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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla
Creation Date: May 29, 2008
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00226
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


108th Year, No. 25
3 Sections, 28 Pages


3 Setios, 2 Paes lus4sdlst1


Thursday, May 29, 2008


City


Takes Over Main Street Wauchula Inc.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Gone are the Farmers Market
days and annual barbecues.
Gone also is longtime
Wauchula Main Street Inc.
Executive Director Megan
McKibben, whose last day was
Friday.
Economic development of
downtown Wauchula took a
new direction late last week
when the city acquired "the
assets, licenses and manage-


ment" of the non-profit organi-
zation began in 1995.
At the request of the Main
Street Board of Directors, the
Wauchula City Commission
considered takeover of the
organization during a special
meeting on May 19.
In its capacity as the city
Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA), the commis-
sion "will become more
involved in the development of
the Main Street corridor," says


a city press release issued
Tuesday morning.
The details of that action will
be further defined in a commis'
sion workshop on Monday at 6
p.m. at commission chambers
in City Hall, 225 E. Main
Street.
"We will sit back and re-eval-
uate it. Many city CRAs are in
charge of their community's
economic development. We feel
this is best for the community
and to the best benefit of the


downtown merchants. We hope
to have Bartow CRA director
Jim Dewayne here," said
Mayor David Royal.
Main Street directors met
with City Manager Rick Giroux
and C mmissioner Ken Lam-
bert abhut two weeks ago. The
directors asked the city officials
to consider becoming more
involved in downtown develop-
ment, which led to the May 19
meeting.
Main Street directors are:


president Patty S. Shackelford-
Brown; secretary-treasurer
Linda T. Oldhar; and executive
board members Elizabeth
"Beth" Gill, Jeraldine Crews,
Linda C. See and Jan Platt.
Shackelford-Brown and Old-
ham signed the contract with
the city, selling the Main Street
assets, including registration
with the state Department of
Historical Resources, for a pur-
chase price of up to $65,000, to
clear all liabilities, including


McKibben's unpaid salary and
benefits.
"Wauchula Main Street has
been a huge success and has
done a tremendous job of en-
hancing the attractiveness and
economic viability of our Main
Street corridor," said Giroux in
his press release.
"Longtime Executive Direc-
tor Megan McKibben is to be
commended for her almost 10
years of tireless service to the
See CITY 2A


GLAD GRADS


Members of Hardee Senior High School's Class of 2008 take a break from the formality of the occasion to enjoy some of their last moments together.


Class Of 2008 To Graduate


By SAVANNAH FAIRCLOTH
For The Herald-Advocate
Families and friends will
gather at the Hardee County
Cattlemen's Arena this
Saturday morning to celebrate
the accomplishments of Hardee
Senior High School's Class of
2008.
Two hundred eleven seniors
will trade in their textbooks for
tassels at this year's commence-
ment ceremony beginning at 10
a.m.
The ceremony will begin with
the traditional processional of
"Pomp & Circumstance," per-
formed by Exceptional Student
Education Director Dot Bell,



WEATHER
. &9E HIGH UM B= M
-.05/21 89 71 0.00
../22 88 72 1.36
05/23 92 69 0.64
,,.0124 91 67 0.00
05/25 91 66 0.00
05/126 84 59 0.00
S05/27 87 60 0.00
TOTAL Rainfall to 05/27108 - 10.60
SSame period last year - 7.31
Ten Year Average - 55.09
Source:Univ. of Fie. One Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds.....................5B
Courthouse Report.......7C
Community Calendar....3A
Crime Blotter..................6C
Fishing Forecast...........2A
Hardee Living...............2B
Obits............................ 4A
Roundups.....................3A



II I1 111 I HI II1I
7 118122 07290 3


and the presentation of colors
by the Air Force Junior Reserve
Officer Training Corps.
Student Body President Jami-
lyn Hand will lead the commu-
nity in the Pledge of Allegiance,
which will be followed by an
invocation from National
Honor Society President James
Oliff.
Principal Mike Wilkinson
will welcome salutatorians
Nicole Bromley, LeAnna Him-
rod and Savannah Palmer as


they present their speeches. The
2008 valedictorian, Katie
Bryan, and Senior Class Presi-
dent Amanda Conley will also
give their final words to their
graduating class.
David Radford will entertain
with a special song in honor of
the Class of 2008. Wilkinson
will certify the class as having
met all the requirements to
receive a diploma, and Schools
Superintendent Dennis Jones
will take the stage next with the


Superintendent's Privilege.
The presentation of the grad-
uates will be given by Assistant
Principal Chris Neff. Jones and
Wilkinson will be handing the
seniors their ticket toward suc-
cess as they pass out long-
awaited diplomas.
The Class of 2008 will say
goodbye to their high school,
family and friends as they
embark on the journey to suc-
cess, wherever life may lead
them, as the recessional sounds.


Dress For Success!
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Some jobs require a jacket and tie, others a uniform, some mod-
est dresses and skirts.
And in Hardee Senior High School's quest to equip students for
the workaday world of adults, it will now require adherence to its
new "Dress For Success" dress code.
The document, approved by the Hardee County School Board
last Thursday night, is the product of lengthy study and survey,
Principal Mike Wilkinson said.
"Basically, for the past year or so we have been considering
changing our dress code," he told School Board members.
Senior-high staffers have watched closely the dress changes
implemented at Hardee Junior High School, he said, adding that a
See DRESS 2A


Commission Approves Farmworker Housing Changes

Ordinance Being Drafted To Mirror Davis Enterprises' Project


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Changes to make the county
rules about farmworker housing
more definitive were approved
at last week's County Commis-
sion workshop.
By the time Thursday's two-
hour meeting was over, Nick
Staszko, county director of
planning and development, had
his orders.
Staszko was told to take all
the approved changes -
including definitions of farm-
worker housing and substantial
employment, density of 3.75
people per gross acre on a min-
imum of 40 and maximum of
100 acres, clustering and
buffering - and draw up an
ordinance for the review of Ken
Evers, county attorney.
The ordinance will come
before the Planning & Zoning
Board in a July 10 public hear-
ing and the commission in a
July 17 public hearing.
The issues came up when
P&Z rejected the Site Devel-


opment Plan for eight units for
150 guestworkers in the midst
of a 40-acre grove off Crews-
ville Road. The commission
denied the appeal of that P&Z
decision.
Mediation of that Davis
Enterprises decision is pending.
Joe L. Davis Jr. and the county
have agreed on Bradenton attor-
ney Chip Rice as mediator. Rice
has scheduled an initial media-
tion session on July 22. If that
doesn't resolve the issues, a full
hearing would be held on July
30. Both will be held in com-
mission chambers and are open
to the public. Notifications will
be sent to adjoining property
owners, said Evers.
Last week's commission
workshop was the next step in a
series of workshops aimed at
clarifying the county's Land
Development Code to more
clearly specify where, what and
how farmworker housing
should be. It's a follow-up to
the sessions of March 14 and
April 17.


Several residents of the
greater Sweetwater/Crewsville
area. who opposed the Davis
housing plan were present at
those meetings to keep an eye
on the progress being made.
However, members of the citrus
industry clearly dominated
those meetings, getting the
commission to shorten a mora-
torium on farmworker housing
applications to 90 days instead
of the proposed six months.
It was the same at last week's
meeting. Mike Carlton, director
of the Florida Fruit and Vege-
table Association, Jay Clark,
president of Florida Citrus
Mutual, Davis and Sweetwater
resident Nancy Craft each
offered several comments.
Staszko opened with a short
presentation or overview of the
proposed amendments to the
Land Development Code. Com-
missioners responded first, then
comments were obtained from
the audience. Following is a re-
cap of the major issues, all re-
sulting in proposed changes to


Section 3:16 of the Land Code.
Development Standards
"A site-development plan is
to ensure that such land uses
minimize(site-specific impacts
with surrounding properties.
The new wording takes out the
concept compatible and re-
places it with the concept of
minimizing impacts and miti-
gating for potential "incompati-
bilities" by buffering and other
restrictions.

Farmworkers
Farmworker housing is living
accommodations provided by a
farm employer on the employ-
er's property, which occurs
exclusively in association with
performance of agricultural
labor.
It does not mean migrant
housing. Migrant farmworkers
are persons working on farms
and residing in the county sea-
sonally. They may work at least
25 days for the same employer
but are not employed year-


round by the same employer.
Farmworkers are: guestwork-
ers-persons working on contract
and under the U.S. Department
of Labor recognized guestwork-
er program. They can be
accompanied farmworkers liv-
ing with a spouse, children or
parents, or unaccompanied.
There are an estimated 15
million migrant workers in the
U.S. but many have children
born as U.S. citizens. When the
Immigration and Naturalization
Service cracks down on illegal
migrants, it will diminish avail-
able labor drastically.
County Manager Lex Albrit-
ton clarified that farmworker
housing is not the same as a
family or person living in A-1
zoning who decides to work in
agriculture. "It is just not every
kind of person who works on a
farm."
Farmworker Housing
"Farmworker housing is
established to provide decent,
See COMMISSION 3A


It's That Time

,- " Of Year Again!

.. .Column 3C


New Dress Code

For High School

...Details 8A


Cherry Hits 13th

Career Knockout

.. .Story 1B


s I


460
plus 40 sales tax








2A The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
SCYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula. FL 33873


Pubhshed weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Ad\ocate
Publishing Co Inc Periodical Postage paid at U S. Post Office. Wauchula. FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), -Postmaster." send address
changes to- The Herald-Advocate. PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873


Schools - Thursday 5 p m
Sports - Monday noon
Hardee Li ng -Thursday 5 p.m
General News - Monday 5 p.m
Ads - Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months- 518: 1 yr. - $31; 2 yrs - $60
Florida
6 months - $22; 1 yr. - 41;: 2 yrs. - $79
Out of State
6 mnirhs - $27, 1 yr - $49. 2 yrs - $95


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on manners of public
interest Letters should be brief, and must be wnnen in good laste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community mailers are welcome Submissions should be
t)ped. double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines All items are sub-
ject to eding

h J


The Hardee High football team will end spring training Friday
night with a game against Lake Wales at Wildcat Stadium in
Wauchula. Last year Hardee lost 10-7 to the Highlanders in Lake
Wales in the spring game.
Last Friday Hardee's defense looked promising in a 10-7 win
by the Blue over the Orange team. The newly unveiled shotgun
offense misfired with several bad snaps, and the new offense
showed little consistency and numerous fumbles.
Hardee ended the 2007 season with four losses but posted a
winning record and made the state playoffs as district runner-ups.

Regular unleaded gasoline on Wednesday was $3.85 a gallon
in Wauchula and $4.65 for diesel fuel.
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, a Democrat, recently said the supply
and demand market price for a barrel of oil should be $55 but spec-
ulators have driven up the price to over $120 a barrel.
Sen. Nelson also said "the U.S. failed in the 1970s to enact a
real energy program to get us off oil. Result: Brazil runs on ethanol
today, not the U.S. Germany leads the world in solar power, not the
U.S."
Nelson notes the oil companies are making record profits, over
$155 billion in 2007 alone, and are not spending enough on refiner-
ies and alternative energy, as consumers are getting gouged at the
pump.
Nelson also criticized the U.S. for taking over 30 years to raise
the mileage standards on cars and trucks to 35 miles per gallon,
while most of Europe averages 43 mpg and Japan just under 50
mpg.
The senator suggests serious conservation measures such as 40
mpg for our vehicles and more tax breaks for hybrid cars. Congress
and the next president should enact a national energy program to
change from gasoline to alternative and synthetic fuels to power
much of our transportation, which uses 50 percent of the oil we use.
The U.S. has 3 percent of the world's oil reserves but uses 25
percent of the world's oil production, said Nelson.
Nelson said unrest in the Middle East and speculators have dri-
ven up the price of oil. "The U.S. cannot drill its way out of an
energy crisis." He said the U.S. also needs to develop solar, wind
and thermal energy and safer nuclear power.

Hardee citrus grower Steve Johnson said last week the price
for valencia oranges had dropped to $1.15 and $1.20 a pound, "if
you can find someone to buy them." He said some valencia oranges
will likely go unpicked this year.
Many of the citrus plants now have a 28-week supply of juice,
and orange juice consumption per capital in the U.S. has declined
for the past six years, reported Citrus Industry magazine recently.
There are many competitive juices and drinks in the market-
place. Orange juice prices have risen. OJ remains one of the most
healthy drinks in the world, loaded with vitamin C and folic acid
and helps prevent cancer, along with other fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles.







Huntng/ishn orcs


5/29/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:17 pm
LoD: 13:45:00
Moon Data
Rises: 2:28 am
Sets: 2:54 pm
Major Times
7:41 am-9:41 am
8:06 pm-10:06 pm
Minor Times
1:58 am-2:58 am
2:23 pm-3:23 pm
Prediction
Better
5/30/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:17 pm
LoD: 13:45:00
Moon Data
Rises: 3:01 am
Sets: 3:57 pm
Major Times
8:29 am-10:29 am
8:54 pm-10:54 pm
Minor Times


2:46 am-3:46 am
3:11 pm-4:11 pm
Prediction
Better
5/31/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:18 pm
LoD: 13:46:00
Moon Data
Rises: 3:37 am
Sets: 5:03 pm
Major Times
9:20 am-1:20 am
9:45 pm-ll:45 pm
Minor Times
3:37 am-4:37 am
4:02 pm-5:02 pm
Prediction
Good
6/1/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:18 pm
LoD: 13:46:00
Moon Data
Rises: 4:16 am
Sets: 6:13 pm


Major Times
10:14 am-12:14 pm
10:39 pm-12:39 am
Minor Times
4:31 am-5:31 am
4:56 pm-5:56 pm
Prediction
Good
6/2/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:32 am
Sets: 8:19 pm
LoD: 13:47:00
Moon Data
Rises: 5:03 am
Sets: 7:27 pm
Major Times
--:-- .. ..:-.
11:15 am-1:15 pm
Minor Times
5:32 am-6:32 am
5:57 pm-6:57 pm
Prediction
Good
6/3/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:31 am
Sets: 8:19 pm


LoD: 13:48:00
Moon Data
Rises: 5:59 am
Sets: 8:39 pm
Major Times
11:53 pm-1:53 am
12:19 pm-2:19 pm
Minor Times
6:36 am-7:36 am
7:01 pm-8:01 pm
Prediction
Better
6/4/2008
Sun Data
Rises: 6:31 am
Sets: 8:20 pm
LoD: 13:49:00
Moon Data
Rises: 7:03 am
Sets: 9:46 pm
Major Times
12:58 am-2:58 am
1:24 pm-3:24 pm
Minor Times
7:41 am-8:41 am
8:06 pm-9:06 pm
Prediction
Best


5 HJH'ers Sign Contracts



For 4-Year Scholarships


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Five students at Hardee
Junior High School have signed
contracts that, when fulfilled,
will pay for four years at the
Florida colleges and universi-
ties of their choice.
It was all part of the Take
Stock In Children program
sponsored by South Florida
Community College.
In the contract signing, the
youngsters agree to maintain
satisfactory grades, attendance
and behavior during their
junior- and senior-high years,
and to remain drug and crime
free
Then, they will have their
way paid for two years at any
community college in the state
followed by two years at any
Florida university.
Students and their parents
signed the contracts at a meet-
ing of the Hardee County
School Board.
The young scholars are
Katherine Carter, Liliana
Iniguez, Hannah Grisinger,
Christian Manresa and Sergio
Jimenez.


"I've got this theory," Schools
Superintendent Dennis Jones
began in introducing the Take
Stock In Children representa-
tives and the parents and stu-
dents, "that every child should
have the opportunity to go
beyond 12th grade if he or she
wants to and has the ability but,
unfortunately, that is not the
case for every child."
Jones went on to explain that
businesses partnering with the
Take Stock In,.Children pro-
gram "give generously of their
resources" to blend state money
with theirs to provide four years
in college to a deserving child.
"Those we honor tonight are
the ones who were chosen,"
Jones said, noting the decision
was a difficult one for SFCC
program leaders "because there
are a lot of deserving students."
He congratulated the young-
sters for applying themselves
and behaving themselves.
"We reward you for that good
work," he told the quintet, "by
making sure you have the
opportunity for post-secondary
education, to go beyond the


12th grade.
"And," Jones added, "we are
happy and proud to do so."
Jones lauded the Take Stock
In Children program. "It is the
best student assistance program
I have ever seen, at least in my
experience in 30 years in educa-
tion. I have high respect for the
work these people do."
Irene Castanon, who serves
as mentor to the Take Stock In
Children students at both the
junior and senior high, noted
there are 34 local youngsters
under contract.
Don Applequist of the South
Florida Community College
Foundation reminded everyone
that the contract the students
and their parents sign "is a legal
document." No grades may fall
below a C, no drugs can ever be
used, and there can be no trou-
ble with the law.
"Students, you have the hard-
est part," he said.
Following the contract pre-
sentations, the students and
their parents were treated to a
celebratory cake and refresh-
ments.


PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Signing Take Stock In Children contracts were (front, from left) Katherine Carter, Liliana
Iniguez, Hannah Grisinger, Christian Manresa and Sergio Jimenez. Congratulating the
young scholars are Schools Superintendent Dennis Jones (left) and Hardee Junior
High School Principal Doug Herron.


Don Applequist and Irene Castanon prepare to serve up a cake and refreshments in
celebration of the contract signing.


DRESS
Continued From 1A
survey also was taken. A new dress code was drafted, and it met
with the approval of the HHS Leadership Team and School
Advisory Committee.
It calls for an end to T-shirts filled with slogans and graphics,
baggy pants, hoodies, underwear on display, and short or tight
clothing.
The high school calls its new dress code the "Dress For Success"
attire plan. It points out that while some clothing or styles may be
in fashion, they are appropriate for "down time," not the business
of education.
Additionally, high schoolers will be required to wear their stu-
dent identification cards visibly, and above the waist - not unlike
the business world requires.
Many of the changes are similar to those now in place at Hardee
Junior High. "Ours is not as strict as the junior high's because we
feel students this age should have some freedom," Wilkinson said.
But the plan does follow standards of dress students will find
when they enter the work world, along with safety considerations.
SStudents will be asked to display cleanliness, good grooming and
proper taste, the plan says.
Shirts must be polos, plain T's in a solid color or those consid-
ered school "spirit" or club T's, or button-up dress shirts.
Pants must be worn at the waistline for boys or hipline for girls.
Baggy, oversized pants are out.
Skirts and shorts can be no shorter than two inches above the
knee.
No rips or tears are allowed.
Dresses must meet the standards of shirts and skirts.
Hats can be school-related, but may not stay on the head once
inside a building.
No bandanas, tank tops, hoodies, hair rollers, leggings, sweat-
pants or slippers, "heelys" or "skate" shoes. No unbuckled belts or
suspenders. No bare feet.
In all, the Dress For Success plan prepares students for their step
into the adult world.
Wilkinson said the new dress code will be enforced beginning
with the first day of the new school year. If necessary, disciplinary
action will be taken as the school strives to achieve full compli-
ance, he said.
See the full Dress For Success attire plan on Page 8 of this sec-
tion.


CITY
Continued From 1A
organization. Megan will be
transitioning to new career
opportunities and she will be
greatly missed," continued the
press release.
Reached at City Hall on Fri-
day afternoon, McKibben was
upbeat about the changeover.
"It's just a good thing for
everyone. I'm fine with it.
We've always worked closely
with the city's Community
Development office and under
the CRA umbrella. I feel I'm
leaving it in good hands with
Olivia (Minshew) and her assis-
tants Kathy Whaley and Susie
Gibbs."
McKibben said she was most
proud of the Main Street desig-
nation which it has had for
many years. "Of the 52 in the
state, Wauchula is one of the 19
to achieve this state designa-
tion," she said.
"This is a wonderful experi-
ence, 100 percent positive for
everyone," said McKibben, not-
ing she was weighing several
options for her next position.
Main Street was formed in
1995 by a group of local citi-
zens. Within a year, it had
incorporated and hired its first
director, Mark Martin.
Initially, the organization
received city funding. The CRA
was up and running in 2000.
Several years ago, the commis-
sion approved its annual
$25,000 contribution to Main
Street Inc. to become part of the
CRA budget.


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


[[[raee L ouwy s 11/l RI I 11cIlol,










115S. t- Ae
Wal, lagFL '33873'

Te lephone (863) 773
3255 Ilggflg
Qaiypitngsrv-
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p I ries! giJt/
ALL YO:UR. " PR[eV [INATING


Mutual


Urges


Farm-Bill


Signature

Florida Citrus Mutual Ex-
ecutive on Thursday urged
President Bush to sign the Farm
Bill into law after both the U.S.
House and Senate passed the
measure by veto-proof majori-
ties.
"President Bush should sign
this bill, which for the first time
ever recognizes the importance
of fruit and vegetables," said
Michael W. Sparks; vice presi-
dent and chief executive officer
of Florida Citrus Mutual.
"This historic bill is good for
Florida citrus growers," he
added.
The bill, which passed in the
House by a 318-106 vote and in
the Senate by an 81-15 vote,
authorizes almost $1.5 billion
in mandatory spending for pro-
grams that benefit fruit and veg-
etable growers. Florida is the
second-largest producer of
fruits and vegetables in the
United States, and by far the
largest producer of citrus, a'
$9.3 billion industry that cre-
ates 76,000 jobs.
"Citrus greening, a new dis-
ease that kills citrus trees, is
spreading throughout our indus-
try," Sparks said. "As a result,
the number-one funding priori-
ty for Florida citrus is pest and
disease research. The current
Farm Bill addresses the need
for investment in research.
"On behalf of the 8,000
grower members of Florida
Citrus Mutual, I would like to
thank Congressmen Tim
Mahoney, Adam Putnam and
Allen Boyd in the House and
Senators Mel Martinez and Bill
Nelson in the Senate for their
hard work on this bill and their
support of Florida citrus,"
Sparks concluded.
Founded in 1948 and current-
ly representing nearly 8,000
grower members, Florida Citrus
Mutual is the state's largest cit-
rus growers organization. For
more information, visit
www.flcitrusmutual.com.






At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.



YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR


HERE

TOO!!

Contact

Amy Brown or

Nancy Davis
At

773-3255




---I * g
Ag gB^


Kelly's Column
By Jim







May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3A


safe and sanitary housing for
persons providing labor foi
agriculture, groves, farms,
ranches, and dairies, year-round
or seasonally. The intent is for
farmworkers on the farm."
Farmworker housing units
shall be clustered on the site to
minimize the space on the prop-
erty used for housing develop-
ment. Structures shall be sepa-
rated by a minimum of 15 feet
(so emergency vehicles can
access them). They shall be set
back from property lines a min-
imum of 300 feet.
Structures shall comply with
Florida Building Codes and
other electrical, mechanical and
plumbing codes.
Two-story structures shall be
prohibited.

Density
Farmworker housing shall


not exceed the density permit-
ted in the agricultural use cate-
gories of the A-I zoning dis-
trict.
The population density shall
not exceed 3.75 persons per
gross acre.
Staszko said this was deter-
mined from the Davis applica-
tion template, with 150 workers
on 40 acres, which equals 3.75
per gross acre.
Commissioners also decided
on a maximum of 100 acres.
That would allow housing for
up to 375 guestworkers at one
site.

Location And Size
Farmworker housing shall be
in A-I zoning. The minimum
lot/parcel size for farmworker
housing shall be 40 acres, the
maximum 100 acres.
Parcels shall front paved pub-


BENEFIT BBQ


COURTESY PHOTO
Janie Revell, 52, is shown here cuddling her first grand-
child, Brooker, now 1. Revell suffers from an inoperable
brain tumor, and medical expenses are mounting as she
battles the cancer. A benefit barbecue will be held in her
honor this Saturday between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. at Main
Street Heritage Park in downtown Wauchula. Tickets are
.$8, and will purchase a meal of pulled pork, baked
beans, cole slaw, roll and a homemade dessert. Tickets
are available at banks, schools, Jave Cafe, Cat's On Main,
Jan's, Lisa's, Wanda's, Heartland Gold, Hardee Ranch
Supply and Heartland Growers Supply.

YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are.you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published in
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear in this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657. - .


licly maintained roads, includ-
ing the 200 miles of county
paved roads as well as state
roads 62, 64 and 66.
There shall be a minimum lot
frontage of 200 feet.
Buffering of the clustered
footprint shall be required to
provide visual and audio
screens between the farmwork-
er housing development and
surrounding properties. Exist-
ing vegetation should be main-
tained, or opaque screens such
as masonry walls, PVC fencing
and berming may be used.
Substantial Employment
The proposal was "farm-
workers housed in Hardee
County shall be substantially
employed within Hardee
County. Substantially employed
shall mean that not less than 60
percent of the work shall be
performed in Hardee County."
Carlton and Clark questioned
the 60 percent, saying hard
freezes, hurricanes and "acts of
God" might diminish available
citrus acreage. They suggested
51 percent, leaving flexibility
for such events.

Special Exception vs.
Site Plan
The site development plan
comes first before the P&Z
Board, which does not have to
approve or disapprove it, but
can set criteria or conditions to
its approval. If the property
owner refuses the conditions,
that would be grounds to turn
down the application.
Craft said a Special Excep-
tion was required for hog-farm-
ing and cattle feed lots. Farm-
worker housing should also
come before the commission as
other agricultural-related indus-
tries. "Are these decisions just
for citrus?"
Commissioner Gordon
Norris said the mindset in these
workshops has been on citrus.
Carlton said farmworker
housing could be small farmers
with one or two people, or 20 to
25. Workers could come and
harvest crops in rotation, such
as cucumbers in Florida and
pickles in North Carolina.
Citrus leaders said no appli-
cations would ever be approved
if held to a Special Exception.
There would always be people
to show up and oppose any
Special Exception and commis-
sioners would bow to their pres-
sure, especially in an election
year.
"None of us want to do this
(guestworker housing). It's
more expensive. You have to
pay an adverse wage and pro-
vide free housing. If we didn't
believe it was necessary, we
wouldn't even try to do it," said
Davis.
Four members of the com-
mission emphatically .said "no"
to a Special Exception.
Commission Chairman Dale
Johnson persisted in asking for
more audience opinions.
Mike Henry and Richard
Grimm spoke of the need for a


.special exception "to give a
voice for the people."
When challenged by his fel-
low commissions, Johnson
acknowledged he was pursuing
the issue because he preferred
the Special Exception method
of review. The other four com-
missioners, Norris, Bobby Ray
Smith, Minor Bryant and Nick
Timmerman, said they had
already declined that idea.
Johnson finally conceded.







Cooking For
Diabetic Needs
Registered Dietician
Roberta Broker will. hold a
healthy cooking demonstra-
tion next Thursday, June 5,
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
the Hardee County Exten-
sion Service Office, behind
the Agri-Civic Center at
Altman and Stenstrom
roads.
The class is limited to 25
people. Cost is $6. Pre-reg-
ister by calling the Hardee
County Health Department's
Diabetes Education Preven-
tion unit at 773-4161, ext.
157.






MONDAY, JUNE 2
VWauchula City Commis-
sion, monthly workshop, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St., Wau-
chula, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY. JUNE 5
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County Plann-
ing & Zoning Board and
Hardee County Commission,
joint meeting on Mosaic DRI
continuation, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.


Letter To The Editor

Sheriff's Finance Director

Responds To Campaign Ad


Dear Editor:
This letter is being written in
response to the ad that was in
last weeks paper regarding
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
payroll.
I feel the citizens of Hardee
County should be made aware
that the figures stated in the ad
were grossly inflated. The ad
states that the pay differential
from 2007 to 2008 is estimated
at $147,470 for the 16 positions
that were listed.
I do not know how Mr.
Santarlas calculated his figures
but based on the information
that was provided to him by the
Sheriff's Office, the difference
in the payroll for those posi-
tions would be less than
$15,000.


Also, the figures listed as
2007 salary figures are not just
salary. Those figures are a total
W-2 wage figure that includes
overtime, extra duty pay, paid
leave and salary incentives that
are mandated by Florida Dept.
of Law Enforcement.
Mr Santarlas was encouraged
to contact me for any informa-
tion that he needed, which he
did not do. Instead he just made
up figures that are completely
incorrect.
Thank you for the opportuni-
ty to set the record straight.

Donna McCleskey
Finance Director
Hardee County
Sheriff's Office
863-773-0304 ext. 214


S- -Fun By The
6 7 9 Numbers
3 5 1 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
7 1 3 sudoku. This
mind-bending
Syou hooked from
2 9 the moment you
square off, so
9 8 7 6 sharpen your
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5 savvy to the test!
96 5 8
2
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Level: Advanced
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Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
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appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
S99 ~ E 6 . 8 L
L 8 S � 9 9 6 8
6 1 9 3 99
9 S 9 ELL 8. 6
961.199tEL
V13 L 6 8 E 9 . 9
S96 L L 9 Z9
LL9 8 9 9 ' 6 8
Z 8 E 6 9 L 9 1.
:l3MSNV


COMMISSION
Continued From 1A


NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the ERP General
Construction on 9.71 acres to serve Recreation known as Hardee Park
Baseball/Softball Complex The project is located in HARDEE County, Section(s) 08
Township 345 South, Range 25 East. The permit applicant is Hardee County BOCC
whose address is 412 W. Orange St. Room 103. Wauchula. FL. 33873

The permit No. is 44006006.001

The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday
through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District (District) 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville. FL. 34604-6899 .

NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this
application may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569
and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code
(FA.C.), of the Uniform Rule of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the
substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the
District's action, or proposed action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person
requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply
with Chapter 28-106, FA.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the
Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice (or within 14 days
for an Environmental Resource Permit application with Proprietary Authorization for the
use of Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time
period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing
under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the posi-
tion taken by it in this notice of proposed agency action. Persons whose substantial inter-
ests will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the application have the
right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the require-
ments set forth above.

Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute regard-
ing the District's proposed action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing. 5:29c







4A The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


ARMANDINA GUZMAN
Armandina Guzman, 68, of
Wauchula, -died on Saturday,
May 24, 2008, at her home.
Born in Mathis, Texas, on
Feb. 6, 1940, she came to
Hardee County from New
Mexico in 1973. She was a
homemaker.
She was preceded in death by
a brother Joe Guzman.
Survivors include a son,
Frankie Sigala of Lake Wales;
six daughters, Eva Sigala of
Wauchula, Rosalinda Aguirre of
Brandon, Maria Enriques of
Clint, Texas, Kathleen Sigala of
Lakewood, N.J., and Rebecca
Villegas of Zolfo Springs; three
brothers, Danny Guzman of
Florida, Armando Guzman of
Texas and Erasmo Guzman of
California; three sisters, Gloria
Fonseca of Texas, Irma Gon-
zalez of Kansas and Diana
Alaniz of Texas; 20 grandchil-
dren; and 25 great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home. Services are today"
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. at St.
Michael Catholic Church, fol-
lowed by interment at Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


8 0ovti g eoMeito j


GLENN
SPURLOCK
Glenn Spurlock, 95, of
Muskogee, Okla., died on
Thursday, May 22, 2008 at
Claremore Veterans Center,
Claremore, Okla.
Born in Hardy, Ark., on
March 13, 1913, he served in
the U.S. Armed Forces, was a
realtor and worked in educa-.
tion administration.
He is survived by a son,
Dennis Spurlock and wife
Patricia of Oklahoma; two
grandsons, Jason Spurlock
and wife Kendra, and Travis
Spurlock, all of Oklahoma;
and a sister, Bonnie Houchin
of Arkansas.
Graveside services were
held on Tuesday at Bowling
Green Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home



9An Sotang IUeotiO j


ARMANDINA
GUZMAN
Armandina Guzman, 68,
of Wauchula, died on Satur-
day, May 24, 2008, at her
home.
Born in Mathis, Texas, on
Feb. 6, 1940, she came to
Hardee County from New
Mexico in 1973. She was a
homemaker.
She was preceded in death
by a brother Joe Guzman.
Survivors include a son,
Frankie Sigala of Lake
Wales; six daughters, Eva
Sigala of Wauchula, Rosa-
linda Aguirre of Brandon,
Maria Enriques of Clint,
Texas, Kathleen Sigala of
Lakewood, N.J., and Rebecca
Villegas of Zolfo Springs;
three brothers, Danny Guz-
man of Florida, Armando
Guzman of Texas and Eras-
mo Guzman of California;
three sisters, Gloria Fonseca
of Texas, Irma Gonzalez of
.Kansas and Diana Alaniz of
Texas; 20 grandchildren; and
25 great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funer-
al home. Services are today
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. at St.
Michael Catholic Church,
followed by interment at
Wauchula Cemetery.


HARRY DELOS ENGLISH
Harry Delos English, 77, of
Hamlet, N.C., died on Friday,
May 23, 2008 at Baptist
Hospital.
Born in Ona, on March 19,
1931, he was a 20-year U.S.
Navy veteran and hospital engi-
neer. He was a member of The
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints.
Survivors include his wife
Barbara Storrs English; two
sons, Harry English Jr. of Utah
and Warren English of
Columbia, S.C.; three daughters
Cheryle Fabry of Saudia
Arabia, Cynthia Blue of
Hamlet, N.C., and Bethany
Pullen of Rockingham, N.C.; a
foster son, Joseph Fennell of
Huntsville, Ala.; a sister, Mattie
Sherrod of Thomasville, Ga.;
13 grandchildren; and six great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday from
9 to 10 a.m. at Lily Cemetery,
where graveside services were
at 10 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter Day
Saints Perpetual Educational
Fund, 310 Roberdel Road,
Rockingham. N.C. 28379.
Brant Funeral Home
Wauchula


GLENN SPURLOCK
Glenn Spurlock, 95, of Mus-
kogee, Okla., died on Thursday,
May 22, 2008 at Claremore
Veterans Center, Claremore,
Okla.
Born in Hardy. Ark., on
March 13, 1913, he served in
the U.S. Armed Forces, was a
realtor and worked in education
administration.
He is survived by a son,
Dennis Spurlock and wife
Patricia of Oklahoma; two
grandsons, Jason Spurlock and
wife Kendra, and Travis
Spurlock, all of Oklahoma; and
a sister, Bonnie Houchin of
Arkansas.
Graveside services were held
on Tuesday at Bowling Green
Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

WILLIAM M. BUCHANAN
SWilliam M. Buchanan, 66; of
Pinellas Parffi"died on Wednes-
day, May 21, 2008 at Hospice
Woodside in Pinellas Park.
He was preceded in death by
parents W.C. "Buck" Buchanan
and Virginia M. Buchanan.
He is survived by two sisters,
Claudia Gibson of Seminole
and Judy Hill of Surprise, Ariz.;
two nephews, Curt and Chris
Gibson of St. Petersburg; and a
niece, Erica Hill of Phoenix,
Ariz.
Graveside services are Satur-
day at 11 a.m. at Wauchula
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be sent to hospice.
Brant Funeral Home
Wauchula





HARRY DELOS
ENGLISH
Harry Delos English, 77,
of Hamlet, N.C., died on
Friday, May 23, 2008 at
Baptist Hospital.
Born in Ona, on March 19,
1931, he was a 20-year U.S.
Navy veteran and hospital
engineer. He was a member
of The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints.
Survivors include his wife
Barbara Storrs English; two
sons, Harry English Jr. of
Utah and Warren English of
Columbia, S.C.; three daugh-
ters Cheryle Fabry of Saudia
Arabia, Cynthia Blue of
Hamlet, N.C., and Bethany
Pullen of Rockingham, N.C.;
a foster son, Joseph Fennell
of Huntsville, Ala.; a sister,
Mattie Sherrod of Thomas-
ville, Ga.; 13 grandchildren;
and six great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday
from 9 to 10 a.m. at Lily
Cemetery, where graveside
services were at 10 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be sent to The
Church of Jesus Christ of


Obituaries


Mining Issues Reviewed


HALLIE GRACE
GILLISPIE
Hallie Grace Gillispie, 90, of
Fort Meade, died Thursday,
May 22, 2008 at her son's home
in Jacksonville.
Born in Des Arc, Ark., in
December, 1917, she came to
Fort Meade in 1947 from
Clearwater. A member of the
community for 62 years, she
was a homemaker and member
of the First United Methodist
Church of Fort Meade.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Sammie Gillispie
Jr.
Survivors include a son,
Sammie Dale Gillispie and wife
Patricia of Jacksonville; a
daughter, Beverly Graham and
husband Michael of Brandon,
Miss; five grandchildren, Sean
Gillispie of Jacksonville
Beach, Sam Gillispie of
Oviedo, Joshua Gillispie of
Tallahassee, Michael Graham
of Bossier City, La., and
Matthew Graham of Fort
Bragg, N.C.; and seven great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was at the funeral
home on Monday from 10 to 11
a.m., with services at 11 a.m.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade

PATSY BARKER GIBSON
Patsy Barker Gibson, 64, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
May 26, 2008, at Sebring.
Born March 4, 1944, in
Wauchula, she was a lifelong
resident and a housekeeper.
She was preceded in death by
sisters Ruthy Moore and Serina
Webb.
She is survived by husband
Jimmy L. Gibson of Wauchula;
a daughter, Sebrina VanSickle
of Wauchula; a step-son, Jamie
Gibson of Windsor, Va.; a sister,
Eloise Rowan of Arcadia; five
grandchildren; and nine great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home. There are no services
planned at this time.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula





WILLIAM M.
BUCHANAN
William M. Buchanan, 66,
of Pinellas Park, died on
Wednesday, May 21, 2008 at
Hospice Woodside in Pinellas
Park.
He was preceded in death
by parents W.C. "Buck"
Buchanan and Virginia M.
Buchanan.
He is survived by two sis-
ters, Claudia Gibson of
Seminole and Judy Hill of
Surprise, Ariz.; two nephews,
Curt and Chris Gibson of St.
Petersburg; and a niece, Erica
Hill of Phoenix, Ariz.
Graveside services are
Saturday at 11 a.m. at Wau-
chula Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be sent to hospice.

Brant Funeral

Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula





PATSY BARKER
GIBSON
Patsy Barker Gibson, 64,
of Wauchula, died on
Monday, May 26, 2008, at
Sebring.
Born March 4, 1944, in
Wauchula, she was a lifelong
resident and a housekeeper.
She was preceded in death
by sisters Ruthy Moore and
Serina Webb.
She is survived by hus-
band Jimmy L. Gibson of
Wauchula; a daughter,
Sebrina VanSickle of Wau-
chula; a step-son, Jamie
Gibson of Windsor, Va.; a sis-
ter, Eloise Rowan of Arcadia;


As a courtesy to our friends and neighb
are now listed daily at www.hardee


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
This is the final article on the
proposed mining on the east
side of the Peace River leading
up to next Thursday, June 5.

DAM SAFETY
Perhaps the biggest concern
of residents along Fussell and
County Line roads is whether
the berms or dams holding mas-
sive amounts of water will hold.
In its report, county mining
staff noted the requirement to
construct perimeter "ditch and
berm" systems wherever the
mining block lies adjacent to
property boundaries and wet-
lands which are to remain
undisturbed.
Attorney and resident Kent
Lily said the area to be mined
wrapped around three side of
his property and he hoped the


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CASE NO. 252007CA000732
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
WAUCHULA, a banking corpora-
tion under the laws of the State of
Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHEN DRISKELL,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant
to Final Default Judgment and
Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on May 21, 2008, in the
above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at the North front door of the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, on the 18 day
of June, 2008, at 11:00 a.m., the
following-described property:
The North 175.00 feet of the
West 498.00 feet of the East
1051.12 feet of the N1/2 of
the NW1/4 of the NE1/4 of
Section 9, Township 33
South, Range 25 East,
Hardee County, Florida
AND

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ID# C1381; 1988 GDAN
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KK259428 and Two (2) Tool
Chest Cabinets With All
Tools Now Owned and
Acquired Replacements,
All Located at 545 Lake
Branch Road, Bowling
Green, Hardee County,
Florida.
DATED this 27 day of May, 2008.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of the Courts
Hardee County, Florida
By:Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk

5"29, 6:5c


definition of safety was the
same for the mining company
as he anticipated.
Frank Kirkland of Fussell
Road expressed the fear of the
"worst case scenario," a dam
break, in which "the water
would be a good 100 feet over
me." There's 20 more houses
and families right there. "What
would happen if the dam broke
on all thiee areas at once? You
don't have to be a rocket scien-
tist to know the ditches are not
deep enough."
P&Z Board member Don
Chancey said, "We're talking
about people's lives, not just
animals or trees. What assur-
ance can we have that there
won't be a dam break?
Engineer Dr. John Garlinger
explained. The elevation of
dams would be 135 feet at the
crest. The water level is not
allowed past 130 feet. Since
1972 the state has made rules to
require subsurface exploration,
engineering analysis and design
and full-time engineering over-
sight of construction of clay set-
tling areas and the berms and
ditches around them.
Whether it is excessive rain-
fall, a hurricane or whatever,
the ditches collect water and
direct it into mine cuts.
Garlinger showed slides of the
three proposed settling areas
hnd explained the ditch and
berm system around them.
Patty Murray said "They
want to put a clay settling area
near where I live. I would have
no time to leave in a hurricane.
Lives don't mean anything to
the Central Florida Planning
Council (which has already
approved the mining plan). A
breach could drown me and
others."
Professional geologist Mike
DeNeve, with 27 years experi-
ence in mine planning and oper-
ations, said during El Nino
episodes and the 2004 hurri-
canes, no clay pond dam broke.
He showed charts of the past
areas mined. "In the hurricanes,
we pulled the ponds down
ahead of time and the levels
held. All took it fine."
The county report notes "citi-
zens who live near the clay set-
tling areas have expressed con-
cerns regarding dam safety.'
County staff required additional
engineering studies to justify
Mosaic's proposed designs."
"Mosaic has designed a
floodwater diversion' system


rn


� "They were


Wonderfull.

We hear kind words
Consistently. We're proud
that people feel comfortable
enough with us to openly tell
us how much they appreciate
what we did for them. In fact,
it's this appreciation that
drives us to offer the very
best in comfort, compassion
and service.





FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula





>ors, obituaries 773-9773


*obits.com


1.24tfc


that would divert and contain
all floodwaters in open mine
cuts in the unlikely event of a
dam breach. Additionally,
Mosaic has developed protocols
for the design, construction,
inspection and maintenance of
retaining dikes, including both
the clay settling dams and peri-
meter retaining berms. Mosaic
is also required to maintain the
overall surface water manage-
ment system of impoundments
and ditches to the original
design standards. Dams shall be
inspected daily and the compa-
ny provide monthly and annual
reports that summarize the
inspections and status of dam
conditions," continues the
report.
There will be additional
buffering and protection for the
residential areas located on the
mine's western boundaries.
Adequate stormwater drainage,
including a 12inch, 24-hour
duration storm event runoff
rates and discharge pumped
into and stored within the mine
process water recirculation sys-
tem. The not-yet-backfilled
areas will create sizeable stor-
age volumes to be filled by cap-
tured runoff.

CONCLUSION
The county mining depart-
ment has spent several years
working with Mosaic during its
mine application, questioning
all aspects of it. The final coun-
ty report recommends 78 condi-
tions if the mining company's
.application is to be approved.
The P&Z Board and commis-
sion has had nearly five weeks
to digest the volumes of ex-
hibits, slides, books of informa-
tion and citizens' comments pro
and con.
During its regular monthly
meeting, which begins June 5 at
6 p.m., the P&Z Board hopes to
make its recommendation to the
commission which, in turn, will
make the final decision whether
to approve the mining applica-
tion, a Major Special Excep-
tion, master mining and recla-
mation plan, and unit plan, and
allow Mosaic to mine over
7,000 acres of its 10,000 acre
tract east of the Peace River.

A man's country is not a
certain area of land, of moun-
tains, rivers and woods, but it
is a principle; and patriotism
is loyalty to that principle.
-George William Curtis


SUTTON MONUMENTS




Allke Every MOllient a Special Mlemon ...













Doug and PJ. Sutton
Owners
1067 South Sixth Ave. - Wauchula - Florida
863-773-0625 3ic


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


five grandchildren; and nine
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funer-
al home. There are no ser-
vices planned at this time.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Latter Day Saints Perpetual
Educational Fund, 310
Roberdel Road, Rockingham,
N.C. 28379.

Brant Funeral

Chapel
"Our family serving your family"
404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula


,3~h


''
















WHAT'S IMPORTANT NOW?
Many of you know that I am a youth director at my church.
That is my full-time job, as well as being a dad and husband to my
children and wife.
Some of you may be saying, "You get paid for doing that?"
Yep!
I love my job. I get to tell people about my Best Friend while
doing a lot of things they and I love to do. I often get to travel. I get
to meet lots of people from all over and learn about how they live.
But one of the toughest aspects of my job is I also get to see a
lot of people who are hurting, or a lot of people that because they
are hurting want to or are actually hurting others.
You hear people on the news or in all kinds of social settings
say, "This generation has lost all touch with reality, morality and
responsibility." We often talk down about the youth in our country.
As one of my parents said, it is easier to complain about things than
it is to listen to the problem and try to correct it.
So whose fault is it that the youth of America have gone so
astray?
The parents, the youth, the teachers, the preachers: Who do
you want to blame? The fact is nobody wants to be responsible for
that big of a problem. But the other fact is very few people want to
take time to be part of that solution, either.
As a Christian American man, I'm against teaching only evo-


lution in our schools. I'm against not allowing people to pray
before football games or class. I'm against $4 gasoline, too. But
have I done anything at all to correct any of those problems? Nope!
America has moved beyond the nation of democracy, to
beyond the nation of special interests groups, to a nation that lets
the squeakiest wheel get the oil e don't seem to govern by com-
mon sense or by any standard other than have we appeased the
afflicted.
Whatever happened to reconciliation?
When I was growing up, I was always taught to make things
right, to say I'm sorry if I had done wrong, or togo to someone
directly if I had been offended and gently seek reconciliation.
Now, don't think I always did as I was told but at least I knew
that was what was expected. I knew there was a right and a wrong.
And'I knew at some point I'd be accountable, to my parents or to
God.
What is important now? Lou Holtz, former Notre Dame and
University of South Carolina football coach and now ESPN ana-
lyst, used that question often in coaching his teams, and speaking
to other teams and organizations around the country. What is
important now? I guess that depends on who you are.
For me, there really are only two viewpoints to look at this
question from. I know that from the world's point of view, that is
very elitist, arrogant, narrow-minded, smalltown of me, but that is
how I see it. Those two viewpoints are, a Christian world and life
view and a non-Christian world and life view.
Ultimately, if you are a Christian the things that are important
to you should be the same things that are important to all
Christians. For everyone that is not a Christian, there should be a
vast array of things that are important.
But did you notice the word "should" in those last two sen-
tences? For some reason, Christians have a hard time coming
together and agreeing on the truths of the Bible. And for some rea-


May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5A
son, non-Christians are able to unite almost overnight on issues that
supposedly quiet the use of the name Jesus in this world.
What is important now?
Don't get me wrong, there are many Christians who are fol-
lowing Joshua 1:8, "Do not let this Book of Law depart from your
mouth, meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to
do everything written in it. Then you will be prosperous and suc-
cessful."
There are many Christians standing up for the Truth, Jesus
Christ. There are many people who are loving God with all their
hearts and all their minds and all their souls, and loving their neigh-
bors like themselves. There are many sinners who are able to do
this because they realize that they are saved by grace.
They realize that what is important now is to see if they can
live by faith, hope and love: faith in Jesus to be our Savior and
Lord; hope that Jesus is the only hope we have of entering Heaven
and being saved from our sins, and living in this fallen world; and
love so that our response for the previous two would be one of love
for God and fellow man. First Corinthians 10:31 says, "So, whether
you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God."
What's important now? Is the war in Iraq? Taxes? Education?
Gas prices? Social Security? Abortion? Horse-riding lessons?
Golf? TV? Computer chat room?
I think God has gifted us all to specifically impact our fami-
lies, our friends, our communities, our world by giving Him the
glory in everything He has gifted us to do.
Whatever God has gifted you with, whatever God has laid on
your heart, whatever God has given you a passion for, do it for His
glory. Then others who don't know Him will see Him through your
faith, your hope and your love.
Live for Christ! That is what is important nnw!
Florence Lawrence, the "Biograph Girl," is considered by
many to be the first U.S. motion picture "movie star."


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6A The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


American Legion


Celebrated Memorial Day


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
About 60 people attended a
Memorial Day ceremony in
Wauchula Monday morning at
Herger Williams Post No. 2 in
Wauchula. Local rancher Duck
Smith was guesf speaker.
Post Commander Mack
Bryan said Memorial Day was
officially named in 1882 and
declared a national holiday in
1971 by President Richard
Nixon as the last Monday in
May.
Lawrence Roberts introduced
Smith as a musician, singer,
businessman and Christian who
ministers to various needs in
Hardee County.
Smith said he remembered
Aunt Mattie Revels selling pop-
pies. He praised the monument
which honors Hardee's war
dead. "They paid the ultimate
price. I hope my grandchildren
and yours will never have to
fight an enemy on foreign land
or on American soil."
He quoted Jesus in the Bible
as saying, "Greater love hath no
man than this, that he lay down
his life for others."
"The servicemen (listed on
the monument) gave their lives
that others might live, and Jesus
Christ did the same thing."
Smith praised America's
founding fathers who signed the
Declaration of Independence
and those who fought in the
Revolutionary War and subse-
quent wars.
"Fifty-six men signed the
Declaration of Independence.
Five were captured by the
British as traitors and tortured
before they were executed.
Twelve had their homes ran-
sacked and burned. Two lost
their sons in the Revolutionary
War. Nine died in the
Revolutionary War.
"What kind of men were
they? Twenty-four were
lawyers, 11 were merchants,
and 9 were farmers or planta-
tion owners. Most were men of
means and well educated. Yet
they signed this document,
knowing full well that the
penalty would be death or
worse if captured. They had
security but valued liberty
more. They may have lost their
lives and fortunes, but their
sacred honor is preserved today
in the hearts and minds of all
freedom loving people through-
out the world."
Smith quoted Psalms,
"Blessed is the nation whose
God is the Lord."
He said he knew Charles
Dickey, Raymond Boatwright
and Corky Oskins, who were
among the 73 Hardee County
servicemen who died in wars.
Smith said he loved everyone
and prays that God will bless
America and protect American
servicemen and women who are
laying their lives on the line in
the fight for freedom. "
He prays that past sacrifices
will not be forgotten or ever be
made in vain.


Later he quoted Edgar Davis ly experienced and is individu-
who said, "Freedom is national- ally self-sacrifice demanding."


THE HONORED DEAD


WORLD WAR I
Alderman, Edward .......................... . Army


Altman, Jebtha L. "Zeb" .......
Bryan, Albert W. ..............
Burch, Grady .................
Collier, Leslie ................
Davis, Issac ..................
Donahue, D.E. .................
Grice, Alton ..................
Holland, Fred .. .............


Jones, John ..............
Madden, Arthur ..........
Mitchell, Wm. E. "Willie" ..
Orr, James R. ............
Thomas, Henry ...........
Webb, Joseph T. ..........
Weeks, Nathaniel .........
Williams, Herger ........

WORLD WAR II


Ballard, M erle .. ..............
Baucom, J.B. ....................
Brewer, John Tol ... ........... .
Cejka, Henry G. ..................
Chesser, Charlie L. ...............
Chestnutt, Freddie L. ............ .
Crane, Albert L. ..................
Davis, Herman Watson ............
Davis, Robert O. Jr. ............. .
Dees, Bradford W. .............. .
Dennis, Jack K ................. .
Evers, Robert D ................. .
Fussell, Donald E ............... .
Fussell, Jack H. ..................
Gilliam, Thomas O. .......... ..
Jones, Dave Clifton ............. .
Lambert, Harold O. ............. .
Lanier, Frank P. ................ .
Maddox, John Robert ............
Makowski, Edwin Adolph .........
M ay, Jack .......................
McCall, Murrell G................
McLean, Malcolm E. ............ .
Minor, Francis J ................ .
Montgomery, Chester ..............
Moore, Douglas T. .............. .
Moseley, Oscar C. ...............
North, Leavy T. Jr. .............. .
Oskin, Stanley J. ................
Patterson, James M. ............. .
Petteway, Roy H. .................
Pringle, J.P. .................. ..
Smith, Halcott L. .................
Southerland, W. Edgar . ...........
Stanton, Arthur Lemmie ..........
Taylor, Jessie J. .. ................
Taylor, John S. ..................
Taylor, Marquis B. ...............
Tew, Charles R. ................ .
W hite, W illiam S..................
Wingate, Andrew J. ..............
Witt, Leslie B. ................. .

KOREAN CONFLICT
Barefoot, Elmer G. ................
Howze, Orville C .................
Ryan, Jim J. ................... .


............... Arm y
............... Arm y
.............. . Arm y
............... Arm y
............... Arm y
............... Arm y
...............Arm y
............. . .Arm y
............. . .Arm y
............. . .Arm y
............. . .Arm y
............. . .Army
............... Arm y
............. . .Army
............... Arm y
............... Arm y


............ .Army
............ .Army
............. .Arm y
............ .Army
............ .M arine
...............Army
. .......... Marine
............ .Navy
............ .Army
............ .Army
............ .Army
............ .Army
............ .Navy
............ .Navy
............ .Army
............ .Navy
............ .Navy
............ .Army
............ Army
............ .Navy
............ Navy
............ .Army
............ .Army
............ .Army
............ .Army
......... . . .Navy
............ .Army
............ .Army
........ .... .Army
.............Navy
............ .Arm y
............ .Army
............ .Army
............. Army
............. Navy
............. Army
............. Army
......... Army
.... ...... .Army
............. Army
............ .Army
............ .Army


............ .Army
.......... . Army
.. . . . . . . . . . . .Army


VIETNAM WAR
Adams, Tim B. ............................... Marine
Boatwright, Raymond L. ...................... .Army
Carter, Terrel Elbert .......................... .Navy
Dickey, Charles C. Jr. .......................... Army
Fulford, Varl E. ............................. .Army
Long, Charles Edward ........................ .Navy
Long, Warren L. . ............................ USAF
M eans, Johnny ............................. . M marine
Pendley, Robert Glenn ......................... .Army
Rickels, Frederick Dale ....................... .Marine
Shaw, Roy E. Jr. ..............................Army


By LACRESHA CARLTON
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Inez Walker Corbett.
Q: Where and when were you
born?
A: Wauchula; Jan. 30, 1925.
Q: Where did you go to school?
A: Wauchula, Avon Park, Bartow.
Q: What was it like?
A: Nothing like school today. When I
went to
school in
Wauchula, .'Bt ' \w it was a (,. I
one-room
schoolhouse. In Avon Park, it was one
school from first grade to 12th grade.
Q: What did your parents do for a
living?
A: My dad (Joseph Walker) worked
at the Coca-Cola Co. and my mom
(Valerie Lawrence) was a maid.
Q: What did you do for entertain-
ment?
A: Went to the movies and went to
church.
Q: What was going on in history
when you were my age?
A: Segregation.
Q: Who were famous people when


you were my age?
A: My uncle, Mathew McKenny. He
sang with a dance band called the Ink
Spots and played the base.
Q: What is one of your most memo-
rable childhood moments?
A: When I went to Bok Tower in
Lake Wales. It had very beautiful land-
scapes and lots of trees.
Q: Did you live in the same city
and state your whole life?
A: I lived in Florida all my life but in
different cities such as Wauchula, Avon
Park and Bartow.
Q: What are some very different
things going on in life today that did-
n't when you were my age?
SA: The schools are mixed with differ-
ent races. We couldn't sit in the front of
buses. We couldn't eat in white restau-
rants. Lots of thugs walking the streets.
Kids had to go to school, if not they
had truant officers to take them.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


First Vice Commander Carl Saunders and Sandy Scott, whose brother Frederick Dale
Rickels was killed in Vietnam, placed the wreath by the monument.


Jennifer Wyatt, local American Red Cross director,
stands next to Lawrence Roberts, who introduced guest
speaker.


,* . . ,







(4/





- - 7

Post Adjutant John W. Burton read second half of
Hardee's war deaths, which totaled 17 in World War I, 42
in World War II, 3 in the Korean Conflict, and 11 in
Vietnam.


Guest speaker Duck Smith sits next to Post Commander
Mack Bryan. About 60 people attended the 10 a.m cere-
mony to honor America's war dead and current service-
men.


Jack Carlton held the bugle which played "Taps."


I --



A Daily Thought

THURSDAY
Nehemiah prayed, "0 Lord,
God of Heaven, the great
and awesome God, who
keeps His covenant of love
.with those who love Him and
obey His commands."
Nehemiah 1: 5 (NIV)

FRIDAY
(Jesus said) "And remember,
I am coming soon!" Happy
is the man who keeps the
words of the prophecy con-
tained in this book (the
Bible) ... He who gives this
testimony speaks, "Yes, I am
coming soon." The grace of
the Lord Jesus be with you
all.
Revelation 22:7, 20-21 (NEB)

SATURDAY
Foolishness brings joy to
thosewho have no sense; a
sensible person keeps on
the right path.
Proverbs 15:21 (NCV)

SUNDAY
Remember, that a man who
keeps the whole law of God,
but for a single exception is
none the less a law-breaker
(sinner).
James 2:10 (PME)

MONDAY
Keep your word, even when
it costs you. Make an honest
living, never take a bribe.
Psalm 15:4 (ME)

TUESDAY
Love is not irritable or
touchy. It does not keep
grudges and will hardly ever
notice when others do it
wrong.
I Corinthians 13:5 (TLB)

WEDNESDAY
(Daniel related) "I prayed to
the Lord my God and con-
fessed, "O Lord, You are a
great and awesome God!
You always fulfill Your
promises of unfailing love to
those who love You and
keep Your commands . . .
But we have sinned and
done wrong . . . We do not
ask forgiveness because we
deserve help, but because
You are so merciful."
Daniel 9:4,5a, 18b (NLT)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


The computer language
PROLOG is an abbreviation
of "PROgramming in
LOGic."

HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY-
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


UNCLE MATHEW MCKENNY WAS


A SINGER WIn THE INK SPOTS


RICA N L E GI ON INC.


I






May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7A


"Don't let your kids and grandkids take these sacrifices lightly," said Duck Smith, stand-
ing with Mack Bryan.


Li m


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Jennifer Wyatt sang the National Anthem Monday, May
26, at Herger Williams Post No. 2 in Wauchula.


Second Vice Commander Jimmy Dickens read first half
of Hardee County's servicemen who died during wars.


I Fied.


V r-

IF.


Monday - Wednesday 2 eggs, bacon, grits Tuesday- Chicken & Dumplings
8am - 8pm or potatoes, toast or Wednesday- Pork Chops
Thursday & Friday biscuit & coffee or tea ednesday- ork Chop
8am-9pm $35& Thursday- Steak Night
Saturday 6:30am - 8 pm Short Stack & Friday - Fish Day
Sunday 6:30am - 3 pm Sausage Saturday - BBQ
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS AND LOOK FORWARD TO SERVING EACH OF YOU.
THANK YOU,
THE MITCHELL &T GAUSE FAMILIES




4831 Dixiana Avenue
Bowling Green, FL 33834
O Phone: 863-375-9996
Fax: 863-375-9993
E-mail: cjfulsey@embarqmail.com


Logon Language Learning Center


Logon:
The language


a
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Parents,
Is your child having difficulty with:
* Reading below grade level?
* Shows little interest in reading?
* Experiences difficulty associating letters with sounds?
* Speaks in simple, short sentences?
* Has difficulty communicating and following directions?
We can help.

SLogon Language Learning Center is an intense, engaging and
individualized summer program geared toward students who
need to quickly improve their language and reading skills for


academic success in school.
www.scilearn.com L a i
2008 Logon Language Learning Camp
June 9-Aug 1, 2008 9
Schedule: Kgn - 3rd Grades 8-12 noon
3rd-8th Grades 1-5 pm
Call now to enroll your child. Spaces are limited.


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Vacation Bible School

Sunday - Friday

June 8 - 13

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Ages 4 yrs - 8th Grade Completed


Oak Grove Baptist Church

4350 W. Main St. * Wauchula * 735-0321


BOWLING GREEN
COMMUNITY OF CONCERNED CITIZENS, INC.
POST OFFICE BOX 73
BOWLING GREEN, FLORIDA 33834
May 26, 2008
Notice of Dissolution
Please note that the Bowling Green Community of
Concerned Citizens Inc. has officially discontinued business
as of January 15, 2008. A copy of the Articles of Dissolution
was filed and accepted by the State of Florida on January 3,
2008. All residual funds were donated to local charities in the
area.
BGCCI would like thank the local community for their
involvement during the past. As well, the organization would
like to thank local businesses for their support including but
certainly not limited to:
* Church of God and True Holiness
* B. G. Convenience Store
* L and J. Restoration and Construction, Inc.
* St. John AME Church
*Mosaic
* Bowling Green Youth Academy
" Parker Farms
" Herald Advocate
* City of Bowling Green
*Doyle Carlton, Sr.
* Sellers Market
SJ. Oliver Speech Pathology Services, Inc.
* Bowling Green Branch of the Wauchula State Bank
* Walmart
Thank You,
Executive Board, BGCCCI 5:29c


4,�






8A The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


Letter To The Editor

To Walk Or Not To Walk -

A Big Question This Year


Dear Editor:
This seems to be the big
question this year for some of
our graduating seniors. Seniors
who have attended school for
13 years, have the required
amount of credits and most of
all the grade point average to
graduate and get this . .. one of
the seniors I know received a
scholarship to attend college,
but a handful of seniors who
have met the requirements will
not have the privilege to walk
across the stage with their fel-
low classmates.
Why would this be? It's not
because of a state or federal
law. It is because our school
superintendent and our school
board members are choosing
not to change a policy.
Their written policy is a child
will not be able to walk with
their fellow senior classmates
unless they have passed the
FCAT test,while our surround-
ing counties allow their stu-
dents to walk proudly with their
classmates.
Two of our neighboring
counties have invited these stu-
dents to walk with their seniors
as they agree these children
have earned their right to walk.
What a honor and pleasure it is
to know that these counties are
welcoming our seniors to walk
with theirs and what a "shame"
it is to our county that the mem-
bers of our school board and
superintendent will not take
into consideration the feelings


and well being of our children,
during one of the most impor-
tant moments of their lives.
To my knowledge this issue
came up with the graduating
class of 2005 and the school
board at that time allowed these
children to walk. I wonder
whose child it was that year,
kind of makes you wonder
doesn't it. These kids are not
asking for a handout . . . they
just want the respect to walk
with their heads held high and
receive a certificate of comple-
tion and have the opportunity to
retake the FCAT test again in
June.
Let this be a wake up call to
our community that it can hap-
pen to any one of our children.
To base our children's future on
one test can simply ruin a child
who has earned the right to
walk with his/her classmates.
I personally do not have a
child who has been affected by
this policy for this graduating
class but I do have two children
one of which chose to attend
one of our neighboring schools
last year and one that is still in
our school system this year and
hoping that he and others will
not want to attend another
school district for a number of
reasons, one being that they-
have earned the right just like
the others to walk but have had
that privilege taken away.
Laura McClellan
Parent
Wauchula


BENEFITS OF A SMALL TOWN BANK
Before I graduated from the University of Florida in 1964, one
of my animal sciences classes invited a professional credit repre-
sentative to discuss credit for farming. I remember his stressing
how important the individual was in banking, and he didn't put as
much emphasis on assets. I believe, with time, history, and chang-
ihg economies, the individual is probably now considered less
important in banking than assets.
Here in Wauchula we still have banking where we deal with an
individual, specifically Bill Crews, who studies the problem and
looks for creative solutions.
Over the years, this creates a sense of extreme loyalty to the
banking institution - sometimes for two or three generations. We
have such a institution, namely, Wauchula State Bank. My Daddy
got the money to plant our first orange grove there. I am 67 years
old and when I went to vet school I borrowed money to finish my,
education. I have been banking with Wauchula State Bank ever
since.
About 20 years ago I was in a legal entanglement that required
the use of an attorney, and, in that particular situation, he had to be
a really good attorney. I went to see the one I chose at his enormous
Annabella home, near the waterfront in downtown Sarasota. We
started discussing the problem, and I told him there was one issue
that concerned me. The issue was that my bank be taken care of in
this situation. I wanted to create as few problems for them as pos-
sible.
The man was a little Cajun lawyer from Louisiana, who had
graduated from Ole Miss Law School, and he absolutely bolted out
of his chair, screaming at me. He got a little red in the face and
asked (in a voice I thought the neighbors could surely, hear). "You
mean, with the issues you have to deal with - and you're are wor-
ried about a bank?"
After he calmed down a little bit, he told me that another client
had come to see him that same week and told him exactly the same
thing about HIS bank. Then he paused and asked, "Where do you
bank?" I said "Wauchula State Bank." He was immediately in his
screaming mode again, "You know that other blankity, blank, blank
son of a gun, banks there too. He said "I got to go over there and
meet those people. I've never heard anything like this in my life!"
The other client was Rufus Shackelford.
After the screaming subsided he finally conceded that, if there
was a bank that dealt with people and developed that kind of loy-
alty, it was probably appropriate to be concerned about my ongo-
ing relationship with them and to protect them at all cost.
I had an orange grove back then, and I remember Bill explain-
ing about grove owners who borrow money. He was philosophical
about it and explained there were some who had the assets and
would pay. Then there were the people who might be in trouble, but
they would figure out a way to pay a loan and he worked with
them. I fell into that category and did pay off my loan. The third
type, Bill said, usually resulted in his owning another grove before
it was all over.
I suspect most small town banks that are successful manage
people and assets well.




Rise & Shine

By Ted Simonson

HOW THE CHURCH GROWS
Attention, all readers who are pastors, deacons, elders, admin-
istrators, Sunday School teachers and anyone else worried about
church growth! Good news: The church grows "all by itself," with-
out human effort provided by you and me!
Jesus spelled this out in his parable of the sower in Mark 4.
Man can sow the seed, He explained, and come along later to har-
vest. But, in between, that seed grows and matures "all by itself"
because of how the Lord has made it.
Most church growth programs are elaborate plans to pack the
pews. However, they are seldom effective because they are gener-
ated by human effort.
What we should be doing is making sure the seed we plant is
truly the Word of God, then praying the Lord will send us enough
workers to bring in the harvest.
It's simple, isn't it?
Mysteries usually are. We don't need a degree in psychology.
We don't need to browbeat our neighbors into attending our
church. We don't even need to figure it out.
We simply need to trust the Lord.


HHS 'Dress For Success' Attire Plan


A student's dress and appearance should not cause disruption, distract from the educational process, or create a health
or safety concern for themselves or others. Faculty, parents, and students alike feel that students should take pride in
their grooming and general appearance by selecting appropriate dress for school.

Clothing which affords modesty and good taste in pursuit of learning is encouraged. Students' dress and appearance
should fall within the limits of cleanliness, good grooming, and proper taste. Several items of clothing currently in
fashion have their place in the area of recreation, but are out of place in the classroom.

THE REQUIRED SCHOOL ATTIRE FOR ALL STUDENTS AT HARDEE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL


DURING THE 2008-2009 SCHOOL YEAR WILL BE AS FOLLOWS:


Shirt Requirements:

1. Shirts may be worn out over the waistline or tucked in. Shirt size shall not be more than "1" size larger or
smaller than the student's measured size.

2. The following shirts are the only allowable shirts to be worn by Students at Hardee Senior High School:

a. Hardee Senior High spirit t-shirts (short- or long-sleeved) and any solid colored plain t-shirts. No
other writing on t-shirts will be allowed. V-neck t-shirts and "Tall" tees are not allowed.

b. Hardee Senior High athletic or club t-shirts

c. Polo shirts (sleeveless, short- or long-sleeved maximum of 4 buttons) in any color. Fourth button
must be fastened. Girls may wear polo shirts with cap sleeves. Polo shirts may have designer
logos, or emblems (Hilfiger, Ralph Lauren, Nautica etc).

d. Button-up dress shirts are allowed with no more than the top 2 buttons unbuttoned. The 2 inch
rule from # 4 below regarding dresses will apply.

Pants/Shorts/Skirt Requirements:

1. Pants must be fastened and worn at the natural waistline for boys and at the hips for girls. Pants, shorts,
skirts, and skorts waist size shall not be more than "1" size larger than the student's measured size. Pants,
slacks, and shorts cannot be baggy/oversize fit. They should be no longer in length than the heels of the
shoes.

2. Skirts, shorts, and skorts shall be no shorter than two inches above the knee, with no slits.

3. Pants, shorts, skorts, and skirts must be free from rips and tears. Pajama bottoms of any kind cannot be
worn to school.

4. Dresses may be worn but must adhere to shirt/skirt and top requirements. Necklines of dresses must be no
lower than two inches from the inner aspect of the collar bone (below the neck). V-Neck, spaghetti,
strapless or tank top dresses are prohibited.

Other "Dress for Success" Requirements:

1. Shoes shall be worn at all times.

2. Students should not wear any clothing, jewelry, buttons, or any other items with words, phrases, symbols,
pictures, patches or graphics which use indecent, swear, or suggestive words or are drug/alcohol or gang
related.

3. Sunglasses, hats, caps or other head coverings are not to be worn in the buildings. Hats must be school
related (HHS or college) or plain without graphics or text.

4.Extremes in dress or grooming that cause undue attention or cause disruptive influences are not allowed.
Body/facial piercing (other than ears) are other examples of extreme dress and grooming and are not allowed.

5. Students must wear their ID card on the front of the body above the waist at ALL times during school
hours.

6. Undergarments are not to be shown.

THE FOLLOWING ARE NOT ALLOWED AT SCHOOL:

* Bandanas of any color or style, visors, shower caps
* Tank tops
* Hair rollers
* Hoodies
* Chain wallets, dog collars, spiked wrist bands, or neck bands
* Unbuckled belts, overalls, or suspenders
* Sweatpants (or other pants\with words screen-printed, sewn, or embroidered on the seat of the pants
* Pajamas or sleepwear
* Leggings of any kind are not allowed
* Bicycling, stretch or spandex pants or shorts
* Excessively short or tight clothing
* Bedroom slippers, heelys or skate shoes
* Bare feet
* Gang related items of any kind

We ask the cooperation of parents with our "Dress for Success" attire plan. It is our desire to create an environment
that will serve the best interests of all students at the school.

Beginning with the first day of the school year, every student will be expected to comply with the HHS "Dress for
Success" attire plan. No exceptions to the plan will be made for any student except for religious reasons. The parent
must file a formal written request for exemption with the principal and provide documentation to support the request
for exemption for religious reasons. Students entering later in the school year will have a one-week grace period for
purchasing "Dress for Success" attire.

If necessary, disciplinary action will be taken to encourage compliance with the "Dress for Success" attire plan.
Hardee Senior High will strive to achieve full compliance. We will resort to disciplinary action only when positive
measures fail to ensure compliance. Prior to initiating any disciplinary action against a student, parents will be
contacted to solicit their cooperation and support of the "Dress for Success" attire plan. Disciplinary action will be
initiated only after all means to secure support and cooperation have not succeeded. A progressive discipline
approach, as indicated by the district and school comprehensive discipline plans, will be employed to encourage
consistent compliance with the "Dress for Success" attire plan.

NOTE: The administration reserves the right to determine what inappropriate dress is. Students who are
inappropriately dressed for school must change into appropriate clothing. Parent/guardian may be called and asked to
bring to school appropriate clothing or take the student home to change. Time missed from class to get appropriate
clothing will be unexcused.


m






May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 9A


HEALTHY COOKING


Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to
be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman.
-Louis D. Brandeis









G = -= _Fort Meade, Florida
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REENWOO o63N tA. 1863) 773-2530
Fort Meade,. Florida (863) 285-8131
205 N. Charleston Ave. * Fort Meade (8 285-
Visit our website at: www.dlrectchevy.com

OVE 25 E5HER LT ALL N AL


PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA KRAHi.
About a dozen people
turned out recently for a
healthy-cooking class
featuring registered diet-
ician Roberta Brocker.
During the session,
Brocker prepared health-
ful recipes for salmon,
pizza and pasta. Then,
everyone shared in sam-
pling the results. The de-
monstrations are spon-
sored by the Hardee
County Health Depart-
ment, and are held over
the lunch hour at the
County Extension Office.
Another session, featur-
ing summer grilling
ideas, is set for Thursday,
June 5. Cost is $6. Here,
extension agent Carolyn
Wyatt and Brocker (top
photo, from left) work on
a recipe, Wyatt displays
the results (middle), and
then everyone digs in for
a healthy lunch (bottom).
Call 773-4161, extension
157, to register for the
next session.


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Braves Sweep Dixie Boys


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Florida Fertilizer Braves
dominated the 2008 Dixie
Boys.
Earning the top spot in the
three-team division of 13-to-15-
year-olds, the Braves went
undefeated in intrasquad
games. We don't have record of
the games played against Fort
Meade, Bartow, Sebring or
Mulberry.
The BJD Excavating Red Sox
and Torrey Oaks Rangers tied.
The teams prepare now for
the All-Tournament which
'begins the week of July 21 in
Fort Meade.
The Braves won all three
games in the final week of play,
starting with the May 19 win
over the Rangers 18-5.
Vince Grimsley and Wintz
Terrell each banged triples and
Justin Knight, Dylan Farr and
John Chason each hit a double.
Dawson Crawford, Grimsley,
Terrell and Farr came around to
score three times apiece and
Knight added twin tallies.
Others scoring for the Braves
were Sid Crews, Justin
Forrester, Dalton Rabon and
Carter Lambert. Chason and
Tyler Cloud didn't make it
home.
f For the Rangers, Deonte
Evans circled the bases twice,
and Will Bennett, Matthew
Grace and Tim Steedley added
solo scores. Others chipping in
were Dalton Hewett, Tanner
Gough, Steve Hodges, Michael


Grace, Justin Dickey, Tyler
Dyal and Jeremy Rowe.
The Braves beat the Red Sox
on Thursday 14-8.
Lambert doubled twice and
Grimsley and Farr also doubled
for the Braves. Terrell and
Lambert were the only three-
score batters. Crawford and
Rabon added twin scores and
Grimsley, Farr, Cloud and
Crews each added a run.
Leadoff batter Jacob Altman
was the only three-hit batter for
the Red Sox. He and Campbel
Aubry eac scored twice and
Daniel Miller, Ramiro Briones,
Julian Rodriguez and Dustin
Scheel crossed home plate once
each. Murrell Winter, Julian
Varela, Derick Sambrano, K.C.
Bryant, Justin Rickett and
Garrett Mimbs added to the
action.
In the season finale on Friday,
the Braves went wild in beating
the Rangers 26-8.
Grimsley homered among his
three hits and Knight doubled
among his four hits. He and
Lambert each scored four runs,
while Grimsley, Crawford,
Terrell and Farr added three
apiece. Rabon also doubled. He
and Forrester each scored twice
and Crews, Chason and Cloud
each had a run.
For the Rangers, a Rowe dou-
ble was the only long-ball hit.
He and Michael Grace put twin
tallies on the board while
Hewett, Evans, Matthew Grace
and Dyal each added a run.


The New York Times published its first movie review in 1909.
It was a report on D. W. Griffith's "Pippa Passes," a film adap-
tation of the Robert Browning poem.


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The Herald-Advocate, 2008


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May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 11A


Signed Penny
By Penny Johnson
Q&A WithA Biblical Perspective


FEAR OF THE ECONOMY
Q: It seems like the economy is getting worse and worse.
Prices keep rising, making it hard to make ends meet. I feel a
surge of fear sweep over me at times. Should we worry about
the rising economy?
Signed, Worried
A: No! We shouldn't worry.
The Bible teaches us to trust the Lord and know that He is able
to take care of us. I know it's easy for us to become afraid when we
look around and see impossible situations, but we must stay stead-
fast in our faith.
The Bible speaks of the last day, and how there will be perilous
times. As hard as we may try to change things, all this is just a ful-
filling of Bible prophesy. Although the news is showing us disas-
ters, famines and shortages, we must be of good cheer and trust that
God is still in control.
We have all felt the crunch from the rising gas prices and out-
rageous cost of groceries, but this means we have to pull together,
use wisdom and conserve more than ever.
God has blessed America so greatly that I think we have
become accustomed to being spoiled. But, now we must learn to


Letter To The Editor
3 Issues Of Phosphate
Mining Are Not Resolved


Dear Editor:
The hidden costs of phos-
phate mining ...
As the date approaches for
our local government, Hardee
County Planning and Zoning
Board and Board of County
Commissioners, to decide on
the permit for the S. Ft. Meade
phosphate mine extension, I
would like to summarize certain
outstanding issues which have
not been properly resolved and
will require further considera-
tion before deciding.
1.) Reclamation: Mosaic is
presently under advisement by
our county commission for its
failure to adhere to its reclama-
tion obligations for existing
mines. In fact Mosaic has
applied to the DEP for an addi-
tional ten years to reclaim 300
acres of mined land in Polk
County.
Mosaic's request for an addi-
tional ten years states that the
necessary sand to finish recla-
mation has not been generated
and that Mosaic is "currently
not in a position to commit" to
generating the necessary sand
to fulfill their reclamation.
Does this default not raise a
red .flag concerning Mosaic's
commitment and ability to ful-
fill their reclamation obliga-
tions as described in previous
permits? There is no assurance
that similar "variances" are not
in store for the S. Ft. Meade
Mine and others?
2.) Economy: In support of
their application to open the S.
Ft. Meade Mine extension in
Hardee County Mosaic has sub-
mitted an economic analysis
that"considered only economic
impacts of the mine, and did not
take into account other impacts
that might be important in the
public decision making process,
such as environmental impacts,
impacts on transportation or
other infrastructure during min-
ing, fiscal impacts (taxes), etc."
Their report does not consid-
er the loss of agricultural jobs
due to the permanent loss of the
land's agricultural potential and
taxes associated with the exist-
ing agricultural economy. Nor


does it consider the potential
loss of income in the county
when recreation resources such
as the Peace River and Payne's
Creek Historical Park are fur-
ther compromised.
Previous economic analyses
(Hazen and Sawyer 2003) pre-
dicting negative effects of phos-
phate mining on our local econ-
omy cannot be overlooked and
ignored.
3.) Water Resources: There
has not been an adequate
assessment of the effects of
ground water withdrawals on
the existing economy of Hardee
County. All of the county's agri-
cultural operations require irri-
gation. All future residential
development will require ade-
quate water supplies for drink-
ing water.
The only way to determine
the far-reaching and long-last-
ing impacts of strip mining
(mine pits, dewatering of the
aquifer, and loss of surface
recharge) on the local water
table is through the impartial
and thorough scientific analysis
of the US Geological Survey
working with the county to pre-
dict these effects.
Phosphate fertilizer is in a
boom cycle due to the produc-
tion of corn for ethanol -
Mosaic's profits are hovering at
about $500 million per quarter.
Mosaic is now in a great hurry
to get more land approved for
mining so they can perpetuate
this windfall. Hopefully our
local leaders will have the wis-
dom and insight necessary to
see past this temporary spike.
Hardee County provides the
phosphate resources that fuel
Mosaic's profits. We will also
bear the permanent loss of our
high-quality agricultural land,
our water resources, our wet-
lands, our recreational re-
sources, and become the recipi-
ent of their clay wastes and
inadequate reclamation long
after the mine has come and
gone.
Dennis Mader
President, 3PR
Lily


spend wisely. This is going to take some discipline.
God promises to take care of our needs. The Bible is full of
stories where He did miracles for His children. He is a caring
Father who loves us.
I once heard Joyce Meyer say that you don't see a bird sitting
on a fence post flapping its wings in fear. It knows that its Creator
will provide what it needs for the day. It continues to sing, fly and
enjoy life with no worries or anxiety.
We can learn a lot from watching how God's creatures trust in
His provision.
The Word says don't worry about anything, but pray about
everything. If we keep our mind set on Jesus, then peace will rule
our hearts. Look at how big God is and not how big the problems
are. This is a test of our faith, to see if we trust Him when we are
down to nothing. It's easy to have faith when everything is going
well, but true faith in God is when we have to trust Him in spite of
our circumstances.
There is a song about trusting God in the storm. This song was


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked
S in the top 10 in customer satisfaction in
Florida I have received Ford's highest
Sales Honor 15 years running and been a
S member of Ford's 300/500 Club for 20
Years. Thanks again and stop by soon.
il 0STEDEM . Ft. Meade
2 TEDE l 80375-2606
,2 14tc v800-226-3325


Outde
Faelows


written after a few people witnessed a lady trusting God in spite of
her storm. She had just received a bad diagnosis about her daugh-
ter. While standing in the hospital, she laid her Bible down on the'
floor and danced around it praising God.
Instead of fear and doubt, let faith and praise take its place.
Signed, Penny
Your questions or comments can be sent to signedpenny@-
yahoo.com or P.O. Box 2604, Wauchula, FL 33873. You can also
visit Penny Johnson's Web site at www.pennyjohnson.net or watch
Sher shows at www.myhwntv.com


Sam Albritton
Electrical Services, Inc.
863-767-0313 Office
863-781-0377 Mobile
SResidential and Commercial Wiring
-Electrical Inspections
*Electrical Preventative Maintenance
-Ground Testing
-Lightning Arrestor


Serving Hardee County Since 1994
.,* ?* H _tVISA I EC13002737
1:31 tfc


irae e
ior

lip


First Baptist Church, Bowling Green, FL

Co-Sponsored by Struttn Ruttn NReeln, Zolfo Springs, FL



ARCHERY TOURNAMENT


Amateurs Only - No Target Bows - Field Tips Only





June 7, 2008 at 8:00 a.m.




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(US Hwy 17 between Bowling Green & Ft. Meade)
'I


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To register or for more information call First Baptist Church at

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,* IBO Hunter Rules


NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURSING
IN RE: The license to practice nursing of
Kimberly M. Tyson, C.N.A.
1200 Mockingbird Road
Wauchiila, Florida 33873
CASE NO.: 2007-01890
LICENSE NO.: C.N.A. 107586
The Department of Health has filed an Administrative
Complaint against you, a copy of which may be
obtained by contacting, Megan M. Blancho, Assistant
General Counsel, Prosecution Services Unit, 4052
Bald Cypress Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee Florida
32399-3265, (850) 245-4640.
If no contact has been made by you concerning the
above by July 3, 2008, the matter of the
Administrative Complaint will be presented at an
.ensuing meeting of the Board of Nursing in informal
proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact the
individual or agency sending this notice not later than
seven days prior to the proceeding at the address
given on the notice. Telephone: (850) 245-4640,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770(V), via
Florida Relay Service. 5:29, 6:5, 12, 19c


I I




12A The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


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Your Local Dealer Will Not Be Undersold!
Put Us To The Test!


mIW
113L^,- *


i..,
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Teresa Bryant Simmons
Service Manager


Welcome Back, Teresa!
Teresa ia a Hardee County native with seven years experience in the
service department. Our customers will be glad to know she is back at
this location ready to serve them.


Elizabeth Harris
General Manager
Hardee County resident for
17 years


I have Alan Jay's 8 dealers hips of" I
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PAGE ONE


SPRING FOOTBALL ROSTER


1. Kelsheem White
2. Antjuan Jones
3. Charlie Powell
4. Michael McTaw
5. Carson Davis
6. Jake Mayer
7. Jarrius Lindsey
8. Conner Davis
9. Postene Louisjeune
0. Nolan Neuhauser
1. Ezayi Youyoute
2. Scott Donaldson
3. Lincoln Saunders
4. Brek McClenithan
5. Tyler Alden
6. Jose Fernandez
7. Sofio Arroyo


19. Andrew Hunt
20. Soloman Maldonado
21. Phillip Barton
24. Devante Carter
25. Damien Richards
27. Tony Valdez
28. Jake Nowakowski
34. Tre' Anderson
42. Lance Mason
44. David Newcomb


JR
JR
SR
SR
JR
SO
SO
JR
SR
SR
JR
SO
SO
SR
JR
SO
SR
SO
SO
SO
SR
JR
JR
JR
SO
SR
SR


50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
57.
58.
60.
61.
63.
64.
65.
66.
68.
70.
72.
73.
77.
78.
80.
81.
82.
83.
.88.
89.
90.


Skylar Alden
Alex Lanier
Valentine Rosales
Jimmy Villegas
Logan Thomas
Kevin Godwin
Eric Martin
Cody Hernandez
Derrick Simpson
Devon Harris
Jesus Villegas
Dalton Farr
Jonathan Kelly
Brett Tyson
Nick Battles
Jordan Baker
Carlos Ramirez
Reggie Snell
Mary Braddock
Jake Grice
Martin Vega
Brandon Darley
Nathan Tomlinson
Caleb MeVey
Josh Gordon
Michael Forrester
Terrance Medlock


Highlanders Visit


Hardee Tomorrow
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate 2008-2009 Cheerleaders
Spring Classic football is
tomorrow (Friday) at Wildcat VARSITY .IV
Stadium. Brittany Abbott Brianna Albr,
The Lake Wales Highlanders ittny A tanna Al
bring their spring show to Sidney Autry Savannah Al
Wauchula to face the Wildcats Paige Clark Smokee Bark
at 7 p.m. Valerie Cobb Taylor Bolin
It may begin with a junior McKenna Crawford Courtney Buc
varsity matchup, as the Lake S D D
Wales coach prefers, or the var- Shelby Durrance Dana Dougla
sities challenging one another, Chelsea Harris Veronica Hal
and the JVs meeting.in the third Kayla Helveston Melissa Hartl
quarter, as Hardee head coach Bailey Knight McKenna He,
Tim Price prefers.
The spring game will further Lindsey Moon Jennifer Ligo
cement the new Wildcat offense Kimberly Perry Lindsey Mart,
in preparation for the fall sea- Courtney Peterson Cierra Martin
son. Hardee remains in Class Christine Skitka Danielle Nich
3A-12, along with Avon Park,
Braden River, DeSoto and Courtney Skitka Taylor Pohl
Sebring,' schools with an upper Jalyn Smith Amanda Rign
class population of 1067 Bailee Williams Chelsea Walla
through 1707.
Hardee varsity coaches Price,
Steve Rewis, John Sharp, week's game. He planned to girl to go out for ft
Gregg Mann and Buddy have Postene Louisjeune and long time, will be a
Martin, along with JV coaches Nolan Neuhauser battle it out or defensive lineman
Rod Smith, Barry White, Chris for a free safety spot. Either After the game,
Spencer and Andy Judah, have Louisjeune will return to his "We saw some br
had a couple of weeks and last defensive end position or some surprise g
Friday's Orange-Blue outing to Neuhauser will go back to out- We're a little more c
get a good look at their troops. side linebacker. than we thought w
"We started with a little over Antjuan Jones moved to out- that may be becau,
60 and are down to about 55. side linebacker and Tyler Alden them up and a lot o
We expect to get a good look went to inside linebacker. New playing both ways.
and see players on both sides of tryout Mary Braddock, current- "The defense play
the ball," said Price before last ly a sophomore, and the first See HIGHLANDER


itton
britton
er

:kley
s

'ey
lein
gn
in
iez
lolson

ney
ace

football in a
it offensive
i.
Price said
ight spots,
,oou ones.
out of shape
e'd be but
se we split
f kids were

'ed well as a
RS 4B


Cherry KOs Johnston


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula pro Edner Cherry
again made his local fans proud.
Improving to 24-5-2, Cherry
knocked former lightweight
champion Stevie Johnston
down twice and decked him
with 26 seconds left in the fight
for his 13th career knockout.
The May 21 main event was
one of three bouts shown on
ESPN2. Delayed an hour by the
world soccer championships,
the bouts were telecast live
from Geche Field House at
Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville,
N.C.
All three bouts involved for-
mer champions. In the first
bout, 38-year-old former feath-
erweight champ Freddie Nor-
wood brought a 42-2-1, 23-KO
record against 28-year-old jour-
neyman Johnnie Edwards with
only 14 wins, 2 losses and a
draw with 8 KOs. Edwards
knocked out his opponent in the
seventh round of a scheduled
eight-rounder.
In the second bout of the
evening, "King" Arthur Will-
iams (43-15-1) won a six-round
decision over Clarence Moore,
whose record of 5-3-1 was pal-
try against the taller (6-2) for-
mer IBF cruiserweight champ.
The 43-year-old champion won
every round against the 33-
year-old challenger.
Finally, it was time (after 11
p.m.) for the main event, pitting
the 5-8 Cherry against the 5-5
Johnston, former lightweight
champion from Denver, Colo.
In pre-fight hype, Johnston,
who had lost his last three bouts
and taken 100 stitches in the
face after a 2003 motorcycle
accident, said he intended "to
give Cherry a boxing lesson. I
didn't train hard for those last
two fights, but I've trained hard
and am in good shape for this
one."
Cherry said the fight "should


open doors for me. It could be
the biggest fight of my career. I
learned in the fight (against
Paulie Malignaggi, a 2007 deci-
sion loss) that I can't wait and
wait. I have to go for it from the
opening bell."
So, it was "The Cherry
Bomb" vs. Lil' But Bad."
Cherry opened the fight
aggressively working his lefty
jab and keeping Johnston on the
defensive. It was probably an
even round as both boxers had
some strong moments in the
feeling out stage.
The second round was simi-
lar, with Cherry getting a bit
more aggressive, nailing John-
ston with a lead right a couple
of times. However, it was in the
third round that the toll began to
tell on the 35-year-old former
champ, when the 25-year-old
up-and-coming Cherry caught
Johnston with a right hand at
the 2-minute mark. Cherry
trapped Johnston on the ropes
for some body work late in the
round.
From then on Cherry was in
control, pursuing Johnston
around the ring. He suffered a
cut in the corner above his right
eye. Cherry slipped punches,
making Johnston miss and
countering with good body
shots.
Commentator Teddy Atlas
had it a 40-35 after the fourth
with Cherry getting a 10-8
round in the third when he
dropped Johnston. In the fifth,
Cherry fought more long-range,
moving in quickly to land his
shots and back out to avoid a
counterpunch.
It was a near knock-down in
the sixth, after which Cherry
kept moving around, making
Johnston use up energy chasing
him. He countered with his sig-
nature big right hand a couple
of times, tottering Johnston. He
teetered Johnston again in the
sixth, seventh and eighth, as


- .-- . -- . 5:29c


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, May 29,2008


THE BIG BOAT RIDE



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Johnston's tired legs refused to
get out of the way.
It was another knockdown in
the ninth round. Cherry used his
reach advantage to land his
shots. The referee cautioned the
fighters against "wrestling," as
there was frequent clutches.
With lest than a minute left,
Cherry launched a barrage that
ended when Johnston hit the
canvas. He got up a bit woozy
and kept backpedaling to stay
alive until the bell.
Cherry was in complete con-
trol and changed strategy a bit
in the final round. Johnston was
obviously weary ,taking small-
er steps and trying to reach
Cherry, who was dancing
around, circling and looking for
the advantage. It came at the
2:34 mark, when he masked a
hard left jab and followed it
with his "Cherry Bomb" right
that Johnston never saw com-
ing.
Johnston hit the canvas hard
with the back of his head, caus-
ing doctors to respond immedi-
ately, keeping him immobile for
a few moments before getting
him up on a stool. "He's been a
terrific champion, but it's time
for him to stop," commented
ringside announcer Joe Tessi-
tore, even as Johnston was
speaking and receptive.
Cherry had hit on a good 31
percent of his 600 shots, and
looks forward to getting more
challenges en route to a cham-
pionship bout within the year.
Help at the Marine base with
some of the evening's success
going to benefit wounded ser-
vicemen, Cherry, his trainer
Peter Fernandez and Starfight
Productions were all supportive
of the endeavor.
"I want to thank all the mili-
tary men and women who put
their lives on the line for our
freedoms every day," said the
exuberant Cherry, a bit sobered
by the surrounding servicemen.








2B The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008





-Hardee


Jennifer Lynn Hensley has
announced the wedding plans
for her upcoming marriage to
Ralton Veach Albritton III.
The bride-to-be is the daugh-
ter of Danny and Yvonne Hens-
ley of Wauchula. The prospec-
tive groom is the son of Ralton
Jr. and Leslie Albritton of
Wauchula.
The couple will exchange
vows on Saturday, June 7, at


QUILT WINNER


COURTESY PHOTO
Mrs. Michael Hall II
Whitney Hoskins Weds

Michael Hall II


Living


Valerie Shayman Graduates

Summa Cum Laude


Florida's First Assembly of God
church in Wauchula. Music
begins at 3 o'clock in the after-
noon, with the ceremony com-
mencing at 3:30.
Following the ceremony, a
wedding reception will be held
at Camp Wilderness in Fort
Meade.
Friends and relatives of the
couple are invited.


Hensley/Albritton

Wedding Plans


Valerie Shayman, Hardee
High school Class of 2004,
graduated from the University
of North Florida in Jacksonville
on May 2 with a bachelor's
degree in communications on
the electronic media track and
with minors in education and
sociology. She graduated from
the university honors college
and summa cum laude by
attaining a 3.82 grade-point
average on a 4.0 scale in her
studies and by being named to
the dean's list all eight semes-
ters in attendance.
Among her activities while a
student were honors college
class facilitator, resident assis-
tant in the residence life depart-
ment, writing tutor in the acad-
emic center for excellence,
community ambassador for
Melrose Student Suites,
American Cancer Society Relay
for Life team captain, reading
tutor and mentor at Woodland
Acres Elementary School in
Jacksonville and volunteer with
The Sanctuary, which is an
after-school program for inner
city at-risk youth.
Shayman completed an edu-
cational internship at the J.
Allen Axson Montessori
Academy in Jacksonville, as a
marketing and public relations
intern for Melrose Student
Suites, and a summer internship
in housing and residence life for
the Association of College and
University Housing Officers at
Belmont University in Nash-
ville, Tenn.
Currently, she is working as


Shayman of
Shaman -of


Shayman


and Linda
Wauchula.


Whitney Laine Hoskins be-
came the bride of Michael
Shane Hall II on April 26 at
Bes-semer City Church of God
in Bessemer City, N.C.
The couple were united in a
small, private candlelight cere-
mony.
The bride wore a simple sum-
mer wedding gown, and carried
a bouquet of yellow tulips.
The bride's sister, Brittney
Hoskins, served as maid of
honor. She wore a dress of blue
and white and carried a single
yellow tulip.
The groom wore a black
tuxedo and his brother, Chris
Hall, served as best man.
Dillon Hall, the groom's baby
brother, served as the ring bear-
er.


The bride was given away by
her mother, Mary Jo Callahan.
The couple are employed at
Tube Enterprises and are
enrolled in Cleveland College,
where they.are both pursuing
careers in the medical field.
Both are graduates of Kings
Mountain High School.
The bride is a former resident
of Hardee County, where she
attended school for 11 years.
She is the daughter of Reginald
and Mary Jo Callahan of
Hudson, N.C., and Scott and
Angel Lang of Wauchula.
The groom is the son of
Michael Shane Sr. and Lori
McDaniel Hall of Kings
Mountain, N.C.
The couple reside in Kings
Mountain.


'The brute necessity of believing something so long as life lasts
does not justify any belief in particular.
-George Santayana



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3365 U.S. Hwy 17
Foods * Crafts * Clothing
Household goods and more
To Make Donations Call 375-4032 or 735-8020


COURTESY PHOTO
Jackie Weeks shows the antique quilt she won at Easter
in a raffle to benefit the 4-H Clubs' "Back to asics" pro-
gram. Sponsoring the fund-raiser was the Harde County
Family And Home Community Educators group' Another
quilt will be raffled off on July 4. Tickets are available
from FAHCE members or from advisor Carolyn Wyatt at
the County Extension Office in Wauchula.




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Dr. Mark D. Sevigny, O.D:
Dr. C.N. Timmerman, O.D.
Dr. Ronald 0. Sevigny, O.D.
Dr. David M. Loewy, M.D.

Board Certified Optometric Physicians

735 North 6th Ave,
Wauchula, FL
(863) 773-3322
soc5:29c


the assistant director of resident
and community relations at
Melrose Student Suites in
Jacksonville.
Shayman will be pursuing
her master's degree in higher-
education administration at
Virginia Tech University in
Blacksburg, Va., beginning July
1, where she was selected for a
graduate assistant position as
director of first-year programs.
This position includes responsi-
bility for the 4,000 first-year
students residing on campus,
conducting research for the
educational administration and
psychology department and
teaching freshman seminar
classes. This assistantship
includes all tuition, fees, off-
campus housing and a monthly
stipend for the two-year mas-
ter's program.
She is the daughter of Bob






May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Children Perform 'Rock Solid'


TV METEOROLOGIST


The Heartland Chorale Child-
ren's Chorus will present the
musical drama,
"Rock Solid" on Sunday,
June 8, at 3 p.m.
Tickets are available at Cat's
on Main or at the door for the
performance at Hardee Senior
High School auditorium. Tick-
ets are $6 for adults, $3 for chil-
dren and under 5-years-old free.
The Heartland Chorale staff
invites everyone to attend this
event and to support "our very
talented young musicians," in
featured music, drama and
choreography.


The directors are Sherry Mill-
er, Kay Paris, Brenda Knight,
Stephanie Benton, Tanya Dub-
berly, Erica Eisenhauer and
Susan Robertson.
The newly formed group
traveled to Lakeland Civic
Center on April 13 to hear
Imperial Symphony Orchestra's
"Cookie Concert."
The 30 children, from grades
2 though 6, were privileged to
hear 80 instrumentalists as they
presented a variety of music by
Richard Strauss, Gustav Hoist
and John Williams.
An informative demonstra-


tion of all the instruments was
also presented by Maestro Mark
Thielen and symphony mem-
bers.
There was pre-concert enter-
tainment by bass trombonists
Vic Larsen and his "Junkyard
Band," a very popular perfor-
mance. The children enjoyed
participating with Larsen, who
was dressed as a colorful clown.
They*played homemade drums
of all sizes, strings, horns, pans
and other instruments while the
audience sang along to familiar
tunes.


- - - rmr Fs -- -.T ~


r .:rL�~


COURTESY PHOTOS
A large group of junior musicians and their directors went to Lakeland to hear the
Imperial Symphony.


31


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Fox 13 meteorologist Andy Johnson spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday
of last week at the Java Cafe in Wauchula. He said climate is cyclical, hurricanes have
not changed, society has changed, and a law passed in 2006 allows for a $5,000
matching grant for hurricane retrofitting of Florida homes. Johnson said only three
Category 5 hurricanes have hit the United States: an unnamed hurricane on Labor Day
1935, Florida Keys; Camille, 1969, Mississippi; and Andrew, 1992, South Florida. Major
hurricanes to hit Hardee included Donna in 1960 and Charley in 2004. No major hurri-
canes hit Florida in the 1970s and 1980s. The main threat to human safety from hurri-
canes is the storm surge along coastal areas. The hurricane season begins on June 1.
Johnson, who trained under Roy Leep, says to have a plan in case of a hurricane.
Shown (from left) are Juan Delatorre, Johnson, Gina NeuhOfer and Frankie Vasquez,
who won a Fox 13 umbrella.


Local Marine Honored


Company A, 1st Battalion at'
Parris Island, South Carolina,
Gutierrez earned the prestigious
Iron Man Award in the PFC
training. Upon graduation from
boot camp he was meritoriously
promoted to Private First Class.
Reassigned to the School of
Infantry East at Camp Geiger,
he graduated again with honors
and was promoted to Lance
Corporal.
Reporting to the 3rd Battal-
ion, he was deployed to Iraq in
August 2005 and again in
January 2007.
He was named non-commis-
sioned officer (NCO) of the
quarter for 2nd Marine Division
and went on to be named NCO


of the year. In August 2007, he
was promoted to Sergeant.
He plans to leave active duty
in August and begin his college
career at Valencia Community
College before going on to a
four-year college, earning an
accounting degree. His career
goal is to be a stock broker. He
feels his strengths in attention
to detail and overachieving will
help will obtain this goal.
In his promotion, he was
noted for "setting the example
for his peers to emulate, contin-
uing to display great leadership
and mentoring to younger
Marines, and exceeding all the
expectations required of a non-
commissioned officer.


Sgt. Rodriguez Gutierrez
recently received top honors as
the March Service Member of
the Month for the U.S. Marines.
He is the son of Manuel and
Maria Gutierrez of Bowling
Green. He is married to his
childhood sweetheart Patricia,
with whom he has three chil-
dren Maria, 5, Rodrigo Jr., 3
and Ryan 2.
The sergeant was born March
13, 1984 and joined the Marines
after his May, 2004 high school
graduation. He said he liked the
Marine uniforms and his per-
ception of the discipline, broth-
erhood and drill, and especially
because of 9/11.
During basic training with


performed in the colorful 'Junkyard Band."


Stephanie Basey
Bogaert Earns
Master's Degree
Stephanie Basey Bogaert,
formerly of Wauchula, graduat-
ed with honors on Saturday,
May 10, from the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte.
A member of the honor soci-
ety of Phi Kappa Phi and of the
National Scholars Honor
Society, Bogaert earned a mas-
ter of education degree in read-
ing.
Bogaert is a 2000 honors


Bogaert


graduate of Hardee Senior
High School.
She and her husband, Matt
Bogaert, currently make their
home in Iron Station, N.C.,
where she teaches second grade
at Iron Station Elementary
School.
Those making the trip to
North Carolina for her gradua-
tion ceremony were her parents,
Steve and Ann Basey of
Wauchula, and brother James.




ONE BLUE, NO PINKS
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Crews,
Arcadia, an eight pound 11
ounce son, Nathan Samuel,
born March 31, 2008, Sarasota
Memorial Hospital, Sarasota.
Mrs. Crews is the former Julie
Jones. Maternal grandparents
are Emerson and Mary Jones of
Wauchula. Maternal great-
grandmother is Nelma Stone of
Wauchula. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Bill and Jeraldine
Crews of Wauchula.


Royal Heirs


in Connrrt


Saturday, May,

S.r 6 pm

Fort Green Baptist Church


2875 Baptist Church Rd., Bowling Green * 773-9013

Joining them in song will be

Simple'Faith Trio t Connie Abbott t Carol Brown

Tim Casey t Charles Abbott


Free Admission - Love Offering will be accepted
Everyone is invited. Please come.


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4B The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


unit. We have a long ways to
go. We expect to move some
people around. We struggled
learning the new offense and its
concepts. It may take all sum-
mer to learn it. We have 39
scheduled to go to Black
Mountain, N.C. camp the week
of July 6. I'm not sure what our
August camp will be like yet,"
continued Price.
He is pleased with the job of
Bartow native Martine, who
was a graduate assistant at
Shorter College in Rome, Ga.,
where 2008 grad Jordan Grims-
ley will go. Jimmy Cimeus is
going to Dodge City Com-
munity College in Kansas and
Wade Mahoney is going to
,-Fondulac College in Minnesota,
coached by former Hardee and
junior college standout Tony
DeLeon.


HIGHLANDERS
Continued From 1B
The Wildcats held practice on
Monday, with many tired from
the holiday weekend after a
hard Friday night. "We expect
to play hard and shape up our
forces a bit at this week's
game," concluded Price.
The Blue team won last
week's scrimmage 10-7 over
the Orange Squad.
Orange had first crack at the
ball. Kelshee'm White tried to
go over left end but was stuffed.
Quarterback Ezayi Youyoute
then went ver right tackle after
a fake harioff, going 67 yards
to paydirt. We was penalized for
showboating, putting the ball
back to'the 17-yard line for the
PAT by soph Martin Vega. With
10:41 left in the first period, the
Orange squad led 7-0.
Jake Mayer took the handoff
to start the Blue team, moving


We would like to
thank everyone for the cards, concerns
and prayers through our recent family
crisis. Skipper is doing well and is on his
way to a full recovery! Thanks again for
everything each of our friends, family
and loved ones have done!
\ _^ The Skipper Gause Family
soc5:29p "
- jc ii-- ' - &�-


N% '1-877-822-6669
FLORIDA QUIT-FOR-LIFE LINE
Hardee County Health Department 1-877-U-CAN NOW toll free



PhotosI

*Little League Baseball
*Baseball Action
*Football Action
*Miss Hardee County
*Jr. Miss Hardee County
*Little Miss Hardee County
*Prince & Princess Pageant
*Kindergarden Pageant
*Livestock Sale
*Junior High Volleyball

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com

"Photos... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Alex Gilliard And Ralph Harrison


from the starting point, the 35-
yard line to the 47. A Jarrius
Lindsey try up the middle was
stopped cold. He then went over
left tackle for a five-yard gain.
Quarterback Conner Davis
went right on the keeper by was
hit hard and coughed up the
ball, recovered by David
Newcomb for the Orange
squad.
Orange started at the Blue 47.
A Youyoute pass went to
Devante Carter for a gain of
seven yards. A delay-of-game
penalty lost five of those yards.
A pass to Andrew Hunt miscon-
nected. The next handoff went
to Tre' Anderson. While going
over right tackle, he was
stripped, and the ball was
recovered at the Blue 46,
An offsides penalty backed
Blue up. Jones tackled Mayer
for a loss. A Davis pass intend-
ed for Scott Donaldson in the
flat was incomplete and another.
good pass intended for him also
was missed.
Orange took over on downs
at the Orange 30. Jones went
over left guard for two yards,
but Hunt was pushed back at
right end for twq yards. White
was tackled in the backfield for
a 15-yard loss.
Blue took over at midfield.
Davis went up the middle for no
gain. Lindsey took the ball over
right guard for a 13-yard gain.
SDonaldson took the pitch for six
more yards. A pass missed
Donaldson, but he carried the
ball on the next play for a first
down at the 25. Lindsey moved
the ball to the 16. Davis passed
to Donaldson, who broke a
tackle on the way to the end
zone for the score. Vega made
his second PAT. It was a tie
game 7-7.
The teams traded possessions
until late in the first half, when
Blue moved close enough for a
field goal attempt. Davis to
Donaldson went for three yards.
Michael McTaw picked up 15
yards for a first down. Donald-
son went high for the next pass
but fell with it at the two-sec-
ond mark. Vega nailed a 35-
yard line-drive field goal to put
Blue in front 10-7 as the half
ended.
The second half was a combi-
nation of fumbles and bobbled
plays as the coaches moved per-
sonnel around and players
began to tire from the humidity
and effort. There was no further
scoring.
Staff writer Jim Kelly con-
tributed to this report.

The earliest fishhooks date to
around 30,000 B.C. and were
carved from wood.


Hade 0111Vs 1lelo nC l-r


RED CROSS REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Bobbi Larson, of the Manatee Chapter of the American Red Cross, and Jennifer Wyatt,
service center coordinator of the Hardee County Red Cross Center at 401W. Orange
St., Wauchula, spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club on Tuesday of last week at the
Panda Restaurant. The Hardee Red Cross has helped 29 people this year who were dis-
placed by five house fires. Four of the homes were destroyed. The Red Cross will spon-
sor a First Aid course from 1 to 5 p.m. and a cardiopulmonary resuscitation course
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., both set for June 7 at the old Hardee Junior High building. Shown
(from left) are club president Steven Southwell, Larson, Wyatt and Red Cross board
member Kenny Miller. The local Red Cross phone number is 773-9097.






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The


May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5B






Classifieds


ABOUT ...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Eadh
additional word is 20 cents. Ads. in all cap-
itals are 32 cents per word. Headlines are
$2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $3
extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
.Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
WanteO
Yard Sales


Agriculture
L. DICKS, INC. is now contracting
to purchase fruit for the
2007/2008 season and beyond.
Contact Mark Manuel @ 781-
0384. 6:28tfc


WILL PAY TOP price for junk cars
and we pick up. Crooms Used
Cars and Parts. 773-0637. 1:10tfc
1989 CADILLAC Sedan Deville 47
Dr. One of a kind, Low mileage,
Extra Clean Purchased New By
Elderly Lady That Stopped
Driving $2,495. 863-735-0907
863-245-1496 5:22-29p


LPN, FULL TIME - Are you tired of
heavy patient loads which do not
allow you to give the quality care
your patients deserve? Explore
the rewards you can achieve in
your career by becoming a
Hospice Nurse in our Continuous
Care department where you will
deliver one-on-one direct patient
care your entire shift. Work three,
12-hour shifts, 8 p.m. - 8 a.m.
Covers Highlands/Hardee coun-
ties. Interested candidates,
please apply online at www.good-
sheperdhospice.org and click on
career opportunities. EOE/DFWP
5:29c


Short Time Job * Bankruptcy * Repo * Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly payments * Competitive Rates - Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit - Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll free
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity requirements apply.



Guavas
Made for Cobblers (recipe included)

$5.00 quart
also
Homemade Guava Jam

(863) 735-03495:29-6:5p




GILLIARD !

FILL DIRT INC.

SFill Dirt * Rock * Sand: Sbhf1
*Pond Digging * Ditch Cleaning;


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
c18:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


I Help W an e


ROUTE/SERVICE DRIVER -
Ullrich's Water Conditioning
Service, 4V0 Goolsby St., Wau-
chula. Apply in person.


5:15-6:5c
WANTED CDL CLASS A driver to
run long distance. Please call
863-773-6195 for more Informa-i
tion. 5:15-6:5c


NOW HIRING - Island of
Adventure Childcare Center, must
have CDA. Call 767-0800. 5:ltfc



2 BR 1 BATH in Wauchula 863-
767-8938 5:22-6:19p


SLAKE BUFFUM
LAWN CARE

Affordable Rates
Reliable Service


Stephen Judah


cl5:29-6:12p


863-781-9532


Tommy Davis


Ag^ Lawn Ca

Free Estimat

Irrigation Repairs Landscape

863-767-0497 5:29p 863-781-4055


Rental Home on Lake June
Lake Placid, Florida
May - August $850 weekly
Newly Remodeled
Large kitchen area, sleeps 6
1 3 Bed/2 Bath, Boat lift
Contact Jamie
(863) 781-1413
_ - . "'-'_ 5:15-29c


I __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


ioeLT
IN C, R E




REALTY

Jim Stallings
(863) 412-4379

See more listings at
REAL ESTATE
Gorgeous 37� acs on the Peace
River has native areas, tree-
lined paths, open pasture, hi-
king trails and 1400�ft of river
frontage. Property is fenced.
$685,000!
Green St: Very nice starter
home.. $60,000!
2.62� ac parcel on Merle Lang-
ford Rd, has pond & is great
size for homesite, recreation
or cattle. Eligible for permit-
ting. $66,000!
5 lots in Wauchula have total of
978�ft rd frontage. Close to
hospital, schools and shopping.
Call for individual lot prices or
buy all for $95,000!
10� ac improved, fenced pas-
tureland on Abendhoff Rd.
$147,000!
Two 5� ac parcels improved
pastureland, high & dry. One
parcel has old mobile home.
$14,500/ac!
2.84� acs in the city of Wau-
chula zoned R-3, multi-family
residential. City utilities avail-
able. Property has 386� ft of
road frontage & is 345� ft
deep. $150,000!
Large office building
w/5,432�SF total & 3,788�SF
A/C Plenty of warehouses for
storage! 1� ac lot, zoned C-2
w/100�ft frontage on US17S
Wauchula. $750,000!
PRICE REDUCED! PEACE
RIVER FRONTAGE! 1.06� ac
parcel w/city water & sewer.
Zoned R-l, which can accom-
modate 2 homesites, Being sold
w/0.35� ac parcel,
which can accommodate 1
homesite NOW $34,500!
PRICE REDUCED! Private
10� ac cleared pasture w/ag
exemption, pond, some woods,
4" well. Accessed by easement
from county rd. NOW
$160,000!


AL T 0 R S
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
'OR JOHN H. O'NEAL



- www.joeldavis.com
INVESTMENTS
Find the privacy you're look-
ing for in this secluded
4BR/3BA home on 12� wooded
acs. Just minutes to Wauchula
or Zolflo Springs. $350,000!
Generous 1.5� ac residential
lot in Okeechobee Co is priced
below assessed value for great
investment! $30,000!
HOMESITES OR INVEST-
MENT! Four residential lots in
Indian Lake Estates. Three lots
are 100'x218', listed for
$22,000 each. One is 200'x218',
listed for $46,000! Golf course,
community center, fishing pier,
& shops!
5.4� acs tracts, pasture & Oak
rees. Possible owner financing.
$10,000/ac!
82� acs: metal barn w/horse
stalls, well, 5 pastures with
water to each, deer & turkey.
Beautiful oaks. $899,000!
Great location! Commercial
zoned lot with 450'� frontage
on north end of Fl Ave.
$360,000!
Stellar location! 10� ac Val
grove on SR 62 has 6" well,
diesel power unit, drain tile &
micro-jet irrigation. Also
fronts Moye Rd. $150,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 20� ac
pastureland is fenced & has a
4-in diameter well. Great for
horses or cattle. Secluded loca-
tion would make excellent
homesite! NOW $10,000/ac!
Now this is country riverfront
property! 20� acs w/750�ft of
relaxing Peace River frontage.
$190,000!
Beautiful wooded lot fronts the
tranquil Peace River, only min-
utes from Wauchula. Enjoy
fishing, boating and other
recreational activities from
your own riverfront lot.
$125,000!


"' II


iAIM SEE REALTY, INC.



206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 * Evening (863)773-4774
www.iimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker * James V. See, Sr., Broker


NEW LISTING! 2BR/1BA CB
home. Metal roof put on after
Hurricane. Some work needs
to be done inside. Large cor-
ner lot in Wauchula. $72,000.
3 BR/2 BA house on 7 1/2
acres. Stocked pond.
$179,900.
1� acre. Great place for your
new home! Close to schools,
shopping and hospital in
Wauchula. Paved road front-
age. Deed restrictions. Zoned
FR. Lot size 130' X 305'.
$38,500
REDUCED! MUST SEE!
3BR/2BA home on landscaped
lot. Granite countertops, stain-
less appliances. 2 car garage.
$159,900
PRICE REDUCED! Water-
front property! 2BR/2BA
mobile home in Punta
Gorda.Located on a canal that
leads into Charlotte Harbor.
Buyer concessions possible.
Priced right at $165,000!
3 Bedroom/2 Bath home in
Golfview Big 1+ acre lot. 2 car
garage. $225,000.
3 BR, 2 BA immaculate home
with many extras. Home was
built in 2000 and all appli-
ances are included. Land-
scaped yard with several fruit
trees and even a pecan tree.
$148,900.
Two mini-ranches! One is
5.95� acres, the other is 6.65�
acres. $99,500 each
70� acres of prime develop-
ment property. City water and
sewer allocated. Annexed and
rezoned to single family with
Developers Agreement.
$20,000 per acre.


Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


170.8� acres of pasture land in
Manatee County, Myakka City
area. 2600 feet of frontage on
State Road 64.
38.6� acre grove with 700 feet
on Lake Lizzy. 2400 feet paved
road frontage on Lake Hendry-
Lake Buffum Road. 8" deep
well and 6" deep well.
10� beautiful acres ready to
build on. Plenty of shade trees
in a great country setting.
$150,000.
Three 5 ac tracts located on
Johns Rd. Well located on one
of the tracts. Price Reduced!
$89,900 each.
three adjacent 5 ac tracts
Icated on East Main Street in
uchula. Price Reduced to
$74,900 each.
One of a kind development
property. 300� acres in
Sarasota. Hamlet designation.
700� acres in Eastern Sarasota
County. High & Dry. Hamlet
designation. Plenty of paved
road frontage.
3.19� acres. Zoned C-2. Plenty
of room for several businesses.
Potential income already in
place. Hwy 17 across from
Walmart. $1,200,000.
Golf Course/Development Pro-
perty! Water & sewer avail-
able. 127� acres! Call for price
and details!
COMMERCIAL LOT! NEED
VISIBILITY? - Put your busi-
ness here!Located on North &
South bound Hwy 17. North
end of Wauchula. Zone C-2.
$195,000
Commercial property. 1.28�
acres. Frontage on Main Street
and Hwy 64. $120,000.


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445-0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Knight
Calvin Bates (863)381-2242


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
(863)781-1396


KELLER WILIAMS
\R. . -\A v
LLJ \ BK."-


Mikey Colding
Realtor
(863) 781-1698


/ Dane Hendry
Realtor
(863) 381-2769


An Independently Chned Brokerage


* * * New Listing * *

3900+ sq. ft. CB home, 3BR/2BA, hardwood foors. RG, $99.000.
Call Dane today! This one won't last long.
* Asking $8,500/acre. Abandoned citrus grove. Ideal for any type
of agricultural use. 29-40-60 acre parcels or buy as a whole 100
acre tract. Wells, barn & trailer on property. Call for more
details.
* Zoned commercial 8.5 acres, corner of Hwy. 17 and Hwy. 62 in
Wauchula, City sewer & water.
* 65 acre grove; 40 acres Valencias; 25 acres Hamlins; 10" well
a 6 cylinder Deutz Power Unit, 1" Polytubing, Fruit crop goes
with sell, with no contract fruit, Sweetwater area. $14,900 per
acre.
* 40 Acre Tract - 28 acres of grove, 12 acres of improved pasture.
8" well. 2 year old Case power unit, pump, gear head, fuel tank,
etc. County maintained duel road frontage. Subdivided into (4)
five acre parcels, (2) ten acre parcels. Additional 5-8 acres of the
pasture could be planted in grove.
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home on this
beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the prop-
erty. Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000.
* Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered
oaks and pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5� ac.
wetlands. Great Investment Property. Sweetwater area.
Call Mikey at (863) 781-1698for more details.
* 30 acres on Rabbit Run Rd. with mobile home, great hunting.
Reduced to $325,000.
* 4/3 Lake House on crystal clear Lake Isis.
CALL DANE AT (863) 381-2769 FOR MORE DEI'AILS. cds 2


_ L .._r��~


---" I


I







6B The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


The


Classifieds


4BR/2 BATH, double car garage,-
nice neighborhood. For more
Information call 786-218-5236 or
786-218-5250., 5:29-6:5p
THREE BEDROOM, one bath
house In Zolfo Springs, 3035 Oak
St. Call for Information 863-735-
0870 leave name and number.
5:15-6:12p


LARGE 7'4" WHIRLPOOL bath-
tub, 3 yrs. old, pump & fittings,
$300.773-9791. 5:29p


2 MAN 10' PONTOON boat, $250
OBO; 20' flat bed trailer, $800
OBO. 445-0445. 5:29p
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER - IBM
Wheelwriter 3, good condition,
recently serviced, $200. 773-
4449. 5:29-6:5c
SET OF TIRES & rims, Summit
Trail Climbers, 31x10.50, 15"
rims, like new, full tread, $450
OBO. 781-0121 after 4 p.m. 5:29c


8x8 SHED and wheelchair ramp.
767-8822. 5:29c
TROY BILT TILLER, 8 HP, good
condition, $500. 735-1722.
5:15-6:12p


Topsy See
REAL ESTATE
773-5994
Topsy See

Beautiful Country Setting - Six 1/2 ac. lots and one 1.66 ac. lot
@$15,000.00 each or 4.66 ac. for $85,000. Each Lot Has Been
Surveyed.
5 acres all fenced, High and dry with pond. Appaloosa Lane. $84,995.
1 ac. with app. 296 ft. road frontage. $39,000.
JUST LIKE NEW - 2000 DW Palm Harbor. This home includes win-
dow treatments, ceiling fans, all appliances, Ted's Shed, deep well.
$134,995.
NEW LISTING: 3 BR-1B CB - Very nice home in nice quiet neigh-
borhood. New Drywall - New Tile Floors - Appliances. $115,000.
App. 58 AC. Great for development property. High and dry. Call for
information.
5 acres in the Oaks. Owner financing with approval. $20,000 down.
$64,900.
5:29

Topsy See, Broker
Elva Whidden, Associate
2634 E. Main Street * Wauchula, FL 33873


COIN COLLECTOR Buying U.S.
coins 1964 and earlier paying
great money for your coins call
Troy-at 772-530-7043 No Dealers!
5:22-29p
PRICE REDUCED $3,500 com-
mercial mower, Hustler Super
MIniZ, 44". 781-0012. 5:1tfcdh



DOUBLEWIDE FOR SALE - Must
move from lot - '93, 60x27,
3BR/2BA, large family room, fire-
place, hardwood floors, garden
tub, 3 yr. old heat/air, 20x12 wood-
en deck, $10K. 813-661-0856.
5:8-6:5p


REPO MOBILE HOMES -
Hundreds to choose from. Set up
& delivery available. 863-381-
1000. 4:24-6:26p
NEW 2008 MOBILE HOME and
lot, 3 BR, 2 BA, city sewer and
water, 2050 Petteway, Wauchula
Hills, $70,000, owner pays clos-
ing. Carol's Realty, 863-412-8932
or 941-627-2769. 3:6tfc


FREE TO GOOD HOME mix chi-
huahua puppies, have shots. 773-
0849. 5:29nc.
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh



BROWN EGGS FOR SALE - 526


SR 62, 773-6756. 5:29
1Ral stt -


5 ACRES - beautiful, cleared, with
pond, Ft Meade, $59,000 OBO.
863-253-9098. 5:1-29p


I D -F fOIA RA-TY







Main building 3200 sq. ft, storage building 1300 sq. ft. Large
commercial lot in Bowling Green. 225 ft. US 17 frontage.
Formerly Bills Meat Market. $175,000. AS IS.
2.10 acres prime corner SR 64 W. and Golfview Drive. $80,000.
2.20 Acres Comm. Hwy 17 South. Road Frontage on 3 sides.
$225,000.
Corner lot in Torrey. Old Dixie Hwy. Heavily wooded. $20,000.
1 acre MOL zoned C-1 behind ACE Hardware. 1/2 ac. site
ready - needs fill and clearing. $50,000.
5:29


GROVE FOR SALE 19.43 acre
early grove with 6" permitted well.
Asking $12,500 per acre. Call BJ
for more Information at 863-781-
0048. 5:29-6:19c



1984 RV 30' WITH 2 TIP OUTS for
sale, exc. condition. 767-8822.
5:29c


1979 30' RV $1,700 767-8822.
5:29c

uTi
*^**^B-a


3BR/2BA, 1,750 S.F. HOME, new
construction, 1/2 acre,
$975/month, $400/security
deposit. 245-6106. 5:29-6:5c
2 BEDROOM/ 2 BATH mobile
home in Oak Hill Park, very nice,
$500 deposit, rent $700. 863-781-
3570. 5:29-6:5c


2BR/1BA UPSTAIRS apartment
$800/month, 1st and $500 securi-
ty deposit, utilities included. Non-
smoking, references and credit
check required. No pets. 863-773-
6255. 5:29p
DUPLEX APARTMENT in good
neighborhood, Wauchula. Not
smoking, no pets. 2BR/1 BA, $600
monthly plus deposit. 781-3570.
5:29-6:5c


RENT WITH OPTION to buy
4BR/2BA, 2 car garage for Info
786-218-5236 or 786-218-5250.
5:29-6:5p


EXCELLENT CONDITION 2BR/2
1/2 B townhouse. Call 773-2122 to
see. America South Realty. 5:29p
2BR/1B fully furnished, electric
and cable included, great neigh-
borhood, Ft. Meade. $800 month,
security required. Call Shella 375-
9988, 863-285-7203, 863-781-
3039. 5:15tfc


Towing Service Avallable
0 2-1 1 Im il. Sol-% ice 0
hm('�t P()��ihle R'It" -
- kl�t 'Ind RcliA)lc a
(863) 78-1 -' )090 or 781-3091


~.~i~---- -~--1r~-l


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


NEW LISTING! Charming 3B/lBth C/B home
situated on nice corner lot in town. $155,000

MAKE AN OFFER on this well maintained
3B/2Bth C/B home located on 5 acres just out-
side Wauchula; 2232 square feet; 24'x36' con-
crete shop; two 4" wells on property. Call for an
appointment.

15 Acres of pasture plus 3B/1Bth C/B home in
need of repair; metal barn. $235,000

POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING! 30 acres of
pastureland; secluded; small pond with natural
flow of water; perfect for home site or small
ranch. $255,000

MINI FARM - 5 acre tract with 3/1 CB home;
updated kitchen; property is fenced for horses
or cattle. $199,000

LOCATED IN COUNTRY NEIGHBOR-
HOOD, this 3B/1Bth, C/B home is situated on 1
acre. $155,000


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
rhL-Inft. T__-1


Charloue Terrvell - " '
TWO STORY GOLF COURSE HOME!
3B/3.5Bth; large rooms with laminate and tile
floors; many extras; nice curb appeal! $350,000
CHOOSE YOUR COLORS when you select
building plan; constructing 3 and 4 bedrooms,
C/B homes; prices start at $133,000
Looking for that perfect building site or week-
end retreat? This 5 acre tract has large oaks,
small creek, plenty of wildlife. $99,000
Excellent location for building your new home;
1/2 acre tracts; city water and sewer. deed
restricted area. $40,000
Lovely home site - 5 acres with fruit trees, large
oaks and 1 acre pond. $110,000
10 acres with 12" well; nice area for your new
home. $365,000
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY! 1.2 acres, high-
way 17 frontage. $100,000
5 acre tract of land; paved road frontage; east-
ern Hardee. $125,000


SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON I
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOISJOHNSON.............773-9743 ASSOCIATE: MICHAELADAMS.............781-2413
ASSOCIATE. CHARLOTTE TERRELL..781-6971 ASSOCIATE: CAROL JACKSON..............991-1255
ASSOCIATE: JUDY HINERMAN............735-0268 ASSOCIATE: ROBERT HINERMAN........227-0202
ASSOCIATE: JOSEFINA GARAY........863-399-3329
cl5:29c


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873

Gary Delatorre - Broker
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jessica Smith, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Nancy Craft, Associate


781-3627
781-1186
773-0575
832-0370


Richard Dasher


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


OWNER READY TO SELL! This 4/1 CBS Home on
double lot has Central A/H, open porch and
loaded with fruit trees. Two blocks north of the
County Line, Bowling Green. Reduced from
$85,000 to $82,500. Make an offer!!!

FOOTED TUB!!! PRICE REDUCED AGAIN!!! This
charming 5 Bedroom, 6 Bath home was once a
Bed and Breakfast. 3.5 acres of high and dry
land surrounds the oak shaded home. Was
$129,900, NOW $124,900.

SWEETWATER ROAD NURSERY Income produc-
ing nursery on 55 acres with 6" well and 1800+
frontage. $832,500.

TIME TO INVEST!!! 3BR, 1B, central A/H located
on busy Hwy 17 Bowling Green. Great for
Business or Home or Both. Only $85,000.

MONEY MAKING DUPLEX!!! Incoming producing
investment property already has tenants 2/1 and
1/1 with Fireplaces, Priced at $120,000. Make
Offer!!

ALMOST NEW!!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB Home on
corner lot in great neighborhood. Built in 2006,
includes two car garage with door opener and
more. Access on Lake Adelaide. Reduced from
$145,000 to $137,900.

CABBAGE PALMS, OAK TREES AND
QUIET!!! This 16 Acre parcel of land has a Well
and Septic Tank. Build your own Home or Mobile
Home. $150,000.

BUILD YOUR NEW HOME!! On this Residential
Lot in this Nice Neighborhood of Riverview
Heights located on Garden Drive. Only $29,900.


INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY!!! 10 A/C on Hwy.62,
large building Included. $750,000.
BIG, BIG HOUSE WITH LOTS AND LOTS OF
ROOM!!! 4 Bedroom, 4 Bath with 2,241 Living sq.
ft. new carpet, fresh paint, and new roof makes
this home a must see at a Reduced Price of
$165,000 or bring offer.
SIMPLY CHARMING!!! Immaculately clean 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath Doublewide with carport, nice
neighborhood, all on .28 AC lot. REDUCED!!!
ONLY $82,500.
NEED MORE ROOM??? Come take a look at this
3/2 with an office and game room. This home
features a large kitchen and inside utility room
for a Reduced Price of $149,900.
BEAUTY OF A BARGAIN!! Nice - 2 Bedroom 1
Bath Villa in Avon Park. Good condition, present-
ly rented. Need extra income, Good Investment.
In walking distance to town!! Only $67,500.
THIS 6.15 ACRES OF LAND is located on beauti-
ful Peace River. Canoe, camp or build your own
vacation home. Priced only at $125,000.
WATCH YOUR MONEY GROW!!! Excellent rental
home features, 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath for Only
$40,000. Rush to review!!!
AFFORDABLE!! This well maintained 3 Bedroom,
1 Bath home on 1 acre of land in nice quiet area
of Bowling Green has large barn and chainlink
fenced yard. Must See!! $119,500.
ENJOY THE SUNSET!!! On the balcony of this 2
story home on 3.4 acres of land, with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths and recreation room on bottom
story. Jacuzzi tub, Trane AC, galvaluminum roof
and more for only $189,000. Call Today!!!
5 ACRES - $62,500. Possible Financing!!!


FEATURES OF THE WEEK NEW LISTINGS!!!
POSSIBLE LEASE WITH OPTION TO BUY! Beautifully remodeled 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath with
Pool, formal livingroom, family room=possible 4th Bedroom, Back porch great for out-
side Poolside entertainment. Only $185,000.
STARTER HOME!!! This 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath CB home has central air and heat, complete
with washer and dryer located in great neighborhood on Illinois Ave. $90,000.
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath. $92,500 With front porch and large fenced yard. In nice neighbor-
hood!
JUST LISTEDIII 27.5 acres with a 2 bedroom, 1 bath home In the Center Hill area fronts
beautiful Payne Creek. Includes 12 acres of Irrigated citrus groves and barn. Seller will
consider dividing property into parcels. Call today for details. $350,000.
c15:29c


EMPLOYEE
EASIN(;
TIONS, INC.

Robby Albritton, Vice-President
Office (863) 735-9226 Cell (863) 528-7085
Fax (863) 735-9228
ralbritton@eloinc.net
www.elonic.net
159 State Road 64 East * Zolfo Springs, FL 33890


* Commercial Welding Business, $250,000, Wauchula
* 4BR/2-1/2BA on 1 acre, Golfview. $350,000.
* 2 story, 3BR/2BA, large yard on Bell St., Wauchula.
$92,500
* 3BR/1BA, 2 apts., remodeled, Carlton St. $135,000
* 274 acres, Hwy 17 frontage, 1 mile south of Zolfo, 600 ft. on
Peace River.
* Newly Remodeled - 2BR/1BA, Bowling Green, Chester Ave.
$65,000.
* 2 acre tracts available on Kazen Rd.
* 30 Unit Warehouse, Hwy 66, Zolfo Springs. $100,000, owner
motivated. Make Offer!
- SOME COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE - 5:29c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1998 GMC
VIN:1GKCS13WXW2522276
8:00 A.M. JUNE 12,2008
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL
cl5:29c


I BuY HOUSES




B781-1062


Billy Hill Don't delay ... Call today!
BillyHillcl'417tI


COD" IL


3


E








May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


OFFICE FOR RENT - 210 N. 3rd,
Wauchula, $450 per month. 832-
1984. 5:8-6:5p
,RENT OR SALE 3 BR, 2B Single-
wide Mobile Home on 1/4 acre Ft.
Green $600 month + $600 securi-
ity Dep. No Smoking will consider
contract for Deed $700 month
with good Credit. cell 772-530-
.7047 home 772-336-441. 5:22-29p


POST
OFFICE
NOW
HIRING es




Olfrei by En. Simme. sl all wjUPS who hires


11-866-749-14


WAREHOUSES, several different
sizes. Jack Ullrich Warehouses.
'73-6448. 3:27tfc
* MOVE-IN SPECIAL *
2 BR/1 B AND 2 BR/2 B from $125
weekly or $450 monthly. No pets,
low deposit. Next to school &
hospital. Citrus Valley MHP. 863-
i698-4910 or 698-4908. Se habla
espanol 863-838-4447. 8:23tfc


SDeSoto County


I . a,


OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565
d5 Eftif


PARKER FILL DIRT
DEMOLITION
*FillDirt Tree Removal Special
*Stump Removal* Dragline * Tandam Axle Load
*Track Hoe * Land Clearing * (14-16 yards)


SShell* Clay * Top Soil
*Bulldozer * Dump Trucks �
(863) 735-2415


$ 100/Load
within S mile radius of Zolfo Springs
Fill-Top Soil-Hard Pan
Hardee County Area only


Tree Thimming * ftump Grinding
Complete Troe Removal * Land Clearing

*FREE ESTIMATES*

(863) 781-2089

iUeon d a Insured Accept M/C e Visa


TWO BEDROOM one bath apart-
ment, $550 plus deposit. 832-
1984. 5:8-6:5p
NEW SUMMER RATES - Crystal
Lake Village, 1 BR, $500/month.
767-8822. 5:1tfc
WAREHOUSE OFFICE YARD,
brand new, 6,000 SF, 3647 Hwy.
17 frontage in Zolfo Springs for
lease. 239-273-7381.
12:20tfc
APARTMENTS AND HOUSES.
773-6667. 9:6tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,-
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


,2 BR/1 BTH APARTMENT - $550
month, first, last, deposit


required. 773-0100. 2:21tfc


TOMMY DAVIS LAWN CARE, free
estimates, irrigation repairs, land-
scaping and clean outs, some
tree and hedge trimming, 863-
781-4055, 15 years'experience.
5:29-6:26p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave.,
Wauchula, and Friday and
Saturday nights 7:00 p.m. at First
Methodist Church, corner of
Grape and Church St., Bowling
Green. 12:6tfcdh


WV. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478
V Complete Tree Service
r' Bobcat Service
SCrane Service
Sawmill Service
Free Estimates - Insured - 26 years experience
cl6:14tfc



FAULKNER
4 , Stump Grinding & Tree Service, LLC

; Wayne Faulkner
i. Owner


(863) 261-3729
(863) 261-3759
1142 Doc Coil Road
Bowling Green, Florida 33834 c15:22-6:12,


SJUAN DELATORRE
(863)781-1128
WWW. IUANDELATORRE.COM
- ^ EMAIL:MAIL@IUANDELATORRE.COM

S. oe LI. lhi
--_ REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS BROKER ASSOCIATE
3430 Garrard Rd. Ft. Meade Lk Buffum home - $200,000
1933 SR 64 W. Zolfo Springs Home & 12� acs - $350,000
405 Georgia St, Wauchula - $125,000
708 Steve Roberts Sp. Zolfo Springs Home & 4� acs - $130,000
619 Green St. Wauchula $60,000
4401 Beechwood Rd. Ft Green $95,000
601 N 8th Ave, Wauchula 4/2 CB - $153,000
316 E Orange St. Wauchula Lg Lot & home zoned C-1 - $150,000
215 Cracker Ln, Wauchula $140,000
2976 Whippoorwill Ln. Wauchula $230,000






3 BR, 2 B, 2+ acres, close-in, pond and steel frame barn. $229,900.
Call Sherrick.
Beautiful 3 BR, 2.5 B o n7 ac anatee Co. line. $449,000.
Call Cind - '-- -
2 BR, 2 B. in towivn 124,00
2 BR. 2 B. pool. 5a. $199,'900 . :
Make Your Vicr P rin nov. "B iT' .1',Mu Cab mental, Sleeps
4-5, very seclhidedJ,$550 eekly. " -..
One lot lell in WhiisrilerWV6ds3.8 '.c iS .
. '*'i . , . .e ' ..* .
10 ac. Val gploe. irrig & dram ie $1.000' per ac. Call David.
30 ac. wiih 10 ac. HamlnJn, 10i ac ' Vlenia, 10 ac. beautiful oaks,
microjet irrig. 12-in. well. $470,000. Call. David




* .0 0 -
[ - *dllR [ gF s] = 1- -o I-dlldl[~l, ll


ROGERS CARPET CLEANING
$50 one room or 2 or more for $30
each. Also) upholstery & exterior
pressure cleaning. 863-773-6603.
5:15-6:12p
ALDERMAN'S CITRUS TREE
REMOVAL. Call Tim for quote.
863-781-5289. 4:3-1:8p


B SEE
SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event.
773-6375. www.bseesound.com.
3:6-7:3p


JIM'S LAWN SERVICE
Specializing in cleaning beds,
trimming hedges & trees, and
landscaping. Also, clean ponds.
773-3293 or 781-4641.
10:4ffc/nc
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP. Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
Located at the SFCC Annex,
Room #105, Hwy. 17 North,
Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc


Lonestar
Constimctiorn Corp.-

General Contractor
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated

Office 863-773-4779 Fax 863-773-9865
cl6:9tfc






SRealtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
- Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
Noey A. Flores www.floresrealty.net
I need help
Hi my name is Delilia Shepard, I am
a widow and a grandmother, who
wants to move to Tennessee and watch
my grandchildren play soccer and
grow-up.
My problem is: I need to sell my
home at 365 Old Dixie HWY, Bowling
Green, Florida. This is a 3 bedroom, 2
bath, concrete b o Ik h dontWh over
2,300 sq ft. undereroof. t includes a
security system, outside Office, work-
shop, storage shed and a long list of
extras.
This was a great place to raise my fam-
ily, I have alot of wonderful memories Blake and Courtney
here, but now my children are gone and
the fenced in yard of almost 2 acres is getting to be more and more
difficult for me to maintain.
Please call my Realtor for an appointment, I'm biased, but I really
believe the value is here. It hasn't been that long ago that it was appra-
iased fro $270,000 and now, I am willing to let it go for only
$225,000.00. Come see foryourself!
Who wants to help this grandma achieve her dream?
*NEW HOMES *NEW HOMES *NEW HOMES
ALL QUALIFY FOR 100% FINANCING.
Look over the list - Take a look at the home of your choice.
* 3BR 2BA CB home with carport - 3061 Hickory Ct. - Zolfo
Springs $140,000.00
* 3BR CB home - 733 Sally Place $119,000.00
* 3BR 2BA CB home with-large garage - 4815 Church Street
- Bowling Green $149,000.00
* 3BR 2BA CB home with about 2,000 sq ft under roof - 4817
Church Street - Bowling Green $149,000.00
* 4BR 2BA CB home - 5116 Epps Avenue - Bowling Green
$149,000.00


WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember
Our listings are on the Internet.
SAnyone with a computer can
fa t access them anytime! U


EMUAL HOUWUO
OPPOnTUMITY



John Freema
Steve Lanier
Jason Johns


Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net


After hours
(863) 781-4084 Lisa Douglas
(863) 559-9392 Jessie Sambrano
(863) 781-3734 Noey Flores


n

on


II3


(863)781-3247
(863) 245-6891
(863) 781-4585


TheHerld-dvoat


Hardee Car Comnany


Wauchula Hills
Corner of Hwy 17
and REA Rd.
~r J f']-'m -l


Wauchula
(across from
First National Bank)
773-6667


Billy Hill, I
Maria Owner Ruby
-lll-llillllllllllll--
I "Coupon I

$500 OFF any vehicle on our lots

I Hurry! Sale ends May 31,2008!
L i I 1mmmmm I m I mI c15:22c


N@MIA,,;l luwo
rb 0


NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!.
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pcbed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
S2346 U.S. 27 North * Sebring
Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot
cl42o0tf


fsplTf.Aes


Eml


i


I


I


i


I


I


1







8B The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


The


Letter To The Editor

FCAT Should Not Keep


HHS Seniors
Dear Editor: '
As I sit at the computer and-
keep researching information of
this much talked about test in
our school system FCAT that
could have a significant impact
on your child in the future or for
some of us today. How could
the school system possibility be
accepting teacher layoff in
areas that our children need
help, sometime we need to
think where else could the
money come from.
I believe as a business owner
we have had to sacrifice our
income due to the economy.
This is what we have done to
take care of our children and
should be thought about in
other areas in our school sys-
tem. I would like to point out
that if schools eliminate the
coaches, practice tests and other
special efforts to boost FCAT
scores, those scores could stag-
nate or fall. That could prove
hard to explain for educators.
I don't see anyone stepping
up on considering a percent cut
on their salary, and I am not
talking about teacher! I do
believe our children and their
education should come first.
I keep asking myself how
could I help my child more,
did I solely depend on high
school to help my child through
this one test that could not only
crush her entire spirit but stop
her from walking with her class
set by our School Board mem-
bers and backed by our high
school principal. As a parent
very involved with my child
through elementary and junior
high, I felt strong to not inter-
vene as much with the teachers
in high school, to believe this





IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 735-2511.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number.
dh


SATURDAY - Antique furniture,
glassware, Jewelry and pool table,
also, children and adults cloth-
Ing, shoes, accessories and
home goods. 3030 Myrtle Street,
Zolfo. -5:29p
SATURDAY - 8-?, 322 Riverside
Dr. Baby Items, misc., microwave.
5:29p
HUGE CHURCH YARD SALE
Saturday, 7-?, Story of Jesus and
Real Life Church, 3365 Hwy. 17.
Food, crafts, clothing, household
goods, and more. To make dona-
tions call 375-4032 or 735-8020.
5:29c
SATURDAY - 7 a.m. -1 p.m., 1025
Knollwood Circle. Appliances,
piano, riding mower, furniture.
5:29p
EDNA'S PLACE - Lots of new
Items. King beds, refrigerators,
stoves, washers & dryers. 767-
8822. 5:29c


From Walking
was her time to enjoy school as
I did in high school. This is a
wake up call. School is nothing
like it was when we were there.
I believe this was a decision I
wish I could only take back
now that I have opened this can
of worms, with three more chil-
dren to come through our
school system. I will challenge
every parent and grandparent as
well as myself to stay involved
and listen to your children when
they may complain and you
brush it off or tell you stories
and you say that couldn't be
happening in our school system
"but you see it is." Listen to
your children and the teachers
when they are complaining.
On Friday two weeks before
graduation, I called the school,
to send a message to ask my
daughter to pick up the kids
after school. And they said she
signed out, knowing the school
did not have my permission,
and to tell me a guidance coun-
selor was trying to get a hold of
me, as she told me the news she
barley missed the score for
FCAT to receive her diploma
and knowing her excitement for
graduation had come to a end.
SThe counselor said she let her
go home that it was like a Mack
truck just hit her. The counselor
wanted to talk to her but it was
like no one was there. By the
time she made it to attendance
the ladies said she just lost all
composure and the emotions
were released, I cannot imag-
ine. Attendance workers said it
was hard to watch her in so
much pain. I could only swal-
low as they told me the news.
It felt like when someone just
told me a loved one died. It
doesn't seem possible you say
but as I sit here with tears run-
ning and trying to be silent so I
don't wake the kids and my
husband to see me in such pain.
It is something unexplainable.
I am writing this letter to
blame no one, but to say there
need to he changes in our
school system.
I challenge all parents who
look forward to seeing their
child walk in a cap and gown in
Hardee County with their peers
to get on the Internet and pull
up information about this one
test and to be active in our
School Board meetings. Show
your concern now. They are
usually short and I do believe it
would be well worth your
child's interest, and we are all
about what's best for our chil-
dren.
As the School Board votes
and after you are aware of these
new rules that are in effect, it
takes more time than if you
were there the night it gets
introduced to our School Board
members. Remember they are
there for the public and to hear
how we feel, and it is time we
all stay informed with our
school system and how it is run.
I felt that maybe it was a bad
test day. The first time she also
barley missed it within a few
points, knowing math was her
most challenging subject
through junior high. I felt she
would pass the reeling the next
test given, not struggling in
reading. There is much more to
this test than reading words. I
couldn't understand why the
test seemed as if it got harder. It
was because standards get
raised usually every year. I


Classifieds


think if I had the knowledge
now about the FCAT I would
have been involved more at the
high school and School Board
meeting. I do understand for
some parents that is impossible.
Information about the FCAT
and how one is scored is inter-
esting. Take a look at this the
passing score two years ago
while seniors attended 10th
grade was a 287. It is now a 300
and some seniors this year
missed it by a few points, even
one point.
I have tried to approach the
School Board to change the
requirement as other counties
around us have, to let the kids
walk with a certificate of com-
pletion that says your child has
completed all requirement met
by school standards, have all
credits, GPA of more than a 2.0
and attendance requirements
and had attended 13 years. This
certificate of completion allows
you child to continue their edu-
cation at a community college
after taking the CPT college
placement test and after begin-
ning college, nor did Governor
Bush state that the FCAT would
prevent a child to walk with
their fellow classmates. It was
left open for the local district
School Board that was voted in
by parents of this county. A
petition was signed by teachers,
lawyers, law en-forcement, par-
ents and walking seniors.
Gov. Christ is signing a new
rule that only 50 percent of the
school grade which our high
school is a D will be reflected
from FCAT for 2008-2009
school scores. It will include
graduation rate, dual enrollment
classes and grades students
make during the year as well as
dropout rates. This aims to help
bring teaching back into the
school system not just teaching
the test. If changes are being
made in the legislature then
what could be wrong with
things changing in our commu-
nity. Only you can make things
change. Your opinion and voice
count. Teachers are under so
much pressure as are teacher
cuts are being made how can
we sit back and say nothing.
Speak up in the School Board
meeting. A teacher talked about
it will only get worse with these
students. Next year there will be
more students and less help.
We did have a time in 2005
that our county School Board
unanimously voted an emer-
gency vote for seniors to walk
with the class of 2005 members.
At that time were Jan Platt,
Tracy Baxter, Tonya Royal, Joe
Jones, Wendell Cotton. I'm sure
those who were granted this
were very thankful. What
makes the year of 2005 any dif-
ferent from other years? We all
have to ask that question, and I
am still looking into this puz-
zling question.
At this time the parents and
students who did not receive
waivers are waiting to hear if
Mr. Jones (Superintendent),
Mrs. Tonya Royal (chair of
School Board) which did not
suggest at the School Board
meeting nor voted for. Mrs.
Royal went on in the meeting to
only say she is sorry but you
just cannot change policies that
quick, it takes time and we did
not have this on the agenda.
This was true. So as I research
and found how our School
Board meetings are conducted I
have found that it takes no more
than two days notice to pull a
special meeting into force.
Note: Convene in special ses-
sions when called by the district


school superintendent or by the
district school superintendent
on request of the chair of the
district School Board.
I have to admit I was a parent
who was not educated on
School Board meeting so thank
you to the person who came to
me and informed me of this
special meeting after the board
adjourned. The parents then
realized something went wrong
and approach Mr. Dennis Jones
for a special meeting to be set
and then sent us to Mrs. Royal
stating she was the one who
needed to call that meeting. We
then approached Mrs. Royal as
she was walking out the door to
please set an emergency meet-
ing. We pleaded with her. The
students and parents are waiting
to see if they will get a chance
on an emergency meeting and a
vote on letting the children
walk with their class and others
to come.
The information and sample
test I have been taking will
make you understand the
importance to have your child
in a positive state of mind and
hope that there are no distrac-
tions from home-problems or
personal problems because a
bad day could hinder the focus
ability and be deemed a bad test
day. Anxiety is a large factor.
Think if it was you in front of
that test knowing it could cause
you to not walk with you peers,
and receive a diploma and of
course the humiliation and sad-
ness when in Hardee County
these kids know each other by
name not just a number.
Take the stress off these stu-
dents as our surrounding coun-
ties have. Could it help our stu-
dents test better and help our
school grade? We don't know
until we try. Elementary school
grades are outstanding, and I do
not believe our students just
stop performing in reading
skills in high school!
Through my research I found
our FCAT grade for Hardee
Senior High School is a "D."
That means our 10th grade stu-
dents did not do well overall in
2007. The overall score for
reading was a 282. The question
is how many 10th graders did
not pass the reading portion or
barely. Florida's readers look
like terrible readers. Their


PCAT scores are the worst in
the state. Yet those same stu-
dents are among the best read-
ers on a test that compares
Florida students with their peers
across the United States.
Many educators aren't sure
what test scores say about the
reading ability of Florida's high
school students. Ninth and tenth
graders do poorly on the FCAT
which sets a higher bar in high
school than in lower grades.
But the same students perform
well on the Norm Referenced
Test, or NRT, which measures
them against their peers nation-
ally. As they go on to retake
this test again in. llth grade
their scores no longer count for
the school's grade for next year.
As our grade stays low our
school fund also go low which
could result to budget cuts
which I can't agree we need at
this time knowing Hardee
Senior High is a "D."
The day of FCAT testing the
teachers as well as the students
and parents are in a frenzy,
questioning themselves how
will they do, did I cover what
will be on the test, will our jobs
be cut. Do you think the stu-
dents don't feel the stress, and
how about the question students
ask will I walk with my class-
mates or be left out after 13
year of school and giving to our
community whether it be FFA,
football, cheerleading, baseball,
basketball, honor society, cho-
rus, helping with prom, home-
coming and many other event in
the community!
I can't explain to you the
feeling I had, as well as other


- MLS 10435 - - MLS 10130 -
Enjoy country living in the Beautiful 3/2 concrete block
3/2 home on over 7 acres. home in gorgeous subdivision.


- MLS 10155 -
Peaceful country setting on
5+ acres with native trees.


- MILS 9578 -
Over 5 acres o0 native plants
and mature oak and pine
trees.


- MLS 10433 -
Huge office space with lovely
reception area, offices, &
storage.


parents who called me to please
help. (Someone in our commu-
nity was giving my name to
these desperate parents for help
which convinced me to help
stand up and fight for the stu-
dents of this county. If you
never been in this situation you
could never know how it must
feel. God puts us all in a posi-
tions, and this is my call to
change thing so I would like to
thank The Herald-Advocate for
supporting me to bring this to
the attention of Hardee County.
Please remember the students
who continued pursuing their
education did not intentionally
fail the FCAT. They did not
give up on the system. The sys-
tem failed them. Some of these
students will be registering and
preparing to attend South
Florida Community College or
others of their choice, and some
are waiting with full scholar-
ships.
'lease help speak out and
change policies set by the
School Board deemed to not let
Hardee County students walk
with a certificate of completion
after 13 years of education from
our school system. The teachers
have worked hard teaching
our students (How can one test
stop them from at least walk-
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change this.
Things must change in our
school system and the time is
now!

Sincerely,
Lisa Douglas
Zolfo Springs


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Challenging Games For Dixie Youth


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The 2009 Dixie Youth divi-
sion is heating up.
At the end of last week, the
standings race was tighter than
ever. The Florida Fuel Mets
dropped a pair of games, while
the Joe L. Davis Braves picked
up a pair of wins. The Mets are
at 10-3 and the Braves at 9-4.
Behind them the All Crea-
tures Animal Hospital Yankees
at 8-4 and, Hardee Signs +
Tees at 7-5 are also battling it
out. Following up are the Vision
Ace Hardware Reds, Chapman
Fruit Red Sox and Countryside
Growers Tigers.
There were a pair of close
games last Monday. On Field 1,
the Braves upended the Mets 8-
6.
Luke Palmer homered among
his twin hits and Jacob Bolin
also had two hits for the Braves.
'Kramer Royal scored all three
tithes he got on base, Bolin
added twin tallies and Palmer,
Dylan Salas and Chris Lee each
added a run. Others chipping in
were Tyler Helms, Seth McGee,
Roby Paris, Ryan Ramirez and
Patrick Carlton.
For the Mets, a Dustin
Goodwyn grand slam homer
ended a fifth-inning rally. Kris
Johnson had four hits and
Scored three times. Garrett
Albritton, Dalton Tubbs and
Goodwyn added solo scores.
Others contributing were Cody
Spencer, Dalton Reas, Wyatt
Maddox, Tyler Bragg, Blake
Crawley, Wyatt Montgomery,
Mikey Heine and Dalton
Bryant.
Meanwhile, the Monday
Field 2 game was a 4-3 win for
the Yankees over the Red Sox.
Mason Gough paced the
Yanks with a pair of doubles
and a triple. He scored twice
and Omar Alamia and Wilson



Angel
By JOAN SEAMAN
--Of The Herald-Advocater
- It's down to the last week for
the 2008 Dixie Angels.
The girls, ages seven to 10,
have a final five games this
week, a pair of doublp-headers
on Monday, one game Tuesday
and two tonight (Thursday).
In action last week, the Lady
Bugs picked up a pair of victo-
ries to maintain their first-place
position with a 12-2 record. The
closest opponent is the Orange
BloSsoms at 10-4-1. The
Blossoms have only one game
left on the schedule, while the
Lady Bugs still have three
games.
Last week began with the
early game Monday, a 10-10 tie
between the Diamonds and the
Pink Sox.
Anna Erekson and Alyssa
Tatum each put dual scores on
the board for the Pink Sox.
Adding a run each were Josie
Hancock, Jessica Bembry,
Taylorjay Roberts, Rayann
Kulig, Tara McNabb and
Morgan Crews. Not quite get-
ting home were Caitlin
Dufresne and Amber Mendoza.
The Diamonds countered
with twin tallies by Bridgette
Conley and Catalina Longoria
and single scores by Mallery
gough, Mara Goodwyn,
Svannah Aubry, Michaela
Villarreal, Alex Brant and
Madison Rucker. Also helping
out were Tamara Griffis,
Kristian Judah and Cynthia
Briones. -
The Monday nightcap fea-


Bembry each added a run.
Others joining in were Frank
Farias, Armando Alamia,
Marco Briones, Austin Judah,
Kendall Gough, Austin Altman,
Jose Gonzales and Aaron
Briones.
For the Red Sox, it was 2ack
Battles, Cole Choate and Luke
Winter coming home in a sixth-
inning rally, moved along by
Cody Dyal and Tomas Gomez.
Others playing were Marcus
Battles, Steven Rodriguez,
Blaine HarShburger, Chris Hull,
Ezekiel Servin and Ty
Trammell.
The Rays won the only
Tuesday game, 10-7 over the
Tigers.
Leadoff batter Marco Deleon
tripled and doubled for the
Rays, putting a pair of runs on
the board. German Pigueroa
doubled and singled twice. He,
Julian Galvez and Mason
Waters each added twin scores.
Devin Pearson and Sam
Erekson added a run apiece.
Alex Clarke had three hits but
didn't quite get home, nor did
Tanor Durden, Hunter Bryant,
Kevin Kunkel, Jordan Rogers
of Tristan Montgomery.
David Badillo was the only
twin-tally batter for the Tigers.
Cesar Fimbres doubled, and
scored. Michael TomlinSon,
Ruben Olmos, Russell Weems
and Cody McVay also scored.
Conner Crawford, Adam.Salas,
Andy Manley, Josef Crosby and
Kyler Caskey didn't get all the
way to home plate.
On Thursday, the Field 1
game followed the pattern with
the Braves beating the Yanks 7-
5.
McGee and Paris each dou-
bled for the Braves. Royal and
Palmer crossed home plate
twice apiece and Helms,
McGee and Ramirez each
added a run.


s In Final Week


tured the Lady Bugs in a.7-3
win over the Orange Blossoms.
Nubia Gomez and Illiana
Flores crossed home plate twice
each for the Lady Bugs. Jamee
Keller tripled and scored and
Cheyanne Gough and Sarah
Welch also touched home plate.
Others playing were Gabrielle
Allen, Desiree Ford, Taylor
Graham, Karley Owens and
Sophie Cardenas.
Cheyenne Pohl, Jolie Pleger
and Rosienell Rivers were the
only Orange Blossom to get all
the way home. Others on the
squad are Ally Dotson, Emily
Bennett, Hannah Carlton,
Senida Garcia, Karley White,
Claudia Klein and Alicia
Lopez.
There was also a double-
header on Tuesday. In the 5:45
game, the Blossoms beat the
Cowgirls 13-6.
Rivers and Bennett each dou-
bled for the Blossoms. Pohl,
Pleger, Dotson, Garcia, Shayna
Harned and Bennett were two-
score batters, with Carlton
adding a solo score.
For theCowgirls, it was lead-
off batter Yadiro Castillo Com-
'ng around to score twice.
Li ianna PonCe, Cori-Ann
Resales, Yasmin Ramiret,
Marisol Montanez and Kaela
Villegas each added a run.
Other contributing were
Christian Napier, Morgan
Walters, Ashleigh Adams,
Danielle Zuniga and Destinee
Pace.
The Lady Bugs won the 7:15'
game 14-4 over the Diamonds.


Owens homered among her
twin hits for the Lady Bugs.
Gough, Gbmez, Flores, Allen
and Welch each Scored twice
and Ford, Briana Juarez and
Owens each added a run.
Aubry, Kristian Judah, Griffis
and Millarreal were the only
Diamonds to get all the way
home. Three others were
stranded along the way.
In the Thursday finale to the
week, the Cowgirls won 15-10
over the Diamonds.
Castillo, Napier, Walters,
AdamS, Ponce and Pace were
all twin-tally batters for the
Cowgirls. tuniga, Resales and
Villegas each added a run.
Longoria, Goodwyn, Aubry
and Judah were two-score bat-
ters for the Diamonds, with
Conley and GriffiS each adding
a tally.


Armando Alamia tripled and
Farias and Judah each doubled
for the Yankees. Farias, Alamia,
Gough, Judah and Gonzales
were the only runners to get to
home plate.
On Field 2, the Red Sox
downed the Reds 15-4.
Zach Battles circled the bases
four times and Marcus Battles
added a trio of tallies for the
Red Sox. Choate and Winter
came home twice each and
Gomez, Harshburger, Servin
and Trammell added solo
scores.
For the Reds, leadoff batter
Reed Woods scored twice. Tyler
Hewett had three hits and 2ack
Carranco two, but both were
stranded. Quinton Sanchez and
Keith Powell added solo scores.
Others playing for the Reds
were Bradley Brewer, William
McClelland, tack Crews, Steve
Crews, Austin Stoner, Lane Ball
and Brandon Hill.
The Friday Field 1 game was
another barn-burner, with the
Rays edging the Mets 6-5.
Deleon came around to score
twice for the Rays. Durden,
Galvez, Bryant and Rogers
added a run apiece.
For the Mets, it was Johnson
belting a homer and a double.
Goodwyn also doubled.
Leadoff batter Spencer came
around to score twice, while
Reas, Johnson and Albritton
added a run each.
The Field 2 game was an epi-
logue, with the Reds running
past the Tigers 12-1.
Hewett doubled for the Reds.
He, Woods, Powell and Stoner
put twin scores on the board,
while Carrance, Brewer,
McClelland and CrewS added a
run each.
Olmos was the lone Tiger to
score. Crawford singled and
was stranded as were Salas,
Badillo and Glen Ellis.


Athletes Succeed


Spring
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Athletes from the five spring
sports reaped their rewards in
ceremonies last Wednesday
evening.
In the midst of senior activi-
ties and final exams for under-
classmen, they all took time for
their achievements to be recog-
nized.
Baseball
Pitcher/infielder Kaleb Saun-
ders was named the Most
Valuable Player for 2008 as the
Wildcats advanced to the semi-
final rounds of districts before
losing 1-0 to arch-rival Sebring.
The Wildcat hustle award
went, to catcher Cody Gullatt,
the Wildcat Academic Award to
Carl Basey and the Carl
Saunders Award to Kyle Cobb.
Josh Spencer and Dan Timmons
shared the Coach's Award.
Underclassmen getting, spe-
cial awards were Best Offen-
sive Player Brek McClenithan,
Best Defensive Player Tony
Martinez and Rookie of the
Year Scott Donaldson.
Timmons and Gullatt gath-
ered the only third-year
plaques. Getting' second-year
plaques .were Saunders,
Spencer, Cobb, Basey, Will
Abbott, Ben Krause and
McClenithan.
First-year plaques went to
Conner Davis, Adam Cart-
wright, Tyler Robertson, Nolan
Neuhauser and Donaldson.
Softball
"I was very pleased with our
performance at districts this
year. We really gave our oppo-
nents a run for their money.
:Many teams that used to take a
win against us for granted are
starting to take us more serious-
ly.
"I am very proud of the girls
for coming so far. I look for-
ward to next season where
almost all of our girls are
returning. We are losing only
senior Amber Steedley," com-
mented head coach Liz Lenhart.
The Coach's Award went to
junior Krystin Robertson.
Kristina Garcia had the Highest
Batting Average of .442. Amber
Steedley had the .moSt stolen
bases. Elvira Servin claimed the
most RBIs with 18 and Highest
.Slugging Percentage with .563.
Amber Steedley got the only
four-year award and Robertson
the only three-year award.
Second-year awards went to
Garcia, Lola Rivera and
Chelsey Steedley.
First-year awards went to Paige
Clark, Halley Marshall,
Miranda Powell, Heather St.
John and Servin.
Tennis
Coaches Ken Leupold and
Barbara Leupold presented
awards to their teams. For the
boys squad, Joe Porter was
named Most Valuable Player.


Mike Torres was named Most
Improved Player and Dylan
Justice took the Coach's Award.
In girls tennis, it was Clara
Durrance as Most Valuable
Player, Satanah Palmer as Most
Improved Player and Shelby
Durrance taking the Coach's
Award.
Senior Natalie Green had the
only four-year letter. Three-year
letters went to Kaitlin Justice
and Clara Durrance. Porter,
Shelby Durrance and Amanda
Porter got two-year letters.
First-year letters went to
Palmer, Torres, Drew Macias,
Dylan Justice, Dusty Spears
and Isaac Vasquez.
Track and Field
Don Trew, Rod Smith and
assistant coaches Rob Beatty
and James Carpenter chose a
variety of participants for track
awards: Some received several.
Postnea Louisjeune, who got
two medals at state, claimed the
girls MVP award. She also got
awards for setting school
records in the high jump, triple
jump and as park of the 4x400-
meter relay team. She todk the
Top Jumper award as well.
Marwin Simmons, who also
got two medals at state, was the
boyd MVP. He also'had awards
for setting school records in the
long jump, triple jump, and as
part of .the 4x100 and 4x400
relays. He also took the Top
Jumper award.
The Solis twins, Gloria and
Pete, claimed almost identical
awards. Both were Scholar-
Athlete award winners and
received awards as part of a
winning 4x400 relay team. She
received the Top Thrower
Award, while he received the
Top Vaulter and Top Middle
Distance awards.
Andrea Parkinson set school
records in the 100-meter hur-
dles, 300-meter hurdles and as
part of the 4x400 record-setting
relay. She got the girls Top
Hurdler Award.
Jayquan Gandy set school
records in the 200 meters and as
part of the 4x100 relay. He was
named the Top Sprinter.
Jean Frenot set school
records in the 300-meter hur-
dles and as part of the 4x400
relay. He received the Top
Hurdler Award and the boys
Leadership Award.


0 Eoin u for .. os oemos aL %.

DIABETES SEMINAR SEMINAR DE DIABETES


Da ,Sessions in .
5 DsaSion5 in 5esiones de dia en singles o

..ngisi JUEVES V

THURSDAY Junio 12,19, y 26

June 12th, 19th & 26th 9:00 am a 12:00 pm
9:00 am to 12:00 pm son nocC en

- Night sessions in i ngls yespanol

E-nqlish and 5panish MARTES Y JUEVES
MARTES Y JUEVES
STUESDAY & Junio 17 y 19

THURSDAY 5:00 pm a 8:00 pm
June 17th and 19th
5:00 prnm to 8:00 pm

. ......-.. ... .. .. .....a... . ...)


For more information please call.... Para Mas Informaci6n Ilame a.... ,
The Hardee County Health Department Departamento de Salud del Condado De Hardee \1.
Siab6t6b Prevention and Control Program Programa de Prevencion de Diabetes
1 Mrs. Veronica Hernandet or Mrs. Angela Hernandez Mrs. Veronica Hernandez or Mrs. Angela Hernandez "
"115 KD Rieell Road * W uchulo 115 KD Revell Road - Wauchula
863 473-4161 ext 211 or 157 863-773-4161 ext 217 o 157 5:29se

AZ^^^ ^ A Z _'-ts-


The Herald-Advocate
(UsPS 57-g7o)

Thursday, May 29, 2008


,GE ONE


DeA I AJAuction Co.

Saturday - May 31, 2008 - 9:00 a.m.
1740 SE US 27
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Sale Site Phone: 863-946-9135
Terry DeMott, Sr. Mobile: 229-891-1832

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E-MAIL: sales@demottauction.com
Auctioneer: Terry DeMott, Sr. FL #AU1833 - ABl189 5


Jimmy Cimeus set school
records in the 110-meter hur-
dles and as part of the 4x100
relay.
Top Distance Awards went to
Gilberto Gutierrez and Laura
Galvan.
Others received special
awards were: Jalyn Smith-
Leadership Award and Top
Middle Distance Award; Mary
Braddock and Postene
Louisjeune-Most Improved
Awards; Kara Norris and
Devonte Carter-Rookie Of the
Year Awards; Carlos Ramirez-
Top Thrower; Briana Aguila-
Top Vaulter; and Brittany
Brown-Top Sprinter.
Many other tracksters re-
ceived letters in addition to
those named above. For the
girls, it was Norris, Braddock,
Lacresha Carlton, Lacey Garza,
Heather Kouns, Amanda
Bissette, Shanique Outley,
Lauren Moore, Daisha Blandin
and Yesenia Vargas.
For the boys, received letters
or pins were Reggie Snell,
Brandon Wright, Pablo Macias,
Andrew Hunt, Nick Battles,
Michael McTaw, Kelsheem
White, Gerardo Villegas and
Tre' Anderson.

Boys Weightlifting
Senior Jorge Lopez was the
only weightlifter to advance to
state and earned the Most
Valuable Lifter award. He was
the only three-year award win-
ner.
Receiving two-year awards
were Wade Mahoney, Phillip
Barton, David Newcomb,
Logan Thomas, Alex Lanier
and Skylar Alden.
First-year awards went to
Tony Martinez, Murad Ottalah,
Charlie Powell, Jarrius Lindsey,
Postene Louisjeune, Lance
Mason, Carlos Ramirez, Jordan
Baker, Nick Battles, Brett
Tyson, Kevin Godwin and
Cody Hernandez.

Clearly a forward thinking
man, Alfred Nobel, the inven-
tor of dynamite, is also credit-
ed with inventing plywood.

Art is a collaboration between
God and the artist, and the
less the artist does the better.
-Andre Gide









2C The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


-Schedule Of Weekly Services


Printed as a Public'Siviot-
. ..nby.. : y ,
SThe Herald- Avocate',
S u hlla-ii ri nit 4,'

.Deadline: Thursday'5 p.:,r


BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
STuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. - 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd -. ...........
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group - Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. - 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD '
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ...................... 5:00 p.m.
COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship......0.....10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. - 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1 :00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. - 375-2253
Bible Study ...........:................9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship .............1..0:45 a.m.
:Discipleship Training ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..6:30 p.m.
Wednesday WOW Service ..7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets -375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road - 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.in.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. - 375-3370
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. - 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAII BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. - 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training........... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

Help your brother's boat


across, and your own will
reach the shore.


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study,
Thurs..................... 7:30 p.m.


ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. * Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane - 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1 :00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane - 773-2540
Sunday School ............. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .........11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. - 494-5622
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1...1 I:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids
.................................... ....6:30 p.m .
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic
Rd.
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service .................. 11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................700 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
IIARDEE CAMPUS
225 E. Main St. (City Hall
Auditorium)
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday ................................10:00 a.m .

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East - 773-3447
Pastor - James Bland
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
;Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .............'.....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men ' Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd..
767-0199


CHURCH 01
OF THE FIRS'
807 S. 8th
773-457


WAUCHULA

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. - 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 11:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. - 735-8681
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning .................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night .......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night ..................7:30 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
152 Airport Rd.
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio...............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. - 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............... 11:30 a.mn.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. - 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................6:00p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave - 773-3800
Praise & Worship .............0:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service......7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. - 773-4182
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Family Night Supper .............5:00p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Mtg............6:00 p.m
M& M Kids's Klub................6:00 p.m
(Music & Missions 4 yr -grade 5)
IMPACT (Jr. High)................6:20 p.m
(Youth Worship for gr. 6-8)
323 (Sr. High)..... .............6:30 p.m
(Youth Worship.for gr 9-12)
FIRST BAPTIST-THURCEIT
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. - 773-4722
Escuela Dominical ................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Predicacion .......................... 11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles......7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. - 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Children's Programming
(0-12th grade).........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Dinner.................................... 5:30 p.m .
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
(Lil'K)/Sonshine Singers
.................... ............. 6:30-8:00 p.m .
Jam Team......................6:30-7:15 p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups
..................................7:15-8:00 p.m .
6-12th Grade (Oasis)....6:30-8:00 p.m.
Adult Bible Study.........6:30-8:00 p.m
FIRST-IJiIRCH OF
THne4ORENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday;Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARYY
,BlATIST CHURCH
1347 M" tin Luther King Ave.
-773-6556
Sunday School'......*..............9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Stody ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. - 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship. 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

.FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service ..........7:00 p.m.
Wed. Family Ministries ........7:00 p.m.


F GOD
T BORN THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Ave.Pentecostal
. 810 W. Tennessee St. - 773-3753
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. - 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts...................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
S W worship .............................. 10:30 a.m .
SA .Wed. Night Dinner ..................:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult CI.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min. ..........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
M r.5 Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfruta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos .......... .................6:00 p.m
M iercoles...... ..................... 7:00 p.m.

85-0470 IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
)rings, FL Old Biadenton Road
767-1010


WAUCHULA

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
. ENGLISH "
155 Altman Road - 1131
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening..................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
- SPANISH
Sunday Evening ....................4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ..................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday .Evening...&......7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road - 773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
113 N. 7th Ave.
Sunday Service ..............1.....1 :00 a.m
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Church Training ...... ............ 5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship ...................(.. st & 3r
Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................... :45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
.2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. - 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. - 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...:............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road - 773-2858
I1 & 3" Sun. Communion ..10:00 a.m.
2" & 4"' Sun. Divine Worship......10:00
a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CIIRCH
149 Manley Road - East Main - 773-
5814
Sunday School ..................... :30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US IIwy 17
Morning Service .................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MIS-
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East - 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays ........9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................000 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9TH Ave. - 773-6418
Sunday Service...............10:00 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road - 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ............7.....700 a.m.
(English) .................... 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ..................11:00 a.m .
(Creole)......................1:00 p.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SECOND CHANCE BIBLE
CHURCH
1511 US Hwy 17 N. - 873-1148
Sunday School.......................9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:30 am.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
SBC Affiliation

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. - 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. - 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946


Sunday Morning Worship.. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship .....................7:30 n.m.


The Brooklyn Bridge, in
New York, is a suspension
.bridge that contains enough
wire in its cables to stretch
more than halfway around
the world.


WAUCHULA
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Wbrship ..................7:00 p.m.'
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train...........7:00 p.m
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
SWAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service .....................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service..j .............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..............7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .................7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
1720 W. Main
773-2929
iSunday Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all Services.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN
CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker 'Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsvifle Road
Church - 735-0871 Pastor - 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ...................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 730 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee - 735-0114
Bible Study .................1..... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ..................1 1:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH,
South Hwy. 17 - 494-5456
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. - 735-2524 - 773-
0989
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship................................ 1 :00 a.m .
Evening..................................6:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet. ..7:00 p.m.,


ZOLFO SPRINGS

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER-
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church...............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & .T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.
- PRIMERA MISSION ""-
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 1:00 a.m.
......................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday . ..................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy.'66
863-735-8600
Sunday School. . ...............9:45 a:m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month
Cowboy Fellowship............7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South - 735-0636
Sunday School . .................:30 a.l.
Morning Worship ......................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SSAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane - 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones........................1.. 0:00 a.m.
Doctrina............. ........... 11:30 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica .. ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................................ 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio............................ .....8:00 p.m ,
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. - 735-1200
Sunday School ..:.................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Training Union ..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p .p.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


SEEDS
. FROM
THE
SOWER

ele Geor~ga

A judge asked, "Will you
tell the court what passed
between you and your wife
during the argument?"
"I will," said the husband.
"An iron, a rolling pin, six
plates and a kettle."
Too often a marriage is a
duel, not a duet. The couples
don't communicate, they
combat. Their homes aren't
built on love, but lust, God
isn't first in their lives, He's
last.
There's no greater thing
than for two souls to feel
they're joined by the Lord for
life, to strengthen each other
in labor, to rest on each other
in sorrow, to care for each
other in sickness, and to love
each other and the Lord with
all their hearts.


A4clisc rmo eurv tmb-,. urmvlkd by huvr and .mutuid w d b ay..w
(71 ix u bri& as rays ofama nd the peudW arftrqr at purt bmzts kAs
pnc~ *e p, we 1 09 sni wmW ad" asaul o ma s cnh ln Iwaome d 7L The wrliies
mski ay mirror nrupkd spirits d sdeep mkM Dugt eae an caily �iuamfte.
lnlldrr I And
Adua our undry shoulM khedem- rtoh . four unte vso h *ti in it's difleuk So
rtmse. It we mre put f aemiawumltky oft wr4, each wk we hik we b i0 tM 6bidtY
(o rera& uur body and renew ur.a utsiva e ntterCrsd an) * a e am
tspeslesae a "s nI ml ckah a ("ad's Ward nwasea as Mlaetr k itfaMr. In John
15:3 we rrud... "N-aw ye arecdean through She Word odak I hasr spikta undo1*90
Worhnp elvk week Ron afrehi .hwith GO&


Ark h. b
si-ia 7. .t~I


A.m,


lM-LI SAIS *lFlO 1P4 1


:~SC 511.8.~r 8 . M. q . n ~P . ,


CPeace Yivoer Grou

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 7
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Sp


The

Herald-Ad
1111111,4 (olofm,% /bmw

PRINTERS -- PL
115 S. 7th
Wauchula, FL
Telephone (663)











W.E.S. Honor Roll

Third Nine Weeks


KINDERGARTEN
Griffin Clark
Quintin Lindsey
Carolina Ramirez
Madi McGee
Hannah Brown
Terah Servin
Tiaykiyse Spnith
Weston Schraeder
Adam Pazzaglia
Blake Tinsley
Jack Driskell
Gage Gough
Maddy Stockton
Dalton Kiella
Mahin Khan
Taylor Watkins
Marah Al Uri
Kein Knight
Jocelyn Pritchard
Cristal Miranda
Madison Garcia
Dylan Crawford
Joshua Albritton
Cade Alexy
William Roland
Kyleigh Miller
Jesus Jurado
Chelsi Bee
Ayrica Baker
Ramon Banda
Allison Barber
Daisy Diego
Fabian Lopez
Summer Bond
Kate Melendy
Jaronda Terrell
Renell Herrera
Billy Diakomihalis
Nyelli Flores
Sophie Allen
Alitzah Aleman
Sandra Paniagua
Nathan Carrion
Javier Chavez
Mariela Badillo
Dakota Hay
Jake Henderson
Jessica Kunkel
Alex Mancillas
Damian Hernandez-
Oliva
Jerica Pierce
Joel DeSantiago
Elias Ramirez
Damon Caraway
Logan Cartwright
Ana Baltazar
Tomas Cardoza
Jonathan Carnley
Anna Cook
Dylan Davis
Talia Faulk
Scott Meeks
Dristen Newcomb
Andy Lopez
IGenaro Alanis
FIRST GRADE
Adriana Arana


Katie Camacho
Dawson Cantu
Claire Carlton
Mikie Cruz
Jeremiah Mancillas
Ashlee Patterson
Aubrey Stark
Christian Brant
J.M. Brown
Ederika Austin
Kimberly Fonseca
Lianna Albritton
Ciera Munoz
Daylin Newcomb
Angel Perez
Anahi Ramos
Makayla Wilson
Shelby Zeigler
Luis Martinez
Marc Anthony Delatorre
Bryce Hernandez
Bibiana Mier
Javier Montoya
Jessica Roland
Hayley Thomas
Lizandro Bo Villarreal
Valeria Lopez
Sandra Cruz
Joel Martinez
Yamilex Miranda
Trey Stephens
Tyson Sutton
Dustin Willis
Adrian Flores
Denali Briones
Sarah Carlton
Joely Garza
Tara Hines
Josiah Mirabella
Shelby Spencer
Noah Torres
Matthew Tyson
Quinton Yates
Daisy Badillo
Malik McMillian
Anthony Rosado
Rachel St. Fort
Jose Castillo
Andrea McVay
Colen Oakes
Hailey McLeod
Jerika Rimes
Jose Vera
Garrett Williams
Mateo Maldonado
Kory Giles

SECOND GRADE
Lindsey Barwick
Shelby Gibson
Damar Harris
Ellie Palmer
Gabriella Ruiz
Sarai Santana
Brooke Shaw
Cole Terrell
Savannah Mullins
Mercedes Owens
Conrad Pace
Maribel Rodriguez


Alicia Ruiz
Rico Arana
Erika Garcia
Mariela Miramontes
Cody Ellis
John Waldran
Emily Pierce
Lexi Harris
Alejandra Salgado
Tanner Carlton
Hope Elliott
Kylie Mirabella
Emily Patarini
Jax Ullrich
Bridgette Conley
Joley Pleger
Nicholas Sellers
Brilyance Augustus
Alexx Brant
Darwyn Howard
Dawson Ratliff
Joshua Ward
Josue Arana
Selene Espinoza
Yisselle Mier
Sophie Cardenas
Ayana Daniels
Sophia Diakomihalis
Kara Friers
Gabriela Montoya
Lilianna Ponce
Miguel Ruiz
Cecilia Castillo
Nubia Hernandez
Miguel Cardoza

THIRD GRADE
Soraya Castillo
Rosie Fimbres
Connor Pritchard
Jonatan Martinez
Isaac Flores
Levi Lovett
Boone Paris
Parker Carlton
Morgan Crews
Shayna Harned
Vaughn Kirkland
Briseyda Molinero
Kendall Winter
Wyatt Zeigler
James McGee
Selena Miranda
Aaron Delatorre
Lisa Crouse
Landon Albritton
Holly Brown
Abby Clark
Brooklyn Graham
Hayden Lindsey
Amber Westberry

FOURTH GRADE
Rebecca Albritton
Hannah Carlton
Seth McGee
Dalton Tubbs
Carly Wadsworth
Morgan Walters
Jacob Servin


MAY FLOWERS
OK, so we didn't have a lot of April showers for May flowers
but I think I will plant some seeds of wisdom that will bloom and
flower into some knowledge for you. All corny metaphors aside,
let's jump feet first into this month's column.

Don't Look Now, It's Almost June!
Whether you are a proud Florida native or you moved here
yesterday, you should know Atlantic hurricane season runs from
June 1 through Nov. 30. You should also know there are many
opportunities for you to get your family prepared for whatever haz-
ardous event might come your way.
SHere are some "hurricane specific" things you can do to help
get you on your way:
* Review your homeowner's insurance policy.
* If you have a disaster kit, check the shelf life of the products
and re-stock it. If you don't have one, visit our Web site on what
should be in it.
* If you have a generator, check it thoroughly and put in fresh
fuel. You may want to consider adding a fuel conditioner since
generators tend to sit unused for long periods of time.
* If you have a pet or special medical need and plan on uti-
lizing a public shelter, make sure you register with us for those
programs. Applications can be found on our Web site.
* Create a family disaster plan by visiting http:/floridadisas-
ter.org..Click on the "Create a Family Plan" link to get started. It
takes about 10 minutes, and you can print out the plan when you're
done.
There are many more activities that should be done when
storms threaten our area, and even more to do when we are in the
"error cone." Next month's column will focus on the timeline of
approaching storms and what you should be doing to get ready.
Florida has the distinction of being the most prone to huiticane
landfalls in the continental United States; it's not a question of "if,"
it's a matter of "when". Stay tuned ...
And The Winners Are ...
I would like to congratulate the winners and runners-up in the
annual Hazardous Weather Awareness Poster & Essay Contest.
* Poster Contest Winners: Rouke Madronal, North Wauchula
Elementary School; Efrian Martinez, Hilltop Elementary School.
* Poster Contest Runners Up: Halie Strey, North Wauchula
Elementary School; Carolina Ibanez, Hilltop Elementary School.
* Essay Contest Winner: Althea Madronal, sixth grade.
* Essay Contest Runner Up: Erica Vasquez, sixth grade.
Contest sponsors were the American Red Cross, Crowder Gulf
Disaster & Debris Management, Tri-Star Telecom, Wal-Mart,
Heartland Broacasting and Hardee Signs Plus T's.
The students were recognized at the School Board meeting last
Thursday night.

TIP OF THE MONTH
Would you like to schedule a hurricane preparedness program
for your business, church or civic group? Contact our office at 773-
6373 and we'll schedule a program for your group. We can do pro-
grams for small or large audiences, days or evenings.
Remember, managing your emergencies begins with you.


Xochil Zavala
Josie Moore
Alexandra Dotson
Cheyenne Pohl
Dashawna Goad
Genesis Torres
Jonathan Martin
Hayden Hawthorne
Jordan Evers
Kaydance Owens
Kristen Burkett
Logan Gunnoe
Mara Goodwyn
Morgan Evans
Reyna Kirkland
Sarah McClenithan
Savannah Aubry
Shelby Dees
Adam Salas
Karan Limbachiya
Eduardo Lopez
Kelsie Earls
Rebeca Espinoza
Gabrielle Allen
Rachel Parlor
Deisy Piedad
Brenda Miramontes
Stephanie Narciso
Felimon Olivera
Donesha Wilson

FIFTH GRADE
Anahi Arroyo
Patrick Carlton
Diana DeSantiago
Cesar Fimbres
Milli Jones
Haneen Ottallah
Danielle Smith
Alex Ullrich
Rayna Parks
Jose Jurado
Marcus Battles
Berenice Arana
Makayla Deuberry
Breanna Godwin
Hannah Napier
Roby Paris
Jace Flemer
Leonel Rodriguez
Kasandra Alvarez
Cain Roman
Kirsten Ramirez
Adriana Olivas
Daniela Moran
Tatiana Juarez
Kristiana
Fleurimond
Elizabeth Alvarez
Michael Youngblood
Raymond Hall
Guadalupe Rosales
Raquel Maldonado
Dana Terrell
Gemi Saunders
Leah Chavez
Ai.xandra l.pez
Alysa Salazar
Timothy Perkins
Augustine Sanchez


We have too many high-
sounding words, and too few
actions that correspond with
them.
-Abigail Adams







r -S FL38
Teehoe(63 7335


il ll .* ]=Ed -


BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE
HARDEE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT,
DIABETES PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROGRAM AND
L THE HARDEE COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE A


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ppr ;


May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Adopt A
Pet On the
Internet
Hardee Animal Clinic in
Wauchula has joined other
organizations in the area and
nationwide in listing its home-
less dogs and cats on the
Internet in hopes of finding
homes for the animals.
Petfinder.com, the oldest and
largest database of adoptable
animals on the Web, currently
has over 250,000 homeless pets
listed. The site is updated con-
tinuously.
More than 10,800 animal
welfare organizations in the
United States, Canada and other
countries post their pets on the
site.
A potential adopter enters
search criteria for the kind of
pet he wants, then a list is
returned that ranks the pets in
proximity to the zip code en-
tered. Adoptions are handled by
the animal-placement group
where the pet is housed, and
each group has its own policies.
Petfinder.com was created in
early 1996 as a grassroots pro-
ject by Jared and Betsy Saul to
end the euthanasia of adoptable
pets. Since its inception, the site
has facilitated roughly 15 mil-
lion adoptions.


HHS Super Sixties Reunion

Planned for Jan. 17, 2009

The Super Sixties Reunion, for all Hardee High School classes
for the 1960's, will be held Saturday, Jan. 17, 2009, in Wauchula.
Please contact the following committee members to give contact
information. Brochures or e-mails will be sent around the first of
October. At that time specific information will be provided as to
the location in Wauchula.
Some of the activities planned for the weekend include a hot air
balloon race, a golf scramble, and a barbecue.
The Class of 1969 is having their "Almost 40" reunion, home-
coming weekend October 10-11, 2008. Contact Gloria Clavel
Davis.
The Class of 1968 is having their 40th reunion in Sebring,
Quality Inn, May 24, 2008. Contact Thelma Albritton Hendrix.
The Super Sixties Reunion Committee and their contact informa-
tion follows:
Class of '60, Sheila Carlton Smith, Lake Placid.
Class of '61, Sue Bryan Jackson, Wauchula, jacpac2@embarq-
mail.com, 863-773-4065.
Class of '62, Ingie Burke Givens, Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
mbgivens@yahoo.com, 256-454-1318.
Class of '63, Sue Green Birge, Wauchula, suebirge@strato.net,
863-735-1479.
Class of '64, Mitzi Roberts Chronic, Valrico, mitzichronic@ver-
izon.net, 813-655-8319.
'Class of '65, Sue Maxwell Baker, Wauchula, bakerS@helena-
chemical.com, 863-773-4436.
Class of '66, Jerold Knight, Miami Beach, jknight305 @aol.com,
305-345-0111.
Class of '67, Linda Sasser, St. Augustine, lindasasser@bell-
south.net.
Class of '68, Thelma Albritton Hendrix, Wauchula,
Thelma Hendrix@doh.state.fl.us, 863-773-1000.
Class of '69, Gloria Clavel Davis, Wauchula, 863-773-2498.


AiE (O.U GOING TO 3 E OREED

TfHIS SUMMERi?


We have leagues at different times and different days for Men
and Women that work! Elementary, Junior High, and High
School Kids there are leagues for you guys! So don't just sit all
day and let the Summer fade away come and hang out with your
friends and have a good time!


Men'5

Monday , Thursday


Cat's age 1 2 +up
Monday


Women's

Monday , Tuesday, Thursday


No-tap
Thursday


Mens and Women's

Monday, Thursday


K itten's 6-1 1 years old
Thursday


Learn to bowl
Tuesday, Friday


Bowl-Of-Fun


, Lanes


Call Joan at

773-6391

for more information
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Healthy Cookin


Demonstration with Tast


ing


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Featuring Quick and Easy Recipes

for Grilling and Summer



June 5, 2008 On
25 Seats
11:30am - 1:00 pm Available!


Hardee County Extension Office .gi
(behind Civic Center)


Cost is $6 per person

Register today by calling 773-4161


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Greetings to you all from Fort
Green.
We thank the Lord as' we
finally received some rain.
Some areas of Fort Green
received more than others but
that is scriptural, where it says it
rains on the just and unjust. We
jokingly say us unjust need to
receive more rain! We received
a half-inch and soil around the
weeds is still dry!
We used to have little green
frogs that we always called rain
frogs. When they would start
croaking, rain was coming. I
have been hearing those frogs,
so maybe we will soon be com-
plaining that we have too much
rain! Most of us are never con-


tent.
Paul
revival


Adams attended the
meeting in Lakeland


that is taking the surrounding
areas by storm. What I under-
stand is it started with a week
planned revival and it was
extended and moved to larger
facilities due to the large
crowds. Maybe this part of the
United States is turning back to
God.
Charlotte called me last
week. She used to be my walk-
ing partner but moved away. If
you walk, you need to be com-
mitted to meet someone daily
who is walking with you. This
way, when you wake up and
don't want to walk, you will get
up and go as someone is wait-
ing for you!
My dog is waiting every day
and want s to walk but some-
how he is easy to put off. You
need to have a lot self-disci-


CITY OF WAUCHULA

WAUCHULA CEMETERY
The City of Wauchula would like to give lot own-
ers the opportunity to remove any item that vio-
lates the rules and regulations of the cemetery.
The City of Wauchula will begin removing items
that are in violation June 1, 2008. If you have
any questions regarding the rules please feel
free to call City Hall at (863) 773-3131. 5-29



CITY OF WAUCHULA

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City of Wauchula, City Commission will hold a Special
Meeting on Monday, June 2, 2008 at 5:30 p.m. This will be
to amend Section 2.03.05 of the Code. Following the
meeting there will be a workshop. The meeting will be
held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 E. Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT AND SECTION 286.26, FLORIDA
STATUTES, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
MEETING SHOULD CONTACT THE CITY CLERK'S
OFFICE AT 863-773-3131.


ATTEST:
S/Clarissa Abbott
City Clerk


CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/David Royal
Mayor


5:29
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*Football Action q
*sHdCu
*Jr. Miss Hrdee Count
eatl isHadeCut
Wrince& Pricess agean


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


pline, which I evidently do not
have!
The only person I know of
who is consistent about jogging
without a partner is Bud Abbott.
Three mornings a week, you
will meet him on the road if you
are an early riser. The new word
for walking-jogging is wob-
bling. I think that is the correct
way to spell it, as it was the
answer to one of the questions
on "Jeopardy" recently.
Edith Bassett advised they
were" busy putting up vegeta-
bles. Quite a few others are
busy in this canning season,
which will soon be another
thing of the past. Lots of people
freeze rather than jar. Tomatoes
are the easiest to jar, in my
opinion. All the canning books
advise that peas, beans, etc.
need the pressure-cooked sys-
tem rather than the water bath
method, and that I can't do.
Years ago, right after World
War II, they had canning plants
in most towns. This furnished
jobs to the people who worked
there and allowed the farmers to
take their prepared vegetable to
town and put then in cans rather
than jars. They had big vats
they would can a hundred at the
time. This was exciting to the
youth, and they loved to stamp
the lids with whatever veg-
etable was going into the can. It
sure didn't take much to please
kids in the days before videos,
TV, headphones, etc.
Wild violets used to grow in
the woods in South Georgia.
Every spring when Grandpa
would come in with a violet
stuck in his lapel, you knew that
after Sunday dinner we would
go violet picking. It seemed
when you found one violet, if
you looked the way it grew you
could find another. Big bunches
would be picked and nothing
smells as good as wild violets.
Well, Leo and Lila Blink had
Mother's Day dinner with us
and brought me a pretty hand-
made vase. I was in a local store
and there were purple violets
that looked like the kind we
used to pick. They look so pret-
ty in my' new vase. You wonder
how China can make all the
variety of items that bring back
such pleasant memories!
There is going to be a gospel
sing at Fort Green Baptist this
Saturday night at 6 pm. The
Royal Heirs Quartet will be
hosting the concert. They have
not been singing due to health
problems. Sherman Cooper is
well now and the group is anx-
ious to share the message,
through song.
Joining the Royal Heirs is the
Simple Faith Trio from the
Tampa Bay area and local tal-
ents Connie Abbott, Carol
Brown and a duet of Charles
Abbott and Tim Casey. Please
come out and join us. With the
new time it will be daylight
when you arrive and still day-
light when the concert is over.
This helps some with the dri-
ving. Incidentally Sherman's
birthday is the 31st, so happy
birthday, Sherman.
This year's graduating class
will remember the high cost of
gas at nearly $4 a gallon. When
I graduated it was three gallons
for $1! Of course, our gradua-
tion class members could go
lots farther for $5 than the 2008
graduates, but most didn't' have
a car. Graduation is Saturday.
The annual 4-H Awards
Banquet if tonight (Thursday).
The Senior Sermon is also this
night, but the two will not have
many conflicts. Most 4-H mem-
bers drop 4-H and join FFA
upon entering high school. 4-H
does have scholarships avail-
able for: its members in their
senior year, so possibly they
should reconsider and remain in


Book Review
By Spessard Stone


4-H. 4-H members from, the
Fort Green clubs will be hoping
to win some of the coveted
awards.
Polly Banda still needs
prayers. She has started taking
stronger medicine. Also, Chris
Thompson is back home, She
thanks the Lord she was able to
spend a few days with her son
and pray with him before his
home going. She said he moved
to Arkansas three years ago and
loved it there. She was
impressed with his friends and
the special ways they treated
their family. There are good
folks all around.
The population of Fort Green
is increasing. Judy McQuaig
has a beautiful new baby. A
baby is a gift straight from God.
John Brown taught the
Wednesday night services. He
did a wonderful job.
Connie and Danny Coker and
others, for a total of eight in
their group, took a cruise to
Cozumel, Mexico. Connie said
the weather made it a little
rough going but wonderful on
the return trip. The men went
deep-sea fishing and caught
tuna. The had a super time fish-
ing, and the ladies took this day
to visit the interesting sights.
Connie said the beach was
just beautiful and the water was
a royal blue. You had to see it to
believe something so gorgeous.
They all had a terrific vacation.
They left on a Thursday and
returned on Monday. It is amaz-
ing the many varied colored
water of the ocean and the Gulf.
Two men from Fort Green,
Donald Samuels and Donny
Waters, are running for com-
missioner. The roads will be
busy when they begin to visit
neighbors and knock on doors!
With gas so expensive maybe
they. will be driving their golf
carts.
There will be a Men's Bake
Off after the p.m. services on
June 8. The men bake a cake,
and a winner is chosen king as
the best "Cake-Maker" in Fort
Green. Men, instead of "start
yotr engines," like the car races
begin, start reading those cook-
books! There will be some pret-
ty and some good cakes, if it is
anything like in the past.
Take care and remember to
pray for one another.

ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, RO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


'MAMA: ROOT, HOG, OR DIE_
Barbara Oehlbeck has lovingly portrayed her mother, and.in a
greater sense every mother of her era, especially of the South, in
"Mama: Root, Hog or Die."
A gifted storyteller, Oehlbeck, called "Youngest Daughter," has
artistically in prose and photographs patched together quilt-like the
life and times of "Mama," Nancy Halsey Harding, form her birth
as a "liberated" woman in a cold back bedroom of the coldest win-
ter on record in Grayson County, Va., through her married life'in
Henry County, Va.
Glen Harding was a devoted husband and father, who worked
full-time at a furniture factory and, in after hours and weekends,
ran a motorcycle and fix-it shop and a farm, of which the latter two
Nancy co-ran.
Yet he was willingly overshadowed by Mama, picking up peo-
ple and pieces of life without ever looking back or giving up. Never
idle, she cooked from scratch, sewed all the family's clothes, tend-
ed her garden (from which she canned everything) and grew beau-
tiful flowers while taking in stray animals and even, on occasion,
children, and making toys for children at Christmas.
To Youngest Daughter's endless questions, Mama, who had and
intuitive knowledge of how to do things, taught by example, "Just
look, real good. You learn by looking. "
Never wasting anything, Mama was always happiest when
making something from almost nothing. Scraps of clothing vari-
ously became a tablecloth or quilts. Admonished about the hungry
little children in China, the children ate all on their plates. Compost
was utilized long before "green" became politically correct.
Mama mothered many hungry kid, who just happened by from
time to time, but one, Ricky, found that secret door to her heart and
was invited in. Ricky, who lived on the back side of the hill for at
least half a dozen years, defended his trespassing enroute to school
by saying "I mostly wanted to smell something' good to eat coming'
out you back door." Indeed, even hobos smelled their way to her
kitchen.
She loved flowers, plants and gardens in general. The chapter
"Pink Vi'lets" tells of Mama's gift on her wedding day to a young
woman who had to have pink violets to go with her petal-pink
bridal dress. Hers were the only such flowers, seen by the bride-to-
be in the dormer window.
"Soup Beans" relates a family tradition, passing on a recipe.
Youngest Daughter, now living in Florida, if given all the instruc-
tions on cooking soup beans for "him," her son-in-law. And, final-
ly, the passing of the old bean pot, with the promise that it will get
the best of care.
Her lifelong dogged determination was for freedom to do what
she needed to do and wanted to do. So, she did until a stroke left
her crippled her lifelong fear and unconscious for three agonizing
months in a hospital, until she "went away," her surviving husband
being unable to say she'd died.
Mama was not given to praise or apology, but on meeting her
son-in-law, Dr. Luther W. Oehlbeck, she exclaimed, "Well, you
finally done something' worthwhile."
Oehlbeck in "Mama" has again done something worthwhile. It
is a delightful book, which will remind you of your mother and
grandmother. It is a page turner you will not want to put down. You
must read this book.
"Mama: Root, Hog or Die" contains 359 pages and numerous
photographs. It can be obtained from Barbara Oehlbeck, 25075
Grassy Run, LaBelle, FL 33935; telephone (863) 675-2771.

These, then, are my last words to you: Be not afraid of life.
Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create
that fact.
-William James


IITCr 1 r TS .

Political Canidates

Your advertising deadline is each




This will permit us to give your ad the
greatest amount of attention.
Please do not ask us to make an exception.
We desire only to serve all candidates
equally & well.
- The Herald-Advocate
"Your local hometown newspaper
for over 100 years"
1k A A - Aic _A- _ -4 (_ 1 k1 Ai .


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED

CHANGE TO THE WAUCHULA COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing to consider a proposed amendment to
the Comprehensive Plan will be held and thereafter Ordinance Number 2007-17 will be
presented to the City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida, for adoption upon the
second reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 9th
day of June 2008, at 6:00 RM. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from
the office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any
person may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed
Ordinance is entitled as follows:
ORDINANCE 2007-17
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR THE AMENDMENT OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE CITY
OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, ADDING A PUBLIC SCHOOLS FACILITY ELE-
MENT, SAID AMENDMENT BEING KNOWN AS "AMENDMENT 07-01-SC"
(SCHOOL CONCURRENCY), AND CONCURRENTLY REVISING THE
INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION ELEMENT TO THE COMPRE-
HENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR TRANSMISSION OF THIS ORDINANCE
TO THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS FOR REVIEW
AND A FINDING OF COMPLIANCE; PROVIDING FOR CODIFICATION;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; AND PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may. need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves evdry
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.,
s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
City of Wauchula
Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula 5:29c


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May 29, 2008, The Herald-Advocate 5C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

CASE NO: 25-2007-CA-000585

WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
AND CUSTODIAN FOR MORGAN
STANLEY ABS CAPITAL 1 INC,
MSAC-2007-HE4 BY: SAXON
MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC.,
F/K/A MERITECH MORTGAGE
SERVICES, INC.
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
BERTHA CASTILLO; NICHOLAS
CASTILLO JR.; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
IN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; HARD-
EE COUNTY THROUGH ITS
HOUSING PROGRAM REFERRED
TO AS HOUSING REHABILITA-
TION PROGRAM; JOHN DOE
AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated 4-
7,2008 entered in Civil Case No.
25-2007-CA-000585 of the Circuit
Court of the 10TH Judicial Circuit
in and for HARDEE County,
WAUCHULA, Florida, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash at THE NORTH FRONT
DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE at
the HARDEE County Courthouse
located at 417 WEST MAIN
STREET in WAUCHULA, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 11 day of
June, 2008 the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to-
wit:

A PORTION OF BLOCK
"10" OF ROBERTS AND
SKIPPER RE-SUBDIVISION
OF ROBERTS AND SKIP-
PER ADDITION TO THE
TOWN OF ZOLFO
SPRINGS, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, PAGES 2-
119 AND 2-120, ALSO IN
PLAT BAR A-50, IN THE
OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF
COURT OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING
A UNNUMBERED LOT IN-
THE SE CORNER THERE-
OF, SUBJECT TO A 10
'FEET EASEMENT FOR
4IIIGRESS AN EGRESS
. ALONG THE NORTH LINE
THEREOF.

Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale. If any.
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens.
must file a claim within 60 days


after the sale.

Dated this 7 day of April, 2008.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT
ADMINISTRATION, at the HARD-
EE County Courthouse at 863-
773-9853, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD)
or 1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
. . 5:22.2.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 25-2008-CA-000143
DIVISION
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUSTEE FOR
LEHMAN BROTHERS - STRUC-
TURED ASSET SECURITIES
CORPORATION SASCO 2007-
BC3,
Plaintiff,
vs.-
DON.HUNT, et al,
Defendantss.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated May
19, 2008 and entered in Case No.
25-2008-CA-000143 of the Circuit
Court of the TENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for Hardee County,
Florida, wherein U.S. BANK
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR LEHMAN BROTH-
ERS - STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORPORATION
SASCO 2007- BC3, is the Plaintiff
and DON HUNT; TENANT #1
N/K/A ALICE LEE are the
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at
NORTH FRONT DOOR OF THE
HARDEE COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 417 W. MAIN STREET at
11:00AM on the 11 day of June,
2008, the following described
property as set forth In said Final
Judgment:

THE WEST 35 FEET OF
LOT 9 AND 10 AND THE
EAST 16 FEET OF LOT 11


AND 12, BLOCK 1,
WAUCHULA VILLAS SUB-
DIVISION, A SUBDIVISION
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 10, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
A/K/A 703 SUMMIT
STREET E, WAUCHULA, FL
33873
Any person claiming an Interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the
seal of this Court May 19, 2008.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the Americans
Disabilities Act, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special
accommodation to participate In
this proceeding should contact
the individual or agency sending
the notice at Echevarria, McCalla,
Raymer, Barrett & Frappier, 601
Bayshore Blvd., Suite 800,
Tampa, Florida 33606, telephone
(813) 251-4766, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceeding. If hearing Impaired,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or voice
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida


Relay service.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL CIR
OF THE STATE OF FLOOR
AND FOR HARDEE CO
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 252007D
IN THE INTEREST OF:
R., D. DOB: 10/01/200

CHILD
SUMMONS AND NOTI
HEARING ON PETITION
TERMINATION O1
PARENTAL RIGHT
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
Carlos Enrique Ruiz
(ADDRESS UNKNOWN)
YOU ARE HEREBY N(
that a Petition under o
been filed in the abov
Court for the permanent
ment of D.R., a female ch
on October 1, 2002, to
Ruiz, for subsequent adopt
you are hereby COMMAI
be and appear before the
ABLE Marcus J. Ezelle
A.M on the 24th Day of Ju
for this hearing at the
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
Division, 417 West Main
Third Floor, Courtro
Wauchula, Florida 33873.

YOUR FAILURE TO AP
PERSON WILL BE TREAT
CONSENT TO THE TERM
OF PARENTAL RIGHTS A
WILL PERMANENTLY LC
LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PAR
THE CHILD AS NAMED
PETITION FOR TERMINAL


PARENTAL RIGHTS.


YOU HAVE THE RIC
HAVE AN ATTORNEY
SENT YOU IN THIS MA1
YOU CANNOT AFFOI
ATTORNEY, YOU MUST I
SENT AND REQUEST TH
COURT APPOINT AN AT
FOR YOU IF YOU WANT C
In accordance with the Ar
with Disabilities Act, pers
disabilities needing a
accommodation to partic
this proceeding should
the Dept. of Children & I
Legal Department, 1014 S
Ave., Wauchula, FL
Telephone (863) 773-9746
than seven days prior to
ceeding. If hearing ir
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, o
(V) 1-800-955-8770, via
Relay Service.

B. HUGH BRADLEY

Delol
as his Depi


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL CIR(
IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLO

CASE NO.: 25-2007CA

AMERICAN GENERAL HO
EQUITY, INC.
Plaintiff,
V.
CHARLES F. WALKER; et
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALI
NOTICE IS HEREBY C
hereby given that pursu
Summary Judgmen
Foreclosure entered in t
in the Circuit Court of
County, Florida, the real
described as:

Lot 53, of the OAKS
HARDEE COUNTY,
Unrecorded subdiv
lying in Sections 11
and 15, Township 35 S
Range 25 East, Hi
County, Florida, desc
as follows: Commen
the Southwest corn
said Section 11; then
on assumed bearing
00� 05' 46" W along
West line of said Se
26-46-37 feet to
Northwest corner of
1/2 of said Sectiol
thence S 89� 52' 3
along the North line o


Tarzan's mate Jane's last
name was Parker.

Jimmy Carter was the first
president to walk the inaugu-
ral parade route from the
Capitol Building to the White
House.



ABOUT...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, ..ate of death, occu-
pation, memberships, im-
mediate survivors and funer-
al arrangements. The list of
survivors may include the
names of a spouse, parents,
siblings, children and chil-
dren's spouses and grand-
children, and the number of
great-grandchildren. If there
are.no immediate survivors,
consideration of other rela-
tionships may be given.


S 1/2, 3478.31 feet to the
5:22-29c P.O.B.; thence continue S
89� 52' 38" E., 200.00 feet;
OF THE thence S 00* 26' 19" W,
CUIT 1220.00 feet; thence N 89"
IIDA, IN 52' 38' W 200.00 feet;
)UNTY thence N 00* 26' 19"
)N E.,1220.00 feet to the
iP000159 P.O.B.; subject to road
easement over the South
30.00 feet thereof;
12 TOGETHER WITH DOU-
/ BLEWIDE MOBILE HOME
BEARING ID#FLA714593 &
714594.
CE OF
N FOR will be sold at public sale, to the
F highest and best bidder for cash,
S at the front steps of the Hardee
County Courthouse, 417 West
TO: Main Street, Wauchula, Florida
33873, at 11:00 a.m. on June 4,
2008.
DTIFIED DATE: 5/6/08
Death has
e styled B. HUGH BRADLEY
commit- Clerk of Court
ilid, born By: Connie Coker
I Angela Deputy Clerk
option and
NDED to If you are a person with a disabili-
HONOR- ty who needs any accommodation
at 10:30 in order to participate in this pro-
ily, 2008, ceeding, you are entitled, at no
HARDEE cost to you, to the provision of
Juvenile certain assistance. Please contact
n Street, the Court Administrator (863) 773-
om A, 4174, within two working days of
your receipt of this Notice. If you
are hearing or voice impaired, call
PEAR IN Florida Relay Service (800) 955-
ED AS A 8770. .
NATION
,ND YOU -5:22-29c
)SE ALL IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
RENT TO TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN THE IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
TION OF FLORIDA
Case No.: 252008DP000110
GHT TO
GHTRE - Donna Granadero,
RTER. IF Petitioner
TTER. IF
RD ANan
BE PRE- and
IAT THE
TORNEY Paul Martinez,
)NE. Respondent

nericans
ons with
special NOTICE OF ACTION
:ipate in TO: Paul Martinez
contact Address Unknown
Families-
;outh 6th YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
33873, action has been filed against you
,no later and that you are required to serve
the pro- a copy of your written defenses, If
paired, any, to it on Donna Granadero,
or Voice whose address Is 2026 Rigdon
Florida Rd. Wauchula FL on or before
6/20/2008, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at PO
r, CLERK Drawer 1749, or 417 W. Main St.,
by Room #202, Wauchula, FL 33873,
by before service on Petitioner or
a Franks
ty Clerk immediately thereafter. If you fall
uty to do so, a default may be entered
5.298-19 against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.
OFTHE
CUIT, Copies of all court documents
In this case, including orders, are
)RIDA available at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office. You may review
N-000647 these documents upon request.

)ME You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. ( You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
al., papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at
S the clerk's office.

E WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
GIVEN Is requires certain automatic disclo-
ant to a sure of documents and informa-
it in tion. Failure to comply can result
his case in sanctions, including dismissal
Hardee or striking of pleadings.
property
Dated this 19th day of May, 2008.
S OF
an B. Hugh Bradley
vision Clerk of Court
1, 14, Delois Franks, D.C.
South,
rdeth "If you are a person with a disabil-
cribed ity, who needs any accommoda-
C at tion in order to participate in this
r of proceeding, you are entitled at no
cost to you, to the provision or
:e run certain assistance. Please contact
of N the Office of the Court
g the Administrator,, (863) 534-4690,
-thon, within two (2) working days of
the
the S your receipt of this (describe
S11 notice), if you are hearing or voice
" 11; impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777
3f said or Florida Relay Service 711 ."
a 5:22-6:12


First Christian Tourn


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
When the dust settled, First
Christian Church had added the
post-season tournament cham-
pionship to its season title.
There was only two teams
left in the single-elimination
tournament last week when
First Christian, which finished
the season 12-1 and swept
through the tournament, locked
horns with Bowling Green
Baptist, which was Division B
runner-up and had also won its
tourney games.
The Women's Church League
begins its game June 10 and
will alternate weeks of Tues-
day-Thursday games with
games on Mondays, Tuesdays
and Thursdays. The Communi-
ty Men's League begins on June
17 and will play on Tuesdays
Sand Thursdays.
Behind First Christian in the
Division A season were Holy
Child Catholic, Celebration-
Hardee Campus, St. Michael
Catholic and Primera Mission
Bautista Hispana. St. Alfonso I


won Division B, followed by
Bowling Green, Northside
Baptist, St. Alfonso II and New
Vision Worship Center.
In the tournament champi-
onship game, Bowling Green
took the early lead, making
First Christian come back in the
late innings to claim the 14-11
win.
Austin Helms and Michael
Carte hit back-to-back doubles
and raced home on a J.J.
Johnston hit to give Bowling
Green the first inning advan-
tage.
Bowling Green padded its
lead with another four runs in
the third stanza, homers by
Carte and Doug making the tal-
lies.
First Christian tied the game
6-6 with its outburst in the top
of the fourth. Eddie Hernandez,
Keith Nadaskay, Billy Hernan-
dez, Chris Knight, Justin
Battles and Aaron Nadaskay all
scored.
Bowling Green broke the tie
in the home half of the fourth,


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

AND INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE 2008-17
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2008-17 will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the second
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 9th day of
June 2008, at 6:00 RM. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the
office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any per-
son may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed
Ordinance is entitled as follows:
ORDINANCE 2008-17
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, AMENDING
SECTION 2.03.05, CODE OF ORDINANCES, BY DELETING THEREFROM
THE WORDS "CHURCH OR"; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment-in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


5:29c


y Champs
when Ian Trott, Wally Helms,
Austin Helms and Carte came
home with a single by Doug
and � double by Michael
Mahoney pushing them home
for the 10-6 lead.
Neither team scored in the
fifth. First Christian narrowed
the Bowling Green lead to 10-9
with a Billy Hernandez homer
and scores by Battles and Aaron
Nadaskay, aided by a Travis
McClenithan single and Johnny
Obersky double.
Bowling forged in front 11-9
with one run in the bottom of
the sixth. Carte singled and
came around to score.
In the top of the seventh, and
final, inning, First Christian
came alive. Jacob Dotson led
off with a double and.by the
time Battles homered, Keith
Nadasky, Billy Hernandez and
James Blum had come around
to score.
Paul Roberts singled for
Bowling Green in its final at-
bat, but it was too little and First
Christian won 14-11.







6C The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
May 25, Quinton Stacy Young, 36, of 699 .Baker St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. J.K. Cloud
and charged with DUI.
May 25, a fight at South Florida Avenue and SR 64 and thefts
in two locations on U.S. 17 North were reported.
May 24, Lorenzo Sanchez, 18, of 400 S. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by FHP Tpr. J. K. Cloud and charged with
DUI, fraud-giving a false ID to a law enforcement officer, pos-
session of alcohol under age 21 and no valid license.
May 24, Emory Rivers Jr., 34, of 670 Baker St., Wauchula,
was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF) on a
charge of resisting an officer without violence.
May 24, Christian Hernandez, 20, Erwin Hernandez, 19, and
Jovani Ryvas Hernandez, 20, all of 1534 First Ave., Arcadia, were
arrested by Dep. Todd Souther and each charged with trespassing
on property not a structure or conveyance.
May 24, criminal mischief on Bostick Road, Martin Luther
King Jr. Avenue and Dishong Road, and thefts on SR 64 and on
Oak Hills Road were reported.
May 23, Reynaldo Salazar, 30, of 635 U.S. 17 South,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Mixon Trammell on a charge of
contempt of court-violation of an injunction for protection.
May 23, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North, and a theft on
Myrtle Drive were reported.
May 22 Carlos Angel Martinez, 34, of 589 Trumpet St.,
Sarasota, was arrested by DTF and charged with trafficking in
amphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
May 22, Domirys Ferreiro, 26, of 1850 NW 34th Ave.,
Miami, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of contempt
of court.
May 22, a vehicle stolen on Cecil Durrance Road, criminal
mischief on South Road and East Palmetto Street and a theft on
Murphy Road were reported.
May 21, Dustin Bruce Williams, 23, of 990 Rhoden Road,
Fort Meade, Steven Lee Purser, 37, of 630 Grove St., Bowling
Green, and George Kendell Knight, of 200 Ave. K, Winter Haven,
were arrested by DTF and each charged with possession of drug
paraphernalia. Williams was also charged with trafficking in am-
phetamine and sale of methamphetamine. Purser was also charged
with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription,
sale of methamphetamine within 1,000 feet of a school, church or
convenience store and manufacture/delivery of drug paraphernalia.



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Knight was also charged with selling drugs within 1,000 feet of a
school church or convenience store, sale of methamphetamine, traf-
ficking in amphetamine and manufacture/delivery of drug para-
phernalia.
May 21, a residential burglary on Lincoln Street, criminal
mischief on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue and U.S. 17 South,
fights at Golden Oaks Road, Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue and
South Road and a theft on Steve Roberts Special were reported.
May 20, burglary of a conveyance on Cheyanne Path, crimi-
nal mischief on South Road, and a theft on Lost Acres Drive were
reported.
May 19, Gabriel Martinez, 19, of 130 Fox St., Ona, was arrest-
ed by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with criminal mischief and
assault on an officer or firefighter.
May 19, criminal mischief on Griffin Road and thefts on U.S.
17 South (two locations), Golden Oaks Road and Martin Luther
King Jr. Avenue were reported.
WAUCHULA
May 25, Angel Luis, 28, of 900-21st Avenue East, Palmetto
was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with resisting an
officer without violence and two traffic offenses.
May 24, Eugenio Yescas and Jose Martinez, ( no ages given),
General Delivery, Wauchula, were arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt
and each charged with disorderlyintoxication.
May 25, Antonio Perez, 23, General Delivery, Wauchula, was
arrested by Cpl. Gabe Garza and charged with loitering/prowling
and disorderly intoxication.
May 25, a residential burglary on West Main Street was
reported.
May 24, Eric Turner, 25, of 483 Hanchey Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with simple
assault-threat to do violence.
May 22, Euglogio Hernandez Bautista, 24, of 100 Lang Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. John Eason on a charge of failure
to appear in court and two traffic charges.
May 22, a tag stolen on East Palmetto Street was reported.
May 21, Michael Blain Johnson, 45, of 812 N. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with dis-
orderly intoxication and trespassing on a structure or conveyance.
May 20, Elizabeth Ann Allen, 20, of 5145 Deer Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Cpl. Gabe Garza and charged with larce-
ny-petit theft.
May 20, Christobal Lopez, 40, of Ralph Smith Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with dis-


Letter To The Editor

It Is Hard To Get Out

Of A Financial Pickle


Dear Editor:
I do not want to complain or
criticize since the individual
over at the Hardee Help Center
was very nice and explained to
me how the Help Center works.
I just feel I need to let the peo-
ple of Wauchula know how the
Help Center works.
I have called many churches,
individuals and the Help Center
for help with my phone bills,
bus tickets, money to pay credit
card bills, and also money to
put in my checking account to
prevent bounced checks.
Well, not to come against the
Help Center, but the Help
Center does not give money for
credit card bills, buses, bounced
checks or phone bills.
They do help people out with
food, rent and electric, only if
you are going to be kicked out
of the apartment or you are
going to bet your lights turned
off.
The overseer of the Help
Center told me they need to be
good stewards of the money
they are taking care of. We are
all thankful for the Help Center.
The Help Center nevertheless is
very reserved with their money.
Just sum this letter up--when
an individual gets in a financial'
pickle like I do frequently, it is
difficult to get out of it. I guess
the answer for me and others is
to not spend beyond our means.
My advice is do not write
check unless money is in the
bank. If you get in a bind with
credit cards, a financial debt
counselor would be helpful.


Just stop using credit cards alto-
gether, because interest rates
and fees are so high.
Food is available at the
Hardee Help Center and every
other Saturday at the Catholic
Church helpcenter. The church
help center also has clothes and
household items for a small fee.
Connie Rowe
Wauchula
i , '


orderly intoxication, and loitering/prowling.
May 20, a fight on South Seventh Avenue was reported.
BOWLING GREEN
May 24, Christina Rodriguez, 25, of 682 Chamberlain
Boulevard, Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and
charged with disorderly intoxication and possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription.
May 23, Pedro Lopez Jiminez, 44, and Victor Jose Jimenez,
21, both of 4517 Dixiana Drive, Bowling Green, were arrested by
Ofc. Daniel Arnold. Pedro Jiminez was charged with aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon. Vict
or Jimenez was charged with battery.
May 23, a fight on Dixianna Street was reported.
May 22, a fight on Mason-Dixon Avenue was reported.
May 19, Bernabe Castillo-Cruz, 26, of 4245 Middle Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Chief John Scheel and charged
with DUI.




Social Security
By Louis Ortiz
Social Security Specialist

HELP YOUR MOM SAVE $3,600!
People all over the country are helping their moms save as
much as $3,600 per year on the cost of prescription drugs. You can,
too!
We all know the high cost of medicine can be a burden on
mothers who have limited income and resources. But there is extra
help available through Social Security that could pay part of her
monthly premiums, annual deductibles and prescription co-pay-
ments. The extra help could be worth up of $3,600 per year.
To figure out whether your mother is eligible, Social Security
needs to know her income and the value of her savings, invest-
ments and real estate (other than the home she lives in). To qualify
for the extra help, she must be receiving Medicare and also have:
* Income limited to $15,600 for an individual or
$21,000 for a married couple living together. Even if
her annual income is higher, she still may be able to get
some help with monthly premiums, annual deductibles
and prescription co-payments. Some examples where
income may be higher include if she or her spouse:
- Support other family members who live with
them;
- Have earnings from work; or
- Live in Alaska or Hawaii; and
* Resources limited to $11,990 for an individual or
$23,970 for a married couple living together. Resources
include such things as bank accounts, stocks and bonds.
We do not count her house and car as resources.
Social Security has an easy-to-use online application that you
can help complete for your mom. You can find it at www.socialse-
curity.gov. To apply by phone or have an application mailed to you,
call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) and
ask for the Application for Help with Medicare Prescription Drug
Plan Costs (SSA-1020). Or go to the nearest Social Security office.
To learn more about the Medicare prescription drug plans and
special enrollment periods, visit www.medicare.gov or call 1-800-
Medicare (1-800-633-4227; TTY 1-877-486-2048).
So, this Mother's Day help your mom save up to $3,600 a year
on her prescription drugs. Long after the candy and flowers are
gone, the extra help through Social Security will keep on giving.
Louis Ortiz is a public affairs specialist at the Social Security office
in Sebring.


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May 19, 200I ; Th6 Herala-Advocate 7C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Joel Aquino, 23, Myakka
City, and Hilda Vasquez, 20,
Myakka City.
Jason Coats, 29, Bowling
Green, and Michelle Marie
Dean, 26, Bowling Green.
Kevin Eugene Richardson,
33, Zolfo Springs, and Stacy Jo
Richardson, 32, Zolfo Springs.
Roy Bennard Sapp, 64, Avon
Park, and Peggy Markel Estes,
64, Avon Park.
Teddy Remark Ray, 38,
Wauchula, and Angela Rae
Prestridge, 27, Wauchula.
Juan Carreno Delgado, Wau-
chula, and Yessenia Nunez, 17,
Wauchula.
Francklyn Romelus, 26,
Wauchula, and Marcline Louis
Michel, 21, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Atm Rahman vs.Andrew
Alderman, dismissed.
Livingston Financial LLC vs.
Daniel Miller, dismissed.
LVNV Funding Inc. vs. Jack
Lambert, dismissed.
Chase Bank USA NA vs.
Jeannine Johnson Tatum, dis-
missed.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Michael Eugene Adcox, do-
mestic battery, resisting arrest
without violent force and viola-
tion of probation (original
charge domestic battery), pro-
bation revoked, six months in
jail, $667 fine and court costs
on new charges.
Moises Castaneda, disorderly
conduct, 33 days in jail with
credit for time served (CTS),
$100 fine.
Linda Diana Faye King,
criminal mischief, adjudication
withheld, probation six months,
$315 fine and court costs.
Marcelo Macias, two counts
trespass other than struc-
ture/conveyance and resisting
arrest without violence, 45 days
CTS, $315 fine and court costs,
$40 public defender fee.
Felipe Mendoza, resisting
arrestt without violent force, 60
,days CTS and concurrent with
traffic sentence.
Frank Romeo III, battery, not
prosecuted.
SHenry Gordon Warren, do-
mestic battery, violation of a
domestic violence injunction
for protection and possession of
drug paraphernalia, 15 days
CTS, 12 months probation, 26-


week batters intervention class,
drug/alcohol abuse evaluation
and treatment, no violent con-
tact with victims, $667 fine and
court costs.
Salvador Renteria Arias,
petit theft and giving a false ID
to a law enforcement officer, 90
...-vs CTS.
Angel Diego, battery, adjudi-
cation withheld, 12 months pro-
bation, 12-week anger manage-
ment class, no contact with vic-
tim, no weapons, $667 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fee, 30 hours community ser-
vice.
Jose Sanchez Gonzales, do-
mestic battery, estreated bond.
Clemente Martinez, domestic
battery, time served, $667 fine
and court costs, $40 public
defender fee; domestic battery
- second charge, not prose-
cuted.
Michael Newt McEntyre,
battery - amended to lesser
disorderly conduct, time served,
$315 fine and court costs, $90
public defender fees.
Filiberto Arriaga Soto, do-
mestic battery - amended to
lesser disorderly conduct, pro-
bation six months, four-hour
anger management class, no
violent contact with victims,
$315 fine and court costs, 20
hours community service; bat-
tery, not prosecuted.
Victor Tecuapa Menses, vio-
lation .of probation (original
charge trespassing other than
structure/conveyance), proba-
tion revoked, 60 days CTS.
Eduardo David Castillo,
domestic battery, violation of a
domestic violence injunction
for protection and trespassing in
an occupied structure, 12
months probation, consecutive
to felony, 26-week batters inter-
vention class, $100 investiga-
tive costs, 25 hours community
service.

The following criminal
traffic cases were disposed of
recently in county court.
Dispositions are based on
Florida Statutes, driving
record and facts concerning
the case.
Adin Morales-Perez, DUI
and no valid license, 30 days
CTS, 12 months probation,
evaluation and treatment, ran-
dom screens, license suspended
six months, DUI school,
$640.50 fine and court costs,
$40 public defender fee, 50
hours community service.
Felipe Mendoza, reckless
driving and four non-driving
traffic offenses, 60 days CTS,
$435 fine and court costs, $40
public defender fee.
Alfonso Andres Esteban,


I Courthouse -Report ~r I 1 ~


leaving the scene of an accident
with property damage and no
valid license, 31 days CTS,
$330 fine and court costs.
Juan Santellan, violation of
license restrictions, adjudica-
tion withheld, $185 court costs.
Salvador Renteria Arias,
leaving the scene of an accident
with property damage and no
valid license with property
damage, 30 days CTS (concur-
rent with misdemeanor sen-
tence), $330 fine and court
costs, $40 public defender fee.
Faustino Anselmo, driving
while license suspended
(DWLS), probation 12 months,
$330 fine and court costs.
Glenn Theadore Curry Jr.,
violation of probation (original
charges DWLS and two codihts
no valid license), probation
revoked, 77days CTS, outstand-
ing fines and fees placed on
lien.
Moises Agustin Bautista,
DUI and no valid license, 12
months probation, license sus-
pended six months, DUI school,
evaluation, $903 fine and court
costs, 50 hours community ser-
vice.
Juan Manuel Flores, DUI -
amended to willful and wanton
reckless driving, 12 months
probation, DUI school, $330
fine and court costs, 50 hours
community service.
Felix Flores-Romero,
DWLS, produced valid Mexi-
can license, dismissed.
Juan Tomas Gonzalez,
DWLS, dismissed.
Norma Jean Jones, allowing
an unauthorized person to
drive, adjudication withheld,
$185 court costs.
Mario Lino, leaving the
scene of an accident and no
valid license, $330 fine and
court costs.
Sylvia Regina Outley,
DWLS, produced valid license,
adjudication withheld, $185
court costs.
Corey Terrell Palmore,
DWLS, $330 fine and court
costs.
Isidro Ramos, DWLS, pro-
duced valid Mexican license,
dismissed.
Oliver Sarmiento Tinoco,
DWLS, adjudication withheld,
$330 fine and court costs.
Luann McClellan, leaving
the scene of an accident, proba-
tion six months, $330 fine and
court costs.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civiractions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Eva Dell Coleman vs.
Barbara Coleman Hartman,
petition for injunction for pro-
tection.
Kenneth Spires vs. Florida
Parole Commission, petition to
review inmate status.
Maria Estrada vs. Robert L.
Young, petition for injunction
for protection.
Danuyel Herrin vs. Bryant
Herrin, petition for injunction
for protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Kathleen Patricia Ruschiwal
and Joseph Rudolph Ruschiwal,
amended divorce order.
Marl Willis vs., Leticia
Willis, order.
Jose Ibanez vs. Rachel


Geiger, dismissed.
Shirley and Cornelius
Schwoyer vs. Wilder Corp. of
Delaware, dismissed.
Alice Davis and DOR vs.
Jerry Litton Sr., child support
suspended, arrearages set.
Teresa Pantoja and DOR vs.
Teodore Pantoya, modification
of child support.
Willie Watson III vs. State of
Florida, inmate petition for
review denied.
Felix Freddy Morales vs.
Walter McNeil and the state
Department of Corrections, in-
mate petition for review denied.
Irene Jones and Dor vs.
Oliver Lacy Everett, child sup-
port order.
Daina Michelle, Smith and
DOR vs. Urbano Santellan,
modification of child support
and arrearages.
Mary I. Ramirez and DOR
vs. Ramiro Ramirez Jr., child
support order.
Theresa Lee Rodriguez and
DOR vs. Lauro Cisneros, modi-
fication of child support order.
Debbie F. Thompson and
DOR vs. Larry C. Williams,
child support order.
Miguel Ortiz vs. State of
Florida, inmate appeal denied.
Kayla Danielle Miller vs.
Corey Deshawn Fowler, injunc-
tion for protection.
Laurencio Vasquez-Hern-
andez vs. Isidro A. Santiago-
Rojas, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Mary K. Kilpatrick-and DOR.
vs. Brian S. Vickers, modifica-
tion of child support and arrear-
ages.
Michael Starnes vs. Moye
Farms Inc. and Ronald Moye,
voluntary dismissal of amended
complaint.
Kara Crawford Gaydon and
Robert William Gaydon,
divorce.
Robyn Gerald Rodgers and
Nora Jeanette Rodgers, divorce.
Janice Pace. Jackson and
Bobby Charles Jackson,
divorce.
U.S. Bank National Assoc-
iation as trustee vs. Don Hunt et
al, mortgage foreclosure.
Angelina L. Rizo and DOR
as Calvin G. Martin, child sup-
port contempt order.

Court-ordered certificates
of child support delinquency
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court clerk
in the following cases:
Karista N, Johnson and
Rodney C. Johnson.
Vera G. Trevino vs. Enrique
Gonzales Jr.
Debbie\ Sambrano vs.
Christopher M. Owens.
Margarita S. Flores vs.
Reynaldo Salazar.
Monica Elisondo vs. James
Cook.
Lynne M. Morales vs. Ellis
S. Hodges Jr.
Betty S. Roberts vs. Weldon
E. Roberts.
Thomas J. Sneider vs.
Samantha L. Alderman.
Sarah J. Juarez vs. Jose M.
Garcia.
Brenda Hines vs. Alfred S.
Bragg.
Manuela Alcantar vs.
Luciano Lara III.
Michael D. Owens vs. Tonya
L. Owens.
Cruz Hernandez vs. Flabio
Rodriguez.
Robert S. Keller vs. Jessica
M. Hurst.
Maria L. Leon vs.-Juan--M.-


Rodriguez.
Carolina Luna vs. Santos-
Luna.
Ralph A. Crawford vs.
Sharon J. Crawford.
Patricia M. Albritton vs.
Manuel A. McCumber.
Louann P. Rimes vs. Heather
D. Thornton-Rimes.
Teresa A. Prestridge vs.
Nicole J. Brownell.
Carolina Luna vs. Lisa J.
Castro.
Noel D. 'Henry vs. Cedrick
D. Simmons.
Laquinda Blandin v.
Anthony L. Johnson.
Ana L. Anselmo vs. Jose L.
Espinoza.
Bonnie L. More vs. Cheryl ,
L. Moree.
Daniela Robles vs. Jose A.
Solis.
Leticia Zambrano vs. Rafael
Zambrano.
Ramona Matthews vs. Archi6
J. Hines.
Martha Smith vs. Tami J.
Atchley.
Amy C. Evans ys. James P.
Entwistle.
Simonia Tapia vs. Agustin
Ancelmo. _
S Annie Small vs. Darrell L.
Small.
Hester Lane vs. Ellis gS.
Hodges.
Gwendolyn C. Hughes vs.
Donald C. Clarke.

The following felony critli.
nal cases were disposed of list
_week by the circuit judge.
Defedan- ishiive-iee adjudl� 4
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudicatioisr .,
withheld, it is pending SuC-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are puruaint
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide.
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Willie E. Botrwright, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge felony DWLS), proba--
tion revoked, one year drui
offender probation, drug abuse
evaluation and- treatment, war-
rantless search and seizure, no
alcohol or bars and curfew
added to other condition.
Lewis Eric Brown, failure to j
register as a sexual offender and
failure to sexual offender to
report change of address, proba- b
tion two years, $495 fine and
court costs, $200 public defend-
er fees. 1 yi ;. '
Anita Castillot sal of
methamphetamine, poss& tion
of methamphetamine and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
adjudication withheld, three'
years drug offender probation,
substance abuse evaluation and
treatment, curfew, warrantlesi
search and seizure, $990 fineS
and court costs, $140 public"'
defender fees; possession of
drug paraphernalia with intent
to deliver, not prosecuted.
Mark Dean Fuston, sale of
methamphetamine, adjudica-
tion withheld, two years drugi
offender probation, curfew, no
alcohol or bars,. $495- fine and
court costs, $140 public dif6nd .
er fees; possession of drug para-
phernalia with intent to deliver,
not prosecuted.
Mark Randal Kiella, posses-
sion of methamphetamine. and.
Possession of drug parapherna-
lia, two years drug offender
community control -- Httose
,arrest, license suspended, tw


PUBLIC NOTICE
The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the Hardee County Planning Agency will hold a
PUBLIC HEARINGon
THURSDAY, JUNE 05, 2008, 6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter in the BCC Board Room
412 West Orange St., Courthouse Annex
Room 102, Wauchula, FL
for the following request:
Agenda No.
08-25
Rocky D.IKimberly J. Parks requests a approval of a Special
Exception to locate a a single-family mobile home dwelling on
3.40MOL acres zoned F-R In the Agriculture Future Land Use
District
N si of Altman Rd., W of South Florida Ave
17 34 25 0300 00001 0003
3.40MOL ac Lot 03, Blk 01 Shady Creek Minor SID
S17, T34S.-R25E
Roger Conley, Chairman

PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a
PUBLIC HEARING on
Thursday, JUNE 19, 2008, 8:35 A.M.
or as soon thereafter
to receive a recommendation from the PlanninglZoning Board and to
receive public Input for
Agenda No. 08-25
All Public Hearings to be held in BCC Board Room,
Courthouse Annex, Room 102,412 W Orange St.
Wauphula, FL
Dale Johnson, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners
This i5 a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing to
makespecial arrangements should contact the Planning/Development
Department at least two (2) working days prior to the PIZ public
hearing. This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the County
Manager's office at least two (2) working days prior to the BCC public
hearings. This Public Notice is published in accordance with the
Hardee County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the
documents relating to these proposals are available for public
inspection during weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and'4:00
P.M. at the Planning/Development Department, 110 S. 9th Ave.,
Wauchula, Florida.
All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering any
decision the Boards shall rely solely on testimony that is relevant and
material. Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded,
anyone wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will
geed to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings
sadeby a court reporter. 5:22, 29c


HARDEE COUNTY

PUBLIC NOTICE


The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners

adopted Ordinances Nos. 02-17 and 04-01, which

authorize a financial hardship exception to the solid

waste disposal and fire rescue portions of the special

assessment fees. Property owners qualifying for this

exception will receive a refund or a credit in the

amount of the current tax year's approved non-ad

valorem taxes toward the special assessment fees for

solid waste disposal and fire rescue assessment fees.


If you are interested in applying for this exception, or

if you have any questions pertaining to this issue,

please contact the Office of Management and Budget

at 863/773-3199. Applications will be accepted until

May 31, 2008.


Dale A. Johnson, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Hardee County, Florida s6:1-29c


years, random screens, warrant-
less search and seizure, no alco-
hol/drugs, substance .abusg
evaluation and treatment, $495
fine and court costs, $4,000
restitution; dealing in stolen
property, not prosecuted.
STyrone Perry, violation of
probation (original charge bur-
glary of Structure), probation
revodkd, 180 days CTS, out.
Standing fines and fees placed
on lien.
t.Ceillo Rios, possession of
cocaine and possession of drug
paitiaphernalia, transferred to
drug tprtrial intervention pro-
gram,. .
thitrvy Flores, felony
bWLS, probation one year,
lifenfniv6e river School, 100
hours community service; pos-
aesiott of suspended license,
ndt prosecuted.
SNathan Henry Morgan, pos-
geslion of a counterfeit drug
With intent to sell and posses-
slon df drug paraphernalia, 270
days' CTS, $495 fine and court
s44t, $40 public defender fee,
$100 couft-appointed attorney
fee. '
iuilll6. Snow, sale of
fiith tltphetamine, 90 days
CTS, $495 fihe and court costs.
Brindon Keith Wisniewski,
possession of alprazolam and
Violation of probation (original
charge grand theft), probation
freoked, 10 months in jail,
license SuApended two years,
$495 fine and court costs, $40
public defender fee and $100
iftiit-p itoitde attorney fee
added to unpaid fines and fees
and placed on lien.
The following real estate
transactions of $10;000 or
mor6 were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
SMichael D)waine and Rhonda
Gayei Wlllis to Tortes & Sons
entail Inc., $70,000.
-Hfarold D. Prewitt to Mosaic
Fertilizer LLC, $4,217,760.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Rdsort .LLC .to Richard C.
iivard, Paul J. Berry Ii and
146en-.,arity, $49,900.
R.ogt Sala~ar and Stephanie
Ortio to CarloS and Nora Torres,
$il15,000.
Deutiche Bank Trust Co.
Amteri;as to Robert Bond and
Chelsea Hothem, $141,000.
Floyd 9. and Elaine Albritton
o Dilia S., lores, $56,000.
:Jame - alton and Taryn T.
See to. Shadow E. Ward,
$106,d00.
tulbert Homes Inc. to Taryn
T. and James D. See, $240,000.



ABOUT,.
" Haradee Living
HardeW Living prints your
nOewStn people, clubs ind
orfinitationS, . including
meeting Summaries, births,
Children's and senior citi-
26nd' birthdays, engage-
mentg, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
hurch ,Vents' and military
otrmse are available at bur
office. -or engagement
And : Weddings, a photo
should be included.
.Public6tion it free ob
chArge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited tb a photo and
brfNi hnouncement.
: Deadline is 5 p.m. on
ThutAday.







8C The Herald-Advocate, May 29, 2008


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The Herald-Advocate...

75 YEARS AGO
Hardee County Boys Go To
Forest Camps: Seventeen Har-
dee County boys will leave
Sunday morning for Sarasota to
enter the Civilian Conservation
Corps, and from there will go to
the forests after physical exam-
inations.

Heuerman's Garage Takes
Case Agency: Announcement
was made yesterday by Henry
Heuerman, well-known local
mechanic, to the effect that
Heuerman's Garage has secured
the J.I. Case farm machinery
agency in Hardee County and
hereafter this firm will carry a
full line of Case tractors, farm
machinery, and repairs.

Summer School Starts Next
Monday Morning: A summer
school for mathematics students
will begin on Monday morning,
June 5, according to announce-
ment made this week by J.
Wallace Smith, mathematics
teacher in the local high school.

Frank Smith To Manage
Standard Service Station: Frank
M. Smith, formerly of Lake
Wales, has taken over the man-
agement of the Standard Ser-
vice Station. The change in
management took effect last
weekend and Mr. Smith as-
sumed his duties immediately.

Poppies Go On Sale Tomor-
row: Tomorrow, America will
pay honor to its World war
dead. Millions of Americans in
every part of the country will
wear bright red poppies to show


that they still remember and are
grateful for the services of those
men who gave up their lives for
our freedom.

50 YEARS AGO
Replacement Of Lost Herd
Aim Of Cattlemen: South
Florida cattlemen are being
called on to help replace a herd
of 145 cattle accidentally killed
last Friday morning in the Lily
section when they were sprayed
with a highly toxic vegetable
spray.

First Melons In As Cukes'
Close: Watermelons came in as
cucumbers went out this week
at the Wauchula State Farmers
Market. Tomatoes are expected
to peak next week. The first
load of watermelons came in
yesterday from Leon Stevens
and sold for approximately five
cents a pound.

Starlite Is Hit Again By
Thieves: The second breaking
and entering at the Starlight
Drive-In Theatre in less than
two months netted the thieves
$21 in small change and enough
food for a picnic.

Traditional Pomp Will
Surround '58 Graduation: The
familiar strains of "Pomp and
Circumstance," the stately
march which has sounded in the
ears of graduating seniors for
decades, will be heard again in
Wauchula City Auditorium
Monday night. Eighty young
men and women in mortar
boards and flowing robes will
be graduating.

Construction To Begin In
July On Negro School:
Construction on the new Negro
high school in Hardee County
is scheduled to begin July 15,


I a Bc Wen


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

AND INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE 2008-09
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2008-09 will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the second
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 9th day of
June 2008, at 6:00 PM. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the
office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any per-
son may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed
Ordinance is entitled as follows:
ORDINANCE 2008-09
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR A CHANGE OF THE ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF APPROXIMATE-
LY .28 ACRES LOCATED AT 311 SOUTH 7TH AVENUE, WAUCHULA, DES-
IGNATED AS THE "LYNN VILL PROPERTY", FROM CITY "R-1 SINGLE-
FAMILY RESIDENTIAL' TO CITY "C-1 DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL'; PRO-
VIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; AND PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


Clifford M. Ables,-ll, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 3387'
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


s/Clarissa Abbott.
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


City of Wauchula
Zoning Map Amendment
Ordinance # 2008-09 Exhibit "A"
08-03-SS


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5:29c


barring any last-minute compli-
cations. Final plans for the
school were approved this week
in Tallahassee.

Record Class Is Confirmed:
The largest class of Catholic
young people from Hardee
County in over 18 years was
confirmed Tuesday night in cer-
emonies at St. Paul's Catholic
Church in Arcadia. Eleven chil-
dren took their confirmation
vows, compared to a usual one
or two.,

25 YEARS AGO
Man Sought In Zolfo
Shooting: A part-time Zolfo
Springs patrolman narrowly
escaped injury Friday night
when an unidentified gunman
riddled his patrol car with bul-
lets. Thomas Harris, whose
patrol car was hit with four bul-
lets from a .357 magnum pistol,
lived to tell about it.

Two Killed In Collision: Two
persons were killed and three
others hospitalized Saturday
afternoon in a head-on collision
on U.S. 17 between Wauchula
and Zolfo Springs. Nadine Hay
Reese, 54, and Antonio C.
Picho, 21, died at the scene.

Whiteside Plans To Debut
Customized Bronco At Family
Fun Day: Robert Whiteside of
Zolfo Springs stands next to the
customized 1973 Ford Bronco
he plans to show off at Family
Fun Day on Saturday.

Farmers Giving Cucumbers
Away: The price on cucumbers
is so low the farmers will give
them away if you'll pick them,
according to Arthur Cranford,
manager of MoBo Enterprises.
Jimmy Parker with Parker
Farms confirmed what Cran-
ford said about cukes by saying
they were not really worth pick-
ing and added squash were the
same way.


Jones Earns Top Honor:
Mary Lynne Jones, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Emerson Jones, is
valedictorian of the Class of '83
with a four-year average of
96.3611, the highest in this
year's graduating class.

.Gasoline Prices Up Since
Mid-March: Florida gasoline
.prices have jumped an average
of 10.5 cents per gallon since
mid-March, with most of the
increase attributed to the 6.7
cents per gallon jump in federal
and state gasoline taxes begin-
ning April 1.

Family Fun Day Started To
Help Pay Off Mortgage On
County Fairgrounds: Family
Fun Day was begun by the
Hardee County Cattlemen's
Association last year as a way
of raising money to pay for the
new County Fair facilities.

10 YEARS AGO
It's A Start ...: Groundbreak-
ing ceremonies Tuesday offi-
cially signaled construction of
the Main Street Park. Work will
begin this week on irrigation,
walkways and lighting for the
shaded park at Seventh
Avenue, which will provide'
welcome respite for downtown
visitors.

Foster Dad's Charges Shrink:
Faced with a witness who has
recanted her story, the State
Attorney's Office has dropped
four child molestation counts
levied last year against a long-
time Hardee County foster par-
ent. Defense lawyer Jack


Edmund, of Fort Meade, will
now prepare to take the case to
trial.

3 Youths Die In Car Crash:
Three Hardee County youths
were killed late Friday night
when the vehicle they were rid-
ing spun out of control, over-
turned and caught fire. Four
other teens in the doomed Ford
suffered minor injuries. Driver
German Hernandez was killed


Belles Finish With Tie


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The final game of the 2008
game was a tie.
The Thunder and the Slam-
mers battled to a 6-6 tie in the
final game of the season last
Monday.
The Slammers have been
steadily improving all season
and pushed the Thunder to a 6-
6 tie to end the season. Emily
Starratt and Summer Sisum
each put a pair of runs on the
board, while Aleeza Arguijo
helped with her two hits getting
them home. Sabrina Hernandez
and Arguijo each touched home
once. Other Slammers contri-


buting were Amanda McNabb,
Sierra Coronado, Araceli
Navarro, Naomi Erekeson, Ana
Montanez, Noemi Navarro,
Raquel Rosales and Nicole
Franks. Nicole Brown didn't
get in the final game.
For the Thunder, which has
had the heavy hand all season,
Danika Briones tripled. Taylor
Bolin, Courtney Chason, Penny
McGuire, Haley Shelton,
Latiesha Allen and Karita
Fernandez all around to touch
home plate. Others chipping in
were Courtney Parks, Celeste
Williams, Brooke Tyson,
Vanessa Hernandez and
Kimberly Smith.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate
I I I I I


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED
CHANGE TO THE WAUCHULA COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT, FUTURE LAND
USE MAP FOR THE CITY OF WAUCHULA
The City of Wauchula, Florida, proposes to change the use of land within the area
shown in the map 'in the advertisement. The change proposed in an amendment to the
Wauchula Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Element, Future Land Use Map for the
City of Wauchula.
Amendment #08-03-SS: A change of the official future land use classifi-
cation from City "Single Family Residential" to City "Commercial" on the
"Lynn VIII property" located at 311 7th Avenue South, Wauchula, FL
33873, consisting of approximately .28 acres
A public hearing will be held on the 9th day of June 2008, at &00 RM., and thereafter
Ordinance 2008-08 will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the sec-
ond reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, at which public
hearings all parties and interested citizens may appear and be heard as to any and all mat-
ters pelrinent to'the proposed amendment to the Comprehensive Plan. Comments to
Amendrhent #68-03-SS may be made orally at the hearing or in writing if submitted on or
before the hearing dates.
A copy of the proposed amendment to the Comprehensive Plan may be inspected by
the public in the offices of the City Clerk, at the City Administrative Complex, 126 South 7th
Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 RM., Monday
through Friday, except holidays.
Please note that if any person decides to appeal any decision made by the council
with respect to any matter considered at the meeting or hearing, they will need a record of
the proceedings and that for such purpose will need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeals are to be based.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT AND SECTION
286.26, FLORIDA STATUTES, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS MEETING SHOULD CONTACT THE CITY
CLERK'S OFFICE AT LEAST FIVE (5) DAYS PRIOR TO THE DATE OF THE MEETING.
INTERESTED PARTIES MAY APPEAR AND BE HEARD AT SAID HEARING.
s/ Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
City of Wauchula
Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
Attorney for the City of Wauchula
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873

City of WauchulaN
Future Land Use Map Amendment
Ordinance # 2008-08 Exhibit "A"
08-03-SS


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along with Jose Beijo and Santa
Herrera.

Yes, There Is A Free Lunch!:
"The Big Yellow Bus," that's
what local schools Food
Service Director Ginger
Himrod is calling her restaurant
on wheels these days. She's
hoping it will attract the atten-
tion of hungry kids all summer
as it parks in various locations
to offer a free lunch to anyone
18 or younger.


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