Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00246
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula, Fla
Publication Date: October 16, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00246
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




Hunters: Are

You Ready?

...Stories 9A


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


108th Year, No. 45
3 Sections, 36 Pages


40
plus 40 sales tax


Thursday, October 16, 2008


Forum Asks Questions Of County Candidates


By KASEY HELMS
Of The Herald-Advocate
Local candidates for sheriff,
School Board member, superin-
tendent of schools and county


commissioner participated in a
nonpartisan question-and-
answer forum Tuesday night.
The forum was held at the
Faith Presbyterian Church


Fellowship Hall, and was spon-
sored by the Hardee County
Builders Association.
Each candidate had 1-1/2
minutes to give an introduction


and to answer each question
posed. No closing statement
was given by any of the candi-
dates. Moderator for the ques-
tion-and-answer forum was


Builders Association President
Benny Hash.
First up were School Board
candidates, with incumbent
Gina Neuhofer and Teresa
Crawford each answering four
pre-selected questions. The first
question asked what each felt
was a member's responsibility
to the school system. Crawford,
up first, responded, "The num-
ber one responsibility is to edu-
cate students, that's the primary
mission. Also, to make sure
education monies are priori-
tized for the classroom."
Neuhofer agreed with Craw-
ford that the first priority is the
students, "They need to be inde-
pendent and productive mem-
bers of society." She also
expressed that members are
held accountable and responsi-
ble to the community to utilize
tax dollars for students' educa-
tion.
Another question posed was
what their position is on the


Florida Comprehensive Assess-
m.ent Test. Crawford said,
"Look at it like a tool. The test
measures what students are
learning in the classroom, and it
is the state's validation those
students have the skills they
need."
Neuhofer stated, "I believe
you cannot base a student's per-
formance on one day's stan-
dardized test."
The final question asked both
candidates, "Should students
who do not pass the FCAT, but
have enough credits to pass,
graduate?" Neuhofer said, "The
school systems have no author-
ity to decide that."
Crawford responded, "In all
fairness, probably not." She
also explained that students
may take the FCAT six times
and the test is administered six
to eight times a year.
Next to answer questions
were candidates for sheriff,
See FORUM 2A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The student-body's selections for Homecoming 2008 were (from left) freshiifa"ncr'F~diSedtheart Taylor Bolin; junior
class Sweetheart Chelsey Steedley, Queen Lucy Ruiz, Lady-In-Waiting Chelsea Owens and sophomore class
Sweetheart Daishia Blandin.


ZS Ballot

To Ask For

Longer Terms
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Should town commissioners
serve two-year terms or four?
That is the question Zolfo
Springs voters will be asked on
their ballots come the municipal
election on Monday, Oct. 27.
In addition to selecting three
commissioners from among the
seven candidates, there will be
this one amendment for voters
to consider:
"Amendment to Section 2.02
of the Town Charter of Zolfo
Springs, amending the elected
terms of office for commission-
ers from a two-year term to a
four-year term. Shall the above-
described amendment be
approved?"
See ZS BALLOT 3A



'p e h I LBH B61H
1o6o' 91 69 0.00
i0/09' 90 70 0.00
.10/10 91 71 0.11
'..10/11 92 69 0.00
: :'.112 90 74 0.00
,10/13 87 72 0.02
1,0/14 8s 70 0.01
TJh.L Ralnfall to 10/14108 45.72
same period last year- 37.55
Ten Year Average 55.09
Source Unlv. of Fla. On Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds.....................6B
Community Calendar....9A
Courthouse Report.....lOC
Crime Blotter..................5C
Hardee Living................2B
Lunch Menus..............11C
Obits.............................. 4A
Roundups......................5A



111111112111111 11
7 18122 07290 3


SUCCESS! Despite Disability
By LAUREN RAULERSON
For The Herald-Advocate
October is National Disabilities Awareness Month. Thefollow-
S ,- ing is just one of many local success stories:
i Sean McCandless is not the average overachiever.
Sean's success story is especially unique because while he
i A^ graduated from Hardee Senior High as a National Honor
iim Society member and the captain of the swim team, he did so
.i, ----".- while overcoming autism.
According to the national Centers for Disease Control and
SPrevention, autism is a "developmental disability that causes
substantial impairments in social interactions and communica-
S .' '-. tion and the presence of unusual behaviors and interests."
Autism shows up early in a child's life and lasts throughout
adulthood. Boys are four times more likely to be affected than
girls, and about one in 150 children have the disability.
SAccording to the CDC, the thinking and learning abilities of
S people with autism can vary from gifted to severely challenged.
It is quite evident that Sean is the former.
; S' Sean is the son of Larry and Michele McCandless of
Wauchula. As swim team captain, Sean helped with warm-ups,
: ,, '' .: strokes and stretching. He also helped set up the tents at meets
for shade.
..' Sean enjoys swimming. He won second place in the district
.*" "' finals last year and accompanied his team to regionals in
McCandless See SUCCESS 2A





'Grow House' BE BRAVE!


Found In Ona Y


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two men have been charged
with operating a marijuana
grow house in rural Hardee
County.
Juan Sanchez Luque, 76, and


..5


Lazaro Arturo Villamarin, 45,
both of 5208 Pine Level Road,
Ona, have been accused of cul-
tivating more than 145 of the
illegal narcotic plants.
The pair were booked into
See 'GROW HOUSE' 2A


FSlf


0R"d


Luque


Villamarin
Villamarin


Homecoming A


Royal Success


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In the middle of a seesaw
overtime football game, half-
time Homecoming Activities
were a welcome break.
Before the long weekend was
over Lucy Ruiz was chosen as
Homecoming Queen and Alex
Lanier joined her as Home-
coming King.
The afternoon "Paradise"
parade set the stage for Friday
evening's crowning of the 2008
Homecoming Queen and her
court. Among the many floats,
the sophomore class won and
the senior class was runner-up.
Each candidate and her
escorts were introduced in pre-
game activities, during which
the game was dedicated to the
late Leon Schrader, a football
announcer, teacher, coach and
School Board member.
At last, some of the county's
prettiest and most popular girls
were presented while the Blue
Star Brigade played soft back-
ground music. Now attending
the University of Florida, 2007
Homecoming Queen LeAnna
Himrod, daughter of Joe B. and
Sherri Himrod, came home to
crown the new queen, senior
Lucy Ruiz.
Escorted by her father, Lucy


is the daughter 6f Jose and
Maria Ruiz of Wauchula. She is
vice-president of the senior
class, a member of the National
Honor Society, Future Business
Leaders of America, chaplain of
the Key Club, vice-president of
Students Working Against
Tobacco, and a membber of the
Academic Team and the
Spanish Club.
Her favorite school subjects
are art, psychology and reading.
After graduation, she plans to
join the U.S. Air Force and
major in the medical field. She
would love to travel around the
world and retire at a young age.
Joining her on the Home-
coming Court were Lady-In-
Waiting Chelsea Owens, junior
class Sweetheart Chelsey
Steedley, sophomore class
Sweetheart Daishia Blandin and
freshman class Sweetheart
Taylor Bolin.
The four other queen candi-
dates were Owens, daughter of
Billy Owens and Tiffane
Johnson; Courtney Nicholson,
daughter of John and Leighann
Nicholson; Bailey Knight,
daughter of Brian and Gilly
Knight; and McKenna Craw-
ford, daughter of Van and Kathy
Crawford.
See HOMECOMING 3A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Its a scene being played out in many workplaces throughout the county this month,
but perhaps not to quite as much delight as registered here by this co-worker. It's flu
shot time! The vaccination is needed annually, and Is available now at the Hardee
County Health Department, several local retail stores, private practitioners and various
offices. This one is The Herald-Advocate's, and its Nancy Davis grimacing as Paul
Gonzalez enjoys the moment.


CITY OF WAUCHULA

TRICK-OR-TREATING

Saturday, Oct. 25, 6-9 p.m.


I I








2A The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


SUCCESS
Continued From 1A


FORUM
Continued From 1A


Kelly's Column
By Jim


The Fertilizer Institute in its current Advocate publication list-
ed these three "Fertilizer Facts:"
"Each year there are 80 more million people to feed! To grow
abundant crops for years to come to avoid starvation we must
keep soils healthy and safeguard soil fertility.
"Fertilizers are currently responsible for between 40 and 60
percent of the world's food supply."
"This is a basic problem, to feed 6.6 billion people. Without
fertilizer, forget it. The game is over," said Dr. Norman Borlaug,
Nobel Peace Prize winner.
Therefore, Hardee County with its phosphate reserves can help
feed the world. The key is to mine and protect the environment at
the same time. I believe a balance can be struck.

Marcia Staszko has been writing some fine e-mails about her
husband Nick's recovery from a serious fall. He is getting therapy
at FINR west of Wauchula. Nick is the county's planning and zon-
ing director.

Now there is just Bobby of the Bowden,family still coaching
major college football. Bobby of FSU and Joe Paterno of Penn
State are in a close race as the all-time wins leader in Division 1
NCAA football.
His son Tommy Bowden of Monday stepped out as Clemson
head coach with a 3-3 season mark and 72-45 overall. Pete
Iacobelli of Associated Press reported Tommy will be paid the rest
of the season plus a $3.5 million buyout.
Son Terry Bowden was head coach at Auburn until a few years
ago. Son Jeff Bowden was FSU's offensive coach until the 2007
season. There is a lot of pressure to win in most college and all pro
football programs,

Hardee County Judge Jeff McKibben thinks Steve Spurrier at
the end of the season will be offered the head coaching job at
Tennessee since Spurrier grew up in the Volunteer state.

The Hardee Wildcats won a 57-51 overtime thriller Friday
night at Hardee Stadium over the district rival Sebring Blue
Streaks. This could have been a Hardee record for most combined
points by two teams.
Bob Martin's son Robert recalled Hardee once defeated
Arcadia 60-6.
The Wildcats are a pretty good football team when they don't
make a lot of mistakes and are now 4-2 this season.

A Bayonet Point (FL) grandfather Joseph Prudente, 66, was
jailed without bail recently because his lawn died. This was a vio-
lation of the Beacon Woods homeowners association.
I The St. Pete Times ran a news story about the situation. Andy
Law organized an effort to have the lawn replaced and fixed the
sprinkler system. Prudente had ignored association letters and court
appointments.
I would.not want to live in that subdivision. Grandpa is now
out of jail, the complaint dropped, but he still owes for fines and
court costs. Thankfully-some good citizens helped out, reported
Erin Sullivan of the St. Pete Times.

The stock market recently has been like Mr. Toad's Wild Ride
at Walt Disney World or the Sheikra roller coaster ride at Busch
Gardens.
The market had been in a slow decline the past year but last
week nosedived amidst the housing loan and credit market crisis


HnigFshin6Freas


10/16/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:28 am
Sets: 6:57 pm
LOD: 11:29:00
Moon Data
Rises: 8:11 pm
Sets: 9:25 am
Major Times
1:48 am-3:48 am
2:13 pm-4:13 pm
Minor Times
8:30 am-9:30 am
8:55 pm-9:55 pm
Prediction
SGood
10/17/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:29 am
Sets: 6:56 pm
LOD: 11:27:00
Moon Data
Rises: 9:06 pm
Sets: 10:35 am
Major Times
2:50 am-4:50 am
3:15 pm-5:15 pm
Minor Times


9:32 am-10:32 am
9:57 pm-10:57 pm
Prediction
Average
10/18/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:30 am
Sets: 6:55 pm
LOD: 11:25:00
Moon Data
Rises: 10:08 pm
Sets: 11:45 am
Major Times
3:56 am-5:56 am
4:21 pm-6:21 pm
Minor Times
.10:38 am-ll:38 am
11:03 pm-12:03 am
Prediction
Average
10/19/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:30 am
Sets: 6:54 pm
LOD: 11:24:00
Moon Data
Rises: 11:14 pm
Sets: 12:47 pm


Major Times
5:00 am-7:00 am
5:25 pm-7:25 pm
Minor Times
11:42 am-12:42 pm

Prediction
Average
10/20/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:31 am
Sets: 6:53 pm
LOD: 11:22:00
Moon Data
Rises: --:--
Sets: 1:43 pm
Major Times
5:28 am-7:28 am
5:53 pm-7:53 pm
Minor Times
11:45 pm-12:45 am
12:10 pm-l:10 pm
Prediction
Average
10/21/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:31 am
Sets: 6:52 pm


LOD: 11:21:00
Moon Data
Rises: 12:22 am
Sets: 2:29 pm
Major Times
6:25 am-8:25 am
6:50 pm-8:50 pm
Minor Times
12:42 am-1:42 am
1:07 pm-2:07 pm
Prediction
Average
10/22/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:32 am
Sets: 6:51 pm
LOD: 11:19:00
Moon Data
Rises: 1:28 am
Sets: 3:10 pm
Major Times
7:19 am-9:19 am
7:44 pm-9:44 pm
Minor Times
1:36 am-2:36 am
2:01 pm-3:01 pm
Prediction
Good


Orlando. Sean would wake up
for practice two mornings a
week before school and stay
after school for practice several
times during the week.
Over the years, Sean
improved as a swimmer and
knocked off seconds from his
time. Sean's mother explains
that Sean would "do anything
you asked him to do, no matter
what." Of this Sean says, "I just
do it for the team."
Sean also enjoyed being a
member of the National Honor
Society. He was inducted to the
organization on the same day as
his younger brother, Christian,
who is now in llth grade. To
be a member, a student has to
have a 3.5 grade-point average,
take honor courses and partici-
pate in community service. The
teachers also vote on nominees
to determine who is selected.
Club sponsor Ninfa Skipper
praises Sean, saying, "He really
was very responsible about
coming to every meeting,
bringing what he was supposed
to and asking a thousand ques-
tions."
In addition to the honor soci-
ety and the swim team, he was
also active in the youth ministry
at First Baptist Church of
Wauchula.
Sean praises the people who
have invested in his life. He
commends Skipper for being a
wonderful sponsor and incredi-
bly nice, and does the same for


his youth minister, Carson
Fellows. He also praises Coach
Dick Daggett.
Sean is very interested in
both local and national politics.
He is looking forward tdO oting
this year.
A few courses Sean took in
high school were Algebra 2,
Pre-Calculus and Driver's
Education.
Sean's favorite subject in
school was math. His favorite
teacher was MelwqyKlobuchar.
"Mrs. Klobuchar wasiery nice;
she helped me out with prob-
lems that I had :trouble with,"
Sean says.
While Sean is excited to be
finished with high school, he
says, "It is a long road from
here." Sean attends South
Florida Community College
and plans to enter into comput-
er science. He is intrigued by
computers and wants to learn
how they function.
Sean enjoys surfing the Web
at home and getting on
MySpace. He also enjoys play-
ing video games such as
Nintendo's Wii. Sean plays
chess and reads series such as
Harry Potter, Left Behind,
Chronicals of Narnia, Series of
Unfortunate Events and Eragon
in his spare time.
Finishing up one stage of his
life, Sean is eager to begin the
next with the same determina-
tion he completed the first.


that resulted in a $700 billion bailout package passed by the U.S.
Congress and some other countries doing a bailout to prevent
worldwide economic instability.
Then on Monday the stock market had its biggest single day
rally in 75 years.
Another bright spot is the success of the Tampa Bay Rays who
are trying to go from worst to first and reach the World Series.

Lis Leff of the Associated Press in a Lakeland Ledger article
Tuesday reports over 11,000 same sex marriages have been per-
formed in California since becoming legal in mid-June 2008 and
10,400 such marriages in Massachusetts since gay marriage was
legalized in May 2004. Florida already has a law against same sex
marriage, and a Florida constitutional amendment will be on the
Nov. 4 ballot to define marriage as between a man and a woman.

Kelli Kennedy of the AP reports tough financial times in the
U.S. have caused some violence, especially during home foreclo-
sures.
In California a man killed his family and himself. He had lost
a small fortune, his job and was losing his home. In Ohio a 90-year-
old widow is recovering after shooting herself in the chest when
she was being evicted from her house. In Massachusetts a house-
wife killed herself as the couple faced foreclosure of their home. In
Tennessee a woman, 57, killed herself during a home foreclosure.
In Ocala a man shot his wife and dog and killed himself after set-
ting fire to his home.
There are some hurting people in this country and the rest of
the world.
The new American president, whether Barack Obama or John
McCain, will face a challenging job come January 2009. I hope our
new president can offer great leadership, compassion and courage
at home and abroad.

One of the best breakfast sandwiches available today is a
home-cooked bacon and egg sandwich or a sausage egg McGriddle
from McDonald's.



'GROW HOUSE'
Continued From 1A


the Hardee County Jail last
week on charges of trafficking
in marijuana in excess of 25
pounds, producing marijuana
and possession of narcotic
equipment.
Villamarin additionally was
charged with theft of utilities.
It was that possibility,
spokesman Maj. Claude Harris
Jr. of the Hardee County
Sheriffs Office said, that
brought about the original
investigation. And during the
course of that investigation,
detectives obtained a search
warrant for the property.
Harris said Villamarin was
detained outside the home as
detectives served the search
warrant last Wednesday after-
noon. As officers made entry
into the house, he allegedly
pointed to the second story and
told Det. Sylvia Estes, "There's
a lot of marijuana up there."
Later, as detectives entered a
metal barn, he also allegedly
told her, "There's a lot of mari-
juana in there, too."


Luque, Harris said, was
inside the home at the time, in a
downstairs bedroom. He told
detectives he had lived in the
residence only for a few days.
Harris said the searchers
found 27 marijuana plants in
50-gallon pots in the upstairs
bedroom. The barn concealed
119 marijuana plants.
Also found in the search were
45 ballast lights, water pumps,
air-conditioning handlers and
humidifiers, and liquid fertilizer
- all allegedly used in the cul-
tivation of the illegal crop.
Harris also charged that elec-
tricity was being diverted from
the meter in an attempt to
power the operation without
detection.
Both men were arrested.
Last year, three marijuana
grow houses were discovered in
rural Hardee County within a
matter of weeks.


Arnold Lanier and Roger Clark.
The first question asked if the
county should add on to the jail.
Clark responded, "No, the prob-
lem with the jail is that it was
built in a swamp. It would be
very costly, $3 to $5 million,
and would be a waste."
Lanier answered, "No, the
community would be better
served with a Criminal Justice
Complex. The cost would be
$45 million, but all aspects of
the Sheriff's Office would be
under one roof."
The next question asked what
each candidate's specific plans
were for dealing with the drug
problem in Hardee County.
Lanier explained, "We need
manpower. The real issue is in
the methamphetamine problem,
and we need recovery groups,
where citizens come together to
help addicts."
Clark answered, "Meth abuse
is the number one drug abuse,
and we need to very aggressive-
ly address it with an interdiction
program."
Another question asked was
what the relationship should be
between the Sheriff's Office
and the State's Attorney Office.
Clark said, "One that should be
professional, honest with
integrity. They are the most
valuable asset to the Sheriff's
Office."
Lanier said the relationship
should be transparent, "We
need to work together from
beginning to end, and get with
the state attorney daily."
The final question for the
candidates asked how they
planned to improve communi-
cations between the Sheriff's
Office and the public in general.
Lanier replied, "We need more
public awareness. Currently
there is a Citizen's Advisory
Board that has 138 community
members, which gives them
insight into the Sheriff's Office.
I would like to create a
Citizen's Patrol that would
allow more individuals to give
extra eyes and ears in the com-
munity."
Clark said, "Leadership. The
sheriff needs to be involved in
the community and has to set an
example for the Sheriff's
Office."
Following sheriff candidates
were contenders for superinten-
dent of .schools, incumbent
Dennis Jones and David
Durastani. The first question
asked what percent of the
school budget should go to
classroom teachers compared to
other spending. Durastani
replied, "We need to spend as
much money in the classroom
as possible. Expenditures for
2007, in the classroom, were
69.8 percent. The problem is
trying to find out what makes
up a classroom."
Jones answered, "Money is
spent inside classroom walls,
but you want children to have
access to books, nurses, guid-
ance counselors. Thirty-two
million was given to schools
last year, and 88 percent affect-
ed every child, every day."
Another question posed to
candidates asked them what
process they use to determine
the competence of teachers.
Durastani said, "By being a
hands-on principal. I believe in
administration by walking
around and also checking
teacher credentials."


Jones answered, "Evaluation
is the responsibility of the
administration, ard I have full
confidence in all of our princi-
pals when they go to hire a
teacher."
The last question-and-answer
session was for candidates run-
ning for a County Commission
seat. Running for re-election are
Minor Bryant and Dale
Johnson. The other candidates
are Terry Atchley, Donald
Samuels, Donald Chancey and
Walter Olliff..
The first question asked each
candidate was their position on
impact fees.
Bryant said, "They are an
unnecessary evil... look to the
economy to turn around."
Atchley mentioned a pay-as-
you-go program and expressed
a need to create a blue-ribbon
committee to determine how
the community can look toward
the future. Johnson said, "The
issue of impact fees is dead
when looking at today's econo-
my."
Samuels explained that there
needed to be a decision on
when to start impact fees, and
that it does not need to impact
the community. Chancey said,
"It has been a year and nothing
has been going on about impact
fees. If I was elected, I would
implement meetings immedi-
ately." Olliff commented,
"Hardee County is not dealing
with an exploding population
growth, and impact fees would
hurt job growth."
The next question asked if
each candidate was satisfied
with the current county manag-
er. Atchley stated, "I would
bring leadership and integrity to
the commission and, therefore,
to stand forth and impugn is not
my leadership style." Johnson
said it was an inappropriate
question to answer. Samuels
said, "I'm not sure they do a
county manager evaluation."
Chancey gave the basic job
description of the county man-
ager and commented that,
"People shouldn't judge." Olliff
,said, "I believe a person must
be highly motivated, of moral
character, and the county man-
ager is supposed to be evaluated
all year around." Bryant com-
mented, "I'm not going to criti-
cize his job; he does a lot."
Another question posed tq their
candidates asked how they plan
to trim the county budget.'Olliff'
said, "That's a hard question to
answer because I don't know
what's in the county budget."
Bryant stated, "Very carefully. I
believe in a cost-benefit analy-
sis and to look at this in depart-
ments not just workshops."
Atchley said, "We need to be
diligent in our efforts to main-
tain the budget . and expand
our tax base." Johnson ex-
pressed that the community
needed to take into account the
inflation faced, "We have effec-
tively lowered your taxes and
will continue to be prudent with
your money."
Samuels said, "We need to
increase efficiency in the bud-
get." Chancey concluded by
commenting on the rise of
small-business taxes, "Home-
stead property taxes have gone
up a small amount, but small
business owners are suffering."
Election day is Nov. 4, with
early voting beginning this
Monday.


Hunters, Be Careful


Cleaning
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) is encouraging hunters
to take precautions when dress-
ing and handling harvested wild
hogs.
Wild hogs, though not origi-
nally native to Florida, are now
found within all 67 counties,
and like any wild animal, can
carry parasites and diseases -
some of which can be transmit-
ted to people. One such disease
for hunters to be concerned
with is swine brucellosis.
The FWC is advising hunters
handling wild hog carcasses to
take the following precautions
to protect themselves from ex-
posure to this bacterial disease:
Avoid eating, drinking or
using tobacco when field-dress-
ing or handling carcasses.
Use latex or rubber gloves
when handling the carcass or
raw meat.
Avoid direct contact with
blood, reproductive organs and
fecal matter. Wearing long
sleeves, eye protection and cov-
ering any scratches, open
Sounds or lesions will help pro-
vide protection.


Wild Hogs

Clean and disinfect knives,
cleaning area, clothing and any
other exposed surfaces when
finished.
Wash hands frequently with
soap and water.
When cooking wild hog, as
with any wild game, care in
handling is an important part of
disease prevention. The meat
should be cooked thoroughly to
170 degrees. Swine brucellosis
is not transmitted through prop-
erly cooked meat.
"Hunters shouldn't be overly
concerned with swine brucel-
losis, but they should practice
these good-hygiene, safety pre-
cautions when field-dressing
wild hogs," FWC wildlife vetI
erinarian Mark Cunningham
said.
Brucellosis in people is called
undulant fever and could be
transmitted if a hunter cut him-
self while field-dressing a wild
hog or was exposed to the ani-
mal's blood or bodily fluids.
Symptoms include a recurrent
fever, chills, night sweats,
weakness, headaches, back
pain, swollen joints, loss of
appetite and weight loss.


I







Octoberr 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Freshman class representatives were (from left) McKenna Hellein, Sweetheart Taylor
Bolin and Kayla Austin.


Representing the junior class were (left to right) Lindsay Moon, Kaylyn Stevenson,
Sweetheart Chelsey Steedley and JaLyn Smith.


From the sophomore class are (left to right) Vanessa Garza, Sweetheart Daishia
Blandin and Courtney Chason.


The five girls representing the senior class were (left to right) Bailey Knight, Courtney
Nicholson, Queen Lucy Ruiz, Lady-In-Waiting Chelsea Owens and McKenna Crawford.


j^ M HOMECOMING
'I Continued From 1A


Junior class contestants
included Sweetheart Chelsey
Steedley, daughter of Timothy
and Bettye Steedley; Kaylyn
Stevenson, daughter of Mark
and Monica Stevenson; JaLyn
Smith, daughter of Kim Smith
and Diane SmithVi'nd Lindsay
Moon, daughter 616 Tony and
Leslie Moon.
Sophomore class candidates
were Sweetheart Daishia
Blandin, daughter of Otis and
Katrina Blandin; Courtney
Chason, daughter of Mike
Chason and Wendy Horton; and
Vanessa Garza, daughter of
Greg Garza and Yvonne
Herrera.
Freshman class hopefuls


were Sweetheart Taylor Bolin,
daughter of Todd and Millie
Bolin; Kayla Austin, daughter
of Robert Austin and D'Lise
Wyckoff; and McKenna Helle-
in, daughter of Murray and
Tammy Hellein of Wauchula.
The only missing link was the
Homecoming king, announced
during the Hriiecoming Dance
on Saturday night. Selected was
Alex Lanier, son of Arnold and
Amy Lanier.
Other king candidates were
Skylar Alden, son of Don and
Barbie Alden; Brek McCleni-
than, son of Ross and Renee
McClenithan; and Logan
Thomas, son of Kevin and
Nancy Thomas.


ZS BALLOT
Continued From 1A


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON AND ALEX GILLIARD
Lucy Ruiz was chosen 2008 Homecoming queen. Alex
Lanier was selected as her king.


Sharing the limelight are 2008 Queen Lucy Ruiz (left) and
Lady-In-Waiting Chelsea Owens.


U U Uead-dvcae


Hard'Cont' Hmton'oerg


PRINT E P UBL

TB
115 S. 7th ~Av.WuhlF
3387


If passed, the change would
not become effective until the
following election. No winning
candidates this time around will
enjoy the extended terms.
Currently, Zolfo Springs'
elected officials have the short-
est terms in the county. If
changed, their terms would
match most other elected
boards.


Only the Bowling Green
Commission has a term less
than four years, and it is set at
three years.
Serving four-year terms are
all elected officials on the
Wauchula City Commission,
the Hardee County Commission
and the Hardee County School
Board.


DJAVID DURAWI F OR U S U PI INTEND NTOM IC OL S1


Personal
Married to Hardee County Native Betty Albritton
Three Children Regan, Meredith & Stuart
Two Grandsons Zackary,& Zander
Member First United Methodist Church Bowling Green
Member Wauchula Lion's Club (34 yrs.)
Former Bowling Green City Manager
Past President of Bowling Green Youth Baseball (.18 yrs..)
Bowling Green City Commissioner 7 3yr. terms
Florida Hospital Board of Directors 1984-87
Citrus Grower for 25 years


Experience
School Principal in Hardee County 26 years
Hardee County District-Wide Administrator 7 years
Managing: Federal Programs Staff Development *
Career Education Certification Insurance *
SFinger Printing Personnel Drug Testing *
SIn Service Chief Negotiator (3 yrs.)
Education
* M.A. School Administration
Delta State University, Cleveland, MS
* B.S. Elementary Education
Delta State University, Cleveland, MS
* Additional Course Work University of South Florida


I-,-- -r


L"Mr
"Mr. D"


I PledgeTo .
* Implement.stronger discipline and school safety
* Institute additional vocational courses
* Establish an open door policy ,
. Restore public trust'and integrity
* Review regional salary schedules ~- -.
* Change the things.needing change

I Pledge to Do My Best for You
i I


I ru, rul. lu


CONSRVAIVE UALFIED PROEN LADE

o,, r.n^~~~n. www.For~ c~~; ,,, nn~l~ ur n~r~ 11nids tni cnlhiuturell~llcrmCmnh com ,1011


I v. I up


I


Pd, Pol. Adv, Paid for by David Durastanti Campaign A o ourt Approved oy ua xU L). uuras~oarIII 1 Hepuwan, II m m u ieston, t -a mpaign ire asureri







4A The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


HELEN WELCH
PLUMLEY
SHelen Welch Plumley, 75, of
Bowling Green, died on Mon-
day, Oct. 13, 2008 at her home.
Born Nov. 16, 1932, in Fort
Green, she was a lifelong resi-
dent of Hardee County, member
of Fort Green Baptist Church
and a homemaker.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Eddie Plumley;
parents, Raleigh and Ruby
Dixon Welch; two brothers,
Paul Welch and Owen Welch;
and one sister, Hazel "Annie"
Choate.
Survivors include five
daughters, Susie Moore and
husband Larry of Crewsville,
Nancy Lynne Leavins and hus-
band Rusty of Frostproof,
Patricia "Patty" Rimes of Zolfo
Springs, Barbara Gail Alder-
man of Mulberry and Brigitte
"Gitti" McQuaig of Fort
Meade; four sons, Rueben
McQuaig and wife Nancy of
Fort Green, Wayne McQuaig
and wife Debbie of Lake
Buffum, Steve McQuaig and
his wife Sue of Fort Green, and
Edward "Peanut" Plumley of
Fort Green; two brothers,
Ronald Welch and Carl Welch;
22 grandchildren; and 34 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation is 6 to 8 p.m. today
(Thursday) at the funeral home.
Services are Friday at 10 a.m. at
the Fort Green Baptist Church
with Pastors Ken Belbin and
William Blankenship officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
Fort Green Baptist Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Home
Wauchula






HELEN WELCH
PLUMLEY
Helen Welch Plumley, 75,
of Bowling Green, died on
Monday, Oct. 13, 2008 at her
home.
Born Nov. 16, 1932, in
Fort Green, she was a lifelong
resident of Hardee County,
member of Fort Green
Baptist Church and a home-
maker. She was a very loving,
caring, giving and devoted
mother, grandmother and
great grandmother. She will
be forever missed by her fam-
ily and friends.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Eddie Plum-
ley; parents, Raleigh and
Ruby Dixon Welch; two
brothers, Paul Welch and
Owen Welch; and one sister,
Hazel "Annie" Choate.
Survivors include five
daughters, Susie Moore and
husband Larry of Crewsville,
Nancy Lynne Leavins and
husband Rusty of Frostproof,
Patricia "Patty" Rimes of
Zolfo Springs, Barbara Gail
Alderman of Mulberry and
Brigitte "Gitti" McQuaig of
Fort Meade; four sons,
Rueben McQuaig and wife
Nancy of Fort Green, Wayne
McQuaig and wife Debbie of
Lake Buffum, Steve
McQuaig and his wife Sue of
Fort Green, and Edward
"Peanut" Plumley of Fort
Green; two brothers, Ronald
Welch and Carl Welch; 22
grandchildren; and 34 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation is 6 to 8 p.m.
today (Thursday) at the
funeral home. Services are
Friday at 10 a.m. at the Fort
Green Baptist Church with
Pastors Ken Belbin and
William Blankenship officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
Fort Green Baptist Cemetery.

Brant Funeral
Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula


Obituaries Congressional Candidates Answer Qs


MARK TAYLOR
Mark Taylor, 55, of Bartow,
died on Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008,
at Good Shepherd Hospice in
Auburndale.
Born Dec. 11, 1952, in Lake-
land, he was a heavy equipment
mechanic for CF Industries.
Survivors include wife
Dorothy "Dot" Taylor of Bar-
tow; four daughters, Tammy
Messer of Lake Wales, Sheila
Means of Bartow, Laura Prine
and husband Michael of Fort!,
Meade, and Nikki Gillette and
husband Jason of Atlanta, Ga.;
one son, Gerald Means and wife
Amy of Fort Meade; one sister,
Debbie Cartwright and husband
David Perez of Lake Wales; one
brother, Mike Taylor of Lake
Wales; and 10 grandchildren.
Visitation was 5 to 7 p.m.
Wednesday at the funeral home.
Services were also on Wednes-
day at 7 p.m. at the funeral
home.
In lieu of flowers, contribu-
tions may be sent to Good
Shepherd Hospice.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade







GENEDA NOVELLA
KING
Geneda Novella King, 84,
of Wauchula, died on Mon-
day, Sept. 29, 2008, at Florida
Hospital-Wauchula.
Born May 27, 1924, in
Grundy, Tenn., she moved to
Wauchula on July 26, 2008
from South Carolina and was
a, homenigker.
She was preceded in death
by" her husband, Charles
King.
Survivors include two
sons, Joseph King and
Johnny King; three sisters,
Dorothy Griffin, Golden
Bivens and Alice Bivens;
grandchildren Daniel King
and wife Audra, David King
and Kevin, Cindy Bray and
husband Jerry, Linda King,
Michelle and Shannon, and
Cassie and Lizs King; and 23
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was 6 to 8 p.m.
Friday at the funeral home.
Services were held out of
state. Interment was at Mount
Pleasant Cemetery in Dun-
lap, Tenn.

Brant Funeral

Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula







Ric Button Tom Robarts
Monuments
including
set in cemetery
from $335
245-8956
established 1999 10:9


By KASEY HELMS
Of The Herald-Advocate
The four candidates running
for'U.S. House of Representa-
tives District 13 -which is
comprised of Hardee, DeSoto,
Manatee, Sarasota and part of
Charlotte counties partici-
pated in a political forum last
Thursday night.
The event was hosted by the
American Legion and spon-
sored by the Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce.
The candidates are incumbent
Vern Buchanan (R), Christine
Jennings (D), Jan Schneider (I),
and Don Baldauf (NPA).
Each was asked to answer
pre-selected questions provided
by the chamber. Chamber mem-
bers had submitted questions
and their Board of Directors,
which then chose three, with
two extra questions that would
be asked depending on the time.
All four candidates had three
minutes for opening statements,
three minutes to answer the
questions, and five minutes
were allotted for closing state-
ments. The candidates were not
allowed a rebuttal.
The moderator was Chamber
of Commerce President Vanes-
sa Hernandez, and Sarah Pel-
ham of: the Hardee County
Economic Development Office
served as time keeper.
Candidates went in alphabeti-
cal order when giving their
opening remarks. Baldauf, with
no party affiliation, was first
and remarked on the improve-
ment needed in Washington.
"Unfortunately, politics has
become somewhat of a sport,
and we need people in Wash-
ington who have better skills,"
he said.
Following him was Republi-
can incumbent Buchanan, who


kC--


expressed his appreciation to
the community for the "privi-
lege of serving in Congress."
He also briefly addressed issues
such as global economics and
the farm bill.
Next was Democratic candi-
date Jennings, who spoke of her
background as a banker of 40
years and her concerns of
homeowners facing foreclo-
sures and ending the war in
Iraq. She also spoke of protec-
tion for Social Security.
Lastly was Independent can-
didate Schneider who ex-
pressed, "Democracy can't be
imposed from above; it has to
be homegrown," as well as her
desire to end the war in Iraq.
Schneider also said she would
have voted against the bailout
and that she was for the middle
class.
The first question posed to
candidates was their opinion of
offshore drilling in the Gulf of
Mexico. Both Schneider and
Jennings were against it;
Buchanan was against drilling
right off the coast of Florida but
suggested drilling in the central
Gulf and northeast part of
Alaska. Baldauf was the only
candidate for direct offshore
drilling, adding that it could add
jobs and help the economy.
Schneider and Jennings
spoke of alternative sources of
energy like wind and solar
power. Buchanan added nuclear
energy to his list of alternative
energy sources, providing an
example of the use of it on sub-
marines.
The second question dealt
with a topic specifically for
Hardee and DeSoto counties.
Candidates were asked what
their plans were to facilitate the
completion of U.S. 17 in the
next five years. Jennings ex-


1. =


plained to the crowd, "To be
effective you need to be in the
party that has the power to get
money, and right now that is the
Democratic Party."
Buchanan disputed Jennings,
saying the House Transporta-
tion Committee was "bi-parti-
san" and U.S. 17 was one of his
top priorities for District 13.
Baldauf said in his answer, "I
don't know what other federal
projects are going on in the dis-
trict but I would put Highway
17 in the top three."
Schneider provided statistics,
"There are between 6,000 to
12,000 vehicles a day on High-
way 17, and 20 percent of those
are trucks (semi-trucks)." She
said she would support an ear-'
mark for U.S. 17.
Question three asked candi-
dates what their suggestions
were for immigration reform.
Buchanan stated, "The H2-A
Visa program is broken," and
explained a need for temporary
legal workers. He suggested
that an identification card be
supplied for workers and a form
of identification for employers
as well.
Baldauf expressed the need to
make sure the U.S. borders
were secure. He suggested com-
ing up with a plan to help the
immigrants who wanted to
come legally and work.
Schneider explained that the
U.S. borders needed to be
strengthened along with stricter
enforcement like holding em-
ployers responsible for hiring
illegal immigrants. She also
suggested that there should be a
federal database and assistance
for the issue.
Jennings suggested hiring
more border agents and getting
better technology at both bor-
ders and ports. She also recom-


/ Jennings


10 Want To Head


Main Street Program


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In less than a month 10 peo-
ple have decided they want to
lead Wauchula Main Street Inc.
Since the city took over the
Main Street program in May,
there has been increasing inter-
est in reviving the program
under the city's aegis. Accord-
ingly, city officials said they
would launch a membership
drive as soon as an executive
director/coordinator was hired
in late October.
By the closing date for appli-
cations on Friday, 10 people
had sent resumes applying for
the Main Street director posi-
tion. More than half are from
county/city residents.
Only one, Gail Mundt, cur-
rently of Chattanooga, Tenn., is
from out of state. Floridians not
residing in the county include
Josie Ferraioli of Panama City
Beach, Jessica Newman of
Kissimmee and Lauren Pulido
of Brandon.
Area residents applying for
the position are Bowling
Green's Bob Parm, and
Wauchulans Dawn Atkinson-
Jones, Patricia Detwiler, Tina

Man is a knot, a web, a mesh
into which relationships are
tied. Only those relationships
matter.
-Antoine de Saint-Exupery



Ric Button
Funeral Director
Traditional
Funeral with
Cremation and
use of casket from
$2500.
ICS Cremation and
Funerals,
2620D Highlands Road,
Harbour Heights, FL 33983

245-8956


LeConte, Emily Clements
McClelland and Errick
Snelling.
All of the applicants say they
possess most of the marketing,
volunteer management, small
business development, historic
preservation, retailing, design
and non-profit management and
project funding skills and are
entrepreneurial, energetic, well-
organized and able to work well
with others, the characteristics
outlined in the application
advertisement.
The position will be funded
by Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA) and Main Street
dollars. The person hired will
be a city employee with
assigned responsibility for both
CRA and Main Street.
At Monday evening's meet-
ing a committee was appointed.
Some of the proposed members
had not yet been contacted and
agreed to serve, so the full com-
mittee is unknown as yet. City
Commissioner Clarence Bolin
will represent the commission
as the group sees to review and
rank the applications, and per-
haps short list those who may
be contacted for interviews.


Ottallah Leads


Hardee Runners


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Junior Murad Ottallah is tak-
ing the lead in boys cross coun-
try.
Since the beginning of the
season, Ottallah has steadily
lowered his times, setting a per-
sonal record of 19.40. With that
time, he came in second overall
in the Bulldog Invitational at
Morgan Park last Tuesday.
In Thursday's Alumni Run,
although the course was damp-
ened by steady rainfall prior to
the race, Ottallah still led every-
one to the tape, even though his
time was slowed to 21:41.
Junior High runner Brandon
Beatty ran next best at 23:36.
Alumni Shannon Bradley was
tops for the male alumni, with a
time of 23:54 for third place.
Coach Rob Beatty was the top
faculty runner with a time of


24:47, over a minute behind his
son.
On the girls' side of the led-.
ger, high school runner Nancy
Ramirez was the top female
with a time of 29:22. Karen
Summers led alumni women
with a time of 36:58.
Between them were Brianna
Aguila, close behind Ramirez
at 29:36, followed by Guada-
lupe Flores, Alma Alvarez,
Daisy Escoto, Mesqua Fields,
Lindy Rossman. Nancy Conejo
and Jessica Hunt. Junior High's
Leah Cisneros was right behind
Summers with a time of 37:10.
At the Tuesday meet, Brand-
on Beatty was first in the com-
bined junior varsity/junior high
race. Ramirez led the Hardee
girls with a third-place overall,
while Escoto led the JV girls
contingent.


The baby carriage was invented in 1848 by a New Yorker
named Charles Burton. His earliest model was a large box with
four wheels and a handle attached to it. It wasn't a hit in
America, however, and Burton moved to Britain. Queen
Victoria took a liking to his invention and other moms soon fol-
lowed suit.


rrom our humble beginnings in Alachua, Floridalack in
1906, die Robarts Family traditon of tfunral series has
gron n into a reliable resource you and your family can count
oiln your hour ofneed Rooted in Famlyv tradition we
'st,- Irni Lm onnlcted to the families s e serve and
the level ol5er cwe only we aln proviJe.
As we continue to serve all people of all faiths and
backgrounds, know that you can rely on our compassionate
service and commitment to care for years to come.


-emete/z' ceMwice


We Have


MOVED

To better serve you and your family
with our new waiting/display room
and more offices for your privacy.


228 North 6th Ave.
Corer of Oak & US Hwy 17
Across from Hess

773-0625 ,: 2


I I


--


mended large fines.for employ-
ers who hire illegal immigrants.
The final question asked can-
didates how they would work to
decrease the national debt in-
curred by the large deficits each
year. Baldauf said, "Congress is
the one that spends the money
and it is important to identify
needs versus wants."
Schneider explained that help
needed to be given to home-
owners rather than financial
institutions and "the $3-trillion
war in Iraq needs to be
stopped."
Jennings agreed with
Schneider that the war in Iraq
needed to end. She also ex-
pressed her idea to stop "tax
havens offshore."
Buchanan recommended a
"constitutional balanced budget
amendment" and to not spend
more money than is taken in.
At the end of the forum can-
didates were given five minutes
for their closing remarks. First
was Schneider, who ended with
promoting single-payer health
insurance and addressing the
crowd, "You need a representa-
tive in Congress that's not
afraid to raise questions."
Jennings finished by saying
that fiscal problems were
caused by "greed, deregulation
and lack of oversight," and she
would meet every quarter to
hold a town hall meeting ex-
plaining her votes to the com-
munity, if she is elected in
office.
Buchanan expressed his de-
sire to "get out of partisan poli-
tics," and stressed the impor-
tance of small business.
Baldauf concluded, "I'm a
tell-it-like-it-is guy, and it is
going to take some brave peo-
ple who have nothing to lose to
go to Congress."
P 1




~IrI- rlll '. 4 . .4A~ A.. ;;.


October 16. 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Volleyball Splits Matches


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee varsity volleyball
girls won well and lost tough
last week.
The girls went to Sarasota
Bopker on Tuesday night and
won in four tight games. They
hosted Palmetto on Thursday
and battled in the straight-set
loss.
The regular season ends this
week. The girls went to Sebring
on Tuesday evening and return
home tonight (Thursday) for
Senior Night games against dis-
trict top-seed Desoto.
The district tournament is
Oct. 27-31 at Braden River, and
will include Hardee, DeSoto,







Vendors Wanted
For Annual Show
The Wauchula Garden
club and Wauchula Woman's
Club are looking for vendors
for their annual "Antiques,
Arts and Crafts Under the
Oaks" show. The show will
be on Dec. 6, 2008 from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m.
The show will be located at
313 West Palmetto St.,
Wauchula. For more infor-
mation, contact Jeanette
Perrine for an application at
773-6026 before Nov. 8.

Smoke Free
Community
The Florida Hospital
Wauchula is offering a
Freedom from Smoking
Eight-session program,
sponsored by the American
Lung Association to create a
supportive environment for
those wanting to break their
addiction.
The free program begins
Monday, Oct. 27 at 6 p.m. in
the Conference Room at
Florida Hospital Wauchula.
Pre-registration is required.
For more information, call
Sara at 863-386-6476 or
register on line at
www.fhhd.org.

"Firearms Range
Open to Public
The Hardee County
Sheriff's Office Firearms
Range will be open to the
public on Saturday from 9
a.m. until noon for firearms
practice or to sight hunting
rifles. All participants will be
required to sign a waiver of
liability and pay a fee of $6
per adult.
The range is located at
841 Airport Road, just north
of the Hardee County landfill
three miles east of Wau-
chula. Shooters may pur-
chase targets at the range.
For more information, con-
tact Dep. Joseph Marble at
773-0304 ext. 225.

Republican Party
Volunteers Needed
The Republican Party
needs volunteers Saturday
from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. to
help wave political signs and
man phone banks.
For more information, con-
tact Chet Huddleston at 781-
1514 or go by the Republi-
can headquarters located at
219 E. Main St. in Wauchula.

Support For
Marriage Law
Supporters of Amendment
2 are invited to bring their
family and support traditional
marriage by waving signs to
passing traffic at Main Street
and U.S. 17.
The sign waving will be
taking place on Saturday,
Oct. 25 at 2 p.m. For more
information, call 773-9608.

Weekend For
Retreat
'Good Shepherd Hospice
will hold its annual Family
Retreat on Nov. 1 and 2 at


the Florida FFA Leadership
Training Center in Haines
City. The retreat is designed
tf6r family members who
have suffered- the loss of
someone, and includes
swimming, volleyball, and
other activities as well as
counseling.
Registration of $25
includes each family's
meals, activities, materials
and an overnight lodging.
For more information or to
register for the family retreat,
call 1-800-209-2200.


Sebring, Booker, Palmetto,
Avon Park and Hardee in one of
the most spread-out districts in
the state.
In last week's trip to Sara-
sota, Hardee dropped behind
Booker early. Down 20-12 in
the first game,Hardee bounded
back between the eight-point
serving of Kember Townsend
and final five points by Krystin
Robertson.
Hardee also got behind in the
second game, coming back
from an 18-7 deficit behind the
eight points of Robertson, but
still losing 25-21.
Hardee didn't let Booker get
that kind of lead again and won
the third game 25-20 and went
on to win the fourth game 25-21
for the best of five games.
Although they fould Booker
improved from earlier in the
season, the Lady 'Cats refused
to give in.
On Thursday at home against
Palmetto in a varsity-only
match, Hardee worked for a 19-


SPolitica l C

Your advertising



This will permit us
greatest amount
.Please do not ask us t
We desire only to se
equally


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a'


12 lead in game one, only to
have Palmetto come roaring
back to win 25-21. The Lady
Tigers won the second game
25-15. The game was close
until the 15-all mark, when
Palmetto went on a run to close
it out. Palmetto also won game
three, 25-17, despite good
Townsend serving.
Other varsity girls, besides
the senior trio of Townsend,
Robertson and Naomi Alvara-
do, are juniors Chelsey Steed-
ley and Marisa Shivers, and
sophs Lacey Garza, Vanessa
Garza, Yesenia Vargas, Ali
Holle and Eryn Mahoney.
Playing for the Hardee JV are
Alejandra Rodriguez, Deserea
Newcomb, Hannah Jacobs,
Lacresha Carlton, Daishia
Blandin, Sarah Beyers, Kaila
White, Summer Palmer,
Sabrina Hernandez, Meghan
Graham, Cynthia Garcia,
Angelica Flores and Maria
Anselmo.



andidates!
deadline is each



to give your ad the
it of attention.
o make an exception.
serve all candidates
& well.
The Herald-Advocate
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8A The Herald-Advocate, October 16. 2008


Cancer Society Hosts


Annual Awards Dinner


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
The local unit of the American Cancer Society held its annual awards dinner last week
at the Java Cafe. Shown (from left) are Charlie Potter, who won the Courage Award In
his fight against prostate cancer; unit Executive Director Denise Benavides holding the
Chairman's Cup for fund-raising; and Ken Weis, who won the Hope Award for his pub-
licity work for the American Cancer Society and for his personal fight against a rare
form of cancer. The Hardee unit this year raised $126,267, well above the $94,000 goal.


Local Cancer Society Board members include Ossie Johnson, Sylvia Parker," Sue
Conner and Lauren Canary (in front row), and Sharon Corbett, Ray Gill and Vanessa
Hernandez (in back row).
;TMPFTM 73M


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation recently set new
limits for the harvest of fresh-
water turtles.
The new rule limits the har-
vest of native Florida freshwa-
ter turtles to five per day.
However, fishermen with a
commercial license are allowed
to harvest 20 Florida soft-shell
turtles per day.
The new rules have been
passed to protect freshwater tur-
tle populations while the FWC
develops a long-term compre-
hensive strategy for sustainable
use of amphibian and reptile
populations.
The new rules limit the num-
ber of turtles that may be taken
from the wild, not from turtle
farms or other aquaculture
facilities.
No changes have been made
to the number of turtles people
may possess; the existing limits
still apply. Furthermore, rules
about selling or buying turtles
also have not changed.
"With the newly approved


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
lardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.
iV1p


rule in place protecting fresh-
water turtles, we will continue
to develop a long-term strategy
for the management and conser-
vation of Florida's amphibian
and reptile species," said Bill
Turner, an FWC amphibian and
reptile specialist. "We expect
to bring the strategy for fresh-
water turtles back to the
Commission in one year."
Increased demand for fresh-
water turtles nationally and
internationally caused the FWC
to begin to evaluate the man-


agement of these species to en-
sure the populations aren't
over-exploited. Alabama, Mich-
igan, Maryland, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina, Tennessee
and Texas recently restricted
their turtle harvests, which may
cause turtle harvesters from
those states to focus on Florida,
Turner said.
The new rules are interim
measures while the FWC works
diligently on a long-term strate-
gy for conservation of these
species.


More board members of the Hardee Unit of the American Cancer Society include
Caroline Mackay, Donna Alexy, Cindy Bone, Lavonda Rogers and Diane Smith (in front
row), and Ken Weis, Joe Mackay and Sheila Johns (in back row).


iServing You For A Change
~of
E DAVID
DURASTANTI
'- for
Superintendent of Schools
www.ForOurKidsFuture.com
CONSERVATIVE
"Mr. D" PROVENEADR mber 4th 2008
Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by David D. Durastanti Campaign Account, Approved by David D. Durstarti,
Republican, Chet Huddleston, Campaign Treasurer
10ig l.T


New Rule Limits


Turtle Harvests


10 HOURS A
MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak
up for a child. Volunteer to
be a Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)






October 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


FORGET FOOTBALL, IT'S HUNTING SEASON!
Football season's in full swing, and the 2008-09 hunting sea-
son's starting to crank up.
Archery season's been going on in most of the state, and in this
column I want to talk about three other seasons about to start:
Scrossbow, muzzleloading gun and the first phase of dove.
Crossbow season occurs between archery and muzzleloading
gun seasons in the South and Central hunting zones, lasting five
days: Oct. 6-10 and Oct. 20-24, respectively. In the Northwest
zone, it comes in later, on the Monday after Thanksgiving and lasts
one week, Dec. 1-7.
This season's for any hunter who'd like to use a crossbow or
continue using a bow on private lands. This is not just for disabled
hunters. Crossbow season doesn't apply to wildlife management
areas (WMAs), however.
The most common game to take during crossbow season will
,be deer and wild hog. Only bucks may be taken, and one antler
must be at least five inches long above the hairline. The daily bag
limit on antlered deer is two. Wild hogs considered livestock on
private lands may, with landowner permission, be hunted year-
round with no bag or size limits.
It's also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during
crossbow season. Only one may be taken per day, and there's a
two-bird fall-season limit. But you can't hunt turkeys in Holmes
County during the fall and winter.
Crossbows and bows must have a minimum draw weight of 35
pounds, and hand-held releases on bows are permitted. For hunting
deer, hog and turkey, broadheads must have at least two sharpened
edges with a minimum width of 7/8 inch.
Legal shooting hours are a half-hour before sunrise to a half-
hour after sunset. Except for turkeys, hunters may take resident
game over feed such as corn on private lands.
Some things you can't do during crossbow season include
'hunting deer, hog or turkey with dogs, using explosive or drug-
injecting arrows, and possessing firearms.
Immediately following the close of crossbow season in the
South and Central hunting zones is the beginning of muzzleloading
gun season. Season dates run Oct. 11-19 and Oct. 25-Nov. 2,
respectively. Muzzleloading season comes in later in the Northwest
zone and runs Nov. 21-23.
During muzzleloading season, bows and crossbows are legal
methods of taking game on private lands, along with muzzleload-
ers. On WMAs, only muzzleloaders may be used.

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The month of April gets its name from the Latin aperire, mean-
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Legal shooting hours are the same for muzzleloading gun sea-
son as crossbow season. And, legal game, including bag limits and
prohibited methods for taking game, also are the same as crossbow
season. Bag limits and antler/size restrictions for game on WMAs
can differ, so check the specifics of the area before you hunt.
For hunting deer, muzzleloaders firing single bullets must be
at least .40-caliber. Guns firing two or more balls must be 20-gauge
or larger. You may not use muzzleloaders with self-contained car-
tridge ammunition capabilities or possess modern firearms during
muzzleloading gun season.
The first phase of the mourning- and white-winged dove sea-
son ends Oct. 27 statewide. Shooting hours during this first phase
are noon to sunset, and there's a new, 15-bird daily bag limit this
year.
The only firearm you're allowed to hunt doves with is a shot-
gun, but you can't use one larger than a 10-gauge. Shotguns must
be plugged to a three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber com-
bined).
You may hunt doves over an agricultural field, as long as the
crop's been planted as part of regular agricultural practices.
However, it's against the law to scatter agricultural products over
an area for the purpose of baiting.
Some things you can't do while dove hunting are using rifles,
pistols or crossbows; shooting from a moving vehicle; or herding
or driving doves with a vehicle.
In addition to a Florida hunting license, you'll need a $5 cross-
bow permit to hunt during crossbow season. A $5 muzzleloading
gun permit is needed to hunt during muzzleloader season, and
you'll need a no-cost migratory bird permit if you're going to hunt
doves. If you hunt on a WMA, you must have a management area
permit that costs $26.50.
All are available at county tax collectors' offices or license
agents or by calling toll-free 1-888-Hunt-Florida or clicking
www.wildlifelicense.com.
So if you're going after that monster buck during the crossbow
and muzzleloading gun seasons or dove hunting with friends and
family, I hope I've helped explain the rules and regulations on
some of Florida's hunting seasons.
Tony Young is a media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony. Young@FWC.com.


MONDAY. OCT. 20
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Civic Center, 3210 U.S.
17 South, Zolfo Springs, 6
p.m.
VWauchula City Commis-
sion, special meeting on
power adjustment formula,
City Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 5 p.m.
THURSDAY. OCT. 23
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular and zoning
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex 1, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 200 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


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Dove Limit Raised


When Florida's first phase of
the mourning dove season
opens Saturday, hunters will
find an unexpected bonus an
increase in the bag limit from
12 to 15 birds.
The daily bag limit is a com-
bined bag limit and applies to
both mourning doves and
white-winged doves.
Prior to the 2008 hunting sea-
son, states had the option of
going with a higher bag limit
but fewer days of hunting. This
year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service said states could in-
crease bag limits without giving
up hunting days.
Florida's three-phase dove
season runs 72 days. This year
it's Oct. 4-27; Nov. 15-30; and
Dec. 13 Jan. 11, 2009.
Hunting during the first phase
is legal from noon to sunset.
Hunting is allowed during the
latter two phases from 30 min-
utes before sunrise to sunset.
Kurt Hodges, Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) assistant
small game coordinator, said
states within the service's Dove
Eastern Management Unit are
collecting many types of data to
ensure dove populations remain
unhindered by the bag limit
increase.
"Some states are doing things


a little different, but here in
Florida, we've been banding
doves since 2003. We've band-
ed approximately 6,000 birds
during the summer months,"
Hodges said. "If hunters kill a
banded bird, there's inform4-
tion on the band that tells them
where to report the band infor-
mation.
"Also, we're continuing with
our 'call count surveys,' and the
service will be asking randomly
selected hunters to provide
wings so they can be aged. The
other significant source of data
comes from the Harvest
Information Program survey,
which is a no-cost program,
required for all migratory bird
hunters."
Hodges said if trends show
that dove numbers decline sig-
nificantly in the future for any
reason, there are built-in trig-
gers in the data-collection sys-
tem that will signal both state
and federal wildlife managers
that changes are needed.
The 2008-2009 migratory
bird regulations for dove, snipe,
woodcock, rail, moorhen, crow
and early waterfowl seasons
may be obtained by contacting
the FWC's regional offices, or
may be viewed online at
MyFWC.com/hunting/pdf/2008
-2009MigratoryBrochure.pdf.


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10A The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


New Laws Approved


Attorney General Bill
McCollum has announced that
several laws which greatly en-
hance public safety and con-
sumer protection for Floridians,
and which he personally cham-
pioned during the Spring Legis-
lative Session, took effect Oct.
1.
"The safety and security of
Floridians is my top priority,
and these four new laws will
make an important difference in
the lives of our citizens,"
McCollum said. "These laws
will help protect Florida's fami-
lies and businesses from a wide
range of dangers including vio-
lent gangs, child pornographers,
unsafe products and shady fore-
closure rescue companies."
New laws taking effect
include:
1.) Gang Legislation (HB
43): This comprehensive law
contains provisions that target
gang kingpins by making it a
first-degree felony punishable
by life imprisonment for direct-
ing criminal gang-related activ-
ity; strengthen witness protec-
tion laws by using the underly-
ing criminal act as the starting
benchmark for tampering and
harassment penalties; and make
it a first-degree felony punish-
able by life imprisonment for a
gang member who is also a con-
victed felon to be in possession
:f a firearm.
Many elements of this new
law were based on recommen-
dations of the 2007-08 State-
wide Grand Jury.


The law also creates the
Coordinating Council on Crimi-
nal Gang Reduction Strategies,
chaired by the Attorney Gener-
al, which is developing a state-
wide strategy to reduce gangs
and coordinate its implementa-
tion with state and local agen-
cies. The legislation was spon-
sored by Sen. Jeff Atwater (R-
Palm Beach Gardens) and Rep.
William Snyder (R-Stuart).
2.) Exploited Children's
Rights Act (SB 1442): This law
allows victims of Florida-based
child pornography to seek civil
remedies of no less than
$150,000 against individuals
who download or distribute
their images, and allows the
Attorney General's office to
pursue these cases on behalf of
the victims at the victims'
requests.
The law also gives victims of
child pornography a voice in
state court by allowing them to
submit victim impact state-
ments in cases where their
images of sexual abuse were
downloaded. The legislation
was sponsored by Sen. Paula
Dockery (R-Lakeland) and
Rep. David Rivera (R-Miami).
3.) Foreclosure Fraud Pro-
tection Act (HB 643): This law
protects and educates con-
sumers of their rights when they
are signing a contract with a
foreclosure rescue entity and
includes additional protections
for homeowners who face fore-
closure.
Key provisions of the bill


include the creation of a three-
day right-of-cancellation period
and the requirement that fore-
closure rescuers include in
large, bold font notification
to homeowners of this right of
cancellation on the contract.
The contract must also in-
clude a recommendation that
the homeowner contact his or
her lender or mortgage service
prior to signing the agreement,
and it must inform the home-
owner that the consultant is pro-
hibited from accepting any
form of payment until all ser-
vices are completed.
Furthermore, the law pro-
vides enhanced remedies for
consumers under Chapter 501,
Florida Statutes. The legislation
was sponsored by Sen. Mike
Fasano (R- New Port Richey)
and Rep. Clay Ford (R-Pensa-
cola).
4.) Anti-Counterfeiting Act
(HB 1417): This law targets
those who manufacture, distrib-
ute or possess counterfeit goods
with the intent to sell them.
Key provisions of the bill
include enhanced penalties for
those whose counterfeited
goods cause bodily injury, seri-
ous bodily injury or death and a
tiered penalty system based on
the quantity or the total retail
value of counterfeit goods
knowingly manufactured, pos-
sessed or sold. The legislation
was sponsored by Sen. Alex
Diaz de la Portilla (R-Miami)
and Rep. Andy Gardiner (R-
Orlando).


Five Environmental Questions Never Asked


Simple "green" living ideas
re everywhere-from billboards
o T-shirts-but there are less
ommon, yet equally important,
environmental issues.
1. Whaj is the impact of
omposting?
Composting, the process of
onverting organic materials
nto soil, is a simple way to
educe garbage by one-third
nd preserve living organisms.
According to Com posters.com,
ompostable waste makes up 30
percent of garbage in the United
States.
In 1999, the EPA recorded
hat 64 million tons of materials
were saved from landfills by
omposting and recycling.
Now, just think how much
waste can be saved if compost-
ng becomes as common as
recycling. Web sites such as
Compost.org provide easy-to-
se home-composting guides.
Did you know tea bags, coffee
rounds and corn husks can be
omposted?
2 Can print cartridges be
ecycled?
Yes. In fact, many manufac-
urers offer print cartridge recy-
ling free of charge. Many com-
anies that refill or remanufac-
ure print cartridges are private
nd not required to disclose
nd-of-life recycling processes.
A Gartner Research study
tated: "While the use of reman-
factured. supplies can reduce
initial acquisition costs and pre-
ent cartridges [from] going to

I always prefer to believe the
best of everybody; it saves so
much trouble.


landfills, organizations must
understand that many remanu-
facturers do not have proper
disposal practices, and their
efforts may not be environmen-
tally sound."
No matter where you buy
print cartridges, be sure to
research the company's recy-
cling policies and standards.
3. Paper or Plastic?
Many people know that plas-
tic is harmful to the environ-
ment. Recently, the city of San
Francisco implemented a ban
on using non-recyclable plastic
bags in grocery stores, saving
nearly 5 million bags a month
from landfill.
Plastic bags are not the only
villain; paper bags require more
than double the amount of ener-
gy to manufacture and transport
than plastic bags, according to
the Environmental Literacy
Council. The trend is catching
on, and cities across the nation,
such as Seattle, are working
towards "green" fees for dispos-
able bags and encouraging the
use of reusable bags in grocery
stores.
4. Is it important to pur-
chase organic cleaners?
Harmful pollutants in clean-
ers put people at risk in their
homes and negatively effect
water and air quality. Organic
cleaners have less toxicity, low
volatile organic compounds
(VOCs) and are biodegradable.
According to the EPA, clean-
ers with high VOC content con-

Wherever there is a human
being, there is an opportunity
for a kindness.


tribute to smog formation.
Ingredients containing phos-
phorus or nitrogen evaporate
into the air and pollute bodies
of water, affecting numerous
wildlife species.
It's important to think about
organic cleaners when cleaning
a home but also when searching
for professional cleaning serv-
ices such as housekeepers, car
detailing and dry cleaning.
5. How do I know what
can be recycled?
Understanding what can and
cannot be recycled is a signifi-
cant step toward helping the
environment.
Many people spend 40 hours
a week sitting at a desk, where
throwing away paper becomes
habitual. Sticky notes can be
recycled; tissues cannot. Food
wrappers or soiled products
cannot be recycled.
Magazines, soda cans, juice
bottles (both plastic and glass)
and even most lotion bottles can
be recycled. You may be sur-
prised what can be recycled,
even things without a recycle
symbol can sometimes be recy-
cled, such as dry cleaning wire
hangers and worn-out tennis
shoes.
Web sites such as World.org
provide simple recycling-edu-
cation tools. Keep a "recycle
only" container at your desk for
one month. You may be sur-
prised at how many workplace
items are recyclable.
You can learn more online at
EPA.gov and Compost.org.

Kindness is the language
which the deaf can hear and
the blind can see.


VOTE


David Durastanti




4 Superintendent of


Schools

www.ForOurKidsFuture.com
"Mr. D"

If You Want:
Increased graduation rates "
Increased number of vocational courses J_
Increased alternative education classes Oct. 20 Nov. 1
Restoration of the public trust Oct. 2 Nov. 1
Fair and equal treatment for all Monday-Saturday
Positive Change Early Voting





N Pd. Pol. Ad., Paid for by Davd D. Durstanti Campaign Account, Approved by Daid D. DurastaUt,
Republican, Chet Huddleston, Campaign Treasurer
10:16p


Change
Do-it-yourself (DIY) enthu-
siasts know to seek advice from
friends, hardware store owners
and television to learn how to
make home improvements. But
Web sites provide another
option with even more cus-
tomized designs and "how-to"
advice.
The Internet is an increasing-
ly important resource for the
DIY builder, according to a
report by the Pew Internet &
American Life Project. The
report found that 55 percent of
adult Internet users look for
DIY or how-to project informa-
tion online.
In many cases, these home-
owners add outdoor living
spaces, of which decks are one
of the most versatile outdoor
additions, and, with guidance
and knowledgeable searching,
the Internet makes deck design
the work of an index finger.
In one morning, a DIY enthusi-
ast can research and design a
custom project, read personal
product reviews and watch
instructional videos by profes-
sional builders.
Custom Design
Some home improvement DIY
sites focus on specific projects,
such as decks or outdoor
kitchens, but the sites can also
be expansive, covering every
topic a DIY enthusiast can
imagine.
For homeowners interested
in using one of the most popular
types of lumber for decks,
Western Red Cedar Lumber
Association's Web site hosts
"Deck Designer" (www.cedar-
decking.org/deckdesigner).
Users select and modify sev-
eral deck shapes, customizing
the design with railings, stairs
and even additional levels.
Once the deck is complete,
users will receive a three-


Your


Livil


dimensional model of the
design, lists of materials and
DIY tips. Deck Designer also
provides the nearest Western
red cedar suppliers and allows
the user to save the design.
Other sites include Remod-
eling Center (www.remodeling-
center. cor), which has sec-
tions for remodeling all rooms
of the house, including the out-
door living space. Each section
of the Web site gives planning
advice, product reviews and
photo galleries of other.people's
projects.
Doityourself.com expands
the DIY horizon even more by
including advice and instruc-
tions for the garden and out-
doors, painting and decorating,
and even electrical and plumb-
ing advice.
Check for the online DIY
design sites with local building
code requirements, such as the
Western Red Cedar Lumber
Association's Deck Designer, to
ensure that the design meets
specific codes for a geographic
area to create virtual plans. So a
DIY builder designing at home
still has the backing of knowl-
edgeable, expert guides.
Expert Advice
Some sites provide real-time
interactive opportunities with
expert builders and architects,
and sites often include tips that
will help the user avoid com-
mon mistakes.
For example, in addition to
the Deck Designer tool, the
Western Red Cedar Lumber
Association's Web site
(www.wrcla.org) features an
interactive "Ask Mr. Cedar"
function.
Users can type a question to
Mr. Cedar, a fourth-generation
lumberman, and he responds
with the answers. The site even
has instructional videos con-


ng Space
ducted by Mr. Cedar posted
online (http://wrcla.-org/speci-
ficationsandpublications/diy
_videos/default.htm)
For detailed visual instruc-
tions, users can view one of the
many online DIY videos that
walk step by step through
home-improvement projects.
For example, Bob Vila's Web
site (www.bobvila.com) con-
tains instructional videos, clips
from his show and a blog for
DIY builders to discuss projects
and favorite materials. The site
also includes a feature to calcu-
late quantity and cost of materi-
als.
DIY 2.0
An aggregate site of informa-
tional articles is wikihow.com.
It is an offshoot of the popular
Wikipedia site, a user-generated
encyclopedia that uses "wikis"
to enable users to continually
edit and modify articles. The
wikiHow site contains over
35,000 articles on subjects
ranging from home and garden
to computers to relationships.
DIY users are forming new
groups and communities daily
to share with people who have
similar interests. The HGTV
site features a message board on
which anyone can post ques-
tions, answers and home-
improvement experiences.
Similar online communities
have formed on Web sites of
home-improvement companies,
as well as by independent DIY
enthusiasts.
So go ahead, plug into the
online home-improvement
community before drawing,
cutting or nailing. DIY enthusi-
asts who start by looking for a
unique design may end up find-
ing an online interactive com-
munity with which to share
home-improvement interests
and tips.


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Using Cyberspace To






October 16, 2008. The Herald-Advocate 11A


WEATHER SUMMARY
Heavy rains provided much needed relief in the Panhandle last
week. Showers between one and two inches were reported in all
areas of the State with the most precipitation received in the north-
ern and central Peninsulas. Franklin County, 3.31 inches and Lake
County, 4.44 inches. Daytime temperatures warmed up to the 80s
and.90s with lows in the 60s and 70s. Major cities averaged highs
in the 80s and 90s with lows in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.
FIELD utOPS
Peanut condition was rated 3 percent poor, 26 percent fair, 57
percent good, and 14 percent excellent. Peanut digging is 65 per-
:ent complete, compared with 51 percent last year, and a five year
average progress of 58 percent. Peanut harvest was mostly com-
plete in Santa Rosa County. Cotton harvest was underway in
Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, and Washington counties. Cool night tem-
peratures slowed peanut maturity in Washington, Columbia, and
Gilchrist counties. Hay harvest was very active in the northern
areas of the State with Calhoun County reporting second and third
cuttings last week. Planting of small grains was delayed by dry
soils in some areas. Topsoil moisture was mostly adequate in all
areas. Subsoil was mostly adequate in the northern, central, and
southern Peninsulas but short in the Big Bend.
MoisturTopsoil Subsoil
Rating This Last Last This Last Last
week week year week week Year
Percent
Very short 4 7 11 4 6 13
Short 26 34 21 26 23 21
Adequate 58 48 63 58 60 65
Surplus 12 11 5 12 11 1
VEGETABLES
Growers continued to prepare land and plant vegetables.
Cabbage planting continued in Flagler and St. Johns counties. Root
rot was reported on a few vegetables in Hernando County, but most
looked good. Cucumbers were harvested in St. Johns County.
Squash harvesting began in Bradford County. Other vegetables
marketed last week were eggplant, okra, and tomatoes.
LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
Cool season forage planting was in progress, but cooler nights
and drought were limiting grass growth. In the Panhandle and
northern areas, pasture condition ranged from fair to excellent,
with most in fair condition. Growing conditions were good for
planting winter small grains and clover for grazing. However, for-
age planting in Walton County was held up by lack of adequate soil
moisture. Showers over the weekend encouraged planting of small
grains for forage. Summer pasture has rapidly declined in quality
and quantity. Cattle condition was mostly good. In the central
areas, pasture ranged from very poor to good. Rains during the past
week in Osceola County have resulted in some flooded or extreme-
ly wet pastures and have hurt forage recovery. In Orange County,
the still flooded pastures has caused hoof problems. Rain in areas
of Sumter County turned pastures green. In the southwest areas,
pasture condition was fair to excellent with most in good condition.
Cattle condition was poor to good. Statewide, cattle condition was
poor to excellent with most in good condition.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This I Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 0 1 2 5
Poor 1 1 10, 10
Fair 30 35 35 45
Good 65 55 50 35
Excellent .. 4 8 3 5
t .CITRUS
SOn'average, temperatures were warmer than normal in citrus-
producing counties. Highs were in the upper 80s to lower 90s in all
areas. Lows dropped to the 60s and 70s during the evenings. A
number of quick moving heavy thunderstorms brought rainfall to



Yard Sale Benefits

Gregg White Family


A yard sale will be held this
Friday, beginning at 8 a.m., and
Saturday, from 10 a.m. until 3
p.m., to benefit the Gregg
"Coach" White family. There
will also be a silent auction on
Saturday.
The yard sale will contain
personal items of White's, such
as clothing and Harley
Davidson memorabilia. The
money from the yard sale will
immediately go toward his
three daughters' living expens-
es.


The silent auction will in-
clude White's truck, boat, lawn-
mower and trailer. The money
made from the auction will be
used to pay off the debt owed
on each piece sold, and the re-
maining monies will be placed
in a trust fund for White's
daughters.
Both the yard sale and silent
auction will be at the home of
Debbie and Keith McNabb at
4075 E. Main St. in Wauchula.
White was killed in a motor-
cycle crash on July 21.


The first commercially successful steamboat was Robert
Fulton's Clermont, built in 1807.
One person can take care of up to 200 cattle.


-- TERRY


Elect ATCHLEY
for
County Commissioner District 3
1035 Knollwood Circle Res: 863.773.0882
Wauchula, Florida 33873 Cell: 863.781.9402
Political Advertisement paid for and approved by 10:16p
Terry Atchley, Democrat, for County Commissioner, District 3


the northern, eastern, and central growing areas. Lake Alfred had
almost three inches of rainfall; Apopka and Ft. Pierce had over two
inches. The new crop fruit set was variable, with higher than aver-
age fruit sets on early oranges and early tangerines, and lower than
average fruit sets on later varieties. Maturity levels on early and
late oranges indicated the crop was ahead of recent historical aver-
ages. Grove activity included limited irrigating, herbiciding, and
mowing. Colored grapefruit were showing color break in the east-
ern and southern regions. Scouting for canker and greening by
I Estimated Boxes Harvested Week Ended


growers and caretakers continues. Most of the packinghouses have
opened and have begun shipping fruit. Only two large processing
plants have begun running fruit in small quantities. Varieties being
packed included early oranges (Navels, Ambersweet, and
Hamlins), white and colored grapefruit, and Fallglo tangerines.


Crop Sep 28 Oct05 Oct 12 .
In thousands of 1.3/5 bushel boxes
Early and Mid oranges 19 35 39
Navel oranges 27 46 58 CONSERVATIVE
Grapefruit 34 71 159 "Mr. 0 PROVEN LEADER
Sunbursttangerines 1 0 0
Fallglo tangerines 32 66 81


I7-


Polk County, Highlands County


*Information obtained fromthe Florida Department of Law Enforcement annual 2007 Uniform Crime Report.
Paid Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Roger V. Clark Republican for Sheriff Campaign.


- jChristine i-p s



For Congress


I spent 40 years as a banker helping families and small businesses. I'm running for
Congress in the 13th District to help you and your family in these tough economic times.


As your next Member of Congress, I will:

Promote job creation.

Help homeowners facing foreclosure.

Fight for affordable health care.

Invest in education.

Protect Social Security and Medicare for
our seniors.

Work to balance the budget in
Washington.

Restore our economic strength with tax
relief for families.

Work to end the war in Iraq and keep our
promises to veterans and their families.

And work for an energy policy that
protects our environment and creates jobs.


10:16p


DeSoto County, Manatee County '

etc., etc.,


What do these Counties have in common?

*They have a lower crime rate than Hardee County!



Can we do better? Yes !



Do we have the courage to change? Yes!


Elect


^ Roger V. Clark
for


SHERIFF .


"Your FIRST Choice for SHERIFF"

Endorsed by the Hardee County Republican Party


Elect Experienced
Walter B., Jr.
SB Hard-Working

Knowledgeable
L Honest
f -


I 1J
County Commissioner

District 5'


* Professional

* Leader


I .Paid Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Walter B. Olliff, Jr., Republican for County Commission District 5 1:16


It's time for a change. We need leadership and accountability in Washington. No one
will work harder for you and your family than 1 will.
I ask for your vote in this election.
Christine Jennings for Congress PO Box 49136 Sarasota, FL 34230 941-366-8121 wsww.CshriF.tinwejnning.1.i08..o~
Paid lor and authorized hy Jennings 2008(





10:16p


7FSFn I: %.-


k






12A The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


Inspiration Point
By Rick Leland '
Pastor & Columnist Pr ..

THE MILLIONAIRE'S DAUGHTER
The millionaire's 4-year-old daughter I had never seen her
before. Now, there she was just yards up the beach.
Brisk wind held seagulls in near mid-air suspension over blue
sky touching blue water. But my attention was focused on the mil-
lionaire's daughter. And her father.
I had my camera. I wanted a picture. But a camera could not
adequately preserve the scene. A few degrees cooler than playing-
on-the-beach weather, they frolicked exuberantly on an abandoned
expanse of sand. So engaged with each other, I doubt they noticed
me.
They zoomed a toy yellow front-end loader around a freshly
created sandcastle. If their laughs and hugs were the loader's fuel,
it would run forever.
I stood there lost in my thought world. My mind grabbed
images of several under-nurtured kids I care about.
With emotions continuing to ping pong, I walked toward the
man. A stranger, I extended my hand, "You must be a millionaire."
He replied, "I'm not a millionaire."
He didn't know my brain was contexting our conversation
through the words of Jesus. "For what does it profit a man, what
does he benefit, if he gains the whole world, and yet forfeits his
soul." And along that gain-the-whole-world path, what else will be
traded in for the allurement? Maybe a 4-year-old daughter?
"You're doing what's important," I said. "In my eyes you're a
millionaire."
Our concluding 25-second conversation gave me zero clues to
the "millionaire's" financial status. Then, feeling compelled, I
placed my hand on his shoulder: "Bless you."
That same hand extends to all who properly nurture the chil-
dren in their lives: "God bless you."
If you do not? Change. Today can be your day to become a
millionaire.
Rick Leland, pastor of The Free Church, is a resident of Michigan
who holds a degree in Christian ministry and has served a two-
year apprenticeship with the Jerry Jenkins Christian Writers Guild.
His favorite Bible verse comes from 1 John 1:4, "These things we
write that our joy may be complete." His column is published in
nearly 150 newspapers nationwide.


Wauchula Police Department 'Superior'


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's the only fully accredited
law enforcement agency in the
county.
The Wauchula Police Depart-
ment has once again received
its accreditation, this time with
superior ratings.
For Wauchula Police Chief
William Beattie, it never gets
old. Since he became the top
man in Wauchula law enforce-
ment in August 1999, Beattie
has overseen many changes and
improvements, including relo-
cating the department in 2004
from its small, cramped Eighth
Avenue station to the larger
quarters on South Seventh
Avenue able to accommodate
the two dozen employees.
One of the most notable
achievements is the continued
department accreditation,
which he describes as "a team
effort."
Beattie, Capt. Thomas Harris


and Maria Rojas-Quinn trav-
eled to Crystal River last week
to present its bid for on-going
accreditation to the 14-member
Commission for Law Enforce-
ment Accreditation conference.
There, they answered questions
about the department, a follow-
up to the three-day visit by an
accreditation committee in July.
When the interviews were
over, the trio was presented
with the department's newest
certificate. It had successfully
met all the 250 standards in 39
areas of police efficiency and
professionalism.
"They've done a tremendous
job. It's not just getting by.
Even larger departments with
all their resources have a hard
time getting accredited. It takes
dedication, thoroughness, atten-
tion to detail to get this achieve-
ment. It is a milestone any
agency would be glad to
achieve," said City Manager
Rick\Giroux at Monday even-


ing's City Commission meeting
where the award certificate was
presented to the commission.
The department received its
first accreditation in 1999, the
first in the county to receive
"this distinguished honor" and
the only one to keep it renewed.
Beattie attributes that to the
hard work of Harris and accred-
itation manager Rojas-Quinn in
making sure all the information
is available daily to keep record
of the standards met.
When the accreditation team
visited the Wauchula depart-
ment July 22-23 for its on-site
assessment, they reviewed
many records that show the
department in compliance with
all applicable standards. They
held interviews with various
members of the department and
rode along with patrol officers,
observing the day-to-day opera-
tions of the department.
Team leader Lori Collins stat-
ed in her final assessment


report," the Wauchula Police
Department proudly holds the
title of being the first law
enforcement agency in the
county to receive state accredi-
tation. During the assessment, it
was apparent that Chief Beattie
and all the department members
are truly dedicated to the
Accreditation process."
Accompanying Collins, who
is with the Pasco County
Sheriff's Office, during the
three-day visit were Lt. Rick
Hawthorn of the Gulf Breeze
Police Department and Sgt.
Diana Blackledge of the Palm
Bay Police Department.
At last week's conference,
commissioners there praised the
local department. Osceola
County Sheriff Bob Hansell
said the Wauchula achievement
is an exemplary agency to other
small agencies that are striving
to achieve accreditation.


COURTESY PHOTO
A Wauchula Police Department trio was pleased when their interview resulted in a superior rating for re-accredita-
tion for the local law enforcement office. Receiving the plaque of approval are (from left) accreditation manager
Maria Rojas-Quinn, Capt. Thomas Harris and Chief William Beattie. Presenting it is Chief Peter Paulding of the Gulf
Breeze Police Department, chairman for the committee for the Florida Commission for Law Enforcement
Accreditation, along with Sandra Rojas, Wauchula victim's advocate specialist, and Peg Grant, FCLEA executive
director.


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PAGE ONE


Wildcats Earn Rest Break


Beat Sebring 57-51 In Overtime


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It took well over three hours,
930 yards, eight turnovers, and
108 points.
In the end, the Hardee Wild-
cats and Sebring Blue Streaks
gathered in mid-field for prayer.
Players from each team con-
gratulated each other on a game
well-played.
The Wildcats were behind,
ahead, tied and, finally won
Friday night's marathon game
against the district rival, deter-
mined Streaks.
The Wildcats have a bye
week, then play at Braden
River on Oct. 24, are home for a
visit from Cape Coral on Oct.
31, travel to arch-rival DeSoto
on Nov. 7 and end the season
with Senior Night festivities in
a home game against Ridge
Community on Nov. 14.
Friday night's game was ded-
icated to the late Leon Schrader,
a teacher, coach, School Board
member and beloved member
of the community.
"It was a total team effort,"
said an exhausted but pleased
Head Coach Tim Price after
Friday's game finally ended. He
gave his players and fellow
coaches the long weekend off
as school was closed on
Monday.
"Come back ready to work. If
we beat Braden River we are in
the playoffs," he told his weary
crew. "You faced a lot of adver-
sity and kept giving back. You
didn't lay down and played
hard," Price told them.
"We feel we can play with
anybody when we're hitting on
all cyclinders. Every player had
some good and some not so
good plays," he commented
afterward.
"We wanted to know what we
- -had-to.do, -so we gave Sebring
first crack in overtime. Martin
(Vega), the kicker pulled his
hamstring on his last kick in the
game and we didn't want to use
him if we didn't have to. Logan
Thomas made some great plays.
The defense did extremely well
and Ezayi (Youyoute) got the
final score," ended Price.
Youyoute, the junior quarter-
back, had 18 carries for 298
yards and five TDs., countering
the 28 carries for 145 yards and
an eight-yard catch of Streak
junior Daniel Burnett and
catches of senior Zack Howard
and soph Devin Clarke.
And, although Youyoute and
Burnett had the heavy load, it
was the contributions of other
players that made the game.
Both offensively and defensive-
ly, both squads left it all on the
field.
The game began in Sebring's
favor. Hardee won the coin toss
and deferred to the second half.
Vega, in his unique yellow foot-
ware, kicked off to Burnett,
who returned the ball to the 20-
yard line. Howard got a first
down with a 12-yard gain, but a
David Newcomb stop forced a
punt.
On the punt, soph Scott
Donaldson made a rare muff
and Sebring recovered the ball
on the Hardee 24. Four carries
by Burnett and the Blue Streaks
put the first points on the board.
A fake punt and toss from


Kelsheem White covers
half the distance to the
goal line in the overtime
Kansas tie-breaker, setting
up the winning touchdown.


Burnett to Jake Trussell for the
two-point conversion gave the
Streaks an 8-0 lead.
It took two plays for Hardee
to respond. After Kelsheem
White got a 34-yard runback,
Jake Mayer had a short run.
Then Youyoute faked to Mayer,
took off and kept running, 65
yards down the sideline for the
score. The Vega kick was good.
It was 8-7.
On the Sebring kickoff re-
turn, a fumble gave the ball
back to Hardee. Newcomb was
glad to fall on it for the recovery
on the Streak 14. Youyoute
handed to Mayer who followed
the line into the end zone for the
score. With the PAT, it was 14-
8. Hardee had scored twice in
44 seconds.
Sebring got going again at its
20. Sophomore quarterback
Matt Grubb lateraled to Clarke
for a 40-yard gain into Wildcat
territory. On the next play,
Hardee got the ball back on a
Streak fumble, recovered by
Postene Louisjeune.
White got Hardee on the
move with a step through the
hole the line made for him and
went 22 yards before he was
stopped. A pitch to Antjuan
Jones netted 20 more yards. A
couple of misplays and Hardee
resorted to a 33-yard field goal
attempt, blocked by Sebring.
Ten seconds later Burnett
broke a couple of tackles and
ran 78 yards to score. With the
Buck Schroeder kick, it was a
15-14 Sebring lead.
Senior Brek McClenithan re-
turned the ensuing kickoff 22
yards. A fumble on the next
play was picked up by Streak
Kevin Wellborn, who went all
the way to the end zone. The
left-footed kick by Schroeder
went wide, but Sebring had
w.idened. its-lead 21-14.
Senior Nolan Neuhauser took
the short kick and went down
the sideline for 37 yards before
being forced out of bounds at
the Sebring 33. White gained 20
yards. Youyouote gained a yard,
then pitched to White for the
12-yard tally. Vega made it 21-
21.
And that's the way the first
quarter finally ended about a
minute later.
Early in the second stanza,
Sebring barely got a punt off
from its end zone. It took a
Streak roll out of bounds at the
Hardee 47. A play later,
Youyoute's pass for Carson
Davis was picked off. The
Streaks went backward and
were forced to punt.
Hardee got the ball on a
Donaldson fair catch at the
Streak 45. An encroachment
penalty on Sebring put the ball
at midfield. Mayer cut through
the line and pedaled 45 yards
before being stopped. He got
the next carry for the 5-yard
TD. Another kick made it 28-
21, back in the Wildcat's favor.
Lady Momentum swung
against the Streaks, who went
backward, facing a fourth-and-
25 when the water break was
called. After that, the punt was


nearly blocked and was caught
again by Donaldson at the Blue
Streak 33.
Youyoute circled left and
went out of bounds at the Blue
Streak 8-yard line. Runs by
White and Mayer gained a little
yardage. Youyoute followed the
blocks of Skylar Alden and cen-
ter Jordan Baker into the end
zone. Vega made it 35-21.
Sebring's next kickoff return
ended in a fumble, recovered by
Jones at the Sebring 17. Mayer
gained seven yards. The teams
exchanged penalties. Vega was
forced to try a 26-yard field
goal, which he nailed to made it
38-21.
There was still three minutes
left in the half, time for a pair of
scores. Burnett took the screen
pass from Grubb and went 50
yards. With a roughing-the-
passer penalty, Sebring was at
the Wildcat 12. Burnett went in
for the score. The Schroeder
kick made it a 38-28 game.
Not to be outdone, Hardee
responded. After a holding
penalty put Hardee back at its
18, the line made a hole for
Youyoute and he went through
it and raced 82 yards to score.
Vega made it 45-28.
There was still more action in
the final minute of the half,
which ended 45-28.
While the players rested and
regrouped, Homecoming festiv-
ities included the crowning of
class sweethearts, freshman
Taylor Bolin, sophomore
Daishia Blandin and junior
Chelsey Steedley. The five
Homecoming queen candidates
were presented. Chelsea Owens


was selected Lady In Waiting
and Lucy Ruiz was crowed the
2008 Homecoming Queen.
When the game resumed,
Hardee had first crack at the
football. White circled left past
a good Nick Battles block and
gained 18 yards. Mayer nearly
got another first down, coming
up one-half inch short. He
punched through on the next
play but the Wildcats then went
backward. Carson Davis got off
a 35-yard punt and Sebring
started at its 15.
See WILDCATS 11B


Passing Completions,
Attempts & Interceptions
Passing Yards
Rushing Attempts/Yards
Total Yards
Turnovers
First Downs
Penalties, Lost Yardage
SCORING BY QUARTER


HARDEE
SEBRING


HARDEE
0-4-1

0
49/515
515
5
14
16/102.5


SEBRING

15-30-1

250
35/165
415
3
11

15/97.5


21 24 6 0 6
21 7 8 15 0


Spors Sced~ue Oc. 16- Oc. 3


Lake Placid
Lake Placid
DeSoto
DeSoto


Away
HOME
HOME
HOME


Oct. 17 Open Date For Football
Oct. 20 HJHS Softball DeSoto HOME 5:00 p.m.
Oct. 21 HJHS Football DeSoto HOME 5:30 p.m.
Oct. 23 Swimming Lake Placid Away 5:00 p.m.
HJHS Softball Hill-Gustat Away 5:00 p.m.
Cross Country Lake Placid Away 5:00 p.m.
JV Football Lake Placid HOME 7:00 p.m.
Oct..24 Varsity Football Braden River Away 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 Volleyball Districts Braden River Away TBA
Oct. 28 Cross Country Clewiston Away 4:00 p.m.
HJHS Softball Avon Park HOME 5:00 p.m.


Oct. 30


Hardee Lakes
Okeechobee


IG inIa Ir


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HOME
Away


*


wu


Neuhofer

School Board District 3

The ONLY board member with children in

our schools.


I am committed to making our schools the

best they can be for your children and mine.


Political ,Advmiisem, Paid fr and Annnpro.ve hy Gina N,,, ( fe,, non-nartf . fr SchQ.ool Board D i4 a


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Commissioner
District 5

















VOTE
DALEJOHNSON


* Pea
* Pref

* Rur
* Pea
* Cur
* Cur
* Cur
* Cur
* Cur
* Curl
Paid P


I Believe That Results Show Who You Are

and

What You Do

ce River Electric Cooperative Board of Directors 22 years.
sident of Peace River Electric Coop. 2 terms
al Electric Executive Board in Tallahassee -18 years
ce River Valley Citrus Growers' Assn. Founding Director
rent President of Johnson Groves and Farm, Inc.
rent President of Treeair Cattle Company
rent Vice Chairman Wauchula Airport Authority
rent Vice Chairman First Baptist of Wauchula Deacon Board
rent Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners
rent County Commissioner District 5
political Advertisement by Dale Johnson Campaign. Approved by Dale Johnson (DEM).
10:16p


The Herald-Advocate
: (USPS 578.780)

Thursday, October 16, 2008


=57
= 51


Cross Country
HJHS Softball
Volleyball
JV Football


4:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6/7:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.


Cross Country
JV Football


4:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.


--


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2B The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008





-aHardee


Living-


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

THE KINGDOM OF GOD
Jesus said, "The kingdom of God is within you." Whatever did
He mean? ""
Most Christians have a keen awareness of this exterior world,
the one that we can touch, smell, taste and hear. They are immedi-
ately influenced by the happenings in this outer world: the weath-
er, illness, sports events, political and social events, things other
people say about them, loss or gain of money, moods, things that
happen to family and friends, newspaper articles on and on.
But the Bible teaches that there is another world that is going
on at the same time as this exterior world. This other life is the pri-
mary and most important life, but most are only dimly aware of it.
It is the life within.
This life seems mysterious to most. A "mystery" is something
that is hidden except to a few who are willing to pay the price. God
hides this life because He does not want it to be discovered by the
merely curious, the 'smart guys," the intellectuals, the proud and
those who want to get their hands on something that they can use
for their own advantage.
The religious "experts" write hundreds of books about Jesus
Christ but a little child can know more about the Lord than all these
authors. "Except ye become as this little child," said Jesus, "you
will not enter the kingdom of God" (Mark 10:15).


Mr. & Mrs. Steve Moore
Sara Beattie & Steven

Moore Exchange Vows


Sara Elaine Beattie became
the bride of Steven Matthew
Moore, both of Casselberry, at
Sombrero Beach in Marathon
Key on July 14.
The bride is the daughter of
John and Roberta Beattie of
Wauchula. The groom is the son
of Michael and Mary Moore of
Casselberry.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father. Assisting
her was matron of honor
Meredith Stallings Bolinski of
Norcross, Ga. The niece of the
bride, Drew Beattie, served as
flower girl.
The brother of the groom,
Doug Moore, served as best
man.
The groom is the grandson of
Edward and Dolores Bombalski
of Colorado Springs, Colo., and
Patricia Pakulski and the. late
Richard Pakulski of Natrona
Heights, Pa.
The bride is the granddaugh-
ter of Phyllis Beattie and the


late Walt Beattie of Wauchula
and Lillie Holt and the late
Reson Holt of Wauchula.
SThe bride is a 1996 honors
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School and earned her bache-
lor's degree in business admin-
istration from the University of
Central Florida in 1999. She is
also a 2006 honors graduate
Ultrasound Diagnostic School
in Jacksonville with a degree in
diagnostic medical sonography.
She is currently employed by
Drew Medical Inc. of Orlando
as an ultrasound technologist.
The groom is a 1994 graduate
of Lake Howell High School in
Winter Park and earned a bach-
elor's degree in computer engi-
neering from the University of
Central Florida in 2001. He is
employed by Lockheed Martin
of Orlando as a systems engi-
neer in the missile and fire con-
trol division.
The couple have made their
home in Casselberry.


The month of April gets its name from the Latin aperire, mean-
ing "to open," as do the flower buds that month.




S'3Just Stuff"

S133 E. Townsend St.
Wauchula
Tues. Fri. 10 am 5 pm
f Sat. -10 am- 2 pm
d_ New Items
Ball Gloves
Coca Cola Collectibles and Dolls -
soc10:9,16p Owner Bonnie Johns
wW- --mANW 4 -6C


_Q /





1102 S. 6th Avenue Wauchula 773-4466 1
M SERI&DJEEERT


PROPERTY PARAMEDICS A new paramedic has come
to help save residents of Hardee County. This paramedic, however,
will not rescue humans, but houses!
Local entrepreneur Robert Hinerman has taken over the role of
owner of the franchise PuroClean Property Restoration.
PuroClean first began in 2001 and is now the leader in proper-
ty damage mitigation. It has over 160 franchise offices throughout
the United States.
Hinerman and his team are in charge of restoration services for
water, mold, fire and other traumatic events throughout Central
Florida. They cover damages in Hardee, Manatee, Polk and High-
lands counties.
Hinerman is passionate about assisting families during their
time of need in the timeliest way possible to prevent any further
damage.
"When people have a loss, they are traumatized. The faster we
get on the scene the more we can save. Water damage left unfixed
can be traumatic for a home," says Hinerman.
When your home has been damaged by minor fires, leaks,
mold or other mishaps, the team will come and repair as much.
damage as possible. Not only will they help save your home from
further damages, but they strive to help save you and your family
money.
"Most people think it will never happen to them, but the real-
ity is that you can't turn the TV set on these days without seeing a
flood, hurricane, fire or other natural or man-made disaster," says
Hinerman.
For more information, contact Hinerman toll-free at 866-723-
7876 or go to www.puroclean.com/pr-fl.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Savannah Faircloth at 773-3255 with your business news.
My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people.
-Orson Welles


Native Vocalist Returns

For Musicale's Banquet


Members and guests of The
Wednesday Musicale will wel-
come vocalist Elizabeth Delan-
ey as their entertainer for the
club's annual banquet to be held
in the fellowship hall of Faith
Presbyterian Church on Satur-
day, Oct. 25.
The event kicks off the 2008-
09 club year, and will begin
with hors d'oeuvres and punch
at 6:30, followed by a catered
Southern buffet at 7 featuring
fried chicken, chicken and
dumplings, greens, squash,
mashed potatoes, slaw, rolls,
cornbread, peach cobbler and
ice cream.
Delaney is a native of Hardee
County, graduating from Hard-
ee Senior High School in 2000
after receiving The Wednesday
Musicale's annual music schol-
arship. She is a recent graduate
of Southeastern University in
Lakeland, where she received a
bachelor's degree in church
music and ministry arts.
In addition to her over three
years as a member of South-
eastern Singers, the university's
gospel-singing group, she has
been performing in a variety of
stages. She has premiered in the
Southeastern Lyric Theatre over
four years, both as a regular cast
member and principal. Her re-
cent accomplishments in that
area include Gretel in "Hansel
and Gretel," Headline in the
"O1' Blue Eyes" concert, and
principal in "A Night at the
Opera: Opera Scenes."
The 26-year-old has been
classically trained for the past
eight years under the tutelage of
Edward Bryant and Dr. Shud-


I LIETC RPR


For the week ended Oct. 9, 2008:
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 10,337,
compared to 10,680 last week, and 13,105 a year ago. According
to the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady,
feeder steers and heifers were 2.00 to 4.00 lower. .-


Feeder Steers:


Feeder Heifers:


Medium & pArge Frame No. -2: "
200-300 lbs., 95.00-145.00;
300-400 lbs., 91.00-122.00; and
400-500 Ibs., 82.00-105.00.
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 80.00-122.50;
300-400 lbs., 68.00- 92.00; and
400-500 lbs., 65.00- 87.00.


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 43.00-
48.00.
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 lbs., 56.00-
63.00.


Shrubs and Stuff
SLawn Ca & Landscaping
3496 Peeples Lane vauchula
773-3557 or 781-3584
Let us help you with all of your
lawn care needs. Need plants or landscaping


help.
ome to our nursery,
I or see Mlelissa at the
Hess Station
every 2" & 41h
-Saturday- -

soc10:9-30p


Advocate I
town Coverage ;
ver 100 Years.
iblishers
3225
uchula, FL 33873
9:25-10:30nc

TB,.


K rwe can
SLisa Rodrjguez wS ca
WSat VISA call

e ManoR'I

0:0 a.m.

ct er 8th

) I ng .opm.

le ts Provided. 4 T
SOC10 1c 16





with person
ng Center the nations holiday greet
r of educational services Come by ot
o teachers/instructors. or cal tc
n enthusiastic teachers
ch. To qualify you must d Thank Ye
aching certificate The Herald-)
nt or expired. Hardee County's Horm
Local. Yours. For Oi
or more information Printers Pu
-385-0745
3ur location 863-773-
rdo Coun. 115 S. 7th Ave. Wai
rdo Iounty. 0


Toachai
Pa


ong Braamse of Southeastern.
She is currently a soprano for
Disney's Voices of Liberty and
Disney's convention circuit.
She teaches music at Spook Hill
Elementary School in Lake
Wales, with plans to pursue a
master's degree in vocal perfor-
mance and pedagogy. She con-
tinues to travel and sing with
up-and-coming recording artist
Seth Ready.
She is the daughter of former
Hardee County residents Jerry
and Gloria Delaney of Lake-
land. She has a younger sister,
Lindsey.
The public is invited to
attend, yet reservations are nec-
essary at $15 per person. Call
Musicale President Sylvia
Collins at 773-6251, Treasurer
Claudette Kemen at 773-3218
or Bay Ridge District President
Bess Stallings at 773-3594 for
reservations and/or further
information. Deadline is this
Saturday.


I,





October 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3B


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Jackson Mosley spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Sept. 29 at the Panda
Restaurant. The state park, located southeast of Bowling Green, has over 400 acres
and is experiencing increases in visitors. There are four hiking trails, three picnic pavil-
ions and a playground. A dutch-oven gathering is hosted in January, along with a Fort
Chokonikla Encampment. There is a museum, fort site, trading-post site and a marble
monument at the park, which includes Peace River and Payne Creek. Florida has 161
state parks with 20 million visitors annually and 6,000 volunteers, and $42 million in rev-
enues, said Mosley. Shown (from left) are John Mosley of DeSoto Dual Diagnosis
Correctional Center for juveniles, his brother Jackson Mosley, and Dr. Mike McCoy.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Rotary Club on Sept. 24 visited the newly expanded and renovated emer-
gency room at Florida Hospital Wauchula. The number of ER beds increased from
seven to 14. There are nearly 12,000 ER patients a year, said Hospital Administrator
Linda Adler. All registered nurses are certified in trauma and pediatrics, she said, and
live within 15 minutes of the hospital. In top photo (from left) are RNs Bobby Garner,
Gabriela Lavoy, Cathy Exendine (nurse manager) and Gloria Garrison. In bottom photo
are Adler, the Rev. Harold Davis, Dr. Joe Toulouse, RN Sheila Johns, and Exendine.


ONE PINK, NO BLUE


Look who's Forty
and
Over the hill
and all!
October 18th, 1968
Happy Birthday
Eddie
Love, Amy & Christie


Mr. and Mrs. Shawn Nor-
wood, Wauchula, a seven pound
daughter, Lilliauna Grace Nor-
wood, born Sept. 19, 2008, at
Florida Hospital-Heartland, Se-
bring. Mrs. Norwood is the for-
mer Susan Eells. Maternal
grandparents are Thomas and
Vera Bean of Hadley, Pa.
Paternal grandparents are
Charles and Mary 'helein
Norwood of Wauchula.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.

*\-f^ ^ r iif "


socl 0:16


-* TERRY

Elect ATCHLEY
unty Co ssior
County Commissioner District 3


1035 Knollwood Circle
Wauchula, Florida 33873


Res: 863.773.0882
Cell: 863.781.9402


SPolitical Advertisement paid for and approved by
Terry Atchley. Democrat, for County Commissioner, District 3


10:16p


The Coming Russian Invasion
of Israel
Ezekiel 38-39
Southside Baptist Church
505 South 10th Ave., Wauchula
October 27-31 7:00 pm Nightly

A Bible Conference Focusing On
Israel: Past, Present, and Future
A Precursor to the Russian War
A Sense of Timing
God vs. GOG
A Royal Battle

Conference Speaker
Dr. David C. Laughner, Pastor
Chapel By The Sea Baptist Church, Tybee Island, GA.

Everyone Welcome so,0:16c


Hardee County Drug Abuse

Prevention Coalition

Cordially Invites the Business
& Professional Community


To A Prevention Coalition Luncheon

~ A community forum to provide information, raise awareness, and to
encourage adults help our youth to choose a drug-free lifestyle ~

Guest Speaker: Carlton Hadley, Jr.
President/Founder Sports Camp for Life

October 22, 2008 11:30 to 1:00 p.m.
Panda Restaurant
Please RSVP by October 17, 2008 to 773-2621
Or, kathryn.doddridge@ahss.org soc10:9,16c


PAYNE CREEK PARK
( WI


NEW HOSPITAL ER


GloRy SEEkERS

In Pursuit of God"
There is a sound in the atmosphere, it's the heart beat of God. Let
them that have an ear, hear the sound of His Spirit and march in
Pursuit of God.
2nd Annual Glory Seekers Conference


WiTh PENNy JohNSON
& DENISE EVERETT
October 21-25
7:00 Nightly


City Hall Main Street
Wauchula, FI :% .


Capron Janet German


Clervenia (


Anointed Worship with Jeff Edwards. The
Lillies & Margaret Flemming
Drama and praise dancers
Contact: signedpenny@yahoo.com or 863-781-6680 soclo:2-16c


.9







4B The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


Enterprise Zone Revamped


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
After a bit of a hiatus, the
Hardee County Enterprise Zone
Development Agency (EZDA)
is being revived.
County Economic Develop-
ment Director Bill Lambert and
specialist Sarah Pelham told the
Hardee County Commission
last week that it was time to
bring EZDA up to speed.
Pelham has been working with
Enterprise Florida and realized
that the resolution appointing
members of the EZDA needed
to be updated.
Accordingly, they asked the
commission to approved Reso-
lution 09-01 appointing a 12-
member board and stagger the
terms. Most are former mem-
bers of the committee.
Together they will Enterprise
Zone boundaries, the locations
where there is additional state
funding available for economic
development initiatives. Pres-
ently, it is up and down U.S. 17
from Bowling Green through
Zolfo Springs and about a half
mile on each side of it, and.
along the northern portion of
CR663, from Vandolah to Fort
Green and both sides of it.
Members of the committee
and which group they represent
are as follows: Vanessa Her-
nandez, Chamber of Com-
merce; Rick Justice, First
National Bank, financial or
insurance entity; Frankie Vas-
quez, a business owner within
the EZ; Rick Knight, a resident
within the EZ; and John Bar-
low, a non-profit community-
based organization in the EZ
(the Economic Development
Council).
Also, Dan Graham, local pri-
vate industry council; Olivia
Minshew, local code enforce-
ment, City of Wauchula; Maria
Quinn, local law enforcement,
Wauchula; Linda Allen, labor


market; Marcus Shackelford,
agriculture; Bill Bursler, busi-
ness operating within EZ; and
Michael Choate, Emergency
Management.
The categories of member-
-ship are set by Enterprise
Florida guidelines. Additional
information is available from
Lambert or Pelham at the office
at 401 N. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17
South), the wooden cabin just
north of Courthouse Annex II.
They can be reached at 773-
3030.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
approved the use of
Pioneer Park for the annual
Grillin' and Chillin' event,
which will be held March 27-
28, 2009. Fees will be waived
for the Nickerson-Ullrich build-
ing.
"We think it will be bigger
and better. We can have more
entertainment at the pavilion,
there's plenty of parking area
and there are RV spaces avail-
able," said coordinators Casey
Dickson of the Hardee Chamb-
er of Commerce and Olivia
Minshew of the city of Wau-
chula, who will work with the
Florida Barbecue Association
again to make it a break-even
success.
approved the 2009 meet-
ing and holiday schedule.
During the next budget session
and subsequent union negotia-
tions, there will be discussion of
pay adjustments for some coun-
ty employees who work 10-
hour days, four days a week,
giving them an additional two
hours' pay when a holiday falls
on a Monday.
approved or ratified the
public employees union con-
tract updates. County Manager
Lex Albritton reviewed partic-
ular pages of the 105-page con-
tract. These concerned the step
plan, bumping during layoffs,


assignment ot overtime, pur-
chase of safety boots and shoes
and use of compensatory time
rather than accumulation of it.
Commissioners offered varied
comments on it.
cancelled the Oct. 17
planning session, and the Nov.
20 regular meeting due to
attending the Florida Associ-
ation of Counties meetings. An
emergency meeting will be set,
possibly Nov. 13 or 26, if it
becomes necessary.
held a public hearing,
with no public comments, on
the closing of a portion of Pine
Street and adjacent alleyway as
requested by New Elim Baptist
Church trustees. These portions
are overgrown and have not
been used and closing them
does not cut off access for any
neighbors or for utilities
accepted a state grant of
$98,726 for emergency man-
agement funding and the Eco-
nomic Development Authority
grant of $150,000 for work on
the Vandolah Rural Center
Water Supply System.
heard an update on the
most recent Comprehensive
Plan amendments sent to the
state Department of Commun-
ity Affairs (DCA) in June. After
its review, there are requests for
more information on several
issues of the annual Evaluation
And Report update. That
agency recommends that the
proposed Lemon Grove com-
munity plan not be approved
because it is remote from'com-
munity water, sewer and other
infrastructure and amounts to
urban sprawl.
The county has until Dec. 4 to
respond to the information re-
quested by DCA. One item not
questioned but awaiting DCA
approval is a Special Exception
to the 500-foot setback from a
stream or waterway. A Horse
Creek resident has that water-
way circle through his property
twice, leaving him no 500-foot
setback. He does have more
than adequate place to put his
home on the required five-acre
lot in agricultural zoning and is
willing to dedicate a conserva-
tion easement for the creek,
areas.


PROVEN LEADETr
1 01 .0,PRITERS PUBLISH. .S





Yard Sale

Saturday Oct. 18 10 am 4 pm

Church of God

1543 M.L.King Ave.

*Household Clothing
SYard Equipment Movies
Electronic Computer Equipment
SFun Games Food Drinks Entertainment


2nd Family and Friend Day Gathering

Sunday Oct. 19 4 pm

Descendants of Early Church, former

members and friends are invited.
soc10:16p


BVeeZe


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* Parafango Therapy (firms & inches off bodv)
* Bio Choice (needleless Botox)
* 24 Karat Gold Cleopatra Mask
* Chocolate Temptation Mask
* TCA Peel
* Detox Along With
Hair- Tanning Waxing Body Wrap Nails -
and Massage


13 West Broadway
Fort Meade


863-285-6888


Owners: Patty & Scott Saund


Hours:
M-F 9:30 6:30
Sat. 9:30 2:30
ers soc10:16p


Letter To The Editor


Wauchula Resident Warns


About Religious Cults


Dear Editor:
Are there cults among us?
I am embarrassed to say that
I was a member of a religious
cult for many years without
realizing it. That cult is right
here in Hardee County and con-
tinues to be actively looking for
new members.
Technically speaking, a reli-
gious cult is not considered a
cult by what they believe. They
are considered a cult by the
manner in which they recruit
new members and the method
in which they manage to retain
existing members. A good rule
to remember is that people go to
religions, while cults go to peo-
ple. The best way to avoid
becoming a member of a
destructive cult is to be aware
of how cults operate.
What are some of the warn-
ing signs of a religious cult?
Cults recruit new members
through a lengthy, carefully
planned, indoctrination process
that takes several months of
complete.
Religious cults keep their
members so busy with compul-
sory meetings and activities that
they qave no time to think about
their involvement with the cult.
The cult will claim that its
rules are handed down by God
even though they constantly
change their rules. (If the rules
originate with God as they
claim, why didn't God give its
leaders the correct rules the first
time?)


Glory Seekers Conference
will have its 2nd annual confer-
ence Oct. 21 to 25, nightly at 7
p.m. at City Hall, 225. E. Main
Street, Wauchula. Everyone is
invited to attend.
Featured speakers will be
Penny Johnson and Denise
Everett, with Clervenia Capron
andJanetGerman and anointed'
worship with Jeff Edwards, The
Lillies and Margaret Flemming.
There will also be drama and
praise dancers.

Wauchula Church of God
invites everyone to attend its
2nd Family and Friend Day
gathering on Sunday at 4 p.m.
The church is located at 1543
M.L. King Ave., Wauchula,
where descendants of early
church members, former mem-
bers and friends will gather.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.


Cults instill guilt. (No mat-
ter what you do for the cult, it is
never enough. The cult's rules
will be so vast and difficult that
no member can possibly obey
all of them, which leads-to feel-
ings of guilt. Guilt is a classic
cult control tactic.)
The leadership of a reli-
gious cult gives nothing in
return for the sacrifices of their
members. (The leadership does
not use their amassed fortunes
to help the ill or poor within
their own cult).
Friendship within the cult
is conditional. (Cult members
turn friendship on and off as
quickly as a water faucet, which
is a sure indication that friend-
ship is never sincere within the
.cult).
Cult leaders will claim to
have direct authority from God
or an exclusive channel of com-
munication from God. (This
assures that they can rule with
unbridled authority.)
Cults do not admit to mis-
takes or to failures of their false
prophesies. (Instead, they
blame their members for bing
too zealous or getting the wrong
idea about what the leaders
plainly said or wrote.)
Some cults make doomsday
predictions to boost member-
ship. Some predict or have pre-
dicted specific years when the
end will come or simply insist
that it will come any day now.
Cults are untruthful about
their history. (What if 1914 was
to be the end of Armageddon,
changed to 1915, changed to
1918, changed to 1952,
changed tentatively to 1975,
while presently denying that all
those dates were originally
prophesied by the cult to be the
end of Armageddon?)
Cults try to control the
member's relationships. The
cult member's life is maneu-
vered to maximize contact with
other cult members while mini-
mizing contact with all others
even family. (Cults know
that if they can control their
member's relationship they can
control the member.)
Any information gathered
outside the cult that exposes the
cult's tactics is considered evil,
even when it can be verified to
be true.
The Bible can only be
understood by reading the cult's
literature. (If there is any dis-
pute about what the Bible says
and when the cult's literature
says, the cult's literature always
,takes precedent.)
Religious cults antagonize
other religions or even govern-
ments in order to manipulate
hostilities toward the cult so
that the cult can then claim they
are being persecuted for their
faith. (Cults know that manu-


ovemr Donald



Chance
for
County Commission

District 3 Republican


factured persecution strength-
ens and even increases cult
membership.)
Religious cults shun mem-
bers who voluntarily leave.
Refusing to shun a departing
member is a sin (Cult members
who leave are no longer under
the cult's control and therefore
have an opportunity to search
the real truth about the cult.
Such individuals are a threat to
the cult's existence and are
therefore falsely labeled "apos-
cates." The no-so-subtle sugges-
tion that these ones are now
considered "evil" assures that
the cult members will continue
to remain in darkness, which is
the ultimate goal of the cult.)
We live in a free society, so a
cult can exist legally in this
country, yet still present serious
potential dangers to its mem-
bers. A cult member may be
required to refuse certain med-
ical treatments even though
they could be life saving, such
as vaccinations or blood trans-
fusions.
Sad to say but the members
of the cult in which I left truly
believe that leaving the qult is
the equivalent of leaving God.
(Sigh) I resigned from the cult
one year ago and since then I
have studied its history and am
quite startled by what I have
found. I seriously doubt that
any of the cult members that I
used to know are aware of its
true history, although I'm sure
they believe that they do. There
most certainly is a reason why
the truth is kept from its mem-
bers and why the members are
forbidden to research it inde-
pendently.
Anyone (including churches)
who would like to learn more
about the true facts regarding
this cult may contact me if they
wish. I am also willing to offer
what support I am able to those
who wish to leave the cult as
well as to those who have
already left the cult.

Dean Shultis
Wauchula


If Elected I Promise We Can Work Together To Do The Following:

DfTake care of and support our existing businesses and citizens.
This is our existing economic engine that must be maintained
and strengthened.

ITMake Hardee County offices user friendly and accountable to
taxpayers.

RrUse my Planning & Zoning experience and qualifications to bring
smart planned growth to Hardee County.

WAttract new jobs and opportunities for our citizens and the
future of our children.

EWork to improve the Quality of Life for all Hardee County
Citizens from our children to our Senior Adults.

99ored te 9aree ublicanPartl


Home 773-0000
Cell 781-3084
e-mail chancey28@netzero.com


Early Voting

Oct. 20 Nov. 1


.1,a a P fir, Ad i fr -npr b Doriild Charicc Rcpublcari for Courr %Comamij-on D.Lnci- i


10 16p


Spa Treatment Parties
8 Ladies or More
Pick 2 services Only $20 ea.
* 30 minute massage Pedicure Facial
Hair Treatment or Braids


.1i


m


.


p"w 9- T


Spo,(


f


U U 1.1-10 11 Cl 11


I no 11


jlto






October 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5B


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The only meet last week for
the Hardee Swim Teams was a
double victory.
Both the girls and boys
sql~ds were victorious, the
girls winning 163-76 and the
boys 143-91.
Hardee hosted Lake Placid
on Tuesday and return the
favor, going to Lake Placid for
an Oct. 23 meet to end the reg-
ular season. Districts are Oct
27-31 in Winter Haven. Hardee
remains in Class lA-District 5
with All Saints' Academy, Avon
Park, Frostproof, Haven
Christian (girls only), Lake
Placid, Lake Wales, Lakeland
Christian, Mulberry, Davenport
Ridge, Lakeland Santa Fe
Catholic and the new Lakeland
Teneroc.
At Avon Park last week,
Hardee opened with first- and
second-place finishes in the 200
medley relay. Kaitlin Justice,
Brittany Wiggins, Savanna Ha-
gans and Rebekah Nix came to
wall in 2:30;14 with Kaitlyn
Kennedy, Katie Jernigan,
Stephanie Driver and Chelsea
Goolsby at 2:35.40, well ahead
of an Avon Park team in at
2:42.30.
Hardee boys split on the 200-
yard medley relay, placing first
and third. Jake Willis, Kyle
Bodeck, Josh Rickett and Tyler
Robertson won the event in
2:08.49. Avon Park was next at
2:11.09 and Hardee's Corey
Dudeck, Lee Cortez, Hunter
Henderson and Austin Scheips-
meier were in at 2:32.82.
Kennedy won the 200
freestyle for Hardee with a time
of 2:42.17, ahead of teammate


Kyndall Robertson at 3:01.96.
After a pair of Lady Devils,
Katiana Pesquera and Mindy
Stevens for fifth and sixth.
Tyler Robertson won the
boys 200 freestyle at 2:02.09,
followed by Rickett at 2:09.35,
and three Avon Park swimmers.
Jernigan won the girls 200
Individual Medley (IM) in a
time of 3:00.29 with Willis win-
ning for the boys in 3:00.04.
Soph Kate Krause led all girls
home in the 50 freestyle, getting
top points in a time of 29.69,
her nearest competitor at 30.49.
Hardee also placed sixth
through eighth with Goolsby,
Hagans and Nix.
Soph Dylan Justice (26.73)
nipped teammate Chris Reid
(28.36) to win the boys 50
freestyle. Bodeck placed fourth,
just 14 hundredths of a second
behind the third-place Red
Devil.
Avon Park's Jamie Wirries
was the only girl diver. In the
boys division, Thomas Hogen-
auer was second and Sheldon
Hartman third.
Senior Wiggins won the girls
100 butterfly, followed by
junior Driver less than a second
behind. Rickett won the boys
100 butterfly.
In the 100 freestyle, Kaitlin
Justice took the girls victory in
1:04.83, with Hagans fourth
and Nix sixth. Tyler Robertson
won the boys race in 55.22.
well ahead of Avon Park's Tyler
King at 1:02.40. Bodeck was
fourth.
Krause won the girls 500
freestyle, with Kyndall Robert-
son third and Heather Kouns
fourth. Senior Dustin Spears
won the event for the boys, with


Clay McNabb third.
Hardee girls were first and
third in the 200 freestyle relay.
Goolsby, Driver, Robertson and
Krause were first, and Christian
Granger, Mansi Limbachia,
Pesquera nd Stevens third.


Robertson, Willis, Reid and
Spears were first in the boys
200 freestyle relay, and Rickett,
Scheipsmeier, Bodeck and
Justice placed fourth.
Justice won the girls 200
backstroke, followed by Ken-


nedy and an Avon Park girl
third. An Avon Park swimmer
won the boys event, with Cortez
second by less than five sec-
onds.
Wiggins, Jernigan, Kouns
and Granger went first through
fourth in the girls 100 breast-
stroke. Spears placed second
for the boys.
In the final event, Robertson,


Jernigan, Driver and Kennedy
were first in the 400 freestyle
relay, with Kouns, Nix, Gools-
by and Krause second, well
over a second faster than an
Avon Park team.
Hardee boys Hunter, Reid,
Spears and Justice won the boys
400 freestyle relay, with
McNabb, Cortez, Willis and
Scheipsmeier third.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Looking wins for the Wildcats are (lying down, from left) Joe Porter, Chris Reid, Josh Rickett, Clay McNabb, Hunter
Henderson and Lee Cortez; (middle row) Dusty Spears, Austin Scheipsmeier, Corey Dudek, Brad Adcox, Dylan
Justice and Kyle Bodeck; (back row) Tyler Robertson, Sheldon Hartman, TK. Hogenauer and Jake Willis; missing
Isaac Vasquez, Vincent Hartman and Caleb Boyette.


In the pool for the Lady Wildcats are (first row, from left) Mindy Stevens, Kate Krause, Brittany Wiggins, Christian
Granger, Rebekah Nix and Savanna Hagans; (second row) Katiana Pesquera, Kyndall Robertson, manager Emily
Rhodes and Mansi Limbachia; (on blocks) Katie Jernigan, Heather Kouns, Chelsea Goolsby, Kaitlin Justice,
Stephanie Driver and Kaitlyn Kennedy; missing Jessica Hunt.


Swimmers Beat Avon Park


TERRY

ject ATCHLEY
for
County Commissioner District 3
1035 Knollwood Circle Res: 863.773.0882
Wauchula, Florida 33873 Cell: 863.781.9402
Political Advertisement paid for and approved by
Terry Atchley, Democrat, for County Commissioner, District 3 10:16p


I. I II 54I-0





YES nnON 2

YES2MARRIAGE.ORG

"--MR -,





0- L.

KEY FACTS ON THE FLORIDA MARRIAGE AMENDMENT
Important information for seniors, married/lunarried couples, and others sharing living arrangements

AMENDMENT 2
"Inasmuch as marriage is the legal union
of only one man and one woman
as husband and wife,
no other legal union that is treated as marriage
or the substantial equivalent thereof
shall be valid or recognized."

Amendment 2 does one thing, and one thing only: It defines
marriage as the union of a man and a woman as husband and
wife in the Florida Constitution, but it does not prevent the
government, or private companies, from extending benefits to
whomever they wish.

Amendment 2 will not take away any existing rights or
benefits from anyone. There is no connection between the
Amendment and social security benefits, power of attorney
relationships and legal contracts.

Amendment 2 protects our children from being taught in
public schools that same sex marriage is the same as traditional
marriage.

Amendment 2 allows the people of Florida and not activist
judges to decide how marriage is defined.


Vote YES on 2
10:16c


&


DENNIS


"Leaders'p That Works


In 2006, 3 of our schools were high performing.

We said, "We can do better".
...And we did.


In 2007, 5 of our schools were high performing.
We said, "We can do better".
...And we did.


In 2008, 6 of our schools were high performing.


Because leadership is supportive...

Because instruction is strong...

Because students are our only focus...


Our best days are always ahead of us.
Paid Political Adverlisiement. Paid for by Dennis Jones Campaign, approved by Dennis Jones (Democrat)
10:16p


I


F~i~t~I


F071~







6B The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING.........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Hardee Car Company:

Buy Here ~ Pay Here

20% off

if paying Cash


F-I'-- '-M- ---Mq
Wauchula Hills $500 OFF
Corner of Hwy 17 *
and REA Rd. any Vehicle
773-2011 with coupon
;,... .... ..-------j


Maria


Billy Hill, Owner


Wauchula
(across from
First National Bank)
773-6667


Ruby


cl10:16


KELLER WILLIAMS
m .- LA ...- L." Y: .
An ind endentlnQ ned ~ rage ,
Mikey C lding
RealtqE
(863) 781-1698, \

midfloridalistings.com
* 20 acres w/2 story 4BR/3BA, 3,900 sq. ft. home. Completely
remodeled in 2005. Many extras pool, pond, 20x72 horse barn,
24x48 workshop, completely fenced. $445,000 Eastern Hardee
County.
* 155 Acres of beautiful native Florida Hunting Land. All woods.
Great location. Over 1/2 mile of winding creek bottom. Call for
more details.
* Asking $6,900/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 28-32 acre parcels or buy as a whole 60 acre
tract. Call for more details.
* Zoned commercial 8.5 acres, corner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000.
* Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered
oaks and pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac.
wetlands. Great Investment Property. Sweetwater area.
* 20 acre Ranchettes. 6 available. 127 acres total. Buy one or buy
them all. Fish Branch Rd. Starting at $8,500/acre. ol s:.Is



JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.iimseerealtv.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


45 ac citrus grove. Valencias &
Hamlin. Double wide mobile
home. Fruit proceeds included
(subject to FOM contract).
Located in NE Hardee County.
$427,500
20 acres in Sweetwater area.
Excellent land! Previously a
grove and farmed. Well and
pump included. $12,500 per
acre.
3.19 acres. Zoned C-2.Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential income already in
place. Hwy 17 across from
Walmart. $1,200,000
Waterfront property! 2 BR/2
BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep
water canal that leads into
Charlotte Harbor. Buyer con-
cessions possible. Priced right
at $165,000!
1 acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in Wau-
chula. Paved road frontage.
Deed restrictions. Zoned FR.
Lot size 130' X 305'. $38,500


HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!
3 Bedroom/2 Bath home in
Golfview. Big 1+ acre lot. 2 car
garage. $175,000.

Cut your electric bill in half! 3
BR 2 BA in Riverview is newly
remodeled and built for effi-
ciency! $189,900.

2 BR/1 BA CB home. Metal
roof put on after Hurricane.
Some work needs to be done
inside. Large corner lot in
Wauchula. $72,000.

3 BR/2 BA house on 7 1/2 acres.
Stocked pond. Tlis property is
zoned for up to 3 homes!
$179,900.

PRICE REDUCED! 3 BR, 2
BA immaculate home with
many extras. Home was built
in 2000 and all appliances
are included. Landscaped yard
with several fruit trees and
even a pecan tree. $143,900.


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445-0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242


SEVERAL GENTLE cows for sale.
Call 773-0718. 10:16p
FEMALE BULL MASTIFF, $600,
vet. cert.; pair white geese, $75;
1999 horse trailer, $2,000. 781-
2493. 10:9-30p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2009/10 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 9:4tfc


2004 CHEVY MALIBU, 4 door,
$3,500 cash. 773-0881. 10:16c
1994 CHEVY S-10, extended cab,
1$2,800. 863-735-0464. 10:16p
2001 DODGE RAM, quad cab,
$3,500 firm. 863-735-0464.
10:16p
2002 DODGE RAM 1500 pickup,
quad cab, short bed, 4.7 V8, cus-
tom cap, excellent condition, tow
package, $8,500. 863-735-2726.
10:2-30p


Over 40 years experience residential, agricultural, com-
mercial and industrial properties.
Call us for information on current listings.
We will provide a free property analysis on qualified listings
placed with us. c10o:16c




























NOW RENTING!'R


THE PALMS APTS.

3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Ask About Our Move-In Specials!

Monthly rent from $595 + utilities
Handicap equipped units available.

Located at: 701 La Playa Drive
Office Hours: Mon. Fri.,
1:00 pm 5:00 pm

For Rental Info & Applications

Call

Q 863-773-3809
OPPORTUNITY
(TDD #1-800-955-8771) ci10:3-30







Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net Oralia D. Flores

You have to see this! 4BR 2BA CB home in Bowling Green -
Laminate wood floors. Nicely landscaped All For $139,900.00
5 acres good land out from Zolfo Springs Reduced to $55,000.00
3BR 2BA Home on 2.5 acres located west of Wauchula close to
town Large Carport Good Country Living $225,000.00
NEW HOMES NEW HOMES- NEW HOMES
New homes from $125,000.00 to $299,000.00 and all in between A
home to fit your budget. Remember you can trade up like trading
cars also if you are an empty nester you can trade down.
Locations Zolfo Springs Wauchula Bowling Green and
Wauchula Hills -
We have many more listings Visit our web site. www.floresreal-
tv.net Interested in selling? We will give you a price opinion no
obligation Having trouble with mortgage payments? We may be
able to help.
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember


LB


OP POAlT5 I T


Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net


John Freeman (863) 781-408
Steve Lanier (863) 559-939
Jason Johnson (863) 781-373


After hours
84 Lisa Douglas (863) 781-3247
92 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891 '
14 Noey Flores (863) 781-4585 S


WILL PAY TOP price for junk cars
and we pick up. Crooms Used
Cars and Parts. 773-0637. 1:10tfc


WESTERN AMOIRE, $350; cov-
ered wagon train twin bed,
bought from rustic ranch, $350;
couch table, $50. 773-2977.
10:166p

Help Wante


ISLAND OF ADVENTURE now
hiring CDAs, 40 hrs with clear-
ance. Also, hiring non-experi-
enced chlldcare workers, 767-
0800. 10:16-30c
OFFICE ASSISTANT needed in
Duette for large farming opera-
tion. Duties include data entry,
accounts payable, invoicing, pay-
roll, hiring, etc. HS diploma or
equivalent, excellent computer
skills, and one to two years of
prior office experience required.
SMust be Bilingual (Spanish/Eng-
lish) & have valid drivers license.


APPLIANCE TECH NEEDED Send resume
Apply in person at DeSoto fax, or emai
Appliance & Repair, 108 Carlton com
St., Wauchula. 10:16c


Central Florida

Ranch & Grove

Realty, LLC


a to (239) 657-6764
il mjimenez@sixls.-,
10:9-16p


D Wa *





Joe EDavis
I N C., RE A L T 0 R S
| (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
SI JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL

Kenny Sanders CA OUR E.T
(863) 781-0153 You may quaif to receive a gr.f. *
payment assistance. on your new toFj
See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


Attractive 4BR/2.5BA brick
home in Golfview Subdivision
on 1 ac, includes central vacu-
um, gas fireplace, inground
pool, Jacuzzi tub. Listed for
$299,000!
Two story house w/pool on
beautiful oak shaded lot in
Wauchula. $275,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Brand
new construction! Beautiful
3BR/2BA, 1300+ SF CB home
w/granite countertops, ceramic
tile & carpet floors. $155,000!
Two adjacent parcels on the
Peace River! 7.83 acs for
$219,000, 8.64 acs for
$225,000 or both for $398,000.
Possible owner financing!
Large home w/12 acs, nice
fishing pond & lots of frontage
on Hollandtown Rd. Need to
see the creek-side view to
appreciate. $250,000!
Lovingly maintained 3BR,
2P S home in Bowling
sS
barn with three-bay carport.
$160,000!
Stellar location! 10 ac Val
grove on SR 62 has 6" well,
diesel power unit, drain tile &
micro-jet irrigation. Also
fronts Moye Rd. $150,000!


12 ac w/SR 64 frontage. Front
of property is cleared, back has
trees. Great for cattle or home-
site! $180,000!

9,600SF commercial building
close to Wauchula Airport.
Two work areas, offices &
restrooms w/storage loft, roll-
up doors w/security system.
$410.000! Will consider leas-
ing!
5 ac on Cross Creek Ln is
native Florida land. Access to
Peace River provided by
another shared 5 ac parcel.
$100,000!

Find the privacy you're look-
ing for in this secluded
4BR/3BA home on 12 wooded
acs. Just minutes to Wauchula
or Zolfo Springs. $350,000!
PRICE REDUCED! CLOSE
TO LAKE OLIVIA! 2BR/-
1BA/1CG CB home w/privacy
fence, central" A/H, screened
porch. $80,000!

Bring your canoe & camper!
Secluded 5 acs of native,
wooded land close to Wauchula
has deeded access to the beau-
tiful Peace River. Great prop-
erty for recreation, investment,
or homesite! $90,000!


Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can
access them anytime!


E2
(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS........781-0153 DAVID ROYAL................781-3490
MONICA REAS...............773-9609 SANDY LARRISON........832-0130
JUAN DELATORRE.......781-1128 JAMES STALLINGS.. 863-412-4379

SU.S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873
,"110.16c


I I














The


October 16,2008, The Herald-Advocate 7B






Classifieds


C.NA.'s NEEDED Full-time
w/benefits. Must have depend-
able transportation, FL Drivers
License and proof of insurance.
Contact HOPE of Hardee County
for additional Information. 310 N.
8th Ave., Wauchula (863) 773-
2022. EOE, DFWP 10:9-16c


4BR/2-1/2BA PLUS bonus room
on 9 1/2 acres. 863-773-4207,
863-781-5595. 10:16-11:6c

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1989 MAZDA
VIN:JM2UF4140K0773820
8:00 A.M. OCT 27,2008
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula,c:16c


-907 SOUTH 8TH, $50,000 cash.
Must sell this week. 781-1062.
10:16c
608 SOUTH 10TH must sell
3BR/1BA nice, $84,000, will help
with closing. 781-1062. 10:16c


HORSE BOARDING $100 a
month. 863-781-2493. 10:2-30p


FOUND in Bowling Green, beagle
puppy. 863-445-0118. 10:16c
LOST 2 black cows, Industrial
Park, new school area. REWARD
info to return or for return. 781-
1715, 773-9276. 10:16-11:13p


Pos Fo Saler~


52-R SPORTS ART stationary
bike, $1,500 new, will sell $500.
863-781-7089. 10:16-11:13p
2005 SUZUKI BOULEVARD
motorcycle, 1500cc, like new,
$6,000. 863-781-0855. 10:16-23p
36" COMMERCIAL MOWER, walk
behind, electric start, 15 hours
1/2 price, $995. 941-724-1629.
10:2-30p
MOTORCYCLE 2002 Honda
Shadow 750, $3,000. 863-445-
0708. 9:18-10:16p



FACTORY REPO'S Going out of
business sale 3BR/2BA large
doublewide was $79,900 now
only $59,900, includes AC, skirt-
ing & setup. Call 863-773-2007.
10:9-11:7p
BAD CREDIT BANKRUPTCY, no
problem. We want your business
with $4,000 down we have
4BR/2BA, 28x76 on double lot,
ready to move In. 863-773-2007.
10:9-11:07p


CHARLIE CREEK 1015 Bluejay,
3BR/2BA, 2005 mobile home,
stove, refrigerator, $57,500.
Owner pays closing cost. 941-
627-2769. 10:9tfc
DISTRESSED SALE all models in
stock at dealer cost, going out of
business, everything must go.
Call 863-773-2007 for quotes,
financing available. 10:9-11:7p
2BR/2BA HOMES OF MERIT sold
at factory invoice plus setup &
AC, perfect for winter resident or
adult park. This is a great deal.
Call 863-773-2007. 10:9-11:7p
MOBILE HOMES FOR SALEIll In
quiet family park, 2 or 3 bedroom,
2 bath, handyman special, low
down and rent to own possible.
Don't wait, won't last. 863-698-
4910. 9:4tfc
REPO MOBILE HOMES -
Hundreds to choose from. Set up
& delivery available. 863-381-
2997. 7:3-12:25p

Hi IerldAdoct
/,Ialde 0,1111 'Cs 1mil'I'o".11 C ve/l/K
Telephone (863) 773-325


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Sonya
Lewis, Susan Lopez, Chiquita
Robinson, Thomas Esquival,
Elizabeth Morris, LaShanna
Lampley, Sarah Hildreth, David
Rivera, Joseph Hernandez, Roy
Aleman will be sold pursuant
warehouseman's lien. Said sale
will be at Bowling Green Storage,
5020 Highway 17 North, Bowling
Green, Florida at 9 a.m.,
November 3, 2008. 10:16-23p
PERSONAL PROPERTY of Unda
Wheeler, Ryan Solano, Andrew
Smith, Pamela Johns, Don Hunt,
Chrystal Contreros will be sold
pursuant warehouseman's lien.
Said sale will be at B&J Self
Storage, 667 5th Ave. South,
Wauchula, Florida at 11 a.m.,
November 3, 2008. 10:16-23p

If I can't have too many truf-
fles, I'll do without.
-Colette


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Maria
Moralez, Amanda Kersey will be
sold pursuant warehouseman's
lien. Said sale will be at B&J
Storage, 210 North 3rd,
Wauchula, Florida at 10 a.m.,
November 3,2008. 10:16-23a



ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that aH cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


719 Green Street

$109,000.

3BR, 1 Bath, inground pool

will help with closing

781-106210:16


Local Owner (not a dealer)
\ Very nice black '08 Impala LT
Leather Interior, Many Options Including
Remote Start, 5,000 miles,
no scratches or dents
Bumper to Bumper Warranty.
Make Offer
863-832-2257
S 10:16p



S702 SOUTH 6TM AVENUE
[( D WAUCHULA, FL 33873
Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122 .FAX (863) 773-2173
Donna Steffens, Associate 781-3627
AM-SOUTH REALTY Jessica Smith, Associate 781-1186
Richard Dasher, Associate 773-0575
MAKIN(:;RlAI. FR.iTAEA RAI. EAS1 Nancy Craft, Associate 832-0370 Richard Dasher
pab, w0a ^UaMCMd ,cdt s Victor Salazar, Associate 245-1054


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


5 ACRES ONLY $52,000! Nice, quiet, serene
wooded 5 acres!! BUILD YOUR HOME HERE!
CALL TODAY
GREAT BUY!!! 3/2 D/W M/H, Downing Circle,
includes Central A/H, carport, screened porch,
and utility shed. Only $65,900
NICE NEIGHBORHOOD, NEWLY PAINTED!! 2/1
CB home with Central H/A, new carpet inside,
laundry room, with carport and fenced back
yard. $92,500!!!
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH!! $84,500 In Sun N Lakes
Subdivision. This property Is approved for
ExpressPath Financing. Please contact listing
agent for more information!!
PUBLIC ACCESS ON LAKE ADELAIDE!!! 3 BR, 2
Bath CB Home built in 2006 on a corner lot in
great neighborhood Includes two car garage
with door opener and more. REDUCED!! From
$129.900 TO: $119.000.
GARDEN DRIVE IN RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS!! Would
you like to build a new home on this .29 acre lot
In this Nice Neighborhood? $29.900
BIG!! 4 Bedrooms, 4 Bath Home!! 2,241 sq. ft.
Living area, new carpet, fresh paint, and new
roof makes this home a must see at a Reduced
Price of $165,000 Or bring offer.

REEB Information magazines, affordable
Georgia mountain homes and acreage. Owner
fianancing!! Check It Out!! Call Donna, 781-
3627
PEACE RIVER ACCESS!! Quiet and Peaceful 5.5
acre tract with plenty wildlife and native vegeta-
tion. $82,500!!


LAKE LOTELAIII Home with enclosed inground
pool. Completely remodeled with brand new stain-
less steel appliances including stove, refrigerator,
built in microwave oven, dishwasher, washer and
dryer. Granite countertops In kitchen and bathrooms.
Pine Crest golf course across road. This property is
approved for ExpressPath Financing. "Please con-
tact listing agent for more information." Reduced
from: $354.500 To: $299.000.
DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME!! Well maintained 3
BR, 2 Bath with stove, refrigerator, dishwasher,
washer and dryer, 12x28 screened porch, utility
shed, extra lot If desired, within City of Wauchula
$72,500.
Lovely Mobile Home Lot on Downing Circle
$16,500
CENTER HILL PROPERTY!!! 27.5 acres with a 2
Bedroom, 1 Bath home fronts beautiful Payne
Creek. Includes 12 acres of Irrigated citrus grove
and barn. Seller will consider dividing'property
into parcels. Call today for details. $350,000.
HOME OR OFFICE!! 3 BR, 1 Bath on Hwy 17
Bowling Green, Great Potential at a Great Price.
ONLY $64,500.
THREE SETS OF DUPLEXES on Hwy 66, Buy one at
a time or all three, great Investment property!!! 2
Bedroom, 1 Bath $159,500; 2 bedroom, 1 Bath for
$155,000 and 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath with Fireplace
for $169,900!!! MAKE AN OFFER!!
CHARMING HOME IN GOOD NEIGHBORHOOD!!!
This 3BR, 1 Bath CB home has Central A/H, com-
plete with washer and dryer located on Illinois
Ave. $82,500
CABBAGE PALMS, OAK TREES AND QUIET!!! This
16 Acre parcel of land has a Well and Septic Tank.
Build your own Home or Mobile Home. $150,000
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bath. Only $92,500 With front
porch and large fenced back yard. In nice neigh-
borhood on First Street!!!
ZOLFO SPRINGS!! This 3/2 Is close to shopping,
has fenced back yard, Central A/H, new roof.
$82,500.
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY!!! 10 A/C on Hwy. 62,
large building included. $750,000.


I.


OPEN HOUSE
FRIDAY OCTOBER 17TH
NOON- 4pm

422 South Florida Ave.

List Price $229,900.

Make Offer
c'1;1g,1


LAM BER TE
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873

Well maintained CB country home on 11 acres;
3B/1Bth; terrazzo and wood floors; large fire-
place; enclosed porch; perfect garden spot;
flowing creek on property. MUST SEE TO
APPRECIATE! $225,000

IMMACULATE 2005 D/W mobile home,
3B/2Bth on 1/2 acre overlooking beautiful pas-
ture; this home is in excellent condition and is
partially furnished; built under new FL re-
quirements for durability; 12x16 screened
porch; new 10x12 Smithbilt shed w/electric.
$95,000

WELL MAINTAINED mobile home in Charlie
Creek Estates; 2B/1Bth, completely furnished
including small freezer and patio furniture; sin-
gle carport, metal roof in 2006, screened porch
- MOVE IN READY! $45,000

GORGEOUS 5 ACRES with 3B/2Bth, CB/-
Stucco home; great room plan; new A/C 2007;
new roof 2005; detached 24x36 concrete work-
shop; two 4" wells. THIS PROPERTY IS A
MUST SEE! $259,000

SEE THIS WELL BUILT HOME on lovely tree
shaded lot! 4B/2Bth brick home located close
to schools and shopping; large double carport,
circle driveway, fenced backyard, beautiful
landscaping plus 12x16 building with electric
and water. $195,000


Topsy See
REAL ESTATE
773-5994
Topsy See
Beautiful building lot. Lake access to Istapoga on Lakeshore Drive.
Owner financing available. $75,000.
3BR/2B DW with so many amenities including Security System,
wood burning Fireplace. Sits on 5 beautiful acres with stocked pond.
$149,900.
App. 58 AC. Great for development property. High and dry.
5 acres all fenced, High and dry with pond. Appaloosa Lane. $84,995.
1 ac. with app. 296 ft. road frontage. $39,000.
Two 1-acre lots in beautiful setting in Bowling Green. $29,900
each.
NEW LISTING 2 Story older frame home on large lot on Hwy 17
Zolfo Springs 5 BR 2 Bath. $125.000 Reduced to $105,000.
CONTRACT PENDING
Topsy See, Broker
Elva Whidden, Associate
iio:ie= 2634 E. Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873

1"


Bus. (863) 773-0007 ,' '
Fax: (863) 773-0038 '
www.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert
GREAT VALUE! This comfortable and cozy
3B/2Bth home is located on large lot in quiet set-
ting just outside city limits; wood deck, en-
closed porch, wood burning fireplace; separate
entrance to family room with additional
kitchen. $155,000
Homes of Merit D/W on 17.22 acres; 3B/2Bth;
tile and carpet floors; deck and 16x54 pole barn.
$340,000
FACING GOLF COURSE! This is a lovely
3800 square feet home built in 1999; exterior is
brick and Hardee board; carpet, laminate, tile
floors; extra large 3B/3.5Bth. Call for your
appointment to see today! $350,000

14.74 Acre Tract Nice sloping tract, very well
drained; large pond and some native trees;
excellent home site. $195,000
ALL OFFERS CONSIDERED and POSSIBLE
OWNER FINANCING! 30 acres of pasture-
land; secluded; small pond with natural flow of
water; perfect for home site or small ranch.
$255,000
Lovely home site 5 acres with fruit trees, large
oaks and 1 acre pond. $110,000
Merle Langford Road 5 acre tract of land;
OWNER WILL CONSIDER ALL REASON-
ABLE OFFERS! $90,000


LET US HELP YOU BUY OR SELL YOUR PROPERTY

-- SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON IN
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: JOSEFINA GARAY......863-399-3329
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971 ASSOCIATE: JUDY HINERMAN..............735-0268
ASSOCIATE: ROBERT HINERMAN........227-0202
o


Azalea Apartments

Now Renting! Immediate Occupancy!
3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental rates beginning at $530
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL

(863) 375-4138 (1-800-955-8771)
Monday Friday

.. 9:00 d.LM- 12:00 Voon
aw arum1 ci1te-?n


ToNving Service Available
0 24 1 IOLIr SCI-ViCC 0
Lowest Possible Rates
Fa,,t and Reliable *
(863) 781-3090- or 781-3091







8B The Herald-Advocate, October 16. 2008


The


Classifieds


3 YOUNG PYGMY goat nannies,
excellent pet, $50 each. 735-2400.
10:16p
DOG GROOMER All breeds,
20+ years experience, knowl-
edge of hand stripping, home-
based. 773-4528, 773-4908.
10:16-11:13p


13' GHEENOE WITH TRAILER,
$250. 863-735-0464. 10:16p


NEW SUMMER RATES Crystal
Lake Village, 1 BR, $600/month.
767-8822. 10:2tfc
EXCELLENT CONDITION 2BR/2
1/2 B townhouse. Call 773-2122 to
see. American South Reality.
6:19tfc
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
12:20tfc
APARTMENTS AND HOUSES.
773-6667. 9:6tfc


3BR/2BA/1CG new conat., vault-
ed ceilings, must see, $800 month
and security. 863-443-2903
www.bghomes.net. 10:16tfc
2BR/1BA APARTMENT, central
A/C, $525. 781-1987 after 5:30
p.m. 10:16-11:13p
NICE CLEAN furnished efficiency
apartment for one person only.
AC/Heat, utilities furnished, $130
per week. First and last weeks
rent, damage deposit and refer-
ences required. 773-9793. 10:16p
DUPLEX APARTMENT In good
neighborhood, Wauchula. No
smoking, no pets, 2BR/1 BA, $600
monthly plus deposit. 781-3570.
2BR/2BA APARTMENT upstairs,
$525 per month. 863-781-1987
after 6 p.m. 10:9-11:7p
HOUSES, COMMERCIAL, store-
fronts, restaurants, hunting leas-
es, agri-leases. 773-6616, 445-
0915 Hungery. 10:9-11:7p
2/2 MH IN CHARLIE CREEK on
way to Avon Park. Partially fur-
nished. No pets. Lawn care in-
cluded. $500 rent and $500
deposit to move in. 863-781-0762.
10:9-16p


K-MAC MACHINERY & SERVICE, LLC
Full Machine Shop
Welding & Metal Fabrication
Lathe & Mill Work
Hydraulic Hoses
Site Work
Brake and Shear
Heavy Duty Drilling & Boring
Perry T. Knight Owner/Operator
L Office 863-767-1333 Cell 863-781-0145
a 640 South 6th Avenue Wauchula, FL 33873


PARKEIRI FILL DIRT


DEMOLITION
*Fill Dirt *Tree Removal
*Stump Removal Dragline *
*Track Hoe Land Clearing *
Shell Clay Top Soil*
Bulldozer Dump Trucks
(863) 735-2415


Special
Tandam Axle Load
111-16 yards)
$ 100/Load
within 5 mile radius of Zolfo Springs
Fill-Top Soil-Hard Pan
Hardee County Area orlyl


I Beautiful 3 BR/2 BA CBS Home in Riverview Heights
Large Landscaped Lot. Completely Renovated.
Gigantic Screen Room. Appliances, W/D. Nice Quiet
Neighborhood. $875 mo. FLS on 1 yr. rental agree.
Available Immediately!
Call For Appointment1016 (863) 234-2234
_____ ____ ^__^ ^^ -_ ^-10:16p ^ -


Lovely 2BR/1B

Apartments

$550 Month plus Security Required
Several to choose from!
Very nice location in Ft. Meade

Call Sheila for more information
(863) 375-9988 (863) 285-7203

cell (863) 214-5645 C110:16



HELP WANTED
DEPUTY
$34,660 $38,110

The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is seeking Florida
Certified Law Enforcement Officers. Applicants must
possess a current certification in Law Enforcement
arid meet the requirements set forth by the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement Training and Stand-
ards Commission. Applicants must successfully com-
plete the personnel selection process set forth by the
Sheriff's Office.
Applications may be obtained and returned to the
Sheriff's Office by Oct. 22, 2008 at 900 E. Summit St.,
Wauchula, FL, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. If other accommodations are neces-
sary, call the Sheriff's Office, 863-773-0304 to make
arrangements. EOE c10:916c
||C10:9-16c


WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack Ullrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc
* MOVE-IN SPECIAL *
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B from $400
monthly. 1BR from $300 monthly.
No pets, low deposit. Next to
school & hospital. Citrus Valley
MHP 863-698-4910 or 698-4908.
Se habla espanol.


7:31tfc


ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


CAREGIVER FOR YOUR ELDERLY
or disabled love one, experi-
enced, bonded. Have references
773-3781. 9:18-10:16p
B SEE SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
7:24-10:30p


Bees and


Joshua Clemente
(863) 990-6489
Wauchula, FL
State Inspected
& Insured


TRACTOR MOWING, bushhog-
ging, reasonable rates. Call 941-
730-8180 If no answer leave a
message. 10:16-11:13p
PAUL'S SMALL ENGINE
REPAIR, 20 years experience,
free pickup/delivery, estimates.
We pay cash for old or unwanted
equipment. 375-4081.
9:25-10:16p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION -
Additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening. Harold
Howze Construction. 735-1158.
RR05018 9:18-12:25p
JIM'S PAINTING House and
mobile home repair, interior and
exterior, licensed and Insured,
free estimates. 767-9650.
9:18-10:16p
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


JC's
Pollination, Inc.

Pollination Services
Watermelons
Cucumbers
A RY Blueberries
Squash
Citrus


Pollination Agreements with Written Contract.
$50 per colony 10:16-12:18p



LONiESTAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.


CUSTOM HOMES
REMODELING


* STEEL BUILDING
CONCRETE


GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lice # 291103615
863-773-4779
"QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE


c9:lllfc


GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

SFill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
jo .773-4478





.:1. Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience








We buy copper, brass,

aluminum, scrap metal,

& junk cars.

Come see us

for high prices

and good

service

251 Airport Road 767-0400
Wauchula c110:2-23


CITRUS TREE REMOVAL -
Cheapest rates by the hour or
contract, free estimates. Contact
Curtis Wilson at 767-5349.
7:3-12:4p
ALDERMAN'S CITRUS TREE
REMOVAL. Call Tim for quote.
863-781-5289. 4:3-1:15p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula, and Friday and Saturday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First Methodist
Church, corner of Grape and
Church St., Bowling Green.
12:6tfcdh
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP. Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
Located at the SFCC Annex,
Room #105, Hwy. 17 North, Wau-
chula. 735-2511. tfc-nc


CLEANING BY CHRISTINA
Courtesy Competent
Conscientious
Homes Businesses
Rental Properties
863-446-1195


10:16p


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
dh
If you wish to grow thinner,
diminish your dinner.
-H.S. Leigh


DeSoto County






LOW DOWN-
OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565


POST
OFFICE
NOW


4i
., .


HIRING!




Placed by adSource not affiliated
w/USPS, who hires
1-866-749-1415
c10:2-30c


Name

Iires


ROOMMATE -Room for rent $400
a month. 245-9481. 10:16-23p


GARAGE SALE Saturday, Oct.
18, 745 Altman, Wauchula, 7-?
10:16p
RUMMAGE SALE St. Michaels
Parish Hall, 408 Heard Bridge
Rd., Friday 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m.-12 noon. 10:16p
SATURDAY 8-?, 214
Pennsylvania Ave., kids, adult
clothes, books, teaching aides,
furniture, household Items, toys,
much more. 10:16p
SATURDAY 8-?, 1440 Citrus
Street, Wauchula, exercise bike,
filing cabinet, pressure canner,
mason jars, etc. 10:16p
SATURDAY 8-12, annual multi-
family, lots of everything, 1135
South Florida Ave., Wauchula.
10:16p
THURSDAY/FRIDAY Moving
sale, freezer, baby clothes & lots
of goodies, West Count Lne Rd.,
Bowling Green. 10:16p


SAIURUAY 8-Y, 2-Tamly, Hwy.
62, 2 miles, produce, furniture,
clothes, misc. 10:16p
SATURDAY 7-?, 702 East Oak,
Wauchula, clothing, plus size, &
children. 10:16p
SATURDAY 8 til ?, lots of Items,
3208 Perdue Road. 10:16p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY 8 a.m.-?,
weather permitting, 214 Short St.,
Wauchula, bedding, movies,
glassware, odds/ends, plants,
guava seedlings. 10:16p
3-FAMILY Steve Roberts
Special, 8 miles east, clothes,
baby clothes, playpen, computer,
tanning bed. Friday & Saturday,
8-? 10:16p
SATURDAY 8-12, 220 Pennsyl-
vania Ave., Wauchula. Lots of
misc. Items. 10:16p


NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot
a14c20tc


Short Time Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll free
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity requirements apply.




10 Acres
Perfect For Dream Home
High & Dry Well Included

$125,000
3010 Methodist Church Rd.
954-324-5732 c10:9-30






Bo says.... "I won't be undersold!!
BWoN EspinoICKUB


Bo Espino
Auta T~atnlata

AU MIE..
1wMMF


We repair most
American cars
Full time mechanic
We are licensed and
insured!
Reg #MV-4062S


'W MAREN
kMEil
ra-dmy'


Best dals on wheels! 00
I iBe d on wheels!


WHEEL
PFICKRGES
RURIL-
FIBLE!
L-----i


[ome' in for
Summer
Specials


773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
E VISA ('" (across from Wal-Mart)
CilO 16avw


Billy Ayers
Tire Technician


EMPLOYEE
EASING
OPTIONS, INC.
Robby Albritton, Vice-President
SPayroll Services Workers Compensation *
Year End W-2's 941 Tax Reports *
Office (863) 735-9226 Cell (863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
ralbritton@eloinc.net cal0:c www.elonic.net


-MIM9


OA I nrA~ 01 n -1..LA.-


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New re Used
Tires





October 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 9B


Book Fair Safari At Hilltop/HJH


By KASEY HELMS
Of The Herald-Advocate
Now is your chance to get
some great deals on good
books!
The media center at Hardee
Junior High and Hilltop Ele-
mentary is having a Book Fair.
The Book Fair Safari started
Tuesday, and today (Thursday)
the public is invited to come
from 5 to 7 p.m.* and browse
through a variety of books, toys
and software programs.
However, the public can
come throughout the week from
7:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. If any-
one would like to go to the
SBook Fair during school hours,
a Visitor's Pass is required from
the front office.
There is something for every
age to enjoy from pre-kinder-
garten through adult level
books. Books of all kinds -
fiction, nonfiction, cookbooks
and scrapbooks are going to
be available for sale throughout
the week to students and the
public.
Many current novels will also
be for sale as well as software
programs, reference books and
a wide variety of toy items.
There will also be discounted


books available, some of which
have earned the Sunshine State
Reader award.
The money made from the
book fair will benefit the Hill-


COURTESY PHOTO
Parents should be the first, and best, source of information for teens, pre-teens and
children about sexuality. Family education is so important there is a special month -
: October set aside to proclaim "Let's Talk Month," encouraging parents to get the
information they need for open communication with their kids to promote healthy and
;responsible attitudes and behavior. The local library now has several books available
[for parents to learn how to talk about sex with their children. The Teen Pregnancy
Prevention Council, Healthy Start, and other agencies have worked for years on
teenage pregnancy problems. Hardee County is now ranked second in the state.
Endorsing the proclamation (from left) are Holly Parker of Healthy Start; Patti Lang-
Hardee County Library; Carolyn Wyatt Hardee County Extension Service;
Commission Chairman Dale Johnson, who is liaison to these groups; and Lora Williams
- Teen Pregnancy Prevention coordinator.
-I1


ood

Shepherd
1-1 0 P I c
1rritialr Licewsed in 1984

M.Tk.lAu' the MNlost of Life.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
What will the city of
Wauchula be doing five years
from now?
The Wauchula City Com-
mission approved its five-year
capital improvement, through
2012-2013, at Monday even-
ing's meeting.
It now goes to the state
Department of Community
SAffairs, which must approve it.
Every city and county must
update its five-year plan annu-
ally, planning especially the
funding for projects for the next
three years.
Creating a five-year plan
assures the city is projecting
costs and revenue sources for
levels of service in roads,
schools, drainage, sewer and
water, solid waste and parks to
meet the needs of the residents,
and to coordinate those services
with the county, other munici-
palities and the School Board.
For instance, there must be
5.5 acres of open space per


LET'S TALK!


top Elementary and Hardee
Junior High shared library. The
proceeds help buy new books
for the students and equipment
needed by the library.


COURTESY PHOTO
Gayle Knight checks out the bargains at the Book Fair,
and shows a title of interest to Emma Marshall.


Wauchula Plans More Improvements


1,000 residents. The city more
than meets that with its 136.12
acres in eight parks, Seminole,
Youth sports, Crews, Heritage,
Oak Street, Peace River Park
and the skate park.
Current major projects in-
clude potable water, sewer, and
electric substation renovation.
To meet the requirement for
130 gallons of water per person
per day, the city is working on
water line rehabilitation and
water storage planning in 2009-
10.
Meantime, on Monday even-
ing, the commission approved
accepting interim $3 million
funding from the Florida Rural
Water Association. That will be
paid off when the city receives a
state Department of Environ-
mental Protection priority grant
to complete engineering, map-
ping and development of a fifth
deep well to provide potable
water to residents.
The commission also approv-
ed a resolution accepting a
$984,000 award from the U.S.


Department of Energy for reha-
bilitation and expansion of the
electric substation to ensure
reliable service to residents. U.
S. Representative Vern Buchan-
an was instrumental in obtain-
ing the additional funds for the
needed substation work.

In other action, the commis-
sion:
approved a resolution
which provides for a variance to
the commercial sign height and
area restrictions. Recommend-
ed by the city Planning &
Zoning Board, the proposed
sign on Northbound U.S. 17
will include information for all
the tenants in Hardee County
Centre, including Sweetbay,
Tractor Supply, etc.
The newly approved sign will
be 25 feet high and 409.5
square feet in area, more than
the limits of 15 feet high and 64
square feet in space. The reason
given for the variance was that
the sign represents several busi-
nesses and not just one. City
attorney Cliff Ables said per-
haps the city ordinance should
be amended to consider differ-
ent limitations for shopping
centers than individual busi-
nesses.
approved a resolution cre-
ating a city utility identity theft
detection and prevention pro-
gram under a recent federal
mandate under the Homeland
Security Act.
-met as a Community Re-
development Agency board and
approved funding for several
expenses approved during the
meeting. One is up to $375,000
for three downtown Melendy
properties which will increase
city parking capabilities.
Another is $35,000 for the
engineering and planning for a
truck route to deflect eastbound
traffic to keep it off downtown
Main Street, where newly con-
structed landscaping bulbs are
being run over by 52-foot semis
and their trailers. The proposed
route would have both north-
bound and southbound truckers
turn east at Palmetto Street, turn
back south at Fourth Avenue
and back east onto Main Street.
Another CRA expense is up
to $77,000 for a second Hardee
County Correctional Institution
work crew and its van and
equipment to maintain land-
scaping plants, trim trees and do
other cleanup work.
The CRA has about a
$500,000 balance and can ex-"
pend these monies, some of
which will be paid in install-
ments and some in full. The
final bill was $396 for beautify-
ing the Main Street Heritage
Park.
appointed Robert Shiver
to the Planning & Zoning Board
to replace newly elected Com-
missioner Val Patarini who was
on that board.
discussed the pump and
other problems at the Main.
Street Park fountain and re-
ferred it for more information,
perhaps at Monday's special
meeting on the power adjust-
ment formula ordinance. That
meeting is at 5 p.m. at the con-
ference room of the Admini-
strative office on South Seventh

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
1992 GDAN TL Id. 1GRDM9027CM040302
1994 Ford Tk. Id. 1FTHF26M3RNA10299
1995 FRHT Tk Id. 1FUYDXYB3SH882350
1996 VOLV Tr Id. 4V4WDBRFXTN731323
1999 POLA OH Id. 4XACD50A1X038047
2000 TOYT PD Id. 4TAWN72N9YZ581045
2006 ARCT OH Id. 4UF06ATV86K6A0830
2002 LINC 4D Id. 1LNHM86S42Y645393
Contact Linda Dean for details at Wauchula State
Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on Friday
October 31, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. the Wauchula
State Bank parking lot located at 106 East Main
Street, Wauchula Fl. 33873. c110:16.23


For almost 30 years Good Shepherd Hospice has been bringing
patients and their families the comfort, dignity and simple joys of
living each day to the fullest As the area's most established and
respected hospice organization, we are seeking:

Clinical Manager, RN
Highlands & I Hrdre Cvuntiti
3 yts supervisory & prior Hospice or Home Health exp. required


Staff Physician
[akdand, FL
The selected physician will provide direct palliative care serv-
ices (primary and consultative) for our growing census of
hospice patients and their families, in addition to managing
administrative and regulatory responsibilities.


LPNs-Pool & FT- 8p-8a
Polk Highland I lardee -(Lakeland and Sebring Areas)
Candidate will offer one-on-one patient care. Enjoy a sched-
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View all of our current opportunities,
locations and apply online at
www.goodshepherdh ospice.org
or fax: 813-871-8310
10:16c 06


Yard Sale / Friday 8am

Silent Auction Saturday Only *10am 3pm

4075 E. Main St. Wauchula

These are just some of the things that are going to be auctioned off








'94 21' ProLine 210 Sportsman 2002 Ford F350 Diesel
'94 Johnson Ocean runner 200 hp twin engine Parley Davidson Version
1999 Rolls Dual Axle 22' trailer. Power Stroke V8 FX4 OffRoad
1999 Rolls Dual Axle 22 trailer doors, Running Boards, Chrome tool box
& much mqre
Yard sale will contain personal items of

Coach White:

Harley Davidson items clothes etc.

Please come by to see EVERYTHING!
soc10:16p






10B The Herald-Advocate. October 16, 2008






October 16. 2008, The Herald-Advocate 11B


JV 'Cats Close Out Sebring


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Amidst a downpour, the
Hardee junior varsity Wildcats
kept playing and scored twice
before halftime.
When a bolt of lightning dur-
ing warm-ups halted the game
just as the second half was
about to start, Hardee came
home with a 16-0 victory.
The win assured Hardee of a
solid season, taking its 5-0
record into the final three
games of the season. The JVs
host DeSoto tonight (Thursday)
and Lake Placid next Thursday
before the season finale at
Okeechobee on Oct. 30.
During the pre-game warm-
ups at Sebring last week, "You
could see the storm coming. It
wasn't that it was so black, just
so big," said Wildcat head
coach Rod Smith.
Hardee kicked off to Sebring
which went three and out and


the Wildcats began as the rain
started. Hardee got to the 15,
where a fumble turned the ball
over. An apparent Blue Streak
score on the play was called
back on a clipping penalty.
Hardee got a score later in the
first quarter, when Quinton
Carlton took the handoff from
Tre' Anderson and went the
final yard into the end zone.
Since there was nearly an inch
of water on the field, a PAT kick
was impossible and Anderson
completed a pass to Colby
Baker for the two-point play for
the 8-0 lead.
In the middle of the second
quarter, Hardee was at fourth-
and-four. The 'Cats faked a
punt, with Reggie Snell taking
the ball for the first down.
Hardee continued its drive, with
Anderson sloshing the 37 yards
to score. A pass from Anderson
to Snell made the two points for
a 16-0 halftime score.


"I can't say enough about the
kids playing through adversity.
This time it was the elements.
We had been short on coaching
all week with Andy Judah and
Chris Spencer gone on some
other commitments. We talked
to the kids about having to
adjust and 'keep doing what we
do,' as Tony Dungy says in his
book. They responded and did
just that, and I'm proud of
them," said Smith.
Offensively, Baker finished
with 11 carries for 49 yards,
Carlton had five for 25, Ander-
son three for 47 and Snell the
important one for seven yards.
Defensively, it was Andrew
Hunt, Tony Moreno, Chase Re-
vell, Michael Forrester, Lincoln
Saunders and Snell making
tackles, with Carlton, Hunt and
Moreno each getting a sack.
"We play DeSoto next week.
They are always tough," con-
cluded Smith last Friday.


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON & ALEX GILLIARD
After a goal-line stand kept Sebring out of the end zone, Hardee quarterback Ezayi
Youyoute followed his blockers into the end zone for the game-winner.
WILDCATS
Continued From 1B


In fits and starts, the Streaks
moved downfield, nearly pick-
ed off twice on the way to one
last pass, a 46-yarder to Clarke
for the score. A fake PAT kick
and reverse, in which several
clipping penalties were not
seen, got the two points to make
it 45-36.
Hardee responded with a
seven-play drive which ended
when Youyoute followed
Nathan Tomlinson into the end
zone. The kick was no good, but
Hardee now led 51-36.
As the third quarter wound
down, Donaldson picked off a
Grubb pass intended for
Howard. Despite a 36-yard
Youyoute run to start the fourth
quarter, Hardee was unable to
score. A 33-yard field goal
attempt went wide left.
Sebring took over and went
forward and back for over three
minutes. A Grubb pass into the
end zone was nearly caught by


Wildcat Conner Davis, just
back from injury with a heavily
braced left arm. He was unable
to hold on to the ball and
dropped it. Howard fell on it. It
was ruled a fumble touchdown.
With the Schroeder kick,
Sebring had narrowed the score
to 51-43.
A fumble on the ensuing
kickoff, along with an unsports-
manlike penalty on Hardee,
gave the ball to Sebring at the
Wildcat 16. A pass to Howard
put the Streaks on the Hardee 2.
A fumble in the backfield lost
seven yards. Hardee nearly
intercepted a pass. With another
penalty, it was second and goal
at the 14. Grubb completed the
pass to Howard in the end zone
for the TD and again for the
two-point conversion to tie the
game at 51-all.
For the next 3:37, neither
team could get a true advantage,
leading to the Kansas tiebreaker
overtime (each team gets four


Photos!
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*Senior Awards
*Baseball Awards
*Spring Jamboree
*Little League Baseball
*Football Action
*Fair Photos
*Junior High Volleyball

Check Out

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"Photos.... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Alex Gilliard And Ralph Harrison 9-13tfc



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10:16-30c


tries from the 10-yard line).
Hardee won the coin toss but
deferred.
Bouyed up, Sebring tried its
best to score. Logan Thomas
sacked the quarterback, making
it second-and-16. The next pass
was incomplete, but another
was completed to Howard at the
1-yard line. Tyler Alden and
Jones led the Hardee contingent
in shutting down the possibility
of a Sebring score.
It was Hardee's turn for four
tries. White circled around and
gained five yards. Youyoute put
his head down and followed his
interior linemen into the end
zone to give Hardee the well-
earned win.
Although the offense did a
solid job behind outstanding
blocking, it was' the Wildcat
defense which made. the day,
with fumble recoveries, inter-
ceptions or near interceptions,
good pass coverage or break-
ups, sacks, tackles and assists.
In all, 20 players were noted
in on the tackle parade, with
seniors Louisjeune, Thomas
and Newcomb, junior Tyler
Alden and soph Donaldson
leading the way. Others includ-
ed Devante.Carter, Jones, Neu-
hauser, Skylar Aldeh, Damien
Richards, Jake Nowakowski,
Tomlinson, Mayer, Mikey
Retana, the Davis twins Carson
and Conner, McClenithan,
Jonathan Kelly, Haree Cook,
Sophio Arroyo and Youyoute.
There is a charm about the
forbidden that makes it
unspeakably desirable.
-Mark Twain
Probably nothing in the world
arouses more false hopes than
the first four hours of a diet.
-Dan Bennett


* m mlll


w -r


i-x


El Martes 4 De Noviembre


*r Vote por un homare con idkerazgo*

Vote por un hombre prolesional


SVote por un hombre con Integrilad


Vote por




Terry Alchley

para


Comisionado de el Condado

por el Distrito #3


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Terry Atchley, Democrat, for
County Commissioner, District 3


10:161


Bp


Flu season is here!
Please call the office
to set up an appointment.


Se Habla Espanol


-MM


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767AU41


FNMW- -~lw- .06IMr -q


a I "


--


Iqlmmpp







12B The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

CASE NO. 25-2008-CA-000126

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURI-
TIES CORPORATION MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, 2006-EQ1
PLAINTIFF,
vs. -
DAVID RICKETT; MARY RICKETT;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA; JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION
DEFENDANTSS.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
Oct. 8, 2008 entered in Civil Case
No. 25-2008-CA-000126 of the
Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial
Circuit in and for HARDEE County,
WAUCHULA, Florida, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash AT THE NORTH FRONT
DOOR at the HARDEE County
Courthouse located at 417 WEST
MAIN STREET in WAUCHULA,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 29
day of Oct, 2008 the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to-
wit:

BEGIN AT THE SE COR-
NER OF NE 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 8, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
RUN THENCE NORTH 0*13'
EAST 253.81 FEET TO THE
INTERSECTION OF A
GRADED ROAD; THENCE
SOUTH 61*45' WEST
ALONG THE CENTER LINE
OF THE ABOVE MEN-
TIONED CENTER LINE
307.30 FEET TO POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE
SOUTH 61'45' ALONG THE
ABOVE MENTIONED SAID
CENTER LINE 100 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 28*14'
WEST 176 FEET TO THE
CENTER LINE OF A SMALL
BRANCH; THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG
THE CENTER LINE OF THE
ABOVE MENTIONED
SMALL BRANCH TO THE
INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST LINE OF THE LOT
HEREIN DESCRIBED;
THENCE SOUTH 280 14'
EAST 228 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING,
ALL IN THE NE 1/4 OF
SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, LESS ROAD RIGHT-
OF-WAY ON THE SOUTH,
AND SUBJECT TO EASE-
MENT RECORD.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale. If any.
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lie pendens.
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale

Dated this 10 day of Oct., 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J.
STERN, PA., ATTORNEY FOR
THE PLAINTIFF
900 South Pine Island Road Suite
400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954)233-8000
08-30239(ASCF)
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommoda-
tion should contact COURT
ADMINISTRATION, at the HARD-
EE County Courthouse at 941-
773-9853, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD)
or 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: 25-2007-CA-000628

U.S. BANK NATIONAL


ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST
BOSTON HEAT 2005-6
PLAINTIFF
VS.
DAVID CRUZ SR.; LORRAINE
CRUZ; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; TORREY OAKS
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE


CORPORATION III; JOHN DOE
AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Granting the
Motion to Reset Foreclosure Sale
dated October 6, 2008 entered in
Civil Case No. 25-2007-CA-000628
of the Circuit Court of the 10th
Judicial Circuit in and for HARDEE
County, WAUCHULA, Florida, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at THE NORTH FRONT
DOOR of the HARDEE County
Courthouse, 417 WEST MAIN
STREET, WAUCHULA, Florida at
11:00 a.m. on the 22 day of
October, 2008 the following
described property as set forth In
said Summary Final Judgment, to-
wit:

LOTS 3, BLOCK 1, TORREY
OAKS GOLF COURSE
SUBDIVISION, A PORTION
OF SECTION 17, TOWN-
SHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE
25 EAST, HARDEE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING
TOT HE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BAR 68, PAGE 4,
AND PLAT BAR 69, PAGES
1 AND 2, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale. If any.
other than the orooertv owner as
of the date of the lies endens.
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated this 6 day of October,
2008.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINIS-
TRATION, at the HARDEE County
Courthouse at 863-773-9853, 1-
800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
10:9-16c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252008CP000095
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF

BARBARA A. MYRIE,
Deceased./

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of Barbara A. Myrie, deceased,
whose date .'of death was
December 23; 2007, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 417 W.
Main St., Wauchula, Florida 33873.
The names and addresses of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's
Attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against the dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice Is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.


The date of first publ
this Notice is 10-16-08.
Personal Repre
Cyn
11804 Prickly
Seffner,
Attorney for
Representative:
Mary L. Greenwood, Esq
Attorney for Cynthia Coo
Florida Bar No. 612456
619 E. Lumsden Rd.
Brandon, FL 33511
Telephone: (813) 653-174
Fax: (813) 654-6830


1l14 MI IC n ? 1A RC O:C;#U


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida
Advocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-
Advocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
Lions Enjoy Supper In Park
Wednesday: The Wauchula
Lions Club canceled the regular
luncheon Wednesday noon and
instead enjoyed a supper in the
city park Wednesday evening.
Sheriff C.S. Dishong, Carl
Hanna and other well-known
local connoisseurs of good food
prepared the meal.

This One News Item Saved
People $20,000: Congressman




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252008CA000390

CHAPMAN, LLC, a Florida
Limited Liability Company,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHAPMAN ESTATES, LLC, a
Florida Limited Liability
Company and DMK Associates,
Inc., a Florida Corporation,
Defendants

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant
to Final Default Judgment and
Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on October 22, 2008, in thq
above-styled cause, I will sell tQ
the highest and best bidder for
cash at the North front door of the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, on the 3 day of
October 2008, at 11:00 a.m., the
following-described property:
PARCEL ONE:
Parcel I.D. No. 10-34-25-
0000-00820-0000 The S 1/2
of the SE 1/4 of the NW 1/4,
Section 10, Township 34
South, Range 25 East,
Hardee County, Florida,,
LESS AND EXCEPT the
North 409.44 feet thereof;
AND
PARCEL TWO:
Parcel I.D. No 10-34-25-
0000-03740-0000 The NE
1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section
10, Township 34 South,
Range 25 East, Hardee
County, Florida, LESS AND
EXCEPT the following:
Parcel A:
A parcel of land located in
the NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of
Section 10, Township 34
South, Range 25 East,
Hardee County, Florida,
more particularly describ-
ed as follows: Commence
at the SE corner of the NE
1/4 of SW 1/4 of said
Section 10; thence South
8958'59" West and along
the South line of the NE 1/4
of the SW 1/4 of said
Section 10, 30 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence
continue along the South
line of the NE 1/4 of the SW
1/4, 360.89 feet; thence
North 00'02'24" East,
679.01 feet;'thence South
8957'36" East, 360.42 feet
to the Westerly maintained
right of way of Martin
Luther King. Jr. Avenue;
thence South 0000'00"
East along said right of
way, 342.42 feet; thence
North 8957'36" West
254.66 feet; thence South
0002'24" West 171.21 feet;
thence South 89o57'36"
East 254.78 feet to said
right of way; thence South
0000'00" East and along
said right of way, 165.02
feet to the Point of
Beginning.
P l B


A parcel of land located in
icatlon of the NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of
Section 10, Township 34
tentative: South, Range 25 East,
thi Cook Hardee County, Florida,
Pear Way more particularly describ-
FL 33584 ed as follows: Commence
at the SE corner of the NE
Personal 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said
Section 10; thence South
uire 89*58'59" West and along
Dk the South line of said NE
1/4 of SW 1/4, 30 feet to the
Westerly maintained right
of way of Martin Luther
44 King Jr. Avenue; thence
North 0000'00" East and
along said right of way,
10:16,23c 165.02 feet to the Point of
Beginning; thence continue
North 00000'00" East and
along said right of way,
171.21 feet; thence North
8957'36" West 254.66 feet;
thence South 00002'24"
West 171.21 feet; thence
South 89*57'36" East
254.78 feet to the Point of
,",, OeI Beginning.


1 ni.EF v rTFcJ% I;7 r uil;Tl/i d; r,,
THE STUDENTS' SAFETY WHEN TRAY-
ELING AND EXITNGTHE BUS. MAKE EYE
CONTACT WITH THE
DRIVER WHEN
CROSSING TO
KNOW WHEN IT'S


DATED this 3 day of October,
2008.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of the Court
Hardee County, Florida

As Deputy Clerk
10:9-16c


J. Hardin Peterson, or LaKe-
land, was a visitor in Hardee
County Tuesday night, speak-
ing at the Zolfo Springs Straw-
berry Growers Union meeting.
While here, Peterson related
how one news item in The
Advocate last summer has
saved this congressional district
alone something like $20,000.

Chapman Is Speaker At Ki-
wanis Meeting: The meeting of
the Wauchula Kiwanis Club
Tuesday noon was the fifth con-
secutive 100 percent attendance
of the 10-week attendance con-
test.

Reardon Is Employed To
Succeed Langford: John Z.
Reardon, who was for 12 years
in complete charge of the coun-
ty finance department of the
comptroller's office, has tenta-
tively accepted a position with
R. Clyde Simmons, clerk of the
circuit court, it was announced
yesterday afternoon.

County Rural Schools
Complete 1933 Terms:. Eight
Hardee County rural schools,
which opened last May, have
finished their five-month terms
and are preparing to close for
the year. Seven others will close
next Friday. They are: Pine
Dale, Lemon Grove, Lake
Branch, College Hill, Center
Hill, Tura and Castalia.

50 YEARS AGO
Jayvees Drop 13-6 Decision
To Bartow: The Hardee Jayvees
journeyed to Bartow Tuesday
night and came off on the short
end of the 13-6 score, in spite of
some sparkling play in the sec-
ond half.

Cats, Highlanders Tie; Hard-
ee At Bartow Tonight: Fumbles
nearly cost the Hardee Wildcats
a ball game last Friday night as
the Cats and Lake Wales wound
up the evening with a 13 to 13
tie.

Causey Reelected Cattle-
men's Head: Wauchula rancher
Emil Causey has been reelected
president of the Hardee County
,Cattlemen's Association for the
coming year. Following the
business meeting, Dr. Clark,
state veterinarian who now is
testing cattle for TB in this area,
introduced Dr. Fields and Dr.
Harkings, state veterinarians, to
discuss TB.

Goblins To Gambol At PTA
Carnival Next Saturday: Witch-
es, goblins, black cats and
skeletons will invade Wauchula
next Saturday afternoon. But it
will all be in fun. The reason?
The Wauchula Elementary
School PTA's annual Hallo-
ween Carnival, which opens
with a parade down Main Street
from the court house to the
school grounds.

New Outdoor Gym Nears
Completion In Wauchula: Less
than two years ago, Hardee
County's recreational program
consisted of an empty building
with dirt so deep on the floors
you couldn't see the tiles. About
a month from now this same
program will be able to boast
not only a fully equipped Rec-
reation Center but an outdoor
gymnasium for tennis, basket-
ball, volleyball and maybe even
skating.


1 Wa BackWhen


Board Acts To Speed Up
Roads: In a move aimed at
speeding up the preliminaries
for construction of the new
bond-project roads, the Board
of County Commissioners this
week filed its first suit to con-
demn land for rights of way for
two future secondary highways.

Cuke Prices Good, But Dry
Weather Affecting Quantity:
Prices on cucumbers were still
holding steady around $4.50 a
bushel to the grower on a pack-
out basis this week, but high
winds and dry weather threat-
ened to greatly reduce the yield
of the fall cuke deal.

25 YEARS AGO
City Enforces 2-Hour Park-
ing: The Wauchula Council
agreed Monday night to-have
the police chief enforcet he 2-
hour parking limit on Main
Street between Fourth and
Eighth avenues. Police Chief
Ray Grimes said he would have
his officers give out warnings
for a week.

21 Beauties Compete In Miss
Hardee County Pageant At The
Fair: Twenty-one seniors at
Hardee High will be competing
in the Miss Hardee County
Pageant at the Hardee County
Fair on Nov. 8. For the first time
ever, the contestants will all be
performing together in musical
numbers throughout the show.

Highlanders Hijack Hardee
At Lake Wales 7-6: The High-
landers struck late in the game
and made a fourth-quarter
touchdown and point-after
stand up for a 7 to 6 win over
the Hardee Wildcats at Legion
Field in Lake Wales on Friday
night.

Oveda Smith Named School
Bus Driver Of The Year: Oveda
Smith was named Driver of the
Year at the school bus driver's
appreciation banquet Thursday,
Oct. 6, at The Place Restaurant.
A total of 87 people attended
the banquet. School bus drivers
receiving certificates of appre-
ciation were Doris Thornton,
Wanda Altman, Beadie Keene
and Jessie Wiggins.

Hardee Jayvees Close Season

With Win Over Mulberry 30-
16: The Hardee Jayvees scored
the first three quarters of play to
put the finishing touch on their
season with a well-played 30 to
16 win over the Mulberry Jay-
vees.

Cukes Bring $12 FOB Mon-
day: Cucumbers were bringing
$12 FOB a bushel for super
select Monday. There were no
price quotes available for pep-
per and squash. Arthur Cran-
ford, manager of MoBo Enter-


I1


PUBLIC NOTICE
You are hereby notified that on Thursday, October 9, 2008,
upon public hearing, the Board of County Commissioners of
Hardee County, Florida, adopted a resolution vacating and
closing a portion of Pine Street and an alleyway located in the
Town of Ona Subdivision, legally described as: That portion of
Pine Street located between Blocks 5 and 8, lying between the
east right of way line of Second Street (now known as Badger
Loop) and the west right of way line of Third Street (now known
as Badger Loop) and that portion of the 20 feet alleyway locat-
ed within Block 5, lying between the north right of way line of
Pine Street and the south right of way line of Oak Street (now
known as Badger Loop). The above described portion of road
and alleyway being recorded in the original Plat of the Town of
Ona, Florida as shown in Plat Bar A-26 of the Public Records of
Hardee County, Florida.
Dale A. Johnson, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners .


Strong Passion, Commitment,
and Internal Motivation

.Jote

Arnold Lanier
for

Sheriff of

Hardee County

November 4, 2008
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Arnold Lanier, Democrat, for Hardee County Sheriff.


CITY OF WAUCHULA

.NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City of Wauchula, City Commission will hold a Special meeting on Monday, October
20, 2008 at 5:10 p.m. The purpose of the meeting will be for the second reading of
Ordinance 2008-27. The meeting will be held at the City Administration building located
at 126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873.

The above facility is a disabled-assisted facility. Any person needing to make special
arrangements, please notify the Office of the City Clerk at 863-773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Mayor
ATTEST:
S/Clarissa Abbott
City Clerk 10:16s


prises, said he thought cukes
would be cheaper Tuesday, but
the price was "real good."

10 YEARS'AGO
Wauchula Qualifying Ends
With Only 1 Challenger: There
will be only one Wauchula elec-
tion site in November. Ward II
Councilman David Royal is
opposed by the Rev. Jimmy D. \
Morse, while Ward I Council-
woman Connie Speith and
Ward III Councilman George
Heine were unopposed.

Citrus Crop Estimate Down:
Two hundred fifty citrus grow-
ers gathered at three simultane-
ous breakfasts Friday to hear
the Department of Agriculture's
1998-99 citrus crop estimate.
One hundred ninety million 90-
pound boxes of oranges is the
figure local growers came to
hear.

ZS Wants Code Enforcement:
Are some Zolfo Springs resi-
dents living in houses that are
"falling down around their
ears?" The topic came up as the
Town Council considered con-
tinuing an interlocal agreement
with Hardee County for the pro-
vision of building, permitting,
inspection and enforcement ser-
vices.

Wildcat Swimming Makes Its
Mark: Hardee Wildcat swim-
mers are dominating the Heart-
land. The Lady Wildcat and
Wildcat teams have both won
their meets against area teams.
Each Hardee squad is 6-0 and
each squad has the top times in
the Heartland in eight of the 12
events.

Elks Name Student Of The
Month: Wauchula Elks Lodge
1700 on Sept. 28 named its first
"Student of the Month." Each
month the lodge will give a $50
savings bond to the student cho-
sen for outstanding grades and
citizenship. The award this
month went to Amanda
Clanton, daughter of Buddy and
Linda Norman of Zolfo
Springs.

Wednesday Musicale Hears
Music Of Masters: Last Satur-.
day night over 70 members and
guests of the Wauchula Wed-
nesday Musicale attended the
club's annual fall banquet in the
fellowship hall of Faith Presby-
terian Church.

McKibben 'Earns 1998
Dickey Lirieman Award: Senior
Jake McKibben received the
Charles C. and William B.
Dickey Award at Homecoming
halftime ceremonies last week.
McKibben is in his fourth-year
on varsity, second as a starter,
and often is called upon to play
both offensive and defensive
line.

















Golf Teams


At Districts


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Both Hardee golf teams faced
an uphill battle in district com-
petition this week.
The Wildcats went to the
Links at Greenfield Plantation
in Bradenton on Monday for
their clash, while the Lady
'Cats went there Tuesday to
compete.
Hosted by Bradenton St.
Stephens, the boys Class IA
District 16 playoffs includes
private academies, sometimes
called golf factories, whose
players are on the course for
long hours every day with pri-
vate instructors. Besides St.
Stephens, there are Bradenton
Prep, Bradenton Christian,
Sarasota Out-Of-Door and
Sarasota Christian with only
boys teams, plus the public
schools, Avon Park, Braden
River, Sarasota Cardinal Moon-
ey, DeSoto and Lake Placid.
Hardee girls have only to
contend with the other public
schools plus St. Stephens.
In last week's meets, Hardee
boys picked up three more
vins. On Tuesday, it was a trip
o The Bluffs, playing against
3eSoto and Lake Placid. Hard-
-e shot 165, Lake Placid 190
md DeSoto 218.
Wildcat senior Ben Krause
vas the scoring leader with a


37, including one birdie. Class-
mate Jake Crews was next with
a 39 and two birdies. Sophs
Taylor Barlow and Justin
Bromley came in at 44 and 45
to round out the team score.
Freshmen Dan Miller and Dal-
ton Hewett, "who we will be
counting on for the next few
years, had 46 and 52," noted
Coach George Heine.
Last Thursday, the Wildcats
finished the regular season with
a visit from Lake Placid, in
place of the match scheduled
Oct 2, which was rained out.
The 'Cats shot 161 and the
Dragons had 188.
Krause again paced the
Wildcats, shooting a 36, includ-
ing a birdie. Bromley had his
low score of the season with a
40, which included a trio of
birdies. Tyler Cobb had 42 and
Barlow 43. Miller and Grayson
Lambert came home in 45 and
46 strokes respectively.
Meanwhile, Hardee girls had
only one match last week, at
River Greens in Avon Park. The
Lady Devils shot 208 on their
home course, and Hardee came
in at 228.
For the Lady 'Cats, it was
sophs Kara Norris, at 51 and
Emily Williams at 55, followed
by classmate Lauren Moore and
freshman Emma Marshall.


Letter To The Editor

New Sheriff Will Need


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HJHS GAFoaSVILD e FL 3261e D



HJHS Football Defeats Dragons


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High
Wildcats got back on the win-
ning track last week at Lake
Placid.
For the first time in several
years, the junior 'Cats beat the
yo6ng Dragons, and on their
turf.
This week's game is at Hill-
Gustat, then the season closes
with back-to-back home games.
Hardee will greet DeSoto on
Oct. 21 and Avon Park on Oct.
28 in the season finale.
Last week's game began in
Lake Placid's favor. The Drag-
ons took the opening kickoff
well into Hardee territory.
Running the pitch to the right
got the final 25 yards for a
score. The two-point conver-
sion try failed.
On its first drive, Aaron
Barker had several good runs
for Hardee. But a fumble on a
third-and-five at the Dragon 40
turned the ball over. Lake
Placid made the first down on
the next play but the Hardee
defense stalled and Hardee took


over on downs.
In the second quarter Barker
had several good runs to get
Hardee into the opposing red
zone and fullback Vince
Grimsley ran in for the touch-
down to tie the score 6-6.
Again, the two-point conver-
sion failed.
Hardee appeared to have
backed Lake Placid up on its
next series, when the punter
muffed the snap and it went
behind him. He picked it up,
reversed field twice and scored
a touchdown on the busted play.
This time the two-point conver-
sion was good, giving Lake
Placid a 14-6 advantage.
Barker had a good runback
and Hardee appeared headed
for a score, getting inside the
five-yard line, before a fumble
turned the ball over with less
than two minutes left before
halftime, Lake Placid still led
14-6.
Hardee got the opening kick-
off for the second half and
picked up a first down. On the
next third-down play, quarter-
back Luke Palmer attempted a


pass to Garrett Albritton, but a
defender coming from the out-
side hit Palmer and the pass was
picked off, the first interception
of Palmer all year.
Hardee retaliated. On the
next snap, a fumble was recov-
ered by Hardee. Barker took the
ball 30 yards and had Hardee in
scoring position. Grimsley ran
it in for the TD. Hardee was
down 12-14.
Lake Placid almost put up
another score. On third and
short, and a pitch to the left, the
running back reversed field and
got to the Wildcat five. But a
block-in-the-back penalty nulli-
fied the run. and Hardee held on
the fourth down to take over
possession of the football.
Down two points, Barker and
Grimsley combined to run the
ball to the Lake Placid one-yard
line.-Barker punched it in on the
next play behind the blocks of
Jesus Zuniga, William Beattie
and Grimsley.
Palmer completed the two-
point conversion pass to Kris
Johnson and gave Hardee the
20-14 lead. Hardee was able to


prevent Lake Placid from com-
ing back.
"I feel good about it. It's been
several years since we beat
Lake Placid. They had six pen-
alties. It was Luke's (Palmer)
first interception and he got hit
while passing. He had the usu-
ally good handling of the ball,"
commented Coach Mark Carl-
ton.
"It was a good game. Zuniga,
Beattie and Grimsley made
good holes for the run. It was
great overall. We didn't back
down when we were behind and
handled the adversity well," the
coach continued.
In the fifth quarter, "It was
one of the best fifth quarter
junior high games I've seen.
The offense scored twice and
the defense forced two turn-
overs. These guys don't start,
but they work hard and help
make our team better by going
hard against our starters in prac-
tice, and we appreciate all of
them," concluded Carlton.


Support Of
Dear Editor:
This is in response to
Thomas Santarlas' letter about
other candidates "using my
campaign ideas."
Mr. Santarlas ought to be
ashamed! Did he run for sheriff
to make our county a safer and
better place, or to have every-
one pat him on the back
because of his grand ideas?
Maybe Mr. Santarlas should
be proud that someone thought
about what he was saying and
will try to implement some of


The People
those ideas. Maybe Mr. Santar-
las ought to be helping in any
way he can, if he truly wanted
the job for the people and not
for the money or benefits.
Quit putting our candidates
down. Apparently people saw
your whining attitude and chose
not to have you as our sheriff.
Now is the time to help the new
sheriff so he can help our coun-
ty.
Debra Perry
A voter of Hardee County
Ona


There is a charm about the forbidden that makes it unspeak-
ably desirable.


Time ForA Change
r -


"Family Values"
Elect


David Durastanti
for

Superintendent of Schools





www.ForOurKidsFuture.com

I pledge to:
* Implement stronger discipline and school safety
* Institute additional vocational courses
SEstablish an open door policy
* Restore public trust and'integrity
* Review regional salary schedules
* Change the things needing change


I Pledge to Do My Best for You
Paid political advertisement paid for by David D. Durastanti Campaign Account,
Approved by David D. Durastanti, Republican, Chet Huddleston,
Campaign Treasurer 10:16p


PHOTO BYALEX GILLIARD
Keeping the crowd enthused are Hardee Junior High Cheerleaders (front row, left to right) Lacey McCleniffan
Brooke Conley, Katie Smith, Deanna Sanchez and Kiara Johnson; (middle row) Caroline Durrance, Hailey Clements,
Farrah Muntz, Kaitlyn Laker and Arissa Camel; (back row) Coach Sonya Bennett, Jessica Broadhead, Krista
Pilkington, Shelby Lambert, Sonya Fowler, Alexan Maddox, Lark Lukawski and Coach Kari Noblett.
























State law says we must have a "capital

: "3 finance" plan to pay for the infrastructure

costs or impacts of growth. If we don't do

This, we may find that the State does not
approve future land use changes for much
needed growth. In order to not put an undue
hardship on our local citizens, there has to be a good way to

analyze when to implement impact fees and at what amount.

I prefer to set a "trigger mechanism" with input and


recommendations from a good committee


developers, builders, government rep

officials and other county professionals.


resenta


consisting of

tives, elected


I Home: (863) 773-4314 Email: dsamuels45@yahoo.com -I








2C The Herald-Advocate, October 16,2008





Schedule Of Weekly Services-


WAUCHULA


-PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.,
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
BO ING : Miercoles Servico............6:30 p.m.


APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ...................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m."
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ...............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School ...................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.,
Morning Worship ..........1...1..:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
,Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. IIwy. 17. 375-2253
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
.Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m..
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
SJueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 3754228 or
773.9019
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
iCommunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

-MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.......5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ....................1000 a.m.
I Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
'Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
tMid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs. .................. 7:30 p.m.'


ONA.

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
;Suniday School ......................9:45 a.m.
SMorning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
S INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .... ................9:45 a.m.
iWorship Service ........11:00a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
iSunday School ..:................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
S 131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
....................................... 6:30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

.WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
English Service .............11:30 a.m.
General Wors~p Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesid y Priyer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
225 E. Main St. (City Hall
Auditorium)
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
.Sunday English Service ......10:00 a.m..
Sunday Spanish Service ......11:30 a.m.

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
S773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.;
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Callfor locations

S CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Pastor- James Bland
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
* MMorning Worship .:.........11:00 a.m.
;Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
SWednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m.;
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship.:....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Mens Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773.4576
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ...................... 11:00 a.m.
ELREMANENTE .
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion.........7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio...................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio... ...10:30 a.m.


ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath .7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m..

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CIIURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth' Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave -773-3800
Praise & Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service......7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
SMorning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
SFamily Night Supper .............5:00p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Mtg............6:00 p.m
M& M Kids's Klub...............6:00 p.m
(Music & Missions 4 yr -grade 5)
IMPACT (Jr. High).................6:20 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr 6-8)
323 (Sr. High).............. ........ 6:30 p.m
S(Youth Worship for gr.9-12)
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St.. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical ................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Predicacion ........................ 11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles......7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Children's Programming
(0-12th grade).........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Dinner....................... ......5:30 p.m.
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
(Lil'K)/Sonshine Singers
.................................6:30-8:00 p.m.
Jam Team......................6:30-7:15 p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups
..................................7:15-8:00 p.m .
6-12th Grade (Oasis)....6:30-8:00 p.m.
Adult Bible Study.........6:30-8:00 p.m
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ........... .......10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .........1.....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............:...7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m:.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ...................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship. 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.
FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
-1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School .....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service..........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Ministries .... ...7:00 p.m.
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts..............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
W orship................ .............10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min...........7:00 p.m.


IGLESIA COMUNIDAD
de fe Wauchula
Community of Faith Wauchula
322 Hanchey Rd. 773-0065
954-383-5078
Sunday Service.....................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
Friday Youth Service ...........7:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ............................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles...............................7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL


SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAI'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.:
Tuesday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.


WAUCHUI

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Evening ....................4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
LAKE DALE BA"SSCHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road- 773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..... 11...........1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
113 N. 7th Ave.
Sunday Service ..................11:00 a.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
SMorning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Church Training ...................5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship ................(.....(st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .....................:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .......6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1 & 3' Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2" & 4' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study...................... 1:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service
PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY'
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ,.7,...:..7:00 p.m.

REA LIFE C URCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.



RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
SEvening Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.


ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9TH Ave. 773-6418
Sunday Service...............10:00 .m.

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ................7:00 a.m.
(English) .................... 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ................. 1:00 a.m.
(Creole).................... 1:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship,. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship ...................7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.


Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fami. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.


: aHiLA'

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Church.................................. 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service .....................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ...................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.
,Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.,

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
1720 W. Main
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all Services.

ZOLFO SPRINGS .



COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ............................... 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor- 773-6657
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH IIC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Wrship. 7 00 p m.,
Wednesday ................:.... 7:30 p.m..

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ................11:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524 773-0989
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship............................... 11:00 a.m .
SEvening........................... 6:00p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet. ..7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ............. 10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.


PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m. t
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
...................................; :..... 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday. ..................10:30 a.m.
SEvening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .........................6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School... ...............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship............7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................1 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................ 1:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ... ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ...............................11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ............:............6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................... ...........8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes........5:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.in.
Morning Worship ............1... 1:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
MchaelAGuiA, D00.
Metter. *oia
President Coolidge invited
some friends to dine at the
White House. Worried about
their manners, they decided to
do everything the. President
did.
'When the coffee was sertd
Celidge poured his. into, a
saucer, and so did the guests.
He added cream and sugar.
They did likewise. Then
Coolidge leaned over and
gave his to the cat!
So many say, "When in
Rome, do as the Romans do."
But that, too, can get you into
trouble.
Do you care for better
advice?
The Living Bible says,
"Don't copy the behavior and
customs of the world, but be a
new and different person with
a fresh newness in all you do
and think."
Copy Christ!


The Combination


Your day could have been better.... First, the
car stalled in traffic and when you
finally arrived at work the boss was
growling. You were already
behind on a project and the
school nurse phoned to Inform
you that your daughter was ill
and needed to be picked up
immediately. What else could
possibly go wrong?? Well....
Upon arriving home you find
nothing to fix for dinner and the
washing machine broken. How
could anyone be happy after
such a horrendous day? What

contentment?
Contentment is not
perfection; it's the ability to
cope with imperfection.
After all, we live in an
Imperfect world. Life is not
always fair. But God is
always there
Worship at God's House.
There you will find prayer and
falth...the combination to contentment.
Things will still go wrong, but God will be by your
side to help you through life's challenges.


II CaopvhiO, 2006. K~N.WU~unu N.W0of S s, P. O. 9*8187. Cro tCYg,4R., VA 2280. ww.k


Peace iver Gro wers

SWholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


wmrI


11


*' <*


.rr~iYln






October 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Letter To The Editor

Resident Questions Use


Of County-Owned Vehicles


Dear Editor:
My concern is of the recent
meetings regarding the Fire
.Rescue Department budget. I
am a taxpayer and voter in this
county. I recently attended
some of the budget meetings
that were held by the County
Commission.
My question is . in these
tight budget times . how can
the Chief and Deputy Chief
drive around in their county-
owned vehicles and even pick
up their kids at school in them?
Go to lunch downtown?
Are they paying for their own
gas and documenting their
mileage? If so, I think the resi-
dents of our county would like
to see the documentation. The
Deputy Chief even picks up
other kids at the junior high that
are not his own.
Our County Commission is
condoning these kinds of
actions by not asking such
questions.
Please be careful with your
vote this November.

Thank you,
Bee Williams
Bowling Green

Response by Chief Choate:
This is a rebuttal letter
regarding the concerns of "Bee
Williams."
I have attempted to contact
Mrs. Williams to address her
concerns personally through
email but haven't been able to
get a reply. The intent was to
speak with her just to let her
know that the fire rescue
department has an open door
policy.
This means, if every some-
one would like to know any-
thing or have any comments
(good or bad) I would like to
hear them. Many, many of the
county residents and I have had
some real insightful conversa-
tions over the years. This has
proven to be most advantageous
for those concerned citizens as
well as this administration.
Let me set the record straight
regarding the Fire and EMS


budget. We have felt the crunch
of the tight budgets just as
everyone else. Even with our
increasing call volumes and the
rising cost of fuel and operating
supplies (i.e. medications, IV
fluids, fire hose, firefighting
gear, etc.) our personal services
and operating monies were sig-
nificantly reduced.
With regard to using the
county-owned vehicles. You
can find me each morning in
my highly visible vehicle set-
ting at a bus stop supervising
four children (one of them
being mine) until they are safe-
ly on the bus and on their way
to school.
Concerning the deputy fire
chief, he is perplexed as to the
allegation that he picks up other
kids from school. He assures
me that this has never occurred.
Additionally, because these are
"allegations" and have the
potential to cause an inappro-
priate uproar, I would ask for
you to provide me with the
names of the other children he
allegedly picked up. This will
ensure a proper investigation on
my part.
Unlike the municipalities,
other county departments, law
enforcement, etc. who have
assigned vehicles, the fire chief
and the deputy fire chief are
always on duty. For most occu-
pations, the minute that you
walk out of the door to go
home, your duty is terminated.
You're not expected to come
back to deal with a minor after-
hours crisis. Further, if you
leave town on vacation, you
may call in, but no matter what
happens at the office, or plant,
no one will ask you to return to
work.
This is not so for the fire
chief or the deputy fire chief.
We often joke 'about "our
badges being pinned to our
pajamas," but in fact the chief
officers in Hardee County are
on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week, 365 days a year, no mat-
ter where they are, what they
are doing or what they have
planned.


This fire rescue department
has two administrators for five
internal divisions. Along with
these responsibilities, I as fire
chief am also the Public Safety
Director for the county. This
places me over not only fire res-
cue but includes everything
underneath this umbrella
including emergency manage-
ment, enhanced 9-1-1, veteran
services and county addressing.
Citizens, I would implore
you to make every effort to con-
tact this administration should
you have any questions. All of
us perceive things differently
and are full of our own opin-
ions, but no matter what the
topic concerns, we should fine
out facts before any personal
attacks are made.
One thing that I have learned
being your fire chief for almost
seven years is this, perception is
real. When any of us perceive
something, we truly believe it to
be real. I would just simply ask
everyone, let's come together
and try and find solutions to
problems. As Christians, let's
not attack people personally.
Oh, it is okay to attack people's
ideas or their thoughts, but it is
not okay to attack someone per-
sonally under any circum-
stances.
You are protected 24/7/365
by 12 highly trained and moti-
vated firefighters, emergency
medical technicians and para-
medics, all of whom would give
their life for the life of a
stranger. We instill "customer
service".into all of your public
safety employees. The next
time that you see them, thank
them for the job that they do.
Remember, the next life we
save ... could be yours

Very respectfully,
Michael J. Choate
Fire Rescue Chief
Hardee County Fire Rescue
Division of Public Safety
149 K.D. Revell Rd.
Wauchula, FL 33873
863-773-4362 Office
863-773-3827 Fax
"Jeremiah 15:15"


CURLEW CONFERENCE


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
This small flock of curlews were feeding in a front yard on East Bay Street in Wauchula
on Monday afternoon following a rainshower. The curlew is considered to be a shore-
bird.


Rules Thwart Illegal Release

Of Nonnative Fish And Wildlife


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) has adopted new rules
that will provide options for
unpermitted owners of nonna-
tive species if they can no
longer keep their pet.
"Release of exotic animals by
'pet owners remains a signifi-
cant pathway for the introduc-
tion of nonnative species," said
the FWC's Scott Hardin. "As a
result, the FWC has initiated a
series of pet amnesty events to
provide an option for owners of
exotic pets to surrender their
unwanted pets to responsible
,agencies or individuals instead
'of illegally releasing them."


The FWC requires a captive
wildlife permit to own many
nonnative species, including
Class II and.III wildlife, ven-
omous reptiles and the six.
species designated as reptiles of
concern.
The new rule allows, at
FWC-sponsored amnesty
events, owners of tinpermitted
fish and wildlife to surrender
their animals, and for adopters
to accept nonnative fish and
wildlife from unpermitted indi-
viduals, without penalty.
This addition is an exemption
from the current rule that pro-
hibits transfers of wildlife of
any kind when permits are


Vote


Teresa M. Crawford

for

School Board District 3


''
::.:
n : -:. I~
-.-
:
. .


I am an educator, and I
believe that education is
a vital factor in ensuring
future success. Like you,
I have an investmentt in
all of our students.


Sincerely,

eJ~tefc1 /. owt zd


required.
The new rule also allows
state and county animal control
agencies to accept unpermitted
nonnative animals, with the
owners allowed to surrender
those animals to the agencies
without penalty.
The FWC has sponsored
three amnesty day events. The
next Pet Amnesty Day will be at
the Jacksonville Zoo Nov. 22,
and another one will be in
Miami in early 2009.
The passage of the new rule
will help prevent further releas-
es of nonnative fish and wildlife
into Florida's diverse and frag-
ile environment.


Experienced
Teacher, Counselor,
Campus Director-SFCC

Educated
BA-Social Science Ed
MA-Counselor Ed'
M.Ed.-Education
Leadership

Involved
Hardee County EDC
Hardee County Fair
Board
Hardee County Athletic
Foundation


'OULD YOU COS EMNAERFO IYS


Vote for leadership


r.* *
r


w


Tuesday, November 4th


SVote for Professionalism


Vote for Integrity



Vote for




Terry Atchley


for


County Commissioner


District 3


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Terry Atchley, Democrat, for
County Commissioner, District 3


10:16p


IC II L '


---- 'L


kl.


I % mmmmimliw


- I







4C The Herald-Advocate, October 16. 2008


Parents: This Is 'Let's


Talk Month'; Try It!


HEALTHY START


When parents talk to and
affirm the value of their chil-
dren, young people are more
likely to develop healthy atti-
tudes about themselves.
Research shows positive
communication between par-
ents and children can help
youngsters establish individual
values and make good deci-
sions. Talking helps you share
your values. Teens can learn to
make good decisions.
The Hardee County Teen
Pregnancy Prevention Alliance
(TPPA), through a grant from
Heartland for Children, has
donated several books to the
Hardee County Public Library
on the subject of teen sexuality
and teen pregnancy. Among
these books are several that will
aid parents with the difficult
task of initiating a conversation
with their children concerning
sexuality. Just see Director Patti
Lang at the library for assis-
tance in locating these new
resources.
As October is "Let's Talk
Month," it is the perfect time to
talk with your children about
the choices they face every day.
Discuss their goals for life and
continue to encourage them to
make the right choices.
Unfortunately, Hardee
County has ranked number one
or two in the state for the past
several years in teen pregnan-
cies. As an organization,
TPPA's goal is to reduce that
rate.
The alliance needs the help of
everyone in the community to
partner with it to reach this
goal. The future is in the coun-
ty's youth; helping them make
wise choices is everyone's re-
sponsibility.
Talking about abstinence can
bring up many feelings. If a par-
ent does not have experience in
talking about sex with their
children, it may feel embarrass-
ing. Parents may feel as if they
are prying and that their child
will pull away from them. Or,
parents may fear that talking
will cause their child to chal-


lenge family values and beliefs.
To avoid any of these feel-
ings, make plans on how the
conversation will be initiated.
Parents may even want to prac-
tice what they want to say in
front of a mirror. They will
become more comfortable with
the subject, and will be able to
adjust facial expressions to not
appear judgmental.
Initiating conversations about
the facts of life may be difficult
for some parents because they
did not grow up in an environ-
ment where the subject was dis-
cussed. Some parents may be
afraid they do not know the


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right answers or feel confused
about the proper amount of
information to offer.
Again, the new books avail-
able at the county library will
help.
And remember, the Teen
Pregnancy Prevention Alliance
meets the second Tuesday of
each month at 9 a.m. at the
Hardee County Extension
Office at the Agri-Civic Center
on Altman Road in Wauchula.
TPPA encourages everyone
to take an active part in this
endeavor. Help the group let the
kids know, "Life is full of
choices; choose wisely."


COURTESY PHOTOS
Hardee County Healthy Start recently earned the Provider Recognition Award for Best
Practices in prenatal screenings and support to babies and pregnant women. The local
program consistently beats the state's goal of 75 percent for completion of prenatal
screenings, coming in at over 95 percent. Also, Heartland For Children is providing
$5,000 to the Healthy Start Coalition for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Alliance here,
which is working to end Hardee's claim to number one or two in the state for teen preg-
nancy rates. Pictured here (at far left) is Holly Parker, coordinator of the Healthy Start
Coalition for Hardee and Highlands counties, as she presents the award to (also from
left) Leslie Bond, Maria Luna, Lora Williams, Cheryl Bone and Susana Farias; missing
from the photo is Araceli "Arci" Plata.












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the other "exotic" mortgage loans that now plague our industry. We adhered
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COURTESY PHOTO
Lora Williams and Leslie Bond, members of the Teen
Pregnancy Prevention Alliance and Healthy Start, pre-
sent Library Director Patti Lang (front, right) with several
books on the subject of teen sexuality and teen preg-
nancy.


I love being asked to identify plants, and I don't know which
gives me more pleasure: to know what they are or not to know
what they are. -
-Elizabeth Lawrence

>oeo Time For A Change
"S -- TDAVID 0-
og DURASTANTI
for
Superintendent of Schools
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"Mr. D" PROVEN LEADER Novr 4t 2
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Total cost to taxpayers for three Sheriff's Office Administrators:

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Combining three Sheriff's Office Administrators into one

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Adding FOUR Deputy Sheriffs to help the operational components of the
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Information used in this campaign advertisement was acquired from the Hardee County Sheriff's Office Finance Director
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S2008-09 Florida wate fowl hunting seasons
SS'esorn Dates '.. Bag/possession limits
Canada goose Nov. 22-30, 2008 5/10
Dec. 1, 2008 Jan. 30,
2009
Waterfowl and coot Nov. 22-30, 2008 6/12 ducks**
Dec. 6, 2008 Jan. 25, 15/30 coots
2009 5/10 mergansers *

Youth Waterfowl Same as above;
Days Jan. 31 Feb. 1, 2009 2/4 scaup

Snow, blue and Nov. 22-30, 2008 15/No limit
Ross' geese Dec. 6, 2008 Jan. 25,
2009
* Season now open statewide (previously was open only on Lake Seminole).
** Six-duck daily bag limit shall consist of no more than 4 mallards (no more than 2 of which
may be female); 1 black duck; 1 mottled duck (Florida duck); 1 fulvous whistling-duck; 1 pin-
tail; 2 redheads; 3 wood ducks; and 4 scoters. Daily bag limit on scaup is 1 through first 40
days (Jan. 5, 2009); then 2 for remainder of season (Jan. 6-25, 2009). Canvasback season is
closed. All other species of duck (except harlequin) may be taken up to the 6-duck daily limit.
Taking or attempting to take brant or harlequin ducks is prohibited.
*** No more than 2/4 of which may be hooded


"7






October 16,2008, The Herald-Advocate 5C


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police officers
investigated the following incidents and made the following
arrests:
COUNTY
Oct. 12, Darrell Earl Ellis, 41, of 517 N. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17
N.), Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Thomas Souther on a charge
of larceny failure to remit sales tax.
Oct. 12, a vehicle stolen on East Broward Street, criminal mis-
chief on Ratliff Road and a theft on Owen Roberts Road were
reported.

Oct. 11, Justin David Miley, 34, of 4321-81st W., Bradenton,
was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with DUI.
Oct. 11, Dustin Dewayne Rimes, 27, of 3218 John Holt Road,
SZolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Todd Souther on a charge of
violation of probation.
Oct. 11, Heraclio Hernandez, 46, of 1905 Petteway Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with
DUI.
Oct. 11, Tresa Channel Gains, 25, of 517 Hanchey Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge of contempt of
court.
Oct. 11, a residential burglary on Parkview Terrace and a theft
on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue were reported.
Oct. 10, William Ocie McKinney, 33, of 3918 SR 64 East,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson on a charge of
withholding support of children.
Oct. 10, residential burglaries on Buck Drive and Bost Road,
a vehicle stolen on South Florida Avenue and criminal mischief on
U.S. 17 North were reported.
Oct. 9, Darryl Renard Kennon, 51, of 309 SW Ninth St.,
Mulberry, was detained on an out-of-county warrant. He had been
arrested by Wauchula Cpl. Matthew Whatley on a charge of driving
with knowledge of a suspended license.
Oct. 9, Mark Dwaine Williams, 35, of 418 S. llth Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge of violation of
probation.
Oct. 9, a fight on Lincoln Street was reported.

Oct. 8, Eric Trevino, 19, of Wauchula Garden Apartments, was
arrestedby Dep. Matt Tinsley on a charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance without a prescription and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Oct. 8, Lazaro Arturo Villamirin, 45, and Juan Sanchez Luque,
76, both of 5208 Pine Level Road, Ona, were arrested by the coun-
tywide Drug Task Force (DTF) and each charged with trafficking
in marijuana, producing marijuana and possession of drug para-
phernalia. Villamarin was also charged with fraud by tampering
with or theft of utilities.
Oct. 8, a residential burglary on Martin Luther King Jr.
Avenue, criminal mischief on SR 62 and thefts on Pine Level Road,
Mancini Place and Alderman Road were reported.

Oct. 7, Philip Wayne Kersey, 20, of 3498 SR 62, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Johnny Trammell and charged with
trespass on property other than a structure, resisting an officer by
refusing to stop or fleeing, and a traffic violation.
Oct. 7, Darrell Antron Hines, 24, of 726 LaPlaya Dr., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Johnny Trammell on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Oct. 7, Tyler Lee Richardson, 20, of 410-51st St. W., Braden-


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ton, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on an out-of-county warrant.
Oct. 7, Angel Rodriguez, 37, of 940 Fernleaf Dr., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Manuel Zuniga and charged with grand theft
of a vehicle and criminal mischief--damage to property.
Oct. 7, Kenneth Allen VanSickle, 42, of 3295 SR 64 East,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det lay Nicholson on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Oct. 7, Ashley McCumber, 19, of 977 SR 64 East, Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with larceny petit
theft.
Oct. 7, a vehicle was reported stolen on SR 64.

Oct. 6, Clyde Bowens, 69, of 1608 Martin Luther King Jr.
Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Todd Souther and charged
with larceny-petit theft.
Oct. 6, Robert Daniel Staton, 39, of 930 Buttonwood Dr.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble and charged with fraud
- giving false ID on sale of regulated metals and dealing in stolen
property.
Oct. 6, Michael C. Glover, 41, of 1920 NW 167th St., Opa-
Locka, was arrested on a charge of withholding support of children.
Oct. 6, a residential burglary on U.S. 17 South, a business bur-
glary on Land Drive, a tag stolen on Myrtle Drive and a theft on
Parnell Road were reported.
WAUCHULA
Oct. 12, Guillermo Garcia, 51, of 238 Griffin Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with disorderly
intoxication.
Oct. 12, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.

Oct. 11, Henry Lee Harris, 48, of 210 South CR 663, Ona, was
arrested by Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with two counts pos-
session of a weapon or ammo'by a convicted felon and petit theft-
shoplifting from a merchant.
Oct. 11, a vehicle stolen on South Florida Avenue, and thefts
in two locations on U.S. 17 South were reported.
Oct. 10, a theft on South Eighth Avenue was reported.
Oct. 7, thefts on Downing Circle and on South Florida Avenue
were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Oct. 12, Xuxa J. Carmona, 18, of 4705 U. S. 17 North,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and
charged with two counts battery on detention/juvenile facility staff.

Oct. 11, Carlos Ramirez Sierra, 19, of 724 S. Perry St., Fort
Meade, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and charged with
DUI and no valid license.
Oct. 11, Jose Luis Chavez, 20, of 2405 S. Petty Lane, Fort
Meade was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold on an out-of-county
warrant.
Oct. 11, Gregorio Villeda-Ramirez, 44, P.O. Box 284, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and charged with
DUI.
Oct. 11, a theft on Central Avenue was reported.

Oct. 9, a residential burglary on Dixiana Drive was reported.

Oct. 8, a theft on Central Avenue was reported.


Letter To The Editor

Should Churches Help

Non-Members Financially


'Dear Editor:
I would like to voice my
opinion on a very sensitive mat-
ter that has been on my heart for
a long time.
Of course, it is about money,
my most (and a lot of.others, I
must say) interesting subject.
When I call churches around
the area to help with finances
when I get in a bind occasional-
ly, I receive the top answer and
that is we are obligated to help
our families in the church first
and then we have no more for
others.
Well, it is a blessing to help
people in your own church but I
am just clearing up this state-
ment. I have never seen in the
Bible where it states that the
home church members get first
priority with their churches'
money.
It says in the Bible whoever
does my will is my brother, sis-
ter, mother. It also says in the
Bible in Proverbs whoever
helps the poor is helping the
Lord. The best scripture I will
quote is it is more blessed to
give than to receive.
If these scriptures come right
from the Bible, it also shows we
are living under grace and not
the law and we give from our
hearts, meaning we can give
what we desire or can instead of
holding us to an amount such as
10 percent of the gross or net.
We don't have to live in guilt if
we don't get it right.
If people were conditioned to
help others why do I feel such
shame when I have to go asking
and searching for money from
different ones when I get down
and out and have a genuine
need for money?
I will give my own opinion
here in this letter. I feel the
answer is we have all been
raised with pride. The families
whisper and talk about the poor


or people who come to school
or work or wherever with less
than quality clothes.
There is the stigma we have
all been raised with. It is funny
though how when it is time to
take up the offering or give to
charities on TV or when a spe-
cial speaker comes to visit it is a
different story about money.
Then everyone brings out
the best scriptures on money.
They will say "dig deep it
is for a good cause." We want
to make sure the speaker in
church gets blessed, and of
course they will say we will
receive a blessing by giving our
biggest dollar amount we have
in our pockets.
People are just brainwashed.
to think certain ways. The ways
we have been taught are not
always biblical, unfortunately.
I am in no way making fun or
upset about taking up the offer-
ing because that also is biblical
to give to the church.
I believe though the tithe is
from the old testament. The
new scripture is out of the'abun-
dance of the heart shall we give
to the Lord. I heard actually that
is so we would give more than
the 10 percent outside of the
church like they do in the
church.
We people who get down on
finances would not have to feel
embarrassed or'shamed and feel
like a bum or the scum of the
earth trying to get bills paid.
I do not get down on my
finances just so I can go ask
people for money. At times my
phone bill gets too high or
whatever happens. I do appreci-
ate very much though the ones
who have helped me out finan-
cially. You all have been total
blessings.


Connie Rowe
Wauchula


Oct. 6, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.
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6C The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


1zp;.P -.P. fV -Tr '.,
PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Looking at a winning season, playing for the 2008 Hardee Junior High Lady Wildcats are (kneeling, from left) Summer
Sisum, Kayla Nichols, Addison Aubry, Kate Thomas and Ana Galvez; (standing) Coach Sharri Knight, Katelyn Rowe,
Kayla Knight, Jessica Harrison, Danika Briones, Brooke Tyson and Karlee Henderson; missing is Brooke Knight.


HJHS
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High
School Lady Wildcats picked
up two more wins last week.
The girls shut out Hill-Gustat
12-0 and downed Sebring 11-2
for another successful week.
This week's games are at
Avon Park on Monday and
home today (Thursday) for a
visit from Lake Placid. Next
week includes greeting DeSoto,
the only team to beat Hardee-in
extra innings, on Monday. The
season finale is at Hill-Gustat
on Oct. 23.
At home last Monday against
Hill-Gustat, Hardee had superb
pitching from eighth grader
Kayla Knight, who struck out a
dozen and walked one in secur-
ing the shutout.
In the bottom of the first
inning, Addison Aubry and
Kayla Nichols both walked and
rode home on a double by
Kayla Knight. Kate Thomas
followed that with a triple and


Softball,
Brooke Tyson singled. Karlee
Henderson walked, and come
home on a triple by Jessica
Harrison, who was out trying to
stretch it into an in-the-park
homer. Ana Galvez scored and
Aubry doubled before the final
out. Hardee had a 7-0 lead.
After another three up, three
down Hill-Gustat at-bat, Hard-
ee went back to work, plating
another pair of tallies. Kayla
Knight tripled, Thomas doubled
and Tyson hit an infield hat.
Summer Sisum walked and was
later out at second, but Knight
and Thomas had scored, mak-
ing it 9-0.
Again, it was quickly the bot-
tom of the third, when Harrison
and Galvez both singled and
came around to cross home
plate to widen the Hardee lead
to 11-0.
In the home half of the fourth,
Danika Briones walked and
scored, with Tyson smacking to
single to help her around the
bases.


Adds Twin Wins


When Hill-Gustat failed to
score in the top of the fifth,
Hardee won on the 10-run rule.
On Thursday, Hardee motor-
ed to Sebring Middle School for
another matchup. In the top of
the first, Hardee scored twice,
Aubry walking and Kayla
Knight singling. A Kate
Thomas hit helped them score.
Sebring cut the Lady 'Cat
lead to 2-1 with a run in the
home half of the first inning on
three hits and three strikeouts.
Hardee's lead grew in inning
two. Galvez started it with a
walk. Aubry singled and Kayla
Nichols was hit by a pitch.
Kayla Knight doubled. All four
touched home plate to make it a
6-1 game.
An infield fly and pair of
strikeouts retired Sebring in the
bottom of the second.
Hardee had its first scoreless
inning in the top of the third and
Sebring went down in order too.
The Lady Wildcats put up
three more scores in the top of


Eighth grader Kayla Knight struck out a dozen batters in the 12-0 shutout of Hill-Gustat
Middle School.


the fourth. Aubry, Kayla Knight
and Thomas all singled and
came around to cross home
plate. It was 9-1.
A strikeout, groundout, walk
and pop-up to the catcher-
stopped Sebring in the fourth.
Neither Hardee nor Sebring
scored in the top of the fifth. In
the sixth, Hardee scored its final
pair of runs. Aubry walked,
Kayla Knight and Thomas both
singled. Knight was out coming
home, but Knight and Aubry
each added a run. It was 11-1.
Sebring added a final run in
the home half of the sixth on a
walk, hit and another walk, but
left two runners stranded, end-
ing the game on the 10-run rule.
Coach Sharri Knight ap-
plauded the good work of sev-
enth grader Thomas behind the
plate. Other Hardee players are
eighth graders Kayla Knight,
Harrison, Nichols, Briones and
Katelyn Rowe, and seventh
graders Galvez, Tyson, Brooke
Knight, Sisum and Aubry.

The only way to lose weight is
to check it as airline baggage.
-Peggy Ryan
Fat is not a moral problem.
It's an oral problem.
-Jane Thomas Noland


"DREAM OR REALITY'

Why should I be in a. place so cold and sad?
I cry remembering the things I had.

Thoughts of reality never seem to end.
Trapped alone and defenseless without a friend.

Because the trust I have for you doesn't seem to be.
It's a hard way of living your soul shattered inside,
living in a place where only the strong survive.

What hurts the most is the ones you love,
by going away.
You suffer the risk of losing your most loved,
hoping she's OK.

Praying to God, please don't let anyone hold her
in their arms.

This trial won't last forever, it's just a lonely scene,

hoping I'll wake up and it would all be a dream...

Rodney Youngblood
Central Florida Reception Center
Orlando
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.




Photos!
*Little League Baseball
*Football Action
*Fair Photos
*Pop Warner Action

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com

"Photos... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Alex Gilliard And Ralph Harrison


- ml V~1 =1 ~ U [~


QUESTION: Why is it so important that someone with diabetes get their eyes examined?
ANSWER: Everyone with diabetes should have a dilated eye examination at least once a year.
About 45% of diabetics have some form of diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is the leading cause of
blindness in working people. People with severe diabetic retinopathy can
reduce their risk of blindness by 95%
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October 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7C


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USDA Estimates Florida Orange




Crop Will Be 166 Million Boxes


Florida's orange crop will
decrease slightly this year, by
2.5 percent keeping crop levels
close to previous years with
consistent supplies of high-
quality Florida orange juice
available in the U.S. and over-
seas.
The 2008 crop estimate,
released Oct. 10 by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture,
indicates Florida will produce
166 million boxes of oranges,
23 million boxes of grapefruit
and 4.9 million boxes of spe-
cialty fruit which represents a
four percent decline from actual
production (170.2 million
boxes) in the 2007/08 crop year.
Specialty citrus decreased 8.6
percent, and grapefruit produc-
tion is down 13.5 percent.
"Despite tremendous disease
challenges, citrus production
still contributes a $9.3 billion
annual economic impact to the
state of Florida," said Ken
Keck, executive director,
Florida Department of Citrus
(FDOC). We anticipate the
availability of a consistent sup-
ply of fresh citrus and citrus
juices to U.S. and international
consumers this year."
"Current orange juice sup-
plies mean that consumer prices


should remain steady," said Bob
Norberg, deputy executive
director of research and opera-
tions. "Prices are determined by
a number of factors beyond the
cost of raw materials and cur-
rent economic conditions con-
tinue to fluctuate. For con-
sumers, orange juice continues
to be a tremendous value as one
of the most naturally nutrient-
rich beverages available."
"The entire citrus industry is
working collaboratively to bat-
tle citrus disease," stated Keck.
"We are confident that research
efforts led by the National
Academy of Sciences and the
Florida Citrus Production
Research Advisory Council will
yield innovative solutions."
SCitrus diseases, including
canker and greening, can kill
trees and impact crop counts,
but do not affect the safety of
the food supply. FDOC has
budgeted $20 million to support
disease research in 2008-09.
"FDOC is balancing critical
disease research funding with
important marketing programs
that have been proven to gener-
ate consumer demand for
Florida citrus," Keck added.
"We want to help ensure the
sustainability of the Florida cit-


Bill Crews, chairman of Wauchula State Bank, and Joe L.
Davis Sr. attended citrus crop estimate breakfast Oct. 10
at Joe L. Davis Barn. Both are long-time citrus growers,
and Davis served several terms on the Florida Citrus
,Commission.


rus industry and its important
contributions to Florida's agri-
culture and economy."
The Florida Department of
Citrus is an executive agency of
Florida government charged
with the marketing, research
and regulation of the Florida
citrus industry. Its activities are
funded by a tax paid by growers
on each box of citrus that
moves through commercial
channels. For more information
about the Florida Department of
Citrus, visit www.floridajuice.-
com.
"This is a manageable crop
for our industry," said Michael
W. Sparks, executive VP/CEO
of Florida Citrus Mutual.
"Florida citrus growers need
higher returns so that they can
shoulder increased production
costs due, in part, to unprece-
dented disease pressures and
high input prices."
"For consumers, the combi-
nation of surplus juice invento-
ries and a healthy crop will
most likely lead to an adjust-
ment in prices at the retail level.
We are confident that orange
juice will remain an excellent
value." Sparks continued.
"Florida citrus growers are
investing heavily is pest and
disease research; we are hope-
ful that our retail partners will
expand their promotional activ-
ities in support of the category."
Visit www.nass.usda.gov/-
Statistic_by_State/Florida/Publ
ications/Citrus/cpfp.htm for the
complete USDA estimate. The
USDA makes its initial forecast
in October and then revises it
monthly until the end of the
season in July.
"This crop is above earlier
industry expectations," said
Fran Becker, Mutual's presi-
dent. "Our industry is facing
many production issues; the
fact that we are able to produce
a quality crop at this level is a
testament to our efficiencies.
The economic situation both
here and abroad will most cer-
tainly impact our markets for
fresh and processed citrus, the


extent of which will not be
known for some time."
The USDA predicts 23 mil-
lion boxes of grapefruit will be
produced in '08-'09, down 14
percent from 26.6 million last
season.
The forecast for early and
midseason varieties in Florida
is projected at 88 million boxes,
and Valencias are projected to
total 78 million boxes this sea-
son. For Florida specialty fruit,
the USDA predicts 1.5 million
boxes of tangelos and 4.9 mil-
lion boxes of tangerines. The
yield for from concentrate
orange juice (FCOJ) is expected
to be 1.59 gallons per 90-pound
box.
The Florida citrus industry
creates a $9.3 billion annual
economic impact, employing
nearly 76,000 people, and cov-
ering more than 576,000 acres.
Founded in 1948 and currently
representing nearly 8,000 grow-
er members, Florida Citrus
Mutual is the state's largest cit-
rus grower organization. For
more information, visit www.fl-


citrusmutual.com.
Joe L. Davis Jr. said Oct. 10
the USDA estimate of 166 mil-
lion boxes of Florida oranges
for the 2008/09 season is "high-
er than expected. The two early
estimates were lower 150
million boxes from Elizabeth
Steger and 156 million boxes
by Louis Dreyfus. We were
hoping for less than 160 million
boxes. This USDA estimate will
drive the cash price down and
increase juice inventory."
Davis added, "The demand
for juice is down due to the
economy. We need to do a bet-
ter job of marketing. We proba-
bly cannot increase the per
capital consumption of juice
until the recession is over."
Per capital orange juice con-
sumption in the U.S. has
declined slightly for seven con-
secutive years.
Citrus nursery owner Joe B.
Himrod said, "The Florida
annual production now is just
over 3 million trees from nurs-
eries. It used to be 4 million
trees annually, prior to the new


regulations in 2007 which
require screen enclosures and
double entry doors in nurs-
eries."
Due to hurricane in 2004, cit-
rus canker and citrus greening
diseases, citrus acreage in
Florida has declined in recent
years by over 125,000 acres.
Commercial and residential
development has also reduced
citrus acreage. Some citrus.
groves in Florida have been
abandoned.
"This estimate could be
rough for the sale prices of
early and mid-season oranges,"
said fruit buyer Mark Manuel,
who also grows citrus.
Barbara Oxford, executive
director of the Peace River
Valley Citrus Growers
Association, said the cash price
on Oct. 9 was about $1.00 a
pound solids for earlies and
mids, with a range of 95 cents
to $1.20.
At least half of the Florida's
orange crop is'under multi-year
contracts to such big buyers as
Tropicana.


I, :i



PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
From left are Joe L Davis Sr., Ben Albritton, chairman of the Florida Citrus Commission;
Barbara Carlton, executive director of the Peace River Valley Citrus Growers
Association; and citrus grower Kenny Sanders.


The breakfast was sponsored by Joe L. Davis Inc. and Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association and served by
the Green Acres 4-H Club. The club earned $500 from Joe L. Davis Inc. for their service.


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo

Well, Football Fans, another weekend and more upsets. It's not
even worth explaining the parity concept again because we all
know it is here. Texas ends the short run at number one Oklahoma,
just as the Swami predicted. Missouri goes down to Oklahoma
State as well. Vanderbilt's dream season comes to an end at 5-0
with a loss to Mississippi State closer to home, Florida ends LSU's
unbeaten season, completing a weekend where numbers one, three
and four all lost. Let the playoff debate start again.
The Swami journeyed to West Virginia this weekend to watch
the Mountaineers defeat Syracuse 17-6 without the services of QB
Pat White who still needs 355 rushing yards to become the all-time
rushing QB in history by breaking Missouri QB Brad Smith's
record. Fort Myers product Noel Devine rushed for 188 yards on
18 carries with one touchdown, a game sealing 92-yard to propel
WVU. The defense was the real story as it has given up only 2
touchdowns in 17 quarters. The best part of the trip was the spec-
tacular fall foliage showing its colors under blue skies and 78
degree weather. There is nothing like an autumn afternoon and col-
lege football.
Rich Rodriguez has rewarded the Michigan faithful with a
memorable first season as head coach. The third choice of the
Wolverines to replace Lloyd- Carr saw his team lose its first ever
game to a Mid-AmeriWr tonference foe in history at the Big
House. The Toledo Rockets, losers of three straight games and
sporting a 1-4 record, beat the Big Blue 13-10 in Ann Arbor.
Rodriguez is on a pace to give Michigan its first losing season since
1967 and its first non-bowl year since 1974. Maybe Michigan can
give him another $4 million as a bonus?
Anyone wonder if the loss to Mississippi was a slap in the face


trom the "Thanks I needed that" commercials of old for the Gators?
The 51-21 rout of LSU is hopefully the start of another.national
Title run by UF. There is a lot of football left but a one loss SEC
team is better than any unbeaten Big 10 or Big 12 team. The sec-
ond half of the season will be very interesting.
SNow for this week's Bill O' Fare ...
1.) Ole Miss at Alabama The Top Ranked Tide takes on the
team that beat the Gators in the Swamp. Don't look for Saban to
give up the new ranking this week. Alabama 34 Mississippi 21.
2.) FSU at North Carolina State Noles are sitting pretty at
4-1 and playing a weaker team in the ACC. Bobby's boys should
roll to another win. FSU 38 NCSU 17.
3.) LSU at South Carolina LSU Tigers will be very angry.
LSU 48 USC 13.
4.) Vanderbilt at Georgia Everyone would love for Vandy to
do well but reality is setting in. The SEC heavyweights are now up
for the Commodores. Georgia 33 Vandy 13.
5.) Syracuse at USF Syracuse has not won a Big east game
in 3 years. USF 31 Syracuse 10.
6.) Georgia Tech at Clemson Hey Jackets, this is not
Gardner Webb. Clemson 35 GT 13.
7.) Missouri at Texas Tigers have had their fantasyland ride
long enough. This is loss number two in the Big 12. Texas 47
Missouri 34.
8.) Miami at Duke Canes.win back to back. Miami 30 Duke
17.
9.) Marshall at UAB Herd regroups and takes a 3-0 record
atop the CUSA East. Marshall 27 UAB 13.
10.) Pitt at Navy Navy runs over the Panthers. Navy 33 Pitt
27.
11.) Michigan at Penn State JOPA don't back off. Run up
the score. Penn State 46 Michigan 6.
12.) Mississippi State at Tennessee Croomers get Rocky
Toped. UT 27 MSU 13.


Mike Prescott (left) made the closest guess to the USDA
Florida orange crop estimate and won a John Deere
stool, a knife from Bryan's Farm Supply and a Wal-Mart
gift card. At right is Joe L. Davis Sr.


13.) Arkansas at Kentucky Wildcats in a close one.
Kentucky 34 Arkansas 31.
14.) North Carolina at Virginia Heels primed for a good
bowl, UNC 31 UVA 21.
15.) Ohio State at Michigan State Spartans get some head-
lines. MSU 24 OSU 21.
16.) Seattle at Tampa Bucs get it done. Tampa 24 Seattle 23.
17.) Baltimore at Miami -Fish are back. Miami 27 Baltimore
24.
18.) Cleveland at Washington Skins skin Browns.
Washington 30 Cleveland 17.
19.) New Orleans at Carolina Panthers claw away. Carolina
33 New Orleans 23.
20.) Minnesota at Chicago Peterson runs wild. Minnesota
28 Chicago 20.

Probably nothing in the world arouses more false hopes than
the first four hours of a diet.
-Dan Bennett


8C The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008






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10C The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


CourthuseReort


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Zolly Allen Ziglar, 30, Zolfo
Springs, and Linda Faye Miller,
27, Zolfo Springs.
Jose Antonio Garcia-Cis-
neros, 24, Avon Park, and
Brittany Lynn Wall, 20, Avon
Park.
Miguel Angel Mendez, 33,
Fort Meade, and Maria R.
Gutierrez, 37, Fort Meade.
Gerardo Arvizu, 21, Wau-
chula, and Beatriz Benitez, 20,
Bowling Green.
Jose Angel Garza, 54, Bowl-
ing Green, and Angie Alamia
.Garza, 46, Bowling Green.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Portfolio Recovery Associ-
ates LLC vs. Samuel P. Wagner,
judgment.
Community First Credit
Union vs. Steven W. Swafford,
voluntary dismissal.
Asset Acceptance vs. David
L. Briscoe, voluntary dismissal.
Benjamin R. Hash as person-
al representative vs. Christo-
pher Garza, order for tenant
eviction.
LVNV Funding HC as
assignee vs. Dale Morgan,
judgment.
Calvary Portfolio Sevices vs.
Catarina S. Benitez, judgment.
Aventist Health Systems/-
Sunbelt Inc. vs. Michelle
Patton, judgment.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Martha Herrin, order approving
stipulated settlement, case dis-
missed.
Financial Independence Ser-
vices Corp. vs. Jose L. Ventura,
voluntary dismissal.
CP Financial Services vs.
Asonya L. Davis, dismissal.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Charlie Anderson Jr., domes-
tic battery, not prosecuted.
Roberto Gallegos Jr., resist-
ing an officer without violent
force, not prosecuted.
Mario Rodriguez, violation
of a domestic violence injunc-
tion for protection, transferred
to pretrial diversionary pro-
gram, attend four-hour domes-
tic violence class.
Angelo Ramirez Ybarra,
domestic battery, 120 days in
jail with credit for time served
(CTS), $672 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 cost of prosecution
(COP), $50 investigative costs,
restitution to be set.
Ramon Ramero III, posses-


sion of marijuana and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia, 180
days CTS and concurrent with
traffic sentence. $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP; culpable
negligence, time served; crimi-
nal mischief, not prosecuted.

The following criminal
traffic cases were disposed of
recently in county court.
Dispositions are based on
Florida Statutes, driving
record and facts concerning
the case.
Veronica A. Lopez, driving
while license suspended
(DWLS), adjudication with-
held, $340 fine and court costs,
$50 COP.
Dunn Maldonado, DWLS,
probation 12 months, $340 fine
and court costs, $50 COP.
Jonathan Lee Alvarez,
DWLS, estreated bond.
Sharon Allgood, DWLS, pro-
bation one year, $340 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $50 COP.
Ramon Romero III, DWLS,
180 days CTS, $340 fine and
court costs, $50 COP.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Grow Financial Credit Union
vs. Marta E. Cervantes, dam-
ages-contract indebtedness.
Wells Fargo Bank NA vs.
Michelle Lynn Hovind Car-
penter and Nathaniel Carpenter,
petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Michael Grider vs. State of
Florida, petition for review of
inmate situation.
Atlantic Credit and Finance
vs. Jimmy D. Morris, damages
contract indebtedness.
Rita Marie Sweatt vs. Robert
Bivens Jr., petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Wendell Thompson vs.
Florida Department of Correct-
ions, petition for review of
inmate situation.
Gladys V. Dixon and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Marcel L. Melton, petition
for child support.
Bridget N. Zuck and DOR
vs. Dustin D. Rimes, petition
for administrative child support
order.
Amy Cherie Evans and DOR
' vsg'.'amestnivistle, petition for
child suppSrt.
Maria C. Guzman and DOR
vs. Felipe Cornelio, petition for
child support.
Christine Lynn Wilson and
DOR vs. Jarrod L. Oliver, peti-
tion for administrative child
support order.
Virginia Toole Belcher and
DOR vs. Rozonna Renee Kind-


HARDEE COUNTY
COMMISSION MEETING SCHEDULE FOR 2009


First Quarter
January 08t" and 22nd
February 05' and 19th
March 05" and 19th


Third Quarter
July 02", 16", & 30"
August 13th and 27t
September 10th and 24"'


Second Quarter
April 02nd and 16th
May 07'h and 21s
June 04" and 18"


Fourth Quarter
October 08t' and 22nd
November 05" and 19th
December 10h


2009 PLANNING SESSIONS


January 16th
February 13 '
March 13th
April 10th
May 15"
June 12th


July 10th
August 21st
September 18"'
October 16th
November No Session
December- No Session


PLEASE NOTE THESE MEETING DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE; HOWEVER, ANY
CHANGES WILL BE ADVERTISED. 10.:6nc


PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF HAZARDOUS
MATERIAL INFORMATION
Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emergency Planning and
Community Right-to-Know act of 1986 (EPCRA), the following
information is available to the public upon request during nor-
mal business hours by the Florida District VII Local
Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) for Hazardous
Materials, The District VII LEPC serves residents of DeSoto,
Hardee, Highlands, Polk, and Okeechobee Counties.
Hazardous Material Safety Data Sheets
Facility Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms
Section 304 Chemical Release Follow-up Notifications
District VII LEPC Emergency Plan for Hazardous Materials.
EPCRA requires that any business that regularly uses, handles,
or stores certain hazardous chemicals register with State and
looal regulatory agencies. If you have never registered or wish
to obtain additional information, contact the agency listed
below. If you have previously complied, be sure your notifica-
tions are current penalties for non-compliance are severe.
To obtain notification information or learn more about EPCRA,
please contact:
Florida District VII LEPC
555 East Church Street
P.O. Box 2089
Bartow, Florida 33831
863-534-7130 ext. 107
or visit the website at http://www.cfrpc.org
10:16c


er, petition for child support.
Linda Darlene Ratliff and
,Clyde Thomas Ratliff III,
Divorce.
Charlotte D. Burks and DOR
vs. Antonio Lewis-Rodriguez,
petition to register interstate
child support order.
Julie A. Goodwin and DOR
vs. Jonathan Dickinson, petition
to register interstate child sup-
port order.
Candice Johnson and DOR
vs. Keith A. Moon, petition to
register interstate child support
order.
Evelyn L. Madison vs.
Mattie Moore, petition for
injunction for protection.
Theresa Svendsen and DOR
vs. Tonya Renee Svendsen,
petition for child support.
Katherine Casey vs. Christ-
opher DeLa Torre, petition for
injunction for protection.
Jose Lobato JR. vs. Christ-
opher DeLa Torre, petition for
injunction for protection.
The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Sherie Battey vs. Brandon
Mark Haire, child support
order.
Alicia Rosales Lara and
DOR vs. Felix G. Nunez Sr.,
voluntary dismissal of petition
,to amend child support.
Jessica Estrada vs. Erick
Estrada, voluntary dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Advanta Bank Corp vs.
Alfred Warren Poucher d/b/a
Ullrich's Machine Shop, judg-
ment.
Avelo Mortgage LLC vs.
Vernon R. Greene et al, volun-
tary dismissal.
Helen Albritton vs. Michael
Shawn Albritton, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection. -
Nicolasa Navarra vs. Carlos
Aleman, voluntary dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Michele Carpenter vs. Na-
than Carpenter, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Clinton and Kieshia Wright
vs. W.B. Olliff Jr. Tree Surgeon,
voluntary dismissal.
Julian Victoria Galindo vs.
Judith M. Albritton, order
approving joint stipulation for
dismissal.
Raul Zamora and Veronica
Mendoza, divorce.
Amanda Nicole Jones vs.
William 0. McKinney, order on
civil contempt.
Chapman LLC vs. Chapman
Estates, order of mortgage fore-
closure.
William F. Sullivan as per-
sonal representative (four


cases) vs. Florida Harvesters
Inc.,, Chemical Dynamics Inc.
and Laddy Victor Harrell, vol-
untary dismissal.
Sandra Scott vs. Leon Scott,
voluntary dismissal of petition
for divorce.
Troy A. Brant and Catherine
Brant, divorce.
Brandi M. Roberts and Mark
A. Roberts, modification of
child support.
Jerry Litton vs. Jacqueline
Litton, modification of child
support.

The following civil cases
were dismissed by the circuit
judge:
Albert Mac Pierce III and
Rhoda Pierce.
Carlos Aleman vs. Wendy R.
Toledo.
Eunice R. Howell vs. Christ-
opher Andrew Stone.
Esmeralda Hinojos vs. Raul
Molina and Luciano Lara III.
Elizabeth Ann Darty vs.
Tommy Joe King.
Monique S. Pritchard vs.
Joseph Pritchard.
Samuel Johns and Pamela Eli
Johns.
Tanya Michelle Trevino vs.
James Latimer Sanchez.
Rebecca J. Sanchez vs.
Theresa Lee Rodriguez.
Stephanie Valdez vs.
Anthony Valdez Sr.
State Employees Credit
Union vs. Shannon M. and
Donnie Vernon Selph et al.
Angie Garza and DOR vs.
Aurora Garaza.
Martha Faulk vs. Carolyn
Faulk and Michael Thompson.
Homer Curtis Kirk Jr. vs.
Amanda Kae Sunday.
James David Gay vs. Dawn
E. Pelham.
Sabas Candelario vs. Lor-
enza Nunez.
Crystal Martin vs. Kevin
Martin.
Ramona D. Matthews vs.
Archie James Hines.
Joanna Robarts vs. William
James Robarts.
Robert James Rabon vs.
Leora Michelle Rabon.
Vernerdeen Shanks vs.
Brenda Shanks.
Angela Seibert vs. Leonard
Seibert.
hao Chang vs. Johnny Her.
Daisy Richardson vs. Rod-
ney Smith.
Alejandro Contreras vs. Jose
Luviano and Erik Bautista-
Martinez.
Joven Limited LLC vs.
Cindy Adams. -' .
Countryside PHomes Loans
Inc. v'.' indall W. arrell et al.
Rico Cielo vs. Zclfo Springs
Chief of Police.
Kathy.B. Gregg ,s. David D.
Knutson and State Farm
Insurance Co.
Russell E. and Sandra A.


Correction Notice


The Sample Ballot

for The


Town of Zolfo

Springs

Commission Seat 2


should read


Oscar Diaz
10:16nc


EARLY
VOTING
Early voting for the November 4, 2008 General
Election will begin, in the Supervisor of
Elections office at 311 N. 6th Ave. Wauchula,
FL on Monday October 20, 2008. Voting hours
will be from 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday
through Saturday ending November 1st.

Jeffery Ussery
Supervisor of Elections

TEMPRANO

VOTANDO
Votar temprano por el Noviembre 4, la Elecci6n
General comenzard, en el Supervisor de la
oficina de Eleqciones en 311 N. Avda sexta
Wauchyla, FL el lunes et 20 de octubre de
2008. Las horas electorales seran de 9:00 DE
LA MANANA a 5:00 DE LA TARDE. El lunes
por 1 de finalizar de sabado Noviembre.

Jeffery Ussery
El Supervisor de Elecciones
10 16c


Lyons vs. Rhonda Lynette Vit-
zel and Storm Construction Inc.
William F. Sullivan vs.
Florida Harvester.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of last
week by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Henry Kenneth Daniels, sale
of marijuana within 1,000 feet
of a park or school, possession
of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia, 48 months
probation, license suspended
two years, $520 fine and court
costs, $100 COP; possession of
drug paraphernalia with intent
to deliver, not prosecuted.
Jessica Gonzales, neglect of
a child causing great bodily
harm and child abuse inten-
tional infliction, not prosecuted.
Valerio Hernandez Hernan-
dez, felony driving while li-
cense suspended, adjudication
withheld, 18 months probation,
$520 fine and court costs, $100
COP, 50 hours community ser-
vice.
Pablo Martinez Riemann,
violation of probation (original
charge felony driving while
license suspended), probation
revoked, two years community
control house arrest, $100
COP.
Jorge David Torres, felony
DUI amended to DUI,
felony fleeing or attempting to
elude a police office-amended
to fleeing or attempting to flee
an officer, probation one year,
license suspended one year,
ignition interlock 10 days, tag
impound 10 days, multiple-
offender DUI school, evalua-
tion/treatment, attend AA meet-
ings, $883 fine and court costs,
$100 COP, 150 days communi-
ty service.
Charles Eugene Lumley, pos-
session of firearm by a felon,
possession of ammo by a con-
victed felon and possession of
methamphetamine, found
guilty, 20 months Florida State
Prison, $520 fine and court
costs, $200 public defender fees
and $100 COP placed on lien;
possession of marijuana and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, time served.
Sergio Barrios Ambriz, vio-
lation of probation (original
charge possession of metham-
phetamine), violation affidavit
withdrawn, restore probation.
James Bell Jr., violation of
probation (original charges pos-
session of cocaine, giving false
information to a law enforce-
ment officer, felony driving
while license suspended and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia), probation revoked, two
years community control with
same other conditions.
Daniel Farias, felony driving


while license suspended, es-
treated bond.
Roberto Martinez IV, grand
theft, estreated bond.
Isidro Ramos, neglect of
child, not prosecuted.
Marshall Stephen Vaughn,
fleeing to elude an officer and
felony driving while license
suspended, 18 months Florida
State Prison CTS, license sus-
pended two years, $520 fine
and court costs, $400 public
defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien; no registration
certificate, possession of
methamphetamine, possession
of ammo by a convicted felon
and resisting arrest without vio-
lence, not prosecuted.
Angelo Ramirez Ybarra, vio-
lation of probation (original,
charges felony driving while
license suspended and driving
an uninsured vehicle), proba-
tion revoked, 300 days in jail,
fines and fees placed on lien.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
U.S. Bank National Associ-
ation to Pastor and Francisca
Cabrera, $210,000.
Wells Fargo Bank National
Association to Noey Flores and
Steven Carpenter, $64,900.
Abdon Rivera to Rosa Maria
Rodriguez, $30,000.
Abdon and Ofelia Rivera to
J. Refugio Nunez and Canuto
Arvizu-Gonzales, $20,000.
Abdon Rivera to Sofio
Arroyo Toledo, $25,000.
Tommie B. Underwood to
Brian Keith Staton, $110,000.
Mark and Bettysue Long to
Camilo and Rosa Morillo,
$20,000.
Heartland Community
Church of Wauchula to Higher
Ground International Minis-
tries, $650,000.
Pablo Gomez and Susan
Lynn Jacobs to Andrew Stephen
Crawford, $69,000.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort LLC to LRM Freedom
Funds LLC, $64,900.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort LLC to MRM Freedom
Funds, $64,900.


ABOUT...
Hardee
Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, binrtnhi
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements-
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


--- 1 ~

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DONNIS BARBER,
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO.: 797 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005
Description of Property:
All of the gas, oil and mineral rights on and all
mining rights of every description in and to NE
1/4 of SE 1/4 of Section 34, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 26 EAST.
AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
263, PAGE 10.
ALSO DESCRIBED AS:
40 AC M/R NE/4 OF SE/4
34 34S 26 E
263P10
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.
Name in which assessed: HELEN MARIE BARTHA
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida;
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33871
on the 29h' day of October, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 17th day of September, 2008.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD020XXXX 9:5-
9:25-10:16c







October 16, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 11C

Pet f Th Wee


WINNING, BARELY


I. EA A "54
COURTESY PHOTO
It took just an ounce of difference to win a tournament.
Matt George (left) of Bowling Green and Jason Brewer of
Dundee, combined their talents to win over 16 competi-
tors in the Sept. 28 annual fishing tournament and appre-
ciation barbecue for boat captains who volunteer
throughout the year for the kids in the Lakeland Jr. Hawg
Hunters, of which George is president for the third term.
He and Brewer had a weight total of 10 pounds 12
ounces to take tournament honors, by an ounce over the
next highest total.


S Museum Musings
F^. By Sandy Scott
Cracker Trail Museum Curator


I feel quite confident that at some time or another, everyone
has seen a National Geographic Magazine. It's the distinctive
bright yellow book that may have been stacked along with othe
reading material at your doctor's office. Or, riaybe you found it ir
your grandmother's bookcase while visiting on a Sunday afternoon
... or maybe, you are among the thousands of others who receive
the monthly subscription through the mail.
In 1997, Cracker Trail Museum received a donation of 19:
issues of National Geographic Magazine representing the years o
1954 through 1970. While inventorying those editions recently,
found it interesting to read through some of the articles nestle'
between the averages of 200 pages per edition. Some of those
included "War & Quiet on the Laos Frontier" in the May, 1954 edi
tion; "Triumph on Everest" by Sir John Hunt & Sir Edmon
'Hillary in July 1954, and the article in the March, 1964, edition
titled "How We Plan to Put Men on the Moon."
The National Geographic Magazine had its beginning in 189
when Alexander Graham Bell, then president of the Nationa
Geographic Society in Washington, D.C., engaged the assistance o
Dr. Gilbert Grosvenor to help create "a magazine that would arous
so much interest in Geography that many people would want t
become members of the Society."
In April 1899, Dr. Grosvenor finished addressing th
envelopes that would hold the first edition of the Nationa
Geographic Magazine and carried that small number to the pos
office in one trip. According to research, the April 1954 editio
would have filled a bookshelf 10 miles long. Today, the magazine
has a circulation of over 2 million.


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Bagel, Juice, Fruit Cocktail,
Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice
w/Roll or Pepperoni Pizza (Sal-
ad Tray, Garden Peas, Peaches,
Juice) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
Patty, Biscuit, Cinnamon Toast,
Pineapple Chunks, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Oven-Fried Chicken
w/Roll or Rib-B-Que on a Bun
(Salad Tray, Savory Rice, Pears,
f Juice) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambl-
ed Eggs w/Cheese, Buttered
Toast, Potato Triangle, Pears,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or
Hamburger on a Bun (Salad
Tray, Baked Beans, Fruit Crisp,
Juice) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage, Peaches,
Juice, Cinnamon Toast, Milk
Lunch: Burrito or Macaroni &
Cheese w/Roll (Salad Tray,
Green Beans, Strawberries &
Peaches) and Milk
FRIDAY
* Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
e Applesauce, Milk
e Lunch: Pizza Pocket or
r Combo Sub (Salad Tray, Whole
n Kernel Cor, Pears, Juice) and
n Milk
e JUNIOR HIGH .:'"
2 MONDAY
if i Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
I nut, Bagel, Fruit Cocktail, Juice,
d Milk
S Lunch: Chicken & Rice
Sw/Roll or Pepperoni Pizza
(Tossed Salad, Garden Peas,
d Peaches, Juice) and Milk
n
TUESDAY
9 Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
al Patty, Biscuit, Pi~ieapple Tidbits,
,f Juice, Cinnamon Toast, Milk
Lunch: Oven-Fried Chicken
e w/Roll or Rib-B-Que on a Bun or
o Mozzarella Stick (Tossed Salad,
Savory Rice, Pears, Juice) and
e Milk
al
st WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambl-
ed Eggs w/Cheese, Buttered
e Toast, Pears, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Cheese :,Pizza or
Hamburgerjon a Bun:w/Dill or
Toasted Cheese .w/HB Egg
(Salad Tray, Baked Beans, Fruit
Crisp, Juice) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Peaches,
Cinnamon Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Burrito or Cheese
SPizza or Ham, Macaroni &
Cheese (Tossed Salad, Com-
bread, Green Beans, Straw-
berries & Peaches, Juice, Salad
Bar) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,


'Applesauce, Milk
SLunch: Pepperoni Hot
Pockets or Meatloaf or Combo
Sub (Lettuce & Tomato, Corn-
bread, Whole Kernel Corn,
Pears, Juice) and Milk


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
'Yogurt, Fruit Cocktail, Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice
(Tossed Salad, Turnip Greens,
Pinto Beans, Juice, Peaches,
Beets, Cornbread) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage,
Biscuit, Applesauce, Cinnamon
Toast, Pineapple Chunks, Juice,
Milk
Lunch: Rib-B-Que on a Bun
(Tossed Salad, Savory Rice,
Baked Beans, Whole Kernel
Corn, Pears, Juice) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambl-
ed Eggs, Buttered Toast, Pears,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: MANAGERS CHOICE
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
IToast, Sausage Patty, Peaches,
Juice, Cinnamon Toast, Milk
Lunch: Burrito (Tossed
Salad, Potato Rounds, Baked
.Beans, Corn, Peaches, Juice)
and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza Hot
Pocket (Tossed Salad,, Broccoli
Normandy, Corn, Baked Potato,
Pears, Juice) and Milk


Ouickslver Is a beautiful and friendly Husky.
He was picked up as a stray and Is In need of a
second-chance home. He has a cataract In his right eye
but It does not seem to hinder him any.
Please come out and appreciate how beautiful
and sweet this dog Is In person.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


`^-- --^^^^^^^^


COURTESY PHOTOS
This 1922 edition of National Geographic, recently donat-
ed by Jackie See, adds to the museum's collection.
In September 1903, the National Geographic Society moved
from rented office rooms to the handsome building erected by the
families of Alexander Graham Bell and Charles J. Bell as a memo-
rial to the Society's first President, Gardiner Green Hubbard, their
father-in-law. In an address to its members in 1912, Dr. Bell
,declared that the National Geographic Magazine had become "the
greatest educational journal of the world." The National
Geographic Society is one of the largest non-profit scientific and
educational institutions in the world.
The collection of National Geographic Magazines at Cracker
Trail Museum begins with the year of 1954 and sold for $6.50 for
:an annual subscription of 12 issues. The cost of the subscription
was $9 for those issues ending in 1970 at the museum and all of
;them held the distinctive phrase on the cover "Sixty-four Pages of
Illustrations in Color" or however many pages that was appro-
;priate for that particular issue. Today, the subscription is $30 per
year and sometimes includes additional editions during the year..
These magazines have become an institution in themselves.
The articles are extremely educational and the subject material
spans every corner of the world. Award winning photography is
always included between the 100+ pages of the magazine.
One such two-page photograph included that of 47,000 Boy
Scouts camped out on a 625-acre parcel of land for a Jamboree at
Valley Forge in 1950. The caption stated that it was "one of the
largest gatherings of youth ever held in the hemisphere and during
that week-long encampment, these Boy Scouts ate 35 miles of hot
dogs and stowed away enough pancakes to have made a stack near-
ly two miles high".
While these 16 years worth of volumes of National Geo-
graphic Magazines is a wonderful addition to Cracker Trail
Museum, a more recent one that included only one magazine is
equally interesting. Jackie See recently donated a December, 1922
edition of The National Geographic Magazine and the cost posted
on its front was $3.50 for a year's subscription or 50 cents for a sin-
gle copy. Its 120 pages (not including the 29 pages of advertise-
ments) covered an article about "The Glory That Was Greece and
another one "Sailing the Seven Seas in the Interest of Science."
SEver inclusive were the photographs taken on both of these trips
'"and their quality'was equally impressive as it is today.
S A single magazine that was born from an idea by one man to
bring the scientific community into the homes of every town is one
that has endured for over 100 years.
These additions to the Cracker Trail Museum are but a few of
the examples that you will see when you visit us. One such visitor
remarked that he felt that we were the "best kept secret in Hardee
County." I suppose in a way, he is right; however, we don't want
to keep the secret any longer. Won't you find time to visit and
better yet, check your attic out and see if there is something that is
representative of your family that you would like to share with the
rest of the folks in Hardee County.


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neljigilrs
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
In the top 10 in customer satisfaction in
Florida I have received Ford's highest
Sales Honor 15 years running and been a
member of Ford's 300/500 Club for 20
. years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
Ft. Meade
STEDE MLm 375-2606
I4fte 800-226-3325


Notice to Voters
The clerk or inspector shall require each elector,
upon entering thie polling place to produce a Florida driver's
license, a Florida identification card issued under s. 322.051,
or another form of picture signature identification
approved by the Department of State. F. S. 98.471
Jf you do not have photo signature identification you will be
required to vote a provisional ballot.

Jeffery Ussery
SSupervisor of Elections

Aviso a los yotantes
El empleado o el inspector requeriran a cada elector, a entrar
el centro electoral a producer una licencia de conductor de
Florida, una tarjeta de identificacinde-Florida-pblicada bajo S.
322.051,
u otra forma de identificaci6n de firma de retrato aprobada por el
Departamento del Estado. F. S. 98.471
Si usted no tiene identificaci6n de firma de foto que usted se
requerirV a votar una votaci6n provisional.
Jeffery Ussery
El Supervisor de Elecciones
10:16c


F .. .Attention: -

Hardee County Disposal Customers:


Please be advised of the holiday schedule effective immediately:

On the following holidays, there will be no garbage collection. If a holiday
falls on your regular scheduled pickup day, there will be no collection that
day. Each residence may put out four 32-gallon garbage cans or bags on
their next scheduled collection day.

g New Year's Day
X Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
X Good Friday
SRC X Memorial Day
Fourth of July
X Labor Day
X Thanksgiving Day
X Christmas Day


Please Call (863) 773-6079 with any questions.











10:160


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School

Lunch Menus


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12C The Herald-Advocate, October 16, 2008


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