 and 2008.
He is board-certified both in psychiatry and in neurology.
Wooten practiced at Watson Clinic in Lakeland from 1970 to
2008 as an in-patient and an out-patient psychiatrist. He also
gained his residence at North Carolina School of Medicine.
The two decided to work together to try and provide quality
mental health care for the citizens of Hardee County.
Wooten sees adult clients while Johnson talks with clients of
any age.
Mental Health Associates is currently located at 105 S. Ninth
Ave. This location was chosen because it is hidden, quiet and safe.
"In a small town, people are afraid of others seeing them,"
Johnson said. "The seclusion of this building just makes it seem
perfect."
Both Wooten and Johnson hope to help the people of Hardee
County with any mental issues that might put them in personal
need of assistance.
Presently, Mental Health Associates does not accept insurance,
but hopes to be able to in the near future. Mental Health Associates
also expects to have a Web site up and running shortly.
To find out more information about Mental Health Associates,
the number of the office is 773-0002 or contact Johnson at 863-
448-6764.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Hailey Selph at 773-3255 with your business news.





Heart's Longing
I long to take a walk with you -
Let's go to a place unknown.
A place where we can safely hide-
A place we'll call our own.

I yearn to have a talk with you-
We'll sit here in our special place.
Tell me all your heart has pondered,
As my eyes study your placid face.

My dearest, please, don't stray from me-
Let us have our precious time.
In my heart you'll dwell forever-
For in my heart, you're mine.

When will you be free
To take a walk with me?
-Mesqua LeAnn Fields, 16
Bowling Green

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


I orhos epr


Christopher Lee Cook, petition
for injunction for protection.
Mark Anthony Garcia and
Courtney Garcia, divorce.
Elizabeth Treuino ,s. Wal-
Mart Stores Inc.. damages-
negligence.
Joe Ramon Valdez vs.
Christina McCumber. petition
for injunction for protection.
Patricia Delarosa vs. Jimm.
Delarosa III. petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Elena Teresa Villarreal vs.
Jesse A. Patino, petition for
injunction for protection.
Aaron Ray Chapman and
Shayla Kay Gainous, divorce.
Erlinda Reyna vs. Ford
Motor Co., damages-products
liability.
Lorenza Almajuer and
Gilbert Lee Almaguer, divorce.
Thalia Camarillo and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Juan Camarillo, peti-
tion for child support.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Hardee County Sheriff's
Office In Re 2002 Black Chevy
Tahoe, order of forfeiture.
Lacey Jo Crutchfield and
Cory Crutchfield, order.
Tabatha Mashburn Osteen
and Kenneth Osteen, divorce.
Kayla Maxwell Herrera and
Benjamin Herrera, divorce.
Romell C. Parks and DOR
vs. Stephanie Lynell Richard-
son, voluntary dismissal of peti-
tion to modify child support.
Melody K. Colavito and
Joseph R. Colavito Jr., divorce.
William Newton Willis and
Amanda Mary Ellen Sutton
Willis, divorce.
Asuncion Leon and Sandra
E. Flores, order.
Farmers Home Administra-
tion vs. Kevin Glenn Jackson,
judgment of mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Tiffane Amanda Johnson and
DOR vs. John Johnson Jr., vol-
untary dismissal.
J&J Sports Productions vs.
Delcid C. Ovideo d/b/a Tijuan-
as Catina, default judgment.
Sarah J. Eures Albritton and
Ivan R. Eures, order.
Ford Motor Credit Co. LLC
vs. Christopher J. Friers, order
to stay entry of judgment.
Crystal Lee Becerra and Ivan
Becerra, dismissed for lack of
prosecution.
Clifton L. Jones and Lori R.
Jones Serdynski, dismissed for
lack of prosecution.
Stephanie A. Roberson and
John A. Roberson, divorce.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.'
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and


also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Barbara Ann Barkley, viola-
tion of community control-
house arrest (original charges
possession of cocaine and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia)
community control revoked.
one Near six months Florida
State Prison CTS. S200 public
defender fees and 5100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Taiwan Blandin, violation of
probation (original charge bat-
tery), violation affidavit with-
drawn, probation re-instated.
Anthony Deamro Briseno,
grand theft, criminal mischief
and possession of drug para-
phernalia, adjudication with-
held, probation two years six
months, $520 fine and court
costs, $150 public defender
fees, 5100 COP, 100 hours
community service; possession
of marijuana, not prosecuted.
Heriberto Garcia Jr., posses-
sion of methamphetamine,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year six months, ran-
dom .drug tests, substance
abuse/mental health evalua-
tion/treatment, warrantless
search and seizure, curfew,
$520 fine and court costs, $350
public defender fees, $100
COP.
Manuel Garcia, possession


of burglary tools, adjudication
withheld, probation one year
six months, substance abuse/-
mental health evaluation/treat-
ment, warrantless search and
seizure, random drug screens,
5520 fine and court costs, $350
public defender fees, $100
COP.
Selethia Alfreda Glaze,
aggravated assault with a dead-
ly weapon, not prosecuted.
Edward Alan Makowski,
possession of methampheta-
mine, possession of marijuana
and possession of drug para-
phernalia, adjudication with-
held, probation two years, sub-
stance abuse/mental health
evaluation/treatment, no alco-
hol or drugs, warrantless search
and seizure, random drug
screens, curfew, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, 50 hours
community service.
Jacob Ramirez Mendoza,
resisting arrest without vio-
lence, DUI and three other traf-
fic charges, transferred to coun-
ty misdemeanor and criminal
traffic court.
Jami Irene Santos, posses-
sion of hydrocodone, adjudica-
tion withheld, substance abuse/-
mental health evaluation/treat-
ment, no alcohol or drugs, war-
rantless search and seizure, cur-
few, random drug screens, $520
fine and court costs, $100 COP;


SCHOOL BOARD OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1009 North 6" Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873

HARDEE COUNTY SCHOOLS SEEK "HALL OF FAME" NOMINEES
Superintendent David Durastanti requests that members of the public submit names for potential
inductees into the Hardee County Schools Hall of Fame. Nominees should be people who have made
significant contributions to their professional fields and who have attended public school in Hardee
County.
Letters of nomination will be accepted through March 31,2011. The letter should include the:
nominee's name and address (or address of the nearest living relative if the nominee is deceased)
the approximate dates of enrollment in Hardee County Schools
a description of the nominee's accomplishments
the name and address of the person or organization making the nomination.
Letters should be addressed to:
Hardee County School Board
ATTENTION: HallofFame
P.O. Box 1678
Wauchula, Florida 33873

Persons previously nominated are kept on file for reconsideration each year.
There is no need to renominate anyone.
The program initiated in 1991 has recognized Mr. Merle L. Albritton, Mr. Shelley S. Boone, Mr.
Doyle W. Bryan, Mr. John Burton, Governor Doyle E. Carlton, Sr., Dr. Leffie M. Carlton, Jr., Mr. Jesse S.
Carter, Mrs. Exie Cathcart, Mrs. Catheryn McDonald Coker, Dr. Sylvia M. Collins, Mr. J.W. (Bill) Crews,
Jr., Mr. Michael Crews, Mr. Standish L. Crews, Mr. Joe L. Davis, Brig. Gen. Frederick H. Essig, Mr. W.
Curtis Ezelle, Colonel John Cecil Fralish, Mr. Charles Frazier, Mrs. Annie W. Hart, Dr. Harold E. Henderson,
Miss Valda E. Long, Mr. John W. Maddox, Col. Donell Matthews, Mr. Tom McEwen, Judge Shirlyon J.
McWhorter, Col. William Moran, Mr. Lawrence A. Roberts, Mr. Bartley Sapp, Mr. L. M. Shackelford, Miss
Ruth V. Southerland, Mr. Leon T. Stephens, Mrs. Myrtie W. Strickland, Mr. Dunning Terrell, and Reverend
R. Perry Tomlinson
The recipients will be inducted at the Senior Honors Banquet where Hardee Senior High School's
graduating seniors with a 3.50 grade point average or higher are recognized for their accomplishments.
The seniors and their parents will be guests of Mosaic and the Hardee County Education Foundation,
sponsors of the awards event. 2:17.24c


NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNERS


March 1, 2011 is the DEADLINE to file for:

up to $50,000 Homestead Exemption

$25,000 Senior Exemption

$5,000 Disabled Veteran's Exemption

$500 Widow's Exemption

$500 Widower's Exemption

$500 Disability Exemption

$500 Exemption for Blind Persons

SProperty Tax Discount for Veterans Age 65 and Older with a

Combat Related Disability

(Florida Residency and Other Requirements)

Disabled Veteran Tax Exemption

(At least 10% war or service connected)

Active Duty Military Tax Exemption

All Other Exemptions

And Agricultural Classification

If you have questions concerning the qualifications for these exemptions,

please call the Property Appraiser's Office at (863) 773-2196.

Applications for exemptions and discounts

MUST be made IN PERSON at

Hardee County Property Appraiser's Office Administration Bldg.,

110 W. Oak St., Rm 103

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Monday through Friday
2:17,24c


possession of a controlled sub-
stance without a valid prescrip-
tion, possession of oxycodone,
possession of codeine, posses-
sion of methamphetamine and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, not prosecuted.
Juanita Jackson Wright, two
counts neglect of an elderly or
disabled person, probation one
year, cease to be representative
payee for anyone other than a
relative, $520 fine and court
costs, $100 COP.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Ricardo Sandoval and Diana
R. Sandoval to Pedro Gallegos,
$18,000.
Wauchula State Bank to Paul
F. and Helen C. Summit,
$142,000.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort LLC to Lance P. and
Laurie Ann Patten, $39,886.
Peace River Refuge & Ranch
Inc. to Frank R. and Anita Rose,
$40,000.
Wauchula State Bank to
Jerry and Jacalyn S. Johnson,.
$22,500.
Hardee Association for Re-
tarded Citizens to Grady Sr. and
Patricia M. Johnson, $108,000.
Carl Anthony Standing to
Wiley Jr. and Gayla D. Mc-
Kinney, $51,000.








8C The Herald-Advocate, February 17, 2011


FCA RANCH RODEO FINALS-PART 2
You know how you dread getting that first scratch or ding on
your brand-new car or pickup truck? And then it happens.
Well, I just got my very first "ding" as a columnist-the wrong
photo got attached to the caption in my last column-and you
know what? I survived it! Sorry, Stevens Land & Cattle Co. and
Audubon Ranch, for the mix-up.
* There are various events that can be utilized at the Florida
Cattlemen's Association qualifying ranch rodeos, which is part of
the fun, as you never know what'll take place until you get there.
At the 2010 Finals held at the Silver Spurs Rodeo Arena on the first
weekend in October, there were 16 teams participating in eight
events, each team riding in half of the events each night.
The roughstock event is saddlebronc riding. This is also one of
the events used in traditional rodeos, such as the Professional
Rodeo Cowboys Association events. The rider must stay on for
eight seconds, and receives a numerical score-with the highest
score winning. Catlin Corson's score of 69 was the winner.
All of the other events are timed events, where the lowest time
wins.' The Stampede Race is also one of the qualifying speed
events. Not a frequently used event, this features the female mem-
bers of the teams. They unsaddle their horses, and "make camp."

"..... ^^ -^^ 'J
-',u = = ~


They actually have to pretend to bed down for the nmght. including
taking off their boots.
Another team member takes their horse to the opposite end of
the arena. Then someone ellss "Stampede!" and the\ ha\e to
redress, gather up their saddle and ail their tack and beiungings, run
to their horse carrying everything. saddle up. and ride back to
where they started. (Ladies. start your engines!)
There are also roping events, such as team branding. team doc-
toring and double mugging. Each one consists of a team member
on horseback roping the head of the calf or steer, and sometimess
the back legs too.
The branding was '.on b\ Stevens Land & Cattle Co. with an
incredible time of 31.97 seconds. The double mugging w as w on by
Audubon Ranch with a respectable time of 55.37 seconds. (My
favorite team was KL Bar that night, which put on the most enter-
taining double mugging I have ever seen!)
Then there is the team sorting, which features one team mem-
ber quietly running the calves, and the rest of the team members
yelling and waving to keep the rest of the herd in check
The final two events are sheer pandemonium-with four
teams competing simultaneously in two heats.
In the wild cow milking event, the chutes open. and the four
wild cows are released. Each must cross a line before being
mugged by the team, and must be standing when milked. One team
member then runs the bottle to the judge's circle, and some milk
(even one drop qualifies!) must pour out of the bottle. In the wild
colt riding event, one team member on horseback has a rope on the
wild colt, and all four are released from the chutes simultaneously.
The remaining team members must get the wild colt saddled, and
one team member must ride it to the far end of the arena. These are
wild and crazy events as they occur!
Let me just add a note of what must have been some disap-


pointment: Kaylon Fussel Rodriguez was the female member of
the Rafter G Bar team. She is the niece of The Herald-Advocate's
Jim and Jean Kelly. This team put on an awesome show, and
wound up taking home the winner's engraved saddles, but Kaylon
was not able to participate from having a broken shoulder/arm just
a few days before this event. I look forward to you being there next
year. Kaylon. and hope your injury healed up properly.
Keep these "Bits, boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep yoa covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Coweirls!


The AuduDon Ranch team receives its Deit oucKles tor
winning the double mugging event, with a time of 55.37
seconds.


$30,000 In Scholarships

Open To Kids, Adults


The calf is actually airborne as Josh McKibben hugs its
head, Jay Belflower holds onto a rear leg, and Dennis
Carlton comes in with the tie rope in the double mugging
event.


The Board of Directors of
Operation Round "Up, Peace
River Electric Cooperative's
charitable foundation funded by
members, recently earmarked
$30,000 to provide college
scholarships to as many as 10
college-bound students.
Up for grabs are five four-
year scholarships of $4,000 and
five two-year scholarships
worth $1,000.
Scholarships are available not
only to graduating high school
seniors, but also to adults desir-
ing to further their education.
To be eligible, students must
reside at a permanent residence
which receives power from
PRECO. Peace River Electric
serves 10 central Florida coun-
ties, including, Brevard, De-
Soto, Hardee, Highlands, Hills-
borough, Indian River, Man-
atee, Osceola, Polk and Sara-
sota.
"Since 2006, Operation
Round Up has provided over
$200,000 in college scholar-


ships through the voluntary
contributions of Peace River
Electric members," said Julian
'Tip' Tharp, Operation Round
Up board president. "Rising
educational costs and the state
of our nation's economy are
placing a big burden on college
students, so we're pleased to
make these funds available."
Students who wish to apply
should contact their high
school's guidance office for
application assistance. The
deadline for completed applica-
tions is March 1.
Operation Round Up collects
voluntary donations froin its
members for community uses.
Participating consumers have.
their electric bills "rounded up"
to the next dollar to provide
charitable funds in the areas of
food, shelter, clothing, health,
environment and education.
To download a scholarship
application, visit www.preco.-
coop.


-1 P ----. Aw,
Carlton Ranches' Jamie Rewis starts her run in the
Stampede Race, carrying saddle, blanket, tack, slicker
and everything else she had with her. ...


In the wild-colt riding event, the Carlton Ranches' Dale
Carlton holds the head of the colt while Matt Carlton gets
mounted. Trae Adams is keeping the rear of the horse in
check, and Clint Boney helps from horseback.


When nature made the bluebird, she wished to propitiate
both the sky and the earth, so she gave him the color of
one on his back and the hue of the other on his breast.
-John Burroughs


Last year's winner ..





Pioneer Park


PIONEER PARK DAYS



COYIER ART CONTEST

The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artworkfor the
front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on
Hardee County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


ADULT DIVISION


First place:


Second place: $50 Cash.
Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.


Third place:


CHILDREN'S DIVISION (12 AND UNDER)
A week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days, publication of the artwork, plus.. .


First place:


Second place: $15 Cash.


Third place:


Myrna fMifer,


Winter Resident


RULES:
1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
2) Artwork must be original.
3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must
be depicted.
4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.
5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high (vertical), including
lettering which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2011."
6) Deadline is Friday, Feb. 18, at noon.

TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the drawing.
Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail to Cover Art
Contest, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. 1:27,2:3,10,17nc


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Charles Robert Stevens III ropes the steer's head in the
team doctoring event, while Billy Adams waits to rope the
back legs.


* $100 Cash.
* Publication of your work on the front cover.
* Your photo and biographical story inside.


* $25 Cash.
* Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.


* $25 Cash.
* Publication on the back cover.


* $10 Cash.


JUDGES
JANE LONG PIONEER PARK DAYS DIRECTOR
NICK SUDZINA COURT ADMINISTRATOR FOR 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
SUSAN W. ROBERTS SENIOR CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR IOTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT AND EIGHTH-GENERATION FLORIDIAN


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