Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00298
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula, Fla
Publication Date: October 15, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00298
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text



G IveCo


_ _C


Thursday, October 15, 2009


109th,Year, No. 45 .


464c


time for public participation.
"Sometimes we need to be will-
ing to do something different.
I'm not saying we need to do
this. I'm just saying, let's look
at it," he concluded.
Reactions from city managers
and mayors varied.
BOWLING GREEN
As far as how I react to the
See COUNTY 2A


Bryant, who is the county
liaison to several state commit-
tees, the Florida Association of
Counties and the Small
Counties Coalition, reported
that there has been a lot of dis-
cussion on the topic everywhere
he goes.
The economic climate of
today might make it feasible to


the Sheriff's Office offers dis-
patch and coverage at off times
for the municipalities as well.
"I wonder if we should pur-
sue a grant to get a study done
by someone with no interest in
the subject, perhaps one of the
universities or a consultant,"
said. Bryant. The rest of the
commission agreed.


Sweetwater resident Nancy
Craft asked if that would
increase or decrease the number
of people on the commission.
Bryant said the structure of the
commission would be one facet
of the study. Craft said it would
be important that the public felt
it still had its local representa-
tion.
Bryant said after such a study
was done, there would be lots of


py JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"Let's just look at it."'
Commissioner Minor Bryant
and other members of the
Hardee County Commission
agreed at Thursday's meeting
that a study to look at the pros
knd cons of merging local gov-
ernments was worthwhile.


join the county and municipal
governments into one central-
ized unit. For instance, in Duval
County, the city and county
government are, one and it
seems to be working well, he
reported.
The county already does fire
and emergency medical servic-
es, the landfill and the jail, and


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
A large regional Class I land-
fill has been proposed for
southeastern Hardee County
and may come before the
Hardee Planning & Zoning
Board on Nov. 5.
Tim Salopek of Waste Ser-
vices of Florida Inc. spoke to
the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on
Tuesday about the planned proj-
ect, which would be located on
1,600 acres near 10-Mile Grade
and Crewsville Road. The com-
pany has an option on the land,
owned by the Elton Crews
estate.
Waste Services is the second
largest waste company in
Florida and operates four land-
fills, 30 healing coMpanies and
several transfer stations. .
The proposed Hardee Re-
:::be ocD o 187F5a
of the Crews site, with the actu-


al landfill to be 300 acres. It
would handle household waste
from Hardee and several coun-
ties to the.south within a 100- to
200-mile radius. A special-use
permit would be needed from
the county. *
Salopek said it would take
two or three years before the
landfill opened.
Hardee County would get a
royalty of $2.50 a ton for the
first 2,000 tons daily, and $3.50
for each ton over 2,000 tons a
day, At 3,000 tons a day, Hardee
County would get $2.2 million
annually and the Hardee school
system would get $214,000.
Waste Services owns a Class
I landfIll in Osceola County
near Holopaw that has generat-
ed an average of$2.9 million to
the county annually for the past
five years. The company also
sfo ok bri
See REGIONAL 2A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Selected to reIgn on the HomecomIng Court were (from left) Freshmen Class Sweetheart Janet Lopez, Junior Class
Sweetheart Kara Nonia, Lady-In-Walting Caltlin Chason, Queen BeatrIz Rodriguez and Sophomore Class Sweetheart
Raquel Rosales,


#* Homecoming Reigns Supreme..


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Embedded in the memories
of Wildcats, the-weekend's
commemoration of .Hardee
Senior High School's annual
Homecoming was a big suc-
cess.
Highlights of the week were
student participation in "Ex-
treme Orange & Blue," a down-
town parade, naming of King
and Queen, and a dance to end
the celebration of a great week.
To kick off the festivities,
HHS Wildcats showed their
pride and acceptance of the


chosen theme of "Extreme
Orange & Blue" by doing just
that. Walking around the cam-
pus on Wednesday of Home-
coming week was overwhelm-
ing with "Extreme Orange."
Thursday was observed with
"Extreme Blue," and to finish
the week in anticipation for
Homecoming, "Extreme
Orange & Blue" was splashed.
all across the campus. .
Students enjoyed the oppor-
tunity of being released early
from school to brake their way
to Main Street in downtown
Wauchula for the grand parade.
With over 50 entries in the float
"wimp di no jh unio Cb
ball, took the title of first place
out of the classes that had
entered.
Friday night posted another
victory for the Wildcats as they
beat the Immokalee Indians 48-
6. During halftime, the Blue
Star Brigade played soft back-


ground music as the Home-
coming Queen and Class
Sweethearts were announced.
.The 2008 Homecoming
Queen Lucy Ruiz passed her
crown on to this year's reigning
i-oyal, Queen Beatriz Rodri-
guez, at Friday night's game.
Beatriz is the daughter of
Abel and Maria Rodriguez. She
is a member of the American
Sign Language Club at the sen-
' ior high. Her favorite subject in
school is English, and her future
plans after graduation include
attending college to become a
dentist.
Joining her on the Home-
n airn Car sota
Class Sweetheart Kara Norris'
Sophomore Class Sweetheart
Raquel Rosales and Freshmen
Class Sweetheart Janet Lopez.
Other queen candidates were
Chelsea. Goolsby, Gldria Ruiz,
JaiLyn Smith and Chelsey
Steedley.


Junior contestants were
Berrydina Esparza and Brittany
Hines.
- Sophomore Class hopefuls
were Artrice Hines and Gabby
Lozano,
Freshmen Class candidates
were Sara Camarillo and Kayla
Knight
All the class nominees were
escorted before the public dut"
ing halftime ceremonies.
While the girls were lible to
admire their tiaras, the Home-
coming King candidates would
have to wait for the votmg
results until the dance on
u gh d

was crowned the 2009 Home-
coming King.
Other King candidates in-
cluded Philip Barton, Devon
Harris, Jakarius Lindsey and
Jake Nowakowski.
More Photos On 2A & 11A


Now, they will detour a block
north of the Main Street inter-
section, turning east on Pal-
metto Street, crossing over U.S.
17 northbound, and going to
Fourth Avenue, where they will
turn south for one block and
then back east on CR 636.
U.S. 17 Northbound trucks
can turn directly onto CR 636

sd atkSmve
Point onto SR 64 and continue
west to join U.S. 17 at Zolfo
Springs.
Or, those wanting to go north,
can come on in on CR 636 and
. turn into the northbound U.S.
17 lanet.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"It will stop those wrecks in
front qf Wauchula State Bank."
Wauchula Public Works
Director Ray McClellary said
Monday that the truck route
through east Wauchula would
be effective today (Thursday) at
9 a.m.

DeTh e heon nspoertatti
and city employees will install
the truck route signs along U.S.
17 and the city streets.
The route especially affects
U.S. 17 southbound trucks
which want to turn east on CR
636 (East Main Street).


Attorney's Office has an-
nounced it will lodge a second
count of the capital-felony
charge against the suspect. .
- Aguilar is being held in the
county jail without bond pend-
ing trial.
If ultimately convicted of the
crimes as charged, Aguilar
faces a mandatory sentence of
life in prison.
Though the sexual battery of
a child under 12 is a capital
felony, the Supreme Court long
ago ruled out imposition of the
death penalty for such. sexual


ottenses. A life sentence is the
remaining penalty.
Aguilar has denied the allega-
tions against him, and is cur-
rently being represented by the
Public Defender's Office- 1
The victim was 10 years old
at the time of the first alleged
molestation. She confided in
her pastor, who confronted the
suspect and no further abuse
occurred. Later, however, the
victim told police.
Capt. Brett .Dowden of the
Bowling Green Police Depart-
ment said that report came in on


June 25. He said the girl
remembered being in fourth
grade when allegedly assaulted
by Aguilar.
She told Dowden it happened
more than once, he said. The
victim also told Dowden that
she confided in her pastor, and
that the abuse stopped after that,
Dowden noted that he inter-
viewed the pastor, who recalled
what)te termed "intrppropliate"
attention given the alleged vic-
tim by the suspect. He said he
then counseled with the child,
See MAN 2A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A44-year-old Bowling Green
man has been charged with two
capital-felony counts after
being accused of molesting a
child.
Javier J. Aguilar, of 310 W.
Grape St., was fifst booked into
the Hardee County Jail by
Bowling Green police in
September, on a single count of
sexual battery of a child under
12, a capital offense,
And now, during a hearing in
Hardee Circuit Court, the State


Agullar


The


Herald- advocate


County Studies Merging With Cities


Regional Dump.


New Truck Route, Open


Man Chargled With 2 Capital Felonies Aglainst Child


I lllle~iI











CoUntine rml


Ke/Iy s Column


2A The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009


Zolfo Springs. I'd hate to see it
now. We've just turned around.
"We've changed our ,form of
government (town manager.and
commission) and I'd like to see
what the town could be. We are
improving our services.,With a
full-time manager, we, can get
things done and fixed,"
Robersoh said.
Mayor George Neel agreed.
"The way I feel about that is'
each city has its own identity,
and city residents will not want
to change that, not lose the
city's identity.-The majority of
the people live in the cities, and
the issue would have to go to a
.referendum and be voted on by.
those same people."
"Besides, how citi the county
help? It has its own financial
problems. The city of Zolfo '
Springs does not have any extra
money, but we did make our
budget without cutting anything
or anyone and, in fact, we were
able to buy some equipment
and to give everybody a raise,"
Neel commented.
Staff writer Cynthia Krahl con-
- tribute to this report.





count o sexual battery of a
child under 12.
And with the State Attorney's
Office filing a second papital-
felony count of sexual battery
of a child under 12, involymg
the same victim, in open T-ourt,
Aguilar again entered a not
guilty plea.
His.next court date is Nov. 3


'


news, as an appointed.manager,
I am intrigued to learn the com-
plete details of the story. I also
feel that if the county decided.to
embark on a study on consoli-
dated governments, it is best to
have all the stakeholders -
county, cities and the residents
- informed and/or involved,"
responded Yvonne Kimball, rel-
atively new to her position.
Longtime city commissioner
and Mayor Perry Knight was
more emphatic. "It won't work.
The people of Bowling Green
have a sense of pride in their
town, a sense of sovereignty. It
wouldn't be beneficial. The
quality of services in Bowling
Green is good. We work hard at
keeping the citizens happy.
They pay the bills,' said Knight.
He noted that Jacksonville is
nearly all of Duval County. "I
dos't think the people of
Bowling Green want to lose
their identity. We get very little
from the county as it is.
Bowling Green has always been
on its own. For the ad valorem
taxes people pay, we don't get a
lot of services. You don't see a
commissioner unless it's elec-
tion time."
Knight said that the county
has a whole of chiefs and very
n -
few; Indians. In Bowlang
Green, our management the
commission, police chief, city
-manager and .clerk. is just
seven percent of our budget.
Not like the county's," he point-
ed out.
"We held out with out volun,
teer fire department for two
years. For 30 years, we provid-
ed fire protection for a lot of the
county, too. Then, all of a sud-
den, we didn't know what we
were doing. The people- of
Bowling Green did not want to
give up their fire department,
they trusted them. The only way
we agreed was to have a station
there 24-7, because the people
wanted it that. way. We try to
reflect what the people want.
"We can manage our dollars
better than they can. We work
hard at it, no fancy buildings or
doodads, just work," Knight
concluded.

WAUCHULA
"When it comes down to it,
there's a difference in theory
and practice," said Wauchula
City Manager Rick Giroux. "It
comes down to home.rule, self-
dit-ection, resident responsive-
ness," he said.
He likened it to doing away
with the county government
and just having state rule. "Why
is it necessary to have the-coun- .
ty, if the state can do it? It
already does in the Department
of Transportation, water man-
agement districts and such. But



g
L
Continued From fA
in Hillsborough, Charlotte and
Polk (Haines City) counties.
The project has been in the
discussion stages for about six
months.
Teresa Carver, Hardee
County solid waste director,
said the county landfill lias
about three years of life left add
then the county would need to
develop an; adjacent jfive-acre
extension at a cost of $3.5.mil-
lion. This expansion would iiot
be needed if the regioitaidand-
fill it built.
The rate charged by the coun-
ty landfill to accept garbage is
$62.50 a ton.
. The regional landfill would
charge about $22 to $24 a ton,
said Salopek, It would be open
from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. There
would be about 50 tractor-trail-
ers a day bringing household
waste. The route would be from
State Road 66 to Crewsville
Road.
The regional landfill would
require no investment by
Hardee County and would be
privately owned and erased.
The landfill couldTe up to
200 feet deep, depending on site
analysis, and protected) with a
thick plastic liner. The landfill
would be covered daily and
monitored for 30 years after
closure. Methane gas could be
capttited and used for electrical


generation.
The garbage would go
through a transfer station,
where metals, construction
material, wood products, tires
and other recyclables are
removed, before it is hauled

in hH < t a fall is located
two miles east of Wauchula and
is on & 96-acre site. Some 12.5
acres has been used and is in the
process of being closed out.
Another five acres being used
has a life of about three years
left, said Carver. -


if a Wauchula resident calls a
state office, how responsive are
they don't hold your breath.
The residents can just call their
local offices and, depending on
work load, will get a tWponse
the same day or the next."
Giroux gave a more local
example. "The Sheriff's De-
partment has jurisdiction all
over the county. The police
department covers the same ter-.
ritory. But is that really the
case? The deputies have to
cover large areas. The local
police can respond much quick-
er because their special service
is more focused.
"Can the county guarantee
local residents wpuld get the
same level of services? And, the
citizens would lose the ability
to be in charge of their commu-
nity. It's a different paradigm.
There's home rule for a reason.
Residents of the city are used to
doing things in a: certain way.
They don't want, to lose that
destiny," Giroux concluded. .
Wauchula Mayor David
Royal said it simpler.


"My first reaction is that I'm
not in favor of that. You're deal-
ing with two different entities.
The city offers a lot of services,
especially to older people. That
would all disappear.
"I can understand Duval
County. Jacksonville dominates
the whole county. We have
much smaller communities. I'd
have to see the details of what
they're talking about, but if it
doesn't work, it would be very
hard .to go back. It would be
costly to start up again.
To be honest, I don't see any
positives. I understand the need
to reduce spending, but there's
other ways to do that," Royal
said. .
ZOLFO SPRINGS
"I think they will have a hard
time getting this approved. The
elected officials here won't
have it. It might have benefits,
but I don't know," said Zolfo
Springs Town Manager Linda
Roberson.
"My personal reaction is that
I would hate to lose the town of ,
Zolfo Springs, because I love


Continued From lA'
who confided in him. allegations to police if she
Following that, the pastor wanted to. In an interview with
confronted Aguilar, who denied Dowden, she described sexual
the child's allegations. contact with Aguilar.
The pastor also attempted to An investigation ensued, with
report the allegations to author- Dowden arresting Aguilar on
ities, Dowden said. Sept. 7.
Now older, the alleged victim He was arraigned in Hardee
met with police herself after Circuit Court later in Septem-
learning she could report her ber, pleading not guilty to one


At an annual Florida citrus conference earlier this year we
learned Florida has 554,400 acres of bearing citrus groves com-
pared with 251,000 acres for California.
Citrus canker was a problem in Florida from 1910 to 1933,
again starting in 1986 in Manatee Cqunty, and again starting in
1995 in Dade County. Eradication efforts continued until 2006 fol-
lowing hurricanes Charley, Frances and Jeanne in 2004 and Wilma
in 2005. There is now a'canker management program. .
As the industry dealk with canker and now greening disease
spread by the Asian psyllid, the thinking is, "Failure is not an
option. We are in the battle to win."
Florida Citrus Mutual Executive Director Mike Sparks said the
citrus industry is challenged on three fronts: disease.pressure, high
juice inventories (about 30 weeks worth), and lower orange juice
consumption in the U.S.
Sparks said most citrus growers need a price of $1.21 to $1.25
a pound solids to "break even." He said the cash market last year
for earlies and mids was 90 cents a pound solids and $1.20 for
valencies at season's end.
-TheFlorida citrus industry employs aboutg4000-people and-
has a $9 billion economic impact annually.
Mahy growers are used to replanting-trees a way of life, said
Sparks. Growers in the past have survived low prices, pests, dis-
eases, freezes and hurricanes.
Sparks said orange juice is a wholesome, great-tasting product.
Florida's great climate is good for oranges, tourists, pests and
diseases. '
Citrus greening can kill a tree within two years, said Sparks.
There are over 100 research projects underway to combat this dis-
ease,
The Florida.industry in the past has produced up to 240 mil-
lion boxes in a single year, but the USDA estimate for the 2009-10
season is 136 million boxes, 16 percent less than last year's crops
"We hope to develop pn orange tree resistant to greening. I am
optimistic we can cure the disease or manage it. Last years grow-
ers agreed to spend $10 million to $12 million to fight greening.
This disease came to Florida through the Port of Miami.
The psyllid got herein 1998 and we found the disease in 2005.
Citrus production in Martin County is about over due to greening."

How good is the Hardee Wildcat football team? Pretty darn
good so far. The Cats are playing crisp disciplined football, are off
to a 5-0 start and ranked NO. 3 in the state 3-A poll by sportswrit-
ers, trailing Cocoa and Glades Central. *
Hardee is off this week and plays at Estero next week. Hardee*
however, did lose a close spring game to Lake Wales and itrthei
opening game fell behind Fort Meade 13-0 ib a 400-second fright
before the home fans. The game \vas cancelled by a lightning
t rmso .
The coaches and players have done a fine job so far this sea-
son.

Congratulations to the No. 1 Florida Gators and the USF Bulls
. and Miami Hurricanes. Best wishes go out to 2-4 FSU and head.
coach Bobby Bowden for the rest of the season. .

Shame on Florida Power and Light (FPL) and Progress Energy
for seeking electric rate increases of $1.3 billion and $500 million
annually, respectively, and not wanting to share payroll information
of employees making at least $165,000 a year.
Gov. Charlie Crist is against the proposed rate hikes which are
being considered by the Florida Public Service Commission. The
PSC has ordered the payroll information before making a decision.
The Miami Herald has reported FPL has budgeted $40.5 mil-
lion for 42 executive positions. FPL CEO Armando Olivera, who
receives a salary package of $3.6 million per year, defended the
salaries, saying FPL needs good people with good compensation,
according to the Herald and Brechner Report;
Those salaries are outrageous. You could cut Olivera by a fac-
tor of 10 and he would be making $360,000, far more than the
Florida Governor. Florida homeowners and business owners
deserve a break from greedy, arrogant electrical power compares.

On Monday night Bowling Green received 2.25 inches of rain,
Parts Qf Hardee County got one inch of rain while other areas got
two-tenths or less.

A recent price quote for hamlin oranges was $1.25 a pound
solids, reported local citrus grower Kenny Sanders. Due to a small-
er orange crop at least one or two citrus plants may not open until
late November.


Beatriz Rodriguez was chosen as 2009 Hardee Senior


YOU Can Appear In . .
Odf 8
you a poet? Let us sh 10 0
thia- owapaper in "Poetip
n reader submise


orlax77 Dear


Homecoming King Eric Baditio was crowned at the Homecoming Dance. He Isshowrn


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- *

Pre-register For
A.C.T. Class
Pre-registration is required
for the Nov. 19 Pre-A.C.T.
shsatnods ap of ou
Florida Community College.
The course will include lan.
guage arts, math and test-
taking tips
The course will go from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost of
$39 Includes a book. To pre-
register, go to Building B at
the Highlands Campus or
stop by any of the college
campuses. For more infor-
mation, call 773-2252.


Mountain Moment


JObituaniesl R"'~LRSNTO


W n tobTHROWDOWN
Where: Magnolia Manor Park,
Chamberlain Blvd, Wauchula, FL
Contest Start Time: 10:00 am
Grill-Masters everywhere come out to the
lST ANNUAL MAGNOLIA MANOR PARK
BBQ CONTEST
to see who takes the crown for the best BBQ.
Come and take part in this competition of food and fun.
Entries will be judged; prizes awarded for
1st $150 2nd ~ $75 3rd ~ $25
.
Eritrants have the o tion to sell BBQ to the pubhc*
ARE OU READY!
www.magnoliamanorpark.com
863-773-4045
for more information.
This is a charitable event. Proceeds from this contest go towards
~ continued improvement to Magnolia Manor Park.
soc10:15p


cOURTESY PHOTO
Dr. MIchele Polky principal of Hardee tesilor HIgh School, recently presented the
school's AIr Forbe JunIor Reserve Officer Raining Corps cadets with their first-ever
"Distinguished Unit" strdamer, earned Iti the past academic year of 2008-09. Shown at
the occasion are (from left) Polk and cadets Col. Crystal. Heberl, Lt. Col. Danson
Hensley and Senior Master Sgt. Andrew Hernandez.
Art is the desire of aman to express himself, to record the i*eactions of his personall-
ty to the world he Ilves In.
-Amy Lowell



ANNOUNCEMENT


ay Laundry & Cleaners
Located.at
205 E. Bay St. Wauchula
e g



We would like to thank.all of our loyal customers that have
been with as through the good and bad times. We have served
Hardee County sinde 1968 and we gladly look forward to
rving you with the same quick and courteous
SerVlce as an years past.
Margie Griffin & Leigh Souther
Hours: Mon.- Fri. 7:30 am 5:30 pm; Closed Saturdays socio:150


October 15, 2009, The H-erald-Advocate 3A


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate .
It's less than two weeks away.
The Hardee girls volleyball
team is working its way to dis-
trict playoffs the week of
October 26. ,
The girls still had five match-
es left after last week's efforts.
This week, they hosted Sebring
on Monday, went to Avon Park
Tuesday and travel up to Fort
Meade today (Thursday). Next
week concludes the regular sea-
son with a visit from Avon Park
on Tuesday and a trip to Lake
Placid next Thursday.
Last week began with a home
match, against District 3A rival
Sarasota Booker, with strong
results which will put Hardee in
good stead in the opening round
of playoffs on Oct. 26 at fqurth-
seeded Booker. The Lady
Wildcats, seeded fifth, will need
to win there to advance to the
Oct. 27 match at host DeSoto.
DeSoto and Cardinal Mooney
are currently tied for the top
slot, with Sebring third.
The Tuesday clash with
Booker was a classic brouhaha.
Hardee won 104 points and
Booker only 102, but those
were well-spaced to get the
long five-set victory. Along the
way, Hardee missed 21 serves,
nearly a whole game's worth.
Hardee won the first game
25-19, but dropped the next two
25-22 and 28-26. The Lady
'Cats came back to win the
fourth game 28-17. The first
server for Booker in the fifth
game ran off six service points
in a row, giving the Lady
Tornadoes a big lead in a decid-


ing game which only goes to 15
points. Hardee lost 15-8.
Junior Yesenia Vargas was a
big factor for Hardee, with 10
kills and nine good passes,
Classmate Eryn Mahoney
added eight kills. Soph Summer
Palmer got in 21 good serves,
missing on only one.
Other varsity players are
Lacey Garza, Vanessa Garza,
Brenda Zamora, Meghan Gra-
ham, Sarah Beyers, Daisha
Blandin, LaCreshia Carlton and
Marisa Shivers.
It was a different story last
Thtirsday when Hardee went to
Sarasota to play against top-
seeded Mooney, losing 25-6,
25-12 and 25-7.
"They bounced back from a
slow first game to be more
\competitive in the last two, and
played pretty well against such
competition," said Head Coach
KenLeupold.
The junior:varsity girls split
their matches last week.
. They won strong against the
Booker junior Lady Tornadoes,
with scores of 25-13 and 25-11.
Soph Ana Marie Saldivar led
the team with nine service
points and freshman Desiree
Smith added eight more,
The JV girls, however, also
lost to Booker, in games of 25-
7 and 25-12, although they
played an improved second
game, said Leupold.
Other JV players are Angeli-
ca Flores, Kayla Nichols, Han-
nah Jacobs, Ashley Nichols,
Ashley Armstrong, Maria An-
selmo, Kaitlyn Rowe, Katie
Wheeler, Kailah White, Jessica
Harrison and Myah Gonzalez.


.;: PC-
--saw
PHOTOS BY RAl..PH HARRISON
Taking the court for the Hardee varsity volleyball girls team are (kneeling, right to left, LaCreshia Cariton, Daishia
BlandIn, Brenda Zamora, Vanessa Garza, Lacey Garza and Marisa Shivers; (back ros ) Head Coach ,Ken Leupold,
Sarah Byers, Summer Palmer, Meghan Graham, Yesenia Vargas, Nyshira Jackson and Eryn Mahoney.


THE EVERGREENS
Ghristmas in July . there is nothing better to give you this
feeling than walking through b Christmas-tree farm on a crisp
mopgrain gnorniqg.
.The newly planted treesfooked so forlorn and insigDificantas
the beside t 4 I Go e.. mature trees, and a chuckle
escaped line as Charlie Brown's Christinas tree came to mind. I
.glanced at the little branches of the young seedlings and noticed
they appeared so fragile and delicate, barely looking strong enough
to withstand the weight of the dew that glistened on their young
framesin the early morning light.
The fully grown trees, planted further down the road, bristled
gently is the breeze as they beckoned my admiration of their
majestic beauty. Their branches, so expertly trimmed to perfect
proportions welcomed my presence as I marveled at the magnifi-
cent evergreens before me. The dark brown tree trunks stood fear-
less as they proudly supported the many furry branches with their
deep green needles that whispered soft melodies in the gentle
breeze to those willing to lend an ear.
A sudden longing stirred within me.
"Lord, make me like the evergreen tree that stands fearless.
Despite winter's storms its branches never weaken or break with
the weight of heavy snow, and its color never fades away. It
remains faithful and true to itspurpose and never wavers."
"But, My child," He gently whispered, "it is only when you are
barren and weak that you can truly experience the touch of the
Master's Hand as He breathes new life into brittle limbs, awaken-
ing new life into the most withered of souls. If you were never
weak, how would you truly discover the full extent of My
strength?"
As I basked in the knowledge of His overabundant love, mercy
and grace for a wretched i-reature such as me, the words of 2
Corinthians 12:9-10 came to mind, singing a sweet refreshing lul-
laby tp my weakened spirit. The words of this Scripture reminded
me-that Christ's grace is sufficient for me, for His power is made
perfect in my weakness. .
With a new spring in my step, I continued on my journey rev-
elitig irfHis assurance that I can actually rejoice during my times
- of Weakness, for it is during these times that I will experience the
fullness of Hik power.
Thus, instead of feeling discouraged, I can be content with
weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions and calamities, for His
Word assures me that when I am weak, He is made strong within
me.
Thank you, Lord, for reminding me that in my weakness, l am
madq strong by Your grace and that, in spite of my human frailty,
You have promised that You will never leave me or forsake me.
And, best of all, You will always love me.


Playing hard for the Hardee Junior varsity volleyball squad are (kneeling, from left)! Kayla Nicho~ls, Myah Gon~zales,


ABRAHAM C.
POLLOCK JR.
Abraham C. Pollock Jr., 49,
of Zolfo Springs, died on
Monday, Oct. 12, 2009, in
Sebring.
Born Aug. 11, 1960, in Zolfo
Springs, he was a lifetime resi-
dent, a truck driver and meniber
of St. Paul Missionary Baptist
Church of Zolfo Springs.
Survivors include his wife
Geraldine Pollock of Zolfo
Springs; four daughters, Laura
Colbert of Lakeland Tanisha
Thompson of Bartow, Gerniic-
ka Pollock of Zolfb Springs and
Victoria Madison of Arcadia;
two sons, Kevin Anderson of
Lakeland abd Herman Thomp-
son of Zolfo Springs; and his
mother Catherine Pollock of
Zolfo Springs.
Visitation is Friday from 5 to
7 p.m. at St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church in Zolfo
Springs. Services are Saturday
at 2 p.m. at the Beulah
Missionary Baptist Church in .
FortMeade.
Williams Funeral Home
i Bartow


Volleyball Girls







4IA The Hqrald-Advocate, Oct'ober 15, 2009


wiA IdeA T60Ca
Oc 6rn2 9 uWaulcahula' July
22, 1943, she was a lifelong res-
ident of Hardee County. She
was a security guard for.a'man-
ufacturing plant. .
Survivors ,include one son,
Robert Skinner of Orlando; one
daughter, Kathryn Hinerman of
Bowling Green; brother
Thomas Weiscoff of Michigan;
and two granddaughters,
Jessica Summerlin of Wauchula
and. Jennifer Hinerman of
Bowling Green.
Visitation was Monday from
1 to 2 p.m. at the Chapel of
Robarts Family Funeral Home
.withservices at 2 p.m. with the
Rev. Jimmy Morse officiating.
Interment followed at New
Zion Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

:
The average cruise ship
burns about a gallon of
fuel when it moves six
inches.

rn II
8 '$YOU[@ c..Alt8MOki
~ ~ ~


MCLEOD
Patricia A. McLeod, 66, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
Oct. 6, 2009, at Wauchula.
Born in Wauchula on July
22, 1943, she was a lifelong
resident of Hardee County.
She was a security guard for a
manufacturing plant.
Survivors include one son,
Robert Skinner of Orlando;
one daughter, Kathryn Hiner-
man of Bowling Green; broth-
er Thomas Weiscoff of Michi-
gan; and two granddaughters,
Jessica Summerlin of Wau-
chula and Jennifer Hinerman
of Bowling Green.

fro slitt iC.m tstheMond
of Robarts Family Funeral
Home with services at 2 p.m.
with the Rev. Jimmy Morse
officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at New Zion Cemetery.
*

FUNERAL .MQIVI S
529 w. May street
wnuchula




Ro ra ap


a 00th 8#0#
.










.


MARJORIE'lMEz
FICKNER
Marjorie "Inez" Fickner,
83, of Sebrigg, a foriner r^esi-
dept of Bowling Green, .died
on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2009, at
Avon Park.
Born in Litskillet, Ala., on
April 2, 1926, sh6.moved to
Hardee Cogniy at age $.from
Alabaina and lived most .gf
her life in Hardee County. Shd
was employed at ,Hert'
Jewelry Store and hater as
manager of convertience
stores. She attended the First
Baptist Church of Bowhng
Green.
Survivors include one son,
Walter Eugene fickner of
lviemphis, Tenn; two daugh-
ters, Debbie Bryan and hus-
add Charles of Sebring, and
Diana Cheryl Owen of Avon
Park; five grandchildren; and
13 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Tudsday at


1Q:30 a.m. at thd Chapel of
Roblirts Family Funeral
Hothe, where services were
held at 11 a.m. with the Rev.
lioland Da9is officiating.
Interment followed at
Bowling Green cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


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MARJORIE 'INEZ'
FICKNER
Marjorie "Inez" Fickner, 83,
of Sebring, a former resident of
Bowling Green, died on Satur-
day, Oct. 10, 2009, at Avon
Park.
Born in Litskillet, Ala., on
April 2, 1926, she moved to
Hardee County at age 2 from
Alabama and lived most of her
life in Hardee County. She wa?
employed at Herr's Jewelry
Store and later as manager of
convenience stores. She attend-
ed the First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green
Survivors include one son,
Walter Eugene Fickner of
Memphis, Tenn; two daughters,
Debbie Bryan and husband
Charles of Sebring, and Diana
Cheryl .Owen of Avon Park;
five grandchildren; and 13
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday at
10:30 a.m. at the Chapel of
Robarts Family Ftmeral Home,
where services were held at 11
a.m. with the Rev. Rolqnd
Davis officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at Bowling Green
Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wasichaila

JAMES L. HALL
James L. Hall, 83, of Walton'
W. Va., died on Tuesday, Oct. 6,
2009 at Heartland of Charles-
ton. Oct. 17 1925 in
Born on .
Seattle, Wash.,. he was a
mechanic and was aU S. Navy
veteran of WorlddWar eath b
He was prece e in y
his parents Louis E. and Stella
M. Kendall Hall; and a son'
Ronald I. Hall.
Survivors include his wife
Phyllis Finney Hall; two daugh-
ters, Liana L. Rexroad and hus-
band Gary of Walton, W. Va.'

anddBDenday5 B lil a hu
son Daniel L. Hall and wife
Kim of Belle, W. Va.; and four
grandchildren.
Services were Thursday, Oct.
8, at the funeral home with
Pastor Charles Harley officiat-
ing. Burial, with military grave-
side rites conducted by Amert-
can Legion Post #61 of Clen-
denin, was in the Ryan/Rexroad
Cemetery on L)nch Ridge neat
Walton.
Taylor-Vandale
Funeral Home
Spencer, West Va.


9R 00ERS GNOkg

EUGENE L
YOUNG
Eugene it. Young, 85, of
Sebring, died on Wednesday,
Sept. 23, in Sebpng.
Born on Sept. 16, 1924, he
moved from Wauchula to
Sebring eight months ago. He
was a diesel mechairit in the
trucking indlisity arid attend-

edCthe Tab rnaclaerroa e ts
were made by the local funer-
at home.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 w. Alain Street
Wauchula



Providedasacourtesyof
Robarts Family Funeral Home


9R 00thy 8#0&9
-
ALEXANDER
MOISES LEAL
Alexander Moises Leal,
one year old, of Zolfo
Springs, died on Thursday,
Sept. 24, 2009, at Tampa.
He was born in Lakeland
on Aug. 9, 2008.
Survivors include his
father Carlos Trujillo and
mother Anahi Paola Leal.
Visitation was Sunday,
S 27 f 10ept. ,. rom a.m. to noon
at the funeral home. Services
were Monday at 10 a.m. at St.
Michael's Catholic Church.
Interment followed in Wau-


chula Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


JOHN MELL DUGGAR
John Mell Duggar, 36, of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
Oct. 10, 2009, at Lake City.
Born in Arcadia, on Sept. 30,
1973, he came to. Wauchula
from Palmetto in'1994. He was
a truck driver.
He is survived by his daugh-
.ter, Ashley Duggar of Wau-
chula; parents, Emory :and
Anita Duggar of Palmetto;
grandmother Thelma Paige of
Wauchula; sisters Cindy Tuten
_of Manatee County and Vicky
Rineer of Pennsylvania; and
brother Dewayne Duggak of
Alabama.
Fainily visitation was Wed.
nesday from I to 2 p.m. at
Northside Baptist Chui-ch
where memorial services were
held with the Rev. Albert Blum
officiating. .
The Neptune Society
Jacksonville
:
..RONALD W. WRIGHT
Ronald W. Wright, 59, of
New Tripoli, Pa., died on Tues-
day, Sept. 8, 2009.
Born in Canton, N.Y., on
Sept. 5, 1950, he was a U.S.
Army Vietnam War veteran
whoMas awarded two Purple
Hearts. A graduate of Hardee
High School, he set the pole
vault record of 17 feet, which

stilMA s preceded in death by
his parents Charles W. Wright
and Constance Hobbs Wright.
Survivors include his wife of
29 years, Jane Miller Wright;
two daughters, Ronee L. Wright
of Orefield, Pa. and Taryn J.
Wright of Bethlehem, Pa.;
brother Douglas R. Wright and
wife Sharon of Lutz; sister
rough and -huk
bi en .af Zephythalls,
an nds aden J. Wright.
Memorial services were held
on Saturday, Sept. 12, at 11 a.m.
in Jacob's Church of New
Tripoli with the Rev. Scott L.
Shay officiating. Interment was
private.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to the Disabled
American Veterans in care of
the funeral home at P.O. Box
196TSchtiecksvilleG a. 18078
0196.
Heintzelman Funeral
Home Inc. -
Scliriecksville, Pai.


00(# 8#0#
9

SOLEDAD
MENCHACA
DESANTIAGO
Soledad Menchaca DeSan-
tiagb, 88, of Witichula, died
on Friday,. Oct. 12, 2009 in
Zolfo Springs. .
Born.Dec. 18, 19?0 in Los
Haros, Mexico, she came to
Hardep County frain Meyi e
30 years ago. She was a
homemaker and a Catholic,
She was preceded in death
by her husband Ausevelo
DeSatitiago; two sons, Rd
riguo DeSantiago and Ismael
DeSantiagol and on daughter
Sarita DeSantiago.
Survivors include four
sons, Juan Pablo DeSantiago,
Pedro DeSantiago and Rafael
DeSantiago, all of Wauchula,
and Joel DeSantiago of
Bowling Green; two daugh-
ters, Maria Tala DeSantiago
of Mexico and Olivia Hollon
of Zolfo Sptitigs; 34 grand-
children; and '40 great-grand-
children.
Visitation was Tuekday,
Oct. 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel. A
Mass of Christian burial was
celebrated at 11 a.m. on
Wednesday at St. Michael
Catholic Church, followed by
interment at Wauchula Ceme
tery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


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NAME .


I ADDRESS I


Biologists with the Florida
Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission and the U.S..De-
partment of Agriculture Wild-
life Services will collect sam-
ples from bunfer-harvested
ducks to test for the highly con-
tagious-avian virus H5N1.
Sampling will occur at vari-
ous times during the migratory
game bird hunting season this
fall and.winter.
. Biologists will obtain sam-
ples at several duck-hunting hot
spots throughout Florida, in-
cluding the PotashCorp Wild-
life Management Area in White
Springs, Stormwater Treatment
Area 3 and 4 (also referred to as
STA 3/4) in Palm Beach
County, and the T.M. Goodwin
Waterfol'vl Management Area in
Fellsmere.
Hunters will not needto sur-
render their ducks, and partici-
pation is volt.intary.



ZEBBIE LANE 'ZEB'
GILLISPIE
Zebbie Lane "Zeb" Gillispie,
62, of Fort Meade, died on
Wednesday, Oct. ,7, 2009, in
Fort Meade.
Born on Oct. 24, 1946, in
Wauchula, he was a lifelong
Fort Meade resident. As a cat-
tleman and citrus grower, he
continued to do business in
Wauchula. He was a member of
Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church of
Fort Meade, a U.S. Army
National Guard veteran, and a
member of the Florida Farm
Bureau, Elks Lodge, Moose
Lodge, Florida Cattleman's
Association, Fort Meade
American Legion Post #23 and
the Fort Meade Historical
Society.
He was preceded in death by

hisdpE ItsG bbile Gillispie Sr.
Survivors melude his wife of
44 years, Paulette Gillispie of
Fort Meade; son Zebbie Lane
"Z.J." Gillispie Jr and wife
Tiffany of Atlanta, Ga.; daugh-
ter Sheila Yvonne Dolinger and
husband Michael of Atlanta,
Ga.; brother Phillip JeGillispie
of Fort Mqade; sister Winifred
Clariaga f Lak je d;' and
griendcid b ?WIll liane
Doligger aid Ma3mell fleath
Dolinger, botli of Atlanta, Ga.
Visitation was Saturday at
the funeral home. Services were
Sunday at 3 p.m. at Mt. Pisgah
Baptist Church with the Rev.
Harold Armstrong and the liev
Jack Cochian Jr.~officiating.
Interment followed in Mt.
Pisgah Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
may be made to Caring
People's Ministry, 5207 MasoTi-
Dixon Ave., Bowling Green,
33834.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade


Biologists will obtain the
samples by swabbing the
ducks' respiratory and digestive
tracts. Scientists at a diagnostic
lab will test the samples for the
virus thatcauses avian influen-
za and for other diseases-
While'it is extremely unlikely
that hunters could contract
avian influenza from wild birds '
in Florida, officials recommend
taking common-sense precau-
tions to reduce the risk of con-
tracting any disease from wild-
life.
For instance, do not harvest
or handle wild birds that are
obviously sick or found dead;
wear rubber gloves while clean-
Ing game; clean game outdoors
and stay upwind of game
while cleaning; and do not eat,
drink or smoke while cleaning
game.


It is also important to wash
hands with soap and water
immediately after handling
game or cleaning big feeders.
Wash tools and work surfaces
used to clean game birds with
soap and water, and then disin-
fect them with a 10-perceit
bleach solution.
In addition, hunters should
separate raw meat, and any-
thing it touches, from cooked or
ready-to-eat foods to avoid con-
tamination.
The FWC recommends cook-
ing game birds thoroughly.
Meat should reach an internal
temperature of 165 degrees
Fahrenheit to kill disease organ<
isms and-parasites.

Each garden has its own sur-
prise. -


Hunters' Ducks May





















































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October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Fourth Of July Preparations
The boys have not forgotten the Fourth of July,
and from the preparations being made it is evi-
dent that a big time is anticipated. A tulg v.ace
on Peace river, which is the western boundary of
the town, will be one of the mott amusing fea-
tures.
Already over 30 applicants have notified the
committee that they will enter the race and each
one is confident that he will secure the prize.
Some of the boys have begun practicing early in
the morning, and housekeepers who live near the
river are chaining their dogs to the tub-handles,
as the boys who have no teams and are too lazy
to "tote" their tubs are not over particular where
they borrow them.
Sack racing, climbing the greasy pole, and
numerous other amusements will be indulged in,
Beeves, sheep and hogs are contracted for and
barbecued meat and other good things will be in
attendance.
The brass band will of course furnish music for
the occasion, and a pavilion is being erected on
the scene to give the ladies an opportunity of wit.
nesting the race.
On the night of the 4th a grand ball will be
given at the new hall, and dancing will be kept up
all night.
Board Of Health
Very little is heard about yellow fever in town,
but when the board of health at Punta Gorda put
in their accounts to the new county commission-
ers, the people of DeSoto county will get up and
howl.
Large salaries and a great deal of powwow
seem to be the principal features of this board of
health. The people are not afraid of the yellow
fever, but are in mortal dread of the board of
health and hope to get rid of them soon.
Bone Beds
There have beed several parties in town lately
who seem to be greatly interested in the exten-
sive bone beds near the town. They don't give
much information, but ask a thousand and one .
questions and spend most of their time digging
and getting the numbers of the river land.
Fort Ogden
Aug. 9 The incorporation of Fort Ogden has
been completed by the election of the following
officers: mayor, J.O. Carr;.marshal, J. Madison
Williams; council, C.Y. Crawford, F.C. Bethea,
Stephen J. Carlton, J. Carlton, W.A. Johnson,
Elam B. Carlton,; clerk and treasurer, W.H.G.
Smart; S.J. Carlton was chosen chairman of the
board.
The territory incorporated is two miles square,
and includes sections 13 and 34 in township 39,
range 23, and sections 18 and 19 in township 39,
range 24 east.


Edited by Spessard Stone from the Florida
Times-Union and Daily News-Herald newspa-
pers of Jacksonville in 1887. It is quoted in its
originallanguage andgramman
Schools
June 2 The County Superintendent of
Public School for Manatee county reports 68
schools from Sept. 1, 1886, to May 1, 1887, 10 of
which were for less than three months.
There wqre 61 teachers employed at a net cost
of $6,464.30 for salaries,
There were 1,809 scholars enrolled.
The highest attendance was at Manatee, 68;
and at Joshua Creek, 50 (?), Fort Ogden, 59,
Palmetto, 53, Arcadia and Wauchula, each 52.
Elopement
June 11 The Rev. S.H. Nettles, pastor of
the Methodist Church at Arcadia, eloped with
Miss Leah Smith, the 17-year-old daughter of
Capt. Smith, keeper of the National cemetery at
Fort Barancas, on Wednesday night.
Nettles is about 40 years old and has-been.mar-
ried three times. The young girl with whom he
eloped was a member of his congregation and
decidedly pretty.
They left the county immediately after the cer-
emony, and although no definite news has been
received of their present whereabouts, it is gener-
ally believed that the pair are in Greensville, Ala.
The town is in a state of excitement over the
affair, And the particulars of the extraordinary
runawaymatch are withheld from the public by
the families of the parties concerned.
St John's Day
Thursday, June 30, Arcadia Friday was a
big day with the Arcadians, and more especially
with the Swedish portion of the population. It
being St.Solin's Day, a day which is observed
throughout Sweden.
Johnson & Isgren, who own and operate two
saw and planing mills and also the Arcadia
House, celebrated the day by giving an elegant
dance to which all were invited. In the afternoon
nearly all the young folks participated in an "old
country" open air dance around a May pole, and
from the frequent bursts of merriment one would
certainly believe that they were enjoying them-
selves.
The hotel, which was gaily, decorated and
almost hid with evergreens and flowers, present-
ed a beautiful sight, and with the delightful music
rendered by the Arcadian brass band, and the
presence of the pretty girls, one could easily
imagine lie was:in fairyland. .
After supper the entire party adjourned to the
new dancing hall and danced until near morning,
when tired and weary, they wended their way
home, feeling that they had spent one of the most
pleasant days in the history of the little city.


into this event, it should be our
b
t est yet!ll I am excited about all
ad leswi sa 4k ds ps wellaas
director of Main Street Wa
chula Inc.


businesses will be open or
shopping and dining. Hot dogs,
soda, water, roasted corn on the
cob, nachos and other goodies
will be on sale.
"There is so much packed


There*might not be a harvest
'full moon, but downtown Wau-
. chula will be fyll of fun during
the Friday Night Live "Harvest
Festival" tomorrow night from
5 to 9.
Let the kids play make-be-
lieve in their best costumes and
visit the downtown merchants
for somp trick-or-treating good-
ies frolit 5 to 8 p.m.
One of the harvest highlights
will be a Jack o' Lantern con-
test. Bring your best carved
pumpkin and enter it to win a
cash prize.
Then, shop for fresh produce,
guava jellies and cobblers, and
other baked gdods. Stop by the
petting zoo or take a hayride on
a tractor-pulled wagon, or both!
Spectators and participants
alike will get a kick out of the
pumpkin-seed-spitting or corn-
on-the-cob-eating contests.
Don't forget your camera for
a "Pumpkin Patch" photo you
can take, or select from a vari-
ety of sizes to purchase a pump-
kin of your own!
Visit participating downtown
merchants all week long and
enter for a chance to win a two-
night vacation and other door
prizes sponsored by Peace Riv-
er Electric Cooperative, includ-
ing a harvest basket, energy
savings basket, "Florida Month-
ly" magazine subscriptions and
more!
Drawings will begin at 8 dur-
ing the event, and you must be
present to wm.
But that's not all!
Attendees. can enjoy country
tunes from the stage provided
by the Nashville Road Cats. A
PRECo bucket truck will be on
hand for the kids to see, and
they can even try on gloves and
jackets.
Learn more about energy,
dairies, and 4-H. Keep your
kids safe with fingerprinting
and identification photos at the
ID Kit Booth. Stop by the
YMCA booth for more fun
activities and, of course, don't
forget about the inflatables for
your energetic little ones!
Main Street restaurants and


11.02 S. 6" Ave. Wauchula


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Can DajPir Cows Save Lives In A War Zone?


I was asked to move briskly from the AlviRAP
(Anti Mine Armor Protected) vehicle mto the
building where the training takeli place. Two
female Marines would take one student at a time
into a private guarded area and carefully and
thoroughly search her before allowing her to
enter the classroom. Classes woulc(last for th .
hours.
We were able to conduct several on-farm
demonstrations, but not without serious security
concerns. Future farm visits may be in question
because of our exposure.
One of the greatest concerns for otir security
involves the fact that we establish a predictable
schedule. It is very difficult to contact students to
change schedules and locations at the la'st
moment. They must know well in advance where
and when we will meet, and therein lies the prob-
lem.
There are roughly 220 military camps in Iraq,
ranging from 25 soldiers to thousands. Many of
these camps are being downsized or eliminated.
Upon leaving, I was asked to pray for a group
of Marines. After my prayer, a Marine ap-
proached me and very politely told me, "Dr.
Lockie, all of us appreciate your prayer aind your
sincerity, but you are praying wrong. You see, we
don't want to come home. We want to go to
Afghanistan."
These young men and women volunteered to
serve. No one forced them to join the Marine
Corps. They are focused on their mission, well-
trained and ready to serve.
The morale among the 250 Marines with
whom I had daily contact was excellent. They
represent the best of America, and are deserving
of our gratitude and respect. When you see sol-
diers, go out of your comfort zone and thank
them for their service.
You'll be glad you did.
Lockie Gary most recently served as director of
the Hardee County Extension Service. He has
participated in multiple trips to the Middle East
over the years as an agriculture instructor He
returns to Iraq again this month.


with whom I had the pleasure of working was the
ePRT (embedded Provincial Reconstruction
Team). This group of about 20 subject-matter
specialists in-cluded military officers, civil
affairs personnel, logistical specialists, a veteri-
narian, irrigation and crop specialists, a reporter,
interpreters and translators. Their common pur-
pose is to empower the local government to gov-
ern its constituents more effectively.
Their full support and cooperation as well as
their experience in dealing with local politics and
understanding of the Iraqi culture have made my
job of training in dairy husbandry more produc-
tive.
My scope of work includes providing a five-
week, stand-alone teaching module on dairy cat-
t1e husbandry translated into Arabic. Assembled
for me to train were two groups of women at two
rural locations near Fallujah. Each of the groups
is being coordinated by a female veterinarian
who attends each class.
There are a total of 16.students ranging in age
from 28 to 60. About half of the students own
cattle or have previous cattle experience. The stu-
dent trainers were selected based upon their liter-
acy, their reputation within the community, their
people skills and their willingness to travel to
farms to train vulnerable widows.
They were asked to train 10 of the most desti-
tute widows in their immediate vicinity. They are
being paid for their services, and are being pro-
vided with training tools and livestock and vet-
erinary supplies,
Each and every class and field demonstration
is carefully monitored by a local sheik, selected
by a group of sheiks, to ensure that cultural sen-
sitivity and propriety is observed.
My typical day included living in a tent, par-
ticipating in a briefing by a Marine staff sergeant
at 6:30 a.m. and then traveling "outside the wire"
about 2-1/2 hours to our "classroom."
Upon arrival, the Marines would normally
search the area with dogs for explosives, conduct
a first sweep of the area on foot, and carefully
search each room of the buildings, including the
roof.


By LOCKIE GARY
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Names of individuals( niil'ytarypmits a id specific
locations have been ornitted by the author for
security reasons.
Most Americans would rathe not think about
the war in Iraq.
Fewer still want to know the details of how and
why an Iraqi widow, whose insurgent husband
was killed by a U.S. Marine, would join forces
with al Qaida to be trained as a suicide bomber.
Suffice to say that al Qaida recruiters are very
effective with their persuasive offers of cash to
support the children of suicide bombers after
they are gone and thepromise of entry into "par-
adise" for their active participation in jihad, or
Holy War.
Widowsleing enticed.ate often gang-raped in
order to drive them deeper into depression, and
to convince them that now they hitve shamed
their families and the reputations of their former
husbands. Becoming a suicide bomber and
killing infidels may then become a logical
choice.
The insurgency in Iraq is a different kind of
war which requires a different kind of weapon.
At the suggestion of a women's group, the U.S.
Marine Corps purchased 50 cows for 50 Irac)i
widows in the farming area surrounding Fallujah,
once the insurgent capital of war-torn al Anbar
province,
The cow purchase was seed as a step toward
re-e'stablishing Iraq'( once thriving dairy indlis-
try. It also maybe a way of helping women and
children hurt by the fietinent faihite bf the Iraqi
government to:provide tt(e pensions that Iraqi
law promises to widows. Widows with no other
income have.a marketable product to sell as well
as milk for their children. -
And, if the cow could be made to supply milk
beyond the family's needs, then cheese and
yogurt could be produced, and sold, as.:well and
the widow night be able to hope for a brighter
future.
The intent of the prograin is not entirely altru-
istic, however. With -a source of income andia


glimmer of hope, widows may be less inclined to
be recruited as suicide bombers and that could
save lives.
Many of the widows given a cow were not
"cow people." Not all the cows performed apre-
dicted, and there were other challenges. So the
Marine Corps contacted Land. O' Lakes, the
Minnesota cheese and butter company, to pro-
vide a trainer to instruct the widows in dairy hus-
bandry,
I feel privileged to be asked to train the Iraqi
widows over three six-week deployments. I am
now preparing for my third trip.
Land O' Lakes was hired by the Marine Corps
td examine the Iraqi dairy industry. Two Land O'
LAkes specialists conducted field research in the
fall of 2008, and concluded that there was enor-
mous growth potential for the industry in a milk-
drinking, cheese-eating nation that can locally
produce enough milk to satisfy only five percent
of the demand.
In Iraq, as in most Middle Eastern countries,
. most of the co\v work becomes the responsibility
of the women, eveIi in the presence of able-bod-
ied men. The women milk the cows and bring the
feed and fodder. They are assisted by the chil-
dren.
The cows for widows program has been great-
ly expanded beyond the original vision. The pro-
gram suggested by Land O' Lakes and approved
by the U.S. Marine Corps involves market analy-
sis, technical training in dairy cattle production,
rehabilitation of a milk collection center and con-
struction of a dairy processing plant.
: None of the progress made to date could have
been accomplished without the security provided
by the Marine Corps.
I found the Marines to be incredibly focused
and highly professional. They are very interested
in the project and have been helpful in every
way, They made me proud to be an Americari
slid, as an unarmed civilian, I always felt safe in
their custody, even in very touchy situations.
IVlay God continue to protect and direct their
steps.. n
The other group of highly trained professionals


cOURTESY PHOTOS
Lockie Gary (fatight) Is pictured wittthis stildents as he prepares for a milking demon-
.stration.


Lockle Gary ~scr~edlensa beucke ;t o ik iksple hc ece aiysnesct


Th mrcn rvlt n utor"lsro"t ntuc h rq oe ndiy


The Iraqi women I~sten carefully, often taking notes on what is said.


Armored protection is worn a~nd Is nearby at all times while traveling in ther ar~ .


CU JI






October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7A


HOUSes Were Made Of


home, she was now able to con-
tribute to the family income
without leaving her home.
Everybody in the family was
happy.
We dewormed the cow, vac-
cinated it against several local
diseases and trimmed its feet, as
the cow was old.
Several weeks later, we had a
ceremony where the women
were each presented with a
Certificate of Completion of the
Dairy Cattle Husbandry Train-
ing Course. The certificates
were framed with a gold seal
and signed by their instructor.
Children and family members
looked on as the women, one by
one, were called by name and
came forward to receive their
certificates. Although Huma's
face was covered, it had been
obvious that she had been cry-
ing throughout the ceremony.
As we left the village for the
12-hour trip back to Kabul, I
couldn't wait to ask my inter-
preter why Huma was crying
during the ceremony.
To my astonishment, he
replied that her husband had
died earlier that morning, but
that she had come to receive her
certificate because the day
before I had told the class that
after the ceremony, I was flying
back to America.
Never underestimate the
power of an animal.
Lockie Gary wrote this &(ory
about an earlier trip er
learning that much of
progress made in this vill
had been challenged by t
Taliban.


By LOCKIE GARY
Special To The Herald-Advocate
It is early morning in a
remote village of rural Afghani-
stan, and we are waiting.
We have been here since the
curfew lifted, and the villagers
am bringing in their cattle. We
are in a walled enclosure so as
not to attract attention, but a
crowd begins to gather as the
men and .boys bring in their
cows to be synchronized for
artificial insemination.
Bulls are arriving to be
checked for breeding sound-
ness. And calves by the droves
are arnving to be treated for
diari-hea and respiratory dis-
ease. A herd health clinic is
under way in an effort to protect
hundreds of animals from com-
mon diseases and to maximize
the reproductive performance
of village cattle.
Over 90 percent of the people
in this village rely upon live-
stock to put food on their tables.
Each family owns about an acre
of land. Their sheep, goats and
cattle are raised within their
walled compound, called home.
Often the cattle are housed in
a dungeon-like, underground
cell. The purpose is to shelter
the aniinals from cold weather
in winter and the blazing sun in
summer but, more importantly,
to keep them out of sight of the
Taliban, which for years has
taken or killed livestock for its
own purposes. There are no
banks in this remote area, and
these animals serve not only as
food but as a savings account
and insurance policy against


hard times,
Eighty women farmers are
being trained in dairy hus-
bandry in this village. They are
provided with a milk bucket
with lid, bleach, teat dip, and a
mineral block for their family
cow. They are also provided
with a sickle for harvesting fod-
der.
They are shown how to feed
the cow a balanced ration with
locally grown feeds. They prac-
tice hand milking their cow and
are given instruction in sanitary
milk handling. Many of these
ladies never learned to read, so
most of the instruction is hands-
on and intensely practical.
The responsibility of raising
livestock falls to the women
throughout Afghanistan. One of
these women is named Huma.
On a previous assignment in
this village, Hunfa's cow had
been inseminated. I had helped
her select the bull by showing
her pictures from the sire refer-
ence catalog. She had selected
the bull because he was "hand-
some." The bull also was
known for calving ease and
moderate milk production -
just.what her cow needed,
Huma had brought her cow
and its newborn palf for me to
see. She was accompanied by
her sickly husband and her
brother. She beamed with pride
as her husband, who had diffi-
culty speaking, told me that she
had surplus milk which she was
selling to the milk collector for
the equivalent of $7 per week.
Because women are not per-
mitted to work outside the


By ARACELI NAVARRO
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview was with Xeng Xiong,
who is now 64 years old.
Q: When you were in Laos, what
did you eat?
A: In Laos I ate a variety of vegeta-
bles, fruits, seafood and meat.
The types of vegetables eaten are
rice, corn, beans, mustard greens,
Chinese.broccoli, Chinese squash,
pumpkin, yucca, tomato, potato, bam-
boo shoots and more.
The kind of fruits I ate were peach,
guava, strawberry, mango, Laotian
orange, palmetto, papaya, banana,
pineapple, sugarcane, coconut and etc.
As for


seafood,


coURTESYPHOTO
Xeng Xiong in the days of his youth,
I was like every other child who lost
their parents. I cried waiting for my
parents to return hottle, and I couldn't
sleep while starving on an empty stom-
n ,
ach because there was no food.
Q: Where did you go after your
parents passed away?
A: I went to Xieng Khouang, but I
.
stayed with my grandparents or my
aunt who would care for me.
Q: How did you leave Laos?
What did it feel liker to be free?
A: I walked from.Xieng Khouang to
Thailand without any lights to guide me
'and it took days. Then I flew a plane
to America, and I was happy with relief
to be free.
Q: What kind of stories or legends
were in Laos? What were they
about?
A: In a jungle there is a ghost mon-
key that is very fast and eats humans
that are camping at night. People can't
see it, and begin to fear because they
can only see the trees move from the
ghost monkey's movement. If you put
pepper in the fire and bum the forest
the ghost monkey goes away because it
n't live in such conditions.
g Atwther stWry is thit Emong people
with te last name of "Yang" become a
tiger after they pass away. Usually,
you can tell if the tiger was a person
because it has five fingersand the eyes
are vertical.
Q: What kind obeligions were
there inhte7s Buddhism, Christianity

and Shamanism.
Q: Where wereyou born?
A: I was born in Xietig Khouang,
Laos,.on Nov. 4, 1944.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given tp ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to iktWview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lishedhere as an encouragement to the
studenis:and for the.enjoyment of our
.readers.


kinds, crab
and shrimp.
Then, birds and cattle are eaten for
meat.
Q: How were homes structured in
Laos? Where did you stay?
A: Homes were made of bamboo,
which inside was wood and the roofs
are covered by tall grass. I slept on a
bed made out of bamboo, and the wood
provided support.
Q: What was it like during World
War II?
A: During World War II it was dev-
astating and a tragedy because every-
one lost someone from every family.
Q: Where were you in Laos?
What was it like there?
A: .1 was in Xieng Khouang, where
)here were tall mountains shaped as tri-
agles, and valleys with the Mekong
iver leading all the way to Vietnam.
here were jungles nearby in which I
ved,
Q: Where were your parents at
the time? Who did you stay with?
A: Well, my parents passed away in
ng Khouang, and I stayed with my
father, who was mayor, and my
grandmother, who was mistress.
Q:- Did you go toschool? How did
ydu get to school?
A: Yes, I went to school as a ninth-
gr de student, and I had to walk to
sc ool from Xieng Khouang at the ear-
lie t, around 6 a.m., and stay with rela-
tiv s that lived near the school every
Saqurda Int were your positions in

th military? What were your duties
fo each position?
: I served for a contract with U.S.
a ies. As a beginner I was a soldier,
in t@e year 1959 as a driver, and I was
later pronioted to captain in 1972 as Air
Force, working at the computers to heilp
the pilots who were flying jets.
Qi What hisppened to your par-
ents? How did you cope withyour
loss?
A: Well, my parents were illed and


BOXING WINNERS


Huma and her prized cow, which earned cash for her fam/iy.


Jerry Nance bf Dow Agrosciences
stands by a dogfennel. hn Roy
Gough of Crop Pro action
Services said troublesome sture
weeds include tropIcal soda apple,
dogfennel, smutgrass, broomsage
and cogongress; and citrus grove
weeds Include Spanish needle,
pigweed, vasey bean, balsalm
apple and milkweed vines; and
problem grasses Include nar-
rowleaf panicum and Bermuda.


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
WIIIIam Perry and Alvin English help cook steaks
for Pi.esture Weed Day held at the Range Cattle
StatIon In Ona on Sept. 29. The weed day Is held
every four years to recommend herbicides, treat-
ment methods, and sprayer calibrations to com-
bat problem weeds.


PHOTO BY JIM.KELLY
Ruben Ozuna (left), 14, a Wauchda ninth grader, In late September won a 118-pound
weight divisIon bout by defeating Ivoty Sparrow, 16, In three roumfs #tt INalledelphla. In
center Is TVoy Carter of Archdia. He is a boxing trainer and promefer WhWaynerly IIved
In Philadelphia and Wauchula. At right Is Victor Galvan, 16, of Aroadlairlio dron the 712-
pound clasa In matches held Sept. 25 and 26. Carter plans to have a boxing show In
Wauchula In January. Ruben Ozuna wII leave Oct. 14 for an Invitational national boxing
tournament in San AntonIo, Texas. He hopes to make the 2012 U.S. OlympIc Tham and
then have a pro career. HIs parents are Roger and StephanIe Salater. Carter gave a
special thanks to Omega Boxing on Maple Ave. In Somellng Green runby Dahlel Lozano,
who was Ozuna's trainer. Ozuna started boxIng in Wauchula at Age 4 at 'koy Carter's
Gym on MaIn Street. Carter can be reached at 863-244-1144.


Reyne Speckman, an IFAS exten-
sIon scientist, stands by a bushy
bluestem. Edgar DavIs said local
problem weeds Include smut-
grass, cogon grass, tropical soda
appy,. pigweed, dogfennel, wax
myrtle, blackberry, lantana, rag-
weed and thistle.


iStent Sellers, who coordinated Pasture Weed


Can 1 Cow Make A Difference?


:


Research Center: Holds. Weed Day


'~~r~










IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDER COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 25-2009-CA-000519
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
va
KENNETH T. MAYES, et al,
Defendant(a). 7

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
KENNETH T. MAYES
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
7155 W irrATE ROAD 64
ONA, FL 33865
CURRENT ADDRESS.
UNKNOWN
DENISE SAMON MAYES A/K/A
DENISE MAYES
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
LSTA8TE ROAD 64
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR.
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR.
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, QEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to forolose a mortgage on
the following property in HARDEE
County, Florida:

SOCTI NA3 ORO NSHOp
34 SOUTH, RANGE 23
EAST, HARDER COUNTY,
FLORIDA, MORE PARTICU.
LARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: COMMENCE
A HOEEN THE MSR
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
SAID SECTION 35;
THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE EAST LINE OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER
'OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER A DISTANCE OF
22.33 FEET TO A POINTsON
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF STATE
ROAD NO. 64; THENCE
WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY A DISTANCE OF
200.00 FEET TO THE
PH TCEOF BEGINNING
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 20.00 FEET;
THENCEOFMSO.0A FD
THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WEST A DIS.
TANCE OF 700.00 FEET;
?= EOFW 00A D
DHGN E 17 NOINUHES
SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 700.00 FEET;
THENCE WEST A DIS.
TANCE OF 36.00 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 20.00 FEET TO
A POINT ON THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 64; THENCE
EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE A DSITANCE OF
200.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING,
LESS THE FOLLOWING;
COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEASTERLY COR.
NER OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 Oi" SECTION 35,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 23 EAST, HARDEE
CHEUNNC SOUI"LHORID3
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WI ST AND
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 A
DISTANCE OF 22.33 FEET
TO A POINT ALONG THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF.
WAY OF STATE ROAD NO.
64; THENCE WEST AND
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-
WAY A DISTANCE OF
200.00 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 17
MINUTES 36 SECONDS
WEST A DISTANCE OF
20.00; THENCE EAST A
DISTANCE OF 123.00 FEET
FOR POINT OF BEGIN-


NING; THENCE CONTINUE
SAME LINE A DISTANCE
OF 57.00 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 17
MINUTES 36 SECONDS
WEST AND PARALLEL TO
THE EAST LINE OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 A DIS-
TANCE OF 700.00 FEET:
THENCE WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 13.00 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS EAST AND PAR-
ALLEL TO THE EAST LINE
A DISTANCE OF 641.73
FEET; THENCE NORTH 23
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 22
SECONDS WEST A DSI.
TANCE OF 35.89 FEET:


IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.'

The date of the first publication
of this Notice is October 8, 2009.
Persona epm tAt

21SeTr g e3 87d(
.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John W.H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
PW CO F 317 g
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (863) 773-0910
Florida Bar Number: 065013170:e-ise


and the part of the NW 1/4
of the SW 1/4 of Section 3,
Township 34 South, Range
25 East, Hardee County,
Florida, being described as
follows:
Commence at SW corner of
the NE 1/4 of said Block 13
and run N. 85*40'25" E. and
along the South IIne of said
NE 1/4, 114.07 feet to the
Po o Beg(n8nin4gd them:E*
and along the same IIne,
41.29 feet to the SE corner
of the NE 1/4 of said Block
13; thence continue N.
85*40'25" E. along the
same IIneo 47.87 feet in e
East IIne of NW 1/4 of the
SW 1/4 of said Section 3;
thence N. 0*00'00" E., and
along said East the,141.29
feet; thence N. 88*21't2" W.
and oru in Wrom the N
Section 3 to the NE 1/4 of
said Block 13, a distance of
81.87 feet; thence S.
2*41'24" W., 150.53 feet to
the Point of Beginning,
subject to road right of
way-
DATED this 2 day of October,
2009.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Courts
Hardee County, Florida
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
to:e-ise
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252009CA000373
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
WAUCHULA, a National Banking
Association organized under the
laws of the United States of
America,
Plaintiff,
va.
MICHAEL BRANDON LAMBERT
and SUSIE ANN LAMBERT, as
husband and wife,
Defendants

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45

toN T ED Gu m muaa
Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on September 30, 2009, in
the above-styled cauu, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the North front door of the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, on the 28 day
ofOctober,2009, at 11:00 a.m., the
fetiowing-described paperty:
Begin at the SW corner of
SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of SE 1/4
of Section 29, Township 34
RNo ha M mon
1300.00 feet for point of
beginning; thence continue
North a distance of 100.
2 th nee N h 89
100.00 feet; thence South a
distance of 100.00 feet,
thence South 89*42'00"
West a distance of 100.00
feet to point of beginning
Hoa dtner MF o no
double-wide mobile home
ID#H18186GL &
H18186GR.
DATED this 2 day of October,
2009.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Courts
Hardee County, FlorIda
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
lose
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA,
INANDFORHARDEECOUNTY
CASE NO.: 262009CA000093
IN RE1 THE ESTATE OF
MARY ELIZABETH BUMBY,
a/k/a ELIZABETH BUMBY,
deceased

~ NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of MARY ELIZABETH BUMBY, also
known as ELIZABETH BUMBY'
deceased, whose date of death
was August 28, 2009, and whose -
soolal security number le 255-10-
9579, la pending in the Circuit
Court for Hardse County, Florida' .
Probate Division, the addrea of
which la Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, FL 33873-1749. The
name and address of the Pdroonal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or


demands against the decadent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must flie Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUSLICAtlON OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM*
AII other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must flie their claimed with
this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-


River Resort in Lake Wales.
With limited FWC staff, the
Youth Hunting Program de-
pends on the work and re-
sources of its dedicate volun-
teers to help plan and facilitate
these safe, educational ind
memorable hunting experi-t
ences.
If you would like to receive
huntmaster training at the Oct.
24 class, contact Laura or Tom
McWatters at (561) 644-8Q20
or by e-mail at buckfeathers@-
bellsouth.net.
The program also is always
looking for landowners and
hunting clubs willing to donate
weekend youth hunts and other*
volunteers to be trained as
hunter-safety instructors, cooks
and guides.
For more information on
Florida's Youth Hunting Pro-
gram or to learn about how you
can become involved, visit
MyFWC.com/HunterSafety.




g

MONDAY. OCT. 19'
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meete.
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY OCT. 20
VHardee Lupus Support
Group, regular meeting,
conference room, Fibrida
Hos tal Wauc @h533 W
*
p.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. at
VHardee County' Obm-

OS On,0dygular o
nex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County School
Board regular meeting
Board Room 200 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
JUCIDIAL CIRCUIT OF
AND FOR HARDER
OUNTY
I

CASE NO. 252009CP000062
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
FREDRICK JUAN KERSEY, also
known as FREDERICK J.
KdRS also own eaFFRREED J.
KERSEY, deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
F DTFOR D J KER EY
also known as FRED J. KERMEY,
also Imown as FRED, KERSEH
deceased, whose date of death
was March 10, 2009, and whose
social security number is 266-52-
3954, la pending in the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which Es Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 38873-1749.
The name and address -of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Repreantative's Attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decadent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decadent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice la required to be served
must file their claimed with this
court WITHIN THE I.ATER OF 8
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 QAYS A#TER
TigE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claimed or demands against the
decedent's estate, must flie their
claims with this court WIThiN
THREE! MONTHS AFTER WHE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC*
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH*
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH 733.702 OF THE FLORII)A
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE Til E
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED W WO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of thle
Notice la Octobdr 15, 2009.
Personal Representative


Heidi Fpwler
714 Bay Laurel Ch:
Warner Robine, GA 31088
Attorney for Personal
Representative
John W. H. Burtongof
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, Florida 33878-1729
Telephone: (863) 778-3241 -
Iblocopier: (863) 778-0910
Florida Bar No. 0650137
st):15.22c


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission is
seeking volunteers to help run
its Youth Hunting Program.
The program is aimed at pro-
viding quality huntmg expert-
ences for,12- to 17-year-olds in
order to increase the number of
youths involved and to help
preserve the sport's future.
Interested m becoming one of
the program's huntmasters?
All you need is hunter-safety
certification and good commu-
nication and people skills.
If you fit the requirements,
and you would like to give back
to your commumty and the
sport of hunting by instructing
tomorrow's hunters in firearm
safety, outdoor ethics and
wildlife management, plan to
attend the FWC's next hunt-
master class.
The class is being offered on
Saturday, Oct. 24, from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. at Camp Mack's


NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 4, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 26 EAST,
HARDER COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, LESS ROAD RIGHT OF
WAY ON THE NORTH AND
WEST SIDES. A/K/A 422e
MAIN STREET E,
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the LIs Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this court on Oct. 1, 2009.
BAUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT
R
BY: NN CO K

in accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact
the individual or agency sending
the notice at Echevarria, McCalia,
Raymer, Barrett & Frappler, 601
Bayahore Blvd., suite 800, Tampa,
Florida 33606, telephone (813)
251-4766, not later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing Jmpaired, (TDD) 1-800-
1855-8771, or voice (Vf t-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
10:e,1se
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUCIDIAL, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.252009CP000097
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM
RONALD WATERS, deceased.
7

T NO miE 8tOatC D Sestate
of WILLIAM RONALD WATERS,
deceased, whose date of death
was September 12, 2009, abd
whose soclai security number la
264-06-0290, is pending in the
circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Divialon, the
address of which is Post Officy
Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florldh
33873-1749. The names and
addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.
AH creditors of the decedent


AH other creditors of the dece.
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, must file their
claimed with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC.
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH.
IN. THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH 733 02 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV.
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED. .
The date of first publication of this
Notice la October 15, 2009.
Personal Representative
Deborah Roberts Watere
5876 Rich Rd.
Bowling Grehn, FL 33834
Attorney for Personal
Representative
John W. H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, Florida 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (866) 691-1688
Florida Bar No. 0650137
1015,22c


8A The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009


THENCE NORTH 59
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 26
SECONDS WEST A DIS.
TANCE OF 34.20 FEEE
THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 18 MINUTES 09
SECONDS WEST A DIS.
TANCE OF 7.95 FEET TO
THE POINT OFJilEGINNING
TOGETHER WITH A 1988
SKYL MOBiLE HOME, ID
N 4 612 5AAN TITLE
32620295BX TITLE
45321338. AND TOGETH. .
ER WITH A PERPETUAL
NON-EXCLUSIVE, UNOB.
STRUTTED EASEMENT e
UOR NGRESSAEGRES
FUL PURPOSE OVER AND
ACROSS THE WEST 30
FEET OF LOT 1
DESCRipED AS FOLLOWS:
A PORTION OF SECTION
NTGOEWNSH PST34HSAORUDTEHE
COUNTY. FLORIDA, MORE
PARTICULAR LY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS;
COlulMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHWEST QUAR.
ogARFERHOFNORTHEAE
TION 35; THENCE SOUTH
00 DEGREES 17 MINUTES
36 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
THE NORTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER A DISTANCE OF
22.33 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF STATE
ROAD NO. 64; THENCE
WEST ALONG SAID
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF
400.00 ,FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 20.00 FEEt
THENCE EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 36.00 FEET
THENCE SOUTH 00
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS WEST A DIS-
HNNEEOF 58t00A F S
TANCE OF 364.00 FEE
THENCE NORTH 00
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 36
SECONDS EAST A DIS'
TANCE OF 605.00 FEET TO

A O F SRONDH TTA
ROAD NO. 64; THENCE
EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE A DISTANCE OF
328.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if
anyon florida Default Law Group,
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate Lake
Drive, SuIte 300, Tampa, Florida
33634, and flie the original with
n rt her efom am a n .
thereafter; otherwlae a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or et to shall be published

once each week for two consecu-
tive weeks in The Herald*
Advocate.


M hi NC sh na eo, g
2009.
B. Hugh Bradley
As Clerk of the Court
By Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
Disabilities Act, persons with did-
abilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact themindl-
vidual or agency sending the
notice at Echevarria, McCalia,
Raymer, Barrett & Frappler, 601
Bayshore Blvd., Suite 800, Tampa,
Florida 33608, telephone (813}
251-4766, not later than sever (7)
days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing Impaired, (TDD) 1-800.
955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
lo:e,15c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Or
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLAORRDDACNOAND FOR

CASE NO: 252008CA-000667
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC,
PLAINTIFF
VS. '
CHRISTOPHER D. LOVETE
WENDY M. LOVETT ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM.
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEEs
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS: JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSES-
SION.
DEFENDANTS)

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NalCE IS HEREBYmGIVENF
Judgment of ForecIosum dated
9/30, 22009 red n Civil
Circuit Court of the 10TH Judicial
Circuit in and for HARDEE County,
Wauchula, FI da wi iraell to the
at t h Frontdd for wh,
Courthouse at the ARDEE
County Courthouse located at 417
Wat Maki Street in Wauchula, FL
at 00 a. the 28th da of
descrl e set forth
said Summ lasudgment, to

UNI 15 AND BLOCK
z. NIT #1, RIVERVIEW
HEIGHTS, A SUBDIVISION
FNORHDAARDAESE PECROUPNLA7
BOOK 3 PAGE 15.
Any person claiming an interest in
the autus fromoth sal f
of the date of the IIs pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.

CLEB FGTHHeT8
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTYrCLERK
Dated this 1" day of October, 2009.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special acconimoda
tion should contact COURT
ADMINISTRATION, at the HARD-
EE County Courthouse at 941-
733-9853, 1-800-9155-8771 (TDD)
or 1-800-95@-8770 via Florida
Relay Services.


lo:e,1m
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 25-2008-CA-000706
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff
va.
JORGE VANEGAS et at
Defendant(s) /

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE


and other persons having claims
a demands aInst decedent's
estate on wh ma copy of this
riotice is uIred to be served
must flie air claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLIC.
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER.
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
HARDER COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252009CA000451
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
WAUCHUI.A, banking
Association organized under
the laws of the United States
of America,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHARYN K. SALTER, JAMES H.
WEBB, JR., and, ULLRICH'S
WATER CONDITIONING, Inc*
Defendants J

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO RS. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant
to Final Default Judgment and
Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on September 30, 2009, in
the above-styled cause, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the Nodh front door of the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, FlorIda, on the 28 day
of October, 2009, at 11:00 a.m., the
following-described property:
Being a part of the
Northeast 1/4 of Block 13
of the Original Survey to
the City of Wauchula, as
per Plat Book 1, page 1-29,


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur.
suant to a Final Judgment of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated
September 30, 2009 and entered
in Civil Case No.: 25-2008-CA.
000706 of the Circuit Court of the
TENT@ Judielal Circuit in and for
HARDEE County, Florida wherein
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, la the
Plaintiff and JORGE VANEGAS;
ANGY DIAZ A/K/A ANGY DEL
CARMEN DIAZ; TENANT #1 N/K/A
REBA SEAY, AND TENANT #2
N/K/A MELINDA SEAY are the
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
eat and best bidder for cash, at
thh NORTH FRONT DOOR OF THE
HARDER COUNTY COURTHOUSE
417 W. MAIN STREET at 11:00 AM,
on the 28th day of Oct, 2009, the
following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to wit:
THE NORTH 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 AND THE
NROTH 29.18 FEET OF
THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE
NORTH 1/2 OF THE


Hunin Pr Ha






October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Directing the Hardee Blue Star Brigade is Band Director


Returning for their final year in the Blue Star Brigade are (left side, front to back) Ray
Rodriguez, Jamie Pina apd MIguel Castro; (center, front and back) Irlande Metayer and
Prent/ss Westbrooks; (right, front to back, Alejandra Rodriguez, Nicolas Ortiz and
Stephen Burton.


The 2009 Hardee WIIdcat hand officers are (front row, from left) Yvonne Aguilar, Emily
Starratt and KrIsten Dukes; (second row, middle) Jason Arce; (third row) Zane
Whiteside, JamIe Bashore; (fourth row) Angelo Parkinson, Alejandra Rodriguez; (fifth
Row) Jimmy Fuller, NIcolas Ortiz; (sixth row) Miguel Castro, Stephen Burton; (top row,
middle) PrentIss Westbrooks.


In the Drum Line (from left) is Ray Rodriguez, Julian Rodriiguez, Andrew Reyna, Jlmmy


Participating in the "Wood Winds" (from left) is Angelo Parkinson, Layla Luna, Nicolas
Orth, Jamie Bashore, Travis Bashore, Mercedes Cisneros, and Alejandra Rodriguez.



Youth Center To Be Razed


on Main Street to Seventh
Avenue, then south to Orange
Street and back to the junior
high.
approved the Nov. 14,
YMCA 5K run/walk which will
begin at 8 a.m. at Heritage Park,
go to Orange Street, west to
Florida Avenue, then to Sten-
strom, turn on Harichey and
come back to Main Street and
thence back to the.park. Police
Chief Bill Beattie will coor i-
nate safety support with
Sheriffs Office personnel.
approved the use of
$4,000 from the police depart-
ment's confiscated monies trust
fund account for equipment,
fundraisers charity events such
as Relay For Life and the
Christmas Toy Drive, and edu-
cational promotional materials.
learned there will be re-
sodding going on at the Youth
Baseball fields off South
Florida Avenue and there is a
plan for Louise Weis to paint a
mural on the American Caircer
Society building (the old police
station at Eighth Avenue and
Main Street). Her design will be,
reviewed by the Historical
Preservation Board.
discussed uniforms and-
lor name tags for city employ-
ees and decided to work with
department heads on the issue.
approved demolition of
an unsafe, dilapidated building
on Melendy Street. Repeated
efforts to locate the owner for
the past two years have been
unsucce pointed Sohia Peilvy
to the Historic Preservation
Board.
heard updates on the Bay
Street sidewalk and on Wau-
chula Main Street.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of "Yhi Herald-Advocate
Demolishing the old teen
youth center will begin shortly.
Local attorney Steven
Southwell and building contact
person Clay Cobb asked the
Wauchula City Commission on
IVionday night for permission to
take down the present youth
center at 10th Avenue and
Orange Street so a new one can
be built.
' The city agreed to go them
orie better. City crews will
demolish the old wood frame
building, which belongs to the
city and was once the home of
H.O.P.E. of Hardee as well as
other organizations.
The YMCA has a lease for
use of the buildings and proper-
ty on the entire block from 10th
Avenue to South Florida
Avenue. Presently a 30-year
lease, Southwell asked that it be
extended to 99 years in view of
the expenses the group is put-
ting into it. He and city attorney
Cliff Ables will continue to
refine the terms and bring it
back to the next commission
meeting.
He related how several com-
munity clubs have worked with
the YMCA board to raise suffi-
cient funds to construct a new
bQilding. Additional funds will
provide furnishings and equip-
ment for it. (See related story on
4 in this issue)
During the time it is torn
down and replaced with a new

6e8 fxor36.8 o duiles v-
care will re-locate to the old
junior high building across
South Florida Avenue.
In other action, the commis-
sion:


--- heard the request to re-
mind residents to renew proper
addresses so emergency re-
sponse can be better. "If they
can't find you, they can't help
you," said City Manager Rick
Giroux. Numbers should be
four inches high on houses and
six inches high on businesses.
They should be a color contrast-
ing with the building color, for
instance, not white on white.
will hold amnesty days
twice yearly, in November and
June.
approved extending the
use of the Catheryn McDonald
Senior. Center to NuHope
through October 2012.
Actually, it is assigning that
agreement which belong to
H.O.P.E. of Hardee. NuHope is
now the lead agency in provid-
ing elder services and congre-
gate deals here. The agency,
which kept most of the same
employees, provides services to
about 130 senior citizens each
day, and offer home health
blood pressure screenings, legal
services, hearing impaired tele-,
phones and Food Stamp appli-
cation to seniors coming to the
center.
waived fees for use of the
Historic Wauchula City Audi-
torium on Jan. 13 from 3 to 5
p.m. for a special Wednesday
Musical event. Anna Preston,
sister of Wauchulan Peter
Preston, will bring her dance
troupe of professionals and teen
students in a performance of
on of the Florida-native dance

approved the parade route
for the Jan. 15 Martin Luther
King Jr. Day parade. The 2 p.m.
parade will begin behind the old
junior high school, proceed east


InteBrass s~~~i~~eetlo;ifromletFrnt row ~Is ~ge Csto ScndroOsa


Members of the guard for 2009 are (front) co-captaIn Yvonne Agullar; (second row)
Aleeza Argulfo and Brittany Buckhanan; (third row) DIane Khang, co-captain KrIsten
Dukes and Adna Metayer; (fourth row) MerIslene CImeus, Irlande Metayer and DeeDee
Metayer.


20910 Bluae Sa B g d










































































The Real Florida
.- B. y Do~rothy Harrisi
State Park Fiabnger


WE'RE GOING CUCKOO AT THE HAMMOCK!
















Stepping o aa rom onreb otfthed c hampgound uligho-
sideredtesouda, hoe ws earng 5 09 :0 m.
HAtfrst e thought itas the soundy of og aring aong ds-
tance off. Reconsder bing he beieve it oune moe ie adoto frog
Feolltowng vtheg sond acrossn thoe sampgrouend, e hewnade o
toth Campfire Circe are. T n herei a again. Looking p ntth
treeg coerh arfllydarhs steped ntothe15f wods tan ad ls~tend lse-
WhEact shewI saw beame one3 of the mosti Rexcitng thng that ap

T Parki Rearnge Blakbe Lewdish marde atnaie identification of a nt
.cucomisobird!Ys, that's what I1 Wsaid, ang cuckoof Ro 1


SpThisi bird the Yellw-Billed Cuckoon o has boereren noed on our
pak' hisonrica bir list-oasd "funtycommson,"bu posiber to eqie du


publication~~~~~~ of thi Ntc Cpe t dcmn rlig h







ThisIr aDkrbb~You are herebiy. notdifibed that o onen t
Haeeellardee County hudcotc Board of County Cmisoes
will hols r ivtd t6atn public hearing for the adoption of a
Rheouluion veacaing and b rclosing, those roaslesmn tskon apas an
A Portio n ofd Liet.I the Dixi eain ine t eSubdiavisbaion

R25E, asth showedng in la BartBA5 fte Pycubli Reords f aree

oml Ib John Bo d diin the B ard Cut CounB onrd fomuny
Wauchua, Flrida.


S10A The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Getting into the south side of
Annex II can be impossible on a
rainy day:
For several years, anyone try-
ing to go to the offices of the
Property Appraiser or Tax
Collector would have to plan
for a dry day as rainwater
pooled in the huge dip between
the parking places and the
building.
That should be changing
soon.
At its Sept. 24 meeting, the
Hardee County Commission
authorized Kevin Atchley,
county engineer and director of
public works, to proceed with
bids for correcting the problem
of standing water at Annex II.
Officially called the Curtis
Ezelle Government Bervices
Complex after long-time tax
collector Curtis Ezelle, the An-
nex II building at the corner of
Oak Street and North Seventh
Avenue, during most of his
tenure there, was a moat to
wade across in rainy season.
Since Atchley came aboard
late last year, he has been asked
to look at the Annex II water
problem.
Since then, in his spare time,
he has been designing a remedy.
The plan is to mill the existing
asphalt on the lot 20 inches
wide and 300 feet long, install a
couple of drainage units and
pipe.
There will be a drainage unit
on the southwest corner of the
lot and another at the southeast
corner. Between them will be
140 linear feet of perforated
pipe, collecting the rain water
'and allowing it to percolate into
'the ground, similar to a drain-
field. When there is too much,
the water will carry to the.
drainage units and on out of the
area. .
Atchley said recently that he
is also letting bids for paying on
Steve Roberts Special and
College Hill Road, projects to
be done with state trarisporta-
tion grant funds.


Ratliff roads and Florida
Avenue. Last year 47 runners
and 26 walkers raised over
$1,600 for the local American
Cancer Soclety.
approved a- proclamation
of October as "Let's Talk
Month," encouraging parents to
use a* sincere and honest
approach in talking about sexu-
ality with* their children and
adolescents.
approved, after public
hearing, a waiver of subdivision
regulations to allow two proper-
ties of 7.5 and 5 acres off
Peeples Lane and Palomino
Lane to be reconfigured into
two 6.25-acre tracts, not affect-
ing either ingress/egress. The
non-exclusive easement allows
the public to use the private
road along with the property
owners on it,
approved low bid of
$162,808 of L. Cobb Construc-
tion for waterproofing the
courthouse basement and con-
structing a sallyport on the east
side of the courthouse to allow
inmates to be safely brought to
court. The work will probably
begin in November and last no
longer thin 112 days, said
Danny Weeks, county director
of buildings and grounds.
renewed*the annual cons
tract with the state Department
of Corrections for a five-man
work crew and supervisor five
days a week for cemetery mow-
ing, and worker at Hardee Park,
the Agri-Civic Center, other
parks, the shooting range and
other county properties. The
cost of $62,285 annually in-
cludes providing a vehicle,
communication equipment and
gas.
The county also has a five-
man crew at the landfill regular-
ly and uses trustee labor, which
can vary from none to five peo-
ple from the jail.
appointed Debbie Rome-
ro to a four-year term on the
county Parks and Recreation
Advisory Board and appointed
Paul Samuels to replace Parker
Keen as the director-at-large for


He anticipates letting bids for
the Annex II project shortly
and, hopefully, the project will
be completed before the end of
the year.
In other matters, the commis-
sion expressed a need for peo-
ple in the community to step up
and be interested in serving on
the advisory boards. "They
need to come in and sign an
application, so we have them on
file when a vacancy occurs,"
said Commission Chairman
Dale Johnson, as the other com-
missioners nodded agreement,
Commissioner Terry Atchley
asked what other news Bryant
had from his meetings.
Bryant said "Everyone is
opposed to the home town
democracy amendment which
will be on next years ballot. It
would mandate government by
referendum, meaning that
whenever there was even a
small land use change, it would
require an election. There could
be dozens or hundreds of ballot
questions and a low percentage
of people traditionally show up
to vote."
Cotmty Manager Lex Albrit-
ton reported that there were 52
applicants -for the Building-
Official position the commis-
sion recently approved. Certifi-
cations and other information
on them is being checked, then
they will be shortlisted for con-
sideration.
There will be no planning
session in October due to the
Value Adjustment Board meet-
ings, but the Nov. 13 planning
session will be devoted to cate-
gorizing and prioritizing roads
for a work schedule.
Atchley said, "In the short
nine months I've been a com-
missioner, the number one com-
plaint issoads. There are a lot of
deteriorating roads."

In other action, the commis-
sion:
approved the plan for the
Feb. 6, 2010, road race and fit-
ness walk, closing portions of
Altman, Stenstrom, John's and


the Florida Heartland Rural
Economic Development Initia-
tive (FHREDI) board.
approved low bid award to
Denco Construction Inc. of Fort
Myers of $796,904.50 for Phase
II of the Wauchula Hills Waste-
water/water project. These costs
are met through a state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion legislative appropriation
for the sewer portion and coun-
ty loan funds for the water por-
tion.
approved a net change of
$14,523 to the contract with
Craig A. Smith & Associates for
architectural and landscaping
planning for the water/waste-
water projects.
approved the schedule of
meetings and holidays for 2010.
And, in other recent action,
the commission:
approved an amended fee
schedule for the Hardee County
Health Department, clarifying
some items on the annual
schedule approved last month.
approved a minor subdit
vision request for Stronghold
Self5torage I on 6.4 acres off
U.S. 17 North at Himrod Road
at the north end of Torrey com-
munity.
clarified the L1.15 policy
of the county's Comprehensive
Land Use Plan. It is permissible
for parcels of land five acres or
greater to be subdivided for an
immediate niember of the fami-
ly, but should not be less than
2.5 acres each.
clarified the Land Devel-
opment Code in regard to per-
mitted uses in Commercial-2
zoned areas within the overall
Agricultural-1 areas. Permitted
uses are: citrus grove (orchard);
silviculture (forestry); sod
farming; truck or row farming;
tree farm/wholesale or retail
plant nursery; and ranch-
ing/pasturing.
Permitted uses with approval
of a site development plan are
ag-related services such as: pro-
cessing/shipping facilities; re-
tail sales; wholesale sales; and
ag equipment rentals or sales.


Cracker Trail Museum's recent event, "Night at the Museum,"
was a huge success.
It not only enabled local folks to see the contribution that the
museum is making to the community, bdt it was an evening, of
renewed acquaintances and remembrances.
It was an evening that we who remember Jack Hayman coul
delight in seeing the interest that.he showed as he peered into the
glass cases stocked full of memories that he recalled so vividly
when he was the county's agricultural agent for 22 years.
It was an evening where old friends and former students trad-
ed memories with Elmo Roberts as they sat together on a bench
outside the museum before he, too, made his way through hundreds
of years of memories represented within the walls of the 42-year-
old museum.
It was an evening when former Hardee High School students
gazed upon the photographs and memorabilia that reminded them
of their elementary school days. It was a night that those same
Hardee High Schpol graduates spent time perusing the pages of the
two plastic-encased notebooks which held complete editions of the
1939 and 1940 "Wildcat Scratches," donated to the museum only
the day before.
Yes, it was a grand "Night at the Museum," but there can also
be grand "days at the museum" for anyone who has not visited for
a while. Every week brings something new to the museum through
the kindness of its donors. Each time a son, daughter, grandson or
niece visits the museum to view a relative's donation gives us
pleasure to guide them to its place of honor, many times taking a
picture of them holding the article as yet another memory to take
home with them.
Cracker Trail Museum is not just a cement-block building sit-
uated in Pioneer Park. It is home to Hardee County's history.
It is a home where you can visit for awhile and remember sit-
ting on the front porch swing with your grandpa or canning veg-
etable with your grandma. It is a place where you can stretch your
memory back to the days of doctors Kayton, Poucher, Massam and
Banks. It is a place where you can linger as long as you like as you
gaze upon the photos of buildings that have long been replaced by
Others in Hardee County.
If you missed Cracker Trail's "Night at the Museum," why not
spend a part of your day at the museum?
But, before you come, take time to go through some of your
own family pictures tucked away and share those memories with
others in Hardee County. Cracker Trail Museum will be happy to
scan those photos, if you desire, while you wait. Help to make your
memories a part of Cracker Trail Museum.


ing the summer and fall months. However, this is the first time that


cOURTESY PHOTOS
Elmo Roberts and DIana Youmans greet each other out
aide the Cracker Wall Museum. Roberts was a teacher
and prIncipal In the 1950s


cGURTESYPHOTO
The Yellow-bliled Cuckoo may sometimes be spotted at
HIghlands Hammock, and can be Indentlfled by Its long
curved yellow blII and the large white spots on Its tall.
The deep "cloom" sound Lewis heard from several hundred
feet away was one he believes he has heard before recently, but
never had the time to investigate. The much more animated "ku-ku-
ku-ku-kddowl-kkdowl" vocalizations I had heard a short time
before he came to see me reminded me of what it sounds like with-
in an aviary at a zoo. I had no idea what it was I had heard, and had
attributed it to an animal's cry.
When Lewis came by just a short time later and excitedly told

mo sha r te beer i1auip da h hlati d
"heard and maybe seen.a Yellow-Billed Cuckoo, but being a good
birder, he wanted a.second positive identification from someone
else.
We were both pretty excited because, after all, what birder
doesn't get happy over adding another species to his list?
Lewis left, assuring me that he'd let me know if he heard or
saw the bird again. Not too much later, he pulled up to my office,
and off to the campground we went!
Sure enough, the deep "cloom" sound had us zeroing in on this
mysterious visitor. This was not the same sound I had heard, so L
was especially interested to see whether our research was correct or
not.
Something flew, and off we went again. Stopping the golf cart,
we listened carefully and picked up the sound further into the
campsites. As we zeroed in on the bird, its flight pattern was anoth-
er giveaway that our ID was correct. We could see the bright white
underside of the bird contrasting nicely with the reddish-colored
upper wmgs.
Once it handed and we located the tree, we whipped out the
binoculars and bingo! our bird ID was complete. With two
pairs of eyes and those of a few visitors.drawn by the commotion,
we were able to make a positive identification of our rare visitor,
the Ye eo dB ecd ckoo feeds on hairy caterpillars, but we

didn't get to watch its habit of rubbing the caterpillars through its
bill to remove the fuzz. We simply enjoyed watching it fly, perch
and call for a while before it headed to the next tree-
I wotild suggest that if you want to try and see it for yourself
that you come out for a hike and listen for a deep "cloom" resonat-
ing in the air. As a solitary and secretive species, you may hear it
but have a hard time actually getting a good view. Look for the
bright yellow bill and the large white spots on its tail that are noted
field rk
ma s.
You might be surprised to know that this bird hatches and fully
develops within a mere 17 days! Even more surprising is that its
feathers literally burst out, allowing the bird to become fully feath-
ered in about two hours. More incredible facts about this unique
bird can be found at www.allaboutbirds.org.
For a bird list of species you might see at Highlands Ham-
mock, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org. Loaner bmoculars are also
available at the Ranger Station in case you don't have your own
pair.
Happy birding!


M sumP urao oSmbdy Hctw Ih JeRn moon rred"w~


Jack Hayman served as agricultural county extentl6tr
director for Hardee County from 1958 to 1980. Many wift
remember his office In the basement of the courthoudie,
and that he made personal visits to residents' home.
steads. Here, he re/Ives some of those memories.


gry gy r
..7.
I
***'"..... a sm







October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 11A :t


1-lornecoming 2009 -
In Business
By Machelle Dollar


UNIQUE BOUTIQUE Residing in Hardee County, some
may find it difficult to come across that perfect gift or col]petible to
suit them and their environment.
But with the recent opening of Penny's Twigs & Sticks in .the
heart of Wauchula, choices are many.
When thinking about a name for her boutique, owner Pennf
Johnson came to realize that every possible one was already in use
somewhere. She wanted a riame that would be as different and
uniqise as the items she sold.
"I consider this a priniitive country store. Bat-k in the olden
.' days, people made everything out of what they had. Clothes, furni-
ture and even utensils were made otit of twigs and sticks. I consid-
ered that, and thought it suited best," she explains. . 6
"A lot of items in the store are made out of the simplest mate- e
rial: sticks," Jolmson adds. 's .
This local bolitique is a family owned and operated store. <
Johnson is the official bwner of the shop, but there is plenty of fam-'
ily participation.,11er datighter is sub-leasing space for a custom
graphic-design business and her husband is offering cristom-made
wooden furniture.







enior nomInees were JaLyn Smith, Chelsey Steedley, Queen Beatriz RodrIguez, Lady-In-Walting Caltiln Chason,
helsea Goolsby and GlorIa Rulz.






/
PHQTOS BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Penny Johnson stands among some of the country-style
gift and decorative Items offered at the new old-fash-
ioned boutIque, Penny's TwIgs & StIcks.
Johnson says she has, wanted to open her own shop for 15
years or so. Then, one day, she came across a place for.rent and
within a month her drearn became a reality.
"It just worked for us," she says. "I am able to carry the items
I want, along with my daughter, Casey, opening her custom graph.
ics as well."
Casey's Graphics will be able to offer custom designs in T-
shirts, business cards, logos or decals. Casey Johnson also will
design Web sites or make vinyl signs and displays.
The shops even holds children's furniture sets made by Penny .
F Johnson's husband, Jeff, who will also make custom hope chests.
Located at 118 W. Orange St., Penny's Twigs & Sticks not
only keeps a country feel, but shows.Wildcat pride by selling
orange-and-blue jewelry along with purses, flip flops, and more.
** it,* LUCKY BUCK The residents of Zolk Springs and sA-
rounding areas have a long-awaited, brand-new store in the center
of town, Dollar General.
', ., .... Wouldn't it he fice tegellAny a or all! of 1,QQQ Items
or less? Or to be in a magyplace "where a dolfg goes a
unIor contestants were BrIttany HIngs, Sweetheart Kara Norris and BerrydIna Esparza. way ell, that magical place became a reality two weeks ago as the
new store quietly opened to the public after months of construction.
Being "the neighborhood general store" since 1939, the com-
pany first decided to build an outlet in thd small town of Zolfo
Springs nearly one year ago. Then, construction began in late June.





Now ed.







The familydrlendly and convenIent store, Dollar General,
will h6Id its Zolfo SprIngs grand openIng on Saturday,

Residents have watched and waited excitedly Finally the
"Now Open" sign sprang up.
With the official grand openirig set for Saturday, Oct. 31, gen-
en 1 marriage Dianna Kalmes hasa lot to do to prepare.
The store carries anything from various grocery items chil-
dren's toys and health products to hair inpidiances, cleaning sup-
plies and even clothing and home decorations.
With its convenient and easily accessible location on U.S. 17
at town central, it is sure to be the new hit of Zolfo Springs.
sophomore candidates were Gabby Lozano, Sweetheart Raquel Rosales and Artrice Hines. New.business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Machelle Dollar at 773-3255 ivith your business news.



ABOUT ...

Classified
DEADLINE....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each
additional word is 22 cents. Ads in all cap-
itals are 32 cents per word. Headlines are
$2 a, line. Blind aid box numbers are $3
extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.


CLASSIFICATIONS:

Agriculture Mobile Homes
Appliances Notices
Automobile Pets -
I
Boats Plants/Produce.
Furniture Real Estate
Help Wanted Recreational Vehicles
Houses Rentals
Livestock Services
Lost & Found Wanted
Miscellaneous Yard Sales
leshmen contestants were Sara Camar/IIo, Sweetheart Janet Lopez and Kayla Knight.


S
C


J


F




Th HeadAdoae


I ..


*


*


i:


i;i


:I:r


*;


ALL YOUR PRINTING NEES IN ONE CONVENIENT


i


Business Card s


* Stationery
* Postca rds


Labels


*Picker's


Tickets


* Picker's Cards


~ers


* Invoices


Business Forms


I nvitat ions


* announcements


Letterheads:


* Envelopes
4 Calendars


Magnetic Signs


LOCATION!








- The Herald-Adv
(U5PM 578-750)

Thursday, tobi*r


PAGE ONE


-~ld~ IL


Oct. 16-17 Swimming Lake Placid Away TBA
(Heartland Invitational)
Oct. 19 HJHS Softball Avon Park HOME 5:00 p.m.
Golf Bradenton Away TBA
Qct. 20 Cross Country Estero Away 2:30 p.m.
Swimming LP/AP HOME 5:30 p.m.
HJHS Football DeSoto Away 5:30 p.m.
Volleyball Avon Park HOME 6/7:00 p.m.
Oct. 22 Cross Country Lake Placid Away 4:30 p.m.
HJHS Softball HiII-Gustat HOME 5100 p.m.
Volleyball Lake Placid Away 6/7:00 p.m.
JV Football Lake Placid Away 7:00 p.m.
Oct. 23 Varsity Football Estero Away 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 26 Swimming Winter Haven Away TBA
(District Competition)
Volleyball DeSoto Away TBA
(District Competition)
Oct. 27 HJHS Football Sebring HOME 5:30 p.m.


Breed: Catahoula
a Leopard Cur Mix

Gender: Female
Color: Tan & White
Age: Adult
Coat: Short
Tail: Long


Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320
if you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel location is (i85
Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfdl.


A baby blue whale is 25 feet long at birth.

tBaseball player Roger Maris, who hit 61 home runs in 1961, won only one home run


Sebri g


6ES~E~r~ r I I 1 m~~8~B


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Bowling .Green pro boxer
Daniel Lozano stepped up on
Friday night.
The 19-year-old won his sec-
ond pro fight with a third-round
knockout. It will be shown on
the Spanish television station
Azteca America this Friday
evemng.
As it turned out, Lozano's
fight became the co-main event
on Friday
. His trip to Orlando started at
the weigh-ins on Thursday. He
had expected to fight at 115
pounds but found it woidd be at
112. By the time-of weigh-ms,
set for 5 p.m. and not held until
6 p.m., he-was overdue for din-
ner. .
In an interview after the
weigh-in, he was asked how he
planned to fight. He said he
wodid continue to follow his
game plan and .hoped for a.
knockout win. His opponent,
Steven Ortiz, predicted he
would win in a third-round
knockout-
Ortiz and Lozano both had
extensive amateur careers. The
22-year-old Ortiz had fought
most of his amateur bouts in his
native Puerto Rico and moved
to Orlando when he began his
pro career. Both boxers went
into the four-round bout with
1- or d to wait through
three heavyweight bouts before
they got their chance. As the
hometown favorite, Ortiz opted
to come out second. Since Ortiz
was talking a lot of "trash,"
Lozano didn't play the usual
introductory music.
In the first round, Ortiz
moved around a lot and even
head-butted Lozano, but did not
.open a cut. In the second round,
Lozano began to put more pres-
s po nt cu the
ment and lost track of his game
plan.
By the third round, Ortiz was
frustrated and kept in his cor-
ner, the red corner. Shortly, the
haers traded left hooks, "but
mine got in first," said Lozano.
Ortiz dropped to the canvas and


Oct. 1T5


Girls Golf
Cross Country
HJHS Softball
Volleyball
JV Football


Lakeland Christian
Hardee Lakes
Lake Placid
Fort Meade
Fort Meade


Away
HOME
Away
Away
HOME


4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6/7:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.


COURTESY PHOTos
Bowling Green boxer Daniel Lozano is seen in action In
above photo. In bottom, his hands are raised in victory
after a third-round TKO.


Cross Country


Sebring


Oct. 29


Away


4:00 p.m.


He also noted that two local
brothers, Rigo and Arturo
Ramirez, train with him and are
also going with him to spar in
Winter Haven with pros Andre
Berto and Wauchula's Edner
t rrd yT c twth 02$
Myers show and both won.
Arturo fought a boxer with
whom he had split matches and
won this rubber match. Rigo
fought, and defeated, one of the
top amateurs in the state.
All-three hope to continue to
represent Bowling Green well
in their future bouts.


did not get up by the end of the
10-count. He was up later, seat-
ed on his stool while being
checked by the ringside physi-
cian. He walked out quickly,
embarrassed by his loss after
talking so m hhe didn t know
when his next pro fight will be,
probably in December or
January. He is thankful for the
support of his family and
friends, especially his father
Daniel, who is his trainer at the
Omega gyms. His cornermen,
Jesse and Sylvester, are also
important to him.


W ~h 1a


NOW SOTVing Highlands and Hardee Counties.
4, ,,
& put ORT INIO OUT S&TWC&
ffJOu are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them onfile then transfer them back when you go home.


5 eet birth day






Seacoast is.celebrating its 83rd birthday!
We'vishedndrooklingf rishdlyserviceandlocaldecision-
making along with customiEed products and services
since l9261 So to celebrate, we are giving you a present!


183 day Certificate of Deposit


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to take advantage of this limited time offer.
Yeah, you can smile about that.




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202 N. 6th Avenue, Wauchula, 773-4141

Annual Percentage YIeld. To qualify for the CD offer, account must be funded with $1,000 minimum new
money and depositor must have an existing of open a new companion checking account with $1.500
new money. Limit of 5250,000 maximum in certificate of deposit per customer. Rate is accurate as of 1918
NAstwo:socF date of publication.0tler may be withdrawn at any time.


10:150


Lozano Wins By Knockout


Sebrmng / Avon Park


TR11 T OSTIVal OF SRVIIgs




















go.
6: 9

Moon Data
Rises: 4:16 am
Sets: 4:41 pm
MoonPhase
7% waning
Major Times
9:28 am-ll:28 am
9:53Pm-ll:53 pm
Minor Times
3:45 am-4:45 am
4:10 pm-5:10 pm
Prediction
Good
10/16/2009
SunDate
Rises:7:00 am
Sets: 6:18 pm
LOD: 11:18:00
Moon Data
Em :223pam

Moon Phase
as waning

to:M7 or mespin
10:42 pm-12:42 am
Minor Times


I


.
Rise & Shane

By Ted Simonson
FLESH VERSUS SPIRIT . .
It's like standing between two people, and one is shouting at
you and the other is whispering.
In the beginning, it's much easier to pay attention to the one
who is shouting. In fact, turning to him and giving him your full
attention, you may not even be aware that there is another person
present.
The more you listen to the shooter, the louder he shouts.
The shooterr" is your flesh in this illustration. The desires of
your body. The more you give in, the more demanding he becomeS.
The Holy Spirit is not just "ignored." There is no sense at all that
there is a Holy Spirit. God is basically just an idea.
Now supposing, in desperation, you turn from the shooter and
look in the other direction.
It may be hard at first to distinguish the second person, SO
demanding has become the shooter. But you see the stranger's lipS
moving..Something is being said to you. You are not entirely sure
what it is but you take a chance and move to obey, and as soon aS
you do this, you are able to hear better the one who is whispering.
The shouting may continue to be loud for awhile but the more
you pay attention to the quiet person, the better you are able tO
understand, and each new obedience brings with it a ew peace and
satisfaction.
; Think about it.





YOuth Football
By Paul Paris


Wha~t If Y~UP~,Lou FoundutYouOl


en
G D I






RI *
705 South 6th Avenue Wauchula


(863).767-8800
Fax (863) 767-8801 ms.roserestaurqnt(d)yahoo.com


I


_IY


WHEN:

Saturday, October 17,.2009

7:00. pm

WHERE:

First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green

4531 US Highway 17 N

Bowling Green, FL



For more into please call.
(863)3752253







messe-oinustor.neveninor
great music, fun, and worship!

. .
A love offering will be taken.


I _


I


I ~ `I ` I I


Laurel Liana Diaz pf Wau-
chula has announced the plans
for her marriage this weekend
to Jacob Lee Cornelii1s of
Wauchula.
The couple will exchange
wedding vows at 11 o'clock on
Saturday morning at the Bar
Crescent S Ranch in Ona.
A wedding reception will be
held at 4 p.m. that day at the



A ,

ONE BLUE, NO PINK
1
,






sk. ra


Mr. and Mrs. Clifford
Whaley, Wauchula, an eight-
pound five ounce son, Timothy
Ryan, born Aug. 27, 2009,
Regency Medical Center,
Winter Haven. Mrs. Whaley is
d
ete ram ra areenCrawfor .
late James Mitchell and
Christine Aileen Crawford.
Maternal great-grandparents are
the late Albert and Bertha Mae
Worth. Paternal grandparents
are Randy and Beverly Whaley
of Zolfo Springs. Paternal
great-grandparents are Lorraine
Gillespie of Wauchula and Otta
Whaley of Wauchula.
-
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.


2B The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009


I i


.


Padict on

10/17/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 7:1061 am
LOD: 11:15:00

10 @ m
Sets: 5:44 pm

@
Major Times
11:0 m- pm
Minor Times
: a a

Prediction
Good
10/18/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 7:02 ani
: 1153

R s :D am
Sets: 6:19 pm
Moon Phase


pn an

anor Times
6:14 am-7:14 am
6:39 pm-7:39 pm
Prediction
neuer
10/19/2009
' Sun Data
Rises:7:02 am
: 11:42pn0
Moon Data
Rt 6 491pm
Moon Phase
3%Waxing
Major Times.
12:24 am-2:24 am
12:50 pm-2:50 pm
Minor Times
7:07 am-8:07 am
7:32 pm-8:32 pm
Prediction
nest
10/20/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 7:03 am
Sets: 6:13 pm


Se 7 p
"n

1: Jr na
1:44pm-344pm

z or un
8:26 pm-9:26 pm
Prediction

10/21/2@
Rim 7%Mam
Sets: 6:12 pm
LOD: 11:08:00
I MoonData
Rises: 10:44 am
Sbts: 8:32 pm
Moon Phase
14% Waxing .
Major Times
2:12 am-4:12 am
2:38 pm-4:38 pm
Minor Times
9 os aps
Prediction
Best


.


Torrey Oaks Golf Course Club-
house south of Bowling Green.
Friends and relatives of the
couple are invited.
The bride-to-be is the daugh-
ter of Thomas Sirak and Cheryl
Hildebrand of Miami and Pete
Diaz of Islamorada. The [pro-
spective groom is the son of Jeff
and Beverly Cornelius of
Wauchula.



Scoutoberfest

Is Set For
Th k d
iS Wee en ,
The Calusy District's Boy
Scout "Scoutoberfest" will be
held at Hickory Hitmmock in
Highlands County, just east of
Lorida, this weekend.
Beginning on Friday, it fea-
tures, for Cub Scouts, gameS'
arts and crafts and a host of
other fun activities. .
There will be movies with
popcorn on Friday and Saturday
nights. There will be a "haunted
house" and a campfire program
on Saturday night. There will be
an Order of the Arrow tap as
well.
'
Bo mSec ts areveans mrp e
course, fire building, pioneer-
ing, camp-stove and backpack-
ing training, a five-mile hike,
and dutch-oven cooking and
that's only a partial list!
The Boy Scouts will be
camping in tents aild cooking
outside. .
There will be First Aid train-
ers there as well as volunteer
firefighters, and conservation
representatives.
This will'be a learning and
fun experience for all.
A book is like a garden car-
led in the pocket
-Arabian Proverb


Football season for Hardee Youth Football is almost over.
The last two weeks of games will be at Wildcat Stadium.
Flag and Tiny Mite played close games last Saturday at
Fishhawk. Fishhawk is a very large association with two and three
teams in each division. Hardee played the Wolfpack Blue. Mitey
Mite came back strong to win after its loss last week m Tampa.
Hardee 13 Fishhawk 0.
Jr. Pee Wee suffered its first loss of the season agamst a very
good Fishhawk team. Hardee 11 Fisilhawk 20.
Pee Wee had to forfeit the.game due to several players being
out. .....
Midget played a tough game and lost. Hardee 0 Fishhawk 31.
Saturday's games start at 9 a.m. at Wildcat Stadium. Flag plays
the Manatee Mustangs, Jumor Pee Wee plays the Manatee
Wildcat, and everyone else plays the Tampa Patriots. These should
be very good football games. We are evenly matched against these
teams.
Our post season playoffs are being organized for Jr. Pee Wee,
Pee Wee and Midget. On Oct. 31, depending on our win-loss
record, we will play the Division 2 winner or runner-up of the
opposite region. The winners of that game will go on to play on
Nov.7 for the FYD Division 2 C;onference Finals.
| If we win the D2 conference final, we would face the D2 with,
ners of the Miami conference in Miami on Oct. 14.
Hardee Youth Football' League is a proud member of the Pop
Warner Little Scholars. Pop Warner is the only nationwide foot-
ball pmgram that places more emphasis on scholastic achievement
than on football and cheerleading.


Have you thought about abilities a
what your life would be can't w
like ifyouonly liad 30 days The p
to live? Would it change Christia
your relationships with to take
your family, with your starting
friends, with your God? We invite y
think so! And we think it have g
would all change for the every ni
,better. This challenge is the chu
going to change everyone homek. I
involved in different ways. ed, che
Some will do things they family
have never done and go call our
places they have never to find a
been. Others will mend for you.
relationships and grow see wha
brand new ones. The possi- do!
D IAP ADVERTISEMENT


1II___CIl


re endless and we
ait to get started.
eople of First
n Church are ready
this challenge and
October 25*, we
ou to join us. We
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rch or inchost
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We can't wait to
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The best thing that can come


Trees are the earth's endless


The Fountain ofLife Church,
501 N. Ninth Ave., Wauchula
(at the corner of Ninth Avenue
and Georgia Street), regularly

v'.:dis de thoer second
and fourth Tuesday of each

Cardona at 773-2672.

The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
forthenextedition.


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PHOTO BY JlM KELLY
Dr. Thomas Lackey II and registered nurse Jer/Iyn Stamps spoke to the Wauchula
IGwanis Club on Tuesday of last week about the new wound-care center that has
opened at the old Pete's Pharmacy building at 457 W. CarIton St. In Wauchula. This is
part of the services of Florida Hospital Wauchula. There tWIII be outpatient tmaitment at
the center on Tuesday mornings. Shown (from left) am Club President Thomas Tavino,
Lackey, Stamps, and Hospital Administrator Linda Adler.


socio:1so



3RD ANNUAl.



Glow SEE RS
800181'0800

"The Glory Revealed"-


Clervenia Capron Sherry White


1507 Martin Luther King Blvd.
'- Wauchula, FL 33873
The Spirit ofthe Lord is upon because he has anointed me to preach the gospel to poor. He has sent me
to the bend up and heal the broken hearted. To proclaim liberty to the captures and the opening of the
prison and the eyes to those who are blind. To proclaim the acceptable year of the Isord, the year of ha
faVor and the day of vengeance of our God and comfort all who mourn. Isaiah 61:1-2 soc10:6-22c


,
1
up :


October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3B


chula have lost their licenses.
The church project is supposed
to completed in mid-November,
and if there are no changes
requiring architectural or engi-
neermg services, the contractor
can sign off on the Certificate of
Occupancy.
School Bus Safety Week was
celebrated with a full page of
photos of GrAdy Albritton,
director of transportation, ,and
his staff, including shop fore-
man Ernie Reed, mechanic$
Clyde Davis and Juan Rodri-
guez, and drivers Faye Davis,
Grace Davis, Martha Hall and
Karen Redding. There also
were various scenes of all.*de-
partment employees, of loading
and unloading students, and of
Florida Highway Patrol inspec-
tions to ensure the 3,300 stu-
dents riding 42 buses each day
over 368,000 miles a year con-'
tinue without accident.
-
Wauchula Feed Store has
specials on feed for cattle, hors-
es or hogs. All grain horse fee is
$6.50 for 50 pounds, corn $5.19
for 50 pounds, and cattle feed
$4.95 for 50 pounds.
10 YEARS AGO
The first-ever mausoleum is
shown being placed in the
northwest section of Wauchula
Cemetery last week. The beau-
tifully decorated 12-crypt mar-
ble structure will offer an alter-
native to the usual interment at
less expense. The 8'x8' mau-
soleum covers just three grave
spaces.
-
Mid-Florida Realty offers
several homes, a large 5 BR 1-
1/2 BA on one acre, fenced,
$41,500; five wooded acres,
good for subdividing, $35,000;
a 2 BR, IBA, large workshop,
reduced to $41,000. Also, half-
acre wooded lots with sewer
available, $5,500 to $6.500.


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida
Advocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-
Advocate. .
75 YEARS AGO
Sen. Wm. C. Hodges, presi-
dent of the Home Owners' Leat
gue of Florida, is making a
whirlwind tour of the state and
will stop in Wauchula on Oct.
16 at 2 p.m. in behalf of the pro-
posed Homestead Exemption
Act to be voted on in the Nov-
ember election. He advocates
exempting homes and small
farms from all state, county and
city taxes for 20 years.
"Baby, Take A Bow," coming
to the Royal Theater on Sunday
and Monday, introduces 5-year-
old Shirley Temple in her first
sitle role. After her overnight
success in "Stand Up and
Cheer!" little Shirley has be-
come one of the outstanding
personalities on the screen.
James Dunn and Claire Trevor
are together again as Shirley's
parents.
The Parent-Teacher Associ-
ation will meet. next Thursday
night at the grammar school
auditorium at 7:30. All mem-
bers and anyone interested
should attend.
All-American Store, with
A.W. Kimbrough as manager,
has stock-up specials, a 24-
pound sk. of Morning Joy flour
for 99 cents, peaches 15 cents a
can, five pounds of granulated
sugar for 25 cents, butter 27
cents a pound, pig tails or pan
sausage 10 cents for two
pounds, steak or pork chops (all
cuts, we trim 'em) 15 cents a
pound and beef stew at eight
cents a pound.
50 YEARS AGO
Veteran fairgoers and first-
timers can circle Nov. 9-14 on
their calendars. Those are the
dates for "the biggest show in
the county." In addition to old
standbys, like the queen con-
test, the stock show and the
midway, there will be a number
of new additions to the County
Fair, ranging from a pet parade
to a tractor pull.
A midget football league, for
fifth- and sixth-grade boys, was
= :eds cat Bi ard e
subject to review by the board
attorney that school insurance
will cover the players and all
workers are under supervision
of the schools. It will be spon-
sored by the American Legion.
Zolfo Springs adopted a new


budget calling for the expendi-
ture of $16,760 for the coming
year. It exceeds last year's bud-
get by $4,000. A new organiza-
tion of business men and
women has formed the Zolfo
Busi-ness Club, with about 20
members to encourage commu-
nity interest in the welfare and
progress bf the community. It is
similar to the Bowling Green
Businessmen's Club except that
membership is open to women
also.
-
Hardee Motor Co of Wau-
.chula offers the Sixty's Sizzlers,.
16 new Chevrolets for 1960,
four Impalas, four Bel Airs,
three Biscaynes and five station
wagons such as the thrifty two-
door Brookwood. The company
issued a thank-you letter to Mr.
atid Mrs. Hardee County for
their wonderful attendance,
crowds the largest in the com-
Pany's history, at it "3-Star
Show" last weekend. "We feel
the brand new Chevrolet
Corvair is headed for record
sales in 1960."
25 YEARS AGO
Monday was a sad day for the
Joe Himrod family as they
watched the source of their
income go up in smoke.
Officials from the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Division of Forestry were at
Himrod & Himrod Nursery to
oversee the burning of 143,000
citrus trees in all effort to pre-
vent the spread of canker.
-
Jim Hetherington, acting
county administrator and build-
ing official, notified county
commissioners last week that
the architect and chief engineer
in charge of building the new
First Baptist Church of Wau-


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Wes Roe, owner of Heartland Gold, recently spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club about the
diamond trade. Pictured (from left) are Randy IGzer, district governor from Brandon;
Club President Hamid Davis; Roe; and George Robertson-Burnett, assistant district
governor from Winter Haven. IGzer spoke on Wednesday of last week about Rotary's
International mission to eradicate polio.


B e


.- roatsons


(
I
RR OS I RS OS
(Bric & Baskets)

eweirup

HOURS
Tues. Fri. 10:30a.m. 4:30p.m. Sat. Appt. Only
Sun. Mon. CLOSED

313 W. Main St. Wauchula

(863) 773*0601 or (863) 245-1704


'WAUC


Saturday


12:00pm


7 p.m. nightly


Fulfilling the coMmission...
Reaching the est..
Chang ag livet..




CHURCH OF WA 'HULA


rn w.Palmetto st. Wauchula, FL
Service Times: Sunday 10am &.6pm Wednesday 7pm


DIAMOND FACETS


WOUND CARE


w~fiL t/ ERADIO


Broadcast Schedule


October 20th-24~th


1310A~M


~ Come


foOWUO


WWW.HICW.Or g









_~__~___ W_


'nel.
There are a lot of sick at Forti
Green. Dale Chancey had a
heart attack last Saturday after-
noon. He is in the Sarasota hos-
pital. Arthpr Womack is still in
rehab in Blake at Bradenton.
Faye Davis had to return to the
surgeon because her broken
foot is not healing properly and
might require surgery.
Chrysta Chancey and Betty
and Clint Walker missed church
Sunday, as they were sick.
Betty said she would probably
go to the doctor on Monday.
Helen Albritton advised she is
going to have some tests in
Lakeland shortly. Mabel
Williams was having liack
problems last Sunday. Please
pray or all our sick.
Our sympathy goes to the
Zebbie Lane Gillespie family.
He was very young according
to my standards.
We were happy that Pat
Gugle 'was feeling better and
back at church Sunday. She
played the organ and always
does a good job.
I had read in the paper there
were 51 floats in the Home-
coriting Parade. While there did
not seem to be that number, it
was long enough because of
the intense heat. I even re-
sorted to using my umbrella for
shade.
The 4-H Foundation is hav-
ing its annual fundraiser Nov. 7.
If you have not purchased a
ticket for barbecue chicken or
pork, see a 4-H member. They
do not have much longer to sell
them, and it will be a good


COUTEY POT


r ~.;:~T.~-."it";'a ~1. : .


KENNA TURNER WEST
INTERNATIONAL SINGER AND SPEAKER

DOVE AWARD NOMINEE -

SGM SONGWRITER OF THE YEAR GMA HALL OF FAME MEMBER


The universal brotherhood of man is our most precious
possession.
ar Twain

Competence, like truth beauty and cost a lensis/Is in
the eye of the beholder.


HP-EARTLAND GOLD


4B The Herald-Advocate, October 15. 2009


meal.
I try to walk most mornings
and live on a dirt road. Back in
the early '70s when Sai Spears
had a furniture store in down-
town Wauchula and indoor-oist-
door carpet first came out, we
purchased a beautiful burnt-
orange rug for our then family
room. This carpet was, adver-
tised that it would not stain; you
could spill red drink on.it and
the stain would come out. This
advertisement was true, but the
day-to-day dirt would not come
out!
Well, the reason for this tale
is we ended up removing the
orange carpet and getting avon
cado green, and the orange car-
pet was put out by the road for
garbage pickup. A piece of car-
pet, about 2x3 inches was left,
and that little piece of carpet is
still on .the dirt road! Quite
often when I am walking I see
that*Iittle piece of carpet and it
brings back such memories of a
bygone era that I just leave it in
the road.
When the county scrapes the
road it gets moved, I might not
see it for a month or two and
then, like a bad penny, there jt
is! No wonder the landfills are
full!
Remember to pray for .each
other and our country.

There's little risk in becoming
'overly proud of one's garden
because gardening by its very
nature is haimbling. It has a
way of keeping you on your
knees.
-Joanne R. Barwick,


Greetings from Fort Green!
Saturday a week ago, a friend
called me to tell me Vern
Buchanan wtis going to speak at
the City Hall at 1:30 on the new
proposed health care. As it
turned out, I did not have suffi-
cient time to get ready to go to
the big city but you would think
there would be some advance
announcement on something
this important. I believe that the
grassroots need to get involved
to make and change things in
our government.
Fort Green has another teen-
ager! Makayla Chancey turned
13 this past week. It does not
seem possible that she is that
old, as I remember vividly
going to Winter Haven with her
grandmother, Faye Chancey, to
see her when she was born.
How the tin1e flies! Happy
birthday, Makayla!
- Mr. and Mrs. Blink had
guests with them at church
Sunday. Her daughter and bus-
band are visiting from West
Virginia. He saidi this heat was
unbelievable, and we all can
agree with that! The Blinks are
really enjoying their visit with
the only complaint being it was
not long enough.
Sherinan's daughter, Julie,
had a birthday on Oct. 11. We
met in Sebring for supper and
enjoyed visiting with 'Julie,
Taylor and Lilly.
We all need to pray for David
McQuaig. He is over in the
Middle East and his mama said
he would probably be back in
the field fighting shortly. We are
proud of all our military'person-


The Kiwanis Club of
Wauchula and the community
are coming together to rebuild
the Hardee County Family
YMCA's Teen Center.
The project began with the
Kiwanis Clu'b's offer to donate
funds and labor to remodel or
rebuild the Leon Sharp Youth
Center. Today, the YMCA is
excited to be moving forward
w.ith plansto build a safe, fun
place for teens to call their own.
This new movement for a
Teen Center builds upon the
YMCA's first attempt five years
g ago to have a teen space sepa-
rate from its fitness and child-
care facilities.
In 2004, the YMCA and its
Board of Directors realized the
organization was growing with
such speed that a new place was
needed for its Achiever's pro-
gram and other teen activities.
The appropriately-named
H.O.P.E. of Hardee House dn
the corner of Orange Avenue
and 10th Street, next to the Y,
had been vacant for some time.
With the help of CF Industries,
the deteriorating house was
remodeled and named the Leon
Sharp YMCA Youth Center,
named in memorial of a long-
time Hardee County football
coach.
As that last coat of paint was
applied on Thursday, Aug. 12,
2004, it began to rain. But with
the work complete and the new
sign in place, everyone left
happy that the job was fin-
ished, just hours before Hurri-
cane Charley arrived.


After Charley and two other
hurricanes swept over the area
that summer and fall, the Teen
Center was in rough shape. The
roof and walls were in need of
structural and cosmetic repair.
The windows and electric need-
ed replacing. Once again, CF
Industries with the help of
Mosaic and YMCA staff -
worked to bring the house back
to a condition that would pro-
vide room for teen program-
ming.
All agreed that plans should
be made for future growth of
the YMCA.

. Steps For New Center
A Teen Center Development
Committee has been created
with members of the Kiwanis
Club and the YMCA Board of
Directors. This committee has
decided that because of the
extreme deterioration of and
damAge to the building, it needs
to be replaced with a brand-new
center that will carry the memo-
ries of the Leon Sharp Youth
Center into the future.
"Our intention with the new
Teen Center is to offer existing
programs like Y-Achievers, but
also to expand youth program-
ming," said Calvin Bates, board
member. "We will have a home-
work study room with comput-
ers, apd be able host commu-
mty teen events.
Members of the Kiwanis
Club have also pledged to work
closely with YMCA teen staff
to develop programs that men-
tor teens as they plan for their


future.
How To Help
The undercurrent of excite-
ment about a new Teen Center '
is now bubbling to the surface'
along with financial support, as
word spreads about this special
project.
L, Cobb Construction Inc.
and Michael Scheipsmeier
Builders are teaming to offer
free expertise in the construct~
tron of the new buildmg. Clay
Cobb will be the contact for
anyone who is interested in
offering to help with any part of
the construction, labor or sup-
plies that could be donated to
brmg down the cost of the
building.
Groups and organizations
within the community have
committed to support the project
financially. Major donors are:
Kiwanis Club, Wauchula State
Bank, Joe L. Dayts, Mosaic, CF
Industries, Clear Springs, Peace
River Electric Cooperative,
Florida Institute for Neurologic
Rehabilitation, Florida Hospital,
First National Bank of Wau-
chula, Dr. Barbara Carlton and
L. Cobb Construction.
The project is well under
way, but community support is
still needed in order to complete
the Teen Center.
If you are interested in show-
mg your support or learning
more about this adventure for
this community and its youth,
contact YMCA Board Chair
Lee Hawthorne of Wauchula
State Bank.


The building at the corner of Orange Street and 40thAvenue
planning has begun for a netir Teen center.


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Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well, Football Fans, the return of Tim Tebow went very well
for the Gators. LSU had a 34-game win streak going on Saturday
Night home games but UF ruined the party. Every hit on Tebow
brought concern but he responded. The Gators did miss a couple of
scoring opportunities in the tilt, but who is complaining. Just get-
ting out of Baton Rouge with a win is enough. The Gators return to
the Swamp this week to face the Arkansas Razorbacks.
The Bobby Bowden soap opera in Tallahassee is getting amus-
ing. Calls for him to retire reverberate across the football world.
The governor came to lobby's defense and Ann has "stood by her
man". FSU fans seem divided. Gator fans are beside themselves
enjoying the whole saga. Jimbo and Chuck tried to steal the head-
lines and the Seminoles have fallen to 2-4. Most fans just don't
know what to make of the soap opera that is FSU football. Should
Bowden retire? Should he be made to retire? Should Bobby con.
sider what is best for the program? These questions must be
answered in the next couple of months.
USF had an open date to prepare for a Thursday night show-
down on ESPN with the Cincinuati Bearcats. All eyes will be on
Tampa for that game. The Big East and a BCS Bowl could be on
the line. The Bulls need to knock off Cincy. West Virginia and Pitt
are right there in the mix with the Bulls and Bearcats. Rutgers and
Connecticut are not out of it either.
The Hardee Wildcats have won back-to-back games by a 48-6
score. One has to wonder what the mathematical probability is for
that to happen. Whatever the reason, Homecoming was a success.
The 'Cats have an open date this week then travel to Estero. Knock
on wood, every Hardee Wildcat team is undefeated at this point in
the season. The JV squad defeated DeSoto 57-12 last week to
remain unbeaten. The HJH Cats are 3-0 at this writing also. The
future is so bright for Wildcat Football, I bought a new pair of sun-
glasses. Former HHS Wildcat, Jermain King, had 10 receptions for
146 yards and two touchdowns for West Virginia State in a 56-30
loss to.West Liberty this past week. The West Virginia State Yellow
Jackets Football website has a "you tube" video interview with
Jerniain. Check it out online.
1.) Marshall 4-2 at West Virginia 4-1 The Friends of Coal
Bowl showcases two of the best backs in college football,
Marshall's Darius Marshall and WVU's Noel Devine. WVU is
10th.in the nation against the run though. West Virginia 38
Marshall 17
.2.) Arkansas at Florida Hogs ambushed Auburn just as I
said they would but this is UF in the Swamp where ONLY Gators
get out alive. Arky has some offense but UF has a defense for the
ages. UF 37 Hogs 13.
3.) Cincinnati at USF Thursday Night Primetime for a
showcase game in the Big East Conference. The Bulls have had a
problem with mid-season meltdown. Let's hope the Bearcats don't
bring that about in 2009. USF still has some marquee games com-
ing up. USF 30 UC 28.
4.) Miami at UCF Should be a walk in the park for the
Canes. Miami 43 UCF 13.
5.) Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech Solid game in the All
Cupcake Conference. At least these two have some filling in the
niiddle. Virginia Tech 35 Georgia Tech 31.
6.) Pitt at Rutgers Scarlet Knights have won 12 of their last
L3 games. Pitt is leading the Big East after beating UConn. This
could be at I fil :ht n Piscatawaut. Rutg sk3 tr 3p3pd a tough

game at Pitt that they had control of until the late fourth quarter.
Look for UConn to rebound. UConn 27 Louisville 17.
8.) South Carolina at Alabama Spurrier has been lucky so
rd Anb"RU etA as3e nSon weCb t orlESPN can be ignored.


Wildlife Forecast
By Pat Behnke
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


October 15, 2009, The flerald-Advocate 5B.
9.) Kentucky at Auburn Tigers will rebound from the
Ao ens c e.T uh 8b t ku p2r e this season given the
10.) Georgia at Vanderbilt Just what the Dawgs need at this
point. Poor Vandy. Georgia 31 Vanderbilt 7.
11.) UAB at Mississippi Rebels will take out Bama frus-
tration on the Blazers who did upset Southern Miss their last time
out. Mississippi 34 UAB 13.
12.) Southern Cal at Notre Dame Please, Trojans, put a
stop to the Clausen for Heisman and the Irish are back nonsense
talk. Playing a weak schedule proves nothing. USC 49 ND 13.
13.) Texas and Oklahoma the Texps State Fair is always
the setting for this one. This game is always a national television
broadcast. Texas was ranked second in the nation and Oklahoma iss
always overrated as well. Watching Texas gain a total of 46 yards
in the rushing department against Colorado people have to shake.
their heads. Noel Devine had 220 yards against the Buffs by hirk-
self for West Virginia. If Texas and Florida met for the National
Championship, its doubtful Texas would gain 100 yards total
offense against the Gators. Regardless, the folks in their neck of the
woods will watch this contest like it matters at all. Wonder how bad
Virginia Tech would beat Oklahoma in a bowl this year? Oklahoma
35 Texas 31.
14.) Mississippi State at Middle Tennessee An SEC team
playing a non-BCS team on the road? Interesting to say the least.
Mullen needs a win anyway. Mississippi State 33 MTSU 14.
15.) Virginia at Maryland This has to be the "Toilet Bowl"
game in the ACC. A team that lost to William & Mary against a
team that lost to Middle Tennessee. This should be a hoot to watch.
- Flip a coin in this one but consider Virginia beat Indiana 47-7.
Remember when Michigan beat Indiana 36-33 at the buzzer? For
that Michigan got in the Top 25. Polls are such a joke. Virginia 41
Maryland 37.
16.) Carolina at Tampa Panthers have won a game.i
Carolina 27 Tampa 21.
17.) Tennessee at New England Pats take out the Titans.
New England 31 Tennessee 20.
18.) St. Louis at Jacksonville Jags get a home win.
Jacksonville 33 St. Louis 17.
19.) Cleveland at Pittsburgh Steelers take care of their
hated rivals. Pittsburgh 35 Cleveland 17.


FUDS Ofl0
Lawncamand Landscaping


OPEN TO THE PUBUC


-
VEGETABLE SETS ---10PK $3.50
CABBAGE, ONIONS, TOMATOES, CUKES
& MUCH MORE FOR YOUR
FALL GARDEN NEEDS
PICK FROM PLANTS ON HAND
QB PLACE AN ORDER

3496 PEOPLES LANE -WAUCHULA
781-3884 MELISSA 773-3557 OFFIcE


t I` I II I


- BEACHES & THEIR WILDLIFE
More than one-half of the U.S. population lives within 50
miles of a coast. In Florida, 72 percent of the 18 million residents
live or work in coastal areas, with roughly 12 million people IIvmg
in Florida's coastal counties.
Any merease in population in the next 50 years means our
beaches and'their wildlife will be stressed beyond safe Ismits for
sustainability.
The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission pre-
dicts great challenges ahead as the unpredictable aspects of climate
change also hit the coastal environment.
"Although we cannot predict how much sea level will rise, it
will bring dramatic changes to Florida's coastal habitats, signifi-
cantly affecting both the state's natural habitats and its fish and
wildlife populations," states the FWC's "Wildlife 2060: What's at
Stake for Florida?" released in 2008.
"Not only will people most likely be forced back from the
coasts because of sea-level rise and storm surges, but wildlife will
need to find its way inland as well," said Thomas Eason, leader of
the FWC's Wildlife 2060 team. "It is extremely important that we
take steps now to help the coastal species migrate by maintaining
and creating habitat corridors."
It is such an important consideration that the participants in the
FWC's climate-change summit made it one of the key actions for
the FWC and partners. Further, the report stresses that investments
must be made its land conservation, land use and transportation
decisions.
I'm fine with letting the scientists and planners work all that
out, but I always wonder what I can do as an individual.
Even if you're a nonbehever m climate change, if you live in
Florida you will see tropical storms and hurricanes come blowing
across the state, causing all of the stressors that are becoming
increasingly more difficult to withstand, particularly as the human
population explodes. .
Our carbon footprmt has quite a bit to do with rising sea \em-
peraturesandwhilewecan'tstopthedamagebeingdonewecan
do something to perhaps slow the process.
It's the pollution we put in the air that causes the temperature
of the sea to rise: Last month in this column, I declared I would
drive slower and use less energy in my home. I set the thermostat
several degrees higher, lowered the temperature on my water heater
and use only air-drying for the dishwasher.
Will I make a difference in the temperature of the sea? Not
alone. We all need to participate in efforts to lessen our footprint
We also can do something about the beaches. Governments
need to make decisions requiring shoreline setbacks and building
elevations. Even if you don't see the dire necessity of doing some-
thing now before major changes occur, we all know that restoring
and increasing wetlands and barrier islands will'prevent Florida
from ever knowing the immediate and devastating destruction cre-
ated by Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana and Mississippi in 2005.
It could happen here unless we become wise stewards of our
habitat.
nM t n nto m e bac tt noast on sa Ad
and for wildlife."
The beach mice, bears, manatees and other wildlife may not &
able to say "thank you," but their very existence in 50 years will &
al thanks any of us need for creating safe passage and cleaner


Located in the Walmart parking lot. ( .
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmemmammmmmmmm


1


save with the


10:15i,22c


T~IIL~RP~Y






198 The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009





e


ABOUT ... Classified
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon .
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitalS
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


DIESEl, INJECTION REPAIRS -
pumps, turbos, injectors, can
remove & Install. 863-381-0538,
9:17-1:28P
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2009/10 season
?nd e ond.CallMarkMan e @

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on
10/30/2009 at 10:30 am the following
vehicles will be sold for towing & stor-
age charges pursuant to FS.713.78.
,,87 FORD PK
1FTCF15N2HNA13529
Sale to be held at Roberts Towing 377
Old Dixie Hwy., Bowling Green, FL
33834. Leinor reserves the right to
bid. 0110:150


2/2 DW FL ROOM, screened
porch, carport, shed, upgrades,
like new, 5 years old. Sacrifice
$54,000. 863-773-3814.
9:17-10:15p


LOST- 2 1/2 YR. OLD PUREBRED






SCUBA GEAR 3 tanks, regulla-
tors tim1 nany extras. Beat otr
MUZZLE LOADER for sale -
Thompson Center Omega, 50 cal-
Iber, $250. 773-3681. 10:15p


2907. 10:15-22p





naial.com 10:1 5-22p


BILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

fil Dirt Rock
-
. Ond Digging


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ GAS Of DieSSI Mill1U81 Or Automatle Triansmisslo
~~"~ o job's tob bw"



5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461
Mike Adcox Manager Carl Kelly ASE Certryied Mechanic


Health/Disability Services Coordinator Seasonal
,
Position (6 to 9 months)
ECMHSP is now accepting applications for
Health/Disability Services Coordinator in a Migrant Head
Start Program. Responsible for ensuring that.children
and families have a source of continuous and accessible
health care. Assumes lead role in the implementation of
Health, Disability, Mental Health and Dental-Services at
the center in .collaboration with Family Services
Coordinators.. Assumes primary responsibility for service
es for children with disabilities at center. Preferred:
License Practical Nurse, Certified Medical Assistant, or
Associates degree in health related field and one year
experience working with young children, including chil-
dren with disabilities, and families. Experience in com-
munity services. Supervisory experience. Bilingual
(Sp/Eng or Creole/ Eng). Accepted: High School
Di Ioma/GED and approved formal Health Credential or
45 contact hours of formal training in a health related
field. Experience working with young children, including
children with disabilities. Experience in community serv-
ices. Supervisory experience preferred. Starting salary
$466.40 to $490.00 weekly. Personal Leave and employ-
er-matched retirement plan.
Closing date: 10-23-09 1:
Send resume/Ietter of 6041Martis },uther KI
interest or apply at: 3r. Ave Wauchu[as florida
33873
Telephone: ,' 863-773-2815
EOE, ADAr License # C10HA0511
Anunclo para el pesto de coordinator de los sqryl
clos de salud/discapacidad De 6 a 9 meses cada
temporada
ECMHSP esti aceptando solicitudes de empleo para el
pesto de coordinator de servicios de sall'ld/discapaci-
dades para un program de Head Start. SerA respons-
able de Asegurar que-los nitios y las famillas tengan
recursos de servicios de salud disponible. Tehdrb la prin-
cipal responsabilidad, junto con los coordinadq'res de
servicios pard la familiar, en la implementaci6n de los ser-
Vicios de salud, discapacidad, salud mental, y servisios
dentales del ceistro. Se premiere: Licehcia de enfermera
practicante, certificado de asistente m6dich 0 titulo de
Asociado en el Area de salud y un aio de experiericia tra-
bajarTdo con nitios peguerios, incluyendo los niios con
discapacidades y cott las families. Experience trabajan-
do en servicios para la comtinidad. Experience como
supervisor. Biling0e (espaI~Tol/ingibs a criollo/ingIdis). Se
accept: Diploma de escuela secundaria. o GED, y una
credencial formal en el Area de salud, o 45 horas. de
capacitaci6n fomial@n un canipo de salud y un ano de
experiencia tabajando con nihos pequenos incluyendo
IOS nihos con discapacidades. Experienciatrabajaridgen
servicios para la comunidad. Experiencist como tiuperve-
sor. El salario initial es entre $$466.40 to $490.00 por
Semana. Se ofrece permiso personal, permiso por enfer-
medad, y beneficio de retire con coratribticibn clel
empleador.
La echa final para entregar la sodcitud 10-23-09
es:
Erivie su curricula y su carta do interns o 604 Martin Luther King 3r.Ave
su solicited de empleo a: Wauchula, Florida 33873
Tel&fono: 863-773-2815
E0EADAlicencia# C10HA0511
icoumiddonath S&vis Sante/Enfimite Se yon positiorV
klCs I napkoupkelk u aplikasyon pou Kouw6donath
Sbvis Sante/Enfimite pot( yon pwogrant Migrant Head
Start. Moun ki jwenn dj6b la ap reskonsab pou asire tim-
otin yo ak fanmi yo (;)en yon kgte pou yo toujou jwenri
swen medical san pwobl6m. L ap jwe w61 dirIjan nan
egzekisyon Sbvis Sante, Enfirpite at Sbvis Danth nan
sant lan ansantn av4k Kouwbdonath Avis Panmi yo. L
gp gen premye Yes onsablite pou shvis pou timoun enfim
Ri nan sant lan. Pt-eferans: Enfimy6 k ap pratike av4k
Lishns, Asistan Medikal Agreye, oswa degre Asosye nan
zafe sante opi ennan eksperyaris nan travay av6k jenth
timoun, aybk too timoun enfim, av4k fanmi >yo.
Eksperyahs nan shvis kominoth. Eksperyans nati zaf6
Sipbvizyon. Bilehg (Panybl/Angle oswa KreybI Angle).
Akseptab: S&tifika Asistan-Enfimy& oswa 45 Adtan kost-
tak pop f6masyon pwofesyon41 nan zaf4 sante epi senk
(5) an eksperyans nan travay av4k jenn timoun, av4k tim-
oun eofim yo tou. Eksperyans nan shvis kominoth. Salk
koumansman a se $466,40 tox$490.00 pa semenn. Gen
konje pou pbson41 la, epitou gen plan retr&t annak6 av4k
patron an.
Dat f6mti: 10-23-09
Voye kourikouloum-vite/16t ki 604 Martin Luther King Jr.
montre ou enterese oswa aplike Ave Wauchola, Florida
nant I 33873
Tel.: 863-773-2815 ,
E0E, ADA, # Lisans: C10HA0511


~ ,


I* IN
O'IDIMU 7668,


---'

Now OPEN for water.





Pilly (11? Offr firil Stile ifeMIS) I a
T


414 CNE 0
1171 000 1J.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4TT4
wym iimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


mm me.. mm mm am. mass mm men am um mm mg

OO OFF
I ggy yggif grjt CONpoN
}fust Bring Coupon
mm eems man am mm mm andmm email me mean
Mo ay Thursday Frid & aturday
am p p
Wailchula HIIIS


1


~---~--------~-------~-----~------31


DeAto County




EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.cotti
1-941-774-7980/7565





Store Wide S lq
1))ning robm start $197
Living room table 9
Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
a ioriaAdit 1 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Homepepot 4
863-382-0600


I


.
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.F).I., Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-fl43


Y'


18" GOOSEPIECK for sale. New WE PAY TOP PRICES for junk 2BR BLOCK HChiE 2 large cor-
tires, new railing and new paint. cars & farm tractors. Pickup avall- nor lots. 402 E. 4th St., Zolfo,
- AII steel, heavy duty. Call to come--able. Crooms Salvage. 781-3767.-$45,000 FISM. Call 863-781-3767
and see. 863-781-3712. 10:1-29p 27tfc or 863-773-0637. 9:24tfc


_


2006 MFH, 2100 sq. ft., 5 acres,
SB 3BoA ma rca pHanc s gr0e0a0
on I B ap hitnant. 941-
10:8-12:10p


FOR SALE -: 4BR/2-1/72 BA plus


clBm :2 I~blec; (941)456-6507


Lamar Gilliard -


REDUCli'D! 3.36+ agres with 4
BR/2 BA home. Thik 2,800-1- st
home is extremely energy em-
clent.Plenty of room for a gar-
den or other outdoor uses*
Within walking distance to
sholiping and schools. Value
priced at $265,000 NOW
$239,000!
GREAT Commercial. Site!
2.24+ acres zoned E-2 .with
frontage on Hwfl7, Shasti m
& Holtsclaw. Can be divided.
Supersiteforcommercialoper-
ation. REDUCED! $199,500.
100 acres in SW Hardee
County. Scattered Oaks and
Pines on this beautiful site.
Greathunting.OnCountyroad.
Four 4" wells. $5,000 per acre.
Waterfront property! 2 BR/2
BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep
water canal that leads into
Charlotte Harbor. Buyer con-
Ms pmible. REDUCED
to $150,000.
1& acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
s ingan h f na
Deed restrictions. Zoned FR
Lot size 130 X 305'. $38,500


Opst puj(t 31) BA homb
of # 'rway of rrey Oakh
Golf urse. 2 cal- garage.
Great upgrades throughout
home. Irrigated lawn.
$250,000 Call"and make an
appointment to see this home
today!
Stunning newly built 3 BR, 2
BA house with study.
Upgrades galore! Close to
schools. 2cargarage. Calland
askaboutthebonusofferedby
the builder! REDUCED
$229,500.
-
45 ac citrus grove. Valencies &
Hamlin. Double wide mobile
home. Fruit proceeds included
(subject to FOM contract).
Located in NE Hardee County.
$427,500
3.192acres. ZonedO-2.Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential incoine already in
place. Hivy. 17 across from
Walmart. $1,200,000
a
Great Invest opportunity!
25.67 atres vith 2 homes!
$399,000.


W


A


Wauchula
ear...sron,
Fire seen.'
Blank)
773-6667
.


comer or
e.,, a
pd REA Rd.
773-2011
Ruby


..
m a Regitor Associates
Ben Gibson (941)737-2800 Robert
cawin notes 1863)381-2242 John H.
Dutty Albritton (863)781-0161 Rick Kn


(863)781-1423
s (863)273-1017
;
(863)781-1396 :


Jones


Maria


Bus. (863)
f"ax: (863)
Www.Iambe


KENNETH A. LA
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE


773-0007
773-0038
rtrealty.net

C/B Stucco thome;
with fireplace, stainless
e kitchen, nicely land.
und sprinkler system.

with 3 bedrooin house,
paved road frontage,
cleared for farming or
ponds; property can be
AY F NANCE :FOR
$8000 per acre. Call
,

for this 1.37 acre tract;
city limits. $43,500
act with large pond;
ed. $195,000

B
MBERT, Broker
TERRELL...781-6971 2


L


AMBER


LARGE LOT with oaks and 3B/1.5Bth home EXECUTIVE HOME!
updated with new kitchen appliances, electric 44/3Bth, family room
rewired, A/C only 2 years old and like new roof. steel appliances.In larg
OWNERANXIOUS-Asking$135,000 escaped yard, undergo
LARGE WARE}IOUSE, 3000 sq. ft. with 800 $279,000
sq.ft. living area, all on 3.40 acres located on St.
Rd. #64E, perfect for commercial shop. 262/52 acres on CA 665
$135,000 perfect hunting camp,
large pines, 100 acres
Completely furnished Simcrest M/H, 2B/1.5Bth development, two small
on corner lot; 1800 sq.ft. with 2 storage build- divided; OWNER M
ings; well-kept property. $50,000 QUALIFIED BUYERS.
Large 4B/3Bth home on 5 acres; C/B and frame Delois for more details!
construction, 3614 sq. ft. living space, over 600
sq. ft. mother-in-law suite, outside and inside MAIN STREET location
storage, convenient location. $295,000 2" shallow well, outside
Take a look at this 2B/2Bth, large master suite,
2 screened porches, outside storage, sprinkler 14.74 acres, sloping tr
system with separate well. Offered at $54,900 native trees, very seclud

n*" SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON


Class ife s-


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
,
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


945
includes wax
214 E Orange St. Wauchula

Every Friday a Caturday
Complete Detail
For more info
Call I)onavan 863-781-7680 casetts


9499.0 Ds~own s

















111R/1BA DUPLEX for rent, close
to downtown, quiet neighbor.
hood. No pets, no smoking. $450
rent and $200 depoolt moves you
In. Please call 863-781-3712.
10:1-29p
LARGE 1BR/1BA DUPLEX, 505
High St., Wauchula, $450/month- .
ly, 1st/last to move in. 781-9129.
10:15-22p
WAUCHULA 1BR/1BA, central
air & heat, very spacious. 735-
2626. 10!150
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT,
South 9th Ave., $575 plus
deposit. 1-863-832-1984.
10:1-29p
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL,
rentals, apts., trailer, houses. 863.
773-6616 or 863-445-0915.
9:24-10:22P
DENTAL OR MEDICAL office
space available at Bowling Green
Medical Center, 1,200 sq. ft. for
information call 375-2214.
. 9:17-11:190
VERY CLEAN 3BR/2BA duplex.
No pets, no smoking, need refer-
ences, $500 security, $750 month.
773-9291 or 781-1528. 9:3tfc


4466 for more information, 4:9tfe
~ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or Hmitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or IImita-
tion. Familial status includes chil*
dren under 18 IIving with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfe-dh


GEOVANNI HANDYMAN SERVICE
any help you need, any job. Call
863-709-5649. 10:15P
B SEE SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
9:17-12:31p
CITRUS TREE REMOVAL -
Cheapest rates, by the hour or
contract. Free estimates. C.
WIIson 863-767-5349. 9:10-1:28p
CALL BIG DADDY TRACTOR
SERVICE for all of your tractor
work, knowing, discing, etc. 863.
781-0962. 8:27-10:29p
KITCHENS SEPTIC TANK ST
VICE New installation, drain
field, repairs. 863-832-9358.
10:8-11:5p


monthly plus $300 deposit. 863-
781-1847. 10:15-22p
3/2 SINGLEWIDE MH in park,
$500 depoalt & $475 per 'month.
863-773-9279. 10:15p
FOR RENT IN CHARLIE CREEK
MHP 2/2 ainglewide, $500
deposit, $500 per month. 773-
9279. 10:15p
FOR RENT IN CHARLIE CREEK
MHP 2/2 small doublewide,
$600 deposit, $600 per month..
773-9279. 10:15P
FOR RENT IN CHARLIE CREEK
MHP 2/2 doublewide with den
and porch, $750 deposit & $750
per month (all have a 1/4 acre lot).
863-773-9279. 10:15p
BRAND NEW 3/2 home with dou-
ble garage located approximately
20 minutes from Wauchula.
Monthly rental amount of $800
with depoolt of $800. Call Jessica
Smith at 86-781-1186 for more
info. 10:15c
2BR HOUSE TRAILER, Zolfo
Springs, $450 month. 245-1216-
10:150


WILKERSON LAWN SERVICE -
Comple'te lawn care, guaranteed
lowest price.773-4400. 10:1-29
LAWN MOWER SERVICE repa r
and parts. Lowest prices. Paul's
Small Engine. 773-4400 or 474-
1172. 9:24-10:300
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION -
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool ericio-
sures, rescreening. Harold
Howse Construction. 735-1158.
RRO5018. 9:17-il:19p
DO YOU NEED A WEBSITE
BUILT? Call Doug 863-397-9840.
5:7tfe
ATTENTION
SENIORS / DISABLED
We. are experienced caregivers
who will care for you In your
home. For more Info. call MoIra at
781-3889 or call 781-2869. *
10:15-12:17p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palme#o and 7th Ave., Waud
chula, and Friday and Saturday
nights7:00 p.m.atFirst Methodist
Church, corner of Grape and
Church St., Bowling Green.
12:6tfgdh


HUNTING EQUIPMENT 'that
worke, lost my lease. Single &
double ladders, 1 double open
field stand, 4-40 gallon feeders
with multiple batteries, cheap
$40*$60 stands, $40-$50 feederab
Jalmle941-238-8599. 10:15p
RV FOR SALE ot* rent Crystal
Lake with washer & dryer, $700
month rent or $4,000 sale. 767-
8822. 10:15c
28 FT. TRAVEL TRAILER for sale,
$1,500.767-8822. 10:15c
32 FT. 5TH WHEEL with hookuP
you can put in your truck, $2,000
or $1,500 without hookup. 767"
8822. 10:15c
FOR SALE 1995 PACE ARROW
37' motor home, make offer. John
Deer 773-6661. 7:30tfc

.
BIG APARTMENT 2BR/1BA, all
utilities included, $600 month.
863-781-1007.' 10:15p
NICE CLEAN one bedroom apart.
ment with screened in porch and
washer/dryer hookup. $120 per
week, first weeks rent, damage
deposit and references required.
10:15p


m.rur e as es a 4 u yu" ""' '"' "
pet or are looking for a ttew one,
the City oS Wauchulaonar e
come u're7ook n for The
Wauc ula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfe-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of rasites. tfe-dh


CASH FOR YOUR trust deed' or
e. Private arty. 1-863.
1 10:1-1:1p
The fragrance always re-
mains in the hand that gives
he rose.


rent773-667.10:&15c
very goodR conditonnice lo
`sotion. 7-33 ror Pee78f-5246.

lincludea utilities. 773-6255.
10:8-15c
1BR APARTMENT, Bowling
moenth $550 deposit. 77-100. 5


A MOVE-IN TODAY A
1 bed $300 mo.; A bed $350
mo-up; 3 bed $450 mo-up*
Close to schools & hospital, no
pets, $200 deposit. So hable
espanoI (863) 698-4910 or 698-
::EHOUSE OFFICE
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
WAREHOUSES, several di 2
alzes. Jack UIIrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc


THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through October 31

,ty. RN
Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.

L TeroM rTAvSeT nLoanP rive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours 10on Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
:Ms---,=, @qual Opykirtunity Employer and Provider Was





Realtor
220 N. 6th Ayenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 ,
www.floresrealty.net
Nosy A. Flores
*
Special Of The Week


Happy Home
Apartments
19 Wannamaket Ave. Ft. Meade

-Close Sh I sAMelowed


L ("~ ~'6~;For7informatoncalhdita_~


HELP WANTED
East Coast Migrant Head Start Project in Bowling Green
and Wauchola are now accepting apphcations for
Assistant Teacher to work with children ages 6 wks to 5
yeatS. Responsible for assisting in the provision of devel-
opmentally appropriate activities and care for children
under the guidance and direction of the Teacher. Pre-
ferred:.CDAfor working with appropriate age group
(Infantgoddibr or Pre-Achool), 2 years experience, and
active enrollment in Associates degree program. Bilin-
gual (Spa/Eng .or Creole/Eng). Accepted: High School
Diploma/GED and CDA Credential for working with
appropriate age group (Infant/Toddler or Pre-school) and
two years experichee working with young children.
Starting salary $8.90 -9.35 per hour. Personal Leave and
employer-matched retirement plan.
East Coast Migrant Head Start Project in Bowling Green
and Wauchula are now accepting applications for
Assistant Teacher/Bus Monitor to work with children
ages 6 wks to 5 years. Responsible for assisting in the
provision of developmentally appropriate activities and
care for children under the guidance and direction of the
Teacher. Preferred: High School Diploma/ GED and CDA
credential for working with appropriate age group (In-
fant/Toddler or Pre-school), and one (1) year of expen.
ence. Accepted: High School Dipipme/GED and active
enrollment in CDA Credential for working wilth appropn-
ate age group (Infaint/Toddler or Pre-school). Must
receive the CDA credential no later than 18Q days after
beginning employment in a preschool classroom and
one (1) year after beginning employment in an infant/
toddler classroom. Starting salary $8.09 -8.50 per hour-
Personal Leave and employer-matched retirement plai-
East Coast Migrant Head Start Project in Bowling Green
and Wauchula are now accepting applications for
Teacher to work with children ages 6 wks to 5 years,
Responsible for providing a developmentally appropriate
Head Start environment and for overall management of
the classroom. Provides training and assistance to
Assistant Teachers and volunteers. Preferred: A.A./A.S.
Degree in Early Childhood Education or related field with
enrollment in Bachelor's degree program, and two years
experience in teaching early childhood. Bilingual
(Sp/Eng or Creole/Eng). Accepted: High, School
Diploma/GED and CDA Credential for working with
approprIate age group (Infantgoddler or Pte-school),
enrollment in an Associate's degree program, and three
years working with young children. Starting salary $9.78
-10.28 per hour. Personal Leave and employer-matched
retirement plan.
Closing date: 10-16-09
Send resume/Ietter of interest or apply at: ECMHSP 5115
Mason Dixon Avenue, Bowling Green, FL 33834,
Telephone:863-375-2101, EOE, ADA, LIcense #
C10HA0001
Send resumelletter of interest or apply at: ECMHSP 604
Martin Luther King Avenue, Wauchula, FL33873,
Telephone: 863-773-2815, EOE, ADA, License #
C10HAO511 clio:e-1so


2002 LOG DOUBLEWIDE mobile
home, 4BR/2BA, 2 000 eq.ft. Must
be moved. Asking $30,000 OBO.


Are you renting? Want to buy a home? Are you working?
Have good1-redit? This is your opportunity!! Owrier "
,financingwithsmalldownpayment.Creativelfinancing
with stimulus money from Uncle Sam will put you in your
own home located at 807 Honolulu Dr. 3BR home central
air/heat appliances included Payments as low as rent.
$79,900.00


I


I


I


'


October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7B


C


*, ,q. **1


EDmus
IN C., RE A L TORS
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
. JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REACTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
Juan De orre www.joeldavis.colit
(863) 781-1128 REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS




NEW LISTING! Beautiful Park-like setting w/trees
31+ ac pasture in Ona is galore for this 12.5& acs &
fenced and adorned w/oak 2008 3BR/2BA MH. Eqjoy
& pine trees. $230,000! nature as you stroll around
is beautiful property!
NEW LISTING! 5& ac $199,000!
Early/Mid grove off Miner-
al Branch Rd, well. $80,000! Eastern Hartlee Co! 9.64
acs w/330' of frontage on
PRICE REDUCED! SR64, zoned A-1, conve-
Bavathtaking oaks! 9.8+ ac niently located between
homesite conveniently lo- Avon Park & Wanchula!
cated between Wauchula & $150,000!
Zolfb Springs w/culvert
already in place! NOW Looking for 5 or 10 acs?
$140,000! Two 51 ac higb/dry fenced
parcels on private rd!
Inimatuhate 3BR/2B CB $55,000 for vacant 5& acs!
home w/hardwood floors, $65,000 for 5& acs w/weH &
tife in kitchen bakth. BI septic
vat*yrea 138, yar High & dry pastureland!
8 d
10& ac improved, fence
Pavpd road, great price! land on private rd is attrac-
10& acs cleared land has tive homesite, or per-
well, power unit. Ready for fect for cattle/horses!
your new home or ag use. $140,000!
$110,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Scenic
3BR CB home, central A/4' location w/lots of treed!
w/1 car garage in Wauchula 3BR/2BA 2006 MH on 5&
Hills. $110,000! aes, paved road, fenced,
pond, storage shed. NOW
4BR/2BA frame home close $110,000!
to schools. $55,000'*
tookhig for nati e Florida?
10& acs beautiful oaks pn Secluded 5-t; ac bf wooded
paved rd borders state land. land has deeded access to
Deed restrictions to protect Peace River! Canoe,
your investment $225,000! camp, fossil hunt, relax!
$90,000!
Secluded! 14:t acs, zoned A-
1 w/creek, partially fenced. Possible owner financing!
$124,000! Gorgeous 372 acs of the
Peace River has native
PRICE REDUCED! Multi- areas, tree-lined paths, open
family zoning! Almost 3 ass pasture, hiking trails and
measuring 386'x345', soned 1400sft of river frontage.
R-3 -w/city utilities! Property is fenced.
$145,000! $524,000!


WE SHARE THE SAJISE $11,$ WITH filGHLANDS COUNTYf
Remember
Our #stings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can
access them anytime| "
Contact After Hours
0.R.(Tony)FloresBrokertony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@florearealty.net


I


3B A hobm in eec ny Lar 11 tO@ Ontral air / heat

3BR 1.5BA CB home Central air/hesit carport corner lot -
new painting new flooring Ready to go. $95,000.00
Bowling Green 2BR home inexpensive City water & sewer.
Reduced 39,000.00
2BR CB home in TVauchula Almost 2,000 sq ft under roof -
Central air / heat $79,900.00
3BR 2BA frame home 1,900 sq ft heated area 2,200.00 sq ft total
under roof- carport many extras $ 59,000.00 '


After hours


(863) 781-0744


Class 1 1e s -


he


EXCELLENT CORNER LOT
to build on for ybut new home! Grdat
location right in town and close to schoolS
in Wauchula. Lot size 86'x132'. survey
Alluded. Lycated.at Georgia St. &
Indiana Ave. In area of nice homes and
Quiet Neighborhood.
Asking $26,000 (863) 245-6157





51~~


Removal
6 Stump Grinding
Locally Owned & Operated


LO S NG a r
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
*** dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
rrfo n in I'Int n'
call (863) 773-6448.7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrao-
tor's license number.
dh


Fiaulkner Stump Grinding & Tree Service, LLC




SHearn's Auto Cleaning Service I


Wanted Preschool Teacher 2
(EOwling Green CDC)
Required qualifications include FCCP Birth 5,
Infant Toddler or Preschool National CDA, 9
credits in ECE, NECC. Apply with Beatrice
Juarez at RCMA 404 Orange St.; Bowling
Green, FI 33834; (863)375-3339 or
beatricej@rema.org RCMA is an Equal
Opportunity Employer. coo:1so


C o ho N ae.1
games, kitchen utenalls, comput-
era, software, hardware, luggage,
etc. 10:15p
h ARd., cor8er ne!"
& Pine. 2 chairs & more. 10:15p
LAPTOP COMPAQ, $100; mailbox
4x4 post, $25; vacuum, $15, new
" ot 5,8 M2P450PIr5nt
SATURQAY 8-7, 1621 Dena
Circle, Golfview. Moving. Baby
clothes, toys, household,10 185
SATURDAY 8-1, 1249 Pine
Cl t7)a, sKo t & h seho
items. 10:15c
THURSDAY-SATURDAY 8-2,
"tAR yth8 Merl ng
something for every holiday,
Iarge variety of plants. 10:150


FOf ROnt


1 & 2 Bed rooms
817 E. Main St., Wauchula

Sammy 781 -0707


enonse e


FRIDAY & SATURDAY 7:30-7,
1262 Aspen Lane, Knollwood.
Furniture, clothes, dishes, mise.
10:15p


Hilfs Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowlizig Green

OPEN 7 DAY A E7 4 HAB ESPAROL


0






Now Hiring
Police Officer
The City of Bowling Green is, accepting applications
for full time police officer 3dition. The successful
applicant must possess current Florida certification
and fulfill the hiring prerequisites as set forth by the
department, which includes a thorough background
investigation and drug screening. The position will
remain ,open .until filled. To obtain an application,
please contact Captain Brett howden or Chief John
Scheel at (863) 375-2255 or you may obtain one in
person at 104 F. Main St., Monday throsigh Friday
from 8:00 am til Noon and 1:00 pm until 5:00 pm. The
police department offers competitive pay and benefits
and an active, challenging work environment. The city
of Bowling Green is a drug -free workplace and an
equal opportunity employer. coo:e-rse


Pree Estimates
.Insured 30+ Vears expedience






.* Service ALL Brands of Appliances
$60.00 includes 30 mins of free service
Parts Additional
Parts for ALL Makes Available in Store!!
Appliances available ih all price ranges
We are here to fulfill ALL your USED appliance needs!


781-7680
01
Trained Licensed Insured professional Service 2


, a


The flower is the poetry of


DIVORCE
BANHWTCY

7
863-314-0846
(non-lawyer)




Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
w..sms..w as 7
HIGHPOINT
TSU
2350 U.S. 27 N th Sebring
Across from Home Depot -a
863-382-0600 (


aV

BUSINESS

go
appW A
a 4.idH



"
conses
wancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trg Qg (ggigig
At
773.3255


I I


AM-SOUTH REAlJY
Each ogice independently
owned and operated.


$3,000 certified funds required down on each property. 5%
buyer's premium. All sales subject to seller's approval.
H&M AB110; B.G. Hudson, Jr AU230;
PM, Harvill SL534399, DT Webb BKS34398, S.W Marshall AU2939 0110:15 29?



0a FOI' S
Pool Se r vice

Back Under

Or ig inal
O w nership


*
Now Servin
Pools in Har ee '
COunty


Licensed & Insur.


_ ..~


8B The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009


W R.SMIH LAD cearig &S~ATURDAA'Y "- 8i~eg-,21Gere

remoal;Fening- babedwir, '10:15p
fled ene, oad enc; acorSATURDAY 362 Altman Rd.
work- buh hg, dsc. odePorch awing, Christmas tree and
enoremntcla-u dscun.lots more. 10:15p


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
ENff COmpounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
MOlOT Cl&#HENg


H~wy. 17 & S.R. 66


(863) 735-1495


W. B. Olliff, 3r.,


Tree surgeon, Inc.


***$1.00 SALE*"
Most $1.00 & under. Clothes,
books, Home Decor, microwave,
13" TV, small appliances, 8-1,
1550 Kazen Rd. 10:15p


702 SOUTH 6* AVENUE, WAUCHULA


li


Vitor Sazr


JerryCarion Nncy raft Richard Dasher


uonna usewens 1


COUNTRY LIVING This 4B/2B home is
located on a peaceful country road. Almost
1 Acre. $129.900
REDUCEDji $95.900 5.3 Acres wit 52x101
Ft Slab on site. Paved Road. Call for
Information
PRICE REDUCEDII $124.900 Picture
Perfect is the setting of giant oaks and well
maintained 3/1 home on 1.9 acres. A
screened front & open back porches for
family and entertaining. 2 car carport and
workshop.
cOUNTRY SETTINGII Very Spaciously
$ggQQQ TWO Nice BR, TWO Nice Bath, Too
Good of a DEAL not to see. CALL TODAYII
3 BR, 2 Bath
extra many extras
$69.900
18 ACRE GROVE with 3 BD, 3 Bath Home
$325.000
Reduced! $124.900 Spacious 3/2 home with

.1'o'v','i"L NrElaofB2 R4HOsODn! Your New
Home with White Picket Fence. 3 Large
BDR, 1 BTH, includes above ground pool, A
MUST SEE, at 712 W. Palmetto $115.000.
$75.00011 GREAT PRICEll 3/2 M/H, 1,296
total sq. ft., recently updated and in a nice
neighborhood.
DOUBLE WIDE M/Hil WITH 3 BR/2BTH.
Front and back porches sits on 4.81 Acres
Only $92.500.
A REAL BARGAINil Lovely M/H Iot on
Downing Circle, $9.000 Call NanovI
Vacant residential corner lot, 3.12.500
Residential lot in nice neighborhood with
shady oaks $18,800
INVESTMENT PROPERTY Waller Park -
Great Location Hwy. 17, Owner Financing.
wo, mor.information, o.u nanuals


PRICE REDUCTION. GREAT BUYII 2 BD/2B
with central A/C and Irrigation system.
Central Ave., Bowllrig Green. $62.800
NEW LISTINGII 2B/1B CB Home, Central
H/A, total at ft. of 1,837. OnlyI $75.00011
$129.90011 Ham ullt in 2006, 3 BR/2BIH
in excellent conditibnqceramic tile, stove,
refrigerator and dishwasher
17 COUNTRY ACRESII With 3,432 sq. ft.,
block home covered in red Brick, 3B/3B
$220.000 Call Donnall Qug word Wowit
NEW LISTINGII 15 acre pasture htimesite,
paved road, fenced, ma ketable exotic palm
trees, 2 wells. Owner anxious to seIIII
$150.000.
SEE NEW LISTINGil 212 Riverside 3/1 CB
home, fenced back yhrd. $124.900
FULLY FURNISHEDill Just Bring Your
Toothbrush and Move into this 3 Bedroom,
M/H on Downing Circle 91$.1

TOWNHOUSEII 2BR, 1.5 Bath with Central
H/A. $44,SQQ*
PORTRAIT OF PEACE I Build your home pn
this5.58Acretract.ONLY$110.000110
$.SI.SQQ3BR, 1
Bath, spacious living room, large kitchen,
for entertaining. Much More! .
3 BR, 2 Bath with 1,236 total Sq Ft. IIvlng
area. Only $75.000
3/1 CB Home with extra corner lot. Only
susan
COUNTRY LIVING In this 3/2 Doublewide
M/H with 5 Acres $.00,000
FINANCING AVAILABLE: BY SELLER 5
ACRES vacant land buildryour hom@
here $45.00011 ono:150


OPEN HOUSE:


Cass 1 1e s-


j*


75 FLORIDA HOMES
including 12 n to. Tampa area


OR CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE


HUDSON &
MARSHALL







































































: *




The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Buihling De-
partment during the week of
Oct. 2-10. Listings include the
nwneh tdh e r econtra
t type wo o Idon and
vu at $1,000 or more are

ISSUED
R Smi edBuilders Apostolk
Whitmire A/C Sidney
Roberts Road, air conditioning,
$13, 250.
Hash Building, Florida Beef,
foundation, $1,000.
. David Scott A/C, Lisa Drive,
air conditioning, $4,995.
Capstone, West Main Street,
demolition, $1,000.
FINR, Vandolah Road, win-
dows, $1,500-
BUILDING BLOCKS
When do yoth need a building
permit? Basically, for all build-
ing projects. Large or small pro-
jects require building plans and
a building permit and must be
inspected. This includes sheds,
carports, and even pre-built
storage sheds.


NewTies ncud


*For Keyentable hometown service,


Florida Fuel



go a Eg
M WW .WW. p

*
. .
Hardee County's
ONLY LOCALLY OWNED & OPE RATE D
bulk fuel distributor for over 17 years!

Open Mon. FrI. 6:30am 5:00pm
Sat. 7:30am 12:00pm


863-773-9466

156 Will Duke Road, Wauchula sonso


E t
Trane ven
7 : ooa eq Reastration seens
a : oon as shotgun start
LAST TEAM Lunch, Awards, Raffle

Platinzzin Sponsors


. 2 MAN SCRAMBLE



44
. PRIZES A VAILABLE*
*HOLF IN ONE
*CLOSEST TO THE PI
*50/50 CHANCE DRA WING
*RAFFLE


Co~ter I


Handice:


For questions, please call thle Hardee County Chamber of Commerce at 863-773-6967. 1:-5


n~m~r:~xoxnmnnrrmmramrmlrm~~ulr


October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 9B


SPARKING INTEREST


POWERFUL HELPERS


COURTESY PHOTds
Firefighters at the Zolfo Springs substation of Hardee County Fire-Rescue recently vis-
ited Zolfo Springs Elementary School to complement the youngsters' classroom stud-
ies. Firefighters Dan Brimblecom and Chad Anderson talked to second graders about
fire Safety and explained what a firefighter does. The purpose of the presentation was
to go along with the reading story of the week, "Fighting the Fires." The firefighters
(above) also gave students a look at a fire engine, while (below) Brimblecom answered
questions.


COURTESY PHOTO
Zolfo Springs Elementary Schoot's business partner for the second year is Vandolah


STATE BOWLERS


COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchulan She Streeter was on hand to snap a picture as a local bowling team and its
sponsor won their division at the annual Florida State Bowling Tournament held recent-
ly in Melbourne. Bowl-of-Fun Lanew owner Jean BarwIck (center) pauses with the first-
place team (from lett) Louise Craig, Angel Ussery, Carol-Ann Sink and Brenda Pelton,
who scored a 2,940 for the team victory. The Hardee A-Team of Pat Johnson, Judy
Albritton, Judy Rowe and Kim Benavidez had a team total of 2,735. Benavidez placed
second in the singles with an 815 total. Also in the singles were Ussery with 748 and
Barbara Bergens with 705. In the doubles division, Barbara Bergens and Raina
Bergens came in at 19230 and Albritton/Benavidez finished at 1,417. For the All-events
scores, Benavidez placed ninth with 2,249 points and Ussery was=>1th with-42,242.
Others placing were: Barbara Bergens, 2,120; Pelton, 2,113; Sink, 2,054; and Dianna
Callahan, 2,051.


TPgotinan -

TO Speak

At Chamber
The Hardee County Chamber
of Commerce will be hosting a
"Lunch & Learn" meeting for.
chamber members next week,
with state Rep. Baxter Trout-
inaItas guest speaker.
daTh etmg is setofor Tnhutr
Pa a restaurant banquet

ti I)uringchthemsessi 3 an elae
directors will be held in prepa-
ration for the Annual Dinner
Meetie on Mond ,oNov. 2. of
District 66, currently serves as
chairman of the General
Government Policy Council.
He also serves on the Natural
Resources Appropriations
Committee, Policy Council, and
Rules & Calendar Council. He
was first elected to the House in
2002.
After chamber business is
conducted, Troutman will be
givmg a legislative update to
chamber members regarding
issues affecting District 66. .
The Panda Restaurant is
located at 806 S. Sixth Avel
(U.S. 17) in Wauchula. Lunch is
provided for chamber members.
To reserve, call the chamber
office at 773-6967 or e-mail
kim rly@hardeecc.com.


Llan<


Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SRLE ON
RLL TIRES .
.
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
visA (aWr rom Ti hn


ce






"
A
-c
(
in


Free Mount & Ba


Mailor ropoffcompet rgitraio frmto


Co~tcr 2r


Adobcssr


ist Prize-ssoo.oo
.
2nd Pnze-$400.00
.
3rd Pnze-$300.00


Han cap:


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.,
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wowan comemy


CIF













juice inventories. Higher inven-
tories have driven grower prices
down farther and kept con-
sumer prices elevated. Brazilian
imports of juice also add to this
concerning trend impacting the
local economy's well being,
said Barbara Carlton, executive
director of PRVCGA.
Association president Justin
Sorrells believes there is oppor-
tunity for local growers. Other
citrus production areas have
been hit hard with disease, and
their tree loss may be driving
the production estimate .lower
statewide. He speculates the
bulk of the fruit crop may be in
the PRVCGA region.
"More fruit in local groves
can translate to economic well-
being for local communities."
states Sorrells. "The value of
the fruit paid to growers ends
up circulating throughout the
community iri the form of pay-
checks and supporting local
business."
"Growers will begin receiv-


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Email: kochcon@strato.net ,,,,,. State certifIed Ucense


Bren~;"~ akfast:~~ Held For Citrus Crop Estimate


ing offers from fruit buyers
soon. Time will tell how the
estimated 2009-10 citrus crop
will impact our communities.
Last year's fruit crop in the
five-county region serviced by
PRVCGAhad a value of $248.6
million., The economic impact
of this income as it is spent -by
growers ultimately equals
approximately $563 million.
Hardee County's crop alone
was valued at $77 million, wITh
an estimated economic impact
of $180 million," said Sorrells.
Dan Smith won $100 fr6m
Yara North America for guess-
ing the crop size prior to the
announcement at the Wauchula
breakfast.
Peace River Valley Citrus
Growers Association is a volun-
tary membership organization
representing citrus growers in
five counties in issues relating
to commercial citrus produc-
tion. They are Hardee, DeSotp,
Manatee, Charlotte and Sara-
sota.


ease research projects are un-
derway and the newly formed
Citrus Research and Develop-
ment Foundation Inc. will help
commercialize solutions for
Florida growers."
The economic environment is
slowly displaying positive indi-
cators as consumer confidence
begins to rebound. Robert
Norberg, FDOC deputy execu-
tive director, research and oper-
ations, predicts a one percent
increase in retail orange juice
gallon sales for the overall
2008/2009 season.
"Retailers recognize that
orange juice is a critically
important product for their
shoppers," lyorberg stated.
"With over 100 million house-
holds buying orange juicy,
retailers are motivated to pro-
mote this product more often.
During August, we saw a thir-
teen percent increase in quality
retail promotions, such as fea-
tures .and displays versus one
year ago. Display space in-
ereased by up to nine percent,"
he added. "Retail promotions
are important to the Florida cit-
rus industry because 15. to ?0
percent of all orange juice sold
on promotion is incremental.to
the category."
The FDOC Economic and
Market Research Department
will release its annual compre-
hensive Florida Citrys Outlook
for 2009-10 on Oct. 21.
"We look forward to a pro-
ductive 2009-10 citrus season,"
Keck concluded. "Recent inde-
pendent research demonstrated
that the FOOC's fully integrated
marketing programs generated


a $5 return for every grower
dollar invested during the 52
week period ending March
2009. FDOC will continue to
grow the'market for the Florida
citrus industry to help ensure its
sustainability and important
contributions to Florida's agri-
culture and economy."
The Florida Department of
Citrus is an executive agency of
Florida government charged
with the marketing, research
and regulation of the Florida
citrus industry. Its activities are
funded by a tax paid by growers
on each box of citrus that
moves through commercial
channels.
The announcement was met
with a sigh of relief from about
85 local growers attending a
breakfast sponsored by Joe L.
Davis Inc. and hosted by Peace
River Valley Citrus Growers
Association Oct. 9 at Joe L.
Davis Barn in Wauchula.
Hopes are the smaller crop
will translate to higher prices
growers are paid for their fruit.
In a recent USDA report, citrus
acreage in Florida declined
again, emulating a 10-year pat.
-tern of reduced citrus acreage.
Disease and development are
attributed with creation of this
pattern.
Reduced availability of
oranges should translate to
.higher prices for growers, but
this hasn't been the trend in re-
cent years. Lower grower prices
also do not necessarily translate
to lower consumer prices. Re-
cent consumer pricing coupled
with the economic downturn
has created pooling of orange


The U.S. Department of Agri-
culttire on Friday released its
initial citrus crop forecast for
the 2009-10 season, estimating
Florida will produce 136 mil-
lion boxes of oranges, a 16 per-
cent decrease from last season,
"This is a solid number for
Florida citrus growers," said
Michael W. Sparks, executive
VP/CEO ef Florida Citrus
Mutual. "At 136 million boxes
we suspect the prices growers
get for their fruit will increase
and that's crucial to cover high
production costs as they contin-
ue to badle serious diseases
such as greening and canker.
"The good news is that our
industry's ample inventory of
orange juice will allow con-
sumers to continue to get a ter-
rific tasting, nutritious product
at a great value."
Visit www.nass.usda.gov/-
Statistics byState/Florida/Pub
lications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for
the complete USDA estimate.
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
"Once again Florida growers
are expected to produce a qual-
ity crop," said Fran Becker,
Mutual's president. "Despite
many challenges, Florida grow-
ers continue to be the best and
most efficient citrus producers
in the world."
The USDA predicts Florida
will harvest 19.8 million boxes
of grapefi-uit in 2009-10, down
9 percent from 21.7 million last
season.
The forecast for early and
midseason varieties in Florida


is projected at 69 million boxes,
and Valencias are projected to
total 67 million boxes.this sea-
son. For Florida specialty fruit,
the USDA predicts 1 million,
boxes of tangelos and 4.9 mil-
lion boxes of tangerines. The
yield for from concentrate
orange juice (FCOJ) is expected
to be 1.63 gallons per 90-pound
box.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9 billion annual eco-
nomic impact, employing near-
ly 76,000 people, and covering
more than 569,000 acres.
Founded in 1948 and currently
representing nearly 8,000 grow-
er* members, .Florida Citrus
Mutual is the state's largest cit-
rus grower organization. For
more information, visit www.fl-
citrusmutual.com.
The 136-million-box orange
crop estimate, is 26 million
boxes less than last year's pro-
duction o fl62.4 million boxes.
"In spite of the decrease, we
believe the ongoing viability of
the Florida citrus, industry re-
mains strong," said Ken Keck,
executive director, Florida De-
partment of Citrus (FDOC).
"Today's forecast reflects a
lower crop size due to variable
weather conditions. There are
currently 74.1 million citrus
trees in commercial production
and the indlistry continues to
contribute close to $9 billion to
the state economy.
"The Florida citrus industry
. has united together over the
past 18 months to make signifi-
cant progress in the battle
against greening," Keck com-
mented. "More than 100 dis-


Estimated Citrus 2009-10 Crop For F
Early. Mid Season Oranges di
Novel Oranges
.
Late Season Valencia Oranges

Totol Floriqly Oranges

White Beliuit

Colored Grapefruit

Total Florido

Total Tangerines


Edgar Davls, Trey McCarleyi and Keith Dalvis attended citrus estimate breakfast spon-


PHOTOS SY Jl4 XELLY
Dan Smith (left) receives~ a $100 Wal-Mnart gift card from Yara North America represent-
ed by Jerry Southwell. Smith estimated Florida's new orange crop at 135 milIIon boxes.
The official USDA estimate was' 136 million boxes.


Among 85 Iocal citrus growers at breakfast were Hugh Taylor, J.A. Clar~k, Tina Davis,


LOOKING TO (863) 385-8649





















































































State of Florida

Departm~ent of Environmental Protection
:Notice of Proposed Agehcy Action on Permit Application
The Department gives notice of its intent to issue a permit (File No. 38414-012-SF/01) to
thel Hardee County Solid Waste Department, ~who applield.on April 30, 2009 to the
Department of Environmental Protection for a permit for closure and long-term care of a
portion of an existing Class I Landfill, referred to as the Hardee County Class 1 Landfill -
Phase I, subject to the specific and general conditions attached, located at 685 Airport
Road, east of the City of Wauchula, Hardee County, Florida.
Persons whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's proposed permit-
ting decision may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) in accordance with
Section 1.20.57, Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the information set forth
below, and must be filed (received) in the Office'of General Counsel of the Department
at. 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000,
within fourteen (14) days of publication of this notice. A copy obf the~ letitiorifn-iust also
be mailed at the time of filing to the applicant at the addresiS indicated. Failure to file a
request for hearing within this time period shall constitute a waiver any right such person
may have to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Section 120.57*
Florida Statutes. Mediation is not available in this prdceeding. .
The~petition shall contain the following information; (a) The name, address, and tele-
phone number of each petitioner, the applicant's name and address, the Department
Permit File Number and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) A statement of
how and when each~ petitioner received notice of Department's action, or proposed
action; (c) A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the
Department's action or proposed action; (d) A statement off the material facts disputed
by Petitioner, if any; (e) A statement of facts which petitioner contends warrant reversal
or modification of the Department's action or proposed action; and (f) A statement of
which rules or statutes petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the
Department's action or proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by peti-
tioner, stating precisely the action, petitioner wants the Department to take with respect
'to~ the Department's action or proposed action.
If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate agency
action. Accordingly, the Department's final action may be different from the position
taken by it in this notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any
decision of the Department with regard to the application have the right to petition to
become a party to the proceeding. The petition must conform to the requirements spec-
:Pied above and be filed (received) within 14 days of publication of this notice in the Office
,of General Counsel at the above address of the Depairtment.
Failure to petition within the allowed time frame constitutes a ivaiver of any right such per-
son has to request a hearing under Section 120.57, Florida Statutes, and to participate
as a party to this proceeding. Any subsequent intervention will only be at the approval
of thie presiding officer upon motion filed pursuant to Rule 28-5.207, Florida
Administrative Code.
The application is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m., IVonday through Friday, except legal holidays, at 13051 North Telecom
Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida 33635-0926. 10:15-22c


if f a AA If
5 O Wt I me on ivia in

Saturday, December, 5, 2009 6 p.m.
Downtown Wauchula

Parade Guidelines
1. $25.00 Entry Fee.
2. Entries must pertain to the holiday and/or theme, "It's Showtime on Main."
3. Because this is an evening parade, LIGHTS ARE REQUIRED on all floats or pulled
units.
4. No Santas. Only helpers are allowed.
5. No Vendors.
6. Entries with animals must provide their own clean up during line up and along the
parade route. For the safety of the spectators, all animals must be accompanied by a walk-
ing chaperone.
7. No alcohol or tobacco are allowed.
8. Banner and/or poster and flash lights are required to precede float.
9. At lear$ two walkers are required beside each float.
10. Must be 16 years old to operate any motorized vehicle.
11. No bull whips are permitted.
12. For the safety of children, candy or other items may Sat be thrown from any vehicle,
but should be hand.cd not by people walking in the parade
13. Please have at least I adult assigned to every 20 children. Children must be accompa-
nied at all tames.
14. Field will be available from 9:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. All participants are required td be
in position no later than 4:30 p.m.
15. Immediately following the parade, participants must have a representative at the
judging stand for award presentations.
16. Registration deadline is November 20th.
17. In the event of a severe weather cancellation, the parade will be rescheduled for
Saturday, December 12th.
,,_ ... ..

Entry form
Please print. Only completed forms will be accepted. Check all that apply.
Entry Type: 0 Float- O Vehicles D Marching Unit- O Other
Category: 0 commercial 0 Non commercial
Accompanied by Music? Yes No if yes, please specify ,
Accurate and clear descripflon of entry (To be read by the emcees)



Business or Organization:
Contact Person: Phone Number. .
Address: City & ZIp:
AII entry forms and registration fees must be received by [dggy, Egy, go, ggQg to: I
HardeeCounty Chamber of Commerce RO. Box 683, Wauchula, FL 33873
Fax: 863-773-4915 Email: Casey@hargleecc.com I
""............................am.......... ..1


October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 11B j


Shutouts
down orie, two, three in the bot-
tom of the fourth, the game was|
called on the mercy rule, with
Hardee up 17-0.
It was a similar game at home
on Thursday against ebbingng.
The young Lady Streaks had
a double in the top of the first,
but a pair of strikeouts and a
ground-out ended that threat.
Hardee opened with four
runs. Ullrich tripled and scored
on a Thomas RBI double.
Henderson and Aubty both pin-
gled and came around home
with Thomas on a Dueberry
double. A Galvez hit left two
aboard when the inning ended.
Sebring went down in order
in the top of the second and
Hardee added two more scores.
Derringer and Tyson both sin-
gled and scored on a Hendersqn
hit.
A pair of strikeouts and a
groundout retired Sebring in the
top of the third. Galvez tripled
and scored on an error. .
In the final inning, a walk left
a Sebring runner stranded.
Hardee added its final three
runs. Derringer walked, Tyson
singled and Thomas doubled.
When Henderson doubled, it
scored the 10th run and ended
the game.


By JOAN' SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A couple of 10-run rule
shutouts improves the Hardee
Junior High School softball
team to a 6-0 record.
So far this season, the girls
have outscored opponents 71-2,
using a combination of good
base running, good, hits and
good pitching by Karlee Hen-
derson and Alex Ullrich, said
Coach Shari Knight.
They have a good chance of
completing an undefeated sea-
son and winning the Heartland
Conference Championship. The
nearest opponent, DeSoto beat
Lake Placid, tied with Lake
Placid and lost to Hardee.
Hardee plays its second game at
DeSoto on Oct. 19.
It's one of the four games the
young Lady Wildcats had left
on the schedule at the end of
last week. On Monday, they
hosted Avon Park. They travel
to Lake Placid today (Thurs-
day), go to DeSoto next Mon-,
day and finish the season at
home against Hill-Gustat on
Oct. 22.
Both games last week ended
in the fourth inning on the 10-
run mercy rule.
On Monday at Hill-Gustat,


Hardee scored 10 runs in the
bat-around first inning and went
on to a 17-0 advantage before
the home half of the fourth
allowed the game to end.
The first inning began with
seven straight runs, by Ullrich,
Jaykaysip Lindsey, Brooke
Tyson, Kate Thomas, Hender-
son, Addison Aubry and
McKayla Dueberry. Anna
Galvez was hit by a pitch but
was forced out at second.
Summer Sisum walked and
scored. After a strikeout,
Lindsey singled and Tyson
homered, a three-run shot, to
end the top of the first inning.
The bottom half went by quick-
ly with a walk and a trio of con-
secutive strikeouts.
Hardee put up two more runs
in the second frame. Henderson
and Aubry came home on an
error on a Dueberry hit. It was
three up, three down for Hill-
Gustat in the home half of the
second.
In the top of the third,
Thomas and Henderson added
another pair of runs. Hill-Gustat
went down in order.
In the fourth round, Due-
berry, Kim Derringer and Tif-
fany Owens added runs on the
board. When Hill-Gustant went


By JOAN SEAMAN goal and six of eight extra PAT
Of The Herald-Advocate shots.
With tivo games left on the The game began with Wildcat
schedule, the Hardee junior captains Uvaldo Sanches,
Wildcat have outscored Baker, Justin Knight and Dylan
their opponents 226-82. Farr meeting Bulldog captains
A 10-point victory was the Austin Lambright, Mason Skin-
narrowest for the junior 'Cats' ner and KaReece Richardson at
so far this. season. They won midfield. Hardee won the coin
last week's game at DeSoto 57- toss and elected to kick off.
12. Kickoff man Octavio Alvarez
Tonight (Thursday) is the boomed the first of three kicks
final home game, a return into the end zone. DeSoto start-
matchup with Fort Meade. ed on its 20-yard line, gained a
Hardee won its encounter at first down and continued until
Frank Battle Stadium by a score stopped on downs at its own 43.
of 30-20. The season finale is at Hardee took over, with Taylor
Lake Placid on Oct. 22. going up the middle a couple of
Head Coach Rod Smith con- times, before Baker broke loss
riders this year's JV squad to be for a 33-yard TD fun. Garcia
one of the best he's had. made it a 7-0 game.
"There's no superstars, just that On the next kickoff, DeSoto
the kids listen and accept their' got a 27-yard return, but a sack
roles: I'm really proud of them, knocked the Bulldogs back 10
the way they have jelled and yards. After a gain of 3, another
grown, bought into what we've sack lost three. Daniel Vargas
been teaching them. We scored got off a 44-yard punt.
everyday but on a pass or a However, Monte Carlton re-
safety" he summarized. turned the punt 50 yards and put
Hardee was strong.on offense Hardee just outside the DeSoto
at last week's game, but also end zone. Taylor carried it in
had defensive, achievements, and Garcia nailed the PAT. It
include a fumble recovery score was 14-0
by Damien Martinez and an A Bulldog fumble gave the
interception score by Tyshan ball to Hardee. Martinez picked
Hilliard. Defensive ends Carter up the loose ball and went 30
Lambert and Dawson Crawford yards to score and the PAT was
and linebackers Vince Grimsley good. It was 21-0, late in the
and Michael Pilkington were on first quarter.
the balL Early in the second quarter,
Offensively, scoring was the next Bulldog series nearly
shared. Quarterback Colby ended when Lambert sacked
Baker had two long runs for quarterback Richardson. But on
scores. Workhorse Ullysses a fourth play, Richardson
Taylor added two TDs., Kareem launched a 53-yard pass to
Richardson had one and Laquavious Hightower for a
Hilliard had a 23-yard run for a score. The PAT was no good,
score. Jose Garcia nailed a field but the Hardee lead was cut to


21-6.
Hilliard returned the kickoff
to the Wildcat 30, setting' up a
six-play drive, which ended
when Taylor pushed into the
end zone. This time, the PAT
was no good, but Hardee led
27-6.
There was still a lot of scor-
ing left in the second quarter.
After the Bulldogs punted,
Hardee took four plays to score,
with Richardson running the
counter for a 31-yard score.
Garcia nailed the PAT.
Within a minute, a DeSoto
pass was picked off by Hillard
and returned 20 yards for the
score. Garcia made it 41-6
The Bulldogs got a final tally
late in the second stanza. Rich.
ardson and Hightower connect-
ed for an 80-yard pass play and
touchdown.
Not to be outdone, Hardee
added a score before the half. It
three plays for Baker to go
around end for a 54-yard TD.
While the PAT kick went awry,
the halftime score was 47-12.
The second half weist quickly
on a running clock. Hardee
picked up a Garcia field goal
for the only score in the third
quarter. Monte Carlton moved
to the quarterback spot. A
DeSoto fumble, recovered by
Joseph McQuaig gave Hardee
the opportunity for a final score.
Carlton used Hilliard in the tail-
back spot for consistent gains,
until Hilliard swept right for the
final 23 yards. Garcia made the
final score 57-12
Ken. Baker contributed to this
report.


fare as well, coming a bit slow-
er than their best times. Tony<
Galvan came in at 31:54, com-
pared to his personal best of
30:29. For the girls, Guadalupe
Flores was at 32:40, when she
has done a 30:42; Andrea
Castaneda at 35:08 and best of
34:30 and Nancy Conejo at
35:15 with a best of 32;40.
Times become more impor-
tant looking forward to dis-
tricts, regionals and state times.
Hardee is in a huge Class 2A-
District 6, composed of 17
schools. Joining Hardee are
Fort Myers schools Bishop
Verot, Cypress Lake, Dunbar,
Gateway Charter and South 1
Fort Myers, Sarasota Booker, 2
Clewiston, DeSoto, Naples '
. Golden Gate and Naples Lely, A
Immokalee, Cape Coral Island
Coast, LaBelle, Lake Placid,
Bradenton Southeast and the
host Estero Wildcats.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Several members of the
Hardee High cross country
teams are slashing their times-
As they prepare for the dis-
trict run on Nov. 6 at Estero
Community Park, the runners
are generally improving their
times.
Last week in the seven-team
meet at Highlands Hammock,
the move downward in times
continued. The Hardee girls
came m third and the boys had
no team score with only three
runriers participating.


Tony Moreno led the Itardee
varsity boys with a time of
22:41, over a minute, 1:13, bet-
ter. Alex Badillo came in at
25.43, dropping 48 seconds off
his time.
For the girls, Lindy Rossman
was tops for Hardee with a time
of 29:44, nearly a half mmute
faster. Mansi Lambachia dropp-
ed her time a whopping 1.52.
JV/junior high runner Brandon
Beatty, always in top form, cut
20 seconds off his time to finish
at 22:15, the best of all Hardee
runners. :
Other Hardee runners did not


Placid and won 212-264.
Leading Hardee around the
course were juniors Kars
Norris, with 44, and Lauren
Moore, with 49. Following
them in were junior Emily
Williams, soph Savannah\Selph
and senior Macey Reas.
191eanwhile, the Hardee boys
hosted Lake Wales on Tuesday,
winning 162-206.
"We used our course manage-
silent skills a lot better in this
match than we did against Avon
Park last week. You can see that
in the results," said Coach
George Heine.
CJuniornDanielne r- ad 7e
- Classmate Taylor Barlow
smoked a 40 and senior Gray-
son Lambert came on strong
with a 42. Matt "big putter"
Godwin finished the team scor-
ing with a 43. Junior Lincoln


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Both Hardee High golf teams
won their matches last week.
The boys team won over
Lake Wales and Lake Placid,
while the girls beat Lake Placid
in their only match of the week.
They each finish the regular
season this week and prepare
for the Oct. 19 Class 1A-Dis-
trict 16 playoff hosted aby
BradenTon Southeast. Thiboys
will play at The River Club and
the girls will play at The
Reserve.
Other teams in the district are

taan, BSar taBradentnon
Mooney, DeSoto, Lake Placid,
Sarasota Out-Of-Door Acad-
emy, Bradenton St. Stephens
and Sarasota Christian.
In their only match last week,
the Hardee girls hosted Lake


Saunders carded a 45 and soph
Dalton Hewett rounded out the
scoring with a 46.
The boys went to Lake Placid
on Thursday to play the tough.
Placid Lakes course. :
"We defeated the Dragons
180-199. The fast greens again
gave us problems. We will have
to deal with fast greens at the
Districts, so it is something the
kids will .have to overcome,"
commented ifeine. 4
Miller and classmate. Justin
Bromley led the 'Cats with 44s.
Lambert was right behind with
a 45 and both Hewett and

s ed dme isth a rl ut
hopes to have it ironed out
shortly," said Heine.
With an 11-2 record, the
Wildcats went into the final reg-
ular season match at The Blu"
against DeSoto on Tilesday.


Commerce

rade


1


JV 'Cats Ditch DeSoto 57-12 HJHS Softball Adds


nrs he ove r


SE 00 Ie SO AfGdl Vcois


Hardee County Chamber of
,
Annual Christmas Pa




























*
Lwmg WeII
y Obda B.AOM
Florida Hospital Wauchula Admlhistrator


Oct. 5, Jeffery Logan Smith, 19, of 215 Cracker Lane, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Probation Ofe. Ed Enfinger on a charge of
viola on goaba iondicholas Skitka, 47, of 1866 SR 64 East, was
arrested by Dep. Todd Souther on an out-of-county warrant.
Oct. 5, criminal mischief on Dena Circle and on Birdwood
Road, and a theft on East Main Street were reported.
WAUCHULA
Oct. 11, Brian Keith Staton, 40, of 403 E. Palmetto ft., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza and charged with battery.
Oct.s9, Elias Serrano, 18, of ?9 S. Cleveland St., Fort Meade,
was arrested by Ofe. Pablo Bermudez and charged with trespassing
upon property and carrying a concealed weapon.
Oct. 9, Rolie Gamble, 51, of 735 S. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 47
South), Wauchula, was arrested by Ofe. Cesar Medina and charged
ivith battery.
Oct 9, burglary of a conveyance on North Fourth Avenue and
a theft at Orange Place were reported.
Oct. 7, Joseph Allen Wilkins, 18, of 817 W. Main St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Det. Kevin Brock and charged with unarmed
burglary of an unoccupied conveyance, petit larceny, Jarceny and
sale or dealing in stolen property.
Oct. 7, Debra Lynn Morris, 39, of 311 Diana Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt, John Eason and charged with battery. At the
jail, Det. Russell Conley detained her on a charge of violation of
probation. (This is not the Debbie Morris whods a Bowling Green
Elementary School teacher).
Oct. 7, Vernon Lee Richardson, 29, of 989 Polk Road, Wau.
chula, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer and charged.with DUI,
resisting an officer using lights and siren by fleeing and resisting an
officer without violence.
Oct. 7, thefts on West Oals Street and East Summit Avenu6
were report .d
Oct. 6, a fight at Carlton Street and South Florida Avenue was
reported.
Oct. 5, Vanessa Denise Clayton, 38, of 727 Chamberlaid
Blvd., Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Paul Bohanan on an out-of-
county warrant.
Oct 5, a theft on Heard Bridge Road was reported.
Oct. 9, a residentiBIOb I yGoGB n venue was reported. -
Oct 6, Marcus Darrel Hodges, 22, of 4770 Dixiana Drive,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged
with possession of marijuana.
ZOLFO SPRINGS
Oct 5, a theft on Hickory Court was reported.
With only a few exceptions, true cactl are found exclu-
sively in the Western Hemisphere.
The city of Pasadena, California derives its name from an
Indian word meaning "valley between the hlils."

.
inVIt8tlOn TO BId
of ow r a t8ng ds f nw

by contacting the Police Department at.(863) 375-
2255. The deadline for applying Is.November 1, 2009.
meta


78 Years


(DODGE CHARGER
O $XT


1 Cl*IRYSLER 300


o Town 8 Country

..so ""*
- 1000 DISCOUNT
- 1500 REBATE
- 1000 LEASE LOYAIX
$31515*SitCE


DX001-~


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- 3060009 DISCOUNT
- 4500 REBATE
- 1500 BONUS CASH
- 1000 OWNER LOYA so
$32609*$$$


~Lcwol c0ME


a
a

During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
ofRcers investigated the followlag incidents and made the fol.
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Oct. 11, James Alfred Woods, 66, of 4443 Bill Woods Road,
Ona, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on two counts of failure to
appear in court.
Oct. 10, Joseph B. Winslow, 22, of 309 E. Jones St., Bowling
Oreen, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with trespassing
on a structure or conveyance.
Oct. 10, residential burglaries on Bluebird Lane and on Pal-
metto Street, burglary of a conveyance on River Road,, a vehicle
stolen on SR 64 East, a fight on U.S. 17 South, criminal mischief
on SR 62 and thefts on U.S. 17 North and on Steve Roberts Special
were reported.
Oct. 9, Nathaniel Maybell Jr., 38, of 4412 SW Jasmine St.,
Nocatee, was arrested by Dep. Mdnuel Zuniga and charged with
three counts of battery on an officer/firefighter etc. At the jail, Det.
Russell Conley detained him on two courts of non-support.
Oct. 9, Sebiina Burmeister, 29, of Whippoorwill Lane, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Shane Ward on an out-of-county war-
rant.
Oct 9, a residential burglary on Old Bradenton Road was
reported,
Oct. 8, Misty Dorena Camacho, 30, of 4134 W. Main St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. David Drake on a charge of con-
tempO nia Aviles, 29, of 510 Cypress St.,,Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Pauline Bissette on an out-of-county warrant.
Oct. 8, a residential burglary on Mockingbird Lane, criminal
mischief on two locations on U.S. 17 North and thefts on Dena
Circle, SR 64 West, U.S. 17 South aild Webb Road were reported.
Oct.7, Barbara Thiel, 54, of 1995 W. County Line Road, Avon
Park, was arrested by Det. Sgt. John Shivers on a charge of viola-
tion cp.r stopperr Lance Richardson, 23, of 712 S. Eighth
Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Ellis on a charge of con-
tempt of court-
Oct 7, a residential burglary on Lincoln Street, a tag stolen bn
John Holt Road, a fight on Chamberlain Blvd., criminal mischief
on River Road and on Libby Road and thefts on U.S. 17 North,
U.S. 17 south, and CR 664 were reported.
'Oct. 6, David Navarro, 36, of 812 Aventina Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of violation of pro-
bation.
()ct 6, John Alexander O'Bryan, 43, of 310 Shelton Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Danny O'Bryan on a charge of
violation of probation.
Oct 6, burglary of a conveyance on Hyde Street, a vehicle
stolen on Lincoln Street, a tag stolen on U.S. 17 South, and crams-
nal mischief at U.S. 17 and River Road were reported.

Hain dCit arre by e gPJo a hi o ea ar
* Octin5 day David Smith, 29, of 703 Olik Forrest Dr.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep.,Donna McCleskey and
charged with five counts of fraud by sufficient funds.


I)EJ!=;IVB~RIT


UASULINE ErNUINCi~a


12B The Herald-Advocate, October ISi, 2009


tter To The Editor

I..ocal Federal Inmate

Hopes For Second Chance
Dear Editor* continuously, and if you do all
. I am now a federal inmate at these things then shall ye
USP Coleman. I am writing to receive your reward.
thank you for letting me share Even though I am in prison I
my love of God with your read- am not a prisoner. The only
ers. prison I am ih is with God and
I am blessed the Father of the not man. I pray when this trip is
Lord Jesus continues to give me over that the world gives me a
the strength to go forward. The second chance'
staff of The Herald-Advocate May the love of Christ con'
has blessed me with the outlet tirtue to be with you all.
to share God's word. Belicyer in Christ.
The Lord said to be merciful Kevin Singleton
unto all ifrethren, deal justly, U.S. Penitentiary
judge righteously, and do good Coleman, FL


FIBROMYALGIA
Fibromyalgia is a chronic disorder described by widespread
pain and tenderness in ratiscles.
People with fibromyalgia may also have fatigue, sleep distur-
bances, stiffness (especially in the morning), headaches, depres-
sion, anxiety, difficulty concentrating or forgetfulness. Patients
with this disorder. often report functional impairment and dimm-
ished quality oflife.
br The la s sisa unknown, rece me islences st ainh
proceessed sthe ntral a rvousds m d oam
touch.
This may be from "Substance P" found in spinal fluid, a bhem-
ical that helps the brain and spinal cord.process pAin. This disorder
is also found to run in families --- it could be inherited.
Diagnosing fibromyalgia is very difficult because there are no
specific lah tests for it. Until recently, many health-care profes-
sionals thought it was primarily criused by psychological factors. In
recent years, however, we have come to understand that psycho-
logictil factors do not necessarily cause fibromyalgia, but rather
inay contribute to an increased risk for disability related to the dis-
rde
o .t is estimated that two percent of the (J.S. adult population has
fibromyalgia. It-occurs most often in women of childbearing age
but anyone can be affected.
The severity of symptoms varies. For. some, pain or other
symptoms can be intense and interfere with daily activities.
Others may have discomfort, but still enjoy everyday life.
acti ase c u T e tp swTIdin1udaedath
cianphysicaltherapistandactivernvolvemeritbythepatient.
Well done is better than well said.
-Benjamin Franklin


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,
PHOTO BYNANCYDAVIS
No, 9-thorith-old Bumper is not sporting the latest in
designer dogwear. Instead, the pup, born with a retinal
detachment, weard protective sunglasses called
a u) n a s ed

Bumper, and have a colorful strap which holds them in
p ce.



Your Business Coubl Appear Harol

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


-3


a~~~~~~~~~~ 183Hy 7 .*Wuhla "37


*********************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 18P 48
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 Ll BRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


By JOAN.SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
If it's a rut, it's a nice one to
be in.
For the second week in a row,
the Hardee Wildcats fashioned
a 48-6 victory.
The game Friday night was
key because it was the first dis-
trict game for the Wildcats and
because it was Homecoming,
After beating Frostproof, the
Wildcats moved ahead of the
Bulldogs in the state Class 2A
polls and are now ranked sixth.
On Friday, Hardee moved to a
6-0 record, already an improve-
ment on last year's record and
with only four games left on the
schedule.
The. 'Cats are off this week,
but will resume play Oct. 16
with a trip to Estero for the sec-
ond district game of the season.
DeSoto beat Estero 01-27 last
Friday night. If Hardee wins at
Estero and DeSoto downs
Immokalee, the Nov. 6 game
against district rival DeSoto at
Wildcat Stadium could be the
biggest one of the season.
The Wildcats will be well-
rested as they go into the final
four games of the season. With
time for injuries to heal, the
'Cats expect to continue their
blistering performance, in
which they have outscored
opponents 168 to 36.
Last week's game began as
captains Jake Nowakowski and
Tylar Alden met Immokalee
Indians captains Johnny Gon-
zalez, Maurice Roberts, Roder-
ick Talbert and James Toombs
at midfield. Immokalee won the
toss and elected to receive.
Hardee chose to defend the
south goal.
Martin Vega boomed the first
of several punts into the oppos-
ing end zone and the game was
on. Freshman Tshumbi Johnson
opened at quarterback for the
Indians. Senior back Kovan
McSwain got the first carry and
was stopped by Alden after a
four-yard gain. Linebacker Tre'
Anderson hit the next runner irr
the backfield for a two-yard

yAddraw ay 1 tu ah-oth
IImmokalee p and th
Hardee 45-yard line.
After junior back Jarrius
Lindsey gained 28 yards on
four carries, senior quarterback


Ezayi Youyoute ranged around
the right end and in the clear for
a 22-yard TD. In 1:54, Hardee
had the first score of the game.
Vega's kick made it 7-0.
Another end-zone kick got
Immokalee going again at its
20. A 14-yard pass play, aided.
by a Wildcat penalty took the
ball to the Indiang 48. Shortly'
all kinds of flags hit the ground,
and Immokalee moved back.
ward. A pass intended for
Talbert went off his hands as
Carson Davis offered good pass
coverage.
A screen pass to. McSwain
regained the yardage, plus
enough for a first down.
Nowakowski got to the quarter-
back in time to make a pass go
awry. On a fourth and 13, the
Indians punted.
It took just one play and 12
seconds for Hardee to score.
Youyoute faked to Lindsey, the
defenders chased him, and
Youyoute circled and went all
-the way, 78 yards to pay dirt.
Vega made it a 14-0 game, with
3:36 still left isi the first period.
A third end-zone kick started
things going. A roughing the
kicker penalty caused a rekick,
which went out of bounds on
the Wildcat 27.
As the first quarter blended
into the second, a Hardee fum-
ble gave Immokalee the ball at
its 49. Four plays later, the
Indians punted. Keshaun Rivers
made a fair catch at the Wildcat
26. Lindsey made the start of a
wild scoring quarter for the
Wildcats. After a couple of
short runs, he went through a
big hole in the line and all the
way for a 36-yard TD. Vega's
PAT shot was blocked, but it
was 20-0.
Immokalee made one first
down before being forged to
punt. The high, short kick went
out of bounds at he Hardbe 31.
This time, Youyoute handed the
ball to Antjuan Jones, who.
raced to the end zone and dived
inside the pylon as he was tack-
led. Vega's kick contplbted the
69-yard pass play TD and made
it a -0 game, with 6:42 left in

boThis dti ,) a's kickoff
Within two plays, an Indians
fumble gave the ball back to
Hardee wheri Mikey Retana
recovered it.


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Bowling Green City
Commission in September ap-
-proved a new city budget of
$3.33 million compared with
$4.05 million the year before.
The property tax rate remains
the same at 7.25 mills.
Public hearings on the new
budget were held Sept. 17 and
28.
The biggest reason for the
smaller budget is that expected
grants for the coming year are
$1,000 compared with
$600,000 it\ last year's budget.
The new fiscal year began Oct.
1.
Ad valorem taxes are expect.
ed to bring in $241,472, com-
pared to $259,000 last year.
Utility service taxes are


COOL CANINE?


expected to be $117,500 and
franchise fees, $95,000, report-
ed city manager Yvonne Kim-
ball. Fines and forfeitures are
expected to remain the sanie at
$29,500.
Utility services for water,
sewer and garbage pickup are
estimated to bring in $871,150,
compared to last year's budget:-
ed amount of $833,000.
Capital projects are estimated
to cost $378,000 compared with
$245,000 last year.
The new general fund is esti-
mated at $2.05 million and the
enterprise fund $1.28 million,
for a total budget of $3.33 mil-
hon.
The new fund balance/re-
serves/assets are budgeted at
$1.18 milhon compared with
$1.29 million last year.


Immokalee
5-18-1
57
32/196
253


10
6/45


Hardee
2-2-0
-54
30/387
441


8
1/15


Passing Completions,
Attempts & Interceptions
Passing Yards
Rush Atte ts/Yards
ing mp
Total Yards
Turnovers
First Downs
Penalties, Lost Yardage .
SCORING BY QUARTER


1427


Lindsey fought forward be-
hind the line for a nine-yard
gain. Two plays after an Im-
mokalee timeout, Youyouote
rolled out and passed to Nowa-
kowski alone in the end zone
for the touchdown. Another
Vega kick made it 34-0.
Immokalee had a bit of suc-
cess on its next drive, when
Talbert broke loose off tackle
for a 66-yard gain. Anderson
kept him out of the end zone,
but the Indians were at the
Hardee 8-yard line. On its
fourth try, McSwain tried a
pass, which was intercepted by
Andrew Hooks and taken out to
the 36-yard line.
Hardee's last score of the first
half came, when junior Jake
Mayer wouldn't be denied. He
caught the pass at the 20 and
fought his way the final dis-
tance to the end zone. The PAT
kick made it a 41-0 halftime
score.
Hardee had amassed 321
yards on 20 carries and two
passes for 54 yards. Six touch-
downs and five PAT kicks had
given Hardee an insurmount-
able lead.
After the exciting Home-
Poming halftime flistivities, the
second half was rather dull.

thIt was a rhu i cl kHardm
ee ha thelball first andd promp

took the pitchout from You-
youte and went the final 16
yards. With the PAT, Hardee led
48-0.


Reserves hit the field for the
Wildcats as the clock continued
to run. Immokalee began to
complete a couple of passes but
was unable to score in the third
period.
In the fourth period,
Immokalee finally got on the
scoreboard. Julio Duvernoir
dove over the goal line for the
long-awaited Indians score. The
Indians elected to go for two
points,.but a pass was batted
down by Anderson.
Hardee ran out the clock and
ended the game with a 48-6 vic-
tory.
The defense was effective for
Hardee, with good pass cover-
age or breakup by Anderson,
Hooks, Carson Davis, Nowa-
kowski, Retana, Rivers, Conner
Davis and Tony Valdez.
In on the tackle parade were
Alden, Anderson, Battles,
Hooks, Jones, LuniorSt. Louis,
Valdez, Retana, Chace Revell,
Conner Davis, Jimmy Vallejo,
Quinton Carlton and Noe
Navarro.
Offensively, Lindsey had a
dozen carries for 108 yards and
one TD. Jones had three for 104
yards and a TD. Mayer had four
carries for 38 yards and a 45-
yard pass reception and run, fin-
ko i had eo Tp

ca youte had six carries for
124 yards and two TDs. Others
in, the ball-carrying business
were St. Louis, Valdez, Hooks
and Anderson.


Don't let the fear of the time it will take to accomplish
something stand in the way of your doing it. The time will
pass anyway; we might just as well put that passing time
to the best possible use.
-Earl Nightingale


"
ff gy {4 ggffy ggy f
We Load Your Feed Delivery Available


Fay*Finl CutosSrie


PHOTOS BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
A variety of refreshments supplied treated aplenty recent-
ly at a receptIon held In honor of Mary Caputo. Working
with the postal service for 14 years, Caputo has been
promoted as the new postmaster at the Ona Post Office.
Ceremonies were held FrIday, Oct. 2, as.Ernle Onody
from Lakeland admInlatered the opth of office to Caputo.
Following that official business, a small party with
Caputo's friends and staff took place. Fe/Iow workers
stated that during her years of service, Caputo has never
taken a sick day and rarely wIII take a vacation. Caputo
looks forward to serving the Ona area.


'Cats Control Homecoming Game


Bowling Green OKs


HARDEE


7 0=48


0 0 6 =


POSTAL PARTY



















ZOLFO SPRINGS
NEW V ION W RSol E WRT

Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586 .
Morning Worship .7..............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...... ...........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & FTH ... ....7:00 p.A.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... .....7:00'p.rn.
Tuesday Worship 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
PRIMER MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.

e ao Im 0.
7:00
Servicio del Miercoles ...... 7:30 m

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park

n d rvice .. .. 0:
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
. Sunday Service ....................I1:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Movie Night......................7:00 p.m.


ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ................9:30 a.m.
Morni Worshi 11 a.m.
Wed. Pr yer SerPi 7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . ........10:00 a.m.

t'necelo ........... .......0 300 a m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio..................................8:00 p.m.
Sabado Lign de Jovenes........5:00 p.m.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

320 E.OFh LF 5-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I1:00 a.m.

E 9 :U m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 arii






SE EDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
u.-orses e... Do
Mene. George


br ia maidenMi Taly She
has a beautiful face and a
graceful figure.
The townspeople tell the
story of an untidy girl who
came face to face with it. She
gazed upon it, and hurried
home to bathe, to comb her
hair and to mend her dress.
Day b da she would stand
an are, anst d sh chan ed.
Her face became noble and
her form became graceful.
So it will be if we gaze upon
our Lord. We'll be mending
our ways and becoming more
gracious and Godlike.
That's why the Bible says,
Let us "keep our eyes on
sus "


We live in a country of great wealth; still there are those among
tas who need help. Helping others, even in the smallest manner, is
a way of showing appreciation for our many blessings.
In Matthew 19:21, our Lord commanded, "... go, sell your
possessions and give.to the poor, and you will have treasurtin
heaven." Even if we don't sell our possessions, when we give, we
instantly receive the gift of warmth and establish the kind, of
spiritual equilibrium that comes from putting others first How do
we begin?
Any gift is important to someone who has nothing. Our
churches and synagogues provide the opportunity for giving both
in time and treasure. Visit your house ot" worship this week, you
can find opportunities to help those less fortunate and enrich your
noulas welL You will be twice blessed.


sandy money aday WedneqW agrade Fdda Satate
Job Job Job Job Jermulah J*Nmiah JMemith
33.1-33 34.1-37 35.1-16 86.143 22.1-23 22.24 23.8 23.9.40
.nean........awn.man..some
coprea soons ume-wn.ma mwepoper sawom e.o.eon ever.crwomense.vAnnoes umannumanan


'p
L/

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber

H wy. 66 East (863) 785-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


Prmted as a Public Service
by .
The Herald-Advocate '
Wauchula, Florida /

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.
---

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCHSt
310 range .
375-310
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
Sun 08 W. Grape St. 375- a.m
y .....................
Sunday Wor ....1 3 d 8:00 a.m.
un. ve. p -

T Pra r/Bible4d00 p.m. 00 p m.
nes. ye y ...... p

CHRISTIANSBIB)LE

Hw 17 South
Morning Worsh p .. ...........10 3MO d m.
roup y .......... p

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .. ...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship.................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .. ...9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ... I1:00 a.m-
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ......................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centre.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m-
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting .. .........7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m-
Morning Worship ................l1:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m-
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m-
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

S. Hwy. 3r n 253
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m-
Morning Worship .. ...10:45 a.m.
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED

Grap TC r hSTtrC R3 -2340
Sunday Schoolh 19 4 m.

You nF Ilowsh ..5:00 .m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT G1REERRBHAPTIST

Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .. ...11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6;00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m


MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................l1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .. ...11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of Mason Dixon & County
Line
781-5887
Sunday Worship ..................l1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
The Meeting Tuesday..........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Warship... ....7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Mo ing Worsship ................11:30 a m.

Tues. B ble Stdy
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .. ...10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .. ...11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.


WAUCIIULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Sunday Sch2110 And ..10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ................. ..7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worsi6 7.30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave
Sunday School ................. .10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ....7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
,
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena .

(across from Ha H s Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunda 10:00 a.m

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Su S hool ..... 4d nt

Evening Worship .. ....7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.

Sunda oo 6th and Hicl a.m.
Morning Worship ... ...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
BibleStudy..........................10:00.a.m.
Worship Service .......:..........11:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts SpecIal
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524 773-0989
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Worship.......... ........g........1000 a.m.
Evening..................................1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet...,7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTI$T
CIIURCII OF WAUCIIULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvil.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m
Sunday Morning Worship....H:00 a-"
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.In
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m..
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica... ...10:00 a.m
Servicio................................11:00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m
EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m
ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY

Id cho IGeorgia St. .0
Morning Service ................ .11:30 a.m.

Eveeni bSerSice.. O n
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCII
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................l1:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .. ...10:20 a.m.
E'hildren's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening rieS 9 m

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCII
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Spany;
Bible Study... ....9:45 a.m.
Moming Worship ................l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ........10:00 a.m.
Family Night Supper ..........5:00 p.m.
Extreme Kids Choir............ 5:45 p.m.
Church Orchestra................ 5:45 p.m.
Prayer Meeting .................. 6:00 p.m.
Youth Gatherin ................ 6:00 p.m.
Extreme Kids/ id Mo........ 6:30 p.m.
Adult Choir Rehearsal........ 6:30 p.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243

ons Cafd Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast..........................10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T
(K-5th) ..........10:45 a.m.
Worship Service. ................10:45 a.m.

Check in begins for Nursery-6 p.m

Classes for children ages PreK- 2th
grade...................6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunda S oI .. 10 00 m

Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Praycr .. ....7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
SundaySchool......................9:30a.m.
Morning Service..................ll:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.m
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship.... ....6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study.... ....10:00 a.m-
Wednesday Activities ... ....6:00 p.m.
FLORIODFAGSOFIRS A EMBLY

1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m-
Sund y Morning)Worship.. 10: pa

Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult Children & Youth
FLORIDA GOSPEL <
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....ll:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service... ....10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service 7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship................................10:30 a.m.
.Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult CI.
Crossroads &


Lighthouse Min. ..........7:00 p.m.
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....l1:00 a.m.'
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.
IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA .
501 N. 9* Ave.
Martes ................7:30p.m.
3, eyes . . . . . . . . .7:30 p.m.
Domingo . . . . . . .10:30 p.m.


2C The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA IIISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dips
511 W. Palmetto St.,
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ..............................6:00 p.m.
Micrcoles...............................7:00 p.m.
IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Rdad'- 1131
Sunday Service......................2:00 p.m.
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAlPS WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service....................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Evenin ..............7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD .
MINISTRIES
Woman Center 131 N.'fth Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening......................6:00 p.m.
IsAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 IIcurd Brid2ge Road

Sunday School ........... ..........9:45 a.m.

My in or IcP r
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTER INTERNACIOIRAL

32 d 7Mu- 5
Sunday Service...... ..............9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCII
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................:..9:45 a.x
Morning Worship Service....l1:00 a.m. .
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities (All Ages)
.. 7:00 p.m.

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W.Paknetto St.

Sunday Service....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services


NEW)1WF. ZION tA.M. HURCH
767-0023 -
Morn. Worship ...(1st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .. ...11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.a
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
. 912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947

Mu y So lhip 1 4d
Evening Worship .... .....6:00 p m.
Wednesday4tupper ...6:00 p m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship H:00 am

Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
l' & 3"' Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2'" & 4'' Sun. Divine Worship......

Bible Study ... ...11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .... .............11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

. REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.


RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Ra io Pr ogram

Sunday Y/ZZS Sundays .......1 '
Mornis Worshi 11:00 a.m.
ig p ................
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CIIURCII
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ....................... ..........9: a.n
f loly Days ..

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CIR)RCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish)......... ........11:00 a.m.
(Creole)., ...................1:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH


205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...11100 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Medi\lg ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTIISIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
805 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m-
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPElk liOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.a

PRIMER MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico. ...............6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.

r or hip 00 m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs. ....................7:30 p.m.


ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.
.
ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................l1:00 a.m.,
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076.Lily urch Rd. 494-5622
Sunday Scho .....,..............10:00 a.m
11orny Wo ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .. ....6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
................. ............................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service..................l l:30 a.m.
Gener Wors p Ser ce p m.

Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m-

. CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
SundayMorningService....11:00a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services
CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Sprvice..............10:30 a.m-
Wednesday Evening Cell Grensps
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations
CHARLIE CREEK .
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Pastor James Bland
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.

cedn sdWo irph .m
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. Si Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............I1:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.In
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Ment Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Supday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
.. CHORCli OF JESUS CfthlS't
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 4.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m


Pretod .............. ... ...:..... : am








October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 30


















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To apply for a
mortgage call

(863) 888-8443
or apply onlitie at
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Ivanes.om
(viortgage center





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2009, for Comcast's Pioneer Creek lineup (Hardee County).
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The Arctic tern's migration route Antarctic Ocean to the Arctic Ocean each year.



SAMPLE BALLOT
BOLETO EJEMPLO

GENERAL ELECTION
GENERAL ELECCIONES

Town of Zolfo Springs
Pueble de Zolfo Springs

Monday, October 26, 200@
Lunes, Octubre 26, 2009

To vote for a candidate mark a cross (X)-in the square
to the right of the name.

Para votar por un candidate; marca una curt (X)
en el cuardo que esta a la derecha de su norabre.

FOR COMMISSION PERSOMVOTEfoR ONE (1) PER SEAT
PARA COMESibN VOYAR PARTING (1) UN SEDE


FORYGlWN COMMISSION SEAT #4
PARA LA SEDE DE LA COMISidN CIUDAD # 4

M AGG IE BE LC HER


SARA ANN SCHOFIELD
sense


15 *
cOURTESY PHOTOS
Trainees for the Florida Highway Patrol Auxiliary are shown at the firearms range,
where they hone handgun and rifle skills.





~M-


60 The Herald-Advocate, October 15, 2009


FI-IP Auxiliary Training H JHS 'Cats in Win Streak


0919 YO n r By JOAN SEAMAN "We are not quite playing yard TD.
Of The Herald-Advocate Wildcat Football yet, and our Brown took the second4ialf
g erhT down and three to go. players need to learn now. kickoff 45 yards to put the


The Hardee Junior High
Wildcats swept past their first
three opponents this season 104
to 36.
The young Wildcats pocketed
a third win in last week's home
game against Lake Placid. This
week, they played at home
again, facing Hill-Gustat.
There's a trip to DeSoto pn Oct.
20, then the season finale on
Oct. 27.
Each season, each Heartland
teams plays another one twice,
so each team has six games,
They rotate this each year. This
year, Hardee will play Lake
Placid twice, and it will be the
opponent again on Opt. 27, at
home again.
"Keyon Brown had a good
game running the football.
Kevin Borjas really stepped up
on his play on defense. Tristen
Lanier is really improving his
play, especially on special
teams," Head Coach Mark
Carlton commented on some of
his players.
"Our guys'have worked hard
and we are glad to win, but we
still have too mainy players
making mistakes. We teach
what it means to be a Wildcat;
real players go full speed every.
play from the snap of the ball
until the whistle. If you make a
mistake, you make it because
you were going too hard, not
because you quit early.


Down t e roa w en t ey are
playing JV, playing varsity, or
dealing with situations in every-
day life, our players will know
to give nothing less than their
absolute best," continued
Carlton,
The game began when Lake
Placid returned the opening
kickoff 18 yards and started at
its 38. Sherman Hawthorne
went seven yards. Quarterback
Akinkawon Hawthorne recov-
ered his own fumble but lost
two yards. Two plays later, a
bad snap led to the tackle of the
punter at the Dragon 32.
Hardee started in good field
position, with Brown the work-
horse. He went forivard, and
penalties went backward. After
Brown got a couple of first
downs, quarterback Luke
Palmer completed the drive
with a 20-yard pass play to
Garrett Albritton for the score.
A PAT pass was no good.
Hardee added two more
scores in the second quarter.
On the first, a five-play drive,
Palmer again finished with
passes to Albritton; one gained
eight yards and the next cov-
ered the last eight yards. Again
the PAT pass went tiwry.
The junior Wildcats scored
again with 36 seconds left in the
half, capping a nine-play, 55-
yard drive with Keyonte Holley
going over right guard for a 13-


young ats n goo pos on.
,Seyen plays later, healso went
in for the TD. Phlmer passed to
Holley*for the PAT score and it
was a 26 0 game.
Another Hardee pere in tl$:
third period made it 32-0.
Holley ran around right end-for
the 11-yard score.
As Hardee reserves hit the
field, Lake Placid got on.* the
board. Al-Kheem Portee took
the kickoff 75 yards to score.
Hardee responded with its
own score. Timothy Steedley
and Lanier joined the offensive
scheme. Holley went in for thb
final five yards. Lanier carried
for the PAT.
As time wound down in the
foiIrth quarter, Portee returned
the kickoff 45 yards. A.
Hawthorne passed to Manuel
Valdovinos for a 38-yard TD.
The PAT pass failed, but it was
a 40-12 game.
Hardee took the kickoff ,45
yards. Brown ran 55 yards to
score. In. just 14 seconds,
Hardee had changed it to a 48-
12 game, the final score.
In the traditional fifth quarter,
which allows younger players
to get on the field, Hardee got
the' only score. DeAndre
Holley, Lanier and Tyler Bragg
toted the football, with Holley
going the final dozen yards.
Staff writer Jim Kelly con-
tributed to this report.


The Florida Legislature es-
ablished the Florida Highway
Patrol Auxiliary 52 years ago.
( Last year, Joe Filice of
Hardee Correctional Institution
submitted his application to the
auxiliary and was accepted. His
training to be a part of the vol-
imteer group began in April of
his year and will continue into
2010-
: Back in the early '70s, Filice
was starting his career as a field
tirtilleryman in the U.S. Marine
'
Corps, where he served for 5
years. "My interest in law
enforcement started around the
time I was getting out of the
VIarines," he says-
But that interest was shelved
(Turing the years he spent run-
ning a successful tractor sales
business in Wauchula. Then,
qeven .years ago, he came to
work at HCI, where he serves as
an analyst.
Sadly, last year Filice's wife
died. That was a large part of
his decision to apply for the
ituxiliary. He recalls being left
with a need to do something
different and valuable to peo-
ple,
"I've had just about zero
experience with law enforce-
ment," he explains, pointing out
that corrections and the Florida
Highway Patrol Auxiliary are
mostly on opposite ends of the
criminal justice spectrum. But
his decision to apply has given
him a broad perspective on
Florida's criminal justice sys-
tem.
Asked how others might join,
Filice explains that the auxiliary
is always looking for competent
and qualified members. If
you're interested in beginning
the application pryceks, you can
visit the Web site at www.flori-
dastatetrooper.org. Applications
are accepted year-round. .
"But," Filice warns, "be pre-
pared. The application process
is very involved."
The following are the basic
requirements set for applicants:
Successfully pass the Basic
Aptitude Test for Law Enforce-


Jo~eF~I~ce during one of the near-yearr-long training ses-


instruction in criminal law, traf-
fic law, search and seizure law,
court testimony, accident inves-
tigation, firearms training, First
Aid, self-defense, report writ-
ing, and public relations.
While the training is not as
extensive as that of the full-time
troopers, it is rigorous.
Filice began his in April of
this year. Ife's scheduled to
graduate March 13, 2010, al-
most a full-year after he began.
"Failing one part of the training
means you're done," he says.
If you make it to graduation,
the state requires a minimum of
one shift per month. The duties
accompanying that shift range
tremendously. A few examples
of the work FHP Auxiliary
troopers do are patrolling state
roadways, assisting disabled
motorists, participating in
Iteense and equipment check-
points, operating a alcohol test-
ing unit, assisting in special
details, and responding to natu-
ral disasters and other emergen-
cies.


ment. .
Undergo a physical exami-
nation and a physical. assess-
ment test (runmng, obstacles,
etc.).
Pass a polygraph exam.
Be a U.S. citizen at least 19
years of age.
Have a high school diplo-
ma or General Equivalency
Diploma.
Be in good standing finan-
cially and morally.
Be in good physical health.
Once you've undergone the
applicant screening, you will
experience the background in-
vestigations. Applicants are ex-
pected to hold all the integrity
of a full-time trooper, which
means neighbors and family are
interviewed, credit is checked,
criminal histories are pulled,
and a nuinber of other charac-
teristics are examined.
If you pass the background
checks, you're in for a serious
year of training. Members of
the auxiliary must complete 320
. hours of training, including


I find that the harder


t~work, the more luck I seem to


Contentment consistent
not in adding more fuel,
but in taking away some
ire; not in multiplying of
wealth, but in subtracting
men's desires.
-Thomas Fuller











YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

4ppy gg

HERE

TO O!!
Contact
sancy Davis,
KimReas or
TrayCS DanielS

773- 255


It


h d h h
'
C i d iti


'Please join us for tAe

'l-farclee Count CRamber of Commerce 91nnual'Dinner Meeting.

damber members odLY.


Monday, Novernber 2, 2009


DA TE:


LOCATION: Torrey Oaks and RV Resort


863-773-6967 or casey @hardeecc.com


RSVP:

































































































''~-~


October 15, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 70


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MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun
r eaus e7Pi aic ad)

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffle,
Sausage Patty, Cinnamon
Toast, Mixe Fruit, Milk .
Lunch: Chicken Patty on a
BundorBH sD oa el
ream anMilk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast; Cereal, Breakfast
Mini Pocket, Cinnamon Tosist,
Pears, Milk .
Lunch: Fish Square or Rib-B-
Que on a Bun (Salad Tray.
Cheese Grits,. Blueberries,
Cornbread) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes*
Sausage Patty, Juice, Cinna-
mon Toast, Milk
Lunch: Macaroni & Cheese
or Comdog (Salad Tray, Green
Peas, Peaches, Roll) and Milk

N


MONDAY
. Breakfast: Cared), Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, quicq*
Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun
or Cheese Pizza (Lettuce &
a aked Beans, Juice

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffle,
Sausage Pa Cinnamon
Toast, Fruit Coc II, Milk
Lunch: Chickeh Patty on a
Bun or PepperoN Pizza or Hot
Dogs (Lettuce & Tomato, Green
Beans. Yellow Cake, fee Cream)
and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast .


Mini Pocket, CInnamon Toast,
Pears, Milk
Lunch Fish Sandwich or
Pepperoni Pizza or Rib-B-Que
on a Bun (Tossed Salad,
Cheese Grits, Blueberries,
Salad Bar) and Milk

Breakfa :UC e ancakes
Cinnamon Toast, Juice, Sau-
sage Patty, Milk
Lunch: Ham, Macaroni &
Cheese or Corndog or Cheese
Pizza (Tossed Salad, Corn-
bread, Garden Peas, Peaches,
had Bar) and Milk

No School



MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut. Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Milk
Lunch: BBQ Harpburger on
a Bun (Tossed Salad, Baked
Beans, Potato Salad. Juice Bar)
and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Coreal; Waffles,
Buttered Toast, Sausage,
Peaches, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Patty on a
Bun (Tossed Salad, BroccolI.
B Cake,

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfash
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Peara
Milk
Lunch: Batter-Fried Fish
(Tossed Salad. Cheese Grits,
Garderf Peas, Blueberries) and
Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast* Cereal, Cinnamon
Toast, Pancakes, Sauisage
Patty, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Corhdog (Tossed
Salad, Peaches, Corn Baked
n Potato Rounds, Carrots)

EBIDAY
No School


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS JiEREBY GIVEN, that VERONA V, LLC, the
holder of the follow g certifloate has flied said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be lasued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of lasuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are awfollows: a on
CERTIFICATEE NO.: 85 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007
Description of Properly:
2.50 AC SE1/4 OF 51/2 OF W1/2 OF NE1/4 OF
NW1/4 14 30S 24E 545P464 : <
SUBJECTTO RESIERVA'HONS, COVENANTS.
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF .
RECORD.
Name in which assessed: TANYA RENA PARRISH
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida*
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, Fl.. 33873
on the #"'day of November, 2009, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 21" day of September, 2009.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: AIIcla C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk -
Tax Deed File No.: 252009TD015XXXX 10:1-2pm



NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN', that VERONA V, LLC, the
holder of the following certificate has flied said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and yeapof Issuance, the description
of the property, and the names Irr whloh it was
assessed are as follow?
CERTIFICATE NO.: 64 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007
Description of Property:
7.50 AC E1/2 OF W1/2 OF NE1/4 OF NW/4
LESS SE1/4 THEREOF 14 36S 24E 473P382
518P464 DC-699P456
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.
Name in which assessed: LOIS ANNETTE HOWELL
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 4*day of November, 2009, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 22" day of September, 2009.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
HardeeCounty, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252009TD01$XXXX 10:1-22c


I-IARDEE COLTN'TY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
107 East Main Street
P. O. Box 688
Wauchula, FL 88878
Phone (863) 778-6967 Fax (868) 773-491.5
Email: hardeecc@hardeecc.com


mar etng, or any ot er acor w .

Nominee:


ge The Herald-AdvocatLe, Octobe 15, 2009'


. ,


Pleas~Ee provide a brief statement as to why this nominee should receive the Business Person of the Year Award.


I C


nity control, $100 COP added
to outstanding fines and fees.
Marvin Richard .Ritenour,
(original charges trespass and
grand theft), amended sentence
to include $2,000 restitution.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were fQed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Gaime Delatorre to Angel
Cleto Alvarez, $90,000.
Dorothy Conerly as trustee to
Jane B. Trimble, $75,000.
Noey A. Flores and Stiven
M. Carpenter to Silverio
Palacios-Hernandez and Maria
Eleria Palacios, $89.900. '


Nathan Carpenter and Mi-
chcle Lynn Carpenter, divorce.
Kacy S. Hays and Justin
Hays, dismissal due to lack of
progress.
Maria Victoria Garcia and
DOR vs. Juan Luis Avalos, vole
unitary dismissal.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust co. vs. David Yahraus and .
Brooke Yahraus, order for
amended title. .
Marie McVey as personal
representative vs. FINR III
LLC and FINR III Inc., joint
stipulation for dismissal.
Zeralda Smith, Hardee
County Tax Collecter, valida-
tion of 2008 delinquent tangible
tax roll and issuance of war-
rants.
Ashleigh Semple vs. Joe
Hernandez, dismissal of tempo-
rary injunction for protection.

Thefollowing felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of last
week by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudl-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-

lihne Final discretion is left to
Jesus Manuel Apolinar-
Cardoso, felony battery, trans-
ferred to county misdemeanor
court.
Kimberly Armstrong, viola.
tion of probation (original
charge unlawful possession of
listed chemicals), probation
revoked, two years community
control house arrest, with
placement in treatment pro-
gram, $100 COP and $50 public
defender fee added to outstand-
ing fines and fees; retail theft,
time served, $50 COP.
Leroy Fender Jr., resisting an
officer without violence, trans-
ferred, to county misdemeanor
court. .
Thomas Justin Fioram, tres-
pass other than structure or con-
veyance, time served, $}25 fine
and court costs, $200 public
defender fees and $100 COp
placed on lien; false verification
of ownership to pawnbroker'
not prosecuted, release to Palm
Beach County.
Joshua Luna, armed burglary
and possession of burglary
tools, adjudication withheld,
probation pyo yearg. jao contact
with victims or property, $5'20
fine and court costs, $350 pub-
lic defender fees, $100 COP,
$200 investigative costs; armed
trespass, not prosecuted.
Joey Lee McCumber, domes"
tic battery, transferred to county
thisdomeanor court; traimper-
ing/harassidg witness/victim,
not prosecuted.
Javier Paritoja, violation of
probation (original charge bat-
, tery on a law enforcement offt.
cer), probation terminated,
Sierra Lynn Staton, posses-
sion of methamphetamine'
manufacture of methampheta-


mine and possession of drug
paraphernalia, adjudication
withheld, time served, proba-
tion two years, no possession of
use of drugs, no alcohol, war-
rantless search and seizure, cur-
few, random drug screens, eval-
uation/tteatment, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP.
Rito Melendez Jr., violation
of probation (original charge
resisting an officer without vio-
lence, possession of drug para-
phernalia and felony driving
while license suspended), pro-
bation revoked, five years
Florida State Prison sus-
pended, six months in jail CTS,
followed by two years commu-


tion. .
Kellie Martinez vs. Jessie
Martinez, petition for injuite-
tion for protection.
The Bank of NY Mellon vs.
Barry R. Edgley, Jill M. Edgley
et al, petition for mortgage fore-
close. .
Stephanie Arlene Roberson
and John. Allen Roberson,
divorce. '
Jason Dean Spillman and
Ada Jane Spillman, divorce.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Uniori vs. Lisa J.
McLeod, John#y W. McLeod et
al, petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
Angelica Fisher Aguilar vs.
Javier Aguilar Jr., divorce.
Jennifer Watson and Keith
M. Watson, divorce.
Tammy Hall Crosby vs.
Bruce Siff, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Wayne Crosby Sr. vs. Bruce
Siff, petition for injunction for
protection,
Sarah Crosby vs. Bruce Siff,
petition for injunction for pro-
tection.
Rhonda Westbrooks vs.
Angela Rivers, petition for
injunction for protection,
Ashley Turner and Eric
Turner, divorce.
Mandy LeeAnne Richardson
and the state Department of
eCh Or s, petiTrenton
administrative child support
order.
Audra Lorraine Hernandez
and DOR vs. Jamal Ag Joney
petition for administrative child
su ort order
Apmpara Melandez and DOR
vs. Esteban Mepdipla, petition
for administrative child support
order:
Tracy Dansby and DOR vs.
David S. Teuton, .pebtiort for
administrative child support
order
Mandy Richardson vs. James
Talmadge Albritton, petition for
injunction for protection.
Jerry.Masias vs. Mono Lara,
petition for injunction for pro-
tection.
Jerry Masias vs. Mona Lisa
Lara, petition for injunction for
protection,
The following decisions on
civil cases peeling in the cir.
cult court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Sylvia Sanchez and DOR vs.
Michael Paul Sanchez, child
support order.
Suntrust Mortgage Inc. vs.
Christopher IL Lovett, Wendy
M. Lovett et.al, judgment of
mortgage foreclosure.
First National Bank of
Wauchula vs. Michael Brandon
Lambert, Susie Ann Lambert et
al, default judgment of mort.
gage foreclosure.
First National Bank of Wau-
chula vs. Sharyn K. Salter,
James H. Webb Jr. et al, default
judgment of mortgage foredo-
sure.
Cynthia Fairless and Richard
Rivera, dismissal due to lack of
. progress.


I'OUNTYTOTIR'f
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
n the oMce of the county
art:
Joshua Clinton Larue, 32,
Azle. Texas, and Aimee Nicole
pellepere, 25, Wauchula.
/ Jose Emeterio Molina-
kolitta, 21, Wauchula, and
Keyri Favida Leon-Gonzalez,
21, Wauchula.
: Cheston Winter Graham, 25.
Wauchula, and Christina Marie
andoval, 34, Wauchula.

The following small-claims
bases were disposed of recent*
ly in county court: .
FIA Card Services NA vs.
nastacio M. Macias, voluntary
dismissal.
Ford Motor Credit Co. LLC
s. Daytd C. Nutter, judgment.
Capital One Bank vs. Deanna
Armstrong, voluntary dis-
ussal.
Chase Bank USA NA vs.
ake E. Johnson, judgment.

The following mis'de-
kneanor cases were disposed
if recently in county court;

at g oAn pe t th
structure or conveyance, adju-
dication withheld, probation six
inonths, no contact with proper-
ty or owner, $325 fine imd court
costs, $50 public defender fee,
$50 cost of prosecution (COP):
dWilllieinFt xa nrpenterd -
(ion withheld, time served,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
&OP.
Marquita Andrea Clark, pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
sesston of drug paraphernalia,
adjudicationn withheld, proba-
tion one year, random drug
screens, evaluation/treatment,
warrantless search and seizure,
425 fines aqd court costs, $50


COP.
Junior Ray Griffin, resisting
arrest without violence, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP.
Francisco Molina Hernan-
dez, petit theft, probation six
months, no contact with store'
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COPs25 hours community ser-
vice.
Ryan E. Hershelman'
sion of drug paraphernalia, pro-
bation one. year, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 public defender
fee, $50 COP.
Brian Christopher Laubert
possession of marijuana, $325
fine and court costs, $50 COP.
Alicia Lynn Lovering, tres-
passing on property other than
structure or conveyance, adju-
dication withheld, $325 fine
and court costs, $50 COP.
Nathan Henry Morgan, do-
mestic battery, one month in jail
with credit for time served
1(CTS), $677 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs.
John Alexander O'Bryan'
trespassing on property other
dd tru ure rhco ey '
firie and court costs, $50 COP
Fidel Melendez, domestic
battery, adjudication withheld,
probation six Months, anger
management class, $677 fine
and court costs, $100 COP, 25
hours community service:
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circyt court .
BAC Rome Loan Serviemg
LP Ms. Clarence Jack See et al'
petition for mortgage foreclo-
state.
Velda tyfay Bloome vs.
Normatt Thomas Holton, pett-
tion for injunction for protec-


Hardee County Chamber of Commerce
Business Person of the Year
2009 Nomination Form


Sponsored b
---- ------
Cz-it
1. Must be a member of the Hardee County Chamber of
Commerce
2. A substantiated history as an established business.
3. Advocate and leader within the business community.:
4. Creativity and imagination in the sales( service,
k i h f t ithin the business


y-
- ------
eria.
5. Membership in councils, boards, aind clubs providing
support and services to the community.
6. Any other uniigue qualities, characters tics, or
accomplishments that may be significant to the
selection of the candidate.


Business Name:
Business Address:
Business Phone Number:


Nominator.


Phone Number:


I Ps....n ea oWs cow.s Iumber or c......r CD.0.( C:gl:hi~:bs.:~~~~q sea, paeans asaens or a lS a s-?7Y)s.


1o:e,1se




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