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Title: The Herald-advocate
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00260
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: January 22, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Volume ID: VID00260
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text
















The


Plane Q

Larlds--h


109th Year, No. 7
3 Sections, 34 Pages


Thursday, January 22, 2009


Resthaven In Danger Of Closing


By KASEY HELMS
Of The Herald-Advocate
Without a quick infusion of
cash, Resthaven will have to
close its doors on March 1.
The assisted-living facility
has been in operation since the
mid-1950s. It would now take


Seek



'Flexible



Funding'
Voters Must Approve
The Shift Of Tax $$$
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
With the Hardee County
School Districis budget repeat-
edly cut. by the falling cleaver
of the state Legislature, the
School Board is seeking relief
from local voters in the form of
a tax-money shift.
Called "flexible funding," the
plan has been provided for in
Florida Statutes, and has been
successfully used by other
school districts statewide.
In it, the Hardee County
School Board would "shift" tax
dollars set aside for capital out-
lay projects into the general
operating fund instead. Schools
Superintendent David Dura-
stanti termed the plan "tax neu-
tral" in presenting it to board
members.
As he pointed out, the state's
"funding formula" does not
allow for the flexibility of funds
between the capital account and
the operating account. Hence
the need to turn to voters.
"We're not asking for any tax
dollars from anybody," Dura-
stanti explained. "We're asking
for the flexibility to move
money from one line to anoth-
er."
Board members unanimously
approved the plan, and will seek
to havethe question placed on a
ballot for voters to decide on
March 24.
The referendum question
would read as follows:
"The Hardee County School
See SCHOOLS 2A


711hElhl1 111111111 3
112 2 07 2 90 3


$130,000 to keep it solvent.
Home to Resthaven is the his-
toric Lemon Grove school-
house. Without the needed
money, the facility will be his-
tory, too, its operators say.
According to administrator
Tina LeConte, Resthave'n is in


danger of closing because of a
low resident census, rising
overhead costs, and the poor
economy. She also speculates
that people may be keeping
family members at home
because of rising costs.
Resthaven has lost seven res-


idents within the past month,
five of which have died and two
were transferred to nursing
homes due to the increased
level of care they needed.
"The Central Florida region
worker's comp auditor told me
that all assisted-living facilities


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Members of Hardee Senior High School's graduating classes of the 1960s lived It up
together once again In a "super" reunion over this past weekend and then went back
away to their adult lives. Classmates traveled from near and far for the event, rocking
'n rolling on Friday night, ballooning on Saturday morning (above) and sharing old
times as a group on Saturday night. Photos of the action can.be found on 10A and
10&11C.


ART CONTEST OPEN!


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The Herald-Advocate's ninth annual Pioneer Park Days
Cover-Art Contest is now open. Both adults and children
are welcome to enter, with monetary prizes and publica-
tion of the artwork in a special tabloid section on March
5. Deadline is Feb. 16. Contest details can be found on
6A. Pictured is last year's winner, Montry Thompson.


Health

Fair Next

Thursday
By KASEY HELMS
Of The Herald-Advocate
Check out your health and
win a free TV!
The annual Get Well Com-
munity Health Fair will be next
Thursday, Jan. 29, from 8 to 11
a.m. at the Hardee County Agri-
Civic Center.
The health fair is sponsored
by H.O.P.E. of Hardee and
Florida Hospital Wauchula.
Organizations such as Hardee
County Emergency Manage-
ment, the Health Department,
the public library, American
Red Cross and many others will
be on hand to provide informa-
tion to help residents make
healthier life choices.
Some of the vendors will
even provide free health screen-
ings, including blood- pressure
checks and blood-sugar, choles-
See HEALTH FAIR 2A


he has visited are low on their
census, too," said LeConte.
She notes several cutbacks
have occurred around Rest-
haven in order to tighten the
budget. With a staff of 13, three
of those are part-time, most
make above or at minimum
wage. Cutbacks have affected
staff hours, supplies like
Styrofoam cups, and grocery
shopping, which was cut from
two or three times a month to
once a month because of the
lower number of residents.
"We have not cut back on ser-
vices like transportation. Our
last outing was to the Christmas


parade and then out to dinner,
however that was our last town
activity," says LeConte.
The residents still get to trav-
el and some even go with the
staff to the grocery store.
LeConte says another cut-
back option would be to start a
sliding fee for residents.
Currently the monthly rent for
residents is from $900 to
$1,000. The hope is that with a
lower resident fee, more people
would be drawn in from Hardee
County as well as surrounding
counties of Highlands, Polk,
DeSoto and Charlotte.
See RESTHAVEN 2A


HISTORIC MOMENT


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
This, the 23rd national observance on Monday of Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. Day, was most significant in that it
fell one day before the inauguration of this country's first
black president, Barack Obama. Here,. orator Errick
Snelling recognizes and reflects on this historic moment
as he delivers the keynote address for the local obser-
vance of MLK Day. Find his speech on 9A, and find full
photo spreads of the weekend-long events in King's
honor on 4-7C.




Forum Explores



Development Here


by JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A three-hour forum Friday
with a standing room only
crowd focused on a variety of
economic development issues
for the county, past, present and
future.
Bill Lambert, county director
of economic development since
October 2007, led the meeting,
with Casey Dickson, executive
director of the Chamber of
Commerce, and other staff
members Sarah Pelham and
Kimberly Miller.
It began with positive com-
ments from Rick Justice, chair-
man of the 15-member Eco-
nomic Development Council;
Vanessa Hernandez, president
of the Chamber of Commerce;
and Wauchula mayor David
Royal. All spoke of the need
for teamwork (Together Every-
one Achieves More), retaining
the hometown flavor while
growing "so our children have
jobs to come back to," and
preparing infrastructure to meet
the future.
"They said after Hurricane
Charley that 64 percent of busi-
nesses wouldn't reopen, but 100
percent did," said Royal.
"We're excited about Main


Street and downtown develop-
ment," he added.
He introduced new Main
Street Inc. and Community
Redevelopment Agency direc-
tor Jessica Newman. "In 1997
two things happened with the
creation of the CRA and Main
Street designation. CRA alone
is not effective in promoting
growth. To ensure success, it
means joining with others. I'm
excited to be back and look for-
ward to working with you," said
the Hardee High graduate.
Prescott opened the program
with a power point of pho-
tographs of the past, Wauchula
from 1898 until after it became
part of Hardee County estab-
lished in 1921.
TAXES
Property Appraiser Kathy
Crawford set the stage with
comments on population, real
property and tangible taxes and
other factors from 1930 to the
present. Population has grown
from about 10,000 in 1930 to
about 30,000 now.
Ad valorem or property taxes
values have grown from $4 mil-
lion in 1921 to $1.8 billion in
2008. Part of the large jump
See FORUM. 3A


ho UP, UP AND...

Schools 1-. .. -..m


rash RedistrItfIn Bu A BookAt .
Mere "dergoe "nges Bargain Price

eta tory B .. Story 12B






Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


46V
plu 4,: ides Ux








2A The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009


EMERGENCY LANDING


COURTESY PHOTO
A single-engine plane made an emergency landing here on Sunday, ending upside down in a field in Fort Green
Springs. The pilot, 31-year-old Ahmed Kamel Metwall, and his passenger, 29-year-old Saeed Dahfer Algahtani, both
of Saudi Arabia and employed by Saudi Air, were not injured. Hardee County Sheriff's Office spokesman Col. Claude
Harris Jr. said Metwalil decided to make an emergency landing after the engine began to vibrate. He tried to glide
the plane to the Wauchula Municipal Airport. Due to a headwind, Metwali was forced to land in a field, and the front
wheel of the plane hit a mound of dirt causing it to slowly flip over. It landed on its roof about 1.5 miles southeast of
the Intersection of CR 663 and SR 62, said Harris. The plane was a rented Cessna 152, and the two men were flying
from Brooksville to the Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport located 13 miles southwest of Miami. Harris said an inves-
tigator with the Federal Aviation Administration was at the scene and is investigating the cause of the crash.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


RESTHAVEN
Continued From 1A


Charlie Potter is sponsoring the third annual Hillacious 10K
Run on Saturday, Feb. 7, with an 8 a.m. start. A fitness walk begins
at 8:05. The start/finish is the Hardee Recreation Complex on
Altman Road.
Registration is $15 by Jan. 30 and $20 thereafter and on race
day. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society Hardee
Unit. Make check payable to One Hillacious 10K Run and mail to
Charlie Potter, 300 Park Drive, Wauchula, FL 33873. This includes
a T-shirt.

Sebring author Casey Wohl, the official Getaway Girl who has
written Girls Getaway Guides to Orlando and Key West, spoke to
the Wauchula Kiwanis Club recently.
She said 2009 trends include recessionary living whereby peo-
ple want long-term value and not just short-term happiness, quali-
ty over quantity, money loses prominence in our lives and is
replaced with stability, peace of mind and sustainability.
Casey said authenticity matters, jhat.convunTrshaype lost faith
with some businesses and institutions and that local companies and
those.with alopg-lr[r-hfrirn ty.rre.wylpositieaed for the-future.,
Nationally; with layoffs and uncertain times now is the time
for many people to assess their life goals and career ambitions.
She said 2009 is a good time to invest in'stocks and bonds and
real estate. Lqw interest rates could cause rising real estate prices
by mid-year. Americans will have an opportunity to live within
their means, that taxes are not expected to go up and new President
Barack Obama has a historic opportunity to reshape public policy.
2009 travel trends include lower prices to visit Mexico,
Hawaii, Iceland, the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and U.S. ski resorts.

New county schools superintendent David Durastanti told the
Lions Club last Thursday the local school system is facing funding
cuts from the state.
The Hardee district was cut $696,000 on Dec. 10. Durastanti
was told to expect a cut of $350,000 to $700,000 in the first quar-
ter of 2009. In July the state might announce a further cut of $1 mil-
lion to $3 million, he said.
Durastanti said on Jan. 22 the school district will ask the
Hardee County Commissioners to authorize a March 24, 2009,
election here that would allow the schools to use one mill of taxes
($1 million to $1.5 million) in capital outlay funds for general oper-,
ating expenses for four years. Hardee already levies two mills for
capital outlay, so this would be one of those mills.
A quarter-mill of capital outlay ($396,000) has already been
shifted to Tallahassee, said Durastanti.
"We have a hiring freeze. We are cutting personnel through
attrition so far. This is a legitimate crisis in school funding in the
state. Orange County has cut 550 teachers. Volusia County has lost
2,700 students, closed seven schools and laid off 1,000 employees
largely due to the construction industry slowdown. Pinellas County
plans to close eight schools next year. Kenny liames, Orlando
Edgewater High School principal, has laid off 28 teachers and 10
other employeese"
Former Hardee schools superintendent Lee Burns is an assis-
tant principal at Orlando Edgewater.

I visited with Don Herndon, an excellent high school football
coach, a couple of weeks before he died Jan. 10 at age 72.
Who were some of his all-time favorite high school football
players? He was a head coach for over 20 years at Hardee High,
Tampa Chamberlain, Haines City and Dade City.
He poached Tom Pace at HHS when Tom was in the ninth
grade. "Tom Pace was the best linebacker I ever coached."
Herndon did not get to finish coaching Pace at HHS because
he was part of the teacher walkout around 1968 and was not
rehired. All the other teachers who walked out .ere rehired but not
the administrators.
Pace became a dominating Wildcat as linebacker and running-
back. "As a senior at HHS Tom was good enough to go directly to
the NFL," HHS defensive coordinator Jim Mitchell said.
Other Herndon favorites at HHS included Zeke Mowatt,
Myron Refoure, Chris Barnes, Josh and Jake McKibben, his old
teammate Bobby Gambrell, Robbie Burnett, Robert Bennett,
Lawrence Thompson, and Dan Durrance, "pound for pound the
best I ever coached."
Among his Haines City players Herndon cited runningback
Clarence Gandy, quarterback Bryan Kier, Mike and Eddie Weaver,
runningback Willie Wilder, and placekicker Bobby Lyle. Eddie
Weaver became an All-American defensive guard at Georgia. /
He mentioned lineman Jim Yarborough of Arcadia and punter
Fred Monts De Oca of Avon Park.
Herndon was a star runningback at HHS and won a scholar-
ship to University of Tampa and later played pro ball for a short
time in New York.
His-son Donald Herndon of Fort Pierce said his father "had a
wonderful life and touched a lot of people. He had a love for life,
football and golf."
Don was born in 1936 and grew up in the Lake Dale area the
youngest of six children. A tomato was his first football. He played
football and track in high school. 00
University of Florida scouts came to see Don and said he was
too small at 5-10 and 150 pounds. He got n full scholarship to
,University of Tampa,and after a sensational freshman year UF con-


According to LeConte, the
difference between Resthaven
and other assisted-living facili-
ties is mainly that Resthaven is
non-profit.
"A majority of assisted-living
facilities are for profit, and we
are non-profit in order to make
it more affordable for the aging
generation," LeConte says.
The facility houses 38 beds
within the 11 rooms. There is
currently one private room; all
others have between three and
four beds per room. LeConte
has received feedback from
many people that say they can-
not afford private rooms at
other assisted- living facilities,
and .she notes that' Resthaven.
can create more privacy for
married couples. offering them
their own room.
There are other options for
residents who make below $752
and can qualify for Medicaid
and Optional Social Security,
which will pay their resident
fee.
In, preparation for the possi-
bility of the facility closing, the
staff met with residents and
their families to inform them of
the changes. LeConte said the
meeting was to help families
find an exit strategy in case of



HEALTHFAIR
Continued From 1A
terol and HIV tests.
There will also be free orange
juice and cookies.
Every person will receive a
ticket, at the'door, for a chance
to win the grand, prize of a tele-
vision for attending the health
fair.
Individual vendors will also
contribute door prizes, increas-
ing the chances of winning.
The health fair sponsors are
encouraging anyone who
attends to bring one or more
non-perishable 'food items,
which will then be donated to
help feed needy residents.
The Get Well Community
Health Fair is free to all Hardee
County residents. The Agri-
Civic Center is located at the
intersection of Stenstrom and
Altman roads in Wauchula.


. the closure.
The main question is what
would it take to keep Resthaven
from closing?
According to Tessa Graham,
Resthaven's accountant, it
would take $130,000.
The accountant says that
amount of money would sustain
the facility with the current
number of residents living there
now, however a census increase
,would still need to occur to
maintain Resthaven.
Graham said that Resthaven
receives $50,000 annually in
October from the county, and
that money is used to fill in
gaps when resident fees cannot
covir'ex pnses." . ..
"Norm li Resthaven makes
it all 'the' ay through the sum-
mer on. county money but after
that, donations are needed to
help cover expenses until


LANCE ARMSTRONG
A Page One, story last
week inadvertently revert-
ed to the first name of the
most common Armstrong
in the news today. Of
course, it was Neil Arm-
strong who walked on the
moon on that historic day
in 1969. We apologize for
our momentary lapse,
which made it into print.
We seek to set the, record
straight for those who are,
indeed, unfamiliar with that
point in history.

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-.
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


tacted him again. Don's answer was an emphatic no. Don loved
Spartan coach Chela Huerta.
In 1957 he married UT cheerleader and majorette Linda who
had a date scheduled with Elvis Presley but went with Don instead,
said Donald.
Don was signed to a pro contract by Vince.Lombardi, defen-
sive backfield coach of the New York Giants. The second year Don
went to the New York Titans. At a party Don and another player
once carried out Johnny Carson who had had too much to drink.
Don's coaches included Tom Landry, Huerta and Lombardi.
He later played pro ball in St. Petersburg and Orlando.
He was hired as HHS head football coach in 1964 and took the'
Wildcats to the state title game in 1965. The teacher walkout ended
Herndon's Wildcat career.
He coached at Chamberlain one year and had a winning record
before a 12-year career at Haines City. With the Hornets hereached
the state title game in 1971 at Belle Glade and in 1973 won the
state title with a 7-0 win at Delray Beach Atlantic. ..
The 1973 Hornet team had eight shutouts,and gave up 30
points, said Donald.
Herndon did not like to cut 'boys trying out for the team and
applicants usually cut themselves from the team by running up and
down a 30-foot high sand hill near the practice field. Those who did
the required number of runs made the team.
"My father was honest and had integrity, courage and gen-
erosity. He was a forthright man, a superior man. We loved to play
golf together," said Donald..


October," said Graham.
As of now, Graham says
Resthaven has enough money
to stay open for eight weeks.
She also admits with the econo-
my the way it has been, dona-
tions have decreased.
According to Graham, Rest-
haven received $117,520.79 in
total donations from January to
December 2008. The facility's
total year expense was
$375,852.45. It ended with a
deficit of $29,488.66.
Chairman of the Board of
Trustees Mary Lois Crawley
says that donations to
Resthaven "keep us afloat." She


- also thinks it would take a mir-
acle from God to keep
Resthaven from closing at this,
point.
"We've done everything we
know to do," she said, adding,
"The people of Hardee County ]
have been generous and we>
appreciate that."
The difference between an
assisted living facility and a'
nursing home, according to
LaConte, is that a nursing home
requires total assistance and
care whereas an assisted living
facility just helps bath and dress,
residents when they need help.


SCHOOLS
Continued From 1A


District proposes to reduce its
ad-valorem taxation for capital
funding and enact ad-valorem
taxation for operational funding
in an equal amount. Shall the
district reduce its annual ad-val-
orem millage for capital outlay
by 1.000 mills and enact 1.000
mills for general operations for
a four-year period beginning
July 1, 2009?"
State law allows for the flex-
ible funding for a period of four
years, and also provides for a
voter-approved renewal of the
plan. Monroe County voters,
for instance, recently voted in a
renewal of the plan. Other area
districts which won a voter OK
for the money shift include
Hendry, Glades and Collier,
Durastanti said.
If 1.00 mill is approved by
Hardee County voters, capital
outlay funding here will be
reduced' by $1.6 million and


general operating funding will
increase by that same amount,
starting with the 2009-10
school year.
Meanwhile, $9.3 million will
remain in the capital outlay
fund, which will provide for
about $7 million for projects
already on the books and $2.3
million in an undesignated bal-
ance.
Current high-dollar capital'
projects include classroom
additions at Bowling Green'
Elementary School and reroof-
ing Hardee Senior High School.
Such projects would not be'
affected.
In 'seeking the relief, howev,
er, Durastanti noted that with-
out the flexibility to shift the tax1
money over into the general
operating account, budge;i
shortfalls will impact thet
instructional needs of students.


WEATHER SUMMARY
The Sunshine State recorded below average temperatures last
week, with many areas covered in frost. Growers received rain'r
showers of less than an inch across the State; the most precipitation
was reported in Suwannee County. Major cities averaged high tem-u
peratures in the 60s, 70s, and 80s with lows ranging from the 20sc
to 60s. Daytime temperatures reached highs in the 60s, 70s, andr
80s; lows ranged from the 20s to 50s.

FIELD CROPS
Cool season grains made slow progress due to dry conditions
in northern areas of the State and some growers made preparation
for spring crops. Winter forage growth slowed due to cold andi
frost, however, Columbia County reported sufficient growth toq
begin grazing. Pine tree planting remained active in Taylor County.u
Topsoil moisture was mostly short for the central Peninsula but
adequate for the remaining areas of the State. Subsoil moisture wasj
mostly short in the Big Bend and central Peninsula but adequate ir,
the Panhandle and southern Peninsula.

LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
The pasture condition throughout the State was very poor ton
good as some pastures were hurt by cold and drought. In tht4
Panhandle and northern areas, pasture condition was very popr tor
good with most in poor condition. Winter forage (small grains) wasit
in fair condition, set back by cold weather. Permanent pasture grassy&
(Bahia) greened up during the past couple of weeks. In the north-.
ern areas, about a third of the cool season forage pastures were just.
at sufficient growth to start grazing.. The cattle condition was poor
to excellent with most fair to good. In the central areas, pasture
condition was mostly fair. Ryegrass pasture was in poor conditions
because of drought. Cattle were being fed supplemental hay. Cold)
weather slowed forage growth. In the southwestern areas, pasture
was very poor to excellent with post in good condition. Hay and-
supplement were being fed. Pasture in some locations was still suf-
fering from flooding from Tropical Storm Fay. Statewide, cattle
condition was,very poor to excellent with most fair to good.








January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3A


FORUM
Continued From 1A


from 1968 to 1978 was a
Supreme Court decision man-
dating 100 percent valuation,
instead pf the average 60 per-
cent which had been valued.
Another huge spike was in 1993
when Hardee Power Partners
opened the first power plant.
In 2008 real property valua-
tion was $839 million and tan-
gible property (equipment, etc.)
was $775 million, for a total
taxable value of $1.614 billion.
The majority of property is
agricultural and non-agricultur-
al acreage (even though citrus
acreage has declined in the last
10 years. Next are residential
and vacant residential proper-
ties, commercial, institutional/-
government and miscellaneous.
The majority (62 percent) of
tangible property taxable value
was from the three power
plants, and only 38 percent
from other business property.
Tangible property value makes
nearly 50 percent of the total
taxable value.

FINR
The first of several current
projects discussed was for
Florida Institute for Neurologic
Rehabilitation, which has a
large facility in the Vandolah
rural center area and several
smaller ones. Operating since
1992, the one-time hunting
lodge, now provides facilities
for brain-injured people and
employs about 600 people.
They have added three units so
are only at 70 percent capacity
instead of the usual 90 percent.
The most recent $10 million,
10-acre project is a pair of 12-
bed units and vocational build-
ing in the WINNR adult living
division on Johns Road. Start-
ing this year is a $4 million
office building at Eighth and
Main in Wauchula, which will
employ about 30 people.
"Next year will be our big
year, with $25 million in pro-
jects, including a 12,000-
square-foot storage building, a
gym, three 12-bed residential
units, road work, a 9,000-
square foot vocational building,
a general store and a $700,000
swimming pool equipped for
the clients.

PRECo
Started in 1940 by local peo-
ple, Peace River Elect~ic
Cooperative Inc. spread from
Manatee, Polk and Osceola
counties all the way to Yeehaw
Junction. Its new $10 million
office building on the old 55-
acre Metheny Grove off North
Florida Avenue will be ready to
move in the last weekend in
February, reported operating
manager Bill Mulcay. An open
house will be held in March
when the final phases are com-
plete.
The current staff will fill
about 60 percent of the build-
ing, with anticipated growth
over the next 15 to 20 years.
About 100 employees will work
in Wauchula and about 30 will
remain in the Manatee County
operations center, handling the
expansion involved in the
Lakewood Ranch area.
Mulcay said the company is
also in the first year of a $60
million capital expansion, in-
cluding a new substation and
three replacement transformers
to increase size and capacity.
"At this time there are no plans
to change rates. They will be
stable for the next 12 to 13
m ntlis," he said.

INSURANCE
HEADQUARTERS
Joe Albritton of Albritton
Insurance LLC gave an update
on the proposed regional head-
quarters to be built in a hurri-
cane-resistant building in Wau-
chula. Plans for the huge center
to have 100 to 150 white-collar
jobs have "gone as far as they
can. Albritton is in the process "
of hiring a chief executive offi-
cer, has verbally hired a senior
vice-president of marketing,
completed a lengthy and robust
business development plan and
is 'in line to receive 45,000 to
60',000 policies of the state-run
catastrophic insurance program
when it is stabilized by the leg-
islature.
The current economic crisis
has stalled the final stamp of
approval when the new compa-


ny has the $1.1 million surplus
funding pool required to start
the business. Albritton has been
working with European, Ber-
muda and New York resources
to get this going.

MILLS ASSISTED LIVING
Stu Mills of the Doylestown,
Pa. Mills Development Group
LLC, said he has been working
for six to eight months on plans
for the senior facility planned
on 72 acres on the west side of


Wauchula, which will need 50
to 75 full-time employees.
The company's bid for an up
to $30 million economic stimu-
lus, tax exempt bond issue was-
immediately approved. As soon
as the bonding company gets
the funding, construction will
start. It will take about a year to
build and a year to 18 months to
fill up, said Mills. A marketing
team will work with churches,
civic groups, the hospital and
others to take residents from
areas in a 30-mile radius.
Mills described the three-fold
project he has in other loca-
tions. He will start here with the
first phase of independent liv-
ing with several different size,
and price, apartments. Resi-
dents can own their vehicles or
will be provided transportation
for medical appointments,
church, shopping, etc. There is
'a full-time activities director.
When the time is right, a res-
ident can move to the assisted
living portion, which provides a
greater level of care, assistance
with bathing, dressing and daily
caregivers.
The final phase is for the 47
percent of people age 85 and
older who have some form of
dementia and need closer super-
vision and assistance.

AIRPORT
The mega-airport in western
Hardee County proposed by
John Reed and Van Fleet has
stalled due to funding in these
economic times.
However, Fred Fox, a Daeda-
lus aviation consultant well-
known in the aviation industry,
said a Jan. 12 conference with
the Florida Department of.
Transportation (F-DOT) recog-
nized the need for "a centrally
located air cargo site." Ford has
been commissioned to do a
$200,000 study for the need.
British Airways has been
sending a Boeing 767 wide-
body daily from Columbia to
Miami on to London. The
Miami airport cannot handle the
job, causing a three-day delay
for U.S. inspectors to check
flowers, meats, vegetables and
fruits, causing a lot of spoilage.
They are now taking their
flights through Barbados. '
Ford is also working with the
.U.S. Trade & Development
Commission on an alternative
northern Mexico/southern U.S.
passenger site, rather than
Mexico City.
With his experience, Ford
feels a Hardee County site
would be able to handle fresh
foods and flowers, with rapid
access up SR62 to SR37 to 1-4
to go west to 1-75 or east to 1-95
and carry cargo all over the U.S.

JATROPHA
Lambert reported on the new
biodiesel fuel plant which is
being grown in south Florida.
Presented here in a November
seminar, the plant can yield up
to 10 times the amount of oil of
typical oil plants like soybeans
or canola and can more easily
be converted to biodiesel fuel.
Lambert said there will need
to be some gene-splicing to
allow the plant to be grown this
far north because of the cold
weather. "We are looking for an
alternate crop. With 600 square
miles in the county, most avail-
able for agriculture, there's a
place for it, and we also hope to
get some of citrus problems.
corrected," he said. *

SYNAGRO
A residuals management
company, Synagro is a member


of The Carlyle Group and has -home rule. Hardee County does:
600 plants on over 900,000 not attempt to interfere with'
acres all over the nation, from major exceptions or Develop-
Hawaii to New York. The ments of Regional Impact in.
Texas-based company owns, or 'those counties and feel they'
uses, rail and truck transpora- should trust Hardee County and
tion. the Central Florida Regional
Regional vice-president Les Planning Council (CFRPC) to
Kemp said the company pro- do its job up here, says the let-
poses a five-acre site for its ter. The insatiable need for
$65-75 million project in water by the more populous
Hardee County, which would counties does not justify
take Class B and eventually appealing the local decisions, it
Class A sludge (treated solid adds, appealing to the counties
waste from wastewater and to withdraw opposition. The let-
water treatment plants) from as ter was approved by the com-
far away from St. Petersburg. mission.
It takes the sludge and con- S
verts it into pellets and compost SITE SELECTION
used in fertilizer for agriculture, Economic Development
landscaping or erosion control Coordinator Sarah Pelham
and for renewable energy at described the site selection
power plants, cement kiln and process EDC and IDA use to
similar businesses. "grab onto a possible project."
With its state-of-the-art, heat- By word of mouth, phone calls,
drying technology, the local advertising locally, regionally
plant could handle up to and nationally, from FHREDI
400,000 pounds of biosolids and Enterprise Florida, refer-
daily in a clean, non-odorous rals of possible business loca-
environment. tions or relocations/expansions
Lambert said he had poor come to Pelham.
visions of what such a plant One of her jobs is to 'gather
would be like, but that changed reams of information" prospec-
after visiting the Synagro plant tive clients want on utilities
in Pinellas County. "It was (electric, natural gas), trans-
really clean, immaculate. There portation (rail, truck), available
was no noxious odor." I o.ation rinlntivrk (vntbr-


COMMERCE PARK
Lambert said there is still
room in the initial 100-acre
Commerce Park and there are
no plans immediately to use the
104 acres south of it purchased
less than a year ago for $1.5
million. He immediately said,
however, that negotiations have
been going with one client who
may want to use that whole por-
tion. "We need movement in the
economic market in order to
move forward.
He said he was excited with
the paving of Gebhart Road,
which "is a really good im-
provement." It provides better
access for the commercial vehi-
cles using the park off SR 62.

MOSAIC
One of the first discussions of
the future was the Mosaic
Fertilizer progress in getting
approval for extension of the
South Fort Meade Mine into
Hardee County, which., has
been going on for over five
years. The county's 10-year,
$42 million economic stimulus
agreement with Mosaic only
begins with the first year of
mining that area.
Mosaic Vice-President Tom
Myers said the agreement has
been held up because of glitch-
es in the permitting process
because of appeals by Lee and
Sarasota counties. After three
weeks of administrative law
judge hearings in Tallahaassee
in November, a recommenda-
tion went to the state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion on Dec. 18 to issue its per-
mit approvals. The two counties
filed an exception on Jan. 5, and
DEP has until Feb. 2 to issue a
final order.
There is consideration of ask-
ing the counties to post bond for
money damages to the company
caused by the delays. Once the
DEP final permit is issued, that
provides a water quality certifi-
cation necessary for the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers to
issue the final permit.
Lambert read a letter to be:
signed by the Chamber of Com-
merce chairman, EDC chair-
man, Commission Chairman
Dale Johnson and president of
IDA and sent to Sarasota and
Lee counties, emphasizing


ABOUT ...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each
additional word is 20 cents. Ads in all cap-
itals are 32 cents per word. Headlines are
$2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $3
extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


prise Zone, Brownfield area),
and demographics (available
workforce and/or training for
them). A packet of this informa-
tion is immediately sent to
clients and follow-up contacts
made with them.
"It takes a lot of planning and
work to prepare for smart
planned growth," she said.,

GIS
Analyst Bryan McCall ex-
plained the Geographic Inform-
ation System role in strategic
planning for commercial, in-
dustrial, real estate, law en-
forcement, public health, prop-
erty titles, disaster recovery,
economic development and
growth management, and utili-
ties and services.
The Hardee County website,
which anyone can access, has
links to land resource data,
including an aerial map, which
is movable and sizable, and
shows water bodies, wetlands,


SArts and Crafts Rules


Categories

Breads Quick Yeast
Cakes (plain or decorated), Cookies, & Pies
Candy
Needlepoint
Latch Hook Items
Crocket, Knit and Embroidery Items
Pottery
Painting (Oil, Watercolor, or Charcoal)
Photography (must be framed)
Woodworking

1. Participation is open to all residents of Hardee County.

2. All exhibits should be brought in person to the exhibit hall between
1:00 4:00 PM on Sunday, February 15, 2009.

3. All exhibits will be required to remain on display until Sunday,
February 22"". Exhibits must be picked up prior to 4:00 PM on Sunday.

4. Each entry should be labeled with the name of the person responsible for
its creation in a manner that can be concealed from the judges.
5. Exhibitors in the youth division must be school age and be residents of the
county and/or enrolled in the Hardee County School System youth
exhibitors will be judged separately from the adult division.
6. All entries must be clean and in good condition.
7. Entries should have been created between the end of the 2008 fair and prior
to the 2009 fair.
8. All canned products must be in standard canning jars (half-pint, pint or
quart). Jars must be clean and no rust apparent on rings or jars. Judging
will be based on: color, ripeness, and taste.
9. Bread categories must consist of four muffins or one loaf on a plate and
covered with clear plastic wrap. Judging will be based on: taste, texture,
and appearance.
10. Cookies must be on a plate, covered with plastic wrap and can be
accompanied by an attached 3x5 recipe card. Judging will be based on:
taste, color, appearance and texture.
Judging:
A modified Danish System of judging will be used and decisions of the judges
are final. Judging will begin at 8:30 AM, Monday, February 16'".


H arde Iont x n i


institutional and public lands.
People can find out who owns
property and follow the
Property Appraiser office link
to find the record card.
People can see the big pic-
ture, where their properties fit
in with other county properties,
or zoom in to see buildings,
roads and other coordinates for
the best placement of a busi-
ness. They can print maps big
and small.

CFRPC
Jennifer Codo-Salisbury,
CFRPC director of planning,
gave an overview of the
Heartland 2060 yisioning which
has four task forces: education,
workforce and economic devel-
opment; environment and nat-
ural resources; transportation
and land use; and community
resources. Any one is invitedcto
join them as they plan for
proactive growth for the future
of Hardee and its surrounding
counties.
Agriculture, construction,
manufacturing, retail, trans-
portation and services (nursing,
communication, etc) are the
employment of the area. more
jobs will require college or
vocational education, with a
high school education or less
not adequate.
The population is getting
increasingly older, .with 27.1
percent of Florida residents to
be over age 65 and only 20.1
percent to be under 18. By
2060, one in six new Americans
will be Floridians, one of the
most populous states, along
with California and Texas. The
Heartland is expected to add
over 400,000 residents by 2030.
Florida will be a global gateway
to the nation. Future growth will
show congestion in most
Florida communities.

SUMMATION
Lambert use a quote to con-,
clude the presentation. "Success;
is not about waiting for the.
storm to pass, but rather learn-
ing to dance in the rain." There
is no intention to shackle the
local economy. We want to
maintain the quality of life
issues and continue to grow.
"We do not need to be driven
by taxing and fee schedules
which can present insurmount-
able problems to bringing busi-
ness here. The county has
grown exponentially since 1898


and will more so in the next 50
years. We need a disciplined
schedule of meetings like this, to
plan."
Commissioner Terry Atchley
spoke for his fellow officials
and said the community needs
to get on board. "I'm a die-hard
Baptist. I can't dance, but I'll
get out on the floor and waddle
with you. Remember after
Hurricane Charley outsiders
wanted tb help tell us what, to
do. We don't need that. We can
develop our own vision, even in
today's tough economic times.
We want to move forward, not
make excuses. We need a short-
range and long-term plan."
Lambert said he wanted -to,
have regular meetings with
County Manager Lex Albritton,
city managers Rick Giroux
(Wauchula), Yvonne Kimball'
(Bowling Green) and Linda
Roberson (Zolfo Springs) to
keep everyone on the same
objectives.
From the audience, Kimball
said "On behalf of Bowling
Green, I'm excited. We want to
be a part of this."




Obituaries

NANCENA FELISHA
HOLLOWAY
Nancena Felisha Holloway,
35, of Wauchula, died Tuesday,
Jan. 13, 2009, at Good Shepard
Hospice in Auburndale.
Born Sept. 24, 1973 in Wau-
chula she was a Certified
Nursing Assistant and a mem-
ber of True Holiness Church in
Zolfo Springs.
She was preceded in death by
a daughter, Afro D. Holloway.
Survivors include her moth-
er, Dorothy Mae Melton; one
brother, Jermaine King; four
sisters, Mary Helen Melton and
Savera Forest, Amanda Outley,
Sylvia Outley and Melissa
Cloud, all of Wauchula; and
numerous relatives
Visitation will be Friday, Jan.
23, from 10 a.m. to noon at the
funeral chapel and services will
follow at 2 p.m. at Brant
Funeral Chapel with Bishop
Young Laster officiating.
Interment will follow at
Magnolia Manor Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Home
Wauchula










4A The Herald-Advocate, January 22. 2009


LAWRENCE 'LARRY'
SMITH JR.
Lawrence "Larry" Smith Jr.,
60, of Wauchula, died Wednes-
day, Jan., 14, 2009, at Sebring.
Born in Fort Myers, on Dec.
22, 1948, he lived in Hardee
County for 43 years. He was a
funeral attendant for Robarts
Funeral Homes and was a
Jehovah's Witness.
He was preceded in death by
his mother, Helen Smith; and
two sisters, Betty Ward and
Shirley Tillmran.
Survivors include his wife
Patricia Herrin Smith of Wau-
chula; one daughter, Angela
Smith Harllee of Enterprise,
Ala.; one son, Lawrence Smith
III "Little Larry" of Enterprise,
Ala.; two grandchildren, Addie
Harllee of Sebring, and Bruin
"Bear" Haillee of Enterprise,
Ala.; three brothers, David
Allen Smith and wife Susan of
Avon Park, Philip Smith and
wife Sandra of Wauchula, and
Ernie Bryant and wife Denise
of Avon Park; three sisters,
Wanda Rodgers and husband
Jerry of Wauchula, Lorine Platt
and husband Sam of Avon Park,
and Lisa Prestridge and hus-
band J.R. of Zolfo Springs; and
numerous nieces and nephews.
Visitation was Friday, Jan.
16, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel. Services were
Saturday at 3 p.m. at the King-
dom Hall in Wauchula with
Steven Storts officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Friendship
Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

HAROLD MEDLEY
Harold Medley, 80, of Scott
City, Mo., died Wednesday, Jan.
7, 2009.
Born Sept. 1, 1928, in St.
Louis, Mo. he lived in Wau-
chula from 1966 to 1992 and
was retired from Agrico Chemi-
cal Co. of Fort Meade. He
served in the U.S. Army and
was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Scott City,
Mo.
He was preceded in death by
three brothers and a sister.
Survivors include his wife,
Mitzie Medley; six daughters,
Pat Criswell and husband'
Tommy of Riverview, Carolyn
Raska and husband Don of
Indjana, Barbara Easto.,of
Geqrgia, Janet McClenitiof.
Cape Girardeau, Mo., Debra
Wilson of Scott City, Mo., and
Crystal Crawford Hoke and
husband Herb of Scott City,
Mo.; one sister, Irene Gray of
Belleville, Ill.; 14 grandchil-
dren; and 18 great-grandchil-
dren.
Services were held Sunday,
Jan. 11, at the funeral chapel
with the Rev. Gregg Fina offici-
ating. Full military honors were
given by the, Missouri Honors
Team.
Amick-Burnett
Funeral Home
Scott City, Mo.


For

Condolence Purposes

Mitzie Medley

314 Missouri St.

Scott City, MO 63780






Ric Button Tom Robarts
Monuments
including'
set in cemetery
from $335
245-8956
established 1999 10i


LAWRENCE 'LARRY'
SMITH JR.
Lawrence "Larry" Smith
Jr., 60, of Wauchula, died
Wednesday, Jan., 14, 2009, at
Sebring.
Born in Fort Myers, on
Dec. 22, 1948, he lived in
Hardee County for 43 years.
He was a funeral attendant
for Robarts Funeral Homes
and was a Jehovah's Witness.
He was preceded in death
by his mother, Helen Smith;
and two sisters, Betty Ward
and Shirley Tillman.
Survivors include his wife
Patricia Herrin Smith of
Wauchula; one daughter,
Angela Smith Harllee of
Enterprise, Ala.; one son,
Lawrence Smith III "Little
Larry" of Enterprise, Ala.;
two grandchildren, Addie
Harllee of Sebring, and Bruin
"Bear" Harllee of Enterprise,
Ala.; three brothers, David
Allen Smith and wife Susan
of Avon Park, Philip Smith
and wife Sandra of Wau-
chula, and Ernie Bryant and
wife Denise of Avon Park;
three sisters, Wanda Rodgers
and husband Jerry or Wau-
chula, Lorine Platt and hus-
band Sam of Avon Park, and
Lisa Prestridge and husband
J.R. of Zolfo Springs; and
numerous 'nieces, nephews,
extended family, and friends.
t Visitation was Friday, Jan.
16, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel.
Services were Saturday at 3
p.m. at the Kingdom Hall in
Wauchula with Steven Storts
officiating with interment
following at Friendship
Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home



10 HOURS A
MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)





Funeral Director

Simple Direct
Cremation
from
$750
ICS Cremation and
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2620D Highlands Road,
Harbour Heights, FL 33983

245-8956,
.


PHILIP EDWARD
GLORIOUS
Philip Edward Glorius
died peacefully at his home,
in Wauchula, on Saturday,
January 17, 2009, with his
family at his side.
He was born on April 26,
1914, in Wauchula, the son of
Philip I and Catherine Glor-
ius. He was a devoted hus-
band, loving father, proud'
grandfather and great-grand-
father, and loyal friend to all
those who knew him.
Mr. Glorius devoted his
life to serving Christ. He was
a dedicated and faithful mem-
ber of First United Methodist
Church of Wauchula for more
'than 57 years, serving on var-
ious church committees,
including the Pastor-Parish
committee. He was an usher
and an active member of the
men's bible class.
He was 61ll known and
loved throughout Hardee and
surrounding counties as an
insurance agent for, Suthern
Life and Health Insurance
Company for 40 years.
Mr. Glorius served many
years and continued to be
active with Hope of Hardee.
He was an election official as
recently as the 2008 presiden-
tial election. For many years
he was very active in the
Wauchula Elks Club, serving
as Exalted Ruler and Esquire.
Mr. Glorius was preceded
in death by his granddaugh-
ter, Dr. Tammy Pendergrass.
of Marietta, Ga.
He is survived by his wife
of 73 years, Grace Marguerite
Glorius; one son, Larry
'Glorius a d' wf& Jean'~i-f'
Valdosta, Ga.; one daughter,
Sharon Ghioto and husband
Jim of West Palm Beach;
three grandchildren, Kimber-
ly Tolle and husband Albert,
Kevin Glorius and wife
Leigh, and Philip Justiss and-
wife Lauren; and five great-
grandchildren, Josh, Meg and
Anna Grace Glorius, Caleb
Tolle of Valdosta, Ga., and
William Justiss of Seagrove
Beach.
Visitation, was held Tues-
day, January'20, 10 to 11 a.m.
followed by services at 11
a.m. at Wauchula First United
Methodist Church with
Pastor Rick Walker officiat-
ing. Interment followed at
Wauchula Cemetery.

Brant Funeral

Chapel,
"Our' family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula


DAVID STANLEY SHEARL
David Stanley Shearl, 62, of
Fort Meade died Friday, Jan.
16, 2009, at his home.
Born March 13, 1946 he
moved to Fort Meade from
Bartow in 1998. He worked for
the City of Bartow in the Public
Works Department, was of the
Pentecostal faith and a U.S.
Army veteran.
He was preceded in death by
his father, Hearl C. Shearl and
his brother, Eugene Shearl.
Survivors include his wife,
Cheryl F. Shearl; one son, Geoff
Meyer of Grand Island, Neb.;
one daughter, Andrea Barnett
and husband Wes of Lakeland;
mother, Ruby Shearl, of Akron,
Ohio; one brother, Donald
Shearl of Lakelarnd; one sister,
Linda Shearl of Akron, Ohio;
and two grandchildren, Taylor
Burnett and Isaac Meyer.
Visitation was Tuesday, Jan.
20, from 6 to 8 p.m. with a
memorial service at 7 p.m. at
the funeral home.,
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade


Learn CPR
Save a Life
Become certified to save a
life on Saturday from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. The Hardee County
Health Department will be
training on CPR and First
Aid. Space is limited.
Registration is required.
There is a cost of $30 per
person, which includes all
manuals and certification
cards. Forrnore InfoYrrmation,
"call Erin"'at 773S4161 ext.
176.

More grows in the garden
than the gardener sows.
-Old Spanish Proverb


PHILIP EDWARD
GLORIOUS
Philip Edward Glorius, 94,
of Wauchula, died Saturday,
Jan. 17, 2009, at his home.
Born in Wauchula, on April
26, 1914, he was a lifelong res-
ident of Hardee County. He was
an insurance agent and a mem-
ber of First United Methodist
Church of Wauchula. He served
as an election official, a mem-
ber of Wauchula Elks Club and
served as Exalted Ruler and
Esquire, and Hope of Hardee.
He was preceded in death by
his granddaughter, Dr. Tammy
Pendergrass.
Survivors include his wife of
73 years, Grace Marguerite
Glorius; one son, Larry Glorius
and wife Jean of Valdosta, Ga.;
one daughter, Sharon Ghioto
and husband Jim of West Palm
Beach; three grandchildren,
Kimberly Tolle and husband
Albert, Kevin Glorius and wife
Leigh, and Philip Justiss and
wife Lauren; and five great-
grandchildren, Josh, Meg and
Anna Grace Glorius,Caleb
Tolle of Valdosta, Ga., and
William Justiss of Seagrove
Beach.
Visitation was Tuesday, Jan.
20, from 10 to 11 a.m. at First
United Methodist Church with
services following at 11 a.m.
with Pastor Rick Walter offici-
ating. Interment followed at
Wauchula Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Home
Wauchula







Training Offered
For Caregivers
Training to help care-
givers take care of people
suffering from Alzheimer's
Disease will be offered at
Hope of Hardee, 310 N.
Eighth Ave., Wauchula,
tomorrow (Friday) and Feb.
5 from 1 to 2 p.m. and on
Feb. 6, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The training, put on by
-the Alzheimer's Association,
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter,'
will cover dementia and safe
return. There will also be a
free memory screening. For
more information and to reg-
ister, call Lisa Rodriguez at
863-385-3444.


Obituaries


MOST TIEALTH PROFESSIONALS SAY
THAT PERSON SHOULD GET 20 TO 30
MINUTES OF MODERATE PHYSICAL
ACTIVrTYADAY.


IMPORTANT PUBLIC MESSAGE
REGARDING PRE-PAID FUNERAL PLANS
ROBARTS FAMILY FUNERAL HOME IS CURRENTLY THE ONLY FUNERAL
HoME IN HARDEE COUNTY THAT IS LICENSED AND CERTIFIED TO OFFER
PRE-PAID FUNERAL PLANS. (PRE-ARRANGEMENTS)
.. . .I 11.. j I---


Your funds are placed in a completely safe trust fund that is regulated by
the Florida Department of Financial Services, Funeral and Cemetery
Board. This licensing and regulation is for your protection and peace of
mind so you know your money is safe.

If you. currently have a pre-paid plan with another firm but would like us
to provide the services. WE WILL HONOR ANY PRE-ARRANGED
FUNERAL PLAN at no additional cost to you.

So if you would like more information just' give us a call or stop by and
we'll be glad to help you in any way we can.

Robarts Family Funeral Home is proud to have a proven record of
compassionate'care and dependable service for many years.
We thank you for the privilege of allowing us to serve you.


I rKUBAKIS"
FAMILYFUNERALHOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906


529 WEST MAIN STREET. WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873 863-773-9773


1:8tft


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BURTON & BURTON, RA.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
501 WEST MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873-1729
TELEPHONE (863) 773-3241

WILLS & TRUSTS
PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
LARGE & SMALL ESTATES
HOMESTEAD DETERMINATION
DURABLE POWERS OF ATTORNEY
LIVING WILLS GUARDIANSHIPS
1:22c


SUTTON MONUMErrs













Any Style Any Design
Call for a Saturday Appt.

228 North 6th Ave.
Comer of Oak & US Hwy 17
Across from Hess
773-062511:


THURSDAY, JAN. 22
VHardee County. Com-
mission, regular/zoning
meeting, 'Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 200 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.'

FRIDAY, JAN. 23
VHardee Legislative Dele-
gation, public meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex 1, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 10 a.m.
MONDAY, JAN. 26
/Project Graduation,
meeting, Peace Valley
Lutheran Church, 1643 Sten-
strom Road, Wauchula, 6
p.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 29
*Zolfo Springs Elemen-
tary School, advisory council
meeting, Media Center, 3215
Schoolhouse Road, Zolfo
Springs, 6:30 p.m.


SFCC Offers
Yard Workshop
Turn your yard into an
oasis with the help of the
Florida-Friendly Yards work-
shop Saturday at the South
Florida Community College
DeSoto and Hardee cam-
puses.
Registration begins at 7:45
a.m. at the DeSoto campus
and at 12:45 p.m. at the
Hardee campus. For more
information, visit www.-
chnep.org or call toll-free 1-
866-835-5785 ext. 240.

Bachelor's fare: bread and
cheese, and kisses.








January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Museum Musings
By Sandy Scott
Cracker Trail Museum Curator


'HIGHWAYMEN' ARTIST AL BLACK
The Christmas Open House hosted by Cracker Trail Museum
on Dec. 22 proved to be a huge success, with 175 guests enjoying
refreshments and visiting with Highwayman Al Black.
Black was accompanied by a second generation of the famed
group, A'J. Brown, who brought a selection of her paintings.
Throughout the evening, they both visited with museum guests,
explaining their own special style of painting.
Many guests brought with them paintings that they had
acquired over the years, many of those from the 1950s when Black
could be seen around downtown streets selling his not-yet-famous
paintings from the trunk of his car.
Frances Davis recalled those times when Davis & Roberts
Insurance Agency was located across the street from The Herald-
Advocate and her husband, Dave, walked over as Black visited that
office and purchased one of his paintings.
While Black was thrilled to see some of his first paintings
again, he also had on display a good variety of his current paint-
ings, many of which were sold, perhaps for a last-minute Christmas
gift. Brown's style of painting is very similar to Black's and hers,
too, lined the walls and cases of the museum for guests to admire
and purchase.


Paintings lined the hallways in the case room at the
museum, as visitors took in the art and the exhibits the
facility has to offer.


Rhonda and Tim Darty, Hardee County employees, with
one of the works that they, too, discovered was painted
by the famed artist.
. '. l, .. .. .. .. 'n.


This was the second year that Cracker Trail Museum hosted a
Christmas Open House, and it allowed yet another group of Hardee
County citizens to view the contents of this 44-year-old institution.
Many of the guests remarked that it had been a number of years
since they had been to the museum. and that they were pleased to
see the variety of items that had, ',en acquired.
Cracker Trail Museum is now moving forward readying for
yet another event, Pioneer-Park Days, which will be held March 4-
8. Many events and activities are being planned for the museum
and surrounding Pioneer Village during that time, and we look for-
ward to visiting with those of you who also have not been inside
Cracker Trail Museum in quite some time.


Brooke Shaw (left) with second-generation Highwaymen
artist A.J. Brown.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Artist Al Black, of the famed Highwaymen, is reunited
with his early works as visitors to the open house
brought paintings they had purchased long ago.


Gary Delatogr (right)rvisits with the artist.


Wendell Turner and Frances Davis, who remembers when
AI Black sold paintings out of his trunk in downtown
Wauchula.
The golden opportunity you are seeking Is in yourself. It is not
In your environment; It Is not In luck or chance, or the help of
others; it Is In yourself alone.
-Orison Swett Marden




Fun By The
9 6 5 Numbers
7 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
3 2 6 1 sudoku. This
mind-bending
5 8 7 puzzle will have
you hooked from
4 9 the moment you
__ square off, so
2 4 8 sharpen your
2 4 8 pencil ad put
4 9 3 yoursudoku
S9 1 1 savvy to the test!
7 2 4
6 1 2
L.vi:; Advanced
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle
8 81.9 6 9

C 6 L. L 9jaV9
6 9 V 8 99L I. T

9 LZ I. 9 V iE 69
L 1.9V9T 96

8 9 9 6 z L I.
UM:SNV


PIONEER PARK BAYS



COYER ART CONTEST

The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artwork for the
front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on
Hardee County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


ADULT DIVISION


First place:


Second place:


Third place:


* $200 U.S. Savings Bond.
* Publication of your work on the front cover.
* Your photo and biographical story inside.


* $100 U.S. Savings Bond.
* Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.

* $50 U.S. Savings Bond.
* Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.


CHILDREN'S DIVISION (12 AND UNDER)
A week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days, publication of the artwork, plus ..


First place:


* $50 U.S. Savings Bond.
* Publication on the back cover.


Second place: $15 Cash.


Third place:


* $10 Cash.


Son try Thompson

JUDGES
JANE LONG PIONEER PARK DAYS DIRECTOR
NICK SUDZINA COURT ADMINISTRATOR FOR 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
SUSAN W. ROBERTS CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR 10OTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND
EIGHTH-GENERATION FLORIDIAN


RULES:
1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
2) Artwork must be original.
3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must
be depicted.
4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.
5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high (vertical), including
lettering which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2009."
6) Deadline is Monday, Feb. 16, at noon.

TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the drawing.
Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail to Cover Art
Contest, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.








6A The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009


'Cats Challenge

By JOAN SEAMAN -hoops. Louisjeune nailed a pair
Of The Herald-Advocate of free throws and Jontes
A three-pointer ended the dropped one in from the top of
game. the key. Hardee led 27-23 going
Most Hardee Wildcat fans into the final eight minutes.
woold dispute that Bulldog Jajuan Hooks drove the key
senior Anthony Ruth got his and dished to Jarrell Ellis to p'..
shot off before the final buzzer, Hardee up 29-23 as the fourth
but it gave DeSoto a 40-39 vic- period started. Hardee kept just
tory on Thursday night. ahead, but there was no quit in
It was, one of three games the DeSoto. A Summers shot at the
'Cats played last week. They 2:40 made it a 33-32 as Hardee
have a trio of road games this clung to its lead.
week and finish up with two Jones dished to Louisjeune
more road games. and a trey by Anderson circled
Hardee went to Sebring on and finally dropped in the hole.
Tuesday, visit Mulberry today Hardee was up 38-32. But,
(Thursday) and travel to within 30 seconds, a pair of free
Sarasota Booker on Friday throws and a trey by Ruth nar-
evening. There's a rematch at rowed it to 38-37. DeSoto
DeSoto next Friday and the sea- pressed on the inbounds play,
son finale, a varsity-only game fouling Louisjeune with 11.6
at Okeechobee. on Feb. 3, seconds left; he missed both
before playoffs begin the fol- shots.
lowing week. As the seconds ran off, the
Hardee crowd was on its feet .
AVON PARK 59, Again on an inbounds play,
HARDEE 41 Louisjeune was fouled, with 2.5
"It was a matter of a few too seconds left. He hit one of two
many turnovers and missing a to give Hardee a 39-37 lead.
few good shots. Avon Park hurt DeSoto rebounded and called
us with their two big men time out.
inside. Our lack of size and cold The officials, who are all
shooting did us in," said Head scheduled to do the playoff
Coach Vance Dickey of last finals this year were being eval-
Tuesday's trip to Avon Park. uated by a retiring senior offi-.
Alonzo Robinson had 27 cial at courtside. For some rea-
points and Cleveland Knoles son, they elected to put, the
added 14. Avierre Conner had clock from 1.9 seconds back to
seven points and four other Red 2.5. DeSoto had to take the ball
Devils had five or less points, under the Hardee basket. Ruth
Hardee players were con- raced through the crowd ari hit
trained by the taller opponents a three-pointer. The crowd
and 18 fouls which were called booed to no avail as the officials
while the physical Avon Park quickly left the court.
squad had only 12. Rhoten acknowledged "We
Scoring for Hardee were didn't deserve to win this game.
Antjuan Jones with 10 points, Your team outplayed us from
and Postene Louisjeune, Carl start to, finish. Sometimes, it's
"Junior" Brown and Jarrell better to be lucky than good,"
Ellis, each with a half dozen he said.
points. Jajuan Hooks added, 'I'm so proud of our guys.
five, Keshun Rivers four, and They played a little more phys-
Andrew Hooks and Lucas ical and challenged them. They
Juarez each two points. Tre' were an average of four to five
Anderson and Justin Bromley inches taller and 40 to 50
were unable to score, but pounds heavier per, man. Pound
Anderson added twin steals and -for pound, we hung with them..
Bromley a rebound and an Several people have improved
assist Juarez had three rebounds in several areas," Dickey said.
and a steal, Ellis five rebounds "We may have lost in the
and a blocked shot and scorebook. Life is about move-
Louisjeunie three rebounds. ment. You either can'go forward
or backward. We are turning
DESOTO 40,. negatives into positives. This is
-HARDEE 39. bur message :to the players,
A pair of seniors were set to clean up the details (turnovers,
tip' it off, Postene Louisjeune, free throws). If.we pay attention
for Hardee and Jumane Robin- to details, we can win. We'll
son for DeSoto. They both just go and do our best at
missed the ball and there was a Palmetto tomorrow," Dickey
mad scramble until Anderson continued.
came up with it for the For DeSoto, Ruth was high
Wildcats. In the back and forth scorer with 11 points, nine in
first two minutes. Louisjeune. the crucial fourth quarter,.
opened with a trey from the cor- Robinson and Summers each
ner and Jones banked one in on had nine and Summersett had
an inbounds play. DeSoto coach eight, making the majority of
Chip Rhoten called time out. scoring for the four senior
It was more than a full minute starters.
before anyone scored. Finally Hardee was led by Anderson
Greg Summers, one of four who had 14 points, some every
senior starters on the Bulldog period. Louisjeune had eight,
squad, took a pass from class-, Jones and Ellis each six, Hooks
mate Darryl Summersett for a two and Bromley a free throw.
DeSoto deuce. Shortly, Sum- PALMETTO 72,
mersett added two more. HARDEE 35
Another minute went by and At Palmetto on Fridaynight,
James Green, the only soph on after the exhausting thriller on
the DeSoto squad, hit one-of- Thursday evening, Hardee
two to tie the game 5-5. could never get on track.L The
There was no other scoring in 'Cats were down: 27-14 at the
the first quarter until Jones end of the first period and never
grabbed a defensive rebound recovered. The Tigers didn't
and threw long to Anderson for pull their starters until the final
a deuce which beat the buzzer. p d ther arters until the final
Hardee led 7-5. period. They were led by 17
Ruth hit the first of five treys points by Reggie Baity and
to open the second period and Trevante Rhodes with 14. Miles
give DeSoto its first lead. Waiters had 11 points and no
Within 69 seconds, DeSoto had other Palmetto player had more
upped its lead to 13-7, before than eight.
Hardee fought back, with Jones For Hardee, Anderson hit
going down the key for a lay-in four treys and a deuce for 14
to make it 16-18 at halftime. points. Louisjeune added nine,
A trey and a deuce evened the Brown six, Jones three, Ellis
score to 21-21 .at the five- two and Juarez one point. \
minute mark of the third stanza. JV GAMES
Jones and Summersett traded Junior varsity games have


Mike, Anarah Schmidt Win

Jan. 18 Bass Tournament


The team of Mike and Anarah
Schmidt won the Jan. 18 Bass
Anglers of Hardee County
Tournament held at the Chain
of Lakes in Winter Haven.
Their total weight of bass was
12.65 pounds.
Second place honors went to
Ray Rivas and Jeremy


Goodwyn with 10.64 pounds.
Rivas won the big bass division
with 6.81 pounds.
Joe and Bobby Mullins won
third place team honors with
9.88 pounds.
The next tournament will be
held at Lake Okeechobee on
Feb. 8.


PRNT RS- P BLSHE SS

115 S.*7th Av .W uhl F 387


DeSoto
.been few and far between thi-.
season as some teams opt to let
their JVs play anything but,
local games. Off since Dec. 16,
the Hardee JV had a' pair of
games last week. With an inex-
perienced squad getting little
experience, Hardee lost both its
games last week.
At Avon Park on Tuesday,
,Hardee lost 52-38 as the junior
Red Devils put 20 points on the
board in the second quarter
alone. For Hardee Ivan Fermin
was the only player in double
digits, with a dozen points.
Deonte Evans added eight,
Quintin Carlton seven, Ricardo
Fermin six, Murrell Winter
three and Jeremy Rowe two
points. Sammy Cisneros,
Dalton Hewett and Jesse
Belcher added to the floor
game.
Against DeSoto, Hardee
stayed close early, tied at 4-4
before DeSoto forged ahead to
lead 9-4 at the end of the first
period and 21-12 by halftime.
Hardee made a run in the third
quarter, narrowing the score to
32-30. DeSoto surged to start
the final period, and although
Winter blocked a shot and
grabbed a couple of rebounds,
Hardee could not hold off
DeSoto and lost 48-41.
A. Washington led DeSoto
with 12 points, two players had
seven points and five others six
points or less. For !Hardee,
Evans was the game's high
scorer with 18 points, including
five-for-five from 'the free
throw line. Ricardo Fermin had
eight, Carltoni six, Ivan Fermin
five and Cisneros 'five points.
Winter added one-of-two at the
foul line. Rowe, Hewett and'
Belcher added to the floor.
game.


: PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON :
The junior varsity hoop squad is mostly players fairly new to the sport; (In front, from left) Ivan Fermin, Dalton Hewett,
Deonte Evans, Sammy Cisneros and Ricardo Fermin; (back) Head Coach Rod Smith, Jesse Belcher, Murrell Winter,
Jeremy Rowe and Coach Shawn Rivers.


Varsity basketball lost a heartbreaker at the buzzer against DeSoto. Kneeling (left to right) are Andrew Hooks, D'Vonte
Hooks, Jajuan Hooks, Tre' Anderson, Keshun Rivers and AntJuan Jones; (back) Coach Chris Polly, Carl "Junior"
Brown, Jarrell Ellis, Postene Loulsjeune, Lucas Juarez, Justin Bromley and Head Coach Vance Dickey.








January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7A


BOOMING BOUTIQUE With prices on clothing, acces-
sories and d6cor sky-rocketing, it can be disheartening to shop at
any department store.
Mom & Me consignment boutique, owned and operated by
Cathy Hemmelstein, is the perfect place to find all of your family's
needs at a low price.
The boutique first opened in October of 2007 with the inspira-
tion of Hemmelstein's daughter and co-owner, Staci Bustle. Bustle
had always dreamed of opening up her very own consignment shop
and finally made it happen with the help of her mother.
Many characteristics of the shop have been altered to better fit
the needs of the customers. Since opening, a wide variety of acces-
sories, home d6cor and clothes have been added.
Not only have a variety of assortments been added, but the
store itself received a makeover when Bustle was once again
inspired to better the overall appearance of the store.
"She is definitely the idea person. We redecorated for four
hours, which wasn't that bad, and completely changed the overall
look of the store," said Hemmelstein.


PHOTOS BY SAVANNAH 1-AIHGLOTH
Cathy Hemmelstein, owner of Mom & Me consignment
boutique, is confident that her business has the best
quality items at a low price to fit your financial needs.
To better assist you during your time of shopping, Mom & Me
has a designated children's area with a television, toys and music
to keep your little one occupied.
While your child is entertained by the array of exciting games
and toys, you can shop for any of the home d6cor, shoes, acces-
sories, candles, Melissa and Doug toys, gift items by local crafters
and spa sets available in the store. Women's clothing ranges from
size 0 to 28.
Baby'items are also for sale, including an assortment of cribs,
infant games, car seats and many other necessities for your infant.
Although Mom & Me offers a wide variety of inexpensive
items, it is important that folks throughout the community remem-
ber to save some items left over from spring cleaning to take to the
boutique.
Because Mom & Me owners find pride in the items they carry
in their store, all clothes must be of high quality, freshly laundered,
no stains or rips and in very good shape. If you would like to drop


off clothes that don't fit the previous criteria, Mom Me will
deliver the clothes to a local church.
Due to the requirements for the clothing accepted, customers
can rest assured that their items are of the highest quality at a low
price.
"Pricewise you can't beat it. Even Wal-Mart is expensive now.
There is no comparison of the price and quality of the clothes," said
Hemmelstein. Mom & Me also hosts frequent seasonal discounts.
Layaway is available for customers, especially expecting
mothers who are in need of baby supplies plus time pay off pur-
chases.
Mom & Me is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.
For more information, call Hemmelstein at 767-0020 or visit
and start shopping at 130 W. Main St., across the street from Java
Caf6.

RAPID REPAIR You finally found that perfect house that
you can call home, moved in your furniture and hauled in all your
shiny new appliances.
After a several months of using your brand-new microwave, it
breaks, leaving you and your dinner cold and angry. Before you
leave it for the garbage truck, let Donavan Tollison repair your bro-
ken appliances.
"People usually have the old mentality to just trash any broken
appliances. If it can be fixed, then you should repair it," said
Tollison.
Tollison first dived into the repair service when he left correc-
tional institution work after 13 years of service to work with an
appliance repair company. After working as a lead tech for a few
years, Tollison decided to put his talents to the test.
With the help of friend and co-owner Collin Furness, Tri-
County Repair now shares a building with Jesse's Auto Sales, 203B
E. Townsend St. in Wauchula. The repair service has already begun
to satisfy customers in Hardee with its eight years' worth of expe-
rience and positive attitude about every job.
"Donavan really does care about his customers and the quali-
ty of work that he does. You always get service with a smile," said
Furness.
Tollison is confident in his ability and the quality of his work,
and knows that folks would not only save money and time, but also
be more satisfied with his service.
"My repair service is the best in town. We are consistently
super-competitive and we have a modest building so that finances
and attention can be focused on the appliances and customers,"




on.






In



(863) 6


PHOTOS BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Donavan Tollison of Tri-County Repairs makes sure to
always give his customers high- quality service with a
smile.


It is obvious that Tollison is passionate about his area of work
and determined to satisfy his customers at all costs.
"I am the owner, so I am responsible for the quality of work
done. We want all of Hardee County's needs to be met. We have
the best price and the best experience. We want to be everything
our customers need us to be," said Tollison.
In the rare case that Tollison is unable to save your broken
appliance, low-price appliances of all major brands are available at
Tri-County Repair. Such appliances as refrigerators, stoves,
microwaves and washers and dryers can be purchased.
"We believe people should have options against having to
spend a lot of money on new appliances. We are licensed and
insured, and can easily install any appliances purchased from our
wide selection of items," said Tollison.
Tri-County Repair also offers another unique feature to its ser-
vice. The Power Mizzzer 7, designed by NASA, is a new item that
Tollison and Furness are offering their customers.
The Mizzzer is a device installed next to your fuse box. The
benefits of installing the Mizzzer include a savings of up to 26 per-
cent on electric bills, surge protection, added life to appliances and
a way to help conserve the earth.
"This device not only saves you money, but it is also green for
the environment. It will provide immediate savings to the owner or
we will give them a refund," said Furness, who is an authorized
distributor for the Power Mizzzer 7.
Tollison installed the Power Mizzzer 7 and saved a total of $50
just in the first month since the installation, he noted.
If you would like Tollison to tackle your repairs or if you
would like to purchase a Power Mizzer, call him at (863) 781-7680
or Furness at (954) 701-3301.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Savannah Faircloth at 773-3255 with your business news.




Disaster Action


Team Needs You!


Earn the appreciation of a
neighbor by helping him in his
greatest time of need. Become a
volunteer on the Hardee Dis-
aster Action Team of the Ameri-
can Red Cross.
The Disaster Action Team
responds to disasters in Hardee
County, such as single-family
house fires, gas leaks and other
emergencies. Training is pro-
vided by the American Red
Cross.
Participation on the team
allows members to use their
desire to serve the community
and their compassion in a
meaningful way.
Duties after training include:
Responding to a house fire
or other local disaster.
Assessment of scope and
size of disaster response.
Client interviews with
those affected by the event to
determine immediate needs.
Completion and submis-
sion of necessary forms and


reports related to the incident.
Provision of appropriate
assistance based on the chap-
ter's approval.
Arrangements for neces-
sary followup or additional
assistance to disaster victims.
Regular attendance at team
meetings and participation in
drills.
Provision of food/drink to
emergency responders as need-
ed for large-scale responses.
All Disaster Action Team
volunteers must be 18 years or
older and hold a valid driver's
license with a clean driving
record.
Transportation is a must to
ensure timely arrival to the
assigned response facility and
to attain required training locat-
ed in Manatee County.
Hardee County volunteers
have the full support of the Red
Cross Chapter Headquarters in
Bradenton. Call Brandi Jones at
773-9097 for more information.


P









8A The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009


featured creature
1


via~g.


The spotted eagle ray is one of the most beautiful creatures in the ocean and one of the largest rays. (Photo by Zig Leszczynski)


Florida's rays are majestic,


graceful, shy and shocking


By FWC Staff

At least 11 species of rays inhabit
Florida's coastal waters. Some of them
are enormous almost 30 feet across.
One of them can generate electricity to
stun its prey. Some have barbs that are
equipped with venom. All of them are
shy creatures that prefer to avoid contact
with people.
Manta ray
The largest of the rays is the manta
ray. The full-grown ones average about
22 feet from the tip of one of their pec-
toral fins (which resemble wings) to the
other (disc width), but they can reach
29.5 feet in disc width and weigh up to
3,000 pounds.
All mantas have two modified "fins"
called lobes that extend from the front
of their head just ini front of their eyes.
These fins are actually used by these
amazing fish to direct water current into
.their mouth so they can filter out their
favorite food. Early scientists thought
that the cephalic fins resembled the
- horns of a devil, thus the well-recog-
nized common name "devil rays." In
fact, the most common manta species
-'present in Florida waters is called the
devil ray. The devil ray is small in com-
parison to most other mantas, reaching a
disc width of only 4-5 feet.
Mantas sometimes show up close to
shore. At other times, people see them
over the continental shelf and over reef
habitats, usually close to the ocean's
surface. They are often seen swimming
in schools, and they sometimes leap out
of the water and land with a huge splash.
Scientists aren't sure why they jump,
however some believe it is to dislodge
parasites that often attach to the rays'
skin. Others have speculated they may
use jumping to attract mates.
Manta rays usually are dark brown,
grayish blue or black on top with pale
edges and white underneath. Some, but


not all, mantas have a venomous barb
which is near the base of the tail on
the top surface. They live at least 20
years.

Spotted eagle ray
The spotted eagle ray is another large
species of ray that may reach a disc
width of up to 9.8 feet and weigh up-
wards of 500 pounds.
They have very long whip-like tails.
At the base of their tails spotted eagle
rays have one or more venomous spines.
Eagle rays use the spines as defense
against predators, such as sharks.
People see spotted eagle rays mostly
in bays, over coral reefs and in estuar-
ies. They like inshore waters, but they
also show up in deeper coastal waters.
Mostly, they swim in pairs or small
groups in the open water close to the
surface, and they often leap out of the
water similar to their close relatives,
the manta rays.
This is, one of the most beautiful rays,
named for the cryptic spotted pattern
across the top of its body with small
white, bluish-white, greenish, pearly
or yellow spots on its black, dark gray
or brown body. Sometimes the spots
are large white rings with black dots in
the center. Eagle rays are typically all
white on their bottom side.
Cownose ray
Yet another ray species common to
Florida is the cownose ray. It typically
grows to 35 45 inches disc width,
although there is a report of one reach-
ing 84 inches. Cownose rays will have
at least one venomous barb at the base
of the tail and typically are brown with
a whitish or yellowish belly and a broad
head, eyes wide-apart.
This species has very hard tooth plates
and powerful jaw muscles that it uses
to crush various shellfish species that
it primarily feeds on, such as clams,
oysters, scallops and crabs. They
often swim in large schools containing
thousands of individuals. These larse


The lesser electric stingray can generate a
37-volt discharge to stun prey and fend off
predators. (FWC photo)

schools of rays! when f ending can
devastate local shellfish beds4 .

Lesser electric stingray
You can find the lesser electric ray
along the beaches and coastal waters
of the western Atlantic Ocean from
North Carolina to Argentina and in the
Gulf of Mexico. They keep to shal-
'low coastal waters, buried beneath the
sand or mud or in sea grass most of the
time, but they sometimes venture into
water 180 feet deep.
They have the ability to generate
an electric discharge of 14-37 volts,
which they use to stun prey and to
fend off predators.
This species does not have a venom-
ous barb. It is dark brown, light brown
or reddish orange on top with irregular
rings or ovals. The underside is white,
yellowish or greenish.
Males grow to about 26 inches
across; females are a little smaller.
Electric stingrays eat primarily
marine worms but also include other
invertebrates, juvenile snake eels,
anemones, small fish and crustaceans
in their diet.


The Wildlife Foundation of Florida
helps fund marine life conservation


'The 'nonprofit Wildlife
Foundation of Florida, Inc.
offers nature lovers a way
to help Florida keep its
natural character through
tax-deductible donations.
The foundation provides
assistance, funding and
promotional support to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
and other organizations
engaged in science-based
nature conservation, man-
agement, education and
research.


Interested people may
send donations to the Wild-
life Foundation of Florida,
Inc., P.O. Box 11010,Tlila-
hassee, FL 32302 or make
donations on the founda-
tion's Web site, www.Wild"-
lifeFoundationofFlorida.
com.
Florida is like no other
place on earth. Working to-
gether, we can keep it that
way.
For more information,
call 850-922-1066 or visit
the foundation's Web site.


. Beachgoers should exercise
caution. Beaches and coast-
lines are where you find sting-
rays year-round.
The most common rays in
Florida coastal waters include
three species of whip-tail rays,
including the Atlantic sting-
ray, bluntnose stingray, and
southern stingray. Although
stingrays are actually very shy
by nature, they are equipped
with a sharp spine (or barb) on
their tail which they use as de-
fense against predators, such
as sharks.
These rays also use
camouflage to hide from


predators-burying themselves
under the sand with only their.
eyes and long spaghetti-
shaped tail exposed. That
makes them very difficult for
beachgoers to see. Unaware
bathers walking or wading in
shallow waters can step on a
ray resulting in being stung
in the leg or foot by the ray's
sharp, venomous spine.
To avoid being stung, bath-
ers only need to shuffle their
feet as they move across the
sandy bottom. Rays usually
sense the disturbance and
swim away.


Remember: heat to treat
A stingray's spine or barb is razor-sharp and made of a
hard, tooth-like material called dentine. It has notches on
both sides that act like a series of miniature arrowheads,
preventing the spine from backing out of a wound.
Most stingrays have a single spine, but some have more,
from 1 to 8 inches long. The spine produces venom, and
anyone stung by a stingray should seek immediate medi-
cal attention. Medical professlonals'carf remove all traces-
of the spine and flush out the wournd"With antiseptic to
prevent infection. Victims also usually require a tetanus
shot.
Also, soaking the wound in hot water (at least 113
degrees Fahrenheit) can bring immediate relief from the
painful effects of the venom. Remember the saying "Heat
to treat."


This historical giant manta ray photo from the Florida Museum of
Natural History shows a ray that measured almost 20 feet across.
(Photo by Capt. Jay Gould)


Kids Activities

Ask the Fish Expert
Are stingrays fish?
Yes, they just look a little different. They don't have
bones -just cartilage like you have in your nose and
ears.

What do you call a scientist who studies fish?
A scientist who studies fish is called an ichthyologist
(ik the aw low gist). "Ichthy" is Latin for fish;
and "ologist" means one who studies.

Do stingrays have wings?
What some people call wings are actually pectoral
fins that ome species flap when they move through
the water. Sometimes when the pectoral fins break
the surface of the water, people think they are seeing
sharks.

Where is the stingray's mouth?
The stingray's mouth is on the underside of its body
with its nostrils and gills. Stingrays have strong jaws
and some have bony plates in their mouths that can
crush shellfish and other things stingrays like to eat.

Do people eat stingrays?
In some parts of the world, stingray is considered a
delicacy. Barbecued stingray is popular in Singapore
and Malaysia, and pickled stingray is a tradition in
Iceland. Some rays are considered endangered and
are protected.


Circle these words


shuffle,
clams
rays
smalltooth
spotted eagle


pectoral
oysters
electric
yellow
Atlantic


barb
cownose
devil
venom
lesser


spine
fins
manta
sea


Connect the dots and

color the stingray
-------------------------------


23
3 2202 I
9 24
21 2
II
0 &25
S1819
I 1 1517 I
11 1213 @16 9 26
6 7 0 8 9I
I 27
5 28
029
4 30
@31
:3. 32

2 @33 I
33

S 34
0 0 35
40 0 36
39 38 37

Cut alongdotted line .. .
- -- -- -- - -- - --- -- -i


WILDLIFE FOUNDATION OF TFLORIDA
ESTABLISHED 1994


Beachgoers should always.

do the stingray shuffle


C L A M S Z T
O Y S T E R S
W O H D A K C
N M A N T A X
O Y E L L O W
S L S N A O S
E I P V N L H
Q M O T T E U
S Z T W I S F
M D T B C S F
A I E T A E L
L O D V F R E
L P E E I E B
T E A N N L S
O C G O S E P
O T L M A C I
T O E R F T N
H R A Y S R E
Y A L B Q I S
W L A S H C B












MLKAddress: Moments In Time


'As Barack Obama placed his hand on the burgundy velvet of a
gilded-edge Bible on- Tuesday to take the oath of office as this coun-
try's 44th president, he left an indelible fingerprint on history. The
Bible was the same one used in 1861 to swear President Abraham
Lincoln intb office, and no other inauguration since that date has
made use of that Bible, held in the collection of the Library of
Congress. As Obama became this nation's first black president, the
historic moment was paramount in the thoughts of local orator
Errick Snelling, who pointed out :/:ose "who came before" in lead-
ing up to this "moment in time." The words of his keynote address
for this year's local observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day
'follow in their entirety.
Moments in time. Whitney Houston has a number one song
that says:
Each day I live, I want to be
A day to give the best of me
I'm only one, but not alone
My finest day is yet unknown
I broke my heart fought every gain
To taste the sweet I face the pain
1 rise and fall, but through it all
This much remains
I'want one moment in time
Where I'm more than I thought I could be
When all of my dreams are a heartbeat away
And the answers are all up to me
Give me one moment in time
When I'm racing with destiny
Then in that one moment of time
I will feel eternity
I live to be the very best
I want it all no time for less
I've laid the plans
Now lay the chance here in my hands
Give me one moment in time
Where I'm more than I thought I could be
When all of my dreams are a heartbeat away
And the answers are all up to me
Give me one moment in time
When I'm racing with destiny
Then in that one moment of time
I will be free
Good evening. My name is Errick Snelling, and it is a pleasure
to be here tonight to address you on this historical and momentous
occasion.
This celebration of Dr. King's legacy will be different than any
!other that we have ever had. It will be different for many reasons,
'and for many of those reasons I am especially honored to come
before you tonight to provide the keynote address.
I feel that, to many, this is the first time the significance of who
:Dr. King really was and what he stood for is being realized. I take
this opportunity as a responsibility. I understand that the words that
I say here tonight may well linger in the minds of some youngster
who will go on to do great things. I am also elated that our presi-
dent has re-energized the art of public speaking, and I pray that he
spawns a new generation of dynamic orators, which is something
near and dear to my heart. So, again, I thank the committee for
-inviting me to speak.
The number four should be a very important number in the
psyche of black people. The official era of slavery in America was
400 years; Martin Luther King Jr. was killed on the 4th of April in
1968. The night before he was killed, in what has become one
momenitin time, he uttered,these words: ... -
"When I got into-Mempphis some began to;say. the threats or
talk about the; threats thatwere out: What would happen to me from
some of our sick white brothers?
"Well, I don't know what will happen now. We've got some
difficult days ahead. But it doesn't matter with me now, because
I've been to the mountaintop, and I don't mind.
*"Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has
its place; but I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do ;
God's will, and He's allowed me to go up to the mountaintop, and
I've looked over, and I've seen the Promised Land.
,"I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight
that ;we as a people will get to the Promised Land; and I am happy
tonight, I'm not worried about anything; I'm not fearing any man;
mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord!"



Orange Blossom RV News
By Connie Fisher


HYSONG FAMILY
Friday evening, the Hysong
family sang for our enjoyment.
You' know, the Bible says
"make a joyful noise unto the
iLord." They did. They are
:gospel singers, and were truly
wonderful.
They will be returning next
-year for our enjoyment. Mary
Catozzi booked them last year.
They are friends of Mary's.

ORANGE BLOSSOM OPRY
Charlotte Wilson has gath-
ered all -her actors and act
actresses for the annual Orange
:Blossom Opry. Practice has
begun. Charlotte has worked on
this, show all summer.
I think this year's program
well be betterthan last year's, if
that is possible. The show will
take place on Feb. 20.

'GAMES
Bingo: For Thursday, the
mid-coverall was split between
Peggy Ardelean and Dina
Paswater; Mabel Burns won
final coverall. Monday, Al
Gurney won the mid-coverall
and Ardie McDonald won the
final coverall.
Euchre: For Saturday, the
winners were Harold Cogar,
first; second, Del Wells; and
third, Carl Craib. Ron Kintz had
the most lone hands with four,
and Roger Hambel was low. For
Wednesday, first, Richard Mil-
bert; second, Betty Brief; and
third, Kitty Kelsey. Richard
Milbert had the most lone hands
with seven, and Judy Hambel
was low...
The' euchre players make life
fun, here on our park. They have
this little showman with a
blinking nose. This little fellow
goes home with the loser. In the
past, I have seen this little fel-
low hanging by the neck in
trees, on an awning and even


behind the shrubs.
Cribbage and pokeno were
played on Tuesday evening.
Cribbage winners were: first,
Fred Stahle; second, Fred Dale;
and third, Eleanor Dale.
The winner for the pokeno'
coverall was Richard Milbert.
Shuffleboard is still being
played on Wednesday and
Thursday mornings at 9:30.
Also, on Friday evenings you
can play under the lights.

BREAKFASTS
Sausage and pancakes was
served to all who attended
Saturday morning. We had a
very large turnout for breakfast.,
There was a get-well card."
passed around for Margaret
Volz. She will not be with us
this year, due to illness, but will
return next year.
Ted Morris made announce-
ments and, of course, Fred
Stahle helped with the coupons
along with a few jokes. Lee
Jarvis and Richard Milbert won
the 50/50.
Wednesday morning we
enjoyed coffee and doughnuts..
Ted introduced a representative'
--of Wauchula State Bank. The'
representative told us that the
bank has been in business for
80 years and is still family
owned.

KARAOKE
Billy and Charlotte Wilson's'
karaoke Sunday evening was
great. If you missed Sunday,
you missed a good time. Not
Only our good singers from the,
park entertained us, but we also
had several guests from out of
the park.
Several of the line dancers
were there, and able to show:
what they have learned. Ed
Denman has been the teacher of
line dancing for the last two1
years. .


These words have echoed over four decades and now seem
more prophetic than they did in the days after the slaying of Dr.
King.
Forty years could not stop what was put into motion. The
assassin's bullet was unable to silence the words that were the
: voice of a people on the move. The bullet was unable to stop a plan
that was already on its way to being fulfilled.
They were able to kill the man, but were never able to kill the
dream.
I On Nov. 4, 2008, 40 years later, we were allowed to hear these
words from the first African-American as he was elected the 44th
president of the United States of America, Barack Hussein Obama.
It is that promise that 45 years ago today brought Americans
from every corner/6f this land to stand together on a mall in
Washington before Lincoln's Memorial and hear a young preacher
from Georgia speak of his dream.
The men and women who gathered there could have heard'
many things, they could have heard words of anger and discord.
They could have been told to succumb to the fear and frustrations
of so many dreams deferred.
But what the people heard instead, people of every creed and
color, from every walk of life, is that in America our destiny is
inextricably linked, that together our dreams can be one. We can-
not walk alone, and as we walk we must make the pledge that we
shall always march ahead, we cannot turn back. America, we can-
not turn back.
This is perfect example to use for tonight, This is the example
of how our pasts affect our futures. This is the prime opportunity to
show how the dream of one man can ultimately be realized by
another.
There is no way that I can speak tonight without thinking
about the pending inauguration of President Obama, and we can
never think about the historical importance of this election without
remembering those in the past who have laid the groundwork for
this momentous event that many of us will, watch on television,
and, as evidenced by the sparse numbers here tonight, have
undoubtedly traveled to D.C.
Yes, President Barack Obama will go down in the annals of
history as a great (possibly; to many, the greatest) black figure in
American history, but I am here to remind you tonight that as great
as this achievement is, it should never overshadow the dream upon
which it is built.
Many times we look at the action without understanding fully
the process that brings it to fruition.
In old days, we saw Harriet Tubman running the Underground
Railroad, but we did not see the dream that told her that she could
do something to help change the condition of her people through
her actions.
In academia, we saw Fredrick Douglas gaining an education,
but we did not see the dream that allowed him to believe that he
was as smart as any other man, no matter the color of his skin.
In politics, we saw Adam Clayton Powell elected to the House,
but we could not see the dream that made him know that he could
do it.
In sports, we saw the domination of Jerry Rice, but we did not
see the dream which told a young skinny kid at a small black col-
lege that he could be better at this than anyone who had ever gone
before him.
We could see former head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and
Secretary of State Colin Powel sitting down with dignitaries, but
we cannot see the dream that made a young cadet at West Point say,
I am more than those who just stand in the ranks.
We can see the historical record of the Tuskegee Airmen, but
we do not see the dream that told each of them that not only could
they fly they could fly better than any group of pilots flying at that
time, so much so thatihdey wvould'send historians scurrying about to
look for flaws in history to disprove what they have done.
In the case of Barack (if I may be so bold as to imply that I
have a personal relationship with the man, just as I have a person-
al relationship and speak to every black man I see in the mall, in
court and anywhere else; I know that even though I do not know
-him intimately, I know the struggle that he deals with on a daily
basis), we have a different opportunity because, in his case, we
have a glimpse into the thought process that allowed him to think
that he could one day be. the president of the United States of
America.
We have this glimpse because a young eloquent preacher with
a very pronounced Southern drawl was somehow audacious
enough to tell us about his dream one day in the summer of 1963.
We heard about how one day he knew that we would be judged
not by the color of our skins, but by the content of our character.
We heard him send people back to the slums, cities and Southern
states sharing the hope of his dream. We, who did not have the
opportunity to be there, have had the opportunity to hear this dream
through celluloid, wax and, most recently, the World Wide Web.
Somewhere in that hearing, this dream took root in the mind of
a young man who was born of mixed heritage, consisting of a white
mother and a Kenyan father. A young man who marched to the
beat of his own drummer. A young man who became the first black
editor of Harvard's Law Review, who became a community orga-
nizer in one of those Northern cities that the aforementioned
preacher spoke of.
The dream had taken such root in the young man that the
shackles of the past, of the history of a country that was famous for
telling people of the darker hue what they could not do, had been
shaken off to the point that all he was able to hear was: "Yes, we
can!"


Yes, we can be entertainers. Yes, we can be doctors. Yes, we
can be lawyers. Yes, we can be Supreme Court justices. And, yes,
.we can even be the president of the most powerful country in the
world.
Make no mistake, what we are seeing is a great thing, but it is
not an isolated incident. It is the culmination of the dreams, hopes
and, most importantly, the actions of many people. No one walks
alone.
The fact of the matter is that we all play a part in the lives of
one another, and President Obama, in that sense, is no different that:
any of the people sitting here. We are all a product of what has
been put inside of us. No matter what you may think. If you think'
that you have put something good into someone and you are not
getting good out of him, you need to investigate what else has been
placed inside or re-evaluate what you have placed there.
This is more important than ever as I think about our children.
They are going to become products of what we place inside of them
or allow to be placed inside.
I have always said that black history is a job for parents and.
those in our own communities, because I will not leave something
,as important as that to be taught to my child by someone who has
ino real desire that she learn it.
I think that we, as black people, if we did not know it before,
understand that we have an awesome task ahead. In this room, we
may well begin the nurturing process of a future doctor, senator,,
captain of industry or president.
I have every intention of standing on the dais at the swearing-
in of President Errica Sharleen Snelling (or whatever her last name
'will be at that time). I have always told her that she can do any-
thing, and now she sees that there are no limits to that statement.
We have to be able to help our children understand that they!:
can be the products and realizations of the dreams of many who
have come before them, and that when they achieve anything, they
are standing on the shoulders of those that came before. They need


To understand that though they may be the latest and greatest in
their minds, they were not the first.
Remember that Thurgood Marshall was Clarence Thomas.
Remember that Sydney Portier was Jamie Foxx.
Remember that Sam Cooke was Jay-Z.
Remember that Billie Holiday was Beyonce.
Remember that Jackie Robinson was Derek Jeter.
And remember that Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X,
Medgar Evers, Stokley Carmichael, John F. Kennedy, his brother


January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 9A

Robert Kennedy and others were Barack Obama.
So, not only would I like to encourage the youth to live, but as
well to dream. Each generation has to have both dreamers and
doers of the dreams. This is echoed so well in the poem '"The
Bridge Builder," which I recite with my liberties.
Martin and Malcolm were going along a highway
When they came at the evening cold and gray
To a chasm vast and wide with waters rolling deep
The old men crossed in the twilight dim*
That sullen stream held no fear for them
They turned when safe on the other side
To build a bridge to span the tide.
Old Phen, said Jesse Jackson who was standing
near
You're wasting your strength with building here
Your journey will end with the ending day
And you never again shall pass this way
You have crossed this chasm vast and wide
Why build you this bridge at evening tide?
Dr. King lifted his old gray head
Young Jesse, we've come in the path, he said
But there comes after us today
A youth whose feet must pass this way
This chasm which was naught to we
To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be
Little Barack must cross in the twilight dim
Jesse, we're building this bridge for him.
I want to tell the people in our communities to keep on keep-
ing on. We cannot afford to see this as a climax, but as a new begin-
ning.
Older people, continue to give wisdom from your wealth of
knowledge and experience.
Middle-aged people, continue to educate, provide guidance
and discipline from your current conditions.
Young adults, continue to reach toward the stars, understand-
ing that one day it may be your words that fill the sleep of a young
child sitting here tonight.
Children, continue to dream. Dream bold, dream big. Do not
be afraid to dream, to believe the dream, and to one day become the
dream. So, again I say to you, dream:
Dream the impossible dream
Fight the unbeatable foe
Bear, with unbearable sorrow,
Run where the brave dare not go.
Right the unrightable wrong
Love pure and chaste from afar
Try when your arms are too weary
To reach the unreachable star.
Let this be your quest, to follow that star
No matter how hopeless, no matter how far
To fight for the right, without question or pause,
To be willing to march into hell for the heavenly
cause.
I know, if you'll only be true
To this glorious quest
That your heart will lie peaceful and calm
When you're laid to your rest.
And the world will be better for this
That one man, scorried and covered with scars,
Still strove with his last ounce of courage
To reach the unreachable star.
It is then that you will be able to have your one moment in
time.



The Oasis RV News
By Georgianna Mills

WELCOME mately 250 two-stomping,
Welcome goes out to Joe and hand-clapping listeners and
Cindy Diverda and Charlie and beautiful weather, too. The
Joyce Williamson. We know guest bands were:
that you will enjoy your stay The Bluegrass Travelers from
with us. Indiana, with Jim Avery, man-
dolin; Jim Sisson, banjo; Dan
AROUND THE PARK Hagemien, guitar; and Carolyn
Saturday at 2 we heard music Hagemien, base.
and, going to investigate, we :. The Little. Charlie Creek
found it coming from Bill Har- Band, Bill Terrel, vocal and gui-
tigan's patio. Elina Henderson, tar; Lou Mothersbaugh, man-
Bill and Jack were playing: dolin; Dale Officer, guitar;
music from the '30s to the '50s. ': Mary Officer, base; and Glen
I wasn't the only one hearing ; Barrett, fiddle.
the music, as we had 18 listen-- The Indiana Sweethearts.
ers before they finished play- The Oasis Bluegrassers of
ing. Ray Moore, fiddle; Chris
Ray and Jo Moore had the Anderson, vocal and guitar;
pleasure of their daughter, Gary Hyde, base; Lou Mothers-
Chris and Dave Anderson, visit- baugh, mandolin; and Fred
ing vith us from Christmas din- Braham, banjo.
ner from Indiana. How could I We gave out five gift certifi-
have missed not mentioning cates. The recipients were
then, when I sat next to them Nancy DeWitt, Ron Gaskill,
during dinner? Woe is me. Harry Hicks, Joyce Carson and
Bruce Walworth.
ACTIVITIES The 50/50 recipients were
Karen and Melvin Roberts Shirley Barrett, Grace Dool,
have started up a bowling team, Rose Price, Ruby Ramey, me
and there" were 13 signed up: and Dave Anderson, accepting
Karen, Melvin, Dave, me, Ed, with glee.
Charlene, Don, Eddie, Don, Fred Marsh did a fine job
Neda, Winnie, Annette and putting up the sound system and
Carolyn. The excitement of "furnishing the coffee and cook-
strikes and spares could be ies.
heard all over town. Some of us
have not bowled since high BINGO
School, others were just natu- Thursday's bingo Ron Reid
rals. won the 50/50, and the jackpot
Our walking group has start- went to Sylvia. Thirty-six
ed walking again at 8:30 a.m. attended and merchant certifi-
With all those extra goodies we cates were given to Charlene
consumed during the holidays, Souligne, Eddie Philips, Connie
we need the extra exercise. We Swanson, Connie Akelian and


saw Mary Marr, Neda Colston, Ron Reid.
Eddie Phillips and Bert Tuesday's bingo saw 30 in
,,Summers, and me, too. attendance, with Leon Sumner
winning the 50/50; jackpot,
BLUEGRASS Ernie Katzur; and merchant cer-
Our own Ray Moore headed "tificates going to Jeanetta
iup the Jan. 11 Bluegrass -Meckes, Donna Martin, Ernie
!Sunday. There were approxi- Katzur and Ed Souligne


I


YOUR BUSINESS COULD.

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


I






10A The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009


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PAGE ONE-


By JOAN
Of The Hera
What a
makes!
Since the
ment of f
there hav
changes a
move up, o
tion or ap
they were
Although
High did
posed nine
final redist
Friday puts
2A, four-
along with
and Estero.
"The ch
ing. It does
schools w
always bee
trict. Yes,
changes
teams. We


NATIO


Redistricting Cha
SEAMAN schools our own size," said Fort Myers, Fort Myers
Id-Advocate Head Coach Tim Price. Cypress Lake, Naples Cypress
difference a month According to the Florida Lake, Naples Lely, Immokalee
High School Activities Associ- and Naples Golden Gate.
e Dec. 15 announce- ation, that has been accom- Immokalee was also in 3A-14..
football redistricting, polished by dropping Hardee last season, compiling a 3-7
e been a slew of from Class 3A (72 schools with record, beating Naples, Pal-
s schools asked to 1,391 to 1,739 students) to 2A metto Ridge, Naples Golden
r down, in classifica- (57 schools with 1,015 to 1,390 Gate and Estero, but losing to
pealed what district students). Cape Coral, Fort Myers Dun-
assigned to. FHSAA school population bar, Naples Gulf Coast, Naples
h Hardee Senior reports show DeSoto with Lely, Fort Myers and Naples
not appeal its pro- 1,139 students, Immokalee with Barron Collier.
e-school district, the 1,315, Hardee with 1,265 and Arch-rival DeSoto was in
ricting plan revealed Estero with 1,422. Estero was 3A-12 last year and finished 7-
s it a revamped Class one of the 25 schools who 3, with wins over Port Char-
school District 6, appealed and were granted lotte, Braden River, LaBelle,
DeSoto, Immokalee approved to move down in clas- Bradenton, Sebring, Avon Park
sification. and Hardee and losses to Fort
anges were surpris- That may be partially because Myers Dunbar, Lake Wales and :
isn't affect how many Estero, which was in 3A-14 last Punta Gorda Charlotte.
ve play. We have year had an 0-10 record, being Hardee was also in 3A-12 last
-n in a four-team dis- shut out by North Fort Myers, year and finished 4-6, beating
there were a lot of Cape Coral Baker, Cape Coral Riverdale, Avon Park, Sebring
with the types of Mariner, Naples and Cape and Lakewood Ranch, but los-
are trying to play Coral and also losing to South ing to Fort Myers Riverview,
Fort Meade, Braden River,
Cape Coral, Davenport-Ridge
and DeSoto.
A month ago Hardee was in a
NAL BOXING huge 2A-6 with Sarasota
Booker, Fort Myers Cypress
Lake, DeSoto, Naples Golden
Gate, Immokalee, Cape Coral
Island Coast, LaBelle and
Bradenton Southeast.
Booker and Bradenton South-
east moved back up to 3A-10
Sand both Cypress Lake and
Golden Gate back to 3A-12.
Island Coast and LaBelle
moved down to 2B-6. DeSoto
and Immokalee stayed in 2A-6
... '.- .. -.w, with Hardee and Estero joined
them.
Hardee High Principal Mike
;-, Wilkinson and Schools Super-
:l .,-l~ -' ',, ,


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Bowling Green boxer Ruben Ozuna has fought his way to
national competition after the winning two bouts in his
weight class division at regionals in North Carolina last
week. The 14-year-old will now represent the southeast-
ern region of the United States for the Feb. 4 Nationals in
Kansas City, Mo. The eighth grader, is the son of Roy and
Stephanie Salazar, has been training hard five days a
week and has been going to other gyms to spar different
boxers to prepare for the big fight.



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HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


nges
intendent David Durastanti
agreed the changed district was
an asset. "The smaller district
will allow us to play more of
Our traditional rivals! I am
pleased with that change.
Hopefully, it will reduce our
travel cost," commented Dura-
stanti.
"We like the new arrange-
ment much better than the first
district plan. It provides more
scheduling[ options, which
should work better for us and
the faithful Wildcat fans. The
coaches are working on the
scheduling process which
should provide games with our
traditional opponents that will
be closer geographically. That,
in turn, saves on expenses for
the school and fans traveling to
support the team," explained
Wilkinson.
Traditional opponents Avon
Park and Sebring didn't fare as
well in districting. Avon Park
went down from widely spread
2A-4 nine-school district spread
from Eustis to Crystal River to
Tavares, to 2B-5, along with
Tampa Berkeley Prep, Clear-
water Central Catholic, Lake
Highland Prep of Orlando,
Mulberry and Tampa Catholic.
Sebring moved from 3A-10
with four schools to 3A-9 with
8 schools, joining Auburndale,
Celebration, the new Orlando
Lake Nona, Lake Wales,
Kissimmee Poinciana, Lake-
land Tenoroc and Winter
Haven.
Fort Meade remained in its
five-school IA-6 but lost its
coach, as Mike Hayde has re-
tired to spend more time with
his family.


Help Count

Your Neighbors


By KASEY HELMS
Of The Herald-Advocate
The next census is less than a
year away. The U.S. Census
Bureau needs employees now
for the 2010 census.
The Bureau is looking for
Hardee County residents inter-
ested in working in their own
neighborhoods and communi-
ties.
There are five possible job
positions available: census
taker, crew leader, crew leader
assistant, recruiting assistant
and census clerk.
A census taker, referred to as
an enumeratorr," will locate
households, update address lists
and conduct interviews.
A crew leader will supervise
a crew of 20 to 25 people and
review their work. The crew
leader will also meet with each
census taker daily to approve
daily payroll records, train cen-
sus takers and crew leader
assistants, and make sure proce-


dures are properly followed.
A crew leader assistant is*
expected to assist the crew lead-
ers in meeting with census tak-
ers to help review work and
answer questions. Assistants
will also carry out some of the
same tasks as census takers.
The recruiting assistant will
be responsible for promoting
census jobs and finding local
residents to work for the census.
A census clerk is expected to
assist recruiting assistants,
process payroll and personnel
actions, answer phone calls and
schedule tests.
In order to qualify, a candi-
date must have no prior felony
convictions, take a basic skills
exam, and be available days,
evenings and weekends. Each
assignment may last between
five to 10 weeks and up to 40
hours per week. .
For more information, go to
www.2010censusjobs gov. or
call 1-866-861-2010.


To cherish what remains of the Earth and to foster its renewal
is our only legitimate hope of survival.


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Reserve Seat Information


Nautical Nights 2009












Al Pageant Deadline Pick-up
Kindergarten Feb. 6th Feb. 12th @7:00 pm
Prince/Princess Feb. 13th Feb. 18th @ 4:00 pm
Lil' Miss Feb. 17th Feb. 20th @ 4:00 pm
Jr. Miss Feb. 10th Feb. 15th @ 6:00 pm
SMiss Hardee County Feb. 10th Feb. 13th @7:30 pm


The Herald-Advocate
.'USPS .78.780)
Thursday, January 22, 2009


E3







2B The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009




-Hardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO
Jonathan Railsback & Jordan Lamb
Jordan Lamb To Wed

Jonathan Railsback


Nona Dasher of Wauchula
and Joel Tew of Tarpon Springs
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Jordan Elisabeth
Lamb, to Jonathan Edward
Railsback, the son of Dale and
Peggy Railsback of Buffalo,
N.Y.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Wake Forest University with
a bachelor of arts degree in psy-
chology. She earned a master's
degree from American Univer-
sity in public administration.
She is currently employed as
the development and communi-


cations manager for the
National Law Center on Home-
lessness & Poverty in Washing-
ton, D.C.
The prospective groom is a
graduate from the University of
Buffalo with a degree in electri-
cal engineering, and worked as
an engineer for five years in the
U.S. Navy. He is employed by
Progeny Systems Corp. in
Virginia as a computer pro-
grammer.
Plans are being made for an.
April wedding in the Washing-
ton D.C. area.


WHAT'S YOUR SECRET?
My big secret is that about 20 years ago, I gave'myself to God.
I know now that God was blessing me before this moment, but
it was far from clear to me then. I was still hurting from being self-
ish and hurting others. Would God pick me up 'in such a bad
moment and do something good with my life?
Well, I wasn't 100 percent sure, but I was so discouraged by
all the failures I'd accumulated by doing things my way, that I just
did it. I made the choice and God took me up on it!
You see, our choosing is like a key that unlocks God's bounty.
He wants all of His children to be happy, but only He knows how
to dispense that happiness. But the important first step is choosing
to give our Father a free hand.
The reality is that God is like a big fire. Most people want to
come close enough to get warm, but not so close they'll get burned.
Remember the Old Testament story of Shadrach, Meshach and
Abednego, who were thrown into the fiery furnace because they
refused to bow down to an idol? Instead of getting burned up, they
met the Lord there and walked around together in the furnace
unharmed.
That's the way it is when we give the Lord freedom to manage
us, our businesses, families and finances. It seems, at first, to be
highly risky.
In time, though, it turns out to be the smartest move we ever
made!



Youth Football

Wants Your Advice


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Four meetings, which started
Tuesday, will give parents and
coaches a chance to say what
needs to be changed.
At issue is the Hardee Youth
"Pop Wamrner" Football League
bylaws, which are being revised
by the league's Board of
Directors, hopefully with assis-
tance from parents of the 400
kids enrolled in football or
cheerleading and the 50 or more
coaches and team parents who
have worked so hard in it.
These special meetings are all
at the Celtic Crossing Sports
SRoom, 222 W. Main St., Wau-
chula from 7 to 9 p.m. The first
meeting was Tuesday night, but
the others are tonight (Thurs-
day), and next Tuesday and
Thursday. If you can't make
one, go to another.
The goals for the bylaws are
to continue to require a high
level of character and teach life
skills to the youth involved in
the program as there are acade-
mic as well as athletic recogni-
tions for them.
After the four meetings to re-
vise the bylaws, a final Board
meeting will be held on Mon-
day, Feb. 2 at 7 p.m. at South
Florida Community College.
There will be election of the
2009 Board of Directors as well
as introduction and vote on the
new bylaws. Anyone wanting to
vote on then must be present to


socl:22c


complete a ballot for the elec-
tions.
For any questions, call Dawn
Atkinson-Jones at 863-781-
6999.


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Craig Trotter
Mindy Engel & Craig

Trotter Are Married


Greg and Jo Engel of Wash-
burn, Iowa, announce the mar-
riage of their daughter, Mindy
Engel, to Craig Trotter of
Waterloo, Iowa, the son of
Wayne and Emily Trotter of
Wauchula.
The couple married on
Christmas Eve, Wednesday,
Dec. 24, 2008, at the home of
the groom's parents in a cere-
mony performed by the Rev.
Jim Davis..
The bride is a graduate of the
University of Northern Iowa
and is a second-year medical
student at Des Moines Univers-


ity, where she is pursuing a doc-
tor's degree in podiatric medi-
cine.
The groom is a graduate of
the University of Central Flori-
da, a veteran of Operation Iraqi
Freedom and a captain in the
U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. He
is employed at John Deere of
Waterloo, Iowa.
The couple plan to repeat
their vows in front of family
and friends at Oak Grove
Baptist Church on Saturday,
March 21.
The couple have made their
home in Waterloo, Iowa.


What a desolate place would be a world without a flower! It
would be a face without a smile, a feast without a welcome. Are
not flowers the stars of the earth, and are not our stars the
flowers of the heaven.


Nifty Nifty
Both
Ricky and Glenda
Selph
are
II 50"
Happy Birthday
o __ -o socl:


iy)rannah4 Jousi ene t


SDelcious Steak 'Dinner
qncCuding Baked Potato & SaClad


$25.00
yerperson


Speaker
Mr. John Terrell
also
Christian Country New Artist of the Year
Danny Ray Harris


Plus
* Other Entertainment Door Prizes *


Silent Auction


Hardee County Civic Center I
6 p.m. January 24, 2009 U'
For If--oo ksC


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson


Maregart Prime RiDTnner
I -






Advance Signup
773-3820

Only $12.00
Sing and Dance to
B & B Karaoke
6:00 pm to 10 p.m.
WAUCHULA MOOSE LODGE D


Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser

ZSES PTO / hariinga 'Spag/ietDrie-T/i u Dinner"

Friday, February 13,2009 5:00pm 7'00pm
North Parking Lot Bus Loop Ticket Required

$6.00 PER MEAL
DINNER INCLUDES: SPAGHETTI, GREEN BEANS, BREAD, COOKIE
Tickets go on sale January 20, 2009 February 3, 2009
Available from ZSES 5th Grade Students or from Mrs. Jane at 735-1221


Limestone Baptist Church

Revival

January 25 30
Sunday 11 am & 6pm
(Dinner follows 11 am service)
Monday Friday 7 pm


Pastor Jerry waters Jan. 25-3

4868 Keysone Ave. Ona (Limestone Community)


863-494-4553








January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3B


AREA AUTHOR


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Highlands County author Casey Wohl spoke to the Wauchula KIwanis Club on Tuesday,
Jan. 6, at the Panda Restaurant. She said 2009 trends include "recessionary living"
whereby people want long-term value not just short-term happiness and quality over
quantity, and where money loses prominence and is replaced with stability, peace of
mind and sustainability. She said consumers have lost faith in some businesses and
institutions, and that local companies and those with a long-term history are well posi-
tioned for the future. Many people will assess their life goals and career ambitions. She
Is the.author of "Girls Getaway Guide to Orlando" and "Girls Getaway Guide to Key
West. Shown (from left) are James Braddock, Wohl, Steven Southwell and Ken Hunt.


RECOGNITION AWARD


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Two people were recognized on Sunday for their service
to the community by the Martin Luther King Committee in
a ceremony during the annual observance of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Day. Dee Williams-Tatis and the late Jesse
Lee Wiggins Sr. were honored for contributing to their
community in different-Ways. Accepting the award on
Wiggins' behalf was his granddaughter, Latoya Wiggins.
The committee made its selections from a group of nom-
inated names. This is the first time the award has been
presented. Shown are (from left) Wiggins and Williams-
Tatis.


A very big thanks to everyone that has come in
contact with our family since January 9th. From
those of you who stopped to help the morning of
the accident, to the ones that drove the ambulance,
to those who flew the helicopter, to those who
come and help everyday, to all that have called,
stopped by to see ho%, things are going, to those
who have brought us dinner or desserts, to those
who said a prayer everyday, or kept us in their
Thoughts. We would like to say we appreciate
everything. We could never sa, Thank You enough.


With Greatful Hearts,
Bryan & Crystal Birge


socd 22p


g Happy 50th Birthday Russell,
You made it in life and you have
come a long way. You took one
giant step after the other and kept
on till you got where you are today.
To name just a few from student,
farmer, Navy, National Guards,
construction, carpenter, officer to
': name just those few plus all those
skills you have learned in life. God
Bless You!
I know it was even harder on you as
you were surrounded by six sisters
and of course you were the baby of
us all. We often fought over you as
to whom would get to take care of
you, but it was because we all
loved you so much even though
some of us dressed you as a girl as
we didn't have many boys clothes.
Lol, Hey but look you turned out alright and you have a
beautiful wife to go along with it. May you have many
more birthdays and may they all be happy and blessed.
Oh! I hope you get what you want for your Birthday ....
All our Love, Elizabeth, Mama, Kathleen, Frankie, Joann
Betty, Jeannie and all the rest out there that love yah.s6c:22
_ _'___________________ *' soc 1:22p


First United Methodist
Church of Bowling Green will
hold the women's workshop
"Winter Soulstice: Time to Stop,
and Smell the Snow" this
Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon.
The creativity workshop, led
by Jayne Jaudon Ferrer, author
of four women's books, is
designed to help women take
time to recognize and appreci-
ate God's gifts. For more infor-
mation, call the church, located
at 4910 N. Church Ave., at 375-
2340.


JOSEPH J. RUSCHIWAL
Navy Seaman Recruit Joseph
J. Ruschiwal has completed
basic training at the Recruit
Training Command in Great
Lakes, Ill.
During the eight-week pro-
gram, the seaman completed a
variety of training, including
classroom study and practical
instruction on naval customs,
First Aid, firefighting, water
safety and survival, and ship-
board and aircraft safety.
In addition, he participated in
"Battle Stations," the final exer-
cise of boot camp, which is a
practical application of the
basic Navy skills of sacrifice,
dedication, teamwork and en-
durance.
Ruschiwal is the son of
Kathleen P. Ruschiwal of
Eagleville, Pa., and Joseph R.
Ruschiwal of Zolfo Springs.
He is a 1996 graduate of
Hardee Senior High School.


ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


e^iewmty ,F%
Piano & Violin Lessons
Instruments, Books & Accessories for Purchase
Piano Tuning
Specializing in Music Ministry Training
Instructor Mandy H Bell
(863) 773-4140 410 north Ohio Avenue, Wauchula soc1:22c


rica 's
"Your Tfew mage Salon"
752 lorth 6th Avenue Wauchula
773-5933
SMonday's Special Appointments
Tues.-Fri. 10:00 pm 5:30 pm,
Sat. 8:00 am 2:00pm
Specializing in: Color, Razor Cuts,
Highlights, Updos, Facials, Waxing,
Perms, Makeup Applications, Manicures,
Sarah Lazo Cosmetobogt Pedicures, Foils & Fades


- -ILA


COUPLE OF YEAR


COURTESY PHOTO
Chapter FL2-H of the Gold Wing Road Riders Association
awarded Bill and Althea Frenier as Couple of the Year for
2009 during the chapter's Christmas and New Year's din-
ner on Saturday, Jan. 3. The Freniers have been married
almost 45 years and were the only couple to be nomi-
nated by chapter members for the honor. The couple,
who live in Fort Meade, received medallions and Ore con-
sidering running for couple of the year for the district.



Nicholas R. Mendoza

September 10, 1925 -
January 22, 2008


Our Daddy
Went Home.

An Angel Awaiting
On the hill in the distance
an elderly man quietly waits
patiently he watches
for his family at the gate.
His brown eyes shines so brightly
7iashope swells within.
For joyous will be the meeting
as mother holds her husband,
and children kiss softly
the angel "Their long lost father."
Once more they'll hold each other,
and tears will be no more
forever they'll be together
as they pass through heaven's doors.
In loving memory of our daddy.
Forever in our hearts,
Love All Your Children


POPPO


The HARDEE YOUTH "Pop Warner"
FOOTBALL LEAGUE ... Wants YOU!!!


In an effort to provide the best youth football program possible in Hardee County, the Hardee
Youth Football League Board of Directors is calling on all PARENTS and COACHES! There
will be 4 special collaborative meetings to review, discuss, and revise the League's Bylaws for
the program. With approximately 400 youth from Hardee County currently enrolled in the
football and cheerleading programs, along with the 50 plus coaches and team parents who
assist, it is evident that the program is not only growing, but working ... as we are working
to build a higher level of character and to teach life skills to our kids ... WE WANT YOU...
your input, your advice, your chance to have a voice in the program for your child . .
WE WANT YOU!!
The meeting schedule is as follows:
All meetings are to be held at Celtic Crossing Sports Room on Main Street
First Reading and Discussion of the Bylaws Tuesday January 20 7 pm 9 pm
First Draft Changes to the Bylaws Thursday January 22 7 pm 9 pm
Second Draft Changes to the Bylaws Tuesday January 27 7 pm 9 pm
Third Draft Changes to the Bylaws Thursday January 29 7 pm 9 pm

A board meeting for Election of 2009 Board of Directors and Executive Officers, as well as
introduction of the new Bylaws will be held on Monday, February 2, 2009 at 7:00 p.m. at
South Florida Community College. An entirely new Board of Directors for 2009 will be
voted on and elected, and you must be in attendance for your vote to be counted. The election
will be done by Ballot only and in person. Your presence is required. no exceptions!

Should you have any questions or wish to receive further information about this matter, please
contact Dawn Atkinson-Jones at 863-781-6999. We look forward to working with you in
bringing a fantastic 2009 Season!!

In Service for Youth,
Hardee Youth Football League 2008 Board of Directors
soc 1:22.29c j







4B The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009



"We Made Toys



Out Of Mud'C


RANGE CATTLE STATION


By EDUARDO MACEDO
Special To The Herald-Advocate
I interviewed Antonia Aviles
Romero.
Q: Where were you born?
A: Huetamo Michoacan, Mexico.
Q: What
day, month
and year
were you
born?
A: June 13, 1945.
Q: While you were a kid or teen,
was there a war and why?
A: No, there was no war going on.
Q: At what age did you start
working?
A: Since when I was able to walk
was pretty much when I started to
work. My mom got me to sell things at
her store.
Q: How many brothers and sisters
did you have?
A: Four sisters and seven brothers.
Q: While you were growing up,
did you have both parents or did you
have one?
A: While I was growing up, I had
both parents, but lost my dad when I
was 28 years old.
Q: During your time as a girl what
technology was there?
A: There was pretty much every-
thing we have today, just that people
really couldn't afford it or just didn't
see the need for it. We had a typewriter
and people mostly sent each other let-
ters.
Q: Do you think that life is better
now or back then?
A: Now, because back then nobody
got to eat till they were full and now I
can. Since we were a big family, my
parents counted out and divided the
food between everybody.
Q: What would you do for fun?
A: My brothers, sisters and I would


make little toys out of mud. We would
also play with the other kids of the
neighborhood. We played tag, hide and
seek, and all the other old games that
little kids could think of.
Q: Did you finish school?
A: No, I didn't finish school. I only
got to third grade. But the teachers
were very strict back then. They would
never let us print our writing. We could
only write in cursive. Now I can't write
nothing else but cursive!
Q: Do you feel like your life has
been good?
A: Sometimes I do and sometimes I
don't. Being poor, having too much
family was the bad of my life, but even
being poor and having a lot of prob-
lems, God has always been there and
helped me and my family.
The difficult moments in life make a
person value the good moments in life.
And it makes you see that not every-
thing in life is bad.
Q: What do you regret doing these
past years?
A: I regret living my life without my
Jesus Christ as my Savior. But I thank
Him that He reached my life, and now I
am very happy.
Another thing that is a happy
moment in my life is when I had my
daughters and sons.
Q: What plans do you have in the
future?
A: Serve my Lord Jesus Christ and
spread His word to everyone I can.
Present my Lord as their only and suffi-
cient Savior.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Conmm i Health Fair

THURSDAY, JANUARY 29th
8:00 -11:00 A.M.

At the HardeeCounty Agri-Civic Center
515 Civic COerritrDiVe
Comer of Stenstrom Rd. and Aluman Rd., Waucbula


Sponsowrdythie
.... Hardee County -

Council on Aging, ncJ

IH.O.P.E. of Hardee County
&

FLORIDA HOSPITAL
Wauchula


I, I


Focusing on
Health and Safety
Free
Blood Pressure Checks
Blood Sugar Testing
Pulse and Oxygen Levels
HIV Testing
More ...
includes:
* Safety Information
* Health Information
* Local medical, community and recreational
program information
* Representatives from community services on
site ...
DOOR PRIZES AND MORE!
For more information
Call (863) 773-2022


I 15.22c


*?eaebirimig a miou-peris~haible immed1 foo~d iiiLmn


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
The University of Florida Cattle Range Station in Ona honored four employees on Dec.
18. Director Dr. John Arthingon (left in top photo) presented pins for years of service
to (left to right) Kim Parks, custodian, five years; Christina Markham, business office
manager, 25 years; and Alvin. English, senior ag technician, 25 years. Not present is
Walt Beattie, biological scientist, five years. Dr. Gordon Kirk started the experiment sta-
tion in 1941 and was joined by Dr. Elver Hodges in 1942. Visiting the center were (lower
photo, from left) Hodges, 96; his daughter, Margaret Hodges Blanco; and Edgar Davis
and wife Tena. The 3,000-acre center does research on cattle forage and has about 800;
adult cattle and 550 calves. Field Day will be held April 16.


"INVITATION TO BID"
The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners will receive'sealed bids in the
County Manager's Office, 412 West Orange Street, Room 103, Wauchula, Florida 33873
for:
ADVERTISING THE 2008 DELINQUENT TAXES
Bid forms and specifications may be obtained from the Hardee Counfy Manager's Office
at the above address. Envelopes must be sealed and marked "2008 DELINQUENT
TAXES.and must be delivered to:
HARDEE COUNTY MANAGER'S OFFICE
412 West Orange Street, Room 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
so as to reach said office no later than 3:00 p.m., Thursday, February 05, 2009. Bids
received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be
responsible for the late delivery of bids made in person, by mail, or any other type of
delivery service.
ALL BIDS RECEIVED TIMELY SHALL BE OPENED IN THE COUNTY MANAGER'S
OFFICE, AT 3:00 p.m., Thursday, FEBRUARY 05, 2009, OR AS SOON THEREAFTER AS
PRACTICAL.
The Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any part thereof that
may be considered to be in the best interest of Hardee County and also reserves the right
to waive irregularities in any bid.
DALE JOHNSON, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA 1:22c





One Hillacious 10K Run A Trilogy
When: Sat. February 7, 2009 8:00 a.m. Start 8:05 a.m.Fitness Walk
Where: Start/Finish is Hardee Rec. Complex on Altman Road
Registration Deadlines and Fees:
$15 if received before 1/30/2009
$20 thereafter and on race day (T-shirt not guaranteed to race day registrants)
.. All proceeds of this race will be forwarded to The American Cancer
Society Hardee Unit
Make check payable to One Hillacious 10K Run. Send entries to:
Charlie Potter
300 Park Drive
Wauchula, Florida 33873
For further information, call 863-773-6216


Fitness walk (approximately 3 miles)


10K Run


10K Awards Overall top male, female, Master's male, Master's female trophies
Male age divisions 15-19 five deep, 70 and above five deep. All other age divisions three
deep. 20-24,25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44,45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60- 64, 65-69
Female age divisions 15-19 five deep, 70 and above five deep. All other age divisions three
deep. 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69
Commemorative medallions to the first 25 finishers of the Fitness Walk


Last Name


Address City Zip


Female T-shirt size S M L XL Circle size


Age_ Male


Entry fees are non refundable. I hereby, for my heirs, my executor and administers waive
and release all claims for damages against One Hillacious 10K run/Fitness Walk and its
sponsors for any and all damages.

Signature


First Name


'Fh.e erald-Advocate
Hardee Count 's Hometown Coverage
PRINTERS 9 PUBLISHERS
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL 33873te


(Parent if under 18 years of age)


1:22nc








January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Name: Bull
Breed: White English .
Bulldog &
Catahoula
Leopard Cur
Sex: Male

.Age: Adult
Coat: Short

Tail: Bob


I Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320
if you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel location is 685
Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Edna Bell & Reggie DeSmet


CHAPEL
Gerry welcomed 184 with
her beautiful music on the or-
gan. The greeters were Joe and
Aletia Boyer and Jim and Cathy
VanDyke. The welcoming
prayer was done by Vanetta
Nelson and the choir, with audi-
ence participation, sang "I Have
The Joy," directed by Ardeth
Johns accompanied by Cheryl
Conkle.
Pastor Jim gave the five
things we can improve so we
would be better Christians.

COFFEE HOUR
We had 240 for doughnuts
and coffee, while Wanda gave
us all the upcoming events and
successes of the past week.
Our pancake breakfast was


well-attended with 154, and
potluck with 157. The music
jam was well-attended with
musicians and spectators.
The pool party was a great
party. We had around 60 to
attend and we danced under that
beautiful full moon. Many
coupons were won and 50/50
was won. Congrats to all the
winners.

SHUFFLE/HORSESHOES
The shuffle league is in full
swing. On Wednesdays we have
eight teams of six people each
battling it out for the most wins.
Thursday, Interpark now has
two teams alternating who hosts
a team here, and one goes out to
another park.
It's all about fun and fellow-


ship. On Monday we will have
a Novice Tournament for any-
one who has never won a tro-
phy. This is a chance for all you
new shufflers to come out and
compete and have fun.
The Interpark played Florida
Lakes, and our women won
eight and lost four; the men
won. 11 and lost one. Then they
played Fort Meade. Our women
won 12 and lost six, and the
men won nine and lost nine.
The horseshoe team played
Good Life and tied. The team
keeps getting better and better.

SPOTLIGHT
Carlene Balavitch has been
in our park for the past 14 years,
hailing from Pentwater, Mich.
She came here to visit friends
after the loss of her husband.
She fell in love with the people
and the park. She has two chil-
dren and four grandchildren.
Carlene and her husband
owned a recreational vehicle
business in Muskegon, Mich.,
where they lived until they,
retired. They then moved to
Pentwater and built their dream
house on the Pentwater River.
Carlene was our activities
director for two years and she is
still very active in the park,
going to stained glass, Bible
study, bocce, as chairman of
decorations for many years, and
was in carving for five years.
She enjoys being active in the
singles club, which has 12
active members.
Carlene appreciates the fact
that there is so much to do in
our park that you could be busy
every minute, or you can take
the other approach and relax
and do things at your leisure.
Carlene has been a great
asset to our park over these past
years. We have been blessed to
have her as our neighbor and
friend.


The U.S. Department of Agri-
culture (USDA) today released
its January orange crop forecast
for the 2008-2009 season, re-
ducing its earlier estimate by 3
million boxes to 162 million
boxes.
"'This is a manageable crop
and hopefully the reduced pro-
duction will spur higher prices
to growers .because right now
they are facing very high input
costs, associated with disease
pressure and fertilizer prices,"
said Michael W. Sparks, execu-
tive VP/CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual. "We are in the middle
of a very challenging season."
Visit www.nass.usda.gov/-
Statisticsby_State/Florida/Pub
lications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for
the complete USDA estimate.
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July. In 2007-
2008, Florida harvested 170.2
million boxes of oranges.
The .USDA maintained its
prediction that 23 million boxes
of grapefruit will be produced
in 2008-09.


A lower forecast for
early/midseason varieties and
navels in Florida accounts for
the estimate's decrease. The
early and midseason crop is
now projected at 84 million
boxess. down'from 87 million
boxes.
The Valencias projection is
unchanged at 78 million boxes
this season.
Florida specialty fruit stayed
the same; the USDA predicts
1.5 million boxes of tangelos
and 4.9 million boxes of tanger-
ines.
The yield for from-concen-
trate orange juice (FCOJ) is
expected to be 1.62 gallons per
90-pound box, up from 1.58.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9.3 billion annual
economic impact, employing
nearly 76,000 people, and cov-
ering more than 576,000 acres.
Founded in 1948 and current-
ly representing nearly 8,000
grower members, Florida Citrus
Mutual is the state's largest cit-
rus grower organization.
For more information, visit
www.flcitrusmutual.com.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS|
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Fruit Cocktail, Milk
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or
Hamburger on a Bun (Salad
Tray, Baked Beans, Juice Bar,
Juice) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffle,
Sausage Patty, Buttered Toast,
Peaches, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Patty on a
Bun or Hot Dog on a Bun
(Salad Tray, Yellow Cake, Ice
Cream, Green Beans, Juice)
and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambl-
ed Eggs w/Cheese, Potato
Triangle, Buttered Toast, Pears,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Oven-Fried Chicken
w/Roll or Rib-B-Que (Salad
Tray, Savory Rice, Pears, Juice)
and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Buttered
Toast, Cheese Grits, Pineapple
Chunks, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Corndog, Hamburger
Gravy w/Roll (Salad Tray, Mash-
ed Potatoes, Garden Peas,
Juice) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Pears,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Tacos or Toasted
Ham & Cheese (Salad Tray,
Pinto Beans, Juice, Jell-O) and
Milk

JUNIOR HIGH


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, Fruit
Cocktail, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun
or Pepperoni Pizza (Lettuce &
Tomato, Baked Beans, Peach-
es, Juice Bar) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffle,
Sausage Patty, Buttered Toast,
Peaches, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Patty on a
'Bun or Pepperoni Pizza or Hot
Dogs (Lettuce & Tomato, Green
'Beans, Yellow Cake, Ice Cream,
Juice) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambl-
ed Eggs w/Cheese, Potato Tri-
angle, Buttered Toast, Pears,'
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Oven-Fried Chicken
w/Roll or Cheese Pizza or Rib-
B-Que on a Bun (Tossed Salad,
Savory Rice, Pears, Juice) and
Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Pineapple
Tidbits, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy
w/Roll or Corndog or Pepperoni
Pizza (Tossed Salad, Salad Bar,
Mashed Potatoes, Green Peas,
Fruit Cocktail, Juice) and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Pears,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Toasted ;Ham &
Cheese or Max Stick Mozzarella
or Tacos (Lettuce & Tomato,
Pinto Beans w/Ham, Jell-O,
Juice) and Milk


SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, Fruit
Cocktail, Yogurt, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Manager' Choice
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, yVaffles, .
Sausage, Juice, Peaches, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Patty on a
Bun (Tossed, Salad, Fresh
Potatoes, Broccoli, Macaroni
Salad, Birthday Cake, Ice
Cream, Juice) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambl-
ed Eggs, Buttered Toast, Pears,
Juice
Lunch: Rib-B-Que on a Bun
(Tossed Salad, Savory Rice,
Baked Beans, Corn, Pears,
Juice) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Cheese Toast, Juice,
Pineapple Chunks, Cinnamon
Toast, Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy
w/Roll (Tossed Salad, Mashed
Potatoes, Garden Peas, Juice,
Fruit Snacks) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Tacos (Tossed Sal-
ad, Corn, Refried Beans w/-
Cheese, Mexican Rice, Carrots,
Jell-O, Juice) and Milk


Have but luck, and you will
have the rest; be fortunate,
and you will be thought great.
-Victor.Hugo


rE.G,. Koch Construction


1417 Swank Ave. Sebring, FL 33870

(863) 385-8649


MANY COLORS
AVAILABLE


Low


"For all of your Aluminum, Steel, and Conventional Construction needs"
Email: kochcon@strato.net 1:f State Certified License #CBC058444
I*


DON'T WAIT!


PRICES ONLY OOD THROUGH JANUARY 311


lIKE ITO(C II
Iill ITO( ll
(HILDRENr1


Nancy Bandy
Irene Castanon
Teresa Cortez
Kathy Crawford
Teresa Crawford
Gloria Davis
Teresa Gaitan
Karen Hartman
Angela Hemand
Amparo Islas
Fernando Islas
Kimberly Islas
Sharri Knight


Take Stock In Children
Would like to thank some of the
busiest people in Hardee County
for taking the time to mentor
our scholars:





Gayle Knight
Joe Kohan
Caroline Mackay
Joann McCray
Terrin McKelvey-Green
Patricia Naranjo
Gina Neuhofer
Candance Preston
ez Peter Preston
Rita Rodriguez
Kathleen Roehm
Kimberly Smith
Carolyn Wyatt


You can take part by donating one hour a week as a
mentor. For more information, please call the South
Florida Community College Foundation at 453-3133.







SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
1:22nc.j)


2008-09 Orange


Estimate Decreases


5 INCH
GUTTERS

$2.75
PER LINEAR FOOT


61 CH
GUTTERS

$3.89
PER LIN








6B The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009


The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services


DEMOLITION
Fill Dirt *Tree Removal *
eStump Removal Dragline .
*Track Hoe Land Clearing *
Shell Clay *Top Soil*
Bulldozer Dump Trucks *
(863) 735-2415


Special
Tandam Axle Load
(14-16 yards)
$100/Load ,
within S mile radius of Zilfo Springs
nlTop Soill*Hard Pan
Hardee County Area only"


! :1 ~YAV~1 d SI!


Lost on January 13
Griffin Road Area Wauchula
If you have information please call

773-6948 or 863-444-0174
cll:22p



IJIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.ilmseerealty.com
4 P James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


3.36 acres with 3 BR/2 BA
home. This 2,800 sf home is
extremely energy efficient.
Plenty of room for a garden or
other outdoor uses. Value
priced at $275,000.
3 BUILDING LOTS on the
corner of Hogan and 7th Ave
in Wauchula. Great location
for duplexes or other commer-
cial operation. Close to shop-
ping. Only $99,900.
8,000. sf Commercial
Building on Main Street.
Zoned Historic Commercial.
Lots of possibilities. $285,000.
85 acres of improved pasture.
Hwy 17 frontage. $6,000 per
acre.
NEW CONSTRUCTION!
Beautiful 3 BR, 2 BA home.
Great location in town. Tray
ceilings, stainless appliances,
upscale landscaping with irri-
gation. Builder is offering a
bonus to the buyer! $230,000.
2 BR/1 BA CB home. Metal
roof put on after Hurricane.
Some work needs to be done
inside. Large corner lot in
Wauchula. $72,000.
3 BR/2 BA house on 7 1/2
acres. Stocked pond. This
property is zoned for up to 3
homes! $179,900.
3 BR, 2 BA immaculate home
with many extras. Home was
built in 2000 and all appli-
ances are included. Land-
scaped yard with several fruit
trees and even a pecan tree.
$143,900.


3 Bedroom/2 Bath home in
Golfview. Big 1+ acre lot. 2 car
garage. $175,000.
45 ac citrus grove. Valencias &
Hamlin. Double wide mobile
home. Fruit proceeds included
(subject to FOM contract).
Located in NE Hardee County.
$427,500
3.19 acres. Zoned C-2. Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential income already in
place. Hwy 17 across from
Walmart. $1,200,000
Waterfront property! 2 BR/2
BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep
water canal that leads into
Charlotte Harbor. Buyer con-
cessions possible. Priced right
at $165,000!
1 acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in
Wauchula. Paved road front-
age. Deed restrictions. Zoned
FR. Lot size 130' X 305'.
$38,500
Cut your electric bill in half! 3
BR 2 BA in Riverview is newly
remodeled and built for effi-
ciency! $189,900.
Stunning newly built 3 BR, 2
BA house with study. Up-
grades galore! Close to schools.
2 car garage. Call and ask
about the bonus offered by the
builder! $259,000.
2.24 acres zoned C-2 with
frontage on Hwy 17, Stenstrom
& Holtsclaw. Can be divided.
Super site for commercial
operation. Priced at $220,000.


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445.0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242


Classifieds


-I


-1


KELLER WILLIAMS
^ i.. A---A L. iT Y
An i ndeentflykQ ned Brokr-age
Mikey C6lding
Realt i
(863) 781-'698 \

midfloridalistings.com
* 155 Acres of beautiful native Florida Hunting Land. All woods.
Great location. Over 1/2 mile of winding creek bottom. Call for
more details.
* Asking $6,900/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 28-32 acre parcels or buy as a whole 60 acre
tract. Call for more details.
* Zoned commercial 8.5 acres, corner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.,
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000.
* Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered
oaks and pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac.
wetlands. Great Investment Property. Sweetwater area.
* 20 acre Ranchettes. 6 available. 127 acres total. Buy one or buy
them all. Fish Branch Rd. Starting at $8,500/acre c:i 22e


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873 --
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net Oralia Flores


SPECIAL OF THE WEEK


A Golfer's Paradise Enjoy the peace and quiet in
this beautiful country setting. Over 4,000 total
square feet and over 2,800 square feet of living area
In this very well maintained home. Lots of extras
including ceramic tile floors, custom cabinets, 3-car
garage, 2 wells ( 1 for home and 1 for irrigation),
Living room, family room, Florida room and 3 large
bedrooms. Very large master suite bath with lots
and lots of storage. Professionally landscaped and
overlooking the golf course.

Townhouse 2BR/1.5BA home in Wauchula Over 1,100 sq ft of liv-
ing area Central air/heat. This is cheaper than rent In fact you
may want to buy and rent as an investment only $49,000.00
Best Mobile Home Location 3BR/2BA well maintained mobile
home in Downing Place. Close to shopping hospital and restau-
rants $77,000.00 MLS # 202856
5 acres well electric pole located NE of Wauchula Price
Reduced Now $48,000.00
On Painter Road.- New Hope section 10 acre tract wooded -
Nature trails Ideal Home sites Restricted Enjoy country living
close to town 10 acres $178,000.00
Bowling Green 3BR home with Central air/heat Close to all ser-
vices. $88,000.00
3BR 2BA CB Home built in 2006 on a corner lot within the city
limits of Zolfo Springs Elementary School Banking Dining and
grocery Shopping. All For $120(00K*:M REDUCED TO $99,900.001

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember
| Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can l _
access them anytime! OP.Po,,o
Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralla D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net
After hours
Oralla D. Flores (863) 781-2955 Tony Flores (863) 781-0744
John Freeman (863) 781-4084 Steve Lanier (863) 559-9392
Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891 *


THREE BEDROOM house, rent
with option to buy. 832-1984.
1:22-2:19p
9.8 ACRES 'OF PASTURE and
oaks, Johnston Road, 3/2 DW, 2
pole barns, $160,000. 941-729-
5407. 1:15-2:12p
4BR/2-1/2BA PLUS bonus room
on 9-1/2 acres. 863-773-4207.
863-781-5595. 1:8-22c
3BR/2-1/2BA, MANY EXTRAS.
Owner motivated. Make offer.
773-3316, 781-0681. 1:8-2:5p


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1996 PONTIAC
VIN:1GMDU06E2TT214639
8:00 A.M. FEB. 5, 2009
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL
cl1:22c


NEW 3/2 WITH 2 CAR garage In
Bowling Green. Cath. ceilings,
Whirlpool appl. and many up-
grades. Landscaped lot with
trees, $142,000. Call 973-773-
9571 or 863-445-0662. 1:15 tfc



DeSoto County






LOW DOWN--
OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 |
z


Lost & Found Wanted
Miscellaneous Yard Sales





PARKER FILL DIRT


1--,
Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


E3
(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


9 L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing-
citrus fruit for the 2009/10 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 9:4tfc


'94 TOYOTA WITH CAMPER top,
new tires, manual transmission,
many new parts, AC/heat, good
running. 832-0334. $2,000.
1:15-2:13p

Luck never made man wise.
-Seneca



We Repair All Brands Of
Lawn Mowers Golf Carts
ATVs Chainsaws
Grove Carts Trimmers etc.



863-375-4081
863-474-1172
829 Bostick Rd. Bowling Green


NEEDED IMMEDIATELY Person
with auto retail skills, pays atten-
tion to details, self motivator,
great communication skills, com-
puter and bookkeeping knowl-
edge. Bilingual A+, must be will-
ing to work on Saturday every
other week. Would prefer some-
one with auto detailing back-
ground and willing to work detail-
ing into business. Base pay, plus
commission. Contact 863-773-
2213 for application or appoint-
ment. 12:25tfc
(WOMAN TO WORK with develop-
mentally disabled women. Call
Edna 767-0374, Monday thru
Friday, 8 to 2. 1:22-29p
CLEANING PERSON for laundry
mat, $200 per week, must be
bilingual, dependable, have cell
phone and vehicle. 941-238-8578.
1:15-22p

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1998 ROAD
VIN:1KR21DT21WB288335
8:00 A.M. FEB. 5,2009
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL
cl1:22c


Ti County Appliance Repair











New Appliances with CLOSEOUT PRICING
Kegorator Stainless Steel $600
Stacked Washer/Dryer Combo Apartment Size $700
Chest Freezer 15cf $339
Chest Freezer 13cf $309
White Glass Range 5 Burner $439
Cooktops $150 and up
Duel Fuel, 30" Drop In, Gas Cooktop & Electric Oven $900
All new appliances have manufacturers warranty
When These Are Gone They Are GONE!

Parts for ALL Makes!!

Donavan ~ 781-7680
Trained Licensed Insured Professional Service
cll: 15-29c


08



Joe LYlavis
SN C., REA L T 0 R S
S| | (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
John,, O'eai www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
Why rent a home when you can own one?
Call today for important information on how you may
qualify to receive a grant for down payment assistance on
your new home. Interest rates are low and inventory is high.
Let us help you today!
Call:
Sandy or Juan
832-0130 781-1128
NEW LISTING! 11 acs Two adjacent parcels on
w/566' of frontage on SR the Peace River! 7.83 acs
66. Also frontage on for $219,000, 8.64 acs for
Nursery Rd. Zoned A-1. $225;000 or both for
$139,000! $398,000. Possible owner
financing!
Charlie Creek Estates
MH & lot all for only Big back yard w/privacy
$29,000! fence & an immaculate
3BR/2BA CB home.
Home for RENT on E $138,000!
Main St in Wauchula.
3BR/2BA w/pool. PRICE REDUCED!
$750/mo! 35.22 ac fenced pasture
in private setting current-
2.84 acs in the city of ly used for cattle. Mobile
Wauchula zoned R-3, Home without well or sep-
multi-family residential. tic being sold "as is".
City utilities available. $350,000!
Property has 386 ft of
road frontage & is 345 ft PRICE REDUCED!
deep. $150,000! Brand new construction!
Beautiful 3BR/2BA,
Find the privacy you're 1300+ SF CB home
looking for in this seclud- w/granite countertops,
ed 4BR/3BA home on 12 ceramic tile & carpet
wooded acs. Just minutes floors. $155,000! Lease
to Wauchula or Zolfo option to buy available!
Springs. $350,000!
Lots of mature oak trees
PRICE REDUCED! make this 9.8 acs a beau-
9,600SF commercial tiful homesite. Very close
building close to to Wauchula & Zol(d
Wauchula Airport. Two Springs w/over 200'
work areas, offices & fronting SR 64. A-1 zon-
restrooms w/storage loft, ing allows for residential,
rollup doors w/security pasture for cattle/horses,
system. Will consider or farmland. Culvert in
leasing! $340,000! place! $168,000
REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS..........781-0153 SANDY LARRISON.--. 832'-0130
JUAN DELATORRE.......781-1128 MONICA REAS- ...--.77 3-90
DAVID ROYAL..-............781-3490
U.S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCIHULA, FL 33873
caia


-777 - -., _, .


". ? -














The


January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 7B


Classifieds


FEATHERLITE 3 HORSE slant alu-
minum gooseneck, rear tack a/c,
refrigerator, microwave, more,
$8,500 OBO. 863-993-2363.
_ 1:22-2:19p


LOST 2 PIT BULL DOGS on
SR62, male, red/white; female,
brown/white. 773-6853. 1:22p
FOUND 3 COWS, 3 calves in
northeast side of Hardee County.
Call to describe. 781-1740. 1:22nc
LOST FEMALE CAT, long hair,
black and white, answers to Katy.
773-5702. 1:22:2:19p


Lost/Found

REWARD LOST man's gold'
flat-link fence bracelet, Friday
night at sports complex. 863-382-
8233. 1:15-22p
FOUND Black Angus bull near
Snipe Drive. Call 735-1570.
1:1-29p


WANTED HARDEE COUNTY
4-H history Items for county fair
display. Contact Joy Brummett
773-3805 or Naorni Erekson 767-
0008. 1:15-22P


3 BR 1 Bath (lot included) AC
$45,000 Each Owner Financing

Also, Mobile Homes For Rent ;


'SttnIc
(863 781446 or 863 781457


BO LN GRE




YOU SPO


DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME,
furnished, 2BR/2BA, Florida room
on lakeside, Crystal Lake Village.
773-9301. 1:8-2:5p


FREE 1/2 LAB, 1/2 bulldog pup-
pies, ready Jan. 29. 781-3330.
1:15-29p
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold In Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


Prime Residential Building Lot
Riverview Heights, Wauchula.
100' x 125', Access to City Utilities.
Zoned SF Residential.

$23,900

(863) 234-2234
1:15,22p


-I


GROOMING 20 yrs. exp. with"
knowledge in carding and hand-
stripping. Offering shedless treat-
ment & teethbrushing, full groom'
service Includes bath, groom to
breed standard, anals & nails.
863-773-0547. 1:1-29p


FOR SALE BY OWNER 3/2
w/bonus room, located on 1 acre
on Florida Ave., near hospital, pri-
vats well with low utilities,



2BR/1BA MOBILE home with AC,
$500 month, $300 deposit, no
pets. 863-559-4579. 1:22c


SMALL APARTMENT, Minor i
Bowling Green. 863-712-0072
1:22


NICE CLEAN 1 f-bedroom ipart-
ment for rent. AC/Heat, washer/-
dryer hookup and screened in
porch, $130 per week. Utilities
Not Included. First and last weeks
rent, damage deposit and refer-
ence required. 773-9793. 1:22p
3BR/2BA on 15 acres, $1,200
month, deposit, first and last.
863-781-0593. 1:22p
HOUSE FOR RENT 4BR/2BA, 2
car garage, nice neighborhood.
For more information 863-773-
0065, 954-383-5078. 1:22-29p
THREE BEDROOM HOUSE, $800
and two bedroom apartment,
$575.832-1984. 1:22p


BRAND NEW 3/2 home w
ble garage located app
min. from Wauchula, $80(
ly, $800 deposit. Call
Smith 863-781-1186.


Ave.,
2. OFFICE FOR RENT 1
-29p across from Burger King
per month. 863-414-3850.


ilth dou-
prox. 20


HOUSES COMMERCIAL, store-
fronts, restaurant, hunting leases,
agri-leases. 773-6616, 445-0915,
863-245-6566. 12:25-1:29p
3BR/2BA, CENTRAL AIR, River-
view, $1,000 monthly. Available
Dec. 1st. Call for appointment to
view. 773-2309. 1:1-29c
3BR/2BA/1CG new const., vault-
ed ceilings, must see, $800 month
and security. 863-443-2903
www.bghomes.net. 10:16tfc
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage In Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
12:20tfc.


0 month-
Jessica POST OFFICE
1:8-2:c OW
,800 SF NOW HIRING!
1,8oo _


1 :6-2:5p


3BR/1-1/2 BA, DEN, WASHER &
dryer, $800 plus deposit. 863-990-
5037,863-781-0072. 1:1 -29p
WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack Ullrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc


Placed by adSource not affiliated
w/USPS, who hires.
1-866-749-1415
I1':1-31c


Mif al


Toin SrvceAvial

0 2 1 ourSeri ce


L AMBER,
REALTY INC.


402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
MAKE A REASONABLE OFFER on this 2005,
very nice, D/W mobile home on lovely lot;
12x16 screened porch; outside storage; many
extras; good location. $89,000

EXECUTIVE HOME in EXCLUSIVE
NEIGHBORHOOD See this lovely 3252
square feet C/B Stucco home with all amenities;
beautifully decorated and move in ready.
$279,000

CONVENIENT LOCATION for this 4B/3Bth
home with fireplace; large storage area; poten-
tial rental property. $100,000

INVESTMENT PROPERTY 4 rental units
plus one 3/2 home within walking distance of
schools, medical facilities and shopping. Call to
see today! Listed at $225.000
OWNER MOTIVATED! Lovely home on tree
shaded lot; 4B/2Bth brick home, close to
schools and shopping; large carport, fenced
backyard, 12X16 building with water and elec-
tric. $179,500

MAKE AN OFFER on this 3B/1Bth home on
large lot; central H/A, screened porch, outside
storage. $98,500

AFFORDABLE LIVING! 2B/1Bth completely
furnished M/H; large screened porch and nice
yard. $38,000


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Charlotte Terrell
CHARMING C/B home on 11 acres, MUST
SEE INSIDE TO APPRECIATE; 3B/lBth;
large fireplace, enclosed porch; flowing creek on
property. $225,000
Lovely 3800 square feet home built in 1999, fac-
ing golf course; exterior is brick and hardee
board; carpet, laminate, tile floors; extra large
3B/3.5Bth. $350,000
OWNER ANXIOUS TO SELL this 3/2 Homes
of Merit D/W on 17.22 acres; 16x54 pole barn;
located in Manatee County. $269,000
ALL OFFERS CONSIDERED and POSSIBLE
OWNER FINANCING! 30 acres of pasture-
land; secluded; small pond with natural flow of
water; perfect for home site or small ranch.
$255,000
Lovely home site 5 acres with fruit trees, large
oaks and 1 acre pond. $110,000
Beautiful home site with paved road frontage;
make an offer on this 5 acre tract. Listed at
$90,000
14.74 acres on Bailes Rd, nice sloping tract with
large pond; some native trees; very secluded.
$195,000
Excellent location for building your new home;
1/2 acre tracts; city water and sewer. deed
restricted area. $40,000
Duette Area 10 acres with 12" well; perfect for
your new home. Call Delois Johnson for more
information.


... SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: JOSEFINA GARAY......863-399-3329
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971 ASSOCIATE: JUDY HINERMAN..............735-0268
ASSOCIATE: ROBERT HINERMAN........227-0202
,1


I


RN's/LPN's/CNA's
Full Time
Needed for a 79 bed SNF. If you like geri-
atrics, COME JOIN THE HARDEE MANOR
HEALTHCARE TEAM. Apply In person.
Hardee Manor Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873
PH: 863-773-3231
FAX: 863-773-0959 cii:15,22c


NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,.
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGIIPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot
cl4:20tfc


Moving Sale

Friday and Saturday
143 Golden Oaks
(off S. 17 in Zolfo Springs)
Lots of items
Collectibles (Indian, Wolves, Masks, Glassware, Nascar)
Antique (Radios, Stove)
Furniture
Washer & Dryer
Generator
Pressure Washer
Riding Lawn Mower
52" Big Screen
LOTS OF ONE OF A KIND THINGS

For more info call Chris

863-781-6493
cll :22p


13 Mobile Homes'For Sale I


m


i







8B The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009


The


Classifieds


I entl


* MOVE-IN SPEC
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B fro
monthly. 1BR from $300 r
No pets, low deposit. I
school & hospital. Citrus
MHP. 863-698-4910 or 69
Se habla espanol.


ATTFIJTIAMiThe -Federe


Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
.tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


IA *' W.R. SMITH LAND Clearing &
>m $400 Tree Removal Services Inc Land
monthly. clearing demolition, tree
Next to removal, etc.; Fencing barbed
Valley wire, field fence, board fence,
)8-4908. etc.; Tractor work bush hog,
disc, etc. Will Smith, owner/oper-
7:31tfc tore. 863-781-0158 cell or 863-
ral Fair 773-3557 office. 1:22-2:19o


B SEE SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
1:8-4:16p
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP. Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
Located at the SFCC Annex,
Room #105, Hwy. 17 North, Wau-
chula. 735-2511. tfc-nc


Short Time Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll free
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity requirements apply.


Robby Albritton
Payroll Services Workers Compensation *
Year End W-2's 941 Tax Reports *
Office (863)735-9226 Cell (863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
ralbritton@eloinc.net cIo:23tfc www.elonic.net



On Line Shopping Mall


Shop From Home


www.4674onetouchshopping.biz
socl:1-22p


ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION -
Additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening. Harold
Howze Construction. 735-1158.
RR05018 1:1-2:16p
DO-YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula, and Friday and Saturday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First Methodist
Church, corner of Grape and
Church St., Bowling Green.
12:6tfcdh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


RYAN GARZA
(863) 804-7203


Pr


IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5: Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09'
Section 10 Paragraph D require'
all ads for any construction-relat-.
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
dh


SATURDAY 1409 Lost Acres
rlve, Wauchula Hills. Misc.
Hems. 11:22p
SPRING CLEANING EARLY
Friday/Saturday, 624 'Green St.,
Wauchula. Appliances, furniture,
baby Items, collectibles, books,
material & much, much more.
1:22p


WALLY HELMS
(863) 781-0222


Total Package
Property Maintenance
Lawn Care PO Box 1001 Hedging
pressure Washing Wauchula, FL 33873 Edging


Weed Pulling
Tree Trimming
Back Hoe Work


*Insured*
r 21 '9 29O


Weed Eating
Irrigation
Culverts
Fences


I Service


THREE FAMILY YARD SALE:
Plenty of everything, baby items,
kitchenware, pictures, clothes,
furniture, books, videos, etc.,
Saturday, 8-2, 1668 Dena Circle,
Golfview Subdivision, Highway 64
West. 1:22p
COKER'S GARAGE SALE -
Saturday, 24th, 8 a.m. -?, 2594
Boyd Cowart Road, look for
signs. Lots of miscellaneous
Items. 1:22p
ATTENTION Yard sellers and
organizations! Bring your good-
ies to our property, good expo-
sure, Hwy. 17 N, plenty of park-
Ing. 773-2672. 1:22-2:19p
THURSDAY/FRIDAY 8-3, Dixie
Drive, Bowling Green. Lots of
goodies. 1:22p
MOVING SALE 2433 Azalea,
Crystal Lake Village, Saturday, 9-1.
1:22p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY 8-?, Lazy
Acres Trailer Park, Zolfo, motor-
cross boots, etc., household,
toys, baby items, too much to list.
1:22p
SATURDAY 8 till ?, collectible
porcelain dolls, what nots & other
items. Large multi-family sale,
814 North 9th Ave. 1:22p


3 Bedroom 2 Bath Ft. Green


For Sale or For Rent

(863) 773-6667 c:22c
"T U


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132* FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorlda. edu


FACULTY POSITIONS
The following full-time faculty positions are open for the 2008-09
academic year. Requirements vary by position. Please visit our
web site for detailed position announcements and application
information.
English
Master Student/College Success
Office Education
Nursing
SFCC offers competitive salaries and benefits, including.
health/life insurance, retirement, and paid leave. Application
review will begin February 18, 2009 and continue until appoint-
ments are made. Application forms are available in Human
Resources, Building I (Highlands Campus), at any SFCC cam-
pus/center or on our web site.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
c c1:15o 22C





Best deals on wheels!


MPLOVEE.
O.EASING
OPTIONS INC.


CUMBEE SANDBLASTING AND PAINTING
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FL
STOCK TRAILERS
EQUIPMENT TRAILERS
EQUIPMENT;
Make you old, rusty stuff look new.
CONTACT:
LAMAR 863-781-0988 122


HELP WANTED
DETENTION DEPUTY
$33,00000 $38,11000
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is seeking:
Florida Certified Correction Officers. Applicants
must possess a current certification in Corrections!
and meet the requirements set.forth by the Florida4
Department of Law Enforcement Training and'
Standards Commission. Applicants must success-
fully complete the personnel selection process set.
forth by the Sheriff's Office.
Applications may be obtained and returned to the
Sheriff's Office at 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula, FL,
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
If other accommodations are necessary, call the
Sheriff's Office, 863-773-0304 to make arranged
ments. EOE 11:22,296
d11:22,2g9.6


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicles described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
2003 Dodg Pk Id.# 1D7HA18N03S169486
Contact Linda or Shannon for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Friday January 23, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at the
Wauchula State Bank parking lot located at 106
East Main Street, Wauchula Fl. cl1:15,22c


Iam


IE


Billy Ayers
Tire Technician


NowD se


Come in for
Summer
Specials


773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
VISA [ c', (across from Wal-Mart)


Hardee Car Company

2004 Ford Taurus
2004 Chevy Malibu
2003 4 dr Crew Cab F-150
2003 GMC 4x4

2003 Chevy Venture Van
2003 Pontiac Sunfire (Actual Miles)

S$500 OFF,
any Vehicle with coupon
Must Bring Coupon
i --'-- - ....--- -'

Tax Time!
Wauchula Buy Here Pay Here2 Wauchula Hills
(across from We can use your orner of Hw 1
First National Bank) '*- t tax refund check as d REA Rd
773-6667 a down payment _9 773-2011


12


'


-1


r-


- [


THURS/FRI/SAT Gas Book.
stoves, refrigerators, beds all
sizes, bunk beds, bedroom suite,
fish cooker. All the clothes you.
can get in a bag $1. Miss Edna's
Place. 1:22c




STARTING AT $65
.- 1 Signature Divorce
-- Missing Spouse Divorce
"WE COME TO YOU"
Covering ALL Areas
1-888-705-7221
(E.ublihed 19921 1 8-2 5p







Teehn (863) 73-325


GREENWOOD 1-800-535-6061


11


I







January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 9B


JAM TO JAZZ


COURTESY PHOTO
Attention, jazz lovers! The Benny Goodman Centennial Tribute is coming to the South
Florida Community College Auditorium in Avon Park tonight (Thursday) at 7:30. The
tribute is a part of the SFCC Jazz Series and features clarinetist Allan Vanche, pianist.
Mark Shane and jazz vocalist Terry Blaine. Tickets are $23-$25 and can be purchased*
online at http://performances.southflorida.edu or by calling the SFCC Box Office at,
(863) 784-7178.


SYMPHONY SOUNDS


HJHS Hoops Winding Down
By JOAN SEAMAN coming along and had the hot-against the junior Lhady Red
Of The Herald-Advocate hand for 13 of Hardee's points. Devils, losing 37-24.
With three more games under Nichols added six, in-cluding Again, Hardee had no answer
their belts, the Hardee Junior .two at the charity stripe. Tanks- for Johnstavia Perry's 20,
High School basketball teams ley, Hunter, Patel and Brown points, 12 coming in the .first
are seeing the end of the season. each chipped in with two quarter. For Hardee, it was
Because of this week's holi- points. Carlton again leading the Lady,
day on Monday, the only games Hardee boys forged ahead for 'Cats with .a dozen points.
are today (Thursday) at Se- a 12-4 first-quarter advantage Allysa Casso nailed a trey, and
bring. The season's final pair of and upped it to 24-15 at half- Tanksley, Patel, Maddox and
games are next week, Monday time, stretching it to 46-29 by Brown each had two points,
at Hill-Gustat and the home the final buzzer. Laquavious while McClellan added one at
finale next Thursday vs. Lake Hightower led DeSoto with 10 the foul line.
Placid. points. Hardee boys played much
The new year began for the For the junior Wildcats, it tougher against Avon Park, los-
junior high squads with a Jan. 8 was Brown as game high scorer ing by five points instead of the
trip to Lake Placid. The local with 18 points, followed by 18 in the first meeting between
girls squad began with a press Albritton with 14 to put two these squads. It was a close
and jumped off to an 8-2 advan- men in double digits. Johnson game throughout, the first peri-
tage. With a 14-point second added four points, Casso three, od ending 11-all. Hardee was
period, Hardee had a 22-4 half- and Kramer Royal, Zachary up 19-17 at halftime, but Avon
time lead and had pulled the Neuhofer and Luke Palmer with Park had a strong third period to
press away. two points apiece. Daniel take a 33-28 edge. Both teams
The lead gave coaches Andy Boehm nailed one-of-two at the got nine points in the final peri-
Maddox and Regan Davenport free throw line. Others on the od.
the opportunity to get some Hardee roster are Forrester, Avon Park placed two men in
play for their reserves as the Jacob Neuhofer, C.K. Douglas double digits, Michael Rhoten
starters sat out the second half. and Luke "Chuck" Winter. with 15 points and Jarviel Hart
Still, Hardee won 36-14. Bria Last Thursday's home games, with 12.
Wilson led Lake Placid with against Avon Park, probably the Brown, only a seventh grad-
eight points, top team in the Heartland Con- er, was again game high scorer
For Hardee, scoring was bal- ference, were an exercise in with 18 points. Albritton chip-
anced, with Robyn Tanksley frustration for both Hardee ped in with nine, Casso had
tops with eight points. Carlista squads. Hardee girls did about five, Johnson four and Zachary
Brown added six, Ashley Arm- the same as the first game Neuhofer two points.


strong and Bailey Carlton each
,five, Kayla Nichols and Ana
Saldivar each three, and Allison
Hunter, Shreya Patel and Desi-
ree Smith two points apiece.
Others sharing time on the court
were Destiny McClellan, Alex-
ann Maddox, Nyshira Jackson
and Carleigh Coleman.
Hardee boys, meanwhile, had
a much harder time, losing 55-
20. Hardee started slowly and
was down 16-5 after the first
quarter. Led by E.J. Moate's 13'
points, Lake Placid increased
its lead each period.
Keyon Brown led Hardee
with eight points, while Garrett
Albritton had four, Kain Casso
three, Justin Forrester and
Zachary Neuhofer each two
points and Kris Johnson one of
two at the free throw line.
Last Monday both teams
were rude hosts in defeating
visiting DeSoto Middle School.
Hardee girls shut out DeSoto
for the first half, and again gave
reserves a good bit of playing
time in the 27-10 victory. Carl-
ton, a seventh grader, has been


Enjoy an evening with the sounds of the Czech Symphony Orchestra qq it recreates the
music of RachmaninA's "Piano Concerto No. 2" along with the muslfcof Smbtana and
Dvorak on Thursday, Jan. 29, at 7:30 at the South Florida Community College
Auditorium on the Highlands Campus. Tickets range from $23 to $25 and can be pur-
chased online at http://performances.southflorida.edu. Tickets can also be purchased
by calling the SFCC Box Office at (863) 784-7178.


Greetings from Fort Green!
We are all praising the Lord
for not letting us have a serious
freeze last week. We are thank-
ful for the cloud cover and the
wind. According to the TV, the
weather could have been real
bad, but our God is still in con-
trol and we pray He will contin-
ue to protect us.
Tammy and Dustyn Waters
celebrated their 19th wedding
anniversary recently. It is hard
to believe it has been that long,
as I remember their wedding
vividly. Time really does fly!
Randy Davis was in the hos-
pital last week and had to return
last Tuesday for a heart cath.
Please pray for Randy and Faye
as he undergoes these tests.
Edith Bassett, Faye's mother,
still has some tests. We need to
remember all of them in prayer.
Betty Walker was not able to
attend church last Sunday.
This cold virus is really making


people sick. Keep Betty in your
prayers.
On a happy note, several of
the young ladies from Fort
Green Baptist were awarded the
"Top Cat" last week. Those
receiving the honor were Han-
nah and Holly Brown, Abby
Duke and Kaylee Hogenauer.
It was nice to see Dan Duke,
Abby's grandfather, and other
family members, mom and dad
and grandmother Jean Sadler
and aunt Pat Albritton. It is
great when relatives support the
youngsters.
T.K. Hogenauer had shoulder-
surgery last Thursday and is
recovering. He said it did not
hurt as long as he did not move,
but that is very difficult! You'
just have to move for some
things. Please remember all the
sick in prayer.
Doris Thornton and Brenda
Braxton were recent Georgia
visitors. Doris said it was cold


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478




Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience clo0:2tfc




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CONSTRUCTION CORP.


CUSTOM HOMES
REMODELING


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CONCRETE


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863-773-4779
"QUALITY- WXRKAT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE


cl1 22c


and rainy, so they did not do
much other than rest! In
Georgia, the rain turned to sleet
and she said there was quite a
bit of ice. That is not my kind of
weather. They had a safe trip.
Charles and Lynda Abbott
were Blairsville, Ga., visitors.
Lynda has wanted to see snow
and if they had stayed a little
longer, she might have gotten
her wish. Doris said there were
flakes falling in Hiawassee, but
they melted before they hit the
ground.
The Fort Green church voted
to have Brother Jack White as
the interim pastor for at least six
months, unless we find a full-
time pastor before then.
Sherman Cooper is a little
under the weather with this cold
virus. His mother, Mildred
Cooper, slipped the other morn-
ing and hit the floor. Please
remember Mrs. Mildred, as she
has a very hard time navigating.
Most of it is now in the wheel-
chair. She lives with her daugh-
ter, Gwen.
Our hearts were saddened
when we learned of the death of
Phil Glorius. Phil was the insur-
ance agent for quite a few of the
Fort Green folks in the olden
days. Phil will be missed, and to
know him was to love him.
Kaylee Hogenauer's 4-H
swine enjoyed some freedom
last Saturday. His pen devel-
oped a problem and the pig was
able to push open the door.
Luckily for Kaylee's dad, the
pig loves marshmallows. After
Miss Piggy explored the yard,
Mark was finally able to get a
rope on her, which he made into
a harness. Miss Piggy then fol-
lowed the trail of marshmal-
lows right back into her pen.
To have been raised in a city,
Mark does a good job of adapt-
ing to the "country life."
Remember to pray for our
country and each other. Please
call me with the news.


Carl Kelly iviKie iacux
ASE Certified Mechanic Manager
"NTo job's too big."

We Repair .,

/ All Types of Tires

/ Foreign and Domestic Cars

/ Diesel Engines

/ Repair or Rebuild Gas or Diesel Manual

or Automatic Transmissions

Licensed and Insured
Reg.#MV-40625






Open Mon Sat from 8:00 am 6:00 pm

5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green

375-4461

1 7 ji M771


Snails travel on "roadways" that they make themselves. A snail
produces a sticky liquid on the underside of its flat foot. The
rim of its foot skids along on the liquid with a rippling motion.;
Wave after wave of this motion pushes the snail along.




P1 otrp






...... es F-roin The Pas
*F obl l Iction


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


BOWLING GREEN QuialLUBE

& AUTO REPAIR








10B The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009

Hardee Livestock Market Hosts Customer Appreciation Day


Maurice Ballard, 80, Donald (Duck) Smith, 69, and Robert Ray Smith, 81, enjoyed the
cattlemen's event.


Shown (from left) are Linda and Hollis Albritton, Marcus Shackelford, Duck Smith, and
Robert Ray Smith.


Adrian Chapman, Charles Shackilford, Rick Knight and David Bridges attended the
event.


George Wheeler, Janice Wheeler and John D. Alexander celebrated the cattle industry
George Wheeler, Janice Wheeler and John D. Alexander celebrated the cattle industry


This is part of the crowd in front of the Hardee Livestock Market.


r Il


Rita Sweatt and Tommy Redding get steaks ready for Judy Albritton and Cathy Jo Jhana work at Hardee Edna Rutkosky and Jedina Justesen help the cattle mar-
grill. Livestock Market's office. ket process sales.







January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 11B


Girls Hoops


Almost Over


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two evenings this week and
one next spells the end to the
regular season for Hardee girls
basketball.
The girls showed improve-
ment in the first two of the three
games last week before being
blown out of the gym at
Palmetto on Friday.
This week, there was a trip to
Sebring on Tuesday and a visit
from Sarasota Booker today
(Thursday). The last game of
the season is at Lake Placid
next Thursday.
Last week began with a varsi-
ty-only game at Avon Park, one
in which Hardee showed a vast
change from its 23-point loss in
early December, when the Lady
Red Devils scored the first 37
points before Hardee got on
track. This time, Hardee out-
played Avon Park in the second
half, although never overcom-
ing the first-half deficit.
On Thursday night, both
Hardee teams went to Lakeland
Christian. The varsity game had
barely gotten started when soph
Maria Avalos was injured. Late
in the first quarter, senior leader
Sabrina "Noonie" Holmes, who
had already scored 10 points,
went down with a dislocated
shoulder and had to be trans-
ported by ambulance to Lake-
land Regional Medical Center.
Other Hardee players stepped
up and met the challenge, said
Head Coach Don Gray, noting
especially freshman Ashley
Nichols who finished with nine
points. The only other senior on
the squad, Naomi Alvarado, had
10 points, including a pair of
treys and pair of deuces. Avalos
had four before her injury.


Sophs Elvira Servin and Ashley
Louis and freshman Summer
Palmer each added two points.
Lakeland Christian had one-
sided scoring with Christina
Strawbridge picking up 22
--aints, more than half of her
team's 41 points. None of the
four other scorers had more
than eight points.
The varsity game was preced-
ed by a JV game, won by
Hardee 31-28. Lakeland Christ-
ian opened with an 8-2 advan-
tage, which was cut to 13-10 by
halftime. Lakeland Christian
clung to a 22-21 edge by the
start of the fourth quarter,
which saw Hardee outscore the
junior Lady Crusaders 10-6 for
the victory.
Megan Watson led Lakeland
Christian with 10 points, while
Hardee had two players in dou-
ble digits. Soph LaCresha
Carlton topped all player with
15 points on a half dozen
deuces and a trio of free throws.
Classmate Tiffany Prestridge
added 10 points, including two-
for-two at the charity stripe.
Paige Massey added four points
and Frances Banda had two.
Sarah Beyers, Monserrad
Duran, Lauren Moore, Caitlin
Sockalosky, Danely Flores and
Amanda Bissette joined in the
action.
It was a varsity double-head-
er at Palmetto on Friday even-
ing, the girls at 6 p.m. and the
boys at 7:30.
Hardee girls were limited by
the overall pressure of the Lady
Tigers, who kept their starters
in the game to the end, allowing
A. Smith to score 27 points, 13
of them in the fourth quarter of
a 63-7 win. Other starters were
in at the end, but no other play-
ers had more than seven points.


PHOTOS BY ALEX GILLIARD
In a mix of home and away uniforms, Lady Wildcat basketball players are (front row, from left) Lindy Rossman, Naomi
Alvarado, Ashley Nichols, Elvira Servin and Ivette Cisneros; (back row) Maria Avalos, Coach Don Gray, Carleen
Brown, Summer Palmer, Katie Jernigan, Ashley Louis and Sabrina "Noonie" Holmes.
i .l

.'- ...
- : .". -*


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular and
zoning session today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in
Room 102, Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula.
The following is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of pub-
lic interest Times are approximate except for advertised pub-
lic bearings.
Zoning Publicfaaring, a rezone of four acres off U.S.
17, east of REA Road for a temporary office trailer, and later per-
manent building for Coker Fuel, 8:35 a.m.
Revised Health Care Task Force bylaws, 8:45 a.m.
Request for special election March 24 on school ad valorem
tixes, allowing the capital outlay portion to be used for general
operating expenses due to economic crises, 8:55 a.m.
Agreement with Chastain Skillman for engineering on
.records storage and office building, 9:05 a.m.
Appeal of Federal Emergency Management Agency work-
sheets for two major roads damaged by hurricanes.
Discuss jail committee.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.

WHAT A CATCH!


Playing for the Hardee JV Lady 'Cats this season are (first row, left to right) Caitlin Sockalosky, LaCresha Carlton,
Frances Banda, Artrice flihes and Sarah Beyers; (back row) Monsurrad Duran, Danely Flores, Amanda Bissette,
Lauren Moore, Paige Massey and Coach Ken Leupold; missing is Tiffany Prestridge.


"Man Laws for Moms"


"Understanding Dads and Why We

Do What We Do"

Presented by

Mark Keith, Training Coordinator

This session for Moms will explore some of the
reasons why Dads do the things that they do related
to family involvement and strategies that Mom can use
to help encourage Dad to be more involved with a
child with special needs.


UUUI- RITr S f IP u
A unique Christmas gift, a chartered deep-sea fishing trip
from his grandparents, former Zolfo Springs residents
Ralph and Monica Pflugh, turned into a special occasion
for 12-year-old Alex Clarke of Wauchula, who landed the
32-pouod frophy-quality kingfish off Islamorada on Dec.
21. Fishing In 200-feet deep water five miles offshore, it
took 20 minutes to land the over-50-lnch long fish, which
had a 194nch girth. Witnesses Included his 8-year-old
brother Ben Clarke and mother Jean Norris. Four coolers
on the 34-foot Hatteras, called Sassy Lady, held seven
;smaller kingfish; vermillion, yellowtail and golden snap-
Spr; and black grouper, making many fish dinners for the
family.,


2 0 T
Date

Time




Loce








Exce7

7


wo Opportunities to Attend
3: Monday January 26, 20

es: 11:30 am- 1:00 pm
or
6:00 pm 7:30 pm

nation: ESE Training Room
200 South Florida Ave.
Wauchula


To Register
Contact Teresa Hall,
optional Student Education
73-2600, ext. 260


09 *
















1:22c


DOu







12B The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009

Community Garden Growing


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Community Garden is located west of the Hardee County Agri-Civic Center
in Wauchula.


Need A Bargain? Buy A

Used Book At Library Store


The only used bookstore in
Hardee County is now back!
The "Friends of the Library
of Hardee County" organization
is proud to announce the reno-
vation of the store is now com-
plete. With the help of some
public-school students, the
store has recently been trans-
formed into a user-friendly
establishment.
"The library needed help, and
I thought it was a great opportu-
nity to earn community-service
hours," says Machelle Dollar, a
junior at Hardee Senior High
School. "We took out all the
books, reorganized them into
categories and then alphabet-
ized them. While it was a lot
of work, I am happy I helped
out and love the way the store
looks," she adds.
To help customers, the store
is now divided into the follow-
ing fiction categories: General
Fiction, Romance, Mystery,
Westerns, SciFi, Spanish, Teens
& Children, and Audio/Visual.
Non-fiction sections include:
Travel, Sports Biography/Auto-
biography, Current Events, and
Reference.
Monies from the bookstore
sales are used to assist in fund-


ing a variety of projects, like
promoting library programs,
paying for guest speakers and
purchasing books.
The Friends of the Library's
used bookstore is located in the
back of the Hardee County
Public Library, by the giant fish


mural. The library itself is
located in the Curtis Eielle
Complex 6n U.S. 17 and Oak
Street in Wauchula.
Come and find unbelievable
bargains 'and out-of-print trea-
sures as you support your p.ib-
lic library.


COURTESY PHOTO
Machelle Dollar with some of the selections available at
the library bookstore.


The project is sponsored by the University of Florida Institute of Food & Agricultural
Sciences, Mosaic and CF. Shown at the garden (from left) are Donna Bailes, Denton
Cash, Sandra Brown and Adam Shanks.


The garden has collards, turnips, mustards, beets, carrots, cabbage, kohlrabi, rutaba-
ga and broccoli. For more information, call 773-2164.


I 17 --_ -&*P
L 1. -.u 11
Garden leader Denton Cash works In the garden.


NOTICE:
This ad shall serve as legal notification of channel changes effective on or around February 17,
2009, for Comcast Cable customers in Polk, Highlands and Hardee Counties.
Bartow / Ft. Meade / Lake Wales / Frostproof channel lineup:
WXPX HD will be added to channel 438 as an HD Limited Basic Service channel.*
WUSF PBS, channel 16, will be relocating to channel 204 as a Limited Basic Service
channel.*
WUSF Kids Will be added to channel 205 as a Limited Basic Service channel.*
WUSF Create will be added to channel 206 as a Limited Basic Service channel.*
WUSF FKN (Florida Knowledge Network) will be added to channel 207 as a Limited
Basic Service channel.*
Sebring / Avon Park / Lake Placid, Spring Lake and Wauchula channel lineups:
WXPX HD will be added to channel 438 as an HD Limited Basic Service channel.*
To accommodate the above changes, the following West Coast feeds will be removed:
Encore West, channel 151; Encore Action West, channel, 153, Encore Mystery West, channel 155;
Encore Love West, channel 157; Encore Drama West, channel 159, Encore Westerns West, chan-
nel 161, Sundance Channel West, channel 166; Flix West, channel 171; Showtime West, channel
343, Showtime Too West, channel 344, Showtime Showcase West, channel 34, Showtime Extreme
West, channel 348; Showtime Beyond West, channel 349; The Movie Channel West, channel 351;
The Movie Channel XTRA West, channel 353; Starz West, channel 376; and Starz Cinema West,
channel380.
*A digital-ready television set and/or digital equipment may be required to receive certain digital
channels or certain services. Service charges may apply. Subscription to High-Definition television,
required to receive HD channels. -Services not available in all areas, restrictions apply. For infor-
mation about all of our product offerings, please visit www.comcast.com. 1:22ci


FREE

Prescri, tion


p



DELIVERY









CVS/Phar acy'

for all the ways you caresm.




6TH Avenue


Wauchula, Florida 33873

863-767-1195







*******************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 25P 14S
University of Florida
Library of Florida History
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


PAGE ONE


HEAD START HOSTS


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
A combined open house and Christmas party was held at the East Coast Migrant Head
Start Program in Wauchula on Dec. 24. The Rev. Wendell Smith (top photo) looks at the
48 stuffed toys donated by Faith Temple Church of God and Cutting Edge Ministries.
Joining him are Charles Grimsley, teacher Isidra Garcia and 7-month-old Angel
Hernandez. Cutting Edge also gives food away on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. at 3059 Elm St.,
Zolfo Springs. The open house hosts included (middle photo, from left) Lizaida Ramos,
education coordinator; Veronica Garcia, program assistant; and Carmen Serrano, fam-
ily service worker. The federal centers in Wauchula and Bowling Green offer free day
care Monday through Friday 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. November through May for children ages
8 weeks to 5 years while their parents harvest fruits and vegetables. Some of the 92
children enrolled at the Wauchula center (in lower photo) sang songs for the visitors.


Sore iUts Schedule [J1an. 2 Fe.


Jan. 22


Girls Weightlifting
HJHS Basketball
Girls Basketball
Boys Basketball


Avon Park
Sebring
Booker
Mulberry


Away
Away
HOME
Away


4:00 p.m.
5:30/6:30 p.m.
6/7:30 p.m.
6/7:30 p.m.


Jan. 23 Boys Basketball Booker Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 26 HJHS Basketball Hill-Gustat Away 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Jan.,29 HJHS Basketball Lake Placid HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Girls Basketball Lake Placid Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 30 Boys Basketball DeSoto Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Feb. 2-5 Girls Basketball
Playoffs Avon Park Away TBA
Feb. 3 Boys Basketball (V) Okeechobee Away 7:00 p.m.


Feb. 3-5


Girls Softball
Preseason


DeSoto


Away


TBA


FIGHTING DEER


COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchula veterinarian Dr. Slade Hayman on Jan. 3 took this picture of two buck deer
In the back yard of his getaway home in Ellijay, Ga. The house is on eight-tenths of an
I acre In a residential community near some woods.


FORT MYERS

,,RV SHOW.

JAN. 22 23 24 25
Lee Civic Center
10 AM-5 PM: Thurs., Fri., & Sat.
10 AM-4 PM: Sunday


AREA DEALERS
DISPLAYING HUNDREDS
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POP-UPS
TOY HAULERS
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OVER 100 RV SUPPLIERS H
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LEE CIVIC CENTER From 1-75 take EXIT 143 Florida RV Tra Association
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1017 US Hwy 17 No. Wauchula
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The UeraIdAd~~

Th~a~i4iat3~ 2Z
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ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


FARM]

BUREAU

INSURANCE


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2C The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009




-Schedule Of Weekly Services-


BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ...............7:-30 p.m.
CELEBRATION CHURCH
5112 Hwy. 17 N.
(Fuego's Sports Cafe)
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Service .................-11:00 a.m.
CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ............. 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ...........
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................0:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School..................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship.................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service.................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..............6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs. .................. 7:30 p.m.


ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Coinn.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ...........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


Morning Worship ............. 1:... : a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m. UNION BAPTIST CHURCH -
Evening Worship ..............63,.pnWs50a6 'Lily Church Rd. -494-5622
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m. Sunday Schol ..................1... 0:00 a.m.


-' FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Ilwy. 17 375-2253
Bible Study .........................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m.
-Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship .... ............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST,
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection .................9:45 a.m.
Morning Woiship ........1..... 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper, ..:..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday .......7:00 15m:.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIV6
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 pip.
Jueves De.Predicacion ........J.7:00 p.rim.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School u....;,.............9:45 -ina.
Morning Worship ....... .......1. 1:. iQO a.m.,
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.rii.
Wednesday Prayert..............:.7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Servibe .... ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.,
MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375.4409
Sunday School ...........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training....: .......... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of Mason Dixon & County
Line
781-5887
Sunday Worship .................11:00 a.m.


Morning Woksnip ................ I I;00 a.m..
Evening Worship ................:6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
..............................................6 :30 p .m .
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
English Service.................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer......................7:00.p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.


CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Service .................... 9:30 a.m..


CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .........:......7:00 p.m.
S YouthCell Croup ........... ... 7:00 p.m.
Children's.Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call.for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CIIURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Pastor Janies, Bland.
Stinday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.-.
Evening Worship ........... :..6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
.CIIURCII OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
W wednesday ........................... 7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Mens ci, Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576


WAUCHULA
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament.M eeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion.................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio.................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio..............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Service ...... ...... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.. ................ 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gati ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.mn.
Sunday Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service......7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday Bible Study ..............9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Sr. Adult Bible Study
............................................. 10:00 a.m .
Wednesday Family Night Supper
...............................................5 :00 p.m .
Extreme Kid's Choirs (ages 3-gr. 5)
...............................................5:45 p.m .
Church Orchestra Reh...........5:45 p.m.
Prayer Meeting................ 6:00 p.m.
Youth Life Groups .................6:00 p.m.,
Adult Choir Reh.................... 6:30 p.m.
Adult Outreach and Visitation
............................................... 6 :30 p .m .
Exreme Kids Missions (ages 3 gr. 5)
...............................................6 :4 5 p .m .
Catalyst Youth Worship w/Catalyst
Praise Band 6-45 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
S MISION-BAUTISTA --
S13 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical ................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Predicacion ....... ............ 11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles ......7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243

Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast........................ 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) .......... 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service. ..............10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for Nursery-5th
grade......................... 6:15 p.m .
Classes for children ages PreK-12th
grade...................6:30-8:00 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF'
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave4
773-6556 ;
Sunday School ...................... 900am.
Morning Service ...... .........11:0 a.m.
Eveniilg Worship ..............6:00'p.in.
-Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study .......: ..........,6:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45,am.
Traditional Sumday Worship.I 1:00 a:m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ...........6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School .................9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service..........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Ministries ........7;00 p.m.

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THIE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal


810( W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..:.........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service....... .........7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCII
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donus..................... 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult'CI.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min..........7:00 p.m. .


WAUCHULA


IGLESIA COMUNIDAD
de fe Wauchula
Community of Faith Wauchula
322 Hanchey Rd. 773-0065
954-383-5078
Sunday Service................... 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
Friday Youth Service. ...........7:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to 'amllia.y amigos y
Disfruta de La j alabi'a de Dios
Domingos ........................... 6:00 p.m..
M iercoles...... .................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAI'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service.................... 2:00 p.m.
Thursday Evening...............7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.

Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
113 N. 7th Ave.
Sunday Service ................... 1:00 a.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCII
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ....... .........9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ... ........... 11:00 a.m.
Church Training .............. 5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship ....................(1Ist & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen'Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
5"'- rn'ig W6rship ................. l1:00-i.i.
- Evening-Worship ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321-
Sunday School ....... .........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3" Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2'- & 41' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.


RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
I WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 plm.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m .
Holy Days .....................................
ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHIIOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ..................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m .
(Spanish).................. 1 :00 a.m .
(Creole)...................... I:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ................. 9:30 a.m.


Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Player Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTIISIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ....... ......... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

The one way to get thin is to
reestablish a purpose in life.


WAUCHULA
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship .................... 7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1...11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..... .........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church................... 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer...................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
1720 W. Main
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all Services.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
,Gardner
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..'..:..:....7:00 p.m:
Wednesday Service....: ..........7:00 puflt
COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ................................ 0:00 a.m.
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10.00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ........ ...........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
.CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524- 773-0989
Sunday School ..........1....... 0:00 a.m.
Worship.... .......... .... 11....... :00 a.m.
Evening................. ...........1... :00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet...,7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

NEW VISIOl-WORSHIP CENTER
64 E.,& School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586 ,
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................ 0:00 a.m.
-Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & FT.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m..
Evening Worship ..............:...7:00.p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..............:.7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
............................................... 7 :00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday . ..............:...10:30 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ........................ 6:00 p.m.
REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School. ................. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship............7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ..............9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship................;.11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones........................ 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................ 1:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ........10:00 a.mr
Scrvicio ..........:...................... 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club .........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio.................................8:00 p.m.,
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Training Union .... ............... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship'. ..............6:00 p.m:
Waltnsday Prayer '.:.......::..00' p.m.








FROM

SOWER
M,.aaelA CG.ua DO
Mel. er G-w,. 3

It was graduation day, and a
mother asked her son to dress
in his cap and gown and pose
with his father for a picture.
"Make it look natural, she
said. "Put your arm around
your father."
"To look natural," he
answered, "I should put my
hand in father's pocket."
Father: he's the fulfiller of
wishes and dryer of dishes;
maker of gains and soother of
pains; fixer of bikes and chas-
tiser of tykes; buyer of toys
and leader of boys; wiper of
smirches and worker in
churches; tiller of sod and
revealer of God.
.No wonder the Bible says,
"Honor they father."


E ach shining surgical Instrument reflects the bright light overhead.
Gowned and masked figures move deitly and quietly. All of this
skill and technology is dedicated to one purpose...the assurance that the
patient will be restored to health.
There is one condition which all the skill of the surgical team cannot
control; the condition of the patient's spirit. It has been proven that those
patients with a hopeful, positive, and faithful attitude have a significantly
greater chance of survival and recovery.
Romans 12:12 Instructs us to "be joyful in hope, patient in affliction,
faithful in prayer." We can learn those attributes by worshipping at
God's House and by studying His Word. Practice positive spiritual
conditioning. It could save your life!




&4sN..Sek.~ dby The AimdS &a. So9di y
Cop 0oi 2009. KeWiVAlhia Ne fwspaWpIServici P.O0 Boo 0167. 0mw~aoeoA. VA 2290M.ww k


%Peace ivoer ro wers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL'








January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 3C


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida
Advocate, fhe Hardee County
Herald *and The Herald-
Advocate...
75 Years Ago
Strawberry shipments out of
Hardee Countv showed a


decided drop this week as only
47,450 pints went out, as com-
pared to 100,000 pints the pre-
vious week. The price was
slightly better, with slightly bet-
ter and good berries bringing.
growers eight to 13 cents.
Plans have been completed
for a series of meetings to be


For the week ended Jan 15, 2009:
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 7,950, com-
pared to 6,375 last week, and 8,295 a year ago. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:' Compared
to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady to 2.00 high-
er, feeder steers and heifers were 3.00 to 6.00 higher.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 111.00-165.00;
300-400 lbs., 95.00-132.50; and
400-500 lbs., 86.00-112.00.
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 90.00-122.00;
300-400 lbs., 80.00-100.00; and
400-500 lbs., 77.00- 95.00.


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 40.00-
46.00.
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 lbs., 57.00-
65.00.


held in Wauchula Jan. 23-Feb.
4, during which noted evange-
list the Rev. Gypsy Smith will
preach. His first sermon will be
in the City Auditorium on
Tuesday night, beginning at
7:30.

Coach Cale Keller's Wau-
chula Wildcats started their
1934 basketball season with a
game at Bradenton Tuesday
night. Coach Keller has a light,
inexperienced team, but one
that is expected to give others
considerable trouble before the
season ends.

An ad for the Royal Theater
list the final showing of "Paddy,
The Next Best Thing," featur-
ing Janet Gaynor and Warner
.Baxter. The show includes car-
toon and newsreel, and the
entire family is admitted on one
35-cent ticket. On Saturday, it
will be "King of the Wild
Horses," with Rex the Wonder
Horse, also comedy, cartoon
and a serial. Admission prices
are 10 cents and 25 cents.
50 YEARS AGO
Nine months after it was first
suggested that a school for re-
tarded children be built in Wau-
chula, the Hardee County Day
School is not only completed,
but free of debt. Fred Dennis,
chairman of the Juvenile


I Way Back When


Guidance Committee, reports
there is still $100 in the bank to
provide some special supplies
which the public school system
cannot furnish. The Wauchula
Elementary School PTA raised
$500 and the high school and
Zolfo Springs Elementary each
donated $250. Other organiza-
tions joined in to raise $3,390 of
public donations.
The Board of County Com-
missioners will seek first-hand
information at its meeting next
month about where the $8,000 a
year budgeted for hospitaliza-
tion of the poor is going.
Commissioner Jack Jones ob-
jected to the procedure which
calls for no check by the com-
missioners themselves.

The Woods family, which
includes five youngsters from 2
to 12, was burned out of its
home in the Lily section about 2
a.m. in below-freezing weather.
Although they escaped injury,
they had only their night-
clothes. If you have any cloth-
ing or household goods to,
spare, drop it off at Clayton
Terrell's store in Ona.
Merchants in Wauchula who
give S&H Green Stamps are
Bay Street Service Station, Red
& White Grocery, Eaton's
Department Store, Slaughter
Motor Sales, Rutland's Radio &
TV, Ellis Texaco Station and
Newell's Jewelry.
25 YEARS AGO
Citrus fruit damage in Hardee


County from the Christmas
freeze has been estimated at 10
to 15 percent for early and mid-
season and 30 percent for all
varieties. Adrian Chapman,
owner of Chapman's Fruit Co.,
says this is the first time Hardee
County has come through a
freeze when the citrus growers
didn't hurt bad.
Wauchula Fire Chief Jim
Platt warned the City Council
last week that the City Hall,
. which has been condemned for
about two years, is a fire haz-
ard. Platt said the problem is
that rats are scattering pieces of
old records all over the auditori-
um. "I don't want to wake up in
the firehouse next door and find
the auditorium on fire," he said.
Both of the men killed in an
aircraft that crashed in a pasture
last week have been identified.
From information gathered by
the Sheriff's Office, Charles
"Chuck" Fisher and Garrison
Barnes, both of the Miami area,
were part of a hunting party on
the D.T. Davis Ranch off SR.
66. The plane hit the top of
some cypress trees bordering
the pasture and fell to the
ground about 75 yards north of
the trees, Sheriff Doyle Bryan
said.
An Eckerd Drug Store sale
lists Kodak color print film for
$1.39, Vanish toilet bowl clean-
er for $1.09, two-liter Pepsi or
Diet Pepsi for $1.09 and a four-
pack of Duracell AA batteries
for $2.29.


Little Charlie Creek RV News
By Linda Snowden & Jean Sian


We have had another excit- event to the last Saturday due to
ing and fun week at the park. the Elvis concert.
Old and new friends are still
rolling in and renewing friend- ONGOING
ships and making new friends. Line dancing is Mondays at
Let's not forget prayers for 10 a.m.
those who are ailing. Patty Po-Ke-No Monday and
Caudle is back from the hospi- Thursday at 1 p.m.
tal after an unfortunate episode. Crafts, Tuesday at 2 in the
Russ Sian is back from the hos- afternoon.
pital in Sarasota and is doing Nickel-Nickel is Wednesday
well. Mary Lou Camres is still in and Saturday at 1 p.m.
rehab but coming along very Texas Hold-'em is played on
well. Bernice Randolph is home Wednesday night at 7.
and recuperating. Charles John- Jam sessions are held on
son is in rehab but doing well Thursday night at 7.
and is expected to be home very The Flying Club meets Fri-
soon. day mornings at 9.
Shuffleboard is played every
S .. COFFEE ,, day at 10 in the morning, 2 in.
The Monday morning coffee the afternoon and 7:30 in the
'is filling up with all the people- evening.
arriving, and this is a good "... _
thing!
The 50/50 winners were John -.Y O TD
Reynolds, Jim Salisbury, Dot
Reynolds, Mary Lou Gillea-
beau and Donna Roebuck. BUSINESS

BINGO
Jan. 9: Caller, Norm Ed- COU LD
wards; special bingo, first
Sbingo, Carol LeReux; comple-
tion of the diagram, Shirley A PP EA.
Spence; around the free spot,
John Grigsby; and coverall,
Rena Brumby. HERE
Jan. 11: Caller, Jerry Mus-
taine; coverall, Maxine Jenkins.
Jan. 12: Caller, Bob Bisch- T m
off; special bingo, first line Contact
bingo, Bonnie Edwards; com-
pletion of the diagram Marcia Nancy Davis,
Zander; around the free spot,
Marcia Zander; and coverall, Kim Reas or
Rama Sarazin. Trayce Daniels
S GAME WINNERS
Euchre: First, Bill Godsey;
second, Bill Padgett; third, Don 773-3255
.Jones; and fourth, Jerry Mus-
taine.
Floating Dollar: Jerry Mus-
taine
Booby Prize: Fred Glosser
and Gene Carlisle. (They are L
fighting over winning this
prize!)
Texas Hold-'emn was won by
Chubbs LeReaux on Wednes-
day night.
EVENTS
About 80 residents attended
the pizza party sponsored by
Sky Med. The $20 raffle was
won by Gordon Bitely.
The bluegrass concert was
well-attended, and the 50/50
was won by Irwin Tiejema, Jim
Roe, and Chuck Snyder.
UPCOMING
Saturday, bluegrass concert
in the rec hall at 7 p.m......
Sunday, Elvis concert in the
rec hall at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5
and can be purchased at the
oitfice,
Jan. 28, lunch in the rec hall '
starting at 11:30. Price depends
on what you order.
Jan. 31, pancake, sausage
and egg breakfast starting at 8.
Cost is $3 per person. Remem-
ber, this is our men in the park
cooking this wonderful break-
fast.
Jan. 31, ice cream and cake
will be served at 6 p.m. to cele-
brate the birthdays and anniver-
saries for the month. This U's
moith we have changed this


A &A STEREO SOUND '
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We guarantee time lowest prices Iround!

m See us for all your car stereo systems.



S6ONY OSS0* JVC

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Alen ---------n
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SUBBOXES


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Flip Down TFT Monitor
with Built in DVD Player


Kits & Wire Harness


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I I (


10 YEARS AGO
Like many hospitals across
the nation, Florida Hospital/-
Wauchula is looking death in
the face. Severe cuts in Medi-
care reimbursement will result
in a direct hit on the hard-won
stability of the 44-bed facility,
the only emergency and inpa-
tient center in the county. The
projected losses are soq severe
the hospital i's looking at the
possibility of closing its doors.

The Hardee County Road:
Department knows only. too'
well how last spring's El Nino-
induced weather made havoc
with their plans for road work
for this year. Changing the pri-
ority for resurfacing roads came
before the County Commission
last week.

County officials have been
thinking about going into the
water-sewer business. The plan
would center around providing
water and sewer services to the
Wauchula Hills area. Extending
a public water supply to the
community might remedy the
domestic water problem of high
nitrate levels in wells in
Wauchula Hills.

Coldwell Banker lists a 3BR,
1B home with carport in
Bowling Green for $39,900. A
2BR, lB remodeled home was
"cozily" priced at $42,500. A
pair of one-acre tracts close to
Highlands Hammock on
Raccoon Road were listed at
$8,000 each.


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4C The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009
MAKING PROGRESS
I 7.----


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| ,~~ -


PHO TO BY KASEY HELMS
The time to dust off those soccer cleats Is getting closer as the ground is being lev-
eled out at Hardee Park for the future home of the four youth soccer fields off Altman
Road just north of the Hardee county Agri-Civic Center. The fields will be used for offi-
cial high school or adult tournaments, or even youth leagues by making two of the
smaller In size. The soccer fields are part of Phase I of the Hardee Sports Complex,
which also Includes trails and picnic facilities such as restrooms and parking areas.
Later In Phase II baseball and softball fields will be added.


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


KOFFEE KLATCH ,by Carol Jones on the piano and
Lee and Eileen Kearns were 'Wilma Behymer on the organ.
the hosts on Jan. 14, with help .'Our choir, directed by Nancy
from Bill and Margaret Bohl. *Morrison, sang "Hallelujah
Don Plumley led the U.S. iCelebration."
Pledge, Cal and Betty Gadsby! : Prayer was offered by Don,
led the Canadian Pledge and Ed: Merillat. Winne has begun a
Frantz led the prayer. three-week sermon series on.
Henri Swearingin announced Jonah and the whale. The ser-
that the Crystal Lake cook-1 vice closed with the congrega-
books were a sellout. Congratu- tion singing "Come and Dine."
lations to Shirley Glessner, 'A social time followed. Judy
Shirley Johnson No. 2, Char- McBride and Flo Smith served
lotte Householder and Joy doughnuts, coffee and orange
Beckley, who did a great job juice.
gathering recipes and selling BINGO
the cookbooks. Sylvia Baker and Cal Gadsby
The 50/50 winners were Jack split the large jackpot on Jan. 9,
and Betty Jacobs, Bonnie and with Darlene Henry winning
Jim Smeltzer, Maxine Strom- the small jackpot. Nancy Morri-
me, Mary Stewart and Bubbles son was the winner of the large
and Raymond Powell. jackpot on Jan. 12.


CHURCH
by Diane Burget
The Rev. Robert Winne.
opened. the service on Jan. 11,
with the congregation of 98,
singing "I Will Serve Him."'
Accompaniment was provided-


SCORES
Men's Golf, Jan. 8: A's, a tie
between Aurele Dufour and
Dewey Morrison; B's, Loyd
Lankford; C's, Bill Arola; and
D's, Al Johnson.
Ladies Golf, Jan. 8: First, Jan


Brinker; and second, Marilyn
Funkhouser.
Mixed Golf, Jan. 12: Winners
were Barb Kramer, Len Walter,
Joe Newman and Claire Trem-
* blay.
Shuffling, Jan. 13: Our sym-
*pathies to those who won three
games, but as the last session
was rained out, no scores count.
LUAU
Alice Hunt is the coordinator
of the 18th annual luau, which
will be held Saturday, Feb. 28.
The Chick & Pig Jig will begin
with a social hour starting at 5
followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m.
This year you will have a
choice between roast pig and
chicken. Music for the dance,
starting at 8, will be provided:
by Chrissy.
Tickets will go on sale start-
ing Feb. 4. Get your group
together and buy your tickets .
early; as there will be limited
seating and ticket sales.
I know Alice has a few sur-
prises up her sleeve.


Graham Income Tax Service, Inc.


,- A :',T4 l UR XN RDS"

S .--" immigration Filir .,
',/ /' ,// Notary Services -
S Crew Leader ,ad Filing. '.
/ ITlN,-Nuienbi'pplications dr'

., SPECIALIZIG IN:
Federal and State Taxes
Monthly Bookkeeping


.. Payrolls
,ill Paying Services
/ Harvesting P rolls
120~N. 4 Ave Wauc. Lla FIFL 33873
PhOlft 863-773-2637/,- .Fax 863-773-2590


Accountant TESSA GRAHAM ~ Contadora
Tax Pract. MARIA NIONTANEZ -Preparacion de Impuestos
E. A. -JUDY GRAHAM ~ E.A.
ASSOCIATES/ASSOCIADOS
LAURA ALDERMAN,
ERICA MONTANEZ

1lHablamos Espatol!

!AI jRA OF CIpNDO!
"REPIMBOLS E Su inco r1 ax en 24 HORAS"
Clasiacton de Immigracion
,, : Servicios de Notaria ,
Clasificaci6nde tarjetas de lider de contratistas
Aplicaci6nes de numero de ITIN
/ NOS ESPESCIALIZAMOS EN:
Impueos Federales y Estatales
/Contabilidad Mensual


6',minas e Pagos
o.-le Pagar sus, F fturas Mensuales
omtnina d~ pgop..a Cosecha
,am i "' !J '. "' -a ",'


"I^ eleMtl Vatitliula .FL 33873:
8 ax. 86I-Q73-2590 9


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8C The Herald-Advocate, January 22, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 10th
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY,

CASE NO #: 25-2008-CA-000518
DIVISION #:
UNC:
US Bank National Association, as
Trustee for the registered holders
of Asset-Backed Pass-Through
Certificates Series 2007-AMC2,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Rolando Cuevas; Argent
Mortgage Company, L.L.C.;
Unknown Parties in Possession
#1; Unknown Parties in
Possession #2; If living, and all
Unknown Parties claiming by,
through, under and against the
above named Defendant(s) who
are not known to be dead or
alive, whether said Unknown
Parties may claim an interest as
Spouse, Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s). /


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
January 8, 2009, entered in Civil
Case No. 2008-CA-000518 of the
Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial
Circuit in and for Hardee County,
Florida, wherein US Bank National
Association, as Trustee for the
registered holders of Asset-
Backed Pass-Through Certificates
Series 2007-AMC2, Plaintiff and
Rolando Cuevas are defendantss,
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, ON THE FRONT
STEPS OF THE HARDEE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, IN WAUCHULA,
FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. ON FEB-
RUARY 4, 2009 the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to-wit:

LOTS 30 AND 31, BLOCK
"D", OF UNIT NO. 1,
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS, AS
PER PLAT BOOK 688, AT
PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE SUR-
PLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS
AFTER THE SALE.

;IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
-DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
'ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
:PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-.
SION OF CERTAINASSISTANCE.
PLEASE CONTACTT Hardee
'County Courthouse, 417 West'
:Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
'WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE
OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING
IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-8771;
IF YOU ARE VOICE IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8770.

DATED at Wauchula, Florida,
this 8 day of January, 2009.
B. HUGH qRADLEY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCI
IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 25-2008-CA-00
DIVISION:

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERTO TORRES, et al,
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROBERTO TORRES
LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS: 719 E OAK STR
WAUCHULA, FL
CURRENT
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
TIES CLAIMING BY, THR(
UNDER, AND AGAINST
HEREIN NAMED INDIV
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARI
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INT
AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEV
GRANTEES, OR 0
CLAIMANTS.
LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED tl
action to foreclose a mortg
the following property in HA
County, Florida:

TRACT 7: COMMENCE
THE SOUTHWEST C(
NER OF SOUTHEAST
OF THE NORTHWEST
OF SECTION 3, TOWNS;
34 SOUTH, RANGE
EAST; THENCE R
NORTH 89 DEGREES
MINUTES 55 SECOND
EAST ALONG THE SOU
LINE OF THE NORTHWE
1/4 OF SECTION 3 FOI
DISTANCE OF 223.34 Fl
FOR POINT OF BEG
NING; THENCE CONTAIN
NORTH 89 DEGREES
MINUTES 55 SECOND


EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH
LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF
16.66 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 1 DEGREE 36 MIN-
UTES 55 SECONDS EAST
AND PARALLEL TO THE
WEST LINE OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 3 FOR A DISTANCE
OF 85.00 FEET; THENCE
RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
51 MINUTES 55 SECONDS
WEST AND PARALLEL TO
THE SOUTH LINE OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 3 FOR A DISTANCE
OF 16.66 FEET; THENCE
RUN SOUTH 1 DEGREE 36
MINUTES 55 SECONDS
WEST AND PARALLEL TO
THE WEST LINE OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 3 FOR A DISTANCE
OF 85.00 FEET TO POINT
OF BEGINNING, HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA

has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, If
any, on Florida Default Law Group,.
P.L., Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address Is 9119 Corporate Lake
Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida
.33634, and file the original with
this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for two consecu-
tive weeks In the Herald
Advocate.


WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on this 12 day of
January, 2009.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
SDisabilities Act, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the
individual or agency sending the
notice at Echevarria, McCalla,
Raymer, Barrett & Frappler, 601
Bayshore Blvd., Suite 800, Tampa,
Florida 33606, telephone (813)
251-4766, not later than seven (7)-
days prior to the proceeding If
hearing Impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
1:15-22c .
IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 10th
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
;::i' !. 1. : ,Si:. "^ |
SCASE NO #: 45-2008-CA-000497
DIVISION #:
UNC:
LaSalle Bank National
Association, as Trustee for the
registered holders of GSAMP
Trust 2005-AHL2, Mortgage Pass-
Through Certificates, Series
2005-AHL2,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-


Elena Ramos and Jorge Ramos,
Husband and Wife; Unknown
Parties in Possession #1;
Unknown Parties in Possession


#2; If living, and all Unknown
1:15.22c Parties claiming by, through,
F THE under and against the above
UIT named Defendant(s) who are not
E known to be dead or alive,
whether said Unknown Parties
may claim an interest as Spouse,
Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or
"-----Other Claimants
10713 Defeant(sa /


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
January 8, 2009, entered in Civil
Case No. 2008-CA-000497 of the
Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial
/ Circuit in and for Hardee County,
Florida, wherein LaSalle Bank
National Association, as Trustee
for the registered holders of
GSAMP Trust 2005-AHL2, Mort-
gage Pass-Through Certificates,
EET Series 2005-AHL2, Plaintiff and
33873 Elena Ramos and Jorge Ramos,
Husband and Wife are defen-
dant(s), I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash, ON THE
N PAR- FRONT STEPS OF THE HARDEE
OUGH, COUNTY COURTHOUSE, IN
THE WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00
'IDUAL A.M. on February 4, 2009 the fol-
E NOT lowing described property as set
ALIVE, forth in said Final Judgment, to-
N PAR- wit:

SEES, LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 14,
OTHER MAGNOLIA MANOR, A
SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN
SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP
34 SOUTH, RANGE 25
EAST,. HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AS PER PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 23.

hat an ANY PERSON CLAIMING
age on AN INTEREST IN THE SUR-
ARDEE PLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
AT THE DATE OF THE LIS
OR- PENDENS MUST FILE A
1/4 CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS
1/4 AFTER THE SALE.
HIP
25 IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
IUN DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
51 ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
IDS PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDS
JTH ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
EST COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
R A SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
EET PLEASE CONTACT Hardee
IN- County Courthouse, 417 West
IUE Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
51 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF
IDS YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE


OF SALE; IF YOU ARE HEARING
IMPAIRED CALL: 1-800-955-8771;
IF YOU ARE VOICE IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8770.

DATED at Wauchula, Florida,
this 8 day of Jan, 2009.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Hardee County, Ilorida
BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

CASE NO.: 25-2009-CA-000012
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$5,023.00 U.S. CURRENCY.
/

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JESUS FELIX MEDRANO,
AND ALL OTHERS CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN OR TO THE PROP-
ERTY DESCRIBED BELOW.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED' that an
action for forfeiture of the follow-
ing described personal property
In Hardee County, Florida:

$5,023.00, U.S. CURRENCY

Has been filed against you by
the Petitioner, THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, POLICE
DEPARTMENT, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida, 33873-1308, on or before
Feb. 20, 2009, and to file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Petitioner's Attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Petition.

DATED on January 15, 2009.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of the Court
BY: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

CASE NO.: 25-2009-CA-000013
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$1,000.00 U.S. CURRENCY.
/

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHRISTOPHER JOSEPH
CRUM, AND ALL OTHERS CLAIM-
ING AN INTEREST IN OR TO THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action forfeiture of the follow-
ing described personal property
in Hardee County, Florida:

$1,000.00, U.S. CURRENCY

Has been filed against you by
the Petitioner, THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA,, POLICE
DEPARTMENT, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida, 33873-1308, on or before
Feb. 20, 2009, and to file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Petitioner's Attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Petition.

DATED on January 15, 2009.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of the Court
BY: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
1:?9 9p,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 25 2008 CA 000472

AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,


vs.
" 1 "9 9


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 25-2008-CA-000721
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting through the United States
Department of Agriculture, Rural
Development, f/k/a Farmers
Home Administration,


Plaintiff,


RAFAEL A SANCHEZ A/K/A
RAFAEL SANCHEZ; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED AS
NOMINEE FOR FIRST MAGNUS
FINANCIAL CORPORATION;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAFAEL
A SANCHEZ; JOHN DOE; JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS)
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
/


- RE-NOTIl-OF FOIICLOSURE
'" SALE


ARMANDO GARCIA, SR., a mar-
ried man; BRENDA ALVARADO,
a/k/a BRENDA ALVARADO GAR-
CIA, a married woman; HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA; B. HUGH
BRADLEY, CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT, in and for HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA; ROSA L.
CARMONA; ROBERTO CAVA-
ZOS; and MARIA TERESA
RODRIGUEZ,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF HARDEE

TO: MARIA TERESA RODRIGUEZ,
P.O. Box 1913, Zolfo Springs, FL
33890

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
regarding the following property
In Hardee County, Florida;

The South 45 feet of Lot 18
and the North 40 feet of
Lots 16 and 17, Block 17,
Wauchula Hills Subdiv-
ision, according to the Plat
thereof recorded In Plat
Book 3, Page 1, public
records of Hardee County,
Florida.

has-been --filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If any, to
It on: FREDERICK J. MURPHY,
JR., Esquire, Attorney for Plaintiff,
Boswell & Dunlap LLP, 245 South
Central Avenue, Post Office
Drawer 30, Bartow, FL 33831, with-
In thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this Notice of
Action, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default judgment will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Compliant or
Petition.

DATED on this 14 day of
January, 2009,

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS WITH DISABILI-
TIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTICI-
PATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (863) 534-
4690, WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS
NOTICE. IF HEARING IMPAIRED,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, OR VOICE
(V) 1-800-955-8770, VIA FLORIDA
RELAY SERVICE.

DATED on 1-14-09.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Post Office Drawer 1749
Wauchula, FL 33873

BY: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
1;22.29o


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Motion and Order
Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date.
dated the 13th day of January,
2009, and entered in Case No. 25
2008 CA 000472, of the Circuit
'Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit
In and for Hardee County, Florida,
wherein AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC is the Plaintiff and
RAFAEL A SANCHEZ A/K/A
RAFAEL SANCHEZ; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED AS
NOMINEE FOR FIRST MAGNUS
FINANCIAL CORPORATION;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RAFAEL
A SANCHEZ; JOHN DOE; JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT (S)
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY are defendants.
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the AT NORTH
FRONT DOOR OF COURTHOUSE
at the Hardee County Courthouse,
in WAUCHULA, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 4th day of February,
2009, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:

PARCEL A OF A AND L
LAND SUBDIVISION AS
PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 36 PAGE 3, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE
PARTICULARLY DES-
CRIBED AS FOLLOWS THE
NORTH HALF OF SE
QUARTER OF NE QUAR-
TER OF NE QUARTER OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP
33 SOUTH, RANGE 26
EAST, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO
COUNTY ROAD RIGHT-OF-
WAY (HOLLAND TOWN
ROAD) ALONG THE EAST
SIDE.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990
(ADA), disabled person who,
because of their disabilities, need
special accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding should
contact the ADA Coordinator at
417 W. Main Street, Wauchula, FL
33873 or Telephone Voice (863)
773-4174 prior to such proceed-
ing.

Dated this 13 day of January,
2009.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
1:22, 29c

To be born is to be lucky.
-Kylle Tennant


Looking ahead at the sched-
ule of activities here at Torrey
Oaks, there is a dilemma!
Remember back a few weeks
ago when such a big deal was
made of the fact that "one more
second" was being added to our
clocks? Folks on TV were ask-
ing, "What do you plan to do
with that extra second?"
Well, our dilemma is that we
don't just need an extra second,
we need an infusion of a few
more spare hours! The schedule
of activities here is so full that
we have to make choices
between several activities that
we'd like to participate in. And
we all thought that retirement
was easy. There is no reason for
anybody at this park to be
bored.
Here is a bird's eye view of
the goings on here as well as
activities that are available but
not scheduled per se.

GOLF
We are fortunate to have on
site retired PGA Master Pro-
fessional Dennis Henderson.
The golfers here are able to
have one-on-one time with him
to problem solve specific con-
cerns regarding their game. He
holds clinics on the putting
greens, schedules events and is
available for teaching the new-
bies to the sport.
On Jan. 6, a golf scramble
was held at the Torrey Oaks
Golf Course. This was an 18-
hole event with result: as fol-




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 25-2008-CA-000688
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRA HERNANDEZ, et al,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
SANDRA HERNANDEZ
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:,32-1 S-
7TH AVENUE, WAUCHULA, FL ,
33873
ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 806 W B1
ST, APT 124, HIALEAH, FL 33014;
606 W 81ST ST APT 124,
HIALEAH, FL, 33014; 716 W 29TH
ST, HIALEAH, FL 33012 AND 614
W MANGO ST, LANTANA, FL
33462
CURRENT RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SANDRA
HERNANDEZ
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 321 S
7TH AVENUE, WAUCHULA, FL
33873
ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 806 W Bi
ST, APT 124, HIALEAH, FL 33014;
606 W 81ST ST APT 124,
HIALEAH, FL 33014; 716 W 29TH
ST, HIALEAH, FL 33012 AND 614
W MANGO ST, LANTANA, FL
33462
CURRENT RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:

LOT 3 AND SOUTH 23.20'
LOT 4, BLOCK 2, OF
HANNA AND LEE SUBDIVI-
SION TO THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGES 2
THROUGH 117 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA A/K/A 321 7TH AVENUE
S, WAUCHULA, FLORIDA
33873.

has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A.,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 1800 NW 49th STREET,
SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL
33309 on or before February 13,
2009, a date which is within thirty
(30) days after the first publication
of this Notice in the THE HERALD
ADVOCATE and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter; oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990 (ADA), disabled person who,
because of their disabilities, need


special accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding should
contact the ADA Coordinator at
417 W. Main Street, Wauchula, FL
33873 or Telephone Voice (941)
773-4174 prior to such proceed-
ing.

WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of
January, 2009.
B. Hugh Bradley
As Clerk of the Court'
Hardee County, Florida
By: C. Timmons
As Deputy Clerk
1 15.22c


lows: Tied for first place at 3
under par 69, Team "A" Gary
Davis, Kyle Schierling and Paul
Voegtlin; Team "B" Floyd Ray,
Rich Harrison and Lee Carter.
Maybe some of you also are
unfamiliar with what a golf
scramble is. In a nutshell, teams
are picked by a blind draw. In
this scramble format, all 'three
team members tee off. The
member with the best ball lie is
chosen to be the one ball in
play. The other two balls are
picked up and' all three mem-
bers hit their second shot from
the chosen position and contin-
ue in this fashion until the ball
is holed. At least one drive from;
each player must be used.
Players are sharpening their
game for a repeat scramble on
Friday.
The daily pickleball games
are a big hit. New players are
eager to learn the sport, and
show up each morning to play
doubles. On Jan. 9 several play-
ers from Torrey Oaks participat-
ed in a tournament at Peace.
River Thousand Trails/NACO
preserve in Zolfo Springs. Two
of our own, Pat Bordeau and
Richard Rivard,' took first and
second in the men's division.
Today (Thursday), Torrey Oaks
will sponsor a tournament with
Peace River coming here to
play.

GAMES & MORE
Other daily activities include
fitness walks, horseshoes and
shuffleboard. On scheduled
days, one can participate in line
dancing with Jenny Love,
euchre, poker, billiards, texas
hold-em, bingo, holey board
and a variety of Wii games.
Evenings bring out varieties of
card and board games.
We now have bunko, a game
that we played years ago but in
some areas is still popular.
Guess we will have to brush up
on the rules.
This week the owners and'
staff are busy with the large
Florida RV Super Show in
Tampa as well as hosting a
number of RV rallies here. on
site. Owners Doug and Sheri
are keeping us all busy and we
love it! All we have to do is
:k aI the weather across !he
country .nd we know whh we
are in Forda andhavingTun!









1. .. 7 .t






IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE

CASE NO. 25 2008 CP 000 116

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
WILLIAM JOSEPH CANNON,


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate
of WILLIAM JOSEPH CANNON,
File Number 25 2008 CP 000 116,
is pending In the Circuit Court for
Hardee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Post Office Box 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873. The name and
address of the Personal Rep-
resentative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
.or demands against the. dece-
dent's estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS'
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED


WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. .
The date of first publication of
this Notice Is January 15, 2009.
CHARLES H. CANNON
Personal Representative
405 South 10th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
J. STEVEN SOUTHWELL, II, ESQ.
Post Office Box 1748
Wauchula, FL 33873
863.773.4449
Florida Bar# 869791
Attorney for Personal
Representative 1:15-22c'


Torrey Oaks RV News
By Jean Mulder








.,January 22, 2009, The Herald-Advocate 9C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court: -
David Wayne Kuschke, 47,
Wauchula, and Thelma Lena
Stubbs, 38, Wauchula.
Saul Zuniga Hemandez, 22,
Wauchula, and Diana Grana-
dos, 21, Wauchula.
: Garrett Michael Grahamr, 18,
.Wauchula, and Kristina Ro-
chelle Cobb, 17, Wauchula..
Federico Campos Mata, 25,
Wauchula, and Maria Molina
Hernandez, 26, Wauchula.
There was no county small
claims, misdemeanor or crim-
inal traffic court last week as
rit was trial week.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Cassandra Escamilla vs. Luis
Gutierrez, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Wauchula Police Departmept
vs. Jesus Felix Medrano, peti-
tion for forfeiture.
Wauchula Police Department
vs. Christopher John Crum,
petition for forfeiture.
Countrywide Home Loan
Services vs. Paulino M. Rivera,
Terri M. Rivera et al, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.
IMPAC Funding Corp. vs.
James D. Gough et al, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.
Household Finance Corp. III
vs. Angel Pesquera, damages -
contract indebtedness.
Helen Mae Parrish vs. Ken-
neth Lee Coughlin, petition
for injunction for protection.
David McKinzie vs. State of
Florida, petition to review
inmate situation.

The following decisions on
.civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Deborah Nicole Keen vs.
Horace Edward Keen II, volun-
tary dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Amanda L. Elisondo vs.
Robert M. Revell Jr., injunction
for protection.


Linda Sue Gray vs. Sophy
Elaine Alvarez, amended in-
junction for protection.
First National Bank of Wau-:;
chula vs. Miguel Jesus Avalos
and Maria Guadalupe Avalos,
default judgment entered.
Anita Vandervender vs.
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., voluntary
dismissal.
Raafat Zakhary and Ramissa
Safar Zakhary, order.
GMAC LLC vs. John S.
Patterson PEA. and John S.
Patterson, default judgment.
LaSalle Bank National
Association vs. Elena and Jorge
Ramos et al, judgment of mort-
gage foreclosure.
U.S. Bank National Associ-
.ation vs. Rolando Cuevas et al,
judgment of mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. as trustee vs. Tamara
Sue McMahan et al, judgment
of mortgage foreclosure.
Laura N. Rivera vs. Jose
Rivera, voluntary dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
James David Gay and the
state Department of Revenue.
(DOR) vs. Dawn Elizabeth
Pelham, voluntary dismissal of
petition to amend child support.
Maria Magdalena Gutierrez
and DOR vs. Gabriel Gutierrez,
voluntary dismissal of petition
to amend child support.
There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as it was
trial week.
The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
U.S. Bank National Associ-
ation to Jose L. Aguilar,
$93,000.
V.C. Hollingsworth Jr. and
V.C. Hollingsworth III to VCH
Citrus (three properties),
$524,300.
V.C. Hollingsworth III to
VCH Citrus, $131,000.
V.C. Hollingsworth Jr. to
VCF Citrus $261,900.
Betty Jo Hollingsworth as
trustee to V.C. Hollingsworth Jr.
as trustee, $131,000.
Henry B. and Sandra K. Life
to John Otis Gardner, $46,000.


No accidents are so unlJcky but that the wise may draw some
advantages from them; nor are there any so lucky but that the
foolish may turn them to their own prejudice.
--Francois Rochefoucauld



Frankie's
A REDKEN Hair Salon
Diane Ovina Frankie

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting Hours:
_IS_ Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
U 1:22c


courthouse Report


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Jan. 18, Nicholas Andrew Vasquez, 25, of 730 W. Second St.,
Zolfo Springs, Christopher Boyette, 24, of 211 Pennsylvania Ave.,
Wauchula, and Jose'Portillo, 26, of 205 N. Florida Ave., Wauchula,
were arrested by Det. David Drake and each charged with robbery
with a firearm, larceny petit and armed trespass on property.
Bdyette. was also charged with smuggling or introducing contra-
band into a detention facility.
Jan. 18, Alfredo Ramirez Ramirez, .21, of 1757 Cactus Ave.,
Waudhula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart-anid charged with .three
counts battery and fraud-giving a false ID to a law enforcement
officer.
Jan. 18, a residential burglary on Hanchey Road, a business
burglary on U.S. 17 North, criminal mischief on Weston Court and
a theft on Snell Street were reported.
Jan. 17, Lester Eugene Elbertson, 45, of 547 Callie Lane,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Jesse
DeBoom and charged with DUI.
Jan. 17, Raymond Guerrero, 43, of 324 S. Seventh Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody on a charge of con-
tempt of court.
Jan. 17, a robbery-holdup on U.S. 17 North, criminal mischief
on East Main Street and a theft on Hibiscus Lane were reported.
Jan. 16, a fight at SR 64 and Maude Road, and a theft on
Ralph Johns Road were reported.
Jan. 15, Lucas Victoria-Leon, 32, of 4059 W. Montague St.,
Charleston, S.C., was detained by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a
charge of failure to appear in court. He was arrested by Bowling
Green Ofc. Jereme Bridges on a charge of no valid license.,
Jan. 15, Troy Coleman Dickey, 34, of 2026 Rigdon Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force on
charges of withholding support of children and an out-of-county
warrant.
Jan. 15, thefts on Kelly Roberts Road and U.S. 17 North were
repotted.
Jan. 14, David Wayne Mann, 46, of 8 Quail Run Lane, Lake
Placid, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Jan. 14, Steven Clyde Hogue, 46, of 6220 N. Nebraska Ave.,
Tampa, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a charge of
withholding support of children.
Jan. 14, Courtney Lynn Grice, 27, of 1071 U.S. 17 North,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Mixon Trammell and charged with
shoplifting-petit theft.
Jan. 14, thefts on CR 664A, Golf Boulevard and U.S. 17
North were reported.
Jan. 13, Roberto Busto Trejo, 30, of 350 Akridge Dr., Frost-
proof, was arrested by Dep. Donna McCleskey on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.
Jan. 13, thefts on Mowatt Street and on Peterson Street were
reported.
Jan. 12, Jaime Ruiz Figueroa, 49, of 652 Airport Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Det. David Drake and charged with posses-
sion of methamphetamine.
Jan. 12, Marina Perez Salas, 37, of 1923 Rigdon Road, Wau-
chula, was9 arrested y, Dep. Todd Souther and charged with battery.
Jan. a theft on Dixianna Drive was reported.
WAUCHULA
Jan. 18, a fight on U.S. 17 North and a theft on Carlton Street
were reported.
Jan. 17, Steven Clyde Hogue, 46, of 6220 N. Nebraska Ave.,
Tampa, was arrested by Cpl. Gabe Garza and charged with disor-
derly intoxication.
Jan. 17, a residential burglary on U.S. 17 North and a theft at
River Chase Circle were reported.
Jan. 16, Shantel Jalin Goodwin, 20, of 206 Rust Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Ofc. Sean Guthas on an out-of-county war-
rant.
Jan. 16, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 South and thefts on
Heard Bridge Road and on U.S. 17 South were reported.


Tricia Ahner
P.A.-C.


Hours:
Mon. Fri.
8:30 5:00


Se Habla Espanol


Apurba Manik
M.D., F.A.A.P..


1125 S. 6TH AVE.
WAUCHULA
1:15tfc


Hardee County

Office of Community Development


Housing


Rehabilitation


Grant-Funded Assistance Program

Funds can be used for repairs and/or rehabilitation of Owner-occupied, single-family,
detached homes (no mobile homes) to ensure that they are decent, safe and sanitary.
Some eligible usages of funds include, but are not limited to:

Weatherizatioh Activities
Home Repairs, as well as necessary repairs to correct substantial code violations
Repairs/Alterations to improve health, safety and well-being of the occupants
Repairs to contribute to the structural integrity and preservation of the home
Modifications to provide accessibility for elderly/physically impaired occupants


ELIGIBILITY
* Contractually agree to program guidelines.
* Certify ownership and primary residence of
the home to be assisted.
* Current with first mortgages, property taxes
and/or assessments.
* Property to be assisted must be free from any
liens or judgments.
* Total household income adjusted for family
size must be within program limits.

APPLICATIONS
available on-line at:
www.hardeecounty.net
or
Courthouse Annex,
412 W. Orange St.,
Room 201,
Wauchula, FL


TERMS
The program provides an interest-free
forgivable loan to qualified, eligible applicants.
All loans are deferred until point of sale, transfer
of'title, moving refinancing with a cash pay-out,
refinancing with higher interest rate, failure to
maintain homeowner's insurance or failure to
occupy the home. At the end of the lien period,
the forgivable loan is forgiven and does not
require repayment, if all program requirements
are met.

Preference will be given to
lower income, elderly and/or
physically impaired
homeowners.


Call 863-773-6349 if you have additional questions.


Flu season is here!
Please call the office
to set up an appointment.


Jan. 14, Edward Edgar Fisher, 28, of 1212 Blue Jay Lare,,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Cpl. Matthew Whatley and charged
with DUI. .
Jan. 14, a business burglary on U.S. 17 North and burglary of
a conveyance on West Main Street were reported.
Jan. 13, criminal mischief on Peace Drive and thefts on. Oak,
Street, U.S. 17 North and North Seventh Avenue were reported.
Jan. 12, Attemio Tepectuim, 24, of 909 Louisiana St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged.with bat-
tery.
BOWLING GREEN
Jan. 18, criminal mischief on East Banana Street was report-
ed.
Jan. 16, Antonio Sambrano Ornelas,.35, of 4117 Captiva Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Michael Lake on an out-of-
county warrant.
Jan. 13, Leroy James Abram, 20, of 1023 W. Fifth St., Lake-
land, and Herman Eugene Patterson, 20, of 879 Chamberlain Blvd.,
Wauchula, were arrested by Chief John Scheel and each charged
with grand theft of a vehicle, possession of marijuana and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia. Abram was also charged with. posses-
sion of .cocaine and violation of probation. Patterson was detained
for failure to appear for court.
Jan. 12, a theft on Mason-Dixon Street was reported.




Photos!

*Pictures From The Past
*Football Action
*Christmas Parade
*Pop Warner Photos

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com

"Photos ... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Alex Gilliard And Ralph Harrison 11-6




I HEARTLAND PEDIATRICS
I "New Patients Welcome" |


767-lE414
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