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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula, Fla
Publication Date: November 4, 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Holding Location: University of Florida
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


110th Year, No. 48
4 Sections, 36 Pages


Thursday, November 4, 2010


46
plus 4; sales tax


Platt Prevails, As Do Birge, Johnson, Trevino


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
An incumbent School Board
member barely clung to her seat
by the end of vote tabulations
Tuesday night.
The race between Jan Platt
and Garry McWhorter for


School Board District 4 turned
into the hottest contest of the
night in a county election filled
with close races early on.
Oddly, the Platt/McWhorter
duel was widely separated-
with McWhorter holding 56
percent of the vote to Platt's 44


-when the first four precincts
reported in, but the other three
races were whites-of-their-eyes
close.
Yet those races grew further
apart as results continued to roll
in, while the Platt/McWhorter
gap narrowed. A crowd gath-


ered to hear returns audibly
gasped as the numbers were
read aloud, often showing Platt
and McWhorter just a handful
of votes apart.
In the end, however, Platt
gained the lead and expanded it,.
finally securing 52 percent of


the vote to McWhorter's 48.
She won another term in office.
Also emerging victorious
were Sue Birge for County
Commission District 2, with 53
percent of the vote to Bess
Stallings' 47; Grady Johnson
for County Commission Dis-
trict 4, with 54 percent of totals
to Matt Moye's 46; and Thomas
Trevino for School Board
District 5, with 56 percent to
Jack Webb's 44.
Voter turnout was 44 percent,
Elections Supervisor Jeff Us-
sery said.
"I want to thank everybody
for their support and the confi-
dence they have in me to be
their board member," Platt said
after the battle ended with a
conclusive win. "I thank my
supporters, and I thank my
opponent for a good clean race.
"And I thank God," she
added, "because I put it in His


hands."
.Platt said she is eager to
retake her seat on the School
Board. "I am looking forward to
working with our current mem-
bers and with our new mem-
bers," she said. "I will continue
to assess each thing as it comes
in."
Platt garnered a total 2,584
votes to McWhorter's 2,387.
Each won strong in their home
precincts, and in two precincts
they matched vote totals exact-
ly.
One of those new School
Board members Platt will work
with is Thomas Trevino, who
took 2,778 ballots to Jack
Webb's 2,191. The other is Paul
Samuels, who was unopposed
for the vacant District 1 slot.
For the County Commission
races, Sue Birge scored 2,738 to
Bess Stallings' 2,436 to secure
See ELECTION 3A


Man Murdered


On Halloween

BGPD Arrests 3 Suspects


PHOTO BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Sharon Ussery stands on a chair in the room at the Hardee County Public Library where some citizens and candi-
dates assembled to hear election results as they came In. Here, listeners react to the close contest for School Board
District 4.




Agreement Would Allow Some Mining

Court Must Approve Motion By Mosaic, Environmental Groups


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Mosaic Co. and the three
opposing environmental groups
have reached an agreement
allowing Mosaic to mine rough-
ly 200 acres and send employ-
ees back to work for at least
four months, pending judicial
approval.
The settlement has been sub-
mitted to the U.S. District Court
in Jacksonville in a joint motion
by' Mosaic, the Sierra Club
Florida, ManaSota-88 and 3PR,
and asks for a limited stay of
the preliminary injunction is-
sued on July 30.
The compromise would al-
low Mosaic to mine about 200



WEATHER
ATE 1.HIH LQW H"I
10/27 91 70 0.00
10128 92 67 0.00
10129 84 64 0.00
10/30 87 67 0.00
10/31 88 57 0.00
11/01 87 62 0.00
11102 78 71 0.14
IQTOT Rainfall to 11/02/10- 45.62
Same period last year 38.65
Ten Year Average 52.43
Source: Unv. of FlI. One Reearch Center

INDEX
Classifieds ........ 6B
Community Calendar .9A
Courthouse Report .:. 7C
Crime Blotter ....... 5C
Hardee Living ....... 2B
Information Roundup .12A
Obituaries .......... 4A
School Lunch Menus .10A



11II I ll
7 18122 07290 3


acres while agreeing not to
mine 40 acres includingl4.3
acres of wetlands, which will be
preserved through a conserva-
tion easement.
The court is expected to grant
the stay, and Mosaic spokesman
Russell Schweiss estimated it
will take 30 days for the South
Fort Meade Mine to be back up
and operating after that.
Dennis Mader, president of
People Protecting Peace River,
said the settlement protects bay-
head wetlands and offers pro-
tection to certain hard-working
members of the organization
whose homes border the mine
property.
"It also takes the issue of jobs
off the table while the environ-
mental effects of this phosphate


mine are adjudicated," he wrote
in a released statement.
Richard Mack, Mosaic exec-
utive vice president and general
counsel, said the company
appreciates the willingness of
the environmental groups to
compromise and allow the mine
to continue to operate while the
litigation process continues.
."As we move forward, we
aim to continue a constructive
dialogue with the environmen-
tal community to promote a bet-
ter understanding of our respec-
tive interests," Mack said in a
press release.
All the employees who were
laid off on Sept. 10 are expect-
ed to be called back to work
once the mine reopens,
Schweiss said. Approximately


60 people have been out of
work since the mine was closed,
he said.
The remainder of the mine's
250 or so employees were
moved temporarily to the
Hooker's Prairie Mine or
placed into other jobs until the
mine reopened, according to
Schweiss.
The preliminary injunction
remains in place on Mosaic's
plan to mine more than 7,000
acres of the planned 10,583-
acre extension into Hardee
County.
The U.S. District Court has
yet to rule on a permanent"
injunction against the mine
which was granted approval by
the U.S. Army Corps of
See MINING 2A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 27-year-old man was killed
when his vehicle struck a power
pole in the early morning hours
Wednesday of last week, the
Florida Highway Patrol said.
Ryan Michael Drury, of
Treasure Island,-became the
eighth person to die on Hardee
County roadways so far this
year.
According to reports filed by
Tpr. Jesse L. DeBoom and Cpl.
Larry H. McClellan, investiga-
tion shows the single-vehicle
crash occurred at about 12:30
a.m. on State Road 64 and
Charley Bryan Road.
Drury was driving his 2006
Mitsubishi two-door eastbound
on SR 64 at the time, the FHP
said.
Then, for an unknown reason,
the Mitsubishi veered off the
pavement and onto the south-


side shoulder of the roadway.
From there, it went on to strike
a concrete electrical pole.
Investigators said the vehicle
appeared to have rolled over
before coming to a final rest.
The crash scene was not dis-
covered until daylight hours.
Hardee County Fire-Rescue


personnel pronounced Drury
dead at the scene, the FHP said.
He was not wearing a seat belt.
His body was transported to the
District 10 Medical Examiner's
Office in Lakeland.
Damage to the Mitsubishi
was placed at $10,000, accord-
ing to the FHP report.


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
An as yet unidentified man
was beaten to death in a Hallo-
ween homicide in Bowling
Green.
And less than 24 hours later,
the Bowling Green Police De-
partment had three suspects in
custody.
Charged with second-degree
murder are Fredi Ramirez
Morales, 24, Orlando Morgan-
DeLeon, 19, and Fernando
Vazquez, 29, all roommates at
4637 Church Ave. in Bowling
Green.
All are being held without
bond in the Hardee County Jail.
City police Capt. Brett
Dowden said the victim was
one of two men allegedly beat-
en by the trio sometime around
9:30 p.m. on Sunday. The first
man successfully fled from his
attackers, and suffered only
minor.injuries, he said.
But the unidentified man did
not.
Dowden said the man, about
30 years of age, was beaten
with a "blunt instrument," caus-
ing multiple injuries and upper
body trauma. He apparently
was killed in the parking lot of
the Parker Farms office at 204
E. Main St.
"His body was dragged off
the parking lot and into a
grassy, overgrown area by a
small tree," Dowden described.
He said the body "was not read-
ily visible," and was not discov-
ered until the next morning,
when an office worker saw it
shortly before 9 o'clock on
Monday.
The captain noted the victim
was a Hispanic male, a migrant
worker newly arrived in the
city, hence the uncertainty sur-
rounding his identity. Dowden
said police are checking three
or four possible names for the
man.
According to Dowden, the
five men-three suspects and
two alleged victims-shared
the Church Avenue home with
six or seven other men. Some-
time Halloween night, the five
began arguing, he said.
"It was petty bickering," said
Dowden. "There was evidence
at the scene to suggest alcohol
may have played a contributing
factor."
Police were called that night
in regard to a disturbance at the
house, and arrested two of the
suspects for battery in the


alleged attack on the surviving
victim. It was that man who told
police of the second victim,
who had fled as well but was
now missing.
Also not found that night was
the third suspect, Dowden
noted.
After the second victim's
body was discovered Monday
morning, Bowling Green police
called for mutual aid from the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
and the Polk County Sheriff's
Office, he said.
"Everybody worked together
in an absolutely outstanding
display of cooperation and
teamwork," Dowden said. "It
See MURDER 2A
1 .'


Morales


Morgan-DeLeon


vazquez


It's The Oldest


Rivalry In State!
... Story 1B


DAYLIGHT-SAVING

TIME ENDS SUNDAY
Set Clocks Back
1 Hour At 2 a.m.


Teen Makes

China Trip

... Story 4D


Driver Dies In SR 64 Crash


To Our Readers:
We experienced a severe equipment failure on Oct.
20 which has compromised our ability to print the quality
of newspaper which you are accustomed to receiving,
most evident to you in some of the photographs on our
pages.
We have been making non-stop repairs since that
date and are currently in the process of securing replace-
ment equipment.
We thank you for your patience as we work to resolve
this issue.


_I


I - a








2A The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage :
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor a ORoS



115 S. Seventh Ave. 'jot
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE.SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida. by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office. Wauchula. FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), 'Postmaster." send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


f DEADLINES:
Schools -Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 pm
General News Monday 5pm
Ads Tuesday noon


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on mailers of public
interest Leters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community manners are welcome Subnussions should be
typed. double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines All items are sub-
ject toediting
SJ


COURTHOUSE CHILI COOK-OFF


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Employees of the courthouse and local law firms gathered for the seventh annual chill cook-off Oct. 22 In the third
floor courtroom of the Hardee County Courthouse. County Judge Jeff McKibben presided over the contest to assure
fairness to all contestants. After the awards were handed out, everyone enjoyed tasting the nine different versions
of chill, along with hotdogs and homemade deserts. Winning first place and representing the Clerk of Court's
accounting and recording division are (from left) Vickie Rogers, Patricia Wilson, Sandra Holt, and Chris Price.
Claiming second place was Cliff Ables PA., represented by Rhonda Pattillo and Ables. Third place went to the Clerk
of Court's eastside department represented by Crystal Rogers, Carla O'Bryan, Connie Coker, Colleen Timmons and
Edwina Murphy. Winners were giving a plaque which will be proudly displayed in their offices until next year.


MINING
Continued From 1A


[ Kelly's Column



On Oct. 23 Auburn defeated LSU 24-17 in Auburn, Ala., as
Fort Meade's Onterio McCalebb ran 70 yards for the winning
touchdown. Quarterback Cam Newton, formerly of UF, ran for 217
yards and two TDs.
Bill Crews and his wife Jeraldine went to the game with their
daughter Dena Aloian of Tampa and her son Grey,, 14. Bill flew
them in his light twin-engine Beech Baron. Jeraldine and Dena are
graduates of Auburn, and Dena was a band drum majorette there
four years, including head majorette her senior year.

Toye English of Wauchula is 89 and plays golf every morning
at daylight at Torrey Oaks Golf Course. He is retired from the local
Chevrolet business. His usual partner is Wauchula Police Capt.
Thomas Harris.

A local mother and grandmother recently wrote this message
for the paper:
"If we had things to do in Hardee County there would be less
kids out on the streets buying and selling drugs and in and out of
jail. You know or hear of a juvenile in trouble, in jail and some are
trying to steal to keep going or even dead out there somewhere.'
"Some parents fear to let their child out of the house in fear to
never see them again. It hurts to see your child brought in front of
you with chains on hands and feet. You just want to take them in
your arms and comfort them and say it will be OK. Then next they
are being punished as an adult, depending on what they did."
"What this is coming to ... Hardee County not only needs
more jobs for those who have been in trouble and done their time
plus entertainment for our children now."
"I am sure someone out there can come up with ideas for enter-
tainment for our kids so we don't have to travel so far out of town."
"You know once a person has been locked away from their
family so long, did their crime and paid their price ... there are
people out there who want to punish them more by not allowing
them to work and inspire themselves. Why?"

The Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday conducted a straw
poll on the election with these results: Amendment 4 failed by 26-
0; Rick Scott defeated Alex Sink for governor 17-9; U.S. Rep. Vern
Buchanan won over James Golden 26-1; Adam Putnam won 27-0
for commissioner of agriculture; and Rubio won the U.S. Senate
race with 22 votes, Charlie Crist 3, and Meek 2.

Asked how she is, Bowling Green Postmaster Dee Williams-
Tatis usually responds, 'Blessed and thankful." The late Hardee
Tax Collector Curtis Ezelle would say "On top of the world."
Former First Baptist pastor Herschel Creasman would say "Super!"

A Rotary Club visiting member said last week children need to
learn these two things as part of growing up to be successful-the
meaning of the word "no" and learning how to work.
Henry Lee.Chancey of Wauchula passed away Oct. 27 of heart
disease at age 76. For years he and his wife June and Ty and Margie
Chapman were pillars of Florida's First Assembly of God Church.
A large crowd attended his funeral Sunday at the church, pas-
tored by Rev. Bob LeCocq. Chancey owned radiator shops in
Wauchula and Avon Park. Former pastors attending were Rev.
Spencer Decker and Rev. Barry Taylor.
Kevin Brown, a nephew, read a poem he wrote about Henry
and his love of snook fishing. Brown said he was a man of few
words, loved by everyone, had a sense of happiness, appreciated
the outdoors, enjoyed the moment, and loved dogs, quail hunting
and fishing.
Angel Cousens, a niece from Lakeland, said Henry loved to
fish and take people with him, was spiritual, and was dedicated to
family and friends. Many people in attendance had fished with him.
Bob LeCocq said Henry often said "I am a righteous man," not
in a boastful way but meaning having a right relationship with God.

Ella Hanchey, 90, of.Wauchula passed away Saturday from
cancer.
At her funeral Tuesday pastor emeritus Rev. Ken Smith of
.Wauchula First Baptist Church said she loved to have buttermilk
and'cornbread with him and' have him read her the 23rd Psalm.
Ella was known for wearing a red dress and red lipstick. She
has two sons Jimmy and Bobby. She was a good cook and loved to
bake.a cake adld was opinionated.
She was married to farm and grove owner Oscar Hanchey,
who passed away in 1.996 at age 92. Oscar's first wife had died, and
tmey had a daughter, Arlayne Pritchard who lives in St. Petersburg.
-Ella's niece Tammy Pitts Rawling of Hastings, Minn., a 1980
graduate of Hardee High School, read the following statement at
Tuesday's funeral service:
"Today I wear red in honor of Aunt Ella. She was never quite
ready to face the world 'til she had on her red lipstick and often red
shoes, too. When I got to the nursing home in August when I came
to visit, she was waiting.for me ready to go to supper with her lip-
stick in place."
"When I was growing up, Aunt Ella was always around
whether it was her coming to our house or to Aunt Dora's house or
us going to hers-usually for cake and coffee. When I asked my
son, Skyler, what he remembered first about Aunt Ella, it was that


Engineers on June 14.
On July 1, a federal judge
ordered a 28-day restraining
order against the mine on the
grounds the Corps did not fully
assess the environmental im-
pacts of Wetlands and tributar-
ies to Peace River.
The injunction was extended
until the Corps can review the
mine plan and determine if
there are any less environmen-
tally damaging alternatives.
The Corps will soon begin
work on conducting an area-


wide Environmental Impact
Statement that 'will assess the
past, present and future effects
of phosphate mining within the
Central Florida Phosphate
District, or "Bone Valley,"
region.
The Bone Valley region com-
prises 1.32 million acres, or
2,100 square miles, in Hardee,
Hillsborough, Manatee, Polk,
DeSoto and part of Sarasota
County.
Mining has occurred in the
region for more than 100 years.


there was always cake when we went to her house, and he's right.
There was always food whether it was cake or having everybody
out for a fish fry complete with grits and hush puppies. The house
would be full of family and us kids usually ended up on the front
porch swing with Uncle Oscar smoking acigar while Aunt Ella and
the sisters talked inside."
"I'll miss talking to Aunt Ella on the phone. Yaknow, she did
like to talk. It was her who called us early1-'ne moving in '76 to
tell us to look outside at the snow coming down. She called me sev-
eral times when I was still in school to tell me to be careful that day
because she'd had a bad dream and was worried about me. And for
the past several years she kept me up-to-date with the happenings
here in town. I don't think I'll ever find a source of information like
that again."
"Aunt Ella knew how to have fun. My favorite picture of her
was taken at our house before Daddy died. She had a big wad of
gum and had just blown a huge bubble. When Skyler was just about
3, she taught him how to play Chinese checkers and the two of
them would sit and play game after game, her letting him win most
of the time. She even surprised herself sometime like the time she
decided to fly up to Minnesota all by herself. Momma had come to
visit for a couple of weeks and I think Aunt Ella just flat-out missed
her, so she called and we got it all arranged and she made it up just
fine. We went sight-seeing and even went to the Mall of America.
I know Momma was happy to have her company on the way
home."
"Aunt Ella was never one to let somebody tell her what she
could and couldn't do--she might have been a little bit opinionat-
ed. It seems to have served her well, though. When a doctor had the
nerve to tell her about a year ago that she wouldn't live to see
Christmas, she told him right quick that he wasn't God and that he
didn't know what he was talking about. She was right, too. She
lived a pretty good life for the past year."
Aunt Ella could be a handful, but she was always there for me,
happy to talk and to listen. When Momma got tired of me talking
too much when I was little (which was frequently), she always told
me, you take after your Aunt Ella! And you know what? Maybe
that's how I want to be-just like Aunt Ella, opinionated, outspo-
ken, independent, always ready to go out to eat or to spend time
with family and friends, and maybe above all-being willing and
ready to wear red."


Oscar and Ella Hanchey (in 1977 photo) raised two sons, Jimmy
and Bobby.


Letter To Public

November Is Hospice And

Palliative Care Month


Dear Sir or Madam:
November is National Hos-
pice and Palliative Care Month,
a time set to raise awareness of
the compassionate care that
hospice organizations provide
to patients and their loved ones.
Each day, hospice profession-
als partner with our families,
our friends, our neighbors and
our colleagues to address the
many challenges associated
with life-limiting illnesses.
Hospice provides the physical,
social, emotional and spiritual
support to answer the difficult
questions, offer the sound
advice and comfort the intense
fears that come at a vulnerable
time.
On a personal note, I want to
share why hospice is important
t9 me.
In the mid-1970s, my mother
was diagnosed with ALS, a
cruel disease. I was a young
woman with three small chil-
dren, and I spent a great deal of
time at my mother's bedside,
caring for her as she rapidly
declined. At that time there was
no hospice, there were no sup-
port groups, there were no
fundraisers. It was my father,
my sister and me, and it was a


hard, isolated, sad journey.
I made up my mind that, if
given the chance, I would help
others in the same situation.
Over the years, I had friends
and loved ones receive hospice
care at the end of life. Two
years ago I joined the volunteer
ranks at Good Shepherd
Hospice, where I've had the
opportunity to help a family
dealing with the ravages of
dementia. I visit once a week,
giving the spouse a short break
to deal with the ordinary
aspects of life. It gives me great
satisfaction to know that I can
provide a small bit of help so
someone doesn't have to face
these issues alone, as I did.
I have seen firsthand the
compassionate care hospice
brings to 'each experience. If
you or a loved one is coping
with the challenges of advane'.-
ing-age or an advancing illness,.
I encourage you to learn more
about hospice a special kind
of care that provides dignity,
hope and love at the end qf life.
Sincerely,
Marilyn McAdams
Sebring
Good Shepherd
Hospice Volunteer


was just phenomenal. It was a
massive.undertaking, with three
crime scenes, the packing
house, the parking lot and the
residence. There was a lot of
evidence, and there were a lot
of leads."
The captain noted the Polk
County Sheriff's Office sent a
team of eight crime scene
investigators. The Hardee
County Sheriff's Office worked
on interviews and translation,
he added.
Hardee sheriff's Sgt. Johnny
Shivers handled search war-
rants, while Det. Andrew
SMcGuckin participated in inter-
views. Dowden credited sher-
iff's detectives Russell Conley
and Manuel Martinez for the
arrest of the third suspect.
"They put this gentleman in
our hands," he said. That sus-
pect, Morales, "was waiting to
get on a bus, he was trying to.
flee," the captain further
alleged.
He was jailed early Monday
afternoon.
Dowden said all three sus-
pects have been interviewed
and alleged all three have con-
fessed to the crime. "They each
were interviewed and each
admitted to their involvement in
the death of this individual," he
said.
Dowden quashed rumors
spreading throughout the small
city following the discovery of
the dead man's body on'
Monday morning. There was no
gang killing nor is there a seriali
killer on the loose, he said.
"The rumors surrounding it!
are false," said Dowden. "It was
an isolated killing, a personally
attack. The citizenry is safe." I
Bowling Green police believe
this is the first murder within.
'the city since 1996.
They, again, credit coopera-


tion among law enforcement
agencies and the Medical
Examiner's Office with the
quick conclusion to the case.
"It was almost as if we had
trained for a multi-agency effort
such as this," concluded
Dowden.




Hospital .

Lab Hosts

Open House
Florida Hospit4a Wauchula's
lab renovation is complete, and
an open house will be held from
noon to 3 p.m. on Friday in the
Laboratory Break Room.
The hospital invites the com-
munity to join in celebrating the
complete transformation of the
lab and to view the recent reno-
vations.
Renovations began in May
and included a cojnplete over-
haul of the previous lab.
The newly renovated lab
reduces turnaround time for
reporting'lab tests to physicians
by nine percent; meets space
requirements per Joint Com-
mission standards; 'improves
efficiency; increases storage
area by 30 percent; improves
work environment, cleanliness
and organization by reducing
clutter; and improves employee
satisfaction and morale.
With the community's help,
the Florida Hospital Wauchula
Foundation Board raised the
$80,000 necessary to complete
the renovation. Donors includ-
ed Joe L. and Patricia Davis,
Mosaic, Wauchula State Bank
and Peace River Electric
Cooperative.


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18; 1 yr. $31;2 yrs. 60
Flonda
6 months $22; I )r. $41; 2 yrs $79
Out of State
6 months $27; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. $95


MURDER
Continued From 1A'








November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Local Election Results By Precincts

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
FG Faith BG 1st Meth. Ona Cnty. Comm Civic 1st Miss. New Hope City T T
__ Bapt. Assem. Council Church Bapt. Annex Center Baptist Baptist Hall PRECO Armory TOTAL
County Commission Dist ct 2

BIRGE 113 173 193 214 175 136 551 13 501 175 133 361 2,738

STALLINGS 99 207 118 216 133 131 374 142. 371 166 128 351 2,436
County Commission Distr ct4 .

JOHNSON 126 156 185 210 181 139 562 13 532 170 145 381 2,800

MOYE 89 225 119 217 120 127, 367 137 342 168 115 335 2,361

School Board District 4

McWHORTER 102 210 141 198 125 123 349 145 373 166 109 346 2,387

PLATT 109 151 160 219 169 132 508 10 479 166 135 346 2,584

School Board District 5

TREVINO 100 196 146 253 151 151 445 108 457 195 147 429 2,778

WEBB 113 167 161 162 139 109 41'3 30 398 135 99 265 2,191
a ----j


the District 2 seat. Grady
Johnson rallied 2,800 voters to
Matt Moye's 2,361 to win
District 4.
Said Birge, "Thank you,
again, to the voters of Hardee
County. I am deeply humbled
and appreciative of your confi-
dence in electing me as you
next county commissioner for
District 2.
"This position takes commit-
ment," Birge continued, "and I
will keep my promises to you. I
am anxious to take my place in


making history as the first
woman county commissioner in
Hardee County."
Johnson, too, is ready to
begin service on the commis-
sion. "A lot of the issues that I
will spend the coming weeks on
I am already aware of, and now
I will get into every aspect of
them," he said. He is preparing
for his Nov. 16 oath of office.
"So I will hit the ground run-
ning," he said.
"I attended most meetings of


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Benny Hash reads the final results as newly elected county commissioners Sue Birge
and Grady Johnson begin to celebrate their victories.


the County Commission, so I
am up to date, but I did not have
access to all the information
and data before that I will have
as a commissioner," said
Johnson. He believes the most
challenging issues before him
are the economy, tax base and
services.
Said an appreciative Johnson,
"I want to thank everyone for
their support, and I intend to put
my heart and soul into this for
them."
Hardee County voters went -
along with the state in most
other contests on the lengthy
ballot.
Voters here picked Rick Scott
for governor over Alex Sink,
with a total 3,115 votes to
Sink's 1,879. Statewide, the
battle waged into Wednesday
morning, with Sink ultimately
conceding just before 11 a.m.
Hardee picked Marco Rubio
at 2,860 to 771 for Kendrick
Meek and 1,542 for Charlie
Crist in the bid for U.S.Serate.
Vern Buchanan won local favor
3,833 votes to 1,260 for chal-
lenger James Golden.
Pam Bondi was a big local
favorite for attorney general,
taking 3,324 ballots to Dan
Gelber's 1,519. Ditto for Jeff
Atwater for chief financial offi-
cer at 3,359 to Loranne
Ausley's 1,437. And Adam
Putnam's overwhelming 3,923
votes to Scott Maddox' 1,120 in
the race for agriculture commis-
sioner.
Ben Albritton, a hometown
boy, easily took the House
District 66 chair, with 4,545
local votes.
Hardee Countians voted
along with the state on all pro-
posed amendments but one.
Local voters were willing to
revise class-size requirements
as suggested in Amendment 8,
but state voters rejected the
plan.
Here, it won 2.828 votes to
2,140. Still, that was only 57
percent of the total, and all
amendments required a 60 per-
cent majority to pass.
Okd here and passed. in the
state were amendments 2, 5 and
6. Amendment 2 allows for a
military homestead exemption,
and 5 and 6 will prohibit law-
makers from drawing district
lines which favor themselves or
their parties.
In all. Republicans won big
here and statewide.


Q: I keep hearing that eating
a variety of vegetables is
important, but I am stuck in a
rut eating just a few. How do
you suggest I get more vari-
ety?
A: You're right: vegetables are
a key source of many nutrients
and thousands of different phy-
tochemicals (natural plant com-
pounds that are antioxidants or
protect our health in other
ways). No single vegetable pro-
vides them all, however, so the
wider the variety of your choic-
es, the better. Set a goal to try at
least one new vegetable each
week. If you're ready to be
adventurous, go to the grocery


A successful marriage
requires falling in love
many times, always with
the same person.,
-Mignon McLaughlin

If you want your spouse to
listen and pay strict atten-
tion to every word you say,
talk in your sleep.
-Anonymous

All great things are simple,
'2nd many can be
expressed in single words:
freedom, justice, honor,
duty, mercy, hope.
-Sir Winston Churchill


store or farmers' market and
just pick up something that
looks interesting (and find out
what it's called if you don't
know). Then check recipe web-
sites for different ways to pre-
pare it. The AICR Test Kitchen
offers healthy, easy recipes. Or
check the library for a vegetable
or ethnic cookbook, since many ,
international cuisines have/
developed fabulous ways to
serve vegetables. You might
pick up a magazine focused on
healthy cooking, and make a
point of preparing one veg-
etable or salad recipe from it
each week. Go to a new ethnic
restaurant once a month or so
and try some vegetables unfa-
miliar to you. When you find
something you like, ask about
how you can duplicate the dish
at home. If all that's too much
adventure for you, email friends
and family to askl for their
favorite vegetable recipes. Or
perhaps make.it a weekly game:
pick a particular vegetable, ask
people how they like to prepare
it and circulate the results to
everybody. Just remember that
if the recipes are loaded with
unhealthy fat or sodium, the
overall benefits for your health
won't be as great. In that case,
you can take the flavor concept,
but find ways to prepare it in .a
healthier manner.


Youth Baseball Begins March 1


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The little players won't have
to play on cold January even-
ings any more.
Although Hardee County
Youth Sports signups are next
week, giving ample time to
check uniforms and the myriad
of other tasks to start the sea-
son, construction of new fields
at Hardee Park will allow all
teams to play in the same spring
season.
Registration is all next week
at Farr Field off South Florida
Avenue in Wauchula. Girls,
under Dixie Softball rules have
a cutoff date on ages as of Jan.
1. T-ball players are ages 4 to 6
by that date; those under 10
play in the Angels division,;
under 12 in Ponytails; and
under 15 in Belles.
Boys baseball ages under
Dixie Youth are as of May 1,
2011. T-ball is ages 4-5;
machine pitch 7-8, minors 9-10,
majors 11-12, and juniors 13-
15.
For registration, 5 to 9 p.m.
weeknights and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
next Saturday, parents or guard-
ians must accompany the child
and bring birth certificate,
insurance and medical contact
information. Cost is $75 per
child, with a $5 discount for
additional siblings.
At its Oct. 7 meeting, the
Hardee County Commission
tackled both youth baseball and
soccer decisions. The time
schedule for start of youth base-
ball and softball was of para-
mount concern to Kevin Moore,
president of Youth Sports and
grandparents concerned about


Nutrition
U- Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH

Q: Do those elastic tubes and
bands really work for
strength training?
A: Yes. Elastic tubes and bands
are now available for virtually
all levels of strength training,
and they're inexpensive and
easily stored. You need to use
the right band or tube to match
your strength level and the par-
ticular muscle group being
exercised (chest presses, for
example, need more resistance
than the arm curls that exercise
your upper arms). When work-
ing with an elastic tube or band,
you secure it under your feet or
around a heavy piece of furni-


T-Ball players on cold January
nights.
Moore said there are 29 base-
ball teams and 24 softball teams
to spread over the fields. If the
four fields at Hardee Park were
available, and softball played at
George Heine and Farr fields,
the season could start March 1.
That makes a better swing into
summer All-Star tournaments
than T-Ball playing in January
and February and having to
gear up again for summer com-
petition.
After lengthy discussion of
plans to install the concession
stand/restrooms, etc. and do
only three fields at Hardee Park,
commissioners agreed to let the
league use portable restrooms
and concessions for one year
and change the work schedule
to have all four fields complet-
ed by March 1.
Another $200,000 FRDAP
(Florida Recreation Develop-
ment Assistance Program) grant
application will be.uad for the
bathrooms and concession.
stands. '" ,;.;
As always, more volunteers
are needed to make the base-
ball/softball season successful.
People don't have to be on the
17-member league board to
help out. The new fields are not
for practice. There are four
backstops at Pioneer Park and
two donated pastures among
other sites for practice.
While at it, the commission
also discussed soccer at the new
fields at Hardee Park. panny
Weeks, county director of facil-
ities, brought up the youth and
adult soccer rules and agree-
ments to be signed for a team or

ture or a pole. Focus on squeez-
ing the muscle in use when you
encounter resistance as you pull
on the tube/band and as you
return to starting position. Just
as when strength-training with
free weights or stationary
machines, good posture and
proper technique is important to
appropriately work the muscle
and to avoid injury. You can use
many of the same exercises you
may have learned with other
forms of strength training, but if
you haven't received instruc-
tion, it's best to learn good tech-
nique by meeting with a certi-
fied fitness trainer at a local
facility. If this isn't possible,
check out a recognized fitness
organization's DVD or website.
For example, the American
Council on Exercise (ACE)
offers a free suggested routine
with elastic tubing.


league to use those fields.
The facility rules cover such
things as insurance; background
checks on all coaches, board
members and officials; provi-
sion of schedules and accounts;
a vendor booth application;
cleanup after games; security
and prohibited items.
The latter brought a little dis-
cussion as items not permitted
at the fields include weapons of
any kind, including pocket
knives, firearms, etc. Commis-
sioner Minor Bryant said pock-
et knives should be excluded as
"everyone in Hardee county
carries a pocket knife." It will
be amended to include any
other type of knife.
Alcohol, glass beverage bot-
tles, animals except service ani-
mals, skateboards or roller
skates, whistles and, of course,
illegal drugs or chemicals are
not allowed at the park. Anyone
with any item that does not
meet security measures will be
asked to put it in their vehicles
or dispose of it.
The third item commissioners
tackled under recreation review
was another FRDAP grant
application for use at Hardee
Lakes Park. Plans would in-
clude 50 RV campsites; base-
ball, volleyball, tetherball and
horseshoe areas; and picnic and
fishing piers. There already are
seven or eight miles of horse
trails and other improvements
have been made from Land &
Water, Game commission and
Florjda Boating Improvement
grants. All four lakes are avail-
able for fishing and the board
walk is completed.


'1rhe











. erad -Adocat


ELECTION
Continued From 1A


rNutrition Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


ABOUT...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted.through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries. contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships, im-
mediate survivors and funer-
al arrangements. The list of
survivors may include the
names of a spouse, parents,
siblings, children and chil-
dren's spouses and grand-
children, and the'number of
great-grandchildren. If there
are no immediate survivors,
consideration of other rela-
tionships may be given.








4A The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010



Obituaries


ELLA F. HANCHEY
Ella F. Hanchey, 90, of Wau-
chula, died on Saturday, Oct.
30, 2010, at Hardee Manor Care
Center.
S Born on Aug. 27, 1920, at
Carrolton, Miss., she lived in
Hardee County most of her life.
She was a homemaker and a
Baptist.
Survivors are two sons,
James M. Hanchey and wife
Mary Katherine of Wauchula,
and Robert E. Hanchey and
wife Penny of Zolfo Springs;
stepdaughter Arlayne Pritchard
of St. Petersburg; five grand-
children Kevin Hanchey and
wife Cindy of Wauchula, Amy
and Chris Olcott of Brandon,
Christopher Hanchey of Wau-
chula, Robert E. Hanchey Jr. of
Lakewood Ranch, and Cari
S McKibben and husband Josh of
Dothan, Ala.; and three great-
grandchildren Briana Hanchey,
Dawson Hanchey and Bayli
S Olcott.
Visitation was Tuesday, Nov.
2, from 9 to 10 a.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel, followed by
graveside services at 10:15 a.m.
: at Wauchula Cemetery with the
Rev. Ken Smith and the Rev.
Alan Permenter officiating.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


STELLA S. HARPER
S Stella S. Harper, 91, of Mel-
bourne, died on Sunday, Oct.
24, 2010, at Holmes Regional
Medical Center.
A native of Wauchula, she
had lived in Melbourne since
the 1990s. She had worked for a
factory as an assembler.
S Survivors include son Ron
Harper of Leesburg; two sisters,
Martha Douglas of Gardner and
Jewel Keen of Wauchula; broth-
er Joe Skitka of Wauchula; and
two grandchildren David Har-
per of Deland and Craig Harper
of Melbourne.
Visitation was last Thursday,
Oct. 28, from 1 to 2 p.m. at
Faith Temple Church in Wau-
chula where services were at 2
p.m. with the Rev. Wendell
Smith officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at Wauchula Cemetery.
Fountain Funeral Home
Avon Park


JOYCE PIERCE LANIER
Joyce Pierce Lanier, 78, of
Fort Meade, died on Monday,
Nov. 1, 2010, at Royal Care of
Avon Park.
Born in Wauchula, on Dec.
18, 1931, she was the owner
and operator of antiques and
collectibles and Lanier Western
Wear in Wauchula. She was a
member of New Hope Baptist
Church in Wauchula.
She was preceded in death by
husband Glen Edwin Lanier Sr.;
parents Robert and Doshia
Pierce; and sister Glenda
Browder.
She is survived by daughter
Susan Lanier Chapman of Fort
Meade; two sons Glen E. Lanier
Jr. of Chicago, Ill. And Chris-
topher M. Latier of Shreveport,
La.; seven grandchildren, Will
Chapman of Fort Meade,
Charlene Sastre and Stephanie
Lanier, both of Dallas, Texas,
Monica Lanier and Jennifer
Lanier, both of San Antonio,
Texas, and Trinity Lanier and
Trenton Lanier, both of Shreve-
port, La.; great-granddaughter,
Sophie Sastre of Dallas, Texas;
and three sisters, Ruby Howze
and Topsy See, both of Wau-
chula, and Bobbie Bolin of
Sebring.
A graveside service will be
held tomorrow (Friday) at 11
a.m. at New Hope Cemetery.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade

FRANCES BUCKLEY
BALDWIN
Frances Buckley Baldwin,
89, of Wauchula, died on
Monday, Oct. 25, 2010, at her
home.
She was born in Attleboro,
Mass., on Aug. 6, 1921, to Earl
and Ellen Buckley. She moved
with fier parents and brother
Milton "M.E." to the Torrey
Community near Bowling
Green in 1926. She attended the
Torrey School and graduated
from Wauchula High School in
1939. After earning her R.N.
nursing diploma in Attleboro,
she practiced nursing in Tampa
and Mission, Texas. She
returned to Hardee County in
1983 and became a resident of
Wauchula.
She was predeceased by her
parents, brother and husband
Jim Baldwin.
She is survived by four
nephews and a niece: David
Buckley of Winter Haven,
Bobby Buckley of Bowling
Green, Billy Buckley of Tampa,
James Buckley of Fort Myers,
and Linda McElfresh of
Riverview.
A memorial service will be
held on Saturday, Nov. 6, at 4
p.m. at First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green.
Fountain Funeral Home
Avon Park


1Pn 1coving uAeuohiy














LINDA SHANNON
GAUSE
Linda Shannon Gause, 42,
of Avon Park, died on
Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2010, in
Avon Park.
Born on Feb. 1, 1968, at
Lake Wales, she had lived in
Hardee County most of her
life. She was self-employed in
trucking.
She was preceded in death
by father Jerald Story.
Survivors include her
mother, Gayle Keene Story of
Sebring; daughter Patricia
Gause of Sebring; brother
Mack Story of Bradenton; sis-
ter Stephanie Mills of Se-
bring; and grandchild Westen
Gause.'
SFuneral services were
Tuesday, Nov. 2, at 4 p.m. at
SRobarts Garden Chapel with
Bill Breylinger and Eddie
Morrison officiating. Inter-
ment followed in, Paynes
Creek Cemetery.


MARIO SOTO
Mario Soto, 79, of Wauchula,
died on Sunday, Oct. 31, 2010,
at Casa Mara Nursing Home in
Bradenton.
Born on Jan. 18, 1931, at San
Benito, Texas, he was a
plumber.
Survivors include a son and
daughter, Samuel Soto and
Susana Soto, both of Corpus
Christi, Texas; three sisters
Felicitas Sanchez of Wauchula,
Seledina Sanchez and husband
Amado of Austin, Texas, and
Ignacia Trevino of Sinton,
Texas; and brother Apolinar
Soto and wife Dora of Brian,
Texas.
Visitation was Wednesday,
Nov 3, from 10 to 11 a.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel where
services were held at 11 a.m.
with Pastor Antonio Ramirez
officiating.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


LINDA SHANNON GAUSE
Linda Shannon Gause, 42, of
Avon Park, died on Wednesday,
Oct. 27, 2010, in Avon Park.
Born on Feb. 1, 1968, at
Lake Wales, she had lived in
Hardee County most of her life.
She was self-employed in
trucking.
She was preceded in death by
father Jerald Story.
Survivors include her moth-
er, Gayle Keene Story of Se-
bring; daughter Patricia Gause
of Sebring; brother Mack Story
of Bradenton; sister Stephanie
Mills of Sebring; and grand-
child Westen Gause.
Funeral services were Tues-
day, Nov. 2, at 4 p.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel with Bill Brey-
linger and Eddie Morrison offi-
ciating. Interment followed in
Paynes Creek Cemetery.'
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


VERNA MAE GREEN
Verna Mae Green, 72, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
Oct. 26, 2010, at Hardee Manor
Care Center in Wauchula.
Born on Sept. 29, 1938, at
Hamilton, Ala., she came to
Hardee County from Walker
County, Ala. in 1954. She
cleaned houses.
She is survived by husband,
James Green of Wauchula;
three daughters, Barbara And-
erson and Linda Hicks, both of
Tyler, Texas, and Shela Motos
of St. Louis, Mo.; two brothers,
Jessie Keeton of Zolfo Springs
and Wallace Keeton of Oke-
echobee; two sisters Jeanette
LaRue of Vernon, Ala. and
Wilma Jean Mashburn of Mul-
berry; nine grandchildren; and
six great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Saturday, Oct.
30, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home. Services were
Sunday at 2:30 p .m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel with the Rev.
Steve Polk officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Wauchula
Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


9n Seagoing J #e0oay


VERNA MAE GREEN
Verna Mae Green, 72, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
Oct. 26, 2010, at Hardee
Manor Care Center in Wau-
chula.
Born on Sept. 29, 1938, at
Hamilton, Ala., she came to
Hardee County from Walker
County, Ala. in 1954. She
cleaned houses.
She is survived by hus-
band, James Green of Wau-
chula; three daughters, Bar-
bara Anderson and Linda
Hicks, both of Tyler, Texas,
and Shela Motos of St. Louis,
Mo.; two brothers, Jessie
Keeton of Zolfo Springs and
Wallace Keeton of Okeecho-
bee; two sisters Jeanette
LaRue of Vernon, Ala. and
Wilma Jean Mashburn of
Mulberry; nine grandchildren;
and six great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Saturday,


COURTESY PHOTO
Participating in the Alumni Run were Sean Brown, Regan Durastanti, Zack Durastarnti,
Wesley Mercer, Davina Nuccio and Brandi Albritton.


Cross Country District Bound


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
After an up-and-down sea-
son, the Hardee cross country
teams have been preparing to
do their best in this week's
Class 2A District 6 meet.
There were a half dozen
extras in the Oct. 21 Alumni
Run. Times were slow as the
course was soft and the grass




JIM T. FARMER
Jim T. Farmer, 77, of Zolfo
Springs, died on Monday, Nov.
1, 2010,-at his home.
A native of Arkansas, he had
lived in this area for 35 years,
coming from Missouri. He was
retired from Sprint as a techni-
cian.
Survivors include daughter
Pam R..Clanton and husband
Gerald of Bowling Green; three
sons Jim T. Farmer Jr. and wife
Karen of Wauchula, Michael
Jene Farmer and wife Brenda of
Zolfo Springs, and John Mark
Farmer and wife Pam of
Winder, Ga.; four sisters; two
brothers; 12 grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren.
Visitation is today (Thurs-
day) from 6 to 8 p.m. at New
Hope Baptist Church. Services
will be Friday at 10 a.m. at the
church, with interment follow-
ing in Wauchula Cemetery.
Fountain Funeral Home
Avon Park

FRANCISCO
MANDEJO JUAN
Francisco Mandejo Juan, 71,
of Wauchula, died on Aug. 29,
2010, at Wauchula.
He was born on Feb. 14,
1939.
Interment will be in Friend-
ship Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


,n Coutng u lemoiy


MARIO SOTO
Mario Soto, 79, of Wau-
chula, died on Sunday, Oct.
31, 2010, at Casa Mara Nurs-
ing Home in Bradenton.
He was born on Jan. 18,
1931, at San Benito, Texas.
He was a plumber.
He is survived by son
Samuel Soto and daughter
Susana Soto, both of Corpus
Christi, Texas; three sisters,
Felicitas Sanchez of Wau-
chula, Seledina Sanchez and
husband Amado of Austin,
Texas, and Ignacia Trevino of
Sinton, Texas; one brother
Apolinar Soto and wife Dora
of Brian, Texas; and many
nieces and nephews.
Visitation was Wednesday,
Nov. 3, from 10 to 11 a.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel,
where services were held at
11 a.m. with Pastor Antonio
Ramirez officiating.



'FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


thick, reported Coach Don-
Trew.
He was especially pleased
with the past runners and guests
who participated with the
Hardee runners.
"Our top women finisher,
known back in the days, was'
Regan Durastanti, who finished
at 25:00. Davina Nuccio, just
off having a baby, nevertheless
did a 32:38. Brandi Albritton,
who just started training again,
came in at 37:58. These ladies
were dominant as Wildcats and.
are keeping it going."
On the male side of the
ledger, Sean Brown, not a for-
mer Wildcat, but a former
Heartland runner, was the top
male in at 24:58. "Zack Dura-
stanti, Regan's 9-year-old son,
hit the tape at 29:50 and will be
a dominant force himself when
he gets here himself many years
from now."
Finally, Wesley Mercer, sen-
ior Ann Garcia's granddad,
"represented us grey hairs well
at 25:49," and is a regular on
the Road Racing scene and
prepping for his next marathon.'
For the Wildcats of today, the
top runner was Reimundo Gar-
cia at 20:17. Brandon Beatty
came in at 20:20, Angelo Par-


kinson at 22:24, Morgan Garcial
at 23:01 and Tyler Helms at,
24:56. Following them in were:
Justin Ratliff, Tony Galvan and!
Victor Salazar.
Only two girls ran in the race.
Ann Garcia was in 13th at
30:54 and Andrea Castaneda in:
at 34:56.
The teams went to the Avon
Park Rotary on Oct. 26. The
Hardee boys picked up wins
over four other teams despite
the absence of the number three,
and four runners. Beatty had the
top finish, coming to the tape in
fourth place at 18:42, a new
personal record. Junior Rei-
mundo "Ray" Garcia was sixth
in a new standard of 18:44 and
freshman brother Morgan'
Garcia was 12th overall at
21:43. Senior Ratliff shaved
almost a minute off his previous
best to finish at 25:56.
There were three Lady
Wildcats in this meet. Ann
Garcia led the way with a 13th
placejnish at 28:28. Castaneda
finished at 33:47 and senior
Amy Garcia, "just back from
getting her tonsils yanked,"
took 23rd at 38:30 despite it
being her first week back since
the Hardee Lakes meet on Oct.
5.


DEPENDABLE/TRUSTWORTHY

COMPASSIONATE CARE





ROBARTS'
FAMILYFUNERALHOME
ATrusted Family Name Since 1906
529 WEST MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873
863-773-9773
View Obituaries at robartsfh.com 7:29fc



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING.
INTENT TO CHANGE LAND
USES AND ZONING

NOTICE IS HEARBY GIVEN THAT THE ZOLFO SPRINGS
TOWN COMMISSION WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING IN
THE ZOLFO SPRINGS COMMISSION CHAMBERS ON
NOVEMBER 15, 2010 AT 6:00 PM. THE PURPOSE OF
THE HEARING WILL BE TO HEAR THE REQUEST OF
STATON, INC. FOR APPROVAL FOR A CONDITIONAL
USE, TO AMENED THE FUTURE LAND USE MAP OF THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND REZONE FROM SINGLE
FAMILY RESIDENTIAL (R-1A) TO INDUSTRIAL (I-L) FOR
THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS PARCEL: S 26.39 FT OF
LOT 7 & LOTS 8-13 INC BLK 17, R & S RE-SUB OF R & S
ADD LOCATED IN 26-34S-25E, 1.12 AC CUTOUT 12-1995
513P329(MEG) 200725009219 OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO
SPRINGS. All interested parties are urged to attend and be
heard.
Any person who may wish to.appeal any decision made at
this meeting with respect to any matter considered there-
in, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that
appeal, and it is solely the responsibility of that person to
insure that such verbatim record is made and includes tes-
timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based per Florida statue 286.0105. The town does not fur-
nish verbatim transcripts. Copies of the map amendments
will be available at the Zolfo Springs Town Hall. Any person
with a disability requiring reasonable accommodation in
order to participate in this meeting should contact the town
clerk's office with their request at telephone (863) 735-
0405, fax (863) 735-1684


ATTEST: June Albritton
Town Clerk


George Neel
Mayor


11:4c


1n souivng ( tenMofy














ELLA F. HANCHEY
Ella F. Hanchey, 90, of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
Oct. 30, 2010, at Hardee
Manor Care Center.
She was born on Aug. 27,
1920, at Carrolton, Miss. She
lived inr Hardee County most
of her life. She was a home-
maker and a Baptist.
Survivors are two sons and
daughters-in-law, James M.
and Mary Katherine Hanchey
of Wauchula, and Robert E.
and Penny Hanchey of Zolfo
Springs; stepdaughter Arlayne
Pritchard of St. Petersburg,
her children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren; five
grandchildren, Kevin and
Cindy Hanchey of Wauchula,
Amy and Chris Olcott of
Brandon, Christopher Han-
chey of Wauchula, Robert E.
Hanchey Jr. of Lakewood
Ranch, and Cari and Josh
McKibben of Dothan, Ala.;
three great-grandchildren,
Briana Hanchey, Dawson
Hanchey and Bayli Olcott;
numerous nieces and nep-
hews; and very special friend
Ann G. Stephens of Wau-
chula.
- Visitation was Tuesday,
Nov. 2 from 9 to 10 a.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel, fol-
lowed by graveside services
at 10:15 a.m. at Wauchula
Cemetery with the Rev. Ken
Smith and the Rev. Alan
Permenter officiating..



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Oct. 30, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
the funeral home. Services
were Sunday at 2:30 p .m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel with
the Rev. Steve Polk officiat-
ing. Interment followed at
Wauchula Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


~a~ :t






November 4, 2010, The lerald-Advocale /A


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6A The Herald-Advocate, November 4,2010



'Penn's Pals' See Bucs Win Season Opener


Although the weather started
off sunny and hot for the Bucs'
season opener against the
'Cleveland Browns, by the sec-
Sond half of the game it had
rained and the temperature had
cooled for the 25 local children
and parents in the stands.
On Sept. 12, the Wauchula
:group headed to Raymond
James Stadium to watch the
STampa Bay Buccaneers beat the
Browns 17-14. It was the first
local blackout since 1997.
As Big Mike from "American
Idol" sang the national anthem,
the children so proudly stood
tall and waited with excitement
for the game to begin.
I The local youngsters were
!known as Penn's Pals for the
day, and were given T- shirts
;displaying No. 70 Donald
Penn's name. There was no
chance of the children missing
,any of the opening-game
action, as they were given front-
row seats in the end zone.
The children were so close to
the field that they were able to
slap hands with some of the
teammates both Bucs and
Browns as they made touch-
downs and went into the locker
room. Even the Buccaneer
cheerleaders came by to shake
hands with the children.
Captain Fear, the Tampa Bay
mascot, also came by to take
pictures with the children.
The children kept cool with
cold drinks, which came in sou-
venir cups. Lunch was provided
for the children by way of Bucs
Dollars, which also were donat-
ed.
After the Bucs' win of 17-14,
the children were able to meet


The Bucs won their first game of the regular season Sept.
12.


with some the players.
Players autographed items for
the children, to their excited
delight. Signing their names
were Bucs Carnell "Cadillac"
Williams, No. 24; Adam
Hayward, No. 57; Quincy
Black, No. 58; Sabby Piscitelli,
No. 21; and E.J. Biggers, No.
31.
And No. 70 Penn, their "pal"
and game sponsor, came over to
thank the children for all their
support and to autograph items
for them and take pictures with
them. The youngsters respond-
ed by voicing their appreciation
to Penn and his family.
The day was deemed a great
experience for the children.
Many of them never before had
the opportunity to see a
National Football League game


in real life. Then to be able to
meet the players after the game
was just an indescribable treat
for them.
For their part, the players
took time to stop by for pictures
and to autograph items after a
hard game. No matter what the
record book says at the end of
the season, the Buccaneer foot-
ball players are and will always
be winners in these children's
books!
It's never forgetting who you
are and where you came from
that makes a person a success.
The Bucs taught the children to
never get so high that they for-
get where they started from, and
then to "pay it forward," mean-
ing if someone does something
nice for you, do something nice
for someone else.


COURTESY PHOTOS
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers pray before the start of their season-opening game against
the Cleveland Browns.

-.*m ,
k I ~' T ~s:'h: .,w


Enjoying front-row seats and stadium snacks are
, Fleurimond, Arissa Camel and Sahmaud Blandin.


(from left) Jerry Browdy, Kristiana The crowd celebrates a touchdown for the Bucs!


No. 70 Donald Penn, sponsor of the children's day at the
Game, willingly autographs items for the kids.


The seats were close to the action on the field.
57 Adam Hayward and No. 92 Brian Price.
Parent Shauntee Hines, a volunteer with the community
organization, gets a hug from player E.J. Biggers, No. 31. :


Hunter Scranton wears his "Penn's Pals" T-shirt as he
S. roots for the home team along with Karen Bolln.


Arissa Camel enjoys the excitement of the stands.


The children were Penn's Pals for gameday, Including
(from left) Hunter Scranton, Darla Harned and Treasure
Camel.





Noveriber 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Bryan Bracey Sings At Southside Baptist Church
-m 1.......


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Brian Bracey, 42, held a gospel singing concert Sunday
morning, Oct. 31, at Southside Baptist Church on S. 10th
Ave. in Wauchula.


Leyton Bracey, 11, played the drums to accompany his
father's songs.


Playing the trumpet since the age of 13, Bracey said he
Church pastor Rev. Jerald Dunn and his wife JoAnn surrendered his life to Jesus Chsist at age 28. He and his
enjoyed the concert along with other church members. family live in Lakeland.


Southside Baptist Church in Wauchula is one of many
churches that help serve the spiritual needs of people In
Hardee County.


2010 Hardee County ",y h
Family YMCA
Soccer Registration
In conjunction with the

Hardee Soccer Club














For more information call the
YMCA ~ 773-6445
or Able Vargas ~ 781-4834 C
Dara inicio la registration para la temporada
2010 de Football Soccer
Este es un gran esfuerzo de
YMCA y HardeeSoccer Club
Ninos que tengan 5 13 anos se pueden
registrar esta
Sabado dia 7 de Novembre desde
las 2-4 de la tarde
en el Mildred y Doyle Carlton Jr. Complexo.
Para mas information lilame al
YINICA 773-6445
1 1 .1


The lima bean gets its name from the city of Lima, Peru. Archaeologists have found
evidence they were cultivated there over 6,000 years ago, in what was the Indian vil-
lage of Rimac.

2010
2nd Annual Golf Tournament

to benefit

Hannah's House
-A shelter for women who are victims of domestic abuse~
Torrey Oaks Golf Course
November 13, 2010 ~ 8 AM
4 Person 18-Hole Scramble
$50.00 per person (lunch included)


Sponsored by: o F I
^a *** ; [jr


NR


Sign up at:
~ Torrey Oaks: 8 am 5 pm Mon.-Sun. ~
Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries 9am-4pm
Phone 773.5717 113 N. 7th Ave. Wauchula -
Or call after hours 863.245.3674


1st Place Prize
2nd Place Prize -
3rd Place Prize -


Mulligan Tickets
$5.00 or 3 for $10


$200
$100
$50


Grand Prize Tickets
$5.00 or 5 for $20


Auction
"Balls from Heaven" Drop $10/Ball
Door Prizes


If you would like to be a player or sponsor, please call
Pattie at 836-773-5717 for information.
11:4c









8A The Herald-Advocate, November 4.2010


I1-


In Business
By Hailey Selph


JAZZ IT UP!-Jazzercise has danced its way into Hardee
County.
Jazzercise began 40 years ago and now spans the world. This
'exercise program is a unique full-body workout that combines car-
dio with strength training. The moves sculpt, tone and lengthen
muscles while burning fat and boosting endurance and flexibility-
all to the beat of popular music.
The choreography is formed by founder Judi Sheppard
Missett. At every Jazzercise location the dance routines are the
same, making it easy for members to transfer from one Jazzercise
location to another.
The instructor of the Jazzercise program located in Hardee
County is Anne Marie Schneider.
Schneider became certified as an instructor in Southern
California, and has been with the company for 20 years.
Schneider brought Jazzercise to Hardee County when she and her
husband moved to Florida to be closer to their children and grand-
children.
Jazzercise classes are currently held at 1397 S. Florida Ave. in
Wauchula, in the Life Center at Florida's First Assembly of God.
Classes are scheduled for Monday, Tuesday and Friday at 4 p.m.;
Tuesday and Thursday at 5:30 p.m.; and Saturday at 8 a.m.
Instruction, which takes exercisers through an upbeat and fit
dance routine, lasts an hour long. For more information, contact
Schneider at 767-0613 or phone (800) 348-4748 or visit online at
www.jazzercise.com.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Hailey Selph at 773-3255 with your business news.


- .AP I


a
,,


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Winning the quarterfinal
S round in volleyball just set the
girls up to face the top team in
the district.
Hardee expended its energy
last Monday in the quarterfinal
matchup against rival Sarasota
Booker, and little left to face
top-seed Cardinal Mooney in
the Bradenton Southeast gym
Son Tuesday evening.
Hardee's senior six ended
their season and high school
careers in the 25-7, 25-12, 25-6
loss to Mooney. "It got down to
two girls didn't even show up
to play in these districts. For the
most part, we have fought for
every point we got, but it's hard
to win if they are not all com-
mitted," said first-year coach
Jessica Leupold.
The Hardee girls were
focused and fighting last Mon-
day when they hosted Booker in
a quarter-final round.
Kylie Conner started service
for Booker. The Hardee return
was good, but Booker's went
into the net, awarding a point to
Hardee. In turn, Eryn Ma-

( A-^J


honey's serve for Hardee, was
returned into the net and it was
a tie 1-1.
It tied again at 3-3, as Lady
Tornado Wendy Thomas went
on a four-point streak. After a
Summer Palmer serve was
returned twice, then went off
Hardee, Cherlinda Polynice
used her jump serve to up the
Booker lead to 8-5.
The teams traded serves and
it was a 13-9 game in favor of
Booker, when Mahoney came
back up to serve and Hardee's
front line of Ashley Louis and
Palmer combined to block
Booker returns. By the time one
fell back on Hardee, the Lady
'Cats had cut the lead to 12-14.
A Booker serve went awry and
it was 13-14, but a Hardee
serve, after a furious volley,
rolled down the net and
dropped on Hardee's side. It
was 13-15.
Thomas ran it back up to 17-
13, but Palmer came up with a
hot hand, tied the game and
went on to put Hardee up 19-18.
It was tied again at 20-20. It
took LaCresha Carlton to score
five service points with the aid


PHOTO BY NANCY DAVIS
Ann Marie Schneider moves to the music as she con-
ducts a Jazzercise class at Florida's First Assembly God.


DON'T EVER GIVE UP!
Learning to never quit is a tough process, especially when los-
ing and pain and suffering are involved. Throw in some persecu-
tion and you have a very tough proposition in front of you.
So, in light of some of my favorite teams going through rough
times and extended losing streaks. and all of it coinciding with
Breast Cancer Awareness Month-which has all the players wear-
ing pink-it made me think of Jimmy Valvano and some advice he
shared back in 1993.
Valvano's advice came at a very pivotal point in my life. I was
at an all-time low. I had graduated from USF with my AA and I was
working in Wauchula until August, when I would be attending The
University of Florida. (Emphasis on the word "The.") I remember
it like it was yesterday, so I thought I'd share it with you in case
you are in a spot where you need to be reminded that you should
not ever give up.
Valvano was diagnosed with bone cancer in June 1992. In
July, he found out that it had metastasized.
Shortly before his death, he spoke at the inaugural ESPY
Awards, presented by ESPN, on March 3, 1993. While accepting
the Arthur Ashe Courage & Humanitarian Award, he announced the
creation of the "Jimmy V Foundation," an organization dedicated
to finding a cure for cancer.
When thinking about quitting, I'm reminded of that speech,
where Valvano gave the motto for his foundation, "Don't give up,
don't ever give up." (You can watch it on Youtube.)
In it, he tells the story of when he was about to coach his first
game as the Rutgers men's basketball coach of the freshmen squad.
He was reading about legendary football coach Vince Lombardi to
get ideas and inspiration.
One quote in particular stuck with him. Lombardi recalled his
first speech to the Green Bay Packers. Lombardi waited until three
minutes before the Packers took the field, busted through the doors
and began pacing back and forth and waited several seconds before
saying, "Gentlemen, all eyes on me! We will be successful this year
if we can focus on three things, your family, your religion and the
Green Bay Packers."
Valvano wanted' to inspire his young Rutgers team with the
same speech, so he practiced the speech, changing it to fit, saying:
gentlemen we can be successful this year if we can focus on three
Things, your family, your religion and Rutgers University.
Then he waited until three minutes before the game and went
to bust through the doors, but in the process fell and hurt his arm.
His players gathered him up and he started pacing, trying to get the
tingling out of his arm. Finally, he delivered the speech, saying,
"Gentlemen, eyes on me! We can be successful this season if we
can focus on three things, your family, your religion and the Green
Bay Packers."
Laughing at himself, he smiled and continued with his speech,
saying it's important to know where you've been, to khow where
you are and where you are going.
Know where you are, where you want to be. To get there you
need an enthusiasm for life, a dream, and passion for your goal and
be willing to work for it, Valvano said. He went on to quote Ralph
Waldo Emerson, who said, "Nothing great was ever achieved with-
out enthusiasm."
I think this is one of the main issues young sports teams today
have, a lack of enthusiasm for the game. We've taken the fun and
the ability to be enthused out of games for our children. There is a
win-at-all-cost mentality that I believe creates undue pressure and
forces teams to make mistakes and lose interest, even when that
team is capable and talented.
If you need support just'look at teams like the Yankees, who
for years have had better athletes than any other team, but it was-


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The volleyball senior six weren't ready to finish their season on Monday night as the Lady Wildcats won a district
quarterfinal game against Sarasota Booker; the girls are (from left) Yesenia Vargas, Lacey Garza, LaCreshsha
Carlton, Eryn Mahoney, Sarah Byers and Ashley Louis.


n't until they realized they could be enthusiastic and play their kind
of ball that they started winning. I think that is why Joe Madden
and the Tampa Bay Rays have been so successful. They have fun.
In order to be successful at what you do you must create an
atmosphere that people can't stand to miss. An atmosphere of
enthusiasm is the first step in getting everyone to buy in to your
philosophy. If you are not genuinely enjoying what you do, it will
show. If you are enjoying what you do, that will show as well.
Jimmy Valvano was a man who exuded enthusiasm. When his
team won the National Championship, his elation was very evi-
dent. This was a man who was truly thankful for the time God had
given him and wasn't about to waste it. He was going to enjoy
every second of every day.
During his speech, he pokes fun at the teleprompter, saying,
"They got that screen up there flashing 30 seconds, like I care about
that screen. I got tumors all over my body and I'm worried about
some guy in the back going 30 seconds?"
His speech became legendary, and he closed it by saying,
"Cancer can take away all of my physical abilities. It cannot touch
my mind, it cannot touch my heart, and it cannot touch my soul.
And those three things are going to carry on forever. I thank you,
and God bless you all."
One particularly poignant section of Valvano's speech is as fol-
lows:
"To me, there are three things we all should do every day. We
should do this every day of our lives. Number one is laugh. You


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should laugh every day. Number two is think. You should spend
some time in thought. And number three is, you should have your
emotions moved to tears, could be happiness or joy. But think
about it. If you laugh, you think, and you cry, that's a full day.
That's a heck of a day. You do that seven days a week, you're going
to have something special."
So whether you are a stay-at-home mom, a teacher, a preach-
er, retired, a student, a Wildcat or a Gator, I hope you are able to
take Jimmy V's advice and "Don't give up, don't ever give up!"


CITY OF WAUCHULA

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula
will hold the regular scheduled meeting Monday
November 8, 2010 at 6:00pm or as soon thereafter as it
reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as fol-
lows: Ordinance 2010-08- First Reading- Revising The
Adopted Capital Improvement Element And Updating
The 5-Year Capital Improvements Plan, Ordinance
2010-09 Amending Section 22-118 Re-Connections,
Ordinance 2010-10- 2009/2010 Fiscal year Budget
Adjustments, Resolution 2010-29 Establishing a City
Policy for conducting and attending a "Florida
Sunshine Law" and "Public Records Act" seminar,
Resolution 2010-34 FDOT FM 420379-1 JPA for Master
Storm Water Pond System, Mutual Aid Agreement 2011
with the Hardee County Sheriff's Office, and any other
business that may come before the Commission.
The meetings will be held at the Commission
Chambers located at 225 East Main Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as
amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any
interested person decides to appeal any decision made by
the City Commission with respect to any matter consid-
ered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to
insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula,
Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any indi-
vidual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy
involves every aspect of the Commission's functions,
including ones access to, participation, employment or
treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring
reasonable -accommodation as provided for in the
Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk


CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Mayor

11:4c


Volleyball Bows Out In Semi-Finals


_~I~~___ nXI1


of repeated Mahoney blocks to
knot the score at 24-all. A
Booker serve was returned deep
in the corner for a Hardee point,
and a Lacey Garza serve was hit
three times, then out of bounds,
to give Hardee the 26-24 win.
Game two was equally close,
with five ties, the last at 19-19,
before Booker's Conner and
Thomas got service points to
give the Tornadoes the 25-22
win.
With one game apiece, it
went on to game three. A Book-
er serve rolled back on its side.
Mahoney, Yesenia Vargas and
Palmer got in good serves to
forge to a 6-2 advantage Hardee
never trailed. An ace by Maria
Anselmo kept it going, Carlton
added two more on a kill by
Mahoney and a good block.
Mahoney got back to serving
and for three more points.
Gradually, surely Hardee forged
ahead. Louis closed it out with
the final six service points for
the 25-14 victory.
Booker was ready to quit and
tied the fourth game several
times, the last at 10-10. Louis
and Palmer had service runs to


go ahead 15-10. Lady Tornado
Danielle Dygert caught her
team up to a 15-14 deficit, but
Garza got two more Hardee
points. Makala Jones forged
ahead for Booker and tied the
game at 18-18.
It was tied at 20-20. Booker's
Aubry Lavalliere put her team
up 22-20, only to have Palmer
even it up at 23-23. Louis
dropped a Booker return back
on its side and a Booker return
of a Louis serve was too long.
Hardee had won the set and
match 3-1.
Finishing up on Tuesday
evening were seniors Vargas,
Mahoney, Garza, Carlton,
Louis and Sarah Byers. Ex-
pected back are juniors
Anselmo, Ashley Nichols and
Brenda Zamora.
Coming up from the JV
squad may be sophs Ashley
Armstrong, Myah Gonzalez,
Jessica Harrison, Nyshira Jack-
son, Kayla "Louie" Nichols,
Ana Maria Saldivar, Desiree
Smith and Katie Wheeler, or
freshmen Bailee Carlton,
Karlee Henderson or Erica
Roberts.








November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Hardee Rides In World


Championship Ranch Rodeo


By KATHY ANN GREGG
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Action, excitement and real
cowboys showing off their
know-how-the perfect combi-
nation for a World Champion-
ship Ranch Rodeo!
This one, sponsored by the
Working Ranch Cowboys As-
sociation, runs Nov. 11-14 at
the Amarillo Civic Center in
Amarillo, Texas.
And Hardee County will be
front and center!
Carlton Ranches is the only
team from the state of Florida in
the competition, as the winners
of the Best of the Ranches
rodeo held on Labor Day week-
end at the Arcadia Rodeo
Grounds. The 2010 roster of
qualifying ranch rodeos ran.
from mid-March to early
October, consisting of 24 con-
tests in nine different states:
Oklahoma, Texas, South Da-
kota, Colorado, Kansas, New
Mexico, Missouri and Nebraska
as well as Florida.
The Carlton Ranches, togeth-
er with the 20 other teams in
these world finals, will compete
on each of the four nights in dif-
ferent events, until all. of the
teams have completed the five
events of bronc riding, stray
gathering, team penning, wild
cow milking, and team brand-
ing.
.While these are activities
used on cattle ranches, two of
these events-the stray gather-
ing and the team penning-are
not part of Florida ranch rodeos,
so the local team will be per-
forming them in competition
for the first time.
But the other events are
favorites of this team, with Matt
Carlton winning the bronc rid-
ing event at Arcadia with a

L^^5E1_
L"j I asc
rff~u-i -\. VH'S4f


score of 80 points, and the team
taking first place in both the
wild cow milking event, in
40.47 seconds, and the team
doctoring event, in 46.22 sec-
onds.
This team is made up of Dale
Carlton, Charles T. "Trae"
Adams III, Matt Carlton, Clint
Boney, Brian Alexy and Lloyd
McGee.
Several are associated full-
time with Doyle Carlton III
Ranches. Dale Carlton is the
ranch foreman. Adams, a third-
generation cowboy, is a full-
time ranch cowboy. Alexy has
worked as a ranch hand for the
Past 15 years. And McGee, who
at 70 years of age is the senior
member of the team, was the
foreman of the Highlands
County ranch for many of his
33 years of cowboying for
Doyle Carlton III.
Matt Carlton is also a cattle
rancher, in addition to his fami-
ly's construction business. He is
the team's bronc rider-usually
scoring high and rarely being
bucked off-and he is a mem-
ber of the Professional Rodeo
Cowboys Association. Boney is
best known as a pickup man,
working for many rodeo com-
panies nationally. Boney and
Adams, who was a calf roper in
the PRCA for many years, are
the team's ropers, so their skills
will be put to the test in several
of the events.
The WRCA was founded in
1995 to promote ranching on a
national level and preserve the
lifestyle of the ranch cowboy.
This year is its 15th annual
World Championship Ranch
Rodeo.
The theme for this year's
championship rodeo is "An
Intimate Look at 15 Years of


With a time of 40.47 seconds, the team garnered first
place in the wild cow milking event. Dale and Matt
Carlton and Brian Alexy hand the milk bottle to Trae
Adams, who ran faster than any other cowboy.


Matt Carlton displays his skills as the team's bronc rider,
winning him first place with a score of 80 points.


Giving," celebrating the good.:
works this organization does,
such as funding scholarships,.
many of them for a full four
years to deserving students who
could become the veterinarians
and ranch managers of tomor-
row, and, through its Crisis
Fund, helping cowboys and
their families with financial
assistance when disease or
injury strikes, or just to make
ends meet in bad times. At the
Best of the Ranches event, the
WRCA awarded a scholarship
to a Florida girl. She resides in
Okeechobee County and was
raised by her cowboy brother
when they lost their parents, but
he had no way of paying for her
to attend college.
The Ranch Rodeo Finals is
not the only event being hosted
at the Amarillo Civic Center.
There is the Working Ranch
Horse Show, where top ranch
horses show their ability to
"cow," as well as Pokey's
WRCA Junior Ranch Rodeo
Finals for 4- to-16-year-olds,
and the junior and senior class
of the WRCA Youth CowHorse
Championship. There is also the
Trade & Trappings Show,
which features some of the
most gifted cowboy craftsmen
in the country, and the Ranch
Expo, which is a ranch-based-
business trade show.
The team's families will ac-
company them on this adven-
ture, which will be a thrill for
these young cowboys and cow-
girls-several of them youth
rodeo winners themselves. So,
Hardee County, send this team
off to Texas with best wishes
for a safe trip and to bring those
championship belt buckles back
to Florida-where they belong!


THURSDAY. NOV. 4
VHardee County Com-
. mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse -
- Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, .30 a.mr

VHardee County Com-
mission and Planning &
Zoning Board, joint meeting
on Mosaic annual review,
Room 102, Courthouse An-
nex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

MONDAY. NOV. 8
VWauchula City Com-
mission, regular meeting,
City Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY. NOV. 9
VBowling Green City
Commission, regular meet-
ing, City Hall, 104 E. Main
St., Bowling Green, 6:30
p.m.

The job of the artist is
always to deepen the mys-
tery.
-Francis Bacon

Great art picks up where
nature ends.
-Marc Chagall

Those who do not want to
Imitate anything, produce
nothing.
-Salvador Dall


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
After roping the steer's head, Clint Boney holds it steady for Trae Adams to rope its legs
in the team doctoring event, which they won in 46.22 seconds.

a~~~- .s-T-~"--


Matt and Dale Carlton help as Brian Alexy brands the calf, with Trae Adams on horse-'
back, in the team branding event, one of five events they will perform in at Amarillo.


Working Ranch Cowboys Association's John Norris (left) and Kaycee Hooper (right)
flank the winning Carlton Ranches team: (kneeling) Trae Adams and Lloyd McGee and
(standing) Brian Alexy, Clint Boney, Dale Carlton and Matt Carlton.


HJHS Football At Season Finale


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High
Wildcats took an undefeated
record into this week's game.
The problem was that DeSoto
was also at 5-0 when the teams
met in the rescheduled season
finale on Tuesday evening.
Results were unavailable at
press time.
"Last Tuesday was a good
team win, but we still have
room for improvement, said
Head Coach Mark Carlton on
Friday. "We are at DeSoto at
;5:30 p.m. Tuesday. We're both
undefeatedd 5-0. The 'winner is
the Heartland Athletic Confer-
ence champion.
"Anytime Hardee plays De-
Soto, it matters, whether it's
football or tiddlywinks; but
when we play them for a cham-
pionship, it's special. For some
of these kids, it's their first real
taste of this rivalry, so we're
working hard trying to make
sure we're ready," said Carlotn.
Against Lake Placid, Hardee
won 44-0, upping its five-game


record against Heartland oppo-
nents to 180-32.
In the first quarter, Jerry
.Browdy opened scoring with a
52-yard TD run. Keyonte
Holley added the two-point
conversion run to make it 8-0.
It wasn't long before Alex
Hinojosa picked up a fumble
and returned it 34-yards to the
end zone. The PAT failed, but
Hardee had a 14-0 advantage.
After a Lake Placid punt, quar-
terback Andrew Valdez ran the
ball in 38 yards to score, giving
the junior Wildcats a 20-lead
after the first period.
In the second quarter, the
Hardee defense kept Lake
Placid on its heels. In turn, the
Dragon defense had a tipped
ball interception, but eventually
had to punt again. Holley got a
28-yard run for a touchdown
and Valdez ran in the conver-
sion for a 28-0 halftime advan-
tage.
The second half was a run-
ning clock, but IIardec added a
pair of touchdowns. Holley had
a 25 yard run and Browdy


added a 37-yarder. Valdez threw
to Marco DeLeon for one con-
version pass and Tomas Gomez
for the other, making the final
score 44-0.
Holley got the nod as the
offensive player of the game
and the entire team got the
defensive award.
Other eighth graders seeing
time on the field were Felipe
Agauilar, Christopher Arroyo,
Tyler Bragg, Patrick Carlton,
Tanor Durden, Jose Gonzales,
Jordan Jones, Austin Judah,
Diante Leslie, Randi Lopez,
Calvin McLeod, DeShawndre,
Roby Paris, Devin Pearson,
Adam Ramirez, Cesar Ramirez,
Pedro Sandoval, John Snell and
Fredrik Torres.
Seventh graders sharing
duties were Omar Alamia,
Allen Brown, Jose Coronado,
Trey Faulkl, Andrew Hagans,
Colten Howell, Christopher
Hull, William McClelland, Seth
McGee, Jose Mendoza, Jose
Ornelas, Danny Owens, David
Ramirez, Kole Robertson and
Ty Trammell.








10A The Herald-Advocate, November 4. 2010


What'~sFo


COURTESY PHOTO
SDuring the days before the new school year began, First United Methodist Church of
Bowling Green hosted a luncheon for the faculty and staff of Bowling Green
Elementary. The meal featured barbecue pork, green beans, potato casserole, garlic
Spread and a variety of homemade desserts. The church also surprised the teachers by
donating a case of paper for each classroom. Shown with the boxes of paper are (from
left) Principal Kathy Clark, Mary Ruth Aired, Julle Durrance, Gretta Jones, the Rev.
Steve Polk, School Board member Joe Jones, Jill Southwell, Schools Superintendent
. David DurastantI and Jerry Southwell.


HJHS Softball Dominated Heartland


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High soft-
ball team overwhelmed all its
opponents.
Outscoring them 153-7, the
junior Lady Wildcats squelched
any possibility of a threat to its
Undefeated season and a second
Heartland Conference champi-
onship.
"This group has been won-
derful to coach. I am retiring
from junior high coaching after
this year, and what a way to go
out! I can't wait for this group
to join us on the high school
team. With support from our
youth league and travel ball,
Hardee County softball is on
the right track," said Coach
Shari Knight.
She has a right to be proud, as
Hardee pitchers Alex Ullrich
and Senaida Garcia combined
to master opposing batters. In
the final four games, Hardee
won 11-3, 10-0, 10-2 and 23-1.
At home against Hill-Gustat
on Oct. 14, Hardee gave up a
pair of runs in the opening
inning and another in the top of
the fourth, but claimed the 11-3
win, tying the game in the bot-
tom half of the first and going
on to add some runs each inning
except the third.
Bridget Whidden walked,
Kim Derringer was hit by a
pitch and Kristen Judah walked
to load the bases in the fifth


inning with two outs in a 6-3
game. Gabby Allen singled and
stole second. On a Josie Moore
hit, the rest of the girls on base
came in, except Allen, who was
out going to third.
Hardee finished the game in
the home half of the sixth, when
Makayla Deuberry and Jakaysia
Lindsey hit back-to-back sin-
gles and raced home on an Alex
Ullrich double to win on the 10-
run rule.
It was a week before the next
game, Oct. 21, at home against
Sebring. Neither team scored in
the tight first inning. After Se-
bring went down one, two,
three in the top of the second,
Hardee broke loose for five
runs. Hannah Carlton started it
with a hit to left field. Morgan
Walters doubled to right and
:Deuberry singled. Anna Ereck-
son drew a walk, and Lindsey
and Ullrich both doubled
before the final out. The first
five batters crossed home plate.
It was 5-0.
It was a defensive battle
again until the home half of the
fifth, when a Hardee bat-around
added five more runs. Ullrich
started and ended it. Coming
home in the inning on a combi-
nation of hits, steals and walks,
were Derringer, Garcia, Carl-
ton, Deuberry and Ereckson.
When Ullrich doubled Ereck-
son home, the game ended on
the 10-run rule.


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The season ended with last
week's pair of games. Hardee
won its home finale on Oct. 25
against DeSoto, despite Lind-
sey being sidelined with a
sprained wrist.
Hardee got going in the last
of the first inning, Garcia sin-
gled and Ullrich and Derringer
followed suit. A Kendall Gough
hit cleared the bases before the
final outs left her stranded in a
3-0 lead.
Hardee widened its lead in
the bottom of the second. Allen
doubled, Breanna Godwin
- moved home along with a sacri-
fice and Garcia doubled to
bring Allen in. Ullrich singled
but was out stretching for third
on a Derringer hit which
brought Garcia home. Gough
trotted home on a Carlton hit.
DeSoto made it 7-1 with a
run in the top of the fourth, and
Hardee got that run back in the
home half of the fifth. Garcia
led off with a single and made
her way around the bases while
teammates were walking or
being hit by a pitch. Hardee
added another run in the fifth
when Ereckson singled and
similarly worked her way to
home plate.
Hardee added an insurance
run in the bottom of the sixth.
With two down, Whidden sin-
gled and Deuberry doubled to
bring Whidden home and make
it a 10-1 game.
When DeSoto was only able
to get one run in the top of the
seventh, Hardee won 10-2.
The season finale was at
Avon Park, where repeated
walks and hit batters, with scat-
tered hits, scored 11 runs in the
top of the first and 10 more in
the second inning when all
reserves were playing. After
Ereckson scored in the top of
the third, Hardee resorted to
leaving base early and other-.
wise causing outs to end the
game.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252010CA000629
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
2002 BLACK CHEVY TAHOE,
VIN # 1GNEK13252J241864


NOTICE OF ACTION


TO:
MICHEL MENDEZ, AND ALL
OTHERS CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN OR TO THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for forfeiture of the follow-
Ing described personal property
In Hardee County, Florida:
2002 BLACK CHEVY TAHOE,
VIN # 1GNEK13252J241864
has been filed against you by
Petitioner, HARDEE COUNTY
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT, and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If any,
on Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's.
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1308, on or before
Dec. 3, 2010, and to file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In the
petition.
DATED on 11-1, 2010.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
AS CLERK OF THE COURT
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
11:4,11c


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Donut,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice,
Pepperoni Pizza, Salad tray,
Green Peas, Cherry Juice Bar,
Rolls, Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
Patty, Biscuit, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Macaroni and
Cheese, Burrito, Salad Tray,
Green Beans, Juice, Apple
Crisp, Cornbread, Condiments
and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Cheese in a Blanket, Mashed
Potatoes, Salad Tray, Apple-
sauqe, Rolls, Condiments and
Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, buttered Toast, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Lasagna with Ground
Beef, Stacked Ham Sandwich,
Great Northern Beans, Salad
Tray, Peaches, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Rounds, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot Pock-
et, Combo sub, Salad Tray,
Corn, Mixed Fruit, Condiments,
and Milk


I JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice and Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice
w/Roll, Pepperoni Pizza, Salad
Bar, Tossed Salad, Garden
Peas, Juice Bar, Condiments
and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Burrito, Sausage
Pizza, Tossed Salad, Green
Beans, Apple Crisp, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Chicken Nuggets, Rolls,
Cheese Stix (Mozz) w/Dip,
Lettuce & Tomato, Mashed
Potatoes, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Pineapple
Chunks, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Lasagna, Rolls, Stacked ham
Sandwich, Salad Bar, lettuce &
Tomato, Pinto Beans, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Bar, Peaches, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot Pock-
ets, Combo Subs, Meatloaf,
Combread, Lettuce & Tomato,
Whole Kernel Corn, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
burger on a Bun, Chicken 7
Rice, French Fries, Turnip
Greens, Black-Eyed Peas,


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Every Wednesday a Friday
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Tossed Salad, Beets, Juice, Grits, Buttered Toast, Pineapple
Condi-ments and Milk Chunks, Condiments and.Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Plzza,
TUESDAY Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit, burger on a.Bun, Lasagna With
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi- Ground Beef, French Fries,
ments and Milk Green Beans, Veggie Cup,
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza, Tossed Salad, Waldorf Salad,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham- Peaches, Rolls, Condiments
burger on a Bun, Ham, and Milk
Macaroni & Cheese, French
Fries, Pinto Beans, Turnip FRIDAY
Greens, Tossed Salad, Juice, Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Cornbread, Condiments and Bar, Peaches, Condiments and
Milk Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
WEDNESDAY Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham-
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes, burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Sausage Patty, Condiments Tacos, Whole Kernel Corn,
and Milk Mexican Rice, Tossed Salad,
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza, Jello,. Fruit Cocktail, Condi-
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham- ments and Milk
burger on a Bun, French Fries,
Potato Rounds, Garden Peas,
Pig In A Blanket, Tosses Salad To keep your marriage
Pears, Condiments and Milk brimming, with love In the
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THURSDAY you're wrong, admit it;
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese whenever you're right, shut
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A eordbla-i A A


/ I






November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 11A


.HE FLED COMMUNISM


To COME To AMERICA


By ADAM KHANG
Special To The Herald-Advocate
*I interviewed Tou Khang for this
assignment.
Q: What country were you born
in?
A: The country of Laos, village of
Nong Haet, province of Xieng
Khouang.
Q: When was your birthday?
A: Sept. 2, 1948.
Q: How was your life in that coun-
try?
A: Lived pretty well, raised animals,
and traded.
Q: What school did you go to?
A: In Long Cheng village, in which
the school was named Long Cheng
Primary School, with grades 1-12.
Q: What did you guys learn about?
A: Learned similar to the United
States: math, social studies, science,
reading and also learned languages of
Laos and French.
Q: Were there any buses?
A: No, had to' walk to school about a
mile and a half.
Q: How did you get to school?
A: Walked, and get up at 6 o'clock.
School time was from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Had to wake up extra early because
there was no plumbing and had to go
fill up a barrel of water for brushing
your teeth or to shower.
Q: How would you know you were
ready for school?
A: When you were 6 years or could
reach over your head to touch your ear.
Q: Did a lot of people go to your
school?
A: A lot of people, about 1,000 kids
that went to that school.
Q: What was your school like?
Strict, fun, or hard?
A: The school was very strict, and if
you were bad they would hit your fin-
gers with a ruler or make you run five
laps around the school. If you were
really bad they made you kneel with
both knees on sharp rough rocks, and
made you hold your arms up for 30
i nutes.
Q: What activities or sports did you
have?
A: Mornings and afternoons, you
exercised and stretched. Also played
soccer and volleyball.
Q: What kind of environment did
you grow up in?
A: Bad environment, because of war
and needed to run from the enemies.
Q: How was your country like?
A: My country had mountains, cities,*
cliffs, and lots of nature.'
O: How many family members did
you have?
A: Two girls and six boys; had anoth-
er two boys and two girls, but they
passed away around ages 4-8.
Q: Being the oldest, did you bare a
big burden on you?
A: I was responsible for caring for
my brothers and sisters, cooking, clean-
ing, babysitting, and to feed the ani-
mals.
Q: Did your family members help
you a great deal?
A: Yes, we worked together in groups
and gathered wood for fire, water for
drinking and cleaning.
Q: Was any. war going on when you
were young?
A: Yes, the Vietnam War.
Q: What position were you?
A: Company leader that worked in a
CIA group that handled heavy artillery.
.Q: Did you and everyone catch on
during the training?
A: Yes, everyone did, because all you
had to learn was how to shoot, plant
mines, and throw grenades.
Q: How was it like to stay and sleep
at night in the mountains?
A: It was very dark and scary,
because there were so many dangers out


there 'like the enemies and ghosts.
Q: What type of armory equipment
did you have?
A: We had carbines, rifles, M-16s,
mortars, M-60s, and MB-40s that
launch little missiles like a rocket.
Q: What part of the country were
you posted at?
A:.I was posted back support for the
frontline that would fire the heavy
artillery.
Q: Who
were you .
guys going .'
--against? '
A: The
conflict was North Vietnam fighting
South Vietnam.
Q: Why did the conflict start the
war?
A: The North wanted to take over the
South, and so the North attacked, which
broke the treaty between the North and
the South.
Q: How much'food and equipment
.did they drop down to the villages?
A: They dropped a lot of rice and
canned food.
Q: Where were the civilians sta-
tioned at?
A: They stayed with their families
and were caught between the war.
Q: What bad and cruel things did
they do to your people?
A: They killed innocent people, chil-
dren and women. Also, when they
caught young wives or daughters, they
would rape and kill them.
Q: Were you in a shootout battle
with the enemies?
A: Yes, because you could be so close
to them that you could throw a grenade
at them.
Q: Did they bomb the villages?
A: Yes, they did, but with only heavy
artillery.
Q: Where were the airports at?
A: On the mountains that had run-
ways that measured up to 500 feet.
Q: Where did the Americans sta-
tion at?
A: During the day, thosohelpedby
flying and dropping food, equipment
and goods. At night they would fly back
to Thailand, where it was safe.
Q: What part of the war were you
scared of?
A: I was scared of a lot of things, like
getting shot and killed.
Q: Did you cross the Mekong
River?
A: Yes, to escape from the
Communists, by boat, for which we had
to pay 150,000 KIP, which is worth
$100 of American money.
Q: What was your pay each month
while serving the Americans?
A: Three dollars a month, which was
very little.
Q: How:did you get to America?
A: Escaped to Thailand and stayed at
a refugee camp, then was interviewed
by the Americans and was told we were
able to start a new life in America.
Q: When you came to America, did
you need a high school degree or
GED?
A: I.graduated in Laos, but took night
classes for a GED.
Q: What did you work as?
A: I worked as a janitor in an all-girls
Catholic college and got paid $2.25 an
hour.
Q: Was it hard to live in America?
A: Yes, but we eventually caught on
with everyone with help from a
Catholic church and more opportunities.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


Joy is importantly different from mere pleasure. Joy has
in it the real recognition of the contrasts and depths and
problems of life. Joy is an act of courage because it can
carry you through anxieties and sorrow.
-Lady Bird Johnson


PRINTER1S*IJ P ISHEtRS

115 7h Ave. e WauchlaFL 33873^^


IF NOT YOU,

Do It For Kid


By JEFF ADAMS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Back in 1997, a very good friend
introduced me to what being a Guardian
ad Litem is all about.
By 1999, I received my second case.
It involved a special young child who
began his involvement with "the system"
five years earlier.
Let me tell' you a little bit about
"Allen's" story. (I would not use his real
name.)
The reports of abuse go back to
1994. The Department of Children
& Families began its involvement
in 1997 with various interventions.
In 1998, Allen and his sister were
removed from the home and[
placed into state care.
By 2001, I found myself in the middle
of a.termination of parental rights action,
with mne recommending that the parents'
rights be severed. Allen knows I was
very much a part of that, but he doesn't
.blame me for taking that position. He
knows I was simply trying to protect him
and his sister.
There are times when I wonder.if I am
worthy of this mission. Many times I
grieve very heavily over the decisions
that we as GALs must make. For Allen,
the removal from the abusive home envi-
ronment meant that, over time, he would
spend 500 days in temporary shelter
care; experience over 30 different foster
care placements; spend 50 lonely days in
DJJ detention; and 400 days inDJJ resi-
dential commitment and treatment pro-
grams.
Did I mention the 10 different ele-
mentary schools he confusingly waded
through in his early, childhood develop-
ment? I guess that explains his FCAT
scores.
I don't want to paint a picture where
Allen is a perfect angel and the system
failed him. What I would like to present
is a child who is hurting, and who loved
his parents in spite of what he experi-
enced at their hands and in their care.
The way our child welfare system
works is that the children are removed
from parents who have been found to be
a threat of harm, or who have actually
injured their child through maltreatment,
neglect or sexual abuse. The ideal would
be to remove the parents, perhaps, and
have "Nanny 911" rushed to the home.
That way, the children would experience
lesser disruption to their lives.
As it is, the children who are removed
from their homes get confused and often
wonder if it was because of something
they did.
The child welfare guidelines focus
with purpose on "12 months to perma-
nency"; this is part of a federal mandate
to achieve a solution to the family's
problem within "childtime," to remedi-
ate, rehabilitate or provide another per-
manent solution, including terminating
the parents' legal rights if that is found to
be necessary. All within one year. That is
the theory and the hope.
By 2004, I realized that Allen was'


THEN WHO?

Is Like Alln
more than just a "case" to me.
He has been in my life just a few
years less than my own sons. I watched
Allen play Little League baseball when
he was small, and saw the joy in his face
when he proudly baked cookies last year.
I have spent birthdays, Christmas,
Halloween and countless other events
with this boy over the years, trying to
give him something constant and stable
in his life. (I even suffered the cafeteria
food in order to share lunchtime
with him at school.)
I never judged Allen. I always
N tried to be there for him, guide
him when he would listen, and
speak for him when it was time to
go to court. And there were plenty
of court hearings, let me tell you.
I have seen Allen in church clothes,
street clothes, baseball uniforms, school
uniforms, and even the bright orange of
the Department of Juvenile Justice I
always tried to treat him the same.
Last year Allen turned 18, and as soon
as he could, he got on a plane and head-
ed to the person he worried about the
most over the years his biological
mother, who he had recently heard was
now dying from cancer.
I had thought about and struggled
over the years with adopting this young
boy myself. How many of the negative
experiences could have been avoided,
how much could his suffering have been
less, if only things had been different?
The impact of the Guardian ad Litem
program has been far reaching and
relentless in presenting the best interests
of children to the, court. The stories of
my fellow volunteers are full of the extra
mile they have gone on behalf of fighting
for the cause of the children they repre-:
sent.


The role of the Guardian ad Litem is
to be the voice of children involved in
dependency proceedings. At a time of
alleged abuse, neglect or maltreatment,
this cannot be a time for these wounded
children to be seen and not heard.
The importance of this program has
been acknowledged by the Legislature in
the State Statutes, where it is stated:
f'e Legislature finds that for the past.,
20 yearsvthe Guardian ad Litem program
has been the only mechanism for the best '
interest representation for children in
Florida who are involved in dependency'
proceedings" (39.8296).
That was included in the statutes in
2006, but I believe it states my purpose
for volunteering, each and every day that
I am able to:
I encourage my fellow volunteers to:
persevere and continue the good fight. I
am very grateful to have this opportunity.
to serve children in need. Won't you?
If you want to help a child who has been:
thrust into the court system via allega-
tions of abuse or neglect, call the local'
office at 773-2505. You can speak up for.
that child, while everyone else is talking;
for the adults in the case. If you have a:,
heart for children, remember: If not you,,
then who?


The legitimate object of government is to do for a community of people whatever they
need to have done, but cannot do at all in their separate and individual capacities..
-Abraham Lincoln
It was once customary to bake a cake with a bean in it on January 6th. Whoever got
the slice with the bean was believed to have good luck all the rest of the year.
I li_


Hydr -1

Hydroponic Growers


raste


COME PICK YOUR WAY To A HEALTHY LIFE STYLE
Open Tuesday-Saturday 9am-5pm
Sunday 11am-5pm Closed Mondays

TAKE SR 70 12 MILES EAST OF 1-75
LOOK FOR OUR BIG SIGN ON SR 70 WHEN GOING
EAST ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE ROADWAY
THEN TURN LEFT ON VERNA BETHANY ROAD.
CHECK OUR WEB SITE FOR DIRECTIONS AND A MAR
www.hydrotaste.com
Phone (941) 322-0429
SO 1:c


'








12A The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg
THE SEPARATION PRINCIPLE
In school we learn about the principle known as the separation
df powers, and the separation of church and state. But last week, I
learned about the separation of column and photos!
Cyndi Krahl, the managing editor of The Herald-Advocate,
I was sick enough to stay home last week. We all love modern tech
nology, but the bane of it is that she had to work from home where-
asin olden times we actually got to rest and get better when we
were home sick!
Bulythphotos that accompanied last week's column got sepa-
sated-ftiom the printedwvord (they were on CDs on her desk, the col-
umn was on her lapolp computer), so the photographs of the
Stevens Land & Cattle/Fulford Cattle and Audubon Ranch teams
never cleared the Production Department.
I'm sure these teams will forgive Cyndi for this situation, and
here's hoping she feels better. So, Stevens/Fulford and Audubon
cowboys, enjoy your photos from last week!
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!
*1


Jay Belflower and Dennis Carlton Jr. flank the calf for the
brander, while Pat Thomas watches after roping the calf
in the team branding event.


Billy Adams receives the trophy for Top Horse, "San Joes
Hickory Bar," from Working Ranch Cowboys Association
Vice President Randy Norris and representative Kaycee
Hooper.


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHYANN GREGG
Charles Robert Stevens III and Joey Drake, of the
Stevens Land & Cattle/Fulford Cattle Team, hold the calf
down so Bobby Joe Fulford can brand it, while Billy
Adams watches after roping it In the team branding
event.


Pat Thomas and Dennis Carlton Jr., of the Audubon
Ranch Team, are still on horseback, while Andy Morgan
grabs the steer and Jay Belflower runs to help in the
team doctoring event.


In the wake of recent calf
depredations on ranches in east-
ern Collier County, a team of
experts will attempt to capture
and collar the suspected male
Florida panther in the area.
Working with the U.S. Fish &
Wildlife Service, biologists
with the Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission will
then examine the panther and
conduct a health evaluation.
SProvided the panther is healthy,
it will be released in a remote
location in Collier County.
Capture and relocation is a
form of aversive conditioning
aimed at creating an unpleasant
association for this panther near
the area where depredations
have occurred. Other forms of
aversive conditioning may be
used by the biologists to deter
the panther from returning to
the site of the depredations.
A number of calves were
taken by Florida panthers over
the past several weeks within
the Sunniland area. Most re-
cently, a calf with head injuries
indicative of a panther depreda-
tion was discovered last week.
The calf later died of its
wounds.
FWC investigators found
male Florida panther tracks
near the site of two of the de-
predations.


TALL MARIGOLD PLANT


Light One Candle
By Stephanie Raha
The Christophers


REALITY TV ISN'T REALITY
The next time you're channel-surfing to find a TV show, you
might notice that you're seeing more and more over-the-top emo-
tional outbursts.
But is it just a television phenomenon or is it catching? As
viewers, are we being influenced to have our own meltdowns?
And are these emotional over-reactions becoming more acceptable,
more the norm?
A recent article in USA Today asked, "Is TV causing our reac-
tions to boil over?"
Certainly, television has been blamed for exposing audiences,
especially children, to excessive violence for generations. So
what's different now? Perhaps it's the type of violence as well as
the participants and their situations that have changed.
"Reality" TV has become immensely popular on both broad-
cast and cable outlets. Most of these shows put everyday people
in unusual circumstances, usually vying against one another for
prizes. Other programs offer what are supposed to be slice-of-life
situations. Still others have celebrities competing, sometimes for
charitable donations.
But the overall appeal to audiences appears to be that all of
these programs are unscripted and that whatever the participants
say and do however outlandish or inappropriate is strictly up to
them.
Many viewers realize that a reality show from its concept to
the specific urgings of the producers or hosts encourages
extremes of behavior. More than that, these over-the-top words
and actions are simply not normal.
Sarah Coyne, a professor of family life at Brigham Young
University, is the co-author of a study on aggressive behavior on
TV. After reviewing programming from five reality shows and
five'non-reality programs including dramas, comedies and soap
operas, she found that reality TV averages 52 acts of aggression per
hour and non-reality TV averages 33 per hour. These acts include
both physical aggression (especially punching, pushing and kick-
ing) and verbal aggression (most commonly yelling, arguing, or
insulting others).
Coyne believes that such levels of media violence are "pro-
ducing this culture of being mean to each other. We're setting up
our culture to being over-reactive."
uow do we recognize our own inappropriate aggressive
behavior and how do we deal with the actions of other people?
Judith Siegel, author of "Stop Overreacting" and associate
professor of social work at New York University, says, "An over-
reaction is about emotions that. are bigger than the immediate situ-
ation calls for. You may be releasing a lot of frustration, but your
response is far greater than what is justified." Most people who
overreact learn that "it leads to consequences that lead to regrets.
People will say 'You're way over the top,' or afterward you may
feel guilty or remorseful."
As with every aspect of life, we need to recognize our own
responsibility for our words and actions. Whatever outside forces
may affect us, we still need to choose our own path, preferably a
peaceful one that we travel with God. "Too often, we think that
God only cares about the 'spiritual stuff,' says pastoral counselor
and writer Gregory Popcak. "We forget to invite God into -our
work struggles, our challenges, and ourefeelings."
Staying cool and calm isn't always easy, but it sure beats the
consequences of allowing ourselves to get hot and bothered and
blowing up at those around us: better for them and far better for us.
"Almighty God, by whose mercy my life has been yet pro-
longed to another year, grant that Thy mercy may not be in vain ..
.. As age advances, let me become more pure in my thoughts, more
regular in my desires, and more obedient to Thy laws. Let not the
cares of the world distract me, nor the evils of age overwhelm me.
But continue and increase thy loving kindness towards me, and
when Thou shalt call me hence, receive me to everlasting happi-
ness, for the sake of Jesus Christ, our Lord."
For a free copy of "The Best Is Yet To Be," write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
mail@christophers.org.


Get Scholarship
Dinner Friday
Spaghetti dinners are be-
ing sold for pick up or deliv-
ery on Friday, beginning at
11 a.m.
All proceeds will go to the
Major C. Morris Scholarship
fund.
The dinners, at $6 include
spaghetti, green beans, roll
and dessert. To get one, call:
245-1704 to order.

School Board
Changes Meeting
The Hardee County
School Board has changed;
its November schedule.
Following state statutes, it;
will meet on Tuesday, Nov.
16 at 5 p.m. for reorganiza-
tion, and will continue with
the regular meeting after
new members are seated.
There will not be a meeting
on the second Thursday,
Nov. 11. The Nov. 16 meet-
ing will be the only,meeting
in November.

Get Amplified
Phone Dec. 9
Florida residents who have
a hearing or speech loss can
get a free amplified tele-.
phone on Dec. 9 from 12:30
to 2:30 p.m. if they make an
appointment to do so.
Representatives of the
Hearing Impaired Persons of
Charlotte County Inc. will be
at the Catheryn McDonald
Center, 310 N. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula. To make an
appointment, call 941-743-
8347.

The man who puts Into the
marriage only half of what
he owns will get that out.
-Ronald Reagan


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
David Stanford, 72, of the Popash community and his
girlfriend Donna Carector stand behind a tall marigold
plant filled with blooms and are proud of their goat Holly
for producing natural fertilizer for the marigold plants.
Stanford has a new FEMA two-bedroom, one-bath mobile
home build In 2006 following the 2004 Hurricane Charley
which destroyed his mobile home at 1225 Popash Road.
He is retired following four heart attacks and open hebrt
surgery. He worked in a sugar factory, n LaBelle before
moving back to Hardee County and working for Wau-
chula Feed Store, Adrian Chapman and Buford Long. He
loves to eat squirrel and cottontail rabbit. He was a
welder and truck driver and helped build two CF drag-
lines. Carector worked for FEMA in 2004 when she met
stanford. She helped get his and about 40 other new
FEMA homes for Hardee County after the Huricanes. She
now works for the Polk County Sheriff's Office and Is a
math and reading tutor for K-fifth grade students under
the federal No Child Left Behind program at homes after
school Stanford lives on 1.25 acres well off the road and
covered with oak trees.


Under the terms of the Inter-
agency Florida Panther Re-
sponse Plan, the FWC, the U.S.
Fish & Wildlife Service and the
National Park Service are the
primary agencies responsible
for responding to human-pan-
ther interactions and depreda-
tions in a timely and effective
manner. These partners are
making every effort to work
with cattle ranchers and the
ranching community.
This type of depredation is a
relatively new occurrence. Past
panther depredations have in-
volved animals such as goats
kept in residential yards. In
those instances, people have
been largely successful at deter-
ring residential depredations by
securing their animals at night
in protective enclosures. How-
ever, it is more difficult to pro-
tect large herds of cattle,
because they roam over hun-
dreds of acres.
The FWC and its partners
have worked with the ranchers,
who are allowing the panther
team to'capture and collar the
panther on their land.
"We're extremely grateful to
these landowners for working
closely with us on this situa-
tion," said FWC Executive
Director Nick Wiley. "We're
committed to working with


these ranchers, because they
have taken good care of our fish
and wildlife resources for many
generations on the lands they
own. Their continued support is
critical to the overall success of
panther management and con-
servation in Florida."
The Florida panther is one of
the rarest large mammals in the
United States. The population
declined to about 30 cats by the
early 1980s. Today, biologists
believe there are at least 100
adult panthers in Florida.
Human-panther encounters
are occurring more often be-
cause of human encroachment
near panther habitat and an
increase in the panther popula-
tion. Conflicts with humans
raise issues that require careful
consideration and action to con-
serve the species while the safe-
ty of the public remains para-
mount.
The panther was listed as
endangered in 1967 and is pro-
tected under both the Federal
Endangered Species Act and
Florida law.
To report panther threats, pets
or livestock lost to a panther, or
an injured or dead panther, call
the FWC's Wildlife Alert
Hotline at 888-404-FWCC
(3922).


Collier County Calves


Killed By Panthers


YOUR BUSINESS COULD;

APPEAR HERE TOO!! s>
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels '

.773-3255
Y PIii lf B>MM ii IM


..... ...








PAGE ONE


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcats can
control their own destiny with a
win at DeSoto on Friday night.
The 'Cats are literally in a
four-way tie for the Class 2A-
District 6 championship. All
four ,teams in the district have
1-1 records. Estero at Im-
mokalee and Hardee at DeSoto
makes the season for whoever
wins, and could mean a playoff
spot at the end of the season.
All the other teams were idle
last week as Hardee beat
Okeechobee 48-25. Estero is 3-
4-1, Immokalee 3-5 and DeSoto
3-5, while Hardee is 2-6.
However, Hardee is on the
move, winning its last two
games impressively.
That makes for an exciting
game Friday, not just in the old-
est football rivalry in the state,
but for all the marbles.
Hardee has won the most
games in this oldest rivalry,
leading 54-30 after last year's
28-6 victory. There have been
five ties over the 89 games that
have been played. The rivalry
officially began in 1923, when
two games were played that
season.
Actually, the rivalry between
these two teams may be much
older. In the Dec.6, 1984 issue
of The Herald-Advocate, there
was a picture of the first game,
In Novemberl909 between then
Arcadia High School and
Wauchula High School. The
game was played in Arcadia,
which won 21-0.
The Florida High School
Athletic Association mandates
which week district games can
be played, the fifth, seventh and
ninth of the season. So far,
Immokalee beat Hardee 36-34
and lost to DeSoto 43-29;
Estero beat DeSoto 46-12 and
lost to Hardee 31-28; DeSoto
lost to Estero 46-12 and beat
Immokalee 43-29.
DeSoto has the number one


Year DeSoto Hardee
1923............ 9......................... 6
1923....... ..... 14......................... 0
1924 .......... 0 ...................20
1924............20........................ 0
1925............ 3........................10
1926............ 0..........................20
1927............ 0.....................:.. 7
1928............ 1 8.........................
1929............12..........................6
1930............12........................ 13
1931 ..............6........................ 13
1932.............0....................... 18
1933.............0..........................40
1934..............0........................ 13
1935..............0..:.....................20
1936..............0........ .......... 13
1937..............0........................ 6
1938..............0..........................0
1939..............7........................18
1940............ 13..........................
1941 ..............6........................18
1942..............7........................ 0
1943..............6.......................0
1944............ 7........................ 7
1945............19................... 18
1946..............0.............. 20
1947............25.................... 14
1948............33......................... 8
1949............ 6................... 0
1950............19.................... 20
1951............ 19....................... 27
1952..............7........................ 19
1953............ 0........................53
1954............27........................ 0
1955............ 0........................ 15
1956............ 0........................ 19
1957............. ......................... 6
1958............ 0........................40
1959............13........................35
1960............14.........................40
1961............20........................33
1962............ 6........................ 13
1963............20........................ 6
1964............ 14........................ 14
1965............ 0........................41


DeSoto wins: 30


rusher in the district in senior
Antonio Washington. Behind
him, DeSoto has accumulated
121 points so far this season.
Hardee counters with a vari-


Year DeSoto Hardee
1966............26......................... 7
1967............27........................ 27
1968 13..................... ......20
1969............20........................ 40
1970 ............1 4 ..................... 0
1971 ...........40.......................13
1972............47........................... 7
1973............40........................ 0
1974............13......................... 13
1975.. ............. .......................27
1976. .............. .............. ......21
1977..............6....................... .. 15
1978..............0........................ 6
1979 ..............6 ........................ 14
1980 ............ 14 ........................2 1
1981..............6......................... 40
1982. ..................... .......14
1983..............7......................2 1
1984..............7... ............. .. 14
1985............2 1... ............ ........ 17
1986..............0........................20
1987............28........................24
1988............21.........................
1989............34.................. 28
1990............14...........................7
199 1 .......... 35........................15
1992............16.................. 12
1993..... .... .....6................ 14
1994..............0.................. 14
1995............ 6................... 60
1996............20........................42
1997............28........................ 47
1998............20........................14
1999............ 6....................... 54
2000...... ..... ..................... 41
2001 ............21........................ 56
2002............21.........................40
2003...... ............................. 50
2004............ 7......................... 19
2005...... ........................... 16
2006............ 7......................... 10.
2007............13....................... 0
2008............21......................... 20
2009.......... 6............................ 28


Ties: 5


Hardee wins: 54


ety of scorers in its shared
offense led by junior quarter-
back Colby Baker, with seniors
Jarrius Lindsey, Tre' Anderson
and Jake Mayer and junior


Andrew Hooks alternating in
carrying the football.
The official rivalry between
these two squads began in 1923.
two years after Hardee became
a separate county. Two games
were played in that first year.
one at the beginning and anoth-
er at the end of the season.
DeSoto won both games in
1923 and the teams split games
in 1924. There have been five
ties over the years.
At game's end, the Walter F.
"Buck" Carlton trophy is
awarded to the winning school.
Symbol of the long-standing
competition between these two
schools, the trophy was first
presented in 1965 in honor of
the DeSoto manager and avid
fan, who had died in 1964.
The Carlton trophy was
retired in 1972 after DeSoto had
won three consecutive years, a
stipulation of the original pre-
senter.
It was reactivated in 1982 by
Bruce and Sue Carlton and won
by Hardee in 1982m 1983 and
1984. DeSoto and Hardee alter-
nated in 1985 and 1986. The
Bulldogs ran off a string of vic-
tories from 1987 through 1992.
The Wildcats then had a five-
year win streak, only to have
DeSoto come back to win 20-14
in 1998. Hardee claimed the
Carlton trophy from 1999
through 2006. DeSoto took it in
2007 and 2008, while Hardee
won last year 28-6.
Another' presentation at the
end of Hardee-DeSoto game is
the Bob Martin Golf Challenge
trophy presented at halftime of
the game between these teams.
The golf matches are played the
weekend before the big game.
Martin successfully coached
football at each school for a
number of years. The schools
split the tournament proceeds
and the golf winner gets to keep
the trophy until the next year's
game.


HHS Grad J.T.

Taylor Race Leader


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 1986 Hardee High School
graduate with local ties contin-
ued his racing career by recent-
ly being named general manag-
er for the Torchmate Racing
Team.
Jason "JT" Taylor, who
joined the U.S. Army shortly
after his graduation here, was
sent to Germany and eventually
to Iraq. He retired as a first ser-
geant and earned the bronze star
in Iraq. His father J. Marvin
Taylor, sister Patty Toft, aunt
Ruth Young and uncles Perry
Taylor and Melvin Taylor still
live in Hardee County and fol-
low his career. His father has
been to many of his son's races
as well as going to Mexico with
him for the Baja 250.
Bill Kuntz, owner of Torch-
mate Racing, announced re-
cently. "I couldn't be more
excited about the promotion of
JT Taylor to the position of gen-
eral manager. He has been a
member of our team for a few
years now. His organizational
and leadership skills are second
to none ... He will represent us
well in managing the ongoing
relationships with our cus-
tomers, partners and team
members."
Taylor will not only be man-
ager, but will be the driver of
record for many events and race
both the new Ultra4 car and the
7200 truck. He will start his
new duties as the Driver of
Record for the 7200 truck in the
2010 SCORE Baja 1000. The
focused team member will
share driving duties with team-
mates Gregg Jones and Mark
Leverett, and Marty Fiolk, the
editor of Dirt Sports Magazine.


LCUURItSY PHOTI
Taylor
Taylor has had multiple rac-
ing career successes across
multiple racing disciplines. He
has maintained a top 10 posi-
tion in XORRA racing for five
years and is the two-year reign-
ing champion in the XORRA
Germany series. He is the
Colorado Hill Climb Associ-
ation Ultra4 champion -and
made history as the first Ultra4
to run Pikes Peak. He is one of
the original 13 competitors of
the King of the Hammers.
His mechanical capabilities
allow his key crew chief roles
with Speed Technologies, Shan-
non Campbell, Torchmate and
Dirt Sports race teams. He has
been featured in multiple maga-
zines and websites for his
accomplishments on and off the
track.


Riches may enable us to confer favours, but to confer
them with propriety and grace requires a something that
riches cannot give.
--Charles Caleb Colton


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Parade Guidelines
1. $25.00 Entry Fee.
2. Entries must pertain to the holiday and/or theme, "A Christmas Caroling Celebration".
3. Because this is an evening parade, LIGHTS ARE REQUIRED on all floats or pulled
units.
4. No Santas. Only helpers are allowed.
5. No walking vendors along parade route. Stationary vendors allowed on 7th Avenue
upon approval from the event coordinator. Mandatory vendor application available at
Chamber Office.
6. Entries with animals must provide their Twn clean up during line up and along the
parade route. For the safety of the spectators, all animals must be accompanied by a
walking chaperone.
7. No alcohol or tobacco are allowed.
8. Banner and/or poster and flash lights a'e required to precede float.
9. At least two walkers are required besi e each float
10. Must be 16 years old to operate any motorized vehicle.
11. No bull whips are permitted.
12. For the safety of children, candy or other items may no be thrown from any vehicle, but
should be handed out by people walking in the parade.
13. Please have at least 1 adult assigned to every 20 children. Children must be accompanied
at all times.
14. Field will be available from 9:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. All participants are required to be in
position no later than 4:30 p.m.
15. Immediately following the parade, participants must have a representative at the judging
stand for award presentations.
16. Registration deadline is November 19th.
17. In the event of a severe weather cancellation, the parade will be rescheduled for
Saturday, December 11th.

--------Entry Form-------. I
Please print. Only completed forms will be accepted. Check all that apply.
Entry Type: 0 Float 0 Vehicles 0 Marching Unit 0 Other
Category: Q Commercial 0 Non Commercial
Accompanied by Music? _Yes No If yes, please specify__
Accurate and clear description of entry (To be read by the emcees)

I.|

Business or Organization:
Contact Person: Phone Number:
Address: City & Zip:
All entry forms and registration fees must be received by Friday. Ny. 19 201 to:
Hardee County Chamber of Commerce RO. Box 683, Wauchula, FL 33873
Fax: 863-773-4915 Email: Casey@hardeecc.com 1
L ---- -- -- --- -- -- --- ------- ---- 10:-----21-:18----


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, November 4, 2010


Hardee-DeSoto 90th Clash Friday


Buy a pair of



glasses or lenses


and we will



DONATE



a percentage



each month to



our local


CCER IN OUR





HARDE

9t, CO
"'/" SPPORT FO '




We will also donate

toward other organizations.







EYE CARE



^soCIAeTS

735 N. 6th Ave. Wauchula

(863) 773-3322

11:4c





2B The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010




Hardee


Living


1


COURTESY PHOTO
Kristina Evers & Sean Alderman

Kristina Evers Will

Wed Sean Alderman


Kayren Evers of Land o'
Lakes and Chuck Evers of Lady
Lake announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Kristina Lynne
Evers of Bowling Green, to
Sean Christopher Alderman, the
son of Roy and Mary Alderman
of Bowling Green.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Land o' Lakes High
School and is currently attend-


ing University of South Florida
Polytechnic.
The prospective groom is a
1998 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School. He is employed at
the Florida Institute for Neuro-
logic Rehabilitation.
The couple will exchange
marriage vows this Saturday at
Homeland Heritage Park in
Homeland.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate






h r1 :"
T T









NOVEMBER 6
Jessica Drake & George Rosenberg, Jr.

NOVEMBER 20
Adrian Parrish & Jess Calder

JANUARY 1, 2011
Jennifer Taylor & Brandon Sellers

MARCH 19, 2011
Carolyn Lewis & Matt Driskell

JUNE 25, 2011
Kaylyn Crawford & Dustin Walton

Coar 1n n 9kn
S`Gifts Since 1970
J/ 117 East Main St. Wauchula
7 (863) 773-6565 -
9U/764 www.catsonmain.com --
_soc11:4c


ANNvAL


SILVER MEDAL WINNER


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Don't look to men for help;
their greatest leaders fail; for
every man must die. His
breathing stops, life ends,
and in a moment everything
he planned for himself has
ended.
Psalm 146:3-4 (TLB)
FRIDAY
Indeed, all of you should
wrap yourselves in the gar-
ment of humility towards
each other, because God
sets His face against the
arrogant but favors the hum-
ble. Humble yourselves then
under God's mighty hand,
and He will lift you up in due
time.
I Peter 5:5b-6 (NEB)
SATURDAY
But happy is the man whose
hope is in the Lord, his God,
who made both earth and
heaven, the seas and every-
thing. He is the God Who
keeps every promise.
Psalm 146:5b-6 (TLB)
SUNDAY
Jesus said, "Now I am giving
you a new command-love
one another. Just as I have
loved you, you must love
one another."
John 13:34 (Phillips)
MONDAY
God says, "I have created
you and have cared for you
since before you were born.
I will be your God through-
out your lifetime-until your
hair is white with age. I made
you, and I will care for you. I
will carry you along and save
you.
Isaiah 46:3b,4 (NLT)
TUESDAY
Be at peace among your-
selves. ... Be patient with the
weak. See that none of you
repay evil for evil, but always
seek to do good to one
another and to all.
I Thessalonians 5:13b, 14b (RSV)
WEDNESDAY
Blessings accrue on a good
and honest life, but the
mouth of the wicked is a
dark cave of abuse. A good
and honest life is a memori-
al; a wicked life leaves a rot-
ten stench.
Proverbs 11:5-6 (The Message)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV), New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.
The secret of joy In work is
contained in one word-
excellence. To know how
to do something well is to
enjoy it.
-Pearl Buck


t-^ '7tAk
"r C


:-ALL t'AZAARP

Saturday, November 13


8 a.m. -2 p.m.

*A 5 Crafts, Plants,

Homemade Baked Goods,
Rummage Sale Items,

MFood and Drinks


first United Methodist Church
4910 N. Church Avenue, Bowling Green _
b"* F A ^socl11:4,11 d


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COURTESY PHOTO
Dr. Barbara Carlton's new. book, written with help from Barbara Oehlbeck, on Oct. 9
won the silver medal in the category Florida Nonfiction For Adults at the Florida
Publishers Association's 2010 book awards ceremony in Sarasota. Her book is entitled
"This Nearly Was Mine: A Journey Through Carlton Country." A group of 25 Florida
librarians and three members of the book design firms were judges. One gold and up
to two silver medals were awarded in various categories. The state association is in its
28th year and consists of publishers, self-publishers, authors and others interested in
book publishing in Florida. From left are Carlton and Oehlbeck.


/


/ Thank You
FROM THE FAMILY OF
SONNY B. HENEGA R
9-16-1941 10-16-2010


S Emergency Medical Services
Friend and Familv-


---- .7----~~ \P
' Thank you for your help, prayers, compassion,
visits, food and flowers, and for your care during
the sudden loss of our husband, daddy, papa and
-. uncle.
ST. FAMILY OF. SONNY B. HENEGAR


. Wauchula Moose Lodge
4 #1487 117 King Rd. Wauchula
SERVING

MOUTH-WATERING BBQ
jR RIBS & CHICKEN
The 1 SATURDAY of EVERY MONTH
11 a.m. 6 p.m.
Beginning Saturday Nov. 6
I 4


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November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3B


WOMEN HELPING WOMEN


HIGH-SPEED INTERNET


PHOTO BY JEAN KELLY
The Wauchula Woman's Club recently donated $500 to Hannah's House, an organiza-
tion sheltering women who are victims of domestic violence and their children.
Hannah's House also helps the homeless, provides parenting classes, and offers coun-
seling, among other services. Lorraine Gillespie (left), executive director of Hannah's
House, is shown accepting a check from Woman's Club President Nellie Garcia and
Vice President Zee Smith.


Extra Nice Room A/C Seats 60-80
. Music & Karaoke Available
773-3820 )soc 1: 1


The youth of Lake Dale
Baptist Church, 3201 Heard
Bridge Road, Wauchula, are
holding a yard sale/bake sale
Saturday, beginning at 8 a.m.
The church will hold its fall
estival at 4 p.m. For further

There will be gospel singing
n Saturday at the Victory
Praise Center, 132 E, Main St.,
SBowling Green, beginning at 7
.m. and featuring the Spirit
Wind trio.
Finger foods will be served
following the hymn sing. Pastor
Robert A. Murphy invites
everyone to come enjoy the fel-
owship. For more information,
all 863-681-3617.
The deadline for Church News
submissions ,is Thursday at 5
or the next edition.
Congratulations. I knew
the record would stand
until it was broken.
-Yogi Berra
It seems to me that people
have vast potential. Most
people can do extraordi-
nary things if they have the
confidence or take the
risks. Yet most people
don't. They sit in front of
the telly and treat life as if it
goes on forever.
-Philip Adams


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Brice Rich, business development director for Rapid Systems, Inc. of Tampa, spoke to
the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, Oct. 19, at Panda Restaurant. Rapid Systems,
with a $2 million grant from the county economic development board, is providing
high-speed wireless broadband Internet service in the county. The company has
installed 15 concrete poles and also attached equipment to water towers in Wauchula
and Bowling Green. There is free installation for the first 2,500 customers. Residential
rates range from $19.95 to $39.95 monthly and business rates range from $39.95 to
$59.95 monthly. From left are Ralph Arce, Rich, Kevin Sanders and Mark Manuel.


Homemade Fruiteakos

Available Now


3 lb. $25.00


(Bowling Gren


5 lb. $35.00


Church of Godsc:4-18c


34th HOMECOMING


SUNDAY *

Founder and Pastor
for'34 Years

Dr. JW Miller
Serving Hardee County with Good News
""Jesus Saves"


Morning Service
Evening Service


10:50 a.m.
6:30 p.m.


Dinner Following Morning Service


NOVEMBER 7






SI i GI




SPECIAL SINGING


46-a- it *,1A em I (t4o6
4937US Hy 1 N -Bowing.ree


g i iosa pl ie


<)j


IT'S d HOLIDAv PREVIEW PaRTV

d SrNEa PEEK JUST FOR VoV

Thursday November 4

5pm 7pm

Holiday Treats and Door Prizes Too!
767-0017 773-9684


1'.*


Free Gift Wrap by
Santa's Elves


1 MAJOR C. M1ORuRI
SCHOLARlSHiiPr
Spaghetti
Green Beans All
Roll Proceeds
Dessert Benefit
the
Major C.
p FUND I- AI SE R Morris
Pickup Scholarship
or Friday Nov. 5 11 a.m. Fund
Delivery Call 245-1704 To Order soc11:4,


The Miss Hardee ;
County Pageant
Committee will
be holding an \\
informational *-
meeting for all
Senior girls '
wishing to .%
participate in the upcoming 2011
Miss Hardee County Pageant.
The meeting will be
Tuesday, Nov. 9th at 6:00 pm
in the HSH Media Center.
Please'bring a parent or guardian
with you, along with $10 for a
deposit on the opening number
attire. Any questions call
Krista Ullrich at 781-1282.
Check outour website at
hardeecountyfair.org. socl 4c


I Call today. 375,*2230


'*:'7'`


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4B The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


By MASQUA FIELDS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
An ample amount of extraordinary
Talent seems to be produced from little
Hardee County.
Dusty Mendoza, Wauchula native
and Hardee Senior High School gradu-
ate in 2007, made it to the Top 10 in the
Tampa Bay Idol contest this past sum-
mer-an elite group which consisted of
five males and five females.
When it comes to competitions like
this, Mendoza tends to be a little on the
shy side. It was his grandfather who
noticed an advertisement for the Tampa
Bay Idol contest and encouraged him to
audition. Unfortunately, that was the
last conversation the two shared. His
grandfather died of a heart attack two
days later.
Mendoza hadn't expected anything
of the competition, only to have a good
time; yet because of it happening during
the week of his grandpa's death, every-
thing was very crazy, he recalls.
Auditions for Tampa Bay Idol con-
sist of a four-minute, or less, DVD fea-
turing the applicant's singing. Mendoza
turned in his audition DVD at the very
last minute. "I had to drive to Tampa to
deliver it. I handed it to a security guard'
- to deliver it to the right people,"
Mendoza notes.
Two days after that, he received a
phone call proclaiming he'd made the
Top 10-while he was on his way to his
grandfather's viewing. "I had to be at
the Brandon Mall to compete for the top
spot that Friday," he says.
Among the judges at the event was
former American Idol finalist Melissa
McGhee. The competition was featured
on Fox 13 News at noon, and replayed
on the 6 o'clock news.
Mendoza's experience was a
promising one, and he is sure to excel
in all his future endeavors.
Right now, though, Mendoza is
unaware of the path his musical career
will take. He says, "I enjoy doing it, but
it isn't a career choice right now. I'll
sing wherever people will let me." He
may do a competition like thisagairnhe


COURTESY PHOTO
Dusty Mendoza of Wauchula wows the
crowd as he sings in the Tampa Idol
finals.
adds.
As with many young musicians,
Mendoza's "driving force" is mainly his
parents, but for him it's also pretty
much everyone around him.
"I am very proud of my son," his
mother, Darlene, says. "He often sings
aloud at home and in the car, and I usu--
ally join in. Our love for music keeps
our relationship strong.
"I know that he will continue to pur-
sue his dream of becoming a profes-
sional performer," she adds.
For others interested in a musical
career, Mendoza advises, "You only live
once, so go for it. The hardest person
you have to please is yourself."
The Tampa Bay Idol contest was a
great experience for Mendoza, and he
says he is grateful he was able to be a
part of it. "I had lots of fun, and my
grandpa would have been proud," he
exclaims.
Nevertheless, Mendoza's current
focal point is to finish school at
Southeastern University with a degree
in business management.


The Black Ball Line in New York advertised in 1818 that it was the first shipping com-
pany to offer regularly scheduled service from the United States to England. It also
publicized the idea that it was concerned with the comfort of its passengers.

The pat on the back, the arm around the shoulder, the praise for what was done right
and the sympathetic nod for what wasn't are as much a part of golf as life itself.
-Gerald R. Ford

IF II


Sam B. Wilson


"HEAVEN"
What a wonderful city Heaven must be,
Its wonders can never be told.
You must be so happy there,
Treading daily the streets of gold.
Twelve years ago you made it your home,
The date I well remember.
You left us with sadness in our hearts,
It was the Ninth day of November.
Many tears were shed on that sad day,
Our hearts were riven.
But it's really a joy to know that
Some glad day we'll meet again up in Heavertl
Written in Memory of Sam B. Wilson by his wife, Wanda Wilson
Missed by she and children Ronnie e Sandra, and grandchildren.


MAIN STREET WAUCHULA
1ST ANNUAL TRAIL RIDE

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH


Inaugural

r00fin'It

I ff Main
m2010


Bring your horse and join us for a half
day, fun filled ride and fundraiser
through forested wilderness, pasture land
and across beautiful streams on
CF Industries' Reclaimed North Rasture!

All proceeds benefit
Main Street Wauchula, Ic.
For more information call 863.767.0330
or download a registration form from
www.mainstreetwauchula. com.


IMPORTANT DETAILS
Date: Saturday, November 13, 2010
Registration: 8a.m. Ride: 9a.m. Noon (includes lunch after the ride)
Registration Fee: $50 per rider 16 and up. $40 per rider under 16
Registration Includes: A Fantastic Ride, A T-Shirt, and Lunch
Location: From Hwy 17 travel West on Hwy 62. Turn Right onto SR 663.
Follow sign to CF Industries on your left.
To reach someone the morning of the ride call 863-245-8309 or 863-781-1085.
11:4c


LOCAL VOCALIST TAKES

TOP 10 IN TAMPA IDOL


By MESQUA FIELDS
For The Herald-Advocate
"Where grows? Where grows
it not? If vain our toil, we ought
to blame the culture, not the
soil," said Alexander Pope, an
English poet.
Today (Thursday), the entire
body of fourth graders in
Hardee County took a trip to the
Cattleman's Arena. Their mis-
sion? To attend Ag Fest.
What is Ag Fest? It includes
exhibits and demonstrations
from agricultural and ag-related
businesses. And it teaches chil-
dren where and how their food
is raised.
The youngsters are exploring
such displays as: Crews Wild-
life Management, wildlife on
the ranches; Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
water conservation; CF Indus-
tries, reclamation; Mosaic,
phosphate dig and fertilizer;
Florida Department of Citrus,
citrus; and the Institute of Food
& Agricultural Sciences, food

POSTER PERFECT!


nutrition.
Also, Himrod Nursery, citrus
tree budding and growing; John
Harvesting, irrigation and tree
spacing; Cantu Apiaries, bees;
Cresent Bar C, horses; M.
McIntyre, horse shoeing; Nick-
erson Dairy, dairy; Buckhorn
Nursery, horticulture; Cresent
Bar D, commercial cattle and
hay making; Shackelford Cattle
Services, purebred cattle; Peace
River Valley Citrus Growers
Association, citrus.
Hardee County 4-H also is
there, as is Fields Equipment
Co.
This entire program provides
a hands-on experience that
shows children the different.
aspects of agriculture in Hardee
County. Bill Hodge, who's been
involved in the program for at
least 10 years, has been doing it
every year. "We think it's a
good age to introduce the agri-
culture in Hardee County," he
says. "It's a good educational
experience."


COURTESY PHOTO
Bowling Green Elementary School hosted its annual spaghetti dinner on Oct. 21.
Beforehand, students participated in a poster contest to promote the event. Contest
winners, shown here flanked by Assistant Principal Stuart Durastanti and Principal
Kathy Clark, are (from left) first place, Serenity Aguirre-Banda, fourth grade; second
place, CInthia Santiago-Villanue, third grade; and third place, Haley Rogers, fifth grade.


MAIN STREET WAUCHULA'S
Adopt-A-Pole Program
Decorating Downtown for Christmas!


Poles MUST follow the theme "A Christmas Caroling Celebration"
(select a Christmas carol of your choice)

For a complete application and more information visit
www.mainstreetwauchula.com or call 863.767.0330
11:4c










12WAUCHULA

PRESENTS
a a
I I






Sath
a Friday, November 19.

Registration is now open!

#k Download a registration packet from www.mainstreetwauchula.com r
or pick one up at 107 E. Main Street.
Call Main Street Wauchula at 767-0330 for more information.

a I
a 9999999999JJJJJJJJJJ a9J


The Ag Fest started at 8 a.m.,
and includes lunch for the chil-
dren and the 50 volunteers who
help out with the program.
Among those volunteers, were
the Future Farmers of America
from Hardee Senior High:
School.
The kids load up on their
buses at about 1:30 and head
back to school.
Sponsors of the event in-
clude: Hardee Livestock Mar-
ket; Citrus Solutions; BMH!
Ranch; Buckhorn Nursery;i
Florida Fertilizer Co.; John
Harvesting Inc.; D&S Cattle
Co.; Fields Equipment Co.;
Krause Grove Service; ATP
Agri-Services; Ullrich's Pitcher
Pump; The Andersons Inc.; JLC
Farms; Central Pump &
Irrigation; Hardee Ranch Sup-
ply; Orange Enterprises;
George Wadsworth Jr. and Jay
Bryan, Farm Bureau agents;
Peace River Electric Coopera-
tive; Rocking S Ranch; arid
Alan Jay Automotive Network.


Kids Head To Ag Fest


Two Prize Categoriest
Best Business $100 in advertising of your choice
Best Non-Profit $100 cash donation

Entry Feet
Business- $25
Non-Profit- $10

Entry Deadline:
Friday, November 26th


-AIL








November 4. 2010. The Herald-Advocate 5B


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
No pay, no work, was urged
by the Central Florida Educa-
tion Association last week in a
resolution calling for the clos-
ing of schools when funds for
the payments of teachers'
salaries were exhausted, saying
it was the only way to bring the
cause of public education
squarely to the attention of the
people.
Mr. M.I. Farabee, of Oak
Grove, brought in the first ripe
strawberries of the season yes-
terday. He has about a quarter
of an acre and expects to be
picking berries for the market in
about a month.
Sports fans will be excited to
learn that the Indianapolis base-
ball club of the American
Association will train on
Wauchula soil next spring. One
of the best clubs in the Ameri-
can Association, it will play
eight exhibition games here
during spring training.'
A one-week sale at Kim-
brough's All American Store
includes Fancy Blue Rose Rice
four pounds for 23 cents; Post's
whole bran two packages for 25
cents; red smoked sausage two
pounds for 25 cents; fresh chit-
terlings or a pound of hamburg-
er, each for 10 cents a pound; a
special three-pound box of
guava paste 25 cents a pound or
three pounds for 65 cents; and
chuck beef roast for 13 cents a
pound.
50 YEARS AGO
Cooler weather'which moved
into the county this week on the
heels of rain and high winds has
drastically cut the volume of
cucumbers. Prices dropped
from $4.75 early Monday to



College Hill

School Reunion

This Saturday
The annual reunion of the
College Hill School will be held
this Saturday at the old school-
house.
The program begins at 11
a.m., with a luncheon planned
for noon. Those attending are
asked to bring a covered dish.
This year, the reunion will be
dedicated to the Toole family,
which has five living members,
four sisters and a brother rang-
ing in age from 84 to 96.
,The schoolhouse is located
on CR 663 and College Hill
Road.
For more information, call
Pat Gugle at 375-2844.









CRACKER TRAIL
Cracker Trail 4-H Club held
its monthly meeting on Oct. 11
at 6:30 p.m. Eric Klein and
Kaitlyn Shaw, co-presidents,
called it to order.
Ellie Palmer held the Amer-
ican flag and led the pledge and
Aaron Bunch held the 4-H flag
and led its pledge. Devotion
was read by Audra Weeks.
Secretary's report was read by
Cheyenne Pohl. The treasurer's
report showed that we have
$38.88 in our account.
Announcements included
that we might not have an ethics
class this year. The club will be
ordering T-shirts (same as last
year) soon.
The Helping Hands/Helping
Hearts group presented its proj-
ects. Kaitlyn explained "Pen-
nies for the Pound." A challenge
has been raised between boy
and girl members and the adult
. leaders as to who can raise the


most pennies to be donated to
tlh local pound. Members will
also volunteer a day of service
at the pound. Luke Palmer pre-
sented the food drive project.
Details to come later.
Jack Driskell provided the
snacks of trail mix for the mem-
bers.
Members were reminded to
keep their agendas, as it con-
tains important information and
dates.
By Abby Clark,
Reporter


$3.50 or lower to the grower by
mid-week, but are' expected to
begin rising again.
W.H. Gilliard, a lime and
dolomite dealer, has been elect-
ed mayor of Zolfo Springs, suc-
ceeding Bartley Sapp. Elected
to the council were newcomers
Delbert Weed and Wendell Cole
and incumbent Luther Sasser.
In Wauchula, Doyle Spears Jr.
and W.L. Warren are new mem-
bers of the council, along with
incumbents T.C. Underwood
and Charles Cannon. Spears is
vice president of First Federal
Savings & Loan and Warren is
the owner of Hardee County
Seed & Crate Co.
Wauchula Police Chief Paul
Johns called U.S. 17 through
Wauchula the most hazardous
stretch of street in the city, and
will ask for a study by the safe-
ty division of the Florida
Highway Patrol. There were a
total of 27 wrecks on the 20-
block stretch from the north to
the south city limits, and 12 at
the narrow intersection of the
highway and Road 64-A in the
center of town.
The third annual Pioneer
Days rodeo is expected to pro-
vide a colorful and exciting
kickoff for Fair Week in the
county. Selection of the
Cucumber Queen is on Mon-
day, and selection of the Pickle
Queen and King is on Tuesday.
There is a turkey shoot and
fashion show on Wednesday.
The fair closes next Saturday.


IWy BacW R


25 YEARS AGO
An impromptu sampling of
Wauchula business men and
women gave responses to a 27-
question survey. In general,
they asked for consolidation of
city and county government, a
wet county, downtown restau-
rants, a city manager, and told
downtown merchants to spruce
up, show enthusiasm and offer
longer hours and competitive
prices.

Jim Kelley, of Mobil Mining
& Minerals Co., is shown pre-
senting a $5,000 check to Opal
Saunders, office manager for
Hardee Memorial Hospital,
which is starting a drive for
$200,000 for equipment and
operating funds to keep the hos-
pital open.

Survey crews began work
Monday along U.S. 17 between
Wauchula and Bowling Green,
for development of plans to
improve the highway along this
stretch. Work will include locat-
ing the centerline, taking eleva-
tions of drainage structures, and
tying in property owners within
one mile adjacent to the high-
way. Surveyors will seek per-
mission from landowners to
enter upon private property to
complete their surveying.
Supporters of Hardee County
sports include Bowling Green
Canning Co., Nicholson Supply
Co., Ullrich's Water Condition-
ing, Fields Equipment Co.,
Senterfitt's Restaurant, Polk
Auto Parts, Wauchula Farmers
Supply Co., Peace River
Growers) wholesale nursery,
Agrico, contractor George T.
Wheeler, American Tractor &


Equipment Co., English Chev-
rolet Co., McCall's Grocery &
Exxon Service, Peninsular
Equipment Co., CF Industries,
B& S Harvesters and Doyle
Carlton Jr.
10 YEARS AGO
A $2.5 million grant/loan
approved recently will 'enable
construction of a farmworker
housing complex to begin next
year. The plan has actually been
scaled down to include 39 units
plus the manager's residence, a
day care center, community
roornclassroom and other
amenities. It will be built on
Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue
south of the Hardee County
Sheriff's Complex and just
within the city limits.
A principal resigned and
another reportedly has been
asked to leave as the county's
newly elected schools superin-
tendent planned administrative
changes. Greg Dick, deputy
superintendent of curriculum,
said district staff seeking a
smooth transition asked
Superintendent Dennis Jones to
meet with principals and make
his recommendations. Dr.
Diane Nichols tendered her res-
ignation as principal of North
Wauchula Elementary and it
was rumored that Hardee High
Principal Steve Myers had been
,asked to resign. The School
Board set further discussion for
a board meeting on Nov. 21.
Automobile ads for Ferman
Ford offer a 2001 Chevrolet
Malibu for $14,611, a 2001
Ford Explorer for $20,999, a
2001 Chevrolet 4x2 Silverado
for $13,918 and a 2001
Plymouth Neon for $11,272.


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Oct. 25-29. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tot; the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1.000 or more are
listed.
ISSUED
Mark Moye, SR 62, air con-
ditioning, $4,700.
Westberry Sales, Deer Run
Drive., renovations, $5,500.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate



Domino's Pizza of Wauchula
Stop in the 3rd week of the month
for $5 Large 1 topping of your
choice pizzas. Call in advance
to place your carryout order
and they'll be fresh when you
arrive! 773-0486
*Carryout only. Deep dish $1 extra. Extra toppings $1.19 each:


SHARDEE RANCH SUPPLY, INC


U 1203 Hwy. 17 S. Wauchula, FL 33873 773-4322



SATURDAY NOVEMBER 6 P


THINK PINK

EXTENDED E ENT HOURS7am 2pm .'

S.....ISERV IIN G

LEMONADE
.P DONUTS



Sonfnf lTE Fo R Tti- Cl US


/on For Your Discountf
When YVo URy PET VET I

A PIR I (Discounted Vaccinations) I
LAVENA RA##IT CHOW
OAT CHOW OMOLENE 200 I 10am-2pm
STRATEsY EQUINE SENIOR L I






Hardee County B
S-H Foundation B B


Saturday, November 6

4 p.m. 6 p.m.


Pork & Chicken Dinners


$800 each



i Pick-up at Cattleman's Arena

Limited Altman Rd.

number of Take-out Only!

tickets will be

available at Call 773-2164

the door! Q "' 0* for tickets and more information


Thank you for your support!
We appreciate everyone who
has purchased tickets.
10'28-11,4c


Douglas Battey, Maxwell
Drive, renovations, $2,600.
Dale Bury, Maxwell Drive,
well, $2,490.
Doug Battey, Barkdoll Road,
renovations, $3,000.
Sam Albritton Electrical,
Willow Avenue, installation,
$3.900.
Jon Lee Earhart, SR 62, alter-
ations, $2,300.
Brent Driskell-EMBR, Hon-
olulu Drive, renovations,
$2,375.
James Riley, Palmetto Street,
renovations, $18,400
BUILDING BLOCKS
To report a product hazard or
a product-related injury, write
to the U.S. Consumer Product
Safety Commission, Washing-
ton D.C. 20207, or call its toll-
free hotline at 1-800-638-2772
or visit the website at
www.cpsc.gov.








6B The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
QEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00.for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


YOUNG CATTLEMAN Seeking
fenced pasture 10+ acres. Save
on taxes and mowing. 863-494-
5991. 10:28-12:2p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, Injectors, can
remove and install. 863-381-0538.
9:16-12:23p
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2010/11 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


'94 S-10 GMC, $1,850 cash. 781-
1062. 11:4c
'95 S-10, Auto, $1,850 cash. 781-
1062. 11:4c
2005 5 SPEED CHEVY Aveo
$4,000. 863-245-9582.
10:14-11:11p
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
cars. Pickup available. Crooms
Salvage. 781-3767. 2:7tfc


(1) 1985 EVENRUDE 15hp
Outboard Motor (Hard to Find),
electric start, short shaft, new
prop/head/water pump, runs
great, $700. (1) 9.5 HP Johnson
Outboard good condition w/2 gas
tanks $400. The Boat Shop, 3306
Griffin Whidden Road (West
Maint Street, 4 1/2 miles out of
town), Wauchula, Phone 863-633-
8516. 10:28;11:4p


NEW SOLID WOOD Entertain-
ment center, holds up to 60" TV,
cd storage, glass curios, drawers
on bottom $125. 863-375-2816.
I. -


MECHANIC NEEDED. Mus
experience. NO PHONE C
Apply in person ONLY at
Auto World across from Pre
Bowling Green. 10:28


MY FLORIDA LANDSCAPE
Services Inc. Part time position
available. 832-2102. 11:4p


3/2 ON 5 ACRES. 1104 N..
Hollandtown Road. $200,000.
863-245-9582. 10:14-12:16p


HORSES & DONKEY, mare and'
filly, gentle. 863-245-9582.
10:14-11:11p
I I* I


2001 KAWASAKI NOMAD 1500
$4,400. 863-773-2478. 10:7-11:4p


USED 16x80 $24,850; 24x48
$28,850; park trailer, $13,850;
Del./set/AC/skirting/eteps. New
14 and 16 wides sale priced.
Banks 863-688-4635, near 1-4 I
98. 10:28-11:25


FREE Black male kitten 7 weeks
old, very calm. 773-2321. 11:4nc
FOR SALE Chihuahua puppies,


11:4p good lood, males & females,
GNERAC GENERATOR 7500 EXL $150, 735-2200, leave message.
rated watts, $800. Wagon train 11:4p
twin bed, all wood, $300. Round ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
t have bar tablewith two tall chairs $250. Iet or are looking for a new one,
tALLSI 773-2977. 11:4-12-2p .the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
Hill's JOHN DEERE GATOR 6x4, engine the pet you're looking for The
esto in problems, $1,500 OBO; USA Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
l;11:4c made 2 seater Go-Kart, needs ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
Seat bottom and motor, nice, $250 call 773-3265 or more Informia
OBO. 863-832-2021 days. 11:4p tion. tfc-dh


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720'


s. ugle(alguglescomputerservices.com www.GulesComputerServices.comn


Foryorsot1 cal
7-6


-600 West College Drive
IAvon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132* FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
SOUTH FLORIDA www.southflorida. edu
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
GRANT DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST
Full-time, year-round, grant-funded position providing support
to the Director of Grants Development. This position will be
responsible for assisting with the College's grants development,
submission, and implementation efforts. Bachelor's degree
required. Experience working in higher education or fundraising
is preferred. Strong written and verbal communication skills are
required. A writing sample will be requested at time of interview.
Ability to work in a face-paced, collaborative environment is
required. Must exhibit professional appearance and demeanor.
Starting salary range: $28,000-$32,000 plus a comprehensive
benefits package, including retirement, health/life insurance, and
vacation/sick leave. Application deadline"" 5 p.m., 11/9/10.
Please visit.our website for more infoonation.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION





Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net J ~ a. S~b

Special Of The Week


5/6 BR 4BA CB home on corner lot in Bowling Green.
2,600+- heated area; 3,000+- total under roof. Central
air/heat, chain link fence, well landscaped yard.
A real buy at $129,900.00
3BR 2BA CB home in Knollwood Excellent location Central
air/heat Garage $169,000.00
Large 5BR home with 1.7 acres in Bowling Green. Chain link
fence around entire property. Over 2,600 sq ft of outside storage.
$69,000.00
Perfect home for a growing family 3BR 2BA with two car garage,
family living room, dinning room and large game room with door
exiting pool area. 3,300+- under roof 2,600+- heated. Large corner
lot. Price Reduced to $139,000.00
Bowling Green 3BR Home with central air/heat Close to all
services. Reduced to $64,900.00.
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863)781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
M111 ;s


Monday Thursday Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7 pm 10 am to 7:30 pm
Wauchula Wauchula Hills
(cro from1 Corne of
FlnB Nlonk)l I-d E Rd.
73- 7 Billy Hill b 77 3211
773-6667 M., Owner Ruby 773-2011


2 Salespeople
Needed
To sell the BEST
cars! Successful
candidates have
exc. people skills,
great work habits
& the desire to
succeed.
Fantastic income
potential.
Training pay,
salary + comm.,
benefits & spiffs!

Apply in person to:


FORD
1031 U.S. HWY 17 N.
WAUCHULA
OR


CHEVY/CHRYSLER
DODGE/JEEP
1405 U.S. HWY 17 S.
WAUCHULA

Come Ready to
Interview with
Kevin Hanchey!
cl10:28tfc


Delivre dStpwtl S up P w Ne
Code Seps -FinancngAvilal


FEATURING
Rt. 60 & 39 PLANT CITY


JACOBSEN HOMES
l01:4c 813-650-8100


DESOTO COUNTY




EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.comn
1-941-778-7980/7565





Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Ilome Depot ,
863-382-0600


L


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines f
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Ucened and Insured Reg.#1V-41062 5
"No job's too big."


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager Carl Kelly ASE Certified Mechanic


******** **** *******


GOLF CART BATTERY INSTALLATION SPECIAL *'
0 $ 3 )O00 Complete Set (6) of Batteries
" J J V. w/ Installation Pick Up & Delivery Included
*4 GOLF CART & LAWN MOWER RENTALS AVAILABLE
COMPETITIVE PRICING! *


* FAST Er FRIENDLY 5ER VICE
22 Years of Experience *Locally Owned & Operated "

* 773-4400 m *
829 Bostick Rd. Bowling Green
*- Rad Runs besides Torrey Oak' ,idf Coursc cll:4c ;-




THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through November 30"
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider 111:4-2


AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


OWNER ANXIOUS TO SELL! CB/Stucco,
3B/2Bth home built in 2004, tile and carpet
floors, large bedrooms, utility and eat-in
kitchen. $125,000
CHECK THIS ONE OUT! Updated 3B/2Bth
home within walking to schools, medical facili-
ties, extra storage, wheel chair accessible.
$155,000
PRICE RECENTLY REDUCED! Charming
"old Florida style" home, 3B/2Bth, ceramic tile
floors, new appliances, large lot with gazebo,
near shopping and post office. $120,000
Brick home on corner lot, 3B/2Bth, and all
appliances, well maintained and located in
desirable area. $160,000
Make an offer on this updated C/B home,
3B/1.5Bth, almost new A/C and roof. List Price
$115,000


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert
PLENTY OF SPACE in this 4B/3BTH,
CB/Stucco home; large kitchen, living room
with w/b fireplace, double garage, spacious yard
for outside entertaining. $165,000
LOOKING FOR A WINTER RESIDENCE?
This 2B/lBth M/H has nice yard and large
screened porch; completely furnished. $38,000
Fenced 10 Acres with 8" well and pond, located
in eastern Hardee. $85,000
14.74 Acres with some trees, 4" well, large pond;
located on county maintained road. $135,000
BEAUTIFUL PROPERTY-262.52 acres, road
frontage, large pines, 100 acres cleared,
We have several 5 ACRE TRACTS priced from
$45,000 to $85,000. Call for details


12" SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON LE
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker I
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


L~'U~E"~~;"~


WOW
I'W| IU I[SEIIUK


rra~ii~a


I iN HOME


st
,lt vllte








November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


-~U-
*ATTENTIONI State Statutes -
2.828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


L Produce


U-PICK ZIPPERS $15/bushel,i
Corn $8/bushel, Squash
$10/bushel NOW. Black-Eyes
available Nov. 10. 2949 Center
Hill Rd., Bowling Green, FL. Off
SR 62, 4.5 miles west of US Hwy.
17. Open 7 days, 7am-6pm. 863-
223-5561. 11:4p


ARE YOU RECEIVING Monthly
payments from a mortgage? I
buy mortgages. 863-832-1984.
11:4-12:2p
2007 D/W MANUFACTURED
home, 3BR/2BA, 5.14 acres,
fenced, goat shed, chicken
house, shop, porches, $155,000,
(731) 614-1297. 10:21-11:18p


1997 PURSUT 25', real low-
mileage, $8,000, negotiable. 773-
2977. 11:4-12:2p
MH 1998 PACE ARROW, good
condition, 22,000 actual miles,
new tires, $25,000. For appoint-
ment call (813) 426-4729 or (863)
445-3405. 10:28-11:25D


3 BR HOUSE in country, 2-story
off Kazen Rd, West Wauchula.
$900 month, $500 deposit. No'
pets. Year-round job. 417-867-'
3234. 11:4c
BEAUTIFUL HOME 3/2 4544
Seminole Trail, Wauchula. 863-
781-5828. 11:4,11p
A WASHER AND DRYER come
with this light, cheerful one bed-.
room duplex apartment. Has a
private entrance and screened
porch. $120 weekly, damage
deposit and references required.
773-9793 or 863-832-0676. 11:4p
COZY FURNISHED 1 bedroom
country apartment. $495 monthly,
$495 security, electric Included.
305-747-6359. 11:4p


302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental rates beginning at $450
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)


MAnday Friday
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
Equal Oppirtuniv' Ermplo.er & Prvider


PPORTU NTY


cl11:4-25c kq


TRSi St


2


3


New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires

BIG SALE ON

RLL TIRES. :
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
1 E VISA (across from Billy Ayers
S.,, Wal-Mart) Tire Technician


I Rentals I


Rn t ls


3BR, 2B, HOME, Ft. Meade $600 SUPER BARGAIN! Electric includ- VICKERS' LAWN CARE. Hardee
month, $600 deposit, 863-205- ed. Furnished, large 1 bedroom and Highlands. Good job, fair
2427. 11:4p apartment. Ideal for non-smoking, price. Free estimates. 863-448-
NICE, CLEAN, FURNISHED effi- working person. Decorated mar-j 7491. 10:14-11:11p
ciency apartment. AC/heat, utili- ble fireplace. $550 monthly, $550 ALUMINUM ,CONSTRUCTION
ties included. $130 per week. security. 954-629-4486. 11:4p additions, screen rooms, car-
First week rent, damage deposit OFFICE SPACE can be a bar-i ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
and references required. 773- ber/beauty shop. Also a office sures, rescreening, decks, con-
9793 or 863-832-0676. 11:4p, area. 781-6746. 10:28-11:25p create. Harold Howze Construction


MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed $300
mo.; 2 bed $350 mo-up; 3 bed -
$450 mo-up. Close to schools &
hospital, no pets, $200 deposit.
Se habla espanol (863) 698-4910
or 698-4908. 8:20tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh
3 BEDROOM. 1 Bath home in
Bowling Green, 781-1062, 781-
6667. 11:4c
1 BEDROOM 1 BATH very clean,
references, no smoking, no pets.
$500, $550 security. 863-773-
9291. 10:28tfc
THREE BEDROOM HOUSE cen-
tral, big yard, $650 plus deposit.
773-4855. 10:28-11:25p
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT,
central, no pets, $500, plus
deposit. 773-4740. 10:28.11:25p
3/2 COMPLETELY REMODELED.
Nice area, Wauchula, $750
monthly, $750 deposit. 863-735-
1158, 863-781-2708. 10:28-11:25p


S3BR/2BA, CENTRAL air and heat,
large lot, Bowling Green,
$775/month plus deposit,
(863)781-1847. 10:28;11:4c


APTS. & HOUSES FOR RENT.
773-6667. 10:28c
2/1 $550 MONTHLY, $550 Deposit,'
available 10/21.773-0100. 10:7tfc


APARTMENTS, DUPLEXES for
rent. Call 773-0123. 9:16-11:11p


B SEE SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
10:21-11:18p


PORTABLE, Certified, Welder
Patrick Brown will go wherever.
you need him to go. 863-245-1338
or 863-781-5492. 10:21-11:18p
JOSEF'S PROPERTY CARE -
Mow, trim, plant. $20 hour. 797-
6509. 10:21-11:18p
NEWMAN'S LAWN CARE. Free
estimates. Licensed, insured.
863-781-6960. 10:7-11:4p
HANDY WORK, Home improve-
ments, carpentry, tree works,
misc. 863-245-6558. 10:7-11:4p
FT. GREEN GRASS CHOPPERS.
Licensed/Insured. Mowing,
weedeating, edging, pressure
washing. Locally Owned. Randall
Davis 863-773-4246, 863-781-
0902 or 863-781-0900. 10:7-11:4p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting In Hardee County:
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430.
9:2dhtfc


DUKE PLATT CONST. INC.
L I C E N S E D I N S U R E D




Free Estimates References Available


735-0848


Mobile (863) 202-6465


CRC058080


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478




Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience
cl10:2tfc



Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
il

PaYHerel f o .C sDa inmeCharges

TOICABH BDISBSLB
24 1 ice - Lowe-st P()ssi1-11v Rates^^^^
^^^^^^^^^^- Fo.^^t and Rchab ^^^^e ^
(863) 8-1-300 or 71-3091d^l^c


735-1158. RR0050181.
10:28-12:2p
RJ LAWN CARE. Free estimates.
NO CONTRACTSI 863-448-3255.
__10:14-11:11p


OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillesple) have been moved to'
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and sell
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More Information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc


DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh


I Service


Bjt GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt *Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs *
clS:2tc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs ,,, ..


(863) 735-1495


Deofo. Appliances

Established Since 1987 Rgp dair


SALES SERVICE


* 863-773-3573

Fax 863-773-0521 108 Ca
desotoapppliance@earthlink.net Wauchul


arlton Street
a, FL 33873_


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.iimseerealty.com


James V. See, Jr., Broker *


Great 5 acres! Completely fenced and in the
country! Perfect building site. Priced to sell at
$35,000.
HUGE Price Reduction! 15t acres located West
of Wauchula on Vandolah Rd. Beautiful building
sites with small creek meandering across proper-
ty & it's across from the Wauchula Airport
entrance. $150,000.
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood. Won't
last long at $220,000!
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Hardwood floors under carpet in bedrooms.
Central air/heat. Massive brick fireplace. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths. 2 car carport. Asking $229,000.
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Cute house
with nice landscaping. Only $97,500.
5 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Great place for your new residence. Deed
restricted. $72,500.
POLK COUNTY! 1.48 acres with highway
frontage. Great location for any operation need-
ing a shop, office and on-site storage. $225,000.


James V. See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)381-2242 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396 cil :4c


45 ac citrus grove. Valencias & Hamlin. Double
wide mobile home. Fruit proceeds included (sub-
ject to FOM contract). Located in NE Hardee
County. $427,500.
REDUCED! Spacious home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath
house with wrap around porch,detached 2 car
garage with office and full bath. $379,000.
58 acres close to town. Great property with tons
of potential! $464,000.
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 1/2
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1/2 acres of
producing nursery. $430,000.
3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath home. Double French doors
open up to the huge porch and pool area.
Conveniently located in a charming neighbor-
hood right in town. $178,900.
UNDER CONTRACT! Spacious 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with 2 car garage and large lot, cen-
tral air/heat & 2 kitchens. Located 1 block from
YMCA in Wauchula. REDUCED to $93,500.


SM702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
3 (863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
i JGary Delatorre Broker
AM-SOUTH HEALTY www.cbhardee.com
Each office independently owned and operated.

NEW LISTINGII 3 Bedroom/2 Bath CB home EXTRA LOTII 2B/ 2B Home with central
with central heat and air located within City heat/air, one car garage, appliances, garage
of Wauchula and close to shopping, Parks, door opener, workshop and storage area, all
and schools. Call today for more informa- In quiet neighborhood and close to shop-
tion. $119.900. ping and schools. $115.00011
LAKE FRONT HOME ON LAKE RED BEACHII ZOLFO SPRINGS!I! Very clean, well main-
Approved for HomePath Renovation tained, 3 BD / 2BTH Double Wide, w/ central
Mortgage. Great lake for Fishing and heat/air, stove, refrigerator, two car garage,
Boating. REDUCED!! $63.000 metal roof, and also storage shed. $62.500.
Call Donna for more information
NEW LISTINGIII 3/2 CB home in Bowling
Green with central heat and air, stove, refrig- REDUCED!! $92.9001! 3Bdr / 2Bth Mobile
erator, carport, fenced yard. All for $79.900. Home with 5 acres between Wauchula and
Call Donna for more information. Avon Park.
REDUCED!! $39,900 3B / 1.5 Bth home In EXCELLENT LOCATION FOR BUSINESS!!
Bowling Green has large lot w/privacy fence Frontage on US Hwy 17 North And North
and large workshop in back yard, one care Florida Avenue. Access from both highways.
garage, back porch, has been approved for Across form Winn Dixie. Call Todayll
HomePath Renovation Mortgage. Call for $350.000
more Information.
SUN N LAKES of SEBRINGI! Beautiful 2 bed-
WASH $42.50011 NOW!! $39.900. 3 Bedroom, room, 2 bath home. Just a Short drive to
1 Bath home with double lot, utility shed, Lakeshore Mall, and other shopping areas.
appliances, metal roof, and much more. Almost new appliances, central heat/air,
Located in Zolfo city limits close to school. fenced yard, close to schools and hospitals.
CALL TO SEE TODAYI! Call for more information. $69.900.
GOTO: HomePath.com For More GREAT INVESTMENT!! 3/2 CB home with
Fannie Mae Properties. central H/A, one car garage, total sq. ft.
1,728, Sun and Lakes of Sebring, close to
5 ACRES $42.500. OWNER FINANCING malls, shopping and medical care. Short
AVAILABLEII drive to Sebrlng Circle for festivals. Only
$46.500. clll:4c


E Ben Gibson
S Calvin Bates
Dusty Albritton


***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


BUYING GOLD & SILVER COINS,
US paper money, scrap gold and
silver. Do not sell to hotel buyers.
They buy for melt value. Do not
send scrap gold in the mail. You
get stung. Buying and selling 40
years. Capt. Ed 904-222-4607.
11:4-12:2p
BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS are
running a car campaign program
to help underwrite their .youth
programs. if you have a car that
you would like to donate, please
call 800-246-0493. Cars need not
be in running condition. 11:4c


,--~----~--~-~--~__~,,


____j


,


I









8B The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010






-The


SATURDAY, 8 till ? Lots of misc.
716 S. 7th, Wauchula. 11:4dh
EVERY MONDAY THRU SATUR-
DAY now thru December. All items
In the house for sale. Everything
must go. 1104 North Hollandtown
Rd, Wauchula. 10:14-11:11p
HABITAT FOR HUMANITY yard
sale. Saturday, November 13. 8
am till Noon. 502 East Main
Street, Bowling Green. Non-cloth-
ing donations accepted. Call 375-
2513 or 781-2874 leave message.
10:28-11:11c
YOUTH YARD SALE/BAKE SALE.
Lake Dale Baptist Church, 3102
Heard Bridge Rd., Saturday, Nov.
6 at 8am. Call 863-781-9442.
11:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, Mult-family.
3728 SR64 East. Tools, appli-
ances, clothes and more. 11:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-2. 110 East
Oak Street, Wauchula. 11:4p


SAT. 6am-? 610 N. Hwy 17. Bolln
Carpet parking lot. 11:4p
MANAGER'S SALE Saturday,
Washer, Dryer, furniture, tools.
Bowling Green Storage. 11:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY. 1144
Sparrow Road, Charlie Creek.
Huge. 11:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-? 822
South 10th Ave., Wauchula.
Moving sale. Everything must
goll Stainless steel refrigerator,
stove, high end collectibles.
11:4p
SATURDAY 8am. Corner Bay &
10th. Bunk bed, exercise bike,
kids stuff, etc. 11:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY. 504
Illinois Ave. 11:4p
2 FAMILY. Small refrigerator,
washer, dryer, hospital bed, frame
(new) wood bedroom set, wheel-
chair, lots of misc. Thurs-Sat.
8:30-?. Follow signs on Heard
Bridge Road. 11:4p
GOLFVIEW COMMUNITY, Zolfo
Springs. Multi-family, Saturday,
8-? Something for everybody.
11:4p
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
corner of Franklin and Chester,
BG. Adult and children's clothes,
toys, tools, household Items,
Avon products, misc. 11:4p
SATURDAY, 8am-2pm. 591 MLK
Jr., Wauchula. Tanning bed, wed-
ding gowns, wedding items and
misc. 11:4p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY. 4 Family
Corner of Lisa Drive, Wauchula.
TV's, truck grill, rims, video
games, Xbox, large baker's rack,
toys, clothes, plants, pig collec-
tion, lots of misc. 11:4p
SATURDAY- 362 Altman Road.
Push mower and lots more. 11:4p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 8am-? 1121
Downing Cir., Wauchula. Lots of
items 11:4p
BIG SALE FRIDAY 8-?, Saturday
8-Noon. 404 W. Palmetto.
Furniture, toys, clothes, col-
lectibles. 11:4p
MULTI-FAMILY, Saturday. Jan's,
215 W. Orange St., Wauchula.
Furniture, baby to toddler, girls
and boys, huge misc. selection.
11:p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 8-? 1060
Knollwood Circle. Clothes, baby
items, new skateboard deck,
misc. 11:4p


FRIDAY, SATURDAY. 805
Road, Wauchula. Clothes,
ture, household items.


Polk
furni-
11:4p


FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 9-7 4544
Seminole Trail, Wauchula. 863-
781-5828. 11:54p
SATURDAY 8-? 503 E. Orange,
Wauchula. Construction equip-
ment, clothes, household items,
misc. 11:4D


Classifieds


BOWLING GREEN EMPLOYEE RETIRES


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Mary Sue Russell retired Oct. 15 after 22 years with the City of Bowling Green and the
City Hall office. From left are city manager Yvonne Kimball, city commissioner Richard
SBarone, Mary Sue- Russell, Mayor Perry Knight, city commissioner Shirley Brown, and
eity commissioner Stuart Durastanti.


6' ,'

S* :, ',..



From left are John Russell, his wife,Mary Sue Russell, children Michael Russell, Amy
Russell, and granddaughter Rachel Coker.





Golf Ends At Regionals


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Both Hardee High School
golf squads ended 2010 at
regional competition last week.
The girls had won their Class
IA District 16 championship
and went on to Region 6 match-
es at Hideout Golf Club in
Naples.
"The greens were 10 on a
Stentmeter," said Coach Byron
Jarnigan. "They were very fast
and it was a tough course. We
didn't do very well," he contin-
ued.
As it has all season, the girls
squad was led by its seniors.
Kara Norris shot 105, Emily
Williams 115 and Lauren
Moore 123. Behind them were
junior Courtney Parks and
freshman Courtney Alexander,


t.-


both in at 126.
"We played some good teams
several times and our girls were
right there with them, competi-
tive. I've got a whole team
coming back for next year.
They have improved a lot this
year," said Jarnigan.
Expected to return are juniors
Park and Caitlyn Sockalosky,
and freshmen Alexander, Kait-
lyn Shaw and Brooke Knight.
"We may have a couple of jun-
ior highs coming up that will
help us too."
"We had a good season. I did-
n't expect to win our district.
We shot 412, which would be
206 on a usual 18. During the
season we averaged 202 to 210,
so it was right in there," con-
cluded Jarnigan.
Boys golf did "OK" in


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regionals, according to Coach
George Heine. "The course was
beautiful but very difficult. The
greens were fast but not unplay-
able. Larry Bird is port owner
of the course. I believe we beat
South Fort Myers, but the pri-
vate schools did us in once
again. Hopefully, we can move
to a new district soon," com-
mented Heine.
Senior Taylor Barlow led the
way with a 79. "He has been
very consistent for us this year.'
Will Bennett had a very good
Sday and came in with an 83. He
is just a soph with a bright
future ahead," said Heine.
Senior Lincoln Saunders had
a good day with an 84, includ-
ing a triple bogey on the last
hole. Junior Daniel Miller and
senior Justin Bromley "had off
days and came in with a 91 and
93. Justin is a senior but had a
good year. Daniel will be back
to lead the 'Cats," added Heine.
The Wildcats finished the
year 13-1-1. "That wasn't too
bad. Hopefully, the ones return-
ing will play in the off season
and in the Sertoma matches this
summer and come back sharp,"
concluded Heine.
Expected back along with
Bennett and Miller are juniors
Matt Godwin, Dalton Hewett
and Dustin Sheel, sophs Wil-
liam Beattie and Trenton Moon
and freshmen Bradley Brewer,
Tyler Hewett and Eric Klein.



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
2001 DODGE
VIN:1B3ES46C31D128561
8:00 A.M. NOV 17, 2010
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL





Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room.tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Week ending October 31, 2010
WEATHER CROP
Weather Summary: Warm, dry conditions persisted in
Florida. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated
October 26, drought conditions were present in approximately 75
percent of the State. The Florida Automated Weather Network had
one station in Santa Rosa County reporting over an inch of rain,
with the remainder reporting less than an inch of precipitation or
none at all. Temperatures during the past week averaged four to
seven degrees above normal, with highs in the 80s and 90s.

Field Crops: Harvesting of cotton was winding down.
Overall, cotton was able to withstand the dry weather. Soybean har-
vesting was also coming to an end; however, the lack of rain hin-
dered some pods from filling. Peanut harvesting is 93 percent com-
plete, 21 percent greater than last year's progress, and 8 percent
above the five-year average. Drought conditions hindered planting
of forage and cover crops. Sugarcane harvesting continued as
scheduled.

Vegetables: Fall vegetable harvesting in the north was
increasing. Cool overnight temperatures continued to delay crop
maturity. Producers planted and prepared vegetable fields for the
winter season. Planting of cabbage took place in Highlands County
and the Hastings area. Farmers in Polk County ran irrigation in
strawberry fields due to dry conditions. Vegetables moving through
the market were avocados, cucumbers, eggplant, okra, bell pep-'
pers, squash, and tomatoes.

Floriculture: The warmer weather during the past weeks has
delayed the development of Caladium bulbs.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture condition was
mostly fair due to drought and seasonal decline of warm season
pastures. Winter forage planting was at a standstill. In the Panhan-
dle, pasture condition ranged from very poor to excellent with most
in poor condition due to prolonged drought and warm season pas-
ture decline. There was limited preparation for planting cool season
forage. The cattle condition was mostly fair. Cattle producers were
feeding supplement hay due to poor pasture conditions. In the
northern areas, pasture condition ranged from very poor to good
with most in fair condition with some pasture overgrazed. Range
and pasture forage production had virtually stopped due to dry soil
conditions. The cattle condition was poor to excellent with most in
fair condition. In the central areas, pasture was very poor to excel-
lent with most in fair condition. The cattle condition was mostly
fair. In the southwestern areas, pasture condition was poor to excel-
lent with most in fair condition. Stock pond and cow well water
levels were dropping. Pasture quality began to decline. The condi-
tion of the cattle was fair to excellent with most in good condition.
Statewide, the condition of the cattle ranged from very poor to
excellent with most in good condition.

Citrus: Highs this week were in the lower 90s, with early
morning lows ranging from the lower 50s to the lower 60s. There
was very little recorded rainfall in the citrus producing area this
week. Umatilla received the most precipitation with 0.73 inches.
Eighteen of the 25 stations reported no precipitation. Overall, there
were abnormally dry conditions in all of the citrus area according
to the U.S. drought monitor, last updated on October 26. Indian
River County is now experiencing extreme drought conditions,
while surrounding counties are experiencing severe conditions.
Moderate to extreme drought conditions extend over a third of the
citrus area. Thirty-eight packing houses and seven processors have
opened, with a few more scheduled to open soon.



;J; DDil


I N C.,


Kenny sanders
781-0153


REA LTORS8
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


NEW LISTING! 25+ ac fenced
pasture, Greenbelt qualified, on
US Hwy 17 S w/well, septic &
electric. $192,900!

Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil hunt,
relax! $90,000!

38.5 ac on the Peace River
w/lots of beautiful oaks, pines
and palmettos! Pole barn &
2BR/2BA MH. $524,900!

Charming and priced to sell!
2BR/1BA 1060 SF home w/lots
of updates: new A/C, insulation,
carpeting, wiring. Den can be
3rd BR. $89,900! Make an
offer!

PRICE REDUCED! Pack your
overnight bags & head to this
peaceful retreat! 5 ac fenced
w/lots of oaks, pond, creek,
12'x20' shed. $66,500!

High & dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$120,000!

Roomy 4BR/2BA CB home in
Wauchula on corner lot!
Remodeled bath, solid surface
kitchen countertops, large
screened porch, new carport!
$158,000!


3BR/2BA home on 4 lots
w/beautiful oaks, fenced in
backyard. Close to schools.
$95,000!
Ideal for farming! 21.86 ac
pasture is fenced, has well, close
to town. $186,500!
Imagine your new home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Eenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
100' fronting US17S,
Wauchula, zoned C-2! Plenty of
warehouses for storage! Large
office building, 5432SF total &
3788SF A/C, 1 ac lot.
$450,000!
14 acs on private rd, creek,
pasture & woods, zoned A-1.
$112,000!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
Move-in ready! New 3BR, 2B
CB home w/open kitchen, luxu-
rious master bath, on 1/2 ac lot!
$110,000!
3BR/1BA home in BG on corner
lot w/fenced yard, workshop,
shed. $68,900!
Goodbye, traffic...Hello, peace
& quiet! 20 ac fenced pasture
w/pond, 288SF cabin, 4" well
inside 60SF shed. NOW
$160,000!


REALTORASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS........781-0153 SANDY LARRISON...... 832-030
JUANDELATORRE......781-1128 MONICA REAS.......... 781-088
DAVID ROYAL.................781-3490 KAREN O'NEAL........... 781-7633
H' n IGHWnAY 17 S(oiiil, WAI(IIILA., I. 3.87.13 c.40
Ct111.4C


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.




November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 9B


1% -- ddLV-


SDIXIE BASEBALL'

AND SOFTBALL

REGISTRATION

November 8- 12
5pm to 8pm
and
November 13
9am to 1pm


BAEBL Farr Field
Baseball Ages:
Tball 5-6; Machine Pitch 7-8; Minors 9-10;
Majors 11-12; Boys 13-15 years old
*League Age as of May 1, 2011
Softball Ages:
Tball 4-6; Darlings under 8; Angles under 10;
Ponytails under 12; Belles under 15 years old
*League Age as of January 1, 2011
Please bring the following with you for registration:
Birth Certificate
Insurance Information
Physician Phone Number


..$75.00
($5.00 discount for
additional siblings' registration)


11 4c


lk )I'







10B The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


6 Swimmers Go To Regionals


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A half dozen Hardee swim-
mers advance to regional action
this weekend in Fort Pierce.
Campbell Aubry, Carleigh
Coleman, Hunter Henderson,
Kate Krause, Wyatt Kofke and
Emily Rhodes will represent the
school and the team at Indian
River in an attempt to go to
state. Only the top eight indi-
viduals and top three in relays
in each event advance. The 400
free relay team of Henderson,
Kofke, senior Michael Forrester
and soph Justin Rickett have an
outside chance for an at-large
bid.
For Henderson, Krause and
Forrester, it is the final opportu-
nity as they are in their senior
season. Sophs Aubry Kofke
and Rickett, and freshmen
Coleman and Rhodes can build
on this year's experience.
At districts at Winter Haven last
week, Hardee was without the
services of senior Kalan Royal
and' sophomore diver Kyle
Schrank, lessening their
chances as a team. Neverthe-
less, both the boys and girls
squads placed fifth overall.
Savannah Miller, Jessica
Hunt, Korin Roehm and Megan
Hartman, a junior and three
freshmen, opened for Hardee in
the 200 medley relay, placing
seventh. The boys 200 medley


relay team of Kofke, Forrester,
Will Crawford and Kramer
Royal placed sixth.
In the 200 free, Coleman
placed 10th and classmate Leah
Weeks placed llth. Four
Wildcats competed in the event,
with Kofke placing fifth to ad-
vance. Soph Will Crawford,
freshman Cleston Sanders and
Rickett followed him in, but not
high enough to advance.
Rhodes placed 11th in the
girls individual medley, fol-
lowed by junior Allie Yeomans.
There were no boys in that
event.
The 50 free was where both
seniors shined. Krause placed
fifth to advance and was fol-
lowed in the event by freshmen
Rachel Burton and Hartman.
Henderson was sixth to advance
and was followed by senior
Josh Fuentes and Kramer
Royal.
In diving, Aubry placed
fourth with 287.70, good
enough to advance to state.
Freshman Rhodes qualified
for state by placing seventh in
the 100 butterfly, followed by
Roehm. Crawford just missed
state with a ninth-place finish in
the boys division.
Krause qualified for another
state event by finishing fourth
in the 100 free in a time of
1:06.52, followed by Weeks,


Burton and Hartman. In the
boys 100 free, Rickett, Fuentes
and Kramer Royal did not qual-
ify to advance.
On to the grueling ,500
freestyle, where Coleman
placed seventh in 7:00.95 and
will go to state in that event.
Henderson placed third for his
second qualification for state in
a time of 6:03.77. Sanders
placed 1lth.
The girls 200 free relay team
of Coleman, Rhodes, Weeks
and Krause finished just out of
state contention with a time of
2:10.21. The boys team of
Henderson, Fuentes, Kramer
Royal and Crawford placed
sixth in 2:03.86.
In the 100 backstroke, Miller
placed out of state qualification
with 10th place, while Kofke
picked up a second state entry
with sixth place at 1:10.14.
Hunt and Yeomans placed
14th and 19th in the 100 breast-
stroke, while Forrester placed
11th for the boys.
In the final event, the 400 free
relay, both teams did well. For
the girls, Coleman, Weeks,
Rhodes and Krause combined
for a 4:58.31 and fifth place.
The boys team placed fourth in
4:26.20, with Kofke, Forrester,
Henderson and Rickett and will
have to wait to see if their time
qualifies them for state.


Old age isn't so bad when you consider the alternative.
-Maurice Chevalier
A man is not old as long as he is seeking something.
-Jean Rostand
The time to begin most things is 10 years ago.
-Mignon McLaughlin


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


LOOKING TO (863) 385-8649


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773-3117
1017 US Hwy 17 No. Wauchula
George L. Wadsworth, Jr.
Agent


He's


7 6..6,
I nv1" 4^" vCs'

\ .^ 7.. 3 V'S. ',[^'"

iI '^J
\V 7. jy


MASTER
JEWELER


(Santa, you rock, brother!)


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BRII. IAN.CE YOU )ESERVF*


1102 S. 6'thA


OUR HEAR-IS 10 YOURS"

ve. Wauchula 773-446(


JAI ^ n' o iw










Hours:
Mon. Fri. 9-5
Sat. 9 2
S 11 ,c


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N.


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


A *





I ,


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mmmd


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baaaaaaaack!


40













Museum Musings
i By Sandy Scott
Cracker Trail Museum Curator


BEESON'S DRUG STORE
We all have pleasant memories of times gone by. There are
even certain smells which linger in our minds of particular build-
ings that once graced the downtown sections of Hardee County.
One such business establishment that includes both a familiar
smell and wonderful memories is Beeson's Drug Siore.
Beeson Brothers Drug Store was started by brothers William
B. Beeson Sr. and Dr. James M. Beeson after buying out a previous
partner and brother-in-law, Ashton Berry. It was in the spring of
1904 that these two brothers began operating the soon-to-be recog-
nized oldest Rexall store in the state.
The Beeson Brothers Drug Store carried a wide variety of nec-
essary items, including the most modern of medicines. It was here
that you could purchase a small brown bottle of paregoric to help
soothe a baby's stomach ache, a canister of Dr. Graves Tooth
Powder or, if you weren't completely confident of William Brown
Beeson's weather predictions. you could always pick up a
"Farmer's Almanac," with its distinctive yellow cover.
In 1978, this Hardee County dynasty ended when the store was
sold to long-time pharmacist Tom Holland.
Now, that's part of the history of Beeson's Drug Store, but
what about the memories of those of us who were raised in that era,
memories that cause many stories to be told even today'?
Beeson's was situated on the corner of U.S. 17 and Main
Street. There were two entrances from Main Street, one led to the
soda fountain area and the other deposited one directly at the mag-
azine section. The prescription department was at the back of the
store; and cigars could be purchased at the counter.
Probably the most memorable to Hardee Countians was the
luncheonettee area." It consisted of a long marble counter with
padded stools in front that spun around if you so desired. Sitting
on the counter was a triple-tiered glass display shelf which held
delicately carved pieces of freshly baked pies that Virgie had sup-
plied daily.
Virgie Clause was well known around Wauchula for her deli-
cious lemon, coconut cream and chocolate pies piled high with
meringue. Five days a week she would deliver nine to 12 pies as
early as 7:30 in the morning so they would be ready for the morn-
ing crowds when Beeson's opened. A Saturday afternoon grilled
cheese sandwich was not complete without a piece of one of
Virgie's pies.
Booths were situated at the back of this area, with the largest
one wrapping around the corner so it would be necessary for its
potential occupant to "scoot" into it, especially when there were
Large groups of individuals sharing the booth.
Walking home from school always included a quick stop at the
soda fountain, where the choices ranged from a plain Coca-Cola
that bubbled and burned as it went down your throat to root beer,
vanilla phosphates and even more concoctions that were thrown
together.
And, oh, those milkshakes that were prepared in the tall stain-
less steel containers and then slipped under the electric appliances
that buzzed while spinning slowly yet gently enough to mix the ice
cream, chocolate syrup and malt flavoring. They were even poured
into "real glass" receptacles at your table rather than being served
in today's Styrofoam containers. Of course, each Beeson's malted
milkshake was topped off with just a smidgen of whipped cream
and a sweet cherry.
Students might be seen leafing through the magazines dis-
played on the wooden rack, until they caught the eye of Reynolds


Allen gazing their way. They would then collect the latest chosen
edition of Archie & Jughead comics and proceed to the checkout
counter, depositing the 10 cents due to the waiting outstretched
palm of Mr. Allen.
Each of us has our own memories of Beeson's Drug Store.
Generations of high school students and downtown merchants and
employees will hold those memories dear to them as they reminisce
about those good old days.
Long gone are these neighborhood drug stores. The family-
owned gathering places of yesteryear have been replaced by the
super stores that have steel bars at the doors to detect merchandise
that has not been properly scanned, causing an alarm to sound as
one exits the store.
The familiar faces that we all grew up knowing have either
passed on or handed off their presence in the community to the next
generation, who now stand behind counters waiting to scan our
purchases crossing on the conveyor belt.
The hometown drugstore with its familiar smells has left the
small communities with grace, bowing out for the sake of progress.
But to those of us who are fortunate to remember an earlier Hardee
County, we will each have our own special memories
And to those hometown business families including the
Beesons, Dashers, Herrs, Weiners and Crewses, we will always be
grateful for their participation in the early years of Wauchula's
growth. .
Cracker Trail Museum is likewise grateful to the folks who
have participated in its growth by sharing their memories and treas-
ures. We want to continue to add to this historic collection, and
hope you, too, will consider sharing items and memories so future
generations will understand why Hardee County is truly the best
place to live and that it really "doesn't get much better than this!"




Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well, football fans, the Swami predicted the Gators to win 38-.
31. Not too bad of a prediction considering the 34-31 final. The
overtime game was a thriller. It was good to see Chas Henry.kick
the winning field goal. Florida still has a shot at the-SEC Title. If
the Gators beat Vanderbilt and South Carolina, a trip to Atlanta is
coming up. Alabama and Auburn should decide the other half. This
may not be the season Gator Fans expected but it could end on a
positive note.
The USF Bulls will play a Wednesday Night ESPN game at
Raymond James against Rutgers. The 4-3 Bulls are trying to nail
down another spot in the bowl lineup and this game at home is a
must win. Rutgers is also 4-3 but lost to Tulane, a bottom feeder in
Conference USA, at home.
The Hardee Wildcats won again over Okeechobee as the Cats
put more points on the board this week. The Cats have come alive
in the past two weeks and now is the big week as the team prepares
for the DeSoto Bulldogs. A win over the arch rival means a playoff
berth for HHS. Hopefully, this past weekends Florida (Orange and
Blue) victory over another rival Bulldogs carries over for the
Wildcats.
In a very strange year, Oregon looks like the real deal. The
Ducks can put up 50 points per game and it doesn't look like any-
one can stop them. Auburn still has to overcome Alabama and win
-the SEC in Atlanta to get to the title game.,Boise St. is at confer-
ence rival Hawaii which is unbeaten in the conference this week
and then must travel to Nevada. TCU and Utah meet this week for
the Mountain West top spot.
Former Hardee Wildcat wide receiver Jermaine King had 13
receptions but is still 5 yards short of the school record in reception


November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 11B

yardage at West Virginia State. The Yellow Jackets lost to Shepherd
to fall to 0-8. King should break the record against West Virginia
Wesleyan this week. Weston Palmer had 9 tackles including one for
a loss on a blitz, for Princeton in a 21-19 loss to Cornell. Eziah
Youyoute and his Georgia Southern Eagles lost to Samford 20-13.
Now let's look at this Week's Bill O' Fare ...
1. North Carolina at FSU-UNC had to rally to "upset"
William & Mary this past weekend 21-17. The Noles should have
no problem at home FSU 24 UNC 17.
2. Rutgers at South Florida-Bulls will look good on ESPN
and take the next step to a bowl game with a win over the Scarlet
Knights. USF 30 Rutgers 17.
3. Florida at Vanderbilt-Gators will struggle early after the
big Georgia win then pull away for a victory. Nashville is always a
fun trip for the fans, Florida 34 Vanderbilt 14.
4. Maryland at Miami-Terps put' up 62 on Wake Forrest last
week. They have FSU coming in later for a showdown that should
decide their division of the ACC. Surely; they won't stumble
against a team like Miami with that on the line? Maryland 34
Miami 24.
5. Charleston Southern at Kentucky-Wildcats get a breather
and their fifth win. With Vanderbilt and Tennessee after, UK still
could come up bowling. Kentucky 41 CSU 16.
6. Idaho St. at Georgia-Dawgs need this game. It will be
their fifth win but have Auburn and Georgia Tech left. Georgia 57
Idaho St. 14.
7. Arkansas at South Carolina-Spurrier sits atop SEC East
but the Hogs are 6-2 as well. Mallet and the Hogs pull a stunner
that send the Gamecocks to Gainesville tied with the Gators for the
berth in Atlanta. Arkansas 38 South Carolina 34.
8. UT Chattanooga at Auburn-Auburn rolls. Nuff said.
Auburn 56 UT Chattanooga 13.
9. Marshall at UAB-Herd beat UTEP 16-12 for a homecom-
ing win but now travel to a surprising UAB. The Blazers had
Tennessee on the ropes early in the season and are coming off an
overtime 50-49 win over Southern Miss. Marshall has the defense
but the offense has to step for a road win. Marshall 27 UAB 24.
10. La-Lafayette at Ole Miss-Mississippi joins a lot of the
SEC with an out of conference breather. This should be an easy
one. Ole Miss 44 ULL 17.
11. TCU at Utah-TCU has been real stingy on defense but
they have not faced a team like Utah. This should be a national
game. The country doesn't see these teams as much. Utah 24 TCU
20.
12. Alabama at LSU-LSUs lucky winning is over. Tide
crashes over them. Alabama 34 LSU 16.
13. UCF at Houston-Conference USA leaders meet but no
Case Keenum for Houston gives the edge to UCF even on the road.
UCF 33 Houston 27.
14. Tennessee at Memphis-Hapless Tigers provides some
relief for Vols fans. This isn't basketball. Tennessee 37 Memphis
10.
15. Louisville at Syracuse-Orangemen are the first Big East
to become bowl eligible. Can the Cardinals win in the carrier
Dome? Syracuse 27 Louisville 14.
16. Tampa at Atlanta-fight for the division lead but' the
Falcons are unbeaten at home. Bucs have played better away
though than at the Ray Jay. Atlanta 33 Tampa 30.
17. Miami at Baltimore-Two 5-2 teams go at it but it is at
Baltimore. Ravens say nevermore at home. Baltimore 27 Miami
19.
18. New Orleans at Carolina-hapless Panthers go down
again. Saints 35 Carolina 17.
19. NY Jets at Detroit-barring an upset its Jets 27 Detroit
17.
20. Dallas at Green Bay-Cowboys are Americas Team?
Packers 34 Dallas 20.


CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD MEETING
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2010, 5:30 PM



The City of Wauchula Planning and Zoning Board will hold a public hearing regarding the
following amendments to the City of Wauchula Comprehensive Plan.

1. AN AMENDMENT OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY OF WAUCHU-
LA, FLORIDA, REVISING THE ADOPTED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT ELEMENT AND
UPDATING THE 5-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN.

2. TEXT AND MAP AMENDMENTS TO THE CITY OF WAUCHULA COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN BASED ON THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE EVALUATION AND
APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR).

3. ANNUAL REVIEW OF THE SPECIAL EXCEPTION GRANTED FOR A STORAGE
POD FOR FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD LOCATED AT 701 N 7TH AVENUE.




3A
HARDEE& I
COUNTY aI8






,,.. J, J .L.. .. J ,
\"" K 64E















The City of Wauchula Planning and Zoning Board will consider these proposed amend-
ments on Monday, November 15, 2010, at 5:30 pm or as soon thereafter as possible. The
hearing shall be held at 225 E. Main Street, Suite 105, Wauchula, FL 33873. At the meet-
ing interested parties may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed amend-
ments. The hearing may be continued by the Planning and Zoning Board under appro-
priate circumstances.

Copies of the proposed amendments are available for inspection and review With the City
Clerk from between 8 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
Comments may also be submitted in writing to the City Clerk prior to or during the meet-
ing.

Persons are advised that if a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board
or. Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or
she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made, at his or her own expense
and effort, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based per Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes.

Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Clerk's Office at
least 48 hours before the hearing by contacting (863) 773-3535. 11:4c


I- ~ .- .~ ,








12B The Ilerald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


LET'S TALK


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COURTESY PHOTO

Stacie Whaley, a second-grade teacher at North Wauchula Elementary School, demon-
strates how sign language is used. The lesson helped to teach the children the impor-
tance of communication and the many ways people talk to one another.


COLORFUL CHARACTERS


I u n in / F s h n g F o e c st.


.11/4/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 7.40 ain
Sets: 6 41 pn
Day Length
I'1 hrs. 01 11 ns
Moon Diata
Rise.s 5.54 miin
Sets 524 pin
I'p I 1:43 aml

Moon Phase
3'
Waning Crescet
Major Times
II 43 1111-I 43 pim

Minor Times
5.54 aim-6 54 ;in
5:24 pai-6:24 pam
Prediction
Better
Time Zone
'TC. -4
11/5/2010
Sun Data
Rises" 7:40 nm
Sets: 6:40 pinl
Day Length
II hrs. 00 mins.
Moon Data
Rises: 7:01 ;inl
Sets: 6.09 pin
'p 12:38 pim
Doun 12:10 ain
Moon Phase
0';
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:38 pio-2 38 pmi
Minor Times
701 il-8 01 aiii
6 09 pm-7 09 pin
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
I I'C. -4


11/6/2010
Sun l. ta
Rises: 7.41 iam
Sets. 6 39 pll
Day Length
10 hrs. 58 ilins
Moon D)ata
Rises: 8 08 .n
Sets. 6.58 pil
L'p: 1:36 pmt
lowsn I 07 ill
Moon Phase
0' ;
NEW MO)ONN
Major Times
1 36 pm-3:36 pin
Minor Times
8:08 a.ml-9 08 ;iln
6.58 pin-7:58 pill
Prediction
Best
Time Zone
I'TC -4
11/7/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 6:41 ati
Sets: 5:39 pmi
Day Length
10 hrs. 58 milns.
Moon Dlata
Rises 8 I3 iin
Sets: 6.52 pm
Lp: 1:34 pm
Don- 1.05 ;am
Moon Phase
3',
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1 34 pnit-3.34 pin
Minor Times
8. 13 i-9I 13 nI l
6 52 pin-7:52 pil
Prediction
Belier
Time Zone
tlIC -5


11/8/2010
Sun Data
Rises. 6:42 n;Il
Sets: 5:39 pil
Day Length
10 hrs. 57 n11is.
Moon Data
Rises: 9.15 .an
Sels: 7:49 pinl
U'p 2 32 pill
tDons i 2 U4 :ill
Moon Phase
8';
Waxing (rescelnt
Major Times
2:04 aini-4:04 im
2 32 pm-4 32 pmi
Minor Times
9:15 ani-10: 15 ain
7 49 pmi-8:49 pii
Prediction
Good
Time Zone
I'TC: -5
11/9/2010
Sun Data
Rises: 6:43 aml
Sets: 5:38 pm
Day Length
10'hrs. 55 mins.
Moon Data
Rises 10:09 ;im
Sets: 8:47 pin
U'p: 3 28 pm
Down: 3.01 aml
Moon Phase
14,'i
Waxing recentt
Major Times
3 01 aimn-5 01 lam
3 28 pin-5 28 pil
Minor Times
10 09 aln-i 11:09 alil
8:47 pm-9 47 pmn
Prediction
4\ erage
Time Zone
S'TC -5


11/10/2010
Sun Dat:l
Rises 6:-44 Wa1
Sets 5:38 pil

Day Length
10 hrs 54 minills
Moon Data
Rises 10.58 1m1
Sets. 9 45 pil
L'p: 4-21 pin
Don, I 3 55 l.n
Moon Phase
W;I\Illg (Crescent
Major Tinimes
3:55 ;11i-5:55 til
4-21 pml-6'21 p1
Minor Times
10 58 alm11I 58 am1
9:45 pm-10:45 plil
Prediction
Average
Time Zone
I'TC: -5
11/11/2010
Sun Data
Rises 6.44 ami
Sets. 5:37 pml
Day Length
10 hrs. 53 mins
Moon Data
Rises 11 40 ;mn
Sets: 10.41 pm
I'p: 5:10 pm
Down. 4:46 amn
.Moon Phase
31'i
Waxing Crescent
.Major Times
4:46 aim-6:46 aim
5 10 pm-7 10 pin
Minor Times
11:40 am- f2.40 pm
10.41 pm-l11:41 pin
Prediction
As erage
Time Zone
t r(. -5


210 W. MAIN ST. DOWNTOWN WAUCHULA
Across From Main Street Park


773-3104 |

Agents: James Yeomans & Michelle Crawley-Yeomans Shawn Brabant


TAX COLLECTION NOTICE


The certified tax roll for 2010 has been delivered by the Hardee County
Property Appraiser to Zee Smith, Hardee County Tax Collector for collection.
The 2010 tax roll is now open for payment at the Tax Collector's office at 110 W.
Oak St.. Room 102, Wauchula. Florida beginning Monday, November 1, 201.0
'I between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M.
The 2010 tax bills will be mailed on October 30, 2010. If you have not
Ith
received a tax bill by November 15th, contact the Tax Collector's Office at the
number shown below to request a bill be mailed to you.


at 1, Discounts allowed are:


November ......... ........ ............ 4%
December ................ ......... ....... 3%
January ......................... 2%
February .................... ............. 1%

M arch ................ .................. Net


COURTESY PHOTOS After April st 3% penalty is charged.
it's blue, red, green,
pie, pink, orange and
ow? The second-grade YOU WILL NOT RECEIVE A RECEIPT unless you send a self-
:hers at Zolfo Springs addressed stamped envelope with payment or pay at the Tax Collector's office.
nentary School! Lucky
ond graders had the
e-in-a-lifetime chance 2011 INSTALLMENT PAYMENTS
aint their teachers from Real Estate and Personal Property Taxes for 2011 Tax Year may be paid
d to toe for reaching
r Accelerated Reader in four installments IF an application is filed with the Tax Collector before May 1,
I for the month. These 2011. You must request an application form.
;hers will do anything If you are presently paying by the Installment Method, your account will
get their students to
, and they proved it! be automatically renewed for 2011, UNLESS you advise the Tax Collector to
Dying the moment (top remove your name. THIS APPLICATION DOES NOT APPLY TO 2010
to, from left) are teach- TAXES.
Malena Klein, April
)d, Kari Gicker, Kaylee
bb and Michele Hall. Zerelda "Zee" Smith
n (bottom) is shown
ing the swarm of young Hardee County Tax Collector
iters. Students who 110 W. Oak St., Room 102
:h their AR goals will Wauchula, FL 33873
eive some sort of fun
Crazy reward each hardeecountytaxcollector.com
ith. Wonder what next (863) 773-9144 11:4,11c
ith will bring?





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........ .. SGli 3 -DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 17P 53
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIB RARY WIEST
GA IIIESVILLE FL 32611-0001


Wildcats Beat Brahmans 48-25


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of.The Herald-Advocate
The much-improved Hardee
Wildcats continued their win-
ning ways by beating the
Okeechobee Brahmans 48-25
Friday night at Wildcat
Stadium.
This week, the 'Cats take on
the Desoto Bulldogs for the
90th time in the state's longest
running rivalry game at 7:30 in
Arcadia.
The winner will be guaran-
teed a spot in the playoffs as
either the district champion or
runner up, depending on the
outcome of the Immokalee and
Estero game being played on
the same night.
If Hardee wins and Estero
beats Immokalee, the Wildcats
would be district champions. If
Immokalee beats Estero, Har-
dee would be district runner-up.
The Wildcats didn't waste
any time Friday night getting
domination of Okeechobee
under way.
The Brahmans received to
start the game. The Hardee
defense sent them backwards
and forced a punt after three
plays.
Hardee started with. good
field position at its 46-yard line
and had a healthy Jarrius
Lindsey in the backfield for the
first time in two games.
Lindsey looked fresh and
back to his old self, ripping off
runs of seven and 37 yards to
start the game, setting up a first-


and-goal for the 'Cats.
Hardee decided to go for it on
fourth-and-two and called for
an option to the .right. Junior
quarterback Colby Baker kept
the ball and dove into the end
zone, putting Hardee up 6-0 just
over four minutes into the
game.
The Octavio Alvarez point
after try (PAT) was good, mak-
ing it 7-0.
The Hardee defense forced
another three and out as the
freshman defensive end duo of
Keyon Brown and James Green
teamed up to sack Jack Rade-
baugh on third down.
Hardee took over at its 40-
yard line after a Colby Frank
punt that Deonte Evans took as
a fair catch.
SA 20-yard run by Lindsey
gave Hardee the ball inside
Okeechobee territory.
Two plays later, Baker made
a play action fake and threw
deep to a wide open Carter
Lambert for a 37-yard touch-
down strike.
After the Alvarez PAT,
Hardee led 14-0 with 3:14 to
play in the first quarter.
Okeechobee started its next
drive at the 23-yard line and
was forced to punt again after
just three plays thanks to the
Hardee defense that harassed
the Brahmans all night.
The Frank punt was fielded
by Evans at the Hardee 32-yard
line. He made a good return to
midfield that was nullified by a


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block-in-the-back penalty.
Hardee started this drive at its
own 25 and went on an 11-play
scoring drive.
Faced with third and four
from the 12 yard line, senior
Jake Mayer took a handoff
around the left end, stiff-arming
his way into the end zone.
The Alvarez PAT made. the
score 21-0.
On the ensuing kickoff,
Alvarez made a touchdown-
saving tackle on Aukeemian
Mills at the 50-yard line.
A roughing-the-passer penal-
ty helped keep the drive alive
and Radebaugh found the end
zone on a quarterback keeper
up the middle from 2-yards out.
The PAT was no good, mak-
ing the score 21-6 with five
minutes left in the half.
The ensuing kickoff was high
and short with Andrew Hooks
picking the ball up at the 19-
yard line and racing to the left
sideline. He outran everyone
for an 81-yard touchdown.
The Alvarez PAT was true,
putting the 'Cats up 28-6.
Okeechobee could not get
anything going on its next pos-
session against the 'Cat defense
and was forced to another three-
and-out.
Hardee took over at the
Okeechobee 40 with a little
more than two minutes remain-
ing in the half.
Three plays later, Baker
dropped back and once again
found Lambert alone in the end
zone, this time for a 20-yard
touchdown pass.
After the Alvarez PAT,
Hardee took a 35-6 lead into the
locker room at halftime.
Okeechobee tried an onside
kick to open the half but Hardee
was ready and recovered at its
45-yard line.
The Wildcat offense went
right back to work driving
down the field.
Senior Tre' Anderson capped
off the eight-play drive with a
14-yard pitch around the right


end untouched for the score.
The Alvarez PAT made it 42-
6 with 8:03 to go in the third
quarter.
The. Brahmans kept playing
hard and Radebaugh found
Alonzo Coleman for a 45-yard
touchdown pass, cutting the
lead to 42-12 after a failed two-
point conversion.
Hardee gave the ball back to
Okeechobee two plays later
after an Anderson fumble at the
Brahmans' 46-yard line.-
Radebaugh found the end
zone again, this time hitting
Mills from 11-yards out.
Okeechobee went for two
points unsuccessfully and
trailed 42-18 with 27 seconds
remaining in the third.
Harder got the ball back and
went on a game-clinching drive
that took more that six minutes
off the clock.
The 11-play drive was
capped, off when Brown was
called in for a fourth and one
from the 15-yard line.
Brown got the one yard and
kept his legs and a big pile of
people moving before bursting
out of the back of the bunch to
race into the end zone.
A muffed snap caused the
extra point attempt to be unsuc-
cessful.
Okeechobee added one more
late score on a Radebaugh pass
to Coleman, making the final
score 48-25 in favor of the
Wildcats.
Head Coach Buddy Martin
was pleased with his offense
racking up 413 yards for the
evening, including 358 rushing
yards.
He said his special teams
executed very well.
Desoto had an off week last
week so Martin expects them to
be extra prepared when the
Wildcats roll into town next
week.
He said that will make the
preparation and execution for
the Wildcats that much more
important this week.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


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ll2 clUSf1i7 SeWau[c lai o(3I ) 76 7-8920 1


DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


"We Put Our V Into Our Service"


If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


L7 L


Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


(USPS 78-780)


Players of the Week











Carter Lambert Deonte Evans
21 #5
Offense Defense
2 receptions for 57 4 tackles, 3 pass
yards, and 2 touchdowns break-ups, and held
Okeechobee's best
receiver to 1 catch.



Photo

Not

Available



Maxon Delhomme Luscious Everett
#16
Special Teams Scout Team
3 tackles and recovered
surprise onside kick.


Pauline Ochoa, Sue Lobato, Red Camp Pharmacist and Crystal Contreras


r^


. . .

Odo










2C The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010





-Schedule Of Weekly Services


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH '
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship Ist & 3rd ............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................ 10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .....................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Iwy. 17. 375-2253
Bible Study ....................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 10:45 a.m.
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED '
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.


IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m


MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.


MTI. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training........5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of Mason Dixon & County
Line
781.5887
Sunday Worship ..................1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........l 1:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

-ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m..
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1.....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship. ........?:00 p.m.
Kidz Club. ....................7:00 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I 1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................II:00 a.m.
_Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............:...6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
....................................... 6:30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
____Rd.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
English Service ..................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesdary'v Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Pastor James Bland
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....I I:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica............................10:00 a.m .
Servicio........................ ........ :00 a.m.;
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion .......... .........7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................ 10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..............1..1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.rn.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ..:................. 10:00 a.m.,
Sunday Worship .................11 :00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ...............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Church Orchestra................ 5:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry .................... 6:00 p.m.
Children's Ministry ............ 6:00 p.m.
Legacy of Faith/Mid-Week
W orship .......... ................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal ........ 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast.......................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T
(K-5th) ..........10:45 am.
Worship Service. ................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for Nursery-5th
grade ......................... 6:15 p.m .
Classes for children ages PreK-12th
grade.................. 6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................... I1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ............1.....1:00 a.m.
SEvening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ............... ........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.


Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m. FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
Wednesday Worship ............. 6:30 p.m. OF GOD CHURCH
CHURCH OFC IST.-- .-. 1397 South Florida Avenue
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St. 773-9386.
773-9678 Early Morning Worship ........8:30 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m. Late Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m. Wed. Family Night ................ 7:00 p.m.
-..... -... Adult Children & Youth '


CHURCH OFI CHK1ST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 1:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men v Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRISI'
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ I I:00 a.m.


FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.,
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts...................:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.'
W orship................................ 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult CI.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min..........7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.,
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.,


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 91 Ave.
Martes ................7: 30 p.m.
SJueves ............... .7:30 p.m.
Doiiingo .......... 10:30 p.m.
IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ........... .....................6:00 p.m .
M iercoles... .......... ,:' .....7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ......................2:00 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
drWednesday Activities (All Ages)
............. 7:00 p.m .

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m...:
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services


NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship ...................1..(st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1' & 3" Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2" & 41' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ......................... 1:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service


PkOGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
- 'Sf day School ..................9:30 a.
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
i Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.


RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.'

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ..............1......0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m .


H oly D ays ......................................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m .
(Spanish) ............... 11... :00 a.m.
(Creole)................... I:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.j
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.'
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.:
Friday-Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.


TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD-'
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship-..:.............7:30 p.m.
SWAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .:................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

SZOLiO SPRINGS
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.'
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.'
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service........:.......7:00 p.m.


COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ............. ............ 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............:..6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS (
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .............. I1:00 a.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCIf
OF ZOLFO
.320 E. 4tlh.St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m..
Training Union .....................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............:00 p.m.
Wednesday Praver ................7:00 p.m.,


--


Every time he went for a sail in his
yacht, Joseph Dollar threw a bottle
containing his business card and a
fifty-dollar bill into the sea.
He kept this up for many years,
but he never received any thanksfor
his gifts.
All along your journey on the sea
of life;tihetord has been dropping
tokens of His goodness and grace.
Some ignore them. Others
accept them. But few thank Him.
Ingratitude- it'sone of the worst
sins we can commit.
No wonder the Psalmist said,
"Say 'Thank You'totheLord. Every
morning tell Him, 'Thank You foi
.Your kindness,' and yery evening.
rejoice in His faithfulness."

Visit us at: www. TheSower.com


Shen "thank you" is said it is encouraging,
whether it's for a small, routine matter or
a large undertaking. A personal thank you also
reminds us that a thank you to God is in order.
As we pray each day and weekly at our house of
worship, we can thank Him for everything, big and
small. With each thank you we can acknowledge
God's love for us and our love for Him!



















SciprMes Seedud by TheA kneinweDo*Society
Copynr t2010. eiNsr Wiesa Napaper Seice. PR0 8f88117,Chapttesir. VA 22S00mtltIt


eace iJiver grdvers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis a Kathy Barber (
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ....................1000 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
SMARANATIA BAPTIST
CHURCHH' '
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524 773-0989
Sunday School ............:.......10:00 a.m.
W orship................................ :00 a.m .
SEvening................. .......... 1:00 p.m
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet...,7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTEIt
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's ChusKh................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.,
"P~RMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
............. ........................... 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday . ................. 0:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m .

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .. ............. 11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night ......................7:00 p.m.
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday SchQl... ..... ....9:30 a.Rq,
Morning Worship .....................I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................11:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ....,............. .11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club........................... 6:30 p.m.
Scrvicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Scrvicio.............................. 8:00p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.








November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 3C


.r^ ;.-'
- ------------ .--


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims
Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration.

Health and Safety
Wildlife
I


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


"My family's been fishing for eight generations. It's just a way of life.
That's why we've got to get this cleaned up."
.,,,.,Pete Floyd
Commercial Fisherman,
Pascagoula, Mississippi


When the spill hit, a lot of people said it would be the end. BP said
they would try to make this right. But how was an energy corrpany
going to help a fisherman?

Putting People to Work
The first thing they did was rent my boat and hire me to help with
the cleanup. They made up my losses so I could pay my bills. And
they worked with all kinds of people here from fishermen and
shrimpers to restaurant owners. It helped us keep our businesses
open. And it helped us make ends meet so we could support
our families.

Staying for the Long Haul
When they capped the well in July and finally killed it, we were all
relieved. But would BP stick around? Well, they did. The beaches
are clean and we're back on the water fishing so things are getting
a whole lot better. They are still here and have said they will keep
working for as long as it takes.

Getting Back to Normal
BP asked me to share my story with you to keep you informed. If
you still need help, please call 1-866-448-5816 or go to bp.com. If
you're wondering what you can do, well the next time you're
shopping, buy a little Gulf seafood. There is none finer.


For assistance, please call:
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
floridagulfresponse.com


bp





11:4c








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November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Greetings from Fort Green!
The Fall Festival has come
and gone, but it was loads of
fun and well attended. One
thing about Fort Green is
there's always something going
'on and whatever it is, there is
always plenty of help and lots
of people partaking of the fun.
Several of us went to the
"Speed Trap of the USA" and
made it there and back without
any tickets. We went to the
gospel sing in Waldo, and the
police car parked or "hid"
behind a sign near the camp-
ground. Day or night you could
hear the siren wailing as he got
another one. We all made sure
to go below the posted 45 miles
per hour.
Earl and Mary Bargeron
stopped by Waldo on their way
home after spending a month in
the mountains. Mary said the
leaves were the most beautiful
she had ever seen. Now I
believe her, but sometimes the
most current ones are best!
Sometimes, I will think this is
the very best and then a year
later that becomes the best!
Anyway, she was very fortunate
to get to enjoy them for a month
and arrive home safely with no
problems.
John and Essie Deer, Sam
and Arden Rawls, Earl and
Mary Bargeron and Sherman
and I made up the eight who
attended the sing from our area.
Besides the good music, just sit-
ting around the campground
and visiting is great fun. Most
of us do not take time to just
visit in this fast-paced world we
live in.
We all arrived home in time
to attend the Fifth Sunday Sing
at Fort Green. As usual, this is a
good sing. Fort Green is
blessed, as are so many other
churches, with good musical
talent. I don't fall into that cate-
gory, but I enjoy going.
Our sincere sympathy is ex-
tended to the family of Shannon
Story, who lived in our area
when she was in school. Her
mother and dad, Gerald and
Gayle, had one of the stores in
Fort Green and everyone loved


to stop in, if not to buy just to
visit!
The last report I had. Brother
Eddie Kennedy is still in the
Wauchula hospital, but is anx-
ious to come home as most peo-
ple are after a stint in the hospi-
tal. Randy Davis had his heart
cath Monday. Tom Lynn's son
had a heart attack and was out
West working. He had surgery.
Sharon Lynn's son came
through his surgery well and is
now out of the hospital.
Christine Murdock is home and
Buck Tool is still under the
weather. Margie Albritton said
Punk is still suffering with his
cold and deep cough. Please
pray for all of these.
Mildred Cooper and Gwen
Albritton were able to attend
the sing Sunday night. Mrs.
Mildred can only attend one
function a day, and decided she
wanted to hear the singing. Her
son, Sherman, was going to
sing and this probably influ-
enced her along with lots of
nieces and nephews singing.
Quite a few of our neighbors
have told me they went to the
new broadband system and are
very happy with it. I am waiting
for them to call and schedule
me.
Edith Bassett had a very good
visit with her great-grandchil-
dren, Aaron and Beka Btown,
and their parents. She rode up
with John and Carol Brown,
who visited their son, John-
mark, and wife Amy before
going on to Tennessee to visit
another son, Matthew, and his
family. They all had a good
time.
Quite a few of our youth sold
tickets to the 4-H BBQ so
remember to pick up your din-
ner this Saturday. Our Thanks-
giving dinner at church will be
on the 10th. The Ladies Night
Out at Fort Green is only a
week away, as it is on Nov. 12
this year. If you don't have your
ticket, please get with Connie
Coker.
Please remember to pray for
one another, our military and
our country.


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


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Small Business



Rates as low as


David Hand
Chief of
Business Services


Commerdal Real Estate


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seeing you and your business succeed because we live and work
here too. Find out how we can help your small business grow.


Cemmr Real Estate Commercial Vehicle Loans *And Morel


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small business loan started.


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(863)616-2162


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Southern Counties East Polk County
(863) 260-0786 (863)293-5196


MIDFLiOMD

Lending A Million Dollars A Day
www.midflorida.com


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During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Nov. 1, Jerry Lynn King, 52, of 524 Hammock Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White and charged with pos-
session of marijuana.
Nov. 1, criminal mischief on Shanna Lane was reported.

Oct. 31, Debbie Sambrano, 31, of 618 Old Bradenton Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged with
disorderly conduct.
Oct. 31, Ariel Lopez, 18, of 135 Carlton St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged with affray.
Oct. 31, Michael Paul Sanchez, 34, of 5007 Troublesome
Ave., Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward on a charge
of withholding support of children.
Oct. 31, residential burglaries on East Main Street and on
Redbird Lane, a fight on Alamo Drive, criminal mischief on SR 62
and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Oct. 30, Jami Irene Santos, 46, of 801 Hudson St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF)
and charged with trafficking in drugs, possession of methampheta-
mine, possession of drug paraphernalia and seven counts of pos-
session of drugs without a prescription.
Oct. 30, Esdras Gonzalez, 36, of 2460 Pine Cone Trailer Park
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged
with battery.
Oct. 30, residential burglaries on McDonald Road and on
Walking Horse Drive, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North and
thefts on U.S. 17 South and on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Oct. 29, David Allen Nowakowski, 49, of 575 Bronco Dr.,'
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. James
Cruz and charged with DUI and six counts of possession of drugs
without a prescription.
Oct. 29, Jason Baldree, 34, of 208 S. Third Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with grand theft and
trespass on property other than a structure or conveyance.
Oct. 29, Martin Villa Mondragon, 21, of 158 Bryer Patch,
Arcadia, was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward on an out-of-county
warrant.
Oct. 29, Willie Lee Grey, 39, of 1515 Washington St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with larce-
ny-petit theft.
Oct. 29, a residential burglary on Terrell Road, a business bur-
glary on U.S. 17 South and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

.Oct. 28, Elizabeth Barbara Purser, 32, of 5011 Chester Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Det. John Shivers on a charge of
violation of probation.
Oct. 28, Kerry Dan Rogers, 49, of 3433 Hickory St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Todd Souther oona charge'of with-
holding support of children.
Oct. 28, a robbery/holdup on Chamberlain Boulevard and
Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue was reported.

Oct. 27, Russell Brian Smith, 40, of 829 Bostick Road,
Bowling Green, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession
of drugs without a prescription and possession of drug parapherna-
lia.
Oct. 27, Alejandro Rosas Murrieta, 30, of 1816 Smith Road,


Federally
insured
by NCUA.


Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Todd Souther and charged with
disorderly intoxication.

Oct. 26, a residential burglary on U.S. 17 North, a stolen vehi-
cle on Mott Road, criminal mischief on Captiva Avenue arid tag
stolen on North Florida Avenue and on East Bay Street were report-
ed.

Oct. 25, Jennive Mae Miller, 28, of 4631 Westwood Dr., Punta
Gorda, was arrested on charges of larceny-petit theft, possession
of methamphetamine and possession of drugs without a prescrip-
tion.
Oct. 25, burglary of a conveyance on David Court, and thefts
on West Broward Street and on Boyd Cowart Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
Oct. 311 Juan Cruz-Jimenez, 39, of 611 S. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with dis-
orderly conduct.
Oct. 31, Jose Eulogio Espinosa-Garcia, 29, of 426 Bell St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with bat-
tery.
Oct. 31, a residential burglary on South Ninth Avenue, a fight
on U.S. 17 South and a theft on South 10th Avenue were reported.

Oct. 30, Mario Marco Garcia-Amaya, 32, of 124 Fox St., Ona,
was arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer on a pair of out-of-county
warrants.

Oct. 28, Roy Alvin Sellers, 58, of 705 Pennsylvania Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Kevin Brock and charged with dis-
orderly intoxication.
Oct. 27, Joey Wayne Windham, 38, of 206 S. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with
possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Oct. 26, Pedro Hernandez, 36, of 5927 Tomoka Dr., Orlando,
was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with possession of
marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Oct. 26, a theft 6n West Oak Street was reported.

Oct. 25, Johnny Lee Cook, 64, General Delivery, Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and charged with trespassing
on property not a structure or conveyance.
Oct. 25, a residential burglary on Turner Avenue, burglary of
conveyances on Maurice Sonny Clavel Road and on Georgia
Street, and a vehicle stolen on North Florida Avenue were report-
ed.

BOWLING GREEN
Oct. 31, Orlando Morgan-DeLeon, 19, of 4630 Church Ave.,
Bowling Green, and Fernando Vazquez, 29, of 133 E. Main St.,
Bowling Green, were arrested by Ofc. Robert Ehrenkaufer and
each charged with battery.
Oct. 31, a fight on East Main Street and a vehicle stolen on Ceptral
Avenue were reported.

Oct. 28, a theft on Church Avenue was reported.

Oct. 27, Enoch Henry Rogers, 38, of 8417 Williams Town
Blvd., Lakeland, was arrested by Chief John Scheel on an out-of-
county warrant.
Oct. 27, a theft on West Main Street was reported.

Oct. 26, a theft on Grove Street was reported.

A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you are
talking big money.
-Everett M. Dirksen


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6C The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


Book Review
By Spessard Stone

A GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY HISTORY
"A Golden Anniversary History.of Service to the Southern
Region" by Dr. Canter Brown Jr. and Kenneth J. Nemeth pays trib-
ute to the regional energy organization, the Southern Interstate
Nuclear Board from 1961 to 1977 and its successor, the Southern
States Energy Board from 1978 to the present.
Presented initially are an overlay of civilian nuclear energy
from 1945 to the mid-1950s and.then from 1957 to 1961 the pred-
ecessor agency, the Regional Advisory Council on Nuclear Energy
(RACNE). The Atomic Energy Act of 1946's monopoly on atomic
power as a military weapon gave way to a new era in 1954 with
amendments to the Act that permitted nuclear energy for power
generation.
In September 1956, the Southern Governors Conference, led by
Gov. LeRoy Collins of Florida, assisted by governors Frank
Clement of Tennessee and Luther Hodges of North Carolina,
declared basic objectives for RACNE, which convened in February
1957, including aiming for industrial development from inexpen-
sive electricity from nuclear reactors.
There are, however, ongoing controversies which are present-
ed. Nuclear power was and continues to be divisive, and the con-
flicts are detailed, as are the reluctance of oil, gas and coal state
leaders to embrace nuclear energy.
Progress, nevertheless, continued when the Southern Interstate
Nuclear Board (SINB) was empowered to organize, and began
operations in September 1961 with eight states: Kentucky,
Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee, Texas, South Carolina, Florida
and Alabama; with nine more, Georgia, Mississippi, Virginia,
Maryland, Missouri, West Virginia, North Carolina, Oklahoma and
Delaware ratifying by 1966. Delaware, however, withdrew in
1971. Moreover, two territories, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin
Islands, became members.
Each jurisdiction is represented by the governor and a legisla-
tor from the House and Senate, with a governor serving as the chair
and legislators as vice chair and treasurer. To interact with them,
serving as secretary, and administer the agency, the board has had
able executives, including Robert H. Gifford and Kenneth J.
Nemeth.
In the 1970s, the SINB commenced to trend away from its
nuclear focus to an advisory board on all energy questions, includ-
ing energy conservation, energy supply and demand, environment
and safety, nuclear energy, fossil energy, and other energy sources.
Accordingly, in February 1978, SINB became known as the
Southern States Energy Board (SSEB).
As the actions of the board are interconnected with the nation's
energy policies, provided is a narrative of the various crises and
how the agency responded.
These include desegregation, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the
1973-74 energy crisis, environmental challenges, the Iranian
hostage crisis, the Reagan Revolution, the Clean Air Act of 1990,
the Gulf and Iraq wars, Kyoto Protocol, and the post 9/11 land-
scape, all of which through the.years the SSEB maintained its focus
on the urgent need to address energy and environmental concerns
with comprehensive solutions emphasizing the enormous promise
of technological innovation.
"A Golden Anniversary History" contains 407 pages, contents,
preface, 168 photographs, six appendices, and sources. It is pub-
lished by the Southern States Energy Board, 6325 Amherst Ct.,
Norcross, GA 30092; telephone 770-242-7712; www.sseb.org.


i ,

*.,ftGY B o0
1419 dr l


By Dr. Canter Brown,Jr. and Kenneth. Nemeth

COURTESY PHOTO
Florida governor LeRoy Collins Is prominently featured
early in this new work by historian Canter Brown Jr.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EQUITY TRUST
COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO LAURA VANCE IRA, the
holder of the following certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 509 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2005

Description of Property:
DESCRIPTION:
LOT 6
HARLEM HEIGHTS

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.
Name in which assessed: EMMA JEAN ROBINSON
Said property being in the County of HARDEE,
State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property described in such certificate
shall be sold to the highest bidder at the Hqrdee
County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second
floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL
33873 on the8 day of DECEMBER, 2010, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 26 day of October, 2010.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252010TD011XXXX 11:42c


IRONKID CHAMPION


COURTESY PHOTO
Zachary Duranstanti, 9, is shown with his finisher's medal
and first-place trophy in the Ironkids Triathlon in St.
Petersburg in early October. Completing a 150-yard
swim, four-mile bike ride and one-mile run in 28.07, not
only earned him the championship for his age group, but
qualified him to participate in the 2011 Ironkids National
Championship against kids his age from all over the
United States.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EQUITY TRUST
COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO LAURA VANCE IRA, the
holder of the following certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 197 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2005

Description of Property:
DESCRIPTION:
.49 AC ALL THAT PART OF W 1/4 OF SE 1/4
OF NE 1/4 LYING N OF SR S 664A
09 33S 25E
123P296 251P75 268P273 269P681 & 684

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.
Name in which assessed: PILAR GARCIA

Said property being in the County of HARDEE,
State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property described in such certificate
shall be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second
floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL
33873 on the 8 day of DECEMBER, 2010, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 28 day of October, 2010.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252010TD013XXXX 11:4-25c


Orange Blossom RV News
By Connie Fisher


WELCOME BACK!
It's just is not possible that I
am starting to write the news
again! Where did the summer
go? I am sure that everyone
reading this is thinking the
same thing.
We are welcoming some new
people to our park this year.
Bob and Dottie Manger are on
Lot 21; they are from Wapa-
koneta. Ohio. We have Rob
Meyers and Jayne Guarisgo on
Lot 93, and they are from White
Cloud, Mich. We have Al Mar-
tin on Lot 94; he is from
Canada.
We also have Jack and
Norma Manning on Lot 95A;
they are from Port Charlotte.
We have Ted and Pat Bam on
Lot 115; they are from Grass
Lake, Mich. We have Jim and
Tommie Rehfeldt on Lot 141:
they are from Lake Station, Ind.
We also have Eleanor Rudd on
Lot 143; she is from Wauchula.
I want to say welcome to all
of you.

NO LONGER WITH US!
Over the summer we lost two
of our long-time residents.
Mary Catozzi decided to go to
Arizona to be with family. We
all wished her well. We lost
Margaret Volz. She came down
over the summer and told us she
was going into assisted living.
She was very happy about her


new arrangement. During this
week Rex Perkins came in and
said he and Dorothy were sell-
ing. their place as Dorothy's
health was too bad to make the
trip again. All of these people
will surely be missed by us all.

PASSING OF A FRIEND
I know all are asking about
our friend, L.V. When are the
memorial services, where are
they going to be?
They will take place some-
time in January. Right now it is
impossible to give you a time
and date. But, I promise, you
will have the information in
plenty of time for planning.
SRuth and her family, all
appreciated the showering of
cards and well wishes. Ruth
told me many times if it weren't
for the cards at first when L.V.
was so sick, she just wouldn't
of had the strength to get
through. Just in case you have
not seen her yet, she is doing
wonderfully.

MONTHLY PLANNER
The monthly planner is out.
You should find it in your mail-
box. If you don't have a mail-
box you can find one in the
office. I think it is as close as I
can get it.
Most activities will start
Monday. The worship service
will start Dec. 5.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EQUITY TRUST
COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO LAURA VANCE IRA, the'
holder of the following certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 604 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2004

Description of Property:
DESCRIPTION:
LOT 46
HARLEM HEIGHTS
205P257 249P47 366P727 387P225
DC-582P792 (DMM) AFF-591P766
591P767

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.
Name in which assessed: CHARLES LAMONT
ARMSTRONG

Said property being in the County of HARDE
State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed ac
ing to law, the property described in such certi
shall be sold to the highest bidder at the H
County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street,
floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauc
33873 on the 8 day of DECEMBER, 2010, at 1

Dated this 22 day of October, 2010.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252010TD010XXXX ,


A ( iF "\ 1.' ,.' HISTORY

OF SERVICE TO THE SOUTHERN REGION


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EQUITY TRUST
COMPANY CUSTODIAN FBO LAURA VANCE IRA, the
holder of the following certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 414 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2005

Description of Property:
DESCRIPTION:
LOT 11 BLK 18
ANDERSONS RESUB OF PACKERS.ADD
146P416 238P33 238P637 655P701

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.
Name in which assessed: BENITO G. VALDIVIEZ
AND CONSUELO VALDIVIEZ

Said property being in the County of HARDEE,
State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property described in such certificate
shall be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second
floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL
33873 on the 8 day of DECEMBER, 2010, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 26 day of October, 2010.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252010TD012XXXX
11:4-25c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ETC CUSTODI-
AN FBO BRADLEY ALEXANDER VANCE COVERDALE
(EDUCATION), the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 153 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2005

Description of Property:
DESCRIPTION:
LOTS 37 TO 40 INC BLK A MT ZION SUBD
05 33S 25E
219P159 DC-373P701 477P730P732

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.
Name in which assessed: ELVIRA GARCIA AND
HELMIRO GARCIA
Said property being in the County of HARDEE,
State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed accord-
ing to law, the property described in such certificate
shall be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second
floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL
33873 on the 8 day of DECEMBER, 2010, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 29 day of October, 2010.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252010TD014XXXX11:4-25c
11:4-25c









November 4, 2010, The Herald-Advocate 7C


IN THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 252010CP000076

IN RE: ESTATE OF
JERRY H. MELENDY, SR.

Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

SThe administration of the
estate of JERRY H. MELENDY,
SR., File Number 252010-
CP000076, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 417 Main
Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claia.s
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this'
notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is November 4,
2010.

Personal Representative:
KATHRYN C. MELENDY
912 West Main Street
Wauchula, Florida 33873


Attorney for Personal
ReDpresentative:
TASO M. MILONAS
Florida Bar No. 469858
2639 Fruitville Road, Suite
Sarasota, Florida 34237
Telephone: (941) 954-541(
Facsimile: (941) 954-5490


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
2 TENTH JUDICIAL CIRC
AND FOR HARDEE CO
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO.:25-2010-CA-(

BANKUNITED,
Plaintiff,

vsa

ANNETTE K. CULLOP,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated October 19,
2010, entered in Case No.- 25-
2010-CA-000202 of the Circuit
Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit
In and for Hardee County, Florida,
In which BankUnited, is the
Plaintiff and Annette K. Cullop,
Bruce J. Mayer, and The Unknown
Spouse of Annette K. Cullop n/k/a
George Sandoval, are defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in the Hardee
County Courthouse, 2nd Floor,
outside room 202, 417 W. Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873, at
11:00 A.M. on the 17 day of
November 2010, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

LOTS 1 TO 4 INCLUSIVE
OF BUNTING SULiiDVI-
SION, A SUBDIVISION IN
SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP
33 SOUTH, RANGE 24
EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AS PER PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 51.

A/K/A 5159 COUNTY
ROAD 663 NORTH, BOWL-
ING GREEN, FL 33834

Any person claiming an interest
In the surplus from the sale, If
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the LIs
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated in Hardee County, Florida
this 20 day of October, 2010.

CLERK OF THE COURT
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863)534-4690
within 2 working days of your
receipt of this (describe notice); if
you are hearing or voice
Impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777
or Florida Relay Service 711.
10:28;11:4c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT\OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR)
HARDEE COUNTY /

CASE NO. 252010CA000616

HAROLD ROOMS,
Plaintiffs,

vs.

NORMAN C. PLACE, deceased;
MARSHALL PLACE; ESTATE OF
MARCELLA PLACE BETTER;
ESTATE OF DELORES PLACE
MACKAY; and ESTATE OF RUTH
PLACE; and their unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees,.
grantees, creditors, and all other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against them,
Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO THE DEFENDANTS:

NORMAN C. PLACE, deceased

MARSHALL PLACE
c/o Ami Baggett
23 Sweetwater Road
Mt. Mitchell, AL 36856

ESTATE OF MARCELLA
PLACE BETTER
c/o BRIAN BETTER
2210 Trowbrldge Ct.
Belleville, IL 62221

ESTATE OF DELORES PLACE
MACKAY
20 Acapulco Drive
Brick, NY 08723-7903

ESTATE OF RUTH PLACE
KELLOGG
c/o GAIL TADDECCI
15926 Woodlet Park Court
Chesterfield, MO 63017

if alive or if dead, and their
unknown spouses, heirs, de-
visees, grantees, creditors, and
all other parties claiming by,
through, under or against them

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
to quiet title on the following
described property in Hardee
County, Florida:

Lot 6 and the West 1/2 of


Lot 5, Block 5, Roberts and
Skipper Resubdivision of
Roberts and Skipper
Addition to the Town of
Zolfo Springs, according to
e 204 the plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 2, page(s) 119,
0 inclusive, of the public
records of Hardee County,
11:4,11c Florida.

and you are required to serve a
OF THE copy of your written defenses, if
UIT IN any, to JOHN W. H. BURTON of
UNTY, Burton & Burton, PA., Post Office
Drawer 1729, Wauchula, Florida
33873, on or before the 3rd day of
December, 2010, and file the orlg-
000202 final with the Clerk of the Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after, or a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed In the complaint or petition.

WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on this 26th day of
/ October, 2010.


B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Courts

BY: CONNIE COKER
Deputy Clerk
11:4-25c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 25-2009-CA-000230

ARCH BAY HOLDINGS, LLC
SERIES 2009 A,
Plaintiff,

vs.

DANIEL MARTINEZ; MARIA ANN
MARTINEZ, ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOW TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES; HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; TENANT #1, TEN-
ANT #2, TENANT #3, AND TEN-
ANT #4 THE NAME BEING FICTI-
TIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PAR-
TIES IN POSSESSION,
Defendant(s).
/

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
October 19, 2010, entered in Civil
Case No.: 25-2009-CA-000230 of
the Circuit Court of the Tenth
Judicial Circuit in and for Hardee
County, Florida, wherein ARCH
BAY HOLDINGS, LLC SERIES
2009 A, Plaintiff, and DANIEL
MARTINEZ; MARIA ANN MAR-
TINEZ; TENANT #1 n/k/a THERE-
SA MARTINEZ, are Defendants.

I will sell to the highest bidder for
cash, Hardee County Court-
house, 417 W. Main Street,
Second Floor Hallway outside of
Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873,
at 11:00 A.M. on the 17 "day of
November 2010, the following
described real property as set
forth In said Final Summary
.Judgment, to wit:

LOTS 2, 3, AND 4 OF
BLOCK A OF MT. ZION
SUBDIVISION, TOWN OF
BOWLING GREEN, HARD-


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the, office of the county
court:
Aaron Markeeia Cook, 29,
Bowling Green, and Delores
Belmares, 32, Bowling Green.
Rafael Lopez-DeJesus, 20,
Bowling Green, and Iveth
Arana Gonzalez, 20, Bowling
Green.
Jessop Drew Calder, 25,
Zolfo Springs, and Adrian Sue
Parrish, 28, Wauchula.
John S. Elofson, 77, Wau-
chula, and Lillian Oneida
Landon, 71, Wauchula.
Jerry Geronimo Huron, 32,
Wauchula, and Sherri Aguilar,
29, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-




EE COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS
PER PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE
12.

If you are a person claiming a
right to funds remaining after the
sale, you must file a claim with
the clerk no later than 60 days
after the sale. If you fail to file a
claim you will not be entitled to
any remaining funds. After 60
days, only the owner of record as
of the date of the lis pendens may
claim the surplus.

WITNESS my hand and the seal
of the court on October, 20, 2010.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK

10:28;11:4c
'


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TI
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AI
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORII
CIVIL DIVISION
SCASE NO.25-2010-CA-000171

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.S., AS
TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2004-OPT1, ASSET
BACKED PASS-THROUGH CER
TIFICATES, SERIES 2004-OPT1
Plaintiff,

vs.

CHER TONG XIONG; TRIA V.
XIONG; TOU HER XIONG; ZOU.
XIONG; UNKNOWN PERSONS
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.


HE
ND
DA






I-





A
I)


./


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated October 20,
2010, and entered in Case No. 25-
2010-CA-000171, of the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit
in and for HARDEE County,
Florida. WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CITI.
GROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2004-OPT1,
ASSET BACKED PASS-
THROUGH 'CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2004-OPT1 is Plaintiff
and CHER TONG XIONG; TRIA V.
XIONG; TOU HER XIONG; ZOUA
XIONG; UNKNOWN PERSONS)
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY; are defen-
dants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash AT THE
HARDEE COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 417 W. MAIN STREET,
SECOND FLOOR HALLWAY OUT-
SIDE OF ROOM 202, WAUCHULA,
FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 17
day of November, 2010, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to
wit:

THE.-ORTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP
34 SOUTH, RANGE 25
EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

A person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated this 21 day of October,
2010.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK

This notice is provided pursuant
to Administrative Order No. 2.065.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, If you are a
person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to provisions of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact
the Court Administrator at 417
West Orange Street, Wauchula, FI
33873, Phone No. (863)534-4690
within 2 working days of your
receipt of this notice or pleading;
if you are hearing Impaired, call 1-
800-955-8771 (TDD); If you are
voice impaired, call 1-800-995-
8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay
Services).
10:28;11:4c


ly by the county judge:
Athena Funding Group vs.
William Gilliard, judgment.
Chase Bank USA vs.
Thomas T. Davis Sr., settlement
agreement approved, dismissed.
CACH LLC vs. Gene Davis,
judgment.
Ford Motor Credit Co. vs.
Maria D. and Luis Gutierrez,
order.
FIA Card Services vs.
Francisca C. DeLuna, judg-
ment.

There was no county mis-
demeanor court due to the
judge's absence.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Brian Jonathan Price and
Jennifer Price, divorce.
Peggy Luna and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Cesar Garcia, petition to
register child support order.
Elizabeth A. Riley and DOR
vs. Jeremy L. Mouldin, petition
to register child support order.
Mary Brown O/B/O and
DOR vs. William Royce Grim-
mette, petition for child sup-
port.
CACH LLC vs. Rossana R.
Patron, damage-contracts and
indebtedness.
Ada Dees and DOR vs.
Andrew Bernard White, peti-
tion to enforce administrative
child support order.
Shawn Tamara Mitchell vs.
Michael Staton, petition for
injunction for protection.
Mariana Perez Gaona vs.
Jesusa Gaona, petition for
injunction for protection.
Mariana Perez Gaona vs.
Reynaldo Gaona, petition for
injunction for protection.
Coosaw Ag LLC and Steve
Reas vs. Florida Fertilizer co.
Inc., damages-contracts and
indebtedness.
Sherina Taylor and DOR vs.
Dan Michael Lumly, petition
for administrative child support


order.
Kara Hernandez and DOR
vs. Salgado Hernandez, petition
for administrative child support
order.
'Cassie M. Cameron and
DOR vs. Benjamin R. Solo-
mon, petition for administrative
child support order.
Terri Lyn Shull and DOR vs.
Shelley M. Thompson, petition
for child support.
Maria Elena Tavares and
DOR vs. Julio Cesar Tavares-
Tapia, petition for child sup-
port.
Nora J. Garcia vs. Enrique
Velazquez, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Carolyn Jean .Tice and
Edward Arden Tice, divorce.
Millie Johnson vs. Cleofas
Juan Leyva, petition for injunc-
tion f6r protection.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252010CA000434

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
WAUCHULA, a national banking
Association organized under the
laws of the United States of
America,
Plaintiff

vs.

JODY SUE FISHER, Et Al,
Defendants.
/
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO F.S. CHAPTER 45


NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to Final Default Judgment
and Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on October 18, 2010, In the
above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at the second floor hallway
outside of room 202 of the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, on the 17th
day of November, 2010, at 11:00
a.m., the following described
property:

TRACT 45 OF DEER RUN,
A SUBDIVISION OF HARD-
EE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PER PLAT RECORDED IN
PLAT BAR 62, PAGE 2,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA. TOGETHER WITH
2005 HOMES OF MERIT
MOBILE HOME VIN#
FLHMBA1653-52025A &
FLHMBA1653-52025B.

Dated, this 26 day of October,
2010.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF COURTS
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK
11:4,11c


I Court use RepI ort


American General Home-
Equity vs. Ralph Marshall
Bladen, petition for mortgage
foreclosure.
Catalina Rodriguez and
DOR vs. Carlos Fabian, petition
for child support.
Tiffane Amanda Johnson and
DOR vs. John Johnson Jr., peti-
tion for child support.
Tabernacle of Praise & Joy
Inc. vs. Susan Drake et al, peti-
tion for mortgage foreclosure.
Corinna Bursley vs. Raul
Gonzalez, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.

An entry in this section two
weeks ago was incorrect. It
should have said "First
National Bank of Wauchula vs.
Miguel Ponce and Mirtha
Ponce, petition to foreclose
mortgage.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Branch Banking & Trust Co.
vs. Mark F. Butler and Erika
Butler, judgment.
Unifund CCR Partners vs.
Don W. Douglas, dismissed.
Amy D. Garza and DOR vs.
Jay A. Coker, voluntary dis-
missal of petition for payment
on child support arrearages.
South East Architect Ser-
vices Inc. vs. Florida Reno
LLC, voluntary dismissal.
Sammy L. Williamson and
Sandra M. Darty Williamson,
divorce.
Mark David Forsyth and
Cynthia Lee Berry Forsyth,
divorce.
Erika Rashida Carlton and
James Edward Carlton Jr.,
divorce.
Ruth E. Anderson and Phillip
J. Anderson, divorce.
Kenneth M. Watson and
Susan B. Watson, divorce.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Charles H. Burns and Susan
Burns, judgment.
Steven Dwayne Schontag
and Kerry Sue Schontag,
divorce.
Marvin Brett Johnson and
Jamie Renee Johnson, divorce.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Jody Sue Fisher
et al, judgment of mortgage
foreclosure.
BankUnited vs. Annette K.
Cullop, Bruce J. Mayer et al,
judgment of mortgage foreclo-
sure. 5V
Arch Bay Holdings LLC vs.
Daniel Martinez, Maria Ann
Martinez et al, judgment of
mortgage foreclosure.
William A. Neal III and
Deborah H. Neal, divorce.
Jacqueline Faulk and DOR
vs. Michael Pierce, modifica-
tion of child support.
Wells Fargo Bank as trustee
vs. Cher Tong Xiong, Tria V.
Xiong, Tou Her Xiong, Zoua
Xiong et al, judgment of mort-
gage foreclosure.
Heather Lang vs. Joshua
Alderman, voluntary dismissal
of injunction for protection.
Christopher L. Norton vs.
Deanna Turner, modification of
child support.
Citimortgage Inc. vs. John
Adler et at, voluntary dismissal
of petition for mortgage fore-
closure..

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of last
week by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion, Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-Agreement on resurfacing CR 663 North, 8:40 a.m.
-Approval of minor subdivision plat at Wal-Mart Square
Properties, 8:45 a.m.
-Changing Williams Road to Heartland Way, 8:50 a.m.
-Revised Hardee Health Care Task Force By-Laws, 8:55 a.m.
-Recreational vehicles ordinance discussion, 9:05 a.m.
-Housing grant application and registration fees, 9:20 a.m.
-Legislative package preparation.
This agenda is proved as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.



YOU Can Appear In...

Poet's Place
Are you a pioet? Let us show It Your work could be published In
'thi'newupapr In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
eolely Qn'rneder aubmisalona. Poems must be your own.original
wo k,,' wtten by you, not someone else. bT appear In this fea-
,tug, indyour poetry, name and-town of residence to: Poet's'
PlIasTii HeraldAdvoste, RO. Box a33, Wauchula, FL 33873
,or fax 77367.


.and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Michael Daniel Brown,
grand theft auto, not prosecut-
ed.
Santos Contreras, violation
of probation (original charges
possession of methampheta-
mine and fleeing to elude an
officer with active lights and
sirens), probation revoked, six
months in jail with credit for
time served (CTS), $200 public
defender fees and $100 cost of
prosecution (COP) added to
outstanding fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Gerardo Garcia, possession
of methamphetamine and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
transferred to drug pretrial
intervention program.
Matthew John George, sale
of schedule I marijuana and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, transferred to county misde-
meanor court; possession of a
prescription medication without
a prescription and fleeing to
elude an officer with active
lights and sirens, not prosecut-
ed.
Jermaine Lee Harris, sale of
marijuana within 1,000 feet of a.
church and possession of drug
paraphernalia, five months'in j
ail CTS, license suspended two
y ears, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender fees
and $100 COP placed on lien.
Victor Byron Jackson, grand
theft, two months 15 days in jail
CTS, $520 fine and court costs,
$350 public defender fees, $100
COP, $500 restitution.
Julius Robert Merchant III,
violation of probation (original
charges three counts burglary of
conveyance), time served,
three-year probation reinstated
with $50 public defender fee
and $100 COP added to out-
standing fines and fees. *
Felipe Rios Roman, battery
and aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon, not prosecuted.
Adolfo M. Fuentes, lewd and
lascivious molestation, five
years in Florida State Prison
CTS, followed by probation
five years, designated a sexual
offender, no contact with vic-
tim or victim's family, $520
fine and court costs, $350 pub-
lic defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien.
Anthony Rico Alvarado, vio-
. nation of community control--'.
house arrest (original' charge$
burglary of a conveyance and
possession of burglary tools),
community control revoked,
two years three months Florida
State Prison CTS, $350 public
defender fees and $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Betty Joe Wilson, accessory
after the fact, not prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
. the office of the clerk of court:
James Grady Griffin as per-
sonal representative to Micah
Hendrickson and Sylvia D.
Estes, $125,000.
James W. III and Joy D.
Harrison to Williard K. and
Elizaabeth A. Durrance,
$170,000.
Donn A. Goodwin and Judith
L. Goodwin to Thomas W. and
Donna C. Davis, $52,000.
Power Investments LLC and
Danny James Powers to Wau-
chula State Bank, $50,403.29.
Wauchula State Bank .to
Flora Sanchez, $46,400.
Christopher E. Peavy and
Sophia Peavy to David and
Jessica Nord, $100,000.





8C The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


F -t


HARDEE COUNTY
W '%


V-


During our recent Fail jIaSiau event
at the Hardee County Wildlife Refuge, a number of
people contributed of their time and money to make
the event possible. Without their support,
the event would not have enjoyed such great success.

[ Deepest appreciation is extended to the following:


CENTER FOR GREAT APES
CHARLOTTE HARBOR
NATIONAL ESTUARY
DANIELLE WEEKS
ELIZABETH WEEKS
ESMERALDA HARRIS
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT
OF FORESTRY
FLORIDA FISH AND
WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
COMMISSION
FLORIDA SKUNK RESCUE
FULL CIRCLE JU-JITSU


H.E.A.R.T


HARDEE COUNTY BOARD
OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HARDEE COUNTY FRIENDS
OF THE PARKS, INC.


HARDEE COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD
JACQUE WEEKS.


JOHN AND CARLA
WITH THE FUDGE


SAFFER
SHOP


JOHN AND CAROL ACKERLY
KAYTON NEDZA AND HIS
HELPERS WITH THE
OUTDOOR CLASSROOM
MEMBERS OF THE PARKS
AND RECREATION
ADVISORY BOARD


MOSAIC


PAYNE'S CREEK STATE
HISTORIC PARK
SOUTH WEST FLORIDA
WATER MANAGEMENT
DISTRICT
SUNCOAST SCHOOLS
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
THE POWELL FAMILY


ND


With Every T-Shirt Purchase
You will receive


One Free Admission


* cC


Did you miss the event?


It's not too late!


We still have a limited supply of
"Fall Back To Nature" T-Shirts


to the Wildlife Refuqe.

Get Yours Today!


B^ Cl^


,"
J.*


L~rq


Aw


~t~


:r/








PAGE ONE


YMCA Dedicates Burton Building At Leon Sharp Youth Center


PHOTOS By' MICHAEL KELL'
Thomas Trevino, president of the Wauchula Kiwanis Club, spoke as Betty Sharp and
John W. Burton listen. The $90,000 building, located on Orange Street between the
YMCA and the county courthouse, was built with the help of a $35,000 donation from
the local Kiwanis Club. The remainder of the money was donated by other local busi-
nesses and organizations.


Betty Sharp, left and John W. Burton get ready to cut the ribbon. Sharp is the widow
of the late Leon Sharp and Burton has been a longtime member of the Kiwanis Club.
In rear representing the YMCA are Jim Purdy, COO of the Sarasota YMCA; Paul Smith,
CEO of the Sarasota YMCA; and Calvin Bates, executive director or the Hardee YMCA.


Reyna Kirkland. Zoey Whiteside and Antonia Siles are enjoying lounging around the
new youth center after school. The building has a flat screen TV, couches, video
games, a kitchen, bathrooms and even a study room. Outside are volleyball and bas-
ketball courts.


Colt Hancock, left, is having a blast playing pool as Josie Hancock and Conner
Crawford look on. The youth center is open every day after school and gives kids a
wholesome environment to gather after school gets out.


Farm & Ranch Liquidation


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'62 Chevrolet Corvette* '84 Ford Bronco Honda Jet Skis Honda Generators Dixie Chopper XF2600 quad loop
6' Disk Trailers Tractor with Bush Hog power lift, box blade and spear 500 gallon diesel tank with electric pump
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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, November 4, 2010


NMAA
mP


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(863) 773-4113 LRIf J]RY.coM (863) 773-4744


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D'Vonte Hooks
Tre' Anderson
Kareem Richardson
Quinton Carlton
Deonte Evans
Mikey Retana
Jarrius Lindsey
Tony Rodriguez
Keyon Brown
Colby Baker
Justin Knight
Andrew Hooks
Maxon Delhomme
Brandon Darley
Murrell Winter
Octavio Alvarez
Jake Mayer
Carter Lambert
Vince Grimsley
Austin Prestridge
Dawson Crawford
Wintz Terrell
Michael Pilkington
Jimmy Vallejo
Dillon Skitka
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IRDEE WILDCATS

It



STADIUM

DeSoto Bulldogs
4 Name Pos. Yr.
1 Xavier Payne RB 11
'2 Antonio Washington RB 12


Adrian Harris
William Green
Justin Richardson
Derrick Hillard
Kavauris Polk
Marquis Dickens
Jonathan Richardson
Isiah Bryant
Rashad Dennis
Cedric Jackson
Robert Craggette
James Greene
Sheldon Saunders
Brandon Hairston
Decquon Cowell
David Pitts
Laquavious Hightower
Christian Friend
Austin Lambright
Dalton Wertz
Ivan Velazquez


CB
WR
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OLB
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SS
CB
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TE,DE
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DT
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DT,T
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DT,T


o v Football pom

Quinton T. Carlton, #4


Inside Linebacker
Full Back
SParents: Laura
Colbert and
Christopher Carlton
f YLeague


Years In Football:


8 Years-2 Varsity,
I Junior High, 4


1 Junior Varsity,
Little League


Hobbies/Interests: Freshwater and salt-
water fishing, playing different sports
and helping others
Future Plans: Attend college and learn
about cars


Just name the score of Friday night's Wildcat Football game and
you could win
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
All Other Games $40 Gift Certificate Payable to
one of our selected "Wildcat" page sponsors
CONTEST RULES
* Contest is closed to all Herald-Advocate employees and families.
* In the event of a tie, the winner will be picked by a random drawing.
* If no one picks the exact score, the closest score wins.
* Official entries only.
No PHOTOCOPIES WinL BE ACCEPTED!
Winners wil bepicked Monday morning, notfled by phone tat
afternoon and announced in next week's paper.

Last Week's Wkinei
Chad Jones


16 ft

MAIN i we
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COME BY FOR GREAT FOOD BEFORE THE GAME
Go WILDCAT!
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INSRuANCI David Singletary, Agent
Wauchula 773-6100

,i Good Luck ,
'P Wildcats


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204 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula Ph: (863) 773-4w01


Years In Football:
10 Years-4 Varsity, 2 Junior High,
4 Little League
Hobbies/Interests: Sleep

Future Plans: To attend College


I
I


Nov. 5

SName:
Address:
I


Hardee
DeSoto


I . ----I
IDay Phone:
DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.
I Fill out.entry form and return it to: The Herald-Advocate I
I 115 S. Seventh Ave., Wauchula
L--- ---------------- ---------


LDCATS


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4D The Herald-Advocate, November 4, 2010


Teen Trave

By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Despite his youth, a local 13-year-old boy already
has made the trip of a lifetime, and made memories to
match.
Cleston Sanders, the son of Scott and Denise
Sanders of Wauchula, was one of 38 students who
went on a trip to China provided by the People to
People Student Ambassador Program. The 17 days
entailed a visit to the Great Wall and beyond.
The students journeyed to cities such as Beijing,
where they walked through Tianamen Square; Xi'an,
which uncovered the mysteries of the Terracotta
Warriors; and Shanghai, where they attended the
Peking Opera and met with the performers.
They also floated through the water town of
Wuzhen and strolled along Star Boulevard, the equiva-
lent to Hollywood's Walk of Fame, in Hong Kong.
The People to People Student Ambassador
Program was founded by President Dwight D.
Eisenhower in 1956. As retold by his granddaughter,
Mary Jean Eisenhower, the current head of People to
People International, he created the program with the
hope that "ordinary citizens of different nations could
solve their problems and live harmoniously with one
another."
Back in sixth grade, Cleston was nominated to the
program by his science teacher, Leanne Moore, allow-
ing him the opportunity to travel to Washington, D.C.,
and later giving him the chance of a lifetime to travel
with the program once again.
In an effort to keep the details of the trip as a per-
manent remembrance, the students who attended were
given a journal to keep daily.
"Day One," begins Cleston's. "We are on the air-
plane to Hong Kong where we will then fly to Beijing.
At the end of the flight an unexpected bolt of lightning
flashed right outside the window right next to the
plane and almost hit the wing. The flight was a total of
13 hours and 45 minutes."
Tea is a customary drink worldwide. In Asian
countries, the making and drinking of tea is a special
ceremony tied to arts and local customs. China is rec-
ognized as having the most ancient tea ceremony. The
tea is the heart of the ritual, and the host and partici-
.pants will smell, taste and enjoy the many layers of the
tea. The service itself can last an hour or two. While
on his visit to Beijing, Cleston was a participant in a
tea ceremony of four different types.
"Day Two: We walked to the entrance to the
Forbidden City. I had no idea it was that big. After we
walked there for an hour or two, we ate lunch and then
went to a vocational school. There we learned how to
perform the tea ceremony and how to make
dumplings; we got to eat them when we were fin-
ished."
As early as 7 years old, Chinese students are taught
the art of Kung Fu, giving them the knowledge and
prospect for defense. Cleston spent some time at a
local school learning the different moves and tech-
niques.
"Day Three: We woke up and went to a very nice
Kung Fu school; the teachers put us in groups of boys,
girls and a mixture of both. A student at the school
showed us some basic movements and we performed
them on stage as a competition. The girls won," his
journal notes.
China's Terracotta Warriors exhibit represents only
a small portion of the 8,000-statue underground
"army" buried as protection in front of Emperor
Qinshihuang's tomb. Whilelearning of the statues'
importance and value, Cleston was able to make his



-, .,


f .. .^ *. -' .- ,..
.. .









Cleston Sanders was able to learn and practice the
ancient art of cloisonne, a technique to decorate metal-
work, but was not able to keep his sample.


The Great Wall of China. The structure began in the 5th
century BC to protect the Chinese Empire from intrusion.
Portions have been rebuilt over the centuries, and some
sections consist of natural barriers or canals rather than
manmade wall. In all, It spans about 5,500 miles and is 30
feet wide at Its widest point.


To China


COURTESY PHOTOS
Cleston Sanders, 13, of Wauchula, sits on the Great Wall
of China. He considers climbing it one of his greatest
achievements.


The interior of a Kung Fu school.
own terracotta warrior and enter it to be judged.
"Day Six: We went to a Buddhist temple and
learned about Buddha," the journal says. "After lunch
we met the farmer who discovered the Terracotta
Warriors, and then went to actually see the Terracotta
Warriors. While we were there I discovered that Apple
Fanta was delicious. For dinner we saw an opera show
and ate delicious dumplings; my favorite was the
shark's fin and beef and veggies. The show was great,
though, too."
For over 219 years, Americans have spent one day
in remembrance of the lives sacrificed and freedom
g': .ed for this country. While their families were back
h me having barbecues and shooting off fireworks in
c ition of the Fourth of July, the students on the
trip to China commemorated the occasion in a differ-
ent way.
"Day Nine: On this very exciting day in American
history, we celebrated with ice cream and Pizza Hut.
We also went to the Mongolian BBQ for lunch. It was
very good but Pizza Hut was better. Also that day we
went to a silk factory in Shanghai, where we learned
how to tell the difference between single and double
cocooned silk worms. We had plans to go visit a local
who we were to visit and ask questions, we went to the
supermarket to buy groceries. As I was walking out of
the market an old man rubbed my belly. I guess he
thought I was happy Buddha, and would be happy for
the rest of his life ... not!"
From his time spent in China, Cleston will forever
carry one experience with him, the one that proved to
be more than he expected and the only true wish he
hoped to fulfill.
"After we spent time learning Kung Fu and per-
forming it, we then went to the Great Wall. I walked
up the left side, which was, according to our guide, the
most difficult. But I got to the highest point and went
back down. That was my greatest achievement," he


The Wild Goose Pagoda in Xi'an, while a beautiful exam-
ple of Chinese architecture, serves many functions,
including holding the sutras and figurines of the Buddha
brought to China from India.


P% i --U
The entrance to the Forbidden City. A tour of the court-
yard alone took 2-1/2 hours for the teens. Built in 1406 to
1420, it was the home of emperors and their households
for nearly 500 years. It was declared a World Heritage
Site in 1987.
says.
In 2-1/2 weeks' time, Cleston was given the chance
of a lifetime to travel to a different country and learn
its ways. He was taught the ancient tea ceremony, the
art of Kung Fu and a more particular lesson about its
culture.
"While on the trip I learned that the Chinese cul-
ture involves mostly having respect for each other, and
that they are very family-oriented," he notes.
"Their country is very large and mountainous,
which makes it beautiful. It was a great trip overall,
and more than what I expected it to be. It will definite-
ly be an experience I will continue to cherish," Cleston
concludes.



LUNCH LINE
| --- E - --- -


COURTESY PHOTO
Over 590 parents and other family members celebrated
National School Lunch Week by taking time out from
their busy schedules to have lunch with their children at
North Wauchula Elementary School. For three days, the
food services team at the school served these special
guests of students in grades K-5 in recognition of the
efforts made to provide nutritious meals for school chil-
dren all across the nation. Pictured is just a small portion
of the huge number of people who participated in the
three-day event.




Frankie's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting
S- Hours:
Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3


Legal Holiday

Notice


We will be closed


Thursday, November 11, 2010

in observance of


Veteran's Day

Please transact your
business with us
with that in mind.

FIRST NATIONAL

BANK OF

F WAUCHULA


Jr^c^1 4




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