Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00228
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: June 12, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00228
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text






2008 Senior

Award Photos!

.. .Beginning 4C


The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


108th Year, No. 27
3 Sections. 28 Pages


Thursday, June 12, 2008


County Considers Tougher Restrictions On Sex Offenders


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A proposed county ordinance
will strengthen protection for
Hardee County children and
teens.
It sets limits where a sexual
offender/predator can live, not
within 2,500 feet from the
boundary lines of the property
of a school, day care center,
public park, library or play-
ground, even those on apart-
ment complex grounds. In.addi-
tion, a sexual predator may not
reside within 1,000 feet of a
designated school bus stop or
religious institution (church,
synagogue, etc).
It sets penalties of up to $500
fine and/or 60 days in jail for
each incident (day) it is violat-
ed.


Prepared by the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office, the
ordinance would pick up where
the state statute ends, explained
sheriff's community liaison
Col. Arnold Lanier, who was
asked to visit each municipality
and introduce it. He went to the
Wauchula City Commission on
Monday evening and the
Bowling Green City Commis-
sion on Tuesday. He will visit
Zolfo Springs Town Commis-
sion on Monday.
Lanier will return to the com-
mission on June 19 at 9:35 to
again request to advertise the
ordinance for a public hearing,
probably to be held at the July 3
commission meeting.
Similar ordinances have been
approved in several counties
now and are in the works in


Hardee and other counties.
Since it sets stricter restrictions
on where sex offenders/preda-
tors can live, counties are enact-
ing them to prevent sex offend-
ers from moving to counties


SHADY MOMENT
vk.%ry' w-I RM M,


where the law is more lax.
The problem is that the state
law only covers sex offend-
ers/predators during the time
they are under direct supervi-
sion, on parole or probation.


Once they are released from
that, the only requirement is to
register annually at the Sheriff's
Office, and also to inform that
office if they change residence.
The proposed ordinance


would be applicable to the 37 of
58 sexual offenders presently
residing in Hardee County who
are no longer under state super-
vision. Two sexual predators
See OFFENDERS 2A



False 911

Calls Lead

To Arrest
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A teenager who allegedly
made multiple 911 hangup calls
in a single day has been arrest-
ed and arraigned- in Hardee
County Court.
Heather Pavolini, 19, of 309
E. Main St., Apt. 10, Wauchula,
pleaded not guilty last week to
two counts of making a false
911 call. Assistant Public De-
fender John Kilcrease was ap-
pointed to represent her.
Pavolini's next court date is
set for Wednesday, July 2, at
8:30 a.m. before County Judge
Jeff McKibben.
Capt. Thomas Harris, a
spokesman for the Wauchula
Police Department, said Pavo-.
lini was arrested on May 11
after reportedly making numer-
ous calls to the 911 emergency
line over a 16-hour period on
May 10.
The two misdemeanor counts
against her stem from the two
occasions Hardee County dis-
patchers sent police officers out
See ARREST 3A


Pavolini


COUNTY
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
'Of The Herald-Advocate
The official candidate quali-
fying period for 11 open coun-
tywide offices begins at noon
on Monday.
Political hopefuls for any of
the near-dozen posts must file
thqir paperwork and, if they
haven't already submitted voter
petitions, pay their fees some-
time by noon on Friday, June
20.
Candidate qualifying takes
place at the Supervisor of
Elections office in Courthouse
Annex II at the corner of U.S.
17 and Oak Street in Wauchula.
So far, 25 potential candi-
dates have acquired the neces-
sary voter signatures to have
their names placed on the elec-
tion ballot without paying the
otherwise hefty qualifying fees.
Now, to complete the filing
process, each must only show
up at the Elections Office next
week with their formal candi-
date paperwork. ,Elections
Supervisor Jeff Ussery says that
includes a statement of candida-
cy, a loyalty oath and a financial
statement.
"If, by noon on the 20th, all
that is not completed, then they
are not a candidate," he
explains. "They are officially
out of the running."
Traditionally in Hardee
County, potential candidates
announce their intent early, then
gather voter signatures on peti-
tions so that their names can be
See COUNTY 2A


WEATHER
DATE HIGH LOW BAH
06/04 96 66 0.00
06/05 94 69 0.00
06/06 95 69 0.00
06/07 93 68 0.00
06/08 92 65 0.03
06/09 90 65 0.65
06/10 93 65 1.02
IRTAL Rainfall to 06/10/08 12.81
Same period last year 10.96
Ten Year Average 55.09
Source: Univ. of Fla. On Research Cenle

INDEX
Classifieds.................. 6B
Courthouse Report....... 7C
Community Calendar....A
Crime Blotter...............11B
Fishing Forecast...........2A
Hardee Living..............2BB
Obits......................... ..4A
Roundups................ A




7 18122 07290 3


WAUCHULA
By JUAN 5AMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Qualifying for Wauchula City
Commission begins Monday at
noon.
There are four seats up for
grabs in the city. Up for grabs
are commission seats 1, 3, 5 and
6. Qualifying continues through
noon next Friday, June 20.
A candidate must be a resi-
dent and registered voter in the
city for at least one year. There
is a filing fee of $61 and a can-
didate must establish a cam-
paign account. In addition, a
candidate must reside in the dis-
trict he/she wishes to represent.
Commission members are
paid a total of $430 per month,
which includes $30 toward the
utility bill, $200 salary and
$200 expense allowance.
District 1 is all the city terri-
tory east of U.S. 17 South. That
seat is currently filled by Troy
See WAUCHULA 2A


LAST STEP


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The final stages of streetscaping in Wauchula began this
week as workers from Spectrum Underground Inc. start-
ed putting trees in the planters along U.S. 17 North. Work
also continues along U.S. 17 South and two blocks of
Main Street in the $1.4 million beautification project.
Businesses remain open and entry is clear even while
the construction continues. It is expected to be done by
mid-July.


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Joe Justiss, a Hardee County Building & Grounds employee, has a precious few
moments of work in the shade. He and co-workers Mark Bostick and Hunter Floyd have
already spent about three weeks, on the lift or on the ground, painting the columns and
trim around the main Hardee County Courthouse and Annex I. Next they will move to
the Emergency Operations Center and proceed north on the other county buildings
housing the State's Attorney, Planning Department, and Building & Zoning.


Schools Hall Of Fame Inducts New Member

Family Of The Late Dr. Leland Carlton Accepts The Award


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
For The Herald-Advocate
Almost everyone has had a
hero in his life; someone to look
up to and follow.
Yet very few of the people
who make a lasting impact on a
community ever get recog-
nized. But the Hardee County
Education Foundation has been
honoring hometown heroes
since 1991.
And it has just inducted Dr.
Leland F. Carlton into the
Hardee County Schools Hall of
Fame.
The Senior Honors Banquet
for Hardee Senior High
School's top students and the
Hardee County Schools Hall of
Fame induction shared the stage
at the Agri-Civic Center recent-
ly for the 14th year in a row. It
is hoped the annual induction
will be an inspiration to the
graduates.
Each year, an individual is
chosen for installation into the
Schools Hall of Fame. The pur-
pose is to showcase the success-
es of individuals who are prod-
ucts of the Hardee County
School District and prove that
attending a small rural school
does not hinder one's potential
for success.
The inductees must have
attended local schools and have
made, or be making, significant
contributions to their profes-
sional fields and communities.


The 2008 Hall of Fame in-
ductee, Carlton, was said to
have exceeded the criteria with
his many accomplishments
throughout his life.
Leland Francis Carlton, son
of Martha and Albert Carlton,
was born Jan. 23, 1888, in
Wauchula. He was the lone boy
in Wauchula High School's first
graduating class. The year was
1906, and the class was made
up of only four members.
After high school, Carlton
furthered his education at Rush


Medical College in Chicago,
Ill., where he earned his doctor-
ate in medicine. Upon complet-
ing his one-year internship he
moved to Tampa, where he
'began his own practice in 1915.
That practice was interrupted
briefly, however, while he
served as a lieutenant in the
U.S. Army Medical Corps in
World War I.
Carlton married Margaret
Brown and had two daughters:
Margie (Mrs. Victor R. Gullatt
See MEMBER 2A


PHOTO BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Schools Superintendent Dennis Jones (far right) pre-
sents the posthumous Hardee County Schools Hall of
Fame Award for Dr. Leland F Carlton to grandson Victor
Gullatt and great-granddaughter Stephanie Valdez.


SATURDAY IS

FLAG DAY
Fly It Proudly!


Gator Hunt Permit

Period To Reopen|

.. Story 6A


A V


Election Filing


Periods Open


460


I










2A The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


JAMES R. KEL
Publisher/Edilt
CYNTHIA M. KR
Managing Edit


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338


Wauchula, FL 33873


LY.
>r '* '
AHL ...
or :
RALPH ILARRISON-
Production Manager -

NOEY DE SANTIAGO'
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


DEADLINES: -.
Schools -Thursday 5 p.m
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Th-urday 5 p.m
General Nev Monday 5 pom.
Ads --Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months-Sl 8: I r $31; 2 yrs. -60
Flonda
6 months 22: I yr 41, 2 yrs. $79
Out of Siate
6 months -$27; I yr.- $49; 2 yrs. $95
a


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMIISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
mop


Kelly's Column
By Jim



Clear Springs earlier this year sponsored the Hardee Junior
High Girls basketball team and donated two roofovers for the
Hardee County Dixie Youth field bleachers.

Jimmy Dickens of Wauchula recently sent in a poem, by a
schoolteacher who lamented how prayers and the 10
Commandments were taken out of public schools, and that students
can be dressed poorly and attend school while pregnant. In years
past teachers could have a Bible on their desk.
His pastor, Rev. Ken Smith of First Baptist Church of.
Wauchula, said he is more concerned that Christianity and prayers
be taught to children at home by parents.

Rev. Harrison Conley died Feb. 22 at age 95. He was well
known for his jail ministry in Hardee and his concern and visits to
widows, orphans, shut-ins and those in the nursing home. "He ran
the race to the end," said Rev.-Ken Smith.
Marcus Shackelford said he was-atrue treasure of First Baptist
Church and was the son of an Alaba fa shafecropper who once
worked for Hardee citrus growerGus Bailey.
Conley was a part-time pastor and ran a trotline on Lake
Istokpoga.
Duck Smith said of Rev. Conley, "Precious to the sight of the
Lord is the death of his saints. He led a life of character and ser-
vice."
Kenny Sanders shared his jail ministry in recent years. In the
first year there were 235 decisions for Christ, said Sanders.

It appears the proposed Sweetwater Ranch project that could
double the population of Hardee County may not occur after all.
Most of the land is scheduled to be sold at public auction June 27
at 11 a.m. at the Turner Agri-Civic Center in Arcadia. This is the
old Wesby Ranch on Charlie Creek and near Ben Hill Griffin's
Peace River Ranch. This involves 4,500 acres in 22 tracts ranging
from 54 to 457 acres. Four tracts are guaranteed to sell to the high-
est bidder.

Kenny Weis, a former star slowpitch softball pitcher in
Wauchula, seems to be doing well so far after his Jan. 25 bone mar-
row transplant at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa.
In Tampa he was taking 15 different medicines and now is tak-
ing 7. Ken is a leader in raising funds for the American Cancer
Society. About $125,000 has been raised in Hardee this year in the
fight against cancer. He has a medical checkup every two weeks.
We hope his cancer is in remission and that he has many more
years of a good life ahead.

The Fertilizer Institute reports natural gas accounts for 70 to
90 percent of the cost to produce a ton of ammonia. Since 1999 26
U.S. nitrogen plants have shut down.
Michael Bennett, TFI chairman, said in six of the past seven
years global consumption of grains and oilseeds has exceeded pro-
duction and that if all the world's farmers stopped growing food
today, there would only be enough grain stored to feed the world's
population for 55 days. He said fertilizer represents about 40 per-
cent of the world's food production.
Bennett said the U.S. 10 years ago was essentially self-sup-
porting in nitrogen fertilizer and today, with only 30 plants in oper-
ation, we import 55 percent of our nitrogen fertilizer needs.
"America's food security, and by extension, our national security
will be jeopardized if action is not taken to address our country's
current natural gas crisis."

Over 3,000 homes could be built on 1,500 acres in the
Vandolah area, Hardee County Planning and Development director
Nick Staszko told the Kiwanis Club last week.
FINR may build 900. The Larry Davis property could have
1,000 homes plus industrial, retail and office space. A third devel-
opment could have 1,249 homes.

Twenty percent of the 2008 Hardee High School girl graduates
were either pregnant or mothers, Healthy Start program manager
Leslie Bond told the Rotary Club last week.

Here are some interesting marriage facts in the current issue of
AARP Bulletin, comparing 1958 and 2008.
In 1958 the typical bride was 20, named Mary, and lived to be
65. Today the typical bride is 26, named Jennifer, and will live to
age 78.
In 1958 the typical groom was 22, named Robert, and lived to
age 57. Today the typical groom is 28, named Michael, and will
live to 70.
In 50 years the divorce rate has gone from 33 percent to 50
percent, and the number of children has fallen from 3.5 to 2.1.
Annual weddings in 1958 were 1.5 million and today, 2.4 million.
The typical honeymoon cost has gone from $237 to $3,680.

Sen. John McCain will turn 72 in August. Sen. Barack Obama
is 46. Ronald Reagan was elected president at age 69 and re-elect-
ed at 73, winning in a landslide over Walter Mondale, 56. Hillary,
Clinton is 60.
If elected, McCain would be the oldest chief executive inau-1


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send'address
changes to. The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


cally resume his or her seat on
the commission.


All.. .


MEMBER
Continued From 1A
of Wauchula) and Betty (Mrs.
Herbert W. Kay Jr. of
Wauchula).
Carlton's nickname, "Daddy
Doc," was given to him by his
two daughters. The name came
close to perfectly describing
him, for he served as a father-
like role model for many people
in Hardee County, where he
continued to maintain strong
ties.
While at his Vandolah ranch,
Carlton noticed many residents
could not get medical care due
to finances or transportation.
Carlton offered free medical
assistance to any Hardee
County resident and also made
house calls. He would not take
money even from those who
could afford to pay, instead
gladly accepting the offer of a
meal while away from wife
Margaret's home-cooked din-
ners.
He made a lasting impact on
the Hardee County by provid-
ing not only his medical assis-
tance, but also his love, friend-
ship and generosity.
During the 1920s and '30s,
Carlton was instrumental in
establishing cancer research at
Tampa General Hospital. In
those years, little was known of
the disease and the hospital had
no research facility. At his own
expense, Carlton initiated what
became a fully operational
Cancer Unit there.
Later, Carlton was diagnosed
with pancreatic cancer. He
underwent exploratory surgery
a few days before his death on
June 5, 1950. Prior to the oper-
ation, he consulted with the
research doctors and helped
plan the procedures and biop-
sies to be performed. He also
arranged to have his body
donated after death to Johns
Hopkins University for further
study.
His surgery and body, it is
said, created a milestone in can-
cer research and contributed to
the development of tests and
treatments for that type of can-
cer.
Wife Margaret died in 1999,
leaving their two children.
Daughter Margie Carlton
Gullatt and her husband, Reid, a
retired physician, reside in
Lakeland. Of their five chil-
dren, son Victor lives in Hardee
County. And his son, Cody
Gullatt, just graduated from
Hardee Senior High School
with honors.
Daughter Betty Carlton Kay
and husband Herbert W. Kay Jr.
took over the Vandolah ranch in
1950 with Dr. Carlton's death.
Both Betty and Herbert Kay are
deceased, and were preceded in
death by their .two sons, Dr.
Leland Carlton Kay and Steven
Francis Kay.
Today, the Vandolah family
ranch is home to great-grand-
daughter Stephanie Kay Valdez,
husband Anthony and children
Steven, Tony and Savannah.
Dr. Leland Francis Carlton
made a lasting impact on not-
only this community, but the
city of Tampa and also the
world. His unselfish acts of
kindness and his determination
to battle cancer are reasons he
became the 33rd member to be
inducted into the Hardee
County Schools Hall of Fame.

WAUCIHULA
Continued From 1A
Brant.
District 3 is west of U.S. 17
South and north of Main Street.
That seat is currently filled by
incumbent Ken Lambert.
Seats. 5 and 6 are west of U.S.
17 South and south of Main
Street. There are two seats
available in this district. Seat 5
is held by long-time incumbent
Clarence Bolin. Seat 6 is held
by appointee Heather Lee, who
was selected last fall to com-
plete the term of Mavis Best,
who had replaced former com-
missioner Amy McClellan
when she moved out of Wau-
chula.
Although four commission
seats are open for the Nov. 4
election, anyone not opposed
when qualifying ceases next
Friday at noon, will automati-


.gurated to a first term, reports AARP Bulletin. One-third of voters
polled by the Pew Research Center in February said age 71 is "too:
old to be president," wrote Marie Cocco.
Eight U.S. presidents have begun their first term in their 40s,
reported AARP. John F. Kennedy was 43. Richard Nixon was 47.
The average age of a president starting his first term is 55.
I Obama was elected U.S. senator in 2004 and previously served
in the Illinois state legislature. McCain has been in Congress for 25
years, first as U.S. representative and now as senator. He served in
the Air Force in Vietnam and spent several years as a prisoner of
war.
This will be a classic race of youth against experience. Obama,
is a favorite of younger voters, while older voters favor McCain.
They are of a different generation, separated by a quarter of a cen-
tury.


OFFENDERS
Continued From 1A
and 20 other sexual offenders
are still under strict state super-
vision, which has numerous
conditions on contact with vie.
times or their families, employ-
ment, residence near any place
children congregate, DNA reg-
istration, and warrantless search
and seizure.
The new law would not affect
where offenders live now, only
if they move. It will be in effect
throughout the county. The
municipalities do not need a
separate ordin4,ce, ut do need
to notify the county writing if
they will decline to enforce it.
Most conrnunities are
"working hard to assess and
plan improvement in their cur-
rent approaches to sex offender
management," says part of the
proposed ordinance. Approxi-
mately 20 percent of children
will have been sexually abused
before they reach adulthood.
The focus is shifting to protect-
ing people from sexual offend-
ers by restricting access to
places children frequent, the
ordinance continues.
. "Hardee county is a family-
oriented county which highly
values its children, and a place
that families with young chil-
dren find highly desirable." The
Sheriff and Board of County
Commissions desire" to ensure
that the citizens of the county
are protected from criminal
activity to the maximum extent
possibly by enacting this ordi-
nance to benefit the citizens of
the county," concludes the ordi-
nance.
Most people wonder about
the difference between a sexual'
offender and a sexual predator,
either being a designation by
the court at the time of snenc-
ing.
A sexual offender could be a
young adult who has sexual
relations with someone under
the age of consent (under
agel8), or someone who has
been found guilty of incest, sex-
ual assault or other sex-related
crimes.
A sexual predator is someone
convicted of a capital, life or
first degree felony, usually
involving younger children or
unusual violence, pornography,
and certain lewd and lascivious
offenses.
A list of 45 frequently asked
questions, another of sexual
predators and offenders in the
area, their criminal records and
much more is available at the
website www.fdle.state.fl.us by
following prompts to the infor-
mation wanted.


COUNTY
Continued From 1A
placed on the ballot without
paying the qualifying fee.
Now, anyone who wants to
get on the ballot must pay up to
do so.
For Clerk of Courts, that fee
is $5,738.
For Sheriff, with a state-man-
dated salary of $104,224, the
fee will be $6,253. All fees,
Ussery notes, are based on six
percent of the position's annual
salary, with the exception of
non-partisan School Board
races. The fee for those seats is
based on four percent of the
yearly wage.
For Property Appraiser and
Tax Collector, the fee is $5,738
as well.
For Elections Supervisor, it is
$4,727.
For Superintendent of
Schools, state-mrandated as with
all the others, the salary also
figures out to a $5,738 fee.
For County Commission,
Districts 1, 3 or 5, the fee is
$1,788.
And for School Board,
Districts 2 and 3, the fee is
$1,012.
Ussery says that, so far, only
one person has inquired as to
the amount he must pay in order
to become a candidate. That
person is considering a County
Commission slot, he notes.
And one announced candi-
date who did not turn in his
voter petitions by the May 19
deadline, Don Chancey, has
also inquired as to the fee now
necessary to run.


Vt'


6/12/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:31 am
Sets: 8:23 pm
LoD: 13:52:00
Moon Data
Rises: 3:21 pm
Sets: 2:19 am
Major Times
. 723 am-9;23 am-.
7:49,pm-9:49 pm
Minor Times
1:40 am-2:40 am
2:06 pm-3:06 pm
Prediction
Average
6/13/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:31 am
Sets: 8:23 pm
LoD: 13:52:00
Moon Data
Rises: 4:15 pm
Sets: 2:49 am
Major Times
8:05 am-10:05 am
8:31 pm-10:31 pm
Minor Times


2:22 am-3:22 am
2:48 pm-3:48 pm
Prediction
Average
6/14/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:31 am
Sets: 8:24 pm
LoD: 13:53:00
Moon Data
Rises: 5:10 pm
Sets: 3i21 am
Major Times
8:49 am-10:49 am
9:15 pm-ll:15 pm
Minor Times
3:06 am-4:06 am
3:32 pm-4:32 pin.
Prediction
Good

6/15/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:31 am
Sets: 8:24 pm
LoD: 13:53:00
Moon Data
Rises: 6:06 pm
Sets: 3:56 am


Major Times


Major Times
9:34 am-11:34 am
10:00 pm-12:00 am
Minor Times
3:51 am-4:51 am
4:17 pm-5:17 pm
Prediction
Good
6/16/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:24 pm
LoD: 13:52:00
Moon Data
Rises: 7:01 pm
Sets: 4:35 am
Major Times
10:21 am-12:21 pm
10:47 pm-12:47 am
Minor Times
4:38 am-5:38 am
5:04 pm-6:04 pm
Prediction
Best
6/17/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:25 pm


Th0 -e Herald

Advocate '


How to Fly The American Flag
Ten Guidelines
I. The flag should be hoisted briskly and low-
ered ceremoniously.
2. The flag is never allowed to touch the
ground or the floor.
3. When hung over a sidewalk on a rope
extending from a building to a pole, the
union stars are always away from the build-
ing.
4. When vertically hung over the center of
the street, the flag always has the union star
to the north in an east/west street, and to the
east in a north/south street.
5. The flag of the United States of America
should be at the center and at the highest
point of the group when a number of flags of
States or localities or pennants of societies
are grouped and displayed from staffs.
6. The flag should never be festooned, drawn
back, nor up, in folds but always allowed to
fall free.
7. The flag should be displayed at half-staff
until noon on Memorial Day then raised to
the top of the staff.
8. Never fly the flag upside down except as a
signal of distress in instance of extreme dan-
ger to life or property.
9. The flag is never flown in inclemen
weather except when using an all-weather
flag.
10. The flag can be flown every day from
sunrise to sunset and at night if illuminated
properly.
'


I u*ig' F0hn g F o e a s


LoD: 13:53:00
Moon Data
Rises: 7:55 pm
Sets: 5:20 am
Major Times
11:37 pm-1:37 am
12:02 pm-2:02 pm
Minor Times
6:19 am-7:19 am
6:44 pm-7:44 pm
Prediction
Better
6/18/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:25 pm .
LoD: 13:53:00
Moon Data
Rises: 8:46 pm
Sets: 6:09 am
Major Times
12:27 am-2:27 am
12:52 pm-2:52 pm
Minor Times
7:09 am-8:09 am
7:34 pm-8:34 pm
Prediction
Best.


-1


By the end of next week, the
final ballot list will be set.






June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3A


From The Heart
By David Kelly


THURSDAY, JUNE 12
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 200 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.
MONDAY, JUNE 16
/Zolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY. JUNE 19
v'Hardee County Com-
mission, regular and zoning
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.






Special Funds
For Farmworkers
Hardee One Stop Career
Center, 205 Carlton St.,
Wauchula, has emergency
funds available today
(Thursday) from 9:30 a.m. to
3 p.m. for migrant farmwork-
ers who need help with elec-
tricity or rent.
The monies are available
through the Agricultural &
Labor Program Inc. To apply,
migrants need to bring,
Social Security numbers for
family members, proof of!
income and proof of citizen-
ship. For more information,
call ALPI at 1-800-330-3491.

Health Screening
On Tuesday
Screening for heart rhythm
or irregular heartbeat, ab-
dominal aortic aneurysms,
hardening of the arteries in
the legs and bone density
are included in the package
offered through LifeLine
Screening on Tuesday.
The group will be at the
Health Department, 115
K.D. Revell Road (off U.S.
17 North), Wauchula, for
appointments beginning at
10 a.m. Cost for the entire
package is $159. Pre-regis-
tration is required. Visit the
website www.lifelinescre'en-
ing.com or call 1-8004697-
9721 to register or for more
information.










Letters To

The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters, should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification..
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


THE ETERNAL THINGS
Some things that are not eternal seem that way.
If you have ever owned a boat, you know what I mean. Maybe
you don't see the correlation yet; just hang in there and you will.
Having a boat seems like an eternal sentence of trouble.
Unless you own a jon-boat with an electric motor, which is what
I'm considering switching to, your run-of-the- mill bass boat can
wreak havoc on you.
A strap could break on your trailer, or the tire could blow out.
You could have a board on the trailer rot out, or have the carpet
come off. You could back the trailer into something and bust out
your trailer lights. These are just a few things for starters.
As far as the boat goes, we don't have enough space in this lit-
tle column for all the calamities you might face. We could start
with the lights on the boat itself; they love to go out early in the
morning and late in the evening and, for some reason, flicker on in
the middle of the day.
Of course, there is the automatic bilge pump that convenient-
ly becomes stuck after an all-afternoon rainstorm, therefore nearly
sinking your boat. We could go into the motor, but I'd rather not.
We could talk about how much gas is now, but I'd rather not. Then
there are the seats, the carpet, the trolling motor, the fish finder, the
gauges and on an on.
There is also the safety equipment that you have to keep up to
date. You have to make sure you return your whistle after ball prac-
tice and replace that fire extinguisher that was eight months
expired, because you never know when the engine ... oh, right, we
aren't going to talk about the engine.
Life jackets get cooler and cooler in design, and so you have
to keep replacing them, too; not to mention if you're like me, your
figure changes over the year, so upgrading is not merely for style
but an essential for comfort and breathing.
Are you catching my drift? Has this idea floated through your
head before'?
Sure, a boat can be a lot of fun and enjoyment, once you get
all this work stuff done and maintained.
But it just seems like it never stops, keeping your boat up to
date that is. Maybe it is just me, maybe I'm the only one, but I fig-
ure all these boat shops aren't open for nothing.
Well, yes I have been working on my boat. How did you
know?
Yes, I replaced all the boards on my trailer with new pressure-
treated boards, and stainless screws, and new carpet. Well, I say
"I," but really a good friend named Tom and I were able to do it
yesterday. It was a good day's work. It was also about 92 degrees
and hot even in the shade.
This morning we were able to take our kids to school via the
lake. Backpacks and all, we loaded up the family in the boat,
cruised across Lake Woodward and arrived on the shores of Faith
Lutheran School. We saw a bald eagle, an osprey, a hawk, some
ducks, minnows, spiders and one raccoon all before we got to
school.
Needless to say, the kids thought that was pretty cool and were
really excited.
I had to protect Karen from the raccoon on the way back, but
we made it. It actually reminded us of our first date, coon hunting,
believe it or not.
So as the kids went to school, I went to work on the boat again,
looking for a new strap and trying to figure out why that blankety-
blank bilge pump never works when you need it to.
Maybe I just need to focus on the eternal things, and not those
things that seem eternal but really are not.

Peti Of ThWe


This miniature poodle was picked up as a stray.
He had been attacked by another dog but only suffered
minor injuries and is recovering nicely. He is white and
in need of a good grooming, so with his $45 adoption fee
we will include one grooming session by a local
experienced dog groomer.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


~

~~'~tj ~.


- It's like 4 parks for 1 low price
Rides, Slides, Animals & Gardensi

.,. ,r I ,.. r -, "


36-Year-Old Mother Of


3 Battles Breast Cancer

Benefit Car Wash Set For This Saturday


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
While still mourning the loss
of her 56-year-old mother to
ovarian cancer, Blanca Dela-
rosa was herself diagnosed with
cancer.
Delarosa, 36 and a mother of
three, has Stage 3 breast cancer.
Delarosa, a former Zolfo
Springs resident who moved
from Hardee County less than a
year ago, is known to many
here for her 10 years at the main
branch of Wauchula State Bank,
where she most recently
worked as a teller supervisor.
Her family is well-known,
too.
Husband Vincent was an offi-
cer with the Bowling Green
Police Department for years.
Her mother, Gloria Sandoval,
had been a school bus driver
here for over 20 years when she
died this past February.
And family members remain
in Hardee County.
A group of them will be
working to raise money for
Delarosa as she battles this
deadly disease, one most 36-


ARREST
Continued From 1A
to respond to her calls.
The first time, Harris said,
was at 5:45 in the morning,
when a woman called claiming
she needed help then hung up.
Officers spent 30 minutes at the
Earnest Apartments searching
for the caller or any trouble, all
to no avail.
The last call was at 9:47 p.m.,
this time from the Hess station
on U.S. 17. Again, responding
officers found no one and noth-
ing, the captain said.
' Hardee County Dispatch told
officers they had received hang-
up calls all day long from the
same number, a cell phone, and
that they had been able to trace
the cell phone to its owner.
Harris said officers then went


year-old women believe they
are "immune" from getting. Not
so, notes sister Monica Her-
nandez, whjo many may know
from her current employment
with the State Attorney's Office
in Wauchula or from her time
with the Wauchula Police
Department and the Hardee
County Sheriffs Office.
A benefit car wash will be
held this Saturday from 8 a.m.
to 3 p.m. in the parking lot at
McDonald's on U.S. 17 in
Wauchula.
It is the first fund-raiser in
Delarosa's behalf.
Hernandez says while both
Blanca and Vincent Delarosa
are employed, medical expens-
es are high. Just gas for the
daily trip from her new home in
Winter Haven to the cancer
treatment center in Lakeland is
breaking the couple's budget.
Right now, Delarosa is in
Phase I of her cancer treatment
plan. It entails eight chemother-
apy sessions plus daily injec-
tions to boost bone marrow for
white-cell production.
Phase II will be surgery. Then



to Pavolini's apartment, where
she first told them that her
boyfriend had taken her cell
phone two days earlier. Asked
who the female caller could be,
she reportedly admitted to mak-
ing the calls, saying she did so
because she was upset with her
boyfriend.
Harris said the woman then
produced the cell phone from
underneath a mattress.
Pavolini was arrested and
booked into the Hardee County
Jail. She was released to await
trial four hours later.
Jill Peve, the county's En-
hanced 911 coordinator, alleged
Pavolini made a total of 15 calls
within 16 hours.
"It ties up the line for real
emergency calls," Peve said. "It
ties up dispatchers on the calls,


will come radiation and more
chemotherapy in Phase III.
Meanwhile, Delarosa raises
three sons: Manuel, 15, a for-
mer Hardee Junior High School
student, and Esteban, 9, and
Vincent, 6, who attended Wau-
chula Elementary School.
Anyone who would like to
help the family is asked to stop
by the fast-food restaurant on
Saturday and have a vehicle, or
two, washed for the "price" of a
donation.


Delarosa


it ties up dispatchers as they
dispatch officers, and it ties up
law enforcement officers as
they respond to the calls," she
pointed out.
Peve warned, "I just want
people to be aware it is illegal.
You can be criminally charged
if you make a false call.
"And, with new technology,"
she added, "there is a good
chance of locating you even on
your wireless cell phone."
She advised parents of chil-
dren who make a 911 call while
playing with a phone to stay on
the line and tell the dispatcher
all is OK. "If your child calls,
please, please stay on the line to
say it was a mistake, because if
you don't, the dispatcher will be
tied up chasing down the call,"
Peve said.


Father
Frank Romeo, Jr.


Grandfathers
Wyatt Guice
Frank Romeo, Sr.


Great-Grandfathers
Benjamin Romeo
Base Snell


Uncles
JD Snell
Harvey Romeo
Lee Streeter Camel, Sr.


Godfathers
Thomas Daniels
Allen Bailey


Love,

Debbie, frank III, Brian, La'Dorian
6:12p


What Makes A Dad

God took the strength of a Mountain,

The majesty of a tree,

The warmth of a summer sun,

The calm of a quiet sea,

The generous soul of nature,

The comforting arm of night,

The wisdom of the ages,

The power of the eagles flight,

The joy of a morning in spring,

The faith of a mustard seed,

The patience of eternity,

The depth of a family need,

Then God combined these qualities,

When there was nothing more to add,

He knew His masterpiece was complete,
And so,

He called it...Dad

Author Unknown


In Loving Memory of Our







4A The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


EVELYN MAUNEY HYDE
Evelyn Mauney Hyde, 92, of
Fort Meade, died Friday, June
6, 2008, at Hardee Manor Care
Center in Wauchula.
Born March 20, 1916, in
Georgia, she was a lifelong res-
ident of Fort Meade and of the
Baptist faith.
She is'survived by daughter
Shirley Hyde Lunn and hus-
band Roy of Bartow; son Max
Elton Chesser of Sebring; sister,
Elizabeth "Betty" Hart of
Bowling Green; eight grand-
children; and 11 great-grand-
children; and two nieces.
Visitation was at the funeral
home on Monday from 10 a.m.
to the 11 a.rp. services. Inter-
ment followed at Evergreen
Cemetery in Fort Meade.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


PETRA CRUZ
Petra Cruz, 79, of Bowling
Green, died on Wednesday,
June 4, 2008, at Lake Placid.
Born in Mexico on Oct. 19,
1928, she came to Hardee
County from Corpus Christi,
Texas, in 1968. She was a farm-
worker and homemaker. She
was a member of St. Michael
Catholic Church in Wauchula.
Survivors include four sons,
Richard Cruz, Ruben Cruz,
Roger Cruz and Jose Cruz; six
daughters, Maria G. Cruz,
Maria A. Cruz, Maria D. Cruz,
Rosa Cruz Rodriguez, Sylvia
Cruz Mandosa and Patricia
Cruz Rodriguez; two brothers,
Francisco Peralez and Severo
Peralez; two sisters, Ninfa
Peralez and Sofia Peralez
Torres; 15 grandchildren; and
four great-grandchildren.
Visitation was at the funeral
home Saturday, June 7, from 2
to 3 p.m., followed by 3 p.m.
services with the Rev. Vincente
Clemente officiating. Interment
will be held later in Texas.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula
















ENRIQUETA G.
MARTINEZ
Enriqueta G. Martinez, 80,
of Zolfo Springs, died on
Saturday, June 7, 2008 at
home.
Born in Driscoll, Texas, on
July 15, 1927, she came to
Hardee County in 1965. She
was a homemaker and of the
Pentecostal faith.
Survivors include four
sons, Michael Martinez and
wife Juanita of Bartow,
Robert Martinez and wife
Janie of Lake!and, Tommy
Martinez and wife Mary of
Dade City and Ricardo
Martinez of Zolfo Springs;
five daughters, Susanna Gib-
son and husband Robert of
Wauchula, Rosa Flores of
Lakeland, Esperanza Mendez
of Bishop, Texas, Carlota
Jones and husband James of
Panama City and Irma San-
chez and husband Frank of
Texas; two brothers, Joe
Gomez and wife Dora of
Alice; Texas and Adolfo
Gomez and wife Maria of
Robstown, Texas; three sis-
ters, Marcelina Ovalle and
husband Leon of Muleshoe,
Texas, Petra Solis and hus-
band Eustaquio of Pensacola
and Maria Castillo and hus-
band Jose of Ellenton; 20
grandchildren; and 36 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funer-
al home. Services were Wed-
nesday at 10 a.m. at the
funeral home, followed by
interment in Wauchula Cem-
etery.


ENRIQUETA G.
MARTINEZ
Enriqueta G. Martinez, 80, of
Zolfo Springs, died on
Saturday, June 7, 2008 at home.
Born in Driscoll, Texas, on
July 15, 1927, she came to
Hardee County in 1965. She
was a homemaker *and of the
Pentecostal faith.
Survivors include four sons,
Michael Martinez and wife
Juanita of Bartow, Robert
Martinez and wife Janie of
Lakeland, Tommy Martinez and
wife Mary of Dade City and
Ricardo Martinez of Zolfo
Springs; five daughters,
Susanna Gibson and husband
Robert of Wauchula, Rosa
Flores of Lakeland, Esperanza
Mendez of Bishop, Texas,
Carlota Jones and husband
James of Panama City and Irma
Sanchez and husband Frank of
Texas; two brothers, Joe Gomez
and wife. Dora of Alice, Texas
and Adolfo Gomez and wife
Maria of Robstown, Texas;
three sisters, Marcelina Ovalle
and husband Leon of Muleshoe,
Texas, Petra Solis and husband
Eustaquio of Pensacola and
Maria Castillo and husband
Jose of Ellenton; 20 grandchil-
dren; and 36 great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitation was Tuesday from
6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.
Services were Wednesday at 10
a.m. at the funeral home, fol-
lowed by interment in Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


HOW DOES A PARENT LET. GO?
Q: With the school year over and graduation done, I know
my child will be going off to college and moving away. But, how
do I let go? I'm starting to stress over the idea. I know I can't
*hold on to her forever, but I really need peace to let her go.
Signed, Overwhelmed Parent

A: Throughout children's lives, we give them roots. We teach
them lifelong lessons that will stick with them forever. We show
them love, responsibility, and get them prepared to face the real
world.
When children are older, we give them wings that will carry
them to their dreams and their futures. We can't hold them back or
they will never soar to their full potential.
I know firsthand how hard this is because I, too, have an 18-
year-old.
We are so used to carrying them that it becomes comfortable
to us. Then, when they become adults, we still think we have to
continue. We want to keep them close to us because it's hard to cut
them loose.
It's like when a baby is born. The doctor will cut the umbilical
cord, then we nurse them for awhile, then comes the day we have
to wean them, then they become an adult and, for the third time, we
have to cut them loose. It is hard. But each of these stages is prepar-
ing your child for growth and maturity.
The best and hardest thing you can do for your child is to hand
her over to the Lord. Totally surrender her into His loving arms.
Trust that He will care for her when you're not present. This is
where I draw my peace from, knowing that when I can't reach
them, God can.
We all have to let go, as hard as it is, because if we allow them
to sail on our wings and never exercise their own, they will never
learn to fly.
A mother bird will peck away at her nest piece by piece until
there is nothing comfortable for the baby birds to stay in, then she
will push them over the limb and watch. If they get too close to the
ground, she will swoop down and bare them up on her wings. But,
she doesn't stop until the birds have learned to fly, and then she
watches as they do figure eights and soar with confidence. This is


Now Could Be The

Time To Buy A Home


The old adage "There's no
time like the present" might not
first come to mind when look-
ing at today's national housing
market. But according to some
real estate industry experts,
these homespun words of wis-
dom are quite appropriate when
a closer look is given to individ-
ual local markets across the
country. They point out these
favorable factors that can con-
tribute to making this, for many,
consumers, a most opportune
time-to buy a home:
Inventory is up. When the
market is hot, new listings can't
replenish the supply of homes
fast enough, and that works in
the sellers' favor. In today's
market, the opposite is true,
providing more choices for
buyers.
Sellers are motivated.
Homes that in a hot market
would have been snapped up in
days are now lingering unsold
for weeks, even months. Factor
in bank-owned properties due
to the recent and unfortunate
spike in foreclosures and buyers
find themselves in an advanta-


Aln ovEing u(temoxg


PETRA
CRUZ
Petra Cruz, 79, of Bowling
Green, died on Wednesday,
June 4, 2008, at Lake Placid.
Born in Mexico on Oct.
19, 1928, she came to Hardee
County from Corpus Christi,
Texas, in 1968. She was a
farmworker and homemaker.
She was a member of St.-
Michael Catholic Church in
Wauchula. She enjoyed fish-
ing and gardening.
Survivors include four
sons, Richard Cruz, Ruben
Cruz, Roger Cruz and Jose
Cruz; six daughters, Maria G.
Cruz, Maria A. Cruz, Maria
D. Cruz, Rosa Cruz Rod-
riguez, Sylvia Cruz Mandosa
and Patricia Cruz Rodriguez;
two brothers, Francisco
Peralez and Severo Peralez;
two sisters, Ninfa Peralez and
Sofia Peralez Torres; 15
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was at the funer-
al home Saturday, June 7,
from 2 to 3 p.m., followed by
3 p.m. services with the Rev.
Vincente Clemente officiat-
ing. Interment will be held
later in Texas.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


geous negotiating position they
haven't enjoyed. for years.
Interest rates are down.
Recent cuts in the prime rate by
the Federal Reserve have
sparked drops in interest rates,
which at the end of January
were below 6 percent for a 30-
year fixed-rate mortgage. While
banks have tightened lending
requirements in the wake of
increased loan defaults, home-
buyers with few credit prob-
lems qualifying to purchase a
.home they can afford should
still have little trouble securing
favorable financing terms.
What's more, a market cli-
mate like this especially favors
buyers who don't need to sell an
existing property before their
purchase, buyers like first-
timers and those looking for a
second home. This tilts the
scale even more toward many
buyers.
But regardless of the situa-
tion, for every buyer, the key is
to work with a real estate pro-
fessional who knows the local
market and specializes in buyer
representation.

Believe in something larg-
er than yourself. Get in-
volved in the big ideas of
your time.


R 0ovk kang o


JUNIOR F.
HANCOCK
Junior F. Hancock, 78, of
Bartow, and formerly of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
June 3, 2008 in Bartow.
Born in Nashville, Ga., on
Sept. 30, 1929, he served in
the U.S. Army. He was for-
merly employed in the Wau-
chula public works depart-
ment. He was a Baptist.
Survivors include three
sons, David Hancock of
Charleston, Tenn., Donald
Hancock of Fayetteville,
Ark., and Richard Hancock
of Wauchula; one daughter,
Betty Sue Brown of Tenn-
essee; seven grandchildren;
and several great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitation is tomorrow
(Fri-day) at the funeral home
from I to 2 p.m. when ser-
vices will be held with the
Rev. Jim Harris officiating.
Interment follows in Wau-
chula Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Obituaries


Tc~cnwteu#e'z~et~ce,


Mike Every Moment a ycecial Memory ...


Doug and P.J. Sutton
Owners
1067 South Sixth Ave. Wauchula Florida
863-773-0625


Pastor Mitchell Landress

and the congregation of


Northside Baptist Church

invites you to join

them for the


Fathe r.'s Day



Service


SSunday, June 15


Father, grandfather, former pastor & friend r er pm .


Father, grandfather, former pastor & friend With former pastor


Rev. Warren Elliott

All former members during his ministry
are encouraged to join us.


-Baptism In Morning Service~


313c


what the Bible means by, "He will bare us up on eagle's wings."
Sometimes it may seem that the ground is very near, but there
is a Father who is watching and will not let us fall. We have to do
this with our own children.
I do want to say, however, that you should still keep an eye on
your child in college. She is going to walk into uncharted territory,
new friends, and a new lifestyle. So, keep in touch with her and,
again, pray because she stepping outside her comfort zone.
College .can be overwhelming and stressful, making temptations
easy to give into.
So, be wise and prayerful, but do not fear and let that emotion
control your life. Fear is the opposite of faith. Just know that our
parent's had to let us grow up, too. Aren't we all glad they did?
Signed, Penny.
Your questions or comments can be sent to signedpenny@-
yahoo.com or P.O. Box 2604, Wauchula, FL 33873. You can also
visit Penny Johnson's Web site at www.pennyjohnson.net or watch
her shows at www.myhwntv.com


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


912 N. 8th Ave., Wauchula 773-6947
6:12c





,""They were

wonderful".

S.. We hear kind words
consistently. We're proud
.'*'- ^ that people feel comfortable
enough with us to openly tell
us how much they appreciate
What we did for them. In fact,
it's this appreciation that
drives us to offer the very
best in comfort, compassion
and service.





'^ | |f ,FUNERAL HOMES
....529 WV. Main Street
Wauchula



negh' .borsob,,uaris 773-9773
As a courtesy to our friends and neighbors, obituaries 773-9773
are now listed dally at www.hardeeobits.com I ,


I









Vf~-


June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5A


JUST WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST,

THE BEST OFFER OF THE YEAR.


We want to help hardworking Americans

get into the toughest, hardest-working trucks out there.

So now, when you buy or lease a Ford F-150 or Super Duty@

you'll get our Employee Pricing. You pay what we pay

because we're one big family that's Built Ford Tough.

Visit a Ford Dealer or go to fordvehicles.com.


ENDS JUNE 30TH.


JAY FORD OF WAUCHULA
1031 US HWY 17 N
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
863-773-4113
WWW.ALANJAY.COM


Employee pricing at participating dealers on 2008 F-Series pickups, excluding Harley-Davidson' F-450 and higher models.
For all offers, take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 6/30/08. See dealer for details.


*'~.,.


6:12c


aW N IfY Pord

2008 FORDWa F-SERIES

2008 FORD F-SERIES


.


I .*


4P


ALAN


piAl?


LT



UG


THOUGH


x4e







6A The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 252008CA000165
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
WAUCHUE.A, a banking corpora-
tion under the laws of the State of
Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KENNETH A. REAS and CRYSTAL
G. REAS, as-Husband and Wife,
Defendants.
/


NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F. S.
CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant
to Final Default Judgment and
Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on June 9, 2008, In the
above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at the North front door of the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, on the 2 day of
July, 2008, at 11:00 a.m., the fol-
lowing-described property:
Tract No. 67 The W1/2 of
the E1/2 of the N1/2 of the
SE1/4 of the NW1/4 of
Section 32, Township 33
South, Range 26 East,
Hardee County, Florida.
Subject to a non-exclusive
easement for Ingress and
egress and public utilities
over the South 30 feet
thereof.
Together with a 60 foot
wide non-exclusive ease-
ment (Thoroughbred Road)
for Ingress and egress and.
public utilities with it's cen-
ter line described as fol-
lows: Commence at the NW
corner of the SW1/4 of the
NW1/4 of Section 32,
Township 33 South, Range
26 East, Hardee County,
Florida, run thence South
0014'10" East along the
West boundary of said
SW1/4 of the NW1/4,
822.51 feet to the Point of
beginning. Run thence
North 89041'24" East,
431.29 feet, thence North
73053'28" East, 250.06 feet,
thence North 8941'24"
East 638.58 feet, thence
North 7204'52" East,
298.92 feet, thence North
89'41'55" East, 991.62 feet
to the end of this descrip-
tion. Together with 2006
Horton Double Wide
Mobile Home ID#
H184209GL, Title#
95782843, ID#
H184209GR, Title#
95782785.
Dated this 9 day of June, 2008.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Courts
Hardee County, Florida
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk


:j12.1


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-Chinese Proverb


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.C.-act


New Gator-Hunt Permit


Sale Opens
The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission will
hold a supplemental sales peri-
od for people who failed to get
an alligator hunt permit or those
who would like to return a per-
mit with the hope of trying to
obtain another.
This additional sales period
will help reduce any inconve-
niences caused by a computer
programming glitch during the
initial sales period on Tuesday
of last week.
At 10 that morning, 4,800
alligator hunt permits went on
sale on a first-come, first-served
basis. Shortly after the start
time, the licensing system oper-
ated by a third-party vendor,
Outdoor Central of Jefferson
City, Mo., experienced prob-
lems handling the high volume
of applications.
A limited set of permits will
go on 'sale starting at 10 a.m.
this coming Tuesday on a first-
come, first-served basis through
the Total Licensing System.
A listing of the minimum
number of permits that will be
available during this supple-
mental sales period, along with
instructions on how to return
unwanted permits and more
details about this opportunity,


Next Week
will be posted on the FWC's
Alligator Management Web site
at MyFWC.com/gators.
The deadline to purchase a
permit during this supplemental
sales period is 11:59 p.m. on
Monday, June 23.
During this supplemental
sales period, people will be
allowed to purchase only one
permit, enabling them to take
two alligators. Those who have'
already been awarded a permit
will not be allowed to apply
during the supplemental sales
period, unless they have already
contacted the FWC to return the
previously awarded permit.
Persons who applied on June 3'
and wish to apply during the*
supplemental sales period are
encouraged to check their per-
mit status to ensure they do not
have a valid permit.
The date when customers can
purchase additional permits, if'
any are available after the initial
and supplemental sales periods,
has been postponed from June
10 to June 24 at 10 a.m.
People can apply for a permit at
any county tax collector's of-
fice, any retail outlet that sells
hunting licenses or on the
Internet at www.wildlifeli-
cense.com..
People can check the avail-
ability of permits during any
sales period, in real time, by
going to MyFWC.com/gators
and clicking "Check Alligator
Harvest Permit Availability."
The alligator hunting season,
runs Aug. 15-Nov. 1.

Happiness consists in
activity. It is a running
stream, not a stagnant
pool.
-John Mason Good


Circle The Date!
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
DEADLINE
IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate
encourages submissions
from Hardee County
schools. Photos and write-
ups should be of recent
events, and must include
first and last names for both
students and teachers.
Identify photos front to
back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on 'Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.,


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The Herald-Advocate Needs
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CORRES-PONDENTS

SBdwilog Green Magnol Manor
Center Hill Oak Grove
College Hill. Wauchula Hills
Lake Dal" '. Crewsille,
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We are currently seeking individuals in the areas listed here
who are willing to write newsy columns about their community
and its residents, much like the "Fort Green News" and the
various RV park columns already found on our pages.
Correspondents receive a small compensation.
If this interests you, or you would like to know more,
call Managing Editor Cynthia Krahl at 773-3255.


Political Gandlidates!
Your advertising deadline is each



This will permit us to give your ad the'
greatest amount of attention.
Please do not ask us to make an exception.
We desire only to serve all candidates
equally & well.
The Herald-Advocate
"Your local hometown newspaper
for over 100 years"
7 -- A -


I I


Photos!
*Senior Awards
*Baseball Awards
*Spring Jamboree
*Little League Baseball
*Football Action
*Miss Hardee County
*Jr. Miss Hardee County
*Little Miss Hardee County
*Prince & Princess Pageant
*Kindergarden Pageant
*Livestock Sale
*Junior High Volleyball

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com
"Photos ... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Alex Gilliard And Ralph Harrison-13


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June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7A


KIDS HAD RESPECT FOR


PARENTS, OTHER ADULTS


By VINCENT DERBY
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your name?
A: Marjorie Ann Lewis.
Q: Where were you born, and
when?
A: Baltimore, Md., May 16, 1942.
Q: Where did you grow up at?
A: Sykesville, Md.
Q: What was school like?
A: I went to Sykesville School. You
went to this
school
from the
first grade
to the 12th.
Everyone
got along in those days. The work was
hard and you always had a lot of home-
work.
Q: What was going on in history at
the time?
A: I was born in May and WWII
broke out in December.
Q: What did you do for fun?
A: Hide and seek, softball. I had two
brothers and one sister. We only had
each other to play with. In the winter
we would sleigh ride till early morning.
Q: What were your responsibili-
ties?
A: At the age of 12 I had to help keep
my room clean and make my bed daily.
I washed and dried the dishes after each
meal. In the winter I did all the ironing.
By age 13, I did the washing of clothes
during the summer as well.
Q: How long have you lived in
Florida?
A: Twenty years.
Q: What was your favorite place?
A: Maryland, because I like the
change of seasons.
Q: Did you go on vacation as a kid?
A: We went to Ocean City twice and
my grandparents rented a house on the
water one year and we spent a week
there. We did visit relatives a lot during
the summer. My aunt bought a place on
the water and we spert several weeks
during the year there.
Q: What do you remember most
about your childhood?


A: We were a close-knit family and
all our holidays were spent together.
Q: What was your favorite holiday
growing up and .why?
A: Thanksgiving and Christmas were
my favorite holidays. All our relatives
came to our house for Thanksgiving
and Christmas because of our nice pre-
sents.
Q: Were you a good child or a mis-,
behaved one?
A: I was a good, good child but I was
also a daredevil because I loved to do
things that I could get hurt doing.-
Q: Do you regret anything you did?
* A: No.
Q: If you could go back and do one
thing what would it be?
A: I would want my parents alive so I
could have spent more of my adult life
with them.
Q: What is your biggest accom-
plishment?
A: Having two wonderful children
who have turned out to be good adults
and who show a lot of respect toward
me as well as others.
Q: Did you go to college? Why or
why not?
A: No. I got married at 17, so college
was not a factor at this time.
Q: As a kid what was your favorite
game to play?
A: Checkers, rummy, old maids.
Q: What is the biggest change
you've seen over the years?
A: When I was growing up, you had
respect for your parents and other
adults. I don't see kids showing respect
toward their parents and other adults
today. There is more crime today, and
the punishment is minor compared to
years ago.
Q: Do you miss childhood?
A: Yes.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Mosaic Mine Decision Delayed


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Once again, a decision on an
application to mine in Hardee
County, has been postponed.
This time, it was Mosaic
Fertilizers Inc. which requested
the delay during Thursday
night's meeting, saying the
company wanted more time to
complete a presentation on eco-
nomic impacts.
, That was more than agreeable
to the Hardee County Planning
& Zoning Board, and Hardee
County Commission, which
continued their joint meeting to
6 p.m. on June 30.
At issue is Mosaic's request
for a Major Special Exception,
mining application, master min-
ing and reclamation plan, and
unit plan to allow it to mine
over 7,000 acres of the 10,000-
acre -tract east of the Peace
River from County Line Road
almost down to East Main
Street.
Mosaic plans not to mine
over 3,100 acres to preserve
wetlands along the Peace
River.- The reclamation plan
also provides for additional
wetlands and forested uplands
as well as land good for indus-
trial, commercial and residen-
tial uses.
In related matters in the com-


mission's regular morning ses-
sion, the commission approved
two other items regarding
Mosaic.
Resolution 2008-14 approves
the company's annual reports
for 2006 and 2007.
There was more discussion,
however, of the Fort Green
Southern Reserves Reclamation
Plan, which was expanded to
include certain acreage to be
fully reclaimed by late 2008,
late 2009 and 2010. A laundry
list of conditions was applied to
the Reclamation Plan.
The commission increased
the legal fees for county attor-
ney Ken Evers from the usual
$150 hourly rate to $200 per
hour for legal work related to
developments of regional im-
pact, for farmworker housing
and other topics as well as for
. mining.
Finally, the commission also
approved a second extension of
the time frame for reclamation
of CF Industries clay settling
area N-i and its possible pur-
chase by Clean Energy for man-
ufacture of electric energy.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
Approved a proclamation
of the month of June as
Myasthenia Gravis Awareness,
Month, urging residents to learn


more about the muscle weak-
ness and limited activity caused
by this crippling disease.
Approved a request from
the Hardee County Youth Coal-
ition, formerly the Juvenile Jus-
tice Board, to work together on
July 4 events at Pioneer Park.
Agreed to close the
Hardee County Library on Oct.
13 so staff can attend a Heart-
land Library Cooperative staff
meeting in Lake Placid.
Approved Letter of
Agreement with Bradenton
attorney H. Hamilton "Chip"
Rice to act as Special Magi-
strate on the Davis Enterprises'
Farmworker Housing site plan
application. There' will be two
hearings in late July. Both will
be open to the public.
Approved an amendment
to the Public Records Request
policy., Public records are gen-
erally available from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday.
Costs may be 15 cents for a
one-sided copy and 20 cents for
a two-sided copy. Larger docu-
ments, book pages, microfiche,
video or audio tapes and similar
materials shall be at actual cost
to the county. If there is exten-
sive requests, taking more than
15 minutes to reproduce, a labor
charge based on the employee's
salary will be included.


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Business Cards
Stationery
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Invitations
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ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS IN ONE CONVENIENT
LOCATION!









PAGE ONE


All-Star Boys Head Into Action


Hardee Swimmers Excel


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The youngest of the boys
baseball All-Stars got their first
games in over the weekend.
The 5- and 6-year-old team
and also the 7-year-olds began
play at Bartow on Saturday.
Early word is the first game for
the 7-year-olds was a victory.
The 5-6 teeballers are
coached by Wes Redding, Matt
Tinsley, Will Cartwright and
Jason Clark. The team includes
Gage Gough and Kyle Gilliard
of the Peace River Electric
Cooperative Inc. Braves; Will-
iam Redding and Jared Rickett
of the David Singletary-State
Farm Mets; Taleia Moreno and
Christian Brant of the Brant
Funeral Home Rays; Weston
Schraeder, Blake Tinsley,
Griffin Clark and Quinton
Lindsey of the Albritton In-
surance Co. Red Sox; Trenton
Roberson of the Jacob's In-
surance and Bail Bonds White
Sox; and Logan Cartwright of
the Seacoast National Bank
Yankees.
The 7-year-olds are also play-
ing at Bartow this week. Most
of them played machine pitch
here during the season but, in
Dixie All-Stars, they are con-
sidered T-Ball. Coached by
Andrew McGuckin, Brent
Stephens and Doug Sutton, the
roster includes Matthew Tyson
and Tony Webb of the Lake
Branch Dairy Braves; Bryce


Hernandez, Tyson Sutton,
Lizandro "Bo" Villarreal and
Adrian DeLeon of the Elks
Lodge Yankees; Zachary Deu-
berry, Drew McGuckin and
Cody Helms of the Rapid Tech
Rays; and Miguel Ruiz and
Andy Garza of the Rimes and
Sons Cardinals.
The Machine Pitch 8-year-
olds will play at Fort Meade,
starting on Monday. On the
squad are Matthew Laker and
Mason Block of the Rimes &
Sons Cardinals; Jax Ullrich,
Josh Carlton and Tanner Carl-
ton of the Lake Branch Dairy
Braves; Chase Benton and
Lance Bursler of the Wauchula
Police Department Rangers;
Zack Macias, Pablo Salgado,
and Zack Richardson of the
Sunshine Foliage World Mar-
lins; and twins Kyle Choate and
Keith Choate of the Hardee
Fire-Rescue Reds. They are
coached by Jeff Block,
Bryan Laker, Matt Carlton and
Jake Carlton.
The 10-and-under Minors
will begin play at Wahneta on
June 21. They are coached by
Kenny Hewett, Gerry Lindsey
and Justin Battles, whose team
includes Omar Alamia, Ruben
Olmos and Austin Altman of
the Jack See Construction Ath-
letics (A's); Aaron Harrison,
Kyle Hewett and Hayden Lind-
sey of the Vols Cubs; Blake
Crawley of the KMW Photo
Rays; Cesar Fimbres, Tanor


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Durden and Hunter Bryant of
the CF Industries White Sox;
Marcus Battle of the Hardee
Fire-Rescue Red Sox; and Seth
McGee of the C&B Cattle Co.
Yankees.
The 12-and-under Dixie
Youth (majors) are coached by
Frank Johnson, Chris Spencer
and Todd Bolin. They will play
at Frostproof, starting on Junei
28. Their players are Kris
Johnson, Wyatt Maddox, Gar-
rett Albritton and Cody Spencer
of the Florida Fuel Mets; Ma-
son Gough and Armando Ala-
mia of the All Creatures Animal
Hospital Yankees; Jacob Bolin,
Luke Palmer and Kramer Royal
of the Joe L. Davis Braves;
Luke Winter 'of the Chapman
Fruit Co. Red Sox; Tyler Hew-
ett of the Vision Ace Hardware
Reds; and Marco DeLeon of the
Hardee Signs + Tees Rays.
The oldest group are the
Dixie Boys (ages 13-15). On
the team are Justin Knight,
Dawson Crawford, Wintz Terr-
ell, Vince Grimsley, Carter
Lambert and Dylan Farr of the
Florida Fertilizer Braves; Mur-
rell Winter, Jacob Altman and
Daniel Miller of the BJD Ex-
cavating Red Sox; and Steve
Hodges, Tanner Gough and
Jeremy Rowe of the Torrey
Oaks Rangers. They will play in
Fort Meade the week of July 21.
They are coached by Brian
Knight, Van Crawford, Keith
Farr and Dane Terrell.


There may be times when
we are powerless to pre-
vent injustice, but there
must never be a time when
we fail to protest.
-Elie Wiesel

Knowing others is intelli-
gence; knowing yourself is
true wisdom. Mastering
others is strength, master-
ing yourself is true power.
-Lao-Tzu


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
For the first event of the sum-
mer, Hardee swimmers did
quite well in a tri-meet at Avon
Park.
The Hardee Swim Associa-
tion girls won their portion of
the meet with 276 points, while
the Highlands Hurricanes Swim
Team had 223 and Lake Placid
Aquatics 214.
Hardee boys were just off the
top spot. Highlands had 279 and
Hardee 276, with Lake Placid at
251.
Overall, the combined scores
gave Hardee the meet champi-
onship with 552 points. High-
lands was next at 502 and Lake
Placid at 465. -
Competition was keen
throughout the day, but several
Hardee swimmers took individ-
ual honors in their age groups.
Little Taylor Watkins, at 6,
dominated her age group, with
first place of 17 points. In the
three events she entered, she
placed first once and second
twice.
Ten-year-olds Atasha Johns-
ton and Jade Knight placed
well. Johnston was second
overall with 24 points on a pair
of first place finishes and pair
of second-place points. Knight
was fourth with 18 points on a
pair of second place points and
pair of thirds.
In the 11-12 group, 12-year-
old Rachel Roberts was second
overall with 15 points on a trio
of second-place finishes.
Adam Petrie, 11, led the 11-
12 boys division with 21 points
on a trio of wins. Kevin Borjas,
12, had 13 points to place fourth
overall.
For the girls 13-14 group,
Kate Krause placed third with
16 points and Savanna Hagans
fourth with 14 points.
Finally, in the boys 13-14


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group, Wyatt Kofke topped the
group with 28 points on a trio of
victories. Daniel Boehm was
second with 19 points for three
second-place finishes and a
third-place. Derek Sambrano
had 14 points, good enough for
fourth place overall. He took
second twice and third once.
Watkins opened the meet by
placing second of three swim-
mers in the 6-and-under 25-
yard freestyle. She was 4.45
seconds off the winning pace.,
She won the 25-yard butterfly
in a time of 45.69 and was sec-
ond in the 25-yard backstroke.
In boys 6-and-under Ethan
Sambrano and Hugh Pate did
well. Sambrano was second in
the 25-yard freestyle. Pate was
fourth in the 25-yard freestroke,
third in the 25-yard breast-
stroke, and fifth in the 25-yard
backstroke. He and Sambrano
joined with Lane Parks, 7, and
Daniel Sambrano, 9 to place
second in the 8-and-under 100-
freestyle relay, and second in
the 8-and-under 100-yard med-
ley relay.
The 8-and-under girls in-
cludes Victoria Borjas, Shelby
Zeigler and Jalen Ureste, who
variously competed in the 25-
yard freestyle, 25 backstroke,50
freestyle, 25-breaststroke and
100 individual medley. Parks
was the only boy in the 8-and-
under group.
Moving to the 10-and-under
girls, there was a large group.
Behind Johnston and Knight,
there was Lydia Borjas, Rayna
Parks and Priscilla Cisneros, all
doing well against strong oppo-
sition.
Jordan Petrie, Daniel Sam-
brano and Nicholas Sellers
combined efforts in the boys
10-and-under competition,
varying from third to 10th place
in their events.
Perhaps the largest groups,


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sometimes 19 or 20, were in the
11-12-year-old events. Back-
ing up Rachel Roberts was
Maggie Brumfield, Amy Brum-
field, Emily Rhodes, Leah Cis-
neros, Erica Roberts, Kaleigh
Johnson and Alexandria John-
son. Rhodes won the 100
freestyle. Both Rachel and
Erica Roberts, Amy Brumfield
and Rhodes won the 200-yard
medley relay over teams from
Highlands and Lake Placid.
Adam Petrie topped the boys
11-12 with victories in the 50
free, 100 free and 50 breast-
stroke. Kevin Borjas was sec-
ond in the 50 back and 50 free
and fourth in the 50 breast-
stroke. Cleston Sanders was
third in the 50 free. Sellers,
Sanders and Jordan Petrie
joined Adam Petrie in the 200-
yard freestyle relay and 100
medley relay.
Krause, Kaitlyn Kennedy and
Savanna Hagans shared events
in the 13-14 girls group.
Maggie Brumfield and Rachel
Roberts joined Krause and
Hagans to compete in the girls
200 freestyle relay and 200
medley relay.
Kofke swept through the 50
free, 100 free and 100 individ-
ual medley for victory in the
boys 13-14 group. Behind him
were Boehm, Derek Sambrano
and Godwin.
The oldest girls group had
one Hardee competitor Steph-
anie Driver, who placed third,
fourth, and fifth in the 50 back,
50 free and 100 free respective-
ly.
The oldest boys group was
led by Dylan Justice with sec-
ond, third and fifth-place
points. James Bodeck, .Jake
Willis, Brian Hagans, Lee
Cortez and Cory Dudek joined
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The Herald-Advocate:
. IUSPS 578.-7J8U

Thursday, June 12, 2008


DENNIS


teaPer3wp TLat4 Word



My time as Superintendent has been both

rewarding and challenging, and I thank you

for the privilege.


Thanks to the hard work of teachers and staff,

our school district has many things of which it

can be proud.


We also recognize that to continue the

progress, we have many challenges still to

face. To meet the demands and accomplish our

goals, I offer my experience as Superintendent

and my daily commitment to the education of

our community's children.


I will appreciate your consideration.

Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by Dennis Jonebs Cthpflpigni approved by Dennis Jones (D)
6:12p


AN AMEFUCAN F


I


---------------- A


F07







2B The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008





Hardee


TEEN BIRTHS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Hardee County in 2006 had the second highest teen birth rate In Florida, Healthy Start
program manager Leslie Bond told the Hardee Rotary Club on last week. In 2006, two
Hardee girls aged 10 to 14 gave birth, 34 teens 15 to 17 had babies, and 59 19-year-
olds gave birth. Some were married. Bond said teen mothers have a 50 percent high-
school dropout rate, and are more likely to go on welfare and have babies born with
problems. Forty percent of the fathers are 20 or over, averaging six to eight years older
than the mothers. Twenty percent of the 2008 Hardee High graduate girls either were
pregnant or were mothers, said Bond. She said the 36 births in 2006 to teens under 18
cost taxpayers $740,000. Shown (from left) are Bond, the Rev. Harold Davis and Lora
Williams, care coordinator for the Hardee County Health Department.


COUNTY PLANNING


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Hardee Planning & Development Director Nick Staszko
spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on last week. He
said real estate and housing went up in Florida from 1998
to 2005 and has slowed. He said Mosaic has applied to
extend its South Fort Meade mine. "The Heartland is
poised for growth if desired." Sarasota County now
requires a 5-0 County Commission vote to change land
use east of 1-75. Staszko said 3,150 homes have been
proposed for the Vandolah area on 1,500 acres. Larry
Davis has proposed 1,000 homes on 600 acres, plus light
industry, retail and offices. The Florida Institute for
Neurologic Rehabilitation has proposed 900 homes, and
the other proposed Vandolah project would have 1,249
homes. There has been some decline in recent enroll-
ment in local schools. Some property of the proposed
Sweetwater Ranch project will be sold at auction on June
26. Shown (from left) are Staszko and club President
Steven Southweil.


2-Year-Old
Celebrates
With 'Shrek
Dawson Dwayne Williams,
the son of Crystal Williams and
Michael Wingate of Mulberry,
turned 2 years old on March 16.
He celebrated with a birthday
party on March 23 at Pioneer
Park in Zolfo Springs.
Theme for the party was
Shrek.
Guests were served an Easter
dinner and birthday cake.
Joining in were great-grand-
parents Betty and Roy Johnson
of Zolfo Springs, grandparents
Penny and Kelly Little of Mul-
berry, uncle Bradley Merchant
of Wauchula, and cousins
Nicole Johnson, Kaylee.and
Kaleb Wingate, Khloe and
Landon Smith, and Devon Hill.


Living


CHAMBER SPEAKER


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Casey Dickson, executive director of the Hardee County Chamber of Commerce,
spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club on May 28. The chamber has 180 members, and there,
are active committees on leadership, education, events, membership and business
advocacy. Shown (from left) are Gina Neuhofer, Dickson, Candace Preston and club
President Arnold Lanier.


Class Of 1999
Begins Plans
For Reunion
Hardee Senior High School's
Class of 1999 is currently in the
process of planning for a 10-
year reunion.
Organizers ask all members
of the Class of 1999 to send
their contact information by e-
mail to sr_class_of_99@ya-
hoo.com. They also ask that
class members pass this e-mail
address along to any fellow
graduates they know of who are
out of town.
Anyone interested in joining
the planning committee should
add that to the e-mail message.
The next planning meeting will
be in September.


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June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

WHEN WE SEE STARS
C.S. Lewis wrote a little book called "The Great Divorce." The
opening scene 'takes place at a bus stop in Hell, where people are
arguing and fighting over their places in line.
Some get discouraged and wander off. Others bitterly com-
plain. All the time, there is an unchanging gloom in which it seems
about to rain but never does.
It seems to me this hellish gloom describes well the futility and
lack of meaning in our culture today. Every perversion and blas-
phemy under the sun is tolerated, while few speak with authority
about anything.
Meanwhile, people are getting more and more angry and are
suing each other for every possible kind of insult, real or imagined.
In the confusion, we are faced with a "practical atheism" that
is more effective than the Scopes Trial because the real issues are
seldom mentioned.
"The truest proponents of godlessness are almost never those
who are most blatant about it," say Joel Belz in "World Magazine."
He points to a recent issue of "Time" in which a 3,000-word lead
article called "What Makes Us Good/Evil?" is pursued without the
topic of religion being mentioned once.
To make things even more bewildering, we are in the midst of
election fervor in which we are trying to find out just what candi-
dates believe.
Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, "When it gets dark enough,
men see stars." I wonder how dark does it have to get in a big, sen-
sual culture like ours for someone to glance up and say, "Look, I
see a star!"


THREE PINKS, NO BLUES


Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Thomas, Wauchula, an eight
pound six ounce daughter, Eliza
Claire, born May 8, 2008, Re-
gency Medical Center, Winter
Haven. Mrs. Thomas is the for-
mer Claire Roberts. Maternal
grandparents are Susan Roberts
of Wauchula and Gary Roberts
of Lakeland. Maternal great-
grandmother is Maderia Rouse.
Paternal grandparents are Mike
and Lisa Thomas, and Debbie
Moles, all of Sebring; Paternal
great-grandparents are Vernon
and Zella Warren of Wauchula.


Strawberry i
Orange Marmalade I
I Blackberry .


Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Rick-
ett, Wauchula, a six pound 11
ounce daughter, Kylie Darlene,
born May 23, 2008 at Florida
Hospital, Sebring. Mrs. Rickett
is the former Ashley Newman.
Maternal grandparents are
Eddie and Trish Newman of
Wauchula. Maternal great-
grandparents are Buddy and
Mary-Ann Osteen, and Louise
Newman, all of Wauchula.
Paternal grandparents are
Russell and Pam Swailes, and
Lyle 'and Gayle Rickett, all of
Zolfo Springs. Paternal great-
grandparents are Thelma
Trammell and Lyle Rickett Sr.,
all of Wauchula.
Lenoard "Bo" Cochran Jr. and
Jamie Steele, Sebring, a seven
pound seven ounce daughter,
Pashion Ann Nicole Cochran,
born May 30, 2008, at Sebring
Hospital. Maternal grandpar-
ents are John and Tammy Steele
of Lorida. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Lenoard Sr. and
Marilyn Cochran of Arcadia.
Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant as
a newborn only may be
added at no cost. Any other
photo of the baby will cost $15.

Being First 'Lady is the
hardest unpaid job in the
world.
-Pat Nixon
Saint Thomas College set
a record for quick field
goals in a football game
against Albright College.
St. Thomas scored four
field goals in only 16 sec-
onds.


60a4


221 West Main Street


TARPON WINNER


COURTESY PHOTO
Riley Page, fourth from left, caught this 177-pound tar-
pon in late May to win Week 4 of a 5-week tarpon tour-
nament at Boca Grande. The college student from Cape
Coral is the son of Scott and Leigh Anne Creasman Page
of Cape Coral and the grandson of Chuck Page of
Wauchula, Linda Ballard of Zolfo Springs, and Rev. and
Mrs. Herschel Creasman of Coral Springs. The tourna-
ment was organized by the Tarpon Anglers Club.
Highlights will be featured on Sun Sports TV channel on
July 3, when Riley turns 21.


Hang on to your glass. Prior to 1750, coasters originally
came with small wheels so drinks could be moved
across a table. Sometimes shaped like tiny wagons, they
were also known as sliders.


VOLUNTEER RECEPTION


COURTESY PHOTO
Volunteers at Bowling Green Elementary School were
honored on May 22 with a reception at the school. Time
was taken to thank each individual and entity for assis.
tance given to the school throughout the year. Here,
Principal David Durastanti (right) presents a plaque of
appreciation to Don Adams of Mosaic's South Fort
Meade Mine, the school's business partner.
It is not what we do, but also what we do not do, for
which we are accountable.


Hardee County for your tremendous

support during our recent opening of








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4B The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The H1erald-Advocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
City Council Builds Log
House In Park: The City
Council of Wauchula, in regular
session jMonday night, agreed
to pay for the carpenter over-
seeing the work on the new log
house, 30 by 40 feet, being built
in the new city park.

Move To Designate New
Highway 'Michigan To Florida':
Wauchula is soon to be on
another national highway, if
plans now under way are com-
pleted. A bill was introduced in
the House of Representatives in
Washington Saturday. Mayor
W.D. Carlton, of Wauchula, is
chairman of the Hardee County
section of this highway.

Bridge On Road 2 Has Been
Completed: Contractor Paul
Gilmore stated yesterday that
work on the new bridge south
of Wauchula on the new state
road number two has been com-
pleted, with finishing touches
being put on today and tomor-
row.

Carload Of Cowhides
Shipped From Hardee: Dry and


green cowhides, a solid carload
of them, rolled out of Wauchula
Wednesday night bound for
Charleston, S.C., where they
will be used in the manufacture
of leather goods.
A.A Price, Hardee County's
representative in the state
Legislature, will give the sum-
mary of the 1933 legislative
session for readers of the
Advocate this week.
50 YEARS AGO
High School Too Crowded
For 7th Graders In Fall; New Jr.
High Proposed: Parents of
Hardee County seventh graders
will have the choice this fall of
keeping their youngsters at
Zolfo Springs or Bowling
Green another year or starting a
new style, classes under the
trees. There is no room in the
junior-senior high school build-
ing!
Thursday To Be Boys Ranch
Day At Cattle Market: Hardee
County ranchers who want to
have a part in stocking a herd
for the Florida Sheriff's Boys
Ranch may bring their dona-
tions to the Hardee Livestock
Market next Thursday. Donors
will receive a certificate making
them founders of the home,
according to Maurice Carlton,
chairman of the project.


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


QUOTA PERMITS
Every hunter knows you have the best chance of catching a
monster buck off-guard during the first part of hunting season.-
That's why many of us enjoy hunting the archery and muzzleload-
ing gun seasons and, why we can't miss opening weekend of the
general .gun season.
If you plan to hunt on public land next season, you should
know many of Florida's wildlife management areas (WMAs)
require a quota permit to hunt during archery, muzzleloading gun
and the first nine days of general gun season.
There also are quota permits available for hunts involving air-
boats, track vehicles, quail, youths, families and the mobility-
impaired. The application period for these hunts is June 25 to July
9. You may apply as early as 10 a.m. on the first day of the appli-
cation period, and have until midnight on the last day.
Two of these quota permits are unique to the state's South
Region. An airboat quota permit is required for anyone wishing to
hunt out of an airboat on Everglades and Francis S. Taylor WMA
in Broward and Miami-Dade counties. But, if you'd rather hunt off
a track vehicle there, or on Rotenberger or Holey Land WMAs in
Palm Beach County, you'll need a track-vehicle quota permit.
In the western Panhandle, hunters wanting to quail hunt at the
field trial area of Santa Rosa County's Blackwater WMA must
have a quail quota permit.
The FWC offers youth hunts for deer at Camp Blanding WMA
in Clay County and Andrews WMA in Levy County. If you have
children ages 8-15 and you want them to have the chance of expe-
riencing one of these great hunts, apply for a youth-hunt quota per-
mit. During these hunts, only the youngsters may hunt, and they
and their adult supervisors are the only people allowed on the area.
This coming season, there will be family hunts on 15 different
WMAs! Those areas are: Matanzas, Andrews, Devil's Hammock,
Dinner Island Ranch, Lafayette Creek, Allapattah Flats, Perdido,
River, Cary, Okaloacoochee Slough, Blackwater, and the newly
established areas of Belmore, Four Creeks, Hatchet Creek, Thomas
Creek Kings Road Unit and Hilochee Osprey Unit.
You must have a family-hunt quota permit to hunt these areas
during specific time periods. Should you get drawn, the permit
requires one adult to take one or two youths hunting.
Disabled hunters, certified mobility-impaired, can apply for
mobility-impaired quota permits. These permits allow exclusive
access to general-gun hunt on eight of the state's better public hunt-
ing areas.
If any of this is starting to sound exciting to you, you'll want
to get ahold of the correct quota permit worksheet so you can apply
for one or more of these great opportunities. All quota permit work-
sheets are at MyFWC.com/hunting under "Quota." Once you've
completed the worksheet, you may submit it to any license agent or
tax collector's office. If you have a valid Florida driver license,
you also can go through the Internet at MyFWC.com/hunting.
The random drawings to decide who gets general gun and
archery/muzzleloading gun quota hunt permits take place in late
June. In early July, you'll receive, by mail, a quota permit if you
were selected. You should know by late August if you've drawn
one of the other quota permits. Also, the results are posted after
each drawing at MyFWC.com/hunting under "Limited Entry
Hunts."
Tony Young is a media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony. Young@FWC.com.

He who truly knows has no occasion to shout.


Way Back When


Fall Preview Event

June 16-22,2008



Register
for the I
chance to I f


One of Fall's New Totes


Legion Baseballers Top Open
Here Tomorrow: The Junior
Legion Baseball schedule has
been shifted around again with
the result that Wauchula will
play its opening game tomor-
row night here against Fort
Myers. The Legion team took
on the Wauchula Growers in a
practice game Friday night,
winning 14-3.
Wauchula Buys New Cruiser:
The Wauchula City Council has
accepted a low bid of $1,784.40
for a new police cruiser, a 1958
Chevrolet. The bid was submit-
ted by Hardee Motor Co. The
Police Department will retain
the old cruiser as a second car to
be used when the new one is
being serviced.
25 YEARS AGO
Local Teacher 1 Of 15 In
Nation: Only 15 would be cho-
sen from the more than 400
teachers who applied nation-
wide. Only 15...and Teri Tilbe,
English and humanities teacher
at Hardee High School, was
one of them. Tilbe has been
awarded a $2,125 grant form
the National Endowment for the
Humanities to attend its semi-
nar on Chaucer's Canterbury
Tales.
Selected To Compete In
Florida Miss Teen Pageant:
Miss Stephanie Rhoden, 17,
granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs.
J.H. Rhoden of Wauchula, has
been selected to compete in the
1983 Florida Miss Teen Pageant
to be held at the Hyatt in
Orlando. This pageant is the
official statewide finals for the
Miss Teen National Pageant.
Elks Plan Open House For
Flag Day: Wauchula Elks
Lodge, 318 W. Main St., plan
an open house celebration for
Flag Day at 8 p.m. June 14.
There will be refreshments
served after the Flag Day pro-
gram. There will be a history of
the flag and a display of seven
different flags the U.S. Armed
Forces have fought under.
Masonic Lodge Donates
$1,000: For the last several
years the Sahib Temple Shriner
marching bands, clowns, and
motorbike riders have taken
part in the Pioneer Park Days
parade. For several years the
Wauchula Masonic Lodge No.
17 F&AM has given $1,000
annually to be used at the
Shriners Crippled Children's
Hospital.

Elks Lodge Gives Teenager
Of The Month Awards: The
Elks Lodge presented $50 U.S.
Savings Bonds to nine seniors
for Teenager of the Month for
the past school year. Students
who received the award includ-
ed Richard Nicholson, Todd
Fittro, Jonathan Perin, Becky
McHan, Kitty Colavito, Kim
Krichbaum and Tracy Terrell.
10 YEARS AGO
Farmworker Housing Focus
Of New Board: The governor's
recent appointment has made
the Hardee County Housing
Authority complete, and set


into motion plans to construct a
50-unit farm labor housing
complex here.
Pickup Truck Crashes
Through Storefront: At noon
Friday a 1989 Ford Ranger
pickup crashed into the front of
the S&S Suprex in Wauchula,
pushing a Zolfo Springs man
through a plateglass window
into the grocery store. Co-
owner Faye Shackelford said
her business has been in its
Earnest Plaza location for 31
years, and this was the first time
a vehicle had struck the store.

Group's Goal: A Tobacco-
Free Hardee: "Join me in the
fight against tobacco," says
Cathie Bryant. Recently hired
as the program coordinator for
the Tobacco Free Hardee
Partnership, Bryant said she is
excited about the challenge of
helping young people resist
tobacco's allure or quit smoking
if they have started.
4-H Awards And Recognition
Ceremony: Over 200 people
attended the annual 4-H Awards
and Recognition Ceremony at
the Agri-Civic Center auditori-
um Saturday, May 16. Kathleen
Moye, County Council presi-
dent, led the opening ceremony
and recognized special guests.
Lawsuit Accuses City Of
Wrongful Death: The daughter
of a man who died after falling
into a hole at his rented home is
suing the city and his landlord.
Faye McGahee, acting as per-
sonal representative of the
estate of Sammie L. Wouldrige,
and has filed a wrongful death
suit in Hardee Circuit Court.
BG Commission Now 'Neu-
tral' On Center: The Bowling
Green City Commission Tues-
day night withdrew its opposi-
tion to a proposed juvenile and
women's rehabilitation com-
plex in south Polk County.


S ---- ------------------ e C -------- -

18 Sincere Thanks Rr Your Support!


The United Methodist Men and Women of
Wauchula and Bowling Green would like to
thank all those who helped make the
9th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit
Missionary Frank Zajicek a success, especially:

Golf Players
Sponsors
Volunteers (food preparation & service)
Supporters
Torrey Oaks Golf Course

The tournament was a success.
Again, we thank the community for your support!


If you were not contacted, and would like to be a supporter for our
Hardee County South A.merica Mlissions missionary, please send
contributions to United Methodist Men "Zajicek Mission",
| 207 N. 7th Avenue, Wauchula. FL 33873
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ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos frontto back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


4-


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Daring ideas are like chessmen moved forward. They
may be beaten, but they may start a winning game.
-Johann Wolfgang von Goethe



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Greetings from Fort Green,
which may soon be called the
"dust bowl" of Hardee County!
We definitely need rain. Duette,
just about eight miles west of us
received two-and-one-half
inches last. Saturday. Larry
Walker, about two miles north,
told us they received one-and-a-
half inch Monday and Center
Hill got a nice rain. It is just
stopping before it gets to Fort
Green. The old story around
church is years ago in a drought
they were having a special
prayer service, praying for rain.
Uncle Fate Hendry came to
church and brought his umbrel-
la. People laughed and asked
him if he thought it was going
to rain and he answered in the
affirmative. He had to use his
umbrella as he was leaving the
church! Now that is faith!
The sing at Fort Green was
very good. One thing that made
it special to me is there were
three senior citizens, 89, 91 and
92, respectively. It is always a
pleasure to see Mrs. Walker.
Her daughter-in-law Debbie
enjoys bringing her to the sings.
Mrs. Walker gets around real
good. Mrs. Burnett's daughter
provided the transportation for
her and it is always a special
pleasure to see them both.
When I moved to Wauchula in
1964, her daughter and I were
next-door neighbors. Sherman's
mama, Mildred Cooper, sur-
prised him by attending the
sing. She had told him she did
not feel good and would not
make it, but Gwen and Donna
Albritton were able to help her
with her walker and getting in
and out of the car, which is a
chore. It was great to see all


three of these ladies.
Happy Birthday wishes are
extended to Norma Alejandro.
she enjoyed a trip to Disney to
celebrate this milestone.
Congratulations to Holly
Brown for winning an award at
the recent Award Program at
Wauchula Elementary. She pos-
sibly won other awards but one
super one was for making the
honor roll every grading period.
That is terrific, Holly!
Kaylee Hogenauer won a
Citizenship and Reading award.
She was real pleased. She said
she wished she had won the
perfect attendance, which will
give her something to shoot for
next year.
Wauchula Elementary has
received the FCAT grades and
they were super! The third-
grade students must pass the
FCAT to proceed to the fourth
grade. Wauchula Elementary
students made higher grades
than any other third grade in the
five counties in the Heartland
Consortium. Holly Brown,
Kaylee Hogenauer and Dalton
Richey were some of the third
graders from Fort Green.
Courtney Alexander, David
Godwin and Kaylee Hogenauer
won the Spirit i'ward at the
recent 4-H Awards Program. I
was teasing Courtney about
this, as all three of these stu-
dents are shy. Their leader said
they were always at the meet-
ings, did what they were asked
and did not cause any trouble!
Sincere sympathy is extended
to James and Mable Williamson
in the death of his sister-in-law,
who lives out of state.
Incidently, Mable was in a car
wreck recently. The car was


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


about totaled but Mable saTid
she had her seat belt on and did
not get a scratch, just bumps
and pain the next day. We are
thankful for that.
Willie Godwin received tNv
awards and his brother David
three at the Junior High Awards
Program. This makes Mama,
Daddy and Memaw and Papa
really proud. Charles and Lynda
Abbott returned from a short
vacation in time to attend the
program.
T.K. and Kaylee Hogenauer
and parents attended State
Bowling in Orlando last week-
end. They always have a good
time. T.K. and Kaylee both
bowl in youth leagues at the
local bowling alley.
I saw Nancy and Judy
McQuaig in the grocery store
and Nancy advised the kids
were on their way home. The
kids are her son David and fam-
ily. He is in the service and they
were on the way home due to
the death of Roy Parke. Our
deepest sympathy is extended
to them on the death of this rel-
ative.
Well, school is out so there
are some happy youth. It was
always great to get out when I
was in school but always won-
derful when it began again in
the fall.
Sylvia Hovind missed church
Sunday with a painful kidney
stone. Thank the Lord, I have
never had one but Sherman has
had several so he said he knew
the pain she was in. Sure hope it
goes away soon.
Happy Father's Day wishes
are extended to all the dads and
also Happy Birthday to Leo
Blink. He will be another year
older on June 15.
We have been picking peas. I
say this jokingly. We planted
one row of corn, peas, squash
... v. .


June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5B

Writers Group Meets

Twice Each Month,


and okra. Some animal has
enjoyed them. Whatever ani-
mals it is, they pick the peas and
leave about one to two inches
on the vine. They are very
choosy about the corn and
shuck it on the stalk and eat a
portion of it. This has taught us
that it is easier to buy from a
professional farmer. It is the joy
of seeing something yott
worked at producing but is
heartbreaking when the animals
get to them. We had a good
mango tree and the squirrels are
enjoying them. That is life in
the country!
Please continue to pray for
Polly Banda. She'is still up and
about but just doesn't feel good.
Vacation Bible School will
begin at Fort Green Baptist on
June 22. It will be at night,
beginning at 5:30 and there will
be classes through the sixth
grade. Everyone is invited.
Pray for one another. Please
call with any news you want in
or don't want in the paper!




Conley Family

Reunion Set

For Saturday
A reunion of the Conley fam-
ily has been planned for this
Saturday.
The reunion will be held at
the First United Methodist
Church of Wauchula's fellow-
ship hall on North Seventh
Avenue in downtown Wau-
chula. The gathering begins at
noon.
All Conley family members
are welcome.


writing and critique each
other's works.
The group is led by Sarah
Hollenhorst, poet and play-
wright, who holds advanced
degrees in art and biology.
If you are addicted to the pen,
come meet, among others,
Karin Smoke, who writes and
illustrates children's books and
nature tales; Yvonne Morace,
who is a watercolor artist, as
well; Bruce Siff, travel and
adventure essayist; and Mary
Stock, humor writer and colum-
nist.


Once we accept our limits, we go beyond them.
-Albert Einstein


OPEN

DURING CONSTRUCT


lq(9TA-


767-0020
130 W Main Street, Downtown Wauchula
(side entrance available off 7th Ave.)
soc6:12c




Happy Father's Day!

SJune 15. 2008


In all the world there
couldn't be a better
blend of father, family
man and friend.
There couldn't be a
sweeter man than you
Frankie on to live with and love
our whole life through.
We miss you and your lovely smile
so much...

Love,
Lillie, Your Daughter LaRosha,
Your Sons Tony, Calvin and Karu,
and Granddaughter Rosie and
Grandson Tye soc6:12p


soc6:5-26c


Authors from DeSoto and
Hardee counties assemble twice
each month in Arcadia. The get-
together is open to the public
the first and third Wednesdays
from 3 to 5 p.m. at Last Chapter
Books & Coffee, 15 W. Oak St.
No fee or membership is nec-
essary.
The Writers Group, part of
DeSoto Arts & Humanities
Council, welcomes writers at
all levels. Meet those who com-
pose memoirs, novels, poetry,
plays and children's stories.
Participants discuss the craft of


IHappy Father's Day,

4, June 15. 2008 o

\a Special Father Is
d Gift rom God
Dads are important in so
many ways -
They love and protect, they
_^ encourage and praise.
Dads are role models who
teach right from wrong -
The everyday Heroes who
keep families strong.
And because you're
Levi McLeod. Sr. Dad who s all that
and more, too.
This brings special Father's Day wishes to
you.
Love, Your Kids,
Levi & wife Bernestine, Gloria, Lillie &
Sampson, Susie & Bobby, Ray, Floyd & Lil
Levi, Grandkids & Great-Grandkids
soc6:12p


Hardee County Disposal


Residential Customers

Beginning in July all yard trash will be picked up
on the 1st Wednesday of each month.
Customers must call in before 5:00 p.m. the Monday before the
1st Wednesday of the month in which they wish to receive service.


Call (863) 773-6079

for Yard Trash Pickup!


, As a pr,,yard trash must be:
Bagged, rbd in bundles, or put In cans
Each bag, bundle, or can must not exceed 40 lbs
Each limb must not exceed 4 Inches In diameter







6B The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008






-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


* Commercial Welding Business, $250,000, Wauchula
* 4BR/2-1/2BA on 1 acre, Golfview. $350,000.
* 2 story, 3BR/2BA, large yard on Bell St., Wauchula.
$92,500
3BR/1BA, 2 apts., remodeled, Carlton St. $135,000
274 acres, Hwy 17 frontage, 1 mile south of Zolfo, 600 ft. on
Peace River.
Newly Remodeled 2BR/1BA, Bowling Green, Chester Ave.
$65,000.
2 acre tracts available on Kazen Rd.
30 Unit Warehouse, Hwy 66, Zolfo Springs. $110,000, owner
motivated. Make Offer!
SOME COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE ~ cl6:12c





KELLER WILLIAMS
S R r A-L T Y

Mikey Co in
Realt \
(863) 781-1698 \

An Independently Owned Brokerage

* New Listings *
20 acres w/2 story 4BR/3BA, 3,900 sq. ft. home. Completely remod-
eled in 2005. Many extras pool, pond, 20x72 horse barn, 24x48
workshop, completely fenced. $474,900 Eastern Hardee County.
5133 acre Hamlin grove. Production average 290 boxes/acre.
Located in Lily area. Call for more details. $531,126.
155 Acres of beautiful native Florida Hunting Land. All woods.
Great location. Over 1/2 nile of winding creek bottom. Call for
more details.
* Asking $8,500/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 28-32 acre parcels or buy as a whole 60 acre
tract. Call for more details.
* Zoned commercial 8.5 acres, corner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000.
* Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered
oaks and pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac.
wetlands. Great Investment Property. Sweetwater area.
* 20 acre Ranchettes. 6 available. 127 acres total. Buy one or buy
them all. Fish Branch Rd. Starting at $10,500/acre.
Call Mikey at (863) 781-1698 for more details.
ofbcl6:12c


Classifieds


L. DICKS, INC. is now contracting
to purchase fruit for the
2007/2008 season and beyond.
Contact Mark Manuel @ 781-
0384. 6:28tfc



1994 CHEVY K2500 pickup, 4x4,
V8, automatic, 86,600 miles,
$3,750. 863-381-0538. 6:12p
1992 S10 BLAZER, one owner,
4.3, V6, 165,000 miles, good con-
dition, $1,100. 863-832-0547.
6:12p
2004 JEEP LIBERTY like new
inside and out, new Cooper tires,
53,362 miles. Call Mike 863-245-
9182. 6:12p
1989 GRAND MARQUIS, $800,
good work car. 863-269-7367,
863-448-6432. 6:12-19p


2002 TOYOTA CAMRY, 4 cyl.
engine, transmission, $850 OBO;
2000 Chevy Blazer, 4.3 Vortex
engine, transmission, $750 OBO.
445-0048. 6:12p
2006 CHEVY SILVERADO truck,
excellent condition, 34,000 miles,
$21,000. 767-8822. 6:12p
2003 FORD F150, $4,000. 781-
1062. 6:12c
2003 CHEVY CAVALIER, $3,850.
773-2088. 6:12c
2000 DAEWOO NUBIRA, 40,000
miles, $3,200. 773-0881. 6:12c
2005 CHEVY MALIBU, 60,000
actual miles, $5,000. 781-1062.
6:12c
1989 GRAND WAGONEER,
$2,500. 863-773-4264. 6:5-26p
WILL PAY TOP price for junk cars
and we pick up. Crooms Used
Cars and Parts. 773-0637. 1:10tfc


EMPLOYEE
-EASING
OPTIONS, INC.
Robby Albritton, Vice-President
Office (863) 735-9226 Cell (863) 528-7085
Fax (863) 735-9228
ralbritton @eloinc.net
www.elonic.net
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890


Bo Espino We repair mAos
Auto Tfthnklin America cars

AUBM.. i nsue d







GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning

Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 o,8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507



JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www jiimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


Two mini-ranches! One is
5.95 acres, the other is 6.65
acres. $99,500 each
70 acres of prime develop-
ment property. City water and
sewer allocated. Annexed and
rezoned to single family with
Developers Agreement.
$20,000 per acre.
170.8 acres of pasture land in
Manatee County, Myakka
City area. 2600 feet of
frontage on State Road 64.
38.6 acre grove with 700 feet
on Lake Lizzy. 2400 feet paved
road frontage on Lake
Hendry-Lake Buffum Road.
8" deep well and 6" deep well.
10 beautiful acres ready to
build on. Plenty of shade trees
in a great country setting.
$150,000.
Three 5 ac tracts located on
Johns Rd. Well located on one
of the tracts. Price Reduced!
$89,900 each.
Three adjacent 5 ac tracts
located on East Main Street in
Wauchula. Price Reduced to
$74,900 each.
HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!
3 Bedroom/2 Bath home in
Golfview. Big 1+ acre lot. 2
car garage. $195,000.
1 acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in
Wauchula. Paved road
frontage. Deed restrictions.
Zoned FR. Lot size 130' X
305'. $38,500
NEW LISTING! 2 BR/I BA
CB home. Metal roof put on
after Hurricane. Some work
needs to be done inside. Large
corner lot in Wauchula.
$72,000.


Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


3 BR/2 BA house on 7 1/2 acres.
Stocked pond. $179,900.

REDUCED! MUST SEE! 3
BR/2 BA home on landscaped
lot. Granite countertops, stain-
less appliances. 2 car garage.
$159,900

3 BR, 2 BA immaculate home
with many extras. Home was
built in 2000 and all appliances
are included. Landscaped yard
with several fruit trees and
even a pecan tree. $148,900.

One of a kind development
property. 300 acres in
Sarasota. Hamlet designation.

700 acres in Eastern Sarasota
County. High & Dry. Hamlet
designation. Plenty of paved
road frontage.

COMMERCIAL LOT! NEED
VISIBILITY? Put your busi-
ness here! Located on North &
South bound Hwy 17. North
end of Wauchula. Zone C-2.
$195,000
Commercial property. 1.28
acres. Frontage on Main Street
and HIwy 64. $120,000.

PRICE REDUCED! Water-
front property! 2 BR/2 BA
mobile home in Punta Gorda.
Located on a canal that leads
into Charlotte Harbor. Buyer
concessions possible. Priced
right at $165,000!

3.19 acres. Zoned C-2. Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential income already in
place. Hwy 17 across from
Walmart. $1,200,000.
Golf Course/Development Pro-
perty! Water & sewer avail-
able. 127 acres! Call for price
and details!


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445-0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


1999 MERCURY, 40 HP, oil injec-
tion, stainless steel prop, excel-
lent condition, $2,000. 863-773-
3316. 6:5-12p


ANTIQUES China cabinet, $275;
oak cabinet, $250; bedroom set,
$375; end tables, $75;
table/chairs, $350; oak dresser,
$75; armoire, $250. FURN. oak
pedestal table/chairs, $150; oak
entertainment center, $150;
mahogany shelves, $75 each;
Queen Anne chair & ottoman,
$50. 445-0048. 6:12p
Happiness depends upon
ourselves.


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


SELF-MOTIVATED, honest, pro-
fessional individual needed for
automotive sales team at English.
Call Kevin Hanchey at 773-4744.
6:12-19c
DRIVER Class A CDL, local,
experienced, motivated, depend-
able, and clean record. Benefits
and paid holidays, DFWP Keen
Farm & Grove Service, Inc. Call
Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:10p
MECHANIC -diesel/heavy equip-
ment, and maintenance, welding
& fabrication a plus, motivated,
dependable, and clean record.
Benefits and paid holidays, DFWP
Keen Farm & Grove Service, Inc.
Call Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:10p


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132- FAX (863) 784-7497
* E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida. edu


PSYCHOLOGY INSTRUCTOR
Full-time, 10-month faculty position to teach Psychology and
related courses beginning in the Fall (August, 2008). Master's
degree in Psychology (or 18 graduate semester hours in Psy-
chology and a Master's degree) required; Ph.D preferred. Post-
secondary and distance learning experience strongly preferred.
Preference will be given to applicants who have 18 additional
graduate hours in Sociology. Competitive salary plus a compre-
hensive benefits package, including retirement, health/life insur-
ance, and sick leave. Deadline: 5 p.m., 7/7/08. Visit our website
for detailed position description.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
_cl6:12-19c



NOW RENTING!


THE PALMS APTS.

2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments

Located at:

701 La Playa Drive
Office Hours: Mon. Fri.,
9:00 am 5:00 pm
Monthly rent from $595 + utilities

For Rental Info & Applications:

The Palms
at

863-773-3809

(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Housing Opportunity o06 12-30c


IN C., REALTORS
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
| |JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
Juan Delatorre
(863) 781-1128

See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
PRICE REDUCED! Tirn-key 5 ac on Cross Creek Ln is
car wash operation w/6 open native Florida land. Access to
bays, 1 automatic wash bay, Peace River provided by
vacuum equipment, vending, another shared 5 ac parcel.
$435,000! $100,000!
New' Construction in Zolfo 5 ac on private rd in central
Springs! 3BR/2BA CB, 1700t Hardee Co has well maintained
Springs! 3BR2BA CB, 1700 3BR/2BA MH. Floors are wood
SF, carport, large yard, tile & tile. Some appliances includ-
carpet. $159,500! ed. $115,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Brand PRICE REDUCED! Huge
new construction! Beautiful house w/lots of potential. Large
3BR/2BA, 1300+ SF CB home corner lot zoned C-1. $145,000!
w/granite countertops, ceramic
tile & carpet floors. $155,000! 20 ac grove in Villa Citrus
w/micro-jet irrigation.
PRICE REDUCED! Corner lot $239,000!
w/new construction, 4BR/2BA
CB home, Wauchula. New Bring your canoe & camper!
refrigerator, stove & micro- Secluded 5 acs of native,
wave. Call today for more wooded land close to Wauchula
details!,$140,000! has deeded access to the beau-
tiful Peace River. Great prop-
12 ac w/SR 64 frontage. Front erty for recreation, invest-
of property is cleared, back has ment, or homesite! $90,000!
trees. Great for cattle or home- Beautiful country setting, lots
site! $180,000! of wildlife. 22 acs located
Tl.. .l .. H halfway between Wauchula &
Two residential lots in High- Avon Park has 2 story
lands Park Estates in Lake 3BR/2.5BA CB home w/fire-
Placid, both 75X150, listed for place & large screened in back
$5,000! porch. $479,900! *
PRICE REDUCED! Great 2BR/1BA CB home in Sebring
weekend getaway! Small cabin has total of 1,622SF &
on 22.8 acs of pastureland, 1,178SF living area. Large
fenced & cross-fenced, w/4" screened in front porch.
diameter well. NOW $220,000! $129,995!"
REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS..........781-0153 DAVID ROYAL.. ........ ....81-3490
MONICA REAS...............773-9609 SANDY LARRISON.........832-0130
JUAN DELATORRE.......781-1128 JAMES STALLINGS.. 863-412-4379
U.S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCIULA, FL 33873
,, 6_.12_


=MOM


l'


I I






June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


ASSISTED LIVING has resident
assistant and experienced cook
positions open. Apply at 298
Resthaven Rd., Zolfo Springs.
6:12c
SPREADER DRIVER Class D
license, experienced, motivated,
:dependable, and clean record.
Benefits and paid holidays, DFWP
Keen Farm & Grove Service, Inc.
Call Patty at 941-737-1484.
6:12-7:1Op
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY Person
with auto retail skills, pays atten-
tion to details, self motivator,
great communication skills, com-
puter and bookkeeping knowl-
edge. Bilingual A+, must be will-
ing to work on Saturday every
other week. Would prefer some-
one with auto detailing back-
ground and willing to work detail-
ing into business. Base pay, plus
commission. Contact 863-773-
2213 for application or appoint-
ment. 6:5tfc


Help ante


WOMAN TO WORK with d
mentally disabled women
between 8-2. 767-0374.
NOW HIRING Isla
Adventure Childcare Cent
have CDA. Call 767-0800.


develop-
en. Call


Classifieds


8 GENTLE COWS and one bull for
sale. 773-0718. 6:12p


LARGE BILLY GOAT and 3 small-
6:5-12p er 'billies, $165 total. 954-629-
3nd of 4486. 6:12p


er, must
5:1tfc


3BR/2B, large family room,
screened porch, appliances, inte-
rior new refurbished. Quiet set-
ting, 2 lots, large oaks, fenced
yard, located in Torrey communi-
ty, south of Bowling Green.
Excellent buy at $99,900. Call Pat
at 375-2844. 6:5-12p
THREE BEDROOM, one bath
house in Zolfo Springs, 3035 Oak
St. Call for information 863-735-
0870 leave name and number.
5:15-6:12p
2 BR 1 BATH In Wauchula 863-
767-8938 5:22-6:19p


I W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc,


773-4478
Complete Tree Service
Bobcat Service
Crane Service
Sawmill Service


Free Estimates Insured 26 years experience
cl6:14tfc


I..

I


5 YEAR OLD gelding, all tack.
781-0632. 6:12-19p


EDNA'S PLACE full set of cabi-
nets with countertop, antique
white. 767-8822. 6:12p
MAN'S BROWN golf bag with 2-
wheel cart, 7 clubs plus acces-
sories, $100. 735-0121. 6:12p
LADY'S BLUE golf bag with 7
clubs, like new, $75. 735-0121.
6:12p
DELL DESKTOP with WIN 98,
speakers, 17" monitor and key-
board, $300 OBO. 773-9122.
6:12-19p


BANTAM CHICKENS for sale.
863-773-0718. 6:12p
LARGE 7'4" WHIRLPOOL bath-
tub, 3 yrs. old, pump & fittings,
$300. 773-9791. 6:5-12p
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER IBM4
Wheelwrlter 3, good condition,
recently serviced, $200. 773-
4449. 6:12c
TROY BILT TILLER, 8 HP, good
condition, $500. 735-1722.
5:15-6:12p



RENT TO OWN 2/2 mobile home
in Mulberry. 735-1462. 6:12-19p
2002 CHARIOT EAGLE park
model for sale: 12x34, 1 bedroom,
fully furnished with central A/C,
$14,500 firm, call Crystal Lake
Village. 773-3582. 6:5-12p


Lonestar
Con3strctLtion Corp-

General Contractor
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated


Fax 863-773-9865
ceMe:CI


Office 863-773-4779


Towing Service Available
a 24 1 It Mt- SIL'I'Vi(T 0
Lowe"t Possible R'lls
1:,I',t OIICI RVIi,11110 11
(863) 781-3090 or 781-3091


REPO MOBILE HOMES -
Hundreds to choose from. Set up
& deliver) available. 863-381-
1000. 4:24-6:26p


NEED GOOD HOME for fine
guard dog. Call 773-9215.
6:12-19p
FREE ADORABLE KITTENS. 773-
3168. 6:12nc
SHIH TZU PUPPIES, AKC, first'
shots. Taking deposits, $300.
Health papers. 941-456-0580.
6:12-7:10p
AKC REGISTERED Cocker
spaniel puppies, buff color. 375-
4001,873-3559. 6:12p
AKC BOSTON TERRIER puppies,
red and white, gorgeous, 8
weeks. 863-453-9584. 6:12-19p


CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES, 8-9
weeks, vet checked, males and
females, white and multi, $200.
863-245-7707, 863-214-9078.
6:5-12p
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to. come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes-
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold In Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh
Fun is about as good as a
habit as there is.


Short Time Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and.you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll free
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity requirements apply.



Guavas
Made for Cobblers (recipe included)

$5.0- quart
also
Homemade Guava Jam

(863) 735-0349cl6:12



PARKIER FILL IIIRT
DEMOLITION
*Fill Dirtree Removal* Special
*Stump Removal. Dragline Tandam Axle Load
*Track Hoe Land Clearing 114-16 yards
*Shell Clay *Top Soil. $ I 00/Load
Bulldozer Dump Trucks ithln S mile radius o Zolfo Sprlrgs
Fill-Top Soll *Hard Pan,
(863) 735-2415 Hardee Counw, Area oril -


SLAKE BUFFUM
LAWN CARE

Affordable Rates
Reliable Service


Stephen Judah c,,,2,6,2p 863-781-9532


I BuY HOUSES ^m



781-1062 A


Billy Hill Don't delay ... Call today! c17




L A M B E R T
REALTY INC. Bus. (863) 773-0007
402 South 6th Avenue Fax: (863) 773-0038
wauchula, FL 33873 www.lambertrealty.net
Charlotte Terrell
5 + acres in eastern Hardee; native grasses. LOCATED IN COUNTRY NEIGHBOR-
$64,900 HOOD, this 3B/lBth, C/B home is situated on 1
acre. $155,000
Older home with lots of charm! Tall ceilings, TWO STORY GOLF COURSE HOME!
hardwood floors and large rooms are just some 3B/3.5Bth; large rooms with laminate and tile
of the features in this 3B/2Bth home located in floors; many extras; nice curb appeal! $350,000
Wauchula. $99,900
CHOOSE YOUR COLORS when you select
Corner lot with 3B/1Bth C/B home, convenient- building plan; constructing 3 and 4 bedrooms,
ly located and move in ready. $155,000 C/B homes; prices start at $133,000
MAKE AN OFFER on this well maintained Looking for that perfect building site or week-
3B/2Bth C/B home located on 5 acres just out- end retreat? This 5 acre tract has large oaks,
side Wauchula; 2232 square feet; 24'x36' con- small creek, plenty of wildlife. $99,000
create shop; two 4" wells on property. Call for an Excellent location for building your new home;
appointment. 1/2 acre tracts; city water and sewer. deed
restricted area. $40,000
15 Acres of pasture plus 3B/IBth C/B home in
need of repair; metal barn. $235,000 Lovely home site 5 acres with fruit trees, large
oaks and 1 acre pond. $110,000
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING! 30 acres of
pastureland; secluded; small pond with natural 10 acr 12" well; nice area for your new
flow of water; perfect for home site or small home. $365,000
ranch. $255,000 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY! 1.2 acres, high-
MINI FARM 5 acre tract with 3/1 CB home; way 17 frontage. $100,000
updated kitchen; property is fenced for horses 5 acre tract of land; paved road frontage; east-
or cattle. $199,000 ern Hardee. $125,000


11 SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON IR
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: MICHAEL ADAMS .............781-2413
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971 ASSOCIATE: CAROL JACKSON..............991-1255
ASSOCIATE: JUDY HINERMAN..............735-0268 ASSOCIATE: ROBERT HINERMAN........227-0202
ASSOCIATE: JOSEFINA GARAY........863-399-3329
cl6:12c


m FAULKNER
'Stump Grinding & Tree Service, LLC

i~ IWayne Faulkner
Owner


(863) 261-3729
(863) 261-3759
1142 Doc Coil Road
Bowling Green, Florida 33834 ds22-6:12o


oXBowling Green

Flea Market

Friday, Saturday,
,Sunday
ReStrooms Water *
Electric

781-1062


azalea apartments

Now accepting applications!
3 Bedrvom apartment*
*Handicap Unit dvaible *
E Renail rates beginning at $530 *
pluss electric, cable and phone)
Rental assistance available for ualfled applicants *
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL

(863) 375-4138
Monday Friday 9:00 dA. 12:00 Noon
Equal Housing Opportunity cI6:12-30c


es







SB The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008






The


Classifieds


GROVE FOR SALE 19.43 acre
early grove with 6" permitted well.
Asking $12,500 per acre. Call BJ
'for more Information at 863-781-
0048. 5:29-6:19c



'83 FLEETWOOD PROWLER, 30',
excellent condition. 767-8822.
6:12c



SMALL 2 BR/1 BATH mobile
home, $400 month, $400 sec.
dep., utilities not included. 3010
Edwards Peace Drive. 863-781-
0395. 6:12p
1 BEDROOM APT. includes utili-
ties, AC, $550 month, $300
deposit, credit check required.
Little Cypress Golf Course. 735-
1333. 6:12-19c
2 BEDROOM APT. includes utili-
ties, AC, $725 month, $300
deposit, credit check required.
Little Cypress Golf Course. 735-
1333. 6:12-19c
VERY LARGE MH in the country,
3BR/2B, living, dining, central
H/A, fireplace, 2 porches, $800
month plus deposit. 863-245-
7707. 6:12-19p
4BR/2 BATH HOUSE, 1725 Dena
Circle, $1,000 per month, $1,000
sec. deposit, utilities not includ-
ed. 863-781-0395. 6:12p
3BR/1.5 B, ZONED business/resi-
dential, $650 per month, first, last
and security, 716 N. 7th Avenue.
4BR/2BA, newly renovated In
established subdivision near
schools, $1,500 per month, first,
last and security, 178 Myrtle Dr.
Daytime 863-773-9684, evening
863-773-3678. 6:12-19c
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS for
rent or rent to own. Call 863-773-
2007. 6:12p
4BR/1 BATH, $750/month,
$750/dep. 320 Will Duke Rd. 786-
251-2038. 6:5-7:3p


2 BEDROOM/ 2 BATH mobile
home In Oak Hill Park, very nice,
$500 deposit, rent $700. 863-781-
3570. 6:5-12c
DUPLEX APARTMENT in good
neighborhood, Wauchula. No
smoking, no pets. 2BR/1BA, $600
monthly plus deposit. 781-3570.
6:5-12c
NEW SUMMER RATES Crystal
Lake Village, 1 BR, $500/month.
767-8822. 5:1tfc
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
12:20tfc
APARTMENTS AND HOUSES.
773-6667. 9:6tfc
2 BR/1 BTH APARTMENT $550
month, first, last, deposit
required. 773-0100. 2:21tfc
WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack Ullrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 3:27tfc
* MOVE-IN SPECIAL *
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B from $125
weekly or $450 monthly. No pets,
low deposit. Next to school &
hospital. Citrus Valley MHP 863-
698-4910 or 698-4908. Se habla
espanol 863-838-4447. 8:23tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh




COCHRAN LAWN AND LAND-
SCAPING Quality lawn care at
an affordable price! Call today for
a free estimate! 863-873-1768
Kevin or 863-781-9337 Aaron.
6:12p


Happy Home


Apartments

Fort Meade
2BR/2B, laundry, patio, C/HA, $600
month plus deposit"

2BR/1 B, furnished, utilities & cable
included, $800 month, plus deposit

(863) 285-7203 or (863) 241-5645

Ask for Sheila c16:12c







Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net John D. Freeman

Present home too small? Need a lot of repairs? Don't worry! You
can trade up for a new 3Br/2BA CB home just like trading cars.
Now is the best time low interest rates. Excellent Financing -
good prices wide choices. Call one of our associates for more
details.

2BR/ 1BA home in Bowling Green on corner lot Home built in
2006. Good first time home $79,900.00 MLS # 202503
3BR/2BA home with double carport Central air/heat 9 acres
with about 6 acres in bearing orange trees Picking about 3,000
boxes $299,000.00 MLS # 203122
Ft Green Area HWY 62 5 acres with 3Br/2Ba CB Home -
Computer Room Outbuilding Fenced Trees Excellent
Homesite Additional information call free 1-877-632-1906 ext
51. Reduced to $229,000.00 MLS # 201124
3BR/1.5BA CB home in Bowling Green Cental air/heat -
Appliances included. $90,000.00 MLS # 202456

GOLFVIEW 3BR/2.5 BA HOME ON ONE ACRE CENTRAL
AIR/HEAT 2 CAR GARAGE LOTS OF ROOM. APPLI-
ANCES INCLUDED. NOW ONLY $179,900.00

3BR/2BA CB home New Appliances included $142,000.00 MLS
# 200077
3BR/CB home in Bowling Green 1,300+- sq ft living area close
in $107,000.00 MLS # 202190

WE HAVE SEVERAL NEW HOMES IN HARDEE COUNTY
ALL QUALIFY FOR 100% FINANCING.

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember
Our listings are on the Internet. 1
Anyone with a computer can
access them anytime! os.= ?
Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net


After hours
John Freeman (863) 781-4084 Lisa Douglas
Steve Lanier (863) 559-9392 Jessie Sambrano
Jason Johnson (863) 781-3734 Noey Flores


(863) 781-3247
(863) 245-6891
(863) 781-4585
R:12c


BARRY'S LAWN CAR- DAND
LANDSCAPING INC., commercial
and residential, licensed and,
Insured. Call 448-7009. 6:12-19p
TUT'S LAWN MAINTENANCE -
Summer savings average yard,
ZS, Wauchula, BG, $25, includes
mowing, weedeating, blow off dri-
veway and walk. Licensed/In-
sured. 863-781-2129. 6:5-7:3p
LOOKING FOR A SUMMER
TUTOR to help your elementary
aged child become a better read-
er? Call 781-5645. 6:5-7:3p
JIM'S PAINTING house and
mobile home repair, Interior and
exterior, licensed and Insured,
free estimates. 767-9650. 6:5-26p
TOMMY DAVIS LAWN CARE, free
estimates, irrigation repairs, land-
scaping and clean outs, some
tree and hedge trimming, 863-
781-4055, 15 years experience.
5:29-6:26p
ROGERS CARPET CLEANING
$50 one room or 2 or more for $30
each. Also, upholstery & exterior
pressure cleaning. 863-773-6603.
5:15-6:12p
ALDERMAN'S CITRUS TREE
REMOVAL. Call Tim for quote.
863-781-5289. 4:3-1:8p
B SEE
SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
3:6-7:3p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave.,
Wauchula, and Friday and
Saturday nights 7:00 p.m. at First
Methodist Church, corner of
Grape and Church St., Bowling
Green. 12:6tfcdh
JIM'S LAWN SERVICE -
Specializing in cleaning beds,-
trimming hedges & trees, and
landscaping. Also, clean ponds.
773-3293 or 781-4641.
10:4tfc/nc
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP. Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
Located at the SFCC Annex,
Room #105, Hwy. 17 North,
Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
dh

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on
6/29/2008 at 10:30 am the following
vehicles will be sold for towing and
storage charges: Year: 20i1 Make:
NISS Model: EK VIN#:
1N6DD26S51C332233 Sale to be
held at: ROBERTS TowING 377 OLD
DIXIE HwY BowuLNG GREEN. FL.
33834. ROBERTS TOWING
reserves the right to bid. c16:12c


POST
OFFICE
NOW:












FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot
cl4:20tic


EDNA'S PLACE King beds with
frame, $200; new full bed, $200;
plenty of appliances, washers,
dryers, refrigerators, also wheel-
chair ramp. 767-8822.
6:12c
THURS., FRI., SAT 8 to 4, St.
Michaels, new clothing, lots of
goodies. 6:12p
SATURDAY 8 to 1, lots of misc.
Items. Edge Dr. take East Main to
;Boyd Cowart then on to Edge Dr.
6:12p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY 8-1, 220
Park Drive, Infant, furniture, appli-
ances, all size clothing, misc.
6:12p
SATURDAY 7 to ?, 3 family, at
322 Park Drive, Riverview. 6:12p
FRI./SAT./SUN. 8 to ?, lot of
tools & furniture, 943 Sumner Rd.
6:12p
MOVING SALE Friday Only, 8-2,
620 Cypress St., 2.5 miles on E.
Main, left on Boyd Cowart, left on
Cypress. Sofa, entertainment
center, desk, toys & much more.
6:12p
SATURDAY 8-1, 4 family, clean-
Ing out the house & garage, truck
tires, household items, shelves,
dining table, men, women & kids
clothes, way to much to list.
Everything must go. Walton Ave.
6:12p

Andrew Magee is the only
golfer in PGA history to
make a hole in one on a
par four hole during a reg-
ular PGA Tour event.

Huge Rummage Sale
Thurs/Fri/Sat
8am-4pm
New clothing, lots of goodies
St. Michael's ChurchW


Wauchula Hills
Corner of Hwy 17 "
and REA Rd.
773-2011
Maria


Q i I D




AM-SOUTH REALTY
MAKING REAI. ESTATE REAi. EASY."
linhlstcl*O ult[*) elne~dEsCaa


Words re a mirror of their times By looking at the areas
in which the vocabulary of a language is ex-panding
fastest In a given period, we can form a fairly accurate
impression of the chief preoccupations of society at that
time and the points at which the boundaries of human
endeavour are being ad-vanced.
-John Ayto



JUAN DELATORRE
(863)781-1128
B WWW. IUANDEIATORRE.COM
EMAIL'MMIL@TuIANDELATORRE.COM

REL *I"T.'M I1
REALESTATE INVESThENTS BROKER ASSOCIATE
SR 66 & Poplar St. Zolfo Springs 0.195 ac vacant lot $22,000
619 Green St. Wauchula $60,000
708 Steve Roberts Spo. Zolfo Springs Home & 4 acs $130,000
601 N 8th Ave. Wauchula 4/2 CB $153,000
215 Cracker Ln. Wauchula 4/2 MH $140,000!
316 E Orange St. Wauchula Lg lot & fiome zoned C-1 $145,000;




MID RA RELY AA





Main building 3200 sq. ft., storage building 1300 sq. ft. Large
commercial lot in Bowling Green. 225 ft. US 17 frontage.
Formerly Bills Meat Market. $175,000. AS IS.
2.10 acres prime corner SR 64 W. and Golfview Drive.
$80,000.
Corner lot in Torrey. Old Dixie Hwy. Heavily wooded.
$20,000.
2.20 Acres Comm. Hwy 17 South. Road Frontage on 3 sides.
$225,000.
1 acre MOL zoned C-1 behind ACE Hardware. 1/2 ac. site
ready needs fill and clearing. $50,000.


Wauchula
(across from .
First National Bank)
773-6667

cl6:12c


S illy Mill,
Owner


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873

Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122 .FAX (863) 773-2173


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jessica Smith, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Nancy Craft, Associate


781-3627
781-1186
773-0575
832-0370


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


OWNER READY TO SELL!! This 4/1 CBS Home on
double lot has Central A/H, open porch and
loaded with fruit trees. Two blocks north of the
County Line, Bowling Green. Reduced from
$85,000 to $82,500. Make an offer!!!
SWEETWATER ROAD NURSERY Income produc-
ing nursery on 55 acres with 6" well and 1800+
frontage. $832,500.
TIME TO INVEST!!! 3BR, 1B, central A/H located
on busy Hwy 17 Bowling Green. Great for
Business or Home or Both. Only $85,000.
ALMOST NEW!!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB Home on
corner lot In great neighborhood. Built In 2006,
Includes two car garage with door opener and
more. Access on Lake Adelaide. Reduced from
$137,900 to $129,900.
CABBAGE PALMS, OAK TREES AND QUIET!!!
This 16 Acre parcel of land has a Well and Septic
Tank. Build your own Home or Mobile Home.
$150,000.
BUILD YOUR NEW HOME!! On this Residential
Lot In this Nice Neighborhood of Riverview
Heights located on Garden Drive. Only $29,900.
STARTER HOME!!! This 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath CB
home has central air and heat, complete with
washer and dryer located in great neighborhood
on Illinois Ave. $90,000.
THREE SETS OF DUPLEXES on Hwy 66, Buy one
at a time or all three, great Investment property!!!
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath $159,500; 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
for $155,000 and 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath with
Fireplace for $169,900.
JUST LISTED!! 27.5 acres with a 2 bedroom, 1
bath home In the Center Hil area fronts beautiful
Payne Creek. Includes 12 acres of Irrigated cit-
rus grove and barn. Seller will consider dividing
property into parcels. Call today for details.
$350,000.


INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY!!! 10A/C on Hwy. 62,
large building Included. $750,000.

BIG, BIG HOUSE WITH LOTS AND LOTS OF
ROOM!!! 4 Bedroom, 4 Bath with 2,241 Living sq.
ft. new carpet, fresh paint, and new roof makes
this home a must see at a Reduced Price of
$165,000 or bring offer.

NEED MORE ROOM??? Come take a look at this
3/2 with an office and game room. This home
features a large kitchen and Inside utility room
for a Reduced Price of $149,900.

BEAUTY OF A BARGAIN! Nice 2 Bedroom 1
Bath Villa in Avon Park. Good condition, present-
ly rented. Need extra Income, Good Investment.
In walking distance to town!! Only $67,500.
THIS 6.15 ACRES OF LAND Is located on beauti-
ful Peace River. Canoe, camp or build your own
vacation home. Priced only at $125,000.
WATCH YOUR MONEY GROW!!! Excellent rental
home features, 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath for Only
$40,000. Rush to reviewl!l
AFFORDABLEII This well maintained 3 Bedroom,
1 Bath home on 1 acre of land in nice quiet area
of Bowling Green has large barn and chainlink
fenced yard. Must Seell $119,500.

ENJOY THE SUNSET!!! On the balcony of this 2
story home on 3.4 acres of land, with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths and recreation room on bottom
story. Jacuzzi tub, Trane AC, galvaluminum roof
and more for only $189,000. Call Today!!!

5 ACRES $62,500. Possible Financingl!l

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath. $92,500 With front porch and
large fenced yard. In nice neighborhood!!!


FEATURES OF THE WEEK NEW LISTINGS!!!
A TOUCH OF CLASS!l Located on Florida Ave. This beautiful home sits on 1 acre +,
Upstairs 3 large Bedrooms, 1 Bath. Downstairs has Dining room, Kitchen, Den, living
room, family room with large Bathroom. Front and back porch, and gorgeous hard wood
floors!! Graceful selection of Color schemes to reflect the era of 1920s. This house Is a
show place. Shown by appointment only. $245,000.
THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW 06:120


2004 Dodge 4 Door, 80,000 miles


Hardee Car Company


* I


mmemmmmunema







j.unc 12, 2008, The Ilerald-Advocate 9B


WEATHER SUMMARY
Most locations throughout the State received less than half an
inch of rain last week. Hernando, Hillsborough, and Baker counties
each reported 0.59 inches of rain. Live Oak, Sebring, and Palmdale
received 1.2, 1.28, and 3.02 inches, respectively. High tempera-
tures ranged from the upper 80s to 90s, with Umatilla hitting 101
degrees. Lows were in the 60s and 70s.

FIELD CROPS
For the week ending June 8, peanuts were 93 percent planted.
Last year at this time, peanuts were 77 percent planted. Potato dig-
ging continued in St. Johns County. Scattered showers in the south-
ern Peninsula were greatly appreciated. However, crops in Indian
River County were suffering due to afternoon wilting. Many grow-
ers from the Panhandle to the central Peninsula irrigated crops to
compensate for dry conditions. Drought and hot temperatures in
Santa Rosa County were reported as producing severe conditions
for cotton. Wheat harvesting continued in Santa Rosa County. The
Big Bend and central Peninsula reported very short soil moisture.
The Panhandle and southern Peninsula soil moisture levels were
reported as short.
Moisture Topsoil Subsoil
Ratin This Last Last This Last Last
week week year week week Year
Percent
Very short 47 43 43 43 37 54
Short 35 39 38 36 38 37
Adequate 18 18 19 21 25 9
Surplus 0 0 0 0 0 0
VEGETABLES
Cantaloupe and watermelon harvests slowed seasonally in St.
Johns County. Harvesting of avocadoes began. Sweet corn season
wound down in the southern Peninsula. Growers were all but fin-
ished harvesting eggplant and peppers. Producers marketed avoca-
dos, cantaloupe, sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant, okra, peppers,
potatoes, radishes, tomatoes, and watermelon during the week.

LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
The State pasture condition decreased last week due to
drought. In the Panhandle and northern areas, pasture condition
was very poor to good, with most in poor condition. Hot and windy
conditions increased the impact of the drought. Cattle were fed
supplemental hay. Cattle condition was poor to fair. In the central
areas, pasture condition was very poor to good, with most in very
poor to poor condition. Drought conditions have become extreme.
Some cattlemen are completely out of hay. Cattle condition was
very poor to good. In the southwestern areas, pasture was in very
poor to good condition. However, some rain and showers fell in
Desoto, Hendry, and other southwest counties. Statewide, cattle
condition was mostly poor to fair.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 15 15 25 20
Poor 30 20 35 30,
Fair 35 40 30 35
Good 20 24 10 15
Excellent 0 0 0 0
CITRUS
Citrus producing areas continued to experience the hot and dry
weather pattern of the last few weeks. Temperatures ranged from
the mid 60s to the mid to upper 90s in all citrus areas. Rainfall was
sparse except for isolated but strong storms in several areas.
Thunderstorms popped up in many areas as afternoon temperatures
reached the upper 90's but rainfall was limited. With the continued
and extensive use of irrigation, most trees looked goo with heavy
folRage and healthy new'friuit. Hedging and topping continued into
%the latter part of the citrus season. Other production activities
included irrigating, spraying, mowing, and brush removal.
Growers combated greening by removing trees and attempting to
control the psyllids with pesticides. Valencia harvest dropped
below the six million box weekly amount as hot temperatures slow
harvest Availability of fruit remaining to be harvested decreased
with softness of some fruit reported because of the dry and hot
weather. Some processing plants plan to run Valencia oranges into
the second week of July. Grapefruit utilization was declining rapid-
ly. Honey tangerine harvest neared completion as packing houses
closed for the season.
ESTIMATED BOXES HARVESTED WEEK ENDED
Crop May 25 June 1 June 8
In thousands of 1-3/5 bushel boxes
Navel oranges 1 1 2
Valencia oranges 5,550 5,144 4,891
Grapefruit 96 51 44
Honey tangerines 49 14 7

The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure
and the intelligent are full of doubt.


Memory Lane


L-


Ordinance Allows Liquor Sales


By JOAN' SEAMAN
Of The Heraid-Advocate
An ordinance approved Mon-
day night paves the way for the
Celtic Crossing to proceed with
plans to open.
The restaurant with a lounge,
patterned after the Celtic Ray in
Punta Gorda, will be at 216-222
West Main Street. Whether it
could have a lounge and offer
alcoholic beverages depended
on the accepted change to a city
ordinance.
Once prohibiting alcohol
sales within 500 feet of a
church or school, the ordinance
has been amended to remove
churches from the prohibited
500 feet.
The amended ordinance,
which now conforms to the
state statute only prohibiting
sale of alcohol within 500 feet


of a school, takes out language
which could affect Main Street
restaurants. At least two are
within 500 feet of either Faith
Presbyterian Church on North
Seventh Avenue or the church
at the intersection of South
Eighth Avenue and Orange
Street.
Nick Fisher and Kevin
Doyle, the new owners of the
planned restaurant want Celtic
Crossing to be a "family friend-
ly place, with its historic de-
cor."
In other action, the commis-
sion:
Approved a pair of reso-
lutions. One confirms the city's
purchase of the Main St. Inc.


and its assets fc .$65,000,
Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA) funds.
The other approves convey-
ing the title of a 1991 Saturn to
the Sheriff's Office. The city
received the vehicle through
forfeiture after a drug-sale
arrest.
Approved second, and
final, reading of three other
ordinances.
One amends the city's
Comprehensive Land Use Plan
to add a public schools element,
providing for the design and sit-
ing of additional schools or
additions to schools to meet the
needs of a growing population.
The other two change the


land use and zoning designa-
tions for a property at 311 South
Seventh Avenue, changing it
from residential to commercial
as several adjacent properties
have recently changed.
Discussed the ongoing
plan for churches in the historic
district to relocate, specifically
the Celebration-Hardee Cam-
pus church meeting at the City
Hall Auditorium and the
Celebration congregation meet-
ing at Robart's Funeral Home.
Briefly discussed and
were updated on several other
projects in the works.

The first human who
hurled an insult instead of
a stone was the founder of
civilization.
-Sigmund Freud


SUBMIT TED Br PRESTON CONLEY
This 1945 photograph shows teacher Mrs. Blackburn and her class of second graders
at Bowling Green Elementary School. The well-behaved class neatly poses with the
girls' hands folded in their laps and the boys hands clasped behind their backs. Mrs.
Blackburn may have her hands full, though, as the boys more than outnumber the girls
two-to-one. Little girls seated in the first row are (from left) Betty Jean Branning, Adrian
Moore, Sonja Marston, Jennie Albritton, Betty Sue Whidden, Betty Ruth Brooks,
Carolyn Ann Eures and Sara Ann Studstill; boys standing (middle) are Paul Mills,
unidentified, Earl Glover, William Ray Grice, James Durden, Billy Buckley, Joe
Anderson, Bobby Buckley and Wayne Smithwick; (back row) Jessie Ray Davis, Charles
Dean, Wayne Johns, Calvin Dwight Murphy, unidentified, Ricky Warren, Sidney Davis,
Joe Lynn Cranford and Preston Conley.

SHARE YOUR OLD PHOTOS WITH US!
Take readers on a walk down Memory Lane by sharing your photos from Hardee County's past. Bring your submissions
to the newspaper office at 115 S Seventh Ave or mail to The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula., FL 33873.
Photos will be returned.


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6:12c


NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of.the Environmental
Resource Permit on 69.68 acres to serve Public Recreation known as Hardee Park
Soccer Complex. The project is located in HARDEE County, Section(s) 08 Township
34 South, Range 25 East. The permit applicant is Hardee County BOCC whose
address is \ 412 W. Orange St. Room 103. Wauchula, FL. 33873

The permit No. is 44030203.001
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday
through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District (District) 170 Century Blvd., Bartow, FL 33830-7700 .

NOTICE OF RIGHTS

Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this
application may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569
and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code
(F.A.C.), of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how
the substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the
District's action, or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person
requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply
with Chapter 28-106, FA.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the
Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of-this notice (or within 14 days
for an Environmental Resource Permit application with Proprietary Authorization for the
use of Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time
period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing
under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the posi-
tion taken by it in this notice of proposed agency action. Persons whose substantial inter-
ests will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the application have the
right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the require-
ments set forth above.

Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, FS., to settle an administrative dispute regard-
ing the District's proposed action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing. 6:12c


d mI


J


% .







10B The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


TOP WRITERS!


'




~.


LIBRARY LUNCHEON


COURTESY PHOTO
This trio of students from Bowling Green Elementary School earned a five or higher
on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test's fourth-grade Writing +. For their
achievement, the youngsters were treated to a limousine ride, a Red Lobster lunch,
and a movie. Flanked by fourth-grade teacher Carey Crawford and Principal David
Durastanti are (front) Destiny Alderman, Juan Martinez and (back) Victoria Garza ,


Become so wrapped up in
something that you forget
to be afraid.
-Lady Bird Johnson

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY
CASE NO. 07-502-CA
ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS,
INC, A CALIFORNIA CORPORA-
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
AMPARO ADELIADA MURILLO, IF
LIVING, AND IF DEAD, THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST AMPARO ADELIA-
DA MURILLO; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF AMPARO ADELIADA
MURILLO; JAMES H. WEBB;
SHARYN SALTER; FEBE A.
MURILLO; ANDREW R. MURILLO;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1 AND
UNKNOWN TENANT #2,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF SALE
TO: AMPARO ADELIADA
MURILLO
Last known address: 607
E. PALMETTO ST. WAUCHULA, FL
33873
362 CYPRESS ST. SEBRING, FL
33870
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
AMPARO ADELIADA MURILLO,
Last known address: 607 E.
PALMETTO ST. WAUCHULA, FL
33873
362 CYPRESS ST. SEBRING, FL
33870
ANDREW R. MURILLO,
Last known address: 1624 OLD
BRADENTON ROAD WAUCHULA,
FL 33873

If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming an interest by, through,
under or against AMPARO ADELI-
ADA MURILLO, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF AMPARO ADELIADA
MURILLO, ANDREW R. MURILLO
and all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or interest
in the property described herein.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property;
SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION
ATTACHED HERETO AS
EXHIBIT "A"


has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
It, on Sara Barbaccia,, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address Is 2901
Stirling Road, Suite 300, Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33312 either
(chose one)
(a) within 30 days after the first
publication of this notice, or
(b) on or before July 4, 2008.
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 27 day of May,
2008.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
AS Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons
needing a reasonable accommo-
dation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should, no later than
seven (7) days prior, contact the
Clerk, of the Court's disability
coordinator at 8637732161.412 W
ORANGE ST. flM A102. WAUCHU-
LA FL. 33873. If hearing Impaired,
contact (TDD) 8009558771 via
Florida Relay System.

This Is an attempt to collect a
debt. Any Information obtained
will be used for that purpose.

6:5.12c


Orange Crop


Estimate The Same


Florida's 2007-2008 orange
crop estimate remained the
same at 168.5 million boxes,
according to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture (USDA)
revised citrus forecast.
The 168.5 million boxes are
made up of 80.5 million boxes
of Early-Mids, 3.0 million
boxes of Navels and 85 million
boxes of Valencias.
"We're in the stretch run of
the '07-'08 Florida citrus sea-
son and this has certainly been a
good, quality crop," said
Michael W. Sparks, executive
VP/CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual. "We've rebuilt invento-
ries to the point where we're
concerned about fruit prices to
growers and that's something
we will have to watch as the
season ends and we head into
'08-'09."
The Florida citrus industry
saw a decline in orange produc-
tion from 230 million boxes to
129 million boxes during the
five-year period between the


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 252008DP000110
Donna Granadero,
Petitioner

and

Paul Martinez,
Respondent


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Paul Martinez
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, If
any, to it on Donna Granadero,
whose address is 2026 Rigdon
Rd. Wauchula FL on or before
6/20/2008, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at PO
Drawer 1749, or 417 W. Main St.,
Room #202, Wauchula, FL 33873,
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fall
to do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office. You may review
these documents upon request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. ( You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at
the clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and Informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
In sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.

Dated this 19th day of May, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Court
Delois Franks, D.C.
"If you are a person with a disabil-
ity, who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled at no
cost to you, to the provision or
certain assistance. Please contact
the Office of the Court
Administrator,, (863) 534-4690,
within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this (describe
notice), if you are hearing or voice
Impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777
or Florida Relay Service 711."
5:22-6:12


2001-02 season and the 2006-
07 season. This reduction was
due in large part to the effects of
hurricanes, development, and
pests and diseases such as citrus
canker and greening.
A 168.5 million-box-orange
crop would represent about a 31
percent increase from the 2006-
2007 season. The USDA issues
its initial estimate in October
and then revises it each month
through the end of the citrus
season in July.
In the revised estimate,
Florida grapefruit increased
from 26.3 million boxes to 26.5
million boxes. Tangelos re-
mained unchanged at 1.5 mil-
lion boxes and tangerines in-
creased from 5.3 million boxes
to 5.5 million boxes.
The complete USDA crop
forecast is available from the
Florida Agriculture Statistics
Service online at http://www.-
nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_Sta
te/Florida/Publications/Cit-
rus/cpfp.htm.

Children are apt to live up
to what you believe of
them.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 252007DP000159
IN THE INTEREST OF:
R., D. DOB: 10/01/2002
/
CHILD
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF
HEARING ON PETITION FOR
TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS
THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO:
Carlos Enrique Ruiz
(ADDRESS UNKNOWN)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition under oath has
been filed in the above styled
Court for the permanent commit-
ment of D.R., a female child, born
on October 1, 2002, to Angela
Ruiz, for subsequent adoption and
you are hereby COMMANDED to
be and appear before the HONOR-
ABLE Marcus J. Ezelle at 10:30
A.M on the 24th Day of July, 2008,
for this hearing at the HARDEE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, Juvenile
Division, 417 West Main Street,
Third Floor, Courtroom A,
Wauchula, Florida 33873.

YOUR FAILURE TO APPEAR IN
PERSON WILL BE TREATED AS A
CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION
OF PARENTAL RIGHTS AND YOU
WILL PERMANENTLY LOSE ALL
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO
THE CHILD AS NAMED IN THE
PETITION FOR TERMINATION OF.
PARENTAL RIGHTS.

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO
HAVE AN ATTORNEY REPRE-
SENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF
YOU CANNOT AFFORD AN
ATTORNEY, YOU MUST BE PRE-
SENT AND REQUEST THAT THE
COURT APPOINT AN ATTORNEY
FOR YOU IF YOU WANT ONE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact
the Dept. of Children & Families-
Legal Department, 1014 South 6th
Ave., Wauchula, FL 33873,
Telephone (863) 773-9746, no later
than seven days prior to the pro-
ceeding., If hearing Impaired,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
by
Delois Franks
as his Deputy Clerk
5:29-6:19


Hardee County Public Library workers were recently recognized for their labors and
dedication. They all were treated to a luncheon feast hosted by the Friends of the
Library. Ready to dig in are (front, from left) Dee Shackelford, Rhonda Darty, Cathy
Brant, Nancy Collins, Millie Bush, Nona McElfresh and Library Director Patti Lang; and
(back) Bob Hedenberg.





Turtle Season Is Closed


The Florida Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Commission
notes the state is in the midst of
closed seasons on river cooters
and soft-shell turtles.
Harvesting river cooters and
their eggs is prohibited from
April 15 to July 31, and soft-
shell turtles and their eggs from
May 1 to July 31. River cooters
and soft-shell turtles are the
most frequently harvested of all
Florida turtle species.
The FWC has received infor-
mation that prices for freshwa-
ter turtles and their meat have
been increasing, which may
cause a rise in the black market
for illegally harvested, or
poached, turtles.
Anticipated tighter restric-
tions on harvesting may have
caused the increase in turtle
prices nearly twice what
they typically have been. The
FWC is reconsidering rules on
freshwater turtle harvesting
after receiving information peo-
ple were removing hundreds of
freshwater turtles at a time. The
more valuable turtles and turtle
meat may be incentive enough


for some to break the law and
harvest turtles out of season.
The FWC is urging the public
to immediately report anyone
catching and keeping river


cooters or soft-shell turtles this
time of year.
To report violations, call the
Wildlife Alert Hotline at (888)
404-3922.


FLORsIALIVESpTOCK MARKET REPORT

FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE

For the week ended June 5, 2008:

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 7,577, com-
pared to 4,560 last week and 8,155 a year ago. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to last week: slaughter cows and bulls were steady to 1.00 high-
er, feeder steers and heifers were steady to 2.00 lower.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:




Slaughter Cows:
57.00.


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 118.00-160.00;
300-400 lbs., 109.00-129.00; and
400-500 lbs., .100.00-115.00.

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 95.00-128.00;
300-400 lbs., 92.00-110.00; and
400-500 lbs., 88.00-105.00.

Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 47.00-


City of Wauchula

Wauchula Cemetery -

The City of Wauchula would like to give lot owners the opportunity to remove nay item
that violates the rules and regulations of the cemetery. If you have nay questions please
feel free to call City Hall at (863)773-3131.
Section 6 Decoration of Plots
6.01 No flower receptacles may be placed on any plot unless it consists of galvanized
iron, alumin, bronze, or other rust-resisting material and of a size and design approved
by the Superintendent, and set wholly beneath the level of grass, except for urns of mar-
ble or granite that are a part of the monument. All flower receptacles, other than those
part of the monument, must be set and placed beneath the level of the grass, except for
urns of marble or granite that are a part of the monument.
6.02 The City is not responsible for floral pieces, baskets, frames, or receptacles in or to
which flowers are placed or attached.
6.03 The City may remove any flower, weed, shrub, or plant of any kind if the
Superintendent determines it is unsightly, diseased, or detracts from the dignity or
appearance of the cemetery.
6.04 The City is not responsible for any planting damaged by the elements, thieves, van-
dals, or any other cause beyond the City's control.
6.05 No planting of flowers, shrubs, or herbage of any kind is permitted on plots in the
cemetery.
6.06 Any item consisting of glass, brick, cement, wood, metal (except temporary metal
markers), and any toys, souvenirs, or emblems are prohibited from being placed upon
any lot.
6.07 Lot owners may place one bouquet of flowers on each grave, providing they are
placed in an approved ground-level vase or in a vase that is part of the memorial. Any
extra decoration placed on holidays or other special occasions will be removed in ten
days.
6.08 The use of artificial flowers during the summer is discouraged.


Ciudad de Wauchula

Wauchula Cementerio

La Ciudad de Wauchula gustaria much dar los propietarios la oportunidad de eliminar
nay tema que viola las normas y reglamentos del cementerio. Si tiene preguntas nay por
favor no dude en Ilamar al Ayuntamiento (863) 773-3131.
Secci6n 6 Decoraci6n de Parcelas
6,01 flor recipients no podrAn ser incluidos en cualquier parcela a menos que se com-
pone de hierro galvanizado, alumin, bronce, o de otro tipo de resistencia a la roya de
material y de un tamafio y disefio aprobado por el Supertintendent, y establecer en su
totalidad por debajo del nivel de c6sped, con excepci6n de urnas de marmol o granito
que forman parte del monument. Todos los recipients de flores') distintos de los de la
parte monumnet, debe establecerse y se coloca por debajo del nivel de la hierba, con
excepci6n de urnas de mArmol o granito que forman parte del monument.
6,02 La Ciudad no es responsible de piezas florales, cestas, marcos, o en recipients o
en los que se colocan flores o adjunto.
6.03 La Ciudad puede eliminar cualquier flor, la maleza, arbustos, plants o de cualquier
tipo si el Superintendente determine que es antiest6ticas, enfermas, o sea contraria a la
dignidad o la apariencia del cementerio.
6,04 La Ciudad no es responsible de cualquier plantaci6n dafiada por los elements,
los ladrones, vandalos, o por cualquier otra causa mas allA de la Ciudad su control.
6,05 No plantaci6n de flores, arbustos, hierbas o de cualquier tipo estA permitida en las
parcelas en el cementerio.
6,06 Cualquier tema que consta de vidrio, ladrillo, cemento, madera, metal excepto met-
ales marcadores temporales), asi como cualquier juguetes, recuerdos, o emblemas
estan prohibido de ser puestas en cualquier lote.
6.07 Lote propietarios puede colocar un ramo de flores en cada tumba, siempre y cuan-
do se sitian en un aprobado a nivel del suelo jarr6n o en un florero que forma parte del
monument. Toda la decoraci6n extra en las vacaciones o otras ocasiones especiales
se eliminarAn en diez dias.
6,08 El uso de flores artificiales durante el verano se desalienta. 6:12-19c






June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 11B


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
June 8, Walter Antonio Najera-Jimenez, 34, of 129 Heard
Bridge Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol
Tpr., J.K. Cloud and charged with DUI and no valid license.
June 7, Lasidlado Rodrigues .'pcz, 56, of 1520 Hinson Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Mixon Trammell and charged with
trespass on property other than structure.
June 7, Cauahtemoc Machuca, 32, General Delivery, Wau-
chula, and Rigo Montez, 22, of 1747 Ratliff Road, Wauchula, were
arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and each charged with loitering/prowl-
ing.
June 7, a residential burglary on Sandpiper Drive, a fight on
Riverside Drive, and criminal mischief on Conerly Road were
reported.
June 6, Hasan Jaleel Williams, 32, P.O. Box 444, Bowling
Green, was arrested on charged of withholding support of children
and larceny.
June 5, Marcel Louis Melton, 24, of 694 Hlneysuckle St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF)
and charged with sale of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a place of
worship or business; possession of.a controlled substance without
a prescription, destroying/tampering with evidence and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
June 5, Lorie Ann Shiver, 35, of 108 E. Broadway, Fort
Meade was arrested on a charge of contempt of court.
June 5, Francis Peter Grzegorzeski, 26, of 1814 N. 47th St.,
Tampa, was arrested by Sgt. Eric Thompson on a charge of con-
tempt of court.
June 5, Luis Miguel Hernandez, 18, of 316 Orange St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession
of marijuana.
June 5, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.
June 4, Elaine Medrano Bias, 33, of 316 Ohio Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble and charged with torment
animals/depriving of food.
June 4, Erica Denise Alvarez. 23, of 1020 Makowski Road,


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6:12c -


Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of con-
tempt of court.
June 4, residential burglaries on Parkview Terrace, SR 62 and
Dink Albritton Road, a vehicle stolen on Commerce Court, crimi-
nal mischief on Lake Branch Road and thefts on CR 663 and on
U.S. 17 North were reported.
June 3, Michael Holland, 21, of 732 Sandpiper Dr., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Mixon Trammell and charged with aggravat-
ed assault with a deadly weapon.
June 3, a residential burglary on Terrier Drive, a fight on
Sandpiper Drive, and thefts on CR 664 A and SR 64 East were
reported.
Jpne 2, Eustacio Moreno Calvario, 30, of 2493 U.S. 17, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Barry Schnable on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
June 2, Allan Blake Page, 54, of 157 Will Duke Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
"WAUCHULA
June 8, Gerardo DeSantiago, 21, of,4621 Pine Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Cpl. Gabe Garza and charged with disor-
derly intoxication.
June 8, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 South, a fight on
South 10th Avenue and criminal mischief on Makowski Road were
reported.
June 7, Aurora Alamia Garza, 28, of 1703 Popash Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with pos-
session of methamphetamine.
June 5, a vehicle on North First Avenue was reported stolen.
June 4, Andre Terron Louis, 21, of 303 Eason St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with resisting or
obstructing an officer by disguise, and failure to appear in court.
June 4, Lelan Hill, 40, of 747 Sandpiper Drive, Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Matthew Whatley on a charge of failure to
comply with sex offender requirements.
BOWLING GREEN
June 2, a theft on Willow Avenue was reported.
ZOLFO SPRINGS
June 5, Rafael Junior Juarez, 31, of 1037 Steve Roberts
Special, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Chief Chris Baty and
charged with larceny and driving with knowledge of a suspended
license. At the jail he was detained on a charge of contempt of
court.
June 5, thefts on Elm Street and on U.S. 17 South were report-
ed.
June 4, a residential burglary on Pear Street was reported.
June 3, a theft on Palmetto Street was reported.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Contact Amy Brown or. Nancy Davi's
At The Herald Advocate



NOTICE OF ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that the Primary Election for the
City of Wauchula will be held on August 26, 2008 for the
election of City Commissioners in District 1, District 3,
District 5 and District 6.
Qualifying will begin Noon, Monday, June 16, 2008 and
will end Friday, June 21, 2008 at Noon. Necessary infor-
mation for qualifying may be obtained from Crissy Abbott,
City Clerk, City Administrative Building, 126 S. 7th Avenue,
Wauchula, FL 33873.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Mayor
ATTEST:
S/Clarissa Abbott
City Clerk
6:12c


THE STATE OF THINGS
Get up again this morning, will this finally be my big day?
Pounding the pavement
Waiting for this or that employer to hire me, how long must it.be
this way?
Oh, Took, gas went up a quarter from just a week ago
Better fill her up
Because tomorrow gas.will rise, and I cannot afford to
fill her once she gets too low.
Shall I forget the movies our family watches on Friday nights?
Just to add a few more groceries
Because the price on everything continues rising left and right.
I think I'll buy in bulk just to save a couple bucks
The kids like the name brands, thought,
But how can we afford it, barely making it month to month.
We might as well forget that sporty new SUV
We're pinching pennies now
No Escalade, Navigator, not even a used Jeep Cherokee.
Too bad my health insurance also had to. simultaneously go out.
My job ddn 't need me.
Guess we'll have to see what Hillary and Obama are really all
about.
No new messages from any employer today.
Who is hiring?
I'd like just one chance to show that I'm really worth their pay.

I wonder if our president really pays attention to any kind of news.
Maybe so
But I doubt that he realizes the stress of walking in common
American shoes.
Maybe I'll just get lucky and finally sell this place.
I'll have to take a loss.
But then I can downsize, and besides it's just a lot of wasted space.
I am an American, I have faith it will get better.
Until that time, however,
I'll keep my hopes up by writing just another letter.
-Marla Kahlig
Zolfo Springs
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, RO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.



Barbecue Scramble
Unscramble the words tQ complete the sentences.

1. Grilled food can be enjoyed on a I I P C N C.
2. Fatty foods may E M S K Q on the grill.
3. Many people flavor grilled foods with U E S. AC.
4. H N C ICEK tastes delicious cooked on the grill.

Frederick A. Cook discovered the geographical North
Pole in 1908.


7Zdden Creek
A unique single family residential development


FRONT VIEW (1 of 3 available)





3 floor plans to choose from.


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6:12c


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The Herald-Advocate, June 2008


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* Taxes, fees and surcharges (including a Carrier Universal Service charge of 11.0%, which may vary by month; Carrier Cost Recovery surcharge of $0.99; state and local fees that vary by area; and certain in-state surcharges) are excluded. Cost recovery fees are
not taxes or government required charges. Services not available everywhere. Residential customers only. EMBARQ may change or cancel services or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval. Additional restrictions
apply. Services governed by terms at Website: embarq.com/ratesandconditions (the "Website"). Monthly rate: Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services,. If one of the services is canceled, the standard monthly rate will apply to each
remaining service. Taxes, fees and surcharges are additional and are based on standard monthly rate. Local Service: Local and in-state long distance (including local toll) services are governed by the applicable state tariffs and/or state terms and conditions located
at Website. See rates, terms and conditions at Website. Home Phone service includes local calling, 7 features and choice of EMBARQT Long Distance plan (additional charges will apply for long distance calling). Unlimited Nationwide Long Distance: Long
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EMBARQTm High-Speed Internet: Service terms and conditions located at Website. A $99 early termination fee will apply. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. DISH Network: Offer ends 7/31/08 and is
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from DISH Network, installed free of any charges with subscription to local channels at time of Initial installation. Social Security numbers are used to obtain credit Scores and will not be released to third parties except for verification and collection purposes only or if
required by governmental authorities. All service marks and trademarks belong to their respective owners. Digital Home Advantage: Requires 24-month qualifying programming purchase (minimum of DishFAMILY), Social Security number, valid major credit card and
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6:5c










PAGE ONE


F, I -,l), S,

11, I` IJ / '6 F I 1,


'Young At Heart' Reception Held At Senior Center


The annual "Young At Heart"
reception was'held on May 9 at
the Catheryn McDonald Senior
Center in Wauchula.
The event is sponsored by the
Hardee County Council on
Aging during the month of
May, Older American's Month,
to recognize and honor Hardee
County's senior residents.
The Outstanding Senior
Award for this year was pre-
sented in memory of Ruth
Carsten Hodges. Hodges dedi-
cated many years to advocating
for senior services and pro-
grams within Hardee County
and the state. A plaque and a
picture will be placed in the
Senior Center in her memory.
Dr. Elver Hodges, her husband,
was present for the event.
Curtis Bell with Symphony
Studio provided the entertain-
ment for the event.
Winners of the "My Favorite
Older Person" essay contest
were present to read their win-
ning essays. The essay contest
is conducted in the fifth-grade
classes of all elementary
schools in the county. There
were 268 essays submitted this
year.
The winners were: first place,
Alexandria Johnson, North
Wauchula Elementary School;
second place, Victoria Brad-
dock, North Wauchula Elemen-
tary School; third place, Cain
Roman, Wauchula Elementary
School; and Extraordinary
Achievement Award, Marvin
Williams, Bowling Green Ele-
mentary School.
The winning essays are print-
ed unedited'below:
BIMMY
By Alexandria Johnson
Some children have Grand-
ma's, other children have
Grandmother, while yet others
have Granny's, but I was privi-
leged to have a "Bimmy."
It's very hard to write about
someone whom you loved for


so long and who has gone on,
however, I want to share just a
little bit of her with the world.
Her unconditional love, gener-
ous spirit and listening ear have
* helped shape me into the person
I am today.
Unconditional, is a perfect
word to describe Bimmy's love.
When everything in my life was
going well, she was my biggest
cheerleader. Once when my sis-
ter and I were in a talent show,
Bimmy not only listened to our
endless practicing, she encour-
aged us to come practice more
for her because she couldn't
attend the event due to poor
health. When we didn't win that
same event, she left no doubt
that she thought the judges had
made a huge mistake. By show-
ing me her unending love and
ever open arms, Bimmy has
planted in my heart a clear pic-
ture of what unconditional
means.
The perfect compliment to
her love was her generous spir-
it. Bimmy was never a wealthy
woman, but she had an open
hand and and an open wallet for
any legitimate reason. I can't
begin to count the number of
times she purchased items from
miscellaneous school sale that
she didn't need and would like-
ly never use. You can open
almost any drawer in her spare
bedroom, even today and see
.the evidence of her generosity. I
can't help but smile when I see
the unused items. Her support
made it clear to me that you
don't have to have a lot of
money to be generous.
Finally, and perhaps most
importantly, was Bimmy's skill
as a listener. If I had a problem
or just needed to talk, her office
door, a beat up rocker at the
front room window, was always
open. She wanted to be a part of
both good times and bad.
Whether listening to the details
of the latest fight between sis-
ters or celebrating with me over


good grades, I knew she never
forced her views on me, but I
always walked away knowing
she and God would be having
some long' talks about me.
Bimmy showed me how some-
thing as simple as listening can
have a lasting impact and only
costs a little time.
Unconditional love, a gener-
ous spirit and a listening ear,
those are the things that made
Bimmy so important to me. I
know her lifes lessons will
always be with me and will
continue to shape me as I grow
older. Bimmy, you will always
be one of my favorite older per-
sons.
DONNIS BARBER
By Victoria Braddock
My favorite person, who hap-
pens to be older, is Donnis
Barber. You can say I have
known him all of my life. My
mom worked for his nursery
until I was born, then he asked
my mom to come back for two
weeks, while someone took a
vacation. We stayed for over
nine years in his nursery busi-
ness. He became like a second
DAD to me. He would take me
out on the golf cart for rides,
and to check plants. He held me


COURTESY PHOTOS
Winners of the "My Favorite Older Person" essay contest included (from left) Alexandria
Johnson, first place; Victoria Braddock, second place; and Marvin Williams,
Extraordinary Achievement Award.


Open to Children
Completed

Kindergarten

through

Completed 5th 6rade







Parents are invited

to stay for an

adult class from

6(:3opm to 17:3pm

Monday-Thursday*

*Childcare will not be available for
children who have not completed
tKinderqarten.


if I was crying, so my mom
could do sales on the phone.
One reason I chose Donnis
Barber is because any child that
asked for a donation or contri-
bution for a project he always
gave it to them. From an add-on
at the Fair to sponsoring them
in athletic events he gave with
his heart. Maybe it was because
he did without so many things
when he was a child or just
because he is a good hearted
person.
During the hurricane season
of 2004, he provided food and
meals for about thirty people
three times a day, all of my fam-
ily, his family and all of the
workers for almost a month,
until life became normal again.
People don't know how special
he is because he is not a very
public person. If you ever got a
chance to know him like I have
he would find a special place in
your heart to.
BIG PA
By Cain Roman
My favorite older person is
Mr. M.A. Drake, he is 89 years
old. I call him Big Pa.
He came to Florida in his
early 20's. He rode a motorcy-
cle from Indiana to Florida on
dirt roads, which are now major
highways.
Big Pa came into my life by
way of Jed Drake, son of Big
Pa. He lives north of my house
across two pastures in a home
he built himself.
I respect and admire him for
many reasons. He is a Christian
man who loves his family. He
goes to church every Sunday
with his one and only "Ma."
Big Pa works everyday
-around the house, his farm, the
garden and with his cows. He
can still hold up to a full days
work right with his son and my
dad. He builds and creates
equipment and machinery out
of scrap things. He even made a
small dragline to dig out ponds
on our property.
Big Pa has the most patience
to teach and listens to people
than anybody I know. There are
just a few of the reasons he is
my favorite person over 60
years old.
GRANDMA SHIRLEY
By Marvin Williams
My favorite older person is
my Grandma Shirley. She is
always doing special things for
me. She takes me to Wet and
Wild every summer. She also
takes me to Peace River to go
fishing and swimming. She is
the one who taught me how to
swim. She has always encour-
aged me to do well in school,
and treat others the way I would
like to be treated.
She makes me feel special
and loved by spending so much
time with me. I have learned
valuable lessons form her that I
can carry with me the rest of my
life. I can't wait until this sum-
mer to see what adventures she
will take me on!

Happiness consists in
activity. It Is a running
stream, not a stagnant
pool.


Ann Martin, executive director of the Hardee County
Council on Aging, presents a posthumous Outstanding
Senior Award to Ruth Carsten Hodges. Dr. Elver Hodges
accepts the honor for his late wife.


B -ANCHEY ,


110 East Main Street Wauchula
(863) 773-4792
(863) 773-4738

"We Install What We Sell"
Free Estimates
Featuring Top Name Brands
in Carpet, Tile and Wood
Satisfied Customers Since 1968
JIMMY HANCHEY CHRIS HANCHEY'
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909 So. 6th Ave.
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Come for


First Baptist Church.

1510o est Main St.

\Wauchula, FL
S33573


(sW*3) -n-3-45?-


6:5-12c


The Herald-Advocate,
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, June 12, 2008.


loin us for


Vacation 5ible School Family Night
Thurs,ne :oo- opth
8:oo--8:3opmi


First Baptist Church


June ISth-1ith


5pm to 8pm









2C The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008




Schedule Of Weekly Services-,


Printed as a Public Serice
by ." .'
The Herald-Ady dat6e +
Wauchula, F oid

Deadline: Thursday 5p.m.

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.'
Thursday Service ................ 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ...........
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.i
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School.....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship............... 6:30 p.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .
S CHURCH OP GOD --..
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..... ........11:00 a.m.
.Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
.Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
'Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.emi
Morning Worship :................10:45 a.n*
Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.n-
Wednesday Supper ............5:30 p.n.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.-3
,Wednesday -WOW Service ..7:00 p.ni
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ................5:00 p.m.
:Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
.Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........11:00 a.m."
Sunday Evening ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.,
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School .............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship /.............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
SChurch School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ............... 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communton-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1... 1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service............. ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

Help your brother's boat
across, and your own will
reach the shore.


BOWLING GREEN.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road offHwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ......5:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servico.................. 6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs. ....................7:30 p.m .


ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
'Evening Worship ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................1:00"a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ ..11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
................................... ........... 6 :30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time .........7:00 p.m

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sundaqy,School .. .. ....:..10:00 a.m.
English Service .;r.-..:...... 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer................7....700 p.m.1
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
HARDEE CAMPUS
225 E. Main St. (City Hall
Auditorium)
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m.

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ............7...7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Pastor James Bland
ISunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
,Morning Worship ...........1...1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ............1....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship.....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576


WAUCHULA

J CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST,
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Priesthood .......................... 11:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. 735-8681
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning .... ............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night ................7:30 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion .................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio.................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................. 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio..............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................... 7:30 p.m.
,Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Service ..................6:00 p.m.
jWednesday Night Service......7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School ....... ...........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Family Night Supper .............5:00p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Mtg............6:00 p.m
M& M Kids's Klub................6:00 p.m
(Music & Missions 4 yr -grade 5)
IMPACT (Jr. High)...............6:20 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr 6-8)
323 (Sr. High)........... ............. 6:30 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr.9-12)
FIRST BAPTISTTHU fIRCr
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical .................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracioti..........11:00 a.m.
Predicacion .......................... 1:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles ......7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Children's Programming
(0-12th grade).........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Dinner.................................. 5:30 p.m .
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
(Lil'K)/Sonshine Singers
..................................6:30-8:00 p.m
Jam Team.................... 6:30-7:15 p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups
..................................7:15-8:00 p.m .
6-12th Grade (Oasis)....6:30-8:00 p.m.
Adult Bible Study.........6:30-8:00 p.m
FIRS. RCH OF
Ta lNE
511 W. Ialmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00,a.m.
Morning Service ................... l:00 a.m.
Evening Worship' .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRS MISSIONARY
>B A IST CHURCH
1347 Luther King Ave.
".-773-6556
Sunday School'.'...................9:30 a.m.
Morning.Service.....................I1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Fues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Stdy ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Ned. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship.1 1:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study...........10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m:.

.FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ...... ........... 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service..........7:00 p.m. ,
Wed. FamilyMinistrics ........7:00 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal ; ,
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
M morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts................ 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...:............:....9:30 a.m.
Worship...............................10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner .............. .6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min...........7:00 p.m.


IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.,
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos.............................6... :00 p.m.
M iercoles...........................7... :00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Biadenton Road
767-1010


WAUCHULA

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Rodd -1131
Sunday Morning ............10:00 a.m.'
Tuesday Evening ............7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening............7:30 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Evening .................. 4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening ..............7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
113 N. 7th Ave.
Sunday Service ...... ..... 11:00 a.m.,
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ....... .....11:00 a.m.
Church Training .... ............5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship ................(...(1st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. --773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3' Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2" & 41 Sun. Divine Worship...... 10:00
a.m.
Bible Study ........................ 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service
PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPIIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-
5814
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US IIwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
"Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .... .......... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9TH Ave. 773-6418
Sunday Service.............10:00 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ................ 7:00 a.m.
(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish).................. 1:00 a.m .
(Creole)......................1: p.m .
Daily'Mass in English ..........8:3\a.m.
SECOND CHANCE BIBLE
CHURCH
1511 US Ilwy 17 N. 873-1148
Sunday School .............. ......9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.
SBC Affiliatiot

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHIIURCHII
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
*Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946


Sunday Morning Worship. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship................... 7:30 n.m.


The Brooklyn Bridge, In
New York, is a suspension
bridge that contains enough
wire in its cables to stretch
more than halfway around
the world.


WAUCHULA
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue-
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............7:00 p.m.]
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train. .......t.,7:00 p.m
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.
, WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr, Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11l:15'a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ..... ............. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ..................7:00 p'm.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ...... ........10:00 a.m
Evening Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ..... .............7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
1720 W. Main
773-2929
!Sunday Service ....................10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.'
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all Services.


ZOLFO. S

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ...................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.


EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ..................7:30 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ........................ 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................1:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ...................10:00a.im.
Morning Worship ..: .............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..........7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. 735-2524 773-
0989
,Sunday School .... ............ 10:00 a.m.
W orship.................. ....... 11:00 am .
Evening.................................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet. ..7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

-NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.:
Children's Church..........1...10:00 a.m.:
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.

BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.............................................. 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ..................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ..........................6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School ..... ..........9:45 a.m.
-Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship ............7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School .................9:30 a.m
Morning Worship ....................11 a.rr
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.ir, '
SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m
Confesiones......................... 10:00 a.m
:Doctrina.............................. 11:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio......... .......... 11:00a.m.
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles.Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio...... .... ............. 8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m?

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m!
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ....................5:00 p:m.
.Evening Worship ,..................6:00 p.m.
.Wedneiay Prayer ......7.....7...7:.00p..m


FROM
EWATHE
SOWER



Robert Louis Stevenson, in
search of health, went to the
South Seas to live. The
natives fell in love with him.
They built a road up the
mountain to his home.
They called it, "The Road
of the Loving Heart."
That's what the Lord has
done for you. He has built a
road to your heart.
He comes to give you
strength for the day, rest for
your labor, light for your way,
grace for your trials, help
from above, unfailing sympa-
thy, undying love.
Today as He walks up "the
Road of the Loving Heart,"
receive Him, won't you?


a jZ~~44 >
-~ m ~


cPeoce ^ioer Growers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL
I


I lelephone (bbJ) ffJ-d2bb I







June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Tommy, John Underwood Write


About Civil War, Hardee History


Editor's Note: This article was
written by John Underwood and
his father'Tommy Underwood
of Wauchula.
This story was started by my
father, Tommy Underwood who
died about 5 years ago. Since it
involves what would later
become Hardee County, I
thought it would be of interest
to your readers. This paper adds
a new layer of historical docu-
mentation that is only begin-
ning to surface concerning the
Florida State Park site in
Bowling Green, Ft. Chokonik-
Ia. If anyone has not visited this
site, it should not be over-
looked. It really shows Hardee
County, together with the state
of Florida at its best. Now con-
sider the historical influence of
this site to both Florida history
and the War Between the States

FORWARD
So many friends have asked
me to write down a few stories
that I have acquired in my col-
lection of "Florida history" and
the "Civil War" documents. It is
a wonder why I have abstained
for so long. But with insistence
of my son, John and other local
historians, I bow to their request
and will attempt to write a story
which involves our local histo-
ry.
The reader must remember
that Hardee County did not
exist in the period covered in
this report (1840-1865) rather it
being a part of Hillsborough
County. In fact, Florida did not
become a state until 1845 with
Hardee only recently becoming
a county in 1921. Many were
also unaware that where I live,
Azalea Hill was where a meet-
ing was held and plans created
to rename this proposed new
county after the governor at the
time, Cary A. Hardee.
The reader must also under-
stand that both the Mexican
War (1846-1848) and the Indian
Wars in Florida (3 wars begin-
ning 1818 and end ending
1858) were considered "train-
ing grounds" for that period in
time (1861-1865) when war
raged across this great nation.
This is a story about one man
and his contribution to the hor-
rors of that war.

GABRIEL AT PAYN ES
CREEK
"In his own mind he shall be
great. Without warning, he
will destroy many lives"
(Words of Angel Gabriel to
Daniel 8:25)
Flight' 642 was on its final
approach to Richmond, Va., and
was lining up on the
North/South runway nearest the
terminal. On board that beauti-
ful October morning in 1997
was a grandpa and grandma
with their two grandchildren,
Thomas and Virginia. We were
on our way to Williamsburg,
Pa., for a history lesson on colo-
nial America. To the grandkids,
I was lovingly referred to as
"Pop" and Elizabeth, my wife
was called "Ma." We were
energized by the grandkids and
ready to see the sights.
As the plane banked, I could
see a small village just north-
east of the runway and
refreshed my memories of a
previous trip. This was the sight
of the Civil War battle, "Seven
Pines" also known as "Fair
Oaks." Should one drive frm
Richmond to the capital of the
American Colonies -
Williamsburg, it would bring
you across this great battlefield.
Seven Pines was a typical
Virginia community except for
the size of its cemetery. Many
resting here were the results of
a massacre an this massacre had
Hardee County connections.
This was where 59-year-old
Brigadier General Gabriel J.
Rains, C.S.A., held his defen-
sive position against over-
whelming odds.
I knew 'then that our history
trip to colonial Williamsburg
had to include aside ervingf
my favorite time period, the
"'War of Northern Aggression"
more commonly known as the
"Civil War."
General .Gabriel Jones Rains
was born in Craven County,
North Carolina, on June 4,
1803. Oldest son of a New Bern
cabinetmaker he proudly gradu-
ated from West Point in 1827.


Until the Civil War he was a
typical' officer, of the U.S.
Military and captain of the U.S.
Army, 7th Infantry. He looked,
forward to being transferred to
where all the military action at
the time seemed to be, Florida.
In 1840, Gabriel Rains
arrived at Fort King (Ocala, FL)
and later detailed to Ft. Brooke
(Tampa). It was here that he
received orders that brought


him to Hardee County, specifi-
cally; Paynes Creek and Fort
Chokonikla where he was given
the task of rebuilding the bridge
over Payne's Creek.
But why should history con-'
cern itself with a typical line
officer in a routine assignment?
Most scholars would point out
that the American Civil War
was the first "modern" war uti-
lizing weapons of mass destruc-
tion. Some of these new and
awful tools of war include new
cannon shells for the "rifled"
barrels with timed fuses,
grapeshot canisters for cannons
to be used in close range, the
telegraph for immediate com-
munication, the train system for
rapid movement of troops and
supplies, submarines (C.S.A.
Hunley, etc) and a modern
Navy utilizing both ironclad,
steam and older sail-powered
ships, most equipped with vari-
ous size 'Dahlgren rifled can-
nons.
This was the first war to use
hot air balloons so a man can
see and report enemy positions,
colored smoke and flag signal-
ing, battlefield ready mobile
ambulances, and a battalion of
support personnel handling
rations, ammunition distribu-
tion and food preparations for
the Army they were following.
This didn't include the army of
Sutlers '(mobile salesmen of
various products), media
reporters, preachers, prostitutes
and general public fol-lowing
the outcome of each battle.
Later, repeating rifles, Gatling
guns and had grenades were
introduced during the closing
days of this horrible period of
American history.
Now consider these weapons.
The various torpedoes (used for
both land and sea), including
the torpedo ram (mine used on
long pole affixed to bow of
ships and ironclads used to ram
into enemy ships) electric tor-
pedoes (detonated underwater
explosives from a land based
battery bunker), self-propelled
torpedoes (fired from sub-
marines or ironclads), various
type of land mines, hand
grenades, exploding bullets and
the secret tool unknown by
most scholars, and only recent-
ly discovered by this writer, the
new "coal bomb."
The coal bomb was disguised
to look like a regular piece of
coal containing approximately
7 pounds of pressed gunpowder
painted black. Secret agents of
the C.S.A. would slip into
enemy territory placing this
item into the coal supply of the
North which they used for their
steam ships and ironclads. One
would wonder how many
Union ships were sunk by stok-
ing their boiler with this explo-
sive only to be blamed on a type
of torpedo or enemy fire.
Brigadier General Gabriel J.
Rains, C.S.A., either directly or
indirectly was responsible for
developing theses weapons.
Rains had his engineering and
military training at West Point,
graduating in the top 10 percent
of his class. His younger broth-
er, George Washington Rains,
also a West Point graduate quite
possibly expanded his brothers
understanding of the chemistry
of gunpowder, both having a
thorough knowledge of elemen-
tal explosive chemistry.
Early in the war, George
Washington Rains became the
"go to" person for supply of
southern gunpowder. He estab-
lished a fine grade powder
works in Augusta (Augusta
Powder Works) and several
smaller refineries throughout
the South. .His unique method
ofsecuring the vital supply of
gunpowder ingredients are well
documented showing both inge-
nuity and resourcefulness need-
ed to manufacture gunpowder.
No gunpowder manufacturer in
the North or even Europe could
match the quality of his powder.
Combined, the Rains brothers
will be remembered as re-
Ssourceful, self-trained muni-
tions makers whose innovations
Sdid much to enhance the hopes
of victory for a brief time with-
in the failing Confederate
ranks. Each brother's contribu-
tions to the southern cause com-
plimented the other's efforts.
Research notes Captain


Gabriel Rains first experiment-
ed with a controversial weapon,
a type of land mine while sta-
tioned in Ft. Chokonikla
(Bowling Green). In April
1840, his work crews were con-
tinually being ambushed by the
Seminoles while attempting to
scout, survey and construct a
bridge over the Paynes Creek.,
During one of these ambushes
his hand was shot leaving it par-
tially paralyzed throughout his


life. This injury necessitated his
military creativeness and sup-
ported his belief that winning
this type of war, a strong defen-
sive position would be required.
One night while at Ft.
Chokonikla, Gabriel Rains
modified a 12-pound artillery
shqll with a special designed
trip primer looking similar to a
mouse trap and covered the
shell with a blanket. It was
designed to detonate when the
blanket was removed springing
the trip primer and firing he
open shell lying half buried and
covered by a bed of nails. All
soldiers were made aware of
this hazard and it seemed all
was forgotten until several
nights later. Late in the evening
a booming sound awoke the
garrison. Expecting to find
Indian carcasses scattered
about, Rains disappointed,-
found only parts of an opossum.
Throughout -his tenure in the
Florida campaign at Forts
Chokonikla, King, Brooke and
possibly others, reports docu-
ment that Rains continues to
experiment with various shell
modifications and ignition fuses
that he felt could be utilized
defensively.

CIVIL WAR STUDIES
After about a day of enjoying
the sights of Williamsburg arid
the Colonial American history
of this area, my interest
returned to the Civil War. It was
decided that "Ma" and Virginia
would tour the Colonial gover-
nor's home and other homes so
beautifully restored by the
Rockefeller family while
Thomas and I would -take
another route for our history
lesson. Thomas was very
patient, appearing interested in
the endless historical markers
that I had to read, all found
within one hour drive from
Williamsburg.
After a pleasant weekend we
decided to rent a car for a
leisurely return to Richmond.
As I approached the York River,
my thoughts returned to Gabriel
Rains in early 1862. The Union
Army of the Potomac was
attempting to, invade Rich-
mond, the southern capital by a
flanking movement of their
army. At this time Rains was a
brigadier' general apid 'iiharged
with defending the perimeter of
the capital. His defensive tac-
tics worked but gained his repu-
tation as being "ruthless" and
even to his comrades he was
considered a "barbarian."
Military history established a
new concept, booby traps.
Weapons of mass destruction
had been introduced to the
world.
Rains saw how the invading
army both outnumbered and,
had the higher ground as they
advanced towards his defensive,
positions. His early days in


Florida must have revisited his
memory that cold January. He
ordered his troops to place tor-
pedoes beneath the soft sandy
roadways leading into the capi-
tal. He instructed his men how
to disguise their appearance and
new ways of positioning so that
it impacted a higher percentage
of victims. Besides his first
"mouse trap" type primer, he
now had other types of "fric-
tion" and "weight sensitive"
primers. The invading army
was advancing towards a trap.
Causalities were corisiderable
but the psychological impact to
the Union Army was even
greater. The Northern press
poured out headline after head-
line concerning the new evil
Southern style ambush. The
South was fighting unfair, they
lacked fighting chivalry as
everyone had expected, mur-
derous and barbarous %%as their
theme. The Northern press
quoted "sources" thai under-
ground mines had discharged in
water wells, front yard of
homes, under bags of flour,
under blankets (remember Fort
Chokonikla?) base of telegraph
poles and under the roadway.
All, they claimed had taken the
lives of dozens of "innocent"
citizens.
General Joseph E. Johnson
and James Longstreet both
viewed the press unfavorably
and ordered General Rains to
discontinue use of "harsh
implements of war." A
Confederate policy squabble
developed prompting General
Rains to appeal to Secretary of
War George W. Randolph,
C.S.A, for a final decision. The
decision was in Rains' favor.
The Federal army retreated
carefully and on guard against
further land-based booby traps.
Now Rains moved his defen-
sive operationsJp further pro-..
tect Richmond, this time from.
naval invasion. Under assign-
ment by General Lee Rains was
now in command of the "sub-
marine defenses of the James
\and Appomattox Rivers." here
Rins placed his new style "keg
torpedoes" on defense of these
rivers. With special gunpowder
supplied by his brothers' pow-
der works in Augusta, these
waterproof torpedoes were suc-
cessful because of his highly
sensitive fuse primer which
would detonate with just 7
pounds of applied pressure.
The formula for the "Rains
Fuse" was a carefully guarded
secret until the end of the war
when it would become a matter
of public record. Each torpedo
contained fuses made of 50
parts potassium chlorate, 30
parts sulphuret of antimony and
20 parts powdered glass. The
keg torpedoes were constructed
in such _a way that gravity
forced the fuse side upward,
with thin protective copper tub-
ing surrounding this primer.
Any slight impact to the keg
would bend this copper tubing
causing the primer to detonate
the surrounding gunpowder.
Rains instructed his men cre-


COURTESY PHOTO
Virginia Underwood poses with her grandfather Tommy
Underwood, Civil War historian and former Mayor of
Wauchula and president and board chairman of First
National Bank of Wauchula.


ative ways to launch and anchor
these mines. Torpedoes were
anchored in place at various
depths in prime locations for
advancing enemy warships.
Other torpedoes were drifted
towards the Union fleet at
anchor in Southern harbors
safely upstream during outgo-
ing tides.
The mines protected Rich-
mond from advances from both
land and sea. Now Gabriel rains
was respected by all and was
called forward to protect other
important Southern harbors and
river ways. Both the Union
Army and Navy were now fear-
ful of approaching the South,
offensively. Thanks to Rains,
the South had won an important
psychological war against
northern aggression.
Much more could be said of
the creative and cost effective-
ness of Gabriel Rains' wartime


contributions. One would won-
der that had he not experienced
a similar need to defend his post
from the Seminoles earlier in
his career, would he have still
developed these types of
weapons? Would the Civil War
have lasted so long and been so
violent? Would Ft. Chokonikla
been capable of defending itself
from an invasion of hostile
Indians?

At the Richmond airport we
were preparing to board the
plane for our return trip home.
My granddaughter asked, "Pop,
why was I named Virginia?" I
smile proudly at her and said,
"Haven't you learned that
Virginia was the mother of our
country and in her name we
fought for freedom" She looked
puzzled by my answer and said,
"Guess that means I should
fight my brother more often."


Vitus Jonassen Bering is credited with discovering
Alaska and the strait between it and Russia. The Bering
Strait and the Bering Sea are both named for him.


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
In t-e top 10 In customer satisfaction In
Florida I have received Ford's highest
Sales Honor 15 years running and been a
member of Ford's 300/500 Club for 20
years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
Ft. Meade
S 375-2606
2:14tfc 800-226-3325


T'han.k You



Teachers, Staff

&


the Hardee County Community



"On behalf of the Quality Assurance Review

Team, SACS CASI, and AdvanceEd, I commend

and congratulate you, the professional staff, the

Board of Education, and stakeholders

throughout the community on this achievement

to be awarded District Accreditation as a

Quality School District."

(signed by Mark A. Elgart, Ed.D., President and

Chief Executive Officer for AdvanceEd.)


On behalf of the Hardee County School Board

and the District Administration Team,

thank you for your hard work and

daily support for our schools.
6:12





4C The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


2008


Seniors


Share


.wards


I am determined to be cheerful and happy in whatever situation I may find myself. For
I have learned that the greater part of our misery or unhappiness is determined not by
our circumstance but by our disposition.


SPoliical Candidates!
Your advertising deadline is each


This will permit us to give your ad the
greatest amount of attention.
Please do not ask us to make an exception. A
We desire only to serve all candidates
equally & well.
The Herald-Advocate
"Your local hometown newspaper
for over 100 years"
.,, ^ \ s


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June 12,2008, The Herald-Advocate. 5C


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6C The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


66 Seniors Honored


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
For The Herald-Advocate
As the Class of 2008 prepared
to graduate, many of the seniors
were recognized for their acad-
emic accomplishments through-,
out their high school careers.
On May 27, families, faculty
and students from Hardee
Senior High School met togeth-
er at the Hardee County Agri-
*Civic Center for the annual
Senior Honors and Hall of
Fame Banquet.
Principal Mike Wilkinson be-
gan the ceremony with a wel-
come, followed by the posting
of colors by the U.S. Jr. Air
Force ROTC Unit from Hardee
High School. Mosaic was rec-
ognized for their extreme finan-
cial support, as well as the
National Honor Society for
serving during the banquet.
After Hardee County School
Board chairman Tanya Royal
led the invocation, the honorees
and their families enjoyed a
meal of ham, mashed potatoes,
vegetables, rolls and strawberry


shortcake, prepared by the
Hardee County Food Service
ladies. School board members
and faculty and staff of HHS
also joined the students for their
last dinner as seniors.
The 2007 Teacher of the Year,
Chrysta Chancey, stood in for
the 2008 Teacher of the Year,
Stacy Sharp. After reciting
encouraging words from Sharp,
Chancey read aloud the famous
graduation book, "Oh, The
Places You Will Go," by Dr.
Seuss.
Principal Mike Wilkinson,
Assistant Principal Christopher
Neff, and teacher Linda Smith
honored the 66 seniors who
graduated with honors. Those
seniors include Blaine Abbott,
Rebecca Aguilar, Julissa Ala-
mia, Jacob Barone, Carl Basey,
Coby Battles, Nicole Bromley,
Katie Bryan, Ciara Chancey,
Justin Cobb, James Cortez,
Dalton Davis, Craig Daw, Sarai
Deloera, Jeremiah Escobedo,
Elizabeth Estrada, Emaline
Fils-Aime, Alexis Flores, Chris-


tina Gonzales, Natalie Green,
Cody Gullatt, Gilberto Gutier-
rez, Magaly Gutierrez, Saman-
tha Hagans, Mohamad Halim,
Marissa Hall, Jamilynn Hand,
Donald Harris, and Joshua
Heggie.
2008 seniors also graduating
with honors were Esthela Her-
nandez, LeAnna Himrod, Kim-
berly Holt, Gilberto Jaimes,
Sheila Jean, A. Lee Juarez,
Jacob Juarez, Mayhoua Khang,
Arnold Louis, Joseph Macias,
Jared Matz, Sean McCandless,
Ashley Milby, Letha Mogle,
Veronica Narvaez, Ashlee Neu-
hauser, James Oliff, Eliazar
Olmos, Courtney,Packard, Sa-
vanah Palmer, Esteban Pania-
gua, Pablina Paz, Alyssa Purdy-
Grimes, Jonathan Reese, Luis
Reyes, Kristopher Rossman,
Blanca Salazar, Miranda
Schlipf, Bridgette Singletary,
Aaron Smith, Adam Smith,
Gloria Solis, Pete Solis, Joshua
Spencer, Amber Steedley,
Kristian Taylor and Anastasia
Timms.


PHOTOS BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
The Class of 2008 members and their families celebrated their success as honors grad-
uates with a meal prepared by the Hardee Senior High Food Service ladies and a cer-
emony honoring their accomplishments.


Superintendent Dennis Jones and Principal Mike Wilkinson recognized the 2008 hon-
ored graduates as Linda Smith read aloud their involvement in school activities and
accomplishments.


Duck Smith spoke about the 2008 Hall of Fame inductee,
Dr. Leland Francis Carlton, and his successful career as
a well-known doctor in both Hardee County and Tampa.

Pytheas, a merchant, geographer and explorer from the
Greek colony Massilia, is the first person known to
record a description of the Midnight Sun, the aurora and
Polar ice.


Gator-Hunt

Permits Go

Quickly
Within the first six hours, the
Florida Fish & Wildlife Con-
servation Commission sold
4,555 alligator-hunt permits
despite a computer program-
ming glitch.
The licensing system, operat-
.ed by independent vendor
Outdoor Central in Jefferson
City, Mo., encountered prob-
lems handling the high volume
of applications and failed to
provide confirmation to cus-
tomers when they tried to pur-
chase a license and permit.
This resulted in some people
being unable to successfully
purchase a license and permit,
and resulted in confusion and
frustration for many applicants.
The FWC says it will take
action against the vendor and
will explore ways to help those
who were unable to purchase a
permit.


School Board members showed their support for the 2008 seniors by attending the
14th annual Senior Honors Banquet at the Hardee County Civic Center.





Mets Master Dixie Youth


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A victory in its only game last
week gave the Florida Fuel
Mets the season championship
for the 2008 Dixie Youth divi-
sion.
The Mets shut down the All
Creatures Animal Hospital
Yankees 5-0 to ensure their sea-
son title would not be in jeop-
ardy. The Mets finished the sea-
son 13-3.
Several other teams did not
get to finish up last week due to
Monday night's thundershow-
ers. Those games will not be
rescheduled.
One of the teams not playing
was the Vision Ace Hardware
Reds, coached by Kenny Hew-
ett, Bobby Brewer and Randy
Crews. On their squad this sea-
son have been Lane Ball,
Bradley Brewer, Zach Carran-
co, Steve Crews, Zack Crews,
Tyler Hewett, Brandon Hill,
William McClelland, Dylan
Norwood, Keith Powell, Quin-
ton Sanchez, Austin Stoner and
Reed Woods.
Supposed to play the Reds on
Monday were the Joe L. Davis
Braves, whose roster includes
Jacob Bolin, Patrick. Carlton,
Tyler Helms, Glenn Kelley,
Christopher Lee, Seth McGee,
Luke Palmer, Roby Paris, Ryan


Ramirez, Kramer Royal, Dylan
Salas and Joel Urdiera. They
are coached by Todd Bolin,
West Palmer and Mark McGee.
The final team which missed
its game Monday was the
Hardee Signs + Tees Rays,
which were to play the Chap-
man Fruit Red Sox. For the
Rays this season, coaches are
Brian Smith, James Blum and
'Todd Durden. The team in-
cludes Hunter Bryant, Alex
Clarke, Marco Deleon, Tanor
Durden, Samuel Erekson, Ger-
man Figueroa, Julian Galvez,
Kevin Kunkel, Matt Lake, Tris-
tan Montgomery, Devin Pear-
son, Jordan Rogers and Mason
Waters.
The Red Sox did play a final
game on Tuesday night, out-
scoring the Countryside Grow-
ers Tigers 19-0.
Leadoff batter Marcus Battles
led the Red Sox with a trio of
doubles and a walk for four
scores. Luke Winter homered
and doubled, and Cole Choate
also homered. Ezekiel Servin
tripled and doubled. Choate and
Servin circled the bases three
times each. Zack Battles and
Cody Dial added twin tallies.
Winter, Blaine Harshburger,
Tomas Gomez, Chris Hull and
Steve Rodriguez each added a
run. Ty Trammell didn't get


Money may be the husk of many things but not the ker-
nel. It brings you food, but not appetite; medicine, but
not health; acquaintance, but not friends; servants, but
not loyalty; days of joy, but not peace or happiness.
-Henrik Ibsen


home. The Red Sox have, been
coached by Justin Battles, Mike
Choate and Jose Flores.
For the Tigers, solid hits by.
Cesar Fimbres, Cody McVay
and David Badillo went for
naught as they were stranded.
Other Tiger players were
Jackson Starratt, Josef Crosby,
Adam Salas, Andy Manley,
Russell Weems, Ruben Olmos
and Glen Ellis. Their coaches
are Andrew McGuckin, Jeff
Block, Matt Tinsley and Keith
Weems.
In the alternate game on
Tuesday, the Mets were victori-
ous with doubles hit by Cody
Spencer, Kris Johnson, Blake
Crawley and Wyatt Maddox
and a pair of triples by Garrett
Albritton. Tyler Bragg joined
Crawley, Johnson, Spencer and
Albritton in making solo trips
around the bases. Other players
were Dustin Goodwyn, Dalton
Bryant, Dalton Reas, Wyatt
Montgomery, Mikey Heine and
Dalton Tubbs. Their coaches
are Frank Johnson, Steve Reas,
Chris Spencer and Todd Mad-
dox.
A Mason Gough triple was
the only long-ball hit for the
Yankees. Austin Judah, Wilson
Bembry, Frank Farias, Kendall
Gough and Jose Gonzales were
also stranded. Others playing
were Armando Alamia, Jordan
Jones, Austin Altman, Aaron
Briones, Omar Alamia and
Marco Briones. They are
coached by Walt Altman, Raul
Alamia, Jack See and Jose
Carrillo.


SWEET WORK







June 12, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Le1I urhoslEF~~e Report


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Rocky Verlin Driggers Jr.,
30, Bowling Green. and
Rhonda Michelle Bartlett, 30,
Bowling Green.
Ralton Veach Albritton III,
Wauchula, aind Jennifer Lynn
Hensley, 26, Wauchula.
James William Black, 24,
Wauchula, and Melissa Deanne
Prine, 24, Wauchula.
Henry Gordon Warren Jr., 45,
Wauchula, and Vanessa Boll-
inger Wilson, 45, Wauchula.
David Trevor Beumel, 25,
Wauchula, and Leigh Frances
Schneider, 24, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly in county court:
Ramon-DeAnda vs. Gloria
Castillo Colon, amended judg-
ment.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Jama L. Clanton, judgment.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Edward L. Stevens, voluntary
dismissal.
Wauchula Garden Apart-
ments vs. Idalia Cervantes,
default judgment for possession
and tenant removal.
Omnilytics Inc. vs. Moore
Farms Inc., default judgment.
MRC Receivables Corp. vs.
Nancy Craft, order.
Atlantic Credit & Finance
Inc. vs. Yun C. Claman, default
judgment.
Mainstreet Acquisition Corp.
vs. Claretha L. Wilson, order
approving stipulated settlement.
Financial Portfolios II Inc.
vs. Claretha L. Wilson, order,
stay of entry of judgment.
FIA Card Services NA vs.
Michael R. Bollinger, default
judgment.
Citifinancial Services Inc. vs.
Jay E. Wells, stipulated judg-
ment upon default.

The following misde-


The following criminal
traffic cases were disposed of
recently in county court.
Dispositions are based on
Florida Statutes, driving
record and facts concerning
the case.
Tavita Lean Carrizales, reck-
less driving, adjudication with-
held, probation six months,
$330 fine and court costs.
Joanna Marie Esquivel, vio-
lation of license restrictions,
$185 court costs.
Amy Danielle Hays, driving
while license suspended
(DWLS) and possession of sus-
pended license, adjudication
withheld, $185 court costs.
Maria Meliquiades Leon,
DWLS, produced valid Mexi-
can license, dismissed.
Lazaro Mendoza-Lopez,
DUI and no valid license, 12
months probation, license sus-
pended six months, tag im-
pound 10 days, DUI school,


I ~ AGGRESSIVE REPRESENTATION


meanor cases were disposed,
of recently in county court:
Eutiquio Chavez, trespass
other than structure or con-
veyance, probation six months,
stay away from victim/property,
$315 fine and court costs, $40
public defender fees.
Margarita Dominguez, disor-
derly intoxication, adjudication
withheld, $315 fine and court
costs.
Meliton Gabriel-Lopez, dis-
orderly intoxication and retail
theft, time served, $315 fine
and court costs.
Juan Carlos Morales, disor-
derly intoxication, time served,
$315 fine and court costs.
Juan DeJesus Perez, trespass
after warning, not prosecuted.
Robin Lee Scolaro, domestic
battery and unnnatural lascivi-
ous act, not prosecuted.
Ermitanio Tamio-Perez, dis-
orderly intoxication, $315 fine
and court costs.
Asael Trujio, retail theft,
time served, $315 fine and court
costs placed on lien.


evaluation/treatment, no alco-
hol or bars, $740.50 fines and
court costs, 50 hours communi-
ty service.
Humberto Molina, DWLS,
32 hours community service.
Kristopher Ryan Rossman,
reckless driving, adjudication
withheld, probation six months,.
$330 fine and court costs.
Dustin Tyler, DWLS, adjudi-
cation withheld, $185 court
costs.
Juan Martin Valdez, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, $185
court costs.
Marc P. Velez, violation of
license, restrictions, adjudica-
tion withheld, $330 fine and
court costs.
CJ Clifford Albert Fountain
Jr., allowing an unauthorized
person to drive, time served,
$330 fine and court costs.
David Navarro, DWLS, pro-
bation 12 months, $330 fine and
court costs.
Jose Carlos Santoyo, DUI
with personal injury, 12 months
probation, license suspended
six months, ignition interlock
two years, tag impound 10
days, DUI school, evalua-
tion/treatment, no alcohol or
bars, $1,428 fines and court
costs, restitution to be set; DUI
and DUI with property damage,
not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Michael Leon Holland vs.
Biandon Keith Wisniewski,
petition for injunction for pro-
tection.
Anita Briseno and Arnesto
Briseno, divorce.
Joanna Centeno and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Mauricio Centeno, petition
for administrative child support
order.
Carmen Sanchez and DOR
vs. Joshua Sanchez, petition for
administrative child support
order.
Noemi Salgado and Miguel
Alvarez, divorce.
Clifton Jones III vs. Kathy
Jones, petition for injunction
for protection.
Jenny Poblano and DOR vs.
Vicente Fabrias Cabrera, peti-
tion for child support.
Brandy Leigh Murphy and
DOR vs. Michael Jerome
Youngblood, petition to enforce
administrative child support
order.
Elizabeth D. Delepa and
DOR vs. Miguel A. Santoyo,
petition for administrative child
support order.
Efren Magana vs. Angelina
Magana, petition for injunction
for protection.
Ashley Turner vs. Eric
Turner, petition for injunction
for protection.
Deborah Leek vs. David


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
2000 FORD 2 Dr. Id. #FAFP42X6YF302530
2000 Ford Pk Id. #1FTYR1-C4YTA01283

Contact Linda Dean for details at Wauchula State
Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on Friday
June 13, 2008 at 10:00 am at the Wauchula State
Bank parking lot located at 106 East Main Street,
Wauchula Fl. 33873. 6:5,12c


NOTICE OF ACTION

BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURSING
IN RE: The license to practice nursing of
Kimberly M. Tyson, C.N.A.
1200 Mockingbird Road
Wauchula, Florida 33873
CASE NO.: 2007-01890
LICENSE NO.: C.N.A. 107586

The Department of Health has filed an Administrative
Complaint against you, a copy of which may be
obtained by contacting, Megan M. Blancho, Assistant
General Counsel, Prosecution Services Unit, 4052
Bald Cypress Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee Florida
32399-3265, (850) 245-4640.
If no contact has been made by you concerning the
above by July 3, 2008, the matter of the
Administrative Complaint will be presented -at an
ensuing meeting of the Board of Nursing in informal
proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact the
individual or agency sending this notice not later than
seven days prior to the proceeding at the address
given .:on the notice. Telephone: (850) 245-4640,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770(V), via
Florida Relay Service. 5:29, 6:5, 12, 19c


Ramos, petition for injunction
for protection.
Donna Headdy vs. David
Ramos, petition for injunction
for protection.
Sharon Denise Smith vs Roy
G. Martin, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Yvonne Cisneros and DOR
vs. Eric Rivera, interstate peti-
tion for child support.
Fiona Borland and DOR vs.
Ernest Del Martinez, interstate
petition for child support.
Wachovia Bank National vs.
Roderick J. Ciferri and Marga-
ret A. Ciferri, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Timothy James Alderman
and Paula Marie Alderman,
divorce.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Joanie Valdez and DOR vs.
Javier A. Garcia, judgment on
enforcement of administrative
child support order.
Delisha K. Redden and
Cherylene Carlton and DOR vs.
Clarence C. Graham Jr., order.
Eudelia Ferrer Martinez and
DOR vs. Jessica Prince Valdez,
child support order.
Jesse Joe Valdiviez vs.
Armando Sanchez Jr., dismissal
of injunction for protection.
Angela Seibert vs. Adan
Cruz, amended injunction for
protection.
Danuyel Herrin vs. Bryant
Herrin, injunction for protec-
tion.
Frances A. Frey and DOR vs.
Michelle Deneen Jardin Teuton,
order.
Felix Aviles and DOR vs.
Sonia Aviles, order.
Frank and Waltraud Von
Stauffenberg vs. Joseph Carter,
Lillie Mae Carter and Mildred
Smith, voluntary dismissal.
Nora Wheeler and Ernest W.
Wheeler, divorce.
Juana Maria Delgado vs.
Juvenal Ayala-Guadarrama, dis-
missal of injunction for protec-
tion.
Maria Estrada vs. Robert L.
Young, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Daisy Faircloth vs. Robert
Preston Bivens, voluntary dis-
missal of temporary injunction
for protection.
Jennifer Maldonado vs. Isaac
Maldonado, amended injunc-
tion for protection.
Nicolasa Navarro vs. Carlos
Aleman, amended injunction
for protection.
Armando Sanchez Jr. vs.
Jesse Valdiviez, dismissal of
injunction for protection.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of last
week by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-


I


cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is'
withheld, it is pending suc-'
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant:
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left tol
,the judge.
Frederick Perkins, two;
counts grand theft, not prose-
'cuted. ?
Gloria Perkins, two counts:
grand theft, not prosecuted.
Steven Lee Purser, posses-
sion of methamphetamine and'
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, not prosecuted.
Jeffery Bryant Ramirez, petit
theft, four months in jail with
credit for time served (CTS), no
contact with victim or property,
'$495 fine and court costs, $140
public defender fees; burglary
of a structure and trespass, not
prosecuted.
Raul Molina, possession of
methamphetamine and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
transferred to county misde-
meanor court.
Latisha Taylor, violation of
probation (original charge bat-
tery on a detention or communi-
ty facility staff), probation
revoked, 90 days CTS, out-
standing fines and fees placed
on lien.
Samir Zimic, felony driving


I


Available from Commercial News Providers"
I W


a
S S'S
S U S U
I *
S


* S
* SW


*


> Board Certified Civil Trial Lawlver ..
Named to Florida Super Lawyert (2007)
D Member of the Multi-Million Dollar
Advocates Forum -
683-7500 AV Rated

683-7500


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while license suspended, adju-
dication withheld, 15 months
probation, warrantless, search
and seizure, $495 fine and court
costs, $140 public defender
fees, 15 hours community ser-
vice.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
William Lee to Anastacio
Domingo Santiago-Garcia .and
Imelda Garcia, $13,000.
Tyna D. Carter to Joshua
Cardona, $50,000.
Isidro Acosta and Maritza
Bayola to Amalia B. Dorado,
$250,000.
Barbara Calhoun to Deborah
J. Barker, $40,000.
Angelo Luz Martinez to F.L.
Revell Jr., $10,000.
Main Street Wauchula Inc. to
City of Wauchula, $65,000.
Lynda S. Abbott as trustee to
Mark A. and Amy Abbott
Franks, $125,000.
B. Hugh and Elizabeth S.
Bradley to Eddie and Barbara
Bailey, $15,000.
Peter J. Stevens to Buck
Creek Farms LLC, $35,514.
Bobby Joe and Agnes Irene
Redding to Kenneth A. And
Eileen M. Lambert, $200,000.
Wilt Family Limited Partner-
ship to Lavon and Linda Cobb,
$100,000.
Kenny Sherone Faulk to
Jacqueline Faulk, $39,000.


Photeso
*Senior Awards
*Baseball Awards
eSpring jamboree
eLittle, League Baseball
*Football Action
Wiss Hardee County
*Jr. Miss Hardee County
eLittle Miss Hardee County
*Prince & Princess Pageant
eKindergarden Pageant
*Livestock Sale
sJunior High, Volleyball

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com

"Photos ... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Alex. Gilli6rd And Ralph Harrison 9-13tfc






8C The Herald-Advocate, June 12, 2008


TAN YOUR HIDE! Tired of those tan lines? Want to look
flawless in that summertime swimsuit? Head on over to Cow Town ,
Tanning to tan your hide!..
Amber Schnable, a certified tanning professional with the
International Smart Tan Network, recently relocated her business.
to downtown" Wauchula, at 111 W. Main St. Its previous location .
had been 210 N. Third Ave., next to the Wauchula Skate Park.
Not only does Cow Town Tanning have a chic and relaxing I Amazing
atmosphere, it also offers four beds ranging from extreme bulbs to s
bronzing bulbs. Extreme bulbs get very heated, while bronzing t s Aa in
bulbs give you a deep brown color at a cooler temperature. All "Amazin Animal Adventure" at North
bulbs and acrylics are new. "Amazing Animal Adventure" at North
While you are getting your perfect tan, you can also save Wauchula Elementary School on May
money with special pricing for unlimited sessions or 10, 15, 20 or 9. Each class visited six learning sta- -
25 visits. tions complete with hands-on sci-
Cow Town Tanning also has Rhinestone Bangles and Belly ence activities. Then, after lunch,
Rings available to purchase. New purses and jewelry will also be pupils headed to the school cafeter
for sale soon. pupils headed to the school catete-
Schnable makes it a point to make your tanning experience a ria, where they viewed various ani-
carefree and relaxing time. She cleans the bed after every tan ses- mal, bird and reptile demonstrations.
sion, and always has tanning goggles and a folded towel prepared Providing the daring daytime adven-
for the next customer. ture were The Florida Aquarium,
"I want the customers to come and relax. I basically wait on Mosaic Four Corners Mine, Kayton
them hand and foot while they enjoy their 20 minutes of tanning,"
says Schnable. Nedza, Bill Graham, Carrie Fuller, -
BgH -" MWendy Miller, Susan Barton,
.-;,. p..i. ;' '.,. Guillermo Aquilar and Norio Juarez.
; .COURTESYPHOTOS








PHOTO BY SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
Owner Amber Schnable works hard to make customers
feel relaxed during tanning sessions at Cow Town A
Tanning.
Afraid your busy work hours may cause you to run out of time _
to tan? Cow Town Tanning is open six days a week to help you get
that golden brown tone. Monday to Thursday, hours are from 11
a.m. to 8 p.m.; Fridays are from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Saturdays"...'..
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cow Town Tanning plans to soon be open on
Sunday for tanners from 2 to 4 p.m.
For more information, call Cow Town Tanning at 773-3813.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Savannah Faircloth at 773-3255 with your business news.
Cheerfulness is full of significance: it suggests good health, a clear conscience, and Dedicate yourself to the good you deserve and desire for yourself. Give yourself
a soul at peace with all human nature. peace of mind. You deserve to be happy. You deserve delight.
-Charles Kingsley -Mark Victor Hansen










4500+ Acres ,




in 22 Tracts ] .

Tracts ranging from 54 to 457 acres

a '. Outstanding Development
Potential on Charlie Creek

': Adjacent to Ben Hill Griffin Ranch

- Grove Production
< Sod Harvesting
..... "- .,Agricultural Uses
S' Abundant Wildlife
Great Hunting

*-.Sale Site:
Turner Agri-Civic Center
'- ,2250 NE Roan Street,


Situated on Highway 17 (SR 35) between Wauchula & Arcadia Florida


Arcadia, FL 34266




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