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Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00231
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula, Fla
Publication Date: July 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00231
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
        Page B 11
        Page B 12
    Section C
        Page C 1
        Page C 2
        Page C 3
        Page C 4
        Page C 5
        Page C 6
        Page C 7
        Page C 8
Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


Thursday, July 3, 2008


Schoo
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Without a word of discus-
sion, the Hardee County School
Board fired a 30-year employee
and department head last week.
Board members opted 2-3 not
to renew the district's contract
with Transportation Director
Dick Daggett. Wendell Cotton
and Joe Jones voted to retain
Daggett, while Jan Platt, Gina
Neuhofer and Chairman Tanya
Royal voted to dismiss him.
No reason was given for their


Board Fires Transportation Head


decision.
Daggett's last day was
Monday.
The matter had come before
the School Board as part of
Schools Superintendent Dennis
Jones' recommendations for
administrative appointments for
the upcoming academic year.
The agenda item asked for the
board's approval of his nomi-
nees.
Administrators are hired on
an annual contract, which
expires on June 30 of each year.


Their employment must be con-
tinued by School Board action.
Traditionally, the board does so.
Last Thursday night's action
appears unprecedented in board
history.
Superintendent Jones had
made no changes to the list of
current district administrators,
and presented them all for
renewal by the board.
The only indication that the
annual exercise would be less
than routine this year came
when Platt asked that the list of


29 names be divided into two
groups, one for deputy superin-
tendent, principals and assistant
principals and the other for
directors.
Then, Platt asked that the
directors be considered individ-
ually.
With that, the board voted 5-
0 to retain, as a whole, the cur-
rent deputy superintendent and
all principals and their assis-
tants. Following that single
vote, the directors were named
and voted on one at a time.


Only Daggett failed to win a
majority. In fact, the other 11
directors were unanimously
approved by the board.
Board attorney Gavin
O'Brien asked if he was correct
in understanding that Daggett's
nomination had been denied.
Royal responded with a "yes."
O'Brien then went on to explain
that the board must give a "just
cause" legal reason for rejecting
the superintendent's nomination
of Daggett.
See SCHOOL BOARD 2A


New Foundation


Supports
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A newly formed athletic asso-
ciation hopes to "bring excite-
ment back into Hardee sports."
The Hardee Athletic Foun-
dation (HAF) has twin goals. Its
leaders want to assist athletes
and athletic organizations with-
in Hardee County, whether they
be the 6-year-olds playing base-
ball or football or high school
graduates., .
The secondary goal is to raise
funds and provide scholarships
and grants for Hardee County
athletic organizations and ath-
letes through not-for-profit 501
(c) 3 initiatives and tax advan-


PHOTO BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Hardee County Animal Refuge Manager Carmen Soles enjoys spending time with playful and energetic baby rac-
coon Miracle, whose tale has stolen the hearts of his keepers.


MIRACLE: Baby Raccoon A Survivor
B3y SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH back on, purposely burning to death the mother rac-


For The Herald-Advocate
Long lazy days of sunbathing, splashing in water
and being pampered now fill the life of baby raccoon
Miracle, who is making his home at the Hardee
County Animal Refuge.
But for Miracle, this loving and safe environment
is all new. In fact, Miracle's rocky start in life is what
gave him his name.
In April of this year, a roofer in Pinellas Park heard
screeching coming from a tar- heating machine. He
realized that a raccoon and her baby were trapped
inside, and were being burned. After rescuing the baby
raccoon, he became impatient and turned the machine


coon.
That baby raccoon, who suffered severe bums all
over his body, was Miracle.
Miracle was sent to an animal hospital in Pinellas
Park to be nursed back to health. Although doctors
thought the baby raccoon might suffer from blindness,
Miracle walked away healthy and happy from this
tragic incident.
The story of Miracle and his mother quickly spread
throughout the state, making headline news in The
Tampa Tribune and on Channel 9, Channel 13 and
other newscasts.
See MIRACLE 2A


Athletics
tages for businesses.
"We want to work together
for better opportunities for our
kids," said organization presi-
dent and chairman Derren Bry-
an, a former successful Wildcat
football coach. He later said
that this foundation will "allow
coaches to coach, not spend
time fundraising."
The organization is dedicated
to all sports and education.
Businesses will be able to des-
ignate the venue for advertising
signs, whether it be the gym,
baseball or softball field, soc-
cer, swimming or football field.
A membership drive will
See ATHLETICS 2A


Farmworker Housing

Rule Up For Review


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Meetings in the next two
weeks may change the farm-
worker housing ordinance.
First will be a Hardee County
Planning & Zoning Board
meeting next Thursday, July 10,
at 6 p.m. Then there will be a
Hardee County Commission
meeting on July 17 at 8:35 a.m.
Both public hearings will
consider an ordinance to amend
the Land Development Code to
more clearly specify where,
what and how farmworker
housing should be.
The proposed ordinance
starts with changes to the rea-
son for a site-development plan


PEN PERFECTION


for farmworker housing, taking
out the word "compatible" and
replacing it with "minimizing
impacts and mitigating for
potential incompatibilities by
buffering and other restric-
tions."
The next change clarifies that
farmworker housing and mi-
grant housing are different.
Farmworker housing is "living
accommodations provided by a
farm employer on the employ-
er's property, which occurs
exclusively in association with
performance of agricultural
labor.
The safe and sanitary housing
is for persons providing agrari-
See FARMWOKER 3A


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Community C alendar ...5A
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Crime Blotter h ......


Classifieds..................... 6B
Courthouse Report.......6C
Community Calendar....5A
Crime Blotter.................7C
Fishing Report...............2A
Hardee Living................2B
Obits..............................4A
Roundups ......................3A




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7 18122 90


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July 4th Fires Up Fun!

By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH Boy Scouts will be preparing appearance and host boxin
For The Herald-Advocate barbecue chicken meals and activities for the community t
Folks throughout Hardee grilled hot dogs and hamburg- enjoy.
County will be heading down to ers. Andy Tootle will be selling Many organizations, bus
Pioneer Park to celebrate In- his famous boiled peanuts also. nesses 'and clubs are coming
dependence Day with food, fun Alan Jay will quench the down to the Fourth of July cel
nd fireworks! county's thirst by providing free bration to show support fc
ice-cold water to benefit the Hardee County Youth Coal
The Fourth of July festivities Hardee County Youth Coali- tion, which helped save Inde
will begin at 11 a.m. with an tion. nendence Dav in Harde


opening ceremony. Parking and
entrance is free, and $5 arm-
bands will be available for chil-
dren to partake in all the activi-
ties for the day.
Kids can cool off from the hot
July sun by riding the water
slides or burn off energy in the
bounce houses. After splashing
around, you and your family
can satisfy a sweet tooth with
cotton candy, ice cream, shaved
ice, the "World's Finest Choco-
late" and other yummy desserts
and snacks available at the cele-
bration.
Hardee Youth Football and


Don't forget to stretch that
arm before heading down to
Pioneer Park. You will be able
to show your best pitch at the
"Dunk Your Favorite Politi-
cian" tank. All politicians, from
any category, are invited to
have some fun with the commu-
nity this Fourth of July.
Other fun and exciting activi-
ties you and your family can
enjoy are a cake walk, step
dance contest, graffiti contest
and a karaoke contest. Edner
Cherry, a local professional
boxer, will also make a guest


ng
o:0
i-
ng
e-
or
i-
e-
e


County.
Thanks to the HCYC, the
local annual Fourth of July cel-
ebration will not be affected by
Florida's budget cuts.
After a long day of fun, you
can snuggle up next to your
loved ones and watch the annu-
al fireworks show, beginning at
9 p.m. The fireworks were
donated by Mosaic, CF Indus-
tries and Vandolah Power.
Come on down and enjoy a
family-filled day as the commu-
nity celebrates American's In-
dependence Day and reflects on
how far Hardee has come.


PHOTO BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Brlanna Cavazos, a student at North Wauchula
Elementary School, has the distinct honor of being the
only youngster in the Hardee County School District to
score a perfect Level 6 on the Florida Writes exam.
Brianna has been in Regan Davenport's exceptional stu-
dent education classroom for four years, and Davenport
describes her as "an amazing kid" who "works very hard."
Brianna was recognized for her unique achievement on
the state test at last Thursday night's meeting of the
Hardee County School Board, and is pictured here with
(from left) Schools Superintendent Dennis Jones, mom
Sofia Cavazos and Davenport.


Mining Decision

Delayed Again..
M ot. ._


108th Year, No. 30
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Plus J,7 ,-le 14aK


Daggeft


E







2A The Herald-Advocate, July_3, 2008


MIRACLE _
Continued From 1A


begin around the start of school,
when high school volleyball,
golf, cross country, swimming,
cheerleading and football,
junior high softball and foot-
ball, and youth sports begin
anew. Members can be individ-
uals or businesses.
There will be four levels of
membership, starting from
$250 and extending to $1,500
or more. Benefits start with a
pair of year-long super tickets,
admission to any high school
sport, plus two hats, an associa-
tion decal, and admission to
pre-game "tailgate" activities.
Higher contributors will also
get such things as stadium cush-
ions, a sign at the venue of
choice, and radio recognition
for game sponsorship.
All funds raised will be used
for athletes, perhaps individual-
ly with an athletic camp or All-
Star grant, special equipment,
etc., or for a team need. The
money will be sent directly to
the vendor, camp, college, etc.,
not to individuals.
Part of the presentation on
HAF says, "Hardee County is a
small, rural, tight-knit commu-
nity that, supports kids of all
ages and diverse backgrounds.
Athletics is a way for our youth
to build self-esteem and self-
confidence. In our community,
athletics serves as the only
familial setting that some of our
athletics experience.
"Athletics can also provide
an opportunity for further edu-
cation. The Hardee Athletic
Foundation was established to
assist athletes in both of these
arenas by supplying funding
and support to the athletic pro-
grams that provide these essen-
tial support systems in our com-
munity and to assist individual
athletes in furthering their edu-
cation."
At his presentation at the
Hardee County School Board
meeting last week, Bryan gave
a power point explanation of
HAF and its goals and
answered questions from the
board..
"It's a win-win situation; a
long time coming. It dispels the
notion that football gets all the
money. I'm for it," said Board
member Wendell Cotton.
Bryan explained there would
be, hopefully, four scholarships
offered each year, two girls, two
boys. They would be renew-
able, meaning in four years, it
could affect 16 athletes in their
academic progress. They would
be expected to maintain a 3.0
grade point average.
Scholarship applicants must
have participated in a sanc-
tioned sport or team event, such

A man there was, tho'
'some did count him mad /
The more he cast away, the
more he had.
-John Bunyan


as the state-award-winning
Academic or A-Team.
For its members, HAF will
purchase tickets like any other
people. It will also purchase
parking, at $50 per member,
and requests a designated park-
ing area for its members.
Pre-game activities would
include games for members'
children, such as a tire football
toss or sprints. There would be
hamburgers and hot dogs pre-
pared for them. It is hoped to
increase fan enthusiasm and
participation.
At the end of the Board meet-
ing, an added item considered
use of school facilities, the sta-
dium, baseball and softball
fields and high school gym
throughout the school year foi
signage, pre-game activities
and parking. Proof of insurance
was provided.
Board attorney Gavir
Q' qrien said that the Boarc
could not approve the HAF
request in its present form anc
outlined several other ways it
could be done. After much dis-
cussion, the Board approved the
request on a 4-1 vote, with Joe
Jones following the attorney's
recommendation.
Bryan explained later that
HAF could not become a ven-
dor as it was non-profit and no
one in the .organization was
salaried. It also would not qual-
ify under either of the other
ways the attorney described.
"It is not a broad request, a
blanket permission to use
school grounds. It would onl)
be when there was an event
We're not doing it on our own
not for our use, but in conjunc-
tion with an athletic event, bas-
ketball, baseball, soccer, oi
what have you. Youth sports use
facilities anytime they want for
practices. It's not that. We only
want to be at an event to show
support."
He intends to talk at civic
organizations or anywhere any-
one wants more information
"Once they understand our mis-
sion statement, that we just
want to help athletes, I think it
will be a very positive thing. It's
not set up for parents, for a spe
cific sport. We want to raise
funds and use due diligence in
properly spending them for ath-
letic and educational needs," he
concluded.
Officers of the organization
are chairman-Bryan; vice-chair-
man Paul Samuels; and secre
tary-treasurer Joe Albritton. On
the board of directors are Jay
Belflower, Denise Benavides
Millie Bolin, Jason Clark
Teresa Crawford, Kenny Miller
Ray Rivas and Barry White, a
group of Hardee athletes
coaches, and businessmen. The
attorney is Ken Evers and CPA
is Mike Manley.
For questions or more infor-
mation, contact Bryan or any of
the other individuals.


Dawn Woodmen, of the animal hospital, and -
Vernon Yates, of Wildlife Rescue & Rehab, contacted
the Hardee County Animal Refuge and asked if it
would be interested in making the park Miracle's
home. Workers at the Animal Refuge eagerly accepted
the offer and welcomed the baby raccoon about two
weeks ago.
Animal Refuge Manager Carmen Soles is one of
the three animal keepers who take care of Miracle;
Blake Perry and Ryan Harris also care for baby
Miracle.
Soles, who has worked with the county since 1995,
received a degree in veterinary technology and fish
and wildlife management. Her passion for animals has
helped her give Miracle the best home possible.
Soles can still remember the day that Miracle
arrived at the Animal Refuge and surprised all the
keepers with his friendly and hyper personality.
"As soon as he arrived here he climbed out of his
carrier and hopped on my shoulder so he could play
with my hair," says Soles.
Miracle not only acts as Soles' personal hairdress-
er, but also is an inspiring pianist, or so it seems. After
a long hot day at the park, Miracle cools down and
shows off his piano skills in the sprinklers.
"Miracle loves to play in the sprinklers, he looks
like he's playing the piano when he does it," says
Soles.
Miracle is now 2 months old and livelier than ever.
Looking at his playful personality and friendliness,
one would never suspect Miracle has endured so much
at his young age. He seems to surprisingly show no
fear of human beings, and loves to be handled by the
animal keepers.
"He has grown up thinking that people are OK,
which is a good thing," says Soles.
Miracle is not only friendly with humans, but also
gets along with the other raccoons throughout the
park. Although his pen is separated from the adult rac-
coons until he reaches a certain age, Miracle still tries
to interact and communicate with the other animals.
"Miracle is not quite sure he's a raccoon yet, but
he is starting to vocalize with the other raccoons," says
Soles.
Although Miracle had a rough start as a baby, he is
receiving the best in medical care and love from the
animal keepers at the Hardee County Animal Refuge.
His diet is closely monitored, and he is always kept
busy so that he can live the most enriched life possi-
,ble.


PHOTO BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Although Miracle has scars from his past, he continues
to have a lively and energetic personality that keeps
everyone smiling.


Miracle has made a lasting impact on many people
throughout the state who heard his story and how he
survived. Soles has not only grown fond of baby
.Miracle, but is also inspired by his strength.

"He is so sweet. It amazed me that he survived
what he went through," says Soles.
The Hardee County Animal Refuge invites all of
the folks from Hardee County to come and see Miracle
and the rest of the wildlife throughout the sanctuary.
Animals include bobcats, foxes, otters, ostriches, black
bears, cougars, panthers, deer and African Spur
Tortoise.

The Animal Refuge is open 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
every day except Monday and Wednesday. It is located
in Pioneer Park at 1650 Animal Way in Zolfo Springs.
Admission for adults is $2, and $1 for children 6-12.
Children 5 and under get in free.
Head on down to the Hardee County Animal
Refuge and see the baby raccoon who has made head-
line news and who truly is a miracle.


SCHueOOL BOARDm
Continued From 1A


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None was given.
O'Brien further stated that
Daggett would be entitled to
request a hearing on the nonre-.
newal. From the audience,
Daggett called out, "And I'm
asking for that hearing."
O'Brien noted the request must
be made in writing.
The board then moved on to
other agenda items.
Immediately after the mpet-
ing and again this week,
Daggett alleged his termination
was the product of personal
conflicts rather than perfor-
mance.
Superintendent Jones on
Monday said he asked Royal
for a meeting on the matter.
"Since we did not have the
opportunity for very much dis-
cussion at the board meeting
and since it came as much of a
surprise t me, I wanted the
opportunity to discuss it," he
said. Set for noon that day,'
Royal called minutes before the
hour to cancel.
"Since there is potential for
legal action, she was advised by
Mr. O'Brien not to meetL_ and
that probably was good legal
advice," Jones added.
Jones noted that he has
received Daggett's written
request for a hearing, and that
he has forwarded that request to
the state Division of Adminis-
trative Hearings in Tallahassee.
An administrative-law judge
will be assigned to and hear the
case, and will render a ruling on
the matter.
Jones did not know how long
the process would take, estimat-
ing two months.
"Certainly, it is in every-
body's best interest that this be
resolved quickly," said Jones. "I
will do whatever it takes to
move it along. I am without a
director of transportation as of
tomorrow."
Jones said Deputy Super-
intendent Rocky Kitchens
would assume oversight of the
transportation department.
In addition to loss of an
administrator, Jones said he has
lost a high-school swim coach,
a lifeguard trainer, a chief nego-
tiator, an insurance committee
member, a representative on the
Heartland Workforce Board, an,
emergency operations represen-i
tative and "a host of lesser,
things he does."
Jones said Daggett "has never'
refused an assignment that I:
have asked him to do."


Jones said he was satisfied
with Daggett's performance as
director of transportation, a
position he has held for five
years. "My responsibility is
does the transportation depart-
ment run well so that the district
runs well? The answer is yes.
Mr. Daggett has been an excel-
lent director of transportation."
The superintendent said he
was unaware of any concerns
over Daggett's job performance..
"No member of the board spoke
to me about their intent to reject
the nomination," he said.
Daggett said Tuesday that no
board member spoke with him,
either. "It's total shell-shock. It
just surprised me," he said. .,
He said he did not know why
three board members chose to
reject his nomination. "I don't
know," he said. "I don't think
there is a legal reason. I think
it's personal."
Daggett alleged Platt wanted
him gone because of his opin-
ions concerning the district's-
health insurance coverage,
which recently switched from a
self-insurance plan to private
coverage with Cigna.
Daggett admitted on Tuesday
to posting an Internet blog criti-
cal of board action and ques-
tioning why certain board mem-
bers seemed to favor Blue
Cross/Blue Shield, which was
not the low bidder for the dis-
trict's business.
Further, the blog asked what
was motivating these board
members, and seemed to hint at
improprieties.
Platt, along with fellow board
members, had taken exception
to the blog, which was written
under the name "The Informer,"
and went so far as to ask Jones
to investigate who authored the
Web site.
Daggett also said Tuesday
that he was the individual who
sent e-mails to district employ-
ees telling them of the blog's.
existence and inviting them to
visit the site and add to the:
comments.
"It is not illegal," he said on
Tuesday. "It was a personal
opinion of what I was looking
at, what I was seeing."
He said he did not view the
blog as a conflict. "I separate'
my personal opinions from my
professional responsibilities,"
he said, noting that the ability to
do so was honed during his.
,years as president of the local
teacher's union.


"I am really good, and have
been, at compartmentalizing,
separating personal from pro- *
fessional," Daggett asserted.
He also said his personal
writings were all done from his
home computer.
"I'm entitled to my personal
opinion," he said. He added that
he would have admitted to
authorship of the blog if asked.
Daggett said no board member
ever spoke to him concerning it.
Daggett went on to allege
that Neuhofer might have voted
against him because he is serv-
ing as campaign treasurer for an
opponent of Neuhofer's bid for
re-election, Charles Crutch-
field. Crutchfield is Daggett's
son-in-law.
As for Royal, "I have no
idea," Daggett said.
He said he was visiting a
lawyer in Tampa on Wednesday
in regard to his requested
administrative hearing. He said
he would "wait and see" on any
possible civil action against the
board.
Platt acknowledged that she
did ask Jones to conduct an
investigation into who wrote
the blog. She also asked for, and
received, his report on the mat-
ter. A definitive answer was
unattainable, Jones noted,
though two members of the
community offered Daggett's
name. Jones said four other
authors had been suggested as
well, however.
In changing the procedure for
voting on the nominees, Platt
said, "I didn't want to lump
them in a group because I had
one I wasn't going to approve."
She said she had "some unre-
solved concerns," but because
Daggett is entitled to a hearing,
she would "rather it be brought
out at that time."
Platt said she understands the
legal requirement for a good-
cause reason for nonrenewal. "I
, am aware that we have to prove
just cause," she said. She would
not elaborate on her "concerns"
other than to say "people have
come from different directions
with different problems."
Platt denied Daggett's charge
that her action was prompted by
personal conflict. "Everyone is
entitled to an opinion, whether
that opinion is right or wrong,"
she said of his allegation.
Neuhofer, too, denied
Daggett's allegation of political
motivation on her part. "It's not'
politically motivated at all on'


my part," she said on Tuesday.
"I'm a servant of the people, and
would never misuse my politi-
cal office."
She said she did not feel "at
liberty" to state her reason for
denying Daggett's appointment,
as the matter is now in the legal
arena.
Neuhofer did note that she
understands there must be a
just-cause reason, and feels that
she has a reason that "would
qualify." She said she did not
know what might be in the
minds of the other board mem-
bers.
- Royal, as chairman, has been
in contact with board attorney
O'Brien and has been advised
not to comment on the matter,
shb noted. She said she under-
stands the requirement for good
cause.
Royal issued a written state-
ment, assuring the public that
she is working to represent
them and to "make a differ-
ence." She said she will contin-
ue to labor to do her best as a
School Board member.
Meanwhile, Daggett said he
has not yet learned the reason
for his dismissal, and fears it
comes in retaliation for his pub-
licly expressed opinions. --
He pointed to the federal
court case of previous adminis-
trator Kenny liames, who was'
fired after two years as an assis-
tant principal.
A federal jury found that
liames' First Amendment right
to free speech was violated, and'
awarded him $79,000 in com-
pensation from the district.

ABOUT
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must De written in good
taste and include, the
winter's full name, address,
and daytime telephone
number for verification'.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to:. Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocath, P.O.. Box- 338,
WauchUla, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 713-0657.


ATHLETICS
Continued From 1A


M W---RMM
19hua










On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses
sion today (Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
Grant application for $80,000 for emergency management
8:35 a.m.
Public hearing-renewal of six-cent optional fuel tax effective
January, 2009, 9 a.m.
Resolution urging Congress to take action to reduce the cos
of fuel.
City annexations and county annexation procedure.
Resolution to withdraw from Public Risk Managemen
insurance pool.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those whi
may wish to plan to attend.


Grilling Word Find
Just intime for National Grilling Month, see how many related
words you can find and circle throughout the puzzle.
BACKYARD COOKING HEAT
BARBECUE FLAME OUTDOORS
CHARCOAL FOOD PROPANE
COOK GRILL SUMMER
BGR I LLGS OOEO
MANZ Y B NU UCND
A I R I F J J T OOAG
CEMB K LDXCOPB
HVBOEOAEDKO J
ACQCOCOMS PRT
RVQR ZMUCEOPR
CZS TAEHE FXEA
ODRAYKCABMF Q
AJ HNMJ DOMOQH
LQUCSFYUOKNK
GTYGZCSDL I HW



1II GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS


-- - --


2:14tfc


Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
in the top 10 In customer satisfaction In
Florida I have received Ford's highest
Sale*. Honor 15 years running and been a
member of Ford's 300/500 Club for 20
years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
STEDEM Ft. Meade
------t-J 800-226-3325


FARMWORKER
Continued From 1A
an labor year-round or seasonal,
and should be clustered to min-
. imize the space on the property
, used for housing. There will be
I- no two-story housing. The den-
c sity should not exceed 3.75 per
c gross acre, meaning 150 work-
ers on 40 acres. The maximum
, would be 100-acre tracts.
Farmworker housing shall be
e in A-1 zoning, on a minimum
lot acreage of 40 acres. It
t should be along publicly main-
tained, paved roads, with a min-
imum lot frontage of 200 feet.
It Either vegetation or opaque
screens such as masonry, PVC
. fencing or berming may be used
o for buffering.
Finally, the farmworkers or
guestworkers must work at least
51 percent of the time on the
property owner's Hardee
County property.
The need to clarify farm-
worker housing arose because
of application by Davis
Enterprise Inc. to put eight units
for 150 guestworkers in the
midst of a 40-acre grove off
Crewsville Road, just outside
the Sweetwater community. It
was denied by the P&Z Board
on a tie vote, and denied by the
commission on a 3-1 vote with
Commissioner Minor Bryant
abstaining.
Mediation on the Davis mat-
ter is scheduled for July 22 and
July 30, both open to public, but
limited as to testimony
received.


FCA Hosts Free
Youth Fun Day
Today (Thursday), the
junior Fellowship of Christian
Athletes will be holding a fun
day at the Hardee Junior
High/Hilltop Elementary
campus. Registration be-
gins at 8:15 a.m. Festivities
begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4
p.m..
The event is for upcoming
seventh, eighth and ninth
graders. There will be sport-
ing activities, live music and
several speakers throughout
the day. Free lunch will be
provided. This is one of two
events. The next fun day will
be Thursday, July 17.

Holiday Changes
Trash Collection
Because of the July Fourth
holiday, the county landfill be
closed tomorrow (Friday)
and garbage collection will
also be changed.
In Wauchula and Bowling
Green, Friday's routes will
be picked up on Monday. For
customers of Hardee County
Disposal, Thursday's routes
were run on Wednesday and
Friday's routes will be. run
t today (Thursday).

Plans Start For
Class of 2009
Project Graduation 2009
gears up for the new school
years with the first planning
meeting for this year's
seniors. The first meeting is
Tuesday, July 15, at 6 p.m.
All parents and guardians
of the Class of 2009 students
are invited to come to the
Peace Valley Lutheran
Church, 1643 Stenstrom
Road, east of the Hardee
County Agri-Civic Center. To
keep in the communication
loop, email projgrad09@ya-
hoo.com.

I have made mistakes, but
I have never made the mis-
take of claiming that I
never made one.
-James Gordon Bennett

The best way to cheer
yourself up is to try to
cheer somebody else up.
-Mark Twain


July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3A


You "Otter" Be

On The River

^ Peace River Adventures LLC I[
SRentals .
I., f Day Full Day *
S.iX-<. : Overnight
Serving from Payne Creek & Upper Peace River
863-229-8149 or 806-681-8440
PeaceRiverAdventures.com
for reservations: PRAlll.com 7:3-lopj,


Vote Tuesday, August 26th 2008


Teresa M.


Crawford

for
School Board District 3


Qualifications: 23 Years of Educational Experience
16 Years at Hardee Senior High -
Social Science Teacher and
Director of Guidance
7 Years at South Florida Community
College Hardee Campus
Director
AA South Florida Community


Key Issues:


College
BA Social Science Education -
USF
MA Counselor Education USF
M.Ed. Educational Leadership -
USF
Further Graduate Study Political
Science USF/AMU
Ensure quality instruction
Provide better benefits for school
personnel
Review district budget and allocation


of resources
Establish better communication
among all stakeholders
Guarantee professional educational
expertise on the board

Eviry Vote Counts
Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by Teresa M. Crawford Campaign. Approved by Teresa M.
Crawford for School Board District 3. 7:3p


The new limited-edition Gator" XUV Camo 4x4


If it wasn't already the toughest 4WD utility.
vehicle in the forest, the new XUV now comes
with a REALTREE@ camo pattern, so you can
go just about anywhere without being seen.
JohnDeere.com


FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY
3440 US HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FL
(863) 735-1122
www.fieldsequip.com


FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY
17215 HIGHWAY 27 NORTH
MINNEOLA, FL
(352) 394-7181
www.fieldsequip.com


* Limited-edition camo pattern
* True four-wheel drive
* Diesel or gasoline engine


O JOHN DEERE


FIELDS EQUIPMENT COMPANY
3203 HAVENDALE BLVD
WINTER HAVEN, FL
(863) 967-0602
www.fieldsequip.com


Shown with optional camo canopy. JlW-i Dee02 a9ren and yellow conor scheme, the loping deer ymbol and JOHN DEERE are tratdenrks ol Deere & Cnpay 7:3c
l1IBUV -I3 Xl(E310070BWHA-BW-0249584 c


ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include .t'e name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


DENNIS


JLeader.44p hai Wos"



With a graduation rate

at its highest level in 10 years,

and above the state average...



And a dropout rate

at its lowest level in 10 years...



We are proud of the

teachers and staff who are

making this progress possible.

Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by Dennis Jones, Campaign, approved by Dennis Jones (D)







4A The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008


Obituaries

JANIE REVELL
Janie Revell, 53; died on
Saturday, June 28, 2008 at her
home. -
Born in Lakeland, she was a
lifelong resident of Hardee
County.
Survivors include husband
Jerry Revell of Bowling Green;
a daughter, Jamie Revell of
Wauchula; a son, Jared Revell
and wife Bonny of Sebring;
parents Cecil and Sara
"Granny" Lee of Wauchula;
two sisters, Barbara Jernigan
and husband James, and Celia
Hayman and husband Slade, all
of Wauchula; and a grandson,
Brooker Lee Revell of Sebring.
Visitation was Tuesday, July
2, at First Baptist Church of
Wauchula from 5 to 8 p.m.
Services were Wednesday at 2
p.m. at First Baptist Church of
Wauchula with the Rev. Chris
M. Bishop of New Hope Baptist
Church officiating. Interment
followed in Paynes Creek
Cemetery, Bowling Green.
Dowden Funeral Home
Sebring


JOSHUA CHRISTIANSEN
Joshua Christiansen, 27, of
Bartow, died Tuesday, July 1,
2008, in Highland City.
Born in Oelwein, Iowa, he
was a longtime Bartow resident
and worked in his family busi-
ness, All Types Aluminum.
Survivors include parents,
Charles and Lisa Tucker of Fort
Meade; two brothers, Jacob
Christiansen of Fort Meade and
Travis Euans of Bartow; two
sisters, Ashley Christiansen and
Alissa Christiansen, both of St.
Charles, Minn.; maternal grand-
mother Dorothy Leads of
Mulberry; paternal grandpar-
ents Bert and Ginger Black-
welder of Fort Meade; and
numerous uncles, aunts and
cousins.
Visitation is Saturday from 9
to 11 a.m. at the funeral home.
Services are at 11 a.m. with the
Rev. Val Hattery officiating.
Interment follows in Evergreen
Cemetery in Fort Meade.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade








15 0S.7t A




,a ucov.g FL 33873














GLADYS MAE
FACEMYER
Gladys Mae Facemyer, 69,
of Wauchula, died Tuesday,
June 24, 2008, at her home.
Born July 1, 1938, in
Charleston, W.V., she came
to Hardee County in 1970.
She was a member of Oak
Grove Baptist Church and
had been employed as a pri-
vate caregiver.
Survivors include two
sons, William Lanham and
wife Kimberly of Bradenton,
and Thofias Wayne Lanham
and wife Renee of Wauchula;
two daughters, Lou Ann
Rimes and husband Jerry of
Wauchula, and Rose Ellen
Lanham and husband Steve
of Bowling Green; three
brothers, Jim Facemyer,
Eugene Facemyer and Leo
Facemyer, all of West Vir-
ginia; two sisters, Carolyn
Villa of Zolfo Springs and


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Wauchula native Col. Dcvell Mathews, USAF Ret., recently
sent us a news story of Florida name pronunciations printed in the
Florida Today. He lives in Melbourne.
Wauchula made the hard-to-pronounce list along with
Myakka, Albee, AquiEsta, Apalachicola, Asolo, Bahia Vista, Boca
Grande, Bradenton, Calle Ocho, Captiva, Dona, Kissimmee,
Micanopy, Oneco, Okeechobee, Phillippi, Robarts, Tamiami, Terra
Ceia, Van Wezel, Wimauma, Withlachoochee.and Zephryhills.

Hardee County Clerk of Court Hugh Bradley is in his 12th
year in office and will be unopposed for a new four-year term. He
would complete 16 years in office in 2012.
It is not unusual for elected clerk of courts in Hardee to have a
long tenure if they do a good job and have a good staff. Consider
the last two. Colemon Best served 20 years, and Ben Coker served
32 years. Bradley on Monday praised his staff.

The State of Florida and the South.Florida Water Management
District recently agreed in principle to buy U.S. Sugar and its
187,000 acres for $1.75 billion. This would include a sugar mill,
citrus processing plant, and railroad. The idea is to help the
Everglades restoration plan.
U.S. Sugar would be able to farm another six years or longer
by mutual agreement. The purchase would be financed by a long-
term loan or bonds that would push the total price, including inter-
est, to about $3.5 billion.
This is supposed to help the Everglades with cleaner water and,
greatly reduce polluted water running into the St. Lucie River (East
Coast) and Caloosahatchee River (West Coast).
The purchase, suggested by Gov. Charlie Crist, would be paid
by state and water taxes in the south Florida area and is expected
to be finalized in late November.
Not addressed yet is 35,000 acres in the area owned by Florida
Crystals.

A Palm Beach Gardens single mom, 42, has advertised her
house for $340,000 and her hand in marriage for the right man
for another $500,000. Deven Trabosh, an attractive blonde, ide-
ally hopes a European man will close the deal and said she is will-
ing to move overseas, wrote Kelli Kennedy of Associated Press in
the June 29 issue of the Lakeland Ledger.

President George W. Bush and Republican presidential hope-
ful John McCain stands against drilling for offshore oil. Florida
Gov. Charlie Crist recently said he is willing to consider the issue.
This is all part of an effort to help wean the U.S. from depen-
dency on foreign oil.

Those getting out on the water should be careful of alligators.
A teenager in the Okeechobee area recently was attacked by an
11-foot gator while swimming across a deep canal. He grabbed a
buoy rope and punched the gator in the eyes but lost his left arm in
the attack.
There has also been a shark bite report or two lately, and there
is a drowning danger of getting caught up in a rip tide in some
coastal areas.

Wauchula native Richard Nicholson has an interesting job his-
tory. He worked for corporate computer giant IBM and then came
to Wauchula to help his family run Nicholson Supply Company
Ace Hardware. He is now a U.S. diplomat living with his family in
Nairtobi, ItBnya, Africa.
His jqb is interviewing people seeking visas. He has handled
8,7Ft applications and gives each applicant an interview of about
90 seconds. He then decides whether they get a visa.
The U.S. Kenya mission last year issued over 11,000
tourist/temporary business immigrant visas.
There are 10,000 Americans living in Kenya, and 7,000
Kenyan students in the U.S. Many Kenyans want to visit America
and then try to stay here and become permanent residents.
In 2007 102,000 Americans, second only to the British, visit-
ed Kenya. Some were on safaris where Americans can use cameras
not guns when viewing big game animals.
Hardee County can be proud of Richard Nicholson, his wife
Judi and their two young children.
His first cousin, Jennifer Sanders, a Bowling Green native, is
fluent in several languages and also works for the U.S. govern-
ment.
Richard's brother Steven and family are Christian missionaries
in Africa.

The local citrus season is coming to a close in the next week
or so, reported local harvesting contractors Steve Johnson and
Mark Manuel. Prices dropped late this season, as processing plants
generally have a big inventory of juice.
Orange and grapefruit juices are among the healthiest bever-
ages available, although there is a lot of competition from other
fruit juices, sports drinks and waters.
I like Anita Bryant's slogan of yesteryear, "A day without
Florida orange juice is like a day without sunshine." I also liked the
old orange juice TV commercial featuring a talking ham sandwich.

The blueberry season has been over for awhile in this area of
Florida. Blueberries are considered one of nature's best foods along
with citrus and many other fresh fruits and vegetables.
A recent Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Pyramid lists these
types of foods we should eat, in order of servings: vegetables,
fruits, carbohydrates, protein/dairy, fats and sweets. Healthy diets
can range from 1,200 to 2,000 daily calories.

Toye English has had two holes-in-one while golfing. On April
25 he scored an eagle on No. 4 at Torrey Oaks by holing a shot of
over 150 yards. His witness was Wauchula Police Capt. Thomas
Harris.
The memories of men are too frail a thread to hang his-
tory from.


Softball All-Stars Go To State


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
All four Hardee Dixie soft-
ball teams will advance to state
competition in Belleview this
weekend.
The Dixie Darlings, Angels,
Ponytails and Belles will all go
on to test their skills at the state
level.
The Dixie Darlings, the 6- to-
8-year-olds, actually got a bye
to the state level as there were
no teams in the district competi-
tion in their brackets. Coaches
, Jerry Welch, Wayne Graham
and Keith Patterson will take
Cori-Ann Rosales, Michaela
Villarreal, Sarah Welch, Yadira
Castillo, Lindsey Welch,
Destinee Pace, Sarah Carlton,
Ashlee Patterson, Heather
Coronado, Destiny Scheel,
Yasmin Ramirez and Lilianna
Ponce on their first-ever trip to
state.
The Dixie Angels, ages 7 to
10, swept through their games
at Sebring, defeating the only
other district competitor, Se-
bring in back-to-back games.
On June 26, Hardee won 15-2,
following it up with an 11-5 win


on June 27, again behind the
pitching of Senaida Garcia.
Good hitting by Tara McNa6b,
Kimberly Derringer, Allison
Farr and Kristian Judah helped,
too. Other players are Mara
Goodwyn, Brooke Dixon,
Morgan Walters, Anna Erekson,
Hannah Carlton, Gabrielle
Allen and Illena Flores. They
are coached by Missy and Jake
Carlton and Julian Garcia.
The 11-12 Ponytails shut out
Lake Placid at the opening
game 10-0, with Karlee Hen-
derson pitching a no-hitter.
Facing only 15 batters, she
recorded 12 strikeouts in lead-
ing her team to a victory short-
ened by the 10-run mercy rule.
Kaitlyn Thomas smacked an in--
the-park homer and Alex
Ullrich went three-for-three.
Lake Placid came back to
beat Sebring in the next game.
Hardee then played Sebring and
won 10-2, with Amber Reid and
Hailey Andrews sharing the
pitching load. Dana Terrell hit a
triple and Ullrich went two-for-
three.
The third game was another
Hardee shutout over Lake


Placid, again winning 10-0.
Amber Reid had eight strike-
outs. With the 31-1 record for
three games, Hardee goes on-to
Belleview to challenge the best
in the state.
Other Ponytails are Jakaysha:
Lindsey, Ana Galvez, Kayla,
Nichols, Arissa Camel, Bridgett
Whidden and Gemi Saunders,,
Their coaches are Max Ullrich,
Melanie Henderson and Mike;
Thomas.
The final girls came is.thei
Belles, ages 13 to 15. They used,
a team effort to defeat Lake
Placid twice. Behind the pitch-
ing of Amanda McNabb, Court-
ney Parks and Sabrina Her-nan-
dez, the won the first seven-
inning game 19-8.
Returning to Sebring, they
faced Lake Placid again.,
McNabb pitched all five inn-
ings in the 14-1 victory. Other
Belles are Penny McGuire,
Karina Fernandez, Celeste
Williams, Danika Briones,
Brooke Tyson, Taylor Bolin,
Emily Starratt, Summer Sisum
and Sierra Coronado. They are
coached by Debbie McNabb,.
Rocky Parks and Randy Tyson.


COURTESY PHOTOS
The Hardee Angels were all smiles as they won the District 8 championship and knew
they were going to state competition in Belleview.


The Hardee Angels cheered and ran for the dugout as showers deluged the field after
their championship win. The district trophy was presented to them in the dugout.




mm ea U -Ad oc
HareeContys omtow Cveag
PRNTRS9 UBISER


-"'7.,
~,


i.


As a courtesy to our friends and neighbors, obtuarl
are now listed dally at www.hardeeoblts.com


"They were


wonderful".

We hear kind words
consistently. We're proud
that people feel comfortable
enough with us to openly tell
us how much they appreciate
what we did for them. In fact,
it's this appreciation that
drives us to offer the very
best in comfort, compassion
and service.





FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula





,es 773-9773


1:24tfc


Dixie Gibson of Sebring;
four grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren.
Memorial service was held
at 1 p.m Saturday, June 28 at
Oak Grove Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


ceowtez. ,t e ueice,


Make Every Moment a special Mlemory ...
'1w


uoug ana r.J. union
Owners
1067 South Sixth Ave. Wauchula Florida
863-773-0625 3:13fc






July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5A


In Business
By Savannah Faircloth


DINING DIVERSITY Driving through Wauchula, one can
see the changes seeping into the heart of Hardee. Streets are being
restored, buildings constructed and new businesses are making
their way into this small town.
Celtic Crossing, a new Irish-themed restaurant and pub, is one
of the new businesses that is bringing diversity to Hardee County.
Owners Kevin Doyle and Nick Fisher met in the summer of
1998. Doyle was the owner of a well-known Irish restaurant and
pub in Punta Gorda called "Celtic Ray Public House."
"Doyle's business was a very friendly and relaxing place,"
says Fisher. "Customers didn't have to try to talk over anyone or
have to hear screaming fans during a football game. It was just a
time to sit and relax with family and friends."
When Doyle sold the business, he and Fisher decided to try to
open up an Irish restaurant and pub that featured the same peaceful
atmosphere. The only problem was finding a location.
After searching in Sebring and Avon Park, Doyle and Fisher
decided that none of the buildings had the right historical, down-
town appeal that they were looking for.
One day, Fisher and Doyle decided to dine at the Red Garage
in Wauchula, 216 and 222 W. Main St. During this meal, the two
discussed potential places that could occupy their restaurant and
pub. Little did they know at the time, but the restaurant they were
eating at would soon be the home of their business.
When Red Garage went out of business, Doyle and Fisher pur-
chased the building and began construction for the restaurant in
May of this year.
Doyle and Fisher have been working hard to completely strip
the building of its old interior and create a unique and placid envi-
ronment for guests.
The pub will feature a beautiful red-mahogany wood bar,
loveseats to sit and visit on, new flooring and walls the color of red-
velvet cake.


PHOTO BY SAWWNNAH FAIRCLOTH
Kevin Doyle and Nick Fisher hope their peaceful Irish-
themed restaurant and pub will help keep diners in
Hardee County.
"The definition of an Irish pub is the extension of everyone's
living room. We want our restaurant and pub to have a living-room
feel to it," says Doyle.
Finishing touches to the building include staining the concrete
floor, finishing the walls and the overall clean-up of the restaurant.
: ,>-Doyle and Fisher hope to provide a good quality restaurant and
.-,pubifor the residents of HIrdee County, as well as its many out-of-
town visitors. They also want people to realize that the pub and
restaurant area family place where all ages are welcome.
."We are opening a restaurant that also has a bar, not a pub with
a restaurant," says Doyle.
Fisher, the manager of Sears, will be handling money manage-
ment of Celtic Crossing while still working at Sears. Doyle will run
the restaurant management and oversee the creative/decorative
details of the restaurant.
The restaurant, which will be attached to the pub, will feature
European-American foods such as steak, seafood and various other
dishes. The pub will feature Irish pub food such as fish n' chips,
bangers n' mash, shepherd's pie, Guinness pie, Cornish pastie and
many other Irish-inspired dishes.
Many people find themselves driving 30-minutes out of town
just to have a sit-down meal with their family. Doyle and Fisher
hope that by providing a unique and peaceful eating environment,
that business will start to turn more toward Hardee County.
"You can go out to dinner in Sebring and see half of Hardee
County eating there. Everyone leaves because there is nowhere to
eat here. By offering more restaurants in Wauchula, the business
and money will be directed toward the county," says Fisher.
Celtic Crossing hopes to be able to offer its unique and tasty
food to Hardee County by July 31.
Doyle and Fisher are accepting applications and will call the
potential employees when ready to begin interviewing.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Savannah Faircloth at 773-3255 with your business news.


Fun By The
2 8 3 Numbers
5 1 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
9 sudoku. This
mind-bending
7 4 5 puzzle will have
you hooked from
3 2 8 the moment you
square off, so
4 sharpen your
pencil and put
your sudoku
-9 2 5 savvy to the test!

4 3
Leve: Adanced
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
9L ] 618 C T t T
SG 9 L9 b I.Z9 .

8 I. 9L 6. 99
9 fl .#69L C
:U3MSNV


THURSDAY. JULY 3
/Hardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse An-
nex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
MONDAY, JULY 7
VWauchula City Commis-
sion,'planning session, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St., Wau-
chula, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY, JULY 10
VHardee County 'School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 200 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.
VHardee County Planning
& Zoning Board, first public
hearing on farmworker ordi-
nance, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.

A joy that's shared is a joy
made double.


IL


Granny Graham's

S. Come in for daily

discounts and

giveaways

through the

month of July.

116 N. 4th Ave Wauchula

1773-0292


(ii


7:3c


Summer Hours
Closed on Mondays
Tues Thurs 5:30 am 2 pm
Friday 5:30 am 8 pm
Saturday 6 am- 11 am
Sunday 6 am- 2 pm


Sunday Nights in JULY!


*-*.-*-AA-AIt


Coming July 20th


A








JA\


p


- 6:00pm


A
/ V


I.:

~ 'N


Sunday July 6th
No Evening Worship
Family weekend!
Sunday School 9:45am / Worship 11:00am


Sunday July 13th
Mark Dickerson
Gospel Concert Artist
.Ice Cream Social following concert!


Sunday July 27th
Robert Winecoff
Gospel Concert Artist
Dessert Fellowship following concert


Dennis Swanberg

Christian Comedian & Communicator
Tickets $10.00 per person available in Church Office
6:00pm in the Sanctuary

Church-wide Picnic at 5:00pm
Cost $4.00 Adults / $2.00 Children under 12 (limited to first 500)


FI'*st Bptl'st Curc


. ... ......


.1 1








6A The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No.: 252008DR000034

IN RE: TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
GRANDPARENT ADOPTION OF

C.T. DOB: 12/02/1999
R.M. DOB: 06/14/2002
C.M. DOB: 11/04/2003
V.M. DOB: 10/20/2004
Minor Children. /

PETITION TO TERMINATE
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
GRANDPARENT ADOPTION
Petitioners, Jose L. Torres, Sr.
and Aurella M. Torres, being duly
sworn, petition this Court for ter-
mination of the parental rights of
Aurella Torres, Ramon Martinez,
and Jose Oscar Rodriguez, pend-
ing adoption of the above-named
minor children by the grandpar-
ents under Chapter 63, Florida
Statutes, and allege:
I. PETITION TO TERMINATE
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
ADOPTION
GENERAL ALLEGATIONS
1. This Is an action for termina-
tion of parental rights of Aurella
Torres, Ramon Martinez, and
Jose Oscar Rodriguez, pending
adoption of the minor children by
their grandparents, whose names
and address are Jose L. Torres,
Sr. and Aurella M. Torres, 3222 E.
Main St., Wauchula, FL 33873.
This case is being filed In the
Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial
Circuit, in and for Hardee County
located at 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, FL 33873. The tele-
phone number of the division of
the circuit court where this peti-
tion is filed Is (863) 773-4174.
2. The minor children subject
to this petition are:
a. C.T., female, d.o.b.
12/02/1999, born at Lakeland, FL;
b. b..M., male, d.o.b..
06/14/2002, born at Bartow, FL;
c. C.M., female, d.o.b.
11/04/2003, born at Sebring, FL;
and
d. V.M., female, d.o.b.
10/20/2004, born at Sebring, FL.
3. The minor children have
been known by all of the following
names (not to Include the adop-
tive name to be known by):
a. C.T.;
b. R.M.;
c. C.M.; and
d. V.M..
4. ALLEGATIONS UNDER THE
UNIFORM CHILD CUSTODY
JURISDICTION ACT.
a. The current address of
the minor children is:
I. 3222 E. Main St., Wau-
chula, FL 33873
b. The minor children's' res-
Idences for the past five years
have been:
.3222 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, FL 33873'
c. The persons with whom
the minor children have resided
in the past five years are the
grandparents and the aunt.
d. The grandparents have pre-
viously participated In a depend-
ency proceeding Involving the
minor children.
e. The grandparents do not
know of any other pending court
proceedings Involving custody,
divorce, mental health, delin-
quency, or crimes involving the
minor children.
f. The grandparents do not
know of any other parties who
have or claim to have physical
custody, visitation, or paternity
rights to the minor children other
than Respondents.
g. The grandparents will
Inform the Court of any relevant
Information regarding any other
proceeding as It becomes known
to the grandparents.
5. The following are the names
and addresses of persons whose
consent to the adoption Is
required, but who have not con-
sented:
a. Ramon Martinez; address
unknown; and
b. Jose Oschr Rodriguez;
address unknown.
i COUNT ONE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS OF AURELIA TORRES
S6. Petitioners reallege para-
graphs 1 through 5 as though
fully set forth herein.
7. Aurella Torres Is the biologi-
cal mother of the children at
issue, C.T., d.o.b. 12/02/1999;
R.M., d.o.b. 06/14/2002; C.M.,
d.o.b. 11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.
10/20/2004.
8. The grounds for termination
of parental rights are:
a. Aurella Torres has execut-
ed a valid consent that has not
been withdrawn. The consent Is
attached to this petition.
b. The minor children have
lived the majority of their lives
with the Petitioners. The minor
children rely for their sole sup-
port upon the Petitioners.
' WHEREFORE, Petitioners
requests this Court enter a Final
Judgment of Termination of
' Parental Rights Pending Adoption
of the Minor Children by the
Grandparents and terminating the


parental rights of Aurella Torres.
COUNT TWO
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS OF RAMON MARTINEZ
9. Petitioners reallege para-
graphs 1 through 5 as though
fully set forth herein.
10. Ramon Martinez is the bio-
logical father of the minor chil-
dren, R.M., d.o.b. 06/14/2002;
C.M., d.o.b. A11/04/2003; and V.M.,
d.o.b. 10/20/2004.
11. The grounds for termina-
tion of parental rights are: a
a. Ramon Martlnez has.
abandoned the minor children,'
IR.M., d.o.b. 06/14/2002; C.M.,-
d.o.b. 11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.,
10/20/2004, within the meaning of
Section 63.032 (1) Florida
Statutes. Ramon Martinez does
not support the children, has:


failed to hold communication with
the children, and in all respects
has failed to evince a settled pur-
pose to assume all parental
duties for the mindr children.
b. Ramon Martinez has lost
custody of the minor children as a
result of his failure to perform the
tasks of a case plan previously
ordered by the Court In depend-
ency case number 252005-DP-
000330.
12. The actions of R.M. de-
monstrate a willful disregard for
the safety and welfare of the chil-
dren.
13. Ramon Martinez has been
well able to financially support
the children but has failed to do
so.
14. Though requested to so,
and while having the ability to do
so, Ramon Martinez failed to pro-
vide medical treatment for the
children.
15. At all times material hereto
Ramon Martinez has been well
able to provide financial support
to the children, has been well
able to communicate with the
children, but has failed and / or
refuse to do so despite being
requested to do so and despite
being notified of his paternity of
these children.
16. Based upon the foregoing,
the Court should find that Ramon
Martinez has abandoned the chil-
dren within the meaning of Sec-
tion 63.032 (1) Florida Statutes,
and otherwise pursuant to Sec-
tion 63.089 (4) Florida Statutes.
WHEREFORE, Petitioners re-,
quests the Court terminate the
parental rights of Ramon Martinez
as to the minor children, R.M.,'
d.o.b. 06/14/2002; C.M., d.o.b.
11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.
10/20/2004.
COUNT THREE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS OF JOSE OSCAR
RODRIGUEZ
17. Petitioners realleges para-
graphs 1 through 5 as though
fully set forth herein.
18. Jose Oscar Rodriguez Is
the biological father of the minor
child at Issue, C.T., d.o.b.
12/02/1999.
19. The grounds for termina-
tion of parental rights are:
a. Jose Oscar Rodriguez
has abandoned the minor child,
C.T., d.o.b. 12/02/1999, within the
meaning of Section 63.032 (1)
Florida Statutes. Jose Oscar
Rodriguez does not support the
child, has failed to hold communi-
cation with the child, and in all
respects has failed to evince a
settled purpose to assume all
parental duties for the minor
child.
b. Jose Oscar Rodriguez
has lost custody of the minor
child as a result of his failure to
perform the tasks of a case plan
previously ordered by the Court
in case number 252005-DP-
000330.
20. The actions of Jose Oscar
. Sdglguez jmonstrate a willful
d .fga.rd f the safety and wel-
fare of the Lid.
21. Jose Oscar Rodriguez has
been well able to financially sup-
port the child but has failed to do
so.
22. Though requested to so,
and while having the ability to do
so, Jose Oscar Rodriguez failed
to provide medical treatment for
the child, and failed and / or
refused to provide medical treat-.
ment or prenatal treatment for the
child's mother during pregnancy.
23. At all times material hereto
Jose Oscar Rodriguez has been
well able to provide financial sup-
port to the child, has been well
able to communicate with the
child, but has failed and / or
refuse to do so despite being
requested to do so and despite
being notified of his paternity of
this child.
24. Based upon the foregoing,
the Court should find that Jose
Oscar Rodriguez has abandoned
the child within the meaning of
Section 63.032 (1) Florida Stat-
utes, and otherwise pursuant to
Section 63.089 (4) Florida
Statutes.
WHEREFORE, Petitioners re-
quests the Court terminate the
parental rights of Jose Oscar
Rodrlguez as to the minor child,
C.T., d.o.b. 12/02/1999.
II. INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT
AFFIDAVIT
Petitioners, Jose L. Torresa, Sr.
and Aurella M. Torres, being duly
sworn, certify the following state-
ments are true:
25. Upon Information and
belief the minor children, C.T.,
d.o.b. 12/02/1999; R.M., d.o.b.
06/14/2002; C.M., d.o.b.
11/04/2003; and V.M., d.o.b.
10/20/2004, who are subject to
this proceeding, are not Indian
chIldren and the Indian Child
Welfare Act does not apply to this
proceeding.
Aurella M. Torres
Petitioner
Jose L. Torres, Sr.
Petitioner

Robin H. Stevenson
Robin H. Stevenson
Florida Bar No. 0977470
Attorney for Petitioners
1165 E. Main St.


Bartow, FL 33830
863-533-9138
863-533-9476 fax 7:3.24c


Life isn't about finding
yourself. Life is about cre-
ating yourself.
-George Bernard Shaw


'cl Avocalc
lit,


3. 7th Ave.
AuchLila. F- 325-1
(863) 773-3255


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 252008DR000034

IN RE: TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS PENDING
GRANDPARENT ADOPTION OF

C.T. DOB: 12/02/1999
R.M. DOB: 06/14/2002
C.M. DOB: 11/04/2003
V.M. DOB: 10/20/2004
Minor Children.


SUMMONS
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF HARDEE
To Each Sheriff of the State:
YOU ARE COMMANDED to serve
this Summons and a copy of the
Petition to Terminate Parental
Rights Pending Grandparent
Adoption in this action on the
Respondent by delivering service
to:
Jose Oscar Rodriguez
United States of Mexico
Each Respondent Is required to
'serve written defenses to the
Complaint on Robin H. Steven-
son, Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 1165 E. Main St.,
Bartow, FL 33830, within twenty
(20) days after service of this
Summons on that Respondent,
exclusive of the day of service,
and to file the original of the
defenses with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or Immediately
thereafter. If a Respondent falls
to do so, a default will be entered
against that Respondent for the
relief demanded on the
Complaint.

DATED: 1-15-08
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate In this proceed-
ing should contact the Polk
County Courthouse, 255 N.
Broadway, Bartow FL 33830,
Phone 863/534-4000 not later
than seven days prior to the pro-
ceeding. If hearing Impaired,
(TDD) 1-800/955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800/955-8770, via Florida
Relay. 7:3-24c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY
CASE NO.: 252008CP000056
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
GERALD LEE CONROY, deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of GERALD LEE CONROY, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
April 24,2008, and whose, social
security number Is 263-34-0117, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Hardee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is
Post Office Drawer 1749, Wau-
chula, FL 33873-1749. The name
and address of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, on whom a copy of
this notice Is required to be
served must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of the first publication
of this Notice is July 3, 2008.
Personal Representative:
JOHN P. CONROY
305 Goose Point
Spring City, Tn 37381

Attorney for Personal
Representative:


John W.H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (863) 773-0910
Florida Bar Number: 0650137
7:3-1.0c


Happiness does not ;ome
from doing easy world. but
from the afterglow of satis-
faction that comes after
the achievement of a diffi-
cult task that demanded,
our best.
-Theodore I. Rubin


Q: What are soy nuts? Are
they healthful choices?
A: Roasted soy nuts are
roasted whole soybeans. They
may be dry-roasted or oil-roast-
ed. Soy nuts are available plain,
salted or in a variety of other
flavors. A quarter-cup serving
contains about 200 calories, just
a little less than the same por-
tion of peanuts.
Like many other soy foods,
they are not low fat, but the sat-
urated fat content.is very low.
Unsalted soy nuts contain only
a trace amount of sodium.
Salted versions, which contain
about 70 to 120 milligrams of
sodium in a quarter-cup, remain
reasonable choices as long as
you watch your portion sizes.
Q0 Is weight gain unavoid-
able when someone quits
smoking?
A: Modest weight gain is not
unusual when someone quits
smoking, but it is not universal.
One factor: increased calorie
consumption as people begin to
eat when they otherwise would
have smoked. These extra calo-
ries, combined with a return to a
normal metabolic rate (nicotine
may elevate the metabolism,
helping smokers burn calories
more quickly), can lead to
excess pounds. Exercise is one
of the most effective ways to
avoid weight gain after you quit
smoking. Two or three 10 to 15
minute blocks of activity can
burn enough calories to com-
pensate for a drop in metabolic
rate.
In addition, by reducing
stress and improving mood,
regular exercise can decrease
emotion-based eating. Many
people find that snacking on
small amounts of food several
times a day is helpful as well.
Eating more frequently can help
people avoid rapid drops in
blood sugar, which can stimu-
late cravings. The key is to
choose balanced snacks, not
just sweets or chips.
Q: What causes constipa-
tion?
A: Constipation involves
straining to pass small, hard
bowel movements. It can make
you feel bloated and uncomfort-
able. It is usually caused, or at
least made worse, by poor diet
and lack of exercise. One poten-
tial remedy: fiber. Dietary fiber
absorbs-4water, making stools
softer and easier to pass. Adults
need from 21 to 38 grams of
fiber daily. Children also need
plenty of fiber to prevent con-
stipation; kids need somewhat
less than adults do, but current
guidelines suggest as much as
25 to 30 grams a day starting at
age nine. A high-fiber diet
includes: at least 3 1/2 to 6 cups
of fruits and vegetables every
day; at least 3 or 4 servings of
whole grains; one or more serv-
ings of beans, nuts, seeds or
bran daily. Although it can seem
daunting, the fiber adds up
quickly when you include these
healthful foods at every meal.
Note, however, that fiber only
works to prevent constipation if
you drink enough liquids.
Most experts recommend that
adults drink from 8 to 10 cups
of a variety of fluids each day.
Daily physical activity is also
important to help the muscles of
the digestive system keep
things moving. In addition to
dietary causes, constipation
may also result from pregnancy,
laxative abuse, certain medica-
'tions and medical conditions
such as stroke, irritable bowel
syndrome and other colorectal
problems. If you think any of
these conditions may be affect-
ing you, or if you have a signif-
icant or prolonged change in
bowel habits, see your doctor.
Q: What's the difference
between albacore, white and
light uflitf _
A: "White" tuna is albacore
tuna. It has a milder flavor and
whiter flesh than the product
labeled "light," which can come
from skipjack or yellowfin
tuna. Both are good sources of
protein and are low in saturated
fat, characteristics shared by all
seafood. Each type of tuna
offers slightly different benefits
to different people. Albacore or
white tuna is higher in omega-3
fat, which seems to help protect
against heart disease by reduc-
ing inflammation and support-
ing healthy heart rhythms.


While some research suggests
that omega-3's anti-inflamma-
tory effects could offer anti-
cancer benefits as well, more
research is needed. Light tuna
provides some omega-3 fat, but
white tuna provides about three
times as much. But light tunas
has its advantages, too: It tends,
to have less mercury contami-
nation.
Mercury consumption can
harm young children even


unborn infants. Current advi-
sories emphasize that albacore
tuna is quite safe to eat in mod-
eration, but all women of child-,
bearing age should keep it to no
more than six ounces a week
(children under age six should
limit consumption to perhaps
half that amount). Men and
older women stand to benefit
most from.omega-3's heart ben-,
efits, so for them, slightly more
albacore tuna may be a reason-
able choice.
Q: Are broccoli stalks
nutritious, or should I just.
stick to the florets?
A: Broccoli is a nutritional
powerhouse, providing vitamin
C, folate, beta-carotene and
lutein (a compound being stud-
ied for its role in eye health). In
addition, it is rich in isothio-
cyanates, phytochemicals that
may play a role in fighting can-
cer. While researchers cannot
pinpoint which areas of the
plant supply which phytochem-
icals, the location of some com-
pounds is known. The florets
and leaves, for example, are
higher in carotenoids than the
pale stalks, although the stalks
remain good sources of vitamin,
C and folate. Broccoli stalks are
also great sources of fiber.
Regardless, be confident that
the whole broccoli stalk is pro-
viding solid nutrition. When the


Nutrition No


WEATHER SUMMARY
High temperatures throughout Florida ranged from the upper
80s to mid-90s. Low temperatures were in the mid to upper 60s for
the majority of locations. Rain was scattered in various pockets,
with most areas receiving over an inch. Considerable precipitation
came to nearly the entire southern and central Peninsula. Rain
amounts totaled about 1 to 2 inches for most Panhandle cities.
Osceola, St. Lucie, and Highlands counties received 5.26, 3.64, and
3.59 inches, respectively. /

FIELD CROPS
Peanut pegging was 44 percent complete compared to 24 per-
cent last year and the condition was rated 1 percent poor, 67 per-'
cent fair, 25 percent good, and 7 percent excellent. Soil moisture
levels were short in the Panhandle and central Peninsula, but ade-
quate in the southern Peninsula and Big Bend area. Many counties
experienced improvements in field crops due to recent rains. Crops
remain stressed in those areas that did not receive sufficient rain-
fall. Washington County reported that early planted crops were
developing well. All peanut and cotton crops were emerged and
soil moisture was good enough to piaaptice adequate weed control
in Washington County. Irrigated cor&nin Jefferson County was
described as good, with ears developin'Pecans and cotton were in
fair to good condition in Jefferson County. Crops in Brevard
County were aided by rain, but needed more to get Back to normal.

Mosure Topsoil Subsoil
Rating Th s Last Last This Last Last
week week year week week Year
Percent
Very short 15 25 43 26 40 47
Short 15 28 30 30 15 33
Adequate 65 43 26 43 44 19
Surplus 5 4 1 1 1 1
VEGETABLES
The summer harvest of many vegetables has ended, especially
in the central and southern regions. Washington County was in
mid-harvest for watermelon. Some seedless varieties showed signs
of hollow heart. Okra, tomatoes, watermelon, and avocadoes
moved through the market for the week ending June 29, 2008.

LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
The pasture condition improved in most of the State; however,
much more rain will be needed for normal forage growth. In the
Panhandle and northern areas, pasture condition was very poor to
excellent with most in fair condition. Recent rainfall has helped
pastures. Grass was recovering from drought conditions, but was
very short and recovery will take time due to overgrazed condi-
tions. Drought has reduced hay production. Most cattle in the north
were in fair to good condition. Pasture in the central areas was poor
to excellent and the condition of cattle was poor to good. In the
southwestern areas, pasture condition ranged from very poor to
excellent condition with most fair to good. The cattle condition
ranged from poor to excellent. Statewide, cattle condition varied
from poor to good.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week Week week
Percent
Very poor 0 20 5 20
Poor 20 9 20 20
Fair 45 30 40 30
Good 35 40 33 30
Excellent 0 1 2 0
CITRUS
Typical summer patterns have set in with warm mornings and
plenty, of sunshine followed by afternoon soaking rains and
evening thunderstorms. Areas all across the citrus belt received
ample amounts of rainfall. Ft. Pierce and Sebring had the most at
over three and a half inches. On several days highs were in the
lower 90s. All areas had at least one day reaching 93 degrees. The
tropical weather continues to be an asset to fruit growth and tree
foliage. Oranges were as large as golf ball size, while grapefruit-
were about two to three times as large. Trees in well kept groves
were in good condition for next season's crop. Production practices
were on schedule in all areas and included herbiciding, spraying,
mowing, and brush removal. Some growers were combining efforts
and used aerial applications for Psyllid control. Valencia harvest
continued to be active in southern areas where the majority of'
remaining fruit was located. A few processing plants plan to ruh!
Valencia oranges into the second week of July. Grapefruit utiliza-I
tion was nearly over with small amounts of red varieties continu-!
ing to be processed. Honey tangerine harvest was completed for the
season.


Estimated Boxes Harvested Week Ended
Crop Jun 15 Jun 22 Jun 29
In thousands of 1-3/5 bushel boxes
Navel oranges 1 1 1
Valencia oranges 4,419 3,551 3,106
Grapefruit 35 26 15
Honey tangerines 0 0 4
: _.: _ I , i ,


0j


tes

stalks are peeled and sliced
thinly on the diagonal, they.,
make a great, less expensive:
alternative to bamboo shoots in:
a stir-fry. Their crunchy texture.
also makes them a welcome:
substitute in many recipes that
call for celery.
Q: What should I look for
when purchasing papaya?
A: Great choice! Papayas,:
which are extremely high in
vitamin C, also provide lots ofl
beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxan-
thin (another carotenoid),:
folate, magnesium and potassi-
um. These sweet fruits can dif-
fer widely in size, shape, and
color the flesh inside may be
yellow, pinkish-orange or red.
Because of these color differ-
ences, it's difficult to judge
ripeness by color. Instead, look:
for a papaya that gives slightly;
to palm pressure without being:
too soft. If needed, ripen the
fruit at room temperature. Store
ripe papaya in the refrigerator
for up to a week.
The cluster of small black
seeds in the center cavity is edi-
ble, though most people discard
them. Serve chunks of papaya
in a fruit plate, added to a green
salad or as a topping for chick-
en or fish. It's also great
chopped with some cilantro and
sweet red pepper for a flavorful
fruit salsa.






July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7A


SPECIAL CABINETS


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Forestwood Designs LLC will join five other industries at the Hardee County Commerce Park off SR 62. The new 12,000-square-foot warehouse expects to start cabinetry and
solid surface production by late fall. A brainchild of builders EMBR Inc. leaders, Emerson Jones, Robert Jones and Tim Wells, the business will include a 2,000-square-foot show-
room for display of cabinets, floor coverings and countertops. County commissioners Dale Johnson, Minor Bryant and Gordon Norris, along with County Manager Lex Albritton
joined in the recent groundbreaking. In photo above (from left) are Economic Development assistant Betty Croy and EDA board members Tomas Macias and Lory Durrance,
owner Robert Jones, EDA member Rick Justice, commissioners Bryant, Norris and Johnson, owners Emerson Jones and Wells, Chamber of Commerce Director Casey Dickson,
Albritton, Commerce Park manager Bill Lambert and EMBR associate Brent Driskell.




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P ge^s r ^Ror- Your advertising deadline is each

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Issue Of The Herald-Advocate We Ades(ireonyp m4
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WO-RLD FAMOUS QUALITY-BUILT


(Continuing: All areas within the Southwest Florida Water Management District)
(New: Areas in eastern Marion County in the St. Johns River Water Management District)
A.T RD A KI CKM D Expiration date: September 30, 2008


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The Southwest Florida Water Management District regularly monitors groundwater levels, river
flows and other drought indicators in accordance with its Water Shortage Plan (Chapter 40D-21,
Florida Administrative Code). These drought indicators are still abnormally low in the sixteen
counties served by the District.
What does this mean to me?
* Lawn and landscape watering in the
Southwest Florida Water Management "
District remains limited to a once-per- ___ | 'o
week schedule. ,
Eastern Polk, Highlands and Charlotte \ )
counties have similar countywide ordinances ____'
in effect outside of the Southwest Florida Sui rn
Water Management District. HER N 0O
Lawn and landscape watering in eastern
Marion County within the St. Johns River Aco
Water Management District is now limited I
to a once-per-week schedule under Water oHILLSBOPOUGH
Shortage Order No. SWF 07-02. The ,o ,
Order is in effect as a result of interagency
agreement between Marion County, the
St. Johns River Water Management District ,
and the Southwest Florida Water FA'NAIFE .HAR EE
Management District. L, D .
If your city or county already has a special ,
once-per-week schedule in effect, continue SARASOTA ESOTO -
following it; otherwise refer to the schedule shown
below. CHRL TTE AfectedAea;
= District Boundary
* Unless your city or county has stricter hours in effect, --=triBounda
you may only water before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. on the allowable day.
* These restrictions apply to the use of water from public and private water utilities,
wells and surface water sources (ponds, rivers, etc.).
* Vehicles may only be washed one time per week.
* Restrictions for other types of water use also apply.

Addresses with "house numbers"... May only water on...
ending in 0 or 1 Monday
ending in 2 or 3 Tuesday,
ending in 4 or 5 Wednesday
ending in 6 or 7 Thursday
ending in 8 or 9* Friday
and locations without a discernible address, such as medians and common areas


This notice is only a summary of the Fourth Modification to Water Shortage
Order SWF 07-02. For more information, please visit the District's web site or call
1-800-848-0499, or 1-800-423-1476, ext. 4498, during normal business hours.


Southwest Florida
Water Management District
WATTEMAR'ES.OORG 1-800-423-1476


This information will be made available in accessible formats upon request. Please contact the Communications Department
at (352) 796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4757; TDD only at 1-800-231-6103 (FL only).
7:30


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8A The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008


All-Star Baseball Boys Still Going


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The 2008 baseball All-Stars
continue to represent Hardee
County in various ways..
Among the six Hardee teams,
one is definitely going to state
competition. Others have lost or
no report is available.
Minors
The 10-and-under (Minors)
All-Stars have played two tour-
naments. First, the team went to
Sebring June 7 for the annual
warm-up classic, competing
against Sebring, Okeechobee,
East Lakeland, Lake Placid and
Sebring and placing second
overall.
That done, the District 7 tour-
nament at Wahneta was next on
tap, beginning July 21. Hardee
had to battle mightily, even
playing until 1 a.m. one night
until Fort Meade won 8-7.
Hardee, however, came back
the next day to win over Fort


Meade and Wahneta. Other
teams in the district are Mul-
berry, Bartow and Frostproof.
Hardee won the district
championship. Highlights of
the games included three over-
the-fence homers by Tanor
Durden and one by Kyle
Hewett, reports assistant coach
Gerry Lindsey.
The state tournament begins
at East Lakeland on July 5.
Okeechobee American faces
Panama City Beach in game 1
at 11 a.m., Spring Hill Ameri-
can goes against MVP Poin-
ciana at noon. Chipley plays
South Lake at 1 p.m., Wewa-
hitcha vs. West Seminole at 2
p.m., Hardee vs. Calhoun
County at 3 p.m. and Sebring
vs. East Lakeland at 4 p.m. -
Games after that are deter-
mined by wins and losses.
Hardee players are Durden,
Hewett, Marcus Battles, Seth
McGee, Cesar Fimbres, Aaron
Harrison, Hunter Bryant, Hay-


den Lindsey, Blake Crawley
Austin Altman, Ruben Olmas
and Omar Alamia. They are
coached by Kenny Hewett,
Justin Battles and Gerry
Lindsey.
Majors
Still in action on Tuesday was
the 12-and-under Dixie Youth
(Majors) coached by Frank
Johnson, Chris Spencer and
Todd Bolin and playing at
Frostproof.
Hardee won its opening game
against East Lakeland 12-2.
Kris Johnson, Luke Palmer and
Mason Gough shared pitching
duties. East Lakeland scored
once in the fourth on a solo
homer and again in the fifth on
a pair of errors.
Hardee, the visiting team, had
control from the get-go. Kramer
Royal led off with a double to
left field, Johnson single to left
center scored Royal. Palmer
singled and Garrett Albritton hit
a sacrifice fly. When Jacob
Bolin beat out an infield hit, it
put the third run on the board.
Wyatt Maddox's second-


inning double went for naught.
The top of the order contin-
ued to score in the third inning.
Royal, Johnson, Palmer and
Albritton hit back-to-back sin-
gles. A Bolin hit again brought a
runner home. Hardee led 7-0.
Gough walked and scored in the
fourth inning on an Armando
Alamia hit and Royal sacrifice.
Still up 7-1 in the top of the
fifth, Hardee plated four more
runs. Albritton, Cody Spencer,
.Bolin and Hewett came across
home plate. East Lakeland got
its final run before bowing out
on the 10-run mercy run.
Sunday's game was a 10-0
shutout of Bartow, with John-
son and Palmer combining for
six strikeouts and keeping Bar-
tow at bay.
Royal scored in the first
inning on a walk and errors.
Albritton was safe on a fielder's
choice, which plated Royal.
Hardee exploded in the third
inning, with Maddox, Luke
Winter, Marco DeLeon, Royal,
Johnson, Spencer and Bolin all
circling the bases. Palmer
added a run in the fourth and


DeLeon another in the fifth,
giving Hardee the win when
Palmer retired the side in order
in the home half of the fifth.
Monday's game was sup-
posed to be at 8:30 against
Wahneta, but was changed to 1
p.m. on Tuesday. If successful,
Hardee would play the winner
of the loser's bracket Frost-
proof/Bartow game. The cham-
pionship game should be on
Thursday evening.
Teeball
Hardee's 5- and 6-year-olds
did their best in games at
Bartow. They lost to Bartow,
won over Fort Meade and lost
to East Lakeland. Coached by
Wes Redding, Matt Tinsley,
Will Cartwright and Jason
Clark, the team includes, Gage
Gough, Kyle Gilliard, William
Redding, Jared Rickett, Taleia
Moreno, Christian Brant, Wes-
ton Schraeder, Blake Tinsley,
Griffin Clark, Quinton Lindsey,
Trenton Roberson and Logan
Cartwright.
Other Teams
Information has not been
available on three other Hardee
teams.
The 7-year-olds, a combina-


tion of Teeball and Machine
Pitch players, also played at
Bartow. The roster included'
Matthew Tyson, Tony Webb,
Bryce Hernandez, Tyson
Sutton, Lizandro "Bo"
Villarreal, Adrian DeLeon,
Zachary Deuberry, Drew
McGuckin, Cody Helms,
Miguel Ruiz and Andy Garza.
They are coached by Andrew
McGuckin, Brent Stephens and
Doug Sutton.
The Dixie Boys (ages 13-15)
played at Fort Meade. Coached
by Brian Knight, Van Crawford,
Keith Farr and Dane Terrell, the
team includes Justin Knight,
Dawson Crawford, Wintz Terr-
ell, Vince Grimsley, Carter
Lambert, Dylan Farr, Murrell
Winter, Jacob Altman, Daniel
Miller, Steve Hodges, Tanner
Gough and Jeremy Rowe.
The final team is the 8-year-
olds, playing also at Fort
Meade. The squad includes
Matthew Laker, Mason Block,
Jax Ullrich, Josh Carlton,
Tanner Carlton, Chase Benton,
Lance Bursler, Zack Macias,
Pablo Salgado, Zack Richard-
son, Kyle Choate and Keith
Choate. They are coached by
Jeff Block, Brian Laker, Matt
Carlton and Jake Carlton.


COURTESY PHOTO
The 10-and-under Hardee team won and all and hope to carry their district championship into a successful run in
the state competition this weekend in Lakeland.


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PAGE ONE


Mining Decision Delayed Again


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A possible decision about
Mosaic mining will wait until at
least Aug. 7.
When the Hardee County
Planning & Zoning Board could
not muster a quorum at Monday
evening's hearing, it threw
another stumbling block in the
way of Mosaic's Fort Meade
Mine Extension plans.
P&Z members Vida Tomlin-
son, Don Chancey, Mike
Thompson and Charles Parker
were present, but it takes five
members of the board to reach a
quorum and legally make any
decision. Vacation schedules
claimed Carl Saunders, James
Barncord, Max Ullrich and
Roger Conley, the usually faith-
ful chairman. Oscar Ortiz has
not attended recent meetings.
All five Hardee County Com-
missioners were present, but
they were unable to act without
a recommendation from P&Z.
They did decide to review two
issues, dam safety and econom-
ic mitigation. The latter is to
form an agreement with the
phosphate company on ways to
make up for the economic
impacts of mining, particularly
clay settling ponds.
There will be two public
hearings on the economic miti-
gation agreement. The first will
be Aug. 7 at 6 p.m. when P&Z
members expect a full board
and can make a recommenda-


tion on the mining plan, and
also hold the first public hear-
ing on the agreement.
A second public hearing will
be held before the commission
on Aug. 21 at 6 p.m.
DAM SAFETY
Dr. John Garlanger reiterated
earlier testimony on clay set-
tling dams or berms. Despite
objection, it was determined
that no new testimony was giv-
en. A former assistant professor
at MIT, Garlanger has been 42
years experience in earthen dam
construction and design.
Garlanger reviewed his June
5 testimony, explaining the dif-
ference between large-volume
hydroelectric reservoir dams
and low-volume clay setting
dams, where there is no risk of
water topping the embank-
ments, even after a 30-inch rain.
Clay settling ponds are de-
signed to receive clay slurry,
from which the water gradually
drains or can be diverted to
other mine cuts. The slurry
forms a liner,-preventing seep-
age, and dikes are built as an
extraordinary protection, a con-
tingency plan.
The pipes and dams are in-
spected three times daily by
mining staff, weekly by an
engineer and at least twice a
year by a specialized consultant
engineer such as Garlanger. In
addition, each annual report
must include plans for what will


occur in dams and clay settling
areas in the next year.
ECONOMIC MITIGATION
Hardee County Economic Di-
rector Bill Lambert was asked
to represent the county in dis-
cussions on the economic
effects of phosphate mining
processes, considering both the
property rights of Mosaic, and
those of the community, the
county as a whole.
Lambert has been meeting
with Mosaic staff to reach
accord on what would be the
best way to provide economi-
cally for future generations,
when mining is over, those jobs
are no longer available, sever-
ance tax revenue is gone and
Hardee continues its mainly
agrarian base.
It is estimated mining will
reach its sunset in 25 to 30
years. Clay settling areas are
only good for pasturage, not for
crops or other agricultural uses.
Of particular concern is the
mining in setback areas. Recla-
mation restores other mined
areas acre for acre to its original
use, uplands, lakes, etc.
It will take a few weeks to
"dot the i's and cross the t's in
an economic agreement. Nick
Staszko, planning director, said
he would have copies available
for the commission and on the
internet for the public well
before the Aug. 7 first public
hearing.


a h ealg Advg S
Haree outy' Hoetwn oveag

ARNTR ePULSHR
11 .7hAe aucu FV 383


Impact Fees: Schools


More Kids=More Rooms


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
This is the second of a series
of articles on impact fees and
their effect on the community.
The fourth delay in imple-
menting impact fees could haz-
ard the future of education in
Hardee County. Implementa-
tion of impact fees has been ex-
tended until at least January
2009.
About half of the impact fees
are earmarked for schools. Last
year, the Hardee County Com-
mission approved school im-
pact fees at 50 percent of the re-
commended levels, starting
with $2,494 for a single-family
residence and lesser amounts
for a mobile home, and for each
unit of a multi-family resi-
dence.
School impact fees are not
assessed on retail, commercial
or industrial construction,
which will not add students to
the county's eight current
schools nor create a demand for
more schools.
Impact fees are planned to
accommodate the influx of pop-
ulation. State mandates require
concurrency, meaning the'
cities, county and schools must
work together on setting impact
fees, each one having a school
facilities growth management
element in its Comprehensive
Land Use Plan, and each agree-
ing to the others' plans.
The state makes the county
responsible to set school impact
fees in cooperation with 'the
Hardee County School Board.
If the county does not set and
implement fees, exercising con-
currency, the school district will
lose eligibility for a variety of


state school funding.
School impact fees can pay
for new buses to transport the
additional students, not replace-
ment vehicles or maintenance.
It also includes construction of
a new school or wing solely due
to additional students in new
housing, not maintenance or
upgrades to facilities. The fees
do not include equipping or
staffing schools.
Complicating the matter are
the school-size amendments
approved by voters, which caps
the students in each class and
can determine the total number
of classrooms/schools needed.
It also requires additional
staffing to meet the additional
classroom needs.
It took $42 million to con-
struct the new Hilltop Elemen-
tary/Hardee Junior High cam-
pus. It takes years of planning
for a new school, equipping and
staffing it.
"The bottom line is someone
has to pay for growth. It's either
ad valorem (property) taxes on
current homeowners or impact
fees on new homeowners.
There are no alternatives," ex-
plained Commissioner Dale
Johnson, when the school
impact fees were approved.
There are a dozen major sub-
divisions planned and approved
by the county, with build-out
anywhere from 10 to 25 years
away. Together, they would add
a minimum of 3,000 and, more
likely, 5,000 students who will
need additional space and staff.
There are two huge commu-
nities planned, rural 'villages
which will bring probably
enough students to need a sepa-
rate school. The southernmost


Sweetwater Estates, in spite of
the auction of 4,500 of the esti-
mated 8,000 acres it would fill,
has planned to construct and
donate an elementary and junior
high school.
In the north end of the coun-
ty, west of Bowling Green,
Shadowlawn plans for about
1,820 residences, adding anoth-
er couple thousand students.
West of Wauchula there will
be a rural center of nearly 2,000
acres of development, including
Vandolah Estates, the Florida
Institute for Neurologic Devel-
opment, Davis Properties and
even down to Little Cypress
and Cypress Pointe, affecting
Zolfo Springs; Wauchula and
North Wauchula elementaries
as well as the upper level
schools.
East of Wauchula, there are
the newly approved Lemon
Grove Estates of 663 homes
and Old Town Creek, together
providing over 1,000 students.
Finally, the Torrey Groves
community, Ridge Estates,
Elihoreph's Ten-Fold Talents
and Saddlewood will add near-
ly another 1,000 students.
Scattered around the county,
and within the limits of Wau-
chula, are about two dozen
more minor subdivisions, vary-
ing from the 135 residences at
Chapman Estates to those of
just three to a dozen homes,
each adding more and more stu-
dents.
Will there be enough money
accumulated to provide for
these students?
Next week: impact fees and
roads.


Cracking your knuckles doesn't lead to arthritis or enlarged joints. The cracking noise
is caused by a lubricating liquid synovial fluid being quickly forced from one side of
the joint to the other.












Saturday, July 12


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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, July 3, 2008


I






2B The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008





-Hardee


Rocky Salas & Christina Petersen
Christina Petersen To

Marry Rocky Salas
Charles and Mary Jo Peter- Board as a first-grade teacher at
sen, formerly of Wauchula, Crystal Lake Elementary
announce the engagement of School.
their daughter, Christina Peter- The prospective groom is a
sen of Lakeland, to Rocky Salas 2001 graduate of Hardee
of Lakeland, the son of Eliseo Senior High School. He is cur-
Jr. and Olivia Salas of Zolfo rently self-employed with Salas
Springs. Mobile Detailing.
The bride-elect is a 2008 The couple are planning a
graduate of the University of March 14, 2009, wedding at St.
South Florida. She is employed Joseph's Church in Lakeland.
by the Polk County School


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

BLESSED ARE THE PURE
Morality is simply behaving yourself. On the other hand, puri-
ty is a fountain which produces all sorts of actions people call
"moral" and all with little effort.
The battle is a secret one in the heart, and when it is won, the
streams of purity flow freely.
C.S. Lewis said, "Christianity seems at first to be all about
morality: duty, rules, guilt and virtue. Yet it leads you on, out of all
that into something beyond. What is it? I think it is righteousness.
"Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness for they
shall be filled.'"
Purity is something that is hard to deal with because it is sopri-
vate and personal. We can see the outward results of impurity in
immorality, lying, compromise, sex crimes, etc. But purity is an
inward thing.
If you are assaulted by an evil, impure thought, there is a good
chance no one else will know about it. But what you do about that
thought is tremendously important.
"Draw near to God and He will draw near to you. Cleanse your
hands, ye sinner, and purify your hearts, ye double minded" (James
4:8).
The secret of personal purity is not trying harder in the flesh to
please God but too "draw near" to Him, to seek God Himself as the
only solution. When we do this, He "draws near" to us.
Few people act so drastically because most people have a
strong desire for independence. A total commitment to God would
mean the seeker would lose the one thing he thinks he must hold
on to: his own freedom to live as he pleases.
He doesn't even mind the idea of living a godly life, in fact he
might highly approve of such a life as long as he can manage
the enterprise himself!

Benefit Yard Sale/Bake Sale-
i -for


Malachi John
Roberson
I E[dgTlsd with Down Syndrome &
Ilir-chsprung's Disease)
Saturday, July 5
8 am until ???


Northside Baptist Church
N. Sth .Acue Wauchula
C-l_'thes, dre-.ser, dining room set w!/hutch,
tuck topper, and misc. -
Come join us for fellowship & food!
Co.i. "onu


Dallas Grice
Celebrates His
3rd Birthday
Dallas Laydyn Grice, known
as Bubbie, turned 3 years old on
June 8.
Bubbie is the son of Pete and
Tonya Grice of Bowling Green.
He celebrated his birthday
with a party on Saturday, June
7. Theme for the occasion was
Power Rangers.
Guests were served pizza, ice
cream and a red Power Rangers
cake.
Joining in the celebration
were grandparents Delbert and
Dot Moye, Dale and Janet
Beckham, Vernon and Zella
Warren and Betty Beckham;
uncle and aunt Buster and
Angie Tomlinson of Fort
Pierce; and many family mem-,
bers and friends.


Living-


LeBrights Celebrate 50th Anniversary


William and Thelma
LeBright of Zolfo Springs cele-
brated their 50th wedding
anniversary on May 3, 2008.
William Robert LeBright, son


The LeBrights on their wedding day.


Marilyn Morris
Earns Degree
In Education
Marilyn Browdy Morris of
Wauchula has earned a bache-
lor's degree in elementary edu-
cation from Rochville/Phoenix
University.
Morris graduated with hon-
ors, achieving a 3.19 grade-
point average. She is currently
pursuing a master's degree.
Morris is a 1984 graduate of
Hardee Senior High School.
She is the daughter of Ethel
and the late Sidney Browdy of
Wauchula. She has two sons
with her late husband, Major C.
Morris. They are Major L.
Morris, 16, and Tirease, 9.








Victory Praise Center is
holding a gospel sing on Satur-
day at 7 p.m. with Spirit Wind
providing the special music.
Everyone is invited to join
the time of music and fellow-
ship at the church at 132 E.
Main St., Bowling Green.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.

Doubly rich is the man still
boyish enough to play,
laugh and sing as he car-
ries and emanates sun-
shine along a -friendly
road.
-Charles R. Wiers


AMILY MACVII K1


FUN
EXCITEME
ra line ,ENTERTAl,

the mr

Chants"

friday, July 119, p.m.

Bowling Green

First United Methodist Church
Fellowship Hall
4910 N. Church Ave.
Kids and Parents are invited to join us for family
fellowship, a great movie, and free popcorn and drinks!
"Admission is free.


of Howard and Harriet
LeBright, married Thelma
Margot Amerbach, daughter of
William and Thelma Amerbach,
on May 3, 1958, at Trinity


COURTESY PHOTOS


The LeBrights at their 50th anniversary celebration.


Lutheran Church in Maspeth,
N.Y. The best .man was the
groom's- brother, Joseph
LeBright. The maid of honor
was Margaret LeClairefuture
sister-in-law of the bride.
The anniversary celebrations
began with a special cake
reception at Resurrection
Lutheran Church in Avon Park.
The celebrations continued at
the Old Key West Resort in
Disney World, where 24 people
spent four days.
The LeBrights' children and
their spouses are: Cheryl-Ann
Grove (John) of Zolfo Springs;
Elizabeth Miranda (Danny) of
Davie; Allison Oost (Anthony)
of LaGrange, Ky.; and William
J. LeBright (Rebecca) of
Barrington, N.H.
Grandchildren are: Jennifer
Hajos, Michael Grove, James
Boost, Samantha Rodemick and
Stephen Oost. Great grand-
daughter is Katielynn Hajos.
All joined the celebrations,
which were also attended by
David and Margaret Amerbach,
Paul and Marie Lauridsen and
the Rev. John and Maureen
Grodzinski.
The LeBrights and their chil-
dren enjoyed breakfast at
'Ohana along with Lilo and
Stitch at the Polynesian Hotel.
Everyone enjoyed Disney
World, and the highlight of the
trip was a Magical Gatherings
Fireworks Cruise on the Seven
Seas Lagoon with everyone
wearing matching T-shirts read-
ing "Bill and Thelma
LeBright's 50th Anniversary,"
which prompted everyone they
met to offer congratulations!


Family members all wore matching T-shirts.


Seven year old with cancer needs your help.
Caroline Coronado, a seven year old Bowling Green first grader, is the daughter of
Edward and Olivia Coronado. Edward is a sergeant with the
Bowling Green Police Department. On March 26, 2008
Caroline was diagnosed with State 2 Large B-Cell Lymph-
oma. Since that time she and her parents have made regular
trips to St. Joseph's Children's Hospital in Tampa. Caroline
has had several blood transfusions and is also undergoing
chemotherapy, which she will be receiving for many
months to come.
"I am going to get better because God is going to make me
better. I am strong because God has made me strong."
These are the words of a child with great faith. She is taking that
mustard seed faith and moving this mountain in her life.
Pastor Bob Bates and the Apostolic Lighthouse Church Family along with Gloria, of
Gloria's Restaurant in Bowling Green, will be sponsoring a fundraiser by selling
BBQ Dinners on Saturday, Aug. 2,2008 outside of Gloria's Restaurant beginning at
11 a.m. All proceeds go to help with the family's expenses. For more information or
to purchase tickets please contact: Pastor Bates (863) 773-1017 or Deborah Sosa (863)
448-7313. We thank you in advance for your support. s7:3


-saw

.We Will Be Closed

Friday, July 4

and

Saturday, July 5




Hardee Ranch Supply
S1203 Hwy. 17 S. "S
Wauchula

773-4322 '
soc6:26, 7:
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July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3B


PRINCESS PARTY


COURTESY PHOTO
Doyle Bryan, sheriff of Hardee County for 12 years, cele-
brated his 80th birthday with a huge cake and tall tales.

Doyle Bryan Feted On

His 80th Birthday


COURTESY PHOTO
Two dozen young ladies were treated to a Princess Tea Party at the Hardee County Public Library this spring.
Highlight of the event was meeting some real royalty, Miss Hardee County Natalie Green and Junior Miss Meghan.
Graham. The two queens held court, reading to the excited little ones and sharing refreshments with them. Dee
Shackelford, program organizer for the library, gave each pint-sized princess a tiara and a royal coloring book to
commemorate the occasion.


Retired Hardee County sher-
iff Doyle Bryan celebrated his
80th birthday on Saturday, June
7, at the Rawls Barn next to the
home of daughter Shuree and
husband Gregg Rawls in the
Center Hill community.
Bryan's wife Jean, son Derrel
and wife Marci of Lake Placid,
and daughters Denice Driskell
of Bowling Green and Karen
and husband Ricky Grice of
Zebulon, Ga., joined his grand-
children, great-grandchildren,
sister Ella Mae Carlton of Zolfo
Springs, nieces, nephews, and
over 100 friends and relatives
for an afternoon of food, fun
and celebration.
Friends began arriving at "the
barn" around 5 p.m. to visit
with Bryan and his family.
Barbecued chicken and ribs
with all the "fixin's" were
served at 6.
While everyone was enjoying
the meal, the fun began with
opportunities for reminiscing,
storytelling and even some "tall
tales" about Bryan and his rela-
tioiship' with family, friends.
and especially thbse \ ho seed
with him during his 12-year
tenure as Hardee County's sher-
iff.-
Bryan warmly greeted the
crowd and expressed his deep
appreciation to everyone for


taking time to celebrate this
special day with him. He even
jokingly had to "set the record
straight" a few times in re-
sponse to his buddies' recollec-
tions of events.
Following storytelling time,
everyone sang "Happy Birth-
day" and enjoyed a piece of a
..huge birthday cake. Finally, a
video of pictures and music
portrayed Bryan's life with
family and friends.
Bryan is the youngest son of
F.L. and Ella Bryan of Bowling
Green.
He married Kathryn Thomas
on June 12, 1949. He was wid-
owed in April 1999 after nearly
50 years of marriage.
Doyle and Kathryn Bryan
had four children: Derrel,
Shuree, Denice and Karen.
There are 10 grandchildren -
Derren, Darci, Shelly, Kacey,
Kara, Amanda, Kyle, Tyler,
Stephanie and Justin and 11
great-grandchildren.
Bryan married Jean Yates in
January 2001. They currently
live in Bowling Green.

The feeling of friendship is
like that of being comfortably
filled with roast beef; love,
like being enlivened with
champagne.
-Samuel Johnson


Rooster's 352322
Corner of Schoolhouse Road & m
S.R. 66 -Zolfo Springs




Closed July 5 & 6 Reopening July 7 s
Mon/Tues/Wed 8am-2pm; Thurs & Fri 8am-9pm 8


1 A Memorial Service
for
Dr. Charles Robert
AL "Bob" Blackmon
will be held
S, aturday, July 5 .,
4 p.m.
New Zion Baptist Church
State Road 64 West
Ona, Florida
Relatives and friends are invited to join the family
in celebrating Bob's life.


Christian Prentice and
Rebecca Rodriguez, a seven
pound three and a half ounce
son, Nathaniel Matthew Pren-
tice, born March 28, 2008, at
DeSoto Memorial Hospital,
Arcadia. Maternal grandparents
are Ray and Betty Rodriguez of
Wauchula. Maternal great-
grandparents are the late Robert
Young' a'i Irene Young of
Wauchula, and the late Carmen
Rodriguez of Miami. Paternal
grandmother is the late Jennifer
Shaw Chortkoff of Tampa.
Paternal great-grandparents are
the late John and Helene Shaw
of Simsbury, Conn.


Mr. and Mrs. Michael Boley,
Crestview, a seven pound four
ounce son, Michael Brooks
Boley II, born April 11, 2008,
Eglin Air Force Base. Mrs.
Boley is the former Sarah
Olliff. Maternal grandparents
are Walter Jr. and Sonya Olliff
of Wauchula. Paternal grand-
parents are Charles and Leora
Boley of Richwood, W.V.

Live simply that others
might simply live.


Mr. and Mrs. John A.
Roberson, Bowling Green, a
seven pound, eight ounce son,
Malachi John Roberson, born
June 10, 2008, Florida Hospital
Heartland, Sebring. Mrs. Rob-
erson is the former Stephanie
Barnett. Maternal grandparents
are Walter and Stacy Reed of
Wauchula. Maternal great-
grandmother is Christine Reed
of Arcadia. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Wallace and Gloria
Roberson of Wauchula. Pater-
nal great-grandmothers are
Beulah Conerly and Reba
Roberson, both of Wauchula.


Dustin Rimes and Bridget
Zuck, a six pound six ounce
son, Tanner Lee William Zuck,
born June 17, 2008, Florida
Hospital, Sebring., Maternal
grandparents are Donna Clark
of Wauchula and Stanley Zuck
of Malden, Mo. Maternal great-
grandparents are Geneva
Tanner and Virgil Tanner, of
Malden Mo. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Jerry and Louanne
Rimes of Wauchula. Paternal
great-grandparents are Howard
and Lucy Rimes of Wauchula.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.


Have you seen me?

Please call my


Lost off Highway 62

773-5052





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4B The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008

Oak Grove Baptist Church Held Vacation Bible School In June


PHOTOS BY NANCY DAVIS
The vacation bible school was held June 8-13 and averaged 48 children and 48 work-
ers a day. There were 862 pounds of coins collected 436 by the boys and 426 by the
girls. The children raised $1,596.36 In pennies for the Florida Baptist Children's Home,
raising the seven-year total to $12,232.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The thunderstorms have not
been as helpful as one might
think.
Rainfall deficits continue to
plague the 16 counties in the
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District, which include
Hardee County.
As a result, the agency voted
to extend watering restrictions
which began Jan. 16, 2007
through Sept. 30.
That means people with pri-
vate wells, on municipal water
supplies or however they get
their water, are limited to water-
ing one day a week: Mondays
for those with addresses ending
in 0 or 1; Tuesdays for those'
ending in 2 or 3; Wednesdays
for 4 or 5; Thursdays for 6 or 7;
and Fridays for 8 or 9 or no
address.
Although the district has
averaged about five inches of
rain in June, that is only 67 per-
cent of normal. In fact, for the
last 24-month period, the rain-
fall deficit is 17.2 inches.
At the end of last week, the
aquifer levels for the south
SWFWMD region, which in-
cludes Charlotte, DeSoto, High-
lands, Manatee, Sarasota and
Hardee counties, had dropped
from 88 tenths of a foot to 77
tenths of a foot. Rainfall levels
for June, through June 25, were
still over two inches below the
historic normal. For the year to
date, it is 1.19 inches short.
Annual yearly rainfall for the
South region has varied consid-
.erably in the last eight years.
The historic annual of 52.50
inches was exceeded in 2002
through 2005, partially due to
hurricane activity. But for 2006,


soc7:3c


it was on!y 42.28 and for 2007
even worse at 38.53.
The district urges people to
conserve water by: not watering
in any week there is rain; in-
stalling low-flow spray valves;
and using low-volume faucets
and toilets.
The Florida Legislature re-
cently approved $15 million for
SWFWMT for 2008-09 for
water supply development and
environmental restoration,
water resource protection and
sustainability and finding ways
to help meet the minimum flow
requirements of the upper Peace
River.
Earlier this year, in the dis-
trict, there were two projects to
help citrus groves reduce
groundwater pumping. One
installs soil moisture sensors
and a weather station at the
444-acre Groves of Peace River
Inc. and the other puts four soil
moisture sensors and two
weather stations at the 1,170-
acre Las Lomas Holdings Inc.
groves.
On the individual or business
side, residents are urged to
retrofit old light fixtures with
new energy-efficient models
and replace refrigerators with
energy-compliant ones.
In addition to limiting irriga-


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L R-VOWTION


tion to one day a week, other
restrictions apply. Properties
under two acres in size may
only water before 8 a.m. or after
6 p.m. Those larger than two
acres may water before 10 a.m.
or after 4 p.m.
Handwatering or microirriga-


tion of non-lawn landscape
plants is allowed and there are
certain exemptions for newly
planted materials. Fountains
and other aesthetic-only fea-
tures may only operate eight
hours per day. Car washing is
limited to once per week.
For more information, turn to
www.WaterMatters.org or call
1-800-848-0499 or 1-800-423-
1476 during normal business
hours.


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July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5B


To Your Health!
By Erin E. Hess
jHardee County Health Department


JULY IS ... DOG-BITE MONTH?
Annually more than 4.7 million Americans, about half of them
children, suffer from dog-bite injuries. Many of these injuries are
from dogs they know and interact with regularly.
"Public education plays an important role in reducing the risk
of dog bites, particularly with children," said Dr. Carina
Blackmore, state public health veterinarian. "Responsible dog
ownership and dog safety education for children are proven ways
to prevent dog bites."
Every year, more than 500 Florida residents are bitten severe-
ly enough to require hospitalization, and two Floridians die due to
injuries sustained from dog bites. Injury rates in Florida are high-
est among children between the ages of I and 9, with boys being
bitten more often than girls. In addition, a higher proportion of chil-
dren under 10 years of age sustain bites to the head and neck com-
pared to other age groups.
However, dog bites can also result in serious injuries for
teenagers and adults. In 2006, three Florida residents 25 or older
died as a result of dog attacks.
Studies show that unneutered male dogs are associated with
70-76 percent of reported dog bites, emphasizing the importance of
neutering pets. The number of dog-bite injuries increases during
the months of April through September, with the peak occurring in
July.




How To 'Fix' Jail


By MICHAEL KELLY
For The Herald-Advocate
A newly formed committee to
"Study the Hardee County Jail
situation" will look at several
different options to alleviate
overcrowding caused by hous-
ing federal inmates and the
increasing number of county
inmates.
At the first meeting Monday,
County Commissioner Bobby
Ray Smith was named chair-
man of the group and Sheriff's
Col. Arnold Lanier will be vice-
chair.
Other members of the group
include former Sheriff Doyle
Bryan, banker Rick Justice, cur-
rent jail supervisor Capt.
Andrew Rigney, County Judge
Jeff McKibben and county
Director of Facilities Danny
Weeks.
One of the options discussed
is a 124-bed addition to the cur-
rent 191-bed jail built in 1992.
The nearly $5 million addi-
tion would be a stand-alone unit
built in the recreation area in
the center of the current jail.
The current facility is in need
of an estimated $3 million over-
haul and is expected to reach
maximum capacity -6f just
county inmates by 2014.
A criminal justice complex is
also being discussed which
would bring the jail, Sheriff's
Office, Probation, Clerk of
Courts and the courthouse all
under one roof.
That complex, located at the
old airport site on East Main
Street, could cost the county
between $35 and $45 million.
This would free up room at
the current courthouse to move


some of the other government
offices into the current building
on West Main Street.
If a complex was built, the
current jail could be used to
house federal inmates awaiting
trial or who have been sen-
tenced, as well as juvenile jus-
tice and Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement.
How to fund the expansion or
the cost of a new facility is still
to be determined.
The Sheriff's Office has been
able to generate several hun-
dred thousand dollars a year by
housing federal inmates due to
the lack of room for federal
prisoners.
It is currently paid $55 a day
for' every federal inmate
housed, plus the cost of trans-
portation. The jail currently
averages 30 federal inmates a
day. Rigney estimates the
Sheriff's Office will generate
approximately $800,000 this
year.
As the population of county
inmates rises, it lowers the
number of federal inmates that
can be housed at the jail, thus
limiting the amount of revenue
that can be generated for the
county.
All of the 191 beds cannot be
used because of required sepa-
ration of inmates due to age,
sex, those sentenced and those
awaiting trial.
Committee members decided
to look at other facilities around'
the state to see the various
options available to them, and
get current assessments on
upkeep and repairs needed to
the jail, before meeting again on
Aug. 18.


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE

For the week ended June 26, 2008:

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 7,853, com-
pared to 6,551 last week and 7,543 a year ago. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to last week: slaughter cows and bulls were steady to 1.00 high-
er, feeder steers were unevenly steady, and heifers were steady to
1.00 higher


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 118.00-185.00;
300-400 lbs., 94.00-128.00; and
400-500 lbs., 90.00-111.00.

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 96.00-185.00;
300-400 lbs., 88.00-107.00; and
400-500 lbs., 82.00-97.00.


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 50.00-
59.00.

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 lbs., 68.00-
76.00.

Gold can be hammered into foil 10 times as thin as a
sheet of paper.




SPolitical Candidates!

Your advertising deadline is each




This will permit us to give your ad the
greatest amount of attention.
Please do not ask us to make an exception.
We desire only to serve all candidates
equally & well.
The Herald-Advocate
"Your local hometown newspaper
for over 100 years"


When you or your child approach a dog, remember to:
Wait and watch the dog's body language.
Ask the owner for permission to pet the animal.
Let the pet sniff you.
Pet the dog in the direction of its fur.

Safety tips for dog owners:
Before getting a dog, ask a veterinarian or ani-
mal shelter personnel about which dog is right for your
family and your lifestyle.
Spay or neuter your dog.
Socialize your dog so that it feels at ease
around people and other animals.
Do not put your dog in situations where it may
. feel threatened or teased.
Follow leash laws. Do not let your dog roam
freely.
Train your dog to obey basic commands con-
sistently such as "stay," "sit" and "come."
Keep your dog healthy with regular checkups
and a vaccinations program tailored to your dog's
needs.
Make sure your veterinarian vaccinates your
dog against rabies with a licensed rabies vaccine.
See a veterinarian promptly if your dog is sick
or injured. Illness and pain can make a dog more like-
ly to bite.
Do not play aggressive games with your dog.
Confine your dog in a fenced yard or "dog run"


when it is outside.
Do not leave your dog on a chain for long peri-
ods of time. Chained dogs are more likely to bite.

Safety tips for adults and children:
Never approach an unfamiliar dog.
Never run from a dog and never scream around
a dog.
If you believe a dog is about to attack you, try
to place something between yourself and the dog, such
as a backpack or a bicycle.
If a dog knocks you over, roll into a ball, cover
your face and stay still.
I Children should never approach or play with
dogs unless supervised by an adult.
Children should tell an adult if they see a stray
dog or a dog acting strangely.
Do not look a dog right in the eyes.
Do not disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating or
caring for puppies.
Adults should never leave an infant or young
child alone with any dog, not even the family pet.

If bitten:
Seek medical attention immediately.
Control bleeding and wash the area of the bite
with soap and water.
Report the bite to your local health department,
animal control agency or police.


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE A VARIANCE

The Department of Environmental Protection (Department) gives notice of its intent to issue a variance (File No. 0221122-
005-EV-VE) to Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C., Post Office Box 2000, Mulberry, Florida 33860-1100, under subsection
373.414(17) and paragraph 403.201(1)(a), Florida Statutes, (F.S.), from the provisions of rule 62-302.530(31), Florida
Administrative Code, (F.A.C.), which provides minimum standards for dissolved oxygen levels in surface waters. This
variance will apply to dissolved oxygen levels in the hypolimnion (the deepest layer) in the man-made lakes proposed
in environmental resource permit application No. 0221122-004.
On October 13, 2006, Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C. applied for an environmental resource permit and a conceptual reclama-
tion plan for the Mosaic South Ft. Meade Hardee County Mine. The project is to conduct phosphate mining activities on
approximately 7,756 acres of uplands, wetlands and other surface waters within a 10,856-acre area and to reclaim
approximately 7,756 acres of uplands, wetlands and other surface waters following the completion of mining activities.
On October 13, 2006, Mosaic submitted a petition for a variance, under subsections 373'.414(17) and paragraph
403.201 (1)(a), F.S., from the provisions of rule 62-302.530 (31), F.A.C, which provides minimum standards for dissolved
oxygen levels in surface waters. The variance will be permanent.
The dissolved oxygen levels in the hypolimnion of the man-made lakes are expected to drop below the mandatory min-
imum of 5.0 mg/I at times. Stratification and the associated reduction of dissolved oxygen in the hypolimnion are natu-
ral phenomena in deep-water bodies, especially during warmer parts of the year. This condition is well documented in
the limnological literature and recognized in paragraph 373.414(6)(a), F.S., which states, "[t]he Legislature recognizes
that some mining activities that may occur in waters of the state must leave a deep pit as part of the reclamation. Such
deep pits may not meet the established water quality standard for dissolved oxygen below the surficial layers. Where
such mining activities otherwise meet the permitting criteria contained in this section, such activities may be eligible for
a variance from the established water quality standard for dissolved oxygen within the lower layers of the reclaimed pit."
The low dissolved oxygen levels in the hypolimnion of the man-made lakes are not expected to result in any on-site or
off-site impacts. Oxygen levels in the upper layers of the man-made lakes are expected to meet the requirements of rule
62-302.530, F.A.C., and be adequate to support healthy fish populations. Existing man-made lakes on lands previously
mined for phosphate support healthy populations of fish. Several man-made lakes are currently being managed by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to provide the public recreational fishing opportunities: Once recla-
mation is completed, most of the man-made lakes will be connected to reclaimed and/or preserved wetlands and
streams. Water exiting these man-made lakes is expected to meet the requirements for dissolved oxygen and other
water quality criteria of rule 62-302.530, F.A.C. The water will exit from the upper surface of the man-made lakes and will
flow through shallow conveyances that will provide further aeration.
There is no practicable means known or available to achieve the required-dissolved oxygen-levels within the deep-water
pockets. Therefore, the Department intends to issue a varidh"epursuant to paragralif# 03.20.1 (1)(a), FS., for dissolved
oxygen within the hypolimnion in the proposed man-made takes. ""
Under this intent to issue, this variance is hereby granted subject to the applicant's compliance with any requirement in
this intent to publish notice of this intent in a newspaper of general circulation and to provide proof of such publication
in accordance with section 50.051, F.S. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department
unless a sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., as pro-
vided below. If a sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed, this intent to issue automatically becomes
only proposed agency action on the application, subject to the result of the administrative review process. Therefore,
on the filing of a timely and sufficient petition, this action will not be final and effective until further order of the
Department. When proof of publication is provided, if required by this intent, and if a sufficient petition is not timely filed,
the variance will be issued as a ministerial action. Because an administrative hearing may result in the reversal or sub-
stantial modification of this action, the applicant is advised not to commence construction or other activities until the
deadlines noted below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing or request for an extension of time have expired
and until the variance has been executed and delivered. Mediation is not available.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition must contain the information set forth below and
must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.
Under rule 62-110.106(4), FA.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may also
request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown,
grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel
of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the appli-
cable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the
request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party
showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect.
If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be
affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding.
Intervention will be permitted only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with
rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
In accordance with subsection 373.414(17), F.S. and section 403.201, F.S., petitions for an administrative hearing by the
applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the appli-
cant, and other than those entitled to written notice under subsection 120.60(3), FS., must be filed within 14 days of pub-
lication of the notice or within 14 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under subsection 120.60(3),
F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days
of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The
failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a
waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the following infor-
mation: (a) the name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b)
the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petition-
er's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an
explanation of how the petitioner's substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) a state-
ment of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) a statement of all disputed issues of
material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) a concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, includ-
ing the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) a
statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency's
proposed action; and (g) a statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petition-
er wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department's action is based shall state that no such
facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by rule 28-106.301,
F.A.C. Under paragraphs 120.569(2)(c) and (d), F.S., a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the
agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed.
This intent to issue a variance constitutes an order of the Department. Subject to the provisions of paragraph
120.68(7)(a), F.S., which may require a remand for an administrative hearing, the applicant has the right to seek judicial
review of the order under section 120.68, F.S., by the filing of a notice of appeal under rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of
Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of appeal accompanied by the appli-
cable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the
date when the order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. 7:3c






(B The Hlerald-Advocate, July 3. 2008


The


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DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


JUAN DELATORRE
(863)781-1128
WWW.IUANDELATORRE.COM
EMAIL:MAIL@IUANDELATORRE.COM


REAL ESTAT INVEST 'MENTS BROKER. ASSOCIATE
SR 66 & Poplar St. Zolfo Springs 0.195+ ac vacant lot $22,000
405 Georgia St. Wauchula $125,000
6163 NW CuldeSac Rd., Arcadia. Home & 4.76 acs $150,000
2976 Whippoorwill Ln. Wauchula, 4/2.5 two-story home -
$230,000 c7:3c





KELLER WILLIAMS
H R A- ..L. T Y
Sndforidsstings.clm -
Mikey Codin -

(863) 781-1698 \
--

An Independently Owned Brjofrage!

** New Listings *. *
20 acres w/2 slory 4BR/3BA, 3,900 sq. ft. home. Completely remod-.
eled in 2105. Many extras pool, pond, 20x72 horse iarn, 24x48
workshop. completely fenced. $474,900 Eastern-Hardee County.
51.33 acre liamlin grove. Production average 290 boxes/acre.
Located in Lily area. Call for more details. $531,126.
155 Acres or beautiful native Florida Hunting Land. All woods.
Great location. Over 1/2 mile of winding creek bottom. Call for
more details.
* Asking $8,500/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 28-32 acre parcels or buy as a whole 60 acre
tract. Call for more details.
* Zoned commercial 8.5 acres, corner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000.
* Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered
oaks and pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac.
wetlands. Great Investment Property. Sweetwater area.
* 20 acre Ranchettes. 6 available. 127 acres total. Buy one or buy
them all. Fish Branch Rd. Starting at $10,500/acre.
Call Mikey at (863) 781-1698 for more details.


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873

IIYDROPONIC FARM Grow your own veg-
etables for personal and commercial use on
this 8.91 acre tract with 6" well; two 30x100
shade houses; all irrigation equipment includ-
ed; septic tank for house or mobile home.
$280,000

EXECUTIVE HOME! See this beautiful home
with numerous amenities to appreciate the
excellent craftsmanship and style; 3+
B/2.5Bths, 3800 sq. ft.; 16x12 metal building,
16x12 pole barn, all on 2.3 acres; excellent loca-
tion. $330,000

5 + acres in eastern Hardee; native grasses.
$64.900

NEMW PRICE for this older home with lots
of charm! Tall ceilings, hardwood floors and
large rooms are just some of the features in
this 3B/2Bth home located in Wauchula.
$99,900

Corner lot with 3B/lBth C/B home, convenient-
ly located and move in ready. $155,000

15 Acres of pasture plus 3B/lBth C/B home in
need of repair; metal barn. $235,000

POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING! 30 acres of
pastureland; secluded; small pond with natural
flow of water; perfect for home site or small
ranch. $255,000


L. DICKS, INC. is now contracting
to purchase fruit for the
2007/2008 season and beyond.
Contact Mark Manuel @ 781-
0384. 6:28tfc


A 5 -iv


I


2003 PONTIAC SUNFIRE, 86,000
miles, $4,250 cash. 781-1062.
7:3c
2004 FORD F150, $6,250. 781-
1062. 7:3c
2001 SILVER TOYOTA TUNDRA,
4WD pickup, 169K miles, well
maintained, cold AC, runs great,
$5,900 or OBO. Call Mark 781-
0384. 7:3-10c
TAKE OVER PAYMENTS 2001
Chrysler PT Cruiser, 7300 Lake
Buffum Road North, Ft. Meade.
863-537-9172. 6:26-7:1 Op


2005 CHEVY MALIBU, 60,000.
miles, must sell, $5,000 cash.
781-1062. 7:3c


2002 HONDA VTX 1800 R, 10K
mi., fully loaded. Must see to
appreciate, $10,000. 767-0922,
781-3971. 6:19-7:17p
WILL PAY TOP price for junk cars
and we pick up. Crpoms Used
Cars and Parts. 773-0637. 1:10tfc

HelpSWanted


MATH INSTRUCTORS P/T posi-
tions for daytime and evening
classes at South Florida
Community College (Avon Park).
Min. bachelor's degree in math or
related field req. Visit our web-
site, www.southflorida.edu, for
details. 863-784-7132. EA/EO.
6:26-7:3c


Short Time Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll free
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity requirements apply.




SF- 0- F, Inc.
Crop Dusting
Spraying Dusting Fertilizing Seeding Foliar Feed
Fire Ant Control Aquatic Weeds Mosquito Controle
Greening & Psyllids Control

tkh anr- E ..116u[elm E ic ation 11 W~ ~.


Nobody ever died of laugh-
ter.


OFFICE f
NOW
HIRING


I Not aft. wUSPS who hires. I
1-866-749-1415


Bus. (863) 773-0007 1
Fax: (863) 773-0038 *.
www.lambertrealty.net
Charlotte Terrell
MINI FARM 5 acre tract with 3/1 CB home;
updated kitchen; property is fenced for horses
or cattle. $199,000
LOCATED IN COUNTRY NEIGHBOR-
HOOD, this 3B/lBth, C/B home is situated on 1
acre. $155,000
TWO STORY GOLF COURSE HOME!
3B/3.5Bth; large rooms with laminate and tile
floors; many extras; nice curb appeal! $350,000
CHOOSE YOUR COLORS when you select
building plan; constructing 3 and 4 bedrooms,
C/B homes; prices start at $133,000
Looking for that perfect building site or week-
end retreat? This 5 acre tract has large oaks,
small creek, plenty of wildlife. $99,000
Excellent location for building your new home;
1/2 acre tracts; city water and sewer. deed
restricted area. $40,000
Lovely home site 5 acres with fruit trees, large
oaks and 1 acre pond. $110,000
10 acres with 12" well; nice area for your new
home. $365,000
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY! 1.2 acres, high-
way 17 frontage. $100,000
5 acre tract of land; paved road frontage; east-
ern Hardee. $125,000


I SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: JOSEFINA GARAY......863-399-3329
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971 ASSOCIATE: CAROL JACKSON..............991-1255
ASSOCIATE: JUDY HINERMAN..............735-0268 ASSOCIATE: ROBERT HINERMAN........227-0202 cl7:3c


AM-SOUTH REALTY
MAKING REAl. E rATR ,EASY."


An IsHdeWeMn, n i D5wi Aedm d CAwe sBnketr RlE s eF-tnm


FULL TIME GROUNDS person
needed mut have ZTR experi-
ence. Call 773-3582. 7:3-1 0p


EMCI-WIReILESS Is seeking an
Account Manager/Store Manager
for their Arcadia location.
Candidates should possess the
following skills: Familiar with,
Microsoft Word and Excel, sales
and customer service experience,
the ability to work In a team envi-
ronment, bi-lingual is a plus.
Incentive plans include base
salary, commission, and benefits.
For immediate consideration
send a resume to EMCI-Wireless
(Matt Hall): mhall@emciwire-
less.com or fax (863) 314-0378.
6:26-7:3c


NOW HIRING Island of
Adventure Childcare Center, must
have CDA. Call 767-0800. 5:1tfc


SPREADER DRIVER Class D
license, experienced, motivated,
dependable, and clean record.
Benefits and paid holidays, DFWP
Keen Farm & Grove Service, Inc.
Call Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:10tfc
DRIVER Class A CDL, local,
experienced, motivated, depend-
able, and clean record. Benefits
and paid holidays, DFWP Keen
Farm & Grove Service, Inc. Call
Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:10tfc
MECHANIC -diesel/heavy equip-
ment, and maintenance, welding
& fabrication a plus, motivated,
dependable, and clean record.
Benefits and paid holidays, DFWP
Keen Farm & Grove Service, Inc.
Call Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:10tfc


GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Lonestar
COtistrt.Lwction. COx' .

General Contractor
Uc.1 RG291103615
Locally owned and operated


Fax 863-773-9865
cl6:9tfc


Office 863-773-4779


DEMOLITION
Fill Dirt Tree Removal *
*Stump Removal Dragline *
*Track Hoe Land Clearing *
Shell.* Clay *Top Soil*
Bulldozer Dump Trucks
(863) 735-2415


Special
Tandam .A.xle Load
114-6.ivards)
$OO/kadl
R R-ii T 6P S o c b m MI a rd P a r '
Htatdee CourlvNea ar.Iv


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
D WAUCHULA, FL 33873
Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122 *FAX (863) 773-2173


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jessica Smith, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Nancy Craft, Associate


781-3627
781-1186
773-0575
832-0370


Richard Dasher


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


ALMOST NEW!!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB Home on
corner lot in great neighborhood. Built in 2006,
includes two car garage with door opener and
more. Access on Lake Adelaide. Reduced from
$137,900 to $129,900.
CABBAGE PALMS, OAK TREES AND QUIET!!!
This 16 Acre parcel of land has a Well and Septic
Tank. Build your own Home or Mobile Home.
$150,000.
BUILD YOUR NEW HOME!! On this Residential
Lot in this Nice Neighborhood of Riverview'
Heights located on Garden Drive. Only $29,900.
STARTER HOME!!! This 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath CB
home has central air and heat, complete with
washer and dryer located in great neighborhood
on Illinois Ave. $90,000.
THREE SETS OF DUPLEXES on Hwy 66, Buy one
at a time or all three, great investment property!!!
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath $159,500; 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
for $155,000 and 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath with
Fireplace for $169,900.
5 ACRES $62,500. Possible Financing!!!
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY!!! 10 acres on Hwy. 62,
large building included. $750,000.

SO, YOU WANT TO MOVE TO
GEORGIA?? Want to know more??
Call Donna!! 863-781-3627. Many home
and acreage available!!

"app +th ofJulg"


JUST LISTED!! 27.5 acres with a 2 bedroom, 1
bath home in the Center HiI area fronts beautiful
Payne Creek. Includes 12 acres of irrigated cit-
rus grove and barn. Seller will consider dividing
property into parcels. Call today for details.
$350,000.
BIG!! 4 bedroom, 4 Bath Home!! 2,241 sq. ft.
Living area, new carpet, fresh paint, and new
roof makes this home a must see at a Reduced
Price of $165,000 or bring offer.
NEED MORE ROOM??? Come take a look at this
3/2 with an office and game room. This home
features a large kitchen and inside utility room
for a Reduced Price of $149,900.
BEAUTY OF A BARGAIN!! Nice 2 Bedroom 1
Bath Villa In Avon Park. Good condition, present-
ly rented. Need extra Income, Good Investment.
In walking distance to town!! Only $67,500.
THIS 6.15 ACRES OF LAND Is located on beauti-
ful Peace River. Canoe, camp or build your own
vacation home. Priced only at $125,000.
ENJOY THE SUNSET!!! On the balcony of this 2
story home on 3.4 acres of land, with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths and recreation room on bottom
story. Jacuzzi tub, Trane AC, galvaluminum roof
and more for only $189,000. Call Today!!!
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath. Only $92,500 With front
porch and large fenced yard. In nice neighbor-
hood!!!
IT'S A BUYER'S MARKET MAKE OFFERS,
YOU WILL NEVER KNOW UNTIL YOU ASK.
DEALS ARE EVERYWHERE!!!


FEATURES OF THE WEEK NEW LISTINGS!!! K
LAKE LOTELA!!! Home with enclosed inground pool. Completely remodeled with brand
new stainless steel appliances including stove, refrigerator, built in microwave oven,
dishwasher, washer and dryer. Granite countertops in kitchen and bathrooms. Pinecrest
golf course across road. This property is approved for ExpressPath Financing. "Please
contact listing agent for more information." $364,500.
A TOUCH OF CLASS!!! Located on Florida Ave. This beautiful home sits on 1 acre +,
Upstairs 3 large Bedrooms, 1 Bath. Downstairs has Dining room, Kitchen, Den, living
room, family room with large Bathroom. Front and back porch, and gorgeous hard wood
floors!! Graceful selection of Color schemes to reflect the era of 1920s. This house is a
show place. Shown by appointment only. $245,000. c17:3c


PARKER FILL DIRT


MEMMMMMMOMMEW


.


I







July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7R


The


Classifieds


NEEDED IMMEDIATELY Person
with auto retail skills, pays atten-
tion to details, self motivator,
great communication skills, com-
puter and bookkeeping knowl-
edge. Bilingual A+, must be will-
,ing to work on Saturday every
other week. Would prefer some-
one with auto detailing back-
ground and willing to work detail-
ing into business. Base pay, plus
commission. Contact 863-773-
2213 for application or appoint-
ment. 6:5tfc



3B, 1 1/2 BA, BLOCK house,
remodeled, fenced yard, central
air and heat, stove. (863) 273-
0920. 7:3tfc
When gains equal losses,
stock traders call it a
"wash."


3 MOBILE HOMES including
lots, $99,000 OBO. All currently
rented. Excellent investment
opportunity. 863-245-1507.
6:19-8:21 p



REWARD LOST off Highway 62,
large male dog, black & white.
773-5052. 7:3p



200 RASCAL SCOOTER, 3-wheel,
$300 OBO. Also, 6 eight foot
church pews, 2 alters and pulpit,
$200 OBO. Call 863-223-5126 or
773-4271. -7:3p
FOR SALE talking spider. 773-
9333. 7:3p
DUNE BUGGY frame. 781-0632.
7:3c


GO TANKLESS Tankless water
heaters, save on your electric bill.
Call for details 863-686-7679.
7:3-31 p
FOR SALE 14K WHITE GOLD
rope, 90 grams, $1,150 or best
offer. (863) 773-9333. 7:3-17p
2003 SUZUKI 400CC four stroke
dirt bike, like new, $2,000 or best
offer. 863-773-9333. 7:3-17p
1997 CHEYENNE, 4x4, cold air,
$3,750 or best offer, 350, V8. 863-
773-9333. 7:3-17p
1995 VIRAGO 750 CC YAMAHA
street bike, $2,500 or best offer.
863-773-9333. 7:3-17p
LARGE BROWN EGGS FOR
SALE. 773-6756. 7:3p

Wheresoever you go, go
with all your heart.


LOWEST PRICE ON mobile
homes in Florida. We take trades,
no down payment, deal with your
lot equity. We have easy financ-
ing. Call today 863-773-2007.
7:3-31 p
CENTRAL MOBILE HOMES, INC.,
Wauchula office, inventory clear-
ance sale. All 2008 homes must
go. New models arriving soon.
Call 863-773-2007. 7:3-31 p
3 BEDROOM, 2 BATHS used wind
zone 3, your lot or ours.
Fireplace, tape and texture walls.
Very low payment, easy credit.
Apply now 863-773-2007. 7:3-31 p
REPOS MUST SELL large 3.2
2001 double wide mobile home,
like new $39,900. Includes set-up
and a/c, easy credit approval. Call
863-773-2007. 7:3-31 p


PARK MODEL RV In Little Charlie
Creek Park, $7,000 OBO. 863-773-
4834 or 229-393-6108. 7:3p
2002 CHARIOT EAGLE PARK
model for sale 12x34, 1 bedroom,
fully furnished with central A/C,
$14,500 firm. Call Crystal Lake
Village. 773-3582. 7:3-10pE
NO MONEY DOWN if you own
your lot. Easy financing, low
monthly payments. 3 & 4 bed-.
room homes. Call 863-773-2007.
7:3-31 p
COUNTRY SETTING Charlie
Creek Estates land home pack-
ages, easy credit. Call 863-773-
4003. 7:3-31p
2005 FLEETWOOD MH, 24'x48',
carport & shed, 55+ Villa Del Sol
in Avon Park. Health reasons,
Reduced to $55,000; furnished;
2BR/2BA, owner only used 12
months. 863-368-0207. 6:12-7:17p


REPO MOBILE HOMES -
Hundreds to choose from. Set up
& delivery available. 863-381-
1000. 7:3-12:25p



PERSONAL PROPERTY of Ashley
White will be sold pursuant to
Warehouseman's Lien. Said sale
will be at 112 Carlton Street,
Wauchula, Florida at 9:00 a.m. on
July 12, 2008. 7:3-10c


AMERICAN/PIT CROSS puppies.
Two males, one white with blue
eye and one blk and white pied.
Health cert. and first shots, $350.
781-0897. 7:3-1 Oc
GREAT DANE puppies. Taking
deposits. Health cert., $350. 773-
3834 leave message. 7:3p


CAma lrd


CB Home on 2 1/2 acres, 2,000 sq ft -1,800 heated,
lots of tile. High & Dry. Only 3 minutes from town.
REDUCED Asking $175,000.

REDUCED 3BR, 3B, 2 AC. -'229-,90- $219,900.
Beautiful 3 BR, 2.5 B on 5.7 acres near Manatee Co. line. $449,000.
Call Cindy. a s ,
2 BR, 2 B "frgs,'l9t ir ae. C IA, ryncm,.em. n $124,900.
2 BR, 2B MH 'i,6i .n i, ff Ste-id'Roherts Special, 5 ac.
$199,900. 1 -
Make YourV Pl'~ I' Iab Rental, Sleeps 4-
5, very seclud d S550 veek **
One lot left in 'hilier Wo 7 jc 75.000.
10 ac. Val. gro e."img )dra 4I0, S. 0Qer ax Call David.
30 ac. with 10 ac Ham '.. Iln a.e i a. 10 ac. beautiful oaks,
micorjetirrig. 12-in aell '$X1T. Call Djaid












JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www. imseerealty. com
James V. See, Jr, Broker James V. See, Sr, Broker


Three 5 ac tracts located on
Johns Rd. Well located on one
of the tracts. Price Reduced!
$89,900 each.

Three adjacent 5 ac tracts
located on East Main Street in
Wauchula. Price Reduced to
$74,900 each.

1 acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in
Wauchula. Paved road front-
age. Deed restrictions. Zoned
FR. Lot size 130' X 305'.
$38,500

REDUCED! MUST SEE! 3
BR/2 BA home on landscaped
lot. Granite countertops, stain-
less appliances. 2 car garage.
$159,900

One of a kind development
property. 300 acres in Sara-
sota. Hamlet designation.

700 acres in Eastern Sarasota
County. High & Dry. Hamlet
designation. Plenty of paved
road frontage.

COMMERCIAL LOT! NEED
VISIBILITY? Put your busi-
ness here! Located on North &
South bound HIwy 17. North
end of Wauchula. Zone C-2.
$195,000

Commercial property. 1.28
acres. Frontage on Main Street
and Hwy 64. $120,000.

3.19 acres. Zoned C-2. Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential income already in
place. Hwy 17 across from
Walmart. $1,200,000.

Golf Course/Development
Property! Water & sewer
available. 127 acres! Call for
price and details!


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


3 BR/2 BA house on 7 1/2
acres. Stocked pond. This pro-
perty is zoned for up to 3
homes! $179,900.
PRICE REDUCED! 3 BR, 2
BA immaculate home with
many extras. Home was built
in 2000 and all appliances are
included. Landscaped yard
with several fruit trees and
even a pecan tree. $143,900.
Waterfront property! 2 BR/2
BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep
water canal that leads into
Charlotte Harbor. Buyer con-
cessions possible. Priced right
at $165,000!
HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!
3 Bedroom/2 Bath home in
Golfview. Big 1+ acre lot. 2
car garage. $195,000.
2 BR/1 BA CB home. Metal
roof put on after Hurricane.
Some work needs to be done
inside. Large corner lot in
Wauchula. $72,000.
Two mini-ranches! One is
5.95 acres, the other is 6.65
acres. $99,500 each
70 acres of prime develop-
ment property. City water and
sewer allocated. Annexed and
rezoned to single family with
Developers Agreement.
$20,000 per acre.
170.8 acres of pasture land in
Manatee County, Myakka
City area. 2600 feet of front-
age on State Road 64.
38.6 acre grove with 700 feet
on Lake Lizzy. 2400 feet paved
road frontage on Lake Hen-
dry-Lake Buffum Road. 8"
deep well and 6" deep well.
10 beautiful acres ready to
build on. Plenty of shade trees
in a great country setting.
$150,000.


Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones'
(863)445-0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242


Topsy See -

REAL ESTATE
Y773-5994


Topsy See


JUST LIKE NEW 2000 DW Palm Harbor. This home includes win-
dow treatments, ceiling fans, all appliances, Ted's Shed, deep well.
$134,995.
5 acres in the Oaks. Owner financing with approval. $20,000 down.
$64,900.
NEW LISTING: 3 BR-1B CB Very nice home in nice quiet neigh-
borhood. New Drywall New Tile Floors Appliances. $115,000.
NEW LISTING 3BR 1-1/2B CB Home in Bowling Green. Close to
school. Very good buy at $69,900.
5 acres all fenced, High and dry with pond. Appaloosa Lane. $84,995.
1 ac. with app. 296 ft. road frontage. $39,000.
Beautiful location 4.6 acres surveyed into six 1/2 acre lots and one
1.66 acre lot. $15,000 each or $85,000 for all.
App. 58 AC. Great for development property. High and dry. Call for
information.
| | Topsy See, Broker
Elva Whidden, Associate
3 7:3. 2634 E. Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873







Joe L.Davis
I N C., R E A L T 0 R S
| (863) 773-2128
SREALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL

Sandy Larrison CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
(863) 832-0130 You may qualify to receive a graptfor dqwn
payment assistance oid yokijr.,_pA,.,
See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
2BR/1BA CB home in Sebring Two residential lots in High-
has total of 1,622SF & lands Park Estates in Lake
1,178SF living area. Large Placid, both 75X150, listed for
screened in front porch. $5,000!
$129,995!
Beautiful country setting, lots 12 ac w/SR 64 frontage. Front
of wildlife. 22 acs located of property is cleared, back has
halfway between Wauchula & trees. Great for cattle or home-
Avon Park has 2 story 3BR/- site! $180,000!
2.5BA CB home w/fireplace &
large screened in back porch. Stellar location! 10 ac Val
$479,900! grove on SR 62 has 6" well,
Bring your canoe & camper! diesel power unit, drain tile &
Secluded 5 acs of native, micro-jet irrigation. Also
wooded land close to Wauchula fronts Moye Rd. $150,000!
has deeded access to the beau-
tiful Peace River. Great prop- PRICE REDUCED! 20 ac
erty for recreation, invest- pastureland is fenced & has
ment, or homesite! $90,000! a 4-in diameter well. Great
Green St: Very nice starter for horses or cattle. Secluded
home. $60,000! location would make excellent
homesite! NOW $10,000/ac!
PRICE REDUCED! Huge
house w/lots of potential. Large PRICE REDUCED! Corner lot
corner lot zoned C-1. $145,000! w/new construction, 4BR/2BA
5 ac on private rd in central CB home, Wauchula. New re-
Hardee Co has well maintained frigerator, stove & microwave.
3BR/2BA MH. Floors are wood Call today for more details!
& tile. Some appliances includ- $140,000!
ed. $115,000!
5 ac on Cross Creek Ln is PRICE REDUCED! Brand
native Florida land. Access to new construction! Beautiful
Peace River provided by 3BR/I2BA, 1300+SF CB home
another shared 5 ac parcel, w/granite countertops, ceramic
$100,000! tile & carpet floors. $155,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Great;
PRICE REDUCED! Great New Construction in Zolfo
weekend getaway! Small cabin New s olfo
on 22.8 acs of pastureland, Springs! 3BR/2BA CB, 1700
fenced & cross-fenced, w/4" SF, carport, large yard, tile &
diameter well. NOW $220,000! carpet. $159,500!
REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS..........781-0153 DAVID ROYAL.................781-3490
MONICA REAS...............773-9609 SANDY LARRISON............832-0130
JUAN DELATORRE.......781-1128 JAMES STALLINGS.. 863-412-4379
r U.S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHII.A, FL 33873


2.10 acres prime corner SR 64 W. and Golfview Drive.
$80,000.
Corner lot in Torrey. Old Dixie Hwy. Heavily wooded.
$20,000.
1 acre MOL zoned C-1 behind ACE Hardware. 1/2 ac. site
ready needs fill and clearing. $50,000.
2.20 Acres Comm. Hwy 17 South. Road Frontage on 3 sides.
$225,000.
Main building 3200 sq. ft., storage building 1300 sq. ft. Large
commercial lot in Bowling Green. 225 ft. US 17 frontage.
Formerly Bills Meat Market. $175,000. AS IS.
7:3c


SI j 38+1-4460 863-781-4577








Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net John D. Freeman


A we ce/erate tMe F7ourit Ithis yea, with /ani, and

/riendi let us count America ?IejJsings and ours and

give thanks to our Aeaven4 Creator.

JUST A FEW OF OUR LISTINGS WE HAVE MANY MORE -
VISIT US AT www.floresrealty.net
FOR A COMPLETE LIST.

One acre CB home 3BR could be 4BR/2BA located on Kazen
Road close to town Price Reduced to $205,000.00 MLS #199369

Knollwood Subdivision Charming 3BR/2BA CB home off a cul-
de-sac 2,000 sq ft under roof Excellent floor plan 2-car
garage Many Extras Large Lot. $189,900.00 MLS #201014

Advantages of buying a NEW HOME:
Easier financing Builder's warranty Lower Insurance
Premium You are first to occupy You decorate according
to your taste. We have several listed by address and price -
Take a look Calls us!

3BR 2BA CB 4815 Church Street, Bowling Green, Florida
$140,000.00
3BR 2BA CB 4817 Church Street, Bowling Green, Florida
$150,000.00
3BR 1BA CB 733 Sally Place, Wauchula, Florida $119,000.00
3BR 2BA CB 3061 Hickory CT, Zolfo Springs, Florida
$140,000.00
3BR 2BA CB 4846 Freeman Avenue, Bowling Green, Florida
$142,000.00
3BR 2BA CB 2110 Rigdon Road, Wauchula Hills $135,000.00
3BR 2BA CB 418 Hancock Road, Wauchula Hills $135,000.00

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember
Our listings are on the Internet.
S| Anyone with a computer can
access them anytime! L
EO|EUAL HOUMO
Contact After Hours oPORU....
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net


John Freeman (863) 781-401
Steve Lanier (863) 559-939
Jason Johnson (863) 781-373


After hours
84 Lisa Douglas
12 Jessie Sambrano
34 Noey Flores


(863) 781-3247
(863) 245-6891
(863) 781-4585






8B The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008





The


Classifieds


ATTENTION! State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold In Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health,
certificate, have necessary shots!
and be free of parasites., ffc-dh
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing vehicles will be sold for tow-
ing & storage charges pursuant to
F.S. 713.78 on 7/25/08 at 10:30 am.
Sale to be held at: Roberts Towing,
377 Old Dixie Hwy., Bowling Green,
FL. 33834. 863-375-4068. Vehicles:
1994 FORD 1FTCR14X6RPC27715
1996 YAMAHA YAMA3064A696
1992 FORD 1FMDU32X3NUD76169
1994 LINC 1LNLM82W5RY621133
cl7:3c


SHIH TZU PUPPIES, AKC, first
shots. Taking deposits, $300.
Health papers. 941-456-0580.


Re al =Estate


5.06 ACRES FOR SALE Ready
to build, Cleared, fenced, well
and pond, beautiful oaks, pines
and maples. Must see. Reduced
to $80,000. Call 781-0897.



250 REBEL, 1985, 1,750 original
miles, runs excellent, $1,250. 773-
5878. 7:3p


4 1/2 ACRES, beautiful oak ham-
mock with nice 3BR, 1BA, 2005
SWMH. $700/month, $700 securi-
ty, good credit needed, no smok-
ers or Indoor pets. 772-336-4411
home, 772-530-7043 cell. 7:3p


2BR/1BA DUPLEX, good location
in Wauchula. $600/month, $500
deposit. 863-781-3570. 7:3-10c
2BR/2BA MOBILE HOME, like
new, good location. $600/month,
$500 deposit. 863-781-3570.
7:3-10 c
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
plus office space for rent. 832-
1984. 7:3p
LEASE OPTION TO BUY -
4BR/2BA, nice neighborhood. For
information call 786-218-5250,
863-773-0065, 786-218-5236.
6:29-7:3p


15 HOUSES, APTS, $500, N.D-
20,000 Commercial. 773-2177,
773-6616, 832-1965. 6:19-7:17p
FOR LEASE Nice remodeled 3/2
home, yard, large shed. 207 N.
10th, Wauchula, $945 month. 305-
970-1957, 305-338-4976.
6:19-7:17p
EXCELLENT CONDITION 2BR/2
1/2 B townhouse. Call 773-2122 to
see. American South Reality.
6:19tfc
4BR/1 BATH, $750/month,
$750/dep. 320 Will Duke Rd. 786-
251-2038. 6:5-7:3p


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478
Complete Tree Service
Bobcat Service
Crane Service
Sawmill Service
Free Estimates Insured 26 years experience
cl6:14tfc


HOME FOR RENT!
Spacious 3 BR/2 BA CBS Home in Riverview
Heights. Large Landscaped Lot. Completely
Renovated. Gigantic Screen Room.
Appliances, W/D. Nice Quiet Neighborhood.
$900 mo. FLS on 1 yr. rental agree.
Available Immediately!


Call For Appointment


(863) 234-2234
c17:3o


APARTMENTS AND HOUSES.
773-6667. 9:6tfc
2 BR/1 BTH APARTMENT $550
month, first, last, deposit
required. 773-0100. 2:21tfc
WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack UIIrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc
* MOVE-IN SPECIAL *
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B from $400
monthly. 1 BR from $300 monthly.
No pets, low deposit. Next to
school & hospital. Citrus Valley
MHP. 863-698-4910 or 698-4908.
Se habla espanol 863-838-4447.
8:23tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


,'--0

, *


NEW SUMMER RATES Crystal
Lake Village, 1 BR, $500/month.
767-8822. 5:1tfc
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for,
lease. 239-273-7381.
12:20tfc


CITRUS TREE REMOVAL -
Cheapest rates by the hour or
contract, free estimates. Contact,
Curtis Wilson at 767-5349.
7:3-11:27p
LONNIES LANDSCAPING -
Flower beds, pull weeds, lawn
maintenance. 773-2208, 781-
0982. 6:19-7:17p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION -
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening. Harold
Howze Construction. 735-1158.
RRO50181 6:19-8:21p


Happy Home


Apartments

Fort Meade


3 to choose from!
2BR/1B, unfurnished, central H/A,
$500 month, plus deposit

(863) 285-7203 or (863) 241-5645
Ask for Sheila7:3c
cl7:3c


Wewl roe


Towng ervceAvalal
0 4 H u e vc

Love osible Ra 's


\ We can finance anyone!
t Bad Credit? Slow Credit? No Credit?
I It doesn't matter!
,I Come check out our new finance company.


1 m # *- -
I



H/ ardcee Car Company

I .
FE-'






Maria Billy Hill, Ruby
aria Owner Ruby
^^ Wauchula Hills Wauchula
Corner of Hwy 17
and REA Rd. (across from )
773- 20 First National Bank)
773-2011 773-6667
"a"o "t0 cl7:3c N


EMPLOYEE
EASING
IONS, INC.
Robby Albritton, Vice-President
Office (863) 735-9226 Cell (863) 528-70851
Fax (863) 735-9228
ralbritton@eloinc.net
www.elonic.net
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 a


Water & Wastewater

Utility Plant Superintendant

Town of Zolfo Springs, Florida

Located in Florida's Heartland, the Town of Zolfo Springs (pop. 1,600), is seek-
ing an exceptional person to fill the position of Utility Plant Superintendant for its
water and wastewater treatment facilities.

The position is a hands-on department head administrative position, reporting
only to the City Manager. The Utility Plant Superintendant operates, manages
and oversees operation of the Town's water and wastewater treatment plants,
and supervises department employees. Position works closely with the
Maintenance Superintendant.

Position requires minimum possession of Florida Class "C" license for both
water and wastewater treatment facilities and a Florida driver's license. A strong
candidate would also have substantial experience and competence in plant
operation, maintenance, QA/QC, and recordkeeping, and have some manage-
ment experience. Present pay range is $37,000 to $ 41,600 per year, DOQ.
Opportunity for advancement. Moving expenses provided with long term com-
mitment of employment.

Contact City Hall at (863) 735-0405, e-mail resume with salary, experience and
copy of licenses to twnzolfo@strato.net, or fax resume with copy of licenses to
(863) 735-1684. Only candidates meeting the minimal qualifications will be asked
to fill out an application. We require background investigations and drug tests for
top candidates for any administrative position prior to hiring. EOE; Drug Free
Workplace.
cl7:3c


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Count vs Iloynelown Coverage
Telephone (863) 773-3255 1







July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 9B


The


Classifieds


ALDERMAN'S CITRUS TREE
REMOVAL. Call Tim for quote.
863-781-5289. 4:3-1:8p
B SEE
SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
3:6-7:3p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave.,
Wauchula, and Friday and
Saturday nights 7:00 p.m. at First
Methodist Church, corner of
Grape and Church St., Bowling
Green. 12:6tfcdh
JIM'S LAWN SERVICE -
Specializing In cleaning beds,
trimming hedges & trees, and
landscaping. Also, clean ponds.
773-3293 or 781-4641.
10:4tfc/nc
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUR Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
Located at the SFCC Annex,
Room #105, Hwy. 17 North,
Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc

NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot
cl4:20tfc


TUT'S LAWN MAINTENANCE -
Summer savings average yard,
ZS, Wauchula, BG, $25, includes
mowing, weedeating, blow off dri-
veway and walk. Licensed/In-
sured. 863-781-2129. 6:5-7:3p
LOOKING FOR A SUMMER
TUTOR to help your elementary
aged child become a better read-
er? Call 781-5645. 6:5-7:3p
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
dh



SATURDAY, JULY 5 9-2. No early
birds. 6019 Van Simmons Rd.,
Wauchula. 7:3p
ELLEN'S THRIFT SHOP, 4709
North Central, next to train depot.
:Washer, trundle bed, two pop
coolers, and lots of merchandise.
7:3p
FRI./SAT./SUN. 3 family. Lots of
stuff. 605 East 7th, Zolfo Springs.
7:3p
SATURDAY 3007 CR 664-W,
Bowling Green. 781-0632. 7:3c
MULTI-FAMILY July 4 and 5 at
Lemon Street, Bowling Green, 7
a.m. 4 p.m. 7:3p
SATURDAY, 8 a.m till ? Benefit
yard sale/bake sale, Northside
Baptist Church, North 8th Ave.,
Wauchula. 7:3p
YARD SALE 3435 S. Palmetto
'St., Zolfo Springs. Friday &
Saturday. Lots of clothes and
Smisc. items 7:3p


How wonderful it is that
nobody need wait a single
moment before starting to
improve the world.
-Anne Frank

Happiness does not come
from doing easy work but
from the afterglow of satis-
faction that comes after
the achievement of a diffi-
cult task that demanded
our best.
-Theodore I. Rubin


I Bo says.... "I won't be undersold!!"
SBo Espino W eeaiSo \

. M. .. I






Lisa's Live Bait
Crickets, Minnows, Shiners, Worms, Tackle
Fishing & Hunting Licenses
Accepting Credit Cards
3721 E. Main St. Wauchula
(6 miles east of US 17 at TNT Fill Dirt)
Open Mon.-Sat. 7 am To 7 pm Summer Hours: Mon-Fri
Phone 863-773-9443 7AM to 6PM
After Hrs. 863-781-3344 Saturday 7AM to 12 noon
Closed 4th of July weekend c]7:3p



HELP WANTED
ECMHSP is now accepting applications for ECE
Coordinator in a Migrant Head Start Program. Responsible
for providing on-going direction, support, training and
technical assistance for Direct Services Center in support of
quality Early Childhood Education services for migrant
children and families. Preferred: Bachelors Degree in ECE
or related field with 12 credit hours in Early Childhood
Education and a minimum of 5 years experience working in
Early Childhood Education with a minimum of 2 years in a
supervisory position. Head Start experience preferred.
Bilingual. Accepted: Bachelors Degree in Early Childhood
Education or related field with 3 years experience in Early
Childhood Education. Head Start experience preferred.
Supervisory experience preferred. Starting salary $620.80 -
652.40 weekly. Annual and Sick Leave and employer-
hnatched retirement plan.
Closing date: 7-12-08
Send resume/letter of ECMHSP-Bowling Green
interest or apply at: Center, 5115 Mason
Dixon Avenue, Bowling
Green, Florida 33834
Telephone: 863-375-2101
EOE, ADA, License # C10HA0001
Bel ~~H U E


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
But now the Lord says: This
(sinning) must stop! I will
honor those who honor Me,
but I will dishonor those who
ignore Me."
I Samuel 2:30b (NCV)

FRIDAY
Shun immorality. Every other
sin which a man (person)
commits is outside the body,
but the immoral man sins
against his own body You
do not belong to yourselves;
you were bought with a
price. Then honor God in
your body.
I Corinthians 6:18-20 (NEB)

SATURDAY
Yours, 0 god, is the great-
ness, the power, the glory,
and the majesty. Everything
in the heavens and on earth
is Yours, 0 Lord, and this is
Your kingdom. We adore
You as the One who is over
all things. Riches and honor
come from You alone, for
You rule over everything.
Power and might are in Your
hand, and it is at Your dis-
cretion that people are made
great and given strength.
I Chronicles 29:11-12 (NLT)

SUNDAY
Let love be genuine; hate
what is evil, hold fast to what
is good; love one another
with brotherly affection;
outdo one another in show-
ing honor.
Romans 12:9-10 (RSV)

MONDAY
Don't assume that you know
it all. Run to God! Run from
evil! . Honor God with
everything you own; give
Him the first and the best.
Proverbs 3:7,9 (ME)

TUESDAY
"Thou art worthy, 0 Lord our
God, to receive glory and
honor and power, for Thou
didst create all things; by
Thy will they existed and
were created."
Revelation 4:11 (PME)

WEDNESDAY
(But God says) "But true
praise is a worthy sacrifice;
this really honors Me. Those
who walk in My path will
receive salvation from the
Lord."
Psalm 50:23 (TLB)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.




ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, PO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


What does the future hold?-
It's one of life's great questions.
You could seek out fortune-
tellers or peer into a crystal ball
for answers about your future,
but what if you had the opportu-
nity to speak with yourself 20
years from now-your future
self-and ask questions about
life in retirement? What would
you want to know?
According to a recent survey
conducted by the Lincoln Re-
tirement Institute, an internal
think tank created by Lincoln
Financial Group, nearly two-
thirds of baby boomers said
they would be more inclined to
ask an older version of them-
selves about the welfare of their
spouse or children versus want-
ing to know about their own
activity levels or the realization
of materialistic desires such as
owning their dream homes.
Furthermore, it is often fami-
ly ties that motivate the start of
retirement planning. Almost
one-third of survey respondents
said that the death or serious ill-
ness of a loved one made them
think more carefully about the
importance of saving for their
futures. Other trigger events
included the birth of a child or
grandchild and children moving
out of the house.
The old adage "never mix
family and finances" doesn't
always apply. The Lincoln
RetirementSM Institute has
identified four important tips
for boomers to consider as they
plan for their retirement futures
and the futures of their loved
ones:
o Get Professional Help. Sixty-
six percent of boomers sur-
veyed wanted to know about
-the success of their financial


strategies, specifically asking,
"Did I save enough for retire-
ment?" (38 percent) and "Did I
make the right investment
choices?" (28 percent). Why
leave your retirement security
to chance? Seeking the counsel
of a financial advisor can help
you evaluate your financial
position, identify your wants
and needs for retirement, and
develop a proactive plan to
make those goals a reality.
Prepare for Retirement
Together. It's important to
involve your spouse or partner
in the emotional and financial
aspects of planning for your
retirement future together.
More than one-third of sur-
vey respondents recognized
their spouse or partner as play-
ing the most significant role in
helping them prepare for retire-
ment.
Expect the Unexpected.
The survey revealed that
boomer women were twice as
likely as boomer men to want to
know if they were a financial
burden on their children in
retirement. This generation
places high value on indepen-
dence and must plan to address,
the financial challenges they
may face throughout their
retirement years, such as rising
health care costs, the unexpect-
ed loss of a loved one, account-
ing for market volatility and
inflation, and sustaining income
for life.
Leave a Legacy. One-third
of boomers surveyed feared
they might run out of money. As
we face a potentially volatile
economy, it is more critical than
ever to seek professional help to
develop strategies to protect
your legacy for the next genera-


Also, regularly update essen-
tial documents such as wills and
estate plans to account for
changing circumstances. En-
suring your family's happiness
for tomorrow serves to make
today brighter.
No one knows what the
future holds. Not the fortune-
teller nor the crystal ball. But
it's evident that family is at the
heart of our past, present and
future. Preparing for retirement
goes way beyond dollars and
cents. It's ensuring your dream
retirement-whatever that may
be-and putting in place safe-.,
guards to protect yourself and
loved ones against unforeseen
circumstances.
Retirement planning is a life-
long effort, one that must
account for all the exciting
twists and turns the future may
hold.
For more information on ensur-
ing your retirement future,.
please visit www.lincolnfinan-
cial.com.

ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate
encourages submissions
from Hardee County
schools. Photos and write-
ups should be of recent
events, and must include
first and last names for both
students and teachers.
Identify photos front to
back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


Highlands County HOME Consortium
Third Proaram Year Action Plan
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Heartland Rural HOME Consortium (which includes DeSoto, Glades, Hardee,
Hendry, Highlands, and Okeechobee Counties, Florida),is, applying to.the U.S.,
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the 2008-2009.allocation.
under the HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME). This Third Program Year
Action Plan is submitted under the Consolidated Plan for 2006-2011.

The preliminary activities, with the estimated dollar amount for which the Consortium is
applying are:


Funding Source

HOME Investment Partnership
American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI)
Total

Planned Activities
HOME Homeownership
ADDI & County Buy-In Homeownership
Community Housing Development Corporations (15%)
Administration


Budget

$ 598,098
$ 3.096
$ 301,195

Budget
$ 448,489
$ 3,096
$ 89,766
$ 59,844


Each County in the Consortia has adopted a single anti-displacement and relocation
plan before submission of the Consolidated Plan. The Consortia will assist displaced
persons with grant funds, as indicated in the budget and policy. A required 25% match
will be covered by on-going activities in each County under the State Housing Initiatives
Partnership (SHIP) Program.

Two Public Hearings to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the Third
Program Year Action Plan will be held at 201 E Oak Street, Ste. 201, Arcadia FL
beginning at 11:00 a.m. on July 9, 2008, and at 165 S. Lee Street LaBelle, FL, on July
9, 2008 beginning at 2:00 p.m.

A draft copy of the Annual Plan will be available for review at that time. A final copy of
the application will be made available at the Highlands County Housing Department,
501 S. Commerce Avenue, Sebring, FL 33870 on July 30, 2008 Monday through Friday
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Third Program Year Action Plan will
be submitted to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on or
before August 14, 2008. To obtain additional information concerning the application and
the Public Hearings contact Teresa Hofer, Acting Highlands County Housing Director, at
(863) 402-6717.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any
handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually
impaired should contact Teresa Hofer at least five calendar days prior to the meeting
and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend
the public hearing should also contact Teresa Hofer at (863) 402-6917 at least five
calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. To
access a Telecommunication Device for Deaf Persons (TDD) please call (800) 955-
8771. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting
should contact Teresa Hofer at (863) 402-6917 at least five calendar days prior to the
meeting.

Pursuant 91.225, the following certifications will be submitted to HUD with the Third
Program Year Action Plan. The certifications will be made available by Highlands
County Housing Department and HUD for public inspection upon request. These
certifications will be available on and after the date of submission of the application and
shall continue to be available for a minimum period of five years.


Affirmatively furthering fair housings;
Anti-displacement and relocation plan;
Drug-free workplace;
Anti-lobbying;
Authority of Jurisdiction;
Consistency with Plan;
Acquisition and Relocation; and
Section 3.


A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION
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10B The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH -County Youth Coalition.


For The Herald-Advocate
It is often said that it takes a
village to raise a child.
This theory has become the
foundation for a newly formed
non-profit organization, the
,Hardee County Youth Coali-
tion.
When the Hardee County
Juvenile Justice Board dis-
solved, Pastor Chuck Dixon
and sheriffs Col. Arnold Lanier
made an effort to form the
board once again. After meeting
with eager residents of Hardee
County, a board was selected
under the name of Hardee


The members of the coalition
include Dawn Atkinson-Jones,
chairman; Lanier, co-chair and
law enforcement liaison; Dix-
on, co-chair and training coor-
dinator; Joyce Fulse, treasurer;
and Sharon Ussery, secretary.
The coalition plans to target
five main problems that Hardee
County and its youth struggle
with: drop-out prevention; gang
activity and crime prevention;
substance abuse prevention;
grants, funding and budgeting;
and healthy living.
The Hardee County Youth


Coalition has many events and_ nation and to be an example for


projects planned to help bring
the community together in
hopes of improving family life
in Hardee County.
"We cannot reach the youth
without reaching the family. We
cannot reach the family without
reaching the community," says
Atkinson-Jones.
One of the main projects the
coalition is anticipating is the
upcoming Fourth of July cele-
.bration at Pioneer Park. When
the annual celebration was at
risk of being canceled due to
budget cuts, the coalition
stepped up as leaders and saved
the day.
The coalition hopes to bring
the community together to cele-
brate the independence of this


the youth of this county.
"We want to get back to the
basics of family and the com-
munity," says Atkinson-Jones.
The Hardee County Youth
Coalition is also in search of a
logo. Youth are invited to head
down to the Fourth of July cele-
bration and create a possible
logo for the organization. The
winner will receive a $100 gift
certificate donated by Mosaic.
This new group also hopes to
be able to expand the Wauchula-
Skate Park and even make a
new "Art Park" for kids to
express their creativity. The Art
Park will give youngsters a
chance to display their work,
whether its art in pencil, paint,
ink or graffiti. By providing the
youth of Hardee County with a


New Youth Coalition At Work


5 'Problem Areas' Are Focus Of Efforts


place to express themselves, the
coalition hopes to see changes
in the amount of criminal activ-
ity among youth.
Another main focus of the
coalition, healthy living in
Hardee, has spawned yet anoth-
er idea. The group would like to
provide an activities park that
features rock climbing, an
obstacle course and various
other forms of exercise.
"We want to provide the
youth with a place to exercise in
a safe environment and also-
promote healthy living in
Hardee County," says Atkin-
son-Jones.
The Hardee County Youth
Coalition strives to be an exam-
ple for the youth of today and
offer projects and events that
will keep kids focused on prior-
ities and out of trouble.
The coalition would like to
give youngsters who "owe"
community-service hours the
opportunity to do so through the
coalition by serving Hardee
County with all of its events,


It's all about youth sports at this time of year.
Congratulations to up-and-coming eighth grader Kayla Knight,
who is among 11 girls on the travel team the Southern Shockers
which won the state ISA championship in' Fort Myers by playing
seven games in a row.
Kayla and teammates from Arcadia, Fort Meade, Myakka,
Sebring, Bradenton and Naples, will go to Atlanta July 14-20 for
the ISA World Series. Kayla, who pitches, has taken lessons for
three years.

There's also congratulations to a bunch of Hardee All-Stars
involved in district competition, or going on to play at state games
in Belleview. All four girls teams, the Dixie Darlings, Angels, Pony
Tails and Belles will go to state competition this weekend.
Some of the boys are still playing. The Major boys (ages 10-12)
were rained out at Frostproof on Monday evening and scheduled to
play a double-header on Tuesday. Other boys teams have either
won or been eliminated after putting up a fight.
See elsewhere in this issue for a report.

Women's Church League and Men's Community League soft-
ball has kept up its schedule despite afternoon or evening thunder-
showers.
Summer baseball, football, tennis, volleyball and other lessons
continue. Several high schoolers are involved in each.

A reminder, if there are to be girls or boys soccer this fall and
winter, soccer officials are needed. Former players, parents and
others are urged to complete the short training to qualify and be
employed as a referee, linesman, etc. Check with Gilbert Vasquez,
Val Patarini or other school athletic folks for more information.
Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please call The Herald-Advocate at 773-3255 or email
me at news.heraldadvocate@embarqmail.com with news for this
biweekly column. The sports deadline is Thursday at 5 p.m., except
for events which happened over the weekend. They are due by 11
a.m. Monday.


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"Photos... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
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Fm

rN~
-J.


Officers of the Hardee County Youth
Arnold Lanier and Chuck Dixon.


'.


COURTESY PHOTO
Coalition are (from left) Joyce Fulse, Sharon Ussery, Dawn Atkinson-Jones,


projects and volunteer work.
Since the Hardee County
Youth Coalition was. just
formed, there are still somt
minor fine points of the organi-
zation, such as grant money and
other corporate details, to work
out.
The Hardee County Youth
Coalition hopes to make a last-
ing impact on the youth And the
entire county as a whole, notes
Atkinson-Jones. The members
of the organization will try hard
to make sure that the kids of
today always have a brighter
future than those of yesterday.
By offering parks, events and
projects for youngsters to
become involved in, the coali-
tion hopes to successfully bring
kids out of the crime-filled
lifestyle on the street and help
them and their families get back
to the basics of family.
The group meets the first
Thursday of each month at the
Hardee County School Board
Training Center, 400 S. Florida
Ave. in Wauchula.


STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF APPROVAL OF CONCEPTUAL RECLAMATION PLAN
The Department of Environmental Protection (Department), gives notice of its approval of a Conceptual Reclamation Plan
(MOS-SFMHC-CP) to Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C, Post Office Box 2000, Mulberry, Florida 33860-1100. The 10,856-acre proj-
ect site is located at the Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C., South Fort Meade Hardee County Mine, which lies just south of the
Polk/Hardee County Line, northeast of Wauchula, and mostly east of the Peace River in Hardee County. The project
includes all or portions of Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, 36, Township 33
South, Range 25 East, and all or portions of Sections 5, 6, 7, 8, 18, 19, 30, Township 33 South, Range 26 East.
The reclamation plan includes the creation of 864.6 acres of wetlands and other surface waters. The 296.2 acres of cre-
ated herbaceous wetlands will include 145.3 acres of freshwater marsh, 59.3 acres of wet prairie, 48.5 acres of shrub
swamp, and 43.1 acres of lake littoral zone. The 358.3 acres of forested wetlands will include 208.9 acres of mixed wet-
land hardwood forest, 98.5 acres of bay swamp, 40.6 acres of mixed wetland forest, and 10.3 acres of hydric hammock.
The created surface waters include 29.8 acres of stream channel and forested and non-forested non-wetland floodplain
and 180.3 acres of lakes and cattle ponds. Creation and restoration of a total of approximately 67,397 linear feet of
streams or stream channel segments is also part of the reclamation plan. Approximately 6,891 acres of uplands will also
be created following the completion of reclamation activities. This includes the creation of 5,635 acres of pasture, 139
acres of mixed rangeland, 172 acres of palmetto prairie, 424 acres of coniferous forest, 54 acres of pine flatwoods, 21
acres of xeric oak forest, 24 acres of oak and hardwood forest and 423 acres of mixed forest.
The reclamation plan also includes approximately 3,100 unmined acres including 1,839.4 acres of wetlands and other
surface waters and 1,260.1 acres of uplands. A conservation easement and management plan will be implemented on
2,100 acres of this unmined habitat along the Peace River, Little Charlie Creek, Parker Branch, Lake Dale Branch, Max
Branch, and several wetlands and unnamed tributaries that drain into the Peace River and Little Charlie Creek.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes, (.S.). The petition must contain the infor-
mation set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office df General Counsel of the Department at
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.
Under rule 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, (FA.C.), a person whose substantial interests are affected
by the Department's action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The
Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must
be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for an extension shall toll the running
of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still
grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before
the deadline was the result of excusable neglect.
If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be
affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding.
Intervention will be permitted only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with
rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
In accordance with rules 28-106.111(2) and 62-110.106(3)(a)(4), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing by the
applicant must be filed within 21 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the appli-
cant, and other than those entitled to written notice under subsection 120.60(3), F.S., must be filed within 21 days of pub-
lication of the notice or 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under subsection 120.60(3), F.S.,
however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of
receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The
failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a
waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the following infor-
mation: (a) the name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b)
the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petition-
er's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and ar
explanation of how the petitioner's substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) a state-
ment of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) a statement of all disputed issues of
material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) a concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, includ-
ing the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) a
statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency's
proposed action; and (g) a statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petition-
er wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department's action is based shall state that no such
facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by rule 28-106.301,
F.A.C. Under paragraphs 120.569(2)(c) and (d), F.S., a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the
agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed.
_______ ____________________________________________________________________77 :3c


* 1







July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate Ii


Inside Out
By Chip Ballard


BROWN IS BEAUTIFUL
This piece was written just. before the summer rains set in.
Yesterday morning I mowed my lawn. It was not the first time
I'd mowed this year. I mowed a couple months ago, even though it
didn't need it that much.
It's beenso dry the grass has hardly grown at all. There were
raggedy little patches of weeds here and there, but overall it didn't
look too bad.
But it was dry. Oh, was it dry. I put Kyle on the mower and I
took the weedeater, and we each kicked up so much dust that nei-
ther of us could see the other, even when we were only a few feet
apart.
I mean it was dry.
When we finished, it looked great. What set my lawn apart
from all my neighbors' is that my lawn is brown. I'm not saying
you wouldn't find a sprig of green if you got down on your hands
and knees and crawled around with a magnifying glass. But you
don't see a lot of people doing that these days; and they wouldn't
do it but once in my yard unless they enjoy getting stuck by sand-
spurs. f ,
Now, what a lot of people don't realize is that my lovely brown
lawn didn't just happen by chance. It is the result of a long-range
and carefully-crafted plan.
I first conceived of the idea when I read about the severe water
shortage Florida is facing. At the rate we're using it up, in a few
years we might only be allowed by law to take one shower a week.
That would cut down dramatically on social functions where
you have to be near or downwind of your neighbor. Can you imag-
ine being in a movie theater with 200 or 300 people who hadn't
bathed in a week? I suspect even attendance in church would drop
off considerably.
As I contemplated this scary and smelly future, I saw people
watering their lawns, swearing and shaking their fists at the first
blade of brown grass. I began to wonder who said lawns had to be
green in the first place.
Brown is a color too, and it is just as pretty as green. Did you
ever see a green cow? Of course not. But there are plenty of brown
cows. If the Good Lord thought green was so much lovelier than
brown, He would have made some green cows.
Anyway, as I thought about that I realized I was going to have
to be the one to set the example, to show people that a brown yard
was just as beautiful as a green one. So while all my neighbors
were watering and coddling and babying their lawns like sick chil-
dren, I sat on the porch and watched mine turn brown and with
great pride, I might add.
I didn't mow much, either. Someone please tell me where it's
written, that short grass looks any better than long grass. No one
can, because it isn't written anywhere. That's just a myth, some-
thing somebody made up, like green being better than brown.
I want to tell you that all my many months of not doing any-
thing to my lawn paid off. Late yesterday afternoon thunder rum-
bled in the distance and I stepped out onto the porch to see if it was
going to rain. Not a breath of wind was blowing and the air had
taken on that eerie orange hue that sometimes precedes a storm.
The orange air and my freshly cut brown grass blended into the
most beautiful shade of golden-orange I have ever seen.
Chill bumps ran up and down my spine, and I just stood and
stared in total awe at my creation for a long time.
If the tens of thousands of green-eyed Floridians who water
regularly had' seen that sight, they'd throw their sprinklers in the
garbage and we could all continue to take showers and go to
movies on Friday night and attend church on Sunday.
Readers may e-mail Chip, Ballard at chipkyle746@embarq-
mal.com or visit his Web she at www.chipballard.com


CATCHING CATFISH
The living is easy in Florida this summer, and the catfish are
abundant in the state's fresh waters.
With vacations in full swing and gas prices restricting long-
distance travel, more than ever, we will see anglers from neighbor-
ing states and other areas in Florida coming to wet a line in our pro-
lific waters.
Channel cats (Florida record: 44.5 pounds), with their deeply
forked tails, whiskered faces and spotted sides, are the most com-
mon of our catfish and are found everywhere except the Keys.
Channel catfish typically school where the bottom drops off
sharply to deeper water. They usually do not hide within vegetation
but can be found outside on the deepwater side of weed beds.
Stink baits fished on the bottom are popular for channels.
White catfish (Florida record: 18.9 pounds) share some simi-
larities. However, the tail isn't as deeply forked and the lobes of the
tail fin are more rounded. White catfish prefer live bait, such as a
minnow or worm.
Blue catfish (Florida record: 61.5 pounds) are bigger than
either channels or whites. Not only does their coloring distinguish
them, but the long flat anal fin on their belly and hump in front of
the back fin give them a distinct look. These river fish inhabit fresh
water in Northwest Florida. Use cut or live fish baits with heavy
sinkers and bottom rigs.
Flathead catfish (Florida record: 49.4 pounds), like blues, are
not native to Florida. As a result, intense harvest of them is encour-"
aged. Do not move or live-release flatheads into other waters. They
are solitary fish that are more difficult to catch than the others but
are taken with similar equipment to blues.
Bullheads, the smallest of the targeted catfish, are identified by
squared-off tails and a heavier skull than other catfish. The yellow
bullhead's barbels (whiskers) are pale; on a brown bullhead, the
barbels are dark. Bullheads are caught mostly at night on dough-
balls, or on worms or crickets during daylight hours. They are very
frequently taken for food, and there is no bag limit on them.
Catfish angling shines during the warmer months, but these
fish can be caught year-round. While fishing can be good through-
out the day, catfish are usually most active in the morning and
evening.
Fish on the bottom using a wide variety of baits, from chicken
livers to commercial stink baits, to catch most catfish. Catfish also
can be caught on live baits such as small shiners and minnows
fished near the bottom. Catfish in lakes and ponds with automatic
fish feeders concentrate near these feeders and can be caught on
small pieces of dog food, bread or hot dogs.
Top spots for catching catfish occur all over the state.
Clermont Chain of Lakes, for instance, offers anglers superb
opportunities for channel and white catfish. Cut baits or stink baits
should work well for both species.
Haines Creek, near Leesburg, provides good angling for bull-
heads, channel catfish and white catfish.
Upper Kissimmee Chain of Lakes affords great bullhead,
channel catfish and white catfish opportunities. Catfish are often
found near dropoffs or around bottom structures in the canals.
Southwest Florida Lakes offer many excellent opportunities
for channel catfish and bullhead angling.
Florida earned the title "Fishing Capital of the World" by cou-
pling its great resources with responsible management of those
resources by the Fish & Wildlife Commission. Help keep Florida
the fishing capital by following sound conservation practices.


Inspiration Point
By Rick Leland
Pastor & Columnist


2~


LEFTOVER MEATLOAF
"The battle belongs to the Lord," I said to my wife as she
dashed off to work. Turning around as she opened her car door,
Nancy said, "But we have leftover meatloaf."
I knew what she meant was, "Invite Ted to dinner." He was
going through the meat grinder of life: outright sin, striving to live
up to people's expectations, and pride.
Ted was first to admit his sinful activities. Now repentant, he
still had to deal with the fact that "a person reaps what he sows."
Sin big, little, yours, mine or his there is still a cleanup oper-
ation after we get right with God.
Ted was putting the'battle into the accepting hands of God.
Besides that, Nancy was todsing her homemade meatloaf on the
table as a formidable weapon.
The Bible says, "Though one may be overpowered, two can
defend themselves. A cord of three strands is not quickly broken."
When we gathered around leftover meatloaf plus some other
tasty dishes that evening, Ted looked broken in body, soul and spir-
it. We started slicing the meatloaf, we looked into God's Word, we
prayed, we talked, we dreamed about what God had for Ted's
future. Our faith rose, then soared.
As the meatloaf disappeared, Ted, Nancy and I became a God-
believing, resilient cord of three strands.
Does the battle belong to the Lord? Absolutely, yes. But it is


k


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE PERMIT
The Department of Environmental Protection (Department), gives notice of its intent to issue an Environmental Resource
Permit (Permit # 0221122-004) to Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C., Post Office Box 2000, Mulberry, Florida 33860-1100, to con-
duct phosphate mining activities on approximately 7,756 acres of uplands, wetlands and other surface waters within a
10,856-acre area and to reclaim approximately 7,756 acres of uplands, wetlands and other surface waters following the
completion of mining activities. The project includes disturbance of 751.3 acres of wetlands and other surface waters,
including 274.1 acres of herbaceous wetlands, 277.8 acres of forested wetlands and 199.4 acres of other surface waters.
The herbaceous wetlands consist of 121 acres of freshwater marsh, 49 acres of shrub swamp, 31.7 acres of wet prairie,
50.2 acres of wet pasture and cropland and 22.2 acres of hydric palmetto prairie and rangeland. The forested wetlands
consist of 62.1 acres of bay swamp, 115.3 acres of mixed wetland hardwood forest, 14.9 acres of hydric woodland pas-
ture, 52.7 acres of hydric oak forest, and 32.8 acres of mixed wetland forest. The other surface waters consist of approx-
imately 48 acres of herbaceous non-wetland floodplain, 18.2 acres of forested non-wetland floodplain, and 133.2 acres
of upland cut ditches, cattle ponds, and natural and ditched-natural streams. A total of 60,430 linear feet of streams or
stream segments will be mined or disturbed.
The mitigation plan includes the placement of a perpetual conservation easement on 2,100 acres of unmined habitat
associated with the major riparian systems and the creation of 641.2 acres of wetlands and other surface waters con-
sisting of 253.1 acres of herbaceous wetlands, 358.3 acres of forested wetlands, plus 29.8 acres of created surface
waters. The created herbaceous wetlands will include 145.3 acres of freshwater marsh, 59.3 acres of wet prairie, and
48.5 acres of shrub swamp. The created forested wetlands will include 208.9 acres of mixed wetland hardwood forest,
98.5 acres of bay swamp, 40.6 acres of mixed wetland forest, and 10.3 acres of hydric hammock. The created surface
waters will include stream channels and forested and non-forested non-wetland floodplain. Approximately 67,397 linear
feet of streams or stream channel segments will be created or restored. Mitigation is not required for impacts to 90.6
acres of ditches and cattle ponds. In addition to these wetlands and other surface waters created to meet mitigation
requirements, approximately 180 acres of lakes and 43 acres of associated herbaceous littoral zone wetlands will also
be created as part of the reclamation plan.
The project will also disturb 7,005 acres of uplands for phosphate mining and associated activities. The reclamation plan
will consist of creation of approximately 5,635 acres of pasture, 139 acres of mixed rangeland, 172 acres of palmetto
prairie, 424 acres of coniferous forest, 54 acres of pine flatwoods, 21 acres of xeric oak forest, 24 acres of oak and hard-
wood forest and 423 acres of mixed forest. The reclamation plan also includes approximately 3,100 unmined acres
including 1,839.4 acres of wetlands and other surface waters and 1,260.1 acres of uplands. A conservation easement
and management plan will be implemented on 2,100 acres of this unmined habitat.
The 10,856-acre project site is located at the Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C. South Fort Meade Hardee County Mine, which lies
just south of the Polk/Hardee County Line, northeast of Wauchula, and mostly east of the Peace River in Hardee County.
The project includes all or portions of Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,15, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, 36,
Township 33 South, Range 25 East, and all or portions of Sections 5, 6, 7, 8, 18, 19, 30, Township 33 South, Range 26
East, and includes wetlands and other surface waters associated with the Peace River, Little Charlie Creek, Parker
Branch, Lake Dale Branch, and Max Branch, Class III waters.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes, (F.S.). The petition must contain the infor-
mation set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail -Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.
Under rule 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, (FA.C.), a person whose substantial interests are affected
by the Department's action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The
Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must
be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for an extension shall toll the running
of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may siill
grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before
the deadline was the result of excusable neglect.
If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be
affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding.
Intervention will be permitted only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with
rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
In accordance with rules 28-106.111(2) and 62-110.106(3)(a)(4), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing by the
applicant must be filed within 21 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the appli-
cant, and other than those entitled to written notice under subsection 120.60(3), F.S., must be filed within 21 days of pub-
lication of the notice or 21 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under subsection 120.60(3), F.S.,
however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of
receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The
failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a
waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the following infor
mation: (a) the name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b)
the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petition-
er's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an
explanation of how the petitioner's substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) a state-
ment of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) a statement of all disputed issues of
material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) a concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, includ-
ing the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) a
statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency s
proposed action; and (g) a statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petition-
er wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department's action is based shall state that no such
facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by rule 28-106 301,
F.A.C. Under paragraphs 120.569(2)(c) and (d), FS., a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the
agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed.
This intent to issue constitutes an order of the Department. Subject to the provisions of paragraph 120.68(7)(a), F.S ,
which may require a remand for an administrative hearing, the applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order
under section 120.68, F.S., by the filing of a notice of appeal under rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure
with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35.
Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fSs
with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the
order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The applicant, or any party within the meaning of paragraph 373.114(1)( )
or section 373.4275, F.S., may also seek appellate review of the order before the Land and Water Adjudicatorv
Commission under subsection 373.114(1) or section 373.4275, F.S. Requests for review before the Land and Water
Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20
days from the date when the order is filed with the Clerk of the Department,.


better to go through the battle with friends.
How about you? Do you know any battle-weary ,tul i ,1,,,
might need some meatloaf tonight?
Rick Leland, pastor of The Free Church, is a resident o, Ahi l\,' i
who holds a degree in Christian ministry and has served a /i,
year apprenticeship with the Jerry Jenkins Christian Writcrs ( i/,
His favorite Bible verse comes from 1 John 1:4, "These thin ,'
write that our joy may be complete." His column is publoho' I/ /I
nearly 150 newspapers nationwide.

If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one.
-Mother Tere: a


PUBLIC NOTICE

The Hardee County Board of County Commis-
sioners will conduct their budget workshops
beginning July 21, 2008 July 24, 2008, begin-
ning at 8:30 a.m. each day.

The workshops will be held in the County
Commission Chambers, 412 W. Orange Street,
Room 102, Wauchula, Florida.

For more Information, please call the County
Manager's Office at 863/773-9430.

Dale Johnson, Chairman 7:3,







12B The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008


Light One Candle
By Stephanie Raha
The Christophers.


WHAT IS HOPE?
Here at The Christophers, it's quite common to get requests
from people who want to quote our literature. Since we've been
around over 60 years, we have a large library of material. The
other day I received an e-mail asking about a saying of Father
fames Keller, our founder: "A candle loses nothing of its light by
lighting another candle."
Keller was inspired by the image of candles, and chose the
Chinese proverb "it's better to light one candle than to curse the
darkness" as our motto. Perhaps that was because candles are so
symbolic of hope blazing through the fear, anxiety and helplessness
that can overshadow our lives. And Keller was a man of hope.
Keller truly believed that each and every person can change
the world for the better in some unique way. This is what he said:
"Hope looks for the good in people instead of harping
on the worst.
"Hope opens doors where despair closes them.
"Hope discovers what can be done instead of grum-
bling about what cannot.
"Hope draws its power from a deep trust in God and
the basic goodness of human nature.
"Hope 'lights a candle' instead of 'cursing the dark-
ness.'
"Hope regards problems, small or large, as opportuni-
ties.
"Hope cherishes no illusions, nor does it yield to cyn-
icism.
"Hope sets big goals and is not frustrated by repeated
difficulties or setbacks.
"Hope pushes ahead when it would be easy to quit.
"Hope puts up with modest gains, realizing that 'the
longest journey starts with one step.'
"Hope accepts misunderstandings as the price for
serving the greater good of others.
"Hope is a good loser because it has the divine assur-
ance of final victory."
If we rely on God's grace and use the gifts and opportunities
He gives us, rather than depending only on ourselves, hope will
flourish in the depth of our being. Hope will transform our lives.
Vaclav Havel, the writer and political activist who became the
first president of the Czech Republic, put it this way: "I am not an
optimist, because I am not sure that everything ends well. Nor am
I a pessimist, because I am not sure that everything ends badly. I
just carry hope in my heart.
"Hope," he continued, "is the feeling that life and work have a
meaning. You either have it or you don't, regardless of the state of
the world that surrounds you. Life without hope is an empty, bor-
ing and useless life. I cannot imagine that I could strive for some-
thing if I did not carry hope in me. I am thankful to God for this
gift. It is as big as life itself."
I hope you will never curse the darkness. And I hope you will
always light one candle.
For a free copy of "Keep Hope In Your Heart," write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
mail@christophers.org.


Full Circle
By C.J. Mouser


LOVE/HATE RELATIONSHIP
Somehow or another, I have passed on my love for extreme
weather to my eldest daughter.
Every summer I wait with bated breath for the first thunder-
storm to roll through. I check the weather forecasts diligently and
watch the skies, praying for the black puffy clouds that bring the
rain that somehow raises my spirits more than sunshine ever could
and remind me that I'm alive.
By mid-June, we are in full swing, with rain every day or at
least every other day, and yesterday evening we had our first clas-
sic, violent Florida summer storm.
At first the thunder came to us as a mild rumble off to the
north.
"Was that thunder?" I yelled through the house. This is part of
the fun, responding to that first indicator and running through the
house from window to window, peering out hopefully.
Jill appeared instantly at my elbow. "Coulda been a truck," she
said.
It came again, an insistent growling from the sky.
"It's thunder!" we cried in unison, clutching each other before
racing to the north side of the house.
"Look at the sky! Look how dark it is!" Jillian squealed.
"Oh, yeah! We're gonna get pummeled!" I agreed.
The sky off to the north was a roiling, rolling, black mass, and
as we watched, lightning began to fork off in all directions as the
storm crept ever closer. The next peal of thunder left no doubt, as
it rattled the glass in 'the window panes and sent Frog straight under
Jillian's bed with his tail tucked. Jillian squealed again, hitting high
C, and then whatever note it is that's higher than that.
"Let's go outside!" she said.
"Of course!" I replied.
By the time we got to the front porch, the wind had hit and the
trees were dancing, shaking their branches angrily. The first dime-
sized drops of rain began to hit with insistent thuds and Jill grabbed
my arm and squeezed. "It's gonna rain real hard!" she squeaked.
"Yep, gonna be a patty floater, for sure."
"A frog strangler!"
"Gully washer!"
"Trash toter!"
"Yep,.gonna rain like a cow peein' on a flat rock!" I said.
"Ewww!"
The wind changed direction and suddenly we were being hit
by the raindrops.
"Better go inside," I said.
The local weather radar was being displayed on the television
and we listened to the weather guy tell us what we already sus-
pected ...
".. a severe thunderstorm producing high winds and grape-
sized hail. This storm is traveling southwest at nine miles per hour,
and will produce 2-3 inches of much-needed rain, folks, but it will
bring with it those winds that like to lift roof shingles .
"Did he say hail?" I asked.
"Yep," Jill replied.
"My truck's out there."
"I know."
"You gotta help me move it in the garage."
I "Now?"
"What, you wanna wait 'til it quits raining? Yes, now! I can'
afford a new windshield."
We headed for the door, Frog watching us with eyes like base-
balls from under the edge of the bedspread. The rain was cold,
bracing, invigorating. The thunder crashed, the lightning stabbed.
Jill stood holding the garage door, her hair blowing wildly, so that
I could drive through without the door blowing into the side of my
truck. I parked, turned off the ignition, scoped the rear-view mirror
for Jill. She was gone. I found her-on the back porch.
"I ran," she admitted.
"Hmmm," I said.
It seems that I have passed on my love of angry weather to my
eldest daughter. I have also passed on my fear of the same.


Signed Penny
By Penny Johnson
Q&A With A Biblical Perspective


SECRETS
Q: I just found out something about my friend. I know if I
go to her, the news will hurt her. I feel guilty that I know this
information, and every time I'm around my friend I feel like I
should tell her. Is it wrong to keep this secret to myself or
should I tell my friend what I know?

Signed, Secretive Friend

A: We have to be very careful that we do not conceal infor-
mation that needs to be told. Sometimes a secret needs to be told to
protect people from being hurt. If we are not careful, we could be
actually lying by not sharing things we know.
First of all, your motive has to be right. There are people who
share everything told to them, lies and truth, just because they
enjoy gossiping. There are people who feel they gain friendships
by telling all. Their motive is selfish and not of God.
But, if you're heart is right and your motive is only to protect
your friend, than I would share what you have been told.
Let your friend know that someone shared this with you and


that you're not sure if it's true or not, but that you felt she needed
to hear it. Once you tell her, it is up to her what she does with the
information.
Always pray before doing something like this. Pray that God
will be working on your friend's heart and that she will receive the
information in love. Also, pray for the wisdom to know what to say
and the perfect time to say it. It is very important that you cover.the
whole situation in prayer before making a move. If you do this,
God will open up a perfect time for you and the words will begin
to flow from your mouth easily.
Again, make sure your motives are not vindictive or. selfish,
pray for God to prepare her heart and yours, then go to her in faith
believing that you are doing t'-e right thing. By doing things
according to God's Word, we iin ite Him to go with us and to pros-
per our way. God is faithful.

Signed, Penny
Your questions or comments can be sent to signedpenny@-
yahoo.com or P.O. Box 2604, Wauchula, FL 33873. You can also
visit Penny Johnson's Web site at www.pennyjohnson.net or watch
her shows at www.myhwntv.com


HARDEE COUNTY KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY HELP!
Ease a dependent child's way through the court system.
Volunteer to be a Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE A VARIANCE
The Department of Environmental Protection (Department) gives notice of its intent to issue a variance (File No. 0221122-
006-EV-VE) to Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C., Post Office Box 2000, Mulberry, Florida 33860-1100, under section 378.212,
Florida Statutes, (F.S.), from the provisions of rule 62C-16.0051(6)(a) & (b), Florida Administrative Code, (FA.C), which
provides that at least 25% of the high-water surface area of each water body other than streams shall consist of an annu-
al zone of water fluctuation to encourage emergent and transition zone vegetation; and that at least 20% of the low water
surface shall consist of a zone between the annual low water line and six feet below the annual low water line to provide
fish bedding areas and submerged vegetation zones. This variance will apply to the design of the man-made lakes pro-
posed in Conceptual Reclamation Plan MOS-SFMHC-CR
On October 13, 2006, Mosaic Fertilizer, L.L.C. applied for approval of a conceptual reclamation plan for the Mosaic South
Ft. Meade Hardee County Mine. The project is to conduct phosphate mining activities on approximately 7,756 acres of
uplands, wetlands and other surface waters within a 10,856-acre area and to reclaim approximately 7,756 acres of
uplands, wetlands and other surface waters following the completion of mining activities. On October 13, 2006, Mosaic
submitted a petition for a variance, under section 378.212, F.S., from the provisions of rule 62C-16.0051 (6)(a) & (b),
F.A.C. The variance will be permanent.
The technique that Mosaic is proposing is to design and construct the reclaimed lakes at the South Fort Meade Hardee
County Mine so that the littoral zone vegetation is concentrated in several broad, shallow areas including the outlet of
the man-made lakes. This will be accomplished by constructing several broad shallow shelves then planting the shelves
with the herbaceous and transitional species. This design provides the environmental benefit of having the herbaceous
vegetation required for the man-made lake placed so that filtration is increased for any water overflowing from the man-
made lakes during stormwater events and other high water situations. By constructing the man-made lakes in this fash-
ion, the environmental benefit of filtration is increased at the outlet. Wildlife benefits by having several more extensive
wetland ecosystems concentrated around the man-made lake. Wildlife will also benefit by enhanced water quality down-
stream of the man-made lakes that will be more conducive to healthy fish populations, which in turn benefits wildlife that
prey on the fish and other aquatic species populations. This design also provides more useable shoreline for boating,
fishing and recreational activities along the remaining shoreline
The location of the littoral zone vegetation component in several broad, shallow shelves including the outlet of the man-
made lakes is not expected to result in any on-site or off-site impacts. Except for this variance, the. man-made lakes are
expected to meet the requirements of rule 62C-16.0051, F.AC., and be adequate to support healthy fish populations.
Existing man-made lakes on lands previously mined for hosphate support healthy populations of fish. Several
reclaimed man-made lakes are currently being managed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to
provide the public recreational fishing opportunities.
To encourage the development of new technology that will improve the quality of restored lands, the Department intends
to issue a variance pursuant to section 378.212, F.S., from the provisions of rule 62C-16.0051 (6)(a) & (b), F.A.C, which
provides that at least 25% of the high-water surface area of each water body other than streams shall consist of an annu-
al zone of water fluctuation; and that at least 20% of the low water surface shall consist of a zone between the annual
low water line and six feet below the annual low water line. Of the four man-made lakes proposed, one will meet the rule
requirement of 25% of littoral zone; two (2) of the lakes will have a littoral zone over 20% of the total area; and the remain-
ing lakes will have.a littoral zone of just under 14% of the total area.
Under this intent to issue, this variance is hereby granted subject to the applicant's compliance with any requirement in
this intent to publish notice of this intent in a newspaper of general circulation and to provide proof of such publication
in accordance with section 50.051, FS. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department
unless a sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed under sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS., as pro-
vided below. If a sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed, this intent to issue automatically becomes
only proposed agency action on the application, subject to the result of the administrative review process. Therefore,
on the filing of a timely and sufficient petition, this action will not be final and effective until further order of the
Department. When proof of publication is provided, if required by this intent, and if a sufficient petition is not timely filed,
the variance will be issued as a ministerial action. Because an administrative hearing may result in the reversal or sub-
stantial modification of this action, the applicant is advised not to commence construction or other activities until the
deadlines noted below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing or request for an extension of time have expired
and until the variance has been executed and delivered. Mediation is not available.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS. The petition must contain the information set forth below and
-must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the -Department at 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.
Under rule 62-110.106(4), FA.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may also
request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown,
grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel
of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the appli-.
cable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the
request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party
showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect.
If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be
affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding.
Intervention will be permitted only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with
rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
In accordance with subsection 378.212(3), F.S., petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed with-
in 14 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those
entitled to written notice under subsection 120.60(3), F.S., must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice or with-
in 14 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under subsection 120.60(3), F.S., however, any per-
son who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of such notice,
regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The
failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a
waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the following infor-
mation: (a) the name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if known; (b)
the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petition-
er's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an
explanation of how the petitioner's substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) a state-
ment of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) a statement of all disputed issues of
material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) a concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, includ-
ing the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) a
statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency's
proposed action; and (g) a statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petition-
er wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department's action is based shall state that no such
facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by rule 28-106.301,
F.A.C. Under paragraphs 120.569(2)(c) and (d), F.S., a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the
agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed.
This intent to issue a variance constitutes an order of the Department. Subject to the provisions of paragraph
120.68(7)(a), F.S., which may require a remand for an administrative hearing, the applicant has the right to seek judicial
review of the order under section 120.68, F.S., by the filing of a notice of appeal under rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of
Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of appeal accompanied by the appli-
cable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the
date when the order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. 7:3


m








")-2
- il V~l ~3U~OS rY!


HE WORKED AT FURNITURE Buying Or Fixing A House?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Whatever the housing need,
the county may have a program
for it.
As housing costs decline and
interest rates are low, this may
be the best time to buy or build
a home.
Among several programs of
the Hardee County Office of
Community Development
(OCD), low and moderate in-
come singles, couples or fami-
lies may obtain up to $40,000
for down payment and closing
costs. Other programs provide
funds for single-family, owner-
occupied homes to repair them
and/or make them handicapped
accessible or in compliance
with county codes.
When someone applies for
any program, OCD takes a good
look at any and all of its hous-
:ing programs to combine re-
sources for this person. If the
applicants have credit issues
preventing them from getting a
home loan, OCD has a certified
credit counselor available at no
charge to help them clean up
their credit history.
Since all of Hardee County
was affected by the 2004 hurri-
canes, funds are still available


for replacement housing, new
or existing homes. It only
requires that an applicant has
not owned a home in Hardee
County in the last three years.
Housing programs can pro-
vide up to $40,000, but is limit-
ed to the difference between the
first mortgage and final cost of
the home and property, which
cannot exceed $189,600.
A soft, or second, lien for the
amount of the housing program
contribution is recorded, but
does not accrue interest. In fact,
if the family resides in the home
for 10 years, half of it is forgiv-
en. If they stay in the home for
20 years, all of the debt is
erased. If they sell the home
during the 20-year length of the
housing lien, there is a propor-
tionate amount of repayment
due.
The only requirements are
that applicants keep the first
mortgage payments paid up,
pay taxes and hazard property
insurance and maintain the
home in good condition.
,_Alternate housing programs
heippeople get essential repairs
completed. Again, these funds
are for single family, owner-
occupied homes, not mobile
homes or Auplexes, etc.


The goal of these programs is
not just to remodel a home.
Once again, the county has
received an annual $350,000
grant called SHIP (State
Housing Initiatives Partner-
ship). The money is available
particularly for people with low
or moderate incomes, with pref-
erence given to elderly or dis-
abled.
Funds can be used to fix leak-
ing or sagging roofs, broken
windows, rotted siding, plumb-
ing or electrical wiring, founda-
tions or floors, heating, drafty
doors and any other weatheriza-
tion or structural problems.
which hazard the health, safety'
and well-being of the home's
residents. It can also include.
handicapped access for the
elderly or physically impaired,
such as wheelchair ramps.
Again, funds are provided in
the form of an interest-free loan
or lien, with provision that the
homeowner maintain the home,
pay the taxes and insurance and
keep mortgage payments cur-
rent.
For information, visit OCD at
Room 201, Courthouse Annex
I, 412 W. Orange St., Wau-
chula, or www.hardeecoun-
ty.net or call 773-6349.


By BRITTANY SPEARS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your name?
A: William Sam Spears.
Q: Where and when were you
born?
A: Wauchula, June 28, 1927.
Q: Who are your parents and do
you have siblings?
A: My
parents
were W.H.
Spears and
Ruby Dean
Spears. I
had one-brother (Ray Spears) and one
sister (Betty Henderson).
Q: What did your parents do for a
living?
A: They were farmers, growing their
own vegetables, strawberries and rais-
ing cattle.
Q: Where did you go to school and
what was it like?
A: He went to Wauchula, Torrey and
Fort Green. He said it was a lot of
walking and the teachers gave him lots
of homework. The schools that he went
to are not standing today.
Q: What kind of responsibilities did
you have?
A: He had to help in the fields every
afternoon after school and do chores.
Q: How did you spend your spare
time?
A: He didn't really have any spare
time because he had to help in the
fields. When he did have spare time, he
read comic books and went rabbit hunt-
ing with friends.
Q: What was your first job?
A: He joined the U.S. Navy in May
1945 and served two years on the USS
Princeton CV-38, where he was one of
three who cooked for the chiefs. When
he came out of the service, he farmed
for a year and went to work with Lloyd
Jernigan at Wauchula Furniture store as
a salesman. Eventually his father, W.H.
spears, bought and ran the store until
the '70s, where he then purchased it
from his father until the store closed in
the early '90s
Q: What are some changes you
have seen in the world?
A: The improvement of the electron-
ics, gas prices, men and women in
space, and the worst change he has
seen in the world today is all of the


wars.
Q: What was going on in your time
period?
A: World War II, Third National
Policy, Attack on Pearl Harbor,
Depression.
Back In Time is the result of a class
As soon as man does not take his existence for granted,
but beholds it as something, unfathomably mysterious,
thought begins.


assignment given to ninthgr#ders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Brittany Spears and her grandfather, Sam
Spears.


Leadership for a Change

_B~___________I


David D.



Durastanti


November 4th, 2008


for


Superintendent of

Schools
www.ForOurKidsFuture.com


Qualified Conservative Proven Leader


Thank you to all the citizens of Hardee County who have:

VContacted me
VSigned my qualifying petitions
VSupported my entry into the campaign

During the next four months I hope to see you
on the campaign trail.
I will make every attempt to visit you.
I look forward to listening to your concerns.

Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by David D. Durstanti Campaign Account, Approved by David D. Durastanti, Republican,
Chet Huddleston, Campaign Treaturer


SDog Daj of tiummor


Thursday, July 3


~ 11 am


-2pm


We have all been fighting


through these


i
Holidays Hours
Sales
Fri., July 4 ~ 9 am -4pm
Sat., July 5 ~ Closed
Service
Fri. & Sat.
.1 Closed


unique economic times, so come by to take

a break and enjoy a FREE hot dog and

drink with your friends at English Chevrolet.

We are doing this to show our appreciation

to our past, current and future customers.

Serving Hardee County Since 1979!
1- w 10arm Iw -I m


Visit our website:
www.englishchrysler.com

i.


STORE, THEN OWNED IT


iE ONE


-- IIII I


m


m


w I I










2C The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008





-Schedule Of Weekly Services


BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................ 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ...........
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.;
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
- Morning Worshipmw .-............10:30'a.m.
Youth Grbup Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
-375-3100
Sunday School..................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .... ..... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ......... ............ 7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH k,
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 375-2253
Bible Study ....................... .9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship...............10:45 a.nm.
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.im
Wednesday Supper .......... .5:30 p m. -,
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.in
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCII
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................ 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ............9...9:45 a.m.
M morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ...... ........ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD


Printed as a Public Service
by ,-
.The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula, Florida .

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ....:...7:00 p.m. CHARLIE CREEK
S -- ..--- -BAPTIST-C IURCII -
IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO 6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
105 DixiagSt. 375-3370 astor James Bland
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m. 'Sunday School ....... ......... 9:45 a.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m. :Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m. Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.


IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCHII
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School ................9...9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............7...7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CIHURCII
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ................9...9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .... ........ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ............7..... 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAII BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ................. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1 :00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7.00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


Help your brother's boat
across, and your own will
reach the shore.


CIIURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study .......... ........... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..... ........ 11:00 a.m.
W wednesday ................... ....7:00 p.m .
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576





The J I~~ig'N '

Herld-AdvocF/ilate l
HareeCluqsHomton Cveag


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dorm. ......9:45 am.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico................ 6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Leaming ..6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs. ...... ........ 7:30 p.m.


ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CIIURCII
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Conun.
Sunday School ...:...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Eveni" j W orship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............. 7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .... ........ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training...................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............. 7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
.............................................. 6 :3 0 p .m .
Wednesday Prayer Time .........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
-.' :'. Rd.
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m..
-Eiglishg SeMvEI ........ ..... 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Praye ........................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCII
IIARDEE CAMPUS
225 E. Main St. (City Hall
Auditorium)
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday ................................ 0:00 a.m .

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ................ 7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................. 7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations.


Lighthouse Min ..........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA IIISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Veiln con to fainilia y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
D om ingos ..............................6:00 p.r
M iercoles............................ 7:00 p.m

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


WAUCHULA

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting .............. 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood .........................1...11:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. 735-8681
Sunday School ..................10:00 a7.m.
Sunday Morning .................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night ................ 7:30 p.m.


EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion .................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio.................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio.............. 10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m .
Morning Service .................. 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service..................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yi. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITHII PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCHII
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TElIPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
[Wednesday Night Service......7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
M morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Family Night Supper ............. 5:00p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Mtg............6:00 p.m
M& M Kids's Klub................6:00 p.m
(Music & Missions 4 yr -grade 5)
IMPACT (Jr. High)...............6:20 p.m
(Youth Worshipf./r gr: 6-8)
323 (Sr. High)....................... 6:30 p.m
(Youth Worship.obr gr:9-12)
FIRST BAPTISTCHIURCIT-
MISION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical .............. 9:45 a.m.
Servicio dc Adoracion..........I 1:00 a.m.
Predicacion ....................1... 1:30 a.m .
Estudio Biblic, Miercoles ......7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN ( 1.11 R II
.1121 W. Lpuisiana St. 773-9243,
SUNDAY:
Children's Programming
(0-12th grade)......... 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
D inner .................................... 5:30 p.m .
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
(Lil'K)/Sonshine Singers
..................................6:30-8:00 p.m .
Jam Team.................... 6:30-7:15 p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups
...................... ........... 7 :15-8:00 p.m .
6-12th Grade (Oasis)....6:30-8:00 p.m.
Adult Bible Study.........6:30-8:00 p.m

FIRST.CHURCH OF
TIHE-l IZRENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .............:......10:00 a.m.
M morning Service ....... '. .....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, Prayer ..........7...7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPITIST CHURCH
1347 Mat-tin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School' ......................9:30 a.m .
Morning Service ............1...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6...6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/.
Bible Study ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......... ... ..... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship. I11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

.FLORIDI)A'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CIHURCII
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m .
Sunday Morning Worship....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service..........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Ministries ........7:00 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning S'crvice ............... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.
IIEARTLANI)
COMMUNITY CHIIURCII
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts.................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a m .
W orship .............................. 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner .. ............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuildeis Adult Cl.
Crossroads &


*Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6...6:00 p.m.
.Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship ................7...7:30 n.m.


The Brooklyn Bridge, in
New York, is a suspension
bridge that contains enough
wire: in its cables to stretch
more than halfway around
the world.


WAUCHULA

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Morning ................10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Evening .................. 4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
113 N. 7th Ave.
Sunday Service .... ............ 11:00 a.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ................ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Church Training .... ............ 5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship .... ........6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
M orn. W orship ......................(1st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3', Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2''- & 41' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ........................11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

" PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US IIwy 17
:Morning Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.......:........7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9TH Ave. 773-6418
Sunday Service............1...0:00 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ................ 7:00 a.m.
(English) ..............8...8:30 a.m.
(Spanish).................11:00 a.m .
(Creole)......................1:00 p.m .
Daily .Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SECOND CHANCE BIBLE
CHURCH
1511 US Hwy 17 N. 873-1148
Sunday School.......................9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
SWednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
SBC A.filiation

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHIIURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
STues. Prayer Meetinig .......... 7:00 p.m.

SOUTIISIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946


WAUCHULA

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.'
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train.........7:00 p.m,.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.!
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.
[ WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Church...............................' 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .... ........7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer...... ............ 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.'
Saturday Worship .... ............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ..................1.. 0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .... ............7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .................7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
1720 W. Main
773-2929
Sunday Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.'
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all Services. ;


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch. Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ...... ......... ...........10:00 a.m :

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.,
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.


EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .............7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..........7...7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. 735-2524 773-
0989
Sunday School ..... .........10:00 a.m.
W orship.............. ........... 11:00 a.m.
Evening..................................6:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet. ..7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

-'NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER-
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.:
Wed. Youth & FT.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.
SPRIMERA MISSION" 1-

BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
.............................................. 7 :00 p .m .
I Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .................. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.'
5th Sunday .................6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School ............9:45 a.m?;
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship ...........7-9 p.m.,

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones........................ 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina ................................ 11:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................ 8:00 p.m ,
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Training Union ..................... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer 7...... ......7:00 p.m,




SEEDS
FROM

THE
SOWER
UP,~ elA G.'ao DO
Mkul& ,' Georj1
A Japanese magazine came
out with a butterfly on a page.
It was dull gray. But touch it
with your hand, and it trans-
formed into a rainbow of
color.
David was like that. He was
a shepherd. His life was a dull
gray. But the Lord touched
him. He became a poet and
wrote the Psalms. They glow
with glory.
Moses was like that. At
forty he was a murderer, hid-
ing in the desert. His life was
a dull gray. But the Lord
touched him. He became a
deliverer.
Is your life dull? Call on the
Lord. His touch will transform
your life into a flashing rain-
bow of color.


CPeacc 'iocer growers


Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL







July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Greetings from Fort Green
Fort Green is getting rain.
We are not complaining, yet,
but it did rain one and a half
inches the afternoon fertilizer
was put in the grove that morn-
ing! Everyone thinks and I do
also, that the price of food is up,
gas is expensive, electricity 'is
through the sky but the fertiliz-
er is also. Will it ever stop? I
do wonder how people on real-
ly fixed incomes manage?
Happy Birthday greetings go
to Gwen Albritton. She cele-
brated another milestone on
June 29th.
Betty Abbott called me and
said she and Al would have cel-
ebrated their 63rd wedding
anniversary on June 29. They
married in June 1945 amid the
quotes "it won't last!" She was
a young beautiful girl from
Maine and Al, a young dashing
soldier from Florida. They
came to Fort Green and the rest
is history!! Betty has retained
her delightful accent and is still
a very pretty lady. You can see
why Al was swept off his feet!
(Betty always called Albert E.
Abbott, Jr., Al while most of his
siblings called him Junior.)
When you lose a spouse you
still always remember their
birthday, the anniversary date
and recall the warm feelings
you had and the wonderful life
two people can experience.
Colin Cooper had an accident
this past week. Cows can be a
problem. He had some prob-
lem cows that knocked him
down and resulted in a serious
accident. He was airlifted to
Tampa General and was sche-
duled for back surgery Monday
morning, June 30. His sister,
Vianna Grimsley was up from
Fort Myers visiting another
cousin when she got the news.
Barbara Casey and I went to
Tampa with Vianna on Monday
for Colin's surgery. The spinal
surgery should prevent paraly-
sis. All you ranchers be careful
with those nice, sweet cows. It
is always the gentle ones that
seem to hurt you. We once had
an Angus bull, aptly named
"Sweetie", that rolled Kay


Silverman all around the lot
until he rolled him near enough
the fence and he could roll
under it. We all were more
careful with that sweet old bull!
He was just greedy that day and
wanted more of the pellets that
we hand-fed him!
Vacation Bible School is over
for another year at Fort Green
Baptist. Tammy Waters was the
director and she does an out-
standing job. She is always
complimenting the workers and
seems to call all the students by
their names. That is a big
accomplishment when you have
an average attendance of 40 stu-
dents per night. Fort Green is
unique with its Bible School.
It is a community affair. You
do not have to be a member or
attend Fort Green Baptist to be
a worker. This let's us get better
acquainted with our neighbors!
We really appreciate all of
them. Fort Green feeds the stu-
dents and workers every night.
This is possibly different from
the other churches but I do not
know, but, Fort Green has some
terrific cooks.
They prepare the usual kid
delight meals like corn dogs,
pizza, etc but one night they
also cooked for us country
adults and have lima beans,
rice, corn bread, onions, and
tea! Once the word is out, quite
a few people turn up for supper!
It is a treat when Judy Bargeron
cooks her cornbread using but-
termilk and Elizabeth Powell,
Faye Davis, Anita Keene, Pat
Gugle, and Edith Bassett pre-
pare all the other delicious food.
The Kitchen Crew really does a
terrific job. Besides the meal,
they have adorable snacks.
Example of adorable, this year
the theme was on a Hawaiian
Island. Some of the cookies
were shaped like surf boards,
flip-flops, flowers etc. Now,
that takes some thought and lots
of time! It was a good
Vacation Bible School week in
the community of Fort Green.
Besides the good food, the kids
learned the best food, food for
their souls. Brother Brian
Laker said two students had


accepted the Lord and he will
be talking more with them and
their parents. That is the reason
behind all the hard work that
goes into a spirit high week for
teachers! The closing ceremony
was on Friday night and the
parents watched as the students
recited memory verses and sing
songs. It is an awesome expe-
rience.
Ruben McQuaig attended the
Friday night VBS program and
does not look like he is recover-
ing from a heart attack. He says
he is feeling good but I did not
see him holding grandson,
Dakoda, though he was there!
Chris and Slick Thompson were
able to attend. Chris has been
sick and missed church lately.
It was good to see them.
There are always people you
have not seen for some time and
are surprised to learn their son
or daughter is old enough to
come to VBS! Members who
no longer attend Fort Green will
bring their children to VBS and
this is wonderful. It was great to
see the parents who are still
members of Fort Green but
have. moved to town, etc.
VBS keeps you in touch!
Clay Samuels enjoyed visit-
ing his grandparents last week.
He has really grown taller. He
also attended VBS.
Kenny Watson is home and is
better but he is still not feeling
like jumping any fences. Con-
tinue to pray that he gets totally
recovered.
Angie Sonnier and Connie
Coker flew up to Tennessee to
spend five days with Amber
Coker and to help her celebrate
her 25th birthday. They had a
grand time and visited many
sights in Tennessee, including
Nashville. They toured the city,
visiting the interesting sites in
"Music City." Amber has a few
more classes before she will be
a certified air traffic controller.
Doris Thornton is back home
and reports a terrific vacation
but very glad to be home. The
old adage, "there's no place like
home," is very true.
Paul Clark has a doctor visit
on July 1. Please pray that the


tumor has disappeared, or will
shortly, and Paul will be healed.
Faye Chancey enjoyed two
weeks of vacation. Some of the
nights were spent at Bible
School, plus she enjoyed hav-
ing her sister, Doris visit from
Avon Park. Her sister-in-law,
Bonnie Keene had knee sur-
gery. Remember Bonnie and
pray for a full and speedy
recovery. __
Sherman Cooper's group, the
Royal Heirs, had a good sing
over at New Elam. The music
was good and the refreshments
delightful. I always talk about
our good cooks, but I learned
New Elam has some mighty
good cooks. Their "finger
food" was delicious. There
were quite a few visitors, ac-
cording to David Spencer and
this made the Royal Heirs feel
good. Of course, they all could
have come to hear Sara Spencer
as she sang three songs and did
a mighty fine job. Norma
Alejandro used to attend this
church so the Randy Davis fam-
ily came to the sing. Norma
always enjoys attending New
Elam. Pauline and Ernie Hen-
drickson were there as was John
Deere. Debbie Waller and Mrs.
Pauline Walker attended.
One interesting item Mrs.
Pauline Walker wondered was
if anyone went there who
attended the Old Elam Church
on SR 555 and the answer was
yes, a Mr. and Mrs. Miller.
One of the storms blew down
the old church, thus the New
Elam. Mrs. Walker met her hus-
band at the Old Elam Church
back when the mode of trans-
portation was horse and buggy.
She enjoyed reminiscing and
talking about the old church
with the Millers. The Walker
Family still takes care of the
Old Elam cemetery. New Elam
is a pretty little church in the
Ona community.
Jamie Harrison will be leav-
ing the 30th for basic training.
Bud, Connie, Ashley, Jamie and
others went fishing Friday.
Connie said everybody caught
'fish but- only one was large
enough to keep. This proves the
REA calendar I always check to
see if I should go fishing or not
is not always correct. It said
Friday was a bad day to fish!
Anyway, I now know why they
did not holler for all the neigh-
bors to come for the fish fry!


Everyone, please remember
to keep Jamie in prayer. We
should pray for all our military,
but remember, he is now one of
Fort Green's own!
Incidentally, I am also a year
older! I celebrated my birthday


on the 30th. When I turn 80, if I
am able, I plan to give myself a
big party! I did this when 1
turned 60!
Please let me know of any
news in our lovely part of
Hardee County.


My Life

Where is my life?
Oh, where are my dreams?
I was happy just to see the world unfold each day
Every person I see looked happy, I was happy
I would see only the good in people
I was young and the world was young
The days went slow and we took our time doing things,
I always said there is time to do that another day.

My life
Now the world is going around so fast
30 years are gone like a blink of eye
Now I think back and wished
I had tried to be a better person
Friends, where are my friends?
I know many people, but I can't
find one friend.

Why did I look anywhere for a friend
When You were therefore me always?
Why did I feel lonely when You were there
Always waiting for me to come to You
When I was sad You were there with a smile
When I was lost You found me and gave me a hug
And said you are OK everything will turn out
Fine. Thank You, thank You for finding me.
Jesus is my forever friend. I was lost and now
I have found You, my sweet Jesus.

Maria Luz (Escobar)
De La Rosa
Sebring
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE ANNEXING CERTAIN PROPERTY INTO
THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2008-18 will be presented to the City Commission for approval upon the first
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 14th day of
July 2008; at 6:00 PM. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the
office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any per-
son may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed
Ordinance is entitled as follows:
ORDINANCE 2008-18
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR THE ANNEXATION OF APPROXIMATELY 2.430 ACRES LOCATED AT
SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE, WAUCHULA, DESIGNATED AS THE "PEGGY
MURPHY PROPERTY", INTO THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE CITY
OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida.
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT City Clerk
City of Wauchula


6:26-7:3c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE ANNEXING CERTAIN PROPERTY INTO
THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2008-19 will be presented to the City Commission for approval upon the first
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 14th day of
July 2008, at 6:00 PM. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the
office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any per-
son may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed
Ordinance is entitled as follows:
ORDINANCE 2008-19
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR THE ANNEXATION OF APPROXIMATELY 1.197 ACRES LOCATED AT
1070 SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE, WAUCHULA, DESIGNATED AS THE
"HANCHEY WARD PROPERTY", INTO THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF
THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PRO-
VIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT City Clerk
Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire City of Wauchula
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula




SANDPIPER DRIVE

PROPOSED
ANNEXATION
WITHI/REZONE F.I.N.R.
& COMP PLAN
AMENDMENT







Nt I





6:26-7:3c








4C The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNT

Case No. 2008000219CA
ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS,
INC, A CALIFORNIA CORPORA-
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SULTANA RAZZAQUE et al,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated June 13, 2008,
and entered in Case No.
2008000219CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit
in and for Hardee County, Florida,
wherein ACCREDITED HOME
LENDERS, INC, A CALIFORNIA
CORPORATION, is a Plaintiff and
SULTANA RAZZAQUE;
MOHAMMED ABDURRAZZAQUE;
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REG-
ISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.
(MERS) AS NOMINEE FOR
ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS,
INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORA-
TION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the
Defendants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at 417
W. Main St, Wauchula, FL, at 11:00
am on July 16, 2008, the following
described property as set forth in
the said Final Judgment, to wit:

PLEASE SEE ATTACHED SCHED-
ULE "A" HERETO AND MADE A
PART THEREOF
Parcel 1:
Begin at SW corner of NE
1/4 of Section 1, Township
34 South, Range 25 East;
and run North 582.5 feet to
P.O.B.; thence continue
North 26 1/2 feet; thence
East 120 feet; thence South
155.15 feet; thence North
4300'29" West a distance
of 175.93 feet to RO.B.,
Hardee County, Florida.

Parcel 2:
Begin at SW corner of NE
1/4 of Section 1, Township
34 South, Range 25 East
for P.O.B.; thence run North
582.5 feet; thence run
Southeasterly in a straight
line to a point begin 535
feet East of P.O.B.; thence
run West 535 feet to point
of beginning. Subject to
State Road rights of way,
Hardee County, Florida.

Parcel 3:
A portion of the NE 1/4 of
Section 1, Township 34
South, Range 25 East,
Hardee County, Florida,
being more particularly
described as follows:
Commence at the SW cor-
ner of the NE 1/4 of Section
1, thence North 89o30'59"
'East along the South line of
NE 1/4 of Section 1 for a
distance of 535 feet; thence
North 4231'08: West for a
distance of 55.28 feet to a
point on the North right of
way line of State Road #64-
A for P.O.B.; thence contin-
ue North 4231 '08" West for
a distance of 247.45 feet;
thence South 8952'09"'
East and parallel to the
North right of way line of
State Road #64-A for a dis-
tance of 442.85 feet; thence
South 007'51" West a dis-
tance of 182 feet to a point
on the North right of way
line of State Road #64-A;
thence North 8952'09"
West along said right of
way line for a distance of
275.20 feet to P.O.B.
Parcel 4:
A portion of the NE 1/4 of
Section 1, Township 34
South, Range 25 East,
Hardee County, Florida,
being more particularly
described as follows:
S Commence at the SW cor-
ner of the NE1/4 of
Section 1; thence North
*89o30'59" East along the
South line of NE 1/4 of
Section 1 for a distance of
535 feet; thence N North
4231'08" West for a dis-
tance of 55.28 feet to a
point on the North right of
way line of State Road
#64-A; thence continue
North 4231'08" West for a
distance of 247.45 feet;
thence South 89052'09"'
East and parallel to the
North right of way line of
State Road $#64-A for a
distance of 442.85 feet for
P.O.B.; thence continue
South 89052'09" East
359.00 feet, thence South
007'51" West a distance of
182 feet to a point on the
North right of way line of
State Road #64-A; thence
North 89o52'09" West
along said right of way line


for a distance of 359.00
feet; thence North 007'51"'
East 182 feet to P.O. B.

Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated this 13 day of June, 2008.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing a reasonable


accommodation to partic
this proceeding should,
than seven (7) days prior,
the Clerk of the Court's d
coordinator at 86377321
W. ORANGE ST. RM
WAUCHULA FL, 33873. If
Impaired, contact
8009558771 via Florida
System.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT C
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRC
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLOI

Case No. 25-2007-CA
AVELO MORTGAGE, LLC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VERNON GREENE A/K/A V
NON R. GREENE; COLETT
GREENE; et al,
Defendantss.


Ipate In
no later
contact


isability
61, 412
A102,
hearing
(TDD)
i Relay


6:26 7:*"3c
OF THE
UIT,

RIDA,

I000567





lER-
rE


RENOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated June 3,
2008, and entered In Case No. 25-
2007 CA000567, of the Circuit
Court of the IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA Judicial
Circuit in and for HARDEE County,
Florida. AVELO MORTGAGE, LLC,
is Plaintiff and VERNON GREENE
A/K/A VERNON R. GREENE;
COLETTE GREENE; LONG'S AIR
CONDITIONING, INC., are defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the North
Front Door of the HARDEE County
Courthouse at 417 West Main
Street, Wauchula, Fl 33873 at
11:00 a.m., on the 16 day of July,
2008, the following-described
property as set forth In said Final
Judgment, to wit:

LOTS 49, 50, 51, AND 52,
BLOCK 1 OF MOUNT ZION
SUBDIVISION BOWLING
GREEN, ACCORDING TO
THE MAP OR PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BAR A-13, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

IMPORTANT: In accordance with
the Americans with Disabilities
Act, if you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate In
this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to provision of
certain assistance. Please contact
the Court Administrator at 417 W.
MAIN STREET, WAUCHULA, FL
33873. Phone No. 863-773-4174
within 2 working days of your
receipt of this notice or pleading.

Dated this 3rday of June, 2008.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of said Court
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk

"Any person claiming an Interest
in the surplus from the sale, If any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Us Pendens
msut file a claim within 60 days
after the sale."
6:26; 7:3c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

Case No.: 25-2008-CA-000175
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE STRUC-
TURED ASSET SECURITIES
CORPORATION MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-OPT1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARIDAD ROQUE, et al,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
FELIX ROGUE
Last Known Address 255 Soggy
Bottom Ln, Wauchula, FL 33873
Current Mailing Address: PO Box
1337, Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
Also Attempted at: 55 E. 36th St,
Hialeah, FL 33013 and 3300
Astoria Ave., Sebring, FL 33875
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:

SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "'W
Tract 6: Begin at the NE
corner of the NW 1/4 of
Section 6; Township 34
South, Range 26 East, and
run West 1322.58 feet;
thence South 0*06'20" East
331.33 feet to the PO.B.;
thence continue South
006'20" East 331.33 feet;
thence East 661.84 feet to
the center line of a 50 foot
private road; thence North
009'10" West 331.32 feet;
thence West 661.57 feet to
P.O.B., Hardee .County,
Florida.

Together with and subject
to the following easement:
Begin at the NE corner of
NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section
6, Township 34 South,
Range 26 East, and run
West 661.29 feet for P.O.B.,
thence continue West 25
feet to a point 636.29 feet
East of NW corner on NE
1/4 of NW 1/4 of said
Section 6, thence South
009'10" East to the South


Women's Games Close


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two of the three games
played in the Women's Church
Softball League last week w-rc-
close encounters.
The score on the only Tues-
day game was a bit more spread
and the Tuesday late game was
cancelled by thunder and light-
ning.
By, the week's end, First
Methodist Church of Wauchula
had increased its lead in the
standings with a 4-0 record.
Both Holy Child Catholic and
Alpha & Omega/Freedom
Ministries are at 2-1. Behind
them are United Methodist of
Zolfo Springs, Celebration-
Hardee Campus, First Christian
Church and New Hope Baptist
Church.
In Tuesday's only game
United Methodist upended First
Christian Church 23-15.
Angel Ussery, Sarah, Priscilla
and Elaine all circled the bases
three times for United Metho-
dist. Jessica and Megan added
twin tallies, and Donna and
Lorie had solo scores.
For First Christian, in its first
game of the season, Melissa
Albritton led with a trio of
scores. Paige Massey, Staci
Stanford, Ketus and Nikki Mil-
by added dual scores and Sandy
Driskell, Anna, Becky and Tina


Hewett each added a run.
In the early game on Thurs-
..ay, Alpha & Omega chal-
lenged First Methodist in a 9-7
loss.
First Methodist picked up
four runs in the second frame,
added two more in the third,
one in the fifth and two in the
seventh inning. Heather Heine
was the only batter to get to
home plate twice. Megan
Smith, Jamie Rivas, Elene Sal-
as, Mary Morgan, Kim Tyson,
Diane Brummett and Jackie
Vessels each touched home
twice. Aimee Dellepere
was stranded all three times she
got on base.
Wanda Stettler and Sami Jo
Morgan each came around the
basepaths twice for Alpha &
Omega. Amy Franks, Lori Dees
and Jodi Griffin each came
home once. Several other bat-
ters were stranded.
In the Thursday nightcap, it
was Celebration skipping pasi
First Christian 11-8.
Lizanne, Erica and Patricia
all -scored two runs for Cele-
bration. Jaime, Gloria Solis,
Erica Ureste and Autumn each
added a run.
Leadoff batter Massey scored
three times for First Christian.
Stanford, Albritton, Ketus,
Driskell and Nikki Milby added
a run each.


Fighting Obesity In Toddlers


With childhood obesity con-
tinuing its dramatic rise, it's
clear that America's weight
problem has moved beyond just
affecting adults.
According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), nearly 14 percent of
children ages 2 to 5 are over-
weight, putting them at
increased risk of becoming
obese adults.
Experts agree that the key to
combating these weighty statis-
tics is to get parents involved
with their children at an .early
age to teach them the impor-
tance of healthy eating habits
and exercise. That explains why
. a new project called Sprout
Smart, from the folks behind
the popular and well-respected
PBS KIDS Sprout television
network for preschoolers, is
generating such excitement.
"Kids develop healthy diet
and exercise habits as pre-
schoolers," explains Mary L.
Gavin, MD, Medical Editor,
KidsHealth, Nemours Center
for Children's Health Media.
"Parents can be both teachers
and role models when it comes
to eating right and being
active."
That's where Sprout Smart
comes in. In partnership with
KidsHealth and sponsored by
Mott's for Tots, Sprout Smart
helps moms and dads find fun
and simple ways to keep kids
both active and eating healthy.
Parents can visit the Web site
SproutSmart.com for expert
articles and related blog discus-
sions about ways to connect
with, their preschoolers and
watch videos about children's
health. Topics include "The
ABCs of Getting ZZZs," "Kids


line of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of
said Section 6, Township
34 South, Range 26 East,
thence East 50 feet, thence
North 009'10" West to the
North line of said NE 1/4 of
NW 1/4 of Section 6, thence
West 25 feet to P.O.B., less
right of way for James
Cowart Road on the North
side thereof.

has been filed against you and
Syou are required to serve a copy
Sof your written defenses, if any, to
.It, on Marshall C. Watson, PA.,
SAttorney for Plaintiff, whose
address Is 1800 NW 49th STREET,
SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL
33309 on or before July 25, 2008,
a date which Is within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of
this Notice in the (Please publish
In THE HERALD ADVOCATE) and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans Disabilities Act of 1990
(ADA), disabled persons who,
because of their disabilities, need
special accommodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding should
contact the ADA coordinator at
417 W. Main Street, Wauchula, FL
33873 or Telephone Voice (941)
773-4174 prior to such proceed-
ing.

WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 17 day of June,
2008.
B. Hugh Bradley
As Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk

6:26, 7:3c


in tne Kitchen" and "The Power
of Play."
"The idea is to help parents
and kids find fun ways to builc
healthy habits and relation.
ships," says Dr. Gavin.
Sprout Smart offers these tips
and more:
Get preschoolers moving-
and have fun doing it. Try walk-
ing like a penguin, hopping like
a frog or imitating other ani-
mals' movements with your
child.
Teach kids that healthy
foods taste good. Serve deli-
cious but low-sugar juice bever-
ages, such as Mott's for Tots,
with a handful of whole-grain
cereal for a tasty, nutrient-
packed snack.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
S IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

Case No. 2007-401-CO
DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LORETTA SWAFFORD, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur
suant to an Order Reschedulini
Foreclosure Sale dated June 18
2008, and entered in Case Nc
2007-401-CA of the Circuit Cour
of the TENTH Judicial Circuit hi
and for HARDEE County, Florid;
'wherein DLJ MORTGAGE CAPI
TAL, INC., is the Plaintiff an
LORETTA SWAFFORD; TENAN
#1 N/K/A LEONA FACE; TENAN
#2 N/K/A GAIL BRIDGMAN are thi
Defendants, I will sell to the high
est and best bidder for cash at th
NORTH FRONT DOOR OF THI
HARDEE COUNTY COURT
HOUSE, 417 WEST MAIN STREET
at 11:00 AM, on the 16 day of July
2008, the following described
property as set forth in Fine
Judgment:

LOT 8, BLOCK 12, OF
AVALON PARK ADDITION
TO CITY OF WAUCHULA,
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, AS PER PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 75, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 501 ILLINOIS
AVENUE, WAUCHULA, FL
33873

Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus form the sale, if any
other than the property owner a
of the date of the Lis Penden
must file a claim within sixty (60
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and th
seal of this Court on June 18
2008.

B. Hugh Bradle
Clerk of the Circuit Coul
By: Connie Coke
Deputy Cler

In accordance with the American
Disabilities Act, persons with dis
abilities needing a special accorr
modation to participate In this prc
ceeding, should contact the Ind
vidual or agency sending th
notice at Echevarria, McCalla
Raymer, Barrett & Frappler, 60
Bayshore Blvd., Suite 800, Tampa
Florida 33606, telephone (813
251-4766, not later than seven (7
days prior to the proceeding.
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800
955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
6:26. 7:


J- By Rich Shepard
7 Emergency Management Director


HELLO, RAIN!
Well, gentle reader, I am happy to report we have finally start-
ed getting some rain!
S Now, this doesn't mean you can start watering your lawn with
reckless abandon or taking 20-minute showers twice a day; we are
still well below the normal rain amounts and will probably be that
way for some time. It is still important to remember we are in
drought conditions and everyone needs to continue to observe
e water restrictions and make wise water choices for the time being.
e This month, .1I am going to talk about hurricane impact time-
lines and actions you should take as a storm approaches.

Advisories, Watches & Warnings
S Hurricanes, as a rule, give us plenty of time to prepare.
Unfortunately, many people don't heed warnings until it's too late.
S The National Hurricane Center and the National Weather
S Service coordinate public information regarding approaching
storms. Listed below are the different types of advisory products
and the information they provide:
Public advisories for Atlantic tropical cyclones are
t normally issued every six hours at 5 a.m., 11 a.m., 5
t p.m. and 11 p.m. That's Daylight Saving Time. For stan-
dard time, it's still every six hours, but at 4 and 10. The
S advisories can be found on the NHC's Web page,
www.nhc.noaa.gov.
Tropical Storm/Hurricane Watch: Indicates storm
h conditions in your area are possible within 36 hours.
This is the "trigger" for activating your-family disaster
d plan.
Tropical Storm/Hurricane Warning: Indicates
storm conditions in your area are likely within 24 hours
d or less. At this time, all preparations should be rushed
to completion.
Hurricane Local Statements: Regular updates on
what is happening in your geographic area. Includes
wind-speed data, rainfall projections, etc.
I had the opportunity to speak to former National Hurricane
Center director Max Mayfield, and when I asked him what was the
r most important thing I could tell the people of Hardee County
about hurricane preparedness, he said, "Tell them don't focus on
s the skinny black line." What he meant was that hurricanes are mas-
d sive storms and just because the "skinny black line" (AKA "storm
track") isn't predicted to go through Hardee County, it doesn't
mean we won't feel the effects.
s Instead, when observing forecast directions, pay attention to
the "cone of uncertainty," also referred to as the "error cone." This
will give you a much more accurate picture of the potential area of
impact when a storm makes landfall.

Batten Down The Hatches!
So let's say we're in the "cone of uncertainty" and it looks as
though we're going to be impacted by a hurricane. Here's a run-
down of a timeline for possible impacts and what activities you
should be doing to prepare.
72 hours: Review your disaster plan, check your
supplies, purchase/replace items that are missing, check
S around your home and make preparations to the struc-
ture as necessary (shutters, board up, trim branches,
etc.).
48 hours: Make sure you have necessary medica-
tions, specialty food items, extra water,- pet arrange-
-" ments.
36 hours: Fill vehicle witlifuiel, obtain emergencyy -
cash, purchase any last-minute itirfs.
24 hours: Bring in all outside articles,'fill tub,
other containers with water for flushing toilets and other
A non-drinking purposes, rush all other preparations to
completion.
12 hours: Lower refrigerator and freezer to lowest
levels to preserve food should power go out, unplug any
non-essential items that could be damaged by electrical
surge, listen carefully to media sources for shelter open-
ings and know the closest route to get there.
Remember, this is not a checklist but a framework you can use
to give you a good idea how long in advance you should prepare.
Of course, all this and more can be found on our Web page at
www.hardeecounty.net/eoc.

r- TIP OF THE MONTH
g Have an emergency generator at your house? Good. Make sure
0. you observe some basic safety rules by keeping it outside your
rt home, away from open windows, and dry. All internal-combustion
n engines release carbon monoxide gas, a colorless, odorless gas that
a can kill in large amounts.
d- Remember, managing your emergencies begins with you.
T The first semielectronic digital computing device was
e constructed by John V. Atanasoff, an American mathe-
h. matician and physicist.


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Sam Albritton

Electrical Services, Inc.
863-767-0313 Office
863-781-0377 Mobile
-Residential and Commercial Wiring
-Electrical Inspections
-Electrical Preventative Maintenance
-Ground Testing
-Lightning Arrestor




Serving Hardee County Since 1994


EC13002737


On '~VISA


NOTICE

from the
Hardee County
Planning/Development Department


On Thursday, 07/10/08 at 6:00 P.M. or as
soon thereafter the Planning/Zoning Board
will be hearing a proposed ordinance to
amend the provisions in the Unified Land
Development Code for farmworker housing.

The hearing will be held in
the Courthouse Annex, First Floor, Room 102
412 West Orange St., Wauchula, FL
07:03c








July 3,2008, The Herald-Advocate 5C


1 Unb
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In the close races in the 2008
Men's Community Softball
League, at the second week of
action only one team hasn't
lost.
Division II's leader Mosaic
Fertilizers stands atop the pile
with a 2-0 record. With seven
teams in the 'division, one is
extra on any given week.
Behind Mosaic, is a three-way
tie with Team Blacklist, Brant
Funeral Chapel and Peace River
Electric Cooperative Inc. all at
2-1. Behind them are Merrill
Lynch, A-I Safari Glass and
Nemesis.
In Division I, JXR Construc-
tion has moved to the top, now
with a 3-1 record. Celebration
and Recycling at Marty's are
each at 2-1. Behind them are
Outlaws, TKO and La Floresita.
Teams played around the
weather last week, especially on
Tuesday evening. The season
stretches to at least Aug. 21.
Some weeks games are on three
nights, Mondays, Tuesdays and
Thursday, and some weeks
Monday are open dates for
makeup games.
Both games on Field 3 last
Tuesday were close encounters.
In the early game, JXR nipped
TKO 8-7.
Reid Benton and Ryan
Thomas each tripled and Tadd
Holton doubled for JXR. Mike
Weatherington and Reid Benton
circled the bases twice each.
Holton, Randy Benton, Thomas


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The Herald-Advocate...

75 YEARS AGO
Intangibles Tax Law To Be
Made Effective: The intangible
tax law, passed in 1931, which
makes individuals, firms and
corporations file returns with
the tax assessor listing their
intangible property, is to be
enforced, State Comptroller
J.M. Lee ha;s advise' Tax
Assessor Fred Southerland.

.Dixie Highway Project Can-
celed: In executive session here
yesterday morning, the Board
of County Commissioners re-
scinded its previous action in
regard to securing the right-of-
way of the new state highway
between Main Street and Arro-
wood's filling station.

Future Farmers Off To State
Convention: Several local boys,
members of the Future Farmers
of America, left Monday after-
noon for Gainesville to attend
the state convention of the
Future Farmers. The boys mak-
ing the trip include Tom Jones,
Wilton Stephens, Jamie Cle-
mens, Clyde Driggers, Marvin
Lynn, Philip Johnson, F.B.
Boone and Ervin Boone.

Hardee Gas Consumption For
May 114,525 Gallons: Hardee
County motorists burned 114,
525 gallons of gasoline during
the month of May, says a report
from the Inspection Bureau,
Department of Agriculture. This
county also used 10,270 gallons
of kerosene.

Lower Postage Rate Effective
Tomorrow: Postmaster H.B.
Rainey has announced that the
two-cent local letter rate will be
restored, effective tomorrow,
July 1, 1933. Beginning July 1
the postage on letters and other
first-class matter mailed for the
delivery at post offices will be
charged two cents for each
ounce or fraction.

50 YEARS AGO
Board Accepts $78,246 Bid
On Negro School: A low bid of
$78,246 for the construction of
a Negro high school for Hardee
County was accepted this week
by the Board of Public Instruc-
tion. The bid, submitted by
United Builders, Orlando, is
$6,754 below the board's esti-
mated cost of $85,000 for the
building.

Wauchula To Gulf Boat-A-
Cade Set: The Wauchula Boat
Club's annual boat-a-cade on
Peace River from Wauchula to
Punta Gorda has been tentative-
ly set for July 19-20, if there has
been enough rain to push the


eaten In Men's Li
.-and Eric Mushrush added solo. _homer and Lamar Gilliard a- an
scores. triple for the long-ball hits. lie
An Erick Virgile triple and Gary Mills scored twice and Va
doubles by Osles Lazarre and Lester Hornbake, Nate Lee, M
Joe Rivers were the long-ball Steve and Gilliard each scored a
hits for TKO. Donald White, run. do
Joe Gomez, Lazarre, Rivers, In the 8:15 game, it was
Eric Grace and Joe St. Fort each Merrill Lynch 25, Nemesis 15. do
put a run on the board. Ray Rivas homered and dou- ho
The Field 3 nightcap was a bled, Ruben Rivas homered and M
barn-burner, with the Outlaws David' Beumel doubled twice an
edging La Floresita 15-14. for Merrill Lynch. Ruben Rivas do
Leadoff batter Josh Sneider finished with four trips around Fr
. circled the bases three times for the bases. Ray Rivas and fo
the Outlaws. Shay Baker and Thomas Trevino each added Ga
Jarvis Baker each came home -three runs, and Beumel, Will
twice. Adding solo tallies were Tyson, Bud Plumley and Fred fo
George Butler, Eric Mushrush, Hodges added two apiece. on
John McBride, Simon Olvera, Sam Rivera homered and R(
Hackem Shweil, Junior Salas, doubled twice for Nemesis. Ta
Robert Martinez and Robert Jose Gomez was the only three- Jo
Martin. score batter. Rivera, Rigo
Anthony Harn homered and Briones ,Elias Ramirez and
doubled, and Eddie Strange, Mario Tamayo each scored
Ernie Briseno, Roy Rodriguez twice and Roy Santoyo, Mario
and Adam Koftwitz also dou- Santoyo, Isauro Figueroa and
bled for La Floresita. Strange Jessie Reyes added solo scores.
and Koftwitz each scored twice In the Field 4 opener on
and Bobby Flores, Ramiro Her- Thursday, Recycling beat
nandez, Pete DeLuna, Julian Celebration 21-11.
Garcia Jr., Jessie Aguilar, Quin- Will Cartwright smacked a
ton Blundell, Justin Taylor, grand slam homer among his
Jaime Flores, Rodriguez and four hits and five RBIs for
Harn each added a run. Recycling. Hagan Bylund and
Meanwhile, on Field 4, Kyle Rinderle each tripled and
Mosaic mashed A-I Safari 16-6 Adam. Cartwright and Paul
in the 6:45 game. Beckham each doubled. Willie
Willie Dickerson, Jason Henderson and Adam Cart-
Johnston and Billy Hernandez wright were the only triple-tally
each homered for Mosaic. batters.
Austin Helms, W.T. Redding, Justin Painter, Yogi Lozano,
Bryan Smith, Dickerson and Briant Shumard and Cody
Johnston each put a pair of runs Greene each doubled for Cele-
on the board. bration. Shumard circled the
For A-1, it was Steve with a bases three times and Painter


river up to safe navigational
depth.

School Board Asks Ynclan
To Resign: James Ynclan, band
director in Hardee schools.for
the past seven years, submitted
his resignation, effective imme-
diately, to the Board of Public
Instruction yesterday.

J.C. Hayman New Agent:
Jack C. Hayman, former assis-
tant county agricultural agent in
Highlands County, has been
named new Hardee County
agent, succeeding John Barco.
He will take over Aug. 1. Hay-
man, son of Polk County agent
Paul Hayman, has been in agri-
cultural extension work for five
years.

$500 Taken From Nicholson
Office In Bowling Green:
County law officers are search-
ing for someone who walked
into Nicholson Supply Co. in
Bowling Green and took a bank
bag containing $500 off the
desk.

Wauchula Children Stricken
With Polio: Two Wauchula chil-
dren were stricken with polio
last week while visiting Holly-
wood. No new cases of polio
were reported in Hardee
County, according to the county
Health Department.

25 YEARS AGO
County's First AIDS Victim
Dies At Hardee Memorial Hos-
pital: An AIDS victim is be-
lieved to have died at Hardee
Memorial Hospital last month.
No official verification has
been received yet. AIDS, or
Aquired Immune Deficiency
Syndrome, is a new and deadly
disease that is untreatable at this
time.

High Levels Of Radium
Found In Hardee Wells: High
concentration of radioactive
radium have been discovered in
the drinking water of some
wells in Hardee County, accord-
ing to a recent state report. Out
of a total of 76 community and
private wells in the county cho-
sen for the study, 18 were found
to contain radiation levels in
excess of federal standards.

Students Honored At Faith
Evangelistic Academy: Faith
Ann Jones received a trophy
from Faith Evangelistic Aca-
demy in Bowling Green for
Most Improved Student during
the 1982-83 school year. She
also received a certificate for
Scripture memorization. Her
brother, Charles, received hon-
orable mention for both of the
categories as well.

Miss Bowling Green Beauty
Contest Friday Night: There
will be something new and dif-


ferent in this 1983 Fourth of
July Celebration. Bowling
Green will conduct a beauty
contest at the swimming pool
this Friday night, with the
search for Miss Bowling Green.
Contestants competing for the
title are Melinda Bryant, Linda
Henley, Rita Zimmerman,
Sonja Morgan, Vicki Folsom
and Chrysta Smith.

New Junior High Principal
Starts July 1: Lee Burns of
Lawton, Iowa, was recently
accepted as the new principal at
Hardee Junior High. The
School Board has hired Burns
to fill the vacancy left by the
untimely, death of Leon Sharp,
and to replace interim principal
James Mitchell.

10 YEARS AGO
Heat Wave Breaks?: Al-
though Tuesday evening storms
may be the start of summer
rains, Hardee County still suf-
fers from record drought condi-
tions. Words of caution about
continued emergency condi-
tions abounded early this week.

Land Purchase Helps ZS:
Zolfo Springs officials received
a huge windfall recently with
the receipt of nearly a half-mil-
lion dollars. The check, actually
for $491,400, was received
June 15. It will enable the town
to purchase 273 acres off SR 66
east of its wastewater treatment
plant for use as sprayfields and
a sludge application site, said
Town Clerk Jack Logan.

New NWES Head On Board:
Dr. Diane Nichols is the new
principal at North Wauchula
Elementary School. Nicholas
was approved by the School
Board at last week's meeting
and will begin her duties at the
school starting on Monday.
Nichols, 51, was most recently
the director of instructional ser-
vices for the DeSoto County
school system, where she has
been working in that position
for six years.

Harris Visits Peace River
Ranch: Peace River Ranch
south of Zolfo Springs was
packed with visitors last Friday
to see the Democratic candidate
for secretary of state, Katherine
Harris. Harris, niece to ranch
owner Ben Hill Griffin III, is
running against current secre-
tary of state, and one-time lieu-
tenant-governor candidate San-
dra Mortham.

Peace River Cleanup Nets 11
Tons Of Trash: The third time
was a charm for the annual
Peace River Cleanup. With over
200 participants from Hardee
County at work and 546 total,
the exact amount of trash col-
lected in the day's effort
equaled 11.13 tons. And 5.68
tons were taken from the
Hardee County area alone.


Stephen Perry of the London-based rubber manufacturing Perry and Co. patented the
rubber band in 1845. He saw it as a way to hold papers or envelopes together. He made
the first ones by chopping sleeves of vulcanized rubber into bands.


league

d Willie Gilliard had twin tal-
-s. Lozano, Greene, Lee
aladez, Jose Alonzo and Ray
urr each added a run.
In the closer on Field 4, JXR
)wned La Floresita 29-8.
Randy Benton homered and
)ubled twice and J.R. Bass
)mered and doubled for JXR.
arty Gainous also homered.
d Weatherington tripled and
)ubled. Randy Benton, Jamie
anks and Ralph Arce were
ur-score batters, while
ainous added three scores.
Koftwitz homered and tripled
r La Floresita. He was the
ily twin-tally batter. Strange,
odriguez, Blundell, Justin
aylor, Jamie Flores and
)hnny Huron each added a run.


On Field 3 on Thursday,
Brant beat Blacklist 20-16 in
the 6:45 game.
Daniel Rucker homered and
Wayne Graham, Troy Brant and
Ted Svendsen each doubled for
Brant. Leadoff batter Rucker
came around to score four
times. John Roberson and Tony
Gilliard each added three runs
and Graham, Joe Porter, Robby
Bond and Svendsen had twin
tallies.
Brian Patterson nearly hit for
the cycle for Blacklist, with a
homer, triple and double. Bryan
Pelham homered twice and
Keith Nadasky doubled twice.
Daniel Patterson scored all
three times he was on base.
Nadaskay and Pelham had twin
scores and Daniel Patterson,
Scott Dickson, Chase Best,
Brett Johnson, Chris Cobb and


Calvin Bates added a run
apiece.
In the week's finale on Field
3, PRECo won 18-13 over
Merrill Lynch.
Brian Alexy, Rodger Erutus
and Matt Bell each homered for
PRECo. Peck Harris tripled,
and Billy Alexy and Scott.
Driskell each doubled. Billy
Alexy was the only tripld-score
batter. Brian Alexy, Daniel
Barnett, Van Crawford, Brutus,
Bell and Harris added two runs
apiece.
Will Tyson homered and Ryn
Heine, Raul Garcia, Ruben
Rivas, Jeremy Goodwyn and
Hodges each doubled. Paul.
Samuels went four-for-four. He
joined Heine, Garcia and
Hodges in circling the bases
twice each. Doyle Tyson,
Plumley, Goodwyn and Trevino
added a run each.


PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE TITLE V AIR OPERATION PERMIT REVISION
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Division of Air Resource Management, Bureau of Air Regulation
Draft/Proposed Air Permit No. 0490015-010-AV
Hardee Power Partners Limited, Hardee Power Station
Hardee County, Florida

Applicant: The applicant for this project is Hardee Power Partners Limited. The applicant's authorized
representative and mailing address is: Mr. Ralph E. Randall, Plant Manager, Hardee Power Partners Limited,
Hardee Power Station, 6695 North County Road 663, Bowling Green, Florida 33834-6817.
Facility Location: Hardee Power Partners Limited operates the existing Hardee Power Station, which is
located in Hardee County at 6695 County Road 663 North, Fort Green Springs, Florida.
Project: The applicant has submitted a complete and certified Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Part Form and
has requested its incorporation into the existing Title V air operation permit.
The existing facility consists of the following emissions units: Currently at the plant site are four General
Electric (GE) dual-fuel fired combustion turbines (CTs). The facility utilizes pipeline natural gas as its primary
fuel source, with No. 2 distillate fuel oil serving as a backup fuel. Three of the CTs (CT-IA, CT-IB and CT-
2A) are identical emissions units, GE Model No. PG-7111EA, and CTs IA and 1B together comprise a
combined-cycle unit operation and CT 2A is a simple cycle unit operation. All of the CTs have a nominal
power production output of 75 megawatts (MW); 'and, for CTs IA and 1B, each has a generator nameplate
rating of 113 MW (total of the CT and associated HRSG). CT-1A and CT-1B are each equipped with a heat
recovery steam generator (HRSG), which feed one common steam turbine (ST). CT-IA and CT-IB are each
equipped with a stack to bypass each unit's HRSG. Water injection is used to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx)
emissions when firing natural gas and low sulfur distillate oil (backup fuel). The fourth and latest CT (CT-2B)
is also manufactured by GE, Model No. PG-7121 (7EA), and is a simple cycle unit operation. The CT has an
electrical generator with a nominal power production output of 75 MW.
Permitting Authority: Applications for Title V air operation permits are subject to review in accordance with
the provisions of Chapter 403, Florida Statutes (F.S.) and Chapters 62-4, 62-210, 62-213 and 62-296.470 of the
Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.). The proposed project is not exempt from air permitting requirements
and a Title V air operation permit is required to operate the facility. The Bureau of Air Regulation is the
Permitting Authority responsible for making a permit determination for this project. The Permitting
Authority's physical address is: 111 South Magnolia Drive, Suite #4. Tallahassee, Florida. The Permitting
Authority's mailing address is: 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS #5505, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400. The
Permitting Authority's telephone number is 850/488-0114.
Project File: A complete project file is available for public inspection during the normal business hours of
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (except legal holidays), at the address indicated above for the
Permitting Authority. The complete project file includes the Draft/Proposed Permit, the Statement of Basis, the
application, and the information submitted by the applicant, exclusive of confidential records under Section
403.111, F.S. Interested persons may view the Draft/Proposed Permit by visiting the following website:
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/air/eproducts/apds/default.asp and entering the permit number shown above.
Interested persons may contact the Permitting Authority's project review engineer for additional information at
the address or phone number listed above.
Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit: The Permitting Authority gives notice of its intent to issue an air permit
to the applicant for the project desc.rjgb. aboyA. h~.iTapplicant has provided reasonable assurance that
operation of proposed equipment will not adversely impact air quality and that the project will comply with all
appropriate provisions of Chapters 624, 62-204, 62-210, 62-212, 62-213, 62-214, 62-296, and 62-297, F.A.C.
The Permitting Authority will issue a Final Permit in accordance with the conditions of the proposed
Draft/Proposed Permit unless a timely petition for an administrative hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, F.S. or unless public comment received in accordance with this notice results in a different decision or a
significant change of terms or conditions.
Comments: The Permitting Authority will accept written comments concerning the Draft/Proposed Title V air
operation permit for a period of 30 days from the date of publication of this Public Notice. Written comments
must be received by the close of business (5:00 p.m.), on or before the end of this 30-day period by the
Permitting Authority at the above address. As part of his or her comments, any person may also request that the
Permitting Authority hold a public meeting on this permitting action. If the Permitting Authority determines
there is sufficient interest for a public meeting, it will publish notice of the time, date, and location on the
official web site for notices at Florida Administrative Weekly (FAW) at http://faw.dos.state.fl.us/ and in a
newspaper of general circulation in the area affected by the permitting action. For additional information,
contact the Permitting Authority at the above address or phone number. If written comments or comments
received at a public meeting result in a significant change to the Draft/Proposed Permit, the Permitting
Authority shall issue a Revised Permit and require, if applicable, another Public Notice. All comments filed
will be made availableTfor public inspection.
Petitions: A person whose substantial interests are affected by the proposed permitting decision may petition
for an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition must contain
the information set forth below and must be filed with (received by) the Department's Agency Clerk in the
Office of General Counsel of the Department of Environmental Protection at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard,
Mail Station #35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to
written notice under Section 120.60(3), F.S. must be filed within 14 days of publication of this Public Notice or
receipt of a written notice, whichever occurs first. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who
asked the Permitting Authority for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of that
notice, regardless of the date of publication. A petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the
address indicated above, at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition within the appropriate
time period shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hearing)
under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any
subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will be only at the approval of the presiding
officer upon the filing of.a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Permitting Authority's action is based must contain the
following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or
identification number, if known; (b) The name, address and telephone number of the petitioner; the name
address and telephone number of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service
purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner's substantial rights will
be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the
agency action or proposed decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the
petition must so state; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts the
petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) A statement of the
specific rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency's proposed
action including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and, (g) A
statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action the petitioner wishes the agency to
take with respect to the agency's proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts upon
which the Permitting Authority's action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall
contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, F.A.C.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the Permitting Authority's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this Public
Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final
decision of the Permitting Authority on the application have the right to petition to become a party to the
proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation: Mediation is not available for this proceeding.
EPA Review: EPA has agreed to treat the Draft/Proposed Title V air operation permit as a Proposed Title V
air operation permit and to perform its 45-day review provided by the law and regulations concurrently with the
public comment period. Although EPA's 45-day review period will be performed concurrently with the public
comment period, the deadline for submitting a citizen petition to object to the EPA Administrator will be
determined as if EPA's 45-day review period is performed after the public comment period has ended. The
Final Title V air operation permit will be issued after the conclusion of the 45-day EPA review period so long
as no adverse comments are received that results in a different decision or significant change of terms or
conditions. The status regarding EPA's 45-day review of this project and the deadline for submitting a citizen
petition can be found at the following website address: http://www.epa.gov/region4/air/permits/Florida.htm.
Objections: Finally, pursuant to 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) Section 7661d(b)(2), any person may petition
the Administrator of the EPA within 60 days of the expiration of the Administrator's 45-day review period as
established at 42 U.S.C. Section 7661d(b)(l), to object to the issuance of any Title V air operation permit. Any
petition shall be based only on objections to the Permit that were raised with reasonable specificity during the
30-day public comment period provided in the Public Notice, unless the petitioner demonstrates to the
Administrator of the EPA that it was impracticable to raise such objections within the comment period or unless
the grounds for such objection arose after the comment period. Filing of a petition with the Administrator of
the EPA does not stay the effective date of any permit properly issued pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 62-
213, F.A.C. Petitions filed with the Administrator of EPA must meet the requirements of 42 U.S.C. Section
7661d(b)(2) and must be filed with the Administrator of the EPA at: U.S. EPA, 401 M Street, S.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20460. For more information regarding EPA review and objections, visit EPA's Region 4
web site at http://www.epa.gov/region4/air/permits/Florida.htm 7:3c


Way Back When







6C The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008

Co-utho Report


COUNTY COURT
The *following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
David Allen Sanders, Zolfo
Springs, 41, and Tracy Alex-
ander Moffitt, 43, Wauchula.
Adam Agustin Lopez, 31,
Bowling Green, and Bedzaida
Cruz, 25, Bowling Green.
Matilde Guerrero, 51, Wau-
chula, and Angela Lynn Guer-
rero, 41, Wauchula.
Raul Juarez Jr., 25, Wau-
chula, and Amanda Brooke
Wagner, 21, Lakeland.
Jason Michael Bowers, 25,
Wauchula, and Amanda Lynn
Sconyers, 24, Wauchula.
John Michael Oberski, 28,
Fort Meade, and Vanessa
Sheerie Smith, 23, Fort Meade.
Kenneth Allen VanSickle,
42, Wauchula, and Amanda
Michelle Ford, 21, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Palisades Collection LLC vs.
Nedra Cornelius, dismissed.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Juan Valdez, judgment.
Palisades Collection LLC vs.
Thomas W. Lanham, dismissed.
LVNV Funding LLC vs.
Joyce Warren, dismissed.
Eastern Financial Florida
Credit Union vs. Mario Ponce-
Trejo, judgment.
Erin Capital Management
LLC vs. Fulgencio Aviles, order
lifting stay of execution on stip-
ulated agreement of June 19,
2007.
Roy Brown vs. James Kelly,.
order for tenant eviction.
CACV of Colorado LLC vs.
Mary J. Tindell, judgment.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Kirby Clarke, judgment.
STB Recovery Inc. vs.
Theresa R. Lambert, stipulated
agreement approved.
Applied Card Bank vs.
Gloria Rodriguez, default judg-'
ment.
LVNV Funding LLC vs.
Dale Morgan, order of dis-
missal set aside.
Dennis Carrico vs. Rose
Cullifer, order for possession of'
property and tenant eviction.
Valencia Garden Apart-
ments LTD vs. Jessica Taylor et
. al, judgment for removal of ten-
ant.
Resurgence Financial LLC
vs. Robbie L. Diamond, judg-
ment.
.Wells Fargo Financial Bank
vs. James Carpenter and Sharon
D. Carpenter, default judgment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Melquiades Alarcon-Ros-
ales, possession of drug para-
phernalia, 12 months probation,
fines in traffic case.
Gerardo DeSantiago, disor-
derly intoxication, time'served,
$315 fine and court costs, $50
cost of prosecution (COS).
Jeronimo Goan, trespassing
in an occupied structure, 27
days in jail with credit for time
served (CTS), $315 fine and
court costs, $50 COS.


Luis Miguel Hernandez, pos-
session of marijuana, adjudica-
tion withheld, 12 months proba-
tion, random drug screens, eval-
uation and treatment, no alco-
hol or drugs, $315 fine and
court costs, $40 public defender
fee, $50 COS.
Ladislaido Rodriguez Lopez,
trespassing on property other
than a structure or conveyance,
30 days CTS, $315 fine and
court costs, $50 COS.
Rigo Montez, battery re-
duced to disorderly conduct, 18
days CTS, $315 fine and court
costs, $50 COS; loitering/-
prowling, 35 days CTS, $100
fine.
Catarino Moreno, battery,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion six months, no contact with
victim, $315 fine and court
costs, $150 investigative costs,
$50 COS.
Lourdes A. Rodriguez,
allowing an unauthorized per-
son to drive, adjudication with-
held, $330 fine and court costs,
$50 COS.
Brenda Lee Trevino-Valerio,
issuing a worthless check and
obtaining property by worthless
check, not prosecuted.
Carlos Aleman, domestic
battery, adjudication withheld,
12 months probation, 12-week
domestic violence class, obey
terms of injunction, $667 fine
and court costs, $50 COS.
Daniel Farias, domestic bat-
tery, 12 months probation, no
violent contact with victim, 12-
week batters intervention class,
$667 fine and court costs, $90
public defender fee, $45 inves-
tigative costs, $50 COS.
Thomas Florez, affray, pro-
bation six months, $315 fine
and court costs, $90 public
defender fee, $50 COS.
Marco A. Huerta, resisting
arrest without violence, and
failure to enter prepayment plan
on fines for five counts posses-
sion of prescription drugs with-
out a prescription and posses-
sion of marijuana, 90 days CTS,
$315 fine and court costs and
$50 COS added to outstanding
fines and fees and placed on
lien.
Christina Nicole Prescott,
petit theft, transferred to pre-
trial diversionary program.
Catarino Dario Borjas, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge criminal mischief), pro-
bation revoked, 60 days CTS,
outstanding fines and fees
placed on lien.
Ronald Eugene Grizzard,
' violation of probation (original
charges two counts trespassing
'other than a structure or con-
veyance), time served, resume
probation.
Rafael Juarez Jr., petit theft,
probation six months, concur-
rent with traffic.sentence, $315
fine and court costs, $90 public
defender fees, $50 COS.

The following criminal
traffic cases were disposed of
recently in county court.
Dispositions are based on
Florida Statutes, driving,
record and facts concerning
the case.
Melquiades Alarcon-Rosa-


les, leaving the scene of an acci-
dent with property damage and
DUI with property damage,
probation 12 months, .license
suspended six months, tag
impound 10 days, DUI school,
evaluation and treatment,
$640.50 fine and court costs, 50!
hours community service.
Rafael Juarez Jr., driving
while license suspended
(DWLS), probation six months,
concurrent with misdemeanor
sentence, $100 fine.
George Scott Bogart II, oper-
ating a motorcycle without
required endorsement, adjudi-
cation withheld, $330 fine and
, court costs, $50 COS.
Rojelio Garcia, reckless dri-
ving, $330 fine and court costs,
$50 COS.
Walter Antonio Najera-
Jimenez, DUI and no valid
license, estreated bonds.
George Harold Rice, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, $185
court costs.
Jaime Rasheed Rohoman,
violation of license restrictions,
adjudication withheld, 16 hours
community service.
Santana Castillo Salgado,
DWLS, adjudication withheld,
$330 fine and court costs, $50
COS.
Robert Anderson Smith,
DWLS, adjudication withheld,
probation six months, $330 fine
and court costs, $50 COS.
Betty Stalvey Williams,
DWLS, adjudication withheld,
$185 court costs.
Ledell Wilson Jr., DWLS,
adjudication withheld, $330
fine and court costs.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Jami N. Reyna and Jessie
Reyna vs. Adventist Health
Systems d/b/a Florida Hospital,
damages.
John Mayer Jr. and Sarah
Mayer, divorce.
CMAC LLC vs. Maria Tru-
jillo, petition to recover proper-
ty.
April Prine vs. Erica Moli-
nar, petition for injunction for
protection.
Johnny Lowery vs. state De-
partment of Corrections, peti-
tion to review inmate situation.
Adolfo Rosales vs. Florida
Department of Law Enforce-
ment, Al Danna, Debbie Cook
and Raymond Velboom, dam-
. ages.
David Allen Burr and Helen
Ann Bradley-Burr, divorce.
Jimmy Lewis Moss vs.
Charles Anthony Hubbard, peti-
tion for injunction for protec-
tion.
Areca Cotton and George
Cotton vs. Faye Shackelford
and State Farm Mutual Auto'


. Insurance, damages.
Ester Albritton Reas vs.
Chris Reas, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Raymond Mabrey vs. Florida
Parole Commission, petition to
review inmate status denied.
Deborah Anne Beeson Walk-
,er vs. William B. Beeson III,
amended child support order.
Nola Denise Jackson vs.
Stanley Dean Jackson Sr., child
support terminated.
Xe Vang and Hue Vang vs.
Kenneth Ewell Thompson and
Milton Hart, voluntary dis-
missal.
Suzanne Hernandez vs. Ar-
mando Sanchez Jr., dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Jimmy Lewis Moss vs.
Charles Anthony Hubbard, dis-
missal of temporary injunction
for protection.
Victoria Lynn Locklear vs.
Jessica Lee Rodriguez, injunc-
tion for protection.
Gulf Coast Business Finance
Services vs. Pamela J. Ellis,
judgment.
Alice Davis and the state De-
partment of Revenue (DOR)
o/b/o minor child vs. Jerry Lit-
ton Sr. o/b/o minor child, child
support suspended, arrearages
set.
Danuyel Herrin vs. Bryant
Herrin, voluntary dismissal.
Staci Reynolds vs. Frances
Garza-Alvarez, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Crystal Hernandez vs.
William Fleurimond, injunction
for protection.
Louissa M. Froehlich vs.
Daniel K. Richardson, injunc-
tion'for protection.
Betty Beatrice Richardson
vs. Michael Leon Holland,
injunction for protection.
Kimberly Ann McQuaig and
Bruce W. McQuaig, divorce.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of last
week by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Rosa Linda Carmona, two
counts possession of metham-
phetamine and sale of metham-
phetamine, 250 days CTS, fol-


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lowed by three years drug
offender probation, license sus-
pended two years, warrantless
search and seizure, random'
drug screens, evaluation and
treatment, no alcohol or drugs,
curfew, $1,485 fine and court
costs, $340 public defender
fees, $100 COS; three counts
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, time served.
Marco A. Huerto, child
abuse, battery, petit theft and
violation of probation (original
charges possession of metham-
phetamirie with intent to sell,
aggravated assault with a dead-
ly weapon and child abuse-in-
tentional infliction), probation
revoked, two years Florida
State Prison, $315 fine and
court costs, restitution not over
$200 and 100 hours community
service added to outstanding
fines and fees and placed on
lien.
Justin D. Mahaffey, violation
of probation (original charges
felony DWLS and resisting an
officer without violence), pro-
bation revoked, 90 days CTS,
outstanding fines and fees
placed on lien.
David Ronnie Parrish, mo-
tion to terminate probation
(original charge manufacture of
marijuana), early termination of
probation granted.
Sergio Barrios Ambriz, vio-
lation of probation (original
charge possession of metham-
phetamine), probation revoked,
two years community control
house arrest, with standard
conditions.
Gerardo DeSantiago, viola-
tion of probation, (original
charges possession of metham-
phetamine, possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession of
alcohol under age 21), adjudi-
cation withheld, 60 days CTS as
condition of probation rein-
stated with drug and alcohol
conditions and curfew.
Kenneth Ray Dickey, two
counts trespass other than struc-
ture or conveyance and felony
petit theft, seven months in jail
CTS, $495 fine and court costs,
$140 public defender fees and
$100 COS placed on lien; bur-,
glary of structure, not prosecut-
ed.
CJ Clifford Albert Fountain
Jr., violation of probation (orig-
inal charged felony DWLS),
probation modified to include
time served, resume probation
with same conditions.
Barbara Lee Hassell, aggra-
vated battery causing bodily
harm amended to lesser
felony battery, and trespass in,
an occupied structure, 60 days'
CTS as condition of one year
probation, no contact with vic-
tim, continue AA meetings,
evaluation and treatment, war-
rantless search and seizure,
$672 fine and court costs, $140
public defender fee, $100 COS,
restitution to be set.
Rafael Juarez Jr., larceny and
DWLS, transferred to county
misdemeanor and criminal traf-
fic court.
Kyle Matthew Lumley, sale
of methamphetamine, adjudica-
tion withheld, two years drug


offender probation, license- sus,
pended two years, random
drug screens, no alcohol or
drugs, warrantless search ai)d
seizure, curfew, $495 fine and
court costs, $140 public defend-
er fees, $100 COS, 100 hours
community service.
j Michael Crosby Mach, vibla-
tion 'of probation (original
charge felony fleeing to elude
an law enforcement officer
using lights and sirens), proba-
tion revoked, 60 days CTS, out-
standing fines and feesA/laced
on lien.
Lisa Marie Mainello, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge purchase of cocaine),
probation terminated.
Jeff Austin McCall, selling
marijuana within 1,000 feet of a
park or community center and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia with intent to deliver, adjudi-
cation withheld, two years drug
offender probation, warrantless
search and seizure, random
drug screens, no alcohol or
drugs, curfew, evaluation and
treatment, $495 fine and court
costs, $140 public defender
fees, $100 COS, 100 hours
community service.
Robert Lee Mendoza, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges possession of drug
paraphernalia, driving with a
suspended license and felony
DWLS), probation revoked, 11
months CTS, outstanding fines
and fees placed on lien.
Karista Newsome, posses-
sion of morphine and violation
of probation (original charge
petit theft), probation revoked,
60 days CTS, license suspended
two years, $495 fine and court
costs, $140 public defender fees
and $100 COS added to out-
standing fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Jerry Jason Nichols, posses-
sion of methamphetamine with
intent to sell, one year one day
Florida State Prison CTS,
license suspended two years,
$495 fine and court costs and
$140 public defender fees
placed on lien; possession of
drug paraphernalia and resisting
'arrest without violence, tiref6
served.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Michael D. II and Amanda
Marie Colding to Randall L.
Gibson and Linda D. Gibson,
$135,00.
Roiald and Harriet Senger to
Michael D. II and Amanda M.
Colding, $235,550.
Florida Professional Services
Associates Inc. to Maria Teresa
Castillo, $133,000.
Tomas and Stephanie C.
Macias to Kenneth Wayne and
Tabatha K. Osteen, $129,000.
Joseph R. and Patricia
S.M.D. O'Neill to Kelley L.
and Bruce Judah, $141,600.
Roger M. Harrison II to
Roman Martinez Jr., $148,000.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
1992 Acur 2D Id.# JH4DA9355NS023603

Contact Linda Dean for details at Wauchula State
Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Thursday July 3, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. at the
Wauchula State Bank parking lot located at 106
East Main Street, Wauchula Fl. 33873. 6:26,7:3s


HARDEE COUNTY

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The Hardee County Office of Community Development will hold a workshop to
discuss tife FL Recreation Development Assistance Program for Phase II of the
proposed Hardee Baseball Complex on Tuesday July 15, 2008 at 5:00 p.m. The
meeting will be held in the Office of Community Development, 412 W. Orange St.,
Rm. 201, Wauchula, FL.
For more information, please contact Janet Gilliard, Director of Community
Development at 863-773-6349. 7:3c


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July 3, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7C


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
June 29, Jeronimo Goan, 39, of Wauchula, was arrested by
Dep. Julie Bridges and charged with disorderly intoxication.
June 29, Kasey Lee Bourgoin, 26, of 8910 Tropicaire Blvd.,
North Port, was arrested by Dep. Julie Bridges on a charge of con-
tempt of court.

June 28, a residential burglary on Marie Road, criminal mis-
chief on Old Bradenton Road, a fight on Mowatt Street and a theft
on Finch Drive were reported.

June 27, Jaime Martinez Cerna, 46, of 3861 Dixiana Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with
burglary of a dwelling structure or conveyance and larceny-theft.
June 27,Evangelina Cruz Cardenas, 33, and Catarina Orozco
Gallardo, 22, both of 4419 Dixiana Dr., Bowling Green, were
arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF) and each
charged with possession of marijuana and possession of drug para-
phernalia.
June 27, Feliciano Gracida Martinez, 33, of 713 E. Palmetto
St., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of con-
tempt of court.
June 27, a fight on Mowatt Street was reported.

June 26, John Alton Knight, 42, of 120 S. French Ave., Fort
Meade, was arrested by Dep. Mark McCoy and charged with
aggravated battery on an officer, resisting an officer with violence
and fleeing to elude an officer with disregard for safety.
June 26, a residential burglary on Lemon Street, and thefts on
Alligator Alley, Dena Circle and U.S. 17 South were reported.

June 25, Adrian Florez, 34, of 209 E. Main St., Wauchula,
was arrested on a charge of failure to appear in court.
June 25, Teddi Edna Magnuson, 34, of 37851 W. SR 64,
Myakka City, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
June 25, Thayson Lacey Quinn, 45, of 408 E. Oak St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with trespass on
property other than a structure, possession of cocaine and two traf-
fic violations.
June 25, a residential burglary on U.S. 17 North, and thefts on
Buttonwood Drive, CR664 and U.S. 17 North were reported.

June 24, Joshua Lanham, 18, of 112 N. First Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of methamphet-
amine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
June 24, Danny Fred Faulk, 56, of 628 Peterson St., Wau-
chula, was arrested on a charge of failure to appear in court.
June 24, Elias Saul Hernandez, 21, of 130 Melear Dairy Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Julie Bridges and charged with
battery.
June 24, criminal mischief on SR 66, and thefts on Norris
Road, U.S. 17 North and Golden Oaks Road were reported.

June 23, Tammy Lynn Smith, 42, of 5201-37th St. N., St.
Petersburg, was arrested by Dep. Danny O'Bryan on a charge of
withholding support of children.
June 23, Herman Eugene Patterson, 19, of 879 Chamberlain
Blvd., Wauchula, was arrested on charges of unarmed burglary of
an unoccupied dwelling, larceny and failure to appear in court.


June 23, criminal mischief on Makowski Road, a fight on U.S.
17 South and a theft on Washington Street were reported.

WAUCHULA
June 29, Justin Earl Woods, 20, of 2909 Garza Road, Zolfo
Springs, and Austin Robert Erickson, 18, of 4789 Murphy Road,
Ona, were arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and each charged with
possession of marijuana and possession of alcohol under 21.
June 29, Efren Magana, 30, of 318 S. Ninth Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Matthew Whatley and charged with DUI with
property damage.

June 28, Alexander Poole, 32, of 309 S. Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with resisting/obstructing
an officer without violence. At the jail, Dep. Pauline Bissette de-
tained Poole on a charge of failure to appear in court.
June 28, a theft on East Oak Street was reported.

June 27, Victoria Ann Sanders, 23, of 324 N. 16th Ave., Ar-
cadia, was arrested by Cpl. Matthew Whatley and charged with lar-
ceny and dealing in stolen property.
June 27, a theft on Heard Bridge Road was reported.

June 24, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.

June 23, a theft on Goolsby Street was reported.

BOWLING GREEN
June 29, a vehicle on West Pineapple Street was reported
stolen.

June 25, criminal mischief on East Main Street was reported.

June 24, a residential burglary on Chester Avenue was report-


Letter To The Editor

Wauchula City Councilman

Responds To June 26 Letter


Dear Editor:
I would like to briefly
respond to Terrin McKelvey-
Green's letter to the editor last
week regarding the City of
Wauchula's streetscaping pro-
ject.
First, I do appreciate any cit-
izen that will voice an opinion;
furthermore, if McKelvey-
Green had cared enough to
attend any of the meetings on
the topic she might have been
pleased to know that every'


6:26-7:3c


question raised in her article
had in fact been discussed in ad
nauseam.
Perhaps as well we might
gain yet another citizen who
becomes informed on the diffi-
culties we have created for our-
selves through boundless gov-
ernment required bureaucracy.

Kenneth A. Lambert
City Commissioner
District 3
Wauchula


SUMMER BOUNTY
Did you even realize that June was National Fresh Fruit &
Vegetable Month?
Fruits and vegetables give you many of the nutrients you need:
vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, water and healthful phytochemi-
cals. Some are sources of vitamin A, while others are rich in vita-
min C, folate or potassium. Almost all fruits and vegetables are nat-
urally low in fat and calories, and none have cholesterol.
Research shows that those who eat more generous amounts of
fruits and vegetables, as part of a healthful diet, are likely to have
a reduced risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease,
stroke, diabetes and certain types of cancer. Everyone needs 5-9
daily servings of fruits and vegetables for the nutrients they contain
and for general health. Here are some ideas for incorporating fruits
and vegetables in your diet:
At breakfast, top your-cereal with bananas, peaches or
blueberries. Drink 100 percent orange or grapefruit
juice. Mix fruit into fat-free or low-fat yogurt.
Put some fruit and milk in the blender and make a
milkshake.
Pack lunches with oranges, bananas or grapes, and
keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table, counter or in the
refrigerator as a reminder that fruit makes a convenient
and nutritious snack.
Include a green salad witK dinner every night. Add
fresh vegetables that are in season, which cost less and
are likely to be at their peak flavor.
Consider vegetable toppings for pizza, such as mush-
rooms, green peppers or onions.
Throw some fruits and veggies on the barbecue.
Grilled pineapple tastes great when added to a chicken
sandwich. Or, slice up some asparagus and zucchini,
lightly brush with olive oil and cook on the grill, rotat-
ing regularly, for three to five minutes depending on
thickness.
Pile veggies on your burgers! Add juicy tomatoes,
crisp lettuce, pickles and onions to your sandwiches.
You will increase your servings of veggies and fill your-
self up more quickly, leaving less of a chance for
munching on those potato chips and desserts.
Serve a fresh fruit and vegetable tray for appetizers at
your next family get-together or patio or pool party with
friends and neighbors.
Decide this summer to check your eating habits, and make
sure you are eating at least three daily servings of vegetables and
two daily servings of fruits. This should not be difficult in our area
of the country, where fresh fruits and vegetables are 'in abundance
this time of year. You have a large selection of fruits and vegetables
to choose from with colors across the rainbow so you can
find a variety to eat.
So, determine to make good health and nutrition a priority.
You will be glad you did! For more information, contact the Hardee
County Extension Service Office at 773-2164.

In order that people may be happy in their work, these
three things are needed: They must be fit for it: They
must not do too much of it: And they must have a sense
of success in it.
-John Ruskin


Your Business Could Appear Here!l
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE ANNEXING CERTAIN PROPERTY INTO
THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2008-20 will be presented to the City Commission for approval upon the first
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 14th day of
July 2008, at 6:00 RM. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the
office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any per-
son may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed
Ordinance is entitled as follows:
ORDINANCE 2008-20
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR THE ANNEXATION OF APPROXIMATELY 1.16 ACRES LOCATED AT
1120 SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE, WAUCHULA, DESIGNATED AS THE
"WHITEHEAD PROPERTY", INTO THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE
CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVID-
ING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire City of Wauchula
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE ANNEXING CERTAIN PROPERTY INTO
THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2008-21 will be presented to the City Commission for approval upon the first
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 14th day of
July 2008, at 6:00 RM. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the
office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any per-
son may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed
Ordinance is entitled as follows:
ORDINANCE 2008-21

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR THE ANNEXATION OF APPROXIMATELY .435 ACRES LOCATED AT
1130 SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE, WAUCHULA, DESIGNATED AS THE
"BOYETT PROPERTY", INTO THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE CITY
OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact theCity Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire City of Wauchula
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


SANDPIPER DRIVE
FLORIDA
N HOSPITAL
FI.N.R. r










PROPOSED "
ANNEXATION
WITH/REZONE
& COMP PLAN
AMENDMENT



STENSTROM ROAD
6:26-7:3c






8C The Herald-Advocate, July 3, 2008

God Bless America
and the men and women
who serve to protect us all!






Hill's Auto World
and
Bowling Green Quick Lube


WAUCHULA PAWN & GUN
708 N. 6th Ave 773-0050
Mon.-Sat. 9:30 am-6 p.m


Come in & take advantage
of our summer sale!

JAN'S
773-3033
0 215 w orange St, Wauchula

Month of J oy

Have a great summer & a great 4th!
Jan & Julie

LOOK 0ooD. ~ l eRoE Exclusive Salon


Pioneer Park
Zolfo Springs
11 AM ~ OPENING CEREMONY
Food
Vendors
Karaoke Contest
Fun & Games
Water Slides
Bounce Houses
Logo Contest
Dunk Tank
Live Bands
Local Candidates
Edner "Cherry Bomb" Cherry
FREE Parking
Day's events brought to you by
Hardee County Youth Coalition
and its sponsors

FIREWORKS AT 9 PM


FUNERAL HOMES


A Trusted Family Name
Since 1906



Dennis Robarts
Dennis II & Summer Robarts


Peace River Growers

Wholesale Nursery








Donnis Barber
(863) 735-0470 3521 N. Nursery Rd.
Wats: 1-800-533-1363 Zolfo Springs


Everybody Needs a
Whopper on the 4th!


W -,
4
*


Happy
4th Qf 4,

SJuly! I.




4 G*iwitantr e.touoe
767-0020
130 W Main Street, Downtown Wauchula
(side entrance available off 7th Ave.)


|) C isf iob bopathat Ponheer Park, Friday July 4!


Central Pump
and Irrigation, Inc.
Computer Designed
Irrigation Systems for Yards,
Groves and Row Crops
Repairs for House Pumps
to Larger Turbines & Irrigation Supplies



Ronald Henderson
2318 E. Main St., Wauchula, FL 33873
773-6259


Happy
Fourth of July!

MIDFLORIDA HARDWARE
We've Got What You Need
*Lumber *Building Supplies *Tools *Home Decor
*Electrical Supplies *Plumbing *Lawn and Garden
1010 Highway 17 South
773-3106
Mon-Fri 7:30-6 Sat, 7:30-5
CLOSED SUNDAY


' I


Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula


PIONEER
MEDICAL CENTER & STAFF


515 Carlton St., Wauchula 773-6606




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