Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00125
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Uniform Title: Herald Advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: June 14, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00125
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




New Business Locates

In Commerce Park

.. .Story 1B


\ TODAY Is I

FLAG DAY!-


Dove Hunters: Permits

Available On July 1

.Story 10B


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


107th Year, No. 27
4 Sections, 48 Pages


Thursday, June 14, 2007


46le
| plus 4c iles u%


Local Teen Spars For Olympic Slot


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Ranked second in the nation, Daniel Lozano may be an Olympic
contender before starting his senior year at Hardee Senior High.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Olympic contender: it has a nice
sound to it.
Hardee County could have a
2008 Olympic contender in local
teen Daniel Lozano of Bowling
Green.
Lozano took' the first step last
week when he won three prelimi-
nary bouts and became U.S.
Boxing silver medalist.
Sporting his new U.S. Boxing
jacket awarded to the runner-up,
Lozano reported Monday on his
experiences last week which have
led to qualification for the Olympic
trials to be held in August. Of the
top eight invited, he is ranked sec-
ond in the nation.
He's not content with that either.
He has about six weeks to train and
follow his plan to beat number one,
Luis Yanez of Duncammille,
Texas, and claim the stop spot in
the 106-pound division on the
Olympic boxing team.
"I want to thank God, my spon-
sors and everybody who backs me
up," said Lozano. He is especially
grateful for his father Daniel, who
is also his trainer, and arranges his
work schedule so he can accompa-
ny his son on these boxing excur-
sions. His mother Sylvia is also one
of his biggest fans.
Since he began boxing over 10


Woman To Donate Kidney


To Ailing Brother-In-Law


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
A benefit barbecue is planned to
help a local man facing surgery.
Scott Lang, 40, of Wauchula is
scheduled to receive a kidney trans-
plant today (Thursday) at Tampa
General Hospital. The donor is his
sister-in-law Tracy Lang.
He is expected to be out of work
for about 90 days. For the first
month after the surgery, he is sup-
posed to be quarantined at home
except for three visits a week to the
hospital.
Tracy Lang should miss two
weeks of work. She said a hospital
employee said this is the shortest
time span for a person to receive a
kidney transplant once the opera-
tion is deemed necessary.
Scott Lang said 12 people were
willing to donate a kidney to him,
including his brother Jimmy, who
did not rate a match due to his
blood glucose level. The brothers
have owned and operated Lang's
Service Center at 1007 U.S. 17
South in Wauchula for about 14
years.
Scott Lang is covered by his wife


. Angel's Blue Cross/Blue Shield
insurance. He believes his anti-
rejection medication, estimated at
$7,000 a month, will also be cov-
ered by. the insurance.
A special fund at Tampa General


Hospital through the National
Kidney Foundation is supposed to
cover the medical costs of Tracy
Lang, who does not have insurance.
Scott and Angel Lang do not
See KIDNEY 2A


HUII T Y JIM 'tLLY
Scott Lang (left) is shown with his sister-in-law Tracy, and broth-
er, Jimmy. Tracy Lang will donate a kidney to Scott.


Since he began boxing over 10 years ago, 17-year-old Daniel
Lozano of Bowling Green has been a consistent winner at local,
state, regional and national bouts. He took his first step to the 2008
Olympics last week, when he became U.S. Boxing's silver medalist.


years ago, the 17-year-old Lozano
has been a consistent winner at
local, state, regional and national
bouts. When he turned 17 in
November, he entered the open
division, putting him in the ring
against any age fighter. In only his
second open championship series,
Lozano has had the success he
expected.
Lozano and his 10 teammates
from Team Florida represented
Region 3 (Florida, Georgia, North
Carolina and South Carolina) at the
national bouts last week. Lozano
was the only one to get out of the
preliminaries.
The whole group except Lozano
went to Colorado a week early, but


Lozano wore a mask while training
to simulate the high altitude he
would find.
Bouts at the U.S. Championships
are scored on points for contact
with the white or front portion of
the glove. Three of the five judges
have to hit a certain button within
one second to score a hit.
Lozano's bouts began on
Monday June 4 when he faced
Region 4's Henry Clay, 18, of
Carenany, La. The bout was
stopped in the third round when
Lozano had gained a 20-point
advantage over the unusual oppo-
nent who was shorter than him.
Most are taller than the 5'8"
Lozano.


That was most evident in his next
bout, a return match against
Roberto Ceron, 25, of Doraville,
Ga., whom Lozano had beaten in
the regional competition in March.-
Lozano again won, this time by a
14-10 decision. "I kept him frus-
trated, moving my head, and using
my speed," commented the Hardee
High senior.
On June 6, Lozano had a semi-
final bout against Keola McKee, of
Wailuku, Hawaii, taking a 35-14
decision. "He had won the first two
days and I expected trouble from
him, but he didn't move much. I
just used my speed and angles
against him."
That placed Lozano in the June 8
finals against Yanez, an "awkward
fighter" with a right hook that
threw Lozano off balance. The bout
was televised by Altitude Sports
and covered by the Colorado
See LOCAL TEEN 2A


Museum Celebrates 40 Years

Open House Set For Next Thursday Night


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's own Cracker
Trail Museum will be celebrating
its 40th anniversary here next
Thursday.
Sandy Scott, museum director,
has been planning a celebration that
will appeal to everyone. The muse-
um and surrounding Cracker
Village will be open late, from 4 to
8 p.m. Refreshments will be served.
"To my knowledge, this is the
first time the museum and all of the
buildings have been open after
working hours," Scott said.
Scott has invited several groups
and committees around the county
to attend the function, and is hoping
for a big turnout from the public.
"I didn't want to have a big to-do
and decided to keep it very infor-
mal, so there will not be a ceremo-
ny," she said, "I just want everyone
to come to the museum as it always
is and have a good time."
The Cracker Trail Museum was
donated by the Peace River
Historical Society and was official-
ly opened in June of 1967.
After the society was disbanded,
the county took it over. It has been
running the museum ever since.
Surrounding the area of the
museum is a pioneer settlement that
consists of a blacksmith shop, log
cabin and small post office.
The C.A. Bryant Blacksmith
Shop was still in use in the city of
Bowling Green in 1956, and con-
tains all of the items that a period
blacksmith would need to craft his


wares.
One of Hardee's oldest homes,
the 1879 Hart Cabin, can be found
in the settlement. The home origi-
nally .belonged to William Henry
and Mary Jane Hart, who raised
seven children in it.
The Cracker Trail Post Office
was built in 1886 as part of the
original home of Dr. E.L. Williams


of Fort Meade. It was moved to the
park in 1994 after it was disassem-,
bled and relocated to its, current
locale.
Guided tours throughout the
entire village will be made avail-
able during the celebration for
those wanting to get a more in-
depth history on the buildings.
See MUSEUM 2A


PHOTO BY BRETT JARNAGIN
Sandy Scott sits at a desk from the 1920s that was donated by
Wauchula State Bank, and holds an old Western Electric Phone.
In her hand is a phone directory of Arcadia from 1948.


WEATHER
,ATE HmGH LOW a
06/06 86 62 0.00
* 06/07 91 62 0.00
.06/08 88 66 1.30
06/09 92 68 0.70
,06/10 87 e68 0.00
l06/11 87 68 0.00
06/12 0.00
- TOAL Rainfall to 06/12107 10.71
SSame period last year -11.16
Ten Year Average 58.45
Source: Univ. of Fla. One Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds......................6B
SCourthouse Report......11C
CoMrmunity Calendar.....2A
Crime Blotter.................. 4C
Hardee Living..............2B
Information Roundup....5A
Obits ..4A
Puzzle 1 1B


S18122 07290 3


Canary's Logo Chosen



For City's Centennial


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The drawing of Jen Canary was
chosen to represent Wauchula in its
centennial year.
Hers, which features a small
town living theme, was one of sev-
eral submitted to be used on ban-
ners, posters and correspondence
for centennial events, which began
with the city's birthday bash on
May 22.
Drawings of three other local
artists were also considered. Oneita
Revell, Gretchen Mason and
Debbie Gulliver offered their rendi-
tions.
All of the proposed logos for the
centennial year were displayed at
the City Commission meeting on


Monday evening. Megan
McKibben, Main Street Inc. direc-
tor, and Olivia Minshew, city direc-
tor of community development,
have been working with a commit-
tee to foster a variety of activities
during the year to celebrate the
city's 100th year.
The biggest event will be an Oct.
27 hometown celebration centering
at Heritage Park. There will be a
variety of music from bluegrass to
rock n' roll, and a Theodore
Roosevelt look-alike since he was
president when the city charter was
adopted May 22, 1907.
Schools may have poster con-
tests, and the artistry of Canary,
Revell, Mason and Gulliver will be
See CENTENNIAL 2A


Jen Canary's sketch was chosen for posters, fliers and other notices during Wauchula's
Centennial Year which began May 22.







2A The Herald-Advocate, June 14. 2007


f The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
'Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Production Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published Aeekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Florida. by The Herald-Advocate Publishing
Co Inc Penodical Postage paid at U S Post Office. Wauchula. FL 33873 and additional
entry office (USPS 578-780), "'Postmaster," send address changes to: The Herald-
Ad.ocate, PO. Boi 338, Wauchula. FL 33873.


(/ DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Liing -Thursday 5 pm.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon


LETrERS:
The Herald-Adocate %elcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest Letiers
should be brief. and must be written in good taste, signed and include a daytime phone
number
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on colnmunity matters are welcome Submissions should be typed, dou-
ble-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines All items are subject to editing


MUSEUM
Continued From 1A
Those who visit the museum will
find an impressive collection of
over 3,500 artifacts from Hardee
pioneer families, including house-
hold items and even furniture.
There is also a collection of busi-
ness items from the early 20th cen-
tury.
You will never know what you
may come across next at the
Cracker Trail Museum, and the
public is invited to come June 21
and see a large part of Hardee
County's history.








THURSDAY, JUNE 14
VHardee County School
Board, Board Room, 200 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula, work-
shop on the staff review of the
Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools accredi-
tation report, 4 p.m. and regular
meeting, 5 p.m.


MONDAY, JUNE 18
V/Zolfo Springs Town Council,
regular meeting, Town Hall,
3210 U.S. 17 North, Zolfo
Springs, 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, JUNE 21
VHardee County Commis-
sion, regular and zoning meet-
ing, Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.


007


Wauchula had a train, faith and firm leadership at the start of the 1900s.

CENTENNIAL sion in this tab. Scheips
Continued From 1A McKibben and Minshew also For m


At The Herald-Advocate, we
want accuracy to be a given,
not just our goal. .If you
believe we have printed an
error in fact, please call to
report it. We will review the
information, and if we find it
needs correction or clarifica-
tion, we will do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


displayed around town. The
Herald-Advocate will present a
special tab for the event. Anyone
who has old-time photos that can
be used in a then-and-now pictorial
is welcome to lend them for inclu-


hope that the Homecoming and
Christmas parades can include a
centennial theme. Joining them on
the planning committee are City
Administrator Rick Giroux, Linda
See, Jama Abbott and Erica


being p
any con
tacted,
9193 c
One ca
ominsh


meier.
nore information on events
planned or ideas for them,
nmrittee member can be con-
or call Minshew at 773-
or McKibben at 767-0330.
in also e-mail Minshew at
ew @cityofwauchula.com.


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Ruben "Chino" Ozuna brought a pair of trophies home from
Hurricane Boxing in Tampa May 19. The 12-year-old is on target
to represent Florida in regional Silver Gloves and other major
boxing events.

LOCAL TEEN
Continued From 1A


Springs Gazette, which pictured
Lozano landing a straight right on
his opponent. However, he lost the
bout 18-8.
"He's the only one I have left to
beat to be number one. Even if the
top four at the Olympic trials go on
to the Olympics, I want to be
ranked number one," said Lozano
calmly.
"He's going to have to fight him
aggressively. He has an awkward
style and is cocky but I believe we
can beat him," said his trainer
father.
Under the older Lozano's tute-
lage also is 12-year-old Ruben
"Chino" Ozuna, who wants to fol-
low young Lozano on the champi-
onship trail. Ozuna brought home a
pair of trophies from the Hurricane


Boxing championships in Tampa in
late May, winning an exciting 85-
pound bout and taking the Out-
standing Novice Boxer trophy as
well.
Neither wants to follow yet in the
footsteps of Wauchula's pro boxers.
Lightweight Edner Cherry fought
last night (Wednesday) at the A La
Carte Event Pavilion in Tampa in a
championship bout. He put his
NABA and USNBC belts up
against experienced opponent Wes
Ferguson, whose 16-1-1 record
does not approach the 21-5-2 of
Cherry.
On the undercard of the bouts
featured on "Wednesday Night
Fights" on ESPN2, is.Jenna Shiver,
also of Wauchula, in the only ladies
bout of the evening.


KIDNEY
Continued From 1A


have any children. Tracy, 31, and
her husband Jimmy are the parents
of four children, Stephanie, 15,
Brian, 11, James 3 and Jaymee, 18
months.
Good friends Bob and Pam
Belflower, owners of Belflower's
Floors Direct, are planning a bene-
fit barbecue and car show on July 4
beginning at 11 a.m. at their place
of business, 325 U.S. 17 South,
Wauchula. The meals will be $7.
All proceeds will help the Langs
with their living expenses and med-
ical bills.
Bob Belflower is contacting local
friends and businesses to help with
the barbecue, which will be cooked
by Jerry Robinson who recently
finished in third place in a local
grillin' and chillin' event sponsored
by MAin Street Wauchula.
Belflower said the Langs are
close-knit families and often do
favors for other people. "Scotty is
my friend. I want to help him in any
way I can. They are some of the
best people I have ever known."
Lang has continued working, but
each night since January has had to
go through eight hours of dialysis
treatment.
He said he was healthy but
became sick from a contaminated


bottle of water. He went to a store,
opened it there and took a big swal-
low. The water immediately burned
his tongue. This was on a Saturday
in May 2006.
Lang said Rusty Kitchens, of the
Hardee County Health Department,
came down and then called a lady
from Tallahassee who came the fol-
lowing Monday. The lady did a test
strip on the water which showed it
was highly acidic.
She said he should go directly to
Tampa General Hospital. It was
very busy and sent him to Lakeland
Regional Medical Center. Lang
said his tongue and throat recov-
ered, along with his pancreas which
he said was injured from the water.
The lady from Tallahassee and
the Lakeland hospital kept samples
of the water, said Lang. The other
bottles were removed from the
store, but they did not have the
same run number as the bottle in
question, said Lang.
The Langs have not heard any
test results from the water in ques-
tion, other than the test strip which
showed a high acidic level. Lang
has talked to an attorney, but no
decision has been made as to seek
legal action, he said.


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $16. I yr S8: 2 yrs $54
Flonda
6 months $20; I r. $37; 2 )rs $72
Out of State
6 months $24; I yr. .44. 2 yrs. $86


'Fhe erald-Advoc Ate

PRINTERS PUBLISHERS
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL 33873 Telephone (863) 773-3255:
Quality printing services at competitive prices!


6q


q 0 V-/'





June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 3A


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Oneita Revell included river fowl, deer and cattle among the features of rural Wauchula a centu-
ry ago.


Another Debbie Gulliver sketch continues the western, citrus, palm trees and birds known to this
area.


Faith, farming and early buggy rides, as portrayed by Debbie Gulliver, were common a century
ago.


Debbie Gulliver presented four sketches, this one canoeing on the Peace River along with riding,
rooina and citrus activities.


Granny Graham's
Nobody Feeds Ya Like Granny Feeds Ya!
116 N. 4th Ave., Wauchula 773-0292


FREE COFFEE!
, 'Jul'7


7am 9
(with purch
Dad's get a FREE Dessert
* for Father's Day


Sunday, June 17


Homecooking
Homemade Desserts
Friday Night Catfish


Gretchen Mason's sketch was drawn as the city seal, portraying cattle and citrus as the main
industries.


AW.


Hours:
Sunday 6:30am-2pm
Monday-Friday 5:30am-2pm
Friday Nights 5:00pm-8:30pm


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4A The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007


GUADALUPE HERNANDEZ
Guadalupe Hernandez, 67, of
Bowling Green, died Thursday,
June 7, 2007 at home.
He was born March 12, 1940 in
El Paso del Guayabal, Mexico. He
was a member of the Seventh Day
Adventist Church and a harvester.
He is survived by his wife, Edna;
two sons, Miguel and Oscar Hem-
andez; four daughters, Sofia Hem-
andez, Minerva Rivera, Irlanda.
Losoya and Maria Guadalupe
Montoya; three sisters, Eusebia
Escamilla, Alejandrina Gaona,
Maria Concepsion Garcia; 21
grandchildren; and six great-grand-
children.
Visitation was Saturday, June 9,
5 to 8 p.m. Services were held at 10
a.m. Sunday at Robarts Garden
Chapel with Elder Oscar Hernan-
dez officiating. Burial was in
Bowling Green Cemetery.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula



SA SoVing dmemox0

GUADALUPE
HERNANDEZ
Guadalupe Hernandez, 67, of
Bowling Green, died Thursday,
June 7, 2007 at home.
He was born March 12, 1940
in El Paso del Guayabal, Mexico.
He was a member of the Seventh
Day Adventist Church and a har-
vester.
He is survived by his wife,
Edna; two sons, Miguel and
Oscar Hernandez; four daughters,
Sofia Hernandez, Minerva
Rivera, Irlanda Losoya and Maria
Guadalupe Montoya; three sis-
ters, Eusebia Escamilla, Alejan-
drina Gaona, Maria Concepsion
Garcia; 21 grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Saturday, June
9, 5 to 8 p.m. Services were held
at 10 a.m. Sunday at Robarts
Garden Chapel with Elder Oscar
Hernandez officiating. Burial
was in Bowling Green Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


DENA SPIETH
Dena Spieth, born in Atlanta,
Ga. on November 20, 1923,
passed away on April 4, 2007.
She graduated from nursing
school in St. Petersburg, Florida
and worked as a registered nurse
for many years. Dena found her
niche in nursing. She was able to
take special care of patients from
infants to the elderly. Her sense
of humor, creativity and love of
people made her the great nurse
she was. She seemed to be happi-
est when she was helping others.
She married A.K. Spieth Jr. and
lived in Florida for most of her
life. In 1999, she retired as head
nurse of Hardee Manor Nursing
Home and moved to Colorado
Springs to be near her family. She
was a loving mother and wonder-
ful grandmother.
Dena is survived by her two
daughters, Kappy Stewart (hus-
band Blair) and Karen Ray (hus-
band James), five grandchildren,
Brian Blair Stewart, Kari
Kathryn McCabe (husband
Trevor), Lucy Ray, Charlie Ray,
and Henry Ray, and one great
grandchild, Ava Kathryn
McCabe. She also is survived by
her half-sister, Diane Rice and
her half- brother, Gorden Fox,
both of Auburn, Georgia.
Memorial contributions may
be made in memory of Dena
Spieth to Newborn Hope, P.O.
Box 2515, Colorado Springs, CO
80901 or Bell of Hope Memorial,
mentalhealthamerica.net/memo-
rial or National Mental Health
Association, P.O. Box 16810,
Alexandria, VA 22302-0810.
6-14c


GEORGE GRANT
George Grant, 75, of Sebring,
died Tuesday, June 12, 2007, at his
home.
He was born Aug. 12, 1931, to
Ulysses and Mary Farabee Grant in
Ona. He was a lifelong resident of
Highlands County. He worked as a
carpenter in the construction busi-
ness and was a member of the
Christian Assembly.
He is survived by one daughter,
Connie Brown of Sebring; one son,
George M. Grant of Sebring; two
sisters, Marie Futch of Plant City,
and Juanita Moore of Statesboro,
Ga., 11 grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be held today
(Thursday), June 14, at 4 p.m. at
Stephenson-Nelson Funeral Home,
Sebring. Following visitation, a
funeral service will be held at 5
p.m. in the Chapel with Pastor John
Zonneveld officiating.
Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home
Sebring


FAY PROCTOR
Fay Proctor, 95, of Zolfo
Springs, died Thursday, June 7,
2007, in Wauchula.
She was born Feb. 26, 1912 in
Napa, Idaho. She came to Hardee
County in 1979 from Michigan.
She was a homemaker, member of
New Hope Baptist Church, and the
Pink Lady Auxiliary Florida Hos-
pital-Wauchula.
Survivors include two sons,
Jerry Proctor and wife Becky of
Zolfo Springs, Charles Hewlett and
wife Maryjean of Big Rapids,
Mich; one daughter, Patricia Harris
and husband Tom of Murfreesboro,
Tenn.; two sisters, Merle Zakrzew-
ski of Sterling Heights, Mich., and
Lois Brownlee of Arizona; eight
grandchildren and 11 great-grand-
children.
Visitation was Sunday, June 10,
4 to 6 p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel. Services were held at 11
a.m. Monday at New Hope Baptist
Church with the Rev. Albert Blum
officiating. Burial was in New
Hope Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be made to Good Shepherd
Hospice, 4418 Sun n Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33872 or Every Child
Ministries Inc., P.O. Box 810,
Hebron, IN 46341.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


ABRIANNA O'RYAN
JUAREZ
Abrianna O'Ryan Juarez, infant,
died Tuesday, June 5, 2007.
She was the daughter of John
SManuel Juarez Jr. and Salina Nicole
Gatton-Quackenbush.
She is also survived by grand-
parents John Manuel and Elizabeth
Juarez of Bowling Green, Barney
Quackenbush of Wauchula and
Vicky Gaston of Tennessee; and
many aunts and uncles.
Funeral services were Tuesday
at the funeral home with the Rev.
Mike Graham officiating. Burial
was in Friendship Cemetery.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


9 moving J 0eMo04y


MARY LOIS
STATON WYCKOFF
Mary Lois Staton Wyckoff, 82
of Bowling Green died Monday,
June 11, 2007 at her home.
Born in Altoona, Ala. she was
a lifelong resident, a homemaker,
and attended the Bowling Green
Church of God.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Don F, Wyckoff;
one son, James Johnson, three
brothers, Troy. Horace and Bob
Staton.
She is survived by one son,
Eugene Johnson of Zolfo
Springs; two daughters, Christine
Harrell of Bowling Green, and
Virginia Oden and husband Gary
of Wauchula, one daughter-in-.
law, Louise Johnson of Nicholls;
Ga.; nine grandchildren and 16
great-grandchildren.
The family received friends at
the funeral home on Tuesday
from 6 to 9 p.m. Funeral services
were Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the
funeral home with the Rev. Doyle
Staton and the Rev. Michael
Howell officiating. Burial was in


Wauchula Cemetery



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Obituaries


one daughter, Selena Enfinger and
husband Ashley of Mulberry; two
sons, Darrell Evers of Lakeland,
and Mike Taylor and wife Rhonda
of Mulberry; two sisters, Dianne
Schuette and husband Herb of
Lakeland, and Rosa Marie Scarlett
and husband Rick of Deltona; three
brothers, Terry Evers and wife
Joyce of Mulberry, Wayne Evers
and wife Margie, and Kenny Evers
and wife Mary, all of Lakeland;
eight grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren.
A memorial service was held on
Monday, June 10 at 7 p.m. at the
Christina Baptist Church, 445 W.
540A, Lakeland.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


WILLIE MAE HAYES
SWAILES
Willie Mae Hayes 'Swailes, 88,
died on Friday, June 8, 2007.
She was born Jan. 15, 1919 in
Fairbanks to the late Willie and
Nellie Hayes. She was a homemak-
er and a member of Zolfo Springs
Baptist Church. She attended
Hardee County Schools and lived
most of her in Hardee County.
She was preceded in death by
one son, James L. Swailes; one
grandson, Durant Swailes; one
great-granddaughter, Caitlin
Swailes; four brothers, J.P., Felter,
Robin, and Royce Hayes; and four
sisters, Hazel Williams, Roberta
Mathis, Roxie Christopher and
Virginia Knight.
She is survived by one sister,
Alberta Swailes of Savannah, Ga.;
one daughter, Julia Ann Smith of
Wauchula; one daughter-in-law,
Audrey Swailes of Wauchula; two
grandsons, James D. Swailes and
wife Connie of Martinburg, W.Va.,
and Russell Swailes and wife Pam
of Zolfo Springs; two granddaugh-
ters, Tina Rickett and (Paul) of
Zolfo Springs and Renee Stevens
and (Wes) of Bowling Green; 10
great-grandchildren; six great-
great-grandchildren and several
nieces and nephews.
Services were Sunday, June 10,,
at New Hope Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula

QUINCIE M. AUSTIN
Quincie M. Austin, 80, of
Wauchula, died Thursday, June 7,
2007 of heart failure at Hardee
Manor Care Center.
A resident of Wauchula since
1998, she was a member of the
First Baptist Church in Wauchula.
She retired aftel 25 years as a beau-
tician. She owned and operated her
own beauty shops in Lehigh Acres
and Immokalee.
She was preceded in death by
her husband William in 1996; an
infant son, Alan; and her parents
Woodie Mock and Zola Newberry
Mock.
She is survived by a daughter,
Kathy Walker and husband James
of Wauchula; and a grandson Jarod.
Graveside services were on
Saturday, June 9, at the New Hope
Cemetery at 2:30 p.m. Friends vis-
ited the family from 1 until 2 p.m.
Saturday at Brant Funeral Chapel
in Wauchula.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the Frist Baptist Church
Sanctuary Choir Fund.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauichula

STELLA M. HELMS
Stella M. Helms, 82, a longtime
resident of Fort Meade, died
Wednesday, June 6, 2007, at her
home.
A native of Enterprise, Ala., she
had been a resident of Fort Meade
since 1942. She was employed by
the Polk County School Board for
over 45 years, serving as lunch
room manager and school bus
attendant. She was a member of the
Fort Meade chapter of the Order of
the Eastern Star and was a Baptist.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 48 years, Milford
Helms.
She is survived by three sons,
M.J."Jerry" Helms, Wyman E.
Helms and James C. Helms, all of
Fort Meade; 13 grandchildren; 26
great-grandchildren; and four
great-great-grandchildren.
The family received friends
from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday at the
funeral home. Graveside services
were held Monday at Homeland
Cemetery with the Rev. Roy
Hancock and son M.J. "Jerry"
Helms officiating.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


ALEXANDER "ALEX"
EVERS III
Alexander "Alex" Evers III, 65,
of Fort Meade, died Thursday, June
7, 2007, at his home.
A lifelong resident of Mulberry,
he had lived in Fort Meade only a
few months. He was the
owner/operator of Tank Cleaning,
Resource & Recovery Inc. of
Mulberry and former production
manager of Farmland Industries.
He was preceded in death by his
parents Ossie and Rosa Evers; his
first wife, Marcia Evers; and
daughter Marcy Evers.
He is survived by his wife,
Patricia R. Evers of Fort Meade;


Nutrition Notes


MARY LOIS STATON
WYCKOFF
Mary Lois Staton Wyckoff, 82 of
Bowling Green died Monday, June
11,200. t 'her home.
Born i6. Altoona, Ala. she was a
lifelong resident, a homemaker, and
attended the Bowling Green
Church of God.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Don F, Wyckoff ; one
son, James Johnson, three brothers,
Troy, Horace and Bob Staton.
She is survived by one son,
Eugene Johnson of Zolfo Springs;
two daughters; Christine Harrell of
Bowling Green, and Virginia Oden
and husband Gary of Wauchula,
one daughter-in-law, Louise John-
son of Nicholls; Ga.; nine grand-
children and 16 great-grandchil-
dren.
The family received friends at
the funeral home on Tuesday from
6 to 9 p.m. Funeral services were
Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the funer-
al home with the Rev. Doyle Staton
and the Rev. Michael Howell offi-
ciating. Burial was in Wauchula
Cemetery.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula




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FAY
PROCTOR
Fay Proctor, 95, of Zolfo
Springs, died Thursday, June 7,
2007, in Wauchula.
She was born Feb. 26, 1912 in
Napa, Idaho. She came to Hardee
County in 1979 from Michigan.
She was a homemaker, member
of New Hope Baptist Church,
and the Pink Lady Auxiliary
Florida Hospital-Wauchula.
Survivors include two sons,
Jerry Proctor and wife Becky of
Zolfo Springs, Charles Hewlett
and wife Maryjean of Big
Rapids, Mich; one daughter,
Patricia Harris and husband Tom
of Murfreesboro, Tenn.; two sis-
ters, Merle Zakrzewski of
Sterling Heights, Mich., and Lois
Brownlee of Arizona; eight
grandchildren and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Sunday, June
10, 4 to 6 p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel. Services were held at 11
a.m. Monday at New Hope
Baptist Church with the Rev.
Albert Blum officiating. Burial
was in New Hope Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorials
may be made to Good Shepherd
Hospice, 4418 Sun n Lake Blvd.,
Sebring, FL 33872 or Every
Child Ministries Inc., P.O. Box
810, Hebron, IN 46341.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Q: What is so special about
"coral calcium" supplements?
A: Promotional material suggests
that coral calcium supplements sup-
posedly made from remnants of
Asian coral are responsible for the
longevity and good health of people
on Okinawa. Okinawans do have
very low incidence of cancer and
heart disease, and overall good
health, but many things about their
lifestyle are far more likely to be
responsible. The Okinawan diet
features an abundance of vegetables
and frequent seafood, is low in fat
and emphasizes portion control. In
fact, Okinawan culture teaches a
style of eating in which one stops
eating before becoming completely
full, which makes sense with what
we now know about the delay in our
ability to sense when we've had
enough food. People on this island
are physically active and maintain
healthy body weights. The
American Institute for Cancer
Research says habits like these
could lower our incidence of cancer
30 to 40 percent and are the steps
recommended for other aspects of
good health. Safety of coral calcium
may be questionable, because labo-
ratory analyses have found some to
contain lead and other contami-


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ABRIANNA O'RYAN
JUARE
Abrianna O'Ryan Juarez,
infant daughter of John Manuel
Juarez Jr. and Salina Nicole
Gatton-Quackenbush went to be
wth Jesus, June 5.
Besides her parents she is sur-
vived by grandparents John
Manuel and Elizabeth Juarez of
Bowling Green, Barney Quack-
enbush of Wauchula and Vicky
Gaston of Tennessee; and many
aunts and uncles.
Funeral services were Tuesday'
from the Chapel of Robarts
Family Funeral Home with the
Rev. Mike Graham officiating.
Burial was in Friendship
Cemetery.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home






June 14, 2007, The I-erald-Advocate 5A


$1,000 FOR YOUTH BASEBALL


COURTESY PHOTO
English Chevrolet, in partnership with Chevrolet, will be donating 20 tickets to four Tampa Bay
Devil Ray games this year for Hardee Youth Baseball players to attend. They will also be donat-
ing $250 for every home run the Rays hit during the game. That amount will be doubled to $500
for every home run if the Devil Rays win the game. Pictured above with a check for $1,000 for a
recent game is Kevin Hanchey of English Chevrolet; Brian Knight, president of Hardee County
Youth Sports; and Donnie Canary of English Chevrolet.


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Class Of 1984
Gets Together
Plans are under way for a July
14 get-together of the Hardee
High Class of 1984. It will be
held at 1026 Briarwood Drive,
Wauchula.
The party's theme is "Let's
Take It Back," Everyone in that
class is invited. For more infor-
mation, call Marilyn Browdy
Morris at 773-9906 or cell 863-
245-1704.






A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
How can a young person live a
clean life? By carefully reading
the map of Your Word .. Be
blessed, God; train me in Your
ways of wise living.
Psalm 119:9,12 (ME)
FRIDAY
Don't let people look down on
you because you are young; see
that they look up to you because
you are an example to them in
your speech and behavior, in
your love and faith and sincerity.
I Timothy 4:12 (PME)
SATURDAY
An idol does no good, because
a human made it; it is only a stat-
ue that teaches lies... It cannot
tell you what to do. It is only a
statue covered with gold and sil-
ver; there is no life in it. . The
Lord God is in His holy temple;
all the earth should be silent in
His presence.
Habakkuk 2:18a, 19b-20 (NCV)
SUNDAY
But God has chosen the foolish
things of the world to confound
the wise; and God has chosen
the weak things of the world to
confound those that are mighty.
. And so there is no place for
human pride in the presence of
God.
I Corinthians 1:27,29 (NEB)
MONDAY
For you are dealing with the One
who formed the mountains and
made the winds, and knows
your every thought; He turns the
morning to darkness, and crush-
es down the mountains under
His feet: Jehovah, the Lord, the
God of hosts, is His name.
Amos 4:13 (TLB)
TUESDAY
Now faith is the assurance of
things hoped for, the conviction
of things not seen . By faith
we understand the world was
created by the word of God.
Hebrews 11:1,3a (RSV)
WEDNESDAY
Committo tohe Lord whatever
you do, and your plans will suc-
ceed .. When a man's ways
are pleasing to the Lord, He
makes even his enemies live at
peace with him.
Proverbs 16:3,7 (NIV)
All verses are excerpted from The
Holy Bible: (KJV) King James
Version; (ME) The Message;
(NCV) New Century Version; (NEB)
New English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (RSV) Re-
vised Standard Version; (PME)
Phillips Modern English; and (TLB)
The Living Bible.


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Always A Welcome Sight

At Home At School On Vacation

Wherever You Are!
















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Hardee's County's Hometown Coverage

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In County: 6 Months $16.00; 1 Year $28.00; 2 Years $54.00
Out of County: 6 Months $20.00; 1 Year $37.00; 2 Years $72.00
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June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Ke/lly's Column
~By Jim


On May 26, 2007, John Wayne would have been 100 had he not died
28 years ago. Some say he is the most recognizable movie star in American
history. Even Former Tampa Bay Bucs head coach John McKay said one of
his hobbies was watching old'`ihnrWayne movies.
As many movie watchers w.- .J say, "John Wayne was a man's man."
Thank Heaven he did not keep the name he was born with in Winterset,
Iowa. His birth name was Mari6nib,:ichael Morrison.

Is George W. Bush a great president or not? Former President Jimmy
Carter said recently the Bush administration has been "the worst in histo-
ry" for its impact around the world. Carter later said he meant to say Bush's
foreign policy was not as good as President Richard Nixon's.
The White House responded by saying former President Carter is
"increasingly irrelevant."
Carter later said, "The overt reversal of America's basic values as
expressed by previous administrations, including George H.W. Bush and
Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon and others, has been the most disturb-
ing to me." Carter said he is careful not to level personal criticisms against
President Bush, wrote Don Schanche Jr. of The Associated Press in
Lakeland Ledger story.
Carter certainly had his problems as president, including high inflation,
high interest and American hostages held by Iran who were not released
until Reagan was elected president. A Georgia road billboard once apolo-
gized for sending Carter to the White House. He is considered a far better
ex-president than president.
Carter was criticized for admitting he "lusted in his heart" in Playboy
magazine article. His successor, Bill Clinton, apparently took that quote a
step further. And more apparently, President John F. Kennedy could have
written a book on lust.

In north Florida there was a report that the drought has cut the tupelo
honey crop in half. I guess we will have to settle for orange blossom honey,
which is my favorite anyway.

A great man died recently in Jerry Falwell, 73, founder of the Moral






WEATHER SUMMARY
Rain fell in most areas during the week of June 4 10 due mainly to the
clash of the Atlantic and Gulf sea breezes. Rain totaled from about one third
inch to nearly three and a quarter inches in areas receiving significant rain.
Some localities of the central and northern Peninsula remained somewhat
dry with a tenth inch or less of rain recorded for the week. The rains helped
ease the threat of wildfire throughout the State. As of June 8, the Florida
Department of Agriculture's Division of Forestry reported 83 active fires
affecting 130,831 acres. In the major cities, temperatures for the week aver-
aged from one degree below normal in Tampa and Miami, to two degrees
above in Jacksonville and Pensacola. Daytime highs were'in the upper 80s
and lower 90s. Nighttime lows were in the 60s and 70s with Immokalee and
Balm reporting at least one low in the upper 50s at the
beginning of the week.

FIELD CROPS
Recent scattered showers increased soil moisture in some Panhandle
and northern Peninsula areas which allowed peanut and cotton planting to
resume. Peanut condition was rated twenty-five percent very poor, thirty-
five percent poor, thirty percent fair, and ten percent good. The Panhandle
and the northwestern half of the northern Peninsula reported very short to
short soil moisture while the rest of the northern Peninsula reported short to
adequate soil moisture. The central Peninsula reported mostly very short to
short soil moisture. Dade County reported mostly adequate soil moisture
and a few spots of surplus supplies which represented less than a half per-
cent statewide. The rest of the southern Peninsula reported short soil mois-
ture supplies.

Moisture Topsoil Subsoil
Rating This. Last Last This Last Last
week Week year week week Year
Percent
Very short. 37 57 52 49 65 48
Short 44 24 25 41 27 25
Adequate 19 19 23 10 8 27
Surplus 0 0 0 0 0 0
VEGETABLES
Harvest is slowing seasonally over the central and southern Peninsula
as production increases in the northern areas and in other states. In the
Quincy area, tomato picking increased seasonally. Vegetables and non-cit-
rus fruit shipped during the week included cantaloupes, cucumbers, egg-
plant, okra, peppers, potatoes, squash, tomatoes, and watermelons. Growers
also marketed very light amounts of dry onions, snap beans, and blueber-
ries.

LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
In the Panhandle, pasture condition is mostly poor due to long term
drought. Pasture is greening up following rain and less supplemental hay
needs to be fed. More rain is needed for stock ponds and continued pasture
growth. The northern areas, pasture condition is mostly fair with some loca-
tions receiving rain. In the central areas, pasture condition is mostly poor.
Forage and pasture grass is greening up following the rainfall. Rain has pro-
duced significant greening and growth of grass in most locations. In the
southwest areas, pasture condition is mostly poor with some locations in
fair condition. Statewide, cattle condition ranges from very poor to good
with most in fair condition.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 20 10 40D 45
Poor 25 55 30 40
Fair 45 20 25 12
Good 10 15 5 3
Excellent 0 0 0 0
CITRUS
Although widely scattered, all areas of the citrus belt reported some
rainfall associated with the beginning of summer. Heavy thunderstorms pro-
duced over three inches of rain in some areas while others received less than
an inch. Interior areas received more precipitation than coastal regions.
Rainfall is still needed in all areas to assist the trees in maintaining moisture
for next season's crop. Water restrictions are in place in southwest areas.
Valencia estimated utilization has dropped below two million boxes per
week. Processing plants are closing with one plant to remain open until


about the end of June. Grapefruit harvest is mostly complete for the season.
A small amount of colored grapefruit is still being picked for both fresh and
processing. Packinghouses that are still open are mostly for later variety
oranges that will be utilized for storage fruit. Irrigation is being used less to
supplement shortage of rainfall. Also, some field practices being observed
are fertilizing; herbiciding, mowing, removing of dead trees, and hedging
and topping.
Crop May 27 | Jun 03 | Jun 10
In thousands of 1-3/5 bushel boxes
Navel oranges 2 1 2
Early and Mid oranges 8 12 20
Valencia 3,680 2,287 1,722
Grapefruit 101 31 16
Honey Tangerines 1 0 0
Temples 0 0 0


Majority and the Thomas Road Baptist Church in Lynchburg, Va. He
helped get conservative Christians off the sidelines and into American pol-
itics and the voting booths. His ministry was partly responsible for the elec-
tions of Presidents Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush.
Conservative Christians grew tired of the likes of Madalyn O'Hai tlak-
ing prayer and Bibles out of schools and of the Democratic Party champi-
oning gay rights and abortion rights.
Finally the Democrats have awakened and seen the handwriting on the
wall that has caused them to lose one presidential election after another in
recent years. Ironically Tennessee Sen. Al Gore, self-proclaimed inventor
of the Internet and champion of the current fight against global warming,
won more popular votes for president in 2000 than George W. Bush.
The election was in limbo for several days because of the Florida vote.
Bush finally prevailed in Florida by I believe 537 votes, but a lot of votes
in southeast Florida were thrown out for having "hanging chads." And in
charge of overseeing the Florida election was Secretary of State Katherine
Harris, a Republican who openly supported Bush and later became a U.S.
representative and tried to be a U.S. senator but fell hundreds of thousands
of votes short of Bill Nelson.
Al Gore could still have been elected president if he had carried his
home state of Tennessee. How bad is that, when a state's favorite son who
could be president is suddenly treated like a red-headed stepchild at a fam-
ily reunion.

The death toll of American soldiers in the current "war on terror" has
passed the 3,500 mark. The Democrats won a sweeping victory in the
national elections in 2006, and some Democratic leaders want a timetable
to begin bringing American troops out of Iraq and an end to the war in Iraq.
Many Republicans, but not all, still support Bush's decision to go to
war against Iraq, a nation that Bush considered was an imminent threat to
the security of the U.S. and had weapons of mass destruction and was try-
ing to create nuclear weapons, according to Bush's inner circle. Saddam
Hussein was toppled from power quite easily but no weapons of mass
destruction or nuclear work was found.
And now the question remains, can America's 150,000 troops in Iraq
help Iraq's new democracy be successful and bring peace to the nation?
Some people view the U.S. as a "foreign occupying force" there. Bush's
idea, I'm sure, is "we're here to help you." Time will give us the answer,
but the question is, how much time? The time clock began March 2003.
In the Persian Gulf War in 1990-91 America lost 382 troops. In the
Vietnam Conflict, which lasted about 10 years, U.S. military deaths were
58,209. The four-year Korean Conflict claimed 36,576 American military
deaths.
Other wars and American troop deaths: World War II, 405,399; World
War I, 116,516; Spanish-American War, 2,446; Civil War, 364,511;
Mexican War, 13,283; War of 1812, 2,260; and Revolutionary War, 4,435.
War does not cause deaths just to soldiers. Think of the injuries to
troops and the deaths and injuries to innocent civilians.


A call to Hardee Supervisor of Elections Jeff Ussery to doublecheck
my memory resulted in these facts: In the 2000 presidential elections in
Florida, Bush received 2,912,790 votes and Gore 2,912,253. In the 2006
Florida election for U.S. Senate, Bill Nelson received 2,890,548 votes and
Katherine Harris 1,826,127.
It is amazing how close Gore came to being elected president. And
some people feel, in retrospect, that Jeb would have been more qualified for
president than older brother George. We will never know, because Jeb,
probably can never be a U.S. president after Papa and W. Not likely to be
Bush III administration.
But then, who thought 10 years ago that Hillary would be considered
in 2007 to be a leading presidential candidate? In politics, as Yogi Berra
might say, it ain't over until it's over.
In support of President George W. Bush, he has been a strong decisive
leader and America has not had another terrorist attack on our home soil
since 9-11-01. Gas prices? That's another story.

Rick Dantzler recently spoke to the Tiger Bay Club in Bartow about
the proposed Heartland Parkway toll road that would go north-south
through eastern Hardee County, connecting Lee County with 1-4.
Dantzler said the University of Florida predicts 1.5 million people
moving into the Heartland area within the next 25 years, 6 million south of
1-4.
Large property owners along the route could designate some areas
close to the parkway for development but allow the majority of their prop-
erty to remain undeveloped in exchange for the road. He said this would
prevent numerous 5 to 10-acre ranchettes and willy-nilly growth. Planned
and controlled communities would be better for the environment, he said.
The alternative, said Dantzler, would be urban sprawl and not con-
serving enough land for agriculture and wildfire. A lot of ranchettes would
also be a drain on public services, he said.
John Ryan, a resident of Winter Haven and member of the Sierra Club,
said the proposed parkway would generate and attract growth. "You don't
build a road then plan the growth around it. You plan the growth and then
build the road," he told Andrew Dunn of the Lakeland Ledger.
Dantzler said 1-95 is becoming very busy and the parkway could help
serve as a hurricane evacuation route for south and southwest Florida. He
said he did not want to see a brand new road punched through a large area
of undeveloped property without a lot of benefits to agriculture an the envi-
ronment.
The former state senator said about half the right of way could likely
be donated by landowners. He said the parkway is needed most in Polk
County due to big growth rather than the southern portion.
I do not think the parkway is needed, since there are already four major
north-south routes: 1-75, 1-95, U.S. 27 and U.S. 17. A priority should be
completing the four-laning of U.S. 17 instead of the proposed toll road.

One is not born a genius, one becomes a genius.
Simone de Beauvoir






8A The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007


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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, June 14,2007


PAGE ONE


-mwr Aw 1c p

Aw


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Participating in the groundbreaking ceremony are (from left) Betty Croy of Hardee County's Economic Development Office (CEDO), County Commissioner Dale Johnson, IDA Board Member Dana
English, County Commissioner Gordon Norris, Industrial Development Authority (IDA) Board Member Marcus Shackelford, John Swaitkowksi and family of Pacer Marine Engineering, Contractor
Mark Cahill, EDC board member Lory Durrance, IDA Chairman Lavon Cobb, IDA Vice-Chairman Rick Justice and IDA board member Tomas Macias.


Pacer Marine Breaks Ground PICNIC OUTING


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
On May 22, a new business offi-
cially broke ground in the Hardee
County Commerce Park.
Pacer Marine Engineer (PME),
Inc. will be putting in a new
40,000-square-foot facility at 2515
Commerce Ave in the park off SR


Are you looking for a fulfilling
and rewarding volunteering oppor-
tunity close by in the community?
Then look no further than Good
Shepherd Hospice.
Good Shepherd Hospice, the
area's oldest hospice service, is
seeking volunteers to provide com-
panionship to patients and assis-
tance to caregivers.
Good Shepherd Hospice volun-
teers commit to giving two to four
hours each week and training is
required. Along with providing
support for patients and their fami-
lies in their homes, volunteers can
also visit patients in assisted living
facilities and nursing homes.
There are no "typical" days for a
Good Shepherd Hospice volunteer.
One day a volunteer could be found
reading the newspaper to a patient.
The next visit can find them remi-
niscing. And on yet another visit
they could be playing cards.
Volunteers are also needed to


62.
PME is a privately owned and
operated company based out of its
headquarters in Sarasota.
The company manufactures elec-
trical systems and also designs dig-
ital AC and DC control systems for
boat keels. Its primary market is the
marine and recreational vehicle


provide important office support,
staff special events and work at
Life's Treasures Thrift Store.
Volunteering training will be
held in Wauchula starting June 30.
To learn more about the many vol-
unteering opportunities with Good
Shepherd Hospice, contact Natalia
Conner at 863-991-0558 or visit the
Good Shepherd Hospice website at
www.goodshepherdhospice.org.
Good Shepherd Hospice em-
braces its mission to make the most
of life by relieving the suffering of
patients and their families affected
by life-limiting illnesses or end-of-
life issues. Good Shepherd is the
only local agency offering hospice
programs accredited by the Joint
Commis-sion, which sets the
national standards for healthcare
accreditation. Community bereave-
ment programs offered by Good
Shepherd Hospice are funded in
part by United Way of Central
Florida.


industry.
Currently, PME employs 100
people in the Bradenton/Sarasota
area. The company will initially
employ 30 people in Hardee
County but within a few years will
expand that number to 100.
There will be a 4,000-square-foot
office and training area; a 2,000-
square-foot aluminum panel fabri-
cation, powder coat and-silk screen-
area; a 3,000-square-foot panel
assembly and testing department;
3,000-square-feet of wire process-
ing equipment; 5,000-square-feet
of termination and sub-assembly
equipment and over 20,000-square-
feet of wire harness assembly.
The Pacer building will be envi-
ronmentally controlled and will
include both indoor and outdoor
lunch ,and break facilities for
employees.
Already inside the county indus-
trial park about a mile from U.S. 17
is Autumn Blum's Organix South,
an international company produc-
ing lipstick, soaps and pet health
care products.
Another company already up and
running is the roofing tile manufac-
turer Allyndeb, under the name
Milano Ceramic Tile.
Scott Stanley, of SCOSTA,
opened up operations over six
months ago and has been busy
making trusses.
Southern Equipment pipe sales
and service also is sited in the park.
Negotiations are wrapping up
with another company, Graybar,
and a site has already been chosen.


6:14,21cJ


COURTESY PHOTO
Residents from Hardee
Manor Healthcare Center
(shown above) were treat-
ed to a picnic recently at
the Pioneer Park Pavilion.
S This is one of the many
special activities that
".+ .those who live at the cen-
." ter enjoy throughout the
"year. Friends and family of
the residents were invited
to attend the picnic, which
really brightened the out-
;ing for those who attended
(as shown below.) Hardee
.-.,jManor is always looking to
find people to volunteer
their time to better the ser-
vices that it provides.
Those interested in volun-
teering should call
Bernice Murphy at 773-
3231.









MEAT DEPARTMENT SPECIALS

We have the bad prices in town


Delmonico Steak
Beef Bottom Round
Sirloin Tip Steak

Pork Spareribs
Pork Neck Bones


$ 7.99 LB
$ 2.89 LB
$ 3.59 LB


$ 2.39
$ .99


LB
LB


Chicken Split Breast $ 1.59 LB
Leg Quarters (Box of 10 Lbs.) $22.00 each
Prices in this ad good the week of 6/13/07-6/19/07

112 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula, Florida PH: (863)773-9149
STORE HOURS: MON.-SAT. 6AM-9PM SUNDAY 8AM-8PM


Good Shepherd Hospice

Needs Local Volunteers


POO KOESALE




Ulirich's Pitcher Pump


is selling chlorine


from 3 to 5 PM,

Monday Friday

at


409 Goolsby Street

Wauchula







2B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007





-Hardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO
Jerry Patterson & Dena Scott
Dena Scott & Jerry Patterson

To Marry On Saturday


Matt and Emma Lee Scott of
Wauchula announced the engage-
ment and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Dena Nicole Scott,
to Jerry Laron Patterson, the son of
Laron and Donna Patterson of
Wauchula.
The bride-elect is currently
employed at Galberry Farm Ele-
mentary School in Hope Mills, N.C.
The prospective groom is in the


U.S. Army, currently stationed in
Fort Bragg, N. C.
The couple will exchange vows
in a private ceremony on Saturday
at 3:30 p.m. in the Chapel of the
First Baptist Church of Wauchula.
A reception will follow at 4 p.m.
at the home of Laron and Donna
Patterson, 617 N. Hollandtown
Road, Wauchula. Friends of the
couple are invited to the reception.


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson -
THIS WORLD IS SOON GONE
I used to go hours and hours, sometimes a whole day, without once
thinking about God. This was because this present world and all ittgatc-
tions were more real to me than the Lord. I was busy making a living Ind
building a career. It was absorbing and competitive. I believed in God, but
He was little more to me than a religious idea.
On Sunday I went to church and tried to think about eternal things. But
I couldn't dial my mind to a different station. It kept broadcasting over and
over the things I'd been thinking about all week.
When I tried to pray, all I could ask for was help in my various week-
ly enterprises.
Today, all this has changed. I have come to realize that God is not
something valuable that I need to add to my life in order to be successful.
He is Life itself, and I need to stay connected to Him in order to be alive. "I
am the Way, the Truth and the Life" (John 14:6).
If anything seems irrelevant, it is this world and all its frenzied activi-
ties carried on as though God did not exist. Now, I can see, beyond the tin-
sel and trimmings, there is little of value. '"The world and its desires pass
away, but the man who does the will of God lives forever." (I John 2:17).
What is this "will of God"? It is treating others with tenderness and care
- just the way the Lord has treated me. It is obeying His gracious com-
mands and, in this way, honoring Him as the King of Kings. It is depending
on Him to direct and guide instead of relying on myself.
"Trust in the Lord with all thine heart and lean not unto thine own
understanding." (Proverbs 3:5).


Conley Reunion On Saturday


The J.W. Conley family reunion
will be held Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
Everyone who is attending is
asked to bring a covered dish with
enough to share.


The reunion will be in the fel-
lowship hall of the First Baptist
Church of Wauchula, 1570 W.
Main St., Wauchula.
For more information, call Anna
Conley Smith at 375-2879.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate



SThe Camo Corner





Camo, Law Gear, Gift Shop
Paul R. Davis 773-0077 112 W. Orange St., Wauchula
soc6:14p






.. i. has come again, avnd we're
... going to ceLebrate our 3s2a"
.a nlivelrsary 0ov the 13th 0da
ofjvuee. I vwvarrtled this Laod
.. back l the year of '75 on ma
Mabel Sage Woman Boone Fridy aftber- /< .. .
Vnoovn. I've Loved this Ladty for a ,
Lovngo time and this Love gets ,*. '- ':
better aLL the t'vwe, the Lord gave ,
i--. ^. ...+ A I ... -'...2- --^. 2... 0 -


/- 1036 S. 6th Ave.
Wauchula, FL 33873 ,
(863) 767-8964

Father's Day & Indopondonce Day
Thomod Party Goods


mWeddinar

.Wedding


1st Birthday
Balloon's For A
Banners


Anniversary


bisrley


Party Prices


Bridal Shower


Solid Color Tableware


soc6:7,14c


\< N T- \' V. W" Wi7
Mason
Mason Carlton

Turns One
Mason Carlton, son of Scott and
Jaklynne Carlton of Wauchula,
turned one year old on June 7, but
celebrated early with a swim party
at Lake June, The theme was John
Deere.
Besides swimming and boating,
the honoree and his guests were
treated to hot dogs, hamburgers
and, of course, birthday cake and
ice cream.
Joining in for the special occa-
sion were grandparents Dennis and
Darlene Harned, and James and
Penny Carlton, as well as great-
grandparents Sammee and Lynda
Ruth and Vernon and Ardis See,
along with several aunts, uncles,
cousins and friends.


Curious George
Party Honors

Markieto Huerta
Marco Antonio "Markieto"
Huerta, son of Ty Lee and Jessica
Gonzales, turned one year old on
May 31, celebrated on May 27 at
Paynes Creek State Park with a
Curious George party.
Guests shared hamburgers, hot
dogs, chips and cake.
Among those attending were his
grandparents Johnny and Mar4.
Saldivar, aunt Mia Saldivar, uncle
Darius Saldivar, great-grandmother
Clara Lopez and cousins Jessie
Gonzales and Johnny Saldivar Jr.


Markieto

Jeannies
Decorating Rental Service
A Home Based Business
Let me give your event
the attention it deserves
Jeannie Gilliard
1059 Lockmiller Rd.
Wauchula, FL 33873
Home (863) 735-2227 c
Cell (863) 781-2146
www.WauchulaWeddings.com


Jacqueline Waldron met Govern4
the state capitol.

Waldron I
Jacqueline Waldron has been an
important part of Florida State
University's "Flying High" Circus
for two years.
The 19-year-old is a junior and is
the daughter of Bill and Arnell
Waldron of Wauchula.
Her acts in the big top include the
quartette adagio and the double
trapeze.
Jacqueline has performed her
acts at many school functions and
around the Tallahassee community.
During last year's football season
she and her group performed at the
Pow Wow, FSU's Homecoming pep
rally, that filled over 10,000 seats.
Stephen Colbert, comedian news
anchor from Comedy Central's The
Colbert Report, was featured at the
pep rally.
Waldron also performed at the
Homecoming Half Time Show at
Doak Campbell Stadium. Her final
performance of the season was at a
Tallahassee Titans football game
tailgate party.
Most recently, Jacqueline per-


Khloe
Dora The Explorer
Fetes 3-Year-Old
Khloe Smith, was born April 20,
2004 and celebrated her third party
on April 15, 2007 with a Dora The
Explorer party at the home of her
parents, Andrew .and Daffney
Smith.
Guests were served pizza, Ichips,
soda and, of course, birthday cake.
Along with her brothers Devin
and Landon, those helping to cele-
brate the occasion were grandpar-
ents and great-grandparents and
aunts, uncles and cousins.


D.J. Faulkner
On Dean's List
Donald M. "D.J." Faulkner III,
recently was named to the Dean's
List at Florida Atlantic University
in Boca Raton.
The Dean's list is made up of stu-
dents who had 12 hours or more per
semester and earned above a 3.0
grade point average.
The son of Don Jr. and Renee
Faulkner of Zolfo Springs, D.J. will
be a junior in the engineering pro-
gram in the fall. He is a 2002
Hardee Senior High School gradu-
ate


June 24th

6:00 P.M.


COURTESY PHOTO
or Charlie Crist at FSU's day at


:Iies High
formed at FSU's Day at the state
Capitol where she got to meet Gov.
Charlie Crist.
The junior has been featured in
the Tallahassee Democrat, St. Pete
Times, Edge Magazine and FSU's
monthly faculty newsletter.
Jacqueline practices from three to
five days a week and, along with
the other members of the circus,
must take part in helping out with
costumes, rigging and overall care
of the circus tent.
Over the summer she will be
going with a 26-member group of
the circus to Callaway Gardens in
Pine Mountain, Ga.
There they will help run the sum-
mer adventure program for the
guests' children and perform in
seven weekly shows in the
evenings.
Jacqueline is an elementary edu-
cation major with a minor in child
development. She has been named
on the Dean's List and is a member
'of the Kappa Alpha Theta social
sorority


YARD SALE


Saturday, June 16
corner of N US 17 & Orange St.


\~rfl.


Proceeds to benefit
Hardee Youth Football
soc5:31-6:14c


VACATION!
LAKE HOUSE FOR RENT
Located on Lake June in Lake Placid, FL.


Newly renovated, 3/2, private dock,
and boat lift. $800 weekly. Contact
Jamie at 863-781-1413. No pets.


soc6:7-28p


New Zion

Baptist Church
S 202 Sidney Roberts Road
Ona, Florida



June 27th

8:00 P.M.


soc6:7,14c


Ages preschool through sixth grade

Como and Have come Fun

In The Jungle With Us!

For further information contact the church office
Tuesday Friday between 8:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.
Pastor, Stephen Darley'







June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 3B


E uiar.

News*B


CHRISTOPHER D.
ROGRIGUEZ
U.S. Marine Corps 2nd Lt.
Christopher David Rodriguez, the
son of Robert and Maria M.
Rodriguez of Zolfo Springs, gradu-
ated from the United States Naval
Academy in Annapolis, Md., on
May 25, 2007, when he earned his
commission.
Home schooled by his mother,
Rodriguez entered South Florida
Community College at age 15 and
graduated in 2002 with his AA
degree. He has now successfully
completed four years of intensive
academic, physical and professional
training resulting in a bachelor's
degree in engineering.
As a graduate of the Naval
Academy, he completed a four-year,
total immersion program where a
strong, balanced academic program
focused on the educational needs of
the Navy and Marine Corps and
superimposed on a strict profes-
sional military training environ-
ment emphasizing the development
of leadership skills.
The Naval Academy has more
than 4,000 students from every state
in the union who comprise the
Brigade of Midshipmen.
Considered one of the top institu-
tions in the country, the U.S. Naval
Academy was founded in 1845 and
has graduated more than 60,000
men and women. Its graduates have
included 4,000 admirals and gener-
als, one president, 200 members of
Congress, three governors, 73
Medal of Honor winners, one Nobel
Prize winner and 40 astronauts.
Following graduation, Rodriguez
has been assigned to The Basic
School at Quantico, VA., where he
will begin training as a rifle platoon
commander before proceeding to
the area where he is to serve.

There is more refreshment and
stimulation in a nap, even of the
briefest, than in all the alcohol
ever distilled.
-Edward Lucas


Lyria
Lyria Hrabal

Turns 3
Lyria Hrabal, daughter of Andy
and Jenny Hrabal of Wauchula,
turned three on March 6, 2007 and
enjoyed a party at the home of her
grandparents Sam and Karen
Hrabal. The theme was Baby Jungle
Animals.
They were joined by great-grand-
parents Ken and Louise Baucom;
grandparents Don and Renee'
Faulkner; and godparents Bob and
Betty Cain.
Others dropping by were aunts
and uncles Loraine Childress, Ray-
mond and Roxanne Garcia; Andy
Faulkner; Dan and Kami Arnold;
Jami Hrabal and Alexis; D.J.
Faulkner and Reuben Faulkner as
well as cousins Dylan Robinson;
Samuel Braxton; Dray and Breezy
Hrabal; C.J. Arnold; Cassie and
Mark Baucom; Amanda Faulkner;
and Amy, Raymond and Morgan
Garcia.

You know your children are
growing up when they stop ask-
ing you where they came from
and refuse to tell you where
they're going.
--P. J. O'Rourke


ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


e A
THREE PINKS, TWO BLUES
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Barta,
Arlington, Va., a six pound seven
ounce daughter, Katherine "Katie"
Elizabeth, born April 17, 2007,
Virginia Hospital Center, Arling-
ton. Mrs. Barta is the former Keri
Schrader. Maternal grandparents
are Leon and patty Jo Schrader of
Wauchula. Paternal grandparents
are Dr. and Mrs. Joe Barta of
Radford, Va.


i /






Mr. and Mrs. Andy Hrabal,
Wauchula, a five pound ten ounce
son, Logan Samuel Andrew, born
May 10, 2007, Lakeland Regional
Medical Center, Lakeland. Mrs.
Hrabal is the former Jenny
Faulkner. Maternal grandparents
are Don and Renee Faulkner of
Zolfo Springs. Maternal great-
grandparents are Ken and Louise
Baucom of Lake Dale, Bill Bishop
of Wauchula and the late Gina
Bishop, and Jenette Faulkner of
Longwood and the late Don
Faulkner. Maternal great-great-
grandmother is Ruth Faulkner of
Hagarsville, GA. Paternal grand-
parents are Sam and Karen Hrabal
of Bowling Green. Paternal great-
grandparents are Laverne Meeks of
Fort Green and the late Dale Meeks
and the late Dutch and Zelma
Hrabal.












Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Samuel
Whaley, Wauchula, a seven pound
two ounce son, William Samuel,
born May 6, 2007, Florida
Hospital-Sebring. Mrs. Whaley is
the former Stacie Whaley. Maternal
grandparents are the late James
Mitchell and Christine Aileen
Crawford. Maternal grandparents
are the late Albert and Bertha Mae
Worth. Paternal grandparents are
Raridy and 'Beverly Whaley of
Zolfo Springs. Paternal great-
grandparents are Otta Whaley and
Lorraine Gillespie. Paternal great-
great-grandmother is Benita Kazen
of Wauchula.
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Knarr,
Bowling Green, Megan Renee, six
pounds twelve ounces and Caitlin
Elizabeth, five pounds, seven
ounces, twin daughters born May
16, 2007, Florida Hospital,
Sebring. Mrs. Knarr is the former
'Robin Miller. Maternal grandpar-
ents are Daniel Miller of Wauchula
and Catherine Pack of Lake Wales.
Paternal grandparents are Leona
Knarr of Bowling Green and the
late Merrill Knarr.

Hospital newborn shots may be
included with your announcement
free of charge. Any other photo is
$15.


Swimmers Get Dozen Wins


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In their first meet of the summer
season, Hardee swimmers collected
12 first-place medals.
Swimming in five age groups, 29
Hardee Swim Association members
competed last weekend in Lake
Placid against others from the
Highlands Hurricanes and Lake
Placid Aquatics.
"Many of them were in their first
time out, and did really well," said
coach Dick Daggett, obviously
pleased with his squad's outing.
Maggie Brumfield, Dylan
Justice, Amy Brumfield, Jonathan
Tucker, Brittany Wiggins, Casey
Brutus, Leah Cisneros, Wyatt
Kofke and two relay teams claimed
first place in various events.
Other Hardee swimmers are
Priscilla Cisneros, Wyatt Zeigler,
Cole Terrell, Daniel Sambrano,
Emily Rhodes, Megan McCul-
lough, Willie Godwin, Derek
Sambrano, Kaitlyn Kennedy,
Savanna Hagans, Susan Bromfield,
Korin Roehm, Jake Willis, Rebecca
Quinones, Chelsea Goolsby, Corey
Dudek, Lee Cortez, Heather
Kouns, Boomer Olliff, Joe Porter
and Christina English.
The meet began with the age 6
and under, but Hardee's youngest
swimmer was seven-year-old Cole
Terrell.
In the 8-and-under girls freestyle,
Priscilla Cisneros placed second
among five swimmers. There were
10 swimmers in the 8-and-under
boys freestyle, with Zeigler placing
seventh and Terrell 10th.
Maggie Brumfield won the girls
50-yard freestyle for ages 9-10.
Also among the 15 girls in that
event were Amy Brumfield, 10th,
Rhodes llth and McCullough,
12th.
In the girls 50 freestyle Leah
Cisneros placed third among six
girls. Hardee boys placed second
(Kofke), third (Tucker) and fourth
(Godwin) in the boys 50 freestyle.
Hardee had four girls among the
10 in the 50 freestyle for 13-14s.
Kennedy led them with 5th place,
followed by Hagans, Susan
Bromfield and Roehm.
Justice picked up a first-place
finish in the boys 50-yard freestyle.
Willis placed third of the six boys
in the 13-14 division.
The oldest group is the girls divi-
sion, for 15 and older, although
younger swimmers can compete on
its relays. Hardee's Wiggins,
Quinones and Goolsby were in the
pack of 14 girls in the 50-yard
freestyle. On the boys side of the
ledger in that event, Brutus placed
fifth, with Dudek and Cortez far-
ther down in the standings.
After a time in which Hardee had
no contenders, Amy Brumfield
won the 50-yard breaststroke for
girls 9-10. Maggie Brumfield
placed sixth of the dozen girls in
the event.
Hardee's next entry was the boys
50-yard breaststroke for ages 11-
12, with Tucker touching the wall
first over other competitors.
In the 100-yard breaststroke for
13-14, Willis placed third. Moving
. on to the girls division 100 breast-
stroke, Wiggins won the event with
Kouns following her in. Brutus
won the boys division 100-breast-
stroke, with Olliff and Porter
behind him.
After another gap, Leah Cisneros
placed second in the 11-12 individ-
ual medley (IM). Kofke won that
event in the boys 11-12 division.


Olliff placed third in the Boys 200-
yard IM.
Then it was relay time. In the 9-
10 girls 200-yard freestyle, the
Brumfield sisters, Rhodes. and
McCullough combined to place
third. Similarly, 11-year-old Leah
Cisneros joined Roehm, Hagans
and Susan Brumfield to place sec-
ond in the 13-14 age division. The
13-14 boys squad of Willis, Justice
and 12-year-olds Kofke and
Godwin won the boys 200 freestyle
relay.
In the older division 200-
freestyle relay, it was Wiggins,
Quinones, Kouns and 14-year-old
Kennedy placing fourth for the
girls and Olliff, Brutus, Dudek and
Porter placing third.
The butterfly was next, 25 yards
for the youngest group, working up
to 50 and 100 yards for the older
groups. Hardee got third and fourth
place by Zeigler and Daniel
Sambrano in the boys 8-and-under.
Tucker won the 11-12 event, fol-
lowed by Godwin and Derek
Sambrano.
With no competitors for a while,
Hardee got back in the pool for the
backstroke. Priscilla Cisneros
placed second in the 8-and-under
girls 25-yard event. Zeigler and
Terrell were fourth and fifth in the
boys 8-and-under division.
Amy Brumfield was third in the
50-yard backstroke for ages 9-10,
with Rhodes and McCullough fol-


lowing her in. In the girls 11-12, it
was Leah Cisneros in first place.
For the girls 100-yard freestyle,
Wiggins placed eighth. In the boys
division, it. was Olliff sixth, fol-
lowed by Porter and Dudek.
The final events were relays, In
the 9-10 girls medley relay,
Rhodes, the Brumfield sisters and
McCullough Were third.
For the boys 13-14 event, Hardee
combined, 12-year-olds Godwinl
and Derek Sambrano, 11-year-old
Tucker and 8-year-old Zeigler to
compete for the experience of the
event.
There were two girls teams in the
200-yard medley. Quinones,.
Wiggins, Hagans and Kennedy
placed third and Goolsby, Kouns,
Susan Brumfield and English were
fifth.
There were also two boys
squads. Brutus, Olliff, Porter and
Willis placed fourth and Dudek,
Justice and Cortez were joined by
12-year-old Kofke for a fifth-place
finish.


We won't always know whose
lives we touched and made bet-
ter for our having cared,
because actions can sometimes
have unforeseen ramifications.
What's important is that you do
care and you act.
-Charlotte Lunsford


Cesario & Marta


Saturday, June 16

Pioneer Park
Bring a covered dish.
soc6:14p


In Memory of Olin Vern Hendry
November 8, 1922 to November 8, 2001
Just a little over 5 years ago you left us, destined for greater things.
But we still hear you when there's laughter,
Sense you when we're troubled,
Act as we believe you would have us act in all things
But most of all, miss you.
We want to wish you a Happy Father's Day
to the best father anyone could ask for.
No one could have been more fortunate.
Love Always,
Jackie, Jim, Sandy, Mike, Lisa, Delos and Delmas 8


Happy Father's Day!

JL
We love you and miss
S ygour lovely smile. Even
though you're gone -
Just wanted you to
know you are always
* in our thoughts.

Frankie Carlton LOUe You,
Lillie, Your Daughter
LaRosha, Your Sons Tony, Calvin,
Karu and Grandson Tyrone and
Grandaughter Rosie
soc6:14p




Happy Father's Day

For the Best Dad in the World

on Father's Day June 17. 2007

How can we ever thank you for
all that you've given us? You
loved us so completely and saw
only the best in us. Your belief in
us gave us wings to fly and
caught us when we fell.
You work so hard and gave so
much so that we could have
the things you never had. You
Levi McLeod taught us life's most important
lessons just by being the kind
and considerate person you were.
I hope you know that you will always be our hero.
Thank you for a life time of Love.
Your kids,
Levi & wife Bernestine; Gloria, Lillie & special
friend Sampson, Susie, Ray, Floyd & Lil Levi,
Grandkids & Great-Grandkids soc6:14p


JOIN US


THURSDAY, J1


4 P.M.-8


FOR REFRES


CRACKER TRAIL



MUSEUM


40TH YEAR ANNIVERSARY



ON


UNE 21ST

P.MA


t MENTS



VEW THE MUSEUM DISPLAYS WITH ITS

40 YEARS OF ACQUISITIONS,

BRYANT BLACKSMITH SHOP,

HART CABIN, & POST OFFICE


7
soc6:14c


- .. I






4B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007


More City Housing Coming


Scouts that participated in the events are shown with the ribbons and winning Gateway plaque:
(front row from left) Clark Zelyk and Andy Hunt; (back row) Jake Barone, Eddie Hunt, Jake Grice,
Matt Fite and Kendall Grice.

Local Boy Scouts Host Rendezvous


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
Local Boy Scout Troop 813 of
Wauchula hosted the annual Calusa
Rendezvous at Hardee Lakes Park
from Feb. 16 to 18.
A total of 10 Boy Scout Troops
and Webelos from several Cub
Scout packs around the state partic-
ipated in the annual event.
On the first day Gateway exhibits
were started. A gateway is a struc-
ture made from wood lashed
together with ropes and displays
the American and troop flags.
Gateways are erected at the en-
trances to each troop's campsite.
Troop 813 of Wauchula took
home the Gateway Award for con-
structing the most structurally
sound and visually appealing gate-
way. The winning entrance also had
all of the appropriate knots required
by the competition.
During the rendezvous the scouts
had to compete in eight events to
showcase the skills that they had
learned in camping, pioneering and



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate
encourages submissions
from Hardee County
schools. Photos and write-
ups should be of recent
events, and must include
first and last names for both
students and teachers.
Identify photos front to
back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Skip Calder of Cowboy Up Ministries presented his service on
horseback.


first aid.
On the second day the scouts
were divided up into new "troops"
comprised of members of the dif-
ferent troops in attendance. They
participated in a scavenger ,hunt
and a tug of war together.
This event helped to show the
boys could work together even if
they did not know each other.
In the afternoon the Dutch oven
competition was held, where the
participants had to create a meal
within two hours. The main course
was a chicken-based dish with a
fruit dessert.
Judges from Highlands County
watched as the scouts prepared the
food from start to finish and judged
each meal presented by the troop.
After the event, the Webelos who


..--"" -


I Be-s le- e
$2500 Landscap
I ^ MaaeoJer- L




Selected 1 Gallons $12
Blue Daze Gold Lantana
Croton-Mamey Croton-Gold Dust
Liriope-Big Blue Parsoni-Juniper
Society Garlic Blue Eye Grass
Purple Lantana Plumbago
Star Jasmine Verbena
Thumburgia Mexican Petunia


8:00 am
to
4:00 pm


AUSTIN GROWERS, INC.
LANDSCAPE & IRRIGATION
CONTRACTORS


were eligible were called by name
and crossed the Bridge of Scouting
to be received by the Scoutmaster
of the troop they would join.
This represents the graduation
and transition from Cub Scout to
Boy Scout.
On the last day of the ren-
dezvous, a church service was con-
ducted by Skipper Calder of
Cowboy Up Ministries. The service
began with a tribute to America and
was followed by singing led by
Max Baker of Troop 813.
Calder teaches the value of obe-
dience to God by demonstrating
how to train horses to be obedient
to their master.
At the end of the service, closing
ceremonies were held and awards
were presented for the events.


Selected 3 Gallons $49
Boxwood-Japanese Conf. Jasmine
Emerald Blanket Eugenia*Azalea
Gold Tip Ligustrum Green Ligustrum
Hawthorn Ilex Schilling African Iris-White
Parsoni-Juniper Philodendron-Selloum
Plumbago Podocarpus
Red Cluster Bottle Brush
Red/White Fountain Grass
Red/Sunset Ixora Sand Cord Grass
Thryallis Trinette Green Arboricola
Var. Pittosporum Viburnum Sus.
Viburnum Odo. Wax Myrtle
Hibiscus-Various colors Macho Ferns

Garden Center


863-773-4450

1329 US Highway 17 N.,Wauchula


soc6:14c


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A plan to put more housing at
Stenstrom Road and Florida Ave-
nue drew discussion at Monday
evening's meeting.
The Wauchula City Commission
declined to approve first reading of
several ordinances to annex an
additional 2.61 acres between
Florida and Huss avenues. After
reviewing it, the commission de-
cided to approve first reading with
the stipulation that the land use des-
ignation change from R-3 multi-
family housing to R-2 (single fami-
ly and duplexes).
The commission asked that a
developer's agreement be available
before final reading of the ordi-
nances at the July 9 meeting. They
said there is enough apartment
units available and more individual
homes and duplexes are needed.
They said it should also be desig-
nated low density instead of medi-
um density.
The parcel in question is adjacent
to a 10-acre parcel annexed earlier
this year. To the east of them is the
planned Stenstrom Road Senior
Village, a 75-unit retirement apart-
ment facility with additional
amenities for the elderly.
In other action, the commission:
Approved first reading of an
ordinance to allow an extra $25,000
homestead exemption for low-
income seniors. To be eligible, a
person must be over 65 and have
less than $20,000 annual income.
Approved first reading of an
ordinance prohibiting panhandling
within the city limits. It amends the
previous panhandling ordinance to
remove the term "aggressive" and
replace it with specific definitions
of panhandling. This makes it more
enforceable and more subject to
prosecution, commissioners were
told.
It makes it illegal to solicit in
public places or streets and within
20 feet of an entrance to a financial
institution such as a bank, automat-
ed teller machine, pawn or check
cashing facility or public tele-
phone.
Penalties can vary from a warn-
ing on the first offense to a fine of
up to $500 and/or 60-day jail sen-
tence.
Sat as the Community Rede-
velopment Agency Board and


approved invoices from Main
Street Wauchula Inc. One was for
$1,519.92 for chlorine for the pool
and for weeding, seeding and fertil-
izer in Heritage Park. The other
was for $5,332.14 for expenses for
the centennial year celebration as
well as other Main Street expenses.
Commissioner Jerry Conerly
opposed approval because there
had been no accountability for the
$25,000 the city contributes to
Main Street each year. Commis-
sioners Mavis Best, David Royal,
Connie Spieth and Troy Brant
approved paying the invoices.
Commissioners Ken Lambert and
Clarence Bolin were absent.
Discussed a cost of living
increase for the city's retirees.
Originally planned for three per-
cent every two years if the pension
fund could afford it, no raises had
been forthcoming in at least 10
years. Pension Board representa-
tive Ray McClellan suggested a
one-time increase of 10 percent.
Staff was advised to consult a pen-
sion attorney on the proper way to
accomplish the increase and an
actuarial study to show the fund is
able to absorb the increased
expense.
Learned that longtime elec-
tric department employee Charles
"Bud" Norwood was feted earlier
in the day as he retired after 22


Matching sofa and
loveseat available.


"Drake"
Roll Top Desk

$39995


years of city employment. A
Dunkin' Donuts is coming to the
old Subway shop at the plaza at the
southeast end of Wauchula. A sign
is being erected at each of the four
entrances to Wauchula, noting it is
the home of the Hardee High
Academic Team which has won the
state championship for two years in
a row and also sent a representative
to the state academic champi-
onships each year.
Discussed construction of
the new public works building on
Green Street which will house the
Hardee Help Center. Cost is about
$53,000. Once they are moved, the
old Ausley Library will be renovat-
ed to be the new home of the
Wauchula Garden Club.
A comparison of utility costs for
each of the service organizations in
city-owned buildings show a
marked increase in utilities at the
old police station at Eighth and
Main now used by the American
Cancer Society. Its staff has been
asked to turn off vents in unused
areas and reduce usage as much as
possible. Police Chief Bill Beattie
said each organization should pay
its own utilities and would be more
responsible if they had to pay for
what they used.

Great necessities call out great
virtues.


Celebration Fellowship

Youth sponsored BBQ

Saturday June 23 After 12pm

at Mojitos
221 W. Main St., Wauchula

Rib Dinner $9 Chicken Dinner $7
includes
Rice, Black Beans, Slaw, Corn, Drink
OR

Half Rack $9 Full Rack $17
Whole Chicken $8

For tickets or information call 773-0427
soc6:14,21c


Since 1929



oyal's)


FURNITURE

APPLIANCES & BEDDING


Hand Painted Cherry
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Closed on Sunday


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this Father's Day!


Cherry or O,'ak '--:
Golf Hall Tree
with Putter


lim-, = I







June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Letter To The Editor

Concerned About Safety

Of Clay Settling Areas


Dear Editor:
In their South Fort Meade Mine,
Hardee County Tract, Master
Mining Plan, Mosaic Fertilizer is in
the process of applying for permits
to build clay slime areas. The dams
are specified to be 50 foot above
120-foot existing ground elevation.
This makes total dam elevation 170
foot. The Peace River is only 50 or
60-foot elevation.
This leaves as much as 110-foot
elevation drop or grade in around
1.5 miles. There are a total of 1,500
acres specified in the application to
be built on top of the creek
(unnamed) that flows from the dam
site downhill to the river through
Fussell Road neighborhood.
In addition to these slime pits
there are 4,500 acres of the same
kind of dams on the other side of
County Line Road in Polk County.
In the event of simultaneous dam
failure due to extraordinary rainfall
and wind, not only our local area
but the entire region would be
impacted.
The creek valley starts at the
berm. Surrounding land and a tail-
ings pile will create a funnel which,
in case of an accidental spill, will
channel all the water from the


slime, ponds and its toxic material
straight down to the river in min-
utes destroying everything in its
path, including the human habita-
tions on Fussell Road, Bowling
Green.
We can see from our transactions
with Hardee County officials that
not even one of them has demon-
strated any concern for those of us
who live in the path of this death
trap. In its master mining plan,
comprehensive plan, and mining
ordinance the county does go so far
as to demand financial liability of
the mines for clean-up in the event
of such failure. While there are sev-
eral places in all these documents
that the human environment is
mentioned, there are few rules for
the protection for our life, health,
and quality of life and no means of
enforcement.
We are told by Hardee County
officials that we can register our
issues at the DRI hearings, but if
anything we say is not backed by
expert witnesses it will not be con-
sidered. The burden of responsibil-
ity is left up to the private citizen to
obtain expert witnesses.
Mosaic tells us that the. county
would be paid by them for getting


the necessary data, reports, and
expert opinions, but as of today
Mosaic has not surrendered proper
documentation pertaining to these
issues of dam failures and the
impact to those of us in h," 's way.
I suspect Mosaic doesn't want
these reports on public record long
enough for them to be studied by
us, but they are the most important
to those of us living below these
proposed slime ponds. Mosaic tells
us as of April 25, 2007, that they
will be submitting these reports to
Hardee County with the next cou-
ple weeks. The truth is Mosaic has
no real excuse of the delay. The
reports should have been done
much earlier in the application
process, but the county hasn't
demanded that the reports be sub-
mitted in a timely manner.
Another problem we have'
encountered is the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection. They give us the
famous Mosaic sales pitch that the
berms are so well engineered that
they cannot fail. It's bad enough for
Mosaic to say these things, but it's
pretty bad to have our state govern-
ment officials pitching for Mosaic.
I am awed at their audacity and
arrogance in making these state-
ments as if they were in Mosaic's
employ.
If this interest you we need your
help with these issues. Any legal
support, moral support, news items,
word of mouth, attendance at meet-


PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE AIR PERMIT
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
DEP File No. 0490344-002-AC
MCBAR5, LLC
Hardee County
The Department of Environmental Protection (Department) gives notice of its intent to issue an
air permit to MCBAR5, LLC for the construction of an air curtain incinerator located at 4778 County
Road 663, west of Limestone, Hardee County. The permit authorizes MCBAR5, LLC to re-locate and
construct an air curtain incinerator that was previously permitted at to Allman Homes, Inc. on air con-
struction permit 0270019-001-AC. The incinerator is to be re-located from 3480 Addison Avenue,
Arcadia, DeSoto County. MAILING ADDRESS: MCBAR5, LLC, 11451 MJ Road, Myakka City, FL
34251 to the attention of Mr. James A. McLeod, Owner.
The Department will issue the final permit with the attached conditions unless a response
received in accordance with the following procedures results in a different decision or significant
change of terms or conditions.
The Department will accept written comments concerning the proposed permit issuance action
for a period of fourteen days from the date of publication of this Public Notice of Intent to Issue Air
Permit. Written comments should be provided to the Department of Environmental Protection, 13051
N. Telecom Parkway, Temple Terrace, FL 33637-0926. Any written comments filed shall be made
available for public inspection. If written comments received result in a significant change in the pro-
posed agency action, the Department shall revise the proposed permit and require, if applicable,
another Public Notice.
The Department will issue the final permit with the attached conditions unless a timely petition
for an administrative hearing is filed pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. before the dead-
line for filing a petition. The procedures for petitioning for a hearing are set forth below.
Mediation is not available in this proceeding.
.A person whose substantial interests are affected by the proposed permitting decision may peti-
tion for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition
must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received) in the Office of General
Counsel of the Department, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station #35, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000. Petitions filed by the permit applicant of any of the parties listed below must be filed
within fourteen days of receipt of this notice of intent. Petitions filed by any persons other than those
entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), FS. must be filed within fourteen days of publica-
tion of the public notice or within fourteen days of receipt of this notice of intent, whichever occurs
first. Under Section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who asked the Department for notice of
agency action may file a petition within fourteen days of receipt of that notice, regardless of the date
of publication. A petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated
above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition within the appropriate time peri-
od shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination (hear-
ing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. or to intervene in this proceeding and participate as a
party to it. Any subsequent intervention will be only at the approval of the presiding officer upon the
filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must con-
tain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency's
file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the peti-
tioner, the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall
be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how
the petitioner's substantial interests will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of
how and when petitioner received notice of the agency action or proposed action; (d) A statement
of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise
statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts the petitioner contends warrant
reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or
statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action;
and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner wish-
es the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts upon which the Department's action is based
shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set
forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, F.A.C.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the fil-
ing of a petition means that the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by
it in this notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final decision of the
Department on the application have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in
accordance with the requirements set forth above.
A complete project file is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, Southwest District, 13051 N. Telecome Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida.
The complete project file includes the application, technical evaluations, Draft permit, and the
information submitted by the responsible official, exclusive of confidential records under Section
403.111, F.S. Interested persons may contact Mara Grace Nasca, Southwest District Air Program
Administrator, at 13051 N. Telecom Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida or call 813-632-7600, for addi-
tional information.
Any person may request to obtain additional information, a copy of the application (except for
information entitled to confidential treatment pursuant to Section 403.111, F.S.), all relevant support-
ing materials, a copy of the permit draft, and all other materials available to the Department that are
relevant totthe permit decision. Additionally, the Department will accept written comments concern-
ing the proposed permit issuance action for a period of 14 (fourteen) days from the date of publica-
tion of "Public Notice of Intent to Issue Air Permit." Requests and written comments filed should be
provided to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection at 13051 N. Telecom Parkway,
Temple Terrace, FL 33637-0926, to the attention of Mara Grace Nasca (phone no. 813-632-7600) ref-
erencing the DEP file number listed above. Any written comments filed shall be made available for
public inspection. If written comments received result in a significant change in the proposed agency
action, the Department shall revise the proposed permit and require, if applicable, another Public
Notice.
6:14c


ings, calling politicians or prayers
would be helpful. United we stand,
divided we fall.
Frank Kirkland
Fussell Road
Bowling Green
Response by Mosaic
Thank you for the opportunity to
respond and give perspective to
comments from Mr. Kirkland
regarding Mosaic's i 'ation for
the extension of the South Fort
Meade Mine.
Clay settling areas (CSA's) are a
part of phosphate mine operations.
Clay particles that are separated
from phosphate rock settle out from
water in these impoundment struc,
tures. The clarified water is
returned for use in the mining
process to minimize deep well
water use.
The areas are designed, reviewed
and built following strict regula-
tions using current engineering
standards and technology. An
extensive monitoring program is a
part of the daily operation of
CSA's. The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection and


Hardee County provide for the con-
struction and safe operation of
CSA's with regulations and
enforcement.
Permitting a phosphate mine
involves professional engineers,
hydrologists, biologists and other
experts working as a team for sev-
eral years. In more than five years
of work on the South Fort Meade
Extension application, Mosaic has
submitted all documentation in the
required time frame of the regulato-
ry permitting process.
Last year at a community meet-
ing held for adjacent property own-
ers, Mosaic presented information


developed for the South Fort
Meade Extension permit applica-
tion and about the ongoing permit-
ting process. Mosaic staff listened
and responded to questions and
concerns. We continue to be avail-
able to do so.
Mosaic employees are commit-
ted to the safe operation of all facil-
ities and to being a good neighbor
in Hardee County.

Diana Youmans
Public Affairs Manager
Mosaic
414 W. Main Street
Wauchula


YOU Can Appear In...

Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published In this
newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies solely on
reader submissions. Poems must be your own original work, written
by you, not someone else. To appear in this feature, send your poet-
ry, name and town of residence to: Poet's Place, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873 or fax 773-0657.


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE VARIANCE

The Department of Environmental Protection (Department) gives notice of its intent to issue a vari-
ance (File No. 0151551-009) to CF Industries, Inc. (CF), Post Office Box 1549, Wauchula, Florida
33873 under section 378.212, Florida Statutes (F.S.) from the provision of section 62C-16.0095(3),
Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), which requires that the 1999 Florida Land Use, Cover and Forms
Classification System (FLUCCS) be used to describe vegetation and land uses in Notices of
Disturbance (NODs). The variance will only be applicable to the processing timeframe of the South
Pasture Mine Phase IIB reclamation parcel application that was received by the Department on April
23,2007.
The South Pasture Mine is located immediately south of State Road 62 in Hardee County, Florida.
Mandatory reclamation parcel Phase IIB is located within the limits of the South Pasture Mine prop-
erty in Sections 22, 23, 26, 27, 28, 34, and 35, Township 33 South, Range 23 East, Sections 23, 24,
25, 26, 35, and 36, Township 33 South, Range 24 East, and Sections 19 and 30, Township 33 South,
Range 25 East in the Peace River Watershed, Class III waters.
Under section 62C-16.0095(3), F.A.C., the 1999 FLUCCS is to be used to describe vegetation and
land uses in NODs for mandatory reclamation parcels. CF's current conceptual reclamation plan
(CFI-SP-CPA) uses the 1976 FLUCCS, which differs slightly from the 1999 FLUCCS that is required.
Use of the 1999 FLUCCS in the Phase IIB NOD would necessitate revision of the conceptual recla-
mation plan for the South Pasture Mine in order to maintain nomenclatural consistency with regard
to land use across the mine site. As revision of the conceptual reclamation plan can be a lengthy
process, CF has requested a variance from the provision of section 62C-16.0095(3), F.A.C., which
requires that the 1999 FLUCCS be used to describe vegetation and land uses in NODs. CF is prepar-
ing an update to the conceptual reclamation plan for its South Pasture Mine and will be required to
use the 1999 FLUCCS when that application is submitted. The update to the South Pasture Mine con-
ceptual reclamation plan is expected to be submitted by the middle of 2008.
The Department's file on this matter is available for public inspection during normal business
hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Mine Reclamation, 2051 East Dirac Drive,
Tallahassee, Florida 32310-3760, Telephone: (850) 488-8217.
Under this intent to issue, this variance is hereby granted subject to the applicant's compliance
with any requirement in this intent to publish notice of this intent in a newspaper of general circula-
tion and to provide proof of such publication in accordance with section 50.051, F.S. This action is
final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a sufficient petition for an
administrative hearing is timely filed under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., as provided below. If a
sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is timely filed, ;this intent to issue automatically
becomes only proposed agency action on'the application, subject to the result of the administrative
review process. Therefore, on the filing of a timely and sufficient petition, this action will not be final
and effective until further order of the Department. When proof of publication is provided, if required
by this intent, and if a sufficient petition is not timely filed, the variance will be issued as a ministerial
action. Because an administrative hearing may result in the reversal or substantial modification of this
action, the applicant is advised not to commence construction or other activities until the deadlines
noted below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing or request for an extension of time have
expired and until the variance has been executed and delivered. Mediation is not available.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition for an
administrative proceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. The petition must con-
tain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General
Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000.
Under rule 62-110.106(4), F.A.C., a person whose substantial interests are affected by the
Department's action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hear-
ing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time.
Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the appli-
cable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for fil-
ing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant
it upon a motion by the requesting party. showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of
time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect.
If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose sub-
stantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to peti-
tion to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be permitted only at the discretion of the presid-
ing officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with rule 28-106.205, F.A.C.
In accordance with section 378.212, F.S., petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant
must be filed within 14 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than
the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under section 120.60(3), F.S., must be
filed within 14 days of publication of the notice or within 14 days of receipt of the written notice,
whichever occurs first. Under section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the
Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of such notice,
regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at
the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the
appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative
determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain
the following information:
(a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification num-
ber, if known;
(b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and tele-
phone number of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service pur-
poses during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner's substantial
interests are or will be affected by the agency determination;
(c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indi-
cate;
(e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petition-
er contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action;
(f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or
modification of the agency's proposed action; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petition-
er wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department's action'is based shall
state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth
above, as required by rule 28-106.301, F.A.C. Under paragraphs 120.569(2)(c) and (d), F.S., a peti-
tion for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantial-
ly comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed.
This intent to issue a variance constitutes an order of the Department. Subject to the provisions
of paragraph 120.68(7)(a), F.S., which may require a remand for an administrative hearing, the appli-
cant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under section 120.68 F.S., by the filing of a notice
of appeal under rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the
Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35,
Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of appeal accompanied by the
applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed
within 30 days from the date when the order is filed with the Clerk of the Department.
6"14C






6B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007





-The


ABOUT ...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Looking For Jack!
An experienced equipment operate
i t 'ixtv our wor
An exper nced equ ipme
00 i g 0 op rate
ctors, mo rs' discing, front end loi
tractors, mowers, d scing, front end loi
rnAh nt F 7nh
-.n,4 6nu anii;nmPnt- Fiftv tn qixtv hour wor


anaIU nay LluilJmheI. rEEL7 7 -- --i vu ft oi


the Heartland area. Salary based on knowledge,
experience, and efficiency of your working skills.


SMus
dri

Yes,


t be at least 18 years old and have a valid
vers license, Class A CDL license a plus,
but not mandatory. DFWP
I'm looking for a "Jack of all trades."
Please send resume to:
Box N, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873
t'.:.,." i ::" .. .- ., t- ..


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net Jason Johnson
*** 1I T T W ***

This Will Sell Quickly, Owner Highly Motivated to Sell!
Don't miss this 3BR/1BA CB home in Wauchula.
Listed for $97,000 MLS 196090

We try to rotate and change our ads weekly and
feature new listings. Please check our ad weekly and
don't forget to view all of our properties on our
website at www.floresrealty.net


Looking for some vacant land? 20
acres in eastern Hardee County,
some pasture, some woodlands.
Asking only $11,000 per acre. MLS
196045
To be completed in mid-July.
3BR/2BA CB home on large lot. Be
the first to enjoy! $135,000 MLS
195922
Country setting just out of town
with a 2001 3BR/2BA DW mobile
home. Call today to take a look!
$89,900 MLS 195837


Hurry, just listed 2005 DW mobile
home! 3BR/2BA on 5 acres just
south of Zolfo Springs. $165,000
MLS 195937
Office space, well maintained yard,
and lots of room in this 3BR 2BA
CB home. Many extras. $275,000
MLS 194427
Don't miss out on a yard like this! 8
lots surrounding this 3BR 2 BA CB
home in Bowling Green. $142,000
MLS 194081


Commercial lot in Wauchula. Perfect for new development. $99,900

If you have good credit and a job, but need assistance for
down payment and closing costs, we have sources available.
Check with us for details!

*In trouble with your payments??
Let us sell your property fast get needed
money and avoid foreclosure.
Contact After Hours
g O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net
gyoa'n s v After hours 863-773-2840
Daniel Lanier 863) 698-2971 John Freeman 863 773-6141
Amanda Mishoe 863) 781-3587 Steve Lanier 863 559-9392
Lisa Douglas 863) 781-3247 Jessie Sambrano 863 245-6891
Noey Flores (863) 781-4585 Jason Johnson (863 781-3734
cl6:14c


Classifieds


L. DICKS, INC. Is now contracting to
purchase fruit for the 2006/7 season
and beyond. Contact Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 8:17tfc
Ag* -
TV COMBO VCR/DVD, $150; chest
type freezer, $200; washer/dryer,
$150.735-1289. 6:14-21p



1998 FORD F150 XLT, 5.4 I, V8, long
bed with liner, new brakes, $5,500
firm. 781-2846. 6:14-21 p
2003 FORD TAURUS, 73,000 original
miles, $5,000. 781-3090. 6:14c
2006 CHEVY COLORADO, crew cab,
full power, auto, $16,995. Call Ray
Rivas 773-4744. 6:14c
1992 FORD F150, 6 cyl., 4 speed, A/C,
$2,500.773-9448. 6:14p
'06 SILVER MUSTANG, V6, leather, GT,
extras, low miles, $17,000. 781-2216.
6:14-21 p


2003 FORD F150, auto, A/C, $9,995.
Call Ray Rivas. 773-4744. 6:14c
1997 OLDS 88, 4-door, fully loaded,
82,000 miles, $4,700 OBO. 773-4000
ask for Cindy or 781-2399 ask for Ted.
6:14p
1994 SATURN, 1.9 liter, good for parts,
$500; tires and rims, 255-75-17, F150,
$150. Call between 6-9 p.m. 863-375-
2338. 6:14p
2001 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE, 93,000
original miles, $7,000. 781-3090.
6:14c
2005 CHEVY TAHOE, 3rd seat, dual
air, $19,995. Call Ray Rivas. 773-4744.
6:14c
2000 FORD WINDSTAR, 59,000 origi-
nal miles, $6,000. 781-3090. 6:14c
1996 FORD EXPLORER, excellent,
$5,200. Call Sue 832-0098. 6:7-14p
1996 FORD EXPLORER, excellent
condition, $5,200. Call Sue 832-0098.
6:7-14p
2004 GMC SIERRA SLE, fully loaded,
40,000 miles, auto., 20" wheels, 12"
subs optional, $18,000. 245-6802.
6:7-14p


'IA


0


TOP DOLLAR PAID for junk cars. We
pick-up. Crooms 773-0637. 5:17tfc
1996 4WD diesel F350. Runs good.
863-781-4176. 5:24-6:21 p


6 PIECE BEDROOM SET, full size,
$600; coffee table, end table, $150 for
both; wall unit, $60; kitchen table w/4
chairs, $150; sports weight station,
$275; side table, $20, old chest, $20
OBO. 767-1123. 6:14p


MATURE HOUSEKEEPER needed.
Live on ranch. Must have valid driver
license and references required.
D/F/W. Call days 863-634-7552 -
nights 863-763-5321. 6:7-14c
HELP WANTED Person with retail
skills, outgoing personality, great
communication skills, computer and
bookkeeping knowledge. Bilingual
A+, must be willing to work on
Saturday every other week. Please
send resume to: Personnel Manager,
P.O. Box 873, Wauchula, FL 33873.
5:17tfc


PARKER FILL DIRT


DEMOLITION
Fill Dirt Tree Removal *
*Stump Removal Dragline *
*Track Hoe Land Clearing *
Shell Clay Top Soil*
Bulldozer Dump Trucks *
(863) 735-2415


Special
Tandam Axle Load
(14-16yards)
$ 100/Load
within 5 mile radius o: Zolo Spings
Fill -Top Soil *Air,l Parn
Hardre Countv Area only


25x25x9 Ambassador
Vertical Roof (2:12), Soffit/Fascia,
ew, --I Sectional or 2 Roll-up Doors,

2 Gable Vents, 4" Concrete Slab*


30x35x9 Executive
Vertical Roof (3:12), Soffit/Fascia,
2 Roll-up Doors, 1 Entry Door,
1 Window, 2 Gable Vents,
4" Concrete Slab*
$20,295


- Other Sizes Available
- Meets 120MPH Wind Load
- Up to 35' Wide, Unlimited Length
- "Stamped" Florida Engineered Drawings
- Florida Owned & Operated


METAL SYSTEMS PLUS, LLC

877-951-2300
*Concrete & Installation by Others


Price, Plus Sale Tax & County Fes Photo for d.spay putpoo., only Cl4:19tfc www.metalsystemsplus.com


Joe L7Davi
I N C., R E A L TO R S
(863) 773-2128

REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
REALTOR JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
JOHN H. O'NEAL
Monica Reas
See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
4 BR, 2 bath Fleetwood 2000 MH 12.95 acs on Murphy Rd, west
h 16_ iv'g ar t ter fHardee Co. Beautiful, high & dry,
*si* Fib, shOr eBid fenced w/2" well. $14,500/ac!
huge walk in closet.o me appli- Take part and locate your business
ances included. Located on 0.413 in this growing commercial area!
acs in Bowling Green. $95,000! 450_ on North Florida Ave.
Striking 4BR/2.5BA home w/3,152 Zoned commercial. $360,000!
SF on landscaped 1 ac lot in Equestrian's dream: Outstanding
Golfview. Gas fireplace, central vac- 4BR/4BA, new const-CB home on
uum, dual A/C units, in ground 10 acs w/horse barn. Open floor
pool, attached garage. $329,000! plan, 2 fireplaces, and large back
Completely renovated, beautiful porch. $495,000! Close to Hwy 66
3BR/2.5BA home only minutes from on Johnson Rd!
Wauchula or Zolfo Springs is locat- PRICE REDUCED! HOME-
ed on 2.5 acs w/paved rd frontage. SITES OR INVESTMENT! Four
$280,000! residential lots in Indian Lake
Estates. Three lots are 100x218 ft,
Ten 5-6 ac tracts, Friendship area listed for $22,000 each. One is
of Hardee Co Possible owner financ- 200x218 ft, listed for $46,000! Golf
ing. Some deed restrictions, course, community center, fishing
$125,000 each! pier, and shops!
65 ac grove in SW Hardee Co has Homesite or investment! 1.5 ac
25 acs-Valencias/40 acs-E&M. lot in Okeechobee. $30,000!
Numerous resets, 12" well, and new Two-story charmer w/4BR/3BA,
barn. Plenty of wildlife. $900,000! 3,000+ SF, central A/C, privacy
Lovingly maintained 3BR/2BA CB fenced back yard, and out build-
home in Bowling Green. Large ings for storage on corner lot in
fenced backyard. Includes all new Bowling Green. $158,000!
high-end appliances. $136,000! Investment opportunity! 20 ac
Stellar location! 10 ac Valencia citrus grove in Villa Citrus devel-
grove on SR 62 has 6" well w/diesel opment. Irrigation and shared
power unit, drain tile and micro-jet well. 320,000!
irrigation. Also fronts Moye Rd. 24 acs w/frontage on SR 64, west
$150,000! of Zolfo Springs. Great opportuni-
Beautiful deed restricted homesites ty for investment/development.
close to Zolfo Springs, Fl. on paved $500,000!
rd. Two 10ac tracts $180,000 each. OWNERS MOTIVATED! Com-
Two 5 ac tracts-$110,000 each. pletely remodeled, 3BR/1BA
Corner 5 ac. tract(dble paved rd frame home. N 9th Ave in
frontage)-$125,000. Additional Wauchula. $119,000!
acreage available, call today for full 15 acs of pasture and native land
details. 15 acs of pasture and native land
and roomy 2000 MII w/3BR/I2BA,
Peace and quiet await you in this 1809 living SF, 3855 total w/car-
3BR/2BA, 2001 MII on 12 acs in port and porches. Large shed, dog
Gardner. Central A/C, 1404 SF pens. $270,000!
split floor plan, appliances included. Bring your canoe and camper!
$215,000! Secluded 5 acs of native, wooded
27 ac Hanilin grove. Eastern land close to Wauchula has deeded
Iard Ce o i)$15,0 00/ac! access to the beautiful Peace River.
Great recreation and investment
property! $90,000!
REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS..........781-0153 l DAVID ROYAL................781-3490
MONICA REAS...............773-9609 ANDY LARRISON........832-0130
MIKE NICHOLSON

U.S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA. FL 33873
cd6:14c


Equal Housing Opportunity


/










b


t:lt


n3 Certain Income Restrictions Apply
M M - -- -- -- -- -- -


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker
NEW LISTING!
5.02 acres in the country! $115,000


NEW CONSTRUCTION!
Beautiful 3 BR/2 BA home in a great location. Upgrades include vaulted
ceilings, vinyl windows, architectural shingles and brushed nickel light and
plumbing fixtures. Stainless steel appliances in the kitchen. Lot has been
landscaped complete with sod. This won't last long priced at $196,000!
PRICE REDUCED!
Beautiful 3BR, 2BA home in nice quiet neighborhood. Stone fireplace,
solid wood cabinets, Jacuzzi tub. Large detached garage with shop area
and loft storage. $275,000!
Vacation home!
What a great opportunity to own waterfront property!
2 BR/2 BA mobile home in Punta Gorda. Located on a canal that
leads into Charlotte Harbor. Priced right at $185,000!
BRAND NEW!
3 Bedroom/2 Bath house in nice subdivision!
Many upgrades. Must see to appreciate. $282,000!
BRIARWOOD LOT! $45,000
7 1/2 Acre grove. Recently remodeled mobile home.
Large pole barn. $225,000.
10 beautiful acres ready to build on.
Plenty of shade trees in a great country setting. $150,000.
13.83 ac grove. Small frame house. Now only $295,000.
21 acres on the Peace River. 2 BR 1 BA mobile home.
Huge Quonset. Asking $416,000!
BUILD YOUR DI)REAM HOUSE!
4.8 Acre deed restricted homesites. Starting at $99,000.
10 acre citrus grove in Polk County. Near Lake Wales.
Lake frontage. Only $245,000!
17 acre grove. Listed for $19,500 per acre!
65 Acres of grove
1 1/2 miles from Wauchula. Frontage on two paved roads.
High and dry. Zoned FR. Listed for $18,000 per acre.
74 acres of prime development property.
City water and sewer within 1/2 mile. Annexed and rezoned to
single family with Developers Agreement. $20,000 per acre.
170.8 acres of pasture land in Manatee County, Myakka City area.
2600 feet of paved road frontage. One 3" well and one 2" well. Equipment
shelter, outhouse & cow pens on the property. Listed at $3,875,000!
500 ac grove in DeSoto County. 55% Valencia, 45% Early & Mids.
All microjet. Valencias sold for $2.50/11). $4,900,000.
1,800 ac. will divide. Starting at $12,500 per acre.
*
Commercial Property.
1.28 acres. Frontage on Main Street and Hwy 64. $120,000.
3.19 acres. Zoned C-2. Hwy 17 across from Walmart. 5 wells. $1,200,000.


m


Ben Gibson
Jerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton
Jan Knight
Madgaly Santana


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445-0662 Johnil 1. Gross
(863)781-0161 Rick Kniglht
(863)781-2345 Miguel A. Santana
(863) 677-1499


(863)273-10171
(863) 677-3051


Lone star
Con LS.ctr-Li1ctiox Cori.-

General Contractor
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated


Fax 863-773-9865


Office 863-773-4779


VALENC ILARDENS


APARTMENTS

637 South 5th Ave.
Wauchula, FL 33873
Office: (863) 773-9902

2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Tile Floors in Kitchen;
Living Room & Dining Room Microwaves
Washer & Dryer Hookups Laundry on site
Volleyball court State of the art Fitness room
2 Baths in 2 & 3 BR apartments


Rent starts at $454 per month
New apartment homes for active families
Stop in and see us.


I


. I


i


W LEASINGIM


B


tor:
Daders,
)rk week in


t













T.he


June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 7B






Classifieds


FIRST NATIONAL BANK of Wauchula.
Please come in and fill out application
at 406 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula.
6:14-21c
MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST NEEDED
for busy office. Medical insurance
experience desirable, benefits, bilin-
gual helpful. Send resume to: P.O. Box
338, Box D, Wauchula, FL 33873.
6:14-21 c
MATH INSTRUCTORS P/T positions
for daytime, evening, and on-line
classes at South Florida Community
College (Avon Park). Min. bachelor's
degree req. Visit our website,
www.southflorida.edu, or call 863-
784-7336 for details. EA/EO. 6:7-14c
Be Silly. Be honest. Be kind.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson



Umas
GAS SERVICEMAN
Ridge Propane Gas in Avon
Park has an opening for a
install-repairman. Must be
experienced with gas. Offering
excellent pay and benefits.
Please call John at 453-3959 or
call toll free 1-877-528-2510
or email us info@upgas.comn
for more details on benefits.
cl6711c


3 BR/2 B, C/HA, 1 acre, close to town,
nice subdivision, $135,000. 773-9446 -
781-3342. 6:14p
2 BR/1 B ON LARGE lot, BG, remod-
eled Inside. 863-581-7610. 5:31-6:28p
HIGHLANDS COUNTY $1,000 MOVES
YOU IN! Brand new 3 BR/ 2 BA/ 2CG,
concrete block-stucco home. Approx.
$895 mo. Own today, no credit need-
ed. 863-402-4600. 4:5tfc
HARDEE COUNTY $1,000 MOVES
YOU IN! Brand new 3 BR/ 2 BA/ 2CG,
concrete block-stucco home. Approx.
$895 mo. Own today, no credit need-
ed. 863-402-4600. 4:5tfc

NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf
dinette $197, 50-table and 4 chairs
$397 up, 200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4P1c bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot cl4:20ffc


azalea apartments

Now accepting applications!
2, & 3 Bedroom apts.*
Rental rates beginning at $420 *
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental assistance available for qualified applicants *
Handicap Units available *
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL

(863) 375-4138
Monday Friday 9:00 d.M. 12:00 Noon
Equal Housing Opportunity d6:7-28c



STEVE SENN

ELECTRIC, INC.
..\\\ I//,


S Remodels
Steve Senn /- Remodes
417 CR 665 Ona, FL / //
735-2333
941-650-2888 cell
158*25*1972 Nextel Lic. # EC13001263






KELLER WILLIAMS
REALTY
OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY
Dane Hendry I Mikey Colding
Realtor Realtor
(863) 381-2769 (863) 781-1698
* NEW LISTING * *
9800 SF Commercial Warehouse w/1600 SF
of office space, Sebring. Call Dane.
* Priced to sell, 22 acres of pasture land on Highway 64 East. Nice homesite.
Owner financing to qualified buyers. Great buy at $250,000. Call Mikey.
* 40 Acre Tract 28 acres of grove, 12 acres of improved pasture. 8" well.
2 year old Case power unit, pump, gear head, fuel tank, etc. County main-
tained duel road frontage. Subdivided into (4) five acre parcels, (2) ten
acre parcels. Additional 5-8 acres of the pasture could be planted in grove.
Call Mikey for details.
* Great development potential! Or build your dream home
on this beautiful 9.5 ac. tract with a creek running through the property.
Great location on Altman Road. Asking $230,000. Call Mikey.
* **REDUCED** 200 ac. abandoned citrus grove. 5 wells on property.
45x120 steel barn. Will divide or sell as whole. $8,500 per ac. Many extras.
Call Mikey for details.
* Beautiful 110 ac. tract with improved pasture and scattered oaks and
pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac. wetlands. Great
Investment Property. Sweetwater area. Call Mikey.
* 19.4 ac. Lake Bonnett Rd. Located in Highlands County., Ag zoned, barn
with concrete floor, great for tree or caladium farm. Hard rd frontage,
board fence entry, $219,000. Call Mikey.
* 40 ac. on Polk Rd., currently farm field, 1320 ft. hard road frontage, 8"
well $19,900/ac. Call Mikey.
* 1.5 ac. Commercial Property Hwy 17 S. Wauchula. Call Dane.
* 9 ac. Foliage nursery Hwy 66 E. Zolfo Springs. Call Dane.
* Commercial Property Hwy 17 Bowling Green. Call Dane.
* 30+ ac. Reduced can be divided, $10,000/ac. Ollie Roberts Rd., Paynes
Creek frontage. Call Dane.
* 9 ac. Foliage nursery, Hwy 66 E., Zolfo Springs. Price Reduced. Call
Dane.


12 YEAR OLD cow horse, gelding,
$2,000; 15 yr. old paint, gelding,
$1,000; 11 yr. old pony, $800, 1 don-
key, jack. 781-5272. 6:14-7:12p


FOUND Cows: 7 red, black & brindle,
1 black bull in Lily area. 993-3594.
6:14nc-6:21 p
LOST Long-haired chihuahua gold-
ish brown, Charlie Creek Mobile
Home Park, Saturday. 773-0149.
6:7-14p


KIDS JOHN DEERE GATOR, $25;
oversize chair and ottoman, $25; Pier
I glass and iron coffee table, $75. 832-
0334. 6:14p
BROWNING COMPOUND BOW with
case, good condition, $90. 832-1407.
6:14p
1 4-TON with A/H, $400; 1 3-ton with
A/H, $200. 767-8822. 6:7-14c


BRAND NEW 2007 2 BR/ 2 BA MH on
1/4 ac. lot (incl.), new home warranty,
new C.A.H. & septic, community
water, low taxes & utilities, by owner,
$49,900. Call 863-899-1714. 4:26tfc


3 SMALL DOGS, $50 each, cock-
apoo/terrier/chi-yorkie mix. 781-5272.
6:14-7:12p


POST
OFFICE
NOW


WHITE COBY PITBULL puppies with
red nose, 1st shots, 9 weeks. Can be
seen at 2629 Griffin Rd., Wauchula.
6:14p
PIGMY GOATS, great pets, $65 and
up. 773-9195 or 781-1947. 6:7-28c
BOSTON TERRIER, 7 months old,
male, $375. 781-2135. 6:7-14p
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a pet
or are looking for a new one, the City
of Wauchula invites you to come and
see if you can find the pet you're look-
ing for. The Wauchula Animal Control
is located at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more information.
tfc-dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes 828.29
requires that all cats and dogs sold in
Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have
an official health certificate, have nec-
essary shots and be free of parasites.
tfc-dh


FRESH PRODUCE GARDNER FARM,
E-Z Pick, berries, fruits and vegeta-
bles, 160 Fish Branch Road, Gardner.
863-735-1000. 3:8tfc


5 AC. FOR SALE 1260 Painter Rd.,
off of Popash Rd. Call 781-7978.
5:17-6:14p
PROJECT FACILITATION, engineering
referrals, site plans, house plans. Tera
863-773-4567. 5:17-6:14p
BUILDING LOT one block from Hwy.
17, Palmetto and 7th Avenue, zoned
commercial. Zero lot line. Excellent
for offices, great parking, only
$46,900. Mid-Florida Realty, Mark 863-
899-1714 or 773-0300. 4:5tfc
10 acres. Barn with apartment.
Fenced and cross fenced. 863-781-
4176. 5:24-6:21 p


Paid Training, Vacations. PT/FT.
1-800-584-1775 |
EXT. 5517
USWA cl5:24-6:14c


New Hon-mes Pole Barns
FREE ESTIMATES
( REFERENCES AVAILABLE
Ser inL I- r-lrdee Count\ lor o\ er 0 -. -ears
(863) 781-0012 (863) 202-6465


-. .."i -Shell


GILLIARD FILL DIRT INC.


Fill Dirt

Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Rock


Sand


olfo Springs
clo:5tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Quality, Compassionate Care!

Now Hiring:
Med Tech Full Time
Respiratory Therapist Full Time
CT Tech Full Timne

Nursing:
RN- ICU Full Time
RN Med/Sutrg Full Time
RN ED Full Time

Ask about our sign-on bonus for nurses!
HRMC leam members are rewarded for their con-
tributions with competitive compensation, exceptional
benefits, and the opportunity to make an impact with an
evolving health care leader.
If you are ready to be a part of our pro-
fe-sional team, forward yourresume to:
1. HR MC, Attn: Human Resources,
3600 S. Highlands Ave., Sebring, FL
33870;
Fax: 863-314-0263

nH www.highlandsregional.comn


I Wefga nacjt


cl6:14c


off a- W MM ANWSMMW MMA4- 4



4 We do it for LE$$!
A'N Chrome Wheels Brand Name Tires! 1 I1
II* 18" & up! Come see our selection iN

HII II Ilil
II II II


IIggII HOURS .
A" Sat. 8-12 la g
1t -1 / Se Hable Espol! iIIt 11
Ii~tl 11011
AI Billy Ayers Donna Eures Ill I
101 Tire Technician Secretary I1401

I ill Fast & Friendly Service! 1
! II We won't be undersold! III
II 773-0777 773-0727 1N I
101 I116 REA Rd., Wauchula "I11
I1041 ,(across from Wal-Mart)
0'5%ati ( We also do S e
'I9 Semi-Tires & Trailer Tires!


"manna En:NN e
lll lljjljjjj l


Bo Espino
Auto Technician


WE REPAIR LL TRES...
BEN SEI-iRES!
"OUR TIRES ARE ON SALE EVERYDAY!"

* We repair most American cars
* Full time mechanic
* We are licensed and insured!
Reg #MV-40625


Mike Adcox
Auto Technician


This business is FOR SALE !
Call 375-4440 for details.







L


,ooc
%-.-- ..11 .. n St. -
L AQ te block.
$134,900. OBO.
309 Goolsby St. 3BR, 1 B concrete block.
$79,900
- 1220 Stenstrom, Brand new executive
home. 3BR/2B, tons of extras. Call for price.
Charlie Creek Mobile Home Park -
3BR/2B. $59,900.
417 N. 9th Ave. 5BR/2B $74,900.








Florida Institute For
Neurologic Rehabilitation, Inc.
Where a Job Can Become A Career
FINR IS GROWING. Come join our team. The following
positions are now available.
Entry Level Positions
OUR NEW STARTING PAY FOR ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS
is $10.00 PER HOUR!
Minimum Requirements are H.S. Diploma or G.E.D., 18
years of age or older and no disqualifying offenses.
C.N.A-Current Florida license required. Evening, weekend,
night & PRN shifts are available in the Skilled Medical Center.
Experience is a plus.
R.S.A.'s-Provide direct care to clients. Duties include, super-
vision of 1-6 clients during assigned shift. Other duties are
implementation of behavior plans, documentation, showering,
feeding, accompanying on transports, etc. C.N.A. License, AA,
AS, BA or BS preferred. Previous experience is a plus.
Dietary Servers- Serve meals to clients, clean tables, clean
in kitchen & dining area.
Dietary Aides- Wash dishes, clear tables, cleaning in kitchen
& dining area.
Skilled Positions
Utility Service Technician-Must be HVAC certified with 2-
5 yrs. experience.
Cook-Food Handlers Certificate required with 1-3 years exp.
Professional
RN-Night shift for our Skilled Medical Rehab Center. Current
FL License required.
RN's & LPN's for TLF-Evening, night & weekend shifts
avail. Current FL License required.
Program Case Managers-1 position is available on the
Adult Intensive Campus. Qualifications are BA/BS in Social
Work, Criminal Justice or Health related field. Previous Case
Management experience is preferred.

Apply at 1962 Vandolah Rd., Wauchula, FL 33873, fax
resume to HR Dept (863)773-2041, or e-mail to
annettedhr@finr.net. FINR has an excellent benefit pack-
age including competitive pay scale and is a DFWP and
EOE. c15:t IOtfc


------ArA ,







8B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007






The


Classified.s


"tree commercial lots in Wauchula
Hills. 125x60, 1/2 block from Highway
1,. Serious buyers call 863-773-4005.
* 5:24-6:21 p



2 BD/1 BATH, central A/C in Bowling
Preen. $525 per month, $200 deposit.
675-4573 after 5:30 p.m. 6:14p
Y T. MEADE fully furnished 1 BR
apartment, $750 month plus security.
Electric & cable included. Nice neigh-
borhood. Call Sheila 375-9988, 781-
'l927, 863-285-7203. 6:7tfc


15 'Years



Bud & Mary
cl5:31-6:14D


STORE FRONTS, HOUSES, apart-
ments, warehouses, salons, restau-
rants, 24,000 sf available. 773-4567 or
445-0915. 5:17-6:14p
PARK MODEL in Crystal Lake 767-
8822 for rent. 1:25tfc
RVs IN CRYSTAL LAKE. 767-8822.
12:14tfc
DOWNTOWN OFFICE space avail-
able, please call 773-4186 or 773-
6065. 11:23tfc
Under New Management. Nice 2 bed-
room mobile home near school.
Starting at $475/mo. with deposit.
Quiet neighborhood. Please call 863-
698-4910 or 863-838-4447. 5:24-6:28c


* Home & Auto
* Inside & Out


10% r~OFF
ale.or&


(863) 244-9331 Waucha
Wauchula
t i or
Little Torch Key


2 vacant lots, excellent location on West Palmetto behind Woman's Club.
Zoned Historic, C-1, access on 3 sides, only $ 15,900 reduced $46,900.
5 acres Prime location. Vandolah Rd and Dink Albritton Rd. $110,000.
Celito Lindo 3.75 acres MOL frontage on North & South Hwy 17. 8,160
SF auditorium includes beverage license. $1,180,000.
1 acre MOL zoned C-1 behind ACE Hardware. 1/2 ac. site ready. Needs
fill and clearing. $50,000.







NEW LISTING 1.42 ac.. 3/1,closei.%.eat buy $115.000..
PRICE REDUCED Ownrers have relocated. This b'autuiull'. landscaped and
well maintained home has 4 bedrooms. 3 baths, with :a 2 car garage and a 24x28
detached x ork-hop/garage Mlany extras.Call Judy or Robert for an appointment.
Reserve Now! Summer Vacation-Mountam cabin. sleeps 4-5, Bryson City, NC
20 acres, indu[rial zoning. $400.00O..
86 ac., Hil 6-14 Frorntage. across fronm Little C.press. $ 1 3N1 -
CommercUlt --4 Lots H. I, $225.000. Bo 20 ling Green.


WAREHOUSES, SEVERAL DIFFER-
ENT sizes. Jack UIIrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 6:14c
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising any
preference or limitation based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin, or
the intention to make such a prefer-
ence or limitation. Familial status
includes children under 18 living with
parents or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


LAWN CARE free estimate, depend-
able, trustworthy, reasonable rates.
863-245-0791. 6:14-21 p
JIM'S LAWN SERVICE specializing in
cleaning beds, trimming hedges and
trees. JIM'S CAR WASH at your house
or mine, reasonable rates. 767-0439
or 245-9472. 6:14tfc/nc
BIG DADDY TRACTOR SERVICES -
pasture mowing, grove mowing, disc-
ing, bucket work, fence building, any
kind and maintenance. 781-0962.
5:17-7:5p


My Florida
Landscape
Services Inc.
207 Illinois Ave. Wauchula
863-832-2102
Beautiful Landscapes! !
At My Florida Landscape Services, Inc. creating and maintaining
beautiful Florida landscapes isn't just a job, it's a passion.
Let the professionals at My Florida Landscape Services, Inc.
help with your lawn care and landscape projects.
We can handle all your needs, large or small.
FREE ESTIMATES
Visit us at www.myfloridalandscapes.com
and see what our customers say about our service.
cl6:7-28c







USA Heavy Duty Starters
and Alternators in stock!
Cummings and Detroit
Engines. A

INDUSTRIES


Locally owned and operated
for 32 years
Hydraulic hoses made
Paint mixed in house
All major credit cards accepted


306 N 6th Ave.
Wauchula


863-773-3218
Open Mon. Sat. 7:00 am 6:00 pm
cl6:14-28c


EAGLE SOD We install sod. Loviest
prices in town. Call 863-773-6113 or
727-639-3966. 5:17-6:14p
FRANKS LAWN CARE Free esti-
mates, residential, commercial, rea-
sonable pricing. 781-7360. 5:17-7:19p
SCRAP METAL, junk car removal and
hauling services. Call Dee 375-4633
leave message. 6:7-7:5p
WE BUY JUNK cars, trucks and farm
equipment. We pay $100 per car, we
haul, more for others. Carl's Re-
cycling 767-0400. 4:19tfc


BIG DADDY TRACTOR Services -
Pasture, mowing, discing, finish level-
ing, roto-tilling, bucket work, yard
cleaning. Insured. Now accepting all
major credit cards. Contact Lupe "Big
Daddy" 863-781-0962. 6:14-7:12p


B SEE
SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event. 773-6375.
www.bseesound.com. 6:15-10:26p
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUR Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. Located
at the SFCC Annex, Room #105, Hwy.
17 North, Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a problem?
Call Alchoholics Anonymous in
Hardee County at 735-2511. Several
weekly meetings. dh

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales, service and
installation, call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc'.


Topsy See

REAL ESTATE
773-5994

Wow this 3BR-2B CB home is ready for new owners New roof new cen-
tral .4j4).uu ilAG$eoT dePi -& -N Q.4Nuge to do
is move in. $470,000. $164,900.
NEW LISTING: 2005 D.W. Fleetwood M/H 2000 sq. ft. 4 large BR/2 bath.
All appliances. Deep well. Beautiful home sits on 1.25 acres. $159,000.
NEW LISTING: 2 BR/1Bth completely remodeled. New central A/H unit,
electric and plumbing. Everything new top to bottom. Sits on 2 lots in Zolfo
$99,500.
10.68 acres in Western Hardee County. 4BR 2 1/2 Bth. 2005 Palm Harbor
Doublewide. Fireplace, vaulted ceiling and all the extras. Very open for large
family gatherings. 24x36 Pole Barn. $299,000.
5 acres all fenced, High and dry with pond. Appaloosa Lane. $95,000.
6.2 acres. Fenced & gated with utility building. Pond great location in
Western Hardee county. $129,000.
Very nice 2BR/2B DW Mobile Home sits on 1/2 ac. lot. 22x32 garage w/1/2
bath. Also screened patio. New roof in 05. Appliances including washer &
dryer. Mostly furnished. $95,000.
2 1 acre tracts. Bowling Green $28,000 each.


We Have Buyers!


We Need Listings!


cl6:14c


Everyone is born with genius,
but most people only keep it a
few minutes.
-Edgard Varese


( I D




NM

AM-SOUTH REALTY

MAKING REAIA EsrAwnr REAL EASY."
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of Coldwel Banker Real Estate Corporation


AWESOME & THEN SOME
4 bedroom, 2 bath home, located within 1 mile of
Wauchula city limits. Open floor plan with cathedral
ceilings, ceramic tile, sun porch, fireplace, two car car-
port and workshop on 2.5 acres. $298,900.
LOCATED IN RIVERVIEW
Large home in nice neighborhood with 4 Bedrooms, 4
Baths with 2 Car Carport. This home in Wauchula is CB
& Stucco Construction with carpet and tile flooring.
Only $175,000.
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING
This 5-acre tract is the perfect place for horses or recre-
ational purposes. Great place to relocate your mobile
home and family! Owner motivated to sell! Make an
offer. Asking $69,500.
GREAT INVESTMENT-POTENTIAL RENTAL INCOME
3 BEDROOMS 1 BATH ON 2 LARGE SHADY LOTS. ONLY
$65,000.
THE PERFECT HOME SITE!!
This beautiful, high and dry 5 AC is the perfect site for
your Dream home. Located on CR 665 near Solomon's
Castle on a corner tract. $75,000.
PRICE REDUCED
Peaceful atmosphere
Fenced 5.32 acres with very well kept 3/2 2005 Modular
home, nice location for horses, children and summer
play. $205,000 CALL TO SEE!!
NEW LISTING-EXCELLENT CONDITION AND GREAT
PRICE (2002) 3 BEDROOM 2 LARGE BATH CB HOME
WITH STORM SHUTTERS, ALSO INCLUDES WASHER,
STOVE AND REFRIGERATOR!! ONLY $129,900.

FEATURES 01O
EXECUTIVE STYLE COUNTRY HOME!! This 3 Bedr
Hardee County on 2.5 Acres. Built with custom Quali
valet, outside showers, large custom workshop and
DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH LOT, NOT IN
Beautiful 3 bedroom (A MUST SEE) with 2 large bath


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873

Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122
FAX (863) 773-2173


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jessica Smith, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Nancy Craft, Associate


781-3627
781-1186
773-0575
832-0370


INVEST IN 2007
Escape to the quiet in these 40 Acres on Maude Road.
Raise cattle, horses or build your own dream home in this
quiet area. $15,000 per Acre.
NICE NEIGHBORHOOD MOVE RIGHT IN
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 2005 Furnished MH with Front & Back
Screened Porches, Storage Shed & Carport. Only
$89,900.
BRAND NEW CONSTRUCTION IN AVON PARK
This newly listed home has 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bath with 2 Car
Garage. Kitchen has upgraded appliances with wood and
tile flooring. Reduced Price: $189,900
TWO COMMERCIAL LOTS
Located on Hwy 17 North in Bowling Green. $75,000.
COMMERCIAL LOT 64x65. Located on Townsend St. E.
MOTIVATED OWNER! $64,900
EASY ON THE POCKETBOOK!
2 Bedrooms, 1.5 bath on shaded lot, located in Ft. Meade,
Central air and heat, Only $82,500
CORNER LOT
With 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath CB home will be great for a rental
or starter Home. $65,000. Located on Epps Street
Bowling Green.
PRICE REDUCED TO ONLY $135,000
READY TO MOVE IN!! CB HOME
Located in very nice neighborhood. 1,856 total square
footage, with 2-car garage. This is a very spacious 2
Bedroom, 1.5 Bath, large utility room with washer and
dryer, stove, refrigerator. Also has well with irrigation sys-
tem. WAS LISTED AT $150,000.
ANOTHER NEW LISTING!
Great fixer upper, frame home on corner lot in City of
Wauchula also close to schools. Has upgraded electric.
Ready to go. ONLY $69,900.

FTHE WEEK!!
oom, 2.5 Bath CB home is located in Western
ty workmanship. Includes fireplace, personal clothes
more. $305,000.
MOBILE HOME PARK!!
rooms. ONLY $72,500. 6 1
cl6:14c


L AMBER R
REALTY INC. T
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


COMFORTABLE AND SPACIOUS! 3B/2Bth
D/W, built in 2006. 1296 sq. ft., large kitchen.
Located on quiet street in Charle Creek area.
$75,500

GREAT BUY FOR THIS 2B/1Bth, C/B home with
wood burning fireplace; fenced yard; family neigh-
borhood. $99,500
MOVE YOUR FAMILY IN this new 3B/2Bth
CB/Stucco home on 1 acre in developed area; great
design, cathedral ceilings, granite counter tops, nice
pantry, ceiling fans throughout; ceramic tile and lam-
inate floors; inside utility and double garage.
$245,000
Great Seasonal or Starter Home! 2B/lBth, central
A/C, carpet and tile floors, fenced yard with outside
storage shed. $55,000
HORSE LOVER'S DREAM! 10 acres with 2 horse
barns, workshop and charming 3B/3Bth, brick home;
3195 square feet, central vac, fireplace, Jacuzzi, beau-
tiful in-ground pool and many more amenities. Call
today for details!
Peaceful 20 acres and country style home; 3B/1Bth
frame home with 2 porches, ceiling fans, kitchen
essentials and some furniture included with sale; 3
wells on property. $350,000
COUNTRY LIVING AT IT'S BEST! 3B/2Bth
CB/Stucco home on 5 acres; 2232 square feet, 24x36
concrete workshop; property has two 4" deep wells.
$319,900
CHARMING OLDER HOME in Wauchula located
within walking distance of schools, shopping and
more. 4B/2.5Bth. new roof, hardwood floors; fenced
back yard. $147,000
5 ACRES with 3B/lBth CB home plus mobile home;
3 wells and 3 septic systems on property; located in
southern Hardee County; listed at $200,000
RESIDENTIAL AND/OR COMMERCIAL PROP-
ERTY! Great location for this 3B/1.5Bth home, C/B
home on nice size lot; 1434 square feet. $138,500


OP OPPORTUNITY


Bus. (863) 773-0007 "
Fax: (863) 773-0038 .
www.lambertrealty.net

Carol Jackson


WHAT A DEAL AT THIS PRICE! Recently renovated
3B/2Bth, CB/Stucco, 2244 square foot home, nicely
landscaped lot and located in great family neighbor-
hood. $164,900
HERITAGE HOME AT A GREAT PRICE! 3B/2Bth
with 2 wood burning fireplaces, hardwood floors, wrap
around porch, high ceilings; charming house at a
charming price! $125,000
QUIET GETAWAY! 5 ACRES in excellent location for
this 3B/lBth CB/Stucco home; newly updated kitchen;
property is fenced and cross fenced ready for your
horses or other livestock; in the country but close to
town. $229,900
COUNTRY LIVING just outside of town! 5 acres
fenced and cross fenced and 4B/2Bth M/H; 2387 square
feet; built in 1998; large pole barn. $160,000
Located in Arcadia this 3B/lBth, CB home has a
screened lanai; attached garage plus additional garage;
large, corner lot. $175,000
SEE THIS 3B/2Bth, BRICK HOME, split floor plan;
large master bedroom with spacious closets, screened,
ceramic tile floored lanai. $220,000
SUMMER IS HERE VACATION ALL THE TIME
when you live in this 2B/2Bth, C/B Stucco home with
new windows overlooking the peaceful Lake Redwater;
close to Highlands Ridge North/South and Pinecrest
Golf Courses and a great place for fishermen, golfers
or nature lovers! Situated on approximately one acre,
beautiful oaks enhance this immaculate home! $238,900
House and 5 Acres! $200,000
NEW LISTING! Build your home on this tract of
approximately 5 acres in desirable area. $90,000
5 Acre tract, high and dry, partially fenced; listed at
$80,000
5 acres of vacant land; beautiful homesite; paved road
frontage and excellent location. $125,000
NEW PRICE FOR THIS EXCELLENT HOMESITE!
10.52 acres of pasture land; nice fish pond with dock;
located in eastern Hardee County. $157,800
14.74 acre tract located just outside of town; large pond
and 4" well located on property. $215,000 5 acre tract
can be purchased separately for $90,000
Excellent building site; 2.5 acres on Highway 64 West,
4" well, large oaks; ideal for nursery. Owner financing
to qualified buyer. $79,000


SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON


DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743
ASSOCIATE: DAVID McCLINTOCK........781-1226
ASSOCIATE: RHODA McCOY..................245-0753


KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: MICHAEL ADAMS .............781-2413
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971
ASSOCIATE: CAROL JACKSON..............991-1255
cl6:14c


Shamrock Detail
Paint & Cleaning Service


Topsy See, Broker
Cindy Hand, Realtor Associate
107 W. Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 lPM






June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 9B


The


Classifieds-


ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-119
Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee
County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10
Paragraph D require all ads for any
construction-related service to carry,
the contractor's license number.
dh
OSTOMY, COLOSTOMY, AND ideosto-
my supplies now in stock at Pete's
Pharmacy. tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs?,
Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday
nights 7 p.m. at St. Michael's
Catholic Church, Heard Bridge Rd.,
Wauchula and Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday nights 7 p.m. at First
Methodist Church, Corner of Grape &
Church St., Bowling Green.
7:18tfcdh


New Park Model
Set up in ADULT
PARK. Central heat
and air. Oak trees,
1 *i. pool and rec. hall.
Lewis
N- W863-244-9331
cl5:31-6:14p




a GARDEN CE
W SOD
S Sold by Pallet, Half Pallet, Piece
MULCH
Fill Dirt Drainfield & Driveway Rock, Stump Grinding
Potting & Top Soil (sold by the yard) R.R. Ties Delivery Available


120 Hogan St.
Wauchula, FL
(Behind Panda Restaurant)


Monday Friday 12:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. 1 p.m. %
773-3500 cl7:27tfc


BJD EXCAVATING.

Complete Site Development Demolition *
i, Dump Truck Hauling*
Pihiu *Underground Utilities* 4 -
Orange Tree Clearing*
Call for FREE Estimates 863-773-6195
cl11:2tfc



A Mortgage Made


Just For You!


www.mymortgage7.com
cl6 7-21p


S(- go- o1 3 3





Palm Harbor MH, 10 ac.fenced on paved road, inground pool $284,900.
20 Ac. PopAsh $17,500.00 per ac.
24.28 Ac. Golden Oaks Road, $15,000. per ac.
20 acres, Oak trees, Homesites, Moffit and Steve Roberts $15,000 per ac.
67 AC Can be broken down. PEACE RIVER ACCESS $15,000 per ac.
2 Acre tracts available in a deed restricted community. $48,500.00 c06:1
c16:l1


lIc


Notice of Public Sale
1996 CHEV
VIN:1G1LV1544TY111987
8:00 A.M. June 28, 2007
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 IIwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL
cl6:14c



Wauchula Fl 3 3873
Te Ieho !86)l-3255
U, Ul Se[ilynig'] i

^^^MBBcffwc


MOVING SALE: Friday/Saturday, 8-3,
lots of children's clothes, sizes 5-14;
household items; curtains; furniture;
reasonable prices. 478 Terrell Rd.,.
Wauchula. 6:14p
3 FAMILIES FRIDAY/SATURDAY 8-
12, 206 Ohio Avenue, Wauchula.
Something for everyone infant, chil-
dren, teen, and adult size clothing and
shoes, housewares, toys, books, TV,
boat, computer printer and so much
more! 6:14p
2-FAMILY Thursday, Friday,
Saturday, 8-? 772 Polk Rd. Lots of
misc. 6:14p
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 1879 Kazen.
Rd. Clothing, lamps, knives, swords,
candles. 6:14p
408 S. 9th AVENUE, Friday, 7 a.m. -
noon. Lots of everything. If rain will
reschedule. 6:14p
HUGE SATURDAY, 8-3:30, Zolfo
Springs east 64, 1 1/2 miles. Look for
signs. Lots of everything. 6:14p
FRIDAY/SATURAY/SUNDAY 8 a.m.-?,
841 Terrell Rd., Wauchula. 6:14p
SATURDAY, 7-?, Ralph Smith Rd. Lots
of misc. 6:14p
HEARD BRIDGE RD., Friday, 9-?,
Dresser, clothes, collectibles and
more. 6:14p
MULTI-FAMILY Sat. & Sun.,
Wauchula, 1008 S. 9th. Furniture, jew-
elry, dressers, desk, papaya seedling,
plants, everything must go, house-
hold items, clothes, sofa bed, materi-
als, bike, more. 6:14p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY 2577 Garza
Road, Zolfo Springs. Lots of chil-
drens, women clothes, other misc.
6:14p


Birds sing after a storm; why
shouldn't people feel as free to
delight in whatever remains to
them?
-Rose F. Kennedy


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5 Bedroom/2 Bath A must see!
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417 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula







HECTOR'S
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House Pads And More!

NOW OFFERING

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Fax: 863-773-0902
ci6:7-14p


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* Phone (863) 781-9720


Good Shepherd Hospice
J ;,.',2 ;,*..
NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Good Shepherd Hospice is
seeking compassionate, caring
nurses to join our dynamic team
in providing quality care to
patients and families in the
following positions:
RNs
FT, 8a-5p
*RN, New Admissions
RN, Home Visits
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RN, Home & Nursing Home Visits
(Hardee County)
RNs
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Opportunities in Highlands antd
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LPNs
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For consideration,
please call (800) 464-3994
or apply online at
cl6:14c


www.laborsolutionE


;e (
159 S.R. 64 E., Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 ,
is.com ralbritton@laborsolutions.corrn
cl9:14tfc


EMlr]E I -wireless
Seeks Individuals for inside and outside sales'
positions. Positions open in Sebring, Arcadia, and;
Wauchula. Interested candidates should apply in'
person.
See Matt Hall at 3708 Sparta Road, Sebring.
Bring resume if possible.
(863) 385-7470 c5:316:14c


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.


7


,- Bobcat Service
Crane Service
Sawmill Service
Free Estimates Insured 26 years experience
cl6:14tfc


NOW RENTING!
THE PALMS APTS.
ATTENTION FARM WORKERS
3 Bedroom Apartments
Located at: 701 La Playa Drive
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 AM 5:00 PM
Monthly rent from $570 + utilities
Occupancy restricted to households with one family member receiving 50%
or more of their gross annual income from farm labor activities.
For Rental Info & Applications
The Palms at 863-773-3809
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Housing Opportunity
AHORA ARQUILANDO!
ATENCION TRABAJADORES DE FINCA
THE PALMS APARTMENTS
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Localizado en: 701 La Playa Drive
Horas de Oficina: Lunes y Viernes de 9:00 AM 5:00 P.M.
Mensualidades de renta comenzando de $570 + utilidades
Apartamentos designados para los encapacitados y desabilitados.
Intalarse es restrict a un miembro de familiar que reciban el 50% o mas de
Ingreso grueso annual en actividades de labor en agriculture.
Para information de renta o solicitudes
Llame, The Palms al: 863-773-3809
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Iqual Oportunidades de Viviendas c!6:7-28c


8 acres, east of Arcadia
$139,900
OWNER FINANCING ,





PUBLIC AUCTION
June 16, 2007 -9:00 AM
- CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME -
Complete Liquidation of
M&M Backhoe Service
Trucks, Construction Equip.,
Trailers, Tractors,
Farm Equip., ATV's


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Florida City/Homestead, FL
Phone (786) 243-2883
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cl6:7,14c


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CI6.7-28p






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Contact: Robby Albritton
iffOi l863) 73_QOOR ("i*Cell (863) 528-7085


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Complete Tree Service


I IN HoME


cu-G







10B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007


Museum Musings
By Sandy Scott
Cracker Trail Museum Curator


AGRIRAMA HAS HARDEE COUNTY TIES
For those of you who have not visited Agrirama in Tifton, Ga., you
have missed out on a wonderful experience. I recently visited Agrirama
with the intention of bringing back some ideas for our own Cracker Trail
Museum.
Agrirama is Georgia's living history museum and pioneer village. It
opened on July 4, 1976, under President Carter's administration. It consists
of five acres, a traditional farm community of the 1870s, an 1890s progres-
sive farmstead ("progressive" refers, to its having indoor plumbing) and
'other rural town buildings and businesses. Over 35 structures have been
-relocated to the 95-acre site and have been lovingly restored or preserved.
Costumed interpreters explain the origin of the buildings and demonstrate
lifestyle and activities of this time in Georgia's history.
The progressive farmstead the one with indoor plumbing was
built in 1896 by Allen Gibbs in Worth County, and was donated by his chil-
H^^L ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 -V i-S~ jjSSl'


COURTESY PHOTO
Hardee Countian Frank Gibbs' grandfather, Allen Gibbs, built
this home now on display in Georgia's Agrirama.
dren. This house was of particular interest to me because it was the home
of Hardee Countian Frank Gibbs' grandfather. When Frank, who is organ-
ist at First Baptist Church of Wauchula, learned I was going to visit
Agrirama, he told me to "look up" his grandfather's house.
Well, Frank, I did. But I also discovered another structure built and
donated by the Gibbs Family.
The Sand Hill one-room schoolhouse was built in 1895 by Johnnie
Gibbs near Ty Ty, Ga. It was originally a private school intended for the use
of his children as well as his brother Allen's children, who lived nearby. A
teacher boarded with the Allen Gibbs Family, and it is believed that she
taught school in this building.
It was naturally an exciting experience to be able to listen to the histo-
ry and take pictures inside and out of both these structures and to share
them with Frank.
I spent almost three hours with the curator of Agrirama, and he
informed me they had been invited to Cracker Country in Tampa to help
with its interpretive programs when it was first begun.
He went on to say that Cracker Country continues to send its people to
Agrirama from time to time for educational workshops. Here was' yet
another indirect tie of Agrirama to Hardee County, in this instance to the
Doyle Carlton Family.
I spent two days at Agrirama visiting all of the buildings and listening
to instructions on how turpentine was made, viewing the sawmill at work,
.and watching its blacksmith form a utensil from a metal rod, much in the
same way Mike McIntire does in the C.A. Bryant Blacksmith Shop in
Pioneer Village here during Pioneer Park Days.
Workshop, are .given during the fall and winter, and in fact the last he
.of the season was in progress while I visited. A group of home-schooled
children took part in a half-day of instruction at the Gibbs one-room school-
'house, which was taught by the local "school marm." Agrirama's curator
Checked to see if other workshops were scheduled during my visit, but this
was the time that they were winding down this particular program. They
,will start up again in the fall.
An old-fashioned ice cream float was enjoyed at the drugstore and the
train took me on a short trip winding through the town area and into the
country where the traditional homestead was located across a wooden
,bridge, just a short distance from the country church.
During the noontime meal, visitors can watch the preparation at either
pf the two farmhouses, while "Mama" cooks over the open fire. They may
,it down with "the family" and enjoy the meal of the day, along with teach-
ings of how the pioneer children conducted themselves during this time

600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132- FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida. edu
SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
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A full-time, year-round, grant-funded position to coordinate the ESOL
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preferred. Must have excellent communication skills and the ability to
work with a variety of people. Must have reliable transportation and
knowledge of the community for extensive travel within Highlands
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and sick leave. Deadling: 5 p.m., 6/26/07. Visit our website for detailed
position description.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cl6:14,21c


For Qualified Low
Income Families Call
Or Write To:
Centre Campesino
516 Avenida Del Maiz
South Bay, FL 33943.







HANDYMAN
OR
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FOR DETAILS
239.340.3968
V Must carry Workers
Compensation & Liability
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cl6:14,21c


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115O S. 7hAe
Wacl. FL-383 ,
Telephone (863) 773-3255

Qult rni ng servicesa t


Dove Club Hunting Permits

Will Go On Sale July 1


with their family.
Visitors are greeted in each of the buildings by a very well-informed
lady or gentlemen, costumed in period dress. Each must be knowledgeable
with information concerning both of the buildings, because they are moved
around and, many times, even at the exact time their shift begins.
One particular woman knew I was returning the next day, and said she
was looking for me because they moved her from where she was stationed
the previous day to a new location. There she was, when I entered the
Miller cabin, rocking in a rocking chair! And when I entered, she hugged
me and said she was glad I found her in this new location.
It was a pleasant two days' experience traveling back in time to a less
busy era. A time when families worked and played together, and children
learned valuable lessons that would benefit the community in years to
come.
Georgia is very proud of Agrirama, and I soon discovered that for its
employees it was more than just a job. It was truly their pleasure to share
the knowledge that they had to visitors to their small community. Each told
me that they all felt they were part of a family, and it was evident that they
desired you to join that family during your stay.
As I walked around the town and through the buildings, I did in fact
come away with some ideas that could be implemented at our own Cracker
Trail Museum. It is well worth the time to visit other places, not only for
our own enjoyment but to gain knowledge about how our ancestors lived.
As we get older, it seems we begin to take the time to really listen to
those who have experienced those "olden times," as many schoolchildren
now refer to our earlier years. The time grows shorter and we try to sand-
wich in all those things of which we are now interested. Wouldn't it have
been wonderful if we had felt that way when our grandparents and great-
grandparents were still a part of our daily lives, and listened to their stories
then? ,
Agrirama will take you back in time, and it is well worth a side trip for
every family.


Reduced To Sell



$223,000
Beautiful 2,800 sq. ft. CB/Stucco 3BR/2B home, split floor
plan with separate living room and family room. Cathedral
ceilings, impressive brick fireplace, laminate wood floors,
MB with double sinks & walk-in closet. Special interior
features, security system, large screened porch, double car
garage, privacy fenced backyard. On large lot in nice neigh-
borhood, 219 Georgetown Loop.
Call 832-1407 for appointment.
cl6:14p


Seven special-opportunity dove
fields will be open to the public this
season through the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion's special-opportunity dove
hunt program.
Beginning at 10 a.m. (EDT) July
1, sportsmen can purchase Dove
Club permits at any county tax col-
lector's office, authorized license
agent, online at MyFWC.com/dove
or by calling toll-free 1-888-
HUNT-FLORIDA (486-8356).
The deadline to purchase permits is
11:59 p.m. (EDT) Sept. 9.
Dove Club permits are available
on a first-come, first-served basis
and allow one adult and one youth
(under age 16) to participate in all
scheduled hunts for a designated
dove field (up to eight days). These
Saturday half-day hunts cost $150
and enable both the permit holder
and youth to take a daily bag limit
of birds.
Dove hunting opportunities are
in high demand, and these special
hunts offer the perfect setting for
friends and family to hunt together
in a social atmosphere. Hunters
who purchase the annual permits
save more than half the cost of reg-
ular daily permits for the season.
The seven special-opportunity


Truck Week

Don't miss this one week sale!


'99 Chevy Silverado
$5995


'98 Dodge Diesel
$5995


2001 Ford F150
$5995


HVRRVI
These won't
last long!


2000 Dodge King Cab
$5995


'99 Mazda King Cab
$2995


Hardee Car Co.


Maria


Home For Sale


S._ .. ,.......... ..
CB 3B, 2BA home on 5 acres.
Cathedral ceiling, open dormer windows,
attached 1 car garage, matching 20' x 20' workshop,
paved driveway and more.
Private yet minutes from town.
Located at 537 Boyd Cowart Rd.
Shown by Appointment
773-2140


Wauchula
E!n]
(across from First NEatio6i k)
773-6667


Wauchula HNIS
Corner of Hwy 17 & REA Rd.
773-2011 1


dove fields are: Schneider Farms
PSGHA (Escambia County),
Caravelle Ranch (Putnam County),
Dexter/Mary Farms Unit (Volusia
County), Hilochee (Lake County),
Allapattah Flats PSGHA (Martin
County), Fussell Farm PSGHA
(Polk County), and Frog Pond
(Miami-Dade County).
Daily dove permits also are
available for $35. These daily per-
mits enable one adult and one
youth (under age 16) to hunt
together on one half- day hunt but
allows only one bag limit of birds
between the two hunters.
Additionally, there is an option to
buy a $10 youth permit at the same
time a daily dove permit is pur-
chased. The youth permit allows
the youth to harvest his own daily
bag limit of birds, while hunting
under the supervision of the adult
daily dove permit holder. The daily
dove permits and youth permits go
on sale 10 a.m. (EDT) Sept. 17, and
they are transferable.
Interested hunters should pur-
chase permits early, because
demand for these hunts often
exceeds their availability. For more
information on these great dove
hunting opportunities, visit
MyFWC.com/dove.








June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 11B


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 25-2007-CA-000151
ELIHOREPH, LTD,
a Florida limited partnership
Plaintiff,
vs.
FLORIDA RENO, LLC,
a Nevada limited liability company,
ET AL,


NOTI,


Defendants

(CE OF S ALE


NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant tvs
a FINAL JUDGMENT OF FORECLO-
SURE dated June 4, 2007, in the
above styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Hardee County, Florida, I will
sell the property situate in Hardee'
county, Florida, described on Exhibit
"A", which is attached hereto and
made a part by this reference, to the
highest and best bidder, for cash, on
the front steps of the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, at 11:00 A.M.; on
Wednesday, June 27, 2007 '
EXHIBIT "A"
BEGIN AT THE NW CORNER
OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4
OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP
34 SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
RUN THENCE EAST 141.89
FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE EAST 524.78
FEET; THENCE SOUTH
662.46 FEET; THENCE EAST
261 FEET TO WEST SIDE OF
PEACE RIVER; THENCE
SOUTH ALONG WEST SIDE
OF RIVER TO SOUTH LINE
OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4;
THENCE WEST TO STATE
ROAD 35A; THENCE N
44*02'22" W 165.14 FEET;
THENCE N 19*34'54" E 307.60
FEET; THENCE N 3431'57" E
364.15 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 619.07 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING; AND
'BEGIN AT THE SW CORNER
OF SW 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SAID
SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST, TO
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE N 026'30" W
ALONG WEST LINE OF SAID
TRACT 372.42 FEET; THENCE
S 2442'08" E 407.53 FEET TO
SOUTH LINE OF SAID TRACT;
THENCE S 8915'27"' W
ALONG SOUTH LINE 167.45
FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN-
NING;
AND
THE W 1/2 OF THE NW 1/4 OF
THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 21,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 25 EAST, LESS RIGHT
OF WAY TO STATE ROAD
35A, HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, LYING WEST OF
THE FOLLOWING PARCEL:
THAT PART OF THE W.1/2 OF
THE NW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4
OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP
34 SOUTH, RANGE 2EAST, :
SHARDEE COUNTY, Fl IIDA,
BEING DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGIN AT THE NE
CORNER OF SAID W 1/2 AND
RUN S 89012'11" W AND
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID W 1/2 25.00 FEET;
THENCE S 0037'33" E,
1324.62 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID W
1/2; THENCE N 8915'25"' E
AND ALONG SAID SOUTH
LINE 20.00 FEET TO THE SE
CORNER OF SAID W 1/2;
THENCE N 024'34" W AND
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID WEST 1/2,1324.61 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING;
AND
ALL THAT PART OF SW 1/4
OF SE 1/4 OF SECTION 21,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 25 EAST, LYING
WESTERLY OF SR#35A,
LESS A PARCEL IN SW COR-
NER DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGIN AT THE SW
CORNER OF SW 1/4 OF SE
1/4 OF SAID SECTION 21,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 25 EAST FOR POINT
OF BEGINNING, THENCE N
026'30" WEST ALONG WEST
LINE OF SAID TRACT 372.42
FEET, THENCE SOUTH
2442'08" EAST 407.53 FEET
TO SOUTH LINE OF SAID
TRACT, THENCE SOUTH
8915'27" WEST ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE 167.45 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING;
AND
BEGIN AT NW CORNER OF
SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 21, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
FOR POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE N 8913'35" E
ALONG NORTH LINE OF SAID
TRACT 141.89 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 005'40" EAST 619.07
FEET; THENCE S 34"31'57" W
364.15 FEET; THENCE S
1934'54" W 307.60 FEET TO
EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
STATE ROAD 35A; THENCE N
4402'22" W ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY 1338.44 FEET
TO PC OF CURVE TO RIGHT
HAVING A RADIUS OF 683.68
FEET AND AN ARC LENGTH
OF 519.71 FEET; THENCE
NORTHERLY ALONG SAID
CURVE 272.52 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE NORTH LINE
OF SW 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SEC-
STION 21; THENCE N 89013'35"
E ALONG NORTH LINE
1243.10 FEET TO NE COR-
NER OF SAID SW 1/4 OF SE
1/4 FOR .POINT OF BEGIN-
NING;
AND
THAT PART OF THE NE 1/4
LYING WEST OF PEACE
RIVER AND LYING NORTH OF
SR#64 IN SECTION 28,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 25 EAST.


ALL LYING IN HARDEE
. COUNTY, FLORIDA.


ANY LIENHOLDER CLAIMING AN


INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FUNDS
FORM THIS SALE, IF ANY, MUST FILE
A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 45-031(1)(A), FLORIDA
STATUTES

Dated this 4 day of June 2007,

B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Court

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
f you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the office of the
Court Administrator (863) 773-4174,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this document; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, 'call
Florida Relay Service (800) 955-8771.
6:7-14c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 252007CP000057
IN RE: THE ATATE OF
JOAN KRATZER, deceased /

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JOAN KRATZER, deceased, whose
date of death was May 15, 2007, and
whose social security number is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Hardee County Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Post
Office Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida
33873. The names and addresses of
the Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's Attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and,
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file their
claims with this Court WITHINTHE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS .OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is JUNE 7, 2007.

Personal Representative:
,CAROL ANN KRATZER
3867 Raccoon Road
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890

Attorney for Personal Representative
John W.H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (863) 773-0910
Florida Bar Number: 0650137

6:7-14c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 252007CP000055
In Re The Estate Of:
Helen Thompson,
Deceased /

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Helen Thompson, deceased, File
Number 252007CP000055, is pending
in the Probate Court, Hardee County,
Florida, the address of which is:
Hardee County Clerk, Probate
Division, RO. Drawer 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
SAll creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, on whom
a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent, or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is June 7, 2007.


Personal Representative:
William David Broderick, Jr.

1871 Woodard Road
Elma, New York 14059

Attorney for Personal Representative
W. Roy Wilkes
3750 U.S. 27 North, Suite 9
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-7700 Telephone
Florida Bar Number: 0608475


If I were asked to name the
benefit of the house, I si
say: The house shelters
dreaming, the house pro
the dreamer, the house a
one to dream in peace.
-Gaston Bach


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No. 25-2007-CA-000131
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
RURAL HOUSING SERVICES, USDA,
a/k/a FARMERS HOME ADMINISTRA-
TION
Plaintiff,
v.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANTEES,
DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES,
AND CREDITORS OF VIOLA MAY-
FIELD a/k/a MARY VIOLA MAYFIELD
and JAMES G. CARPENTER, DE-
CEASED, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PER-
SONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR
CORPORATE, AND WHOSE EXACT
LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN,
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST VIOLA MAYFIELD a/k/a
MARY VIOLA MAYFIELD and JAMES
G.iCARPENTER, DECEASED, OR ANY
OF THE HEREIN NAMED OR
DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS OR PAR-
TIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY,
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN AND
TO THE PROPERTY HEREIN
'DESCRIBED; EDITH SPENCE; WILL-
IAM MAYFIELD a/k/a BILL MAYFIELD;
and PATRICIA TATE a/k/a KATHY
TATE, and all unknown parties claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
herein named Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties claim
as heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, spouses, or other claimants;
TENANT #1 and/or TENANT #2, the
parties intended to account for the
person or persons in possession;
CLERK OF COURT, HARDEE COUNTY
Defendants /


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is herby given that, pursuant
to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated June 6, 2007 in this cause, I will
sell the property situated in HARDEE
County, Florida described as:

LOT 9 OF REPLAT OF ROSE-
WOOD SUBDIVISION, AS PER
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 68, HARD-
EE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

a/k/a 440 Lynn Street, Bowling
Green, Florida 33834
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at the North Steps of
the Hardee County Courthouse, 417
W. Main Street, Wauchula, Florida, at
11:00 o'clock a.m., on June 27, 2007.
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Wauchula, Firoida this 6
day of June, 2007.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons needing
a social accommodation to participate
in this proceeding should contact the
Personnel Department of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court at 417 West Main
Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873,
Phone (863) 773-2161, not later than
seven (7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771 or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay
Service. 6:14,21c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 25-2007-CA-000175
NOVASTAR MORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT VILLALOBOS, ET AL.,
Defendants /

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judgment
in Foreclosure dated May 30, 2007
and entered in Case No. 25-2007-CA-
000175 of the Circuit Court of the 10th
Judicial Circuit in and for Hardee
County, Florida, wherein NOVASTAR
MORTGAGE, INC. is Plaintiff and
ROBERT VILLALOBOS, ET AL. are the
Defendant(s), I will sell to-the highest
and best bidder for cash at the
NORTH FRONTDOOR of the Hardee
County Courthouse, in Wauchula,
Hardee County, Florida, at, on the
27th day of June, 2007, the following
described property as set forth in said
Order or Final Judgment, to wit:

File Number: 03-5814
Begin at the NE corner of W 1/2
of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 26,
Township 34 South, Range 25
East and run thence South 0008'
West a distance of 00 feet, thence
West a distance of 135 feet,
thence South 85054'56" West a
distance of 210.59 feet, thence
West a distance of 150 feet for
Point of Beginning. Thence con-
tinue West a distance of 57.81
feet to a point in the
Southeasterly R/W line of State
Road 64, thence South 44"55'20"
West along said R/W line a dis-
tance of 148.20 feet, thence East
a distance of 162.28 feet, thence
North 0o08' East a distance of 105
feet to Point of Beginning,
Hardee County, Florida.
Street Address: 804 EAST 3RD
STREET, ZOLFO SPRINGS,
FLORIDA 33890
Any person claiming an interest In the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.


6:7-14c WITNESS my hand and the seal of the
Court this 31st day of May, 2007.
chief
should B. HUGH BRADLEY
day- By: Edwina Murphy
)tects As Deputy Clerk
allows This notice is provided pursuant to
Administrative Order No. 2.065.
ielard, In accordance with the Americans


Bonding Will Build Housing Units


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
About $11 million in housing
revenue bonds will finance a pair of
rental properties for low, moderate
and middle income people.
Last week, the Hardee County
Commission cleared the way for
sale of the bonds by the Hardee
County Housing Authority which
the commission established several
years ago when similar duplexes
and quadplexes were constructed
off Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue
south of Wauchula.
The new projects include the
Stenstrom Road Senior Village
Apartments, at 615 Stenstrom
Road, Wauchula. The individual
apartments will provide a safe envi-
ronment for 75 elderly residents no
longer able to manage all that own-
ing a home entails. A pool, parking
and other amenities will be provid-
ed. The estimated cost will be $6
million.
The second project is the Old
Orchard Village Apartments,
approximately 50 rental units at
4550 Bryan Ave., Bowling Green,
east of the elementary school. The
estimated cost will be $5 million,

In other business, the commis-
sion:
Heard a presentation on
School Impact Fees which will be


with Disabilities Act, If you are a per-
son with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate
in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to provisions of certain
assistance. Please. contact the Court
Administrator at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873, Phone No.
(941)534-4690 within 2 working days
of your receipt of this notice or plead-
ing; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-
800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice
impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via
Florida Relay Services).
6:7;14c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.DIVISION 25-2006-CA-379
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
OF AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE
SECURITIES, INC. ASSET-BACKED
PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES
SERIES 2004-R10, UNDER THE
POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT DATED AS OF
OCTOBER 1, 2004, WITHOUT
RECOURSE,
Plaintiff, .. .. .
vs.
NATHANIEL R. BRADDOCK, et al,,
Defendant(s) /

NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN, pursuant
to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure
Sale dated June 5, 2007 and entered
in Case NO. 25-2006-CA-379 of the
Circuit Court of the TENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for HARDEE County,
Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS
TRUSTEE OF AMERIQUEST
MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC.
ASSET-BACKED PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R10,
UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVIC-
ING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF
OCTOBER 1, 2004, WITHOUT
RECOURSE, is the Plaintiff and
NATHANIEL R. BRADDOCK; BONNIE
ALICE BRADDOCK; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE
ADMINISTRATOR OF THE SMALL
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION; DIS-
COVERY MARKETING AND DISTRIB-
UTING, INC A/K/A DISCOVERY MAR-
KETING AND DIST., INC; are the
Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at NORTH
FRONT DOOR OF THE HARDEE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 417 W.
MAIN STREET at 11:00AM, on the
27th day of June, 2007, the following
described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment:

THE NORTH 375 FEET OF THE
'SOUTH 408 FEET OF THE EAST
151.71 FEET OF THE WEST
176.71 FEET OF THE WEST 1/2
OFTHENE 1/4 OFTHENW 1/4
AND THE NORTH 175 FEET OF
THE SOUTH 408 FEET OF THE
WEST 115 FEET OF THE EAST
483.29 FEET OF THE WEST 1/2
OFTHENE 1/4 OFTHENW 1/4
OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST, HARD-
EE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 124 Bill Woods Road, Ona,
FL 33865
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date
of the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of
this Court on June 5, 2007.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
Disabilities Act, persons with disabili-
ties needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceeding
should contact the individual or
agency sending the notice at
Echevarria, McCalla, Raymer, Barrett
& Frappier, 601 Bayshore Blvd., Suite
800, Tampa, Florida 33606, telephone
(813) 251,4766, not later than seven
(7) days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-
8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service. '
6:14,21c


added to the county's other impact
fees which the county has already
set. Adopted effective July 1 at 50
percent of the recommended level,
adopted impact fees are $2,682 for
a single family home, $2,661 for a
mobile home and $1,857 per unit
for a multi-family unit (duplex,
triplex, etc).
School impact fees, only
assessed on residential units which
will produce the additional students
and require a new school or class-
room wing, could be assessed at
100 percent of the recommended
levels of 50 percent as the others
are. The commission said it would
notify the public the required 90
days in advance of proposed school
impact fees to be effective Oct. 1,
but did not adopt the level of fees to
be assessed, preferring to set those
amounts during budget workshops
in July.
These could vary from the rec-
ommended $4,989 for a single fam-
ily home to any portion of that
. amount. Similarly, the 100 percent
recommendation for mobile homes
are $4,976 and for multi-family res-
idences $2,73,3 per unit. The coun-
ty could adopt fees at any level or
percentage it deems necessary.
Schools Superintendent Dennis
Jones said all the schools were at or
near capacity, especially in view of
the class size amendment. Limiting
each class size would make adding
a classroom wing a real possibility.
Student growth has occurred,
although the pattern has changed.
Hardee is the only county in the
state allowed to have a student
count in October and .again in
December for the numbers on
which to receive per student fund-
ing. However, in the last two years,
Hardee's influx (or migrant stu-
dents) has come up just short (4.8
or 4.9) of the five percent required
to obtain increased .student funding.
More migrants are living in the
county- year-round and only travel
in the summer, commented school
officials.
Heard a report from Lynn
Topel, director of the Florida's
Heartland Regional Economic
Development Initiative. The group
is working to bring broad-band
satellite connection to all residents
of the region, .


It has also been working on
establishing a list of available
industrial sites, some shovel-ready,
some not. The REAL program is 'a
three-year $987,000 grant to train
300 people in the region how to
create or expand a business. The
12-week class meets three hours a
day, working on "out-of-the-box
business plans, -marketing and eco-
nomics. The first class of 12 stu-
dents found the class helpful to
their businesses.
Other plans are for training and
opportunities for import and
export, a mobility study and pre-
planning for businesses 48 hours
before a hurricane is expected.
More information can be obtained
at www.fhredi.com.
The commission approved a rea-
olution in support of the coal-fireo
electric generating plant in Glades
County.
Approved application fdor
$500,000 in housing preservation'
grants for rehabilitation. (
Discussed and approved '
minor subdivision plat for Greeji
Meadows Estates, a 60.59-acre par;
cel on Johnston Road north of trie
T. Lanier Road turnoff. The plain
includes breaking down to five
parcels and a 60-foot easement to
them. They vary from 12 acres to
five acres in size and there is an
outparcel of more than 20 acres. ;
This was followed by a lengthy
discussion of the L.115 exceptiofi
policy allowing transfer of property
of less than five acres to a relative.
Commissioner Minor Bryant, who
was the only one on the commis-
sion when this land use policy was
set, said it was intended to allow
transfer of property in A-1 zoning
because the normal requirement is
for a minimum of five acres for a
home. This would allow transfer of
2.5 acres to a close relative. Other
commissioners felt the policy
should extend to all land use cate-
gories.
Approved two Small County
Road Assistance grant agreements
with the state Department of
Transportation. One is for $447,480
for the resurfacing of College Hill
Road from SR 62 to CR 664 and
the other is for $2,163,150 for
resurfacing CR 636 from SR 64 to
Parnell Road.


"Copyrighted Material
SSyndicated Content I
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Everyone is a genius at least once a year. The real geniuses sini-:
ply have their bright ideas closer together. '
-Georg Lichtenberg'




It pays to advertise

in your Hometown Newspaper

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115 S. 7th Ave., Wauchula, FL


Telephone: 773-3255






12B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007


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reduce deep-well pumping
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SEE PAGE 4


Published by the


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PHOSPHATE MINING
The discovery of phosphate led to widespread
mining in the Peace River watershed.


SEE PAGE 6


Sun Newspapers in partnership with the Wauchula Herald.


DEVELOPMENT
Thousands of new residents, but the same
old problem: Where to get the water?


SEE PAGE 12


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Page 2


To our readers
The 105-mile-long Peace River and the
communities along its shore are interdependent,
with residents and industries needing the river's
abundant water and the health of the river (and
very existence) relying on what we take out and
what we put in. "Disturbing the Peace" examines
those factors from several angles, including the
Peace River Cumulative Impact Study, which was
commissioned by the Florida Legislature in
2003. The Sun also spoke with developers,
farmers, ranchers, phosphate mining executives,
environmentalists, city, county and state elected
officials and residents to provide a range of
perspective on these issues. The Sun invited a
panel of three experts William Dunson,
Charles "Chip" Fletcher and Don Ross to
review much of the material in these pages to
ensure factual accuracy and balance. The result
of that effort lies in the pages that follow.


DISTURBING THE PEACE
A SPECIAL SECTION OF
SUN COAST MEDIA GROUP NEWSPAPERS

SCMG PRESIDENT
DEREK DUNN-RANKIN


PUBLISHER
DAVID DUNN-RANKIN

EXECUTIVE EDITOR/VICE PRESIDENT
JIM GOUVELUS
...........................
MANAGING EDITOR
CHRIS PORTER
..................44
CHARLOTTE SUN EDITOR
BUDDY MARTIN


CHARLOTTE CITY EDITOR
LORRAINE SCHNEEBERGER


COPY DESK CHIEF
JIM MERCHANT


SECTION LAYOUT/DESIGN
JOSH OUVE


............ ...........
STAFF MEMBERS
SARAH COWARD, scoward@sun-herald.com
S.L FRISBEE, fpcslfiv@aol.com
BRIAN GLEASON, gleason@sun-herald.com
JOHN HACKWORTH, hackworth@sun-herald.com
JOHN HAUGHEY, jhaughey@sun-herald.com
RICHARD HITT, rhitt@sun-herald com
GREG MARTIN, gmartin@sun-herald.com
STEVE REILLY, reilly@sun-herald.com
PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com


CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
BARBARA CARLTON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PEACE
RIVER CITRUS GROWERS ASSOCIATION
WILLIAM DUNSON, MEMBER, PEACE RIVER
CUMULATIVE IMPACT STUDY SCIENTIFIC
PEER REVIEW PANEL
RON HILL, PRESIDENT, CHARLOTTE-DESOTO
BUILDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION
TOM MYERS, ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR
MINING, MOSAIC FERTILIZER LLC.
HONEY RAND, PRESIDENT,
ENVIRONMENTAL PR GROUP

REVIEW PANEL
DON ROSS, PRESIDENT, EARTHBALANCE
CHARLES "CHIP" FLETCHER, ATTORNEY, DE LA
PARTE & GILBERT LAW FIRM
WILLIAM DUNSON, SEE ABOVE


ON THE WEB
Go to our Web site (www.sun-herald.com) to download
the entire Peace River Cumulative Impact Study and
the Peace River Management Plan. In addition to all
the stories from this section, the Web site includes
stories from the Sun's February roundtable discussion
about the Peace River and its tributaries and more.
Look for the link under News Features.


ON THE COVER
(Photo illustration by Paul Schmidt and Josh Olive)
The sun rises over Harbour Heights Park along the
Peace River in Charlotte County. Despite the
seemingly idyllic setting, "No Swimming" signs posted
nearby warn visitors of high bacteria counts frequent-
ly detected in the water. An agricultural worker
(bottom left) picks strawberries at a farm in DeSoto
County. A dragline (bottom center) digs phosphate
from the ground in northern Hardee County. Members
of a construction crew (bottom right) perform site
work for the Bella Via subdivision in Port Charlotte.


Steam shovels replaced miners using |
around 1905, but phosphate is still shipped


'HOTO PROVIDED BY
)SPHATE RESEARCH "
picks and crowbars .'
?d by rail. :. .. ,.




S1881: Phosphate
pebbles discovered in
Peace River by Army Corps of
Engineers officer.


1908: River pebble mining
in Peace River ends.

S1930: Populations of
counties in Peace River
Basin: Polk, 72,291; .
Hardee, 10,348;
DeSoto, 7,683;
Charlotte, 4,013.

S1940s: 85 ,
P, percent of the drp
2,350-square- . ,
mile Peace River
watershed covered ?
Switehe foret d .,,,, SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMID
.4 with forest and
wetlands; agriculture Sprinklers irrigate a sod farm outside Fort Mea
covered 11 percent. Phosphate tural operations account for 43 percent of the
mining on 7,495 acres. square-mile Peace River watershed.

S1950s: Floridan Aquifer water level falls by 50 feet due to overpumping for phosphate mining.
Kissingen Spring stops flowing.

S1960: Populations of counties in Peace River Basin: Polk, 195,139;,Hardee, 12,370; DeSoto, 11,683;
Charlotte, 12,594.

1960s: Cyclical climate change begins, resulting in reduced rainfall through the 1990s. Flow levels of
Peace River fall by 35 percent over that period. Lower rainfall totals cause 85 percent of the drop.


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT. schmidlt@sun-herald corn
A "For Sale" sign beside a citrus grove in Polk County is literally
a sign of the times. Rising land prices, intensifying pressure from
developers and foreign competition for their produce is convinc-
ing many grove owners to sell their property.
^La^^'h^^^^p-U Ph.*4 *W1,i\


.








SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
In a three-mile section of the upper Peace River, the flow has been
drained by sinkholes, leaving some fish stranded without water.
1 !


I '.













T, scnmidt@sun-heraid.com
de in Polk County. Agricul-
e land use in the 2,350-
-


.." .,* ;' 5 .(,A, "


* 1961: Legislature creates Southwest Florida Water Management
District (Swiftmud) in response to floods in 1959 and 1960. -

* 1964: Hendrickson Dam constructed across Shell Creek east of Punta
Gorda.

* 1975: Florida begins requiring phosphate companies to reclaim mined land.

1975: General Development Corp. obtains permits to build Peace River Water
Treatment Plant.

* 1980: Populations of counties in Peace River Basin: Polk, 321,652; Hardee, 19,379;
DeSoto, 19,039; Charlotte, 58,460.

1980: Peace River Water Treatment Plant begins pumping from river to supply
water to Port Charlotte and North Port.

1982: Peace River Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority created by
, Charlotte, DeSoto, Manatee, Sarasota and Hardee counties. (Hardee later withdrew.)

1940s to 1999: 343 miles of streams lost.

1979 to 1999: 31,000 acres of wetlands lost.

S2000: Sections of the upper Peace River stop flowing during winter dry season for
the first time. River stops flowing again in 2001, 2002, 2006 and 2007.

S2000: Populations of counties in Peace River Basin: Polk, 483,924;
Hardee, 26,938; DeSoto, 32,209; Charlotte, 141,627.

2000-2001: Peace River Water Treatment Plant unable to pump
water from river for 469 of 770 days due to drought.

,' 2001: Charlotte County challenges DEP permit for one of five
proposed phosphate mines in Hardee and DeSoto counties.

2002: Swiftmud creates FARMS program to encourage
agricultural operations to adopt water management methods
that limit the amount of water pumped from deep wells.

2003: Legislature authorizes Department of Environmental
Protection to conduct cumulative impact study of the Peace River
watershed.

2006: Charlotte County settles challenge to Mosaic Inc. Altman Tract
phosphate mine.

2007: Peace River Cumulative Impact Study released. Study spreads
blame for negative impacts on the watershed over three primary culprits:
agriculture, phosphate mining and urbanization.
BRIAN GLEASON


Sources: Florida Institute of Phosphate Research,
U.S. Census Bureau, Peace River Cumulative Impact Study

SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com


May 2007







Page 3


Peace


River study


AGRICULTURE


details damage


By GREG MARTIN
STAFF WRITER
The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection's 400-page study of the cumulative
impacts to the Peace River details how
mankind drained wetlands, replaced streams
with ditches and bulldozed forests.
Those resources were sacrificed to convert a
natural landscape into farms, phosphate
mines and cities over the last 60 years.
Now, it will be up to the region's stakehold-
ers to decide how far the government should
go to protect what's left, officials involved with
the study say.
It won't be an easy task. With land prices
rising, the pressure is building to develop the
last of the Peace River's wild lands
"I don't know what the answer would be,
but I damn sure think they ought to do
something," said Lamar Cumbee, a Hardee
County cattle rancher.
Cumbee said he's alarmed at the rate urban
development seems to moving from coastal
areas east into the Peace River watershed.
Now more than ever, Cumbee said, he's
seeing big DeSoto and Hardee county cattle
ranches getting sold for future developments.
"It's the almighty dollar," he said.
The DEP's study, published in February, was
mandated by the Florida Legislature in 2003.
The mandate came in response to lobbying
from Charlotte County for a cumulative
impact study of phosphate mining in the
Peace River watershed.
However, the study was designed to exam-
ine the effects on the river not just from
phosphate mining, but all the land uses,
including agriculture and urban development.
The Legislature also mandated that the
DEP draft a resource management plan
based on the study.
The study uses aerial photographs and land-
use maps to take snapshots of how develop-
meet altered the hydrology of the river in
dhrif periods: 1940s, pre-1979 and pre-1999.
The study shows how phosphate mining,
which was concentrated in Polk and northern
Hardee counties and is now moving south,
had excavated several major streams, mined
out wetlands and drained down the Floridan
aquifer by the 1970s.
The drawdown on the aquifer caused
Kissengen Spring near Bartow, a major
source of water for the river, to go dry amid
a mining boom in the 1950s.
Since the 1970s, the mining industry has
reduced its withdrawals of well water and
improved reclamation practices to restore and
preserve more wetlands than in the past.
The study also shows how most of the
watershed's natural forests and
wetlands were cleared,
ditched and drained for
cow pastures, veg-
ln- etable farms and


THE PEACE RIVER CUMULATIVE IMPACT STUDY


What:
Under a 2003 mandate from the Florida
Legislature, the state Department of
Environmental Protection studied of the
combined effects of phosphate mining,
agriculture and urban development on the
Peace River. The 400-page study was
published in January..
How:
To conduct the study, the DEP hired the
Post Buckley engineering firm. Post
Buckley analyzed aerial photographs from
the 1940s to the 1990s to determine how
the landscape changed over the years.
Scientists also reviewed data on water
quality and quantity in nine different sub-
basins of the river to determine how the
different land uses were stressing the
watershed.
The scientists also reviewed a study that
showed most of the decline in the river's
flow is due to a climate cycle.
Conclusions:
Phosphate mining excavated streams
and wetlands in the past and drained down
an aquifer that once fed millions of gallons
of water per day to the northern end of the
river. Now, the upper river's flow drains
down sinkholes.
Urban development replaced wetlands


citrus groves. Much of the clearing came in
the 1950s, when cattle prices made ranching a
lucrative business, the study states.
In some areas, agriculture has intensified
with the development of citrus groves and
vegetable farms. Those operations also
pumped so much low-quality well p~r fpj
irrigation, seepage caused a decline in the
water quality of Payne, Joshua, Prairie and
Shell creeks.
The level of minerals in those creeks is
approaching the point that more than a
dozen fish species may no longer be suited to
,survive in them, according to the study.
The study also shows how urban develop-
ments, which are predominantly located in
Bartow at the north end of the river and Punta
Gorda at the south, replaced streams with
canals, drained wetlands and removed
marshes and mangroves.
Stormwater running off the impervious
surfaces in such urban areas loads the river
and Charlotte Harbor estuary with sediment,
fertilizer, pesticides, petroleum wastes and
metals, according to die study.
The flow of the Peace River has declined
some 35 percent since the 1930s. However,
mankind's impacts account for only 15 percent
of the decline, according to the study.
A cyclical climate change to a
period of less rain between
the 1960s and the 1990s
accounts for 85
percent of the
decline, accord-
ingto the
study.


and forests with impervious surfaces.
Now, stormwater runoff contributes to
pollution loads.
Intensive agriculture now pumps so
much low-quality well water for irrigation
that seepage increases the flow of some
streams during dry winter months. The
hard mineral water, however, has degrad-
ed the quality of the streams.
Most of the river's remaining streams
and wetlands are located in the middle and
southern segments of the river areas
now threatened by intensive agriculture,
phosphate mining and urban development.

The Players
The Department of Environmental
Protection is a state agency charged with
protecting, conserving and managing
natural resources and enforcing environ-
mental laws.
The Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District is one of five regional
agencies that manage the state's water-
related resources. Its duties include
issuing water use permits, establishing
yard-watering restrictions and funding
conservation projects, overseeing basin
boards and water suppliers, including the
Peace River/Manasota Regional Water
Supply Authority.


Scientists from the Southwest Florida Water
Management District theorize that the climate
change is caused by a 1-degree change in the
water temperature of the North Atlantic
Ocean. As the ocean temperature rises,
Southwest Florida should experience more
summertimee storms, according to the theory.
Since die mid- 1990s, the cycle has been
shifting into its wetter phase.
But that hasn't stopped the upper Peace
River from going dry for spells in 2000, 2001,
2002 and 2006.
In total, the study shows that, between the
1940s and 1990s, mankind reduced the
amount of naturally forested uplands from
60 percent of the Peace River watershed to
just 17 percent.
Mankind, during that period, also
reduced wetlands from 25 percent of the
watershed to 16 percent.
And some 343 miles of streams were lost.
Some were replaced by ditches and canals.
But, in some areas, water that once drained
into the Peace is now impounded in lakes
or ponds.
Most of the natural areas that remain are
located in the middle and lower Peace River
segments. They are areas that are under threat
of development, the study states.
"The county that has the most to lose is
DeSoto County, with ithe development that's
coming," said Don Ross. a wetlands mitiga-
tion consultant who worked on the study.
He alluded to the fact that DeSoto, now a
rural area, is targeted for both large-scale


SUN PHOTO BY SARAH COWARD
A cabbage plant spreads its leaves in the warm fall
sun at Williams Farm in Charlotte County.


PHOSPHATE MINING


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT
Algae-rich water still seeps from the American
Cyanid phosphate plant, 30 years after it closed.


DEVELOPMENT
," _J -- ..g


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
Scenic stretches of the Peace River, such as this section near Bartow,
belie the devastating impact human activity has had on the river.


May 2007







May 2007


Page 4


Conservation goal: Cleaner creeks


THE SPREAD OF AGRICULTURE

Until the 1940s, 85 percent of the
2,350-square-mile Peace River water-
shed was covered with natural forests
and wetlands, and agriculture occupied
just 11 percent.
Today, agriculture occupies 43 percent
of the watershed; phosphate mining, 10
percent; and urban development, 10
percent.
Intensive agriculture, which includes
citrus groves and vegetable farms,
occupies 16 percent and improved
pastures occupies 27 percent.

Source: Peace River
Cumulative Impact Study


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
Compared to the dry months of 1999 to
2001, the water in Shell Creek this year is a
little clearer.
That's good news to Tom Jackson, Punta
Gorda's interim utilities director.
Better quality water is now flowing into the
city's Shell Creek reservoir and into the city's
water treatment plan. What's left over goes
over the dam and into the Peace River and
Charlotte Harbor.
In 2000, drought conditions led citrus
growers and other farmers to pump out well
water that flowed through groves and into the
city's reservoir on Shell Creek. The water,
drawn from agricultural wells 1,500 feet or
deeper, was loaded with high levels of chlo-
rides, dissolved solids and other minerals.
Despite the recent weeks of dry weather,
the chloride levels in the city's Shell Creek
reservoir measured 160 parts per million, a
drop from the 260 parts per million in 2000.
The city's water treatment remains within the
state regulatory parameters for chlorides and
other secondary water treatment standards.
That couldn't be said in 2000.
Jackson credited the lower chlorides to the
projects emerging out of the Shell Creek and
Prairie Creek Watersheds Management Plan.
"It was unique," Jackson said of the plan. It
not only brought together city utility officials
and state regulatory agencies, but it also'
involved Charlotte and DeSoto counties'
agricultural groups, growers and ranchers.
They banded together to help improve
the quality of water flowing into Shell and
Prairie creeks to the city's reservoir behind
the 5-foot Hendrickson Dam on Shell
Creek. The water quality had denigrated to
the point that Punta Gorda found itself
pressing against the secondary water
quality regulations of the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection and
other regulatory agencies.
According to the Peace River Plan, DEP
officials are also looking at the Shell Creek
plan as having bigger implications to the
Peace River, since the watersheds of Shell and
Prairie creeks are significant to the river.
"The drought has revealed the extent to
which the long-term use of mineralized
groundwater has increased salts in the area's
fresh surface waters and associated surficial
aquifer," DEP officials stated in the Peace
River Basin Plan.
The water district now offers as much as
$5,000 per well for back-plugging. Growers
can get up to $15,000. By 2006, the program
led to the plugging or repair of 4,024 wells.


* STUDY
From page 3
urban developments and phosphate mining.
The DEP calls for a Peace River land acqui-
sition plan to be established, and suggests
that a portion of a tax on phosphate ore
extraction be used to finance it.
The study shows that state and local
governments have done little to acquire
conservation lands along the Peace River.
In Charlotte County, for example, 24
percent of the county has been preserved for
conservation purposes. But, in DeSoto and
Hardee counties, only one-tenth of 1 percent
has been placed into conservation.
Rising land prices, however, are certain
to make land acquisition an expensive
proposition. The prices have also caused a
spike in property taxes and that has put
pressure on the owners of undeveloped land
to develop or sell, according to Becky Bragg,
owner of the Canoe Outpost in Arcadia.
Bragg, whose family has operated the canoe
rental business on the Peace River since 1969,
said she owns two forested areas along the
banks of the river totaling more than 300 acres
in northern DeSoto and Hardee counties.
Bragg said developers and their brokers
are constantly contacting her, asking to buy
the properties.
But she said she wants to preserve them in


SUN PHOTO BY SARAH COWARD, scoward@sun-herald.com
Orange blossoms bloom on a tree in Brian Burns' grove in DeSoto County. Many groves, including Burns'.
242-acre operation, pump water from the aquifer to irrigate their trees. Overpumping has lowered the level
of the aquifer, resulting in water that is high in salt and other minerals.


But back-plugging wells wasn't a silver bullet.
The water district also created the Facilitat-
ing Agricultural Resource Management
Systems program, referred to as FARMS. The
program was designed to offer citrus and
other growers grants up to 75 percent of
the costs to deepen or build new reservoirs
and end their dependence on well water.
"We tried to sample as many agricultural
wells as possible and try to get an idea of
where the worst problem places were," said
Eric DeHaven, the Southwest Florida Water
District Resource Conservation director who
heads up FARMS projects.
"East Charlotte County is one of the worst


their natural state as wilderness picnic areas
for her canoe customers.
The taxes on one of the properties rose from
$3,000 to $14,000 in one year, and the other
property's taxes are expected to climb soon.
"I'm told I have to clear my native property
and put cows on it (to get a tax exemption),"
she said. "So how does that help the river?"
The DEP in the plan, calls for local govern-
ments to provide incentives for developers
and property owners to preserve buffers along
streams and wetlands. Such an incentive is
needed now, according to Bragg.
Today, the DEP requires phosphate compa-
nies to reclaim their excavated sites to a useful
condition. Excavated streams and wetlands
must be replaced.
But, a number of phosphate mines were
excavated before such reclamation became
mandatory in 1975. At some, abandoned
pits now impound water that used to drain
into the river.
The plan suggests the state re-establish a
program that taxed phosphate companies
to finance the reclamation of such old
mining sites.
The funding for the so called Non-Manda-
tory Phosphate Lands Trust Fund had been
phased out a few years ago, after the fund was
depleted to clean up the abandoned Piney
Point phosphate chemical plant.
"If we lost 343 miles of streams, some of
them substantial tributaries, then we ought to


problem areas for (ground) water quality that
we have," DeHaven said.
In Charlotte County alone, the water district
funded seven FARMS projects, which are
completed, and three more that are under
construction. Those 10 projects alone are
anticipated to offsetthe use of 2.1 million
gallons of well water.
Besides expanding existing farm ponds and
reservoirs, the FARMS program also offers
grants to help growers pay for installation of
computerized systems that allow farmers to
analyze water moisture in soils and allow
precise irrigation of their crops.
"It's really working because you're not using


look at all the sources," said Rick Cantrell, a
deputy director for the DEP who oversaw the
plan. "But the time to start looking at that is
now and that's what this plan is about."
Cantrell said the key to saving the Peace
River lies in local stakeholders and govern-
ments forming a coalition of support for
major initiatives and acquisition programs.
"We're going to seek to develop as many
coalitions as we can," Cantrell said. "We're
hoping local governments will come to the
plate also and see the importance of protect-
ing their environment."
Ross, as a consultant for the DEP study,
wrote a chapter on past regulations and
drafted recommendations for future actions
to protect the river.
He said the DEP's management plan fell
short of calling for the specific actions he
recommended in the study. But Ross said he
understands the DEP's dilemma.
'An agency, like DEP can't say, 'This ought
to be done,'" said Ross. "They'd be prescribing
to the Florida Legislature and the public how
to spend money."
The study was comprehensive, but the plan
falls short in detailing specific actions to
protect the river, said Tony Janicki, an ecolo-
gist who consults for Charlotte County.
"A workable plan has to have defined
actions," he said. "In the absence of these
things, it will be one of those things that will
sit on a shelf."


revealed the extent to
which the long-term use
of mineralized ground-
water has increased
salts in the area's fresh
surface waters and asso-
ciated surficial aquifer."

Source: Peace River Basin Plan


the poor water quality, gradually diluting the
poor water quality that's accumulated in the
shallow aquifer and in the soils," DeHaven
said. "You're using the rain water, and what
water goes off site is that water."
The benefit of improved water quality
along Shell and Prairie creeks to the growers
equates to greater production of their citrus
and other crops. And what water runs off into
the creeks and into the Peace River, DeHaven
said, will also be better quality.


Drafting such a plan will depend on stake-
holders, local governments, the water district
and the DEP to reach a consensus, Janicki
added.
Whether such a consensus gets formed
remains to be seen, for not everyone weighs
conservation by the same values.
The impacts described in the study haven't
resulted in much of a decline in the quality of
life in the region, said Robert "Bucky"
McQueen, a developer and life-long Punta
Gorda resident.
"I think there's more recreation taking place
on the Peace River and Charlotte Harbor than
ever," he pointed out. "I think a trip up the
Peace River is just as picturesque as it was 50
years ago.
"There was no sport fishing here 50 years
ago," he added. "The sailboaters, the kayakers,
the bird watchers, the sport fishermen all
of that has come in with the residential
development."
In the early 1970s, McQueen was a member
of the Charlotte County Conservation Com-
mittee, which worked to facilitate the state's
acquisition of an 18,000-acre buffer preserve
around Charlotte Harbor.
McQueen, however, questions how far
government should go in limiting develop-
ment in sensitive areas.
"It boils down to the question, do you have
the right to choose where you live and can
(you) own a piece of property?" he asked.







May 2007


Small citrus growers feeling the squeeze


By RICHARD HITT
STAFF WRITER
Brian Burns knows hard work seeing as
how he's a one-man show overseeing his
citrus grove and caretaking service in
DeSoto County.
"Some days run longer than others," said
Burns, who describes himself as a very small
grower who operates 242 acres of citrus.
Burns took over the business in 1980 from
his grandfather, Harry Fenton, who had
been carrying on since taking over from the
founder, E.L. Walrath, who started the
business in 1908.
Burns will tell you a lot has changed in the
citrus business since Walrath and Fenton
worked at it.
"Back then you just ditched the groves,
fertilized and then harvested there were
only 40 to 50 trees per acre.
"Today groves average about 150 to 200
trees per acre," Burns said.
Irrigation did not really become popular
until the 1950s and '60s. "Microjets and
overhead sprinklers came into use in the
1970s," he said. "Today we have more
efficient watering systems."
The longtime citrus grower explained that
the big growers any company operating
more than 1,000 acres have automatic
timers that turn on the irrigation for three
hours and some are computer-controlled
and can automatically test the soil, auto-
matically watering when the soil is dry.
Other equipment is able to automatically
check the pressure in the irrigation lines and
will shut down the watering if a break in the
line is detected.
The 52-year-old Burns has not had to
change the way he operates due to new
regulations or concerns over water. He does
not rely on the Peace River for watering, but
instead uses deep wells. .
According to the Peace River Basin Study,
in some areas agriculture intensified with
the development of citrus groves and
vegetable farms.
So much water was pumped from deep
wells that the cumulative effect caused
seepage creating a decline in the water
quality of Payne, Joshua, Prairie and Shell
creeks. The level of minerals in those creeks
is approaching the point that more than a
dozen fisklspepies ayv npo nonrger besuited
to survive min them, according to the study.
Owning a mile-and-a-half of land on the
Peace River, Burns has seen some changes,
but not many.
"The average flow of the river is lower than
it used to be. I'm not sure why," he said.


Burns does not think agriculture has had a
major impact on the river. He points to
urbanization and development as having a
negative impact.
"I don't feel what we do on our mile-and-
a-half on the river has had a negative
impact," he said.
What does bother Burns very much is the
amount of trash thrown into the river and
along its banks. "It's a shame we have to
clean up the river. I support the annual
Peace River Cleanup and always have."
As a member of the Peace River Growers
Association, Burns thinks the group "is in
the best shape ever." He applauds the work
of executive director Barbara Carlton.
"Barbara is the best thing that has happened
to the Peace River Growers Association. She
has done a great job."
He predicts the association has a bright
future.
As far as his company is concerned, Burns
said he intends to continue until he retires,
"unless someone comes along that wants to
pay me $30,000 an acre."
He also might hire someone, later, to run
the business and stay involved in citrus. His
daughter, Heather Nedley, is also in agricul-
ture. She is the executive director of the Polk
County Farm Bureau.
Burns sees the number of acres of citrus
groves across the state shrinking as more
and more growers sell to developers and
smaller farmers sell to bigger citrus
concerns.
"I think the industry is going to become a
big grower business."
A major problem that stands in the way
of continued success for growers, Burns
said, is a deadly one for the trees that is.
The citrus greening disease kills trees, and
unless something'happens with research
to combat it, it will continue to be a big
problem.
He added that Hurricane Charley took out
a lot of trees along the-river including 5,00.0
of his citrus trees, which he was able to
replace.
Tomorrow, as the smell of orange
blossoms fills the air, Brian Burns will be
at his 242-acre citrus grove doing what he
loves to do and what he has been working
at for close to 30 years. Disease, develop-
ment, labor none of those issues ruffle
Burns' feathers much. After all, he is his
only employee.
He'll keep minding his groves every day -
until he is no longer able to. Or, until
someone shows up with a very large check.
That could get his attention.


SUN PHOTOS BY SARAH COWARD, scoward@sun-herald.com
Brian Burns inspects oranges in his DeSoto rountyacitrus grove.I he grove, has b6een'rod6icih citrus fruit
since 1908.


TAINTED BY IRRIGATION WATER


The DEP study of the Peace River found that intensive
pumping from wells for irrigation at citrus groves and vegetable
farms has caused a decline in water quality in several Peace
River tributaries.
The tributaries with the problem include Payne, Joshua,
Prairie and Shell creeks.
The well water is highly mineralized with dissolved salts that
include chloride, nitrate, sulfate, sodium, magnesium, calcium
and iron.
Although no study of the fish in Shell Creek has been con-
ducted, scientists speculate that as many as 15 freshwater
species can no longer survive in the creek because the levels
of minerals exceed their tolerances.
The Southwest Florida Water Management District's plan to
address this problem calls for "back plugging" of wells so the
water will be drawn from higher-quality zones of the aquifer.
The mineralization is measured by testing the conductivity of
the water.
A state law sets a standard for the conductivity of water that
discharges into streams at 1,275, or 50 percent higher than
background conductivity, whichever is higher. However, fresh-
water fisheries are most productive at levels of 150 to 500.
The DEP study calls for the state standard to be revised.


Source: Peace River Cumulative Impact Study


LA,

ILI, b A l~uig,
MIL


Guadalupe Bernache picks strawberries at Williams Farms in eastern Charlotte County. The farm partici-
pates in the Southwest Florida Water Management District's FARMS program. The acronym stands for
Facilitating Agricultural Resource Management Systems. In layman's terms, participants reduce deep-well
pumping by capturing water used to irrigate crops, filtering it and reusing it.


ne, 1 0


Page 5


, .J ,









May 2007


Phosphate mines brought jobs, impacts



WHAT'S PHOSPIHTE USED IN?


Most of the phosph : ic acid produced,
about 90 percent, is tL d to make
agricultural products I 1e fertilizer.
Another 5 percent i' used to make
animal feed suppleme6I ts.
The remaining 5 pel ;ent is used in a
wide variety of produce t including soap,
toothpaste, baking po under and soft
drinks.
There is phosphate 1 camera film
and inside light bulbs., lit helps make
steel harder and water softer. It plays a
part in dyeing cloth an;i in washing
clothes, and helps to : lish aluminum.
Phosphate is used in the cement a
.dentist uses on teeth id in the fluids
used to drill for oil antd gas. Phosphate
is also used in making plastics, shaving
cream and bone china dishes.

Sour!: Florida Institute
of Pl isphate Research



By GREG !MARTIN
STAFF FWIt TEr
BARTOW-As a chilc .rowing up in the
upper Peace River valle' Carter Lord had
both the sprawling moct scape of phosphate
strip mines and the prisimt ne swamps and
woods of the natural lan'ilscape for his
playground.
Now 60, Lord has com to believe the
prosperity that phospha 4 mining brought
to his area wasn't worth n-e cost the
drastic alteration to the naturall landscape.
"This just used to be woods and swamp
- and now look at it," s d Lord, as he
watched draglines excav te a strip mine in
the headwaters of Horse Creek off Duette
Road in northeastern Hi: ;dee County.
"Three years ago, we v .re hog hunting in
there," said Lord. "It wail ust absolutely rich
with deer, hogs and turk .
"'This was a healthy, d op woods swamp
full of life. And they just attended it. I think
the time has come that i e phosphate
industry has to spend rr nre money taking
care of the environment ,'' headed. .
A study of thle cudiuiti Ne'itffip tts to the
Peace River published b the Flodirida
Department of Envirom 'ental Protection
last February confirms tt t phosphate
mining has had numerot s significant
impacts on the Peace Ri r.
Historically, the minin i',has been concen-
trated in the upper half i Peace River, in
Polk and Hardee countih ', according to the
study. And the industry, i that area,
"appears to have had an historical, major
influence on hydrology, ,ater quality and
native wetlands and upl id habitats," states
the study. 1
"My father built these I|ihosphate plants,"
said Lord, who moved mt' 3artow with his
family in 1949 at age 3.
His father, William Loi,:, a partner in the
Wellman-Lord Engineer' g firm, worked
building houses at the tihie. Then the firm
acquired an internauion.i.l patent for a
method to separate pho, )hate ore from
sand and clay.
The method proved rdolutionary, and his
father's success meant pi 'sperity for his
family, Lord recalled. ,.
The industry also broti, ht jobs to an area
that, in the 1940s, was ertnomically
depressed.
"There was plenty of l~1ind and no way to
make a living," Lord saic', "(The phos-
phate miners) found sot thing that
had value, and there wa, 'i lot of
it here.


SUN PHOTOS BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
Carter Lord, a lifelong Central Florida resident, recalls hog hunting in this area before it was mined. The area
is located off Duette Road in Hardee County in the headwaters of Horse Creek. At right, phosphate pebbles.


"They were good people and they were
trying to dop something good," he added.
Since then, the industry has mined out
-some 300,000 acres, leaving behind 100,000
acres in clay settling areas and much of the
remainder in landscapes that no longer
resemble a natural landscape.
In the past, much of the topsoil removed
from the mine sites was lost and the sites
were backfilled with sand, clay or a mix of
both.
Although fish and birds can be found in
abundance around the lakes on rig e sites,
such'-game asdeer,;hogs an'dturkeys'arerio
longer abundant, according to Lord.
Instead of lush forests, mine sites also
become revegetated with cogon grass, an
invasive species, and other "industrial
weeds," according to DEP officials.
"That, to me, means it's barren," said Lord.
"I dislike the fact that it's unhealthy, the fact
that its vitality has been sucked out of it."
The mining eliminated as much as half of
the streams and wetlands in the Bartow and
Payne Creek areas, according to the study.
But as wetlands excavations came under
stricter mitigation requirements in the
1990s, the phosphate industry improved its
reclamation, said Mike Deneve, reclamation
and permitting superindentent for Mosaic
Fertilizers.
"Originally, you just put back the basin
and let the stream find its own course," he
said.
"Now, you have to put back the linear feet
of each stream," Dee Allen, another Mosaic
reclamation superintendent.
The industry's past wetland mitigation
projects have failed to meet current state
standards, but the industry has
been improving
its


mitigation "continuously," Deneve said.
"As we build and mitigate, we learn," he


said.
The industry also lowered the level of the
Floridan aquifer by some 60 feet by the
1950s. The water was pumped out for the
mining process and after it was used once, it
was discharged back into the river.
The excessive pumping caused a major
spring, Kissengen Spring, to cease flowing in
the 1950s.
Since the late 1970s, the mining industry
had been working to reduce, its, pumping,;
"froin the aqtiffer, Theindustry began'to 'T
capture rain water within its mine sites and
recirculate it.
At its peak in the 1980s, the phosphate
mines in Polk County consumed 207 million
gallons of well water per day. That's been
reduced to some 80 mgd today.
As a result of the reduction in mine-site
discharge, scientists noticed that water
quality in the river had improved. Phospho-
rus levels remain "extremely high" due to
both natural and mining sources, according
to the study.
But levels of fluoride, radioactive stron-
tium and total dissolved solids, a measure of
the mineral content of water, declined, *
although they remain high in Payne Creek,
an area intensively mined, according to the
study.
Despite the improvement, scientists
believe that well water pumping for
.phosphate mining and agriculture are
causing "large increases of alkalinity, total
dissolved solids, sodium and sulfate" in
Payne Creek, which flows through an area
where 70 percent of the landscape has
been mined.
The study also points out that mining has
left behind 100,000 acres of clay settling
areas. The areas, which take up some 30
percent of each mine site, consist of a pit
surrounded by a berm. The areas are used
as disposal sites for waste clay slimes.
The clay, which solidifies over a
period of many years,


alters natural hydrology in several ways,
according to the study. Rains run off faster
and seep into the ground at a vastly dimin-
ished rate through a clay settling area,
according to the study.
SMjning altes ,the.way water.seeps i n to
the ground or drains across it, and "these
changes often persist in spite of reclania-
tion compliance with current standards,"
states the study.
Spills of both clay settling areas and
phosphoric acid plants have also have had
significant impacts on the river, according to
the study.
The study cites five spills since the 1960s,
including ones in 1997 and 2005 that spilled
some 50 million gallons of acidic "process
water" into the Alafia River and Archie Creek.
The study also points out that a researcher
in a 3001 study found that wildlife does not
return to reclaimed mine sites in the same
abundance as natural areas. The researcher
found; for example, that gopher tortoises
couldn't burrow into the rock-hard soil of a
reclaimed mine site because of its extra-high
clay content.
That study was flawed, however, because
it tested for wildlife on a lot of early phos-
phate mines reclaimed years ago under
different standards, said Allen.
"It's not representative of what we do
today," she said.
Now, the mining companies must cover
their sites with a thicker layer of topsoil,
according to Mosaic.
"We've saved over 10,000 gopher tortois-
es," said Dave Townsend, a spokesman for
Mosaic.
"I mean, we're almost like a wildlife


h water is left behind by a dragline on a phosphate mine in northern Hard-
equire the mining companies to recontour the pits into a more useful form.


Page 6





h j ~


A


Page 7


Phosphate has a long history in Florida


By S.L. FRISBIE IV
STAFF WRITER
The accidental discovery of phosphate in
and near the Peace River in the late 1800s
foreshadowed the development of what
would become the largest and most contro-
versial industry in Polk County for most of
the 20th century.
Phosphate is a major ingredient in fertilizer,
with peripheral uses ranging from animal
feed to laundry detergents.
Phosphate mining is a classic example of
heavy industry, bringing with it mammoth
payrolls and equally impressive disturbance
of the natural terrain.
The discovery of phosphate and the early
years of the industry is recounted in "Peace
River Pioneers," a history of the four counties
that abut the Peace River, written in 1974 by
Louise K. Frisbie.

A chance discovery
Capt. J. Francis LeBaron of the Corps of
Engineers is credited with making the first
discovery of phosphate in pebble form near
Arcadia in 1881, as he directed a survey party
for a possible cross-state shipping route
from Jacksonville to Punta Gorda. Four years
later, two hunters from Orlando John C.
Jones and Capt. W.R. McKee found
phosphate in the riverbed of the Peace River
near Fort Meade.
In 1888, George S. Scott of Atlanta, drifting
down the Peace River, tied his boat to what he
believed to be a projecting root south of
Arcadia. He discovered his mooring to be the
tusk of a prehistoric animal. Such fossil
findings often indicated the presence nearby
of phosphate ore.
Jones and McKee created a syndicate and
bought some 21 and a half miles of shore-
line on the Peace River, saying that they
planned to extract tannic acid from palmet-
to roots. Land in the area typically sold for
$1.50 per acre.
In the 1890s, 10 small phosphate mining
companies dredged phosphate from the
riverbed from south of Arcadia almost to
Bartow. Miners with picks and crowbars pried
lumps of phosphate rock from the soil and
loaded it by hand onto barges, which were
floated downstream to ships.
nThE rice of land skvrocketed'to:$200 per

nfthe 19th century, little thought wa8'
given to the impact on the environment o0
open strip mining in a riverbed.
In 1908, mining in the river came to an
end as higher grade ore was found beneath
the area's pine forests.
For the industry's first three decades, most
of the phosphate was shipped to Europe to re-
energize that continent's worn-out farming
lands. America's farmlands didn't become the
primary market for phosphate until 1911. By
that year, there were 30 phosphate mining
companies in Florida 14 in Central and
South Florida, 16 in the vicinity of Ocala and
Dunnellon.
Steam shovels began replacing manual
labor in 1905, and the industry's first diesel-
powered dragline made its appearance in
1920.
For most of the 20th century, the phosphate
industry paid some of the highest wages in
Polk County, and phosphate companies were
among favorite customers for products as
diverse as motor vehicles, office supplies, and
commercial printing.

An economic bonanza
Phosphate companies, during the heyday of
the industry, didn't quibble over price. The
industry was a major customer of both the
railroads and the trucking industry.
The economic health of the county tracked
the highs and lows of the phosphate industry
When phosphate workers went on strike, their
unemployment was quickly felt by retailers
who saw a marked reduction in their sales.


And when the industry went into its periodic
slumps, vendors who prospered when the
industry prospered shared its pain.
Some of the strikes were marked by vio-
lence and occasional fatalities, particularly in
the first half of the 20th century.
Long after the Peace River was abandoned
as a phosphate field, water played a major
role in the mining process.
Florida's high water table resulted in the
cutting into underground streams as
draglines scooped away the overburden, then
dug into the rich lode of phosphate rock.
Water under pressure is used to break up the
ore and create a slurry that is then pumped by
pipeline to beneficiation plants to begin
processing the ore into fertilizer products.
Water is used to separate the phosphate
rock from the sand and clay that is dug up
with the ore and to create the soluble form
of l~hosphate that is used to create the
fertilizer products.
The mining and manufacturing process
makes heavy use of water, and reuse of water
has been a continuing focus.

95 percent reuse
According to the Florida Institute of Phos-
phate Research, 95 percent of the water used
in the processing of ore is recycled or reused
water, and 90 percent of the water used in
manufacturing is recycled. Before the indus-
try concluded that recycled water could be
used in the chemical manufacturing process,
about 40 percent of the water used for that
purpose was pumped from the aquifer.
It is generally believed that mining probably
cut off the flow of pristine water to Kissengen
Springs, a popular recreation spot south of
Bartow until it dried up around the middle of
the 20th century. What the industry now
acknowledges to have been over-pumping of
ground water in the 1950s apparently diverted
the water that once flowed into the springs.
Even more dramatic, though less perma-
neht, environmental damage was caused by
periodic failure of dams which held huge
quantities of clay-laden water, properly, if
unglamorously, defined as slimes. These
bodies of water were called slime pits.
In an injunction hearing prompted by one
of the dam breaches many years ago, a circuit
judgeitold lawyers for a phosphate company
that their cAuse was-made difficult to defend
by the use of two words: "slime" and "pits."
The dam breaks released huge volumes of
slime-laden water into tributaries to the
Peace River, often causing massive fish kills,
which in turn brought heavy fines from
regulatory agencies.
The fish kills, though devastating both to
fish populations and to the industry's image,
were of short-lived duration.
Not so the scarring of the earth's surface.
For much of its tenure in Polk County, the
industry did little to reclaim or recontour its
mined-over land, creating what critics deri-
sively and not altogether inaccurately -
called moonscapes.
On the other hand, the abandoned land
was widely used by Boy Scouts, campers,
fishermen and hunters, and was a favorite
place for families to go harvest their own
Christmas trees.
I A growing sensitivity to environmental
concerns nudged the industry to partial
reclamation. Critics complained again with
some justification that most reclamation
occurred within sight of well-traveled high-
ways, with moonscapess" remaining out of I
sight and out of mind.
Those companies that allowed local man-
agement the greatest latitude generally were
the most conscientious about reclaiming their
mined lands. Some of the most environmen-
tally-conscious phosphate company man-
agers urged their colleagues to adopt a
voluntary standard of reclaiming two acres of
land for every acre they mined.
This voluntary initiative was replaced in
1975 by a Florida law mandating reclamation.


INSTITUTE FOR PHOSPHATE RESEARCH
In the years between the discovery of phosphate in the Peace River in 1881 and the introduction of steam
shovel methods in 1905, mine workers used picks and shovels to carve phosphate rock from the ground.


SUN FILE PHOTO
A dragline digs for phophate in Polk County. Phosphate companies have mined 300,000 acres in the
Peace River watershed, with plans to mine another 100,000 acres.


,Increasing pressure from the Legislature and
"from state and federal environmental agen-
cies forced the industry to be better stewards
of the environment.
Today; a phosphate company must get
regulatory agency approval of a plan to
reclaim the land before mining may begin.
Reclamation plans must address how the
mining process will disturb the natural water
flow and the impact on wildlife habitats.

Phosphogypsum disposal
Another major issue facing the industry is
the disposal ofphosphogypsum..
Huge tonnages of phosphogypsum are
created as a byproduct of fertilizer manufac-
turing, and are piled in what are commonly
called gyp stacks. In one instance, the weight
of a massive gyp stack was believed to be a
factor in the opening of a huge sinlkhole on a
parcel of mined land in southwest Polk
County. Research by FIPR, the phosphate
research agency funded by severance taxes,
phosphogypsum has been shown to be an
excellent road-building material, but environ-
mental concerns over the release of radon gas
thus far has prevented its use for that purpose.
Radon is found naturally in the soil, but is
released in higher concentrations when land
is mined. As a radioactive substance, it is a
carcinogen, and creates both a public health
concern and a public relations quandary.
Homes and other buildings often are built
on mined land. Ridding a home or other
building of radon gas concentrations is as
simple as opening the doors and windows to
allow fresh air to circulate, FIPR has reported.
Even so, the Polk County school board


refuses,to build schools on reclaimed land.-
,-To, minimize the incursion-rof radon gas
into buildings built'dn rhined land, two
measures are recommended by FIPR -
either making the slab a monolithic pour,
without seams, or elevating the building a
couple of feet above the soil, as once was
common with frame buildings.

Road-building material
Proponents of the use of phosphogypsum
in road-building, including FIPR, argue that
the only way the radon could pose a public
health hazard is if someone were to build a
house in the middle of a road built on a
phosphogypsum base, and remain in the
house 18 hours a day for 70 years.
They have suggested that to prevent this
unlikely occurrence from taking place,
construction of homes be prohibited on
abandoned roadways that have phospho-
gypsum roadbeds.
As phosphate reserves have been nearly
depleted in Polk County, the industry has
been moving south, particularly into
Hardee County.
Smaller phosphate companies have faded
from the scene, and larger ones have merged.
Today, there is only one phosphate compa-
ny Mosaic, created by the merger of two
industry giants, IMC Global Inc. and Cargill
Crop Nutrition still mining in Polk County.
Much of the mined and reclaimed land
today is occupied by sprawling subdivisions
or commercial developments, and thou-
sands of acres are in parks, ranging from
full-developed recreation complexes to
nature preserves.


The Bone Valley phosphate reserve was
discovered in the Peace River watershed
in the 1880s and phosphate strip mining
has been occurring ever since.
To mine for phosphate, bulldozers first
clear off vegetation and topsoil. Large
cranes called "draglines" then excavate
the "overburden" and cast it aside. Finally,
the draglines excavate the ore.
The ore is washed into a pipeline and
pumped to a beneficiation plant where
diesel fuels are used to float impurities off.
Most of. the ore is then transported by
rail to one of 25 phosphate chemical
plants. There, the ore is treated with
sulfuric acid and ammonia to manufacture
diammonium phosphate fertilizer.
Leftover clay is pumped into large clay
settling areas. Leftover sand is used to fill


in the mining pits.
Phosphogypsum, a slightly radioactive
waste, is piled up in stacks at the chemical
plants.
Florida phosphate supplies 75 percent
of the U.S. demand and 25 percent of the
world demand.
Some 300,000 acres in Central Florida
have been mined to date, with 100,000
acres in clay settling areas and about
150,000 acres of active mining.
Mosaic Fertilizers, the larger of two
mining companies in the area, expects to
mine an additional 100,000 acres before
its reserves are exhausted.

Sources: Florida Department of
Environmental Protection,
Mosaic Fertilizer LLC


* MINES
From page 6
sanctuary," Allen added. "You can find
burrowing owls, scrub jays, gopher frogs,
hogs, deer and birds on our sites."
In response to litigation from Charlotte
County, the DEP has revised its reclama-
tion requirements in recent years. The DEP
now requires the phosphate industry to
replace mined-out streams with manmade
versions.
"It's not only possible (to reclaim streams),
it's required," Allen said.
The phosphate industry is also working
to reduce the amount of new clay settling
areas as the last 100,000 acres of phos-
phate reserves are mined in the lower half
of the Peace River in the years to come,
Allen said.
The industry expects to accomplish that
by pumping more clay to existing clay


settling areas to fill them to their maximum
levels, she said.
There will be impacts from the future
mining, but they should be insignificant,
when compared to the impacts of other
industries, Townsend said.
"I mean, we won't be invisible," Allen said.
Townsend pointed out that Florida
phosphate supplies 75 percent of the U.S.
supply of fertilizer and 25 percent of the
world's supply.
Lord, a staunch Republican who works as
a filmmaker, understands how the phos-
phate industry may have been oblivious to
its environmental impacts in the past.
Times were different then, he said.
Now, however, the equation has changed,
he said. Now, it's the last of the Peace River's
natural areas that are at stake.
"Are they going to be able to fix this back?"
he asked. "I'm-skeptical.
"I think we just have to make them try,"
he added.


May 2007


PHOSPHATE FACTS










PEACE RIVER WATERSHED, 1940 WHAT =w

In the 1940s, 60 percent of the Peace River~*
2,350-square-mile watershed was forested witbets
"native uplands" and 25 percent covered with aldtl
lands. Only 15 percent was previously develolON ras
mines, farms and towns. By 1999, only 17 peticeAt of
Sthe watershed remained native uplands and 1" *
percent wetlands. Of the remaining 64 percer1ip414
percent was developed as agriculture, 10 perctit
phosphate mining and 10 percent urban. vnoo

SSince th 1940s 9vBri
.'* 136,000 acres of wetlands have been drained
?-,^ \-V. : and converted to other land uses.

Tampa .
I7. -,.-t --rp j- 2 PEACE IFE


UNDEVELOPED LAND USE


County Line

., Interstate

: Highway


River


Water Body


Lr--


Watershed Boundary
Basin Boundary


Native Upland Habitat


Wetland


5- all

Tampa Z











P




















4L4,












NqQ Pon 1 1


Lake


MAPS PROVIDED BY PEACE RIVER CUMULATIVE IMPACT STUDY













BB ENLOST


*81,000 acres of the lost wetlands disappeared
aftlt the Clean Water Act and Florida's mandatory
phosphate mine reclamation law passed in the
asB190s. Phosphate mining accounted for 13,000 of
to theolost acres.
043 miles of streams have been converted into
ttqhes and canals, or lost.
trieO00,000 acres of native uplands have been
converted to farms, phosphate mines and cities.
600 acres of coastal marshes and mangroves
have been lost.
ben
Source: Peace River Cumulative Impact Study


TElHED, 1970


Lake Reedy


PEACE RWER WATERSHED, 1999














Lakelaind*- ~






17741e ,12







P'oaca at.-Zolfoa Sprifigs -







Pyne Creak 4



IJ.









h6 'wa lit~,



j. Hors:


4;4






~'1




JosShell Cree
ib~
Qosaoe eae. -.A
S, A

~Nrh ot uta LO rPeac


WANT TO KNOW MORE? -

The graphics above are just 21 't 7)' ;5 ri
three of the hundreds of maps,


ucnarts aiU Uiagramsi containeiIdU In1
the Peace River Cumulative
Impact Study. To see more graph-
ics or the complete study and
subsequent management plan, go
to www.sun-herald.com and click
on "Disturbing the Peace" in the
News Features section.


.-
I.-.
C, 55 b.,,

1' I 5'
*1* ~ )
r* ...,&*. ~.


fte








May 2007


Peace River is being



lost piece by piece


PHOTOS PROVIDED.BY THE FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ARCHIVES
Kissengen Spring as it was in 1894, above, and in 1948, below.


Hope springs



for Kissengen


By GREG MARTIN
STAFF.WRITER
One lost piece of the Peace
puzzle was Kissengen Spring,
located a few miles south of
Bartow on the east side of the river.
Until the 1940s, the spring
pumped some 20 million gallons
of clear water into the river each
day. It also served as a popular
recreanonal site.
The spring ceased flowing in the
1950s amid a phosphate mining
boom. The spring went dry
because excessive pumping of well
water for the mining drained down
the Floridan aquifer by some 60
feet, according to the study.
Since then, water in the upper
Peace has drained down sink-
holes and crevices in the karst
limestone beneath the riverbed.
Because of the sinkholes, the
river has ceased flowing in a 10-
mile stretch in five of the last
seven years.
By implementing practices to
capture rain water and recircu-
late it through the mining pro-
cess, the phosphate industry has
cut its pumping in half since the
late 1970s.
However, pumping for agricul-


ture and urban developments
increased to keep the aquifer too
low for Kissengen Spring to flow,
according to the study.
The bowl-shaped basin that
once served as Kissengen Spring's
swimming area is now dry. Howev-
er, in the bottom of the bowl is a
funnel-shaped hole called a "sink."
During a recent visit to the
spfing;,co'olprifig water could
be found in the sink.
"It was a Garden of Eden, flush
with fresh water," said Charles
Cook, a DEP permitting specialist
based in Homeland, as he dipped
his hand into the water.
Cook, a life-long Bartow resi-
dent, has taken a personal interest
in the geology of Kissengen Spring.
Now that man's impacts are
known, society should focus on
recharging the aquifer by restor-
ing wetlands and reducing
pumping, he said.
Water district managers say the
economic cost of reducing
pumping sufficient to make
Kissengen flow again would be
astronomical.
Cook, however, remains hopeful.
"I say we get what we give,"
he said.


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
This measuring stick, placed at Kissengen Spring by the U.S. Geological Survey, is
intended to show water levels. If the levels reached 83 feet, water would once
again spill into the Peace River, but the spring has been dry since the 1950s.


By GREG MARTIN
STAFF WRITER
Nature created the Peace River during a time when
oceans were receding and woolly mammoths roamed
the earth. ,
But it took mankind only five decades to erase
136,000 acres of the rivershed's wetlands, 343 miles of
its streams and at least one prolific artesian spring.
Those resources were ditched, drained, excavated or
filled in by cattle ranches, citrus groves, vegetable farms,
phosphate mines and urban development, a Peace
River Cumulative Impact Study shows.
The study was published February by the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection.
The study compares aerial photographs taken of the
2,350-square-mile Peace River watershed in the 1940s,
1970s and 1990s. The snapshots reveal that drastic
changes have occurred in a relatively short period.
The changes have contributed to declines in the
quality and quantity of the water flowing from the
Peace's headwaters near the Green Swamp, east of
Tampa, to its mouth at Charlotte Harbor.
The decline has been subtle but noticeable, according
to Jim Kelly, 78, a retired fishing guide whose parents
founded the Eagles Nest Lodge in Solana.
"I can remember as a young boy going out on' that
dock and that water quality was so pure and clean, I
could see the line on a snook's side,"
said Kelly. "Now, you'd have a hard
time even seeing the snook."
Early aerial photos of the 105- mile-
long river show it to look much like a
tree. Off the main trunk extended
about a dozen major branches, some
as long as 30 or 40 miles.
Each branch had its own set of
smaller "second order" streams and
capillary-sized "first order" streams.
The landscape was also dotted with
a myriad of forested wetlands,
marshes and ponds. Some were
connected by streams, some isolated.
In later aerial photos, several major
streams appear severely truncated
and countless wetlands are missing.
Headwater impacts
In the 1800s, the uppermost Peace
River was formed by a creek that, .
meandered through a series of lakes.
The lakes, now mostly surrounded .
by residential developments, remain ,
perched on plateaus that step down ,
from Lake Hamilton, located along a
ridge northeast of Bartow.
Man began changing that land-
scape as early as 1910, when the
meandering headwater creek was
replaced by the Peace Creek Drainage
Canal. The goal was to remove water
and open up wetlands to agriculture.
The Peace Creek canal now
drains stormwater from the Winter
Haiven area.
And the Peace River's main channel
now starts at the confluence of
Saddle Creek and the Peace Creek .
Drainage Canal just north of Barrow.
Saddle Creek drains Lake Hancock,
which has become polluted wi th
effluent (treated wastewater dis-
charge), nutrients and algae, accord-
ing to the study.
Aerial photos of Lake Hancock in
the 1960s show a plume of suspend-
ed sediments flowing into the lake
from a phosphate mine.
After the area was mined out, the
lake continued to serve as a receiving
pond for municipal effluent until the
early 1990s. An old cypress trn
The lake is now spoiled with Bartow. Discolora
enough unconsolidatedd deep dry seasons over
organic muck" to cover 12,000 acres the last seven yea
one foot deep, according to the study.
And water quality declines stemming from periodic
discharges from the lake can be detected as far down-
stream as the Peace River Water Plant, according to
water district scientists.
Mining the creeks
In the 1940s, the river was also fed by two major V
streams, Six Mile and Bear, located northwest and
southwest of Bartow, respectively They were bulldozed
for residential development, phosphate mines and
chemical plants by the late 1970s.
On the east side of the Peace south of Bartow, a series
of nine short creeks that were present until the 1940s
are now gone. They appear to have been shaved off the
river's main channel by phosphate mines.
Farther south, and west of Fort Meade, about half of
Little Payne and Payne creeks also disappeared amid
phosphate strip mines.
Some of the mines were excavated before the state
adopted mandatory mine reclamation laws in 1975.
However, most of the mining in the Payne Creek
watershed has been conducted since the 1970s, after
both the state reclamation law and U.S. Congress's
Clean Water Act were adopted.
Throughout the entire Peace River watershed, 22
percent of the original stream channels were erased
or channelized, the study indicates. Many of the
streams were lost in urban centers, such as Bartow
and Punta Gorda.


However, the stream losses in the Bartow and Payne


Creek areas, where phosphate was dominant, are more
than double the losses anywhere else in the basin,
according to the study.
Urban developments also consumed other chunks of
the resource. In the lower Peace River, marshes and
mangroves declined by 600 acres or 22 percent.
In the 1940s, wetlands took up 25 percent of the
Peace River's landscape. That number has declined to
15.6 percent since then.
Now, most of the remaining wetlands are located in
the middle and southern portions of the watershed, the
study indicates.
Phosphate's philosophy
The impacts occurred because, years ago, people
didn't realize the value of conservation, said Dee Allen,
reclamation superintendent for the Mosaic Fertilizers
phosphate mining company.
"I think the philosophy of everyone was different then
than it is today," Allen said. "Before regulation, you
could take out wetlands and now you have to put them
back and, some that are ecologically significant, you
have to preserve."
As awareness increased, the mining industry
improved its ability to reclaim mine sites and restore
wetlands, she said.
However, Tony Janicki, an ecologist who has provided


SUN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JOSH OLIVE AND PAUL SCHMIDT
ee clings to life in the dry bed of a section of the Peace River near
tion marks on the tree's trunk indicate water levels during wet and
the years. Parts of the upper Peace River have gone dry in five of
ars, including earlier this year when this photo was taken.

expert testimony in Charlotte County's litigation against
phosphate mining, pointed out that phosphate mining
wiped out 60 percent of the streams in the Bartow area
and 52 percent in the Payne Creek watershed.
"That's ridiculous," Janicki said. "That's a shame, let's
put it that way."
Janicki pointed out it took litigation from Charlotte
County to get the mining industry to replace excavated
streams with reasonable facsimiles.
"That was the thing I was really hammering (in the
phosphate hearings)," Janicki said. "I mean, these guys
were allowed to just take streams off the landscape. If
any other industry tried to do that, they'd be laughed
out of the room."

Hope springs for Kissengen
Another lost piece of the Peace River system was an
ecological jewel known as Kissengen Spring.
Located three miles south of Bartow on the east side
of the river, Kissengen pumped some 20 million gallons
of sparkling clear water into the river each day.
It also provided a pristine swimming hole for local
residents, recalled Bob Hill of Englewood, who was
born in Bartow in 1938.
He said he and his older brother during their
childhoods swam in the spring and fished with
homemade spear guns in a quarter-mile run from the
spring to the river.
See LOST, page 11


Page 10







May 2007


Critics say plan reinforces status quo


By JOHN HAUGHEY
STAFF WRITER
The regulatory emphasis of any plan can
be interpreted as an actionable expression
of purpose.
To some, the regulatory articulation within
the Peace River Resource Management Plan
speaks loud and clear.
It says this: Status quo.
"There is no 'there,' there," said Honey Rand
of the Environmental PR Group in Tampa, a
Charlotte County consultant.
"They just left us hanging," she continued.
"The status quo is the status quo and
there's the problem: The status quo is what
got us to where we are."
"I didn't see many specific goals, quantifi-
able goals, and acknowledgement of specific
changes in policy that need to be made," said
Linda Young of the Clean Water Network of
Florida. "It's full of general statements, such
as, 'Well, we should not destroy another
140,000 acres in the coming years.'"
"My early impression is, it was really a plan
to do a plan," Charlotte County Commission-
er Adam Cummings said. "And I thought it
was better than having a specific plan
because the (study) was inadequate. So, you
really wouldn't want to have a real manage-
ment plan based on insufficient information.
"But, I was disappointed to learn it isn't," he
continued. "That's the plan. It's so vague and
insubstantial, it would just perpetuate the
status quo."
Relax, says Rick Cantrell, deputy director for
water resources for the state's Department of
Environmental Protection.
"This is the beginning of a process," he said.
"You just don't solve everyone's problems at
once. It has to be a cooperative effort. It can't
be accomplished without a lot of people
working together and it won't happen
overnight."
Cantrell said, essentially, the plan is a work
in progress.
He said it incorporates recently created
programs and regulations that are showing
promise, rather than set forth a new array of
initiatives.
"Let's look at some stuff that is already in
place," he said.
Cantrell said while the study provided a
detailed range of facts and figures, there's still


SUN PHOTOS BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
Cogon grass, a noxious weed, dominates this reclaimed phosphate mine near Bartow.


much to learn.
"In restoring minimal flows" to the upper
Peace River and its tributaries, he said, "there
are engineering studies that have to be done.
One of the proposals is, does it make sense to
wall off sinkholes? Is it a good idea or a bad
idea? We need to find that out."
Cantrell said it doesn't make sense to
impose regulations designed to raise aquifer
levels until the DEP figures out how or if-
it can be done.
"That is highly doubtful, based on how
much water you would have to stop using
to make that happen," he said. "There are
different approaches to restoring the
aquifer, which may and I say, may not
be possible."
Former Charlotte County Commissioner
Don Ross, an environmental consultant who
helped draft parts of the plan, said it's impor-
tant to separate facts from policy.
"I've never seen a study this broad," he
said, noting it employed new technologies
and methodologies to produce "incontro-
vertible" data.
"Only within the last decade or so has it


been economically possible to do this type of
change analysis using photographs," Ross
said. "This allowed us to do, for the first time
in Florida, maybe nationwide, an indepen-
dent check on our regulatory system."
Recommendations in the plan are "analo-
gous to FCAT," he said. "You don't go ask the
teachers, the students, the parents how well
schools are doing, you test the students.
Basically, we did for regulatory agencies what
FCAT did for teachers. It doesn't say whether
you pass or fail, it just says what the facts are."
Here are the facts: 31,000 acres of wetlands
and 343 miles of streambeds have disap-
peared since 1979 after regulations were
imposed to prevent such loss.
"So, the facts are on the table," Ross said.
"What we do about it is policy."
And therein lies the rub.
Critics cite several flaws in terminology that
defuse the plan's regulatory emphasis.
Attorney Charles Fletcher, a Charlotte
County consultant, said the plan continues to
define mining as a temporary land use.
"What happens with phosphate mining is,
as the lands are mined and reclaimed, the


hydrology of the subsoil and the surface left
after" is altered forever, he said. "It may be a
temporary land use, but it's a permanent
impact."
Chuck Schnepel at the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers wetlands permitting office in
Tampa said the federal government does not
use the same definition.
"That's the state's terminology and it is not
necessarily the Corps'," he said.
Retaining that terminology "is a very good
example of an unwillingness to get real,"
Young said.
"Mining is a very permanent, very devastat-
ing impact," she continued. "The politicians,
the DEP, the Legislature none of them
wants to acknowledge the truth and have real
enforceable mechanisms in place to say no."
Cummings said findings in the state justify
a change in regulatory terminology.
"Even though they are calling it a temporary
land use, they admitted (in the study) recla-
mation is not working, which means it is a
permanent impact," he said.
Fletcher said the plan fails to adjust the
regulatory and permitting process.
"What is not being pursued is a consoli-
dated permitting process for phosphate
mining," he said. "Right now, it is a frag-
mented process."
While the DEP has "determined the idea
has merit, obviously, the devil is in the
details," Fletcher said. "It is up to the depart-
ment to take that initiative. They have not, as
yet, done that."
Ross would like to see "the surface water
quality be considered in the permitting of
water wells."
Yet, he added, it's wiser to audit existing
regulations for efficiencies before adopting
wholesale changes.
"I share the process frustration," Ross said.
"But it is a process and it is bigger than DEP
and bigger than the Southwest Florida Water
Management District. It is a legislative and
public process."
The study "was a very good product,"
Fletcher said. "What we need to do now is
make sure the management plan is an
equally good product. That may take more
resources than the department has. And that
needs to be addressed whether or not this
is a priority."


* LOST
From page 10
"It was a beautiful spot, I can tell
you that," he said of the spring.
"There were beautiful oak trees all
around it and a cabin where the
family that kept it stayed. There was
a picnic shelter and a place to
change clothes and a place to dance
and a pool table."
It was common knowledge
around Bartow at the time that the
spring suddenly ceased flowing one
day in the late 1940s after a dragline
inadvertently broke through a rock
layer, Hill said.
However, studies conducted by he
U.S. Geological Survey have blamed
excessive pumping of well water
primarily for phosphate mining. The
pumping drew down the Floridian
aquifer by some 60 feet at its peak in
the 1970s.

Calculating costs
The lost streams have resulted in
diminished flow, declining water
quality and degraded wildlife
habitat, according to Janicki.
Even first order streams, which
form the tips of the river's branches,
provide habitat for important small
organisms such as mayflies and
caddisflies, he said.
In their larval stages, such crea-
tures break down leaf matter into
organic carbon. That forms the
bottom of the food chain, he said.
In virtually all levels of the Peace
River system, "fish showed adverse


,effects" stemming from mankind's
activities, noted Dr. Tom Fraser, a
fish scientist, in the DEP study.
Even smaller wetlands and
streams that flow only during wet
periods serve as nurseries for
juvenile fish, Fraser said.
Such minnows serve as prey not
only for sport fish, such as trout,
bass and snook, but also for wading
birds, he pointed out.
"A channelized stream is not the
same habitat for fish," he said. "All


At left, Dover Sink,
pictured just two weeks
before the upper Peace .
River went dry. Water
drains into the sink hole *.
because excessive
pumping lowered the
water level in the aquifer
some 60 feet in the
1940s, according to the
U.S. Geological Survey.
At right, a photo taken at
the same spot two weeks
later reveals the sink hole. .



you have to do is go look at the
channelizedd) Caloosahatchee River.
It's extremely limited."
Fraser also estimated that some 15
freshwater species may no longer be
suited to survive in the Payne,
Joshua, Prairie and Shell creeks
because they are tainted with the
discharges of highly mineralized well
water from citrus groves, vegetable
farms or phosphate mines.
Also believed missing from the
modern Peace River is "tape grass,"


an aquatic plant with long, velvety
green blades.
The grass may have disappeared
as the mineral content increased
and the water darkened, he said.
Horse Creek, one of last Peace
River tributaries to remain relative-
ly pristine, now has more fish
species and abundance than the
main channel of the Peace, the fish
study states.
The river's remaining natural,
areas also provide habitat for


The entire flow of the upper Peace River disappears into a limestone rock formation that forms the cap of the intermediate
aquifer near Bartow.


protected species, including bald
eagles, scrub jays, sandhill cranes,
red-cockaded woodpeckers and
wood storks, according to the study.
But most of those remaining
natural areas "are threatened by
citrus, phosphate mining and urban
development," the study states.

Restoration limited
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District has launched
two major projects to restore the
upper Peace River, at least to a
minimum flow of just 6 inches of
water during dry seasons, said Mark
Hammond, resource management
director for the district.
One project calls for increasing
the level of Lake Hancock and
restoring wetlands downstream. The
goal is to filter the lake's water
before it drains into the Peace.
The other also calls for restoring
Peace Creek canal wetlands to store
Winter Haven's storm water for
release during dry periods.
The district is also working to map
the sinkholes in the upper Peace.
The district hopes to determine
whether berms can be constructed
to divert water now draining down
the holes, Hammond said.
But restoring other Peace tribu-
taries is currently beyond the
district's capability, he said.
"Those (upper Peace) projects will
be quite expensive," Hammond
pointed out. "They're a five- to 10-
year effort.
'Anybody can only take on so
much," he added.


Page 11







May 2007


Rethinking Peace River's urban future


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
No one needs a crystal ball to know that
people will want to build homes and settle
along the Peace River.
The big question looming, however, is
whether that growth will add to the urban
impacts already sustained on the Peace River.
Or could a "greening" of future urban devel-
opment keep the river relatively healthy?
"Urbanization had the heaviest impacts in
the northernmost and southernmost sub-
basins and is expected to expand," the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection
Peace River Plan stated.
"In the coastal lower Peace River sub-
basin, stream loss was most directly due to
the practice of eliminating first- and second-
order streams through extensive canal
networks designed to sufficiently lower the
water table to allow the widespread use of
septic tank wastewater treatment systems in
subdivisions."
In the lower, coastal Peace River, urban
development, along with agricultural land
practices, led to the loss of 77 miles of stream
channels. And in the upper Peace, urban
development, compounded with its 79.8
million-gallons-a day potable water use,
contributed to a decline in water table
elevations and shrunk the base water flow
that sustains the river.
Those urban impacts do not include
stormwater runoff, increasing demand for
water and other urban pressures on the
river's resources.
"If local zoning, land use planning and
overall comprehensive planning are not
undertaken carefully, the situation will be
exacerbated," the FDEP plan stated. "The
opportunity exists to exploit these tools more
effectively to assure development is directed
away from the most sensitive environmental
resources and that the future quality of life for
area residents can be preserved."

Missing wetlands
Future management of the Peace River
should try to solve a mystery from the past.
Don Ross, CEO of EarthBalance environ-
mental consulting firm and a former Charlotte
County commissioner, participated in the
development of the Peace River cumulative
impaclstudy upon which the FDEP officials
based their Peace River management plan.
What proved surprising, Ross said, is the
number of acres, of wetlands that evaporated
into thin air.
"The single most important discovery is
that not all of the wetlands are going through
permitting," Ross said "There's a gap."
Between 1979 and 1999, an estimated 4,000
acres of wetlands were lost to urban develop-
ment along the Peace River. That number.is
five times more than was permitted during
the same time period.
"If it were done through permitting, those
wetlands would be mitigated," Ross said. He
believes there's a "leakage" in the permitting
process that's allowing for the disappearance
of wetlands. "It's not in an obvious way,
bulldozers filling in the land."
He suspects that the missing wetlands
were drained on lands that were given
agricultural exemptions.
Once the land is drained for pastures or
groves or some other agricultural use, the
wetlands are gone and do not have to be
replaced before the land is prepared for
housing and other urban development.
That trend must be addressed, put to an
end, according to Ross.

DeSoto's challenge
The urban development die was cast


URBANIZATION IMPACTS


Since the 1940s, population in the four-county Peace River watershed has grown by
800 percent.
The size of the urban footprint on the watershed also grew, from 1 percent in the
1940s to 10 percent today.
Where urbanization occurred in the lower Peace River, the amount of marshes and
mangroves declined by 600 acres, or 22 percent.
Urbanization replaces natural forests and soils with impervious surfaces that prevent
recharge and speed up storm water runoff. And that washes contaminants into surface
waters including sediment, nutrients, pesticides, petroleum wastes, metals and bacteria.
The loss of shade from trees in urban areas also cause "thermal impacts" by heating
stormwater before it drains.
Source: Peace River Cumulative Impact Study


decades ago when lots were platted for much
of Charlotte County. A greater challenge in the
near future may be faced in DeSoto County.
"DeSoto has beautiful land and a world of
opportunity," Ross said. But, he added,
DeSoto will need to find the vision that will
allow the county to find a balance between
environmental protection of the river and the
pressures of urban and other development.
DeSoto County Administrator Craig M.
Coffey suggested his county is well aware of
the challenges it faces. DeSoto County
planning staff is now overhauling the county's
comprehensive plan and is looking at better
ways to protect the Peace River.
"People may have taken (the Peace River)
for granted (in the past), but they are waking
up to it as something that needs protecting,"
Coffey said. "(The Peace River) is our future.
It's our 'beach front.'"
Today, Coffey estimated more
than 95 percent of DeSoto's devel-
opment is devoted to some form of
agriculture, and the county itself
ranks as the fourth-largest agricul-
tural producer in the state. In the
future, he said, he expects the
county's agriculture to be reduced


-............


to 88 percent of development.
The county is also taking into account
trends affecting urban development. A recent
population and land use study noted, "Land
prices in coastal metropolitan areas have
skyrocketed. This has put pressure on the
development industry to provide 'affordable'
and workforce 'attainable' housing." The high
land prices are causing urban growth inland,
into counties like DeSoto.
DeSoto County officials, Coffey said, are
now using the comprehensive planning
process and other strategies to address and
direct future urban development, as well as
affording the river greater protections.
Through new land use regulations, Coffey
said, the county hopes to redirect develop-
ment away from the river's floodplain.






...i.w


DeSoto County will also work with the
Southwest Florida Water Management
District and other agencies to garner grants
that will lead to the preservation of the more
environmentally sensitive lands.
"(Future) development under the (land use
regulations) will be much different," Coffey
said. Compared to past development in
Charlotte, Sarasota and other counties, he
said future DeSoto urban development "could
be 10 times better."
And he suggested future development in
DeSoto County will be more environmentally
sensitive.

Cooperative planning
Charlotte County land use attorney Geri
Waksler is among those who are working to
create a public-private planning effort for U.S.
17. Waksler saw elements of the FDEP Peace
River Plan as being incorporated into any
plan for Charlotte County's U.S. 17 corridor.
According to Waksler, who has been a
practicing land use attorney for 15 years,
developers today are thinking "greener" than
they did in the past.
"I very, very, very rarely work on a project
where a developer wants to take out all of the
wetlands," she said. "Typically, developers,
who want to bring in projects on budget,
want to avoid wetland impacts. Wetland
mitigation and restoration is expensive."
To implement the Peace River plan and
afford better protections to the river,
Waksler said more than new development
should be considered.
"We tend to talk about the problems on
the Peace River and the loss of wetlands,"
she said. "But we don't want to talk at the
same time that we don't want to spend any
dollars to extend sewers so we can get some
of these septic systems (off line) that are in
the floodplain."
Waksler suggested, Charlotte and other
counties will have to address problems
created by older developments while ensuring
better new developments. Charlotte and
other counties will have to review their codes
to ensure they allow clustering and other
development strategies that allow more open
space and preservation.
"It's no one thing, and it's going to take a
whole new way of thinking the way we
develop nd the wqy,,we regulate;" she sad.
"People.are starting to move towards that.
'Green' development, environmentally
sensitive development are the kinds of
development people want to move into."
The Peace River plan does call for some
buffering along the river. Waksler cautioned,
"Developers build what people want, and if
they don't, they won't be very successful. And
people want to be on the water.
"That's where I see the greatest struggle, as
they try to work out buffers that protect the
Peace River and satisfies the public's desire for
water access" she said.
And while Waksler views the U.S. 17 corri-
dor as a natural extension of Charlotte's urban
service area, especially in light of the develop-
ment just north of county line in DeSoto, she
also sees a cooperative effort between private
development and public agencies possible,
and a cooperative effort could make many of
the Peace River recommendations a reality.


TIMBERS NORTH

LAKEFRONT COMMUNITY

_CALL TERRY OR JANET


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
A billboard announces the imminent construction of a new
subdivision just off U.S. 17 Aorth of Fort Meade.


Page 12


..2 4 I -Y i om I T L






Page 13


May 2007


Old-timer yearns for the river he knew


By JOHN HACKWORTH
STAFF WRITER
"I would trade all my tomorrows
for one yesterday."
That is Tommy Howard's favorite
quotation. It pretty much sums up
how the 72-year-old Florida native
feels about his life and the
changing environment around the
Peace River.
Howard, like his parents, was born
and raised in Arcadia. He remembers
living in a small home in an orange
grove where his father worked.
"When I was a young'n, I could
see the stars through our roof," he
said. "We didn't have windows in the
house and no heat. But it was a
happier time than today."
Howard is a fisherman. Although
he made a living working for the
State Road Department (before it
was the Florida Department of
Transportation) for 33 years, he was
never far from the water. His love of
fishing began at a very early age.
"I remember Mom and I, and my
sister she died when she was 13
- took our Model A Ford down to
the Peace River on weekends. We
would cut swamp cabbage and cook
it and fry the fish we caught.
"I could wade across the river
then. I don't think the depth of the
river has changed much today. But
the river has."
Howard remembers casting a net
or a fishing line and reeling in bass
and bluegill. He said he never had'to
fish long to get more fish than he
could eat. That was back in the 1940s
- the starting point for the Peace
River Cumulative Impact Study.
The study points to trends that
mirror Howard's memories. The
triple threats of mining, develop-
ment and agriculture are men-
tioned often by Howard as he


SUN PHOTO BY SARAH COWARD, scoward@sun-herald.com
Arcadia native Tommy Howard, 72, untwists the line on his fishing rod during a recent trip to the banks of the Peace River. Howard didn't
need a state study to tell him about the impacts of mining, development and agriculture have had on the river he's seen them first-hand.


remembers his life.
In the 1940s, according to the
study, there were only 7,495 acres
being mined in the Peace River
watershed. Today, there are more
than 150,000 acres being excavated
for phosphate. ;
During the 1940s and '50s, we lost
354,674 acres of wetlands, and by
1979, another 249,255 had disap-
peared. Wetlands accounted for 25
percent of the Peace River Basin in


the 1940s, but today, only 16 percent
of the basin is in wetlands.
There was intense farming on
8 percent of the basin in the 1940s,
and by 1999, it had expanded to
17 percent.
None of that is news to Howard.
He has watched development,
mining and farming slowly squeeze
life from the river and the world he
knew back then.
"I remember when the phos-


phate spills used to turn the river to
chocolate," he said. "You'could
wade into the river and pick up
bass and bluegill as they floated by.
Their gills were stopped up and
they were gasping for air. You could
still eat them, but they eventually
choked to death.
"The banks of the river were
nothing but yellow mud for
months. It just stuck to your feet.
something awful. It took Mother


No impact from Peace withdrawals seen


By GREG MARTIN
STAFF WRITER
Withdrawals from the Peace River to
supply people in four counties with drink-
ing water have yet to cause a noticeable
impact on the Charlotte Harbor estuary,
according to the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's recent cumula-
tive impact study.
But the Peace River/Manasota Regional
Water Supply Authority has recently teamed
up with the city of Punta Gorda to tap a
large wetland in the headwaters of Shell
Creek to augment supplies.
The authority, on average, withdraws
about 20 million gallons per day from the
Peace River at its plant off Kings Highway in
DeSoto County.
The authority is currently working on a
$130 million project to increase the
withdrawals, to 32.7 mgd and expand its
reservoir from 600 million gallons to 6


billion gallons.
The DEP's study found that the authority
on average takes about 1 percent of the
average annual flow of the river, which
amounts to 1,084 cubic feet per second.
One concern over the withdrawals is that
they reduce the freshwater flowing into the
Charlotte Harbor estuary, a sensitive
marine nursery.
However, the study concluded that the
withdrawals have had no impact on the
salinity of the estuary. That conclusion was
based on data from a water quality monitor-
ing program conducted by the authority.
The study also noted, however, that an
impact to salinity levels downstream would
be difficult to discern because of the way
tides naturally cause wide variations in
salinity levels.
The flow of the river has declined 35
percent since the 1960s, largely due to a
cyclical climate change.


While still ample in average flow, most of
the flow comes during the summer rainy
season. Also, the river now suffers from a
lack of base flow in its upper reaches,
according to the study. ,
Because of drought conditions this year,
the Southwest Florida Water Management
District in December agreed to lower a
minimum flow cut-off level below which,
withdrawals for public supply would not be
allowed. The minimum flow was lowered
from 130 cubic feet per second to 90 cfs.
That allowed the authority to pump an,
extra 1 mgd from the river this winter than
would normally be permitted.
However, the authority has just about
exhausted its stored supplies and has begun
drawing raw aquifer water into its storage
wells. That is expected to lead to a decline
in water quality below the state's "sec-
ondary" drinking water standards in the
weeks to come.


The standards include limits to such
minerals as sulfate, nitrate and chloride. The
levels of these minerals are high in natural
well water but low in surface water.
The DEP also has announced its intention
to grant the authority a three-year exemp-
tion to those standards.
The exemption would allow the authority
to exceed the standards until its plant
expansion gets completed in three years.
Even with the plant expansion, growth
projections show demand for more water
will outstrip capacity in a little more than
seven years.
So, the authority and Punta Gorda have
launched a study to build a berm across
the downstream end of a large wetland
system called Tippen Bay and Long
Island Marsh.
That would store enough water to harvest
some 20 mgd for public supplies, according
to preliminary studies.


't -k
S.41 .4". 1 0 -


Nature a long time to flush out the
river after those spills.
"But no one seemed to care back
then. I think they fined the phos-
phate companies $700. That was
nothing to them because it would
have cost them hundreds of thou-
sands to build holding areas."
It wasn't until 1975, according to
the study, that the state toughened
standards for phosphate mining.
But, just as the impact study says,
Howard doesn't cast blame on
phosphate alone for the disappear-
ance of fish and the changes in the
environment.
"Runoff from groves has hurt too.
Too many of them were built in low-
lying areas. They were allowed to
destroy too many wetlands. And the
runoff from fertilizers and so on
really hurt the river."
Howard takes his hat off and rubs
over his head, shakes his head again
and puts the cap back on.
"There's just too many people
now," he says.
"We will never be able to go back
and fix (the river). There are just too
many people here now.
"I used to be able to go to my
favorite fishing spot around 9 a.m.
and fish all day. Now, by 9 a.m. there
have been 25 other people there.
You see boat after boat go by. And
those Jet-Skis too they ought to
outlaw those things."
For Howard who said his
grandparents remembered when
Native Americans owned one side of
the river and white settlers the other
- Father Time has been an enemy
to the Peace River.
"I wouldn't trade my life for
anything. I have lived in the best of
times. But I would trade tomorrow
for yesterday, anytime."






PEACE RIVER VIEWPOINTS


Time to allot


oversight of


Peace River


to one entity

OUR POSITION: A Peace River
management plan is just a starting
point for the work that must be done to
preserve the river and its tributaries. To
make a real difference, lawmakers and
the public must support regulations
and practices that can stabilize the
watershed.

Imagine having 27 parents giving
instruction to one child. One parent in
charge of what to eat. Another in
charge of clothes. A different parent in
charge of schooling. A parent in
charge of the child's afterschool hours.
A parent in charge of dinner time to
bedtime hours.
Each of the 27 parents are giving
instructions to the single child -
often with conflicting advice, and
never communicating well among
themselves.
None of us would design a system
with 27 parents for one child. Yet we've
designed such a system for the man-
agement of the Peace River watershed.
Stretching from Polk County in the
north to Charlotte Harbor in the
south, more than 27 different govern-
mental institutions have some say so
over how the Peace River watershed
should be managed. It's no wonder the
river and its tributaries are under such
stress from human mismanagement.
Even if every single city, county,
state agency and federal agency
involved made great decisions, there
are simply too many parents for this
single child; T here is no single, coor-
dinated master plan for the Peace
River watershed. There is no single
person or agency who can say, "I am
the one responsible" for the long-term
sustainability and health of the Peace
River watershed.
Perhaps the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection should be
the single parent. Our concern is that
FDEP has many children all across the
state and our favorite child, the Peace
River watershed, might lose out in
money and attention. Plus FDEP does
not regulate water use, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District
does. FDEP also has little or no say so
over land use or zoning.
The Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District could be the single
entity in charge, but it does not regu-
late mining, or control zoning and has
little control over all the cities and
counties. Swiftmud is not geared to
lobbying and soliciting matching
funds from the state, federal agencies
and nonprofits for worthy projects.
What we believe is needed is a single
entity responsible for the Peace River
watershed that would be in the form
of public-private partnership. There
are examples for us to follow.
There are more than 23,000 aban-
doned mines in Colorado. Not only are
these abandoned mines dangerous
but they leak toxic chemicals into the
watershed. The Clear Creek Watershed
Forum was created in 1990 to coordi-
nate the communications from more
than 50 organizations including 12


communities in four counties for a
single watershed.
In 1997 they formed the Clear Creek
Foundation as a nonprofit to raise
money to support restoring and
enhancing the watershed. In one
example, they reduced 400,000
pounds of heavy metals coming from
just one mine into the watershed.
We believe it is time to stop looking
around for someone to blame. It is
time to create a single entity, a single
parent, responsible for ensuring the
future of the Peace River watershed.


pyrighted Material


rndicatedCotentent, -
a Comm-ercia. P- W rt"
n Commercial News Providers"


To fix the river, we must fix government


ST he management plan for the Peace
River generally restates the findings of
the Peace River cumulative impact
study and provides a series of specific fixes
for 22 major adverse impacts caused by
past and present practices of agriculture,
mining and urbanization.
Table 5.1 (page 44) of the impact study
summarizes the recommendations and
few would argue against implementation
of any of these policies. However, if one
truly desires to makes things better for the
environment and the people who enjoy,
using it in various ways, it is necessary to
think "outside the regulatory box" and
consider exactly which of these strategies
have worked in the past and might work in
the future.
About the only ones that would make my
hit parade of guaranteed successes would
be habitat acquisition and restoration. The
rest are mainly old ideas that have failed to
working. the pastiThe reasons theyphave. ;
failed to work are as follows:
For the most part, regional and state
governments are the problem, not the
solution. In this context, "governments"'
mean the Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection and the Southwest
Florida Water Management District. These
two agencies have in the past permitted
the practices that have led to the adverse
impacts that are so carefully detailed in
this and other reports, and continue to do
so today.
The government has failed to protect


William A. Dunson
Dunson is emeritus .
professor of biology at
Penn State University and t- H
a member of the Peace
River Scientific Peer
Review Panel.

the people's commons
(such as the river, bay and gulf) in favor of
special interests. In large part, this is due to
ineptitude and favoritism/corruption.
The government has failed to pursue
viable solutions such as conservation of.
resources in favor of more exploitation of
resources.
The government has shown a great
unwillingness to let local governments that
more closely represent the interests of the
people to participate as full partners in
seeking solutions. ,
The government has failedto get, .the.,
best scientific advice from outside the web
of conflicts of interest that underlie most
consulting jobs reported here.
The government has failed to include
the entire ecosystem involved (Charlotte
Harbor and the near-shore Gulf of Mexico
are excluded), despite the fact that two of
the most serious problems afflicting coastal
communities (red tide and drift algae) likely
involve an interaction of all components of
the basin.
Some specific examples of governmental
failure to enforce rules set up to avoid


adverse impacts:
Agricultural groundwater dumped into
the Myakka River causes mineralization
and inappropriate seasonal hydrology, and'
is going to be permitted for withdrawal as
drinking water in direct violation of South-
em Water Use Caution Area rules.
A decrease in minimum flow for with-
drawals of drinking water from the Peace
River at the DeSoto plant from 130 to 90
cubic feet per second is completely unsup-
ported by ecological data, was not
approved by a Scientific Peer Review Panel
specifically set up to oversee such issues,
and violates previously set criteria.
Swiftmud continues to use the so-called
"10 percent rule" for avoidance of adverse
ecological impact of freshwater with-
drawals, which was struck down by an
administrative hearing judge in 1997.
There are many other examples in
which the DEP and Swiftmud have failed
tq enforce rules ,r,simp]y mi e ;/ ..
enforcement so lax that the rules are
meaningless (for example, the rule that .;
wetlands must be restored-fter phos-
phate mining). Given this history, what is.
the likelihood that anything will change in
the future?
The bottom line: We need a radical new.
approach whereby the people's interest in ,
the environmental "commons" is truly
protected. This can only be achieved by
vesting decisions in local governments
which are most directly responsive to the
voice of the people.


Builders build where people want to live


The Charlotte-DeSoto Building Indus-
try Association is made up of local
companies that are building custom
homes, developing small locally owned
parcels and serving the needs of our
,Charlotte and DeSoto citizens with remod-
eling and building services. We live and
work here too. We are equal stakeholders in
a sustainable local economy and the
environmental quality of life.
The Peace River, and for that matter
every potable water resource that can
possibly provide essential water to present
and future residents here, is of vital con-
cern to all of us. That said, we are also
concerned with other issues including
government efficiency, reduction of costly
bureaucracy and affordability of homes for
our own employees and families.
From our nontechnical review, the
mammoth Peace River Cumulative Impact
Study appears to be is a highly detailed
recitation of data and past practices. There
is little evidence to support the belief that
government intrusion has been able to
overcome basic human behavior:
The lesson we take from those findings
is that even well-intentioned regulatory
interference, while frequently costly to the
consumer and artificially impacting the
economic dynamic of normal market
forces, does not solve the problems of a
changing society.
Growth is not caused by homebuilders
building homes. That is only a response to
the demand from people to live in a partic-
ular community.
Homebuilders will not build where there
is no customer interest. When looking at
the needs for water and infrastructure in 20
or 50 years, we assume population growth
in our area, not because builders are
clearing wilderness and building vast ghost
towns of vacant houses, but because we


Ron Hill
Hill is president of the
Charlotte-DeSoto Building
Industry Association.


know that our area enjoys
many of the amenities
that people choose when
selecting a place to live.
The Peace River study states that it must
identify and offer recommendations for
"regulatory and nonregulatory" actions to
minimize cumulative impact. That's fine,
except no governmental agency is going to
effectively alter human behavior and
overcome the long-term effects of the
marketplace. The bureaucrats and the
elected officials who believe they can do so
will be sadly mistaken and cause more
harm than good along the way.
Yes, they can pass laws making future
development more costly and thereby
somewhat alter the customer base, probably
pricing many working people out of the
marketplace and creating longer commutes
and more road impacts as we go.
We make no comment on the scientific
review of agricultural use and the phos-
phate mining issues that are addressed. Our
comments are directed to the urbanization
and industrialization section of Chapter 5 of
the study which states:
'"A hallmark of urban development is
intolerance of flooding. Local, state, and
federal agencies have historically enacted
land use, building, and stormwater runoff
regulations to prevent flooding.
"Each of the counties and municipalities
within the watershed regulates land use
and development within their boundaries
in accordance with a state-approved local
comprehensive plan. Each local plan
consists of eight basic elements including


capital improvement, future land use,
traffic circulation, public facilities and
services, conservation, recreation and open
space, housing, and intergovernmental
coordination. The Growth Management Act
(Chapter 163, FS) requires that all public
facilities and services, including drainage
facilities, needed to support development
must be available, concurrent with impacts
of development.
'All of the above regulations address the
objective of keeping water out of homes and
off roadways during even relatively rare
storm events. Achieving these objectives
requires storage capacity and, historically,
this storage capacity has been created by
lowering water tables.
"During the past 20 years, rules have
shifted toward reliance on storage in created
lakes, but throughout much of the urban-
ized areas of the Peace River watershed,
drainage ditches and canals had already
been constructed to permanently lower
water tables by providing direct discharge
for vast areas of flat landscape.
"Nothing could be worse for the shallow
wetlands typical of the Peace River water-
shed than drainage of the surficial aquifer
that keeps them hydrated through most of
the year. Where urban development
occurred, there was the need and the means
to create drainage works. There was also the
population (votes) to demand them."
As Charlotte County revises its compre-
hensive plan, it must develop a strategy
that deals with stormwater and the pub-
lic's expressed determination to live where
they choose to live.
Excavation of agricultural lands for the
mining of fill dirt and aggregate for con-
struction use and the resulting creation of
holding ponds and man-made lakes are part
of that picture. We must build these realities
into our management of the resources.


1 1 A


Page 14


May 2007






PEACE RIVER VIEWPOINT'


Page 15


We have the Peace River study, but what comes next?


As with most public policy challenges,
the only thing that really matters is
the outcome. We focus on the process.
We focus on the rights and wrongs and should
and shouldn't. We focus on who participates
and who wins and loses, but ultimately, the
outcome is what we all live with.
The process of evaluating where we are in
deciding what we want for an outcome for
the Peace River has commenced. And what
a process it has been.
Meetings. Consultants. Neighbors. Inter-
ested businesses like agriculture, real estate
and even phosphate. Governments. Envi-
ronmental groups. People who've made
money up to now, and people who hope to
in the future ... People who've enjoyed the
river and people who still want to.
But where are we really? What has the
effort gotten us, and what can we expect for
the balance of the process, let alone the
outcome?
More than two years ago, the Florida
Legislature directed the state Department of
Environmental Protection to study the
Peace River Basin. The goal of the study was
to identify the major impacts to the Peace
River as a result of human activity. The
Legislature budgeted $700,000 to the DEP to
conduct the study. That study, according to
"the Legislature, was to provide the founda-
Lion of a management plan. The manage-
ment plan then determines the outcome:
What do we want the Peace River to be?
Lots of people were skeptical about the
study-- including environmental and
business groups and local governments.
Many of these folks didn't believe that the
agency that hands out strip-mining permits


Honey Rand
Rand is president of The
Environmental PR Group.
She has consulted with
Charlotte County on
phosphate policy.
........................................
could fairly evaluate the
real impacts and their
source. Lots of people also thought that the
study wasn't given enough money. While
$700,000 is a lot of money, the scope of work
was enormous: looking at plants and animals,
water flow and water quality, models and data
over years and years ... and then analyzing it.
As expected, the study points out that


agriculture, phosphate and people make the
biggest impact pretty much in that order
- depending on which factors you're
looking at.
When the study was released earlier this
year, there was a pleasant surprise. Given
the time and budget constraints, it was
actually a pretty good document. Charlotte
County's experts and those of its partners
generally agreed that while lots of questions
remain, for what it was, it was OK. But it was
the management plan that was the next step
to a good outcome.
The DEP was supposed to take the infor-
mation learned in the cumulative effects
study and develop a plan to both stop the
degradation of the river and restore what


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
The Peace River winds around a bend in this view from the Canoe Outpost in DeSoto County.


can be restored. A management plan should
have specific goals and the means by which
the goals are to be achieved. This manage-
ment plan did not have that. In contrast, it
suggests that the DEP's current rules and
permitting standards are just fine.
The management plan doesn't give us a
road map. It suggests that the road we've
been on will get us to our destination. It
doesn't take us to a good outcome.
Now what? For starters, Charlotte, Saraso-
ta and Lee counties, along with the Sierra
Club and local business and environmental
groups, are working toward an Environmen-
tal Impact Study. Such a study would have a
larger, more robust scope, and be compre-
hensive and detailed.
Will it take some time? It will. And some
have suggested that until the study is
complete, there should be a moratorium on
the expansion of phosphate strip mining.
That doesn't stop the strip mining that is
already permitted. It simply protects what is
presently unmined until we're sure we know
the consequences of expansion.
It seems that until we're sure of the out-
come we want not from the studies, or the
plan, but the results of those efforts we're
not going to know if we got what we needed.
What do we want the Peace River to be? An
abundant drinking water source? Quality
freshwater flows to the Charlotte Harbor? Do
we want vibrant streams and wetlands feeding
fish populations downstream and providing
recreational opportunities? Do we want to
leave the basin as environmental treasure, as a
heritage for our children and for theirs?
Once we have the outcome in mind, the
rest is simply process.


Phosphate industry committed to protecting water


or more than a century, Florida's
phosphate industry has helped make
America's farmers the most productive
agricultural force in the world. In fact, 75
percent of the phosphate used by America's
farmers comes from right here in Florida.
We are one of the Sunshine State's oldest
and most important industries. And like any
other business, over the years, we have
gotten better at what we do. Today we are
more efficient than ever, and we are using
the newest'emironrenta t[echnologiesto
help do our job in a way that protects natuife
while providing an essential natural product.
Since 1975, Florida law has required that
we reclaim every acre of land we mine.
'Some former mine sites are also returned to
nature. Others become parks, playgrounds,
lakes and neighborhoods that are a part of
everyday life throughout the region. Since
the 1980s the phosphate industry has had to
adhere to environmental standards that are
among the strictest in America. This is
important to us because being good envi-
ronmental stewards is good for our business
--as well as good for Florida.
We also work hard to conserve and protect
tour region's water supply. Today, we recycle
k.95 percent of our water. The result? Our
industry accounts for less than 10 percent of
groundwater withdrawals from the Peace
River basin.
The Peace River basin is important to the


Tom Myers
Myers is assistant vice
president for mining with
Mosaic Fertilizer LLC.


environment, economy I -
and quality of life of our
region. Like other stake-
holders, we are carefully
reviewing the findings of the recently
releasedDepia rmien r of Environmental
Protection study on cumulative impacts to
the basin.
Certainly the most important conclusion
of the report is found immediately under the
heading "Major Findings of the Cumulative
Impact Study," where it states "There is no
single, predominant cause of impacts to
water resources in the Peace River basin."
There are those who for their own
political or economic gain would make
the case that the phosphate industry is
primarily responsible for any harm to the
Peace River Basin. But the truth is that
virtually every human endeavor has an
impact on the environment and these
impacts taken together have had an effect
on the Peace River basin.
The population of this region has
increased 700 percent over the historic
period reviewed in the study. Development
and yes, mining, that occurred before


current, strict wetlands regulations were
enacted in the 1980s did adversely affect
water resources. But times and practices
have changed. Today, spiraling population
growth is requiring more and more potable
water every year. And our farming commu-
nity needs water to grow the food we buy at
the supermarket.
Who would challenge this most important
conclusion of the study? The same people
who seek headlines and profit at the
expense of one ofTlorida's most important
industries and hardworking local taxpayers.
Since 2001, Charlotte County taxpayers have
been burdened with nearly $10 million in
legal costs for a crusade against the phos-
phate industry half of which has been.
paid to one Tampa law firm. More than a
quarter-million dollars more has been spent
for an outside public relations firm to wage
what amounts to a political campaign
against our industry.
Are these lawyers committed to finding
solutions for the good of your community?
Or are they mainly interested in perpetuat-
ing a lucrative controversy? Will they heed
the conclusion that there is "no single,
predominant cause of impacts to water
resources in the Peace River basin" and
search for broad-based solutions, or will
they try to manipulate findings to suggest
that one industry is primarily to blame, and
perpetuate a seemingly never-ending cycle


of litigation?
We are committed to being part of the
solution. Unlike many water users, we are
reducing our groundwater withdrawals. Like
new development or any enterprise that
impacts wetlands, we are required by law to
mitigate for or replace wetlands that we
disturb. We are committed to pioneering
new environmental technologies so that we
can continue to set the standard for envi-
ronmental stewardship.
We,axe also,conp itted. -participating in
the Peace River planning process. We believe
the methodologies used in formulating
many of the study's conclusions need to be
thoroughly reviewed to ensure that science
- not politics or emotion -'will drive
important policy decisions.
We know, for example, that the study
contains conclusions about wetland impacts
that do not take into account the benefits of
mitigation and reclamation that has been or
will be done. Including these factors will
provide a more accurate picture. We certain-
ly agree with many recommendations of the
plan including the recommendation that
more of the special taxes already paid by the
phosphate industry should be directed to
environmental land acquisition in this basin.
We look forward to continuing to work
with all who care about the future of this
region and our state, to protect the Peace
River basin for generations to come.


Growers do their part to preserve Peace River Basin


Completion of the Peace River Cumula-
tive Impact Study and its correspond-
ing stakeholder response has brought
considerable attention to the watershed.
Although this is a new format, the content
should not come as a surprise.
The objective of the 2003 Legislature-
funded study was to assess the cumulative
impacts of changes in the Peace River Basin,
,specifically focusing on land form and
hydrology. Consultants charged with the task
compared statistics from the 1940s to 2000 to
determine changes. It is obvious there has
been significant transformation in this area
during this 60-year period. It is also apparent
the changes in population and land use will'
in turn impact our native habitats uplands,
wetlands, lakes, streams the entire water-
shed.
Unfortunately, the public has not been
conscious of these changes and the realiza-
tion has shocked many. Those involved in
industries such as agriculture are not sur-
prised, as they have been working for years to
better protect our land and water resources.
We must be involved in this process; it is how
we remain economically viable.
Watershed-wide land-use changes were
registered in the 60 years from 1940 to 2000
showing declines in native habitats and
increases in agriculture, mining and urban-
ization. In the first 40 years, the habitat took
,the greatest losses. In the 20 years between
,1980 and 2000, habitat loss slowed, ag
increased slightly, and mining and urban


Barbara Carlton
Carlton is the executive
director of the Peace River
Citrus Growers Association.


growth continued signifi-
cant gains.
Also during those 20
years, rapid growth in
technology and environmental stewardship
have taken place. Both have helped everyone
understand the need for continually improv-
ing, being more efficient, more productive
and more sensitive to the needs of native
habitat. Because of this better understanding,
regulatory agencies have required continued
improvements.
The most obvious way to preserve agricul-
ture is to assure farms remain viable, not
merely through regulation.
Agriculture growth patterns have slowed in
the past 20 years and agriculture itself has
gone through tremendous changes. Trends
show continued declines from 2000 to
present, and forecasters predict this trend to
continue in coming years. Fortunately,
technology has made it possible for 1 percent
of the population to feed the other 99 per-
cent. Improvements in logistics and commu-
nication alone save farmers hours each day.
Add in other forms of technology and knowl-
edge gained from $23.5 million invested by
agriculture in research each year and you
realize how enormous this transformation to


modern agriculture has been.
Ag can become more efficient in usage of
its resources because of better tools. Growers
today use less water because of technological
advances in irrigation systems. Citrus grow-
ers today use less water as they moved from
overhead irrigation systems to micro-sprin-
kler systems which apply water directly to the
area of the tree roots. This same system can
deliver fertilizer, lessening the possibility of
runoff. Computerization is further improving
these savings as growers can monitor the
physical environment in their fields and
respond to irrigation and drainage functions
from off site.
Science allows growers to better under-
stand plant physiology to supply its exact
needs. Precision technology allows growers to
save money and assure inputs are utilized by
plants and not lost into the environment.
Global positioning systems, weather stations
and soil probes allow growers to track water
and product use, comparing it to crop yields,
making ag product application an exact
science.
Best management practices are available
for most agricultural crops. These practices
make it possible for even the smallest and
least technologically advanced growers to
make production improvements. Cooperative
programs also make it possible for growers
who cannot afford to invest in these advance-
ments to receive cost share funding for the
improvements. Funding percentages are
based on the production practices and how


much the improvement will contribute to the
overall public good.
If that isn't enough to make the needed
changes, there is always monitoring and
regulatory actions to assure everyone does
their part to preserve our beautiful environ-
ment. The Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection and the
Southwest Florida Water Management
District, as well as many private and federal
agencies have literally hundreds of monitor-
ing points in the basin many of these on
agricultural properties. The monitoring
programs assure variations in water quality
are known and needed actions are taken.
We cannot return to the Florida of the
1940s, even if we could return to the popula-
tion and activities of those days. If we are
honest with ourselves, most of us don't want
to return to the ways of the past as we enjoy
our comfortable and convenient life. We
simply want to assure we maintain our'
lifestyle for future generations.
Agricultural producers are and have been
making changes which will assure the health
and welfare of our natural habitats. As
technology and information becomes
available, more changes will need to be
made. As a good neighbor, Florida agriculture
will continue to be a major player in sustain-
ing the health and welfare of our native
habitats, ensuring a safe and adequate supply
water, and promoting the health of our
society in the years to come.


May 2007







May 2007


Question persists: Where are the feds?


By JOHN HAUGHEY
STAFF WRITER
Perceived flaws in the state-financed
Peace River cumulative impact study and
proposed management plan have renewed
calls for a federal assessment of the entire
Peace River Basin.
Charlotte County has been lobbying the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for
years to conduct a regional environmental
impact study.
"We're still trying to make that happen,"
Charlotte County Commissioner Adam
Cummings said. '"As far as I know, we still have
$350,000 budgeted this year and $350,000
next year to get that done."
Charlotte County, along with Lee and
Sarasota counties, has pledged to contribute
to a common fund to finance a federal study.
Helen Jelks King, of the Sierra Club's
Greater Charlotte Harbor chapter, said
convincing Manatee County to join the
effort could prove pivotal.
"If we get four counties and $2 million on the
table, our voice will speak louder," she said.
Cummings, King and others believe a
federal study would be more comprehensive
than the state's recently concluded analysis.
They say federal terminologies differ from
the state's, which could result in different
findings and regulatory emphasis.'
The state's cumulative impact study "every-
body knew, from the day they started, would
be insufficient," Cummings said. "It was not
the kind of thing (a federal) area-wide impact
statement would do."
Among those things, he said, is "project


into the future what is going to happen, so
you can decide what actions to take to have
a positive result."
And that is a chief flaw cited by many in the
state's study it doesn't assess future impacts
if all stays the same.
"If you haven't looked into the future, it's
not possible to create a sustainable manage-
ment plan," Cummings said.
King said a study that defines projected
impacts would benefit every constituency in
the basin, including the mining industry.
"It would make it easier for them to study
20 to 30 years of future mining, and come up
with a set of rules," she said.
Mosaic, the basin's largest mining opera-
tion, "has alluded that it may not be a bad
idea, as long as (a federal study) includes
agriculture and urbanization."
On its Web site, Mosaic says it is "not
opposed to the concept of an area-wide EIS,
but we believe it will only be valid if it
addresses all the major activities and interac-
tions within the watershed."
Attorney Charles Fletcher, a county consul-
tant, said federal agencies will only initiate
such a study if one or more "triggers" compel
them to do so.,
"In Florida, at least, usually the federal
government does not get actively involved in
environmental impact studies unless there is
a federal agency action pending or it involves
something that is receiving federal money,"
he said.
Without any federal public works projects
in the basin, the only two potential venues for
launching a study are permitting for wetlands
and mining.


"Wetlands permitting requires environ-
mental assessment of past, present and
reasonably expected future activities of a
like nature," Fletcher said. "In our view, the
(state's cumulative impact study) didn't
really do that adequately."
The Army Corps of Engineers does conduct
site-specific studies of proposed phosphate
mining areas.
Chuck Schnepel, of the ACE's Tampa
wetlands permits office, said the agency sees
no need to go beyond site-specific studies.
"Several years ago, there was a review made,
and the determination was a cumulative EIS
was not required," he said. '"At least, not at
that time."
The only way Schnepel envisions that
determination changing is if mining opera-
tions propose expanding into the lower basin.
He said the EPA and ACE have no regulatory
relationship with local agriculture and
urbanization.
"Those are areas primarily outside our
jurisdiction," Schnepel said. "The state would
be the most proper choice."
Former Charlotte County commissioner
Don Ross, an environmental consultant who
helped draft the proposed management
plan, agreed.
"When it gets to the down and dirty of it,
Florida does a better job than the feds do in
Florida," he said. "The feds are typically a
pusher of requirements. They set the
standards."
Maybe so, says LindaYoung of the Clean
Water Network of Florida, but that doesn't
mean they enforce them.
In fact, Young said, not only are federal


agencies not upholding regulations, they have
essentially abandoned those responsibilities.
"The EPA used to be very involved in
Florida, enforcing or implementing (regula-
tions) themselves, or making sure the state did
it," she said. "When Jeb Bush became gover-
nor, environmental laws really started getting
ignored. When George (W) Bush got elected
president, the EPA disappeared in this state."
In many instances, federal agencies need
only finish what they started such as
following through with more studies to
confirm or deny the findings contained in the
controversial 2001 'draft site-inspection report
of the former Tenoroc mine in Polk County.
That report allegedly documented "elevat-
ed" levels of radioactive contamination in
soils and ground water at the 6,000-acre
former phosphate mine.
The draft was disputed by a wide range of
federal and state agencies, including the EPA
itself, which said it would stage more studies
of the Tenoroc area and 21 similar sites.
While the Tenoroc study has been shelved,
no subsequent analyses have been initiated.
"When (EPA officials) tell you they're
working on it, what it means is, (the EPA)
won't let them work on it," Young said.
Cummings said there may be another way
to induce a federal area-wide study.
While attending a conference in Washing-
ton, D.C., last year, he was surprised by an
ACE official's candid advice.
"'If you want the Army Corps of Engineers
to do something, sue,'" Cummings said he
was told. "'Our resources have been cut back
so far, the only thing we have the time and
money to do is what judges order us to do.'"


WHAT'S NEXT?


The future of the Peace
River is uncharted
water. The rivershed can
be a vibrant, productive
ecosystem or it can
be barren banks beside
a muddy ditch. The
choices made now may
determine whether the
Peace River becomes a
model for restoring
troubled waterways or a
fading memory.


SUN PHOTOS BY PAUL SCHMIDT, schmidt@sun-herald.com
A snail is left stranded on the bottom of the Peace River after it went dry near Bartow this month.


Live oak branches overhang the Peace River that laps the shore of Harbour Heights Park in Charlotte County.


Public participation could drive direction


By JOHN HAUGHEY
STAFF WRITER
Now, it's up to you.
The state's Department of Environmental
Protection will stage a series of "stakeholder"
public meetings to discuss the Peace River
Resource Management Plan which began
May 11 in Wauchula.
What's at stake?
Life as we know it in the Peace River Basin.
"I think the deal is the DEP and the South-
west Florida Water Management District are
looking at issues that are so big, they need to
feel public and legislative support to break
new ground," said Don Ross, a former
Charlotte County commissioner who helped
draft parts of the plan.
Without public participation and insis-
tence that regulations are imposed to
protect the river, Ross said any momentum
for substantial remedy will pass like "water
under the bridge."


Don't expect the DEP to lead the charge,
he said.
"If you put yourself in the position of an
-agency staff person, even an executive
director, you work for the people, the Legisla-
ture, and your governing board," Ross said.
"You cannot afford to get too far ahead of
them. You can lead, but the leaders have to be
in sight of the parade."
Rick Cantrell, DEP's deputy director for
water resources, said the meetings and
ensuing discussions are an effort to "continue
to try to bring a consensus."
"The management plan is not a static
document," he said. "We will be looking for
additional direction. Hopefully, that is what
will be accomplished. But it can't be accom-
plished without a lot of people working
together and it won't happen overnight. This
is the beginning of a process."
"Public input is necessary to drive the
department and the plan," agreed attorney


Charles Fletcher, a Charlotte County
consultant.
"But the contribution of stakeholders in
developing a good plan cannot happen
without the department," he added. "It is
going to take their leadership to put this
all together into a good resource planning
process."
That has Linda Young of the Clean Water
Network of Florida concerned. She said the
DEP does not have a good track record of
acting on public input.
"I agree with Rick to a degree," she said. "It
is critically important to make the informa-
tion available. Here is what's wrong with what
he is saying. The public was very involved in
this mining issue 15-20 years ago. I can't tell
you how many meetings I went to in the early
to mid '90s. Groundwater was contaminated
and there was a huge public outcry.
"They did nothing," she continued. "I
respect what he says. At the same time as I


agree, it has to be a two-way street. The DEP
has to be genuinely willing to listen to people
and enforce the law. There has to be clearly
defined goals, milestones, numbers and
enforceable laws."
Cantrell said there is only so much money,
time, and science available but the DEP is
committed to allowing the public to define
the plan's priorities.
"Those priorities may be different in
different areas of the basin," he said. "I'm an
optimist. At the same time, I'm a realist. There
is a limit to what can be done."
Which makes public participation even
more important, Ross said.
"We are in a process and the public has tc
raise the issue and identify the needs," he
said. "So, the agencies need to hear from the
public and their representatives if they want
anything done. I don't begrudge the agen-
cies wanting that. You got to stay in sync
with your bosses."


Page 16








2 (.
'Al
I I I j ~ ~~'~'~'*


Letter To The Editor

St. Paul Baptist Church

In Limestone Needs Help


Dear Editor:
We are a small African American
church in need of help. In August
2004, our church was destroyed by
Hurricane Charley, Jeanne and
Wilma. We are the only black
church in this small community.
Our church did have insurance at
the time the church was destroyed
in the Hurricane disaster. At the
time of the disaster, we were
scammed by an unethical contrac-
tor.
We served approximately 25
members, and after the completion
of this building, we will be able to
serve 100 to 150 people in our
community.
We need the following things to
complete our building:
1. Doors, (6 exterior, interior 2
36 in. and 6 32 in.);
2. concrete slab, front and back;
3. carpet and tile;
4. white paint, interior and exte-
rior;
5. sheet rock and installation;
6. electric pump;
7. septic tank;
8. hot water heater;
9. ceramic tile;
10. outside lightings;
11. gutters;
12. commercial stove, refrigera-
tor and sink;
13. P.A. system;
14. monetary donations to assist
with material purchases, and to pay


the workers and volunteers;
15. 2 handicap and 1 regular
commode, 1 urinal;
16. vanities for both bathrooms;
.17. finish electrical wiring.
We have been out of church for a
long period of time. We are appre-
ciative of whatever help you can
contribute to the cause. Our com-
munity has been deprived of the
church benefits for almost three (3)
years this coming August, because


of the lack of funds.
If you or anyone you know can
contribute to this mission, please
contactthe church's administrttor
and secretary Ms. Charlie Mae
Jones at 863-494-3466 or 863-399-
0015 or 5005 Lee Ave., Ona, FL
33865.
The pastor and members of this
community appreciate your
thoughtfulness and thank you in
advance.
Sincerely yours,
Charlie Mae Jones,
Church Secretary
Rev. James Marion, Pastor
St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church
Limestone


* MIl IlAll r im I Jky .l*40 l,'-:IN aInIl .lI-

For the week ended May 31, 2007:
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 5,664 compared to
8,512 last week and 4,384 a year ago. According to the Florida Federal-
State Livestock Market News Service: compared to last week: slaughter
cows and bulls were 1.00 to 2.00 lower, feeder steers and heifers were
mostly steady.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs.,. 142.00-190.00
300-400 lbs., 119.00-150.00; and
400-500 lbs., 105.00-131.00.
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 120.00-170.00;
300-400 lbs., 108.00-132.50; and
400-500 lbs., 92.00-113.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 44.00-49.00.
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 Ibs., 56.00-64.00.


Working behind the table after the packages were unloaded are Jennie Johnson, Jason Baldrey,
Jeff Johnson, Marnie Flowers, Arin Johnson, Donnie Flowers and Andy Johnson.

Couple Hosts Food Ministry


By PENNY JOHNSON
Special To The Herald-Advocate
After Hurricane Charley hit,
Donnie Flowers, who was living in
Georgia at the time, felt a real need
to come back to Hardee County and
help with a food ministry.
Flowers poured his heart and soul
out to reach the area's hungry fam-
ilies for over a year. When the Lord
called him back home to Georgia,
he left a piece of his heart here in
Hardee County. He still felt led to
feed the hungry.
In the fall of last year Donnie and
his wife Marnie moved back to
Wauchula and started a ministry
called Last Day Food, an outreach
from Soul Harvest Ministries. They
began the process to become the
host site for Angel Food Ministries.
They are feeding nearly 100 fami-
lies a month now, and the number is
growing daily.
Angel Food was started in
Georgia in 2003 by Pastor Joe and
Linda Wingo. This couple started
feeding 30 families out of their
home. The ministry began to grow
at an astronomical rate. The
Wingos decided to call it Angel
Food Ministries. Today, they are
sending out 400 semi-trucks a
month to host sites just like the one
the Flowers have started in our
county. In the month of December,
over a million families were fed


through the Angel Food programs.
Angel Food offers good quality
food at a discount price. You get
$80 worth of groceries for $25
There is no application to fill out
and everyone is eligible to partici-
pate. You can purchase as many
boxes as you like. There are also
specials each month in addition to
the box that can be purchased very
cheaply. One box will feed an
elderly person for one month and a
family of four for a week; it consist
of meats, vegetables and dessert.
"We are not only touching their
bellies," says Marnie Flowers, "but
we are touching a soul. It's our
hearts desire to be servants of the
Lord. We want to physically and
spiritually help the people.
Everyone has to eat and Angel
Food has made it possible for us to
help people get groceries they can
afford."
"At this present time the food is
shipped to Clearwater, where other
men and I drive to pick it up on dis-
tribution day, but if we reach 200
boxes, the company will deliver
right here in Wauchula," says
Donnie, "and that is our goal."
If you would like to see the menu
for this month go to www.-
angelfoodministries.com it's writ-
ten in Spanish and English, the
menu changes monthly. If you are'
interested in receiving Angel Food,


First Ba tist Children's Academy



First Baptist Children's Academy is now

accepting new enrollment for the 07-08
school year, to begin August 20, 2007.
The following age groups have limited
availability:

Infants (birth to 6 months)
Infants (7 months to 1 yr)
Iyr olds
2 yr olds
4 yr olds "
After School Care

Applications are available in the academy
office, located on 1570 W. Main Street,
Wauchula. For questions please call
773-9185.
I.D. # 0152233
6:7,14c


contact Donnie and Marnie
Flowers at 863-773-4224 or e-mail
them at last-day-ministries@hot-
mail.com. They accept cash, money
orders, major credit cards; such as
Visa, MasterCard, American Ex-
press and Discover, and EBT (food
stamps).
The couple shared that they are in
need of a small office that they can
work this ministry'out of a couple
days of ,week. Pray that this need
will be met.
Distribution of the food is the last
Saturday of every month and the
pick-up spot is the Farmers Market
on US 17 South.


SE. O Koch Construction

3504 Office Park Road P.O. Box 1965
Sebring, FL 33871 Phone: (863) 385-8649

Commercial & Residential Construction
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property,
build your dream home, or do your remodeling.
ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DESIGN
ROOFING
New and repairs
ALUMINUM
Screen and glass enclosures carports patios siding soffit fascia
SEAMLESS GUTTERS AND DOWNSPOUTS
"For all of your Aluminum, Steel, and Conventional construction needs"


Email: kochcon@strato.net


8:i8tfc State Certified License #CBC058444


I--%N


AN j)


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, June 14, 2007


COURTESY PHOTOS
(From left) Andy Johnson, Donnie Flowers and Jeff Johnson stand behind a van full of food pack-
ages for those who need them.


Affordable Housing



and Rentals



Coming Soon to Wauchula!!!





First-Come First-Serve





Call for information

and application.




(863) 808-9031


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2C The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007





-Schedule Of Weekly Services


Printed as a Public Service
by
The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning...................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ..........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service .................... 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ..............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ..........6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship..................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday..............6:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship.................... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship................... 6:30 p.m.
VWednesday 7:30 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship..............10:30 a.m
,Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ................7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..... ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs..........5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................:.. 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................6:30 p.m

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .... .....11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .. ...............7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m
HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ............7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo Serv. De Predicacion 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ............7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ......7:00 p.m.
Jueves Serv. De Predicacion ....7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer.................... 7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service.....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer Ser. ..7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Evening 6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School .9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ........... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training ....................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ..........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..................7:30 p.m.



Most people are more com-
fortable with old problems than
with new solutions.
-Anonymous


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17 375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom...........9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ............5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico .................. 6:30 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service.................... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning......6:30 p.m.
VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service ..............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study, Thurs. 7:30 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone Comm
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...... ........7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................... 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ......... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ............7:00 p.m
NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training .................. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................... .6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer.................... 6:00 p.m

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship.................... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer..................... 7:00 p.m

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship.................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids...6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer Time...........7:00 p.m

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
English Service ..................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ..........1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer 7:00 p.m
Wednesday Service..................7:00 p.m
CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service ................ I0:30a.m.
S Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .................... 7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group.......................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..............7:00 p.m.
Call for locations
CELEBRATION CHURCH
HARDEE CAMPUS,
225 E. Main St.. (City Hall Auditorium
863-368-0950
hardee.celebration.org .
Sunday 10:00 a.m.
CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Pastor James Bland
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .... ............ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship................6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................... 11:00 a.m..
Wednesday ....7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship ........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class ............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship..........6:00 p m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ............7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month............4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Priesthood................ .......... 11... I :00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Sununmmit St. 735-8681
Sunday School .............. .......10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning......................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night.. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night................7:30 p.m.


The following merchants

urge you to attend

your chosen house of worship

this Sabbath


"---- -----------i
+.


P-ac a c-Ri 7 T71 10 .751

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber .(863) 735-047
SHwy. 66 East (863) ,735-0470
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA


ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service...................... I1:30 a.m.
Evening Servicc .... ..............7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath. ....7:30 p.m.
r" "ft Night (Holy Ghost Night)..7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday W orship...................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship............ ..... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper.......:............6:15 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Fellowship ..6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St. 767-8909
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service.................... I 1:00 a.m.
. Evening Worship ....................5:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................... 7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship .... ............ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service...................... 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service ........7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCIl
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School ........................ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical .................. 9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Predicacion 11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie. Miercoles ........7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Children's Programming
(0-12th grade) ..............9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study ..........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ....................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Dinner ......... 5:30 p.m.
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
(Lil'K)/Sonshinc Singers..6:30-8:00 p.m.
Jam Team 6:30-7:15 p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups 7:15-8:00 p.m.
6-12th Grade (Oasis)........6:30-8:00 p.m.
.....Adult Bible Study..............6:30-8:00 p.m
-- FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
M morning Service ..........1........... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ........................ 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........ ........ 6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ............................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.
FIRST U NI'ED
METHODIST CHURCH
D) 207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship....l 1:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study ..............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities................6:00 p.m.
FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386.
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ......10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service ............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Ministries...7:00 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service.................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service..... ............7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts ...... ............ 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .9:30 a.m.
W orship ..... ...................... 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner..................... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads & Lighthouse Min. 7:00 p.m.

IW TTESIA IIISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Ven con to familiar y amigos y
Disfr-ta de La palabra de Dios
Domingos.... .............. 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles .7:00 p.m.
IGLESIA AD)VENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAHII'S WITNESSES ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Morning............. 10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Evening ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening ....................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES SPANISH
Sunday Evening.............. .......4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ......................7:30 p.m,
Wednesday Evening...............7:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCII
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School ........................ 9:45 a.in.
Morning Service...................I 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m.
NEW'BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of 7th Ave. & Palmetto St.
735-0555
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ........................9:4:5 .itv*t
Morning Service......................11:00 a.m.
Church Training 5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship .....................6:30 ).m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave. 767-0023
Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) 8:00 a.m;
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1....11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service........4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor ........4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.

NORTIISIDE BAPTIST CHIURCHI
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ........................ 9:45 a.m.
SMorning Worship.................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper..................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship.................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
'1" & 3" Sun. Communion ......10:00 a.m.
2"' & 4" Sun. Divine Worship 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-5814
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...................... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
coming Sevice...........10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning......6:30 p.m.
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program WZZS Sundays9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........ ...... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........ ........ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................7:00 p.m.
ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Holy Days

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ..........5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ............7:30 p.m..
Sunday (Spanish) ...................7:00 a.m.
(English) 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) .................. 11:00 a.m.
(Creole) 1:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..............8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School 9:30_a.m.--"
Morning Worship ..............1......1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting................7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE


tiday Meming Worship .... i0O a.m.
Evening Worship . . . . .. ...6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship . . . . .... ...7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY
116 Orange St.
Sunday School .... ....... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship . . . . . 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train.7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayeir Service . . . 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ............10:00a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship . . . .. ...6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training . . 7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ... . 7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship. ....... 7:30 p.m.


LIGHT OF THE WORLD MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL






The Heald* doc0S.


WAUCHULA

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Church .................. 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service .............. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ............ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .......... 7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ............. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship .......... 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church ....... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... .7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ........... 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ....... . . 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
102 N. 6th Ave. (Earnest Plaza)
773-2929.
.Sunday Service ... ......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .......... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service. .... 7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .. ...... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.......... 7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66 (across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .................. 10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ............. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... . 7:00 p.m.
Wedfiesday Prayer ...... .:... 7:00 pmh.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ................ 7:30 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ............... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ........... 11:00 a.m.
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. 735-2524 735-0989
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Worship ................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet.. . 7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-8586
Morning Worship .... ..... 10:00 a.m.
Children's Church.......... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H......... 7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD
FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ........... 10:00 a:m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship .. ... . 7:30 p.m.
'Saturday Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ........... . 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ............ 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH COWBOY
CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School ... .......... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... I11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month Cowboy
Fellowship ............... 7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ............. 9:39 a.m.
Morning Worship............. 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ......... 7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol... 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones .............. 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina ................. 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica .. ... .. 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................. 1 1:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club ............... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ........ 7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ........ 6:00 p.m.
Servicio .................. 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ...... 5:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..... . ... 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ............. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.


One day a boy said, "Dad, guess
what I h've in my hand? A honey
bee!"
"It will sting you," cautioned the
father.
"It won't," said the boy. "We
removed the stinger."
That's what Christ did to death
on the cross. Now, when death
strikes a believer, it's with a
stingless process. Death has lost
its sting.
Death is no longer a foe, but a
friend that opens the door to the
believer and ushers him into
heaven where there's no sin, no
sorrow, and no suffering.
Like the Bible says, "0 death,
where is thy sting? 0 grave, where
is thy victory?"


JA (ecad Jlboe tv ehe Te


As Father's Day ,' -',
approaches, we think of .
the limes when our -
lathers made the .
dilllerence.... ., ,-
The colorful crowd '
lining Main Street was -
animated with laughter *
and enthusiasm as the
parade marched by. '
Standing on tiptoe, a --
small boy searched for N, "
an opening through -
which he could see the Y
festivities.
"Here come the A .. .
clowns!" cried someone .
In the Ifront row. The
little boy craned his neck
and cried to his father.
Daddy, I can't see the
clowns, help me see!"
Dad knew what to do.
He scooped his son up
and put him on his shoulder. Now a head above the rest. his son
clapped his hands and laughed with glee as the clowns went by.
God Is there for us. like a father is for his son. When life crowds
In around us, and we can't see what's going on. God can lift us up on
His shoulders...a head above the rest. "For He will command His
angels concerning you...they will Iift you up in their hands...."
S(Psalm 91:11) Be raised up with God in worship this week.




scnu N esrSeiced by The A7mec&nBblescoWe 2y
CopyngWt 2007, Keister-Wiliams Newspaper Services, P.O. Box 8187, Charlottesvlle, VA 22906, www kwnews.com







June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Inside Out
By Chip Ballard


MURDER ON MUSIC ROW


Someone killed country music, cut out its heart and soul ...
Steel guitars no longer cry, and you can't hear fiddles play -
With drums and rock 'n' roll guitars mixed up in your face;
Old Hank wouldn't have a chance, on today's radio -
Since they committed murder; down on music row.
Alan Jackson & George Strait

Many of today's young country music fans wouldn't recognize a real
country song if it chugged up beside them on the Wabash Cannonball pick-
ing a Dobro and whistling "Waltz Across Texas."
Today's country music is little more than pop rock of the 70s -and
bad rock at that.
On their 10th anniversary album, in a song called "Nobody Wants to
Be Country," the Statler Brothers sang:
"Nobody wants to be country, everybody wants to go pop;
They've traded in their saddles and all try to straddle the road that'll
take 'em to the top. They put their steel in hock, add a little rock, and wind
up something they're not;
Nobody wants to be country, they want to go pop."
Elvis must bear a sizable chunk of the blame for that. After he burst
into the national spotlight in 1956, a whole generation of country singers
suddenly forsook their roots and decided to "go pop." Even the countrified
Conway Twitty went pop for a while. Twitty, however, had the good sense
to realize his country roots were too deep to defy and climbed back over
onto his own the side of the fence.
Elvis was a country boy, too, but the difference in him and Conway -
and the hordes of other country boys who aspired to go pop was that
early on Elvis's musical interests were more far-reaching. On Saturday
nights he listened to the Grand Ole Opry, but on other nights he sneaked
into all-night gospel sings that featured such groups as The Blue Ridge
Quartet, The Blackwood Brothers, The Sunshine Boys and The
Statesmen-and he studied the performances of flamboyant front men like
Ace Richman, Laverne Tripp and Hovie Lister.
In the afternoons after school, Elvis would slip into black music stores,
hunch down in a booth and listen to rhythm and blues. From a combination
of country, southern gospel and the rhythm and blues of the Deep South,
Elvis developed his unique style that became known as rock 'n' roll.
As a whole generation of wannabes tried to follow in his footsteps, one
might assume that to find any honest country music one would have to go
back before Elvis. If not for a handful of country purists, like George Jones,
that might be true.
Jones was country before Elvis got here, he stayed country while Elvis
was rocking the world, and he has remained country since Elvis left the
building.
Another country music great, Merle Haggard, is still rolling down
America's highways in his big Silver Eagle, making great country music,
along with George Strait, Randy Travis and Alan Jackson.
But for the very best, the purest country music, we do indeed need to
go back before Elvis to the 1940s and early 50s. For a taste of the real thing
we must listen to Hank Williams Sr. and Lefty Frizzell. Listening to Lefty
sing the songs of Jimmy Rodgers, I agree with Hank Williams Jr. that Lefty
Frizzell just might be the most underestimated talent in the business. Hank
Jr. led the force that had Lefty, however belatedly, inducted into the
Country Music Hall Of Fame.
Hank Sr. and Lefty toured together for years. Each was so popular
they'd flip a coin to see who would perform first. At the end of each show,
they'd do a number together. How sad they never collaborated on an album.
Williams died, an old man, at 29. Frizzell staggered on to the ripe old
age of 47. But in their short, troubled lives, each man wrote some of coun-
try music's greatest songs and recorded enough music to delight country
fans forever.
*I apologize for not mentioning the great ladies of country music like
Mother Maybelle Carter, KItty Wells, Tammy Wynette, Loretta Lynn and so
many more. The women are a whole other story.
Readers may e-mail Chip Ballard at chipkyle746@earthlink.net or visit his
Web site at www.chipballard.com


Keeping9 it Clean
Property clean-up Ordinance violation correction
Mobile home & shed removal Debris & Brush removal
Site clean-up Scrap metal & car removal
Commercial or Residential



Joe Ruschiwal
Servicing Hardee and surrounding counties. 6:14,21p




WAUCHULA PAWN & GUN




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Mon. Sat.
9:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.


773-0050
317 N. 6th Ave.


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"New Patients Welcome"


Tricia Ahner
P.A.-C.


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Provider for:
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Se Habla Espanol


1125 S. 6TH AVE.
WAUCHULA


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
When it was all over, Wauchula
First Baptist Church had claimed
the post-season tournament title.
The single-elimination tourna-
ment began on June 5 and ended
late on June 8 after rain relays on
June 7 postponed completing the
tournament.
First Christian took second place,
and Bowling Green Baptist was
third. In order, the other teams par-
ticipating were St. Alonso's
Chapel, St. Michael's Catholic,
Northside Baptist, New Vision
Worship Center, Holy Child
Catholic and Celebration Hardee.
On opening night, there were a
pair of games on each field. In
game one on Field 3, New Vision
nipped Celebration 10-8.
Ricky Wiggins, Joey Brantley
and Trey Talley socked triples for
New Vision. Wiggins and Chad
Richardson were twin-tally batters,
while Richard Cummings, Kenny
McDuffie, Eric Harrison, Tony
Smith and Brantley came around to
score once each.
Celebration profited from a pair
of hits by Willie Gilliard and Clint
Hendry. Gilliard collected three
RBIs. Andrew Hinojosa was the
only two-score batter, but Jose
Carrillo, Lee Valadez, Yogi
Lozano, Amos Trevino and Charlie
Flesher added a run apiece.
In the 6:45 game on Field 4, St.
Alfonso's downed Holy Child 15-
11.
Julian Garcia tripled and Marty
Gainous doubled three times in his
four hits for St. Alfonso's. Eddie
Strange' rounded the bases four
times, Willie Dickerson came home
three times and Raul Garcia and
Dale Roberts cross home twice
apiece. Gainous, Julian Garcia,
Duck Kersey and Quinton Blum
touched home once each.
Emmanuel Rivera tripled and
doubled for five RBIs for Holy
Child. Samuel Rivera and Jose
Gomez each put three scores on the
board. Robbie Lee joined
Emmanuel Rivera in coming home
twice each. Ernie Briseno added a
run and Ram Briones helped others
score with his twin hits and trio of
RBIs.
In the Field 3 nightcap, First
Baptist began its winning trek with
a 29-6 victory of New Vision.
West Palmer homered twice for
First Baptist and Todd Rogers
added a three-run shot. Mark


McGee was the only player to cross
home plate four times. Gerry
Lindsey, Brian Alexy, Bobby
Barnes, Steve Johnson, Palmer
and Rogers each put three scores on
the board. Jay Belflower and
Phillip Smoak had two runs apiece
and Daniel Barnett, Efrain
Schrader and Bobby Calves had
solo scores.
For New Vision, it was Eric
Russell banging a triple, and
Cummings with a double. Steve
Brantley, Richardson, Wiggins,
Eric Russell, Harrison and
Cummings each touched home
plate once.
In the 8:15 game on Field 4, First
Christian won 13-7 over Northside.
James Blum homered and dou-
bled and Randy Benton chipped in
with a triple for First Christian.
Chris Knight had four hits and
three scores. Keith Nadaskay and
Blum came around to touch home
twice each and Alan Tubbs, Eddie
Hernandez, Tommy Hartm.an,
Aaron Nadaskay, Johnny Obersky
and Benton crossed home once
each.
Michael Carte and John Rober-
son each homered for Northside.
Carte had three hits and Roberson,
Reid Benton and Rob' Davis each
had two. Benton and Roberson
came home twice and Carte, Ches
Graham and Davis each put a run in
the book.
There was only one game on
Thursday night. Bowling Green
Baptist outlasted St. Michael's 17-
14 despite the inclement weather.
Hank Butler, Ron Bromley and
J.J. Johnston each homered for
Bowling Green. Leadoff batter
Austin Helms tripled, doubled,
walked and scored three times.
Bromley picked up five RBIs on
his twin hits. W.T. Redding, Craig
Cook, Mike Adams, Davis and
Johnston each put a pair of scores
on the board. Bryan Cook, Justin,
Butler and Matt Gruebb each added
a run.
Calvin Brutus homered twice and
Francisco Rodriguez added a
homer and triple for St. Michael's.
Brutus and Robert Navarro each
also doubled. Navarro and Brutus
had triple tallies, and Rodriguez
and Jose Olivia put twin scores in
the book. Felix Salinas, Roy
Rodriguez and David Navarro
added a run each.
It came down to the final three
games on Friday evening.
On Field 4, First Christian


downed St. Alfonso's 15-11.
Justin Battles and Blum each
homered and doubled for First
Christian and Aaron Nadaskay
tripled. Blum scored three runs and
had four RBIs, while Tubbs used
two hits and a fielder's choice to
come around to score three times.
Obersky added twin scores and
Hernandez, Keith Nadaskay, Aaron
Nadaskay, Battles, Hartman,
Benton and Dusty Massey chipped
in with a run each.
Roberts homered and Raul
Garcia tripled for St. Alfonso's.
Both came around to cross home
plate three times. Strange added
twin scores and Julian Garcia,
Quinton Blum and Ralph Arce each
added a run, while Julian Garcia Jr.
helped with a pair of RBIs.
Meanwhile, on Field 3, First
Baptist came back for a 27-7 win
over Bowling Green in the 6:45
game.
Palmer homered twice of his
three hits and had four RBIS, while
Lindsey homered and doubled
twice for five RBIs. Belflower
added four hits. Calves came home
four times, and Dale Carlton,
Schrader, Palmer and Alexy three
times apiece. Lindsey, Belflower
and Jerry Albritton were two-score


Golden Nuggets
By Lorraine and John Gillespie
Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries of Wauchula


CFo


0 Israel (Christian), trust the Lord! He is your helper. He is
your shield. 0 priests of Aaron, trust the Lord! He is your
helper; he is your shield. All of you, His people, trust in him. He
is your helper; he is your shield.
Psalm 115:9-11
It goes on to say Jehovah is constantly thinking about us and he will
surely bless us. He will bless the people of Israel and all, both great and
small, who reverence him. You and your children.
Are you being blessed? Maybe you are not reverencing Him. Think
about it.
Do you call on Him as your helper? He really wants to help you in
everything so you will make wise decisions and be blessed.
He can be your shield and protector in all things if you will allow Him
to do it. He can protect you from the enemy (satan). God can be whatever
you need, even mother or father, as Psalms tells us. Many times our moth-
er or father is not there for us or abandoned us, but God can fill that gap.
A Golden Nugget today is to trust Him above all people and things and
He will work out what is best for you if you surrender and let Him be your
helper and shield and to reverence Him. You will be blessed.


Even better than chocolate



and peanut butter together.



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Residential voice usage only. State-to-state and international long distance services governed by Embarq Communications, Inc. terms and conditions at embarq.com. Usage for Directory Assistance, EMBARQ' Calling Card service, operator services,
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assessed a data usage fee or have service disconnected U.S. residents in EMBARQ local temtories only with dial-1 service qualify. Includes one phone line. No pro-ration of any monthly recurring charge for partial bill when customer cancels service
Local toll and international rates vary, and surcharges may apply, including surcharges on residential calls made to foreign mobile phones. Call 1-866-421-7935 for local toll and international rates. Operator-assisted calls and toll-free/calling card calls
made from payphones in the U.S. will be assessed a surcharge. All rates subject to change. Wireless service: Coverage not available everywhere. Terms and conditions apply; see store or embarq.com for details. May not be combined with other offers.
Device subject o availability. $75 (1-yr, term) or $150 (2-yr. term) early termination and. if not an EMBARQ~ wireline customer, a $35 activation fee applies per line. A deposit maybe required. Unused plan minutes do not carry forward. Partial minutes
are charged as full minutes. Overage charges apply. Equipment credit: Requires purchase and new service activation by 00/31107. Applied at point of sale or on initial invoice, depending on purchase location. Not available on accounts that received
equipment credits associated with renewal or activation within the last 12 months. Cannot exceed customer's actual purchase price of devicess. Activation at lime of purchase required for credit. Untimted Calling to EMBARQ Home Phone: Calls
to your EMBARQ" home wireline number do not count toward any minute allocation. One Voicemail Supports only EMBARO" Wireless (primary line only) and wireline phones, All phones must be under the same customer name. 2007 Embarq
Holdings Company LLC. All rights reserved The name EMBARQ and the jet logo are trademarks of Embarq Holdings Company LLC. 6:1 4-28C EMBl-07-04714


First Baptist Wins Tourney


ft Al:lllm- mml


ME


batters and McGee, Barnett and.
Rogers added a run each.
Butler smacked a two-run homer
for Bowling Green and Austin
Helms tripled. Redding was the-
only twin-tally batter. Adams,
Craig Cook, Butler, Austin Helms
and Wally Helms each put a run on
the board.
The championship game on Field
3 at 8:15 was a marathon, with First
Baptist working for its 26-15 win
over First Christian.
Belflower homered twice and
Palmer added a three-run homer for
First Baptist. Barnett circled the
bases five times, McGee and
Rogers four times apiece and
Lindsey and Belflower three times
each. Palmer, Schrader and Carlton
were each two-score batters and
Alexy, Albritton and Johnson added
a run each.
Justin Battles socked a grand-
slam homer in a seven-run sixth-
inning rally for First Christian. .
Tubbs also homered and doubled
and Hartman doubled twice.
Battles came around to cross home
plate three times, and Tubbs,
Hartman, Oberskys and Massey
each put a pair of scores on the
board. Johnson, Blum, Hernandez
and Benton chipped in with a run
each.


LLij;l







4C The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007




During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police officers
investigated the following incidents and made the following arrests:
COUNTY
June 10, Jerzy Kospieruk, 52, of 639 W. Central Blvd., Orlando, was
arrested by deputies Carree Williams and Jerry Rutledge and charged with
disorderly intoxication and failure to appear in court.
June 10, Stephen Adam Rickels, 22, of 220 Brown Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Pauline Bissette and charged with simple assault.
June 10, residential burglaries on Cross Creek Lane and Smith Road,
a tag stolen on U.S. 17 South and a fight on U.S. 17 North were reported.
June 9, Joseph Nicholas Carmona, 43, of 702 Sandpiper Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge of withholding child sup-
port.
June 9, Adam Cruz Sr., 37, of 3230 Perdue Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Manuel Zuniga and charged with battery.
June 9, a theft on U.S. 17 North and criminal mischief on Long Road
were reported.
June 8, Vreen Crawford III, 19, of 1556 Churchhill St., Lake Placid,
was arrested by Dep. Shane Ward and charged with DUI.
June 8, Kirby Lee Clarke, 39, of 5495 Sweetwater Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested on a charge of contempt of court.
June 8, Jesus Jose Lozano, 56, P.O. Box 1054, Bowling Green, was
arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with possession of marijuana, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia and possession of drugs with intent to sell.
June 8, Mauricio Mora, 26, General Delivery, Wauchula, was arrested
by Dep. Nathan Woody and charged with disorderly intoxication.
June 8, criminal mischief on Johnston Road and a theft on SR 64 East
were reported.
June 7, Robert Earl Woods, 45, of 719 Sandpiper Drive, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Shane Ward and charged with battery.
June 7, Willie Lee Grey, 36, of 618 Sally Place, Wauchula, was arrest-
ed by Sgt. Eric Thompson and charged with lewd/lascivious behavior.
June 7, criminal mischief on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue was
reported.
June 6, a theft on U.S. 17 North, criminal mischief at U.S. 17 and REA
Road, and a tag stolen on Metheny Road were reported.
June 5, Abram McCumber, 38, of 5018 Poplar Ave., Bowling Green,
was arrested by Dep. Jerry Rutledge and charged with larceny.
June 5, Fatema Renee Marinei, 27, of 1542 Lincoln St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Danny O'Bryan on charges of failure to appear in
court, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, posses-
sion of cocaine, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia
and driving with knowledge of a suspended license.
June 5, Felipe Galdino Ramirez, 20, of 420 N. Ninth Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. David Drake on charge of hit and run, leaving the
scene of a crash involving injury and no valid license, and was detained on
three counts violation of felony probation.
June 5, Pedro Perez, 30, of 2150 Stansfield Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Pauline Bissette on a charge of contempt of court.
June 5, thefts on Lake Branch Road, East Main Street and two loca-
tions on U.S. 17 North, and a tag stolen on Heard Bridge Road were report-
ed.
June 4, Donna Marie Day, 32, of 734 Ave. B., Winter Haven, was
arrested by Dep. David Drake and charged with withholding child support.
June 4, Ethan Nickerson, 18, of 5445 Roy Coker Road, Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Dep. Jerry Rutledge and charged with passing a forged or
altered check and larceny.
June 4, Peter Leroy Ramsey, 47, of 2739 Gall Blvd., Zephyrhills, was
arrested by Dep. David Drake on a charge of contempt of court.
June 4, Michael Paul Sanchez, 31, 5007 Troublesome Creek Road,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Eric Thompson and charged with
grand theft auto, fleeing to elude police, resisting an officer without yio-
lence and driving while license suspended.
June 4, Roger Sylvester Darty, 42, of 5975 New Tampa Highway,
Lakeland, was arrested by Dep. David Drake on a charge of withholding
child support.
June 4, Juan Ramon Maldonado, 30, of 1817 Smith Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Pauline Bissette and charged with resisting an officer
without violence and violation of a county ordinance.
June 4, James Riley Driver, 43, of 3759 Penny Drive, Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Dep. Carree Williams and charged with resisting an offi-
cer without violence and a nonmoving traffic violation.
June 4, residential burglaries on Sparrow Road and Martin Luther
King Jr. Avenue, criminal mischief on Altman Road and a theft on Heard
Bridge Road were reported.
WAUCHULA
June 10, Herman Herrera, 23, of 209 E. Main St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Cpl. Gabe Garza and charged with burglary of a dwelling or
conveyance, resisting an officer without violence and criminal mischief.
June 10, Ramiro Mata, 22, General Delivery, Bowling Green, was
arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with battery.
June 10, Charlie Taylor Jr., 61, General Delivery, Wauchula, and
Kevin Andrea Powell, 49, of 157 Will Duke Road, Wauchula, were arrest-

GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS


76tfc


Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked in
the top 10 in customer satisfaction in Florida
I have received Ford's highest Sales Honor
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01 800-226-3325


"The Heartland HOME Consortia here pro-
vides notice to execute a substantial
Amendment to the 2005-2010 Consolidated
Plan for DeSoto, Glades, Hardee, Hendry,
Highlands and Okeechobee Counties. In
the One Year Action Plan, on page 92, the
Consortia plan to Rental Strategy 1 below:
Rental Strategy 1
Create 10 new affordable rental units
through new construction, rehabilitation, or
conversion, for families at or below 50% of
the median income. Housing for homeless
or special needs may be included in this
goal.
Time Period 10 units to be completed by
Fiscal Year 2006-2007
Resources HOME $200,000
Other funding will be sought for leveraging.
The Rental Strategy funds of $200,000 will
be applied to Homeownership Strategy 1."
6:14c


ed by Ofc. Robert Spencer and each charged with disorderly intoxication.
Taylor was also charged with trespassing.
June 10, Mannic Owens Jr., 43, of 618 Sally Place, was arrested by
Ofc. Robert Spencer and Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with disorderly
intoxication, trespassing, resisting an officer with violence and battery on
an officer or firefighter.
June 10, a business burglary on U.S. 17 South and a theft on Louisiana
Street were reported.
June 9, Calino Hernandez, 36, General Delivery, Wauchula, was
arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and charged with disorderly intoxication
and resisting an officer without violence.
June 9, Ulises Zanchez Zoto, 24, of 238 Griffin Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with forgery altering a
license plate, and four traffic violations.
June 9, Jose Luis Sanchez-Iule, 23, of 935 Fernleaft Drive, Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with possession of
methamphetamine and driving with knowledge of a suspended license.
June 7, Jose Luis Hernandez, 37, of 130 Miller Road, Wauchula, was.
arrested by Ofc. Amy Drake and charged with fraud by giving a false ID to
an officer and driving while license suspended.
June 7, Kevin Andrea Powell, 49, of 157 Will Duke Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Matthew Whaley and charged with trespassing.
June 7, Barbara Lee Hasell, 26, of 520 W. Main St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Cpl. Matthew Whatley and charged with DUI.
June 6, a theft on South Seventh Avenue was reported.
June 5, Joseph Ryne Beeson, 19, of 210 Pennsylvania Ave., Wauchula,
and Virginia Joy Underwood. 20, of 4255 W. Humphrey St., Tampa, were
arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and each charged with possession of mar-
ijuana. Beeson was also charged with possession of methamphetamine.
June 5, Michael Harry Mohn, 63, of 404 N. Seventh Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Gabe Garza and charged with disorderly intoxication.
June 5, criminal mischief on Court Street and thefts on Carlton Street,
Short Street and two locations on South Florida Avenue were reported.
June 4, Arael Perez, 29, General Delivery, Wauchula, was arrested by
Sgt. John Eason on a charge of failure to appear in court.
June 4, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 South was reported.
BOWLING GREEN
June 10, Abram McCumber, 38, of 5018 Poplar Ave., Bowling Green,
was arrested by Ofc. Scott Grace and charged with battery.
June 10, a business burglary on Chester Avenue was reported.
June 8, burglary of a conveyance on Pleasant Way and criminal mis-
chief on West Jones Street were reported.
June 7, Nathan Glenn Franks, 49, of 213 Keeton Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with possession of
marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
June 7, Charles Eugene Derringer III, 22, of 810 Pleasant Way,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges and charged with
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.
June 7, Amy Louise Waters, 33, and Travis Waters, 36, both of 5935
Rich Road, Bowling Green, were arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges and each
charged with possession of marijuana and possession of drug parapherna-
lia. Travis Waters was also charged with possession of methamphetamine.
June 7, a theft on Mason-Dixon Avenue was reported.
June 4, a theft on East Main Street was reported.
ZOLFO SPRINGS
June 4, a theft on Fifth Street East was reported.


Light One Candle
By Dennis Heaney
President Of The Christophers


TAKE A SHORT PRAYER BREAK
Years ago a priest friend showed me some daily schedule pads that he
had made up for himself. At the top was a line for the date and the heading
"To Do Today" and then 15 lines for the various things he wanted to accom-
plish. The basic difference from similar pads was that on lines 1, 5 and 10
it had "Pray" and on line 15 it said "Thanksgiving Prayer."
The first time I saw the pad I commented that it would:be interesting
to market it, and suggested that he let me "borrow" the idea as a premium
for the diocesan paper where I worked at the time. He was okay with that
if I didn't tell anyone where the idea had come from. He didn't want cred-
it in any way.
The pads were his way of reminding himself each day of God's prima-
ry place in his priesthood and his life. Line 15, he said, was the most impor-
tant because it reminded him to thank God for the gifts of the day and -
some days for the help God had given him to make it through the day.
He said that the idea came to him soon after his ordination, following
his first months assigned to a parish. Filled with the excitement and self-
importance of his new work, he got so caught up in his parish ministry that
at the end of too many days he realized that, other then presiding at Mass,
he'd taken little time during the day for prayer and reflection as he regular-
ly did in the more structured seminary life. The pads were his way of mak-
ing sure prayer was always on his schedule and on his mind.
As one who gets caught up in my own daily "To Do" list, it was good
for me to hear that a priest had to remind himself to take a few minutes dur-
ing a day to put things into a prayerful perspective. I thought it was just me!
For many of us, it seems our schedules are not just filled, but jammed,
with commitments, appointments and "absolutely-have-to-do" projects. I
leave it to the social scientists to explain why this happens, but I know I
sometimes feel overwhelmed by my schedule. Even getting a bite to eat, let
alone a meal, is a challenge. Take a few minutes for prayer or meditation?
I'll get to that later or tomorrow!
I find that when it gets that way the healthiest thing I can do is take
even five minutes for a "prayer break" right at my desk. I have a couple of
resources I use to help me in this quiet time. Obviously and honestly, the
day's reading in our Christopher book "Three Minutes a Day" helps me
focus on the good in the world around me.
In this computer age I can also go to "Sacred Spaces," a Website of the
Irish Jesuits that has a short reflection, scriptural reading and prayer. To my
surprise one of my own brothers recently told me that when he turns on his
computer in the morning he listens to "Christopher Minutes" on our
Website (christophers.org). Even though he has to listen to me (his words!)
he says that it helps him at least start the day in a positive perspective.
I'm sure the short prayer breaks I take during the day help me to slow
down a bit, and that makes them mental health breaks too. Yet I know that
first and foremost the breaks help me put all the busyness into perspective
- and remember to make my work a prayer.
For a free copy of the Christopher News Note, THREE MINUTES TO
MAKE A DIFFERENCE, write: The Christophers, 12 East 48th Street, New
York, NY 10017; or e-mail: mail@christophers.org


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate


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June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 5C


VETERINARIANS & THEIR VEHICLES
Last week I wrote about the challenges and hazards of a large animal
practice. It seems one story always reminds me of another, or in this case
several others, because there were times when it wasn't me that suffered, it
was the trauma to my vehicles.
A large animal practitioner will normally drive 60,000 to 70,000 miles
a year and over the course of a 30-year career that is a couple million miles
or more. That is a lot of miles and a lot of vehicles, and many times the dev-
astation was caused by the large animal patients we treat.


FUN LEARNING


4


- -














.., w. . :-'
r,


COURTESY PHOTOS
Monday was the first day of EcoCamp
for 20 seventh through 12th grade stu-
dents. Teacher Kayton Nedza lead
instructor is assisted by instructors
Byron Jarnigan, Cula Hodges and
Donna Parks. The crew and students
took buses and canoes to Lake June in
Lake Placid for the day. After instruction
on canoe safety and rowing techniques,
the students put their canoes in the
water (top photo). The students had to
battle the wind and several canoes were
intentionally and unintentionally tipped
over (middle photo). After Nedza taught
the students how to use the Secchi disk,
which measures the turbidity of the
water, and lead line, which measures
the depth of the water, the students
brought the canoes to shore (lower
photo). They were then given a comput-
er lesson, because they will be making a
DVD and interactive CD of EcoCamp.
After the long, educational day, the stu-
dents took a well-earned dip in the lake
and then returned home.


When I was working for the Herman family, who owned the famous
Lippazon Stallions in Myakka City, there was the time I was driving my
pickup around the pasture checking some mares and colts.
They had one old blind mare. They just never had the heart to put her
down because she had been raised there, but I didn't know anything about
her, or the fact that she ," right behind me. When she got up beside me on
the right hand side she ntc the truck, bounced off the hood and tore up the
whole front end, and it was hard to believe the horse walked away from it.
There was another time 1 was working for Mose Hollingsworth. We
were out there to castrate some horses and one of them got away. I was in
mny truck, foolishly, trying to run him back into the pens. We iot about had
him through the gate when he whirled around and slammed. aito the pas-
senger side of the truck, and it cost $3,500 to fix it. I also learned if I left a
vehicle where horses could get to it they would set their teeth in the metal
and pull down, making long, deep, vertical scratches in the paint job.
Probably the most devastating wreck was the time my wife had this
really beautiful, black Saab and rather than trade it in I decided I would just
use it for work. We had just had it repainted, and it was so black and shiny
you could see yourself in it.
I was at a dairy in Highlands County at the time and had parked the
Saab in the dry cow pasture while I walked over to look at some of the
springers. I may have been distracted by a cow having a calf or something
like that, but when I looked back at my beautiful, black Saab, the cows had
surrounded it.
When I got back there to run them off I realized I was too late. It seems
I could not only see myself in my shiny Saab, but the cows could see them-
selves in it and, cow-like, they had started butting what they perceived as
strange cows in their pasture. They had crushed several panels which
required a lot of body work, and if I remember right cost more than the car
was worth.
I thought for a while I must be a slow-learner because it took a lot of
damaged vehicles to learn not to park my truck, car or van where cows or
horses could inflect such costly damage.
However; when I was visiting a classmate in Kentucky, after he had
been in practice for about 25 years, I noticed he had a backyard full of dam-
aged vehicles, too, so I concluded this might be just one more occupation-
al hazard for large animal veterinarians.

The only two angels identified by name in the Bible are Michael
and Gabriel, who appear in the Book of Daniel.


Be A Good Sport!
SPORTS NEWS DEADLINE IS NOON ON MONDAY


I~e Of.1p The Week


As our school year comes to a close, some might think that summer is
a time when the employees of the school district put up their feet and wait
until the students return in August.
Actually, summer proves to be the busiest time of the year for many.
Teachers and school-related personnel. (SRPs) enroll in classes to fur-
ther their education or knowledge of certain subjects or gain proficiency in
an area needed to maintain their certification. Some teachers and SRPs are
involved in summer school and voluntary Pre-K. School-based office staff
is busy ordering supplies, transferring student files and enrolling new stu-
dents. Administrators are involved in hiring new staff members, budgeting
for the upcoming school year and coordinating instructional schedules.
Transportation spends the summer hiring and training new bus drivers,
and schedules routine maintenance and repair of the District's vehicles.
Maintenance workers take care of the grounds, perform much needed
repairs, paint classrooms, and complete routine safety and maintenance
requirements. Each school cleans its classrooms, floors, and common areas
to ensure they are ready for students in August.
Food service coordinates the summer breakfast and lunch program
sponsored through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Many children of
the community come to our area schools daily to receive a free breakfast
and/or lunch throughout the summer.
The Finance Department must prepare the end of the year reports and
close out the fiscal year. The budget for the upcoming school year will be
finalized.
New employees and recent retirees are processed through the
Personnel Department including insurance, benefits and certification.
The Management Information Services (MIS) Department must pre-
pare and send student data and survey reports to the State of Florida. The
student data base must be rolled over during June to promote students to the
next grade level which will allow the schools to complete their scheduling
process. Technicians will be working to upgrade and change hardware that
is essential to efficient data transmission. The District has over 1,200 com-
puters in use and many are in need of repair and maintenance.
This is just a small sampling of the many activities that occur during
the summer months. Look for more departments and their roles in our
school district next month. As always, we hope to see you in the Board
room.


Highlands Regional

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6C The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007


John W. Burton recalls Desert
Storm.


Betty Croy, Rep. Buchanan, Candace Preston, Dr. Sylvia Collins,
attended chamber event.

Chamber Of Commerce

Honors American Military


Commerce on May 29 presented a
"Honoring The Heroes Among Us"
tribute to American military troops.
Guest speaker was U.S. Rep. Vern
Buchanan.
The steak dinner event was held
at the Army National Guard
Armory in Wauchula. Chamber
director Erica Scheipsmeier came
up with the idea from a similar
event held recently in Highlands
County.
- Tributes were given to local mil-
itary personnel and remembrances
of past wars and American troops
who were missing in action or pris-
oners of war.
Rep. Buchanan said he recently


Carl Saunders and Bill Crews

spent six or seven days in Iraq and
two day in Afghanistan. "I am so
proud ol' our men and women. We
have challenges. We want to find a
way to win, to look for the road to
victory. We nmisjudged some things
We are up against a religious jihad,
but are making some progress."
Buchanan is on the U.S. I ouIse
Veterans Committee. "There are
1.7 million veterans in Floiida,
including 97,000 in this district. I
lost an uncle in World War 11."
Buchanan said 300 acres in
Sarasota County have recently been
purchased and will be used for a
military cemetery. "There are 1,000
to 1,200 World War II veterans
dying daily in the U.S. We plan to
open the new cemetery in October
2008."
About 185 people attended the
chamber dinner honoring the mili-
tary.


Mack Bryan and Frank Mancini presented the POW/MIA flag
over an empty chair with a place setting at a table.


Jimmy Dickens remembers
the Vietnam War.


Suzanne See sang "We've Got
To Get America Back To God."


Carl Saunders leads the
Pledge of Allegiance.


Mack Bryan recalls
Korean Conflict.


Brandon Powers of the Marines thanked by Rep. Buchanan.


Jessie Sambrano honors
Operation Iraqi Freedom.


David Curry of National Guard honored by Rep. Buchanan.


Sign shows the event sponsors CF Industries, Clear Springs, Hardee County Republican Party,
Mosaic, Peace River Electric Cooperative, and Wauchula Worship Center.


John W. Maddox remembers
World War II.


Hardee High School ROTC members presented the colors.


Dawn Atkinson sings "God Bless America."


Larg Large 1-Topping Pizza $ 99
Large Chicken or Steak Quesadilla E]
and a 2-Liter of Pepipi jDeiveiy Extra


Lawrence Roberts remembers
Operation Enduring Freedom
and Afghanistan.


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Chamber of


Eric Peavy of the Army honored by Rep. Buchanan.





June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 7C


4r
j


li


A


Huss of National Guard thanked by Rep. Buchanan.

Michael Huss of National Guard thanked by Rep. Buchanan.


.IN
Oo oeB
t -

OscarD a of. Bn .


Oscar Diaz of Army congratulated by Rep. Buchanan.


Congressional district office manager Casey Prescott show
with Rep. Buchanan and State Rep. Baxter Troutman.


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
U.S. Rep. Vern Buchanan talks with Steve Johnson.


It C


Jessie Sambrano of U.S. Army receives gift from Rep.
Buchanan.
In 1995, students at Savannah College of Art in Tybee Island, GA,
completed a 76,726 square foot painting of Elvis Presley.


Erica Scheipsmeier, a chamber of commerce director, was
emcee for event.

Final Cut Cabinetry
For Fine Kitchen and Bath
Granite-Corian & Solid Surface
Countertops, etc.


Thanks


for doin


These Hardee County United Way Partners thin
part to make our community the very best it cai
the United Way of Central Florida and know tha
efforts work to bring lasting change.

BOCC/Hardee County
CF Industries, Hardee
City of Wauchula
English Auto
Florida Hospital Wauchula
Hardee County Family YMCA
H;'dee County School Board
Hardee Help Center
H.O.P.E. of Hardee County


A United Way
ers. of Central Florida

k it's really important to do their
n be. They are proud supporters of
t their contributions and volunteer


Jim See Realty, Inc.
Mosaic Company
Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Pete's Pharmacy
Pioneer Medical Center
Seminole Electric Cooperative
Sweetbay Supermarket
Wal-Mart


. - -


Jimmy Lane Sr. honored by Rep. Buchanan.


Call: 863-664-9147
6:7-6:14p


Lau chula, FL
U


0)
L.




E


I Wauchula, FL I






8C The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2007


Dixie Belles Season Done


Playing for the Mosaic Phosphates Wahoos were (in front row, from left) Sarah Reyna, Lindy
Rossman, Taylor Pohl, Aleeza Arguijo and Chelsea Steedley; (back row) coach Tracy Mahoney,
Kristin Bergens, Courtney Buckley, Kate Krause, Summer Palmer, Eryn Mahoney and coach
Patrick Mahoney. _


COURTESY PHOTOS
The Peace River Electric Cooperative Inc. Racers batted around. Kneeling (from left) are Heather
St. John, Sabrina Hernandez, Amanda McNabb, Emily Starratt, Deserea Newcomb and Keri
Douglas; (middle row) Elvira Servin,. Nicole Brown, Carrie Crews, Kristina Garcia, Kaitlyn Hanshaw
and Nabmi Erekson; (in back) coaches Jeff Hanshaw, Michael Mahoney and
Julian Garcia.


The David Singletary State Farm Pride played hard in every game. Kneeling (from left) are Leigha
Trammell, Cierra Martinez, Courtney Chason, Melissa Hartley and Caitlin Chason; (second row)
Marisa Shivers, Emma Marshall, Celeste Williams, Taylor Bolin and Penny McGuire; (third row)
coaches John Shivers, Amy Madewell, Alan Hines and Jim Faulkner; missing Haley Shelton,
Amber Hines and Haley Marshall.


The KMW Photography Patriots played home and road games on weekends. In first row (left to
right) are Kaitlyn Rowe, Kayla Powell, Sierra Coronado, Cassidy Knight, Summer Sisum and
Stephanie Lewis; (second row) coach Shari Knight, McKayla Jeter, Courtney Parks, coach Mike
Jeter, Kayla Knight, Christa Shiver, Savannah Selph and coach Rick Knight.


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June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 9C


Ponytails Finish 2007 Season


COURTESY PHOTOS
The Gourley Plastering Wahoos competed well. In first row (from left) are Dana Terrell, Bridget
Whidden, Arissa Camel, Emily Albritton, SaraBeth Albritton, Alex Ullrich and Milli Jones; (center
row) Emily Hughes, Erica Roberts, Jessica Harrison, Carleigh Coleman, Kelsey Powell and Holly
Hughes; (back row) coaches Robert Jones, Darren Hughes and Jerry Albritton.


0 1 1,44,4,,*X


This week in history, as
researched from the archival pages
of The Florida Advocate, the
Hardee County Herald and The
Herald-Advocate of...

75 YEARS AGO
Five Hardee Students Graduate
At Florida: Five Hardee County
boys. received diplomas from the
University of Florida at Gainesville
this week at the annual commence-
ment exercises.
Those from Hardee County to
receive diplomas were: E. Odell
Carlton, Elton Winthrop Crews,
Thomas Naney Farabee, Charles
Alfred Stansfield and James Milton
McEwen.

Diamond Ball Nine In 11-Inning
Battle Here: After being washed out
by rain at Frostproof last Thursday
night, the Wauchula diamond ball
team came home to stage an 11-
inning battle with the Sebring team
here Monday night.
Sebring finally won out by stag-
ing a rousing three-run rally in the
eleventh, while Wauchula was held
scoreless. Al Kohn bagged a triple
for the locals and Clemens, on the
mound for Wauchula, let the visi-
tors down with only eight hits.

J. Wallace Smith Will Teach Here
Next Term: A report from Cross
City says that J. Wallace Smith, for
the past three years coach in the
Dixie County High School, has
resigned his position to accept a
position in the Hardee County High
School in Wauchula.
It is understood here that Smith
takes the place formerly held by
Professor L.P. Elam here in the
school. Coach D.G. McPherson will
remain as head coach according to
our information.

50 YEARS AGO
Bombing Range Function Told: A
description of the activities of the
Avon Park Bombing Range was
given to the Wauchula Kiwanis
Club Tuesday by Warrant Officer
Bill Sapp.
The flashes that can be seen at
night from a distance of up to 100
miles from the range are photo-
flash bombing. The bomber makes
a run, drops its bombs and a flash
attachment goes off in the air as the
bomb. hits, photographing how
close it came to the target.


Hardee Removed From Quaran-
tine: The entire county of Hardee
has been removed from the
Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine.
This became official May 31.
Permits and certificates are no
longer required for movement of
fruits and vegetables.
Much of the state of Florida is no
longer quarantined. Although
Hardee County is now free from the
Medfly the State Plant Board in
cooperation with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture will con-
tinue to keep traps in the county as
a precautionary measure.

Miss Patti Timmerman Wed To
Billy Mack Read Sunday: The
childhood dreams of a garden wed-
ding became reality Sunday after-
noon at half past five when Miss
Patti Timmerman became the bride
of Billy Mack Read at her home.
The ceremony was performed
before a natural arch and an altar
banked with palms and fan-shaped
arrangements of white gladioli,
white and yellow daisies, pom
poms and yellow majestic daisies in
baskets and urns.

25 YEARS AGO
8-Year-Old Boy Acts In Com-
mercials: Kevin Moore, 8, makes
more money in a day when he
works than may people do in a
week. He is paid $275 a day for act-
ing in commercials. He also gets a
commission each time the commer-
cial is shown.
Kevin has been in the business
since he was 4 1/2 -years-old. His
parents are David and Maria Moore
of Lake Placid, and he is the grand-
son of the late Rueben and Lettie
Moore of Wauchula. Kevin's par-
ents puts his earnings (he netted
$18,000 in 1981) into a savings
account and invest it for him to
have when is grown.

Bob Hanchey Wins GABI Golf
Tournament: Bob Hanchey was the
winner of the Second Annual GABI
(Gardinier Athletic Benefit Invi-
tational) held at Little Cypress Golf
and Country Club on Highway 64
west of Zolfo.
Hanchey carded a 75-73-148 to
walk off with the trophy. Ironically
Hanchey won the tourney even
though he was playing in the first
flight division A. Hanchey outshot


the field to win by a margin of one-,
stroke over the closet competition.

Local Musicians Win Top:
Honors: Danielle Carlton and Amy
Gantt, both from Wauchula, woni
top state honors at the Florida State
Student Musicians Day lisi
Saturday in Orlando. Both were
selected for the Honors Recital held
that same day at the University of
Central Florida.
The event, sponsored by the
Florida State Music Teachers
Association, is the annual contest
for all levels of piano students. The
300 students participating had pre-
viously been rated as "superior" in
district contests throughout the
state.

10 YEARS AGO
Chuck McIntire Is Manager Of
Paynes Creek Historic Site: As a
park manager, husband and father
of two, Chuck McIntire has a neverL
ending job. His duties as park man-
ager for Paynes Creek State
Historic Site include overseeing
operation and management of the
400-acre park.
He is also in charge of protecting
the animal and plant species inside
the park, monitoring projects and
managing resources. The park is
located southeast of Bowling Green
on Lake Branch Road.

Jason Kemen Is FSU Graduate.
Jason Richard Kemen, son'of Jol6
and Claudette Kemen of Wauchulh,
recently received a Bachelor of
Science degree from Florida State
University.
Jason majored in communica-
tions and minored in psychology.
He has recently moved to Atlanta,,
Ga., where he is employed with
Black & Decker. The 21-year-old is
a 1993 graduate of Hardee Highl
School.

Masons Present Scholarship:
Wauchula Lodge No. 17, Free &
Accepted Masons, presented James
Mark Carlton with a $500 college
scholarship at a May 26 dinner. The
recent Hardee High School gradu-
ate plans to attend South Florida
Community College.
From there he plans to transfer to
the University of Florida to major in
political science. While in high
school he was a member of the aca-
demic, football and tennis teams.


The Peace River Growers Racers ran hard all season. Kneeling (from left to right) are Amber
Franks, Atasha Johnston Caryssa Johnson, Brooke Dixon, Hailey Andrews and Hannah Grisinger;
(middle row) Brea Farrer, Kaitlyn Thomas, Cacee Keller, Nicole Franks, Brooke Knight, Brooke
Shelton and Gemi Sanders; (back row) coaches Gordon Dixon, Doug Knight and Chip Knight.


Be assured that your employees
understand the criteria of the
workplace and have the skills they
need to perform reliably and with
success.





SFlorida*, W
Red t Woirk

C r e d e n t i a I



By taking a three-part WorkKeys'
online assessment, current and future
employees prove their competence in
these essential working skills:


Reading to comprehend information.

Using basic math to complete
job tasks.

Ability to locate and gather
information.


The Central Pump and Irrigation Dragons did their best every game. In front row (from left) are
Kendall Gough, Abigail Vargas, Ana Galvez, Brooke Conley, Tori Hernandez and Jakaysha
Lindsey; (second row) Karleigh Henderson, Kayla Nichols, Reham Alqabsi, Alexan Maddox, Arin
Johnson and Megan Hartman; (third row) coaches Melanie Henderson, Tom Hartman and Kristie
Gough.


[ Nutrition Notes


Workers who pass the assessment receive a Florida Ready to Work
Certificate signed by Gov. Charlie Crist.





Employers who want to arrange for their employees to take the WorkKeys' assessments and
receive a Florida Ready to Work Certificate should contact Heartland Workforce.

Individuals seeking to obtain the credential for their own benefit should contact South
Florida Community College.


Q: How often do I have to eat
broccoli sprouts to cut my risk of
cancer?
A: Broccoli sprouts are tiny
plants with tender shoots and baby
leaves. They contain more than 20
times as much of the compound
called sulfor4phane as the other
major sources, such as broccoli,
cabbage, Brussels sprouts and cau-
liflower. Sulforaphane stimulates
the body's production of enzymes
that detoxify carcinogens before
they can damage cells and start the
cancer process. Enjoy these sprouts
in salads and sandwiches for nutri-
tion and taste, but remember that


their benefit is just one piece in the
cancer- prevention puzzle.
Research now emphasizes the con-
cept of synergy, which means that
protective substances accomplish
more working together than they
can individually. Focus on the goal
of a mostly plant-based diet that
contains a wide variety of fruits and
vegetables in abundance each day
so you get a wide range of cancer-
fighting substances.
Q: Is the plant-based diet that
you so often recommend low in
protein?
A: No. People sometimes think
of protein as only coming from


meat and dairy products, but we
also get protein from plant foods.
Beans, nuts and seeds are the most
concentrated sources of plant pro-
tein, and they provide fiber, magne-
sium, potassium and natural protec-
tive phytochemicals. Grains and
vegetables also supply small
amounts of protein that add up
when you make them a major part
of your meals. The DASH and
USDA-patterned diets referenced in
the latest Dietary Guidelines' for
Americans are both plant-based
diets. They provide 16 to 19 percent
of calories from protein, well with-
in the recommended range.


HEART WORKFORCE


2730 U.S. Highway 27 North
Sebring, FL 33870
www.heartland-workforce.org
Highlands: (863) 385-3672, Ext. 241
DeSoto: (863) 993-1008
Hardee: (863) 773-3435
An equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and
services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


Highlands:
Hardee:
DeSoto:
Lake Placid:


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
www.southflorida.edu


(863) 453-6661, Ext. 7114
(863) 773-2252
(863) 494-7500
(863) 465-5300


South Florida Community College is an equal access/equal opportunity
institution. SFCC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern
Association olf Colleges and Schools to award associate degrees. Contact the
Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane. Decatur, Georgia 300)33-4097
or call 404-679-4501 for questions about the accreditation of SFCC. 6:14c
6:14C


I


I Way B a-ck. WEhen j






10C The Herald-Advocate, .Junc 14, 2007

Dixie Boys Batting Over For 2007 Dixie Angels Softball Ends


'A.


'-'A


COuRTESY PHOTOS
Batting around for the BJD Excavating Red Sox were (kneeling, from left) Murrell Winter, Austin
Carey, Taylor Barlow, Daniel Miller, Julian Varela and Trenton Muntz; (second row) coach Ron
Bromley, Dillon Rabon, Justin Bromley, Kyle Ward, Thomas Flores, Jake Mayer, Chase Revell and
coach Bubba Barlow.


COURTESY PHOTOS
The Pink Sox of Chancey and Associates Design Group played solid all season. Kneeling (left to
right) are Caitlin Defresne, Josie Hancock, Amber Mendoza, Andrea Crawford, Taylor Roberts and
Alyssa Mae Tatum; (standing) Marissa Chancey, Reyna Kirkland, Danielle Smith, Tara McNabb,
Ruthie Erekson and Anna Erekson; (back) coaches Keith McNabb, Dale Crawford and Donald
Tatum.
NOW-. ..-.' .-r... ..--_ -


-. .. "- ... .... --- .. J
Fielding for the Florida Fertilizer Braves were (in first row, from left) Carter Lambert, Caleb Reas,
Justin Knight, Dawson Crawford, Brandon Holton and Dylan Farr; (center row) Wintz Terrell,
Dustin Ratliff, Joe Adams. Grayson Lambert and Justin Fones; (third row) coaches Van Crawford,
Dane Terrell, Brian Knight and Keith Farr.


The Lady Bugs of Cooper's Flowers played hard in every game. In front row (from left) are Taylor
Graham, Breanna Godwin, Litzy Vargas, Illeana Flores, Allison Farr, Desiree Ford and Ahdam
Alqabsi; (middle row) Gabrielle Allen, Sarah Welch, Tiffany Owens, Amber Newton, Josie Moore
and Carleigh Daugherty; (in back) coaches Jerry Welch and Wayne Graham.


Running the bases for the Torrey Oaks Rangers were (in front) Deonte Evans (left) and Dalton
Hewett; (first row) Sean Holmes, Malik Tatis, Lincoln Saunders, Michael Forrester, Jeremy Row
and Jarrius Lindsey; (back row) coach Tommy Taylor, Tanner Gough, Scott Donaldson, Kalan
Royal, Kyle Bodeck, Steve Hodges, coach Fernando Tatis and coach Shane Forrester.


Male Revie


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Wednesday Thursday Friday & Saturday S
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The Orange Blossoms of Jake L. Carlton Construction (JLC) tried to win every game. In first row
(from left) are Rosienell Rivers, Cheyenne Pohl, Hannah Carlton, Shayna Harned, Kimberly
Derringer and Senaida Garcia; (second row) Karley White, Meagan Shivers, Rebecca Albritton,
Kaitlyn Shaw, Claudia Klein and Emily Bennett; (third row) coaches Missy Carlton, Jake Carlton
and Laura Weeks.



I'J-'l(-i'14-r ] ,d IiAdvo-' e

il l PRI"JNTERS PUBLISHFRS[e~I:N


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IN







June 14, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 11C,


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage license
were issued recently in the office
of the county court:
Rudy Edward Simpson, 51, Fort
Meade, and Delia Juarez, 47,
Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of receritly
by the county judge:
Palisades Collection LLC
Arlene A. Ornelas, default judg-
ment.
Samuel L. Delatorre vs. Angela
C. Daniels, default judgment.

The following misdemeanor
cases were disposed of recently in
county court:
Obeymar Aguilar Aguilar, retail
theft, 20 days in jail with credit for
time served (CTS), $315 fine aiid
court costs.
Shane Eugene Barrington,
domestic battery amended to bat-
tery, and criminal 'mischief, time
served, 12 months probation, no
contact with victim, 12-week anger
management class, $315 fine and
court costs, $1,000 restitution, 25
hours community service.
Jose DeJesus Castro, indecent
exposure and disorderly intoxica-
tion, time served, $315 fine and
court costs, $40 public defender fee.
Jesus Juarez Chavez, domestic
battery, 27 days CTS, $315 fine and
court costs.
Steven Lacy Devane, possession
of marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia, adjudication with-
held, $400 fine and court costs.
Randy Lee Fugate, disorderly
intoxication, not prosecuted.
James Dale Fulton, criminal mis-
chief, $330 fine and court costs, $40
public defender fee, $100 restitu-
tion.
Artemio Hernandez Jr., loiter-
ing/prowling, adjudication with-
held, time served, $315 fine and
court costs.
Oralia Gomez Ibarra, disorderly
conduct, not prosecuted.
. Daniel Juarez, domestic battery,
not prosecuted.
Vito Lara, domestic battery, not
prosecuted.
Melvin Lewis, domestic battery,
not prosecuted.
Jonathan Bernard Mariner, viola-
tion of a domestic violence injunc-
tion for.protection and violation of
probation (original charge domestic
battery), probation revoked, 90 days
CTS, $315 fine and court osts and
$40 public defender fee added to
outstanding fines and fees, 25 hours
community service..
Robert Andrew Michener, disor-
derly conduct, not prosecuted.
Berta Ann Morales, domestic bat-
tery, not prosecuted.
Savas Reynosa, possession of
marijuana amended to posses-


sion of drug paraphernalia, 17 days
CTS, $315 fine and court costs.
Mario Rodriguez, battery, $667
fine and court costs, $40 public
defender fee.
Lisnell Youyoute, affray and dis-
turbing a school function, not pros-
ecuted.
. Dominique Hughes, violation of
"probation (original charges battery
and criminal mischief), probation
revoked, 45 days CTS, outstanding
fines and fees placed on lien.
Henry Anthony Royal, violation
of probation(original charge tres-
passing), outstanding fines and fees
placed on lien, terminate probation.

The following criminal traffic
cases were disposed of recently in
county court. Dispositions are
based on Florida Statutes, driving
record and facts concerning the
case.
Lawrence Arthur Fayles, DUI,
probation 12 months, license sus-
pended six months, ignition inter-
lock two years, alcohol abuse eval-
uation and treatment, DUI school,
no alcohol or bars, 50 hours com-
munity service.
Christy Lee Brown, driving while
license suspended (DWLS), $330
fine and court costs.
Frank Francisco Moreno, viola-
tion of probation (original charges
DUI and DWLS), probation
revoked, six months in jail sus-
pend 90 days, outstanding fines and
fees placed on lien.
Bradley Michael Sockalosky,
DWLS, adjudication withheld,
$330 fine and court costs.
Paula Vargas-Diaz, DWLS, dis-
missed, produced valid Mexican
license.
Juan Sanchez Jr., DWLS, adjudi-
cation withheld, $330 fine and
court costs.
Claudia Perez, DWLS, adjudica-
tion withheld, $330 fine and court
costs.
Irma Rivera, DWLS, adjudica-
tion withheld, $330 fine and court
costs.
Filemon Calvillo, violation of
driver license restrictions, $330
fine and court costs.
Christiano D. Corsini, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, produced
valid license, $205 court costs.
Maria DeJesus DeLeon, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, $205 court
costs.
Darion Rashon Jacob, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, $330 fine
and court costs.
Blanca Ruby Lopez, DWLS and
attaching tag not assigned, adjudi-
cation withheld, $330 fine and
court costs.
Lazaro Mendoza-Lopez, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, $330 fine
and court costs.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions were


V uesl, 7 'Y 96zimaw*u

9fU&iicW Stadio-

i:,,i' "-. om .- M .,,d aij laj '2."3
Lessons, Instruments, Accessories.
Piano Tuning & Recording Studio
Piano, Violin, Guitar,
all Band Instruments

(863) POP TUNE


2:1tfc


I Courthouse Report ]


REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGER SERVICES
FOR THE REMODELING
OF FOUR BUILDINGS AVON PARK

SOUTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 600 W. College Drive, Avon
Park, Florida 33825, in compliance with Section 287.055, Florida Statutes,
and State Requirements for Education Facilities (SREF), is issuing:

RFQ 07-09 CONSTRUCTION MANAGER SERVICES

For the purpose of soliciting and accepting applications from construction
management firms to provide services necessary.to complete remodeling of
four buildings of the Highlands Campus in Avon Park, Florida.

SCOPE OF SERVICE

This project involves the remodeling of Building F from laboratories to admin-
istrative spaces, Building T from Nursing classrooms and labs to general
classrooms, Building C for a realignment of administrative spaces and
Building C-2 from Board Room to other administrative spaces. The contract
shall be for construction manager services at risk, providing a guaranteed
maximum price. Insterested firms may pick up design development drawings
(for reference) from the Purchasing Office. The total square footage of this
project is estimated at 17,931, which includes the new construction to con-
nect Building F to Building C.

To receive an application packet, please e-mail R.T. "Dick" Peavy,
Purchasing Coordinator (peavyr(southflorida.edu) or call 863-784-7275,
Fax 863-453-6656 to receive the RFQ by mail or fax.

Completed application packets must be received in the Purchasing Office no
later than 4:00 RM. Friday, June 22, 2007, when they will be opened. 6:14c


filed recently in the office of the
circuit court:
Lori Gagnon vs. Elias Torres,
petition for injunction for protec-
tion.
Ivery Tiana Jackson Casso and
the state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Rudy N. Casso Jr., peti-
tion for an administrative child sup-
port order.
American Express Centurion
Bank vs. James Warren Gibbs,
damages.
Midfirst Bank vs. Sissy Camacho
et al, petition for mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Donna Headdy vs. Rodney
Cristofaro, petition for injunction
for protection.
Mobley Greenhouse Inc. vs.
Bowling Green Enterprises Inc.,
damages. '
Christine M. Smith and DOR vs.
Reynaldo Olvera Jr., interstate peti-
tion for child support.
Rico Cielo vs. Zolfo Springs
Police Chief and Lt. Mark Gizas,
damages.
Carla Jean Fulton vs. John
George Shenefield Jr., petition for
injunction for protection.

The following decisions on civil
cases pending in the circuit court
were handed down recently by
the circuit court judge:
Julie Frances Hood vs. James
William Hood, injunction for pro-
tection.
Idalia Violeta Badillo vs. Uriel
Reyes-Castanon, dismissal of
injunction for protection.
American Express Centurion
Bank vs. Gerald William Robinson,
judgment.
Whitney Paige Justice vs. Shane
Eugene Barrington, injunction for
protection.
Jo A. Dunaway vs. Easter
Johnson, injunction for protection.
Aurelia S. Tynes vs. Linda Ellis,
dismissal of injunction for protec-
tion.
Selena Lakay Camacho and
DOR vs. Larry Camacho, dismissal
of petition to amend child support
order.
Juan Manuel Borjas and DOR vs.
Angie P. Stevenson, voluntary dis-
missal of petition for child support.
Elithoreph LTD vs. Florida Reno
LLC et al, judgment of mortgage
foreclosure.
Ruby Olvera and DOR vs.
Martin J. Morales Jr., voluntary dis-
missal of petition to amend child
support order.
Lynne M. Morales and DOR vs.
Ellis Steve Hodges Jr., voluntary
dismissal.
Thelma Ellison Reddics and
DOR vs. Jan Alfonzo Ellison, child
support contempt order.
Aurelia M. Torres and DOR vs.
Aurelia Torres, child support con-
tempt order.

The following felony criminal
cases were disposed of last week
by the circuit judge. Defendants
have been adjudicated guilty
unless noted otherwise. When
adjudication is withheld, it is
pending successful completion of
probation. Sentences are pur-
suant to an investigative report
by and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guidelines.
Final discretion is left to the
judge.
Michael D. Alexander, felony
driving while license suspended,
adjudication withheld, time served,
pay up all tickets, $495 fine and


court costs, $100 public defender
fees.
Paulos Chale Amogne, posses-
sion of marijuana with intent to sell
within 1,000 feet of a church or
school, possession of drug para-
phernalia and resisting an officer
without violent force, 364 days
Hardee County Jail CTS, license
suspended two years, $495 fine and
court costs and $100 public defend-
er fees placed on lien.
Barbara Ann Barkley, possession
of cocaine and possession of drug
paraphernalia, 18 months drug
offender probation, license sus-
pended two years, no alcohol or
bars, evaluation and treatment,
warrantless search and seizure, cur-
few, $495 fine and court costs,
$340 public defender fees, 50 hours
community service.
Simon Lorenzo Brown, violation
of probation (original charges bur-
glary and two counts grand theft),
probation revoked, one year one
. day Florida State Prison, outstand-
ing fines and fees plus $195 fine
and court costs and $70 public
defender fee and all placed on lien.
Charlie Daniel Lumley, violation
of probation (original charge
arson), probation revoked, 30 days
CTS followed by new two-year
probation with same conditions.
Fatema Renee Mariner, posses-
sion of cocaine, possession of
methamphetamine, possession of
marijuana, possession of drug para-
phernalia and felony driving while
license suspended, estreated bonds.
Enrique Martinez, failure to pay
fines (original charges possession
of methamphetamine and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia), unpaid
fines and fees placed on lien, pro-
bation terminated.
Jose Luis Montoyo, purchase of
marijuana, transferred to Drug
Pretrial Intervention program.
John Morrison, possession of
drug paraphernalia, probation 12
months, $495 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees; posses-
sion of hydrocodone and posses-
sion of marijuana, not prosecuted.
Juan Francizo Orozco, assault on
a law enforcement officer and
resisting an officer without violent
force, transferred to county misde-
meanor court; aggravated assault,
not prosecuted.
Jawain Dante Robinson, posses-
sion of marijuana with intent to sell
and resisting an officer without vio-
lent force, six months in jail CTS,
license suspended two years, evalu-
ation and treatment, no alcohol or
bars, warrantless search and
seizure, random drug screens, cur-
few, $495 fine and court costs and
$100 public defender fees placed
on lien.
Angel Rodriguez, two counts
aggravated assault with a deadly
weapon, two counts armed kidnap-
ping, robbery with a weapon and
domestic battery, not prosecuted.
Jessica Lee Rodriguez, grand
theft, 12 months probation NCTI
school, letters of apology, $495 fine


and court costs, $340 public
defender fees, $1,886 restitution
already paid.
Jesus Ventura, resisting an officer
without violence, 20 days CTS,
$315 fine'and court costs and $100
public defender fees placed on lien;
aggravated battery and aggravated
assault, not prosecuted.
Rodney Eugene Williams, pos-
session of cocaine with intent to
sell, adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, drug evaluation and
treatment, random drug screens,
curfew, warrantless search and
seizure, $495 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, 75 hours
community service.
Matthew Lee Kemp, grand theft,
grand theft auto, possession of
methamphetamine and fleeing to
elude a police officer using lights
and siren, 30 months Florida State
Prison followed by three years
community control-house arrest,
license suspended two years, no
alcohol or drugs, warrantless
search and seizure, drug abuse
evaluation and treatment, $495 fine
and court costs, $340 public
defender fees; resisting an officer
without violence, 364 days CTS
(concurrent); no valid license -
amended to driving while license
suspended, time served; possession
of a firearm by a felon and posses-
sion of ammo by a convicted felon,
not prosecuted.
Thomas Michael Fussell, viola-
tion of probation (original charges
grand theft auto, possession of
methamphetamine and possession
of drug paraphernalia), probation
revoked, new two-year drug
offender probation, license sus-
pended two years, no alcohol or
bars, drug abuse evaluation and
treatment, warrantless search and
seizure, random drug screens, cur-
few and 75 hours community ser-
vice added to outstanding fines,
fees and community service.
Jeffrey Lee Dease, violation of


SAColon &Lopez IPA
I Ir AGGRESSIVE REPRESENTATION


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Hardee County Board of County Commisioners
for the
Creation of Torrey Groves CDD

DATE: June 21, 2007
TIME: 8:30 AM
LOCATION: Commission Chambers, Room 102, Courthouse Annex
412 West Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida

The Board of County Commissioners of Hardee County will hold a public hearing to consider an
ordinance to grant a petition to establish Torrey Groves Community Development District
pursuant to Chapter 190, Florida Statutes at its regular meeting on June 21, 2007, at 8:30 A.M. or
soon thereafter. The proposed ordinance is titled as follows:

An Ordinance establishing the Torrey Groves Community Development District,
Pursuant to Chapter 190, Florida Statutes, specifying general powers and special
powers of the District, describing the boundaries of the District, naming the Board
of Supervisors of the District, providing severability, and providing an effective
date.

The petition is for the establishment of a Community Development District comprised of the
following described lands as depicted by the map below:

W 1/4 of NE 1/4 of NW ,1/4 of Section 21, Township 33 South,
Range 25 East, Hardee County, Florida.
Together with
The East 466.42 feet of the SE of SW of Section 16, Township
33 South, Range 25 East.

All interest persons wishing to submit evidence or testimony must submit same at the Public
Hearing. Anyone wishing to appeal any decision of the Board of County Commissioners
regarding this petition will need a record of the proceeding for that purpose any such person may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is created.
g2 U oSA TORREY RD
S.uo o xj AUSTIN LN(P)
L UItNV'D. \ D BIRDWOOD
: 0 RD BIRDWOOD RD (P)

5 SAULS RD
8 Subject Parcels


BOSTICK RD i



S4:
I,, n VO.lr.(4-PAR KP mIr 5:17-6:21c


probation (original charges pur-
chase of cocaine, resisting arrest
without violence and fleeing to
elude a police officer), probation
revoked, reinstate to community
control and transfer to Highlands
County.
Alberto Garcia, lewd act, dis-
missed.

The following real estate trans-
actions of $10,000 or more were
filed recently in the office of the
clerk of court:
Charlie D. and Phyliss Joy
Spencer to Daniel Aaron and Kellie
Michelle Patterson, $225,000.
James D. Hall to Lee M. and
David Fowler, $129,000.
Ralph and Margaret Selhorst to
Marvin and Shelby Kelsey,
$35,000.
George E. Patterson to Osles
Lazarre, $120,000.
Desiderio G. and Maria R.
Gonzalez and Javier and Maria V.
Garcia to. Javier Raul Garcia,
Jonathan P. Stembler and Jessica
M. Garcia, $150,000.
Desiderio G. and Maria R.
Gonzalez to Javier Raul Garcia,
Jonathan P. Stembler and Jessica
M. Garcia, $110;000.
J.R. and Jackeline S. Owens to
Guy A. Williard as trustee,
$735,000.
Pedro and Esther Ordehi to Pedro
M. and Jessica A. Ordehi,
$200,000.
Gary Delatorre to Martin..
Miranda-Rodriguez, $12,000.
Marie R. Felix to Mario Wilson,:
$95,000.
Carmen W. Whitehurst to Elton
and Starr Richey, $95,550.
Wauchula Commercial Proper-
ties LLC to KMS II LLC,
$220,000.
Martin Miranda-Rodriguez to
Maria DeJesus Arellano, $25,000.
Burton D. McLeod Jr. and
Jessica D. Smith to Yeni. Arencibia
and Bayardo Detrinidad, $154,000.













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