<%BANNER%>
The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00363
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: February 10, 2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
sobekcm - UF00028302_00363
System ID: UF00028302:00363
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text







Who Helped Fight

'40s School Fire?

... Story 10A


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 10
3 Sections, 32 Pages
I


460
plus 4 sales tax


Thursday, February 10, 2011


Workshop Targets County Manager's Job


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A workshop tomorrow (Fri-
day) could result in a change in
the county manager's job
description or his job.
The Hardee County Commis-
sion has designated its work-
shop, which begins at 8:30 a.m.
irn Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, to address issues


with the county manager.
That could be an involved
discussion as the county man-
ager duties and responsibilities
are outlined in an ordinance
adopted in November 1989 and
the ordinance would have to be
amended.
First-year Commissioner
Grady Johnson has twice asked
for termination of County Man-
ager Lex Albritton but been


unable to get a second to his
motion. Instead, several of the
commissioners asked for this
workshop to discuss the issues
and amend his job description if
necessary.
The ordinance calls for the
county manager to be "the
administrative head of the
county, responsible for the
administration of all depart-
ments of county government


which' the Board of County
Commissioners has the authori-
ty to control . and proper
administration of all affairs
under the jurisdiction of the
board.
According to the ordinance
he can only be appointed or re-


moved by a vote of not less than
three members of the commis-
sion.
The ordinance lists 17 duties
of the county manager. It
specifically states it is an
administrative position and is
not delegated any governmental


power of the commission as the
governing body of the county
... and its role as the policy-set-
ting body of the county. (To
avoid repetition, the phrase for
the Board of County Commis-
sioners is not repeated in each
See WORKSHOP 2A


PHOTO BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Hardee District School-Related Employee of the Year Angee Coker (left) and Hardee
District Teacher of the Year Ninfa Skipper (right) are congratulated by Schools
Superintendent David Durastanti following the 2011 Recognition Banquet last week.


School District Honors Its Best
Teachers, School-Related Personnel Of The Year


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A veteran teacher who be-
lieves "everyone can do some-
thing well" and an office man-
ager ready to do "whatever it
takes" were named the Hardee
School District's Teacher of the
Year and School-Related Em-
ployee of the Year in a recogni-
tion banquet last week.
As this school district's
Teacher of the Year, Ninfa Skip-
per will go on to represent the
county in the statewide compe-
tition. Named the district's
School-Related Employee of
the Year was Angee Coker.
In an unusual circumstance,
both districtwide winners are
from Hardee Senior. High
School.
In all, seven teachers and 11


school-related personnel were
honored at the Tuesday night
banquet held at the Agri-Civic
Center, each the winner of the
title at individual schools or
departments..
Each winner earned that
honor by nomination and vote
of their peers at their worksites.
Then, those winners were inter-
viewed and a final districtwide
winner was selected, one for the
teachers and one for the school-
related personnel.
But all hold the title at their
work places.
Skipper, a teacher for 28
years, is very involved with the
students at Hardee Senior High
School, serving as class sponsor
across the grade levels, direct-


ing prom and graduation, coor-
dinating various events, and
sponsoring the National Honor
Society.
She is joined by worksite
winners Nicole Moreau of
Zolfo Springs Elementary
School, Tammy Waters of
Bowling Green Elementary,
Missy Kirkland of Wauchula
Elementary School, Amy Bryan
of North Wauchula Elementary,
Elizabeth Jaquez of Hilltop
Elementary and Lori Bromley
of Hardee Junior High School.
Coker, who is office manager
at the senior high, has served
the district for 16 years. She
notes her job entails, "Whatever
it takes to make HHS run
See SCHOOL 7A


Gets Overhau


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Employees of the county
building department will re-
ceive a pay increase after re-
ceiving additional training and
a changed job description but
not until it is completed.
County Building Official
Jerry Smith went before the
Hardee County Comission ask-
ing it to approve the job
description changes and pay
increases for his employees



Y Hosts

Valentine

Party!

By HAILEY SELPH
For The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County YMCA's
new Teen Center will host its
"first annual" Valentine's Day
Party this Friday night.
Junior-high students are in-
vited to join in the fun, begin-
ning at 6 p.m.
Students can enjoy the wide
variety of music that will be
played by disc jockey Ralph
Arce. There also will be several
games that the can be played,
such as football, pool, basket-
ball, volleyball and even a Wii
and a Play Station 3.
Gift cards for the Java Cafe
and Subway will be given as
door prizes.
Admission is $5, and that
will cover pizza, soda and
candy, and all activities.
Senior-high teens who are
already involved with the
YMCA will be serving the jun-
ior-high students.
The party will- end promptly
at 10 p.m.
The Teen Center is housed in
the Burton Building, located at
132 S. 10th Ave. in Wauchula.


before the training is complete
to be consistent with the current
budget passed last year.
Smith said the building de-
partment's budget went from
$282,149 in 2006-07 to the cur-
rent $182,224 budgeted for
2010-11. The number of em-
ployees was cut from eight- to
four.
Smith said the cross-training
of his employees allows the
office to operate more efficient-
ly and cover additional duties


Raises
when an employee is absent.
When an employee misses
work it creates an increased
work load for the rest of his
staff, often causing them to
work through lunch or stay late.
The additional credentials
and responsibilities of the thred
employees would increase pay-
roll by $7,949.
"Having just a permit tech
and an office manager is not
working," said Lex Albritton,
See BUILDING 2A


CONTEST DEADLINE NEAR!


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The Herald-Advocate's 11th annual Pioneer Park Days
Cover-Art Contest offers artists young and old a chance
to display their talents on either the front or back covers
of the special tabloid section which will publish on
March 3. There are cash prizes for each of first, second
and third-places in two-divisions, one for children and
one for adults. Full details and rules to help you enter
your original artwork in the competition which ends
Friday, Feb. 18, at noon can be found on 7C. Here, last
year's top winner, Myrna Miller, displays her drawing.


FAIR MISSES


WEATHER
DATE IGHf LOW RAIN
02/02 84 60 0.00
0203 80 67 0.00
02/04 82 60 0.00
02/05 82 59 0.11
02/06 68 60 0.01
02/07 83 59 0.18
02/08 61 42 0.00
IQITA, Rainfall to 02/08/11 2.46
Same period last year 3.21
Ten Year Average 54.30
Source: Univ. of la. One Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Community Calendar .4A
Courthouse Report ... 6C
Crime Blotter ....... 7C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menu .. 11A




i B111 I0 2lli i
7 18122 07290 3


COURTESY PHOTO
Everyone is gearing up for the Hardee County Fair, which runs from Feb. 19 to Feb. 26. Among those preparing are the Junior Miss Hardee County
contestants shown above (first row, kneeling from left) Krissy Hall, Amber Cunningham, Bridgett Whidden, Hayley Derby, Brook Aleman, Gemi
Saunders, Sarah Albritton, Amy Rogers and Allison Farr; (second row, standing and seated) Lindsay Cooper, Rayna Parks, Kendall Gough, Brooke
Dixon, Cheyanne Skinner, Makayla Chancey, Kirsten Ramirez, Mariah Edenfield, Shaina Cummings, Milli Jones, Alex Ullrich, Brinkley Yeomans,
Tiffany Owens, Gabriella Garza and Meghan Shivers; (back row) Dana Terrell, Maria Morales, Tara McNabb, Lacey Cumbee, Hayley Edenfield,
Caitlin Dufresene, Emily Albritton, Danielle Smith, Caryssa Johnson and Destiny Snyder.


j Sandi Patty

Inspires Women

... Story 9A


Going For

Army Champ!

... Story 1B


Building Department


I _


I -










2A The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate. P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


f DEADLINES:
Schools- Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports- Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads-Tuesday noon I


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months 518; I yr. 531;2 yrs. -$60
Florida
6 months S22; 1 yr. $41; 2 yrs. S79
Out of State
6 months S27; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. $95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions:should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.






SKelly's Column
By Jim


Some 71 percent of Hardee County teenagers have not used
alcohol within the past 30 days, a recent survey showed. Most
Hardee teens do not need to drink alcohol to have a good time.
This info came from a Feb. 8 meeting at Hardee High School
of the Hardee County ASAPP (Alliance for Substance Abuse and
Pregnancy Prevention). The No. 1 influence of teens is their par-
ents, says the alliance. Over half of the 29 percent of teens who
used alcohol went on a drinking binge.
Alcohol use can result in unhealthy choices of behavior.
Alcohol use is involved in 85 percent of first sexual experiences,
says ASAPP. Underage drinking should be the single most pre-
ventable at-risk behavior among our teens.
ASAPP has a five-year federal grant for $125,000 a year to
spread the message against substance abuse and teen pregnancy.
There are T-shirts with the following messages: "Stay Off The
Grass," "Cut The Bullying," "Drinking Makes You King Stupid,"
and "Don't Be A Dip or A Butt Head."
ASAPP on May 6 will have an all-day event for the 8th grade
students at Hardee Junior High. Mosaic will spend $5,100 again
this year for food for the event from Sonny's BBQ.
Even when teens are bored ASAPP'expects them to make good
decisions. Parents, teens and the community as a whole can work
together to reduce alcohol use and risky behaviors.

On Saturday, April 30, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. people can bring
their unwanted or expired human and pet medications for safe dis-
posal to the Wauchula Police Department, the Hardee Sheriff's
Office and the sheriff's substation in Zolfo Springs. Medications
should be in a clear air-tight sealed plastic bag.

Congratulations to the Green Bay Packers for their Super
Bowl win over Pittsburgh and to quarterback Aaron Rodgers for his'
MVP award.

The Hardee County Fair will be Feb. 19-26. A schedule is
printed inside on Page 5-C.

The Florida State Fair will be Feb. 10-21 in Tampa. Cracker
Country is always a highlight and is named for founders Mildred
and Doyle E. Carlton Jr. We always like the Florida wildlife exhib-
it, the cinnamon rolls, the livestock exhibits and many other attrac-
tions.

This is a busy time of year with playoff basketball at the high
school level, the start of Major League Spring Training, spring
turkey season, orange blossoms and spring gardening.



BUILDING
Continued From 1A


the county manager.
Commission Chairman Terry
Atchley told Smith he used to
receive phone call after phone
call regarding the building
department.
"My phone doesn't ting any-
more because of your depart-
ment and that's a blessing to
me." he said.
The office used to have a
building official, two inspec-
tors, two code enforcement offi-
cers, two permit techs, an office
manager and an executive assis-
tant.
It is currently staffed with a
building official, deputy chief
inspector, office manager/code
enforcement/ permit tech and a
code enforcement/permit tech.
"As you increase your skills,
you increase your marketabili-
ty,." Albritton said. "Increased
skills and certification justifies
a pay increase."
Smith said unlike other
county departments, his em-
ployees all must hold licenses.
The building inspector has
more than 10 licenses.
Smith said he was recently
offered $10.000 a year more to
leave for another county.
"The community has been
very good to me and I did not
want to walk away and leave
this community in the state I
found it," Smith said.
Atchley asked "What incen-
tive are we sending to our
employees to want to stay here


and be here?"
Commissioner Dale Johnson
made a motion to approve the
pay increases as requested by
Smith. The motion died for a
lack of a second.
Smith then said "I find it
strange we are arguing about a
$100,000 reduction to the budg-
et."
Commissioner Minor Bryant
then made a motion to approve
the pay increases, but only after
the certification is obtained and
not before. It was seconded by
Commissioner Sue Birge.
The motion carried 3-2 with
Bryant, Sue Birge and Atchley
voted in favor of it. Commis-
sioners Dale Johnson and
Grady Johnson voted against it.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact -, person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


lwrro0 4


DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE

Don't Know Where
To Turn For Help?

CALL THE CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh



YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At

773-3255


Hoion Roii

Hilltop Elementary
Second Quarter


WORKSHOP
Continued From 1A
duty.
He is to assure that all resolu-
tions, ordinances, regulations
and policies are faithfully exe-
cuted.
He is to make an annual
report on the state of the county,
work of the previous year and
any recommendations as to
actions or programs he deems
necessary for improvements of
the county and welfare of its
citizens.
He is to provide the board, or
individual members, upon re-
quest with data or information
on county'government and pro-
vide advice and recommenda-
tions on county government
operations.
He is to prepare and submit
... an annual operating budget,
a capital budget and a capital
program.
He is to establish the sched-
ule and procedures to be fol-
lowed by all county depart-
ments, offices and agencies in
connection with the budget
... .and all phases of the budg-
etary process.
He is to prepare and submit a
report . at the end of each fis-
cal year on the finances and
administrative activities for the
preceding year and submit his
recommendations.
He is to supervise the care
and custody of all county prop-
erty.
He is to recommend a current
position classification and pay
plan for all positions in county
service.
He is to develop, install and
maintain centralized budgeting,
personnel, legal and purchasing
procedures.
He is to organize the work of
county departments . and
review the departments, admin-
istration and operations of the
county and make recommenda-
tions for reorganization.
He is to select, employ and
supervise all personnel and fill
all vacancies, positions or
employment under the jurisdic-
tion of the county.
He is to suspend, discharge or
remove any employee . pur-
suant to procedures adopted by
the commission.
He is to negotiate leases, con-
tracts and other agreements ...
and make recommendations
concerning the nature and loca-
tions of county improvements.
He is see that all terms of them
are performed and notify the
commission of any violations
noted.
He is to attend all meetings of
the commission with authority
to participate in the discussion
of any matter.
Two other points allow him
to undertake a task for any other
agency and perform other du-
ties required of him
Some commissioners and res-
idents may feel the county man-
ager has too much authority and
over-manages everything. He is
responsible for the enforcement
of the Comprehensive Land
Use Plan, land use ordinances
and violations or conflicts with
these.
It is up to the commission to
decide if his broad job descrip-
tion and authority should
change.


Paz, Veronica
Prieto, Harmoni
Ray, Tedrick
Reyes, Amaris
Robertson, TJ
Santana, Joel
Santiago, Sandra
Sotelo, Adalberto
Toledo, Damian
Toribio, Nancy
Torres, Oralia
Velasco, Jesus
Zamora, Izaiah

FIRST GRADE
Carlton, Aviana
Castanon, Juan
Castillo, Caroline
Delaney, Josalyn
Garcia, Jesus
Gibson, Sarah
Gilliard, Presley
Gonzalez, Isabel
Machara, Ayden
Martinez, SaraLi
McCumber, Aliyanna
Molina, Gerardo
Molina-Verdin, Diana
Perez, Marissa
Richardson, Chloe
Rivera, Dezeray
Salgado, Daniela


Santoyo, Mikhayla
Sigala, Casandra
Silva, Genesis
Skipper, Caylin
Sockalosky, Trace
Torres, Alejandro
Villa, Lorena

SECOND GRADE
Aviles, Annaee
Cardenas, Angel
Carlton, Aniah
Delarosa, Vanessa
Garza, Gage
Guevara, Omar
Guevara, Oscar
Gutierrez, Omar
Johnson, Zoey
Martinez, Rocio
Melecio-Flores,
Angelica
Molinero, Alexis
Moseley, Tayler
Paz-Santiago, Jessica
Salgado, Katelyn
Sanchez, Alma
Santiago, Minerva
Sebastian-Paz, Erica
Spires, Sara
Toledo, Tomas
Venegas, Yvonne
Wilson, Brandon


THIRD GRADE
Alvarenga, Nestor
Derringer, Stephanie
Fontana, Blake
Garcia-Paz, Maricela
Roberson, Trenton
Sanchez, Angelina
Velasco-Gonzalez,
Miguel

FOURTH GRADE
Cruz, Sandra
Guevara, Ana
Hernandez, Eddie
Mason, Will
Richardson,.Cadee
Skinner, Owen
Wilson, Kyra

FIFTH GRADE
Benitez, Miguel
Figueroa, Deborah
Garcia, Monica
Gomez, Yashira
Guerrero, Juan
Lemus, Yesenia
Maldonado, Aaron
Molina, Guadalupe
Parks, Lane
Suarez, Cristobal
Taylor, Kevin


MAPPED OUT


COURTESY PHOTO
Indira Sukhraj (background) and Kate Himel (foreground) of the Florida Institute of
Phosphate Research are shown helping first-grade students at North Wauchula
Elementary School prepare a state map for the presentation of "Florida's Ancient
Oceans." Sukhraj and Himel provide an interactive role-play for primary students using
puppets, maps, fossils and other hands-on materials that condense a span of 24 mil-
lion years into a couple of hours! The children learn how habitat changes in Florida
have affected animals over long periods of time. The children also learn that the ani-
mals adapt, flee or become extinct, sometimes leaving a record of their existence
through fossils.


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property,
build your dream home, or do your remodeling.


SEAMLESS GUTTERS

6 inch GUTTERS 5 nch GUTTERS
$3.99 s2.95
PER LINEAR FOOT Specials PER LNEBAR FOOT

DON'T WAITI Low PRICES ONLY GOOD THROUGH FEBRUARY 28
0 & S '. 0 S ,.^ i,,'.l.'lS Ir^


Email: kochcon@strato.net


:. State Certified License #CGC1515338


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255







E0KhCsu i
1A IF(


KINDERGARTEN
Albarran, Fermin
Albiter, Alex
Calvillo, Christian
Canales, Amaria
Carbajal, Natalie
Castillo, Vivianna
Clemente, Nataly
Contreras, Ayden
Diaz, Artina
Ehrenkaufer, Robert
Espinoza, Danny
Estrada, Alejandro
Faulk, Ja-niya
Flores, Ruby
Fuentes, Gustavo
Gomez, Anthony
Jackson, Ireland
Jiang, Daring
Kerney, Travis
Leon-Garcia, Michelle
Leyva, Hailey
Maldonado, Alani
Matra-Cruz, Jorge
Maya, Idalia
McCoy, Lizzie
Mendoza, Lazaro
Mondragon, Alexandra
Munguia, Maria
Murphy, Bryan
Nulles, Omar
Paulino, Manuel


Z I'







February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A

HJHS GIRLS BASKETBALL
mI


*~ The Real Florida
By Dorothy Harris
State Park Ranger

OLD-TIME STRING BAND CONCERT
On Saturday, Feb.19, beginning at 7 p.m., the Friends of
Highlands Hammock will welcome the return of great mountain
ballads and traditional tunes from the Back Porch Revival's Old
Time String Band.
Their sweet and sassy old-time music is loaded with bounce
and humor. Playing both traditional tunes and some of their own
creations, they'll have your toes tapping with their wide array of
instruments, including a banjo, mandolin, autoharp, fiddle, har-
monica, bass and a couple of guitars.
Back Porch Revival has performed together for 20 years. In
1995, they were honored by the folk music community as the top
vocal group at the Pioneer Florida Old Time Music Championship.
In 1996, they took honors again as the top Old Time Band in a year-
ly competition held in Dade City. In 2004, they were featured as
part of a special "Florida Heritage" program at the Florida Folk
Festival.
The band features Jim Robertson on the fiddle, guitar and lead
vocals. His wife, Melanie, plays an old-time failing banjo. She
learned this unique style as an apprentice to a master artist under
the sponsorship of the Florida Bureau of Folklife and has been fea-
tured at the Florida Folk Festival and on National Public Radio.
Her brother, John McClure, plays the mandolin, occasional
autoharp, harmonica, and provides backup and lead vocals. His
wife, Ginger, plays the Appalachian lap dulcimer, penny whistle
and recorder.
Joining his aunts and uncles on fiddle and mandolin will be
nephew Matthew Coltharp. James Dion will be providing solid
rhythm on the bass.
This will be a wonderful night of old-timey string band music
under the stars.
Load up some lawn chairs and blankets, grab a flashlight and
pack a picnic basket of goodies. The Friends of Highlands
Hammock will offer light snacks and hot drinks for sale.
Admission to the concert is $5 per person, with accompanied


COURTESY PHOTOS
Back Porch Revival will perform mountain ballads and
traditional tunes
children 12 and under admitted free of charge. All concert proceeds
benefit park improvement projects and provide a wonderful way to
relax and enjoy the arts.
We hope that you will join us for this unique musical experi-
epce, out here in The Real Florida.


Light One Candle
By Tony Rossi
The Christophers
wt


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Taking the court this season for the junior high Lady Wildcats were (kneeling, left to right) Faith Hodges, Alexi
Santana, Florence Lee, Marsela Ramos, Emily Albritton, Honesty Martinez, Jakaysha Lindsey and Desiree Martinez;.
(back) student assistant Summer Palmer, Coach D.D. Darceus, Makala Faulk, Tamara St. Fort, Destiny Thompson,
Jasmine Thompkins, Catherine Jackson, Head Coach Gloria Soils; and student assistant Yvette Cisneros.




Vehicles Kill 16 Panthers In 2010


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission doc-
umented 23 panther deaths in
2010.
Of those mortalities, 16 pan-
thers died after being struck by
vehicles. Six of the panther
deaths are attributed to "intra-
specific aggression," or pan-
thers killing other panthers.
One panther died of unknown
causes.
This is very similar to 2009,
when the FWC documented 25
deaths, with 17 of those killed
by vehicles. The five-year aver-
age is about 23 panther death
per year, with an average of 14
killed by vehicles.
"Motorists should be aware
that panthers are not always
struck in posted panther speed
zones," said Darrell Land, FWC
biologist and panther team
leader. "We caution motorists to
be on the lookout for the large
cats in wild areas near panther
zones, especially around sun-
down and sunrise."
Panther speed zones are well-
marked, with speed limits re-
duced at night to 45 mph. Mo-
torists should be aware that vio-
lators often receive fines ex-
ceeding $200 for their first
offense, and any violation of
more than 29 mph over the


posted limit will result in a
mandatory court appearance.
The panther population has
been slowly increasing in Flo-
rida, Land said, which results in
the documentation of more
dead panthers.
Land noted the female pan-
thers that were radio-tagged
during 2010 produced 29 kit-
tens. The total number of kit-
tens born for the entire popula-
tion is unknown.
Florida panthers have been
listed federally as an endan-
gered species since 1967 be-


cause of the small, isolated pop-
ulation and habitat loss. Re-
cently the FWC completed a
"Statement on Estimating Pan-


their Population Size," which
notes there are likely between
100 and 160 adult panthers in
South Florida.


The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life,
by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred
years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again,
since it is life.
-William Faulkner

Everybody should have his personal sounds to listen
for-sounds that will make him exhilarated and alive or
quiet and calm. One of the greatest sounds of them all-
and to me it is a sound-is utter, complete silence.
-Andre Kostelanetz


A VALENTINE STORY
Valentine's Day turns people's minds and hearts to love and
romance, but what about God? Should He be part of the equation,
too?
The question came to mind after reading about my friend Abby
Caperton's engagement to her boyfriend, Simon Fuhrmann. On her
Facebook note about the engagement, she wrote the following:
"We ask for your prayers as we discern further for marriage and
God's will in our lives. He's our third party in all of this."
I've heard priests lament the fact that couples often come to
them for a church wedding more because they want the pomp and
circumstance of the event than out of a genuine commitment to
their faith. Abby and Simon considering God as a "third party" in
their relationship therefore intrigued me, so I asked her about it.
Abby explained that her friend, Kendall, often kidded her that
God was her "wingman" when it comes to relationships, and this
situation proved the point. Abby and Simon had been casual friends
for a while, but the thought that he could be more didn't occur until
they were both on a retreat-team together. At a planning meeting
during which everyone was practicing the talks they would give
during the retreat, Simon got up to speak. As he shared his story,
everyone was moved to tears.
After that evening, Abby and Simon often found themselves
together at church or church-related events, and the conversations
always circled "around God and our call to holiness." Still, a
romantic relationship wasn't immediately in the cards, because both
Abby and Simon were discerning potential vocations.
Abby recalled, "As time passed, I found myself praying for
him more and more, but it was never for us to be together. It was
always that God would prepare his heart and guide him. I just
prayed to be an instrument that showed him the love of God."
Abby now sees that as God slowly fashioning their hearts
together. Her biggest fear was telling Simon about some of her past
relationships with men which took place during a period when she
struggled with her self-respect and before she put Christ first in her
.life. Simon accepted what she describes as her "past brokenness"
with understanding, compassion and love.
As their relationship now proceeds toward the sacrament of
marriage, God and their Catholic faith remain the glue that hold
Abby and Simon together.
She said, "Separate, we are two complete individuals.
Together with God and by His grace, we are one complete unit.
He is our glue, our bond, our wingman. Especially in moments
when we fall and sin, God is there with us and He gives us the
grace to encourage the other to go to Confession, to attend Mass,
to pray more, and to read Scripture together. God gives'us the grace:
to lead each other to Heaven."
Hopefully everyone reading this will offer a prayer for Abby
and Simon as they approach their big day. Their story also offers an
important reminder as Valentine's Day draws near.
While hearts and flowers are an important part of any rela-
tionship, commitment to God is the foundation that will help you
weather life's storms. So this Feb. 14, relish the romance but also
foster your faith, maybe by doing something simple like sharing a
prayer before your romantic dinner.
Remember, God is the source of all love and the ideal wing-
man. Keeping Him as the "third party" in your relationship can
help it bloom like a rose.
For a free copy of "The Greatest Gift, write: The Christophers, 5
Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail: mail@christo-
phers.org.


wiaiwaian freeze


GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE.
* Cuts Razor Cuts
* Color Highlights Make-Up
- Up-do's
& Much More


a p?


- U--


Contact us for your life,


S* V auto, home, annuity or long












773-3117
1017 US Huwy 17 NO. Wauchulac
George L. Wadsworth, Jr. Jay Bryan

Agent Agency Manager


-
a
0;


KERRY SUE MESS.4 RUiCER
SCHONAG P1v SAINDERS NL TECH JENNIFER HAND
Sm-rS F4CL'L SPECMUST Snus-r
773-0320


a I


mm mmm


a-
r
;;~


r








4A The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


Obituaries


PHYLLIS RUTH BEATTIE
Phyllis Ruth Beattie, 85, of
Wauchula, died on Thursday,
Feb. 3, 2011, at Hardee Manor
Care Center.
Born on April 14, 1925, in
Ashland, Ohio, she came to
Ilardee County in 1962. She
was a homemaker.
She was preceded in death by
husband Walter E. Beattie; par-
ents John and Florence Gray;
sisters Josephine Stillion, Letha
Lefever and Donna Calhoun;
and brother Gene Gray.
Survivors include son John
Beattie and wife Roberta of
Wauchula; grandson Walt Beat-
tie and wife Shannon of Fort
Green'; granddaughter Sara
Beattie Moore and husband
Steve of St. Cloud; brother
Ernie Gray of Ohio; and grand-
children Drew Beattie and
Wyatt Beattie of Fort Green.
A memorial service was held
on Monday at St. Ann's
Episcopal Church at 10 a.m.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

The minimum pool depth
required for international
water polo matches is six
feet.


In LMemory







'' ""






GLENNA HILL BEYNON
SHEPPARD
Glenna Hill Beynon Shep-
pard, 84, of Bartow, died on
Feb. 5, 2011, at Southland
Suites in Lakeland.
She was born on Aug. 30,
1926, in Tampa. She graduat-
ed from Hillsborough High
School in 1944 and the
University of Tampa in 1948.
She was a longtime mem-
ber of First United Methodist
Church of Fort Meade. She
loved music and directed and
sang in the choir for many
years.
She and her first husband,
Howard L. Beynon, moved to
Bartow from Fort Meade in
1972. She retired as a service
representative for General
Telephone co.
She was preceded in death
by her husbands Howard L.
Beynon and Hilary W. Shep-
pard; three sisters; and two
brothers.
She is survived by her
daughter Debra Beynon Hall
and husband Lloyd of Fort
Meade; sons Howard C. Be-
ynon and wife Dawn of Fort
Meade, and Joe L. Beynon
and wife Debbie of Gaithers-
burg, Md.; sister Barbara
Hansard of Pensacola; six
grandchildren, Joe and Scott
Beynon, Stefanie Beynon
Ruleman, H.C. and Emily
Beynon, and Leah Shirley;
and seven great-grandchil-
dren.
Memorial services will be
held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb.
12, 2011, at First United Met-
hodist Church of Fort Meade
with the Rev. Raymond Ca-
meron and the Rev. Vincent
Price officiating. In lieu of
flowers, those wishing 'may
make contributions to the First
United Methodist Church of
Fort Meade or to Good Shep-
herd Hospice.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade


Downtown Wauchula Is Cookin'!


Get your taste buds ready for
this month's mouth-watering
Friday Night Live, presenting
the seventh annual Grillin' &
Chillin' on Main.
The dual event is Friday, Feb.
18, from 5 to 9 p.m. in down-
town Wauchula, with the annu-
al competition continuing on
Saturday, Feb. 19, from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m., brought to you by
Main Street Wauchula Inc.
For two days you can eat all
the tasty barbecue you care to
as teams compete to see who
has the best around. In addition
to filling your belly you will be
giving to a worthy cause. All
the contest teams will donate a
portion of their proceeds to a
non-profit organization.


Wildlife Vie
By Rodney Barretc
Fish & Wildlife Commission Ch


So, find a worthy cause and
help them raise some funds!
The competitive spirit is not
just for the barbecue teams,
though. On Friday night you,
too, can enter your best home-
made chili or dessert for a
chance to win a cash prize for
amateurs and a plaque and pub-
licity for the professionals.
You won't be able to keep
your feet still as the band One
Night Rodeo takes the stage
Friday night. Kids will have
fun with inflatables, games,
Legos, chalk art and more.
Enjoy vendors with arts and
crafts, merchandise and other
treats like homemade ice cream,
kettle corn, funnel cakes and
boiled peanuts.



--\


ao "m
lairman i _


PLEASE DON'T FEED THE PELICANS
Just don't do it.
I've written about this before, but we're still seeing the effects
of brown pelicans becoming dependent on throw-away fish and
fish scraps, and I felt it was important to bring up the subject again.
In Jacksonville this winter, about 30 pelicans have died. These dead
birds have been sent to a wildlife laboratory for testing, and we're
still awaiting the results.


On oving 0emo0oy


LEE A. FENNELL
Lee A. Fennell, 73, of
Bowling Green, died on
Monday, Jan. 31, 2011, at his
home.
He was born on July 5,
1937, and came to Bowling
Green in 1972 from Palatka.
He was a trucking owner/-
operator aifd attended First
Baptist Church of Bowling
Green.
He is survived by his wife,
Joyce .Fennell of Bowling
Green; two sons, Daniel Lee
Fennell, and David Lamar
Fennell and wife Glori, all of
Wauchula; brother James A.
Fennell and wife Bonnie of
McAlpin; four sisters. Bar-
bara Parks and husband David
of McAlpin, Marilyn Kasno
and husband Bob of Salem,
S.C., and Faye Ridge and
Shirley Geibieg and husband
Jim, all of Lake City; three
grandchildren, Daniel Lee
Fennell Jr. of Dorcester, Ill.,
and Brittany Doyle Fennell
and Austin Lamar Fennell
both of Bowling Green; and
one great-granddaughter Ken-
dal Spiller of Bowling Green.
Visitation was Tuesday,
Feb. 8 at 11 a.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel. Graveside
services and interment were at
noon Tuesday at Bowling
Green Cemetery with the Rev.
Jimmy Morse officiating.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.



Jn 2ovtng ^Uemomj


PHYLLIS RUTH
BEATTIE
Phyllis Ruth Beattie, 85, of
Wauchula, died on Thursday,
Feb. 3, 2011, at Hardee Man-
or Care Center.
She was born on April 14,
1925, in Ashland, Ohio, and
came to Hardee County in
1962. She was a homemaker.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Walter E.
Beattie; parents John and
Florence Gray; sisters Jos-
ephine Stillion, Letha Lefever
and Donna Calhoun; and
brother Gene Gray.
She is survived by son John
Beattie and wife Roberta of
Wauchula; brother Ernie Gray
of ohio; grandson Walt Beat-
tie and wife Shannon of Fort
Green and their children
Drew and Wyatt; granddaugh-
ter Sara Beattie Moore and
husband Steve of St. Cloud;
and numerous nieces and
nephews residing in Ohio.
A memorial service was
held on Monday, Feb. 7, at St.
Ann's Episcopal Church at 10
a.m.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Don't think because you
came on Friday night that you
saw it all!
The stage will be hopping on
Saturday, too, with Tip Toes
Dance Studio and Bailey's
Dance Academy performing at
10 a.m. One Night Rodeo will
take the stage again from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. and Generations
Bluegrass will finish out the
day from Ito 3 p.m.
Saturday is packed with more
barbecue and vendors, along
with a craft project for the kids
and a petting zoo.
Departing every hour on the
hour between 10 a.m. and 2
p.m., you can learn a little
Wauchula history with historic


downtown tours in partnership
with Lydia's House and the
Cracker Trail Museum. On the
hour between 11 a.m. and 1
p.m. enjoy learning a few new
recipes for the grill to go along
with your barbecue with
Wauchula's favorite red-headed
chef, Layne Prescott.
This fantastic two-day event
would not be possible without
sponsors Mosiac, CF Industries,
Kimley-Horn & Associates and
Peace River Electric.
For a complete event sched-
ule, chili and dessert entry
forms, vendor applications and
more event information, visit
www.mainstreetwauchula.com
or call 863-767-0330.


However, according to Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission biologists, cold weather stress and the alteration of
migration due to feeding may be to blame.
The birds had been gathering at a local seafood-processing
plant, where fish scraps are readily available. Our law enforcement
personnel are working with that facility to alter the way they dis-
pose of fish and fish scraps. We are also working with a local bird
sanctuary to assist in saving birds that are sick or stressed.
FWC staff and other experts worry about the overall health of
brown pelican populations. Because of this concern, the commis-
sion passed a rule in 2008 to stop the feeding of large numbers of
pelicans.
The activities no longer permitted under this rule include:
Dumping or discharging large amounts of fish scraps,
bycatch or comparable materials from a fish house or similar facil-
ity. This attracts large numbers of pelicans to that area and causes
changes in their behavior. By indirectly feeding pelicans, such
large-scale activities can have a detrimental effect on a brown pel-
ican population by inhibiting migration and leading to cold-weath-
er-induced illness and injury.
Individuals or groups feeding large numbers of pelicans at
regular places and times. This does not apply to feeding pelicans
that are captive or under care at places such as a rehabilitation facil-
ity.
Anglers tossing scraps at public fishing piers and beaches.
Public piers that attract large numbers of fishermen may want to
consider creating scrap chutes, where folks can dump the abundant
leftovers to keep them away from pelicans.
The intent of this rule is not to regulate the occasional or the
casual feeding of individual pelicans. This rule provides an en-
forcement tool to resolve situations where large-scale feeding
could negatively influence the health or survival of a pelican.
You can help keep pelican populations healthy by not feeding
them.
If available, use fish-scrap repositories at piers and docks. If
they are not available, discard your fish scraps in a garbage can or
at home.
Your efforts will help keep pelican populations healthy and
wild. Please don't feed them.


It is far better to grasp the
universe as it really is than
to persist in delusion, how-
ever satisfying and reas-
suring.


3i ^oltiing #le0wo&ay


MARION G.
RATLIFF
Marion G. Ratliff, 82, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Jan. 31, 2011, at home.
She was born on Oct. 18,
1928 and came to Hardee
County in 1952 from New
York. She was a nursing
supervisor at the Hardee
County Health Department
and a member of Florida's
First Assembly of God.
Survivors include her
daughter Barbara Ann Ratliff
of Fort Lauderdale; brother
Jack Gelke of California;
brother-in-law Robert Ratliff
of Wauchula; and grandson
Joshua Lanham.
Memorial services will be
held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Feb.
11 at Florida's First Assembly
of God, with the Rev. Robert
Lecocq officiating.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


THURSDAY. FEB. 10
VHardee County School
Board, workshop and meet-
ing, Board Room, 230 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula,
workshop 4:30, meeting 5
p.m.
/Sustainable Hardee Fo-
cus Group-Economic Devel-
opment, County Commission
Chambers, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6-8
p.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 11
VHardee County Com-
mission, planning session on
county manager, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.

MONDAY. FEB. 14
VWauchula City Commis-
sion, monthly meeting, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY. FEB. 15
VSustainable Hardee
Focus Group-Housing, Wau-
chula City Hall Auditorium,
225 E. Main St., Wauchula,
6-8 p.m.

THURSDAY. FEB. 17
VHardee County Com-
mission and Planning &
Zoning Board, joint meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.


Two local families working together...


to provide your family the very best care available.


ROBARTS
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
------- ~* ----
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906

529 West Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873


SUTTrr MONumENMS


&Temeu Sewmic&e

228 N. 6th Ave Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-0625


863-773-9773
View Obits at robartsfh.com Dependable Affordable


/


I NEW


Could You

Be Next

Grill King?

Do you have what-.i takes-to
be the King of the Grill? Do
have a favorite charity you want
to raise funds for?
Then Main Street Wauchula
is looking for you!
Join the seventh annual
Grillin' & Chillin' on Main in
downtown Wauchula on Feb.
18 and 19. Enter your barbe-
cue team and raise funds for a
non-profit organization of your
choice.
There is only space for 10
teams, so don't delay!
For more information, con-
tact the Main Street Wauchula
Inc. office at 767-0330 or visit
www.mainstreetwauchula.com.

Only when we are no
longer afraid do we begin
to live.
-Dorothy Thompson


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 25-2009CA-000200
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
ACTING THROUGH THE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE, RURAL
DEVELOPMENT, F/K/A FARMERS
HOME ADMINISTRATION,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
KEVIN GLENN JACKSON, A SIN-
GLE PERSON,
DEFENDANTS.
I
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered
on January 31, 2011, by the above
entitled Court in the above styled
cause, the undersigned Clerk of
Court or any of his duly autho-
rized deputies, will sell the prop-
erty situated in Hardee County,
Florida, described as:
LOT.2, BLOCK 7, AVALON
PARK ADDITION TO THE
CITY OF WAUCHULA, AS
PER PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2
75, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA,
at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash on
02/23, 2011, at 11:00 A. M., at the
courthouse located at 417 W.
Main Street In Hardee County in
Wauchula, Florida 33873, second
floor hallway outside Room 202,
subject to all ad valorem taxes
and assessments for the real
property described above.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
OFFICE OF THE COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATOR, 255 N. BROADWAY
AVENUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA
33830, (863) 534-4686, AT LEAST
7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHED-
ULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR
IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING
THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME
BEFORE THE SCHEDULED
APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7
DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
DATED on 02/02, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office Drawer 1749
Wauchula, FL 33873
(S E A L)
BY: /s/ B. Reid
Deputy Clerk
2:10,17c


2:10c






February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


.1IR~I


I "


2I0uMunm r Iu2m u 0 a Izii H MtiUlU |200 Ci YSU SIrIEUii 2005U CHEVY C AL 2005BUICKT TRAZA 2007 PIAC VIBE 2005i DODGE CARAVAN
.-SAE $ 2 SAE $7,466 SALE $7,995 E $7,964 SALE $8,496 SALE $ 9, 78'5 SALE ;,3'4
ALEf .:r92 IILE $,4i6f 1 i^ L7iS $ f596 y4 IL $,96 ^^^^ SM W 7 I JSLg 9, 314


SALE $9,898


D00 CHEVY SUBURBIA 2007 PONTIAC 5 2O116 TOBTfACAJRIE I EGPIRMY SPORT
ALE $9,995 SMALE$10,495 SALE $ 10498 SMISA$0,995'


2007 CHEVY 1500 2007 CHEVY HHR 2006 CHEVY MALIBU 207 CHEVY MONIE CARLO
ScA I. 4 r 11S cAltJ I ro eArSi AIt w12-St 7ar A #ar


BUICK CADILLAC CHEVROLET CHRYSLER DODGE FORD GIIC HONDA HYUNDAI JEEP KIA
- LINCOLN MAZDA MERCURY NISSAN SATURN SCION TOYOTA VOLKSWAGEN AND IVMORE!!


' I I I I I I 'I I
mR L E miE, T1 a NJN lOi ~BEr
WITH EVERY PURCHASE U 000

WIN O1 000
i A l A DOUBLE YOUR WINNINGS WITH ANY
MCIFHI E of n VEIPI E DIIDPrUne ll


r~i~l


~k~i~i


I








6A The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


Teachers of the year are (from front left) Amy Bryan, districtwide winner Ninfa Skipper
and Lori Bromley; (back row) Nicole Moreau, Tammy Waters, Missy Kirkland and
Elizabeth Jaquez.


School-related personnel of the year are (from front left) Irene McCasland, Linda
Valdez, districtwide winner Angee Coker, Angelita Hinojosa and James Carpenter;
(back row) Debbie Daggett, Amy Rigney, Steve Pakovich, Luisa Villegas, Sylvia Reyna
and Wanda Altman.


Guests gathered around appetizing displays as students prepared and served finger
foods and punch.


Honorees and guests filled the Hardee County Agri-Civic Center on Tuesday night of
last week for the banquet and program recognizing teachers and school-related per-
sonnel of the year.


The Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps at Hardee Senior High School pre-
sented the colors.


PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Members of the National Honor Society at Hardee Senior High School served those
attending the 2011 Recognition Banquet honoring Hardee District Schools' teachers
and school-related personnel of the year.


Serving as master of ceremonies was the Rev. Bob Lecocq of Florida's First Assembly
of God.


Event sponsors, the Hardee Education Association/United and School Board members
participated in a receiving line Io congratulate each winner called to the stage.







February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


The culinary operations class from Hardee Senior High
School provided a variety of hors d' oeuvres for guests
to enjoy during the reception preceding the dinner.

SCHOOL
Continued From 1A


smoothly." She is known for
helping whenever and wherever
she is needed.
Joining her are worksite win-
ners Steve Pakovich of the
Educational Facilities Depart-
ment, Wanda Altman of the
Transportation Department,
James Carpenter of Pioneer
Career Academy, Irene Mc-
Casland of Zolfo Springs
Elementary, Linda D. Valdez of
Bowling Green Elementary,
Sylvia Reyna of Wauchula
Elementary, Debbie Daggett of
North Wauchula Elementary,
Angelita Hinojosa of Hilltop
Elementary School, Amy
Rigney of Hardee Junior High
and Luisa Villegas of the
District Office.
Each site's teacher of the year
and school-related employee of
the year was called to the stage
before the crowd gathered at the
Agri-Civic. Center. Photos of
them, their jobs and their fami-
lies were projected onto the
wall as a biographical sketch of
each was read by master of cer-
emonies the Rev. Bob Lecocq.
Deputy Schools Superinten-
dent Woody Caligan,, and
Schools Superintendent David
Durastanti presented each site
winner and districtwide nomi-
dee with a plaque.
Then, each passed through a
long receiving line, collecting
gratitude and congratulations
from Jonelle Cochran of Sun-
coast Schools Federal Credit
Union, Doug Jenson of Van-
dolah Power Co., Brian Ham-
man of CenturyLink, Selden
Spencer of the Hardee Edu-
cation Association/United, and
Paul Samuels, Jan Platt and
Mildred Smith of the Hardee
County School Board.
Nicole Moreau of Zolfo
Springs Elementary, it was
noted, is in her sixth year as a
teacher. She has served as a
mentor teacher, grade chair,
reading and writing coach and
committee member, along with
many other activities.
Tammy Waters of Bowling
Green Elementary has 13 years
teaching kindergarten, first and
third grades. She works with the
Christmas program,. math su-
perstars and science presenters.
Missy Kirkland has 20 years
of experience, 16 of them at
Wauchula Elementary. She has
been grade chair and has served
on textbook and curriculum
committees.
Amy Bryan of North Wau-
chula Elementary is in her 10th
year of teaching physical edu-
cation. She has served as men-
tor teacher, a curriculum leader
and committee member and has
sponsored cheerleading and
chaired fairs, field days and
bike rodeos.
Elizabeth Jaquez of Hilltop
Elementary School is in her
13th year of teaching. She has
served as grade chair and on
parent involvement and school
improvement committees.
Lori Bromley of Hardee
Junior High has taught for 16
years. She is a department chair
and has served on textbook and
literacy committees, and


worked to develop improve-
ments to the Pupil Progression
Plan.
Steve. Pakovich of the
Educational Facilities Depart-
ment serves as electrical and
HVAC supervisor, and is in his
20th year. He was an integral
part of various upgrades and
remodels, and in outfitting the
culinary arts room and a com-
puter lab. Restoration of the
schools following the 2004 hur-
ricanes was a top project in his
career.
Wanda Altman of the Trans-
portation Department holds the
distinction of driving a school
bus for 35 years. She has trans-
ported both mainstream and
exceptional students safely to
classes each day.
James Carpenter of Pioneer
Career Academy has 16 years
of experience. He was involved
in founding the program, and is
a computer and athletic coach.
Irene McCasland of Zolfo
Springs Elementary has 26
years with the district, two as
tutor and 24 with data entry and
records. She helped acquire
books for the school library fol-
lowing Hurricane Charley.
Linda D. Valdez of Bowling
Green Elementary has worked
here for nine years. She oper-
ates the reading technology lab,
serves as a translator and is
chair of the School Advisory
Council.
Sylvia Reyna is in her 10th
year at Wauchula Elementary,
and 14th overall with local
schools. She is certified in child
care, crisis prevention and First
Aid.
Debbie Daggett, office man-
ager at North Wauchula Ele-
mentary, has 30 years with the
district. She has served as a
tutor and administrative assis-
tant and has worked with the
Outdoor Classroom, EcoCamp
and the Summer Marine
Science programs.
Angelita Hinojosa of Hilltop
Elementary School has 23 years
in the school system, working
as a migrant tutor and in the
early childhood program. She
has tutored physical education
and, currently, kindergarten.
Amy Rigney of Hardee
Junior High has 17 years with
the district, seven as a tutor at
First Steps and since 2001, as a
.hookkeeper. She has sponsored
Color Guard and helped coach
cheerleading.
Luisa Villegas is migrant
advocate for the District Office,
and his done so for 20 years.
She works with data and with
home-school liaisons, and has
arranged vision and other
exams and appointments for
migrant students.
The banquet in their honor
was sponsored by Vandolah
Power Co., Suncoast Schools
Federal Credit Union and
CenturyLink. Helping to make
the evening possible were the 4-
H Foundation and the Culinary
Operations class, National
Honor Society and Junior
Reserve Officer Training Corps
of Hardee Senior High School.


I 1 .E--4 P
Student Amanda Rigney led the Pledge of Allegiance and
student Catalina Rosario (above) sang the national
anthem.gc


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Flonda Fish & Wildlife Commission


D IS FOR DEER
Hunting season has been pretty good so far.
I shot a 170-pound seven-point and a doe during Zone C's doe
week. Then, I shot another doe on the first day of Zone D's antler-
less deer season. What made that hunt special was that I took it off
some property I have on the Sopchoppy River that's less than an
acre in size. And, it was the very first time I ever even hunted on it
since I bought the 70-foot-wide lot in 2005, making it the first deer
I ever harvested on land I own!
But, I still have a little room left in my freezer, and I'm not
calling it quits just yet. After all, there are still lots of hunting days
left in my neck of the woods, and my game camera's still taking
pictures of some pretty good bucks, although they are mostly at
night, I must admit.
So if you're like me, or if you live in the central or southern
part of the state and don't mind hunting with a primitive weapon,
then point your pickup truck north,' because Zone D's deer season
is still goin' strong on private lands and on a lot of the wildlife man-
agement areas.
The second phase, if you will, of muzzleloading gun season
runs Feb. 21-27 in this western part of the Panhandle. This unique
late season, which occurs only in Zone D, was established to allow
hunters the chance to hunt the rut that runs from late January,
through February in this part of the state.
A $5 Muzzleloading Gun Permit is required to hunt during this
season, where, on private land, hunters have the choice of using a
muzzleloader, bow or crossbow.
On WMAs, this post-season is referred to as the archery/muz-
zleloading gun season. Hunters can use bows or muzzleloaders, but
no crossbows-unless they possess a Disabled Crossbow Permit.
Hunters who choose to hunt with a bow must have the $5 Archery
Permit, and those using a muzzleloader need the $5 Muzzleloading
Gun Permit.
The most common game to hunt during this season are deer
and wild hogs. Only bucks may be taken (even if you use a bow),
and one antler must be at least five inches in length. If you're hunt-
ing deer, make sure you have the new $5 Deer Permit first. On pri-
vate land, the daily bag limit is two. Bag limits and antler size for
deer on WMAs can differ, so please consult the area brochure
before you hunt.
Wild hogs aren't considered game animals on private lands,


The Florida Department of Education


Presenting the awards were (from left) Deputy Schools
Superintendent Woody Caligan and Schools
Superintendent David Durastanti.


and because of this, they can be taken year-round by most weapons
with no bag or size limits. On most WMAs, there's also no bag or
size limits, and hogs are legal to take during most hunting seasons
except spring turkey. On selected WMAs, specific bag and size
limits do apply, so check the area's brochure to make sure.
No dogs may be used in the pursuit of deer during this season,
but leashed dogs can be used to track a wounded deer if necessary.
And it's important to note that no turkeys may be taken during this
season.
Bows and crossbows must have a minimum draw weight of 35
pounds, and hand-held releases on bows are permitted. Broad-
heads used in taking deer must have at least two sharpened edges
with a minimum width of 7/8 inch.
During this season, you may use only muzzleloaders that take
black powder or a non-nitro-cellulose substitute and are fired by
wheel lock, flintlock or percussion cap ignition (including 209
primers). You may not use muzzleloaders that require smokeless
powder or those with self-contained cartridge ammunition capabil-
ities. For hunting deer, muzzleloaders that fire single bullets must
be at least .40-caliber, and those firing two or more balls must be
20-gauge or larger.
And you're allowed to take deer and hogs over feeding sta-
tions on private land, but it's illegal to do that on WMAs.
Twelve of the WMAs in Zone D have the late archery/muzzle-
loading gun season. If you plan to hunt any of 'em, you must have
the $26 Management Area Permit as well as your.hunting license.
And the following nine WMAs don't require a quota permit during
this period: Apalachicola, Apalachicola River, Choctawhatchee
River, Econfina Creek, Escambia River, Point Washington, Tate's
Hell, Upper Chipola River and Yellow River.
You can get all of the licenses and permits you'll need at any
tax collector's office, retail outlet that sells hunting and fishing sup-
plies, by calling 888-Hunt-Florida or by going online at
www.fl.wildlifelicense.com.
So if you're like me and not quite ready to give up on deer
hunting, have no fear, 'cause February's here! Grab your favorite
primitive weapon and head to Zone D, where the rut's goin' on hot
and heavy.
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony.Young@MyFWC.com.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


is conducting


a survey


designed to provide the state with information on how well schools
are supporting parents' involvement in their child's education.
Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), states
must report this information to the federal government on an
annual basis.


When?
February 1 through June 30, 2011.


How?
To complete the Survey go online to: www.ESEsurvey.com


Results?
Survey results are reported to the United States Department of
Education, Office of Special Education Programs, as part of
Florida's Annual Performance Report and are posted on the
Florida Department of Education's Website at www.fldoe.org/ese.
Improvement activities are determined based on the survey
report. Progress.is monitored through the annual parent survey,
No names will be released in any report. All responses are
confidential.


Please call the ESE office at 773-2600 if you need more infor-
mation or help with the Survey. 20


Survey for Parents of Students

with an Individual Educational Plan (IEP)

in Exceptional Student Education (ESE)


YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show Itl Your work could be published in
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear In this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.








8A The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


KINDERGARTEN
Aiden Thomas
Alex Trevino
Alondra Luna
Alyssa Contreras
Annaka Brace
Blake Rucker
Brendan Holton
Briana Tambunga
Cassie Higginbotham
Chase Sanders
Christina LeConte
Danielle Gutierrez
David Hernandez
Desmas Davilla
Devan Medrano
Deysi Rojas
Emma Eures
Eryn Hagwood
Ethan Tracy
Genesis Chaviz
George Alamia
Hannah Atchley
Haylee Elisondo
Holly Rowe
Jaidyn Newman
Jayden Cabrera
Jose Ibanez
Joshua Vasquez
Kaelea Bryant
Kaira Detrinidad
Kami Kelley
Karlie Alderman
Leanna Bryant
Liliana Castillo
Lillian Edwards
Luis Reyes
Mackenzie Bacon
Makayla Kersey
Martin McClenithan
Miguel Avalos
Morgan Dickey
Nathan Delarosa
Nathaniel Deemer
Robert Mondragon
Rolant Simon
Roxanna Arvizu
Rylie Morris
Samantha Shackelford
Samara Arreola
Santos Zuniga
Saul Ruiz
Serenity Walters
Trinity Vansickle
Vanessa Peraza
Victor Fabila
Zander Yeomans

FIRST GRADE
Abigail Neel
Alison Schultz
Allazae McLeod
Amey Moralez
Andon Whaley
Annalise Terrell
Arika Perez
Azavie Calhoun
Brianna Downey


Brianna O"Bryan
Carter Birge
Cassandra Jaimes
Cecilia Alvarez
Christopher Leal
Christopher Sosa
Codee Walker
Crystal Wingate
Darius Yang
David Orta
Dora Santoyo
Eliana Enriquez
Emanuel Rodriquez
Eve Quintana
Gabby Garcia
Guillermo Ramos
Haven Rimes
Hunter Atchley
Iliana Ruiz
Isaac Badillo
Jose Fernandez
Kaden Bryan
Karina Valadez
Kaylie Grice
Khalid Lymon
Khloe Smith
Lahna Christian
Liliana Plata
Lille Gaydon
Lizet Vargas
Luis Paulino
Maria Medrano
Mario Marcial
Maritza Mondragon
Matt Webb
Miguel Vasquez
Mollie O"Bryan
Petra Gaitan
Reese Stone
Ricardo Sanchez
Robert Limon
Rojelio Hipolito
Samantha Castillo
Samia Holley
Sonia Macedo
Stephanie Perez
Tomas Hernandez
Valerie Mlartinez
Victor Torres
Yayoua Vang
Yesaily Martinez
Zaria Davila

SECOND GRADE
Abel Servin
Acheline Delhomme
Adrian Juarez
Alan Felipe-Zuniga
Alessa Valerio
Amy Gutierre .
Breana Reynolds
Brianna Rivers
Caleb Arana
Caleb Macias
Chloe Martinez
Chloe Selph
Christopher Castaldi
Daisy Chavez


Daniel Campos
Daniella Marrero
David Edwards
Desirae Cabrera
Elvia Garcia
Esteban Fernandez
Haley Dickey
Hannah Ward
Heidi Smith
Hunter Davis
Hunter Rowe
Isabel Calvillo
Jamal Holley
Jamie Walker
Jarell Jackson
Jelissa Torres
Joseph Peters
Juan Morales
Landon Newman
Leigha Alderman
Mackenzie Wallace
Macy Kingdon
Malaki Kangala
Matthew Peters
Mayte Tellez
Michael Barber
Nathaniel Bacon
Oscar DeSantiago
Reyna Rivera
Richard Sanders
Richard Torres
Robert Mushrush
Roman Rivas
Roxana Araujo
Sara Ibanez
Seth Durrance
Seth Gough
Travon Thomas
Trey Canary
Tulsi Patel
Veronica Rivera
Zachary Estrada
Zachery Perez

THIRD GRADE
Blake Richardson
Brianna Farias
Brianna Valadez
Bryan Herrejon-
Madragal
Bryce Rucker
Cinnamon Williams
Cristina Lopez-Rojas
Cruz Avalos
Diana Paulino-Pena
Elijah Powell
Elizabeth Camarillo
Evontae Rogers
Fabian Lopez
Hallie Atchley
Hannah Ford
Hugh Pate
Hunter Presley
Isaac Estrada
Jacob Contreras
Jesus Lopez
Jonathan Orta
Laura Ordehi


Maria Deloera
Misael Arana
Promise Nichols
Rachel Garland
Rosa Guerrero
Sandra Gomez
Saul Arvizu
Savannah Valletutti
Trista Miller
Victor Aleman
Weston Roberts

FOURTH GRADE
Adamaris Garcia
Anahi Cano
Angel Conejo
Betsy Mejia-Flores
Daniel Sockalosky.
Devan Rimes
Eddie Rivera
Eric Romero
Erica Martinez
Fatima Ramirez
Hannah Bandy
Jansen Walker
JC Kulig
Jean St. Louis
Laura Reynolds
Lindsey Boyette
Marisa Molina-
Santibanez
Marta Ramirez
Mary Young
Nick Cunningam
Patricia DeLoera
Ramiro Guerrero Leon
Tony Webb
Vincent De La Rosa
Yenny Saldana
Zackary Durastanti

FIFTH GRADE
Adelina Luna-Muniz
Adelina Villafranca
Alexis Neel
Anthony Loredo
Caleb McCoy
Carlos Perez
Chris Velez
Elizabeth Weeks
Emily Patarini
Garrett Norris
Kassidy Wallace
Kayla Curry
Mario Gomez
Nubia Gomez
Pablo Salgado
Ricardo Rodriguez
Rouke Madronal
Ruby Rivera
Salvador Herrejon
Madrigal
Sydni Lopez
Taylor Bone
Zack Macias
Zackary Richardson


Family Restaurant

Fabulous Soup & Salad Bar "The best steaks in town!" *
Seafood Variety of Chicken Homemade Specials *
SLarge Selection of Cakes & Pies *


Now SERVBG qEER & WINE

VALENTINE WEEKEND SPECIALS


* Roast Turkey
* Pork Loin wlHomemade Stuffing
* Baked Lasagna
All Served with
Green Beans & Mashed Potaoes
* Prime Rib
w/Green Beans & Choice of Potato
* Lemon Pepper Grilled Tilapia
G..-'aaa n D ane D Cf' .e.> t fBajaf


-RW:;/wreen ceans & choice o OtT oM
Plus many more choices from the regular menu.





H-. SM

TUSA -STRDY7M- ..9P-
Serving rekfst- unh Dnnr 10


Softball Started Tuesday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's nearly spring, and time
for girls softball to get going.
Head coach Shari Knight, her
staff and players hosted Avon
Park Tuesday in a double-head-
er, the JV playing at 6 and the
varsity about 7:30. The varsity
girls go to Sarasota Booker
tomorrow (Friday) for the first
district game of season.
The season stretches to an
April 15 game at Avon Park.
The Class 3A-District 11 tour-
nament is at Hardee April 18-
21.
Assisting Knight will be
Julian Garcia, Linda Arre-
dondo, Leigh Beumel and
Jamie Rivas.
Girls out for softball this year
hadn't been divided into varsity


and JV at press time. They
included seniors Lacie Carlton,
Caylah Coker and Elvira Servin
and juniors Latiesha Allen,
Sabrina Hernandez, Amanda
McNabb and Courtney Parks.
Added to the mixture are
sophs Rachel Coker, Michelle
Delatorre, Karina Fernandez,
Nicole Franks, Anjelica Jack-
son, Jessica Johnston, Kayla
Knight, Penny McGuire and
America Sandoval; and fresh-
men Isabel Abel, Arissa Camel,
Chantel "Bailey" Carlton, Vi-
ridiana Chavez, Ana Galvez,
Karlee Henderson, Maixee
Khang, Noemi Navarro, Sum-
mer Sisum, McKenzie Staton,
Kaitlin Thomas and Brooke
Tyson.
Hardee remains this season in
District 11 with Booker, Sara-


Varsity Softball Schedule


Feb 8
Feb.11
Feb 14
Feb 17
Feb 18
Feb 25

Feb 28
Mar 4

Mar 8
Mar 14
Mar 17
Mar 18
Mar 21
Mar 29
Mar 31
Apr 1
Apr 4
Apr 7
Apr 8
Apr 15
Apr 18-21


*District Game
**Senlor Night

Head Coach: Sharrl Knight
Asst. Coach: Jullan Garcia


Avon Park
Booker*
Cardinal Mooney *
Haines City
Desoto*
Bradenton *
Southeast
Sebring
Bradenton *
Southeast


HOME
AWAY
HOME
AWAY
HOME
HOME

AWAY
AWAY


7:30
6:00
6:00
6:00
7:00
7:00

7:30
7:00

7:30
7:30
6:00
6:00
6:00
6:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:30
7:00
7:30


sota Cardinal Mooney and
Bradenton Southeast, but with
the Florida High School Ath-
letic Association redistricting to
change to eight levels, Hardee
will be in 5A-District 10, along
with Auburndale, Lake Wales
and Lakeland Tenoroc. Familiar
opponents DeSoto, Avon Park,
Frostproof and Lake Placid will
join McKeel and Mulberry in
4A-10. Sebring will go to 6A-9
with Kathleen, Lake Gibson
and Winter Haven.
Hardee will be led on the
mound again by soph Kayla
Knight, whose travel team
experience with the Tropic
Wave last summer and fall
included qualifying for the
International Softball Fede-
ration Junior World Cup and a
trip to Huntington Beach, Calif.

HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)



ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advoqate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular scheduled
meeting Monday February 14, 2011 at 6:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it
reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as follows: Resolution 2011-05
FDOC Contract; City Manager Interview with Joseph Miranti, CEB Foreclosures -
Douglas and Rodriguez/Valdiviez, Approval of Bulk Power RFP extension to March
18th as noticed by WHH Enterprises, and any other business that may come before
the Commission. The CRA will meet during a recess of the Commission meeting.
The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will
need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he,may need to insure
that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon
the basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves
every aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26,
Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 2:10c



CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold the regular scheduled meeting Monday February 14,
2011 immediately following the City Commission meeting which will convene at 6:00
pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as
follows: Resolution 2011-01 CRA Expansion & Extension, Resolution 2011-06 Review
and Approval of Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.'s contract for Engineering and
Planning Services; and any other business that may come before the Board.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby advis-
es that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with
respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.

The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863)
773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 2-10c


Palmetto AWAY
Sebring HOME
Lemon Bay HOME
Cardinal Mooney AWAY
Booker* HOME
Haines City HOME
Lemon Bay AWAY
All Saints** HOME
Desoto* AWAY
Palmetto HOME
All Saints AWAY
Avon Park AWAY
- DISTRICT TOURNAMENT HARDEE


I


TO







February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9A

800 Attend Wauchula First Baptist Church Ladies Night of Inspiration on Jan. 27
bout Sandi Pattvy: paid singer in the Christian B ]
bout USandi Patty: music industry
-in 1999us r dhivoe d from


-She spoke from her book
"Broken On the Back Row"
concerning sin, brokenness,
restoration, and blended fami-
lies. She was accompanied to
Wauchula by her daughter Erin
who lives in Orlando.
Patty ended her concert and
testimony with her trademark
song, "We Shall Behold Him."
They spent the night in Wau-
chula at the guest home of Dr.
Barbara Carlton.
-Was inducted into the
Gospel Music Hall of Fame in
2004. Won 39 GMA Dove
Awards, 5 Grammy Awards, 4
Billboard Music Awards and
has 5 Gold albums and 3 plat-
inum albums.
-Was born July 12, 1956, in
Oklahoma City. The contempo-
rary Christian music singer is
nicknamed "The Voice." Her


father Ron was a minister of
music. Her mother was a church
pianist.
-first performed at the age
of 2 by singing "Jesus Loves
Me" for her church in Ander-
son, Indiana. Graduated from
Crawford High School in San
Diego, Calif., and attended San
Diego State University and
Anderson (Ind.) University,
studying voice and conducting.
-Recorded her first album
in 1979. Sang backup for Bill
Gaither and the Bill Gaither
Trio. Headlined her first nation-
al tour in 1984. Received nat-
ional acclaim when she sang
"The Star-Spangled Banner"
July 4, 1986, at the Statue of
Liberty rededication.
-In the late 1980s and early
1990s averaged over 200 con-
certs a year and was the highest


w


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Preparing and cooking 650 KFC chicken pot pies for the Jan. 27 Ladies Night of
Inspiration at First Baptist Church in Wauchula were Matt Cline (KFC manager in
Wauchula), Deshawn McMillian and Lashawn McMillian. About 800 ladies from the cen-
tral Florida area attended the event. About 640 ate the meal before the program.


--inl1 iy/-, w as uivcu t. lzJ1m1
her husband/manager John Hel-
vering, and her career stalled in
the mid 1990s following an
infidelity scandal.
-Wrote an autobiography
entitled "Broken on the Back
Row" about her fall from grace.
her adultery, and seeking for-
giveness and restoration. She
expressed remorse and took
responsibility for her actions
and tried to seek forgiveness
from people she hurt.
-She is remarried to Don
Peslis and has a blended family.
They live in Oklahoma City and
have also adopted a mixed race
child named Sam. She has
rebuilt her career and is once
again producing albums, re-
cording songs, doing concerts
and giving her testimony. Patty
had four children and Peslis had
three children, all under the age
11, when they were married.


Florida's First Assembly of God Praise Team sang at Ladies Night of Inspiration on
Thursday night, Jan. 27, at First Baptist Church of Wauchula. In front row from left are
Tabita Grosu, Sue Birge, Sandi Patty, Lyndsay Naranjo, David Naranjo, and Deborah
Sosa. In back row are Dusty Mendoza, Leslie Albritton, Melinda Nickerson, and Rev.
Chris Rutledge. Not in photo is Mike Wilkinson.


Flowers have spoken to me more than I can tell in writ-
'ten words. They are the hieroglyphics of angels, loved
by all men for the beauty of the character, though few
can decipher even fragments of their meaning.


To see the earth as we now see it, small and beautiful in
that eternal silence where it floats, is to see ourselves as
riders on the earth together, brothers on that bright love-
liness in the unending night.


Golden Nuggets
By Lorraine Gillespie,
Alpha & Omega Fre'de'om Ministries

Train a child in the way he should go and when he is old he will
not turn from it.
-Proverbs 22:6
People can't seem to break free of their own wounds, and it
affects their families and other relationships.
If you want to be free so you can love and receive love, it is
possible. Do you have a problem staying in a relationship or on the
same job very long, get offended very easily, blame others for your
problems, or expect all men/women to treat you badly? It is possi-
ble to change all this around and have a good life if you so choose.
There is help for you.
Healing for Lack of Basic Trust:
Offer affectionate and appropriate touch and words, which
reach beyond the present to the little one within.
Have faith for the counselee that God will provide what is
necessary: Pray that the parents will love their children more than
the things of the world.
Pray for trust to be built/restored.
Be encouraged and understand God can heal those wounded
areas. Find someone that can help you.
Counselors, help them to forgive their parents for not being
affectionate or not being there for them, so as to build basic trust.
We, as adults, must look at our life first and be healed within
before trying to help our children. Also, adopted children have
much more to overcome. Just remember, through Jesus Christ our
lives can be healed and changed.
A Golden Nugget is to seek healing for yourselves, as parents,
so you can help your children and grandchildren to be healed.
To be an American (unlike being English or French of
whatever) is precisely to imagine a destiny rather than to
inherit one; since we have always been, insofar as we
are Americans at all, inhabitants of myth rather than his-
tory.








Mission Thrift



Store, Inc.

123 N. 7h Ave. Wauchula
773-3069 or 773-2287 (Ray)

WE NEED YOUR DONATIONS

Pick-Up Available


We are a Christ based
corporation.


I


I


U r


Valentine s night just



got more interesting!!


ji tSrrrtrtI I


Now through Valentine's


on all in-store items
excluding Costa and LeStage items









EWEI

1* #7446


A


i'.


From left are Rev. Alan Permenter and his wife Karen, Sandi Patty, Donnelle Smith, and
Rev. Tim Davis. Permenter is senior pastor of First Baptist. Smith is the wife of pastor
emeritus Rev. Ken Smith. Davis is First Baptist minister of music. Patty was a surprise
replacement for Patsy Clairmont who had to cancel due to illness.


- ":I


soc2:10p








10A The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


He Helped Fight The School Fire In The '4Os


By KENIA VILLALVA
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Myles Emmet Albritton.
Q: When wer you born and
* where?
* A: Dec. 15, 1923. I was born in a
log house one mile down from Myles
Road.
Q: Did you go to school and do
you remember the name of it?
A: Torrey School, and I had to walk
one mile to get there. It was summer
school. We went to school in February
and March then in the winter we went
to the fields and picked strawberries. I
weit there until the eighth grade and
then I quit. The school burned down in
the '40s; I helped put it
out. Fortunately, nobody
was inside.
Q: What were the sub-
jects taught and did you
have electives?
A: We had one teacher and she
taught English, history, geography-the
basics. We didn't have electives.
Q: Were there bullies back then?
A: No, everyone got along just fine.
Q: What kinds of toys and enter-
tainment did you have back then?
A: We didn't have toys or entertain-
ment; we just lived in the country.
Q: Did you have any free time and
what did you do during that time?
A: Up until I was 6, I played in the
fields while everybody worked.
Q: Did you have a pet as a child
and what was it?
A: My family had lots of dogs, and I
played with them.
Q: What was your favorite snack


as a child?
A: We didn't have snacks back then;
it was just whatever my mom cooked.
Snacks came from the fields, not from
boxes.
Q: Did you have a hobby?
A: No, I went to work when I was 8
to help in the fields.
Q: Did you have any siblings?
A: Yes, I had seven siblings. I was in
the middle, the fourth child.
Q: Diyou have any chores?
A: Ye inches of them. When I
was 10 or 12I had to ride the horse
and plow the fields. '
Q: How did you dress back then?
A: I dressed in overalls and button-
up shirts. I also wore Levi britches.
Q: At what age did you
get your first job?
A: I reckon I was 14; I
worked in the fields with
cattle.
Q: What was the minimum wage
back then and how much did you
earn?
SA: A dollar a day, and that's what I
got paid.
Q: Did you have any goals as a
teenager? And did you accomplish
them?
A: Not in particular, I just worked
and worked.
Q: What kinds of cars were made
back then?
A: The first car I rode in was a
Model T.
Q: What are some differences
from cars back thenand now?
A: Lots, I don't really believe it.
Q: Did you have amusement
parks?


COURTESY PHOTO
Myles Albritton in his youth.
A: Heck no, but we did have the
Strawberry Festival.
Q: What kind of technology did
you have back then?
A: I don't know. We didn't have
electricity until 1944.
Q: What kind of agricultural
equipment existed back then?
A: A horse and a plow, there were no
tractors back then.
Q: Did you get married?
A: Yes, the first time there was no
big wedding. I got married twice.
Q: Where did you meet your wife?
A: In Zolfo Springs.
Q: Do you remember any impor-
tant dates that happened during your
lifetime?
A: I got drafted in 1942 for World
War II but got turned down for my
right eye. But my best friend got in,


and he always carried a picture of me
everywhere he went for 60 years.
Q: Do you see a difference in mod-
ern-day presidents and the ones in
your lifetime?
A: Well, they are all alike.
Q: How did you get news or learn
of upcoming events?
A: We didn't have newspapers or
radios.
Q: When did you move to Hardee
County?
A: I've lived here most of my life.
Q: Where are your descendants
from?
A: They are from England, where
the Albritton family started.
Q: Whatwere-the punishments for
disobeying the law?
A: The punishments werepretty
harsh. It depended on what you had
done. You didn't see crime like nowa-
days. Kids could play in the street and
they w oul-d't get snatched.
Q: Do you remember a president
that did something really good or
bad for the country?
A: When Roosevelt created Sociaf
Security in 1938.
Q: If you had the opportunity to
go back in time, would you change
anything?
A: I don't know; I lived a happy life
in the country.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


From The Heart
By David Kelly


BACKYARD CAMPOUT
Why is it that backyard campouts always sound so fun?
Maybe it is the excitement of doing something different.
Maybe it is the thrill of checking out some new camping equipment
you got for Christmas. Maybe it's just staying up late.
Well, all you ranchers and farmers can start sending gift cards
accompanied with thank-you notes right away. Why, you ask?
Because I decided Jan. 16 would be a great night to camp out in the
back yard since the kids didn't have school the next day.
Fortunately for you, and quite unexpected by me, was the 24
hours of rain we would experience. I know we haven't had rain in
quite' a while and it is much needed for pastures, farms and groves
alike. I just wasn't prepared mentally for the deluge. Thankfully
J.T.'s new four-man tent held up pretty good under the adverse
weather conditions.
That is, until 5:30 a.m. on the 17th of January, when I felt drip,
drip on my pillow.
Yep, the weather cover over the top had shifted slightly in the
early morning hours thanks to some wind gusts and the rain had
found its way in. My daughter, ever the optimist, just suggested I
scoot down and go back to sleep.
I, on the other hand, was done and ready for some coffee and
leftover doughnuts that were just feet away in the nice warm, dry
kitchen.
So ended the campout at 6 a.m.
It was quite fun for the kids. They got to do something differ-
ent. We were able to endure the whole night.
Looking back, it wasn't that awful. Just eight hours of sleep-
ing on the ground isn't a lot to deal with when you get to spend
some quality time with your kids.
Now, I won't lie. I did toss and turn and wake up just about
every hour on the hour, which isn't too hard to believe since all you
could hear was the waaaaa of the rain pouring down outside the
tent.
I don't know why I didn't trust this brand-new tent. Maybe
because it was J.T.'s tent and it was just four feet high and six feet
wide. And maybe because it doesn't have zip-up windows, just a
weather-proof light-weight cover to keep the damp dew out. Or
maybe it was because I hadn't checked the weather and had no idea
it was going to rain, so I didn't even think to Scotchgard the tent
before using it.
Whatever the reason, I was sure we would all end up being
drenched little rats by the start of the morning, however I was
pleasantly surprised at 5:30 when the dry rats started-rustling
around, turning on the flashlights and then the iPods to watch and
listen to music and videos as they woke up. /
Well, I was right on one account. I picked the right day. That
Monday was Martin Luther King Jr. Day and a day off for Karen
and me. We were able to stay home and watch it rain and take care
of various indoor chores. This was a nice transition from a long
,rainy, but enjoyable, backyard campout frm the night before.
Now we just need ito stop raining so we can hang out the
sleeping bags and et the t a dry out really good before we pack it
up and put it away or next time.
HopefuUy Dad ha learned his lesson. Check the weather,
check sd weatherproof cover of the tent, make sure you have some
jppe' inside the tent, make sure you invest in a single air mattress
that fits.in J.T.'s tent, since the massive king-size one that goes in
my tent doesn't.
As much as I like to go camping in the woods and get away
from all the hustle and bustle, there is something nice about being
at home. So, ultimately, I'm ever thankful for backyard campouts.
The coffee is close, the bathrooms are clean and the showers are
hot. The cook is pretty cute, too!
Whether jt's in the back yard, local state park or national park
or in your $1-million RV, go camping with your kids. You will be
glad you did.



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels'
At The Herald Advocate


. ATHLETIC DOLLARS


"- -L


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Athletic Foundation donated $52,350 to Hardee High School last year. The foundation relies on mem-
bership dues and fundraising to support athletics of all types in Hardee County. The money went to the various
sports offered by the school. Presenting the check are foundation members (from left to right) Thomas Trevino,
Tanya Royal, Theresa Crawford, Derren Bryan, Barry White, Millie Bolin, Andy Judah, Joe Albritton, Paul Samuels and
Jason Clark.



Here at Sevigny and Timmerman Eye care we strive to offer
the best quality care at a reasonable rate. Our Contact Lens


F


Department carries top of the line brands for
the lowest prices in the area. Many of our
items are currently less expensive then other
retailers including online advertisements,
however, if at any time you find a better deal,
Sevigny and Timmerman Eye Care will price
match any offer. Bring in the priced
advertisement and we will be happy to'
match and even send them to your


Ot. M home or office at no additional cost.

To ensure our patients get the best deal possible, our office is
working along with contact lens manufacturers and have many
current rebate offers available. When you purchase various
brands of lenses you will receive a mail in rebate
which lowers your out of pocket expense even more!

During this economy everyone needs to save!


I


I I


--


-- JtL










February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11A


This week in history, as-taxes, which have to be paid in
researched from the archival cash, not bonds. Bond suits
pages of The Florida Ad- have increased taxes and limit-
vocate, the Hardee County ed homestead exemption.
Herald and The Herald-Ad-


vocate...

S 75 YEARS AGO
The seniors of Hardee
County High School will spon-
sor a stunt night on Friday
evening in the city auditorium.
The public is invited to attend
and vote for the skit of its
choice. Various classes and
organizations will present 10-
minute skits for everyone's fun
and enjoyment.

Mt. W.C. King, chairman of
the Hardee County Board 0 ,
County Commissioners, an-:,
nounced this week that the
newly proposed highway from
Wauchula to Zolfo Springs
would be paved this year, and
that the Wauchula-Bowling
Green Road would be graded.
He didn't think there would be
any work this year on the new
highway east of here to Avon
Park.

The officials of Wauchula
request that the property owners
of this city meet with them next
Friday evening at 8 for the pur-
pose of having the possibilities
of securing a bond refunding
program explained to them.
Some people have secured gov-
ernment loans on their proper-
ties and are unable to pay the


~*'<*.&,*l


In real estate, there is a five-
room furnished tile bungalow
for $1,890 and 10 years to pay,
and an eight-room furnished
close to town for $3,250 and 10
years to pay.

50 YEARS AGO
When the Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce mem-
bership drive ends at a breakfast
meeting this morning at
Knight's Restaurant, it will,
hopefully, have reached its goal
to increase from 112 to 175 per-
.sons of business. President C.J.
Patton said an organizational
meeting and election of officers
will be held shortly.

Raising of speed limits in
Wauchula will apparently pro-
ceed despite repeated objec-
tions from the Wauchula City
Council, said Mayor Paul
Thomas. The city feels U.S. 17
is too narrow and full of holes
to make high speed travel safe.
The state Department of Trans-
portation will raise speeds on
U.S. 17, Road 64-A and 35-A.
The present 25 mph will be
raised to as much as 45 mph in
some locations.

The city of Bowling Green,
which has been flirting with the
idea of a municipally owned


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Graham


MONDAY Crackers, Pancakes, Sausage
Breakfast: Lucky Charms, Patty, Juice, Condiments and
Graham Crackers, Glazed Do- Milk
nut, Bagel Bars, Orange Juice, Lunch: Toasted Cheese, Pig
Condiments and Milk in a Blanket, Sausage Pizza,
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza, Salad Bar, Lettuce & Tomato,
Ham, Mac & Cheese, Alter- Potato Rounds, Pears Condi-
native Meal, Salad Tray, Green ments and Milk
Beans, Cornbread, Blue Rasp-
berry Juice Bar, Condiments FRIDAY
and Milk.. .. -.Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
'.... ,~-~acke=,-reakfast Rounds,
S"E1 qElAT M a;.,' Peaches, Condiments and Milk
.ralhOafcheerl6sr-C, al, Lunch: PB&J Sandwich,
Graham Crackers, Sausage Pepperoni Pizza, Nachos w/
Patty, Biscuit, Pineapple Tidbits, Ground Beef, Pinto Beans,
Oranges, Condiments and Milk Tossed Salad, Applesauce,
-Lunch: Chicken Pot Pie w/ Condiments and Milk
Biscuit, Stacked Ham Sand-
wich, Alternative Meal, Salad SENIOR HIGH
Bar, Broccoli, Peaches, Condi- SENIOR HIGH
i ---i- RAl!'.'


merts and MIIK
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix, Cheese Grits,
Buttered Toast, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce, Alter-
native Meal, Salad Tray, Corn,
Mixed Fruit, Sugar Cookies,
Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Graham Crackers, Pan-
cakes, Sausage Patty, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Toasted Cheese, Pig
in a Blanket, Alternative Meal,
Salad Tray, Potato Rounds,
Pears, Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Cookie, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Peanut Butter Sand-
wich, Stacked Ham Sandwich,
Baby Carrots, Apple Wedges,
Animal Cookies, Condiments
and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH .
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Super Donuts, Bagel
Bars, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Ham, Mac & Cheese, Corn-
bread, Salad Bar, Tossed Salad,
Green Beans, Juice Bar, Con-
diments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Biscuits, Sausage
Patty, Pineapple Tidbits, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pot Pie w/
Biscuit, Sausage Pizza, Stacked
Ham Sandwich, SaladBar, Let-
tuce & Tomato, Broccoli, Peach-
es, Condiments and Milk

f WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Spaghetti w/Roll, Pepperoni
Pizza, Lettuce & Tomato, Whole
Kernel Corn, Fruit Cocktail,
Chocolate Chip Cookies, Con-
dimehts and Milk


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super Do-
nuts, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie
on Bun, Chicken Breast Fillet on
Bun, French Fries, Fresh Pota-
toes, Broccoli, Tossed Salad,
Macaroni Salad, Red Velvet
Cake, Ice Cream, Condiments
and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Pineapple Chunks,
Condiments and Milk ,
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie
on Bun, Chicken Pot Pie,
French Fries, Broccoli Norm-
andy, Peas & Carrots, Tossed
Salad, Cucumber and Tomato
Salad, Peaches, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, 'Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Spaghetti and
Meat Sauce, French Fries,
Green Beans, Veggie Cup,
Tossed Salad, Waldorf Salad,
Butter Cookies, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon
Toast, Oatmeal, Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Pig in a
Blanket, French Fries, Baked
Beans, Cole Slaw, Tossed
Salad, Mixed Vegetables, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Bar-B-Q
Chicken on Bun, French Fries,
Baked Beans, Potato Salad,
Tossed Salad, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk


Animals chosen as pets differ around the world.
Japanese children tame mice and teach them to dance to
music, while in Australia, children sometimes make pets
of kangaroos.


Real estate ads offer: a frame
home on four lots in Bowling
Green, remodeled for newly-
weds or winter visitors, for
$41,000; a 2BR, 2B CB home
in Golfview with 2-car garage
for $68,000; and an older
2,000-sq.-ft. home on large cor-
ner lot for $55,000.
*i*c


sewage disposal system for sev-
eral years, has revived the pro-
posal again. It may pledge part
of its water revenue for bonds
for the sewage system.

Two Polk County men have
been charged with illegal fish-
ing in Charlie Creek and 500
pounds of catfish were confis-
cated. They each posted $50
bond and will appear before
County Judge Clyde Maddox
next Monday.
25:YEARS AGO
The Florida Army National
Guard last week leased the old
Chevrolet dealership for use as
a temporary armory, said a
Chamber of Commerce spokes-
man unofficially last week. The
lease, year-to-year, is expected
to be good for about four years.
Seventy-five members of the
Hardee unit have been without
a temporary facility and meet-
ing in Arcadia. It was officially
recognized on Oct. 6, 1984.

County commissioners took a
tour last Thursday of the recent-
ly completed trusty housing
area for the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office. The completed
facility will house up to 32 min-
imum-security trusty inmates.
Sheriff Doyle Bryan, Maj. Leon
Stephens and secretary Sylvia
Nicklow will also have new
offices in the building. The
additional space will enable the
county to meet state Depart-
ment of Corrections standards
and result in dismissal of its
lawsuit against the county.

Attorneys representing Har-
dee County and Property Ap-
praiser Carolyn Coker met
Monday in Judge Carol C.
Murphy's chambers in Lake-
land to discuss the lawsuit
involving them. The lawsuit
was brought by the county
against Coker to force her to put
special assessments for fire and
waste disposal on the ad val-
orem bills. Coker is opposed to
such a move.


10 YEARS AGO
The 162-acre Peace River
Park is now under construction
with help from AmeriCorps and
local school science classes.
The park, south of the Peace
River bridges east of Wauchula,
includes a long stretch of river-
front land and will be used for
outdoor recreation, wildlife
habitat and environmental edu-
cation.
For the first time in a decade,
Wauchula water and sewer rates
will be increasing. First reading
of the proposed increases will
be heard in Monday's meeting.
The basic water rate will go up
$3.35 per month and the sewer
rates will increase $9.20.

Ad sponsors for the Hardee
Senior High School career day
included CF. Industries,
H.O.P.E. (Helping Older People
Enthusiastically), Curry Raley
Funeral Home, First National
Bank, The Pet Care Center,
South Florida Community
College, Cargill Fertilizer Inc.,
Ferman Chevrolet/Ford, Farm
Credit of Southwest Florida,
IMC, and Miller's Discount
Computers.


Check Out Facebook At
SCharlotte's Webb Pub or at
www. charlotteswebbpub.net

Charlotte's Webb Pub
S3315 SR64 West, Wauchula













Raffels & Games
ALL FOOD BY AVON PARK MOOSE RIDERS
For More Info 863-735-8887 Free Camping
Charlotte's Backyard Venue Available For
Private Parties BBQs Weddings & More
P l s R


Friday, February 18th

5pm 9pm

AND

Saturday, February 19th

9am 3pm


DOWNTOWN WAUCHULA


e O SFebruary

ive On Stage:


i8th ,


S'44
C. ,. . .-



4 ~
~~ ,' "-c,'
9am 4I


Live On Stage: -'
= '-V :l




S. .. .Other Fun j.




S..... Fu n"

*. ? . ..' - ..,.


Sponsored By:


- CF
"^ CF'
'^^.


, ;d ,. , '. .
:.. ,^ .... ; ^ .; ', .,. ". :, .. ,' ,," ,. ...
; .'i i . .: .

': ".=' ; .; "; . ., ." ..
'.'-'". 1- . ,; ' -'. ' " ." "
.... !' a | ~- .F e . ,. .,
'!" i a ray, February Igth,
] ": "' '. ;:' =


- N,-...


^^What's For^TT^^


NEW LOCATION NOW OPEN
JAZZERCISE HEARTLAND FITNESS CENTER
808 State Hwy. 66 East Zolfo Springs
Class Schedule:
Monday, Tuesday & Friday 4:00 pm
Tuesday & Thursday 5:30 pm & Saturday 8:00 am

$20.11 First Month!
Disclaimer: Valid only for first month's membership for new customers and those who haven't
attended in 6 months or longer. Regular rates apply after first month. Other restrictions apply.
For more information: Ann Marie 863-767-0613
On Facebook at Jazzercise Wauchula or
www.jazzercise.com 2:10









12A The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011

BEDROCK BUSINESS



Jimmy Hanchey tands On His Products


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
For the past 42 years, Jimmy Hanchey
has stood on quality and customer serv-
ice.
"If you take care of your customers
and back up your merchandise, you will
find that they will continue to stay loyal
and you will always have business," said
the owner of Hanchey's Carpets in
downtown Wauchula.
The son of Oscar and Ella Hanchey,
Hanchey is a lifelong resident of Hardee
County. During his teen years, he could
be heard on the air at WAUC until he
graduated Hardee High School in 1960.
After graduation, he worked as a radio
announcer at WAVP based in Avon Park,
as well as working at WPRV.
Hanchey became interested in the car-
pet business, however, when he began
working for Roger Jaudon's Stores for
Homes. He was employed there from
1964 until 1967. During that time, he
also attended a carpeting seminar in
Tampa, where he learned how to install
and measure carpet for homes and
became certified.
1968 was an important year for
Jimmy Hanchey; it was then that he not
only opened Hanchey's Carpets, but
when he married Mary Katherine, his
wife of 42 years.
"I had already been working for
Roger selling carpet and a friend of mine
asked why I don't just open my own
business. I thought about it and decided
to open Hanchey's Carpets," commented


Hanchey.
Along with tending to the flooring
needs of his customers, Hanchey is
known for other areas: local owner of
J&J Jewelers, a car wash and a rental
business as well as a beauty pageant
judge traveling as far as Orlando. Local
pageant goers may know him as the mas-
ter of ceremonies for the Miss Hardee
County Pageant.
Active in the community, Hanchey
has received numerous awards and hon-
ors for his memberships in local boards
and organizations. He was the American
Heart Association's chairman for five
years, receiving the Volunteer of the Year
award in 1989; he was on the Economic
Development Board for two years;'was
vice chairman of the Traffic Safety
Committee; a member of the Police
Advisory Board; and was named the
honorary mayor of Main Street. He is
also an inactive deacon of First Baptist
Church of Wauchula.
During times of economic struggle,
Hanchey's Carpets has found solace.
"It has slowed down from previous
years, but we continue to do our best to
hang on," said Hanchey. "We don't
charge a fee for an estimate. The price
for carpet has increased, but the labor is
the same from the past. Backing up our
merchandise has been the key to our suc-
cess."
Currently, Hanchey has no plans for
retirement. With 42 years under his belt
and having made a name for himself in
the community, he hopes to continue


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Jimmy Hanchey has spent the last 42 years building up the reputation of Hanchey's
Carpets, a Main Street mainstay.

supplying and keeping in touch with his St. in Wauchula, Hanchey is at work


customers.
"I don't want to retire right now,"
Hanchey insisted. "I enjoy my job and
getting to talk to my customers and the
people that come in. I don't want to just
sit at home when I could be at work."
With his store located at 110 E. Main


from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday. I
Bedrock Business is a new feature high-
lighting those stalwarts of the business
community who have dedicated their
lives to filling the needs of Hardee
County residents.


a Fish Busters
By Bob Wattendorf
S Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


THE FUTURE OF BASS TOURNAMENTS
In surveying anglers about a proposed Long-term Black Bass
Management Plan, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's Division of Freshwater Fisheries, Management learned
that people have opposing views about fishing tournaments.
Ray Scott, founder of the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society,
brought a network of large, competitive bass tournaments to reali-
ty and attracted millions of anglers to the sport, enhancing their
understanding and enjoyment of what has become America's most-
sought recreational fish. Along the way, tournament groups helped
promote catch-and-release fishing and educated the public about
conservation issues.
However, many anglers feel tournaments exploit the resource
and cause congestion at ramps. They are also concerned with bass
that die after release and, especially, the impact of interfering with
bedding bass.
One angler said tournaments shouldn't be continued if they
don't overwhelmingly benefit the state. Someone else held the
opposite view: that high-profile tournaments draw worldwide
attention to Florida's fisheries, boost local economies, and provide
great public relations to the bass fishing Florida offers.
A third survey participant said that during and after weigh-ins,
bass are kept out of the water far too long. "Go to a tournament site
the next morning and look at all the dead bass floating in the
water," the participant said.
The FWC, in drafting the Black Bass Management Plan, is
considering another aspect of holding tournaments: the pros and
cons of allowing bass tournaments to be temporarily exempt from



H O s hing .ore.ast


2/10/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:08 AM
Set: 6:14 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 06 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:06 AM
Set: 12:07 AM
Overhead: 6:03 PM
Underfoot: 5:39 AM
Moon Phase
44%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
5:39 AM 7:39 AM
6:03 PM 8:03 PM
Minor Times
12:07 AM 1:07AM
11:06 AM 2:06PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/11/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:07 AM
Set: 6:15 PM
Day Length
I1 hrs. 08 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:49 AM
Set: 1:02 AM
Overhead: 6:53 PM
Underfoot: 6:28 AM
Moon Phase
50%
First Quarter
Major Times
6:28 AM 8:28 AM
6:53 PM 8:53 PM
Minor Times
1:02 AM 2:02 AM
11:49 AM-12:49PM
Prediction
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/12/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:06 AM
Set: 6:16 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 10 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:37 PM
Set: 1:58 AM
Overhead: 7:47 PM
Underfoot: 7:20 AM
Moon Phase
64%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
7:20 AM 9:20 AM
7:47 PM 9:47 PM
Minor Times
1:58 AM 2:58 AM
12:37 PM 1:37 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/13/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:06 AM
Set: 6:17 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 11 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:33 PM
Set: 2:55 AM
Overhead: 8:43 PM
Underfoot: 8:14 AM
Moon Phase
74%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:14AM- 10:14AM
8:43 PM 10:43 PM
Minor Times
2:55 AM 3:55 AM
1:33 PM 2:33 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/14/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:05 AM
Set: 6:17 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 12 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:33 PM
Set: 3:50 AM
Overhead: 9:40 PM
Underfoot: 9:11 AM
Moon Phase
83%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:11 AM-11:11 AM
9:40 PM 11:40 PM
Minor Times
3:50 AM 4:50 AM
2:33 PM 3:33 PM
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/15/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:04 AM
Set: 6:18 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 14 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:38 PM
Set: 4:41 AM
Overhead: 10:38 PM
Underfoot: 10:09AM
Moon Phase
90%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:09AM- 12:09PM
10:38PM 12:38AM
Minor Times
4:41 AM 5:41 AM
3:38 PM 4:38 PM
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/16/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:03 AM
Set: 6:19 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 16 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:45 PM
Set: 5:30 AM
Overhead: 11:34 PM
Underfoot: 11:06AM
Moon Phase
96%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:06 AM 1:06 PM
11:34 PM 1:34 AM
Minor Times
5:30 AM 6:30 AM
4:45 PM 5:45 PM
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/17/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:02 AM
Set: 6:19 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 17 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:53 PM
Stt: 6:14 AM
Overhead: --:--
Underfoot: 12:02PM
Moon Phase
99%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:02 PM 2:02 PM
Minor Times
6:14 AM 7:14 AM
5:53 PM 6:53 PM
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -5


size limits. A summary of those discussion points is provided
below.
Continue Tournament Permitting
Competitive bass tournament angling is very popular in
Florida and has profound economic impacts locally and statewide.
For example, the 2005 BassMaster Classic on the Kissimmee
Chain of Lakes generated an estimated $25 million for the com-
munity during the three-day event. Some premier largemouth bass
fisheries in Florida (e.g., Istokpoga, Orange, Walk-in-Water) have
protective slot limits (15-24 inches) that would restrict tournament
anglers from maximizing their daily weight.
Because most tournaments, including small clubs, penalize
anglers for dead fish, tournament anglers try to take very good care
of their fish. Therefore, the FWC provides exemptions to size
restrictions (but not bag limits) to allow tournament anglers to tem-
porarily possess these fish. Permitted tournament anglers must fol-
low strict permit requirements, including releasing all fish after
weigh-in and any dead fish must be donated to charity or research.
Tournament angling depends on temporary exemptions to be com-
petitive.
So, for economic and social reasons, exemptions should be
continued, since they don't hurt the resource, compared with allow-
ing these same anglers to harvest their catch.
Discontinue Tournament Permitting
Many anglers think it is unjust for tournament participants to
get even a temporary exemption from designated size limits.
Harvest restrictions are set to manage a fishery based on a stated
objective. Research from the University of Florida and elsewhere
has shown that tournament-associated mortality could harm a fish-
ery and prevent managers from meeting objectives.
Tournament-associated mortality has been found to average


26-28 percent, and modeling effects of this mortality show that,.
under certain circumstances, it could affect the sizes of fish avail-
able for anglers. Thus, all anglers should follow size restrictions to
ensure objectives are met.
Given that both sides have valid points, the FWC continues to
review the impact of tournaments. It studied them in the 1980s and
again in the '90s and found no significant impacts. An FWC sub-
team is looking at the tournament issue again, as is its technical
Assistance group of stakeholders representing various groups that
use these fisheries or are affected by management decisions. *
The FWC's No. 1 objective is to ensure sustainable bass pop-
ulations. Tournaments won't affect that, but they could alter the
quality of a local fishery. Moreover, this is a resource-allocation
issue, so sharing of public resources in an equitable manner and
economic and social considerations need to be weighed.
An FWC team is endeavoring to think outside the box and
consider testing alternative solutions, at least for smaller qualifying:
tournaments, such as digital tournaments. As an example, with.
smart-phone technology, fish can be photographed on official
rulers, date-stamped and the location plotted with GPS accuracy,
enabling the angler to release the catch immediately.
On a preliminary basis, the team identified five main issues
that could be addressed through FWC efforts:
1. Tournament mortality.
2. Issues with moving fish from one water body to another for
weigh-in.
3. Crowding/pressure (at access points and on the lake).
4. Data collected from tournaments.
5. Education.
Recommendations have not been finalized, and people can still
contribute by completing a brief survey about tournament bass
fishing at www.surveymonkey.com/s/BBMP_tournaments.


Hardee Help Center




Thrift Store


Hardee County's Original Thrift Store!

Serving Our Community For Over 10 Years




NOW OPEN


AT OUR NEW LOCATION

226 W. Main Street, Wauchula 773-0550

(Across from Giovanni's)


N~ AL PECAL


* MILITARY MONDAY (Bring Military ID for 20%off)

* TWO-FER TUESDAY (Two for One on marked items)

* WORSHIP WEDNESDAY (Bring recent church newsletter for 20%

* SENIORS DAY THURSDAY (over 55)

* CITY/COUNTY DAY FRIDAY (Bring ID for 20% off)

* STUDENT/TEACHER DAY SATURDAY (Bring ID for 20% off)


**20% discount includes everything BUT furniture**

SAll Proceeds Benefit Hardee County Residents

Outreach of the Hardee County Ministerial Association

Hours: Monday Friday 9:30 5:30 Saturday 10 3
2:10c


Scoff)


S S .


F.










PAGE ONE


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
As a teenager, he used to box
in Hardee County. Now he
boxes for the U .S. Army.
He used to be just Toribio
Ramirez. Now he's Sgt. Toribio
Ramirez, 23, a light-wheel
vehicle mechanic with overseas
experience, and now contend-
ing for the All-Army light-
weight division title.
Ramirez has taken the long
route to resuming the boxing
career he had hoped to pursue
when he was 16 years old.
To improve he entered the
U.S. Army five years ago., It
didn't immediately help him.
After basic and additional train-
ing, he was deployed to Af-
ghanistan with the 82nd Air-
borne Division. Fifteen months
later, older and wiser, he re-
turned to the United States.
He was stationed at Fort
Leonard Wood and finally got
the nod in 2009 to compete for
the All-Army team. He began
training before and after his
work day.
He was considered a long
shot for the 2010 All-Army
competition at Fort Huachuca,
Ariz. He won his first bout on
points and then had to face Spc.
Connor Johnson, a dominant,
defending World Class Army
fighter.
Ramirez took the finals fight
to Johnson and hoped to finish
the fight quickly. Considered
the underdog, he landed a jar-
ring right straight to the chin
and dropped the more experi-


PRllNTR.ll S ]PUBalISERSl

11 S thAe.oWachl, L337


Sgt. Toribio Ramirei.
enced champion to the canvas.
However, Johnson was able to
get up before the 10 count
ended and was able to come
back and win on points.
Ramirez went back to work,
now stationed at Fort Stewart,
Ga. He's dropped his weight,
and improved his stamina with
six-mile runs almost daily.
He was back at the Barnes
Field House for competition
last weekend. Results haven't


been posted yet. He's compet-
ing with several others for the
now vacant All-Army light-
weight class, one of the deepest
in the competition.
Local folks interested can fol-
low the boxer's career on
Facebook-the U.S. Army
World-Class Athlete Program,
the All Army Sports Program or
Stand To: Soldier Athlete Initia-
tive.


I


FILE YOUR TAXES NOW
WITH NO UPFRONT FEES!!!
Immigration Filing Notary Services
SCrew Leader Card Filing ITIN Number Applications

SPECIALIZING IN:
All Federal and State Income Taxes Monthly Bookkeeping
Payrolls Bill Paying Services Harvesting Payrolls


Date


Onnonent


Place


February
Tuesday 8 Sebring (Boys and Girls)
Thursday 10 Lemon Bay (Boys and Girls)
Tuesday 15 Avon Park (Boys and Girls)
Thursday 17 De Soto (Boys and Girls)
Thursday 24 Sebring (Boys)

March
Fri/Sat 4/5 Heartland Invitational
Monday 7 Avon Park (Girls)
Tuesday 8 Avon Park (Boys)
Tuesday 15 Okeechobee (Boys and Girls)
Thursday 17 Sebring (Girls)
Monday 28 Lemon Bay (Boys and Girls)
Tuesday 29 De Soto (Boys and Girls)
Thursday 31 Booker (Boys and Girls)


April
Monday-Wed 4-5-6
Monday-Wed 4-5-6


District tourney (Boys)
District tourney (Girls)


Girls Coach: Barbara Leupold
Boys Coach: Kenneth Leupold
Assistant: Jessica Leupold

1130/2011 Printing


There 4
There 4
There 4
Here 4
Here 4



AP/Sebring
Here 4


Here
There
Here
Here
There
Here


Time Leave


4:00
4:00
4:00
[:00
[:00


[:00


4:00
4:00
4:00


3:00
2:00
3:30


TBA


2:00


4:00
4:00 3:30
4:00


Bartow
Winter Haven


8:00
8:00


Tennis Teams Already On Court


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The 2011 girls and boys ten-
nis teams got their season going
on Tuesday with matches at
Sebring.
Coaches Ken Barbara and
Jessica Leupold have a variety
of experience and youth on
their squads.
Hardee is in the huge Class
2A, District 8 this year, which
includes schools from four
counties, Polk, Highlands and
Osceola as well as Hardee
County. The season, which
' began Tuesday, ends April 4-6
S with the district tournaments.
The boys will play at Bartow
and girls at Winter Haven.
Opposing district teams are
Auburndale, Avon Park, Lake
Placid, Lake Wales, Mulberry,
Poinciana, Sebring and Lake-
land Teneroc, a fairly new


opponent.
The first four matches of the
season are double-headers, with
both the boys and girls squads
at the same time, sometimes on
different courts" in the same
venue. They play today (Thurs-
day.) at Lemon Bay, then go to
Avon Park before the DeSoto
teams visit Hardee on Feb. 17.
The boys go to Sebring on Feb.
24.
March opens with the Heart-
land Invitational and stretches
to March 31 when the boys and
girls host Sarasota booker.
Slated on the girls team are
senior Kate Krause and juniors
Summer Palmer, Taylor Pohl
and Robyn Tanksley, just out
from basketball.
Four freshmen are all about
equal in play, including Caro-
line Durrance, Lacey McClen-
ithan, Ashley Baker and Katie


Smith. Also new are Araceli
Ramos, Kaitlyn Shaw and
Susana Oceguera.
Palmer will probably play in
the number one slot, followed
by Krause, Pohl and Tanksley
and some of the freshman girls.
The boys bring a lot of expe-
rience back with four seniors,
four juniors and a soph compet-
ing. The first four seniors are so
close, anyone can beat the other
on any given day, but it looks
like Juan Mier may play at the
number one slot, followed by
Dylan Justice, Justin Fones and
Kyle Bodeck. Junior Matt
Godwin is moving up to chal-
lenge them and classmate Jared
Jernigan will probably fill the
sixth slot. Others in the mix are
juniors Matt Burris and Austin
Scheipsmeier and soph Skylaar
Simmons.


N


tr-
I


---iHablamos Espaol!-

FOR OUR NEW CLIENTS
GET $10
OFF TAX PREPARATION FEES!*

I FOR OUR EXISTING CLIENTS
REFERRAL DISCOUNT
BRING A NEW CLIENT TO US AND YOU WILL BOTH RECEIVE
$10 OFF
TAX PREPARATION FEES!*
*MusT MENTION AD TO RECEIVE DISCOUNT
----- --------------------I
PARA NUESTROS CLIENTS NUEVOS
RECIBA $10
DE REBAJO PARA PREPARATION DE TAXAS*
PARA NUESTROS CLIENTS EXISTENTES
DESCUENTO DE REFERENCIA
TRAIGANOS UN CUENTE NEVO Y LOS DAS RCEIBIRAN
RECIBA $10 OFF
DE REBAJO PARA PREPARATION DE TAXAS*
L *EBE MENCoNAR ANUNO PARA RECIVIR DESCUeNTO
HAGA SU INCOME TAX AHORA
SIN PAGO POR ADELANTADO!!!
Clasificaci6n de Immigraci6n Servicios de Notaria
Clasificaci6n de Targetas de lider de tripulaci6n
Aplicaci6nes de nimero de ITIN


: NOS ESPESCIALIZAMOS EN:
Impuestos Federales y Estatales Contabilidad Mensual
N6minas de Pagos Servicio de Pagar sus Facturas


SMensuales N6mina de pago para Cosecha
. "iK '^" > /.///


SSaturday February 19 7pm
ks HARDEE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL WAUCHULA

Harlem Ambassadors

vs Hardee Homebuilders

TICKET PRICES Advance Door
SGeneral Admission $9 *11
Seniors & Students $7 $9
Children Under 3 Free .
S DOORS OPEN AT 6:20 P.M.
tr ^ ^________________________________________________________________________2


N~


J.'

i


Tickets Available At

Wauchula State Bank

Hardee Ranch Supply |

Heartland Growers Supp I


2:10-24c
,*7 & 1"' .-


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-78)
Thursday, February 10,2011


Boxing For The Army


2011 Hardee Wildcat Tennis


Class 2A, District 8
Auburndale Polk
Avon Park Highlands
Hardee Hardee
Lake Placid Highlands
Lake Wales- Polk
Mulberry Polk
Poinciana Osceola
Sebring Highlands
Teneroc -- Polk


A`









4)











'.4
N
S


I


I ~" ~ ~---


Account ant -TJSIAGRAHA Co t tdor
Ta rc.M RI INA E PeaaindeIpiso
E. A -JUYuGRHAM E.A


'sumert.o ...* Use; As*+ ;


4- /.q I "









2B The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011





-Hardee


Living


Wednesday Musicale

Hosts Feb. 19 Luncheon


COURTESY PHOTO
Jonathan Reed and Christy Setters

Christy Setters Will

Marry Jonathan Reed


Barry and Vicky Setters of
Avon Park announce the en-
gagement and upcoming wed-
ding of their daughter, Christy
Setters of Sebring, to Jonathan
Reed of Sebring, the son of
Gary Reed of Lorida, Rebecca
Reed of Sebring and John
Russell of Davenport.
The bride-elect is employed


at the Functional Rehabilitation
Center in Sebring
The prospective groom is
employed by Coldwell Banker
Am-South Realty in Wauchula.
The couple will exchange
marriage vows this Saturday at
2 p.m. at the Lorida Civic
Center in Lorida. A reception
will follow.


February is the month the
Wednesday Musicale celebrates
its Past President's Silver Tea.
This year, the commemora-
tion will be a luncheon held on
Saturday, Feb. 19, at the First
United Methodist Church Fel-
lowship Hall. Punch will be
served beginning at 11:30 a.m.,
followed by a soup/salad/sand-
wich lunch and special music.


The "guest" musician will be
musical member Sam Dunn.
With Valentine's Day having
just passed, the program likely
will include favorite love
songs!
The cost for the luncheon is
$8 per person. All are welcome.
Contact club President Jill
Southwell at 773-6899 if you
plan to attend.


Wauchula Garden Club


Will Study
The Wauchula Garden Club
will meet Wednesday, Feb. 16,
at the Woman's Club building
for a program entitled "Totally
Terrific Terrariums."
Fellow club members Lydia
Neff and Joyce Butsch will
present the program.
Members and guests will


Terrariums
meet for a noon luncheon,
which will be served by host-
esses Carol Saunders, Jana
Thorpe and Gayle Palmer.
Prospective members are
invited to attend.
For more information, call
President Sylvia Thornton at
735-2680.


One important key to success is self-confidence. An
important key to self-confidence is preparation.
Conversation is an art in which a man has all mankind for
competitors.


I


Mign.Bigg.EmlllJ4JilU.I.IJ.Ii--i

1036 US 27 South Generai Dentst
Highlands Plaza Marc A. Sander, DDS, FAGD
Avon Park, FL 33825 Fellow of the Academy of
(863) 784-0463 General Denistry


NO APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY
AFFORDABLE
IMPLANTS


*SAME DAY SERVICE
IF IN BEFORE 9A.M.
DENTURE
REPAIR


I


S .. ...... I
I SAVE $100 SAVE $75 SAVE $50. SAVE $25: I
-on- -on- -on- -on-
WlNI DBNTAL ULTRA PREMIUM CUSTOM
I WLANTS Complete or Complete or Complete or
i '" 4.SeT a Partia Denture Portlial Denture Partial Denture
SCoupon 'u tI: -'..' r,. ....-. -' : ,:r';. I E.pire "I ; ': I
L ---
We gladly accept Cash. Checks with ID.Visa.Mastercard -
and Discover as payment for our services.
030iCA CODE REQ JIES'E FOllOW J'SG 5ATVEYIT 'THESE A 'l'Vi. FEES AD C AGES3 VA' .'E;C SE
DFENtCNG CN NIE T EFlT EU:REG3.I' ThEE EM A' A O' E PE' FcS0i SONSISBE Of' PAYMENT
-AS Tr-E ISfl7T O REUSE TO PAY. A\CEL A, ME.IE O 5 tREIVUIED C, ?0 Px-ENT FOB AN"Y EI5:E.
EAM A NAN. C;O IAEN'rAT 15 E5FO'ECd AS A RESTl OF FANDC iA ;IN HOj7 C IPESCNCNIG
-3YE AD'ESPSEME?> FO- TE E -'EE ..SCOATMED FEE. 03 ,E3JCE0 FEE SE?,CE E.M.tKAIOON O'GIEAIMEN .
For.more informationlescl180ETU
orvi sit-urw .siaw .o -be nuscm


COURTESY PHOTO
Matthew Smith and Ashley Hendry

Ashley Hendry Engaged

To Wed Matthew Smith


Dane and Yvette Hendry of
Sebring announce the engage-
ment and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Ashley Yvette
Hendry of Bowling Green, to
Matthew Lamar Smith of Bowl-
ing Green, the son of Gary and
Sophia Smith of Wauchula.
The bride-elect graduated
with honors from Sebring High
School in 2007. She is currently
majoring in elementary educa-
tion at the University of South
Florida, and will graduate this
May.


The prospective groom is a
2003 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School, and a 2009 gradu-
ate of the licensed practical
nurse program at South Florida
Community College. He is cur-
rently enrolled at the University
of South Florida, where.he is
continuing his nursing educa-
tion.
Plans are being finalized for a'
Sunday, March 13, wedding at
the Zolfo Springs home of the
bride's grandfather.


Peace has to be created in order to be maintained. It is
the product of Faith, Strength, Energy, Will, Sympathy,
Justice, Imagination and the triumph of principle. It will
never be achieved by passivity and quietism.
-Dorothy Thompson


Arts & Crafts Sale

Saturday Feb. 13
9 a.m. 1 p.m.
SNACK BAR
Good Food, Better Prices
In Our Recreation Hall
PIONEER CREEK RV PARK
SHighway 17, Bowling Green so:


ECONOMY ROLLBACK!
Full Set <(oD5110 2o).............................................$360
A SAVINGS OF $15
Full Upper or Lower Denture each
A SAVINGS OF $15 per arch
Upper or Lower Partial Denture m.2i..................$260
each
A SAVINGS OF $15 per partial
Fees effective January 10, 2011
^~~~~~ ~~~ *-'*,* tr--*-


Custom.Full Set Dentures (D5110. D5120) .............. ..... .........$625
Custom Upper or Lower Denture (D5110. D5120)........................ $365
Premium Full Set Dentures (D5110, 05120) .....................................$945
Ultra Full Set Dentures (05110.D5120)...................... ...............-...$1,275
Reline (eoch)(D5710,D571 1)........ ................................ $130
Simple Extraction (each) (D7140) ........... ................................ ..............$75
Full-mouth X-ray (required for extractions) (D330)....................... $70


MARCH 13, 2011
Ashley Hendry & Matthew Smith

MARCH 19, 2011
Carolyn Lewis & Matt Driskell

APRIL 2, 2011
Amanda Abbott & Guy Carlton
Kara Keen & Christopher Lucas

APRIL 9. 2011
Jaime Platt & Jason Carnley

APRIL 30, 2011
Caitlin McHargue & Roy Petteway

MAY 7, 2011
Kelsey Williams & Tyler Johnson

JUNE 25, 2011
Kaylyn Crawford & Dustin Walton

IULY 16, 2011
Erin Longshore & Eric Goudge



Col' On 9I aoi
Co Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula -
(863) 773-6565
www.catsonmain.com soc2 ioc
S. ___ __________________________________________


MEN WHY NOT TRY SOMETHING NEW THIS YEAR?

Give her a Valentine's gitl that she can enjoy longer than just a few days!



OL3D IPLN cDLE & GIFS&


WE'LL MAKE IT A5 ELA.5Y .A5 OKDLKING LOWERK5!


Here's all you need to do:


1 Call us or sl.op by anytime before Fe b 12li
2. We'll tell you our candle basket options and pricing
3. Place your order
4. We'll deliver a beautiful gift basket to your sweetie on Valentine's Day
. 5. elax because we'll make it stress fre!



< 313 W. Main 9L Wuuchlda. FL 33873 863-77-0065


soc2.3,10c


r


%N


-I


r-






February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


RED CROSS REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, Jan. 25, heard a report on the American Red
Cross from volunteer services director Brandi Jones. The Florida West Coast Red
Cross has an office in Wauchula at 401 W. Orange St. The phone is 773-9097. The Red
Cross, over 125 years old, is a humanitarian organization led by volunteers and guid-
ed by its U.S. Congressional Charter, providing relief to victims of disaster and helping
people prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies. Shown (from left) are Calvin
Bates, Jones and Sam Fite. Volunteers are needed, she said.


CHAMBER REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Casey Dickson, executive director of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce,
spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, Jan. 26, at the Java Cafe. The cham-
ber promotes Hardee County, has a marketing program for members, and speaks out
on legislative issues. The chamber has 132 members and has a goal of 100 new mem-
bers in 2011.


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, Jan. 19, heard a report on visioning from
Kenny Denny, Hardee County director of planning and development. The five parts of
the visioning plan will be land use/environment/recreation, infrastructure, housing,
economic development, and education/workforce. Each county commissioner will be
assigned a part. In order of sequence above, the commissioners are Minor Bryant,
Grady Johnson, Sue Birge, Terry Atchley and Dale Johnson. Citizen input is needed to
prepare the visioning plan. Show (from left) are Denny, club President Birge, Shiela
Johns and Wes Roe. f


TENT SALE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16
& THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17
8 AM TIL ???
Corner of Florida Ave. & Carlton St.

C Crafts, Plants, DOLls, Antcqles, gaead coods, yard
saLe items (doiatwovs apprec.Lated), white letphlM t
Items, Brogflws... and i.tch, moh Umore!


0a-G2. lB


soc 2 3. 0c


Categories
Winter Residents Mixed Media


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, Jan. 12, heard a report from Hardee County
Economic Development Director Bill Lambert. Hardee also has an Economic
Development Council and an Industrial Development Authority. Lambert said State
Rep. Ben Albritton, from Wauchula, will be an asset to the county's future. Lambert
said he is working on six potential projects that could create 1,000 to 1,200 new jobs
in the county in the $28,000 to $30,000 range. He is hopeful half of them could occur
within the next year or two. Shown (from left) are lambert, club President Sue Birge,
Vanessa Hernandez and Lavon Cobb.









Sponsored by: Hardee County Fair Assocation


Entries must be submitted by Hardee County residents.
Winter Residents residing in the county for less than six
months must submit under the winter resident category.


BBB^^^DROSPOF FR ARTS EXHIBIn~T WffIBE ^^
SA~ilj;TURDAYFEB RUA RY1 2TH F 1 0 2
I AT5 THEA E U CI E R


I


Adults Charcoals, Pen, Ink, Pastels, Oils, Acrylics, Watercolor,
Photography Abstract, Floral, Landscape, Animal, and People.
luniors Grades 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Drawing, Painting and
Photography.
Beginners Pre-K, K and Grades 1-2 Mixed Media, Painting and
Drawing.
Guidelines


Paintings-Must be original work, not reprints. Should be unframed and
mounted on stretcher frame with hanging wire on back. Both oil and
water will be accepted.
Photography-Must be matted on heavy black material, boarder should
be one inch minimum to allow for stapling. No glue should be used to
adhere photos to black material.
Exhibitors must include names and contact
information on the back of all work.
Exhibitors are limited to three entries total in all categories.
Exhibitors should be non-professional artists residing in the county. No
entries accepted from anyone selling work professionally.
All Junior, intermediate and beginner entries will be selected by the art
teachers at the student's respective schools and should be submitted on
February 13" as well.
Awards
First, second and third place ribbons will be awarded in each judged
category. Honorable mention awards are given at the discretion of the
judges.
Six, "Best of Show" ribbons will be awarded: one beginning, one inter-
mediate, three juniors and one adult.
No work will be accepted after 12:00 pm on February 12, 2011

F M e f ato Contact


i
r
d

p
;I
p


Hardee Senior High School will ONLY be HOTIE
taking deliveries from FLORISTS for
Valentine's Day.
Flowers will ONLY be allowed
on Friday, February 11th, 2011. SMILE
FLORISTS will ONLY deliver until 12 NooN,
so please plan ahead.


No OTHER DELIVERIES FROM PARENT-
OR FRIENDq WILL BE PERMITTED!

No DELIVERIEi WILL BE TAKEN
ON MONDAY. FEB. 14'TH
Thank You in advance
HHS Student Council
&
Jamie Rewis
Student Council Advisor


I -r Is Illlls- I I a-I mal


I


4
r


L








4B The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


ARC REPORT


PRECO To Salute

Vets On March 12


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Wauchula Lions Club on Thursday, Jan. 20, heard a report on the Ridge Area ARC,
which operates a Wauchula Adult Training Program at 233 U.S. 17 at the old South
Florida Community College building. There is also a thrift store at the old Eckerd Drugs
location at 1010 U.S. 17 S. ARC provides adult basic education, adult day training,
behavior analysis services, companion services, in-home support, personal care, resi-
dential services, respite care, supported employment services, supported living serv-
ices and transportation. The Ridge Area ARC took over services here when the Hardee
ARC was closed about a year ago. The phone number is 863-452-1295. ARC used to
stand for Association for Retarded Citizens but clients are now described as having
intellectual disabilities. Pictured (from left) are Ed Algreen, director of employment
services Toni Salvaggio, director Cameron Banard, and club President Talmadge
Albritton.


cc~~


W ai Stmekt la/ et
Flowers & Gifts
(863) 773-0409


Valentine's Day
Sis
Monday, Feb. 14th
S ,,, Order early for -
guaranteed delivery.
S % Free Delivery To Schools /
Also available...
Candles ~ Balloons ~ Candies Gift Baskets
Tuxedo Rental ~ Wedding Consultation
Visit Our New Location
315 W. Main Street Historical Downtown Wauchula
soc2:lOc G 3


Cowboy-up Ministry will
observe Valentine Sunday with
music, food and, of course,
horses. Bring your horse to
church, which starts at 10 a.m.
with Richard Kiser in concert.
Kiser is 2009 Country Gospel
Music Association Hall of
Fame inductee and won instru-
mentalist of the decade.
Following will be food, fel-
lowship and a trail ride. For
information, call Skipper
Calder at 863-781-2281or visit
www.cowboyupministry.com.
Cowboy-up Ministry meets at
the Cracker Trail Arena, 6134
State Road 66, Zolfo Springs.

The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.


I I





The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Jan. 31-Feb. 4. Listings include
the name of the owner or con-
tractor, the address for the proj-
ect, the type of work to be done,
and the cost involved. Only
projects valued at $1,000 or
more are listed.

ISSUED
Harold Childress, Griffin
Road, electrical, $1,350.
Douglas Battey, two loca-
tions Shelton Avenue, renova-
tions, $4,600.
Douglas Battey, West Main
Street, renovations, $3,000.
Donald Maddox, North Ham-
mock Road, new construction,
$65,000.
Charles P. Rogers, Maude
Road, manufactured home,
$125,000.
Owner/builder, Broward
Street, renovations, $1,364.
Gary L. Giddens, Hanchey
Road, renovations, $3,125.
Charles P. Rogers, Roy
Moore Road, new construction,
$109,870.
Gary Palmer, Altman Road,
new construction, $20,000.

BUILDING BLOCKS
The ISO (Insurance organiza-
tion) sets the standards for
insurance rates in communities,
and thus sets the tone for resi-
dential and commercial* con-
struction. It assigns a grade
from 1 to 10 on its Building
Code Effectiveness Grading
Schedule. Communities are
graded on whether they have
effective building code enforce-
ment that results in safer build-
ings and less damage from cata-
strophic events. The Hardee
County Building & Zoning
Office meets or exceeds those
expectations on inspections,
permits issued, certified licens-
es and continuing education.
The county's fire and law
enforcement response also
meets standards.

Warning: Humor may be
hazardous to your illness.
-Ellie Katz


Since the founding of this
nation, military personnel,
through their selfless acts and
even their lives, have estab-
lished and maintained the free-
doms that Americans enjoy.
In recognition of these brave
men and women, Peace River
Electric Cooperative, headquar-
tered in Wauchula, is hosting a
special "Military Salute" at its
71st Annual Membership Meet-
ing set for March 12.
The Annual Membership
Meeting is a once-a-year event
for PRECO's member-con-
sumers. Held on the coopera-
tive's property, members are
invited to enjoy family-friendly
games, educational displays
and food booths, and participate
in the business session.
The meeting's "Military
Salute" theme will host a "Wall
.of Honor," which features vet-
erans, past and present. PRECO
is currently soliciting members
for photos and service informa-
tion for display.


"PRECO members and their
extended family, living or
deceased, are eligible to be
included on our "Wall of Hon-
or," said PRECO meter reader
supervisor Mike Rouse. "We
simply request the veteran's
photo, name, branch of service,
and dates served information,
which will be proudly displayed
at the Annual Meeting."
To participate, PRECO mem-
bers are asked to e-mail photo
and service information to the
cooperative's office at Mike.-
Rouse@preco.coop or Ken-
dell.Coker@preco.coop.
Alternatively, the requested
information may be mailed to:
Peace River Electric Coopera-
tive, Wall of Honor Project,
P.O. Box 1310, Wauchula, FL
33873. Photos will not be
returned.
For more information, con-
tact Peace River Electric Co-
operative, toll-free at 800-282-
3824.


-. soc2 i5 d


Save 50-75% on pet Vaccinations

Thursday, February 17th


Vision Ace Hardware

S''225 East Oak St., Wauchula 5:00 to 6:00 pm 773-3148
l; Dog & Cat Packs start at $45 With heartworm test $55
W' / Kitten and puppy packs $36 5
.1 Save money on your favorite Heartworm t


and flea products such as
Revolution, Heartguard, Comfortis & Frontline


.:.i. ,











S 1040 & Business Tax Preparation -

Payroll & Bookkeeping Services
Quickbooks
Checks, Training & Assistance
Electronic Filing Fax Service
Notary



1 '$20 COUPON $201
I This coupon entitles you to twenty dollars off any return I
filed in our office. Thank you for being a valued client. I .

Este cup6n le permit a veinte d6lares de cualquier regre
son archivado en, Nuestra oficina. Gracias por es un
client valorado.
TNT Bookkeeping Service, Inc
I 1329 US Hwy 17 N, Wauchula, FL
--- -(863)773-3754 $ 2 0


Jose L. Torres, Sr.
Owner
S J VISA


Tax Practitioner
brmcvay@strato.net


II rrr~ -~~1 ~ Ilhl~ -- IE.'.q- -.............-_


ALLMAORCRDI


Crystal Rive
Tax Practition


ra
er


I I


l


I--- i


I







February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252011CP000008
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES P LOWE, deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of FRANCES P. LOWE,
deceased, whose date of death
was January 14, 2011, and whose I
social security number Is XXX-XX-
XXXX, Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873-1749.
, The name and address of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's Attor-
ney are pet forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice Is 02/10/11.
Personal Representative:
BRENDA JOYCE ALDRIGE
8950 NW Prairie Road
Arcadia, FL 34269
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John W.H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopler: (866) 591-1658
Florida Bar Number: 0650137
2:10,17c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE'
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252010DR000706
IN RE: THE PETITION OF .-
PRJ/CX, A MINOR CHILD


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County can help resi-
dents meet keep their homes
The Hardee County Com-
mission last week approved the
county getting involved in a
federal program to help unem-
ployed or underemployed peo-
ple keep up their mortgages.
The Office of Community
Development has been desig-
nated to provide the advisor
services for local participants,
people who are either unem-

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Ad Hoc
Committee Meeting: Consider
SWFWMD business including
consideration of workload and
staffing analysis. Some Board
members may participate in the
meeting via communications
media technology.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February
22, 2011; 9:00 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD
Headquarters, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar;1 (800)423-1476
(FL only) or (352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: Luanne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0113)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@
swfwmd.state.fl.us
2:10c


- played or underemployed.
There are two aspects to the
program. The Unemployment
Mortgage Assistance Program
will provide up to 18 months of
payments to the mortgage
lender for borrowers on a first
mortgage until they can resume
payments on their own.
The Mortgage Loan Rein-
statement Program will bring a
delinquent mortgage current for
a homeowner who has returned
to work.
Called the Hardest Hit Fund,
monies are allocated to five
states, Arizona, California, Mi-
chigan, Nevada and Florida, the
five hardest hit by excessive
housing market depreciation
and high unemployment. The
mortgage foreclosure preven-
tion program had allotted
$656.8 million for Florida resi-
dents and added an addition
$401 million recently.


There are a list of require-
ments for eligibility for the pro-
gram. The housing debt must
exceed 31 percent of the month-
ly income and the homeowner
must be no more than 180 days
in arrears. The maximum
amount of a mortgage is
$400,000 and foreclosure pro-
ceedings must not have started.
The Office of Community
Development will work with
local realtors and banks to
inform citizens of the program
to help residents who are strug-
gling to keep their homes. For
more information, people can
contact their lending institution,
realtor or the Community De-
velopment Office at 773-6349.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-added Sophia Cummings
and Thomas Trevino to the
Sustainable Hardee Steering
Committee, along with Tim


STORE


County In Mortgage


Assistance Program


Wells, Mark White, Michael
Kelly, Russell Smith, Joe Al-
britton, Vanessa Hernandez,
Kenny Miller, Nicole Drake,
Jake Crews and Donnie Canary.
The steering committee will
gather information from the
various focus groups and con-
solidate it for a final plan.
Meetings set for focus groups
are 6-8 p.m. and generally at
commission chambers, Room
102, Courthouse Annex I, 412
W. Orange St., Wauchula. Peo-
ple can attend any or all of
them, depending on their areas
of interest.
The first focus group meeting
is today (Thursday) on econom-
ic development. Tuesday's
meeting on housing is at
Wauchula City Auditorium, 225
E. Main St., Wauchula. Meet-
ings resume at commission
chambers on Feb. 21 on land
use/environment and open-
space; Feb. 22 on education and
Feb. 28 on infrastructure.
Meetings scheduled so far in
March are Ist-Economic De-
velopment; 7th-Housing;
8th-Land Use/Environment/-
Open Space; 10th Education;


CLOSING


~4IEVE1Th!U{%USTkiIBJ*SOLDJ


ECLA


NOTICE OF ACTION


TO:
WHITNEY JUSTICE
611 E. SUMMIT
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA
and
SHANE BARRINGTON
413 WINTHROP ST.
AVON PARK, FLORIDA
YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, If
any, to it on Richard K. Justice,
whose address is 478 River Lane,
Wauchula, Florida 33873 on or
before February 18, 2011, and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court at PO Drawer 1749, or 417
W. Main St., Room #202,
Wauchula, FL 33873, before ser-
vice on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fall to do so, a
default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.
Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record
at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.


Dated
2011.


this 11 day of January,


B. Hugh Bradley,
Clerk of Court
BY: Connie Coker D.C.
"If you are a person with a dis-
ability, who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled
at no cost to you, to the provision
or certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863) 534-4690,
within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you
are hearing or voice impaired,
call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida
Relay Service 711."
1:20-2:10c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
FILE NO. 252011CP000006
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
WILLIAM CARROLL BISHOP,
also known as WILLIAM C.
BISHOP, deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of WILLIAM CARROLL
BISHOP, also known as WILLIAM
C. BISHOP, deceased, whose
date of death was December 30,
2010, and whose social security
number Is xxx-xx-xxxx, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is .Post
Office Drawer 1749, Wauchula, FL
33873-1749. The names and
addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is 02/03/2011.
Personal Representative:
PAMELA D. BISHOP
5008 Prescott Avenue
Ona, FL 33865
John W. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (866) 591-1658
Florida Bar Number: 0650137
2:3,10c


first Come, First Served!


I


Flowers

& Plants

up to

50% off











Used

Furniture

up to

70% off


Pictures

& Mirrors

up to

50% off


All Lamps &

Accessories

up to

50% off


At these prices items won't last long!


Royal's Furniture,
snce19 2 Ap pliances & Bedding

Roy al' 131 West Main

Wauchula, FL 33873

FURNITURE -


A PPLIA NCES & BEDDING


and 15th-Infrastructure-at
Wauchula City Hall.
To get on the mailing list visit
www.hardeecounty.net/vision-
ing.
-approved a long-term
(three-years and renewable)
lease for the antenna tower for
the radio system for public safe-
ty.
-approved purchase of
seven laptops for the commis-
sioners, county manager and
administrative assistant to set
up the agenda management
software which will make com-
mission meetings on-line for
the public. The county attorney
will have a smaller Netbook, as
his preference.
-heard an update on the
Mosaic Resort project just north
of the Hardee County Line.
Called Streamsong, the resort
will have 160-200 rooms and
will plan to open the golf club-
house in October 2012 and the
resort in the fall of 2013. The
resort property is on 2,300 acres
of the 16,000 that has been
mined and reclaimed.
Michael Kelly contributed to
this report.


Our Lowest Prices Ever!


^-.-,





Floor


Sample

Bedding

35% off


1'


Used

Appliances

up to

50% off


VISA
layj "A --ja


2:10c


TOA INVNOR IQIATO I


Store


ClosingT?


Soon!!


1119~


'. f


k
3







6B The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


I ]










MDS/CARE PLAN COORDINATOR
RN-LPN NEEDED FULL TIME FOR CHALLENGING
MDS POSITION. EXPERIENCE IN LONG TERM CARE,
VERY DETAILED ORIENTED, COMPUTER SKILLS
NECESSARY.
Apply in Person At: Hardee Manor Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873
cl2:10c


CHURCH WORSHIP LEADER
First United Methodist Church of Wauchula
First United Methodist Church of Wauchula is a congregation that
strives to "Know God, Love Others, and Serve the World." It is
through this mission statement that we see the need to reach a
larger demographic and wish to begin greater opportunities both
for worshipping God and growing in God. From this need we
have decided to hire a part time worship leader. We are seeking
through God's direction, an individual who would be able devel-
op some of the opportunities mentioned above as well as begin
to bring contemporary elements into our current worship service.
For further information in reference to this ministry opportu-
nity please contact the Church Office at 863-773-4267 or at
wauchulal stumc@embarqmail.com. cl :20,27c


Elder Affairs SHINE Program
Seeks Volunteers
-Volunteers help improve the lives of Florida's elders-

Tampa The Florida Department of Elder Affairs, along
with the West Central Florida Area Agency on Aging,
invites you to join the award-winning SHINE team of
volunteers. This program helps elders make informed
decisions about Medicare, health insurance and
prescription drug plans.
SHINE volunteers provide individual counseling and
assistance to elders and their caregivers about Medicare,
Medicaid, Medicare plan choices, long-term care planning
and prescription discount drug programs. Volunteers may
also make educational presentations to community
groups and participate in local health fairs, senior fairs and
other outreach and educational events.
If you would like additional information about this exciting
opportunity and would like to become a SHINE volunteer
in Hillsborough, Hardee, Highlands, Manatee and Polk
Counties, please call the West Central Florida Area
Agency on Aging at 813-740-3888, ext. 5593.
WEST CENTRAL FL. AREA AGENCY ON AGING
Attn: Robin Watt, Volunteer Manager
5905 Breckenridge Pkwy, Suite F
Tampa, Florida 33610
(813) 740-3888 Fax (813) 623-1342
Website: www.AgingFlorida.com 2:33:24




THE PALMS,

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through February 28th
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professi6nal Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
1 (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider cl2 3-24c


ROUND BAIL HAY for sale $30 per
bail. Call Donald 781-0554.
2:10-3:10p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and Install. 863-381-0538.
1:27;8:18p
40 ACRE GROVE, 80% earlies,
20% valenclas, 3 yr contract min.
$1.30-$1.55, joins to Wauchula
Airport to the east. Owner financ-
Ing available. Call Reynolds
Allen. 813-334-9321. 1:20-2:10c
75 HP 1997 4x4 open cab tractor
with ROPS, 2,200 hours, $9,500.
321-284-7632. 1:20-2:24p
BW LAND & CATTLE Ag property
management. Fences, pastures,
groves. Brian 941-391-1277.
1:13-2:10p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


05 CHEVY 1-TON 4X4 Duramax
Diesel 12' flat bed, underbox stor-
age. Excellent condition $15,500.
863-245-8911. 2:10-3:10p
05 FORD TAURUS $3,000 cash.
781-1062. 2:10c
96 GMC 2 DR. 4X4 Blazer $2,000
cash. 781-1062. 2:10c
2000 2 DR BLAZER $2,550 cash.
781-1062. 2:10c
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
cars. Pickup available. Crooms
Salvage. 781-3767. 2:7tfc


LOCAL CHURCH seeking part-
time worship leader. Please see
display ad In the classified sec-
tion. 2:10,17c
BABYSITTER NEEDED for
Jazzercise Zolfo 3:45 pm-5:00 pm
Monday, Tuesday and Friday.
Minimuni 18 years. Free
Jazzercise at alternate classes.
Call Ann Marie 767-0613. 2:10c


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

.773-4478




Free Estimates

Insured 30+ years experience l2tfc



0"-1 Charles N. Flesher II, Inc
-o TILE & FLOORING SPECIALIST
TILE* LAMINATE
'i"i WOOD ENGINEERED WOOD
Bathtubs Showers Backsplashes & More
When a product is installed with care and know-how, you'll receive
a service that I am willing to stake my name on! Charley
FREE ESTIMATES
863-781-2867 701 BUMBY LANE, WAUCHULA 2:10c



right Residential 6

Beginnings commercial
Painting Service, Inc. FREE ESTIMATES
No Job Too Small or Too Large!
Steve Christmas Cell 863-781-4001
With God All Things Are Possible. Matthew 19:26





IIEART'IlAN
YOUR ^- TO
7 REAL ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
a Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties
* Immaculate, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 BA home with barn sits on
2.16 acres in a very desirable country setting & close to town.
PRICE REDUCED to $199,000. Call Mikey @ 781-1698.
* 5 acres with 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage home, fenced yard, large oaks,
peaceful setting in east Hardee.county. $149,900. Call Jeri Wohl @
381-8595.
* 3 BR, 1 BA lake cottage on highly desired Lake Byrd in Avon Park.
Beautiful views from living room, lakeside gazebo, storage unit, boat.
$99,900. Call Jeri Wohl @ 381-8595.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net c
cl2:10c


LOVE TO HUNT, FISH?? 1.5 a/c adjoins the 13,500 acre
Arbuckle Lake Wildlife management area. Modern 3 BR, 2+ bath
home, attached garage, large "L" shaped decked with views of
lake and adjoining wildlife area. Detached 2 car/2 story garage
with exercise room or apartment? Motor home parking, dock, 160
ft. lake.frontage. Beautifully shaded with mature Oaks and much
more. Asking $575,000.
24 a/c LAKEFRONT (Lake Annie) Large tree nursery with inven-
tory, nice 3 BR, 2 B home, "cook" house, 2 apartments, 2 wells, all
under irrigation. Asking $735,000. For the package. Possible
owner finance.
1600 ACRE LAKEFRONT RANCH Package includes modern 5
BR home, 2 employee houses, cattle herd, exotic animals, citrus
and over 1 3/4 mile lakefront and paved road frontage. Adjoins
State lands. $7999. Per acre entire.
154 and 212 Acre Pastures with Paved Road Frontage. Both
fenced, shade for animals, some game, $600(H. Acre.
Several citrus groves including 52 acres near Limestone.
Just a few of my listings. Check web site for full detail.
Find details as well as other listings at
www.marvadsit.com.


PERSONAL ASSISTANT Some-
one to help do anything; in house,
yard & occassionaly help In office
filing, etc. Non-smokers only.
Must pass drug & background
check. Part-time at first, maybe
more later. 767-2978. 2:10p


3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. $190,000.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p
3BR/2-1/2 BATH in Wauchula,
Riverview subdivision. New
kitchen and appliances, huge
family room with fireplace large
laundry room, 2 utility/storage
rooms. Moving, must sell, 100k
OBO. 863-245-8911. 2:20-3:10Op
PARK MODEL 1BR/1-1/2BA fur-
nished, w/FL room & screened
porch-Little Charlie Creek RV
Park Lot 166. 828-775-9639.
2:10-3:10 p


X-Box Elite barely used $300. Call
863-835-3067. 2:1 Op


30 X 50 STEEL Building. 4 years
old. $12,000. 863-781-3528 or
863-781-3906. 2:1 p
2 CEMETERY PLOTS $1,000 for
both. Call 735-0285. 2:10-3:10p
1959 FORD DEXTA Tractor.
Partially rebuilt. Make and offer.
863-735-0792. 2:3;3:3p
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
-send scrap gold in the mail. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
1:6tfc
60 LOADS FILL DIRT. Has some
grass, digging more ponds. You
dig ponds, you keep dirt. 863-
990-6489. 1:6tfc
DEHUMIDIFIER $178 new, $75.
904-222-4607. 1:6tfc


MOBILE HOME at Pioneer Creek
RV, Bowling Green. 1BR, 1B,
$1,500, available April let. 863-
473-1429. 2:10,17p


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)


Monday Friday
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider


EOUAL HOUMG


cl2:3-24c


L idAf's ftovISC hrift Store

\I Furniture Home Decor* Crystal N/O
^9 China Quality Merchandise OPN
ALL DONATIONS APPRECIATED
Pick-Up Service Available
Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
(Directly Behind Heaven Sent)





i/eaven c5en Cleaning service
Now offered by Sherry White Ministries
Carports Garages Homes Lawns
Commercial & Residential
Call for Estimates 863-245-1184






Joe L0 Drmis


I N C.,


John O'Neal


R E A


L T 0 R S
(863) 773-2128


J REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
L JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.


Beautiful native Florida! Se-
cluded 5 ac of wooded land has
deeded access to Peace River!
Canoe, camp, fossil hunt, relax!
$90,000!
38.5 ac on the Peace River
w/lots of beautiful oaks, pines
and palmettos! Pole barn &
2BR/2BA MH. $524,900!
PRICE REDUCED! Pack your
overnight bags & head to this
peaceful retreat! 5 ac fenced
w/lots of oaks, pond, creek,
12'x20' shed. $66,500!
40+ acs farmland, 8" well,
paved rd frontage, near Wauc-
hula. $360,000!
High & dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$120,000!
20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!


Roomy 4BR/2BA CB home in
Wauchula on corner lot!
Remodeled bath, solid surface
kitchen countertops, large
screened porch, new carport!
$158,000!
Imagine your new home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Fenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
5 acs fenced on Mel Smith Rd
zoned Agriculture. $45,000!
3BR/IBA home in BG on corner
lot w/fenced yard, workshop,
shed. $68,900!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!


REAID, R ASSOCIATES AFTER HQO
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 SANDY LARRISON...... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL.......... 781-7633 MONICA REAS..............781-0888
DAVID ROYAL............781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 :1


J


I Ir


1:2lc 0-24c















The


February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B






Classifieds


1999 SINGLE WIDE MH, 16' x 65',
S2BR/2BA, very nice, must move.
$12,000. 781-3570. 2:3,10c


CHIHUAHUA 10 Weeks old $200.
407-929-6491. 2:10,17c
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


STRAWBERRIES U-PICK $1
pound (quart). Available now.
2949 Center Hill Road. Off SR 62,
4.5 miles west of US 17. Open
every day 7:30-6. 863-223-5561.
2:10p


1996 30' 5TH WHEEL CAMPER,
14' slide, side-by-side refrigera-
tor, cold ac, t.v., non-smoker,
electric, gas, hot water heater,
microwave, with 2000 E-Z Go golf
cart with full side curtains. Both
units very nice, $9,500, 863-712-
1126 or 863-224-4790. 2:10p
1997 COUNTRY STAR 36' 5th
wheel, queen bed, pantry, all cut-
lery, dishes, furniture, bedding,
outdoor furniture, awnings, plus
many, many extras. $5,500 OBO.
Wauchula 863-832-1981. 2:10p
30' TRAILER WITH 30' sunroom
attached. Reduced $3,000.
Crystal Lake Village. New bath-
room, patio. 863-773-6351.
1:27:2:24p


3/1 A/C NICE Neighborhood.
$700 monthly, $200 security. 863-
781-7061. 2:10-3:10p
APT. & HOUSES 773-6667. 2:10c
$400 MONTHLY, electric Included.
Large furnished 1 bedroom coun-
try apartment on 64. 863-773-
4860. 2:10p
4 BEDROOM BLOCK C/A $800
monthly, Wauchula area. 863-781-
0982. 2:10,17p
3/2 FENCED IN YARD, Rivervlew,
$840 monthly, $840 security. 863-
735-1953. 1:27-2:24p


* 863-773-3573

Fax 863-773-0521 108 Ca
desotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchul


arlton Street
a, FL 33873


TWO BEDROOM Duplex, C/A, no
pets. $550 plus deposit. 832-
1984. 1:20-2:17p
THREE BEDROOM two bath, no
pets. $800 plus deposit. 773-
4740. 1:20-2:17p
ONE BEDROOM loft cabin near
Clayton, GA. Wrap-around deck,
fireplace, fully furnished. Close to
Lake Burton, driving distance to
Dillard, GA and Franklin, NC.
$400 weekly, $120 nightly. 941-
799-1088. 1:13-2:10p
NICE CLEAN 2 BEDROOM 1 bath
house. Central heat/cool, new
carpet and a walk-in closet, wash-
er & dryer hookup. $150 per
week, damage deposit and refer-
ences required. 773-9793 or 863-
832-0676. 2:10p
TOWNHOUSES, Immaculate con-
dition, 1400 sq. ft. 2 BR, 2 1/2 B,
$600 month. 773-2122. 11:11tfc
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo. up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
698-4908. 8:24
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


CARING HANDS MINISTRY,
assisted living facility/respite
care. 863-781-6680, 863-773-
6128. 2:3;3:3p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze
Construction. 781-2708.
RR0050181. 12:16;2:18p


JEREMY'S handl-works & tree
service. 863-245-6558. 1:20;2:17p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting In Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders is the facilitatory.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:1 8tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number, tfc-dh


I AM LOOKING for part time em-
ployment, Hardee resident with
customer service background,
other fields considered. 941-716-
1411. 2:10p
I WILL SIT with your loved one,
references. 863-781-0982.
1:27-2:1 Op
GROVE HERBICIDE Boom used
or new. Harvey 773-6012. 2:3,10p


GHC CONSTRUCTION, INC.

ASPHALT PAVING
COMPLETE SITE WORK i
SHELL TREE REMOVAL

Office: 863-494-4147 '1.B"
Mobile: 863-990-0059
ghcconstruction@embarqmail.com



Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAIOL


Pay Here!H IIr ahele



F* a st*adRliale

(83 8 -00o 8 -01 cl6S

BU ILL O 'IR E.0 EU ES ygF1I
TIE PBes Tr Soe n on!7#0-


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 3/8 S. 10th
Ave., Wauchula. Large yard sale.
2:10p
ORANGE BLOSSOM RV Park
2829 Hwy. 17, North, 8 Noon.
Sewing and bingo machines,
lamps, fans, clothing, jewelry,
sheets. Clubhouse open with
food served till 1 pm. 2:10p
YARD SALE Saturday 321
Riverside Dr. Wauchula. 2:10p
CRACKER LAKE RV Resort. Hwy
64 E. Zolfo Springs. Parkwide
yard sales. Sat. 8-1. 2:10p
SAT. MANAGER'S SALE.
Furniture, refrigerator, tools, bed.
Bowling Green Storage. 2:10p
NEW VISION WORSHIP Center
Amp'd Youth yard sale & car
wash. Saturday 8 12. 2915
Schoolhouse Road Zolfo. Lots of
Miscellaneous clothes, books,
household items, etc. 2:10c
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-3. 3-Family,
huge yard sale, everything must
go. Prices are unbelievably
cheap. 4635 St. Rd. 62, Bowling
Green. 2:10p


Es-
SATURDAY 7:30 am 1 prnf
Clothes, tools, toys, furniture. 314
Park Drive, Riverview. 2:1 p
FRIDAY, 8 am ? 814 N. 9th Ave.)
Wauchula. DVD's, new clothes. ',
2:10p
MISSION THRIFT STORE, INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available.
2:10p
MULTI-FAMILY YARD Sale 1-
Saturday only! 8 am ? 185 MyrtIp
Drive, Wauchula. 2:10p.
SATURDAY 8-2 525 ILL. Av4,
Wauchula. New/used clothes. -
2:1(p


DESOTO COUNTY





EASY FINANCING '
www.landcallnow.comr
1-941-778-7980/7565 5


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg.#MV-40625


"No job's too big."
(Illli~n;; Sll i


I


M-


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
SMike Adcox ~ Manager


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
c,,:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


WR SMITH

LAND CLEARING
* MOWING FENCING GROVE CARE FERTILIZER *
LAND CLEARING DISCING *

773-3557 781-0158


New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires


BIG SRLE ON

ALL TIRES.
773-0777 773-0727'
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
VISA '" (across from Billy Ayers
Wal-Mart) Tire Technicianc1
cl2:10c


L AM B ER Bus. (863)
REALTY INC. Fax: (863)


402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
PRICE REDUCED! Charming "old Florida
style" home, 3B/2Bth, ceramic tile floors, new
appliances, large lot with gazebo, near shop-
ping and post office. $120,000
MAKE AN OFFER! CB/Stucco, 3B/2Bth,
home built in 2004, tile and carpet floors, large
bedrooms, utility and eat-in kitchen. Asking
$115,000
5 acres prime land located on Merle Langford
Road. $65,000
5 acres Lonnie Shackleford Road. $85,000


www.lambel


773-0007
773-0038
trealty.net


Doris Lambert
EXCELLENT CONDITION! This 3B/2Bth
home has been updated with new carpet, A/C
and roof; convenient location to schools, med-
ical facilities. $140,000
AFFORDABLE and CONVENIENT! This
2B/1Bth M/H has nice yard and large screened
porch; completely furnished. $38,000
5 Acres with large oaks and cleared field; very
secluded. $40,000
16.5 Acres with 5 wells (4-2" and 1-4" well);
3B/2Bth M/H surrounded by beautiful oaks.
$195,000


1 1 SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON i
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMB


DELOIS JOHNSON 773-9743


iERT. Broker 01


STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


UL


Turn All

Your

Unwanted

Items Into

Extra Cash!


For yus


Realtor
310 Couit St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net Noey A. Flores
(863) 781-4585

Specials of the Week











Just listed! 3BR/2BA MH in Charlie Creek Mobile Estates-
corner lot, storage sheds, large back patio. Must see at $79,900.

Wooded vacant lot! 2.75 +/- acres on St Rd 64 West, great resi-
dential building lot with lots of big oaks. Priced to sell at $24,900
Reduced- New Construction! 3BR/2BA custom built, CB home
with tray ceiling and crown molding. Reduced to $125,000.
Get away for the weekend on 8 +/- acres, great for recreation or
livestock. Offered at $32,000
ALWAYS WANTED YOUR OWN RANCH! Come see this
3BR/2BA CB home with brick on 10 acres with horse stalls, feed-
ing barn. Lots of fruit and palm trees. Large screened patio with
swimming pool, great for entertaining. All this for $298,000)

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
r Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl2:10c


L
DeSoto ApplianoLc

Established Since 1987 R
SALES SERVICE


863-397-9840
354 Bostick Road Bovling Green. FL
1-
..




www.gatorheatingandair.com
Gator Heating-Air-Mold Inspections LLC
, ',1i 1-12- ji : n..: I III -4.ii'4


.. GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


I~;E;~-~-~-~-~--~*1*


ASSOCIATES


AI


Ir







8B The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011





-The


Classifieds


Football Players Get Awards


SU-PICK STRAWBERRIES


$* 0 Pound (Qurt


I~mlll~R11IIIHI W[IN OiilNiM'Ii


2949 Center Hill Road Bowling Green
(Off Hwy. 62 ~ 4.5 miles West of US17)
863-223-5561


2:10p


'uust Stuff"
133 E. Townsend St. Wauchula 832-5759

BIG SALE

EVERYTHING 20% OFF,
Tues. Fri. Sat.
10 am 5 pm 10 am 2 pm


.


Huge Garage Sale


Hardee Car Company
(Across From First National Bank)


Saturday Feb. 12

Lot of tools, Boats, Appliance
Clothes, Toys & Lots of Othe
Misc Items


..sT



A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Go home and wash up.
Clean up your act! Sweep
your lives clean of your evil
doings . Say no to wrong,
learn to do good work for jus-
tice. Help the down-and-out.
Stand up for the homeless.
Go to bat for the defense-
less.
Isaiah 1:16a, 17(ME)

FRIDAY
Don't criticize people, and
you will not be criticized. For
you will be judged by the way
you criticize others, and the
measure you give will be the
measure you receive.
Matthew 7:1 (Phillips)

SATURDAY
Lord, through all the genera-
tions You have been our
home! Before the mountains
were created, before You
made the earth and the
world, You are God, without
beginning or end.
Psalm 90:12 (NLT)


SUNDAY
Let every man be quick to
hear, slow to speak, slow to
anger.


)thI


James 1:19b (RSV)


MONDAY
Don't make friends with
?Sy quick-tempered people, or
spend time with those who
r have bad tempers. If you do,
you will be like them; then
you will be in real danger.
2:10c Proverbs 22:24-25 (NCV)


TUESDAY
They were more astonished
than ever, and said to one
another, 'Then who can be
saved (eternally)? Jesus
looked at them and said,
"For men, it is impossible,
but not for God; everything is
possible for God.
Mark 10:26-27 (NEB)
WEDNESDAY
As for me, I look to the Lord
for His help, I wait for God to
save me, He will hear me ...
God will bring me out of my
darkness into the light, and I
will see His goodness.
Micah 7:7, 9b (TLB,





Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.iimseerealty.com


E James V. See, Jr., Broker *
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood. Won't
last long at $220,000!
Nice lot in Torrey community with frontage on
Hole Number 6 of Torrey Oaks Golf Course. Lot
$14,900 Owner will build to suit for just
$159,900!
Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $98,500!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $229,000
PRICE REDUCED! Beautiful home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. Was
$475,000.....Now $379,000!


Ben Gibson
Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


James V. See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Dusty Albritton


(863)781-1423 LJ
(863)273-1017 11
(863)781-1396 cl2:10c


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A variety of awards were dis-
tributed to Hardee Wildcat foot-
ball players at festivities last
week.
Head Coach Buddy Martin
and staff applauded those who
had been outstanding in the
2010 season and carried the
Wildcats to the Class 2A-
District 6 championship and
beyond.
Under the new districting
system, which has eight classes,
Hardee has been reclassified to
Class 5A Region 3 District 10,
which also includes Bradenton
Bayshore, DeSoto, Bradenton
Southeast and possibly Pal-
metto, which asked to move
down from 6A.
The 2011 schedule begins
with Aug. 8 as the first day of
,practice. The Pre-Season Clas-
sic can be held Aug. 25-27 and
the regular season extends from
Sept. 2 through Nov. 11.
But for seniors Tre' Ander-
son, Jorge Ayala, Quinton Carl-
ton, Brandon Darley, D'Vonte
Hooks, Jarrius Lindsey, Jake
Mayer, Herbert Pace, Austin
Prestridge, Kareem Richardson,
Tony Rodriguez and Jimmy
Vallejo the high school football
experience is over. Several of
them and some underclassmen
shared football awards. Each
senior was presented with an
8/10 picture.
The Most Valuable Player
award went to junior defensive
back Andrew Hooks. Offensive
Player of the Year went to sen-
ior running back Jarrius Lind-
sey and Defensive Player of the
Year to linebacker Quinton
Carlton. The Most Improved
Player Award went to lineman
Herbert Pace.
The Mr. Wildcat Award went


10 HOURS A
MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)

-------U



Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot g
863-382-0600


to junior quarterback Colby
Baker, who exemplified the
'Cats designation, the Char-
acter, Attitude, Trust and
Strength expected of a Wildcat.
Several players came in for
eight special awards presented
each year.
First up was the L. Dale
"Dooley" Carlton award, pre-
sented by his namesake Dale
Carlton to senior Jarrius Lind-
sey. Carlton was an announcer
for the Wildcat football team
for many years and was a foot-
ball coach during the 1940s. the
award recognizes outstanding
leadership and dedication in the
sport of football.
The Caleb Skitka award pre-
sented by Defensive Coordi-
nator Steve Rewis went to sen-
ior linebacker Quinton Carlton.
The award was instituted by
former Wildcat coach Derren
Bryan in memory of the senior
who died in an accident just
before graduation in 2001.
Skitka was a four-year starter
on both offense and defense and
displayed "extreme dedication,
courage and pursuit of excel-
lence in the game of life and
football." The award recognizes
an individual who exemplifies
these qualities.
The Coach Bob Martin
Award was presented by his
grandson Brandon Sellers to
wide receiver/defensive end
Brandon Darley. The award, for
outstanding citizenship, aca-
demic achievement and leader-
ship, was named for the Hardee
coach who had led the Wildcats
for 27 winning seasons and was
the fifth most winning coach in
Florida high school history. He
led the Wildcats to the runner-
up position in the 1995 state
championship game.
Another senior, running back


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


REDUCED $199.900!! 3 Bedroon/3 Bath
Home recently painted and remodeled sits
on 5 acres with pole barn.
COUNTRY LIVING!! In this 3 bedroom, 2
Bath Double Wide Mobile Home and 5 acres
with beautiful Oak trees. $92.900!!
REDUCED!!! $82.500 2B/2B Home with cen-
tral heat/air, one car garage, appliances,
work-shop and storage area, extra lot includ-
ed, all in quite neighborhood and close to
shopping and schools.
Priced @ $72.500!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath home
with central heat and air, private well, utility
shed, and more sits on 2.4 Acres.
WATCH YOUR MONEY GROW!! Excellent
rental home features 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
with extra lot. Call today!! $34.900
PRICED REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
home with extra lot, walking distance to
school, and town. House in good condition-
owner ready to negotiate Only $100,000


Jake Mayer, received the
Charles C. and William B.
Dickey Award presented by
Thomas Trevino for the Key
Club. It honors the pair of for-
mer Wildcats who "were out-
standing in attaining the goals
for which Key Club strives."
Charles Dickey went to West
Point where he later served as
an instructor before giving his
life in the Vietnam conflict. Bill
Dickey perished ina parachut-
ing accident while attending the
Citadel.
Back/defensive tackle Ka-
reem Richardson was awarded
the Luther Colbert Football
Sportsmanship Award. Pre-
sented by Jim Kelly, publisher
of The Herald-Advocate, the
award is in memory of the long-
time sports writer for whom the
press box at Wildcat Stadium is
named.
Backup quarterback, running
back and linebacker Tre' An-
derson received the Martin
Roberts Award from Coach
Travis Tubbs. The award recog-
nizes dedication and achieve-
ment in the sport of football and
was established in honor of the
man who was a loyal Wildcat
supporter for many years.
Several players received
plaques for selection to the
District 6 all District first team,
including Defensive Player of
the Year Quinton Carlton.
Others on the first team were
defensive linemen James
Greene and Keyon Brown, line-
backers Mikey Retana and Tre'
Anderson, defensive back
Andrew Hooks, offensive line-
man Herbert Pace and running
back Jarrius Lindsey.
Receiving honorable mention
were running back Jake Mayer
and lineman Dylan Farr.


702 SOUTH 6h AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www. cbhardee.com



8-1 1




Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 24541054


Charming Historic Home with loft and studio
apartment on 1 acre in City limits. $69.900
REDUCED!! $139.900 3 B/2 BTH CB home
built in 2007 has central heat/air stove,
refrigerator, two car garage, and much more.
Call today!!!
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath CB home with central
heat/air, located within City of Wauchula.
Call today!! $119.900
Frontage on US Hwy 17 North and North
Florida Ave. Access from both highways and
across from Winn Dixie. Call for more infor-
mation today. Only $350.000
SEBRING!! Nice 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB
home with central heat/air, refrigerator, dish-
washer, washer/dryer, screened rear porch,
view of golf course, one car carport. Only
$94.600
LOVELY 2 B/1 Bath home with large lot with-
in city limits. Only $69.900
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties. c12:10c


Lake June House! 4 Bedroom, 4 1/2 Bath with
over 200 feet on Lake June. Includes Jacuzzi,
Sauna, Dock & Boathouse. $780,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE! 1/2 acre
Commercial business lot in Wauchula. 6' securi-
ty fence & gates. Office & storage shed. All utili-
ties ready for your business. $85,000.
A Little Bit Country! Three Bedroom Two Bath
Home on Over Two Acres. Great Area for Horses
or Other Animals or Just Enjoy the Serenity and
Calm of This Popular Part of the County!
$169,500
POOL Home! 3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath. home.
Double French doors open up to the huge pbrch
and pool area. $178,900.
CHECK OUT THIS PRICE! Great 5 acre tract
fenced and ready to build on! $35,000


a


1, i w -







February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9B


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
The Caleb Skitka Award was won by Quinton Carlton, flanked by Defensive
Coordinator Steve Rewis (left) and Head Coach Buddy Martin.


The Martin Roberts Award went to Tre' Anderson, flanked by Coach Travis Tubbs (left)
and Head Coach Buddy Martin.


The Coach Bob Martin Award went to Brandon Darley, flanked by Brandon Sellers,
Martin's grandson, and Head Coach Buddy Martin.


Defensive players named to the Class 2A-District 6 all-district team were (from left)
Keyon Brown, Mikey Retana, Quinton Carlton, Tre' Anderson, Andrew Hooks and
James Greehe.


The Charles C. and William B. Dickey Award went to Jake Mayer, flanked by presenter
Thomas Trevino (left) for the Key Club and Head Coach Buddy Martin.
9. I


The L. Dale "Dooley" Carlton Award was won by Jarrius Lindsey, flanked by Head
Coach Buddy Martin (left) and presenter Dale Carlton, his namesake.


Offensive players named to the 2A-6 all-district team were (from left) Dylan Farr,
Jarrius Lindsey, Jake Mayer and Herbert Pace.


Most light planes are capable of taking off or landing in
90-degree crosswinds that are less than 20 percent of
the airplane's power-off stall speed.




TheHerald



Advocate
Harde Conly' Hoetow Covrag


The Coaches Award winners are (from left) Defensive Coordinator Steve Rewis;
Andrew Hooks-Most Valuable Player; Quinton Carlton, Defensive- Player of the Year;
Herbert Pace-Most Improved Player; Jarrius Lindsey-Offensive Player of the Year; and
Offensive Coordinator Ray Rivas; missing Colby Baker-Mr. Wildcat Award.


A Safe Place
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119

End The Abuse!
tfc-dh


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


L -0







10B The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011










February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11B


JV Boys Finish



With Wins


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Wildcats honored on Senior Night last week were (from left) Jimmy Vallejo, DVonte Hooks, Carl Brown, Tre'
Anderson and Tony Rodriguez.


'Cats Win Finale; Go District


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcat hoop
squad took its season finale on
Friday night against Fort Meade
and proceeded to get ready for
the district playoffs.
The Class 3A-District 11
tournament began on Monday
in DeSoto, when fourth-ranked
DeSoto hosted fifth-ranked
Sarasota Cardinal Mooney.
The semi-final round was
yesterday (Wednesday) in the
Hardee gym. In the early game,
at 6 p.m., top-seed Bradenton
Southeast took on Monday's
winner. At 7:30, as the host
team, third-seed Hardee greeted
second-seed Sarasota Booker.
The Wednesday night win-
ners clash tomorrow (Friday) at
7 p.m.
Hardee finished up its regular
season last week with three
games.
Mulberry 47-Hardee 46
A last-second shot gave the
Panthers the win over the Wild-
cats in Mulberry last -I day
night.
Hardee opened the game
well, up 14-6 at the end of the
first hectic quarter. That contin-
ued into halftime, with a 23-16
advantage. Mulberry made ad-
justments at halftime and came
out to outscore Hardee in the
third session 22-12 and take a
38-35 lead into the final period.
The teams seesawed, with
Hardee ahead in the final min-
ute, before a shot fell in before
the final buzzer and gave the
home team the 47-46 win.
"We lost on a last-second
shot. D'Vonte. (Hooks) played
pretty well, and Jajuan (Hooks)
had several assists. We were
ahead at the half, but then their
shooter got going and changed
out timing. We has some key
mistakes and gave up two quick
baskets. We were up by two
near the end when a three-
pointer put them from two
down to one up for the win,"
said Head Coach Vance Dickey.
Frank Gonzales led all scor-
ers with 18 points for the
Panthers.
. For the Wildcats, Tony Rod-
riguez was high with 15 points,
followed by D'Vonte Hooks
with 11 and Andrew "Drew"
Hooks with seven points in the
first period and a total of 10 to
put three 'Cats in double digits.
Carl Brown had six points,
and Keshun Rivers and Jajuan
Hooks each added two .points.
Tre' Anderson, Bobby Brown,
Jimmy Vallejo and Christian
Moralez contributed on the
floor game, assists, steals and
rebounds.
Lake Placid 59, Hardee 55
After opening Senior Night
activities, the teams settled into
a battle all over the court.
Hardee changed its lineup to
start all five seniors and have
the remaining five come up in
relief later in the game.
Hardee again started strongly.
After a 2-2 tie, the 'Cats went
on to build a 12-4 edge by the
end of the first period. It was
the same in the early going of
tie second quarter, when the
Hardee lead went from 14j-6 to
18-10. The Dragons began to
find the range and gradually
narrowed the lead to 24-21 at
halftime.
With about one minute gone
in the third period, senior for-
ward Carl "Junior" Brown went
down with an injury. It was sev-
eral minutes before he could stir
and finally limped off, done for
the evening. With that loss,
Hardee continued to hold a slim
lead throughout the quarter,
which,ended with Hardee up


36-35.
Fatigue and turnovers began
to both the Wildcats. Opening
the final period, Tony Rod-
riguez took a pass from Vallejo
and went baseline to up Har-
dee's lead. Shortly, there was
the first of several ties and lead
changes, until the Dragons
began to pull away, with a six-
to-eight point spread midway
through the period.
Vallejo made a free throw,
Jajuan Hooks nailedone in the
key and it was a 54-50 game.
When Lake Placid made it 55-
50, Andrew Hooks sank a three-
spot to cut the lead to 55-53
with 25.6 seconds left in the
game. Hardee was forced to
foul and Lake Placid made its
free throws. Too little too late,
Hardee fell 59-55.
"We played our seniors
tonight. It was the right thing to
do. We didn't execute as well as
we could and still have a lot to
learn about closing out the
game. We played hard and
made a good effort, but they.
were just a little bit better. We
had several unforced errors and
need to keep working on it and
pull it out before the district
games," said Dickey.
The Dragons featured five
seniors, two juniors and a soph.
Senior Andre Wilson with 24
points, 13 in the final period
with five-of-seven at the free
throw line, led Lake Placid.
Classmate Devontra Flemming
added 16 points.


For the Wildcats. Almost all
players got in the scoring col-
umn. Rodriguez was top with
nine points, Rivers had eight,
D'Vonte Hooks seven, Vallejo
and Brown both six before he
was sidelined. Anderson, Mo-
ralez and Andrew Hooks each
scored five points and Jajuan
Hooks added four.

Hardee 82-Fort Meade 54
Friday night's game was
rather one-sided. Fort Meade
only has one squad this year as
the football players were busy
with recruiting and other adtivi-
ties and did not come out for
basketball. That left the Miners
with a junior, a sophomore and
five freshmen for their only
players.
Hardee countered by bringing
its entire JV squad up and start-
ing five of them against the
Miners. After two ties, Daniel
Boehm banked a three-spot to
put Hardee up 7-4 and the 'Cats
barely stayed in front, leading
19-17 after YMt busy first period.
Junior Cole Myers made a
deuce to start the second period
with a 19-19 tie. The war con-
tinued throughout the second
quarter with several lead
changes and ties. Hardee was
up 39-36 at halftime.
Fatigue began to set in for the
short-handed Miners in the sec-
ond half, and Hardee gradually
increased its lead. The 'Cats
were playing without Brown,
who had hyperextended the


medial collateral ligament on
his left knee and was held out to
heal'for districts.
Nevertheless, Hardee gradu-
ally increased its lead as fouls
and tiredness caused the Miners
to rush their shots just a bit and
not get their rebounds. By the
end of the third, Hardee had a
57-44 lead and alternated its JV
reserves and starters to give
everyone some playing time in
preparation for district playoffs.
The final score was 82-54.
"Let's say we won. We
played a lot of JV, then mixed in
the JV and varsity. We had a full
squad and they had few re-
serves but were honoring their
schedule. They are impressive
and are going to be real good by
the time those five freshmen are
seniors," said Dickey.
Freshman Jay Smith led Fort
Meade with 16 points, followed
by classmate Chris Morris with
13 and another freshman La-
jarius Dunlap with 10. Devin
McCalebb had six, Davis four,
soph Jordan Belcher three and
Malik Brown two points.
For Hardee, freshman Keyon
Brown had 22 points, followed
by Rivers with 13 and Andrew
Hooks with 11. Moralez had
eight, Steve Metayer six,
Boehm five.
Lucius Everett had four
points, Alonzo "Kane" Casso
three and Anderson, Vallejo,
Jajuan Hooks, D'Vonte Hooks
and Rodriguez each two points.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Ending the season by win-.
ning six of the final seven
games gave the junior varsity
Wildcats a break-even season 8-
8.
They started slowly, but
when they began practicing
with the varsity, improved rap-
idly.
JV Coaches Travis Bone and
Shawn Rivers used all their
lineup in the final two blow-out
victories.
They won at Mulberry last
Tuesday 49-28. None of the
junior Panthers scored more
than 10 points.
For Hardee, freshman Keyon
Brown scored 10 in the first
quarter and finished with 15
points. Classmate Lucius Eve-
rett chipped in with 13, seven in
the hectic second quarter.
Freshman Steve Metayer added
eight points, soph Daniel
Boehm seven, and freshman
Zack Neuhofer added six. Soph
Alonzo "Kane" Casso, and
freshman Jacob Neuhofer
added with assists and defen-
sively.
It was a similar story on
Thursday night in the JV season
finale at home against the visit-
ing Lake Placid junior Dragons.
Hardee took a big lead 14-6


at the end of the first period, but'
led Lake Placid in the open
door to cut the lead to 19-16 by.
halftime. In the second half
Hardee ran away with the game,;
up 39-23 at the end of the third
and finishing 57-36. William T.
kept Lake Placid in the gamq
with his 18 points.
For Hardee, Brown had a
.strong game with 24 points,
some every period. Casso
knocked down a pair of threes,
trio of deuces and 2-of-3 at the
foul line for 14 points. Metayer
added 11 to give three players
in double digits.
Everett picked up six points;
and Jacob Neuhofer two. Zack,
Neuhofer and Boehm con-i
tribute on game action as well.'
With the varsity losing five of,
its 10 players to graduation,:
there will be slots to fill and
many of these players will, no:
doubt, move up to meet the
challenge.

Happiness is the meaning
and the purpose of life, the
whole aim and end of
human existence.
-Aristotle
A lot has been said about
politics, some of it compli-
mentary but most of it
accurate.
-Eric Idle


Stop by and see why so .
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com Gene Davis
9 :,crc 800-226-3325 Sales and Leasing




M. JOAN KROLL, MBA



"Entiled Agent

All Taxes:
Individual, Corporate, Estate
Flexible Hours


Tel: 863-773-9469 200 N. Florida Ave.
Fax: 863-773-6209 Wauchula, FL 33873
2:3,10c


At CenturyLink we care about technology. More importantly,
we care about reaching across the nation to connect us all to
what matters most. Each other. So our advanced technologies
deliver broadband, entertainment and voice for your life.


Voice


centurylink.com/strongerconnected


Sebring
311 US Highway 27 N. | 863.471.0272


'
k ~l


CenturyLin kTM

Stronger ConnectedT


Technologies described are examples only and not necessarily offered by CenturyLink or available in all areas if offered.
2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc.


2:10c


Broadband Entertainment









12B The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


Girls Hoops End

At Districts


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Lady Wildcat basketball
team's hopes to get past the dis-
trict playoffs was crushed in
last Wednesday's loss to Sara-
sota Booker.
Hardee nearly upset Booker
in their last regular season
meeting, when Booker barely
won 33-30. The districts were at
Bradenton Southeast, a neutral
court.
Booker was seeded second
and Hardee third, with high
hopes of getting past Booker
this time to advance to the
championship game on Friday
evening. It was not to be as
Booker brought it's A game.
Hardee kept even for the first
quarter, up 9-8 as that buzzer
rang. Booker came out more
determined in the second ses-
sion and outscored Hardee by
10 points to take a 25-16 advan-
tage to the locker room at half-
time.
The rest of the game was
pretty even, but Hardee never
made up the deficit and lost 50-
38.
Brittni Browning with 16
points and Mekala Jones with
12 led the Lady Tornadoes.


For Hardee, senior Ashley
Louis was the game's high scor-
er with 20 points, including
nine in a furious effort in the
fourth quarter. Classmate Paige
Massey added nine, seven of
them keeping Hardee in the
game in the second stanza.
Senior Maria Avalos had six
and classmate Elvira Servin had
three. Senior LaCresha Carlton,
juniors Robyn Tanksley and
Artrice Hines and soph Kayla
Nichols contributed in assists
and steals. Sophs Stephanie
Perez and Allison Hunter had
moved up from the JV but did
not get to see any action.
The Lady Wildcats will see a
different district next season as
the Florida High School Ath-
letic Association has reclassi-
fied into eight districts instead
of six. Hardee has moved up
from 3A-11 to 5A-10, along
with Auburndale, Lake Wales
and Lakeland Tenoroc, a fairly
new school.
Sebring will be in 6A-9 with
Kathleen, Lake Gibson and
Winter Haven. Familiar oppo-
nents DeSoto, Frostproof, Lake
Placid, McKeel and Mulberry
go to 4A-10.


YOU Can Appear In .. '.
Poet's Place <'
Are you a t Let us show Itl Your work could be publhhed In
stnewspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature whlch-relles
solly on reader submissions. Poems must be your owrit'origna
woik, written by you, not someone else. T appear kItdhle feai-
ture, send your poetry, name and-town of residence to: Poet'sr
Place, Thie Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.



Donna's Back
at

Badcock
HOME F URNITU.E.& more
765 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula
.. 2:10c


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Playing their final game this season for the junior varsity Lady 'Cats were (kneeling, from left) Alyssa Casso, Destany
McClellan, Stephanie Perez, Bailey Carlton and Diana Gomez; (back) Coach Ken Leupold, Carleigh Coleman,
Edreina Martinez, Allison Hunter, Adna Metayer and Kashia Mosley.
A sphygmomanometer is
used to measure blood
pressure.


LaCresha Carlton, Paige Massey, Maria


$ GATOR HEATING & AIR


ICE MACHINE REGRIFERATION LLC

THINK GREEN 0 SAVE ENERGY O SAVE MONEY

863-832-3399 2370 HwY 17N, WAUCHULA

4, LOCALLY OWNED 0 7 DAYS A WEEK
S A -t-.- _T- AB"...-..... .- "nb---...-.- -....w-...... T r n..... ..".... Ir....


AIRCONITININ IC MAHINS REFRIGERATION 0 MOBILE HOMES* DUCT WORK* CHANGE OT
Licensed & Insured CAC 1 815095














ON


CHANGE OUTS


rr
Li. iii


Scratch & Dent Units Available


YOUR

BUSINESS



APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
.At
773-3255


\R(.(I nl1 DI
< ONIRN( IOK


I:6


___ _ __ ^ ___-


2"1On















n


....... -V "-D I T "
S. .- u5 c ,, SP 4S
UilVERlITY OF FLORIDA
L LT',-F :-;F FLORIDA HDS, I -RV
,: r,:R' ,WEST
Gr,; iEVV ILLE !L 2261-


When An Emergency Arises


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
This is the fifth in a series of
articles on county government
and what it accomplished in the
past fiscal year, 2009-10, which
ended Sept. 30.
Is there a life-threatening ill-
ness, accident, fire, vicious dog,
hurricane on its way? Who's
can help?
There are four units in county
government which combine ef-
forts to protect the lives and
property of Hardee County res-
idents. They are all under the
leadership of Public Services
Director and Fire-Rescue Chief
Mike Choate, who was also
chosen as the Southwest Region
Director for the Florida Fire
Chiefs' Association.
Choate oversees the Emer-
gency Management, Enhanced
9-1-1 and Animal Control serv-
ices as well as the 44-person
Fire-Rescue Department.
EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT
Director Rick Shepard works
year-round in keeping the coun-
ty prepared for any disaster,
whether natural or man-made.
Shepard is also the Region di-
rector on the Florida Emer-
gency Preparedness Associa-
tion's board of directors.
He regularly coordinates and
stages a major disaster exercise
which includes all personnel in
the county, from law enforce-
ment to Fire-Rescue to school
officials, which would have to
deal with an actual event.
There's preparation of the
annual All-Hazards Guide in
both English and Spanish, 20
public education seminars,
attending the annual hurricane
conference and conducting an
annual hurricane exercise.
There's keeping the web-based
shelter lists, including the
newest one for residents who
don't want to leave their pets,
and one for residents with spe-
cial needs.


There's routine tasks, ensur-
ing that 15 home-health and
Adult Living Facilities update
their disaster plans, training for
first responders from school,
community, county offices and
law enforcement, and visiting
mobile home parks for presen-
tations to prepare residents to
handle their emergencies at a
clubhouse or on-site shelter.
There's responding to the
unexpected emergency, a major
accident which closes roads, a
fire with hazardous materials
which could mean evacuation
of nearby residents.
Things have been quiet, but
keeping prepared for a Hur-
ricane Charley and its devasta-
tion is a full-time job.
ENHANCED 9-1-1
Jill Newman assists Shepard
in her spare time, but her pri-
mary task is ensuring that every
business and resident address is
correct, updated and entered
into the GIS and Computer
Assisted Dispatch (CAD) emer-
gency response systems. Last
year, there were 26 new ad-
dresses issued and entered into
the systems.
Newman works with other
county personnel on road name
changes to clarify addresses,
such as changing Cazen Road
because of conflicts with Kazen
Road. She speaks to civic
groups, mobile home parks and
others to emphasize the impor-
tance of correct addresses. Last
year there was also help with
Hardee County Partnership on
the 2010 census.
Newman monitored the
10,581 emergency calls into the
primary public safety answer-
ing. point. Currently that is to
the Emergency Operations Cen-
ter in Polk County, which has a
self-imposed 59-second man-
date to dispatch a rescue vehi-
cle. Its constantly updated
screens show where each
Hardee County rescue vehicle
is and dispatches the closest one


to the new emergency, updating
information to the vehicle on its
computer as it is in route.
There is an on-going discus-
sion of the E-9-1-1 dispatch and
its return to the Sheriffs Office
which gave it up nearly 10
years' ago. The county currently
pays Polk County $46,500 for
emergency dispatch. The Sher-
iffs Office could provide it at
$142,341.96 for round-the-
clock staff to man the system.
ANIMAL CONTROL
This three-person staff is
based at the Hardee County
Landfill. Its two officers coordi-
nate with Wauchula's officer to
handle all the animal control
problems in the county, whether
stray cats and dogs who are a
nuisance or a threating/bother-
some neighborhood animal.
Last year, the county officers
received 978 complaints, which
resulted in 92 citations and 79
written warnings. It impounded
849 dogs and cats, of which 195
were owner surrenders. There
were 100 adopted, 92 reclaimed
by owners and over 600 eutha-
nized.
EMS
The 44 dual-certified fire-
fighter and paramedics/emer-
gency medical technicians
serve shifts around the clock for
over 3,000 calls last year. There
were 1,989 rescue/EMS calls,
265 fire calls and nearly 400
good intent or false alarm calls.
Some come from cell phones,
most from homes or accident
sites.
There are three stations, the
central one in Wauchula and
additional units in Zolfo
Springs and Bowling Green.
The seven personnel per shift
are two each in Bowling Green
and Zolfo Springs and three in
Wauchula. The three lieutenants
are rotated in the one day one,
two off system which requires
an in-charge person at a
fire/major incident. Choate


often fills the slot or attends
most events.
There is a fire prevention
officer/inspector to visit
schools, adult and child day
care and businesses and to
ensure fire prevention plans are
updated and appropriate. All
construction plans are reviewed


and on-site visits made to
ensure buildings are safe and
protected.
There's always ongoing train-
ing for all personnel in addition
to the hundreds of hours man-
dated before a firefighter/EMT
takes to the road. As soon as a
vehicle returns, there is a condi-
tion check.


There's staff logging in every
event for the multitudinous
state and federal reports re-
quired. And, there's grant appli-
cations, such as recent thermal
imaging which helps show hid-
den spaces in a building where
a victim or hazardous material
may be normally unseen.
Next week public works.


Feb. 9-11 Boys Basketball Districts HOME TBA
Feb. 9-11 Boys Baseball Tourney Fort Meade Away TBA

Feb. 10 Girls/Boys Tennis Lemon Bay Away 4 p.m.
Fe6. 11 V. Softball Booker Away 6 p.m.

Feb. 14 V.Softball Mooney HOME 6 p.m.

Feb. 14-18 Baseball Tourney Lake Wales Away TBA

Feb. 15 Girls/Boys Tennis Avon Park Away 4 p.m.

Feb. 17 Girls/Boys Tennis DeSoto HOME 4 p.m.
Varsity Softball Haines City Away 6 p.m.
JV Baseball Frostproof HOME 6 p.m.

Feb. 18 JV/V Softball DeSoto HOME 5/7 p.m.

Feb. 19 Harlem Ambassadors Basketball HOME 7 p.m.
Feb. 24 Boys Tennis ,Sebring HOME 4 p.m.


The future is called "perhaps," which is the only possible thing to call the future. And
the only important thing is not to allow that to scare you.


Isn't it time you put a face



with a name?



Your face.

Your name. a

Your FREE ., .

Snapshot Debit Card.


Just open a checking

account today
to get that nice little perk- ... .
plus all this:


> Deposit from Home
> FREE online banking and bill pay
FREE debit card
> FREE eStatement

1 Overdraft protection up to
$500 with Courtesy Pay
0 Rewards on debit card purchases .I

What A Bank Should Be

www.midflorida.com

... 56 .. ..(863) 688-3733
VI.viA sao VISA VS VIS vA Toll-free (866) 913-3733


Federally
A SS minimum savings account is required for membership. Credit approval is required. Different checking accounts have different opening balance requirements ask for details. Bill Pay is offered free on all accounts except insured by
Basic Checking. Courtesy Pay is not available on Outrageous or Basic Checking accounts. To order your free photo debit card, you will need to upload your photo and place your order online at midflorida.com. NCUAL 2:10c


The Herald-Advocate

Trsy, Febary 57370 21
Thursday, February 10,201U


Need Help
Getting Out Of An
Abusive Situation?

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
HOTLINE

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh


our

ma ZOLFO SPRINGS
105 SR 64 East, Inside BP
wvww.'pyiees.rn 735=-2100
limited time offer Atp IpawtiW nations. 2:10c










2C The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011





Schedule of Weekly Services-


-Printed as a Public Service |








BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................... 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP -
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ...............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ...................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ... .......7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade)....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .;.................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISI CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmhnetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ...............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service ............1...1..:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for loafrions

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I I:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 1:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
- CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ................ .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio................... .......... 11:00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion .....................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio.................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..............1..1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.
FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry .............. 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
Worship ....................... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal.......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243

Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-Sth Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10:45 a.m .
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service .................. 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ............1..... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ......................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........ 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship .............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School .................:30 a.m.
W orship .............................10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min. ................7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M artes .................................. 7: 30 p.m.
Jueves .................................. 7:30 p.m .
Domingo............................ 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Dom ingos ..............................6:00 p.m .
M iercoles..............................7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service......................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ...................10:00 a.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(A ll Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m .


NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) .................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ...............:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
l" & 3" Sun.
Communion ...................10:00 a.m.
2'" & 4"' Sun.
Divine Worship................ 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...............1... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ..............1...... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........1.....1:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday .................................9:00 a.m.
H oly D ays .........................................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ................ 1:00 a.m.
(Creole)..................... 1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ..................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................1.0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ...............7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1.....1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OFZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Training Union ...................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


IApAvnrs itc,


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456 -
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.'
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCiIER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Worship.............................. 1:00 a.m .
Evening..................................1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............:...7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.......................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday . .................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ...... ........... 11:00a;.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night ......................7:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I...I.. a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.nm

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Coqfesion s.......................... 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................1 1:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club .......................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m. 1


When the West was wild, a
rancher went to town for supplies.
He hitched his team, and went into
the general store to shop.
Suddenly a gunslinger engaged
a stranger in a gun fight, and the
shots caused the horses to bolt in
terror.
Instantly the farmer ran for his
team. He stopped his horses, but
was trampled under their feet.
"Was your wagon worth it?"
asked the doctor.
"Yes," said the dying man. "My
children were in it."
Should you ask God if it was
worth it to send His Son to die for
our sins. I know He'd say. "Itwas!"
And the Bible says."There is joy I
in the presence of the angels of
God overone sinner that repents."






.. I.'
f%~ ~y?


there simple things that we take for granted
in our lives? Do we overlook the fact that the
ordinary activities throughout our day can delight
and mean the most to us? Consider Psalm 118:24,
"This is the day the Lord has made; let us rejoice
and be glad in it." Watch for the moments to
treasure: give thanks for the simple things. Rejoice
with God at your house of worship this week!


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Luke Luke John John John Philemon Psalm
15.1-10 15.11-32 8.1-20 10.1-21 10.22-42 103

Scnpre Selectd y The Amencan S&e Socity
Copynr t M210 Kaster Wltlmas Newspaw.erS es P. B0o 887 O.nad1~ide VA 22906. ~ia ~eta


Peace ioer Pr6toers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL








February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


VARSITY Baseball Schedule


2011
FEB
9-11
14-18
24
25


MARCH


APRIL


DIAMOND CLASSIC
HIGHLANDER INVITATIONAL
FROSTPROOF
CARDINAL MOONEY



SEBRING
SARASOTA BOOKER
FORT MEADE
DESOTO
SEBRING
AVON PARK
CARDINAL MOONEY
FROSTPROOF



BRADENTON SOUTHEAST
SARASOTA BOOKER
MULBERRY
BRADENTON SOUTHEAST
LAKEWOOD RANCH
DESOTO
MULBERRY
FORT MEADE
AVON PARK


FT MEADE
LAKE WALES
HOME
HOME



AWAY
HOME
HOME
AWAY
HOME
AWAY
AWAY
AWAY



AWAY
AWAY
AWAY
HOME
HOME
HOME
HOME
AWAY
HOME


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Wildcat baseball
begins its pre-season this week.
The Wildcats are in tourna-
ment at Fort Meade High
School. It began yesterday
(Wednesday) and continues
through tomorrow. Next week's
tournament is at Lake Wales.
The season begins in earnest
at home on Feb. 24 against
Frostproof. Another home game
is the next night against Sara-
sota Cardinal Mooney. Varsity
games are at 7 p.m. this year.
There are eight game in
March and nine in April, lead-
ing up to the district tournament
at Bradenton Southeast April
26-29.
Head coach Steve Rewis will
be assisted by Paul Samuels and
Brian Alexy, while John Sharp
will again direct the JV attack,
assisted by Ryne Heine and

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following special
event to which all interested per-
sons are invited:
"Get Outside!" guided hike
event to promote recreational
activities on District lands. One
or more Governing, Basin
Board. or Advisory Committee
members may attend.
DATE/TIME: Saturday, February
19, 2011; 9:30 a.m.
PLACE: Lower Hillsborough
Wilderness Preserve Oak Ridge
Equestrian Area; 15847 Morris
Bridge Road, Thonotosassa FL
33592
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; 1 (800) 423-1476
(FL only) or (352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: Toi.Basso@watermat-
ters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL only)
or (352)796-7211, x4756 (Ad
Order EXE0112)
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@
swfwmd.state.fl.us 2:1oc


Travis Tubbs.
The JV schedule begins with
a Feb. 17 game at home against
Frostproof. There are four
games in March and four in
SApril. JV games are normally at
6 p.m., unless it is a double-
header with the varsity, when
the JV plays at 4 p.m.
Players on the varsity squad
are seniors Taylor Barlow. Jus-
tin Bromley, Scott Donaldson,
Jake Mayer. Kalan Royal. Lin-
coln Saunders and Kyle Ward.
Juniors are Dawson Crawford.
Deonte Evans, Dylan Farr,
Dalton Hewett, Justin Knight.
Carter Lambert, Wintz Terrell
and Murrell Winter. Joining
them are freshmen Kris John-
son and Kramer Royal.
On the JV squad are juniors
Jake Altman, Ramiro Briones
and Jeremy Rowe, sophs Cole
Choate, Justin Forrester and
Vince Grimsley, and freshmen
Armado Alamia, Garrett Al-
britton, Jacob Bolin, Felix
Esquivel, Dustin Goodwyn,
Tyler Hewett, Eric Klein, Wyatt
Maddox and Luke Palmer.

A wise prince will seek
means by which his sub-
jects will always and in
every possible condition of
things have need of his
government, and then they
will always be faithful to
him.
-Niccolo Machiavelli

The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following work-
shop to which all interested per-
sons are invited:
27th Annual Growth Manage-
ment, Energy, Climate Change
and the Environment Short
Course. One or more Govern-
ing or Basin Board 'members
may attend.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February
22-24, 2011; 8 a.m.
PLACE: Wyndham Orlando
Resort, 8001 International Drive,
Orlando FL 32819
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: www.
floridaenet.com, or Lou.Kav-
ouras @watermatters.org or 1
(800) 423-1476 (FL only) or (352)
796-7211, x4606 (Ad Order
EXE0111)
2:10c


CHAPEL
Jim and Jennie Harman and
Larry and Nancy Willey greeted
212, and Jennie led the opening
prayer. I sang the special music,
"The Clinging Saving Hand."
The choir anthem was "I'll Fly
Away," directed by Sandy Fees-
er with Bob Bell as soloist, ac-
companied by Cheryl Conkle
and organ by Sandy. The hymn
sing before the service was led
by Bob Conkle.
Pastor Jason spoke about
"Filling Your Empty Vessel."
Closing hymn was "God Be
With You."

COFFEE
Fun was had at coffee hour,
with Janet welcoming and
telling jokes to 259 and leading
the prayer. Jo Ann Armour led
the pledge. We had Wauchula
State Bank speak as well as
Sheriff Arnold Lanier regarding
scams.


ACTIVITIES
Shuffle: Roses were present-
ed to Ruth Brown. for being
inducted on Jan. 17 into the
state Hall of Fame, at our ham
and egg breakfast. Congrats!
At the National Amateur
Tournament in Lakeland, Lou
Faulkner won third in consola-
tion. At the Central District
Tournament, played at St.
Cloud, in Pro Division, Bob
Hoskins won first, Max Tate
was third in main and in the
Amateur Division Cheryl
Conkle third in main.
Horseshoes: Playing Craig's
RV here, our team won 21-16,
and the team is anticipating
their end-of-the-year banquet
on March 22 at Homer's.
Bowling: Steve Mclntire and
Frank Drust had high games of
202, and Steve won high series
with 580. For the women,
Marilyn Achard won both high
game 149 and high series 422.


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet and Sharon Magee


--I


SPECTACULAR, WORLD ACCLAIMED DRAMA

Witness an incredible and epic depiction of how today's life affects

tomorrow's eternity. Using elaborate lighting, sound, costumes and

backdrops. 'Heaven's Gates and Hell's Flames' is a high impact and

compelling presentation about eternity.


26-29 DISTRICT TOURNEY @ BRADENTON SOUTHEAST

HEAD COACH: STEVE REWIS


2011 JV Baseball Schedule
FEBRUARY
17 FROSTPROOF HOME
22 LAKE PLACID AWAY
25 DESOTO AWAY

MARCH
3 SEBRING AWAY
10 FT. MEADE AWAY
11 LAKE PLACID HOME
15 DESOTO HOME
18 SEBRING HOME
21 AVON PARK AWAY
27 FROSTPROOF AWAY
31 FT MEADE HOME

APRIL
1 SOUTHEAST AWAY
5 AVON PARK HOME
7 MULBERRY HOME
8 SOUTHEAST HOME
13 MULBERRY AWAY
15 AVON PARK AWAY


HEAD COACH: JOHN SHARP



Baseball Boys



On The Move


: FREE ADMISSIONs'I


SUNDAY TUESDAY

FEBRUARY 13", 14 & 15% @ 7,.

NURSERY PROVIDED 0-3 YEARS

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
1397 S. FLORIDA AVE. WAUCHULA
(863) 773-9386 FLORIDASFIRSTASSEMBLY.COM


SPOTLIGHT
Jack and Bev Bremmer will
celebrate their 20th wedding
anniversary on Feb. 23, and
have celebrated all of them
snowbirding with us. They
spend their summers in Gay-
lord, Mich., and are blessed
with seven children, 21 grand-
children and eight great- grand-
children.
Jack owned his own Ford
dealership prior to retiring as
the postmaster of the Hillman,
Mich., post office. He has
enjoyed playing horseshoes and
bocce, and was the first golf
chairman for the chicken snack
bar. Jack was instrumental in
organizing the first bocce court
for the park, and for that we are
grateful.
Bev retired from her position
as a bank teller in Hillman.
Jack and Bev have chaired
the Michigan picnic as well as
being the head of the Michigan
summer luncheon in Wyman,
Mich. Both enjoy golfing, love
card playing, alley and crib-
bage.
They came here because


1 : 1j i


HEARTLAND PHARMACY




DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


"We put our W into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


Julian Garcia, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Crystal Contreras & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to :Opm


Bev's sister was in Orange
Blossom RV Park, and they vis-
ited our park and the rest is his-
tory. As of April they will be
leaving our park permanently
for health reasons. With Bev
requiring dialysis three times a
week, many of the park family
have taken her. Both have com--
mented that everyone here is
like family and want to share.
their appreciation to everyone
for their helpfulness. They said
they will miss everyone so
much.
They will certainly be
missed. We wish them well and
we share our cares, prayers and
love.
Barley was probably the
first cereal harvested by
.people. Grains have been
found in Egypt that are
believed to be 5,000 years
old.

Be always at war with your
vices, at peace with your
neighbors, and let each
new year find you a better
man.
-Benjamin Franklin


:r .







4C The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


RIDING HIGH


DRESS CODE?


COURTESY PHOTO
Second-grade students at Zolfo Springs Elementary School are at it again! Those who
met their Accelerated Reader goal for the month of January were given the privilege
of dressing up their teachers as silly as possible. And they did a great job! In full cos-
tume are (from left) Kaylee Webb, Malena Klein, April Wood, Michele Hall and Kari
Gicker. Stayed tuned for next month, as you never know what idea these teachers will
come up with next to motivate their students.


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


DANCES
Everyone had a great time at
the dance Saturday, Jan. 29,
with. Buddy Canova. Door
prizes were donated by Lois
and Paul Conley, Sherry and
Paul Vaughan, Barb and Chuck
Ellis, Leona Munsie, and Sheila
and Ron Lapier. The prizes
were won by Peggy Ralph,
Chuck Ellis, Nancy Morrison
and Sheila Smith.
The next dance is this Sat-
urday, and is our Valentine's
Dance with Doin' It Rite. We
hope to see everyone there with
their sweetheart. After this
dance, there will only be three
more dances left for this season,
so 'please come and support
them.

KOFFEE KLATCH
The hosts on Feb. 2 were
Barbara and Jerry Koehne and
Carole and Bob Jones. Joe
Bennitt led the U.S. Pledge, I
led the Canadian Pledge and
Don Merillat led the prayer.
The 50/50 winners were Fay
Curran, Gaylord and Cede
Williams, Pennie and Bruce
Kendorski, Jack and Loni
Elofson and Shirley and Bill
Johnson.


BINGO
Jack Elofson and Madeline
Hollenbeck split the large jack-
pot on Jan. 28 and Susan Henry
won the small jackpot. Theresa
Montgomery won the large
jackpot on Jan. 31, Bernice
English and Barb Ellis split the
small jackpot and Liette And-
erson won the special jackpot.

SCORES
Bowling Jan. 26: First, No. 7;
second, His and Hers; and third,
Flo's Flurries.
Men's Golf Jan. 27: Winners
were Bill Arola, Fred Leverone,
Ron Lapier and Ken Bolin.
Ladies Golf Jan. 27: First,
Mary Kessler; second. Jan
Brinker; and third, Mary Walter.
Bocce Jan. 31: Winning
teams were Blue, Aqua, Multi,
Yellow, Beige and Pink.
Shuffling Feb. 1: Three-game
winners were Bill Arola, Dale
Baker, Ray Baker, Bob Beshel,
Bob Bundy, Bernice English,
Steve Gray, Bob Jones, Fred
Kessler, Bob Kramer, Sharon
Potter, Ron Storms, Doug
Taylor, Myrna Wilday and Arlie
Wooters.
Bocce Feb. 2: The Blue team


and the Multi team are in first
place with no losses.

CHURCH NEWS
By Diane Burget
Pastor Bob Winne opened our
worship service on Jan. 30 by
leading us in singing "Amazing
Grace." Carole Jones provided
the accompaniment on the
piano and Linda Gray on our
new organ.
Pastor Bob played "Give Us
More Grace" on his trombone
as Linda accompanied on
piano.
Offering prayer was given by
Don Merillat, and Lowell
Gordon and Bill Burget
received the offering. Maxine
Stromme served as our greeter
today.
The message today was taken
from the Old Testament, book
of Zephaniah. Pastor Bob spoke
about how the people did not
obey the voice of God. No one
could tell the king anything, the
people did not trust in the Lord
and they did not draw near to
the Lord. Just some of the
Scripture references were from
Exodus, Genesis, Romans,
Proverbs and Psalms.
He closed by encouraging us
to draw near to God by getting
in the Word and by praying and
making for a quiet time with
God.


COURTESY PHOTO
Andon Whaley, a first grader at North Wauchula Elementary School, shows off the new
bike he just won in a drawing sponsored by Doreen McCarthy (left) with the Ident-A-
Kid program. Andon's teacher, Amy Franks (right), congratulates him on his good for-
tune.


31c


.0040


Storts Taxes
-^^ Jl^^ILr^ Id^lw^---_:



,_Bookkeeping, Inc,-



S$sTORTS TAXES

BOOKKEEPING, INC

63) 773-2200



Danielle & Deborah

Over 30 years of combined experience
Fast Electronic Filing Get your money 24-48 Hours c.
If Bank Approved

BRING IN

^ u $15"00 OFF :





120 W. Orange Street
(next to Great Florida Insurance)

_773-2200 ,127-:


t





February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5C


2011 ARDEE COUNTY FAIR SCHEDULE

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 19 SATURDAY FEBRUARY 26

SCHEDULE OF lZVNs


Saturday, February 19, 2011
Armbands 12:00 p.m. Closing *20.00
Gates & Midway Open C
Miss Hardee County Pageant Civic Center
Sunday, February 20, 2011
Armbands 1:00 p.m. Closing S20.00
Gates & Midway Open
Kindergarten Princess Pageant Civic Center
Monday, February 21, 2011
CHILDREN'S DAY
I All Children High School & Under Admitted FREE
Armbands 1:00 p.m. Closing *15.00
Gates & Midway Open
Rabbit Show Arena
Dairy Show Arena
Grooming Contest Arena
Junior Miss Pageant Civic Center
Tuesday, February 22, 2011
MERCHANTS DAY
Armbands 5:00 p.m. Closing *20.00 *5 Coupon Available
Gates & Midway Open
Poultry Showmanship Arena
Swine Show Arena


." Wednesday, February 23, 2011
All Rides 1 Admission *1 Parking 1 Select Food Items $1
Gates & Midway Open
Breeding & Heifer Show .Arena
Steer Show Arena
"' Beef Showmanship (After Steer Show) Arena


Thursday, February 24, 2011
MERCHANTS DAY
Armbands 5:00 p.m. Closing *20.00 *5 Coupon Available
Gates & Midway Open
Farm Credit Livestock Buyers Dinner
FFA & 4-H Livestock Sale


Civic Center
Arena


Friday, February 25, 2011
MADNESS TILL MIDNIGHT
Admission FREE with Purchase of *20 Armband after 8:00 p.m.
Gates & Midway Open
Prince & Princess Pageant Civic Center
Ranch Rodeo Arena
Bronc Riding, Team Sorting, Barrel Racing, Double Mugging, Calf Doctoring, Mutton Busting (6 &
Saturday, February 26, 2011
LAST BLAST
Armbands 12:00 p.m. Closing *20.00
Gates & Midway Open
Little Miss Hardee County Pageant Civic Center
Mexican Band Arena
Mexican Bull Riding, Mutton Busting (6 & Under) Arena


& Under)


m -

7


12:00
7:00


1:00
7:00


1:00
5:30
6:30
7:00
7:00


-m


5:00
5:00
7:00


5:00
6:00
7:00


5:00
6:00
7:0^



5:0-
7:00
7:00




12:00
4:00
4:00
7:00


I


Nlllll 7 44oa








6C The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


Courthouse Reportd


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Cruz Kenneth Hernandez,
29, Wauchula, and Kara Nicole
*Williams, 26, Wauchula.
David S. Hernandez, 19,
Wauchula, and Jurisarai Her-
nandez, 18, Jacksonville.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Citibank South Dakota NA
vs. Guadalupe Almaguer Jr.,
judgment.
Edwina Murphy vs. Edward
Pilkington, amended judgment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Eric Lamar Banks, posses-
sion of marijuana, adjudication
withheld, time served, proba-.
tion one year, substance abuse
evaluation/treatment, random
drug screens, warrantless
search and seizure, $325 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 cost of pros-
ecution (COP), $50 investiga-
tive costs.
Rebecca Lolene Bragg, dis-
orderly conduct and resisting an
officer without violence, $325
fine and court costs, $50 COP,
$50 investigative costs.
Michael Dennis Drake, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP; .posses-
sion of marijuana, not prosecut-
ed.
David Robert Dutton, do-
mestic battery, one month in jail
with credit for time served
(CTS), $677 fine and court
costs, $50 COP.
John Donald McCauley, two
counts possession of drug para-
phernalia, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 COP.
Ely Morales Verdugo, do-
mestic battery and giving false
identification to law enforce-
ment officer, one month 15 days
each count, consecutive and
CTS, $325 fine and court costs,
$50 COP.
Misael Gomez, possession of
drug paraphernalia, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation one
year, substance abuse evalua-
tion/treatment, random screens,
warrantless search and seizure,
no contact with co-defendant,
$50 COP, $50 investigative
costs, 50 hours community ser-
vice; causing a minor to
become dependent or delin-
quent, not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Olivia Arana Castillo and
Casimito Jaime Castillo,
divorce.
Desiree Gilman Northern-
Hege and Jason Lee Northern,
divorce.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Armando Mejia
and Vivian Flores, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Elmer White
estate, petition for mortgage


foreclosure.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Michel Mendez,
petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Seacoast National Bank vs.
Jesus Juarez Jr. d/b/a The Pro's
Automotive Repair, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Lorena B. Grills and Michael
D. Grills, divorce.
Stefanie Long and Joseph
Clayton Long, divorce.
Bank of America National
Association vs. Tracy R. Kersey
and Richard A. Kersey, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.
Florida Department of
Highway Safety vs. Sarai Elena
Deloera, petition for forfeiture.
Orvel Winston Lloyd vs.
Hardee Correctional Institution,
petition to review inmate situa-
tion.
Harold Howze Jr. and Con-
nie Chapman Howze, divorce.
Joanie Valdez and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Gilberto Gutierrez, petition
for administrative child support
order.
Maria Sierra and DOR 'vs.
Florentino Perado, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Dennis Albritton and Lou
Ann Albritton, divorce.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Florida Power Corp. d/b/a
Progress Energy Florida vs.
Harold D. Prewitt, stipulated
judgment approved.
Jennifer Maldonado vs.
Cipriano Ibarra, dismissed for
lack of prosecution.
Diane L. Bilbrey vs. Citi-
financial Auto Corp. et al,
denial of petition for judgment.
John C. Revell and Lori
Revell Burns vs. JoAnn Grims-
ley as trustee and Lisa Revell
Pelio, partial judgment of parti-
tion of property.
Moye Farms Inc. vs. Ayco
Farms Inc., dismissed.
Thomas Rivera Jr. and Sonia
Gonzalez Rivera Vargas, order.
Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and Consumer Ser-
vices vs. Ag Land Services Inc.,
order of permanent injunction.
Vernon Frazier vs. Walter A.
McNeil and the state Depart-
ment of Corrections, defen-
dant's motion to dismiss grant-
ed.
Robert young vs. Eric
Estrada, injunction for protec-
tion.
Magali Almanza vs. Juan
Guerrero-Tapia, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
BAC Home Loans Servicing
vs. Angela R. Lang et al, volun-
tary dismissal.
Margrene Lampley vs.
Sweetbay Supermarket, dis-
missed for lack of progress.
Mirianne Myrtil and DOR
vs. Frantz Francois, voluntary
dismissal.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-


erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Catarino Dario Borjas, grand
theft and two traffic charges,
four years Florida State Prison
-suspended, probation four
years, substance abuse evalua-
tion/treatment, random screens,
warrantless search and seizure,
curfew, no alcohol or drugs,
$520 fine and court costs, $100
COP.
Michael Leon Holland, vio-
lation of probation (original
charges two counts improper
exhibition of a weapon), proba-
tion terminated, outstanding
fines and fees placed on lien.
Candace Denise Kilpatrick,
uttering a forged instrument,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion 18 months, $520 fines and
fees, $350 public defender fees,
$100 COP, 75 hours community
service; petit theft, not prose-
cuted.
Scott Michael Lacosse, bur-
glary of an occupied structure
or conveyance and petit theft,
probation one year, $520 fine
and court costs, $200 public
defender fees, $100 COP.
Timothy Lee Murphy, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge grand theft), probation
revoked, two years Florida
State Prison-suspended, two
years community control-
house arrest, $150 public
defender fee and $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Elizabeth Barbara Purser,
violation of probation (original
use fraudulent use of credit
cards), probation revoked, two
years Florida State Prison, $150
public defender fees and $100
COP added to outstanding fines
and fees and placed on lien.
Kera Elizabeth Rayburn,
possession of methampheta-
mine, possession of oxycodone
and possession of drug para-
phernalia, adjudication with-
held, probation 18 months, sub-
stance abuse/mental health
Sevaluation/treatment, curfew,
warrantless search and seizure,
$520 fine and court costs, $350
public defender fees and $100
COP placed on lien, 25 hours
community service.
Andrew Jerome White, pos-
session of marijuana, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and a
traffic charge, transferred to
county misdemeanor and crimi-
nal traffic court; grant theft
auto, not prosecuted.
Joey Wayne Windham, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
three months CTS, $520 fine
and court costs, $350 public
defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien; possession of


methamphetamine and domes-
tic battery, not prosecuted.
Angela Marina Newman,
possession of methampheta-
mine and possession of drug
paraphernalia, completed pre-
trial drug intervention program,
dismissed.
Shaylin Kristopher McKen-
zie, possession of marijuana,
transferred to county misde-
meanor court; tampering with
physical evidence, not prose-
cuted.
Antonio J. Toscano, posses-
sion of marijuana and two
counts possession of drug para-
phernalia, transferred to county
misdemeanor court; two counts
possession of cocaine, not pros-
ecuted.
Wade Joseph Aubry, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
transferred to county misde-
meanor court; possession of
marijuana, not prosecuted.
Jason Lee Baldree, grand
theft and trespass on property
other than a structure or con-
veyance, not prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
William Earl and Joyce Ann
Hall to Nickerson Brothers
LLC, $350,000.
Sylvia Edwards vs. Marvin
B. Jr. and Ada A. Walker,
$80,000.
Richard N. Taylor as person-
al representative to Robert L.
Castner, $58,000.

You can't wait for inspira-
tion. You have to go after it
with a club.
-Jack London

Love one another and you
will be happy. It'sas simple
and as difficult as that.
-Michael Leunig


For the week ended February 3, 2011

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 7,793 head,
compared to 7,860 last week, and 6,380 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were mostly
steady, feeder steers were unevenly steady and heifers were
steady to 2.00 higher.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:




Slaughter Cows:
53.00-61.00

Slaughter Bulls:
71.00-80.00


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 152.50-210.00
300-400 Ibs 136.00-172.50
400-500 lbs 123.00-152.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 125.00-188.00
300-400 lbs 115.00-142.50
400-500 lbs 105.00-132.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent


Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs


The reading of all good books is like a conversation with
all the finest men of past centuries.


waluoww


pharmacy


o...... ...Oee*.oe............e...
OPENING SOON *



FREE LOWEST
.ANTIBIOTICS PRICES IN
AND TOWN
DELIVERY DRIVE-THRU



518 SOUTH SIXTH AVE, WAUCHULA FL 33873
PHONE : 863.774.3536 FAX : 863.774.3538
2:10c


For dependable homvetownvi service,





10 lorida



Suel


Of Hardee Coumty Inc.



Hardee County's only locally owned &
operated bulk fuel distributor
for over 18 years!


Open Mon. Fri. 7:00 am 5:00 pm
Sat. 8:00 am 12:00 pm


863-773-9466
156 Will Duke Road, Wauchula
2:10c


PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a
PUBLIC HEARINGon
THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2011, 6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter in the BCC Board Room
412 West Orange St., Courthouse Annex
Room 102, Wauchula, FL

to hear a request from Clean Energy LLC seeking a three-
year extension from the date of approval of an approved with
conditions Major Special Exception and Variance
associated with the constructionloperation of an electrical power
plant planned for location on the West side of CER663 North,
approx. '/4 mile South of the Hardee/Polk County Line.
The Major Special Exception was approved with conditions, and
the Variance was approved by the Board of County
Commissioners on May 15. 2008 under Agenda No. 08-18.

The approved project is planned for location 366+1-acres of
parcels numbered
06 33 24 0000 10020 0000
and 07 33 24 0000 10020 0000, Hardee County, FL

Terry Atchley, Chairman

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the County Manager's
office at least two (2) working days prior to the Public Hearing.

This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents
relating to this proposal are available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the
Planning and Development Department, 110 S. 9th Ave., Wauchula,
Florida.

All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering
any decision the Board shall rely solely on testimony that is rele-
vant and material.
Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will need
to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a court
reporter. 02:10c


RESOLUTION 2011-1


A RESOLUTION OF THE CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING
COUNCIL IN SUPPORT OF FEBRUARY 13th THROUGH 19T, 2011,
SHALL BE KNOWN AS "FLORIDA HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
AWARENESS WEEK"

WHEREAS, the Federal Emergency Planning and Community-Right-to-Know
Act was passed by Congress in October, 1986, and the Florida Hazardous Materials Emergency
Response and Community Right-to-Know Act was passed by the Florida Legislature in 1988;
and

WHEREAS, the Federal Accidental Release Prevention Program became
effective in July 1999, and the Florida Accidental Release Prevention and Risk Management
Planning Act was passed by the Florida Legislature in 1998; and

WHEREAS, those laws, implemented by the Federal Environmental Protection
Agency and the Florida State Emergency Response Commission for Hazardous Materials,
protect the safety and well-being of all Floridians; and

WHEREAS, more than 10,000 businesses and government facilities in Florida
have reported the use of hazardous materials, and more than 2,000 hazardous materials incidents
are reported in Florida annually; and

WHEREAS, the Emergency Planning and Community-Right -to-Know Act
requires businesses and government facilities with certain quantities of covered substances to
develop plans to prevent accidental releases and have a coordinated emergency response
program; and

WHEREAS, right-to-know provisions in the state and federal law help
communities become aware of the substances utilized by local facilities;

NOW, THEREFORE, LET IT BE RESOLVED by the Central Florida Regional Planning
Council that February 13--19t, 2011, shall be known as Florida Hazardous Materials
Awareness Week and urges the general public to recognize the importance of this effort.

DULY PASSED AND ADOPTED THIS 12T DAY OF JANUARY, 2011

CENTRAL FLORJDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL

Pat Huff Chairman


Sigature of harper

ATTEST: aA_ I__
ignatur2


I


2:10c














During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Feb. 6, Isidro Tavera-Mendoza, 32, of 1468 SE Airport Road,
Arcadia, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Eduardo
Cruz and charged with DUI and no valid license.
Feb. 6, Heladio Hernandez Lopez, 23, General Delivery,
Bowling Green, was detained by Dep. Eric Ellis on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court. He had been arrested by Bowling Green Ofc.
Sean Guthas on a traffic charge.
Feb. 6, a residential burglary on Elm Street and a theft on U.S.
17 South were reported.

Feb. 5, Fernando Santiago, 20, of 303 Doc Coil Road, Bowl-
ing Green, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged with
possession of marijuana and battery.
Feb. 5, David Roblero, 20, of 1833 U.S. 17 North, Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Mark McCoy and charged with retail theft.
Feb. 5, Gabina Santiago Lopez, 22, of 2144 Stansfield Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by C4Shane Ward on a charge of failure
to appear in court.
Feb. 5, Nicolas Mendez-Perez, 31, of 1931 SR 64 W., Ona,
was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with battery.
Feb. 5, a residential burglary on Lincoln Street, burglary of a
conveyance on Cracker Lane, a fight on East Main Street and a
theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Feb. 4, Macy Lynette Jones, 35, of 3928 Country Place,
Winter Haven, was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers on a charge
of withholding support of children.
Feb. 4, Teresa Brewer, 52, of 801 SR 66, Zolfo Springs, was
arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with DUI.
Feb. 4, a residential burglary on Steve Roberts Special was
reported.

Feb. 3, Adam Christopher Demalignon, 20, of 4131 SE Lemon
Ave., Highland City, and Mark Roman Chernov, 19, of 610
Glendale St., Lakeland, were arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson and
charged with knowingly committing theft to a temporary or per-
manent fixture.
Feb. 3, criminal- mischief on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue
and thefts on Will Duke Road, Dansby Road and two locations on
U.S. 17 North were reported.

Feb. 2, Jimmy Spoon, 61, of Gino Camp, Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with violation of the
city/county ordinance-open container law.
Feb. 2, Jose Fidencio Garza, 38, of 2599 Garza Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
Feb. 2, Oscar Gonzalez, 19, of Sarasota Street, Lake Placid,
was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers on three counts of failure
to appear in court.
Feb. 2, Shawn Matthew Edmondson, 26, of 13511 U.S. 98,
Sebring, was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Feb. 2, Lonnie Gene King, 55, of 2946 Redbird Lane, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with
making false reports of workmen's compensation fraud.
Feb. 2, Christy Lucella Pace, 31, of 169 Lincoln St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with shop-
lifting from' a merchant.
Feb. 2, John McCauley, 58, of 1949 Peace River Woods Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with
possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug parapher-
nalia.


Feb. 2, Otis Jerome Faulk, 35, of 659 Baker St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with four counts
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, possession of weapons or
ammunition by a convicted felon and withholding support of chil-
dren.
Feb. 2, fights on Lincoln" Street and at Pine Cone Park, and
thefts on U.S. 17 North, Sr 66 and East Main Street were report-
ed.

Feb. 1, Benjamin Lazo, 20, of 415 S. First Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters on a charge of trespassing on
property not a structure or conveyance.
Feb. 1, a robbery/holdup on U.S. 17 North, and thefts on
Merle Langford Road, Leavy North Road and Old Crewsville Road
were reported.
Jan. 31, Eston John Kersey, 40, of 1160 Mockinbird Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with
DUI.
Jan. 31, Mark Anthony Garcia, 21, of 250 Maxwell Dr.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson and charged with
battery.
Jan. 31, Kevin Thomas Rarick, 33, of 2370 U.S. 17 North,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged with
battery.
Jan. 31, criminal mischief on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue
and thefts on SR 66 and on Cypress Street were reported.

WAUCHULA
Feb. 6, criminal mischief on East Townsend Street was report-
ed.

Feb. 5, Ralph Williams, 25, of 909 Martin Luther King Jr.
Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Paul Bohanan and charged
with battery.
Feb. 5, Michael Harry Mohn, 66, of 717 U.S. 17 S., Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with battery.
Feb. 4, Malaycia Rivers, 17, of 3707 Myrtle St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with pos-
session of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 4, a theft on South Fifth Avenue was reported.

Feb. 3, a theft on West Palmetto Street was reported.

Feb. 2, a residential burglary on North Second Street was
reported.

Feb. 1, Destiny Nicole Froehlich, 21, of 1021 S. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Frank Tomlinson on a charge of
violation of probation.
Feb. 1, Lewis Eric Brown, 32, of 1040 Makowski Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Cpl. Paul Bohanan and charged with loiter-
ing/prowling.
Feb. 1, a residential burglary on North Seventh Avenue, crim-
inal mischief on East Bay Street and thefts on North 10th Ave.,
South Seventh Avenue and South Fifth Avenue were reported.

Jan. 31, a theft on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue was report-
ed.

BOWLING GREEN
Feb. 6, a robbery/holdup on Dixiana Street was reported.

Feb. 5, a fight on Middle Drive was reported.

Feb. 3, a residential burglary on Church Avenue was reported.

Feb. 1, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.

Jan. 31, Arnesto Briseno, 39, of 105 East Main St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with
criminal mischief-damage to property and battery.


February 10, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


Greetings from Fort Green!
This is a beautiful time of the
year. In my yard alone, I have
peach trees, plum trees and
whatever those yellow blossom
trees are called blooming pro-
fusely. It is a beautiful sight.
Also, some of my Florida roses
are blooming. Those are those
"old-timey" roses that don't
require all the attention that the
hybrids do. Before we know it,
the orange trees will be bloom-
ing and then everyone can smell
the beautiful fragrance that only
the sunny South has!
Last week I was going to
Sebring for a haircut and was
on SR 66 and the maples were
in the fall colors. Florida does
have a fall season.
Brother Eddie Kennedy had a
good home-going service. The
church was overflowing, which
is a small comfort to the family.
Please continue to pray for Jane
and her family.
Sympathy is extended to the
family of Doyle Spears. I
worked for Doyle at First Fed-
eral over 40 years ago! So many
of the ones I worked with have
already made their final jour-
ney: Ethel Mae Strickland,
Herb Perin, Carmen Metheny
and Shirley Sanders Davis. The
ones still around are Dot
Knight, Carla Gibbs, Mildred
Jernigan, Wynell Davis, and
me. Dot Knight is in bad health
and needs our continued prayer.
Doyle was a super boss, loved
to talk and did not meet a
stranger. He will be missed.
Earl and Mary Bargeron and
Sherman and I spent a week
over at Lake Manatee State
Park. If anyone wants to see
Florida the way it used to be, go
to a state park. There are plenty
of scrub oaks and palmettos.
We all went to the Southern
Gospel sing in Palmetto and
what a sing it was. Sherman
Compared it to the National
Quartet Convention, just on a
little smaller scale.
We all had a good time, and
Brother Steve and Tara came
over Friday and attended the


matinee with us and..we all ,
enjoyed eating supper together.
Gregg Rawls and his daughter,
Stephanie, came for the Friday
evening show.
Greg Rawls and his Gulf
State Quartet had a good crowd
Saturday night that enjoyed
some good singing. Jerry Goff
was the emcee, and he was on
the program at Palmetto during
the week.
Mrs. Mildred turned 95 on
Saturday. Dennis Sasser, our
song leader at Fort Green, said
he knew Mrs. Mildred was tired
of the fuss being made over her
birthday, but very few make it
to 95 so he went and stood
beside her and led the congre-
gation in singing "Happy
Birthday" to her!
Congratulations to Makayla
Chancey for making straight A's
on her report card. Junior high
was always considered difficult
during my school days.
Hunter Davis and Kaylee
Hogenauer missed church last
Sunday as they were competing
in the bowling tournament in
Lakeland. Next week, if they
tell me, I'll report their scores!
Don't forget that next Sunday
morning immediately after the
morning service the youth will
be having a Valentine dinner
fundraiser. Dinner will be $6 -
per person and the GA girls will
present a fashion show. It
should be lots of fun and some
good eating, as Randy Davis
will be on the grill preparing
chicken.
If you are like me and want
something on your computer,
find a grandchild. Kaylee put
screensavers on my computers;
on my desktop she put a dachs-
hund that looks just like Rascal
and on the laptop, my other
favorite bird, a goose. I used to
have live geese and I sure miss
them, but you could not potty -
train them and they made a
mess in the yard. They are the
best watchdogs!
Remember to pray for one
another and our country.


What a delightful thing is the conversation of specialists!.
One understands absolutely nothing and it's charming.
-Edgar Degas'


winner ..


ioneer Park


PIONEER PARK DAYS



0 COVER ART CONTEST

The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artwork for the
front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on
Hardee County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


ADULT DIVISION


First place:


* $100 Cash.
* Publication of your work on the front cover.
* Your photo and biographical story inside.


Second place: $50 Cash.
SPublication of your winning entry Inside the special section.


Third place:


CHILDREN'S DIVISION (12 AND UNDER)
A week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days, publication of the artwork, plus ...


First place:


Second place:

Third place:


* $25 Cash.
* Publication on the back cover.

* $15 Cash.

* $10 Cash.


Myrna MVifer, Winter Resident


JUDGES
JANE LONG PIONEER PARK DAYS DIRECTOR
NICK SUDZINA COURT ADMINISTRATOR FOR 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
SUSAN W. ROBERTS SENIOR CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR 1OTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT AND EIGHTH-GENERATION FLORIDIAN


RULES:
1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
2) Artwork must be original.

3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must
be depicted.

4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.
5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high (vertical), including
lettering which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2011."
6) Deadline is Friday, Feb. 18, at noon.


TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the drawing.
Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail to Cover Art
Contest, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. 1:27,2:3,10,17nc


I


Last year's


* $25 Cash.
* Publication of your winning entry Inside the special section.


- f, -
e,








8C The Herald-Advocate, February 10, 2011


LOOKING UP!


COURTESY PHOTOS
Students at Zolfo Springs Elementary School are enjoying the new Positive Behavior
Support program Implemented this school year. From teachers painting ceiling tiles to
students becoming "Principal of the Day," it has truly been a positive experience.
Positive Behavior Support encourages kids to continue doing all the right things they
already do at home. Everyone laughs, smiles, compliments each other, acknowledges
successes, and learns many new things every day. Students also learn school-wide
expectations and procedures, receive praise and meaningful rewards for good behav-
ior, and have a safe, respectful, and positive school environment. Above, Analisa Camel
(left) and Amarl Deleon (right) take on administrative tasks for the day. Below, (from
front to back) teachers Leigh Beumel, Kaylee Webb and Kari Gicker give ceiling tiles
an artistic flair.