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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00285
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla
Creation Date: July 16, 2009
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00285
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




See July 4th

* Fireworks & Mote

... Photos 4C


The


Resthaven Adds

Day-Care Service

* ..,. Story 1B


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


46�


109th Year, No. 32
3 Sections, 24 Pages


Thursday, July 16, 2009


County Settles Wrongful-Death Claim


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The family of a woman killed
two years ago in an automobile
collision will be paid $195,000
as settlement of a wrongful-
death claim, filed against the
Hardee County Commission.
Pamela C. Bladen of Wau-
chula died on April 18, 2007, as
the result of a crash the day
before at the intersection of
East Main Street and Holland-
town Road. County workers,
the lawsuit claimed, had re-


moved the stop sign there with-
out posting any warnings to dri-
vers.
Bladen, who was headed
south on North Hollandtown
Road at the time, entered the
intersection without stopping
and was hit by an oncoming
van, a Florida Highway Patrol


report said.
Her husband, Ralph M.
Bladen, filed a wrongful-death
suit against the county in
January of 2008. In it, lawyer
Theodore Zelman of Zelman &
Hanlon in Naples said employ-
ees of the county's Road &
Bridge Department were work-


ing on Hollandtown Road at
East Main Street on April 17,
2007, at about 9:30 a.m.
They were "repairing and
replacing a stop sign that ordi-
narily governed southbound
traffic on North Hollandtown
Road," he said. The stop sign
was not in place, the civil action


went on to assert.
The plaintiffs alleged the
county employees "parked their
truck by the side of the road,
obscuring the area where the
stop sign was normally locat-
ed," and further that they "failed
to place any warnings or signs
for southbound traffic on North


Hollandtown Road that a stop
was required at that intersec-
tion."
Zelman claimed that "as a
direct and proximate result of
the negligence of the defen-
dant," Pamela Bladen drove her
1999 Honda into the path of a
Long's Air Conditioning van
which was westbound on East
Main Street.
She died the next morning at
Tampa General Hospital, leav-
ing a husband and two sons.
See COUNTY 2A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two people have been arrest-
ed for allegedly buying, and one
time stealing, some of the ingre-
dients used in the making of
methamphetamine.
Jailed by the Hardee County
Drug Task Force were
Kimberly Sue Armstrong, 27,
of 807 SR 64 W., Zolfo Springs,
and Victor John Garza Jr., 38, of
615 Saunders St., Wauchula.
Armstrong was charged with
;possession of a controlled
chemical and two counts of
shoplifting.
Garza was booked in on a
charge of possession of a con-
trolled chemical.
Both remained in the Hardee
County Jail this week, Arm-
strong in lieu of $5,500 bond
and Garza in lieu of $5,000.
Each will appear in Hardee
Circuit Court for arraignment
on Tuesday at 8:30 a.m.
According to sheriffs Maj.
Randy Dey, a spokesman for
the inter-agency Drug Task
Force, detectives received


information on June 30 that
three people were going to be
driving around town buying the
chemicals needed to manufac-
ture methamphetamine. Offic-
ers, he said, found and followed
the suspect vehicle.
The first stop, Dey noted,
was at the CVS pharmacy, then
Ace Hardware. From there, the
suspects traveled to Winn-
Dixie.
Dey said that when a traffic
stop of the vehicle was made on
Heard Bridge Road, the driver
fled on foot. Armstrong and
Garza remained, he noted.
Detectives found a CVS
store-brand box of cold tablets,
crystal Drano, Coleman fuel
and lithium batteries in the
vehicle, the major alleged.
All are used in the "shake n'
bake"' method of manufacturing
methamphetamine, an illegal
narcotic, in home labs, he fur-
ther pointed out.
In interviews with detectives,
See METH 2A


Garza


OURTHESY PHOTO
Paynes Creek Historic State Park In Bowling Green offers plenty of opportunities for peace, tranquility and reflec-,
tion. The waters of both Paynes Creek and Peace River converge here, making the park a great spot for scenery,
activity and, of course, wildlife. In this image captured by Bob Battles of the park's Citizen Support Organization, a
lone ibis Is reflected in the waters of Paynes Creek.


I-rAvot Wins 3aState Awards
'4-Advoq-,e 4s-on statewide recog- Earning second place for in-4"ti portirg
it- writing and photography on was Joan Seaman. Taking the honors was her
an awards ceremony at the annual series of articles on the Crewsville labor camp
ofF't.lprida Press Association issue. .' , '
pap as honored with one thrst- "Extensive coverage of a local situation that
o .secord-plaCe aard in its divi- generated dis- " h
jgion writing, in-deph. reporting agreement in the
photography. . , community," a
tIhe 4s fr iftbhereligion judge wrote.
tihle ~ A 'S OffHppe: A "The visit to an i
o '-. .:.'. ther'sIPtece," written existing, labor
'Krabi. The story dealt with a camp. added a --
iliMy tb five htian who shot great dimension."
,i, er. d~ugh And photog-
ter 13 rapher ' atipli
.: ti Ie s , Harrison took jhe " . - ,
i' Mfling her. judges' eyes.with'ht piis odL:shbt of a
"A-1 . tmbnv- ,Wild.at! np ethe air
ing stpr,. in ai0efflcfoorizw$5X' 'a titah f
. t. ,n u a H.-.
11Wjtll a1 Thea~' co nb , 'entries
ji , ffc~ ~in 'vri cagteg ^ '* -.b94 ,.,- .
h~ e' annual weekly and tri-we~1y afj owe n zhn
^ itoiy "Ti e awards. were, received y . Managing
...,atra non-bejiever. Editor Krahl, Sports Edito Seaman arid
m^ tI^ Wpod it not~ Publishoe.Jim Kplly, who attendg4d the con-
1'v entiolath tThe B1U alNm4i ph:.


Local Hunters


On TV Show


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
"It made us a little nervous,
having a television camera
there filming us for national
TV," George Wadsworth Jr.
remembers of the turkey hunt
which will be shown three
times in the coming week.
Still, h,, and his fellow
hunters were successful in find-
ing and taking the elusive
Osceola turkey during filming
of an episode of the national
production of the show "Turkey
Country," a hunting series pro-
duced by the National Wild
Turkey Federation.
The federation announced
this week that the episode,
filmed about three years ago,
according to Wadsworth, is set
for airing on the Sportsman
Channel this Tuesday at 6 p.m.;
Friday the 24th at 11:30 a.m.;


and Sunday, July 26, at 10 p.m.
Wadsworth was surprised by
the news. "I guess they're going
through some of their archives
of footage," he said.
The federation says "Ttirkey
County" traveled to south
Central Florida in search of the
Osceola. Filmed for this epi-
sode are Phillip Smoak of rural
Zolfo Springs and Wadsworth,:
who resides in Wauchula. *
The men were hunting in the
Crewsville area, Wadsworth
noted.
"They were supposed to be
here three days to get the
footage," he described, but the
hunters killed their birds in a
single day. To get more footage,
hunters Greg Gordon of rural
Bowling Green, Noel Green of
rural Zolfo Springs and Max
Ullrich of Wauchula took to the
See LOCAL 2A


It's Time Again For

Friday Night Live!

_... Story 1B


$195,000 Wi


Be Paid Out


Meth Ingredients



Land 2 In Jail


REFLECTION

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07/1? UN4WAUABLE
07112 UNVAVAILABL.E
07/l3 BO .11 0.02
07114 91 , 72 , 0.00
IrdQ . Ruaimfl to 07o4/09-20. 07
Sam. pero ta,.t .ar- .41
S~ouftuUnhq. GIl.Fa Omp Auwroi CGI!

INDEX
Classifieds..................6B
Community Calendar....4A
Courthouse Report.......8C
Crime Blotter.................5C
Hardee Living..........2B
Information Roundup....4A


Obituaries......................


Armstrong


4AJ| i-
I -I


3, b








2A The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Regular unleaded gasoline prices this week fell to $2.49 a gal-
lon, which is good news considering the price was $2.65 a few
weeks ago and nearly $4 last summer. Americans are driving less
and buying more fuel efficient vehicles.

At the All-Star break the Tampa Bay Rays are trailing Boston
and New York in the American League East. I hope they can make
the playoffs.

The federal government is enticing people to buy a home for
the first time by offering a subsidy of up to $8,000.
Uncle Sam is helping the auto industry by offering a limited
number of Americans up to $4,500 to trade in their gas guzzler for
a more fuel efficient car or truck.
Those sound like good programs. The stock market has gone
up in recent months after hitting a low point in March. Many
Americans are starting to invest again and save more.
However, the unemployment rate continues to climb and the
budget deficit and national debt, are increasing. Government
bailouts have helped the banking and insurance ,industries.
We are living in interesting times.
To know Joe Gilliard was to like the guy. He loved fun and
fishing, said his cousin pastor Willie Gilliard at Joe's graveside ser-
vice July 8 at Wauchula Cemetery.
Gilliard, 68, is survived by daughters Amy and Logan and
grandchildren.
Willie looked over Joe's Hardee High School annual and noted
Joe's ambition was to "be a certified tractor driver." His motto was
"I burn the midnight oil but not for studies."
He was a valued member of the Elks Lodge and Moose Lodge
and was a Mason and Shriner.. "He was determined. Starting out he
drove his tractor from grove to grove until he could save money to
buy a trailer."
Willie said Joe's legacy is that he made people feel they had
value, were special and were loved. He was a life-long Wauchulan
and citrus grower and served in the Army.

Rev. Bob Lecocq, pastor of Florida's First Assembly of God
Church in Wauchula, recently said the author of the following
quote about sin was possibly unknown but might have been from
Dr. Adrian Rogers, former pastor at Bellevue Baptist Church in
Memphis, Tenn.:
"Sin will take you'further than you want to go. Sin will keep
you longer than you want to stay. Sin will cost you more than you
want to pay."

A 19-year-old Miami boy was recently arrested for killing and
mutilating about 19 cats. They were from the neighborhoods of his
divorced parents who lived in different areas. The youngster defi-
nitely has a problem.

On-Dec. 11, 1936, Popash Elementary School had graduation
ceremonies at the New Hope Baptist Church for 14 students.
Joe L. Davis Sr. said recently he and Walter Moore may be the
only ones still living from that graduating class.
Others in the class were T.J. Bryan, Glen Germain, Pauline
Germain, Robert Godfrey, Polly Anna Griffin, Paul Jenkins, Louise
Jones, Edna Klein, Mable Moore, Rubie Moore, William Nychyk
and L.M. Shackelford. (
Songs featured at the graduation program included "Dream of
Reaper," "Ships That Come In," "Together," "Farewell," and
"Years Cannot Destroy."
I have had the privilege of knowing three of the graduates:
Davis, 85, T.J. Bryan and L.M. Shackelford.
In those years, I believe, students did not go to school during
the strawberry harvest season, which was in the winter.

If you take advantage of everything America has to offer,
there's nothing you can't accomplish.




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Homebuyer Program To Start


SThe Herald-A4 I7
|-Hardee County's Home'o'w'niCoveragA: .
JAMES R.'KELLY ' < t y
Publisher/E'ditor - '_'..':
CYNTHIA I' AHt';
* ManagingEEdtor -. -
JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor , o
. . ' ' : ', ,
S: ' AsstP~"o Manager
115 S. Seventh Afe. Phone: (86 773-3255
P.O. Box 338 .
Wauchula, FL 33873 Fax: (863Y,7 -0657.
aa . . " , - . ,,'t . * " '""
Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The:Herald-Advocatei.
Publishing Co Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. P6st'OtficeWaichuli;FL,
33873 and additional eritiy office (USPS 578-780). "PostmaSt,.'e1W&bad"l0s
changes to The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula;ILt33873:. L' '
changes The . .:, -* *'..: ,' ' ', "- - .-""
, , .; . .-� ,*,' . .-. , ., ,
.-. SUBSCRIPTIONS'., ..'i.
f DEADLINES: Haefoty.. -
Schools - Thursday 5pm. .6 m oh Sl8 3lyr 3lr s
Sports - Monday noon '- : .'f, -:.., I..
Hardee Living -Thubrsday 5p.m rmnSths- .. 7
Ads -Tuesday noon 6 moths - 7 '

LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocite-welcomes. letters to the editor onmatters pub.
interest Letters should bebrief,;and musthbe written in good taste signe '
and include a daytime phone number..
SUBMISSIONS: ..
Press releases on community mattersare .welcome. Submissions should ti
typed. double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines.AJll items.are sub-
ect to editing. .
an icldea aymephn nmbr.. -.. ....-"-,.. -


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Want to own a house and just
can't afford the closing costs
right now'?
The federal government
wants to help. It has made stim-
ulus dollars available in each
community's State Housing In-
itiative' Program (SHIP) grants
,and upped the income levels to
make home ownership possible
for more people.
The federal funds became
available through the American
Recovery arid Reinvestment
Act of 2009. In Florida, they are
designated the "Florida Home-
buyer Opportunity Program."
In Hardee County, up to
$350,000 may be available after
Aug. 1 to help first-time home-
buyers, someone who has not
owned a home for at least three
years. It would provide up to
$8,000 for down payment and
possibly closing costs for some-
one wanting to buy a conven-
tional home. It does not apply to


mobile homes. Maximum pur-
chase price of a home cannot
exceed $189,682 and the home
must be purchased before Dec.
1. -
The program has been
expanded to include households
with 140 percent of the county's
median income of $42,000.
That means households with a
single income of up to $75,000
and two-person income of up to
$150,000 could be eligible for
the $8,000 down payment.
The money is considered a
loan. The applicant can amend
this year's tax return or include
the first time homebuyer tax
credit on 'next .year's return,
whether or not there is a refund
or tax owed. Regardless of
other factors on the tax return,
the entire $8,000 homebuyer
tax' credit will be sent to the
homeowner, who will then have
to repay the county's loan.
Prospective homeowners
must attend credit counseling
and an eight-hour homebuyer


education course. The Hardee
Help Center as well as the local
community development office'
have certified credit counselors
available.
While the homebuyer pro-
gram income guidelines have
been expanded, priority is still
given to the elderly or physical-
ly impaired applicants. The
amount awarded is up to 10 per-
cent of the prospective home's
value. If the home to be pur-
chased is less than $80,000, the
award will be less.
For instance, if the home is
purchased for $75,000, the
down payment/closing cost
award would be limited to
$7,500.
Applications are available
online at www.hardeecounty.-
net or by stopping by the
Hardee County Community De-
velopment .Office, Room 201,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula. For
more information, call 773-
6349.



METH
Continued From 1A
the suspects reportedly admit-
ted to buying pseudoephedrine
- the cold tablets. - at CVS,
taking Drano from Ace Hard-
ware and stealing Coleman fuel.
from Winn-Dixie, Dey said.
Both also allegedly said their
intent was to make metham-.
phetamine out of the products.

COUNTY
Continued From 1A
The . $195,000 settlement-
amount will go to her survivors
and to lawyers, and to reim-
burse varied expenses.
Approved by Circuit Judge
Marcus J. Ezelle on June 17, the
settlement document spells out
the disbursement of the money,;
with Ralph Bladen'and the tob
boys receiving the bulk of it.
Ralph Bladen will be paid
$30,000. Another $30,000 will
be deposited in an account for
the one son. And a final
$30,000 will purchase an annu-
ity for the second boy, which.
will pay $41,529 to him in the
year 2017.
Funeral bills And probate
costs of $11,100 will be reini-
bursed to Ralph Bladen.
Zelman & Hanlon will re-
ceive $60,000, plus a reim-
bursement of $21,800 for ex-
penses, the settlement states.
Connie L. Collins of Eugene
E. Waldron Jr. PA will receive
$5,000 for her representation of
Bladen as personal representa-
tive of his wife's estate, and
lawyer Candace S. Preston will
be paid $600 for Guardian Ad
Litem work for the two chil-
dren.
With the plaintiffs and the
defendants reaching agreement,
Ezelle also granted Ralph
Bladen permission to sign a
release of further claims on
behalf of his two sons.
With the signed settlement,
the lawsuit against the county is
ended.


Gob's HOTEL

I checked you in again last night, my child.
You see, it hurts Me so bad to see you
out there running wild
All tired and sucked up, you appeared to Me, put
a mirror in front of you and you can't even see.
You're a number among the walking dead, sores all
over your body, confusion in your head.
Jail is not the place that you. want to be, but it's
"My Hotel" where I can work on thee.
You see, you weren't just arrested,
' you were rescued from yourself..
I had to bring you back here,
to put your drug use on the shelf;
Give you some rest, some food and some talk,
encourage you and love you, before I let you walk.
Don't be like the mule that's led around by a bit,
Just listen to my warnings and rcan help you quit.:
This could be the last time you have
to come into this place,
Just listen to me, the Creator of all,
with tears on My face.
, Leisa'opez
S. ' ' 'Citrus County
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O.' Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.



PUBLIC NOTICE,
The Local Mitigation Strategy Working Group
has scheduled a workshop ariand luncheon on
July 28,.2009, at 11:30 a.m., located at the Board
of County Commission Chambers, 412 West
Orange Street, Room 102, Wauchula, FL 33873.

The Hardee County Local Mitigation Strategy
was created by the county and its municipalities
as a guide for the identification and implementa-
tion of mitigation projects and programs. Those
projects and programs have helped to reduce
the human, economic, and environmental costs
of disasters.

The LMS Plan is currently undergoing its five-
year update meaning new projects and pro-
grams must be Identified. The purpose of the
workshop will be to enable participants to iden-
tify and prioritize mitigation-related projects to
be included in the LMS.

For more Information or to reserve a seat, please
contact the Hardee County Office of Emergency
Management at (863) 773-6373.
7:16c


woods.
Camera crews added to the
tension of the hunt, Wadsworth
recalled.
"The camera man would give
us the shoot signal," he said.
"They wanted to be sure they
had enough footage, what they
call 'pre-roll.' You can't just
shoot the bird when he comes
into range. You had to wait for
the signal."
And viewers will see Smoak
and Wadsworth take their shots.
"We had a good time,"


Wadsworth said of the experi-
ence. "It was neat to see how
the whole outcome of a televi-
sion show comes together." He
said seven or eight hours' worth
of footage was made, then edit-
ed.
Wadsworth said Hardee
County hunters were chosen for
the Osceola hunt for "Turkey
Country" mainly because the
Hardee County Chapter of the
National Wild Turkey Feder-
ation is one of the five largest in
the state.


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Staff there have been work-
ing with rehabilitation, home-
maker preservation and other
programs since 1992 and assur-
ed county commissioners they
would have no problem com-
pleting the rigorous'palerwork
required by federal monies.
That office is also. applying
for up to $100,000 from a fed-
eral housing preservation grant.
There are only 160 such awards.
in the nation, but IIardee's
excellent record of use. of such
funds may qualify it for these
dollars which can be used to
help people prevent foreclo-
sure.
The community development
office was one of the first in the
state to get rehabilitation grants
after Hurricane Charley and
worked with volunteer housing
groups and contractors to get a
significant number of the 90
percent of homes damaged
locally repaired. A feware still
on the rehabilitation waiting
list.







NEW PASTOR
A story on the Hardee
Living pages last week
concerning a new pastor at
Fort Green Baptist Church
contained a typographical
error which changed the
meaning of a sentence.
Pastor Steve McGaugh-
ey, who began full-time at
the church on May 31, had
been in full- and part-time
ministry for several years.
He was again serving part-
time before coming to Fort
Green.
The Herald-Advocate
apologizes for any confu-
sion the error may have
caused.
At The, Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if 'fe. find it needs correqd-,
tionpr clarification, we will
do so"here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.

There's little risk in becoming
overly proud of one's garden
because gardening by its very
nature is humbling. It has a
way of keeping you on your
knees.


A Safe Place
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE
1 (800)500-1119
End The Abuse!


LOCAL
Continued From 1A









July 16, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Letter To The Editor

Heartland Pump Upset With County Bidding Process


Dear Editor: essary work. The only need was
The purpose of this letter is to for updating the dispensers
let the people of Hardee County (actual gas pumps). Instead the
know how some of their tax- county wrote, specifications to
payer money is being spent, install new equipment that they
We have been servicing the already have. Equipment that
county fuel pumps and equip- was installed only a few years
ment since 1992 and have ago, is still working correctly.
always thought we have tried to The equipment currently will
provide excellent service to the tell the county whom got fuel in
county ana the taxpayers. We what vehicle and to what
have tried to keep competitive department. A tank monitor is
and to offer goods and services currently there to give readings
that would benefit our county. of how much fuel is in each
We employ local people who tank.
are property owners and tax- With the economy in the con-
payers. We also contribute to edition it is in, I as a taxpayer see
the local economy in many no point in changing out equip-
ways. Thru ads, with the local ment that is currently working.
paper, to ads in the yearbooks, I did make a recommendation
to support for the county fair, to to update the dispensers due to
sponsorship of school func- the ability to get repair parts.
tions, we have always tried to Again, this is the only equip-
put Hardee County folks first. ment that really needs to be
With that, we also, need the updated. I thought that someone
support of the county and the with the county could have let
taxpayers. While a lot of our us know that they were not
work does come from outside happy with the system or the
the county, we also rely on operability of the system, but
work to come within the county. only found out after the bid was
A bid was recently taken'for released. This in itself is disap-
updating the fuel dispenser pointing, that our county could
equipment at the public works not give the local company a
department for the county. call to consult on their needs.
Specifications for the bid were We could not bid on the ini-
issued for equipment this coun- tial specifications the county
ty really does not need. Equip- put out for bids. Those specifi-
ment was specified we already cationss were for equipment that
have and is performing the nec- we did not distribute or offer.


Letter To The Editor

Suggestions For Increasing

Use Of Hardee Lakes Park


Dear Editor:
Young, enthusiastic, imma-
ture, hopeful and yet, vulnera-
ble - Hardee Lakes Park.
A youthful park born of
spent, 'donated land and living
on handouts. Unassuming, un-
popular, and unknown.
Brought along by limitedcoun-
ty staff, state grants and \avors
by its benefactor, Mosaic. The
park is at a juncture: grow into a
unique county showcase / or
slide into the slim pit of unreal-
ized potential.
This park has two attributes
rarely found in a state full of
parks. It is not overdeveloped
and huge. The secluded quiet
tranquility felt when walking
around any of the four lakes is
truly therapeutic. These 1,300
acres are wholesome, safe,
unspoiled and native to Hardee
County.
The planners have done this
place right - still wild, still nat-
ural, and still in line with the
original year 2000 objectives.
They set guidelines that match
services with limited staff and
resources: limits on days open;
closed at night (unless camp-
ing); no alcohol; no ATVs; lim-
/its on number of small fishing
boats.
However, there are pressures
afoot to change park objectives.
Pressure from budget deficits,
commercial agendas, develop-
ers and short-sighted, impulsive
half-baked ideas with far-rang-
ing unintended consequences.
Without strong parental guid-
ance from our commissioners,
this 16- year-old kid could easi-
ly fall in with the wrong crowd.
Allow alcohol, nighttime
hours, dangerous litigious ac-
tivities or gate-charge full-
blown events, and the park be-
comes an uncontrollable delin-
quent. A 1,500-inmate prison
with visitation sits four miles
north; drug and gang woes pep-
per The Herald-Advocate; the
fdw park employees are only
custodians and the closest
police officer is 15 to 20 min-
utes away. It only takes one
aggravated robbery, abduction,
rape, murder, drug infestation
or gang fight in this remote area
and the untarnished reputation
of Hardee Lakes Park as a fam-
ily safe place is gone forever.
Then, people have a real reason
for not coming.
The park planners have just
the right formula that appeals to
family fun without attracting
trouble. So, why would Hardee
Lakes Park be on a recent com-
mission meeting agenda?
Under-utilization and revenue
were the common threads.
Why would this young park
be under-utilized? Wrong, it is
not a marketing problem. The
reason is simply that most peo-
ple visiting remote parks want
to stay awhile and prefer sites
with" electrical/water hookups
arid at least a sewage dump sta-
tion.
So, what natural upgrade to
park services would market
itself at premium rates of $38 a
night; carry a six-month waiting
list and be fully self-supporting
in the first year? The answer is
obvious.
Why would campers want to


leave 454 sites on 28 acres at
KOA Zolfo Springs (1/16th
acre/site)? For quality RV pads
on super-sized sites with elec-
trical and water hookups.
Give the people what they
cannot get at any private RV
park and most state parks:
space!
The only public lakes in the
county are in Hardee Lakes
Park (stocked with fish)!
People want privacy, security, a
quiet natural setting and space.
. But, it will all be lost if the
park loses its way by allowing
an ATV, jet ski, Cracker Lake
Mud Bog, Budweiser beer
extravaganza, flea market,
Woodstock, gun show or motor-
cycle rally. All high-impact,
short-term, unsustainable, high-
liability money pits costing the
county resources and stuffing
the pockets of promoters.
So, forget the crappola and
stick with core values that cur-
rent resources can sustain indef-.
initely.
With a little investment and
some help from park friends
like Mosaic, the county can
complete the package of ser-
vices it has so expertly crafted
for our park .by adding RV
hookups.
Guidelines to Increase Use
and Establish the Park as a
County Profit Center:
1.) 'The park runs the show.
Commercial enterprises work
against core park values and
will push for high density and
maximum profit, requiring
oversight that dilutes and cor-
rupts over time. \
2.) Build RV sites in blocks
of 25 sites per phase near Lake
3. Each site has a pebble rock
pad, electric and water hookup,
and covered picnic/BBQ area.
One four-lane dump station
serves 50 sites.
.3.) Three site sizes offered:
one acre at $22 a night and three
acres at $28 a night; premium
200-foot lakeside sites demand
$38 a night.
4.) Electric golf carts
allowed. (Park could rent
them.) No alcohol, firearms,
fireworks, loud music, etc. No-
fishing license' required while
camping. (Park pays negotiated
fee with the state.)
5.) Reserve America online
system used for all reservations
(same as. state parks).
6.) Fees support check-in
office operating 16 hours per
day and one maintenance per-
son.
7.) Highly visible video
recorder surveillance system at
entrance/exit to deter crime and
assist police, monitored remote-
ly at the Sheriffs Office.
Hardee Lakes Park will not
pass this way again.
It is too big a prize to linger
for long in adolescence -
pushed and pulled - protected
and developed or prostituted
and exploited.
The opportunity is ours, for
those of us who care, to step
forward and support keeping
this special place special.
Make yourself heard.
Thank You,
Henry Kuhlman
Friends of Hardee Lakes Park
Fort Green


One point to make is recently
the county passed an ordinance
that would allow local contrac-
tors to' compete by allowing
them a 5 percent competitive
bid cap. This would allow the
local contractor to be chosen if
they were within 5 percent of
the bid. However, if the county
specifies equipment the con-
tractor does not offer, (which is
easy to do) then again the local
contractor is at a disadvantage.
We found ourselves in this posi-
tion.
We were allowed to bid for
equipment that we could pro-
vide, but had to offer equipment
that did not meet the specifica-
tions. We also proposed a sec-
ond option that would allow
using the existing fuel manage-
ment system and tank monitor-
ing equipment and just updating
the fuel pumps. We were led to
believe that we could bid .this
option and that other bidders
were bidding on this same
equipment. We were allowed to
bid thru a process called
BidBridge. This is an electronic
bid process that is filled with
flaws. This process allows you
to enter a bid to start and then
you can go down on the bid
(reverse bidding) throughout
the bidding process. The prob-
lem is that if two contractors are
not operating straight, the sys-
tem could be compromised.
Two or more contractors could
conspire to fix a bid without the
county's knowledge. Further-
more, the county taxpayers
must pay for this service. The
minimum amount is $2,500 for
this service. This represents $
2,500 of taxpayer money the
contractor must include in
his/her bid.
I feel this county, in this case,
is spending money on too many
things that are wasting the tax-
payer's money. As much as I
would like to sell the county
extra equipment, I only believe
in selling what the county
needs, not necessarily what the
county wants. I think we oper-
ate this county above our means
and need to be operating as a
county with less then 30,000
people. Instead, in this case, we
are operating with specifica-
tions that even the City of New
York would not require. i.e . . .
500,000 vehivlew and employees
system specifications for the
fuel management system. I
don't think we need a system to
handle 500,000 vehicles and
employees. This is only one
example of the requirements
our elite county .has specified.
One concern is that the per-
sons making some of these
decisions do not even own any
property in the county. In one
conversation with Mr. Lex Al-
britton (county manager), I
tried to explain some concerns
and was told to basically keep
quiet and this conversation was
not going to take place and was














.


missioners may have thought. I
would like to think that maybe
the three commissioners who
voted for this were misinformed
and if they had been advised
properly, would have reconsid-
ered.
I know this letter is long, but
felt compassioned to let the
county taxpayers know of how
your county money is potential-
ly being spent. The failure of
the county to recognize the
need to support our local busi-
nesses and contractors needs to
be addressed. I urge you to con-
tact your local commissioner to
voice your concern over this
practice. I appreciate the sup-
port we have had for the many
years we have been here. I care
about this county and also own
more than one business here.
We need to take care of our
local people and help each
other. The night of Hurricane
Charley, a sheriff's officer and


cut short on trying to explain
some of the problems with this
bid and specifications. If you
cannot talk to the county man-
ager, whom else, as a taxpayer,
could I try to explain this to?
This in itself should be looked
upon as a concern. The good
part is that the commissioners
have to approve some of these
expenditures. These same com-
missioners that we elected are
supposed to watch out for our
taxpayer money. While I need
to give credit to two of the com-
missioners, Mr. Bobby Smith
and Mr. Minor Bryant, I must
also point out that Mr. Terry
Atchley, Mr. Nick Timmerman
and Mr. Dale Johnson sure did
not seem to promote using local
contractors or vendors.
It was mentioned in the coun-
ty commissioner meeting on
July 2nd, that I withdrew my
bid. The point needs to be made
that I could not or did not with-
draw my initial bid. This bid
had to be guaranteed for 60
days and therefore I would have
been in breach of my contract
should I have withdrawn. I
withdrew from bidding a sec-
ond time after the initial bid
was completed. The second bid-
ding process did not follow the
procurement (purchasing agents
manual) process and I did not
have adequate time to prepare a
bid that was based upon new
requirements that the county
management came up with.
They contacted me on June
25th at 4:12 p.m. with specifi-
cations and wanted me to have
a bid prepared by the following
day at 12:00 noon, June 26th.
This is not reasonable to be
expected to do this on a techni-
cal bid, such as what the county
personnel had specified. I there-
fore, withdrew from this second
bid request. Anyone, put in this
situation would question the
validity of the procedures the
county followed. Furthermore,
it is now noted that the third
bidder in this process (Pro In-
dustries, Inc. Mulberry, FL) did
not even get to bid on the re-
vised second bid. This does not
follow the purchasing agent
guidelines and should have
been disallowed. .
My purpose in this is to bring
attention to the gross negli-
gence that some of the county
management is allowing to take'
place. I have filed a "Notice of
Protest" in this matter and will
be giving a formal complaint to
the county manager and com-
missioners. This bid should be
retracted and re-bid under prop-
er guidelines and specifications.
The purchasing department
should be required to bid on
items that are the same. It
should be noted that the original
specifications that were bid and
in comparison to the last speci-
fications were significantly dif-
ferent. Bids were apples to
bananas, unlike what the com-


JR Prestridge (the former assis-
tant public works director and
county manager) asked me to
come out at 2:00 a.m. and I was
able to get a generator hooked
,up for the fuel system to keep
our emergency services going
*thru this ordeal. This is a bene-
fit to this county to use local
folks. 'Hopefully, we ,Will be
here when the need arises.
Without the support of the
county business, the next.'time,
we may not be here to help.
Please support your local busi-
nesses. Call me if you'want to
know more about this or if you
have any questions. I welcome
your concern. (863) 781-4529
or (863) 773-2213.

Sincerely,
Mark Burrus
Heartland Pump and Tank,
Co.,Inc.
Wauchula


commands me to for God's
glory, not mine.
When I began to look at Don
through God's eyes, it changed
the way I saw him: he was His
creation, fearfully and wonder-
fully made, a precious gift. I no
longer looked at him with my
own selfish agenda. He was no
longer somebody who couldn't
meet my expectations; he was
an expression of God's love and
grace..
God meets my expectations
and fills me with purpose. God
had freely forgiven Don his
shortcomings and imperfec-
tions, so why couldn't I? After
all the things that God had for-
given me for I should be able to
forgive the things that my
spouse does.
Who are you really being dis-
satisfied with when you are
upset with your spouse? Are
you dissatisfied with your
spouse, yourself or God? I'm
afraid God may see it as your
dissatisfaction with what he has
provided for you.
Yes, it's sometimes difficult
to maintain this heavenly per-
spective. Whenever I lose it, I
go before the Father. I ask,
"Lord, help me to see him again
through your eyes. Help me to
treat him the way You treat
him."
Then God faithfully reminds
me that Don isn't in my life to
make me happy, but to teach me
how to love. No matter the cir-
cumstances.

Cheryl Faulkner
Wauchula


Sometimes people call me an idealist Well, that is the way I
know I am an American. America is the only idealistic nation
in the world.
'-Woodrow Wilson


RDEE YOUTH FOOTBALL LEAGUE

is looking for football players between the

ages of: 9-10-11 weighing 75-120 Ibs. and

12 year olds weighing 75-100 lbs.


TlherebArekbjlIL'A few PmositionLeft


Thursday

July 30 Behind the Old Jr. High Gym

5-7p.m. $140.00 registration fee


',
0,~


Letter To The Editor

Wauchula Wife Describes

God's Purpose For Marriage


Dear Editor:
Like a lot of men and
women, I jumped into.marriage
with the thought that being
happy was the ultimate goal. As
I look back, many of the strug-
gles my husband, Don, and I
encountered in the early years
stemmed from our misconcep-
tions about our roles and goals
and about marriage in general.
Our expectations, tone of
voice, requests and responses to
each other all reflected our self-
ish hearts, which considered
each other to be the producer of
our personal happiness.
One day, I listened to a ser-
mon on the high calling of mar-
riage. I became extremely emo-
tional and saw my husband and
marriage in a totally different
way. I told Don that I think I
finally understand this thing
called marriage.
The sermon convicted me
with the truth that my marriage
is about much more than man-
aging intimacy, conflict, kids
and finances. It's about more
than simply meeting needs and
making each other happy.
Those aspects are merely natur-
al outcomes of a much greater
purpose-glorifying--God and
reflecting his sacrediruth t66'iee"
another and to the world.
When we become one in our
marriage, we reflect the unity of
God. When we are not one,
when we do not follow His pat-
tern, it affects our relationship
with Him and with each other. I
must reflect God's purpose in
my marriage even if Don does-
n't. I must love him like God








4A The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009


CLIFFORD E. ECKHARDT
Clifford E. Eckhardt, 89, of
Fort Meade, died Sunday, July
12, 2609.
Born March 15, 1920, in
Oakland, N.J., he retired from
the U.S. Air Force after a 20-
year career. He moved to Fort
Meade from Long Island, N.Y.
in 1989 and was a member of
St. Elizabeth Catholic Church
in Fort Meade.
He was preceded in death by
a brother Robert Eckhardt;and a
sister June Courtnay.
. Survivors include his wife of
67 years, Georgette M. Eck-
hardt of Fort Meade; two
daughters Catherine DeBiasi of
Ronkonkoma, N.Y., and Caro-
leen Naugles and husband
Steve of West Palm Beach; one
son Clifford C. Eckhardt and
wife Cathy of Fort Meade; six
grandchildren Joseph DiBiasi,
Michael DiBiasi, Thomas
Naugles, Christopher Naugles,
Tabitha McEhreath and Eric
Phillips; and eight great-gra'nd-
children.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home. Services are today
(Thursday) at 10:30 a.m. at St.
Elizabeth Catholic Church of
Fort Meade, followed by inter-
ment at Evergreen Cemetery in
Fort Meade.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade






Ric Button * Tom Robarts
Monuments
including
set in cemetery
from $335
245-8956
established 1999 1o:9s



Pn moving CUemO/uy














LAWRENCE
"LARRY" SMITH ]R.
Lawrence "Larry" Smith
Jr., 60, of Wauchula, died
Wednesday, Jan., 14, 2009, at
Sebring.
Born in Fort Myers, on
Dec. 22, 1948, he lived in
Hardee County for 43 years.
He was a funeral attendant
for Robarts Funeral Homes
and was a Jehovah's Witness.
He was preceded in death
by his mother, Helen Smith;
and two sisters, Betty Ward
and Shirley Tillman.
Survivors include his wife
Patricia Herrin Smith of
Wauchula; one daughter,
Angela Smith Harllee of
Enterprise, Ala.; one son,
Lawrence Smith III "Little
Larry" of Enterprise, Ala.;
father, Lawrence Smith Sr. of
Avon Park; two grandchil-
dren, Addie Harllee of Se-
bring, and Bruin "Bear"
Harllee of Enterprise, Ala.;
three brothers, David Allen
Smith and wife Susan of
Avon Park, Philip Smith and
wife Sandra of Wauchula,
and Ernie Bryant and wife
Denise of Avon Park; three
sisters, Wanda Rodgers and
husband Jerry or Wauchula,
Lorine Platt. and husband
Sam of Avon Park, and Lisa
Prestridge and husband J.R.
of Zolfo Springs; and numer-
ous nieces, nephews, extend-
ed family, and friends.
Visitation was Friday, Jan.
16, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel.
Services were Saturday at 3
p.m. at the Kingdom Hall in
Wauchula with Steven Storts
officiating with interment
following at Friendship
Cemetery.


CLAY D. ROGERS
Clay D. lRogers, 33, of Zolfo
Springs, died on Friday, July
10, 2009 at his home.
Born Sept. 26, 1975, in Avon
Park, he was a lifelong resident
of Zolfo Springs.
Survivors include his parents
Billy D. and Patricia Rogers of
Zolfo Springs; sister Rhonda
Willis and husband Mike; and
grandmothers Kathleen
"Granny Kat" Morris and Mary
N. Rogers.
Visitation was Sunday from
4 to 6 p.m. at the funeral home.
Services were Monday at 10
a.m. at First Baptist Church of
Zolfo Springs with the Rev.
Dwaine Willis officiating..Inter-
ment followed in Wauchula
Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


CLAY D. ROGERS
Clay Rogers, 33, passed
away at home on Friday, July
10, 2009.
Born in Avon Park on
Sept. 26, 1975, he was a life-
long resident of Zolfo
Springs. Clay enjoyed the
simple things in life and was
a blessing to many. His
favorite pastimes were travel-
ing nd being with family.
is survived by his par-
ents Billy D. and Patricia
Rogers; one sister Rhonda
and husband Mike Willis;
one niece and one nephew,
Ashlyn and Dustin Willis; his
loving caregiver and aunt;
Myrl Roberts; paternal
grandmother Mary N.
Rogers; maternal grandmoth-
er Kathleen "Granny Kat"
Morris; and numerous aunts,
uncles and cousins.
Visitation was Sunday,
July 12, from 4 to 6 p.m. at
the funeral home. Services
were Monday at 10 a.m. at
First Baptist Church of Zolfo
Springs with the Rev. Dwaine
Willis officiating. Interment
followed in Wauchula
Cemetery.

Brant Funeral
Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula



1n Moutng &UemoeitJ














SEVENNS
ST. LOUIS
Sevenns St. Louis, 14, of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
July 4,, 2009, at Zolfo
Springs.
Born in Port de Paix, Haiti,.
on May 13, 1995, he came to
Hardee County with his fam-
ily eight years ago. He was a
student and member of Faith
Temple Church of God.
Survivors include his par-
ents Dieulira and Secifie St.
Louis of Wauchula; three
brothers, Lunior, Jean Marie
and Jozie St. Louis, all of
Wauchula; and two sisters,
Lovelina and Lotisha St.
Louis, both of Wauchula.
Visitation was Friday from
6 to 8 p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel. Services were Satur-
day at 10 a.m. .at Faith
Temple Church of God with
Pastor Wendell G. Smith and
Pastor Etienne Delphin offi-
ciating. Interment followed at
Wauchula Cemetery.
A memorial fund is set up
through Faith Temple Church
of God, 701 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, to assist the fami-
ly with funeral expenses. For
information, call 773-3800.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


I Way1BackWhenIT


Obituaries


Ministry Asks
For Volunteers
Sherry White Ministries is
seeking a variety of volun-
teers. A mechanic is needed
to service vehicles, a handy-
man needed at Lydia's
House, people to work at
Pioneer Village cabins and
landscaping, others to work
in the Heaven-Scent Thrift
Store and some to send
supplies to an orphanage in
the Dominican Republic.
However you can help, an
hour or part of a day per
week, call Sherry White at
cell phone 863-245-1184.

School Board
Changes Meeting
The next regularly sched-
uled meeting of the Hardee
County School Board has
been changed. Instead of
Thursday, July 23 at 5 p.m.,
it Will be Monday, July 27. at
5:30 p.m.
The time and day of the
meeting, which will still be at
the Board Room, 200 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula, was
changed to follow the first
public budget hearing set for
5 p.m. on that Monday.

Blood Mobile
Visits At Bank
Wauchula State Bank will
host the Florida Blood
Center bloodmobile tomor-
row (Fri-day). The bloodmo-
bile will be in the bank park-
ing lot from noon to 5 p.m.
Blood donations help save
lives for accident victims and
others needing surgery or
battling illnesses. Cancer
.patients can donate one
year after treatment. Stop by
and donate to save a life.




Ric Button
Funeral Director

Memorial Service
with cremation
from
$1090
ICS Cremation and
Funerals,
2620D Highlands Road,
Harbour Heights, FL 33983


245-8956
S,


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida
Advocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-
Advocate...

75 YEARS AGO
About 200 citrus growers in
the county met at the court-
house on Wednesday night to
hear leaders of the Florida
Citrus Growers League appeal
for membership at $10 a grow-
er. They said growers should
first get their fruit on f.o.b. to
control the price.

Marriages set a new record
for the first six months of 1934.
There were 149 marriage
licenses issued, compared to
103 for the same period in 1933
and 102 for the first six months
of 1932. Divorces granted dur-
ing the first six months of this
year were 26, compared to 10 in
1933 and 27 in 1932 for the
same period of time.

The Board of County Com-
missioners will meet as an
equalization board on July 16 to
receive complaints and take tes-
timony for the purpose of
equalizing tax assessments.
Any taxpayers who may have a
complaint about assessed valua-
tion should present them. After
the meeting, the values adopted
will be final for adopting the
1934 tax roll.

J.W. Earnest & Co. offers "a
beehive of bargains," 39-inch
pure silk for 79 cents a yard;
double-bed spreads for $1.98,
hosiery for 69 cents a pair;.
men's shirts and shorts 21 cents
each, and cotton sports pants for
$1.49, $1.69 and $2.19.
Tropical suits are $16.98 and
$21.98, and fine silk dresses
from $3.98 to $5.49 to $7.94.

50 YEARS AGO
A Page One picture caption


says, "The memories of yester-
year, when 20 miles and hour
was a dangerous speed, and
Mama'wore a veil to keep out
the dust, were revived last week
with the meeting here of the
southeastern region Antique
Car Association. Emerson
Clavel, owner of several
antiques, was on hand to host
the meeting.

State Sen. Doyle Carlton Jr.,
of Wauchula, has been named
"Most Valuable Senator" in the
1959 session of the Florida
Legislature by members of the
Florida Press Corps, 59 legisla-
tive reporters and editors of
Florida newspapers. The Wau-
chula senator was considered
by newsmen as a leading voice
of moderation in the Senate in
the last session.

One of the largest land sales
in Hardee County history, close
to a half-million dollars, was
recorded this week. About half
of the old Campbell ranch near
Ona, a total of 3,809 acres, was
sold for $115 an acre, about
$439,000, to Hardee Groves
Inc., a company controlled by
Irving Shapiro of Miami.

Members of the Wauchula
Board of Realtors featured this
week include Frank Bass, F.L.
Revell, C.T. Ratliff, Annabel
Mathis, Davis & Roberts and
H.L. Chambers and Joe L.
Davis.

25 YEARS AGO
The sheriff's proposed bud-
get for next year is $1.147 mil-
lion, compared to $1.096 mil-
lion this year, an increase of
4.74 percent. It represents a
five-percent increase in salaries
for employees. In his cover let-
ter, Sheriff Doyle Bryan said he
was hQlding down expenses as
much as possible for the 19M4-
85 year.

Pizza Hut is coming to Wau-
chula. The 2,300-square-foot
building will be built on proper-
ty at U.S. 17 and Stenstrom
Road which the company is
purchasing from Thriftway..The
restaurant will have a seating
capacity of 104, employ 25 to
30 people and be open seven
days a week, said Karen Perrill,
corporat ,secretaW,,.

Five candidates have filed for


THURSDAY, JULY 16
WHardee County Corm-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Court-house
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.

MONDAY, JULY 20
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY, JULY 21
V/Hardee Lupus Wellness
Group, open meeting on
understanding lupus, Florida
Hospital Wauchula, First
Floor Conference Room,
533 W. Carlton St., Wau-
chula, 6 p.m.


. ,,.


As a courtesy to our friends and neighbors, obituary
are now listed daily at www.hardeeobits.com


fall elections: William "Sonny"
Coker for supervisor of elec-
tions; Doyle Bryan and Newton
Murdock for sheriff; Curtis
Ezelle for tax collector; and
Gordon Norris for School
Board district two. Property
Appraiser D. Reid Stewart has
announced he will not run for
re-election. There are seven
other openings to be filled.

Griff's Steak & Catfish
House offers a noon buffet spe-
cial for $3.95 for all you can
eat. The night and Sunday buf-
fet are $5.95. Menu items vary
from fresh fried catfish for
$4.95 to a fresh combination
platter or T-Bone for $11.95.

10 YEARS AGO
Is Hardee County Y2K
ready? Yes, said 14 local offi-
cials gathered Tuesday morning
for a Year 2000 Steering Com-
mittee meeting. Each of the
county, municipal and School
Board employees explained
how they were prepared for the
turn of the century.


PIANO KEYS


PHOTO BY'CHELSEA HARRIS
A new key to history was'added to the Cracker Trail
Museum recently with a 100-year-old Baldwin piano
donated by Jackie See. The piano had been in his family
for as long as he can remember. The piano belonged to'
the late Betty See, or "Mama." She lived in a two-story
house where John Burton's office now sits on Main
Street. Jackie and his brother, Billy, were taught how to
play Mama's piano at the age of 5. The piano also was
used at the old Lord's Church. See wanted the piano to
go somewhere he knew it woui. be taken care of. You
can see Mama's piano at the Cracker Trail Museum at
Pioneer Park in Zolfo Springs.


4:23tfc


"They were


wonderful".

We hear kind words
consistently. We're proud
that people feel comfortable
enough with us to openly tell
us how much they appreciate
what we did for them. In fact,
it's this appreciation that
drives us to offer the very
best in comfort, compassion
and service.





FUNERAL HOMES
529 V. Main Street
W\auchula





ies 773-9773
2:12tfc


"Thank you for our new
home," Fire Chief Billy Win-
gate said of the new 10-bay
central area, sleeping and recre-
ation areas and offices for
Hardee County Fire-Rescue at
149 K.D. Revell Road, off U.S
17 North behind the Health
Department.

Area drivers face yet another
detour as the state Department
of Transportation placed signs
closing CR 663, better known
as Fort Green-Ona Road, to all
but local traffic. The dirt road,
the main north-south artery
on the west end of the county,
will be closed until next spring
while paving of it is com-
pleted.

The Zolfo Springs Town
Council is considering buying a,
stately old home on U.S. 17
North, directly across the street
from the Civic Center, which
currently houses town offices.
The council hoped to get a his-
toric preservation grant to pur-
chase the old home.


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


"





July 16, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 5A


S ---4 __


Announces


G-M-Supplier Pricing

for


$2009 Chevy Cobalt LS
Full Power, OnStar, Rear Spoiler


MSRP
$18,805


. . . . . .$18,248.62
. . . . . . . -2,000.00
$16,248.62


Yo S .


Supplier Price .............. ...$19,627.55
LESS Factory Rebate ............ . -2,500.00
^ .,i , Price e.. 17,127.55



2009 Chevy 1500 4X4
Crew Cab, LT, Z71, Leather, Full Power, Trailer Tow





Supplier Price .. .. . . . ....... . . $34,828.62
LESS Factory Rebate ............. -4,000.00
- sPrice oyv .30,828.62
'Yo Sa e .. . . .. . . ... .. .$ 58 03


2009 Chevy Malibu LT
Full Power, OnStar, Bluetooth and Much More!


StI. ,09020G


MSRP
$24,460


Supplier Price ...... ........ $23,443.13
LESS Factory Rebate. ............. -2,000.00
.. Price ' 21,443.13
--Yo a e . . . . . . . . . . . a.:$,168


2008 Chevy 2500
Crew Cab, LT, Diesel, Full Power, Trailer Tow, OnStar


-. I
4


MSRP
$44,035


Supplier Price .....
LESS Factory Rebate
e ew n Price


. ............$40,149.99
. . . . . . . . . . . . . -7,000.00
obf 33,149.99


YuS av ..........:..$1,850


SL EHEVROLET
1405 U.S. HIGHWAY 17 S. WAUCHULA
(863) 773-4744
Prices include all factory rebates & incentives, assigned back to dealer Prices exclude taxes, tag title & dealer fee. Vehicle sublect to prior sale. Sale ends 7/21/09. Pictures are for illustration purposes only


2009 Chevy 1500
Auto, A/C, CD


-MSRP
$19,985

Supplier Price .............. . .. .$19,229.80
LESS Factory Rebate ............. -2,500.00
a W'',nPrice 0~4 $16,729.80
.75ou . S' . .


2009 Chevy HHR LS
Full Power, Auto, Remote Start, OnStar
-'J-fk �r *"'%


MSRP
$20,380


m aw


I


i


Supplier Price .....
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48

AFA


4


I


E~ HEV OLE [
^^i ^^~ j^ ^ I~ iR T-i


_0)








6A The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009


The Blue Star Brigade on
Monday. began rehearsals to
prepare for camp in August.
Each of the performance
groups will rehearse from 9
a.m. until noon on Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday of
each week, with the percussion
on Monday, auxiliary on
Tuesday and the winds on




Obituaries

LOUISE M. POWELL
Louise Metheny Powell, 91,
of Zephyrhills, died on
Monday, July 13, 2009, at East
Pasco Care Center.
Born in Wauchula on April
21, 1918, she was a homemak-
er.
She was preceded in death by
her- parents, Earl Lesley and
Chrisolene Spires Metheny;
husband' of 64 years, Edwmin
Lindsey Powell; two brothers,
William Lesley Metheny and
Harley Allen Metheny; and two
sisters, Frances M. Newsome
and Myrtle M. Powell-Willis.
She is survived by three'
sons; Edwin Earl Powell and
wife Susan of Woodbridge, Va.,
Richard Larry Powell and wife
Brenda of Valrico, and William
Lindsey Powell and wife Patsy
of Lakeland; one daughter
Karen P. Little and husband
George of Zephyrhills; sister
Faye .M. Cheatwood of
Lakeland; six grandchildren;
two step-grandchildren; nine
great-grandchildren; and five
step-grandchildren.
Visitation is Saturday from
noon to 1 p.m. at the funeral
home, with services at 1 p.m.
Interment follows at Wauchula
Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252009 CA 000359
MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL
cREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,. . -, -
V.
OSCAR A. CREWS; KAREN F.
CREWS; MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION; TENANT #1;
TENANT #2; and ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, AND
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS,
Defendants. /

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, AND UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN-NAMED
DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER /CLAI-
MANTS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
.that an action to foreclose on the
following real property in Hardee
County, Florida:
LOT 24, BLOCK 1, GOLF-
VIEW ESTATES, ACCORD-
ING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 50,
OF-THE PUBLIC RECORDS /
OF HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
has been filed against you in the
Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial
Circuit, Hardee County, Florida,
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses to
the Complaint, if any, to Gregory
A. Sanoba, Esq., 114 E. Edgewood
Drive, Lakeland, FL 33803, on or
before August 7, 2009, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
� DATE: 7-2-09
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Court


By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who 'heeds any accommodation
in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, yodu are entitled, at no.
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
the Court Adinlnistrator (863) 534-
4690 within two working days of
your receipt of this Notice; if you
are hearing or voice impaired, call
TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida
Relay Service (800) 955-8770.
7:9-16c


Wednesday.
The band will be preparing its
show for the competition that
-lies ahead this fall. The mem-
bers will be preparing a "Spy
Mission" show. The local com-
munity will be hearing the
music from "Secret Agent," the
television show, several songs
from the James Bond series and
a percussion feature on the
"Mission Impossible" theme.
The members are excited and
looking forward to presenting
the show to the local communi-
ty and representing the town
and county in competition.
Members will also be
approaching local businesses
for the local football program to*
support the band and bring spir-
it to the home football games.
Next Thursday, members will
be involved in a "Tag Day" to
obtain ads, donations and solic-
it sponsors for the band pro-
gram.
Local business owners will
be receiving a letter from the
band about this event, and the
members are looking forward to
meeting the goal of having the
band's budget fulfilled in the
town.


Anyone can help, and if you
are interested in assisting' the
band it its growth, contact
director David Faulk at Hardee
High School, 773-3181.
Alumni of th6 band are
reminded that Homecoming
this year will be on Oct. 9, and
al alumni are invited come and
be a part of an alumni band for
that night. Information about
this event will be coming later
in the fall.
The band camp for prepara-
tion for the fall will be at
Hardee High School Aug. 3-7
and Aug. 10-14. The band will
rehearse at the high school 8
a.m. until 6 p.m.
The band will be performing
each home game and will be
representing the community at
area competitions in hopes of
going to state finals. The band
has received an invitation to
represent the county, city and
state at the Peach Bowl in
Atlanta later on this year. The
decision if the band can attend
will be made later this summer.
Make plans to come out to
enjoy the Blue Star Brigade as
it works to be the "Pride of
Hardee County."


Sizzling Summer


Summe
some of th
year. Back
nics at the
ice cream
people enj
As enjo
er fare cai
avoid ove
months,
bloated fee
a hot day.
When
this summ
lowing tip
summer is
too filling
* Take
unknown.
associate
ing with
burgWrs, th
great place
choils. I
can also b
Veggies-gi
flavor whe
In addition
into kabob
heat for a

IN THEC
HARDER
PR(
FILE NO
IN RE: EST
JANET MA
Do


Dieting Tips
rtime cuisine can be * Drink your water. The
he best food we eat all higher temperatures common to
kyard barbecues, pic- summer can lead to dehydration
e park and, bf course, for those who don't drink ample
, decorate the menus fluids. What's more, the symp-
joy each summer. . toms of dehydration can mimic
yable as warm-weath- those of hunger, making you
n be, it is important to feel hungry when you might not
creating during the hot be. To avoid overeating and
as no one likes the dehydration, be sure to drink
eling of overeating on the recommended daily amount
of water.
planning your meals * Snack healthy as well. It's
ner, consider the fol- not only meals that can weight
is to ensure that your you down during summer heat
s both healthy and not waves. What you snack on
while at the office or lounging
your grilling to. parts around the house can make you
While it's common to. feel sluggish as well. Instead of
grilling and barbecu- potato chips or other heavy
steaks, hot dogs and snacks, choose lighter fare such
hegrill can also be a as fresh berries. Berries can
ce, to cook healthier even be added to healthy snacks
Fruits and vegetables such as yogurt or salad io give
e cooked on the grill. . them a boost in flavor and you a
ain much in regards to boost in energy.
-n cooked on the grill. * Think lean. Because it is
n, fruit can be made grilling season, you're not going
bs and grilled on low to entirely abandon summer
delicious meal. favorites such as steaks and
burgers. And you can still enjoy
CIRCUIT COURT FOR beef and be healthy at the same
E IRCUIT COUFLRTFORIDA time. When shopping with a
backyard barbecue in mind-,
OBATE DIVISION look for lean cuts of beef such
as sirloin and loin cuts. To add
. 25-2009-CP-000064 flavor, marinate the meat in a
rATE OF low-calorie marinade, such as
,E RICE, light salad dressing or even cit-
eceased. / rus juice.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of Janet Mae Rice, deceased,
whose date of death was March
21, 2009 and whose Social
Security Number is 377-52-5096 is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Hardee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is
Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873-1749.
The names of the Petitioner and
Petitioner's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, Including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims on
whom a copy of this notice Is
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, Including
unmatured, contingent or unliqul-
dated claims must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL. CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.


NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
Petitioner:
Wilbur Rice
9564 Walking Horse Drive
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
Attorney for Petitioner:
Sarah Schelling
Florida Bar No. 0015705"
UAW Legal Services Plan
2454 McMullen Booth Rd, B -#425
Clearwater, FL 33759
(727) 669-5319 or (877) 309-1787
i 7:16-23c,


Citrus Crop Estimate Grows


HHS: It's Time To


Strike Up The Band!


The U.S. Department of Agri-
culture raised Florida's 2008-09
orange crop estimate by 2.5
million boxes to 162.1 million
boxes in its final citrus forecast
released on Friday.
"Another Florida citrus sea-
son is over and once again
Florida growers produced a
high quality crop," said
Michael W. Sparks, executive
VP/CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual. "We are certainly fac-
ing some challenges as an
industry but we remain a pow-
erful economic engine support-
ing many communities particu-
larly in Florida's interior. With
the overall economy sagging,
citrus - and agriculture in gen-
eral - becomes even more
important."


The USDA said the increase
is comprised entirely of
Valencias, which is now esti-
mated at 77.5 million boxes.
Early and midseason varieties
are final at 84.6 million boxes.
Visit www.nass.usda.gov/-
StatisticsbyState/Florida/Pub
lications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for
the complete USDA estimate.
The USDA makes the initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
In 2007-08, Florida harvested
170.2 million boxes of oranges.
The USDA reduced the
Florida grapefruit projection by
100,000 boxes to 21.7 million
for the 2008-09 season. Colored
grapefruit stayed at 15.1 million
while white grapefruit was


m


INVITATION TO BID
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
ORANGE BLOSSOM RV PARK LIFT STATION REHABILITATION
Sealed BIDS will be received by the Board of County Commissioners, Hardee County,
hereinafter referred to as "County", at:
Hardee County, Purchasing Department
205 Hanchey Road
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863)773-5014
until 2:00 PM on August 14. 2009, at which time they will be publicly opened by the
County Purchasing Director or designee and read aloud. Any BIDS received after the time
specified will not be accepted.
The BIDS shall be based on furnishing all labor, materials and equipment necessary to
refurbish the existing lift station at Orange Blossom RV Park and connect same to exist-
ing force main.
Plans, Specifications and Bid documents are being distributed electronically.
Copies of Plans, specifications and instruction and bid form are provided in Adobe
Acrobat Reader Format. They can be downloaded from: http://www.mcdonald-
grouD.com/oranaeblossom.
Hardee County adheres to a Local Preference Policy. Details may be obtained by con-
tacting Jack Logan, Purchasing Director, at (863)773-5014.
All questions regarding the bid are to be made in writing to the Hardee County
Purchasing Department, and must be made no later than 7 days prior to the bid date in
order to provide an addenda response to all bidders.
Hardee County is an equal opportunity employer and invites MBE and WBE firms to bid.
on this project. Bidders shall make every effort possible to utilize local contractors for this
project. Partial BIDS will not be considered.
Each BID shall be accompanied by a certified check or by an acceptable (according to
the Department of Treasury, Circular 570) BID BOND in an amount equal to at least five
(5) percent of the amount of the BID payable to "Board of County Commissioners",
HardeeiCourit,yFlorida, as a guarantee that if the BID is accepted the BIDDER will exe-
cute tht' CONTRACT and file acceptable PERFORMANCE AND PAYMENT SURETY
BONDS equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price within ten (10) days
after written notice of the AWARD OF CONTRACT. No bidder may withdraw its BID-for a
period of ninety (90) days after the date of Bid opening.
BIDS must be sealed and the outside of the envelope MUST be marked:
"SEALED BID - ORANGE BLOSSOM RV PARK LIFT STATION REHABILITATION."
Hardee County reserves the right to: waive informalities and/or irregularities in any BID,
delete any portion of the project; extend the project within the limits of the work involved
which in its judgment is in the best interest of the County. Bids may be withdrawn prior to
the date and time of bid opening. The County reserves the right to reject any or all bid(s)
and may postpone the award of the Agreement for a period of time which shall not extend
beyond sixty (60) calendar days from the Bid opening date.
Dale Johnson, Chairman 7:16c


It pays to advertise



in your Hometown



Newspaper



We are saving this space just for




YOU!





The Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage



115 S. 7th Ave.



Wauchula, FL




Telephone: 773-3255


down the 100,000 boxes to 6.6
million.
Florida specialty fruit saw no
change with tangelos holding
steady at 1.15 million boxes and
tangerines at 3.9 million boxes..
The yield for from-cpncentrate
orange juice (FCOJ) held
steady at an average of 1.66 gal-
lons per 90-pound box.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9.3 billion annual
economic impact, employing
nearly 76,000 people, and cov-
ering more than 576,000 acres.
Founded in 1948 and current-
ly representing nearly .8,000
grower members, Florida Citrus
Mutual is the state's largest cit-
rus grower organization. For
more information, visit www.fl-
citrusmutual.com.














WEATHER SUMMARY
Warm, humid conditions continued with scattered showers and
a downpour over the weekend for some areas the week of July 6-
12.-Daytime temperatures reached the upper 80s and 90s with lows
in the upper 60s and 70s. Major cities averaged highs in the 80s and
90s, lows in the 60s and 70s. The Panhandle received showers
between one and two inches in a few areas, but most of the rainfall
was in the central Peninsula. Hernando County received the most
accumulated precipitation of 5.19 inches.

FIELD CROPS
Peanut pegging continued with 55 percent complete compared
with 59 percent last year. Peanut condition rated 2 percent poor, 28
percent fair, 48 percent good, and 22 percent excellent. Corn,
peanuts, and hay progressed well in Columbia County with some
growers receiving their second cutting. Peanuts pegging was virtu-
ally complete in Suwannee County while corn growth continued.
Recent rains provided relief to the hay crop in Gadsden,
Washington, and Holmes counties. Growers were busy preparing
for the caladium festival in Highlands County. Nurseries continued
to struggle with the lasting effects of Tropical Storm Fay in Miami-
Dade County.


MoistureTopsil Subsoil
SRatin "This Last Last This Last Last
Ratng week week ear week week Year
Percent
Very short 1 2 2 0 0 9
Short 12 13 23 16 16 40
Adequate 73 71 69 74 73 46
Surplus 4'. 14 6 '10 11 5

VEGETABLES
Growers began laying plastic for the fall crop in Manatee
County. Extreme heat combined with moisture caused fungal dis-
eases for vegetable crops in Highlands County. Pumpkins and
sweet potatoes were in the ground last week. Harvesting of sweet
potatoes was in progress in Miami-Dade County. Growers planted
papayas and wrapped up the mango crop. Longans and avocados
came to the market. Columbia County producers harvested late
watermelons 'and peas. Watermelon harvest was in full swing in
Washington County. Okra was also marketed.

LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
In the Panhandle and northern areas, pasture condition ranged
from very poor due to drought to mostly good to excellent. Most
pasture grass received rain recently and the condition has signifi-
cantly improved. Cattle condition correspondingly improved due
to better pastures. In the central areas, range and pasture were fair
to excellent, with most in good condition. Pasture condition
improved due to rain. Some pastures in low areas were very wet. In
the southwest, pasture was mostly good; however, some locations
suffered from drought while other low lying areas were near flood-


July 16, 2009, The Herald-Advncate 7A

ed. The condition of the cattle was very poor to excellent with most
in good condition. There were plenty of flies and mosquitoes both-
ering livestock. Statewide, cattle condition was very poor to excel-
lent with most good.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 1 1 1 1
Poor 4 4 1 3
Fair 25 30 18 26
Good 55 50 60 45
Excellent 15 15 20 25
CITRUS
Typical summer weather continued throughout the citrus-pro-
ducing region. Temperatures were very warm again, with several
afternoon and evening rain showers pushing their way across the
center of the State. Highs reached the low to mid-90s in all moni-
tored counties. The most rainfall recorded was in the northern cit-
rus-producing region at just over three inches, followed by the cen-
tral region at one and one-half to two inches of rainfall. Harvest of
last season's fruit was complete. Growers focused attention on next
season's crop through fertilizations, nutritional spraying, and hedg-
ing. Most growers combated the citrus psyllid that causes greening
by using both aerial and ground spraying. Some growers with
heavy concentrations of greening chose to treat the groves or push
individual tress, while others pushed entire blocks. Overall, trees
and fruit made good progress in well-cared-for groves.


POLICE ASSISTANCE


COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchula Police Chief William Beattie (left) recently pre-
sented a service award to local insurance agent David
Singletary for his volunteer work with the department.
Singletary gives of his time to sit on advisory and oral-
review boards for city police.



Book Review
By Spessard Stone

'UNDER THE SHELTERING TREE'
"Under the Sheltering Tree - A Brief History of the Florida
United Methodist Children's Home 1908-2008" by Stephen T.
Hartsfield, who has served on the staff of the Children's Home
since 1993, chronicles the history of the Florida United Methodist
Children's Home from its:establishment in Enterprise in 1908 to its
ceptennial in 2008. , . .
Although the first Orphanage Committee by the Florida Annual
Conference was organized in December 1869, only a limited num-
ber of children were accepted, and they resided in the Methodist
Orphan's Home in Macon, Ga.
In 1896 the Florida Conference of the Methodist Episcopal
Church South \approved a resolution to establish a home for
orphaned children in Florida. It was not, however, until 1908 that
there was organized a permanent Board of Trustees of the
Orphanage to be located at Enterprise on Lake Monroe, five miles
from Sanford.
That first year began modestly with 14 children.
Thus commenced the founding of a Christian institution for
"getting the helpless ones" as the driving force and passion of the
Florida United Methodist Children's Home for 100 years.
From its genesis, the home has been staffed and supported by
Christians with a great heart for children, such as Emma Tucker,
whose property became the orphanage home.
The first matron was Hattie Greene Brooks, assisted by 'Miss
Hendry. Her successors included: Mrs. M.J. Gramling, Mr. and
Mrs. H.H. Hoffman, the Rev. W.A. Betts, Louise Stork, Mr. and
Mrs. H.B. Leach, the Rev. John R. Cason, the Rev. Smith Hardin,
the Rev. J.W. Austin, C. Roland Shannon, the Rev. W.M. Mullin,
the Rev. Harold R. Barnes, the Rev. Charles A. Thompson, Dr.
Bascom W. Carlton, the Rev. Dr. Edward L. Dinkins Jr., the Rev.
Alexander C. Carmichael IV, Scott Davidson and Mike Galloway.
Revenue for operation was a continuing challenge until as late
as 1940.
Besides the financial support of the churches, the children
worked hard tending an extensive farming operation, consisting of
gardens and farm animals, with canning services of fruits and veg-
etables contracted out to help raise money. Vocational training
also taught a variety of skills.
Through the succeeding years as the campus population
increased, new-buildings, including a-change from dormitory-style
living to individual family cottages, were constructed and pro-
grams begun to include increased awareness of and attention to the
clinical and therapeutic needs of the children, as well as the break-
down of the family.
Responding to the changing times, the home today is a diverse
ministry, which includes residential care, therapeutic. group care,
foster care, adoption services, emergency shelter care, independent
living assistance and a community child-care center.
For 100 years the Children's Home has reached out in Christian
compassion as a haven of peace and merciful blessing for the chil-
dren who have come into its care.
"Under the Sheltering Tree" contains 14 chapters, 93 pages and
138 photographs, most of which are of the children, but also of the
staff and buildings.
It is published by the Florida United Methodist Children's
Home, 51 Main St., Enterprise, FL 32725; phone (386) 668-4774.


COURTESY IMA(bi
The book's cover includes photographs past and pre-
sent. ,


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT
The Department of Environmental Protection hereby gives notice of its intent to issue a
construction permit (Permit File No. 0272939-001-UC) for the reasons stated below.

The applicant, CF Industries, Inc., P. 0. Box 1549, Wauchula, Florida 33873, applied on January
17, 2007 to the Department of Environmental Protection for a permit to construct one Class V,
Group 2, test injection well in order to obtain hydrogeological information to determine the
feasibility of recharging the Avon Park Formation of the upper Floridan aquifer with non-
hazardous surface water from the facility's wetland treatment system, which primarily consists
of storm water from on-site retention areas and minor amounts treated effluent from the City of
Wauchula. The project is located at the CF Industries Hardee Phosphate Complex, 6209 North
County Road 663, Bowling Green, Hardee County, Florida.

The proposed permit authorizes the construction of well TRW-1 with a 32-inch diameter surface
casing to +75 feet below land surface (bls); a 24-inch diameter steel intermediate casing to �750
feet bis; a 16-inch diameter steel casing to -�1,050 feet bls; and a 15-inch diameter open hole to
+1,250 feet bls. Two ground water quality monitor wells will also be installed, recharge zone
monitor well RZMW- 1 and shallow monitor well SMW- 1 at depths of approximately 1,250'and
700 feet bls respectively.

The Department has permitting jurisdiction under Chapter 403, Florida Statutes, and Chapters
62-4, 62-520, 62-528, 62-600, 62-601, and 62-660, Florida Administrative Code. The project is
not exempt from permitting procedures. The Department has determined that a construction
permit is required for the activity described above.

The.,D.partp.i5nt will issue the permit with the attached conditions-unless a petition for an
administrativ-piroceeding (hearing) is filed pursuant to the prbvisionds of Sections 120.569 and
120.57, F.S., before the deadline for filing a petition. Mediation is not available for this
proceeding.

A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) in accordance with Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be
filed (received). in the. Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Petitions filed by the permit
.applicant and the parties listed below must be filed within 14 days of receipt of this Notice of
Intent to Issue Permit. Petitions filed by other persons must be filed within 14 days of
publication of the public notice or within 14 days of their receipt of this notice of intent to issue
permit, whichever first occurs. Petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the
address indicated above at the time, of filing. Failure to file a petition within this times period
shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request an administrative
determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this
proceeding and participate as a party to it.
Any subsequent intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing
of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-5.207, F.A.C.

The petition shall contain the following information:

a. The name, address, and telephone number of each petitioner; the applicant's name and
address; the Department's permit file number; and the county in which the project is
proposed;

b. A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department's action or
proposed action;

c. A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the Department's
action or proposed,action;

d. A statement of the material facts disputed by petitioner, if any;

e. A statement of facts which petitioner contends warrants reversal or modification of the
Department's action or proposed action;

f. A statement of which rules or statutes petitioner contends require reversal or modification of
the Department's action or proposed action; and

g. 'A statement of the relief sought by petitioner which precisely states the action the petitioner
wants the Department to take with respect to the Department's action or proposed action.

If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate agency action.
Accordingly, the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this
intent. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any decision of the Department
with regard to the application have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding in
accordance with the requirements set forth above.

The application, draft permit, and fact sheet are available for public inspection during normal
business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except legal holidays), at the
Department of Environmental Protection, Southwest District Office, 13051 North Telecom
Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926.








8A The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009


:y -,� . ,. . . . .. 1 . '


Greetings from Fort Green!
Someone thinks the beautiful
area near the bridge on Hendry
Road is a' garbage dump.
Somebody called me and ad-
vised someone had thrown out
an old refrigerator and asked
me to put something in the
paper requesting people to be
more considerate of our little
part of the country.
This bay head is a beautiful
area full of trees and pretty
underbrush, flowers, ferns, etc.
Junior Abbott used to put signs
around the area, requesting peo-
ple not to dump their trash
there. With everyone having
garbage pickup, you would
think there would not be any
trash thrown out.
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Blink were
Winter Haven visitors Tuesday.
Mr. Blink had an eye appoint-
ment for some laser surgery.
He is feeling and seeing better.
Bailey Skinner had tubes put
in her ears on July 7. She is fine
now but has to be careful swim-
ming for a while.
Dale Chancey was having
chest pains and his son, Jeremy,
carried him to Lakeland
Regional where he was admit-
ted last Wednesday night. As
usual, plenty of tests were per-
formed. Donna Chancey and
Betty Spears spent Thursday at
the hospital and then Donna
was back again on Friday. This
is tiring, to stay with someone
in the hospital, but necessary.


When this column was writ-
ten he was still in the, hospital.
Hopefully by the time the
paper is published, he will be
better and back at home. There
is a sign on the Avon Park Road
that reads any chest pain is an
emergency, and we should all
heed it.
Carol, Holly and Hannah
Brown spent nearly a week vis-
iting her son, Johnmark and
family, in DeFuniak Springs.
Carol and the girls had a good
time.
Johnmark, Amy and children
Rebeka and Aaron came to Fort
Green last Monday. Everyone
who was lucky enough to see
them really enjoyed it. John-
mark is doing well with his
church, Friendship Baptist. If
you are up that way, stop in and
hear him preach.
Rebeka and Aaron remained
down in Fort Green for, a short
visit. Tuesday was Aaron's
birthday, and a big family din-
ner was had celebrating him
turning 11. Makayla Chancey
was included in the family, as
she and Rebeka were best
friends at Fort Green.
Wednesday, Randy and
Faye Davis and Norma Alejan-
dro and Rebeka and Aaron went
to Sea World. They had a super
time and came home on Thurs-
day. Faye said they never go to
Orlando without going to Bass
Pro. That place is addictive!
All good things come to an end,


Sports Update
By Joan Seaman


Winners of the July 4 Hannah House Golf Benefit Tournament
were: first - William Anderson, David Smedley, Manny Castanoy
and Earl Jacobs; second - Jim Davis, Bill Tewksby, Ron Bromley
and Justin Bromley; and third - Joe Lutz, David Singletary,
Spencer Decker and Mark Timmerman. Congratulations and
thanks for helping to raise funds for Hannah House.

Speaking of golf, Hardee youth are doing well on the Sertoma
Youth golf tour, which plays at various Heartland courses each
Thursday. Repent winners have included Daniel Miller, William
Beattie and, will Bennett.
Hardee hosted the Sertoma group last Thursday and did it right.
With the help of sponsors, the Wauchula Police Department,
Mosaic Mining, Singletary State Farm Insurance and Alan Jay
Ford, golfers and their parents were treated to hamburgers and
more, all the Gatorade they needed. Golfers and parents were
appreciative of the extras provided at Torrey Oaks.

Hardee summer swimmers literally got their feet wet in the first
meet of the season for most of them last weekend at the Tampa Bay
Invitational in Lakeland. Little Taleia Moreno, just turning 7 years
old, had Hardee's best offering of the day. For Hardee youth it was
an eye-opener seeing the competition they face.
The local contingent will participate in the Area 3-5. champi-
onships Aug. 1 weekend in St. Petersburg.

On the baseball/softball front, several Hardee teams went on to
state All-Star competition. Machine Pitch and ages 7-up T-Ball
went on for the boys and the girls Ponytails and Angels went on.
So far, we'vb only heard from the Ponytails, which won their first
two games, before losing two tough games, 6-2 and 1-0.

In the adult sports, Holy Child Catholic seems to have a lock on
the Women's Church League leadership, while Farm Credit leads
Community League Division I and Fuego's leads Division II.
Several of the recent games have been decided by a run or two.

Fishermen, a reminder that there TGIF Bass Fishing tourna-
ments every Friday at the Lake June public boat ramp from safe
light to noon weigh-ins. Cost is $25 per one- or two-man boat with
$20 going toward the pot and $5 for big bass. Call Steve George at
863-832-0603 or Geoff Balog at 954-303-1405 for more informa-
tion.

There's no official word yet on the 20 percent rule on high
school sport cutbacks. A women's group is challenging it and word
is that the Florida High School Athletic Association may revert to
allowing a full schedule for all sports. Hardee High athletic direc-
tor Val Patarini said Monday Hardee will probably stay with the 20
percent reduction in schedules because of the expenses.
FHSAA has approved some rule changes for softball and base-
ball.
In softball, the pitching mound will be moved back from 40 to
43 feet by the 2010-11 season, although the longer distance can be
used starting the 2009-10 school year. The intent is to put more
balls in play and keep the defensive players more active in the
game.
There's also an exception allowing unadorned hair devices,
bobby pins, barrettes or hair clips no longer than two inches to con-
trol a player's hair.
Finally, for softball, the winning pitcher has to pitch at least one
half of the total innings in a game. She can leave the mound, play
another field position and return to the mound and total innings
pitched is what counts.
For baseball, effective Jan. 1, 2012, the bat definition is amend-
ed to "a smooth cylinder implement from the top of the cap to the
top of the knob." All non-wood bats must meet the college NCAA
performance standards of a "batted ball coefficient of restitution."
In another rule change, an assistant coach cannot leave the
dugout or coaching box to dispute a judgment call by the umpire.
The penalty is that the head coach and that assistant are restricted
to the dugout for the rest of the game. In severe cases, both the
offending coach and head coach can be ejected.
In the final boys rule change, a batter is out if any member of
the offensive team or coaches interferes with a fielder's effort to
field a foul ball, except the runner. If the runner interferes with a
fielder, he may be out by player interference, but the batter would
not necessarily be out.
Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please e-mail me at news.heraldadvocate @embarq-
mail.com or call me at 773-3255 with news for this biweekly col-
umn. The sports news deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday, except for
events which happen over the weekend. They are due by noon
Monday.


so Faye and Pam Davis drove
the kids back home on the 13th.
A really good time was had by
all!
It's unbelievable that Rebeka



Cyclers Pedal


413 Miles For


Slain Officer


will be a freshman this year!
How the time flies!
Faye Davis Will man the Fort
Green kitchen again on Tuesday
the 21st as they are cooking
pulled-pork dinners as a fund-
raiser for the youth. Even
though I call dinner in the mid.-
die of the day, some people
don't, so this meal will be ready
at 11:30 a.m.!
Please remember to pray for
all the sick and our nation.
Call me with any news!


Stop In Wauchula
On Monday Night
Hardee County Emergency
Management will welcome the
"Brotherhood Ride" to Wau-
chula on Monday.
Brotherhood Ride will be
pedaling in memory of Ofc.
Andrew Widman of the Fort
Myers Police Department, who
was shot and killed when he
responded to a disturbance in
the early morning hours of July
18, 2008.
To honor Widman, the
Brotherhood Ride members
will pedal their bicycles 413
miles in six days, starting this U
Saturday with riders leaving
from the North Naples Fire
District and returning Thursday,
July 23, at the Fort Myers
Police Station. .
Their route will take them
through Arcadia, Wauchula,
Winter Haven, Cape Coral and
Punta Gorda.
Hardee County Emergency
Management along with the
* Hardee County School Board is
hosting their stay in Wauchula.
Riders will spend Monday
evening in the Hardee Junior
High School gym, at 2401 U.S.
17 N. in Wauchula.
If you would like to make a
donation or get more informa-
tion, contact Jeff Morse at (239)
633-7098 or Candy Morse at
(239) 872-1551. You may also
visit the Web site at wsww.bro-
therhoodride.com.









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NOTICE TO POTENTIAL HOMEOWNERS
Hardee County announces the potential availability of $350,000 under
the State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program of the FL
Housing Finance Corporation. The County's 2009/10 Local Housing

for financial assistance to home buyers eligible to receive the federal
first time homebuyer tax credit created through The 2009 American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM-
Funds will be based on availability and allocated to First Time Home
Buyers in an amount up to $8,000 for immediate aid with closing costs
and down payment for the purchase of a single-family home (no mobile
homes) located anywhere within the boundaries of Hardee County. The
assistance must be repaid when the applicant receives their federal tax
credit.

APPLICATIONS FOR HOMEBUYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Applications ,are available at Hardee County Community Development,
Courthouse'Annex, 412 W. Orange St., Rm. 201, Wauchula, or online at
www.hardeecounty.net. Refer questions to 863-773-6349.
NOTE: APPLICATIONS ON FILE WILL HAVE PRIORITY OVER NEW APPLICATIONS. PRIORI-
TY WILL CONTINUE TO BE GIVEN TO ELDERLY AND/OR PHYSICALLY IMPAIRED APPLICANTS
THAT MEET THE PROGRAM'S INCOME GUIDELINES.
7:16c









PAGE ONE


Resthaven Adds Day Care Freedom Festival Friday


-By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Herald-Advocate Intern
Age is inevitable.
With each day that passes we
all grow a little older, and hope-
fully a little wiser. To help us
along during our older years,
Resthaven has added brand new
features to make folks feel more
at home.
Resthaven has been around
for over 50 years, first as a
school, then the "county retire-
ment home," and then into an
assisted living facility. A-
Ithough this non-profit estab-
lishment has suffered from
financial downfalls, it always
seems to land back on its feet.
"We did go through some
financial problems this past
January, but the community has
helped and supported lest-
haven to the fullest," said ad-
ministrator Tina LeConte.
Since then, Resthaven has
made some additions to its pro-
gram. One addition is the
Limited Nursing Services. This
feature allows. Resthaven to
expand its services to the resi-
dents.
Other features include a part-
time day program, which is
available for $8 per hour, with a
minimum of four hours. The
program includes meals, snacks
and activities.
Another unique feature is the
waiver program. If the resident
has less than $2,000 in assets ad
$1,900 monthly income, a state
program will pay a portion of
the expenses.
"With the waiver program
and the additional features we
are adding to Resthaven, I
believe we will be able to self-


sustain in the near future," said
LeConte.
Resthaven is boosting up its
status through marketing and
advertising weekly in the com-
munity. The residence also has
a brand new Web site with a
wide range of information. Visit
http://resthavenl.wordpress.co
m to check out the custom-
designed Web site maintained
by LeConte.
Resthaven takes pride in pro-
viding residents with a home
like environment with personal
care, medication management,
trained staff on site 24 hours a
day, housekeeping services,
three well-balanced meals, per-
sonal laundry and linen ser-
vices, ongoing monitoring of
healthcare needs, local doctor
transportation, weekly on-site
beauty salon/barber shop ser-


vices, and weekly outings to
local historical sites and shop-
ping.
"It is important that we pro-
vide our residents with a com-
fortable living space. We are
among royalty, they are beauti-
ful," said LeConte.
Although Resthaven is great-
ly recovering from this year's
financial downfall, the commu-
nity is encouraged to continue
its donations. Other than finan-
cial assistance, Resthaven is
looking for volunteers to partic-
ipate in activities with the resi-
dents, such as bingo, card
games and visitation.
For more information on
Resthaven and its services or
how to become a volunteer, call
773-6000 or visit the facility at
298 Resthaven Road in the
Lemon Grove community.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
You like hot dogs? How
many can you eat?
Hold your appetite for hot
dogs until 7 p.m. Friday for the
hot dog eating contest, one of
the Friday Night Live events.
There will also be a water-
melon seed-spitting contest at 6
p.m., water ball toss and many
other activities from 5 to 9
Friday at this month's Freedom
Festival.
Main Street will be closed
from U.S. 17 to Eighth Avenue.
There will be no parking on the
lot between Heritage Park and
the city offices but there's plen-
ty up and down Seventh and
Eighth avenues, at the Elks
Club, or the city lots on both
sides of U.S. 17.
Main Street restaurants and
businesses will remain open
late, for shopping and dining.


From Cats On Main west there
will be several places to stop in,
pick up an item, have a meal or
'whatever. Several will have
specials or sales, frequent shop-
per cards or downtown incre-
ment cards with rewards.
At the park, there will .be
entertainment. There will be
Cajun, country and Blue-Grass
music by the five-person Porch
Dogs band, perhaps with a local
guest fiddler. Singing ventrilo-
quist Chere' and her friend
Leroy will serenade the crowd
with patriotic songs.
First Baptist Church Child-
ren's Ministries is partnering
with Main Street Wauchula Inc.
to provide lots of fun for the
children. Along with Lydia's
House, they will provide a pet-
ting zoo. Cowboy Up and
Reality Ranch will provide
horse rides. There will be crafts
and lemonade for 50 cents.


While listening -to - great
/music, stop at the library booth,
or one of two booths by the
Health Department for. informa-.
tion on children, or the tobacco-
free lifestyle.
Bring your lawn chair and
enjoy the evening. Main Street
Wauchula will have snow
cones, hot dogs or water for $1
or a Friday Night Live T-shirt
for $12 in kids or adult sizes.
"The past three months -of
Friday Night Live have been
a blast. The community has
really enjoyed and supported
them," said Jessica Newman,
Main Street director. "Don't let
the heat keep you at home.
There is too much fun to miss
what is going on downtown,"
she said.
For more event information,
to volunteer, call her at 767-
0330 or e-mail at jnew-
man@cityofwauchula.com.


Businesses Must Be Prepared


To Better Weather Disasters


COURTESY PHOTO
Robert Earnest, one of the volunteers at Resthaven, per-
forms all the lawn services with the help of a Gator donat-
ed by Buckhorn Nursery.


Ponytail State Run Ends


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Dixie Ponytails
started their state tournament
run on July 4 weekend with a
pair of wins.
That's the good news. The
bad news is the next two games,
where Hardee was defeated and
ousted from the double-elimi-
nation tournament.
On the 2009 Ponytail (ages
11-12) All-Stars are Kim Der-
ringer, Jakaysha Lindsey, Ana
Galvez, Kendall Gough, Addi-
son Aubry, Karlee Henderson,
Makayla Deuberry, Alex Ull-
rich,, Senaida Garcia, Bailey
Carlton, Lacey Cumbee and
Morgan Walters, who are
coached by Melanie Hender-
son, Julian Garcia and Max
Ullrich.
The girls were elated after
winning the District 7 champi-
onship with a pair of dramatic
wins over DeSoto, led by a pair.
of in-the-park homers by Lind-
seyand and another by Derringer.
They started the state series
on the same note, shutting out
Wahneta 10-0. Lindsey had
three solid hits and worked her
way around to home plate each
time she got on base. Gough
used two hits and walk to do the
same. Galvez had a pair of
tallies and Aubry and Carlton
each added another in the 10-
0' victory. Hardee pitchers
recorded eight strikeouts in the
win.
The .next game was harder as
the Hardee Ponytails barely got
past -Spring Hill 3-2. It was-a
pitching duel until the fifth
inning, when Hardee put the
first run on the board. Gough
singled and Aubry followed
suit, bringing Gough to home
plate after she had stolen sec-
ond and third.
Spring Hill answered with a
pair of scores in the top of the
sixth on a walk, fielder's choice
and pair of hits. Hardee tied the
game in the home half of the
sixth when Carlton and Garcia
both singled. Carlton stole
home with the tying run.
The game rocked along to the
10th inning without any further
scoring, both teams stranding
runners along the way. After a
three up, three down top of the
10th, Hardee got the victory


when Lindsey walked,and stole
her way home. Hardee recorded
a half dozen strikeouts.
It got more difficult as
Hardee moved to its third game
of the series, facing Belleview.
Hardee got the first pair of
scores in the home half of the
first. Lindsey singled, and
Galvez walked, stealing their
way around the base' paths to
home plate. I
Belleview took the lead with
triple tallies in the top of the
second on a pair of singles, a


I,


double and a triple. Another
score in the fifth and two more
in the sixth gave Belleview the
6-2 win.
Now in the loser's bracket,
Hardee faced Hernando in
another pitchers' duel. Hernan-
do got the only score of the
game in the top of the first on an
in-the-park homer. Hardee
struck out seven Hernando bat-
ters and 13 of the local girls
went down the same way, end-
ing their hopes of a state title
just a couple of games short.


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Herald-Advocate Intern
Hardee County is no stranger
to disasters and the destruction
they bring.
Ever since Hurricane Charley
hit in 2004, the county has been
working to build back its busi-
nesses and residents.
To better prepare businesses
for these unexpected disasters,
business analyst David Noel of
the Florida Small Business De-
velopment Center at the Uni-
versity of South Florida recent-
ly came and spoke with busi-
ness owners and workers at
South Florida Community
� College.
Lynn Topel, executive direc-
tor of Florida's Heartland Rural
Economic Development Initia-
tive Inc., began the meeting
praising Hardee County for its
preparation for Hurricane
Charley.
"Hardee County had more
plans put together than most
larger counties did. At a con-
vention in New Orleans, I spoke
about how prepared Hardee was
for any disasters," said Topel.
Noel focused on three key
points during the meeting:
increase small business aware-


ness, assistance offered by the
Internal Revenue Service and
outline a -disaster preparation
plan.
Sixty-eight percent of busi-
nesses do not have a disaster or
continuity plan, he said.
Because of the lack of prepara-
tion by businesses, very few
actually survive past a disaster.
Almost 40 percent of all small
businesses that close due to a
disaster never re-open, he
added.
"Many businesses believe
that after a disaster they can just
get a loan or struggle to recover.
The answer is not a loan, the
answer is being prepared," said
Noel.
Besides being prepared be-
fore disaster strikes, Noel also
taught that the key variable to
survival is to understand what
happened to the customer.: By
"getting on their level," you can
adjust your prices and merchan-
dise to better fit their needs.
After a disaster, many busi-
nesses can feel overwhelmed
and alone. Heartland Workforce
has devised a plan to better help
businesses and residents get
back on their feet.
The MAC, Mobile Business


Assistance Center, travels
around communities that have
been affected by natural disas-
ters. Inside of the vehicle there
are 13 computers with satellite
links.
To conclude the meeting,
Noel went over the many tips
small businesses are recom-
mended to do before disaster
actually hits. Keeping a record
of any important documents in
a safe location is a very impor-
tant part of surviving. It is also
important to come up with a
business continuity plan, he
said.
In that continuity plan, busi-
ness owners are recommended
to keep a large amount of
records at hand. Important doc-
uments , include employee
forms, supplier/vendor forms,
key contact information, busi-
ness function and recovery
location forms, vital records,
critical telephone numbers, sup-
plies form, computer equipment
and software form, voice/data
communications form and a
miscellaneous resource form..
For more information on how
to prepare and protect your
business from disaster, visit
www.FloridaDisaster.org.


I , - I ~I


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M .


'The Herald-Advocate

Thursday Jly 16. 200
Thursday. July 16, 2009


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Dor't Know Where
To Turn For Help?
CALL THE CRISIS LINE
1 (800) 500-1119


-- ---- I ~--�l�Mi��rmrsnu~a~I~--"-----~~







2B The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009





-Hardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO
Erin Jones & Kyle Pace

Erin Jones & Kyle


Pace Are
Al and Maty Nell-' Pace of
Wauchula announce the 'en-
gagement of their son, Albert
Kyle, to Erin Elizabeth Jones,
the daughter of Rod and Kristy
Jones of Tallahatsee.
The bride-elect is a 2003
graduate of Lawton Chiles High
School, and a 2007 graduate of


There's little risk in becoming
-overly proud of one's garden
because-gardening by its very
nature is humbling. It has a
way of keeping you on your
knees.


Engaged
Florida State University with -a
bachelor of science degree, in
studio art. She is currently
employed as a graphic designer
with Ron Sachs Communi-
cations in Tallahassee.
The prospective groom is a
2001 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School, and a 2006 gradu-
ate of Florida State University,
where he earned a bachelor of
fine arts degree in studio art. He
is currently enrolled in Talla-
hassee Fire School.
Plans are being made for a
Saturday, Aug. 15, wedding at
the First Baptist Church in
Tallahassee.


Thank You
We would like to than& evei'one who
called, visited, sent flowers and food. It
was nice to see how many good friends
he hach
The Family of Wendell Turner
soc7:16p Wenjea Turner Fischer & Family





&C5uezi a .f,7/d"e otu, wy zce /99 7

Piano & Violin Lessons
Instruments, Books &Accessories for Purchase
-^"-Piano Tuning
SSpecializing In Music Ministry Training
lInstructor: Mandy HfBell
(863) 773-4140 410 North Ohio Avenue, Wauchula soc7:16c


First Baptist Children's Academy
is now offering VPK!
Limited, Spaces
License Pending #CIOHA0517

-,- First Baptist
Children's
Academy

91._" U for the
____.-____ Fall 2009-2010
... School Year
License #152233
soc7:16,23c



Shrubs and Stuff
Lawncare and Landscaping




FREE Estimates From Professional Nurserymen!

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Daylillies * Hydrangeas
Gardenias * Confederate
Jasmine

AND MUCH MUCH MORE

3496 PEEPLES LANE, WAUCHULA !
781-3584 - MELISSA * 773-3557 - OFFICE


The Political Chat Session
met last Friday at The Panda
restaurant in Wauchula with 19
in attendance.
The subject of local govern-
ment, usually discussed at chat
sessions, was set aside to focus
instead on flag etiquette. Larry
Pelton, county Veterans Affairs
representative, spoke on the
topic.
Pelton prepared a packet for
everyone on the U.S. Flag
Code. He touched on such mat-
ters as the proper display of the
flag, saluting the flag, the
Pledge of Allegiance, the
National Anthem, and the prop-
er ceremony for the retirement
of a flag.
Those in attendance shared
their thoughts and ideas on
what the American Flag
means to them:
Roy Albritton said he remem-
bered the process of raising and
lowering of the flag when, he
was in school. Barry Edgley
said being in America and see-
ing how Americans honor their
flag makes him appreciate his
country's flag even more.
Frankie Vasquez said that hon-
oring and respecting the flag is
an important part of everyone's
lives. Steve Spinks said, "When
I see that flag, I see representa-
tion of self-determination."
Sam Fite also commented on
how the Scouts help handle re-
tirement ceremonies of the flag.
Bobby Hanchey and Donnie
Canary attended the group
meeting.
Hanchey spoke on the com-
mitment Wauchula State Bank
has made in displaying the flag.
He spoke on the maintenance of
the American flag located in the
parking' lot outside the Wau-


chula facility. He called it "the
community's flag," not Wau-
chula State Bank's flag. Hanch-
ey noted the bank purchases
two to three of these flags a
year, that cost in the range of
$1,200 to $1,300. ,
The Political Chat Session
presented Wauchula State Bank
with a certificate of apprecia-
tion for its display of the U.S.
Flag. Hanchey accepted the cer-
tificate on behalf of the bank.
The certificate was printed
over a photo of the flag at
Wauchula State Bank.
Gary Delatorre and Mark
Burrus commented on two top-
ics that will be up for discus-
sion. Burrus wants to discuss
the bid process used by the
Board of County Commission-
ers at last month's meeting. He
feels the process wasn't com-
pleted fairly. He will discuss his
opinion Friday. Delatorre com-
mented on some zoning issues
that will be discussed more in-
depth at Friday's chat, also.
The goal of the weekly chat
sessions is to improve the lives
of every Hardee County citi-
zen.
The group promotes commu-
nity involvement. Despite the
name "Political Chat Session,"
it does not disctfss party affilia-
tion.
Political Chat Session pro-
motes you, your opinions, your
ideas, your thoughts, your con-
cerns and resolutions to those
issues: Please attend when your
schedule permits. The next
meeting will be at the Panda
restaurant Friday at 11:30 a.m.
Coordinators are Chet Hud-
dleston and Steve Spinks. For
more information, e-mail Politi-
calChatSession@gmail.com.


COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchula State Bank's Bobby Hanchey accepts a certifi-
cate of appreciation for the bank's display of the U.S.
Flag.



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Paniels
At The Herald Advocate

--- -- --i


h


Your Child Will
Learn to Read! {
Free Evaluation
internationally Acclaimed Method
Children, Teens & Adults \
Academic ates Rose Mitchell-Freeman
AcaReading Instruction
"Learning Centers' (863)773-6141
I) soc7:16c


11ll IA


Sherry White Ministries, Inc.
Heaven Scent Thrq f Store
Supporting Local & Forign JItisions
* Lydia's House
* Pioneer Village
* Casa de.Lydia
* Dominican Orphanage
Your Donations Appreciated
Volunteers Welcome
Open
C Wednesday - Saturday
912 Hwy 17 South, Wauchula - 245-1184


JLE� fJIA


JOIN INTRO CHOIR
[ S---


COURTESY PHOTO
A community choir is forming to present two selections
on Aug. 9 in the 11 a.m. worship service before guest
speaker Anne Graham Lotz (above), daughter of evange-
list Billy Graham, speaks at First Baptist Church of
Wauchula. About 100 singers -from the community are
expected to participate in singing "In The Presence of
Jehovah," by Geron Davis and Lari Goss, and "Honored,
Glorified, Exalted," by Randy Vader and Jay Rouse. The
only choir rehearsal will be on Aug. 5 at 7 p.m. in the
church sanctuary. Music packets and CDs will be avail-
able at the church, beginning on Monday.To register, call
music minister Rev. Tim Davis and give your name and
the part that you sing. Contact him at the church office,
773-4182 or tdavis@fbcwauchula.org.

HABITAT HELP


COURTESY PHOTO
The Wauchula Woman's Club recently donated $500 to
Habitat For Humanity in Hardee County. Shown present-
ing the check to Habitat President Pam Warren (left) is
Woman's Club Treasurer Sandy Larrison.


-N LALONDE MUSIC
LINDA CASSELL-LALONDE
CERTIFIED MUSIC TEACHER

, 1332 DAVIS STREET
WAUCHULA FL. 33873
REFERENCES AVAILABLE
PIANO VOICE STRINGS BEGINNER THRU ADVANCED
MANDOLIN HARP WINDS soc7:9-30p 863-773-4480











FREE SEMINAR

Tuesday, July 21st at 10:00 AM
Hardee County Family YMCA
610 West Orange Street
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Seating is limited!
To RSVP, or for more information, call
1-888-359-3552.










www.BlakeMedicalCentir.com .
- -?---1fl


Political Chat Session

Promotes Involvement


E--�


mmmmr--l


F


.1





July 16, 2009. The Herald-Advocate 3B


ROTARY OFFICERS


MUSIC CONVENTION


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Outgoing officers of the Hardee Rotary Club are (top photo, from left) Lavon Cobb,
sergeant-at-arms; Nellie Garcia, treasurer; Ann Martin, secretary; Doug Andrews, past
district governor from Tampa; Valerie Andrews; and Juan DelaTorre, president. New
officers shown below are (from left) Sue Birge, public relations director; Lavon Cobb,
sergeant-at-arms; Lora Williams, secretary; Zee Smith, treasurer; the Rev. Harold Davis,
president; Doug and Valerie Andrews; and Claude Harris, vocational director. Not in
photo are Arnold Lanier, administrative director; Wes Roe, Rotary Foundation director;
Jeff Ussery, membership director; the Rev. Bob Lecocq, service project director; and
Candace Preston, youth projects chairperson.


J �


a children


E E A

g boutd(


1



]ue


Big Summer

Sale


Starting Monday July 20
All Spring & Summer Clothing
BUTY ONEl. GETONW FREE

of equal or lesser value
(No Limit to Buy 1 Get 1 Free Purchases)


210 W. Main tfroot * Wauchula
(863) 767-0017
. Mon-Fri 9:30-5:30 e* aturdag 9:30-1:30
Swww.hopjollyboans.com


COURTESY PHOTO
The Wauchula Wednesday Musicale was represented at the Florida Federation of Music
Clubs' 91st annual convention in Ocala in May. Among the activities for the three-day
convention was the installation of state officers. Michael Edwards of Plantation is the
new state president, replacing two-term president Connie Tuttle-Lill of Delray Beach
(standing, middle). Shown flanking her are Musicale President Jill Southwell (left) and
Recording Secretary Joanne Douglas; (seated) Musicale Vice President Judye Mercer
and Bay Ridge District President Bess Stallings, who also serves as the federation's
Member of the Year Committee Chairman and Florida Fellow Chairman. She introduced
and welcomed four new Florida Fellows and revealed the name of the 2009 Member of
the Year, Shirley Clark of Gainesville. The local club will join other Bay Ridge District
members in hosting the next federation meeting, the 2010 Fall Session.


Donations always
welcome
(during store hours, please!)


Christmas In July
* Trees * Gift Bags * Ornaments * Stockings
* Cookie Tins * Wrapping Paper * Much More
Hardee Help Center Thrift Store
123 N. 7th Ave. (across from Faith Presbyterian Church)
Non-profit outreach of Hardee County Ministerial
Association ALL income from Thrift Store stays in Hardee
County to HELP Hardee County residents.
Store Hours: 9:30 - 5:30 Mon. - Fri.
Open the first and third Saturdays ofeach month from 10-2 . 0


You Are Invited To An

Old Fashion Holy Ghost Revival

Thursday thru Saturday, July 16 - 18
7:30 Nightly
Sunday, July 19
Services 10 am & 6 pm
with Evangelists
/ Kenneth & Hope Wilkins
i I Apostolic Lighthouse
310 West Orange Street, Bowling Green
For more infor-nation call Pastor Bob Bates
863-375-3100 or 863-773-1017 sc7 916c

Swing Raffle
This swing was constructed and the material donated by Butch
Bowes, pictured on the right, of Zolfo Springs and donated to
Boy Scout Troop 813 at the request of Mrs. Rhonda Perkins to
be raffled off as a fundraiser for the troop. Chance drawing
tickets can be purchased by contacting any of the following:


Richard Nichols . . . .
Mon.-Fri. 7am-5pm
Max Baker . .. . . ...
SuOe Baker .:. . . . .


....... 863-773-3187

.... . .863-245-9087
. . . . . .863-781-2732


Tickets
$1 each
or
6 for $5

5- Drawing will be
held on Saturday,
August 22 at 3:00
pm at the pavilion
in front bf the
Ullrich Building at
Pioneer Park.
You do not have
to be present to
win.


k.. . . . soc7:16p


---I---g I --


sOC7 16C


I







4B The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2000


Fifteen children graduated
from First Baptist Children's
Academy in a graduation cere-
mony on May 14.
The students in the graduat-
ing class recited individual
Bible verses selected by their
teacher, Carisa Barwick. Each
of the'other academy classes
sang two songs and recited
Bible verses. Scrapbooks were
prepared by the staff for each
student, giving parents a keep-
sake of their child's year
through pictures and artwork.
First Baptist Children's
Academy has over 100 students
in the pre-school program and
more than 30 students in the
after-school program.
Academy Director Vickie
Conerly stated, "FBCA is mak-
ing a vested interest in the spir-


itual and educational growth of
our students. The use of Wee
learn curriculum, one of the
state-adopted curriculums, is
helping to prepare children for
school, and we have a chapel .
service every Wednesday morn-
ing giving students a unique.
opportunity to learn how to par-
ticipate in a worship service."
During Teacher Appreciation
Week, the staff of FBCA was
honored by a luncheon given by
the parents to show their appre-
ciation for all the love and care
given to their children.
To conclude the school year,
all of the 3- and four-year-olds
took an end-of-the-year trip to
the Hands-On Museum in
Lakeland, followed by a fun-
filled lunch at Chuck E
Cheese's.


The academy's 3-year-olds sang at the graduation ceremony.


Plans for next year are under
way as FBCA applies to be a
voluntary pre-kindergarten pro-
vider and remodels its facilities.
Once VPK certification is re-
ceived, the academy will be
using another state-adopted cur-
riculum provided by Saxon
Publishing that will adequately
prepare more children to be
successful kindergartners.
The 2009 graduates are:
Hunter Atchley, Treasure Cam-
el, Brinson Conerly, Saraly
Diego, Tori Durden, Lillie Gay-
don, Nabi Mumin, Hannah
Souther, Emily Sheffield, Caie-
den Richardson, Evelize Quint-
ana, Sylvia Preston, Presley
Gilliard, Cody Best and Cason
Gough.


Alan Permenter, associate pastor of families, passes out
diplomas to graduates.


COURTESY PHOTO


Gwynn Mahoney thinks grocery shopping is a fun task at
the museum.


Travis Tubbs

Graduates
From Webber


Tubbs


Travis Tubbs graduated on
May 2 from Webber Inter-
national University in Babson
Park with a bachelor's degree in
general business studies.
On June 8, Tubbs started
summer workouts as the quar-
terback and special teams coach
for the Lake Region Higli
School "Thunder" in Eagle
Lake. His future plans include
working toward receiving his
certification in teaching., r
Tubbs, a 2005 graduate ot
Hardee Senior High School, i,
the son of Talmadge and.Cyndj
Albritton of Wauchula. ....


Stephens Family
Reunion Is

On Saturday
The annual Stephens Family
Reunion will be held this
Saturday at New Zion Baptist
Church.
The gathering will begin a
11 a.m. Visiting and reminisce
ing will continue until 3 p.m. I
Those who will attend thd
family reunion are asked td
bring a basket lunch and tea o#
lemonade. Tableware will be
furnished..


HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS


Teacher Appreciation Week featured a luncheon. Shown here (from left) are Candace
Conerly, Holly Clark, Missy Hughes, Stacy Sharp, Jamie Rewis and Diane Bryan.


Future firefighters are (from left) Wilney Francois, Josiah Lazano and Josh Block.











A
*ade 0out







Fabif YC


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Rich Shepard, Hardee County emergency management director, spoke to the Rotary
Club on Wednesday of last week at the Java Cafe in Wauchula. Shown (from left) are,.
Lavon Cobb, Shepard and club President Harold Davis. Shepard's topic was hurricane-%
preparedness.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255\...


The Staff, Board Members, & Ladies at Hannah House
thank all of you for your support of our
First Annual'Goif Tournament Benefit

Torrey Oaks - Volunteers - Golf Players

Gold Sponsors
Mosaic, FINR, Doyle Carlton, III, and Others '
Silver Sponsor
Joe L. Davis
Bronze Sponsors
Chapman Fruit Co., David Singletary Insurance

Hole Sponsors
Wauchula State Bank, Philip & Faye Brauchlar, Tito & John Terrell, LaVoq
Cobb, Alan Jay Automotive, Aarons, Dale Johnson, Farr Groves, Inc., Duck &
Susan Smith, Hanchey's Carpets, Albritton Insurance Services, Sevigny Eye Care

Door Prizes Donated By
Ace, Olive Garden, Pioneer Restaurant, Winn Dixie, Sweetbay, Royals,
Giovannis, Klassics Salon & Spa, and Sandy Barrett

Grand Prize TV - Donated by Badcock of Wauchula
Winner - Reid Crews
If anyone wants to contribute or be a supporter of Hannah House ministry please contact us by phone: 863-773-5717
(office); Mail P.O. Box 339, Wauchula, FL 33873; Physical address: 113 N. 7th Ave., Wauchula (office).
, soc7:16c


15 Graduate From First

Baptist Children's Academy






July 16, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 5B


SLEEP ON IT!
The next time you need to solve a problem, sleep on it.
Networks in the brain may help you find solutions while you are
asleep.
During one phase of normal sleep called rapid eye movement
(REM) sleep, we experience jerking eye motions, irregular and
shallow breathing, relaxed muscles and increased heart rate and
blood pressure. This phase is about 25 percent of our total sleep
time for adults, and about 80 percent of the sleep time for babies.
REM sleep is known to improve our memory function and it boosts
creative problem solving, possibly by causing the brain to make
new associations between unrelated ideas.
Vividly recalled dreams mostly occur during REM sleep.
In a study on REM sleep at the medical school at the Univer-
sity of California, participants were tested in the morning and again
in the afternoon after a nap with REM sleep. The persons who
reached that level of sleep in their nap did 40 percent better in
answering questions than the ones who did not reach a REM cycle
in their nap or those who only quietly rested.
A good night's sleep of 8-9 hours for most people is absolute-
ly vital for good health. Children and teens need to have a set bed-
time and stick to it.
Lack of sleep may lead to anxiety, depression, obesity, type 2
diabetes and impulsiveness.
Mandated bedtimes do us all good, helping us to reach all the
phases of sleep necessary to feel rested - and maybe even to solve
problems!


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

PITY THE POOR ATHEIST!
He must try to make sense out of his existence, but without
God, what sense can anyone find?
The atheist tries to live by the Sermon on the Mount. He has,
to admit it is the finest, highest morel teaching in history. But he
cannot identify the author.
The atheist admires the wonders of nature, the sun, moon and
stars and the physical diversity of a thousand animals, fish and
birds, but he must struggle to believe that all of this amazing, spec-
tacle-happened by chance!
The atheist is baffled by the universal prevalence of evil. The
Bible teaches that this evil got a foothold in human nature when
Adam and Evil sinned in the Garden. But how does this apply to
20th century living if there is no divinity?
Why don't people grow up, discover that evil unproductive,
then reject it? Why don't people get smarter, generation after gen-
eration? Is there a connection between this and the Bible report that
God punishes those who disobey HIm, and so He has "given them
over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not conve-
nient" (Romans 1:28)?
And hardest of all, the atheist must look at the cross and see no
divine purpose, no sacrifice, only the useless, meaningless death of
a carpenter's son in faraway Palestine.
It's a tough job being an atheist! He needs a lot more faith than
a C hristiri ! . . -, -


S-M 'Museum Musings
SBy Sandy Scott
' Cracker Trail Museumn Curator

CASES READY FOR NEW DONATIONS
Cracker Trail Museum has been undergoing some changes
during the past several weeks.
Located in the "Case Room" of the museum are 38 glass
showcases that hold miscellaneous items ranging from fossils, anti-
que firearms, early farming implements, Seminole Indian items,
physicians' equipment, school memorabilia, agricultural pieces,
photographs and household items.
As items are being donated, it is becoming more of a challenge
to find adequate space to properly exhibit them, so some rearrang-
ing of previous acquisitions has now been completed. The cases are
now housing items of like nature, and with this move several cases
have now been made available for additional donations.
One area that had not been represented very well was that of
the military. While two cases hold donations of the Civil War era,
there was no available space allotted to World War I, World War II,
Korea or Vietnam, However, even if the space would have been
available previously, Cracker Trail Museum only has less than a
dozen acquisitions that would represent all four of those eras.
By regrouping miscellaneous areas, the museum now has three


Q: Following a workout, is
it better to eat or not?
A: If your exercise routine is
a low-level, moderate activity
like walking, special attention
to food or drink is probably not
needed - especially if you are
trying to lose weight. However,
after a strength-training work-
out or vigorous sports or
endurance exercise, food and
drink are important to future
success. The first one or two
hours after a workout are
known as the recovery period.
During this time, changes in
hormones and blood flow to
muscle offer a unique window
of opportunity where nutrients
can have extra impact. Sports
nutrition experts highlight three
priorities during this recovery
time: replenishing fluids lost
through sweat; providing carbo-
hydrate to restore muscle glyco-
gen (the carbohydrate fuel mus-
cles use during exercise); and
providing protein to promote
repair and rebuilding of muscle.
Eating a full meal within this
time frame is not necessary, but
a snack is important. Most
sports nutritionists suggest
about 50 to 100 grams of carbo-
hydrate andj 0 to 20(grams of


protein, depending on body size
and intensity of the workout.
Examples include: cereal (or a
cereal bar) with milk; fruit and
yogurt; bread with sliced
turkey; or a sports drink or juice
with nuts. If you choose -foods
with, enough carbohydrate,
plain water is suitable to meet
your rehydration needs.


empty cases awaiting donations that perhaps many of you are stor-
ing in attics, chests and scrapbooks. These items may represent a
time of your lives that you served in the military, and Cracker Trail
Museum is interested in sharing these times with the rest of Hardee
County. If you would like to share some of the military memora-
bilia with us, please contact us at 735-0119. Even if you have some
of your photographs during that time and you do not wish to donate
them, we can scan the originals and return them to you.
Other space has also been made for more- of a selection of
items representing the Hardee County school systenT. Perhaps you
have old report cards, photographs, commencement programs or
any other grammar school and high school memorabilia. Were your
relatives involved -in the teaching of our Hardee County young-
sters? Contact us so we may widen our collections.
Additional case space is awaiting items from the medical prac-
tices in Hardee County. Currently, there is a good selection of items
used by Dr. Wesley Pyatt of Bowling Green and the medical bag
belonging to Dr. Alfred Massam. Obviously, over the years of
Hardee County history, there have been a number of physicians
who have practiced and whose relatives may have miscellaneous
items that could be represented in those cases.
Clybs including service organizations, 4-H, Boy Scouts, Girl
Scouts and the Grange, businesses including service stations, eat-
ing establishments, boarding houses and grocery stores, industry
including packing houses, salvmills and turpentine stills and agri-
cultural including farming and cattle ranching - these are but a few
of the entities that make up the history of Hardee County.
Many of you have photographs and miscellaneous keepsakes
that have special meaning to you that represent a significant time
of your lives. Cracker Trail Museum would like to fill these newly
opened spaces to include items that would complete the story that
it is trying to pass on to our new generation.
You, like W.T. Payne, may not be sure whether Cracker Trail
Museum would be interested in some of your precious keepsakes.
But, I think you will find that we want to share your memories with
the rest of Hardee County. Mr. Payne discovered very early in his
visits to Cracker Trail Museum that, yes, of course, we are inter-
ested in the items that once were used by his father and grandfather
in earlier years.
Won't you share yours with us as well?


Juypeia


Freedom Festiv

Sponsored B



MAIN STREET
KITCHEN

Friday, July 17th from 5:00pm-9
Main Street Heritage, Park
Downtown Wauchula

Live Entertainment:,

Porch Dogs

Singing Ventriloquist Chere & L

Presenting of the Colors Cerem

Join in the Watermelon Seed Spi
Contest, Hot Dog Eating Conte
Water Ball Toss, Water Activitie

,Shopping & Dining, and Fun for All

Bring Your Lawn Chair and
Join Us Downtown!
| Ij U LA /

Event Partner: FBC Children's Min
For more information call 863.767.0330


r


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tt
s
s
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S BREAKFAST
2x Pancakes or EggsYourWay,
SiBisCit&L HOmeFries or Grts,
Sausage GMMVy Bacon, Ham or Sausa

1| ^f^^1$i-99^^^


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OOpm









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ony

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stories
7:16c


S.and ich Specals6 0N4
wih rnchFries & 'Soup ^^^^c~cg~^^

More Homemae Specials n Our Boar


Ar ----------- ---m------------


I


S DINNER
S Take $1 off of all Dinner Entree
Ask your server for the daily specials & dinner for 2
Kids eat for $2.49 (kids menu only - 1 child per adult)
o Glors Homemade Desserts
r $99 with any dinner
I - - Must bring in coupon. Coupon Expires 7/30/09
L --- - -- - -m--6--mI--------- - --m- - J


J


~

f


CARRY OUTrr ONLY
1/4 ried Cdcken (dark meat only) wIh2. sides $3.99

GLORIA'S RESTAURANT
U.S. Hwy 17 N. * Bowling Green
375-9955
6, a.m. 1Fr at. ' & Sun. I't 3 P.z.


Nutrition
Notes


Thank You
On behalf of the St. Louis Family and
The Summer Youth Program

The car wash benefiting the Sevenns St.
Louis Family Fund was a success. The
community support was overwhelming and
greatly appreciated. The St. Louis family
and The Summer Youth Program would
like to thank everyone for their support.

Thank You and God Bless
7:16c


-I


I


FRIDAY 01
SEAFOOD NIGHT QF11'] CI(i
tfisil

Crab Legs Dinner I lb. $14.99
Boiled Shrimp Dinner $8.99 for 20
or $15.99 for 40
Soup & Salad & 2 Veggies offBoard
M=j


- � � � 19 1


I


ti


I


:


n\l


1,


I'


I


i






6B The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009




The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


A & C Lawn ServieO

Complete Lawn
Maintenance

Aaron 863-781-2813
Chridty 863-781-6739 .



p wiff'Bb' ivres


New Tires Include
Free Mount & Balance


Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires


BIG SRLE
O N ftLL TIRES.i

773-0777 * 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)


VISja '-


BEST TRAVEL DEALS


(863) 375-DEAL


Wanna Go Somewhere
But Not Sure Where?

I CAN HELP

Call Chrystal or
email
getvacationdeals@yahoo.com


;- ..;', lg: a


w




c17 16c


(3325)


Classifieds


TRACTOR, 5ft. rotavator tiller,
$1,000 for both. 767-1205. 7:16-
23
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2009/10 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 9:4tfc


2002 FORD EXPLORER, new
tires, new brakes, very 'clean,
$3,500 OBO. 863-245-8911.
7:16-30p
2001 DODGE INTREPID, runs
good, looks good, $3,000 OBO,
781-7198. 7:16p


" :- " ,I*iii ii

� - GILLIARD -

FILL DIRT INC.
* Fill Dirt * Rock * Sand * Shell
* Pond Digging * Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


FOR SALE
1989 Double Wide Mobile Home: located within Crystal
Lake RV Resort at 2413 Lilly Lane, Wauchula. 2
Bedroom & 2 Bath. Air Conditioned front porch,
attached carport with functional utility / storage / work-
shop area, central A/C unit. $ 25,900.00.
For more information contact:
Sam Fite, Collections Officer
sfite@fnbwauchula.com or
863-773-4136
cl7:9-1 6c


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green
375-4441
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK * SE HABLA ESPAROL
["Bu Here " 1 No Iere-si
Pay Here!' .SoFrch~ge










214 E. Orange S. - Wauchula
(across from Klassix),
* All New Appliances have Manufacturers Warranty
* Service ALL Brands of Appliances
*$60.00 for 30 min of Service
Parts Additional
* Parts for ALL Makes!!
Appliances available in all price ranges



781-7680
Trained * Licensed - Insured * Pr-fessional Service


863-397-9840
1 BRnosriick Rad * RBowlino Green. Fl


.





www.gatorheatingandair.com
Gator Heating-Air-Mold Inspections LLC
, ,, | l , -,. - 1 -1 ,'n .: , I ' - . ' , , , * *


200 FLORIDA HOMES
including 17 in the Tampa/St.Petersburg area


THURSDAY
AUGUST 6th * 7:00 PM
Tampa Marriott Westshore
Get your next home at the price you set with NO STARTING BIDS. If you're
buying your first home or your 10th, today's housing market and low inter-
est rates make this an ideal time for you to buy!
GBB et llThei Deta is At3


I FLHouseAuction.com


OR CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE
866-509-4473


HUDSON &
MARSHALL


OPEN HOUSE:
Saturday & Sunday
August 1st & 2nd
1:00 to 3:00 PM


Successful bidders will be required to put down $3,000 per property. The down payment MUST be
in the form of CASH or CASHIER'S CHECK made pa'yale to the bidder's name. 5 . premium on
each sale. All sales subject to seller's approval.
,H&MAB110 B.3 Hiiason Jr BK3006464 AU?30.
P.A Harll SL534399 DT 'Werbb BK53.398 SW Marshall AU2939 cl7:9-30c


- NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY -
ALAN JAY AUTOMOTIVE NET-
WORK is hiring motivated sales
representatives for ALL of our
automotive dealerships. Must
have exc. written, verbal & phone
skills, and a great attitude
Training wages, commission,
salary options, plus bonuses,
spiffs & benefits. Fax your
resume to (863) 471-2974 or
e-mail, to Wayne.phillips@alan-
jay.com. EEO/DFWP 7:16c
STORE CLERK NEEDED for non-
profit, send resume including ref-
erences to J. George, P.O. Box
422, Wauchula, FL 33873.
7:16-23c
ALAN JAY FORD of Wauchula is
looking for a Ford certified
mechanic. Call Theresa at 773-
4113. 7:16c


A DIRECTOR is needed for a
Christian daycare. Credentials
preferred. Please apply at New
Hope Baptist Church, 1999 SR 64,
Wauchula. 7:16p



2005 3BR/2BA M.H with appli-
ances and A/C, 1015 Bluejay,
Village at Charlie Creek, $49,000.
Seller will may closing costs. 863-
412-8932. 7:9-16c ,
OWNER FINANCING with down
payment, 2006 MFH, 2100 sq.ft., 5
acres, 5BR/3BA major appli-
ances, great condition. Sacrifice
$165,000 negotiable. By appoint-,
ment. 941-923-7888 leave mes-
sage. 7:2-23p


ObamaI s Giving Away
Why Don't You Get Some?





* Energy saving improvements & upgrades
* Replacement windows, doors & siding
* Kitchen & bath - large & small remodels
* Commercial construction & remodels
* New homes & additions
SHandyman

SEWA HT (863) 385-9403
( CONSTRUCTION Toll Free (866) 365-6119%








Joe


I N ..


Kenny Sanders
(863) 781-0153


RE A


L T R 318
(863) 773-2128


[I L REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
L| .t 'JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
You may qualify to receive a grant
for down payment assistance on your new home.


NEW LISTING! 3BR block
home, central A/C w/1 car
garage in Wauchula Hills.
$110,000!
PRICE REDUCED!
3BR/1BA home on 0.72� ac
lot near Lake Francis, Lake
Placid. Roof & A/C fairly
new. Furniture included. 3
utility sheds, pole barn, &
back yard pond. Wild
turkeys & deer frequently
visit. $69,000!
5 lots in Wauchula w/over
975' total rd frontage. Close
to hospital, schools & shop-
ping. Call for individual lot
prices. Buy all for $95,000!
Eastern Hardee Co! 9.6�
acs w/330' of frontage on
SR64, zoned A-1, conve-
niently located between
Avon Park &, Wauchula!
$150,000!
Longing for peace & quiet?
3BR/2BA 2007 MH
w/1980�SF on 5� acs.
Includes 30'x18' detached
garage w/2 bay doors,
1/2BA, electric, loft.
$179,900!
5� acs w/paved county rd
frontage in Eastern Hardee
Co. $62,500!
10� ac Valencia grove w/two
4" wells, pump, micro-jet ir-
rigation, drain tile $95,000!
10� acs w/beautiful oaks on
paved rd borders state land.
Deed restrictions to protect
your investment. $225,000!
3BR/2BA CB home,
1,744�SF total & 1,560�SF
living area, spacious living
rooms. Close to schools &
shopping. $125,000!


MUST SELL; owner mov-
ing; reducing price to take a
loss! 3BR/2.5BA, 1600�SF,
CB home includes new
Rheem A/C, laminate
floors, appliances, roof,
kitchen. 2-car carport, CB
storage shed, 150'x125' lot.
$155,000!
4BR/2BA frame home close
to schools. $55,000!
Grab your canoe, paddle,
tent! 5� acs w/deeded access
to Peace River is native
Florida! Culvert in place!
$100,000!
Weekend getaway cabin!
Sits on 22� ac fenced pas-
tureland w/established
oaks, 4" well, 2 barns, pri-
vate rd! $220,000!
Investment, agriculture,
homesite? You choose w/this
12� acs of land on SR64!
Fenced, w/cleared pasture
& trees $180,000!
Stellar location w/dble rd
frontage! 10� ac Val grove
has 6" well, diesel power
unit, drain tile, micro-jets!
$130,000!
Immaculate 3BR/2BA CB
home w/hardwood floors,
tile in kitchen, & bath. Big
privacy fenced back yard
looks great! $138,000!
What a great price! New
3BR/2BA, 1700�SF, CB
home in Zolfo Springs
w/carport, large yarfl,
tile/carpet floors! $140,000!
Frontage on SR66! 11� ac
fenced pastureland also
fronts Nursery Rd, zoned A-
1! Priced to sell at $139,000!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS..........781-0153 SANDY LARRISON....... 832-0130
JUAN DELATORRE.......781-1128 MONICA REAS...............781-7110
DAVID ROYAL................781-3490 KAREN SUMMNIRS.........781-7633
) .S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCIflJLA, FL33873
SI ci' I


THE PALMS 7

Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through July 31st
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)
* Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
* Open, quiet country setting.
* Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa Drive.
* Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
* Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental 'Office Hours Mon - Fri 1:00 - 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
. (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 .
"SS. Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider 7 :2-30c


II


-I


'


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-------, -


I


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UP TOB
2.5%B
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[,*i tI I ,














The


July 16, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7B





Classifieds


27 FT. MH, 87 mode, located in
Orange Blossom RV Park, lot
#59, Hwy. 17, Bowling Green,
$6,000. 8q3-245-6401. 7:16p
HOUSE, BARN, 10 acres, in west-
ern Hardee County,, quick sale,
$150,000. 941-730-1152.
6:25-7:23p


BEAUTIFUL MALE GOAT, $75,
hogs and pigs. 245-1184. 7:16c


FOUND: Female Jack Russell,
Peace River north of Heard
Bridge Rd. 781-1316. 7:16nc


Flore & Fl re InI II!1


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.nt,
. - ( " Y


John D. Freeman


SPECIAL O/ THE WEEK


K 1.53 h nome on ,12 acre - outsiae ciy lmits -
/ large pole barn. $78,000.00
Mobile H6me with 7.5 acres located approximately 3 miles east of
Wauchula on Airport Road. Home has 5BR, 2.5BA - metal roof
and Central air / heat. Lots of room for a horse or livestock, fenced
and cross fenced. Backyard has some chain link fencing and pool
(above ground) with a wood deck. Lots of room for a large family
close to town. $199,000.00
3BR 1.5 Bath CB home - Central air & heat - Carport - Corner
lot - New flooring - New paint job - Ready to go. $95,000.00
3.41 acres of good land with 3BR 2BA MH close to Popash. Cental
air & heat - Outside storage - close but with a lot of privacy
$119,000.00
Best mobile home location '-3BR/2BA well maintained mobile
home in Downing Place. Close to shopping - hospital and restau-
rants REDUCED TO $69,900.00
3BR/2BA MH with carport and enclosed porch located in Downing
Place - Convenient to all services - appliances included $69,900.00


WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!


ER


Remember
Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can
access them anytime!


QOUAL OUS0N5
OPPORTUNITY


Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
* Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net


After ho
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955
John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Jessie Sambrano


Tony Flores (863) 781-0744
Steve Lanler (863) 559-9392
(863) 245-6891 c79c
-68919


TABLE .AND CHAIRS, all wood,
$100; big screen TV, $200 OBO.
375-4068. 7:16p
EZ GO GOLF CART, electric, 36
volt, runs very good, excellent
tires with 2 spares. 863-245-2360.
7:16p
1984 350 BOX TRUCK, new
motor, $1,800 OBO; 30 ft. 5th
wheel; 2 axles utility trailer; 5x9 1
axle utility trailer; 8x16 1 axle util-
ity trailer; 10x4 1 axle utility trailer.
Call 863-375-2270. 7:16p
NORDIC TRACK SL728 exercise
cycle, good condition, $75. 375-
4443. 7:16-23p
230 VOLT PLASMA cutter. Cuts
metal up to 3/8 inches thick.
Purchased 2008. Used twice, still
under warranty. Must sell! Call for
details. 781-5365. 7:16p

MobleHome-


14x40 PARK MODEL with appli-
ances and AC as is, you move,
$5,000 OBO. 954-560-6351. 7:16p


FREE KITTENS, litter trained, in
house, 735-0744. 7:16nc
GERMAN ROTTWEILER puppies,
2 female/2 male, AKC registered
parents on site. 863-949-4132 or
863-512-6157. 7:16-23p
TEACUP CHIHUAHUAS, 5 fe-
males/2 males. 863-949-4132 or
863-512-6157. 7:16-23p
FREE - 8 year old male Rottweil-
er, great watch dog, needs good
home in country (never been
chained). 781-7165 or 781-9336.
7:16nc
NOW READY - Bull Mastiff pup-
pies, registered males and
females. Kelly 781-1637 or
www.yellowtter.com. 7:16-23p
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Afiimal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh


I BUY

HOUSES

781-1062


'-, 7
/


1 I %-P L %I.PAW
" Billy Hill



R ,____- ,: --Y-_Y

KELLER WILLIAMS�

An,,idepwudtenf&'Qvned B rOu e
Mikey C~iding
Realtor
(863) 781-1698

midfloridalistings.com





* 127 acres, Fish Branch Road, $5500/acre.
* 155 Acres of beautiful native Florida Hunting Land. All woods.
" Great location. Over 1/2 mile of winding creek bottom. Call for
more details.
* Asking $6,000/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 28-32 acre parcels or buy as a whole 60 acre
tract. Call for more details..
* Zoned commercial 8.s acrescorner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $220,000. calls




Buy Here- Pay Here


A Restocked With *
t New Inventory

--- -------
$500 OFF I
I any Vehicle with Coupon
SMust Bring Coupon

t Running Specials r


Monday - Thursday
10 am to 7 pm
Wauchula


Friday & Saturday
10 am to 7:30 pm
Wauchula Hills
Corner of Hwy 17
and REA Rd.
IJ 773-2011


I Pets


I aU I


ATTENTION! State Statutes SATURDAY ONLY 8-12-Close out
828.29 requires that all cats and sale on all trees; maple, elm,
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8 magnolia, Cypress palms, pine &
weeks old, have an official health oak trees, $5-$15. Hundreds of
certificate, have necessary shots ' free plants. Starke Ave. off East
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh Main St., Bowling Green. 7:16p


FREE KITTENS 863-781-2045.
- *7:16nc
THE BARKER SHOP starting
soon Pet of the Month drawing.
Call for all the details. 773-0547.
7:2-30p


'98 FLEETWOOD PROWLER 5th
wheel, 36' camper, triple slide-'
out, $7,500. 781-7165 or 781-
9336. 7:16p


FOR SALE
2003 THOR �kyDeck 34' 5th Wheel Travel Trailer.
Has 2 slide-outs, large kitchen, with observation/party
deck on top. Great for races, hunting camp, etc.
Nice, clean ... Asking $18,000 OBO.
For more information contact:
Sam Fite, Collections Officer
sfite@fnbwauchula.com or
863-773-4136


EMPLOYEE
LEASING
OPTIONS , INC.
Robby Albritton
Payroll Services' * Workers Compensation *
* Year End W-2 's * 941 Tax Reports *
Office (863) 735-9226 * Cell (863) 528-7085 * Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East * Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
ralbritton@eloinc.net ci7:16c' www.elonic.net



LONES TAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.'


CUSTOM HOMES
REMODELING


* STEEL BUILDING
CONCRETE


GENERAL CONTRACTOR '
Lice #f291103615
863-773-4779
"QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE


crd717 I


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions
Licensed and Insured Reg.#MV-40625
"TNo job's too big."




5101 N. Hwy 17 * Bowling Green

Mike Adcox 375-4461 CarlKelly
Manager ASE Certrfied Mechanic




JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 * Evening (863)773-4774
. www.jimseerealty.com
. 4James V. See, Jr., Broker * James V. See, Sri, Broker


REDUCED! 100 acres in SW
Hardee "County. Scattered
Oaks and Pines on this beauti-
ful site. Great hunting. On
County road. Four 4" wells.
Asking $5,000 per acre.
Bring the horses! Country liv-
ing just outside of town in a
great family neighborhood.
Large 2 Bedroom/1 Bath home
with detached 2 car garage.
Office that-could be 3rd bed-
room. All newly updated on
2.5� acres. $175,000.
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house 2 1/2
acres, in area of nice, new
homes. Large uncompleted
addition. Must see. $200,000.
Adorable 3 bedroom/2 bath
home. Large backyard with
workshop, shed and gazebo.
Interior beautifully remod-
eled. In town. $140,000
COMMERCIAL LOT! NEED
VISIBILITY? - Put your busi-
ness here! Located on North &
South bound Hwy 17. North
end of Wauchula. Zone C-2.
$195,000
Commercial property. 1.28�
acres. Frontage on Main Street
and Hwy 64. $120,000.
Two mini-ranches! One is
5.95� acres, the other is 6.65:�
acres. $99,500 each


Three 5 ac tracts located on
Johns Rd. Well located on one
of the tracts. Price Reduced!
$89,900 each.
Three adjacent 5 ac tracts
located on East Main Street in
Wauchula. Price Reduced to
$74,900 each.
Great Opportunity for possible
DUNKIN DONUTS location!
Approximately 1/2 acre on cor-
ner of US 17 and Stenstrom Rd
in Wauchula. 2,550� SF build-
ing, built to Dunkin Donuts
specs. Partial equipment \in
place. Sell or Lease, call for
details.
One of a kind development
property. 300� acres in Sara-
sota. Hamlet designation.
700� acres in Eastern Sarasota
County. High & Dry. Hamlet
designation. Plenty of paved
road frontage.
45 ac citrus grove. Valencias &
Hamlin. Double wide mobile
home. Fruit proceeds included
(subject to FOM contract).
Located in NE Hardee County.
$427,500
140 acres with 3 homes on Hwy
64 West. 12 miles from 1-75. A
portion of the property is
approximately 4,000' long.
Plenty of room for landing
strip. $1,800,000.


SRealtor Associates
Ben Gibson (941)737-2800 Robert Jones
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242 John H. Gross
Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161 Rick Knight


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017 ,
(863)781-1396 I


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478




Free Estimates
Insured - 30+ -jears experiei ce
cllO:2tfc


Total Car Detailing
2 /4E. Orange St. * Wauchula


Every Friday a saturday
Complete Detail
For more info
Call Donavan 863-781-7680


Hardee County School Board
Employment Vacancy
Position: Transportation -,Mechanic
Requirements: High School Diploma or Equivalent required.
Valid Florida Class B CDL. Minimum of 2 years experience as
mechanic
Salary Range: $22,936 - $31,890 (Per Salary Schedule)
2009-2010 School Year
Benefits Included
Contact Personnel Dept. (863) 773-9058 c[7:16c


Azalea Apartments

Now Renting! Immediate Occupancy!
2. 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental rates beginning at $426
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

860 Pleasant Way * Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
- Monday' - iday
- 9:00a.M. - 12:00 o ooo


Equal Opportunity Employer- & Provider
rl7 9.16c


IPQU IOUSNI
OPPORTUNITY


r-.


I 9P " IM A IV X7 d-% T T " C, A Im 1D Yr, T T'l, I


I








8B The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009






-The


Classifieds


U
FOR RENT - 4.5 acres In Golden
Oaks, Zolfo Springs, 3/1 mobile
home, newer zone 3 model. $600
per month & $600 sec. deposit.
No indoor pets or smoking. Must
have good credit report. Call
Dennis @ 772-530-7047.


6:25-7:23p


-0
DUPLEX APARTMENT in good
neighborhood, Wauchula. No
smoking, no pets. 2BR/1BA, $550'
monthly plus deposit. 781-3570.
7:9-16c




Genuine Orthopedic
Foam encased sides
Waverly -
Was $594 now $297
Pegasus -
Was $695 now $397
Westmorland -
Was $1199 now $597
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North * Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600


Used

Furniture

for Sale
(In Storage)
Rattan Chairs (4) $5 each
Kitchen Table (tile top) w/4
chairs w/ built-in leaf $200
Dining Room Table w/4
padded chairs and leaf $400
Double Bed w/mattress &
box spring, dresser $50
Couch (hide-a-bed) w/match
ing love set $350
Coffee Table and 2 matching
end tables $75
Lamps $50 set
Recliner-Dark Green $50
Washer & Dryer $200
Large Bookcase $50
7' Artificial Christmas Tree
$20
Patio Furniture love
seat/two chairs, glass top cof-
fee table $100
Computer Desk w/file draw-
er $75
Club Car electric golf cart
$1,500 (batteries less than one
year),
Fiberglass Ladder-6' $40
Hose cart/reel w/50' rubber
hose $20
18" TV set-old but works $15
Also: misc. dishes, pots and
pans, and pictures

Call
863-370-0002
cl7:16c


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Spacious 4B/3Bth home on 5 acres; C/B and
frame construction, 3614 sq. ft. living space,
over 600 sq. ft. mother-in-law suite, outside and
inside storage, convenient location. $295,000

New roof and new paint on this 3B/lBth con-
crete block home, central H/A, screened porch,
corner lot, fenced yard, outside storage.
$144,000

Lovely home in family neighborhood, 2B/2Bth,
large master suite, 2 screened porches, outside
storage, sprinkler system with separate well.
$54,900

ONE OF A KIND! 2 bedrooms, cozy cottage
with fireplace, hardwood floors, lots of storage
space, huge 30x18 storage building. Call Delois
to see this home today! $128,000,

This is a must see! 3.16 Acres and 3B/2B manu-
factured/MH built in 1990 with large rooms,
fireplace, screened lanai, in ground pool, 12x20
metal storage. $125,000

A GREAT DEAL! 2005, 24x44, D/W mobile
home, peaceful location, Smithbuilt shed has
electricity and 12x16 porch. $73,000

EXECUTIVE C/B Stucco home; 4B/3Bth, fam-
ily room with fireplace, stainless steel appli-
ances in large kitchen, lovely yard with under-
ground sprinkler system; desirable location in
Wauchula. $279,000
.Investment Property - Heritage home,
3B/2Bth; plus 4 rental units, currently rented,
tall ceilings, hardwood floors, plenty of extras
in this listing. Call Charlotte for details.

I SERVICE YOU
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743


2BR/1 BA SFH, large fenced yard
in city, $650, first, last and securi-
ty. 863-491-8110. 6:18-7:16p


3BR/1BA AC, heat, 2 duplexes
available, $1,000 monthly, first,
last deposit in Sebring, Juanita
Wright 863-781-0982. 6:18-7:16p
HOUSE & APT. FOR RENT - 773-
6667. 7:16c
OFFICE SPACE for rent. Call 773-.
4466 for more Information. 4:9tfc





Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North * Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot g
863-382-0600


U

MODERN LARGE DUPLEX in
Bowling Green, 3BR/2BA/2CG
each unit. Must see! $800 month
+ security. 863-443-2903,
www.bghomes.com 4:2tfc
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
12:20tfc


WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack UIIrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc


* MOVE-IN SPEC
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B fro
monthly. 1BR from $300 r
No pets, low deposit. I
school & hospital. Citrus
MHP. 863-698-4910 or 69
Se habla espanol.


IAL *
im $400
monthly.
Next to
s Valley
)8-4908.
7:31 tfc


ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation'
based on race, color, religion;
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh
,.._. -- ---?

DeSoto County





EASY FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com |
1-941-778-7980/7565 ?.


For Rent

Apartments

1 & 2 Bedrooms

817 E. Main St., Wauchula

Sammy 781-0707
"HOMFON E 7:16-8:6c


"HOME ON THE RIVER"


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net

2B/lBth, completely furnished M/H; large
screened porch and nice yard. $38,000

Well maintained C/B Home on 11 Acres!
3B/lBth; large fireplace, enclosed porch; great
garden area. A MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!
$225,000
Nice lot with small house and good pole barn;
road frontage on Hwy 64. $45,000
30 acres of pastureland in secluded area; small
pond has natural flow of water; perfect for
home site or small ranch. ALL OFFERS CON-
SIDERED and POSSIBLE OWNER FINANC-
ING! Call Delois today.
5 acres with fruit trees, large oaks and 1 acre
pond; this would make a lovely home site.
$110,000
Beautiful 5 acre tract with paved road frontage;
make an offer on this 5 acre tract. Listed at
$90,000
14.74 acres, nice sloping tract with large pond;
some native trees; very secluded. $195,000
10 acres with 12" well; perfect for your new
home. Call Delois Johnson for more informa-
tion.
1.2 Acre Commercial Lot on Highway 17; high
traffic area. $100,000
1.37 acres; 2" shallow well located on Main
Street, outside city limits. $43,500
2.76 Acres with 2" well located Highway 64
West. $49,000

CAN COUNT ON
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker 2
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


'JL I_ LL


EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER for
you elderly/disabled. Bathing,
dressing, laundry, doctors visits,
meals, companionship, errands.
773-3781' or 405-802-4501.
Bonded/references. 7:16-8:6p
BEST TRAVEL DEALS - 863-375-
DEAL (3325) - Need help booking
a hotel, airline tickets, cruises,
group outings? Wanna go some-
where but not sure where? I can
help. Call Chrystal or email getva-
cationdeals@yahoo.com. 7:16p
LYNCO INC. - Large & small jobs,
all types of removal, fully licensed
& insured. 863-735-0525 or 863-
245-9737. 7:9-8:6p


JIM'S LAWN SERVICE -
Complete lawn care, mowing,
edging, trimming, weeding, tree
trimming, estimates. NO job to
big or to small. 781-4641 or 863-
832-2138. 7:9tfnc
AFFORDABLE HOUSE CLEAN-
ING. Call Cissy 'for free quotes.
863-304-3069 or 850-571-8060.
7:2-30p
NEED SOMEONE TO manage
your rental property? We screen
applicants through a background
check, collect rent, coordinate
repairs and continuously monitor
property through inspections. For
more information call All About
Rentals at 863-781-0767 or e-mail
allaboutrentals@ymail.com.
7:2-30p
R&J COMPLETE LAWN .CARE
and pressure washing, small
engine repair, reasonable rates,
locally owned and operated. 781-
1443. 7:2-9:3p
PAUL'S SMALL ENGINE REPAIR
taking care of ALL your lawn
mower needs. Guaranteed lowest
prices. Parts at discount prices.
773-4400 or 474-1172. 7:9-30c
BEAT THE BAD economy from
home. Free sign up and website
www.isxperia.com/betterhealth,
or Lee 863-221-6288. 6:25-7:23p


DIVORCE

BANKRUPTCY

669

863-314-0846
(non-lawyer)
cl5:28tfc


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently
owned and operated.


Jerry Carlton
781-3608


"W.R. SMITH LAND Clearing &
Tree Removal Services Inc. -
Land clearing - demolition - tree
removal; Fencing - barbed wire,
field fence, board fence; Tractor
work - bush hog, disc. Code
enforcement clean-up discount.
Ag pole barn construction. Will
Smith, owner/operator. 863-781-
0158 or 863-773-3557. 4:9-9:24p
CITRUS TREE REMOVAL -
Cheapest rates, by the hour or
contract. Free estimates. C.
Wilson 863-767-5349. 4:2-8:20p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula, and Friday and Saturday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First Methodist
.Church, corner of Grape and
Church St., Bowling Green.
12:6tfcdh
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP. Every
first and third Wednesday night at
6:30 p.m. Located at the SFCC
Annex, Room #105, Hwy. 17
North, Wau-chula. 735-2511.
tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
dh


-DO' YOU NEED A WEBSITE
BUILT? Call Doug 863-397-9840.
5:7tfc



REFRIGERATORS, BEDS, bunk
beds, tables & chairs, all on sale
Saturday. We have lots of reclin-
ers, curtains, priscillas & all kinds
out front on table. 767-8822.7:16c
SATURDAY - 8-?, multi-family,
705 N. Illinois Ave.,Wauchula.
7;16p
HUGE -HUGE - huge yard sale -
Friday and Saturday, 1366 Dena
Circle, Golfview Estates. Do not
miss Everything must gol 7:16p
3 FAMILY- Saturday 8-?, Palmer
Apartments on 8th Ave., Wau-
chula. Baby, kids, adults, furni-
ture, and ATV. 7:16p
ELLEN'S THRIFT SHOP, 4709 N.
Central, Bowling Green. Electric
stove, refrigerators and lots of
misc. Next to train depot. 7:16p

Perennials are the ones that
grow like weeds, biennials are
the ones that die this year
instead of next, and hardy
annuals are the ones that
never come up at all.


10 HOURS A
MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA

(863) 773-2122 .FAX (863) 773-2173
www.cbhardee.com

Gary Delatorre - Broker


Nancy Craft Richard Dasher
832-0370 781-0162


LOTS OF WILD GAME surrounds this 6.15
Acres on beautiful Peace River with natural
Florida flora. Call for more information
$125.000
REDUCED!! 96.900Q5.5 Acre tract zoned F-
R great for building, has 52X101ft. slab
already on site. Call for information.
NEED MORE ROOM? spacious 3/2 home
with a total living area of 2,244 sq ft. that's
close to Peace River. Reduced! $124.900
PORTRAIT OF PEACE! When you build
your home on this 5.58 acre tract Only
$110.000
TOWNHOUSE!! 2 BR, 1.5 Bath with Central
H/A, Great starter or retiree home. $50.000
COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT PROPERTY
onUS 17 North. Approx. 1 acre. Motivated
Seller!! 299000
MAKE OFFER!! 5 ACRES- serene wooded
acreage
ONLY 45.Q01.1 BR, 1 Bath home, WHAT
DEAL!

7.33 ACRES surrounds this 5 BR/3Bth/2
Car Garage home with inground pool, also
includes many extras. $350,000
OUTSIDE CITY LIMITS!! 3BR, 1Bath, spa-
cious living room, large kitchen, stove and
refrigerator, beautiful oak trees shading
front yard. $95,000
Vacant residential corner lot, $12,500
2BD. 1 BTH on 27.5 Acres, approx. 12 Acres
in early And Valencia oranges, plus much
more. $325,000
BJAUTIE.L 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath M/H in nice
neighborhood recently updated. $75,000
DOUBLE WIDE M/H $92,000 with 3Br/2Bth
l2 B/1BATH well maintained CB home with
large family room for entertaining, has
fenced back yard and many extras! OLY
$79.900


Victor Salazar Donna Steffens
245-1054 781-3627


A REAL BARGAIN!! Lovely M/H lot on
Downing Circle, Only $9.000 Call Nancy!
PURRRFECT!! CUTE AS A KITTEN this
3BR, 1 BTH home includes stove, refriger-
ator, nice fenced yard $115,000
WAUCHLA HILLS CONVENIENCE STORE!!
All new building ALL new fixtures, NEW
Coolers, All inventory, including Video
Recording Alarm system, with 2/1
Apartment in back $400.000
INVESTOR'S DREAMII Main Street
Business Including building, business and
all Inventory. WHAT A BARGAIN!!
$200.0001!
GREAT LOCATION FOR NEW BUSINESS!
Over 2 acre frontage on US 17 N and North
florida Avenue. Access from both high-
ways, $415.000
$190.00011 3 BR, 2 Bath possible 4th BR,
Beautiful hardwood floors, living room, din-
Ing room, kitchen, den, office, front and
back porch with total Sq ft. 3,716. CALL
TODAY!!!
ONLY $68.00011! 3 BR. 2 BATH M/H Owned
Land on Downing Circle includes stove,
refrigerator, wacher, dryer, and some furni-
ture.
DOWNING CIRCLE!! 3 BR, 2 Bth D/W/M/H
includes refrigerator, stove, dishwasher
with total living Sq Ft. 1,291 for $Z2.500.
RECENTLY REMODELED! 4 BR, 2 BTH
home with Central H/A and nice Fireplace
on 2.9 acres Including many extras and
Fruit trees in yard. REDUCED!! $155.000
3 BR, 2 Bath with 1,236 total Sq Ft. living
area. OnIy 75.00$
3 BR, 2 BATH HOME on fenced large lot
also Includes sprinkler system Jacuzzi tub,
shed/workshop with car lift installed.
$124.900
2 BR, 1.5 BATH TOWNHOUSEl! $24.600
COUNTRY LIVING in this 3/2 Doublewide
M/H with 5 Acres $95.00 c117:16c


Simply 4U Computer Repair, LLC.




Serving ardee & DeSoto Counties


7:2-7:30c


Home with 5 ac on

Beautiful Peace River

$275,000

Call Ken Sanders (863) 781-0153
at Joe L. Davis Real Estate (863) 773-2128


: 1M


_ ,,


1 I I �








r,^,'t O *" ***"),'1 2 ,6Jfi:' S
U" )" Uc."S I- jm
RUNA V I Y 0 OI-,, I
-I- i IFS [ L I 0 HISO TORY
"1 1H~I f1Ii t o',j l


Men's League Adds Games


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 'revised schedule now has
the Men's City Softball League
playing its games through Aug.
11 before beginning a double-
elimination tournament.
The addition puts games on
three fields on Mondays and
only Fields 3 and 4 on Tuesdays
and Thursdays. The Monday
games will begin on July 27.
At the end of last week, Farm
Credit continued to lead Divi-
sion I with a 5-0 record, fol-
lowed by La Floresita at 4-1,
then Western Pleasure Karaoke,
Country Club, Charlotte's Web
Pub and CF Industries.
Fuego's is still atop Division
II, with a 4-0 record, followed
by Mosaic Fertilizer at 3-1, then
Hardee Merchants, Nemesis,
Blacklist, Peace River Electric
Cooperatives's Legion of Doom
and FINR (Florida Institute for
Neurologic Rehabilitation).
Many of the games last week
were close- encounters. The
Tuesday early game on Field.4
ended 4-3 in favor of Farm
Credit over Charlotte's Web
Pub.
Justin Conerly, Phillip
McGee, Dale Carlton and
Chase Best all smacked doubles
for Farrm Credit, but it was
Cody, Keith Revell, Conerly
and Bucky Leonard who came
around to cross home plate for
Farm Credit.
Ryan Thomas,' Teddy Svend-
son and Jason Evans doubled
for Charlotte's Web. Rocky
Sonnier joined Svendson and
Evans in coming around to
score.
Field 4's Tuesday late game
was a marathon but also close,
with Western edging Country
Club 24-22.
Eric Cobb, Eric Mushrush,
Dino -Torres and Jesse Aguilar
circled the bases three times
each for Western. Roy Rodri-
guez, Johnathan Pleger, Mich-


ael Wetherington and Gabriel
each added twin tallies.
Hank Butler banged a homer
and pair of doubles and leadoff
batter Travis McClenithan
joined him with four scores
apiece for Country Club. Jerry
Welch, Luke Prine and Scott
King each added three runs.
Meanwhile, on Field 3, FINR
downed PRECo 24-13 in the
Tuesday 6:45 game.
Ches Graham homered twice
and Yogi Lozano homered and
doubled three times to lead
FINR. Rene Guzman, John
Wallace and Lozano were each
four-score batters, with Dale
Roberts, Billy Hernandez and
Graham each adding three
more.
Mikey Driskell homered and
Jeffery Albritton tripled for
PRECo. Billy Alexy, Darryl
Keen, Bill Alexy, Darryl Hen-
derson, Scott Driskell and
Mikey Driskell each circled the
bases twice.
In the Tuesday 8:15 game on
Field 3, Nemesis won 28-23
over Blacklist.
Elias Ramirez homered and
tripled for Nemesis. Austin
Helms added a pair of triples
and pair of doubles. Jesse
Reyes, Rigo Briones and Helms
were each four-tally batters.
For Blacklist, it was Briant
Shumard socking a pair of
homers and James with three
doubles. Patty Dawg and James
each crossed home plate three
times.
Thursday's opener on Field 3
continued the close games, with
La Fl9resita winning 19-16
over Charlotte's Web.
Sam Rivera homered and
doubled, Julian Garcia Jr.
homered and Willie Gilliard hit
four doubles for La Floresita.
Gilliard crossed home four
times and Eddie Strange added
three runs.
Sonnier tripled twice and
doubled for Charlotte's. He was


the only triple-tally batter. Troy
Brant. Ted Svendson and Gor-
don S. each added two runs.
* In the Field 3 nightcap, it was
Country Club 20, CF 10.
Kellon Durrance had the hot
hand with two homers, a triple
and a single for Country Club.
He scored five times. Travis
McClenithan added three scores
and Butler, Leroy McClenithan,
Chris Altieri, Tater Fuller and
Tony McVay added twin scores.
Teddy Cornett homered to
pace CF. Logan Thomas dou-
bled twice and Daniel Rucker,
Josh Schneider and Shawn
Rivers also doubled for CF.
Weston Johnson, Rivers and
Cornett were twin-tally batters.
In the Field 4 early game on
Thursday, Fuego's nipped
PRECo 11-10.
Jose Perez and Rob Torres
each circled the bases twice for
Fuego's. Osles Lazarre, Raul
Garcia, Ryn Heine, Eric Virgile,
Fred Hodges, Paul Samuels and
Eric G. each added a run.
PRECo countered with lead-
off batter Brian Alexy, who
doubled, tripled and singled to
score three times. Mikey Dris-
kell and Vent Crawford each
added three runs and Keen
added the last tally.
In the week's finale on Field
4, Blacklist slipped past FINR
16-15.
Brian Pohl homered and dou-
bled and Brian Schofield dou-
bled twice for Blacklist. Lead-
off batter Keith Nadaskay and
Pohl each circled the bases
three times. Justin Painter,
Schofield, Chad Knight and
Cody Greene added twin tallies.
Blum homered twice and
doubled twice for FINR. He
was the only four-score batter.
Hernandez added three scores
and George Sandoval, Lewis
Martin and Wallace added two
runs apiece.


SE. 0. Kof h Construction!

1417 Swank Ave. * Sebring, FL 33870

(863) 385-8649

LOOKING TO Commercial


BUILD? Residential .

UILB9 Construction
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial
property, build your dream home, or do your remodeling.

SEAMLESS GUTTERS

6 inch GUTTERS 5 inch GUTTERS
$3.89 fl II $2.75
PER LINEAR FOOT Specials PER LINEAR FOOT

DON'T WAITI Low PRICESPONiLY GooD THROUGH MAY 301 .
"For all of your Aluminum, Steel, and Conventional Construction needs".'-
Email: kochcon@strato.net 2 , State Certified License


HEARTLAND PHARMACY

Sebring Wauchula
6360 U.S. 27 N. Sebring / Avon Park 1123 US 17 S
(863) 385-5588 Delivery Service (863) 767-892'

Now serving Highlands and Hardee Counties.
"We put our V into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file - then transfer them back when you go home.














Sue Lobato, Crystal Contreras, Red Camp - Pharmacist, Pauline Ochoa and Dara Massaline
Hours:
L Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm * Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


0


Name: Elvis
. . Breed: Hound
.- " Sex: Male
Color: Red, White Blaze
* On Chest
Age: Young Adult
Coat: Short
Tail: Long
He ain't nothing but a hound dog that
.needs a loving home! Elvis is playful and
is good with other dogs.

Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320
if you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel location is 685
Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.




Holy Child Continues Leadership


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With only three games last
week, the standings have
changed little in the 2009
Women's Church Softball
League.
Holy Child Catholic picked
up another win last week, giv-
ing it a 5-0 record. The nearest
opponent is first Methodist
Church of Wauchula with a 2-1
record and two rainouts. Its
game against third-place First
Christian Church last week was
rained out.
First Christian lost to Holy
Child and is now tied with
Alpha & Omega/Freedom Min-
istries, both with 3-2 records.
Rounding out the standings are
San .Alfonso's Chapel, New
Vision Worship Center and
New Hope Baptist Church.
Last week began with the
Tuesday early game rained out.
New Vision and New Hope


were able to get in the late
game, which New Vision won
15-14.
Ann Talley led New Vision
with three scores. Brittany
McMillian, Haleigh, Beverly
Pauley and Valerie Smith each
added a pair of runs and
Kimberly Holt, Donna Smith,
Christina and Sandra Holt each
crossed home plate once.
New Hope countered with a
pair of tallies apiece from Jessi-
ca, Peggy, Sharon, Summer W.
and Amanda B. Beth Radford,
Monica R., Mellanie H. and
Courtney each. added a run.
Both games on Thursday
were played. In the opener,
Alpha & Omega went on a tear
to top San Alfonso 38-5.
Leadoff batters Jodi Griffin,
Sami Jo Morgan and Lori Dees
each circled the. bases six times
for Alpha & Omega. Glenda
Eures added four scores, four
players had three runs apiece


and another pair had two each.
Five players had solo scores
for San Alfonso's. Melindh Sil-
va, Carmen, Reshonea Lamp-
ley, Priscilla and Irma Arch
each came around to cross
home plate once.
In the Thursday nightcap,
Holy Child beat First Christian
18-11.
Liberty Mushrush paced
Holy Child with a quartet of tal-
lies. Briana, Susanna Castillo
and Jamie Buckley each came
home three times, Tita and
Aurora Santiago twice apiece
and Lucy Garcia added a run.
For First Christian, it was
leadoff batter Kimberly Miller
with three trips around the base
paths. Tara Santoyo, Jessica
Hays and Paige Massey were
twin-tally batters and Erica
Deaton and Angel Lang
chipped in with a run apiece.


The Herald-Advocate
(usMss78b7so)
Thursday, July 16 2009


ONE


The Hardee County


Chamber of Commerce


Now accepting applications


for











Please call the chamber at



773-6967


for an application or email


hardeecc@hardeecc.com


This program is for
Chamber Members only.


Deadline for applications: July 31, 2009
7:1 6c


L ~C9~P �-�- L


�- `` -L


'% I- o


.


All-










2C The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009





Schedule Of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
t . . b ",.,
S- , wa ul :


Deadline: Thursday 5 p. -

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening :..... .......... 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................ 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. - 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd - ...........
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................0:30 a.m.
Youth Group - Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. - 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............ 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. - 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..............:...6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 . - 375-2253
Bible Study ...............9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .........l..... 10:45'a.m:
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets - 375-2340
Sunday School .:...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road - 773-9013
Bible Connection ................ 9:45 a.m.,
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .... ........... 6:00 p.im.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m:
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. - 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. - 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School ..................:...9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m."

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. - 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of Mason Dixon & County
Line
781-5887
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
SBread of Life - Sunday........12:15 p.m.
The Meeting - Tuesday..........6:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ........ ........ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico. ...............6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .... ...........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs .................... 7:30 p.m.


ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. * Limestone
Conmn.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane - 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training........... :_-.::.6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane - 773-2540
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. - 494-5622
SSunday'School...... .......... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
..............................................6 :30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service ................ 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service.......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
.863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m;
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel),
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations
CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East - 773-3447
Pastor - James Bland
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
. CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.


773-4576


WAUCHULA
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. - 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..... .........10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ........ ............. 11:00 a.min.

. COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Marnes Oracion .................... 7:00 p.m.
Juieves Servicio....... ......... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .... ............ 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio...............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. - 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service...... ........7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CIIURCIH
114 N. 7th Ave. - 773-2105
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .... ............. 1r:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .... ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.mn.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
*OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave - 773-3800
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ..............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. - 773-4182
Sunday Bible Study ..............9:45 a.m
Sunday Morning Worship....I1 :00 a.m
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m
Wednesday Sr. Adult Bible Study
.............................................. 10 :00 a.m .
Family Bible Study ............6:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. - 773-9243
SUNDAY
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins.. 10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast....... .............10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ..........10:45 a.m.
Worship Service. .............. 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for Nursery-5th
grade......................... 6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages PreK-12th
grade...................6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ... .............10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ...... ..... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.m .
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. - 773-4267
Sunday School ................9...9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
.Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.:
Sunday School ................9...9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship. ,...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult * Children & Youth

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship,... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. - 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. - 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .....................9:30 a.m.
W orship................................10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min ..........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA COMUNIDAD
de fe Wauchula


322 Hanchey Rd. - 773-0065
Sunday Service..................... 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
Friday Service...................... 7:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to fainilia y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ........................... 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................. 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
,767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
- ENGLISH
155 Altman Road - 1131
Sunday Service .................... 2:00 p.m.
Thursday Evening................ 7:30 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
- SPANISH
Sunday Service .... ............ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening .... ..... 6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities (All Ages)
. .......... 7:00 p.m .
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 0:00-a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
. 767-0023 .. .
Morn. Worship ....... ........ (Ist & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor ......4:00 p.m..
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. - 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
.Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .....:.........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. - 735-0321
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road - 773-2858
1" & 3' Sun. Communion ..10t00 a.m. *
2" & 4"' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 1:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road - East Main - 773-
5814
Sunday School ................9...9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ............1...10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.


RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East - 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...9:00 a.m.




SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ...............:....6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. - 773-6418
Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m .
Holy Days ......................................

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road - 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish)......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m .
(Spanish)............... 1 :00 a.m.
(Creole)................... .1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH


WAUCHULA

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship. . 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:.30 p.m.
Friday W orship ........... ..........7:30 p.m.
.TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morhing Worship ..............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stly.
& Child Train. ..........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:d00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fain. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCIIULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD*
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School'.................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ...............,..7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ............... 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................:..10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evenifig Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
SHwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church - 735-0871 Pastor - 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...:............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............1:. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7...:00 p.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee - 735-0114
Bible Study .......................... 0:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 - 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer .:.............7...:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524 - 77340989
'Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
W orship......................... ..... 11:00 a.m.
Evening.......... ..... ....... 1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet...,7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER"
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586 )
Morning Worship ................0:00 a.m.
Children's Church.............. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00'p.m.
Wed. Youth.& F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ................ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA,
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
..............................................7 :0 0 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .....................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
51h Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m .

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School. . . ...............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a:m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship............7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South - 735-0636
Sunday School . . .............. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship...................... 11 a.m.,
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane - 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones.... ................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................ 1:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . . . .......10:00 a.m.
Servicio ............................... 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ............. 6:30 p.m.'
Servicio de la Noche ............7-00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................. 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. - 735-1200
Sunday School ..............1...10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 1:00 a.m.
Training Union .................... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ;..;.......... ..6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.


' " SEEDS
FROM
.- THE
SOWER
M. nit ." ..

Mark Twain wrote, "This
life is a losing proposition;
nobody gets out alive."
But Christ got out alive.
Now, for the Christian, death
is no deadend street, but a
door of hope. Because He
lives, we shall live.
Since Christ is our Living
Lord and not a coffined
Christ, He's. with us in our
lineliness to cheer us, in our
perplexity to guide us, in our
sorrow to comfort us, in our
temptation to strengthen us,
and at death to bring us to
heaven.
Life without a risen Christ
is a hopeless end, but with
Him an endless hope!


205 S. 11th Ave. - 773-9927
Sabbath School ..............9...9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. - 773-4368
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m,
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


�Peace ivcer Growe.r

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber ,
Hw . 66 East (863) 735-0470
P. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL I
E Box -'80 FL










Cows Could Be Caught Out On The


By CARTER LAMBERT
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview is of my grandmother,
Doris Spearman Lambert.
Q:, When were you born?
A: Oct. 20, 1927.
Q: Where were you born?
A: At my home in Wauchula. I have
never lived anywhere else.
Q: Were meals different a long
time ago?
A: No. It was basically the same:
meats, potatoes, fruits and vegetables.
We had no frozen foods, though, only
fresh and canned
Q: What was your main source of
transportation?
A: The family had one car, which Doris Spea
only went 30 mph, but I walked to
school every day - rain or shine. We also h
Q: Would the schools allow bathrooms
African-Americans to attend? homes ha
A: No. Eventually, they had their ndt afford
own school. Q: Ho
Q: What was the approximate A: Fiv
population in Hardee County? a Coke wa
A: I can't be sure, but in the whole station S
county about 3,000 people I think. in'Wauchi
Q: Was the animal population a
lot greater? . Q: Di
A: Most game was greater in num- around th
ber and there was open range for hunt- A: Yes
ing. Quail was still in abundance. wash dishes
Q: 'If any, how many TV channels other odds
did you have? Q: Hom
A: We had no television until about A: Ten
the 1950s. I only remember having 6ne high schoc
channel, and watching "The Jackie Q: Was
Gleason Show." ty?
Q: Growing up, did most homes A: No.
have electricity? for things
A: Some did not, however ours did. n't afford



Citrus Crop


Estimate Grows


The U.S. Department of Agri-
culture raised Florida's 2008-09
orange crop estimate by 2.5
million boxes to 162.1 million
boxes in its final citrus forecast
released on Friday.
"Another Florida citrus -sea-
son is over and once again
Florida growers produced a
high quality crop," said
Michael W. Sparks, executive
VP/CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual. "We are certainly fac-
ing some challenges as an
industry but we remain a pow-
erful economic engine support-
ing many communities particu-
larly in Florida's interior. With
the overall economy sagging,
citrus - and agriculture in gen-'
eral - becomes even more
important."
The USDA said the increase
is comprised entirely of
Valencias, which is now esti-
mated at 77.5 million boxes.
Early and midseason varieties
are final at 84.6 million boxes.
Visit www.nass.usda.gov/-
Statisticsby_State/Florida/Pub
lications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for
the complete USDA estimate.
The USDA makes the initial


forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
In 2007-08, Florida harvested
170.2 million boxes of oranges.
The USDA reduced the
Florida grapefruit projection by
100,000 boxes to 21.7 million
for the 2008-09 season. Colored
grapefruit stayed at 15.1 million
while white grapefruit was
down the 100,000 boxes to 6.6
million.
Florida specialty fruit saw no
change with tangelos holding
steady at 1.15 million boxes and
tangerines at 3.9 million boxes.
The yield for from-concentrate
orange juice (FCOJ) held
steady at an average of 1.66 gal-
lons per 90-pound box.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9.3 billion annual
economic impact, employing
nearly 76,000 people, and cov-
ering more than 576,000 acres.
Founded in 1948 and current-
ly representing nearly 8,000
grower members, Florida Citrus
Mutual is the state's largest cit-
rus grower organization. For
more information, visit www.fl-
citrusmutual.com.


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS


Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
in the top 10 in customer satisfaction in
Florida I have received Ford's highest
Sales Honor 15 years running and been a
member of Ford's 300/500 Club for 20
years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
&0 TFt. Meade
STEDEAIVleR 375-2606
800-226-3325


HEARTLAND PEDIATRICS
"New Patients Welcome"


. -- " ,.

Apurba Manik
M.D., F.A.A.P.


Infants, Children and Adolescents


67-1414A
^^^^H^ 24 Hours^H^^


Se Habla Espanol


1125 S. 6TH AVE..
WAUCHULA
4:16tfc


_ - --


irman Lambert


COURTESY PHOTO


ad running water, but no
s. As far as I remember, most
d electricity, but some could
a $5 light bill.
w much was a Coke?
e cents. The only place to get
as at the drug store or filling
ome Cokes were bottled here
ula.
d you have any chores
ie house?
s. I had to rake the leaves,
es, iron my own clothes, and
and ends around the house.
�w much was gas per gallon?
cents. Before I got out of
D1 it had gone up to 25 cents.
s money such a high priori-

Money was just a necessity-
we needed to live. We could-
a lot of luxuries, and that was


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
So be very careful. to act
exactly as God commands
you. Don't veer off to the
right or to the 'left.' Walk
straight down the road God
commands, so that you'll
have a good life and live a
long time in the land.
Deuteronomy 5:33 (ME)
FRIDAY
When someone becomes a
Christian, he becomes a
brand-new person inside.
He is not the same anymore.
A new life has begun.
SI Corinthians 5:17 (TLB)

SATURDAY
The Lord says, "Whoever
loves Me, I will save. I will
protect those who know Me.
They will call to Me and I will
answer them. I will be with
them in trouble; I will rescue
them and honor them. I will
give them a long, full life."
Psalm 91:14-16a (NCV)
SUNDAY
Don't let the world around
you squeeze you into its
own mold, but let God mold
your minds from within so
that you may prove in prac-
tice that the plan of God for
you is good, meets all His
demands, and moves to-
ward the goal of true maturi-
ty.
Romans 12:2 (PME)


MONDAY
I will be your God through-
out your lifetime - until your
hair is white with age. I made
you, and I will care for you. I
will carry you along and save
you.
Isaiah 46:4 (NLT)
TUESDAY
Then I (John) saw a new
heaven and a new earth; . . .
and I heard a great voice
from the throne of God say-
ing, "Behold, the dwelling of
God is with men. He will
dwell with them and they
shall be His people, and
God Himself will be with
them."
Revelation 21:1,3 (RSV)
WEDNESDAY
The Sovereign Lord says, "I
will give you a new heart and
put a new spirit in you . . I
will put My Spirit in you, and
move you to follow My
decrees and be careful to
. keep My laws ... You will be
My people, and I will be your
God."
Ezekiel 36:26-27a,28b (NIV)


that.
Q: Did your family own any cat-
tle?
A: No. My father was a very well-
known mechanic.
Q: Were things as stressful when
you were growing up as they are
now?
A: No. It was as relaxed an environ-
ment as it could be and extremely fun.
Q: Were there any problems with
gangs or Indians?
A: No. There were no gangs and the
Indians stayed on reservations pretty
much. We were not afraid of people.

Q: What types of jobs were in
high and low demand?
A: Orange picking and road work
were in high demand. There was no
demand for baby sitters, since mothers
stayed home.
Q: Could you purchase cattle or
did you have to get it from the wild?
A: Some people bought cattle, but
most cows were caught in the wild.
They roamed freely, and if you found
one without a brand you could claim it
as your own and brand it.
Q: Were there huge farms like
today or did most people have their
own garden for food?
A: There wqre not huge farms as we
know them today. There was far
acreage in cucumbers and strawberries,
but every one relied on their own gar-
dens for food as well.
Q: Did you go to school? How.
many students were in the average
classroom?
A: Yes. There were about 18-20 stu-
dents per class, but that number grew
as time went on. There was a school in
every little community initially, but by
the time I graduated all the students
were bused to one school in Hardee
County.
Q: Were cars common?
A: Yes. Most roads were dirt,
though; very few were paved. .
Q: Did you have indoor plumb-
ing?
A: When I was 10 years old we
moved into a house that had indoor
plumbing, and my dad bought our first
water heater. . . ..
Q: Were most people literate or


July 16, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Open Range
illiterate?
A: Most were illiterate because they
had to work instead of going to school.
Q: Were clothes hard to come by?
A: Yes. My mother made all my
clothes. Some were made out of flour
sacks and most from 10-cent material
she got from the dime store. My mother
was a self-taught seamstress, and mad
my sister and me the most beautiful.
clothes.
Q: What sports were common or
popular?
A: Baseball and football were the
most important sports in Wauchula.
Some of the players lived as far as 15
miles away and had to walk to and
from practice.
Q: How far was it to the nearest
store or house?
A: From my house, it was about six
blocks to the nearest grocery store on
Main Street.
Q: How many brothers and sis-
ters do you have?
A: I have one brother and one sister.
My sister and I traded work responsi-
bilities, but my brother wasn't born
until after I was married.
Q: What did you do for fun?
A: We went to the movies, played
under the street lights, roller skated,
played jacks, jump roped, and swam in
the Zolfo swimming pool.
I was a cheerleader all four years of
high school. I sang in the choir at First
Baptist Church at the age of 12, and
was the first member of my family to
become a Christian. The others all fol-
lowed suit as well.
I was fortunate to grow up with a
loving mother and father in a whole-
some environment.
Q: Looking at modern technolo-
gies, do you wish you had any of
them?
A: Yes. I am glad to have the use of
a car. This is one of the modem tech-
nologies I use the most today.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
student', ind for the enjoyment of our
readers. '


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4C 'The Hlerald-Advocate, July 16, 2009


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July 16,2009, The Herald-Advocate 5C


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
July 12, Sidney Albert Browdy, 57, of 2932 Redbird Lane,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White and charged with
larceny - petit theft.
July 12, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.

July 11, Luis.Rodriguez Flores, 35, of 711 Manatee St., Ellen-
ton, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Jesse DeBoom
and charged with DUI.
July 11, James Bell, 51, of 369 Eason Dr., Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of violation of proba-
tion.
July 11, burglary of a conveyance on Popash Road, and thefts
on U.S. 17 North and on Smith Road were reported.

July 10, Jessica Nicole Guevara, 25, of 708 E. Green St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison and charged with resist-
ing/obstructing an officer without violence. She was detained on
charges of non-support and failure to appear in court.
July 10, Jose Angel Ramirez, 38, of 3531 Palmetto St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison and charged with
felony domestic.battery, batter, kidnapping/false imprisonment of
an adult and resisting an officer without violence.
July 10, Jose Tehandon Garcia, 54, and Jose Angel Garcia, 22,
both of 2295 Gilliard Farm Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by
Dep. Pauline Bissette and each charged with battery.
July 10, criminal mischief on Keeton Road, a theft on Airport
Road and a fight on Gilliard Farm Road were reported.
July 9, Chad Edward Renaud, 37, of 432 Sunrise Blvd., Se-





On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
- Scarborough Road budget amendment, 8:45 a.m.
- Fire Control Budget, 9:05.
- Tentative 2009-10 budget, 9:15.
- Property Appraiser's budget, 9:35.
- Awarding insurance bid.
- Law enforcement and emergency management grants.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend-.


bring, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
July 9, Ivan Becerra, 21, of 115 Jackson Road, Ladson, S.C.,
was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a charge of violation of
probation.
July 9, Roberto Trevino, 24, of Riverchase Circle, Wauchula,
was arrested by the countrywide Drug Task Force (DTF) on a
charge of contempt of court and six counts of failure to appear in
court.
July 9, a robbery/holdup on Chamberlain Boulevard was re-
ported.

July 8, Ermando Birisario Leyva, 43, of 3551 Palmetto St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested and charged with fraud-giving a false
identification to a law enforcement officer and driving with knowl-
edge of a suspended license.
July 8, Charity Stephens Faulk, 36, of 817 E. Main St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by DTF on an out-of-county warrant.
July 8, a residential burglary on Finch Drive and a vehicle
stolen on Old Town Creek Road were reported.

July 7, Daffney Michelle Smith, 30, of 2909 W. Garza Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Det. Russell Conley and charged
with five counts uttering forged instruments, larceny - grand theft
and an out-of-county warrant.
July 7, Rene Cervantes, 22, of 1000 Bill Bryant Road,
Bowling Green, was arrested by FHP Tpr. Jesse DeBoom and
charged with criminal mischief damage to property and failure to
appear in court.
July 7, Tavaris Deon Wilson, 22, of 1525 Lincoln St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on three counts of vio-
lation of probation
July 7, Erick Estrada, 31, of 225 Beeson Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison on a charge of battery. At the jail,
Sgt. James Adler detained Estrada on two.counts of violation of
probation.
July 7, Bessie Mae Brown, 53, of 879 Chamberlain Blvd.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. David Drake and charged with lar-
ceny - petit theft.
July 7, criminal mischief on Smith Road and on Broward
Street and thefts on Maude Road and County Line Road were
reported.

July 6, Samantha Alderman, 31, of 2309 Locust Dr., Bowling
Green, was arrested on a charge of non-support.
July 6, criminal mischief on Buckskin Drive and Oak Road
and SR 66, and thefts on Riverside Drive, U.S. 17 North and
Saunders Lane were reported.


WAUCHULA
July 12, Reginald Hudson, 24, of Whooping Crane Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with bat-
tery, driving with knowledge of a suspended license, and fleeing an
officer in patrol vehicle.
July 12, a fight on South First Avenue was reported.

July 11, criminal mischief in two locations on West Main
Street and a theft on U.S. 17 South were reported.

July 10, criminal mischief on Illinois Avenue and thefts on
Eason Drive, South Seventh Avenue and North Eighth Avenu.e
were reported.

July 9, Manuel Rodrigues, 22, of 166 Old Dixie Hwy, Bowl-.
ing Green, was arrested by Ofc. Jason Hale on charge of violation
of probation.
July 9, thefts on East Summit Street and U.-S..17 South were
reported.

July 8, a residential burglary on East Main Street and a vphi-
cle stolen on N. 10th Avenue were reported.

July 7, a vehicle stolen on North Third Avenue was reported.

July 6, thefts on East Oak Street and on South Seventh Avenue
were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
July 12, Steven Michael Hall, 46, of 404 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Abbott on an out-of-coun-
ty warrant.

July 8, Ester Cavazos, 52, and Melquiades Alarcon, 25, both
of 801 N. Florida Ave., Wauchula, were arrested by Capt. Brett
Dowden and each charged with larceny - theft. At the jail, Det.
.Manuel Martinez detained Alarcon on a charge of violation of pro-
bation.
July 8, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.

ZOLFO SPRINGS
July 10, a residential burglary on Ninth Street West was re-
ported.

July 9, residential burglaries on Marion Street and on Myrtle
Street were reported.

July 6, criminal mischief on Oak Street was reported.


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Major Times
10:00 am-12:00 pm
10:25 pm-12:25 am
Minor Times
4:17 am-5:17 am
4:42 pm-5:42 pm
Prediction
Good
7/20/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 6:44 am
Sets: 8:22 pm
LOD: 13:38:00
Moon Data
Rises: 4:50 am
Sets: 7:20 pm
Moon Phase
Moon Phase is 3
percent waning
Major Times
11:04 am-l :04 pm
Minor Times
5:21 am-6:21 am
5:46 pm-6:46 pm
Prediction
Good
7/21/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 6:45 am
Sets: 8:22 pm
LOD: 13:37:00
Moon Data
Rises: 6:02 am


Sets: 8:13 pm
Moon Phase
Moon Phase is 0
percent waxing
Major Times
11:41 pm-l:41 am
12:07 pm-2:07 pm
Minor Times
6:24 am-7:24 am
6:49 pm-7:49 pm
Prediction
Better

7/22/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 6:45 am
Sets: 8:22 pm
LOD: 13:37:00
Moon Data
Rises: 7:15 am
Sets: 8:59 pm
Moon Phase
Moon Phase is 0
percent waxing
0% Waxing
Major Times
12:41 am-2:41 am
1:07 pm-3:07 pm
Minor Times
7:24 am-8:24 am
7:49 pm-8:49 pm
Prediction
Best


George L.


773-3117
10 17 US Hwy 17 No. * Wauchula
Wadsworth, Jr.
Agent


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


Central Florida Health Care, Inc.
Offers Affordable 'ONE-STOP' Complete Primary Healthcare Services:
* Family Practice * Pediatrics
* Lab * Radiology * Dental
Serving Polk, Hardee & Highlands Counties
Since 1972
Most Insurances Accepted
Uninsured patients are offered services through sliding Fee Scale (with proof of household income).


Central Florida Health Care, Inc.
204 East Palmetto Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
Phone: 863-773-2111


Hours of Operation
Monday - Thursday: 7:30 am to 5:30 pm
Friday: 7:30 am to 5:00 pm


_ 7:16c J


I6 un i g/ i hi g Fo e as


7/16/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 6:42 am
Sets: 8:24 pm
LOD: 13:42:00
Moon Data
Rises: 1:11 am
Sets: 3:02 pm
Moon Phase
Moon Phase is 37
percent waning.
Major Times
7:06 am-9:06 am
7:31 pm-9:31 pm
Minor Times
1:23 am-2:23 am
1:48 pm-2:48 pm
Prediction
Better
7/17/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 6:43 am
Sets: 8:24 pm
LOD: 13:41:00
Moon Data
Rises: 1:54 am
Sets: 4:07 pm
Moon Phase
Moon Phase is 26
percent waning
Major Times
8:00 am-10:00 am
8:25 pm-10:25 pm
Minor Times


2:17 am-3:17 am
2:42 pm-3:42 pm
Prediction
Better
7/18/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 6:43 am
Sets: 8:23 pm
LOD: 13:40:00
Moon Data
Rises: 2:44 am
Sets: 5:14 pm
Moon Phase
Moon Phase is 17
percent waning
Major Times
8:59 am-10:59 am
9:24 pm-11:24 pm
Minor Times
3:16 am-4:16 am
3:41 pm-4:41 pm
Prediction
Good
7/19/2009
Sun Data
Rises: 6:44 am
Sets: 8:23 pm
LOD: 13:39:00
Moon Data
Rises: 3:43 am
Sets: 6:19 pm
Moon Phase
Moon Phase is 9
percent waning


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Diane * Ovina * Frahkie

773-5665
116 Carlton St. * Wauchula
Now Accepting Hours: .
Ivts m Tuesday - Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
4 * M7: " 7:16c


Dr. Maria de
Padua

Dr. de Padua completed her
residency training in General
Pediatrics at State University of
New York at Buffalo and
Children's Hospital of Buffalo.
She is a board-certified pedia-
trician and a fellow of the
-American Academy of
Pediatrics.
Dr. de Padua provides Primary
Care services to children new-
born to 18 years of age.
Dr. de Padua joined Central
Florida Health Care, Inc.'s
medical staff in 1995.


Dr-. Karen McKenzie
Dental

Dr. McKenzie completed her
Dentistry studies at Nova
Southeastern School of
Dentistry in Fort Lauderdale,
Florida.
Dr. McKenzie joined CFHC's
Dental department in 2007 and
was named Dental Director in
July 2008.


Dr. Yanitt Lozada-Perez
Family Practice

Dr. Lozada completed her Pre
Medical Studies at the
University of Puerto Rico. She
moved to Mexico to complete
her Doctorate degree as a
Physician-Surgeon at the,
Autonomous University of
Guadalajara. She then returned
to Puerto Rico to finish her
training as a General
Practitioner at La Concepcion
Hospital and Metropolitan
Hospital at San German.
Dr. Lozada practices General
Medicine and provides Primary
Care services to patients 18
years of age and older.
Dr. Lozada joined CFHC's
medical staff in 2008.


FARM


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6C The Herald-Advocate, July 16, 2009


ZS Offers Tour Of New Police, Fire Station


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Herald-Advocate Intern
The town of Zolfo Springs
recently- celebrated the grand
opening of its combined police
and fire station with an open
house, allowing interested resi-
dents to tour the facility.
Few took the opportunity,
however, though local pride in
the structure is high.
The new building replaces the
one destroyed by Hurricane
Charley in 2004, and it was paid
for with insurance proceeds and
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency funding.
Housing both the town's
Police Department and a
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
unit, the facility at the corner of
U.S. 17 and Fifth Street is
equipped with a variety of spe-
cial features to better assist law
enforcement officers and fire-
fighters in performing their
respective roles.
The new building is home to
offices, a training room, an evi-
dence room, records room,
armory, leisure room, locker
and shower rooms, kitchen,
sleeping quarters, a laundry
room and a medical supply
room.
The police side features a
wall of lockers where evidence
can be secured until it is logged
and processed inside the evi-
dence room on the other side of
the wall. Ammunition is safely
stored in a solid room equipped
to contain any explosion. An
office is even set aside for the
Hardee County Sheriffs Office,
which will use it regularly for
its "south county" deputy.
But it is the Fire-Rescue side
of the building which offers
more homey highlights.
Firefighters, who live, eat and
sleep at the station during their
shifts, now have a comfortable
leisure room including recliners
and a television to entertain
them when they are able to take
a well-earned break.
After a long day of fighting
fires and defending the commu-
nity, these hometown heroes
can get a good night's rest in the
sleeping area of the new build-
ing. The room has five twin


beds with lockers available for
each firefighter's personal
belongings.
Firefighters can take a hot
shower in one of the three
showers available, two for men
and one for women. Sometimes
firefighters must shower three
or four times in a single day,
Fire Chief Mike Choate
remarked.
The kitchen comes with
pantries, three refrigerators,
cabinets and plenty of prepara-
tion space.


There's a washer and dryer to
handle laundry chores and plen-
ty of storage for medical sup-
plies. Large airy bays provide
parking for fire engines and res-
cue trucks within the garage.
"I am very grateful to every-
one for their time and effort put
into designing and building the
fire station. We look forward to
serving our south county resi-
dents out of this new building
for years to come," said Choate.
Staff writer Cynthia Krahl con-
tributed to this report.


p-pI


The building features storage rooms for medical supplies
and such.


PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Zolfo Springs Town Manager Linda Roberson shows the locker wall at the new, secured
evidence room on the police side of the stationhouse.
P1


1 -


The Hardee County Sheriffs Office will keep an office in the building, manned during
the open house by (from left) Col. Claude Harris and Maj. Randy Dey. Other days, a
"south county" deputy will use the space.


A shiny new garage will house fire and rescue vehicles.


PRO:




PHOTO BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Firefighter Dan Brimblecom stays prepared to protect the community.


A television is hooked up in the day room, ready for leisure-time viewing.


Anyone touring the facility could get a peek at the private sleeping quarters, with beds
and Individual lockers for firefighters.








July 16, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7C


By JOAN SEAMAN wings and Gatorade to about 60
Of The Herald-Advocale golfers and parents and e\-
Torrey Oaks was the stop last pressed appreciation for the
Thursday. for ihe week. cooperation from other spon-
'se I.rl.i ~*l.ulh i.Ift . u-r *.'r.
SThe Hardee nine ,olters who In the boys 15-16 age group. -
pairicipated with others from Daniel Miller grabbed second
around the Heartland. played place. with Taslor Barlow and.-
well on the home course. Lincoln Saunders tied for fourth
although all scores %ere higher place four strokes back. Also in
than usual when play resumed that age group are Dalton
after a 90-minute storm delay Hewett and Justin Bromley,
"'Torre Oaks can be a diffi- who were seventh and ninth.
cult course to play if you ha\e Will Bennett and William
ne'er played it before. Once Beattie tied for second place in'
again. course management was the huge boys 13-14 group F,
a big problem for a lot of these Trenton Moon %was in a few
kids. but I expect that kids. I strokes behind them
call it the growing pains of Hardee's only other golfer -.
golf." said Sebring Sertoma pro was Grayson Lambert. who
and tour coordinator Andy placed fourth in the boys 17-18,
Kesline group.
He lauded the local course for "Experience means so much.
its welcome "'The Wauchula You must b able to choose the
P',lice Department, along with smart shot and be able to e\e-
-M..saic Mining. Dauid Single- cute it. not just for one hole but
tar\ State Farm Insurance andl for all 9 or 18 holes." comment-
. Alan Ja', Ford. did a fantastic ed Kesling "Golf is most cer-
Pjob of providing drinks. food tainly) a grind and, oer time.
gand a goodie bag for the kids I -these young golfers %will start to
-w-.ant to thank Police Chiet Bill understand that you must keep
SBeaitte for putting it all togeth- \our head in the game. These'..
er and making this eent one to kids ,all learn and the next time"..
. remember." added Kesling. . they play. hopefully, experience
Beaitt estimated they pro-'-w ill start to play a factor'" con-
iaded hamburgers and the fi\- cluded Kesling.








8C The Herald-Advocate, July 16,2009



CourhoueRpor


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court>:
Joshua Grady Johnston, 19,
Wauchula, and Nancy Temple
Roberson, 19, Wauchula.
Tony Edwards Ward, 37,
Avon Park and Thresa Edwards
Shorts, 44, Avon Park.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Capital One Bank USA NA
vs. Robert L. Ice, judgment.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Erik Andrew England, default'
judgment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Gabriel Gomez Bruno, cul-
pable negligence and causing a
minor to become delinquent or
-dependent, adjudication with-
held, probation one year, attend
parenting class, no violent con-
tact with children, $325 fine
and court costs, $50 cost of
prosecution (COP).
Sandra Botello Cardoza, tres-
pass/larceny with relation to a
utility and petit theft, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation six
months, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs, $337.77 restitution,
20 hours community service.
Jessie Aguilar, resisting
arrest without violence, not
prosecuted.
Tiffany Lemay, trespass, ad-
judication withheld, probation
six months, stay off property,
$325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP.
John Everett McClenithan,
Sr., domestic battery, not prose-
cuted.
Debbie Richardson, disorder-
ly intoxication, $325 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $50 COP.
Domingo Diaz, giving false
identification to a law enforce-
ment officer, two months in jail
with credit for time served
(CTS) and concurrent with
criminal traffic court sentence,


$50 COP added to other fines
and fees.
Jose Angel Hernandez,
domestic battery, not prosecut-
ed.
Sergio Rodriguez Jr., viola-
tion of probation (original
charge giving false identifica-
tion to a law enforcement offi-
cer), probation revoked, four
months CTS, $50 public
defender fee and $50 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
World Alliance Financial
Corp. vs. John Eric Reschke ais
trustee, petition for mortgage
foreclosure.
MWauchula State Bank vs.
Martha V. Ponce-Calderon,
petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Wauchula State Bank" vs.
Yerly B. Lee and Cheala J. Vue
Tong et al, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Dargos M. Alexandru and
Florica M. Alexandru, divorce.
Maria Moreno vs. Mary Lou
Gonzales, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Maria Moreno vs. Javier Val-
dez, petition for injunction for
protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down,
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Wendy Donelle Harbarugh
and the state Department of
Revenue (DOR) vs. Jason Har-
barugh, order on child support
modification.
Ralph Marshall Bladen as
personal representative vs.
Hardee County Board of
County Commissioners, Long's
Air Conditioning and Tom
Watson, voluntary dismissal.
Marianne Angela DeBruy-
cher Combee and Oris Donald.
Combee III, divorce.
Erica F. Garza Blas and DOR
vs. Efrain Garza, petition to
modify child support held in


1040 & Business Tax
. Preparation
Payroll & Bookkeeping
Services
- Quickbooks
Checks, Training & Assistance
Electronic Filing - Fax Service
Notary


Jose L. Torres, Sr.
Owner
*VLIA


Bridget McVay
ax Practitioner
7:9tfc


abeyance.
Virginia Snyder and DOR vs.
Efrain Garza, petition to modify
child support held in abeyance.

The following felony crinmi-
nal case were disposed of last
week by the circuit juilge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Justin Canfield, battery on a
person 65 or older, transferred
to county misdemeanor court.
Berardo Carrillo, larceny,
adjudication withheld, 18
months probation, warrantless
search and seizure, random
screens, no contact with victim,
$520 fine and court costs, $350
public defender fees, $100
COP, restitution to be set, 100
hours community service; deal-
ing in stolen property, not pros-
ecuted.
Duane Otis Griffin, violation
of probation (original charges
felony driving while license
suspended and DUI - reduced
to reckless driving), probation
revoked, six months in jail
CTS, $150 public defender fee
and $100 COP added to'out-
standing fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Enrique Gutierrez, burglary
of a conveyance, petit theft and
battery, not prosecuted.
Daniel M. Lumley, grand
theft, two years community
control - house arrest, war-
rantless search and seizure,
$520 fine and court costs, $350
public defender fees, $100
COP, restitution to be set, 200
hours community service.
Tyrell Lavhone Smith, petit
theft and burglary of con-
veyance, three months in jail
CTS, $520 fine and court costs,
$350 public defender fees, $100
COP.
Ronnie Rias, sale of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of a public
park, community center etc.,
found guilty in jury trial on
May 15, three years 18 days
Florida State Prison, CTS ,
$520 fine and court costs, $340
public defender fees, $100 COP
placed on lien; resisting arrest
without violence, time served.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed. recently in
the office of the clerk of court:


Candida Trejo-Perez and
Miguel Perez to Alejandro and
Maribel Mondragon, $20,000.
Central Mobile Homes Inc.
to Paul and Brenda K. Sutton,
$11,600.
Central Mobile Homes Inc.
to Paul D. and Patricia J.
Sutton, $11,600,
Chad M. Kujawski to Gail L.
Kujawski, $29,400.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. as trustee to John M.
and Brenda J. Barnes,
$140,000.
FL Land Partners LLC to
Deborah Santi Thibos, Denise
J. Santi and Peter A. Santi,
$45,000.
Wayne A. and Lisa C. New-
man to Wauchula State Bank,
$107,187.61.
Bowling Green DG LLC to
Max J. and Mildred R. Finkle-
stein, $94,901.


For the week ended July 9, 2009

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 8,970,
compared to closed last week, and 9,012 a year ago. According
to the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to
1.00 lower, feeder steers and heifers were unevenly steady to 2.00
lower.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:



Slaughter Cows:
46.00


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 113.00-159.00'
300-400 lbs 104.00-128.00
400-500 lbs 90.00-109.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 84.00-112.00
300-400 lbs 82.00-105.00
400-500 lbs 80.00- 94.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent 41.00-


Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs 55.00-'
62.00


NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the General Water
Use on 38 acres to serve Off-Road Challenge known as Hardee Excavation. The project
is located in Hardee County, Section(s) 6 Township 35 South, Range 23 East. The per-
mit applicant is Russell Adams whose address is 734 CR 665, Ona, FL 33865.

The permit No. is 20013368.00.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday
through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District (District) 170 Century Blvd.. Bartow. FL 33830-7700.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this
permit may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.),
of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the
substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the
District's action, or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person
requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply
with Chapter 28-106, FA.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the
Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice (or within 14 days
for an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary Authorization for the use of
Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period
shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the District's final action .may be different from the
position taken by it in this notice of final agency action. Persons whose substantial
interests will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the application have
the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the
requirements set forth above.

Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute
regarding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing. 7:16c


Danlelle Reschke
Receptionist *


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JUANITA WRIGHT,
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be Issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO.: 530 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007
Description of Property:
Lot Two (2) of Block Nine (9) of Magnolia
Manor, a subdivision located in Section 15,
Township 34 South, Range 25 East, according
to plat recorded in the Public Records of
Hardee County, Florida.

AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
107, PAGE 295.

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.
Name in which assessed: MAGGIE MILFORD
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
locted at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 2nd day of September, 2009, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 30"th day of June, 2009.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252009TD007XXXX 7:16-8:6c


Highlands County HOME Consortium

Fourth Program Year Action Plan

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Heartland Rural HOME Consortium (which includes DeSoto, Glades, Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, and Okeechobee
Counties, Florida) is applying to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the 2009-2010 allo-
cation under the HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME). This Fourth Program Year Action Plan is submitted
under the Consolidated Plan for 2006-2011.
The preliminary activities, with the estimated dollar amount for which the Consortium is applying are:
Funding Source Budget

HOME Investment Partnership $ 670.986
Total $ 670,986
Planned Activities ,Budget

HOME Homeownership $ 503,241
Community Housing Development Corporations (15%) $ 100,647
Administration $ 67,098
Each County in the Consortia has adopted a single anti-displacement and relocation plan before submission of the
Consolidated Plan. The Consortia will assist displaced persons with grant funds, as indicated in the budget and policy.
A required 25% match will be covered by on-going activities in each County under the State Housing Initiatives
Partnership (SHIP) Program.
Two Public Hearings to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the Fourth Program Year Action Plan will be held
at 201 E Oak Street, Ste. 201, Arcadia FL beginning at 10:00 a.m. on July 22, 2009, and at 165 S. Lee Street LaBelle, FL,
on July 22, 2009 beginning at 2:00 p.m.
A draft copy of the Annual Plan will be available for review at that time. A final copy of the application will be made avail-
able at the Highlands County Housing Department, 501 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870 on July 30, 2008
Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Fourth Program Year Action Plan will be sub-
mitted to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on or before August 14, 2009. To obtain additional
information concerning the application and the Public Hearings contact Teresa Hofer, Interim Highlands County Housing
Director, at (863) 402-6717.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person requiring an
interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Teresa Hofer at least five calendar days prior
to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hear-
ing should also contact Teresa Hofer at (863) 402-6917 at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language
interpreter will be provided. To access a Telecommunication Device for Deaf Persons (TDD) please call (800) 955-8771.
Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact Teresa Hofer at (863) 402-
6917 at least five calendar days prior to the meeting.
Pursuant 91.225, the following certifications will,be submitted to HUD with the Fourth Program Year Action Plan. The cer-
tifications will be made available by Highlands County Housing Department and HUD for public inspection upon request.
These certifications will be available on and after the date of submission of the application and shall continue to be avail-
able for a minimum periOd, of five years.
1. Affirmatively furthering fair housings;
2. Anti-displacement and relocation plan;.
3. Drug-free workplace;
4. Anti-lobbying;
5. Authority of Jurisdiction;
6. Consistency with Plan;
7. Acquisition and Relocation; and
8. Section 3.
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION 7:16c


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