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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: December 16, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
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System ID: UF00028302:00355
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text





Hardee Parades

Holiday Spirit

... Photos 10,11B


The


111th Year, No. 2
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
-- -- -A


46
plus 44 sales tax


Thursday, December 16, 2010


Livestock Market Needs 'Christmas Miracle'


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
"Unless I can get a miracle,
the market will not reopen Jan.
3."
Hardee Livestock Market
General Manager Janice
Wheeler is hoping for a
Christmas miracle. The live-
stock market has a cattle sale
every Monday at noon at its
home on U.S. 17 south of

FREEZING COLD!


Wauchula. The market never
has a sale during the weeks of
Christmas and New Year's Day.
The market would normally
have its next sale on Monday,
Jan. 3. But as of Dec. 14 there
was no plan to sell cattle to the
highest bidder that day.
The market's cattle report
being sent out this week lists
details of the Monday, Dec. 13,
sale but has a note on the bot-


tom:
"Thank you to everyone for
your support over the years. We
value your business and friend-
ship, but we will not be opening
back up for our weekly sales
until further notice. Merry
Christmas and Happy New
Year!"
This year, sales have been a
little short of breaking even
financially. The Jan. 13 sale was


a case in point. The market sold
442 cattle. "We need to sell 450
a week to break even," said
Wheeler.
Wheeler Farms Inc. has
owned the cattle market since
mid-2007. It has two full-time
employees, and employs 20 to
24 workers on sale days.
For 2010 the market sold
16.679 calves, 2,249 cows and
See MARKET 2A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Irrigation-induced ice protected trees and plants around the county Monday and Tuesday nights as temperatures
dropped below 32 degrees. According to the Range Cattle Station, temperatures were at 27.57 from 2:45 to 8:30 a.m.
Tuesday morning, and below 32, a low of 27.13, from 8:30 p.m. Tuesday to after 8 a.m. Wednesday. There were no
reports of ice in the fruit except the thin-skinned fresh fruit variety. It's expected to warm a bit this weekend before
another freeze next week. It will take several days to tell how much damage the freeze caused.




Commissioner Wants To Fire County Manager


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The standing-room-only
crowd was the first indication.
It was not surprising then,
that after the invocation and
pledge of allegiance, that new
Commissioner Grady Johnson
interrupted the normal proce-
dures to speak.
"I must interrupt. There is an
overwhelming issue that has to
be taken care of. As I've gone
through the county from one
end to the other, the citizens



WEATHER
QAf HIGH LOW 5AI
12108 61 30 0.03
12/09 63 43 0.12
12110 77 38 0.00
12111 66 43 0.00
12/12 74 41 0.02
12/13 54 35 0.00
12/14 52 28 0.00
TO&L Rainfall to 12/14110 48.44
Same period lest year 44.31
Ten Year Average 52.43
SourcetW. of Re. On Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6B
Community Calendar .4A
Courthouse.Report ... 6C
Crime Blotter ....... 3C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup .4A
Obituaries .......... 4A




S 1II81111 l I
71" 8122 07290 3


have made it clear to me that
they want a change of manage-
ment in the county," he said.
"I have reservations about
what has happened to this
board, and I want to make a
motion to terminate county
manager Lex Albritton immedi-
ately," Johnson continued.
Long-term commissioner and
vice-chairman Minor Bryant
responded immediately. "This
isn't the time for that. I request
you withdraw your motion until
after the first of the year."


The second new commission-
er, Sue Birge, commented.
"There's without doubt that we
have problems. I have heard
them all over the county. We
have to have this thing docu-
mented and in order. We're
accountable to all the con-
stituents. Although there are
problems to resolve, I need
more research and could not
vote on it today."
Second-term commissioner
Dale Johnson reacted, "I've
been on another planet. I've not


heard this. The commissioners
direct the county manager. If
there's something wrong, get it
out on the table. It's news to
me. To make a motion at your
second meeting ... I've been on
the commission for six years.
Morale is at an all-time low? I
haven't heard this."
Grady Johnson replied, "I've
been coming here for a year and
I've never seen so much dissen-
See COMMISSIONER 2A


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A new Wauchula city manag-
er could be in place in the first
quarter of 2011.
At Monday evening's meet-
ing of the Wauchula City Com-
mission, the first step was taken
when commissioners listed
their top five preferences from a
list of 17 possible applicants.
Each had submitted a short or
long resume of tfeir experi-
ences, education and reason for
wanting the position.
The commission will follow
the recommendation of labor
attorney Reynolds Allen and
send an application to the top
five candidates to be completed
and returned by Jan. 1. Police
Chief Bill Beattie or his des-
ignee will conduct background
checks of each of them.
Job evaluations from their'


current or last employment will
be obtained as well.
At the Jan. 3 monthly work-
shop, commissioners will dis-
cuss a plan to set up interviews.
When each commissioner
gave his short-list of candi-
dates, five had received repeat-
ed mention: James P. "Jim"
Gallagher of Winter Haven;
Therese C. "Terry" Leary of
Hilton Head, S. C.; Joseph S.
Miranti of St. Cloud; James A.
"Jim" McCroskey of Port
Orange; and Richard J. Reade
of Auburndale.
The most selections'(five)
went to Gallagher, a retired
Dundee town manager, who has
"had my fill of daily golf and
am eager to return to the work-
place." He lists a variety of edu-
cation. culminating in a mas-
ter's of public administration
See CITY MANAGER 2A


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
General Manager Janice Wheeler with Cracker, a 2-year-
old Rhodesian ridgeback.




Local Teen


Performs In


Famed Ballet
By MESQUA FIELDS
For The Herald-Advocate
"I can't really see myself doing anything else but
performing-it's all I'm really good at," says Kaley
Shepard, a freshman at Hardee Senior High School.
Shepard has received the high honor of performing
with the Moscow Ballet in the Christmas classic "Great
Russian Nutcracker," which will be held at The
Lakeland Center Youkey Theater on Monday, Dec. 27.
Kaley started dancing 12 years ago at the age of 2.
In that time, she has participated in jazz, ballet, tap and
pointe classes. She only took tap for a few years, how-
ever, after which she started taking pointe. Kaley start-
ed out with a combo class, which included jazz, ballet
and tap.
Her years of toil in dance have paid off.
Her younger cousin also dances, in Lakeland. When
her aunt heard about the Moscow Ballet auditions, she
told Kaley about the event and urged her to give it a
shot. The prerequisite for an audition was that the appli-
cant had to have two years of dance experience, and had
to live close to Lakeland.
Each person who auditioned went into a room
where they all lined up from tallest to shortest. They
See LOCAL TEEN 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
Fourteen-year-old Kaley Shepard of Wauchula prepares to perform in "The Nutcracker"
with the Moscow Ballet.


SHOPPING DAYS

'TIL CHRISTMAS!


15 Tons Of

Snow At FNL
... Story 6A


5 In Running For

City Manager


L -1 II _rll


w IRW









2A The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


The Herald-Advocate WORLD CLASS COWBOYS
The Herald.Advocate w^ tssowo
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor .
RALPH HARRISON
s tJOAN M. SEAN Production Manager
'Sports Editor _=44


115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


A~~


NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida. by The Herald-Advocate
Putblshing Co Inc Perodical Postage paid at U.S Post Office, Wauchula. FL
33873 .nd addiuonal entry office (USPS 578-780). "'Postmaster," send address
cha-ice io The Herald- Advocate. PO Box 338. Wauchula. FL 33873


DEADLINES:
S.:h~x'l Thursday 5 p.m.
Spo.rti Monday noon
Hardee Living-Thursday 5pm
General Neas Monday 5 p.m.
-J, Tuesday noon /


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months S18; I yr $31.: 2 rs 560
Florida
6 months 22. I yr 4I; 2 yrs 17
Out of Stale
6 months $27: 1 yr. S49; 2 rs. $95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Ad.ocate welcomes letters to the editor on mailers of public
intrreit Leners should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Pre., releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typd- double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject i.' edJing







t ~Kelly's Column
By Jim


Local citrus grower Kenny Sanders said Tuesday night's tem-
peratures in Hardee were generally 25 to 28 degrees. There was
some ice in the top part of oranges, which will result in a lower
juice yield. "I would rather have three-quarters of an orange than
none.
Shortly after midnight his Hollandtown Road grove was at 26
degrees and at Lemon Grove, 34 degrees. A low of 22 was report-
ed at Duette.
Sanders said elevation above sea level is the highest in the
county at Lemon Grove at 129 feet. Elevation at First Baptist
Church in Wauchula is 125 feet, falling to 115 at the Mormon
Church and 50 feet at Peace River, said Sanders.

Here's hoping area cattlemen can rally to the support of
Hardee Livestock Market which has operated since 1946 (see
related story on Page 1).

Monday night's freezing temperatures reached 26 and 27
degrees in Hardee County but failed to do major damage to local
citrus groves.

FSU football is No. 1 in Florida. Even UCF is rated higher
than UF. The Gators and the Miami Hurricanes havejust hired new
head coaches.

Donald Earl Albritton, Jonathan Kelly and I saw Tampa Plant
sink the Lakeland Dreadnaughts 48-6 Friday night in Tampa.
Plant's superstar James Wilder Jr., tailback and linebacker, is ver-
bally committed to FSU. James Wilder Sr. was a star tailback for the
Tampa Bay Bucs for years.

Despite injuries and arrests the Tampa Bay Bucs are 8-5 and in
playoff contention. Head coach Raheeth Morris and quarterback
Josh Freeman have been impressive, along with receivers Kellen
Winslow, Mike Williams and Arrelious Benn.

Hardee County Manager Lex Albritton last Thursday dodged a
verbal bullet from new County Commissioner Grady Johnson, who
made a motion to fire Albritton. Johnson fired a blank since the
motion did not receive a second. However, a point was made.

The December freezes have killed pasture grass;This will be a
good season for eating hay if you are a bovine.

It looks like the George W. Bush tax cuts of 2001 and 2003
will be extended. President Barack Obama and the Democrats
wanted to.end the tax cuts for individuals making over $200,000
and couples earning over $250,000 but the Republicans are too
strong. Meanwhile, the nation's debt continues to climb north of
$13 trillion. The U.S., however, can print more money.


CITY MANAGER
Continued From 1A


with distinction. He has numer-
ous professional affiliations and
letters of reference.
Leary was the selection of
four commissioners. Her histo-
ry includes employment in Cry-
stal River and Lake Park as well
as South Carolina, Vermont and
Connecticut. She has a master
of arts in management and
organizational development and
classes in the New York Uni-
versity business law program.
Miranti has worked in a state
agency as well as Osceola and
Madison counties. He holds a
master's degree in business
administration and has a huge
variety of professional and
community/volunteer experi-
ence and awards.
McCroskey cites 25 years of
experience in city planning,
economic development, down-
town redevelopment and all
areas of city government in
DeLand, Daytona Beach, South


Daytona, Tennessee an
Virginia. He has: a n
degree in urban and r
planning.
Reade lists 16 years
ence in all aspects of ci
.', ernment in Delray Beac
'Richey, Davenport, A
dale, Haines City and
Palm Beach. He holds
ter's degree in public a
tration.
Other candidates in
Jeffrey S. Hazel of
Ohio; Stephen C. We
SSebring; Randy D. Ha
Silver Springs; Kenn
Wheeler of Avon Park;
Daughter of Miami; I
E. Venables of Palat
Randall Dilling of
Charlotte; Chris Joh
Florida, no city given; ]
E. Perez of Sunrise
Baughman of Oak Hi
Luke Benjamin Ols
Kearney, Neb.


So divinely is the world organized that every one
in our place and time, is in balance with everythinC
-G

I never saw an ugly thing in my life: for let the form
object be what it may-light, shade, and perspecti
always make it beautiful.
-John Con


COURTESY PHOTO
A team of Hardee County cowboys traveled to Amarillo, Texas, in November to compete in the 2010 World
Championship Ranch Rodeo. Each member of the six-man team lives in Hardee County and works daily In the cat-
tle business. The group competed four times during the event and enjoyed the experience. Shown mounted on their
horses from left are Matt Carlton, Dale Carlton, Clint Boney, Brian Alexy, Lloyd McGee and Trae Adams.


Is^ /' "v^ .,,, -r .B.E i"- B


The landmark Hardee Livestock Market opened in June of 1946.

.F__________ MARKET
Continued From 1A


286 bulls. Cattle prices have
been strong in recent years.
Monday's prices brought an
average of $1.15 to $1.48 a
pound for steers under 500
pounds and $1 to $1.42 for
heifers under 400 pounds.
Cows brought an average of 42
cents and bulls 52 cents a
pound.
The market's mascot is
Cracker, a 2-year-old Rhod-
'esian ridgeback, a breed devel-
oped to hunt lions. "He does his
job because we have not had a
lion since he's been here."
Several factors have come
together to reduce the tradition-


sion every day. There was a,
home invasion of one of our'
resident, ind tdh-


i, iu ti. U a .LiI; UUIILy man-
ager said they must respond to
anonymous calls and e-mails.'
E-mails cannot be anonymous.
There's absolute distrust. The
citizens have made it clear.
They want it done.
d West "But, out of respect for Com-
laster's missioner Bryant and Commis-
egional sioner Birge, I'll withdraw my
motion until after the first of the
experi- year."
ty gov- A group of people, less than a
:h, Port dozen, left when the regular
Luburn- meeting resumed with a motion
d West to accept the lengthy agenda.
a mas- The meeting went on until
dminis- 11:30 a.m.
The county has had a county
clouded: manager form of government
Celina, since 1989, when the commis-
eks of sion then decided it was inef-
arris of fective for them to divide up the
>eth F. various departments of the
Newall county to oversee.
Kenneth Lex Albritton was hired as
ka; H. assistant county manager/eco-
Port nomic development director on
nson- Oct. 10, 2001 under then-man-
Richard ager Gary Oden, when the com-
; Fred mission. terminated financial
ill; and support of the Economic De-
on of velopment Council. Albritton
stepped up to the top position
when Oden resigned in January
2002.
Efforts to interview Grady
of us, Johnson became impossible
g else. when he missed two appoint-
,oethe ments. Seen at a local restau-
rant, he said he was too busy for
n of an: an interview and would stand
ve will, on what he had said at last
Thursday's commission meet-
istable ing.


al numbers of cattle sold at the
market.
Some area cattle owners are
selling their animals through
computers and the Internet.
Some cattle leases have been
canceled by landowners who
plan other uses for their proper-
ty.
Some ranchers are sending
their cattle to the modernized
cattle market in DeSoto County.
Wheeler is hoping to figure a
way to increase revenue within
the next week or two.
Robert Ray Smith, 83, bought
the market in 1970 along with
Russell Farmer. The company


was started in June 1946 by Jim
and Bob Robertson. Doyle E.
Carlton Jr. and Jack Duncan
later bought the business with
Farmer.
Judy Albritton has worked at
the market for 27 years.
Smith said in 2003, owners
from a 70-mile radius from
Wauchula sold their calves and
unwanted cows at auction at the
market. Sellers got their money
five to 20 minutes after the sale.
Six buyers generally bought
half the cattle. There were about
15 buyers in 2003.
Smith said in 2003 there were
nine livestock markets in Flor-


COMMISSIONER
Continued From 1A


The county manager respond-
ed positively to a request for
interview. He noted that Grady
Johnson "has not once come in
and talked to me, not during
campaigning and not since
being elected."
Albritton said if morale of
county employees is low, it is
because there is no sense of
security or that the county can
provide for them with finances
the way the economy is. They
have not had cumulative pay
increases. At staff meetings
each Tuesday, however, he has
had no feedback from depart-
ment heads on staff morale
problems.
Albritton reviewed the "home
invasion" which had already
been discussed at a commission
meeting several months ago. A
code enforcement worker had
gone to a home in response to a
complaint. Several construction
workers were there, the door
was wide open and one of them
told her to go on in. The owner
was not home at the time and
became angry when he learned
of it and was cited. He likened it
to a home invasion. "Code en-
forcement is not popular and
people are 'unhappy with it
when it's them," said Albritton.
.He said some have asked for
ihe personnel files for previous
code enforcement and building
officials, who were let go,. but
he will not discuss personnel
actions. "I don't take them,
lightly, and will not disparage
someone after they have gone."
Albritton feels generaliza-
tions without specifics while
raising issues only discredits


staff for having done its jobs.
"There's a chain of command
and questions should come to
me. If I don't handle them, then
the commission can fire me.
My staff does not have to take
the flak, I do. I've repeatedly
invited anyone to come to my
office with their problems. But,
when they come in with a pre-
conceived idea and don't want
to hear the truth, it's difficult.
The boardroom is not the
appropriate place to discuss
them."
Albritton has made some
changes to improve the situa-
tion in the last year. After a long
search, Jerry Smith began as
building official in early
February. It was some time after
County Planner Nick Stazco
was injured and it became evi-
dent he would not be able to
return to work. Kevin Denny
was hired for that position in
August.
After eight years on the job,
Albritton received his first eval-
uation from the commission in
October. It graded him on pro-
fessional, interactive and
administrative skills and his


ida, compared with 22 markets
15 years earlier.
Wheeler said today there are
10 livestock markets in the state
and Hardee Livestock Market
generally has eight to 10 buy-
ers.
Earlier this year the local
market tried sales on Monday
and Wednesday but the mid-
week sales were not successful.
The livestock market did not
break even financially this year.
It looks like a 64-year-old
Hardee County tradition is
coming to an end. Janice
Wheeler is looking for a mira-
cle.





relationship with the commis-'
sion through a number of meas-
ures. Each commissioner com-
pleted the evaluation and the
results tabulated by county
attorney Ken Evers.
Scores varied from as low as:
3 and high as 10 in the various
areas of his performance. Over-
all, he was rated high in job
knowledge, technical skills and
budgeting and accounting for
the $52 million county budget.
He was rated weaker in rela-
tionships with the public, inter-:
personal communication with
the public, and delegation of
responsibility/authority. Hiring
Smith, Denny and county engi-
neer/public works director
Kevin Atchley has relieved
some of that.
Another evaluation is not due
until October 2011, when com-.
missioners will decide if
Albritton has improved signifi-
cantly in the weak areas.
Discussion in the meantime will
remain one-on-one as each
commissioner has opportunity
to provide him feedback and
ask questions.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


I








December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3A


LOCAL TEEN
Continued From 1A


each had a number on their shirts. Then, they were put
into groups of eight. After that they did numerous dance
steps. Once they were finished with the dance steps,
they were given a water break and told that when they
came back they would be informed of the judges' opin-
ions.
Kaley said that working with the Moscow Ballet
company has "actually been a really fun experience.
I've gotten to meet a lot of professional ballet dancers,
and I've made lots of new friends."
She explained that there was only one teacher at the
practices, who is also Russian. "She's kind of hard to
understand, and she's really shy, but she's strict; she
gets to the point when it comes to teaching you the
moves you need to know."
Kaley said the classes were rather long. Practice
starts at 10:30 a.m. each Saturday. The performers are
required to wear certain outfits which are strenuous
work to prepare and the practices are very strict, "We
don't even get water breaks, it just goes bam, bam, bam,
until it ends."
One would think that with participation in such a
famous ballet company's production, Kaley would be
given some sort of special treatment at Tip Toes, the
local dance studio where she takes lessons. Quite the
contrary. Kaley made it clear that she does not receive
different treatment from any of the other students at the
studio. "Yeah, I've gotten a lot of congratulations for
my achievement, but I'm still treated the same as I was
three months ago," she said.
Kaley has been dancing with Kerri Bryant, the
owner and instructor of the Tip Toes Dance Studio, for
five years. As a result of this, and also the factor that she
is a fast learner and good with children, she has earned
the position of the teacher's assistant.
Her main goal is to graduate from high school. She
plans to take a break for a little while after that; she will
utilize that time to continue dancing. She says she'll "go
to college eventually," but that her heart is in possibly
opening up her own studio one day. "I've actually put a
lot of thought into it, and the idea is there."
As a teacher's assistant, dancer, a performer in the
"Great Russian Nutcracker" and a freshman in high
school, Kaley is faced with the challenge of balancing
everything into one schedule.
"It's really hard to try to do both school and danc-
ing," she noted. "Sometimes I don't get home until 9
p.m. and then I have to stay up another three hours
doing homework. But no matter what, school always


comes first. My mom threatens to pull me out of danc-
ing if my grades start to slip." She confessed that
despite her mother's threats, she doesn't believe that
they will actually be executed.
To aspiring dancers and people who may have a wish
in their hearts to become one, Kaley revealed this piece
of wisdom: "You're whole experience through dance,
whether you do it for a long time or a few months, is
going, to be a very judgmental process. You can't let that
get to you. You can't let that stop you from doing some-
thing you really want to do, what you dream of becom-
ing. You can't let that stop you from being happy, from
making yourself happy."
The Moscow Ballet is a Russian ballet company
which was founded in 1979. It gained its world fame in
1987 when Andrei Ustinov danced during the compa-
ny's first U.S. tour. That year's tour was seen by an esti-
mated 150,000 people.
The artistic director of the Moscow Ballet is
Vyancheslav Gordeyev, previously of the Bolshoi
Ballet.
"The Nutcracker" is a two-act ballet, originally cho-
reographed by Maris Petipa and LEev Ivanov. The score
was written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, and the ballet
premiered at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg,
Russia, on Dec. 18, 1892, on a double-bill with
Tchaikivsky's opera "lolanta."
The original production was unsuccessful, but the
20-minute suite Tchaikovsky extracted from the ballet
was.
"The Nutcracker" in its entirety has enjoyed enor-
mous popularity since the mid-20th century. It is now
performed by innumerable ballet companies, primarily
during the Christmas season and especially in the
United States. This Tchaikovsky score was one of his
most famous compositions, particularly the pieces fea-
tured in the suite.
The Moscow Ballet's "Great Russian Nutcracker"
has been touring America and Canada for 18 years. It is
the largest Russian ballet tour in North America and
averages around 100 performances during the months
of November and December.
It is an honor to be a part of such a distinguished
ballet company's routine and show.
Kaley Shepard has worked very hard in her dancing
career and now she has the chance to show the world
what she loves the most, and everything she has learned
in these past 12 years of dance.
The performance will be held at the Lakeland


Center Youkey Theater on Monday, Dec. 27, at 7:30
p.m. Tickets can be purchased by phone from the Box
Office at 863-834-8111, or Ticket Master at 1-800-745-
3000. They may also be purchased online at www.nut-
cracker.com or at www.ticketrraster.com. Ticket sales
will run through to the date of the performance.
You won't want to miss this spectacular event.

Hutn Fs


12/16/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:10 am
Sets: 5:35 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 1:57 pm
Sets: 2:39 am
Up: 8:44 pm
Down: 8:21 am
Moon Phase
78%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:21 am-10:21 am
8:44 pm-10:44 pm
Minor Times
2:39 am-3:39 am
1:57 pm-2:57 pm
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/17/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:11 am
Sets: 5:35 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 24 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 2:36 pm
Sets: 3:35 am
Up: 9:33 pm
Down: 9:08 am
Moon Phase
86%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:08 am-11:08 am
9:33pm-ll:33pm
Minor Times
3:35 am-4:35 am
2:36 pm-3:36 pm
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


12/18/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:11 am
Sets: 5:36 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 3:20 pm
Sets: 4:32 am
Up: 10:25 pm
Down: 9:59 am
Moon Phase
92%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:59 am-11:59 am
10:25 pm-12:25 am
Minor Times
4:32 am-5:32 am
3:20 pm-4:20 pm
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/19/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:12 am
Sets: 5:36 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 24 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 4:11 pm
Sets: 5:32 am
Up: 11:21 pm
Down: 10:53 am
Moon Phase
97%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:53 am-12:53 pm
--:-----:--
Minor Times
5:32 am-6:32 am
4:11 pm-5:1l pm
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5


12/20/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:13 am
Sets: 5:37 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 24 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 5:08 pm
Sets: 6:30am
Up: -:-
Down: 11:50am
Moon Phase
100%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:50am-:50 pm
--:-----:--
Minor Times
6:30 am-7:30 am
5:08 pm-6:08 pm
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/21/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:13 am
Sets: 5:37 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 24 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 6:10 pm
Sets: 7:27 am
Up: 12:19 am
Down: 12:48 pm
Moon Phase
100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
--:- `---:--
12:48 pm-2:48 pm
Minor Times
7:27 am-8:27 am
6:10 pm-7:10 pm
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -5


12/22/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:14 am
Sets: 5:38 pm
Day Length
10 hrs.24 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 7:15 pm
Sets: 8:18 am
Up: 1:17 am
Down: 1:46 pm
Moon Phase
98%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
1:46pm-3:46pm
Minor Times
8:18 am-9:18 am
7:15 pm-8:15 pm
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/23/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:14 amn
Sets: 5:38 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 24 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 8:20 pm
Sets: 9:06 am
Up: 2:14 am
Down: 2:42 pm
Moon Phase
93%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
2:14 am-4:14 am
2:42 pm-4:42 pm
Minor Times
9:06 am-10:06 am
8:20 pm-9:20 pm
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5


Diabetes Prevention: Never Too Old
Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN, American Institute for Cancer Research


Be not afraid of life.
Believe that life is worth
living, and your belief will
help create the fact.


The Herald-

Advocat
H ardeCo-il 0tlw Cvrg
PRNES PULSES


Diabetes incidence is sky-
rocketing, much of it apparently
due to rising rates of obesity.
Add to that the estimated 57
million Americans who have
pre-diabetes, people who have
higher than normal blood sugar
and are at increased risk of
developing diabetes. For people
who wonder whether lifestyle
in middle age and beyond really
can prevent diabetes, a recent
study suggests that it can.
In the study, 9 of 10 new
cases of diabetes in adults over
age 65 were attributable to 5
lifestyle factors: weight, diet,
activity, tobacco and alcohol.
Amidst discussions of the per-
sonal and national costs of dia-
betes and its complications, the
impact of focusing on moderate
changes in lifestyle demands
attention.
The study tracked 4,883 men
and women age 65 and older for
ten years. After adjusting for
age, sex, race, education and
income, researchers found that
diets highest in fiber with a
healthier balance of fats and
lower in refined grains and
sweets was one link to lower
risk of diabetes. Other habits of
people less likely to develop
diabetes were long-term avoid-
ance of tobacco, light to moder-
ate alcohol consumption, heal-
thy weight and/or waist circum-


ference, and regular physical
activity.
The significance of avoiding
excess body fat seen in past
research was repeated here; that
alone was enough to cut dia-
betes risk almost 50 percent.
Overall, the rate of diabetes was
35 percent lower for each one
additional healthy lifestyle fac-
tor, such as simply walking
more than average and eating
more healthfully (more fiber,
less sweets, healthier fats).
People whose lifestyle ranked
healthier than average in all five
categories slashed their risk of
diabetes by 89 percent.
But can someone whose
lifestyle falls in the high-risk,
unhealthy group-and perhaps
has for years-change behav-
ior? Yes, according to a body of
research. For example, a new
German study of 182 over-
weight and obese middle age
people with pre-diabetes. After
a 12-month program, partici-
pants lost weight, increased
exercise and improved eating
habits. Fasting blood sugar lev-
els dropped.
Two large studies, the
American Diabetes Prevention
Program and the Finnish Dia-
betes Prevention Study, had
previously shown that a low fat
diet, increased physical activity
and weight loss could decrease


incidence of type 2 diabetes by
58 percent in..adults showing
signs of prediabetes. The major-
ity of people in these studies
could attain the goal of a five to
seven percent weight loss.
However, both lifestyle change
programs relied on intensive
long-term individual counsel-
ing.
Together, these studies pro-
vide a vital message: Lifestyle
change works, and your habits
don't have to be perfect to make
a difference. Small Steps. Big
Rewardsexternal site is free
information you can get from
the National Institutes of Health
about how to achieve the
Diabetes Prevention Program
goals. (Order or read online at
the National Diabetes Educa-
tion Programexternal site Web
site.)
If you have trouble creating
or maintaining a healthier life-
style on your own, you're not
alone. In each of these studies,
those in a program that shared
tips and showed people how to
set goals and solve problems
did better than those simply
given written information. So
check with your local hospital
or community centers to see
what's available. If no program
exists, request that they start
one.


The Wauchula Lion's Club wishes

to thank Mosaic for partnering

with us and the following

companies for their continued

support of our Annual Lion's Day


Albritton Insurance CF I

State Farm Insurance


Ag Land Services

Beef O'Brady's

Coldwell Banker

Cat's on Main

First National Bank
of Wauchula

Heartland Growers

Java Cafe

Jellybeans


industries


S Magnolia Tree

Master's Touch

Old Pine Candle and Gifts

Royal's Furniture

Sevigny & Timmerman

Sweetbay

Ullrich's

Wauchula State Bank

Winn Dixie


Cr


i


I.- '- -


JVCILIUL


N -Nuqku


:








4A The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010



Obituaries


WAYNE MORRIS "SPUD"
RICKELS
Wayne Morris "Spud" Ric-
kels, 58, of Wauchula, died on
Thursday, Dec. 9, 2010, at his
home.
He was born in Hamilton,
Ohio, on Oct. 3, 1952 and was a
dragline operator for Mosaic
Fertilizer for 29 years.
He was preceded in death by
his parents Ralph and Viola
Rickels; and brother Frederick
Dale Rickels.
He is survived by his wife
Heather Helms Rickels; four
daughters Angela Elam and
husband Ron of Cleveland,
Tenn., Jennifer Clemons and
husband Josh of Gainesville,
Missy Lee Helms of Lakeland
and April Le'mae Maker of
Winter Haven; two sons
Stephen Adam Rickels of
Atlanta, Ga., and Caleb Scott
Rickels of Crystal River; two
sisters Sandy Scott and husband
Oscar of Zolfo Springs, and
'Marlene Hyde and husband
Roger of Lakeland; 10 grand-
children, Jordan W. Elam,
Malia Alani Elam, Zachary D.
Elam, Micaela L. Ybarra,
Joshua D. Clemons Jr., Bubba
Joe Ybarra, Lydia Cheyenne
Ybarra, Emily Grace Ybarra,
Hailee Rickels and Chloe
Rickels.
Services will be held on
Saturday, Dec. 18 at 2 p.m. at
First Baptist Church of Bowling
Green.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade

Wealth consists not in hav-
ing great possessions but
in having few wants.
-Epicurus

The only active diamond
mine in the U.S. can be
found in Arkansas.


C'n Memory


ROBERT LEE RAPP
Robert Lee Rapp, 77, of
Zolfo Springs, died on Friday,
Dec. 10, 2010, at his home in
Zolfo Springs.
He was born on May 10,
1933, in Christiansburg,
Ohio. and moved to Piqua,
Ohio, as a young child. He
retired from farming in 1986
and moved to Zolfo Springs.
He was founder of the family
business. Custom Maid, and
also worked/volunteered for
the Hardee County School
system. He was a member of
Florida Flywheelers and en-
joyed antique tractors, fishing
and time spent with family
and friends.
He was preceded in death
by his father William Rapp;
and grandson John Rapp.
Survivors include his wife
Evelyn Turner Rapp of Zolfo
Springs; mother Bernice Id-
dings Rapp of Troy, Ohio;
children William Douglas
Rapp and wife Bonnie of
Piqua. Ohio, Debbie Rapp
Gover of Sebring and Don
Rapp of Zolfo Springs; sisters
Mary Joanne Peters and hus-
band Leo S. of Piqua, Ohio.
and Martha Jean Rapp of
Troy. Ohio; three grandchil-
dren James Douglas Rapp of
Indiana. Abbigail Putnam of
Ohio and Damian Rapp of
Ohio; and four great-grand-
children Cole. Anthony, Lan-
din and Alyssa.
Memorial services will be
held Saturday. Jan. 8. 2011. at
2 p.m. at Bowling Green
United Methodist Church.
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home
Sebring


MARIE MARTIN
Marie Martin, 65, of Zolfo
Springs, died Wednesday, Dec.
8, 2010, at her home.
Born on June 24, 1945, at
Hayti, Mo., she was a lifelong
resident of Hardee County. She
was a Baptist.
Survivors include mother
Ivory Lee Martin of Avon Park;
son Roy Gene Martin of
Florida; daughter Shirley Coch-
ran of Wauchula; brother Ken-
neth Martin of Avon Park; and
sisters Rose Mary Cochran of
Englewood and Becky Martin.
A memorial service was held
at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 11, at
Robarts Garden Chapel, Wau-
chula.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


WILLIAM WARREN
DANELLA
William Warren Danella,
infant, died on Friday, Dec. 10,
2010, at DeSoto Memorial
Hospital. He was born Dec. 10,
2010.
He was preceded in death by
grandmother Judy Delores
Danella.
Survivors include father
John Joseph Danella of Wau-
chula; mother Jessie Miller of
Wauchula; grandfather John J.
Danella Sr. of Stark, Michael
Miller of Zolfo Springs and
Patricia Miller of Wauchula.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


y
FELIPE BENITEZ
Felipe Benitez, 82, of Bowl-
ing Green, died on Saturday,
Dec. 11, 2010, at his home.
Born Sept. 24, 1928 in Puer-
to Rico, he worked in the agri-
culture industry.
Survivors include his wife
Catarina Benitez of Bowlilng
Green; two daughters, Judy
Arango of Bowling Green and
Joy Maldonado of Naples; two
step-daughters Janie Hernandez
of Naples and Julie Pena of
Lakeland; step-son Jessie Mon-
roe of Tampa; 14 grandchildren;
and 12 great-grandchildren;
Arrangements are handled
by McLean Funeral Home.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade







FRIDAY, DEC. 17
VHardee County Legisla-
tive Delegation meeting,
Hardee County Commission
Chambers, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 2
p.m.

MONDAY. DEC. 20
/Zolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular month-
ly meeting, Town Hall, 3210
U.S. 17 North, Zolfo Springs,
6 p.m.






MLK Parade
Welcomes All
Floats, walkers, groups,
organizations, everyone is
invited to participate in the
25th anniversary Celebration
for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
and its parade on Monday,
Jan. 17 at 1 p.m.
There is an entry fee of
$10 for participants and the
entry deadline is Jan. 7. For
questions, call Daryle Cook
at 863-773-4045 or e-mail
LaToya Wiggins at Iwig-
gins9599 @ hotmail.com.

Logical consequences are
the scarecrows of fools
and the beacons of wise
men.


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg
REALITY RANCH YOUTH RODEO
SUPPORTS BREAST CANCER MONTH
With getting Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo back in the groove, I
forgot to mention that the October rodeo was in support of breast
cancer month. And the kids came out in full force with pink-pink
shirts, pink boots, pink bell-boots and leg wraps, pink belts, pink
bandannas, pink saddle blankets, and pink bling! (And for those of
us who were not informed about this event, they had handmade
pink-ribbon pins for us to proudly sport.)
Wrangler has a "Tough Enough to Wear Pink" campaign, dar-
ing those rough and tumble cowpokes to dress in that traditionally
female color. I think the best-dressed-in-pink award would go to
Sam Morgan, who wore a pink shirt and bandanna, in the best cow-
boy style, including his horse. My favorite was the many horses
that had the pink ribbon design painted on their hips (and the best
of that award goes to Brighton Baumann for the matching ribbons
painted on both hips-Brighton is cousin to Dalton and Kirklin
Boney).
And I did leave out a few of our newcomers, simply because I
didn't know they were residents in Hardee County. So to add to the
list is Sela Rae Albritton (younger sister to Gracie), Madi McGee,
and roughstock rider Clayton Harris (but you'll just have to wait
another week to see your photos).
Our concession people are Pam Bishop, Kay McClelland,
Brenda Pelton and Donna Webb (proud grandmother to contestants
Tony and Matt), with the barbecuing done by Gerald McClelland.
The first month I had a piece of lemon meringue pie (my favorite
of all pies), and it was to die for! Then,.pumpkin was added. I can't
wait to see what December brings!
And I want to mention some more of our sponsors-without
them, and all of our volunteers, youth rodeo would not exist. They
are the Apostolic Church of Bowling Green, Alan Jay Automotive,
the Wild Turkey Federation, Speckled Dog LLC/Hawkins Ranch,
Fields Equipment, and All Creatures'Animal Hospital. I can only
say that I am thankful that All Creatures' banner is not that neon
orange that Dr. Slade Hayman wears in those jumpsuits of his!
So here's some photos of a few of our newcomers-hope you
enjoy them, Cowboys and Cowgirls.
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!

.. .. ^ ^- .J-





.f









Patrick Carlton, son of Carlton Ranches' Dale Carlton,
turns the steer's head to throw it to the ground in the jun-
ior chute doggin' event.


CENTRAL FLORIDA
eah Care HEALTH CARE, INC.

204 E. Palmetto Street
%. Wauchula, FL 33873
ith A Hear (863) 773-2111

"Se Habla Espafiol"


Pediatric &


Dr. Maria de Padua
Pediatrics


Adult Primary Care


1 7


Dr. John Edmiston
Adult Family
1 1f. Ul, -


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Ryleigh Adams, daughter of Carlton Ranches' Trae
Adams, stretches to round the first barrel in the Tots
Division.


Hope Elliot passes the third barrel to head home on her
new paint horse in the Junior Division.


- -4

Jake Bolin ropes the calf in the senior tie-down event.
Mom Millie Bolin cheers him on.





MONUMENTS OF DISTINCTION

1-863-494-0136'

Call 24 Hours A Day

208 11th Ave. N During
Arcadia, Florida 34266 Winter Months



DEPENDABLE/TRUSTWORTHY

COMPASSIONATE CARE





ROBARTS'
FAMILYFUNERALHOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906
529 WEST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873
863-773-9773
View Obituaries at robartsfh.com 7:29tfc



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that 3-C RANCH LIMIT-
ED, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO. 719 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005

Description of Property:

640 AC-MINERAL RIGHTS 1.80%
OF 1/8 INTEREST IN ALL OF
SECTION 14-33S-26E OR223P30
225P636 381P135 392P216
397P310 499P405

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: RANDY GEISELMAN

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthous, 417 West Main Street, second floor haH-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19'"day of January, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 7t' day of December, 2010.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252010TD016XXXX 1216;16c
12:16;1:6c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that 3-C RANCH LIMIT-
ED, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO. 716 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005

Description of Property:

640 AC-MINERAL RIGHTS 1.80%
OF 1/8 INTEREST IN ALL OF
SECTION 10-33S-26E
223P42 225P636 381P135 392P216
397P310 499P405

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: RANDY GEISELMAN

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthous, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19'h day of January, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 7th day of December, 2010.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252010TD017XXXX12161 6c
12 16;1 6e
































H:i


HIIII1,I


- ..,-:;
Lm^*iE '


Auto, A/C, Hard Top, V6, Keyless Entry
5 Year/ 100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
Stk#E205079
M.S.R.P $25,885
RLRlNJY Discount 1,974


Power Windows & Locks, CD, Keyless Entry,
Power Driver Seat, Trailer Tow,
5 Year/ 100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
Stk#E108886


M.S.R.P.
rLRNjyrYDiscount
Factory Rebate


$38,505
- 4,007
- 5,000


RPffNjaFYPRICE

s29,498
^__^,n^.,-, ..^..i. PI a.


Power Windows & Locks, CD, Leather, Power
Sunroof, Navigation, Keyless Entry,
5 Year /100,000 Mile Poweilrain Warranty
Sttk#A lli26250


M.S. .P.
oRL NJfIY Discount
Factory Rebate


"43,025
- 4,467
- 3,000


riL jrN JY PRICE


$35,


558


Power Windows & Locks, CD, Keyless Entry,
Power Driver Seat, Trailer Tow, Chrome Steps,
5 Year/ 100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
Stk#E121234


M.S.R.P
L~/NJoYDiscount
Factory Rebate


'49,505
- 6,037
- 4,000


iLRiN iRYPRICE

$39,468
L ,


Power Windows & Locks, CD, Keyless Entry,
17"Aluminum Wheels, Trailer Tow, Chrome Steps,
5 Year/ 100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
Stk#E146868


S(


M.S.R.P.


LHJr/(YDiscount
Factory Rebate
LR JiY PRICE


50,945
6,306
4,000


40, 639



PC.


h.


CHR Y SLER

K= > =) ...-.^ ...


US,. HIGHWAY 17 S., Wauchula


Jeep


Shi
Tliel os Woinunit-Tii,OiTim YE~lt


- oS o- -'. o


OLfIN JY.coM


Si Hu: O -F O- Co S at


Prices include all factory rebales an d i enives assigned to dealer Prices exclude taxes, tag & S699 dealer fee Vehicles subject prior sale. Similar savings available on other vehicles in stock, hurry in for best selection. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. Offers Expire 12/22/10.


December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5A


ih I


Power Windows & Locks, CD, Chrome Package,
3'd Row Seating, Keyless Entry, Dual A/C
5 Year/l100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
Stf1f,'tV23-1578
M.S.R.P. "25.670
RLRHNJoY Discount 1,672
Factory Rebate (or (0.01% for 60 ninths) 2,000
RuiNqJrY PRICE

2 1, 998
A- --.._ -7--- -__:


Ht ^ A


14 01


( (863) 773-4744


1
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6A The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


FNL: A Hometown Holiday


In Downtown Wauchula!


It's a Hometown Holiday in
downtown Wauchula this Fri-
day from 5 to 9 p.m. during
Friday Night Live!
Surround yourself with the
beautiful decorations, lights and
sounds in downtown Wau-
chula's Heritage Park while
enjoying live entertainment
from the First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green's Praise Team,
the band Fuel from First
Christian Church's Student
Ministry, and the Youth With
Voices choir.
Have you seen the weather
report? Friday Night Live calls
for 15 tons of snow! Enjoy slid-
ing down the snow on a tube




Crop


Is 143


Million
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA) released
its December citrus forecast
Friday, estimating Florida will
produce 143 million boxes of
oranges in 2010-2011, down 3
million boxes from the initial
October estimate.
The cold temperatures earlier
this week, which didn't cause
any material damage to the
crop, had nothing to do with the
decrease.
"This decrease isn't unex-
pected as we've been hearing
reports of smaller fruit over the
past couple of weeks," said
Michael W. Sparks, executive
VP/CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual. "It looks like the crop
isn't going to be as big as ini-
tially thought."
Visit www.nass.usda.gov/
Statistics_byState/Florida/Pub
lications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for
the complete USDA estimate.
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
The USDA predicts Florida
will harvest 19.6 million boxes
of grapefruit in 2010-11, down
slightly from the initial 20 mil-
lion boxes estimate.
The forecast for early and
midseason varieties in Florida
was reduced 1 million boxes to
68 million boxes, and Valencias
were reduced 2 million to 75
million boxes. For Florida spe-
cialty fruit, the USDA predicts
1.1 million boxes of tangelos
and 4.4 million boxes of tanger-
ines. The yield for from concen-
trate orange juice (FCOJ) is
expected to be 1.61 gallons per
90-pound box.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9 billion annual eco-
nomic impact, employing near-
ly 76,000 people, and covering
more than 569,000 acres.
Founded in 1948 and currently
representing nearly 8,000 grow-
er members, Florida Citrus
Mutual is the state's largest cit-
rus grower organization. For
more information, visit
www.flcitrusmutual.com.

Charity is a virtue of the
heart and not of the hands.
-Joseph Addison


and let the little ones play in the
kiddy snow area!
And be sure to bring your
camera because Santa will
make an appearance from 6 to 8
hear all your Christmas wishes.
Finish your last-minute shop-
ping with the downtown mer-
chants open late for your con-
venience or stop by the art and
crafter booths to find that one-
of-a-kind gift.
Can't decide what to pur-
chase? Downtown Dollars are
just the gift for you. Accepted
by over 20 downtown business-
es from dining to tires, they are
perfect for that hard-to-shop-for
individual. Purchase yours at


the Main Street information
booth.
And if all of this makes you
hungry, be sure to visit one of
the fine downtown restaurants
for a variety of dining options.
Or, enjoy hot dogs. chili, kettle
corn, the hot chocolate bar and
more in the park.
Bring your lawn chair and
join everyone downtown!
Business partner for this
month's Friday Night Live. is
Florida Sales & Rental.
For more event information,
contact Main Street Wauchula
Inc. at 767-0330 or e-mail
jnewman@cityofwauchula.com.


MAIN MOVE-Celebrating its 10th anniversary back in
April, the Hardee Help Center Thrift Store will now be commem-
orating a new location.
Tomorrow (Friday) morning beginning at 9:30 and continuing
until 5:30 p.m., the store will unlock its new doors for a Grand
Opening. Throughout the day, door prizes will be given every hour
along with refreshments. For $5 you could also get a chance to win
a pool table.
Judith George, executive director, and the Hardee Help Center
Board made the decision to switch spots based on the size and loca-
tion of the new store. The move keeps the store in downtown
Wauchula, but takes it from Seventh Avenue to Main Street.
"We hope to be able to improve our revenue by allowing for
more donations along with effectively displaying what we current-
ly have. This new space will allow for both, due to the size being
three times as large as our previous space as well as being featured
right on Main Street," said George.
The store is Hardee County's'original thrift store serving
Hardee residents. It is non-profit, with all sales and donations being
used to fund the Help Center and help those less fortunate in the
area.
LuAnn Bee has been appointed as the new store manager and
Etta Malone serves as the store clerk. Working alongside the two is
a volunteer based work force.
The group also is looking for a volunteer "Mr. Fix-it" who
would be willing to work, either part-time or full-time, on small
repairs as they are brought in. George continues to say, "We are
truly blessed by our volunteers."
The store will continue to offer clothing, shoes, furniture, both
small and large appliances, and a collection of books and toys, all
donated by members of the community.
In an effort to accept donations as smoothly as possible,
dropoffs can be made in the back of the store at the warehouse. The
Thrift Store has asked that all donations be made before 5:30 p.m.,
as they do not receive anything left overnight. Anyone arriving
after hours dan contact the number on the door for further direc-
tions.
The new Hardee Help Center Thrift Store is located at 226 W.
Main St. Hours remain 9:30 to 5:30 Monday through Friday and 10
to 2 on Saturdays.
Though hosting its Grand Opening tomorrow, it will be unable
to participate in Friday Night Live until January as it will be dis-*
tributing toys on Saturday morning for the Hardee County
Christmas Toys for Needy Children program.


PHOTOS BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
The Hardee Help Center Thrift Store staff is excited to be
moving locations. Pictured are (from left) LuAnn Bee,
store manager; Etta Malone, clerk; and Judith George,
executive director of the Heli Center.


.. "] While the store is in the midst of the relocation, a lot has
I been done to prepare for the Grand Openig tomorrow.


From The Herald Advocate
Of Friday, December 17, 1965

Front-Page Headlines:
SNova Formally Protests Game It Lost To Hardee
SCity OK s Renovation Plan For Trailer Park
S \ 2nd Annual Yule Tree Lighting Is Tonight
0 Federal Land Bank To Hold Open House This Afternoon
E MaDie and Taylor Partners, Patanni Opens Own Office
\ '



'4 On 2nd Team, Too


S Four Hardee High Wildcats

.Put On Loop All-Star Team
S, , ,

r l o ,t -K t",, L t 'h ] ,r ". ,, ., *"d '- '
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Gator Hunt Hearing Better May
Hours May Mean Earning More

Be lxtende Peonle with intreetedl heaarinoa ino mav alnn h critical t
Be Extende People wth untreatd hearinging. ma lob ciia


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission
wants to know what Floridians
think about providing more
daylight hunting hours to alliga-
tor hunters.
The public can comment via
an online survey.
The FWC is exploring the
idea of additional daylight hunt-
ing hours for the state's recre-
ational alligator hunting season,
which runs Aug. 15 to Nov. 1
each year.
Currently, legal hours for alli-
gator hunting are from one hour
before sunset to one hour after
sunrise.
"We've received input from
the alligator hunting communi-
ty and are now looking for input
from anyone who is interested
in this issue," said Harry Dut-
ton, FWC alligator-manage-
ment program coordinator.
People can provide input by
going to MyFWC.com/Alliga-
tor.
The commission will take
this input into consideration
when deciding whether any
change is warranted.


ABOUT ..
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write.ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone, number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.



ABOUT ..,
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens', birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


loss may see their income
decrease by as much as $30,000
a year, according to a national
survey by the Better Hearing
Institute. But hearing aids were
shown to reduce the risk of
income loss by 90 to 100 per-
cent for those with milder hear-
ing loss, and from 65 to 77 per-
cent for those with severe to
moderate hearing loss.
Most of the more than 34 mil-
lion Americans with hearing
loss are either in the workforce
or in school. The loss in income
for people with untreated hear-
ing problems, due to underem-
ployment, is estimated at $176
billion, with the cost to society
as high as $26 billion in unreal-
ized federal taxes.
Hearing is critical to effective
communication in the work-
force. The ability to hear and
listen well enables employees
to be more productive and un-
derstand the work that has been
assigned.
Poor communication can
result in unhappy customers,
missed deadlines, poor morale
among co-workers and mis-
takes on the job. Effective hear-



FUNERAL NOTICE
Lois Marie Conley Ledger,
81, a native of Hardee County,
died Wednesday, Dec. 15, at
Resthaven.
Visitation is Friday from 10
to 11 a.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel. Services are at 11.


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ensure safety on the job.
In the study, those with
unaided severe hearing loss had
unemployment rates double that
of the normal-hearing popula-
tion, and nearly double that of,
their-i ided peers.
"People are losing their hear-
ing earlier and staying in the
workforce longer," says Sergei
Kochkin, executive director of
the Better Hearing Institute. "In
today's tough job market, hear-
ing your best is essential for
career success."
Hearing aids remain the opti-
mum treatment for the vast
majority of people with hearing
loss. Yet only 40 percent of
Americans with moderate to
severe hearing loss, and only 9
percent of those with mild hear-
ing loss, wear them.
Half of all people with un-
treated hearing loss have never
had their hearing professionally
checked. To help, the Better
Hearing Institute has a five-
minute hearing test at www.-
hearing check.org. You can
learn more about hearing loss
and how to help it at www.bet-
terhearing.org.


Pessimist: One who, when
he has the choice of two
evils, chooses both.
-Oscar Wilde

I like the dreams of the
future better than the his-
tory of the past.
-Thomas Jefferson


omle Joinl LS for a

ebration of Life andl

hristmas Party for

ivne "Siud" Rickles

Saturday, Dec. 18

2pm 10 pm

admission is free with an .
rapped toy or $10 donation. ,

EE FOOD FREE BEER
music with Carl "Elvis"

Isored BY
.aso 3315 SR64 West,
:,a u.crWa uchula
S863-735-8887
DSOC12 16C

Ai f //*IJ


)







December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Free Food Helps Hundreds

Of Hardee County Families


- ----- --- -- ---


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Boxes of free food are given
out to needy Hardee County
residents on Tuesdays and
'Fridays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at Cutting Edge Ministries at
3059 Elm St. in Zolfo Springs.
On Tuesday, the boxes con-
tained pasta, a can of vegeta-
bles, a large fruit drink, and
frozen sausage patties. "Some-
times there is rice, cheese,
frozen chicken leg-quarters,
canned beef or chicken, and
other food items," said the Rev.
Wendell Smith, who founded
the ministry in 2000.
"After the 2004 hurricanes,
the need for food greatly ex-
panded," he said. Smith is also
pastor of Faith Temple Church
of God at 701 N. Seventh Ave.
in Wauchula.
The food distribution center
is staffed by volunteers who
register the clients and assem-
ble the boxes.
The ministry receives the
food from the U.S. Department
of Agriculture and various non-
profit ministries, but must pay a
transportation fee of $125 for
some pallets.
The ministry also has a 24-
foot box truck that must be
driven to Tampa twice a week
to pick up the food. "The truck
recently needed four new tires


for $1,300 and had a repair bill
of about $1,000," said Smith.
"It takes $2,000 to $2,500 a
month to operate. We would
love to get some year-end dona-
tions. We owe $48,000 on the
property and building and
$7,000 on the forklift. I would
like to have one paid staff mem-
ber."
On the property is a ware-
house, four semi-truck trailers,
and two 40-foot containers.
Some of the trailers have to be
moved for zoning regulations.
"Our goal is to have a 50- by
80-foot warehouse."
Volunteer Betty Sneider said
400 to 600 families represent-
ing 1,200 to 1,800 people a
month are being helped with
free food.
"We are getting 35 to 50 new
applications a week," she said.
There are a lot of people with
no work and no income, and
some have illnesses in the fam-
ily. You would be surprised at
some of the people who need
help. We do what we can.
Individuals have to give a rea-
son for their situation."
People receive free food for
one to four times a month.
Some clients are seasonal
workers. Some have lost their
jobs. Smith said 55 percent of
the families served are His-
panic, 32 percent are white, and


13 percent are black.
"The breakdown includes 11
percent, single parents; 1.5 per-
cent, disabled; 3.4 percent, 18
to 20 years of age; 21.7 percent,
ages 21 to 30; 25 percent, ages
31 to 40; 40.1 percent, ages 41
to 60; 8.6 percent, over 61; and
two percent, unknown," said
Sneider.
Hardee Help Center and St.
Michael's Catholic Church also
give out free food and clothing
to needy residents of Hardee
County.
Smith said, "Referrals come
from Red Cross, Hardee Help
Center, county Health Depart-
ment, Alpha Omega Freedom
Ministries, Hannah House, and
Lydia's House."
Sometimes hygiene products
are given out.
Cutting Edge Ministries is a
501-C-3 organization and dona-
tions are tax-deductible. Smith
is seeking monthly giving part-
ners or one-time donations.
Expenses include fuel, insur-
ance, mortgage and mainte-
nance costs. He would like a
walk-in freezer, a large ware-
house and volunteer truck driv-
ers.
Contributions can be sent to
P.O. Box 1640, Wauchula, FL,
33873. For more information
call 773-2484 or 581-7610.


COURTESY PHOTOS


Ladies bagging items to distribute.


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12









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8A The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010



The Squeezin's
By Barbara Carlton
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers


GROWERS SEARCH FOR DISEASE
SUPPRESSION ANSWERS
Eighty five citrus growers left their beloved pickup trucks to
board charter buses bound groves in south Florida. The purpose, to
learn how to lengthen the productivity and lives of their Greening
infected groves. Greening reduces tree health to eventual death and


Hamed Doostar-Keyplex Researcher, educates growers
on using KeyPlex's foliar nut4ronal program to improve
,their groves viability after Greening infection.


Orange Hammock grove owner MSury Boyd shows grow-
ers health fruit from infected trees.
( T


Dr. Bob Rouse, Ph. D. Horticu~tdre, exoj/ins his nutrition-
al program trials at the Southwest Florda Research and
Education Center.


is endemic in Florida.
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association organized the
Nutritional Evaluation Plus Tour in the form of a rolling citrus sem-
inar. Growers heardfrom aienowned group of researchers from the
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Science
(UF/IFAS) Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred,
the UF/IFAS Southwest Florida Research and Education Center in
Immokalee and, the United States Department of Agriculture's
Horticultural Laboratory in Ft. Pierce.
Upon arrival, growers were able to view groves heavily infect-
ed with Greening and Citrus Canker and learn about research being
conducted to bring the groves back into a productive state. The
groves viewed, the Boyd Orange Hammock grove, Consolidated's
Summerland Grove and Barron Colliers Silver Strand grove all are
considered toibe virtually 100% infected with Greening and are
also infected with Citrus Canker.
Each of these groves is being fed nutrients through their
leaves, rather than the traditional root feedings. A variety of prod-
ucts, minerals and nutrients are being tested in hopes of finding the
correct blend to economically extend tree health and productivity
until a more permanent answer can be found by the research com-
munity.
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association member,
Daren Hughes of Krause Grove Service, stated, "Seeing what
nutritional programs work with our own eyes, tells me that we can
adopt such programs to use in our own production, without the
trial/error they have already been through. It gives us hope, seeing
what they have done to stay in production, being in an area with far
worse infection and they are still in the grove."
The Florida citrus industry is spending millions of dollars to
fund a worldwide research effort in hopes of finding a cure for
Greening. Creation of the Citrus Research and Development
Foundation through the University of;Florida has elevated the;
effort to an international status. Researchers presenting information
during the tour helps growers see and understand the benefits of
their self taxing research effort and gives them hope for a sustain-
able Florida citrus industry.
KeyPlex, a foliar nutritional product manufacturer and


Fishermen:

Harvest Of

Snook Ends
The recreational harvest of
snook closed Wednesday in all
Atlantic coastal, and inland
waters, including Lake Okee-
chobee and the Kissinimee
River.
The annual winter harvest
season closure of snook in these
areas, which normally ends on
Feb. 1, has been extended until
Sept. 1, 2011, by the Florida
Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission due to the pro-
longed, cold weather that
impacted snook in Florida earli-
er this year.
The extended harvest closure
will help protect snook popula-
tions this winter when they are
most vulnerable to cold weath-
er, and give snook added pro-
tection during next spring and
summer's spawning months.
All other Florida waters are
already closed to the harvest of
:snook until next September for:
the same reason.
Anglers may still catch and
release snook during the harvest
closure, and the FWC encour-
,ages everyone to handle and
release these fish carefully to
help ensure their survival upon
release.

The zipper was patented in
1891.
A man's true wealth Is the
good he does in thIs world.
-Mohammed


McLean Ag, a distributor of nutritional products sponsored the trip
for growers hailing from Charlotte, DeSoto, Hardee, Manatee and
Sarasota Counties. This is the second year the companies have
sponsored this type of trip and based on the popularity with grow-
ers, there will be future trips to come.
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association represents
commercial citrus growers in Desoto, Hardee, Manatee, and
Sarasota counties, as well as that portion of Charlotte County locat-
ed in the Southwest Florida Water Management District. The asso-
ciation has approximately 200 grower members. For additional
information contact the association, at (863) 494-0061.


24 T 1 _7 I I
-, el40U -
_l


LOST DOG I
Answers to the name "BO". Blonde Fawn Brindle
Bull Mastiff. 2 years old. Approx. 130 Ibs. Blue and
Orange collar with rabies tag and micro chip tag.
Markings on back resemble tiger stripes. Lost on
Torrey Rd., Bowling Green. If found please call
863-781-5317 or 863-781-3127.
NO QUESTIONS ASKED FOR HIS RETURN


Trusted Professionals Serving Hardee County since 1947

HARDEE COUNTY

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

oWe enae Pear ea a Pre


SComprebensive Pediatric Dental and Preventative Care


Dr. Bob Ebel, Citrus Horticulturist, address growers
regarding his field trials on controlling Citrus Canker.




JERALDINE
Big Black Steinway waiting a master's touch
All hushed, anticipative... music's flair
From melodic notes, tiny hammers fall
Steinway purrs, then Roars; a kitten... 'Lion's-Call!'
Jumping keys, rolling rhythms, warming climes!
Lighting fires within happy souls 'best-of-times'
Heart-beating cadences and arpeggios...
Overwhelming, all infilling, 'Show-of-Shows!'
Musical phrasing rising, falling, pausing...
Joy and sadness, elation's desolation
Mind's music and musician be causing ...
From written score flies interpretations
Flowing sounds, flying fingers most sublime
Allegro, Crescendo, pianissimo...
Thund'rous lighting striking night's darkened sky
Music's brilliantly lighted realms afar
Indwelling... illuminating brightest-glow
Awak'ning sleeping minds... musically bestowed.
Into all hearts, concert's musical magic..:
The big, black, shiny Steinway's dancing keys!
Thanking you 'Jeri' for all the good times!

Thomas Graham
Fort Myers
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


Youth 3 to 21 years with Medicaid, pregnant women with Medicaid and walk in
emergencies. Services offered include exams, X-rays, sealants, cleaning.
S,' fillings, root canals, partial and extractions.
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PAGE ONE


What Will Transportation


Be Like In 2060?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Forming a Heartland Reg-
ional Transportation Authority
could insure that Hardee Coun-
ty will be in on planning all
major roads and facilities in
south Florida.
That's the goal of the newly
forming H-RTA presented by
Economic Development Direc-
tor Bill Lambert at Thursday's
meeting of the Hardee County
Commission.
The commission voted 4-1 to
approve a resolution of support
for forming the H-RTA. Com-
missioner Grady Johnson op-
posed it, saying he needed
more time to study possible
impacts and demands it could
make on the county.
Commissioner Minor Bryant
likened it to an MPO (munici-
pal planning organization), a
combining of local groups by
interlocals agreements to facili-
tate application for federal plan-
ning money and grants. "We
don't have the population to do
that, so we need to band togeth-
er with other rural counties," he
said.
Lambert talked about expan-
sion of the Panama Canal and
relocation of the World trade
route, about three business
hubs, a CSX port between
Bartow and Winter Haven, Port
Manatee and the proposed
inland port in Glades County.
With circles overlapping around
each of them, Hardee County is
centrally located to be an im-
.portant hub for advanced manu-
facturing and distribution and
would probably be along or
near the proposed east-west
corridor.
"It's important. We need to be
at the table with the planning
'going on," said Lambert as he
asked the commission to sign
the resolution of support.
On Lambert's heels came
Lynn Topel, executive director
of Florida's Heartland Rural
Economic Development Initia-
tive (FHREDI). She presented a
brief overview of FHREDI
projects in the last year. FHRE-
DI includes Hardee, DeSoto,
Highlands, Glades, Okeechobee
and Hendry counties and Belle
Glade, Pahokee, South Bay and
Immokalee.
Topel then talked about the
regional broadband sparked by
Hardee's broadband installa-
tions, a proposed cargo airport
in Hendry County, the rural
economic catalyst program, bus
service and roads as a means of
getting people to the employ-
ment available.
"It all counts on mobility;
that's the focus for economic
development," she commented.
The commission also signed
a resolution expressing support
for renewing the RACEC desig-
nation, one of three in the state.
Hardee belongs to the south


central Rural Area of Critical
Economic Concern. The RA-
CEC designation was approved
by the legislature five years
ago, stating it would be for five
years to give some of the eco-
nomically disadvantaged coun-
ties help in getting established.
It allows a waiver of matching
money on state grants and per-
mits and other financial advan-
tages. The resolution was ap-
proved unanimously.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-approved a temporary per-
mit for CF Industries to contin-
ue its mining until the 2010
annual report and unit review
are done. The annual report was
submitted on time but there was
some delay in back and forth to
clarify some items, said mining
coordinator West Palmer. The
public hearing for the annual re-
view was delayed until January
because of the difficulty in hol-
iday scheduling. .
"Just keep everybody work-
ing," commented Commission-
er Grady Johnson.
-approved the appointment
of Dr. Stephen Gordon as direc-
tor of the Hardee County Health
Department, replacing recently
retired administrator Marsha
Rau.
"I am humbled and proud to
be selected by the state and
county. I cannot fill her shoes,
but Marsha left us a clear path-
way for success and for us to be
a leader for health and safety in
the county,' said Gordon.
-approved an up to $25
charge per person to cover
expenses of handouts and other
materials for several classes at
the library, such as on scrap-
booking, Easter crafts, etc.
There is no room in the budget
to pay for these materials, Li-
brary Director Patti Lang said.
She noted there were over 650
people visiting the library
Monday for Santa's visit, 270 of
them children. .
Commissionerir nor Bryant
made the motion to approve,
subject to consent of the Li-
brary board.
--listened to a discussion on
permitting for mobile home
renovations and the building
code. Basically, in pre-1976
mobile homes, repairs can be
done, but if it involves additions
or changes, it requires an engi-
neer's report. After 1976, mo-
bile homes must be repaired in
like kind as built originally.
After lengthy discussion, and
the advice of the county attor-
ney, commissioners decided not
to get involved in the issue.
"The building official is the
authority. It's not our place to
change what he said," said
Bryant. Commission Chairman
Terry Atchley said the commis-
sion was not an appeals board
for the building official and
there were procedures to follow.


Commissioner Dale Johnson
commented, "It is against the
law to influence a public offi-
cial."
-approved three items
brought by Jack Logan, director
of purchasing, to save money in
ordering supplies, telecommu-
nication plans and increased the
spending limit for travel/motel
accommodations for training
seminars. "You said the magic
words, streamline and save
money," said Commissioner
Dale Johnson in a motion to
approve.
-heard an update on the sus-
tainable Hardee visioning pro-
cess. Planning & Development
Director Kevin Denny asked
each commissioner to bring in
two names for a Steering
Committee to coordinate with
the 36 meetings, public and
committee focus groups, to be
held over the next six months. A
public kickoff meeting will be
held in January and the draft
plan brought back to the public
for more input.
-appioved on a 3-1 vote two
change orders on the Florida
Avenue paving project, totaling
$32,235.61. When the county
added $500,000 in additional
work on the curbing and inlets,
it caused some unforeseen con-
flicts with city sewer/water
lines, underlying brick. The
project, now at $1,109,870.41,
is still under budget, and has
handled some unanticipated
problems.
Commissioner Sue Birge ab-
stained because she had once
worked for contractor Lavon
Cobb as marketing and sales
director and also is in partner-
ship with Lavon and Linda
Cobb on ownership of a grove.
Commissioner Grady Johnson
opposed any change order.
-agreed to change the Jan. 6
meeting to Jan. 4 at 8:30 a.m. as
Birge, Grady Johnson and At-
chley will be at meetings on
,Ja;. 6,. so there wouldn't be a
quorum to discuss county busi-
ness.
-appointed Paul Roberts,a
Peace River Electric Cooper-
ative Inc. employee, to the
Economic Development Coun-
cil to replace Paul Samuels,
who is now a School Board
member and cannot remain on
the EDC.
-agreed to seek proposals
for fleet management of the
county's 62 vehicles, with a
plan for replacement, disposal,
acquisition and maintenance.
-learned that Bryant has
been selected vice-chairman of
the Central Florida Regional
Planning Council board and
representative to FRCA, the
statewide regional councils
board.
-scheduled a workshop on
Jan. 14 at 8:30 a.m. on roads,
work needed and funding for
them.


HJHS Girls Clip Eagles


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The girls win at Hill-Gustat
was the only victory of the
week.
It was an uphill battle for the
Hardee Junior High School bas-
ketball teams last week. The
girls won their Monday game
and were outscored by an ag-
gressive Avon Park squad on
Thursday. The boys lost on both
Monday and Thursday.
This week's game were at
Sebring on Monday and at
DeSoto today (Thursday), then
take a break until a Jan. 6 game
at Lake Placid. The girls play at
5:30 and the boys about 6:30.

GIRLS
The'highlight of last week
was Hardee's win at Hill-
Gustat. While Jakaysha Lindsey
was player of the season's
opener, this game's went to sev-
enth grader Jasmine Thompson.
Coaches Gloria Solis and D.D.'
Darceus were able to get all
their players in the game
against the Lady Eagles.
It was a scoreless first quarter
for the Lady Eagles, while
Hardee ran off eight points. The
lead widened to 20-5 by half-
time as Hardee emptied its
bench.
High scorer was eighth grade
point guard Lindsey, with Ma-
kayla Faulk adding eight points,
Destiny Thompson and Hon-'
esty Martinez each four, and
Tamara St. Fort, Alexis Santana
and Catherine "Cat" Jackson
each two points. Also playing
were Emily Albritton, Martha
Valadez, Florence Lee and
Marisela Ramos.
Against Avon Park at home
on Thursday night, it was a dif-


ferent game, a point-for-point
encounter with several ties and
lead changes. Hardee led 6-5
after the first six minutes, but
trailed 11-10 at halftime.
Both teams were aggressive
in the second half. Although
each had seven fouls in the first
half, in the second Hardee had
11 and Avon Park 14, as they
scrambled and ran into or
around each other. It was still
close at 18-16 at the end of the
third period, in Avon Park's
favor. The Lady Devils contin-
ued it was a basket in the first
15 seconds of the final period.
Ramos hit both ends of a one-
and-one and it was 20-18, Avon
Park answered back. By the
four-minute mark, it was 22-21.
Avon Park went on a full-court
press and outscored Hardee 11-
4 in the final minutes of the
game to win 33-25.
"I'm proud of our girls. They
tried hard. We missed 15 free
throws and lost by eight. It
could have been our game,"
said Solis. She named*Jackson
as player of the game. Avon
Park made only eight of 19 free
throws.
For Hardee, Lindsey had 10
points, St. Fort and Faulk six
apiece and Jackson three points.

BOYS
The junior high boys were
defeated handily twice last
week.
At Hill-Gustat, "Hardee did-
n't play consistently enough.
There were way too many
turnovers. We were pressed the
entire game," commented Head
Coach Rashad Faison, with
assistant Sean Brown nodding
agreement.
The Wildcats stayed with the


Golden Eagles in the feeling-
out first period and were down
5-4 after the first six minutes.
The Eagle press began to take
its toll and they took a 20-7 lead
into the locker room at halftime.
That increased to a final 42-18,
although they cleared the bench
and scored only five points in
the final period, when Hardee
had 11.
Jerry Browdy led Hardee
with eight points. Blaiaine
Molitor and Enrique Delarosa
each added three, Marco De-
Leon went two-for-two at the
charity stripe and Roberto
Torres and Diante Leslie each
added a free throw.
When Avon Park came to
Hardee on Thursday night, it
looked like a JV vs. a junior
high team. Several of the Red
Devils looked to be a lot more
than 14-year-olds and played
like it. Hardee was scoreless for
the first three minutes and hhd
but two points at the end of the
first period. By halftime, it was
32-7 and the final was 51-14.
Browdy and Molitor each had
four points for Hardee, with
Leslie, DeLeon and Calvin Mc-
Leod with two apiece. Other
junior Wildcats are Jordan
Jones, Jovan McCall, Ryan
Ramirez, Tyler Smith, Dustin
Smith, Torres and Jesse Fowler.
Encouraging them through-
out the games are cheerleaders
Dana Terrell, Milli Jones, Mea-
gan Shivers, Caryssa Johnson,
Katelyn Hines, Danielle Smith,
Mariah Edenfield, Rayna Parks,
Emily Bennett, Kayla Albritton,
Miranda Smith, Rosie Rivers,
Ally Dotson, Brooke Fones,
Savannah Aubry and Shelby
Dees.


For neither birth, nor wealth, nor honors, can awaken in the minds of men the princi-
ples which should guide those who from their youth aspire to an honorable and excel-
lent life, as Love awakens them.


WAUCHULA MOOSE LODGE
#1487 *773-3820
117 King Rd. Wauchula


NEW YEAR'S EVE

FRIDAY DECEMBER 31


8pm'



CARL "ELVIS"

with his entire Elvis Show

TICKETS

15 ~ SINGLE 25 ~ COUPLE
Purchase tickets from Carl or
at Moose Lodge Bar

AND -G S


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, December 16,2010


YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


'''''r : '~' .Ir
'' ..i~1:;
:. i
.?;
f~f.31i








2B The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010




-Hardee


STROLLING SUPPORT


Living


Winter Weather And Your Health


COURTESY PHOTO
A group of walkers at The Brookside Bluffs in Zolfo Springs participated in the first
annual Strolling 4 a Cure walk on Nov. 20, raising $1,000 for DeSoto Memorial Hospital
Foundation and Tidewell Hospice to assist cancer patients. The walkers, supported by
donations, covered one of two available paths. With the hospice check are (from left)
Walter Wengefeld, Janet Preston, Virginia Stephens, and Sue and Benny Boone

As the traveler who has once been from home is wiser than he who has never left his
own doorstep, so a knowledge of one other culture should sharpen our ability to scru-
tinize more steadily, to appreciate more lovingly, our own.
-Margaret Mead


Pe e acnto lnc


Save 50-75% on pet Vaccinations

Wednesday, December 22nd


J225

I \; -


Vision Ace Hardware


5 East Oak St., Wauchula 5:00 to 6:00 pm 773-3148
SDog & Cat Packs start at $45 With heartworm test $55
SKitten and puppy packs $36
Save money on your favorite Heartworm
and flea productfsuch as
Revolution, Heartguard, Comfortis & Frontline


Il
DI


SShop At Home At


S.Sho n ps On The Corner 4
S30 West Main Street Wauchula 775-++-60


IMon. Fri. 10:00 am 5:30 pm Saturday 9:00 am 1:00 pm

'I 11 SHOPS 4 SUPPLIERS
S Something for Everyone!
S Homemade Custom Made Personalization


Jewelry Ceramics Bath Soaps & Gels Wreaths
Handcrafted Gifts Antiques & Collectables Bibles
Garden Supplies Books Childrens Gifts & Toys'


II


Educational Resources
Free Gift Wrapping!
Closed Week After Christmas
Jan. 3 Christmas Inventory Sale


soc"


:Its

4Mjf?


12:16c


Now that the winter months
are upon us. it's important to
know the potential health prob-
lems facing people with cardio-
vascular disease, including
overexertion, hypothermia, the
flu and complications from
over-the-counter (OTC) med-
ications.
Many people aren't used to
the physical stress of outdoor
activities and don't know the
dangers of being outdoors in
cold weather. While anyone
who is outdoors in cold weather
should avoid sudden exertion
such as lifting a heavy shovel
full of snow, it's even more
important for people with car-
diovascular disease. Even walk-
ing through heavy, wet snow or
snowdrifts can strain a person's
heart.
Winter sports enthusiasts
who don't take precautions can
suffer from hypothermia. Hy-
pothermia occurs when your
body can't produce enough
energy to keep your internal
temperature warm enough, and
it falls below 95 degrees
Fahrenheit. It can kill you.


Talents 'are best nurtured
in solitude; character is
best formed in the stormy
billows of the world.
-Goethe
Earl Tupper, of Tupperware
fame, is believed to have
gotten the design for
Tupperware's liquidproof,
airtight lids by duplicating
the lid of a paint can.
The first umbrella factory
in the U.S. opened in
Baltimore, Md., in 1928.


Heart failure causes most
deaths among hypothermia vic-
tims. Symptoms include:
Lack of coordination
Mental confusion
Slowed reactions
Shivering
Sleepiness.
Cold-weather months usually
bring more cases of the flu,
which is more common among
people with cardiovascular dis-
ease than any other chronic
condition.
Heart patients are encouraged
to get vaccinated as soon as
possible. Even if they can't get
shots early in the flu season, it's
important to remember that flu
shots can be beneficial as late as
January. Flu season often lasts
well into March.
Many people use a deconges-
tant when fighting off a cold or
the flu. People with high blood
pressure should be aware that
decongestants may raise blood
pressure or interfere with the
effectiveness of prescribed
blood pressure medications.
Many over-the-counter cold
and flu preparations contain


decongestants such as:
Ephedrine
Levmetamfetamine
Naphazoline
Oxymetazoline
Phenylephrine
Phenylpropanolamine
Propylhexedrine
Pseudoephedrine
Synephrine
Tetrahydrozoline.
Always read the labels on all
OTC medications, especially if
you have blood pressure of
120/80 mm Hg or greater. If
you have high blood pressure-
and especially if you are on pre-
scription medication-consult
your health care professional
before taking any over-the-
counter medications or supple-
ments.
For more information about
cardiovascular disease and cold
weather, visit www.heart.org/
coldweather.For more informa-
tion on high blood pressure,
visit www.heart.org/hbp. Fol-
low the American Heart As-
sociation on Facebook (HB-
Pescapees) or Twitter
(@AMHeartHighBP).


The average American spends two years of his or her life
waiting for meals to be served.


Cat's on Main Twelve Days of Christmas Sale 30% Off
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday


117 East Main Street
773-6565 -


EXTENDED CHRISTMAS SHOPPING HOURS
OPEN HOUSE
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16 Friday. December 17
5pm to Spm
Refreshments & Christmas Samplings
by Layne Prescott


Ca-i On 9)/ln

Gifts Since 1970


773-6565
S c12:16,23c


;-t


WAUCHULA MOOSE LODGE
117 King Rd. Wauchula 773-3820


MONDAYS

6:00p.m.

WEDNESDAY

1:30p.m. b


Come & Enjoy


ltis


_earge 9/olidy special (






Traditional Or Chicken
LASAGNA
Includes Salad w/1 Dressing
Bread & Small Pan of Flan
$8500'tax
.J HOLIDAY HOURS
4,_ CLOSING AT 3PM
S^ .- 'S CHRISTMAS EVE
ling ". "& NEW YEARS EVE
bog * '


7 ILIL .,
M- erry Christinas ,
E" And A :'1
Happy New Year .
from all of us at /
"Gio vanni'S ./
\" -'. .". 4 I
',-.-. /
,.. J ."/ _
.. .. .. . ,r,'


12 Days of Christmas Swich
Saturday December 11- 24 Flops
13 14 15 16 17 18
Candles
Western Flags Christmas Woodwick Throws Tervis
Decorations Yankee Tumblers
20 21 22 23 24
Thynmes
Collegiate .Bath Willow Wilton Vera
Products Tree Armentale Bradley


117 East Main St. Wauchula (863)
www.catsonmain.com


CLOSED
CHRISTMAS DAY
& NEW YEARS DAJ
221 W. MAIN STREET

767-5300


';''a 9,
'1


1-416







December !5, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3B


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate...
75 YEARS AGO
'the Hardee board of county
commissioners went on record
Thursday as discontinuing the
delinquent tax adjustment board
after January 5, 1936, after
which no more applications for
adjustments will be accepted.
Patrons of the Wauchula post
office may be interested to
know that a letter dropped in
the local office before 9:30 a.m.
can be delivered in Washington
at 4:30 the next morning, in
New York City at 5:50 a.m. or
in Chicago at 6:05 a.m. This is
possible by using the air mail
and the special winter train
which will make its first trip
north on Saturday. Air mail
costs six cents an ounce. A spe-
cial 16-cent combination air
mail and special delivery stamp
is on sale at the local office.
Wallace Beery and Jackie


Cooper are united once more in
the Metro-Goodwyn-Mayer
picture "O'Shaughnessy's
Boy," coming Sunday and
Monday to the Royal Theatre
here. It is a dramatic interest
story of father love told against
the background of universal
appeal-the circus, with all its
pathos, humor and spectacles of
sure-fire animal thrills.
The "Rex," Wauchula's new-
est cafe, opened yesterday in
the Jones-Bailey Building on
West Main Street between R. H.
Herr's jewelry store and Pep-
per's grocery. The cafe has spa-
cious room to seat between 45
and 50 people without crowd-
ing and will employ three wait-
resses.
50 YEARS AGO
The city of Wauchula's water
customers are getting a New
Year's gift they won't appreci-
ate. Minimum water rates will
jump from two dollars to three
dollars on January 1. The addi-
tional dollar is earmarked for an
improvement fund for construc-
tion of new streets and exten-
sions of improvements of the


HAPPY HOLIDAYS
from all of us here at Bowling Green Country Club






Lisa Johnston, Debra Morris, Jill Klein
We Will Be Open
Christmas Day
With Our Normal Business Hours
Everyone Welcome! NO COVER, CHARGE!






Remember our Package Store
for all your Gift & Party Needs

BOWLtNG GMEEN ICOUNTfRY CLIUB,
245 Hwy 17 375-9988
No ONE UNDER THE AGE OF 21 MUST HAVE ID 0




Oa& Qkholie


C'aptist Chucch


S4Aduft Choi pResents


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SUNDAY December 19
11:00 a.m.

Directed by Mr. Duck.Smith

SNursery Provided


4350 CA. dAaiM St., qWauciuQa


soc12:16c


W .IV Th!


I have a

CONFESSION

to make...

I finally found a
workout I truly love.


water, sewer and electric distri-
bution systems.
The Wauchula city council
came within one vote of putting
e' subdivision ordinance on first
reading this week. but balked at
the last moment. The code was
proposed by the city planning
board nearly six months ago
and had been in the hands of the
council for months. The devel-
oper for a proposed subdivision
on Pecan Avenue said the delay
would hamper his plans.
Two of the county's three
elementary schools have been
hard hit by an epidemic of
mumps but think they are over
the crest now. In Zolfo Springs,
where more than half the stu-
dents in first grade were out at
one time last week, absenteeism
is now averaging 15 a day.
Bowling Gren is averaging 15
to 20 out a day. Wauchula
Elementary had not had a single
case of mumps this week but
has had a few outbreaks of
chickenpox. It's not just the
children who are ill; incoming
Superintendent of Schools has
been quite sick with the mumps.
He teaches at Zolfo Springs.
Eaton's Department Store
has followed its grand opening
with a one-stop Christmas sale,
slippers form $1.98 to $4.98,
crinolines from $3.98 to $5.98,
handbags for $1.98 to $3.98,
and chenille robes from $4.98
to $5.98.
25 YEARS AGO
The SSAT (Statewide Stu-
dent Assessment Test) scores
for 1985 show Hardee students
slightly below state averages.
Administered in October, the
state Department of Education
test has been administered to
third, fifth and eighth graders
since 1977. Third grade mathe-
matics and fifth grade writing
scores exceeded state levels.
In special session Wednes-
day morning, Hardee County
Commissioners delegated du-
ties and each commissioner
became liaison to one or more
departments. Gary Oden and
J.R. Prestridge are over the road
and bridge department and Earl
Tindell is over building and
grounds. The board approved
increases in salary during this
interim period, to be handled by
personnel director George
Collins.
Hardee legionnaires had sev-
eral issues during this month's


Class Schedule:
Monday/Tuesday/
Friday 4:00pm
Tuesday/
Thursday 5:30pm
Sat. 8:00am


Florida's First Assembly
of God Church
1397 S. Florida Ave.
Wauchula


For Information call
863-767-0613


pzzerci.e corn
(800)FlT-IS-l 1
1216c


WE WILL RE-OPEN ON


Wauchula Watch
By Ofc. Amy Drake
Wauchula Police Department


meeting. H.P. Burnett recounted
his World War II experiences to
35 members of Herger Williams
Post No. 2. Lawrence Roberts
reported a contract signed for
the design and construction of a
new Legion Hall. Wendell Tur-
ner reported progress on the
design and construction of a
veterans' memorial on the cor-
ner of U .S. 17 and Palmetto
Street. Curtis Ezelle reported on
participation in the county fair.
Property for sale in this
week's issue included: a 3 BR,
2B home in Relyea subdivision
with central air and heat and a
brick fireplace for $48,000; a 3
BR, 2 B CB home with fire-
place and extras, on SR 66, for
$47,500; a 2 BR, 1 B with
paved road frontage and numer-
ous fruit and shade trees for
$32,500; and a 3 BR, 1 B frame
house furnished, on two lots in
nice neighborhood in Bowling
Green for sale by owner for
$20,000.
10 YEARS AGO
The silent majority roared on
Tuesday as local voters chose to
allow full alcohol sales here. It
was a historic moment for
Hardee County. The county had
been "dry" since a 1947 elec-
tion, and a 1977 ballot failed to
change that. With 2,021 votes, a
58 percent showing, sales of
liquor, beer and wine were
approved. The initiative passed
by 542 votes.
The city of Wauchula was lit-
erally in the dark Saturday
night. From Riverview to the
high school, U.S. 17 North and
South, the city was blanketed in
black. Some got their power
back in three hours, for others it
took six as it took a Tampa
Electric Co. substation engineer
to find a way to bypass a failed
protective relay switch.
Grocery store ads this week
include boneless chicken breast
for $1.99 a pound, shank ham
portions for 99 cents a pound,
boneless bottom roast for $1.89
a pound, a three-pound bag of
onions for 99cents, lettuce for
89 cents a head, or red or gold-
en delicious apples for 59 cents
a pound.
If there is one thing worse
than being an ugly duck-
ling in a house of swans,
it's having the swans pre-
tend there's no difference.
-Teena Booth
Man is what he believes.
-Anton Chekhov


YVONNE ABBOTT
Licensed Massage Therapist
MA34261
1006 S. 9th Ave. Wauchula


SABRINA CRAWFORD
Cosmnetologist


773-4364


Male Chihuahua Family Pet
White with brown spots.

S Lost near James

& Boyd Cowart
an tIre Roads, Oak

Meadow Lane,

Red Cedar Lane.

767-9079
soc12:16p


NOTICE OF MEETINGS FOR 2011
The Hardee County Economic Development Council
will hold monthly meetings at 9:00 a.m. at 107 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FlI.
For more information call the Economic Development
office at 863/773-3030.
Schedule as follows:
Jan 11 Apr 12 July12 Oct 11
Feb 08 May 10 Aug 09 Nov 08
Mar 08 June 14 Sept 13 Dec 13
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled
person needing to make special arrangements should
contact the Economic Development office at least
forty-eight (48) hours prior to the meeting.
Joe Albritton, Chairman
Hardee County Economic Development Council
Hardee County, Florida
12:16c


2,


JANUARY


D&S CATTLE Co., INC.

LIVESTOCK DEALER

All of us at D&S would like to wish everyone a

Merry Christmas
and to all our customers, a Prosperous New\' Year!

Hwy. 66 East, Zolfo Springs 735-1112
*^ ^ ^ ^l. .. . .. ., ,,,i; .^ ^ .... ^...;^ < , -.. ... ; 5, :" ;d .? --.';' 2., :- ;* *,, . ,


2011

3, 2011.


I - Ir.


WE WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE HOLIDAYS FROM

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2010


UNTIL SUNDAY, JANUARY


7S5-0M21


Yes, believe it or not. Christmas is only a week away. With
that in mind I would like to take the time once again to remind
everyone about taking a few extra steps to stay safe this holiday
season. Safety at home and out in public begins with you.
Criminals take advantage of the holiday season to prey on those
who are generous and unsuspecting.
While at home:
Be careful when someone you do not know comes to your
door..
Be cautious of charities that contact you over the phone.
Be extra cautious about locking doors and windows when
you leave the house, even for a few minutes.
Don't leave the drapes open with your presents in plain
view.
While out shopping:
Use the trunk of your car to keep your packages out of
sight.
Keep your car locked at all times.
Don't "flash" large amounts of money in public (you never
know who's watching)
Do not overburden yourself with too many packages.
Be aware of your surroundings in parking lots.
After Christmas:
While it may be tempting to place the boxes from Christmas
in front of your residence, we would recommend that you place
everything in bags. Large boxes should be broken down and then
placed in bags. Think about even waiting until the evening before
your regular garbage pick-up to place items outside.
The Wauchula Police Department would like to wish everyone
a safe and Happy Holiday. We look forward to a new year and a
safer community with the support of the citizens of Wauchula.
Report any activity that seems suspicious. If something you see or
hear seems suspicious, or makes your feel uncomfortable-it's
probably because it should. Look out for you and your neighbors
and report all suspicious activity immediately. If you wait until
later to make a report you may be giving the criminals a chance to
get away.


,e4
-'s
Full Service Salon MM25865




FiL PDUB MAIUE


i:

11








4B The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


When it comes to Alzheimer's
disease, one of the first steps
toward early detection and bet-
ter care is awareness. The Alz-
heimer's Association recently
found that the Latino communi-
ty, a group that is one and 11/2
4imes more likely to have the
disease than non-Hispanic
whites, lacks that critical aware-
ness.
In a survey funded by
MetLife Foundation, as many
as 64 percent of Hispanic
respondents agreed their com-
munity is not sufficiently aware
of the condition. While more
than 90 percent knew Alz-
heimer's is a progressive brain
disease that causes memory
loss, problems with thinking
and behavior, only half knew it
is fatal.
Fortunately, the findings also
showed a desire to learn more.
In response, the Alzheimer's


Association created a Spanish-
language educational workshop
to help people with the disease
and their families explore the
warning signs of Alzheimer's.
The workshop's goal is to
raise awareness of Alzheimer's
within the Hispanic community
and provide much-needed in-
formation to families struggling
to recognize the disease.
"Alzheimer's disease is not
normal aging. It is a complex
brain disease that impacts much
more than memory," said Janis
Robinson, Director of Diversity
and Strategic Collaborations at
the Alzheimer's Association.
"Knowing the warning signs of
Alzheimer's is critical to early
detection and receiving the best
care possible." The workshop,
entitled "Know the 10 Signs,"
discusses the following 10
Warnings Signs ofAlzheimer's:
1. Memory loss that disrupts
daily life.


2. Challenges in planning or
solving problems.
3. Difficulty completing fa-
miliar tasks at home. at work or
at leisure.
4. Confusion with time or
place.
5. Trouble understanding
visual images and spatial rela-
tionships.
6. New'problems with words
in speaking or writing.
7. Misplacing things and los-
ing the ability-to retrace steps.
8. Decreased or poor judg-
ment.
9. Withdrawal from work or
social activities.
10. Mood and personality
changes.
LEARN MORE
For more information on the
10 Warning Signs of Alz-
heimer's or to find a local
Alzheimer's Association chap-
ter, visit www. alz.org/espanol.


Hispanic Perceptions

Of Alzheimer's


Hunters May Be

To Report Harvest


Deer ]

Required
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission has
directed its staff to advertise
new rule proposals requiring all
hunters to tag harvested white-
tailed deer and report the har-
vest to the FWC.
Tagging and reporting game
harvests is commonly done in
many states, and FWC staff
reviewed several other states'
harvest-reporting systems to see
what might work well in
Florida.
The FWC, along with its
stakeholders, continues to craft
a system where hunters would
report their harvested deer, to
better track where and how
many deer are harvested in
Florida.
FWC staff presented a draft


The essence of philosophy is that a man should live that
as little as possible on external things.


"We want to make this sys-
tem as friendly as possible for
Florida's hunters," said Cory
Morea. FWC biologist and deer
management program coordina-
tor. "We need the data to give
Florida hunters what many of
them have asked for-that is
better management of the
state's deer herd, and at a more
local level. This will give us
one of the tools to enable us to
do that."
The new rules could become
effective July 1, 2011, and
apply to the 2011-12 hunting
season.
For more detailed informa-
tion on the proposed harvest-
reporting system, ,go to
MyFWC.com/Deer.


his happiness shall depend


FWC May Change

Hunt-Season Dates


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission is
proposing new rules that would
modify hunting season dates on
many FWC-managed areas.
The new rules could be ap-
proved for final adoption at the
February 2011 commission
meeting.
During the past year, the
FWC and its partners and coop-
erating agency landowners have
worked with stakeholders in
developing proposals to change
season dates for these public
hunting lands. These lands
include wildlife management
areas, wildlife and environmen-
tal areas and miscellaneous
areas.
Making these adjustments
would align these areas more
closely with the newly adopted
hunting zone season dates,
which took effect this year.
"With the new changes to
hunting season dates this year
on private lands, we-and our
hunting stakeholders-feel that
season dates need to be modi-
fied on several of-our areas to
correspond better with the new
zonal seasons and the timing of
deer breeding," said Diane
Eggeman, director of the




Citrus

Forecast

Lowered
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture released its De-
cember citrus forecast last
Friday, estimating Florida will
produce 143 million boxes of
oranges in 2010-11, down three
million boxes from the initial
October estimate.
The cold temperatures last
week, which didn't cause any
material damage to the crop,
had nothing to do with the
,decrease.
"This decrease isn't unex-
pected, as we've been hearing
reports of smaller fruit over the
past couple of weeks," said
Michael W. Sparks of Florida


FWC's Division of Hunting &
Game Management.
The FWC held nine public
meetings across the state and
gathered input and. feedback on
the subject through an online
poll. Proposed changes take
into consideration when deer
breed on each area and other
hunter preferences, such as
hunting during holidays, and
the desires of other area users.
"We want to make things as
good as we can for public-land
hunters," said Cory Morea,
FWC'biologist and deer man-
agement program coordinator.
"Adjusting some of these dates
to make the seasons occur clos-
er to peak deer activity or dur-
ing holidays should increase
hunter satisfaction.
"But, at the same time, we
don't want to fix something that
isn't broken," Morea said.
"Hunters have told us that on
some of our areas the seasons
are timed just right, so we aren't
recommending any changes to
those areas."
If.,appromed at the February
commission meeting, these
rules would become .effective
July 1, 2011, and apply to the
2011-12 hunting season.



Citrus Mutual. "It looks like the
crop isn't going to be as big as
initially thought."
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
It predicts Florida will har-
vest 19.6 million boxes of
grapefruit, down slightly from
the initial 20 million boxes esti-
mate.
The forecast for early and
midseason varieties in Florida
was reduced one million boxes
to 68 million boxes, and valen-
cias are were reduced two mil-
lion to 75 million boxes.
For Florida specialty fruit,
the USDA predicts 1.1 million
boxes of tangelos and 4.4 mil-
lion boxes of tangerines. The
yield for from concentrate
orange juice (FCOJ) is expected
to be 1.61.gallons per 90-pound
box.


HEAD MOBILE HOME SALES, INC.
Drive A Little Save A Lot!
The Lowest Prices
2 miles South of Arcadia on Highway 17
1-800-328-1154


Hardee Help Center



Thrift Store




GRAND RE-OPENING

226 W. Main Street, Wauchula 773-0550

(Across from Giovanni's)



Friday, December 17


9:30 am


-5:30 pm


Hardee County's Original Thrift Store!

Serving Our Community For Over 10 Years


(All Proceeds Benefit Hardee County Residents )


Outreach of the Hardee County Ministerial Association

Hours: Monday Friday 9:30 5:30 Saturday 10 2
socl2:16c


proposal at five public meetings
Across the state and gathered
input and feedback through an
online poll.
The proposed harvest-report-
ing system would utilize a 24-
hour, seven-days-a-week tele-
phone and Internet system, and
tags to attach to harvested deer.
Some of the information
hunters would have to report
includes their customer number,
date of harvest, county, method
of take, hunting with or without
dogs, type of deer (antlered
buck, button buck or doe) and
number of antler points on
bucks. All compiled statewide
harvest data would be available
to the public online and updated
daily, but would not include
hunters' personal information.


NOTICE
The City of Wauchula will be accepting sealed bids on the
purchase of the vacant residential lot (R-2 zoning)
located at 513 N. 8th Avenue, legally described as fol-
lows:

Lots 19 and 20, Highland Place, a re-subdivision of Block
17 of Packer's Addition to the City of Wauchula, Florida,
according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page(s) 2-121, now known as Plat Book Bar A-40,
Public Records of Hardee County, Florida.
A minimum bid of $6,200 has been set. Bids should be
placed in a sealed envelope and marked with "513 N. 8th
Avenue Bid" on the outside. Sealed bids will be accepted
at 126 S. 7th Avenue, Attn: Holly Collins, City Clerk,
Wauchula, FL 33873 until 4:00 PM local time on Thursday,
January 6, 2011. All bids will be publicly opened, read
aloud and recorded at that time. 12:16-30c











Week ending December 12, 2010
WEATHER SUMMARY
Weather Summary: Drought and freezing temperatures
materialized within the past week. According to the U.S. drought
monitor as of December 7, 2010, drought conditions were present
in all parts of the State and extreme compared to the moisture con-
ditions the year prior. Dry conditions were most severe in the
northeast. Precipitation was light and less than half an inch in any
region. Temperatures were 12 to 14 degrees below normal with
highs in the 60s and 70s and lows in the 20s and 30s.
Field Crops: The majority of field crops were finished for the
season, thus unaffected by the cold weather. The effect of low tem-
peratures on sugarcane was still being assessed. In the Panhandle,
some wheat and oats were being planted. Cotton harvest is nearly
complete.
Vegetables: Highway truck restrictions were eased to allow
vulnerable crops to be transported quickly to processors. Farmers
were protecting crops from frost. Cold weather reduced strawberry
harvesting. In Okeechobee and St. Lucie counties, tomatoes and
bell peppers appear to have incurred freeze damage. In Palm Beach
County, green beans, sweet corn, and leafy vegetables sustained
variable damage. In Miami-Dade County, farmers were busy har-
vesting squash and boniatos and planting winter vegetables. Light
harvesting of celery and cabbage will begin within the next few
weeks. The season for okra and avocados was drawing to a close.
Market movement consisted of sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant,
endive, escarole, okra, bell peppers, radishes, squash, tomatoes,
strawberries, and avocados.
Livestock and Pastures: The pasture condition decreased this
past week throughout the State due to freezing temperatures and
continued drought. Most pasture in the Panhandle and northern
areas was in poor condition due to cold and freezing temperatures.
Freezing weather has stopped winter forage from growing. Small
grains for forage were being planted. Some grazing was started on
small grain forage. The cattle condition ranged from very poor to
excellent with most in fair condition. More cattlemen were feeding
hay and supplements. In the central areas, pasture condition ranged
from very poor to good with most in poor to fair condition. Heavy
frost and temperatures as low as 22 degrees, greatly decreased pas-
ture condition. Winter small grain forage did not meet expectations
due to limited rain. The condition of most of the cattle was fair to
good. In the southwestern areas, pasture condition ranged from
very poor to good with most in poor condition. Heavy frost De-
cember 6 and 7 damaged pasture grasses that were already stressed
from lack of rainfall. More cattle were being fed hay and molasses.
The cattle condition ranged from poor to goodwith most in good
condition. Statewide, the condition of the cattle was very poor to
excellent with most in good condition.
Citrus: Highs were in the 60s and 70s, with early morning
lows in the upper 20s and lower 30s the first few days of the week,
rising to the 40s and 50s in the latter portion. Twenty-four of the 25
stations recorded some precipitation. The stations reporting the
most precipitation were Palmdale and Clewiston, each reporting
0.25 inch of recorded rainfall. Overall, there were moderate
drought conditions in most of the citrus area according to the U.S.
drought monitor, last updated on December 7. Indian River,
Brevard, and St Lucie counties are experiencing extreme drought
'conditions, while surrounding counties are experiencing severe
conditions. Moderate to extreme drought conditions extend over
most of the citrus area. Forty-four packinghouses and 14 proces-
sors have opened, with a few more scheduled to open. Cultural
practices included application of lime and irrigation.


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


DECEMBER'S TRADITIONS
INCLUDE HOLIDAY HUNTING
There's finally a chill and a certain festiveness in the air as
most of us try to take time off from work to enjoy spending quali-
ty time with family and friends and reflect on the passing year.
Children will be out of school on winter break soon, and while the
holiday season is upon us, so are several traditional hunting oppor-
tunities.
The second phase of waterfowl and coot season comes in
statewide Dec. 11 and runs through Jan. 30. In addition to the usual
hunting license and permit requirements, duck hunters also must
have a Florida waterfowl permit ($5) and a federal duck stamp
($15).
The daily bag limit on ducks is six, but you need to know your
ducks before you pull the trigger, because there are different daily
limits for each species. For instance, within the six-bird limit there
may be only one black duck, one mottled duck, one fulvous
whistling-duck and one canvasback.
Only two of your six-bird limit may be pintails, redheads or
scaup, and three may be wood ducks. And you may have no more
than four scoters and four mallards (of which only two may be
female) in your bag. All other species of ducks can be taken up to
the six-bird limit, except harlequin ducks.
The daily limit on coots is 15, and, there's a five-bird limit on
mergansers, only two of which may be hooded.
When hunting waterfowl, hunters may use only non-toxic
shotgun shells. In fact, it's illegal.for hunters even to possess lead
shot when waterfowl hunting. Only iron (steel), bismuth-tin and
various tungsten-alloys are permissible.
For something different, try woodcock. hunting. Woodcock
season runs Dec. 18-Jan. 16. Woodcocks are excellent game birds
because they hold well for pointing bird dogs and provide a chal-
lenging shot when flushed. The daily bag limit is three.
The third phase of mourning and white-winged dove season
opens Dec. 11 and runs through Jan. 9. The daily bag limit is 15
birds.
From November on, shooting hours for all migratory birds are
one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. You must get a no-cost
migratory bird permit where you purchase your hunting license
before you hunt any of these birds, though.
The only firearm you can use to hunt migratory game birds is
a shotgun, no larger than 10-gauge. Shotguns must be plugged to a
three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber combined). Bows also
are legal.
Retrievers and bird dogs can be useful in hunting migratory
game birds. Artificial decoys, as well as manual or mouth-operated
bird calls, also are legal and essential gear for duck hunters.
You may hunt migratory game birds over an agricultural field,
as long as the crop's been planted by regular agricultural methods.
However, don't even think about "sweetening" the field by scatter-
ing agricultural products over it-or anywhere near it-or you
could wind up in serious trouble. It doesn't matter if you aren't the
one who scattered the bait. If you knew 'or should've known that
such bait was present, you're accountable under federal law.
Some other things you can't do while hunting migratory game
birds include using rifles, pistols, crossbows, traps, snares, nets,
sinkboxes, swivel guns, punt guns, battery guns, machine guns,
fish hooks, poisons, drugs, explosive substances, live decoys and
recorded bird calls, sounds or electrically amplified bird-call imita-
tions. It is also against the law to shoot from a moving automobile
or boat and herd or drive birds with vehicles or vessels.


December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5B
Bobcat and otter hunting season is Dec. 1-March 1, and there's
no daily bag or season limit on either species.
Like foxes, bobcats may be chased year-round with dogs, but
possessing firearms during the closed season, between March 2 and
Nov. 30, is prohibited. On a few wildlife management areas, bob-
cats and otters may not be taken, so please consult the specific area
brochure before you hunt.
Whether upland bird hunting with friends and family, shooting
ducks on the pond with your favorite lab or taking that big bobcat
as he slips up behind an unsuspecting fawn, December has the
hunting opportunities you're looking for.
Here's wishing you happy holidays and a successful hunting
season. If you can, remember to introduce someone new to our
great sport. As always, have fun, hunt safely and ethically, and
we'll see you in the woods!

NOTICE OF MEETINGS FOR 2011
The Hardee County Industrial Development Authority
will hold monthly meetings at 10:00 a.m. at 107 East
Main Street, Wauchula, Fl.
For more information call the Economic Development
office at 863/773-3030.
Schedule as follows:
Jan 11 Apr 12 July 12 Oct 11
Feb 08 May 10 Aug 09 Nov 08
Mar 08 June 14 Sept 13 Dec 13
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled
person needing to make special arrangements should
contact the Economic Development office at least
forty-eight (48) hours prior to the meeting.
Marcus Shackelford, Chairman
Hardee County Industrial Development Authority
Hardee County, Florida
12:16c


NOTICE OF MEETING
The Hardee County Economic Development Authority
(Independent Board) will meet on Tuesday. December
21, 2010. at 9:00 a.m. in the County Commission
Chambers, 412 West Orange Street, Room 102,
Wauchula, Florida.
For more information call the County Manager's office
at 863/773-9430.
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
County Commissioner's office at least forty-eight (48)
hours prior to the public meeting.
This notice is published in compliance with Florida
Statutes 286.0105.
Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and
be heard. If a person decides to appeal any decision made
by the members, with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the pro-
ceedings, and that, for such purpose, he may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Lexton H. Albritton, Jr. County Manager 12:16c


e. r .. .
.* **,.-- *i: '


*FEB WELLS
MOTOR COMPANY
Since 1931
STTYITTT <*5 -h' u0 -, DX-TUrOMV\Qf I A DTTN


2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
Retail................25,835
Rebate............ -. 1,750
Van Bonus ......... -.750
Wells Bonus.... -51,750
Chrysler Group or
Van Owner Bonus -11,000
00/0 FO


2010 JEE
WRANGLER UNLII


p 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN-N-COUNTRY
MITED X Retail..............37,27
Rebate........... -.2,00
Van Bonus......... -$75
$26,555 Wells Bonus.... -$2,00
Wells Bonus..-51,381 Chrysler Group or
Big Finish......... -500 Van.,wner Bonus -$2,00

*24,674 CXl0


NEW 2010 DI
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Rebate ......... -2,000
Wells Bonus.....-.781 '- .
Big Finish......... -500

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IBER


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Wells Bonus.....-.896
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*2199


NEW 2010 DI
JOURNEY


DODGE



$26,080
Rebate.......... -2,500
Wells Bohus.....-581
Big Finish......... -500

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NEW 2010 J
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IEEP NEW 2010 CHRYSLER -
; SEBRING TOURING

$23,635 22,885
Rebate.......... -2,000 Rebate.......... -2,500
Wells Bonus..-$1,136 Wells Bonus.....-886
Big Finish......... -.500 Big Finish.........-s500

CX139


NO DEALER FEE, PLUS TAX & TAG, STATE FEE, O% with ALLY, SEBC RULES APPLY. 12/31/10
Swww.WellsMC.com c: H-r YS-=L R
"W" A WELLS Je, -p

o C), E= i MOTOR COMPA Jeep
US 27 between Avon Park and Sebring
AVON PARK & SEBRING 453-6644 LAKE PLACID & OTHER CITIES TOLL FREE 1-888-453-6644 12:16c
12 16


I_ _ __ _


I _


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:I:::_: ::::


i


__


- -- -







6B The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010





-The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720
61J


I s.gugle(gualescomouterservices.com wwwGualesComputerServices.com

********************A
* EnA A, ',,I,[aI L

* GOLF CART BATTERY INSTALLATION SPECIAL
.Q$549 0 Complete Set (6) of Batteries
Sw/Installation, Pick Up & Delivery Included
COMPETITIVE PRICING!


F FAST Er FRIENDLY SERVICE
S22 Years of Experience Locally Owned & Operated
S773-4400 E m
829 Bostick Rd. Bowling Green
t Road Runs beside Tornly Oak Golf Course c112:16c



THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through December 31"s
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)
Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
S(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider cl12:2-30










Hardee

Car Company

Christmas Party
Thursday. December 23
3:00 p.m.
(The hlt ajcr:os ircm First Nalnonal Bankl
All Customers Welcome
2 Weeks Left to Make E\ira Pa. ments
More Pai ments More Tickets for Dra\w ing


SMonday Thursday
10 am to 7 pm



Maria
Wauchula
(acro :-
First Nanc "',
1 773-6667


Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7:30 pm



Ruby
Wauchula Hills
Billy Hill Corne of
Owner Hwy 1
and REA Rd
773-2011


Classifieds


7 g

NOW PAYING CASH for fruit.
Barajas Fruit, Inc. 863-773-0345,
863-781-9318. 12:16;1:6p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
9:16-12:23p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


2005 CHEVY SILVERADO 4 x 4 1
Ton, Dura Max Diesel, 12' Flat Bed
w/storage boxes underneath.
Fully serviced every 3,000 miles.
Very good condition. 863-245-
8911. 12:16;1:13p
04 EXT. CAB RANGER. $5,000
OBO. 781-1062. 12:16c
98 EXT. CAB DODGE $2,200 cash.
781-1062. 12:16c


1984 BRONCO, mud ready. $800.
781-4278. 12:16,23p


2001 YAMAHA 650cc
Classic. 1,507 actual
$2,500.727-439-1644.


V-Star
miles.
12:16nc


2004 BIG DOG, show bike. Many
extras, chameleon paint. This
bike turns heads. $15,000. 375-
2624. 12:9-1:6p
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
cars. Pickup, available. Crooms
Salvage. 781-3767. 2:7tfc


FORMER OWNER TIGER WOODS
PGA golfer, 1998 20.5 ft. Nitro
Fish N Ski Boat. New carpet,
upholstery and button down
Sunbrella cover. New boards and
carpet on trailer. Needs engine
work on 150hp Mercury. Asking
$6,000 OBO. Call David 352-250-
9419. 12:9-16dh


L
Deoofo Appliance

Established Since 1987 R epair
SALES SERVICE


* 863-773-3573
Fax 863-773-0521 108 Ca
desotoapppliance@earthlink.net WauchulE


arlton Street
a, FL 33873,


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773-4478




SFree Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience 2





New Tires Include1
Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires

BIG SALE ON

ALL TIRES.
773-0777 773-0727 /'
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
S1VISA (across from Billy Ayers
SWal-Mart) Tire Technician12
C11 2:161


VENTURE CRICKET model, 15'
trolling motor, live well, depth
finder, seats 4, with trailer, new
tires, recent engine overhaul, 45
hp, excellent condition. $1,795.
904-222-4607. Capt. Ed.12:16,23c


ANTIQUE BED, dresser, church
pew, china cabinet, cedar chest.
832-1909. 12i2p-30p


WRIGHT'S ASSISTED Living
Home. Must pass level 2 back-
ground screening AHFC. 863-
773-0166, 863-781-0982 Wauc.
12:16p
PT, 2 HRS./DAY, 5 days/week, pre-
fer couple, consider single, light
commercial janitorial works, 407-
844-7403. 11:25;12:23p


4/2 WAUCHULA City Limits.
Financing available for qualified
buyers. 877-330-8727 Jason.
12:16;1:13p
SALE OR RENT-3 BR House. Call
781-1062. 12:9c


3/2 IN ZOLFO, 2.2 acres with 2 car
garage. Financing available for
qualified buyers. 877-330-8727
Jason. 12:16p


3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. Make Offer.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p
W-.


St, i ,,w.,^ e- ,, ,.. *- .













SJoe L. Davi

SI N C., R E A L T 0 RS
V.

Q zInqit es you to stop by to help us
S*. --:


celebrate 50 years of servini


2 central FIoridas real estate needs.








,- .. ,- -^ -a '... .
C1129,16
Z~i~L~~ ~ IaN19


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600 i


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental rates beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
S Monday Friday *
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
IpMrH 1 Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider cl 2:2-30c


I


I- -


ZZ4k


I IN HOME^B


01







1 December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


1999 COMMERCIAL HORSE trail-
er.all 863-245-9582. 12:2;1:20p



470 NITRO EXPRESS, double bar-
rel, single or double ejection, cus-
tom made by hand, Hambrusch
Austria, for big game (elephants,
rhinos, lions, etc.). Retail $25,000
- $50,000, sell $22,000 firm! Call
863-990-6489. 12:16c
18 1/2 x 18 1/2 x 25 Small refrig-
erator, new, paid $100, sell for
$50; deh/jmldifier, new, paid $178,
sell for $75. 904-222-4607. 12:2c
BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
send scrap gold in the mail. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
11:4-12:2p
BICYCLE FOR SALE. Huffy
Cruiser 26". Brand New. $50. 773-
9183. 12:16p
SADDLE FOR SALE-HDR 14"
English Riding saddle. Premium
condition. Asking $400. Call
David 352-250-9419. 12:9,16dh
3-

CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES $200 863-
233-0151 or 863-245-9096. 12:16p


HELP WANTED
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR:
$21,293.66($10.24/hrly) $29,353.55 ($14.11/hrly)
Wanted for the Hardee County Road & Bridge
Department. Knowledge of the general practices applied
in the care and operation of a wide variety of light and
heavy construction and maintenance equipment. Ability to
perform preventative maintenance on related equipment.
Must have a High School Diploma or GED.
A valid Florida Class B CDL is required.
Complete job description and Application forms posted
on County web site: www.hardeecounty.net. Please sub-
mit Applications to the Human Resources Department,
205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL 33873. Phone:
(863)773-2161. Position closes December 23, 2010 at
5:00 p.m. EOE-F\M\V c112:16c



HELP WANTED
MAINTENANCE WORKER II
$20,401.79 ($9.81/hr.) $28,124.09 ($13.52/hr.)
Wanted for the Hardee County Road & Bridge
Department. Applicants must have some knowledge of
the general maintenance trades. Ability to perform heavy
manual labor.
Must have a High School Diploma or GED.
A Valid Florida Class "B" CDL is required.
Complete job description and Application forms posted
on County website: www.hardeecounty.net. Please submit
Applications to the Human Resources Department, 205
Hanchey Road. Wauchula, FL 33873. Phone: (863) 773-
2161.
Position closes December 23, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. EOE-
F\M\V. c112:16c



FOREST GLADE/RIVER CHASE APARTMENTS
Now Accepting Applications for a one
Bedroom, Handicap Accessable Apartment
Located at River Chase Apartments 316
River Chase Circle, Wauchula
This unit has central heat/air conditioning,
refrigerator, stove, wheel chair accessibility.
Rental assistance available for all who qualify.
Please come by the rental office at 700 East
Townsend Street in Wauchula for application.
Office hours are 9-5 Monday thru Friday and
you can reach us at (863)773-0592. TDD 711.

In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of
Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from
discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin,
sex, age or disability. To file a complaint, write USDA,
Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Ave., SW,
Washington DC 20250-9410, or call 800-795-3272 (voice) =
or 202-720-6382 (TDD).
This institution is an equal opportunity Employer and Provider.


.Topsy See
REAL ESTATE
773-5994
Topsy See
3BR 2 Bath DW. All appliances, window treatments, ceiling fans
.included. Very nice home in excellent condition. Sets on 5.2 ac.
$120 REDUCED $127,500.
Beautiful secluded property in Golf View. 8.8 ac with 2 building sites.
$75,000
3 BR 2 Bath 1987 DW 1890 sq. ft. all the extras including security
system. 5 acres with beautiful oaks and stocked pond. $115.000.
1 ac. high & dry. Approx. 269 ft. road frontage-deed restricted.
$29,900.
Very nice 1980 M.H. 1982 sq. ft., fully furnished, move in ready,
includes linens, dishes, cookware, TV, most anything you will need.
This is a great buy at $4I8^O. REDUCED $42,000.
Hwy 17 frontage-1BR 1 Bath home sits on 50 x 152 lot in Bowling
Green. $84,500.
3BR 2B 2005 DW Mobile Home Very Modern all appliances
set on 5.4 acres all fenced w/pond $130,000.
c112:16c


1 A.
W^W^^^^^^*^ SA - Sw -


1. Produ


Rentals I


STRAWBERRIES-U-PICK-Why 1B/1B STUDIO APT. $450 month-
pay $4.99/pound (quart) in the ly, $450 deposit. Very nice, quiet
grocery store when you can pick neighborhood, close to down-
your own fresh berries for town Wauchula. References and
$1.00/lb (quart). Available now background check a must. Please.
2949 Center Hill Road. Off SR 62, call 863-781-3296. 12:16;1:13p
4.5 miles west of US 17. Open THREE BEDROOM HOUSE,
every day 7-6. 863-223-5561. Wauchula. No pets. $800 plus
U2bLg.r I ~ I ..aL


Rentl


CKC MINI DACHSHUND Dapple
10 wks. Last one Available.
Health Certificate and shots.
Male. Asking $450. 863-773-3808.
12:16p
5 DOGS that need good homes
$15 for Rabie shots. Call 773-
9215 or stop by All Creatures
Animal Hospital. 12:16c
AFRICAN GREY PARROTS. For
details call 735-2472. 12:9;1:6p
FREE CHIHUAHUA needed for a
mentally challenged young lady-
who lost her pet. 773-6414.
12:9dhr
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you.
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-'
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please;
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites.' tfc-dh


A man cannot be said to
succeed in this life who
does not satisfy one friend.
-Henry David Thoreau


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300-
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo-up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol (863) 698-4910
or 698-4908. 8:20tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair.
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation-
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


WRIGHT'S ASSISTED Living
Home has 4 beds spaces avail-
able. 863-773-0166, 863-781-0982
Wauchula. 12:16p
60 LOADS FILL DIRT. Has some
grass, digging more ponds. You
dig ponds, you keep dirt. 863-
990-6489. 12:16,23c


Troee Trimming Ptump Grinding
Complete Troe Removal Land Clearing
Bobcat services
Ca
*FREE ESTIMATES*

(863) 781-2089 .ur
Licensed Insured


ROBBY & SHERRY ABRITTON
LABOR SERVICES 8 SOLUTIONS






(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
robbie @strato.net
0S6


Yard SaIe


HANNAH HELPERS -
Supports Hannah House
DECEMBER 8TH -17TH
9:00am-5:00pm

Ill N. 7th Ave Wauchula




Drawing on December 17th at 5pm for '
Decorated Christmas Tree ,l 9 ,i :
II


EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.comn
1-941-778-7980/7565 5


A Safe Place

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119

End The Abuse!
tfc-dh

Sft



Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 ajd get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
additions, screen rooms, car- lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo- in Hardee County at 781-6414.
sures, rescreening, decks, con- Several weekly meetings.
create. Harold Howze dh
Construction. 781-2708. **
RR0050181. 12:16;2:18p kNEED A WELL OR HAVE DPUMP


B SEE SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com. ,
12:16;1:14p
NEED HELP WITH honey do list?
Experienced helper, good refer-
ences. Christmas lights, carpen- -
try, yard work. 863-245-1191.
12:2-30p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders Is the facilitatory.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc


DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-.
chula. 12:6tfcdh;


TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


LOOKING FOR AGRICULTURE
acreage. 786-399-5820. 12:2-30p


EVERY MONDAY-SATURDAY.
Generator, new refrigerator,
Polaris 4-wheeler, marble tables,
etc. 1104 N. Hollandtown Rd.
11:18-12:30p


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873


(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


Jessie Sambrano


Special Of The Week


Large 5BR home with 1.7 acres in Bowling Green.
Chain link fence around entire property.
Over 2,600 sqft of outside storage. $69,000.00
3BR 2BA CB home in Knollwood Excellent location .- Central
air/heat Garage $169,000.00
Inexpensive living close to golf course Quiet neighborhood -
3BR 2BA 2005 Mobile Home outside storage. Look Today
$69,900.00
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! J
After Hours ,,-"
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
NoeyA.Flores (863)781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863)245-6891
c112:16c


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com


y James V. See, Jr., Broker
NEW LISTING! 320 acres in Eastern Hardee
County. 57 acres in mixed grove with the
remainder in pasture. Includes 12' well with
diesel power unit, irrigation & microjets. Pasture
has metal cow pens. Asking $1,200,000
REDUCED! 3 Commercial lots in Wauchula!
Just 1 block from Hwy 17. Fenced and ready for
your business! Owner says...MAKE AN OFFER!
Asking $85,000
40 acres of prime development property.
Adjacent to the new Hilltop school. Zoned
Commercial. Call for details!
5 acres Completely fenced and in the country!
Perfect building site. Priced to sell at $35,000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath block home on 2+ acres. Close
to town. Asking $169,500.
HUGE Price Reduction! 15 acres located West
of Wauchula on Vandolah Rd. Beautiful building
sites with small creek meandering across proper-
ty & it's across from the Wauchula Airport
entrance. $150,000
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood. Won't
last long at $220,000!
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors under carpet in bedrooms.
Central air/heat. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000


Ben Gibson
S Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


James V. See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Robert Jones


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


RI
c112 16c


3BR HOUSES & Apt. for rent. 773-
6667. 12:16c
NICE FURNISHED EFFICIENCY
apartment, utilities included. $125
per week, damage deposit and
references required. 773-9793 or
863-832-0676. 12:16p
MH 3 BR/2BA Wauchula, good
neighborhood, no smoking, no
pets. $600 month, $500 deposit.
781-3570. 12:9,16c
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT $500
plus $400 deposit. No pets. 832-
1984. 12:9;1:6p
NICE ONE BEDROOM duplex
apartment with a washer and
dryer. $110 per week, damage
deposit and references required.
773-9793 or 863-832-0676. 12:16p
TOWNHOUSES, immaculate con-
dition, 1400 sq. ft. 2 BR, 2 1/2 B,
$650 month. 773-2122. 11:11tfc
1 BEDROOM 1 BATH very clean,
references, no smoking, no pets.
$500, $550 security. 863-773-
9291. 10:28tfc


DESOTO COUNTY


5 a Tact, n -Pve
d,$9 I0


3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great place for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72,500
Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000
45 ac citrus grove. Valencias & Hamlin. Double
wide mobile home. Fruit proceeds included (sub-
ject to FOM contract). Located in NE Hardee
County. $427,500
REDUCED! Spacious home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. $379,000
58 acres close to town. Great property-with tons
of potential! $464,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath home. Double French doors
open up to the huge porch and pool area.
Conveniently located in a charming neighbor-
hood right in town. $178,900.


Services1


F S e rv ic es^__^^^^^^^^^^^
i --:1


deposit 832-1984. 12: 0


I I -


I Z~i6


For your spot ca^


I;


^
;

I






8B The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010





-The


-. I


SATURDAY, 7-2, 2997 George
Anderson Road, Wauchula.
Children's clothing, toys, house-
hold items, adult clothing. Lots of
other stuff.- -12:16p
SATURDAY 8-2. Clothes, toys,
household items, weight set and
lots of misc. Take Steve Roberts
Special to 2337 Oxendine Road.
Zolfo Springs. 12:16p
SATURDAY 8-? 1060 Knollwood
Circle, Wauchula. Clothes, toys,
baby items, tools, lots of great
stuff misc.
12:16p
FRIDAY & SATURDAY. 132 East
Main St., Bowling Green. 12:16p
BIG YARD SALE. Sat. 7-2. 638
Kellla Road off Louisiana,
Wauchula. Lots of items. 12:16p
FRIDAY 2 miles out Hwy. 66. Lots
of baby items. 12:16p
THRUSDAY & FRIDAY Boyd
Cowart Rd. 12:16p

Gentlemen prefer bonds.
-Andrew Mellon


THURS., FRIDAY, SAT., home-
made porch swings, tools,
clothes, 208 Park Drive,
Riverview, Wauchula. 12:16p
FREE CLOTHES all day Friday &
Saturday. Surplus Stop by Double
J. Rest. 12:16c
FRIDAY 8-2. 1025 Knollwood
Circle. Baby girl stuff, lots more.
12:16p
YARD SALE. 4 Family. Antique
dols, what-nots, x-mas deers,
mis. Friday, Sat. Hwy. 17 N. to
Maxwell Dr., follow signs. 12:16p
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 3208 Perdue
Road, Wauchula. Lots of stuff.
Lots of good deals. 12:16p

My formula for success is
rise early, work late and
strike oil.
-J.P. Getty


C.N.A.'s FULL TIME ALL SHIFTS
Only Caring, dependable and reliable C.N.A.'s.
needed for 79 bed SNF. If you fit this profile and
enjoy working with the elderly, COME JOIN THE
HARDEE MANOR HEALTHCARE TEAM.
Apply in person or call Penny Polk HR Manager
Hardee Manor Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873
PH: 863-773-3231 FAX: 863-773-0959


Classifieds


Life is a maze in which we
take the wrong turn before
we have learnt to walk.
-Cyril Connolly


There are three ways to get something done: Do it.your-
self, employ someone or forbid your children to do it.




GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning
Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 cl8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


SHearn's Auto Cleaning Service


Eyelashes help to keep dirt out of eyes and eyebrows
help to keep perspiration from running into eyes.

The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of
two chemical substances: If there is any reaction, both
are transformed.
-Carl Jung


So 600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132- FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
SOUTH FLORIDA www.southflorida.edu/hr/
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
DIRECTOR, EPI Full-time, 10-month position to coordinate
and manage the functions of SFCC's Educator Preparation
Institute as well as teach EPI classes (generally scheduled on
Saturdays. Master's degree in Education, Educational
Leadership, or closely related field required. P-12 teaching
experience required. Educational leadership experience
preferred. Current Florida teaching certification preferred.
Clinical educator training or national board teacher certification
preferred. Must maintain Highlands County Schools level two
background clearance. Competency in basic computer skills
including but not limited to Microsoft Word, Power Point,
Publisher, Excel, and Outlook. Experience working with
relational database software (specifically BANNER) preferred.
Must be flexible for scheduling, including Saturdays. Must have
reliable transportation for travel throughout the service district
and adjacent counties. Starting annual. salary:
$38,000-$42,000.
STUDENT SERVICES ADVISOR, CAREER CENTER -
Full-time, year-round position responsible for providing general
college information, academic advising, scheduling, and career
planning services. Bachelor's degree required. Academic
advising or guidance experience preferred. Demonstrated
ability in communicating effectively with people from diverse
cultural and socio-economic backgrounds required. Starting
annual salary: $26,000-$28,500.
Full-time positions offer comprehensive benefits, including
retirement, health/life insurance, and vacation/sick leave.
Detailed position announcements and application information
located on our website. Application deadline for both
positions is 5 p.m., Tuesday, January 11, 2011.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
c112:16c


(863) 735-1495


:~i~ k~ ~g~~j~ ~g~ ~q~ (g ~g~ t_
.~7;9~
;i


I L
/r
I~ar(h


U ml


L AMBER
REALTY INC. |
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
3B/2Bth M/H, built in 2005, located on 16.5
acres, 4 2 inch wells, 1 4 inch well; beautiful
property surrounded by large oaks. $195,000
BRICK, 3B/2Bth, w/b fireplace, very conve-
nient location. $57,000

BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY 262.52 acres, road
frontage, large pines, 100 acres cleared. $4300
per acre
PRICE RECENTLY REDUCED! Charming
"old Florida style" home, 3B/2Bth, ceramic tile
floors, new appliances, large lot with gazebo,
near shopping and post office. $120,000


12 SERVICE YOU
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
wvww.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert
MAKE REASONABLE OFFER! Updated
3B/2Bth home within walking to schools, med-
ical facilities, extra storage, wheel chair accessi-
ble. $155,000
PLENTY OF SPACE in this 4B/3BTH,
CB/Stucco home; large kitchen, living room
with w/b fireplace, double garage, spacious yard
for outside entertaining. $165,000
5 Acres with large oaks and cleared field;
secluded. $40,000
14.74 Acres with some trees, 4" well, large pond;
located on county maintained road. $135,000
Call for details on several 5 ACRE TRACTS
priced from $45,000 to $85,000

CAN COUNT ON I
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


_ I, I J .


Loe osle Rat es


rleh






Qualty pintng srvics a

^*^W^^^competitive prices!^




Ell^^^^^^^^


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.

[FTK] 4~mr


Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


NEW LISTINGS!! Very nice 2 B/1 Bath home
with Large lot in quiet neighborhood within
city limits. Recently remodeled and painted.
Call today for more information. Only
$78.900
NEW LISTINGS!!! Charming Historic home
with loft and studio apartment on 1 acre in
City limits. $69.900
20/20 INVESTMENT VISION!! Frontage orT
US Hwy 17 North and North Florida Ave.
Access from both highways. Across from
Winn Dixie. Call for more information today.
Only $350.000.
$72.500 2 Bedroom/1 Bath home sits on 2.4
acres located between Wauchula and Avon
Park. Central heat and air, private well, utility
shed, shingle roof, hardwood flooring.
$119.900!! 3 Bedroom/2 Bath CB home with
central heat and air located within City of
Wauchula and close to shopping, parks, and
schools. Call today for more information.
GREAT INVESTMENT!! 3/2 CB home with
central H/A, one car garage, total sq. ft.
1,728, Sun and Lakes of Sebring, close to
malls, shopping and medical care.
REDUCED!! $42.750.
GO TO: HomePath.com For More
Fannie Mae Properties.


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www. cbhardee.cor


Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 245-1054


NEW LISTING!! Nice 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB
home with central heat and air, screened
porch, view of golf course, on car carport.
Total sq. ft. 1,820. Call for more information.
Only, $94.600
PRICED AT ONLY $71.500!!! Beautiful 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home in Indian Lake
Estates near Lake Walk In The Water, has
Barrel tile roof, open kitchen and screened
back porch, central heat/air, two care
garage. Golfing, boating, fishing near by.
NEW LISTING!!! 3 Bedroom, 2 .Bath home
with extra lot, walking distance to school,
and town. House in good condition-owner
ready to negotiate. GREAT LOCATION-Only
$121.500
REDUCED!!! $82.500 INCLUDING EXTRA
LOT!!! 2B/2B home with central'heat/air, one
car garage, appliances, work-shop and stor-
age area, all in quiet neighborhood and
close to shopping and schools.
NEW LISTING!! 3 B/2 Bth CB home with cen-
tral heat/air, stove, refrigerator, vaulted ceil-
ings, two car garage, tile/carpet flooring,
close to schools and various other activities.
Priced (5 $159.900
REDUCEDI! $92.900!! 3Bdr/2Bth Mobile
Home with 5 acres between Wauchula and
Avon Park.
THE PRICE IS RIGHT!! Don't need to guess!
Only $34.900 for this 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home with double lot, Call today for an
appointment!!
c112:16c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.

2002 Volv 4D Id. YW1RS61R322189620
1990 Ford CV Id 1FACP44EOLF144466
1998 Ford PK Id. 1FTYF17W4WNC08086
Contact Linda or Shannon for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Tuesday, December 28, 2010 at 10:00 am at the
Wauchula State Bank parking lot located at 106
East Main Street, Wauchula.FL. 12:16,23c


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs c12:16c


-~- --- I


I" L- --_








December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 9B


-Herded Cattle Across Florida in 1937-

Pershing Platt Is A Lifetime Rancher


Editor's Note: Notes from a
recent talk by Pershing Platt,
91, A Florida Cracker Cowboy
who lives with his wife Pud at
their Grass Valley Ranch along
Hwy. 66 and Charlie Creek east
of Zolfo Springs. He spoke
Friday, April 23, at Reality
Ranch.
My grandpa was born in 1845
at Pinecrest and moved to Crab-
grass or Deer Park. Wrote to
friends to settle there. Thigpens,
Shivers, Herndon, Laniers and
Summers.
They went to Fort Drum or
Kissimmee for supplies in horse
and wagons. All was fine until a
man named George Hopkins
bought the land for timber. That
meant all these folks had to
move to more open range.
The Platts moved across the
St. Johns River west of Mel-
bourge and drove cattle around
the head of the river-Uncle
Hiram.
In order to market timber,
SHopkins built a railroad across
the river to haul pine and
cypress logs. He hauled logs
one way and came back.
My Daddy's job was to load
the cars. Willis got stuck. Hop-
kins gave jobs to scores of peo-
ple. Wasn't like out West-
burned them out.
Hopkins also had cattle, and
his foreman was Dan Summer.
Sid Summer and Johnny Platt.
It was open range from west
of Cocoa to Fellsmere-about
40 miles of Platt land. My
Daddy quail hunted. Joe Sexton
from Christ sent us a purebred
Hereford bull. He bred two
cows before fever ticks killed
him. They were both bulls, but
one was from a flap Brahman\
cow and he lived. The other calf
died from ticks.
My Mama would give me a
coffee can to put the ticks in
when her milk cow got down.
In 1930 we were required by
the state to dip cattle for fever
ticks. Every 14 days for 18
months. A state man was there
to paint every cow.
One dip day the cows were
painted with a spot of yellow,
the next day blue, then red, etc.
In the two weeks between dip
days state range riders would
check the cattle. Any cow: not
painted would be drove P, the
dipping vat to be dipped. If they
couldn't drive the cow they
would rope her. This caused


Platt sits on his horse ready for another hard days work.


Pershing proudly stands amongst his son and grandchildren. From left: Jamie Platt,
John Platt, Russ Melendy, Kristen Melendy, Jerry Melendy and Julie Platt.


Pershing and Pud Platt have been married for 62 years
and have two children.


trouble. Most cowmen were
against the dipping vat, but it
was the making of the cattle
industry in Florida. Bartow
Williams and Paul Johns were


Pershing Platt, 91, is one of the last cowboys left in
Florida who drove cattle across the state to market. He
has seen the industry go from free range grazing to the
fenced pastures of today.




Gestational Diabetes

Means Lifelong Risk


Gestational diabetes is dia-
betes that is found for the first
time when a woman is preg-
nant. It puts a woman at high
risk for developing diabetes in
Sthe future. Diabetes means that
your blood glucose (also called
blood sugar) is too high. It can
lead to serious lifelong health
problems, such as heart disease,
blindness and amputations. If
left untreated or uncontrolled, it
can lead to problems for the
mom and her baby.
Fortunately, modest but im-
portant steps can lower the risk
for developing diabetes, while
helping to keep the whole fami-
ly healthy.
"Women with a history of
gestational diabetes can lower
their risk for developing dia-
betes by making an effort to


reach and maintain a healthy
weight, making healthy food
choices, and being active for at
least 30 minutes, five days a
week," according to 'Judith
Fradkin, M.D., of the National
Institute of Diabetes and Di-
gestive and Kidney Diseases.
"Keeping a healthy lifestyle as a
family is good for everyone."
Women who have had gesta-
tional diabetes need to be tested
for diabetes six to 12 weeks
after their baby is born and at
least every three years after
that. Mothers should let their
doctor-and their child's doctor-
know about their history of ges-
tational diabetes.
For example, Holly Romans
was diagnosed with gestational
diabetes when she was pregnant
with her first child. After the


range riders.
After the fever ticks were
gone, the open range was get-
ting crowded. Uncle Cab had
five boys and uncle Hiram had
four boys all getting in the cow
business.
The Crane Creek Drainage
District was formed and big
canals were dug and a drainage.
tax put on the land. It was still
open range but you couldn't
afford to buy it because of the
drainage tax.
I always thought they ruined
the land. It was open prairie
land before they drained the
land. After that new growth
covered the land, so I decided it
was time to move.
In the summer of 1937 we
started looking for a place to
move. After lots of traveling we
found a place west of Ona. It
had 800 acres of land, a big log
home and a barn for $5 an acre
for the land and $25 a head for
the cows. It was all fenced. The
tax was four cent an acre on the
land.
We borrowed money from
Wauchula State Bank and
closed the, deal. Now came the
big job of moving. It is always a
surprise how many things you
have to move.
Then it was time to go back
and get the cattle. Our home
placed was called Northfield on
the east bank of St. Johns River.
We left there with the cattle in
September of 1937.



baby was born, a blood test
showed Romans' blood glucose
was back to normal, so she
thought there was nothing to
worry about. But a follow-up'
test showed her headed toward
a diagnosis of diabetes.
She shared this information
with her daughter's doctor and a
note was made in her daughter's
health record. Romans joined a
diabetes prevention program at
a local hospital and learned how
to keep a healthy lifestyle for
herself and her family.
She lost weight by making
small changes in her daily rou-
tine, such as replacing choco-
late snack cakes with fresh fruit,
preparing more salads,' eating
smaller portions, and taking
daily walks. In just a few
months, Romans' glucose levels
had improved so much that she
was no longer in the "danger
zone" for diabetes. And thanks
to her lifestyle changes, she did
not develop gestational diabetes


The crew was Sybil Platt, my
cousin; Mary, my sister; Buck,
my brother; and myself.
We crossed the St. Johns
River on a wooden bridge.
When the cattle's hoofs hit the
boards they would run. Sybil
and I galloped ahead with our.
horses.
Buck and Mary were riding
drag pushing up theslow ones.
Daddy and Tom (7 years old)
were behind them with the
truck and supplies and 2 dogs.
Tom's job was to take care of
the dogs. The dogs were Roster
and Ribs. They were cow dogs.
We turned off the Kissimmee
highway at crabgrass or deer
park. Our first bad crossing was
Jane Green Swamp. The cross-
ing was an old oxen and wagon
trail with swamp on both sides
of the trail. This is where our
dogs were a big help. It took all
of us to get the cattle pushed
across the swamp.
The dogs were well trained.
Daddy sent Roster to the right
side and Ribs on the left. When
we got across the swamp the
dogs had the cattle held up.
There was an old saying that a
cow dog was worth two cow-
boys. I don't think we would
have made it without Rosters
and Ribs.
We crossed several creeks
before we got to Kenansville: I
remember Crabgrass Creek,
Bull Creek and Blue Cypress
Creek.
At Kenansville we spent the
night at Oliver Bass' place. He
was, brother to Rudy Ashton's
wife, Nell Prescott's uncle.
From Kenansville we headed
to Turkey Hammock, where
road 60 crosses the Kissimmee
River. There George Mann was
penning cows on the other side
of road 60. We met some old
cowboys there, Cole Godwin,
Barry Smith, Roy Bass, Buck
Lee and Eddie Monsdeocka.
Buck Lee was living in a two-
story house at Turkey Ham-
mock and invited us to stay
there that night. Sybil and Mary
were invited to sleep in the
house. Buck and I didn't know
where to sleep so we stretched
our skeeter bars under an oak
tree in the back yard. Next
morning we realized we had
slept under the chicken roost.
We left Turkey Hammock
and crossed Kissimmee River
with a lot of help from some of
the old cowboys. From there we
crossed Blue Jerdon Swamp
and camped at Arbuckle Lake.
We drove east of Avon Park and
took road 64 heading west.
On the Hardee-Highlands
county line there was a cattle
guard right in the middle of the
highway. Beside the cattle
guard was a wire gate. A drift
fence separated cattle from the
two counties.
From the county line we



when she became pregnant with
her second child.
Today, Romans continues to
get tested for diabetes at least
every three years. She makes
sure she and her family main-
tain a healthy lifestyle by stay-
ing physically active and mak-
ing healthy food choices.
For a free tip sheet for
women with a history of gesta-
tional diabetes, including steps
to reduce the risk of developing
diabetes, call the National
Diabetes Education Program
(NDEP) at 1-888-693-NDEP
(6337) or visit www.
YourDiabetesIrifo.org.

An. Oklahoman, Sylvan
Goldman, is credited with
inventing the first shop-
ping cart.

A final comfort that is
small, but not cold: The
heart is the only broken
instrument that works.
-T.E. Kalem


John Platt rides alongside his father, Pershing. John and
Pershing live near each other on the family's Grass
Valley Ranch off S. R. 66.


drove to seven mile point,
crossed Peace River at the
Zolfo bridge. There was no road
from Peace River to Oak Grove
station, just a cleared right of
way. '. ,
By the time we gotjo Ona it
was getting late an' Mr. Ira
Williams let us pen the cows at
his place. We went to our new
home to spend the night.
The next morning we fin-
ished the drive. Happy to be in
Hardee County.
Most of the time when you
buy something there is a sur-
prise somewhere. When we
bought to 800 ares, we were


told there was plenty of open
range to the south.
. This was true but there was
plenty of cows on it to. We
finally bought 2,600 acres from
the Florida Land Co. in Rye,
New York.
After my father died we!
divided it 3 ways. Tom took thej
north end, Buck the south and I.
was the middle.
There was 40 acres of land
right in the middle of my land
with a livable house. I bought
the house and 40 acres for
$1,200. My momma always
said get the cage before you get
the bird.


One great way to celebrate
the holidays is to help a furry
friend in need.
If you're thinking of adopting
a pet, animal shelters are a fan-
tastic option. Warner Bros. and
the ASPCA (The American
Society for the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals) want to
remind potential pet owners
that adopting and caring for a
companion animal goes far
beyond providing food, water
and shelter-it's a lifelong com-
mitment. It takes research and
careful planning to bring the
right pet into your home.
For more help with adopting
the perfect family pet, consider
the following tips from the
ASPCA:
Before you adopt a pet,
talk to family members about
what they want. Discuss ev-
eryone's likes and dislikes.
Large dogs may be too strong or
active for young children, for
example, while some 'people
may simply prefer cats over
canines.
If you're getting a pet for
your children, do not expect
the kiddies to do all the work.
Children, no matter how ma-
ture, need constant supervision
and help handling the responsi-
bility of a cat or dog.
Ultimately, the parent is respon-
sible.
Teach your children
about responsible pet owner-
ship before you adopt, and
make sure they are ready for
the changes a new pet will


bring. Learn about pet care,
and explain to your children
that walking a dog several times
a day or cleaning a cat's litter
box is part of the ongoing
responsibility of caring for an
animal.
Make sure a pet suits
your home and lifestyle. Your
personality and lifestyle-along
with challenges such as space
restrictions and the amount of
time your family spends at
home-should be explored to
determine which pet is right for
your household.
Also, be sure to watch
Warner Bros.' family-friendly
"Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of
Kitty Galore," now. available on
Blu-ray combo pack and DVD.
In the movie, an evil feline
plans to unleash a diabolical
device and take over the entire
world. Cats and dogs are forced
to work together for the first
time in history in an unlikely
alliance to save themselves-and
their beloved humans-from
global cat-astrophe. The film
blends live action,,state-of-the-
art puppetry and computer ani-
mation in order to create a visu-
al spectacular that's perfect for
kids and-adults alike. With an
all-star cast led by Christina
Applegate, Neil Patrick Harris,
Bette Midler and Nick Nolte,
this pet-friendly romp will
strike a chord with any animal
lover.
You can visit www.aspca.org
to find a shelter near you.


The tip of a bullwhip moves so fast that it breaks the
sound barrier; the crack of a whip is actually a tiny sonic
boom.

Research is formalized curiosity. It is poking and prying
with a purpose.
-Zora Neale Hurston


Adopting A Cat Or

Dog This Holiday Season







10B The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


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12B The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


BGE Recognizes Its 'Proud Panther' Winners


COURTESY PHOTOS
Kindergarteners who received the Proud Panther Award for outstanding classroom
behavior are (front row, from left) Yadira Sanchez, Diego Bautista-Luviano, Caleb
Ybarra and Uziel Martinez; (back row) Andrew Kuen, Desteny Escamilla, Jared Fowler
and Lydia Valadez.


First graders at Bowling Green Elementary School who were given the Proud Panther
Award for the first quarter are (first row, from left) Leonardo Gaytan, Zachery Palacios,
Taylor Douglas and Alfredo Reyes-Sanchez; (back row) Erick Ontiveros, Nayeli Navarro,
Alexi Rodriguez, Litzy Abrego-Ambriz, Yesenia Chirinos and Oliver Mendoza.


Second graders recognized for their accomplishments were (first row, from left) Kaylee Third-grade Proud Panther Award winners for their citizenship are (front row, from left)
Gibson, Julian Kimball, Adan Molina and Monica Hernandez-Ruiz; (second row) Jose Eivis'Acuna, Lusero DelaCruz, Omar Hurtado-Dominguez, Amber Jones and Abriana
Hernandez, Julia Mateo-Armenta, Chloe Boyette, Breeshia Hrabal, Giovanni Lopez and Reyna; (second row) Ciara Smith, Emilio Garcia, Caroline Coronado, Luis Gapi, Jason
Brittany Lopez. Garcia and Dulce Martinez.


Fourth-grade students who were acknowledged for their leadership were (front row,
from left) Nadae'ya Perry and Ignacio Lopez; (back row) Isidro Medrano, Amber
McCall, Damion Rodriguez, Aaliyha Sanchez, Roberto Tavares and Miranda Pearson.


IN MY HEART, ` ....-

YOU'RE MY BRIDE FOREVR*II
";- :'.'!
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the bride's pendant.
for the bride inside the heart oi every woman


, Fifth graders who were recognized as good citizens were (first row, from left) Alexis
Garza, David Reyna and Marissa Pearson; (second row) David Espinoza, Ana Corona,
Jasmine Mendoza, Enrique Gomez, Dray Millerand Julissa Molina-Lozano.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255











-0, 17P '
JLU v FLr


false.
Exodus 23:1 (TLB)


FRIDAY
Don't let the world around
you squeeze you into its
own mold, but let God
remold your minds from
within, so you may prove in
practice that the plan of God
for you is good.
Romans 12:2 (PME)

SATURDAY
The path of life is level for
those who are right with
God; Lord, you make the
way of life smooth for those
people. ... Lord, all our suc-
cess is because of what You
have done, so give us Your
peace.
Isaiah 26:7-12 (NCV)

SUNDAY
You must face the fact: the
final age of this world is to be
a time of troubles. Men will
love nothing but money and
self, they will be arrogant,
boastful and abusive...
They will be men who put
pleasure in the place of God,
men who preserve the out-
ward form of religion, but are
a living denial of its reality.
Keep clear of men like this.
II Timothy 3:1a, 2a 5-6 (NEB)

MONDAY
For the Lord is the One who
shaped the mountains, stirs
up the winds, and reveals
His every thought. He turns
the light of dawn into dark-
ness and treads the moun-
tains under His fee. The Lbrd
God Almight is His name!
Amos 4:13 (NLT)

TUESDAY
If we say we have no sin, we
deceive ourselves and the
truth is not in us. If we con-
fess our sins, He (Jesus) is
faithful and just, and will for-
give our sins, and cleanse
us from all unrighteousness.
1 John 1:8-9 (RSV)

WEDNESDAY
The distance all around the
city is 18,000 cubits; and the
name of that city, from that
'time on will be, "The Lord Is
'There.
Exekiel 48:35 (NIV)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


Stop by and see why so
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com
930Mc 800-226-3325


Gene Davis
Sales and Leasing
Consultant


Baseball/Softball Vie For Practice Fields


Wauchula Woman Enjoys Her Poems
By MESQUA FIELDS from school during lunch and "We travel when we want-the
For The Herald-Advocate got some food," she stated. The cows keep us busy. We're build-
'I want everyone to know Four Way was a filling station ing a new house, too. This home
that what I do? My talent for and a restaurant. Oden would will go to our son." The Odens
writing poems? It's not mine. cook burgers or pump gas there, attend Oak Grove Baptist
I'm not the one doing this. It's 'The Four Way was my first Church, where her husband and
God who's working through job," said Oden, promptly. Her his two brothers are deacons.
me," says Kitty Oden. second job was at Herr's When she was about 4 or 5,
Kitty Oden was born and Jewelry. She also worked at Oden went with her family to
raised here in Wauchula. In fact, J.W. Earnest Department Store visit some of her kin in
her current home has been in selling shoes there. Alabama. That visit is what cre-
her family for over 100 years! It The time came when Oden ated her first poem years later.
started off smaller than it is was to "fly from the nest." She Oden has 14 poems, collective-
now; through the years they married Kenneth Oden. Her ly. One such poem, which. is
added onto it and added the husband, now retired, worked untitled, has played a special
stone work. She graduated from for the Division of Corrections. role in the lives of many.
Hardee Senior High with the He started out as a CO1 in The poem was about her
class of '59. 1964. Because he stayed with friend's son-who died at age 17
She didn't really like school, the state, as he moved up in on the basketball court. "He'd
but she made average grades. rank, he moved to the place the had heart problems and one day
After school she would pick state positioned him. "He it just . gave out on him.
strawberries. Oden also, along opened Hardee Prison," says Right there. On the basketball
with her mother, ran the Four Oden. Though they were court," recalled Oden. The very
Way Restaurant. The Four Way required to move many times, same poem was read at her own
was here back in the early '60's they didn't do so alone; they son's funeral. "At times It's
and across from Robarts Family also had their children with very hard, in this life, to keep
Funeral Home. It was placed them. going. But that's what makes
where the cement slab is now, The Oden's first child was a you an individual-is the things
"Mr. Kelly was known as one of girl; whom they, regrettably, that you go through in life."'
the 'Four Way Boys'," said lost at birth. They then had a Along with her poetry, Oden
Oden. "That's what mama and I son; and after him they adopted is also ah artist. She has a few
called the regulars." Lots of another son. The adoptive son paintings in her. home that she
kids came for burgers after was killed by his best friend at has done-one, in particular, ol
school. "Some snuck away the age of 18. The loss of a son a white horse in an oval frame.
is great, "Even though we still At one point, the teachers went
had another son, we grieved ter- on a strike, and the school had
ribly for the one we lost. His no art teacher. They called her.
place can never be filled," said and asked her to come in and
Oden, sorrowfully. teach the students. "I didn't
After the loss of their son, really teach them art," she said
her husband was transferred to cunningly. "I just kept them ir
Crestview, and after that, to the room."
Charlotte Correctional Institu- Oden has had the privilege ol
tion. Her husband worked with touching the lives of many peo-
the prison a little over 30 years, pie through her poetry. She
then retired. "I was a housewife wanted to make sure that every-
A Daily Thought the whole time. Always had one knew it was, in fact, God
Daily Tho t supper ready when he got and not her who was doing such
THURSDAY home, did the laundry, washed a great thing with her poems
Do not pass along untrue dishes-the normal chores you Oden's poems, to some, are
reports. Do not cooperate find in a home," she said. awe-inspiring; and to others
with an evil man by affirming "We thoroughly enjoy retire- they come just at the right time
something you know is ment," said Oden, contentedly. in their lives.


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By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A possible conflict in using
the junior high softball fields
for practice sparked discussion
at last week's meeting of the
Hardee County School Board.
New member Paul Samuels
brought up the discussion. In-
troducing Max Ullrich, presi-
dent of Hardee County Youth
Sports, which oversees 500 to
600 children ages 4 to 15
involved in the baseball and
softball programs, which will
start on Feb. 28.
Meanwhile, Keith Weems,
coordinator of the 13-and-under
and 14-and-under travel base-
ball teams called the Crushers,
has asked for permission to use
the HJHS fields for practice
between 3:30 and 6 p.m. week-
days between December and
June 2011 as needed. HJSH
principal Doug Herron noted
that the travel team certificate
of insurance expires Jan. I and
will need to be renewed.
Hardee girls softball will use
Farr and Heine fields for their
games, while the Youth Sports
baseball teams will play at the
four new fields in the Hardee
Park complex behind the Agri-
Civic Center. But all these
teams need practice fields as
well.


Weightlifting Beats Avon Park


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee girls weightlifting
won its season opener at home
last week.
The Lady Wildcats won 42-
24 over Avon Park by taking
first place in five weight divi-
sions.
TThe girls will continue prac-
tices but not be in an official
meet until Jan. 4, when they are
at home against Lake Placid.
Although Coach Jan Brutus had
hoped to schedule another
match, it won't be before the
Christmas break officially
begins on Dec. 17.
All but four of the girls
weightlifting team are freshmen


and did exceptionally well in
their opening meet. "I am excit-
ed about how well these first-
year lifters did. They are show-
ing some really explosive
power and I feel they will do
very well this year," comment-
ed Brutus.
Freshman Rachel Roberts
started Hardee off with a win in
the 101-pound division, and
senior Lacie Carlton finished it
with first in the 183 division.
Between them, there were
first-place finishes from junior
Jessica Hunt, freshman Mc-
Kenzie Staton and freshman
Erica Roberts,
Rachel Roberts was the only
Hardee lifter in.the 101 group.


Hunt was first and freshman
Rachel Burton second in the
110, and at 119, Staton had 10
more pounds lifted than class-
mate Briana Gardner.
It was a one-two-three for
Hardee at the 1299 level. After
Eric Roberts, were freshmen
Savanah Miller second and
Angela Heuckeroth third.
Frosh Katlyn Shaw was the
lone Hardee entry at 139 and
placed second. Hardee took sec-
ond and third at 169 with junior
Korin Roehm second and fresh-
man Megan Hartman third.
Junior Ashley Hodges missed
the first meet of the season at
154.


S.


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~&% AdI


Hardee Sins Plus T's


(


CUSTOMER APPRECIATION ANNIVERSARY SALE


9 Great Years


Thank You Hardee County


'


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The Herald-Advocate


Thursday, December 16, 2010


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After much discussion, Her-
ron was asked to coordinate
between the Crushers and
Youth Sports for rotating use of
the HJHS fields.
In other action, the School
Board:
--discussed the appeal of the
roofing bid award at Wauchula
Elementary School.
Board attorney Gavin O'-
Brien explained that Florida has
adopted rules especially for
School Board procurement
protests. All award activity is to
stop while the Division of
Administrative Hearings in
Tallahassee processes the case
by its rules. It is assigned to an
administrative law judge, fol-
lowing rules which are on the
DOAH website. State rule pre-
empts county boards. Once the
law judge makes his ruling, it
comes back to the local board,
but it is extremely difficult to
overturn that ruling. The lan-
guage is difficult to follow and
has a lot of double negatives,
explained O'Brien.
-heard from Superintendent
David Durastanti on the FCAT
rating of D for Hardee Senior
High School The school earned
915 points which put it well in
the C level of 870 to 989 points.
It was dropped to a D because
there was not adequate progress


Ko;

h
3.
,e
3,
e


of at-risk students.
-presented a plaque of ap-
preciation to outgoing Board
member Wendell Cotton for his
12 years of service to the
School Board and community.
"The two new young men are a
welcome addition to the Board.
I'm checking out. God bless
each one of you," said Cotton,
as he accepted the plaque from
Chairperson Teresa Crawford.
-heard schedule updates.
The annual Teacher-of-The-
Year banquet will be Feb. '1,
beginning at 6 p.m. The Martin
Luther King Jr. parade will be at
1 p.m. on Jan. 17 and the Board
will coordinate a vehicle to ride
in. The Jan. 13 regular meeting
will be preceded by a 4:30 p.m.
workshop in which O'Brien
will review the Sunshine Law.
-heard reports from Sam-
uels, Trevino and Crawford on
attendance at the four-day
School Board conference.
-approved personnel
changes. Besides supplements
for various additional duties,
other personnel actions include
approval of substitutes teachers
RaShonda Polite and Justina
Graham, paraprofessional Bev-
erly Whaley, office worker Pete
Solis, food service worker
Jessica Miller and custodian
Joann Long.


'"I









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m..
-'*^*


S50% OFF


Entire Inventory


Sj 30% OFF Rhinestone T's





773-2542


\ 511 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula


*


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2C The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010





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Sa Public Service

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hula,Florida:i

: Thursday p'm.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......'........9.....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ..................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ..................::..9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ...................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............ 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....... ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ...........7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico.................6:30 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday.Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m..

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship. ........7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club .....................7:00 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night.Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................... :00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


S. IHwy. 17. 375-2253
Bible Study ............................ 9:30 a.m. UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
Morning.-Wshp,,......-..5076 Li.LChurch Rd. 494-5622
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m. Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Supper ...........5:30 p.m. Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting .6:30 p.m. Evening Worship ..............:...6:00 p.m.
Wednesdv WW Servicn ..6:0 p.m. Wednesday AWANA for Kids
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m. Wednesday AWANA for Kids


FIRST UNITED '
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................ 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISI CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.


IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miarcoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion .........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ................9:45 a.m*:
Morning Worship ............I1100 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m


MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00'pm.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Colnmunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.


MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

SNEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship ............... 1 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........ 12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


....................................... 6:30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA .
APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
English Service ................ 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Ser'ice................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ...5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service........... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Crall/or locations


CHARLIE CREEK
S BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ....:......... 6:30 p.m.


CHURCH OFCHRIiST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ................. 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Roal
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class .......7:00 p.m..
Men'v Leadership & Training Cla.s -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
S 767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood .......................... 11:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
- CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS -
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .................... .... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ... ...............00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion ................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
SFriday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .....................:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ...............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study..for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra ................ 5:00 p.m.
'routh Ministry .................. 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry ............ 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W worship .......... ................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal ........ 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A'ST.
(K-5th) ..........10:45 a.m.'
Worship Service. ...............10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for Nursery-5th
grade ...........................6:15 p.m .
Classes for children ages PreK-12th
grade................. 6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
"FIRST MiSSIONAiliY -
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..............1..1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........ .......... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ........:.............9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
CagbalSunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ..........6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School .....................9:30 a.m.
Worship .......................... 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult CI.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Minm..........7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study........6:30 p.m..


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
Martes ................7: 30 p.m.
Jueves ................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo ............. .10:30 p.m.
IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ....... .. ............6:00 p.m.
M iercoles................. ,;:.....7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Thursday Evening................7:30 p.m.


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service...................... 2:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening .....................6:00 p.m.


LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
M morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNACIORAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service...............7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service....l 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities (All Ages)
............. 7:00 p.m .

NEW LIFE CHURCH .
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.-
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services


NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship ...................(lst & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
A'llen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3" Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2"' & 41' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ......................... 1:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service


PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...........11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ..........7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 ajn.
,Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.


RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.*

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Set vice .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ................. .............. .9:00 a.m


H oly D ays ........ ........ ...... ..........

S ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7.30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....... .......... 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) .................. 11:00 a.m
(C reole)...................... 1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ...........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship .............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................ 7:30 p.m.


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ........... ....... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Wo hip ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train. ..........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD-'
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..................i0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
C hurch................................. 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
(WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
M en's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

SZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281


Sunday .............. ..............10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ........ ..........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ......:.........11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
W wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m .

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ...................... 10:00 a.m.
W worship Service ..................1 1:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ............. ......10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......... ...........5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayeri ...............7:00 p.m..


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456 *
Sunday School ....................10f00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
MARANATHA BAPTIST "
CHUrH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524 773-0989
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship... ...........................11:00 a.m .
Evening................................ 1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet...,7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
'Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.,
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ...........7:00 p.m.'

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ...................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.,
PRIMERA MISSION '
BAUTISTA HISPANA i
518 8th Ave. E
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
............... ........................... 7 :00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ................... :30 p.m. (
5th Sunday .................:..........6:00 p.m .

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .... .......... 11:00 a.m. '
Last Friday of Each Month '
Movie Night................7:00 p m
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................ :30 a.m.
Morning Worship................:..... I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones.......................... 0:00 a.m.
Doctrina.:............................ 1:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica .........10:00 a.m.
g.'"vioo. II IO0 'mn
Pioneer Club ........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecolcs Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Scrvicio..................................8:00 p.m.
S Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.
'. "




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December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well, football fans, the bowl season is upon us. ESPN will
have a game on every night over the holidays. It will be time to get
your fill of college football until spring practice starts. Starting
Dec. 18th through Jan. 10th, a plethora of games will keep guys on
the couch and wives grumbling until it is all over.
The Heisman Trophy was awarded to Cam Newton of Auburn
despite the controversy over pay for play which he was cleared
officially in. Newton is a great player and the win over Alabama
put him over the top in the Heisman Race. The National Cham-
pionship Game with Oregon is one game every fan will be glued
to.
The Miami Hurricanes are looking for a coach. Who might end
up there? It will not be Jon Gruden. The appeal of the U is not
what it once was. Message boards seem to think it will be Marc
Trestman from the CFL. Randy Edsall of Connecticut and Al
Golden at Temple are also mentioned as possible candidates.
The Florida Gators have gone through shock and hiring a new
coach in a short period. Muschamp will be bringing a new look to
Gainesville. He will be adding coaches to his staff. Overall, I don't
see muth drop off. He is a good recruiter and Florida is the hotbed
of high school football.
Now let's look at this Week's Bill O' Fare ... Bowl Week ONE
1. New Mexico Bowl-BYU vs. UTEP Dec. 18-A couple of
6-6 teams square off in this one. Albuquerque is a beautiful town
for a visit but this game should be a BYU win. UTEP lost 5 of its
last 6 games. The Cougars are a 9-and-a-half-point favorite but
look for a blowout. BYU played a tougher schedule as well. BYU
34 UTEP 13.
2. Humanitarian Bowl-Northern Illinois vs. Fresno St. Dec.
18. Northern Illinois Huskies bring a 10-3 team to Boise to face an
8-4 Fresno St. team. Fresno does have wins over the Big East and
Big 10 but NIU is a slight favorite. Northern Illinois 27 Fresno St.
24.
3. New Orleans Bowl-Troy vs. Ohio Dec. 18. The Ohio
Bobcats under Frank Solich have been solid but have not won the
bowl games. The Bobcats are 8-4 with losses to Ohio St. and
Marshall. Troy has been up and down, playing Oklahoma St. close
but gave up 69 points to South Carolina. This game should be close
as well. Ohio 31 Troy 30.
4. Beef O Brady's Bowl-Louisville vs. Southern Missis-
sippi Dec. 21. Charlie Strong has the Cardinals in a bowl in his first
year. The USM Eagles are an equal foe in this matchup. The
Cardinals have played a tougher schedule. Louisville 33 Southern
Miss 27.
5. Las Vegas Bowl-Utah vs Boise St. Dec. 22. Utah was on
roll until the TCU game. Boise lost the Nevada game on missed
field goals. Good matchup in Vegas. Boise St. 47 Utah 35.
6. Poinsettia Bowl-San Diego St. vs Navy. Dec. 23 One of
the best settings in the bowl season, it will be a home game for
SDSU. Look for Navy to control the clock and win the game. Its
ground game is very solid. Navy 34'SDSU 27.


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Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Dec. 11, Brad Elliott Rimes, 28, of 2405 SR 60, Bartow. was
arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF) and charged
with four counts possession of methamphetamine and four counts
of possession of drug paraphernalia.
Dec. 11, Christopher Mark Tindell, 32, of 317 N. 10th Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward and charged with
unarmed burglary of an unoccupied dwelling and larceny-petit
theft.
Dec. 11, Amanda Leigh Elisondo, 31, of 845 Pleasant Way,
Bowling Green, was arrested by DTF on an out-of-county warrant.
Dec. 11, residential burglaries on Cross Creek Lane and on
Hummingbird Lane, and criminal mischief on Maxwell Drive were
reported.
Dec. 10, Eliazar Limon, 26, of 150 Badger Loop, Ona, was
arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with DUI.
Dec. 10, Claudia Estella Mancillas, 28, of 409 N. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Dec. 10, criminal mischief on Deer Run, and thefts on Ollie
Roberts Road and Wilbur C. King Boulevard were reported.
Dec. 9; Brandon Keith Wisniewski, 25, of 611 E. Summit St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a charge of .
battery.
Dec. 9, Brett Adam Contreras, 26, of 756 LaPlaya Dr., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Dec. 9, John Donald McCauley, 58, of 1949 Peace River
Woods Road, Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with
possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia,
smuggling contraband into a detention facility and no valid license.
Dec. 9, Daniel Farias, 22, of 4521 Church Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Steve Ahrens on a charge of contempt
of court-violation of an injunction for protection.
Dec. 9, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 North, and thefts
on U.S. 17 South, Methodist Church Road and Martin Luther King
Jr. Avenue were reported.
Dec. 8, Huan M. Doan, 32, of 4269 Kelsson Ave., Marianna,
was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis on an out-of-county warrant.
Dec. 8, Nathan Lee Turner, 26, of 2436 Loma Linda St.,
Sarasota, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
Dec. 8, Dawn Michelle Kneer, 29, of 2635 Mercedes Ave., St.
Cloud, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina on a charge of violation
of probation.
Dec. 8, Christina Rodriguez, 28, of 405 Third St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Carree Williams and charged with
criminal mischief-damage to property, battery, and trespassing on
property not a structure or conveyance.
Dec. 8, Corey Deshawn Fowler, 27, of 810 S. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with bat-
tery. He was detained on two counts of failure to appear in court.
Dec. 8, a tag stolen on Marion Street, a fight on Carlton Street,
criminal mischief on Rainey Boulevard and thefts on Magnolia
Lane and on U.S. 17 North were reported.
Dec. 7, Sergio Barrios Ambriz, 26, of 11 N. Palmetto St., Fort


Meade, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with posses-
sion of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, flee-
ing to elude an officer with disregard for safety and driving with
knowledge of a suspended license.
Dec. 7, burglary of a conveyance on SR 62, and a theft on U.S.
17 North were reported.
Dec. 6, Benjamin Lazo, 20, of 415 S. First Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with trespassing on an
occupied structure or conveyance.
Dec. 6, Benjamin Hernandez, 34, of 204 Park Springs Circle,
Plant city, was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers on two counts of
violation of community control-house arrest.
Dec. 6, Daniel Lee Calvillo, 23, of 2813 Hampton Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward and charged with bat-
tery.
Dec. 6, a theft on SR 64 East was reported.

I WAUCHULA
Dec. 10, Eliazar Garcia, 22, of 505 Third St., Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with aggravated
battery causing bodily harm. At the jail,.Dep. Steve Ahrens
detained Garcia on charges of violation of probation and failure to
appear in court.
Dec. 10, Maria Natividad Dominguez, 30, of 349 River Chase
Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with
battery.
Dec. 10, a residential burglary on Diana Avenue, a fight on
South Florida Avenue and a theft on East Main Street were report-
ed.
Dec. 9, vehicles stolen on Carlton Street, South Seventh
Avenue and Heard Bridge Road, a fight on West Main Street, and
theftson South Seventh Avenue and on U.S. 17 South were report-
ed.
Dec. 8, Marco Huerta-Casillas, 22, of 828 S. 10th Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Gabe Garza and charged with bat-
tery.
Dec. 7, Rafaela Ruiz-Pacheco, 23, of 826 Second St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
Dec. 7, a theft on Carlton Street was reported.
BOWLING GREEN
Dec. 9, Hector Daniel Gomez, 36, of 825 W. County Line
Road, Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Ryan Abbott and
charged with battery.
Dec. 9, a fight on West County Line Road was reported.
Dec. 9, burglary of a conveyance on Chester Avenue was
reported.


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4C The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


Wildcats Stop Tornadoes 70-64


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcat hoop-
sters are improving slowly but
surely.
The 'Cats lost to DeSoto last
Tuesday, but came back on
Thursday night to outscore
Sarasota Booker on its court.
The district split puts Hardee at
2-2
This week, there was a trip to
Sebring on Tuesday night and
the first home games of the sea-
son at home against Mulberry
on Friday night. That's it until
after the holidays. Play resumes
Jan. 4 at Sarasota Cardinal
Mooney.
Against DeSoto last week,
Hardee.jumped out to an 8-3
advantage at the end of a defen-
sive first quarter. The Bulldogs
cut the edge to 18-16 by half-
time. After the half, DeSoto
came out on a tear and out-
scored Hardee 24-7 in the third
period. Hardee's attempts to
make up the 40-25 deficit did
not pan out. After an even
fourth quarter, Hardee lost 59-
46.
Mason Holland had 14 points
and Jonathan Richardson had a
dozen, all in the second half, for
DeSoto.
. The Wildcats matched that,
with Carl "Jr." Brown putting
up 14 and Keshun Rivers a
dozen, nine in the fourth quar-
ter. Tre' Anderson had 10
points, Tony Rodriguez four,
and Jimmy Vallejo and D'Vonte
Hooks each three points. An-
drew Hooks, Jajuan Hooks and
Bobby Brown helped out
defensively.
"It was a bit more of that
inconsistent play from our core


group. We were winning in the
second quarter, but I sat them
down for disciplinary reasons. I
hate to lost a district game, but
felt it was necessary," said
Head Coach Vance Dickey.
That discipline and a couple
of rigorous practices prepared
Hardee for the Thursday trip to
Sarasota. It was the first game
for freshman Keyon Brown,
who had been nursing a football
injury.
"He came in and rebounded
well for us. The varsity played
much better, a lot more focused.
We scored 51 in the second half
to their 44. We had fewer
turnovers," commented Dickey.
It was a close first half, Har-
dee trailing 8-7 at the end of the
first period and 20-19 at the
half. Hardee played well the
entire second half for the come-
back win 70-64.
Rivers led Hardee with 15
points, including a quartet of
treys. D'Vonte Hooks chipped
in with 14 points, including six-
of-eight at the charity stripe.
The-trio of Andrew Hooks,
Anderson and Carl Brown each
had 10 points. Jajuan Hooks
had nine points, including four-
of-five free throws. Keyon
Brown added two points.
Dickey was most pleased
with the defensive play of
Jajuan Hooks. The junior "did a
great job on their number one
player, Halloway. It was a key
matchup at point guard. D'-
Vonte Hooks joined in with a
good game on rebounding,
along with Keyon Brown."
Halloway was held to 15
points, while teammates Burke
and Bradley each had 16.
Booker had 17 fouls in the sec-


ond half, trying to get ball pos-
session. Hardee made 19-of-33
overall, while Booker sank 10-
of-19.
The JV boys had an up-hill
battle last week, doing better at
DeSoto than at Booker.
After a dismal 16-3 first quar-
ter, not able to find the range for
their shots. But, in the second
half, "they started out the gate
fast, but never could quite catch
up," reported Dickey. Hardee
lost 64-57. The young 'Cats cut
the 31-11 halftime lead to 47-32
at the end of the third and seven
points by the end. D. Richard-
son had 22 points for DeSoto
and N. Williams added 15, all in
the second half.
For Hardee, soph Alonzo
"Kane" Casson had a monster
night with 27 points, five
deuces, four treys and five-of-
eight at the free throw line.
Twenty-two of the points came
in the second half, 14 in the
fourth period, including five-of-
six at the charity stripe.
Freshman Steve Metayer
added 16 points, 14 in the sec-
ond half. Christian Moralez
added seven, Ledarius Sampson
three, and Zack Neuhofer two
points.
The taller junior Tornadoes
outrounded the junior Wildcats
in Thursday's game at Booker.
"Hardee had lots of good shots
and executed well. They didn't
play that badly, but are still
learning. There are four sophs
and four freshmen on the team,"
concluded Dickey.
In the 59-32 loss, Hardee got
10 points apiece from Moralez
and Casso, and six apiece from
Sampson and Metayer.


'I WAS PAID 3 CENTS A


QUART To PICK STRAWBERRIES'


By Nyshira E. Jackson
Special To The Herald-Advocate
I interviewed Beatrice MacIvery.
Beatrice MacIvery was born on
March 19, 1932, in the city of Bowling
Green and that is where she has lived
for all her seventy- seven years of life.
She has one brother, who is
deceased,


and three "
sisters, two C
of whom are


I\
flvte


deceased
and still one alive. Beatrice enjoyed
having her siblings around when they
were around. Essie Mae Hill and
Cornelius Ervin were the parents of
Beatrice and her sibling; and when
asked if they were strict, she replied,
"They were strict in a way."
Beatrice was married to A.C.
McIvery and between the two, eight
kids were born. She never imagined that
someday she would have kids and even-
tually become a grandmother. She felt
that she would have been fine without
them.
Beatrice's first job was picking
strawberries, and she received three
cents a quart for this. She did not enjoy
working as a picker because it was hard
work. She still continues to work to this
day. When asked if she would rather
work where she is now or at her first
job, Beatrice replied, "I sho'll wouldn't


want to have to pick strawberries any-
more because I have to bend over, and I
don't want to do that anymore."
From the time Beatrice attended
school, it was always segregated where
only the African-Americans went to
school together. Back then, math and
science wass not as advanced as it is
now. Beatrice said to me, "I tried to do
the algebra ya'll do.today and couldn't
figure out what it was."
Because the school was right across
the highway in Bowling Green, Beatrice
walked to school; but when she got to
high school, she had to ride the bus. As
mentioned before, Beatrice went to an
all black school, and like today they
changed classes as well. Her class con-
sisted of a lot of students, so many she
couldn't remember just how many there
was.
When asked what she was planning
on doing in the next five years, Beatrice
said, "I honestly don't know what I'm
going to be doing in the next five years.
I may not even be here, but if it's the
Lord's will, I shall be."
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Lady 'Cats Down DeSoto


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Lady Wildcats
took the lead and kept it in a
win last Tuesday against De-
Soto.
Hardee claimed the 43-31
victory, making a temporary 2-1
district ranking. Friday night's
game at home against Sarasota
Booker changed that to 2-2
when Booker won 46-32.
The girls have only one game
this week, at home against
Sebring on Thursday evening
before taking off for the winter
holiday break. Play resumes
Jan. 4 with a varsity-only trip to
Avon Park to play against
Walker Memorial Academy.
Despite not being extremely
focused, the Lady Wildcats
opened last Tuesday's game
with an 8-6 first period and
went on to win 43-31. Hardee
sank 10-of-13 at the charity
stripe and dominated rebound-
ing for the win. DeSoto went 8-
for-15 in free throws.
Senior forward Ashley Louis,
as usual, was the floor leader,
with nine rebounds and a steal
to go with her 22 points. She
was 7-of-8 at the free throw
line. Classmate LeCresha Carl-
ton added a half dozen points,
junior Robyn Tanksley five,
senior Elvira Servin four and
Paige Massey, Maria Avalos
and Kayla Nichols two points
apiece.
The quartet of Nichols, Tank-
sley, Servin and Carlton each
had three rebounds. Servin
added three assists and four
steals. Carlton also had four
thefts.
As it was a varsity-only game
against Bookei on Friday night,
soph Allison Hunter moved up


from the JV for the evening to
spell Avalos was who limited
due to a pulled calf muscle.
Hardee had a difficult time
contending with Booker, as the
Lady Tornadoes were all over
the floor aggressively. They
were so aggressive that senior
Jaberta Jones and soph Mekala
Jones both fouled out. Booker
had six fouls in the first half but
came out even more aggressive-
.ly with 23 fouls in the second
haff".'Both! ervin and Louis
took charging fouls in an effort
to stop them.
Booker got the first four
points before Hardee got on the
board when Carlton stole the
ball and went all the way for a
dish to Avalos for the two-
pointer. The teams traded bas-
kets and Booker got another
before the first period ended
with the Tornadoes up 8-4.
In the second eight-minute
session, Booker continued to
steal the ball and feed in to the
taller junior Breanna Browning
for the easy lay-in. By halftime
Booker led 24-12 and each
squad had six fouls.
Booker had possession to
start the second half, with
Lakisha Langston immediately
hitting an outside shot. Each
time Hardee would get free
throws or a shot, Booker would
answer in kind plus. Carlton
kept Hardee in the game with
her shots and free throws. It got
worse as the second half pro-
gressed, with Booker taking the
46-32 win.
Jaberta Jones paced Booker.
with 17 points, while Browning
added 15 more.
Carlton topped Hardee with
14 points, Louis was held to
five, Massey and Servin each


four, Avalos three and Tanksley
two.
Louis led Hardee with 10
rebounds, a steal and defensive
charge. Tanksley, Servin, Carl-
ton and Massey each had three
rebounds. Tanksley had four
blocked shots and Carlton three
steals.
The JV's only game last week
was at home against DeSoto, a
rather one-sided 41-8 game,.
with Coach Ken Leupold liber-
ally getting everyone in the
game.
Bailey Carlton came out tops
with 10 points, Alyssa Casso
and Allison Hunter each had
eight points and Destany Mc-
Clellan six. Kashia Mosley
added four, Carleigh Coleman
three and Stephanie Perez two
points. Adna Metayer, Diana
Gomez, Endreima Martinez and
Elaney Clark added defensive-
ly.


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For the week ended December 09, 2010

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 11,949, com-
pared to 10,227 last week, and 10,459 a year ago. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to
2.00 higher, feeder steers and heifers were 2.00 to 4.00 higher.


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 136.00-195.00
300-400 lbs 116.00-160.00
400-500 lbs 107.00-133.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 111.00-170.00
300-400 lbs 102.00-125.00
400-500 lbs 92.00-116.00

Lean: 750-1200 Ibs 85-90 percent
46.00-52.00
Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 Ibs
62.00-70.00


Worry is a thin stream of fear trickling through the mind.
If encouraged, it cuts a channel into which all other
thoughts are drained.
-A.S. Roche


- .- 2";1


FA
B.UR.EU..


773-3117
101 7 US HLUy 17 No. Wauchula
George L. Wadsworth, Jr.
Agent


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:



Slaughter Cows:

Slaughter Bulls:


MONDAY

- DECEMBER 13, 2010

is the last sale of the year!

We will take cattle

Sunday, January 2, 2011

for first sale of the year

. Monday, January 3, 2011




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December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5C


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y^&r


SMaking This Right


Beaches

Claims

Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental

Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
S restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bpamerica
youtube.com/bp


"My family's been fishing for eight generations. It's just-a way of life.
That's why we've got to get this cleaned up."
Pete Floyd
Commercial Fisherman,
Alscag ui I Mississippi



When the spill hit, a lot of people said it would be the end. BP said
they would try to make this right. But how was an energy company
going to help a fisherman?


Putting People to Work
The first thing they did was rent my boat and hire me to help with
the cleanup. They made up my losses so I could pay my bills. And
they worked with all kinds of people here from fishermen and
shrimpers to restaurant owners. It helped us keep our businesses
open. And it helped us make ends meet so we could support
our families.


Staying for the Long Haul
When they.capped the well in July and finally killed it, we were all
relieved. But would BP stick around? Well, they did. The beaches
are clean and we're back on the water fishing so things are getting
a whole lot better. They are still here and have said they will keep
working for as long as it takes.


Getting Back to Normal
BP asked me to share my story with you to keep you informed. If
you still need help, please call 1-866-448-5816.or go to bp:com. If
you're wondering what you can do, well the next time you're
shopping, buy a little Gulf seafood. There is none finer.


For assistance, please call:
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com


bp






12:16c


2010 BP. E&P


?' :









6C The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252010CP000086

IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNE C. TAYLOR
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of ANNE C. TAYLOR,
deceased, whose date of death
was November 19, 2010, is pend-
Ing In the Circuit Court for HARD-
EE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is
417 Main Street, P.O. Box 1749,
Wauchula, FL 33873. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is December 9, 2010.

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JANE M. HANCOCK
Attorney for RICHARD N. TAYLOR
Florida Bar Number: 341002
Clifford M. Ables, III, PA.
202 W. Main St., STe. 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873


Telephone: (863) 773-0501
Fax: (863) 773-0505
E-Mail: cmables@cmables

Personal Representative:
RICHARD N. TAYLOR
42 Windingwood Lane
Lincoln, Massachusetts 01



IN THE CIRCUIT COUR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLO
PROBATE DIVISION

FILE NO. 252010CP00

IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY LEE CHANCE,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDIT
(Summary Administra

TO ALL PERSONS
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS A
THE ABOVE ESTATE:

You are hereby notified
Order of summary Admin
has been entered in the e
HENRY LEE CH
deceased, File
252010CP00087, by the
Court for Hardee County,
Probate Division, the adi
which is 417 W. Main
Wauchula, Florida 33873;
decedent's date of dea
October 27, 2010; that t
values of the estate is $48
and that the names and
of those to whom it hi
assigned by such order a

Name
LAURA LEE JOHNSON, G
of person and property
B. CHANCE

Address
2014 Popash Road
Wauchula, FL 33873

ALL INTERESTED PERSC
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the esta
decedent and persons
.claims or demands agi
estate of the decedent ot
those for whom provision
payment was made in th
of Summary Administrati
file their claims With th
WITHIN THE TIME PERIC
FORTH IN SECTION 73
the FLORIDA PROBATE C
ALL CLAIMS AND Di
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
OTHER APPLICABLE TIM
OD, ANY CLAIM FILED
YEARS OR MORE AF
DECEDENTS DATE OF D
BARRED.
The first publication
Notice Is December 9, 20
Person Giving N
LAURA LEE JOI
Guardian of per
property of JUN
CHANCE

Attorney for Person Givin
Notice:
VAL R. PATARINI, ESQ
Florida Bar No.: 0061618
216 Lake Drive Blvd.
Sebring, FL 33875
(863) 385-5821


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 252010CA000651
DIVISION:

THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS,
FLORIDA, a municipal corpora-
tion and public body corporate
and politic of the State of
Florida,,
Plaintiff,

v.

THE STATE OF FLORIDA, and
the several taxpayers, property
owners and citizens thereof and
the of the Town of Zolfo Springs,
Florida, including non-residents
owning property or subject to
taxation therein, and all others
having or claiming any right, title
orinterest in property to be
affected by the issuance of the
Bonds and Bond Anticipation
Notes herein described, or to be
affected in any way thereby,
Defendants.

VALDATION OF THE NOT TO
EXCEED $1,654,000 TOWN OF
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA
WATER AND WASTEWATER
SYSTEM REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

TO: THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE ATTOR-
NEY FOR THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, AND TO
THE SEVERAL TAXPAYERS,
PROPERTY OWNERS AND CITI-
ZENS THEREOF AND OF THE
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS,
FLORIDA, INCLUDING NON-RES-
IDENTS OWNING PROPERTY OR
SUBJECT TO TAXATION THERE-
IN, AND ALL OTHERS HAVING
OR CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN PROPERTY TO
BE AFFECTED BY THE
ISSUANCE OF THE TOWN OF
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA
WATER AND WASTEWATER
SYSTEM REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES
HEREINAFTER MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED, OR TO BE
AFFECTED IN ANY WAY THERE-
BY;


0 The above cause coming on to be
heard upon the Complaint filed
spa.net herein by the Town of Zolfo
Springs, Florida (referred to here-
in as the "Plaintiff" or "Issuer")
seeking to determine the authori-
ty of the Plaintiff to issue its not to
1773 exceed $1,654,000 Town of Zolfo
Springs, Florida Water and
12:9,16c Wastewater System Revenue
Bonds (the "Bonds"), and its not
T FOR to exceed $1,654,000 Town of
)RIDA Zolfo Springs, Florida Water and
N Wastewater System Revenue
Bond Antioipation Notes (the
0087 "Bond Anoipation Notes"), a
more particular description of
such obligations being contained
In the Complaint filed in these
proceedings, to determine the
/ legality of the proceedings had
and taken in connection there-
)RS with, and the legality of the provi-
tion) sion, covenants and agreements
contained therein and the rev-
HAVING enues pledged to the payment
GAINST thereof, and seeking a judgment
of this Court to validate the pro-
ceedings for said Bonds and
I that an Bond Anticipation Notes, the rev-
istration enues pledged for the payment,
estate of thereof, and said obligations
ANCEY, when issued prusuant thereto,
Number and said Compalint now having
Circuit been presented to this Court, for
Florida, entry of an Order to Show Cause
dress of pursuant to Chapter 75, Florida
Street, Statues, and the Court being fully
that the advised in the premises:
nth was
e total IT IS ORDERED AND
,987.00, ADJUDGED that the State of
address Florida, through the State
as been Attorney of the Tenth Judicial
re: Circuit of Florida, and the several
taxpayers, property owners and
citizens of the Issuer, induing
guardian non-residents owning property or
of JUNE subject to taxation therein, and all
others having or claiming any
right, title or Interst in property to
be affected in any way thereby, or
to be affected thereby, be and
they are each hereby required to
appear and show caues, if any
)NS ARE there by, before this Court on the
2nd day of February, 2011, at
teoofthe 10:30 a.m., in the Chambers of
having the undersigned Judge at the
inst the Hardee County Courthouse in the
:her than City of Wauchula, Florida, why the
n for full prayer of siad Compalint should
he Order not be granted and why the pro-
on must ceedings for said Bonds and
1is court Bond Anticipation Notes and said
)DS SET Bonds and Bond Anticipation
3.702 of Notes when issued pursuant
CODE. thereto and the revenues pledged
EMANDS to the payment thereof should not
FOREV- be validated and confirmed as
therein prayed.
ANY
E PER AND IT IS FURHTER ORDERED
TWO (2) AND ADJUDGED that this Order
TR THE to Show Cause be published in
)EATH IS the manner required by Section
75.06, Florida Statutes
of this AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED
)10. AND ADJUDGED that, by such
notice: publication of this Order, all tax-
HNSON, payers, property owners and citi-
rson and zens of the Issuer, including non-
IE.B. residents owning property or sub-
ject to taxation therein and all oth-
ers having or claiming any right,
title or interest in the Issuer, or
ig the taxable property therein or in
any property to be affected by the
issuance of said Bonds and Bond
Anticipation Notes or to be affect-
ed in any way thereby, or the
validity of such Bonds and Bond
Anticipation Notes or of any rev-
12:9,16c venues pledged for payment there-
of, or of the proceedings autho-
rizing the issuance of said Bonds
and Bond Anticipation Notes,
including any remedies provided


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Daniel Reyna, 52, Zolfo
Springs, and Wendy Waddell
Pitts, 39, Zolfo Springs.
Clarence Everett Palson, 74,
Sebring, and Rose Chew Ar-
rington, 61, Arcadia.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Long's Air Conditioning Inc.
vs. L&F Convenience Store and
Leon Fulse, dismissed.
Progressive American Insur-
ance Co. a/s/o Thomas Faulk
vs. Carolyn Faulk, default judg-
ment.
Target National Bank vs.
Kimberly B. Miller, default
judgment.
HSBC Bank Nevada NA vs.
James Gough, judgment.
HSBC Bank Nevada NA vs.
SFelipa S. Alvarado, default
judgment.
Target National Bank vs.
Stephanie S. Parker, default
judgment.
Ford Motor Credit Co. LLC
vs. By Jove LLC and Barry




for their collection, be and they
are made parties defendant to
this proceeding, and that this
Court shall have jurisdiction of
them to the same extent as if
named as defendants in said
Complaint and perosnally served
with process in this cause.

DONE AND ORDERED in
chambers of Wauchula, Hardee
County, Florida, this 2nd day of
Dec., 2010..

MARCUS J. EZELLE
CIRCUIT JUDGE
12:9,16c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252010CA000363

WAUCHULA STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

RIDOBEL GONZALEZ and
ADRIANA GONZALEZ, his wife,
ET AL
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO FLORIDA
STATUTES CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to a SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS dated
December 3, 2010, in the above
styled cause, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at the Hardee County
Courthouse, on the second floor
hallway outside of Room 202, 417
West Main Street, Wauchula, FL
33873, at 11:00 A.M. on
December 29, 2010, the following
described property as set forth in
said SUMMARY FINAL JUDG-
MENT OF FORECLOSURE AND
TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S FEES
AND COSTS, to wit:

S 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of the
SE 1/4, Section 27,
Township 33 South, Range
26 East, Hardee County,
Florida
AND
N 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of the
SE 1/4, Section 27,
Township 33 South, Range
26 East, Hardee County,
Florida

Parcel ID No.: 27-33-26-
0000-08130-0000 and 27-
33-26-0000-08120-0000
commonly known as: 1132
and 1182 Ed Wells Road,
Wauchula, FL 33873
Dated this 6 day of December
2010.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
AS DEPUTY CLERK

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you are a person with a
disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision
of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, 255 N. Broadway
Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830,
(863) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; If
you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.


12:9,16c


Edgley, judgment against Barry
Edgley only.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Cynthia Michel, obtaining
property by worthless check,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion six months, ACF class, stay
out of store, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 cost of prosecution
(COP), $50 investigative costs,
25 hours community service.
Jennifer Gwen Flores, disor-
derly intoxication, $325 fine
and court costs, $50 COP.
Mario Lopez Hernandez,
giving false identification to a
law enforcement officer, time
served, waive fines and costs.
Scott Michael LaCosse, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, substance abuse
evaluation/treatment, warrant-
less search and seizure, random
drug screens, $325 fine and
court dosts, $50 COP ; posses-
sion of marijuana, not prosecut-
ed.
Charles Eugene Lumley,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, time served, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP.
Rosa Linda Carmona, petit
theft, probation one year, $325
fine and court costs, $200 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP, 50
hours community service.
Gayle Harrison Chauncey,
retail theft, probation one year,
stay out of store, $325 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $50 COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs, 50 hours community
service.
Pamela Nicole Johns, petit
theft, adjudication withheld,
probation six months, ACF
Mile Post Class, stay out of
store, $325 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $50
COP, 30 hours community ser-
vice; contributing to the delin-
quency of a minor, not prose-
cuting.
Joe Roman Valdez, posses-
sion of marijuana and obstruc-
tion of a search warrant, time
served, license suspended two
years, $325 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $50
COP.
David Huss, two counts
domestic battery, completed
pre-trial diversionary program,
not prosecuted.


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Dec. 6-10. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Joseph Alan Lang, Georgia
Street, renovations, $1,000.
William D. Hogue, West
Second Street, renovations,
$4,500.
Tommie Mock, SR 64, reno-
vations, $2,450.
Mark Kornovich, Palm
Drive, renovations, $22,500.
Harold Howze, Maxwell
Drive, renovations, $3,975.
Keith Holibaugh, Heard
Bridge Road, renovations,
$1,417.
Thomas Bostick Construc-
tion, East Main Street, renova-
tions, $4,200.
Benjamin Hash, Resthaven
Road, renovations, $9,088.
John Beattie, SR 64 West,
other, $1,000.
Martin Velasco, Polk Road,
renovations, $2,890.
David Allen, West Oak
Street, renovations, $3,000.
Travis Fulford, SKP Way,
roofing, $$4,828,
Phil Rutherford, Heard
Bridge Road, two mobile
homes, $4,400.
Harry Purvis, Osprey Lane,
renovations, $7,500.

BUILDING BLOCKS
Always contact your local
building department to deter-
mine, if a permit is required
before you start your building
project. Obtain several written
estimates and verify that your
contractor obtained the neces-
sary and proper permits prior to
beginning the project. For in-
formation on any of these top-
ics, contact the building office
at 773-3236.


PI c outhou e Re ort
I^MjIj~i~ia-y*


Stacey R. Castillo, disorderly
conduct, adjudication withheld,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
public defender fee, $50 COP.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
John Mark Woodburn and
Ruth Elaine Woodburn, di-
vorce.
Florida Fertilizer Co. vs.
Dale Hamilton, damages-con-
tracts and indebtedness.
Dana Porter vs. Dustin
Porter, petition for injunction
for protection.
Jennifer Maldonado vs. Ci-
priano Ibarra, petition for in-
junction for protection.
Joseph Ouellette and Janet S.
Lee, divorce.
Elizabeth L. Buffalo vs.
Elena Puente, petition for in-
junction for protection.
Donna S. Williams and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. John T. Williams,
petition for administrative child
support order.
Carolina Maldonado and
DOR vs. Ricky Trevino, peti-
tion for administrative child
support order.
Krystle Massey and DOR vs.
Dusty Massey, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Robin Macias and Jose
Macias III, divorce.
Ford Motor Credit Co. LLC
vs. Christopher Friers, dam-
ages--contracts and indebted-
ness.
Cavalry Portfolio vs. Edward
R. Reardon Jr., damages-con-
tracts and indebtedness.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Betty Richardson vs. Maribel
Maya, voluntary dismissal.
Melissa Sunday and DOR vs.
Alan Hudson, child support
arrears established.
Maria Baker Juarez and
DOR vs. Freddie J. Juarez, vol-
untary dismissal.
Holly Fralish Thornton and
DOR vs. Heather Michelle
Oakley, voluntary dismissal.
Casey Lynn Kendall vs.
Jason M. Swain, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Donna Hunt vs. Ralph Hunt,
amended injunction for protec-
tion.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of last
week by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Clint Morgan Albritton,
grand theft auto and grand theft,
four years Florida State Prison
with credit for time served
(CTS), $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender
fees, $100 COP and $150 inves-
tigative fees placed on lien;
grand theft, more than $300 but
less than $500, not prosecuted.


Your Business Could Appear Herel

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate





IT's TIME TO LEARN ABOUT MEDICARE

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have to be complicated. Get personal
guidance from a local representative.

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ALBRITTON
IWAI I 6%r~


St-rvie N, c i n- I. I .i i q -. .:; xpe.rt- Ise

863-773-4101
Independent Licensed Florida Agent 11:18-12:23e


Rosa Linda Carmona, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges three counts possession
of methamphetamine and three:
counts possession of drug para-
phernalia), probation terminat-
ed.
Tracey L. Chandler, violation
of community control-house
arrest (original charge obtaiiingg
a controlled substance by
forgery), community control
revoked, 18 months Florida
State Prison CTS, $350 public
defender fees and $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Mario Lopez Hernandez,-
violation of probation (original
charge carrying a concealed
weapon), probation revoked, 11
months 29 days in jail CTS,
$200 public defender fee and
$100 COP added to outstanding
fines and fees and placed on'
lien.
Matthew Little, manufactur-
ing of methamphetamine, traf-.
ficking in methamphetamine,
unlawful possession of listed
chemicals, two counts posses-
Ssion of a firearm or ammo by a
convicted felon, possession of
methamphetamine, possession
of a short-barrel shotgun and
grand theft, five years Florida
State Prison, $50,395 fines and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees and $100 COP placed on;
lien.
Kenneth Lee Coughlin, ag-
gravated battery with a deadly
weapon, not prosecuted.
Jose Guadalupe Gutierrez,
possession of methampheta-
mine, not prosecuted.
Delores Belmares, public:
assistance fraud, adjudication
withheld, probation four years,,
$520 fine and court costs, $350
public defender fees, $14,626
restitution.
Jassmarie Evelisse Aviles,
violation of probation (original
charges fraudulent use of credit
card and grand theft), probation
revoked, four months in jail.,
CTS, $100 COP added to out-'
standing fines and fees and'
placed on lien.

The following real estate
transactions of' $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Wauchula State Bank to Jose
J. and Maria R. Leija, $23,000.
Shaun Donovan and the fed-
eral Housing and Urban Devel-
opment to Christopher Kylen
Albritton, $50,000.
B.F. Farms LLC to J.A..
Clark III, $1.080 million.
Denysa Auerbach to Richard
Hedge as trustee 239 Land
Trust, $33,000.
Elisa Garza to William F. and
Stephanie Tyler, $75,000.
Russell G. and Lisa M.
Wilkins to Frederic M. and
Lynne E. Wells, $95,000.
Wayne E., and Joan L.:
Swafford as trustees to Jerry
and Lydia Budd, $150,000.
Steven D. and Carmen E.
Horn to Gunter Anton Michael
and Maria Ann Dill, $82,000.
Cypress Point LLC, FVP
Florida Development LLC,
semper Fi Excavates, Semper
Fi Cartage and Semper Fi'
Group to Whitney National
Bank, $2,317,536.50.
Bank of America to Roy F.
Albritton, $17,900.
Grimsley Oil Co. Inc. to Ram
Lands of Central Florida Inc.,
$400,000.


I







December 16, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7C


'Cool Cats' At ZSE Earn Recognition


COURTESY PHOTOS
Kindergarteners who received the Cool Cat Award at Zolfo Springs Elementary School
were (front row, from left) Arianna Rodriguez, Brandon Bailey, Jaqueline Jurado,
Stephanie McMillan, Dinora Villa, Caroline Paulino-Mendieta and Sandra Ruiz; (back
row) Gloria Mendiola, Christopher Quiroz and Esmeralda Jimenez.


Second graders awarded for excellent citizenship were (first row, from left) Jake Cole,
Erika Ojeda, Tanner Congelton, Cameron Cantu, Justin Cole and Oscar Deleon; (back
row) Brittney Covarrubias, Diana Cardenas-Munoz and Alfonso Venegas-Baez.


First graders recognized for their good classroom conduct were (first row, from left)
Arlee Juarez, Adrian Gallardo, Marisa Medieta, Yeng Lor, Roberto DeLira and Makayla
Pratt; (second row) Damian Johnston, Odalis Lopez-Rojas, Joquin Rojo, Summer.
Lanham, A.J. Rodriguez and Itzel Mendez.


Third graders who earned the Cool Cat Award were (front row, from left) Daniel Ramos,
Marisol Torres, Carlos Carranza, Lucy Garcia, Angela Ramirez and Kipp Cooper; (sec-
ond row) Karina Carranza, Dakota Vanderhoff, Brayan Diego and Briana Montero.


Fourth graders acknowledged for their outstanding leadership were (first row, from
left) Alexis Jaimes, Luis Angeles, Amari Deleon, Destiny Ballard, Giovanni Diego and
Jamie Richardson; (back row) Rebekah Hinojosa, Anahi Villa, Marco Alvarez, Claudia
Rojo-Deleon, Katie Dayfert and Javier Garcia.


I' / WWW :.M* .WR 1. 3R .I
Fifth graders awarded for their successes were (front row, from left) Carol Allison,
James Vue, Mason Block, Jasmine Sanchez, Victoria Borjas, Juan Lazaro and Ashley
Gonzalez; (second row) Marisela Duran, Hallei Mushrush, Daniel Alvarez and Cecelia
Castillo.


Frankie 's
773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
SNow AcceptingHours
VTuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3


.**^ ^ -,.

... f .,. I
ie'

Legal 1Holiday Notice

We will be closing
at 1:00p.m.
CHRISTMAS EVE
Friday, December 24, 2010.


We will be closed
Saturday, December 25, 2010.
'in observance of
CHRISTMAS DAY
Please transact your business with us with that in mind.
FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF
,g-1 WAUCHULA
*""11 ? 1 R


i ^*ATTENTION:
Sg HARDEE COUNTY
SsDISPOSAL CUSTOMERS

Due to the Christmas Holiday on Saturday, December 25th,
I THE CITY OF ZOLFO SPRINGS WILL BE SERVICED ON
II Friday, December 24th.
ALL OTHER ROUTES WILL REMAIN THE SAME.

Due to the New Year's Holiday on Saturday, January 1st,
~ THE CITY OF ZOLFO SPRINGS WILL BE SERVICED ON
=l Friday, December 31" si
ALL OTHER ROUTES WILL REMAIN THE SAME.


mm1


REMEMBER TO DROP OFF RECYCLE ITEMS AT OUR DROP OFF CENTER


m J127 East Townsend St. or The County Landfill on Airport Rd
I:: Now Accepting: Plastic, Glass, Cardboard, Newspaper,
Magazines, Junk Mail, Paper, Aluminum and Tin .- .
m | Monday-Friday 8:00-5:00
NI N II.ir H Ii "T H/ /II IH BR -


(


I'--


r,








8C The Herald-Advocate, December 16, 2010


S!orjlwt Green News
S"By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


Greetings from Fort Green!
I sincerely hope you did not
.lose too many flowers or veg-
etables during the cold weather.
Sherman says he thought we
were getting global warming,
but believes it is global freez-
ing!
This cold weather does not
help with the sick. The weather
was too bad for Mrs. Mildred to
get out to church, and Sherman
stayed in for another Sunday as
his get up and go got up and
' left. Brother Eddie Kennedy did
not go to Lakeland with his kid-
ney problem and is still. at
Hardee Manor but his health
continues to decline. Tom Brad-
dock is in Tampa General as he
had a problem when working in
the pasture recently.
Dawn Watson had surgery at
Tampa General and while in the
recovery room, had a severe
stroke and is paralyzed. Broth-
er Steve and Tara went to see
her Saturday but said she was in
bad shape. Johnny Summerville'
had to return to Tampa General
and is still there. Cheryl
Pierstorff was sick and unable
to attend church and Beth Sas-
ser is sick with a cold while
recovering from her foot sur-
gery.
Charlton Sadler began having
:problems with fluid around his
heart and had his medicine
Changed. He seems to be better
but Jean is having back prob-
lems and I am sure just wore
out. When you have sickness in
the home it has a tendency to
make you mighty tired. William
'Porter began his chemo last
week so you can see our prayer
List is serious. Please pray for all
of these.
Everyone was glad to see
Bayleigh Pierstorff Sunday.
She is home from Abraham
Baldwin Agricultural College in
Tifton, Ga., for the Christmas
holidays.
Faye Davis and others will


have a one-day youth camp on
Saturday in the Fellowship
Hall. It will be from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m., and the youth will be
painting so they need to wear
old clothes. This day will give
mothers and fathers time to
complete items around home
that are best done without chil-
dren underfoot.
The Christmas party for the
adults will be Friday at the
Fellowship Hall, beginning at
6:30 p.m. Dolene Fields' class
and the Children's Church had
their party on Monday. They all
had a terrific time.
Karen and Wayne Seminole
have returned to their Fort
Green home. They spend the
summer in Maine and as cold as
it is here, I feel sure it is warmer
than Maine. We are glad to have
them back home.
Leo and Lila Blink were able
to attend church this past Sun-
day. Mr. Blink is real adept with
his new electric scooter, which
is easier than the walker. There
is a special spot for his oxygen,
which is a necessity. We are all
proud that he is getting better.
There will be a good Christ-
mas program at Fort Green this
Sunday. The adults will be
singing in the morning and the
youth in th i e evening. Refresh-
ments will follow the evening
service and a visit is expected
from Santa Claus.
Since everyone eeonwill be tired
of rich food, there will be a chili
cookoff on New Year's Eve in
the fellowship hall. There is a
much-desired Gold Spoon
Award for the best chili, so
men, young and old, get out
those recipes. Ladies are re-
quested to bring dessert but
there will be no reward, just
some good eating!
Please remember to pray for
one another, our country and
the military. I wish you all a
Merry Christmas!


f silence is golden, then speech is platinum. It spreads
wisdom, dispels ignorance, ventilates grievances, stimu-
lates curiosity, lightens the spirits and lessens the fun-
damental loneliness of the soul.
-Jan Struther


Kay and Beecher Dale were
in charge of our Thanksgiving
dinner. There were approxi-
mately 205 residents and fami-
lies in attendance. Kay and
Beecher and their volunteers
did an excellent job.
Cindy and Bill Johnson are
in charge of our Christmas din-
ner again this year. There are
signup sheets in the Games
Room to volunteer to help with
the dinner.
KOFFEE KLATCH
Diane and Bill Burget and
Judy and Don McDermit were
the hosts on December 8.
Richard Brayton led the U.S.
Pledge, Bubbles Powell led the
Canadian Pledge and Don Me-
rillat led the prayer. The 50/50
winners were Lot 30, Betty
Ardis and Don and Monique
Harkin. Fred Leverone an-
nounced that there will be
another Fun Auction on Feb-
ruary 5. Start thinking of what
you can donate to the auction to
make it successful.
NEW YEAR'S EVE DANCE
Tickets are now on sale for
the New Year's Eve Dance at
my house. Music will be pro-
vided by The Nite Lites. Please
bring finger food to share.
50/50 tickets will be sold at this
dance. There will be some nice
door prizes. Get your tickets
early.
BINGO
The large jackpot on Dec. 3
was split between Kay Dale,
Judy McDermit, Jean Swei-
kowski and Barb Newman.
Barb Newman was lucky again
and won the small jackpot by
herself. On Dec. 6, Anne-Marie
Shewan won the large jackpot
and Betty Stephens won the
small one.
SCORES
Men's Golf Dec. 2-the win-
ners were Doug Taylor, Don
McDermit, Brian Kavanagh
and D. Miller.
Mixed Golf Dec. 6-A or B
+ C or D-the winners were


Roy Brinker, Don McDermit
and Bob Keener. Bob Keener
ended up on the winning team
even after falling in a hazard.
Shuffling Dec. 7-the three
game winners on this cold
morning and refinished shuffle
courts were Dale Baker, Bob
Bundy, Sheri Bundy, Al John-
son, Bob Kramer, Don Mc-
Dermit, Charlie Mollett, Peggy
Ralph and Doug Taylor.
It seems Don McDermit has
been busy this last week as I
have typed his name quite a few
times in this article.

CHURCH NEWS !
By Diane Burget
As we entered for worship
this first Sunday in December,
we were greeted by Christmas
carols being played by Carole
Jones on the piano and Wilma
Behymer on the organ. Maxine
Stromme served as greeter. The
service was opened with the
-congregation singing "Silent
Night"; "0 Come, All Ye
Faithful", "O Little Town of
Bethlehem" and, "Rock of
Ages." Under the direction of
Nancy Morrison, our choir sang
"We Come to this Table."
Carole Jones provided the ac-
companiment.
Don Merillat gave the offer-
ing prayer and Lowell Gordon
and Bob Wilday served as offer-
ing stewards.
Don Merillat also gave the
communion prayer for the!
bread and Pastor Winne offered
the prayer for the wine. Gary
Householder, Bill Burget and
Lee Roy Behymer were the
communion stewards. The com-
munion elements were prepared
by Charlotte and Gary House-
holder and Lee Roy Behymer.
Pastor Bob Winne continued
his short series on "Are There
Animals in Heaven" and what
the Bible says about this sub-'
ject. He gave us many scripture
references to consider. Scrip-
tures were from Genesis,
James, 1 John, Job, Revelation,
II Kings and I Corinthians.
The service was closed with
sirigfng "Halleluiah."


We are at risk of producing more technology than the,
world can adapt to.
-Dan Hutchesonj


Our 2010-2011 King and
Queen were crowned Dec. 4,
Norb and Gerry Wilhelm; we
want to congratulate them!
They were very much surprised
and they are a great couple to
receive this honor.
Travel mercies for all our
holiday travelers.

CHAPEL
We had 114 greeted by
Wayne and Lynn Shick and
Larry and Ruth Brown. Light-
ing of the Advent Candle was
by John and Janet Forster.
Special music was "Heaven
Came Down and Glory Filled
My Soul," solo by Joe Boyer
with the choir.
Pastor Jim Williams Family
came to thank all of the Chapel
for the love and support through
their loss of Pastor Jim.
Pastor Jason spoke from
John 3:16 "The Love from God
is Forever." Communion was
served and closing hymn, "Lord
Dismiss Us With Thy Bles-
sing."

COFFEE HOUR
Darlene Hayes led the pledge
and Janet the prayer for 179.
Our speaker Teresa .was from
Wauchula Landfill, with a lot of
information that will be valu-
able to everyone regarding
recycling and toxic elimination.
Janet announced our first
place winner was Don and
Yvonne McDonald Lot E-11
and second place was Robert
and Diane Cormier Lot D-12
for the best decorated units. We
had many coupons, 50/50 and
Perkins Pecan Pie was won.
Congrats to all the lucky win-
ners!

ACTIVITIES
Bowling: Steve McIntire
high game 199 and high series
534, for the woman Joyce
Gilson high game 169 and Dee


Martin high series 455. Good
scores gang! Shuffle: Winter
Haven in the Central District
Pro/Am, Cheryl and Bob
Conkle came in first in the J~
in the consolation division.
Lynn Shick won first place in
the Amateur consolation divi--
sion. Point shuffle has begun in
the park on Wednesdays and
will continue till the end of
February, and the one with most
games won receives a trophy.
SPOTLIGHT
Herb and Edna Bell after
begin High schoolsweethearts,
on October 1st celebrated their
50th Anniversary witi a day of :
celebration on October 2nd ..
with all their family and friends.
They hale from Montrose,
Michigan, but when they retried
they moved to Kalkaska,.
Michigan. They have three j'
sons, eight grandchildren and
six great-grandchildren. Herb
retired from General Motors/-
Buick Division, and Edna
retired from a hearing aid com-
pany and became the owner of :
Bell's Hearing Aid Company.
After coming to our park for
10 years, they have decided to
become full-time residents
starting this year. Edna is cur-
rently the co-librarian, they co-
chair the Monday morning cof-
fee hour, and also.work the
snack bar at our Sunday Jam
Sessions every other Sunday.
Last season Edna retired
after four years as the co-editor
of the parks column with The
Herald-Advocate, with other
interests and endeavors. She
will be missed and was a joy to
work with.
Edna's interest are reading,
writing poems, word and logic
puzzles. Herb is interested in
hunting, horseshoes, golfing
and playing cards. They are an
active couple that are an asset to
our park.


Aum Pharmacy Is Closed

BUT HEARTLAND PHARMACY





HEARTLAND PHARMACY


Is


OPEN!


Bring your Aum bottles to HEARTLAND PHARMACY for transfer &


FRIENDLY HOMETOWN SERVICE!


1112 US 17 S oll'~tii Wach'a, (6) 6 -890l


DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


"We Put Our I Into Our Service"


If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


. .. .. .. . . .. .. . .' .... ; : .


W4j


Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet and Sharon Magee


Your Business Could Appear Herel
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Pauline Ochoa, Sue Lobato, Red Camp Pharmacist and Crystal Contreras




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