Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00238
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula, Fla
Publication Date: August 21, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00238
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text





SHunters: State

Needs You.

..Column 12E


The


108th Year, No. 37
3 Sections, 32 Pages
I


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


Thursday,, ugust 21,2008


46
plus 44 Sades Ux


.I


Hardee County Fares Well With Fay


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County fared well
during Tropical Storm Fay.
Even as T.S. Fay continues to
send heavy winds and rain
along the east coast, Hardee
County Emergency Manage-


ment has issued an all-clear for
the county. Staff there will con-
tinue to monitor the erratic
storm, which may circle back
on north Florida.
Emergency Management Dir-
ector Rich Shepard said Wed-
nesday morning that there were


no reports of major damage
and, most importantly, no in-
juries reported from the storm.
"We were very fortunate. I
hope the citizens had a good
chance to test their hurricane
plans. We had great cooperation
from all the other public safety


officials, volunteer' groups,
everyone. We thank them," said
Shepard.
"When the storm was follow-
ing the exact track to go over
Hardee County as Hurricane
Charley did, we were con-
cerned, but at 5 a.m. Tuesday it


made a deviation to the east.
The heaviest rainfall was
around Crewsville, reportedly
five inches. We had wind gusts
of 40 miles per hour at our cen-
ter here. We will still need to
monitor the rain levels for the
,rest of the week," continued
Shepard, who added that about
300 people reported brief power
outages during the storm.
Residents living near
streams, creeks and rivers
should prepare to move to high-
er ground if flooding is
observed. Precautions still need
to be taken, said Shepard.
County Public Works Direct-
or J. R. Prestridge said Steve
Roberts Special had water over
the road, North Nursery Road
was also under water as a cul-
vert overflowed, and the flasher
lights at Florida Avenue and
Stenstrom Road shorted out.
Crews were out early
Wednesday beginning a thor-
ough assessment of roads.
Prestridge expected also to get
reports from school bus drivers
of any problems they encoun-
tered on the roads while picking


up. students Wednesday morn-
ing.
Schools, including South
Florida Community College,
were closed on Tuesday, but
resumed on Wednesday.
Also closed was the Hardee
County Courthouse, where fel-
ony hearings were scheduled all
day Tuesday. Circuit Judge
Marcus Ezelle issued an order
on Monday rescheduling those
cases.
Public defender and regional
conflict inmate cases were con-
tinued to today (Thursday) at 2
p.m. at the jail. Private attorney
cases, both those out on bail and
those in jail, were continued to
Tuesday, Sept. 2 at 1:30 p.m.
Those out on bail who have a
public defender will either be
contacted for continuance until
court on Tuesday, Aug. 26, at
8:30 a.m. Those who haven't
been contacted by the public
defender will have their cases
continued until Tuesday, Sept.
16, also at 8:30 a.m.
Preparations for the possible
hurricane wdnt smoothly.
See FAY 2A


Vote In Primary


Election
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County voters will
head to the polls on Tuesday to
cast their ballots in the Primary
Election.
Ballots will vary among party
lines but, in all, six county
offices and one circuit slot are
up for grabs.
Registered Democrats will
choose their party's candidate
for superintendent of schools
and for County Commission
districts 1 and 3. Winners here
will go on to the General
Election in November, where
they will battle head-to-head
against their Republican chal-
lengers.
Democrats will also mark
their ballots in three non-parti-
san races, for School Board dis-
tricts 2 and 3 and for circuit
judge.
Republicans will vote in their
party's choice for sheriff, who
will go on to the November
contest. Also on the Republican
ballot will be the non-partisan
School Board and judicial
races.
For those who are registered


Tuesday
as Independents, only the non-
partisan races will appear, for
School Board districts 2 and 3.
and for circuit judge.
All ballots, however, will
include a proposed resolution
from the Hardee County Com-
mission, which asks that it be
granted a 10-year extension of
its authority to give property-
tax exemptions to new or
expanding businesses, with a
goal toward economic develop-
ment in the county. Voters had
approved such a referendum
question 10 years prior, and it is
up for renewal.
Precincts will be open from 7
a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday for
voters to mark their ballots.
Many, however, have taken
advantage of the state's Early
Voting program, which has seen
450 people to date at the
Elections Office in Courthouse
Annex II, at the corer of U.S.
17 and Oak Street in Wauchula.
Early Voting, which precedes
election day by two weeks, ends
this Saturday at 5 p.m.
A Voters Guide with candi-
date profiles and interviews,
See VOTE 2A


INDEX
Classifieds.....................6B
Courthouse Report.......6C
Community Calendar....4A
Crime Blotter.................6C
Fishing Report...............2A
Hardee'Living.................2B
Lunch Menus...............5A
Obits.............................4A




7 8128,2 07290 3


Daggett

Hired

As Coach
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A man fired by the School
Board has now been hired by
the School Board.
Dick Daggett, who lost his
job as director of transportation
on June 26, will be back on
school grounds, but this time
only in his coaching capacity.
Daggett, formerly a 30-year
employee of the school district,
was hired this past Thursday to
continue his 19-year duties as
coach of both the varsity boys
and girls swimming teams.
The personnel recommenda-
tion from Schools Superinten-
dent Dennis Jones met with lit-
tle discussion, a lone question
from board member Jan Platt,
who asked board attorney
See DAGGETT 2A


FATAL CRASH


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
One man died and two people were hospitalized after a crash Thursday which closed U.S. 17 for five hours. Florida
Highway Patrol officers (above) check on a pair of motorcycles Involved in the 9:45 a.m. accident. According to their
reports, Brian Gruntman, 34, of Wauchula, had slowed his 1993 Ford truck about five miles north of the DeSoto
County line to turn Into a residence. Robert Mayo, 18, of Sebring, failed to stop his 2006 Ford box truck, hit
Gruntman's vehicle and veered Into the northbound lanes, hitting a pair of 2006 Harley mortorcyles. Driver Timothy
J. Horgan, 53, of Bonita Springs, died at the scene. Driver Marian Horgan, 52, also of Bonita Springs, was serious-
ly Injured and Mayo was critically Injured.. Both were transported to DeSoto Memorial Hospital. Traffic was re-rout-
ed from Sweetwater Road to Fish Branch or Brownsville roads. One lane was opened about 12:40 p.m. and bot'
lanes cleared by 2:45. Timothy Horgan became the eighth person to die on Hardee County roads in 2008.


BABY BLUES


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
They grow up so quickly! There were tears shed on the first day of school on Monday, but obviously not
by this little one. Candl Gannon approaches this new adventure with enthusiasm, giggles and grins.
Meanwhile, mama Megan Gannon, red-nosed and teary-eyed, grabs one last hug before allowing that
big break which signifies the shift between babyhood and childhood the start of school. It was the
first day at Zolfo Springs Elementary School, but variations of this same scene were played out In kinder-
garten classrooms throughout the county. Sometimes, even, it was the children who were crying!


---I


I


"-I


I








2A The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


The Herald-Advocate -
Hardee County's 'Hometown Coverage.
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
., -, CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN:
Sports Editor 0__ .


115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
SProduction Manager

NOEY'DE'SANTIAGO
Asst::Prod. Manager


o Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co Inc Periodical Postage paid at U S Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "'Postmaster," send address
changes to The Herald-Advocate. PO Box 338, Wauchula. FL 33873.


DEADLINES:
Schools -Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living-Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5;pn.
Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $18 1 yr. 31; 2 yrs -160
Flonda
6 months $22 1 yr. 41, 2 yrs. $79
Out.ofState
6 months- S27; I'yr. $49; 2 yrs.'- $95
, ,


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters.to. the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be bhief; and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number. ,, .
SUBMISSIONS: ,
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed. double-spaced and adhere to the above'deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing


Kelly's Column
By Jim


On Tuesday Hardee voters have an important primary election.
Democrats can vote for superintendent of schools, two County
Commission races, two School Board races, and a circuit judge.
Republicans can vote on the sheriff's race, two School Board
races, and circuit judge.
Non-partisan voters can cast a ballot for two School Board
races and circuit judge.
All voters can have their say on voting yes or no for the
County Commission to be able to grant property tax exemptions to
new businesses and expansions of existing businesses.
City of Wauchula voters can also cast a ballot for a City
Commission seat. Delois Johnson is challenging incumbent
Heather Lee.
For circuit judge, both Nathaniel White and John Radabaugh
are well qualified, being attorneys and having worked for the pub-
lic defender and state attorney. White, a University of Florida grad-
uate, has campaigned hard in Hardee County and has earned my
vote.
Most of the local partisan races will not be decided until the
Nov. 4 general election. Americans will"also elect a new president
'then. -
We are proud of all the candidates participa"tninri'ur de ioc--
ratic form of government. May the voters be wise to pick the best
candidates for public office.

If elected, Alane Solomon of the Lilly area would become the
first woman to ever serve on the Hardee County Commission. She
was raised as a princess in her father's castle next to Horse Creek.

The third annual Labor Day celebration will be held Sept. 1 in
Bowling Green at the city park honoring Maggie Harrington,
Flossie Listen and Mark Lunsford. Activities will begin at noon.
Helping plan the event are Leonard McGill and Michelle Brown.

On Wednesday morning regular unleaded gasoline was selling
for $3.52 a gallon.

Tropical Storm Fay came through Hardee County on Tuesday
and did very little damage, bringing 2 1/2 to 4 or 5 inches of rain.

Hardee County schools closed for the day Tuesday but re-
opened on Wednesday.


Hunting/Fs hingForeca


8/21/08
Sun Data
Rises: 7:01 am
Sets: 7:59 pm
LoD: 12:58:00
Moon Data
Rises: 10:49 pm
Sets: 11:36 am
Major Times
4:12 ai-6:12 am
4:37 pm-6:37 pm
Minor Times
10:54 am-ll:54 am
11:19 pm-12:19 am
Prediction
Average
8/22/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:02 am
Sets: 7:58 pm
LoD: 12:56:00
Moon Data
Rises: 11:32pm
Sets: 12:41 pm
Major Times
5:06 am-7:06 am
5:31 pm-7:31 pm
Minor Times


11:48 am-12:48 pm

Prediction
Average
8/23/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:02 am
Sets: 7:57 pm
LoD: 12:55:00
Moon Data
Rises: -:--
Sets: 1:49 pm
Major Times
5:40 am-7:40 am
6:05 pm-8:05 pm
Minor Times
11:57 pm-12:57 am
12:22 pm-1:22 pm
Prediction
Average
8/24/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:03 am
Sets: 7:56 pm
LoD: 12:53:00
Moon Data
Rises: 12:21 am
Sets: 2:56 pm


Major Times
6:38 am-8:38 am
7:03 pm-9:03 pm
Minor Times
12:55 am-l:55 am
1:20 pm-2:20 pm
Prediction
Good
8/25/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:03 am
Sets: 7:55 pm
LoD: 12:52:00
Moon Data
Rises: 1:19 am
Sets: 4:00 pm
Major Times
7:39 am-9:39 am
8:04 pm-10:04 pm
Minor Times
1:56 am-2:56 am
2:21 pm-3:21 pm
Prediction
Better
8/26/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:04 am
Sets: 7:54 pm


LoD: 12:50:00
Moon Data
Rises: 2:22 am
Sets: 4:58 pm
Major Times
8:40 am-10:40 am
9:05 pm- 1:05 pm
Minor Times
2:57 am-3:57 am
3:22 pm-4:22 pm
Prediction
Better
8/27/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 7:04 am
Sets: 7:53 pm
LoD: 12:49:00
Moon Data
Rises: 3:31 am
Sets: 5:49 pm
Major Times
9:40 am-11:40 am
10:05 pm-12:05. am
Minor Times
3:57 am-4:57 am
4:22 pm-5:22 pm
Prediction
Good


Th Herald










4 Advocate5'


A special needs shelter was
opened at the college and a gen-
eral population shelter was
opened at Hilltop Elementary
School off U.S. 17 North. Red
Cross volunteers manned the
shelters.
As is customary in these situ-
ations, the Hardee County
Commission met in emergency
session on Monday to declare a
state of emergency, which had
already been done by Gov.
Charlie Crist at the state level.
Both declarations clear the way
for federal funding for disaster
expenses of city, county and
state employees and for citizens
who have suffered storm dam-
age. For instance, those in
Barefoot Bay, devastated by a
tornado which touched down
there, will especially benefit
from the state declaration.
Both Peace River Electric
Cooperative Inc. and Progress
Energy Florida were activated
and had crews ready to restore
power wherever there were out-
ages.
Schools Superintendent
Dennis Jones had used the new
message system on Sunday to
alert students and their families
about school closing on
Tuesday.
"There were a couple of rea-
sons we closed school on Tues-
day. First, we were asked to by
the Emergency Management
Office, as it needed to use
school shelters, beginning at 6
a.m. Tuesday at the K-8
school," he said on Monday.
"Even if we were not asked,
the threat was enough. In an
abundance of caution, we knew
it was a safety issue. There were
reports of sustained winds of 55
miles per hour and higher gusts.
By law, we can't run school
buses if the wind speed is over
40 mph," Jones explained. "We
could get students to school, but
getting them home could have
been a real problem."
He promised another bulletin
or message on Tuesday if
school was not resuming on'
Wednesday. As it turned out, it
wasn't needed and school
resumed as scheduled on
Wednesday.
"The administrative meeting
with all school leaders on
Monday went well. We just
-- wanted- to make sure 'wweere
,,all on the same page. It wasga
":'calm meeting. We've been
through much worse (hurri-
canes Charley, Francis and
Jeanne in 2004, which repeat-
edly closed schools). We know
the drill and the lessons we
learned in 2004 have come in
handy," concluded Jones.





VOTE
Continued From 1A
descriptions of each race and
sample ballots was published in
this newspaper last week.
Those Democratic voters will
select incumbent Dennis Jones
or challenger Gary Moore':or
Bob Shayman as the party can-
didate to face Republican David
Durastanti in the fall.
In, Commission District. 1,
either incumbent Minor Bryant
or opponent Gene Davis or
Donny Waters will go on to take
on Republican Don Samuels in
the General.Election.
In District 3, it will be incum-
bent Gordon Norris. or Terry
Atchley or Alane Solomon who
goes on to battle Republican
Don Chancey.
School Board District 2 pits
incumbent Tanya Royal up
against challenger Mildred
Smith, with the Primary Elect-
ion winner taking all. In District
3, however, unless one candi-
date reaches over 50 percent of
the vote total, the two top con-
tenders will go on to the fall.
That race is among incumbent
' Gina Neuhofer and opponents
Teresa Crawford and Charles
Crutchfield.
Circuit judge hopefuls are
John Radabaugh and Nathaniel
White. Each is looking to fill
the vacancy of a retiring judge.
The Republicans will choose
between sheriff candidates
Roger Clark and Thomas
Santarlas. The winner goes on
to the General Election, where


he will meet Democratic candi-
date Arnold Lanier.
Republicans also pick the
School Board and judicial
races.
'Independents will mark their
ballots for Royal or Smith;
Neuhofer, Crawford or Crutch-
field; and Radabaugh or White.
Later, in November, the final
County Commission race,
District 5, will appear. It pits
incumbent Dale "Johnson, a
Democrat, against Walter Olliff
Jr., a Republican.


At the regional level, the
Southwest Florida Emergency
Operations Center activated to
monitor water levels and review
the 81 water control structures
on lakes and rivers throughout
its 16-county area. "Due'to two
years of drought conditions,
water bodies in the district are
expected to have sufficient


FAY
Continued From 1A


storage to handle excess flood
waters from a tropical storm or
hurricane," said an agency press
release.
Although it was nothing like
the Aug. 13, 2004 Hurricane
Charley, which caused over
$700 million from 150-mph
winds and partially or com-
pletely destroyed 1,400 homes,


SDAGGETT
; Continued From 1A


Gavin O'Brien if the board
could hire someone who is
suing it.
O'Brien answered that a
pending lawsuit can never be
cause to exclude someone from
employment.
With that, the board voted
unanimously to keep Daggett as
swim coach for Hardee Senior
High School.
Daggett was present at the
board meeting, as were about
two dozen supporters from the
Transportation Department, the
swim team and from the com-
munity by way of swim-team
parents.
"It feels good to be back,"
Daggett said after the decision
was made. "In terms of the kids,
I have about 10 seniors, and I
told them that I would see them
through graduation, coach them
through graduation. Even if
they had not hired me, I would
have been out there."
Daggett explaihedthat he has
worked with some of the
youngsters since they were 8 or


9 years old and part of the sum-
mer swimming program.
The personnel recommenda-
tion from Jones came, in turn,
from HHS Principal Mike
Wilkinson.
Noted Jones, "The principal
makes the recommendation,
and I'm the one who makes the
decision. Despite the difficul-
ties surrounding Mr. Daggett,
there is one inescapable fact:
Mr. Daggett has been a very
successful coach and is primar-
ily the person responsible for
building our swim program into
one that is respected in Central
Florida.
"Mr. Wilkinson, in recom-
mending coaches, reached that
conclusion, and I agree," Jones
concluded.
Board member Wendell
Cotton, at the vote, briefly
addressed those assembled,.
saying, "You have a coach
tonight!"
With that, Daggett resumed
his duties.


or the three-day rains of
Hurricane Francis less than a
month later, Tropical Storm Fay
dropped copious amounts of
water on eastern Hardee
County.
Residents are reminded;that a
tropical storm watch means
winds of 39 to 73 mph are
expected. When that turns- to a
storm warning, it means those
conditions are imminent, within
24 hours.
Similarly, the Saffer-Simpson
scales for hurricanes notes the
severity expected: level" 1-
winds 74-95 mph; level 2-
winds 96-110 mph; level 3-
winds 111-130 mph; level 4-
winds 131-155 mph; and level 5.
over 155 mph.
Along with hurricane watch-
es and warnings, there are usu-
ally tornado watches, meaning
conditions are right for a torna-
do to form, and tornado warn-
ings, meaning one has been
sighted in the area. Tornadoes
can produce whirling winds of
up. to 300 mph and are consid-
ered a devastating threat along
with the hurricane or tropical
storm.

The earliest recorded interna-
tional cross-country automo-
bile race was a match between
England and France that took
place outside Paris on March
28,1898. England won.


THERE IS HELP!

Spouse Abuse
Crisis Line

1 (800) 500-1119


IL


- I






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at the immune system is A team of atsessors from the T
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patients said their disease is a comply withng and approximates easly 250 and
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women and younger patients9904 general pubvisit www.psore invited to Pol
Psychologist Richard Fried,


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and embarrassment oft c ene or ment Ta im-
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influence daily activities," | rTT
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causes t psoriasis, but is e- tension on her
lived to have a genetic cohes e mpo- tthe 1 and 4 sn
nent. Most researchers agree p r wi
that the immune system is A team of assessors from the Th
somehow mistakenly triggered, Commission For Florida Law for tn
which speeds up the growth Enforcement accreditation will 0 ffic
cycle of skin cells arrive Tuesday to examine all said
IPorimost people, psoriasis aspects of the Hardoee County csra
has a significant and unfavor- Sheriff's Office policies and pract
able impact on quality of life. procedures, management, oper- cies.
Recent studies indicate: nations and support services. writt
Nearly 60 percent of The Sheriff's Office has to indii
patients said their disease is a comply with approximately 250 and (
large problem in their everyday standards in order to receive ance
life. accredited status. Th
Psoriasis has a greater As part of the on-site assess- is C
impact on quality of life in ment, agency members and the the L
women and younger patients. general public are invited to Polic
"Finding the right treatment offer comments to the assess- mei
option can be a challenge for ment team. The public may call hart
people with psoriasis," ex- 773-0304, extension 206, on Sher
pined Dr. Fried.- "The key to Tuesday between the 1 and 4 son f


p.m. Telephone comments are
limited to 10 minutes and must
address the agency's ability to
comply with the Commission
standards. A copy of the stan-
dards is available through Maj.
Claude Harris, public informa-
tion officer, extension 217.
For more information regard-
ing the commission or for per-
YVIION IMPAISMBNN A UIGTS AT sons wishing to offer written
LE10f, OF pV'RY 100oPrOPL-.
LI~L ALLY I IT-SIN.J6i comments about the Sheriff's
AeoNoe0 ,I'J3N Office's ability to meet the stan-
LLFruNTARrsn. r- dards of accreditation, write to:
Commission for Florida Law
Enforcement Accreditation,
3504 Lake Lynda Dr., Suite
380, Orlando, FL, 32817.


Depa
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tes is $292 million,
mmiissloners will try to get
h of the right-of-way prop-
donated by the private
owners to substantially cut
ost of the project. Total
of-way costs are estimated
at $140 million, or almost
of the total project.



nught On

meditation
he accreditation manager
he Hardee County Sheriff's
ce is Capt. Jose Cortez. He
the assessment team is
posed of law enforcement
titioners from similar agen-
The assessors will review
ten materials; interview
viduals; and visit offices
other places where compli-
can be witnessed.
ie assessment team leader
hief Mark Foxworth from
University of North Florida
ce Department. Other team
ibers are Lt. Dave Rhine-
from the Osceola County
iff's Office and Deb Wil-
from the Lake Worth Police
artment. :
nce the commission's asses-
complete their review of
agency, they will report
to the full commission,
h will then decide if the
cy is to receive accredited
is. The Hardee County
iff's Office accreditation is
three years,
rification by the team that
Hardee County Sheriff's
ce meets the commission's
lards is part of a voluntary
ess to gain or maintain
meditation; a highly prized
igniiuin of law enforcement
essional excellence,


Paid PoliticAvertisementi fr apLDV Holier v. UI j nTori U u --


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Neuh ofer

School Board District 3
Political Adv ment Paid for and Appmoved by Gia Neuhofer, non-partnlan, for School Board District 3




SMy Mission
e Advocate for Citizens Rights ;
Campaign for Open Government '
Promote Reasonable Growth Mgt.
Reduce Government Spending
Without Reducing Services

/ Your Concerns are My Concerns
V Cell Phone Accessible 24/7
863-781-1947

WHAT ARE MY CORE VALUES?

Respect ~ Integrity ~ Communication Excellence
and
To Continue My Support To Resthaven
+Let's work together to make positive changes in Hardee County
Remember I do live in District 1

+1 will work hard to gain back the respect Of the Citizens for the
County Government, Which has deteriorated over the last few years.
"I will make a difference"


2


2


2z


gene Davis
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT #1

"We needfresh ideasfor ourfuture"
Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Gene Davis, Democrat For County Commissioner, District 1
S8:21p
i-


L


Elect


SRoger V. Clark


SVOSheriff *

There is a deep sense of duty that resides in most American
police officers and I am no different. I have spent twenty-four
years as a law enforcement officer serving the citizens of Hardee
County in many capacities. I chose this path not because of
financial gain, but a firm belief in justice, fairness and the pro-
tection of people who would not otherwise be protected. The
spectrum of my law enforcement experience includes delivering
a baby, to using lethal force to defend my life and others. I have
been very fortunate to have wore many hats of responsibility
that has afforded me a variety of assignments in my career.
Professional law enforcement has always been my passion and I
have spent most of my adult life dedicated to that pursuit.
Whether the situation demands experience with crimes against
persons, crimes against property, public education, narcotics
violations or professional ethics, I am prepared to do the job.
After serving twenty-four years as a law enforcement officer and
serving in Iraq as a police advisor, I am confident that I have the
professional knowledge and maturity to provide the leadership
necessary as our next Sheriff.
Thank You, v G


"Your First Choice For Sheriff"


8:21


F-_


~B I I BI 17 I41


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113.1A PAIRI-i Arivarflaamonf nairl fnr nnriqnnmvAd hv Racier V. Clark ReDublican for Sheriff CaMDalan.


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16







4A The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


Obituaries Athletic Trainer For The U.S. Olympic Track
TObitaes eam Offers Training Tips Anyone Can Use


THERON C. JONES
Theron C. Jones, 59, of Pen-
sacola, died on Saturday, Aug.
16, 2008.
Born Sept. 6, 1948 in Bow-
ling Green, he had been a life-
long resident until moving to
Pensacola, where he was an
urban planner for Escambia
County for the past five years.
Survivors are daughter
Anjelica Jones of Orlando; sons
N'kosi Jones of Pensacola,
Theo Jones of Bowling Green
and Jeremy Jones of Arcadia;
mother Bertha Jones of Pensa-
cola; sister Yvette Jones of Pen-
sacola; brothers Robert Jones of
Tampa, Gregory Ryals of Pen-
sacola ard Lennard Ryals of
Jacksonville; and one grand-
child.
Visitation will be at First
Assembly of God in Bowling
Green tomorrow (Friday) from
5 to 7 p.m. Services are at noon
Saturday at First Assembly of
God in Bowling Green.
Williams Funeral Home
Bartow









SS.



O R oIA9g. U(emofrg














MARK WILLIAM
McENTRE
Mark William McEntyre,
54, of Bowling Green, died
on Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2008, at
home.
He was born in Savannah,
Ga., on Nov. 24, 1953.
Survivors include his
mother Cassie Brown of
Bowling Green; son Matt
McEntyre of Wauchula;
daughter Daniell McEntyre
of Sebring; brother Mike
McEntyre of Bowling Green;
granddaughter Leanna
McEntyre; and nephews
Mike and Steve, Robert
McKee and Chris Joiner.
Visitation was Saturday 2-
4 p.m. at the funeral home.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


IRENE EMMA
STEVENSON
Irene Emma Stevenson, 79,
of Fort Meade, died Monday,
Aug. 18, 2008, at her home.
Born July 10, 1929, in Garlin
County, Ark., she worked 30
years as a citrus sectionizer for
Sun Coast Cannery; Ben Hill
Griffin Cannery and Procter &
Gamble, retiring in 1989. She
was a member of Full Gospel
Fellowship Church of Fort
Meade.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 53 years, Robert
Henry Stevenson; five sisters,
Cora Tyndall, Arleen Brown,
Margaret Pat Fleming, Mary Jo
Tillery and Jeanette Witt; and a
brother, Doyle Wayne Brown.
Survivors include two
daughters, Jo Leen Harden and
husband Kenny of Fort Meade,
and Dianna Lashley and hus-
band Roy Lamar of Homosassa;
tow sisters, Alma Richardson of
Highmore, S.D., and Ruth Bell
of Portland, Ore.; two brothers,
Harold Gene Brown and Danny
Brown, both of Hot Springs,
Ark.; four grandsons, Roy
Lamar Lashley Jr., Robert
Dewayne Lashley, Joseph
Kenneth Harden Jr. and
Timothy Michael Harden; and
14 great-grandchildren.
Visitation is today (Thurs-
day) from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home. Services are to-
morrow at 10 a.m. at Full
Gospel Fellowship Church in
Fort Meade.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade
ERNEST FERRELL
CLOUD
Ernest Ferrell Cloud, 58, of
Blountstown, formerly of Bow-
ling Green, died on Sunday,
Aug. 10, 2008.
Born in Blountstown on July
23, 1950, to the late Earnest
Ellis Cloud and Velma Lee
Cloud, he was a lifetime resi-
dent of Blountstown where he
worked for the Department of
Corrections as a vocational
instructor. He was a master
woodworking craftsman and
member of the Macedonia
Baptist Church near Altha.
Survivors include his wife
Rose Marie Cloud of Blounts-
town; sons Jeff Cloud of Mari-
anna, .and Jimmi Cloud, and
wife Timra ao' Ciottondale;
brothels R.Li and wife&.
Patty of Melbourne, Nicky
Cloud and, wife Sandra of
Gibson, Ga., and Gerald Cloud
and wife Debi of Bartow; sister
Peggy Page and husband Chuck
of Wauchula; and grandchildren
Jade and Cody Cloud.
Visitation was Monday, Aug.
11, 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home. Funeral services were
Tuesday, Aug. 12, at the Mace-
donia Baptist Church with the
Rev. David Wood and Carlton
VanLierop officiating. Inter-
ment followed in the Nettle
Ridge Cemetery.
Adams Funeral Home
Blountstown


MARK WILLIAM
McENTYRE
Mark William McEntyre, 54,
of Bowling Green, died on
Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2008, at
home.
He was born in Savannah,
Ga., on Nov. 24, 1953.
Survivors include his mother
Cassie Brown of Bowling
Green; son Matt McEntyre of
Wauchula; daughter Daniell
McEntyre of Sebring; brother
Mike McEntyre of Bowling
Green; granddaughter Leanna
McEntyre; and nephews' Mike
and Steve, Robert McKee and
Chris Joiner.
Visitation was Saturday 2-4
p.m. at the funeral home.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


I


Having worked with athletes
for more than 20 years, Los
Angeles-based chiropractor and
certified athletic trainer Dr.
Glenn Lowenberg has heard
about every ache and pain in the
book. Whether it's the world-
class track athlete with a
strained hamstring or the intra-
mural softball player with a
sore back, Dr. Lowenberg has
seen it all.
Now he's at the 2008
Olympic Games in Beijing to
serve as a chiropractor on the
U.S. Olympic Track & Field
team.
"It's tough taking time away
from my busy practice and my
two children, but I love the
work that I do and volunteering
my time for this year's
Olympics in China was a no-
brainer," says Lowenberg.
In addition to his work with
the Olympics, Lowenberg has
participated in World Class
Track & Field events, including
five World Championships,
U.S. National Championships
and multiple Millrose Games.
His association with U.S.A.
Track & Field has taken him to
athletic venues on five conti-
nents.
No matter what country he's








MONDAY. AUG. 25
VProject Graduation 2009
meeting, Peace Valley
Luthe-ran Church across
from the Agri-Civic Center,
1643 Stenstrom Road,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY. AUG. 28
*Hardee County Com-
mission, regular and zoning
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 200 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advbcate'
encourages submissions
from Hardee County
schools. Photos and write-
ups should be of recent
events, and must include
first and last names for both
students and teachers.
Identify photos front to
back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


in, Lowenberg always tells the
athletes, whether competitive or
not, to keep four simple tips in
mind when participating in any
type of workout.
"One of the most important
things I tell any athlete or
patient is that you can never
start a workout without stretch-
ing properly first," says
Lowenberg.
A good warm-up will consist
of at least 20 minutes of stretch-
ing and target all of the muscle
groups you intend to use during
your workout.
Another tip is to make sure
to get a solid cooldown as well
to help prevent strained mus-
cles.
Adds Lowenberg, "Cooling
down is extremely important; it
gives a chance for the lactic
acid in your muscles to dissi-
pate."
Lowenberg advises athletes
to know their limits and not
overextend themselves during
their workouts.
"I'm an advocate for working
hard, but it's important not to
push yourself beyond your lim-
its and overtrain," says
Lowenberg. "This is the easiest
way to cause injuries such as
pulled muscles, which can


4..


MOST GOLF COURSES
AROUND THE WORLR
HAVE 18 HOLES.
HOWEVER, SOME
HAVE ONLY 9,


In 18th century America, artists journeyed from town to town
with paintings of men and women, complete in every feature
but the faces. A person wishing to sit for a portrait had to select.
the body he liked best and let the artist fill in the missing hair
and face.


r
"-t.
*^ Ci '


"They were


wonderful".

We hear kind words
consistently. We're proud
that people feel comfortable
enough with us to openly tell
us how much they appreciate
what we did for them. In fact,
it's this appreciation that
drives us to offer the very
best in comfort, compassion


I:. B... '. ~ and service.
"' ut



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
*1'- 1Wauchula





rAs a courtesy to our friends and neighbors, obituaries 7777
are now listed daily at www.hardeeobits.com 1 24tc


S cte z.f? cSewic


Mhike EverY moment a Syecial Memorl ...












Doug and PJ. Sutton
Owners
1067 South Sixth Ave. Wauchula Florida
863-773-0625 3


D id You
WNOW*


leave you out of commission
for weeks."
* Despite our best efforts, Dr.
Lowenberg knows that aches
and pains are often inevitable as
a side effect of working out. If
this happens, Dr. Lowenberg
recommends using Thera-
Gesic(r), a topical analgesic
cream that cap be applied to the
skin to provide effective relief
of muscle soreness.
"The first thing I tell my
patients suffering from muscle
pain after a workout is to try
Thera-Gesic(r). It's simple to
use and, in my opinion, there's
no other product that is more
effective in topical pain relief-
and you don't have to be a
world-class athlete to use it,"
says Lowenberg.
"One of the great things is
that it can work for nearly any-
one. I recommend it to my
patients suffering from arthritis
pain and even those with nag-
ging everyday pains, and the
feedback is very positive."
The analgesic is available
over the counter at your local
pharmacy. For more informa-
tion, visit www.thera-gesic.com
and for more information on Dr.:
Lowenberg, please visit www.
drglowenberg.com.


INCLUING OR SE






5 acd r cts, On Paved ho bes
Rd, of $95,000






August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Swimming Future Looks Strong


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Seventeen Hardee swimmers
made waves at the huge Titus-
ville swim meet on Aug. 2-3.
They accumulated 500 points
while attaining two dozen top
10 finishes. The top finisher
was Wyatt Zeigler, who placed
second in the 10-and-under 50
butterfly andc 100 individual
medley (IM). He also placed
third in the 50 freestyle, 100


free and 50 backstroke and fifth
in the 50 breaststroke.
High schoolers Stephanie
Driver and Kaitlyn Kennedy
also did well in their division.
Driver was llth in the 100 free,
12th in the 100 fly and 13th in
the 50 free, adding to the team
score along the way. Kennedy
chipped in with eighth place in
the exhausting 500 free, 12th in
the 100 back and 14th place in
both the 100 breast and 50 free.
In the very busy 13-14 age


group, the only Hardee com-
petitor was Susan Brumfield,
who placed 20th in the 100
back, 23th in the 100 free and
24th in the 50 free.
The 11-12 age group had the
most local entries.
In the girls division, that
included Emily Rhodes, Mag-
gie Brumfield, Leah Weeks,
Rachel Roberts, Carleigh Cole-
man, Amy Brumfield and Erica
Roberts.
Amy Brumfield placed fourth
in the FPS and seventh in the


100 breast. Hardee girls placed
sixth in 200 free relay, with
Rhodes, Amy Brumfield,
Weeks and Erica Roberts. Cole-
man, Susan Brumfield, Rhodes
and Erica Roberts combined for
an eighth-place finish in the
girls 11-14 age 200 medley
relay.
The girls had several other
finishes. The trio of Maggie
Brumfield, Weeks and Rachel
Roberts were llth, 12th and
13th in the 100 free. Others in
that group were Rhodes, Cole-
man, Amy Brumfield and Erica
Roberts.
Rachel Roberts was ninth in


the 50 fly, llth in the 50 free
and had the best finish, 18th, in
the 50 back. Coleman was llth
in the 100 back. Maggie Brum-
field was 13th in the 200 free
and 100 IM.
In the boys 11-12, it was
Cleston Sanders and Adam
Petrie having success. Petrie
was third in the 100 breast and
100 back, and seventh in the
100 free. Sanders was fifth in
the 50 fly, eighth in the 200
free, 12th >in the 50 and 100
free, andl3th in the 500 free for
the older boys age group.
The 10-and-under group also
had its strengths, as noted by


the successes of Wyatt Zeigler.
Joining him in that boys divi-
sion was Jordan Petrie, placing
10th in the 100 free for his best
performance.
Atasha Johnston was the only
girl in the 10-and-under group,
placing fourth in the 100 breast,
eighth in the 100 back, ninth in
the 100 free, 10th in the 50 back
and 11th in the 50 free..
The final group was the 8-
and-under where Shelby
Zeigler did well. She was fourth
in the 50 breast, fifth in the 50
fly, seventh in the 25 breast,
eighth in the 50 free 10th in the
25 fly and 13th in the 25 free.


So

Lunh Mnu


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Bagel, Fruit Cocktail, Juice,
Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice
w/Roll or Pepperoni Pizza
(Salad Tray, Garden Peas,
Peaches, Juice) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pineapple
Chunks, Sausage Sandwich,
Biscuit, Juice, Cinnamon Toast,
Milk
Lunch: Oven-Fried Chicken
w/Roll or Rib-B-Que on a Bun
(Salad Tray, Savory Rice, Pears,
Juice) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scramb-
led Eggs w/Cheese, Buttered
Toast, Pears, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or
Hamburger on a Bun (Salad
Tray, Baked Beans, Fruit Crisp,
Juice) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage, Peaches,
Cinnamon Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Burrito or Macaroni &
Cheese w/Roll (Salad Tray,
Green Beans, Strawberries &
Peaches, Juice) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Pizza Pocket or
Combo Sub (Salad Tray, Whole
Kernel Corn, Pears, Juice) and
Milk


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Bagel, Fruit Cocktail, Juice,
Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice
w/Roll or Pepperoni Pizza
(Tossed Salad, Garden Peas,
Peaches, Juice) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage Patty, Buttered Toast,
Pineapple Tidbits, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Oven-Fried Chicken
w/Roll or Rib-B-Que or Mozza-
rella Stick (Tossed Salad,
Savory Rice, Pears, Juice) and
Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scramb-
led Eggs w/Cheese, Buttered
Toast, Pears, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Cheese Pizza or


Hamburger on a Bun w/Dill or
Toasted Cheese w/HB Egg (Let-
tuce & Tomato, Baked Beans,
Juice, Pineapple Crisp) and
Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Peaches,
Cinnamon Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Burrito or Pepperoni
Pizza or Ham, Macaroni &
Cheese (Tossed Salad, Corn-
bread, Green Beans, Straw-
berries & Peaches, Juice) and
Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Juice,
Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Hot Pock-
ets or Meat Loaf or Combo Sub
(Lettuce & Tomato, Cornbread,
Whole Kernel Corn, Turnip
Greens, Pears, Juice) and Milk


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Dough-
nut, Juice, Fruit Cocktail, Milk
Lunch: Chicken & Rice
(Tossed Salad, Turnip Greens,
Juice, Peaches, Beets, Garden
Peas, Cornbread) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage,
Biscuit, Juice, Cinnamon Toast,
Pineapple Chunks, Milk
Lunch: Oven-Fried Chicken
(Tossed Salad, Mashed Pota-
toes, Baked Beans, Broccoli,
Pears, Juice, Roll) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Buttered
Toast, Scrambled Eggs, Pears,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Nachos (Tossed
Salad, Mexican Rice, Corn, Re-
fried Beans w/Cheese, Apple-
sauce, Juice) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Peaches,
Juice, Cinnamon Toast, Milk
Lunch: Ham, Macaroni &
Cheese (Tossed Salad, Black-
Eyed Peas, Steamed Cabbage,
Juice, Strawberries & Peaches,
Cornbread) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Cinnamon Toast, Apple-
sauce, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Corndog (Tossed
Salad, Baked Beans, Potato
Round, Cole Slaw, Corn, Pears,
Juice) and Milk


Watch Your Cholesterol


High blood cholesterol can
cause heart trouble. But you can
help control your cholesterol
levels. .
"Cholesterol has a variety of
uses in the body that are very
important," explains Dr. James
Cleeman of the National Insti-
tutes of Health's (NIH) National
Cholesterol Education Pro-
gram, "but the body makes all it
needs and we should keep the
level of blood cholesterol down
by making heart-healthy life-
style changes."
The landmark Framingham
Heart Study, funded by NIH,
first showed that the higher
your blood cholesterol, the
greater your risk for heart dis-
ease-the No. 1 killer of
Americans, both women and
men.
There are actually two forms
of cholesterol in your blood:
LDL and HDL. Too much LDL-
the "bad" cholesterol-can build
up in the walls of your arteries
and form a waxy plaque. Higher
levels of HDL-the "good" cho-
lesterol-have been linked with a
lower risk for heart disease.
-"Where LDL cholesterol does
its most harm," Cleeman says,
"is in the walls of the arteries
going to the heart-the coronary
arteries."
Like any muscle, the heart
needs a constant supply of oxy-
gen and nutrients. When the
coronary arteries become nar-
rowed or clogged by plaque,
blood flow to the heart is
restricted.


That causes coronary heart
disease. If the blood supply is
cut off, it results in a heart
attack.
Talk to your doctor to see if
you're at increased risk for heart
disease. The higher your risk,
the lower your blood LDL cho-
lesterol level should be. You
can't control some risk factors,
like age and genetics.
-But you can control what you
eat and whether you are physi-
cally active.
The TLC program-short for
Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes-
can help you lower your LDL
cholesterol level. It involves
three things: changing your diet
(by lowering how much saturat-
ed fat, trans fat and cholesterol
you eat), doing more physical
activity and controlling your
weight.
Learn more about TLC at
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/
health/public/heart/chol/chol_tl
c. htm.
If lifestyle changes don't
lower your LDL cholesterol
enough, medication can help.
"Medication should be added to
lifestyle changes," Cleeman
says, "not substituted for them."
NIH's National Heart, Lung
and Blood Institute recom-
mends that everyone 20 and
older have their blood choles-
terol levels checked at least
once every five years. Know
your numbers. Then talk to your
doctor about what you can do to
lower your blood cholesterol
and stay healthy.


~IS jIT O NHRO IS~r| *VIT JUSTTHESEW



INTRODUCING DOMINO'SI


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S _n. 6S pring





Santarlas Background
My competitors are unable to go "head to head" with me on the issues facing the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office. I have created a comprehensive plan of action to protect the community. Not only does it provide
a future for our county but it also details the apparent gross incompetence of the current administration.
Their response has been limited to unsuccessful attempts designed to discredit me verbally and in print.
So let me take this opportunity to set the record straight:

I have owned property in Hardee County for the past three years and pay property taxes just like you.
I have never purchased, distributed or used illegal narcotics.
I am not mentally ill nor have I ever been the subject of a competency hearing.
I have never violated the civil rights of another person.
I have never committed a criminal act.
I have never been convicted of a criminal act.
I have never been sentenced to prison or placed on court ordered probation.
I have never been a defendant in a civil lawsuit.
I have never been involved in a traffic stop with the Hardee County SO, Wauchula PD,
Zolfo Springs PD or Bowling Green PD.
I have never been disciplined by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.
I have never been accused of using excessive force.
I have never been separated from a law enforcement agency due to misconduct.
I have never caused any of my employers to be sued.
I have never been divorced and I am married to my first, last and only wife.
I have never fathered a child out of wedlock.
I am a Christian man who firmly believes in family values, the Ten Commandments and the
Golden Rule.
My Florida drivers' license is valid.
My bachelors, masters and doctorate degrees were earned at regionally accredited universities.
My specialized law enforcement training occurred at police academies and colleges approved by
the Florida Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.
I am tough on crime and compassionate towards my fellow man.
My law enforcement certification is valid and in good standing with the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE).

Any doubts....check for yourself because it is all public record. I have nothing to hide!

FDLE P.O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Fl. 32302; Tele: 850-410-7001

Thomas Santarlas(R)
for Hardee County Sheriff
Restoring Trust in Law Enforcement!
www.newsheriff8.org
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Thomas Santarlas, Republican, for Sheriff. 8:21p






6A The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


Candidates Speak At Forum


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Local political candidates
spoke at the Aug. 12 political
forum hosted by the Hardee
County Builders Association at
the Faith Presbyterian Church
Fellowship Hall.

U.S. CONGRESS
Congressman Vern Buchan-
an, a Republican, said he was
one of six children and his par-
ents worked in factories. Buch-
anan has been married 31 years,
and he and his wife have two
grown children.
He is on the House of Repre-
sentatives Transportation Com-
mittee and said he will make
U.S. 17 four-laning happen.
Next year Congress will pass a
$400 billion five-year highway
bill. He is also on the Veterans
Committee and Small Business
Committee. The district has
97,000 veterans.
Buchanan said hp voted for
the farm bill. "I am pro-life. She
is pro-choice. I am 100 percent
pro-gun. She will take your
guns away."
His opponent Christine Jen-
nings, a Democrat, strongly
denied that she would take guns
away from people. She said her
father was a minister and Ohio
steel worker. Jennings was in
banking for 40 years and started
two banks.
"My campaign is built on


honesty, integrity and accounta-
bility. I have never said I will
take your guns away. I favor the
Second Amendment."
Jennings said she is "pro-
choice but against abortion"
and has been endorsed by for-
mer Governor Bob Graham,
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, and Ed
and Rhea Chiles, son and wife
of the late Governor and U.S.
Senator Lawton Chiles.
In 2006 Buchanan, who owns
auto dealerships, defeated Jen-
nings by 369 votes.
Independent Congressional
candidate Bob Baldauf said he
favors drilling for offshore oil
and bringing an oil refinery to
Manatee County.

COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT I
Minor Bryant said he has
been a county commissioner for
16 years and is certified by the
state. He is the only state-certi-
fied commissioner in the coun-
ty.
"I liked Wauchula in the early
1950s, but we cannot go back.
We have to go forward." He
added the county's tax base has
grown to $1.6 billion, thanks to
new power plants, a mulch
plant, commerce park and a
state prison. He noted a 10-year
agreement between the county
and Mosaic will bring in $42
million for economic develop-
ment.


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
County Commission candidate Walter OIIff Jr. brought a
campaign bus.


State Sen. J.D. Alexander poses with deputy campaign
manager Rob Shave.


County Commissioner Dale Johnson, who is seeking re-
election, talks with Hardee Property Appraiser Kathy
Crawford and U.S. Congressman Vern Buchanan, who is
also seeking re-election as a Republican.


County Commission candi-
date Gene Davis said he has
been in the automobile sales
business for 32 years and wants
"common sense and respect"
brought back to county govern-
ment. He said impact fees
should be kept low.
Davis said the county Zoning
and Building Department is
"not user friendly." He added,
"It is good to ask for advice. I
will work to keep Resthaven
open, and I live in the district,"
a reference to Bryant listing two
residences in the county.
County Commission candi-
date Donald Samuels said he is
retired from PRECO and can be
a commissioner full-time. "I am
63, my wife and I have two
sons. I worked 43 years with
PRECO, and was on the county
Zoning Board and Indigent
Board. I think we need to revis-
it the E-911 issue."
County Commission candi-
date Donny Waters, who owns
King Fries in Fort Green, said
he "has never served on a board
and has always been on the
other end." He promised to be
true to his name and "make
some waves."
COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT 3
County Commission candi-


Running for local political offices are Teresa Crawford, Charles Crutchfield, Gina
Neuhofer, Roger Clark, and Arnold Lanler. Neuhofer is an incumbent School Board
member.


date Terry Atchley said, "Our
county, state and nation are in
great need. Hardee has 11,000
registered voters and 27,000
residents." He cited his experi-
ence in business and project
management.
"We need to diversify our tax
base. Hardee property values
have dropped this year. We
need to be creative and have
responsible leadership. We need
to turn the County Commission
into leaders, not followers."
County Commission candi-
date Don Chancey, a Republi-
can, was absent.
Gordon Norris said he has
been on the County Commis-
sion for 12 years. He cited the
proposed major growth in the,
Vandolah areas which will con-
sist of three projects.
"The county has,experienced
economic development since
1996. The Vandolah rural center
will create a need to expand
Hwy. 62, Hwy 64, the Ona-Fort
Green Road, and Vandolah
Road," he said.
,County Commission candi-
date Alane Solomon said Har-
dee County is a "special place
and environmentally rich." She
and her father run Solomon's
Castle in Lily, and she is used to
dealing with governmental
agencies, she said.
"We need to honor our old
Florida heritage and also seek
economic diversity and
grucm h," said SoloP11n.

COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT 5
County Commissioner Dale
Johnson said he has a passion
and a vision for Hardee County.
His goals include four-laning
U.S. 17, walkable communities,
1,000 high-paying jobs, a new
power plant and a drug-free
community. Johns said the
County Commission has made
progress in recent years and
seeks more economic develop-
ment.
County Commission candi-


VOTE






YES



ON TAX ABATEMENT



( FOR ECONOMIC


DEVELOPMENT





Authorization to grant property tax exemptions to new businesses

and expansions of existing businesses. Shall the Board of County

Commissioners of Hardee County be authorized, for an additional


to S.3, Art. VII of the


State


Constitution, property tax exemption to new businesses and to

expansion of existing businesses?


Endorsed by:

The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners

The Hardee County Economic Development Council

The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce 8:21
8:21o


date Walter Olliff Jr. said he
served as a county commission-
er for 12 years and has "experi-
ence, knowledge and heart. I
am a small business owner."
Olliff said the county charges
too many fees and requires an
engineer's seal on small proj-
ects. "We need to limit the has-
sle when you're earning a liv-
ing. Do not be rude. Treat peo-
ple with kindness, dignity and
respect."

SCHOOL
BOARD
School Board member Tanya
Royal said she has children in
local schools, is a lifelong
Hardee resident, is available,
has passion of education and
seeks the best for children. She
has done a lot of school volun-
teering and attends many school
events.
School Board candidate Tere-
sa Crawford said Hardee stu-
dents need more resources and
she has teaching and adminis-
trative experience. Hardee High
is a "D" school and needs to be
improved. She has been a guid-
ance counselor and has a mas-
ter's degree.
School Board candidate
Charles Crutchfield said he
worked with PRECO for 10
years, served in the U.S. Army
and has worked in supervisory
and safety positions. He said he
is honest and fair and under-
stands what local families need
from their school system.
Crutchfield is an automotive
technician.
School Board member Gina
Neuhofer said "strong schools
mean strong communities." She
cited progress in the county
school system and six of the
county's seven schools are rated
by the state as high performing.
She has a long career as a
school volunteer.

SHERIFF
Sheriff candidate Roger
Clark said he has 24 years in
local law enforcement and was
a civilian police officer in Iraq
the past three years. "We can do
better," said Clark, who empha-
sizes leadership and an open
door policy.
Sheriff candidate Arnold
Lanier said he has been with the
Hardee Sheriff's Office for 29
years and is the best qualified
candidate. He cited the mission
of safey and community protec-
tion. He would work for putting
IDs on equipment to help solve
thefts and citizens patrol.
Sheriff candidate Thomas
Santarlas said the sheriff's


office "needs re-tooling. It has
so many problems. The sher-
iff's office acts like we are in a
booming economy. There is
$147,000 in pay raises for 16
employees." He suggests hav-
ing a tent city to house inmates.
Santarlas said schools need
certified school resource offi-
cers and students need mentors.
"We need to deal with our
youth."

SCHOOLS
SUPERINTENDENT
Superintendent of schools
candidate David Durastanti said
he has lived in Hardee 37 years
and been principal in Wauchula
and Bowling Green elementary
schools. He worked at the coun-
ty office for seven years.
"Stronger discipline and school
safety is needed. More voca-
tional courses are needed. Go
Wildcats!"
Superintendent Dennis Jones
said good schools are important
to a community to teach skills
for a successful life and to
attract new residents. "In 1999
there was not one high-per-
forming school in Hardee
County. In 2006, there were
three, in 2007 five, and in 2008
six of the county's seven
schools' are high-performing.
Hardee High has made great
progress. We have challenges.
We can get better. I am proud of
our 700 school employees and
proud to be a part of it."
Superintendent of schools
candidate Gary Moore said he
has been a teacher and principal
at the elementary and secondary
level. "We have wonderful em-
ployes for the most part. We
need adequate support and
equitable treatment. These are
our kids. We can do better."
Moore cited the importance of
safe schools and firm disci-
pline.
Superintendent of schools
candidate Bob Shayman has
been band director, music
teacher, assistant principal in
Bowling Green and in the past
five years the school where he
is principal West Elementary
in Arcadia has earned an "A"
every year. He and his wife
Linda live in Zolfo Springs.
"Our biggest problem is no
money. About 85 percent goes
to salaries and benefits and 10
percent for fixed costs. Let's
spend money wisely. Hire and
retain employees. Have a uni-
formed deputy at each school. I
have had three jobs, 20 years
with the band. I mirrored my
band after football coach Bob
Martin. We had 150 members."


Bob Shayman campaigned for superintendent of
schools.


years, to grant pursuant





August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Speaking at political rally were Thomas Santarlas, Gary Moore, Dennis Jones, David
Durastanti, and Bob Shayman. Jones Is superintendent of schools.


Local political candidates from left are Minor Bryant, Gene Davis, Donald Samuels,
Donnie Waters and Terry Atchley all seeking County Commission posts. Bryant Is an
incumbent. Not in photo and absent was Don Chancey, Republican candidate for
County Commission.


1*E Ij~:


'7 1 .'


Gary
Yoore
dv.;


Seeking local political offices and speaking were Gordon Norris, Alane Solomon, Dale
Johnson, Walter Olliff Jr., Tanya Royal, and Mildred Smith. Norris and Johnson are
incumbent county commissioners, and Royal is an incumbent School Board member.
I, 1


Gary Moore sought support for superintendent of schools.


Inspiration Point
By Rick Leland
Pastor & Columnist


U.S. Rep. Vern Buchanan talks with Don Baldauf, who is
running for U.S. Congress as an independent. Baldauf
lives in Bradenton and supports offshore oil drilling,
including an oil refinery in Manatee County.


,I Mw~d. .2 "
U.S. Congressman Vern Buchanan talks with Chet
Huddleston and David Durastanti, Republican candidate
for superintendent of schools.


Experienced
8 years as a social science teacher
ati-lardee Sr. High
8 years as a counselor at Hardee Sr.
High
7 years at SFCC as Director of the
Hardee Campus


Personal
Married 23 years to Vent
Crawford
One daughter Kaylyn Crawford
graduate of Hardee High
currently student at FSU
graduating in May of '09
with dual degrees in political
science and communications


I *
Benny Hash, president of the Hardee County Builders
Association, introduced political candidates who spoke
at the Fellowship Hall at Faith Presbyterian Church Aug.
13.


Christine Jennings, Democratic candidate for U.S.
Congress in District 13, visits with Chelsea Harris.


Educated
AA- SFCC
BA USF Social Science Ed
MA USF Counselor Education
M Ed USF Educational
Leadership
Further graduate study in Political
Science @ USF and AMA


Eager To Lead
Director Hardee EDC
Director Hardee County Fair Board
Director Hardee Athletic Foundation
Take Stock in Children Mentor
Secretary Florida Association of
Community Colleges -
Rural Branches

Key Concerns
Student achievement
Budget allocations in this
critical economic climate
Professional Development for
School Board Members
Better benefits for school
employees
Alternative Education for
disruptive students


8:21p


FIRST COMMUNION
"All the little girls get dressed up in new white dresses," Mike
said. With a few laughs, he also described the 7-year-old boys in
exuberance-restraining suits and ties.
I had asked Mike, "What does First Communion mean to
you?"
Over the weekend, he had attended his granddaughter's First
Communion ceremony. I was actually probing for a more mean-
ingful answer. So I refocused my question: "What's the spiritual
significance?"
At the initiation of communion, also called the Lord's Supper,
Jesus said: "Do this in remembrance of me."
At age 41, I did.
Solemn music quietly played and my thinking flowed to the
heavenly importance of this moment as I stood in line. My wife
touched my shoulder, startling me and demanding that my brain
make thejournekback to earth.
She askedif- to look: her in her eye'. W-eheld hands as we
faced each other. Softly, she said, "I forgive you for everything
you've done to me."
I became undone.
In fifteen years as an ungodly husband, the massive trash pile
of transgressions toward her was shameful.
Are there many life-challenges more arduous than forgiving
people of the wounds they inflict?
Communion: Jesus said, "This is My blood . which is
poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins."
Do you really want to understand communion, the forgiveness
of Jesus, in a tangible way? Stack on the scales the sins Jesus has
forgiven you; weigh those against the sins of another who you
refuse to forgive.
Thump. My scale just bottomed out.
I know I must forgive others if I want to experience true "in
remembrance" communion with Jesus. Communion means more
than fancy dresses and ties.
It means forgiveness.
Rick Leland, pastor of The Free Church, is a resident of Michigan
who holds a degree in Christian ministry and has served a two-
year apprenticeship with the Jerry Jenkins Christian Writers Guild.
His favorite Bible verse comes from 1 John 1:4, "These things we
write that our joy may be complete." His column is published in
nearly 150 newspapers nationwide.


-I


MAKING WAVER FOR CHANGE


* Lifelong Hardee County Resident
* Born and Raised in Fort Green
* Farmer for 20 years
* Business Owner In Hardee County





Pd Pol Adv Paid for by the Donny Waters Campaign Account. Approved by
Donny alen cl0821p


Vote



Teresa M. Crawford

for

School Board District III


"Every vote Counts and I'd like yours to count for me.
Vote Teresa M. Crawford School Board District III"
Paid Political Advertisement Paid for and approved by Teresa M. Crawford for School Board District 3)


P.7


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8A The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


Motorists Turn To


Gas-Saving Ideas
While there's no shortcut to impressive 22 mpg city/32 mpg
avoiding'rising gas prices, you highway fuel economy with the
can steer toward fuel economy standard five-speed manual
with these tips from the experts: transmission or the newly avail-
Lower your highway speed able five-speed automatic trans-
and you'll find yourself on the mission.
road to fuel economy. As a gen- Surprising to many motorists
eral rule of thumb, you can is that the difference between a
assume that each five miles an car that gets 20 mpg and one
hour you drive over 60 mph is that gets 30 mpg amounts to
like paying an additional 20 $1,125 a year, when you
cents per gallon for gas. assume 15,000 miles of driving
When you avoid keeping a year and a fuel cost of $4.50
unnecessary items iti your vehi- per gallon.
cle, you'll be driving more effi- Interestingly, Sonata's 3.3-
ciently. An extra 100 pounds in liter V6 engine has also been
your car could reduce your mpg im-proved for more perform-
by up to 2 percent. ance and efficiency. It now
Keep your car well main- pumps out more horsepower.
trained. When your car is tuned The mileage figures for the
up, it can improve gas mileage V6 Sonatas are 19 mpg city/29
by 4 percent. mpg highway. This represents
Interestingly, the most impor- unsurpassed V6 fuel economy
tant fuel economy decision in the midsize sedan driving
you'll make is selecting the car segment.
you drive. One of the pleasant surprises
The new USA Hyundai in the Hyundai Sonata is that
Sonata, for example, is now designers have thoroughly re-
more fuel efficient than the vamped the cockpit to create
Camry and Accord four-cylin- the ambience of an upscale, pre-
Sder engines, delivering an mium sedan.


Catfish A Whopper!

Sets A New Record


A Washington County resi-
dent caught a new state-record
catfish early this month on the
Choctawhatchee River.
The record blue catfish
weighed 64 pounds, 8 ounces
and was 53-1/2 inches long.
The fish is three pounds larger
than the previous record, a 61-
pound, 8-ounce blue cat that
came from Little Escambia
Creek north of Pensacola.
Florida Fish & Wildlife Con-
servation Commission fisheries
biologists met with 64-year-old
James Mitchell in Bonifay the
day after his catch and weighed
his fish on certified scales.
Mitchell, who is disabled but
still -enjoys fishing, fished a
favorite spot on the river, near
Caryville. He caught the record
catfish at sundown. He needed
the help.of his son and grandsot-
to pull the fish over the side of


his boat.
He said the one-minute fight
left him worn out.
Mitchell fishes for catfish
often on the river and uses
bream, which is his bait of
choice. He caught this blue cat
on a hand-sized bluegill, six-
foot rod and bait-caster reel
loaded with 50-pound-test line.
Within the past couple of
months, Mitchell caught big
blues or channel cats he's
not sure which in the same
stretch of the river weighing 40
and 41 pounds.
While blue catfish are found
in most of the rivers and some
creeks in the Panhandle, they
are not native to the area. They
were originally found in rivers
and tributaries in the Midwest.
Exactly how they made it to
Florida waterways is unknown.


Preschoolers Explore Cultures

Learn Through Music


As the number of children in
the United States exposed to
both Spanish and English con-
tinues to increase, there is a
growing need for children's
media that communicates using
both Spanish and English.
To address this need, the
leading provider of educational
children's media is increasing
the amount of Spanish words
and phrases in its preschool
destination.
To kick off its third season,
PBS KIDS preschool destina-
tion introduces Miss Rosa,
played by teacher and actress
Jennifer Pefia, to encourage
children to discover new expe-
riences by presenting Spanish
words and phrases. .
Miss Rosa's daily lessons are
featured in-between the No.1
preschool series "Curious
George,". "Super Why!," "Dra-
gon Tales" and "Clifford the
Big Red Dog" (check local list-
ings).
In addition, to get children up
,and moving and introduce a
new way to learn, Mr. Steve,
played by award-winning chil-
dren's recording artist Steve
Roslonek, performs new origi-
nal music that ties into the day's
curriculum theme.
The interactive songs invite
kids to sing and dance along
and tap into a variety of age-


appropriate topics including
transportation, rhyming and
counting.
"The new season of the PBS
KIDS preschool destination is
designed to encourage chil-
dren's curiosity about the world
around them by providing an
interactive and contemporary
environment with new people
and cultures," says Lesli
Rotenberg, SVP Children's
Media, PBS.
"With the addition of a
Spanish teacher and a music
teacher, we're offering all chil-
dren the opportunity to benefit
from an enriching and diverse
preschool experience."
To round out the new season,
a new on-air segment with PBS
KIDS icon Dash highlights a
series of online "minigames" at
pbskids.org that reveals Dash's
Secret Treasure.
The games were developed to
provide short learning moments
that emphasize age-appropriate
content such as shapes and liter-
acy skills.
Building upon PBS' legacy of
quality children's programming,
the PBS KIDS preschool desti-
nation is one more place fami-
lies can turn to for resources,
role models and activities to
help kids develop the skills they
need for success in school and
in life.


The first and, so far, the only president to be married in the
White House was Grover Cleveland. During his second year in
office, he married Frances Folsom, who was 27 years his junior.
P' .4 ,., .


Political Candidates!

Your advertising deadline is each



This will permit us to-give your ad the
greatest amount of attention.
Please do not ask us to make an exception. /
.: Wa desire only to serve all candidates
equally & well.
S- The Herald-Advocate
S' "Your local hometown newspaper
for over 100 years"
^ ^ ^ ^ r~ ^ ^ ^r -.,.A.,,


Tips For Staying Safe

During Severe Weather


While 58 percent of moms
feel their families are prepared
for a severe weather emergency,
only 30 percent have created
and discussed an emergency
communication plan, according
to a recent survey by the Home
Safety Council (HSC).
When the weather turns
severe, safety is no accident.
That's why many experts say a
detailed communications plan
plays a pivotal role in helping
families and emergency con-
tacts stay connected to each
other during a natural disaster.
To help families prepare for
emergency situations, Embarq
Corporation and the nonprofit
Home Safety Council are edu-
cating families about the impor-
tance of creating an emergency
communication plan.
List Phone Numbers
The groups created wallet-
sized emergency communica-
tion cards that include space to
list important phone numbers
and medical information.
The cards can be downloaded
at www.embarq.com/ severe-
weather.
"First, families should dis-
cuss how they will communi-
cate during an emergency and
then record important plan
information on their emergency
communication cards," said
Home Safety Council President
Meri-K Appy.
Communication, simple pre-
paration and proper supplies are
keys to staying safe and keep-
ing in contact during severe
weather threats.
"When an emergency occurs,
often the first thing people
reach for is a phone to call their
loved ones," said Dan Alcazar,
consumer marketing officer at
Embarq. "This is why Embarq
and the Home Safety Council
have developed these free, wal-


* 1942: THE DISNEY
MOVIE, "BAMBI"
OPENED UP AT RADIO
CITY MUSIC HALL.
* 1961: THE BORDER
BETWEEN EASTAND
WEST BERLIN WAS
CLOSED.
* 1995: BASEBALL LEG-
END MICKEY MANTLE
DIED OF CANCER.


let-sized cards."
The HSC strongly recom-
mends having a corded landline
phone, which is a phone that
has a handset connected to the
base of the phone by a cord.
"Corded landline phones will
continue to operate if the power
goes out at your home," said
Appy. "It is often the most reli-
able source of communication
in the case of an emergency."
Additional Safety Tips
SCompile a "ready-to-go
kit" for when your family needs
to leave your home and a
"ready-to-stay kit" when your
family needs to stay inside your
home for extended periods of
time.
Kits should contain watir,
canned food, can opener, flash-
light, battery-powered radio,
extra batteries, change of
clothes and first-aid supplies.
Designate a safe meeting
location outside your home and
out of harm's way.
Designate a safe place to
stay in your home (away from
windows) in case of severe
weather.
For more information and
tips, visit embarq.com/severe-
weather.


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Keeping Cool Starts At The Top
Here's cool news for many into the manufacturing process,
homeowners: What's atop your virtually eliminating unneces-
home may be key to your cor- sary landfill clutter."
fort. Changing your roof can Another green-energy effort
help curb energy costs and up on the roof is solar tiles.
make your home more visually "They're more affordable
attractive, now and they integrate with the
actual tiles themselves, so it's
Saving Energy seamless and attractive. It's a lot
And The Environment more aesthetically pleasing and
"Clay and concrete tiles have serviceable so a roofer. can'
been around for thousands of install," says Sheehy.
years. They are the original
green product," says Jeanne Other Advantage
Sheehy of the Tile Roofing Concrete tiles are lightweight
Institute. and available in a multitude of
Roofing tiles not only reflect shapes and colors-blues, greens,
heat naturally, they let air circu- browns, even white and black.
late through the roof. This Installed properly, tile roofs
results in keeping homes cooler can withstand harsh weather
in the summer and warmer in conditions, including, high
the winter. winds, snow and ice buildup,
Tile roofing systems are hail and earthquakes.
green for another reason. They Additionally, tile roofing is
come from raw materials that naturally fire-resistant; roof
do not deplete limited natural tiles often last the lifetime and
resources. "With the rising cost more of a home and typically
of oil, asphalt shingles are be- carry a 50-plus-year lifetime,
coming more expensive and the transferable warranty.
price points are starting to equal More traditional asphalt-
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From an environmental point just have 20-year limited war-
of view, says Sheehy, "this is ranties.
he best product that's on the
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6II~ILIII


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8:21c














DOES GOD REALLY SPEAK?
Q: I am always hearing people say that God "told" them
this or that. I do not hear God tell me anything. Do you believe
that God is still speaking to people today? If so, why is He not
talking to me?
A: Yes! I do believe that God is still speaking to people today.
The problem is that people are not listening.
So many times when we kneel in prayer we get right to the
point, we tell Him what we want and need, and then we jump up
before we allow God to speak back. It should be a two-way con-
versation. How boring would it be if your friend called you on the
phone, said everything she wanted to say, then just hung up?
Sounds pretty boring, huh?
How are you,:going to build a relationship with one another
when only one friend is doing all the talking?
God uses many different avenues to speak to His people. He
will speak through your conscience, the Holy Spirit within you, a
preacher, the Word, a prophet, dreams, audibly or a small voice in
your heart.
Many times we do not recognize His voice. But He said, "My
sheep shall know my voice and no other will they follow." It is very
important that you learn what His voice sounds like.
I will share with you a few experiences I have encountered.
During Hurricane Charley, my husband and I lost everything.
Like so many others, we spent our days just surviving. One day, as
I lay on an air mattress on my parents' floor, I began to weep and
weep. I heard the Lord speak to my heart and say, "My daughter,
my queen." That was all I needed to hear to pick myself up and
keep going.
Then, a few years ago my oldest daughter had to have shoul-
der surgery. It was the hardest thing for me to see her lying on the
hospital bed so helpless. When I was asked to leave the room, I
went into the bathroom to cry. When I stepped inside, I heard the
i


Light One Candle
By Stephanie Raha
The Christophers


WHAT'S IN A WORD?
With all the news coverage recently about the disastrous
downturn of the subprime mortgage market, you probably know
exactly what subprime means. Before, you wouldn't even have
been able to look it up in the dictionary.
But last month, "subprime" and about a hundred other words
became entries in the latest edition of Merriam-Webster's
Collegiate Dictionary. The official definition? "Having or being an
interest rate that is higher than a prime rate and is extended espe-
cially to low-income borrowers."
Among the other words that have made the cut are some relat-
ed to computers and technology like "webinar," a live online edu-
cational presentation during which participating viewers can sub-
mit questions and comments. Think of a combination of "web" and
"seminar."
One new scientific entry is "dwarf planet," a celestial body that
orbits the sun and has a spherical shape, but is too small to disturb
other objects from its orbit. Think Pluto.
So, just how are new Aitries chosen?
Peter Sokolowski, an editor-at-large for Merriam-Webster,
said, "As soon as we see the word used without explanation or
translation or gloss, we consider it a naturalized citizen of the
English language. If somebody is using it to convey a specific idea
and that idea is successfully conveyed in that word, it's ready to go
in the dictionary."
The English language offers a vital, thriving, fascinating range
of words for us to read and hear and say. Now, there's even a word
to use when we mistake words for other words. It usually comes
from misunderstood phrases or lyrics.
"Mondegreen" was first used by author Silvia Wright, who
confessed to her confusion about a Scottish ballad called "The
Bonny Earl of Moray." When she was a little girl, she thought that
the lyric "they had slain the Earl of Moray and had lain him on the
green" referred to the killing of the Earl of Moray, and "Lady
Mondegreen."
Face it: Most of us have probably misunderstood words others
have used, in a song or just in conversation. Some speakers may
contribute to the problem by not enunciating clearly. Yet, there's no
doubt that often we simply just don't pay enough attention when
we're listening.
In his book, "How to Speak; How to Listen," Mortimer Adler
compared listening to a baseball game and the mutual communica-
tion of pitcher and catcher. "Catching is as much an activity as
throwing, though it's a skill of a different kind," he says. "Without
the complementary efforts of both players, properly attuned to each
other, the play cannot be completed."
Words are immensely powerful and, for better or worse, they
can take on lives of their own. And if you listen, really listen, you
can offer, the speaker a great gift, that of being taken seriously. At
the same time, everybody can remember some compliment or
expression of appreciation or encouragement from someone else
that really turned around a day or, occasionally, a life.
Poet Emily Dickinson conveyed the value of language when
she wrote: "A word is dead when it is said, some say. I say it just
begins to live that day."
How you speak and how you listen can matter in a way you
may never be able to put in words.
For a free copy of "Three Minutes To Make A Difference," write:
The Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-
mail:'mail@christophers.org.


It pays to advertise
in your Hometown
Newspaper
We are saving this space just
for


YOU!
The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
115 S..7th Ave.
. *


Telephone:


713-3255


SLord say, "Fear not." At that moment a blanket of peace came all
over me, and my tears dried up instantly.
God is always there to comfort us in our time of troubles. But,
we must be willing to allow Him to. He may not say much, but
what He says is enough.
There have been many times in my life that God has spoken to
me. Sometimes it is words of instruction, direction, correction and
sometimes it is words of comfort, encouragement.
Many years ago the Lord kept telling me to go see a friend who;
had been sick. I really had no idea why I had to go. Even after I
arrived, I had no idea what I was supposed to say or do. So, I sat
down on her bed. and took out my Bible and began to read her
Scriptures. Right after that, I began to feel the presence of angels
in her room and, in no time, she closed her eyes and passed on.
S Should I have waited to go, I would have missed the opportu-
nity to see her one last time. Was it a coincidence? I do not think
so. God was leading me to her bedside.


August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 9A
Many times if we do not move when God tells us to, we will
miss Him. Sometimes there is a small door of opportunity that God
gives us. If we hesitate, we could miss Him. This is why knowing
His voice is so very important.
So, my advice to you is to give God time to speak when you
are in prayer. He may not respond every time, but at least give Him
a chance.
God longs to have fellowship with His children, and He is
searching for people who will listen. He created mankind to com-
mune with Him, to praise Him and to love Him.
What are you waiting for?
Signed, Penny
Your questions or comments can be sent to signedpenny@-
yahoo.com or PO. Box 2604, Wauchula, FL 33873. You can also.
visit Penny Johnson's Web site at www.pennyjohnson.net or watch
her shows at www.myhwntv.com


Workingfor You and Our Future


* Students & the Classroom

* Safe & Secure Schools


* Discipline


* Service


* Student Achievement


* Communication


8:21p


"I NEED YOUR VOTE AND SUPPORT
TO CONTINUE MAKING A DIFFERENCE"

If you have any questions or concerns call 773-0460 or email me at
tanyabroyalforschoolboard@yahoo.com

Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Tanya B. Royal, non-partisan, for School Board District 2


L --

RE-ELECT



GORDON





NORRIS



A COMMISSIONER WORKING FOR

HARDEE COUNTY'S FUTURE TODAY.

When you elected me Commissioner 12 years ago, I made a commitment to do
my best to enhance the quality of life within our community. The following
are a few of our accomplishments during this time:

Waste Water Treatment Plants

An Economic Development Council

Hardee Lakes Park

Fire Station #1

Health Department

An Industrial Development Board

An Eco-Friendly Animal Refuge

New Bridges Throughout The County

Commerce Park

Economic development continues to be our greatest challenge.
We will move forward with efficient and responsible operation of
county government and a focus on core services that our citizens
depend upon.

"WE ARE MAKING IT HAPPEN"

VOTE AUGUST 26th OR EARLY VOTE NOW!


GORDON NORRIS
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER-DISTRICT 3
Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Gordon R. Norris, Democrat, County Commissioner-District 3 8:21






10A The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


Hot Tips for Preventing

And Treating Burns


Families enjoying an active
outdoor lifestyle know that
grilling and camping, among
other fun activities, present
some dangers, especially burns.
To keep your family safe, con-
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ing and treating.bums.
Grilling in the Backyard
Follow manufacturers' di-
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Use only commercial start-
ing fluid to light charcoals.
Never use gasoline or other
flammable liquids.
Never add starter fluid to
hot coals. They could catch fire
and explode.
Thoroughly extinguish hot
coals before disposal.


Supervise children at all
times when grills are in use.
Establish a three-foot "keep
l away zone" for children around
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Do not wear loose-fitting
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When Camping
When camping out and a
fireplace is not available, build
campfires in a cleared area.
Adult supervision is espe-
cially important when children
toast foods over the fire.
Be aware that flaming
marshmallows could ignite hair
or clothing.
Keep a supply of water or
an extinguisher within easy
reach.
Store firewood at a safe


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Do not leave a burning
campfire unattended, *
Make sure coals are thor-
oughly extinguished before dis-
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At Home or Away
Doctors recommend- you
keep a bur ointment like Bur
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To protect against burns,
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invested 37-1/2 years educating our children
retired June, 2008
desire to continue serving our children
motivated to research and find answers
determined to make our schools the best

Brent Smith (Dana)
graduate of Hardee High School, University of Florida, and
Stetson University, College of Law (cum laude)


Grandparent of: Harrison Carter Smith, 11 months

Community Involvement


ember:


ner Memi


Hardee County Prince/Princess Committee
Main Street Wauchula
Friends of the Library
Joy Sunday School Class (First Baptist Church)

ber: Hardee County State Fair Booth Committee
Hardee County Little League Team Mother
Oak Grove Baptist Children's Church Pianist
Oak Grove Baptist Bible School Teacher


As an educator, parent and grandparent, I will
bring practical hands-on experience to the board!

Vote for a voice for all children!

Vote Mildred Smith on August 26, 2008!


for School Board District 2 8:21p

I1 l1P1l1tical _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ppo edbyMIdedSm th on aris n


DInflfom


Educator:


Parent of:


Current M




Forn








X


rutumru


p


1I







August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 11A


AYP vs. State Grading


By LAUREN RAULERSON
For The Herald-Advocate
Each year, both the state and
national education departments
grade every school. They each
provide the public with an
assessment of how well a
school is meeting students'
needs. However, the two fre-
quently give drastically differ-
ent grades.
A school is evaluated in order
to inform parents, the commu-
nity and the school of its com-
pliance with state and national
standards. These assessments
are intended to provide ac-
countability for school districts
by making funding partially
dependent upon the grades.
They also serve as measuring
sticks, informing the schools in
which areas they are excelling
and which need improvement.
Both the state and national
education systems use the
Florida Comprehensive Assess-
ment Test (FCAT) to grade
Florida schools. Since the two
assessments are based on the
same test scores and fundamen-
tally serve the same purpose, it
would seem to follow that the
evaluations are relatively simi-
lar. However, this is not the
case.-
PASS ONE,
FAIL ANOTHER
For example, two years ago,
the state deemed Zolfo Springs
Elementary (ZSE) the valedic-
torian of the heartland consor-
tium which is comprised of 30
elementary schools in six
school districts. The school
was given the best grade out of
all of these schools. However,
ZSE did not even receive a
passing grade by the national
department.
While this suggests that the
national grading standard is
simply higher, ZSE's assess-
ment last year proves other-
wise. Last year, the school
received a passing grade by the
national education department.
However, it was not even the
highest performing school in
the county by state standards.
While ZSE's evaluations over
the past two years prove there is
an extreme discrepancy be-
tween the two grading systems,
Bowling Green Elementary
(BGE) illustrates the severe
consequences of these inconsis-
tencies. ; ,;
BAD CONSEQUENCES
BGE was the highest per-
forming school in the county,
according to state grading last
year. However, the school did
not receive a passing grade by
the national program. In fact, it
decided to place the school
under restructuring.
Restructuring means that the
school will not have as much
freedom to determine how the
school is governed. The state
has a similar consequence for
schools they deem insufficient.
However, this is not the only
repercussion of a bad evalua-
tion. Since both assessments in
someway control the district's
funding, a bad grade from either
department can cut the district's
funds. Therefore, such a distinct
inconsistency can place the dis-
trict in a vicious Catch 22.

GOOD CONSEQUENCES
Good evaluations also have
significant consequences. If 'a
school receives a passing grade
by the national program two
years in a row, the school
becomes a "choice school."
This means that any child in the.
district, regardless of which
school they are originally zoned
for, can choose to go to that
school.
While this seems to be an
ideal plan to provide students in
the district with the best educa-
tion, it is only idyllic in theory.
The district witnessed the nega-
tive repercussions of "choice
school" status when Wauchula
Elementary School (WES) at-
tained it two years ago. Last
school year, WES had an influx
of about 100 additional stu-
dents. According to Principal


The
Herald-
Advocate
Hardee Counly's llontelown
Co verage
PRINTERS
PUBLISHERS -
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Telephone (863) 773-
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Michele Polk, this caused fund-
ing problems, class size issues
and major transportation dilem-
mas. Student performance suf-
fered and, as a result, the
national program did not give
WES the same passing grade
last year.
If nothing else, this instance
:.ught the district that parents
are aware of the schools' assess-
ments. According to Director of
Federal Programs Marsha Ka-
pusta, the year before WES
became a choice school, the dis-
trict received 101 waivers from
parents zoned for. different
schools wishing to send their
child to WES. However, once
the school became a. "choice
school" the amount of parents
wishing to send their children to
WES increased by 52. This sta-
- tistic at least suggests that some
parents choose school based
on its assessments.

WHICH IS BEST?
Therefore, if a parent chooses
a school based on its assess-
ment, it is imperative that those
assessments are a true represen-
tation of how the school is
meeting its students' needs.
For this reason, the inconsis-
tencies of the two grading sys-
tems present an enormous prob-
lem: which assessment is an ac-
curate portrayal of the school's
performance?
Not only do parents depend
on this grade to determine
where to send their child, but
schools use the evaluation to
detect their strengths and weak-
nesses, the state and federal
departments of education use
their assessments in distributing
funds, and a community looks
to the condition of its education
system to help determine its
value. With so much depending
on the condition of a school
system, it is essential that the
methods) being used to deter-
mine the school district's c6ndi-
tion is accurate.
In attempting to pin-point
what causes the incredible dis-
crepancy, it is important to look
at the twvo departments' grading
systems.
NATIONAL GRADING
The state and national depart-
ments of education operate on
different grading systems.
According to Director of Stu-
dent Academic Services Sherri
Albritton, the national program
operates on a pass/fail grading
system. This system is the first
reason the grades are often mis-
leading. The school either
meets the standard and passes,
or misses the mark ard fails.
The grade does not show how
far off failing schools were
from meeting the standard, or
by how much passing schools
surpassed the standard.


STATE GRADE
However, the state grades by
levels ranging from A-F.
Therefore, its final evaluation
gives a more precise, differenti-
ated report of the school's per-
formance.
While it is important to
understand the grading systems
of each, it is even more impor-
tant to not simply look at the
final grades, but how each
department arrive, at this grade.

SUB-GROUPS
According to Albritton, the
national department operates
under the "No Child Left
Behind Program." It places stu-
dents in a school into sub-
groups based on race, economic
status, primary language and
disabilities. It then evaluates the
school based on these sub-
groups. Unlike the state's grad-
ing system, the school does not
have to simply meet the stan-
dard as a school, but each sub-
group of students is graded
individually. The school only
receives a passing grade if
every sub-group receives a
passing grade. If one or more
does not, the school fails. The
national department uses this
method to ensure the school is
meeting the needs of each type
of student so that "no child is
left behind."
However, ironically enough,
this tactic actually creates gaps
for students to slip through.
There must be 30 students in a
sub-group for it to be evaluated.
Therefore, if a school only has
29 students in a sub-group,
those students' FCAT scores are
not looked at by the national
department and do not con-
tribute to the school's assess-
ment. Thus, the school is not
held accountable for meeting
the needs of the school's minor-
ity students. This detail drasti-
cally affected schools in the dis-
trict this year and proved to pro-
vide an unfair and misleading
assessment.


ZSE was the only school in
the district to receive a passing
grade by the national depart-
ment this year and BGE, as pre-
viously stated, not only failed,
but is undergoing restructuring.
However, BGE met the stan-
dard in every sub-group except
students with disabilities and
ZSE did not have enough of
these students to make a sub-
group so the national depart-
ment did not look at the scores
of these students at ZSE. While
both schools met the standard in
the same amount of sub-groups,
ZSE passed, and BGE failed.
Furthermore, BGE outscoded
ZSE this year in the state
assessment.
HOW. TO PASS
Regardless of the fallacy in
how sub-groups are used, there
are three different standards
these sub-groups can meet to
receive a passing, grade by the
national department. All of the
sub-groups do not haveto meet
it by the same standard, but
every sub-group must meet one
of the standards to pass.
One way is by having a cer-
tain percentage of students in
the subgroup pass the FCAT.
However, the percentage stan-
dard rises every year. 'In fact, ini
five years, a sub-group will
only pass by this standard if 100
percent of its students pass the
FCAT.
Fortunately, there are two
other standards a sub-group can
meet. If the sub-group makes a
10 percent increase in the
amount of students who pass
the FCAT from the previous
year, it also receives a passing
grade.
The last way for a sub-group
to pass is based on its growth
rate. If the national department
looks at a sub-group's growth
rate and determines that enough
students in the sub-group will
be passing the FCAT in three
years based on that rate, the
sub-group passes.
STATE CRITERIA
The state department looks
for different criteria. Unlike the
national department, the state
grade heavily depends on learn-
ing gains. Student improvement
comprises 50 percent of the
state grade and student achieve-
ment comprises the other half.
The state does not simply
look at whether or not the stu-
dents are passing the test, but
compare their scores to the pre-
vious year and see how much
they have improved. The state
is especially concerned with the
learning gains of the lowest per-
forming students. In fact, they
hold the school accountable for
meeting these students' needs
by making a large portion of the
grade dependent on the learning
gains of these students.
According to Albritton, the
state grade does not simply
depend on achievement. A
school must exhibit high
achievement and vast learning
gains to receive an excellent
grade, Iwhereas a school does
not necessarily have to make
learning gainss to pass by
national Standards..
It is the actual reports of each
depiatnient arid not the Afinal
grade that best reveals how the
school is meeting the needs of
different types of students. For
example, the state grading sys-
tem represents how well the
school is meeting the needs of
the lowest performing students.
Since much of the grade is
weighted towards, the lowest
quartile of students, the final
assessment is skewed in this
direction.

COMPARISON
However, since the national
department breaks the students
into sub-groups, its report
shows how well the school is
meeting the needs of each type
of student. Since one sub-group
can give the entire school a fail-
ing grade, it is important to not
simply look at the report but see
how each sub-group is perform-
ing.
A benefit of the national
department's report is that it
allows a parent to see how the
school is meeting the needs of
his or her student. For example,


a parent of a Hispanic student
whose first language is Spanish
can look at the report, go to the
"Hispanic" and "English Lang-
uage Learners" columns and
see how many students in these
sub-groups passed the FCAT,
made improvements, etc.
whereas the state report only
shows these statistics school-
wide.
These reports can be found'
online at www.fldoe.org.
According to Superintendent
Dennis Jones, the national
department is reauthorizing its


grading system this year in
hopes of moving towards a sys-
:em more consistent with the
states'. Hopefully this will be
accomplished through this reau-
thorization and upcoming


changes in Washington.
In the meantime, it is the
responsibility of parents, com-
munity members and school
staff to look at each report and
make their own assessment


instead of relying on the state
and national department's final
grades to make serious deci- *
sions such as where to send a
child to school or determining a
community's value.


iary




Moore


Knowledgeable


Proven


IN THE FIRST 100 DAYS AS YOUR

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, I PLEDGE TO...

* Conduct a summit/round table with our board members to begin rebuilding a
positive, trusting working relationship

* Create a task force of parents, students, and educators to outline what our
students need to graduate and prioritize the steps we need to take to promote
more student success

* Study successful alternative programs for students not performing well in
traditional classes

* Investigate additional vocational-technical courses that can be instituted at
the high school in the 2009-10 school year to meet the needs of our diverse
Population

* Conduct a technology audit to assess each school's needs

* Reinstitute the district advisory council to gather input from our community

SCollect input/feedback from employees concerning security and safety

* Meet:with the Hardee County Sheriffs Department to strengthen the safety
:and security plan for our students and staff

* Initiate a training program for all administrators in gang violence prevention
* Reprioritize every district administrator's focus for assisting with student
needs to promote academic achievement

* Conduct an in-house audit to begin framing a realistic budget for the
upcoming year

* Reevaluate the instructional programs used across the district to ensure that
we are getting the best return on investment

* Renew our partnership with Hardee Education Association/United to explore
equitable, competitive employee salaries and benefits options well in advance
of the new fiscal year

* Conduct an open, honest survey of faculty, staff, and students to collect ideas
for improvement

* SHARE OUR PROGRESS WITH You AND KEEP YOU UPDATED WITH PERIODIC
REPORTS THROUGH THE DISTRICT WEBSITE AND NEWSPAPER

Iin viteyoutojin ithme:asamm
detemind t mae te Hrde ScoolDisric
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12A The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.
252008CP000072

IN RE: ESTATE OF
GREGG MATTHEW WHITE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of GREGG MATTHEW WHITE,
deceased, whose date of death
was July 21st, 2008, and whose
social security number Is 033-42-
0203, Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is P. 0. Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, FL 33873. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, on whom a copy of
this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM;
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is August 21st, 2008.
Personal Representative:
GEORGE WHITE
545 E. Park Avenue
Gilbert, AZ 85234
Attorneys for Personal


Representative:
SWAINE & HARRIS, PA.
401 DAL HALL BOULEVARD
LAKE PLACID, FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 465-2811
Florida Bar Number: 08082

IN THE CIRCUIT OF THI
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HARDEE CC
Case # 2008-CA
Div

HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as
on behalf of ACE Securitie
Home Equity Loan Trust an
the registered holders of A
Securities Corp. Home Eq
Loan Trust, Series 2006-HI
Asset Backed Pass-Throug
Certificates,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Azzedine Saoud and Nour
Abrami, Husband and Wife
Mortgage Electronic Regis
Systems, Inc. as Nominee
First NLC Financial Servic
Unknown Parties in Posse
of #1; Unknown Parties in
Possession of #2; If living
all Unknown Parties claim
through, under and again
above named Defendant(s
are not known to be dead
alive, whether said Unkno
Parties may claim an inter
Spouse, Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, or Other Claims
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
FORECLOSURE PROCEED
PROPERTY
TO:
Azzedine Saoud; AC
UNKNOWN BUT WHOS
KNOWN ADDRESS I!
Cypress Street, Wauch
33873 and Nourel
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
WHOSE LAST KNOWN Al
IS: 621 Cypress Street, W
FL 33873
Residences unknown,
ing, including any unki
spouse of the
Defendants, if either
remarried and if either
both said Defendants
dead, their respe
unknown heirs, devil
grantees, assigness, c
tors, lienors, and trust
and all other per


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Com-
mission voted 5-0 on Thursday,
Aug. 14, to approve Mosaic
Mining's request for the South
Fort Meade Mine Extension.
Mosaic will be able to mine
about 7,756 acres from a
10,000-acre tract of land in
northeastern Hardee County.
All the mining will be east of
the Peace River.
The commission also gave 5-
0 approval of a plan that Mosaic
will pay about $42 million
over 10 years for economic
development projects in Hardee
County. This is in addition to
regular severance taxes on
mined phosphate pebbles.
Tom Myers, Mosaic vice-
president of mining, was happy
with the results of the meeting.
"There is a lot of responsibil-
ity being a'big landowner. I
commend the county staff. This
agreement will protect the citi-
zens and the environment. We
will do a good job," said Myers,
noting the mining application


Q: Is it true that mangos-
teen helps lower cancer risk?
A: Mangosteen is a tropical
fruit about the size of a tanger-
ine with a sweet-tart flavor; it is
not related to mango fruit. It is
processed as a juice and also
sold in capsule form as a dietary
supplement. Although mangos-
teen is advertised as a vital
source of antioxidants that help
prevent cancer and a variety of
other health conditions, no reli-


claiming by, through, under
or against the named
ID Defendant(s); 9nd the
aforementioned named
Defendant(s) and such of
29 the aforementioned
8:21,28c unknown Defendants and
such of the aforementioned
S10th unknown Defendants as
may be infants, Incompe-
tents or otherwise not sui
OUNTY juris.
-000238 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
vision # that an action has been com-
UNC: menced to foreclose a mortgage
on the following real property,
Trustee lying and being and situated In
Is Corp. Hardee County, Florida, more par-
nd for ticularly described as follows:
ACE
ulty LOT 17, OF LAKE DALE
E4, ACRES, A SUBDIVISION IN
gh HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, AS PER PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 41.
more commonly known as 621
Cypress Street, Wauchula, FL
el 33873.
e;
station This action has been filed
for against you and you are required
es; to serve a copy of your written
ssiaon defense, If any, upon SHAPIRO &
FISHMAN, LLP, Attorneys for
I, and Plaintiff, whose address Is 10004
ing by, N. Dale Mabry Highway, Suite 112,
st the Tampa, FL 33618, within thirty (30)
i) who days after the first publication of
or this notice and file the original
wn with the clerk of this Court either
est as before service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately there after; oth-
ints erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed In the Complaint.
NY WITNESS my hand and seal of
NDINGS- this Court on the 5 day of August,
2008.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
)DRESS Circuit and County Courts
E LAST By: C. Timmons
S: 621 Deputy Clerk
ula, FL
Abrami; IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH .A
BUT DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ADDRESS .ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
auchula, PARTICIPATE IN THE PROCEED-
ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
If Iv- SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
known PLEASE CONTACT THE COURT
said ADMINISTRATION, (863)-534-
has 4488 WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS
er of OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS
are NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING
ctive OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD
sees, (863) 534-7777 OR FLORIDA,
:redl- RELAY SERVICE 1-800-955-8770.
tees,
onn 8:14.21c


process began in 2004.
Myers said Mosaic is ready to
start mining soon in Hardee
County but noted Lee County
has filed a permit challenge
with the Florida Department of
Environmental Regulation. Lee
.County is concerned with water
quality of Peace River entering
Charlotte Harbor.
."There has been mining in
the Peace River watershed for
100 years. The estuary is in
good shape. The phosphate in-
dustry is smarter and better than
years ago. We are concerned for
the harbor,': said Myers.
Myers indicated mining
could start in Hardee in 2009, as
soon as the Lee County chal-
lenge is satisfied.
The phosphate mined in
Hardee will be piped to the
South Fort Meade Mine benefi-
ciation plant, said Myers. This
mine extension in Hardee will
not require a beneficiation
plant, which separates phos-
phate pebbles from sand and
clay in the matrix. The phos-
phate will then be sent to
Mosaic's fertilizer chemical


able studies have established its
effect on lowering cancer risk.
Xanthones, a phytochemical
found in the fruit, have received
attention for their' possible
antioxidant activity, but much
more research is needed to
prove efficacy and to verify
their availability from these
products.
Moreover, the long list of
reported benefits of mangosteen
is based on anecdotal evidence,
not well-controlled research. So
far no dangerous side effects
have been tied to mangosteen
fruit or products. However, it is
cheaper and probably more
effective to get a broad range
of antioxidants and other pro-
tective phytochemicals from an
array of vegetables, fruits,
whole grains and beans. Studies
now suggest that the interaction
of a variety of phytochemicals
and nutrients from food may
provide more protection than
any single source.
Q: Are some types of pie
healthier than others?
A: How a pie is made has a
larger influence on its fat, calo-
rie and nutrient content than
what kind of pie it is. Pecan pie
is one exception to the rule,
however, as it nearly always
adds an additional 100 to 200
calories beyond traditional fruit
pies. Apple pie, for example,
may contain from 300 to 400-
plus calories per slice, depend-
ing on the fat and sugar added
during preparation. A slice of
pumpkin pie usually contains
about 300 calories and roughly
15 grams of fat.
The good news: recipe adap-
tations can help cut fat and
calories while providing addi-
tional nutrients. To try your
hand at healthier baking, use
evaporated skim milk in pump-
kin pie and, when making pie
crusts, substitute canola oil for
some of the butter and opt for
up to half whole-wheat flour. If
the pie filling is what you love,
you can skip the crust altogeth-
er and save up to 150 calories
per slice. Portion sizes can also
be adjusted. If pecan pie is truly
your favorite, simply opt for a
smaller slice; you'll likely be
more satisfied with a sliver of
what you like best than a plate
full of something you don't
really enjoy.



Be master of your petty
annoyances and conserve
your energies for the big,
worthwhile things. It isn't the
mountain ahead that wears
you out-it's the grain of-sand
in your shoe.
-Robert Service


DURASTANTI-
DAVID UsA T


DURASTANTI


WM im
"Mr. D"'November 4th, 2008
Pd. pdl. A, Mv.Palrby DOD. ~md0 Duw Ca1pd1 kAW&M by D"D. OW80. ~M S1IpdtUn, Chot HiMPl, C~ralgnTrmase


plants in Polk County.
Myers said of the 7,756 acres
to be mined, about 1,500 acres
will be left in clay settling areas
which will be reclaimed. Mined
land can be used for develop-
ment and agriculture.
He said clay settling areas
can be reclaimed in three or
four years after'mining activi-
ties have ceased.
Myers noted 2,100 acres of
forested floodplain will be left
as a conservation easement
along the Peace River from the
Mosaic tract.
The South Fort Meade Mine
has about 250 employees.
Mosaic has about 3,000 em-
ployees in Florida and about
7,500 worldwide, he said.
Myers noted Mosaic owns 20
percent of the land area in
Hardee County. Hardee has
400,000 acres and Mosaic cur-
rently owns about 80,000 acres.
"Mosaic could be mining in
Hardee County for 20 or 30
years."
He noted the 2004 hurricanes
produced no major damage to
phosphate clay settling areas in


Florida.
"This is a defining event for
Hardee County," said Mosaic's
David Townsend, assistant
vice-president of public affairs,
noting the $42 million 10-year
agreement for the company to
help improve the infrastructure
and economic development in
the county. He said Mosaic had
not done this before, to form
such a partnership with a coun-
ty.
Myers said Mosaic tries to be
a good neighbor. He noted a
Mosaic ship based in Tamps
brings in fresh sea water for the
Florida Aquarium, costing
Mosaic $60,000 to $70,000, but
saving the aquarium $300,000
annually.
At the meeting Mosaic was
represented by Roger Sims, an
Orlando attorney with Holland
& Knight.
Bobby Ray Smith made the
motion, seconded by Gordon
Norris, to approve the mining
development order. Minor Bry-
ant made the motion, seconded
by Norris, to approve the eco-
nomic development agreement.


Dale Johnson chaired the meet-
ing..
Frank Kirkland of Fussell
Road in Bowling Green ex-
pressed concern for his safety
and other residents who lived
near the proposed clay settling
area.
Dennis Mader, president of 3-
PR (Citizens Protecting Peace
River), asked for a continuance
of the hearing to hear more tes-
timony from an economist who
says the mining will result in a
permanent net loss of jobs and a
loss of nearly $9 million in
taxes.
"I have a business and live in
Hardee County. There is a huge
potential for degradation of the
environment. I do not think
Hardee County should be in
partnership with Mosaic," said
Mader.
Johnson said the board has
heard another economist say the
mining will be good for the
county's economy and had
heard Mader's economist be-
fore.
"There will be a net gain, not
a net loss," said attorney Sims.


ELECT ****



TERRY ATCHLEY

for County Commissioner


vote DISTRICT 3 vote






Early Voting


August llth-23rd


Mon.- Sat.* 9am-5pm



"Together We Will


Make A Difference"

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Terry Atchley, Democrat, for County Commissioner, District 3:21


County OK's Mosaic Plan To Mine In Hardee


Nutrition Notes


MINOR L.


RFE[ECr


BRY2 Ain

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 1
WOULD YOU CHOOSE A MANAGER FOR YOUR 50 TO 70
MILLION DOLLAR BUSINESS (Hardee Coumty)

WHO HAS:

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SLEDUCATION and certification by the Florida

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j^BECOME A VOICE by serving on district and state

committees with dependability.

OR

SOMEONE "NEW" WITH:

X N Government experience

X NO Education in county government

X NO Voice in district and state for contacts



YOU DECIDE WHO YOU WANT MAKING DECISIONS

FOR YOUR FUTURE!


Political Advertisement Paid For and Approved by Minor L Bryant, Democrat for County Commissioner, District 1
8:21 p


I


,vons







PAGE ONE


4-H Day Camp Teaches Students Useful Skills


By LAUREN RAULERSON
For The Herald-Advocate
Several local youngsters
spent their summer at a "Back
To Basics" camp which teaches
useful skills.
Often called "the best-kept
little secret in Hardee County,"


the 4-H day camp is a six-week
program that meets three days a
week. It is not limited to 4-H
members. Anyone between the
ages of 5 and 15 can enroll.
Both the 4-H program and the
Home Community Educators
Club sponsor the camp. In fact,


IL Msic


COURTESY PHOTOS
A horse trainer demonstrates how to teach a horse to
trust its trainer.


the Home Community Edu-
cators faise money all year to
make the camp possible, and
seven club members volunteer
full-time during the summer to
put on the program.
The purpose of the camp is to
teach skills from the past, hob-
bies, etiquette, public speaking
and social skills. Several busi-
nesses, organizations and com-
munity members came to the
day camp and give interactive
presentations to the kids.
For example, this summer
Austin Growers taught the
youngsters how to make herb
gardens. When the Center for
Great Apes came to the camp
with its presentation, the chil-
dren brought in donations.
And part of Mosaic's presenta-
tion included allowing the kids
to dig for fossils.
Other presenters included the
Red Cross, State Farm, Peace
River Electric Cooperative,
blacksmith Mike McIntvre and


a horse trainer.
According to County Exten-
sion program assistant Mary
Mitchell, the camp is teaching
recycling and giving. For ex-
ample, one of the projects
included making placemats out
of old greeting cards, then
donating them to local nursing
homes. The group donated 82
placemats altogether.
Other projects included mak-
ing recipe books, pickling
cucumbers and preparing
speeches to deliver in front of
one another.
The camp charges'a $20 fee
per student, which includes all
of the materials, activities and
lunch every day. The fee 'is
waived for families unable to
pay.
For students wishing to par-
ticipate in similar activities
throughout the year, the 4-H
program will be holding its
annual bpen house today
(Thursday) from 3 to 7 p.m. at
the Agri-Civic Center off Alt-
man and Stenstrom roads in
Wauchula.


The old-time skill of blacksmithing is demonstrated by
Mike Mclntyre, working on a horseshoe.
AM P4" iL~rll~~r7' M. a"'7OF. WI


Peace River Electric Cooperative shows youngsters the bucket truck that gives line- Campers make placemats out of discarded greeting cards. The placemats will find new
men a lift. purpose at local nursing homes.


BOB SHAYMAN
DEMOCRATIC FOR HARDEE COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF SCHOOLS

* Is the Hardee County School District ready for a change?
* Is the Hardee County School District ready for a Superintendent that has a
vision and goals for the students, staff and community?
* Is the Hardee County School District ready for a Superintendent that has a
record of hard work, is goal-oriented and refuses to lie down in the face of
obstacles?
obstacles? What the experts are saying!"

* I wish to offer my congratulations to Bob Shayman for his hard work and outstanding achievement in directing
West Elementary School to another "A" on the FCAT. -J.D. Alexander, State Senator, District 17

* I wish to commend Bob Shayman, Principal, for his dedication and devotion to the students of West Elementary.
We enjoy a strong working relationship that is clearly supporting, nurturing and educating the students under
his supervision. Dr. Hal Hedley, President & CEO, Child Protection Center of Sarasota County

* As principal of West Elementary, Bob Shayman has developed a reputation as a great motivator, a goal-oriented
visionary and a "take charge type of administrator". Bob Shayman is exactly the type of superintendent that will
lead a school district to success. Robert A. Hrstka, Former Principal, Charlotte County Schools Director of
Instructional Services, DeSoto County Schools

* Congratulations to Bob Shayman, principal of West Elementary School on his innovation and commitment in
achieving higher academic performance for all students.
John L. Winn, Former Commissioner of Education, State of Florida

Bob Shayman embodies all of the characteristics I have learned are essential for a successful and effective
educator/administrator. He is collaborative, student-focused, teacher-supported and knowledgeable about
curriculum, instruction and child development. In my 35 years as a teacher, principal and district administrator,
Mr. Shayman ranks at the very top of educators with whom I have had the privilege to work.
Gaeton Zorzi, Chief Academic Officer American Reading Company, Former Regional Superintendent,
School District of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


EMPTY


PROMISES?

....... or


PROVEN


RESULTS!



YOU



MAKE THE


r-U1IPr_


* Bob Shayman, Principal of West Elementary School, is recognized for his professional dedication and I
commitment to improving student achievement and serving the needs of the community.
HOSTS Educational Mentoring and Intervention Corporation



P (orlcal ad .ertisementpaid for and approved by Bob Shayman n -21
(D) for Hardee Count Superintendent of Schoos I I OF SC IO LS 8-21p


'%JIVEhI-


Contact
(863) 735-1160







2B The Herald-Advocate. August 21, 2008




Hardee


COURTESY PHOTO
Andrew Hinojosa & Vickie Maldonado
Vickie Maldonado To

Wed Andrew Hinojosa


Victoria Maldonado of Bowl-
ing Green and Andrew Hino-
josa of Zolfo Springs have an-
nounced their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of Viola Maldonado of
Bowling Green and the late
Pastor Norberto Maldonado.
She is a 2005 graduate of
Hardee Senior High School,
and is currently attending South


Florida Community College.
The prospective groom is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Cresencio
Hinojosa of Zolfo Springs. He
graduated from Hardee Senior
High School in 2005, and is
currently a student at South
Florida Community College.
Plans are being made for a
Nov. 1 wedding at the First
Christian Church in Wauchula.


If money is your hope for independence you will never have it.
The only real security that a man will have in this world is a
reserve of knowledge, experience and ability.
-Henry Ford


Thank You
I wish to thank The Wauchula Moose Lodge
1487, its Officers and Members and all of the people
who helped make my benefit a huge success. A spe-
cial thanks to the cooks, servers, all the helpers and
all who attended the benefit.
Thank you so much for all of your caring and
support. May God bless you all. ,
S: *Michelle Pitts
8:21c


-
ONE PINK, ONE BLUE
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Wyckoff,
Wauchula, a seven pound seven
ounce daughter Alana Nikelle,
born July 14, 2008, Regency
Medical Center, Winter Haven.
Mrs. Wyckoff is the former
D'Lise Krell. Maternal grand-
parents are Ray and Jana Krell
of Bowling Green. Maternal
great-grandparents are Janice
Moye of New Zion community
and the late W.C. Moye, and
Ovell Krell of Lakeland and the
late C.R. Krell Sr. Paternal
grandparents are Rex and Ann
Wyckoff of Wauchula. Paternal
great-grandparents are the late
R.J. and Clara Hancock of
Bowling Green.

f----'


Daniel Aguilar and Brittany
Kelly, Wauchula, a seven pound
13 ounce son, Daniel Jr., born
Aug. 7, 2008, DeSoto Memor-
ial Hospital, Arcadia. Maternal
grandparents are Bret Kelly of
Mexico Beach and Judy Gris-
som of Bowling Green. Mater-
nal great-grandmother is Mar-
gerie Thornton of Wauchula.
Paternal grandparents are David
Aguilar of Fort Meade and
Elena Villarreal of Wauchula.
Paternal great-grandparents are
Javier and Frances Aguilar of
Bowling Green.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.
In its pure state, iron is silvery
white.


Living


NEW NURSES


COURTESY PHOTO
Four Hardee Senior High School graduates have also become new graduates of the
DeSoto County Licensed Practical Nurses Program. Receiving their pins during their
Aug. 1 graduation ceremony at the Family Service Center in Arcadia were (from left)
Kim Bergens, Holly Gilliard, Sylvia Belmares and Erica Flor Solis. Each is now certified
to begin her career in nursing.


J&L Fencing
wood chain link


NwNme
86-82-06


Time-Tested


a~ -

Party Supplies
SJom Deere Disnei
A Solids *
S balloons or All Occasions


2462 Pine Cone Rd. Wauchula
(Between Hilltop & Hwy. 62)
8 63-. -O 1 2I soc87-28c
4..8


ary


oore


Proven


Committed


#I__


Renew your membership
See what new projects are available
Learn about new special interest programs,
events and judging teams
For more information call your club leader
f or the 4-H office at 773-2164
The Florida Cooperative Extension Service programs are available to all without regards to race,
color, sex, age, religion, national origin or handicapping conditions, soc8:14, 21c
* mEm ma m-mE m


I appreciate the welcome I received from so many of you who have
invited me into your homes as I've traveled across our county. I'm sorry
that I missed some of you, but please continue to call or send email
messages. I am so encouraged by your good ideas!


I hope you will join me in my vision to improve Hardee District Schools.
With your help, I promise to put the "public" back in our public schools.







If you need a ride to the polls or'any assistance during the inclement weather
predicted for our area, please call 773-9800, 781-1164 or 781-0162 and leave a
message. Todd Durden or Richard Dasher will arrange for one of our volunteer
drivers to respond.
This advertisement paid for by the committee to elect Gary S. Moore for Superintendent of Hardee County Schools, Democrat.
Todd Durden, Campaign Treasurer -Approved by Gary Moore
8:21P


-- U


Re-elect


4 For County Cornmissioner, District 1




KI Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Minor L. Bryant, Democrat, for County Commissioner
8:210


i


--1


*


*


II1~11






August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Company Builds Hangar, Hope


Little does Hardee County
realize the spiritual influence it
has on the world today.
Harvest Aviation has opened
the door for this county to have
a godly impact well beyond its
borders.
The idea for Harvest Aviation
came to four people in 2000 -
Alan Johnston, Darrel Lingle,
Lucy-Ann Dietez and Terry
Jordan as they met over
hamburgers to brainstorm the
idea of serving missionaries in
Central and South America and
the Caribbean through aviation.
The group looked into
Sebring airport as a base of
operations, but found Wauchula
welcomed them with open
arms. In 2004, when Hurricane
Charley threatened the coast,
Harvest moved an airplane
from Bradenton to Wauchula.
Little did they know that
Charley would change course
and directly hit Hardee. The
plane was destroyed.
Money became quiet a con-
cern, and Johnston, feeling it
best for the company, joined
with another mission. Only a
few months later, Harvest Avia-
tion received what it needed to
operate on its own.
Once again Harvest Aviation
moved to Wauchula Municipal
Airport.
The first three years were
hard for Harvest to get off the
ground, now Harvest Aviation
is at its height. With Johnston
the, only original founder still
active in Harvest Aviation, Jim
Lewis, Mike Burch and Dan
Gangel came on board.
Harvest Aviation is a non-


profit organization relying pri-
marily on donations from busi-
nesses, churches and individu-
als. The money goes then to a
general fund, a certain project,
or a specific family on staff.
Harvest provides missionaries
with supplies or transportation
needs.
"Right now our big focus is
the Belize Life Line, which is at
the moment a once-a-month
flight program. We fly cargo to
missionaries in Belize City.
Then the cargo is distributed
where it is needed most. Kings
Wings, one of our partner min-
istries out of Palm Beach, has
more flights to the Bahamas in
terms of taking pastors out to
different areas to do pastoral
work or mission groups to do
evangelistic work," says Daniel
Leaky, full-time mechanic at
Harvest Aviation.
"Any mission with an aircraft
can come to us and, to help
them serve more effectively, we
will not charge them labor fees;
they do have to purchase the
parts needed for repairs to the
aircraft," notes Leaky. "Mis-
sionaries are able to save thou-
sands of dollars by just paying
for parts. So, with the money
they save, they can use it for
their mission."
Harvest Aviation has many
outreach ministries, one being
the upcoming Harvest Aviation
Institute. Classes will offer
instruction for a private piloting
license straight to commercial
flight training, with engine
training as well. Harvest will
also offer some type of appren-
ticeship program for aircraft


maintenance.
The institute will include
Bible classes for the students,
so they learn how to combine
their knowledge of the Bible
and aviation. The institute will
begin here in Wauchula early
February 2009.
Harvest Aviation also has a
youth program called Mission
Aviation Reaching Kids. The
program uses aerospace educa-
tion, summer camps and year-
round mentorship to reach chil-
dren for Christ. The program is
not just learning about aviation,
it also allows the kids to partic-
ipate in mission trips, service
projects and much more. The
M.A.R.K. program also allows
students to earn community ser-
vice hours.
Harvest provides mission
trips to Central, and South
America and the Bahamas. A
mission trip could be as short as
a weekend to the Bahamas or as
long as two weeks to Guate-
mala. Costs consist of fuel for
the plane, accommodations for
the pilot, and food for the team.
Harvest is quickly growing
and needing more hangars and a
teaching area for the institute.
"We are building a 10,000-
square-foot building that will be
used for a hangar, classrooms
and offices for Harvest," says
Johnston, general director of
Harvest Aviation.
Few Hardee County residents
may know of Harvest Aviation
and the door of opportunity
opened for Hardee and the
world. You can reach Harvest
Aviation at (800) 660-0516 or
HarvestAviation.org.


Auditions Opening
For 'South Pacific'
Hardee County Players Inc. is
hosting auditions for its
November musical production
of Rodgers & Hammerstein's
"South Pacific."
Auditions open this week on
Friday, at 7 p.m. and on Satur-
day at 10 a.m.
They continue Monday at 7;
Thursday, Aug. 28, at 7; Satur-
day, Aug. 30, at 10; and Thurs-
day, Sept. 4, at 7.
All auditions are held at the
Historic Wauchula City Hall
Auditorium at 225 E. Main St.
The Players invite interested
persons to"a brief synopsis of
the show and a complete cast
list on the group's Web site at
www.hardeecountplayers.com.
If auditioning for a singing
part, be prepared to sing a song
of your choosing. Everyone
who auditions will read from
the script.
Anyone interested in being
involved in this production in a
non-acting capacity should drop
by one of the audition sessions,
call 767-1220 or visit the Web
site.




First United Methodist
Church of Fort Meade is pre-
senting a special concert on
Saturday at 7 p.m., featuring
Dony and Reba Rambo-
McGuire, daughter and son-in-
law of the late Queen of Gospel
Music Dottie Rambo.
Both McGuires have doctor-
ates of sacred music from Beth-
el Christian College in River-
side, Calif. They have trained
36 pastors, evangelists and
psalmists. They have experi-
enced God's blessing and
restoration, as recounted in her
book, "Follow the Yellow Brick
Road. They operate The River
At Music City in the Bellevue
community of-West Nashville.
Music Minister Chuck Hancock
invites you to see and hear their
story and songs.


PHOTO BY CHELSEA HARRIS
A plane in the hangar at Harvest Aviation, in for its yearly inspection.


Harvest Aviation is in the process of building a 10,000-square-foot facility just a few
hundred yards from the hangar it currently uses. Shown are (from left) Ronny Erekson,
aviation missionary and mechanic, and Daniel Leaky.


U --L~ L


Tuesday, August 26"

Vote for Leadership *

* Vote for Professionalism

SVote for Integrity


Vote for


Terry


tchley


for


County Commissioner

District 3

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Terry Atchley, Democrat, for


County Commissioner, District 3


Contact us for your


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annuity or long


term care needs.


CHILDREN OF THE FUTURE

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Children 1-5 Yrs. All Day
6:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Children 4 Yrs.-VPK Program
8:00 a.m.-2:oo p.m.
FREE
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Estamos Aceptando:
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de 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
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Desayuno, comida, merienda y registration
423 Sellers St.. Bowling Green
License # C10HA0512 8:21,28p (863) 375-2192


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1017 US Hwy 17 No. Wauchula
George L. Wadsworth, Jr.
Agent


Jay Bryan
Agency Manager


FARM



BUREAU







4B The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008

Velma Smith Celebrates 90th Birthday


When the Smith family de-
cided to honor their mother on
her 90th birthday, nothing was
going to stop them from making
this a celebration that she would
long remember.
Every detail was planned by
Velma Smith's, nine children
and when these siblings get
together for a project, it is
"Katie, bar the door!"
At precisely 2 p.m. on
Saturday, July 12, Earl Smith's
red 1967 Oldsmobile Cutlass
pulled up in front of the First
United Methodist Church
Social Hall with his mother in
the front seat. Velma Smith's
four sons had picked her up at
her home for what was to
become an afternoon of fun-
filled activities.
The theme "Give Me Flowers
While I'm Living" was carried
out in the celebration, as this
was a phrase commonly used
by the matriarch of the family.
A slide show consisting of
family photographs provided
entertainment for the 100-plus
guests before the official pro-
gram began. During the festivi-
ties, Velma was crowned
"Queeri for a Day" while she
enjoyed a synopsis of her life as
provided by her eighth child,
Debbie.
Velma Franks was born on
July 14, 1918, in Savannah,
Tenn., one of five children of
John and Minnie Bell Franks.
At the age of 7, her mother died,
leaving her dad to raise the chil-
dren until he later remarried,
which gave her three stepbroth-
ers and two stepsisters.
Velma Franks met John D.
Smith at an old-fashioned "barn
dance," where she says she did
the "Charleston" and John D.
did the "Buck Dance." They
soon fell in love and were mar-
ried on May 9, 1936.
The first two children of this
union included Dimple Jean
and Earl Dean, still in Tennes-
see. The next two children were
Joyce Marie and Robert D.,
born while the family lived in
Alabama. Then along came a
kink in the family plans as John
D. was drafted into the military
in May of 1944, when Robert
was only 3 months old. The


Smiths then moved to Norfolk,
Va., where John D. served in the
U.S. Navy until he was dis-
charged in July 1945. Returning
to Alabama, the four Smith chil-
dren soon greeted brother
Jimmie Wayne and, later, sister
Carolyn Sue.
In 1949, the Smiths decided
they would move Jo Florida.
Debbie continued, "Mom and
Dad, Dimple, Earl, Joyce,
Robert, Jimmie and Carolyn
gathered their belongings in our
1941 Chevrolet panel truck and
said 'Look out Florida, here we
come! You ain't seen noth-
in'yet!'"
The Smith family had been in
Hardee County since December
1949 when in 1955, the seventh
of the children, Wendell Glenn,
was born followed by Deborah
Ann in 1957 and Patsy Evelyn
in 1961.
For 30 years, Velma and John
D. Smith had children attending
Hardee County schools. All
nine children graduated from
Hardee County High School,
spanning the years 1958-1979.
Velma and John D. attended the
Wauchula Church of God for 37


years, and all of their children
were raised in this church.
The Smiths celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary with
their children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren in
1986. As Debbie gave this
account of her mother's history,
she concluded by saying that
since that anniversary celebra-
tion, their dad had "gone home,
leaving Mom to roam in
Wauchula from place to place!"
That phrase should not be taken
lightly. It's not uncommon to
spot Velma driving her Lincoln
as she runs her weekly errands
or visits friends, or acting as
hostess at Cutting Edge Minis-
try events.
Son Wendell gave a sermon-
ette entitled "The Value of the
Aged," and shared memories of
his life as the seventh child.
He said he really hated that
peach tree in their yard, and
believes now that there was
"fire in those limbs" when his
mother sent him out for a
switch.
Songs were then performed
by the nine children, including
"Why Me, Lord?" "House of


The family matriarch and her sons arrive for the party in a

The family matriarch and her sons arrive for the party in a


In L[ovingMemory


Johnny Lopez

May 17, 1964 Aug. 22, 198


Pimp


You have been gone for 25 years -
It seems like yesterday.


We miss you your sisters,
Angelica M. Torres & Cynthia A. Lopez


soc8 21P


Gold," "Old-Time Religion"
and ending with "You Are My
Sunshine," performed by the
four boys. During their rendi-
tion of this last song, Earl,
Robert, Jim and Wendell each
took their turn to dance with
their mother and present her
with a rose.
In addition to her nine chil-
dren, she has 15 grandchildren
and four great-grandchildren, a
number that will soon increase.
The day had been a long one
for Velma Smith, but she did
not look tired at the end of the
celebration as the last well-
wishers left and the family
began cleaning the hall.
Since all of the siblings were
once again together, they made
plans to eat dinner out as a fam-
ily that evening but, thinking
that their mother would be ex-
hausted, the boys returned her
to her home. When they men-
tioned that they were all going
to Pioneer Restaurant for their
,evening meal, she quickly told
them, "Not without me!"
And so concluded Velma
Smith's 90th birthday celebra-
tion!


1964 Oldsmobile.


I was called "Rembrandt"
Hope in my boxing days,
because I spent so much time
on the canvas.
-Bob Hope


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Velma Smith is crowned Queen for the Day.




Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

CHRISTIANS AND THE ELECTIONS
In every election, Christians are a puzzling voter block.
Politicians try to win them over by getting their candidate into
churches where they can deliver pseudo-sermons. Strong state-
ments are made in favor of morality and principle.
And sometimes religious leaders come out with an endorse-
ment. But the large body of believers are slow in jumping on a
political bandwagon.
I think I know why.
Christians are reminded over and over again in their churches
of the dangers posed by the world. "Pure religion and undefiled
before God and the Father is this, to visit the fatherless and widows
in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world"
(James 1:27).
"Unspotted from the world?" And what is more suspected of
impurity than politics? The result: many believers feel that the fur-
ther they keep away from electioneering, the safer they will be.
But what about this statement by Jesus: "Go ye into all the
world and preach the Gospel" (Mark 16;15). How could the disci-
ples go into the world at the risk of contamination and at the
same time, remain in seclusion, fasting and praying?
This begins to look a little like the history of the church: her-
mits, monks and ascetics retiring from the world to seek purity
while kings, emperors and generals saw force of arms as the fastest
way to multiply conversions.
So what should it be: retreat or advance?
The answer,.of course, is that we riiist bend every effort to win
the world for Christ, but only in His strength, His spirit and under
His direction.


.1


RE-ELECT Gordon



KNORRIS


for

County Commissioner, District 3


Paid Political Advertisement, paid for and approved by Gordon Norris Democrat for County Commission District 3
Paid Political Advertisement, paid for and approved by Gordon Norris Democrat for County Commission District 3


f School Board
District 3

- ', rOur schools face a difficult time as
state funding for education is reduced.

Sr Our Board needs to be able to make
sound decisions based on facts, legal
advice, and what is best for children.

I have the leadership skills that are
necessary to make the decisions
that must be made during these
tough times.
SAs you cast your ballot to change our
School Board, I ask that you consider
selecting me to be your elected
School Board member.

~ ,b o- Working together we can make a
difference that will serve to benefit
our children.


Charles Crutchfield
for School Board


Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by Charles Crutchfield Campaign, Approved by Charles Crutchfield cl8:21p


"Your First Choice For Sheriff"



Elect /


VRoger V. Clark .,

for


ote Sheriff p

Paid Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Roger V. Clark Republican for Sheriff Campaign. 8:21p





























All nine children assembled to celebrate their mothers 90th birthday, including (from left) Dimple Tillman, Earl
Smith, Joyce Cook, Robert Smith, Jim Smith, Carolyn Hines, Wendell Smith, Debbie DeGues and Patsy Farnsworth.


The entire Smith family.


The birthday honoree keeps the beat on the tambourine and joins in as the family sings its way through the decades
of her life.
People in ancient India mad
the first candy with suga
cane.

SThe
Head-doct


August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5B


WHEN IT STORMS
When it storms in my life and I have so much strife,
I pray till my heartache goes away.
When I cry out to Him
He comes in; He's my friend,
When it storms,
when it storms I pray.

When things aren't going my way and I can't take
another day of gray, I pray it's OK.
He's all I need, His love is real.
I don't need a feel-good pill.
When I'm low He's where I go.

I don't want a sinner's night out.
Or go about with the wrong crowd, or go down the
road that is hell-bound.
When Ifeel I don't have a friend
I can count on Jesus again and again.
Oh, I love Him.

When it storms,
when it storms I pray.
Carolyn Sue Bailey
Wauchula
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The, Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


(863) 773-


Piano & Violin Lessons
'Instruments, Books & Accessories for Purcii e
Piano Tuning
Specializing In Music Ministry Training
Instructor Mandy IN Bell
4140 410 north Ohio Avenue. Wauchula soc5:ltfc"


BOWLING GREEN

.COUNTRY CLUB
245 Hwy. 17 375-9988

| Carl "Elvis"
Karaoke
SThursday -8 pm Midnight

Miz Edna
SFriday & Saturday 9 p.m. 1 a.m.
$1.oo Draft
Sunday- Thursday .
Open to Close
Ladies Night
FREE Well Drinks
uesdays 6 pm 8 p.
soc82 21c


Five generations were present. Velma Smith holds Evan Smith, with (front, from left)
Drew Driscoll, Bryant Smith and Brailyn Smith; (middle) Amber Newell Driscoll and
Crystal Newell Smith; and (back) Dimple Tillman and Billy Newell.
In order to have a winner, the team must have a feeling of unity; every player must put the team
first-ahead of personal glory.
-Paul "Bear" Bryant
It is only in playing that the individual is able to be creative and to use the whole personality,
and it is only in being creative that the individual discovers the self.
-Donald Winnicott


Police Dog Training Demonstration
presented by Hardee Co. Sheriff Officer

Cracker Trail Arena
S 6134 East SR 66 Zolfo Springs

Sunday, Aug. 24
10 am-1:30 am
If you love animals you will love our training
with purpose. We apply animal training
techniques to how God is training us.
Watching helps us to understand and
SB apply God's will for our life.
SCowboy-up Ministry is about training
dogs, horses, and people.
Contact Skipper Calder @ (863) 781-2281
www.cowboyupministry.com socB:21p


Hardee Counfv's 11oinclown Coverage
-PRINTERS -PUBLISHERS
115 S. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL 33873
Telephone (863) 773-3255


i


de
Ir







6B The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008






-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720


aualesP-earthlink.net www.GuglesComputerServices.com ~


Classifieds


500 GALLON SPRAY OIL wagon
with 150 gallons spray oil still in
It. All for just $250 OBO. Call Mark
781-0384. 8:14-21 c


1994 FORD F150, 300, straight 6
cyl., auto, cold AC, runs great,
$2,500 OBO. 941-219-9634.
8:14-21 p
1995 CHEVY 1500, Vortec, V6,
auto, runs great, $1,500 OBO.
941-219-9634. 8:14-21 p
CASH FOR UNWANTED vehicles,
paying $150 & up. Call J.T. (863)
269-6556. 7:31-8:28p


WILL PAY TOP price for junk cars
and we pick up. Crooms Used
Cars and Parts. 773-0637. 1:10tfc



MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST need-
ed, please bring resume in per-
son to 735 North 6th Ave.,
Wauchula. Bilingual a must.
8:21nc
FULL-TIME MECHANIC needed.
Apply in person at Hill's Auto
World, 4205 U.S. Hwy. 17 N.,
Bowling Green. 7:24tfc


Clean Cut Lawn Care
and Pressure Washing
free estimates irrigation repairs tree & hedge trimming
Blair 781-5533 c7:31-8:29p






Production Line Personnel
Apply in person at Florida Beef
441 State Rd. 64 East
Zolfo Springs, Fl 33890
\ 863-528-1094
Reading and Writing in English a MUST!


Towing ServiceAvial

0 2 1 I M g S e v i e:


NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297"up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Next to Lowes & across
.. ..... : "- . ... .... -cl4:20tfc


FULL TIME Good drivers license
necessary, exp. in construction,
will train. 863-223-2125. 8:21c



3B, 1 1/2 BA, BLOCK house, re-
modeled, fenced yard, central air
and heat, stove. (863) 273-0920.
7:3tfc


3 MOBILE HOMES Including
lots, $99,000 OBO. All currently
rented. Excellent Investment
opportunity. 863-245-1507.
6:19-8:21 p



LOOKING FOR ROOMMATE to
share home. Call Clark 863-773-
9333. 8:21-28p


Lone star
Construction. Ccor-p.

General Contractor
Uc.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated

Office 863-773-4779 Fax 863-773-9865
cl6:9tic




In my home or mobile
Profit & Loss Reports
Input Data Bank Reconciliations
Organize and File
Payroll and Billing Notary Public
Reasonable Rate

863-773-6763 c84,2p



Azalea Apartments

Now Renting! Immediate Occupancy!
3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental rates beginning at $530
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL

(863) 375-4138 (1-800-955-8771)
'Oi^ Monday Frida
I 9:00 /.M. 12.00 Aoon
O ."OU'UNI = al 1-9 25cI


LA M B E RT
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


IMMACULATE 2005 D/W mobile home,
3B/2Bth on 1/2 acre overlooking beautiful pas-
ture; this home is in excellent condition and is
partially furnished; built under new FL
requirements for durability; 12x16 screened
porch; new 10x12 Smithbilt shed w/electric.
$95,000
PRICE REDUCED WELL MAINTAINED
mobile home in Charlie Creek Estates;
2B/1Bth, completely furnished including small
freezer and patio furniture; single carport,
metal roof in 2006, screened porch MOVE IN
READY! $45,000
TRADITIONAL STYLE HOME on lovely tree
shaded lot! Be the first to see this 4B/2Bth brick
home located in desirable neighborhood, close
to schools and shopping; triple carport, circle
driveway, fenced backyard, beautiful landscap-
ing plus 12x16 building with electric and water.
$195,000
GET MORE FOR YOUR MONEY! This com-
fortable and cozy 2B+/2Bth home is located on
large lot in quiet setting just outside city limits;
wood deck, enclosed porch, wood burning fire-
place; separate entrance to family room with
additional kitchen could be used as rental
space or bedroom #3. $165,000
MAKE AN OFFER OWNER MUST SELL!
5+ acres in western Hardee; perfect homesite.
$59,900 Call Charlotte Terrell for more infor-
mation.
REDUCED PRICE for this older home with
lots of charm! Tall ceilings, hardwood floors
and large rooms are just some of the features in
this 3B/2Bth home located in Wauchula; zoned
commercial. $99,900
EXECUTIVE HOME! See this beautiful home
with numerous amenities to appreciate the ex-
cellent craftsmanship and style; 3+ B/2.5Bths,
3800 sq. ft.; 16x12 metal building, 16x12 pole
barn, all on 2.3 acres; excellent location.
$330,000
15 Acres of pasture plus 3B/1Bth C/B home;
metal barn. $235,000 CONTRACT PENDING


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Delois Johnson
ALL OFFERS CONSIDERED and POSSIBLE
OWNER FINANCINGf 30O acres of pasture-
land; secluded; small pond with natural flow of
water; perfect for home site or small ranch.
$255,000

GOLF COURSE HOME! Two story, 3B/3.5Bth;
large rooms with laminate and tile floors; many
extras; nice curb appeal! Call for details.

Excellent location for building your new home;
1/2 acre tracts; city water and sewer. deed
restricted area. $40,000

Lovely home site 5 acres with fruit trees, large
oaks and 1 acre pond. $110,000

Duette Area 10 acres with 12" well; perfect for
your new home. Call Delois Johnson for more
information.

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY! 1.2 acres, high-
way 17 frontage. $100,000

DRASTICALLY REDUCED! 5 acre tract of
land; paved road frontage; eastern Hardee.
$100,000

Grow your own vegetables for personal and
commercial use on this 8.91 acre hydroponic
farm with 6" well; two 30x100 shade houses; all
irrigation equipment included; septic tank for
house or mobile home. $280,000

Corner lot with 3B/1Bth C/B home, convenient-
ly located and move in ready. $155,000

Two 5 acre tracts, good location. $65,000 each

DUAL PURPOSE! 45 acre grove in excellent
condition, valencias and hamlins, 12" well; also
PRIME LOCATION for development.
$825,000
Commercial building for rent or lease, perfect
for medical facility or offices; 3200 sq. ft. heat-
ed; located on West Main Street. Contact Doris
for more information.


SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON [-
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: JOSEFINA GARAY......863-399-3329
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971 ASSOCIATE: JUDY HINERMAN..............735-0268
ASSOCIATE: ROBERT HINERMAN........227-0202
,U.


( [ )




AM-SOUTH REALTY
MAKING( RKAIE. EAT, REBAI. EASY
sn dtpfntd0and Ol ted Lktna Col Ba~t Rd EsaeCwa


702 SOUTH 6M AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122 .FAX (863) 773-2173


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jessica Smith, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Nancy Craft, Associate


781-3627
781-1186
773-0575
832-0370


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


BE THE FIRST!!! To see this Ample 2/1 CB home
with Central Heat and Air, new carpet, inside
laundry room, with carport and fenced back
yard. ONLY $92,500.
CABBAGE PALMS, OAK TREES AND QUIET!!!
This 16 Acre parcel of land has a Well and Septic
Tank. Build your own Home or Mobile Home.
$150,000.
BUILD' YOUR NEW HOME!! On this Residential
Lot in this Nice Neighborhood of Riverview
Heights located on Garden Drive. Only $29,900.
CHARMING HOME IN GOOD NEIGHBOR-
HOOD!!! This 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath CB home has
central air and heat, complete with washer and
dryer located on Illinois Ave. $90,000.
6.15 ACRES OF LAND ON BEAUTIFUL PEACE
RIVER. Great for Canoeing, camping or build
your own vacation home. Priced only at
$125,000.
BIG!! 4 Bedroom, 4 Bath Home!! 2,241 sq. ft.
Living area, new carpet, fresh paint, and new
roof makes this home a must see at a Reduced
Price of $165,000 or bring offer.
ALMOST NEW!!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB Home on
corner lot in great neighborhood. Built in 2006,
includes two car garage with door opener and
more. Access on Lake Adelaide. CALL LISTING
AGENT FOR BIDDING PROCEDURE!!!
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY!!! 10 A/C on Hwy. 62,
large building included. $750,000.
NEED MORE ROOM??? Come take a look at this
3/2 with an office and game room. This home
features a large kitchen and inside utility room
for a Reduced Price of $149,900.


CENTER HILL PROPERTY!!! 27.5 acres with a 2
bedroom, 1 bath home fronts beautiful Payne
Creek. Includes 12 acres of Irrigated citrus grove
and barn. Seller will consider dividing property
into parcels. Call today for details. $350,000.
COUNTRY HOME WITH ACREAGE!!! Enjoy the
sunset on The balcony of this 2 story home on
3.4 acres of land. This beautiful unique home
under a Galva aluminum roof includes 2 bed-
rooms, 2 bathrooms, Jacuzzi tub, office, recre-
ation room, stove refrigerator, dishwasher, and
heavy duty disposal. Cool it down with the brand
new Trane AC. Reduced from $189.000 to
$172.000.
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath. Only $92,500 With front
porch and large fenced yard. In nice neighbor-
hood!!!
GORGEOUS AIN'T THE WORD!!! Home or Office
- your choice on Hwy 17 N. 3 BR, 1 Bath on Hwy
17 Bowling Green, Great Potential at a Great
Price. ONLY $64,500.
COUNTRY LIVING, BUT CLOSE TO SHOPPING!!!
You will enjoy this 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath large
screened porch on Double lot. ONLY $92,500.
THREE SETS OF DUPLEXES on Hwy 66, Buy one
at a time or all three, great.investment property!!!
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath $159,500; 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
for $155,000 and 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath with
Fireplace for $169,900.
5 ACRES "WHAT A DEAL" ONLY $58,000.
WE HAVE PROFESSIONALS WHO CAN
HELP WITH FORECLOSURES, SALES,
FINANCING AND PURCHASES. CALL
TODAY! WE CAN HELP!!
SO, YOU WANT TO MOVE TO
GEORGIA?? Want to know more??
Call Donna!! 863-781-3627. Many homes
and acreage available!! STOP BY FOR FREE
INFORMATION BOOKLETS.


FEATURES OF THE WEEK NEW LISTINGS!!!
LAKE LOTELA!!! Home with enclosed Inground pool. Completely remodeled with brand
new stainless steel appliances including stove, refrigerator, built in microwave oven;
dishwasher, washer and dryer. Granite countertops in kitchen and bathrooms. Pinecrest
golf course across road. This property is approved for ExpressPath Financing. "Please
contact listing agent for more information." Reduced: $354,500.
JUST LIKE IN MAGAZINES!!I This beautiful 2 story home sits on 1 acre +, Downstairs fea-
tures Dining room, Kitchen, Den, Living room, Family room with large Bathroom. 3 grand
sized Bedrooms, and 1 large Bath Upstairs. Has gorgeous hardwood floors throughout.
Great front porch with rocking chairs and back porch with shade anytime. Graceful selec-
tion of Color Schemes. $245,000 Come see for yourself the space and beauty of this home
cIR':1,


ILL--


I -


CT


IN OMESERIC













The


August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advneate 7B






Classifieds


S
ACTIVE MILITARY families or
friends. Please call Heartland
Chorale for special recognition of
your loved one during our annual
Christmas presentation. 863-767-
6045. 8:14-21c
PERSONAL PROPERTY of Susan
Lopez, Linda Tindell, Walli Gray,
Sarah Hilbreth, David Rivera,
Joseph Hernandez, Roy Aleman,
James Carlton, Laura Ruiz,
Francisco Rosa, Amos Trevino
will be sold pursuant warehouse-
man's lien. Said sale will be at
Bowling Green Storage, 5020
Hwy. 17 N., Bowling Green,
Florida at 9:00 a.m., September 2,
2008. 8:14-21 p
Professional wrestling's most
mysterious hold is on its audi-
ence.
-Luke Neely


KELLER WILLIAMS
K"' A--. ;- Y R W
!-T Y
An indendend'tt vvned Brok~rage -
Mikey C~Iding
Realty \
(863) 781-, 698. \

midfloridalistiigs.com
New Listings Priced to Sell
5 acres desirable location. High & Dry! Cleared w/beautiful oaks
& pines, fenced. Power on property ready to build home site.
$75,000.
8 acres Beautiful Sweetwater area. Mature oaks & pines.
Cleared & fenced w/a 20x40 Pole Barn and a 4" well. Double wide
MH use for rental income until your ready to build your own
home on this great piece of property. $120,000.
20 acres w/2 story 4BR/3BA, 3,900 sq. ft. home. Completely
remodeled in 2005. Many extras pool, pond, 20x72 horse barn,
24x48 workshop, completely fenced. $445,000 Eastern Hardee
County.
155 Acres of beautiful native Florida Hunting Land. All woods.
Great location. Over 1/2 mile of winding creek bottom. Call for
more details.
Asking $8,000/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 28-32 acre parcels or buy as a whole 60 acre
tract. Call for more details.
Zoned commercial 8.5 acres, corner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.
Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000.
Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered
oaks and pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac.
wetlands. Great Investment Property. Sweetwater area.
20 acre Ranchettes. 6 ayvilable. 127 acres total. Buy one or buy
Them all. Fish Branch Rd. Starting at $10,500/acre. c8:21



Flore &: lresIn.


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


NoeyA. Flores


SPECIAL OF THE WEEK


3BR 2BA CB home in excellent condition and well
maintained with central air/heat. Located 2 miles
west of Wauchula off Polk Road. Great location and
just minutes from most schools, churches and
shopping. 1-acre beautifully landscaped yard 5
acres of open and improved pastureland. Many ren-
ovations and updates done after Hurricane Charlie.
Lots of extras include ceramic tile, carpet and wood
laminate floors. Home consists of 2,304 () sq ft of
air-conditioned area and total of 2,752 () under
roof Including porches. Enclosed barn and storage.
2 wells on property (home use and irrigation) This
home has been well cared for and maintained, truly
a "Must See" to appreciate. $325,000.00

Brand New 3BR 2BA Home in Bowling Green. Convenient loca-
tion. Only $109,900.00
Best Mobile Home Location 3BR/2BA well maintained mobile
home in Downing Place. Close to shopping hospital and restau-
rants $77,000.00 MLS # 202856
Golfview 3BR/2.5BA Home on one acre Central air/heat 2 car
garage lots of room. Appliances included. Now Only $179,900.00
MLS # 202760

3BR/1.5BA CB home in Bowling Green Central air/heat -
Appliances included. $90,000.00 MLS # 202456

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember
B Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can
access them anytime! oa'HgSI
Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net
After hours


John Freeman. (863) 781-4084
Steve Lanier (863) 559-9392
Jason Johnson (863) 781-3734


Lisa Douglas
Jessie Sambrano
Noey Flores


(863)781-3247
(863) 245-6891
(863) 781-4585,.....


-U
LEOPARD PUPS lots of spots, 8
weeks, health certificate, great for
hunting, family pet. 863-990-6745.
8:14-21p
HORSE MARE with 4 week foal,
$1,000. Donkey, very friendly, 1
1/2, $250. 954-324-5732.
8:14-9:11p
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


Brand
Name
Tires!
Semi D
Trailer Tires


U-
SHIH-TZU PUPS AKC, shots,
priced to sell, $250 taking
deposit, paper trained, healthy.
941-456-0580. 7:31-8:28p
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


Best deals on wheels!


RUI-


Billy Ayers
Tire Technician


Come in for
Summer
Specials


New & Used
Tires


773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
g oVSAn (across from Wal-Mart)




JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealtv.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


20 acres in Sweetwater area.
Excellent land! Previously a
grove and farmed. Well and
pump included. $12,500 per
acre.
HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!
3 Bedroom/2 Bath home in
Golfview. Big 1+ acre lot. 2 car
garage. $175,000.
Cut your electric bill in half! 3
BR 2 BA in Riverview is newly
remodeled and built for effi-
ciency! $189,900.
3 BR/2 BA house on 7 1/2
acres. Stocked pond. This pro-
perty is zoned for up to 3
homes! $179,900.
PRICE REDUCED! 3 BR, 2
BA immaculate home with
many extras. Home was built
in 2000 and all appliances are
included. Landscaped yard
with several fruit trees and
even a pecan tree. $143,900.
2 BR/1 BA CB home. Metal
roof put on after Hurricane.
Some work needs to be done
inside. Large corner lot in
Wauchula. $72,000.
Two mini-ranches! One is
5.95 acres, the other is 6.65
acres. $99,500 each
70 acres of prime develop-
ment property. City water and
sewer allocated. Annexed and
rezoned to single family with
Developers Agreement.
$20,000 per acre.
170.8 acres of pasture land in
Manatee County, Myakka
City area. 2600 feet of front-
age on State Road 64.
10 beautiful acres ready to
build on. Plenty of shade trees
in a great country setting.
$150,000.
Three 5 ac tracts located on
Johns Rd. Well located on one
of the tracts.Price Reduced!
$89,900 each.


LJ
Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


Three adjacent 5 ac tracts
located on East Main Street in
Wauchula. Price Reduced to
$74,900 each.

One of a kind development
property. 300 acres in
Sarasota. Hamlet designation.

700 acres in Eastern Sarasota
County. High & Dry. Hamlet
designation. Plenty of paved
road frontage.

COMMERCIAL LOT! NEED
VISIBILITY? Put your busi-
ness here! Located on North &
South bound Hwy 17. North
end of Wauchula. Zone C-2.
$195,000

Commercial property. 1.28
acres. Frontage on Main Street
and Hwy 64. $120,000.

3.19 acres. Zoned C-2. Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential income already in
place. Hwy 17 across from
Walmart. $1,200,000.

Golf Course/Development Pro-
perty! Water & sewer avail-
able. 127 acres! Call for price
and details!

BRAND NEW HOUSE!
REDUCED! 3 BR/2 BA home
on landscaped lot. Granite
countertops, stainless appli-
ances. 2 car garage. $159,900

Waterfront property! 2 BR/2
BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep
water canal that leads into
Charlotte Harbor. Buyer con-
cessions possible. Priced right
at $165,000!

1 acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in
Wauchula. Paved road front-
age. Deed restrictions. Zoned
FR. Lot size 130' X 305'.
$38,500


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445-0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


U

EVERYTHING MUST GO 1 ga.
landscaping plants for sale.
Viburnum suspensom, Aztec
grass, Indian, Hawthorn, sweet
viburnum, Loripedlum, Ligus-
trum. Clearance on all plants.
Please contact me at 863-781-
3712 or 863-773-3122. 8:14-9:11p



10 ACRES HIGH and dry, 1030
Methodist Church Rd., Bowling
Green. Build your dream house,
$130,000. 954-324-5732.
8:14-9:11p


U

LAND FOR SALE 40 acres near
Commerce Park. Frontage on Old
Bradenton Rd and Gebhardt Rd.
$30,000/acre. Contact Rob White
@ 305-797-6064. 7:24-8:21p



3 APARTMENTS: One 1 bed-
room, $550; one 1 bedroom,
$600; one 2 bedroom, $725,
Includes everything but phone.
Uttle Cypress Golf Club, 863-735-
1333. 8:21-9:11c


-
1986 29' ROADMASTER travel
trailer, excellent condition, $2,500
OBO. 773-6218. 8:21 p
RED GUAVAS, 863-735-0169,
Zolfo Springs. 8:14-21 p
10 ACRES OF LAND for lease,
$6,000 a year. Call 863-245-3589
leave message. 7:24-8:21p


REPO MOBILE HOMES -
Hundreds to choose from. Set up
& delivery available. 863-381-
1000. 7:3-12:25p

Accidents, and particularly
street and highway accidents,
do not happen-they are
caused.
-Ernest Greenwond


DEMOLITION
Fill Dirt *'Tree Removal
eStump Removal Dragline e
*Track Hoe Land Clearing *
SShell Clay Top Soil
Bulldozer Dump Trucks
(863) 735-2415


Special
Tandam Axle Load
(14-16yards)
$ 100/Load
wllhin 5 mile radius of Zoifo Springs
Fill Top Soil Ha3,rd Pan
;Hardee CountyArea only


HELP WANTED
ECE Coordinator
ECMHSP is now accepting applications for ECE
Coordinator in a Migrant Head Start Program. Responsible
for providing on-going direction, support, training and
technical assistance for Direct Services Center in support of
quality Early Childhood Education services for migrant
children and families. Preferred: Bachelors Degree in ECE
or related field with 12 credit hours in Early Childhood
Education and a minimum of 5 years experience working in
Early Childhood Education with a minimum of 2 years in a
supervisory position. Head Start experience preferred.
Bilingual. Accepted: Bachelors Degree in Early Childhood
Education or related field with 3 years experience in Early
Childhood Education. Head Start experience preferred.
Supervisory experience preferred. Starting salary $620.80 -
652.40 weekly. Annual and Sick Leave and employer-
matched retirement plan.
Closing date: 8-29-08
Send resume/letter of ECMHSP-Bowling Green
interest or apply at: Center, 5115 Mason
Dixon Avenue, Bowling
Green, Florida 33834
Telephone: 863-375-2101
EOE, ADA, License # C10HA0001
I






Joe LTDavis
IN C., R E A L TO R S
m I I (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
Sl JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL

Jim Stallings
(863) 412-4379

See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PARKER FILL DIRT


Gorgeous 37 acs on the Peace
River has native areas, tree-
lined paths, open pasture,
hiking trails and 1400ft of
river frontage. Property is
fenced. $685,000!
Bring the tractor! This 4 acs
& house is about ready & great
for farming! $130,000!
2.62 ac parcel on Merle
Langford Rd, has pond & is
great size for homesite, recre-
ation or cattle. Eligible for per-
mitting. $66,000!
5 lots in Wauchula have total of
978ft rd frontage. Close to
hospital, schools and shopping.
Call for individual lot prices or
buy all for $95,000!
Two 5 ac parcels improved
pastureland, high & dry. One
parcel has well & septic.
$14,500/ac!
2.84 acs in the city of
Wauchula zoned R-3, multi-
family residential. City utilities
available. Property has 386 ft
of road frontage & is 345 ft
deep. $150,000!
Vacant 55ftX155ft corner lot
fronting SR66 & Poplar St,
Zolfo Springs. Zoned Com-
munity Commercial-$22,000!
PRICE REDUCED! PEACE
RIVER FRONTAGE! 1.06 ac
parcel w/city water & sewer.
Zoned R-l, which can accom-
modate 2 homesites, Being sold
w/0.35 ac parcel, which can
accommodate 1 homesite
NOW $34,500!


PRICE REDUCED! Private
10 ac cleared pasture w/ag
exemption, pond, some woods,
4" well. Accessed by easement
from county rd. NOW
$160,000!

Generous 1.5 ac residential
lot in Okeechobee Co is priced
below assessed value for great
investment! $30,000!

HOMESITES OR INVEST-
MENT! Four residential lots in
Indian Lake Estates. Three lots
are 100'x218', listed for
$22,000 each. One is 200'x218',
listed for $46,000! Golf course,
community center, fishing pier,
& shops!

82 acs: metal barn w/horse
stalls, well, 5 pastures with
water to each, deer & turkey.
Beautiful oaks. $899,000!

9,600SF metal building close
to Ona-Ft Green Rd &
Wauchula Airport. Two work
areas, offices & restrooms
w/storage loft, rollup doors
w/security system. $410.000!

Now this is country riverfront
property! 21 acs w/750tft of
relaxing Peace River frontage.
$190,000!

Need some room for entertain-
ment? You can own 4,000SF
on 1.12 ac for just
$225,000!

Premier 100x125 ft residential
lot in Sun-N-Lake is near the
14th hole of Deer Run Golf
Course. $135,000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 DAVID ROYAL.................781-3490
MONICA REAS.............773-9(09 SANDY LARRISON........832-0130
JUAN DELATORRE-...781-lII2 JAMES STALLINGS.. 863-412-4379

SU.S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTV, WAUCHULA, FL 33873
c .. 21c


-*'"' "






8B The Herald-Advocate, August 21. 2008





-The


Classifieds


4BR/3BA CENTRAl A&H, very
nice with porch and carport. 735-
2626. 8:21 c
OUT IN THE COUNTRY 3BR/1BA,
very spacious, central A& H. 735-
2626. 8:21 c
WAUCHULA $650 2BR/1BA,
apartment, South 7th Ave., central
AC, tile flooring, DW, W&D, patio.
781-2146. 8:21-28c
NICE 2BR/1B, upstairs apartment
in town, $750 month. Utilities
included. No pets or smoking.
773-6255. 8:14-21 c
DW MH, Crystal Lake Village, 1/1,
front porch, nice. 863-773-5090.
8:14-9:11p
121 WEST MAIN, 900 SF, zoned,
HC available. 863-445-0915, 863-
773-6616. 8:14-9:11p
HOUSES, APARTMENTS, stores,
restaurants. $500+N.D. weekly,
monthly. 863-832-1965, 863-445-
0915. 7:31-8:28p
EXCELLENT CONDITION 2BR/2
1/2 B townhouse. Call 773-2122 to
see. American South Reality.
6:19tfc


NEW SUMMER RATES Crystal
Lake Village, 1 BR, $500/month.
767-8822. 5:1tfc
APARTMENTS AND HOUSES.
773-6667. 9:6tfc
2 BR/1 BTH APARTMENT $550
month, first, last, deposit
required. 773-0100. 2:21tfc
WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack Ullrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc
* MOVE-IN SPECIAL *
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B from $400
monthly. 1BR from $300 monthly.
No pets, low deposit. Next to
school & hospital. Citrus Valley
MHP. 863-698-4910 or 698-4908.
Se habla espanol.


7:31tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


Short Time Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll free
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity requirements apply.


s pressure Wsr .
0(0' IT'S TIME TO CALL

The man with the Pressure Washer
Low Residential
Rates Commercial
S 'Mobile Homes
P"" 863-381-5359
cl:21tfc




Bo says.... "I won't be undersold!!"


Bo Espino W erpimo
Auto TwuhnklatM

AU M,.. isuA s





Hardee Car Companyl


Wauchula Hills
Comer of Hwy 17
and REA Rd.
773-2011


Wauchula
(across from
First National Bank)
773-6667


Maria Billy Hill, Owner Ruby cl8:21c


HELP WANTED
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS
Full Time $22,36000
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking
applications for full time Telecommunication
Specialists. You must be at least 19 years of age,
have a high school diploma or equivalent, never been
convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor, be willing to
be fingerprinted, pass a drug test and work shifts.
Applications may be obtained and returned at the
Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula, FL.
If other-arrangements are necessary, call 863-773-
0304 ext. 211. EOE
cl8:14,21c



Topsy See
REAL ESTATE
773-5994
Topsy See
App. 58 AC. Great for development property. High and dry. Call for
information.
Beautiful location 4.6 acres surveyed into six 1/2 acre lots and one
1.66 acre lot. $15,000 each or $85,000 for all.
NEW LISTING 3BR 1-1/2B CB Home in Bowling Green. Close to
school. Very good buy at $69,900.
1 ac. with app. 296 ft. road frontage. $39,000.
NEW LISTING 2 Story older frame home on large lot on Hwy 17
Zolfo Springs 5 BR 2 Bath. $125.000 Reduced to $105,000.
NEW LISTING: 3 BR-1B CB Very nice home in nice quiet neigh-
borhood. New Drywall New Tile Floors Appliances. $115,000.
5 acres all fenced, High and dry with pond. Appaloosa Lane. $84,995.
Topsy See, Broker
Elva Whidden, Associate
2634 E. Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873


WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
12:20tfc


TUT'S LAWN MAINTENANCE -
Summer savings average yard,
ZS, Wauchula, BG, $25, includes
mowing, weedeating, blow off dri-
veway and walk. Licensed/In-
sured. 863-781-2129. 8:7-9:4p
UGLY OLD RUSTY tub, we will
make it shine again. Refinish,
repair bathtub, complete job,
$189, inf. 863-253-1845. 8:7-9:4p


FINAL CUT CABINETRY for
kitchen cabinets, remodeling,
refacing, wood, laminate & solid
surface, countertops. 863-664-
9147. Free estimates. 7:31-8:28p


B SEE SOUN -
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
7:24-10:30p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION -
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening. Harold
Howze Construction. 735-1158.
RRO50181 6:10-8:28p
ALDERMAN'S CITRUS TREE
REMOVAL. Call Tim for quote.
863-781-5289. 4:3-1:15p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula, and Friday and Saturday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First Methodist
Church, corner of Grape and
Church St., Bowling Green.
12:6tfcdh


1.P1ll i
% GILLIARD ll

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock* Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490 cl8:2tfc


Zolfo Springs
Mobile: (941) 456-6507


i F t Happy Home

SApartments

S2BR/1B, unfurnished
$600.00 month, plus security deposit
Located in nice neighborhood Ft. Meade
(863) 375-9988 (863) 285-7203 (863) 214-5645
Ask for Sheila c18:21C








Over 40 years experience residential, agricultural, com-
mercial and industrial properties.
Call us for information on current listings.
We will provide a free property analysis on qualified listings
placed with us. c8:21c


EMPLOYEEE
EASING
OPTIONS, INc.
Robby Albritton, Vice-President
Office (863) 735-9226 Cell (863) 528-7085
Fax (863) 735-9228
ralbritton@eloinc.net
www.elonic.net
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890


rT '\ jUAN DELATORRE
(863)781-1128
www. TUANDELATORRE.COM
EMAIL:MAIL@ UANDELATORRE.COM


REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


BOK TE
BROKER ASSOCIATE


601 N 8th Ave. Wauchula 4/2 CB $153,000
215 Cracker Ln. Wauchula 4/2 MH $140,000
316 E Orange St. Wauchula Lg lot & home zoned C-l $145,000
6163 NW CuldeSac Rd. Arcadia Home & 4.76 acs $150,000
1920 Peace River Woods Rd. Zolfo Springs 21+ ac w/750 ft on
river $190,000
3430 Garrard Rd. Fort Meade Lk Buffum home $200,000 cl8:21



NOW RENTING!


THE PALMS APTS.

2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Ask About Our Move-In Specials!

Monthly rent from $513 + utilities
Handicap equipped units available.

Located at: 701 La Playa Drive
Office Hours: Mon. Fri.,
1:00 pm 5:00 pm

For Rental Info & Applications

Call

1t 863-773-3809
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
(TDD #1-800-955-8771) ,


CITRUS TREE REMOVAL -
Cheapest rates by the hour or
contract, free estimates. Contact
-Curtis Wilsonat 767-5349.
7:3-12:4p
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP. Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
Located at the SFCC Annex,
Room #105, Hwy. 17 North, Wau-
chula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
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ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
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August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 9B


3 Excel In Track Club


By MAYA CARPENTER
Special To The Herald-Advocate
In an effort to keep kids
active in the community, The
Mark Anthony Track Club sent
three Hardee County students to
participate in two Florida Sun-
shine sports festivals this sum-
mer.
The Mark Anthony Track
Club was founded in 2006 in
Bowling Green, after Mark
Lunsford, a former teacher at
Pioneer Career Academy, and
an advocate for getting kids
involved in sports, died in a
motorcycle accident in Mobile,
Ala.
However, with lots of plan-
ning, the club didn't become a
reality until this year, when
James Carpenter, founder of the
organization and Lunsford's
close friend, decided that in
order to keep students' interests
afloat, there must be another
alternative during the summers
when they aren't in school, he
said. So Carpenter came across
three students who have a pas-
sion for speed.
Those students are: Miracle
Thompson, a second-grader at
Bowling Green Elementary;
Brandon Beatty, a seventh-
grader at. Hardee Junior High
School; and Lisnell Youyoute, a
sophomore at South Florida
Community College.
Carpenter, who is also an
assistant coach for the Hardee
High School track team, found
all three different ways. Miracle
participated in a 100-meter ex-
hibition event at the Harring-
ton-Liston Park and Lunsford
Basketball County located on
Dixiana Drive in Bowling
Green.
"She showed an interest in
track and field," he said. Car-
penter said Beatty was part of a
coaching clinic at Hardee High
School sponsored by track and
field coaches, and Youyoute
was active in track while at
Hardee High. Carpenter trained
him for three years, he said.
The club is open to any stu-
dent who is interested in the
sport. However, Carpenter said,


parent involvement is vital.
"Parents are able to see the
child excel in athletics, which
empowers the youth to use the
enthusiasm in the classroom,"
he said.
Carpenter felt he gave kids a
chance to really immerse them-
selves in the sport by going to
track events.
In June, Thompson and
Beatty went to the 2008 Sum-
mer Games Youth Track and
Field competition at Winter
Haven High School in Winter
Haven. More than 5,000 ama-
teur athletes between the ages
of 4 and 88 competed in the
three-day competition.
Thompson came in fourth
place in the 100-meter dash
with 17.59 seconds, fourth
place in the 200-meter dash at
38.82 seconds and sixth place in
the long jump. She jumped
seven foot three inches.
Beatty came in fourth place
in the 1,500-meter dash at five
minutes and 58.06 seconds. He
also ran in the 800-meter dash.
That was Thompson's first
meet. Beatty has run in other
track meets.
Though that was Thompson's
first meet, she was determined
to take home some medals
when she and Youyoute were
invited to Tallahassee to partici-
pate in the 2008 Southeast
Sports Festival.
Thompson took home three
medals in the primary girls cat-
egory. She received a silver
medal in the 100-meter dash,
coming in second place. Then
she came in second place in the
200-meter dash at 38.37 sec-
onds and received a silver
medal. She received a bronze
medal in the long jump, coming
in third place at seven-foot two
inches.
Youyoute, who participated
in the master's category with
experienced athletes, came in
seventh place in the 100-meter
dash at 11.49 seconds. He also
ran in the 200-meter dash and
came in 24.28 seconds.
Carpenter said Lunsford
would have been proud of the


community's accomplishments.
"I believe Mark's accomplish-
ments in basketball and sports
in general had an impact on
younger people to achieve
more," Carpenter said.


Syv

COURTESY PHOTOS
Miracle Thompson picked
up a pair of silver medals
and a bronze medal at the
Southeast Sports Festival.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Brandon Beatty placed
fourth, finishing the 1,500-
meter dash in 5:58.06 in
the Florida Sunshine
Sports event.


Live a balanced life-learn some and think some and draw and paint and sing and dance and play
and work every day some.
-Robert Fulghum


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State Opens

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A Price-Gouging Hotline has
been activated by the state
Attorney General's Office.
And with that hotline comes a
cautionary word from Attorney
General Bill McCollum, who
urges Floridians to be alert for
anyone who may try to take
advantage of people preparing
for or impacted by Tropical
Storm Fay.
Residents who suspect price
gouging may call the hotline at
1-866-9-No-Scam, which is 1-
866-966-7226. Investigators
will then research the com-
plaint.
Florida law prohibits extreme
increases in the price of such-
commodities as food, water,
hotels, ice, gasoline, lumber
and equipment needed as a
direct result of an officially
declared emergency.
Under Florida law, the price
of goods or services is consid-
ered exorbitant if the increase


represents a "gross disparity"
from the average price of that
commodity during the 30 days
prior to the declared emergency.
Violators of the price-goug-


ing statute are subject to civil
penalties of $1,000 per viola-
tion, up to a total of $25,000 for
multiple violations committed.
in a single 24-hour period.


Pastors Wendell and Ty Smith
welcome you to attend


Revival Week
August 24-27
Sunday 6pm & Mon.-Wed. 7pm
Bishop Jonathan E. Ziegler, III




Sunday, August 24, 2008 Missionary Service
AM Service at 10:00
Native Missionary from the Philippines
Oscar Y. Magallanes

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD
A Faith-Filled Pentescostal Church
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10B The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008
FIRST-DAY SMILES


ITS A HIT!


COURTESY PHOTO
It was fun at the ballpark recently for a group of local kids. New Hope Baptist Church
Pastor Chris Bishop, his wife, Tasha, Child Development Center Director B.J. Floyd
and teachers Brandy Sanchez and Erica Durrance took 13 children from the church's
after-school program to a Tampa Bay Rays game on Aug. 6. "I believe Jesus was fun to
be around, and wants us to enjoy life and share the Gospel while doing just that!" says
Bishop. "Our goal is to build relationships in all areas of life which are Christ-centered.
It was an opportunity for me and my wife to do something just for these kids this sum-
mer." In addition to this game, Tasha Bishop put together the curriculum the kids stud-
ied for eight weeks this summer. All in all, the summer was a hit!


History is a kind of introduction to more interesting people than we can possibly meet
in our restricted lives; let us not neglect the opportunity.
-Dexter Perkins


FALL BOWLING LEAGUES
Schedules for 2008-09


LEAGUE


TIME


STARTS


Monday Monday Nite Mens 7:00 PM. Meeting August 18
Starts August 25
Early Birds (Ladies) 9:00 A.M. Meeting August 12
Tuesday Starts August 19
Guys & Dolls (Men& women) 7:00 PM. Meeting August 12
Starts August 19
Wednesday Wednesday Night Mens 7:30 PM. Meeting August 13
(18 Week League) Starts August 20
Thursday Nite Owls (Ladies) 6:30 PM. Meeting August 14
Starts August 21
Friday T.G.I.F, (Men& Women) 7:30 PM. Meeting August 15
Starts August 22


Boys & Girls
Juniors Ages 6-11
Juniors Ages 12 & Up


10:00 A.M.
12 NOON


Registration $20
August 23 11 A.M.
League Starts Sept. 6


pS nac k I s


Leadership for the Future

David Durastanti


Superintendent of Schools
www.ForOurKidsFuture.com


"The Children ofHardee County Are Our Future"


- -It's Time to Put Them First


November 4th, 2008


Pd. Po. Adv., Pad tr byav D. DurastanM i Campaign Accoun Approved byDavid D. Durastanti, Republican, Chet Huddleston, Campaign Treasurer






,.Leading to any arrest or
Conviction for the theft of
the following:
2005 Bray Trailer 2008 John Deere LA135
2 Weedeaters Push Mowers
Blue Point 2 Piece Tool Box
"You know who you are and it won't be long before


Jimmy Hill
(863) 781-3090


we know who you are!"
8:21c


Dan Hill
(863) 781-3091


"< 1IMinor L.

Bryant
for

County Commissioner, District 1


Hardee County, I Listen To You!


YOU ASKED FOR...


MORE IOBS


BETTER ROADS


CONSERVATIVE SPENDING


we produced...


HARDEE CORRECTIONAL
INSTITUTE, HARDEE POWER
STATION, SEMINOLE ELECTRIC,
SEABOARD SUPPLY, VANDOLAH
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FOUR-LANED US 17, IMPROVED
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ONA-FT. GREEN ROAD AND MANY
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GRANTS FOR ROADS, BRIDGES,
COURTHOUSE RENOVATIONS,
PARKS AND MANY OTHERS!


Throughout my terms as County Commissioner I have made it a priority to
listen to the needs and concerns ofHardee County and worked diligently to
make them a reality. I not only listen but I will deliver. So, August26, you
decide who will be listening to you.


Progressive, Prepared, and Proven!

Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Minor L. Bryant, (D), for County Commissioner, District 1. 8:21p


DAY


Saturday


Bowl-






August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 11B


Greetings from Fort Green.
Louise Durrance visited her
twin sister in Titusville a few
weeks ago. She had a wonderful
time reminiscing. She said it
had been four years since they
had visited, and it definitely
was not going to be that long
again! Danny, Julie, lan and
Clara went on to the Space
Center for two days. They also
had a good time and will be
available as the chauffer when-
ever Louise wants to go again.
They returned home via
Orlando and visited Byron and
Helen Bond, her older sister.
Louise really had a super week-
end visiting family and when all
is said and done, family is very
important. While they are living
you need to keep in touch and
visit!
I had identical twin cousins.
It was very difficult to tell them
apart. After they were grown
and one lived in New Jersey
and one in Texas, they had to re-
turn to Jacksonville for a funer-
al. They had each purchased a
new sports coat in their respec-:
tive states, and when they were
dressing for the funeral, they
were surprised to see they had
purchased the same brand and
color of sports coat. Growing
up, they dressed alike and
seemed to think alike! I ask
Louise if she and her twin sister
were dressed alike when she got
to Titusville, but she said no.
Hunter Reid spent one night
in Highlands Regional Medical
Center. His dad was helping
him push his go-cart into the
garage and Hunter noticed a
problem with the chain and
reached down to fix it, and one
of those freak accidents hap-
pened. He got his right hand
caught between the chain and
sprocket and lost the first joint
on two fingers and the doctor
was able to stitch the joint back
on the third finger. They are
hoping it will survive.
To top that off, they had to
get a skin graft from his hip to
repair the fingers, so he has had


quite a bit of pain. Now he will
be in a fix, with school begin-
ning. His entire hand is ban-
daged and in a sling, and he is
right-handed! Everyone, please
nray for Hunter.
Jason Keene received bad
news. If you believe in prayer,
Jason needs it so please get
busy.
Little Ashley Pelham will
have gallbladder surgery some-
time this week. Remember to
pray for her please.
Patrick Laker's hand is im-
proving. His dad says he is
chomping at the bits to get back
to work. He cut his hand at
work several weeks ago.
Kaylee Hogenauer went with
her grandparents for a short
weekend trip. They went to
Lake Arbuckle and had a good
time. Sherman did not take the
boat so Kaylee did not catch
any fish. She fished off the
dock, though, and did not hook
the lilly pads like her mema.
She is well equipped to fish.
She was one of the lucky win-
ners at the Hardee Lakes fishing
tourney earlier this year. She is
proud of her own tackle box
and large variety of lures. Pink
is her favorite color and, natu-
rally, she chose to use a pink
artificial worm!
Polly Banda says she is feel-
ing good. She says the doctors
don't know everything and she
believes she is going to recover
from her liver cancer. Her house
is leaking like a sieve and we
are trying to help her get it
repaired.
Sherman and I went to the
political get-together last week.
I heard only one candidate for
county commissioner mention
that Resthaven was important
and he wanted to keep it open.
I still think Resthaven is impor-
tant, and if any of you citizens
are of the same opinion you
need to speak up or vote up!
It is very important for every-
one to get out and vote on
Tuesday.
Please call with any news!


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County Employees Can Now


Donate Time Off To The Sick


SFort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
.. 773-6710
| s .l---------------_


By MICHAEL KELLY
For The Herald-Advocate
County employees will now
be able to donate their personal
leave hours to another county
employee who suffers a cata-
strophic illness or injury.
The Compassionate Leave
Donation Program was
approved Thursday by the
Hardee County Commission. It
is a voluntary program that will
allow full-time employees to
donate accumulated personal
leave hours (sick, vacation or
compensatory time) to another
full-time employee who has
exhausted all paid time off.
All donated time must be
approved by a department
director. The minimum dona-
tion is eight hours with a maxi-
mum of 240 hours in a 12-
month period.
The donating employee:must
also have a minimum of 160
hours in his accrual account,
and cannot donate hours that
will reduce the account balance
below 160 h6urs.
The maximum donation an
employee can receive.,in any
12-month period is 520 hours,
or 13 weeks of pay.
Employees receiving dfiated
hours, must be full-time aind
have a verified illness, injury or
extenuating circumstances.
These circumstances are limited
to the employee .only,; and not
circumstances related to a fami-
ly member of any kind.
Employees who have abused
sick leave in the past will not be
eligible for the program.
Voluntary medical, procedures
such as cosmetic surgery would
also not qualify for the pro-
graim.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
approved changing the


probation fee from $45 to $50 a
month. Commissioners origi-
nally wanted to move the fee to
$55, but County Judge Jeff
McKibben advised them not to
go over $50 a month because of
all the other various fees and
court costs.
- approved waving the
entrance fee to Hardee Lakes
Park.on Nov. 1 for the annual
YMCA Veteran's Day 5K Run.
heard a report on Mary
Nicholson, a 14-year county
employee who is in need of a
bone marrow transplant..
There will be a "Fishin' for
Donations for Mary" day on
Sept. 8 at the Agri-Civic Center
to test people wanting to see if
they are a match and can donate
to Nicholson. Blood donations
also will be accepted.
All family members have
been tested and are not a mar-
row matchh,
Commissioners approved
giving county employees paid
time off to recover if they are a
match and willing to donate
marrow for her.
Each commissioner will also


donate $20 to buy a door prize
to be given away at the event.
heard a report from Mark
Frazier, project coordinator for
the road and bridge department,
about changing the speed limit
on CR 663 along the curve in
the Limestone community.
He told commissioners that a
survey and study have to be
done before the speed limit can
be lowered. He also informed
them of an unfunded federal
highway mandate that will
require all road signs to have a
certain amount of reflectivity.
met with members of the
Resthaven board to assure them
that they are not going to close
the doors of the assisted living
facility.
During their budget work-
shops, commissioners had dis-
cussed the idea of selling the
building, but that would not
mean the facility would not
longer be able to operate.
Commissioners are con-
cerned over the liability of own-
ing the building and the amount
of tax money, about $90,000 a
year, which is spent at Rest-


10 years, to


grant pursuant


to S.3, Art. VII of the


State


Constitution, property tax exemption to new businesses and to

expansion of existing businesses?


Endorsed by:

The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners

The Hardee County Economic Development Council

The Hiidee County Chamber of Commerce 8:21


haven.
Jim Williams, a member of
the Resthaven board, said news
of the possible selling of the
building has worried residents
and community members and
hurt the opportunity of attract-
ing new residents.
Commission Chairman Dale
Johnson assured board mem-
bers, "Our intent was to never
close Resthaven." He said with
better communication between
the two sides it never would
have been an issue.
Except during the nine
months before he draws his
first breath, no man manages
his affairs as well as a tree
does.
-George Bernard Shaw






-PITR --PBLIHER


Remodeling/Repairing an older home?
Learn how to prevent lead poisoning
.FREE.Training on Lead Safe Work Practices
Thursday, August 28, 2008 A- -
8:00am to 4:00pm
Highlands Agri-Civic Center I
Conference Room 1
4509 George Blvd Sebring -.g I l
Advance Registration required by August 22, 2008 X '.I ... .-
at www.leadsafetraining.org or 4: !fii-.*
877-476-2299 A .
Provided by: The Training Network /
-= U 8:21c.,


It's Who's For School Board

District 2

Professional Knowledgeable Qualified
Political.advertisement paid for and approved by Mildred Smith, nonpartisan, 8:21p
S... for School Board District 2


VOTE


SYES


ON TAX ABATEMENT


FOR ECONOMIC


DEVELOPMENT


Authorization to grant property tax exemptions to new businesses

and expansions of existing businesses. Shall the Board of County

Commissioners of Hardee County be authorized, for an additional


I







12B The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


FWC SEEKS DEER HUNTERS' HELP
The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission is
looking to hunters this coming season to help it monitor the state's
deer herd for chronic wasting disease, or CWD, as it's more com-
monly called.
CWD belongs to a group of diseases known as transmissible
spongiform encephalopathies. Currently, scientists still have much
to learn about CWD, which appears to occur only in the deer fam-
ily but is believed to be caused by an abnormal protein called a
prion.
The fatal CWD attacks the brains of infected cervids (mule
deer, white-tailed deer, moose and elk), causing them to become
emaciated, display abnormal behavior and lose control of bodily
functions.
Warning signs of CWD that hunters can be on the lookout for
include deer that are extremely thin or appear sick; those exhibit-
ing odd behavior such as excessive salivating or urinating, stagger-
ing, walking in circles, standing with a wide stance, head tremors;
or deer found dead from unknown causes.
Transmission of CWD occurs by direct contact with bodily
fluids (feces, urine, saliva) or through contact with a contaminated
environment. In this second scenario, the prion stays within the
environment, and it may remain infectious for years.
The good news is, there's no evidence that CWD can be trans-
mitted to humans or livestock, and it's not yet been found in
Florida or any other southeastern state. But, it's going to take the
help of all hunters and the FWC to keep it that way.
Currently, the only practical method for diagnosing CWD is
through analysis of brain-stem tissue or lymph nodes from dead
deer. Therefore, Florida's more than 240,000 hunters can play an
extremely important role in CWD surveillance by helping FWC
biologists collect samples from their harvested deer.
The goal of the FWC is to collect these samples throughout
Florida, and it's asking private landowners and hunting clubs to
please participate in this surveillance. Since 2002, the FWC has
tested more than 3,400 hunter-killed and road-killed deer for CWD.
If you'd like to help, please contact your nearest FWC regional
office or call the toll-free CWD Hotline at 1-866-293-9282 for fur-
ther information and to coordinate collection and pick-up of deer
samples.
Should a CWD outbreak occur in Florida, the keys to effective
management will be detecting it early and taking swift action to
limit its spread. Because of this, the FWC has a CWD action team,
made up of veterinarians, biologists, law enforcement officers and
media folks, in place and ready to formulate a response plan and
develop protocols with other government agencies.
This season, if you come across or harvest a deer that appears
sick or emaciated, or one that has died from unknown.causes, don't
handle it. Instead, contact the FWC 24/7 on its toll-free hotline at
1-866-CWD-Watch. It's important to call as soon as possible,
because any testing must be done within 48 hours of a deer's death
to produce reliable results.
We all can help take part in keeping CWD out of Florida's deer
herd by staying well-informed, taking precautions and acting
quickly when necessary.
Tony Young is a media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony. Young@FWC.com.


Letter To The Editor

Zolfo Springs Mayor Neel

Praises Sheriff's Department


Dear Editor:
I am a citizen of Zolfo
Springs and of Hardee County
which I am proud of. I am
mayor of the town of Zolfo
Springs and am proud to serve.
SI am also the pastor of United
Methodist Church of Zolfo
Springs and am honored to
serve. As a citizen of Hardee
County I would like to express
my opinion of the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office.
As financial constraints forc-
ed the hand of the town to cut
our police department back to
police chief, we the citizens of
Zolfo Springs depend on the
Sheriff's Office to assist in
patrolling and answering our
calls. This could be a burden on
the agency as the calls they' are
already answering are numer-
ous, their finances are strained,
and the added weight they have
taken on could be costly. But
when told of our dilemma
Sheriff Cogburn shouldered the-
responsibility and has provided
coverage for our town.
First of all, I would like to
take this opportunity to ack-
nowledge the outstanding job
they are doing for us. I would
like to thank each deputy for the
part they take in protecting the
citizens of Zolfo Springs and
the County. They have made a
presence in town patrolling our
streets day and night. Quick
responses have been handled
responsibly and professionally.
Their presence in the town is
acknowledged and brought to
my attention daily, again thank
you for serving our community.
Second, though we do not see
them, the Task Force has made
drug arrests in our town and is
working diligently undercover
to eradicate the drug dealings
going on all over. As mayor I
hear about them being in town
investigating and feel the need
to recognize their efforts.


Third, most of our calls are
dispatched through central dis-
patch at the Sheriff's Office.
When a call goes in, they dis-
patch our officer when he is on
duty, if not the call is dispatched
to a sheriff's deputy. They are
all quick to respond to all calls
professionally and proficiently.
Fourth, as cutbacks have
constrained finances of all gov-
ernment agencies we citizens
should be very supportive of
our very professional Sheriff's
Office. They work very hard to
keep expenses as low as possi-
ble. The Sheriff's Office has
been very successful in being
able to house state prisoners
which helps offset the cost of
our own county prisoners.
As mayor I have had the
opportunity on many occasions
to sit down with Sheriff Cog-
burn and Col. Arnold Lanier of
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office to discuss issues involv-
ing the town of Zolfo Springs.
.They have been efficient and
effective in eliminating several
concerns that I have had.
The job these men and
women do for us is a sacrifice
that they make every day. It
takes them away from their
families at times that are impor-
tant to them. It costs them emo-
tional trauma when they deal
with unforeseen events that
involve death. They deal with
children who are vulnerable to
the world who need positive
role models. We need to support
these officers of the law who
make us feel safe in our homes
and neighborhoods.
As citizens we need to help
by becoming involved in our
communities by reporting crim-
inal activities we are responsi-
ble to protect ourselves, fami-
lies and neighbors. By getting
involved we can help.
Mayor, Rev. George Neel
Zolfo Springs


Take a music bath once or twice a week for a few sea-
sons, and you will find that it is to the soul what the water
bath is to the body.
-Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.


'For [lida [S F Lrpi] II EaUJ

WEATHER SUMMARY
All areas across the State received adequate amounts of rain-
fall last week. Precipitation was spotted in the Panhandle, Big
Bend, and central locations. Franklin, Santa Rosa, and Gadsden
counties in the Panhandle received 3.28, 3.91, and 3.24 inches,
respectively. Baker County in the Big Bend and Hernando County
in the central Peninsula received 3.92 and 3.09 inches, respective-
ly. Daytime highs were in the 80s and 90s; lows were in the upper
60s and low 70s.
FIELD CROPS
Peanut pegging was 99 percent complete compared with 91
percent last year and a 98 percent five-year average. Scattered
showers kept the peanut crop progression on schedule and
increased conditions. Peanut condition was rated 20 percent fait, 52
good, and 28 percent excellent. Cotton, corn, and soybean crops
were reported in good condition in Jackson County. Soil moisture
was mostly adequate in all areas.
MoisTopsoil Z Subsoil
Rating This Last Last This Last Last
week week year week week Year
Percent
Very short 0 4 4 0 4 12
Short 7 15 36 9 15 43
Adequate 80 71 55 88 78 43
Surplus 13 10 5 3 3 2
VEGETABLES
Land preparation and plastic laying for vegetables proceeded
on schedule with first transplants of the season in the ground. Okra
continued to be marketed last week.
LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
In the Panhandle and northern areas, pasture and cattle were in
fair to excellent condition. Most pasture was in good condition. In
the central areas, pasture condition ranged from poor to excellent
with most in fair condition. A small portion of pasture was in poor
condition due to drought. The cattle condition was mostly fair and
the balance good to excellent. In the southwest, pasture condition.
was very poor to excellent with most in good condition. Pasture
was in poor condition due to drought. The cattle condition was
poor to excellent with most in good condition. Statewide, the cat-
tle condition was mostly fair to good.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 0 1 0 1
Poor 5 4 5 4
Fair 45 25 45 25
Good 40 60 40 60
Excellent 10 10 10 10
CITRUS
Several days of short, spotty showers produced various
amounts of rainfall throughout the citrus producing area. The heav-
iest rain, just over two inches, fell on the eastern coastal city of Ft.
Pierce, while Balm, on the west coast, received an inch and a half.
Daily high temperatures were in the upper 80s to the lower 90s
most of the week. A high of 94 degrees was recorded in
Immokalee. Growers were continuing to apply summer oil and
spraying copper. Much attention was being given to psyllid control
in all areas. Other activities iticluded mowing, irrigating, and fer-
tilizing. Where caretakers were spending sufficient time maintain-
ing groves, the crop was progressing well. Oranges were as large
as baseballs, while grapefruit were typically larger. Some color
break has been observed on interior grapefruit in younger groves.


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.I.:!i i i ii


The Grahams: 73 Years Of


Love That's Still Growing!


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
For The Herald-Advocate
Every girl anticipates the day
she will find her prince charm-
ing and live happily ever after.
While in today's society it is
difficult to believe in this fairy-
tale love, a couple from Hardee
County prove to every love-
struck girl in the world that love
can last.
Henry and Juanita Graham
have stuck together through
thick and thin for 73 years.
Their love story began when
Juanita was 19 years old. After
dating for a year, they received
news that Henry would be leav-
ing for the Civilian Conser-
vation Corps. In fear that his
love would not wait for his
return, Henry decided to pro-
pose to Juanita.
Henry and Juanita whisked
off to Punta Gorda and were
married on June 27, 1935.
Henry later become the mayor
of Wauchula and is a retiree
from the city after 20 years.
Juanita remembers fondly the
excitement and passion Henry
had for the people of this coun-
ty.
Henry and Juanita both work-
ed very hard during their lives
and rarely had a moment to
spare for activities they en-
joyed. However, Juanita always
tried to find time away from the
hustle and bustle of work to
make time for herself and her
Family.
"We didn't have a chance to
have hobbies because we were
always working. When I had
the time, I loved to do hand-
work, embroidery and cook,"
says Juanita.
Not only did Henry and
Juanita have a heavy work load,
but they also had to maintain a
stable marriage and raise a fam-
ily. Juanita has noticed that


many people nowadays don't
know how to balance their lives
and give up too easily.
"People need to grow up and
get serious about marriage. Be
truthful and communicate. So
many couples don't talk things
out and are too quick to get
gone," says Juanita.
Henry recently had a massive
stroke, which has left him para-
lyjed from the top of his head.
to the end of his toes. Because
of his poor health conditions, he
and Juanita moved into Hardee
Manor Healthcare Center.
Juanita, who is still capable of
moving about, has a hard time
seeing the man of her dreams in
such a sedated state of mind.
"I have a greater love for him
now. I have shed tears and
prayed for him because he is so
helpless. He can't even feed
himself. I pray for him all the
time," says Juanita.
Although the stroke has
affected Henry and Juanita in a
terrible way, Juanita continues
to reflect on their memories
together and the love she has
for her husband.
"I wouldn't have traded him
off for any man I ever met in
my life. We loved and respected
each other... he was my hus-
band," says Juanita.
Juanita feels very blessed to
have the helpers she has to
assist her and her husband. Not
only does she feel blessed by
the Hardee Manor workers, but
she is also thankful for her fam-
ily and their support.
We can't be thankful enough
for our children. We have three
children, eight grandchildren
and 13 great-grandchildren.
They often call and check on us
and bring us anything we need,"
says Juanita.
Henry and Juanita continue to
beat the odds and provide a per-


fect example of what true love
really means. Juanita encour-
ages couples of all ages to stay
together and work things out as
best possible.
"Henry and I had our differ-


ences, but we worked them out
like any married couple does.
Finding a mate, getting married
and raising a family is some-
thing that is intended to happen
in everyone's life."


PHOTOS BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Henry and Juanita Graham, who have been married for
73 years, are still glowing with love for one another.


With eight grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren the
Grahams' walls are covered with photos, gifts and teddy
bears from their little youngsters.


PAGE ONE


Wauchula To Choose

New Commissioner


By MICHAEL KELLY
For The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula City Commission-
ers have four candidates to
choose from to replace Troy
Brant for the District One seat
he will be vacating.
Brant was forced to resign
from his position after moving
out of the district.
The four candidates up for
appointment are Patty Detwiler,
Brent Driskell, Pete Granda and
Val Patarini III.
Commissioners were in-
structed to rank the applicants
in order from one to four, the
candidate with the most points
will win the seat. The decision
will be made at the Sept. 2
workshop and the appointee
will take office at the next
scheduled meeting, Sept. 8.
In other news the commis-
sion:
Heard a report from Sue
Baker about closing some city


streets for a Hardee High class
es of the 60s reunion.
Got an update of the
sewer expansion project from
City Manager Rick Giroux. He
said phase one of the project.is
almost complete.
He also said the city may
need one more additional acre
of land to complete the expan-
sion. He said there is a possibil-
ity of trading four acres of land
for the one acre currently
owned by Florida Community
Trust.
Commissioners Ken Lambert
and Jerry Conerly expressed
concerns over having to pur-
chase more land for the comple-
tion of the project.
Passed a motion to give
Wauchula boxer Edner Cherry
$1,500 to assist him in expens-
es related to his upcoming fight
on Sept. 13 in Biloxi, Miss.
Cherry will have to miss
work for four weeks in order to
train and prepare for the bout.


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Elect:




Delois L. Johnson


Wauchula City


Commissioner



Together...

J We can make h difference!



My mission: Listen, learn, take action, restore pride

and economic viability to our city.



Native ofHardee County

Wauchula resident 48 years

Experienced business leadership

Excellent communication skills

Solid performer you can count on for

proactive approaches and solutions

Your vote will be appreciated

I want to hear your concerns

o Phone: (863) 781-2360

o Email: deloj@hotmail.com

THIS IS A CITY WIDE ELECTION
ALL REGISTERED CITY OF WAUCHULA RESIDENTS
MAY VOTE

Vote early now or on August 26.

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2C The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008




--Schedule Of Weekly Services


BOWLING GREEN


APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........ 7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
Bible Study ..........................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m.
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 37S-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:001p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ...................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ... ......9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................:00 a.m.
Disciples Training... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .... ........... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion .......5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs. .................7:30 p.m.


ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Common.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
:Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
...................................... 6:30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Suiidai School ................... 10:00a.m.
English Service.................. 11:30a.m.
SGenhal Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
HARDEE CAMPUS
225 E, Main St. (City Hall
Auditorium)
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday ................................ 10:00 a.m.

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
S Pastor James Bland
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
IMorning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
.Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship.;....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men 's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................11:00 a.m .
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. 735-8681
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning ...............11:00 a.m.


Sunday Night ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night ..................7:30 p.m.


Peace 'iaer Gro terms


SWholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (86
RO. Box 780 Zolfc


3) 735-0470
b Springs, FL


WAUCHULA
EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Ad.
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ......................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
DomiLgo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CIIURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCII
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service......7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 7734182
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Family Night Supper .............5:00p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Mtg............6:00 p.m
M& M Kids's Klub...............6:00 p.m
(Music & Missions 4 yr -grade 5)
IMPACT (Jr. High).................6:20 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr. 6-8)
323 (Sr. High).........................6:30 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr.9-12)
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical ................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Predicacion ......................1.... 1:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles......7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SENDAY:
Children's Programming
(0-12th grade).........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Dinner.................................... 5:30 p.m .
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
S (Lil'K)/Sonshine Singers
..................................6:30-8:00 p.m.
Jam Team.....................6:30-7:15p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups
................ ...... ....7:15-8:00 p.m .
6-12th Grade (Oasis)....6:30-8:00 p.m.
AdultlBible Study.........6:30-8:00 p.m
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00,p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study .......................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship. 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.


FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service ..........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Ministries ........7:00 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ........ ....9:30 a.m.
Worship ..................... 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner .............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min...........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ..............................6:00 p.m .
Miercoles..... ....... ............7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road


767-1010
JEHOVAI'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Evening ....................4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.


WAUCHUer

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
113 N. 7th Ave.
Sunday Service ....................11:00 a.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Church Training ....................5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship ................(.....(st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773.6947
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1 & 3" Sun. Communion .:10:00 a.m.
2 3 & 4" Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ..................11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service
PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School ..................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ..........7:00 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.



RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .........:........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
ST. ANNS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9TH Ave. 773-6418
Sunday Service...............10:00 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773,4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) .................;7:00 a.m.
(English) ...............8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ................ 11:00 a.m.
(Creole).................... :00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship ...................7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199


Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayet ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .................7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
1720 W. Main
773-2929
Sunday Service.................... 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service.......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all Services.

ZOLFO SPRINGS




COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena *
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ............................... 10:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study .......................... 0:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................11 :0 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds.
735-2524- 773-0989
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Evening..................................6:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet. ..7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church...............10:00 a.m.
'Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .............. ...10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA ,
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
............... ...... ............ 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ...................1030 a.m.
- Evening Service .................... 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School. ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.n.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship............7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones..........................10:00 a.m.
Doctrina................................ 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica .. .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio................................ 11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio..................................8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.




SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
F,.-a,4- G-..d DD

One morning a minister
found a poor fellow sitting on
the church steps. Handing him
a two-dollar -bill he said,
"Don't despair."
The next morning the old
man was waiting for him.
'Running iup to him, he shoved
$18.00 into his hand.
"Why?" he asked.
"Because," he said, "Don't
Despair won yesterday's race
and paid eight to one."
You always win when you
heed the suggestion, "Don't
despair."
Despair distorts your think-
ing, disfigures your face, and
depresses your loved ones.
When you say any thing or
any plape is hopeless, you
limit the Lord. With Him all
things are possible.
Like the man said, "Don't
despair."




ABOUT...
School News:.
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify-pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include ..the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items wll be published as
space allows.


iZAIND OP


Sair s eam ca still on a bright,ho, late summer Iremoon.
Suddenly, a dak cloud appeals out of nowhere accompanied
by the contacting coolness of a rereshing brere. Then the
wtfi raindrop fall It's the beginning of a rain shower.
There Is always a first drop, soon foBowed by a ght rain or a
downpour. That one tia drop wil get things started; mny drops
together wll hap the earth cooled and Mr from droughL
Get started leading about God this week at your house of
worship. Your relatnship with Him will be continuly senewed a
you are aware of His constant presence.... Ui the srst drop of the


f.~Pma *o~maya T SIM-qm"O VA "W-wno N
I~*lj~nr5) sup ~j nsreEVww (R NILyi









7 WANTED To BE A LAWYER'


By TIAN HERRERA
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Manuel Ramon Herrera Jr.
Q: Where and when were you
born?
A: Poteet, Texas, south of San
Antonio. I was born Feb. 28, 1938,
Q: Where did you go to school?
A: I went to school at Progresso,
Texas, Relampago Elementary and
Mercedes High School.
Q: What was it like?
A: Very interesting, the educational
part. We had to memorize sentences,
paragraphs, the alphabet, multiplica-
tions; the same way it is today.
Q: Were you able to use calcula-
tors like
we do
now?
A: No,
we had to
put it on a piece of paper and work it
out.
Q: What did your parents do for a
living?
A: My parents were farmers, agricul-
tural farmers. They both had a green
thumb.
Q: What were your responsibili-
ties?
A: From what I remember, I had to
go to school every day in elementary,
and in high school I had to tend to my
dad's grocery store. It was all day
Saturday and Sunday and after school
Monday through Friday.
Q: Were there any big events when


you were young?
A: Our schools were really big on
football games, track-and-field compe-
titions, meetings such as competition
meetings from different schools in the
area.
Q: Did you graduate from high
school?
A: No. I was-junior the year 1957
and my parents and siblings moved to a
different town, and after that I never
bothered to go back to school. It was
never a requirement to graduate.
Q: What was your first job?
A: I was a grocery service clerk.
Back then I liked that job, even though
it was something I had to do, 4 to 10
p.m. every day and on Saturdays and
Sunday 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Q: Did you have any plans for the
future then? What were they?
A: Yes, I wanted to be a lawyer for
family law.
Q: What made you want to
become a lawyer?
A: The need in the Spanish commu-
nities in Texas. It was a mixture of
poverty, rejection, and one-sided jus-
tice.
Q: What kind of wages could you
have been paid back then to be a
lawyer?
A: It's the same as today; percent-
ages were based on the case. But the
money wasn't the one that encouraged
me, it was everyday life that I was see-
ing in the community.
Q: Were you in any sports?
A: Yeah, I was in track and field,


ah eal A a


Hade Cuny' Hmeow Cveag

.PRITER o PBLIHER


broad jumping. I was also in basketball,
baseball, boxing. Anything you can
think of, I was in it.
Q: Were there any special events
that you were involved in at school?
A: In my town, I was known as the
boxing champ and everyone knew me.
So one day I get to school and my prin-
cipal is sitting outside, and : was the
rest of the school. He challenged me.
Long story short, I knocked him out
and got suspended.
Q: Did you and your friends have
a special hangout?
A: Yeah, it was a club known as the
Armory, where they had Latin dance
competitions. It was more of a promo-
tion place. If ydi were good, you were
promoted. The fee to get in was a dol-
lar.
Q: What was your first vehicle?
A: My first vehicle was a 1951 Ford,
four-door, V8, automatic.
Q: How much was it for gas?
A: It was 19 cents a gallon. With 20
cents, I could go and see my girlfriend.
It was a good ten miles. It took me
there and back.
Q: What kind of music did you lis-
ten to?
A I listened to country, Spanish
music, and some country gospel.


August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3C
Q: Did you celebrate holidays like
we do now?
A: No, my parents believed in nb
celebrations of holidays.
Q: What was your religion?
A: I was a Christian.
Q: What kind of clothes did you
wear?
A: The same kind of clothes I wear
today, jeans and a T-shirt, preferably
short sleeves.
Q: How old were you when you
first moved to Florida?
A: It was 1968 and I was 30 years
old. I moved here because I wanted to
be close to my parents.
Q: How old were you when you got
married?
A: I was 19. You had to be at least
18 years of age.
Q: Is there anything that you
would change today that you had
then? Why?
A: No; why not?
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


RE-ELECT Gordon



M NORRIS


for

County Commissioner, District 3


Paid Political Advertisement, paid for and approved by Gordon Norris Democrat for County Commission District 3 p.,,


- 4~


SElect
SMildred


SMITH
for

School Board
District 2


Honest Loyal Experiencedk Leader
Highly Qualified: Graduate of Hardee County Schools
.AA. South Florida Community College
B.S. College of Education, Florida State University
M.A. College of Education, University of South Florida
Hardee County Teacher for over 37 years
(Hardee Jr. High and Wauchula Elementary)
Professional Knowledgeable Qualified
Key Issues: Budget reform
Open, honest communication
Fair and consistent across the board
Review and update policies to meet student needs
Retain highly qualified teachers
Quality instruction at all levels
Identify and prioritize needs in order to foster student
growth and achievement
Structure and discipline at all levels
Teamwork in solving important issues
Professionalism


Ivl


I Need Your Vote!


Retired from teaching June 2008
Paid political advertisement paid for and approved by Mildred Smith, nonparisan, 8-21 p
for Schnol Rnard District 2


\







4C The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The Herald-Advocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
Wauchulans Off For Century
Of Progress: Wauchula may
seem a little deserted these
days. If it does, blame it on the
Century of Progress Exposition
in Chicago, for at this time no
less than 40 Wauchulans are in
Chicago looking at the exhibits
and enjoying the fair.

Sportsmen Here Plan Protec-
tion For Game: Hardee County
sportsmen, both fishermen and
hunters, are anxious to form a
Hardee County fish and game
protective league, according to
D.E. Gillette, recently appoint-
ed as game conservation agent
for Hardee and DeSoto coun-
ties.

All Officers Elected In Berry
Association: All officers of the
Wauchula Strawberry Growers
Association were unanimously
re-elected at the meeting held
here Tuesday night and they
will serve another year, during
the 1933-34 season.

Spanish War Veterans To
Meet Here Sept. 1: Spanish-
American War veterans will
hold their regular meeting here
Friday, Sept. 1, according to
William H. Hix, commander
who announced that L.D. Lacy,
department adjutant, J.S. Chen-
oweth, department quartermas-
ter, and M.B. Hilton, depart-
ment judge advocate, will all
attend the meeting.

More Information On New
Futch Tax Bill: Sixty-seven
Florida tax collectors are busy
extending on their rolls' the
1932 taxes on delinquent state-
owned taxes certificates, so as
to be able to collect these taxes
the same as other current taxes.
The Supreme Court has ruled
that all 1932 taxes and taxes for
the next five years must be paid


in cash or there can be no sav-
ings on delinquent taxes.

Record Crowd Visits Fair On
Hardee Day: Hardee County
Day was celebrated at the Flori-
da exhibit at Chicago's Century
of Progress Exposition on Mon-
day, according to word received
from Chicago. The event drew a
record attendance so far of
90,000 people, the largest atten-
dance thus far reported.

50 YEARS AGO
Wauchula Adopts New Rates
For Fire Protection: A new rate
schedule for fire protection out-
side the city limits has been
adopted by the Wauchula City
Council. The new schedule
calls for a charge of $3.50 to
homeowners in a three-mile
radius outside the city.

Speed Reduction Requested
On South 17-A: A reduction in
speed on the south end of
Highway 17A from Old Ceme-
tery Road to the city limits of
Wauchula has been requested
by a gioup of homeowners in
that section. The commissioners
have agreed to take the matter
up with the State Road Depart-
ment.

City Council OKs Bid Ad-
vertisement On Sewage Plant:
The Wauchula City Council has
authorized the engineers to go
ahead and advertise for bids on
construction of a sewage treat-
ment plant for the city, although
final papers on a federal loan
have not yet been signed.

Roving Forester Program
Dead: The roving forester pro-
gram for Hardee and Highlands
counties is dead, for this year at
least. State forester C.H. Coul-
ter has notified the Board of
County Commissioners that his
men will not have time to try to
sell various county agricultural
organizations on the plan.

Wauchula CAP Unit State's
Smallest: The Wauchula Civil
Air Patrol unit was represented


Sam Albritton

Electrical Services, Inc.
--,863-767-0313 icet
S:: :'.. 863-781-0377 Mtlbile
SResidential and Commercial Wiring
*Electrical Inspections
-Electrical Preventative Maintenance
-Ground Testing
*Lightning Arrestor



Serving Hardee County Since 1994
SmVISA EC13002737 1:t


in Tampa during the weekend
CAP convention by Lts. Walter
Doring and Jimmy McLean.
One purpose of the meeting was
to set up the annual weather and
hurricane service and for con-
tinuing nightly satellite obser-
vation.

Wauchula Buys New Deco-
rations For Christmas: Wau-
chula will be sporting new
Christmas decorations this Yule
season instead of some that
have done the city for over 20
years. The City Council has
authorized the purchase of
$1,254 worth of new decora-
tions.

Voter Registration Drops 34
Percent: Re-registration of all
voters in Hardee County this
year has resulted in a 34 percent
drop in the total number of vot-
ers.

25 YEARS AGO
McHale Wins Gold Medal:
Annie McHale, a resident of the
Gilliard group home in Zolfo
Springs, returned last month
from a week at the 1983
International Special Olympics
summer games with a gold
medal in bowling.

Communication With Church
Turned Over To Attorneys: The
County Commission last Thurs-
day invoked a get-tough policy
on the First Baptist Church con-
struction after learning the
church had retained an attorney
to represent it.

Church Does Not Meet Fire
Code: According to the report
from the Southern Building
Code Congress International
Inc.,- the First Baptist Church
design does not meet the fire
code.

Teachers Go Back To School
Without Contract: Hardee
County teachers went back to
school this Wednesday without
a new contract. However, nego-
tiators were going to get togeth-
er again Wednesday afternoon
and may reach an agreement
soon.

Miss Hardee County Farm
-Bureau: Becky McHan was
crowned Miss Hardee' County
Farm Bureau 1983 at the high
school Friday night. First run-
ner-up was Kimberly Krich-
baum and second runner-up
was Tracy Terrell.

Sam Weiner Places First:'
Sam Weiner of Wauchula has
again taken top honors as tramp
clown in the Southeastern
Shrine Clowns Contest. He
competed against 75 tramp
clowns from 10 states. This is
the second time Weiner has


taken first place.

Baptist Defeats Methodist:
First Baptist Gold came one
qame closer to clinching this
ar's's championship by defeat-
ing a stubborn Methodist team
from Wauchula. Wanda Leon-
ard turned in a fine performance
on the mound for the winners
by limiting the Methodists to
just two base hits.

10 YEARS AGO
7 Qualify To Run In BG City
Election: Of four seats up for
grabs on the Bowling Green
City Commission, only one did
not draw any opposition by
Friday's close of the one-week
qualifying period for candi-
dates. Gary Albritton Sr. will
gain another term without the
need for campaigning.

We Don't Want It Here!': A
tentative plan to place a com-
post plant northwest of Fort
Green was shot down Tuesday
evening. A vehement crowd of
about 30 Fort Green-area resi-
dents rejected explanations of
state officials and the county
Economic Development Coun-
cil staff and declared them-
selves opposed to the plant
being anywhere near their com-
munity.

Top Jail Administrator Turns
In Resignation: Sexual harass-
ment allegations have prompted
the departure of the lead super-
visor at the Hardee County Jail.
Capt. F.R. "Rowland" Tomlin-
son tendered his' resignation
Friday, following the outcome
of a week-long internal investi-
gation into a claim he violated
departmental policy against
sexual harassment.

Boxers At Sebring Saturday:
A quintet of Hardee boxers will
be on the Saturday card at
Sebring. With ages varied from
8 to 19 and weights from 42 to
185 pounds, Troy Carter-trained
boxers will face the challenge
of youth from around the state
and out of state.

Football Flies Off Next
Week: In a little more than a
week, Hardee football will be
up and running at Wildcat Stad-
ium. With a new sound system,
which includes extension to the
visitor's side, games will be
heard and enjoyed more, start-
,ing with the Kicko.ff Classic
next Friday. ..

TV Football Includes Local
Twosome: Television coverage
of college football in Florida
will include colleges attended
by two 1997 Hardee High grad-
uates. Former Wildcats Daniel
Irby and Josh McKibben will be
.on the field when their teams
compete this season under the
watchful eye of Sunshine-
Network.
All sports are games of inches.
-Dick Ritger


The constellation Orion contains three of the 24 bright-
est stars in the sky. The three stars are Rigel, Betelgeuse
and Bellatrix.


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
in the top 10 in customer satisfaction in
Florida I have received Ford's highest
Sales Honor 15 years running and been a
member of Ford's 300/500 Club for 20
years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
Ft. Meade
STEDEMLS6YJ 375-2606
2:14tfc T800-226-3325



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& Landsc

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S Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-9229 0
863-781-4281
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Competitive Prices
Detail Oriented
Quality Work Guaranteed
Contractors


SSod
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Call us today for a free digital landscaping
session. See the end result instantly on our
computerized 3-D design software.


We take pride in our
t. honest & ethical
treatment of
our customers.
8:7-28c


-c:
-4,


DURASTANTI
for

Superintendent of Schools



November 4th, 2008
SPd. Fb. M, Paid fr by Davd D Du0 sartIa Campaegn aunt, Approved by David D. Durastir, Repwlian, Chet Huddleston, Campaign Tresurer





PUBLIC NOTICE


BOWLING GREEN QUALIFYING PERIOD

The City of Bowling Green opened qualify-

ing period for Commission seats on. August

18, 2008 at 8:00 a.m. and will run until

August 29, 2008 at 4;00 p.m. for the

September 30, 2008 election. Qualifying fee

is $10.00 plus $18.00 election assessment.

Candidates may qualify at the City Office,

104 East Main Street, Bowling Green,

Florida, during the above stated hours.


Pamela Northup

City Clerk 8:21nc


Hardee County Education Foundation Scholarships
Class of 2008 Deadline Approaching ,
Attention HHS Class of 2008 Graduates:
This letter is a reminder that September 1. 2008, is the deadline to apply for our Foundation's
scholarship money.
While you and your fellow class members were in elementary school, the Hardee County Education
Foundation sponsored a fundraising event that gives you an opportunity for some additional scholarship
money as you further your education after high school. This money was raised by parents, community
members, and local businesses. As the Class of 2008, you are the third group of graduating seniors who will
receive the benefits from this money.
To receive the money that was raised ard invested requires that you must have:
1. graduated from Hardee Senior High School with the Class of 2008,
2. attended thd Hardee County School System for 8 years or more. They do not have to be in
consecutive years, and
3. now be pursuing a college, trade, or technical school education after high school.
Unfortunately, if you do not meet all three of these requirements then you will not be eligible for these.
funds. After September 1, all the available money will be divided equally among the seniors who do qualify.
In an effort to process your application, complete and return the following information. You must
include your acceptance letter or other proof of acceptance, i.e. an invoice from your selected
institution verifying your eligibility.
Sincerely,
Sharon Corbett
President
Hardee County Education Foundation, Inc.

r--------------------------------------
I Scholarship Application Form
Student Name:
Home Mailing Address: _
Student Social Security Number:
Telephone Number:
Name of Post Secondary Institution:
Complete Address of Institution's Business or Financial Aid Office:

Telephone Number of Financial Aid Office: _
Return by mail to:
Debra Daggett, contact person
Hardee Education Foundation, Inc.
P.O. Box 1678
Wauchula, FL 33873
or return in person to the Hardee County School Board Office
L -------------------------------------

Al completed applications must be received on or before September 1.2008
Don't forget to include your acceptance letter or other proof of acceptance!
All requests will be processed after September 1, 2008. Funds will be disbursed only after all eligibility is
verified.
8:21c






August 21,2008, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well, Football Fans. It's that time of year again.
Football Season is upon us! Time to get out the car flags, tail-
gate items and your team apparel It is a time when every team is
undefeated and hope springs eternal.
2008 looks to bring another season of excitement to the Tampa
Bay area. Can the Tampa Bay Bucs get back to the playoffs? Home
games at the "Ray Jay" include games with Atlanta, Favre-less
Green Bay, Seattle, Carolina, Minnesota, New Orleans, the finish-
ing at home with the "West Coast Teams," the Chargers and
Raiders.
The college picture is still witnessing the University of
Florida dominate the top spot in the Sunshine State, followed by
the University of South Florida Bulls. Urban Meyer is loaded for
the foreseeable future. Many national publications have the Gators
somewhere in the top Five in 2008 and very possibly playing the
National Championship Game. It's Tebow Time in Gainesville!
The question is can the Heisman Trophy quarterback win the
SEC first, then the National Championship? Will he be a back-to-
back Heisman winner?
South Florida has emerged as the best team besides the
Gators. Since moving to the Big East, the second-best conference
in college football, USF has made a place for itself in the top 25.
The Bulls have finished the last two seasons with a 9-4 record but,
more importantly, defeated second-ranked West Virginia at home
and Auburn on the road. Jim Leavitt's squad has 10 offensive
starters returning, including QB Matt Grothe, once the Big East
Freshman Player of the Year, now a seasoned veteran. USF does
have a tough schedule with Kansas at home and West Virginia in
Morgantown in December. The Bulls are ranked in the top 25
Preseason Polls anywhere from 8th to 20th.
Some items from the "College Football FYI" department.
1) The SEC is ranked the Top Conference in every poll of
power conferences. Back-to-back National Champions make any
argument hard to win if you think another conference is better. Top
to bottom, the SEC is the strongest.
2) How long will Bobby Bowden continue at FSU? How long
with the coach-in-waiting be patient?
3) The Heisman Trophy race in 2008 should be a great one.
Tim Tebow is the defending winner but has challengers in West.
Virginia's Pat White, who needs 784 rushing yards to become the
all-time Rushing QB in history; Georgia back Knowshon Moreno;
and Missouri QB Chase Daniel. A few other names are in the mix,
but these four are the serious contenders.
4) Pre-season publications and the talking heads on television
all have Ohio State ranked first or second in the nation. Please,
"Oh gods of the football world," spare the nation's fans another
disaster of a BCS Championship game. A team from the Big 10 that
can win games over Youngstown State, Ohio University and Troy
State, and that ever-tough "Mid-American Conference with bigger
stadiums," doesn't qualify it for a shot at the National
Championship. In the SEC or Big East, Ohio State would be an 8-
4 team. Hopefully, Southern Cal will kill any chance of sending
the overrated Buckeyes back for a third disgraceful debacle on
Sept. 13 in sunny California.
The Top 10 teams in the nation for the Swami's Poll are:
1) Florida The defense must step up, but the schedule
favors the Gators. UF returns 17 starters. Tebow, Harvin and
Rainey will put up numbers. The defensive line and secondary play
will determine if UF gets back to the championship game.
2) Georgia The UF-UGA game could determine who plays
for the National Championship. UGS fans and players through the


PUBLIC NOTICE
The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the Hardee County Planning Agency will holds
PUBLIC HEARING on
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 04, 2008, 6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter in the BCC Board Room
412 West Orange St., Courthouse Annex
Room 102, Wauchula, FL
for the following requests:
Agenda No.
08-28 -
DAVIS ENTERPRISES INC. by and through the Authorized
Representative requests a Site Development Plan to locate a
150-worker farmworker housing complex on 40MOL ac, zoned A-1 In
the Agricultural Future Land Use District
On or abt Crewsville Rd,
E of Fish Branch Rd 26 35 26 0000 02520 0000
40MOL ac NW1/4 of SW1/4 S26, T35S. R26E

08-30
DONALD T. DAVIS FAMILY LTD PARTNERSHIP by and
through the Authorized Representative requests approval of a
SPECIAL EXCEPTION to construct/operate a 195' monopole
wireless communication tower, and to locate an 11'x20'x11' equip-
ment shelter on a 10,000+/-sq ft leaded area of a 159.27+/-acre parcel
zoned A-1 (Agriculture) in the Agriculture Future Land Use District
On or abt St Rd 66 10,000+/-sq ft of
East of Johnston Rd 16 35 27 0000 01010 0000oooo
10.000MOL so ft described as a portion of land lying in S16, T35S,
R27E to-wit: Com at the SW corn of 516, T35S, R27E; thence N
90deg00mln00sec E along S bdry line of said 816 a diet of 46.63 ft;
thence departing said S bdry line, N 00deg00min00sec E a dist of
153.92 ft to the POB; thence N 00deg20mln 11 sec W a diet of 100 ft;
thence N 89deg39min49sec E a dist of 100 ft; thence S
00deg20minllsec E a dist of 100 ft; thence S 89deg39mln49sec W a
dist of 100 ft of POB 816. T35S. R27E
Roger Conley, Chairman

PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a
PUBLIC HEARING on
Thursday, SEPTEMBER 25, 2008, 8:35 A.M.
or as soon thereafter
to receive a recommendation from the PlanninglZoning Board and to
receive public input for
Agenda No. 08-30
All Public Hearings to be held in BCC Board Room, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex, 412 W Orange St., Wauchula, FL


Full Circle
By C.J. Mouser


KIDDIFIED KITTEN
My daughter's cat, Rudy, came from a family with two chil-
dren, a 4-year-old and a toddler. Rudy was just a kitten and, appar-
ently, very impressionable.
I answered the classified ad about this free kitten because
Jenny, had been wanting one, and I was feeling magnanimous. The
ad read:
"Free kitten to good home. Has been spayed. Has all shots.
Must go due to family allergy."
I went and retrieved the kitten, a little gray-streaked thing with
huge eyes, and presented her to Jenny as a gift. Three days later I
was informed by Jenny that she knew she had a cat, but she had
learned little about her.
"What'd'ya mean?" I asked.
"She stays under my bed, wof't let me come near her, and
won't let me pick her up. She yowls and cries and meows until I put
her down."
"Well, give her some time. She needs to settle in."
Six weeks later nothing had changed.
When I picked the cat up, she squirmed and growled and
hissed, and was not at all the sweet cuddly kitten we had hoped for.
The words in the ad ran through my mind over and over. Had the
family been allergic to the cat, or had the cat been allergic to the
humans?
I watched the cat slink around the house, constantly watching
over her shoulder, going from under one piece of furniture to
another, and I moped; she was a faulty cat, no two ways about it.
Rudy had shed her kitten look by now and was long and slinky,
and even better at being evasive than she was wheft she first came
to us. She seemed content enough; would stretch but in a patch of
sunshine on the floor and play. She romped around the house chas-
ing her. tail or played with Frog; the mutt, for hours on end. She



Dawgs were the top team at the end of last season. It returns 17
starters, including QB Matt Stafford and running back Moreno.
The "Cocktail Party" in Jacksonville could be for all the marbles.
3) West Virginia Pat White, Noel Devine and the best
offensive line in college football make WVU a title contender
again. WVU is at a point where it doesn't rebuild anymore; it
reloads. The coaching staff assembled by Bill Stewart is the best in
WVU history. Auburn early and USF and Pitt at the end are keys to
another title run.
4) Auburn A Thursday night date on ESPN with West
Virginia in Morgantown tells all for Auburn's National Title run.
This team has all five O-linemen returning, along with the top three
running backs. The line-backing corps could be the best in the
SEC.
5) Texas New defensive schemes could help take back the
Big 12 title.
6) South Florida 10 offensive starters and George Selvie
on defense again nuff said.
7) Oklahoma Solid team, but can't win a bowl game. The
last two times the Sooners faced West Virginia, they have been
blown out both times.
8) Missouri Chase Daniel to Maclin will be fun to watch.
The Heisman QB candidate will put up numbers and the Tigers are
fun to watch.
9) Clemson Solid backs should bring an ACC title finally.
It's time for the Tigers to take an ACC title; 16 starters' return for
Clemson. The ACC has never won a BCS game against any team
not now in the ACC.
10) Texas Tecrh- Points and Points and just maybe a good
enough defense make the Red Raiders fun to watch.


I


Certified Music Teacher
BS Music Ed Vocal Strings Instrumental
MM Dana School of Music
MS School Counseling
33 Years Private Studio Lessons
25 Years Public Music Teacher/
5 Years School Counselor
20 Years Church Organist/Choir Director
Students Won University Competitions
Seth Riggs Voice Method
Studied with Teachers From:
v Boston Conservatory
v Jilliard School of Music
Paris Conservatory
Eastman School of Music
v Boston University
Registration All 'Ages 5 N---
L i n d a C li^^ ^s ell^ ^ ^ ^Klo n d e 64^
^^^^^^ all 773-4480M^n^^^^^^^^^


PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE HARDEE COUNTY CANVASSING BOARD
AND CANVASSING OF THE ABSENTEE AND PROVISIONAL BALLOTS
FOR THE AUGUST 26, 2008 PRIMARY ELECTION
Sealed absentee ballots received prior to Thursday August 21, 2008 for the Primary Election will be available for inspec-
tion from 2:00 R M. until 4:00 RM. on Thursday August 21, 2008, at the Supervisor of Elections, 311 N. 6th Ave.,
Wauchula, Florida. The canvassing board will meet at 4:00 RM. on August 21, those ballots will be opened and
processed through the tabulator. Tabulation results will not be released until after 7:00 PM. August 26, 2008.
On Election Day, August 26, 2008 the remaining sealed absentee ballots will be available for public inspection from 3:00
RM. until 5:00 RM. immediately afterwards, those ballots will be opened and processed through the tabulator. Tabulation
results will not be released until after 7:00 RM. on August 26, 2008. Any late arriving sealed absentee votes will be
processed before 7:00 RM.
The canvassing board will remain in session on August 26, 2008 to canvass any provisional ballots that are voted on
Election Day and until the results of the election are obtained.
The canvassing board wilt meet at 5:00 RM. Thursday August 28, 2008 to approve the unofficial results.
The board might need to convene after August 28, 2008. If so, the time and date will be posted at the office of the
Supervisor of Elections and announced at the conclusion of the August 28th meeting.
All meetings will be held in the Supervisor's of Elections office at 311 N. 6th Ave. Wauchula, FL.
In accordance with the Sunshine Law of Florida, these meetings will be open to the public.

NOTE: Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, states that if a person decides to appeal any decision by a board, agency, or
commission with respect to any matter considered at a meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim rerecord of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Jeffery Ussery
Supervisor of Elections

PROVISIONALES REUNIONES PUBLICAS DE LA TABLA
DE CONDADO DE HARDEE SOLICITACION DE VOTOS
Y SOLICITACION DE VOTOS DEL AUSENTE Y VOTACIONES
PROVISIONAL PARA EL 26 DE AGOSTO 2008
ELECTION PRIMARIA
Las votaciones selladas del ausente recibidas antes de mi6rcoles el 21 de agosto de 2008 para la Elecci6n Primaria
estarA disponible para la inspecci6n de 2:00 DE LA TARDE. hasta 4:00 DE LA TARDE el jueves el 21 de agosto de 2008,
en el Supervisor de Elecciones, 311 N. Avda sexta., Wauchula, la Florida. La tabla de solicitaci6n de votos reunir, en
4:00 DE LA TARDE en agosto 21, esas votaciones se abrirAn y serAn procesadas por la tabuladora. Los resultados de
la tabulaci6n no se liberaran hasta que despu6s de 7:00 DE LA TARDE. El 26 de agosto de 2008. En el Dia de la Elecci6n,
el 26 de agosto de 2008 las votaciones selladas restantes de ausente estaran disponibles para la inspecci6n piblica de
3:00 DE LA TARDE hasta que 5:00 DE LA TARDE inmediato despu6s, esas votaciones se abrirdn e inmediatamentedn
procesadas por la tabuladora. Los resultados de la tabulaci6n no se liberarAn hasta que despu6s de 7:00 DE LA TARDE
en el 26 de agosto de 2008. Cualquiera Ilegar tarde los votos sellados de ausente se procesarAn antes 7:00 DE LA
TARDE. La tabla de solicitaci6n de votos permanecerA en la sesi6n en el 26 de agosto de 2008 a lonas alguna votaci6n
provisional que se votan en el Dia de la Elecci6n y hasta que los resultados de la elecci6n se obtengan. La tabla de solic-
itaci6n de votos reunird en 5:00 DE LA TARDE. El jueves el 28 de agosto de 2008 para aprobar los resultados no of-
ciales. La tabla quizas necesite convocar despues el 28 de agosto de 2008. Si 6se es el caso, el tiempo y la fecha se
anunciaran en la oficina del Supervisor de Elecciones y anunciados en la conclusion del reunir de 28 de agosto. Todas
reuniones se tendrAn en el Supervisor es de la oficina de Elecciones en 311 N. Avda sexta. Wauchula, Florida. De acuer-
do con la Ley de Sol de la Florida, estas reuniones estaran abiertas al piblico. La NOTA: la Secci6n 286.0105, los
Estatutos de la Florida, los estados que si una persona decide apelar cualquier decision por una tabla, por la agencia,
o por la comisi6n con respect a cualquier cuesti6n considerada en una reuni6n u oir, 61 o ella necesitarAn un registro
del procede, y eso, para tal prop6sito, 61 o ella pueden necesitar asegurar que un regrabe al pie de la letra del procede
es hecho, que registra incluye el testimonio y la evidencia sobreCuAl la apelaci6n se deber6 ser basada.

Jeffery Ussery
El Supervisor de Elecciones 8:21c


Dale Johnson, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing to
make special arrangements should contact the Planning/Development
Department at least two (2) working days prior to the P/Z public
hearing. This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the County
Manager's office at least two (2) working days prior to the BCC public
hearing. This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents
relating to thebe proposals are available for public Inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the
Planning/Development Department, 110 S. 9" Ave., Wauchula, Florida.
All Interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering any
decision the Boards shall rely solely on testimony that is relevant and
material. Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded,
anyone wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will
need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a
court reporter. 08:21,28c


seemed to love that dog, and even slept with him, but if I went to
try to pet her, she Would spring away, tossing a dirty look over her
shoulder.
What did Frog have that I didn't have? He stunk, and licked his.
own butt. He would eat any dead thing he found in the yard. Or roll
in it. He would eat all her food if we didn't watch him. Nasty, dirty,
bad breath. He was the anti-cat.
I got to wondering what Frog had that we didn't have, and
came to the conclusion that it was not what he had, but what he did-
n't have:
Hands.
I was whisked back to a time when I had a 4-year-old and a
toddler in the house. I remember saying, "No! Don't pick the kitty
up by her tail!" and "No! Don't hold the kitty upside down!" and
"The kitty does not want to wear your baby-doll clothes, honey!"
I thought of the ad again, and I suspected that had it been more
truthful, it would have read:
"Traumatized kitten free to a good home. Has been picked up
by her head. Has been dragged by her tail. Has been dressed in doll
clothes. Must go, for her own good."
I offered Jenny the following advice:
"You ever want that cat to love you, don't chase after her and
don't pet her. Whatever you do, don't pick her up at any time for
any reason."
"Huh?"
"Just don't crowd her, let her alone."
"Well, that's not much fun," Jenny complained. "What good is
it to have a pet that you can't pet?"
"You have a fish, do you pet him? Look, just trust me on this,
OK?"
After about three months, the most miraculous thing hap-
pened: I was lying in bed about 2 a.m. when I felt small paws walk-
ing across my stomach. Frog, who was lying beside me, lifted his
head, sighed noisily, and went back to sleep.
Rudy curled herself into a ball on my chest, purring. I lifted
my hand cautiously to pet her, and she rubbed her face against my
hand and I knew that she had found her peace.







6C The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008





During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Aug. 17, criminal mischief on Cecil Durrance Road and thefts
on Fourth Street West, Whooping Crane Road and U.S. 17 North
were reported.

Aug. 16, John William Amditis, 42, of 2464 Second Place,
Vero Beach, was arrested by Dep. Manuel Zuniga and charged with
vehicle theft, aggravated fleeing to elude and no valid license.
Aug. 16, a residential burglary on Sandpiper Drive, vehicles
stolen on Bostick Road and U.S. 17 North, a fight on Sally Place,
criminal mischief on Morning Glory Loop and Lily Church Road
and a theft on Moffitt Road were reported.

Aug. 15, Mark Webster Fairfield, 50, of 4256 Clifton Bryan
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task
Force (DTF) and charged with possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Aug. 15, Luis Miguel Cruz, 21, of 1752 Cactus Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Nathan Woody on two counts of con-
tempt of court.
Aug. 15, Rusty Allen Pelham, 18, of 1799 Popash Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep! Paul Johnson and charged with DUI.
Aug4 15, a residential burglary on SR 62 and a theft on Heard
Bridge Road were reported.

Aug. 14, Kimberly A. Rodriguez, 27, of 1748 Griffin Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison and charged with
battery.-
Aug. 14, a theft on Diana Street was reported.

Aug. 13, Russell Eugene Nolan, 27, of 1730 Myrtle Ave.,
Sebring, was arrested by Sgt. Eric Thompson and charged with bat-
tery, burglary with assault or battery, aggravated stalking and kid-
napping false imprisonment of an adult.
Aug. 13, Rufugia Rosales, 39, and Raul Trevino, 43, both of
930 Fernleaft Drive, Wauchula, and Carolina Maldonado, 18, of
4405 Dixiana Dr., Bowling Green, were arrested by DTF and each
charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. Rosales and Mal-
donado were each charged with possession of a controlled sub-
stance without a prescription. Maldonado was additionally charged
with possession of a weapon or ammo by a convicted felon.
Trevino was charged with possession of marijuana and trafficking
in methamphetamine/amphetamine.
Aug. 13, a vehicle stolen on Makowski Road, and thefts in two
locations on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Aug. 12, Daniel Cruz Reyes, 21, General Delivery, Wimauma,
was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Steven McKinney and
charged with DUI, two counts DUI with property damage, hit and
run leaving the scene of a crash involving damages, and two
other traffic charges.
Aug. 12, a residential burglary on West Broward St., burglary
of a conveyance on Metheny Road and a theft on Alton Carlton
Road were reported.

Aug. 11, vehicles stolen on Hudson Street and Sparrow Road,
and thefts on Carlton Street and U.S. 17 North were reported.

WAUCHULA
Aug. 17, Ernest Frank Thomas, 40, of 906 N. Ninth Ave., West
Palm Beach, was arrested by Cpl. Paul Bohanan on a charge of
contempt of court.
Aug.. 17, a theft on North NinthAvenue was reported.

Aug. 16, Jesse Mercer Carley, 52, of 408 E. Oak St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and chargedwith aggra-
vated battery causing bodily harm.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that MTAG CUST FOR
ABBOT KINNEY MANAGEMENT, LLC, the holder of
the following certificate has filed said certificate for a
tax deed to be Issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of Issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 131 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2006

Description of Property:

Lot#15, Branch Park Mobile Home Park
Estates, 1st Add, Bowling Green, Hardee Co.
Fla. as per plat Book 3, pag 47.

AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
677, PAGE 731.

ALSO DESCRIBED AS:

Lot 15, BRANCH PARK MOBILE HOME
ESTATES FIRST ADDITION, Hardee County,
Florida, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 3, Page 47, Public Records of Hardee
County, Florida.

AND
LOT 15
BRANCH PARK MH ESTATES 1ST ADD
AD481P371 622P1165 SBR-661P322
671P1108 677P731

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.


Aug. 16, a robbery on U.S. 17 North was reported.

Aug. 15, Ronnie Lee Boyd, 47, of 409 N. Ninth Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with battery
and violation of a city ordinance.
Aug. 15, a residential burglary on East Main Street and a fight
on West Oak Street were reported.

Aug. 14, Kongphet Keokeutla, 26, of 2510-34th Avenue
North, St. Petersburg, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and
charged with felony battery.

Aug. 12, criminal mischief on East Townsend Street was
reported.

Aug. 11, Carlos Alvarez, 22, of 238 Griffin Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and,charged with burglary of
a dwelling, criminal mischief damage to property and larceny.
Aug. 11, vehicles on U.S. 17 and South 10th Avenue were;
reported stolen.

BOWLING GREEN
Aug. 17, burglary of a conveyance on Chester Avenue was
reported.

Aug. 11, a theft on West Jones Street was reported.


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
license was issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Shawn Allen Norwood, 33,
Wauchula, and Susan Jane
Eells, 41, Wauchula.

There was no county small
claims, misdemeanor or crim-
inal traffic court last week as
it was trial week.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
James L. Tate vs. Walter A.
McNeil and the state Depart-
ment of Corrections, Hardee
Correctional Institution Warden
T.H. Cannon, Capt. D. McCar-
ter and Ofc. R. Soonier, petition
on violation of inmate civil
rights.
Jennifer Riley Medrano and
the state Department of Reve-
nue (DOR) vs. Juan Jose Gaona
Jr., petition for child support.
State Farm Insurance Co.
a/s/o Wauchula Abstract vs.
Harrison Construction and
Roger Harrison, damages -
negligence.
SFJV 2005 LLC vs. Fran-
cisco Coronado and April Coro-
nado, petition to foreclose
mortgage.
Pamela McQuaig vs. Steve
McQuaig, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Frank von Stauffenberg and
Waltraud von Stauffenberg,
divorce.
Aurora Loan Services LLC
vs. Rafael A. Sanchez et al,
petition to foreclose mortgage.
Harriette R. Powell and DOR
vs. Karissa Lashawn Rivers,
petition for child support.
Suncoast Schools Federal


Credit Union vs. Mabel L.
Cranford, petition to enforce
payment of indebtedness.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Denise Everett vs. Adnaud
Louis, modification of child
support.
Stacy Gough and William
Maxcy Gough, termination of
child support.
Tasha Dunbar vs. Joshua
Moan, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Pamela McQuaig vs. Steve
McQuaig, dismissal of tempo-
rary injunction for protection.
Marlene Lujano vs. Roxie
Mae Baxter, dismissed.
Lori Jean Gagnon and DOR
vs. Elias R. Torres, voluntary
dismissal.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as it was
trial week.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Alberto Garcia-Jimenez and
Maria Martinez to Osvaldo
Moron, $65,000.
Nelson Steve Adams and
Marilyn 'Sahtiagbo'Lorino to
William Royce Tyson,
$635,000.
Pierre Morel to Oscar
Zamora, $75,000.
Fannie Mae Federal National
Mortgage Association to Jimmy
D. and Gayle D. Morse and
Barbara J. Fromholz, $123,000.
George W. Pierce Jr., George
M. Pierce, Timmy Joe Farmer
and Melissa Farmer to Bison
Properties, $40,000.


All-Natural Methods For

Avoiding Biting Bugs


Millions of Americans would
spend a lot more time in the
great outdoors if not for all the
biting and stinging pests that
Nature put there. Fortunately,
it's now possible to keep bugs
from ruining your outdoor fun-
without resorting to harsh
chemicals. I
A new line of insect repel-
lents harnesses Nature's own
defense against bugs-essential
oils-for a nontoxic, botanical
product that is safe for use on
children of all ages, and works
as well as DEET and synthetic
chemicals.
These formulations target
specific neural pathways in
insects that regulate movement,
behavior and metabolism. And
because these neural pathways
do not exist in mammals, the
formulations are safe to use
around children, animals, birds
and fish.
Unlike conventional formu-
las, EcoSMART's patented
technology uses 100 percent
food-grade ingredients to keep
mosquitoes, gnats and more
away for hours. It has a fresh,
natural scent, is non-oily and
dries quickly.
"We recommend that parents
choose an insect repellent that
is as nontoxic as possible, as
well as protecting children by
reducing the amount of exposed
skin that must be treated with
repellent," says Christopher
Gavigan, CEO and executive
director of the nonprofit organi-
zation Healthy Child Healthy
World, which offers credible
information and expertise to


help create healthy environ-
ments for families and children.,
"DEET is known to have,
adverse health effects when
overused, especially on chil-
dren."
Parents can -find additional
tips to keep mosquitoes from
biting at www.healthychild.org,
including:
Remove sources of stand-
ing water, such as old tires,
birdbaths and planters.
Use goldfish or freshwater
minnows to control larvae in
ornamental pools.
Plant scented geraniums,
lemon thyme, marigold, tansy,
citrosa plants, sweet basil, rose-
mary and/or sassafras near your
home.
Use screens on windows
and doors, and keep them in
good condition.
Turn on the air conditioner
in place of opening windows
and doors.
Stay inside at dusk and
early morning when mosquitoes
are most active.
Do not use scented prod,
ucts, which attract mosquitoes.
Wear lightweight, long
sleeves and pants.
EcoSMART's botanical pesti-
cide products can be found at
select Wal-Mart, Albertsons,-
Safeway, Save-A-Lot, and
Ralphs' stores, and other major
retailers. To learn more, visit
www.ecosmart.com.
Using all-natural insect repel-
lents is one way parents can
protect their children against
insect bites, without using
chemicals.


Believe me! Thesecret of reaping the greatest enjoyment from
life is to live dangerously!
-Friedrich Nietzsche.



SAGGColonRESE REPA
AGGRESIVE REPRESENT ION


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ILENE KLASFELD
AND JON KLASFELD CO-TRUSTEES OF THE ILENE
KLASFEILD TRUST DATED 5-14-96, the holder of the
following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:
CERTIFICATE NO.: 483 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005
Description of Property:
Lots 13 and 14 of Block "A" of Suburban Acres
Replat, a replat of Suburban Acres as record-
ed In Plat Book 4, page 22, being recorded in
Plat Book 4, page 54, Hardee County, Florida.
AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
657, PAGE 139.
ALSO DESCRIBED AS:
LOTS 13 & 14 BLK A
SUBURBAN ACRES
278P246 298P260 DC 358P64 PRO-
89 074 504P533 504P769 507P623
657P139
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.
Name in which assessed: MARY CHERY
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 24 day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 13t day of August, 2008.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD012XXXX 8:21-9:11c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that MTAG CUST FOR
ABBOT KINNEY MANAGEMENT, LLC, the holder of
the following certificate has filed said certificate for a
tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 625 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2006

Description of Property:

Lot 6 and West half of Lot 5 of Block 5 of the
Roberts and Skipper Resubdivision of the
Roberts and Skipper Addition to the Town of
Zolfo Springs Florida.

AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
150, PAGE 367.

ALSO DESCRIBED AS:
LOT 6 & W1/2 OF LOT 5 BLK 5 R & S RE-SUB
OF R & S ADD LOCATED IN 26-34S-25E
150P367 524P122 (NC) NC-565P26

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.

Name in which assessed: NORMAN C. PLACE.

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
locdatd at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 3"day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 25h day of July, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No 1
By: Allcia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD005XXXX 7:31-8:21c


Name in which assessed: MILAGROS C. JOHNSON
AND LOUIS M. JOHNSON

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 3"'day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 18" day of July, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albrltton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD004XXXX 7:31-8:21c


courthuse Rport-







August 21, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7C


In Business
By Savannah Faircloth


GRAND OPENING It's a week before your party and all
you have is a few balloons and a pifiata. At this rate, you'll never
be able to pull off that perfect party you were dreaming of!
Grand Rental Station, 2677 U.S. 17 N., has the perfect prod-
ucts and people to help make your special day everything you
hoped for.
The new business officially opened July 11, under the owner-
ship of Lavon and Linda Cobb. Their son, Clay Cobb, is the gen-
eral manager of the store and Abel Hernandez is the store manag-
er.
Since opening, Grand Rental Station has become the hot spot
to find all your household and outdoor needs.
"We are doing very well. Each day that people realize we are
open we get more and more business," says wedding/party coordi-
nator Megan Mitchell.


PHOTO BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Party and wedding coordinator, Megan Mitchell, is confi-
dent that Grand Rental Station has all the party and out-
door supplies you need.
Put down those do-it-yourself party planners and give Grand
Rental Station a call for the best guidance on how to make your
special event a day worth remembering.
Supplies available for rent include bounce houses and dunk
tanks, cotton candy, popcorn and Sno-Cone machines, wedding
arches, fountains, candelabras, party supplies, food serving items,
dishes, punch bowls, table linens, tents, table and chairs.
Not only does the Grand Rental Station staff help plan your
event, they also set up and take down the decorations and supplies
after your party or wedding is over.
Time is not an issue for the party planners of Grand Rental
Station. Whether it is months before your event or a week before,


LOW COST PET VACCINATIONS


FOR DOGS & CATS
Available
SATURDAY, AUGUST 23
at
ac r Supply '
1101 Hwy 17 South Wauchula, FL
863-773-3456
4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Major Credit Cards Accepted
S Save on Heartworm Prevention
and
lea Protection Products
B\ES For more information call
S100 1-888-673-8838
or visit our web site
www.888petvet.com
8" ic


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that MTAG CUST FOR
AMBERST ASSET MANAGEMENT, LLC, the holder of
the following certificate has filed said certificate for a
tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 92 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2006

Description of Property:

West 1/2 of the South 30 feet of Lot 19 and the
West 1/2 of Lot 20, of Block 32 of the Original
Survey of the Town of Bowling Green, Florida.

ALSO DESCRIBED AS:
W1/2 OF S 30 FT LOT 19 & W1/2 OF LOT 20
BLK 32 BOWLING GREEN RR SURVEY 04
33S 25E 135P94 265P385

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.

Name in which assessed: HEIRS OF CLARA G. FLO-
RES AND ASENCION ROSAS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 3"day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 25" day of July, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD003XXXX 7:31-8:21c


I


Protecting Your Pet:

Tips To Prevent Dog Loss


Mitchell guarantees that they can make it happen. She has had to
plan and put together, a wedding in only five days!
"As long as we have the items available, we can rent it out.
Time is not an issue," says Mitchell.
In addition to the party/wedding supplies, Grand Rental
Station also features everyday household and outdoor items.
In the home maintenance department you can find carpet
cleaners, floor care, mowers/trimmers, pressure washers, power
tools, barbecue grills, packing/shipping supplies, ladders, cribs and
roll-away beds.
Outdoor supplies available are aerial lifts, concrete saws, com-
pactors, earth movers, jackhammers, mixers, pumps, trenchers and
tractors. If a tool or piece of equipment is not on site, it an easily
be ordered within a day.
To set up an appointment with Mitchell or to find out more on
Grand Rental Station, call 773-0807 or 781-1093. Hours are
Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m.
to noon.


TANNING TAKEOVER As summer slips away, so can
your tan. At Cow Town Tanning you can kiss tan lines goodbye and
say hello to that beautiful bronze tan!
Cow Town Tanning, 111 W. Main St, is now under new own-
ership. Previous owner Amber Schnable handed her business over
to Stephanie Benton and daughter Courtney Peterson last Friday.
Benton, who has worked at The Hair Boutique for 12 years, is
excited about the opportunity to take over the business and teach
her 16-year-old daughter the ropes.
"Amber was ready to take other paths in her life, and with us
being right next door we thought it would be the best thing for us
to do," says Benton.
Courtney will be heavily involved in the overall business
details and decisions of the business and looks forward to learning
new things from this opportunity. "I'm very excited about being a
co-owner of the business and I think it will teach me how to man-
age money," she says.


STanning

Cow Town
S111 W. Main St. I

773-3813




TAN N IN'





Stephanie Benton and Courtney Peterson recently took
over Cow Town Tanning and will be running it together as
mother and daughter.
The tanning salon will continue to have four beds, ranging
from extreme bulbs to bronzing bulbs. Prices will also remain the
same, as will the hours, Mondays to Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 8
p.m.; Fridays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 1
p.m.
Benton wants to remind the public to keep an eye open for fre-
quent specials and new jewelry and handbags for sale.
For movie information, call Cow Town Tanning at 773-0497.

NEW DIRECTOR Hardee Manor Healthcare Center wel-
comed its pew marketing and admissions director, Gilly Knight,
this past month.
Knight, who has been a nurse since 2001, will be in charge of
marketing the facility, meeting with potential residents and their
families, and overseeing the entire admissions process.
She is excited about the opportunities her new job will give
her, and looks forward to being able to communicate with the res-
idents."I am excited to get the opportunity to talk to some of the
residents and their families and hear their life stories," says Knight.
While Knight adjusts to her new surroundings, she will also be
writing a column once a month in The Herald-Advocate. Her col-
umn, which will be called "Manor Memories," will feature stories
from residents, staff and their families.
For more information on Hardee Manor, call 773-3231.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Savannah Faircloth at 773-3255 with your business news.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ILENE KLASFELD
AND JON KLASFELD CO-TRUSTEES OF THE ILENE
KLASFEILD TRUST DATED 5-14-96, the holder of the
following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property,
and the names In which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 562 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005

Description of Property:

Lots 15 and 16, Block 14, Magnolia Manor, a
sub-division located in Section 15, Township
34 South, Range 25 East, according to the
plats recorded in the public records of Hardee
County, Florida

AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
285, PAGE 424.

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.

Name in which assessed: TOM LONG, JR.

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE

For the week ended Aug. 14, 2008:

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 9,076, com-
pared to 7,854 last week, and 10,257 a year ago. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to last week: Slaughter cows and bulls were steady, feeder steers
and heifers were steady to 1.00 higher.


Feeder Steers:


Feeder Heife:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 120.00-175.00;
300-400 lbs., 103.00-149.00; and
400-500 lbs., 94.00-118.00.


rs: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 100.00-140.00;
300-400 lbs., 90.00-115.00; and
04 "400-500 lbs., 84.00-104.00.


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 51.00-
56.00.

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 lbs., 67.00-
74.00.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDING
LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 508 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005

Description of Property:

Lot 5 of Harlem Heights, a subdivision located
in Section 10, Township 34 South, Range 25
East, according to the plat recorded in Plat
Book 3, Page 18, public records of Hardee
County, Fla.

AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
57, PAGE 296.

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.

Name in which assessed: HEIRS OF GRADY
COLLINS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 17" day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 5th day of August, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD008XXXX 8:14-9:4c


of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 10" day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 31" day of July, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD007XXXX 8:7-28c
0. /-2OC


There are approximately 74.8
million family dogs in the U.S.
(APPMA, 2007-2008 National
Pet Owners Survey) and the
reality is that most are comfort-
able roaming a territory far
more expansive than the aver-
age home or backyard.
UnfortunAtely, this natural
inclination to explore can Often
result in a dog being separated
from his family. In fact, the
National Council on Pet Pop-
ulation Study and Policy found
family pets are lost nearly every
two seconds, resulting in more
.than 10 million missing pets
each year.
Concerned owners can follow
three simple tips to help ensure
their dog stays safely at home
and maximize the chance to
find him quickly, should he
escape.
Loss prevention starts at
home. All too often, doors,
windows and gates are acciden-
tally left open and dogs escape.
Dog owners must ensure that all
escape routes are secured.
Fit external doors with self-
closing mechanisms (such as
storm doors and gates) and
examine fences for gaps or
holes.
Dog tags and chips. Dog
tags and implanted microchips
are valuable methods that help
identify a lost dog once they're
found. In order to work, you'll
have to keep the information
up-to-date, including your most
recent phone number.


While these are important
tools, they are passive and
depend on others to find and
return your lost pet.
Doggy GPS is affordable
and well worth it. Technology
can play a powerful role in
retrieving your lost pet.
Originally developed for the
military, powerful GPS tracking
has recently been redesigned
for monitoring pets and is avail-
able nationwide at places like
PetSmart and Circuit City.
Zoombak (www.zoombak.com)'
makes a small and affordable
lightweight GPS locator that
comfortably attaches to your
dog's collar and uses satellite
GPS and mobile phone net-
works to keep track of your pet
24/7.
An interactive Web site
allows owners to easily set up
"safe zones" such as your
"backyard" or "park," and if the
pet leaves the zone you'll
receive an e-mail or text mes-
sage alert on your cell phone,
giving'you the dog's location so
you can quickly find him.
If you have a four-legged
escape artist, GPS is definitely a
worthwhile investment to help
provide peace of mind.
Dog owners must be vigilant
in the fight against dog loss.
Following three simple tips-
minimize opportunities for es-
cape, keep identity tags current,
and monitor your pet's location-
will help ensure you and your
pet enjoy a long life together.








8C The Herald-Advocate, August 21, 2008

Making Sure Cell Phones


Work In An
According to a recent survey,
83 percent of cell phone owners
cite "use in an emergency" as
the top reason they have a cell
phone. Meanwhile, 66 percent
list "personal safety" as a pri-
mary reason for having one.
Yet these responses aren't just
the result of consumers being
overly cautious: the survey also
found that 74 percent of cell
phone owners actually have
used their phone in an emer-
gency situation.
Of those who have done so,
85 percent have used their
phone when they've had car
trouble or to call in an accident,
44 percent during a power out-
age and 11 percent for natural
disasters.
Whatever the reason for the
call, however, a cell phone is
only useful when and where
there's a signal-preferably a
strong one. Yet in many areas,
especially inside a building or
vehicle, a signal may be un-
available or too weak to hold a
call; that's where a signal boost-
er comes in.
Wi-Ex, developer of the
zBoost line of cell phone signal
boosters, offers an array of
products that help amplify cell
signals wherever users are. In
addition, to further focus on the
need for personal and public
safety, the company has


Emergency
launched a safety division.
"Our survey reveals just how
important personal safety and
emergencies are when it comes
to consumers and their cell
phones," says Lloyd R. Meese,
president and CEO of Wi-Ex.
"The safety technology plat-
form will make it easy for us to
partner with others who are pro-
viding safety products that rely
on a strong cell phone signal."
The first product released by
the company's safety division is
the zBoost Disaster Relief
Signal Booster, which can be
used to provide an enhanced
cell phone signal in disaster
areas.
The division will also feature
products focused on other pub-
lic safety areas including secu-
rity and emergency vehicles,
law enforcement vehicles and
health care facilities. The pri-
vate safety products will focus
on providing enhanced cell
phone signal for campuses and
public parking decks.
Like all Wi-Ex products,
these new boosters improve
indoor cell phone signals
through the creation of cell
zones. They are easy to install,
affordable and increase in-
building coverage by up to
2,500 square feet.
To learn more, visit www.wi-
ex.com.


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Photos!
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kSpring Jamb orLe


*Little League Baseball
S l Football Action








PFair Photos
*Junior High Voeyball








Check Out
www.hardeepx.com








"Photos... Memories You Can See"
*BAlex Gilliad And Ralph Harrison
*Spring JamUorele
*Little League Baseball








NOTICE Footba APPLICATIONtion
FOR TAX DEEDPhotos









NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDING
uniLLC, the holder of the following certificate has filedeyball
Check Out







said certificate for a tax deepxd to be issued thereon.







The certificate number and year of Issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
"Photowas assessed are as follows: You Can See








CERTIFICATE NO.: 382 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005
Description of Property:os By:
Lot 16 of Block 12, Schenck and Anderson-'s









Subdivision to Wauchula, Florida
AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK







271, PAGE 151.
ALSO DESCRIBED AS:

LOT 16 BLK 12
SCHENK & ANDERSON RE SUB
271 P15 DC (EAM) 666P853
NOTISUBJECT TO REBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDINGTS,
LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be Issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of Issuance, the
















RECORD.
description of the property, and the names n which A.
was assessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO.: 382 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005















MAKOWSKI
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
Description of Property described in such crtficate shall
be sold to the highest biddrchenck and Anderson's door
Sublocated at 417ivision to WMainStreet, Wauchula, FloridL 33873










on the 24'h day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.
DatS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
SCHENK & ANDERSON RE SUB
271 P15 DC (EAM) 666P853







SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.
Name In which assessed: HEIRS OF EDMUND A.
MAKOWSKI
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State




Hardee county, Florida
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 24th day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated thip 12t day of August, 2008.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD011XXXX 8:21-9:11c


.-A Da O
THURSDAY
God is so great that we can-
not begin to know Him. No
one can begin to understand
eternity.
Job 36.26 (TLB)

FRIDAY
Do not store up for your-
selves treasures on earth,
where it grows rusty and
moth-eaten and thieves
break in to steal it, but store
up treasure in Heaven . .
For where your treasure is,
there will your heart be also.
Matthew 6:19-21 (NEB)

SATURDAY
Pray to the Lord for the city
where you are living, be-
cause if good things happen
in the city, good things will
happen to you also.
Jeremiah 29:7b (NCV)

SUNDAY
The man who really believes
in the Son of God will find
God's testimony in his own
heart. The man who will not
believe God is making Him
out to be a liar, because he
is deliberately refusing to
accept the testimony ... that
God has given men eternal
life and this real life can only
be found in His Son.
I John 4:10a-11 (PME)

MONDAY
And the Levites led the wor-
ship, "Stand up and praise
the Lord your God, Who is
from everlasting to everlast-
ing. Blessed be Your glori-
ous name, and may it be
exalted above all blessing
and praise. You alone are
the Lord, You made heav-
ens, even the highest heav-
en and all their starry host,
the earth and all that is in it,
the seas and all that is in
them. You give life to every-
thing and the multitudes of
heaven worship You."
Nehemiah 9:5-6 (NIV)

TUESDAY
Jesus said, "Woe to you that
are rich, for You have had all
your comforts . Woe to
you that laugh now, for you
shall mourn and weep . .
And as you wish that men
would do to you, do so to
Sthem... Be merciful, even as
your Father in heaven is
merciful.
Luke 6.2,4,5b,31,36 (RSV)

WEDNESDAY
God made sky and soil, sea
Sand all the fish in it. He al-
ways does what He says...
He defends the wronged, He
feeds the hungry . God
loves good people, protects
strangers, takes the side of
orphans and widows, but
makes short work of the
wicked.
Psalm 146:6,7,9 (ME)


Florida Fish &Wildlife Conservation Commission
2008-09 Hunting Season Dates
(Seasons and dates are not applicable to Wildlife Management Areas)


Season
Archery
Deer-Dog Training
Crossbow
Muzzleloading Gun

General Gun

Antlerless Deer
Fall Turkey*

Quail / Gray Squirrel
Bobcat / Otter
Spring Turkey**


Northwest Zone
Oct. 18 Nov. 16
Oct. 25 Nov. 13
Dec. 1-7
Nov. 21-23
Feb. 19 March 1
Nov. 27-30
Dec. 13 Feb. 18
Dec. 20-26
Nov. 27-30
Dec. 13 Jan. 18
Nov. 8 March 1
Dec. 1 March 1
March 21 April 26


Central Zone
Sept. 20 Oct. 19
Oct. 4-23
Oct. 20-24
Oct. 25 Nov. 2

Nov. 8 Jan. 18

Nov. 15-21
Nov. 8 Jan. 4

Nov. 8 March 1
Dec. 1 March 1
March 21 April 26


South Zone
Sept. 6 Oct. 5
Oct. 4-23
Oct. 6-10
Oct. 11-19

Oct. 25 Jan. 4

Nov. 1-7
Nov. 8 Jan. 4

Nov. 8 March 1
Dec. 1 March 1
March 7 April 12


Wild hogs, rabbits, raccoons, opossums, skunks, nutrias, beavers and coyotes
may be taken year-round.
* No fall harvest of turkeys allowed in Holmes County.
** Spring turkey season is limited to March 21 April 5 in Holmes County.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ILENE KLASFELD
AND JON KLASFELD CO-TRUSTEES OF THE ILENE
KLASFEILD TRUST DATED 5-14-96, the holder of the
following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of Issuance, the description of the property,
and the names In which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 88 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005

Description of Property:

Lots 15 to 16, Block 14, Bowling Green RR
Survey, Section 4, Township 33 South, Range
25 East, Hardee County, Florida

AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
661, PAGE 782.

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.

Name in which assessed: LINDA SUE GIBSON

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described In such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 10t day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 1" day of August, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD009XXXX 8:7-28c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that JOLENE FUNDING
LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and the names in which it
was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 459 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2005

Description of Property:

Lot 15 of Block "A" of KNOLLWOOD SUBDIVI-
SION, as per the plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 3, page 32, public records of Hardee
County, Florida.

AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK
666, PAGE 1481.

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF
RECORD.

Name in which assessed: JAMES H. WEBB, JR.

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door
located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873
on the 17 day of September, 2008, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 7' day of August, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No. 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton
Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252008TD010XXXXX :14-9:4




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