The Herald-advocate
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00354
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: December 9, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00354
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text






Fishermen: Mosaic

Lakes Reopen
... Story 80


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 1
4 Sections, 32 Pages


Thursday, December 9, 2010


4-Laning Of U.S.


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
After decades of wanting,
pleading and even begging, the
Florida Department of Trans-
portation has listened to the
people of Hardee County and is
funding the four-laning of U.S.
17 in its new five-year plan.


Construction costs for the
,project are estimated to be $70
million with an additional $10
million in right-of-way acquisi-
* tions and environmental costs.
The two additional lanes will
be placed near the existing
roadway, but the exact route is
not yet finalized.


Paving will be done in two
phases beginning next year and
should be completed in either
2017 or 2018, according to
County Manager Lex Albritton
The first portion of the proj-
ect will begin during the end of
2011 and will go from Zolfo
Spring south to Sweetwater


17 Gets Funding!


Road.
This portion of the project
will cost about $28 million.
Right-of-way and environ-
mental costs are budgeted for,
the 2012-13 fiscal year.
The $2 million for environ-
mental costs will be related to
using the old railroad right of


way and any necessary cleanup
involved, Albritton said.
The final phase of the project,
from Sweetwater Road south to
the Desoto County line, is bud-
geted for the 2015:16 fiscal
year and comes with a price tag
of $42.6 million.
Bill Lambert, Hardee County


economic development direc-
tor, said the project will help the
county grow in the future.
"The completion of four-lan-
ing U.S. 17 in southern Haraee
County will provide a vastly
improved transportation corri-
dor leading to direct positive
See U.S.173A


GLEEFUL GLISTENING


HHS Gets


'D' Grade

Fourth Consecutive Year


PHOTO RALPH HARRISON
The fountain at Main Street Heritage Park in downtown Wauchula is all aglow in this exposure as Hardee County cel-
ebrates the joys of the Christmas season. This image was captured on Saturday night, following the Chamber of
Commerce's annual Christmas Parade through downtown streets. For a pictorial of parade highlights, see next
week's edition.


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Under a new grading system
designed to better reflect
achievements, 62 Florida high
schools were able to boost their
D grades to a higher level, the
state Department of Education
said Tuesday.
Hardee Senior High School
was not one of them.
Instead, the school received
its fourth consecutive D grade,
making it one of only 58 of
Florida's 470 high schools to do
so for 2009-10. Because of
those continuing D grades, a
state team of specialists was
assigned to HHS this year in an
effort to enhance performance.
The county's other secondary
school, Hardee Junior High, has
been graded a B. That's an in-
crease from 2008-09's C mark
and also follows a trend, as it
has alternated between a B and
a C each year since 2005.
Gov. Charlie Crist and Ed-


ucation Commissioner Eric
Smith on Tuesday hailed the
release of the high-school
grades as indicative of overall
academic gains, saying the new
grading system relies on more
than just Florida Comprehen-
sive Assessment Test results to
gauge a school's performance.
With the new grading system,
about 71' percent of the state's
high schools earned either an A
or a B grade. Fifteen percent
scored a C. Then, 12 percent
were ranked a D and just two
percent, or 11 high schools, an
F
The new grading system used
this yearwas developed by Sen.
Don Gaetz and passed in the
2008 legislative .session as a
means to track student perform-
ance beyond FCAT scores to
include preparation for 21st-
century success.
To that end, only 50 percent
of a high school's grade is
See HHS GETS 3A


State Files Workers' Comp Fraud Charges Against Businessman/Commissioner


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A Wauchula city commis-
sioner and businessman will
find himself facing felony
charges in Hardee Circuit Court
once again.
'Clarence Bolin, 68, of 808 S.
10th Ave., was charged with
violation of the Florida Gov-
ernment in the Sunshine Law,
along with his six fellow city
commissioners, in August of
this year.
Now, state investigators are
accusing him of workers' com-
pensation insurance fraud and
of violation of a stop-work
order in his role as owner'of
Bolin's Decorating Center.


WEATHER
DATE HWH LOW = AI
12101 69 45 0.01
12102 65 39 0.00
12/03 68 35 0.00
12104 72 34 0.00
12/05 75 50 001
12/06 55 34 0.00
12/07 55 29 0.00
TOTIQA Rainfall to 12/07/10 48.27
Same period leas year 44.31
Ten year Average 2.43
Source: Unhr. of Fl. One Rerrch Center

INDEX
Classifieds ......... 6D
Community Calendar.. .8D
Courthouse Report ... 7B
Crime Blotter ....... 5B
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup ..4A
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menus ..2D



112III11 III lI ii
7 18122 072909 3


Both are third-degree felonies.
Bolin, who was charged by
complaint affidavit and was not
arrested nor booked into jail,
will appear before Circuit.Judge
Marcus J. Ezelle for arraign-
ment on the charges this com-
ing Tuesday.
On Tuesday of this week,


Water

Limits

In Place

By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Water restrictions, which had
been lifted during summer
rains, have come back.
Hardee is among the 16-
county Southwest Florida Water
Management District for which
a Modified Phase I water short-
age notice was issued effective
last Wednesday, Dec. 1.
October was probably the dri-
est on record and it rained
sparsely in November. Aquifer
and lake levels in the
SWFWMD's South Region of
Charlotte, Desoto, Hardee,
Highlands, Manatee and Sar-
asota counties) were at minus
levels.
Lawn water use is limited to.
twice per week, before 10 a.m.
or after 4 p.m., even addresses
on Thursday and/or Sunday;
and odd addresses Wednesday
and/or Saturday. Those with no
discernable address may water
on Tuesday and/or Friday.
There is a 30-30 rule for new
lawns and plants, 30 minutes a
day for up to 30 days. For the
See WATER 3A


Bolin said he would seek the
counsel of a lawyer to defend
him in court. He said he had an
appointment with a lawyer on
Wednesday.
"I thought I had this taken
care of," he said of the state
allegations. "Needless to say, I
was shocked when this hap-

ANNUAL ARTISTRY


opened "
Bolin believes he met re-
quirements. "I did what I was
supposed to do and this came
out and I was surprised," he
said, adding, "I really don't
want to say anything else until I
talk with a lawyer."
According to the State


Attorney's Office, investigators
with the state Department of
Financial Services' Division of
Workers' Compensation/Bu-
reau of Compliance conducted
a random check at the First
Baptist Church of Wauchula
jobsite on April 15 of this year.
A worker, they said, was


involved in a tile project. He
told investigators he was em-
ployed by Bolin's Decorating
Center and was not a subcon-
tractor. Those investigators then
asked Bolin to produce a certifi-
cate of insurance.
Bolin responded that he is
See STATE 2A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The seventh annual presentation of the "Treasures of Christmas" by the Heartland Chorale & Symphony finished its
run on Sunday with its first-ever performance at an out-of-county venue, the new Performing Arts Center at South
Florida Community College In Avon Park. This year's showing featured Inspirational artist Jason Anthony Palmisano
among the musical artists. He, before spectators' eyes, completed a large full-color chalk drawing of the nativity
scene. For more photos from the performances, turn to 4B.


4 SHOPPING DAYS

ITIL CHRISTMAS!


S Soldier Walks

Across State

... Details 3A


46
plui 4- Sale tlax


I-


r Il I


I -










2A The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


( DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p m
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads-Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
months $18; 1 yr. $31;2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months- $22; I yr $41; 1 yrs. $79
Out of Sa.te
6 months $27; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. $95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submussions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines All items are sub-
ject to editing.
I '


SKelly's Column
By Jim


Hardee County had its first cold snap of the season this week,
with temperatures dipping below 30 degrees Tuesday and
Wednesday mornings. One of my neighbors in Bowling Green had
ice in his birdbath both mornings.
The citrus harvest in Hardee County is underway, with some
juice processing plants having opened after Thanksgiving Day.
Drinking orange or grapefruit juice daily can help prevent colds
and improve your health. J.A. Clark of Wauchula serves on the
Florida Citrus Commission.

William R. Hough, who founded an investment banking firm
in his own name, recently donated $30 million to the University of
Florida.
According to Art Levy of a recent Florida Trend Magazine,
Hough as a young man knew his family got through the Great
Depression on dividends from blue chip stocks. Many of the stocks
that crashed in 1929 were on a 90 percent margin, which is illegal
today, when margin is permitted at,5Q percent.
His advice for a young person is to start off with a savings
account and not live beyond your means. To accumulate wealth
you should never live beyond your income, save something every
year, and invest in something that will grow. His advice is stocks of
blue chip companies.
Hough said the biggest investment mistake people make is tak-
ing a short-term view.

Through August there were 118 bank failures in the U.S. in
2010, including 22 in Florida, reports the October 2010 issue of
Florida Trend Magazine.
In 2009 Florida had 341 banks and bank holding companies
with 5,820 offices. The Top 5 had over 52 percent of the market
share. In order they are Bank of America, Wells Fargo, SunTrust,
Regions Bank and BB&T. In 1995 the Top 5 banks in Florida were
Barnett Banks, First Union, SunTrust Banks, NationsBank and
Great Western Bank.
In the second quarter of 2010, 62 percent of Florida banks
reported earnings losses, due largely to the declining real estate
market and foreclosures and loan write-offs. This was a better quar-
ter than 2009. Loan demand from creditworthy customers has been
weak. Hardee County was not affected by the real estate and hous-
ing decline as much as many other areas in Florida.

Nationally syndicated conservative columnist Cal Thomas
says the American health industry should concentrate on finding a
cure for diseases such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer's.

On Sunday we saw the 10-2 Atlanta Falcons defeat the 7-5
Tampa Bay Bucs 28-24 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.
Original Buc head coach John McKay was inducted into the team's
Ring of Honor, joining defensive end LeeRoy Selmon.
McKay was a great coach, coming from his powerhouse col-
lege career at University of Southern California. He was a master
of witty one-liners and loved to watch Western movies on TV, espe-
cially starring John Wayne. His son Rich McKay is general man-
ager of the Falcons.
Fans received a white and orange replica floppy hat, the type
worn by McKay. The hats were 100 percent cotton and made in
China. Buc players wore the old buc colors of orange, white and
red. The Bucs led the Falcons 24-14 in the second half, arousing
false hopes for a Tampa win.

According to the November 2010 issue of CFO magazine,
China's global market share of manufactured goods between 2000
and 2008 increased from 7 percent to 17 percent.
During the same period the U.S. share fell from 19 to 14 per-
cent. The value of U.S. exports, however, during that time,
.increased by 60 percent, the magazine reported.
In 2009 China overtook the U.S. as the world's largest car mar-
Sket, reports Anh Lu, portfolio manager of the T. Rowe Price New
Asia Fund.

The Democratic Naitonal Committee has already compiled a
list of potential Republican rivals to President Barack Obama in the
2012 presidential election. The list of nine include Sarah Palin,
Newt Gingrich, Mitt Romney, Mike Huckabee, Jeb Bush, Bobby
SJindal, Rick Santorum, Tim Pawlenty, and Haley Barbour.
My early favorites would be Mitt Romney or Jeb Bush.

A veteran is someone who, at one point in his or her life, wrote
a blank check payable 'to the United States of America for an
amount of "up.to and including their life," reports Veterans Post
News based in St. Petersburg.

The 33 miners, who were rescued from deep underground in
Chile recently can be very thankful for the holiday season. They
were trapped for 69 days and survived.

The sports world was saddened this week to lose Dandy Don
Meredith, 72, to a brain hemorrhage. He was a Dallas Cowboy
quarterback and a great member of the Monday Night NFL
Football TV team with Howard Cosell and Frank Gifford. When a
game was decided, he would say, "Turn out the lights. The party's
over."



t


engaged in an employee leasints
arrangement with First Finan-
cial Employee Leasing Inc.,
which is the legal employer of
workers leased to client compa-
nies and which holds a master
workers' compensation insur-
ance policy.
On April 19, Bolin submitted
a certificate of insurance to the


Kindergartener Connor
Murray made the Honor
Roll at Bowling Green
Elementary School for
achieving all E's in the first
nine-week period.
Keep up the good work,
Connor!

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


investigators.
They, in turn, contacted First
Financial Employee Leasing,
and allege they were told its
relationship with Bolin was ter-
minated on Dec. 16 of'2009.
The investigators suspected
the document had been altered,
and the State Attorney's Office
alleges the certificate of insur-
ance Bolin produced was a for-
gery.
The state goes on to allege
that on May 3 it issued a stop-
work order for Bolin and
Bolin's DecoratftgdCenter "un-
til this matter was resolved."
But, it further alleges, when
officers with the Division of
Insurance Fraud went to inter-
view Bolin on June 23, his store
was open and actively doing
business.
Bolin later explained to in-
vestigators that the insurance
document he had submitted was
an old one that he had on file,
and that he had it altered to
reflect a "correct date." He fur-
ther said "it is hard not to be
open.
The state, however, filed
charges, and prosecution was
initiated by the State Attorney's
Office for the 10th Judicial.
Circuit.



Once a month the sky falls,
on my head, I come to and
I see another movie I want
to make.
-Steven Spielberg

You can learn many things
from children. How much
patience you have, for
instance.
-Franklin P. Jones


Orange grove abandonment in Florida has hurt in the fight
against the Asian citrus psyllid that spreads citrus greening, Adam
Cancryn wrote recently in The Wall Street Journal. Greening is also
called yellow dragon disease.
There is no know cure for this disease, which causes trees "to
produce shriveled, bitter oranges before killing them."
Most grove owners are trying to kill the psyllids with regular
insecticide spraying. Florida has a $9 billion a year citrus industry
that supplies 90 percent of U.S. orange juice.
The Journal reported 138,000 acres of citrus groves have been
abandoned. The new citrus crop is estimated at 146 million boxes.
Polk County citrus grower Marty McKenna was.,quoted in the
story. Polk is the state's No. 1 orange producing copt1ty.

Main Street Bartow's annual Christmas parade will be at 6
p.m. Friday, Dec. 10, in downtown. Earlier in the day a concert in
the park by Wild Willy will be held from 11:30 to 1:30 at Fort
blount Park. The Antique Fair and city-wide yard sale will be held
from 8 to 2 Saturday, Dec. 11. Call 863-519-0508 for more details.


STATE
Continued From 1A


Avoiding Tax

Relief Scams
If you owe back taxes and
don't know how you will pay
the IRS, it may seem like a
company that promises to sig-
nificantly reduce your tax bill
has the answer to your prob-
lems. Not so fast. You could end
up deeper in debt.
According to the Federal
Trade Commission (FTC), the
nation's consumer protection
agency, tax relief companies
use the radio, TV and Internet
to advertise help for taxpayers
in distress. These companies
Claim that for an up-front fee,
which can be thousands of dol-
lars, they can reduce or even
eliminate your tax debts and
stop back-tax collection by
applying for legitimate IRS'
hardship programs.
The truth is that most taxpay-
ers don't qualify for such pro-
grams, the companies don't set-
tle the tax debt and, in many
cases, don't even send the nec-
essary paperwork to the IRS.
Adding insult to injury, some of
these companies don't provide
refunds and leave people even
further in debt.
Some taxpayers who filed com-
plaints with the FTC reported
that, after signing up with some
of these companies and paying ,


An NFL football is approximately 111/4 inches long and
weighs 14 to 15 ounces.

It's estimated that in one year, an acre of trees can
absorb as much carbon as is produced by a car driven'
up to 8,700 miles.



CENTRAL FLORIDA
teath Care HEALTH CARE, INC.

204 E. Palmetto Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
ith A Heart (863) 773-2111

"Se Habla Espafiol"

Pediatric & Adult Primary Care










Dr. Maria de Padua Dr. John Edmiston
Pediatrics Adult Family
12 4-


thousands of dollars in up-front
fees, the companies took more
of their money by making unau-
thorized charges to their credit
cards or withdrawals from their
bank accounts.

TAXPAYER TIPS -.
If you owe back taxes and
are having trouble meeting your
tax obligation:
Read your notices from the
IRS. Ask about collection alter-
natives. Contact the Taxpayer
Advocate Service, an independ-
ent organization within the IRS
that provides free help to people
who are experiencing financial
difficulties or who need help
resolving a problem with the
IRS. Call 1-877-777-4778 or
visit www.irs.gov/advocate.
Save yourself some aggra-
vation and ignore promises
from companies that say you
are "qualified" or "eligible" for
a tax relief program to resolve
your tax debt. Only the IRS can
make that determination.
The FTC has free materials
about dealing with debt and
other money management
issues at www.ftc.gov/money-
matters. To file a complaint or
get free information on con-
sumer issues, visit www.ftc,gov
or call, toll-free, 1-877-FTC-
HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY:
1-866-653-4261.


I I a-i


__







December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Pregnant Women And Infants
Targets For The Flu


The risk from flu is greater
for pregnant women because
pregnancy can reduce the abili-
ty of the lungs and the immune
system to work normally. This
can be bad for both mother and
bAby. According to a study done
during the first month of the
2009 HINI outbreak, the rate
of hospitalizations was four
times higher in pregnant
women than other groups. Also,
although pregnant women are
about 1 percent of the U.S. pop-
ulation, they made up about 5
percent of U.S. deaths from
2009 HIN1 reported to the
Centers for Disease Control
(CDC).
Young children, whose im-
mune systems are still develop-
ing, are also at risk for flu-relat-
ed complications. Each year,
about 100 flu-related deaths in
children are thought to occur in
the U.S. During the 2009 H1N1
pandemic, more than 300
deaths in children were reported
to CDC. CDC believes many
more deaths in children may
have gone unrecognized or
unreported.
Experts think the 2009 H1N1
virus will be around again this
flu season. So one of the three
parts of this season's flu vac-
cine will protect against the
2009 HINI virus. While CDC
encourages everyone 6 months
and older to get vaccinated
against the flu, there is a special
message for pregnant women
and parents: "Don't pass up this
easy way to protect yourself
and your children against the
flu," says Dr. Anne Schuchat,
Assistant Surgeon General of
the U.S. Public Health Service
and CDC Director of the
National Center for Immuni-
zation and Respiratory Di-


seases.
"Getting a flu vaccine during
pregnancy can reduce the risk
of getting the flu while pregnant
and after," says Dr. Schuchat.
"And babies younger than 6
months can get very sick from
flu but are too young to get vac-
cinated. The best way to protect
them is to have their caregivers
and close contacts vaccinated."
Seasonal flu vaccines have
been given safely to millions of
pregnant women and children
over many years. Though there
is no proof that thimerosal (a
preservative) is harmful to
pregnant women, their babies
or young children, some worry
about it. So, as before, vaccine
companies are making plenty of
preservative-free flu vaccine as
an option for pregnant women
and small children.
Usually worse than the com-
mon cold, the flu can cause
fever, cough, sore throat, runny
or stuffy nose, body aches,
headache, chills and weakness.
Some people also have diarrhea
and vomiting.
Pregnant women and parents
of children younger than 2
years of age should call the doc-
tor or nurse right away if they or
their children become sick. A
doctor can prescribe flu antivi-
ral drugs.
Vaccination continues to be
the best protection. To keep all
family members healthy, get
yourself-and all your children
6 months of age and older-
vaccinated against the flu. One
shot will last all flu season,
even if you get it early in the
season.
For more information, talk to
your doctor or contact CDC at
(800) CDC-INFO or
www.flu.gov.


Self-Employed: Take A Tax

Deduction On Health Costs


There could be big news for
the nation's smallest businesses
in this country and the people
who work for them.
The Small Business Jobs and
Credit Act provides an impor-
tant tax break for the over 23
million self-employed Ameri-
cans who represent 78 percent
of all small businesses in the
U.S., according to the National
Association for the Self-
Employed (NASE).
Until now, the self-employed
couldn't get the same tax bene-
fit for health insurance expens-
es that others enjoy. Other com-
panies can fully deduct the cost
of health coverage as a business
expense, saving a significant
amount in payroll taxes. Now,
the self-employed can take a
one-year tax deduction for
health costs in determining their
payroll tax (self-employment
tax).
Here are some tips on this
new deduction:
1. To qualify for this deduc-
tion, self-employed business
owners must meet the following
three criteria:
File an IRS Form 1040,
Schedule C tax form or


Schedule E with earned in-
come-this includes sole pro-
prietors, single member LLCs
and sole owner S Corporations;
and
Pay self-employment taxes
via IRS Form 1040 Schedule
SE; and
Pay for individual or fami-
ly health coverage.
2. The deduction is available
for health costs paid in 2010.
Business owners can ask their
tax professional if they may
take advantage of the deduction
when preparing taxes for the
April 15, 2011 deadline.
3. To calculate savings, sim-
ply add up your total 2010
health insurance costs and mul-
tiply that by 15.3 percent. If,
however, your annual income is
above the maximum wage limit
subject to payroll (FICA) taxes,
currently $106,800, then you'll
get a lower tax benefit.
Join entrepreneurs across the
country who are urging their
legislators to make this tax
deduction permanent for the
self-employed. Find yotir law-
makers at the NASE's Legis-
lative Action Center at
www.NASE.org.


He who sees a need and waits to be asked for help is as
unkind as if he had refused it.
-Dante
Flowers have spoken to me more than I can tell in writ-
ten words. They are the hieroglyphics of angels, loved
by all men for the beauty of the character, though few
can decipher even fragments of their meaning.
-Lydia M. Child


NOTICE PUBLIC HEARING
All interested persons are hereby notified that the
Wauchula Planning and Zoning Board will consider a
request by the Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency to find the proposed expansion of the Community
Redevelopment Area (CRA) and time extension for pro-
viding redevelopment activities contained within the CRA
Plan Update consistent with the Comprehensive Plan of
the City of Wauchula as provided by Chapter 163, Part III,
Florida Statutes, on Monday, December 20, 2010 at 5:30
p.m. at the Commission Chambers, 225 E. Main Street,
Suite 105, Wauchula, Florida.
Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the
Board with respect to this request for which he will need a
verbatim record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure
.tlat such verbatim record is made.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida
does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's
disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves
every, aspect of the Commission's functions, including
ones access to,.participation, employment or treatment in
its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should
contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
s/David B. Royal
Mayor
ATTEST:
s/Holly Collins
City Clerk '12:9c


U.S. 17
Continued From 1A
economic impacts for this entire
area," Lambert said.
The road will also serve as an
evacuation route for Charlotte
and Desoto counties in case of a
disaster.
Lambert believes the road
will have many benefits to the
people of this area.
"Positive impacts will be
safety for our citizens, includ-
ing evacuation route efficiency,
job creation potential and in-
creased real estate values," he
said.
There are three other sizeable
projects and numerous smaller
ones for Hardee County also in
DOT's five-year plan.
Nearly $1 million is budgeted
in 2012-13 for resurfacing
Hammock Road from Parnell
Road to the Highlands County
line.
State Road 66 will be resur-
faced in 2012-13 from west of
Charlie Anderson Road to east
of Charlie Creek, at a cost of
$8.5 million.
Parnell Road will be resur-
faced in 2012-13 from State
Road 64 to Steve Roberts
Special and will cost $2.2 mil-
lion.
An additional $2 million has
been set aside over the next five
years for various sidewalks and
traffic signals around the coun-
ty.



WATER
Continued From 1A
second 30 days, watering is
allowed three days per week:
either Tuesday, Thursday and
Sunday; or Monday, Wednes-
day and Saturday. Hand-water-
ing and micro-irrigation of
plants can be done at any time.
People are asked to check
their irrigation systems for bro-
ken pipes and leaks, damaged
or tilted sprinkler heads, and to
correct irrigation times and rain
sensors. When washing cars or
pressure washing, use of a shut-
off nozzle is recommended.
Under Phase I shortage regu-
lations, water users are urged to
be conservative on indoor use
as well, especially during the
holidays, when overuse is nor-
mal.
Holiday conservation tips
include: defrost frozen foods in
the refrigerator or microwave
instead of under hot running
water; and rinse vegetables or
fruits in a pan of water instead
of running water. Use the pan
water to water household
plants.
Typical water use is given: a
garbage disposal-four gallons
per minute; dishwaster-7-12
gallons per load; leaky faucet
30 gallons per day; toilet flush-
three gallons or low-volume
flush 1.6 gallons. A water use
calculator can be found at
www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/con-
servation/powerofl0.


MEMORIAL WALK


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Sgt. Michael Cox (far left) is accompanied by members of the Wauchula Police
Department as he walks through Wauchula on his way across the state. Cox is on leave
from the military and is walking from the west coast, where he visited his father, to the
east' coast, where his sister lives. Cox is carrying supplies in a backpack and camps
' along the way. He is walking in support of the 18 soldiers his unit lost during battle. He
chose to walk in honor of his fallen soldiers who can no longer walk. Cox has to report
back to duty in about a month and expects his lengthy stroll to take about six days.
Officers walking with him (from left) are Kevin Brock, John Nicholas, Capt. Thomas
Harris and Chief Bill Beattie.


SHS GETS
Continued From lA


based on FCAT results. The
remaining half is based on such
factors the student graduation
rate, participation in dual-en-
rollment and advanced-place-
ment classes, college placement
test scores, at-risk graduation
rate, and other data.


Education head Smith said
the new grading system does a
better job of showing a school's
performance and demanding
accountability for preparing
youngsters for jobs or college.
Hardee Senior High School
has long instituted programs to


increase reading and writing
abilities and to target students at
risk of not successfully graduat-
ing with a high-school diploma.
Vocational and college-prep.
courses both also are offered at
the school.


The Wauchula Lion's Club wishes to thank Mosaic
for partnering with us and the following companies
for their continued support of our Annual Lion's Day


Ag Land Services

Beef O'Brady's

Cats on Main

First National Bank

of Wauchula

Jelly Beans

Master's Touch

Royal's

State Farm Insurance

Ullrich's

Winn Dixie


Albritton Insurance

Caldwell Banker

CF Industries

Heartland Growers

Java..

Magnolia Tree

Old Pine Candle and Gifts

Sevigny & Timmerman

Sweetbay

Wauchula State Bank


soc12:9c


I 'I iI
Suuda Decembr 12 6:00 PMdb~L~FJ



in th~jamlv Lfe: epte


^S6azw6^1


FRIDAY,



DECEMBER 24



S6pm-7pm

r -I oricla




!iJ irst




{1, As55semb of God


1397 SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE, WAUCHULA, FL e*863-773-9386 |


-- I


I i I Ir ,


bank


qjo







4A The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010



Obituaries


CrL. isElrY niN i uI 1
SOCKALOSKY
A memorial service for Cp
Stephen Coty Sockalosky wil
be held on Saturday from 1 to
p.m. at the American Legio
hall, 117 W. Palmetto St., Wau
chula, with speakers from 1:3
to 2:30.
A native of Bartow, Sock
alosky joined the U.S. Marine
shortly after his high schoc
graduation in 2007. He mos
recently served in Afghanistar
where he was mortally wound
ed. He died on Oct. 6, 2010.
Local survivors include fathe
William Stephen Sockalosk
and wife Traci; brothers Zach
ery and Trace Sockalosly; sis
ters Caitlin and Samantha Sock
alosky; and paternal grand
mother Sharon Fitch Sock
alosky, all of Wauchula.


Zolfo Springs
Parade Dec. 16
Zolfo Springs will have its
annual Christmas parade
with Santa and the fire truck
next Thursday, Dec. 16, be-
ginning at 6:30 p.m. Children
can stop by City Hall after
5:30 p.m. for a picture with
Santa Claus.
The cost is $3. For more
than one child in a family it is
$1 more per picture. All pro-
ceeds from the evening go
for the Relay For Life cancer
programs.



CAROLYN BALLARD
LOUDERMILK
Carolyn Ballard Louder-
milk, of Nashville, Tenn., died
on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2010.
She was preceded in death
by her husband John W.
Loudermilk.
Survivors include sister
Martha Martin; brother Mau-
rice Ballard; nieces Deborah
Scheipsmeier and Linda Bal-
lard Smith; nephew John
Loudermilk; and several other
nieces and nephews.
Visitation was Thursday,
Dec. 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. and
Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at the Harpeth Hills Funeral,
where services were held at 1
p.m. with Pastor Ann Cover
officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at Harpeth Hills Me-
mory Gardens.
Harpeth Hills
Funeral Home
Nashville


I.
11
4
n
I-
0

:s
l1
>t
I,
t-


WALTER MICHAEL
HARRELL
Walter Michael Harrell, 58,
of Ona, died on Friday, Dec. 3,
2010, at home.
Born in Eau Gallie, to Joseph
Harrison Jr. and Louise Virginia
Graham Harrell, he worked in
construction. He was a member
of Union Baptist Church in Ona
and had been a lifelong resident
of Hardee and Highlands coun-
ties.
Survivors include sons, Ja-
son Harrell, Nathan Harrell and
Cameron Harrell; sisters Steph-
anie Gourley and Sheryl Brad-
ley; and brothers Alan Harrell
and Joe Harrell III.
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home
Avon Park


I RA

I :o nid
Help RidgR


Help Ridge ARC
S Move Its Store
y Ridge Area Association for
-Retarded Citizens is move-
Sing its Wauchula store from
SWest Main Street to the old
- Eckerd Drugstore/MidFlorida
- Hardware Store, at the north
end of the Wauchula Plaza
at 1010 S. Sixth Ave. (the
west side of U.S. 17 South),
Wauchula.
A grand opening will be
held on Tuesday from 9 to 11
a.m., with refreshments and
door prizes. Volunteers are
needed to help operate the
store, which will be open
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday and 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. If
Syou can help, call 773-0140
or stop by and the store the
talk to Bobbie.

Collect Food/Toys
For Children
The Hardee County Youth
Coalition and Hardee County
YMCA Youth Achievers are
combining efforts to gather
food and toys for needy chil-
dren. The Peanut Butter &
Jelly Fqod Drive and Toy
Drive are getting collections
from Deb. 6 to 15 at the
Hardee Jr. and Sr. high
school lobbies, and the
YMCA main and Teen Cent-
er lobbies.
The food will go to the
Hardee Help Center and
toys to the Guardian Ad
Litem program. For more
information, contact Chuck
Dixon for the Youth Coalition
at 781-5887 or Dawn Atkin-;
son-Jones for YMCA Achiev-
ers at 781-0999 or 781-
4900.

The ability to see beauty is
the beginning of our moral
sensibility. What we
believe is beautiful we will
not wantonly destroy.
-Reverend Sean Parker
I Dennison


In Business
By Hailey Selph


A DOZEN IN ONE-Wauchula now has a new type of shop-
ping venue. Located at 130 W. Main St., Shops On The Corner,
owned by Patricia and Mike Rouse, is one store containing 12
small independent shops.
The reasoning behind this concept is that it is currently too
expensive for most prospective retailers to own their own building.
So the owners of Shops On The Corner are giving people wishing
to open their own businesses the chance to do just that.
Teacher's Pet, Timeless Treasures, and Beulahland INC are
three shops inside that the Rouses themselves own. Teacher's Pet
contains school supplies for both students and teachers. Inside
Timeless Treasures, shoppers will find items that never seem to go
out of style, such as Bibles, books and, eventually, Avon. Beu-
lahland INC is a bookkeeping business.
Another store found inside Shops On The Corner is Designer
Cowpokes, owned by Idania English and Robbie Lynn Burnett.
This shop offers accessories, body lotions, body washes and soy
candles. A.G. Outdoors, owned by Erica and Anthony Scheip-
smeier, has gardening supplies and outdoor plants for any interest-
ed customer. Barbara Panarello owns Southern Pizazz, filled with'
painted and unpainted ceramics, paintbrushes and paints.
The youngest shop owner is Shelby Gibson,10, of Shelby's
Shoppe. In this area shoppers will find things for a child's room,
candy, Silly Bandz, Snap Caps, and Snap tap chokers.
Red's Woodworking, owned by Ted Watson, contains exam-
ples of his craftsmanship, such as rocking horses, shelves and
standing quilt racks. He also provides a photo book showing sam-
ples of wooden pieces he is capable of building for a customer.
Jerry and Vickie Conerly own Southern Comforts. This shop
contains books, jewelry, soaps, quilts, baskets and cookie mixes.
Roses & Thistles is an antiques and collectibles store owned by
Belva Vance. People can also find baby blankets, stuffed animals,
baby clothes, pacifiers, and baby wash sets in The Monkey Cage,
owned by Janeen Gibson and Julie Coomer.
The 12th business located in Shops On The Corner is. a satel-
lite shop for Cooper's Wayside Flowers, owned by Eileen and Ken
Lambert and Lynn and Randy Bennett. It offers silk and dried
flower arrangements and gift items that will change with the sea-
sons
Each store has its own unique personality to draw a variety of
shoppers.
The Rouses plan to expand upstairs once they have enough
new shop owners signed up on their waiting list. For more infor-
mation, call 773-4460 or go online to www.shopsonthecorner.com.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Hailey Selph at 773-3255 with your business news.


. -.
,


This one building houses a


Toys Needed
For Little Ones
The U.S. Marine Corps
Reserve and the U.S. Post
Office have extended the
deadline to contribute un-
wrapped toys for needy chil-
dren.
They may be taken to your
local post office or the Har-
dee Help Center, 713 E. Bay
St., Wauchula up to Dec. 17.
In lieu of toys, a financial
contribution can be sent to
the Help Center at P.O. Box
422, Wauchula, FL 33873.


COURTESY PHOTO
dozen shops.

Jimmy Carter was the first
president to walk the inau-
gural parade route from
the Capitol Building to the
White House.
Saying what we think gives
a wider range of conversa-
tion than saying what we
know.
-Cullen Hightower


.- 1 -
Sean Greenlee, Greg Gordon, George Wadsworth, Joe Nl erson,
Scott Henderson, John Platt & Allen Widener
The Ministerial Association and the Hardee Help Center would like to thank the Hardee County
Suncoast Spurs NWTF Chapter for their generosity and love that they have shown, The Suncoast
Spurs donated and delivered 100 turkeys to help feed the homeless and under resource this past
Thanksgiving. The first 35 turkeys went to the Ministerial Association who used them for their
annual Thanksgiving Day meal to feed the homeless and less fortunate in our community. There
were over 150 people who were served a hot meal at the Presbyterian Church and many more
who were not able to make it to the church were taken meals to enjoy.
The other 65 turkeys were given'to the Hardee Help Center who in tum were able to bless the
under resource of our community. None of this would have been possible if it weren't for
the incredible love and support of the Hardee County Suncoast Spurs. George Wadsworth, the
banquet chairman of this chapter commented, "We are just glad we could do something like this
to bless our community and help out those who may be on hard times right now. We love our
community and we, as a group, want to do all we can to make a difference and help. We are
honored to work along side the Ministerial Association and the Hardee Help Center as we all come
together to make this great community even better."
The bags that the turkeys were delivered in had the words, "Turkey Hunters Care" printed on the
side. Its obvious from this act of kindness that those words are very true. Thanks so much
Hardee County Suncoast Spurs, your thoughtfulness has made a difference


.1


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels-

773-3255


ANEW. '- .
J 'J:


DEPENDABLE/TRUSTWORTHY

COMPASSIONATE CARE





ROBARTS'
FAMILYFUNERALHOME:
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906
529 WEST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873
863-773-9773
SView Obituaries at robartsfh.com 7:29t1f


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will
hold the regular scheduled meeting Monday
December 13, 2010 at 6:00 pm or as soon thereafter as
it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as
follows: Ordinance 2010-08- (Second Reading).
Revising The Adopted Capital Improvement Element
And Updating The 5-Year Capital Improvements Plan;
Ordinance 2010-09 (Second Reading) Amending
Section 22-118 Re-Connections; Ordinance 2010-10
(Second Reading) 2009/2010 Fiscal year Budget
Adjustments; Ordinance 2010-11 (First Reading) EAR
based Comp Plan Amendments; Resolution 2010-33
Setting Reconnect Fees; Resolution 2010-36 Let's
Move Cities & Towns; Commissioner's Top 5 CtRy
Manager Resumes; 513 N. 8th Avenue (vacant lot),
and any other business that may come before the
Commission.
The meetings will be held at the Commission
Chambers located at 225 East Main Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as
amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any
interested person decides to appeal any decision made
by the City Commission with respect to any matter con-
sidered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the
proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to
insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based,
The City Commission of the Qjy of Wauchula, Florida
does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's
disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves
every aspect of the Commission's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in
its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should
contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 12:9


NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the ERP General
Construction on 15.72 acres to serve Construction Site known as
Peace River Electric The project is located in Hardee County, Section(s)
33 Township 33 South, Range .25East. The permit applicant is Peace River Electric


whose address is RO. Box 1310. Wauchula. Florida 33873 .


44006821.003
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday
through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District (District) 2379 Broad Street. Brooksville. Florida 34604-6899.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this
,permit may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.),
of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the
substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the
District's action, or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person
requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply
with Chapter 28-106, FA.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the
Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice (or within 14 days
for an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary Authorization for the use of
Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period
shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from. the
position taken by it in the notice of final agency action. Persons whose substantial
interests will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the application have
the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the
requirements set forth above.
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute
regarding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing.
12:9c


7:17 7 -1 717 77


It '


The permit No. is





December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5A


if r4 I rI ii[IbIII I 51 l LI'm iiiir iflillllltav 1111 j r V kIji

KIA V$ CHRYSLER, DODGE, JEP CHEVRLUT AND FORD IN A HEAD 1O HEAD SELING SHOWDOWN



SHOW DOWN PRICING ON CARS, TRUCKS, VNS AND SUVS

o -Ph s s6 P~sL I"And -0 'BaMt-7 1(
)) 11 I Thu s d I r da ,
DECEMBER th. I O th a 11 th sat I 1p al:L oaTm Pini


NEW 2011
KIA SOUL
STARTING FROM

81 2,345


NEW 2011
FORD FIESTA SE
POWER WHDOWS,LOCKS,CD,TILT,CRUIE,15" ALUM
WHEELS, SRIUS SAT. RADIO, SPORT APP. PKG
MSRP............................ 18,950
ALAN JAY DISCOUNT.......... -$583
FACTORY REBATE................. -8500


NEW 2011
CHEVROLET AVEO LT
AUTO,POWER WNDOWS,LOCKS,ONSTAR, XM RADIO
,REMOTE KEYLESS ENTRY,TILTCRUISE
MSRP............................ 81,950
ALAN JAY DISCOUNT..........-8982
FACTORY REBATE.............. -1000


PRICE


NEW 2010 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY LX
POWER WHUDOWS, LOCKS, m8RIUS SAT RADIO, DUAL
A/C, REMOTE KBESS EITRY
MSRP............................ $29,125
ALAN JAY DISCOUNT ........-$2127
FACTORY REBATE............... -$2750

,RIQL 2 4.r248


IF WE DO NOT MAKE A DEAL WE WILL PAY FOR YOUR GAS BACK TO YOUR FLORIDA HOME.


GUARANTEED GIVEAWAY
ATTEND THIS EVENT TO REGISTER TO
WIN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
-a 1J I .- *a~m W- U ---


4i.....


DRAWING WILL TAKE PLACE ON SATURDAY AT 4PM
nIgiiir c n i-c~i-aliv v^ ai


k'A'I I I U~A~fA~ I WAUk'I!~'i h

~T~T~i


mmm i.------1----- p


l IT^


~i4------i 4---


GUS BE PRES FORU IN







ae
PRVT DYEET DCME tmIIt
I RIK


FLRaN jiYAUTOMOTIVE
Save up to
thesum of: $7500 DOLLARS & 00/100--------------------------

INSTANT SAVINGS REBATE ON SELECT MODELS


To the
order of:


Bearer of this instrument


I:B7 3?0 2 L


:2 75 20 7998


3 2 ?


AUTHORIZED SIGNATURE


Ii-
Price includes all factory rates and incentives. All incentives assigned to dealer. Price excludes tax, tag, and 699.00 delivery fee. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Similar savings available on other vehicles in stock. Dealer not responsible for typographical
errors. Offer expires December 12, 2010. *Special financing is in lieu of Rebates on select years and models. With Approved Credit +On Select years, and models. Not responsbile for typographical errors. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. +no
purchase necessary. Purchase will not increase your chances of winning. See dealer for complete rules and regulations. Employees of this dealership, their affiliates & family members are ineligible to participate. This sale supersedes all other advertised
sales. Each offer is considered an exclusive sales offer. One offer per purchase. See dealer for details.


1405 US Highway 17 S


* Wauchula, FL 33873-9403


863-314-5370 L.O/ iqy.cpmm


UCHER VALID ONLY ON:
SALE DATES


'7,500


Ir L~I 4 I I I I I _..............--


I-


ftwo Mason a angina wsr m ffiffinam,


,III--~ la--- dC---


EiRoESON:W


Ir lli d


I m l i


LL.711 AWvA.IWiTHI


Si'I WiVWY I TH


0


I-


mop-







6A The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


M(
an
W(
th
or
on


Thi
Vic
Es(
(th
Pa.


Kin
No
Vic
Ca.
an
Sai


Sec
Des
(se
Hei
Fer
Ale)


NWES Honors 'Cool Cats' For First Quarter











Iit
ci "








North Wauchula Elementary School recently recognized its Positively Awesome
S Workers with the RA.W. Award, for outstanding gains in academics or citizenship.
Kindergarteners were (front row, from left) Hayden Humphreys, Johnny "Bo" Trammell,
Chase Sanders, Luis Ortiz, DeAnthony Jones and Vanessa Peraza; first graders were
(second row) Miguel Vasquez, Guillermo Ramos, Victor Torres, Umar Guerrero, 7yler
Bergens and Stephanie Perez; and second graders were (third row) Hunter Rodriguez,
Brett Bennett, Sariah Alamia and Zachery Perez. Not pictured was Marilu Antonio-








COURTESY PHOTOS
osaic's "Spirit of Community Award" is given for outstanding citizenship, scholarship
id service. Pictured are award winner Zachary Durastanti and Assistant Principal Dale -
olgast. Zachary received the award for not only doing well in school, but also doing I
e right things outside of school. When a fire claimed the home and possessions of
ie of his classmates, Zachary donated his entire savings to help the family get back
their feet.






First graders awarded for their good conduct were (first row, from left) Karina Valadez,
Juan Molina, Heather Howell, Kyleigh Revell, Liliana Plata and Ricardo Sanchez; (sec-
ond row) Kaden Bryan, Jose Fernandez, Alison Schultz, Lillie Gaitan, Abby Neel and
Yesaily Martinez; (back row) Valerie Martinez, David Orta, Iliana Ruiz, Marissa DeLoera,
Chistopher Sdsa and Zaria Davila.











ird graders recognized for their citizenship were (first row, from left) Evonte Rogers, -
:tor Aleman, Hugh Pate, Brianna Valadez and Maria Deloera; (second row) Araceli
cobedo, Nicholas Gainous, Rachel Garland, Hannah Ford and Blake Richardson;
ird row) Isaac Estrada, Bryan Herrejon-Madrigal, Puja Ahir, Brianna Farlas, Diana-
ulino-Pena and Elijah Powell.

Positively Awesome Workers for the first quarter of 2010-11 in the third grade were (first
row, from left) Jonathan Orta, Ehtan Sambrano, Mario Lopez, Noe Sierra and Ricardo
Sosa; fourth graders (second row) were MaryLu Araujo, Jennifer Vargas, Sergio
Sydni Lopez, Daniel Sambrano, Samantha Velez and Tomas DeLaPaz.















dergarteners who received the Cool Cats award for the first nine-week period at
rth Wauchula Elementary School were (first row, from left) Holly Rowe, Saul Ruiz,
tor Fabila, Emma Eures, Alyssa Contreras and Kayla Macedo; (second row) Liliana __I
still, Danialee Gutierrez, Anabella Gomez, Roslynn Leanna Bryant, Blake Rucker
d Mackenzie Bacon; (third row) Eryn Hagwood, George (Jeremiah) Alamia,
mantha Shackelford, Morgan Dickey and Nathaniel Deemer.
Fourth graders who earned recognition for their achievements were (front row, from
left) Lindsey Boyette, Eric Romero, Jose Mata, J.C. Kulig, Mariadela Araujo and Edith
Ruiz-Molina; (back row) Jansen Walker, Zachary Durastanti, Norma Rivera and Ray
Zuniga. Not pictured was Tony Webb.


,ond-grade Cool Cats award winners were (front row, from left) Joseph Peters,
sirae Cabrera, Mackenzie Wallace, Jamie Walker, Seth Durrance and Hunter Davis;
cond row) Veronica Rivera, Chloe Martinez, Alan Felipe-Zuniga, Mariana DeLoera, Fifth graders noted as Cool Cats at the school were (first row, from left) Adelina Luna-
di Smith Caleb Macias and Mayte Tellez; (back row) Haley Dickey, Esteban Muniz, Leah Vickers, Veronica Molina and Kassidy Wallace; (second row) Pablo
nandez, Chloe Selph, Isabel Cavillo, Elvia Garcia, Jozie St. Louis, Daisy Chavez and Salgado, Mario Gomez, Zachary Richardson and Shauna Norwood; (third row) Nubia
x Jaimes. Gomez, Maricruz Gonzales, Chris Velez and Anthony Loredo.




A









December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7A


WES Recognizes Its First-Quarter Top Cats


First graders awarded for outstanding citizenship were (front row, from left) Rigoberto
Lopez, Addyson Smith, Alexis Sambrano, Brin Conerly, Raheem Clark, Austin Barker,
Lauren Gainous, Johana Ortiz-Diaz and Ismael Mejia; (second row) Ricardo Martinez,
Samantha Briones, Dawson Bryant, Christopher Nickerson, Emily Sheffield, Jayden
Hays, Saraly Diego, Nicole Martinez and Aaron Daniels; (back row) Kaden Chapman,
Faith Davis, Macy Grace Tyson, Adrianna Mier, Joel Bartolon-Ortiz, Jake Stephens and
Baleigh Herrera.


Second graders recognized for their conduct were (first row, from left) Cole Hines,
Caleb Block, Marcos Aguilar-Velasco, Da'Myah Carlton, Monika Poucher and Sailor
Ulrich; (second row) Samantha Hardin, Andy Medina, Starling Parker, Haven Gray, Jace
Bryan and Keyla Romero; (third row) Leah Hall, Lucy Stone, Marcos Martinez, Jordan
Yates, Riley Justiss, Kiara Coronado and Maria Cardoza. Not pictured were Ruben
Perez, Jocelyn Villarreal and Darla Joe Harned


Third graders who received the Top Cat award were (first row, from left) Dylan Davis,
Javier Chavez-Chaidez, Kein Knight, Jonathan Carnley, Billy Diakomihalis and Jacob
Lee; (second row) Enrique Velazquez, Sophie Allen, Madison McGee, ,essica Kunkel,
Citlaly Gonzalez, Jaronda Terrell, Roxana Garcia and Jerica Pierce; back row) Tony
Guerrero, Francisco-Tinajero, Cristian Cardoza, Marah Uri, Honest Sandoval, Talela
Moreno and Manuel Hernandez.


Fourth graders who showed responsibility were (first row, from left) Lillian Salazar,,
Nadia Flores, Adriana Arana, Yamilex Miranda, Aliyah Bias and Christian Brant; (second
row) Laynee Galvan, Claire Carlton, Ederika Austin, Venessa Valerio, Mikie Cruz, Cody'
Helms and Garrett Williams; (back row) Carrie Taylor, Norma Hernandez, Tara Hines,
Sarah Carlton, Shelby Spencer, Matt Tyson, Lily Franco, Arnout de Jong and Desiree'
Spiker.
E I I-s r-W M m w - ._ _.. ._.. 1Y 3 1*" J'_______________________


LA k
uI-1


COURTESY PHOTOS
Kindergarteners who received the Top Cat award at Wauchula Elementary School for
the first nine-week period were (front row, from left) Diana Jaimes, Haylee Norris,"
Madisyn Hines, Kody Giles, Kaden Bryant, Andrew Bergens, Donald Ellis, Amy Fimbres
and Ethan Ramirez; (second row) Cody Herrin, Miah Velazquez, Logan Albritton,
Maddie Jane Schraeder, Savannah Conerly, Miguel Rodriguez, Amalee Bruno-Perez,
Salud Villafuierte-Herrera, Sofia Salazar and Flor Ruiz; (top row) Maria Antunez, Sierra
Perez, Alvero Desantiago, Gerardo Diego, Boone Pazzaglia, Dean Clark, Leah Judah.
and Roza Poucher.


Fifth graders earning Top Cat status were (front row, from left) Adrian DeLeon, Joel Lee,
Jax UlIrich and Nickolas Ramirez; (second row) Sarai Santana, Emily Pierce,
Alexzandra Brant, Bridgette Conley, Brooke Shaw, Sarai Espinoza, Dora Cardoza and
Hannah Abel; (third row) Conrad Pace, Ricardo Gomez-Molina, Sierra Strickland, Alicia
Ruiz, Kara Friers, Angel Valerio and Sergio Delgado.

h. .


First Steps students who were recognized were (front row, from left) Yahir Lopez, Angel
Lopez and Justin Torres; (back row) Vanessa Montoya, Jaelyn Rogers, Valerie Silva, Eva
Relchenbach, Seth Armstrong and Javier Cruz. Not pictured were Jacob Cisneros-
Montanez and Anthony Ramirez.











8A The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 252010CA000651
DIVISION:

THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS,
FLORIDA, a municipal corpora-
tion and public body corporate
0 and politic of the State of
Florida,,
Plaintiff,

V.

THE STATE OF FLORIDA, and
the several taxpayers, property
owners and citizens thereof and
the of the Town of Zolfo Springs,
Florida, Including non-residents
owning property or subject to
taxation therein, and all others
having or claiming any right, title
or interest in property to be
affected by the issuance of the
Bonds and Bond Anticipation
Notes herein described, or to be
affected in any way thereby,
Defendants.

VALIDATION OF THE NOT TO
EXCEED $1,654,000 TOWN OF
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA
WATER AND WASTEWATER
SYSTEM REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

TO: THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE ATTOR-
NEY FOR THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, AND TO
THE SEVERAL TAXPAYERS,
PROPERTY OWNERS AND CITI-
ZENS THEREOF AND OF THE
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS,
FLORIDA, INCLUDING NON-RES-
IDENTS OWNING PROPERTY OR
SUBJECT TO TAXATION THERE-
IN, AND ALL OTHERS HAVING
OR CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN PROPERTY TO
BE AFFECTED BY THE
ISSUANCE OF THE TOWN OF
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA
WATER AND WASTEWATER
SYSTEM REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES
HEREINAFTER MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED, OR TO BE
AFFECTED IN ANY WAY THERE-
BY;
The above cause coming on to be
heard upon the Complaint filed
herein by the Town of Zolfo
Springs, Florida (referred to here-
In as the "Plaintiff" or "Issuer")
seeking to determine the authori-
ty of the Plaintiff to issue its not to
exceed $1,654,000 Town of Zolfo
Springs, Florida Water and
Wastewater System Revenue
Bonds (the "Bonds"), and its not
to exceed $1,654,000 Town of
Zolfo Springs, Florida Water and
Wastewater System Revenue
Bond Anticipation Notes (the
"Bond Ancitipation Notes"), a
more particular description of
such obligations being contained
In the Complaint filed in these
proceedings, to determine the
legality of the proceedings had
.and taken in connection there-
with, and the legality of the provi-
sion, covenants and agreements
contained therein and the rev-
enues pledged to the payment
thereof, and seeking a judgment
of this Court to validate the pro-
ceedings for said Bonds and
Bond Anticipation Notes, the rev-
enues pledged for the payment
thereof, and said obligations
when issued prusuant thereto,
and said Compalint now having
been presented to this Court, for
entry of an Order to Show Cause
pursuant to Chapter, 75, Florida
Statues, and the Court being fully
advised in the premises:

IT IS ORDERED AND
ADJUDGED that the State of
Florida, through the State
Attorney of the Tenth Judicial
Circuit of Florida, and the several
taxpayers, property owners and
citizens of the Issuer, inciduing
non-residents owning property or
subject to taxation therein, and all
others having or claiming any
right, title or interest In property to
be affected in any way thereby, or
to be affected thereby, be and
they are each hereby required to
appear and show causes, If any
there by, before this Court on the
2nd day of February, 2011, at
10:30 a.m., in the Chambers of
the undersigned Judge at the
Hardee County Courthouse In the
City of Wauchula, Florida, why the
prayer of slad Compalint should
not be granted and why the pro-
ceedings for said Bonds and
Bond Anticipation Notes and said
Bonds and Bond Anticipation
Notes when issued pursuant
thereto and the revenues pledged
' to the payment thereof should not
be validated and confirmed as'
therein prayed.

AND IT IS FURHTER ORDERED
AND ADJUDGED that this Order
to. Show Cause be published in
the manner required by Section
75.06, Florida Statutes
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED


AND ADJUDGED that, by such
publication of this Order, all tax-
'payers, property owners and citi-
zens of the Issuer, Including non-
residents owning property or sub-
ject to taxation therein and all oth-
ers having or claiming any right,
title or interest in the Issuer, or
the taxable property therein or In
any property to be affected by the
Issuance of said Bonds and Bond
Anticipation Notes or to be affect-
ed in any way thereby, or the
validity of such Bonds and Bond
Anticipation Notes or of any rev-
enues pledged for payment there-
of, or of the proceedings autho-
rizing the Issuance of said Bonds
and Bond Anticipation Notes,
Including any remedies provided.


The latest World Health
Organization's Scientific Up-
date on trans fat shows that
companies are gradually re-
moving them from many popu-
lar foods. But even so, it's easy
to think you eat less trans fat
than you do by falling into
some common traps.
Most trans fat forms when
liquid fats are subjected to a
process called hydrogenation.
Partial hydrogenation makes
the oils spreadable or more
shelf-stable. Natural trans fats
are found in meats and dairy
products but are a small propor-
tion of our total intake and do
not seem to pose the same
health risks as the industrial
(partially hydrogenated) trans
fats.
Industrial trans fats account
for about 2 to 3 percent of the
average adult's calories. Studies
show that an increase of just 2
percent of our calories from
trans fats is linked with at least
23 percent increase in heart dis-
ease. They increase LDL
("bad") and decrease HDL
("good") cholesterol and dam-
age blood vessels. Now, studies
suggest trans fat also promotes
inflammation, which may raise
the risk of cancer as well as



for their collection, be and they
are made parties defendant to
this proceeding, and that this
Court shall have jurisdiction of
them to the same extent as if
named as defendants in said
Complaint and perosnally served
with process In this cause.

DONE AND ORDERED in
chambers of Wauchula, Hardee
County, Florida, this 2nd day of
Dec., 2010..

MARCUS J. EZELLE
CIRCUIT JUDGE
12:9,16c,

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252010CA000363

WAUCHULA STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

RIDOBEL GONZALEZ and
ADRIANA GONZALEZ, his wife,
ET AL
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO FLORIDA
STATUTES CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to a SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS dated
December 3, 2010, in the above
styled cause, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at the Hardee County
Courthouse, on the second floor
hallway outside of Room 202, 417
West Main Street, Wauchula, FL
33873, at 11:00 A.M. on
December 29, 2010, the following
described property as set forth in
said SUMMARY FINAL JUDG-
MENT OF FORECLOSURE AND
TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S FEES
AND COSTS, to wit:

S 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of the
SE 1/4, Section 27,
Township 33 South, Range
26 East, Hardee County,
Florida
AND
N 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of the
SE 1/4, Section 27,
Township 33 South, Range
26 East, Hardee County,
Florida

Parcel ID No.: 27-33-26-
0000-08130-0000 and 27-
33-26-0000-08120-0000
commonly known as: 1132
and 1182 Ed Wells Road,
Wauchula, FL 33873
Dated this 6 day of December
2010.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
AS DEPUTY CLERK

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you are a person with a
disability who needs any accom-
modatlon In order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision
of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, 255 N. Broadway
Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830,
(863) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the


time before the scheduled
appearance Is less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
12:9,16c


heart disease. Current recom-
mendations call for less than 1
percent of calories from trans
fats, meaning less than two
grams per day for the average
adult.

Trap #1: You get trans fat
more places than you think
Some people assume that
trans fat is only in margarine or
fast food. Yet research reveals
40 percent of U.S. trans fat
comes from foods like cookies,
crackers, cakes, pies and
muffins. Margarine and short-
ening account for almost a
quarter of trans fat, although
margarine and spreads vary
widely in fat content. French
fries and packaged snacks like
chips and microwave popcorn
provide about 13 percent of
trans fat.
Trans fat can be just as con-
centrated in many deep-fried'
foods, such as chicken nuggets
and breaded fish. Even if a
restaurant fries food in zero-
trans fat oil, if the product is
pre-cooked it may have already


FOR INFORMATION

406._ AVL-k u a


accumulated trans fat in pro-
cessing.

Trap #2: "Zero trans fat"
doesn't mean zero
In the United States, a food
with less than 0.5 grams of trans
fat per serving is labeled as 0
trans fat. Unfortunately, foods
that contain trans fat are often
eaten in portions larger than the
standard serving listed. So if
you have two "0 trans fat"
snack cakes that contain 0.4
grams of trans fat per serving,
you've had more than a third of
your recommended limit.

Trap #3: The effect of remov-
ing trans fat depends on
what replaces it
Experts say the most com-
mon substitutes for partially
hydrogenated oils are tropical
oils, especially palm oil.-
Other substitutes include
interesterified oils, customized
blends of a liquid oil with a
highly saturated fat (like palm
oil or a fully hydrogenated oil).
Some can be relatively low in


)N CALL C


Trans Fat Traps
Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN, American Institute for Cancer Research


saturated fat, but others, espe-
cially those for bakery, often
contain substantial saturated
fat.

Bottom line:
Use oils like olive and canola
oil when possible, and choose a
soft zero-trans spread with low
saturated fat. Limit commercial
bakery goods (cookies, pies,
donuts); chips; crackers; and
processed foods, including
commercial sauces and dress-
ings, breaded entrees and veg-
etables, and cake-or muffin
mixes. As side benefits, you'll.
also reduce sugar, sodium, calo-
ries and have a chance to eat
more unrefined, high-nutrient
foods.
When you do buy pre-cooked
or processed foods, check the
Nutrition Facts panel and the
ingredients list. Top picks are
those that don't list partially
hydrogenated oil and still have
a comparatively low total of
saturated plus trans fat.

The American Institute for
Cancer Research (AICR) is the
cancer charity that fosters
research on the relationship of
nutrition, physical activity and


LURCH OFFICE AT 863-773-41
L |12-9c
A-m d sk \ Ast ViA._ ^ vl&^ .1


weight management to cancer
risk, interprets the scientific lit-'
erature and educates the public
about the results. It has con-'
tributed more than $95 million;
for innovative research con-'
ducted at universities, hospitals
and research centers across the
country. AICR has published
two landmark reports that inter-
pret the accumulated research
in the field, and is committed to
a process of continuous review.
AICR also provides a wide
range of educational programs,.
to help millions of Americans
learn to make dietary changes
for lower cancer risk. Its award-
winning New American Plate
program is presented in
brochures, seminars and on its
website, www.aicr.org. AICR is.
a member of the World Cancer
Research Fund Internatiohal.

Lead your life so -you
wouldn't be ashamed to
sell the family parrot to the
town gossip.
-Will Rogers

in conversation, humor Is
worth more than wit and
easiness more than knowl-
edge.


Featuring the Music & Worship Ministry



Sunday December 12th 6:00pm


(Handbell & Orchestra concert at 5:30pm)




FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


1570 WEST MAIN STREET

WAUCHULA, FL 33873








PAGE ONE


Nu-Hope Has Thanksgiving Dinner


Brother Eric and Leighton Bennett share another Thanksgiving meal together.


Director Debbie Slade, left, and Carolyn Theme pile plates with turkey and all the trim-
mings. Slade said Nu-Hope feeds more than 100 Hardee County residents every day
and has a waiting list of needy people. The meals are free of charge, but donations are
accepted. She said the funding comes from the county and federal government.


Mary McCauley enjoyed having her son, Robert Fowler, with her to share her
Thanksgiving lunch.


PHOTOS BY MICHAEL KELLY
Mary Cook, Clemmie Grooms and Lela Jackson visit before lunch was served.


From left, Imogene Gilliard, Betty Mcleod, Maderia Rouse, Eleanor Hartley and Rene
Bell Smith are enjoying each other's company before the holiday meal was served.


RIDGE AREA ARC

RESALE STORE



OP NINC G

Come visit us at
1010 S. 6th Ave./Hwy 17 S Wauchula
OLD ECKARD'S BUILDING
(863) 773-0140
Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm/Sat. 9am 3pm


Proceeds benefit Ridge Area Arc *
Providing opportunities topeople with disabilities
in Hardee, Highlands, and Polk Counties *
DONATIONS GLADLY ACCEPTED 12:9c
*000.. .0.. .00000...........0500..0..0 .


The Herald-Advocate
IUSPS 57-7'O1
Thursday, December 9,2010


0
o
0
0
0
0


e
.0
.

:0

0:
*


Christmas Carols


Paynes Creek Historic State Park
888 Lake Branch Road Bowling Green, FL


Refreshments
COOK and baked goods

will be for sale

Presented by:
Paynes Creek Preservation Alliance, Inc.




Pynes
Cr12ek
12:9c


i









2B The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


'Our House Was The Only One With A Radio'


By ERIC KLEIN
Special To The Herald-Advocate
I interviewed my grandmother, Pearl
Crosby
Q: Where were you born?
A: I was born in Dodge County, Ga.,
which is a large county, almost the
biggest.
Q: When were you born?
A: I was born on Oct. 16, 1928,
which I am now 82 years old.
Q: How young were you when you
began school?
A: I was 6 years old when I started
school, and I began in first grade. Back
then there was no pre-K or kinder-
garten.
Q: At what age did you finish
school, and did you graduate?
A: Our school day started at 8 a.m.
and ended at 3 p.m. I finished school in
the seventh grade, not graduating but
just deciding not to go anymore.
Then I decided to go to work
'cause I didn't really care for
school and the people that stayed
in school were the smart people
and they liked it.
Grandma Crosby also said she liked
to play hooky but didn't like the conse-
quences when she got caught.
Especially by her dad, telling about a
time when she and her brother played
hooky and they were headed to their
sinkhole to hide in but had to cross rail-
road tracks.
When they came to the tracks, a train
was passing so they waited until it
passed. But after the train passed, they
did not like who they saw and their
father didn't either.
As she laughed, "My dad rode up to
me in his vehicle and said, 'I will deal
with you later.' So we walked home not
looking forward to the spanking we had
coming with a peach twig across the
bottom."
Q: After school, what chores did
you have around the house?
A: Well, I started working in the
crops at 9 after I would get home from


i


school. I would go out into the cotton
fields and chop it, or either go into the
tobacco fields and pick worms off the
plant plus pulling weeds; also spraying
pesticides like arsenic.
Grandma Crosby told me one time a
dog drank some arsenic and it didn't
even kill it.
Q: What was the move from
Georgia to Florida like as a child?
A: My father went to work in Florida
with the citrus industry but when that
was over he came back to Georgia and
there wasn't much work, so we all
moved back to Florida in the year 1949.
Then my dad started working for a cabi-
net company but he later started his
own cabinet shop.
Q: What kind of clothing was worn
when you were a teenager?
A: All girls wore dresses.
Q: What type of food did you eat?
Also, where did
S '" you get your
-C' If lie foods?


S A: We always
had food every-
where we went, wild berries and fruit
we could pick and be on our way. We
always climbed the trees to get the
sweetest fruit we could find and eat
them.
Grandma Crosby also told me she
and her siblings were climbing a tree to
pick something to eat and there was a
tree snake above her sister's head, and
when Grandma told her, she literally
fell out of the tree.
Q: What kind of crops did your
family plant?
A: We planted tobacco, cotton,
pecans, peanuts, peaches and pears.
Q: Were the crops harvested and
sold or eaten?
A: Both. We used all of the crops,
though. Plus we had a family store,
which was the only one in town. We
sold most and some we kept for our-
selves.
Q: How many siblings did you
have?


I w [s] i [S F J MI] *H I ol f!*

Week ending December 5, 2010
WEATHER SUMMARY
Weather Summary: A cold front crossed from the Panhandle
down to the southern Peninsula which brought unseasonably, frigid
temperatures. The cold snap set record lows statewide with tem-
peratures averaging two to five degrees below normal. Many areas
from the Panhandle down to the central Peninsula experienced
some frosts and hard freezes. Chilling evening lows were in the 30s
and 40s; however, lows fell into the 20s in several stations at least
one night. Daytime highs reached the 70s and 80s. Rainfall reports
ranged from none to minimal traces, which increased the risk of
wildfires. Jay and Pensacola reported over one inch of precipita-
tion.

Field Crops: Sugarcane harvesting progressed in the Ever-
glades region. Peanut quality in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties
was reported significantly poorer this year compared to previous
years. Growers finished planting wheat in Jackson County. Cotton
harvesting in the Panhandle is over 90 percent complete.

Vegetables: Some vegetable producers covered plants with
freeze cloths and ran overhead sprinklers for protection. Straw-
berry growers ran overhead sprinklers to form ice caps on plants as
cold protection to save the plants and immature fruit during the
cold nights. Tomato harvesting ended in West Florida. Light har-
vesting of okra was available as the season comes to an end.
Vegetables marketed included snap beans, sweet corn, cucumbers,
eggplant, endive, escarole, okra, bell peppers, radishes, squash,
strawberries, and tomatoes.

Livestock and Pastures: Pastures were hurt by freezing low
temperatures, drought, and shorter days. Pasture in the Panhandle
ranged from very poor to good with most in poor condition. Two
nights with freezing temperatures stopped all summer pasture
growth. Winter forage growth was slow due to low temperatures,
short days, and drier than normal soil. Winter forage growth was
aided by rainfall. The cattle condition ranged from poor to excel-
lent with most in fair condition. Ranchers were feeding hay and
supplements. In the northern areas, pasture condition ranged from
very poor to good with most in poor condition. The cattle condition
ranged from very poor to good with most fair to good. In the cen-
tral areas, the pasture ranged from very poor to good with most in
poor to fair condition. Pastures suffered due to the first significant
frost of the fall and to only traces of precipitation. The condition of
most of the cattle was good. In the southwestern areas, pasture con-
'dition ranged from mostly fair to good. with the condition through-
out the area ranging from very poor to excellent. Light frost on
Thursday morning in some cooler inland areas browned pastures
slightly. Ranchers were feeding hay. The cattle condition ranged
from poor to excellent with most in good condition. Statewide, the
condition of the cattle was very poor to excellent with most in good
condition.

Citrus: Highs were in the 80s, with early morning lows rang-
ing from the 30s to the lower 40s. Twenty-two of the 25 stations
recorded some precipitation. The station reporting the most precip-
itation was Indian River, with 0.48 inch of recorded rainfall.
Overall, there were abnormally dry conditions in all of the citrus
aret according to the U.S. drought monitor, last updated on
November 30. Indian River and Brevard counties continued to
experience extreme drought conditions, while surrounding coun-
ties reported severe conditions. Moderate to extreme drought con-
ditions extend over most of the citrus area. Forty-four packing-
houses and fourteen processors have opened, with few more sched-
uled to open. Cultural practices included application of lime and
irrigation.

When it is a question of money, everybody is of the same
religion.


A: My parents had eight children,
five girls then three boys. The girls
were all born first then came the boys.
Q: What is your maiden name?
A: My maiden name is Wright.
Q: In your teenage years, what did
you do for fun and were there sports?
A: There were no sports as in school-
related or organized rules and events.
So we made or own fun playing hop-
scotch, marbles, jump rope, and even
climbed trees.Also, since my family
was wealthy, we had a radio and we
were the only house to have one. So all
the children would come and listen to '
the Grand 01' Opry.
Q: In your town, what did it con-
sist of?
A: My town or county was very big
and there were farms everywhere and
neighbors. My family owned rentals
where travelers would stay. Also, con-
necting to one of my father's houses,
the family store was located, which I
worked after-I quit school.
Q: At what age did you get mar-
ried to Granddaddy Crosby?
A: I was 15 years young when I got
married to Henry Dorsey Crosby, who
was 19 years of age.
Q: How many children do you
have?
A: I have six children, four girls and
two boys. Just like all the other fami-
lies, we had a pretty good-sized family.
Also, just like my parents' kids, all the
girls were born first and the boys came
last.
Q: What were your means of
transportation?
A: When I went to school I rode the
bus with about 20 other kids. But my
family had a car since they were
wealthy, but our neighbors rode on wag-
ons pulled by horses.
Q: What was the economy like in
your younger days?
A: In my county and my family, we
were fine, we didn't deal with the
Depression affecting other counties. In
other counties, there was a food source


GIVE THE GIFT OF YOU!
Each year the holiday season seems to creep up more and more
quickly. It seems that school begins, the air gets a little cooler and
suddenly it's time to put up the Christmas tree.
For most folks, there is not enough time in a day to complete
our formal tasks yet holiday time brings many more items on our
"to-do" lists along with pulse-raising deadlines. Wouldn't it be
great if each of us could experience the joy of Christmas with less
of the stress, and get closer to understanding the true Reason for the
season?
We can, if we just make a few changes in our routine.
Each year I am reluctant to face another birthday, not that I am
bothered by growing older or contemplating changing my physical
self to create a more youthful appearance. It just seems like there
is an imaginary "Bucket List" of things I want to do before I die,
and I am annually reminded that the time is growing shorter.
This year, instead of worrying about what gifts I would receive
from my family or where we would go out to eat, I chose to serve
instead. It was a no-brainer for me, as my birthday fell on Thanks-
giving (funny how that happens every now and then), and I have
for the last three years helped to serve the Thanksgiving dinner pro-
vided at Faith Presbyterian Church by the local Ministerial
Association, an annual ministry that blesses many hungry folks.
This year it was richer, more meaningful, because I was doing
it on a day that I would otherwise have been thinking about myself.
All who served were blessed as well.
Now, going just a step farther, we have decided in my family
not to exchange presents or any other commercially beneficial tra-
dition this Christmas. We will carol at the local nursing home with
our church and visit family, and probably eat too much, but we will
find a way to serve.
This is not intended to be about me, or my family, but just one
human trying to initiate an internal change to make a little differ-
ence in the world, starting in our little neighborhood. Consider this
a challenge to your family and friends to find ways to do the same,
and be creative.
There are many organizations in Hardee County that could be
blessed by your service. Some ideas would be to visit folks at
Resthaven or Hardee Manor, not because you're related to them but
because you may be the only one who visits them this day or this
week. Offer your services volunteering with food distribution at
Cutting Edge Ministries in Zolfo Springs, or at Alpha & Omega
Freedom Ministries in Wauchula.
Call Lydia's House or Hannah House and see how you could
help there. Maybe you have a neighbor who doesn't drive who
could really use a ride to the grocery store or to pick up prescrip-
tions. Check with your church and see how you can plug in there.
If you don't have a church, start visiting local churches until you
find one that feels like home.
May you and your family feel even a part of the joy that we
felt on Thanksgiving!
As a reminder to the community, the Toys for Tots toy drive is
going on now. Hardee County Christmas for Needy Children, a
joint effort of the Help Center and other local organizations, will be
distributing toys to kids on Saturday, Dec. 18, beginning at 8:30.
If you would like to help or can donate toys or adopt a family,
please call the center at 773-0034. Because of the National Wild
Turkey Federation, we were blessed with a wonderful donation of
65 turkeys for us to distribute to the' needy this holiday season.
Please don't forget to drop your coins/bills in the Salvation Army
Red Kettle. All donations stay in Hardee County to bless those in
need with rent, utilities or other needs. Also, our Hardee Help
Center Thrift Store is moving next week from its long-time loca-
tion on Seventh Avenue to 226 W. Main St. (across from
Giovanni's). Please come see us we are totally non-profit, with
all sales and donations being used to fund the Help Center and help
those less fortunate.


COURTESY PHOTO
The author, Eric Klein, with the subject of
his interview, Pearl Crosby.

for the people that were struggling
called, soup kitchens. These were made
to feed the families who couldn't afford
groceries.
Q: In your most recent trip to
Georgia, how have the surroundings
changed since you were a child?
A: The land is no comparison to
what it used to be, with trees and hous-
es and barns pushed up by equipment
and destroyed. I just like to remember
the way it was before. When I was
young I could walk my way around
with my eyes closed, but now I barely
could tell where I am because the sur-
roundings are so different.
Q: What was the most memorable
moment or time of your life?
A: Grandma Crosby laughed as she
said, "Well, some were good and some
were bad but the most memorable was
when my first child was born. Dr.
Yeomans, a family friend, delivered her
at my house with the help of his mid-
wife."
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth .graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older per-
son. Selected interviews are published
here as an encouragement to the stu-
dents and for the enjoyment of our read-
ers.


Greetings from Fort Green!
I sure don't like the sounds of
what the weather station is pre-
dicting on the TV. Of course,
I'm writing this on Sunday
night and the cold weather is
supposed to come Tuesday
night, but hopefully the fore-
casters are wrong!
Hardee County is fortunate to
have a group of singers who can
put on such a program as the
Heartland Chorale put on last
Thursday night. It was the best
ever, but then I might just not be
able to remember last year!
Sherman had his surgery last
Thursday and came home Fri-
day, so he missed the music. He
said if they had not kept him in
the hospital, I would have had
to take him back as he was very
miserable.
Essie and John Deer enjoyed
Thanksgiving with their daugh-
ter and family in Texas, but
Essie has been sick ever since
with a bad cold and plenty of
congestion. Tom and Sharon
Lynn enjoyed Thanksgiving in
Alabama, but both of them have
been sick since returning home.
Beth Sasser had more foot
surgery last week. She is re-
covering but can't walk on it
yet. Johnny Summerville is still
sick. Dawn Watson is supposed
to have surgery in Tampa Gen-
eral on Thursday. From this list,
you can see there are lots of sick
in our area and they all need
prayer, so please pray for them.
Our. sincere sympathy is ex-
tended to the family of Bill
McQuaig. He made his final
journey this past weekend. He
was in a nursing home in Avon
Park but grew up in Fort Green.
James Williamson enjoyed a
trip to Georgia to get in some


hunting.
Randy and Faye Davis along
with Norma Alejandro and Ed-
ith Bassett enjoyed Thanksgiv-
ing with daughter and family,
Amy and Johnmark Brown in
DeFuniak Springs. Edith told
me Beka took her for a ride and
it seemed impossible that she
already had a beginner driver's
license.
Randy and Faye gave their
son, Josh, a gun as a birthday
gift one Februray, but .Josh
never got to hunt with it as the
season did not come in before
he made his final journey.
Randy and Faye gave his gun to
their grandson, Aaron. Randy
and Aaron went hunting on
Thanksgiving Day, but didn't
get anything that morning and
let a small four-point just walk
on by. But that afternoon they
were back hunting and Aaron
got a nice six-point. Proud
Grandpa was sitting right be-
side him and it was a very spe-
cial time.
We have been having some
pretty special Christmas music
as probably most churches are
during this time of the season.
Things are always busy dur-
ing December. The Adult 11
Class will have a dinner at the
home of Sam and Arden Rawls
this Saturday. Us older folks
will have ours on Dec. 17 at the
Fellowship Hall. Dec. 19, the
choir will sing special music for
the morning worship and that
evening the young people will
put on a program. Lots of ex-
citement in the air. If you don't
have somewhere to go, come on
out to the country!
Remember to pray for the
sick, each other, our country
and the military.


The anti-malarial drug quinine comes from the bark of
the cinchona tree, a South American evergreen.



HARD YOFTHt

FoOOBA L LEA\Usn


ANNUAL ELECTION OF BOARD MEMBERS

DECEMBER 13, 2010 AT 6:30 PM.
12:9c


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


'


al







December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3B


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.

-State five-year transportation plan. 8:35 a.m.
-Temporary mining order for CF Industries. 8:50 a.m.
-Appoint Dr. Stephen Gordon as health department adminis-
trator, 9 a.m.
-Regional Transportation Authority, 9:10 a.m.
-FHREDI annual report, 9:25 a.m.
-Mobile homes and building codes, 9:40 a.m.
-Library registration fee for program materials, 9:55 a.m.
-Purchasing card policies, 10:05 a.m.
-Monthly update on visioning, 10:15 a.m.
-Change orders on Florida Avenue paving project, 10:30 a.m.

This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.


Hardee basketball is under way in a big way.
The high school girls varsity and junior varsity both swept past
Frv-ispr..~.ol on Friday night. The varsity girls are at 3-3. They have
won over Walker, Sarasota Cardinal Mooney and Frostproof and
lost to Lakeland, Sebring and Bradenton Southeast.
The high school boys are at 1-1 with a win over Lake Placid and
loss to 5A Port Charlotte.
Junior high got its teams going last Thursday with home wins
for the boys and girls against Lake Placid.
Most team sports, including basketball, will halt on Dec. 17 for
the holidays and resume in early January.

The soccer boys are at 1-2-1 after opening the season with a
loss, tie, loss and 7-1 victory over Booker.
We haven't been able to obtain scoring information for the soc-
cer girls, but hope to soon. Rumor is that they are doing quite well.

The last of the winter sports began on Tuesday when girls
weightlifting hosted Avon Park at the weight room off the high
school gym. Coach Jan Brutus has a couple of veterans and a lot of
newcomers are nearly every weight level. The state meet is Feb. 12
in Kissimmee.

In boxing, Edner Cherry returns to the ring in St. Petersburg on
Saturday evening (See story elsewhere). Jenna Shiver should also
be on that card.
Information from school and community events is always welcome.
Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heraldadvo-
cate@embarqmail.com with news for this bi-weekly column. The
sports news deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday, except for events which
happen over the weekend. Those are due by Monday before noon.


Highlands County HOME Consortium
Notice of Public Hearing
on the FY 2009-2010
Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report

The Highlands County HOME Consortium receives fund-
ing for DeSoto, Glades, Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, and
Okeechobee Counties from the US Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the HOME
Investment Partnerships (HOME). HUD requires that the
Highlands County Consortium prepare a Consolidated
Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) on
the accomplishments of each the programs goals and
objectives in the Consortium's 5-year Consolidated Plan
for Housing. Notice is hereby given that the Highlands
County Consortium will conduct a public hearing on the
Consortium's activities undertaken during the FY 09/10.
Citizen comments form this hearing will be reported in the
CAPER. The hearing will be held as shown below:

Community Development Building
198 6th Street
Moore Haven, FL 33471
December 20, 2010
10:00 am

All residents are encouraged to attend. For additional
information and for persons requiring special accommo-
dations please contact the Highlands County Housing
Department at 863-402-6648, 7205 S. George Blvd.,
Sebring FL 33875. A Copy of the CAPER may be viewed
at the above listed SHIP offices in each county, and at
www.hcbcc.net. 129c



IT'S TIME TO LEARN ABOUT MEDICARE

Chbosing a Medicare plan doesn't
have to be complicated. Get personal
guidance from a local representative.

*Understand what you want and
need from a Medicare Health Plan

Now is the perfect time to be asking
about MEDICARE ADVANTAGE,
PART D AND MEDICARE
SUPPLEMENT health plans.,

Call todayto schedule some time
to discuss your choices.


Scott McAtee


ALBRITTON

";."'* I. v i ,. (.. I -, <. 'i i L 1 i 'i ,," I'* ,.t.. "r't' ,<

863-773-4101
Independent Licensed Florida Agent 11:18-12:23c


Park It!
By Frankie Larramore >
Paynes Creek Historic State Park


We had a good turnout for the Arts & Crafts Festival. and got
to visit with some old friends. It turned out to be a pretty warm
day and `we were thankful for a little shade and a bit of a breeze.
Visitors were able to find some unique gifts. watch pine-straw bas-
ket making. and try their hands at pottery making.


The second annual Christmas Carols in the Park will be this
Saturday. with the program starting at 6 in the evening and lasting
till around 9. New this year will be better lighting in the parking
area. plus the solar lights.
Bring a lawn chair or use the seating that is available. It got
a little chilly last-year and a lap blanket might feel good after
awhile.
There will be baked goods and hot drinks for sale by the Park
Alliance Community Support Group. The gate will be open for
free admission to this event, just follow the sign to the Visitor's
Center and enjoy!


Mark the calendar, all of you butterfly garden lovers, for a free
presentation by master gardener Debra Howell from the Polk
County Extension Office in Bartow. She will be giving the pres-
entation at the Visitor's Center next Wednesday. Dec. 15. at 10 a.m.
SHowell will speak on what plants are best to attract butterflies
and how to maintain a beautiful garden year round. She will also
gladly take questions related to this topic.


Jackson Mosley. park manager, visited the Peace River
Butterfly Society in Punta Gorda on Nov. 17. Mosley's presenta-
tion covered the special butterfly experience available to everyone
when they visit Paynes Creek Historic State Park.
The park is a great place to see numerous species of butterflies,
such as beautiful swallowtails. zebra long wings (which is our state
butterfly), queens, buckeyes and the brightly colored sulphurs.
Paynes Creek is currently the only state conservation land in
Hardee County, so get out to the park and enjoy the natural beauty
it has to offer.
Merry Christmas everyone!


--i.. ----i--- a ~'


IHnigFshin Foecat-


r_-


12/9/2010
Sun Data
Rises 7:06 anm
Sets: 5:33 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 27 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 10:12 am
Sets: 9:25 pm
L'p: 3:.48 pnl
Do\\n: 3:24 am
Moon Phase
16"i;
\Vaing Crescent
Major Times
3:24 am-5:24am
3:48 pm-5:48 pm
Minor Times
10:12 am-ll:12 am
9:25 pm-10:25 pin
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/10/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:06 am
Sets: 5:33 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 27 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 10:48 am
Sets: 10:18 pm
Up: 4:32 pm
Down: 4:10 am
Moon Phase
249
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
4:10 am-6:10 am
4:32 pm-6:32 pm
Minor Times
10:48 am-1:48 amn
10:18 pm-I1:18 pm
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


-i r


Contact us for your life,


SOauto, home, annuity or long

term care needs.


You don't have-to be.

a farmer to purchase

our insurance.




773-3117
10 17 US Hwy 17 No. Wauchula


George L. Wadsworth, Jr.
Agent


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


eb;





"Thank You" i


"Wildcat" Football I

Albritton Insurance Services

Alan Jay Automotive Network

Bowl-Of-Fun

CF Industries

David Singletary
State Farm Insurance

First National Bank

Florida Fuel

Florida Hospital

Giovanni's

Hardee Livestock

Hardee Signs Plus T's

Heacock Financial

Heartland Gold


- I


j


CONGRATULATIONS

"Wildcats" and Coaches



The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

PRINTERS PUBLISHERS

PO. BOX 338 WAUCHULA, FL 33873


(863) 773-3255

Quality Printing Services At Competitive Prices!


l I I


Page Sponsors

Hungry Howie's

Jim See Realty

MidFlorida Federal I
Credit Union

Mosaic

Peace River Growers

Pet Vet Vaccination Clinics

Robarts Funeral Home

Royal's Furniture

Superior OK Tires

Sevigny/Timmerman

Ullrich's Water


Vision Ace Hardware

Wauchula State Bank


,II


12/11/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:07 ;ai
Sets: 5:33 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 26 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 11:20 am
Sets: 11:11pm
tp: 5:14pm
Down: 4:53 am
Moon Phase
33".
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
4:53 am-6:53 am
5:14 pm-7:14 pm
Minor Times
1 1:20 am-12:20 pm
--:-----:--
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/12/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:08 am
Sets: 5:34 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 26 mins.
Moon Dala
Rises: 11:51. am
Sets:--:-
Up: 5:55 pmn
Down: 5:35 im
Moon Phase
42'%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
5:35 am-7:35 am
5:55 pm-7:55 pm
Minor Times
11:51 am-12:51 pm

Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


12/13/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:08 ;am
Sets: 5:34 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 26 inins.
Moon Data
Rises: 12:20 pm
Sets: 12:02 anm
Ip: 6.35 pm
Down: 6:15 an
Moon Phase
50';
First Quaner
Major Times
6:15 am-8:15 am
6:35 pm-8:35 pm
Minor Times
--:-----:--
12:20 pm-l:20 pm
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
'TC: -5
12/14/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:09 am
Sets: 5:34 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 12:50 pm
Sets: 12:54 am
Up: 7:16 pm
Down: 8:00 am
Moon Phase
61 '
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:00 am-10:00 am
7:16 pn-9:16 pm
Minor Times
12:50 pm-1:50 pm
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
IUTC: -5


12/15/2010
Sun Data
Rises 7:10.mn
Sets: 5:35 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 25 inns.
Moon Data
Rises: I 23 pm
Sets: 1:46 am
'p: 7:59 pm
Down: 7:37 am
Moon Phase
1 70G
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
7:37 am-9:37 am
7:59 pm-9:59 pm
Minor Times
1:46 am-2:46 amn
1:23 pm-2:23 pm
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/16/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7:10 am
Sets: 5:35 pm
Day Length
10 hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 1:57 pm
Sets: 2:39 am
Up: 8:44 pm
Down: 8:21 am
Moon Phase
78%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:21 am-10:21 am
8:44 pm-10:44 pm
Minor Times
2:39 am-3:39 atm
1:57 pm-2:57 pm
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


.FAR
BURE


aNUR


I .





4B The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


I1 -


J ,
I .


Heartland Chorale 2010


14-


4;. P~L


*.1 . .
,4r "


'C!


U


S'r
* I
p -



4 ." ,. -.-


S.


. 4


L .7


rrr~"~
Ile .g:&W


& r-t


I .Ik


Xvy
"_ -
low-,


WA


,4A i
ILI


', . '


':4


',5

'AP


S/rn


I


WA".


.i "


m


rf


,- ,AA


'II


.--
11


,ii


1`1
i


:t


1'


ORI I RV.-


* -,


Lk t
*f


zt







December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5B


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Dec. 6, Benjamin Lazo, 20, of 415 S. First Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with trespassing on an
occupied structure or conveyance.
Dec. 6, a theft on SR 64 East was reported.

Dec. 5, Tomas Coolle-Vasquez, 36, of Pine Cone Trailer Park
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Manuel Zuniga and charged
with disorderly intoxication.
Dec. 5, residential burglaries on Vandolah Road, Bronco Drive
and Lincoln Street, criminal mischief on Civic Center Drive and on
U.S.17 North and thefts on U.S. 17 South, Bronco Drive, Seventh
Street and U.S. 17 North were reported.

Dec. 4, Stephen Michael Gross, 23, of Merle Langford Road,
Wauthula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with
possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and
driving with knowledge of a suspended license.
Dec. 4, Cesar Duarte Rojas, 36, of 2460 Pine Cone Road, was
arrested by Ofc. Cesar Medina and charged with retail theft and
fraud-giving a false ID to a law enforcement officer.
Dec. 4, thefts on Marie Road and on U.S. 17 North were
reported.

Dec. 3, Raul Mesa, 48, of 7903 W. 31st St., Hialeah, was
arrested on charges of trafficking in marijuana and possession of
structure/vehicle for manufacturing drugs.
Dec. 3, Erica Denise Ureste, age not given, of 611- Green St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with
retail theft.
Dec. 3, Jayson Dan Kalinowski, 28, of 917 Lake June Road,
Lake Placid, was arrested by the countrywide Drug Task Force
(DTF) and charged with fraud-concealing information to obtain a
prescription.
Dec. 3, Nicholas Mendoza, 35, of 157 Sweetwater Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Cpl. Manuel Zuniga and charged with
withholding support of children.
Dec. 3, a residential burglary on Redbird Lane, criminal mis-
chief on Will Duke Road, and thefts on Steve Roberts Special and
on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Dec. 2, Christopher Lee Baker, 27, of 3006 Hickory St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Carree Williams and charged with
battery and disorderly conduct.
Dec. 2, Rhonda Danell Warram, 34, of 6120 Swiss Blvd.,
Punta Gorda, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Dec. 2, a tag stolen on South 10th Avenue and criminal mis-
chief on North Florida Avenue were reported.

Dec. 1, Ruth Means, 35, of 1121 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters and charged with
withholding support of children.
Dec. 1, Gary Wayne Douglas, 29, of 809 Hudson St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. RyanWaters on a charge of violation
of probation.
Dec. 1, Stanley Bernard Holdman, 29, of 1314 Gramcary Ave.,
Sebring, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. James Cruz
on an out-of-county warrant.
Dec. 1, Nathan Ray Deanda, 24, of 4484 Dixiana Dr., Bowlijpg


Green, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White on an out-ot-county war-
rant.
Dec. 1, Tracy Ann Sanders, 46, of 1418 Lost Acres Dr.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White on a charge of viola-
tion of probation.
Dec. 1, Perry Jefferson Taylor, 61, of 1650 S. Duette Road,
Myakka, was arrested by FHP CPL. Rene Benavidez and charged
with contempt of court-violation of a domestic violence injunc-
tion for protection.
Dec. 1, Brian James Hagans, 18, of 915 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Everett Lovett and charged with
larceny-petit theft.
Dec. 1, Bobby Joe Taylor, 33, of 3037 SR 62, Bowling Green,
was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of methamphet-
amine, possession of marijuana and possession of drug parapher-
nalia.
Dec. 1, residential burglaries on Steve Roberts Special,
Poverty Lane and Hampton Road and a theft on U.S. 17 were
reported.

Nov. 30, Norman Ray Igo, 43, of 741 Morrel Ave., Lake
Wales, was arrested by Dep. Russell Conley.on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
Nov. 30, a residential burglary on Hampton Road, criminal
mischief on U.S. 17 North, and thefts on Riverside Drive and on
Cemetery Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
Dec. 5, a residential burglary on River Chase Circle and crim-
inal mischief on Green Street were reported.

Dec. 4, criminal mischief on Carlton Street was reported.

Dec. 3, Rebecca Lolene Bragg, 28, of 1020 Makowski Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with
disorderly conduct and resisting an officer without violence.
Dec. 3, Anita Kaye Platt, 52, of 404 S. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with
battery.
Dec. 3, Mary Sena Martin, 64, of 3910 Raccoon Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza and charged with disor-
derly conduct.
Dec. 2, a business burglary on U.S. 17 South was reported.

Dec. 1, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.

Nov. 30, Cipriano Ibarra, 26, of 2446 Taylor Dr., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with bat-
tery.
Nov. 30, Melissa Elizabeth Elliott, 32, of 4808-21st St. West,
Bradenton, was arrested by Ofc. Amy Drake and charged with pos-
session of drug paraphernalia and two counts possession of pre-
scription drugs without a prescription.
Nov. 30, Julius Robert Merchant, 23 of 311 George St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Amy Drake and charged with pos-
session of drug paraphernalia and two counts possession of pre-
scription drugs without a prescription.
Nov. 30, a residential burglary on North Eighth Avenue and
criminal mischief on Constitution Drive were reported.

Nov. 29, a fight on Palmetto Street and a theft on South Florida
Avenue were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Dec. 4, Enrique Juarez, 21, of 4513 Dixiana Dr., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Ryan Abbott and charged with DUI
and no valid license.

Nov. 30, a theft on Snelling Drive was reported.


WORDY WALK


COURTESY PHOTO
Students at North Wauchula Elementary School recently
dressed up as their favorite book or vocabulary word and
then paraded around campus, all to encourage the
development of descriptive speech and reading. Third-
grade student Victor Aleman, aka "The Bookworm,"
shows off his great costume as classmate Jonathan Orta
looks on.


For the week ended December 02, 2010
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 10,227, com-
pared to closed last week, and 11,343 a year ago. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were 1.00 to 3.00 higher,
feeder steers and heifers were unevenly steady.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 130.00-175.00
300-400 lbs 114.00-162.50
400-500 lbs 104.00-127.50

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 108.00-147.50
300-400 lbs 93.00-127.50
400-500 lbs 89.00-113.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent
45.00-50.00

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs
62.00-69.00

Two can live as cheap as one if one don't eat.
-Southern saying






6B The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010

Annual Thanksgiving Meal Served By Hardee County Ministerial Assn.


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Helping serve meals Nov. 25 at Faith Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall were Andrea
Trus, LuAnn Bee, Jim Bee and Bett Miller.


Volunteer helpers included Bruce Siff, Tara McNabb, Leslie Fite and Destany McClellan.
f"T~ '* .^-W M^Hl


The cooks included Russell Adams, Stephanie Adams, Skipper Calder and Bruce Siff.


Serving Thanksgiving dinner at community event were Ana Guevara, Teenah Trus,
Elizabeth McBride and Diana Ramirez.


Jessica Morris, Makenna Fite and Alexis McBride helped serve desserts.


Joy Roberts and Debbie Morris served rolls and iced tea.






HasHometo ag


PRMINTERS PUBLI9S HERS




.Telehone(863


Enjoying the Thanksgiving meal included John Letterman, Connie Rowe and Marjorie
Wickman.









December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7B


co1- rtfho5Iu Rrt]
|MI~t[41r- ):1^


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
There were no marriage
licenses issued recently in the
office of the county court:

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Marcone Appliance Parts Co.
vs. Tri-County Appliance Re-
pair, stipulated settlement ap-
proved.
State Farm Fire & Casualty
Co. a/s/o Daryl Hall and Mary
Hall vs. Sandra D. Guerrero,
judgment.
State Farm Automobile In-
surance Co. vs. Donna L.
Fowler, judgment.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Jodi M. Wilson, voluntary dis-
missal.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Emily Rios, voluntary dis-
missal.
Valencia Garden Apartments
LTD vs. Dixie Rivers, default
judgment for removal of tenant.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Johnny Lee Cook, trespass
other than structure or con-
veyance, time served, stay off
property, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 cost of prosecution
(COP).
Esdras Gonzales, domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Pedro Hernandez, possession
of drug paraphernalia, proba-
tion one year, alcohol/drug
abuse evaluation and treatment,
random screens, warrantless
search & seizure, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs; possession
of marijuana, not prosecuted.
Ariel Lopez, affray, adjudi-
cation withheld, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP.
Alejandro Rosas Murrieta,
disorderly intoxication, time
served, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 COP.
Darlene Elizabeth Williams,
retail theft, probation one year,
stay out of store, ACF Mile Post
Class, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 COP, 50 hours com-
munity service.
Randy Lee Fugate, battery-
amended to disorderly conduct,
325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP,
$50 investigative costs.
Joel Wayne Windham, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, time
served, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender


fees, $50 COP.
Angela Patrice Louis, failure
to appear in court (original
charge possession of drug para-
phernalia), not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
. Marcy Rivera vs. Eliseo
Sanchez Jr., petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Donald E. Woods and
Lizanne Elaine Woods, divorce.
Tami Poucher vs. Bradford
Allen Atchley, petition for
injunction for protection.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Eric Collins, damages-con-
tracts and indebtedness.
Cynthia A. Barlow vs. Lynn
B. Barlow, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Jessica N. Summerlin and
the state Department of
Revenue (DOR) vs. Porfirio
Sierra Morales, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Kevin Eric Smith vs. Warden
David Lawrence,. Hardee
-Correctional Institute, petition
to review inmate situation.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
James Dalton See and Taryn
Todd See, divorce.
Corban E. Field and Marsha
Jean Field, order.
Josefino Garcia vs. Foremost
Insurance Co., voluntary dis-
missal.
Alfred Wiestauer as trustee
vs. Robert Sconyers and
Heather Elizabeth Sconyers et
al, voluntary dismissal.
Patricia Garcia and DOR vs.
Roberto Jose Gutierrez, order of
Nov. 2, 2010 set aside.
Sherry L. Wenzel vs. Arnold
Lanier, sheriff of Hardee
County, voluntary dismissal.
Moye Farms Inc. vs. Alico
Inc. and Alico Plant World
LLC, judgment.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Adela O. Chancey and Chancey
& Associates Design Group
Inc., voluntary dismissal.
Maria E. Garcia and
Guillermo Garcia, divorce..
Noemi Salgado and Miguel
Alvarez, divorce.
Crystal N. Flores vs. Jayce L.
Reyna, child support order.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Ruben and Felipa
Martinez et al, voluntary dis-
missal.
Rilla Silverman Hogenauer
and Mark Alfred Hogenauer,
divorce.
Ronald Moye vs. Lamar


Cumbee, judgment.
Carol M. Clark and Terry
Clark, order.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of last
week by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-!
tion. Sentences are pursuant.
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of:
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-'
lines. Final discretion is left to:
the judge. I
Jimmy Reshod Fuller, pos-
session of marijuana with intent
to sell, possession of drug para- r
phernalia and contributing to
the delinquency of a minor,
transferred to county court.
Autney Louise Hyder, un-
armed burglary to a structure/-
conveyance, adjudication with-
held, probation 18 months,
$520 fine and court costs, $200
public defender fees and $100
COP placed on lien; criminal
mischief and possession of bur-
glary tools, not prosecuted.
Angela Patrice Louis, viola-
tion of community control-
house arrest (original charges
six counts grand theft), commu-
nity control revoked, 18 months
Florida State Prison CTS, out-
standing fines and fees placed
on lien.
Reynaldo Ortega Mejia,
unarmed burglary to structure/-
conveyance, three months in
jail CTS, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender
fees, $100 COP.
Victor Mendoza, robbery by
sudden snatching and battery,
transferred to county court.
Enoch Henry Rogers, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia
and resisting arrest without vio-
lence, not prosecuted. -
Taiwah Blaidin, aluse of a
disabled person, adjudication
withheld, probation one year,
complete anger management
class, $520 fine and court costs,
$100 COP.

The following real estate-
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Staton Inc. to Jose L. and
Darlene M. Torres, $192,500.
Steven Jacobus to James F.
Richards Jr. and Autumn Blum,
$34,500.
William J. and Chantal E.
Sullivan to Christsopher and
Gloria Lopez, $90,000.
Curtis J. and Linds Sue
Rollins DeYoung to Durrance
Groves Limited Partnership,
$215,000.


Wildcat Hoops Split Road Games


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcat five won
its season opener and lost its
only game last week.
The 'Cats are 1-1 after a pair
of games. They beat Lake
Placid 58-51 before the Thanks-
giving break. The game at Fort
Meade on Nov. 29 was can-
celled as the Miners were still
playing football. The Wildcats
went to Port Charlotte last week
and came home on the short end
of a 54-44 score.
"We're good in spurts and
equally bad in other spurts.
We're really inconsistent,
streaky right now; we need to
get more settled," said Head
Coach Vance Dickey, who got
about half his squad out late
after the football regional semi-
finals. Freshman Keyon Brown
is sidelined with a football
injury.
This week's games are also
both on the road, at DeSoto on
Tuesday and at Sarasota Booker
*today (Thursday). Next week,
they play at Sebring on Tuesday
and play Mulberry at home on
Friday before the Holiday
break. Play resumes Jan. 4 at
Sarasota Cardinal Mooney.
Hardee began its season Nov.
23 at Lake Placid. Hardee led
nearly from the get-go, ahead
19-11 at the end of the first peri-
od. It was 35-25 at the half and
the Dragons narrowed that to
38-34 at the end of the third
period. The Dragons' began
fouling intentionally and Har-
dee began making its free


throws to pull away for the 59-
51 win.
Three Wildcats were in dou-
ble-digits. Junior Jajuan Hooks
led with 15 points, including
six-of-six at the charity stripe in
the fourth period. Junior An-
drew Hooks had 11 points and
classmate Keshun Rivers added
10.
Twin towers, seniors Carl
"Junior" Brown and D'Vonte
Hooks each had nine points and
senior Tre' Anderson five, Sen-
iors Jimmy Vallejo and Tony
Rodriguez, and junior Bobby
Brown contributed defensively.
D'Vonte Hooks had the high
with 11 rebounds, while Carl
Brown had 10, along with five
steals and a blocked shot.
Rivers had eight rebounds,
Andrew Hooks and Jajuan
Hooks each six, and Anderson
four rebounds. Rivers had half
a dozen steals and Andrew
Hooks had a trio of assists.
Last Thursday, Hardee played
at 5A Port Charlotte, where
Hardee had narrowed the gap to
one point with four minutes left.
in the game before succumbing
to another slow streak. Port
Charlotte controlled the boards
with its taller players, getting 23
points off second and third tries.
Seventeen Hardee turnovers
also cost the Wildcats the game.
Each team sank a half dozen
three-point shots, but the
Pirates got more deuces. Hardee
had 10-of-20 at the free throw
line and Port Charlotte made
88-of-15.
Rivers was high scorer for


Hardee with 14 points, right
behind Pirate Matt Harrington
with 16.
Jajuan Hooks had nine
points, Carl Brown and D'-
Vonte Hooks each seven,
Anderson five and Andrew
Hooks two points.
D'Vonte Hooks pulled down
10 rebounds, Carl Brown five
and Jajuan Hooks and Andrew
Hooks four apiece. Carl Brown
had four steals and D'Vonte
Hooks a blocked shot.
The Hardee JV squad had a
similar beginning, winning at
Lake Placid and losing at Port
Cliarlotte." "
At Lake Placid, Hardee's jun-
ior varsity kept its lead through-
out, up 15-10 at the first quarter
mark and 27-16 at the half, fin-
ishing with a 46-30 win.
Sophomore Alonzo "Cane"
Casso led all scorers with 18
points. Soph Christian Moralez
added a dozen. Soph Ledarius
Sampson and freshman Steve
Metayer each added seven
points and freshman Zack
Neuhofer added two more.
Also contributing were sophs
Daniel Boehm and Tyshun
Hilliard, and freshmen Jacob
Neuhofer, and freshman Lu-
cious Everett.
At Port Charlotte, Hardee fell
behind and struggled to catch
up. Casso's 16 points matched
Pirate A. Ashley for high scorer.
Sampson added 13 points for
the Wildcats, Moralez had four
and Hilliard two points.


From The Herald-Advocate

Of Friday December 10, 1965

Front-Page Headlines:
Hardee Wildcats To Meet Tough Starke


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate...

75 YEARS AGO
Old-time circus atmosphere
will prevail when Barnett Bros.
brings its three-ring circus here
on Tuesday. It is one of the few
on the road which clings to the
street parade, which will leave
the show grounds on the Ona
Road outside the city at noon
and proceed through the busi-
ness section of town with ele-
phants, damels, open dens of
wild animals, prancing horses,
scores of men and women in
brightly hued costumes and
four bands playing stirring
marches.

"Hidden Romans," a thrilling
farm romance in talking pic-
tures, will be shown at city hall
on Monday evening, courtesy
of Kilgore Seed Co. The free
showing is a picture you and
your family will want to see,
rich in farm background, out-
standing in plot, thrilling in
action.'"

M. A. Jones of Lake Placid is
selling his equity in a little
house here for $250, taking part
of it in cows, chickens, eggs or
can goods, will take anything
but goats. "I don't want any
goats." Part of-it is $210 owed
Dr. Kayton of Wauchula, to be
paid at $10 per month.

J. W. Earnest is having a
grand opening of its newly
arranged store, with a sale on
many items. Melton zippered
wool jackets are $3.69 for men,
$2.98 for boys. Men's dress
shirts are $1.19 or three for
$3.25. Ladies silk dresses are.
$4.95 and coats at $9.95.

50 YEARS AGO
Work on the first of Hardee
County's bond project roads,
twice announced and twice
delayed, actually began this
week as crews began clearing
the right of way on the Gardner
Road. When it is completed,
crews will move on to Metheny
and Hugh Moore roads for
grading. Construction of drain-
age structures on Lake Dale
Road will also begin.

I Bids for the new junior high
school ran into a snag this week
as they exceeded the maximum


the county can pay by $25,000
to $50,000. The board of public
instruction will meet Monday
morning to decide whether to
drop a portion of the project and
build the rest, or forget the
whole thing. If the physical
education facilities are dropped
from the project, the apparent
low bid would be $273,133. If
the paving were removed and
done locally, the low bid would
then be $267,174.

R.H. Herr Jewelers an-
nounces for the first time any-
where, the First Lady by Bul-
ova, feminine watch favorites
with precision, accurate 23
jewel movements and unbreak-
able mainspring. A special cred-
it plan makes owning one, in a
burnished tear-shaped blaze for
$59.50 and a quiet, simple cir-
clet for $71.50, affordable. The
purchase includes S&H Green
Stamps.
25YEARS AGO
It was the first homicide for
the year 1985 when a 27-year-
old man was arrested at 1 a.m.
Saturday and charged with
manslaughter in the stabbing'
death of his father late Friday
night. The Lincoln Street man
and his father had reportedly
been drinking throughout the
day and quarreled over money.

The Zolfo Springs Council on
Monday night unanimously
agreed to go out for bids for its
proposed sewer system. Bids
should be received by Dec. 23.
Project engineer Dale Mills said
the town needs to be under con-
struction on the project by
February. Specifications call for
a 15-month construction period.

New citrus canker regula-
tions require citrus nurserymen
to disinfect and top citrus trees
to help eliminate foliage that
could have been contaminated
during the past high-risk sea-
son. Nurserymen must cut back
all budded field and green-
house-grown citrus trees-
regardless of the variety, to the
brown wood below the scaf-
folding branches.

Doyle Parker announced
Tuesday that he, Bill Crews,
Edgar Davis, Jack Melendy and
Sen. Pat Neal met with railroad
officials in Tallahassee pertain-
ing to the abandonment of the
railroad in Hardee County. A
decision will be made within 30
days. "From all appearances,


the sign is that we'll go on with
the widening and resurfacing of
U.S. 17," said Parker.

10 YEARS AGO
Construction began this week
for a Wal-Mart superstore
which will bring a much needed
traffic light at the intersection
of U.S. 17 and REA Road.
Ground clearing and surveying
for turn lanes for the 21-acre
site about two miles north of
Wauchula is under way.

Hardee County is the first in
the state to offer a one-time
opportunity to residents. The
county landfill is the site for
people to freely and properly
dispose of old, unwanted pesti-
cides in Operation Cleansweep,
a state-funded project collection
of herbicides and pesticides in
the first of seven mostly rural
counties in the pilot project.

Sides are being drawn for the
Dec. 12 wet-dry referendum,
which promises to produce a
good turnout. The two-part ref-
erendum asks voters whether
alcohol should be sold in.
Hardee County and the second
whether it should be limited to
package sales or permit drink-
ing on premises. Supervisor of
Elections staff had to sort
through two heavy folders of
619 pages of petition for the
election, eliminating duplicates,
non-voters, invalid signatures
(printed, not written), etc. to
come up with 2,675, 154 more
than the 2,521 signatures to call
for an election.

S&S Suprex Market features
frozen baking hens and picnic
hams each for 99 cents a pound,
sirloin steak for $2.89 a pound,
Pillsbury flour 99 cents for a
five-pound bag, white potatoes
for $1.39 for a five-pound bag,
and fresh cabbage for 25 cents a
pound.

If you can't get rid of the
skeleton in your closet,
you'd best teach it to
dance.
-George Bernard Shaw

Find something you love to
do and you'll never have to
work a day in your life.
-Harvey Mackay

If you watch a game, it's
fun. If you play it, it's recre-
ation. If you work at it, it's
golf.
-Bob Hope


YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


I. ac hn.








8B The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


Making This Right


Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


"Now Gulf seafood is coming back on the menu, so come on down,
we're open for business. "
Bryan Zar
Co-owner, Restaurant des Families
Crown Point, LA


I grew up bussing tables at this restaurant. Last year, my wife, Brooke,
and I bought it. We were working hard to build a business, then the spill
hit. BP said they would try to make things right. But how was an energy
company going to help our restaurant?

Keeping Businesses Open
We figured they would tell us to take a number and wait in line. Instead,
they asked us if we could serve food to the workers, engineers, scientists,
and local residents they had hired to cleanup the spill. It kept us busy
round the clock. And we weren't the only ones. They hired a lot of local
businesses and kept a lot of people working. They have kept businesses
up and down the Gulf open and it's still making a difference.

Open for Business
BP asked us to share our story with you to keep you informed. Our
restaurant's open six days a week. Customers are filling our restaurant
again and we think it's a good time to come down to the Gulf Coast.
And if we could make just one request, please think of us when planning
your next vacation. We're still here and while it's been tough, we are
still cooking. And we are just one of the hundreds of great places ready
to welcome you when you come down. So don't wait. We're looking
forward to seeing you.


For information visit: bp.com For assistance, please call:
restorethegulf.gov To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
facebook.com/bpamerica To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
twitter.com/bp_america To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
youtube.com/bp floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP, E&P


bp


14,WjiR V










S CH S IC 3-DIG IT 326
935 G5-08-03 1i7 45
UJiVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
G40 LIBi.RiLE FL 11 01ST
GA I *ES= I .!LLE FL 5:-G11-C.01


Soccer Boys Beat Booker 7-1


Dec. 9 HJHS Basketball Avon Park HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Girls/Boys Soccer Southeast HOME 6/8 p.m.
Boys Basketball Booker Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Dec. 10 Girls Basketball Booker HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Dec. 13 HJHS Basketball Sebring Away 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Dec. 14 Girls/Boys Soccer DeSoto HOME 6/8 p.m.
Boys Basketball Sebring Away 6:7:30 p.m.
Dec. 16 HJHS Basketball DeSoto Away 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Girls/Boys Soccer Mooney Away 6/8 p.m.
Girls Basketball Sebring HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Dec. 17 Boys Basketball Mulberry HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Christmas Break Dec. 17 Jan 13



HJHS Hoops Win Opener


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Both Hardee Junior High
School basketball teams started
with wins.
The teams faced Lake Placid
in the season's opener for the
Heartland Conference teams
and both managed to upset the
visiting Dragons. Hardee girls
won 23-20 and the boys 30-23.
The teams took their show on
the road on Monday in a trip to
Hill-Gustat in Sebring. They are
home today (Thursday) for a
visit from Avon Park. Next
week concludes the first half
with trips to Sebring on Mon-
day and DeSoto on Thursday
before the holiday break begins
Dec. 17.
GIRLS GAME
Hardee had a slight height
advantage with 5'9" Laqua-
chious Faulk and 5'8" Tamara
St. Fort, but the Lady Dragons
answered with speed and
aggression.
It was a slow first quarter.
After a Lady Dragon hit one-of-
two at the free throw line,
Hardee got its first lead when
St. Fort tossed to Faulk for a
deuce. When Quasha Williams
notched a shot for Lake Placid
late in the period, the Lady
Dragons led 7-4.
It was midway in the second
stanza that Hardee tied the
game 8-8, when Jakaysha Lind-
sey snared a defensive rebound
and went all the way to the
opposite hole. It was tied again
at 10-10. Hardee took the lead
back after St. Fort drove in for a
shot. Emily Albritton found St.
Fort for another shot just before
halftime, giving Hardee a 14-10
advantage.
It was a lot of defensive back
and forth early in the second
half, with jump balls and turn-
overs the action. Finally, Faulk
got a shot inside and Hardee
briefly led 16-10. Lake Placid
ran an all-over defense, causing
turnovers and had made it a 16-
16 game by the 1:50 mark.
Raisiesha Portee took a pass for
two points and Lake Placid had
an 18-16 lead as the third quar-
ter became history.


The lead changed hands
twice early in the fourth quarter.
At the four-minute mark,
Hardee led 21-20. An inbounds
pass to Faulk netted another
two for Faulk. For the rest of
the game, it went back to hurry-
up shots and defensive stops.
Hardee took the 23-20 win.
Faulk finished with a dozen
points, Lindsey had six, St. Fort
4 and Alexis Santana a free
throw. Others getting in the
game were eighth graders
Albritton, Honesty Martinez
and Marsela Ramos, and sev-
enth graders Destiny Thomp-
son, Martha Valadez, Catherine
Jackson, Florence Lee and
Jasmine Thompkins.
First-year coaches Gloria
Solis and D.D. Darceus were
pleased with the win. "We're
expecting a good season. We"
got everyone in, if only for a lit-
tle. We had some girls off the
bench step up. We have some
things to work on. We hadn't
practiced yet for the man-to-
man defense. I think we did
well with just a few practices,"
said Solis.
BOYS
As soon as the girls cleared
the court, the boys squads took
over.
The Wildcats took the early
lead. A Marco DeLeon shot was
re bounded by Blaine Molitar
for the first two points. Jerry
Browdy shortly went to the
hoop for another deuce. When a
Diante Leslie shot was re-
bounded by Molitar and he was
fouled, he calmly sank both free
throws to give Hardee a 6-0
lead.
Late in the first period, Lake
Placid began to fight back, with
Scott Colley and Marvin Sholtz
getting shots. At the one-minute
mark, Calvin McLeod went
down the lane to make it 11-4.
A Lake Placid shooter made a
trey before the buzzer to make
it 11-7.
Leslie was fouled and sank
one-of-two to make it 12-7
early in the second quarter.
Lake Placid got more aggres-
sive and began hitting shots
with Sholtz and Eddie Diaz. By
the 1:20 mark, the Dragons had


a 13-12 edge. Browdy stole the
ball and made a pull-up shot for
a 14-13. Diaz hit one at the final
second to give Lake Placid a
15-14 halftime lead.
The lead seesawed in the
third stanza, tied at 15-15 and
S19-19 before Colley hit to give
Lake Placid the lead going into
the final six-minute quarter.
Browdy stole the ball and
went all the way to knot the
game at 21-all. Hardee then
began to make its move, with
another Browdy steal and shot.
Browdy drove, then dished
back to Leslie for a deuce.
McLeod got in the act, with
back-to-back shots to make it
29-21. After a time-out, Lake
Placid began intentional fouling
to get the Wildcats to the free-
throw line. Browdy hit one-of-
two to make it 30-21. Colley
made a final shot to make the
final score 30-23.
Turnovers and free throws
made the difference in the
game. Lake Placid made none
at the charity stripe, while
Hardee made eight. Steals and
other turnovers also cost the
Dragons.
Head coach Rashad Faison
and assistant Sean Brown were
pleased. "It's always -good to
get that first win. I'm proud of
our kids. It's a good start on the
season. The boys hustled well
and stayed focused, which was
good considering how few
practices we got in," said
Faison.
Browdy led all scorers with-
11 points. McLeod added 10,'
Molitar seven and Leslie four
points.
Having the cheerleaders on
the sidelines aided with the
home court advantage, and a
halftime exhibition. Cheer-
leaders are eighth graders cap-
tain Dana Terrell, co-captain
Milli Jones, Meagan Shivers,
Caryssa Johnson, Katelyn
Hines, Danielle Smith, Mariah
Edenfield and Rayna Parks, and
seventh graders Emily Bennett,
Kayla Albritton, Miranda
Smith, Rosie Rivers, Ally Dot-
son, Brooke Fones, Savannah
Aubry and Shelby Dees.


MAIN STREET WAUCHUIA

is looking for



Art & Crafters











Hometoat dcays

DECEMBER 17, 2010 5-9PM
Main Street Heritage Park in Downtown Wauchula


Show off your talent and make

rT some extra money..
MA* IN LA Items must be home grown or more than 50% hand crafted
e A0r* $10 per booth space

Entry deadline is Monday, December 13 I-
For an application visit www.MainStreetWauchula.com or call (863) 767-0330.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee boys soccer is well
under way and gaining at each
experience.
The addition of sophomores
Octavio Alvarez and Miguel
Garcia from football has
strengthened the Wildcats.
First-year coach Dennis Aubry
has been pleased with their
effort and improvement.
This week the only game is'
home against Bradenton South-
east today (Thursday). The girls
play at 6 p.m. and the boys
immediately afterward, about 8
p.m. Next week's games are
home against DeSoto on Tues-
day and at Sarasota Cardinal
Mooney on Thursday. Partici-
pation in the Triton Invitational
at Mariner High on Saturday,
Dec. 18, will lead into the holi-
day break.
SThe boys season began at 3A-
SDistrict 11 opponent Desoto on
Nov. 16. It was a scoreless
match until the final period. The
Bulldogs got a pair of headers
from corner kicks and added the
final goal on a solo breakaway
at the six-minute mark to win 3-
0.
Two days later, Nov. 18, the
'Cats traveled to Sarasota
Booker, another district oppo-
nent. After starting slowly and
letting Booker take the lead,
Hardee came back from the
deficit with much intensity for
a dramatic come-from-behind
effort to end the game in a 3-3
tie," reported Coach Aubry.
Sophomore returning wing-
man Oscar Palacios scored
twice. Junior midfielder Jose
Lopez scoring the tying goal.
The Wildcats came home for
a pair of games last week, open-
ing with Mooney on Tuesday.,
With only one senior and four
junior returnees, Hardee is a
very young team and faced an
older Mooney squad, which
managed one goal in the first
half.
Wildcat soph Armando Al-
varez 'chipped a high shot
through the goalkeeper's hands
to tied the game at 1-1 early in'
the third period. After Mooney


DUILU i


scored twice in the fourth peri-
od, Alvarez picked up another
goal on his second effort after
his penalty kick ricocheted off
the opposing goalkeeper.
"Hardee fought hard and'
played a complete game against
the talented Cardinal Mooney
team in the 3-2 loss," comment-
ed Aubry.
Hardee was home again last
Thursday in a repeat matchup
with booker. The boys avenged
the tie at Booker the previous
week with a strong effort.
Freshman Nick Bell scored
twice in less than six minutes.
Armando Alvarez added anoth-
er goal in the first period. In the
second period, Palacios, Lopez
and Octavio Alvarez added
scores. Booker scored on a
penalty kick just before half-*
time to make it 6-1,.
Bell added another goal in the
third to round out the Wildcat
scoring.
"Our boys .showed much
teamwork, ball control, hustle
and patience in this match,"
noted Aubry. "Freshman goalie
Ruben Valasquez had an out-


RESIDENTIAL
CONSTRUCTION


Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial
property, build your dream home, or do your remodeling.

SEAMLESS GUTTERS

6 inch GUTTERS 5 inch GUTTERS
$3.99 $2.95
PER LINEAR FOOT p PER NEAR FOOT

DON'T WAir LOW PRiiuOs O OOry Goo TIhnouenq DbounBus- ,6


standing game. The team appre-:
ciates the fans who have come
out to support the soccer pro-
gram," concluded Aubry.
Seniors on the squad are
returnee Taylor Barlow plus
Juan "Taco" Ortega, Victor
Ramos and Ricky Soria. Juniors
arereturnees Celestino Alvarez,
Jose Lopez, Cody Torres and
Victor Narvaez plus Augustine
Ancelmo, Uber Cavillo, Bralio
Duran.
Sophs include returnees
Armando Alvarez, Octavio
Alvarez, Miguel Garcia, Oscar
Palacios and Alexis Palacios.
Freshman are Nick Bell,
Ernesto Ramos, Ruben Sand-
oval, Ruben Velasquez, Ricardo
Vera and Enrique "Ricky"
Zamora.

The average flea is only 1.
inch long but can jump up
to 13 inches.
The largest fish is the
whale shark, which weighs
more than twice as much
as an African elephant


LARGE 99
1-Topping y-Out
Addtonal Toppings

MOWUNM G GREEN

S- ZOLPO SPRINGS
www.huangryh.w m 105sR 64 Est, inside BP
12:9c Umitedtnmeoffer. Atprtidpatinglocatons. 73- 2100


HEAD MOBILE HOME SALES, INC.
Drive A Little Save A Lot!
The Lowest Prices
2 miles South of Arcadia on Highway 17
1-800-328-1154



P.O. BOX 1286 HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH
ARCADIA, FLORIDA 34265 12 31tfc


J. ANDREW GIROUX, D.M.D.

FAMILY DENTISTRY

773-9344
322 S. 6th Ave. Wauchula

Gentle Dentistry From an Experienced Staff
Cleaning Fillings Extractions Root Canals
S Dentures Teeth Whitening Crowns


I,
vI


K)


Patients who have insurance will
loose this years benefits if not
\ used by December 31st. "
&' Don't Delay Call Today!


Si


"For all of your Aluminum, Steel, and Conventional Construction needs"
Email: kochcon@strato.net o State Certified License #CGC1515338


'
i;
iF~jtj
1
r:
b~ ,: 11
~-~LLL....


The Herald-Advocate
(UM n ss s

Thuudiy, December 9,2 ..1 -


EONE


4P- M& The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to
rfuse to pay. cancel payment., or be reimbursed for payment for any other
S servlcr, eamlnation, or treatment that is performed as a result of and
within 72 hour or responding to the advertisement for the free discounted
fee, or reduced feeserice, examination, or treatment






li W



LOOKING TO (863) 385-8649

0I1 M COMME) & I


I I -


I II II II II


I I


Lb.











2C The Herald-Advocate, December 9. 2010





I-Schedule Of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
,by- t
ral advocate *";.-
chula, .Floridi -

c: Thursday 5,p.n. .

BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..... .............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service .................. 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship Ist & 3rd ...........
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ...................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Central.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD .
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .............:...:....9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Iwy. 17. 375-2253
Bible Study ........................... :30 a.m .
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCII
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection .................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m..
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.


IGLESIA I)EL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Micrcoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Juevcs Dc Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship................I.. 00 aJI.
Evening Worship ........... .... 6:00 p.m.
Wcdnesda) Prayer ..............7:00 p.tn


MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1 I:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
('omiunion-'2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p m.


MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School .......... ..... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................... 500 p.m.
Evening Worship ............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time .....7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship .................. I:00 a.m
Bread of Life Sunday ........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
S. Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servico...................6:30 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ............ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services, .
Evening Worship. ........7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club. ....................7:00 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning,Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday SchoB l ................ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1..1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
........................................ 6:30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
English Service ...............1 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service........ 10:30 a.m.
\Wiednelsdlay Evening Cell Grop.m
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m,
(all for lIocation.

CHARLIE CREEK
- .--...A... PTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ...................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m .
Worship Service ......... 11:00 a.m.
W wednesday .... .....................7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
77.3-2249
Sunday Morning Worship. ....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ..........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ............. ....10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ..................... I 1:00 a.m.


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
-CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS -
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service............. ..7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ..... ................. 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................... .....1... J :00 am .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion....... ............ 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ......................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ...................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio............. 10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m .
Morning Service ................ 1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ...............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............6.:00. p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra ................ 5:00 p.m.
'outh Ministry .................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry ............ 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W worship .......... ................. 6:00 p.m .
Adult Choir Rehearsal ........ 7:00 p,n.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafl Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast...................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ..........10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for Nursery-5th
grade .... ......................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages PreK-12th
grade..................6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ...... ........... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
W wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship I1:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship... ......6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
: 773-9386.
Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Sunday School ..........::......10:00 a.m.
Late Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
M morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.


Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
W orship ............................1. 0:30 a.m
Wed. Night Dinner ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min...........7:00 p.m.

IHIGIER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCIIULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA HISF'ANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9' Ave.
Martes ................7: 30 p.m.
Jueves .. ..............7:30 p.m.
Domingo ..............10:30 p.m.
IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y anmigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles................ 0.....7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service .................10:00 am .
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service......................2.00 p.m .
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ............1...1.. :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ....................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service....1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities (All Ages)
............. 7:00 p.m .

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m...
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services


NEWMT.,ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship ...................... st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .............. .....9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......... ........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1' & 3" Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2"' & 4"' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
B ible Study ................ .........11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service


PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School ...................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ........... 100 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service .......... .10:30 a.m.
SWednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.


RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ..............10:00 am.
Morning Worship ..... ...I 00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Service..... .....7.00 p in

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCHt
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ......................... ..... 9:00 a.m


H oly Days .......... .....................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATIOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ..... 5'00 p.m.
(Spanish) .....7 30 p n.
Sunday (Spanish) .............7:00 a n.
(English). .. .........8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ............. 11:00 a m
(Creole) ....... ....... 1:00 p.m
Daily Mass in English ......... 8:30 a im.


WAUCHULA
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ..................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............1..1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.i
Morning Worship ............. .11:00 a.m.;
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Bible Study ................ 7:30 p.m.


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train. ..........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD-
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
C hurch.................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
! WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m.

SZOLFO SPRINGS
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.'
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .... ...... ............ 10:00 am .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ...................... 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ............. .......... 10:00 a.m .
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCI-r
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ..........5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ......... .....7:00 p.m.1


Sleep in


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494.5456
Sunday School ...................10100 a.n.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
y MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524 773-0989
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship..... ......................... 1:00 a.m .
Evening..................................1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet...,7-00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER,
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
'Morning Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & FT.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Scrvicio del Domingo .......... 1:00 a.m.
....... ................................. 7:00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday . .................10:30 a.m.,
Evening Service .................... 6:30 p.n.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ...................11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night.................... 7:0( p.m.
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY '
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................. :30 a.m.
Morning Worship...................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m .
D octrina................................ 11:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ... .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................................. 11:00 a.m .
lioneq ,C.lub.......................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.'
Servicio............................ 8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.



SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWERS

Michael A. Guido
Mene, Georga


Ray Valine of California lost his
job. It made so many wrinkles on
his head that he had to screw his
hat off.
Then he thought of a novel way to
support his family. He turned his
head into a billboard.
He shaved it, printed four ads on
it, and wandered through the
streets of Sacramento. He made
$100 a day.
That's using your head, isn't it!
The'Christian, too, is a walking
billboard for the Lord, "known and
read of all men."
Are you a good ad, drawing
others to the Lord; or a bad ad,
driving others from the Lord?
How do you communicate
Christ?

Visit us at: www. TheSower.com


Heavenly Prn


Peace...the stillness of a baby sleeping, a quiet walk
in the woods, the silence of falling snow...peace, a
contrast to our busy, noisy lives this holiday season. The
world around us may not be entirely peaceful, but we can
find our own peace within. To achieve a calmness of mind
and soul we can turn to our house of worship. There we
can find guidance and get a better perspective on life. Let
God help you find peace within as you worship each week.




S ceur lectea v the Amerlan tile So esl
CLa n( clet / i K'IY li s'hEsa S PO 8 fw Q ) n esile 0VA229CE AW S kisno m n '


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
PO. Box 780


(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


CPeace fioer grdrtvrs
Wholesale Nursery


- I-- r






December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3C


It's beginning to look a lot
like Christmas around the park.
Jeff and Susan Henry, Flo and
Don Smith and Dale and Sylvia
Baker all have their Christmas
decorations up outside. I guess
the rest of us better get busy and
get our decorations up and get
in the holiday spirit.
When you read this, the
Hardee County Christmas Pa-
rade will be over and we should
all be in the Christmas spirit
now.
Tags are up at the Rec Hall to
buy gifts for people who need a
little help this year. If two peo-
ple go together on a tag, per-
haps we can make someone's
holiday season a little bit better.
Don't forget to support our
troops and their families during
this season and all throughout
the year.
KOFFEE KLATCH
The hosts on Dec. 1 were Bill
and Diane Burget, Don and Jeri
Plumley and Bruce and Theresa
Woods. Dewey Morrison led
the U.S. Pledge, Ellen Gilson
led the Canadian Pledge and
Lee Roy Behymer led the
prayer. The 50/50 winners were
Lot 18, Lot 23 and Gary and
Ann Marie Shewan.
Please bring non-perishable
items for the Love Barrel on
Dec. 15.
BINGO
Barb Ellis won the large jack-
pot on Nov. 26 and the small
jackpot was split between
Pennie Kendorski, Ron Acker-
mann, Betty Tracy and Ann
Marie Shewan.
Dora Morgan won the large
jackpot on Nov. 29 and Pudge
Hierlihy had a lucky streak,
winning the small jackpot, plus
two other games during the
evening.
DANCES
Everyone had a good time at


Our Thanksgiving was en-
joyed with 217 in attendance.
Janet and her many volunteers
were out of the kitchen within
an hour of the dinner. Great job,
everyone!
CHAPEL
Jim and Sharon Ma ee and
Fred and Nancy Thompson
greeted 99. The lighting of the
Advent candle was by Ray and
Darlene Hays, with the choir
singing an Advent song, direct-
ed by Sandy Feeser who also
played "Holy Mania" for the
special music. Pastor Jason
spoke from .Matthew 14:22,
"As You Face Your Storm, God
Is There."
The offering was donated to
Caring People's Ministry.
COFFEE HOUR
Wayne Shick led in the
pledge and Janet welcomed
everyone and led in prayer to
155 enjoying coffee and dough-
nuts. Janet shared with us that
Dec. 5 was John and Gladys
Chambers' anniversary of 67
years. Congratulations!
Janet told of all the many
activities this week and wanting
everyone to get their units dec-
orated for the Christmas judg-
ing. Our Christmas Lanes will
be so festive looking for the
holidays, with Judy Perkins and
Cheryl Conkle busily hanging
up garland and lights.
Many coupons were given
away, 50/50 was won by Cheryl
Conkle, and the chocolate'pea-
nutbutter pie was won by Rene
Brasseur. What lucky winners!
ACTIVITIES
Shuffle: The Thanksgiving
tournament was a draw double.
First place, Larry Brown and
Frank Feeser, second Bill
Morrison and Wayne Shick,
third Martha De Haan and
Dewayne Renwick. Good shuf-


the first dance of the season on
Nov. 27 with Chrissy Harriman.
Door prizes were donated by
Linda and Harold Lockett,
Ellen and Lloyd Gilson, Midge
Saunders, Pudge and Laurie
Hierlihy and Bernadette Mc-
Donald and John Sauve. These
prizes were won by Harrison
Krom, Linda Durham, Stephen
Martin, Midge Saunders and
Peggy Ralph.
The next dance is our
Christmas dance on Saturday
with Doin' It Rite.
SCORES
Men's Golf Nov. 26: The
winners were Don Harkin,
Travis Terhune, Charlie Mc-
Knight and Jim Hommon.
Mixed Golf Nov. 29: The
winners were Bernie Edwards,
Nancy Morrison, Barb Plunkett
and Jack Elofson.
There was no shuffling due to
the courts being repaired.
CHURCH NEWS
By Diane Burget
The service on Nov. 28 was
opened with the congregation
singing "Amazing Grace." We
also sang "My Faith Looks up
to Thee," "Is My Name Written
There" and "Mansion Over The
Hilltop." Carole Jones on piano
and Wilma Behymer on the
organ provided the accompani-
ment. Our choir, directed by
Nancy Morrison, sang "Be-
cause I Have Been Given
Much."
Pastor Bob Winne has started
a short series on "Animals in
Heaven." This week he laid the
groundwork for this interesting
topic. Some of the Scripture ref-
erences were taken from
Genesis 1 and 2; John 1:2-3;
Psalms 19:1-4 and 34:8; and
Revelation 22:1-2.
The service closed by prayer
and singing "God Be with You
Till We Meet Again."


fling, gang!
Point shuffle has started.
Bowling: George De Smet,
high game 173 and high series
507. For the women, Vonnie
Bellis high game 169 and high
series 484. Great bowling,
everyone!
SPOTLIGHT
Dewayne is a disc jockey,
with his alter ego of "Daddy
DeW," and will be entertaining
for our upcoming Sock Hop on
Jan. 15 at 7.
We want to welcome De-
wayne and Cathy Renwick
from Home, Pa. They have
been married for 43 years, have
three daughters and one son,
seven grandchildren and two
step-grandchildren. They are
camp workers over the summer
in Pennsylvania, being full-time
recreational-vehicle campers
for the past 2-1/2 years.
Dewayne retired from instal-
ling replacement windows and
has many interests, shuffle, try-
ing his hand at woodcarving,
flying radio-control planes and
spending time with his younger
brother.
Cathy retired as a secretary
from Indiana University of
Pennsylvania, and has a very
artistic flair for oil painting and
has been commissioned to do
some paintings which will be
sent to Bosnia. She makes
embroidered greeting cards,
likes any type of needle craft
and making of jewelry.
After hearing about our park
and the many activities avail-
able from others in Pennsylva-
nia, they decided to come to
join us and have found they
love it. The problem is how to
pick what they want to do with
so many choices.
Our park is very lucky to
have the Renwicks join our
park family!


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kirm Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Stop by and see why so _-.
many neighbors from
Hardee County buy from me.

JENKINS FORD
3200 U.S. Hwy. 17N
Ft. Meade Florida 33841
www.jenkinsautogroup.com Gene Davis
3oec 800-226-3325 Sales and Leasng
Consultant


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


UNTIL SUNDAY, JANUARY


Book Review
By Spessard Stone

RECOLLECTIONS I
A Collection of Historical Photographs, Documents, Letters,
Diaries, Stories, Recipes, Sayings. and other Memorabilia about
Arcadia and DeSoto County. Florida, Revised Edition, collected
and edited by Carol Mahler, begins a serial history of Arcadia and
DeSoto County, with each edition a miscellany, including many
facets of the history of Arcadia and DeSoto County. Included are
28 articles by many voices past and present.
The stories span a wide range from 7-year-old Steven Ames'
amusing "How to Teach a Fish to Jump" to the scientific in two
contributions by John Arvine Reynolds. In "The Acline Discov-
ery," he educates us that he, an amateur paleontologist, at Acline,
once a sawmill community at now Punta Gorda, discovered in a pit
several species of a sand dollar, which are now in the Smithsonian,
and in "Disappearing Wildlife," re-calls topics as diverse as cattle
dipping vats in the 1930s, controlled burns, and dwindling northern
bobwhite quail, gopher tortoises, "spreading adders," and burrow-
ing owls.
Forest Reynolds, in "'Cracker' Crumbs and Cures," offers a
nostalgic look at folk remedies as diverse as "poke salads," Vicks
Salve, elderberry syrup, and citrus. To which, appropriately, a
brochure of Sunny South Packing Co. contained this poem:
"Oranges grown under Southern Skies, Where Winter is always
Summer, Will bring wealth and health to family ties, and Joys too
many to number," which Peace River Valley Citrus Growers might
consider.
"Fish 'n' Grits," as told by Harold McLeod, recalls his boy-
hood of his family's camping and fishing along the Myakka River
and eating their catch of perch, bream or trout-but, he informs us,
not then catfish-and later as a young man at Montgomery Ranch
in DeSoto County where he caught more fish in 30 minutes than he
could eat. Detailed are the preparation, ingredients used in cooking
the fish, served with hushpuppies, grits and tomato gravy, with a
breakfast the next morning that Tom McEwen would envy.
The African-American experience is related in three articles,
two by Verlene Stebbins Hickson and the other by Fred Carter. In
"Building a School: One Block at a Time," Hickson tells how the
students' "sweat equity" led to the construction of Smith-Brown
School in 1946. Also, she relates of Minnie L. Brown's Brown's
Funeral Home, which in 1960 was purchased by her and her hus-
band Eugene Hickson, a mortician. Fred Carter describes the foot-
ball game of Oct. 13, 1955 when his Dunbar High School of Fort
Myers, admonished by their coach, 'Y'all cannot let them orange
pickers beat you," defeated Smith-Brown of Arcadia; ironically,
Carter in later years taught at Smith-Brown.
Bea Hollingsworth shares her recipe for Florida chocolate-
orange cake, best baked with a lot of doses of love and affection,
while Verlene Hickson, who likes to give baked goods for Christ-
mas and throughout the year because it is a more personal way of
giving, stirs up her old-fashioned bread pudding,


2, 20 11


WE WILL RE-OPEN ON .JANUARY 3,


D&S CATTLE Co., INC.

LIVESTOCK DEALER

All of us at D&S would like to wish everyone a

Merry Christmas
and to all our customers, a Prosperous New Year!

Hwy. 66 East, Zolfo Springs 735-1112


2011.


I 2.-16


w


N>


There are also features on such diverse subjects as "DeSoto
Abstract Company," in which Elise Zarli abstracts the abstract firm
of John L. Jones; "Local Currency" by Carol Mahler, in which she
discusses scrip, Babbitt money and doubloons; "Old Newspaper
Archives" in which John Law-home researches the archives of the
newspapers of Arcadia; and Ruth Reynolds Dunn profiles Delia
Twiss, one of Arcadia's early rodeo queens. And much more.
Recollections I grants us a gratifying insight into the people
and history of DeSoto County. It contains 52 pages, contents, in-
troduction, 30 illustrations, and an index. It is published by the
DeSoto County Historical Society, P.O. Box 1824, Arcadia, FL
34265; www.historicdesoto.org/.





CHRISTMAS BELLS

Why do I like to hear the Christmas Bells
ringing clear and true in coo. December's air?

Every year at the end I say, "Heaven forbid,
not ever again!" Then begrudgingly, putting
away all the "stuff" that brought such "Joy" from
December first!

And yet, all the laughter and happy smiles
seem to linger through the cold... "Spring-Bright"
at the "flick" of a thought.

Oh yes, like the snow, all wealth can soon be
gone, but the ringing of bells at Christmas is
Eternal... transcending the grave and reaching
Heaven's Gates, they'll be ringing for me again!

Thomas W. Graham
Fort Myers
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.
'iU


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet and Sharon Magee


WE WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE HOLIDAYS FROM

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1 6, 2010


Welcome Back



Winter Visitors


* Tanks Requalified/Recertifiec


* Valves Replaced




Herndon's LP Gas


2890 E. Main St Wauchula




773-6868



S Mon Fri 8:00am 4:30pm /Sat 8:00am-12:00pm/


--.- ----


f





4C The Herald-Advocate, December 2, 2010


Wib


I ,


-.l tWUEUP

~~" Q vl


F


t'4
'a~ff~f r .r* *i *.;, .


-C .. .. -

ir

.St;.4* i~ -IJ~Z~:. ~ sl:~u~P~u


Corner of ilh and Marn DownLon n WatlChula
767-9004

Good Food And Drinks
Open 7 Days A Week


----- --- ----- -



Your Home )our Life Your Way
781-0604
Lorraine Braddock


Glassware Pots & Pans
Gifts




Bowl-Of-Fun
Lane
943 Coulh 6th Ave Wauchula
773-6391


Order /our
Party Platters Here!





-ii
902 IlwY 17 S WAUCHULA
773-2337


Breakfast Starting at $1.99
Lunch Dinner


HARDEE RANCH
SUPPLY, INC
1203 Hwy. 17 S. Wauchula
773-4322
Relocating Soon

Hunting Supplies: Cameras,
Scopes, Binoculars, Lights,
Ammo, etc.
Columbia Available 12/15/10




Paul's Kitchen
"Eat right Live longer"
116 N. 4th Ave. Wauchula
773-0292
Thank You For Your Support

Home of the $1.99 Breakfast
Lunch Dinner
Gift Certificates




CLASSIC COWPOK
Robbie L.u nwArLett
130 West Alain Street Wbuchula

781-9139

Jewelry Purses
Western Decor





Sears
Authorized Retail Dealer
317 N. 6th Ae. Wauchula
767-0022

Come Meet New Owners,
Joel & Lynn
TV's Fitness Equipment
Appliances Tools




Peace River
Bee Products
w w.peaceriverbees.com
735-1679
"-* .. :

Skin Care Products
All Natural Honey


W"AT'SINSID


wH-A~s iSIDE


WHA'S ISIDE


Badcock
HOME F uRN.ITE R .NTlulmore.
765 N. 6th Ave.
Wauchula
773-9547

Furniture Electronics
Appliances* Great Gift Ideas
mm"l



s


: t l iV


"Q
9'
"b)i~k~(





December 2i 201-. The Herald-Adv


WV^


mor im S SCSS
. .p.
IL '


~aaAA
.-" .' '

*; :T~n ."~ .' '. L rsU- --
', .af ;s',^-"^ .*.--T;r~-~-. -1^Sgr .. ;


4D


-4
Tq o u


Co& On 9jain
Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula
www.catsonmain.com
773-6565

Vera Bradley
Yankee Candles
Willow Tree Collectable




ARDEE CAR COMPANY
SWauchula Wauchula Hils
jjacrou from First Corner of Hwy 17
SNational Bank) and REA Rd.
773-6667 773-2011

Cars that make great
S"Christmas Gifts






SALES SERVICE
108 Carlton Street Wauchula
773-3573











106 North 6th Ave., wauchula
1 767-0017

i Stocking Stuffers Toys
SGames p Holiday Clothing
Pars *Serice


I MAIN STREET
KITCHEN
221 W Main St., Wauchula
767-5300

Holiday Catering
Available




e4in Street e aret
Flowers Gifts
313? :I Main Street
Historical Do\ ntonun \Iauchula
773-0409

Christmas Centerpieces
Candles Jewelry




HALS OUN SHOP
& ARCHERY
(Formerly From Wauchula)
1140 E. Davidson St. Barlow
863-533-9563

Gunsmithing Bows
Hunting Accessories
.0


IONACE
HARDWARE STORES
The Hepd-jI Place
225 East Oak Street Wauchula
773-3148

Gift Cards Available





Klassix
Salon & Spa
215 E. Orange St. Wauchula
767-6063

Hair Tanning Jewelry
Waxing Massage
Gift Certificates


Magnolia Tree
110 N. 6th Ave. Wauchula
773-9684


Women & Mens Apparel
Brighton Reefs Columbia


JAN'S
215 W. Orange St. Wauchula
773-3033

Tanning Lotions
Jewelry Nails


7--r
';1I

I^'


id Pine Candle & Gifts
TFot All Your C:Yr, ic Cirt Need.'" t.
- -_ -_ :

313 West Main St., Wauchula
767-0065

Kameleon Jewelry, Hand Poured
Candles, Candle Accessories
Country Home Decor ,
,s ,i i ':. .* v


4I.
*s


/I


'I'


SAltman I Sa
George Altmn
c 2196 W. Main Street '
767-107
WHA'T IN-SII
JWhips and Saddles
. Made & Repaired
. -- .


dlry
an
Wauchula
3


----~3~ipyyR-~UrTr


II I -~ I -~3bQ


'~IITC


IIE i-I A*~rr


I *


- -.Zt


i!


illltil


: ~5i~
J~up
--
iP
cuX
~I








6C The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


Faith Presbyterian Church Celebrates 100th Anniversary


Elders Joe Vance, Dr. Robert Helveston and Emerson Jones are the church's Session.
The church is located at 114 North 7th Ave. in Wauchula and has 52 members. Bonnie
Kiger joined th church Nov. 14.


J . ... :,..'o._:. .- .. .. -. .- .

The church building on North 7th Ave. was sold about 1968 to the First Baptist Church
of Wauchula and then repurchased by the Presbyterians in 1975. A community
Thanksgiving meal for the county's needy has been served at the church for the past
10 years by the Hardee County Ministerial Association.
* K


From left are Natalie Whidden, the longest church member who joined Dec. 1, 1946;
Rev. Brook Larrison, church pastor since 1995; and Mae Frank, the oldest church mem-
ber at age 97.


Church pastor Brook Larrison and his wife Sandy Larrison pose in front of church's
sign. The pastor delivered the 100th birthday sermon Sunday, Nov. 14, saying the most
important part of a person's life is faith in Jesus Christ who gives everlasting life in
Heaven.


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Jack Hayman, 84, has been a church member since 1958. He is a former Hardee
County agent and father of local veterinarian Dr. Slade Hayman.


HISTORY OF FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1910-1960


The First Presbyterian Church in Wauchula was founded by seventeen charter members on
November 16, 1910. They met in the old opera house at first and then in the Baptist, Methodist
and Adventist churches, with Rev. T.J. Allison as the first pastor.
The first service in the present Sanctuary was held on September 8, 1916. The Annex was built
in 1952, housing a library, Sunday School, Christian Endeavor and other services. In 1959 the
Fellowship Hall was dedicated when the need for additional Sunday School rooms, especially
an auditorium, arose.
Eleven pastors have served during these Fifty years. This was at first a mission church, with
one pastor also teaching in the high school and another serving Fort Meade Presbyterian
Church as well as in Wauchula. We freed oursleves of our mission church status during the
pastorate of Rev. J. Russell Young. Membership has now increased to One Hundred and Fifty.
Two charter members are still living, Mrs. George Carlton and Mrs. Iva Lou Rust Looney.
There were many material additions. The beautiful manse on North Tenth Avenue was built in
1939 with Rev. Young's family as its first occupants.
The communion service was bought by the Women of the Church; the plates were given by
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Robinson. The first organ, a gift of Mrs. Margaret White, was replaced by
an electric consonata, given by Mr. Kervin Revell in 1953. The stained glass windows are
memorials to Mr. and Mrs. J. Boney, Mr. and Mrs. SA.C. Schenck, Robert Mansfield and Mr.
and Mrs. C.A. White. The organ matched the beautiful pulpit furniture, given by the Jones
family in memory of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Jones, Sr., it was dedicated in 1950.
The Sunday School now has an enrollment of One Hundred and Thirty-five. The Christian
Endeavor, organized in 1916, is now the Young People's Fellowship. The Women of the Church
was organized in 1911 as the Sesame Circle, with Mrs. A.G. Smith as director. It has grown
into four circles.

MEN CALLED INTO THE MINISTRY FROM FPC
Carl Strake
Vance Gordon
Cecil Thompson
Wilson Smith
Dennis Nolan
Ty Keys

MISSIONARY FROM FPC
Ann (Curnow) Eckert Wycliffe Bible Translators Australia


From left are Belva Vance, Sunday dinner coorindator and president of Women In The
Church; Mary Lynn Driskell, who decorated the Fellowship hall with pictures; and Mary
Jones, who played the trumpet.

CHURCH DIRECTORY 1960


THE SESSION
S.N. Reeves, C.A. Stansfield, E.E. Jones, Clyde Maddox, R.W. Banks and C.J. Patton, Clerk

THE DIACONATE
J.E. Causey, W.J. Piercy, O.K. Stringer, Vice Chairman, Jack Hayman, Sec, F.M. Peacock,
O.B. Stansell, A.H. VanDyck, Tres, C.A. Reif, Jr., B.L. Robinson, Chm.

THE CHURCH SCHOOL
F.M. Peacock, Supt, Mrs. L.E. Reas, Sec, C.A. Stansfield, Tres

THE WOMEN OF THE CHURCH
Mrs. B.L. Robinson, President, Mrs. Ivon Tilyou, V. President, Miss Dora Dennis, Treasurer,
Mrs. Clyde Maddox, Secretary, Mrs. W.G. Kirk, Chm Circle 1, Mrs. H.P. Burnett, Chm Circle
2, Mrs. Marie Beck, Chm Circle 3, Mrs. R.W. Banks, Chm Circle 4

THE MEN OF THE CHURCH
C.J. DeYoung, President, A.H. VanDyck, Secretary

PRESBYTERIAN YOUTH FELLOWSHIP
Walter Reas, President, Wilson Smith, V. President, Patsy Banks, Sec-Tres, A.H. VanDyck,
Adult Advisor

THE CHOIR
Mrs. M. Melendreras, Director, Miss Isabel Rhyan, Organist

MEMBERSHIP
150

HISTORY OF FPC
1960-2010
First Presbyterian Church eventually outgrew its Sanctuary at 114 North Seventh Ave, and
Judge and Mrs. Clyde Maddox donated five acres on Main Street for the construction of a
new Church building. The modern facility was completed in 1968, our first worship service
was held in November of that year, at a cost of $223,000. The former church building was sold
to the First Baptist Church to be used as a Chapel.

First Presbyterian Church in Wauchula emerged from a long season of liberal theological drift
in her denomination, The Presbyterian Church in the United States (PCUS), to be reorganized
as the First Continuing Presbyterian Church of Wauchula, Florida, Inc., by a Congregational
Meeting held on Sunday, June 24, 1973. In this meeting a motion was made to place all of the
real and personal property of what was known as First Presbyterian Church of Wauchula into

(See HISTORY On Page 7C)








December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7C


(HISTIORY Continued From Page 6C)
the name of the First Continuing Presbyterian Church of Wauchula, Florida, Inc. The motion
was supported by seventy-nine affirmative votes while fourteen stood opposed. It was further
moved at that Congregational Meeting that the newly named church would join with the Gold
Coast Presbytery which was one of many to which theologically conservative congregations
actively withdrew from the PCUS to align themselves. This "Continuing" church movement
would eventually form into our present denomination known as The Presbyterian Church in
America.
The Westminster Presbytery of the PCUS of which first Continuing Presbyterian had
belonged didn't approve of the actions taken by First Continuing Presbyterian Church.
Westminster moved to defrock the Rev. Russ Toms and then the Presbytery sued First
Continuing Presbyterian Church to reacquire all of the real and personal property of the
church. A Civil court suit ruled for the PCUS and First Continuing Presbyterian Church was
made to relinquish its new Sanctuary on Main Street. The Baptist church invited our church
to return to our original Sanctuary which we did on December 14, 1975. Within two weeks
$61,000 was raised in cash to repurchase our original property back from our brethren of the
Baptist Church. The church was renamed Faith Presbyterian Church.
A member of Faith, Russell Farmer, deeded seven acres of land at the corner of Griffin and
Popash Roads to the church in 1979. The property is affectionately known as East Campus. A
pavilion measuring some fifty by seventy feet graces the grounds along with areas for recre-
ation and baseball.
Through the mid-nineteen'eighties and into the mid-nineteen nineties, three pastors served
Faith Presbyterian Church. Rev. Russ Toms concluded his ministry in 1985, followed by Rev.
Jim Barr, 1986-1988 and Rev. Bruce Lax 1988-1994. The church underwent a steep decline
from its high membership rolls in the years prior to 1973. Rev. Brook Thomas Larrison began
his pastorate at Faith in May of 1995. The church has experienced a great period of peace and
God's grace in the life of the congregation.
The Women in the Church (WIC) are very active ministering to Resthaven Assisted Living
residents, providing birthday cards to patients at Hardee Manor and organizing all of the
church fellowship events along with dinners for families in need. The ladies enjoy a monthly
Bible study and prayer time called the Ladies Circle.
The Session has been involved in the life of the church through prayer and the Word, seeking
to guide Christ's church in ways that glorify the King of the Church. The Elders have respon-
sibility to care for each.member and adherent of our church. They are men of faithfulness and
dedication, second to none.
The Deacons of Faith have involved themselves in mercy deeds, financial oversight and prop-
erty management of the entire church. We are grateftil to God for the gifts that He has given
to these men who serve Christ faithfully.
In cooperation with the local ministerial association, Faith has been a founding partner in the
establishment of the Hardee Help Center and the Hardee Thrift Store. These two entities have
been created to Help those in our community who are the "least of these", as Jesus said,
amongst us.
The annual Thanksgiving Day community meal hosted by the ministerial association has been
served in our Fellowship Hall for nearly a decade.
One of the greatest challenges that the church has ever faced came in the form of a storm.
Hurricane Charlie arrived on August 13, 2004 and it ripped a portion of the Sanctuary roof
off. Rains filled the area next to the Pulpit and one stained glass window was blown out. The
damage ranged upwards to $190,000 and chased us out of the Sanctuary until the following
May of 2005. During this time we worshipped in the Fellowship Hall. The resulting repairs
brought all new roofing on to our buildings and a complete'remodeling of the interior of the
Sanctuary from top to bottom.
Vision clarification brought the Session to challenge the congregation in the areas of worship,
service, fellowship and evangelism in 2006. Stressing these Biblical imperatives moved a mem-
ber of the church to give a gift to the church so we could bring an Associate Pastor on staff to
help with evangelism and church growth. Tom Mirabella was called to a two year term to be
our Pastor of Evangelism and Church Growth from 2007-2009. The Mirabellas have since
relocated to Little Rock, Arkansas where he now serves as Pastor of Trinity Fellowship
Church, PCA. The challenges for FPC today are, in our own strength, daunting. A post-


Christian mindset among the next generation, the economic conditions of Hardee County in its
loss of a middle class population base, which means our educated second generation kids must
move out of the county for employment, the demands of families for entertainment rather than
true spirituality and reflection in worship, these factors and others all contribute to a down-
ward longevity of Faith Presbyterian Church.
But for today, on this Centennial Anniversary, we rejoice in God's rich grace held forth to us
in Jesus Christ His Son! We rejoice in where we have come and to where we are going by His
sovereign will. To God be all glory and praise, now and forevermore. Amen!
CHURCH DIRECTORY 2010

THE SESSION
Rev. Brook T. Larrison, Moderator, Dr. Robert Helveston, Stated Clerk, Mr. Emerson Jones,
Mr. Joe Vance
THE DIACONATE
Mr. Robert Jones, President, Mr. Brent Driskell, Vice President, Mr. John Shaw,
Secretary/Treasurer
THE SUNDAY SCHOOL
Mr. Joe Vance, Superintendent
THE WOMEN OF THE CHURCH
Mrs. Belva Vance, President, Mrs. Mary Lynne Driskell, Vice President, Mrs. Sherri Shaiv,
Secretary, Mrs. Sylvia Ann Barrows, Treasurer, Mrs. Nancy Helveston, Christian Growth,
Mrs. Jean Larrison, Missions, Mrs. Mary Jones, Flowers, Mrs. Sandy Larrison, Circle
Chairman, Mrs. Sara Jones, Mercy Needs
THE MUSICIANS
Mrs. Terry McGowin, Pianist, Mrs. Sylvia Ann Barrows, Pianist, Mrs. Mary Jones, Trumpet,
Kids Choir
ELDEST OF OUR MEMBERS
Mrs. Mae Frank Himrod
Born on January 6, 1913
CURRENT LONGEST MEMBER
Mrs. Natalie Whidden
Received by Profession of Faith on December 1, 1946
MEMBERSHIP
52
MINISTERS OF FPC


Rev. T.J. Allison
Rev. A.J. Hutton
Rev. James A. Winnard
Rev. H.A. Tucker
Rev. J.H. Davis
Rev. Fred E. Manning
Rev. William Schmitz
Rev. Rhyan Lee Wood
Rev. J. Russell Young
Rev. J.N. Keels
Rev. William Porter
Rev. W.T. Mulcay, Sr.
Rev. Russ D. Toms
Rey. James E. Barr
Rev. Bruce K. Lax
Rev. Brook Thomas Larrison


1910-1914
1914-1915
1915
1915-1919
1919-1925
1925
1925-1927
1927-1941
1942-1943
1943-1949
1949-1960
1961-1970
1971-1985
1986-1988
1988-1994
1995-present


Faith Presbyterian Church is a congregation of The Presbyterian Church in America.
Our local Presbytery is Southwest Florida Presbytery, which includes Tampa, Lakeland,
Sebring, Wauchula, Sarasota, Venice and Lake Suzy areas.


Aum Pharmacy Is Closed

BUT




y HEARTLAND PHARMACY


Is


OPEN!


Bring your Aum bottles to HEARTLAND PHARMACY for transfer &


FRIENDLY HOMETOWN SERVICE!


113IU 1So achuln (63),67-892


DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


"We Put Our Into Our Service"


If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.
/' *- .. ... .. ., .1 i i i ..|.M __|


SPauline Ochoa, Sue Lobato, Red Camp Pharmacist and Crystal Contreras


Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm










8C The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.:252010CA000495

WAUCHULA STATE BANK, A
FLORIDA BANKING CORPORA-
TION,
Plaintiff

vs.
*
RAJKUMARI SETHI,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice Is hereby given that pur-
suant to a final decree of foreclo-
sure entered in the above-entitled
cause In the Circuit Court of
Hardee County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated In Hardee
and St. Lucie County, Florida,
described as:

Hardee County Property:

A portion of the East Hall
of Section 19, Township 35
South, Range 27 East,
Hardee County, Florida,
being more particularly
described as follows:

Commence at the
Southwest corner of said
Section 19, thence South
89017'07" East, along the
South line of said Section
19, a distance of 5145.57
feet to the Southeast cor-
ner of said Section 19;
thence North 00o05'41"
East, along the East line of
said Section 19, a distance
of 3020.34 feet to the
Westerly right of way line
of Johnston Road; thence
North 5430'12" West,
along said Westerly right
of way line, a distance of
1060.31 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING; thence
South 00*05'41" West, a
distance of 1317.69 feet;
thence North 70*47'37"
West, a distance of 335.57
feet; thence North
00"05'41" East, a distance
of 1433.17 feet to the
Westerly right of way line
of said Johnston Road;
thence South 54*30'12"
East, along said Westerly
right of way line, a dis-
tance of 389.00 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.

STREET ADDRESS:
Johnston Road, Zolfo
Springs, Florida 33890

St. Lucle County Property:

Lot 2, Block 1297, PORT
ST. LUCIE, SECTION
TWELVE, according to the
Map or Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 12,
page 55, Public Records of
St. Lucie County, Florida

STREET ADDRESS:
1161 Southwest London
Lane, Port St. Lucie,
Florida 34953

at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder for cash, in the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 West Main Street,
Second Floor, Hallway outside of
Room 202, Wauchula, Florida, in
accordance with Section 45.301,
Florida Statutes (2004), at 11:00
a.m., on the 15 day of December
2010..

NOTICE: Any person claiming
an interest In the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the proper-
ty owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.

Signed this 16"' dayA of
November, 2010.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
12:2,9c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.:252010CA000306

SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff

vs.

STEVEN J. MEDEIROS;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STEVEN
J. MEDEIROS, ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TEN-
ANT #1; TENANT#2,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pur-
suant to Final Judgment of
Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered
in this cause, In the Circuit Court
of HARDEE County, Florida; I will
sell the property situated in
HARDEE County, Florida
described as:

LOT 16 OF THE OAKS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, AN
UNRECORDED SUBDIVI-
SION, AS MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS: A
BOUNDARY SURVEY OF


LOT 16 OF THE OAKs, AN
UNRECORDED SUBDIVI-
SION LYING IN SECTIONS
11,14 AND 15, TOWNSHIP
35 SOUTH, RANGE 25
EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: ASSUMING
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION 15 TO BE
NORTH 894921 WEST,
COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID SECTION 14;
THENCE SOUTH 58"1347
EAST, 531.05 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 002619
WEST, 580.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE SOUTH 0002619 WEST,
230.00 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 895238 EAST,
960.00 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 0002619 EAST,
230.00 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 89"5238 WEST,
960.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO A ROAD
EASEMENT OVER THE
WEST 30.00 FEET THERE-
OF.
and commonly known as 5187
Greenfields Run, Zolfo Springs,
FL 33890, a public sale, to the
highest and best bidder, for cash,
In the Second Floor Hallway out-
side of Room 202 of the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 W. Main
St., Wauchula, Florida 33873, on
December 15, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNERS
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administrator's Office,
10th Judicial Circuit, PO. Box
9000, Drawer J-102, Bartow,
Florida 33830-9000, phone (863)
534-4686 within 2 working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you
are hearing or voice impaired,
call 1-800-955-8771.

Dated this 11-17-10

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
12:2,9c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.:252010CA000416

WAUCHULA STATE BANK
Plaintiff

vs.

ARTIE BURKES, ET AL,
Defendants.
______________I


NO CE OF SAL PUMUANT


TO FLORIDA STATUTES
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to a SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS dated
November 16, 2010, in the above
styled cause, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at the -Hardee County
Courthouse, on the second floor
hallway outside of Room 202, 417,
West Main Street, Wauchula, FL
33873, at 11:00 A.M. on
December 15, 2010, the following
described property as set forth in
said SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS, to wit:

Lot 33, of Lake Dale Acres,
a subdivision in Hardee
County, Florida, as per Plat
Book 3, Page 41

Parcel Id: 36-33-25-0815-
00001-0033

Commonly known as 498
Cypress Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873

Dated this 17 day of November,
2010.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you are a person with a
disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision
of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, 255 N. Broadway
Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830,
(863) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.


12:2,9c


IN I Mt CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252010CP000086

IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNE C. TAYLOR
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of ANNE C. TAYLOR,
Deceased, whose date of death
was November 19, 2010, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for HARD-
EE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
.417 Main Street, P.O. Box 1749,
Wauchula, FL 33873. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is December 9, 2010.

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JANE M. HANCOCK
Attorney for RICHARD N. TAYLOR
Florida Bar Number: 341002
Clifford M. Ables, III, PA.
202 W. Main St., STe. 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Telephone: (863) 773-0500
Fax: (863) 773-0505
E-Mail: cmables@cmablespa.net

Personal Representative:
RICHARD N. TAYLOR
42 Windingwood Lane
Lincoln, Massachusetts 01773

12;9,1Pc

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

CASE NO.:252009CA000679

HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS
INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE
REGISTERED NOTEHOLDERS
OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUI-
TY LOAN TRUST 2007-1
Plaintiff


vs.

GEORGE FRANKLIN BOWEN,
AND AUDREY MAE BOWEN,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Summary
Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated October 18th, 2010, and
entered in Case No. 2009-CA-
00679 of the Circuit Court of.the
10th Judicial Circuit in and for
Hardee County, Florida, wherein
HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as
Indenture Trustee for the regis-
tered Noteholders of
Renaissance Home Equity Loan
Trust 2007-1, is Plaintiff and
George Franklin Bowen, and
Audrey Mae Bowen, are
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at
the Hardee County Courthouse,
417 W. Main Street, Second Floor
Hallway outside of room 202,
Wauchula, FL 33873, at 11:00
o'clock A.M. on the 15 day of
December, 2010, the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to
wit:

All that certain land situate
in -lardee County, State of
Florida, viz:
South 33 1/2 feet of Lot 4
and all of Lot 5, Block 16 of
Carlson and McEwen
Addition to the City of
Wauchula

Street Address: 120 North 8th
Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873

and all fixtures and personal
property located therein and
thereon, which are included as
security in Plaintiffs mortgage.

Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property own-
ers as of the date of the lis pen-
dens must file a claim within 60,
days after the sale.

Dated at Hardee County,
Florida, this 17 day of Nov., 2010.
*
B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
12:2,9c


Girls Hoops Handle Frostproof


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Both Hardee girls basketball
teams prevailed over Frostproof
on Friday night.
It was the culmination of a
mixed week for the girls. This
week they hosted DeSoto on
Tuesday and entertain visiting
Sarasota Booker today (Thurs-
day). Next week's only game is
- at home against Sebring on
Thursday. Play resumes after
the winter break with a varsity
trip to play Walker Memorial in
Avon Park.
The varsity girls are at 3-3.
They lost at Lakeland'just
before the Thanksgiving break.
Last week, they beat Sarasota
Cardinal Mooney, lost to
Bradenton Southeast and beat
Frostproof.
At Lakeland, the girls were
"intimidated, overmatched,"
said Head Coach Don Gray.
Hardee lost to the 5A Lady
Dreadnaughts 62-20. Senior
Ashley Louis led the Lady
'Cats,with 10 points, while jun-
ior Robyn Tanksley added a
half dozen, and seniors Paige
Massey and Elvira Servin each
had two points.
It was different when Hardee
went to Sarasota last Tuesday to
play Mooney. Louis had a triple
double, with 17 points, a dozen
rebounds and a dozen steals in
Hardee's 46-21 victory. "I can't
recall ever talking about anyone
with a triple double, although I
don't have the statistics to
prove it," said Gray. Tanksley
chipped in with nine points,
senior Maria Avalos eight,
Servin six, and seniors Massey
and LaCresha Carlton and jun-
ior Caitlin Sockalowsky each
two points. Senior Artrice
Hines and sophomore Kayla
"Louie" Nichols added defen-
sively.


KINDERGARTEN
E
Marisa Alvarez
Muizz Anchur
Isabela Anselmo
Keyara Auguste
Brand9n Bailey
Ethan Barber
Ralee Barnett
Preston Barringer
Marisa Botello
Alberto Castillo
Jennifer DeSantiago
Morgan Dunlap
Jessenia Duran
David Garcia
Veronica Gomez
Crystal Gonzalez-
Lopez
Hunter Graham
Savana Granado
Xander Hearns
Braxton Holt.
Jaqueline Jurado
Tayler Kiella
Rose Kirkland
Cody Knight
Andrew Lee
Sidney Madison
Stephanie McMillan
Gloria Mendiola
Alexa Mondragon
Eric Mushrush
Kyla Patton
Carolina Paulino-
Mendieta
Carmen Rivera
Arianna Rodriguez
Sandra Ruiz-Vasquez
Beau Schultz
Alberto Sierra
Ada Starnes
Isai Venegas
Donovan Weaver
William Willis

E/S
Charley Anton
Azucena Arista
Alyssa Botello
Esmeralda Cardenas-
Garza
Eduardo Cardenas-
Munoz
Gus Carlton
Omar Carranza-
Alvarez
Mariah Carrizales
Elizabeth Darty
Kimber Davidson
Roberto Flotes
Cristian Gomez
Rablo Gonzales
'Haley Grice
Laurence Johnson
Emma Knighton
Kenyiin Lee


It was another story when
Hardee went to Bradenton
Southeast on Thursday night.
With championship banners
hanging for every year since
1990, Hardee knew it would be
a tough game. The 3A-District
11 tournament will be at
Southeast this year.
Hardee played a stronger first
half, causing Southeast, which
usually only uses the press for
the first three minutes of each
half, to keep it on all of the first
half. But they came out more
aggressively in the second half
and dropped Hardee 56-19.
Southeast had only two play-
ers in double digits, Mariah
Dowdell had 13 points and
Tynea Dunbar had 11. Hardee
players were held under double
digits. Louis was highest with a
half dozen, followed by Massey
with four, Carlton three, and
Sockalowsky, Servin and Hines
with two apiece.
Coming home after a four-
game road stint, Hardee began a
four-game home streak with an
overwhelming win over 2A
Frostproof. Louis ran off the
first five points, with a trey and
a steal for a full-court run for
the layup.
Everyone got lots of playing
time, as Gray rested his starters
and let everyone had a shot of
showing what they could do. It
was 19-4 at the end of the first
period, 33-5 at halftime and
ended 49-11. The Lady Bull-
dogs played furiously but had
difficulty making their shots
over Hardee's twin towers,
Louis and Tanksley.
In the three quarters she
played, Louis had 22 points, 15
rebounds, three steals and two
hustles. Tanksley had six
points, six rebounds, a pair of
blocked shots and twin hustles.
Carlton added eight points and


Briana Molina
Karen Monterrosa
John Nord
Esteban Rios
Emillio Rodriguez
David "Luciano"
Santos-Gutierrez
Ami Taguja-Garduno
Ramon Torres
Dinora Villa-Munoz

FIRST GRADE
A
Perla Abarca
Lucio Aquino
McKenzie Banda
Victor Chavez-Saldana
Heather Dayfert
Chloe Dean
Katie Henderson
Michael "Dylan"
Lambert
Andrew Lee
Itzel Mendez
Valeria Montanez
Lindsey Montero
Uriel Morales-Herrera
Ariana Olmos
Jesus Paniagua
Thalia Sanchez
Kolby Sanchez
Elicarmen Sargento-
Santiago
James "Levi" Taylor
Katelyn Vasquez

A/B
Michael Adams
Adeline Adams
Humberto Aguirre
Melody Aleman
Antonio Arellano
Soleil Baque
Lane Black
Justin Browning
Victor Cosme
Griselda Duran
Leiana Ealom
Alexander Fenton
Alicia Gonsalez
Heath Hendry
Tyler Jones
Summer Lanham
Diana Lopez
Odalis Lopez-Rojas
Yeng Lor
Ana Martinez-Herrera
Marisa Mendieta
Rachael Mendoza
Brooke Ownby
Mario "AJ" Rodriguez
Ari Soles
Alejandro Solis
Tyler Teuton
Andrew Tootle
Mattie Wells
Bryndllian Witt


SECOND GRADE
A
Colton Block
Kaitlynn Brandeberry
Vicente Cabrera
Cameron Cantu
Jake Cole
Justin Cole
Alexis Crews
Anthony Griffis
David Mendez
Jeremy Myers
Rosalba Salazar-
Barbosa
Shaydan Ward

A/B
Miguel Avilez
Jacklin "Alana" Barber
Kaylen Barringer
Erica Blasingain
Joelynn Carver
Vicente Chaidez
Daniel Contreras-
Ramirez
Billy Courtright
Brittney Covarrubias .
David Cruz
Oscar DeLeon
Brianna Franks
Megan Gannon
Blake Graham
Trinity Her
Palmer Klein
Erin "Gracie" McElroy
Pablo Molina-Rosales
Raquel Montanez
Alan Pina
Jasmine Rodriguez
Cheyann Strickland
Emily Thompson
Yacquelin Villalva
Jason Walker

THIRD GRADE
A
Isabella Adams
Dylan Bozeman
Bailey Harrell
Jesus Jurado
Sydnie Steiner

A/B
Aaron Bunch
Karina Carranza
Kipp Cooper
Darren Daniels
Myrka DeLaTorre
Brayan Diego
Tyler Lambert
Maria Martinez
Mackenzie McCoy
Henry McElroy
Briana Montero
Angela Ramirez
Daniel Ramos
Liliana Ramos


a half dozen steals to her four
rebounds.
In fact, every player con-
tributed on the rebounding,
assists and steals. On points,
Avalos added five points,
Sockalowsky had four at the
charity stripe, Massey three
points, and Servin a free throw.
The JV Lady Wildcats have
had only four games so far, as
neither Walker or Mooney have
JV squads.
Against Lakeland, Hardee
played tough in the second-ever
game for four of the players and
only second high school game
for five freshmen. Although
Hardee never took the lead, it
lost only 26-17 to the junior
Lady 'Naughts.
Destany McClellan had five
points, Carlista Brown and
Carleigh Coleman each four,
and Allison Hunter and
Sockalowsky each two points.
It was a hard game at talented'
Southeast, losing 54-16. Fresh-
man Bailey Carlton tied with
Southeast's Daisha Kelly for
top scorer with 13 points, while
McClellan had two and Alyssa
Casso a free throw.
Hardee picked up in its first
home game, against Frostproof
on Friday night. The junior
Lady Bulldogs could not get the
ball to stay in the hoop and
were down 23-0 at halftime. All
the Lady 'Cat players got on.the
court often, as Coach Ken
Leupold rotated his squad.
Carlton led with 10 points,
while Casso had six, McClellan
five, and Coleman, Hunter and
Stephanie Perez each had four
points. Kashia Mosley, Adna
Metayer and Edreina Martinez
each added two points. Diana
Gomez and Brown added
defensively.


Zaida Rojas
William Roland
Sandy Vue
Sierra Weaver
Joseph Wood


FOUTH GRADE
A
Amari DeLeon
Michaela Klein
David Martinez
Jose Romero-Vazquez

A/B
Luis Angeles
Destiny Ballard
Dawson Cantu
Joanna Cisneros-
Montanez
Sandra Contreras-
Ramirez
Johnathon Couch
Mary Courtright
Katie Dayfert
Samuel DeLaTorre
Alejandro Duran
Jasmin Ealom
Javier Garcia
Jose "Tommy" Garcia
Rebekah Hinojosa- '
Montelon
Infiniti Randolph
Sanjan Rifty
Donald Rhoden
Ada Starnes
Jillian Thompson
Daniela Villalva
Gabrielle Willis

FIFTH GRADE
A
Mason Block

A/B
Stephen Aguilar
Makayla Benavidez
Nicholas Buchanan
Avery Bunch
Jesaiah Delgado
Guadalupe Garcia-
Cendejas'
Rosalba Garza
Ashley Gonzalez
Sylas Kirkland
Sarah McCoy
Hallei Mushrush
Gabriela Reyes
Maria Reyes
Ulyssa Rodriguez
Jose Rojas
Jasmine Sanchez
Jessie "Alex" Sconyers
Kaela Villegas
Yesenia Villegas
Chuasyeng "James"
Vue


I don't believe one grows older. I think that what happens early on in life
is that at a certain age one stands still and stagnates.
-T.S. Eliot









PAGE ONE
II


Cherry Returns to Ring


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
After a 10-month layoff,
Edner "Cherry Bomb" Cherry
is set to return to the ring
Saturday at the Jannus Live in
St. Petersburg.
Cherry will put his 27-6-2
record with 15 knockouts on the
line in an eight-round fight that
will not be for a belt.
Since his last fight on Feb.
27, Cherry described himself as
being a "gym rat," and said he
is in great physical shape and
ready to fight again.
The long hiatus was due to
lack of a willing opponent and
scheduling and venue conflicts.
Cherry said he will be dedi-
cating this fight to his former
boss, Denise Miller and all
other residents in Hardee who
are battling cancer.
"I want to let them know not
to give up," he said. "They can
beat it, but you have to fight all
the way until the end."
Cherry will give his gloves to
Miller after the fight.
One thing that will be a first
for Cherry is fighting outdoors.


Photo By NANCY DAVIS


Edner "Cherry Bomb" Cherry.


He expects it to be a little
cold when he steps into the ring
but does not think the chilly
weather can stop him.
Tickets for the fight can be
purchased at the event or


through Francois Cherry at
Royal's Furniture before Fri-
day.
The fights begin at 7 p.m. but
Cherry does not know exactly
what time he will fight.


City Seek
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Long on-going negotiations
with Tampa Electric Co.
(TECO) have sputtered.
Wauchula officials decided at
Monday night's workshop to
proceed with its back-dated
notice of cancellation and seek
requests for proposals (RFPs)
for bulk power supply for the
city.
It approved a contract with
WHH Enterprises (William H.
Herrington), which has already
been representing Wauchula
and several other cities in trying
to re-negotiate the TECO con-
tract.
The city is required to give a
year's notice of intent to cancel
service and it did so, effective
Sept.' 30, 2011. WHH will de-
velop a strategy for bulk power


ring Electric Povider


supply to the city's recently
muili-millio-ndollar renovated
substation.
WHH will evaluation wheel-
ing costs and potential suppliers
and solicit RFPs for the city,
specifically including monthly
energy and demand data and
costs.
Hopefully, the company will
be able to issue RFPs by
February and evaluation ensu-
ing bids by April 15, plenty of
time to negotiate a final con-
tract and changeover before the
Sept. 30 deadline given TECO.
In other action at Monday's
workshop, the City Commis-
sion:
-discussed resumes re-
ceived for city manager and
sent them to the city's labor
attorney Reynolds Allen to
shortlist. Commissioners will


rank the top five for discussion
at next Monday's regular
monthly meeting.
-amended the resolution to
provide Government-In-The-
Sunshine training from the
annual December workshop
meeting to one in February.
-put the city property at
513 N. Eighth Avenue acquired
.by code enforcement foreclo-
sure up for bid. An adjacent
property owner has expressed
interest in owning it.
-learned that the Tommy
Underwood Trust has agreed to
a Bay Street sidewalk along the
Azalea Hill property.
--discussed whether a person
renting an apartment is consid-
ered an apartment complex/-
commercial endeavor for
Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA) grants.


iWAUCHULA MOOSE LODGE
117 King Rd. Wauchula


Karaoke

Fri. Dec. 3 & 10

6:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m.



--^^^^^with
L-JOHRy 3.1^^^^^^^^^^R^^^ VICKI-^^^^^^


I I `


The Herald-Advocate
IrLSPS 57-.7801
Thursday, December 9, 2010


SMIz EDNA'S COUNTRY DINER
- 705 S. 6th Ave., (Hwy. 17) 863-773-6241

Mon. Fri 7 a.m. 2 p.m. Sat. and Sun. 7 a.m. 3 p.m.

SPECIALS EVERYDAY SURE To PLEASE!
Stop In & Check Us Out Same Good Food
We Will Be Glad To Host Club Meetings


Watch For Open House & Christmas Party ]

See You Soon!


UNSTOPPABLE.


HydrdTaste
Hydroponic Growers



NO BENDING -iNO N LIG




Open Tuesday-Saturday 10am-5pm
Sunday 11am-5pm Closed Mondays

FREE CLASSES ON "How To START YOUR GARDEN"
CALL AND MAKE YOUR RESERVATION Now!

Phone (941) 322-0429

7308 VERNA BETHANY, MYAKKA CITY, FL 34251
TAKE SR 70 EAST 12 MILES FROM 1-75.


www.hydrotaste.com


I Ill'


c,


soc12:9C









2D The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010






Hardee


Living


THANKSGIVING TREAT


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. James Brown

Renee Myrick & J.B.

Brown Exchange Vows


Saunder Renee Myrick of
Barnwell, S.C., became the
bride of James Edward "J.B."
Brown of Wauchula on Oct. 30.
The couple exchanged mar-
riage vows at the B&G Civic
Center in Allendale, S.C., with
the Rev. Jimmy R. Wise offici-
ating. .-
The bride is the daughter of
Inez Jones-Myrick and Willis E.
Myrick Sr., of Barnwell, S.C.
The groom is the son of the late
Mr. and Mrs. James Z. Brown.
The ceremony took place at 5
o'clock in the afternoon. Vo-
calist Kimberly G. Riley sang
"Rapture of Love." Music was
provided by Teron Brabham.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her oldest brother,
Willis E. Myrick Jr. She wore
an ivory satin mermaid gown
adorned with embroidery and
Swarovski crystals, rhinestones
and sequin accents. The gown's
train also featured crystals
along with cultured pearls. The
bride's tiara was embellished
with crystals as well.
MiKeisha Jones of Hilton
Head, S.C., cousin of the bride,
served as maid of honor.
Matron of honor was Jacqueline
B. Myrick of North Augusta,
S.C., the bride's sister-in-law.


Gowns were truffle-colore
accented with floral bouquets
ivory calla lilies, cream ros
and ivory carnations.
Serving as flower girls we
Samantha T. Myrick, the bride
niece, and J'myah Jones, tl
bride's cousin.- They wo
creme-taffeta gowns with truff
sashes. Ring bearer was Bra
don L. Myrick, the bride
nephew.
Attending to the groom
best man was Bryrique Samu
Myrick, son of the brid
Groomsman was Clarence
Myrick of North Augusta, S.C
brother of the bride, and Denn
Addison of Barnwell, S.C., w;
the usher.
The bride's mother wore
full-length ivory gown.
Following, the ceremony,
reception was held in the bal
room at the civic center, a fivi
tier buttercream cake w;
graced with live flowers and
flowing champagne fountain.
The couple are at home
Barnwell, S.C.
Prior to the wedding, a re
hearsal dinner was held, featu
ing barbecued baby-back rib
dirty rice, potato salad, corn an
baked beans, all hosted by th
groom.


Full Service Salon MM2586




BF RACIAL PEDICURES MANICURES


YVONNE ABBOTT
Licensed Massage Therapist
MA34261
1006 S. 9th Ave. Wauchula


SABRINA CRAWFORD-
Cosmetologist
773-4364


JANUARY 1, 2011
Jennifer Taylor & Brandon Sellers

MARCH 19, 2011
Carolyn Lewis & Matt Driskell

MAY 7, 2011
Kelsey Williams & Tyler Johnson

JUNE 25, 2011
Kaylyn Crawford & Dustin Walton


Cat' On 9(in
Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula,
(863) 773-6565
www.catsonmain.com
soc12:9c


;d,
of
rf..


COURTESY PHOTO
Parents of first-grade students at North Wauchula Elementary School were treated to.a Thanksgiving performance
and a first-rate feast, courtesy of the first graders, their teachers and the school's food services team. Attendees lis-
tened to recitations and songs, and then sat down to a delicious meal of turkey and mashed potatoes with all the
fixings. Above, little pilgrims and Indians perform for the crowd.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS


MONDAY oStck
Breakfast: Cereal, Donut, Stick,
re Juice, Condiments and Milk and Mi
e's Lunch: Sausage Pizza, unc
he Hamburger on a Bun, Salad Lunch.
ie- -Tray, Baked Beans, Cherry
.le- .Juice Bar, Condiments and Milk
n--
n- TUESDAY
's Breakfast: Cereal, French Breal
Toast, Sausage Patty, Graham Cracker
as Cracker, Fruit Cocktail, Condi- ed Juiec
el ments and Milk Lunc
e. Lunch: Chicken Pattie on Hambul
L. Bun, Hotdogs, Green Beans, Tomato
. Salad Tray, Strawberries, Ice Bar, Coi
is Cream, Salad Dressing, Condi-
as ments and Milk
Breal
WEDNESDAY Crackel
a Breakfast: Cereal, Scram- Sausag
bled Eggs w/Cheese, Buttered Condim
a Toast, Potato Triangle, Pears, Lunc
I- Condiments and Milk Bun, Pe
e- Lunch: Fish Square, Sloppy Lettuce
as .Joe on a Bun, French Fries, Beans,
a Salad Tray, Peaches, Corn- Cups, C
bread, Jello, Condiments and
in MilkB
Breal
THURSDAY Cracker
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes, Scramb
r- Sausage Patty, Juice, Condi- Potato
s, ments and Milk ments a
id Lunch: Baked Turkey, Lunc
he Corndog, Mashed Potatoes, Sausag
Green Beans, Pears, Red Velvet Salad E
Cake, Rolls, Salad Tray, Condi- French
ments and Milk Condim






-V,













Open To All Kind
a $50 Entry Fee (
Mandatory pictL
Wauchula Elem
Mandatory Prac
Pageant Sun.
Deadline Fri.,
All forms &
Wauchula
Flyers will be h

PRINT O(R r PI
PA RT ICI P. NT N
PARTICI PANT'S
PARTICIP.\NT'S

PARENT/iGUARI
SNAMiE:
CELL #:


--Lil


FRIDAY
kfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Peaches, Condiments
k
h: Early Release Bag


JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
kfast: Cereal, Graham
rs, Super Donut, Assort-
es, Condiments and Milk
h: Sausage Pizza,
rger on a Bun, Lettuce &
, Baked Beans, Juice
ndiments and Milk
TUESDAY
kfast: Cereal, Graham
rs, Frer ih Toast,
e Patty, Fruit Cocktail,
nents and Milk
h: Chicken Pattie on
pperoni Pizza, Hotdogs,
& Tomato, Green
Strawberries, Ice Cream
;ondiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
fast: Cereal, Graham
rs, Buttered Toast,
led Egg w/Cheese,
Triangle, Pears, Condi-
nd Milk
h: Fish Sandwich,
e Pizza, Sloppy Joe,
Bar, Lettuce & Tomato,
Fries, Peaches, Jello,
ents and Milk


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Pancakes, Sausage
Patty, Assorted Juices, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Baked Turkey
w/Gravy, Cornbread Dressing,
Rolls, Corndog, Pepperoni
Pizza, Salad Bar, Lettuce &
Tomato, Mashed Potatoes,
Green Beans, Red Velvet Cake,
Pears, Cranberry Sauce,
Waldorf Fruit Salad, Condi-
ments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Stick,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Toasted Ham
& Cheese, Sausage Pizza,
Lettuce & Tomato, Mexican
Rice, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie
on Bun, Chicken Breast Fillet,
French Fries, Spaghetti and
Meat Sauce, Green Beans,
Veggie Cup, Tossed Salad,
Waldorf Salad, Peaches, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie


on Bun, Chicken' Breast Fillet,
French Fries, Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Fresh Potatoes, Broccoli,
Tossed Salad, Macaroni Salad,
Stawberries & Banana, Ice
Cream, Condiments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scram-
bled Eggs, Buttered Toast,
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie
on Bun, Chicken Breast Fillet,
French Fries, Rib-B-Que on
Bun, Potato Rounds, Baked
Beans, Tossed Salad, Fruit
Cocktail, Condi-ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Pineapple Chunks, Sausage
Patty, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie. .
on Bun, Chicken Breast Fillet,
French Fries, Chicken Gravy,
Mashed Potatoes, Green
Beans, Sweet Potatoes &
Apple, Red Velvet Cake,.
Cranberry Sauce, Tossed
Salad, Pears, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon
Toast, Oatmeal, Applesauce,.
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken Pattie
on Bun, Chicken Breast Fillet,
French Fries, Pepperoni Hot
Pocket, Broccoli Normandy,
Potato Rounds, Tossed Salad,
Juice, Condiments and Milk


'A i I' V E I ~ ', \.X %
i~~f I' I~I I ii:X L X~'.


r


I


ergarten Girls:
made payable to the Hardee County Fair Board)
ures & coloring contest Tues., Jan. 18th 6:00pm
entary School's Bobcats Den (the old cafeteria)
ctice Thurs., Feb.17th 5:00pm-7:00pm Civic Center
,Feb. 20th 2:00pm Civic Center
Jan. 7th 2:00 pm
fees must be submitted to Kristen Rivas at
Elementary School by this deadline... No exceptions!
handed out to all Kindergarten girls at their school site.


,AME:
SCHOOL & TEACHER:
.\)DRESS:


)I \N CONTACT INFO:


PHONE#:


- I


'O l




















soc12 2.9c


What's Fo


- I


I


J-


i,--


. I-- ". -


-J.1~ ~r~l~r;- r.,...-,l, ~-msrnr?l~~oaraassaoa~-~ar~l-r~


;;


N; I--_______~


whobod6mm-ommmoma


~o ~


Break


I
!


I


i


7 Y, 7o
w)7*1


-i- -l D-i i L.0 n__


II- II H [ n "1 1







December 9, 2010, The 3Herald-Adv H 3D


SAMMY SCIENCE


FALL INTO FUN!


COURTESY PHOTOS
Jean St. Louis (above) demonstrates the power of mag-
nets at one of many "Uncle Sam's Science Night" sta-
tions, where students and their families learned all about
making a successful science fair project. The Science
Night was part of North Wauchula Elementary School's
recognition of Veterans Day, honoring the armed forces
and hosting parents. In the bottom photo (from left),
Zander Yeomans and Zackary Durastanti dressed as
Uncle Sam as they served as hosts, helping parents and
students find their way among the exhibits.

I~~~ Q


Your Child Will
Learn to Read! ,
Free Evaluation
Internationally Acclaimed Method
Children, Teens & Adults
d A *ei Rose Mitchell-Freeman
Reading Instructilon
AcadenmicAssoiates R pecialist
(Learning Centerso (863)773-6141
soc12 9c



I have a
Class Schedule:
CONFESSION Monday/Tuesday/
to m ake... Friday 4:00pm
Tuesday/
I finally found a Thursday 5:30pm
workout I truly love. Sat. 8:00am



Florida's First Assembly
of God Church
1397 S. Florida Ave.
Wauchula













MAIN STREET WAUCHULA'S




State Farm Insurance
Fs00)FIB-15-ir *. a o W S








NON-PROFIT WINNER:
State Farm Insurance

Hardee County YMCA
Thank You For Helping Decorate Downtown!
Cat's On Main
Jellybeans Children's Boutique
Hanchey's Carpet
Florida Hospital Wauchula
Peace River Electric Coop
Wauchula State Bank
Offices of the Hardee County Chamber,
Main Street Wauchula, &
Economic Development
Mosaic
Dani Valentim Interiors
Royal's Furniture
CF Industries
First National Bank of Wauchula
American Red Cross
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Princess House
Phoschem
Wauchula Abstract
Shops On The Corner
12-9c


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Evil people are trapped by
their own sin; but good peo-
ple can sing and be happy.
Good people care about jus-
tice for the poor, but the
wicked are not concerned.
Proverbs 29:6-7 (NCV)
FRIDAY
And, behold, a lawyer stood
up to put Him (Jesus) to the
test, saying, "Teacher, what
shall I do to inherit eternal
life?" Jesus said to him,
"What is written in the law?"
And he answered, "You shall
love the Lord your God with
all your heart, and soul, and
strength and your mind, and
your neighbor as yourself."
Jesus said to him, "You have
answered right; do this and
you will live (eternally).
Luke 10:25-28 (RSV)
SATURDAY
Whoever loves money never
has enough; who loves
wealth is never satisfied with
his income. This too is
meaningless. As goods
increase, so do those who
consume them. And what
benefit are they to the owner
except to feast his eyes on
them? The sleep of the
laborer is sweet, whether he
has little or much; but the
abundance of a rich man
permits him no sleep.
Ecclesiastes 5:10-12 (NIV)
SUNDAY
But God is always ready to
give grace to the humble.
So, humble yourselves
under God's strong hand
and, in His own good time,
He will lift you up. You can
throw the whole weight of
your anxieties upon Him, for
you are His personal con-
cern.
I Peter 5:5b-7 (PME)
MONDAY
God said, "This is My plan
for the whole earth-I will do
it by My mighty power that
reaches everywhere around
the world. The Lord of battle
has spoken-who can
change His plans? When His
hand moves, who can stop
Him?"
Isaiah 14:26-27 (TLB)
TUESDAY
Do not live for money; be
content with what you have;
for God Himself has said, "I
will never leave you or desert
you."
Hebrews 13:5 (NEB)
WEDNESDAY
I will bless the Lord who
guides me; even at night my
heart instructs me. I know
the Lord is always with me. I
will not be shaken, for He is
right beside me.
Psalm 16:7-8 (NLT)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.

Tolerance and celebration
of individual differences is
the fire that fuels lasting
love.
-Tom Hannah


COUIuifSY PHOTO
Students at North Wauchula Elementary School recently were treated to a Fah Festival
sponsored by the Parent Teacher Organization. Teachers, parents and other volunteers
created games and attractions with tons of food and prizes. The event helped raise
money for each grade level, to go toward field trips or educational materials. Ie day
was so successful that the PTO is looking to turn it into an annual event, 'i/h even
more games, bigger attractions, performing groups and more! Pictured, g cup of
children gets ready to go on the hayride sponsored by Coach Amy Bryan.,

Some types of peppers are said to contain up to six times as rnmcha vita-
min C as an orange. The highest levels are found when the peppers are
in their "green" stage. Hot peppers contain less vitamin C than the miider
bell peppers.





SEVERTS CHRISTMAS TREES

Freshest Trees and Wreaths in town

Delivered Daily

Come visit Jodi at the tree lot
Now Till Christmas Eve
9am to 9pm ~ 7 Days A Week


LOOK FOR THE BIG TENT!
m


A


A,


U.S. HWY 27 Avon Park
Just North of Stryker Rd.


< MONDAY

A DECEMBER 13, 2010
is the last sale of the year!

We will take cattle
Sunday, January 2, 2011
for first sale of the year
SMonday, January 3, 2011




)/-^^\


-, 1







,r12 2,9p


I M---Oo


-







4D The Herald-Advocate, December 9. 2010


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate...
75 YEARS AGO
Every paid-up member of
Herger Williams Post No. 2 will
have two chances to win a
brand new standard tudor (two-
door) V-8 Ford automobile. The
plan is simply to encourage
early payment of 1936 dues.
Every serviceman in Hardee
County should appreciate the
cooperation of Hardee County
Motors Inc. in giving them this
opportunity to win this reward.

Adlai Crews, 20-year-old son
of Mrs. C.P. Crews, killed a
nice-sized wildcat about 10:30
p.m. Tuesday, when the cat was
disturbing several chickens in a
coop. The Crews residence is
located on North Fourth Ave-
nue, about a block and a half
from East Main Street, and was
the first ever shot in town.

Any grower of Irish potatoes
who will have potatoes for sale
in December should stop by the
county agent's office for an
allotment of free stamps to take
care of your sales this month.
The office is open Monday,
Wednesday, Friday and Sat-
urday mornings from 8 a.m.
until noon.

Kimbrough's All-American
store has a weekend sale:
Pillsbury flour is 12 pounds for
65 cents; stew beef three
pounds for 25 cents; Baltimore
oysters 45 cents a quart; pork
roast 19 cents a pound; water
ground meal, five pounds for
12 cents; and a two-pound can
of mother's cocoa for 21 cents.


50 YEARS AGO
Outgoing Superintendent of
Public Instruction H.B. Domi-
nick has been given a continu-
ing contract as a teacher at
Hardee High School in spite of
'strong opposition from the
incoming superintendent, Wil-
ton Stephens, and board vice
chairman Reid Stewart. Stewart
said appointment should follow
the usual channels of recom-
mendation of appointments and
Stephens said there should be a
one-year break before appoint-
ment. Once a teacher is granted
a continuing contract, he cannot
be fired without strong cause.
A cement mixer with seven
tons of concrete, owned by an
Avon Park firm, crashed
through the bridge on the
Stephens Road two miles west
of Wauchula, wrecking the
bridge and the mixer. The driver
was not injured. Damage to the
truck was estimated at $500.

Orange boxes are being used
for seats at some of the elemen-
tary schools. A request for
$1,600 in chairs needed to go
with the tables the classes
received brought to light the
unusual seating "used for
years." Some benches and
tables which had been taken out
of the old cafeteria were cut
down and used for makeshift
desks.

Realty ads this week include
a 2BR frame home with carport,
$4,800; a CB home with five
acres of land, with four in
grove, on a paved road close to
town, with barn, for $11,100; a
small two-bedroom home with
lovely landscaped yard for
$4,500; and a 3BR CB home on
five acres close to town for
$8,750.


J1 anI You

Thanks to everyone for your support -
and prayers in the death of 4.
David Medrano this past May.
S We' are very blessed to have so many
Friends & family.
Thank you for your continued
love & support!
REBECCA LEYVA & FAMILY ,

,.. :- .. .. ',.: ia, p








rienda and 'Tmily of

Seasie and Bonnie games

are inoied to celebrate

lbeir 50/bh anniversary



'December 11'M 2:00 p.m.

( C uchula 9 oose iodge
12sp


25 YEARS AGO
The County Commission ac-
cepted Jim Hetherington's res-
ignation as acting county man-
ager and made it effective
immediately, giving him salary
for the rest of the month as sev-
erance pay. Hetherington stated
for the benefit of a future man-
ager, "It is impossible for an
administrator to perform the
functions of this position in a
competent manner with the pre-


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partmient during the week of
No 29-Dec. 3. Listings include
the name of the owner or con-
tractor, the address for the proj-
ect, the type of work to be done,
and the cost involved. Only
projects valued at $1,000 or
more are listed.
ISSUED
MidState Management,
Schoolhouse Road, renova-
tions, $5,830.
Jon Lee Earhart, Quail Road,
renovations, $2,210.
Jon Lee Earhart, Maple
Avenue, renovations, $1,550.
Gary L. Giddens, Golden
Oaks Road, renovations,
$2,800.
Gary L. Giddens, Seventh
Street, renovations, $2,885.
Joseph F. Smith, U.S. 17 N.,
renovations, $4,500.
Wynn M. Phillips, Sally
Place, renovations, $4,300.
Owner/Builder, Minor Ave.,
renovations, $26,800.
Isabel Garcia, Sally Boule-
vard, renovations, $4,000.
Mark S. Moye, Palado Acres,
renovations, $4,800.
Mark S. Moye, Stenstrom
Road, renovations, $4,300.
Travis A. Fulford, U.S. 17 S,
renovations, $4,416.
Douglas Battey, Florida
Avenue, renovations, $6,500.
Joseph R. Mascetti, South
Ninth Avenue, renovations,
$6,750.
Harry Purvis, SR 66, install
mobile home, $7,000.
Steve Senn Electric Inc., CR
663, renovations, $1,000.
Mourer & Mourer Inc.,
Georgia Street, renovations,
$10,947.
Phil Rutherford, Heard
Bridge Road, install mobile
home, $1,800.
BUILDING BLOCKS
The Hardee County Building
Department offers this word of
caution:
Did you know-much like
National Lampoon's "Christ-
mas Vacation," this the time
of year when people are most
likely to overload their electri-
cal outlets.
Most outlets are only rated
for 15 amps, and folks like to
piggyback as many light sets as
they can into one outlet. A sug-
gestion is to try to use multiple
outlets on different circuits, and
not use devices which plug into
one outlet to give you six.
This doesn't increase the
available power supply, only
the number of outlets. It is a fire
waiting to happen. Be careful,
be safe.


sent inadequate staff."

A new venture boasting a $1
million annual payroll may be
locating in west central Hardee
County. Through attorney Joel
Evers, the company has filed
for a special exception to oper-
ate an educational and treat-
ment facility for accident vic-
tims recovering from head in-
juries. The facility would be on
400 acres now owned by
Gardinier Inc.
At the recommendation of
acting ambulance service direc-
tor Robert Shiver, the Hardee
County Commission appointed
two shift supervisors instead of
an assistant director. Shiver said
it would work better for Tino
Vasquez and Mac Leggett as
shift supervisors than to have
one assistant director, and it
would not cost any more
money.
English Chevrolet has end-
of-year specials and new cars: a
1986 Cavalier RS for $10,069;
a 1986 Cavalier convertible for
$14,334; brand new pickups as
low as $5,890; brand new
Chevy El Camino, list price
$11,180, now for $9,975; and a
1986 Camaro for $16,294.
10 YEARS AGO
SSeveral months of discussion
have resulted in a County Com-
mission decision last week to
borrow up to $5 million to fix
county roads and bridges,
pulling from the priority list for
the most critical needs. Roads
in Wauchula Hills will await
plans for installation of a waste-
water treatment system there,
with extension to local resi-
dents. Construction on Ten Mile
Grade is delayed in working out
some agreement with DeSoto
County, which shares the road.
The Hardee County Econo-
mic Development Council Inc.
held a fundraiser and quarterly
meeting last week to seek dona-
tions as a match for a $25,000
grant from the county next year.
EDC director Lew Attardo,
board chairman Dana English
and Richard Nicholson, Nancy
Craft, Jama Abbott, Cindy
Price, Lavon Cobb and Jeral-
dine Crews were at the fund-
raiser held at Wauchula State
Bank.


Most of the ads this week
focused on Christmas or the
wet-dry issue. Most of the
major churches in town op-


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee girls weightlifting got
under way on Tuesday with a
home meet against Avon Park.
Coach Jan Brutus has only
two returnees from last year's
squad, losing five to graduation
or transfer. Senior Lacie Carl-
ton and junior Ashley Hodges
will anchor this year's squad.
Other lifters are juniors
Jessica Hunt and Korin Roehm,
and freshmen Rachel Burton,
Briana Gardner, Megan Hart-
man, Angela tIeuckeroth, Sa-
vannah Miller, Erica Roberts,
Rachel Roberts, Kaitlyn Shaw
and McKenzie Staton.
Brutus intends to schedule


posed permitting sale of alcohol
within the county. On June, 17,
1947, the vote was 1,546 dry,
1,316 wet. On March 8, 1977, it
was 2,354 dry and 1,550 wet.


another December meet, before
resting the girls during the holi-
day break. Meets resume on
Jan. 6 with a trip to Sebring.
Hardee continues in Class
IA-Section 8, which includes
Avon Park, Bradenton Bay-
shore, Sarasota Booker, Braden
River, Punta Gorda-Charlotte,
DeSotb, LaBelle, Lake Placid,
Bradenton-Lakewood Ranch,
Englewood Lemon Bay, Man-
atee, North Port, Port Charlotte,
Sarasato Riverview, Sebring,
Bradenton Southeast and
Venice along with Hardee.
This season's sectional meet,
state qualifier, is at Port
Charlotte on Jan. 26, beginning
at 9 a.m.


Girls Weightlifting
Dec. 7 Avon Park HOME 5 p.m.
Jan. 4 Lake Placid HOME 5 p.m.
Jan. 6 Sebring Away 5 p.m.
Jan. 8 Lake Placid Away 10 a.m.
Jan. 15 Subsectional Away 9 a.m.
Jan. 20 Travis Todd Away 4:30 p.m.
Jan. 26 Sectionals Away 9 a.m.



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate



Domino's Pizza of auchula
3RD WEEK OF THE MONTH SPECIAL
$5 LARGE 1 TOPPING
Mon. 12/13 Sun. 12/19
Call in advance to place your
carryout order and they'll be
fresh when you arrive!
773-0486
*Carryout only. Deep dish $1 extra. Extra toppings $1.19 each.
0


*
4'


And she was




worried Santa




might not show


Weightlifting

Girls Set 7 Meets


#1487 773-3820
117 King Rd. Wauchula


NEW YEAR'S EVE

FRIDAY DECEMBER 31


8pm-?


CARL "ELVIS"

with his entire Elvis Show

TICKETS

15 ~ SINGLE *25 COUPLE
Purchase tickets from Carl or
at Moose Lodge Bar

w S A i4


Ir


L, ~~ ~~~~p~BPcr*







December 9, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5D


-e 0 TheAWe


Dottie is a Cur Mix.
She is a medium sized young adult with a short white
and black coat and a long tail. Dottie is young and
playful and would make a great children's pet.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 252010CP000087
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY LEE CHANCE,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVIN(
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that a
Order of summary Administratio
has been entered in the estate c
HENRY LEE CHANCE
deceased, File Numbe
252010CP00087, by the Circu
Court for Hardee County, Florida
Probate Division, the address c
which is 417 W. Main Street
Wauchula, Florida 33873; that the
decedent's date of death was
October 27, 2010; that the tots
values of the estate is $48,987.0(
and that the names and address:
of those to whom it has beei
assigned by such order are:
Name
LAURA LEE JOHNSON, Guardiai
of person and property of JUNI
B.CHANCEY

2014 Poddes
2014 Popash Road


Wauchula, FL 33873
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the
decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than
those for whom provision for full
payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 of
G the FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
T ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
n NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
n OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERI-
of OD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
', YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
er DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
it BARRED.
i, The first publication of this
if Notice is December 9, 2010.
t,
e Person Giving Notice:
s LAURA LEE JOHNSON,
al Guardian of person and
0, property of JUNE B.
s CHANCE


Attorney for Person Giving
Notice:
VAL R. PATARINI, ESQ
Florida Bar No.: 0061618
216 Lake Drive Blvd.
Sebring, FL 33875
(863) 385-5821
12:9,16c


n


n
E


P' l
'u


"SOLDIER"

Lonely soldier of the day,
Fighting hard for a better way,
To protect and serve,
is their main call,
When in doubt they give their all.


So walk proud and stay free,
They has fought for you and me.
We owe them more,
than we can ever pay.'
For Our Freedom of Today.


The bravest men and woman we will ever know,
Into battle they must go.
Some have died to keep us free,
Their mom they will no longer see.
They did it all for you and me.


They deserve our love,
and so much more,
One day Heaven will open its door.
Our master will look upon them and say,
You gave your all, step right this way.


They belong among the very best,
For they have surely passed the test.
We owe them more than,
We can ever repay,
For what they did in just one day.


Kelly Jackson
Wauchula

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.





Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Letter To The Editor

Habitat For Humanity

Needs Money, Volunteers


Dear Editor:
During this Christmas time
we wish you a very merry
Christmas and hope you have a
comfortable home in which to
enjoy this special season of the
year.
Habitat for Humanity of
Hardee County, Inc. has built 9
new homes and sheltered 13
adults and 26 children in the
past 10 years. Thanks to people
like you these families are now
in their own safe and affordable
housing to celebrate this.glori-
ous.season.
These families are also con-
tributing to the growth of the
county by paying property
taxes. The children are in a safe
and comfortable home that al-
lows them to have a place to do
their homework in a less stres-
sed environment.
But these are just a fraction of
the many people in Hardee
County who need a home of
their own that is safe and
affordable. We need help to get
these houses built financially
and physically. Families are
contacting Habitat for a home,
but our organization is limited
because currently we are limit-
ed by the numbers of dollars
available and number of volun-
teers.
We are a Christian organiza-
tion led to eliminate substan-
dard housing. We do not dis-
criminate against race, religion
or age.
Homeowners must pay back
a mortgage that is interest free
and it goes back into Habitat for
building more houses. Home-
owners must put in "sweat equi-
ty" (physically work on a


house) before they can purchase
one. The sweat equity is 200
hours per person 18 years old
and above in the family.
We are in need of volun-
teers-especially to help with
the construction, our office in
Bowling Green, procurement of
supplies, and public relations.
Contact us at hardeehabitat
@hotmail.com or call 375-2160
and leave a message.
We are planning a fundraiser
for February 19, 2011. The
Harlem Ambassadors basket-
ball team will be playing in the
high school gym against a team
from Hardee County. The
Harlem Ambassadors are like
the Harlem Globetrotters except
they have a Christian message
to share with us. Please plan to
buy tickets for this worthy
cause as they will be going on
sale in the very near future and
they will not last very long.
Please send donations to
Habitat for Humanity of Hardee
Co., 502 E. Main St., Bowling
Green, Fl 33834.
Maybe your business, church
or civic group would like to
work on one of our houses.
Call our office at 375-2160 and
leave a message as we do not
have an office person. Or you
can call me Pam Warren at 735-
0645.
Remember your donations
are tax-deductable as we are a
501 (C) 3 non-profit corpora-
tion.
Please help us help provide a
hand up not a hand out.

Sincerely ,
Pam Warren
Habitat Board President


HENDERSON ANIMAL CARE
1001 E. Main St., Wauchula
'. c (863) 773-4047

CHRISTMAS SPECIAL

0n 6 BATHiNiG W/MAIi
By "Appointment Only" Starting December 20-24, 2010

Bring this Ul_ to redeem socl2:9,16
I o


Responsible Farming

Nourished Soil

Sunlight


.1


r%9







6D The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


GILLIARD
FILL DIRT INC.
Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning
Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 cI:2m Mobile: (941) 456-6507

PUBLIC WORKS
MAINTENANCE WORKER
The City of Bowling Green Public Works Department is
seeking a full-time Maintenance Worker. Position salary
range: $7.50 to $8.00 per hour. Must be in good physical
health and capable of manual labor, lifting, walking, and
operation of certain equipment. Must possess a valid
Florida driver's license. Requires high school diploma or
GED. Job description and application form are available at
city hall, 104 E. Main St., Bowling Green. EOE. Position
Open until filled. Initial review December 13, 2010. 12:9



THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through December 31s"
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)
Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
: Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider c112:2-


F Hardee

Car Company

Christmas Party
Thursday. December 23
3:00 p.m.
SThe lot ac3iro from Fir stNational Banki
All Customers Welcome
3 Weeks Left to Make Eulra Palments
More Pa. ments More Tickets for Drawing


Monday Thursday
10 amr to 7 pm



Mails
Wauchula

S773-6667


Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7:30 pm



Ruby
Wauchula Hills
Billy Hill coiner of
Owner Hwy 17
and REA Rd
773-2011
,l 2 9 2 3 .


NOW PAYING CASH for fruit.
Barajas Fruit, Inc. 863-773-0345,
863-781-9318. 12:16;1:6p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, Injectors, can
remove and Install. 863-381-0538.
9:16-12:23p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


FRIGIDAIRE S/S water, ice on
door, white. $250 OBO. 863-448-
6161. 12:9p
AMANA WASHER & DRYER.
Seldom used, commercial size
both for $300. 863-735-0495.
12:9p


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
1995 Saturn S Series, 4D, Silver
VIN# 1G8ZK5278SZ107413
10:30 A.M., Dec. 23, 2010
HILL'S TOWING, INC.
4205 US HWY 17 N.
BOWLING GREEN, FL 33834


2004 RANGER EXT. CAB $5,500
cash OBO. 781-1062. 12:9c
2005 FORD TAURUS $3,000 cash.
781-1062. 12:9c
2000 WINDSTAR $2.500 cash.
781-1062. 12:9c
98 EXT. CAB DODGE $2,200 cash.
781-1062. 12:16c
2004 BIG DOG, show bike. Many
extras, chameleon paint. This
bike turns heads. $15,000. 375--
2624. 12:9-1:6p
1992 FORD EXPLORER. Runs
good. $500. 863-473-1429. 12:9p-
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
.cars. Pickup available. Crooms
Salvage. 781-3767. 2:7tfc
Talents are best nurtured
in solitude; character is
best formed in the stormy
billows of the world.
-Goethe

DESOTO COUNTY




EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 S
___________________________


Now OPEN FOR F4LL & WINTER
(Bring all your yard sale items)







Complete Tree Removal.e Land Clearing
Bobcat e rvicos

*FREE ESTIMATES* i

(863) 781-2089 insu
Uonand Insuraed


HELP WANTED
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS
Full Time $22,36000
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking
applications for full time Telecommunication
Specialists. You must be at least 19 years of age,
have a high school diploma or equivalent, never
been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor,
be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test
and work shifts. Applications may be obtained
and returned by noon Dec. 15, 2010, at the
Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula,
FL. If other arrangements are necessary,, call
863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE c112:2,9c


FORMER OWNER TIGER WOODS
PGA golfer, 1998 20.5 ft. Nitro
Fish N Ski Boat. New carpet,
upholstery and button down
Sunbrella cover. New boards and
carpet on trailer. Needs engine
work on 150hp Mercury. Asking
$6,000 OBO. Call David 352-250-1
9419. 12:9-16dh


ANTIQUE BED, dresser, church
pew, china cabinet, cedar chest.
832-1909. 12:2p-30p


OFFICE MANAGER-req. include
MS Word, Excel, Customer
Service exp. Supervisory exp.
Free Y Membership. Apply in per-
son to the Hardee County YMCA,
610 W. Orange St., Wauchula
33873 or call 863-773-6445.
EO/AA Employer. 12:9c
PT, 2 HRS./DAY, 5 days/week, pre-
fer couple, consider single, light
commercial janitorial works, 407-
844-7403. 11:25;12:23p


SALE OR RENT-3 BR House. Call
781-1062. 12:9c
3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N.
Hollandtown Road. Make Offer.
863-245-9582. 10:14-5:26p


F1, ANGUS-BRAHMAN cross bull.
3 yrs. old. Has calves on the
ground. $1,500. 832-0547. 12:9p
1999 COMMERCIAL HORSE trail-
e .cal ... ..5- 5B... 1... . ..


er. Call 863-245-9582. 12:
|^if;T^nrI=aT5Tt


;SADDLE FOR SALE-HDR 14"
English Riding saddle. Premium
condition. Asking $400. Call.
David 352-250-9419. 12:9,16dh
REWARD FOR INFORMATION
leading to the return of stolen
Property. 50" Tosheba TV, two 22
rifles & one 270 rifle. 863-245-
6060. 112:9p
50cc GAS SCOOTER with seat,
gas can and container to mix gas
and oil. Used very little. $250 firm.
735-1067. 12:9p


ROBBY & SH JERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR SERVICES. E SOLUTIONS





(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
robbie @strato.net



Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPAiOL











SNew Tires Include
F ree Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!

Semi & Trailer Tires

BIG SALE ON
R LL TIRES. IR

S773-0777 773-0727 .- "
|IE VISA (across from Billy Ayers
S Wal-Mart) Tire Technician 1
'cl12:9c,


' ..... ..
me- 0 ] D











I N C., R E A IL T 0 R S -:



hvi~tes ouil to stop by to help lls .





-: central Floridas real estate needs. -
,-






















Q f A a :




1"^'. Cf cl12:9,16c -
WAD 4w


No-A


IFurnitur


'


4


--j

















The


Decemifei" 9,2010, The Herald-Advocate 7D






Classifieds


I R e -a E s a- I


Lightly used Kirby vacuum, -1/4 ACRE APPROVED MOBILE
Heritage model. Includes all Home lot, 1341 Morgan Grice Rd.,
attachments. Excellent condition. Village of Charlie Creek off SR64.
$500. 863-448-7397. 12:9dh Water hook up, ready for your sin-
gle or double wide. $11,500 by
owner. 863-899-1714. 12:9tfc


FREE TO GOOD HOME, male and
female cats with fluffy tail.
Beautifully marked. 375-2440.
12:9nc
AFRICAN GREY PARROTS. For
details call 735-2472. 12:9;1:6p
FREE CHIHUAHUA needed for a
mentally challenged young lady
who lost her pet. 773-6414.
12:9dh
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


NICE FURNISHED EFFICIENCY
apartment, utilities included. $125
per week, damage deposit and
references required. 773-9793 or
863-832-0676. 12:9p
MH 3 BR/2BA Wauchula, good
neighborhood, no smoking, no
pets. $600 month, $500 deposit.
781-3570. 12:9,16c
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT $500
plus $400 deposit. No pets. 832-'
1984. 12:9;1:6p
1B/1B STUDIO APT. $450 month-
ly, $450 deposit. Very nice, quiet
neighborhood, close to down-
town Wauchula. References and
background check a must. Please
call 863-781-3296. 12:2,9p
THREE BEDROOM .HOUSE,
Wauchula. No pets. $800 plus
deposit 832-1984. 12:2-30p
NICE ONE BEDROOM duplex
apartment with a washer and
dryer. $110 per week, damage
deposit and references required.
773-9793 or 863-832-0676. 12:9p


FloresI&I Flores,1 Inc


U 4 I SAYS LOOK AN TMAOFFER
Perfect home for a growing family 3BR 2BA with two car
garage, family living room, dinning room and large game
room with door exiting pool area. 3,300+- under roof 2,600+-
heated. Large corner lot. Price Reduced to $129,000.00
Great starter home 3BR 1.5BA CB home close to Catholic
Church Excellent neighborhood central air and heat carport.
Reduced to $79,000.00
3BR 1.5BA CB home in Wauchula Good condition central air
& heat carport high dry lot. $79;000.00
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
A f t e r H o u r s ...* :. .
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
cl12:9c


Rnal


--OWNHOUSES, immaculate con-- APTS. &
edition, 1400 sq. ft. 2 BR, 2 1/2 B, 773-6667.
$650 month. 773-2122. 11:11tfc


1 BEDROOM 1 BATH very clean,
referencesno smoking, no pets.
$500, $550 security. 863-773-
9291. 10:28tfc


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo-up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol (863) 698-4910
or 698-4908. 8:20tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


HOUSES FOR RENT.
12:9p


NEED HELP WITH honey do list?
Experienced helper, good refer-
ences. Christmas lights, carpen-
try, yard work. 863-245-1191.
12:2-30p


FT. GREEN GRASS CHOPPERS.
Licensed/Insured. Mowing, weed-
eating, edging, pressure washing.
Locally Owned. Randall Davis
863-773-4246, 863-781-0902 or-
863-781-0900. 11:11;12:9p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more Info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
Sthe Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitatory.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc


DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


F I


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg.# -40625
"No job's too big."


S 4.u~I* -


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager Carl Kelly ASE Certified Mechanic


muThe dUa.

Hera!qnld-AdvocIa te;
Hade oni ] imcow ovrg


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
wwvw. imseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


CHECK OUT THIS PRICE! Great 5 acre tract
fenced and ready to build on! $35,000
Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $108,000!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
POOL Home! 3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath home.
Double French doors open up to the huge porch
and pool area. $178,900.
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood. Won't
last long at $220,000!
Nice lot in Torrey community with frontage on
Hole Number 6 of Torcey Oaks Golf Course. Lot
$14,900 Owner will build to suit for just
$159,900!
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $229,000


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


-- I


Jim See


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


cR
c112:9c


I


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489--
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
Small ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


NEED 3-WHEEL ADULT BIKE at a
"very" reasonable price. 773-
6226. 12:9dh
FREE CHIHUAHUA needed for a
mentally challenged young lady
who lost her pet. 773-6414.
12:9dh
LOOKING FOR AGRICULTURE
acreage. 786-399-5820. 12:2-30p



EVERY MONDAY-SATURDAY.
Generator, new refrigerator,
Polaris 4-wheeler, marble tables,
etc. 1104 N. Hollandtown Rd.
11:18-12:30p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, Moving sale.
Household, clothes, misc. 5205
Dixianna, Bowling Green. 12:9p
SATURDAY, MULTI-FAMILY. 316
East Orange St. Something for
everyone. 12:9p
SATURDAY 8am till ? 1002 Florida
Ave., Wauchula. 12:9p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? 814 North
9th Ave. Clothes, toys, misc.
12:9p


HUGE MULTI-FAMILY. D3 Barn,
Hwy 64. Friday, Saturday, 8-?
Baby items, clothes for all ages,
household items, tons of misc.
12:9p


SAiTURDAY 8AM ? 705 Hwy. 17:
S., Wauchula across from Smith'
Automotive. Toys, clothes, baby.
'stuff, lots more. 12:9p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? 3440 SR
64 East, Zolfo. Furniture, clothes,
,shelves, misc. 12:9p


I W. B. Olliff, Jr.,


'C

Ni


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


f cl.os-


FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? 446
Metheny Rd. Toys, misc. 12:9p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-2. 2215
Ralph Smith Road, Wauchula.
12:9p
FRIDAY ONLY. Community yard
sale. 401 Orange Place,
Wauchula.


SATURDAY, 7-2, 2997 George
SAnderson Road, Wauchula.'
Children's clothing, toys, hquse-
hold items, adult clothing. Lots of
other stuff. 12:9p


Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478


Free Estimates


insure dj 3L ,..years experience
Li ":tf


Yard SaIe


HANNAH HELPERS
Supports Hannah House
DECEMBER 8TH -17TH
9:00am-5:00pm

111 N. 7th Ave Wauchula


702 SOUTH 6"h AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www. cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 245-1054


PRICED AT ONLY $71.500!!! Beautiful 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home in Indian Lake
Estates near Lake Walk In The Water, has
Barrell tile roof, open kitchen and screened
back porch, central heat/air, two care
garage. Golfing, boating, fishing near by.
NEW LISTINGI!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home
with extra lot, walking distance to school,
and town. House in good condition-owner
ready to negotiate. GREAT LOCATION-Only
$121.500
REDUCED!!! $82.500 INCLUDING EXTRA
LOTQII 2B/2B home with central heat/air, one
car garage, appliances, work-shop and stor-
age area, all in quiet neighborhood and
close to shopping and schools.
NEW LISTING!! 3 B/2 Bth CB home with cen-
tral heat/air, stove, refrigerator, vaulted ceil-
ings, two .car garage, tile/carpet flooring,
close to schools and various other activities.
Priced (@ $159.900
REDUCEDI! $92.900!! 3Bdr/2Bth Mobile
Home with 5 acres between Wauchula and
Avon Park.
THE PRICE IS RIGHT!! Don't need to guess!
Only $34.900 for this 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home with double lot, Call today for an
appointment!!


Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LISTINGSI! Very nice 2 B/1 Bath home
with Large lot in quiet neighborhood within
city limits. Recently remodeled and painted.
Call today for more information. Only
$78.900
NEW LISTINGSII! Charming Historic home
with loft and studio apartment on 1 acre in
City limits. $69.900
20/20 INVESTMENT VISION!! Frontage on
US Hwy 17 North and North Florida Ave.
Access from both highways. Across from
Winn Dixie. Call for more information today.
Only $350.000.
$72.500 2 Bedroom/1 Bath home sits on 2.4
acres located between Wauchula and Avon
Park. Central heat and air, private well, utility
shed, shingle roof, hardwood flooring.
$119,90011 3 Bedroom/2 Bath CB home with
central heat and air located within City of
Wauchula and close to shopping, parks, and
schools. Call today for more information.
GREAT INVESTMENT! 3/2 CB home with
central H/A, one car garage, total sq. ft.
1,728, Sun and Lakes of Sebring, close to
malls, shopping and medical care.
REDUCED!! $42.750.
GO TO: HomePath.com For More
Fannie Mae Properties.


Rentals
^**^Q^^--


SStore Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


1


I.


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental rates beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way eBowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
O Monday Friday *
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon c
oEQUAL HOUSNG Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider c12:2-30c
OPPOR TUNITY______________ ____________C1l : 0 ^


45 ac citrus grove. Valencias & Hamlin. Double
wide mobile home. Fruit proceeds included (sub-
ject to FOM contract). Located in NE Hardee
County. $427,500

PRICE REDUCED! Beautiful home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. Was
$475,000.....Now $379,000!

1/2 acre Commercial business lot in Wauchula. 6'
security fence & gates. Office & storage shed. All
utilities ready for your business. $92,500.

Lake 'June House! 4 Bedroom, 4 1/2 Bath with
over 200 feet on Lake June. Includes Jacuzzi,
Sauna, Dock & Boathouse. $780,000

4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000


I Z Ben Gibson
1 Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


FRIDAY, SATURDAY. 450 Boyd
Cowart Rd. Adult and girls
clothes, misc items. 12:9p
AVON INVENTORY clearance.
New and items no longer avail-
able. Discounted prices. Scents,
lotions, personal items, jewelry,
etc. Some non-Avon stuff. Friday.
and Saturday, 8am ? 608
Kentucky St., Wauchula. 12:9p'
SATURDAY 8-12. Kitchen, home,
clothes, baby items. 220
Pennsylvania Ave. 12:9p
SATURDAY, MULTI-FAMILY. 7471
Popash Rd. Something for evety-i
one. 12:9p
SATURDAY 8 till 11. Various
items. East Main to Boyd Cowart
to Edge Dr. 12:9p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-2. 1745 N.
Florida Ave. Furniture, new
Christmas items, misc. 12:9p
SATURDAY 312 S. 11th Ave.,i
Wauchula. New and name brand
baby clothes, Graco Travel
System, Ped Pergo Stroller, cra-
die swing and bouncy, Daylan
Carpet rugs, lamps and lots of
misc. 12:9j
DECEMBER 8TH 17TH. 9am-
5pm. Hannah's Helpers, 111'
North 7th Ave., Wauchula.
Recliner, rocking chair, shelving,.
: doors, bag of women's clothes $3
each and many misc. items.,
Drawing on December 17th 5pm
for a decorated Christmas tree.
12:9p


m


L


-i1


- ,I


8Mon-


1I.1


c112:9 I


I


Wl








8D The Herald-Advocate, December 9, 2010





-The


Classifieds


Space isn't remote at all.
--It's only an hour's drive
away if your car could go-
straight upwards.
-Fred Hoyle


2 Salespeople
Needed
To sell the BEST
cars! Successful
candidates have
exc. people skills,
great work habits
& the desire to
succeed.

Fantastic income
potential.
Training pay,
salary + comm.,
benefits & spiffs!

Apply in person to:

0LMrNJY
FORD
1031 U.S. HWY 17 N.
WAUCHULA
OR



CHEVY/CHRYSLER
DODGE/JEEP
1405 U.S. HWY 17 S.
WAUCHULA

Come Ready to
Interview with
Kevin Hanchey!
cl 0:28tfc


Reopening Lakes


Teem With Fish


Portions of the Mosaic Fish
Management Area in southern
Polk County will reopen to pub-
lic fishing on Friday.
The 1,000-acre fish manage-
ment area near Fort Meade is
managed through a cooperative
agreement between Mosaic
Fertilizer LLC and the Florida
Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
Lakes Coulter, LP2 East, LP2
West, S8 East and S8 West are
reopening. These lakes have
been closed for more than three
years due to mining-related
public safety issues.
When the lakes reopen, there
likely will be some memorable
fishing trips in store for anglers
looking to catch largemouth
bass, crappie, bluegill and cat-
fish, the FWC predicts. Fish
populations, as well as fishing
success, often improve signifi-



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


cantly when lakes are closed
and then reopened.
The lakes range in size from
20 to 250 acres and have an
angler quota that protects the
fishery from overharvest.
Quotas will be filled on a first-
come, first-served basis.
FWC biologists and Mosaic
staff took advantage of the clo-
sure by improving access roads
and boat ramps, monitoring fish
populations and enhancing fish-
ing opportunities by stocking
channel catfish from state
hatcheries.
The Mosaic Fish Manage-
ment Area has been in existence
for more than 10 years. The
area is open to public fishing
Friday through Mondays, from
6 a.m. until 2 p.m. There is no
cost to fish, but anglers must
check in and out with Mosaic
security staff.







THURSDAY. DEC. 9
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.
MONDAY. DEC. 13
VWauchula City Com-
mission, regular meeting,
City Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY. DEC. 14
VBowling Green City
Commission, regular meet-
ing, City Hall, 104 E. Main
St., Bowling Green, 6:30
p.m.





Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot a
863-382-0600


L A M B E R T Bus. (863) 773-0007
REALTY INC. Fax: (863) 773-0038
4 S2 S .uh.t.,h Anu www.lambertrealty.net


Wauchula, FL 33873
3B/2Bth M/H, built in 2005, located on 16.5
acres, 4 2 inch wells, 1 4 inch well; beautiful
property surrounded by large oaks. $195,000
PRICE REDUCTION! CB/Stucco, 3B/2Bth
home built in 2004, tile and carpet floors, large
bedrooms, utility and eat-in kitchen. $115,000
MAKE REASONABLE OFFER! Updated
3B/2Bth home within walking to schools, med-
ical facilities, extra storage, wheel chair accessi-
ble. $155,000
Call for details on several 5 ACRE TRACTS
priced from $45,000 to $85,000


Charlotte Terrell I
PLENTY OF SPACE in this 4B/3BTH,
CB/Stucco home; large kitchen, living room
with w/b fireplace, double garage, spacious yard
for outside entertaining. $165,000
5 Acres with large oaks and cleared field;
secluded. $40,000
Make an offer on this updated C/B home,
3B/1.5Bth, almost new A/C and roof. List Price
$115,000
Brick home on corner lot, 3B/2Bth, and all
appliances, well maintained and located in
desirable area. $160,000


SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON E
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker III
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


If all the pre-cut vegetables
and fruits in the grocery store
and news stories about the
importance of produce for
health has led you to believe
that you re the only one not eat-
ing many vegetables and fruits,
relax. Once again, a study
shows that most Americans
aren't even though relatively
minor changes in increasing
fruits and vegetable consump-
tion could pay off big in good
health.
The latest study suggesting
we re still more talk than action
when it comes to eating fruits
and vegetables compares find-
ings over the last 20 years from
NHANES, a large federal diet
and health survey. Nutrition
experts urged us to aim higher
when results from the 1988 to
1994 NHANES showed that
among Americans ages 40 to
74, only 42 percent met the
minimum recommendation of
at least five servings of vegeta-
bles and fruits daily. Instead of
increasing, the 2001 to 2006
NHANES showed that 26 per-
cent of adults this age met the
minimum.
The findings of other dietary
surveys may not seem quite as
grim but show the same overall
result. When state health de-
partments surveyed over a mil-
lion respondents by telephone
they found essentially no
change over the last 15 years in
the proportion of adults aged 18
and older who met the 5-a-day
minimum: 24.6 percent in 1994
and 25.0 percent in 2005. This
survey gives a somewhat
incomplete picture of produce
consumption, however, since it
asked people how often they ate
vegetables and fruit without any


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

DPSCOV\/RA Nl: WN WoiL)n


indication of portion size.
Someone who ate two cups of
vegetables at dinner would be
listed as consuming the same
amount as someone who ate a
few forkfuls.
The telephone survey sug-
gests that where vegetable con-
sumption decreased, it was
often due to a drop in potato
consumption. Are people only
hearing half the messages about
vegetable and fruit consump-
tion? Perhaps people responded
to low-carb messages about
over-reliance on potatoes, but
forgot the message to swap for
other vegetables.
Likewise, were people who
decreased juice consumption
responding to messages about
its concentrated calories and
sugar, but missing the message
to swap juice beyond one small
glass a day for eating more
solid fruit?
One strategy to increase veg-
etable and fruit consumption is
to start with times you already
eat them, increasing their por-
tion size and cutting back on
other foods. For example, the
New American Plate approach
recommended by the American
Institute for Cancer Research
calls for making vegetables,
fruits, whole grains and beans at
least two-thirds of your plate at
each meal.
Research suggests that many
people aren t aware of how
many vegetables and fruits we
need for health. Adults can
lower their cancer risk and
improve health by reaching the
minimum target of at least five
servings (about 2f cups) of
vegetables and fruits daily. But
for optimal overall health and
easier weight control, once you


reach that target, most of us
should aim for 7 to 10 standard
servings (30 to 5 cups).
For others, studies show it
takes more than just knowl-
edge; until people see produce
available and affordable and
know how to serve it in ways
they expect to enjoy, they are
likely to stay stuck. The barriers
are more often a matter of per-
ception. Produce need not be
expensive if you buy what s in
season, and choose plain,
frozen produce when it s less
expensive. And if you reduce
purchases of expensive meat
and convenience foods, that
money can be spent on fruits
and vegetables.
The American Institute for
Cancer Research (AICR) is the
cancer charity that fosters
research on the relationship of
nutrition, physical activity and
weight management to cancer
risk, interprets the scientific lit-
erature and educates the public
about the results. It has con-
tributed more than $95 million
for innovative research con-
ducted at universities, hospitals
and research centers across the
country. AICR has published
two landmark reports that inter-
pret the accumulated research
in the field, and is committed to
a process of continuous review.
AICR also provides a wide
range of educational programs
to help millions of Americans
learn to make dietary changes
for lower cancer risk. Its award-
winning New American Plate
program is presented in
brochures, seminars and on its
website, www.aicr.org. AICR is
a member of the World Cancer
Research Fund International.


The names of a number of places are also eponyms. For example,
Pennsylvania was named after its founder's father, Admiral Sir William
Penn, while Seattle, Wash., was named for Chief Seattle, and the Hudson
River and Hudson Bay are both named for English explorer Henry Hudson.

If you toss a penny in the air, it is actually more likely to land on "tails,'
since the "head" image is heavier, so it tends to end up on the bottom.


PICTUREYOUrSelf A
Tow Caree.


By enrolling in South Florida Community College's
career-focused technical programs, you can earn
a college credit certificate, occupational certificate, or
associate in applied science degree in two years or
less! You can choose from:


* Allied Health programs
* Automotive Services
Technology
* Auto Collision Repair and
Refinishing
* Air Conditioning Repair
* Computer Networking


* Cosmetology
* Culinary Arts
* Drafting ,
* Electrical Distribution
* Electronics
* Law Enforcement Officer
* Office Technology
... AND MORE!


Register Today!

SUMMER CLASSES
START MAY 10
(Or Register Early for Fall Classes)
View the Summer-Fall 2010
Schedule of Classes at
www.southflorida.edu.


South Florda Community College is an equal access/equal opportunity Institution. South Florida ommunty College is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southen Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane,
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4501 for questions about the accreditation of South Florida Community College, 12:9c


More Fruits & Veggies: Talk But No Action
Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN, American Institute for Cancer Research


For more information about SFCC programs, call
453-6661,773-2252,465-5300, or 494-7500.
,...' 'v s .


~-~~.----T-~-~-~--i~~ -




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs