Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00300
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula, Fla
Publication Date: October 29, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00300
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text



















___1_ __ __ __ I I I


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Classifleds....................SD
Community Calendar....3A
Courthouse Report.......3G ,
Crime Blotter.................38
Hardee I.Iving................2D
InformatIon Roundup....3A
Obituarles......................4A
School Lunch Menus....8A



7 18 12 2 0 7 2 9 0 3


regional
is requesting a Special Excep- sion
tion "to construct and operate a appr
Class I landfill." scap
Maps show the 300-acre grov
landfill, with room for expan- Th
sion, will sit its the middle of an abou
oblong portion of the base tract. secti
An adjacent smaller section will The
be the site for the maintenance lane
shop; employee building and 23 prese
parking spots; scales and a Road
bypass lane; weigh state and its will
gatehouse; and a leachate stor- agem
age facility and room for expan- the tr


of it. There would be
operate suffering by land-
e screening or adjacent
es.
e site is off Ten Mile Grade
t four miles from its inter-
on with Crewsville Road.
company will build a two-
full-access driveway on the
nt shelled Ten Mile Grade
to as far as the plant and
monitor it for litter man-
ent dropping from any of
ucks.


The landfill operating hours
would be 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and
its 15 employees would work
split shifts to cover the hours.
Approximately 2,000 tons of
; debris household garbage
only would be brought to the
landfill daily. At 25 tons per
truck, that amounts to 80
truckload per day. Seventy per-
cent would come east on SR 66
and down Crewsville Road. The
other 30 percent would come
from the south and southwest


on U.S. 17 to Crewsville Road.
Traffic at peak hours, 4 to 6
p.m., would be seven trucks and
less than 20 vehicles, a maxi-
mum of 33 trigis at the peak late
afternoon hours.
Waste Services offers incen-
tives to the county to obtain its
special exception, suggesting
these could be conditions of
granting the special exception.
The proposed offer would
provide for a host fee, paying of
See DUMP 3A


By JOAN 884thN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wireless networking is com-
ing, bitt won't be here by the
start of the new year.
At a presentation last week to
the Hardee County Com-mis-
sion, Rapid Systems Inc. ex-
plained the technology and
how-it-works to the commis-
sion and audience.
Rapid Systenis owner Dustin
Jurman showed a video with
almost more information than
could be absorbed. Once feder-
al fundhig is available, it will
take about two months to con-
struct and install the system.
When it is completed, wist-
less networking, called broad-
band, will provide rapid access
to 100 percent of the 9,800
households in the county at all
affordable $20 per month, less
than dial-up service.
Basically, broadband is corn-
ing to the cotmty, but federal
financing is still pending. It's
part of the $787 billion federal
stimulus package, which in-
cludes $7.2 billion for broad-
band grant and loan programs,
with particular emphasis to
broadband deployment in rural
counties,-said Denise Hamilton,
Jurman's sister and vice-presi-
dent/chief financial officer for
the company. .


Federal stimulus money
for rural development
COuld bring broadband
80COSS to evely
computer in Hardee '
County, even those in
1900te areas.

She said Rapid Systems has
applied for a $2.2 million grant
and $2.7 million loop to com-
plete the project. The applica-
tion was done in conjunction
with the local Ecoisomic De-
velopmeat Office. There is a
1.76 multiplier on the grant/loan
funds and the money is to re-
Avested over five years to
make the project sustainable.
Broadband is currently avail-
Able in the schools and public
safety, bizt is linked to landline
-capability.
Rapid Systems, the only valid
applicant for the county's need,
proposes a full-service solution.
It provides its own engineering,
in-house help desk, construc-
tion, maintenance, etc. "We
build from within, it's a.single
contact for customers," said
Jurman. The 16-year company
. already has wireless networking
See BROADBAND 2A


enow av mu.en neousan
Ghosts and goblins and tombstones, oh my! This residence at Chartle Creek Estates Is crammed with the creepy
and gqbs of Halloween fun for all to. . uh, enjoy? See Inside for more Information on how to experience the sights,
sounds and shares for yourself.




SZ El to I 5 g


college education and is a state-
certified corrections officer.$he
is employed at Hardee Corred-
tional.Institution,
And while Sara Schofield is
new to public office, her hus-
band, Mike Schofield, has held
every position available in the
town of Zolfo Springs, serving
for a tinie as mayor, town com-
niissioner and town manager.
Sara Schofield, for her turn ait
office holding, said she will at
first "sit back a little bit, listen
and learn."
Sh6 said her goal is "to see
See ZS ELECTION 24


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
There was an election on
Monday in .the town of Zolfo
Springs.
But hardly anybody cared.
Except at the polling place,
where the stark lack of voter
participation created an atmos-
phere of excitement with a star-
tlingly close ballot count. So
Felose, it prompted three re-
counts of the ballots which
were cast.
In all counts, the results were
the same. Challenger Sara
Schofield successfully unseated


Zolfo Springs Town Commis-
sion incumbent Maggie Belcher
by a vote of 20 to 19.
Schofield will take office on
Dec. 21.
In a town of 659 registered
voters, 39 showed up at the
Civic Center on Monday toreg-
ister their choice for the avail-
able seat on the town's govern-
. ing body,'the Town; Commis-
sion. .
Ninety-four percent of the
people stayed home.
The candidates themselves,
however, based their campaign
on their passion for the town.


This was Schofield's second
attempt at winning public office
there. She tried to unseat
incumbent Juan Otero in
October of' 2008, but was
unsuccessful in that bid. -
This time, she pushed harder
to win, and told voters she was
"more into" the campaign and
earning her chance to serve.
' "I would like to see changes
in the faces, new ideas,"
Schofield said, offering voters
an alternative to the current
makeup of the commission.
Schofield, 53, of 408 E.
Fourth St., has three years of


black pouch filled with meth-
amphetamine and marijuana as
officers entered his property.
Detectives searching his barn
found ingredients used to make
meth, including muriatic acid,
fertilizer, lye and acetone. They
also discovered a hole in the
ground which was covered by
brick pavers. It held.a hydro-
See PRISON SA


session of a listed chemical and
misdemeanor possession of
drug paraphernalia. But
Newsome also landed a viola-
tion of probation count, as she
was under sentence fot posses-
sion of alprazolam when the
new offense occurred.
Ezelle sentenced Newsome to
18 mbnthsjn state prison.
She mustpay $520 in fines
and court costs, $350 in public
defender fees and $100 for
prosecution costs.
According to Maj. Randy
Dey of the Hardee County
Sheriffs Office, a spokesman
for the multi-agency Drug Task
Force, the arrests came after a
search warrant was obtained for.
Sink's remote Zolfo Springs
home. Thait search warrant, he
said, had been spurred by tips
Sink made and sold meth from
his house, and a controlled buy
confirmed that.
Because of the explosive
nature of meth labs and the


inherent dangers, the local Drug
Task Force was assisted in its
raid by the Drug Enforcement
Administration's Clandestine
Lab Team.
The raid on Sink's property
on Peace River Woods Road,
near Gilliard Farms Road, be-
gan at about 11:35 a.m. on
Wednesday, June 3.
Dey said link dropped a


By CYNTHIA KRAHL.
Of The Herald-Advocate
A man who operated a
methamphetamine lab in rural
Hardee County and a woman
who helped supply him with the
necessary chemicals have been
sentenced to a mixture of prison
and probation.
Samuel William Sink III, 42,
of 1949 Peace River Woods
Road, Zolfo Springs, and
Karista Borjas Newsome, 32, of
2938 Bluebird Lane, Zolfo
Springs, were arrested by the
Hardee County Drug Task
Force on June 3.
Sink was charged with mak-
ing meth in his home, and other
drug-related crimes. Newsome
was charged with bringing him
ingredients, and also with other
comes.
Sink was first to be sentenced
in Hardee Circuit Court, for
manufacture of methampheta-
mine, possession of a listed
. chemical and sale of metham


phetamine. The state agreed to
drop two misdemeanor counts
of possession of drug parapher-
nalia.
Circuit Judge Marcus J.
Ezelle handed Sink a five-year,
prison term and five years of
supervised probation. Ezelle
suspended the prison time
pending Sink's successful com-'
pletion of probation.
To do that, Sink must stay
away from alcohol and drugs,
undergo an abuse evaluation
and complete its recommenda-
tions, submit to warrantless
searches and seizures, adhere to
a curfew, and stop driving for
two of those five years.
Further, Ezelle assessed
$1,040 in fines and court costs,
$700 in public defender fees,
and $200 for cost of prosecu-
tion expenses.
Newsome, however, went
immediately to state prison,
She had been charged with
possession of morphine, pos-


Sink Newsome


The


Herald- advocate


h t901 Year, No. 47
4 Sections, 36 Pages


R
Hearing On
By JOAN SEAMAN final, public hearing will be
Of The Herald-Advocate before the Hardee County
The first of two public hear- Commission during its regular
ings which could bring a re- meeting on Oct. 19, which
gional landfill to south Hardee begins at 8:30 a.m.<
County is next Thursday night. A review of the Special Ex-
The Planning & Zoning caption application by Waste
Board's public hearing will be Services of Florida Inc. to build
Nov. 5 at 6 p.m. in the Hardee the regional landfill yielded the
County Commission meeting following information.
room, Room 101, Courthouse Waste Services has purchase
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., arrangements for about 1,600
Wauchula \. acres from Crewsville Groves, a
The second, and possibly citrus operation. Waste Services


Dump Next Week


HALLOWEEN. HOUSE


Broadband


I


Prison Time'Part O~f Meth-Lab Formula





MOc~ntain MOment
By Karla Patarini


tute who was now barking with extreme excitement and, much to
my amazement, the older Shih-Tzu was the one why trembled in
fear, needing the reassurance of loving arms while a more youthful
Brownie sped ahead to explore new territory.
For the remainder of our morning walk, Brownib remained in
her position as leader and protector, often having to run back to
nudge Zack to keep up a steady pace. If Zack attempted to disre-
gard her efforts, she would quietly stand by his side until he was
ready to venture on.
As I watched the two canines interact with one another, I wits
suddenly overcome with an overwhelming sense of gratitude for
the wealth of friends who, like little Brownie, gently lead the way,
sticking by my side through thick and thin as they riudge me on
with loving care until I feel brave enough to continue on my jour-
ney.
Proverbs 18:24 tells us that "there is a friend that sticketh clos-
er than a brother." The Friend whom this Scripture refers to is none
other than my loving Savior. He is, and always be, my BFF my
Best Friend Forever.
Friendship what a true blessing from God.
.



vUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO>
Contact :
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Damels

773-3255 -


2A The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
You won't see any pickup trucks or muscle cars
with the words "No F9ar" boldly proclaimed on
their back windows parked at the Charlie Creek
Estates home of Les and Rose Denham this
weekend. Fear is the name of the game as the
Wauchula couple work to scare the socks off
anyone who dares to walk onto their property at
1162 Blue Jay Road. But walkers are their
desire! ,The Denhams have created a creepy
Halloween habitat in hopes of attracting visitors
to share in the fun on Halloween night. There
are inflatable witches and goblins and crea-
tures galore, and gore! There is even a head-
less horseman in pursuit, as in "The Legend of
Sleepy Hollow" by Washington Irving. It won7
take an Ichabod Crane to get a fright as you
venture into a haunted house on site and its
array monsters, ghosts, skeletons and bats.
Add a spooky graveyard and a casket filled with
. . weII, go see!


of at .least 50 years. They are
equipped with surveillance
cameras to withstand theft and
have the capacity for generator
attachment. They will continue
on service for 16 hours, allow-
ing time to get the generators
connected. Other services, such
as cell phone and PICO cell can
attach to the poles.
Placement of the poles, most-
ly along county right-of-way,
will be in a redundant grid pat-
tern, allowing several routes to
the master towers in Riverview
and Tampa. So, if one is out,
service is instantly rerouted,
The Myakka/Riverview tower,
which is 23 miles away, has a.
1,800-foot tower to extend the
longer ranges to local systems.
There will be a fully-staffed
local office, which will help
customers obtain the affordable,
reliable WIMAX system.
Residences will be able to get
service at speeds greater than
two megabytes per second 'and
business seeds will be goater
than five megabytes. There will
be a backbone network' for
emergency and first responders,.
and the system will allow
access to the Florida Lambda
Rail advanced research, educa-
tion and economic development
network, and in turn, to the
National Lambda Rail initia- ,
tive.


BEST BUDS
Brownie was one excited little puppy this morning, for now
she had her best canine friend with her to keep her company. Her
older Shih-Tzu buddy, Zack, had arrived the night before, and she
was thrilled to have a walking companion who would join in on her
escapades of sniffmg tracks, munching on dandelions and, of
course, taking care of "business" in the great outdoors.
The little Shih-Tzu followed her normal pattern of running
ahead in her zest for adventure, stopping every once in a while to
listen to the chirping of the birds and the humming of the bees.
Seeming to forget her fear of that big ol' yellow dog, she zipped
along the gravel road with unusual speed, pausing every so often to
look back to ensure our safekeeping.
As we approached the two-story mountain house that stood by
the side of the county road, I prepared myself for the usual routine
of carrying Brownie to our designated safety spot further down the
road. So when the big yellow dog began its agitated frenzy of bark-
ing, I bent down and held out my arms, expectmg to scoop my
frightened little puppy friend into the safety of loving arms.
To my great surprise, Brownie halted in the middle of the road
and turned her tiny head back in our direction. Her 1,ittle body stood
frozen and her eyes had taken on a new look that I had never seen
before, one of fierce protection for her companions.14cr little paws
dug into the rusty clay as she stood prepared to pounce on any crea-
ture that dared to threaten the safety or well-being of her beloved
companions,
Thus, the three of us walked side-by-side past the tied-up crea-


HORROR HOUSE


Ke/Iy's Column
.
By Jim
'

Main Street Wauchula Incy ,is having a kickoff social on
Thursday, N6v. 5, from 4 to 6 p.m. at their office at 107 E. Main
Street to celebrate the progress and future of Main Street. .
-
The undefeated Hardee Wildcats football team will play at
Okeechobee Friday night at 7:30 against the Brahmans. Hardee is
tied for No. 3 in 2-A with Madison County. No. I and 2 are Cocoa
and Glades Central.

Big-truck drivers need to remember not to take the Main St.
and Hwy.17 intersection in Wauchula.
The Florida Department of Transportation and city of
Wauchula want southbound trucks to turn east on Palmetto Street,
go to Fourth Ave. and go right to Main Street and head east.
Julie Watson of Hardee County Title Insurance reported some
truckers have not gotten the message yet.

A person can lose weight if they are determined. Robert Krahl,
Hardee school's facilities and transportation director, has lost 95
pounds in 18' months. He has worked out regularly at the Hardee
Family YMCA and controlled his eating to reach a goal weight of
200 pounds. Now he is trying to stay at or near the goal weight.
I have been interested in physical fitness difica the skinny
teenage years. When I stood sideways and drank a big glass of
tomato juice, I looked like a thermometer.

A public hearing on a big regional landfill will be held
Thursday, Nov. 5, at 6 p.m. at the Planning and Zoning Board and
on Thursday, Nov. 19, at 8:30 a.m. at the County Commission
meetmg.
Waste Services of Florida of Weston wants to have a 300-acre
landfill on 8754cres on a 1,600-acre site owned by Cruiser Crews
in the Sweetwater/Crewsville area.
The financial benefit to the County Commission looks com-
pelling. At 2,000 tons a day the county would get $1.64 million
annually and the school system $182,500. At 3,000 tons a day the
county would get $2.92 million annually and the school system
$273,750. In addition the county would not have to spend $3.5 mil-
lion to expand its existing landfill.
The landfill would attract 50 to 75 truckload of garbage daily,
operating from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. The household garbage would be
covered daily and eventually reach a height of 200 feet.
The drawbacks are severalfold. The plastic liner under the
landfill could someday fail, creatmg severe groundwater contami-
nation. There would likely be odors and blowing trash. Area prop-
erty vakies could go down. People may not want to build nice
homes in the area. The noise and traffic from the trucks would be
hard on residents along the route. Roads would be damaged by the
heavy truck/trailers. That area would be known as a garbage dump
for parts of south Florida. It is a classic NIMBY (not in my back-
yard) project that has benefits as well as drawbacks.
Two local men are helping with the project Bo Conerly as
engineer and Steven Southwell as attorney.


BROADBAND
Continued From 1A
over 15,000 square miles from
Dade City south to Sarasota and
Clearwater east to Lakeland and
some in OrbindolOrange
County and Apoka/St. Cloud
and the COX radio and TV sys-
tem called 98 ROCK.
In Hardee County, there
would be 18 concrete mono-
poles placed one to three miles
apart. The 28,000-pound poles
are buried 15 feet deep and
extend up to 140 feet high, able
to withstand 300 MPH winds.
The poles have to "cure" for six
weeks before equipment is
placed on them.
The poles have a service life


0128 ER g
Continued From 1A
what J.can do for the town. I
want to help the town."
10 December, she gets that
chance.
Belcher had been a veteran at
the commission table, having
first been elected to office in
December of 1996.
Schofield will join George
Neel, Juan Otero, Lois Dan-
dridge and DiDi White at com-
mission meetings.












" *

Parents To Plan
FOr Graduates
There will be a meeting on
Tuesday at the High School
to plan this year's Project
Graduation. The meeting will
be held in room 303 at 6:30
p.m.
To ensure a successful
2010 graduation, all senior
parents are invited to attend
and are asked to bring
cokes and water to the
meeting..

Homebuyer Offers
Education Course
HomeBuyer Education
courses continues to be
given. The upcoming dates
for this class are Nov. 6, 12,
and 20, from 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
"Reaching the American
Dream" will be the themed
presentation for the Nov. 6
session. Presented by the
Hardee County Office of
Community Development,
this course will be offered at
412 W. Orange St., Room
202, in Wauchula-
Pre-registration is required
as there is limited seating,
and there will be no child-
care or interpreter services
provided. For more infor-
mation or to register for the
classes, call 773-6349.

Free Diabetes
ClaSSes Offered
Are you ready to have fun
while being interactive and
getting answers to your
questions on diabetes? The
Florida Hospital Heartland
Division and the Parish
Nursing/Community Out-
reach Department presents
"Journey for Control: A Con-
versation About Diabetes."
This presentation is a
community service of Parish
Nursing and is free of
charge, however, pre-regis-
tration is required for any
new class member. The


TUESDAY. NOV. 3
VProject Graduation,
MnhyMeeting, Hardee
Hih School, Room 303, 830
AlmnRoad, Wauchula,
6:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOV. 5


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October 29, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3A ~


is.deasyswid o .e90annedm1d6,oan
the Florida Hospital. of
Wauchula, from 3-5 p.m. in
the Conference Room. To
register for the classes, call
386-6420.

Guest S eaker
About H1N1-
Parish Nursing invites
everyone to attend a special
presentAtion featuring
"H1N1: Your Questions
Answered."
This event will be held on
*Monday Nov. 9 from 5-7:30
p.m. in the conference room,
of the Florida Hospital of
Wauchula. Before the pres-
entation, networking and
refreshments will be offered,
along with door prizes to be
won. For more information,
contact Suzanne Crews at
386-6420.

Hardee Manor
TO Trick-or-Treat
In the spirit of Halloween,
Hardee Manor will be open
to Trick-Or-Treaters for chil-
drert aged 12 years and
younger. It will be held on
Saturday from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Children should come in
costume
Hardee Manor is located
at 401 Orange Place, at the
end of South Ninth Avenue
off Carlton Street in Wau-
chula.


the Ten Mile Grade Road to the
project entrance and a proposal
to operate and close the coun-
ty's existing Sanitary Lanfill off
Airport Road.
The host county agreement
would pay the county $2.50 per
ton for the first 2,000 tons of
ro'".::nzd 2 r so ah
be designated for use by the
schools as its School Board rep-
resentatives decides.
After the first quarter, when
the average .daily solid waste
exceeds 2,000 tons, there would
be an.additional dollar per ton,
$3.50 with 35 cents, of that
going to the schools,
Landfill supervisor Teresa
Carver. recently said that the
county landfill will not close
because the new regional center
would accept only household
garbage. The new center may
take over operation of the coun-
ty's site, but .that hasn't been'


....
Continued From 1A
determined yet, she said.
Carver noted that tires, bat-
teries, electronics and metal
have to be removed. Each
truckload of municipal, waste
would be run up the conveyor
belt and unacceptable items
segregated.
whThemsu land 1 n
be a transfer station, continuing
to accept recycling materials,
construction and demolition
debris and the above unacc6pt-
able items.
It is possible the landfill fees
could change. The regional
landfill will charge $22.50 per
ton. With the transfer station
$10 fee, it could be much lower
than the current fee of $62.50.
Waste Services says "it will
make its best efforts while the
application is pending to struc-
ture a deal with the county that
will provide a revenue stream
for the county from the existing


landfill while the proposed
landfill is being developed and
constructed, hopefully by 2012.
As part of its Special Excep-
tion application, Waste Services
includes a recent study done for
the Charlotte Omni Class I
landfill off Belmont Road and
Ru yn DeS o/ lad:
similar-sized landfills, on Bee
Ridge Road in Sarasota County,
the DeSoto County landfill in
Arcadia ones in Osceola
County and the city of Saint
Cloud and the Leon County
Transfer Station in Tallahassee.
In a comparison of property
values in the vicinity of a land-
fill, "there is no market evi-
dence to support the hypothesis
that proximity to a Class I land-
fill impacts the value of abut-
ting or nearby land, whether it
is agriculture land, lot prices,
improved property or normal
market values.,,.


I


Serving Hardee Countyl & Surrounding Areas


Locally O'wned


10:.9


Am be r jack

Harvest

CIOSOS
The recreational harvest and
possession of greater amberjack
in or from federal waters in the
Gulf of Mexico is prohibited
now through Dec. 31.
Federal waters extend beyond
nine nautical miles from shore
in the GulfoffFlorida.
The National Marine Fisher-
ies Service announced this clo-
sure because an established
annual recreational harvest
quota for greater amberjack in
the Gulf has been met.
4 In addition, a person aboard a
vessel for which a federal char-
VIELS ter vessel/head boat permit for
hil- Gulf reef fish has been issued
on must also abide by this closure
offo provision in Florida state
ool waters. This action is required
ht." by regulations implemented
ene under the Fishery Management
ants Plan for Reef Fish Resources of
the the Gulf of Mexico.
:ted. However, all other recreational
ass- anglers may still harvest one
ers, greater amberjack of at least 30
the inches fork length daily per per-
tivi- son in Gulf state waters off
ere Florida under Florida Fish &
olfo Wildlife Conservation Com-
IIng mission rules.
tate
lon,
ads..
uan
:Ipal
id$ PRISON
so Continued From 1A
tom diloric gas generator, the major
spa- '
vere Newsome drove onto the
property during the raid, and
was in possession of two boxes
- of Sudafed she had purchased at
- a Wauchula pharmacy. The pills
are used in the manufacture of
meth, and she planned to trade
them for some of the final prod-
""'" uct, Dey said.
Morphine sulfate pills were
found in her purse, he added.
Dey noted that meth labs are
subject to fires and explosions
because of the chemicals they
use, and that a Haz-Mat Team
was needed to clean up the site-


NIGHT LEARNING


(863) 7&1-2622









4A The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


OCTAVIANO
FLORES SR.
Octaviano Flores Sr., 79, of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
Oct. 24, 2009 at Wauchula.
Born on March 22, 1930 in
Pawnee, Texas, he came to
Hardee County from Texas 53
years ago. He was a fruit har-
vesting contractor and a
Catholic,
Survivors include his wife,
Elvira Flores of Wauchula; two
sons Octaviano "Tony" Flores
Jr. and wifeOralia of Wauchula,
and Robert Flores and wife
Rachel of Mission, Texas; two
daughters Diana Deanda and
husband Raul, and Jolan'da
Goolsby, all of Wauchula; one
brother, Richard Flores of
Snyder, Texas; 10 grandchil-
dren; and 15 great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitation was Tuesday from
6 to 8 p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel. Services were Wednes-
day at 10 a.m. at St. Michael
Catholic Church. Interment fol-
lowed in Wauchula Cemetery.'
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula




NELLIE J. GLASS
Nellie J. Glass, 80, of
Wauchula, died on Friday,
Oct. 23, 2009, at Winter
Haven.
Born in Eastman, Ga., on
April 18, 1929, she was a
waitress and of the ,Pente-
costal faith-
Suvivors include son
Robert Cumbest of Winter
Haven; daughters Carol
Hidden of Winter Haven
and Jennifer Nestor of
Lakeland; brother Oscar
Joyner of Wauchula; nine
grand children; 17 great-
grandchildren; three great-
great-grandchildren and
numerous nieces and
nephews.
Visitation was Monday 6
to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.
Services were Tuesday.at the
funeral home at 2 p.m. with
Pastor Matt Clark officiating.
Interment followed in New
Hope Cenietery.

Brant aneral

Sp@
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula


EVA BONITA MOYE
Eva Bonita Moye, 90, of
Wauchula, died, on Wedilesday,
Oct. 21, 2009, in Wauchula.
Born in Fort Green, on Nov.
29, 1918, she was a homemak-
er.
Survivors include son, Carrol
Moye and wife Lucy; brothers
Roy Albritton and wife Maxine
of Fort Green, and Larry
Albritton and wife Sue from
Avon Park; sisters Vida
Tomlinson of Wauchula, and
Trudy Buckley and husband
Bobby of Bowling Green; and
grandchildren Greg Moyer
Brandy Johnson and Ashley
Johnson and husband Josh.
Visitation was Saturday at
9:30 a.m. at the funeral home,
followed by graveside services
at 11 a.m. at Fort Green Baptist
Cemetery with the Rev. Bobby
Buckley officiating. -
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


Conscience is the voIce of
the soul; the passions are
the voice of the body.
---Jean-Jacques Rousseaul

A rn II
~ ~ ~
MARTIN
CASTILLO
Martin Castillo, 76, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Oct. 12, 2009, at home.
Borit in Panna Maria,
Texds, on Jan. '30, 1933, he
came to Hardee County 20
years ago. He was employed
as a cook and worked in the
orange groves. He attended
St. Michael Catholic Church.
Survivors include a daugh-
ter, Blanca Castillo and hus-
band Rene Garcia of Wau-
chula; and two grandchildren,
Carla Elizabet Flores and
Brenda Isela Flores.
Visitation was Thursday,
Oct. 15, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel.
Services were Friday at 9:30
a.m. at St. Michael Catholic
Church. Interment followed
in Wauchula Cemetery.
*

FUNERAL HOMES
529 w. Main street
Wauchula




aFu 1 e


9# OVER CMOq














OF OA O
Octaviano Flores Sr., 79, of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
Oct. 24, 2009 at Wauchula.

Pa nmeeo ch 22,c 3e
Hardee County from Texas 53
years ago. He was a fruit har-
vesting contractor and a
Catholic
Survivors include his wife,
Elvira Flores of Wauchula;\
two sons Octaviano "Tony"
Flores Jr. and wife Oralia of
Wauchula, and Robert Flores
and wife Rachel of Mission
Texas; two daughters Diarn
De d and husband Raul,
and Joaanda Goolsby, all of
Wa ulabloremeof n

Texas; 10 grandchildren; and
15 great-grandchildren,
froVisitation wasat day
Garden Chapel. Services were
Wednesday at 10 a.m. at St.
Michael Catholic Church.
Interment followed in
Wauchula Cemetery.


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
** -=



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeml Home


PRE-ARRANGEMENTS


Robarts Family Funeral Honie
.
lS very pleased to welconie
was.
8 PRitefSOI1 4 -
*
RS State licensed .

Pre-N ed Cotwaselor




We are oud'to be your only local Funeral Home
licknSect to offer pre-arranged funeral services.

If you would like to have information on
pre-arrangements for funeral services or cremation
SOTViceS, just give us a call or simply mail in the

COUpOn below. And, of course, as always,
Aer@ IS No Obligation'*

529 West Main Street Wauchula, Florida 33873 863-773-9773

YES! I would like FREE information about pre-arrangements and a
free pre-planning guide. (PLEASE PRINT)


NAME


ADDRESS


CITY, STATE, ZIP


L PHONE ic e-a


MARY DARLING .

Mary DBr TeLERtler, 54, of
Fort Meade died on Friday, Oct.
23, 2009, at Wauchula.
Born in Columbia, Tenn., on
March 26, 1955, she was, a
homemaker and of the Christian
faith, .
She was preceded in death by
her father J.T. Dickey, formerly
of Adamsville, Tenn.; brothers
Robert Dickey and Danny
Dickey; and sister Charlotte
Dickey.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 30 years, James Wesley
Butler of Fort Meade; son
Christopher Butler and wife
Juanita Torres of Fredericks-
burg, Va.; mother Alma Peters
of Wauchula; sisters Wanda
Disharoon of Wauchula,
Deborah Baker of Adamsville,
Tenn., Donna Waters of
Wauchula and Janice Doyle of
Adamsville, Tenn.; brother
John Thomas and Kenneth
Dickey, both of Wauchula; and
four grandchildren, Meredith,
Ariana, Christopher and Josiah.
Graveside services were
Tuesday at Wauchula Cemetery
at 4 p.m.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


MARTIN CASTILLO
Martin Castillo, 76, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Oct. 12, 2009, at home.
Born in Panna Maria, Texas,
on Jan. 30, 1933, he came to
Hardee County 20 years ago.
He was employed as a cook and
worked in the orange groves.
He attended St. Michael
Catholic Church.
Survivors include a daughter,
Blanca Castillo and husband
Rene Garcia of Wauchula; and
two grandchildren, Carla
Elizabet Flores and Brenda
Isela Flores.
Visitation was Thursday,
Oct. 15, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel. Ser-
vices were Friday at 9:30 a.m.
at St. Michael Catholic Church.
Interment followed in Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


NELLLIE J. GLASS
Nellie J. Glass, 80, of Wau-
chula, died on Friday, Oct. 23,
2009, at Winter Haven.
Born in Eastman, Ga., on
April 18, 1929, she was a wait-
ress and of the Pentecostal faith.

CASm rs nc etsonHRaobee"
daughters Carol Whidden of
nter HaLeankel dd; nnih

Oscar Joyner of Wauchula; nine
grand children; 17 great-grand-
children; and three great-great-
grandchjldren..
Visitation was Monday 6 to 8
p.m. at the funeral home.
Services were Tuesday at the
funeral home at 2 p.m. with
Pastor Matt Clark officiating.
Interment followed in New
Hope Cemetery.
BrantW l{'hapel


Contentment consistent
not in adding more fuel,
but in taking away some
fire; not in multiplying of
wealth, but in subtracting
men's desires.





- EVA BONITA MOYE
Eva Bonita Moye, 90, of
Wauchula, died on Wednes-
day, Oct. 21, 2009, in Wau-
chula.
Born in Fort Green, on
Nov. 29, 1918, she was a
homemaker.
Survivors include son,
Carol Moye and wife Lucy;
bothers Roy Albritton and
wife Maxine of Fort Green,
and Larry Albritton and wife

SV a mh oPfaW u
and Trudy Buckley and hus-
band Bobby of Bowhng


GMreen, Brraand h reason
Ashley Johnson and husband
Josh; and several nieces and
nephews.
Visitation was Saturday at
9:30 a.m. at the funeral home,
followed by graveside servic-
es at 11 a.m. at Fort Green
Baptist Cemetery with the
Rev. Bobby Buckley officiat-
ing.
.
Brant Waeral

Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.'
Wauchula


MARBUDARRLINE
Mary Darline Butler, 54,
of Fort Meade died on Friday,

Oc 02 n 1 mpac *:
on March 26, 1955, she was a
homemaker and of the
Christian faith.
She was preceded in death
by he} father J.T. Dickey, for"
merly of Adamsville, Tenn.;
brothers Robert Dickey and
Danny Dickey; and sister
Charlotte Dickey.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 30 years,. James
Wesley Butler of Fort Meade;
son Christopher Butler and

Fr eri sa VTorrensoth
Alma Peters of Wauchula;
sisters Wanda Disharoon of
uchula,1Deborah Ba n

Waters of Wauchula and
Janice Doyle of Adamsville,
Tenn.; brother John Thomas
and Kenneth Dickey, both of
Wauchula; and four grand-
children, Meredith, Ariana,
Christopher and Josiah.
Graveside services were
Tuesday at Wauchula Ceme-
tery at 4 p.m.

Brant kneral

Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula


Destiny McCauley
To Co ete In

1.iVOSfOck Expo
It's time once again for the
North Alperican International
Livestock Exposition held in
Louisville, Ky.
Being the. world's largest
purebred livestock show with
more than 22,000 entries, the
expo will include a local girl,
Destiny McCauley of Bowling,
Green.
Competitors from nearly
every state and Canada antici-
pate this event every year. With
as many as 10 different expo
divisions, Destiny has entered
four head of Angus in the beef
division of this year's 36th
annual expo.
Destiny will anxiously be
making her way to Kentucky
for the Nov. 7-20 events, in
hopes of taking first.

Never be afraid of doubt, if
only you have the disposi-
tion to believe.
-Samuel Taylor Coleridge


xx
SUTTON IVJONUMENTS
BrnelefAf* 3esitice
"
our ove nea serve orne ing yeda
DEPENDABLE SERVICE ALWAYS!
The way you want it . .
When you want it . .
AFFORDABLE PRICES
Sell, Set, Reset, Levelin and En savings
*NOW ACCEPTING CREDIT CARDS*
228 North 6th Ave. Wauchula
Corner of Oak & US Hwy 17 Across from Hess


773-0625


so assue


.p :4


:


Loo(for this trademark




Hours:
Afon. Pri. 9-5
Sat. 9 2
10:29c


1-~EAfTTXLAND~I. GOLD


MASTER


p~/;--


. .



'-


Engraving Available








































aBllr -~--


tlll~


;P


r


October 29, 2009, Th1 e Hlerauld-Adlvocalte 5A


r


r


LAST













































i


hu~l~rsb~aand r. Waaruaaren Nuen evda atro h hrh


6A The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


This outhouse represents 1879, when the church wa
founded, and has boards off the old Dupree house of
Horse Creek. Lumber is over 110 years old.


-
.PHOTOS MY JIM KELLY
1960s couple wee Kay GIII Crews and Ray GIII. The 1970s were represented by Julie and AHison Farr.


Reprs~entig the 1879 era were Binky Graham, Ralene Graham, Michelle Graham and


:.IThe 130-year annivel~rsarycomnmitt~eeconisted ofS~hirl~ey Kn~ighlt,; i Gayle Wee~k~s, Maur~i:e


HenPderYson imd Ber~tha Stephe nse. ~ M IIn~f~ rae ent, Danny Weeks helped barbecue pork and chicken.


1980s were represented by d'Gee Hodges, FaIth Hodges, Amanda BIssette and Taylor
Hodges.






October 29), 2009, The Hlerald-Advocate 7A


Sh~ownr (from left) are New Hope Baptist Church's Justin Wordenl, minister of


(More Photos On Next Page)


'Church's interior was remodeled and painted about one year ago.


Vehicles from the past included a 1927 Ford Milk Wagon, 1934 Ford Roadster, 19_30


i Vew f ew op Bkrzaptst puc~ra~&~~lpit chirare an atity















ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets
w/Roll or Pizza Pocket (Salad
Tray, Mixed Vegetables, Juice
Bar) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, cinnamon
Toast, BiscuIts, Sausage Patty,
Pineapple Tidbits, Milk
Lunch: Beanie Weenies
w/Biscuit or Cheeseburger on a
Bun (Salad Tray, French Fries,
Sugar Cookies) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Mini
Pocket, Cinnamon Toast, Pears,
Milk
Lunch: Deli Turkey & Cheese
Wrap or Cowboy Macaroni
w/Roll (Salad Tray, Pinto Beans,
Blueberries) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Cinna-
mon Toast, Milk
Lunch: Pig in a Blanket or
Rib-B-Que on a Bun (Salad
Tray, Baked Beans, Savory
Rice, Pears, Roll) and Milk

Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Apple-
sauce, Milk
w/C cck rsChir FisCho SanC
(Salad Tray, Potato Rounds,
Broccoli, Peaches) and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH .
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Milk
w/ o Pe HoN
(Tossed Salad, Mixed Vege-
tables, Juice Bar) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuits,
Sausage Patty, Cinnamon
Toast, Pineapple Tidbits, Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun or Beanie Weenies or
Cheese Pizza (Lettuce &
Tomato, Biscuit, French Fries,
Peanut Butter Cookies) and
Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scranibi-
ed Eggs, w/Cheese, Buttered
Toast, Pears, Potato Triangle,
Milk


Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni
w/Roll or Deli Turkey Sandwich
or Pepperoni Pizza (Tossed
Salad, Pinto Beans,,Salad Bar;
Peas and Carrots, Blueberries)
and Milk '
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Juice,
Cinnamon Toast, Milk
Lunch: Pig in a Blanket or
BBQ Port on a Bun or Cheese
Pizza (Tossed Salad, Savory
Rice, Pears, Salad Bar) and
Milk

Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Apple-
sauce, Milk
Lunch: Fish Sandwich or
Pepperoni Pizza or Chill
w/Crackers (Lettuce'& Tomato,
BroccolI, Salad Bar, Potato
Rounds, Peaches) and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Buttered Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets
(Tossed Salad, Savory Rice,
Mixed Vegetables, Juice Bar)
and Milk
TUESl)AY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Cinnamon Toast,
Blueberries, Milk
Lunch: Rib-B-Que on a Bun
(Tossed Salad, Potato Rounds,
Efutter Cookies, Peas and
Carrots) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Ham and
Cheese Hot Pocket, Cinnamon
Toast, Pears, Milk
Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni
(Tossed Salad, Green Beans,
oI BBuee esri NHam, qkuash,
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Buttered
Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Pig in a Blanket
(Tossed Salad, Baked Beans,
Potato Rounds, Cole Slaw,
Pears) and Milk
fRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Apple-
sauce, Milk
LGnch: Sloppy Joe on a Roll
(Tosshd Salad, .,Broccoli Nor-
mandy, Baked Potato, Peaches)
and Milk


Thp race is not always to the swift... but to those who
keep on running.
-Author Unknown


NOTICE OF SALE

JULY 144 2007 11:00 A.M.
Personal property in the following units will be sold to the
highest bidder to satisfy rental liens in accordance with
Florida Statute Section 83.801-83.809. Contents mays
include household items, clothing, closed cartons, etc.
The sell will take place at Convenient Mini Storage, 5106
U.S. Highway 17 N., Bowling Green, FL on NOVEMBER
14, at 11:00 A.M.
Unit # 1 Janet Janett Unit #14 Cherylen CarIton
Unit # 4 Roberta Pace Unit #19 David Sotelo
Unit # 9 Misty Camacho Unit #25 Marie Ancelmo
Unit #10 Donald Suttles Unit #31 Keshia Watkins '
Unit #12 Laurie.Key Unit #52 Bowling Green
Unit #13 Mark Mills Youth Academy
Office John T. Stevens


8A Thle Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


r.These resix of the stained-glass windows in the church sanctuary, depicting various scenes from the life of Jesus


Energizer and the Inter-
national Association of Fire
Chiefs are teaming up for the
"Change Your Clock Change
Your Battery" program to
remind families of a simple task
that could make the difference
in surviving a home fire.
Having a working smoke
alarm doubles a family's chanc-
es of escaping, thus surviving a
home fire, but only if it works.
This campaign encourages
families to take action in pre-
venting accidental deaths caus-
ed by home fires and carbon
monoxide poisoning by chang-
ing the batteries in smoke
alarms and CO detectors when
they reset their clocks.
Serving as a reminder for 22
years, the "Change Your Clock
Change Your Battery" program
now incorporates more than
6,200 fire departments hation-
wide to encourage families to
use Daylight-Saving Time as a
reminder to change the batteries
in their smoke alarms when
changing their clocks back to
Standard Time.
"Unfortunately, changing the
batteries in smoke alarms and
carbon monoxide. detectors is


not always top of mind for fam-
ilies," says Chief Jeffrey D.
Johnson, president of the Inter-
national Association of Fire
Chiefs.
"In fact, while 96 percent of
American homes do have
smoke alarms, the sad truth is
that 19 percent of these do not
work due to worn out or miss-
ing batteries. So, hundreds of
fatalities occur every year from
a simple oversight. The habit of
changing batteries during Day-
light-Saving Time is an easy
task that can be the difference
between life and death," he
notes.
The National Fire Protection
Association reports that a home
fire death occurs somewhere in
the nation every three hours. In
fact, home fires kill 540 chil-
dren, 14 and under, each year.
Having a working smoke
alarm can provide those crucial
extra seconds to escape a burn-
ing home. Therefore, it is crit-
ical for families to adopt the
life-saving habit of the "Change
Your Clock Change Your
Battery" program to niake sure
they take this one simple step to
help keep their families safe.


Change Your Clocks,











GOING DISTRICT


I ww a mn - -- PHO SB PH HARRISON

Jumping into the pool for the Lady Wildcats are (top, from left) Jessica Hunt, Nicole Franks, Stephanie Driver, Kate
Krause, Savannah Hagans and Emma Marshall; in front are coaches Melissa Crider (left) and Jan Brutus. In lower
photo, swimming for the boys squad are (front, from left to right) Assistant Coach Melissa, Crider, Willie Godwin,
Josh Rickett, Hunter Henderson and Head Coach Jan Brutus; in back, Brian Hagans, John Miller, Justin Rickett, IIC
Hogenauer, Derick Sambrano, Kabeb Rickett and Will Crawford. The teams are in district competition in Winter Haven
this week.


Light One Candle
By Stephanie Raha
The Christophers


PUBLIC NOTICE
The City of Bowling Green, Florida will consider for approval Ordinance 2009-06 at the
City Commission meeting scheduled for Tuesday, November 10, 2009 at City Hall, 104
E. Main Street, Bowling Green, Florida 33834 starting at 7:00 p.m.
ORDINANCE NO. 2009-06
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BOWLING GREEN, FLORIDA PROVID-
ING AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 2007-07 TO INCLUDE ADDITIONAL
SECURITY FOR PAYMENT OF UTILITY BILLS; PROVIDING FOR AMEND-
MENT OF SECTION 11 TO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL DETAILS ON FORMA-
TION AND ENFORCEMENT OF LIENS FOR UTILITY SERVICE NON PAY-
MENT; AMENDMENT OF SECTION 5 TO PROVIDE FOR NEW DEPOSITS
AND A PROCEDURE FOR ADJUSTING DEPOSITS WHEN CUSTOMERS
FAIL TO TIMELY PAY BILLS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING
A REPEALED; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Interested persons can appear and be heard on this Ordinance at the Commission
Meeting. Copies of this ordinance and background materials may be reviewed or
obtained at the office of the City Clerk, M-F, 8:00 to 12:00 a.m. and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any mat-
ter discussed at any meeting or hearing, he will need a record of the proceedings for
such purposes, he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeals based,
per Florida Statutes 286.0105. Verbatim transcripts are not furnished by the City. Any
person with a disability requiring reasonable special accommodations in order to partic-
ipate in this meeting should contact the City Clerk with the request at (863) 375-2255.
CITY OF BOWLING GREEN, FLORIDA
BY: S/Perry Knight, Mayor

ATTESTED--
BY: S/Pamela Sue Northup, City Clerk
APPROVED AS TO FORM
S/Gerald Buhr, City Attorney 10:29c


October 29, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 9A


CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT
Autumn in Florida brings relief from the suffocating heat and
,dripping humidity of summer. We Floridians begin to venture out-
side once again just in time for the seasonal arrival of unique and
abundant migratory birds.
Some of those birds that fly South only rest in Florida before
heading to Central and South America. Some stay for a couple of
months until their breeding and nesting grounds up North thaw
come sprmg.
Then there are those sliowbirds that return to the Sunshine
State to breed and nest, remaining with us for six months or more.
However, studies are showing these patterns are shifting as a result
,of warmer overall temperatures. The analogy of the canary in the
coal mine is an apt one birds often are the first harbingers of
changing habitats.
Several studies across the nation point to one thing: rising tem-
peratures over the past 40 years have resulted in drastic changes in
migration patterns among some species of birds.
The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration records
show the average temperatures for January rose more than five
degrees Fahrenheit in the continental United States over the past 40
years.
Audubon's annual Christmas Bird Count has resulted in one of
the largest repositories of bird-migration data in the world. The
data, in conjunction with statistics on rising temperatures, is star-
tling: 305 widespread bird species in North America "have moved
dramatically northward toward colder latitudes over the past
four decades."
"We were able to look at the trends for almost four decades
using our counts and NOAA's figures," said Greg Butcher, director
of bird conservation at the National Audubon Society. "If there is
no further warming, then it's just a fun study; but that's not what
the experts say. They say this warming trend will continue."
With predictions of increased rainfall in parts of Florida and
an increase in the intensity of hurricanes in the next 50 years, our
little feathered friends will be forced to adapt faster than a hum-
mingbird flaps its small, yet mighty wings.
"It's the pace of climate change," said Elena Sachs of the
Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission. "When evolu-
tion occurs, species have time to catch up, but the speed at which
temperatures are rising and precipitation patterns are changing
present nmseBp ems. ti that bird 11 back t
er can ons some s wi go o

i sdi 11 toaun tt n nhennt noa raisi sm ae 1, mee
cious habitat will be filled with displaced birds.
"Some will adapt," Butcher said. "Species already endangered
or on the fringe won't do well and will suffer. Florida will be par-
ticularly vulnerable with its coastal shoreline and huge amount and
variety of wintering shorebirds."
Butcher urges individuals to volunteer with local groups work-
ing to protect natural areas. He also suggests participating in the
annual Christmas Bird Count.
The 110th Christmas Bird Count runs from Dec. 14 to Jan. 5.
The Audubon Society's Web site will hAve specific information by
November. Visit www.audubon.org/Bird/cbc and click on "Get
Involved."
If you are a backyard birder with little experience, a fun way
to get involved is through eBird, a Web site devoted to compiling
records of bird sightings. Just register at http://ebird.org and follow
the simple (astructiousefor reporting your birding .information.
You'll be learning.about birds and assisting the experts as they
address they impacts of climate change.


IS TECH SPELLED 'R-U-D-E?'
It's amazing just how much information you can discover on
the Web. Also amazing are the computers, cell phones, and all the
other technological devices that have changed the way we live.
You know, it's been 30 years since the Sony Walkman became
hugely popular. Young people today may know that before their
precious iPods became necessities, CDs provided the musical
background to the world. But what about before that?
Well, the Walkman revolution made it possible for tas to carry
around the music that we wanted to listen to whenever we wanted.
Sure, transistor radios were popular earlier, but radio stations
decided the programming. By 1979, everyone could pick their
own music and play their cassettes anywhere. Thanks to head-
phones, we could hum and sing, dance and walk. And we liked it.
In the years since then, technology has managed to both broad-
en our horizons and narrow our viewpoint. Science and industry
have combined to throw open the great wide world through com-
munication, information and entertainment tools that operate with
the click of a button. And, like the Walkman, many of thim cell-
phones, Blackberries, iPods, laptop and netbook computers are
so small we can take them with us wherever we go. We are never
out of touch with family, friends, co-workers or even the boss.

tered r smuch Ine I avdeet relate to anything that isn't fil-
At a meeting? Text a buddy saying how terribly boring it is.
Having dinner out with friends? Phone someone to describe your
meal and the restaurant. Gone to the movies? Snap a photo of the
screen and send it to your pal, the film buff.
What s wrong with any of this?
Unfortunately, we human beings have a knack for focusing on
what suits us and not necessarily worrying about what bothers
someone else. We may not be any more discourteous than we were
a few years ago, but these days we have far more opportunities to
show a lack of respect for others.
Cellphones go off in church or in class and, while some peo-
ple mumble "Sorry!" and turn them off, still others answer and pro-
ceed to have a conversation, usually in a loud whisper. This isn't
just rude it's too much information! Personal details are not pri-
vate. Yoti may not care who knows the particulars of your latest
visit to the doctor, but the rest ofus would rather be spared the inti-
mate minutiae. .
Increasingly, states are passing laws to prohibit testing or
hand-held cellphone use while driving. But it pegs the question:
How could anyone ever think it would be safe to do these things?
po drivers really believe they're not putting themselves, their pas-
gengers and the rest of us at risk? .
Thoughtlessly using these tech marvels has a strange result:
They become blinders to the people and the world right in front of
us. -
Th 's mhore th di i e nstilntly in cyberspace,

maybe it's time to reach out to those around us. And rather than
just Googling for information, we could also make an attempt to
grow m wisdoni and compassion.
For a free copy of "Let's Stay Civil," write: The Christophers, 5
Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail: mail @christo.
phers.org.


Dibvines. in s:Crea~rc~;h o ater hilddenunerrondar known to use forked branches


Registration
ri
BeglllS SOOll

At SF CC
Registration for South
Florida Community College's
2010 spring term begins in
November.
Priority registration begins
Nov. 2 for continuing students
who have -acquired 40 or more
credit hours. Open registration
for all students begins Nov. 16.
The final day to register is
Jan. 5.
Classes begin Jan. 6-
Returning students (nay reg-
ister and pay for classes over
the Internet using Panther Ac-
cess Web Services (P.A.W.S.),
which operates 24 hours a day.
To access it, visit the college's
Web site at www.southflori-

daTehdu.SFCC Registrar's Office
will accept walk-in registrations
Monday through Thursday'
8:30 a.m.-6 p.m., and Fridays,
8:30 a.me4 p.m.
The college will be closed for
winter break Dec. 19-Jan. 3.












I


MUSOUIH MUSings
By Sandy Scott
Cracker Trail Museum Curator


From The Heart
By David Kelly


SPORT IS ON TARGET
Archery is a sport with a long history. It is an activity that uses
a bow and an arrow to hit a target. It has been used for fun, war,
hunting and sport throughout the history of mankind.
Archery used to mean a long curved piece of wood, carved
into a bow. These bows had a piece of string with two loops on the
end that attached to either end of the bow. In the beginning people
'even whittled their own arrows and chiseled their own broadheads
to attach by handmade twine or rope to the arrow shaft. Feathers
were used to act as fletchings.
This is- a very brief rundown of bows and arrows. There are
manyT ts, but lac does1not allow expl ndhk s.thathave
no wood components at all. The bows can cost over ey are
lightweight, single cam, camo-patterned, multi-sight, arrow-sling-
ing machines. They have special releases, nocks, sights, stabilizers,
and more.
The arrows are carbon or something even fancier, the fletch-
ings plastic or some cooler synthetically engineered aero-dynamic
product. The broadheads are made from hi-tech lasers that make
them sharper than sharp, some even open up on impact.
So which one hits the target better? Insert much debate here.
Despite emotions, sponsorships and bucoos of money, both
long bows, recurve bows and double- and single-cam new-fangled
bows can hit the target.
I believe with the right skill level an advanced archer can be
just as accurate with either type of bow. It really comes down to the
personality of the person hunting and maybe their convictions.
For me, I don't have the money to invest in a fancy hi-tech
single-cam bow, but I was fortunate enough many years ago to be
given two double-cam bows. One was a birthday present and
another a gift from my brother. I've kept these bows updated and;
now, with much practice can hit a target at 30 yards with a tight
group.
But I also remember growing up using my dad's re-curve bow.
It was a bear for a 12- or 13-year-old to string, but I was pretty
accurate with it.
There are many different options for archers to use their bows:
They can enter contests of all kinds, shoot for fun in the back yard
or local range, or enjoy some time in the woods hunting.
For those interested in shooting at more than a target, Florida
offers a long archery season. Archery season varies depending on
which part of the state you live in. However, you can basically hunt
from September through January with your bow. For all of the rules
and regulations and places to hunt with a bow, look it up online at
wwiv.myfwc.com.
Whether you want to target shoot, hunt or just practice in the
back yard for fun, contact your local archery store and get set up to
have some fun. It is a great family activity or something fun to do
to pass a little time and a great stress rehever.
comets tails point away from the sun at all times. When
a comet is moving away from the sun its tall Is actually
leading


YOUR, BUSINESS COULD

**-
Contact val e ar
NSHCy DAVis, Kizn Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


Specializing in: Color, Razor Cuts, Highlights, (Jpdos,
Facials, Waxing, Perms, Makeup Appliciation, Manicutes,
Pedicures, Foils & Fades. Permant Make-up
Coming Soon . Micaderm Abrasion & Body Wraps
Mon. -Pri. 9:00 am 5:30 pm Sat. 8:00 am 2:00 pm


10A The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


run by Granny Bryant. John Q. Bryant was a locomotive engineer
and died before John Roy was born, and the store that was operat-
ed by this jovial lady until it was closed around 1972.
The Gough family actually lived in the residence part of the
store along with Granny Bryant while John Roy was younger.
After his family moved irito their own house, he continued to see
his grandmother very regularly.
He helped her in the grove she owned and mowed the yard.
His horse was kept at the property and, in later years, he stopped
there to fill up his vehicle from the gas pumps located out front.
The grocery business was known for its long hours even then.
Granny Bryant operated her store from 6 in the morning until 9 or
10 at night. She was always at the store except for very rare occa-
sions when it was necessary to visit a doctor in Wauchula. It was at
this time that John Roy's dad would step in and watch over the
operation while she tended to her appointment.
Even her banking business was assisted by others, like the
driver of the Standard Oil truck or the Coca-Cola driver who
worked for T.C. Hornsby. When she received her gas or Coke
.
deliveries, her deposit bag was filled and these men would carry it
into the bank.for her., She only visited town every two or three
montSh was a feisty lad Even though Br ant's Corner had the.
distinction of never being robbed, there was one time that it was
necessary for her to ward off a potential intruder.
Since she Irved m the same building, just to the rear of the
actual grocery operation, it was easy for her to hear any distur-
bances. One mght she heard the gentle bumping of the door and
saw the outline of a figure out front. He obviously was trying to
bump the door to allow the key to pop up in the latch.
In seconds, Granny Bryant retrieved the crowbar that she
always kept beside her bed along with her pistol, and with a beat of
the crowbar on the floor, it didn't take long for the would-be thief
to take off back down the road. .
John Roy Gough has the great fortune of knowing a grand-
mother; something that many others in Hardee County have not
had. She was a part of a small> rural community where everyone
considered their neighbors their friends. She lived in a time where
family was an integral part of your daily life. She loved her church,
and walked every Sunday from her home to New Zion Baptist
Churdi, but not before she cooked a hefty Sunday dinner, ready
atid waiting for the family after services,
There was another resident at Bryant's Corner, and the entire
community knew him as Pee Wee. He only had one eye, and he
didn't like the children very much. He was dedicated to John Roy's
dad, and even though Pee Wee left before John Roy was born, he
heard plenty of stories about him.
Pee Wee was a one-eyed pet whooping crane who flew along-
side John Roy's dad's pickup truck as he left the store to work his
farm north of 64 each day. When they arrived at the location, Pee -
Wee spent the morning walking the road, eating mole crickets and
other bugs until they were ready to leave for lunch. Again he flew
beside the truck, until it reached the store.
In the afternoon, Pee Wee followed alongside the truck until it
reached the farming area, repeating his actions of that morning
until it was again time to return to Bryimt's Corner for the night.
But, it was not meant for him to follow the truck when it made
trips into Wauchula. Pee Wee was made to stay at the store and
entertain those who frequented it.
Memories of times gone by.
They may not be as good as the real events, but in many cases
they're all that remains of a time that an our younger years we did
not see as very important. SR 64 and CR 665 have long since been
devoid of Bryant's Corner, but John Roy Gough has these memo- .
ries of a time in Hardee County's history that communities con-
sist eym s edb k dnms lpirig friends, people having

respect for one another's belongings, and dedication of individuals
to provide services to others.
Cracker Trail Missetink is interested id gui- stories. We are
interested in helping preserve your membriefatid your cherished
items, putting them in a place of honor.
Won't you consider contacting us and helping us expand
Hardee County's history with your memories? Call us at 735-0119.
Share your memories with'future generations.

1
Chamber Annua


BRYANT'S CORNER
As each of us is aware, Hardee County's landscape is ever
changing. Old buildings are being replaced by others, lasting only
deep within our memories' .
One of those once-familiar gathering places was known as
Bryant's Corner. It was a community grocery store at the corner of
CR 665 and SR 64, and at one time it boasted being the last point
that anyone could buy gasoline from there to Bradenton.
It was 7-1/2 miles west of Ona and it was more than a grocery
store. It was a gathering place where everyone who lived in New
Zion stopped to buy groceries and catch up on the news.
It was the first place m the commumty to have a radio, and
many of the neighbors would gather on Saturday nights to listen to
their favorite weekly prograin. Later, when television came on the
scene, it was Bryant's Corner that purchased one of the first ones
again, and the community gathered to watch the Friday night fights
in live action.
And, for those who didn't want to listed to the radio or watch
television, there was always the group of men who gathered out
front to play the card game Rook.
It also was the polling headquarters for the entire Ona area.
After the manually operated gasoline pumps were replaced by
electric ones, Granny Bryant opted to keep one of the old ones so
she could keep kerosene in it for the neighbors to purchase m the
event the electricity went out, forcing everyone to use their
lanterns. Not only was this the on y place to purchase gas before
arriving in Bradentpn, now it was the only source for kerosene as
well.
Bryant's Corner was more than just a grocery store, and it was
run by a lady everyone in the New Zion community considered
their friend as well as their neighbor.

his gr dfRtr a2drteh b shi gr mother well.pSi an


Meeting
The Hardee County Chamber
of Commerce will be hosting its
Annual Mexpbership Meeting
on Monday at 6 p.m. at the
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf Resort
- clubhouse.
The meeting is opened to all
c amber members and their
Th themedf Cthedy ing'
was selected as a constant
reminder of how important
businesses are the Hardee
County.
The evening will begin with
tertainCme hk el u Irst

Band, and will follow with din-
ner provided by Giovanni's


Sarah Lee Lazo-Aleman
863-215-3116 (
Elizabeth Juarez-Mier
863-832-0067


CWoumeavenOUs


RUNNING TO GOD WHEN I NEED HIM
Q: I believe in God, but I don't go to church like I should.
It would make me feel like I'm using Him, like the only reason
I am going is because I'm having hard times. I talk to God on
a daily basis. I just don't go to church! Am I doing the right
thing?
Signed, Believer
A: First of all, I do not believe you have to go to church to
love and serve God.
Jesus is the only way to Heaven, not an organization, building
or program. Many people choose to stay home and keep a close
relationship with God.
But; church is a good thing.
It allows us to be around other Christians. Fellowshiping with
other believers lifts us up and helps us to stay close to God. Think
of it as a fuel station for your soul.
Being in God's house and feeling His anointing is something
we should look forward to, not dread. David in the Bible said, "I
was glad when they said unto me let us go into the house of the
Lord." Going to church should be a joyful experience. I suggest
you search around until you find a church you feel comfortable
attending.
Besides, it is OK to run to God when we are in trouble. Never
feel bad about calling on the Father for help. He wants His children
to need Him. Remember, God is love. He is always standing there
with His arms wide open waiting on us to run into them.
You are not "using" God by going to His house; you milke Him
happy. God knows that there is where you will find the help you
need. It's the enemy that makes people feel selfish for going to
church.

Signed, Penny
Your questions or comments can be sent to signedpenny @-
yahoo.com or P.O. Box 2604, Wauchula, FL 33873. You can also
visit Penny Johnson's Web site at www.pennyjohnson.net or watch
her shows at www.myhwnty.com


:I!


Monday
Main Street Kitchen. .
Members will also be encour-
aged to participate in a "Get to
Know Your Fellow. Members
Raffle Game," with prizes sup-
plied by Mosaic.
Installation of the 20 0

oo std1nda 0 sua epo^
di r sv 1 s thee c g
and outgoing presidents.
The evening will conclude
. with the announcement of the
Mosaic Business Persori of the
Year and Mildred and Doyle
Ca Jr. Aw d rRecapientsGolf
Resort is located at 138 Bostick
Road south of Bowling Green.


159-200s Sut. 14d 64*ZfoSrins












































































































































Circle The Datel


Peo~idBnt Obama Announces $3.4 Billion Energy Investment~;;i


power generation plants the


. soe o thepowr plntsforthey generate can be 5-10 times


automation, these awards will
increase the efficiency, reliabil-
ity and security of the system,
and will help link up renewable
s energy resources with the elec-
tric grid. This will make it eas-
ier for a wind farm in Montana

toainstanthaneouslypicklqpt
blowing in Missouri or a cloud

rolils)over a solar array in
Integrating and Cross-
cutting Across Different
"Smart" Components of a
Smart Grid $2 billion.
Much like electronic banking,
the Smart Grid is not the sum
total of its components but how
those components work togeth-
er. The administration is fund-
ing a range of projects that will
incorporate thqse various com-
ponents into one system or cut
across various project.areas -
including smart meters, smart
thermostats and appliances,
syncrophasors, automated sub-
stations, plug in hybrid electric
vehicles, renewable energy
sources, etc.
Building a Smart Grid
Manufacturing Industry -
$25 million. These invest-
ments will help expand
America's manufacturing base
of companies that can produce
the smart meters, smart appli-
ances, synchrophasors, smart
transformers, and other compo-
nents for smart grid systems in
the United States and around
the world representing .a sig-
nificant and growing export
opportunity for our country and
new jobs for American workers.
The combined effect of the
investments announced Tues-
day, when the projects are fully
implemented, will:
Create tens of thousands of
jobs across the country. These
jobs include high paying career
opportunities for smart meter
manufacturing.workers; engi-
neering techilicians, electricians
and equipment installers; IT.
system designers and cyber
seciIrity specialists; data entry
clerks and database administra-
tors; business and power system
analysts; and others.
Leverage more than $4.7
billion in private investment to
match the federal investment.
Make the grid more reli-
able, reducing power outrages
that cost American consumers
$150 billion a year about
$500 for every man, woman
and child in the United States.
Install more than 850 sen-
sors called 'Phasor Measure-
ment Units' that will cover
100 percent of the U.S. electric
grid and make it possible for


grid operators to better Monitor
grid conditions and prevent
minor disturbances in the elep-.
trical system from cascading
into local or, regional power
outage or blackouts. This
monitoring ability will also help

tbtcksidoftninco oraterelnae"
able energy, like wind and solar

plowere qtakeesaodu h:'
they are available and make
adjustments when they're not.
Install more than 200,000
smart transformers that make it possible for powdr
companies to replace units
before they fail thus saving
money and reducing power out-
ages.
Install almost 700 automat-
ed substations, representing
about 5 percent of the nation's
total that will make it possible
for power companies to respond
faster and more effectively to
restore service when bad weath-
er knocks down power lines or
causes electricity disruptions-
Power companies today
typically do not know there has
been a power outage until a cus-
tomer calls to report it. With
these smart grid devices, power
companies will have the tools
they need for better outage pre-
vention and faster response to
make repairs when outrages do
occur.
Empower consumers to cut
their electricity bills. The
Recovery Act combined with
private investment will put us
on pace to deploy more than 40
million smart meters in
American homes and business-
es over the next few years that
will help consumers cut their
utility bills.
Install more than 1 million
in-home displays, 170,000
smart thermostats, and 175,000
other load control devices to
enable consumers -to reduce
their energy use. Funding will
also help expand the market for
smart washers, dryers, and dish-
washers, so that American con-
sumers can further control their
energy use and lower their elec-
tricity bills-
Put America on a path to
get 20 percent or more of our
energy from renewable sources
by 2020-
Reduce peak electricity
demand by more than 1400
MW, which is the equivalent of
several larger power plants and
can save ratepayers more than
$1.5 billion in capital costs and
help lower utility bills. Since
peak electricity is the most
expensive energy and
requires the use of standby


Speaking at Florida Power
and Light's (FPL) DeSoto Next
Generation Solar Energy
Center, President Barack
Obama Tuesday announced the
largest single energy grid mod-
ernization investment in U.S.

ttc\l hbtro llrange
the nation's transition to a
smartre sa ge m rceefficient

The end result will promote
energy-saving choices for con-
sumers, increase efficiency, and
foster the growth of renewable
energy sources like wind and
solar,
The $3.4 billion in Smart
Grid Investment Grant awards
are part of the Americinw
Reinvestment and Recovery
Act -and will bg matched by
industry fusiding for a total pub-
lic-private investment worth
over $8 billion. Applicants
state that the projects will create
tens of thousands of jobs and
consumers in 49 states will ben-
efit from these investments in a
stronger, more reliable grid.
An analysis by the Electric
Power Research Institute esti-
mates that the implementation
of smart grid technologies
could reduce electricity'use by
more than 4 percent by 2030.
That would mean a savings of
$20.4 billion for businesses and
consumers around the country,
and $1.6 billion for Florida
alone or $56 in utility say-
ings for every man, woman and
child in Florida, said President
Obama.
.One-hundred private compa-
nies, utilities, manufacturers,
cities- and other partners
received awards Tuesday,
including FPL which will use
its $200 million in funding to
install 2.6 million smart meters
and other technology that will
cut energy costs for its cus-
tomers. In the .coming days,
Cabinet members and other
administration officials will fan
out to awarded sites across the
country to discuss how this
investment will create jobs,
improve the reliability and effi-
ciency of the electrical grid, and
help bring clean energy sources
from high-production states to
those with less renewable gen-
erating capacity. -
The awasdsa announced
Tuesday represent the largest
group of Recovery Act awards
ever made in a single day and
the largest batch of Recovery
Act clean energy grant awards
to date.
Tuesday's announcement
includes:

*. Empowering Consumers
to Save Energy and Cut
Utility Bills $1 billion.
These investments will create
the infrastructure and expand
access to smart meters and cus-
tomer systems so that con-
sumers will be able to access
dynamic pricing information
and have the ability to save
money by programming smart
appliances arid equipment to
run when rates are lowest.
This will help reduce energy
bills for everyone by helping
drive down "peak demand" and
limiting the need for "stand-by"
power plants the most
expensive power generation
there is.
Making Electricity Dis-
tribution and Transmission
More Efficient $400 mil-
lion. The Administration is
funding several grid moderniza-..
tion projects across the country
that .will significantly reduce
the amount of power that is
.wasted from the time it is pro-
duced at a.power plant to the
time it gets to your house. By
deploying digital monitoring
devices .and increasing grid


Editor's Note: The following is
most of President Barack
Obama's speech at a Demo-
cratic Party fundraiser Monday
night at the Fontainebleau
Hotel in Miami.
It's good to be back in
Florida. (Applause.) I want
you to know I love you and I
appreciate everything that
you've done. (Applause.) A
lot of you were on the front
lines of our campaign. You
spent countless hours knocking
on doors and making phone
calls -
AUDIENCE MEMBER:
We did!
THE PRESIDENT: Yes, we
did! Not a day goes by that I
don't think about the obliga-
tions that I have to every
American who put all their
hopes and dreams into a cause
that wasn't just about winning
an election, it was about chang-
ing Ahe country.
And, you know,'it's been less
than a year although I know
it seems longer it's been less
than a year since the Obama
family packed up, moved into
the White House. I'm here to
report Sasha and Malia are
doing great. (Applause.)
Michelle is an outstanding Fisst
Lady. (Applause.) We now
have Bo, so that I'm not always
. surrounded by women in my
.house, Bo. and I. (Laughter.)
We share the doghouse some-
- times. (Laughter.)
But it's important to remem-
ber what happened when we
walked through the door,
because there's been some
selective memory out there
going on. We were facing the
worst economic crisis we'd
seen since the Great
Depression. Losing 700,000
jobs a month. Our financial
system on the brink of collapse.
Economists were worried that
we were going to slip into a
depression.
That's why we acted swiftly
and boldly and we passed a
Recovery Act that's made the
difference in the lives all across
Florida and all across America.
Put tax cuts into 95 percent -
into the pockets of 95 percent of
working families and small
businesses all across the coun-
try. We extended unemploy-
ment insurance for 16 million
Americans; gave COBRA cov-
er age that was 65 percent
cheaper to people who are out
there looking for jobs in this
unbelievably difficult economic
climate. We provided relief to
states.so they wouldn't have to
lay off teachers and cops and
firefighters. According to ini-
tial reports, we've saved
250,000 jobs just in schools
across America. (Applause.)
We've given we've given
loans, supported loans to more
than 30,000 small businesses -
including more than 13,000 in
this state which created
thousands of jobs in the private
sector.
isut here's the thing about the
Recovery Act people don't
seem to remember. It wasn't
just the most progressive tax cut
policy in American history. It
wasn't just emergency relief for
states and individuals. It was
also people don't realize this
the single largest federal
investment in education in our
history. (Applause.) It was
the largest investment in clean
energy in our history.
(Aplilause.) It was the largest
boost to medical research and
basic research in our history.
(Applause.) It was the single
largest investment in infrastruc-
ture since Eisenhower built the
Interstate Highway System
back in the 1950s. (Applause.)
And that's putting people back
to work all across Florida and
all across America.
But we didn't stop there. We
passed the Lilly Ledbetter
because we think women
should be paid the same as men.
(Applause.) We lifted the ban
on stem cell research and began
restoring science to its rightful
place; (Applause.) We
extended health care to 11 mil-
lion children across this country


- 4 million of whom never had
insurance. We passed a nation-
al service bill named after Ted
Kennedy, encouraging people
to give back all across this
country. (Applause.) We
passed laws that prevented
fraud in housing, prevented
unfair rate hikes and fees
charged by credit card compa-
nies. We passed a law to pro-
tect our children from big
tobacco companies.
For the first time in our histo-
ry we put into place a national
policy aimed at both increasing
fuel economy and increasing --
and reducing greenhouse gas
pollution for all new cars and
trucks sold in the United States.
(Applause.)
So here's the bottom line. In
nine months we've already had
- if we just stopped now, we'd
already have one of the most
productive legislative sessions
in history. If we just stopped
now. And you made it possi-
ble. (Applause.) But of
course, that's just what we did
domestically.
Internationally, we've begun
a new era of engagement.
We're working with our part-
ners to stop the spread of
nuclear weapons (applause)
- we're seeking a safer, more
secure world free of nuclear
weapons. We're working in
concert with nations on every
continent to stem the economic
downturn, to deal with climate
change. We banned torture.
We're rebuilding our military.
We're reaffirming our alliances.
We are going to close
Guantanamo. We are serious
about this. (Applause.)
We've made good progress tak-
ing the fight to al Qaeda, from
Pakistan to Somalia -
AUDIENCE MEMBER:
Won the Nobel Peace Prize.
(Applause) -c -
THE PRESIDENT- Yes,
didflat too. (Applause.) That
was -- that was unexpected.
(Laughter.)
And of great interest to the
folks here in Miami, we have
reopened a climate of diploma-
cy and goodwill with Latin
America that had been had
been frayed very badly.
(Applause.)
But look, let's face it the
reason you're here tonight is
because we've got more work
to do. Too many people are out
there looking for work. Too
many people are seeing their
hours cut. Too many
Americans subject to the whims
of insurance companies and are
losing their health insurance or
can't afford health insurance at
all. Too many good people are
worried about whether they're
going to be able to retire. A lot
of seniors having to go back to
work. Too many people losing
their homes.
So, this is not news to you.
You've seen it in your own
communities, you understand
the enormous stress that fami-
lies are under. But here's the
thing I want everybody to
understand. When we ran we
knew we weren't going to solve
every problem in nine months.
Right?
AUDIENCE: Right.
THE PRESIDENT: At least
I hope you understood that.
What we understood was is that
we had dug a deep hole for our-
selves and we were going to
have to work really hard first
to get ourselves out of the hole,
to make sure that we yanked
this economy out of a potential
catastrophe and then to start
rebuilding, both domestically
and internationally. And that's
what we're doing.
So now is the time for us to
build a clean energy economy
that will free ourselves from
foreign oil and will generate
new green jobs in the process
- (applause) and will help
save the planet. Now is the
time to transform our education
system and we are making
enormous progress on the edu-
cation front. (Applause.)
Now is the time to start putting
in place strong rules of the road
to prevent the kind of financial


catastrophe that we saw on Wall
Street.
And now is the time to pass
health care. (Applause.)
We're not going to wait another
year or a year after that or a year
after that. Now is the time to'
do it. (Applause.)
And if you've been following
what's been happening in
Washington all the naysay-
ers you remember, I mean,
back in August, "oh, this thing ,
is dead, it's terrible, people are
out" and what did we do?
We just keep on working.
Because we understand that
premiums have doubled over
the past decade and they'll
double again in the next decade
if we do nothing. We know
that there are millions who have
been denied coverage because .
of pre-existing conditions. We
know that we have no choice
but to make sure that we've got
a health system in this country
that makes it more safe and
secure for people who have
health insurance, provides
health insurance to people who
don't, and make sure that we're
driving down .costs for every-
body families, businesses
and our government. And that
is what we are going to accom-
plish. (Applause.) Nobody is
going to be able to stand in the
way of progress on this front.
We are closer than .we've
ever been to passing health
insurance reform closer than
we've ever been. But it's not
going to get easier from here on
out; it's going to get harder.
Now is the time when all the
special interests start saying,
"oh, this is really going to hap-
pen," and "we might lose some
of our profits." And they start
paying big lobbyists and they-
start, you know, twisting arms.
And that's why all of you are
so important See, you can't
just count on change happening
in Washington. You've got to
make it happen. You've got
push. (Applause.) I promise
you, members of Congress lis-
ten to you a lot more than they
listen to me. (Laughter.) And
so the more that you gaiys are
organizing and mobilizing and
understanding that our job .is
not done, it's not it's barely
begun, the better off we're
going to be.
When Iran for the presidency
nobody gave us a chance. But
part of the excitement of our
campaign and some of you
remember because some of you
were there from the very begin-
ning some of the excitement
was not that it was easy ---- it
was that it was hard; that we
understood that we were trying .
to pull off something that had '
not been done before.
Well, governing is even hard-
er than campaigning.
(Laughter.) But but that
' same sense of energy, that same '
sense of commitment, that same
willingness to just keep on
working and going at it, day in, .
day out, even when things seem
tough, even when it looks like
what we're trying to achieve
isn't going to happen that's
how we end up we end up
doing things that nobody
expects. And that's where
we're at right now.
So 1 just want all of you guys
to understand that I am not tired .
I'm just I am energized.
(Applause.) l am excited. I'm
still fired up. I'm still ready to, -
go. (Applause.) And if all of
you are fired up and ready to go
with me, then I guarantee you
that we're going to get health
care passed (applause) -
we're going to get education.
reform, we're going to get an
energy bill that works, we're
going to get financial and regu-
latory reform and we are going
to keep on working until every
American is able to get a decent '
job that pays a living wage, a
good education for their kids, a
retirement that is secure, hedith
care for every single American.
That's what we're working for.
(Applause.)
Thank you, everybody. God
bless you. God bless America.
(Applause.)


President Obama Cites Progress,


Challenges In Monday Speech
























































































Perennials are the ones that
grow like weeds, biennials are
the ones* that die this year
instead of next, and hardy
annuals arePthednes that
-Katherine Whitehorn


ABOUT ***
19ttefS TO
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
ttmrast so d for
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
arid daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The (-lerald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338.
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


-(6 QUSlity youth footballgames 2 Tea ris flows Hardee)
10:00 AM Mitey Mite Bowl Hardee Wildcats vs. Hwrkane Orange
12:00 PM Jr. Pee Wee D2 Semi Fhials Hardee Wildcats vs. Hurricanes
2:00 PM Pee Wee D2 Semi Finals Pirates vs. Hurricanes
Jr. Midget D2 Semi Finals Plrates vs. Hurricanes
6:00 PM Midget D2 Semi Finals Hurricanes vs. Panthers ,


12A Tfhe Heal~dP-Adv~cr a te October 29, 2009


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
The city of Wauchula cele-
brated its 100th anniversary
back in 2007.
With so many years behind
this town, Wauchula has
accomplished many things. Add
to them the awards recently
given to the city by the Office
of the Secretary of State in the
foun of Main Street Awards. .
Held on Sept. 17, this year's


annual Florida Main Street
Awards presentation proved to
be a good one for Wauchula.
Receiving three awards, Jessica
Newman; Main Street Wau-
chula Inc.'s director, is pleased
with the acknowledgement
Wauchula has received.
"Wauchula's Main Street has
always strived to do the best we
can; offering businesses, shops
and restaurants to the people of
Wauchula," Newman said.


"While I am the one to nomi-
nate the awards, I know it
means a great deal to Wauchula.
It really shows the people that
our efforts are being recog-
nized," she added.
Wauchula can proudly claim
to be named Florida's Main
Street best for the following:
Outstanding Florida Main
Street Supporter for the city of
Wauchula; Outstanding Florida
Main Street Improvement was
the city of Wauchula and
Kimley-Horn & Associates for
the city's streetscape; and
Quilters Inn received recogni-
tion as Outstanding Florida
Main Street Business of the
Year.
"I was very honored and sur-
prised when Jessica told me that
we had won this award," said
Pattie Detwiler of Quilter's Inn.

Wh o ep mano odff
different businesses. I do what I
do, making brochures, helping
to organize Friday Night Live,
and helping to spread the busi-
nesses by word of mouth, not
realizing what kind of an effect
it in on the community," she
All of the recipients have
expressed a feeling of honor
and appreciation And will con-
tinue to strive and do the best
they can in order make dowit-
town Wauchula a memorable
and enjoyable place.
"I look forward to seeing
what we can do for next year,"
Newman said.


.. wawram ~B8~'


Pattle Detwiler offers flve charming guest rooms to


customers wishing to stay at


The great majority of men are bundles of beginnings.
------
19 we are foolng in the right direction, all we have to do is keep on waHdng.

I may not be there yet, but I'm closer than I was yesterday.


4 a
AA 1
















REVIVAL REVIVAL


With


*
An Anoznted Woman a God

Operating Under a
*
Powerful Prophetzc Preachzng,
A * *
11HOlntang & Prophesy



Monday Fridav* November 2- 6


7:30 PM NIg htlI


Higher Ground Int'I Ministry
(across from school bus garage) sooto*age


POP WARNER PLAYOFFS AT

WILDCAT STADIUM

AND

Hardee Youth Football League


DUNK YOUR COACH

Saturday, October 31

Come out and joinjhe fun! HYFL is hosting the
Division II Foundation for Youth Development
1st round of playofM. Our coaches and board
of directors will be In a dunk booth,
from 12:00 to 5:00 PM,

Admission is $5.00, 12 and under Free
players and cheerleaders in uniform are Free.

Support HYFL cheerleaders by purchasing bakedigoods under the bleacher
Proceeds help send our girls to Regional competition.





II
a $ O


Quflter's Inn, this year's state Main Street recipient for Outstaniding Business of the


Hunters looking to turkey
hunt on Florida's wildlife man-
agement areas during the 2010
spring season need to apply for
quota hunt permits beginning at
10 a.m. on Sunday.
Quota hunt permit work-
sheets are available now from
the Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission re-
gional offices and online at
MyFWC.com/Hunting under
"Limited Entry Hunts."
Applicants must apply
through the FWC's Total Licen-
sing System. Hunters may
apply online at www.wildlifeli-
'cense.com/fl or present their
completed worksheets to any
tax collector office or heense
agent.
All applicants, regardless of
when they apply, have the same
chance of being selected, as
long as they submit their appli-
cations within the application
period. Applicants must apply


by 11:59 p.m. on Nov. 30 to be
included in the random draw-
ing.
hen you submit your
application, you will receive a
receipt showing the hunts you
have applied for and your pref-
erence status," said FWC quota
hunt coordinator Eddie White.
If chosen, applicants will
receive, by mail, a spring turkey
quota hunt permit.
Applicants not chosen in
Phase I may reapply during
Phase 2 for any hunts not filled
and will still be eligible for the
preference drawing next year.
Applicants may check draw-
ing results at MyFWC.com/-
Hunting, smder "Limited Entry
.Hunts" click "Check Permit
Availability and Drawing Re-
sults."
For moke information on how
to apply for spring turkey quota
hunt permits, visit MyFWC.<
com/Hunting.


L1


Tur key- Hunt Per mit


5 :Baills $3.00-








Th'e ]Heraeld-A~dlvoe~ate
(U5SPS 578.780)

Thurmrsdayv, October 29~,.2009


PAGE ONE


I -~e~4- r-lp


Photos By ALEX GIILIARD* Montage By RAL H HARRISON




WhV II g


I;


~111


3DITIDS
LOWHCOre and Landscaping


OPEN TO THE PUBUC


MIm

VEGETABLE SETS -10PK $350
CABBAGE, ONIONS, TOMATOES, CUKES
& MUCH MORE FOR YOUR
FALL GARDEN NEEDS

PICK FROM PLANTS ON HAND
98 PLACE AN ORDER

3496 PEOPLES 1..ANE, WAUCHULA E
781-3584 MBLISSA 773-3557 OFFIci=)


111


coaches, Barry White, Andy
sdaahndD dd BTohlondsha -
and their parerits. They all help-
tSomke it happen, conclud--
Others playing for the. J\r
'Cats this season were Kareem
Richardson, Braulio Duran
Miguel Garcia, Damien Mar-
tinez, Murrell Winter, Steven
Lopez, Octavio Alvarez, Carter
Lambert, Travis Britt, Rudy
Casso, ViAce Grimsley, Leda-
rius Camel, Dawson Crawford,
Richard Kirk, Noe Navarro,
Dylan Farr, Rito Lopez, Caleb
Abbott, Dillon Skitka, Kyle
Williams, Julian Varela, Uvaldo
Sanchez, Dillard Albritton,
Bobby Swindle, Manny Dela-
rosa, Jothua Fowler, Jose Loba-
to, Joseph McQuaig, Michael
Moreno, D.J. Chapa and Dallas
Thomas.
Each garden has its own sur-
prise.

HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDER COUNTY
HELPI
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tern. Volunteer to be a
Guardian@$

(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


by JOAN 81-AMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's an awesome way to end
a season."
Head Coach Rod Smith was
justifiably proud of his junior
varsity'Wildcats as they aced an
undefeated season wIth a 53-6
romp past Lake Placid last
Thursday night.
In their eight games this sea-
son, the junior 'Cats outscored
opponents 326-95. "I'm so
proud of these kids. They have
a lot of heart, a lot of character.
They listened to their coaches
and executed.
"I think this is the first unde-
feated season in at least a
decade, when coaches Rewis
(Steve) and Carlton (Dale) were
leading the squad. It will be
good to watch some of these
kids go up to the next level,"
said Smith,
He spoke of last week's sea-
son finale. "They pushed us
around a little in the first quar-
ter. They got one score. After
that we held them and every
time we got the ball, they could-
n,'t stop us," summed up Smith.
Lake Placid had first crack at
leth tn reo1i ed a dt
Green Dragon 42.
Ulysses Taylor gained seven


yards, then another seven, more
-than enough for a first down at
the Dragon 28. Sophomore
quarterback Colby Baker then
went around right end for the
score. The Jose Garcia kick was
good and Hardee led 7-0 in the
first period.
Lake Placid then started a
long drive. The kickoff went
into the end zone. Starting on
their own 20, the Dragons took
11 plays to get to the Wildcat
10-yard line. On the fourth-
down play, a fumble turned the
ball over toilardee on downs.
Two plays later Hardee
scored, with Baker over right
tackle, cutting left and racing 75
yards to the end zone. Although
the PAT failed, Hardee led 13-0.
Lake Placid got its only score
early in the second quarter.
Starting at the Dragon 43, quar-
terback Clayton Mason used
Devote Chisolm and Demar-
cus Ismael to carry the ball. A
final pass went to Ismael, who
broke a tackle to go the final 31
yards. The two-point conver-
sion try failed. It was 13-6.
Hardee responded right away.
Monte Carlton returned the
ar e y ds o}de teo e
again for 41 yards and earned
the right to take it on into the


end zone on the next play.
Garcia's kick made it 20-6.
The Dragons were limited to
minus yardage on their next
series and punted. Tyshan
Hilliard returned the punt
almost to where it began at the
Lake Placid 8. Taylor carried
the ball into the end zone. The
PAT kick was good. It was 27-6.
The 'Cats scored twice more
before the half. Michael
Pilkington scored the first one
on a 9-yard touchdown. The
next one occurred when Rufino
Gabriel scooped up' a Hardee
fumble and finished a 32 yard
run for the score. The PAT kick
was wide to the left. The half-
time score was 40-6.
The teams exchanged posses-
sions to start the second half.
Then, Hardee got the ball at its
45 and took for plays tq score.
Carlton went around right end
for the last 39 yards. The PAT
kick was on the money. It was
47-6.
Hardee began a final drive
with a running clock late in the
third quarter. As the fourth peri-
od began, reserve quarterback
Justin Knight went in for the
tally to make the final score 53-
"It's been a memorable sea_
son. I aooreciate the assistant


G EN E DAV IS SAYS TH ANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
.* from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
. In the top 10 in customer satisfaction in
, i T Florida I have received Ford's highest
. Sales Honor 15 years running and been a
* member of Ford's 300/500 Club for 20
A. years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
'1 Ft. Meade
STEDE 375-2606
2 12tfc 800-226-3325
























































































































-


many questI s the


RSVP:


I '1 " ~ ~L I` I II


2B The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


An interview with a Yale W o~


the interest from the student cord their questions and the-neredwell-preparedwithques-
body and the support offered responses they received. tions, and that this is one of
by the faculty and staff. They "The College Day program their favorite prograins to
also applaud the Air Force is a great opportunity for stu- attend every year."
Junior Regerve Officer Training dents to explore opportunities Saddler has served as College
Corps cadets who serve as after, graduation, different -Day coordinator since 1987,
hosts and hostesses. career options and the college hosting '22 of the programs.
"Your students are always experience," Porter stated. "Considering that we are a
well-prepared with) good ques- "It's a great program, if they single-school program, we us-
tions, and take advantage of will take advantage of it." sally get a very gpod turnout.
every minute they are with us," Dr. Michele Polk, HHS Many representatives make a
said one recruiter. principal, was also pleased point to attend our program,
Students were given sug- with recruiter comments about even if they may have to travel
tested questions to ask in ad- Hardee students: Without ex- out of their way to get here,
vance of the event, and several caption, every person I talked she said.
teachers incorporated the event to about our students gave Saddler hopes to increne the
into their classroom assign- positive feedback." number of visiting institutions
ments. Englph teacher Karen As she moved from one ex- next year. "We want to expose
Porter encouragedther students hibitor's table to another, Polk our students to as many of the
to interview one admissions said she repeatedly heard that options open to them as possi-
counselot in-depth, and to re- "our students are well-man- ble," she said.


alumni is.part of the application
process, Hardee Senior High
School students learned at
College Day on Sept. 22 in the
school gymnasium.
Yale University at Hardee
High? You bet!
The Yale representative,
along with recruiters from 39
Other institutions, was avail-
able to the juniors and seniors
who flooded the gym to partic-
ipate in the annual program.
Colleges, junior colleges,
technical schools and military
branches were among the
exhibitors providingg informa-
tion about opportunities which
are available after graduation.
Ranging from Missouri to
Massachusetts, and offering
programs as diverse as flight
training, equestrian studies,
automotive design, nursmg,
modelingand computer anima-
tion, the different institutions
offered a< wide selection of
opportunities for all interested
students-
Many area school districts
hold countywide college fairf
at night, according to guidance
counselor and College Day
coordinator Peggy Saddler;
"By offering our program dur-


Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Trainingi Obrps cadets;


ing the day, students who
might be unable to travel to a
night program get to interact
with the recruiters and be
exposed to opportunities they
may not have been aware of
otherwise," she explained.
Added Saddler, "I have seen
many students who may not
have had plans for pursuing
any education after high school
leave the program with a com-
pletely new mindset." .


Senior Amanda Bissette con-
curred, "College Day was a
really awesome experience.
Without College Day, I would-
n't ha e been aware of all my
options. I know some kids
who weren't serious about
college at all until they went
to College Day."
The recruiters enjoy the expe-
rience, too. Mimy commented
that this is one of their
favoritefairs to attend, citing


Students enjoyed exploring the varied options they have in continuIng their educatIon
and/or training-beyond high-school graduation.


cwUrtilth;TtWUts


barn. He bought stolen feed and
made a lot of bad deals because
they knew his drinking was an
easy way to get him to bargain,
't4,:1hun toabbe ain, to put a
IIe knew cows like the back
of your hand. C.R. was milking
over -1,000 heard, and the other
one 100 and he died drunk and
still rented a barn and had a lot
of trouble with milk companies,
also was deep in debt. I will not
gave his name.
Here are two men who start-
ed in the dairy business at the
same time, got started the same
way, and it shows what you can
do and what drugs and drinking
and bad deals can lead to.
Edward Farmer
Bowling Green


Letter To The Editor -..


- Dear Editor: o
The true story of two men. . g
Every time I go to Avon Park w
I see what honest and hard work s
will do. There was a man who la
came to Florida from Alabama m
with his belongings in a shoe- a
boxi plus a qmall suitcase (sd I o
havfbent told, but the, rest of
this Iknow for a fact). w
He got a backing from his h
brother who was already in the
dairy business and rented a barn in
in Lake Worth and started with o
a few cows. The feed truck fa
drivers used to. put on extra fa
sacks of feed when the boss H
turned his back and tried to sell
it cheap to dairy owners.
But this owner ivas hoffest.
When they offered it to him, he
turned them in to their boss
Well, he did well and bought his
own land and built h ov#ik
barn. I heard he was on the
board of th# bank in take
Worth.
I worked for hiin in the late
1950s, and jt waila doilble shift
(twice a day milking). Fridity
??ha aMdwhen lus eu
door. He said no man would
everdna get their pay when it
We took turns about doing
outside work from milking, so it
was my turn. I was in the badk
pasture (abbut 100 acres) on
Friday morning building a

ye "es walking with
The second time I worked for
him in the 1960s he had dou-
bled his herd and had Guernsey

p 'atwhich ihad ttn1rilkM
richer milk and was kept id a
different milk tank.
We started to milk at 7 p.m.
and were finished about 2 a.m.
so the other crew could milk the
Holsteins. Thursday night he

:2'<'OLba andd sa
we would have our paychecks
Friday morning.
I have never heard of a man
paying his help in advance or
worried about them getting
their money when due.
I worked at the dairy out east


f Hwy. .62 when up walked a
roisp of men and one of .them
as hinr He looked at me and
aid, "It cost me a million dol-
i-s but I have you working for
e again." He died a few years
go, but his son Raymond took
ver the operation.
You guessed it. His name
as C.R. Melear, the best man I
ave ever known.
Now the 6ther man was born
Florida but wag just tl>e
pposilenHe got a loan from a
mily member He used some
mily, members for free labor.
e liked to drink ..and rented a


I~&e~I~sLa~l~s ~ sseea. ~. ``'vsaspint... ..-.a2lm


'P 8458 Oin MS 07 fl 8


GY 8 OMHt C am68T O COMM8TC8 28884 OiHHEY 88? 8 .

1/'
ChamoeT MCMOSYS U 1 .


.>


From HHS To Yale: College Day Explores Possibilities


Information on dental hyglenist programs generated toothy grins.


Monday, November 2, 2009


DAT~E


13 8 B stick Road

Bowling Green, Florida


863-773 -6967 lor casey @ hardeecc.com














During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol.
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Oct. 25, Rdbert Anderson Smith, 21, of 1132 Heard Bridge
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley and charged
with battery.
Oct. 25, a fight at U.S. 17 South and Sweet water Road, a vehi-
cle stolen on Old Fort Green Road and thefts at Altman Road and
at Morgan Grice Road were reported.

Oct. 24, Vincent Alan Tifer II, 23, of 4545 Apache Trail, Wau.
chula, was arrested by Dep. Midhael Lake and charged with DUI.
Oct. 24, Elvis Misael Hernandez-Elias, 27, of CR 663, Ona,
was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr., Jesse DeBoom and
charged with DUI and no valid license. At the jail. Dep. Career
Williams detained him on a charge of contempt of court.
Oct. 24, Deborah Rimes Munoz, 53, of 820 Heard Bridge
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged
with retail theft.
Oct. 24, Raymond Guerrero, 43, of 324 S. Seventh Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of contempt
of court.
Oct. 24, a residential burglary on SR 62, a robbery/holdup on
U.S. 17 North, and thefts on Lake Branch Road, U.S. 17 South and
Bostick Road were reported.

Oct. 23, Lonnie Gene King, 54, of 2946 Redbird Lane, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley and charged with battery
and trespass on property other than a structure or conveyance,
Oct. 23, a residential burglary on North Hammock Road, and
a theft on Farwell Road were reported. .,

Oct. 22, Frank Troy Mendoza, 36, of 802 Redding St., Zolfo
Spritigs, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis and charged with driving
with knowledge of a suspended license. At the jail, he was detained
on a charge of withholding support of children.
Oct. 22, residential burglaries on Deer Run Road and on
Hickory Street, burglary of a conveyance on Sally Place, a business
burglary on SR 62, and thefts on Steve Roberts Special and U.S. 17
North were reported.

Oct 21, Ronald Jefferey Coleman, 46, of 7107 SR 64 West,
Ona, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with bat-
ty.
Oct 21, a residential burglary on Acorn Drive, and thefts on
Dena Circle and Acorn Drive were reported.
Oct. 21, Rose Marie Cullifer, 35, of 1445 Ben Hill Griffin
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested on a charge of withholding sup-
port of children.
Oct. 20, Patricia Dugue Munoz, 37, of 1582 Old Bradenton
Road, was arrested by.Cpl. Todd Souther on three counts of with-
holding support of children. At the jail, she was detained on an out-
of county warrant.
Oct 20, a business burglary on Sweetwater Road and a theft
on Lawndale Drive were reported.

Oct. 19, thefts on Pool Road and on Sparrow Road were
reported.
,
WAUCHULA
Oct 25, Jenella Lenetta Jones, 39, of 630 Snell St., Wauchula,


October 29, 2009v, The Herald-Advocate 3B


was arrested by Ofe. Pablo Bermudez and charged with shoplifting
- petit theft.
Oct. 25, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North and a theft on
U.S. 17 South were reported.

Oct.24,criminalmischiefonNorthSecondStreetwasreport-
ed.

Oct. 22, Ladislado Rodriguez Lopez, 58, of 1520 Hinson
Ave.,Wauchula, was arrested by Ofe. Jason Hale and charged with
disorderly mtoxication,
Oct. 22, burglary of a conveyance on Park Drive and a fight
on East Mam Street were reported.
*
Oct. 20, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 South was reported.

Oct. 19, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North and a theft on
U.S. 17 North were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Oct. 24, Isidro Anastacio Santiago-Rojas, 28, of 817 E. Main
St., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofe. Ryan Abbott and charged with
DUI.
.Oct. 24, Narciso Arriaga Roblero, 33, of 4205 Central Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged
with battery.

Oct. 23, a theft on Mason-Dixon Avenue was reported.

Oct. 21, a fight on U.S. 17 North, and a theft on Dixiana Drive
were reported.

Oct. 20, Debra Ann Rucker, 46, of 116 Hilton Road, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofe. Daniel Arnold on an out-of-county
warrant.

Oct. 19, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 North and a theft
on Maple Avenue were reported,

ZOLFO.SPRINGS
Oct. 25, criminal mischief on Shanna Lane was reported.

Oct. 20, a residential burglary on Suwannee Street was report-
ed.


Letter To The Editor

Some People Have More

Garbage Than Others Do


By JOAN.SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A state Emergency Manage-
ment official agreed last week
that four-laning the final 10
miles of U.S. 17 in Hardee
County was a priority.
David Halstead, Interim
Deputy Director of the state
Department of Emergency
Management, spoke to the
Hardee County Commission on
Thursday, giving the board an
overview of the recent Senior
Leadership Briefing;
Halstead lauded the Hardee
Emergency Operations Center
(EOC) as one of the most pre-
pared in the state. "You have
one of the state's best. Forty
percent of all hurricanes hit
Florida. Hardee County is not
immune, as you know. It is the
Board's responsibility to protect
Its citizens.
"When a hurricane heads
toward Florida, it -puts its 20
million residents in harm's way.
You could be a shelteritig coun-
ty for survivors who come
through a hurricane. Our motto
is 'Semper Gumby,' being flex-
ible and ready with disaster
behavior health early interven-
tion," said Halstead.
The goals are simple: move
people to safety; help them be
calM; help them make the con-
nections they need (family,
services, etc); put them to work
to rebuild their feeling of self-
sufficiency; andrekindlehope.
The moving people to safety
goal got discussion from com-
missioners Minor Bryant and
Bobby Smith. Bryant said
Hardee is in a critical area with
the 10-mil bottleneck south of
Zolfo Springs, where traffic
slows to two-lane. There's a
long history..This is a state and
federal, an intrastate highway,
important for disaster evacua-
tion,''
Halstead responded that the


Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (FEMA) office in
Orlando is still working on year
2000 disaster funding and is
aware of the problem of U.S.
17.
Smith, county liaison to the
Florida Heartland Rural Eco-
nomic Development Initiative
FHREDI, said it has set a
priority of four-laning the rest
of U.S. 17 in Hardee County.
"This six-county organization
recognizes that it's important
for evacuation, for getting peo-
ple out of harm's way," said
Smith.
Local Emergency Manage-
ment Director Rich Shepard
said the regional evacuation
group also identifies the U.S. 17
four-laning issue as a priority.
Halstead went on to describe
the regular annual statewide
disaster testing which is done.
Hardee County does these year-
. ly as part of that program. The
one in May 2010 will be differ-
ent than any other as the goal is
to move all state government,
including the governor and
EOC, out of Tallahassee.
Alabama and Georgia will helP
as will every EOC in Florida.
"We will find out where the
failing points are and correct
them," said Halstead-

In other action, the commis-
sion:
appointed Leslie Bond to a
four-year term on the Indigent
Health Care Board-
decided -to submit Van-
dolah Road as a priority for
state Department of Transporta-
tron grant meentive, program
funding in fiscal years 2101-
2012. Vandolah Road, which
connects to CR 663, the Ona-
Fort Green Road, takes some
traffic off U.S. 17 as drivers
coming east on SR 62 or 64 use
CR663 and Vandolah Road to
come to Wauchula.


Dear Editor:
This is not right for the coun-
ty to charge everybody the
same for garbage pickup and
. landfill fee. I said at the begin-
ning at the commission meeting
I am for pickup for the stinking
of people burning house
garbage. It stinks for hours on
isnd, and they won't stir it or put
it out and/or cannot burn cans
and glass.
But I have a half can or less
most of the time, and I see fam-
ilies with two or more living
there ha~ve two full cans and
bags stacked on top. Why must


I pay for them?
The driver can have a book
and mark how many each per-
son has. So it is more book-
keeping so charge by the can
Doesn't that make sense
instead of making me pay for
John Doe in which I do not
have the money or food-stamps
for bags and wrappers they
have to throw away. I know oth-
ers also agree.
* Wake up, county commis-
sion. Stop making me pay for
services I don't get.
Edward Farmer
Bowling Green


When I go into my garden with a spade, and dig a bed, I
feel such an exhilaration and health that I discover that I
have been defrauding myself all this time in letting oth-
ers do for me what I should have done with my own
hands.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson


stte 18 8 COMOO RS A end






4B The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


B7


9


Operating a ice upaeMdl aeWso n we cree fWuhl.I nincm r Cri Dzidu of Edgewiatr~ and c Bill Rogrso imoin


Standing by entrance of Paynes Creek State Historic Site


Standing by 1849-era Indlan camp are Little White Bear


Tom Seager of Laldy Lake is shown with oild cooper shop


Dustbuonyj Spinner (Betty-Lou Seager) of Lady Lake has.


PHOTOSSY JIM XELLY


*\


Kenneth Wood of fampd'#i if8emIndle Indidh name of Standing by 1849 U.S. soldier's gear is Ken Low of
Hawkwood. Edgewater.


C rIs KImball is from Coller-Semlnote State. Park~ In


Fort Chokonikla Holds Encampment
































I


Hardee Coimty Chamber Af Consmerde

. Annual Christmas Parade


ItsShcrtuneon Mam

Saturday, December, 5, 2009 6 p.nt
Dow ch


1 $2500 Entry Fee.


Name: Koda
Breed: Husky
Color: Black & White
Gender: Male
Age: Adult
Coat: Medium
Tall: Long
Eyes: One Blue/One Brown
Koda gets along with other dogs,
but needs a Mine without cats. .
Koda also IIkes to chew things so a
chew.toy would be required In his
new foriverthome.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neutering of the animal Contact 71312320
If you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving house. The kennellocatiodis 685
Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill,







008 go
Experienced 1)og Groomer



lip

.

Welcome to Our Shop
our shop we limit the amount of dogs we do. By doing this we are able
to spend the timeneeded to cater to your dog's special and individual
needs. Whether your dog is a puppy experiencing a first groom or a
ve old friend we treat them all as if they were our own.
I Can Do AII Things Through Christ Who Strangthens Ms. Philipions 4:13
Beth Brown *** * * 3732 Peoples Lane
(863) 781-5864 ** * wouchula


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Readers of "Florida Monthly" magazIne voted Cat's on MaIn this year's "Best Boutique."
Enjoying Susan Robertson.


.
2. Entries must pertain to the holiday a d/or theme, "I Showtline mI Main."
3. Because this is an evening parade, LIGHTS ARE REQUIRED on all floats or pulled
units.
4. No Sanas only helpers are allowed.
5. No Vendors.
6. Entries with animals must provide their own clean up during line up and along the
parade route. For the safety of the spectators, all animals must be accompanied by a walk-
ing chaperone. .
1. No alcohol or tobacco are allowed.
8. Banner and/or poster and flash liglith-ast required to parcede float.
9. At least two walkers are required beside bach flog
10. Must be 16 years old to operate any pantorized vehicle.
11. No bull whips are rn itted/
12. For the safety of children, candy or other items bl8D&t be thrown from any vehide,
but should be handed at by people wailing in the parade.
13. Please have at least I adult assigned to every 20 children. Children must be accoxinpa-
nied at all times.
14. Field will be available from 9:00 a.m. 4!30 pim. All participants are i-equired to be
in position no later than 4:30 p.m.
11 Immediately following the parade, participants must have a representative at the
judging stand for award presentations.
16. liegidration deadline is November.20th.

.d ,e bo r ere weather cancellation, the parade will be rescheduled for


Entry Form
Please print. Only completed forms will be accepted. Check all that apply.
Entry Type: 0 Float 0 Vehicles 0 Marching Unit 0 Other
Category: D Commercial 0 Nori Commercial
Accompanied by 19kisic? Yes No }yes, pl se specify
Accurate and clear description of entry (To be read by the emcees)



Business or organization:
contact Person: Phone Number:
Acidreds; All entry forms and registration f@eil must be received by Edday. Nex. 20s 2.408 to: I
Hardee County Chamber of bothmerce RO. Box.683, Wauchula, FLS3873
Fax: 863-773-4915 Emall; Casey@harcleecc.com to:a-11:1so I
----------- ---------------- """""""'"""""


October 29, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 5B


final game, Lake Placid g'ot a
run of six straight shots and
won 25-12, despite good serv-
ing of Zamora and Carlton.
With only Shivers graduat-
ing. Hardee could be really
strong next season as Lacey
Garza, Vanessa Garza, Vargas,
Sarah Beyers, Daishia Blandin,
Mahoney and Carlton will then
be in their senior season, along
with Meghan Graham and
Palmer, who will be juniors and
Jackson, who n ill be a sopho-
more.
Meanwhile, the junior varsity
Lady Wildcats lost in three
against Avon Park and in
straight sets at Lake Placid.
Avort Park took the first game
25-12, but Hardee came baqk to
win the second 25-18 behind
the serving of Myah Gonzalez
with a five-serve streak and six
altogether. Kayla Nichols added
a trio of points.
In game three, the first to get
to 15.points wins. Avon Park's
April Waldron carried them in
the final three serybs for the 15-
11 win.
At Lake Placid, the Hardee
JVs never got going, losing 25-
14 and 25-22. In game two,
Jessica Harrison liad' the good
service for Hardee with a balf
dozen successful serves.
Finishing up the JV season
were Gonzalez, Harrison, Kayla
Nichols Angelica Flores, Han-
nah Jacobs, Ashley Nichols,
Ashley Armstrong, Maria An-
selmo, Ana Maria Saldivar,
Kaitlyn Rowe, Kailah White,
Katie Wheeler and Desiree
Smith. They are coached by
Barbara Leupold.


floor, two smaHer rooms seem
to be a great addition. The
"Kitty Litter Roogn" and "Ein-
broidery by Caroline" are visit-
ed regularly. Customers can
find any of the merchandise in
the Kitty Litter Room for half
off or can order custom embroi-
deries from Caroline Mackay as
well.
Following the traditional
"boutiques," Cat's on Main
offers registries for baby show-
ers, bridal showers, and for
local graduates.
You can visit Cat's on Main
Monday through Saturday at
117 E. Main St.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of ThexHerald-Advocate
, Ilardee Lady Wildcat volley-
6411 is playing its best. .
Ending the regular season
with a honje three-set victory
over Avon lfark and winning a
game from Lake Placid, which
is ranked number one in its dis-
trict, the Hardee volleyball
team continued its winning
ways.
The girls stole the opening
match of the Class 3A-District
11 playoffs on Monday night at
Sarasota Booker, a team they
lost to in five games on Oct. 6.
They went on to the district
competition at DeSoto on
Tuesday night, facing the top
seed, Cardinal Mooney. Sebring
would play second-ranked
DeSoto. Scores were uttavail-
able at press time.
At Booker, Hardee won in
straight sets, 25-21, 25-16, 25-
21. In the first game, Brends
Zamora won four of her serves,
Marisa Shivers added fqur and
Summer Palmer had six, report-
ed Head Coach Ken Leupold.
In the total team effort,
LaCieshia Carlton had two runs
of three good serves and Lacey
Garza added three. For the third
game, Hardee was down 2-7, 5-
9 and 10-12, but Shivers got hot
aniserved until Hardee was up
18-12. Yesenia Vargas and Eryn
Mahohey each added a couple
of good serves.
"We stopped Booker's runs.
They only got five serves in a
row once and three serves
twice.'hlat ifas very important.
All three setters set well and \ve
did not miss many serves.


Mahoney, Nyshira Jackson,
Vargas and Shivers all hit well.
Zamora, Palmer and Vanessa
Garza all passed well," summa-
rized Leupold.
Against Avon Park on Senior
Night, Hardee first paused to
honor Shivers, the only senior
on the squad, and her parents
John and Sandy Shivers.
The Lady 'Cats then went to
work, winning 26-24, 25-20
and 25-20. Carton came on and
had seven good serves, includ-
ing an ace and the final point.
Shivers added three solid serves
as the girls overcame the Lady
Devils in the two-point victory
26-24.
The next two games were by
a little wider margin, five
points, with good serving from
Carlton, who nailed six in a row
despite an Avon Park time-out.
Vargas had the heavy hand in
the final game, with seven good
serves, including a string of six.
Shivers had five serves in the
middle of the game, and appro-
priately served for the winning
point. .
Hardee finished the regular
season on Oct. 22 at Lake
Placid, always a tough con-
tender. Hardee seemed over-
whelmed in the opening game,
falling 25-9, but came back to
take the second game 25-23,
behind the serving of Vargas,
who had a run from 12 to 20 to
give Hardee a commanding
lead.
Lake Placid had to work for
the third gaine win, 26-25.
Hardee had good serves from
Carlton, Lacey Garza and
Mahoney along the way. In the


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The HeraldiAdvocate
A Hardee County retail outlet
has been named tops in its cate-
gory by readers of a statewide
magazine. .
Cat's on Main in the Town
Centre in downtown Wauchula
was voted "Florida Monthly"
magazine's "Best Boutique'of
2009."
oFlorida Monthly" is a
lifestyles magazine featuring
events, businesses and points of
interest from Pensacola to Key
West, and is read by three-qtiar-
ters of a million people. It is
those reirders who select the
."Best of Florida" winners in an
annual survey.


Voted as "Best Boutique,"
Cat's on Main offers many dif-
ferent gift items for any taste.
With Vera Bradley being the top
item sold, children clothing,
switch-floys, seasonal d6cor,
candles and more also are
offered.
"Of course we are honored
and feel privileged and excited
to be voted as Florida's No. 1
boutique, however ive are more
importantly honored to repre-
sent our county in such a posi
live way, and we cbuld riot be
what we are if it were not for
the 40 years of community sup-
port," said Elizabeth Durrance
owner of Cat's on Main.
In addition to the main store


M Issa Shivers was honored at Senior NIght activItIes. FlankIng her ( on jrom
Coach Ken Leupold, and her parents Sandy and John Shivers.


Volleyball Season Ends


Local Shop A Statewide


P de i ei S









IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HARDER COUNTY,
FLORIDA


LINCDaA LUNG 252009RDERS000678

and Petitioner
MARDONIO OLIVARES,
Respondent.
/
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARDONIO OLIVARES
ADDRESS UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been flied against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
VnyRE hoon LINdDdAe UGO 10
MAKOWSKI RD., APT. 23, WAU-
CHULA, FL. on or before
November 20, 2009, and file the
original with the clerk of this Court
at P.O. Drawer 1749, or 417 West
Main Street, Room #202,
v onul on3e3F8 beforeaser
thereafter. If you fall to do so, a
default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.

o let I I lund mea
available at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office. You may review
these documents upon request-

CI ut rt' I mi
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Rorida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuIt will be
tmalled to the resa on record at
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and Informa-
*a a, nu Id
or striking of pleadings.
DATED: October 15, 2009
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
10 22-11 120
IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
1)( AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION .
CASE NO: 25-2008-CA-000666
DIVISION
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE FORMORGAN
STRIO.EYCA fl
NOWRPORATED TRusT,
2006-HE2,
Plaintiff <
'**
CARL BROWN, et al, .
Defendant(a).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED ,
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rhacheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated October
22, 2009 and entered in Case No.
25-2008-CA-000666 of the Circuit
Court of the TENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for HARDEE County,
FlorIda wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STAN-
LEY CAPITAL I INCORPORATED
TRUST 2006-HE2, is the Plaintiff
and CARL BROWN; VEROI)IICA
BeR t ea at dn a Id
for cash at NORTH FRONT DOOR
OF THE HARDEE COUNTY COUR-
THOUSE, 417 W. MAIN STREET at
11:00 AM, on the 18" day of
November, 2009, the following
described property as get forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 54, PEACE RIVER
HEIGHTS, UNIT 2, AS
SHOWN BY MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
ERKOF IOCF OCFRCTUHE
COURT IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI.
DA, IN PLAT BOOK 3,PAGE
43
A/K/A 698 CHAMBERLAIN
BOULEVARD, WAUCHUI.A,
FL 33873-8682

Any person claiming an interest
InthequrplusfromthesaleIfany
other than the property owner as
u ellP cl m ith a d
da after the sal
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of the Court on October 23, 2009.

CBerH hh


By:, Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
** See Americans with Disabilities
Anda o dance with the Americans
Disabilities Act, persons with dia.
abilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this pro.
feeding should contact the Indl.
vidual or agency sending the
utice atB Echevarr mp r
Bayahore Blvd., Suite800, Tampa,
Florida 33606, telephone (813)
251-4766, not later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding.. If
hearing impaired, (TI)DF 1-800.
0 9 F ridoac 1(V) 1-80 55.
10:29,11:$c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
HARDER COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NOCIV 5-A200 CNA-000496
DIVISION:
GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC,
Plaintiff,
4,
ROBERTO CAVAZOS, et al,
Defendant@). 7

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE

au OT Ea OrEd e uPI
Foreclosure Sale dated October
22, 2009 and entered in Case NO.
25-2008-CA-000496 of the Circuit
C It I antd for DHEE n
FlorIda wherein GMAC MORT-
GAGE, LLC, is the Plaintiff and
ROBERTO CAVAZOS; SOFIA
CAVAZOS, TENANT #1 N/K/A/
MICHELLE TEJEDA; are the
fendan will ell o the gh.
NORTH FRONT DOOR OF THE
HARDEE COUNTif COURT-
HOUSE, 417 W. MAIN STREET at
11:00 AM, on the 18* day of
November, 2009, the following
d8eider prop2as set forth in
BEGIN AT THE SOUTH.
EAST CORNER OF THE
NORTH 1/2 QF THE
ITN 2WPTT St 3
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
AND RUN THERE NORTH
A DISTANCE OF 210aFEEy
THENCE WI"ST A DIS.
TANCE OF 890 FEEy
EOFNORT SR
A POINT OF BEGilNNING;
THENCE NORTH A DIS.
TANCE OF 200.60 FEEy
THENCE NORTH 75
DEGREES 39 MINUTES 22
DOF 0%8AFD
THENCE SOUTH A DIS.
TANCE OF 227.45 FEEt
THENCE WEST A DIS.
TANCE OF 105 FEET TO A
POINT OF BEGINNING;
LESS 25 FEET OFF SOUTH
SIDE.FOR ROAD RIGHT OF
WAY; AND BEGIN AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORI(ER OF
THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC.
TIqN 29, TOWNSHIP 33
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
AND RUN THENCE NORTH
A DISTANCE OF 210 FEEt
THENCE WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 995 F
THENCE NORTH A DIS-
TANCE OF 155 FEET TO A
POINT OF BEGINNING:
THENCE NORTH K DIS-
1%NOMooFs210.79 FEET9
#"HI"NCP 450tlTM 84
DEGREES 28 MINUTES 34
SECONDS EAST A DIS.
TANCE OF 105.49 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH A DIS.
TANCE OF 200.60 FEET;
THENCE WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 105 FEET TO A
25 ET I
SIDE FOR ROAD RIGHT OF
WAY. TOGETHER WITH A
MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE
ANDRETOAPPURTENANC
0440500341; FL # 2154378.
A/K/A 1414 EAST DRIVE
WAUCHUL.A, FL 33873 '

Any person claiming an.Interest
In the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
mu e atec thw h a e
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the
seal of this Court on 08tober 23,
2009
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
**See Americans with Disabilities
Act**
in accordance with the Ameriodine
Disabilities Act; persons with dIs
abilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this pro'
ceding should contact the Indi-
dtuca ,r8a d 3a ae
Raymer,. Barrett & Frappler, 601
Bayshore Blvd., Suite 800, Tampa,
Florida .33606, telephone (813)
251-4766, not lister than seven (7)
ysinprior tal ,poDDT1n df
955-8H1,mp voice (V) 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
10ady;so
NOTICE UNDERAFICTITIOUS

Notice is hereby given that the
in e la a a
TA3,


as amended, intends to regleter
with the Secretary bf State of the
State of Florida, the fictitious
name of Teasin' & Cuttin' Up under
which the under ignedals on a
W. Main Street in the City of
Waucliula, Florida 33873.
That the party/parties Interested
In said business enterprise le/are
as follows:
Susan Power
Dated at Wauchula, Hardee,
Florida 33873-
10:29c

Each garden has its own sur"
prise. ---Susan Allen Toth


Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JAMES H. McANLY
303 East Oak Street '
Arcadia, FAg(qa 3426(,f
(863) 494-0062
Florida Bar Number: 0123988
10:22-29c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY .
CASE NO.: 252009CP000099
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
JESUS REYNA, also known as
JESSE REYNA,
deceased. /
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of JESUS.REYNA, also known as
JESSE REYNA, deceased, whose
date of death was May 30, 2009,
and whose social securitynumber
is 266-73-6865, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Divialon, the
addree881of wh ui PostFO m
33873-1749. The name and
address of the Personal Repre.
tentative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below-
AH creditors of the decedent
and other persons having clahas
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice la required to be served
must file their cla me with this
uN]WITH HE T EO
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM-
AII other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claimed or demands against the
clecedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DI RO FTHISEN TRS PUBLICA-
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FO 73 702EO EEFLORIEDVA


ERNBOA OUTSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT$ DATE OF DEATH IS

Pe onal Representative:
ERLINDA REYNA
701 South Florida Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Attorney for Personal
he :ons of
BURTON & BURTON, RA.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773.3241
Fabbimile: (866) 5911658
Florida Bar Number: 0650 72-290


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
HARDER COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NOCIVIL5-A2C00T8-CNA-000499
DIVISION:
MSALLE BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR FIRST FRANKLIN
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-
B CI D2CERTIFICATES,
'
Plaintiff,
va.
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an. Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated October
22, 2009 and entered in Case NO.
25-2008-CA-000499 of the Circuit
Court of the TENTH Judicial
Irc inw e nr HA EC nNK
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, As
TRUSTEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,.MORT-
GAGE LOAN ASSETeBACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006'
1S8d a tESaRndS ROA
are the Defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at NORTH FRONT DOOR OF
THE ,HARDEE COUNTY COURT-
HO E 7 W. M IN TRdE
November, 2009, the following
described property as set forth in
said FinalJudgment:
LOTS 5 TO 9, INCLUSIVE,
B HER2LANMD S BD
VISION BEING A PART OF
SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST'
AS PER PLAT BOOK 1,
PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC
R SLOORFDAHARDEE
A/K/A704WMAINSTREET,
WAUCHULA, FL 33873

Any person.claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the LIs Pendens
must flie a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the
seal of this Court on October 23,
2009

. B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court
.
By Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
**See Americans with Disabilities
Act*?
in accordance with the Americans
Disabilities Act, persons with dia.
abilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this pro.
feeding should contact the Indi.
vidual or agency sending the
notice at Echevarria, McCalia,
ye re I S ItFra81 m ,
Florida 33606, telephone (813)
251-4766, not later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
9 1,For vdoace 1 55-
10:29,11:5c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDER COUNTY,
FLORIDA ,
Probate Division
File Number: 252009CPO00088
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MELVIN EARL WILLIAMS'
Deceased,
NOTICE.OF ADMINISTRATION
AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Testate) '
The administration of the estate
of MELVIN EARL WiLLIAMS,
deceased, whose date of' flehth
was July 26, 2009, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Hardee
n ,uFlorida;2 CPDI *0
the address of which is 417 5)fee
Main Street, ,Wauchula, Florida
33873. The names and addresses
of the Personal Representative
the P o I presentative's

The estate is estate and the
date of the decedent's WIII and
any Godicils are dated July 3,
2001*
Any interested person on whom
a copy of this notice was served
must flie with this Court any
objection by such person that
challenges the validity of the Will,
the qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue, or jurisdic-
o Court b fill


t p
o
Florida Probate Rules, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THE OBJECT.
NN T STFS LB FC ONR
BARRED.
AII creditors of the decadent
arid other persons who have
claims or demands agairist the
ar co I nt r I -
dated claims, and who have been
served a copy of this notice, must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE .LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTEli THE DATE OF
THIS RTSCEP L AT N AOF


6B The Herald-Advocate, October 29. 2009


The game rocked along in
scoreless fashion, much as the
first one between* thes& teams.
Hardee put the first score on the
board in the top of the fourth.
Sisum drew a walk and Bailee
Carlton went in to run, coming
around to score on an Aubry hit.
Hardee padded its lead with
dual tallies in the top of the
fifth. Thomas walked and
Jakaysia Lindsey was hit by a
pitch. Sisum also walked, and
Hardee kept runners moving
until the first two girls scored to
lead 3-1.
DeSoto came back with one
run in the home half of the fifth
on a pair of hits. The junior
Lady Bulldogs put the game
in their pocket when they added
five runs in the bottom of the
sixth on four hits and errors.
Hardee left two runners strand-
ed in the top of the seventh
and took its only loss of the sea-
son.
The junior Lady Wildcats
came back for a big wm at
home in the season finale last
Thursday against Hill-Gustat.
The Lady Eagles were unable to
score as Henderson and Ullrigh
shared mound duties and col-
lected a half dozen Ks.
Ullrich, Tyson and Thomas,
who tripled scored in the bot-
tom of the first as Aubry dou-
bled and Carlton singled to
bring the first three runners
home.
Hardee added a half dozen
runs in the second inning.
Galvez started it with a double.
Ullrich homered, and the.runs
continued with Tyson, Thomas,
Henderson and Aubry. It was
9-0.
Four more runners crossed
home plate in the third frame.
Ullrich, Derringer, Lindsey and
.
Henderson all came home,
aided by another Aubry hit.
The final pair of runs were in
the fourth inning, when Der-
ringer and Lindsey rounded the
bases on a Henderson hit.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High
School softball team reigns as
Heartland Champions.
The 9-1 junior Lady Wildcats
ran into difficulty in the ninth
game of the season, playing
DeSoto on its turf. Hardee had
won 3-0 against DeSoto at
home on Oct. 1, but found it
more difficult at Arcadia, losing
6-3. DeSoto, however, had an
8-0-1 record and ended 8-1-1,
giving Hardee the Heartland
Conference title by.
Over the final two weeks of
the season, Hardee won three of
its four games. In all, the local
girls downed their opponents
121-12, recording seven
shutouts along the way.
The Oct. 12 home game was
against Avon Park. Eighth grad-
er pitcher Karlee Henderson
was ailing, so seventh grade ace
Alex Ullrich went the distance,
recording a half dozen strike-
. outs.
With good field support
behind her, Ullrich led her
squad to victory. Hardee got
some key hits to make up for a
couple of errors, reported Head


AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
EAMCOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
'
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons who have
claimed or demands against the
decedent's estate. Including
un ture contingentunilhqul-
claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER' THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.


Coach Shari Knight.
Hardee got on the board in a
big way in the home half of the
first. After Avon Park went
down one, two, three, Hardee
sent 10 batters to the plate. A
Kendall Gough triple and solid
hits by Ullrich, Kate Thomas,
Addison Aubry and Summer
Sisum kept runners moving
along. Brooke Tyson, and Anna
Galvez both walked and scored
on teammates' hittmg.
Avon Park came back with a
three-run spree in the top of the
second on a triple, single and
several errors. It was 6-3.
Hardee got two runs back in
the bottom of the second.
Gough drew a walk, Tyson dou-
bled.and, both scored, pushed
around by teammates.Avon
Park got its final score in the
top of the third on.a hit, stolen
bases and a sacrifice.
Galvez started Hardee' nine-
batter outing in the third inning
She walked. Kim Derringer
doubled, Breanna Godwin,
Ullrich and Gough all singled
and Tyson doubled again. By
the time the dust settled, it was
a 16-4 game. Neither team
scored again, leaving that the
final score.
At Lake Placid on Oct. 15,-
the 15-0 game started slowly.
Hardee finally got on the board
in the top of the third. Derringer
walked and came around to
score on a long Gough double. *
In the fourth inning, Hardee
added four more runs. Thomas,
Apbry, Henderson and Galvez
all singled and scored,*the last
on a Derringer hit. Tyson scored
in the fifth on a smgle and sac-
rifices.
While there was no scoring in
the sixth inning, Hardee broke
the 6-0 game open in the top of
the seventh
It swas the Oct. 19 game at
DeSoto that undid the junior
Lady 'Cats when tincharacteris-
tic errors cost Hardee the game.


Personal Representative


the year were last week. Some
of the Fort Green youth receiv-
ing the award at Wauctiula
Elementary were Holly liroign,
Karson Goodwyn and Kaylee
Hogenauer. Congratulations,
girls, and keep trymg. I sat with
Gayle Gainous and her daugh-
ter, Lauren, also received the
award. Gayle and I worked
together at the prison.
Arthur Womack was released
front rehab And I'm sure hWs
saying "finally!"
VI'sited Don Evorsiand he
looks good; good color, etc.
He .has started chemo and
Elizabeth Powell is about
3hr6ugh with heir radiation,
Please continue to pray for
them.
Karson wyn has' a new
baby brother, Kole, who had a
head full of black hair! Parents
Kara and Jeremy 'are doing
well.
Melissa Davenport a
baby boy. I have not heard the
nante but they are both sup-
posed to be d6ng well. Also,
Mrs and MrsyWilhs, who live at
Hardee Lakes, have a new baby
girl born about two weeks ago.
I saw the proud papa at.Wal-
Mart, and he said they were all
fine.
Our sympathy is extended to
Roy Albritton in the passing of
his sister, Bomta Moye.
Fays Davis had her foot sur-
gery Wednesday, the 21st. She
iq staying in the bed or the
recliner. She has been in lots of
pain but Randy said he is wait
mg on her hand and foot.
Please pray for Faye as she is,
recovering.
Faye was going to be heading
up our Fall FestivAl but Tammy
ate e essts I uthpe t re
day and begins at 4 p.m. It
should end at 6%ith a hayride.
All you children come oil out
and parents, too. It is always
lots of fun. There will be oodl
of games, prizes, funnel cakes
cakewalk, corn dogs, cotton
candy and just plenty of fun.
Sharon Adams said her sister
Sylvia and Mark Hovind took
her fishing last Friday night and
they caught 44 impecs. Thift is
my kind of fishing, but it ])as
only happened once in my life-
time!
Pitty for eve one and beh
county.


Greetings from Fort Green!
Randy Barrows and his two
sons spent a weekend with his
grandmother, Edith Bassett.
Randy spent part of his growing
up years in Fort Green and it is
always good to see him. He
lives near the Cape, and he said
the jobs were scarce.
The GA's had a car wash and
it was a success. They earned
the money for the shoebox pro-
gram and weist shopping last
Wednesday night to make the
necessary pure ases.
David McQuaig has 'had a
stressful time in Afghanistan.
Several of the men in his crew
were killed. Pray for Da4id
and all the military. Incident-
ally, his son is sick so keep.htm
In prayer.
The 4-H Foundation prepares
the Farm Bureau supper. As
usual, it was a good meal and
the Farm Buredu ladies brought
dessert. One lady brought a
spice type cake with nuts and
coconut and I don't know wha
else, but it sure was good. I
have decided that people should
print their name on a card and
put it in front of their cake, pie,
etc. This way, you could ask for
the recipe!
Mary Samuels' aunt, Nellie
Glass, made her final journey
last Friday morning. She had
gone to hit with her grandchil-
dren while her daughter-in-law
took her very sick son to the
hospital. She told her son she
had already buried two of her
children and couldn't stand to
bury another. God heard, and
she had a massive stroke and
you know the rest of the story.
Our sympathy is extended to
the family

puL IBsltidhaad He mt
the "Energize( bunny." He
keeps going, and we are all
proud to know and call him our
friend. He is doing well but said
there is more to getting a pace-
maker than some would say.
Please continue to pray for Mr.
Leo. .
Pastor Steve and Tara
McGaughey got home late last
Thursday afternoon. They had a
good time visiting their family
in Kentucky, but were on the
road again early Friday morn-
ing jo sit with Lila. We have a
od astor.
PThepfirst Top Cat awards of


~HHeatln Chtampon










Stump The Swams
n, son szenso
Well, Football Fans, the Gators again played a subpar game in
the state of Mississippi but escaped with a 29-19 victory. What is it
about the "Magnolia Stqte" that causes problems for UF? The
unimpressive win has the ESPN talking heads lobbying for Texas
to be the number one ranked team. The other conferences are obvi-
ously tired of 'the SEC winning national championships and have
an effort going to dislodge UF especially.
The South Florida Bulls must be thinking its happening all
over again. Did I say that last week? Yes, I did and this week it
looks even worse. Injuries have taken a toll on the Bulls and inex-
perience is not helping either. What will the Bulls do to rebound
against West Virginia? Of course, my wish is they don't. As a WVU
alum and football fan, this is a dangerous trip to Tampa for the
Mountaineers. The Bulls have their backs to the wall. WVU has not
played well against USF also. The showdown is Friday night at
Raymond James. ESPN will carry the game live. WVU is a three-
point favorite. USF has home games with Louisville and Miami
coming up as well.
2009 has had its share of upsets or perceived upsets in college
football. Miami had impressive wins over FSU and Oklahoma
only to realize down the road those wins were not that big at all.
Clemson has taken the wind of the Hurricanes. Were they e er a
Top 10 team this year? I don't think so. Then again with the 85
scholarship limits, any team can beat any other on any given day.
This is precisely why a playoff system should be used to crown a
national champion. The BCS is too restrictive to really guarantee a
true champion,
Notre Dame broke a six-year losing streak to Boston College.
Six losses to BC? No wonder the rumor mills are hearing Coach
Kelly will leave Cincinnati for South Bend at season's end. Rumor
mills are hearing rumors that Ex-Bucs coach Gruden is going to
Louisville as well. It is that time of the season for these rumors to
start
Now it is time to for the Swami's Top 10 week two.
1.) Florida 7-0 Until somebody can beat the defending
National Champs, they stay on top.
2.) Alabama 8-0 A blocked field goal saved this ranking.
3.) Cincinnati 7-0 As I said, the Best Team in Ohio and
could go unbeaten.
4.) Boise State 7-0 Should throw a monkey wrench into the
BCS
5.) TCU 7-0 the best team in Texas deserves this spot.
GOOOOOOOOO Frogs.
6.) Houston 6-1 wins over Texas Tech, Miss. State and
Oklahoma State.
7.) West Virginia 6-1 if not for 6 turnovers at Auburn
would be 7-0.
8.) Texas 7-0 Let me know when they gain more than 46
yards rushing against Colorado.
9.) Pitt 7-1 How did the Panthers lose to N.C. State?
10.) Iowa 8-0- Easy schedule should provide a 12-0 season.
Now for this week's Bill O' Fare:
1.) West Virginia at USF WVU gave up 500 yards to
UConn but USF struggled for 212 against Pitt. WVU was averag-
ing more yards until the past two weeks. USF has been known for
defense. This game could come down to special teams where WVU
has been anything but special on kickoffs. Opposing teams usually
start near midfield. Defensively, they are very similar stat wise.
West Virginia 30 USF 24.
2.) Florida and Georgia The annual Outdoor Cocktail
Party" in Jacksonville. An old tradition dating back to the Great
. Depression. This would be a good time for the Gators to put an A
game together. UF 38 UGA 10.
3.) N.C. State at FSU Noles may have turned a corner with
that great comeback against UNC. Look for an improved game for
four quarters. FSU 31 NCSU 14.
4.) Rutgers at CWrridctitut Two well-coached teantrgott
it. Huskies almost puYdil'dffati upset at West Virginia. This will be
their first home game without Jasper Howard and I look for a big
win by UConn in his honor. Connecticut 35 Rutgers 17.
5.) Cincinnati at Syracuse Would love to see an Orange
Upset but that is about as likely as the Swami winning Powerball
or Duke winning a football championship. UC 63 Syracuse 17.
6.) Ole Miss at Auburn Auburn has a chance to restore
some respect with a win. It would be an upset. Auburn 28 Ole Miss
27.
7.) Miami at Wake Forest Canes bounce back over Weak
Forest. Miami 34 Wake Forest 13.
.8.) Mississippi State at Kentucky MSU played inspired
against UF. Can they do it two weeks in a row and on the road
Kentucky 33 MSU 30
9.) Georgia Tech at Vanderbilt The SAT Bowl but GT has
better athletes. Georgia Tech 36 Vanderbilt 17.
10.) South Carolina at Tennessee Spurrier has been walking
through the raindrops with his wins until now. The Vols almost got
Alabama and they are at home. Kiffen best The Old Ball Coach.
Tennessee 31 South Carolina 24. -
11.) Texas at Oklahoma State Cowboys have the spotlight
and a chance to make a statement. Upset Special here. They take
out Texas. Oklahoma State 34 Texas 31.
12.) Marshall at UCF Thundering Herd gets win number six
and becomes bowl eligible for the first time in the Mark Snyder


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DENTON II, LLC, the
holder of the following certificate has flied said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows: a ,
CERTIFICATE NO.: 3 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007
Description of Property:
3.80 AC THAT PART OF SW 1/4 OF SW 1/4
LYING N OF SR64 AND E OF SYDNEY
ROBERTS RD ,
28 34S 23E
OR176P289 AFF-651P1426 670P343P344
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.
Name in which assessed: GARNER ROBERTS


Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 2" day of December, 2009 at 11:00 a.m
/ *
Dated this 14* day of October, 2009 "
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk f Cl it. C rt
o rou ou
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: AHola C. Al britton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252009TD019XXXX 10:22-11:12c


-

The Real Florida
By Dorothy HarriS
State Park Ranger

PARDON OUR DUST!
As park visitation increased over the years, it became apparent
that upgrades and enhancements to park facilities would be need-
ed.
Friends of Highlands Hammock has helped with many
improvements over the past 15 years, including purchases of equip-
ment, suPillies and vehicles and even building and construction
enhancements. It is now time for some additional improvements
that are part of a Florida Park Service work project.
The first enhancements began this month.
Paving of the roadways in the family campground will provide
better access for the thousands of visitors who camp with us
throughout the busy season. Camping accommodations have
grown from their modest beginnings years ago,.and the hard-sur-
faced roadways will be a big improvement to the dirt roads that
currently provide access.
Once the campground roadways are completed, the park's
popular "Loop Drive" will been(xt. A four-foot bicycle pathway
will be added to the road edge, providing safer access to bicyclists,
runners and walkers while also niceting new state-mandated guide-
lines.
Once both paying projects are complete, then it will be time
for the new picnic-area restroom and two new pavilions to be con-
structed.
The restroom facility will greatly enhance visitor comfort,
especially during large special events, like our annual historic
Civilian Conservation Corps Festival on Nov. 7 this year and
the seasonal."Music in the Park" concert series. .
The two itew pavilions will provide enhanced opportunities to
reserve a pavilion for your family gathering, reunions or parties.
These improvements have been planned for quite some time*
and we are very pleased to have them beginning and, hopefully, in
place before our busiest time of year-
We appreciate your understanding during the construction
process, and hope that these facility improvements will provide
years of enhanced enjoyment at the park.


Era. Marshall 24 UCF 20.
13.) Ttilane at LSU Used to be a good rival game over
Thanksgiving but not anymore. The Tigers have outgrown the
Gre W ansTS t Ita u ille Cardinals get a needed win
out of conference. A beleaguered coach gets a respite? Louisville 35
ASU 21.
15.) North Carolina at Virginia Tech Tar Heels get thrashed.
VPI 45 UNC 13.
16.) Atlanta at New Orleans Saints roll on MNF. New
Orleans 31 Atlanta 17.
17.) Miami at New York Jets Dolphins run the Wildcat to
victory. Miami 34 NYJ 21.
18.) St. Louis at Detroit Lions get a needed win. Detroit 27
St. Louis 12.
19.) Jacksonville at Tennessee Jags get a road win. Jax 28
Titans 20.
20.) Minnesota at Green Bay Oh, the sub plots in this one.
Green Bay 31 Minnesota 30.


,@
A PPE AR HERE TOO TT
on = =
o ntact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

7713-3255


PUBLIC NO TECE
The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the Hardee County Planning Agency will hold a
PUBLIC HEARING AND
REGUI...AR MEETING on
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 05, 2009
6:00 P.M. OR AS SOON THEREAFTER
Public HearinglRegular Meeting will be held in the BCC Board Room
412 West Orange St., Courthouse Annex
Room 102, Wauchula, FL
for the following request and to receive public input:
Agenda No. 10-01
Growsville Groves LLC as Property Owner has authorized
Waste Services of Florida Inc. as the Applicant by and through
Ste Authorized Representative to request approval of a Special
Exc ption to constructioperate a Regional Landfill on 875+/-
acres of a 1,620+1-acre parent tract zoned A-1 (Agriculture) in the
Agriculture Future Land Use District
AND
Crewsville Groves LLC as Property Owner has authorized
Waste Services of Florida, Inc. as the Applicant by and through
the Authorized Representative to request approval of a Site
Development Plan for the constructionioperation of a Regional
Landfill on 875+/-acres of a 1,620+1-acre parent tract zoned A-1
(Agriculture) in the Agriculture Future Land Use District
On or abt W side of Ten Mile Grade
S of Crewsville Rd., N of Doyle Rd
01 36 26 0000 07410 0000
300MOL ac
'S & E1N of NE 4 S S
2796.83 ft for R .0bdeg ggin30sec E 2100 ft W 49deg45min)0aec
W 415 ft N 00degianain30sooW 2400 ft N 89deg40m(n36sec E445ft to
POB 801. T36S R26E
AND
01 36 26 0000 07420 0000
20MOL at
Com NE corn of Sec run S 00deg43min30sec E along E Sec line
2796.83 ft for POB S 00degl3min30sec E 2100 ft S 89deg46min30sec
W 415 ft N 00deg13min30aec W 2100 ft N 89deg46min30sec E 415 ft to
POB 801, T36S. R26E


Slaughter Cows: Lean; 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent 39.00-
44.00

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs 51.00-
58.00


The smallest bird egg is believed to be that of the Vervain
Hummingbird, of Jamaica. It measures just 0.39 inches
and weighs 0.0132 ounces.

2009
SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS FOR HARDER COUNTY
COMMISSION AND APPOINTED BOARDS
Meetings to be held in County Commission
Chambers. Room 102
Courthouse Annex. 412 W. Orange Street. Wauchula-
Florida
unless otherwise noted -
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Regular meetings every other Thursday at 8:30 a.m.
MONTH OF November 05th & 19th
nbe s CNuon a icnesSC Veterans Day
November 26th 27th County Offices Closed Thanksgiving
Holidays

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY "INDEPENDENT
MONTH OF November No meeting scheduled.
PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD meets first Thursday night
of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF November 05th
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD
Meets on the second Monday night of each month at 6:00 p.m.
in Conference Room 202, 412 W. Orange St.
MONTH OF November 09th
COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD
Meets first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF November 02nd
LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD
Meetings called as needed at Library in Annex.ll '
MONTH OF November 09th Friends Board at 5:30 p.m.
HOUSING AUTHORITY ,
Meets second Tuesday of each. month at 1:30 p.m. at 701
LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula
MONTH OF November 10th
HEALTH CARE TASK FORCE
Meetings called as needed at Hardee County Health Department
Auditorium
MONTH OF November To be announced
HARDER COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE BOARD
Usually meets fourth Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m.
MONTH OF November 17th
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person need-
Ing to make special arrangements should contact the County
Commissioners office at least forty-eight (48) hours prior to the
public meeting' -
This notice is published in compliance with Florida Statutes
286.0105.
Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and be
heard. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the
members, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting
or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and
that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Dale Johnson, Chairman lo:2one


5 MQlac '~
ALL4.ESS W1/2 of NWil4 & LESS Nil2 of 81/2 of NE1/4 of NW1/4
811, T36S. RS6 E
1236260000100100000
ass.nes.ms.
Mike S Thompagn, Chairman, PlanninglZoning

PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a
PUBLIC HEARING..
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2009
8:35 A.M. OR AS SOON THEREAFTER
to receive a recommendation from the PlanninglZoning Board
and to receive public input for
the Special Exception application of
Agenda No. 1041
AS DESCRIBED ABOVE
Ai) Public Hearings to be h id in BCC Board Room, Room 102,
courthouse Annex, 412 W Orange SL, Wauchula, FL
oate Jobson, chairman, soons of county commissioners
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing to
make special arrangements should contact the Planning/Development
Department at least two (2) working days prior to the PIZ.DObitG
hangrdBR. This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled pegwon
needing to makh special arrangements should contact the County
Manager's office at least two (2) working days prior to the BCC public
Aggag. This Public Notice is pqbilshed in accordance with the Hanlee
county Unified Land Developmbnt Code. Copies of the documents
relating to these proposals are available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the
Planning/Development Department, 110 8.9" Ave., Wauchula, Florida.
AH interestaidpersonsshallhavetherighttobeheard.Inrenderingany
decision the Board shall rely solely on testimony that is relevant and
material. Although minutes of the Public Heartn0s will be recoded,
anyone wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will
need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made by a court reporter, 10:22,29c


For the week ended Oct. 22, 2009
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 9,169,
compared to 8,858, last week, and 10,567 a year ago. According
to the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last weele Slaughter cows and bulls were 1.00 to
2.00 higher; feeder steers and heifers were 1.00 to 3.00 higher.


~


October 29, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7B


Feeder Steers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 108.00-138.00
300-400 lbs 98.00-130.00
400-500 lbs 86.00-111.00
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 90.00-130.00
300-400 lbs 80.00-104.00
400-500 lbs 72.00- 92.00


2 0 36 26 0000 09470 0000
802 TSBS, R26E -
02 36 26 0000 03120 0000
802. T368. R26E
10 36 26 0000 09320 0000
Sto, TWS, R2()E

11 36 26 0000 00650 0000
81% T368 R26E
1136260000100200000


10MOLas
SW1/4 of SEil4 of SE1/4

50MOLac
SWild of SW1/4 & 81 4 of SE1/4 of SW1/4
A.L.Q
40MOLac
SEil4 ofSEll4
AND
10MOLac
Nil2 of Sil2 of NEil4 of NWil4
AM




fsB The HeraM-~Advocate, October 29, 2009


..-T--


of Red Cross,


Dzear _Firients


you are invitetto thefirst annualMaree soot
Camp Ballat the Civic Center. 1Vear your favor-
ite fatigues or red~ white, andblue. Enjoy great
food~ [isten to music, biton unique auction items,


friends.


and spent


timze rwith


at thiis wondterful community


Please join us


event


hiostecl by


th~e ,American aecl Cross.


Sincerely,


3LZosaic


'Diana


1/oumzans,


Committee Chiair


10:290


Almerica n









The Herald-Advedite:
LU5PS'TIS-''80)
. Thursday,.October29,;2009 .s.


~lln '


Playel'S of the Week


Take UsS 7 South to Zolfo Springs. Turn east
on SR 66 hen you-reach U. S. 27, cross over
it and continue -on -U.S. 98S (CR 700) about 40
.YOUCOfn641tO Okeechobee, turn left
and f61 town Turn north on U.S. 441
'" to the school, 2800 U.S


HAT Is AGE?
MR# IS age?.

Is age just one more wrinkle
,
10 411 already frattle skin?
Or is it something . more?
Is it one more scab on your knee, one more
hello, one more person to love?
Is it possible that these things are not just

pains or leonys1p Sssing thrto the seemingly


Yes. And with each year that passes may it be
a reminder that the scrape on your knee is
something more than it appears.




for your children to look at and be in utter awe.
Something for the world to look at and
show respect.
'And maybe that scar hurt at first, but in the
end the love that you will receive will be better
than anything this world can understand.

Joshua Sargent
Bowling Green
PUBLISH YOUR- ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a fisature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, RO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873,


~II~


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g"^"IRORYF DA HISTORY
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


DNIE


the third period, when reserves
had already hit the field.
Anderson went the final six
yards. The PAT kick was
blocked.
11ardeb gave Estero a last
opportunity when Taylor
Schweitzer recovered a Hardee


penalty. Then Youyoute scored
untouched and Vega made it
28-0.
On its next series, Estero
was intercepted by Npwakow-
ski, who took the ball to the 13.
Chandler Nemitz returned the
favor, intercepting Hardee on
the goal line and running out
eight yards. After Alden's sack
put Estero back to the 1-yard
line, Hunt tackled the quarter-
back in the end zone for a safe-
ty. At the end of the first period,
Hardee had a 30-0 advantage.
It jyst got .worse for Estero.
Hardee got the kickoff, with
Mayer on a good return. As the
second quarter, Hardee com-
pleted a drive with. Lindsey
going for a five-yard TD. Vega
was on the money and it was
37-0.
Estero got going well on its
next series but, after eight plays
and two first downs, stalled on
the Hardee 38. Youyoute ran 11
yards. On the next play he went
over left guard and ran
untouched for a 53-yard score.
Hardee started its next series
on its 49. Two plays later,
Lindsey broke tackles on his
way to a 38-yard score. The
PAT was good. It was 51-0,
which was the halftime score as
the teams battled for the final
six minutes of the half.
It was a running clock for the
entire second half. Hardee got
one. more score early in the
third period, with Jones going
around left end for a 25-yard
TD. The PAT was no good. It
\vas 57-0.
The final score came late in


fumble. As time was winding
down, Estero was knocking at
the door, but had to'attempt a
34-yard field goal, which went
wide right and preserved the
Hardee shutout.
Staff writer Jim Kelly con-
tributed to this article.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Seven players shared carry-
ing the football, seven players
scored and another got a safety-
The Hardee Wildcats drubbed
the Estero Wildcats 63-0 on
Friday mght. All the scoring
was done early. Hardee had 30
points in the first period, 21
more in the second and 12 in
the third quarter.
This week, the 'Cats play at
Okeechobee tomorrow (Friday)
night,- and are not taking the
Brahams lightly despite their
48-0 loss to Class 4A-ranked
Dwyer last Friday.
Although they only had 10
first downs, the Wildcats
amassed 492 yards on 35 car-
ries and 80 more in the air in
last week's game.
Jarrius Lindsey led the
Wildcats with 10 carries for 130
yards and three touchdowns,
earning Offensive Player of the
Week honors. His teammates
helped a lot. Jake Mayer did
everything but cross the goal
line with several long runs on
his nine carries for 120 yards,
Quarterback Ezayi Youyoute
added five carries foi- 106 yards
and a pair of touchdowns and
passed to Jake Nowakowski for
a 38-yard TD.
Senior Antjuan Jones added
two carries for 40 yards and two
scores. Tre' Anderson had one
50-yarder for a TD, Andrew
Hooks three for 59 yards and
Tony Valdez one for 14. .
Keshaun Rivers had a catch for
19 yards and Andy Hunt was on
the ball for the safety.
"The kids never cease to
amaze me. Each week they get
better. The score says it all,"
said Head Coach Tim Price.
Defensively, senior Tylar
Alden-led the pack with six
tackles, three tackles for loss,.a
sack and two pass breakups.
Mikey Retana had an intercep-
tion, seven tackles and a
blocked punt. Rivers added an
interception for a 17-yard return
and Valdez had another for 19
yards.Nowakowski had a sack.


Hardee
3-5-1
80
35/492
572


Estero
2-12-3
19
26/77
96


Passing Completions,
Attempts & Interceptions
Passing Yards
Rushing Attempts/Yards
Total Yards


lylarAlden


Turnovers


Offense


7/54


Penalties, Lost Yardage


8/65


30 1 1 0 6


DIRECTIONS


TO GAMVE:


Keshaun Rivers


Scout Team


.
Quinton Carlton added tour
tackles, three assists and a sack.
Others in on the tackle parade
were Lunior St. Louis, Cody
Hernandez, Nick Battles, An-
derson, Jones, Youyoute, Con-
nor Davis, Jesus Ramirez,
Hooks, Michael Forrester, Jona-
than Kelly and Chace Revell.
Altogether the defense held
Estero to a plus 96 yards.
"I can't say enough about
them. They practice hard all
week and it shows on Friday
night. They can't wait for
Friday each week to outdo last
week s efforts," said an elated
Price.
Hardee last played Estero in
2004 and 2005, winning both
games.
Estero won the toss and
retiirned the opening kickoff 22


yards. A no-gainer, penalty,
four-yard gain and sack led to a
punt.
Rivers returned the punt six
yards and Hardee set up busi-
ness at its own 42. A penalty
moved them back 15 yards.
Youyoute was stuffed on his
first try, but Mayer took the
next pitchout for a first down.
Lindsey had a couple of short
runs, nullified by another penal-
ty. Finally, Youyoute went to
the air, finding Nowakowski
wide open for the 38-yard "
throw. Martin Vega's kick made
it 7-0.
Estero was forced to punt
after a couple of missed passes
and a sack. Hardee got the short
punt at the Estero 32. Lindsey,
Mayer and then Jopes touched
the ball, with Jones going off
let tackles for a 45 yard sprint
to the end zone. Two minutes
from the first score, Hardee

.d eano h tFy rd bdut rtl
gave up an interception to
RHa es tkhth olp7 rdo
Lindsey bulled his way offright
tackles for a 21-yard score.
ve temadea 2tthr e plays and
punted. Rivers got the punt
return to the Estero 32. Hardee
lost five yards on a false start


10:290


0080e DOSs 080 EERter m -


'HARDEE


LOOKING TO (8C63) 385";~C"~P-864


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~t~YI,


a





Itardee County's only locally

owned (# operated balit EWel

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Open Moss. Frl. 6a30assa Ssoopm
Sat. 7530assa xasoopsas


863*773-9466 *
156 WIH Duke Road, Wauelawla





Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 785-0470 .
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


nr aged friend has
<,wa good many yeans
to look back over -
some of dthem good. Wh

all of them there's been
one steady, continuing
force, like a thread of
surel wqven thmugh the
pattem of his life.
.. :. brTi 1faith. Ital

tr a faith At is sustained
r P
i and strengthened when
-, a man devotes great
. Ad time and energy to
J God's House and its
M mission.
Now, in The quiet
years".he can look 0
over what has been.

b
d

imputant to be aide to
aview the right kind of
Ilfr. Don't wall.
Worship God this week.


Mket Hksh Mkah (hth What Nlseh
1.bl6 thD 11-8 Ll-B Ah5 Sh M

Coppogra200).K s *WOams VARR904.- m


I :I -


--Schedlule Of Weekly Serviceso


ZOLFO SPRINGS
. NEH 10 H HSI IP F HR
Church 735-8585 Childcarq735-
8586
Morning Worship ................14.0(fa.in.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening W6rship .:................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.TH. .........7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 paii.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
PRIMER lWISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E
Escuela Domiriical ............ .10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.....7:00 p.m.
Servicio del Miercples ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunda 10:30 a.m
Evening S rvice .... ..... ........6:30 p:m
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m.
REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH

Zolf r s o3 /66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ....................11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night......................7:00 p.ny.


ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY '
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship......................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service..............7:00 p.m.

: SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10;30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8625
EscuelaoDominica . ........10 00 am

Pioneer Club 6:30 p.Its.
Servicio de la Noche ............7;00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio..................................8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11 00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
E ing worship .... .............6:00 li
W esday Prayer .. ... .7200 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
" OFFJi WOORYULL GOSPFIL
PRAISE CENTER*
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMER MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........l1:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico.)................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Leaming ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St. .
Sunday Schpol ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service.... .......7:00 p.m.
10id-WeekT us tudy,..........7:30 p.m.



ONA

LIMESTONy BAFFIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave.* Liritestoise
Conun.
Sunday School ......:.............:.9:45 a.m.
Morning W9tship ................l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..........:.......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
SundAy School ......................9:45 a.m.
WorshipsService ... .....11:00 a.nt.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Pray6r T1me.:......7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Rtiad
Sunday School .................,..10:00 a.m.
Iviornin Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples 11aining..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...:........L...6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.
-
ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......:........l1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
pygday Schoogy.....,.g. ...,..10:00 a.m.
Af gt n Worship ... ....11:00 a.m
Evetung Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
...................... ......................6:30 p.m
Wednesday Pra r Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther ICing and Apostolit
Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00-a.m.
English Seivice..... ....11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
'llnesday Prayer ..... ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
.
CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
1845978141624
inardk.cidebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.in
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services
CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
.529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
o 773-0427 ,
Celebration Service...... .....10:30 a.m
Wednesday Evening Cell Grentps
Adult Cell Group ... .:.:7700 p.m;
Youth Cell Group .............4...7:00 p.in
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m
Call for locations
CHAlklE CREEK
BAYI'IST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Paritor James Bland
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning;Worship .........:......11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Worship ............ .6:30 p.m.
7 CHURCH Oli' CIIRIS'I
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ......................s...10:00 a.m
Worship Service .................. I1:00 a.m
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
77342249
Sunday Morning Worsfiip......9:30 a.m
Sundily Bible Class......... ....11:30 a.m
Sunday Evening Worsli@. ...6:00 p.m
Wed. Night Bible.Class .... ...7:00 p.m
Men'v Leadership & Training Class
2nd Supday of Month ........4:00 p.m
CHURCH OF 000
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF JESUN Gklains
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 4.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 akin.


Priesthood ............................l 1:00 a.m.


WAUCHULA
SPIRif WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ... ....7:30 p.m.
Friday WTrA ERNACLE 5F7:30 p.m.

PRAISE & JOY .
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10 00 m.

Evemimg Worshi 7:00 p.m
Tues. B ble Std
& Chil Train. 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service.. 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHUI,,A CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Ltither King Jr. Avel
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l1:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.In'

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a m.
Youth SeSvic .. 00 p m.

Weed sday Service 7:30 P.m

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CITURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
* Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave,
Sunday School ... ....10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l1:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ....:.............7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Moming Worship ................l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UPMINISTRY
Cracker 'Itail Arena .
g, 44
(across from Opk Hills Ranch I(d,.7
781-2281
Sunday ......................... 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVELE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crdwsville Rodd
Churdi 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657

o ..
Evening Worship ......... ........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

EVANGEL STIC HOLINESS
*

SundCoSrner of 6th and Hi 0 W a.m
Morni Worsh I1:00 a.m
Eveni Worshi ,7:00 p.m.
Wednesday 7:30 p.m

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwance 735-0114
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17- 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10;00 a.m
boring Worship ................11:00 am
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m-


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST "
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.

My SW c . : "
Wednesday Service..... ..........7:00 p.m.
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica........................10:00 a.m.
Servicio................................11:00 a.m-
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m-
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.
EL REpNENTE 9
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd*
Mares Oracion......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio..............:.......7:30 p.m-
Viernes Servicio .....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m-
ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgla St. 773-3470
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................l 1:30 a.m
Evening Service.. ...............7:30 p.m
. Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCII
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
$HISDAYi
Bible Study ..... .....9:45 a.m.
Moving Worship ................l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ........10:00 a.m.
Family Night Supper ..........5:00 p.m.
Extreme Kids Choir............ 5:45 .m.
Church Orchestra................ 5:45 p.m.
Prayer Meeting .................. 6:00 p.m.
Youth Gathering ................ 6:00 p.m.
Extreme Kids/Kid Mo........ 6:30 p.m.
Adult Choir Rebearsal........ 6:30 p.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louislana St. 773-9243
SUting
Generations Card Opens........9:30 a.m
Kids Wdrid Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins::10:15 a.m
Pre-K Blast.... ....10:45 a.m
Kids World B.L.A.S.T
(K-5th) 10:45 a.m
Worship Service. ...... 10:45 a.m
WEDNESDAY:
Chec d ns e h p.m.

Classes for children ages PreK-12th
grade...................6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CAHUARCHNOF

511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .....:............l1:00 a.m:
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.,
Wedne day.Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
. 773-6556
: Sunday Schoof ......................9:30 a.m
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
livening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thes. Yokith Ministry Meetiing/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.in.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
1 : ..'FIR6 II "-
. METHODIST CHilRCIJs
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4247
Sunday School ......................9:45 siP .
. Traditional Sunday Worship I1:00 a.m.
. ChsuaHSunday Worship..... ....6:00 p.
Tuesday Bible Study.... ....10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities .... ...,..6:00 p.n
FLORIODFSOFDRS EMBLY

1397 South Florida Avenue
773 9386.
Sunday School ..; ..................9:30 a
Sunday Morning Worship....10:30 a.ri
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.i
Wed. Family Night ...............i7:00 p.m
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL
. 511 W. Palmetto
. 223-5126 :
. Sunday Mornitig Worship....I1:00 a.m
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.in

THE GOSPEL TABERNAC E
. Pentecostal .
. 810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
. morning Service .... ....10:00 a.in.
. Evening Worship ... .....6:00 p.m.
- Wednesday Service..... .....7:00 p.g.
.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
danday School ......................9:30 a.m
Worship................................10:30 a.in
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &


Lighthouse Min. ... ....7:00 p.m.

INTEH N OMINDSTRy
1258 W. MAIN STREET &
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Moming Worship....l1:00 a.nt.
Wed Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN .

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Mornigg ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..:.................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ...... ...............9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd -
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

C TIANSBIBLE

Hw 17 South
Morning Worship ...............10:30 a.In'
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School .,,.................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............:.. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday z..........................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ......................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Central.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m-
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m-

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy.17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m-
Morning Worship ................l 1:00 a.m.
Disciples'Itain & Choirs .....5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ... .....6:30 p'.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Guen
S. Hwy. 17 375-2253
Rible Study ............................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worsh .. 10 45 a.g.
Discipleshi Thunmg .. ... .....6:00 p.nt-_
Wednesday $upper ..............i:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
"Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED

Grap ThO t R3T-2340
Sunday School .................. ...9:45 a.m.

Moou njel oo p 00
Eveni b oS


FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Chureb Roind 773-9013
Bible Connection;.v.g.e..;,........9:45 a.m.
ivioming Worsimp .. ... .. I I.00 am
Sunday Evening ................. ..6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6100 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHED
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l1:00 a.m
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m


MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH ,
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ....................:.9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT.PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7700 p.m
Wednesday Prayer Time........7500 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of Mason Dixon & County
Line
781-5887
Sunday Worship ..................l1:00 a.m
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m
The Meeting Tuesday..........7:00 p.m


r SEEDS
FROM


SEWER
uenamA

A man stumbled into a caf6
in Las Vegas and said, "I've
lost everything my money,
my house, and my car."
But he smiled and added, "I
haven't lost my good luck
charm '
13ut it's better to .have the
rd th luck
0 an
There was a young man
who lost his family and his
home. He was sold into slay-
ery.
But the Bible says, "'I'he
Lord was with Joseph."
He enabled him to meet his
adversities gracefully, to share
b.talents generously, to for-
give his foes gladly, and to
overcome his obstacles grate-
U Y. .
The Lord made alt at he
did to prosper '
Is.the Lord with you?


MARANATHA BAPTIST
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS. CHURCH
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Corner of Steve Roberts Special
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344 & Oxendine Rds.
adio 735-2524 773-0989
Program Sunday School .........m........10:00 a.m.

nday SY/ZZSI Sun a .1. nt Worship................................11:900 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m ~Evemng................................. p.m
E venin Worship ..6:00 p.m. Wed' Bible & Prayer Meet...,7:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m. (


SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY -
1337 Hwy, 17 South, Wauchula
unday School ....................10:0() a.m.
Morning Worship ... ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418'
Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m.
Holy Days ...
ST. MICHAEUS ,
CATHOLIC CHURCH '
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish)..................l1:00 a.m.
(Creole)......................1:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English .. .....8:30 a.m.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH

Sabb205 S.d1th e.... a.m.

Mu s ay r tilig . :

OUTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.nt-


IGLESIA HISPANA ,
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 96 Ave. c
Martes ............:....7: 30p.m.
Jueves .. ...7:30p.m.
Domingo..............10:30p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W; Palmetto St!
Ven con to familla y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ... ....6:00 p.m.
Mier SIA ADVENTIS A7:00 p.m.

SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH'"
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service......................2:00 p.m.'
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sundsky Service .... ....10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Evening .....:........7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Woman Center 131 N. 7th Ave.\
Wauchula, FL
(riday Evening ..........'............6:00 p.m.
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Brl2d2ge Road

Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.

Morning Ser ice .................. 4)0 a
Wednesday Pra r .7:00 p.m.

MINISTER INTERNACIO19AL
Cambriadores de Mimdo
322 Hanchey Rd. 773-0065
Sunday Service......................9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service.....r..........7:30 .m.
.
NEW HOPE EAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
. Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship Service....l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service......6.30 p.m
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities (All Ages)
... 7:00 p.m.
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W.Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023 .
Morn. Worship ......................(1st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l1:00 a.m'
Su a Sr In.
'
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 173-6947
Sunday School ...............1:.....9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....11"...bin:oo 4.2#.
Bventrig WA ip .. :..!!!si.? 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9 45 a.m.

My i W .
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
l' & 3" Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2" & 4"' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ..........................11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTISICHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773.
5814
Stmday School ..................... 9530 a.m.
Worship Service .......:..........11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CIAURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.
















































5 H SM. 515 J
A REDKEN HaIr Salon
.
Ofane Ovina Frankie
77
& & "
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting Hours:
Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
10:29c


go


' Sebrin Wauchula
*
6360 U.S. 27 N. Sebrmg / Avon Park 1123 US 17 S
(863) 385-5588 D li S (863) 767-8920
6 Very erVICS
Now serving Highlands and Hardee Counties.
,,
& #81 OUT INfO, OHTS4'TP/CO
If you are visiting we will gladly transferoyour prescriptions and
keep them onfile then transfer tEem b ck when you go home.


NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

FIRE ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE

The Hardee County Board of County *Commissioners established a Fire Assessment
Committee and their first meeting will be on November 12, 2009, at 2:00 p.m.
The meeting will be held in the County Commission Chambers, Room 102, 412 West
Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida.
For more information, please call 863/773-9430.
Lexton H. Albritton, Jr., County Manager 10:290




TAX COLLECTION NOTICE

The certified tax roll for 2009 has been delivered by the Hardee County
Property Appraiser to Zee Smith, Hardee County Tax Collector for collection.
The 2009 tax roll will be open for payment at the Tax Collector's office at 110 W.
Oak St., Room 102, Waircliula, Florida beginning Monday,.November 2, 2009
between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M.
The 2009 tax bills will be mailed on October 30, 2009. If you have not
received a tax bill by November 16th, contact the Tax Collector's Office at the
number shown below to request that a bill be mai ed to you.

Discounts allowed are:

November 4%
ecem er ...,............................. 3%
knuary ...,,.,................ ............ 2%
February ................................... 1%
March ...................................... Net

st .
After Apn1 1. 3% penalty is charged.

YOU WILL NOT RECEIVE A .RECEIPT unless you send a self-
addi-essed stamped envelope with payment or pay at the Tax Collector's office.

2010 INSTALLMENT PAYMENTS
Real Estate and Personal Property Taxes for 2010 Tax Year may be paid
in four installments IF an application is filed with the Tax Collector before 191ay 1,
.
2010. You must request an application form.
If you are presently paying by the Installment Method, your account will
be automatically renewed for 2010, UNLESS you advise the Tax Collector to
remo your name. THIS APPLICATION DOES NOT APPLY TO 2009



Zerelda "Zee" Smith
Hardee County Tax Collector
110 W. Oak St., Room 102
Wauchula, FL 33873
hardeecountytaxcollector.com
(863) 773-9144 *
10:29-11:50


October 29, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Fidencio Ariel Gonzalez,
amended injunction for protec-

Wauchula Police Department
vs. Claudia Mancillas, petition
for forfeiture voluntarily with-
drawn.
DOR vs. Wesley Wills, order
on civil contempt.
Vanessa Guadalupe Gon-
zalez and DOR vs. Jose Hum-
berto, order.
Leeza Joan Albritton and
DOR vs. Jason Lee Hara-
barugh, order on civil contempt-
Rossy Miranda vs. Alberto
Gonzalez, dismissal of tempo-
rary injunction for protection.
Rhonda Caswell vs. Angela
Rimes, injunction for protec-
tion,
Jennifer Watson vs. Keith
Watson, injunction for protec-
tion.
Sara A. Schofield and DOR
vs. Robert W. Murphy, order.
Jessica N. Summerlin and
DOR vs. Ariel Martinez, order,
BR/VC vs. Florida Institute
for Neurologic Rehabilitation,
stipulated agreement approved,
case dismissed. ,
Beneficial Florida Inc. vs.
Randall Marvin Mink, volun-
tary dismissal.
Sarah Crosby vs. Bruce Siff,
dismissal of petition for injunc-
tion for protection for insuffi-
cient evidence.
Tammy Hall Crosby vs.
Bruce Siff, dismissal of petition
for injunction for protection for
insufficient evidence.
Wayne Crosby Sr. vs. Bruce
Siff, dismissal of petition for
injunction for protection for
insufficient evidence.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as it was
trial week.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Pamela Makowski to Larry
W. and Catherine L. Easters,
$53,430.22
Hugh E. and Sharon Y. Bur-
nsed to Regna LLC, $134,000.
Lexan Investments LLC to
TNT Reclamation Inc.,
$265,000

ro nl wae s, enn1a sthat
the ones that die this year
instead of next, and hardy
annuals are the ones that
never come up at all,
-Katherine Whitehorn
'"


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of Th'e Herald-Advocate
WOW! A chance to go to
regional competition.
The Lady Wildcat golf team
headed to Naples on Tuesday,
appreciating the opportunity to
play in the Region 6 girls golf
competition at a private course,
the Imperial Golf Club. The
12:30 p.m. regional match was
hosted by Community School
of Naples. Scores were not
available at press time.
The Hardee girls got the
chance to play regionals by
placing second in the Class lA,
District 16 playoffs held at the
Preserve at Tara and hosted by
Bradenton Southeast.
The Lady 'Cats got good re-
sults from their three juniors,
who have played together all
three years at Hardee High.
Kara Norris placed third over-
all, with a 105. Emily
Williams was fifth, two shots
up on teammate Lauren Moore.
"These girls have paid their
dues and it's good to see them
rewarded," commented Coach
Byron Jarnigan.
Soph Savannah Selph and
the. Hardee squad, which was
second of the seven teams
which had entrants. Private
academies St. Stephens Episco-
pal Prep of Bradenton and Sara-
sota Out-Of-Door Academy
each had only two .golfers
entered and did not produce a
team score. All four were
underclassmen, a 10th grader,
two ninth graders and a seventh
grader, as these schools have
jus beegHu dgirlgiTs eam placed

only behind Sarasota Cardinal


Mooney, which had the number
one and number two golfers, a
pair of 10th graders scoring 98
and 100 respectively. There
were 28 golfers entered in the
18-hold competition on one of
the toughest courses on the west
course. Placing three girls with-
in the top six was an accom-
plishment'for the Hardee girls.
The Hardee boys golf team
faced insurmountable odds with
private schools dominating the
first five winners slots. St.
Stephens won with a team score
of 302, with an eighth grader
near the top of the individual
scoring.
Scores were close. Ninth
grader Jordan Miller was the .
medalist with a 7?, but there
were four players also from pri-
vate schools all coming in at.73.
The eighth grader was next at
74, ahead of a Cardinal Mooney
senior in at 75.
After St. Stephens in the team
scoring, was Cardinal Mooney,
Bradenton Christian, Sarasota
Out-Of-Door Academy and
Sarasota Christian. The public
schools were next, with host
school Bradenton Southeast at
363 and Hardee next, four


strokes back at 367. Lake
Placid,, Sarasota Booker and .
DeSoto finished the scoring
In the overall ranking, Wild-
cat soph Daniel Miller came in
21st of the 49 golfers participat-
ing. Seven strokes back were
senior Grayson Lambert, and
juniors Lincoln Saunders and
Taylor Barlow. Justin Bromley
rounded out the Hardee team
score.
Coach George Heine had a
good season with. his squad,
ending ivith a 12-2 record. He
loses only Lambert to gradua-
tion, and will have juniors
Barlow, Bromley and Saunders
back, along with sophs Miller,
Matt Godwin and Dalton Hew-
ett, and freshmen Will Bennett,
William Beattie, Trenton Moon
and Bryson White.
- "I had a good freshman class
this year. They all got in some
matches and gained some valu-
able experience. They should be
much improved next year," said
Heine.

Each garden has its own sur-
prise.
-Susan Allen Toth


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Billy Ray Owens Jr., 38,
Wauchula, and Mary Jane Tm-
dell, 30, Wauchula.
Radio G. Cerna Jr., 27,
Bowling Green, and Cynthia L.
Martinez, 29, Bowling Green.
Ismael Deleon, 26, Zolfo
Springs, and Sonya Erica Al-
varado, 25, Bowling Green.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Gerardo Alvarez Moreno vs-
William Rimes, judgment.
HSBC Bank Nevada NA vs.
Clarence H. Smith, voluntary
dismissal.
Hardee County Housing
Authority d/bla The Palms vs-
Annie Blair, voluntary dis-
missal.
Arrow Financial Services
LLC vs. William A. Martin,
default judgment.
GE Money Bank vs. Jew
Hays, stipulated agreement
approved, case dismissed.
Capital One Bank USA NA
vs. Pamela Evans, judgment,
execution withheld.
James D. Hill vs. Maggie
Barnett, judgment for tenant
eviction.
LVNY Funding LLC vs.
Rocky Y. Ybarra, dismissed.
There was no county mis-
demeanor court as it was trial
week.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actIons
were filed recently m the
office of the circuit court:
Celestina Hernandez vs-
Santos Zuniga, petition for
injunction for protection.
Rarco Packaging Co. vs.
Jimmy Parker, damages -
indebtedness.
Fred Matthew Moye and
Danielle Brown-Moye, divorce.
Sandra Nicole Schneider and
Joseph Francis Schneider,
div acel ovia Bank National
Association vs. Jose A., Mar-
tinez et al, petition for mortgage
foreclosure-
Christopher Dale Gibbs vs.
Otis Sterling, petition for" n-


.
junction for protection.
Huntington National Credit
Co. vs. J&R Grocery Corp.,
petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure-
Onewest Bank FSB vs.
Jeanette Braddock, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Nora Joanne Garcia and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs: Enrique Velazquez
Sr., petition for child support'
Phuc Bach Bach an.d DOR
vs: Hung Van Nguyen, petition
for child support.
Claudia Dolares Gonzalez
and DOR vs. Fidencio Artel
Gonzalez-Palao, petition for
child support.
American General Home
Equity vs. Jack A. Brown'
Sheila D. Brown et al, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.
Otis Sterling vs. Christopher
Dale Gibbs, petition for injunc-
tion for protection'
LindS Lugo Olivares and
Mardomo Olivares, divorce"
HSBC Bank USA NA vs.
George Franklin Bowen, Aud-
rey Mae Bowen et al, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.
Lorna Brown and Derrick
Brown vs. Terry Jones and
Patricia Jones, damages auto
.. negligence.
Sonia Aviles vs. George
Piano Jr., petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Esmerlindla Garcia and DOR
. vs. Jessica Prince Valdez, peti-
tion for child support,
Jennifer M. Black and DOR
vs. Joshua Emory Mohn, peti-
tion for administrative child

suplW a pata and DOR vs.
Leonel Zapata, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Maria D. Diaz and DOR vs.
Dionicio Cuate, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Yvonne Herrera vs. Eliezer
Gregorio Garza, petition for
injunction for protection.
Graham Farms Melon Sales
Inc. vs. Southwestern Vegetable
Seed, damages.
The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently b) the circuit court
judge:
Claudia Dolores Gonzales vs.


SueLobtoCrytalConre asRdCm hrait alieOhaadDr asl


nours:


O


1Vonday-Friday 9:00


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wit apoffigs,



I(ayla
Brooke
Helveston

^ge si

Parents: Dana Baisden and Chris
Helveston
Hobbles/Interests: Lionettes, Future
Farmers of America, National Honors
Society, Cheerleading, American Sign
Language, Story of Jesus, Faith
PresbyterIan Church, scrapbooking
and hunting.
Future Plans: I plan to attend the
University of South Florida and
become a pediatrician.
-


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HEAD COACH: Tim Price 8
Assistant Coaches: John Sharp, Steve Rewis, Buddy
Martin, Greg Mann, Ray Rivas, Gilbert OIvara


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R ewis, Buddy
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* District Games # Homecoming **Senior Night


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Cell: 863-286-5293 es) Neixtel: 161'1 $259 10
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g@ Wauchula, FL 33873 Cathy Hemmeleteln
863-767-0020 Bob Hemmelatein


a 25% OFF entire purchase with this ad O Wi Id ea ts!


i~mnb~mrrrmn I


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Wauchula, FL 33873 I ax: (863) 767-5301




proudly supports
Hardee Senior High Athletics

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toll-free 888-520-7526 local 863 385 %72
fax 863-402-0606
email Thomas.Trevino@Raym

11~~3U Vruc~la


HG F
ome ames


Weight Pos.


, NAME .
Keshaun Rivers
Antjuan Jones
Martin Vega
Quinton Cariton
Carson Davis
Mikey Retana
Jarrlus Lindsey
Conner Davis
Deonte Evans
EzayI Youyoute
Colby Baker
Jake Nowakowski
Andrew Hooks
Brandon Darley
Kareem Richardson
Lunior St. Louis
Jake Mayer
Tre' Anderson
Tony Valdez
chascee Revell
Dawson Crawford
Wintz Terrell
Tylar Alden
Cody Hernandez
Nick Battles
Devon Harris
Jesus Villegas
Dalthn Farr
Noe Navarro
Andy Hunt
Jimmy Vallejo
Jonathan Kelly
c aTFdo kter


Height
5'6"
5'10"
5'11"
5'8"
5'10"
5'11"
5'8"
5'11"
5'5"
6'1"
5'10"
5'11"
5'9"
5'11"
5'6"
5'8"
5'10"
5'8"
5'6"
TI

5'11"
6'1"
6'2"
5'8"
6'3"
5'11"
5'9"
6'2".
5'6"
5'10"
,,
5'9
6'2"


WR/CB
RB/ILB
P/K
RB/ILB
WR/LB
WR/OLB
FB/DB
QB/DB
WR/DB
QB/DB
QB/DB
"fE/DE
RB/CB
WR/DB
RB/OLB
RB/DB
RB/DB
RB/OLB
RB/OLB
TE/ILS
C/DL
C/DL
OL/ILB
OL/DL
OL/DE
OL/DL
OlJDL
OL/Ql..
BL/DL
OL/DL
OL/DL
OL/DE
/ B


150
185
180
175,
140
180
185
150
135
180
160
170
150
140
145
185
170
175
165

195
245
225
165
200
210
230
215
175
165
205
170


107 W. Main Street


Wauchula ,,


O~c mie Can ~le & Gifts


L


Lake Placid
Fort Meade
Sebring
Palmetto
Frostproof
Avon Park
Immokalee*#
OPEN
Estero*
Okeechobee
DeSoto* **


Away
Home
Awhy
Home
Home
Away
Some

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Home


Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.


28
04
11
18
25
02
09
16
23
30
06
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GOP IN1 T P 5 99GERLA 5 Carry-Out
PlZE A _, ,,,
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Lakewood Ran. Away


Thomas T~r vino


CHEVROI T/CHRYSLER/DODGE/JEEP
1405 (J.S. HIGHWAY 17 S
WAUCHULA
3) 770 -4744


i


Ha rd ee Wild cats


.on Cata .



















. is son


STATE FARM David Singletary, Agent
305 North 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Bus: 863-773-6100
IN$URANCE


Barber th-:op
Regullar cu~ts, fades & flat tops

GOOd Luck Cats! G'o Get 'Em! r
773c0507
(~Beside Chapman Fruit Company) l


Just name the score of Friday night's Wildcat Football game and
you could win
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
All Other Games $40 Gift Certificate Payable to
ane of oui' elected "Wildcat" page sponsors
NTEST RULE$
* Contest is closed to all Herald-Advocate employees and families-
* In the event of a tie, the winner will be picked by a random drawing.
* If no one picks the exact score, the closest score wins.
* official entries only.
NO PHOTOCOPIES WILL BE ACCEPTED
Winners will be picked Monda morning, notified by phohe that
afternoon and announced in next week s pape


Marianne Pakovich


~09 Goolsby~t athia,7364 B


~Il' on your $1FP purchase.2 .
Present this coupon at time of purchase|
I ,~ Expires I1/121/09I
1;. iSI~OT Pbk War ware

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The helpf ul place.FB



No vpre 3rdWe anday of each iontli
:1Tractor Supply
Save 50-754bon pellVaccinations


S JOhn .Sharp Steve
Martin, Greg Mann,
G il be rtO Ive ra


enic Crossing Camero.

Saturday 4:00 9:30 pm
FitEE Drink pa
"ng in your ticket stub from the game, arid receive
(1) free drink with the purchase of each meal.
2 2 W. Main Street Wauchula 773-0070
P F over vaud wwoe- imatop


Go WIIdchts!

Parker Farms Inc.
- 8 us.

Bowlin Green, Florida
(863) 375-4311
,a. an.......k........and....:mk..s...m.44.u.....adimu 6

From All of Us at

Pioneer Medical Center



GO S

Have a safe season.
Promoting the Health Care of
Hardee County!
-515 CaritortSt Wauchula (863) 773-6696



3600 S. Highlands Ave
Sebring, FL
(863) 385-6101 Fee


Oct. 30 Hardee

Name- Okeechobee
Address

Day Phone:
r DEADLINE FOR ENTRY* FRIDAY AT 5 P.M. I
1 FIII out entry form and return it to: The Herald-Advocate I
I 115 S. Seventh Ave,, Wauchula
Emummmmemmummemmmmmmemmmmm


77 -00 3 WMinSret*auhl


as


AL BRITT~ON


Parents: Diane Smith

Hobbles/Interests: Key Club, National
Honor Society, Lionettes, Future
Business Leaders of America, Student
Council, First Missionary Baptist
Church and track and field

Future Plans: 1 plan to attend Florida
Agriculture and Mechanical University
and pursue a degree in either criminal
justice or political science, and one
day go on and become a lawyer.


ame He
Allen, Terrafice
peCarlo, Frankie
Fortner, Walt
hanks, Deforest
boleman, A onzo
Spivey, LaVante
Mills, Aukeemian
Washington, Daron
Frank, Colby
adebaugh, Jack
tokes, Cade
artin, Marcus
Kemp, Johnathan
WIcCall, Josh
ackson, Ronald
les, TY'Kashe
Iles, TY'Ronte
arden, Brant
Garcia, Jose
udoff, Johnathan
Egan, Garret
Guido, Alex
Carter, Daidd .
Conrad, Jisst n
Murphy, Chance
Ford, Jason
errir>, Cod
s y, erijamin
Harden, Thor
Striebel, Garth
Jacobs, David
McGee, Kyle
upith, John
Santibane Jose
Egn, Marshall


ight Gir
6'3"
5'10
5'10
5'10"
6'2"
5'9"
6'O"
5'11"
6'2*
5'10"
5'11"
5110"
5'9"
6'1"
5'10"
5'9"
5'9"
61"
5'10"
6'2"
510"
5'10"
6'1"
6'3"
5'10"
6'2"
6'@
6'
6'1"
6'2"
6'O'
6'2"
6'3"
5'11"
6'2"


ade Position
12 QB/FS
11 WR/LB
12 WR/LB
11 RB/DB
11 WR/LB
9 WR/DB
10 WR/LB
9 QB/DB
11 WR/LB
9 QB/DB
9 QB/DE
11 RB/LS
10 H B/LB
12 HB/LB
11 HB/LR
9 H B/DL
9 RB/DB
11 TE/DE
9 TE/LB
12 OL/DL
11 OL/DL
9 OL,/DL
11 OldDI..
12 OIJDL
10 OL/DL
10 Ol./DL
th OlWDL
1# OL/ISL
10 OL/DL
12 OL/DL
11 OL/DL
12 Ol./DL
9 OL/DL
9 RB/DB
11 WFilLB


* Notary 1040 & Business Tax Prep
* Payroll Service Bookkeeeping Service
* Fax Service Quickbook
I'Qi) 6 )( 7 17 N, a AU(')(ULA
sea.ns-syse* ses-77a-aser (tax)
Se hable Eispanol brmovay@strato.net


_


I


*DegABatPeaksatertat$@ 91
*IGHenan@uppppacks$38
Sm money a ye Hmannn
lon, neanguans, comfants a Fronume


406 N. 6th Ave.


FBP ii~i~j~i~


863-773-4136


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Serv~ice Reliabiit~y Expertise


* *


P.O. Box 1733


Ph: (863) 773-4101


& *


dabla 7:30 p.m. ~


) Mrst National Bank of
WAUCHU LA
Onwing per inkingend


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I__ ____I ____ \ _I_~_


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8C The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


With vour bep


At Mosaic, helping to meet the ever-increasing needs of a-hungry
world is at the heart of our mission. And we couldn't achieve it
without the valuable contributions of our employees and the
partnership of our community. We appreciate the success we've
shared over the past five years, and we look forward to continued
growth and opportunity into the future. wwwmosaicco.com


10Sie


@ 2009 The Mosaic Company








Thke HMerald-Advocat~e
(USPS 518-780)
'Thbursdacy, C tober 2, 20099


PAGeE ONE


'


Oct. 29 Cross Country Sebring Away 4:00 p.m.
Oct. 30 Varsity Football Okeechobee Away 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 2 Regional Swim Meet Away TBA
Nov. 6 Cross Country Estero Away 9:00 a.m.
(District Meet)
Varsity Football DeSoto HOME 7:30 p.m.
(Seplor Night)
Nov. 9-10 Swimming Orlando Away TBA
(State Meet)


I I


.
City of Wauchula Finance Director, James Braddock would like to introduce to you City
of Wauchula Meter Readers. From left to right are pictured, Keith Brown, James
Braddock and Raul Garcia. Our meter readers read approximately 2700
electric meters and 2600 water meters included in fourteen routes every a
month. They are tasked with connecting new accounts, disconnecting &
closed accounts, providing rereads for misread meter readings, deliver-
ing collect and cut letters and disconnecting customers for non-payment. >
of utilities. It is necessary for them to enter private properties of resi-
dences and businesses in order to complete their assigned tasks. They can be identi-
fied as City of Wauchula employees by the uniformed shirts seen in above photo, which
include their first names.
10:29c


_


Q: How much did you make?
A: About 15 dollars a week.
Q: What were your chores?
A: Wash clothes, hang clothes, and
milk the cows.
Q; Did you grow up with any
brothers?
A: No, just a cousin.
.
Q: What kind of activities did you
do?
A: Well, we liked to hang out and
pitch hay.
Q: Did you have to grow your
food?
A: Yes, we had a garden and milked
cows.
Q: Were there any stores that you
could buy food from, like today?
A: Yes, there were a few.
Q: Did you get into any trouble?
A: Yes, just like any kid does.
Q: What kind of punishment did
you get?
A: A whipping.
Q: What did you and your friends
do for fun?
A: Pitch hay, walk in the woods and
harg-ourbecause wEdiBhTT\ih'Fm"TicF
to do.
Q: Were you allowed to have
pets?
A: Yes, but we didn't have any.
Q: Were you a popular kid?
A: No, I was a poor kid.
Q: Was the population huge like it
is now?

pa f sst dw e Jnu part
where we lived
.
Back In Tzme as the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


By DAMIEN MARTINEZ
Special To The Herald-Advocate
interviewed Judy Martinez.
Q: Where were you born?
A: I was born in Springfield, Mo.,
on Jan. 15, 1943.
Q: Where did you grow up at?
A: Well, I grew up in Missouri,
also. -
Q: What did you like to do grow-
ing up? . .
A: I used to like walking in the
woods.
Q: How
was the
school sys-
tem grow-
ing up? ?
A: Well, we learned basic stuff like
reading, writing, science and history.
Q: How did you wash your
.clothes?
2 ,Wy used to wash them in a wash
tub.
Q: Did you have slaves?
A: No, we didn't believe in that
foolishness.
Q: Did you have a favorite rests
rant?
A: Nope, because we didn't go to
any restaurants.
Q: Did you have to cook all the
time? '
A: Yes, if not then we just wouldn't
eat.
Q: Did you live with your par-
ents? No, I lived with my grandpar-

ents
Q: How old was the labor age?
A: It was if you were able to get the
job done, then you got paid for it.
Q: How old were you when you .
received your first job?
A: I was 8 years old. -
Q: What was minimum wage?
A: Twenty-five dollars a week.


By 1..AUREN MOORE
For The Herald-Advocate
Congressman Vern Buchanan
visited Hardee County on
Saturday, Oct. 3.
He appeared at the Historic
Wauchula City Hall Auditorium
that afternoon, inviting govern-
ment and party representatives.
In all, 97 people attended, m-
cluding those from local areas
as well as out of town.
Buchanan addressed many
issues, mostly the affect the
economy has made and is still
making on small-town busi-


nesses, like those here in
Hardee, and health care.
Attending folks shared personal
stories about the hardships they
or their businesses face.
One situation shared was
about a family business located
in the Tampa area. Family
members have had to give up
their own paychecks so they
could pay their employees, thus
letting the employees support
their families.
Buchanan handed out infor-
mation saying he is a co-spon-
sor of the Medical Rights Act.


During the meeting he talked
about how the bill will guaran-
tee patients manage their own
heath-care choices. It also will
prevent people being denied
medical care because of ad-
vanced age or high expense.
Buch d health
needs maan r on care
Audience members received
a chance to meet with the con-
gressmen, sharing their grati-
tude or the experiences they
face as a result of acts made by
the American government.


..,;


e e
TESS I I 8 O PHOTOBYLAURENMOORE
Hardee County commissioners were among those attending the brief session with the
congressman. PIctured (from left) are commissioners Terry Atchley and Dale Johnson,
a U.S. Rep. Vern Buchanan and Commissioner Minor Bryant.

Pitch Hay For Fun U.S. Re
p. Buchanan


V ISlts Hardee County


Halloween

.Run/Walk

Planned
There will be a Halloween
10K Run/5K Walk on Saturday
at 8 a.m. in Highlands Ham-
mTchsS tie event, spon-
sored by-Ridge Area Arc and
31idFlorida, will benefit Arc's
scholarship fund. Ridge Area
Arc serves the mentally-handi-
capped citizens of Hardee and
Highlands counties..
The event welcomes serious
10K runners and casual walkers
. as well as Arc's special athletes.
Prizes will be awarded in the
10K race to the overall male
and female winners as well as
the first-, second- and third-
place finishers in each of 15 age
categories; for the 10K or SK
participant with the most
money pledged; and for the best
Halloween costume.
Entry fee is $15 on race day
the fee is $20.
Entry forms .and optional
pledge sheets are available by
calling Rhonda Beckman at
1:::" h tnsi e
ridgeareaarc.org.


MAIN STREETREESTORED )


Main Street Wauchula, Inc.
e
Kr ck O Socr al

NOvember 5th from 4 6pm
.
Mam Street Wauchula O ce


Main Street


107 E.


P ;:
.'
















. '
Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson
A GLIMPSE BEHIND THE CURTAIN
There is another world hidden from our eyes most of the time,
but which occasionally we become aware of.
These rare moments may occur when we choose td clo some-
thing unpleasant just because we ought to. What happens is like
catching a glimpse of something wonderful behind a curtain.
I Feelings and knowledge are almost no help at all.
How many of us can summon up good feelings about the
doing of our simple duty? And when do we possess enough linowl-
edge to be exactly sure of what to say and do when we are tempt-
ed to compromise about something? Don't we always need just a
little more information?
Jesus talked about this invisible world, calling it "the kingdom
of God." He baffled the intellectuals of the first century by insist-
ing that they could enter this kingdom only by becoming "like a lit-
tle child."
Actually,. the air that we breathe is teeming with invisible
micro-organisms. The smallest particle, the atom, is so tiny it can-
not be viewed with the most powerful microscopes.
Announcers and engineers in radio stations work every day
dependent on radio waves, a phenomenon that can be measured but
not seen. Have you ever been "in love?" Can you explain it? Can
you bring a sample into a laboratory for analysis?
In the Old Testament book of II Kings, an enemy army sur-
rounds the little village of Dothan by night with the purpose of cap-
turing the prophet Elisha. At daybreak, Elisha's servant is terrified
at the sight of this army arid he calls his master.
Undismayed, Elisha prays, "O Lord, open his eyes so that he
may see. "Immediately the servant sees a much larger army, one
with horses and chariots of fire surrounding the first army.
Jesus said, "What does it profit a man if he gain the whole
world and lose his own soul?" This world with all its tempting
attractiveness bombards our senses daily. We can see it, hear it,
taste it, smell and feel it.
We had better learn to take the invisible into account! .

The bird with the longest feathers is the Onagadori, a
domestic strain of Red Jungle Fowl. Its feathers span
more than 34 feet.'


ONE BLUE,0NE PINK


phone85.77.436


~~9*O ra@r rsEr'ljc 9


I


/ I II


HARDER COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDER COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(lf office unattended, please leave
message.)


~


2D The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009


Quinn/Langston-
Wedding Plans ..
Colette M. Quinn of Florida Federation of Garden
Poinciana, daughter of Matthew Clubs in Winter Park. Musib
and Tracy Quinn of Kissimmee, will begin at 3:30 p.m. with the
has announced the plans for her ceremony commencing at 4
upcoming marriage to Michael o'clock.
W. Langston, also of Poinciana, Following the ceremony, a
son of Julie and Jay Ellis of reception will be held at the
Bowling Green and David Florida Federation of Garden
Langston Sr. of St. Cloud. Clubs.
The couple will exchange Friends and relatives of the-
vows on Saturday, Nov.7, at the couple are invited.


Mr. and Mrs. Donald K.
Thomas Jr., Fort Myers, a
seven-pound six-ounce daugh-
ter Emery Grace, born Sept, 4,
2009, Lee Memorial Health
Center, Fort Myers. Mrs.
Thomas is the former Danielle
Hunsaker. Maternal grandpar-
ents are Charlene Taylor of Fort
Myers and Mr. and Mrs. Mark
Hurisaker of Ohio; .paternal
grandparents are Debbie and
Dhouul id P eT mase of Wa
mother is Fay Nell Witmer of
Wauchula.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only a may, be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $13.


Mr. and Mrs. Robert White-
side, Zolfo Springs, an eight-
pound eight-oimce son, Rysen
"H an rnRe 2al3,Me2d
Center, Sebring. Mrs. White-
side is the former Jennifer
Long. Maternal grandparents
are Joe and Nancy Long of Ona.
Maternal great-grimdparents are
John and Jeanette Miller of
Havertown, Pa. Paternal grand-
parents are Fred and Helen.
Whiteside of Zolfo Springs.


COURTESY PHOTO
Ashley Sconvers & Trae Adams

Ashley Sconvers To

Marry Trae Adams
J


coder/biller. She is employed at
First Baptist Children's
Academy.
The prospective groom is a
2002 graduate of Lakewood
Ranch High School in Braden-
ton and is employed at Carlton
Ranl s are being made for a
Jan. 2, 2010, wedding at New
Hope Baptist Church in Popash.




rt Meade
not only a smooth tenor
voice to the group, but an
excitement on stage by playing
multiple instruments. From
Jasper, Ind., he has only been
traveling with the quartet for
a short while.
The rich bass tone of Dennis
Dugger completes the Tribute
Quartet's sound. Dennis, who
lives in Bald Knob, Ark., with
his wife and four children, has a
clear, distinct bass voice.
The auditorium is located at
700 N. Edgewood Dr. Tickets,
sold at the door, are $10 for
adults, $5 for children, wi*
those 6 atid under free.
For driving directions or tick-
ets call Chuck Hancock at 285-
8171 or 581-6101,*or Louise
Stokes at 285-8448.


Rex and Michelle Sconvers
of Zolfo Springs announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Ashley Christine Sconvers, to
Charles Talmadge Adams III,
son of Charles nd Gina Adams
of Ona.
grTdhueat f nior20
School and is currently attend-
: ing classes to become a medical




o
Sing In F
The Fort Meade Fine Arts
Auditorium will be hosting a
concert by the Tribute. Quartet
on Thursday, Nov. 5, at 7 p.m.
Combining energy, talent and
enthusiasm for their desire to
minister to others, this male
vocal group hails.from Nash-
ville, Tenn. A "tribute" is an
expression of honor, respect or
high regard, and these men
honor the music, singers and
messages that have shaped
gospel music.
Group manager and lead
vocalist Gary Casto brings over
20 years of experience. Origin-
ally from West Virginia, his
greatest expertise is in the
Southern gospel music genre.
Baritone and.pianist Josh
Singletary brings his smooth
vocals and piano skills to the
quartet. Originally from Rai-
ford, he also is responsible for
most of the humorous moments
within the group.
Vocalist Brian A vey brings



Club Seeks
Vendors For
Annual Show
The Wauchula Garden Club
will be sponsoring the sixth
annual Antiques, Arts & Crafts
Show & Sale "Under the Oaks"
on Saturday, Dec. 5..
The show will be held in the
city park located at 313 W.
.Palmetto St., next to the old
LGo gI onthoof h Elb
3 p.m.
This annual event ir; a popular
kickoff to the Christmas shop-
ping and celebration season.
For further information, con-
tact Janette Perrine at 773-
6026.


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POrk & Chicken Dinners


Pick-up at Cowbellees' Kitchen


Take-out On !~


Thank yoeu for your support!

























PHOTO BY JlM KELLY
The Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday of last week heard a report on the Hardee
COunty Family YMCA at its weekly noon meeting at the Panda Restaurant. The local
YMCA Is located at 610 W. Orange St., started In 1993 and is sponsored by the Sarasota
YMCA. The Wauchula unit has 792 members and will soon build a new teen center, a
project led by the Kiwanis Club. Shown (from left) are Calvin Bates, vice chairman and
fundraising chairman for the YMCA; Linda Hernandez, Y Achievers coordinator; Daniel
Leakey, teen center coordinator; and club President Thomas Trevino.


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October 29), 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3D


YMCA REPORT:


PHOTOBYJlMKELLY
Thomas Trevino, a Wauchula financial management planner, spoke to the Hardee
Rotary Club on Wednesday, Sept. 9, at the Java Cafe. He worked in his family's bakery
business and then was an announcer for a Spanish radio station. He worked for English
Chevrolet, where he was salesman of the month for 43 out of 56 months. He later
worked as a closer at Sefiring Ford and then as financial advisor for Merrill Lynch in
Sebring, where he was ranked 78th out 11,000 financial advisors worldwide for MerrIII
Lynch. He is president of the Wauchula Kiwanis Club and the new Hardee Toastmasters
Club, a board member of the Hardee Chamber of Commerce, and director of the
Economic Redevelopment Committee for Main Street Wauchula. Trevino is an
announcer for Hardee High football games. He and his wife, Guille, have a son,
Benjamin, 3, and are expecting another child. Pictured (from left) are Rotary President
Harold Davis, Trevino and Dr. Joseph Toulouse.


.IlblP(PPn~


WOUND CARE CENTER


~


PHOTO BY JlM KELLY
Nurse manager Jerilyn Stamps spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday of last
week at the Java Cafe about the Center For Wound Care & Hyperbaric Medicine at 457
E Carlton St. In Wauchula. The center is open on Tuesdays and is affiliated with FlorIda
Hospital Wauchulae PIctured (from left) are Dr. Joseph Toulouse, Stamps and club
President Harold Davis.


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This week in history, as
researched fk*om the archival
pages of The Florida Advo-
cate, the Hardee County Her-
ald and The Herald-Advo-
cate. .
75 YEARS AGO
Final arrangements have been
r made for a one-arm endurance
drive. He will start at 9 a.m.
Saturday in an effort to break
the 106-hour world record. An
ex-serviceman and former am-
bulance driver, he will be mask-
ed and hancjpuffed to the wheel
from start to fimsh, sometime
after 8 p.m. Wednesday.
The county assessment roll
for 1934, completed by Fred
Southerland, tax assessor, has a
total valuation of $1,890,557,
compared to last year's
$2,015,365, a reduction of
$125,000 from last year. The
intangible roll shows an in-
crease in valuation from
$231,398 for 1933 to $364,398
for 1934. .
Over 150 large colored repro'
auctions of the old and modern
masters will be available at the
Hardee County high school and
Wauchula Grammar School
from Nov. 6th to the 8th. There
will be a small admission
charge of 10 cents, which will
be used to purchase pictures for
the schools.
The city of Wauchula, after a
lawsuit, has raised taxes to 31
mills to cover bonds. The
assessed valuation is
$1,830,832, compared with the
$1,933,374 of last year. The city
must raise $56,775.79 in taxes,
according to the budget, which
includes bond payments.
.
50 YEARS AGO
Tax statements for 1959 will
be mailed to county taxpayers
this week. The largest is
$14,482 and the smallest one
cent, said Tax Collector Curtis
Ezelle. In all, 4,200 statements
will be mailed out, for at total of


.
$131,000 more than last year,
Ezelle said.
-
First Christian Church in
Wauchula dedicated its new
. $65,000 two-story block con-
struction educational building
on Sunday and classes are
already using it, said the Rev.
Kenneth Bain, the pastor. 'It
adjoins the sanctuary on the
west and a smaller educational
building on the north,

The price on cucumbers con-
tinued to improve this weyk,
ivith top grades averaging $2.50
to the grower. Tomato prices are
good but quality, especially
appearance, is bad. Better gr ide
tomatoes were bringing about
$4.25 a crate, but the supply
was short and only 422 crates
were shipped this week.
'
Eaton's Department Store has
jackets for $3.98 to $8.95, boys
colorful flannel shirts for $1.39,
and slacks for $2.98 to $5.98.
Toylatid is now open at Western
Auto of Wauchula, with budget
terms on, bicycles, gym sets,
guns, wheel goods, toy, radios,
TVs, thousands of items.
25 YEARS AGO
There's a host of commercial
building going on in Wauchula.
Expected to open soot or with-
in a couple of months are
English Chevrolet on U.S 17
South, Kash 'N Karry grocery
store and Beall's Department
Store in the new Hardee County
Centre; Ray Spears' lawnmow-
er sales and service on Eighth
Avenue; Twistee Treat at U.S.
17 and Hogan Street, Wauchula
State Bank's new office com-
plex on South Fifth Avenue, the
U.S. 17 offices of attorney Mar-
cus Ezelle and accountant Char-
les Sanders; and Hardee Ranch
Supply on (J.SL 17 South.

It's cheaper for the city to
continue to collect garbage than
to pay an outside contractor, the
Wauchula City Council decided


last week. Faced with mounting
bills for maintenance, the city
had considered letting a coo-
tract but bids came in niuch
higher than anticipated. Instead,
the city will continue to budget
$159,950 for solid waste/-
garbage for 1984-85.
-----
General Motors, Chrysler and
Ford, the automakers "Big 3,"
are available in Hardee County
without people shopping out of
town, said local owners John
Graham of John Graham Ford
on U.S. 17 North, Toye English
of English Chevrolet on U.S. 17
South and Charlie Joans. They
all said people should buy vehi-
cles locally and get them ser-
viced here.
-
Highway Cash Grocery in
Bowling Green offers whole
fryers for 49 cents a pound,
smoked bacon for $1.39 a
pound, cubed steak for $1.99 a
pound and chuck roast for $1.99
a pound.
10 YEARS AGO
Another new power plant in
flardee County could put about
$2 million in taxes in county
coffers. To be called Vandolah
Generating Plant, the $120 mil-
lion facility is expected to go
into service by Dec. 1, 2001.
Meanwhile, commissioners
gave a 25 percent tax abatement
to Seminole Electric Coopera-
tive Inc. for the $200 million,
500 megawatt combined-cycle
Payne Creek Generating
Station. The 25 percent abate-
ment will amount to about
$425,000 annually.
-
The half-century saga of
widening U.S. 17 added a hope-
ful chapter last week. Commis-
sion Chairman Gordon Norris
will present the U.S. 17 chal-
lenge to the state legislative del-
egation today (Thursday). The
county is also applying for a
$10 million transportation in-
centive grant to get the four-lan-
ing of U.S. 17 from the Peace
River Bridge to Tropicana Road
north of Wauchula expedited.
Commissioner Minor Bryant
was named last week to the
2020 Florida Transportation
Plan steering committee, en-
abling him to "stand up for rural
Florida and its road needs."

Spot ads everything
from tree trimming to tractor
ai ed s akn at


Patrick Smith Online, the
official family website for
Florida author Patrick D. Smith,
recently introduced a new line
of "Florida Cracker" Christmas
cards. The first Cracker Christ-
mas Card released is titled,
"Sox The Ox."
The cards were inspired by
Patrick Smith's popular book, A
Land Remembered, long con-
sidered the "Bible" of the
Florida Cracker. This card hon-
ors the hearty pioneers immor-
talized in that book who
endured hardships in order to
settle this great state.
"For the past several years,
our customers have asked us to
find Cracker-themed Christmas
cards for them," said Smith's
son, Rick, who operates the
family website and online store.
"We simply, couldn't find any.
When you do a web search for
cards about Floriga, you prima-
rily get beach scenes. When you
- do a search based on pioneers,
you get mostly western scenes.
So we hired Esther Morrison
Smith, the artist who drew the
original cover of A Land
Remembered, to draw a scene
based on Florida's unique fron-
tier past."
The scene chosen is of a
young pioneer boy and girl
standing in front of an ox in a
stand of pine trees and scrub
palmetto plants. "Our message
is that you don't have to have a
lot to be happy or to celebrate


Christmas," says Rick Smith.
"The pioneers didn't have
much, but they celebrated
Christmas in their own way.
They made garlands from pine
boughs and bushes, and would
even decorate a Christmas tree
with Spanish moss." The mes-
sage inside the card is "Hoping
your holidays are filled with
simple pleasures."
Esther Morrison Smith, the
artist, says she felt something
special happening when she
was drawing the card. "I was
having trouble with the little
girl. I kept re-working her and
suddenly I heard her whisper, 'I
want a bow in my hair' and
I'm not kidding you I told
her I'd give her a pretty green
Christmas bow, and I got her to '
smile! Weird! And the little boy '


looks so proud with his ox."
She added, "I really had fun
doing these! It brought back
niemories of playing in the
woods in Florida growing up."
(Now in Washington state, she
grew up in Titusville.)
Smith says that these limited
edition cards are only available
at PatrickSmithOnline.com and
a few select gift shops through-
out Florida.
"In light of the season,,5 per-
cent of our net sales will got to
Second Harvest Food Bank of
Central Florida in Patrick and
Iris Smith's name," Sniith con,-
cludes. "It's my way of recog-
nizing my folks and helping out
people in the area of Florida
where they live."


The automobile is the most
recycled consumer prod-
uot in the world today.


I g. hea The thl I
so whre if you'll
-Thomas Hughes


Christmas Cards Based On Patrick


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bFh
Yout oot an
By Paul Paris
CHEER
The annual Foundation for Youth Development 2009 Cheer
Jam Cheerleading Competition was held on Sunday, at the USF
Sun Dome in Tampa. All of our Hardee Youth Football League
(Pop Warner) cheerleading squads represented Hardee County
well! With 25 associations from Pasco, Hillsborough, Manatee and
Hardee counties, competition was tough.
There were approximately 10,000 spectators and competitors
watching as gach squad performed. Just imagine three months
worth of practice for a 2.5 minute performance-
First up was our Jr. Pee Wee squad (ages 8-11), which took the
firsttipla trooemin its sioniand wiHdjve onntdooregional com-

Second to compete was our Pee Wee squad (ages 9-12), which
.took a second-place trophy in its division and will also move on to
the regional competition in November.
Next up were our little Tiny Mite cheerleaders (ages 5-7), who
performed as there is no competing for this age group. They made
us proud!
After Tiny Mite were our Mitey Mite cheerleaders (ages 7-9)'
who also.performed. They, too, made a great showing for Hardee
County!
Lastly were our Midget cheerleaders (ages 11-14, who took a
second-place trophy in their division and they will also move on to
the regional competition in Orlando!


a
is





The following permits were
applied for or, issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Oct. 19-23. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor the address for the project'
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only pmjects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Branca's A/C, East Fifth
Street, Zolfo Springs, air condi-
tioninrg nst nation, u485Fifth
'
Avenue, demolition, $4,500.
Miller's A/C, Golf Boule-
vard, install air conditioning,
$3,843.
AvOwner/ ilder, outh 11th
enu ra/Buildon, Ch Av er, ester e-
nue, roof, $3,000.
Bostick Constr., North Sixth
Avenue (U.S. 17 South) remod-
el, $10,200.
Owner/Builder, Main Street'

2o i Green, modular home'

BUILDING BLOCKS
Homeowners insurance does
t fl od da If
no cover o mage. you
are living in a low to moderate
flood risk area, you may want-to
.see your insurance agent or
contact the National Flood

I uw f nea.gov. op Y7u coul
get coverage of up to $250,000
for residential, $500,000 for
coinmerci sm business,
anti to clients
or renters coverage.


championship at Tampa Bay Technical on Nov. 7. Hardee Pee Wee
and Hardee Midget had a tough time with the Canes. Canes Pee
Wee 44 Hardee Pee Wee 0. Canes Midget 30 Hardee Midget 0.
Hardee Pee Wee and Midget will play in the FYD Don Clark Bowl
on Nov. 7. All post-season play game times have not been
announced yet.
The Division II semifinals will be played at Wildcat stadium
this Saturday. If you want to see some quality football, come out
and join us!
Hardee Youth Football League is a proud member of the Pop
Warner Little Scholars. Pop Warner is the only nationwide foot-
ball program that places more emphasis on scholastic achievement
than on football and cheerleading.

The .Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

Telephone (863) 773-3255


PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUF TITLE V AIR OPERATION PERMIT
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Division of Air Resource Management, Bureau of Air Regulation
Draft/Proposed Pernhit No.0490015-011-AV
Draft Permit No.0490015-012-AC (PSD-FL-140C)
Hardee Power Pariners Limited, Hardee Power Station
Hardee County, Florida
Applicant: The applicant for this project is Bardee Power Partners Limited. The applicant's responsible official
and mailing address is: Ralph E. Randall, Plant Manager, Hardee Power Partners Limited, Hardee Power Station,
6695 North County Road 663, Bowling Green, Florida 33834.
Facility Location: The applicant operates the existing Hardee Power Station, which is located in Hardee County
at 6695 North County Road 663in Bowling Green, Florida.
Project: The applicant applied on May 20, 2009 to the Depaltment for a Title V air operation permit renewal.
This is a renewal of Title V air o eration Permit No. 0490015-005-AV. The existing facility consists of four 75
megawatt.(MW) combustion turbines. Two combustion turbines (Units.CT-lA and CT-1B) are part of a "two-
on-one" combined cycle unit, which produces an additional 76 MW from a common steam-electrical generator.
Units CT-2A and CT-2B are simple cycle combustion ttirbines. AII units fire natural gas as the primary fuel and
distillate oil as a restricted alternate fuel. Units CT-1A, CT-lB and CT-2A use water injection to reduce nitrogen
oxides (NOx). Unit CT-2B incorporates dry low-NOx combustors to pn:vent the formation of NOx emissions
when firing natural gas. Unit CT-2B also uses water injection to reduce NOx emissions when firing distillate oil.
All units monitor the water-to-fuel ratio to ensure proper operation of the water injection systems. Unit 2B also
includes a continuous emissions monitoring system to monitor and record NOx emissions. Compliance
Assurance Monitoring Plans are required for the water injection systems on (1nits CT-lA, CT-1B and Cf-2A.
Unit 2B is subject to the federal Acid Rain Program. All.units are subject to the federal Clean Air Interstate Rule
(CAIR). The project also includes an air construction permit vision to change several testing and monitoring
requirements in Permit No. PSQ-FL-140.
Permitting Authority: Applications for air construction permits are subject to review in accordance with the
provisions of Chapter 403, Florida Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters 624, 62-210 and 62-212 of the Florida
Administrative Code (F.A.C.). Applications for Title V air operation permits for facilities that contain Acid Rain
units are subject to review in accordance ivith the provisions of Chapter 403. Florida Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters
62-4, 62-210, 62-213 and 62-214, F.A.C. The projects are not exempt from the permitting procedures for air
construction or Title V air operation permits. The Bureau of Air Regulation is the Permitting Authority
responsible for making a permit determination for this project. The Permitting Authority's physical address is:
Ill South Magnolia Drive, Suite #4, Tallahassee, Florida. The Permitting Authority's mailing address is: 2600
Blair Stone Road, MS #5505, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400. The Permitting Authority's telephone number is
850/488-0114.
. Project File: A complete project file is available for public inspection during the normal business hours of 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except legal holidays), at the address indicated above for the
Permitting Authority. The complete project file includes the Draft/Proposed Permits, the Technical Evaluation
ad Preliminary DeterminatioII, the Statement of Basis, the application and information submittedby the
applicant exclusive of confidential records under Section 403.111, F.S. Interested persons may vie the
draft/proposed permit by visiting the following website: http://www.dep.state.fl.us/aidemission/apds/default.asp
and entering the permit numbers shown above. Interested persons may contact the Permitting Authority's project
review engineer for additional information at the address or phone number listed above.
Notice of Intent to Air Issue Permits: The Permitting Authority gives notice of its intent to issue a Draft Air
Construction Permit Revision and a concurrent Draft/Proposed Title V Air Operation Permit Renewal for the
projects described above. The applicant has provided Irasonable assurance that operation of the facility will not
adversely impact air quality and that the project will coropjypith aji agggl)cableyirovisiopis of Chapters 62-4, 62-
204, 62-210, 62-212, 62-213, 62-214, 62-296 and 62-297, F.A.C. The permitting authority will issue final
permatsan accordance with use conastrons of the orattn@blibsed Wilrfats unkiss & twely petalonater-an
administrative hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. or unless public commentleceived in
accordance with this notice results in a different decision or a significant change of terms or conditions.
Comments: The Permitting Authority will accept written conmlents concerning the draft air construction permit
revision and the draft/proposed Title V permit for a period of 30 days from the date of publication of the Public
Notice. Written comments must be received by the close of business (5-00 p.m.), on or before the end of this 30-
. day period by the Permitting Authority at the aboke address. As part of his or her comments, any person may
also request that the Permitting Authority hold a public meeting.on this permitting action. If the Permitting
Authority determines them is sufficient interest for a pilblic meeting, it wili publish notice of the time, date, and
location in the Florida Administrative Weekly. If a public meeting is requested within the 30-day comment
period and conducted by the Pennitting Authority, any oral and written comments received during the public
meeting will also be considend by the Permitting Authority. If timely received written comments or comments
meeived at a public meeting result in a significant change to the draft/proposed permits, the Permitting Authority
shall issue a revised draft/proposed permits and require, if applicable, another Public Notice. All comments filed
";"(be nwksaoaHabinebr putbHe inspection. Foradditional information, contact the Permitting Authority at the
Petitions: A person whose substantial interests are affected by the proposed permitting decision may petition for
an administrative hearing in acconiance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition maist contain the
information set forth below and must be filed with (received by) the Department's Agency Clerk in the Office of
General Counsel of the Department of Environmental Protection int 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station
#35, TaHahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Petitions filpd by any persons other than those entitled to written notice -
under Section.120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 14daysef publicatioiref the Public Notice or receipt of a
written notice, whichever occurs first. Under Section 120.60(3). F.S., however, any person who asked the
Permitting Authority for notice of agency action may file a petitiortwithin 14 days ofteceipt of that notice,
regardless of the date of publication. A petitionetshall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address
indicated above, at the time of filing., The failum of any person to file a petition within the appropriate time
period.shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, RS., or to intervene in tilis proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any
subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the approval of the presiding
officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.2Q5 F.A.C.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Permitting tidiarity's action is based must contain the
following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification
number, if known: (b) The name, address and telephone number of the petitioner; the name address and telephone
number of the petitioiler's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the
chase of the proceeding; arid his explanation of how the petitioner's substantial rights will be affected by the
agency determination; (c) A stajpment of when and how tW4petitioner received notice of the agency action or
proposed decision; (d) A statement of all disputedjssues ofanateriff fact. If there are none, the petition must so
indicate; (e) A cycise statement of the ultimate facts alle inchiding the specific facts the petitioner contends
warrant reversal or modification ofthe agency's proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes
the petitioner contends requis reversal or modification of thb.agetigy's proposed action including an explanation
of how the alleged facts relate tp the specific rules or stattites: and, (g) A statement of the relief sought by the
petitioner, stating precisely the action the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's
proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the inaterial faptgppon which the Permitting Authority's action
'abbedashreaHu are a noesu a t3s0arednACHspute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth
Because due administrative hearing process is designed to formulate fmal agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the Permitting Authority's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this Public
Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permits. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final
decision of the Permitting Authority on the application have the right to petition to become a party to the
proceeding, in accordance with the requituments set forth above.
Mediation: Mediation is not av liable for this proceeding.
EPA Review: EPA has agreed to treat the Draft Title V Air Operatioft Permit as a Proposed Title V Air
Operation Permit and to perforniits 45-day review provided by the law and regulations concunently with the
public comment period. Although EPA's 45-day review period will be performed concurrently with the public
comment period, the deadline for submitting a citizen petition to object to the EPA Administrator will be
determined as if EPA's 45-day review period is performed after the public comment period has ended. The final
Title V air operation permit will, be issued after the conclusion of the 45-day EPA review period so long as no
adverse comments are received that resulting a different decision or significant change of terms or conditions.
The status regarding EPA's 45-day review of this project and the deadline for submitting a citizen petition can be
fousid at the following website address: http://www.enamov/resion4/air/pennits/Florida.htm.
Objections: Finally, pursuant to 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) Section 7661d(b)(2), any person may petition
the Administrator of the EPA within 60 days of the expiration of the Administrator's 45-day saview period as
established at 42 U.S.C. Section 7661d(b)(1), to object to the issuance of any Title V air operation permit. Any
petition shall be based only on objectimia to the permit that were raised with reasonable specificity during the 30-
daypu I wr mentp a11pr vi redtin ePsunb coNodemileists hel1Uonsidt insnauteeth Adnli snuor
such objection arose after the comment period. Hiding of a petition with the Administrator of the BPA does not
stay the effective date of any permit properly issued purstiant to the provisions of Chapter 62-213, F.A.C.
Petitions filed with the Administratoref EPA must meet the requirements of 42 U.S.C. Section 7661d(b)(2) and
niust be filed with the Administrator of the BPA at: U.S. BPA, 401 M Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20460.
For more information regarding BPA saview and objections, visit EPA's Region 4 web site at
http://www.epa.gov/region4/air/petrmits/Florida.htni. 10:290


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a a .A At Welcomes Everyone To Stop 197


~PRIR3~


" "" 'October 29, 209, The Herald-Advocate 5D


I~ytlTLlumlim~n


for HYFL Pop Warner. This is the end of a very successful season
locally. All of our teams competed against a tough Carrollwood
Hurricanes Association. Hardee Flag struggled defending the out-
side sweep and speed of the Canes, but the game was respectable.
Hardee Tiny Mite once again dominated on both sides of the ball.
The Hardee Mitey Mite suffered another close loss with
Carrollwood winning, Canes 6, Hardee 0. The only losses Mitey
Mite have had this year hav4 been very close, Mitey Mite will be
playing in a post season bowl game this Saturday. The location and
time is TBA.
Hardee Jr. Pee Wee played like the varsity team has been play-
ing lately. Very few mistakes and solid Hardee-style football.
Canes Orange 0 Hardee 32. Hardee Jr. Pee Wee will play at home
this Saturday in the FYD Division II semi finals. Hardee represents
the Southeast and the Carrollwood Hurricanes Green represents the
Northwest. The winner will go on to play for the FYD Division II


Trees are the earth's endless


ouvernor rave,
Among those at the youth football cheer ]am on Sunday
were (front row, from, left) TalNeshla Lewis-MIdget,
Roslenell Rivprs-Pee Wee, Breakna Parker Junior
PeeWee and Raina Parks as Wildcat WIIhe; in back are
the officers of Hardee Youth Football League and the
cheer coaches, Dawn Atkinson-Jones, Heather Lee,
BonnIe SImpson, Paul Paris, Shauntee HInes and
StephanIe Parker.
Before the competition each association must'sell ads for the
Cheqr Jam program, and Hardee sold the most. Because of that, the
sought-after back page belonged to us. Every year the Foundation
for Youth Development gives out a "Spirit Cup" award to the asso-
ciation with the "most spirit" and, you guessed it, Hardee Wildcats
brought that trophy home also!
This is Hardee Youth Football League's first official year as a
member of FYD. FYD is a premiere league of Pop Warner in the
Southeast Conference, and our community has shown what hard
work, discipline, character and a little country charm can do. The
bar is set very high for next year, but we are up for the challenge.
The Hardee Youth Football League appreciates "all the coach-
es, student demonstrators, coach trainees, cheerleaders, team moms
and parents for doing such a great job at this event!" said Bonnie
Simpson, HYFL cheer coordinator.
fOOTBALL -
Football's regular season ended Saturday at cat st ium


Saturday, October 31 '* 8 p.m. to 12 a.m.

Cha r lotte's We bb Pu b's
2nd Annual HALLOWEEN BASH

S/C y
Costume Contest 10 p.m.
Most Original, Best Exotic, Most Scarriest & Best Impresonator of Famous or Not
So Infamous Person

Food, Fun & Party Games 7 p.nt. Pumpkin Carving Contest
$5.00 Donation, Cash Pritd


Charlotte's Webb Ab


3315 SR64 West Wauchula


10:29c


Tanning Er Nails






6D The Herald-Advocate, October 29, 2009




e


ABOUT ... Classified
DEADLINE....Tuesday noon
RATES Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
/tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitalS
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
Cl..ASSIFICATIONS:


55 GA~LLON HYDRAULIC oil, 68 :`-o'
viscoalty, $300. 245-8983.
10:29-11:5c --


18" GOOSENECK for saile. New
tires, new railing and new paint.
All steel, heavy duty. Call to come
and see. 863-781-3712. 10:1-29P
E LI JECTI leRtEo a
remove & install. 863-381 0538.
9:17-1:28P


PERSON WITH KNOWLEDGE of
Pn tra tuom. r opnThoul ha
knowledge in a variety of con-
structilon, electrical, excavation
and piping of fues a tems if you
may be able to train you. Please
oa me863)E773D2 3 for an
10:29tfo


.


863-375-2417. 10:29-11:26P


HOT 9
1/1-7 .5.1
BANKRUPTCY

0
863-314-0846
(non-lawyer)
cl5:28tfc


5111I~I~


4-1 2('RUISER, $4,9501 289
1999 GMC SENOMA, $2,450,
cash. 781-1062. 10:29c
e?0EWp ICK -s eddo
truck, tires, body needs pairit job,
$1,000firm.863-781-2457.10:29e
WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk
cars & farm tractors. Pickup avail-
able. Crooms Salvage. 781-3767.
t -


e T11T11Tng

*i teumm Grinding

Faulkner Stump ocriodn eid & ree Senrice, u~o
(863) 261-37~29 (863) 261-3759


ROBERT'S TOWING
4 375-4068 or 781-8195

377 OLD BOWLING
1)IXIE HWY GREEN

--
Light Medium Heavy Towing
Low Boy Services eno:1-2so



BILLIARD
FILL DIRT NC.
*



68Ha 3d5-0490 cl8:2Uc 1 (9 1)s456-6 07




214 E. Orange St. achilt "

Service ALL Brands of Major Appliances
$69.00 includes 30 mins of free service
Parts Additional
Parts for ALL Makes Available in Store!!
Appliances available in all price ranges
3 Full-time Technicans
Trained Licensed *nInsu d Pnmfessiorial Service


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461


I~Amrrcn~lnn 4ljnw~


_r~rUIYny~i~S~i~3~TY~Y~:~'-


I


Hrardiee ar 10mp~all


m
-


Topsy See
REAL ESTATE
773-5994
Topsy See
Duurkh am & 0 roadmn age M.ell $10 $98,000 Popash Rd.
2BR 2B 1498 sq ft hoshe sets on 4 1/2 acres in very quiet setting halfway
between Wauchula and Avon Park. $106;000. $100,000
3BR 2B 2005 DW Mobile Home Very Modern all appliances set on 5.4 acres
all fenced w/pond $130,000
App.58 Acres. Great for development property. High and dry. Reduced to
$10,000 per acre*
5 acres all fenced, High and dry with pond. Appalooss Lane. $84,995.
Topsy See, Broker
Elva Whidden, Associate
cho:29c 2634 E. Main Street Wauchula, FL 33875


H ET II WH
A f
available or
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through October 31st
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)
Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
-
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin .
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:0th PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
an.*,-=: Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider 0110;8-200


as attending




















Wednesday at 6:45 pm
Beginning October 22, 2009

Gillespie's Counseling Center
Alpha & Omega Faredom Ministries, Inc.

113 N. 7th Ave. 773-5717
Wauchula, Florida 33873
0110:22-11:50


SEE RE ALT Y INC
. 406 porth 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
wwwJimseerealtV.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker Jainet V. See, Sr., Broker


GREAT Commercial Site!
2.24& acres zoned C-2 with
frontage on Hwy 17, Stenstrom
& Holtsclaw. Can be divided.
Super site for commercial oper-
ation. REpUCED! $189,500.
100 acres in SW Hardee
County. Scattered Oaks and
Pines on this beautiful site.
Great hunting. On Couqty road.
Four 4" wells. $5,000 per acre.
Waterfront property! 2 BR/2
BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda.ca a dtolneads
charlotte Harbor. Buyer con-
cessions possible. REDUCED
to $150,000!
1& acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in Wau-
da.re i io dZ utag .
Lot size 130' X 305'. $38,500
Custom built 3 BR/2 BA home
on #7 fairway of Torrey Oaks
Golf Course. 2 car garage.
Great upgrades throughout
home.Irrigatedlawn.$250,000
aH a rnake an a intent


PAFIT-TIME HANDY able peson
with double cab truck. Non-smok-
er. 954-629-4486. 10:29p


829 Bostick Rd.


863-375-4081


863-773-4400 Offic~e


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleanang
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl R>p
Motor Cleaning


Swy n SR. 66


c1o:2se


A


man


,


Wauchula Hills
com. as
and REA Rd.
773-2011 &


Wauchula


slay nin


rruuy


Stunning newly built 3 BR, 2
BA house with study.
Upgrades galore! Close to
schools. 2 car garage. Call and
ask about the bonus offered by
the builder! REDUCED
$229,500.
45 ac citrus grove. Valencies &
Hamlin. Double wide mobile
Itoine. Fruit proceeds included
tdi NEFHa deceo o
$427,500
3.19-bacres. Zoned C-2.Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential income already in
pl H 17 fr
W le.art. $1,200,a oss om

O notrtunity! 25.67
2 homes! $399,000.
3 Commercial building lots,
zoned C-2. Located just 1 block
off Hwy 17 Southbound. Great
location for duplexes or other
clome c 4,5 .eration. Re-


Realtor Associates
non... man h s
Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161 Rick Knight


Cass 1 1e s


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
BOatS
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
I..ivestock
Lost & found
IVIiscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
.Pets
PlantS/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


GOLF CART REPAIR
Gas or Electric
LOWEST PRICEs GUARANTEED
Pick u and delivery available.
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED


usJ.. oreignen Maonet mats rn Di s sl nes


(83)73-195


sAs cow owAns


mmmmm man m man
$500 OFF
any Vek we oupon

Monday Thursday Friday
10 am to 7 pm 10 am


.,.ngal y..r y.,ar sae ie m


Maria


( 83)8-96





Irrie~l~r~a!w


51~


S RA B TaP2 SO
200 for $24. Please call B
223-5561 '


YI


MUZZLE LOADER, Thompson
Center Omega, 50 caliber, syn-
thetic stock, blued barrel, $200.
773-3681. 10:29p
HEALTH RIDER ELLIPTICAL, new
$1,000, sell $375 OBO. 863-767-
9671 or 863-781-3800. 10:29p


.,
$39,000 FIRM. Must sell. 781-
1062. 10:29c
2BR BLOCK HOME 2 large cor-
;ner lots. 402 E. 4th St., Zolfo,
$45,000 FIRM. Call 863-781-3767
or 863-773-0637. 9:24tfc
FOR SALE 4BR/2-1/2 BA plus
bonus room, 9 1/2 acres. 863-773-
4207 or 781-5595. 9:24-10:29c


CASH FOR YOUR trust deed or
mortgage. Private party. 1-863-
832-1984. 10:1-1:1p


TWO BEDROOMI APARTMIENT,
South 9th Ave., $575 plus
deposit. 1-863-832-1984.
1 0:1 -29p


.
1062. 10:29c
SUPER BARGAIN $500 month.
ly, electric included. Nice large
furnished 1 bedroom country
apartment. First/Iast. $100 securi-
ty. 954-629-4486. 10:29p
2BR/1BA APARTMENTS in
Bowling Green for rent. For more
Information please call 863-773-
3754 M-Thurs 8-5 and Fri 8-8:30.
After houre please call 863-245-
2614. 1Q:2-11:5p
LARGE 1BR/1BA DUPLEX, 505
High St., Wauchula, $450/month-
ly, 1st/Iast tb move in.7 -9 2g,
2p


2002 LOG DOUBLEWIDE mobile
home, 4BR/2BA, 2,000 sq.ft. Must
be moved. Asking $30,000 OBO.
784.5272. 10:15-11:12p


ADULT DOG and cat need homes,
as me by AH 01 u9r .
BEAUTIFUL CHOCOLATE lab
puppies. 10 weeks old. Health
cert. & regletered. $400. Both par-
ents on site. Call Kimberly (863)
581-6682. 10:22-29p


3BR/3-1/2 BATH on 5.66 acres oA
Popash, stone fireplace, master
suite with iwalk-in closets, Jacuzzi
tub, & separate shower, LR, FR,
dining room, sunroom, screen
porch, patio, fenced back yard,
$242,000-773-5880/781-5344.
10:29p
3BR/1 BA REMODELED, 4407
Hwy. 17, Bowling Green, $49,900.
781-1062. 10:29c


2aShE M-7(20W and calf,1 $ 5


FOR SALE 24 ft. pull behind
Cedar Cleek camper, sleepis 6,
full bath, $7,000. 781-9336.
10:29p
TRAVEL TRAILER, 28' with 2 tip
outs, nice, $2,000.767-8822,
10:29c
TRAVEL TRAILER, 28', $1,500.
767-8822. 10:290
1995 JAYCQ POP-UP chilWphi,
sleeps 6, everything (nchided,
enclosed awning, $3,500 OBO.
863-245-3597. 10:22-29p


Realtor
220 @(. 6th Avenue ...
Wauchula, Florida 33873 .
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.florearealty.net Jessie G. Sambrano


Special Of The Week


1989 TRAVEL TRAILER, good
condition, 8x28, $2,200. Call 773-
6424 10:22-29
FOR SALE 1995 PACE ARROW
37' motor home, make offer. John
Deer 773-6661. 7:30tfe


NICE CLEAN one bedroom apart-
ment with screened in porch and
washer/dryer hookup. $120 per
week, first weeks rent, damage
depoalt and references required.
773-9793. 10:29-11:5p


FOR SALE COMPLETE selec-
tion of catering equipment, chaf-
ing dishes, china, crystal, silver-
ware, etc. Wanda Gunn catering
business. 773-7927. 10:29P


ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchul8a5Animal CoRntrtol laPloc to
call 773*3265 or more Informah
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shote
and be free of parasites. tfe-dh


IHil'S AMOWOrl


I 5 * ^


Nevir Tiges Iriclude
Free Mount & Balance .
Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SALE ON
RLL TIRES.


I


____


3BR 1.5BA CB bome Central air/heat carport corner lot -
new painting new flooring Ready to go. $95,000.00
10+- acres of wooded land located on Painter Road in the Popash,
New Hope area. The ideal place to build a family home close in
but privacy and beauty aboimds Restricted $119,000.00
2.4 acres with 2BR home close to seven-mile point. Fronts highway
64 E on South, Ed Wells on the west and Main Street E on the
North easy access location opens up many possibilities.
$95,000.00
3BR 2BA CB home with carport built 2008 all appliances
included over 1,500 sq ft of Ilving area close to schools -
Doctors offices Take a look today. $175,000.00
3Illi 2BA CB home with carport built 2008 all appliances
inchaded over 1,500 sq ft of living area close.to schools Doctors
omces Take a look today. $175,000.00
3BR 2BA CB home with central air/heat located 2 miles west of
Wauchula on Polk Road Great location and just minutes from
most schools, churches, and shopping. One +- acres of beautifully
landscaped yard and 5+- of fenced improved pasture. Many meno-
vations and updates completed since 2004. Home has 2304+- sq ft
of living area and 2752 sq ft under roof two wals (1 for home aml
1 for irrigation) wood laminate floors and carpet enclosed barn
and storage many other extras well maintained Must See to
fuly appreciate. Reduced to $250,000.00


WE SHARE THE SAME MLS Wire HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Remember
0 Isun are on thou fernet. .
-
access them anytime! *"""'"
Contact After Hours
0.R. (Tony) Rores, Broker, tony@florearealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net
After hours
Oralia D. Flores (863)781-2955 TonyFlores (863)781-0744
John Freeman (863) 781-4084 Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585
Jesale Sambrano (863) 245-6891
6110:290


rgna
O w nership


NOw Se rving
Poo ls inHardee '
*ll
LJ


unenned a in.ured 10 e-ase


$3,000 certified fundsirequired, down on each property. 5%


Store Wide Sale
Dinthg room start $197
. Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Sttart94397

Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
.
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across ftom HomeDepot 6
863-382-0600 *
11


-IVIAINTENANCE. ELECTRICIAN .
CF Industries, Inc., a major phosphate fertilizer producer, is current-
ly seeking an experienced electrician for its mining operation in
Hardee County*
,
The successful candidate should posses 5-10 years experience as an
industrial electrician specifically in troubleshooting, medium voltage,
automation/control, and telemetry. Electrician certification & CDL
licensure would be a plus.
CF offers a very competitive wage and benefits package. For consid-
eration, apply at:
Heartland Workforce
205 Cariton Street
Wauchula, FL
Equal Opportunity Employer 0110:22-290 1


SERVICE YOU CAN COTJNT ON
DORIS S. I.AMBEliT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT Broker
ASSOCIATION: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


October 29, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7D


brown, 3BR/2BA DUPLEX, Zolfo Springs, WAUCHULA LARGE 1/1 CAH,
10:29p,_ good location, 1st & last months utility rodm, very nice. 735-2626.
rent plue security deposit. 10:29c
Available after 11/5/09 (863) 781- 2BR/1BA APARTMENT, $550
4529 for information. 10:29tfc month, $550 deposit. 773-0100.
2 RENTALS IN the country. For 10:1tfc
5" more Information 781-3536. 1BR/1BA DUPLEX for rent, close
ob 863- 10:29p to downtown, quiet neighbor-
10:29 2/3 BR/1BA mobile home in nice hood. No pets, no smoking. $450
park. $650 a month, 1st & last rent and $200 deposit moves y6u
month.781-9336. I 10:29p in.Pleasecall863-781-3712.
APT & HOUSES FOR RENT781. 10:1-29p


ASSISTED LikING has 11 pm-7 3/2 CB EXCELLENT condition, 4x8 UTILITY traIler, $245, amall
am shift open (some cooking large corner lot, near Sheriff tiller, $40, great condition. 863-
required), apply in person at 298 Dept., large kitchen, IIving mom, 735-2296. 10:29p
Resthaven Rd,, Zolfo Springs. 1592 sq. ft., $80,000. 352-362- STRAWBERRY PLANTS (Festival
10:290 9076 or Preston Waldron 352-342- variety) for sale. 25/$5, 100/$15 or
HARDEE COUNTY SER 6017. 10:29p 200 for $24. Please call Bob 863.
EED A JOB 3 BR/1 BATH 907 South 8th Ave 223-5561. 10:290


CHIHUAHUA PU PY,
$200.375-2164.


UNEMPLOYED N -
TRAINING Earn whlie you learnt
If you are 55 or older, unem-
ployed, and a realdent of Hardee
County we thay have a traininil
and/or employment opportunity
right for you. HIapanic applicants
welcome. Call Experience Works
today for more detailed Ask for
Vivian (863) 965-3795.


10:29-11:26
c 2006 MFH, 2100 sq. ft., 5 acres,
SEEKING PART-TIME Retail mer4 5BR/3BA, major appliances, great
chandiser to service Hallmaik in condition. Sacrifice $185,000
the Wal-Mart store located in negotiable. By appointment. 941-
Wauchula. To apply, vialt us at: 923-7888 leave message.
ww.hallmark.appone.com- 10:8-12:10p
2:01 2-11:1


OPEN HOUSE:


Bus. (8 3 7300t7


Large 4B/3Bth home on 5 acres; C/B and frame
construction, 3614 sq. ft. living space, over 600
sq. ft. mother-in-law suite,.outsidq, and inside
storage, convenient location. $295,000
Take a look at this 2B/2Bth, large master suite
2 screened porches, outside storage, sprinkler
system with separate well. Offered at $54,900
EXECUTIVE HOME! C/B Stucco home;
4B/3Bth, family room with fireplace, stainless
steel appliances in large kitchen, nicely land-
scaped yard, underground sprinkler system.
$279,000
26232 acres on CR 665 with 3 bedroom house,
perfect hunting camji, paved road frontage,
large piries, 100 acres cleared for farming or
development, two small ponds; property can be
divided; OWNER MAY FINANCE FOR
QUALIFIED BUYERS. $8000 per acre. Gill
Delois for more details!
MAINSTREETlocationforthis137acretra.ct;
2" shallow well, outside city limits. $43,500
14.74 acres, sloping tract with large pond;
native trees, very secluded. $195,000


Classic te s-


The


1/


I


75 FLORIDA HOMES
including 12 In the Tampa ar.. 8 FO S

POo IService
.
BackUnder

O i i l


UNS GALL HUN A 1-Hti 15HUGnU~t


RUDSON &
g


A

402 South 6th Avenue
w.uenula, PL asers
Lovely well-kept horne in perfect condition on 1
acre! 3B/2Bth in Golfyiew Estates, lami-
nate/carpet fibers, metal roof, double garage,
corner lot, w&H landscaped. $125,000
LARGE LOT with oaks and 3B/1.5Bth home -
updated with new kitchen appliances, electric
rewired, A/C only 2 years old and like new roof.
OWNER ANXIOUS Asking $135,000
3.16 Acres and 3B/2B M/H built in 1990 with
large rooms, fireplace, screened lanai, in
round po 1, 12 0 me to ,71 stEedToutS
HOME TO APPRECIATE! $105,000
LARGE WAREHOUSE, 3000 sq. ft. with 8@
sq.ft.1iving area, all on 3.40 acres located on St.
Rd. #64E, perfect for commercial shop.
$135,000
Completely furnished Suncrest M/H, 2B/1.5Bth
on corner lot; 1800 sq.ft. with 2 storage build-
ings; well-kept property. $50,000


















BObcat Banter
By Jessica Gray
Wauchula Elementary School Asst. Principal
.1 1
At Wauchula Elementary School, the faculty and staff strive to
recognize students for outstanding citizenship as well as scholar-
ship.
During the past week many students were recognized for their
outstanding citizenship at a Top Cat assembly. Teachers selected
students who met the following criteria:
Assume responsibility
Are considerate of others
Have good behavior
Cooperate with others
Have self-control
Use time effectively .
Those students were awarded a Top Cat medallion and were


4466for more Information. 4:91tfo
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
rtand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
. 17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for*
Iease. 239-273-7381.
12:201tfc















WARHOSE Ssvealdifeet

Houing ActI Prohbt adyvertiang
based75 on race, coltd~orrlgin
sex, ~ ~~ hanicpfailli taueor


m
W.R. SMITH LAND Clearing &
Tree Removal Services Inc. -
Land clearing demolition tree
removal; Fencing barbed wire.
field fence, board fence; Thactor
work bush hog, disc. Code
eM em d potdisco I
Smith, owner/operator. 863-781-
0158 or 863-173-3557. 10:1tfo
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United .
Met tt Chaun@
chula, and Friday and Saturday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First Methodist
Church, corner of Grape and
Church St., Bowling Green.
12:6tfedh
- IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
ada eA saAn7o8 lu4*
Several weekly meetings.
dh


CALL BIG DADDY TRACTOR
SERVICE for all of your tractor
work, mowing, dishing, etc. ass"
781-0962. 8:27-10:29p
DO YQU NEED A WEBSITE
BUICr? Call Doug 863-397-9: $


Genuine Orthopedic
Foam elicased sides
W r
are ly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
* Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350U.S.27North*Sebring
Florida
Acro8ss6 m Home0mpet
a


FOf 890% -

Apartments
1 & 2 Bedrooms

817 E. Main St. Wauchula

Sammy 781-0707
10:atic


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, InC.


3-FAMILY YARD SALE Saturday,
8-7, 4716 Church Ave., BG.
10:29p
SATURDAY 7 am-?, 745 Altman
Rd., Wauchula. Clothes, house
hold items, lots of mise. 10:29P
SATURDAY 4231 SR 62, BG,
family moving .eale, semi trucks,
clothing, furniture, fleid e ulp"
muRTLAND RUSHERS bene9?,
yard sale Saturday, 8 ain-12 pm,
c hu Oak St. & 9th e.,


"m

A Daily Thought
TH(,HISDAY
The Lord says, "Let not the
wise man bask in his wis-
dom, not the mighty man in
his might, nor the rich man
in his riches. Let them boast
in this alone: that they truly
know Me, and understand
that I am the Lord of justice
and righteousness, whose
love is steadfast; and that I
,,
love to beJ th 23-24 (7LB)

ERIDAY
God made the earth by His
power. He used His wisdom
to build the world and His
understanding to stretch out
the skies. When He thun-
ders, the waters and the
skies roar. He makes clouds
rise in the sky all over .the
earth. He sends lightning
with the rain and brings out
the wind from His store-
house.
Jeremiah 10:12-13 (NCV)


Contentment is a pearl of
great price, and whoever
procures it at the expense
of 10,000 desires makes a
wise and happy purchase.
--John Balga;

ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summanes, births,
children adnad se a
ments, weddings, sil ter or .
golden anniversaries,
church events arid militaW
as grnmmeanrt available at our
office. For ensa9erhents
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
ch gb c v ra e f we
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
ThE)ea e is 5 p.m. on


FRIDAY/SATURDAY 8-1, 5
Terrell Rd. Don't mise these
deals. New high end Items. Vera
] w DI o ,
laser printers, computer desk,
appliances, breakfast table, home
decor, DVDs, baby items, clothing
8-16. 10:29c
DeS t C
OO OUlt





wEA aF cN nNCw cNG
- 8- 0/75 8941 77 79 65


,LD The ~Heal~d-Advocate, October 29, 2009J


given VIP treatment on the following school day at lunch, with a
specially decorated table and a glass of sweet tea.
This was a fun day for the student body as everyone partici-
pated in new Top Cat dances they have learned with Coach Ray
Rivas. Students also enjoyed watching our new staff members par-
ticipate in an animal sounds game. Most especially, the boys and
girls enjoyed watching their new principal, Sonja Bennett, mooing
to find her.teammates.
This week students have participated in Red Ribbon Week
activities and declared, "We're 'paws'itively drug free at WES!"
While focusing on the importance of staying drug-free and pledg-
ing to stay drug-free, boys and girls have enjoyed activities such as
wearing their clothes backward to "Turn Their Back on Drugs."
They will also "Shade Out Drugs" this Friday by wearing their sub-
glasses.
Students who have met their reading goals and kept a test aver-
age of 85 percent or better on their first nine weeks Accelerated
Reader quizzes will have time to celebrate today (Thursday) at the
first Accelerated Reader Celebration. Accelerated Reader is a moti-
vational program where students are able to select books on their
individual reading level and take quizzes to earn points to meet
goals set with their teachers.
On Friday, our students will have the opportunity to participate
in Character Day by dressing as a storybook character. Students
may also wear a career-related costume, Participation is optional.
Those participating are not to wear scary costumes or have toy
weapons.
Students who have earned special recognition on their report
card will be receiving a new type of reward on Friday, Nov. 6.
Both students who made Honor Roll and those who had Perfect
Attendance will receive dog tags, and will have the opportunity to
add to their dog-tag collection each nine weeks.
New third- and fourth-grade inductees will become members'
of our National Elementary Honor Society on Thursday, Nov. 5.
The Wauchula Elementary School Chapter was initiated during the
previous school year. The purpose of this organization is to recog-
nize outstanding academic achievement and demonstrate personal
responsibility, to provide meaningful service to the school and
community, and to develop essential leadership skills.
During these events our staff wiloget to recogmze the accom-
plishments of students for a variety of purposes.
Dates of interest for parents/guardians mclude.
Thursday, Oct. 29 Accelerated Reader
Celebration
Oct. 30 Fall Festivities and Character
Thursday, Nov. 5 National Elementary Honor
Society Induction
Friday, Nov. 6 Report Card Day
Tuesday, Nov. 10 Early Release


SUNDAY
The heart is deceitful above
all things and beyond cure
Who can understand it? I the
Lord search the heart and
exarfline the mind, to reward
a man according to his con-
duct, according to what his
deeds deserve.
Jeremiah 17:9-10 (NIV)

gQgggy
Like a bird that hatches eggs
she has not laid,' so are
those who get their ivealth
by unjust means. Sooner or
later, they will lose their rich-
es and, at the end of their
lives, will become poor old
fOOlS. Jeremiah 17:11 (NLT)

TUESDAY
God says, "Am la God who
is only in one place and can-
not see what men are
doing? Can anyone hide
from Me? Am I not every-
where in all of heaven and
earth?"
Jeremiah 23: 23-24 (?LB)
WEDNESDAY
God says, "I know what I'm
doing. I have it all planned
out plans to take care of
you,'not abandon you; plans
to give you the future you
hope for.-When you call on
Me, what you come and
pray to Me, I'II listen. When
you come looking for Me,
you'll find Me.,,
Jeremiah 29:11-13 (ME)
AII verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The .
Message; (NOV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng.
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales
service and installation '
call (863) 773-6448. '
7:18tfc


r


SATURDAY
God, my strength, my
stronghold, my safe retreat
when trouble descends . -
God answers, "Can mortals
manufacture their gods.
They turn out no-gods, who
cannot walk or talk. Watch
closely now. I'm going to
teach these wrongheaded
people. Starting right now,
I'm going to teach them who
I am and what I do, teach,
. them the meaning of My
name,'God, the 1 Am.
Jeremlah 16:10a,21 (ME)


10& acs wipaved rd frontage
has beautiful oaks & bor-
ders state land. Deed
restriedons to protect your
Investment. $225,000!

PRICE REDUCED! Multi-
family zoning! Almost 3 ass
measuring 386'x345', zoned
R-3 w/city utilities!
$145,000!

Park-like setting w/trees
galore for this 12.5& acs &
2008 3BR/2BA MH. Eqjoy
nature as you stroll around
this beautiful property!
$199,000!

Ride a horse, pet a dqg or go
fishing! 58e ac ranch, Ft
Meade located north of
Lake Buffum. $365,000!

PRICE REDUCED! Scenic
location w/lots of trees!
3BR/2BA 2006 MH on 5&
acs, paved road, fenced,
pond, storage shed. NOW
$110,000!

Double lot! Cute 2BR/1BA
home w/den utilized as 3rd
BR. New Rheem A/C unit,
fenced yard, shed w/new
electric wirhig & roof.
$110,000! OWNERS
MOTIVATED!


'Over I ac in city IImits of
B (J(gy @[y 3
B ew
m led
kitchen, new A/C. $129,900!
CB duplex on Martin
Luther King, each w/1BR/-
1BA 1064tSF. Includes ad-
jacent 125'x80' vacant cor-
ner lot $65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Front.
age on SR66! 11& ac fenced
pastureland also fronts
Nursery Rd, zoned A-1!
Now sixoooo!
What a great price! New
3BR/2BA, 1700tSF CB
home in Zolfo Springs
w/carport, large yard,
tile/carpet floors! $140,000!
Paved rd, great price! 10&
acs cleared land w/well &
power unit. Ready for your
new home or Ag use.
$110,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 54 acs
on paved rd 72 miles from
Wauchula. High & dry pas.
tureland ready for your
home or agriculture use.
$49,900!
Stellar location w/dble rd
frontage! 10+ ac Val grove
has 6" well, diesel power
.
anit, drain tile, micro-jets!
$130,000!


f


Classic le s-


(%3) 773-2128
REACTORS
^^ JOE4.DAVIS
JOE L DAVIS, JR.
REALTORS JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more IIstin s at
ters WWw.joeldaivis.com ,
133 REAL-ESTATE INVESTMENTS




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