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Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00233
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula, Fla
Publication Date: July 17, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00233
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
        Page B 11
        Page B 12
    Section C
        Page C 1
        Page C 2
        Page C 3
        Page C 4
        Page C 5
        Page C 6
        Page C 7
        Page C 8
Full Text




Wauchula Constructs

Building Department

;.." ,. . .


The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


108th Year, No. 32
3 Sections, 28 Pages


I pIL1.~46 0 U


Thursday, July 17, 2008


Family Sues Sheriff's Office In Death


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The family of a man who
committed suicide in 2006
claim it was the negligence of
the Hardee County Sheriffs
Office that caused him to do so.
Betty Gayle Gainous, the
widow of Thomas Dale Gain-
ous, has filed a civil action


Predator

Ordinance

Ready For

Adoption
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
An ordinance to protect
Hardee County's children from
sex offenders comes up for pos-
sible adoption today (Thurs-
day).
It is scheduled for a public
hearing at 9 a.m. before the
Hardee County Commission in
its meeting at Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W. Orange
St., Wauchula.
The proposed ordinance sets
tougher restrictions on where.
sexual offenders and sexual
predators may live. It would not
affect such current residents,
but will whenever a designated
sexual offender moves within
the-county.
A sexual offender could be a
young adult who had sexual
relations with someone under
the age of consent (under age
18), or could be someone found
guilty of incest, sexual assault
or other sex-related crimes.
A sexual predator is someone
convicted of a capital, life or
first-degree felony, usually in-
volving younger children, un-
usual violence, certain lewd and
lascivious offense and posses-
sion/use of pornography.
The proposed ordinance
would limit sexual offend-
ers/predators from living within
2,500 feet from the boundary
lines of the property of a school,
day care center, public park,
library or neighborhood play-
grounds, even those on apart-
ment complex grounds.
In addition, a sexual predator
may not reside within 1,000 feet
of a designated school bus stop
or religious institution (church,
synagogue, mosque, etc.)
The ordinance sets penalties
of up to. $500 fine and/or 60
day's in jail for each incident
(day) it is violated.
A problem recently attacked
See PREDATOR 2A


WEATHER
','DAIT HIGH LOW RAIN
07/09. 92 69 0.05
07/10 95 70 0.00
0711 95 70 0.00
", ,,07/12 90 72 0.01
07/13.' 85 71 0.47
07/14 90 72 0.26
07/15 : 89 71 0.11.
L Rainfall to 07/16/08-23.82
Same period lia year .'21.33 .
S TTen Yearverage,-S,5.b9
SOw.w Univ. o niia. On.ResearwchCat r

INDEX
Classifieds.....................6B
Courthouse Report.......5C
Community Calendar....4A
Crime Blotter.................5C
Fishing Report ..............2A
Hardee Living................2B
Obits ............ :................4A
Roundups......................4A



111| 91111 1 1
7 18122 07290 3


seeking damages in excess of
$15,000 against the Sheriffs
Office.
The wrongful death suit,
entered into the Circuit Court
of Hardee County in late April
and served on the Sheriff's
Office in mid-May, was pre-
pared by lawyer Howard I. Kay'
of Lilly, O'Toole & Brown in


Lake Wales.
It lists Gainous as plaintiff
and the Sheriffs Office as
defendant.
Given to mid-June to re-
spond, defense attorney Bruce
W. Jolly of the Fort Lauderdale
law firm of Purdy, Jolly,
Giuffreda & Barranco did not
enter the customary response,


but instead filed a motion to
dismiss with the court.
Arguments on that motion
will be heard by Circuit Judge
Marcus J. Ezelle in a hearing set
for Wednesday, Aug. 6, at 11:15
a.m.
The lawsuit contends that on
the night of May 22, 2006, the
Sheriffs Office was called to


the area of 5091 Crewsville
Road in rural Zolfo Springs and
told that Dale Gainous, 40, was
threatening suicide.
Though the first officer
arrived at 8:25 p.m., no search
began until 10:15 p.m., it
alleges.
"At approximately 10:50
p.m., Mr. Gainous was ob-


MOSSY BOSSY


COURTESY PHOTO
This bovine beauty spent hours one day this week trying to shake these lovely locks from her horns. It seems she
tangled with a low-lying limb, giving new meaning to the term "gathering moss." Deana Sellers spotted the scene
and captured it here. Sellers says the cow lives in a pasture on County Line Road near Bowling Green, and spent
hours trying to undo her new "do." The long "hair" along with her shaking and movingn" made her look like Brittney
Spears in a music video, Sellers says.


I


Graffiti Arrests

WPD Says Boys
Tagged Town
Early Friday

', By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
NNWr r Whether it was for practice or
pride, the fact that a teenager
sprayed gang signs on a tree
outside his own home led to his
and two other boys' arrests for
Almaraz allegedly going on a tagging
tear early Friday.
___Wauchula Police Chief
William Beattie said three busi-
nesses, one civic organization
and two citizens were left with
a mess to clean up by sunrise.
S ,Currently charged with three
f i third-degree felony counts of
k- criminal mischief for damages
allegedly exceeding $1,000 are
15-year-old Jeremy Albert
Almaraz, of 811 Martin Luther
King Jr. Ave., Wauchula, and
16-year-olds Uber Calvillo, of
205 N. 10th Ave., Wauchula,
and Adrian Arturo Enriquez, of
Calvillo 321 Keeton Road, Wauchula
Hills.
charges are likely.
chBeattie said additional
All three boys were booked
into the Hardee County Jail on
Friday afternoon. They have
since been released to the cus-
tody of their parents as they
S, await trial.
Beattie alleged the boys used
black, and sometimes white,
spray paint to "tag" several
places around Calvillo's neigh-
borhood between midnight and
4 a.m. on Friday.
Enriquez See GRAFFITI 2A


served by Det. Clay Nichol-
son," the civil action states.
"Mr. Gainous began walking
with his hands in the air toward
Det. Nicholson in an obvious
attempt to surrender. However,
as a result of the negligence and
lack of training of the Hardee
County sheriffs officers at the
See FAMILY 3A



Farmworker


Housing To
Become Law


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It took the Planning &
Zoning Board over two hours to
pore over the amended farm-
worker ordinance.
The Hardee County Com-
mission plans to take less time,
scheduling 25 minutes to con-
sider it in the zoning portion of
its meeting today (Thursday),
beginning at 8:35 a.m., because
another public hearing is sched-
uled for 9 a.m. The commission
meets at Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula.
Passage of the amended ordi-
nance may negate the need for
special magistrate hearings
scheduled over the next two
weeks to consider the appeal of
Davis Enterprises Inc. of the
Planning & Zoning Board and
commission denial of an appli-
cation to place a 150-person
farmworker housing complex in
the middle of a 40-acre grove
off Crewsville Road.
The proposed amended ordi-
nance amends the county's land
use plan to meet every one of
the points on which the devel-
See FARMWORKER A


I MARITAL MIRACLE:


Together For 72 Years

. And Still Counting!


By ABBY CREWS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
The following story is the product of a school
assignment. Its 15-year-old author tells read-
ers, "It is my hope that as you read of their
many experiences that you, too, will be as
impressed and rewarded as I was in getting
to know these two wonderful people."
The "good ol' days" truly are the good old
days to Grace and Phil Glorius.
Grace was born Jan. 6, 1914, and Phil was


born April 26, 1914. They are 94 years old'
and will have been married 73 years in
December of this year.
Grace was born in Westminster, Md. She
grew up living on a farm where she and her
siblings worked very hard thrashing wheat to
sell while helping her mother harvest vegeta-
bles for her truck-farming business. Grace
recalls those days as filled with many chores
and long hours; one was milking cows which
See MARITAL 3A


U U


History Of

Azalea Hill

...Story 11B


(









2A The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


( The Herald-Adv
Hardee County's Hometown Co'


r Ke/lly's Column
u .- By Jim


On June 5 Republican presidential candidate John McCain
spoke to the Florida Press Association at the Walt Disney World
Resort.
The U.S. senator from Arizona said 81 percent of Americans
feel America is on the wrong track and are tired of partisan politics
and gridlock.
His campaign theme is reform, prosperity and peace. McCain
said America joined together after 9-11.
Adding earmarks to Congressional bills is a "terrible system"
and must be stopped. There was $3 million to study the DNA of
bears in Montana.
He said reform is needed for airport security, Social Security,
and Medicare. There is a broken safety net of Social Security and
Medicare.
"I will reach across the aisle on issues such as immigration. I
have a clear record of reform."
Over 200,000 Americans have lost their jobs. "We need to
return prosperity in America." New information technology can
create new jobs. "We need to help displaced workers through com-
munity colleges, especially older wo6lcfs. A jd self respect. The
fundamentals of our economy are still strong."
McCain said $500 billion of American dollars goes overseas
for oil. "We need to be energy independent. Brazil has 50 percent
of its automobiles using alternative energy. We need to stop busi-
ness as usual."
Regarding peace, McCain said radical islamists are evil and
out to destroy everything we stand for. They sent two women into
a marketplace and detonated the bombs by remote control.
"The central battleground is Iraq. We are against radical
islamists. We face long, hard, tough hurdles. We are winning Iraq.
We are succeeding."
He called Saddam Hussein "one of the most evil people in the
history of the world."
McCain said he believes the 21st Century will be the American
Century, like the 20th Century. "I can lead this nation through trou-
bled times."
McCain said he vetoed the Farm Bill because it subsidized
ethanol from corn. The Farm Bill should subsidize food, not fuel,
he said.
American government has been on a spending spree, running
up deficits and a big debt. "This weakened dollar makes oil go up.
America needs energy independence.
McCain criticized the "Bridge To Nowhere," which cost over
$300 million and went to an Alaskan island of 50 people and a
small airport. He votes against spending bills that have added ear-
marks. That is why he voted against the Everglades funding bill.
He supports restoring the Everglades.
Regarding conflict among nations, McCain said, "I hate war.
The Vietnam War divided our country. I am worried about inflation
and about radical islamic extremism. We need to keep spending
under control."
Illinois Sen. Barack Obama and New York Sen. Hilary Clinton
were also invited to speak to the Florida Press Convention but
could not work the date into their schedules.

The Tampa Bay Rays will be tested to the limit in the second
half of the Major League Baseball season. They were in first place
for weeks in the American League East but lost seven games in a
row by the All-Star break and fell a half game behind Boston. The
Yankees are not far behind the Rays.
I predict the Rays will finish behind Boston and New York but
will probably have a winning season.

America's most famous cardiovascular surgeon, Dr. Michael
Debakey, died on July 11 at age 99 in Houston, Texas. He was
renowned for his work at the Texas Methodist Hospital there.
I learned about Dr. Debakey in 1964 when my father needed
surgery on his carotid (neck) artery. My father was 55 and wanted
to go to the best surgeon he knew of.
He and Dr. Debakey got to know each other as the famed sur-
geon operated on my father several more times during the years.



Sam Albritton

Electrical Services, Inc.
863-767-0313 Office
863-781-0377 Mobile
-Residential and Commercial Wiring
-Electrical Inspections r&
-Electricial Preventative Maintenance
-Ground Testing
-Lightning Arrestor



Serving Hardee County Since 1994-
., ^J VISA E'v EC13002737 1:31f


FARMWORKER
Continued From 2A


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor


115 S. Seventh Ave. Phone:- 3) 773-3255
P.O. Box 338 7-0 '
. Fax. 63j 7.73065V
WVauchula, FL 33873 F 3) .,
Published %eekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by Ti6JIerald-AdvOcite
Publishing Co Inc Penodical Postage paid at U.S. Post,Ofi&, WauichuIa,'L.
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). "Postmaste."send'addidess
changes to The Herald-Advocate, P.O: Box 338, Wauchula. El33873.
D -.... SSUBSCRnPIONS:. ,., .
f DEADLINES: \ I Hardee County "
Schcls Thursday 5 prm. 6 months SI8; 1 yr. 31; 2 ys.-30
Sports Monday noon I Florida "- " -'
Hardee Li ing Thursday 5pm .6 months- $22; 1 yr.- S41 2yr. $79
General News Monday 5 pm . O of. Saye--;2- 7
S Ads Tuesday noon 6 mo.. 5_ 2 ; s95

LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomesetters ib the editor on matters of public
interest Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are'welcome. Submissions should be
) ped. double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
lect to editing


My father and mother made over a half dozen trips to Houston.
One time Earl Collins, later to be Hardee County Judge, visit-
ed my father in the hospital. My dad died in 1984 at age 75. My
mother is living in Lynchburg, Va., at age 100.'
The late Henry Gilliard, who owned orange groves and a grove
caretaking business, also went to Houston and was operated on by
Dr. Debakey.

Regular gasoline price in Wauchula was $3.93 on Monday ad
then $3.99 on Tuesday. This rise is in spite of Floridians reducing
their use of gasoline.
The Lakeland Ledger reported July 13 that Floridians in 1973
used 531 gallons per person, 472 gallons in 2001 and 450 gallons
in 2007. I feel sure gasoline consumption is less than 450 gallons
annually in 2008.

Florida's popular governor Charlie Crist, who partially
reminds me of the Energizer Bunny, is engaged to be married to
Carole Rome, 38, of Miami. Crist turns 52 on July 24 and Rome,
the mother of two daughters, is 38. She divorced from Todd Rome,
a New York businessman who owns a private charter jet company.
Crist, of course, lives in the governor's mansion in Tallahassee
and rents a condo in St. Petersburg, where he grew up and was a
high school quarterback. He keeps a 25-foot fishing boat docked at
his parents' home in St. Pete.
Crist was married for seven months in 1979 and later engaged
in the early 1980s when he was in law school. He keeps physical-
ly fit with regular daily exercise including calisthenics and swim-
ming.


H nigFs hingForcas


7/17/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:43 am
Sets: 8:24 pm
LoD: 13:41:00
Moon Data
Rises: 8:14 pm
Sets: 5:52 am
Major Times
12:03 am-2:03 am
12:28 pm-2:28 pm
Minor Times
6:45 am-7:45 am
7:10 pm-8:10 pm
Prediction
Better
7/18/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:43 am
Sets: 8:23 pm
LoD: 13:40:00
Moon Data
Rises: 8:53 pm
Sets: 6:50 am
Major Times
12:51 am-2:51 am
1:16 pm-3:16 pm
Minor Times


7:33 am-8:33 am
7:58 pm-8:58 pm
Prediction
Best
7/19/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:44 am
Sets: 8:23 pm
LoD): 13:39:00
Moon Data
Rises: 9:29 pm
Sets: 7:48 am
Major Times
1:38 am-3:38 am
2:03 pm-4:03 pm
Minor times
8:20 am-9:20 am
8:45 pm-9:45 pm
Prediction
Good
7/20/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:44 am
Sets: 8:22 pm
LoD: 13:38:00
Moon Data
Rises: 10:01 pm
Sets: 8:46 am


Major Times
2:23 am-4:23 am
2:48 pm-4:48 pm
Minor Times
9:05 am-10:05 am
9:30 pm-10:30 pm
Prediction
Good
7/21/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:45 am
Sets: 8:22 pm
LoD: 13:37:00
Moon Data
Rises: 10:32 pm
Sets: 9:44 am
Major Times
3:08 am-5:08 am
3:33 pm-5:33 pm
Minor Times
9:50 am-10:50 am
10:15 pm-l:15 pm
Prediction
Average
7/22/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:45 am
Sets: 8:21 pm


LoD: 13:36:00
Moon Data
Rises: 11:03 pm
Sets: 10:41 am
Major Times
3:52 am-5:52 am
4:17 pm-6:17 pm
Minor Times
10:34 am-ll:34 am
10:59 pm-11:59 pm
Prediction
Average
7/23/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:46 am
Sets: 8:21 pm
LoD: 13:35:00
Moon Data
Rises: 11:35 pm
Sets: 11:39 am
Major Times
4:37 am-6:37 am
5:02 pm-7:02 pm
Minor Times
11:19 am-12:19 pm

Prediction
Average


opment was denied.
In its meeting last Thursday,
the Planning and Zoning Board
recommended several changes
to the proposed ordinance to
clarify points.
In its definition section, the
ordinance was changed to in-
clude harvesting all tree fruit
(peaches) as well as citrus and
truck farming, ranches and
dairy farms. It specifies a farm-
worker is a person employed in
one of these occupations either
seasonally or year-round. '
The definition also separates
dormitory farmworker housing,
and one- or two-family dwell-
ings, both provided at no cost to



GRAFFITI
Continued From 1A
Hit were a commercial truck
belonging to A-I Safari Glass at
300 N. Florida Ave., walls at
the Palmer Apartments at 205
N. Eighth Ave., a storage shed
at Brant Funeral Home at 404
W. Palmetto St., a wall at the
Elks Lodge at 318 W. Main St.,
a shed at a private residence at
218 N. 10th Ave., and a fence at
a private residence at 219 N.
Ninth Ave.
Beattie said the targets were
sprayed with Westside 7 gang
signs, sometimes with the num-
ber "13" shown and then
crossed out. The number eludes
to the Sur 13 gang.
The chief noted the spray-
painted mess was first discov-
ered shortly after 4 a.m. by Ofc.
Justin Wyatt, who was on rou-
tine patrol when he spotted
trouble at A-1 Safari Glass.
The rest of the mess was
found later, around 11:30 a.m.,
as Ofc. Amy Drake responded
to a homeowner's call for help.
A further search of the area
revealed several places had
been hit, Beattie said.
Wauchula police Cpl. Gabe
Garza and Bowling Green
Police Chief John Scheel, both
members of the multi-agency
Gang Task Force, investigated
the markings. They also met
with a resident whose front-
yard tree carried similar mark-
ings, asking if the handiwork
was "fresh" or older.
The man, Juvenal Calvillo,
said that his son, Uber, had
spray-painted the tree about 10
days earlier.
The boy told investigators he
was not a member of Westside
7, but that he did not like the
gang Sur 13, and spray-painted
the tags to show "disrespect" to
that gang.
All three boys admitted their
involvement, Beattie alleged.


the farmworker, from migrant
farmworker housing where the
residents pay rent or other mon-
etary consideration.
Each type of housing must
provide housing which meets
their health, safety and welfare
needs.
The new ordinance takes out
reference to the federal H2-A
program. Asked why, Planning
Director Nick Staszko ex-
plained, it could be a worker on
a manch or the federal program
cquld change designations.
Farmworkers provided hous-
ing free must work at least 51
percent of their labor on Hardee
County farms, including non-
contiguous lands which are an
integral part of the same opera-
tion. The 51 percent of time is
measured by the industry stan-
dard of production, on ranch-
herd, milk-pound, row crops-
bushels, citrus-box. The com-
mission can grant a relief from
the 51 percent requirement in
unique circumstances, say a
hurricane destroys the Hardee
County crop.
While normal A-I density is
one home per five acres, farm-
worker group housing must be
centered on a 40-acre minimum
and 100-acre maximum parcel
on an operation-owned proper-
ty, not necessarily in the middle
of a grove, perhaps by the
equipment location, to avoid
destroying part of a grove just
for the housing.
Housing units must be 15
feet apart to allow emergency
access. It allows 150 persons
on a 40-acre lot, 3.75 persons
per gross acre, up to 375 people
on a 100-acre lot. That density
was derived from the Davis 40-
acre proposed housing.
The property must have 200
feet of road frontage on a pub-
licly maintained paved road and
be properly buffered from its
neighbors. Farmworker housing
areas must be five air miles
apart, property line to property
line, and is limited to already
established grove/farming oper-
ations, not someone who moves
to the county just to create
farmworker housing.
Planning board member Don
Chancey noted the laws on
farmworker housing have
been on the books since 1986
and asked: for mnorn time to
review the, ordinance without
"rushing to judgment. We want
to close all the loopholes possi-
ble."
Staszko noted the already-
advertised commission hearing
on the ordinance and said a
decision needed to be made.
Planning Board chairman
Roger Conley said the number
of growers in the county who


PREDATOR
Continued From 1A
by law enforcement officials is of them are no longer under
that state law only covers sex state supervision. Two sexual
offenders/predators during the predators and 20 other sexual
time they are under the direct offenders are still under strict
supervision, of state parole or state supervision, which has
probation. Once they finish and numerous conditions on contact
are released from supervision, with victims or their families,
the only requirement has been residing near any place where
to register annually at the children congregate, DNA reg-
Sheriff's Office, and also to istration, and warrantless search
inform that office if they and seizure.
change residence. The proposed ordinance
Different law enforcement notes that about 20 percent of
officials have handled the prob- children will have been sexual-
lem differently. Some do peri- ly abused before they reach
odic unannounced sweeps of all adulthood. That's why the focus
registered sex offenders in their is shifting to protecting them
district. In Hardee County, a by restricting access to places
detective is assigned to the task children frequent.
of keeping track of known sex- "Hardee County is a family
ual offenders/predators. oriented county which highly
values its children and a place
In addition to periodic unan- that families with young chil-
nounced visits, sexual offenders dren find highly desirable. The
are required to report in, re-reg- Sheriff and Board of County
ister at least twice a year, and Commissioners desire to ensure
also whenever they move. Sex- that the citizens of the county
ual predators must report in are protected from criminal
four times a year. A couple are activity to the maximum extent
awaiting court dates on charges possible by enacting this ordi-
of failure to report a change of nance to benefit the citizens of
address, a third degree felony, the county," concludes the pro-
Recently, several counties posed ordinance.
began passing ordinances limit- A list of 45 frequently asked
ing where sexual offend- questions, another of sexual
ers/predators are living. All predators and offenders in the
Florida counties are expected to' areaidheir criminal records and'
enact them to prevent sexual much more is available at the
offenders from moving from Florida State Department of
county to county where the law Law Enforcement website
is more lax. www.fdle.state.fl.us by follow-
Of the 58 known sexual ing prompts to the information
offenders in Hardee County, 37. wanted.


FINISHING FIRST


COURTESY PHOTO
Gearing up for the summer Sertoma golf season,
Wauchula golfer Taylor Barlow had a one-shot deficit to
start the final round of the All-State Championship held at
Highlands Ridge North. He stroked an 81 to finish first In
the 15-16 boys group. The Hardee soph golf team mem-
ber shot a 74 over 16 holes on the first day and came
back to end with a two-day total of 155, good enough to
beat Jason Savas of Avon Park at 160 and Evan Danzey of
Avon Park with 161. Upcoming Hardee golfer Daniel
Miller tied in the 13-14 age group with a 155 with Austin
Tracey, but sank a 6-foot par putt on the first playoff hole
to win his group title.


pick fruit could be counted on
two hands and that would limit
the number of applications for
group farmworker housing.
Although the room was
crowded, there was little oppo-
sition to the proposed amended
ordinance. A Crewsville woman
read a prepared statement that
the farmworker housing did not
address public concerns ex-
pressed during the previous
meetings. She listed six
changes which were proposed
by private business/citrus in-
dustry and that the commission
had complied with each re-
quest.
"The federal H2-A Guest-
worker Program, clearly the
basis of why we are here
tonight, is never once refer-
enced in this proposed ordi-
nance. Take note this means
150 workers could be housed
on 40 acres without the screen-


ings, protections and assurances
which have been quoted to the
public, and without the provi-
sions, basic rights and guaran-
tees afforded to the workers.
"The H2-A program has been
available for 22 years :.. A six-
month moratorium is insignifi-
cant by comparison. No good-
faith effort or meaningful -dia-
logue has taken place in this
hastily composed ordinance
that is to become an amendment
to Hardee County's Unified
Land Development Code.
"We have the opportunity, as
a strong agricultural county, to
be leaders in the drafting of
farmworker housing policy, to
be a model for other counties in
this state and beyond. This ordi-
nance does not reflect leader-
ship. It reflects the action of fol-
lowing. Solutions do exist, But
first, we must actively look for
them," concludes the statement.


- I







July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3A

U ~Ii


she was not very fond of doing.
Her mother not only grew but canned their
food, ind she has memories of her cooking
three large meals a day. She recalls that most
everyone lived off the land and little needed
to be purchased. Her mother did buy cheaper
fabric for making the clothes that her daugh-
ters wore.
Baths, for the most part, were once a week,
with each child sharing the same bath water.
They had no electricity or indoor plumbing
those early years.
She recalls her father dropping them off at
school each day on his way to the train sta-
tion where he took milk to be sold. Some
milk was kept for home use including the
making of butter.
Grace had three sisters, Helen, Dorothy
and Nellie. Her sister, Nellie Schweigart, for-
merly a teacher in Hardee County, currently
resides in Lakeland. Since there were no
sons, she remembers she and her siblings had
to work like boys, spending long days in the
field. They were taken to school and church
by horse and buggy and in the cold Maryland
winters, they traveled by sleigh.
In 1926, Grace's family relocated to Avon
Park; she was 12 years old at the time She
enjoyed the move and laughingly recalls,
"We didn't have to milk cows anymore." She
graduated from Avon Park High School in
1933.
Phil, a native Floridian, was born in
Hardee County. He had three sisters, Eleanor,
Catherine and Edna, two of whom died in
early childhood. His parents moved to the
Wauchula area in 1913 from Washington,
D.C. They purchased 20 acres of land on
Parrish Road, where Phil was born.
They, too, had no electricity or indoor
plumbing and some of his clothing was made
from flour sacks. Born of a Catholic faith,
there were no local churches for his family to
attend. He recalls his parents establishing the
first Catholic church in Hardee County, and
meeting in individual homes with a priest


MARITAL
Continued From 1A


coming from Tampa to conduct the services.
Phil's first school days were held in the
Methodist Men's Bible class. He later attend-
ed Wauchula Elementary, graduating in 1932
from Wauchula High School, a new two-
story brick high school built in 1926. He
recalls that Miss Ella Beeson was his first-
grade teacher. He also attended Strawberry
School, contributing money to help his fami-
ly. They were paid two cents a quart for their
labor.
He shared that most children went to
school barefoot until the Eighth grade while
Grace quickly chimed in that she didn't, she
wore "buttoned-down shoes."
Both Phil and Grace recall when the high
school burned in 1945. The building was
completely gutted and the entire contents,
including school books, library and all equip-
ment, were destroyed. An ample high school.
building was located in Zolfo Springs, and
students went to school there for a while.
Phil recalls working at his family's filling
station, B&B Grocery and also McCrory's
dime store, where he put up stock and did
window dressing. Like others, he worked
from sun up to 9 most weekdays and 10 p.m.
on Saturday. He was paid $8 per week.
He recalls purchasing his first car, a Model
T, for a $5 down payment. He had to borrow
the rest, and it took three to four years to pay
back the loan.
Entertainment for the Gloriuses during
their growing up years was centered mostly
around their churches, which allowed them
to see their friends the most. They did go to
the "picture show" once a week on family
night. Phil would go with his family and
Grace would go with her family, and they
would meet and sit together. The cost for the
movie was 25 cents for each family and most
of the movies were Westerns. A news reel
was always shown before every show.
Phil and Grace were married in 1935 on
Christmas Day. They were both 21 years old.
Phil recalls that they married that day


because it was the only day which he could
take off work. He borrowed the money for
them to travel to Tampa, and they were mar-
ried in the Catholic church rectory. Grace
quickly recalls that he did buy her a diamond
wedding ring set, although Phil s. "s he had
to borrow the money. ,.
They returned home that evening, spend-
ing their wedding night at Grace's parents,
and Phil returned to work the next day. He
had gotten a raise at his job and was making
$10 a week when they decided to get mar-
ried.
I asked them to share with me about hav-
ing lived through the Great Depression years.
They both quickly said that it was a most dif-
ficult time. While they had plenty to eat, it
was a time that you didn't buy anything other
than what you had to have. Groceries, tires
and gas were rationed, and you were allowed
only sufficient gas to travel to your job. The
cost of gasoline was 25 cents a gallon.
They were issued food stamps once a
month, which had to be managed very care-
fully. If one overspent, there were no monies
left for the rest of the month. Some did share
food stamps with others who received less.
While they were able to manage, they
emphasized that many could not have sur-
vived without government implemented pro-
grams. $
They both fondly recall their one bed-
room/kitchen apartment on Main Street in
Wauchula. It was one of 15 in the building
and everyone shared a single bath at the end
of the long hallway. They estimated that their
grocery bill would have been about $5 per
week and their apartment rent about $15 per
month.
Phil rode a bicycle to work. Grace states
that Phil was the one who worked in the
beginning of their marriage. Like most
wives, she did the household chores while
staying at home with their children until they
were grown. Their first child was born during
the years of the Depression. They had no


washing machine and washed diapers on a
rub board in the bath tub. Polio was very
prevalent then, and many children died from
the disease as well as pneumonia.
Phil's career was one in the insurance busi-
ness and required that they move on occa-
sion. They lived in Bradenton for five years
and the Miami area for nine years before set-
tling back in Wauchula. Grace retired from
working for the School Board of Hardee
County. They continue to live in the same
house on Pennsylvania Avenue which has
been their home for the past 57 years.
The Gloriuses have two children, son
Larry and his wife, Jean, who reside in
Valdosta, Ga. Daughter Sharon and her hus-
band, Jim, live in West Palm Beach. They
have four grandchildren and five great-
grandchildren. They quickly express how the
loss of their granddaughter, Tammy, in
October of last year to cancer has been the
hardest thing they have ever gone through.
They continue to struggle but state that their
strong faith in God sustains and helps them
to cope each day.
When asked if they had any special mem-
ories from having lived through the
Depression, they quickly share that although
they didn't have a lot, they were very happy
during those days. They learned to appreciate
things more and Grace comments" we are
doing good now. As for how it has affected
them, they have no regrets about what they
experienced and would go through it all over
again if they had to.
They both exemplify having faced and
continuing to face life with much zeal and an
optimistic and positive spirit.
Abby Crews will be a 10th grader at DeSoto
High School this coming academic year She
is the daughter of former Hardee County res-
idents Mark Crews and Amy Crews. Abby is
granddaughter to Wauchula residents Bill
and Jeraldine Crews, Tommy and Sue
Jackson and Joe Gilliard.
Photo Album 7A


I U


FAMILY
Continued From 1A


scene, Mr. Gainous became
frightened and scared for his
safety and pulled out a gun and
committed suicide."
Employees of the Sheriffs
Office who are named in the
text of the suit include
Nicholson and Mark McCoy,
Paul Johnson, Eric Thompson,
Russell Conley, Matt Tinsley,
Eddie Davis, J. Paul and
Patricia Richey.
The suit further states that
officers 'had been' informed that-
Dale Gainous was being treated
for depression, had earlier
threatened suicide with a hand-
gunl and had taken a "large
dose" of the sleep-aid Ambien
and the anti-depressant Xanax.
The lawsuit alleges the
Sheriffs Office was negligent
in "failing to have an officer or
unit properly trained in the han-
dling of a person who is threat-
ening suicide."
It also asserts officers were
negligent in "their interaction"
with Gainous, and that 'the
Sheriffs Office "had a duty to
properly train its officers to
have a specific plan or protocol
for the handling of, suicide
threats."
The defendant also "owed a
duty" to act with reasonable
care for Gainous' safety.
The Sheriffs Office, it says,
should have known or foresaw
that Gainous "was in a fragile
mental condition and needed to
be approached and dealt with in
a specific manner, by a person
or persons specifically trained
for such situations."
Failure to do so, it goes on to
assert, led.to Gainous' death.
Kay, in asking the court for a
jury trial, says Gayle Gainous
and 4-year-old daughter Lauren
have "lost the support and ser-
vices of the decedent, the
amount of the decedent's net
income," replacement value of
his services and "prospective
A player who makes a tean
player.


net accumulations," medical
and burial expenses and have
suffered mental pain and suffer-
ing.
Defense lawyer Jolly, in
seeking to have the civil action
dismissed, claims the plaintiff
"has failed to state a cause of
action."
His motion to dismiss states
the Sheriffs Office is not a legal
entity, and therefore no cause of
action can be brought against it.
SSuit. can be. "properly brought"
against the named office holder,
in his official capacity, Jolly
says.
He goes on to assert that tort
liability notes "government will
not be held liable where the
duty owed is a general duty
owed to the public as a whole."
The plaintiff, Jolly says, "fails
to allege a common law or
statutory duty that was owed
specifically to the decedent,
rather than the public at large."
He adds, "Where there is no
duty of care, there can be no
breach of the duty of care and,
ultimately, no claim for negli-
gence."
The motion contends "there
is no suggestion, either direct or
implied, that the defendant
sheriff, through his deputies,
created or placed decedent in a
zone of risk from which a duty
exists."
Negligent training, as well, is
not a claim that can be leveled
against a governmental agency,
Jolly says, citing a 1987 2nd
District Court of Appeal ruling.
"There is no reason to abolish
the long-standing immunity of a
state agency for decisions relat-
ing to training and supervision,"
he concludes.
Sheriff J. Loran Cogburn,
contacted on Tuesday, noted,
"Obviously, I cannot comment
on the details."
The sheriff added, however,
"Under the conditions at the
time, I feel we acted appropri-
i great is better than a great
-John Wooden


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
Telephone (863) 773-3255




li g gptg r v s c p ., e


ately."
Cogburn went on to say, "I
certainly can understand the
Gainous family feeling a need


Nick Staszko

Injured In

Saturday Fall
Nick Staszko;iHardeef'ounty
planning aridldevelopftnt di-'
rector,' was in the intensive care
unit at Lakeland Regional Hos-
pital this week following a fall
Saturday at his residence in
south Lakeland.
The Hardee County Com-
missioners office Wednesday
reported he fell off his roof or
off the top of a ladder and hit
his head on pavement. He was
in a coma, awoke to say a few
words and went back into a
coma, with the hospital cooling
his body to 91 degrees. He had
bleeding on one side of his
brain.


Pioneer

Medical Center


to take this action. My heart and
prayers go out to them and their
loss. I certainly don't fault them
for taking this action."
The sheriff concluded,
"Ultimately, it will be up to the
court to make the decision and
that's why we have the courts."


5-...

- '"
', .", :


DAVID

DURASTANTI
for
Superintendent of Schools
www.ForOurKidsFuture.com


i n 'COMMITTED &
O ViOEN.LEADER E
"Mr. D" ENovember 4th, 2008
Pd Pol. Adv., Paid for by David D. Durastanti Campaign Account, Approved by David D. Durastanti, Republican, Chet Huddleston, Campaign
,A A A A A A7 A 1Ap
K7 -nll -k7 1p


Wauchula HMA


Pioneer Medical Center

Welcomes


Keith Coker, PA-C


staff of Pioneer Medical


Pediatrics,


Internal Medicine


and Emergency


Keith joins the


Center with 18 years experience as a physician
assistant in the areas of Family Practice,


Medicine.

,. ,: '.Keith is a graduate of the University of
Florida, Physician Assistant Program, 1990.
SOriginally from Myakka City, Florida, Keith

currently lives in Lake Placid with his wife Juli and son Mitchel.

Mr. Coker and his family enjoy outdoor activities including
hiking, canoeing, boating, shooting, an occasional round of golf and
spending time with friends and family.

Keith and his family want to thank Pioneer Medical Center and
the community for welcoming him to the practice.


515 Carlton St. Wauchula,FL

773-6606

Mon.-Fri. 8am 5pm; Sat. 8:30 am 12:30 pm


Clk
Tanya Bolin



R OYAL

School Board District 2
Pd.Pol. Adv. Paid for and Approved by Tanya B. Royal,
non-partisan.
7:17p








4A The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


Obituaries


BOBBIE LOU FOWLER
Bobbie Lou Fowler, 50, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday, July
13, 2008, at home.
Born on Aug. 31, 1957, in
Hope Mill, N.C., she came to
Wauchula in 1960. She was a
cab driver for 15 years and
attended the Church of God.
She was preceded in death by
her father, Robert A. Fowler; an
infant son; and her grandpar-
ents.
She is survived by her moth-
er Mary Lou McCausley; two
sons, Bobby Lay and Woodrow
Lay, both of Lakeland; three
daughters, Jennifer Stone of
Texas, Christina Stone of North
Carolina, and Mary Stone of
Wauchula; one brother, Robert
Fowler of Wauchula; one sister,
Judy Krebbs of Jacksonville,
N.C.; one grandchild, Chesnie
Stone; and her companion,
Keith Reed of Wauchula.
Visitation is Friday at 3 p.m.
at the funeral home, where ser-
vices will be held at 4 p.m. with
the Rev. Wendell Smith officiat-
ing. Interment will be private.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to Brant Funeral
Chapel, 404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula, FL 33873.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula

KATHERINE M.
NICKERSON
Katherine M. Nickerson, 90,
of Wauchula and Mayville,
N.Y., died on Thursday, July 10,
2008, in Erie, Pa.
Born in Stockton, N.Y., on
May 28, 1918, she was a former
medical secretary and co-owner
of a dairy farm. She was a
member of the Florida Fly-
wheelers and Ladies Home
Bureau of Hardee County.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Elton I. Nickerson;
son Dennis A. Nickerson; and
sister Marian Barry.
She is survived by two sons,
Donald P. Nickerson of Ash-
ville, N.Y. and David Nicker-
son of Dewittville, N.Y.; one
daughter, Linda Larson of
Mayville, N.Y.; one daughter-
in-law, Linda T. Nickerson of
Lakewood, N.Y.; two brothers,
Ray Munson of Westfield N.Y.
and Ross Munson of Dewitt-
ville, N.Y.; 10 grandchildren;
and 14 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Monday at the
funeral home in New York.
Services were there at 11 a.m.
Tuesday with the Rev. Ray-
mond Mitchell- officiating.
Interment followed in the May-
ville Cemetery in Mayville,
N.Y.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to the Mayville
Fire Dept. Rescue Squad, P.O.
Box 2, Mayville, N.Y. 14757.
Freay Funeral Home
Mayville, N.Y






BOBBIE LOU FOWLER
Bobbie Lou Fowler, 50, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
July 13, 2008, at home Mi
Born on Aug. 31, 1957, in
Hope Mill, N.C., she came to
Wauchula in 1960. She was a
cab driver for 15 years, fun
natural at heart and enjoyed
her time with family and
friends and attended the
Church of God.
She. was preceded in death
by hey father, Robert A.
Fowler; an infant son; and
her grandparents.
She is survived by her
mother Mary Lou McCaus-
ley; two sons, Bobby Lay and
Woodrow Lay, both of Lake-
land; three daughters, Jenni-
fer Stofie of Texas, Christina
Stone of North Carolina, and
Mary Stone of Wauchula; one
brother, Robert Fowler of
Wauchula; one sister, Judy
Krebbs of Jacksonville, N.C.;
one grandchild, Chesnie
Stone; her companion, Keith
Reed of Wauchula; and best
friend, Sunnie O'Neal of
Bowling Green.
Visitation is Friday at 3
p.m. at the funeral home,
where services will be held at
4 p.m. with the Rev. Wendell
Smith officiating. Interment
will be private.


ROBERT E.
CAMPBELL
Robert E. Campbell, 86, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
July 13, 2008 at Lake Placid.
Born on Aug. 14, 1921, in
Tampa, he was a Wauchula
resident most of his life.
He was a World War II vet-
eran serving in the Army Air
Corps as a pilot. He attended
college at the University of
Florida. After finishing two
years and earning a qommer-
cial pilot's license, he joined
the Army Air Corps as a
civilian instructor of cadets
learning how to fly.
After two years, he was
released from his instructor's
job, entered the Army Air
Corp and attended flight
school in Palm Springs to
learn how to fly large aircraft.
After training for a month, he
graduated as a 1st Pilot 4-
engine, having flown aircraft
such as the B25, P38 and
B 17. He flew his last mission
on his 24th birthday, having
clocked more than 700 com-
bat hours and earned the
Presidential Medal, Disting-
uished Flying Cross, Air
Medal, Victory Medal and
War Medal of China.
He was a citrus, grower and
member of First United
Methodist Church of Wau-
chula, American Legion, Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars, Elks
BPOE and the Moose Lodge.
He is survived by his wife
Dorothy Carlton Campbell of
Wauchula; four daughters,
Jean Campbell Larson and
husband Leon of Kissimmee,
Jane Campbell Wofford and
husband Steve of Tallahas-
see, Jan Berelsman and hus-
band Joe of Orlando, and Pat
Quayle and husband Bruce of
Panama Canal Zone; eight
grandchildren Tiffany Davis
of West Palm Beach, David
Wofford and Laura Wofford,
both of Tallahassee, Joe
Berelsman Jr. of Orlando,
Seaman 1st Class John Ber-
elsman USN of Orlando, Bill
Quayle of Switzerland and
Kim Quayle of Naples; and
great-grandson Thomas
Skipper.
Visitation is Saturday
from 9 to 9:30 a.m. at First
United Methodist Church of
Wauchula, where services
will be held at 10 a.m. with
the Rev. Rick Walker officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
Wauchula Cemetery with
military honors provided by
the American Legion.
In lieu of flowers, memor-
ial contributions may be
made to the First United
Methodist Church of Wau-
chula.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


ROBERT GENE DEESON
Robert Gene Deeson, 61, of
Bronson, died, Wednesday, July
9, 2008, in Auburndale.
Born in Miami, on Nov. 8,
1946, he lived in Hardee
County for several years before
moving to Bronson six years
ago. He served in the U.S.
Army National Guard for six
years. He was employed by
O'Steen Brothers and attended
the Bowling Green Church of
God.
Survivors are his wife
Christine Deeson of Arkansas;
mother Bethel Deeson of
Davie; five sons, Robert Dee-
son and wife Lori of Lynn
Ijaven, Wayne Deeson and wife
Victoria of Bowling Green, and
Ricky Deeson, James Deeson
and Thomas Deeson; one
daughter, Tammy Deeson; three
brothers, Arlo Deeson of Davie,
Frank Deeson of Port St. Lucie,
and Edward Deeson of Naples;
one sister, Ruby Boehm and
niece Patty of Bronson; and 18
grandchildren, Lee-Ann, Tara,
Kimber, Kayla, Robbie, Austin,
Megan, Matt, Tim, Crystal,
Rusty, Isaac, Dustin, Shawn,
Haley, Rebecca and Sara.
At his request there will be
no services.
Cremation Services of
Mid Florida
Davenport

ROBERT E. CAMPBELL
Robert E. Campbell, 86, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday, July
13, 2008 at Lake Placid.
Born on Aug. 14, 1921, in
Tampa, he was a Wauchula res-
ident most of his life.
He was a World War II veter-
an serving in the Army Air
Corps as a pilot. He attended
college at the University of
Florida. He clocked more than
700 combat hours and earned
the Presidential Medal, Distin-
guished Flying Cross, Air
Medal, Victory Medal and War
Medal of China.
He was a citrus grower and
member of First United Metho-
dist Church of Wauchula, Ame-
rican Legion, Veterans of For-
eign Wars, Elks BPOE and the
Moose Lodge.
He is survived by his'wife
Dorothy Carlton Campbell of
Wauchula; four daughters, Jean.
Campbell Larson and husband
Leon of Kissimmee, Jane
Campbell Wofford and husband
Steve of Tallahassee, Jan
Berelsman and husband Joe of
Orlando, and Pat Quayle and
husband Bruce of Panama
Canal Zone; eight grandchil-
dren Tiffany Davis of West
Palm Beach, David Wofford
and Laura Wofford, both of
Tallahassee, Joe Berelsman Jr.
of Orlando, Seaman 1st Class
John Berelsman USN of Or-
'lando, Bill Quayle of Switzer-
land and Kim Quayle of
Naples; and great-grandson
Thomas Skipper.
Visitation is Saturday from
9 to 9:30 a.m. at First United
Methodist Church of Wauchula,
where services will be held at
10 a.m. with the Rev. Rick
Walker officiating. Interment
will follow in Wauchula Ceme-
tery with military honors pro-
vided by the American Legion.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the First United Methodist
Church of Wauchula.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


Al skoaliq (-Memokg


CHANDLER B. PULLEN
Chandler B. Pullen, 91, of
Fort Meade, died on Sunday,
July 13, 2008, at his home.
Born in Bartow, he came to
Fort Meade in 1939. He retired
after 43 years with Swift & Co.,
and was a citrus grower. He was
a member of First Baptist
Church of Bowling Green.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Leola Hancock Pullen.
Survivors include a son,
Billy Pullen of Fort Meade; two
daughters, Sandra Pullen Aber-
nathy of Bowling Green and
Susan Pullen Duva of River-
view; two brothers, Jimmy
Pullen and Robert Pullen, both
of Atlanta, Ga.; one sister,
Esther Howell of Lake City;
and five grandchildren.
Visitation was 10 to 11 a.m.
Wednesday at the First Baptist
Church of Bowling Green,
where services were held at 11
a.m. with the Rev. Jim Williams
and the Rev. Blake Albritton
officiating. Interment followed
in Hancock Cemetery in Fort
Meade.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be sent to the
First Baptist Church of Bowling
Green or Good Shepherd Hos-
pice.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade

JOHN KAYE
John Kaye, 85, of Fort
Meade, died on Monday, July
14, 2008, at Hardee Manor
Care Center in Wauchula.
Born Nov. 19, 1922 in An-
sonia, Conn., he came to Fort
Meade from Lake Worth in
2004. He was a U.S. Navy
World War II veteran serving
from 1941 to 1945. Serving on
the USS Haraden in the South
Pacific, he received many
awards and medals. He was a
construction general contractor
and an alderman at St. Margaret
Episcopal Church in Staatsburg,
N.Y. and former member of the
Elks Lodge and Veterans of
Foreign Wars.
He was preceded in death by
his wife Gloria Kaye.
Survivors include a son, Bill
Kaye and wife Mary of Lake
Worth; a daughter, Susan Mi-
kula and husband Jack of Fort
Meade; nine grandchildren,
Terri Sucanek, Tom Kaye,
Michelle Becker, John Mikula,
Christopher Mikula, Mark Mi-
kula, Jonathan Mikula and
Stacie Mikula; tht'l"15 great-
grandchilfren.
Graveside services are today
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. in Ever-
green Cemetery in Fort Meade
with Chaplain Boris Posso offi-
ciating.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade








NWES Plans
New Year
North Wauchula Elemen-
tary School welcomes par-
ents to make teacher re-
quests next week. The dead-
line is Thursday, July 24, for
the 2008-09 school year.
Parents can also register
children for kindergarten.
The school office is open
Monday through Thursday
from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. For
more information, call 773-
2183.


tAs a courtesy to our friends and neighbors, obituar
are now listed dally at www.hardeeobits.com


Q: Why are AICR's recom-
mendations for a "healthy"
waist circumference different
than the recommendations
I've seen elsewhere?
A: AICR's latest major re-
port, Food, Nutrition, Physical
Activity, and the Prevention of
Cancer, identifies maintaining a
healthy weight as one of the
most important steps we can all
take to lower our risk of cancer.
In the report, researchers noted
that fat around the waistline
seems to be highly implicated
in raising risk. These fat cells
increase hormone levels and
promote inflammation two
factors that can encourage can-
cer development. The health-
damaging effects seem to begin
with relatively moderate
increases in waistline fat.
Government health guidelines,
which warn women to avoid
waist measurements above 35
inches and men not to exceed
40 inches, are figures that indi-
cate obesity.
But AICR's international
panel of experts found that risk
increases at even smaller waist
sizes -- at measurements that
correspond to overweight. Their
more conservative guidelines
ask women to aim for waist
measurements of 31.5 inches or
below and men to maintain
measurements of no greater
than 37 inches. These figures
reiterate the expert panels'
judgment that cancer risk dra-
matically increases once one
becomes overweight, even




Obituaries

EDWARD C. FLOOD
Edward C. Flood, 93, of
Bartow, died on Saturday, July
5, 2008, in Lakeland.
Born Feb. 20, 1915 in
Jupiter, he was the grandson of
Luke B. and Alicia Flood, a pio-
neer Fort Meade family, and
son of Joseph George Flood and
Amanda Wilson Flood. A life-
long Polk County resident, he
was a retired attorney, practic-
ing law in his office in Bartow
and Polk County for many
years. He was licensed to prac-
tice law in the Supreme Court.
He was a Protestant, WWII
U.S. Air Force veteran, P-38
fighter pilot, serving in
Washington, D.C. and Papua
New Guinea. He was an air
pilot instructor in Bartow and
Avon Park. He was a graduate
of the University of Florida and
Miami School of Law and a for-
mer agriculture teacher for the
Fort Meade veterans school.
He was a lifetime member of
the Polk County Historical
Museum, and a citrus grower.
He was preceded in death by
brothers Seidel Flood and
Quinton Flood; and sisters
Juanita Flood Bradford and
Marietta Flood Strayhorn.
He is survived by his sister
Helen Flood Knight of Bartow;
and several nieces and
nephews.
Visitation was 10 to 11 a.m.
on Tuesday at the funeral home,
where services were held at 11
a.m. with the Rev. William
Hazelett officiating. Interment
followed in Evergreen Ceme-
tery in Fort Meade.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade


"They were


wonderful".

We hear kind words
consistently. We're proud
that people feel comfortable
enough with us to openly tell
us how much they appreciate
what we did for them. In fact,
it's this appreciation that
drives us to offer the very
best in comfort, compassion
and service.





FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula





les 773-9773
1:24tfC


Nutrition Notes.
________ _


In lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be sent to Brant
Funeral Chapel, 404 W.
Palmetto St., Wauchula FL
33873.

Brant Funeral

Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula


Tfiemelezy c-'ewlce,


make Every Momlent a Splecial Memory'..


Doug and RJ. Sutton
Owners
1067 South Sixth Ave. Wauchula Florida
863-773-0625 3


before the threshold to obesity
is crossed.
_Q: Is it true that elderly
people should not eat sashimi
or sushi?
A: Sashimi thin slices of
fresh, raw fish as well as the
rice and vinegar dish called
sushi (if it contains raw fish),
does raise safety concerns for
older adults. Eating raw fish can
increase risk of foodborne ill-
nesses caused by bacteria,:
which can lead to diarrhea,
cramping and vomiting, and.
more serious problems such as
Hepatitis A and Norwalk-like
viruses. The risk is higher for
anyone who may have a some-
what weakened immune sys-
tem. This includes the elderly,
children and people with liver
disease, HIV/AIDS or any con-
dition that threatens immune
health. (Some experts advise
pregnant women to avoid high-
risk foods, too).
Talk with your doctor if you
think you might be among those
whose immune system is not up
to the risk of raw fish. As an
alternative, you can always
choose sushi dishes that only
include cooked seafood and
vegetables.
Q: What size portion of
juice is equivalent to a serving
of fruit or vegetable?
A: Six ounces of fruit or
vegetable juice is considered
one serving as long as it is
100 percent juice. It's important
to note, however, that while
juice can supply many of the
vitamins, minerals and phyto-
chemicals found in whole fruits
and vegetables, it does not sup-
ply the fiber or complete nutri-
ent load found in solid fruit. In
addition, the calories in fruit
juice can add up quickly and
won't pacify your hunger. Most
recommendations suggest that
we use fruit juice for no more.
than one serving a day.
The American Academy of
Pediatrics encourages children'
to choose whole fruit and rec-
ommends limiting fruit juice to
4 to 6 ounces a day for children
one to six years old. And be
sure to choose carefully: a
"juice cocktail" or "juice bever-
age" label means it is not 100
percent juice. Right above the
Nutrition Facts panel you can,
find the exact percentage, of
juice in the product clearly stat-
ed.





THURSDAY, JULY 17
VHardee County Corn-
mission, regular and zoning'
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30,
a.m.

MONDAY, JULY 21
*Hardee County Com-r
mission, start of weeklong'
budget meetings, Room;
102, Courthouse Annex I,
412 W. Orange St., Wau-
chula, 8:30 a.m. each day.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,'
Board Room, 200 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 9:30 a.m.
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.


I













There Are Angels Among Us
There was a hurricane last year,
And my heart felt so much fear,
When the hurricane came through,
I watched as the winds blew.

The doors began to shake,
The windows began to break,
Then our babies began to cry,
I prayed don't let us die.

I looked up at the ceiling,
And my head started reeling,
The rain began to fall,
Have mercy on us all.

There are angels among us,
Just trust in Jesus,
Don't have any fear,
For angels are near.

The angel wing protected,
The rain was reflected.
Someday I will fly up high,
Like an angel in the sky.

I heard a sound like a train,
I heard it began to rain,
Fear had filled my heart,
The roof began to part.

I couldn't believe my eyes,
There through a hole in the sky,
I saw a bright light
Such an amazing sight.

It was the feathers of an angel wing.
I heard its sweet voice sing.
"Fear not all these things,
I will protect you with my wings."
Carolyn Sue Bailey
Wauchula
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.



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BART ARTONRealtr Assciate


July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5A
Letter To The Editor

Lillie Mae Laster Wants

To Preach One More Time


COURTESY PHOTO
Mark Adcock, a 2008 Hardee Senior High School gradu-
ate, was recently accepted into the National Association
for Stock Car Auto Racing Technical Institute in Moores-
ville, N.C., where he will spend 18 months being trained
as a pit crew technician. He hopes eventually to follow
his lifelong dream of becoming a race car driver. The son
of David and Katherine Baxley of Wauchula, Adcock will
enter the technician program later this month, planning
to finish in early 2010.

Patients Share Stories Of

Their Fight Against Disease


Women's basketball coach
Kay Yow has fought and won a
lot of hard battles on the court.
She led the North Carolina
State University women's bas-
ketball team to four ACC titles
and a trip to the NCAA Final
Four. And she coached the 1988
women's Olympic basketball
team to a Gold Medal.
Her unparalleled success and
the respect she's earned during a
storied career landed her in the
Women's Basketball Hall of
Fame in 2007.
But Yow's greatest battle has
been her off-the-court fight
against breast cancer-a battle
she continues to fight today.
And Yow's story is just one of
the inspiring tales now being
told on "Sharing Miracles," a
new 30-minute public affairs
television program that tells the
compelling stories of real
patients and their fight for
health.
"Sharing Miracles," hosted
by Billy Tauzin, president and
CEO of the Pharmaceutical
Research and Manufacturers of
America (PhRMA), shares the
stories of real patients and how
they confronted and often beat
their disease. Tauzin-himself a
cancer sur,,vor-knows first-
hand how important it is for
patients confronting a health
crisis to hear stories of hope
from other patients.
"The words 'game over' aren't
part of Coach Yow's vocabu-
lary," says Tauzin, "and that's



Nutrition

Notes
Q: Is there any nutritional
difference between green and
red bell peppers?
A: Green bell peppers (or
sweet peppers) are simply the
less mature form of red peppers.
While the two varieties have
identical calorie contents, the
extra maturation time allows
red peppers to accumulate high-
er levels of some nutrients. For
example, both types of pepper
are excellent sources of vitamin
C, but red varieties contain
more than twice as much as
green more than a whole
day's supply in just half a cup.
Similarly, green peppers sup-
ply some beta-carotene, but red
peppers supply almost eight
times as much. Red peppers
also supply seven times as
much beta-cryptoxanthin, an-
other carotenoid, as well as
some lycopene, which research
suggests may be linked with
lower risk of prostate cancer.
On the other hand, green pep-
pers are a much better source of
the carotenoid lutein, which
may play a role in maintaining
healthy vision.
Q: Are Italian ice desserts
low-calorie choices?
A: Italian ice has become
increasingly common in restau-
rants and at larger grocery
stores. While its light, refresh-
ing flavor is due in part to a
lower sugar content than many
popular frozen desserts, that
doesn't mean it is low-sugar.
Each four-ou'nce serving, which
can have as much as 4 to 6 tea-
spoons of added sugar, provides
roughly 50 to 100 calories.
Admittedly, that's still a lower
calorie choice than a similar
serving of ice cream (which
provides from 140 to 270 calo-
ries) or even sorbet (which can
contain up to 9 teaspoons of
sugar and 125 calories per serv-
ing). Also note that restaurant
portions and the pre-packaged
sizes sold at grocery stores are
most often six ounces, which
raises the calorie content slight-


what it takes to fight and even
beat cancer, heart disease,
depression or any illness you're
dealing with.
Hope is an essential ingredi-
ent in the fight against disease."
Recent episodes have featured
former White House Press
Secretary Tony Snow, who is
battling colon cancer; syndicat-
ed television talk show host
Montel Williams, a multiple
sclerosis sufferer; and Tele-
mundo TV personality Mayte
Prida, who suffered from breast
cancer.
Future programs will high-
light Emmy Award winning
actor Joe Pantoliano; "Leave it
to Beaver" star Jerry Mathers,
who is fighting diabetes; and
pop icon and Broadway star
Deborah Gibson, who suffers
from anxiety attacks.
"Sharing Miracles" is now on
the air in over 20 major televi-
sion markets. A complete list of
cities, as well as video of pro-
grams already aired, can be
found at www.sharingmira-
cles.com. In addition, the Web
site includes an interactive
forum for people to relate their
own personal stories of hope
and survival. Says Tauzin,
"Every patient's battle against
disease is unique, but the col-
lective power of shared experi-
ence can offer great help and
courage to others fighting for
their lives."
For additional information,
visit www.PhRMA.org.


Dear Editor:
In times like these, we need a
Savior ... to God be the glory
for all the things he has done.
I have been through a storm,
but God brought me home
again as I sat in my wheelchair
looking out of the window at
the church where souls were
saved, healing took place and
many works that the Lord
allowed me, Pastor Lillie Mae
Laster, to do as his servant.
I begin to think how can I
with my handicap get God's
house put back together again.
Just as Jesus will do, if we are
broken-hearted he is able to
mend that heart.
Since 2004 Hurricane
Charley came and destroyed the
church. It has been one thing
then another.
I have been sick. I lost one of
my legs but I have never
stopped praising god. While I
was in rehab for a year in


Lakeland, I was ministering and
praying for people from my bed
or wheelchair.
Now the Lord has fixed it for
me to be home again: I have
only one thing I desire of the
Lord! I want to preach in the
church the Lord gave me one
more time, but I need your help-
ing hands to put a roof, etc., on
or send or come by with any
donations to repair the church
the way it was.
I am 83 years old, my hus-
band Jessie is 92, and we are
blessed to he here! We are here
because God wants us here.
We pray that you can and will
help us in times like these.
Please! Send donations to The
Laster Tabernacle (formerly
True Holiness Church), Hick-
ory Street, P.O. Box 219, Zolfo
Springs, FL 33890.
Pastor Lillie Mae Laster
Zolfo Springs


I
~A


I I ,1 t
PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
In front row are Deacon Jessie Laster and Pastor Lillie
Mae Laster. Standing are daughter Dorothy Rivers and
grandson Phill Bryant.


.. .





The Lasters live in a FEMA mobile home next to the
church. The old church sign has lost its letters.


Gary
Moore


Knlowledgeable


Proven


Committed


I Believe In Maintaining Positive and Productive
Relationships with All Stakeholders



If entrusted by you to serve as Superintendent of Hardee
County Schools, I pledge to...

* Rebuild a positive, productive and trusting working relationship
with our School Board members.

* Reestablish open and honest communications with our community,
with local charitable organizations, with our Sheriffs Department
as well as other local governmental agencies.

* Take your concerns seriously.

Please check the website for updated information and
opportunities to express your concerns!

www.MooreForOurKids.com


This advertisement paid for by the committee to Elect Gary S. Moore for Superintendent of Hardee County
Schools. Democrat. Todd Durden, Campaign Treasurer. Approved by Gary Moore
7:17p


4 !


*


*








6A The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


Pioneer Back To Full Staff


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
For The Herald-Advocate
For the first time in nearly a
year, Pioneer Medical Center in
Wauchula- has a full staff to
meet the medical needs of their
patients.
When Physician's Assistant
John Gill, left for his third tour
of duty in the U.S. Army
National Guard, his coworkers
at Pioneer Medical Center had
to work even harder.
Left behind were physician
assistants Lauren Canary and
Gary Gossman. Together they
took on the role of providing
medical care for the folks of
Hardee County.
"It is amazing how they held
everything together during my
absence. Canary and Gossman
did a wonderful job. The full
team on the field works better,
like any working environment,"
says Gill.
Although Canary and Goss-
man handled the pressures of
working with a small staff, they
still recall difficulties of being
the only medical personnel on
hand.
"The number of patients
stayed the same; however, there
were less people to see them. It
was more difficult for patients
because of the extended amount
of waiting time," says Goss-
man.
Pioneer also recently wel-
comed a new P.A. to its staff.
Keith Coker, of Lake Placid,
recently joined the center and is
looking forward to providing


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 252008CA000406
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$4,052.00 U.S. CURRENCY.


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROGERILO MENDOZA, AND
ALL OTHERS CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN OR TO THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for forfeiture of the follow-
ing described personal property
in Hardee County, Florida:

$4,052.00 U.S. CURRENCY
has been filed against you by
Petitioner, THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, POLICE
DEPARTMENT, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1308, on or before
August 15, 2008, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion.
DATED on July 9. 2008.


B. HUGH BRj
AS Clerk of the
By: Connie
as Deputy


IN THE CIRCUIT COUI
OF THE TENTH JUDICI
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HAS
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 252008CAO
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$1,350.00 U.S. CURRENCY.


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CARLOS ANGEL MAR
AND ALL OTHERS CLA
AN INTEREST IN OR T
PROPERTY DESCRIBE
LOW,

YOU ARE NOTIFIED th
action for forfeiture of the
ing described personal pr
In Hardee County, Florida:

$1,350.00 U.S. CURREN'
has been filed against y
Petitioner, THE CITY
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, P
DEPARTMENT, and you
required to serve a copy o
written defenses, if an
Kenneth B. Evers, Petiti
attorney, whose address Is
Office Drawer 1308, Wau
Florida 33873-1308, on or
August 15, 2008, and to fi
original with the Clerk o
Court either before servi
Petitioner's attorney or im
ately thereafter; otherwh
default will be entered again
for the relief demanded in th
tlon.

DATED on July 9, 2008.
B. HUGH BRA
AS Clerk of the
By: Connie
as Deputy


care for Hardee County resi-
dents.
Though Gill's absence was
challenging to the staff and
patients of Pioneer Medical
Center, they never lost their
support for Gill and their hopes
for his safe return.
Gill did his first tour with the
National Guard in 1992, which
is also the year he first arrived
at Pioneer Medical Center. He
took another tour for a year in
2003 in Afghanistan. Although
it was five years ago, Gill still
remembers the harsh and rough
environment of the foreign
lands.
"It was a very hostile envi-
ronment to be in. It was totally
foreign to all of the soldiers.
They do things so much differ-
ent over there," says Gill.
Recruited back once again to
Central and South America, he
and his fellow soldiers protect-
ed the southern approaches to
the United States.
"The tour to Central and
South America was a much less
intense environment than Iraq,"
says Gill.
Although Gill was thankfully
transferred to a less hostile en-
vironment, he still endured the
pain and hardships of being
away from home.
"It was hard being away from
my family. Anyone who does
this for a living would have to
agree that the most significant
difficulty of being in the war is
trying to adjust to not having
your family and friends with


you. The hardest part was being
away from my wife, no ques-
tion about it," says Gill.
Gill plans to retire from the
military in the near- future.
However, he will never forget
the lessons learned and the
memories made with the sol-
diers who serve this country.
"I love working with the peo-
ple who are committed to the
freedom and well being of this
nation," says Gill.
Beth Gill, who also works at
Pioneer Medical as a registered
nurse, anticipates his retirement
from the military and is proud
of the sacrifices her husband
has made.
"I am very proud of him for
his continued service and com-
munity. I am thankful for his
return and look forward to his
military retirement so he can
spend time with his family and
friends," she says.
Many folks throughout the
community are grateful for the
return of John Gill and the hard
work and dedication that Can-
ary and Gossman provided dur-
ing his absence.
Gill is a prime example of a
servant for both the community
and the nation as a whole. His
services to both Hardee and the
United States shows his com-
mitment and determination to
the well being of people.
"We are very proud and
grateful for his sacrifice. We are
glad he's home!," concluded
Canary.


Boating And Fishing Key To

Satisfying Healthy Relationships


If you or someone you know
is hooked on boating or fishing,
you may be surprised to 'learn
that people who are drawn to
these great American pastimes
get a lot more than simple
pleasures.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
252008CA000288XXXXXX
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST
SERIES 2005-HE2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JUAN RAMON GONZALES; et al,.
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JUAN RAMON GONZALES
Last Known Address
604 KENTUCKY STREET
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
Current Residence is
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing described property in
Hardee County, Florida:


BEGINNING AT A POINT
ADLEY 301.82 FEET WEST OF THE
Court SE CORNER OF NE 1/4 OF
Coker NW 1/4 OF SECTION 4,
y Clerk TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 25 EAST; THENCE
NORTH 120 FEET; THENCE
_7:1724c EAST 151.68 FEET;
RT THENCE NORTH 179.30
AL FEET; THENCE WEST 180
RDEE FEET; THENCE SOUTH
299.36 FEET; THENCE
EAST 28.14 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING,
000407 SAID LANDS SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
'/ has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If any, to
TINEZ, it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.,
IMING Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
O THE address is PO BOX 11438 Fort
ED BE- Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954)
564-0071, within 30 days from the
first date of publication, and file
hat an the original with the Clerk of this
follow- Court either before service on
property Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
CY relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
ou by
OF DATED on July 10, 2008.
POLICE
are B. HUGH BRADLEY
if your AS Clerk of the Court
y, on By: C. Timmons
oner's As Deputy Clerk
s Post
ichula, Pursuant to Florida Statute
before 45.031(2), this notice shall be pub-
lie the lished twice, once a week for two
if this consecutive weeks, with the last
ce on publication being at least 5 days
imedi- prior to the sale.
Ise a
Ist you In accordance with the Americans
e petl- with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing special accommo-
dation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the Clerk
of the Court not later than five
ADLEY business days prior to the pro,
Court ceeding at the Hardee County
Coker Courthouse. Telephone 863-773-
Clerk 4174 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida
Relay Service.


717.724


7:17,24c


According to a recent survey
by the Recreational Boating &
Fishing Foundation (RBFF),
boaters and anglers tend to be
more environmentally con-
scious than people who don't
participate in these activities.
For example, they are more
likely to recycle, compost trash,
use compact fluorescent light-
bulbs (CFLs), carpool and
donate money to an environ-
mental organization. They are
also significantly more con-
scious of, and actively try to
reduce, their carbon footprint.
Many boaters and anglers
also see these hobbies as step-
pingstones on the path to suc.a
cess. A number of them report
that fishing has had a positive
impact on their careers and that
many of their best ideas come
to them while they are out on
the water.
Perhaps most significantly,
boaters and anglers report being
more satisfied with their mar-
riages, relationships and friend-
ships; more satisfied with their
mental health; and more likely
to have a close relationship with
their children than those who
aren't non-boaters and anglers.
If you're interested in discov-
ering the benefits of boating
and fishing, a newly redesigned
Web site that serves as a one-
stop resource for boaters and
anglers of all ages and experi-
ence levels can be a good place
to start.
TakeMeFishing.org offers
numerous fun and informative
features including:
*Fishopedia-Truly the A to Z
of fishing, the Fishopedia edu-
cates visitors about specific
fish, where they live and how to
catch them. Information is
served up with an engaging mix
of copy, visuals and animations.
*Hot Spots-Visitors can
search through 12,000 locations
for boating and fishing and map
out how to get to each destina-
tion.
*Little Lunkers-A portion of
the site devoted to the youngest
of fishing enthusiasts, Little
Lunkers features fun games that
focus on teaching kids about
boating and fishing, and allows
kids to post pictures of their
proud catches.
*Experience Explorer-A boat
selection tool that helps users
compare boats based on the
buyer's boating and fishing
lifestyle, find links to manufac-
turers.
A growing number of people
are taking the bait and reeling in
the benefits of boating and fish-
ing.
A halophyte is a plant that
grows in salty soil where most
plants would die. Asparagus
is a halophyte.


PHOTO BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
After the return of John Gill from National Guard duty, there is now a full staff of physi-
cians assistants, including (from left) Kevin Coker, Lauren Canary, John Gill and Gary
Gossman who look forward to providing the medical care to Hardee countians.




Tree Falls On Man On July 4th


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
For The Herald-Advocate
The Fourth of July was a day
of celebration throughout
Hardee County and the nation,
but for the Reyna family the
holiday turned near fatal.
The family and friends of
Jessie and Jami Reyna gathered
at the County Line Bridge in
Bowling Green on Independ-
ence Day to celebrate with a
picnic. Around 4 that afternoon,
a tragedy occurred.
When one of the family mem-
bers screamed "Run!" as loud
as he could, family and friends
scattered to avoid a massive
tree that was collapsing. Every-
one ran and made it safely out
of harm's way, all except Jessie
Reyna, who had been sitting
down and did not have enough
time to make it away from the
falling limbs.
Mona Gross, a close family
member, was standing close by
and heard Reyna screaming for
help. The huge 30-foot tree had
landed on top of him and he
was now trapped.
Gross received minor
scrapes and bruises as she and
10 other relatives worked to-
gether to push the tree off of
Reyna's body. No more than
seven minutes after the tree was
removed from his back, the
ambulance arrived. .
"We were all traumatized,
just seeing him underneath that
tree yelling for help. It's hard
that his wife and children had to
see him like that," says Gross.
No one else was seriously
injured in the process.
"We were really lucky that
day. We had children from 1 to
10 years old there, and none of
them got seriously hurt," says
Gross.


PARK PROGRESS


Reyna was airlifted from
Pyatt Park to Lakeland Region-
al Medical Center, where he
underwent an eight-hour sur-
gery on his back.
The tree broke three of his
ribs, snapped his scapula in half
and crushed his vertebrae. A
cage has been put in his back-
bone to relieve pressure off of
his nerves. He started rehabili-
tation in Tampa this past Mon-
day.
It is predicted he will spend
up to a year in rehab therapy,
and will be unable to support
his family financially. His wife,
Jami, now has to drive to


Tampa and back, take care of
their children, and pay the bills
with one less salary.
Although Gross is assisting
the family as much as possible,
gas prices are proving to be a
major factor for Jami Reyna as
she travels to visit her husband.
The Reyna family is asking
for any donations possible to
help with finances for his sur-
gery, bills and gas.
If you would like to donate
something to the Reyna family
during this time of need, call
Mona Gross at 773-0279 or
send donations to P.O. Box 775,
Bowling Green.


COURTESY PHOTO
The Reyna family (clockwise from top): Jessie Jr., moth-
er Jami, Jessica, Amy and father Jessie Reyna Sr.







July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7A


A GLORIOUS PHOTO ALBUM


~.~


A,<
('


The Glorius family in April of 1946: Grace, nearly 2-year-old Sharon, Larry and Phil.


Phil' and Grace Glorius, literally and figuratively, mark the center of their family, shown here in 2005.


Grace Glorius at 3 years old (far left), with her mother, aunt, family friend and 4-year-
old sister. The family farm raised wheat and vegetables.


3 COURTESY PHOTOS
Grace Schweigart Glorius at age 2, in 1916.


Four generations, Grace Glorius (left) with her grandmother, who is holding baby Larry, The Gloriuses in more recent years, well on their way to
and her mother. a record marriage that now boasts 72 years.


Phil Glorius at 7 or 8 years
of age.


Phil and Grace Glorius as newlyweds, in January of 1936.


One week after their wedding, the couple and their first
car, a Chevrolet.


I


Valedictorian of the Class of 1933.







8A The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


Accreditation Team

Seeks Comment On WPD


A team of assessors from the
Commission for Florida Law
Enforcement Accreditation
(CFA) will arrive Tuesday to
examine all aspects of the
Wauchula Police Department's
policies and procedures, man-
agement, operations and sup-
port services,.Chief William C.
Beattie announced today.
The Wauchula Police Depart-
ment has to comply with ap-
proximately 250 standards in
order to receive accredited sta-
tus.
As part of the on-site assess-
ment, agency members and the
general public are invited to
offer comments to the assess-
ment team. The public may call
773-9212 on Tuesday between
the hours of 1 to 5 p.m. Tele-
phone comments are limited to
10 minutes and must address
the agency's ability to comply
with CFA standards. A copy of
the standards is available
through the Wauchula Police
Department's public informa-
tion officer in Wauchula at 773-
3265. -
For more information regard-
ing CFA or for persons wishing
to offer written comments about
the Wauchula Police Depart-
ment's ability to meet the stan-
dards of accreditation, write:
CFA, 3504 Lake Lynda Dr.,


Suite 380, Orlando, FL 32817.
The accreditation manager
for the Wauchula Police Depart-
ment is Maria Roja-Quinn. She
said the assessment team is
composed of law enforcement
practitioners from similar agen-
cies. The assessors will review
written materials, interview
individuals, and visit offices
and other places where compli-
ance can be witnessed.
The CFA Assessment Team
leader is Lori Collins of the
Pasco County Sheriff's Office.
Other team members are Lt.
Rick Hawthorne of the Gulf
Breeze Police Department and
Sgt. Diana Blackledge of the
Palm Bay Police Department.
Once the commission's asses-
sors complete their review of
the agency, they report back to
the full commission, which will
then decide if the agency is to
receive accredited status.
The Wauchula Police Depart-
ment's accreditation is for three
years. Verification by the team
that the Wauchula Police De-
partment meets the commis-
sion's standards is part of a vol-
untary process to gain or main-
tain accreditation highly
prized recognition of law en-
forcement professional excel-
lence, Beattie said.


WEATHER SUMMARY
High temperatures for the week ending July 13 ranged from
the upper 80s to mid-90s. Nighttime lows were in the upper 60s to
low 70s. Most counties throughout the State reported at least one
inch of rain. Alachua and Collier counties reported 5.12 and 4.66
inches respectively. Levy, Orange, and Highlands counties all
reported about 3.50 inches of rain. Most locations reported that
drought conditions were eliminated or almost quenched.
FIELD CROPS
Peanut pegging was 60 percent completed, compared to 51
percent last year. Peanut condition was rated 18 percent fair, 68
percent good, and 14 percent excellent. Pasco County reported rel-
atively large amounts oft hay being baled. Growers in the
Panhandle applied fungicides and herbicides last week. Soil mois-
ture levels in the Panhandle and central Peninsula were adequate.
The Big Bend and southern Peninsula had short to adequate soil
moisture.
Moisture Topsoil Subsoil
Rating This Last Last This Last Last
____ week week year week. week Year
Percent
Very short 2 1 8 9 7 19
Short 24 20 24 41 37 34
Adequate 69 69 67 44 55 46
Surplus 5 10 2 6 1 1
VEGETABLES
Vegetable harvesting was nearly finished for most crops.
Producers marketed avocadoes, okra, watermelon, and tomatoes
last week.
LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
Pasture condition was fair to good in the Panhandle and north-
ern areas. Stockpond water levels are coming up following recent
rains. Grass and cattle were doing better in Suwannee County.
Most cattle were in fair to good condition. Pasture in the central
area was poor to excellent. Rains have done wonders for pastures
in Holmes County. The cattle condition improved with enhanced
forage. Hay making was active. The condition of the cattle was
poor to excellent. In the southwestern area, pasture and cattle con-
dition was in fair to excellent condition, with most in good condi-
tion. Statewide, cattle condition was poor to excellent, with most
in good condition.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 0 0 0 0
Poor 5 20 15 5
Fair 40 45 20 40
Good 50 35 55 50
Excellent 5 0 10 5
CITRUS
Temperatures were normal for this time of year, reaching the
mid 90s in all citrus producing areas at least one day of the week.
Scattered afternoon and evening thunderstorms brought various
amounts of rainfall. Areas in the southern citrus growing region
received the most rainfall at over four and one half inches followed
by the central growing region at three and one half inches. The east
coast received the least rainfall at about one half inch. The daily
showers have been beneficial to the growth of both the foliage and
the new fruit. Trees look good in all areas, due to the favorable
weather over the past several weeks. Valencia harvest is relatively
over for.the season. Growers are now focusing on grove mainte-
nance, scheduled management practices, canker and psyllid con-
trol. Next season's fruit is sizing well across the State and growers
have a positive outlook for the crop.






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This DC-3 is among many planes which come to Wauchula Municipal Airport to fuel. Based in Arcadia, this is the
plane recently used in the latest James Bond thriller. Its owner rents it for a variety of purposes, but comes to
Wauchula to fill up because aviation fuel here is $5.05 a gallon and his aircraft takes an average of 600 gallons per
visit. The Wauchula City Commission recently approved installation of a bulk storage facility and additional upgrades
at the airport off Vandolah Road about five miles west of Wauchula.









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PAGE ONE


17 Hardee Swimmers Seventh Avenue Light

hawu, Thoir Oualitv Going, Going, Gone


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Although completely over-
whelmed by the number of op-
ponents, Hardee Swim Associ-
ation participants put some of
their best times on the board.
"I was pleased with their per-
formances. We saw a great deal
of improvement in their times
and quality of their swimming. I
expect a better finish next times
as our kids learn who their com-
petition is," commented coach


Dick Daggett.
The local team was among 18
at the very huge Tampa Bay
Aquatics Invitational last week-
end. The host team had 178
swimmers with 960 entries,
clearly outscoring all opponents
with 3,388 points.
Next in order was the Winter
Haven Stingrays with 34 swim-
mers and 228 entries, and a
mere total of 713.50 points. The
Lakeland Yacht and Country


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
Commission/Zoning public hearing. Both are amendments
to the Land Code dealing with location and restrictions on farm-
worker housing, 8:35 a.m.
Public hearing- ordinance on sexual offender residence
restrictions, 9 a.m.
Catalyst Project for Economic Development, Bill Lambert,
9:10 a.m
Debris Management Plan, Rich Shepard, 9:15 a.m.
Engineering for Sallyport at courthouse, Danny Weeks,
9:30 a.m.
Citizen appointment to Value Adjustment Board.
Rank applications for Severance Tax awards for economic
development.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.













3 .J -A-"-A A- + ,,r'-A -A -,A a` A "- -. -,< -+< + -,A A ` -A .C +A--r A--A- +A- .A- j .
SPolitical CandJates!a

P Your advertising deadline is each B




This will permit us to give your ad the
greatest amount of attention.
Please do not ask us to make an exception.
We desire only to serve all candidates
^equally & well.
The Herald-Advocate
"Your local hometown newspaper
^- for over 100 years"
r-rC- -A- _


Club team of 59 swimmers had
322 entries and finished third
with 630 points.
There were several heats in
every event in the 10-lane pool,
with up to 50 swimmers in
some events. Other teams in-
cluded were from Bardmoor,
Belleair, Clearwater, East Lake
Woodlands, Highlands Hurri-
canes, Lake Placid Aquatics,
Land 0 Lakes Lightning, St.
Petersburg Aquatics, Sun Coast,
' Swim Tampa, Tampa Area Per-
formance, Walden Lake, West
Florida Lightning and a few
unattached swimmers.
With this caliber opposition,
it was exciting to see local
swimmers measure up with
improved times. The highest
place was ninth, by Wyatt
Zeigler in the boys 10-and-
under 100 butterfly and Adam.
Petrie in the boys 11-12 breast-
stroke.
There were a total of 121
events, counting individual and
relays. Hardee began with its
youngest swimmers in the 8 and
under division. Shelby Zeigler
was in the girls 25 freestyle, 25
butterfly, 50 free and 50 butter-
fly.
The youngest boys were.
Wyatt Zeigler and Jordan Petrie
in the 10 and under 100 free, 50
butterfly, 100 backstroke, 50
breaststroke, 100 individual
medley (IM), 50 free, 100 but-
terfly, 50 backstroke, 100
breaststroke and 200 IM.
Featured in the girls 10 and
under events were Atasha
Johnston and Priscilla Cisneros,
who shared points in the 100
free, 100 back, 50 breast, 100
IM, 50 free and 50 back.
The boys 11-12 division
included Adam Petrie and
Jonathan Tucker in the 100 free,
100 fly, 50 breast, 100 IM, 50
free, 50 fly, 100 breast and 200
IM, where Tucker placed 10th.
There was a larger group of
girls in the 11-12 events, with
Leah Cisneros, Amy Brum-
field, Maggie Brumfield, Erica
Roberts, Emily Rhodes, Car-
leigh Coleman and Rachel
Roberts all participating in such
events as the 100 free, 100 fly,
50 back, 50 breast, 100 IM, 50
free, 50 fly, 100 back; 100
breast and 200 IM. They also
joined in twin entries in the
200 free and 200 medleys.
There were no boys in the 13-
14 age group, and Susan
Brumfield was the only girl in
that age division, competing in
both the 50 and 100 free, 100
breast, 200 free and 100 back.
Stephanie Driver and Kaitlyn
Kennedy were the only girls in
the oldest group, age 15-18.
There were no boys in that age.
group. The girls were in the
100 fly, 200 back (where:
Kennedy placed 12th), 200 IM,:
IN frep annd 90 free.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The stop light, at Seventh
Avenue and Main Street will
soon be a thing of the past.
The Wauchula City Commis-
sion voted Monday night to re-
move the signal light, but
agreed to do it in stages to allow
people time to get used to the
new system.
Stop signs will be installed
today (Thursday) on the north
and south approaches on
Seventh Avenue. Main Street
will be a through street as it is
on the Eighth, Ninth and 10th
Avenue intersections.
For a few weeks, the light
will turn to a blinker, red on the
Seventh Avenue sides and
amber on Main Street. Probably
by late Auigust or September,
the lights will be removed.
The effect may also be offset
by the current streetscaping
project on Main Street between
Seventh Avenue and U.S. 17
South, and future streetscaping
from Seventh to Eighth Avenue,
which was approved for negoti-
ations on Monday night.
The commission was faced


-I.


with a dilemma about the
-Seventh Avenue/Main Street
light. A winter visitor has re-
peatedly told the commission it
does not meet legal require-
ments and threatened a lawsuit.
To meet state Department of
Transportation standards and
federal law, it requires two
lights facing each direction,
in case bulbs burn out in one
light.
A traffic study in 2003
brought out the problem, con-
sultant Dale Jamison told the
commission earlier this year. In.
2003 the city decided to discon-
tinue the Eighth Avenue inter-


sections lights but did nothing
about the Seventh Avenue ones.
Predicted not to last long, the
Seventh Avenue lights with-
stood Hurricane Charley and
subsequent storms. Installation
of pedestal signals at the four
comers of the intersection was
expensive and the commission
opted to put that on the back
burner.
Pedestal lights were not
included in the DOT funded
streetscaping project, and the
commission was forced to make
the necessary decision to re-
move the existing lights.


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
in the top 10 in customer satisfaction In
Florida I have received Ford's highest
Sales Honor 15 years running and been a
member of Ford's 300/500 -Club for 20
years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
STEDE J fFt.Meade
STEDEM 375-2606
4tfc .800-226-3325


- iii'
jAb


Proven Leadership

Gina


Neuhofer

School Board District 3


Sp Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Gina Neuhofer, non-partisan, for School Board District 3
Ai 7:17p
w* i l


l" (ja ry



SMoore


Conservative


Pioven


CONGRATULATIONS

Congratulations to our students, faculty, staff and school
administrators for increasing your scores for 2008 on the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests!
Your hard work is paying off. We are proud of you and
the increase in learning that these scores represent.


Just imagine what you will be able to do with additional
instructional resources, improved communications and
increased support from the district office.

I believe we can do even better!

Please check the website for updated information and
opportunities to express your concerns!

www.MooreForOurKids.com


This advertisement paid for by the committee to Elect Gary S. Moore for Superintendent of Hardee County
Schools. Democrat. Todd Durden, Campaign treasurerr. Approved by Gary Moore


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2B The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008




Hardee


MAENPAA HONORED


Livin g


PUBLIC SAFETY


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Richard Maenpaa was honored last week for serving over 22 years on the board of
directors of Peace River Center, dedicated to improving the mental health of individu-
als and communities In Hardee, Polk and Highlands counties. Peace River Center has
an office in Wauchula at 213 E. Orange St. Maenpaa received a framed print of a pair
of swans at the Wauchula Kiwanis Club meeting held at the Panda Restaurant. Peace
River Center offers crisis services, counseling, medication management, adult mental-
health outpatient and residential programs, domestic violence shelters, a rape recov-
ery and resource center, Club Success, a thrift shop. The 24-hour crisis line is (863)
519-3744 or 1-800-627-5906. Shown (from left) are Dr. Mike McLeod, center Advisory
Board; Margaret Parry, community relations director; Maenpaa; Mary Kay Langford,
chairman, Board of Directors; and Susan Lambert, manager of development. Peace
River Center served over 1,000 Hardee County residents in 2007.


_I
PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, June 17, heard a report on services by Hardee
County Fire-Rescue. Speakers were Public Safety Director/Fire Chief Mike Choate and
irefighter/paramedics Rick Eagerton and James Simpson. They displayed modem
medical treatment and equipment on an ambulance. Fire-Rescuer has 41 employees,
including 36 firefighter/EMTs or firefighter/paramedics. There are 12 per 24-hour shift
- five in Wauchula, five in Zolfo Springs and two in Bowling Green. They average 56
hours of work, which is 16 hours of overtime, except for administrative employees.
Some may work 72 hours or more in one week. County fire assessments generate
about $2.8 million a year, said Choate. Pictured (from left) are Dr. Mike McCoy,
Eagerton, Simpson and Choate.


LIONETTE SENIORS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Six 2008 graduating Hardee High School Lionettes Club members recently visited the
Wauchula Lions Club, which meets Thursday noon at Faith Presbyterian Church
Fellowship Hall in Wauchula. Shown (from left) are Nicole Bromley, who plants to
attend the University of South Florida; Cassandra Baucom, South Florida Community
College; Samantha Hagans, Baptist College of Florida; club President LeAnna Himrod,
University of Florida; Jamilynn Hand, USF; and Christina English, Polk Community
College. The Lionettes completed 23 projects during the d2007-08 school year, includ-
ing working at the Hardee Youth Football concession stand, First Baptist Church
Brotherhood Dinner, Main Street Centennial Celebration, cleaning HHS flower beds,
the Chamber of Commerce annual dinner, raising $11,000 for the literacy program,
donating Christmas gifts for needy children, the Lions Club 80th-Year Celebration, a
carnation sale, the Morris Scholarship Dinner, the Zolfo Springs Elementary Carnival,
the Hardee Manor birthday party, Lions Camp, and National Teacher Appreciation Day.


I am a man of fixed and unbending
which is to be flexible at all times.


principles, the first of


Stephens Family
,Holds Annual
Reunion Saturday
The annual Stephens Family
Reunion will be held this
Saturday at New Zion Baptist
Church.
Family members are asked to
bring a picnic lunch. Paper
goods will be provided for
everyone's convenience.
Relatives are invited to come
and join in a time of food and
fellowship.


Maranatha Baptist Church
Doctrine: We are unashamedly
independent, fundamental,
conservative, old fashioned
King James Version.
We refuse to have the world's (rock)
music in our services.
Christian School: With limited
enrollment, we have students in
grades 2-10.
Services: For the next month or so,
our Sunday evening service
will be conducted at 1:00 P.M.,
after a brief snack break.
Location: 2465 Oxendine (off of
Steve Roberts Special) in Zolfo
Springs
Pastor's phone: 773-0989
Church phone: 735-2524


What I know is, is that if you do work that you love, and
the work fulfills you, the rest will come.
-Oprah Winfrey


-Everett Dirksen


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July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Local Couple Prepare


For Mission To Prague


NEW ROTARY OFFICERS


Wauchula, natives Shannon
and Elizabeth Wilson Bradley
depart soon for the Czech
Republic on a far-from-typical
mission trip.
The Bradleys do not plan on
returning home for five years.
Also, instead, of the usual
humanitarian mission in a
Third-World country, the Brad-
leys are stationing themselves
in a metropolitan European
city: Prague.
The pair is embarking on this
journey as a part of Avant
Ministries. They are going with
a small team in hopes of planti-
ng churches and bringing the
people of Prague hope and
Truth.
The Czech Republic is about
the size of South Carolina.
There are 10 million people in
the country, and 60 percent or
more claims to be atheists.
Only a quarter of one percent
are evangelical believers.
These statistics played a large
role in the Bradleys' decision to
station themselves there. How-
ever, the reason the Bradleys
have a heart for the Czech
Republic is because the country
has recently emerged from
Communism. For the first time,
the citizens have freedom. With
this freedom, they are "search-
ing for something," Elizabeth
Bradley says.
There are about one million
people in Prague and the neigh-
borhood the Bradleys are mov-
ing in to has about 100,000 res-
idents. The neighborhood is
called Krc, and it was devel-
oped during the time of Com-
munism. In this neighborhood
there is only one church, a Ro-
man Catholic Cathedral which
holds about 200 people.
The Bradleys see their mis-
sion as a race for Truth. They
explain that since freedom is a
recent luxury, the country is full
of "somethingists"; meaning
the people ambiguously believe
in something, but have no direc-
tion because they have never
had religious freedom under
their oppressive government.
The Bradleys, along with Avant
Ministries, hope to provide
them with direction.
The mission field is not the
only unordinary aspect of this
trip; the method they plan to use
in planting churches is far from
conventional as well. The tradi-
tional "long-term mission trip"
usually takes about 30 years to
accomplish. A couple usually
spends a lifetime ministering to
a community and planting a
church.
However, Avant Ministries
Models its method after the
apostle Paul of biblical times,
who planted several churches in
his lifetime. Avant sends out a
diverse team consisting of six to
eight people with different


Elizabeth & Shannon Bradley


skills, strengths and personali-
ties. They use the same amount
of man hours in a shorter period
of time to be more efficient and
timely in bringing people spiri-
tual hope, Truth and enlighten-
ment. This method is called
"short-cycle church planting."
According to Shannon Brad-
ley, the team is going to "look
for advantages in the team, geo-
graphy and culture to accom-
plish more with the same
amount of effort." He says that
"the plan is we don't have a
plan." They are entering the
Czech Republic as learners,
sensitive to the needs and cul-
ture of the citizens.
While the trip itself is uncon-
ventional, the story of how both
Bradleys were called to the mis-
sion field is equally interesting.
Elizabeth Bradley explains,
"We didn't really see ourselves
going eight years ago." Al-
though trips had been made to
the Philippines, the Middle East
and the Ukraine, neither had
expected to become full-time
missionaries.
Both attended the University
of Florida after high school. He
is the son of Hugh and Libby
Bradley of Wauchula, and she is
the daughter of Ron and Trisha
Wilson of Wauchula. Both were
active in New Hope Baptist's
youth ministry in high school.
However, in college the cou-
ple attended New Testament
Baptist Church in Ocala, where
they were counselors in the sin-
gles ministry. After college they
moved to Ocala to become
more involved with the church.
It is here they learned of Avant
Ministries and began to feel led
toward mission involvement.


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

WITH THE HELP OF HABIT
We all need the help of habit in our lives.
For example, suppose you are spending more 'than you are
earning. You decide to habitually set aside proper amounts each
month for the bills you know will be coming up. I guarantee you
will sleep easier.
Conversely, bad habits can ruin you. Drugs, alcohol, pornog-
raphy and self-pity diligently practiced can dominate your life and
lead you to despair.
Old age .can be beautiful or horrible, depending on habit. A
grumpy 30-year-old can easily become a cynical and bitter 70-'
year-old, unless something happens to interrupt the deadly process.
A cheerful and generous 30-year-old, given 40 years of practice,
can become a radiant senior, a blessing to all who know him.
Jesus said, "Everyone who hears these words of mine and puts
them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the
rock" (Matthew 7:24).
It takes time to build a house. It also takes time to develop
godly habits, but it pays off.
Jesus said such a "house" would survive the storms of life. He
told, too, about a foolish man who built his house on sand only to
see it collapse.
"Thy will be done" is a choice we can refuse until one day God
says, in effect, "All right." Your will be done!" with all of the
terrible consequences that follow such a judgment.
In "The Great Divorce," C.S. Lewis pictures Hell not as some
awful surprise after death but as the logical extension of the lives
folks live here on Earth! What a ghastly place, filled with people
locked into all the awful habits they have freely adopted during the
years when they could have made wiser choices!





Sf "w my "fke wyz4, icc /997

Piano & Violin Lessons
Instruments, Books & Accessories for
Piano Tuning
Specializing In Music Ministry Training
Instructor Mandy N Bell
(863) 7734140 410 north Ohio Avenue. Wauchula soc5: fc


COURTESY PHOTO


Unsure of how to become
involved in missions, the cou-
ple prayed for guidance. After
which, this opportunity arose
and both felt led to go.
Since New Testament Baptist
and Avant work outside of the
Southern Baptist Convention,
they do not receive the funding
that Southern Baptist mission-
aries receive. Also, the cost of
living in metropolitan Prague is
greater than that of a Third
World country.
The couple will not work in
Prague. "Our job will be this,"
Shannon Bradley explains.
Therefore, the Bradleys are
seeking partnerships to not only
help fund their trip, but to allow
more people to be a part of their
mission. Through their experi-
ence, the Bradleys want to pro-
vide an opportunity for the
community to broaden its per-
ception of missions and what
Elizabeth Bradley calls the
"world that needs to know."
They are currently giving
presentations in nearby church-
es on their planned trip and pur-
pose. They are in the process of
finding churches and individu-
als who wish to partner up with
them and play a part in their
journey. The Bradleys are seek-
ing support in the way of
finance, prayer and encourage-
ment.
The Bradleys hope to provide
their partners with updates and
further opportunities to become
involved in their mission. To
find out more information or
become a partner, call the
Bradleys at 773-6206.
The Bradleys will be leaving
for Krc and beginning their
mission in early fall.



The summit of happiness
is reached when a person
is ready to be what he is.
-Erasmus
I may be the only mother in
America who knows exact-
ly what their child is up to
all the time.
-Barbara Bush


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY ;
New officers for the Hardee Rotary Club were installed on Wednesday of last week at
the Java Cafe in Wauchula. Shown (back row, from left) are Ann Martin, secretary; Juan
DelaTorre, president; Sue Birge, 2007-08 Rotarian of the Year, her third such award;
Arnold Lanier, past president; Nellie Garcia, treasurer; and Jeff Cornelius, sergeant-at-
arms; (front) Bob Arnold, assistant district governor, Winter Haven; and Beverly Hunt,
district governor, Lake Placid. A Rotary International goal is the elimination of polio in
the world. There are 32,000 Rotary Clubs with 1.2 million members. The motto is "Let's
Make Dreams Real." The United Nations reports 9.7 million children in the world died
in 2006, and two-thirds were unnecessary. This was the first time in many years global
child deaths were below 10 million. Rotary International will try to help reduce the child
death toll through other projects, for insecticide-treated bed nets, digging wells for
drinking water, vaccines, and nutrition.

In the path of our happiness shall we find the learning for which we have cho-
sen this lifetime.


DAVID

DURASTANTI
for
Superintendent of Schools
www.ForOurKidsFuture.com


Aj* CONSERVATIVE .E1
""rD PRO1EN1-Ki1A",R d 1
D" POVEN LEADER November 4th, 2008
Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by David D. Durastanti Campaign Account, Approved by David D. Durastanti, Republican, Chet Huddleston, Campaign
A A A A A A A1A




VACATION BIBLE SCHOO


The newly formed

"Hardee County Friends of the Parks"

would like to thank

CF Industries

Vandolah Power Company

and

Mosaic

For their very generous contribution

for this year's 4th of July

Patriotic Fireworks Display

Through their monetary contribution and the efforts of the
Hardee County Youth Coalition's daytime activities, citizens of
our county enjoyed a fun filled day of patriotic remembrances.



MOsaic- OCFIndustries VANDOLfL
,- 4 Hardee Phosphate Complex POWER COMPANY

soc7:17c


Oka--






4B The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


NEW LIONETTE OFFICERS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Zolfo Springs Elementary School Student Council recently visited the Hardee
Rotary Club, which meets on Wednesday noon at the Java Cafe in Wauchula. Shown
(front row, from left) are Julian Galvez, Pagou Vue, Vice President and council sponsor
Nangly Lor, and teacher Kay Crews; (back row) School Board member Gina Neuhofer,
Anna Lazo, President Colton Albritton, Crystal Avila, Secretary Hailey Sauvey, and
teacher Laura Wells.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The officers of the Hardee Senior High School Lionettes Club for 2008-09 year have
been named. Lionettes is sponsored by the Wauchula Lions Club and is a high-school
service and leadership club, Shown are new officers Bailee Williams, historian; Bailey
Knight, record keeper; Kirsti Roehm, president; Chelsea Harris, secretary; and
McKenna Crawford, chaplain. Not in photo is Vice President Courtney Nicholson.


ROTARY HELPS RESTHAVEN


'Little Princess'
Party Fetes
1st Birthday
Amy Danielle Darty, the
daughter of James and Eliza-
beth Darty of Bowling Green,
turned 1 year old on May 23.
She celebrated the occasion
of her very first birthday with a
party on Sunday, May 25, at
Paynes Creek State Historic
Park in Bowling Green. Theme
for the party was Little
Princess.
Guests were served hamburg-
ers, hot dogs and a princess
cake.
Joining in the fun were great-
grandparents Clarence and Irma
Darty, grandmother Beverly
Wills, uncles Shawn Darty and


Amy
Randy Lowe, aunts and uncles
Leeann and Roger Darty and
Kimber and Dustin Darty,
cousins Lindsey Darty and
Adelina Taylor, members of
Bodiford Ministries and other
close friends and family.,


History is a mighty dramos, enacted upon the theatre of
times, with suns for lamps and eternity for a background.
-Thomas Carlyle
Anybody who thinks money will make you happy hasn't
got money.
-David Geffen


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate



VOTER REGISTRATION DRIVE


SAT. JULY 19 11AM 2PM

FREE BBQ Chicken Lunch


219 East Main Street
Wauchula
(across from Quilter's Inn) 7:17c






Photos!

*Senior Graduation
*Senior Awards
*Baseball Awards
*Spring Jamboree
*Little League Baseball
*Football Action
*Fair Photos
*Junior High Volleyball

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com
"Photos ... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Alex Gilliard And Ralph Harrison 9-13tf1


'Disney Princess'
Party Honors
3 Year Old
Elizabeth Nichole. Darty
turned 3 years old on June 17.
She is the daughter of James
and Elizabeth Darty of Bowling
Green.
Nikki celebrated with a birth-
day party on Saturday, June 14,
at the Ona home of her great-
grandparents. Theme for the
occasion was Disney Princess.
Guests enjoyed barbecue
chicken, hamburgers, hot dogs
and a princess castle cake.
Joining in the fun occasion
along with Nikki and her par-
ents were great-grandparents
Clarence and Irma Darty,
grandmother Beverly Wills,
uncles Shawn Darty and Randy
Lowe, aunts and uncles Leeann
and Roger Darty and Kimber
and Dustin Darty, cousins
Lindsey Darty and Adelina
Taylor and other close friends
and family members.


Nikki


COURTESY PHOTO
Nine members of the Hardee Rotary Club on Saturday, June 21, did voluntary land-
scaping work at Resthaven. Countryside Growers donated plants and Florida Fence
Post Co. donated mulch. Workers (from left) are Juan DelaTorre, Zee Smith, Gina
Neuhofer, the Rev. Harold Davis, club President Arnold Lanier, Jeff Ussery, Jeff
Cornelius, Sue Birge and Troy Brant.


,t. ..


It's like 4 parks for 1 low price.',
Rides, Slides, Animals &
. R Florida Spore Ha
Sof Fame Induction


ONE PINK, NO BLUE


Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Thorn-
ton, Wauchula, a seven pound
four ounce daughter, Gairyn
Belle, born April 21, 2008,
Lakeland Regional Medical
Center. Mrs. Thornton is the
former Blaire Bass. Maternal
grandparents are Pete Bass of
Wauchula and Deidra Lambeth-
Bass of Winter Haven. Paternal
grandparents are Carl and Judy
Thornton, of Wauchula.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.
The supreme happiness of
life is the conviction that
we are loved.
-Victor Hugo
What we have to do is to
find a way to celebrate our
diversity and debate our
differences without fractur-
ing our communities.
-Hillary Rodham Clinton






July 17,2008, The Herald-Advocate 5B


City Sets Up Building Department
By JOAN SEAMAN Fourth Avenue to turn back to The second resolution allows
Of The lerald-Advocate Main Street. the use of $3,100 in confiscated
Wauchula will have its own Noted there are three and forfeited drug monies to be
building department up and applicants to fill the Ward I, used to purchase electronics
moving shortly. District 1 seat being vacated by and lights for a tandem axle
On Monday evening the City Troy Brant, who has moved .out cargo trailer the police use for
Commission approved first of that ward. Patty Detwviler, job fairs, investigations, etc. -
reading of an ordinance to make Brent Driskell and Val Patarini Chief Bill Beattie and his
the new building department a have put their names in the hat staff were commended for the
reality by fall. from which the commission quick arrest of juveniles spray-
Although it had been pretty will choose someone to fill the painting along Palmetto Street.
thoroughly reviewed at a plan- four-year term, which is open Approved first reading of
ning session the previous week, since no one completed papers a dozen ordinances annexing
Commissioner Jerry Conerly during the qualifying period, four properties totaling 5.2
noted three sections where Anyone else in the city terri- acres. They are south of the cur-
wording could be improved tory east of U.S. 17 can com- rent Florida Institute for Neuro-
before the 28-page document plete a resume or application, logic Rehabilitation facilities on
comes up for final hearing on The commission will make its South Florida Avenue across
the ordinance, choice at the Aug. 11 meeting. from the hospital and will let
On page 6, work exempt Accepted the $675,079 the group add a similar group of
from permits, including mostly bid of Lavon Cobb Construc- cottages of the same design
minor renovations, does not re- tion for the Aircraft Parking there.
quire a permit to add a residen- Ramp and Storage Hangar. There are three ordinances
tial storage shed, constructed or Roger Miller and staff of PGI for each of the four parcels. One
manufactured, of less than 150 Homes, the lowest bidder at annexes the property into the
square feet. Conerly said per- $658,000 objected. The com- city, the next changes its future
mits would ensure that it is not mission accepted the recom- land use classification from
placeo within setbacks or ex- mendation of the Airport county "town center" to city
ceeds the total square feet of Authority and Avcon consulting "commercial," and the third
building permissible on that engineer on the lowest and best changes the zoning classifica-
particular lot. bid, feeling PGI had not shown tion from county "FR-Farm
Similarly, on page 7, minor experience in airport construc- Residential" to city "Cl-
repairs such as relocation of a tion and meeting FAA regula- Commercial."
variety of items is listed. tions. Both bids were less than Sat. as the Community
Conerly questioned why "soil" the grant approved for the work. Redevelopment Board and ap-
was in the list. Attorney Cliff Approved a resolution proved funds for renovations in
Ables said this could be some- updating an agreement with brick pointing at Park Place and
one brining in fill dirt or even Chastain-Skillman Inc. for the ceiling and windows at City
adding soil for a small garden. preparing work on the proposed Hall.
Finally, on page 18, Conerly fifth well to be on the northwest As the CRA Board, the com-
questioned why a- foundation comer of the Skatepark proper- mission also approved negotiat-
survey would be completed ty where there is room for the ing with Westra Construction
after the foundation was laid. well, housing and generator to Corp. to extend streetscaping
Contractor Lavon Cobb ex- pipe water to the water plant. It from Seventh Avenue to Eighth
plained this was normal proce- also includes demolition and Avenue.
dure to ensure that the slab was replacement of an aerator at the Approved a resolution of
placed on the right lot and with plant to strip out hydrogen sul- an interlocal agreement with the
the right setbacks. An altema- fate. The fifth well will provide county and other municipalities
tive method to using a surveyor drought protection and ensure for hurricane debris removal if
is lining up the property line an adequate water -supply for it becomes necessary..
markers if they are available, residents, said Giroux. Heard Juan Delatorre


In other action, the Commis-
sion: ;
Approved establishing a
truck route to keep truckers
from making a left turn onto the
newly landscaped Main Street.
Southbound truckers will turn
on Palmetto Street and go to


Approved two resolutions
about the police department.
One allows transfer of the title
of a 1997 vehicle confiscated
and awarded to the department
by forfeiture. It will be given to
the Sheriff's Office for contin-
ued interagency drug task force
use.


withdraw his request for rezon-
ing to put a convenience store
and gas station at the intersec-
tion of Stenstrom Road and
South Florida Avenue since the
Planning & Zoning Board rec-
ommended it be denied because
of opposition from nearby resi-
dents.


a 1ealdAdvg g e



11 .7h v. W ucua L S37 J







"Wtlvdrl -a%%Wetkdst,*e


RIDING READER


Simple Solutions To
Combat Rising Food Prices


Food prices are on the rise
and, according to the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture, they
are expected to climb even
higher. With eggs up 40 per-
cent, milk up 20 percent and
chicken up 10 percent, many
families are feeling the strain on
their budgets at the grocery
store.
Taking small steps, such as
eating before heading to the
grocery store and reading the
circular to see what's on sale,
can have a big impact at the
checkout counter. Here are
some other ways families can
make the most of their grocery
budget:
Planning ahead is very


important. Before you go to the
grocery store, plan but a week's
worth of meals. Check your
pantry for any items you
already have and make a list so
you know exactly what to buy
at the store.
To cut down on cost,
choose affordable canned veg-
etables such as Libby's, which
are jusi as nutritious and great
tasting as pricey fresh varieties.
GetBacktotheTable.com has de-
licious easy recipes to help
moms incorporate canned veg-
etables into family dinners.
Buy in bulk only when it's
a product you know you will
use, and check the price per
ounce listed on the shelf to


*make sure you're getting the
most product for your money.
For moms shopping with
children, create a learning expe-
rience. Before you set out, show
your kids your list and explain
that it is exactly what the fami-
ly needs for the week. Get the
kids involved by having them
hunt for essentials. Older chil-
dren can put their math skills to
real-world use by weighing
items, counting cans and calcu-
lating sale prices.
Budget-conscious moms can
download my meal planner and
find cost-saving tips from
Libby's, as well as convenient,
healthy recipes, at www.Get-
BacktotheTable.com.


'W.V1


With presentations and discussion, our group
meetings provide a forum to address the challenges of
living with diabetes. Topics include self care skills,
blood glucose testing, meal planning, exercise, eating
out, goal setting, and much more!


Participation in the program is FREE!
All participants receive a personalize session with a
registered dietician.

Choose between a three day session:
August 7,14 and 21

9:00 am to Noon

OR

a two day session:

August 19 and 21

4:00 pm to 7:00 pm

To register call 773-4161 x217


Free gift to first 15 who register!


Presented by the Hardee County Health
Department Diabetes Prevention and Control
Program
7:17, 24c


I


DENNIS


"Leadership That W orks"


"AdvanceEd District Accreditation provides a

protocol for school systems committed to systemic,

systematic, and sustainable continuous improvement.


I congratulate you, the professional staff,

the Board of Education, and stakeholders throughout

the community on this achievement to be awarded

District Accreditation as a Quality School System."

(signed by) Dr. Mark A. Elgart, President and CEO of AdvanceED


I will appreciate your consideration to be

allowed to continue to lead the dedicated

professionals of our school district.

Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by Dennis Jones Campaign, approved by Dennis Jones (D)
7:17p


COURTESY PHOTO
Haneen Ottallah earned 470.7 Accelerated Reader points through the reading incen-
tive program at Wauchula Elementary School. That made her the schools top point
earner! For this outstanding academic feat, Haneen was awarded a new bicycle pro-
vided by Hardee Manor Healthcare Center. She is pictured (at right) here with (from,
left) Bobbie Davis of Hardee Manor and Accelerated Reader Committee Chairman Amy
Monts de Oca.


,FIO)7







6B The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008






-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING ........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


PARKERI. FILIJ DIRT


DEMOLITION
Fill Dirt *Tree Removal *
*Stump Removal Dragline *
*Track Hoe Land Clearing *
Shell* Clay Top Soil
Bulldozer Dump Trucks *
(863) 735-2415


s.-Taindalm Axle Lo-ad'.

$TOOIL~a4
~jIVOI5 'Qie~rrdius arZolfo springs
Fili*Tdp Solli Hard Pan
Harda County Aiea o#iy


JUAN DELATORRE
(863)781-1128
AWWW.IuANDEATORRE.COM
Jo Emlu:MAn@ IANSDATIEn.COM

I g 10 I!
i ALEVrATEINzMMVomS BIOKER. ASSOCIATE
305 Fondulac. Avon Park 2BR/1BA CB $90,000
601 N. 8th Ave. Wauchula 4/2 CB $153,000
Rhvnn Rd 15 ac grove $195,000
1085 US Hwy 17. Wauchula Great business potential $750,000I







Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net Jessie G Sambrano


SPECIAL OF THE WEEK


4BR 2.5 bath Custom CB home built In 2007
10' ceiling crown molding 3064 sq ft heated area,
3767 total under roof. 2 car garage. All on one acre.
Elegance abounds throughout this home.
$299,000.00.
Best Mobile Home Location 3BR/2BA well maintained mobile
home in Downing Place. Close to shopping hospital and restau-
rants. $77,000.00 MLS # 202856
Residence with a business 4BR/2.5BA CB Home with over 2,000
sq ft under roof. Includes going beauty salon with 2 stations. 1,000
sq ft of outside buildings 2 lots fenced. $179,900.00 MLS # 200983
Looking for a good location to place a mobile home? Look no more
- Downing Place City Services $15,000.00 MLS # 201534
4BR 2BA CB home in Riverview 2 car garage Central air/heat
- Appliances $169,900.00 MLS # 203590
One acre lot in Golfview $25,000.00

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember
1 1^ Our listings are on the Internet. ,
Anyone with a computer can 12
access them anytime! O,,POR,,sT
Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Forces, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net


John Freeman
Steve Lanier
Jason Johnson


After hours
(863) 781-4084 Lisa Douglas
(863) 559-9392 Jessie Sambrano
(863) 781-3734 Noey Flores


(863) 781-3247
(863) 245-6891
(863) 781-4585
7:17c


Clas sifieds


TAKE OVER PAYMENTS 2001
Chrysler PT cruiser, 7300 Lake
Buffum Road North, Ft. Meade.
863-537-9172. 7:17-31 p
2007 CHEVY MALIBU, 16,000
miles, $14,000 OBO. 863-781-
0593. 7:17p
2002 HONDA VTX 1800 R, 10K
ml., fully loaded. Must see to
appreciate, $10,000. 767-0922,
781-3971. 6:19-7:17p
WILL PAY TOP price for junk cars
and we pick up. Rooms Used
Cars and Parts. 773-0637. 1:10tfc


40 HP MERCURY SS prop like
new, 1K OBO. 773-3316. 7:17-24p


18 FOOT LOWES flatbottbm, 25
HP 4-stroke Mercury and trailer,
$4,500. 735-1462. 7:17-31p
BOAT FOR SALE, one owner,
2001 Lowe pontoon boat, 40 HP
Johnson motor, $6500.00. Please
call 863-781-2437, cell No.; 863-
773-3402, home phone. 7:10-8-7p


WOODEN BUNKBED set, double
top, trundle bottom, desk and
drawers, storage space in back,
locally owned, $400. 813-316-
'6896. 7:17nc

When I grow up I want to be
a little boy.


Lonestar
3 Construction Cor-

General Contractor
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated

Office 863-773-4779 Fax 863-773-9865
cl6:99tc




CONSTBUTION _____alter graves


999 U.S. Highway 17 South Fort Meade,.FL 33841-3343
863.285.7381 Fax 863.285.7395
cl7:17-58:7p



CITY OF WAUCHULA
The City of Wauchula will be accepting applications for an
Inventory Specialist position in the Purchasing Dept. This
position requires knowledge of standard office proce-
dures and equipment. Must be able to maintain accurate
records and perform mathematical calculations. Must be
able to use computerized purchasing system. Maintain
inventory records and issue supplies. High school diplo-
ma or GED equivalent required. Related warehouse and
purchasing experience 6 plus. Applications,' nay be
obtained at City Hall until July 21, 2008,yntil 5:QQ(p.m. The
City of Wauchula is an equal opportunity employer and a
drug free workplace. ci7:17c



JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V See, Sr., Broker


Three 5 ac tracts located on
Johns Rd. Well located on one
of the tracts. Price Reduced!
$89,900 each.

Three adjacent 5 ac tracts
located on East Main Street in
Wauchula. Price Reduced to
$74,900 each.

1 acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in
Wauchula. Paved road front-
age. Deed restrictions. Zoned
FR. Lot size 130' X 305'.
$38,500

REDUCED! MUST SEE! 3
BR/2 BA home on landscaped
lot. Granite countertops, stain-
less appliances. 2 car garage.
$159,900
One of a kind development
property. 300 acres in Sara-
sota. Hamlet designation.

700 acres in Eastern Sarasota
County. High & Dry. Hamlet
designation. Plenty of paved
road frontage.
COMMERCIAL LOT! NEED
VISIBILITY? Put your busi-
ness here! Located on North &
South bound Hwy 17. North
end of Wauchula. Zone C-2,
$195,000

Commercial property. 1.28
acres. Frontage on Main Street
and Hwy 64. $120,000.
3.19 acres. Zoned C-2.
Plenty of room for several
businesses. Potential income
already in place. Hwy 17
across from Walmart.
$1,200,000.

Golf Course/Development
Property! Water & sewer
available. 127 acres! Call for
price and details!


Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


3 BR/2 BA house on 7 1/2 acres.
Stocked pond. This property is
zoned for up to 3 homes!
$179,900.
PRICE REDUCED! 3 BR, 2
BA immaculate home with
many extras. Home was built
in 2000 and all appliances are
included. Landscaped yard
with several fruit trees and
even a pecan tree. $143,900.
Waterfront property! 2 BR/2
BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep
water canal that leads into
Charlotte Harbor. Buyer con-
cessions possible. Priced right
at $165,000!
HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!
3 Bedroom/2 Bath home in
Golfview. Big 1+ acre lot. 2 car
garage. $195,000.
2 BR/1 BA CB home. Metal
roof put on after Hurricane.
Some work needs to be done
inside. Large corner lot in
Wauchula. $72,000.
Two mini-ranches! One is
5.95 acres, the other is 6.65
acres. $99,500 each
70 acres of prime develop-
ment property. City water and
sewer allocated. Annexed and
rezoned to single family with
Developers Agreement.
$20,000 per acre.
170.8 acres of pasture land in
Manatee County, Myakka City
area. 2600 feet of frontage on
State Road 64.
38.6 acre grove with 700 feet
on Lake Lizzy. 2400 feet paved
road frontage on Lake Hen-
dry-Lake Buffum Road. 8"
deep well and 6" deep well.
10 beautiful acres ready to
build on. Plenty of shade trees
in a great country setting.
$150,000.


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445-0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


ROGER'S CARPET CLEANING,
office and telemarketer help
needed; computer skills, bilin-
gual, paid by commission. 773-
6603. 7:17p
CLASS A CDL driver needed,
must have clean drivers license,
must be able to work any hours,
drug test required. 863-781-0233
or 863-773-6510. 7:17p
ADMINISTRATIVE assistant for
local, established company. Must
have telephone skills and
Microsoft Word proficiency.
Minimum 2 years secretarial ex-'
perience. E-mail resumes to
huntsherry@hotmail.com or fax
to 863-773-6742. 7:17p


DRIVER Class A CDL, local,
experienced, motivated, depend-
able, and clean record. Benefits
and paid holidays, DFWP Keen
Farm & Grove Service, Inc. Call
Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7i10tfc
MECHANIC -diesel/heavy equip-
ment, and maintenance, welding
& fabrication a plus, motivated,
dependable, and clean record.
Benefits and paid holidays, DFWP
Keen Farm & Grove Service, Inc.
Call Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:10tfc
NOW HIRING Island of
Adventure Childcare Center, must
have CDA. Call 767-0800. 5:1tfc


GILLIARD "I

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Sh |
* Pond Digging Ditch CleaniI


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
ci8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


2.20 Acres Comm. Hwy 17 South. Road Frontage on 3 sides.
$225,000.
Main building 3200 sq. ft., storage building 1300 sq. ft. Large
commercial lot in Bowling Green. 225 ft. US 17 frontage.
Formerly Bills Meat Market. $175,000. AS IS.
2.10 acres prime corner SR 64 W. and Golfview Drive.
$80,000.
1 acre MOL zoned C-1 behind ACE Hardware. 1/2 ac. site
ready needs fill and clearing. $50,000.
Corner lot ip Torrey. Old Dixie Hwy. Heavily wooded.
$20,000. c7:17c







Joe ETDavis
I N C., REALTOR 8S
-ii 1 (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
S REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL

John O'Neal


See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
Need some room for entertain- 25 ac on US Hwy 17 zoned A-
ment? You can own 4,000SF 1. Completely fenced; current-
on 1.12 ac for just $225,000! ly under Greenbelt exemption
for taxes. Includes damaged
Large home w/12 acs, nice MH sold "As Is". Three wells,
fishing pond & lots of frontage septic tank. $300,000!
on Hollandtown Rd. Need to
see the creek-side view to 10 ac improved, fenced pas-
appreciate. $250,000! tureland on Abendhoff Rd.
$147,000!
9,600SF metal building close
to Ona-Ft Green Rd & 4BR/2.5BA/2CG 2-story home
Wauchula Airport. Two work overlooks Little Cypress Golf
areas, offices & restrooms Course. Spacious kitchen &
w/storage loft, rollup doors dining room. $230,000!
w/security system. $410.000!
PRICE REDUCED! CLOSE
Vacant 55ftX155ft corner lot TO LAKE OLIVIA! 2BR/
fronting SR66 & Poplar St, 1BA/1CG CB home w/privacy
Zolfo Springs. Zoned Com- fence, central A/H, screened
munity Commercial-$22,000! porch. $80,000!

Large 4BR/3BA Palm Harbor CB country home on 4.76 acs
home w/fenced back yard sits north of Arcadia, 3BR/1BA.
on 0.25 ac. $140,000! $150,000!
Lots of mature oak trees make 97 ac ranch in the heart of
this 9.8 acs a beautiful home- Hardee Co! Cleared pasture, 2
site. Very closet Wauchula barns, cattlepens, fencing &
& Zolfo Springs w/over 200' n Entta in the unique
fronting SR 64. A-i ponds. Entertain in the unique
fronting SR 64. A-1 zoning 5BR/5BA, 9000SF CB home.
allows for residential, pasture Marble foyer, stone fireplace,
for cattle/horses, or farmland. Marble foyer, stone fireplace,
$168,000! pine paneling & beams, garden
tubs, in-ground pool.

Residential lot in Lake Placid $1,900,000!
near Lake Francis and Lake
June is 107ftX102ft. Great for Priced right! 10 ac pasture in
homesite or investment. Zolfo Springs is fenced; cur-
$24,000! rently used for cattle grazing.
Only $135,900!
Beautiful wooded 35 acs
w/over 1/4 mile paved rd Are you ready for this? The
frontage. Potential to subdivide one and only nightclub in
into 5 ac tracts. Only minutes Hardee Co! $875,000!
from Highlands Co; zoned A-1.
$540,000! Lovingly maintained 3BR,
2BA CB home in Bowling
5.4 acs tracts, pasture & Oak Green sits on 0.84 ac. Includes
trees. Possible owner financing. attached garage & detached
$10,000/ac! barn with three-bay carport.
$160,000!
3BR/2BA CB home has 2 living
rooms, 1,744SF total & Remodeling in process.
1,560SF living area. Close to 4BR/2BA CB home for only
schools & shopping. $125,000! $95,000!
REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 DAVID ROYAL.................781-3490
MONICA REAS.............. 773-9609 SANDY LARRISON............832-0130
JUAN DELATORRE.......781-1128 JAMES STALLINGS.. 863-412-4379
SS.l HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873


CBC-040692 R-C-0067120


I


Owner






July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


SPREADER DRIVER Class D
license, experienced, motivated,
dependable, and clean record.
Benefits and paid holidays, DFWP
Keen Farm & Grove Service, Inc.
Call Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:10tfc



MUST SELL! $69,000 FIRM. 309
Goolsby St., Wauchula, 3BR/1B,
block. 781-1062. ..7:17c
3BR/1BA, CHA, Wood laminate
floors, fresh paint, appliances
included, move-in ready, afford-
able, Sunset Park. 773-3518.
7:17p


REMODELED 2B/1BA frame
house, new wood floors, BG. 863-
328-6004. 7:17-8:14p
3B, 1 1/2 BA OCK house, re-
modeled, fenced yard, central air,
and heat, stove. (863) 273-0920.'
7:3tfci
3 MOBILE HOMES including
lots, $99,000 OBO. All currently
rented. Excellent Investment
opportunity. 863-245-1507.
6:19-8:21 p


HORSE FOR SALE mare, 6 yrs.
old. 863-559-5064. 7:17-24p


FOUND: Young female catahoula
hound, Steve Roberts Special,
spike collar. 773-2424, 781-2847.
7:17nc


BRAND NEW 4" single exhaust
w/down pipe from turbo, fits 99-
03, 7.3 diesel, swd, $300, call 863-
:581-7683. 7:10,17p


,FOUND: Male yellow kitten, cor- I FISH TANK, 29-30 gal. w/door
ner of 17 & Oak at Hess. Wearing i stand w/all acc.: $100.00. 2 glass
collar. Call to identify/claim. 863- tables, coffee and sofa tables,
655-3206. 7:17nc just like new, $80.00. Night stand
w/drawer, $15.00. Camel table
w/glass top, $25.00. BIfold priva-
M E=cy folding door, $10.00. 6-7 foot
16' HORSE TRAILER with tarp xmas tree, stand and lots of oma-
16' HORSE TRAILER with tarp ments, all for $50.00. 767-0304.
cover, gooseneck, horse, and 7:10,17p
tack. 863-735-2803. 7:17-24p .. ..... ..


40' SHIPPING CONTAINER very
good condition, price neg. 863-
773-9251, 561-531-0422.
7:17-8:14p
SLIDE-IN CAMPER 8ft for full size
pickup, $1,000. 863-285-7760.
7:17-24p
FOR SALE: Upholstered banquet
chairs, $8 each. Call 773-3582.
7:17-24p
MOWING EQUIPMENT: 16 foot
trailer, 60-inch Gravely mower,
weedeater, edger, blower, $4,500
OBO. 863-781-0593. 7:17p
FLAT SCREEN 13" TV, great pic-
ture, $75, locally owned. 813-316-
6898. 7:17nc


I c Not I ..w/USPS who hi ,
1-866-749-14151.


=;I


YERF-DOG UTILITY cart, gasoline
powered, low hours, like new
condition. $2,000) call Dale 863-
445-3366. 7:10.17p
GO TANKLESS Tankless water
heaters, save on your electric bill.
Call for details 863-686-7679.
7:3-31p
FOR SALE 14K WHITE GOLD
rope, 90 grams, $1,150 or best
offer. (863) 773-9333. 7:3-17p.
2003 SUZUKI 400CC four stroke
dirt bike, like new, $2,000 or best
offer. 863-773-9333. 7:3-17p
1997 CHEYENNE, 4x4, cold air,
$3,750 or best offer, 350, VS. 863-
773-9333. 7:3-17p


NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 utp,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Next tn Lowes & across
from Home Depot
cl4:20fc


1995 VIRAGO 750 CC YAMAHA
:street bike, $2,500 or best offer.
863-773-933A. 7:3-17p

'Moble H6es-


NO MONEY DOWN If you own
your lot. Easy financing, low
monthly payments. 3 &4 bed-
room homes. Call 863-773-2007.
7:3-31p


COUNTRY SETTING Charlie
Creek Estates land home pack-
ages, easy credit. Call 863-773-
4003. 7:3-31p
2005 FLEETWOOD MH, 24'x48',
carport & shed, 55+ Villa Del Sol,
in Avon Park. Health reasons,
Reduced to $55,000; furnished;
2BR/2BA, owner only used 12
months. 863-368-0207. 6:12-7:17p


LOWEST -PRICE ON mobile
homes In Florida. We take trades,
no down payment, deal with your
lot equity. We have easy financ-
ing. Call today 863-773-2007.
7:3-31p


CENTRAL MOBILE HOMES, INC.,
Wauchula office, Inventory clear-
ance sale. All 2008 homes must
go. New models arriving soon.
Call 863-773-2007. 7:3-31 p
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATHS used wind
zone 3, your lot or ours.
Fireplace, tape and texture walls.
Very low payment, easy credit.
Apply now 863-773-2007. 7:3-31 p
REPOS MUST SELL large 3.2
2001 double wide mobile home,
like new $39,900. Includes set-up
and a/c, easy credit approval. Call
863-773-2007. 7:3-31 p


Towing ServiceAvial

'I iCU


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


OWNER MUST SELL! 5 + acres in eastern
Hardee; perfect homesite. $64,900 Call
Charlotte Terrell for more information.
EXECUTIVE HOME! See this beautiful
home with numerous amenities to appreciate
the excellent craftsmanship and style; 3+
B/2.5Bths; 3800 sq. ft.; 16x12 metal building,
16x12 pole barn, all on 2.3 acres; excellent
location. $330,000
REDUCED PRICE for this older home with
lots of charm! Tall ceilings, hardwood floors
and large rooms are just some of the features
in this 3B/2Bth home located in Wauchula;
zoned commercial. $99,900
15 Acres of pasture plus 3B/lBth C/B home;
metal barn. $235,000

EXECUTIVE HOME and 24.5 acre grove,
located in desirable area; home built in 2006,
6340 total square footage; 4B/4Bth; media
room; beautiful caged pool and much more.
$1,500,000
ALL OFFERS CONSIDERED and POSSI-
BLE OWNER FINANCING! 30 acres of pas-
tureland; secluded; small pond with natural
flow of water; perfect for home site or small
ranch. $255,000

ONE ACRE COUNTRY SETTING, close to
town 3B/lBth, C/B home. $155,000
QUIET COUNTRY SETTING for this C/B
home on 5 acres; 3B/1Bth, large oaks.
$165,000
This site is perfect for your new home sep-
tic tank, yard irrigation in place; this 5 acre
tract has large oaks, small creek, plenty of
wildlife. $99,000


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Delois Johnson
TWO STORY GOLF COURSE HOME!
3B/3.5Bth; large rooms with laminate and tile
floors; many extras; nice curb appeal!
$350,000

N/C Mountain Chalet Home 4B/3Bth, 3
story, sleeps 22; 4700 feet in elevation.
$410,000

Excellent location for building your new
home; 1/2 acre tracts; city water and sewer.
deed restricted area. $40,000

Lovely home site 5 acres with fruit trees,
large oaks and 1 acre pond. $110,000

Duette Area 10 acres with 12" well; perfect
for your new home. Call Delois Johnson for
more information.

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY! 1.2 acres,
highway 17 frontage. $100,000

5 acre tract of land; paved road frontage;
eastern Hardee. $125,000

Grow your own vegetables for personal and
commercial use on this 8.91 acre hydroponic
farm with 6" well; two 30x100 shade houses;
all irrigation equipment included; septic tank
for house or mobile home. $280,000

Mayer Corner lot with 3B/1Bth C/B home,
conveniently located and move in ready.
$155,000

Two 5 acre tracts, good location. $65,000 each


Valencias and Hamlins 45 acre grove with
12" well, excellent condition. $825,000


SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: JOSEFINA GARAY......863-399-3329
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971 ASSOCIATE: CAROL JACKSON..............991-1255
ASSOCIATE: JUDY HINERMAN.............735-0268 ASSOCIATE: ROBERT HINERMAN........227-0202 cl7:17c


I BUY HOUSES



781-1062


Billy Hill Don't delay ... Call today!



S702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
-( [ ID WAUCHULA, FL 33873 I II


AM-SOUTH REALTY
MAKING REAL. E sTATE RAI. EASY.
Ana I oWof0iri e O a]U Mfiop r, w dc sleb stoilE (< a


Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122 *FAX (863) 773-2173


781-3627
781-1186
773-0575
832-0370


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jessica Smith, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Nancy Craft, Associate


Richard Dasher


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


JUST LISTED!! 27.5 acres with a 2 bedroom, '
bath home In the Center Hill area fronts beauti-
ful Payne Creek. Includes 12 acres of Irrigated
citrus grove and barn. Seller will consider divid-
ing property Into parcels. Call today for details.
$350,000.
BIG!! 4 bedroom, 4 Bath Home!! 2,241 sq. ft.
Living area, new carpet, fresh paint, and new
roof makes this home a must see at a Reduced
Price of $165,000 or bring offer.
NEED MORE ROOM??? Come take a look at this
3/2 with an office and game room. This home
features a large kitchen and Inside utility room
for a Reduced Price of $149,900.
BEAUTY OF A BARGAIN!! Nice 2 Bedroom 1
Bath Villa In Avon Park. Good condition, present-
ly rented. Need extra Income, Good Investment.
In walking distance to town!! Only $67,500.
THIS 6.15 ACRES OF LAND Is located on beauti-
ful Peace River. Canoe, camp or build your own
vacation home. Priced only at $125,000.
ENJOY THE SUNSET!!! On the balcony of this 2
story home on 3.4 acres of land, with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths and recreation room on bottom
story. Jacuzzi tub, Trane AC, gaivaluminum roof
and more for only $189,000. Call Today!!!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath. Only $92,500 With front
porch and large fenced yard. In nice neighbor-
hood!!!
IT'S A BUYER'S MARKET
MAKE OFFERS, YOU WILL NEVER KNOW
UNTIL YOU ASK!! DEALS ARE
EVERYWHERE!!!


FEATURES OF THE WEEK NEW LISTINGS!!! !
LAKE LOTELAIII Home with enclosed Inground pool. Completely remodeled with brand
new stainless steel appliances including stove, refrigerator, built in microwave oven,
dishwasher, washer and dryer. Granite countertops in kitchen and bathrooms. Pinecrest
golf course across road. This property is approved for ExpressPath Financing. "Please
contact listing agent for more Information." $364,500.
A TOUCH OF CLASSIII Located on Florida Ave. This beautiful home sits on 1 acre +,
Upstairs 3 large Bedrooms, 1 Bath. Downstairs has Dining room, Kitchen, Den, living
room, family room with large Bathroom. Front and back porch, and gorgeous hard wood
floorsll Graceful selection of Color schemes to reflect the era of 1920s. This house Is a
show place. Shown by appointment only. $245,000. c17:17c


HELP WANTED
DETENTION DEPUTY
$33,00000 $38,110
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is seeking
Florida Certified Correction Officers. Applicants
must possess a current certification in Corrections
and meet the requirements set forth by the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement Training and
Standards Commission. Applicants must success-
fully complete the personnel selection process set
forth by the Sheriff's Office.
Applications may be obtained and returned to the
Sheriff's Office at 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula, FL,
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
If other accommodations are necessary, call the
Sheriff's Office, 863-773-0304 to make arrange-
ments. EOE cl7:10,17c


THE PALMS APTS,

3 Bedroom Apartments

Located at:

701 La Playa Drive
Office Hours: Mon. Fri.,
1:00 pm 5:00 pm
Monthly rent from $595 + utilities

For Rental Info & Applications:

The Palms
at

863-773-3809

(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Housing Opportunity 017:17-8:150


.5--
7u-~


ALMOST NEWI!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB Home on
corner lot In great neighborhood. Built In 2006,
Includes two car garage with door opener and
more. Access on Lake Adelaide. Reduced from
$137,900 to $129,900.
CABBAGE PALMS, OAK TREES AND QUIET!!!
This 16 Acre parcel of land has a Well and Septic
Tank. Build your own Home or Mobile Home.
$150,000.
BUILD YOUR NEW HOME!! On this Residential
Lot in this Nice Neighborhood of Rivenrvlew
Heights located on Garden Drive. Only $29,900.
STARTER HOME!!! This 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath CB
home has central air and heat, complete with
washer and dryer located In great neighborhood
on Illinois Ave. $90,000.
THREE SETS OF DUPLEXES on Hwy 66, Buy one
at a time or all three, great Investment property!!l
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath $159,500; 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
for $155,000 and 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath with
Fireplace for $169,900.
5 ACRES $62,500. Possible Financing!!!
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY!!! 10 acres on Hwy. 62,
large building Included. $750,000.

SO, YOU WANT TO MOVE TO
GEORGIA?? Want to know more??
Call Donna!! 863-781-3627. Many homes
and acreage available!!


Illllllllllmlllmm


m
m







8B The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008





-The


Classifieds


REPO MOBILE HOMES -
Hundreds to choose from. Set up
& delivery available. 863-381-
1000. 7:3-12:25p


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Rocky
Ybarra will be sold pursuant to
warehouseman's lien. Said sale
will be at Zolfo Storage, 115 SR
66, Zolfo Springs, FL at 9:00 am
o.n hlv 1.2n 00r. 7i.n 17c


FREE TO A GOOD home 2 Jack
Russell male puppies. 773-9345.
7:17nc
.LAB PUPPIES, AKC, all black,-
males, females, shots, health
cart., $250. 863-781-4903. 7:17p


ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


FRESH OKRA every other day.
863-832-0065. 7:10,17p

rh HradAdoct


Short Time Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll ftret
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity req m


EMPLOYEE
EASING
( OPTIONS, INC.
Robby Albritton, Vice-President 5
Office (863) 735-9226 Cell (863) 528-7085
Fax (863) 735-9228
ralbritton@eloinc.net
www.elonic.net
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 D








PARTS/COUNTER

HELP

Apply in person. See Bob.


or-- awn rf


1031 US Hwy 17 N

Full Benefits: Medical

Dental Life 401K and more

DFWP 7:17c EOE
^^^^^^^^^^-^---i^H^^^^7:17-c


CB Home on 2 1/2 acres, 2,000 sq ft -1,800 heated,
lots of tile. High & Dry. Only 3 minutes from town.
REDUCED Asking $175,000.
REDUCED 3BR, 3B, 2 AC. --4~2,9Q $219,900.
Beautiful 3 BR, 2.5 B on 5.7 acres near Manatee Co. line. $449,000.
Call Cindy.-=mmm


2 BR, 2 1 r
2 BR, 2B MH,
$199,900.
One lot left ir
10 ac. Val. gr. g. &
30 ac. with 1( .
micorjet irrig. I n.
Make Your Vac. PJ4
Rental, Sleeps 4-5, N


ce, C ice n. $124,900.
f berts Special, 5 ac.

5, $75,000.
ac. Call David.
I Valen ac. beautiful oaks,


efson City Mt. Cabin
ed. $400 weekly.


BART BARTON Realtor Associates
Realtor SHERRICK STONE DAVID TERRELL CINDY HAND
781-0551 781-1433 781-0536 (941) 737-0646

www.ranchandgrove.com
Office: (863) 767-1556'- 401 U.S. Hwy 17 N., Wauchula
I __; c17 17 c


LAND WITH trailer, five or 10'
acres, highway frontage, SR 62,
$15,000 per acre, $15,000 trallor,
16x76, 773-4726. 7:10,17p
5.06 ACRES FOR SALE Ready
to build, Cleared, fenced, well.
and pond, beautiful oaks, pines,
and maples. Must see. Reduced:
to $80,000. Call 781-0897.
6:19-7:17p



2BR/1B HOME in the country,
$650/month; plus security. 863-
781-1318. 7:17c
NICE CLEAN 1 BEDROOM apart-
ment for rent. AC/Heat, carpeted
and a screened in porch, $135 per
week. Utilities not included. First
and last weeks rent, damage
deposit and reference required.
773-9793. 7:17p
3BR/2BATH, central air, River-
view, $1,000 monthly. Available
August 1st. Call for appointment
to view. 773-2309. 7:17-31c
NICE 2-BR/1-B, upstairs apart-
ment in town, $750 month.
Utilities included. No pets or
smoking. 773-6255. 7:10,17c


MOBILE HOME for rent In Zolfo.
Two bedroom, one bath and a big'
Florida room with car port. $500
monthly with $250 deposit. Call:
781-2890. 7:10,17p
FOR LEASE Nice remodeled 3/2:-
home, yard, large shed. 207 N.
10th, Wauchula, $945 month. 305-
970-1957, 305-338-4976.
6:19-7:17p
EXCELLENT CONDITION 2BR/2
1/2 B townhouse. Call 773-2122 to
Isee. American South Reality.
6:19tfc
NEW SUMMER RATES Crystal
Lake Village, 1 BR, $500/month.
767-8822. 5:ltfc
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
1 12:20tfc
APARTMENTS AND HOUSES.
773-6667. 9:6tfc
2 BR/1 BTH APARTMENT $550
month, first, last, deposit
required. 773-0100. 2:21tfc
WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack UIIrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc


inBo savs.... "I won't be undersold!!" I


Boinsspen!



510 N Hw 1 e owin :Gren-. 35-46


Hardee Car Company
773-6667


Marin


cl7:17c


I Rental I


15 HOUSES, APTS, $500, N.D.'
20,000 Commercial. 773-2177,1
773-6616,032-1965. 6:19-7:17p
* MOVE-IN SPECIAL *
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B from $400
monthly. 1 BR from $300 monthly.
No pets, low deposit. Next to
school & hospital. Citrus Valley
MHP. 863-698-4910 or 698-4908.
Se habla espanol 863-838-4447.
8:23tfc


ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


NURSING HOME-MAKER ser-
vices with twenty years experi-
ence, references. 863-375-2639.
7:10-8:7p


'big or to small., ree eaumates.
1735-1462. 7:17-31p
II WILL DO baby, sitting In my
home anytime day or night, week-
ends. 445-0572 or 375-479.
7:10,17p
AFFORDABLE LAWN care, aver- ..
age yard $25, no contract, 863-
781-1664. 7:10-24c:


TREE SERVICES, trimming or
removal, free estimates. 863-512-.
8202. 7:10,17p


JIM'S LAWN SERVICE -
Specializing In cleaning beds,
trimming hedges & trees, and
landscaping. Also, clean ponds.
773-3293 or 781-4641.
10:4tfc/nc
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUR Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
Located at the SFCC Annex,
Room #105, Hwy. 17 North, Wau-
chula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call AlcoholicsAnonymous
In Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh


Topsy See

REAL ESTATE
773-5994 _
Topsy See
NEW LISTING 2 Story older frame home on large lot on Hwy 17
Zolfo Springs 5 BR 2 Bath. $125.000.
5 acres all fenced, High and dry with pond. Appaloosa Lane. $84,995.
Beautiful location 4.6 acres surveyed into six 1/2 acre lots and one
1.66 acre lot. $15,000 each or $85,000 for all.
JUST LIKE NEW 2000 DW Palm Harbor. This home includes win-
dow treatments, ceiling fans, all appliances, Ted's Shed, deep well.
$134,995.
App. 58 AC. Great for development property. High and dry. Call for
information.
5 acres in the Oaks. Owner financing with approval. $20,000 down.
$64,900.
NEW LISTING: 3 BR-1B CB Very nice home in nice quiet neigh-
borhood. New Drywall New Tile Floors Appliances. $115,000.
NEW LISTING 3BR 1-1/2B CB Home in Bowling Green. Close to
school. Very good buy at $69,900.
1 ac. with app. 296 ft. road frontage. $39,000.
Topsy See, Broker
Elva Whidden, Associate
rf:170 2634 E. Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873





KELLER WILLIAMS,
malorxakstings.c~m .


We ilrope-

onJly2


Buy Her
Pa Hr


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

S773-4478
Complete Tree Service
Bobcat Service
Crane Service
Sawmill Service
Free Estimates Insured 26 years experience
cl6:14tfc


* Asking $8,500/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 28-32 acre parcels or buy as a whole 60 acre
tract. Call for more details.
* Zoned commercial 8.5 acres, corner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000.
* Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered
oaks and pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac.
wetlands. Great Investment Property. Sweetwater area.
* 20 acre Ranchettes. 6 available. 127 acres total. Buy one or buy
them all. Fish Branch Rd. Starting at $10,500/acre.
Call Mikey at (863) 781-1698 for more details. 7:17c
cd7:17c


11


r-


m


I






July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 9B


bBowling Green

> Flea Market

Friday, Saturday,
Sunday
Restrooms Water *
Electric


781-1062
^


All-Star Action Winds Down


YOU Can Appear In... .
I Memory Lane.
Wyou have any old photographs of Iardee'County people,
places or events you would, be willing to share with our readers?
Perhaps your second-grade class, a Main Street scene, a family
picnic froq) long ago, canoeing down the Peace River or wash-
ing.your first car? You'can take readers on a walk down Memory
,Alhe.by allowing us to print your photo from Hardee County's
past. You will be credited-with the submission, and your photo
will be returned. To appear In this feature, send the photo along
wh your name to: Memory Lane, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box
S18(,Wauchula, FL 33873 or stop by the newspaper office at 115
Seventh Ave. In Wauchula.


We offer




Single Color




or















Br chores






Door Hangers




Postcards
0t o






















Signs


ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS IN ONE CONVENIENT LOCATION!


NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
dh


6 a.m. 11 a.m. Clothes, toys. 317
Pennsylvania Ave. 7:17p
SATURDAY Toys, clothes & lots
of great stuff. 989 Steve Roberts
Special, Zolfo Springs. 7:17p
FRI. & SAT., 2227 Ralph Smith
Road, Wauchula. 7:17p
SATURDAY ONLY! Multi-family
yard sale. Furniture, appliances,
toddler clothes, household items,
craft supplies and toys, along
with clothes and shoes of all
sizes, big and small. 204
Riverside Drive, Wauchula.
CITRUS TREE REMOVAL -
Cheapest rates by the hour or
contract, free estimates. Contact
Curtis Wilson at 767-5349.
7:3-11:27p
LONNIES LANDSCAPING -
Flower beds, pull weeds, lawn
maintenance. 773-2208, 781-
0982. 6:19-7:17p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION -
additions, screen rooms,' car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening. Harold
Howze Construction. 735-1158.
RR050181 6:19-8:21 p
ALDERMAN'S CITRUS TREE
REMOVAL. Call Tim for quote.
863-781-5289. 4:3-1:8p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula, and Friday and Saturday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First Methodist.
Church, corner of Grape and'
Church St., Bowling Green.
12:6tfcdh
Laughter is the shortest
distance between two peo-
ple.
-Victor Borge


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Of the 10 Hardee teams in
state All-Star competition, only
one is still in action.
At press time, the boys
Majors (12-and-under) were
still battling. All the other boys
and girls teams had fought and
finally went down short of the
state championship level.
GIRLS TEAMS
The oldest group, ages 13 to
15, the Hardee Dixie Belles
won over Wildwood in its first
game at the state level, but then
lost games to Mulberry and
Chipley to be eliminated.
Coached by Randy Tyson,
Debbie McNabb and Rocky
Parks, the squad included Da-
nika Briones, Sierra Coronado,
Karina Fernandez, Sabrina
Hernandez, Penny McGuire,
Amanda McNabb, Courtney
Parks, Summer Sisum, Emily
Starratt, Brooke Tyson and
Celeste Williams.
Another one of the district
champions to advance were the
Dixie Darlings, age 8 and
under, who pushed through
before losing to Wahneta 12-8
in the championship game.
Coaches Jerry Welch, Wayne
Graham and Keith Patterson
were able to play Sarah Carlton,
Yadira Castillo, Heather Coro-
nado, Destinee Pace, Ashley
Patterson, Lilianna Ponce,
Yasmin Ramirez, Cori-Ann
Rosales, Destiny Scheel,
Michaela Villarreal, Lindsey
Welch and Sarah Welch.
Playing for the Dixie Angels,
ages 7 to 10, were Gabrielle
Allen, Hannah Carlton, Kim-
berly Derringer, Brooke Dixon,
Anna Erekson, Allison Farr,
Illena Flores, Senaida Garcia,
Mara Goodwyn, Kristian Judah,
Tara McNabb and Morgan
Walters, who were coached by
Jake and Missy Carlton and
Julian Garcia.
The Hardee Ponytails fin-
ished third at the state level.
Karlee Henderson and Hailey
Andrews shared mound duties
in a 21-0 opening win over Oak
Grinner. Highlights of that
game were .666 hitting by
Amber Reid and 1.000 batting
by Kate Thomas who went
four-for-four. Hardee opened
with a half dozen runs and
never looked back.
In game two, Reid and Hen-


derson pitched in a disappoint-
ing 4-3 loss to the host team,
Belleview. Andrews and Gemi
Saunders scored on an Ana
Galvez double in the fifth
inning, and Reid added a run in
the sixth, but Belleview scored
last for the win.
In a loser's bracket game
later on July 4, Hardee nipped
Hernando 1-0 when Jakaysha
Lindsey came around to score
in the second inning in an other-
wise scoreless game. Reid
pitched the entire game.
Hardee's final game was a 4-
1 loss on July 5 to Wahneta,
which won the state champi-
onship. Andrews walked and
scored on an error on a
Saunders hit for Hardee's only
tally. Other Ponytails were
Arissa Camel, Kayla Nichols,
Dana Terrell, Alex Ullrich and
Bridgett Whidden. Their coach-
es are Melanie Henderson,
Mike Thomas and Max Ullrich.
BOYS TEAMS
Five of the six boys teams
have finished their run through
the district and state champi-
onship games.
Playing for the 5-6-year-olds,
who bowed out at the district
level, were Christian Brant,
Logan Cartwright, Griffin
Clark, Kyle Gilliard, Gage
Gough, Quinton Lindsey, Taleia
Moreno, William Redding,
Jared Rickett, Trenton Rober-
son, Weston Schraeder and
Blake Tinsley. They were
coached by Will Cartwright,
Jason Clark, Wes Redding and
Matt Tinsley.
Playing for the 7-year-old
Teeball/Machine Pitch boys
were Adrian DeLeon, Zachary
Deuberry, Andy Garza, Cody
Helms, Bryce Hernandez, Drew
McGuckin, Miguel Ruiz, Tyson
Sutton, Matthew Tyson, Lizan-
dro "Bo" Villarreal and Tony
Webb. Their coaches were
Andrew McGuckin, Brent
Stephens and Doug Sutton.
The 8-year-olds played at
Fort Meade, with Chase Ben-
ton, Mason Block, Lance Burs-
ler, Josh Carlton, Tanner Carl-
ton, Keith Choate, Kyle Choate,
Matthew Laker, Zack Macias,
Zack Richardson, Pablo
Salgado and Jax Ullrich, who
were coached by Jeff Block,
Jake Carlton, Matt Carlton and
Brian Laker.
For the 10-and-usrfer Miitnors


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All-Stars, who won the District
7 championship, players were
Omar Alamia, Austin Altman,
Marcus Battles, Hunter Bryant,
Blake Crawley, Tanor Durden,
Cesar Fimbres, Aaron Harrison,
Kyle Hewett, Hayden Lindsey,
Seth McGee and Ruben Olmas.
They are coached by Justin
Battles, Kenny Hewett and
Gerry Lindsey.
For the Dixie Boys, ages 13-
15, Hardee players were Jacob
Altman, Dawson Crawford,
Dylan Farr, Tanner Gough,
Vince Grimsley, Steve Hodges,
Justin Knight, Carter Lambert,
Daniel Miller, Jeremy Rowe,
Wintz Terrell and Murrell
Winter. Their coaches were Van
Crawford, Keith Farr, Brian
Knight and Dane Terrell.
The only boys team still play-
ing are the 12-and-under
Majors, which started a week
later than everyone else, with
rain delays at Frostproof where
they won the District 7 champi-
onship.
At the state venue, Hardee
won its opening game against
Paxton 10-0. A Cody Spencer.
homer and Jacob Bolin double
were highlights of the five-run
first inning. Kris Johnson and
Armando Alamia each scored
twice, and Spencer, Bolin,
Kramer Royal, Garrett Albrit-.
ton, Tyler Hewett and Marco
Deleon added solo scores.
Behind Johnson's pitching,
Hardee came back from a 1-0
deficit to take at 2-1 lead over
Okeechobee American in the
fourth inning when Royal and
Albritton scored. Hardee added
twin tallies in the fifth inning
when Alamia and Mason
Gough crossed home plate.
Okeechobee tied the game
with a three-run outburst in the
top half of the seventh, sending
the game into extra innings.
Neither team scored in the
eighth inning. In the top of the
ninth, Okeechobee plated three
runners on uncharacteristic
errors and hits given up. Hardee
stranded a pair of runners in the
home half of the ninth and
absorbed the 7-4 loss.
The next scheduled game was
Monday vs. South Walton. Re-
sults were not available at press
time. Other Majors players are
Dustin Goodwyn, Wyatt Mad-
dox and Luke Winter. They are
coached by Todd Bolin, Frank
Johnson,.and Chris Spencer., .


It pays to advertise

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The Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

115 S. 7th Ave.

Telephone: 773-3255


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10B The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


Pioneer Park was the scene for Hardee County's Fourth of July
celebration, and it was enjoyed by many Hardee County residents.
Food was in abundance, children's activities included water
slides and games of skill, and political figures could be seen
milling around the huge open-air Nicholson/ Ullrich building.
As always, representatives manned various informational
tables which provided everything from brochures, pencils and but-
tons to candy.
Kenny Weis is always on hand at the American Cancer Society
table, and this 1964 graduate of Hardee County High School is
truly an inspiration to any individual who has faced a life-threaten-


COURTESY PHOTOS
Arnold Lanier, of the Hardee County Sheriffs Office, was
a willing volunteer for the dunk tank.


Worn out from all the fun, 3-year-old Eva Hernandez with
her mom, Vanessa Hernandez, of MidFlorida Federal
Credit Union in Wauchula.


Kenny Weis and Denise Benavides of the American
Cancer Society.
ing situation. His big smile will always greet you as you pass him
on the street, at county functions and, of course, at all of the
American Cancer fund raisers.
An added informational table was new to this year's celebra-
tion at Pioneer Park, but its general concept is not new. A newly
organized "Hardee County Friends of the Parks" is a way for the
people of Hardee County to get involved in the promotion and
preservation of our wonderful park system.
Applications are being processed for this "Friends" organiza-
tion, and plans are being made for it to become a non-profit 501 (3-
C) entity. It's extremely possible that many of you have already
come in contact with other "Friends of the Parks" organizations
and are aware of the fund-raising effects that can arise from such
an entity.



SColo n&LPE I A
I AGGRESSIVE REPRESENTATI ON


-~


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-'*I



I


r"~;~


'I.J.


You can help and you can make a difference by becoming a
member of the Hardee County Friends of the Parks. You can
become as active as you wish, either by attending planned meet-
ings, helping with fund raisers, volunteering for special work days
and programs, or just reading about our progress in a quarterly
newsletter. This is your opportunity to get on the bandwagon and
help to see that the "Friends" make an impact on our parks for our-
selves and our future generations.
Contact the Cracker Trail Museum for information on how you
can become one of the first members of this newly formed organi-
zation and how you can become informed on future projects.
And if you haven't made plans for that summer picnic with the
family, won't you consider our lovely Pioneer Park along the banks
of the Peace River? We have a number of picnic shelters and grills
and the children will enjoy the park's recreation area.
And what about that family reunion to wind down the sum- '
mer? Buildings are available to rent for your affair, reminisce back
in time when you swam in the Zolfo Pool as you sit on the wrap-,
around porch of the Pavilion building. Or, how many of you
remember the Rec Hall as being the "Grange" building back in the
'60s? Both buildings are available for rent for whatever your event
happens to be: birthday parties, weddings, reunions,or meetings.
And of course, for larger gatherings there's the Nickerson-Ullrich
Pavilion. Contact Cracker Trail Museum for further information.
As always, this column is committed to make you aware of the
preservation efforts for all of the wonderful acquisitions that many
of you have been so generous to donate for others to enjoy.
The summer is an ideal time to bring the family back to the
museum to reacquaint them with the history of Hardee County.
Plans are being made for other programs to be made available for
you to enjoy. If it's been a while since you have ventured back in
time with a walk through Cracker Trail Museum, this may just be
the time to do so.
And to continue to keep our displays interesting, won't you
consider some of your family's precious possessions as an addition
to the museum?


Florida's 2007-2008 orange
crop finished at 169.7 million
boxes, according to the U.S.
Department of Agriculture
,(USDA) which has released its
final citrus report of the season.
The crop represents a 32 per-
cent increase from the 2006-
2007 season.
"This -was a pretty good
rebound year for the Florida cit-
'rus industry coming off the hur-
ricanes," said Michael W.
Sparks, executive vice presi-
dent/CEO of Florida Citrts
Mutual. "Prices to growers
were reasonable and that's
important. We need higher
prices to offset the increased
production costs associated
with pest and disease manage-
ment and energy prices.
"The recent rains bode well
for next season," Sparks contin-
ued. "However, the industry is
facing many challenges right
now, most prominently a dis-
ease called citrus greening
which has the potential to dev-
astate our crop. We will contin-
ue to fight it through research
and best management practices
as we head into next season."


The 169.7 million boxps are;
made up of 83.5 million boxes
of Early-Mids and Navels and
86.2 million boxes of Valencias.
The Florida citrus industry
saw a decline in orange produc-
tion from 230 million boxes to
129 million boxes during the
five-year period between the
2001-2002 season and the'
2006-2007 season. This reduc-
tion was due in large part to the
effects of hurricanes, develop-
ment and pests and diseases
such as citrus canker and green-
ing.
The USDA issues its initial
estimate in October and then
revises it each month through
the end of the citrus season in
July.
In its final report, Florida
grapefruit increased from 26.5
million boxes to 26.6 million
boxes. Tangelos remained un-
changed at 1.5 million boxes as
did tangerines at 5.5 million
boxes.
The complete USDA crop
forecast is available online at
http://www.nass.usda.gov/Stati
stics_byState/Florida/Publicat
ions/Citrus/cpfp.htm


Memory Lane


COURTESY PHOTO
The late Charles E. Abbott of Fort Green Springs was a horticulture professor at the
University of Florida. He was hired by UF president A. Murphree in 1923 at a salary of
$1,800 and died in 1947. A page in the UF yearbook, named the Seminole, around 1948
was dedicated to his memory. The yearbook stated, "He demanded of a student sincer-
est efforts, and In turn he implanted knowledge of priceless value well realized in later
years. His work constitutes no small part In the scientific pursuit of a better agricultural
program which will long be remembered and followed in the coming years. His friend-
ship was desired by many, a fact which is exemplified by his membership in many social
and honorary societies. He remains a lasting tribute to the University of Florida." Edgar
Davis of Florida Fertilizer Company In Wauchula took agricultural courses taught by
Abbott at UF Davis graduated from UF in 1947.

SHARE YOUR OLD PHOTOS WITH US!
Take readers on a walk down Memory Lane by sharing your photos from Hardee County's past. Bring your submissions
to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. or mail to The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula., FL 33873.
Photos will be returned.


Florida Citrus


Looks Ahead


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
2007 Gulfstream TV Id#1 NL1GTU2X71040047
Contact Linda Dean for details at Wauchula State
Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on Friday
July 25, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. at the Wauchula State
Bank parking lot located at 106 East Main Street,
Wauchula Fl. 33873. 7:17,24c


Frankie's
A REDKEN Hair Salon
Diane Ovina Frankie

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting Hours:
v Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
7:17c


Memory Lane


Ov-





July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 11B


BRAIN BOWL


: .**,* ; I '_ J
"': "-' '- .-, .

COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchula's Azalea Hill is on National Register of Historic sites.


A Revival Is Part Of



History Of Azalea Hill


By JOHN UNDERWOOD
For The Herald-Advocate
Here's a bit of local history
concerning Wauchula's only
property listed on the National
Register of Historic Sites, the
Carlton-Underwood Estate lo-
cated on East Bay Street. This
tidbit of information was told to
me by my father, Tom Under-
wood, and should be remem-
bered by the community.
In my childhood, I remember
Dad telling me a story about the
massive plantings of, azaleas
that were abundant at the old
homestead before the devasta-
tion of Hurricane Charley. He
said his grandmother, Martha
Carlton, told him this tale about
a famous .guest who stayed a
few days here in Wauchula.
My great-grandmother was
surely one of Hardee County's
first nursery growers. She had
rooted over 300 azaleas in cof-
fee cans she kept under the live
oaks near her home. For nearly
a year she had watered her pots
from a nearly hand dug well
and was proud of her success. It
was the early 1930s. Even
though her son was Florida's
Governor at the time Doyle
.E. Carlton, life was tough for
everyone. Each person was just
trying to survive another day
while the Great Depression hit
this nation.
Early one summer evening
my grandparents were prepar-
ing for dinner, when an unan-
nounced visitor came to their
door. Answering the door,
Martha discovered a middle-
aged woman and a boy appear-
ing to be about 14 or 15 years
old. They told her they are from


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252008CP000061
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERT BAILY HENNIS,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of ROBERT BAILY HENNIS, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
December 26, 2007, is pending in
the Circuit. Court for HARDEE
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is Clerk of
the Court, Hardee..County Court-
house, P.O. Box 1749, Wauchula,
FL 33873. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
-below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served.
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
;MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS,
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice Is July 17, 2008.
P personal Representative:
2 Elizabeth Brumfield
2416 Oxendlne Road
SZolfo Springs, Florida 33890
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John K. McClure
Attorney for Robert Bally Hennis
Florida Bar No. 286958
211 South Ridgewood Drive
Sebring, FL 33870
Telephone: (863) 402-1888
Fax: (863) 402-2436
7:17-24c


tne traveling minIistry currently
in town and needed her help.
Her husband was the minister
of this revival while her son
played the fiddle for the service.
The problem was her hus-
band's violent temper to her and
her son, especially when he had
been drinking. The boy did
appear to have been beaten by
someone, and both appeared
quite frightened. Martha invited
them to eat at their table and
gave them a place to sleep. To-
morrow, they would talk.
The next morning she learned
their last name was Rouse. The
revival had been set up just
north of the old Depot for the
past three days, all of which
time her husband had been
drinking. At the revival, atten-
dance had been slim and offer-
ings were even slimmer. He had
spent their last two dollars on
whiskey while the family went
without food. She had enough
and wanted to earn enough
money to get a train ticket south
and a chance to start over again.
My grandparents boarded this
family for the next week.
Earning their keep this mother
and her son planted all her aza-
leas among the live oaks on the
property. The revival had left
behind the minister's wife and
its star fiddle player, Ervin
Rouse. At the end of the week,
my great-grandparents gener-
ously gave $20 in wages and
watched them walk north to
purchase train tickets at the
Wauchula Depot. That was the
last they would ever see of them
again, however Ervin Rouse
would be heard forever.
In the early 1950s, history
would find Ervin Rouse to be
following his father's problem
with alcohol. He had achieved
limited fame with his fiddle
playing and song compositions.
His fame took a back seat to
alcohol one evening while he
played for drinks at the Rod &
Reel Club near Everglades City.
Many famous people had stay-
ed at this place, and chance hap-
pened that a music executive
from Nashville was present
when Ervin was playing.
The song had been recorded a
few years earlier but had not
been properly promoted. When
Ervin's fiddle bowed out the
sound of a train starting up and
gaining momentum, the music
executive's attention was im-
mediate. Later that evening in a
drunken stupor, Ervin Rouse
signed away on the back of a
napkin all rights, interests and
copyrights to that song for $50


and a bottle of whiskey.
The song whiskey had bought
that evening became the most
famous bluegrass fiddle song
ever written. The song was
"Orange Blossom Special",
Ervin Rouse, penniless, died
several years later.


OUUTfIEYPT HT'OU
Instead of the Individual competition of a spelling bee or a math bash, the fourth-grade
department at Wauchula Elementary School came up with a less stressful and more
creative way for students to use their knowledge and compete against one another:
the Brain Bowl. In It, the students compete in teams in a fun game-show environment.
The Brain Bowl was set-up exactly like the show "Jeopardy." Each fourth-grade teacher
selected a team based on a comprehensive test. Then, teams competed against one
another In categories such as spelling, reading, grammar and other academic sub-.
Jects. Pictured above is the first-place winning team of (from left) teacher Nicole
Lindsay, Jordan Evers, Kristen Burkett, Austin Rimes and Karan Limbachiya.


The human spirit needs to accomplish, to achieve, to tri-
umph to be happy.
-Ben Stein


NOTICE
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
PRELIMINARY ORGANIZATIONALMEETING
The Hardee County Value Adjustment Board, consisting of
three County Commissioners and two School Board mem-
bers, will hold a preliminary organizational meeting on
Thursday, July 24, 2008, at 5:00 p.m.
The meeting will be held in the Hardee County
Commission Chambers, 412 W. Orange Street, Room 102,
Wauchula, Florida.
For more information, please call 863/773-9430.
Lexton H. Albritton, Jr., County Manager
7:IO-17c


AryQ u a,poet?Letuisashow itlYurswork could: We
.thlssnewspaper In ot'aPlaafl ,iweeldy.featur
Solely on reader submtisJons Poemh must be y Oui.
work, written byyodu, nt someone else. To appeal
tfre, send your poetry, name and town of resIde'l
Place, .The Herald-Adyocpate, P.O.Box 338, '.Wauchula
br fax 773-0657. .



PUBLIC NOTICE

SPECIAL MEETING DATE
The Hardee County Housing Authority
will meet for a Special Meeting on Tues-
day, July 22, 2008, at 1:30 p.m. at 701
LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula. 7:1


Jail Restructure Can Save Hardee a.Million Dollars or More!
Sheriff Joe Arpaio of the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office in Phoenix Arizona has developed a system that drastically
reduces monies spent on inmates and increases general deterrence. Here are some of his unique and legally approved
methods of operation:
Tent City Inmates reside in a series of tents located outside the walls and secured by barbed wire fencing. This saves
millions of tax-payer dollars earmarked towards building a new jail. Like Sheriff Joe says, "It is 120 degrees in Iraq &
our soldiers are living in tents too and they have to wear full battle gear, but they didn't commit any crimes...
Food & Beverage Nutritional meals down to 40-50 cents per serving. No m4 e elabor.ue meals and drinks, just the
essentials as determined by a licensed nutritionist. The inmates receive refreshing w-arer,'not soda, tea, coffee or any other
drinks lacking nutritional value. The inmates will also reimburse the county for the cost & service of their meals!
Entertainment Federal law requires cable TV in the jails but does not specify which channels. Therefore the inmates
only have access to The Disney ChannelM and The Weather Channel". No more weightlifting equipment, smoking
privileges or porno magazines.
Chain Gangs The inmates work on city and county projects. They paint over graffiti, bury deceased people who are
indigent, retrieve litter and work on landscaping projects. This concept saves the county tens of thousands of dollars in
labor costs. The visibility of chain gangs also serves as a general deterrent for other potential criminals.
Ambience The interior walls of the jail and clothes they wear are the color pink. Studies indicate that the color pink
reduces the anxiety, tension and anger levels of inmates. Less fighting and more compliance make life better for both the
inmates and correctional officers.
Criminals should be punished for their illegal behavior not rewarded by receiving amenities that most law abiding citizens
can't enjoy. As your new sheriff, I will implement the same system in an effort to reduce the financial burden on our
community and send a dear message to potential criminals. Like Sheriff Joe says, "This is not the Ritz-Carlton.. .if you
don't like it, don't come back!"
Thomas Santarlas(R)
for Hardee County Sheriff
SResponsible Use of Tax Payers' Money
www.newsheriff08.org
Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the Thomas Santarlas Campaign Account. Approved by Thomas Santarlas for Sheriff.


Saturday, July 19, 2008

Super Skate Family Fun Center
240 Stenstom Rd. Wauchula, FL


Interact with All Your

SPW Superstars

2:30 pm 5:30 pmn
Face Painting Pictures Autographs


Bell Rings at 7:30 pm

CAN'T GET ENOUGH? Visit us at: southern-pro.com
Photo Gallery Message Boards Monthly Polls -
Box Office Purchase Tickets Online .


i


$12 $8 $5
Fan Fest and General Admission Under 12
General Admission at the Door General Admission
Combo ckets go online or call (813) 967-5206.
For advanced tickets go online or call (813) 967-5206.


ain Event

GEORGE RODRIGUIEZ
DEFENDS HIS FLORIDA HEAVYWEIGHT SPW TITLE
vs.
WENTWORTH'S MONSTER SURPRISE
First Time in Wauchula
FANS BRING THE WEAPONS
(NO GUNS NO KNIVES)
Luke Ryder vs. Butch Long

SPW Tag Team Title
WCW Glacier & The White Scorpion
vs.
DV Branton & Donnie York
PLUS:
Glenn Cortezz, American Patriot, El Guapo,
Former WCW Superstar Ralphus,
and many others!

ALSO:
See the APW Debut of Barney Rumble
-----------------------
WCW Glacier will have his official SPW contract
signing at the top of the show
7:17c


Voted


#1
Indpenen
Sho

-inlria





.Th~ank

Wacul o


Im





12B The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


HOT TOPICS
As we enter the second month of hurricane season, I am happy
to report that, as of this writing, we have had only one named
storm.
Hurricane Bertha made her mark in the record books by being
the sixth-earliest major storm on record and-being the farthest east-
forming named storm. Forecasters and climatologists are debating
if this is a result of climate change, global warming, or just a har-
binger of things to come.
As I have said before, the only hurricane I'm worried about is
the next one, and all we can do is prepare. I do hope for a quiet sea-
ion but history has shown we need to always be "on the lookout"
for the next disaster.
This month, we're going to turn our attention to two summer-
time topics: heat injury and mosquito safety.
Hot Enough For Ya?
OK, we all live in Florida and we all accept that from about
May until November, we are just going to endure some really hot
days. Temperatures in the high 90s, near 100-percent humidity, and
no breeze can equal a really miserable day for anyone outside.
Most of us have either adapted to the heat or have found creative
ways to avoid it.
Having said that, you need to exercise caution whenever
you're outside during the day to avoid a possible heat-related
injury. Extreme heat can cause serious injury. Below are some
signs and symptoms of heat-related injury:
Heavy sweating
Paleness
Muscle cramps
Tiredness
Weakness
Dizziness
Headache
Nausea or vomiting
Fainting
Skin: may be cool and moist
Pulse rate: fast and weak
Breathing: fast and shallow
Heat exhaustion can lead to a much more serious condition,
heat stroke. Some signs of heat stroke include:
Severe symptoms of heat exhaustion.
The victim has heart problems or high blood
pressure.
Little or no sweating.
To prevent heat exhaustion, follow these simple guidelines:
Drink cool, non-alcoholic beverages, as directed
by your physician.
Rest in an air-conditioned environment.
Take a cool shower, bath or sponge bath.
Wear lightweight clothing.
What's The Buzz?
Believe it or not, mosquitoes are still a leading cause of disease
and death in many parts of the world. Even in the United States,
many cases of mosquito-borne illnesses are reported each' year.
Mosquitoes, because of how they feed (yes, we're on the
menu), can pass many blood-borne diseases from person to person
or from animal to animal. While I'm not going to go into all the dif-
ferent diseases, I do want to make you aware of a number of sim-
ple things you can do to prevent mosquitoes from breeding,. and


things you can do to reduce your vulnerability to the little critters
once they're out.
Keep pools clean and chlorinated.
Eliminate all standing water on your property.
Don't forget to remind your neighbors, too. Their
mosquitoes may also be your mosquitoes.
Canoes, boats and wading pools should be
turned over.
Dispose of any tires. Tires can breed thousands
of mosquitoes.
Check your door and window screens for holes
and tears that mosquitoes can use to enter your
home. Put 16-mesh screening or hardware cloth
over bathroom and other vent outlets on your roof.
To better protect yourself, follow these tips:
Wear protective clothing such as long pants and
long-sleeved shirts when outdoors.
Use insect repellents properly. DEET, Picaridin
and Oil of Lemon-Eucalyptus are proven to be the
most effective. Use repellents only as directed on
the label.
If possible, schedule your activities to avoid the
times when mosquitoes are most active usually
dawn and dusk.
If you have a deck or patio, light it using yellow
"bug lights." These lights are not repellent, per se,
but do not attract mosquitoes like other incandes-
cent bulbs.
Avoid shaded areas where mosquitoes may be
resting.
TIP OF THE MONTH
Hydrate yourself before engaging in outdoor activities. If you
feel thirsty, that's your body warning you that it's time to stop, rest
and replace those fluids. Be sure to put on sunblock, at least 30 SPF
to prevent sunburn. Even minor sunburn can damage the skin's
ability to regulate body temperature.
Remember, managing your emergencies begins with you.


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE
For the week ended July 10, 2008:
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 9,012, com-
pared to closed last week and 11,096 a year ago. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to last week: slaughter cows and bulls were steady to 1.00 lower,
feeder steers and heifers were unevenly steady.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 115.00-155.00;
300-400 lbs., 100.00-130.00; and
400-500 lbs., 88.00-112.00.
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 98.00-130.00;
300-400 lbs., 86.00-108.00; and
400-500 lbs., 80.00- 97.00.


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 50.00-
59.00.
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 lbs., 68.00-
74.00.


Sly is a Maine Coon.
He has a medium coat and a long tail.
He is litter-box trained. His adoption fee is $45.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.




- - - -- Fun By The
2 3 Numbers
3 7 4 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
6 9 sudoku. This
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1 5 6 puzzle will have
you hooked from
2 A4 1 f6 the moment you
2 6 __ square off, so
8 sharpen your
8 5 pencil and put
2 5 your sudoku
2 5 1 savvy to the test!

7 1
Level: Advanced
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
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row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
9 Z 1. 6V 1 9 9SL
E aV1 9 L 9 6 9
L 6 s e 9 8 1. Z
6 I. E 9 8 1 9 L
99 9 L 1. 6 V 98
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'AGE ONE


Impact Fees: Fire/Police

More People=More Problems


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
This is the fourth in a series of
articles on impact fees and their
effect on the community.
A growing population is
already straining demands from
both law enforcement and Fire-
Rescue services.
The addition of at least
10,000 residents in new devel-
opments scattered around the
county will put outstations for
both fire protection and police
in more sites around the county,
increasing the staffing and
equipment needs.
} Fire-Rescue
In a recent report at a
Kiwanis meeting, Public Safety
Director/Fire Chief Mike
phoate talked about the average
workweek for the 41 employees
pf Fire-Rescue. There are 36
dual-certified firefighter/Emer-
gency Medical Technicians or
firefighter/paramedics.
There are currently 12 people
on duty each 24-hour shift. That
includes a shift commander, but
does not include the fire chief
or assistant chief, who often are
called out as well. There is a
five-man shift in Wauchula and


ALL-STAR OUTING


another in the Zolfo Springs
station. Two man the station in
Bowling Green. They average
56 hours in a workweek.
County fire assessments gen-
erate about $2.8 million a year.
The balance of revenue comes
from Medicare/Medicaid, pri-
vate insurance, and self-pay,
which often includes the ser-
vices of a collection agency.
New locations could mean a
new fire station in the Vandolah
Rural Center area, another at
the huge Shadowlawn Rural
Village west of Bowling Green,
and others at Torrey Groves
community just south of the
college and the Lemon Grove
community. Of course, each
would need staffing and equip-
ment, with a fire truck running
about $300,000.
Law Enforcement
The Sheriff's Department and
municipal law enforcement
would also face challenges with
a burgeoning population.
A seven-man committee is
looking at alternatives to cope
with the already increasing jail
population. The 15-year-old jail
is in need of $3 million in
repairs. The 191-bed facility is


expected to reach maximum
capacity by 2014. Not all the
beds can be filled because of
mandated separation of
males/females/juveniles, sen-
tenced individuals and those
awaiting trial, and those requir-.
ing single cell occupancy
because for mental or physical
health reasons.
Some of the law enforcement
officers are on routine patrol
and some are designated for
special duties and investiga-
tions, such as agriculture
crimes, gang activity, drug
abuse and its related crimes,
burglaries/robberies, domestic
violence and security/bailiff
needs at the courthouse.
Again, new large communi-
ties may mean substations,'
more staff, more vehicles, more
patrols, more crimes.
While inmates pay'for a por-
tion of their care, much of the
burden for housing and feeding
them and containing crime in
the community falls on the tax-
payer. For new residents,
impact fees can offset some of
this cost.
Next week: Impacts fees and
their effect on water, sewer and
garbage


LIFE WAS

By JONATHAN MORILLO
Special To The Herald-Advocate
I interviewed my grandmother,
Dolores Morillo.
Q: Where were you born?
A: I was born in Santiago, Cuba.
Q: What is your name?
A: My name is Dolores Morillo.
Q: What kind of chores did you
have?
A: I had to clean the house, wash the
dishes and iron.
Q:.What was your first job?
A:I worked at a barbershop.
Q: How much did a piece of candy
-cost?
A: A piece ,'
of candy
was only
five cents.
Q: Did you go to school as a kid?
A: Yes, of course.
Q: Was life hard when you were
young?' /. : .. ..
A: Yes. Life was extremely hard in
.Cuba.
Q: How many brothers and sisters
did you have?
A: I only have three brothers.
Q: When did you get married?
A: I got married on April 5, 1958.
Q: How many countries have you
been in?
A: I have been in Cuba, Spain,
Canada and the United States.
Q: When did you move to the
United States?
A: I moved to the United States on
May 10, 1974.
Q: Was life better in the United
States than in Cuba?
A: Oh, yes, it was much better to.live
in the United States than in Cuba. We
don't have to work so hard'.We have
more food here than in Cuba,
SQ: How many years have you lived
in the United States?,
A: I have lived in the United States


TARD IN CUBA

for 33 years.
SQ: How old are you L'ow?
A: I am 73 years od16

Back In Time is the re ,d of a class
assignment given to n w'h raiders at
Hardee Senior High Sch. Each
student is asked to im:e / an older
person. Selected interv 'i ,,-' are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


COURTESY PHOTOS
A young Dolores Morillo in evening
gown.


In 1926, the Toastmaster, the first pop-up toaster, popped into general stores.
Americanf buy over twelve million toasters a year.


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Belles, ages 13-15, played three games In the state All-Star tournament at
Bellevue. After defeating Wildwood on Friday night, the girls had back-to-back losses
to Mulberry and Chipley to end their streak. Manager Randy Tyson, and coaches
Debbie McNabb and Rocky Parks used pitchers Amanda McNabb, Sabrina Hernandez
and Courtney Parks, who were backed up by Sierra Coronado, Emily Starratt, Brooke
Tyson, Danika Briones, Celeste Williams, Summer Sisum, Penny McGuire and Karina
Fernandez.








School Board
District 3

Veteran US Army
Served with distinction in Iraq.

Honest I understand the importance of a
handshake and honoring my word.

)^ Family Man Father of two sons, Husband of 19 years,
For my entire adult life, I have used my hands, education,
training, and common sense to support my own family.
I understand the struggles of Hardee County families today.

Hard Working Lead Automotive Technician, PRECO

) Hardee County Native -
Student athlete and graduate of Hardee High School.

Dear Hardee County Voter,
I would appreciate your support and vote on August 26.
Our community deserves elected officials who work hard
and who lead with fairness, honor, and integrity.
As your new District 3 School Board member,
I pledge to serve everyone with these important values
that I learned here in Hardee County.

I am proof that our schools can make a positive difference.
I served my Country proudly and now would like
the opportunity to serve you.

Thank You and Go Wildcats!


Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by Charles Crutchfield Campaign, Approved by Charles Crutchfleld 7:17p


Now is the perfect time to

move up to John Deere quality.
Save big when you purchase a new John Deere 5003 or 5025 Series Tractor. First, take
advantage of special zero-percent, 48-month fixed-rate financing. Then, thanks to the
Economrn Stimulus Act.of 2008, you may be eligible for a dramatically higher depreciation
deduction on new equipment purchases made between now and
January 1, 2009. So if you've been thinking about a new tractor, now's / UI
the time to come into your John Deere dealership to demo a new
5003 or 5025 Series Tractor.


'Fixed inti Subject to RaProved credit on John Deire Credit Installment Plan Sonim reicrilons apply
See your sealer for complete details and oiner financing options Ottfer ends July 31 2008


FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY
3440 US HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FL
(863) 735-1122
www.fieldsequip.com


FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY
17215 HIGHWAY 27 NORTH
MINNEOLA, FL
(352) 394-7181
www.fieldsequip.com


JOHN DEERE


FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY
3203 HAVENDALE BLVD
WINTER HAVEN, FL
(863) 967-0602
www.fieldsequip.com


Nohig-un LkeA Dere"


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DNIDUGL44IU4 *A~.F2XIU7tWHA8W4t2~B4fl 7:17c


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.9iU


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7:17c


I








2C The Herald-Advocate, July 17,2008




Schedule Of Weekly Services


APOSTOLIC LIGH I f C .SE
UNITED PENTACO" L,
CHURCH
310 Orange
375-3100,
Sunday Morning .......... a.m.
Sunday Evening ........ .... .... .m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ........7 (0 p.m.
Thursday Service .............. ...7.30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. I
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School .... ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.
r ICHURCHI OVGOD "
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday ....................5:00 p.m.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
.Evening Worship ...............:..6:30 p.m.
.Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m:
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 375-2253
Bible Study ..........................9:30 a.m.:
Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.n ,
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.n%
Wednesday Supper ............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6,:30 p.nr
,Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ...................6:00.p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.,

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.,
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles EstudiorJuvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
.Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Paknlmetto St.
Church School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................I1:00 a.m.
Evening Service................. 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communiin-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training...............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
.Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service............. ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

Help your brother's boat
across, and your own will
reach the shore.


BOWLING GREEN.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375.2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico...................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main SLt.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs.................... 7:30 p.m.


ONA :

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Conunmm.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
'Evening Worship ............... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......... ....... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
, Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........11...I :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
.................................. ............ 6:30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time .........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
English Service .............I11:30 a.m.
General WorshipService ;.....1:30.p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .. ....................7:00 p.m.'
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
HARDEE CAMPUS
225 E. Main St. (City Hall
Auditorium)
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday ................................. 10:00 a.m.

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel),
773-0427 '
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Pastor James Bland
|Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
,Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ........ ............ 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ........... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday ......... ............. 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men 's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576


-Ueefif-(83 7-32


WAUCHULA

I CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood .......................... 11:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. 735-8681
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.:
Sunday Morning ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night ................7:30 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion....................7:00 p.m..
Jueves Servicio.................... 7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ..................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio..............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night) ....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ........0............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.;
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH 1
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship ............10:00 a.m.
Evening Service .... .............6:00 p.m.
[Wednesday Night Service......7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School ................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Family Night Supper.............5:00p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Mtg............6:00 p.m
M& M Kids's Klub................6:00 p.m
(Music & Missions 4 yr -grade 5)
IMPACT (Jr. High)...............6:20 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr. 6-8)
323 (Sr. High)....................... 6:30 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr.9-12)
FIRST BAPTISTTHIU R-C "
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical ..............9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........I1:00 a.m.
Predicacion ..........................11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles ......7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. -.773-9243

Children's Programiming
(0-12th grade).........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Dinner.................................. 5:30 p.m .
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
(Lil'K)/Sonshine Singers
..................................6:30-8:00 p.m .
Jam Team......................6:30-7:15p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups
..................................7:15-8:00 p.m .
6-12th Grade (Oasis)....6:30-8:00 p.m.
Adult Bible Study.........6:30-8:00 p.m
FIR ST1URCH OF
TnE~A1tENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ...........1...0:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
WednesdayPrayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARYY
.BAIST CHURCH
1347 Mt1tin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School...................... 9:30 a.m.
,Morning.Service ..................11:00 a.m.
'Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
:Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
S Bible Stpdy ...... .............. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship. 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

.FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service .........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Ministries ........7:00 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773.3753
Morning Service ...............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts.................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
W orship................................10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &


Lighthouse Min ..........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos ............................ 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles.............................7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Biadenton Road
767-1010


WAUCHULA

JEHOVAH'S WITN ES
ENGLISH *
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Morning ................10:00 a.m.'
Tuesday Evening ................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Evening ..................4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening*......7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Every Friday eveding at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N..7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
LAKE DALE MAPFIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School .......... ...... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
113 N. 7th Ave. i
Sunday Service ..........11:00 a.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Church Training .... ............. 5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship ................(...(1st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
.Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.n.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN,
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I & 3' Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2"' & 4" Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ..........................11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Rbad East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hlwy 17
.Morning Service ................10:30 a.m.
'Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS.
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...........r6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9TH Ave. 773-6418
Sunday Service...............10:00 a.m.

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ................7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish)................ 11:00 a.m.
(Creole).............. .....1:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1... 1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............;7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship ......................7:30 n.m.


WAUCHULA

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ...................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.'
Tues. Bible 9tdy.
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 o.m.'
1 WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................1... 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........11:.....:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship........7:30 p.m.
\ WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST'
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Church...............................1... 0:00 a.m.
Youth Service ......... ......... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7;30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ..... ............. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.'
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church.........1.6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
1720 W. Main
773-2929
,Sunday Service ....................10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
,Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all Services.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ..........1.....0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............I11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781.2281
Sunday :............... .............10:00 a.m .

SCREWSVILLE BETHEL
S BAPTIST. CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... .... 1:00 i.m:
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.


EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ...................... 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study .....................1... 0:00 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 11:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. 735-2524 773-
0989
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Worship................. ........ 11:00 a.m.
Evening..................................6:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet. ..7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO -SPRIN

NEW VISION WORSHIP CrENT-
64 E. & School House Road...
Church 735-8585 Childcae735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church.............10:00 a.m.,
Evening Worship ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.:
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m. -
*pRIMERA MISSIorl?
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
........................... : ... .............. 7:00 p.in.
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH,
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday . ..............10:30 a.im.
,Evening Service ................ 6:... 30 p.m.
5th Sunday. ....... 600pm ,

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2.1/2 Miles east of.
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600 ....... "..
Sunday School. . .................9:45 a.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.n.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship............7-9 p.m.
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH-
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17.South 735.0636
Sunday School .. ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7;00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773.5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10.30 a.m.
Confesiones...........................10:00a.m .
Doctrina..............11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025 -
Escuela Dominica .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio................. .............11:00 am.
Pioneer Club............. ...... 6;30 p.m..
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................. ...... 8:00 p.m,
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH f
OF ZOLFO -
320IE.4thSt. 735-1200 .
Sunday School ...... 10.00 a m
Morning Worship .........:......11.00 a.m.'
Training Union.... ...5.00 pm
Evening Worship ..... 6 00 pm.
Wednesday Prayer .... .7.0.m. .











A man jumped out of a cab ; .
SEEDS







A man jumped out of a n cb
whistling, and a -newsboy
said, "You're not much of a
whistler. Listen to me."
When the boy finished, he
asked, "Can you do better?"
"Yes, sir," said the man,
who was an expert whistler.
And he whistled his very best.
Thrilled by the man's skill,
the 'boy asked, "Why wWere :
you doing so rotten at-first?"
Whatever is worth doing at
all is worth doing well. NO -
work is too trifling to be well
done. : :
Work while you work, play
while you play;
This is the way to be happy

All that you do, do with all
* your might;:
Things done by halves are
never done right. :II :


Iid -7.12 17.11-31 "1"26-5 MID 111-M!43. 19il-H1M 1.1.
.5 *mim IA.


cPcace EiAer Growers


Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL






July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3C


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The Herald-Advocate...

75 YEARS AGO
Appropriations Bill Puzzle
To Officials: What will happen
to the circuit judges and the
state attorneys during the com-
ing two years, is the latest puz-
zle evolved from the state
appropriation bill; which sets
up $250,000 with which to pay
39 circuit judges $5,000 a year
each.
Supreme Court Tests Futch
Law July 21: Settlement of
taxes with bonds may come to
an end at an early date, as such
bond tax-settlement laws are at
this time before the Florida
Supreme Court and oral argu-


Greetings from Fort Green!
It has not rained for two or
three days and you actually
miss it! When it rains, it seems
to cool things off.
Cypress Gardens sent post
cards to some of the Fort Green
residents and hopefully to other
parts of the county. The card
included a free admission ticket
for one person and half off for
another. They know how to get
you! The half-off ticket for a
child is the same as half off
would be for a senior citizen! I
guess this means everything
revolves, as the price is cheaper
when we are young, and then
when we reach our senior days
the prices. get cheap again!
Now I don't mean really cheap,
$18 was the half-off price.
Anyway, the water park was
delightful! One part 6of it makes
one think they are in a fast- run-
ning mountain stream. The dif-
.ference is this water was crystal
clear! We saw other Fort Green
folks taking advantage of their
free tickets.
Polly Banda thought it was
very funny but also a real com-
pliment when the paper stated
she was 18! She actually turned
81 and somehow it got trans-
posed! I can remember my 18th
birthday because I lived in
Georgia and when a female
turned 18 she could register to
vote. A male had to wait until
21. That was the significant
thing to remember, and I voted
that year and have never missed
voting in an election since turn-
ing 18.
Lynda and Charles Abbott
have returned from a wonderful
vacation trip to the mountains
in North Georgia. Lynda said
even when she was a child and
her parents would take a long
car trip she would stay home
with an aunt. She just did not
like to go. All that has changed
since she and Charles have
come under the magic spell of
the mountains. Lynda says she
would like to have a small place
up there, but just for vacations,
as she would never leave
Hardee County and move away
permanently. Sheand so many
of us want to live close enough


ments in three cases are to be
heard next Friday, July 21.
Wauchula Nine Ready To
Start Second Half: The second
half of the Orange Belt baseball
league will get under way
Sunday with all teams in the
eight-club circuit ready for play.
Brewster, the ninth team, has
dropped out and the remaining
eight teams have been strength-
ened to start the last half.

Dr. Peacock To Open Office
Next Monday: Dr. W.H. Pea-
cock, well-known local physi-
cian who has been connected
with Wauchula Infirmary for
the past year, will open an
office in the Stenstrom building
over the picture show next
Monday. Dr. Peacock stated
that he will continue to do
surgery at the Wauchula




Out. -
10 ^ ^ 1 ;- .



to our children and grandchil-
dren that we can see them. Of
course, I bet, part of the moun-
tain attraction is her brother,
Jim Sasser, who lives in Blairs-
ville, Ga.
Paul and Sharon Adams cele-
brated their 19th wedding
anniversary on July 15. My
wish for you is many more
happy anniversaries and hope-
fully you will make it to 50!
Arthur Womack is recovering
from his surgery and is doing
well. Helen Plumley is still in
the hospital trying to get her
sugar regulated. B.J. Haney had
foot surgery on July 16. Paul
Clark had surgery on July 15 to
enable the doctors to obtain
material for a biopsy. Joyce
Coker is doing well after her
eye surgery and is now permit-
ted to drive anywhere she wish-
es, not just Fort Green's back
roads! The eye doctor had told
her not to drive and her family
took him at his word! Vianna
Grimsley, with Barbara Casey
as the chauffer, took Colin
Cooper back to Tampa to have
his stitches removed. Please
pray for all the sick ones in our
community. Jancis Starr is still
in need of prayer.
Lee Chancey went back to
work after a two-week vacation.
It is amazing how most every-
one says "vacation is wonderful
but it is good to be home" and
getting back in the routine of
work! Makayla and Lee played
the guitars Sunday night and
Lee sang a song. It was good
and it is a pleasure to see the
young people learning to play
instruments and be willing to
share their talent at church.
Happy birthday wishes to
Bim Davis. He celebrated
another of these milestones on
July 12. The Randall Davis
family had a delicious Sunday
dinner in honor of his birthday
and had a passel of relatives for
the feast and, as Ms. Zula used
to write, "a good time was had
by all." I had not remembered
this expression of hers but
Carol Williams shared it with
me.
Remember' to pray for one
another.


The busiest international telephone route is between the
United States and Canada.
Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is know-
ing which ones to keep.
-Scott Adams


~ '-.4




I?


I


I


Infirmary.
Wauchula Will Open New
Caf6 Next Week: Plans are
being made by Loys F. Wells,
formerly of Wauchula but more
recently of Lakeland, to open a
cafe in the Peace River Hotel'
building at the corner of Main
Street and Fifth Avenue. All
new equipment is being in-
stalled throughout, and the fur-
niture is being painted an attrac-
tive color scheme of black and
yellow.

50 YEARS AGO
Natural Gas Runs Into
Money Block: Plain dollars and
cents considerations have
pushed natural gas for
Wauchula back into the realm
of the "nice if we could afford it
but . ." this week as city coun-
cilmen learned a distribution
and transmission system would
cost approximately $700,000.

Caloosahatchee Boat-a-Cade
Set: A boat-a-cade up the
Caloosahatchee River Sunday
has been substituted for the
Wauchula Boat Club's Wau-
chula to the Gulf trip originally
planned for this weekend. The
two-day boat-a-cade is now set
for Labor Day weekend.

Peace River Log Clearing
Possibility: A Peace River chan-
nel free of logs and debris may
become a reality in Hardee,
either through action of a newly
formed water conservation
group or by use of federal pris-
oners working for the county.

Hardee Motors Still Un-
defeated In Little League Play:
Halfway through the Little
League season only one team,
Hardee Motors, is still sporting
an unblemished record with
four wins and no defeats.
Nicholson Supply, which was
still undefeated last week, fell
before the league leaders
Thursday.

Cellar-Hugging Firemen Up-
set 4th-Place REA: The Fire
Department softballers, buried
in the cellar, rose up to score 17
runs in one inning to upset
fourth-place REA Tuesday
night. The final score: Fire De-
partment 21, REA 14.
Local VFW Post Wins
Citation From District: The
Hardee County post of Veterans
of Foreign Wars has been
awarded a special citation for
its active part in community
service and youth activity work.
Featured speaker was Sam
Story, Lake Wales, state com-
mander, who discussed recruit-
ment.

Public Hearing Monday On
New School Budget: A
$935,873 School Board budget
which has been "pared to the
bone" to make ends meet will
be presented for a public hear-
ing Monday at 10 a.m. in the
office of the superintendent of
public instruction in the court-
house.

25 YEARS AGO
Wauchula Council Attorney
Resigns: City attorney John
Burton submitted a letter of res-
ignation to the Wauchula Coun-
cil Monday night after serving
the city for 18 years. He says
that he will continue to work
full time at his law practice.
Church Officials Hopeful
Project Can Begin Again: Merle
Albritton, chairman of the
building committee of the First


) iticl CanJidates! oi



Your advertising deadline is each






This will permit us to give your ad the
greatest amount of attention.
lease do not ask us to make an exception.
We desire only to serve all candidates
equally & well.

The Herald-Advocate
"Your local hometown newspaper
for over 100 years"
1 'Ar


I Wa*y Back When I


Baptist Church of Wauchula,
. can see the sun's rays beginning
. to peek through the clouds. For
the past seven weeks, he and
other church officials have seen
the $2 million construction pro-
ject of a new church west of
Wauchula shut down.

Council May Choose Police
Chief Monday: The Wauchula
Council may choose a new
police chief as soon as next
week. A special meeting has
been called for Monday in the
City Council chambers at City
Hall for the purpose of working
on the budget.

Shirley Hennig Receives
Degree: On Thursday, June 30,
the staff of VNA of Hardee
County gave a congratulations
party for their administrator,
Shirley A. Hennig, RN for her
graduation and achieving her
bachelor of science of profes-
sional arts degree. Mrs. Hennig
completed her degree June 24,
at the St. Joseph's College in
Maine.

Dr. Franklin T. Miles Retires:
Franklin T. Miles, MD, director
of radiology service of Hardee
Memorial Hospital, retired July
1, 1983. Dr. Miles had a long
and illustrious career, having
graduated as a doctor of medi-
cine from Queens University of
Medicine, Ontario, Canada, in
1940.

AIDS Hysteria Spreads: On
Wednesday, June 22, the Ameri-
can Red Cross said "a national
hysteria about AIDS" is result-
ing in "critically low" supplies
of donated blood. The San
Antonio, Texas, fire department
has ordered 60 sets of masks,
gowns and rubber gloves to
protect paramedics from AIDS.

10 YEARS AGO
County Issues Rabies Alert:
For the second time this year
the county has issued a rabies
alert. And again, it is for a rabid
raccoon, with this one being
found near Oak Grove. The last
rabies alert occurred in early
March, when a rabid raccoon
was found in the Limestone
area. The most recent case
before that was back in 1995.

ZS. Council Fails To Re-
appoint Police Chief: The Zolfo


Springs Town Council on
Monday night failed to rehire
its chief of police. Charles
Tillman's contract with the'
town expired the day before, on
Sunday. Mayor Lois Dandrige
opened Monday's regular ses-
sion with a recommendation to
reappoint Tillman for another
three years.

Hi-Tides Battle In Huge
Swim Meet: Talk about over-
whelming' odds! The Hardee
Hi-Tides Swim Club, with a lit-
tle over a dozen competitors,
tackled the numbers in a huge
18-team meet in Bartow the last
weekend in June.

Wauchula Methodist Leads
Ladies League: The second
week of play in Women's
Church League left only one
undefeated squad. Wauchula
First Methodist picked up a pair
of wins to catapult into the top
spot in league action with a 3-0
record.

LL Baseball Over; Softball


Elect


Gary


SMoore
For


Superintendent

Hardee District Schools

THESE ARE OUR KIDS
Provide a better education for our students by:
* Sharing honest information with everyone
* Empowering our principals to reinstitute strong discipline
and safety
* Restoring public trust
* Equipping our teachers with more technology and resources
" Establishing a realistic budget and live within our means
* Offering more voc-tech course options for students
* Keeping our best and brightest teachers with competitive
salaries and benefits
WE CAN DO BETTER!
7:17p
Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the committee to Elect Gary S. Moore for Superintendent
of the Hardee County Schools. Democrat. Todd Durden, Campaign Treasurer.
Approved by Gary Moore.


First Baptist thureh-

of

Bowling Groon














4531 U.S. Highway 17 North,

Bowling Green, FL 33834

Phone (863) 375-2253





July 28th August 1st


8:30 am 12 pm


(Registration starts at 8:00 am)


NWL. L-


Completed grades 1st 6th


. 2


Begins: Hardee Little League
All-Stars finished their baseball
series last week, just as the soft-
ball girls were beginning. Both
Hardee baseball teams bowed
out during the week-long
District 4 baseball play which
finished Saturday.

Pioneer Park Days Produces
Profit: Once again, .Pioneer
Park Days has brought revenue
into the county. Pioneer Park
Days Director Jane Long pre-
sented the 1998 financial report
to county commissioners last
Thursday, showing that de-
creased costs have increased
proceeds from the annual five-
day extravaganza.

Orange Juice Donated To
Firefighting Effort: Two of
Florida's largest juice proces-
sors donated more than 2,600
cases of juice and other bever-
ages today to the hundreds of
firefighters, residents and vol-
unteers affected by the rash of
wildfires on Florida's east'
coast.


J







4C The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


Men's Standings Change


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Between the showers, the
2008 Men's Softball League
marches on.
Considering teams which
picked up victories and those
idled by rains, the standings
have changed considerably.
Although Mosaic Phosphates
continues to lead Division II
with a 4-0 record, A-1 Safari
Glass picked up three wins to
move into second place at 3-2
and Peace River Electric Co-
operative Inc. (PRECo) is at 4-
2. Behind them are Team
Blacklist, Brant Funeral Chap-
el, Merrill Lynch and Nemesis.
In Division I, Celebration has
moved to the top with a 4-1
record. Recycling at Marty's is
at 3-2 and JXR Construction at
4-2. Behind them are TKO,
Outlaws, and La Floresita.
There were rainout nights on
June 30 and July 3, keeping
several teams from playing at
all in the last three weeks.
Backing up to July 1, the
Field 3 early game was a 23-9
win for PRECo over Brant.
Mikey Driskell and Billy
Alexy were four-hit batters for
PRECo. Driskell scored four
times and Rodger Brutus and
Brian Alexy each scored three
times.
Teddy Svendsen and Ches
Graham homered for Brant.
Graham also doubled and sin-
gled for five RBIs. Ted
Svendsen joined his son in scor-
ing twice each.
The Field 3 late game was a
close encounter, with Mosaic
outlasting Merrill Lynch 15-13.
James Blum homered and
doubled twice for five RBIs for
Mosaic. He and Austin Helms
each scored three times. Willie
Dickerson, Jason Johnston and
Billy Hernandez added two
runs apiece.
David Beumel homered twice
and doubled for a half dozen
RBIs for Merrill Lynch. Bud
Plumley and Ruben Rivas each
also had three hits. Ryn Heine,
Will Tyson, Beumel- and Rivas
each scored twice.
Meanwhile, on Field 4, JXR
won the 6:45 game over
Recycling 19-9.
Reid Benton tripled twice,
doubled afid singled to put four
runs on the board for JXR.
Mike Weatherington added
three runs and Tadd Holton,


J.R. Bass, Randy Benton and
Ryan Thomas were twin-tally
batters.
Duck Kersey led Recycling
with three hits. Kyle Rinderle,
and Will Davis were the only
two-score batters. Five other
players also put a run on the
board.
In the 8:15 game on Field 4,
Celebration cruised past La
Floresita 20-4.
Clint Hendry homered twice
and scored five times for
Celebration. Willie Gilliard,
Briant Shumard and Yogi Lo-
zano each scored three times,
and Cody Greene and Lee Vala-
dez added twin tallies.
Jessie Aguilar tripled and
doubled, scoring twice for La
Floresita. Julian Garcia and
Junior Garcia each chipped in
with a run. Leadoff batter
Bobby Flores helped with twin
hits.
In last Tuesday's early game
on Field 4, Mosaic topped Team
Blacklist 25-2.
Johnston homered twice and
joined Helms and Michael
Carte in scoring four times for
Mosaic. Doug Sutton hit a 3-
RBI homer and Hernandez and
Mark McGee also homered.
George Dickey smacked a
solo homer and Chris Cobb also
scored for Team Blacklist. A
half dozen other players were
stranded on the basepaths.
In Field 4's late game, A-1
bashed Brant 26-16.
L.P. Hornbake and Lamar
Gilliard each picked up four
RBIs for A-1. Nate Lee scored
four times, and Brent Gilliard,
Lester Hornbake, Steve and
Brad Gilliard each scored three
times.
Lewis Martin led Brant with
three scores. He and Teddy
Svendsen homered. Wayne
Graham, Joe Porter and Svend-
sen put twin tallies on the
board.
On Field 3, in the Tuesday
early game, A-1 nipped Merrill
Lynch 15-11.
Lee, Brent Gilliard and
Lamar Gilliard each homered
for A-1. Lamar Gilliard scored
four times and Lee and Glen
Bergens added twin scores.
Plumley socked a grand slam
and Beumel homered and dou-
bled twice for Merrill Lynch.
Thomas Trevino joined them in
putting two runs each on the
board. Five other players added
1 "...-


a run apiece.
In the Field 3 late game,
PRECo popped Nemesis 12-4.
Brutus and Daniel Barnett
homered for PRECo. Barnett,
Brian Alexy and Matt T. each
scored twice. A half dozen other
batters crossed home plate once
each.
For Nemesis, it was Rigo,
-Briones slapping a grand slam
homer. Roy Santoya and Isauro
Figueroa were each two-hit bat-
ters. Jesse Reyes joined
Briones, Santoya, Figueroa in
scoring a run apiece.
Last Thursday's opener on
Field 3 was a 25-9 win for
Celebration over JXR.
Justin Painter nearly hit for
the cycle with a homer, triple
and pair of doubles for
Celebration. Hendry also home-
red and tripled, and Greene
smacked a trio of triples.
Mike Jones and Bass both
homered for JXR. Mike
Johnston had three hits. Jones
was the only dual score batter.
Seven other batters crossed
home plate once each.
In the closer on Field 3,
Recycling won 24-19 over
Outlaws.
Hagan Bylund nearly hit the
cycle for Recycling, with a
homer triple and pair of dou-
bles. Daniel Garrison also
homered and doubled among
his four hits. Willie Henderson
and Greg Garza also homered
and Rinderle triple and dou-
bled.
Shay Baker tripled and both
Josh Sneider and John McBride
doubled for Outlaws. Robert
Martin, Javier Olvera, Jarvis
Baker, Sneider and McBride
each scored twice.
In the early game on Field 4,
Nemesis won 19-4 over Brant.
Elias Ramirez homered and
tripled and Rigo Briones home-
red and doubled for Nemesis.
Emanuel Rivera, Ramirez,
Mario Santoyo and Briones
each circled the bases three
times. Reyes added twin scores.
Brant scored all its runs in the
third inning, when Daniel
Rucker, Porter, Manuel Herrera
and John Roberson all scored.
Five other batters were strand-
ed.
In the Field 4 nightcap, A-I
edged PRECo 15-14.
Lamar Gilliard and, Dale
Roberts each sacrificed to score
teammates for A-I. Bergens and
Brandon Sellers touched home
three times apiece and Brent
Gilliard and Lester Hornbake
each came home twice.
PRECo countered with a
Brian Alexy homer and sacri-
fice, along with doubles by Van.
Crawford, Billy Alexy, Darryl
Henderson and Matt Bell. Peck
Harris was the only triple-tally
batter. Bell, Bill Alexy and
Billy Alexy added twin scores.

The doer alone learneth.
-Friedrich Nietzsche


Former Wauchulan's Wife


Dies In Auto Accident


Judy Terrell, the wife of
Wauchula native Larry Terrell,
died on June 8 in an automobile
accident in Sarasota, where the
family lived. They were well
known in the restaurant busi-
ness.
Larry is the son of Clayton
and Helen Terrell. Clayton was
one of 10 Terrell children who
grew up in Hardee County and
was a former Hardee County
Commissioner. Other siblings
of Clayton were brothers John
D., Dunning, Grover, Steve,
Gene and Corbett and sisters
Ada Waters, Lena Stringfellow
and Ressie Whidden.
Judy and Larry Terrell found-
ed several restaurant chains in-
cluding Durango's Santa Fe
Steakhouse, and Whiskey
Creek Wood Fire Grill, wrote
Mark Zaloudek of the Sarasota
Herald-Tribune. His article also
appeared in The Tampa Tribune
on July 11.
Brad Knight, 17, a Riverview
High School student, ran a red
light shortly after 7 p.m. and
struck her Dodge Neon on
Proctor Road in Sarasota.
Terrell, 49, her husband, and
their son Travis, 13, loved the
outdoors.
Clayton Terrell estimated he
and his wife had opened over
60 restaurants in 17 states since


their marriage in 1981, wrote
Zaloudek.
They met in 1980 when he
managed two Fat Boys barbe-
cue restaurants near New Port
Richey.
They %opened a Fat Boys
restaurant in Colorado in 1983
and the next year started a ribs
and steak restaurant, the Great
American Rib Co., and added
two more of those restaurants in
Colorado.
They moved back to Florida
and started a restaurant in Boca
Raton in 1987 and in 1988
founded a Mexican restaurant
called Bandito's in Lakeland.
In 1989 they founded a Santa
Fe Steakhouse in Venice and
opened a second in Sarasota in
1991. They sold to investors in
the early 1990s but kept owner-
ship of the restaurants in Venice
an Sarasota.
In 1992 they started Duran-
go's steakhouse in Clearwater
and several others in Florida
before selling the chain in 1995.
Later in 1995 they founded
the Whiskey Creek Wood Fire
Grill in Orlando and one in
1996 in Port Charlotte, then
later several more in the Mid-
west after moving back' to
Colorado. They sold the chain
in 2000.
In 2007 the family moved


back to Sarasota. Larry.Terrell
said after awhile he put the
kitchens together in restaurants
and his wife planned the dining'
room and bar and handled per-:
sonnel.
"Judy was happiest when
sleeping in a tent somewhere in
the Colorado Rockies. She
loved hiking, whitewater raft-.
ing, skiing all the things you
do in the mountains," Larry
Terrell told the Herald-Tribune.
In 2005 she helped her son
earn a Boy Scout merit badge
by the family camping in a tent
in the Rockies where the tem-!
perature never reached above'
10 degrees.
Services were held in
Sarasota. She is survived by her
husband Larry, son Travis, a.
stepson Allen, her parents, a'
brother, and two sisters.
Memorial donations can be
made to Wachovia banks for the
Judy Terrell Fund for her son
Travis, a student at Sarasota
Middle School.
About the time of the fatal
accident Judy Terrell was plan-.
ning to start a fast food restau-
rant for health-conscious peo-
ple, and Larry Terrell was plan-
ning a burger and rib restaurant,
both in Florida.


First Methodist Leads Ladies


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Between the thunderstorms,
the 2008 Women's Church Soft-
ball League has kept going.
Teams missed games on June
30 and July 3 due to storms, but
have gotten in other evenings of
play. Ironically, First Methodist
Church of Wauchula was not
scheduled on the rain-out nights
and had a double-header on
July 8, altogether picking up
three wins and vaulting to a 7-0
record.
With seven teams in the
league, all the other squads
have missed two evenings of
games. The next nearest oppo-
nents are Holy Child Catholic
Church, and Alpha & Omega/-
Freedom Ministries, each at 3-
1. Behind them are United
Methodist' of Zolfo Springs,
Celebration-Hardee Campus,
First Christian Church and New
Hope Baptist Church.
Backtracking to July 1, First
Methodist won the opening
game 21-5 over First Christian.
Heather Heine and Leigh B.
each circled the bases three
time for First Methodist. Jamie
Rivas, Elene Salas, Aimee
Dellepere, Mary Morgan, Kim
Tyson, Shaunte Hines and Jo P.
each had twin tallies and
Jennifer P. added a solo score.
' First Christian got a second-


inning tally from Staci Stan-
ford. Four more runners, Paige
Massey, Sandy Driskell, Ketus
and Tara Bates added runs in a
third-inning rally. Stanford,
Melissa Albritton and Becky
were each stranded twice.
The July 1 closer was a
thriller, with Celebration com-
ing back in the fifth inning for
six runs and holding on to win
10-7 over New Hope.
Lizanne Woods and Jamie
Buckley each came around to
cross home plate twice for
Celebration. Selina Avila, Patri-
cia Taylor, Gloria Solis, Sarah
Mahoney, Erica Ureste, and S.
Ureste all chipped in with a run.
Kim B. and Lori Barbaree
had twin tallies for New Hope.
Michelle Krissi and Julie each
added a run. Shannyn was
stranded all three times she got
on base and several other bat-
ters were also left on base.
Games resumed on July 8,
with First Methodist winning a
double-header, beating New
Hope 16-3 in the 6:45 game and
United Methodist of Zolfo
Springs 23-2 in the 8;15 game.
Leigh B. and Rivas were
triple-tally batters in game one,
while Jennifer B. and Tyson had
two runs each. In game two,
Rivas put four runs on the
board and Salas and Jennifer B.
each added three scores.


In game one, Krissi, Barbaree
and Kim came around to score
for New Hope. In game two,
Megan Henderson and Lori
Henderson each scored for
United Methodist in an opening
inning in which seven batters
went to the plate. Annette and,
Sarah were each stranded twice.
Last Thursday, Alpha &
Omega took the early game 26-
1 over New Hope.
Leadoff batter Sami Jo,
Morgan crossed home plate five
times for Alpha & Omega. Jodi
Griffin and Glenda Eures
chipped in with four scores
apiece and Wanda Stettler and
Lori Dees added three runs.
Kim scored the only run for
New Hope, but she was strand-'
ed twice. Cindy was left on base
three times and several other
runners were also left aboard..
In the Thursday night finale,.
Holy Child downed Celebration
17-9.
Liberty Mushrush, Maggie
Olvera and Kristina Garcia each
circled the bases three times for
Holy Child. Sonia and Lucy
Garcia each added twin scores
and Vira, Valerie, Susana and
Rishonea a put a run each on
the board.
Erica Ureste and S. Rivera
had twin tallies for Celebration.
Avila, Taylor, Woods and Vikki
Maldonado added a run.


yDAVID


DURASTANTI
for

Superintendent of Schools
www.ForOurKidsFuture.coni

QUALIFIED lo
PROVEN LEADER i iiE
November 4th, 2008_
Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by David D. Durastanti Campaign Account, Approved by David D. Durastanti, Republican, Chet Huddleston, Campaign
; 7:17p



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Hardee County Education Foundation Scholarships
Class of 2008 Deadline Approaching
Attention HHS Class of 2008 Graduates:
This letter is a reminder that September 1. 2008. is the deadline to apply for our Foundation's
scholarship money.
While you and your fellow class members were in elementary school, the Hardee County Education
Foundation sponsored a fundraising event that gives you an opportunity for some additional scholarship
money as you further your education after high school. This money was raised by parents, community
members, and local businesses. As the Class of 2008, you are the third group of graduating seniors who will
receive the benefits from this money.
To receive the money that was raised and invested requires that you must have:
1. graduated from Hardee Senior High School with the Class of 2008,
2. attended the Hardee County School System for 8 years or more. They do not have to be in
consecutive years, and
3. now be pursuing a college, trade, or technical school education after high school.
Unfortunately, if you do not meet all three of these requirements then you will not be eligible for these
funds. After September 1, all the available money will be divided equally among the seniors who do qualify.
In an effort to process your application, complete and return the following information. You must
include your acceptance letter or other proof of acceptance, i.e. an invoice from your selected
institution verifying your eligibility.
Sincerely,
Sharon Corbett
President
Hardee County Education Foundation, Inc.

I------------------------------------
IScholarship Application Form
IStudent Name:
Home Mailing Address:
Student Social Security Number: _
Telephone Number: ___________
Name of Post Secondary Institution:
Complete Address of Institution's Business or Financial Aid Office:


Telephone Number of Financial Aid Office: _
Return by mail to:
I, Debra Daggett, contact person
Hardee Education Foundation, Inc.
P.O. Box 1678
Wauchula, FL 33873
or return in person to the Hardee County School Board Office
L---------------- -------------------- J

All completed applications must be received on or before September 1.,2008
Don't forget to include your acceptance letter or other proof of acceptance
All requests will be processed after September 1, 2008. Funds will be disbursed only after all eligibility is
verified.

7:17c







July 17,2008, The Herald-Advocate 5C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Joshua J. Christner, 30, Ona,
and Marga Ree Taylor, 33, Ona.
Christopher James Jeffery,
22, Bowling Green, and Tessa
Lynn Graharp, 37, Bowling
Green.
James Michael Lake, 22,
Wauchula, and Jessica Ann
Bryant, 20, Wauchula.

There were no small claims
decisions listed last week.

There was no county mis-
demeanor or criminal court
last week as it was trial week.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Virginia Toole Belcher and
the state Department of Reve-
nue (DOR) vs. Anthony La-
shawn Belcher, petition for
child support.
Tami Jennifer Atchley and
Bradford Allen Atchley,
divorce.
Wauchula Police Department
vs. Rogerilo Mendoza, petition
for forfeiture.
Wauchula Police Department
vs. Carlos Angel Martinez, peti-
tion for forfeiture.
Amy Jo Dubbery and Arlie
Duane Dubberly, divorce.
Michele Carpenter vs. Na-


than Carpenter, petition for
injunction for protection.
Gustavo L. Brito vs. Javier
Valdez, petition for injunction
for protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Jennifer Ann Kalagian and
DOR vs. Ricky L. Eubanks,
voluntary dismissal.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Douglas Dwight Talmadge Jr.,
judgment of mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Jack B and Jackie C. Garlit et
al, judgment of mortgage fore-
closure.
Dollene Luchinda Fields and
DOR vs. Gregory Del Drew,
voluntary dismissal.
Amy Cherie Evans and DOR
vs. James Preston Entwhistle,
voluntary dismissal.
Lucy Arana and DOR vs.
Rocky Flores Jr., voluntary dis-
missal.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as it was
trial week.

The following real estate
transaction of $10,000 or
more was filed recently in the
office of the clerk of court:
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort LLC to Nancy Jo
Wooten, $69,900.


Courthouse Report


Anyone who proposes to do good must not expect people to roll July 12, Michael Harry Mohn, 64, of 212 S. Seventh Ave.,
stones out of his way but must accept his lot calmly if they even Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Amy Drake and charged with
roll a few more upon it. criminal mischief damage to property.
-Albert Schweitzer July 12, Dorothy Marie Ayers, 39, of 510 South Road, Wau-


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
July 13, Jimmy Spoon, 58, of Will Duke Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison and charged with trespassing on
structure or conveyance.
July 13, thefts on Fishbranch Road and on CR 664A were
reported.

July 12, Samuel Dean Alamia, 36, of 315 Dade St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison on a charge of contempt
of court violation of a domestic violence injunction for protec-
tion.
July 12, a tag stolen on Carlton Street, and thefts on CR 664
and U.S. 17 North were reported.

July 11, a vehicle stolen on U.S. 17 North and a theft on
Center Hill were reported.

July 10, Lewis James Richardson, 42, of 807 SR 64 West,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of bat-
tery.
July 10, thefts in two locations on U.S. 17 North were report-
ed.

July 9, criminal mischief on Nursery Road, Garden Drive and
Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, and thefts on Alderman Road and
Maxwell Drive were reported.

July 8, a residential burglary on N. Florida Avenue and thefts
on Heard Bridge Road and SR 64 were reported.

July 7, Curtis Rush Bell, 41, of 408 E. Main St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Danny O'Bryan and charged with two counts
lewd and lascivious molestation.
July 7, a residential burglary on Creek Road and a theft on
Maude Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
July 13, Doug Wheeler Cramer, 56, of 240 Will Duke Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with
trespass on property other than structure.


What is art? Nature concentrated.


-Honore de Balzac


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
But rescue me, 0 God, from
my poverty and pain. Then I
will praise God with my
singing! My thanks will be
His praise that will please
Him more than sacrifices.
Psalm 69:29-31a (TLB)


So, whether we are at ome
or away, we make it our aim
to please God.
II Corinthians 4:9 (RSV)

SATURDAY
I know, my God, that You;
test the hearts (of men) and
are pleased with integrity.
I Chronicles 29:17a (NIV)

SUNDAY
To sum up, my brothers, we
beg and pray you, by the
Lord Jesus, that you contin-
ue to learn more and more
of the life that pleases God.
I Thessalonians 4:1 (PME)

MONDAY
I, too, give witness to the
greatness of God, our Lord,
high above all other gods.
He does just as He pleases
however, wherever, when-
ever. He makes the weather:
clouds and thunder, light-
ning and rain, pouring out of
the north.
Psalm 135:5-6 (ME)

TUESDAY
Live like men who are at ,
home in daylight, where the
light is, where all goodness
springs up, .all justice and
truth. Try to find out what
would please the Lord.
Ephesians 5:9-10 (NEB)

WEDNESDAY
Will the Lord be pleased with
the sacrifice of a thousand
male sheep? Will He be
pleased with ten thousand
rivers of oil? . The Lord
told you, human, what is
;good: He has told you what
He wants from you: to do
what is right to other people,
love being kind to others,
and live humbly, obeying
your God.
Micah 6:7a, 8 (NCV)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


chula, was arrested by Ofc. Amy Drake and charged with aggra-
vated assault with a deadly weapon.
July 12, criminal mischief on East Oak Street was reported..'

July 11, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 South, a rob-
bery-holdup on West Main Street, criminal mischief on North
Florida Avenue, North 10th Avenue and West Palmetto Street, and
a theft on South Florida Avenue were reported.

July 10, a theft on West Oak Street was reported.

July 7, a vehicle stolen on Alabama Street, a robbery-holdup
on .East Main Street and a theft on East Palmetto Street were
reported. '

BOWLING GREEN
July 10, Ramon Romero, 40, of 516 Palmetto St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and charged with crim-
inal mischief damage to property, felony battery with bodily
harm and possession of marijuana.
July 10, criminal mischief on Orange and Snelling streets was
reported.

July 9, Erik Walker, 27, of 12239 Durango Ave., North Port,
and Amanda Nicole Sams, 26, of 4576 NW CR 661, Arcadia, were
arrested by Chief John Scheel and each charged with possession of
,methamphetamine, possession of marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
July 9, a vehicle on West Pineapple Street was reported stolen.

ZOLFO SPRINGS
July 12, criminal mischief on Myrtle Street was reported.








6C The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No.: 252008DR000034

IN RE: TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
GRANDPARENT ADOPTION OF

C.T. DOB: 12/02/1999
R.M. DOB: 06/14/2002
C.M. DOB: 11/04/2003
V.M. DOB: 10/20/2004
Minor Children.

PETITION TO TERMINATE
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
GRANDPARENT ADOPTION
Petitioners, Jose L. Torres, Sr.
and Aurella M. Torres, being duly
sworn, petition this Court for ter-
mination of the parental rights of
Aurelia Torres, Ramon Martinez,
and Jose Oscar Rodriguez, pend-
Ing adoption of the above-named
minor children by the grandpar-
ents under Chapter 63, Florida
Statutes, and allege:
I. PETITION TO TERMINATE
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
ADOPTION
GENERAL ALLEGATIONS
1. This is an action for termina-
tion of parental rights of Aurella
Torres, Ramon Martlnez, and
Jose Oscar Rodriguez, pending
adoption of the minor children by
their grandparents, whose names
and address are Jose L. Torres,
Sr. and Aurella M. Torres, 3222 E.
Main St., Wauchula, FL 33873.
This case is being filed In the
Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial
Circuit, in and for Hardee County
located at 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, FL 33873. The tele-
phone number of the division of
the circuit court where this peti-
tion is filed is (863) 773-4174.
2. The minor children subject
to this petition are:
a. C.T., female, d.o.b.
12/02/1999, born at Lakeland, FL;
b. R.M., male, d.o.b.
06/14/2002, born at Bartow, FL;
c. C.M., female, d.o.b.
11/04/2003, born at Sebring, FL;
and
d. V.M., female, d.o.b.
10/20/2004, born at Sebring, FL.
3. The minor, children have
been known by all of the following
names (not to Include the adop-
tive name to be known by):
a. C.T.;
b. R.M.;
c. C.M.; and
d. V.M..
4. ALLEGATIONS UNDER THE
UNIFORM CHILD CUSTODY
JURISDICTION ACT.
a. The current address of
the minor children is: "
I. 3222 E. Main St., Wau-
chula, FL 33873
b. The minor children's' res-
idences for the past five years
have been:
3222 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, FL 33873
c. The persons with whom
the minor children have resided
in the past five years are the
grandparents and the aunt.
d. The grandparents have pre-
viously participated in a depend-
ency proceeding involving the
minor children.
e. The grandparents do not
know of any other pending court
proceedings Involving custody,
divorce, mental health, delin-
quency, or crimes involving the
minor children.
f. The grandparents do not
know of any other parties who
have or claim to have physical
custody, visitation, or paternity
rights to the minor children other
than Respondents.
g. The grandparents will
inform the Court of any relevant
information regarding any other
proceeding as it becomes known
to the grandparents.
5. The following are the names
and addresses of persons whose
consent to the adoption is
required, but who have not con-
sented:
a. Ramon Martinez; address
unknown; and
b. Jose Oscar Rodriguez;
address unknown.
COUNT ONE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS OF AURELIA TORRES
6. Petitioners reallege para-
graphs 1 through 5 as though
fully set forth herein.
7. Aurelia Torres is the biologi-
cal mother of the children at
issue, C.T., d.o.b. 12/02/1999;
R.M., d.o.b. 06/14/2002; C.M.,
d.o.b. 11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.
10/20/2004.
8. The grounds for termination
of parental rights are:
a. Aurella Torres has execut-
ed a valid consent that has not
been withdrawn. The consent Is
attached to this petition.
b. The minor children have
lived the majority of their lives
with the Petitioners. The minor
children rely for their sole sup-
port upon the Petitioners.
WHEREFORE, Petitioners
requests this Court enter a Final
Judgment of Termination of
Parental Rights Pending Adoption
of the Minor Children by the
Grandparents and terminating the
parental rights of Aurelia Torres.


COUNT TWO
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS OF RAMON MARTINEZ
9. Petitioners realfege para-
graphs 1 through 5 as though
fully set forth herein.
10. Ramon Martinez is the bio-
logical father of the minor chil-
dren, R.M., d.o.b. 06/14/2002;
C.M., d.o.b. 11/04/2003; and V.M.,
d.o.b. 10/20/2004.
11. The grounds for termina-
tion of parental rights are:
a. Ramon Martinez has
abandoned the minor children,
R.M., d.o.b. 06/14/2002; C.M.,
d.o.b. 11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.
10/20/2004, within the meaning of
Section 63.032 (1) Florida
Statutes. Ramon Martinez does
not support the children, has


failed to hold communication with
the children, and in all respects
has failed to evince a settled pur-
pose to assume all parental
duties for the minor children.
b. Ramon Martinez has lost
custody of the minor children as a
result of his failure to perform the
tasks of a case plan previously
ordered by the Court in depend-
ency case number 252005-DP-
000330.
12. The actions of R.M. de-
monstrate a willful disregard for
the safety and welfare of the chil-
dren.
13. Ramon Martinez has been
well able to financially support
the children but has failed to do
so.
14. Though requested to so,
and while having the ability to do
so, Ramon Martinez failed to pro-
vide medical treatment for the
children.
15. At all times material hereto
Ramon Martinez has been well
able to provide financial support
to the children, has been well
able to communicate with the
children, but has failed and / or
refuse to do so despite being
requested to do so and despite
being notified of his paternity of
these children.
16. Based upon the foregoing,
the Court should find that Ramon
Martinez has abandoned the chil-
dren within the meaning of Sec-
tion 63.032 (1) Florida Statutes,
and otherwise pursuant to Sec-
tion 63.089 (4) Florida Statutes.
WHEREFORE, Petitioners re-
quests the Court terminate the
parental rights of Ramon Martinez
as to the minor children, R.M.,
d.o.b. 06/14/2002; C.M., d.o.b.
11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.
10/20/2004.
COUNT THREE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS OF JOSE OSCAR
RODRIGUEZ
17. Petitioners realleges para-
graphs 1 through 5 as though
fully set forth herein.
18. Jose Oscar Rodriguez is
the biological father of the minor
child at issue, C.T., d.o.b.
12/02/1999.
19. The grounds for termina-
tion of parental rights are:
a. Jose Oscar Rodriguez
has abandoned the minor child,
C.T., d.o.b. 12/02/1999, within the
meaning of Section 63.032 (1)
Florida Statutes. Jose Oscar
Rodriguez does not support the
child, has failed to hold communi-
cation with the child, and in all
respects has failed to evince a
settled purpose to assume all
parental duties for the minor
child.
b. Jose Oscar Rodriguez
has lost custody of the minor
child as a result of his failure to
perform the tasks of a case plan
previously ordered by the Court
In case number 252005-DP-
000330.
20. The actions of Jose Oscar
Rodriguez demonstrate. a willful
disregard for the safety and wel-
fare of the child.
21. Jose Oscar Rodriguez has
been well able to financially sup-
port the child but has failed to do
so.
22. Though requested to so,
and while having the ability to do
so, Jose Oscar Rodriguez failed
to provide medical treatment for
the child, and failed and / or
refused to provide medical treat-
ment or prenatal treatment for the
child's mother during pregnancy.
23. At all times material hereto
Jose Oscar Rodriguez has been
well able to provide financial sup-
port to the child, has been well
able to communicate with the
child, but has failed and / or
refuse to do so despite being
requested to do so and despite
being notified of his paternity of
this child.
24. Based upon the foregoing,
the Court should find that Jose
Oscar Rodriguez has abandoned
the child within the meaning of
Section 63.032 (1) Florida Stat-
utes, and otherwise pursuant to
Section 63.089 (4) Florida
Statutes.
WHEREFORE, Petitioners re-
quests the Court terminate the
parental rights of'Jose Oscar
Rodriguez as to the minor child,
C.T., d.o.b. 12/02/1999.
II. INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT
AFFIDAVIT
Petitioners, Jose L. Torres, Sr.
and Aurella M. Torres, being duly
sworn, certify the following state-
ments are true:
25. Upon information and
belief the minor children, C.T.,
d.o.b. 12/02/1999; R.M., d.o.b.
06/14/2002; C.M., d.o.b.
11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.
10/20/2004, who are subject to
this proceeding, are not Indian
children and the Indian Child
Welfare Act does not apply to this
proceeding.

Aurelia M. Torres
Petitioner
Jose L. Torres, Sr.
Petitioner


Robin H. Stevenson
Robin H. Stevenson
Florida Bar No. 0977470
Attorney for Petitioners
1165 E. Main St.
Bartow, FL 33830
863-533-9138
863-533-9476 fax


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,

Case No. 252008CA000231
WAUCHULA STATE BANK
RO. Box 248
Wauchula, FL 33873

Plaintiff,
vs.
JACK B. GARLIT and JACKIE C.
GARLIT, husband and wife


323 Melendy Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO FLORIDA STATUTES
CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant
to an SUMMARY FINAL JUDG-
MENT OF FORECLOSURE AND
AWARD OF ATTORNEY'S FEES
dated July 2, 2008, In the above
styled cause, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the
front steps of the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873, at
11:00 A.M. on July 30, 2008, the
following described property as
set forth in said SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND AWARD OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES, to wit:

Lots 4,5, and 6 of Mrs.
L.E.A. Hagstrom
Subdivision, the same
known as Lot W, Block 7, of
Kayton & Maddox Addition
to the Town of Wauchula,
as per the map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 2, Page 51, of the
Public Records of Hardee
County, Florida, more par-
ticularly described as:

Lots 4,5,and 6, inclusive, of
Mrs. L.E.A. Hagstrom
Subdivision, according to
the map or plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 2,
Page 51 (Hardee County
Plats recorded in DeSoto
County) and Plat Bar A-39,
all of the Public Records of
Hardee County, Florida,
being a replat of Lot W,
Block 7, of Keyton and
Maddox West End Addition
to Wauchula, Florida,
according the map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 194 (Hardee
County Plats recorded in
Desoto County) and Plat
Bar A-9, all of the Public
Records of Hardee County,
Florida

Dated this 2 day of July, 2008.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Court
By: C. Timmons
As Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons needing special
accommodations to participate in
this proceeding should contact
the Clerk of Court's Office
Administrator at 430 South
Commerce Avenue, Sebring,
Florida 33870-3701, telephone
(863) 773-4174, no later than
seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceeding. If you are hearing or
voice Impaired, call Florida Relay
Services at (800) 955-8770.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
7:10. 17c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No.: 252008DR000034

IN RE: TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
GRANDPARENT ADOPTION OF

C.T. DOB: 12/02/1999
R.M. DOB: 06/14/2002
C.M. DOB: 11/04/2003
V.M. DOB: 10/20/2004
Minor Children. /


SUMMONS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF HARDEE
To Each Sheriff of the State:
YOU ARE COMMANDED to serve
this Summons and a copy of the
Petition to Terminate Parental
Rights Pending Grandparent
Adoption in this action on the
Respondent by delivering service
to:
Jose Oscar Rodriguez
United States of Mexico
Each Respondent is required to
serve written defenses to the
Complaint on Robin H. Steven-
son, Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 1165 E. Main St.,
Bartow, FL 33830, within twenty
(20) days after service of this
Summons on that Respondent,
exclusive of the day of service,
and to file the original of the
defenses with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter. If a Respondent fails
to do so, a default will be entered
against that Respondent for the
relief demanded on the


Complaint.


7:3-24c DATED: 1-15-08


By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceed-
Ing should contact the Polk
County Courthouse, 255 N.
Broadway, Bartow FL 33830,
Phone 863/534-4000 not later
than seven days prior to the pro-
ceeding. If hearing impaired,
(TDD) 1-800/955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800/955-8770, via Florida
Relay. 7:3-24c


History: Laying A Cornerstone


At First Methodist Church


Edited by Spessard Stone from The Florida
Advocate of Friday, June 19, 1914, courtesy of
Jean B. Burton, and quoted here:
The corner stone of the new Methodist church
will be laid today, Friday, June 19th, 1914, at
2:30 p.m.
The local Masonic lodge, assisted by former
Gov. Albert W. Gilchrist, past grand masterof the
Grand Lodge of Florida, and visiting brothers
from neighboring lodges, will lay the stone. Rev.
J.R. Cason, presiding elder of the Bartow district,
will deliver an address, and other visiting minis-
ters will be present and assist in the services. Let
every body turn out and make this a great day.
The Wauchula Methodist Episcopal Church,
South, was organized in 1888, in the Baptist
church, which at that time was a log house stand-
ing just north of Mr. Hugh Moore's saw mill.
Later Dr. T.J. Maddox donated a quarter of a
block for a church building at the corner of
Palmetto (should be Oak) street and the railroad,
where Chase & Co.'s packing house now stands.
A frame building was erected here, but the interi-
or was never finished, and during a hurricane in
September, 1903, this building was blown down.
Dr. Fink came on the work and a neat frame
building was erected during his ministry here.
Later this building was moved to the corner of
Palmetto street and Seventh avenue, where the
new brick building is now in the course of erec-
tion.
The original membership consisted of the fol-
lowing nine members: Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L.
Bostick, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Wilkinson, Mr.
and Mrs. C.G. West, Mrs. M.A. Maddox, Mrs.
Wiley Hill and Mrs. Effie Spivey. Of this num-
ber, five are still living and remain active mem-
bers of the church. The membership today num-
bers 280.
The following is a list of pastors from the orga-
nization down to the present time: Rev. Sam
Carson, 1888; G.W. Sellers, 1889; A.J. West,


1890; F.J. Jones, 1891; R.T. Higgs, 1893; John
Dodwell, 1894; W.B. Tresca, S.B. Carson and
J.H. McRae, 1895-97; J.T. Coleman, 1898, J.T.
Mitchell, 1899 to 1902; A.H. Coles, 1903; F.J.
Fink, 1904; E.J. Hardee, 1905-08; WJ3. Tresca, *
1909-10; A.H. Cole, 1911-12; J.L. Griffiths,
1913-14.
The work was made a station in 1914.
The church has prospered all along, but is at
present enjoying the greatest prosperity in its his-
tory, something like 80 members have been
added to the church the past year.
The present building enterprise was launched
by the present pastor, Rev. J.L. Griffiths, on Jan.
1, 1914. Up to that time no previous steps had
been taken outside of just "talking about build-
ing." The year previous had been spent in paying
off old debts that had been allowed to accumulate
against the church.
On the first day of the year 1914, Mr. and Mrs.
D.O. Ratliff made the first subscription towards
the new building, which was $1,000. This was
followed by Mr. and Mrs. H.P. Mattox with
another $1,000. Then Mr. J.W. Earnest and Mr.
H.M. Alexander each subscribed $500, and thus
the enterprise was launched. This was followed
by numerous subscriptions of smaller amounts
until a total of $7,000 was subscribed.
The building will- cost $10,000 or more com-
pleted, and it s the plan and purpose of the com-
mittee to endeavor to secure the amount neces-
sary for its completion and push the work for-
ward so that by the end of the year 1914 the
building will be finished complete.
The building is of red pressed brick, and of
modern design and convenient, being 97x67 feet,
and when finished it will be one of the hand-'
somest church buildings in this section of the
state.
The following is the building committee: H.M.
Alexander, D.O. Ratliff, J.W. Earnest, T.G.
Wilkinson and J.E. Townsend.


Having once decided to achieve a certain task, achieve it at all cost of tedium and distaste. The
gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labor is immense.
-Thomas Arnold Bennett











July 17, 2008, The Herald-Advocate IC


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8C The Herald-Advocate, July 17, 2008


County Commission To Hold


Budget Hearings July 21-24


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Com-
mission met Friday morning to
discuss the 2008-09'county
budget.
County budget officer Janice
Williamson recommended a
new ad valorem tax rate of
8.4810 mills, compared with
the current 7.7926 mills. The
tax levy would generate $13.39
million, compared with the cur-
rent $13.22 million.-
Williamson said the commis-
sion by a 4-1 vote could ap-
prove a tax levy of 8.4811 to
9.7999 mills or by a 5-0 vote
approve a millage rate of 9.8 to
10 mills. Violations would re-
sult in forfeiture of the half-cent
sales tax revenue, which is ex-
pected to be $663,000 in 2008-
09.
The commission will hold
budget workshop meetings July
21-24 at the county commission
chambers. Commissioner Nick
Timmerman did not attend
Friday's meeting.
Williamson said the tax roll is
$1.59 billion, down from more
than $1.6 billion this year. "The
tax roll is down about $110 mil-
lion."
She said the preliminary new
budget calls for a four percent
salary increase for county
employees.
Williamson said the budget
strives to achieve a 10 percent
contingency in all funds and a
15 percent cash reserve but
noted cash reserves are about
10 percent.
County manager Lex Albrit-
ton said cash reserves help the
-county pay for expenses while


awaiting county taxes and
grants.
Albritton said the three 2004
hurricanes (Charley, Frances
and Jeanne) cost the county
about $2 million. He said debris
removal cost about $7.6 mil-
lion. He said the county bor-
rowed $4 million and that some
of the cost was not reimbursed
by FEMA and the state.
Williamson said the proposed
General Fund is $14.69 million
and the Transportation Trust and
TT Debt Fund is $11.1 million.
The TT debt payment of
$700,000 will be paid by the
optional five cent fuel tax.
Albritton said a small portion
of Moffitt Road, located three
miles south of Zolfo Springs,
will be paved.
Commissioner Minor Bryant
asked if 10-Mile Grade will be
paved. There are no plans at this
time, said Albritton, who noted
it cost the county about $30,000
to $40,000 a year to maintain
this road.
The proposed Fine and
Forfeiture fund is $11.65 mil-
lion, the same as last year.
The proposed Fire Rescue
budget is $3.3 million. The pro-
posed new budget for EMS
(Emergency Medical Services)
is an additional $2.01 million.
The proposed budget for race
track, Pioneer Park Days, grants
and law enforcement trust is
$2.59 million.
The Vandolah Enterprise
Fund (sewer plant) is $360,989.
The proposed Wauchula Hills
Enterprise Fund (sewer and
water) is $5.9 million. Park
Winter said 81 homes in Wau-
chula Hills are hooked up to the


system and only six are behind
on payments. The system also
serves other large customers,
including the Hardee Com-
merce Park, Hilltop Elementary
School, Hardee Junior High
School and Country Manor
Apartments.
*The Solid Waste Enterprise
Fund (landfill) proposed budget
is $5.16 million. A debt of $1
million will be refinanced to
reduce the principal payment
from $500,000 to $200,000.
Albritton said he plans to pro-
pose an energy policy for all
county offices and buildings.
This would include thermostat
settings and equipment idling
policy.
He said the commission
needs a clear cut policy on use
of the agri-civic center, includ-
ing commercial, private and
non-profit rates. He estimates
the county loses tens of thou-
sands of dollars annually every
year on the center. He has not
approved wrestling rental ($75
an hour) since June. The county
does not charge the school sys-
tem for FCAT testing use of the
facility and the prom, the fair
pageants and the Story of Jesus.
Commission Chairman Dale
Johnson said the last time mill-
age rates for the county were
this low was in 1986. Bryant
said the tax roll, however, has
risen from $500 million to $1.6
billion.
Albritton said the county's
loss in taxes from Amendment
One will be $600,000 to
$700,000, but the county is ex-
pected to get the money reim-
bursed by the state since Hardee
is a county of critical economic
concern.
Albritton said some county
employees will lose their jobs
in the new budget year. He said
hours will be reduced at the
library and landfill.
Bryant asked about roadside
food vendors such as the barbe-
cue operation at the corner of
U.S. 17 and SR 62, saying he
has heard complaints from local
restaurant owners and also is
concerned about health issues.
He wondered what other coun-
ties do in this regard.


Eat Fruits And Veggies To Lose Weight And

Lower Your Risk For Type 2 Diabetes


If you have a family history
of diabetes, or you've been told
by a health care professional
that you're at risk for type 2 dia-
betes, you can prevent or delay
the onset of the disease by los-
ing 5 to 7 percent of your body
weight (10 to 14 pounds if you
weigh 200 pounds). To lose
weight safely, make healthy
food choices, like eating more
fruits and vegetables, and be
physically active for 30 minutes
a day, 5 days a week.
The National Diabetes Edu-
cation Program (NDEP) recom-
mends easy and inexpensive
ways to increase the number of
fruits and vegetables you eat as
you take small steps to lose
weight and lower your diabetes
risk:
Visit an ethnic food store or
farmer's market to try a new
fruit or vegetable each week.
Substitute spinach, onions,
or mushrooms for one of the
eggs or half of the cheese in
omelets.
Buy produce in season and


freeze some to use later, or buy
frozen, dried, or low-sodium
canned vegetables and fruits.
Choose fruit without added
sugar or syrups and vegetables
without added salt, butter, or
sauces.
Add strawberries, peaches,
blueberries, or bananas to your
waffles,' pancakes, cereal, oat-
meal, or toast.
Add broccoli, carrots, zuc-
chini, or eggplant between the
layers of your favorite lasagna
recipe.
Combine different fruits
and vegetables such as toma-
toes, mangos, onions, and pep-
pers with lime juice and cilantro
to make salsa.
Try steaming your vegeta-
bles or using low-salt spices
and lemon juice to add flavor.
Choose pineapples, pep-
pers, mushrooms, or tomatoes
as pizza toppings.
Add lettuce, tomato, onion,
and cucumber to sandwiches,
wraps, and burritos.
Eating more fruits and veg-


tables also supplies essential
vitamins, minerals, and fiber
that may help protect you from
chronic diseases. To learn more
about how many fruits and veg-
etables you need daily, use the
online calculator at vwww.fruit-
sandveggiesmat ter.gov. For a
free copy of NDEP's Your
GAME PLAN to Prevent Type
2 Diabetes, which includes a fat
and calorie counter and physi-
cal activity tracker, plus more
diabetes prevention tips, call 1-
888-693-NDEP (6337) or visit
www.YourDiabeteslnfo.org.
The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services'.
National Diabetes Education
Program is jointly sponsored by
the National Institutes of Health
(NIH) and the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC) with the support of more
than 200 partner organizations.
Eating more fruits and veg-
etables can help people with
diabetes take small steps toward
losing weight and lowering
their risk for the disease.


per iSmwi


DmUUCATINAL

@ALB AND INITIATIVES

CREATE AND EXPAND INNOVATIVE
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS


5 IMPLEMENT RESPONSIBLE CURRICULUM
AND EDUCATIONAL POLICIES


INCREASE COMMUNITY INPUT IN SCHOOL
DISTRICT DECISION-MAKING


O5 PROMOTE FINANCIALLY SOUND DECISIONS
l BASED ON STUDENT NEED

INCREASE SCHOOL DISTRICT PERSONNEL
INVOLVEMENT IN DECISION-MAKING
PROCESS

S IMPLEMENT PLAN TO IMPROVE SCHOOL
SAFETY AND SECURITY


0 WB


4VWmmA30


0 i wish to offer my congratulations to Bob Shayman for his hard work and
outstanding achievement in directing West Elementary School to another
"A"on the FCAT. J.D. Alexander, State Senator, District 17

0 Bob Shayman embodies all of the characteristics I have learned are
essential for a successful and effective educator/administrator. He is
collaborative, student-focused, teacher-supported and knowledgeable
about curriculum, instruction and child development. In my 35 years as a
teacher, principal and district administrator, Mr. Shayman ranks at the very
top of educators with whom I have had the privilege to work. Gaeton Zorzi,
Chief Academic Officer American Reading Company, Former Regional
Superintendent, School District of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

0 Bob Shayman, Principal of West Elementary School, is recognized for his
professional dedication and commitment to improving student achievement
and serving the needs of the community.
HOSTS Educational Mentoring and Intervention Corporation


PERSONAL ~
Married to Linda Shayman for 27 years
Resident of Hardee County for 26 years

Daughter, Valerie (22)
S'. Hardee High School Class of 2004
.' 2008 Graduate, University of North Florida
Student in Masters of Education Program
". '., at Virginia Tech University

Daughter, Carla (21)
Hardee High School Class of 2005
(Valedictorian)
... LeSS Talk, More Work Senior, University of North Florida
EDVCATION-
Southwest High School Miami, Florida Class of 1973
Bachelor of Arts in Music Education, 1979
University of Miami & the University of South Florida
Masters of Educational Administration & Leadership, 1988
University of Southern Mississippi

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS -
Florida Association of School Administrators
National Association of Elementary School Principals
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
Central States Judges Association

PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS -
Director of Bands Upson County High School, Thomaston, Georgia, 1979 1981
Director of Bands Hardee High School, 1981 2001
Assistant Principal Bowling Green Elementary School, 2001 2004
Principal West Elementary School Arcadia, Florida, 2004 2008

PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION -
West Elementary School FCAT Grades:
2004 A; 2005 A; 2006 A; 2007 A; 2008 A
School District Calendar Committee Member
School District Transportation Committee Member
School District Dress Code Committee Member
Curriculum Presentation State Reading Conference, Orlando
Classroom Management Skills Presenter
Summer Reading Institute Director


Democrat for Hardee County Superintendent of Schools
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Bob Shayman (D)
for Hardee County Superintendent of Schools


BOB


T OF SCHOOLS -


Pd Pl Av*Pi fr:n.ApovdbyTay.B oyl


School Board, District 3
Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by Teresa M. Crawford Campaign. Approved by Teresa Crawford. (NPA) 7:17p


. EMOMMPM


t 1




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