Group Title: Herald-advocate.
Title: The Herald-advocate
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00106
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Uniform Title: Herald Advocate
Alternate Title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Herald-advocate
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula, Fla.
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: February 1, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028302
Volume ID: VID00106
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886547
alephbibnum - 000579544
lccn - sn 95047483
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




Hardee Hoopsters

Beat Lakeland

... Story 3A


SLibrary Hosts

- Open House

K *.. Story 9A


107th Year, No. 8
3 Sections, 30 Pages


S Thursday, February 1, 2007


ALL DOLLED UP


46
plus 40 sales tax




BRRR!


How Low



Did It Go?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Temperatures hovered as low at
29 degrees Monday night.
That report from the Ona
Research Center was the lowest
reported around the county,
although most said the lowest tem-
peratures may have come after sun-
rise Tuesday morning.
Andrea Dunlap of the Research
Center said the air temperature at
two feet was at or below 32 degrees
from 3:30 to 7:45 a.m. Tuesday,
with the coldest temperature of
29.2 at 6 a.m. At the six-foot air
level, it was 32 or below from 5:30
to 7:30 a.m. with the coldest tem-
perature of 30.5 at 6 a.m.
There was no reported damage to
crops, citrus or plant nurseries
because precautions had been taken
throughout the night.
"Things weren't too bad. It was


in the freezing range, right at or a
little below 32 degrees, but it didn't
stay that way long. We were con-
cerned about the cold, but a cloud
cover brought the temperature back
up," said Barbara Carlton, director
of the Peace River Valley Citrus
Growers Association.
Carlton said temperatures were
10 degrees higher or better on
Wednesday morning. "There's been
no reports of any damage, although
we may see a few burned leaves
where the frost was, nothing else,"
she commented.
A report from Lakeland-based
Florida Citrus Mutual concurs. "As.
the Florida citrus-producing region
faced the threat of freezing temper-
atures last night, much-needed
cloud coverage moved in the area,
preventing temperatures from
reaching forecasted minimums,"
See BRRRR! 2A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The Class of 2007 put on a zany show Saturday night as more than two dozen senior boys transformed into beauty queens for the
annual Miss Project Graduation Pageant. The boys are pictured collapsing on stage at the end of the fundraiser, from foot cramps
and blisters. To see more photos of the graceful affair and learn of the night's winners, see inside.

ChilUil District

Developer Plans Homes & Stores & More Honors Is Best
By JOAN SEAMAN college students and residents can on the second- and third-floor state Department of Transportation
Of The Herald-Advocate gather. floors. (DOT) approves it.
Another proposed development In what is called a town center There will be a temoorarv entry He said DOT had determined


could add nearly 700 residences, a
large grocery store and smaller
businesses.
East and south of South Florida
Community College, the nearly
105-acre Torrey Groves property
will be pedestrian-friendly with a
coffee/sandwich shop where both


concept, the anchor retail tenant
will be a major chain grocery store,
possibly a 14,000-square-foot
Publix. Smaller daytime retail
shops and business offices among
the remaining portions of 85,000
commercial/retail space will have
about 60 apartments or condo units


off Sauls Road, but the main entry
to the housing/retail planned unit
development will be an eastern
extension of Bostick Road, where a
traffic light will probably be
installed. Developer William E.
Straw said the company would
install the traffic light when the


that there be no changes at the
Sauls Road intersection, which had
recently been reconfigured, despite
Ridge Estates planning a 1,200-unit
single-family subdivision on 30
acres north of Sauls Road in the
Torrey community.
Straw said his company was also
prepared to fund connection to the
county sewer/water plants or devel-
op its own capacity. Inflow-out-
flow ditches from its retention pond
areas will provide attractive water-
falls in the commercial center and
along the 12- to 15-foot wide walk-
ing/riding paths around the residen-
tial areas, he said.
The residences will be a variety.
There is a proposal for 284 single-
family detached homes on 4,000-
square-foot lots (40'x100'), plus 88
single-family detached homes on
5,000-square-foot lots (50'x100').
In addition, there will be 128 two-
family homes on 6,000-square-foot
lots (60'x100'). Collector streets
See DEVELOPER 2A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A teacher who uses school spirit
to build pride and confidence in her
students and an administrative
assistant whose work is motivated
by its impact on the classroom were
honored Tuesday night as tops in
the Hardee County School District.
Chrysta Chancey, a math teacher
at Hardee Senior High School, and
Revona Yeager, the administrative
assistant in the Educational
Facilities Department, have been
named district-wide Teacher of the
Year and School-Related Employee
of the Year, respectively.
Their selection was announced at
the annual Recognition Dinner held
at the National Guard Armory in
Wauchula.
Both had been nominated by
their peers at their individual work-
sites. Chancey was one of seven
school-site winners up for the dis-
trict-wide honor, while Yeager was
among eight worksite winners.
Schools Superintendent Dennis


Jones said the final selection of a
county-wide winner from among
the worksite nominees was a tough
one. A committee of five observed
and interviewed the winners at their
workplaces before choosing one
teacher and one school-related
employee to represent the district
as a whole.
Serving on the committee were
Deputy Schools Superintendent
Rocky Kitchens, School Board
member Gina Neuhofer, Hardee
Education Association/United Pres-
ident Selden Spencer, Transporta-
tion Director Dick Daggett and
2006 District Teacher of the Year
Phil Rasmussen.
"Each of the folks on this com-
mittee will tell you two things,"
Jones said. "One, they enjoyed
going around and talking with the'
winners and seeing them in action
and, two, how difficult it was to
pick a winner, if you will, or to pick
someone to represent the district
for one year."
See SCHOOL DISTRICT 8A


rnHvUIu Br YNIHIA KnRAH
Schools Superintendent Dennis Jones congratulates District School-Related Employee of the
Year Revona Yeager (left) and District Teacher of the Year Chrysta Chancey (right).


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
Downtown Wauchula will be
transformed this weekend into an
all out cook-off.
Grillin' & Chillin' on Main will
get its third annual kick off Friday
afternoon at 5, and will last until 9
p.m., and then start again on
Saturday at 10 a.m. and go to 5 p.m.
Also scheduled for Saturday is
One Hillacious 10K Run, a charity
race that will benefit the American
Cancer Society. It will begin at 8
a.m. at the Recreation Complex on
Altman Road.
GRILLING' & CHILLING'
The grilling competition is coor-
dinated by Main Street Wauchula,



WEATHER
DATE '-l.Qt LBM W
r01,24 6s. 55 0.00
011/25 63 39 0.78
01/26 68 33 0.04
01/27 rs75 41 .00
01/2" 67 45 0.37
01/29. 59 36 0.00
.o0130o' 58 29 0.00
ITTAL Rainfall to /01/007 1.51
Same period.awst year -.18
TAn Yewr Average 58.45
Source: Univ. of Ra. Ona Rerch Center


INDEX
: Classifieds 6B
SCourthouse Report.........5C
Crime Blotter 3C
Community Calendar......2A
SHardee Living..................2B
Information Roundup.....6A
Lunch Menus................4A
Obits 4A
Puzzle 8A


and features cooks from around the
county and state.
"We will be having participants
come from Kentucky, Alabama and
Georgia, our competition is pretty
well known in the barbecue cir-
cuit," said event coordinator
Megan McKibben, Main Street
executive director.
Professional and amateur cooks
will take to Main Street to prove
their worth in the Backyard and
Professional divisions of the bar-
beque cook-off. Anyone can partic-


ipate in the competition that thinks
their personal style is worth being
judged.
A $25 fee is charged to those
wishing to enter the backyard
bracket, which consists of four cat-
egories: chicken, ribs, pork and
brisket. The entrance fee covers all
four, and participants can enter as
many of the categories as they
want.
Representatives from the Florida
Barbeque Association will be judg-
See EVENTS 2A


Murder Victim ID'd


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Sheriffs authorities have re-
leased the identity of the woman
found dead in a remote area of the
county last week.
The body of Holly Lynne
LaFlower, 26, of Punta Gorda, was
discovered that Monday at about
1:30 p.m. by an employee of the
Florida Gas Transmission Co.
while out inspecting the gas line.


LaFlower


Maj. Claude Harris Jr. of the
Hardee County Sheriffs Office said
the woman was lying along the
pipeline right of way in the vicinity
of county roads 663 and 664. The
body was in open view in a slightly
wooded spot around 1,000 feet
north of CR 664, he described.
Harris said this week that the
Medical Examiner's Office in
Lakeland has estimated LaFlower's
date of death as the Friday or
Saturday before she was found,
Jan. 19 or 20. She died of internal
injuries caused by a trauma to her
torso, he said.
Her death has been ruled a homi-
cide.
Investigators have not yet deter-
mined whether LaFlower was
killed where she was found or if
she died elsewhere and her body
'was just disposed of at that site, the
major said.
They are actively investigating
the murder, he said, and are seeking
the public's help in locating
LaFlower's vehicle, a 1989 Merc-
See VICTIM 2A


The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


Hillin' & Grillin' & Chillin

Weekend Events Promise Fitness, Food & Food








2A The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Production Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


0j5 RYb

P^K)A


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Florida. b5 The Herald-Advocate Publishing
Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at Li S Post Office, Wauchula. FL 33873 and additional
entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster." send address changes to: The Herald-
Advocate, PO. Box 338, Wauchula. FL 33873.


S DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 pm
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 pm.
General News Monday 5 p.m
Ads -Tuesday noon


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest. Letters
'should be brief, and must be written in good taste. signed and include a daytime phone
number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome Submissions should be typed, dou-
ble-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are subject to editing


HOI BU r naY rn nHArRnirUvi .
Tarps or quilts covering plants in yards and nurseries around the county were a common sight on Monday night and well into.
Tuesday morning. In above photo, Austin Growers protected shrubs and plants at its new U.S. 17 location. Crops and citrus were
relatively unhurt by near freezing temperatures.


BRRRR!
Continued From 1A


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Lawrence Whidden, 82, played second base for the Wauchula High
School Wildcats in this 1942 photo. He was a senior, 5-10 and 150 pounds.
He and most of the other seniors
.j |within a year were serving in the
American armed forces in World War
II. Lawrence served in the Army
infantry in France and Europe.
He is now looking forward to the
Ci HI/ Feb. 6 start of the 2007 baseball var-
sity season of Hardee High School.
His grandson Carl Basey is a junior
fS- i-"iTi'" and is a pitcher/first baseman. Other
.A l.. _-,, grandsons who have played for the
Wildcat baseball team in recent years
are James and Chris. They are the
S sons of Steve and Ann Basey.
Whidden recalls that Wauchula
High School in 1942 was in the
SSouthwest Florida Conference and
played such teams as Fort Myers,
Sarasota, Bradentori, Bartow,
Arcadia, Sebring and Avon Park.
The head coach was Joel Evers.
.:clr Whidden recalls fellow players
included A.M. Marsh, Dunning
Terrell, Hill Lambert, Emory Albritton, Billy Barker, Findley Hanna, Bob
(Lefty) Wells, Dewey Whidden and Lewis Pace.
Whidden said coach Evers was a physics teacher at the high school.
Whidden has been a Wildcat baseball fan for nearly 65 years. Another
veteran fan is Lewis Pace.

The Indianapolis Colts are a seven-point favorite over the Chicago
Bears in Sunday's Super Bowl. The Colts are coached by former Buc coach
Tony Dungy, who was fired by the Bucs for not reaching the Super Bowl.
Jon Gruden led the Bucs to a Super Bowl victory the next season but has
had three losing seasons in the past four years.

The Hardee High boys' basketball team has only nine players left, but
they are a scrappy bunch and are second in the district behind Arcadia
DeSoto. The Wildcats beat Sarasota Booker in a thriller Friday night in
Wauchula.

Former Hardee High athlete Chris Rich transferred to Lakeland High
School this past year. He was the starting wide receiver for the state and
national champion Dreadnaughts in football and is now a starting guard for
the LHS basketball team, which was 22-0 earlier this week. I am very proud
for him.

One of the mildest winters continued in Hardee Monday night as a
cloud cover prevented freezing weather. There are signs of Spring around.
I thought I saw a couple of robins last week.

There are quite a few trucks and trailers loaded with oranges on the
highways these days. Each trailer carries about 500 boxes, or 45,000
.pounds of.oranges..

Hardee County lost a dedicated educator this past week with the pass-
ing of Marsha Beeson Timmerman, 54, assistant principal at HHS, who
bravely battled cancer the past few years.

I am proud of the wife last week who saved her husband from being
killed by a mountain lion out West. The cougar was biting the man's head,
and the lady kept hitting the animal with a big stick until it finally let go.
Some wives might have said "this is what you get for making me take
the wilderness trail instead of the scenic trail I wanted to take" and gone
back to the car to collect the man's life insurance and pension. This was a
good test of their marriage.


There are two means of refuge
from the miseries of life: music
and cats.


At I ne nerala-Aavocate, we
want'accuracy to be a given,
not just our goal. If you
believe we have printed an
error in fact, please call to
report it. We will review the
information, and if we find it
needs correction or clarifica-
tion, we will do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


The laughing hyena is named
for its weird howl, which resem-
bles an hysterical human laugh.








THURSDAY, FEB. 1
VHardee County Commis-
sion, regular meeting, Room
102, Courthouse Annex I, 412
W. Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 8
VHardee County School
Board, board room (former
junior high media center),"200
S. Florida Ave., Wauchula,
workshop on STAR, 3:30 p.m.,
regular meeting, 5 p.m.


said the report. Lakeland's low was
reported at 35 degrees.
"Overall, the Florida citrus
industry caie through last night's




VICTIM
Continued From 1A
ury Cougar. It is dark blue in color,
with the Florida license plate U72-
OAH.
Harris said the car may have bro-
ken windows and damage to the
driver's door. It has a decal of
Tigger on the back glass.
Detectives do not know if
LaFlower had her car with her
while staying here in Hardee
County, where she had been for
about a week, frequenting local
hotels and sometimes staying in the
Magnolia Manor area.
LaFlower has a boyfriend who is
incarcerated in the Charlotte
County Jail and a former mother-
in-law in Punta Gorda. Her family,
however, lives in Vermont.
Anyone who may have seen
LaFlower, knows her local con-
tacts, who she has been seen with
or what vehicles she may have been
riding in is asked to call the
Sheriffs Office at 773-4144.
Information may also be called
in to the Crime Stoppers tip line at
1-800-226-Tips (8477).
This is the first murder this year.


cold temperatures very well. We
have seen no damage to this year's
fruit, and only minimal damage to
early blooms," said Michael
Sparks, executive vice-presi-
dent/CEO.
Locally, citrus grower Carl
Saunders said the cloud cover
which came in during the night
kept temperatures from falling
from freezing levels. Although he
ran irrigation all night, there was no
ice.
Fellow grower Roy Petteway
said temperatures in the Popash
area did not go below 32 degrees
but he heard a report of 27 degrees
in a low-lying area near Avon Park.
Cattleman Butch Hancock com-
mented that recent rains have
helped the grass and the cloud
cover kept it fine. "That helps not
having to buy additional feed for
the cows," he said.
About crop damage, grower
Jimmy Parker said he lost allot of
sleep but really had no damage. "It
was a long night. We cranked up
the pumps, and turned the TV on
for the weather reports during the
night. When I heard about the cloud
cover, I was able to rest better.
"If it hadn't been for that cloud
cover, it could have been worse,"
said Parker, who had set about 40
acres of tomato plants on Monday.
"We had the pumps running on our
farms. It wasn't as bad as expected.
The wind wasn't bad. It was about


TIME FOR GOD
Every day is the same length. Well, technically the daylight hours dif-
fer somewhat based on the tilt of the Earth from one day to the next, but for
the sake of our observations let's say that each day, time-wise, is similar to
the day before and the day after it.
So, mathematically speaking, we have 24 hours, converting into 1,440
minutes and converting into 86,400 seconds. Yet, with all of this time given
to us by God every single day, we still cannot find the time to get everything
done that we feel we need to do.
Everyone seems to be playing "catch-up" every day, until we seem to
compulsively run around looking for more time that is not there.
I am convinced that the problem is not the gift of time that God gives
us but the human insistence that we must fill up every second with busy-
work. In our culture, we seem to think that if we aren't moving or being
what we think is "productive," then we are lazy. And no one wants to be
called lazy!
This week, I came across an anonymous poem called "No Time For
God":
You've time to build houses, and in them dwell,
And time to do business -to buy and to sell;
And none for repentance, or deep earnest prayer;
To seek your salvation you've no time to spare.
You've time for earth's pleasures, for frolic and fun,
For her glittering treasures, how quickly you run;
But care not to seek the fair mansion above,
The favor of God or the gift of His love.
You've time to take voyages over the sea,
And time to take in the world's jubilee;
But soon your bright hopes will be lost in the gloom
Of the cold, dark river of death and the tomb.
You've time to resort to the mountain and glen;
And time to gain knowledge from books and from men;
Yet no time to search for the wisdom of God,
But what of your soul when you're under the sod?
For time will not linger when helpless you lie,
Staring death in the face; you will take time to die.
Then, what of the judgment pause, think, I implore!
For time will be lost on eternity's shore.
We need to realize that life is precious. Life is but a vapor, here today
and tomorrow thrown to the wind (James 4:14). We need to not count on
tomorrow, but place it in the hands of God. And the only way to feel com-
fortable placing tomorrow in the hands of God is to have placed yourself
there also, at His mercy, accepting His grace, showing your love by obey-
ing His commandments (1 John 5:2-3).
So let's not waste our minutes, for as Benjamin Franklin once said, "Dost
thou love life? Then do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made
of." We're Telling the Truth.
J. Adam Shanks is minister of the Church of Christ in Wauchula. He can be
e-mailed at wearewe@earthlink.net


40 degrees until about 6:30 a.m.
After daylight it got colder. It was
about 35 from 7 to 7:30," Parker
said.
The county Extension Service


ing the backyard and professional
brackets.
In addition to the barbeque divi-
sions, there will also be a dessert
and chili cook-off. These two cate-
gories will have local judges and
are sponsored by Albritton In-
surance Services.
Cash prizes will be given to the
cooks that place first through third
in the backyard, dessert and chili
divisions. The prizes are $250,
$100 and $50 respectively. Winners
in the professional bracket are
awarded points in the Florida
Barbeque Association's coripeti-
tion for the overall best barbeque
team.
Those that attend will also get
their say in determining the win-
ners this year with the People's
Choice Award. Everyone that wants




DEVELOPER
Continued From 1A
with at least 60-foot riglit of way
will wind through the project.
The Hardee County Commis-
sion, sitting as the final zoning
authority, approved the Torrey
Groves planned unit development
with a full page of conditions con-
cerning the traffic, setbacks, interi-
or roads, water-sewer and land-
scaping.
In another U.S. 17 project, the
Wauchula Square Subdivision re-
plat by New Smyrna Beach Acqui-
sitions LLC was approved with
conditions. The four-acre property
south of the existing Wal-Mart
Plaza will include a U.S. 17 entry
road to be called Williams Road. It
includes four lots or businesses,
none of which will be approved for
construction permits until a solu-
tion is found for the flooding of
REA Road.
Planning and Development Dir-
ector Nick Staszko told commis-
sioners he had contacted the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District in November about
overflow from the Wal-Mart reten-
tion pond because a 25-year storm
event or heavy rains could cause
flooding to REA Road and on
down to Heard Bridge Road. One
of the swales is not in compliance,
Staszko said, noting either
Wauchula Square should have its
own retention system and not con-
nect to the larger Wal-Mart system,
or site plans for the four new busi-
nesses would be delayed until the
Wal-Mart retention pond system is
able to meet its demands.
The commission also approved a
Special Exception for construction
of an assisted living facility for 12
to 15 neurologically impaired
adults. It will operate in conjunc-
tion with Florida Institute for
Neurologic Rehabilitation and be
adjacent to its other facilities off
Vandolah Road west of Wauchula.
Also given the nod were a pair of
special exceptions for residents to
place a mobile home on farm-resi-
dential property in order to keep a
relative close and care for them.
The mobile homes have to be dou-
ble-wides less than five years old
and would remain on the properties
only as long as needed for caretak-
ing.


office and other local sources also
had no reports of citrus, crop or
plant damages.
Staff writer Jim Kelly contributed
to this report.


to pick their favorite pays $5 to go
around and sample all of the partic-
ipants' Boston Butt.
"The meat is provided to ti ,
cooks through the competition, so
everyone is on a level playing field
and it will come down to the style
that the crowd likes the best," said
McKibben.
Besides bragging rights of crowd
favorite, the winner will receive
half of the money raised by the vot-
ers; the other half goes towards
paying for the meat.
Good eats can be expected to be
found all over as the participants
will be selling their grilled goods,
chili and desserts.
The Tax Collector's Office Relay
for Life team "The Tagalongs" will
be selling strawberry shortcake at
the event. All of the proceeds made
will be donated to the American
Cancer Society. Last year, the team
donated over $500 selling the
dessert.
Since Grillin' and Chillin' is a
family event, everyone can find
something to interest them.
There will be a Kid's Corner
designed specifically for the
youngsters, featuring several inflat-
able bounces and games, as well as
a rock wall.
Event goers will be treated to live
performances by the band Final Cut
on Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. on
Friday in Heritage Park. The band
was featured at last year's Pioneer
Park Days.
Saturday will definitely not
skimp on musical performances.
From 11 a.m. to noon the First
Christian Church of Wauchula will
have its Praise Team playing for the
crowd; from 12 to 1 Savannah
Palmer, Lauren Raulerson and
Courtney Norris will take the stage;
and then at 1 p.m. the band Slick
Willy will perform.
Everyone is invited and a large
turnout is expected to attend the fun
and festivities on Main Street this
Friday and Saturday.

HILLACIOUS RUN
Runners in Hardee County will
be excited to hear of a 10K run that
will precede the festivities on Main
Street on Saturday. The run, coordi-
nated by Junior High teacher
Charlie Potter, will begin at 8 a.m.
at the Recreation Complex on
Altman Road, and will also feature
a 3-mile fitness walk. There is a
$20 registry fee on race day, and all
money raised will go to the
American Cancer Society Hardee
Unit.
So far, around 35 have signed on,
for the run, with an expected 20
more to come on race day. The run
will begin at the public pool, turn
east on Stenstrom Road, make a
south turn onto Florida Avenue,
turn on Ratliff Road, and loop back
to John's Road to rejoin Altman:
Road where the finish line will be
at the pool complex. The walk:
would also begin and end at the
pool complex.
For more information, call
Charlie Potter at 773-6216.


Too bad the only people who
know how to run the country
are busy driving cabs and cut-
ting hair.
-George Burm .


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee Counry
6 months $16; I yr. $28: 2 yrs. $54
Florida
6 months $20. I yr. $37, 2 yrs -$72
Out of State
6 months $24; I yr $44; 2 yrs. $86


EVENTS
Continued From 1A






February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Wildcats Whip Unbeaten Iiakeland


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
;.The Hardee Wildcats continued
their winning ways with a 53-43
upset of the previously undefeated
Lakeland Dreadnaughts on Tues-
day night.
,The David-vs-Goliath show-
down in Wildcat gymnasium was a
game to remember as Class 4A
Hardee (10-10) took the game to
6A Lakeland (22-0 and ranked


fourth in the state polls) from the
get-to.
Hardee center Mark St. Fort sent
the opening tip-off to teammate
Tyrone Pace and the hectic game
was on. Hardee scored eight unan-
swered points before the Dread-
naughts finally put the ball in the
basket at the 4:10 mark. By the end
of the first period, Hardee had an
11-7 lead.
Former Wildcat Chris Rich


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turned up the steam in the second
period, when he scored all eight of
his points for the game. But, when
St. Fort hit both ends of a one-and-
one with 1.6 seconds left, Hardee
took a slim 23-22 edge into the
locker room at halftime.
Jermaine King almost took the
'Cats on his shoulders early in the
second half, scoring back-to-back
shots to put Hardee up 27-22. By
the end of the fast-paced third quar-
ter, Hardee led 38-29.
Arnold Louis and St. Fort got
shots and fouls. Weston Palmer hit
a pair of free throws. Another shot
plus free throw for King and
Hardee led 49-39 with about 70
seconds left.
Lakeland was rushing its shots
and Hardee rebounding strong in
the waning moments. Frustrated
Dreadnaught coach Deron Collins
was called for a technical foul as he
protested too vigorously. It didn't
make much difference in the final
score, as Hardee won 53-43 to the
jeers of the pro-Wildcat crowd.
Lakeland had only one player in
double digits as senior Julius
Williams had 11 points. Soph
Richie Edwards, held in check all
night by the Hardee defense, fin-
ished with just nine points. Rich
had eight and three other players
less than that.
For Hardee, it was a team win,
with three players in double-digit
scoring. St. Fort topped out with 16
points, followed by King with 15
and Louis with a dozen. Palmer
added eight and Olnel Virgile two
points.
"I scheduled Lakeland because I
wanted to play a good, strong team
just before districts. We played one
of our better games of the year.
Jermaine, Weston and Olnel
showed the senior leadership.
Jermaine did a great defensive job
on Edwards and Mark asserted
himself down low. It was a good
win for us going into the district
tournament," said head coach
Vance Dickey.
After the season finale tonight
(Thursday) at Lake Placid, Hardee
prepares for the 4A-10 tournament
which begins Monday night at 6
with second-seed Hardee taking on
seventh-seed Braden River. After
wins last week over Sarasota
Booker and Palmetto, Hardee could
be in the driver's seat, hosting the
playoffs before a positive home
crowd. That will be needed if
Hardee advances to the finals next
Saturday night against top-seed
DeSoto, which is unbeaten in dis-
trict play.


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4A The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


HORACIO ENRIQUE
SUAREZ
Horacio Enrique Suarez, 76, of
Zolfo Springs, died Tuesday,
January 23, 2007 at home.
He was born June 5, 1930 in
Buenos Aires, Argentina, and came
to Hardee County in 1967 from
Pittsburgh, Pa. He graduated from
Northwestern University-The
Technological Institute in Evans-
ton, Ill. with a doctorate degree.
He was employed as a civil engi-
neer in state government, and
retired from the State of Florida
Dept. of Employment.
Graveside services were held at
11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 26 at Wauchula
Cemetery with Pastor Claudio
Garcia officiating.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula




Qw 0fc 1cig 8W1e0o/i


MARSHA BEESON
TIMMERMAN
Marsha Beeson Timmerman,
54, of Wauchula, died Sunday,
January 28, 2007, at Florida
Hospital, Wauchula.
A fourth generation Hardee
Countian, she was born Sept. 25,
1952, in Wauchula to Mr. and
Mrs. W.B. Beeson Jr. She was a
1970 graduate of Hardee High
School and a 1974 graduate of
Florida State University. Further
education included master's
degrees from both Clemson
University and the University of
South Florida. An educator for
over 28 years, she was assistant
principal of Hardee High School
at the time of her death. She was
a lifelong member of the First
Baptist Church of Wauchula and
served on the Hardee County
Library Advisory Board.
She was preceded in death by
one daughter, Sarah Eleanor
Whitmore, in 1984, her father,
W.B. Beeson Jr., in 2005, and her
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W.B.
Beeson Sr. and Rev. and Mrs.
Dow Durrance.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Dr. C. Nicholas Timmer-
man of Wauchula; two sons,
Mark Timmerman of Tallahassee
and Ira Timmerman of Wau-
chula; one daughter, Elizabeth
Timmerman of Brandon; mother,
Noveta Durrance Beeson of
Wauchula; one sister, Kathy
Beeson of Tampa; and one
brother, Bill Beeson of Plant
City; and six nieces and neph-
ews, Emma Boulware, Lillie
Beeson-Tate and Jesse Beeson-
Tate, all of Tampa, Joseph
Beeson of Wauchula, and Bailey
and Riley Beeson, both of Lake
Placid.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday, Jan. 31, at 4 p.m. at
the First Baptist Church of
Wauchula, with the Rev. Jim
Davis, the Honorable Marcus
Ezelle, Dr. Bob Norman and the
Rev. Bob Lecocq officiating.
Burial followed in the Wauchula
Cemetery. Family visitation was
Tuesday, Jan. 30, 3-7 p.m., at the
Timmerman home.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests memorial donations be
made to the Hardee Education
Foundation, P.O. Box 1678,
Wauchula, 33873, or Homeless
Orphan Outreach, Inc., 144 Hill-
side Ave., Lake Placid, 33852.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


BILLY MARK DURRANCE
Billy Mark Durrance, 71, of
Rowland, N.C., died Saturday,
January 20, 2007 at Southeastern
Regional Medical Center in Lum-
berton, N.C.
Born in Bowling Green, he was
the son of William and Mary Alice
Durrance. He was a citrus foreman
for Holly Hill Fruit Products in
Florida.
Survivors include his wife, Clara
Durrance, of Rowland, N.C.; three
sons, Jay Allen Chavis and James
Chavis, both of Avon Park, and
William Paul Chavis of Sebring;
his mother, Mary Alice Durrance of
Avon Park; two sisters, Linda
Stewart of Wildwood and Joyce
Bass of Palatka; and three grand-
children.
Visitation was on Jan. 25 at
Hickory Hill Baptist Church in
Rowland, from 6 to 8 p.m. Private
services were Jan. 26 at 2 p.m. at
the church with the Rev. Grady
Hunt, the Rev. Kenny Mitchell and
the Rev. Dawn West officiating.
Interment was in Benson Chapel
Church Cemetery in Rowland.
Heritage Funeral Home
Red Springs, N.C.


RAYMOND E. VIETCH
Raymond E. Vietch, 87, died on
Sunday, January 28, 2007 at The
Oaks at Avon in Avon Park.
A former maintenance supervi-
sor, he and his wife Winnifred were
residents of Waddington, N.Y.
Services here will be private,
with burial to be held in
Waddington, N.Y.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula



4 0 Sfeoig Uemo0kq










.


FANNIE LENORA4
WARD
Fannie Lenora Ward, 81, a life
long resident of Hardee County,
died Saturday, January 27, 2007,
in Wauchula.
She was born Oct. 22, 1925, in
Lily, and was the food service
manager of First Baptist Church
of Wauchula for many years. She
was a charter member of South-
side Baptist Church in Wau-
chula.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Jerry Ward, one
son, David Ward, and one grand-
daughter, Nikke Ward.
Survivors include three daugh-
ters, Louise Sasser and husband
Edwin, Juanita Murphy and hus-
band Donald, and Joan Radford,
all of Wauchula; one brother-in-
law, Lawton Hughes of Wau-
chula; nine grandchildren, 11
great-grandchildren, and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were held
on Tuesday, Jan. 30 at 3 p.m. in
Wauchula Cemetery with the
Rev. Donnie Murphy, the Rev.
Bob Norman, and the Rev. Jerald
Dunn officiating.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


MONICA MATTOCK
Monica Mattock, 69, of Fort
Meade died on Tuesday, January
23, 2007 at the Life Care Hospice
Center in Winter Haven.
Born May 4, 1937 in Ubly,
Mich., she was the daughter of
Elmer Zinger and Joanna Priemer
and stepfather John Oborski. She
came to Fort Meade in 1996 and
was a resident at Oakview Lakes,
where she served as social activity
chairperson for four years. She was
married to Richard Mattock on
April 21, 1956 at Ramey AFB,
Puerto Rico. Her employment
included work as a school librari-
an's assistant, nurses's aide, and a
hospice volunteer. As an active
member of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church of Fort Meade, she
served as Sacristan, Lector and
Extraordinary Minister.
She was preceded in death by her
father, step-father, son, Jeffrey B.
Mattock and a granddaughter,
Aubrey Jean Mattock.
Surviving are her husband,
Richard Mattock of Fort Meade;
mother, Joanna Oborski of Fort
Meade; one son, John Mattock of
Albuquerque, N.M.; two daughters,
Pamella Cullen of Colorado
Springs, Colo. and Carrie Bush of
Peyton, Colo.; two brothers, Elmer
J. Zinger of Sandpoint, Idaho and
Robert Zinger of Crawford, Colo.;
one sister, Mary Lou Vandenber.of
Brighton, Mich.; eight grandchil-
dren, and seven great-grandchil-
dren.
A memorial service celebrating
her life was held 11 a.m., Monday,
Jan. 29 at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Fort Meade
with the Rev. Peter Mitchell presid-
ing.
In lieu of flowers, donations to
Good Shepherd Hospice, 105
Arneson Ave., Auburndale, FL
33823, in her memory, would be
deeply appreciated.
Hancock Funeral Home
Fort Meade


n 0PRllNTg GeRoSiy
15.7 v.




-







HORACIO ENRIQUE
SUAREZ
Horacio Enrique Suarez, 76, of
Zolfo Springs, died Tuesday,
January 23, 2007 at home.
He was born June 5, 1930 in
Buenos Aires, Argentina, and
came to Hardee County in 1967
from Pittsburgh, Pa. He graduat-
ed from Northwestern Univer-
sity-The Technological Institute
in Evanston, Ill. with a doctorate
degree. He was employed as a
civil engineer in state govern-
ment, and retired from the State
of Florida Dept. of Employment.
He became a U.S. citizen in
1962.
He will be greatly missed by
his very close friends, Angelita
and David Avila and their chil-
dren, Sonya and Selina, all of
Wauchula.
Graveside services were held
at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 26 at
Wauchula Cemetery with Pastor
Claudio Garcia officiating.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Obituaries


-. ,.


LAI"


JAMES E. PORTER
James E. Porter, 84, of Wauchula,
died Monday, January 29, 2007, at
his home.
A resident of Wauchula since
1977, he and his wife moved here
from Pennsylvania. He was a
Baptist by faith. He retired from
Chrysler Motors after 26 years of
service. He served in the Army dur-
ing WWII and was a member of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
He was preceded in death by one
son, David Allen Porter.
Survivors include his wife of 59
years Gladys; one son, Michael
Porter and his wife Sue of Port
Deposit, Md.; one daughter, Judy
Downey of Wauchula; three broth-
ers, Everett Porter of Okeechobee,
Frank Porter of Elkton, Md. and
George Porter of Panama City; four
sisters, June Wyatt of West
Jefferson, N.C., Stella DeBord of
Grassy Creek, N.C., Willa Grey
Mash of Elkton, Md. and Peggy
Greer of Wilksboro, N.C.; four
grandchildren and one great-grand-
child.
Services will be private.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


FANNIE LENORA WARD
Fannie Lenora Ward, 81, a life
long resident of Hardee County,
died Saturday, January 27, 2007, in
Wauchula.
She was born Oct. 22, 1925, in
Lily, and was the food service man-
ager of First Baptist Church of
Wauchula for many years. She was
a charter member of Southside
Baptist Church in Wauchula.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Jerry Ward, one son,
David Ward, and one granddaugh-
ter, Nikke Ward.
Survivors include three daugh-
ters, Louise Sasser and husband
Edwin, Juanita Murphy and hus-
band Donald, and Joan Radford, all
of Wauchula; one brother-in-law,
Lawton Hughes of Wauchula; nine
grandchildren, 11 great-grandchil-
dren, and two great-great-grand-
children.
Graveside services were held on
Tuesday, Jan. 30 at 3 p.m. in
Wauchula Cemetery with the Rev.
Donnie Murphy, the Rev. Bob
Norman, and the Rev. Jerald Dunn
officiating.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


CLARA B. HAYES
Clara B. Hayes, 86, of Kissim-
mee, died Sundayy Januaryi28,
2007, in Osceola Regional Medical
Center.
Formerly of Wauchula Hills, she
was born on May 15, 1920, in
Sebring to the late Robert and
Daisy Eures.
Survivors include five children,
three sons, Leroy Hayes of Inter-
cession City, James Hayes of
Myakka City and Donald Hayes of
Brandon; two daughters, Doris
Huggins of Intercession City, and
Velora Clevenger of Garden Grove,
Calif; one brother, Russell Eures of
New York; two sisters, Thelma
Cook of Moore Haven, and Vivian
Braley of Palmer, Alaska; three sis-
ters-in-law, Evelyn Eures of
Bowling Green, Marlene Eures of
Sebring and Fern Eures of Sebring;
24 grandchildren; 36 great-grand-
children; and eight great-great-
grandchildren.
Services were held on Wednes-
day, Jan. 31, at 1 p.m. at the Brant
,Funeral Chapel. Burial was in
Homeland Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula

Progress is the activity of today
and the assurance of tomorrow.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson


I ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Doughnut,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets or Taco
Hot Pocket (Salad Tray, Mixed
Vegetables, Applesauce, Roll, Fruit
Snack) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Grits, Buttered
Toast, Pears, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on a Bun or
Hot Dog on a Bun (Salad Tray,
French Fries, Juice, Birthday Cake,
Ice Cream) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambled
Eggs, Biscuits, Pineapple Chunks,
Milk
Lunch: Deli Turkey Sandwich or
Cowboy Macaroni (Salad Tray, Pinto
Beans, Peaches, Juice, Roll) and
Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Oatmeal, Cin-
namon Toast, Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Pig in a Blanket or
Chicken Fryz (Salad Tray, Potato Tri-
angle, Pears, Jell-O, Roll) and Milk



MARSHA BEESON
TIMMERMAN
Marsha Beeson Timmerman, 54,
of Wauchula, died Sunday, January
28, 2007, at Florida Hospital,
Wauchula.
A fourth generation Hardee
Countian, she was born Sept. 25,
1952, in Wauchula to Mr. and Mrs.
W.B. Beeson Jr. She was a 1970
graduate of Hardee High School
and a 1974 graduate of Florida
State University. Further education
included master's degrees from
both Clemson University and the
University of South Florida. An
educator for over 28 years, she was
assistant principal of Hardee High
School at the time of her death.
She was a lifelong member of the
First Baptist Church of Wauchula
and served on the Hardee County
Library Advisory Board.
She was preceded in death by
one daughter, Sarah Eleanor
Whitmore, in 1984, her father,
W.B. Beeson Jr., in 2005, and her
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W.B.
Beeson Sr. and Rev. and Mrs. Dow
Durrance.
Survivors include her husband,
Dr. C. Nicholas Timmerman of
Wauchula; two sons, Mark
Timmerman of Tallahassee and Ira
Timmerman of Wauchula; one
daughter, Elizabeth Timmerman of
Brandon; mother, Noveta Durrance
Beeson of Wauchula; one sister,
Kathy Beeson of Tampa; and one
brother, Bill Beeson of Plant City;
and several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held.
Wednesday, Jan. 31, at 4 p.m. at the
First Baptist Church of Wauchula,
with the Rev. Jim Davis, the
Honorable Marcus Ezelle, Dr, Bob
Norman and the Rev. Bob Lecocq
officiating. Burial followed in the
Wauchula Cemetery. Family visita-
tion was Tuesday, Jan. 30, 3-7 p.m.,
at the Timmerman home.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests memorial donations be
made to the Hardee Education
Foundation, P.O. Box 1678, Wau-
chula, 33873, -TiHomeless Orphan
Outreach, Inc., 144 Hillside Ave.,
Lake Placid, 33852.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


"They were


Wonderfull.

1We hear kind words
consistently. We're proud
that people feel comfortable
enough wtih us to openly tell
: us how much they appreciate
what we did for them. In fact,
it's this appreciation that
drives us to offer the very
best in comfort, compassion
and service.





FUNERAL HOMES
529 \V. Main Street
WVauchula


773-9773


1 25"1c


FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambled
Eggs w/Cheese, Buttered Toast,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chili Con Came w/
Crackers or Fish Sandwich (Salad
Tray, Potato Rounds, Broccoli.
Applesauce, Juice) and Milk

S JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Doughnut,
Juice, Milk'
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets or Taco
Hot Pocket (Tossed Salad, Mixed
Vegetables, Applesauce, Fruit
Snack, Biscuit) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Grits, Buttered
Toast, Pears, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on a Bun or
Hot Dog on a Bun or Mozzarella
Stick (Lettuce & Tomato, Baked
Beans, Birthday Cake, Ice Cream,
Juice) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambled
Eggs, Biscuits, Pineapple Chunks,
Milk
Lunch: Deli Turkey Sandwich or
Cowboy Macaroni or Pepperoni
Pizza (Lettuce &Tomato, Pinto
Beans & Ham, Peaches, Juice,
Salad Bar, Roll) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Oatmeal, Cin-
namon Toast, Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Pig in a Blanket or
Chicken Fryz or Cheese Pizza
(Tossed Salad, Potato Rounds, Jell-
0, Pears, Roll) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambled
Eggs w/Cheese & Ham, Buttered
Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chili w/Crackers or Fish
Sandwich or Pepperoni Pizza (Let-
tuce & Tomato, Broccoli, Juice,
Whole Kernel Corn, Fresh Whole
Apples, Salad Bar) and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Doughnut,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets (Tossed
Salad, Savory Rice, Mixed Vege-
tables, Squash, Applesauce, Fruit
Snacks, Juice, Roll) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese Grits,
Buttered Toast, Pears, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on a Bun
(Tossed Salad, Fresh Potatoes,
Broccoli, Macaroni Salad, Birthday
Cake, Ice Cream, Juice) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambled
Eggs, Biscuit, Pineapple Chunks,
Milk
Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni (Toss-
ed Salad, Green Beans, Pinto Beans
& Ham, Squash,: Peaches, Roll,
Juice) and Milk
THURSDAY'
Breakfast: Cereal, Oatmeal, Cin-
namon Toast, Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Pig in a Blanket (Tossed
Salad, Potato Rounds, Baked
Beans, Cole Slaw, Pears, Jell-O) and
Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Scrambled
Eggs, Buttered Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chili w/ Crackers (Tosses
Salad, Mixed Vegetables, Corn,
Applesauce, Juice) and Milk








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February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Inside Out
By Chip Ballard


~.L


THOSE AGGRAVATING ADVERBS
There are things in the world that make me shake my head in wonder:
men and women starving to death in the shadows of towering skyscrapers
containing vast amounts of the world's wealth; innocent children blown to
bits in terrorist attacks; another Clinton getting ready to make a run for the
White House; and books like David Baldacci's "Hour Game" riding high
on bestseller lists.
Now before all you Baldacci fans blast me with protestations, let me
say that I, too, am a Baldacci fan ... or at least I used to be. I read "Absolute
Power" when it was published in 1996 before it was made into a Hollywood
film starring Clint Eastwood. "Total Control" also came out in 1996 and I
read it. "The Winner" poured into bookstores across the country in 1997
and I read that one.
Then a few days ago I began Baldacci's 2004 bestseller, "Hour Game,"
and I was stunned at what must be the sloppiest prose he has penned since
his high school days. If the manuscript had come to an agent or editor from
an unknown writer it would never have gotten past the slush pile.
The plotting is great. Baldacci spins a fantastic yarn. What bogs the
reader down in "Hour Game" is the embarrassing, sophomoric overuse of
adverbs. As you might remember from your high school English class, an
adverb is a word used to modify a verb. In the sentence: "Mary shouted,"
Mary is a proper noun used as the subject, and shouted is the verb. If we
attach ".niril~ to the end of that sentence, angrily becomes an adverb
telling how Mary shouted.
Fiction writers are taught early on to think of adverbs as crutches and
to avoid them as much as possible. In good fiction the characters' actions
and their words themselves should convey the meaning without having to
lean on adverbs for support.
Half; ay through "Hour Game" I couldn't stand it anymore, so I took
.out my red pen and began circling adverbs. On one page I circled 13. It's
incredible to me that a writer of Baldacci's stature would unleash such slop-
py work upon the world. It's not like he doesn't know any better. He does-
n't need the money. How did it happen?
Here is an example of the damage the overuse of adverbs can do:
Michelle ran hurriedly down the stairs. "Leave me alone!" she
exclaimed firmly to her overly intoxicated husband, Sean, who had been
drinking excessively since breakfast.
"I'm sorry, Michelle," Sean replied meekly. He began to sob convul-
sively.
"Oh, Sean, I didn't mean it," Michelle returned gently. "I know you've
been horribly overworked and you must be completely worn out."
"I love you," Sean gushed enthusiastically.
"Me, too," Michelle whispered sincerely.
Do we need the word "hurriedly" after "ran?" If someone is running,
doesn't that imply he is in a hurry? Are the other words ending in "ly" in
this snatch of dialogue necessary to help the reader understand how things
are being said? In the end, that's up to the individual reader. For me, all they
do is distract from what is being said and done, instead of adding anything
to it, and they seem to slow the passage down.
Also, you might have noticed that Michelle and Sean never say any-
thing. They "exclaim," "reply," "return," "gush" and "whisper." I left out
my favorite line: "I will not repeat myself!" he repeated.
You may think I'm jealous, or sore, because publishing houses aren't
banging on my door trying to get their hands on my novel, which is near-
'ing completion again. Maybe I am. I've worked hard, for a long time,
trying to get the words right. And then when an intelligent, bestselling
author who knows better publishes a book where almost every page is rid-
dled with errors that every aspiring author.is warned against in Writing 101,
well, frankly, it bothers me. Actually, it burns me up. It honestly does.


A-Team Places Fourth


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Senior High School
academic team came in fourth
place at' the annual Montverde
,Academy Tournament.
Playing a man down, the acade-
,mic team faced and beat every team
they played in the regular rounds,
churning out an undefeated 6-0
,record.
"All the teams we went up
against were from college prepara-
tory schools, magnet schools, In-
ternational Baccalaureate schools,
private schools and high schools
from larger divisions than us," said
,Head Coach Peggy Saddler.
S"We rarely play teams in, our
ilivision with our own demograph-
ics," she added.
SThe team, consisting of seniors
:Jared Arnold and Kane Cortez and
juniors Jake Barone and Zakk
McClellan, played the entire tour-
iament without senior captain,
Blake Stagg.
SHeavy hitters, the local, team
:bested at the tournament included
Ransom Everglades (a college prep
:school), Eastside Academy (a mag-
:net, International Baccalaureate
school) and Trinity Prep (also a
preparatory school.)
The day opened up with an 80-
point victory over Leesburg High
School, 180-100. From there, the
team went on to defeat Eastside
Academy C, 240-130, and shut out
Lake Weir, a Division II public
school, 295 to 5.
The closest game played in the
regular rounds was against Trinity
'Prep, which came down to the very
last question of the match, which
Hardee snagged, bringing the score
to 215-210 for the boys in orange
:and blue.
Oak Hall Academy, a college
-preparatory school, was next team
to be taken down with a command-
ing score of 245-100, another victo-
ry for Hardee County.
One of the hardest teams to beat
at the tournament was the next in
ihe Wildcats' sights, Ransom Ever-
glades, a team that as of then had
yet to be defeated. With consistent
points coming from each player,
Hardee pulled ahead. An incorrect
interrupt by the high scorer on
Ransom shattered any chances of
that team making a comeback, end-
ing with another Wildcat win.
SThis was the first time a Hardee
County team had ever beaten the
college prep school.
: Despite two losses in the semi-
final rounds to Eastside A and
Southfork High School, the Wild-
cats placed fourth overall in the
tournament, having an undefeated
regular record.


'The fast sermi-final match against
Southfork came down to the last
question with a score of 195-190
with the'Cats ahead. The Southfork
captain grabbed the toss-up on the
massacre at Mai Lai to bring his
team ahead to 210.
Coach Saddler said that the wins
at this tournament bode well for
what is to come at the state champi-
onship rounds at the Commission-
ers Academic Challenge in April.
Only one team in Hardee's divi-
sion was at the tournament, rivals
Suwannee County. They however,
were ousted in the regular rounds
with a losing record.
"Our A-Team has had standout
players in the past, but this year we
have four that mesh well and work
together as a team that covers a
broad spectrum. We do not have
one all-star player, but rather a
cohesive team," said Saddler.


(N



~hr~i I
':


fRaY@Mf$


FOOD CHECKOUT DAY
Celebrated by Florida Farm Bureau this event is set fc ;Sb. 4-10. It
takes 36 days for the average household to earn enough money to pay for
its annual food bill. (See article elsewhere in this edition.)

AG LITERACY DAY
Florida AG in the Classroom and the Department of AG and Consumer
Services has scheduled March 15 as the 4th annual Florida Ag Literacy
Day. Volunteers are asked to visit classrooms in local schools around the
state to talk about Florida agriculture and its importance to the industry of
Florida. Anyone interested in volunteering should contact Lisa Gaskalla at
Florida Farm Bureau, 352-846-1341. School districts may require screen-
ing in advance of visits.

PUTNAM ELECTED REPUBLICAN CONFERENCE CHAIRMAN
The House Republican conference has elected Rep. Adam H. Putnam
(F-FL 12) as Conference Chairman. Putnam, 32, defeated three rivals to
assume the #3 position in the Republican Leadership. He was recently re-
elected to his fourth term in Congress with 69.1 percent of the vote.
"I am gratified to have the support of my colleagues," stated Putnam,
who currently serves as the chairman of the House Policy Committee.
"Now that the Democrats are in control of the House, the Republican
Conference must articulate a bold agenda that not only highlights the com-
peting visions for America's future, but lays the groundwork for
Republicans to regain the trust of the American people in 2008."

FARM BUREAU MEMBERSHIP
Across the nation Farm Bureau has passed the 6 million membership
mark (6,199,285 member families). State Farm Bureaus signed 486,770
new members in 2006. This is the largest growth in the history of the orga-
nization. This was fueled by recognition of many outstanding programs and
services designed to boost member's families, business and standards of
living.
Florida Farm Bureau is the 17th largest farm bureau in the nation with
193,979 member families. Tennessee has more members than any other
state with 619,951. If you are not a member of our local Hardee County
Farm Bureau, it would pay you to check out the benefits of membership.
Call 773-3117 or stop by the office at 1017 U.S. 17 N., Wauchula for
details.



Lady 'Cats Close Season


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The final regular season games
for the Hardee girls basketball
teams did not go as expected.
The Hardee girls played Frost-
proof tight in their first encounter
in mid-December but found a
stronger, more resistive squad
when they played their season
finale last Thursday.
This week the girls were in Class
4A-District 10 playoffs in Palm-
etto, competing Monday night
against third-seeded Avon Park.
Results were unavailable at press
time. This year there is also a three-
pointr-phampionship, but it is not
knows if any Hiardee girls compet-
ed in it.
Against Frostproof last week,
Hardee started well, leading 7-5
after the slow first quarter. The
Lady Bulldogs held Hardee to just
three points in the second period
and took a 14-10 halftime lead.
Down 32-16 at the end of the
third quarter, Hardee staged a 22-
point rally in the final period, dou-
bling the Frostproof output but still
coming up on the short end of a 43-
38 score.
"It was not a good game. The
girls were working hard, hustling,
but we couldn't get in our offense.
They were doing their own
thing;when one adlibs, it throws
our entire offense off. The rest
don't know what's going on. The
girls seemed to have a lack of con-
centration, were brain-dead after a
long week. I can't fault their effort.


They just tried to do too much,"
said head coach Don Gray.
Senior Christina Jena's 15 points
were not enough to counter the 223
of Laura Tinsley and 14 of Leslie
DeLoach of Frostproof. For
Hardee, Andrea Parkinson and
Sabrina Holmes each had a half
dozen points, Holmes' coming on a
pair of treys in the fourth-period
rally.
Paige Avery added four and
Jamie Buckley, D.K. Davis and
Gloria Solis each two points. Ciara
Lambert added one-of-two at the
free throw line. Erica Ureste con-
tributed to the floor game.
The junior varsity finished up its
season at Frostproof last week.
"The girls have had a tough year
with all the coaching changes.
They've made a lot of improve-
ment. Their hustle and work ethic is
good and they are working the
defense better, just have a little
trouble putting the ball in the bas-
ket. We are going to do some train-
ing this summer," said coach Ken
Leupold.
Against Frostproof's duo which
scored 16 and 11 points, Hardee got
12 from soph Naomi Alvarado.
Jennifer Redden added six, Brandy
Crockett five, Courtney Packard
and Andrica Rivers each four and
Lindy Rossman and Carleen Brown
each two points. Megan White
pulled down rebounds and Barbie
Hinojosa helped on assists and
steals.
Ashley Smith was still recover-
ing from a leg injury.


Dixie Majors
Friday, March 9 at 8:30pm
(or immediately following game)
Field 1 George Heine Field


GENERAL INFORMATION
The Federal Government owns 2,644,547 acres of Florida's
34,721,280 acres.
State of Florida owns 2,197,918 acres for conservation purposes.
The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD)
leases 127,000 to agricultural producers.
SWFWMD leases 13,944 mostly for cattle.
According to USDA the following account for Florida's cash
receipts:
Citrus 21 percent, $1.64 billion;
Vegetable and melons 23.9 percent, $1.9 billion;
Field crops 7,5 percent, $580.5 million;
Livestock, milk, poultry 18.7 percent, $1.5 billion;
Foliage 12.6 percent, $967,038,000; and
Other crops 16.2 percent; $126,288,000.

AGRICULTURAL INSPECTORS
At borders agricultural inspectors feel they've lost their clout, accord-
ing to a survey by the new Government Accountability Office. "Nothing is
going well," many of the inspectors believe.
Sixty-four percent of the agricultural border inspectors polled said they
don't think homeland security managers respect their work. Nearly one in
three fears that "the agricultural mission is declining," and one in five
warns that training is inadequate.
"Some wrote that non-agriculture inspectors at their ports view the
agriculture mission as less important," the GAO auditors noted. "Others
noted that (Customs and Border Protection) management is not interested
in and does not support agriculture inspections."
The moral and performance problems matter because the 1,800 agri-
cultural inspectors are literally on the front lines of U.S. efforts to fend off'
avian bird flu and other looming devastations. The inspectors are already
;outgunned, as they confront some 317 million auto passengers, 86 million
airplane passengers and 11 million seaborne containers entering the United
States annually.
Since March 2003, agricultural inspectors have been part of the
180,000-member Department of Homeland Security. From the start, farm-
ers have worried that the sprawling agency will neglect plants and animals
in favor of chasing terrorists. The new survey underscores those fears.
Fifty-nine percent of the experienced inspectors polled said they're doing
fewer agricultural inspections. "Our concern is that the merger has not gone
well and is not going well," said Joel Nelsen, president of California Citrus
Mutual.
"Yes, there are concerns whenever we have more than one agency
involved," White House homeland security adviser Frances Townsend said
when asked about the new survey, "but we are dealing with it by the plan-
ning and preparedness effort we're making now."
Typical government response we are going to fix it, but they never
do! They only make it worse!


GREAT JOB!


COURTESY PHOTO
A trip to the state championship game in Dolphin Stadium was
"a ball" for four local men. The Hardee Wildcats' own chain gang
selected to keep track of downs and yardage for the Class 3A
championship had an exciting Dec. 8 in Miami. (From left) Spud
Albritton, Matthew Tomlinson, Mike Rouse and John Roberson
pause between games in the beautiful stadium. Their new hats
and shirts were compliments of Martin Cortez of Hardee Signs
+ Tees. "By the time we finished the game, it was a cold, misty
rain," the men reported. Tomlinson, the -senior member, has 40
years experience and operated the yard clip to mark measure-
ments. Albritton, next in line with 25 years, kept hold of the yard
marker. Relatively new at the job with seven and four years
respectively, Rouse and Roberson took care of the chain. The
men were able to stay after the 3A game to watch the next game.
which involved 6A Lakeland.


- 7pm


ost

,$SO


Saturday. Fe


@ George Heine Jr. Field off S. Florida Ave.
You must register on one of these dates to be eligible for tryouts. |


All baseball players and gris softball players that played last season must show his or her intent to play by registering


SOFTBALL
Dixie Pongtaile/Angels (12 and under) must be 9 on
or before April 30. 2007 (8 yr. olds are also eligible and encouraged to sign up
because we will attempt to create two separate leagues, a 10 and under Angel only team
next season) and must not be 13 before May 1. 2007.
Dixie Pongtails 12 and under transition team
(must attend tryout for transition team). this team will play other
teams in our district during the season and will also play games
against the older Dixie Belles team here. Contact Doug Knight.
Dixie BeIIe must be 13 on or before April 30. 2007 and
must not be 16 before May 1. 2007.


Dixie Ponytails & Dixie Belles
Saturday, March 3 at 2:00pm
at the Hardee County Recreation Complex


Parents must register their child and show a birth certificate to validate child's league age.
Checks payable to Hardee County Youth Sports (HCYS)
All those registering for the first time in a league must attend tryouts. If a returnee you must register.
2:1c


Monday, February 5


-. Friday, February 9 from 5pm


.bruarv 10 from 9am Noon


If you fail to register, your place on the team
will not be held for you.


BASEBALL
Dixie Majors must be 11 on or before April 30. 2007
and not 13 before May 1. 2007.
Dixie Bogs must be 13 on or before April 30, 2007
and not 16 before May 1, 2007.
Boys who are league age 15 can not be on the HH- JV or Varnity team and will
not be allowed to pitch. 15 yr. olds will not be eligible for All-9tar selection.


Dixie Boys
Saturday, March 10 at 9:00am
at Farr Field


HARDS CURV )OTH tOR~ RIGtTRTIO


!







6A The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 2006-CA-480
CITICORP TRUST BANK, FSB F/K/A
TRAVELERS BANK & TRUST, FSB,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEORGE N. LACKEY; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF GEORGE N. LACKEY;
MELINDA G. LACKEY A/K/A MELINDA
G. LACKEY; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF MELINDA G. LACKEY A/K/A
MELINDA LACKEY; IF LIVING
INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMAR-
RIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUS-
TEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFEN-
DANT(S); SUNCOAST SCHOOLS
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXIST-
ING TOGETHER WITH ANY GRAN-
TEES, ASSIGNESS, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFEN-
DANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s) /

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is herby given that, pursuant
to a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-
styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
Hardee County, Florida, I will sell the
property situate in Hardee County,
Florida, described as:

LOTS 25, 26, 27 AND 28, BLOCK
B, REVISED PLAT OF BRAD-
DOCK AND EDWARDS SUBDIVI-
SION SOMETIMES REFERRED
TO AS DR. W.T. GREEN'S
REVISED SUBDIVISION OF
BRADDOCK AND EDWARDS
SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 8, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
A/K/A
612 GREEN ST.
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, At the North Front
Door in the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 WEST MAIN
STREET, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 at
11:00 A.M. on February 21, 2007.
DATED THIS 23 DAY OF January
2007.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 23 day of January 2007.

B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the American with
Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should
contact the ASA Coordinator no later
than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceedings. If hearing impaired, please
call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay
Service.
2:1,8c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 10T
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 2006 CA 519
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORA-
TION III, as Assignee to MBNA AMER-
ICA (DELAWARE), N.A., a Delaware
corporation,
Plaintiff,
.vs.
SHARON K. VASTOLA; and all
unknown parties claiming by, through,
under and against the above named
Defendant who are unknown to be
dead or alive whether said unknown
are persons, heirs, devisees,
grantees, or other claimants;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHARON K.
VASTOLA; FARMERS HOME ADMIN-
ISTRATION, UNITED STATES DEPAR-
TMENT OF AGRICULTURE; TENANT
I/UNKNOWN TENANT; and TENANT
II/UNKNOWN TENANT, in possession
of the subject real property,
Defendants /

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
final judgment/order entered in the
above noted case, that I will sell the
following property situated in Hardee
County, Florida described as:
Lot 3, Block 10, WILLIAMS ADDI-
TION TO ZOLFO SPRINGS,
according to the map or plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book
I, Page(s) 27-A, Public Records
of Hardee County, Florida.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the north front
steps of the Hardee County
Courthouse located at 417 West Main
Street,.Wauchula, Florida at 11:00


A.M. on February 21, 2007. The high-
est bidder shall immediately post with
the Clerk, a deposit equal to five per-
cent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit
must be cash or cashier's check
payable to the Clerk of the Court.
Finaly payment must be made on or
before 5:00 P.M. on the date of the
sale by cash or cashier's check.
Dated: 1-23-07

B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
2:1,8c

If knowledge can create prob-
lems, it is not through ignorance
that we can solve them.
-Isaac Asimov


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY

Case No. 252007CP000009
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
HENRY CHARLIE SZARO,
also known as
HENRY C. SZARO, deceased /

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
HENRY CHARLIE SZARO, also known
as HENRY C. SZARO, deceased,
whose date of death was October 16,
2006, and whose social security num-
ber is 266-40-0232, is pending in the
Circuit Court of Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873. The name
and address of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's Attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, on whom a copy
of this notice is served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE
CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is February 1, 2007.

Personal Representative
JULIA SZARO MURPHY
4114 Ohio Avenue
Tampa, FL 33616-1202
Attorney for Personal Representative:
John W. H. Burton, of
BURTON & BURTON, PA.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873
Telephone: (863) 773-3241
Telecopier: (863) 773-0910
Florida Bar Number: 0650137
2:1,8c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No.: 252007CA000042
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1997 FORD EXPEDITION
VIN NO.: 1FMFU18L9VLA96134

NOTICE OF ACTION '
TO: JEANETTE WOOD MERRI
AND ALL OTHERS CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN OR TO THE PROP-
ERTY DESCRIBED BELOW.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for forfeiture of the following-
described personal property in
Hardee County, Florida:

1997 FORD EXPEDITION
VIN NO.: 1FMFU18L9VLA96134

has been filed against you by
Petitioner, THE CITY OF WAUCHULA,
FLORIDA, POLICE DEPARTMENT, and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's attor-
ney, whose address is Post Office
Drawer 1308, Wauchula, Florida
33873-1308, on or before March .2,
2007, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on Petitioner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
DATED on January 23, 2007.
B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
As Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
2:1,8c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Case No.: 252007CA000043
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1998 CHEVROLET VAN
VIN NO.: 1GNDX03E7WD323667

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BELTRAN JORGE LUIS RENDON
AND ALL OTHERS CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN OR TO THE PROP-
ERTY DESCRIBED BELOW.

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for forfeiture of the following-
described personal property in
Hardee County, Florida:


Get Homestead
Exemption Now
There's only four weeks left to
apply for homestead exemption
on a new'y purchased home.
The Hauee County Property
Appraiser's Office can receive
applications until March 1 for
people who purchased and
moved into a home in 2006 and
haven't yet obtained homestead
exemption.
For more information, stop by
the office in Room 103,
Courthouse Annex II, 315 U.S.
17 North, Wauchula. Enter on
the Oak Street side of the build-
ing. Or, call 773-2196.

School Board To
Look At STAR Plan
At a special workshop, the
Hardee County School Board
will consider information on the
proposed Special Teachers Are
Rewarded (STAR) bonus plan.
The workshop is at 3:30 p.m.
next Thursday, Feb. 8, at the
board meeting room (old junior
high media center) 200 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula. For
more information, see the web-
site hardee.K12.fl.us or call 773-
9058.

Play Auditions
To Continue
Auditions for the upcoming
spring production of the Hardee
County Players Inc. continue
tonight (Thursday) at 6:30 and
Saturday at 10 a.m. at Historic
Wauchula City Hall Auditorium,
225 E. Main St., Wauchula.
The spring production, March
16-18 and 23-25 will be a mur-
der mystery, not a musical.
People interested in being an
actor or director for it are invited
to show up. For more informa-
tion, call 767-1220.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 252007DR000062
AMANDA J. MINK
JAMES J. MINK,
Petitioner
and
ENRIQUE A. GOMIS,
Respondent

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ENRIQUE A. GOMIS
3031 NE 11th Ave.
Pompano Beach, FL 33064

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
JAMES & AMANDA MINK, whose
address is 404 N. 10th Ave Wauchula,
FL 33873 on or before March 2, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk of
this Court at PO Drawer 1749, or 417
W. Main St., Room #202, Wauchula,
FL 33873, before service on Petitioner
or immediately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the petition.
Copies of all court documents in
this case, including orders, are avail-
able at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of your
current address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida Supreme
Court Approval Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida.
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclosure
of documents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanctions,
including dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
Dated this 30 day of January, 2007.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

"If you are a person with a disability,
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled at no cost to you,
to the provision or certain assistance.
Please contact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863) 534-4690, within
two (2) working days of your receipt
of this Notice of Action, if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call TDD
(863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay
Service 711."


1998 Chevrolet Van 2:1-22p
VIN NO.: 1GNDX03E7WD323667

has been filed against you by
Petitioner, THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, ABOUT ...
FLORIDA, POLICE DEPARTMENT, and
you are required to serve a copy of School NeWS
your written defenses, if any, on. The Herald-Advocate
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's attor-
ney, whose address is Post Office encourages submissions
Drawer 1308, Wauchula, Florida from Hardee County
33873-1308, on or before March 2, schools. Photos and write-
2007, and file the original with the ups should be of recent
Clerk of this Court either before serv- events, and must include
ice on Petitioner's attorney or immedi- first and last names for both
ately thereafter; otherwise a Default students and teachers.
will be entered against you for the Identify photos front to
relief demanded in the Petition. back, left to right.
DATED on January 23, 2007. Deadline for submissions
B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
As Clerk of the Court Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
By: Connie Coker tact person. Qualifying
As Deputy Clerk items will be published as
2:1,8c space allows.


Celebrate Food Check-Out Week


The cost of food in America
remair,-" affordable.
Acco, .ing to the latest statistics
compiled by the U.S. Agriculture
Department's (USDA's) Economic
Research Service, American fami-
lies and individuals currently
spend, on average, just under 10
percent of their disposable personal
income for food.
Applying that statistic to the cal-
endar year means the average
household will have earned enough
disposable income that portion
of income available for spending or
saving to pay for its annual food
supply in about 36 days, according
to the Florida Farm Bureau
Federation.
In recognition of this, Hardee
County Farm Bureau is celebrating
Feb. 4-10, as Food Check-Out
Week.
Not only is America's food sup-
ply the world's safest, but also it's
the most affordable. The safe,
abundant and affordable domestic
food supply produced by America's
farmers and ranchers is responsi-
ble, at least in part, for our nation's
increasing standard of living.
Compared to food, Americans


work longer each year to pay for
their house, federal taxes and med-
ical care. According to the Tax
Foundation, Americans must work
52 days each year to pay for health
and medical care, 62 days to pay
for housing/household operation
and 77 days to pay their federal
taxes.
Florida Farm Bureau says the
affordable, high-quality food we
enjoy as consumers is a product of
our successful food production and
distribution system, as well as
America's farmers and ranchers
continued access to effective and
affordable crop protection tools.
This week should hold meaning
for most Americans. Although we
are concerned that some Americans
cannot afford to buy the food they
need, we are proud of the role
Florida farmers play in producing
the most affordable food in the
world.
The percent of disposable per-
sonal income spent for food has
declined over the last 35 years. In
1970, it took Americans 15. more
days to earn enough income to pay
their food supply for the year.
According to USDA, food is more


affordable today due to a widening
gap between growth in per-capita
incomes and the amount of money
spent for food.
This overall decrease is maae
more notable by trends indicating
Americans are buying more expen-
sive convenience foods, as well as
more food away from home.
USDA's latest statistic, compiled
for 2005, includes food and non-
alcoholic beverages consumed at
home and away from home. This
includes food purchases from gro-
cery stores and other retail outlets,
including food purchases with food
stamps and vouchers for the
Women, Infants and Children's
(WIC) program. The statistic also
includes away-from-home meals;
and snacks purchased by families
and individuals, as well as food fur-
nished to employees.

Food Check-Out Day tracks the
amount of income needed by
Americans to purchase food on an
annual basis. Despite a few fluctua-
tions over the past few years, food
prices have remained relatively sta-
ble over time.


I Wa y Back!WhenI


Left out of last week's issue.
This week in history, as
researched from the archival pages
of The Florida Advocate, the
Hardee County Herald and The
Herald-Advocate of...

75 YEARS AGO
Brilliant Soloists With Royal
Russian: Great interest is being evi-
denced in local musical circles over
the appearance here, on Wednesday
night at 8:15, of the world famous
Royal Russian Chorus, who are
making their second American tour.'
They are under the direction of
Walter Lowe, the well known
Pacific Coast impresario. The cho-
rus is conducted by Princess
Agreneva Slaviansky, one of the
few internationally recognized
women conductors.

Miss Gladys Parker was crowned
queen of the Hardee County
Strawberry Festival at Bowling
Green here last week. She is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R.L.
Parker, and is a freshman in the
local high school. "'a -:


Firemen Seeking Aid In Finding
The Fires: Fire Chief C. A. Barker
has issued a plea to all who may
have occasion to turn in fire alarms
that they give full information.
The fire department is often
delayed in answering alarms by
having to locate just where the fire
is, said Chief Barker. This is caused
by the person turning in the alarm
giving the telephone operator just
the name of the person's house
where the fire is located.

50 YEARS AGO
Costume Cage Game Scheduled:
A costume basketball game featur-
ing members of the Wauchula
Kiwanis Club versus the Wauchula
Lions Club will be staged Tuesday
night in the Joel Evers Gymnasium
at the high school.
The Kiwanians will feature six
foot, seven inch, Dick Riley, who in
years past was a cage star at
Clemson. All the men players will
don appropriate costumes for the
game.


Softball Girls In


Tourney This Week


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A pair of pre-season classic
games at DeSoto this week will get
the Hardee softball girls going.
First-year coach Liz Lenhart-said
late last week that she and junior
varsity coach Sarah Lenhart have
not made final decisions on their
squads.
"We'll wait until after the
DeSoto games. It's a very competi-
tive group. We started with 54 girls
but several dropped out. We have a
lot of talent and a good group of
girls. I'm excited about the upcom-
ing season," said the varsity coach.
She will be assisted by Linda
Arrendondo, while Aimee Delle-
pere will be junior varsity assistant.
The pre-season opened on Tues-
day at DeSoto in a 5 p.m. game.
Hardee returns today. (Thursday)
for a 7 p.m. game. The regular sea-


son opens next Thursday at
Mulberry. The first home game is
Jan. 13 against Sebring, with the
junior varsity at 5:30 p.m. and the
varsity game about 7:30.
Candidates for the two girls
squads include seniors Cynthia
Briseno, Jamie Buckley, Danielle
Hines, Bethany Lang and Lindsey
Moye, and juniors Paige Avery,
Kayle Pella, Amber Steedley and
Casey Johnson.

Underclass girls are sophs Kim
Cason, Alivia Daniels, Chelsea
Owens, Miranda Powell, Lola
Rivera, Krystin Robertson, Lucy
Ruiz and Candis Thomas, and
freshmen Paige Clark, Caitlyn
Chason, Kristina Garcia, Kaitlyn
Hanshaw, Halley Marshall, Lindy
Rossman, Marisa Shivers, Lenora
Shoffner, Chelsea Steedley and
Heather St. John.


2007 HHS Softball


Jan. 30 Pre-Season Classic


Feb. 01
08
13
15
16
20
22
23
26
28

Mar. 02
06
08
09
16
20
22
26

Apr. 02
03
05
16-20


Pre-Season Classic
Mulberry
Sebring
Santa Fe Catholic
Lakeland Christian
Braden River
Lakeland Christian
Sarasota Booker
DeSoto
Braden River

Sebring
Sarasota Booker
Avon Park
Mulberry
DeSoto
Palmetto
Santa Fe Catholic
All Saints

All Saints Academy
Avon Park
Palmetto
District playoffs


DeSoto

DeSoto
Away
HOME
Away
HOME
HOME
Away
HOME
Away
Away

Away
Away
Away
HOME
HOME
Away
HOME
HOME

Away
HOME
HOME


5 p.m.

7 p.m.
5:30/7:30 p.m.
5:30/7:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
5 p.m.
5:30/7:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
4:30 p.m.

5:30/7:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
5:30/7:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
5:30/7:00 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.

6 p.m.
5:30/7:30 p.m.
5:30/7:30 p.m**


one time listed = varsity only game
** Senior Night
Varsity: head coach Elizabeth Lenhart; assistant Linda Arredondo
JV : head coach Sarah Lenhart; assistant Aimee Dellepere


Award Winner: Peggy Paige,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Paige, was named the Betty
Crocker Homemaker of Tomorrow
in Hardee County High School.
She received the highest score in
a written examination on home-
making knowledge and attitude,
administered on Dec. 4, 1956. For
achievement, she received an award
pin designed by Trifari of New
York.

25 YEARS AGO
Trueblood Wins Top Honors:
Gena Trueblood, a senior at Hardee
High School, took top honors in the
"Special Talent Night" held Friday
night at the new high school audito-
rium.
Gena, who has been singing since
she was 3 years old, presented her
song arrangements in a professional
manner. The show was staged by
WQYK Tampa radio station, in
search of talent for future use.

Aunt Matt Revels Takes Care Of
Herself: Although Aunt Matt
Revels was 92 on Nov. 28, she still
lives alone and takes care of herself.
She does her own cooking and
housecleaning and cans pickles for
other people.
She also cans and freezes foods
for herself. She says friends bring
her vegetables and meats, and she
puts them up in her freezer. "I'm
not able to work anymore," Aunt
Matt says, "I just do a little bit at
timee"

Tamie Ranae Ransom Is 1: Little
Miss Tamie Renea Ransom, daugh-
ter of Sandra and Mike Ransom of
Wauchula, celebrated her first birth-
day Sunday at the home of Brenda
and Daniel Johnson of Zolfo
Springs.
The theme for her party was
clowns. Refreshments included
cake, hot dogs, ice cream and
punch. She celebrated with her par-
ents and friends of the family.
Tamie turned 1 year old on Feb. 1.

10 YEARS OLD
HHS Crowns Project Graduation
'Queen': Striding through the usual
beauty pageant segments of casual
wear, evening wear and impromptu
questions and answers, the five stu-
dents shown on the front page of the
Feb. 6, 1997, issue of The Herald-
Advocate rose to the top in the 1997
Project Graduation festivities.
Winner and 'Queen' is LaDarius
Belcher, Ms. Legs Daniel Irby, sec-
ond runner-up Doug Bass, first run-
ner-up Jason Timmons and Miss
Congeniality Andy Dennis.

Scouts To Collect Food For
Needy: Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts and
Explorers in the eight-county Gulf
Ridge Council will do a good turn
soon, when they are "Scouting for
Food."
Thousands of empty grocery
bags, provided by Kash 'n Karry
Supermarkets, will be placed on
residents' doors Saturday, Feb. 8,
throughout the county. The filled
bags will be collected Saturday,
Feb. 15, by Scouts and their adult
leaders.

The true test of character is nbt
how much we know how to do,
but how we behave when we
don't know what to do.
-John Holt






- 1 S7h
W.I ucIhIlIa, F IL 3-ll3873i ]






February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Scenes From HJHS Game Against Avon Park


This column is from December; but
Swas not received by this newspaper
until this week because of a conm-
.puter problem.

PRAYERS NEEDED
We need to pray for John
Veldhuizen and Lorraine Hartley
that have had tests taken and the
ones having tests taken that every
thing turns out well. We need to
pray for those who have needed to
go home for sickness for them or
someone at home. I pray that every-
one has a nice Christmas and
remembers that Christmas is all
about the way we celebrate.
I have been asked to thank
everyone for sending out so many
get well and sympathy and think-
ing-of-you cards to many of our
.friends during their trying times in
life. God is always with you and it
is nice to know that you have
friends across the world.

COFFEE KLATCH
The new people in the park this
week are Art and Pattie Coomer,
they are daughter and son-in-law of
Joyce and Ben Bates, from Canada.
.Mert Backstrom is a sister to Ben
Bates; she also used to live in the
park. Cindy and Roger Prideman
are visiting Martha Abel and Dana
Sweet is back in the park for a visit.
The Christmas dinner will be on
Dec. 25 at the Red Barn at 1
o'clock. There will be a Christmas
program Saturday Dec. 23 at the
Red Barn and at 7 p.m. (bring a gift
to trade) and finger foods. There
will be a Pancake and Sausage
.breakfast on Jan, 5 at the Red Barn.
The Red Wagon Hatters club had a
great time having a pizza party and
then playing some bingo. We have
.a lot of things planned so check on
board weekly and there is always
room for more girls. Shuffleboard
week every weekday, at 10 sharp,
-and crafts daily at the Day Room, at
one o'clock. There should be Hand
and Foote again on Thursday at
1:30 p.m. Birthdays is Arlene
Anderson and there were no
. nnervsaries.




Don't think of retiring from the
world until the world will be
sorry that you retire. I hate a
fellow whom pride or cowardice
,or laziness drives into a corner
:and who does nothing when he
:is there but sit and growl. Let
1him come out as I do, and bark.
-Semuel Johnson


The 50/50 was won by Bob Bell
and the gift certificates were won
by Pasty Siemen, Caryl Lauver,
Ted Metherell, Cloyce Swisher.
Don Garsema, Jake Hartley, Gerri
Geraci, Marie Condra, Sandy
Walker, Len and Anita Le'get,
Martha Abel, Deroy Knowlton, ,
Doug Culp, Larry Callis, Wanda
May, Cathy Vermeulen, Kenneth
Reichel, Bob Bell, Dana Sweet,
Mary Whitman, and me.

PROGRESS EUCHRE
We had fun playing euchre and
we had seven tables. The high man
was Sam Armstrong with 73 points,
runner up man was Bob Bell with
64 points, and the low man was
Henry Graham with 44 points. The
high woman was Shirley Swisher
with 79 points, the runners-up were
Muriel Bell and Marie Condra &
Muriel Bell with each 72 points and
the low woman was Ginny Graham
with 44 points. The Most Loners
was won by Carlos Dennis and
Merit Backstrom they each had
three loners. Under the table was
Clyde Anderson. We had two peo-
ple tht got to take home skunks
again for the week, Mabel Smith
and Henry Graham.

BID EUCHRE
Tuesday, we had only two tables
but had a lot of fun. The winner of
men was Herb Tessier with 184
points and low man was Walt
Broadworth with 153 points. The
high woman was Shirley Swisher
with 187 points and the low women
was Edna Broadworth with 131
points.
Thursday, we had three tables
and the high man was Walter
Broadworth with 169 points and
the low man was Sam Armstrong
with 129 points. The high women
were Marge Luff with 248 points
and the low women was me with 84
points.

SHUFFLEBOARD
The winners of the park tourna-
ment were Fern Tessier and Art
Brown and second place went to
Shirley Swisher and Martha Able.
We are having a fun day on
Thursday and everyone is invited.
Thirty-one people tried their hand
at fun day shuffling. First place
went to Janet Brown with 113
points, second place went to Herb
Tessier, and we had a tie for third
between Grace Moore and Bill
King with each having 101 points,
Iso .we had a roll off. Grace Moore
won with 110 points and Bill King
only had 47.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"What a heartbreaker!"
Wildcat head coach Ron Kline
and his team were still noticeably
disturbed by the weather and field
conditions which had nullified their
efforts for a spot in the Class 4A-
District 10 championship game. "In
a nutshell, the rain turned the field
into beef stew, slop, soup, a mud-
hole," said a disappointed Kline on
Friday.
As number one seed, Hardee had
drawn a bye in the Jan. 22 quarter-
finals. The rain that began last
Monday continued through Tues-
day. "Although it drained fairly
well, there was standing water on
the sidelines and the conditions
were miserable," said Kline of
Wednesday's late game against the
fifth-seeded Sebring Blue Streaks
In Wednesday's early game, sec-
ond-seeded Palmetto scored in the
first two minutes and slid through
the rest of the game to down third-


seed DeS
By the
had earn
and 8-1-
seed, too
the cold,
editions '
advantage
would st(
player s
because
scribed K
After
play, the
overtime
the second
utes left,
was able
goalie F
"Paco le
the ball t
it to the
also give
Sebring I
attempts.
to get pi
make thi
down," s;


Streaks Stop Hardee S
>oto 1-0. "Realisti'ally, the sloppy condi-:
time the Wildcats, which tions negated our advantages. If it
ed a 13-1-4 overall record had been dryer, I have no doubt we
1 in the district to be top would have won with our speed
k the field against Sebring, and conditioning. We didn't look.
steady rain and field con- past Sebring; we know Paul Brown
'cancelled out our speed has a well-coached team," conclud-
e. Many times, the ball :edKline. Sebring went on to lose to
op in the wet grass and the Palmetto in the finals and face
simply overran the ball District 9 champion Tampa Jesuit.
he couldn't stop," de- Kline spent more time praising
line. b his team, especially assistant coach
80 minutes of slip-slop. Gilbert Vasquez. "I can't say how
game went into the first: much I appreciated him this year.
without any scoring. In He had a major impact; he's a good
d overtime, with five min- motivator, has the respect of the
Blue Streak Tim Wheaton kids and is an extra set of eyes and
to get a shot past Hardee ideas."
rancisco "Paco" Lozano. Kline said he had nonimated
aned where he expected senior Alberto "Chico" Rodriguez
o go and the wind carried and Lozano for the area All-Star
opposite side. We should game. "They are both worthy of
credit to the very strong All-Star consideration. Paco has
goalie which stopped our turned into an excellent goalie and
When we took low shots Chico has averaged 20 goals a year
ast him, the grass would over the last two years.
e ball bounce and slow "Overall, this team has given a
aid Kline.


To Your Health!
By Erin E. Hess
Hardee County Health Department


JOIN IN ON 'STEP UP, FLORIDA!'
"Step Up, Florida On Our Way To Healthy Living!" is an annual
statewide initiative promoting physical activity and healthy lifestyles for
Floridians of all ages and abilities.
Participants will engage in activities to promote awareness about the
importance of daily physical activity for youth and adults, and to highlight
opportunities around the state where Floridians can be physically active.
The 2007 event will celebrate four years of promoting the importance
of physical activity. Each county health department, in conjunction with
community partners, will determine specific local events and physical
activity opportunities that will be highlighted throughout their community.
Hardee County is hosting a Step Up, Florida event on Wednesday, Feb.
14, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Heritage Park with two community walks, fit-
ness demonstrations, activities for youth and booths featuring information
on diabetes, nutrition, physical activity and tobacco. Additionally, blood
pressure checks, height, weight and BMI measurements and diabetes oral
risk assessments will be available.
Informational booths and registration will begin at 11. A Pilates
demonstration will take place at 11:30 with a welcome, warm up and the
first of two community walks to take place at noon. At 2 p.m., youth activ-
ities will begin. A Sun Style Tai Chi demonstration will take place at 4:30,
with the last warm up and community walk taking place at 5:15 pm.
Participation is free and backpacks, pedometers and goodie bags will
be given to the first 100 participants. All who choose to participate in fit-
ness demonstrations and/or a community walk must sign a consent and
release form.
Everyone knows that regular exercise greatly improves one's health,
but getting started is not always easy. Step Up, Florida! provides a great
opportunity for Floridians of all abilities, young and old, to take the first
step toward healthy living!
For more information about the campaign, you can visit the Step Up,
Florida! Web site at http://www.stepupflorida.org. -


soccer
ton of effort. They are wonderful.
We will miss Paco, Chico, Pablo
Anselmo, Jose Gutierrez, and Jose
Alonso, who has been an excellent
player, one you can call upon for
any position, anything and he does
it with humor to boot," continued
'Kline.
"I expect us to be very competi-
tive again next year. We have a
good core group coming back,"
said Kline, mentioning the play this
year of juniors captain Luis Reyes
and fellow juniors Adam Juarez,
Jose Castaneda and sophs Roman
Alvarez and Francisco Rivera, and
freshmen Martin Vega, Jesus
Aguirre, Ivan Narvaez and David
Rodriguez.
Also expected back are junior
Gilberto Gutierrez, sophs Elisio
Diaz, Jorge Juarez, Humberto
Nolasco, Carlos. Ramirez, Efrain
Ruiz, Domingo Santiago and Isaac
Vasquez.
"This group will help us continue
our winning ways," ended Kline.


g. .. -






Come Join Us for Our

Opening Weekend
Friday & Saturday 11:00am 10:00pm

Sunday 11:00am till "game over"


Watch the

Super Bowl Game
on our Multiple Screens
and enjoy our

Weekend Specials

Buy 1 appetizer
Get 2nd FREE
(of same or lesser price)
arid
1 Drafts


Downtown Wauchula 222 W. Main St.
V I M =


Wagon Wheel RV News
By'Virginia Merriman


Mudhole,








8A The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


Students Correspond With NASA Astronaut


By LAUREN RAULERSON
For The Herald-Advocate
While Tamara Opalek's first-
grade class at Bowling Green
Elementary was studying outer
space, the youngsters had the
opportunity to ask .an astronaut
questions about his career.
The astronaut who gave the 6-
and 7-year-olds a deeper perspec-
tive on outer space was Robert
Springer of the National Aeronau-.
tics and Space Administration
(NASA). Opalek sent Springer the
children's questions, and Springer
responded. It took some time the
questions were written in the 2005-
06 school year but Springer sent
his apologies for the delay along
with his responses.
The children asked questions
regarding topics from aliens to the
moon, and Springer enthusiastical-
ly answered each query. The
exchange between the class and
Springer is shown here unedited.

Q: How many days does it
take to get to the moon?
A: It takes approximately three
days to travel to the moon.
Q: How many people can fit in
the spaceship?
A: On the space shuttle, usually
seven people.
Q: What do you need to wear?
A: You have to wear a space suit
that protects you from the vacuum
of space no air to breathe.
Q: Do you like it on the moon?
A: I did not go to the moon, but
hopefully we will be sending peo-
ple there in the next 10 years.
Q: Did you land on the moon?
A: No.
Q: What did you land on?
A: My flights were in the space
shuttle and it operated in orbit
around the Earth.
Q: Did you see aliens?
A: No.
Q: Did you kill the aliens?
A: Goodness no!
Q: Did you write on Earth?
A: Yes. I have written a lot of
things about space and the environ-
ment.
Q: What's all the planets
names?
A: Mercury, Venus, Mars, Earth,
Jupiter, Neptune, Saturn, Uranus,
Pluto.
Q: How many days were you
in your spaceship?
A: Ten days
Q: How do meteors look like?
A: Like big chunks of rock.
Q: I like outer space. Can I
go to the moon with you?
A: Not with me, but you can go
to the moon if you study hard and
become an astronaut.
Q: What is it like being an
astronaut? Is it like being like I
am?
A: Yes, it is. Astronauts are just
everyday people who have had a
unique opportunity.
Q: Can I go with you if my
mom and dad say yes?
A: Not until you get good
grades, study hard, and become an
astronaut.


-
0*

'0 a




-4-- .
S
*

4*0


Q: Can you tell us about you
on the moon, please?
A: Since I didn't go there, all I
can tell you is what is in the books,
so I think you should read the
books and find out for yourself.
Q: Can I go to the moon? I
want to go to the moon.
A: Not until you get good
grades, study hard, and become an
astronaut.
Q: I want to go to the Spanish
side of the moon.
A: The moon does not belong to
any country.
Q: Do you be careful on the
moon?
A: Yes, partially because there
is less gravity and because there
isn't any air.
Q: Do you have lasers on your
spaceship?
A: No.
Q: Have you seen an alien
before?
A: No.
Q: I bet it is dark sometimes.
A: It is dark about one-half of
the time.
Q: Is the sun yellow and hot?
A: More like white and hot.
Q: Is it cool and dangerous?
A: No.
Q: Have you seen the planets?
A: Yes, but not up close.
Q: Do you count down when
the spaceship takes off?
A: Yes: 3, 2, 1, blast off!
Q: Do you see the sun in
space?
A: You have to be careful to not
look at the sun from space because
it can hurt your eyes.
Q: Do you see the Earth and
all the planets?
A: I got to see a lot of the Earth,
but not all of the planets were visi-
ble.
Q: What food did you eat?
A: A lot of rehydrated foods,
like powdered eggs or instant
mashed potatoes.
Q: Did you use soap?
A: Yes.
Q: I grow food to eat. Did you
grow food?
A: We did grow food in space,
but only as an experiment.
Q: I would like to have fun on
a spaceship. Is it fun or scary rid-
ing on your spaceship?
A: Mostly fun, as long as things
go well.
Q: Is too much sunshine too
hot?
A: Just like on Earth.
Q. Is their air?
A: No, space is. a vacuum no
air.
Q: How do you "drive the
spaceship?
A: It is something like flying an
airplane.
Q: What about space? De-
scribe this to me.
A: Space is all around us. It is
more than most of us can compre-
hend.
Q: Is it scary up there?
A: No, because you are so well
trained for what is going on.
Q: Would you be scared of
aliens?


"Copyrighted Material
I Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


-M -


- -0


- -


-NN


don.


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~ 1 0


A: No.
Q: If you were scared, did you
see aliens or something that made
you scared?
A: No.
Q: How big is the spaceship?
A: It is about the same size as a
passenger jet.
Q: What does it look like in
the spaceship?
A: Like the inside of an airplane
cockpit.
Q: Can you take me up into


space to see the moon?
A: Not until you get good
grades, study hard, and become an
astronaut.
Q: Is it scary up there?
A: No.
Q: Is the moon big?
A: It is big, but smaller than the
Earth.
Q: Do you like it up there in
space?
A: It was a lot'of fun, but also a
lot of hard work to get there.


.-----= .- .
COURTESY PHOTO
Teacher Tamara Opalek with astronaut Robert Springer.






WEATHER SUMMARY
Cooler temperatures swept over the sunshine State by mid-week during
January 22 28. Cold weather crossed from the Panhandle all the way down
to the central Peninsula with some areas experiencing some frosts and hard
freezes. Temperatures at the major stations averaged around normal to four
degrees above normal with Pensacola and Tallahassee two degrees below
normal. Most nighttime temperatures were in the 30s, 40s, and 50s with
some lows plunging into the 20s. Pleasant daytime highs were in 60s and
70s with some areas receiving highs in the low 80s. Rainfall ranged from
none at Immokalee to over two inches at Balm. Most areas throughout the
State received minimal showers with most areas receiving over one inch ol
precipitation.
FIELD CROPS
Sugarcane harvesting remained active around Lake Okeechobee. Ligh
showers last week helped soil moisture supplies in most localities, but more
rains are still needed. Soil moisture supplies over the Panhandle are mostly
adequate to surplus. In the northern Peninsula, topsoil and subsoil moisture
supplies are short to mostly adequate with some pockets of surplus supplies
Madison County reported very short to adequate soil moisture. Short to
mostly adequate soil moisture were reported in the central Peninsula areas
Soil moisture supplies in the southern Peninsula range from veryshort t(
surplus.
Topsoil Subsoil
Moisture
Ran This Last Last This Last Last
S week week year week week Year
Percent
Very short 7 10 12 10 10 8
Short 40 39 27 43 41 20
Adequate 52 50 60 47 49 70
Surplus 1 1 1 0 0 2
VEGETABLES
Vegetable producers in the southern as well as central Peninsula pre
pared for the cold front expected to hit several areas tonight. Strawberry
growers welcomed the cold temperatures which helped berry development
and growth. Potato planting is active around the Hastings area. Vegetable
marketed included snap beans, cabbage, celery, sweet corn, cucumbers
eggplant, endive, escarole, lettuce, parsley, peppers, radishes, squash
strawberries, and tomatoes.

LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
Statewide, pasture condition ranges from very poor to good. In the
Panhandle areas, pasture condition is fair to good. Winter grass growth i
slowing due to cold and drought. In the northern areas, pasture condition i
very poor to fair. Winter grazing is not doing very well due to drought. Ii
the central areas, pasture is in very poor to good condition with most ii
good condition. In the southwest areas, pasture condition is in very poor ti
good condition with most in fair condition. Some winter rye grass for for
age has fungal growth. Statewide, cattle condition ranges from very poor to
excellent with most in good condition.
Cattle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 5 1 10 5
Poor 10 9 20 5
Fair 40 35 45 50
Good 44 55 25 40
Excellent 1 0 0 0
CITRUS
Temperatures in the citrus areas were above normal levels early in th
week, but a strong cold front that passed through.the State brought colde
weather by Friday. Low temperatures reached the low to mid-40s in mo,
locations. A light wind prevented frost except in very scattered locations
Rainfall preceding the front ranged from none in the lower interior areas t
over one and a half inches in interior areas. Growers report bloom bud
forming in all locations on navels, Valencia oranges, and grapefruit. Th
cooler temperatures have the potential to slow the bloom progression
Harvest on early and midseason oranges for processing was slowed by th
rain, but continues strong for fresh market oranges and Temples. Sales organ
nizations report renewed interest in oranges to replace diminished supplies
from California. Grapefruit for fresh domestic and export use continue
strong with mostly eliminations going to processing. Sunburst tangerin
harvest is almost complete with Honey tangerines increasing in movement
Minneola tangelos are being picked for fresh use and the remaining Orland
tangelos are being used in processing. Growers continue to mow
before harvest and scout for diseases. Ditch maintenance and cleanup after
harvest continues with some hedging reported.

ESTIMATED BOXES HARVESTED WEEK ENDED
Crop Jan 14 Jan 21 Jan 28
In thousands of 1-3/5 bushel boxes
Navel oranges 42 31 24
Early and Mid oranges 5,949 4,276 4,624
Grapefruit 795 679 910
Sunburst Tangerines 28 15 3
Honey Tangerines 120 111 109
Tangelos 171 96 77
Temples 25 32 40


Chancey and Yeager made the
grade.
Chancey is in her 12th year as a
math teacher at the high school.
She motivates her students through
school spirit, and has developed a
"Pep Wall" in her classroom, filled
with shirts and jerseys from various
clubs and sports teams.
It is her belief that good teachers
have to first meet the physical and
mental needs of their students
before they can teach them acade-
mics.
Chancey is called the "driving
force" behind the school's motto for
the year, "Mission Possible." It is
her quest to help youngsters believe
that they can be successful in
school and, ultimately, in life.
She deems "love" the most
important trait a teacher can have.
Yeager has worked in the Hardee
County School District for 22
years, and is currently in the role of
administrative assistant to the
director of the Educational
Facilities Department.
That department, which has
county-wide responsibilities, has
only one secretary. It is Yeager who
maintains the payroll, issues work
orders, inputs inventory and gener-
ates purchase orders.
She is noted as "always looking
for ways to improve," and is credit-
ed with saving time and money by
streamlining how the department
does inventory.
Yeager believes a good school
employee needs to love and care
about the children in the schools.
She feels the work the maintenance
department does is motivated by
the impact it has on the kids in the
classrooms.
A third honor went to Samantha
Hunt, an exceptional student edu-
Scation tutor at Pioneer Career
SAcademy. She was the winner of a
$500 scholarship from Suncoast
Schools Credit Union as she pur-
h sues her bachelor's degree while
Working full-time.
n The event was sponsored by
Suncoast, the HEA/U, the Hardee
f County Education Foundation and
the Hardee County School Board.
Honorees and guests were greet-
ed outside the armory and in its
t lobby by members of the Air Force
e Junior Reserve Officer Training
SCorps from Hardee Senior High
e School.
S The JROTC Color Guard pre-
D sented the flags for the National
Anthem.
o Dinner service was. provided by
members of the National Honor
Society.
In his opening remarks, Jones
noted, "We do this once a year, and
I wish we could do it more often. I
don't know that we can thank
enough the people who take care of
5,000 children every day."
He described those being recog-
nized that night as "the best of the
best."
Then Jones added, "I want to add
S a name to the list of those we honor
t tonight. You are aware Marsha
s Timmerman passed away Sunday."
S He spoke of Timmerman's years
Sin the school district and as assis-
tant principal at the senior high. "I
have known few who loved her
school, loved her students and
e loved her district more than Marsha
s Timmerman."
s He asked for a moment of silence
n in memory of Timmerman. School
n Board Chairman Jan Platt then
o gave the invocation.
Each worksite winner of School
o Employee of the Year and Teacher
of the Year was then presented to
the crowd while a video showed
each at work. Plaques were award-
ed to all, and then the final selec-
tions were announced.
Yeager accepted her district title
first. Chancey came next, noting,
"Wow, what an honor! As we sit
here tonight, we are all winners
because we touch children's lives.
We are blessed. I'm just speech-
less."
Rasmussen, as last year's District
e Teacher of the Year, took the podi-
r um next and declared, "What a
st great night it has been tonight.
s. We've got teachers as good as any
o in this state, bar none, and you just
Is saw some of them tonight."
e He said every school employee
works toward a common goal, and
e in that function, he noted, "We are
educators. It doesn't matter if you
:s are in maintenance, if you are a
's teacher, if you are a paraprofession-
le al, if you are a bus driver, we are all
t. educators because we all influence
o children."


He spoke of the variety of learn-
er ing going on in his physical educa-
tion classes at Bowling Green
Elementary School as well. He said
most important is the one, golden
rule all his students learn. He called
out to 6-year-old Zackary Duras-
tanti in the audience, asking him
what that rule is.
"Treat others as you want to be,
treated," the youngster responded.
Rasmussen then likened district
employees to a construction com-
pany. "Basically, we are building a
product that won't be finished for a
long time."
He said elementary school teach-


ers lay the foundation, junior high
teachers build the walls and put in
the wires as the building takes
form, and high school teachers put
on the roof.
"Whether you are a maintenance
mechanic or a custodian, we are all
a construction team," Rasmussen
concluded.
Each worksite has its own
School Employee, of the Year.
Those winners are:
Margaret Patino, Bowling
Green Elementary School, 25
years, migrant tutor, pre-kinder-
garten tutor and now English for
Speakers of Other Languages tutor
and translator.
Patsy Naranjo, Hardee Junior
High School, nine years, data oper-
ator. She. also serves as a "Take
Stock in Children" mentor.
Amparo Islas, Hilltop Ele-
mentary School, 18 years, substi-
tute, ESOL tutor, ESOL clerk and
currently data clerk.
Susan Brewer, North Wau-
chula Elementary School, 27 years,
front office, where she is able to
interact with and encourage many
students during the day.
Teresa Brandeberry, Transport-
ation Department, 19 years, bus
driver and currently bus driver
trainer and commercial driver's
license examiner. She also coached
volleyball for years.
Ramona Garcia, Wauchula
Elementary School, 26 years, cafe-
teria worker who likes developing
new meals for the children to enjoy.
She also cooks and serves food for
the Honors Banquet.
Shirley Roberts, Zolfo Springs
Elementary School, 13 years, a
food service worker who takes
pride in teamwork, cleanliness and
a good attitude, wearing a smile
each day.
Each school named its own
Teacher of the Year. Those winners
are:
Melissa Massey, Bowling
Green Elementary School, 12
years, teacher of varying excep-
tionalities, resource and inclusion
teacher, and grants writer.
SMeredith Durastanti, Hardee
Junior High School, 10 years,
teaching ESE and gifted students,
serves as attendance dean and has
coached girls volleyball and bas-
ketball.
Regan Davenport, .North
Wauchula Elementary School, 11
years, speech and language teacher,
currently ESE self-contained
teach er who uses coaching tech-
niques to develop teamwork; gnher
students. She also coaches girls
basketball.
Michelle Shepard, Hilltop
Elementary School, 10 years, third-
grade teacher, one of only six,
National Board Certified Teachers
in the district. She also mentors
teachers working toward national
certification.
Francisca Olvera, Wauchula
Elementary School, five years, a
first-grade teacher who uses "real
world" items and activities in
teaching her students. She also
brings technology into her lesson
plans.
Sue Boyette, Zolfo Springs
Elementary School, 20 years, pre-
K, third grade and now a fifth-
grade teacher. She uses hands-on
learning in her classroom and
works to motivate her students to
do well. She also serves as a men-
tor.



It pays to

advertise

in your

Hometown

Newspaper

We are saving

this space just

for



YOU!



The


Herald-


Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave.

Wauchula, FL


Telephone:


773-3255


SCHOOL DISTRICT
Continued From 1A


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate


Q







February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 9A


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Public
Library reopened earlier this
month, but soon will have its offi-
Scial open house.
The public is invited to attend the
open house sponsored by the
Friends of the Library on Monday,
from 1:30 to 6 p.m. There will be
two special guest speakers, draw-
ings for prizes and refreshments.
The Friends of the Library is a
private organization that provides
the library with services and special
items that are not allocated in the
budget. Its latest project includes
donating furniture for the adult sec-
tion, as well as a book sale.
The organization will be at the
open house accepting new mem-
bers for anyone wishing to join.
At the open house will be local



TOUCHDOWN TOTAL


children's author Gayle Knight,
who will be signing and reading
from her books at 3 p.m. At 4:30
p.m., ventriloquist Kerry Terrell
and her doll Kenny will be enter-
taining guests.
This special ceremony will com-
memorate the three-month closure
of the facility for repairs and reno-
vations.
"It was really a 28-month long
project, because we had to start
repairing and saving what we could
right after the hurricanes hit in
2004," said librarian Diane Hunt.
Refurbished and restored, the
library definitely has a new look to
it. It now features a special youth
services wing that is located where
the large hallway between the
library and the supervisor of elec-
tions office was.
Children's Program Director Dee


Shackelford is in charge of the
wing, and will be coordinating
future activities for children and
families alike. She plans to have at
least one family program a month.
Having this addition makes the
Hardee County Public Library one
of the few in the Heartland to have
such a feature. "The other libraries
have a revolving scheduled coordi-
nator, Dee is always here and we
are glad to have her," said Hunt.
An estimated 3,000 square feet
was gained during the closure, pro-
viding more room for members of
the staff and visitors alike. In addi-
tion to the children's wing, a room
designed specifically for periodi-
cals was added.
New carpeting and. repainted
walls are some of the most apparent
physical changes, and the light fix-
tures in the ceiling were also


replaced with recessed lighting.
Hunt said that the hardest job faced
by renovating crews was the air
conditioning system, which had to
be totally replaced.


With all the changes to the
library, it has allowed a change in
hours. Now, the library is open on
Monday 9 a.m. 6:30 p.m.,
Tuesday Thursday 9 a.m. 5:30


p.m., Fridays 9 a.m. 4 p.m. and
Saturday 9 a.m. noon.
For more information on your
local library, call 773-6438 or visit
the website at www.myhlc.org.


PHOTOS BY BRETT JARNAGIN
Computers are available for use at the library and personal laptops can be brought in to access
the wireless internet hotspot.


CHAPEL
Chapel had 166 in attendance.
Pastor Jim Williams talked about
fear and that it takes courage in
mastering fear. God "said I will not
forsake you or fail you." Special


music was Zanneth Casteel, she
played the harp. Ushers were Jim
and Helen Noble and Everett and
Eleanor King. It was also fellow-
ship Sunday hosted by Ray and
Ruth Gunn.


PHOTO BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
For the second consecutive year, Crown Ford in Wauchula has donated $50 for each touchdown
made by the Wildcat football team during the regular season and during playoffs. This year, that
totaled a check in the amount of $2,700 for Hardee Senior High School. Crown Ford's Mike Mathis
presented the check to Principal Mike Wilkinson during a recent meeting of the Hardee County
School Board. "It's $350 higher than last year," Mathis noted. "That's seven touchdowns. And we
hope that in 2007 we can make it even bigger." Schools Superintendent Dennis Jones respond-
ed, "We appreciate the generosity.' Pictured are (from left) Wilkinson, Mathis and wife Kimberly
Mathis.


COFFEE HOUR
We had 219 for coffee hour. The
speaker was Grace Plants from
Florida Life Line. Grace gave a
very informative talk about the
benefits of the life line system. The
50/50 was $71, and it was won by
Robert Opperman.
We want to invite everyone to
join us at coffee hour. Not only do
you find out what is going on in the
park, you also get to visit with old
friends and meet new friends.
Coffee hour starts at 8 and we have
a speaker at 9. We have coffee and
doughnuts and bagels. Shirley
Anderson always has at least 25 to
30 merchants' gift certificates to
give away, so you might win some-
thing.

NEWS OF INTEREST
We are sorry to report that
Wilber Johns passed away Jan. 10.
The shufflers ham and egg break-
fast was a big success, they served
306 people. Also our spaghetti din-
ner was another big success, they
served 203 people.

SHUFFLEBOARD
Cheryl Conkle took fourth in
main at Winter Haven Jan. 17. Ruth
Brown took second in main at Lee
County Jan. 17. In the Ray Mangle
Memorial tournament first, Bill
Morrison; second, Darlene Morris-
on; third, Nancy Singleton; and
fourth, Jim Van Dyke. On Jan. 18 in
St. Cloud, Ruth Brown took fourth
in main.

GAMES
Alley on Jan. 16 had 32 players
with two undefeated, and on Jan.
18 they had 52 players. Euchre Jan.
18: first, Tom Stamm; second was a
tie with Matt Cairns and Bea Be-
ment. Euchre Jan. 21: first, Juanita
Brower; second, Bill Huesing; and
third, Edie Thompson. Pinochle:
first, Grace Stang; second, Dee
Cairns; and third, John Posey.
Pinochle Jan. 23: first, Pat Kenney;
second, Dave Stirling; third, John
Posey.

COMING EVENTS
Saturday is the Ohio picnic to be
held in the rec hall at 12.30. Sunday
is the Canadian picnic in the rec
hall at 12:30.We will have a snack
bar on Tuesday and Thursday, Feb.
6 and 8, at 4:30. This is put on by
the stained glass and the carving
members.
On Saturday, Feb. 10, will be the
Michigan picnic at 12:30 in the rec
hall. That night we will have a
dance with Stone Bridge Country,
/featuring our own park resident,
Diane Pearson.


" IB"a
COURTESY PHOTO
Winners in the Ray Mangle Memorial Park Shuffleboard
Championship were (from left) fourth, Jim Van Dyke; third,
Nancy Singleton; second, Darlene Morrison; and first, Bill
Morrison.

Join The Club!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT 5 RM.

--- --. .--.-r-


* TBelflower's S
FLOORS direct
S\ will be at
SGrillin' & Chillin' on Main
Friday & Saturday

Jerry Robinson will be cooking
Chicken, Ribs, Brisket & Pork Roast!

Stop by, say "hi" and try the best BBQ around.

$7 gets you meat, beans, rice & bread. |
All profit will be donated to one of the baseball programs.


Come See Us! A

U-i -sdd


'q : I---?

Alexi Santana and her younger sister Saria Santana are shown here reading books in the newly
added children's wing.


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Pioneer Creek RV News
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10A The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


Listen


to


what your friends


and neighbors


about


Crown


have


Ford


to


say


0 0.


.,1 ~-7


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ii4-


Elwood Mishue Wauchula
"Before Crown Ford, I was never able to buy a new
vehicle here in Wauchula. Local prices just weren't
competitive. That's all changed now. After doing all
my shopping, Crown Ford offered me the best price
and friendly customer service. I bought my new
F-250 from Crown, and I'm glad I did".


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"I really appreciate the service I received from Mike Mathis and Tommy
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cal problems. My kids and I love our new Explorer from Crown Ford".


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"I've tried to trade locally for years with no success. Crown
Ford made me a great deal, and for the first time I bought a
new vehicle here in Wauchula. Salesman Tommy Jackson
was great, and my wife and I love our new Expedition ".


i" :; ;l; ,
-, -_ ...
1
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c, '


Wanda Ledford Bowling Green
"I could not ask for better service than I receive at
Crown Ford. They are very courteous and listen to
my concerns. They do everything possible to ensure
my satisfaction. They go above and beyond my
expectations to service or repair my vehicles".


Geneva Burns Wauchula
"I have four trucks that I need to keep on the road. The
Crown Ford Service Department fixes my trucks right
the first time. I am very satisfied with Crown's Service
Department and always have a good experience there".


Ken Lipp Thousand Trails Campground
"I like the convenience and the shuttle service that
Crown provides. Service Manager Joe Pipino always
takes care of me and my vehicle. Crown Ford service
has bent over backwards to help me time after time".
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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, February 1, 2007


PAGE ONE


HJHS Boys Beat DeSoto Again


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High Wildcats
continued their domination over
arch-rival DeSoto.
The Hardee boys beat DeSoto
last Monday 40-33, following on
the heels of a 35-29 victory in the
season opener for both teams on
.Dec. 4. Later in the week, the boys
lost to Avon Park 44-18, as they
"played one of their worst games."
Hardee girls, meanwhile, took it
on the chin, battling DeSoto only to
lose 16-12 and being overwhelmed
by Avon Park 30-9.
The teams were on the road this
week, at Sebring on Monday and at
Hill-Gustat today (Thursday). The
season finale is next Thursday, Feb.
8 at home against Lake Placid. The
girls play at 5:30 p.m., and the boys
immediately afterward, about 6:30.


Against the DeSoto Middle
School Panthers, it was even-
steven for the first half, which had
seven ties or lead changes ending in
a 15-15 tie at halftime.
Hardee came out hot in the third
quarter, building up a 10-point lead.
In the final period, Hardee held off
the DeSoto effort for the 40-33 win.
James Greene had 11 points for
DeSoto and Rodney Randolph
added eight.
For the junior 'Cats, it was Scott
Donaldson with. 14 points to lead
the pack. Tre' Anderson chipped in
with seven and Kalan Royal had a
half dozen. Andrew Hooks sank a
three-pointer and Jake Mayer,
KeShawn Rivers, Deonte Evans,
Justin Bromley and Kyle Bodeck
added a pair apiece. Dylan Justice,
Jarrius Lindsey, D'Vonte Hooks,
Jajuan Hooks, Dillon Rabon and


Quinton Carlton added rebounds,
steals and time on the floor.
At home against Avon Park
Middle School last Thursday, it was
a different team. Alonzo Robin-
son's 14 points led Avon Park past
Hardee 44-18, holding the junior
Wildcats scoreless in the second
period to take a 27-7 halftime
advantage.
For Hardee, scoring was shared.
Donaldson and Anderson each had
five points, D'Vonte Hooks three,
Andrew Hooks and Carlton two
each and Justice one-of-two at the
charity stripe. Other young 'Cats
shared floor time in an effort to stop
the Avon Park flurry.
For the Hardee junior Lady
Wildcats, the DeSoto game was a
study in perseverance. There were a
half dozen ties or lead changes in
the mostly defensive game, with


the taller DeSoto center getting
many rebounds. Late in the fourth
quarter, Ali Holle made a free
throw to cut the DeSoto two-point
lead in half, but a free throw and
offensive rebound gave DeSoto
three more points and the 16-12
win.
Avon Park held Hardee in check
on Thursday night, with Brehayla
English getting 12 points and
Markida Hawthorne adding 11.
For Hardee, it was slim points,
with Cisneros, Vargas, Holle and
Servin each pointing one in the
hole for two points apiece. Blandin
Elvira Servin topped the Hardee
girls with six points. Summer
Palmer and Artrice Hines had two
apiece and Yesenia Vargas and
Holle each had one. Savannah
Hagans, Lacey Garza, Kate Krause,
Courtney Buckley, Kara Norris,
Daisha Blandin, Yvette Cisneros
and Paige Massey shared defen-
sively.


made one-of-two at the free throw
line. Other Hardee girls collected


MESSAGE CHANGED DAILY!


Call in DAILY
for a short
Bible message.
2:1c


minutes on the floor in the futile
effort.


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7:00 p.m., Friday
$10 entry fee

Dessert Contest
8:00 p.m., Friday
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People's Choice Award
11 a.m.-12p.m., Saturday
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Entertainment


Cash Awards
Backyard Dessert Chili


1st $200
2nd $100
3rd $50


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Half of the People's Choice Pot!



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For more info contact:
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2B The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007





-Hardee


Local Rapper Moving Up


Living


SURPRISE PARTY


A Wauchula musician recently
received the opportunity to collabo-
rate with a popular band.
Jay Robinson, known as J-Bez,
was featured in a song called
"Watch Yourself" performed by the
Nappy Roots, an alternative south-
ern rap sextet from Kentucky. Their
breakout single was "Awnaw,"
which was released in 2002.
Robinson says that he has been a
fan of the band since its first album
was released and was excited to be
able to collaborate with the band.
'They found me on MySpace and
sent me a message saying that they
wanted me to come and record with
them, so I went up over New Year's.
It was interesting getting to spend
time with someone you've listened
to for years," Robinson said.
The rapper traveled to Song City
Recording Studios in Nashville,
Tenn., where he recorded with
Nappy Roots, and spent the week
with members of the band, the Pink
Spiders.
On New Year's Eve, Robinson
was treated like a celebrity with the
band in Nashville, riding in a lim-
ousine and having an escort of
bodyguards around him.
"I have been friends with Bob
Ferrari for a long time. He's the
drummer of the Pink Spiders," said
Robinson. While recording he also
remixed "Modern Swinger" with
the pop/punk band that will be fea-
tured on its MySpace.
The Pink Spiders are currently


touring with Good Charlotte, a band
of the same pop/punk genre.
"Later on this year I am going to
be doing a song with Sean Paul
from the YoungBloodz," he said.
Sean Paul is also a southern rapper
from Atlanta, Ga., and is one half of
the duo YoungBloodz.
Robinson, 25, is the son of
Sherry White and Jerry Robinson;
his sisters are Darlene Hildreth and
Dalina Robinson.
"You know, I don't have to travel
far to perform with talented artists,
1-1 . Aj>rl-41f


there is plenty local talent here, like
Wildcat, Lil' Heat, Ganggreen, Rick
Gainous, Levi, Dustin Grimsley,
Best of Both, Gordo, Ophnie and
Lil' Tika and Heather," he said.
March will be a big step for the
rapper, as he plans to be releasing a
professionally recorded demo fea-
turing five strong songs of his own
creation.
"But until then you can still catch
me on MySpace to hear my music,
or call me at 863-781-7208 for
some promo cds or to book a
show," he said.


COURTESY PHOTO
Joan Radford, who turned 60 on Dec. 7, was honored with a surprise birthday party hosted by her
sons and their wives on Dec. 9. David Radford and wife Beth (both shown on the right) and Chris,
Hodges and wife D'Gee (on the left) decorated the fellowship hall at New Hope Baptist Church in
the theme of Classic Movies, and asked all guests to dress in theme-related black and white.
Stand-ins of Elvis, James Dean and Marilyn Monroe greeted each guest. A cake was decorated
as an old movie clipboard, and each table was covered with a white tablecloth and held a cen-
terpiece of red poinsettias in a black top hat. Adding to the celebration was a Power Point pre-
sentation of memorable moments in the honoree's life, which played during the evening.


COURTESY PHOTO
B. Stille of the Nappy Roots and Robinson together in Nashville.


BIRTHDAY BUDDIES


Robinson


What is important is to keep
learning, to enjoy challenge, and
to tolerate ambiguity. In the end
there are no certain answers.
-Martina Homer


ICBEATI BESI6N


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Large Variety of Custom Built
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Store Hours:
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Sat. 10am-3pm
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COURTESY PHOTO
Ruth Cresswell shared her 94th birthday on Jan. 13 with great-
granddaughter Christie Burrus, whose birthday is three days
after hers. Also home for the weekend celebrating his birthday
was Tim McCray. The festivities took place at The Columbia
Restaurant in Ybor City with Cresswell's daughter and son-in-
law Karen and Charles Burrus, grandson Mark Burrus and his
wife Debbie, and great-grandson Matt Burrus; granddaughter
Robyn Norris and her husband Ben with great-grandchildren
Courtney, Kara and Garrett Norris; granddaughter Susan
Prestridge and husband John with great-grandchildren
Brandon and Brooke Prestridge; grandson Chris Burrus and
wife Daleace with great-grandchildren Amanda and Nicholas
Burrus; and granddaughter Kathy McCray and husband Tim with
great-grandchildren Ashley and Zackary McCray. The family
enjoyed dinner at the famed historic restaurant and watching
the flamenco dancers perform.

YOU Can Appear In ...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published In this
newspaper in "'Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies solely on
reader submissions. Poems must be your own original work, written
by you, not someone else. To appear in this feature, send your poet-
ry, name and town of residence to: Poet's Place, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula. FL 33873 or fax 773-0657.


HARDEE SENIOR HIGH

VALENTINE'S DAY DROP-OFF

Where: HHS Auditorium ONLY!
Please do not take flowers to the front office. i-

When: February 14, 2007 from 8:30 a.m. 12 p.m. (Noon) 4,

Guidelines:
*NO FLOWERS, BALLOONS, or PACKAGES can be
dropped off after 12 noon! There will be NO o
EXCEPTIONS!!
ALL FLOWERS, BALLOONS, or PACKAGES must o^
have a tag with student's NAME and GRADE on it.
Doors will lock at 12 noon. ALL FLOWERS,
BALLOONS, or PACKAGES should be dropped ,
off BEFORE 12 noon!! 'V

THANK YOU

HHS STUDENT COUNCIL soc2,8


COURTESY PHOTOS
The girls were proud to wear their FFA jackets wherever they went.


'Leadership is Influence'


Five members of the Hardee
Senior High School Future Farmers
of American chapter spent two days
learning about how to be leaders.
Katie Rogers, Halley Marshall,


Kaylyn Stevenson, Shelby Albritton
and Krystin Robertson went to the
Advanced Leadership Development
Conference in Haines City Dec. 9-
10.


Over the course of the two days,
they attended six sessions about
what leadership is and how to apply
it within their FFA chapters.
Not knowing what to expect,.
when the anxious girls arrived Deq..
9 at the training center, they were
greeted with loud noises and cheer-
ing. After shuffling seating with
other members from around th'
state, the leadership training began
in earnest.
By the fourth session, the group
had learned that leadership is influ-
ence and it happens through "me'
to "others." At the end of the
evening, they enjoyed a small dance
after dinner.
In Sunday's session, the idea that
leadership happens through service
was introduced. After a final, ses-
sion, recapping everything learned
and receiving certificates, they girls
were sent on their way, expected to
influence their local chapters andc
communities through the leadership:
skills they learned.
If you really want crystal clear
ice cubes, boil the water first and
let it cool before you freeze it.


- -', .' IV 9 /- -
Attending the leadership conference were Shelby Albritton,
Halley Marshall, Krystin Robertson, Katie Rogers and Kaylyn
Stevenson.


Isn't it



inoce is

501
Lov e,
~yoM- Fa~iL


The girls had their feet firmly planted on their home plate.


~3 sr

Is~ ~






February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Niel and Pamela Matheis of Lake
Placid announce the engagement of
their daughter, Danielle Josephine
Brown of Winter Haven, to Charlie
Lawrence Stokes Jr. of Wauchula,
son of Charlie and Avis Stokes of
Wauchula.
The bride-to-be is a 2002 honors
graduate of Lake Placid High
School. She obtained an associate


of arts degree at South Florida
Community College and is current-
ly attending Traviss Career Center
for Nursing.
The prospective groom is a 1999
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School. He is self-employed.
The couple are planning a June
15 wedding.


SANTA GRAMS


COURTESY PHOTO


Charlie Stokes & Danielle Brown


COURTESY PHOTO
The Parent Teacher Organization at North Wauchula Elementary
School sponsored a "Santa Grams" program during the holi-
days. The Santa Grams were messages with candy attached to
them. Students could purchase one for $1, choose from sever-
al message tags and then send it off to a friend, teacher or fam-
ily member. Pictured with the sweet greetings are (front, from
left) Jessica Bembry and Aubrey Bragg; (middle) Shamaud
Blandin, Emily Albritton and Tyler Johnson; and (back) art
teacher Sue Harvey.


TOY COLLECTORS


HOSPITAL HELP


N -


1.4


.\ i


/ .


COURTESY PHOTO
The Florida Hospital Wauchula Foundation Board recently
'donated five patient chairs, six split-top bedside rolling tables
and three oak bedside storage tables to the Wauchula facility.
The Foundation Board made this $6,800 donation for the com-
fort of the hospital's patients. Pictured (from left) are Treasurer
Pat Davis, Chairman Jim Beckley, Parker Keen, Joyce McLeod
and (seated) Doyle Carlton III; not pictured are Maggie Bobe,
Amanda Justus, Megan McKibben, Tanya Royal and Gerald
Shackleford.


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Wauchula, FL 33873

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COURTESY PHOTO
Big boxes were filled with toys as 4-H Youth In Action collected
donations for the Rudolph Roundup during the holidays. The
toys would provide Christmas surprises for area foster children.
Working as elves for the successful project were Brandon
Sinclair, Kimberly Hernandez, Violet Hernandez, Julie Hern-
andez, Mary Sinclair, Hilda Chazares, Kaleigh Chazares, Diego
Chazares and Phyllis Lambert, all of whom can be seen in the
photo above.



Frenot Joins Honor Fraternity


A Hardee Senior High School
alumnus was recently accepted into
an honors fraternity.
Jackson Minnis Frenot, of
Jacksonville, was recently inducted
as a member of the Sigma Alpha
Lambda fraternity, National Lead-
ership and Honors Organization at
the-University of North Florida.
The fraternity is nationally rec-
ognized and is dedicated to promot-
ing and rewarding academic
achievement. It provides members
with opportunities for community
service and personal development.
Frenot, son of Deanna Minnis of
Wauchula, graduated from Hardee
Senior High in 2006, and has since
been attending UNF in Jacksonville
where he joined the rugby team and
founded a Brain Bowl team.
The new UNF Brain Bowl's team
attended its first competition last
Saturday, and finished fifth. Frenot
placed fifth individually. "I think
my guys are really excited about
playing and we can only go up
from here," Frenot said.
"For the first outing on the col-


lege level, that's not bad at all,"
said Peggy Sadler guidance coun-
selor and Hardee academic team
coach.
Frenot already has ties with aca-
demic competition as he was a
member of the 2006 Hardee state
championship Academic Team. He
was one of the top six players there,
and was selected for Team Florida
that placed second nationally.
Also in his senior year, Frenot
was a football captain and was
selected Prom King in absentia.
This was the first time in school
history that such a thing occurred.
History making seems to follow
Frenot as he has yet again managed
to do something that no one else
has been able to accomplish.
This semester he ran for Student
Senate at UNF, but submitted his
application too late. Many students
wrote him in anyway, bringing him
a near victory over the other candi-
dates.
So many students, in fact, that he
broke the school record for number
of write-ins for a candidate.


Senior Citizen News
By Jim Walton

The setting was a bit different than usual on the evening of Jan. 25 at
the Catheryn McDonald Senior Center in Wauchula.
It kind of reminded those of us with military service of duties, assign-
ments and rosters. For instance, our lovely hostess, Darlene Henry, took a
much needed R&R. Bill Hartigan of the "Three-Note Band" was sent on
T.D.Y. to the Hardee County Players Inc. for dress rehearsal for its variety
show scheduled Jan. 26-28.
Early arrivers were assigned to K.P. duties by the host, Jim. Walton,
with the order of the day: "The evening show and events must go on!" What
a feeling of relief, a wonderful, loving cooperation by all! It seemed like all
the host did was sit back and watch every one of our fine friends go into
action. The set up of the bandstand, the snack bar and table and chair
arrangements were done on time for the first number by the band at 7 p.m.
All of these friends will receive a letter of commendation for their fine
cooperation in helping with the evenings events.
The remainder of the "Three-Note Band," Elena playing the keyboard,
Wanda on the mandolin and Jack Bowman on the upright base, gave us a'
fine performance of dance music from the opening to the final number.
Their performance started off with dance numbers "Memories";
"Whispering"; "Springtime In The Rockies"; "San Francisco"; and
"Tennessee Waltz." Then they did a series of beautiful love ballads such as,
"Hold Me"; "Heartaches"; "Mexicali Rose"; and "My Happiness."
At intermission all present enjoyed the snack bar prepared by our many
friends in attendance. Forrest, Alice, Darlene Thiebert and Fran did the
snack bar set up and clean up detail at the conclusion of the evening.
The door prize for the .event was won by Dorothy Hopkins from
Pioneer Park. The mystery tune was an oldie entitled "My Mother's Eyes,"
answered correctly by Ms. Margaret Ditzier from Wauchula, who was
awarded a prize for her correct answer.
The band closed out the evening's events with audience requests that
included "All Of Me"; "Mona Lisa"; "On Blueberry Hill"; and "Miss You."
Several of the audience then took part in a line dance called "The Hokey
Pokey" that brought lots of fun and laughter. Wanda did a hot old Dixie
number on her mandolin entitled "Bill Bailey" that really livened us all up
on the dance floor. The band's final numbers "Seems Like Old Times" and
"Now Is The Hour" ended another evening of fine entertainment of singing,
dancing and enjoyable friendship. It was a bit wild, but lots of fun.
So please come join us tonight, Feb. 1 at 7 p.m..It will be lots of fun,
especially when Bill and Darlene Henry return to active duty on the roster.
at the Catheryn McDonald Senior Center.




WELCOME

HOME

SSPERRY

TWINS

Kinzee and Morgan Sperry are the twin daughters of Lee
and Kelly Sperry of Jacksonville, FL, formerly of Wauchula.
Kinzee and Morgan have spent much of their time in the
hospital since they were born, November 10th. We are now
back home in Jacksonville and doing well. We want to say
Thank You to our family and friends of Hardee County for
your many thoughts and prayers during this time.
Sincerely,
Lee and'Kelly Sperry soc2:1,


(ga~ vi'~ i%.
"r ?.


A


NJ


rRuE \
"4;


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Wauchula, FI 33873
(863) 767-8964
Dixon ofWauchula, Inc.
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Monday Friday 9 am-6 pm Saturday 10 am 6 pm
Closed Sunday -
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4B The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


Rules For County Fair Arts & Crafts Exhibits:


The following are categories and
rules for the 2007 Hardee County
Fair Arts & Crafts Booth. The fair
will be held Feb. 19-24 at the fair-
grounds on Altman Road.
Categories: breads-quick and
yeast breads, latch hook, needle-
point, cakes/pies/cookies/candy,
decorated cakes, crochet, macram6,
woodworking, sewing (crafts and
garments) knitting, plastic canvas,
canned goods, miscellaneous,
quilts/bedspreads, embroidery, rugs
and toys.
1.) Show open to any resident of
Hardee County.
2.) All articles must be brought


in person to exhibit hall between I
and 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18.
3.) All exhibits must remain on
display until Sunday, Feb. 25. Ex-
hibition hall will be open on
Sunday between I and 4 p.m. to
pick up articles.
4.) Every entry must be in the
name of its bona-fide owner and
must be his work.
5.) All articles must be labeled
with the name of the exhibitor, with
label concealed from view.
6.) Exhibitors in the youth divi-
sion must be school age and/or en-
rolled in the Hardee County school
system. Their exhibits will be
judged separately.


Woman's Club Meeting,

Spaghetti Supper Set


The Wauchula Woman's Club
will meet at its clubhouse Friday at
noon for the regular monthly meet-
ing.
Guest speaker will be Becky
McIntyre from Good Shepherd
Hospice. Special luncheon guests
will be the crew members working
on a house for Habitat for
Humanity.
Hostesses for the meeting will be


Opal Knight, Virginia Metheny and
Belva Vance.
Following the meeting the mem-
bers will make final preparations
for the spaghetti supper held at the
clubhouse on Friday from 5 to 7
p.m. Tickets maybe purchased by
calling President Vance at 773-
4740.
The clubhouse is located at 131
N. Seventh Ave.


4-H GOES TO RESTHAVEN


---/"-;- 4

COURTESY PHOTO
Members of 4-H Youth In Action hosted a Christmas party in
December for the residents of Resthaven. A number of holiday
treats were served along with a smile. Above, Kaleigh Chazares
serves goodies to some of the women joining in the celebfition.




Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

REQUIREMENTS OF FAITH
A Gallup poll has found that 74 percent of Americans indicate they
have a personal commitment to Jesus Christ.
But how can this be when polls show avowed Christians behaving no
better in their daily lives than their pagan neighbors?
Billy Graham has said that only a fourth of the decisions made at his
crusades result in people being born again.
What's going on here? Either the requirements for Christians to live a
drastically different life have been lowered or millions of people are walk-
ing around with a a false sense of security. They think they are going to
heaven because they prayed a prayer or got baptized or joined a church.
When Christianity was legalized in fourth-century Rome, the number
of proclaimed Christians grew from 10 percent to over 90 percent due to
admitting heathen who were willing to perform a symbolic act. As a result,
Christianity became the establishment religion during the most wicked peri-
od of Roman history.
A similar condition exists today in America. As evangelicals have
grown in number and status, it has become more and more difficult to tell
the difference between a believer and anyone else.
While churches have made it easier and easier to join, God hasn't
changed what he requires of all who would serve Him: a heart decision to
believe in Christ as Savior and a life devoted to good deeds.
Why good deeds? Here's one reason: this outward sign will assure oth-
ers of a change within.
Jesus said, "By their fruits, ye shall know them." People have a right to
see a visible manifestation of a born again experience in those who call
themselves Christians.






133 E. Townsend St. *Wauchula
Former Johns Laundromat


t


Palmetto


E. Townsend St
o E. Townsend St.


I-"


One of a kind items, craft
(cotton, linen or lace), dolls
dolls and clothes, pictures


Hours:
Thurs. & Fri.
10:00 5:00

Sat.
10:00 2:00

supplies, tablecloths
(collectibles), Barbie
and frames, dishes,


candles and candle holders, floral arrangements,
toys, handmade jean purses and aprons, salt &
pepper shakers, rooster and rabbit figurines,
sheets, curtains, jewelry, silk scarfs, boys & girls
baby clothes, pillows, lamps and much more.
soc:2:1 p


Jaxon
Jaxon Walter Justiss turned 5
years old on Tuesday, Jan. 30.
Jaxon celebrated his special day
with a Superman party at the Magic
House.
The son of John and Doree
Justiss of St. Louis, Mo., Jaxon is
the grandson of Jamie and Diane
Justiss of Wauchula, Cheryl Landry
of Bowling Green and Walter and
Dr. Doreen Feldhouse of Dyers-
burg, Tenn. Great-grandparents are
Vetres Justiss of Wauchula and
Dora Reese of Dyersburg, Tenn.








ONE PINK, NO BLUE


i D


Mr. and Mrs. John Sharp, a seven
pound eleven ounce daughter,
Caroline Reese, born Nov. 21,
2006, Lakeland Regional Medical
Center, Lakeland..She joins older
brother Gavin, Cole Sharp. Mrs.
Sharp is the former Stacy Durden.
Maternal grandparents are Richard
and Sheri Peacock of Fort Meade,
and James and Tesha Durden of
Dade City. Paternal grandparents
are Betty Sharp of Wauchula and
the late Leon Sharp.
Hospital newborn shots may be
included with your announcement
free of charge. Any other photo is
$15.


7.) The Modified Danish System
of judging will be used. Decisions


Jaxon Justiss
Celebrates
5th Birthday


of judges will be final.
8.) All entries must be clean, in
good condition and completed
since the 2006 county fair.
Articles soiled or worn out will not
be judged.
9.) All canned products must be
in standard canning jars, half-pint,
pint or quart. Jars must be clean.
Rings and lids must be free of rust.


The jars will be judged on appear-
ance (color and ripeness), texture
and pack. Exhibitor's name should
be on the bottom of jar. Only one
jar of food is required for exhibit.
10.) Bread category entries must
be four muffins, one loaf on plate
and covered with clear plastic
wrap. Judged on taste, appearance
and texture.
11.) Cookies must be four on a
plate covered with clear plastic
wrap (with recipe on 3x5 card).


Judged on taste, color, texture and
appearance.
Judging will start at 8:30 a.m. on
Monday. Impartial judges from out-
of-county will be used. For more
information, call the Hardee
County Extension Service at 773-
2164. The Extension Office only
has information in reference to the
crafts booth. The Hardee County
Fair Association would have infor-
mation in reference to community
exhibit rules and .commercial
booths.


Maintaining the appearance of a perfect home,

perfect children, or a perfect marriage can

make for desperate times. No one can keep it

up for long, mainly because we're all far from


perfect. At First Christian, we get that.


We're


beginning a sermon series on how to take our

families from "desperate" to "dynamic" and

begin to focus on what really matters in life.

Why put energy into a better appearance when

you can put it into a better family?




DESPERATE



HOUSE EHO LDS

Things Are Not Always As They Seem












I. J
; .. ..






-. '. CoL ,. .-,

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A unique single family residential development


am


3 floor plans to choose from.


Pre-selling starting in the $190's.



Available through


Jim See Realty, Inc.


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iZ,
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February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Rules For County Fair


Fine Arts Exhibitors:


The Fine Arts Exhibit at the
Hardee County Fair is always an
exciting time for residents of all
ages. This exhibit allows those both
young and old to display their
works of art for the public to
admire and to be awarded by the
judges.
The Hardee County Fair
Association has issued the annual
polices and procedure for the
entries.
Many of the categories are the
same, with one addition to this
year's fair. With the technology
available to the masses, computer
manipulated imagery has been
added to the competition.
The categories include:
Winter Residents Mixed
media.
Adults Charcoals,
pen/ink/pastels, oils and acrylics,
watercolor, photography of people,
landscape, animal, abstract, floral.
Juniors (3-5, 6-8, 9-12)
drawing, painting, photography and
3-D sculpture.
Intermediate (Grade 1-2)
drawing, painting and photography.
Beginners (Pre-K-K) Mixed
media, painting and drawing.
The guidelines for each category
have changed slightly in order to
save space in the exhibit hall.
All photography must be matted
on heavy black material, preferably
a thick corrugated board that is
found beside the posterboard in
most stores..
There should be at least a one-
inch border around each photo-
graph to allow for stapling of pho-
tograph. Please do not use stick
Sglue to adhere photos to boards.
With the variance of temperatures
in the building, these do not last
through the week.


Victory Praise Center is hosting
a gospel sing on Saturday at 7 p.m.
featuring the Glory Road Trio of
Brothers Sid Geiger and James and
Patsy Alderman.
Refreshments will be served after
the program. The congregation
invites everyone to join themnat the
church at 132 E. Main St., Bowling
Green.


Former Hardee County residents
Lee and Kelly Sperry report their
twin daughters, Kinzee and
Morgan, are now home from the
hospital. The twins were born Nov.
10, and remained in the hospital for
weeks before going home. Home
for the Sperry family is
Jacksonville.
Mama is the former Kelly Hall,
daughter of Gary and Sue Hall of
Wauchula. Daddy is the son of
Allen and Carla Sperry of
Wauchula.
The proud new parents want to
thank all their Hardee County fam-
ily and friends for their prayers.

A report also comes on former
Hardee Countians now residing in
Dalton, Ga., Dara Dee and Lark
Lee Evors, the daughters of Lynda
Jones Evors.
Dara entered college this past
fall, after graduating with honors
from Southeast Whitfield High
School. She wore the white robe of
an honors graduate, the National
Honor Society collar, a French
honor cord, and a four-year march-
ing Raider Band medallion. Dara
also received a Georgia H.O.P.E.
scholarship.
Lark is 16 now, and is currently a
junior at Southeast Whitfield High
School. She also is an honors stu-
dent.
The girls and their mother have
lived in Dalton for the past seven
years.


Entries are open to any non-pro-
fessional artist residing in Hardee
County.
Exhibitors' names and phone
numbers must be written legibly on
the back to identify winners.
Exhibitors may only enter three
objects of work in any combination
of categories.
It is requested this year for all
paintings to be unframed but
mounted on stretcher frames or on
black as well. This will allow for
more works to be displayed.
Any exhibitor who resides in the
county for less than six months of
the year must enter his work under
the "Winter Resident" category.
These entries are showcased for
exhibit only and will abstain from
competition.
First-, second- and third-place
ribbons will be awarded in each
judged category. Honorable men-
tion awards are given according to
the judges' discretion.
Six "Best of Show" ribbons will
be awarded: one beginner, one
intermediate, three juniors and one
adult.
All Winter Residents and Adult
entries will be accepted at the Expo
Hall at the fairgrounds Saturday,
Feb. 17, from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. No
entries will be taken after 1 p.m. No
exceptions. Time must be given for
volunteers to hang all works and
allow time for judging.
All Junior, Intermediate and
Beginner entries will be selected by
their art teachers at their school
sites and must be delivered by
teachers on Saturday, Feb. 17, also.
For more information, contact
Keith M. Weems of KMW
Photography at 735-0897 or
Debbie Gulliver, fair booth coordi-
nator, at 773-3147.


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
The Lord counts the stars and
names- each one. Our Lord is
great and very powerful. There
is no limit to what He knows.
Psalm 147:4-5 (NCV)
FRIDAY
The apostles answered, "We
must obey God rather than
men."
Acts 5:29 (RSV)
SATURDAY
When a man is gloomy, every-
thing seems to go wrong; when
he is cheerful, everything seems
right!
Proverbs 15:15 (TLB)

SUNDAY
But Christ died for us while we
were yet sinners, and that is
God's own proof of His love
toward us.
Romans 5:8 (NEB)

MONDAY
God looked over everything He
had made; and it was so good,
so very good! It was evening, it
was morning Day Six . .
Heaven and Earth were finished
down to the last detail. By the
seventh day, God had finished
His work. On the seventh day,
He rested from all His work.
Genesis 1:3, 2:1-2 (ME)

TUESDAY
This statement is completely
reliable and should be univer-
sally accepted: Christ Jesus
entered the world to rescue sin-
ners.
I Timothy 1:15 (PME)
WEDNESDAY
0 Lord, are You not from ever-
lasting?. . Your eyes are too
pure to look on evil; You cannot
tolerate wrong.
Habakkuk 1:12a, 13a (NIV)
I find that the harder I work,
the more luck I seem to have.


Florida State Fair In Tampa


Begins Its 103rd Year Feb. 8
Attending the Florida State Fair ed some visitors, but the Tampa executive director.
in Tampa has become a tradition for Bay Hotel's status as a grande luxe Crawford named George Ste
families across the state for years resort began to wane. IP 1904 fresh brenner to chair the board and R
now. Young parents today are shar- blood came to the hote. he form Vymlatil to serve as execut
ing with their children the fun and of T.J. Laud-Brown, as manager. director. Crawford and Vyml
excitement of the midway rides, the He was the brainchild behind the remained in those positions for
food, the livestock and agricultural South Florida Fair, convincing the and eight years respectively,
exhibits creating new memories city fathers and the rail line that Steinbrenner resigned as chair
just like the ones their parents they needed to work in cooperation in mid-2000.
helped to create with them. on the event and hold it on the
But how does an event like the grounds of his beloved hotel.
State Fair even get started? As the By July of 1904, the South F O R A JS
2007 Florida State Fair, running Florida Fair Association was for-
Feb. 8-19, marks its 103rd year, it's malized, and plans for a new exhi- At the Florida Livestock Au
a good time to reflect back on the bition building 600 feet long and 6,964 last week and 7,831 a ye
history of this Florida tradition. 100 feet wide were proposed. But it State Livestock Market News 5
In its earliest days, the Fair was seems the excitement could not be cows and bulls were steady to 2.
simply a promotion hosted by rail- contained in one building, so plans to 2.00 higher.
road magnate Henry B. Plant. In were drawn to build a stadium, col-
1898, he staged exhibits and horse iseum, and stock stalls too! Feeder Steers:
races under the name Tampa After a few short years it became
Agricultural Racing and Fair know as the Mid-Winter Festival.
Association for guests at his Tampa In 1915, when Articles of Incorpo-
Bay Hotel alongside the Hillsbor- ration for the South Florida Fair
ough River. These events not only and Gasparilla Carnival were filed Feeder Heifers:
provided entertainment for his with the Secretary of State's office
hotel guests but also served as an in Tallahassee, the fair became
enticement for other to come to known simply as the Florida State
Tampa, via the plant Railway and Fair.
Steamship Line. Except for a couple of years dur- Slaughter Cows: Lean: 75(
At the time the attractions were ing World War II, when it would
simple. There were 5 races to bet have been inappropriate to hold a Slaughter Bulls: Yield Gra
on, and the agricultural exhibits festival, the Fair has been held
were displayed in just one building, every year since its inception. In its
Tampa's notoriety during the first years, the Fair took place on a
Spanish American War still attract- two-acre plot in downtown Tampa, /C .,_ r


JAYCE L. REYNA
Army National Guard Pvt. Jayce
L. Reyna has graduated from the
Multiple Launch Rocket System
Repairer Advanced Individual
Training course at Redstone
Arsenal, Huntsville, Ala.
The son of Guadalupe Reyna of
Bowling Green, he is a 2006 grad-
uate of Hardee Senior High School.
The course is designed to train
soldiers to operate, test, trou-
bleshoot, repair, replace and main-
tain the electrical, hydraulic and
mechanical assemblies, cables,
modules and components on multi-
ple launch rocket systems.
Rocket launch systems include
the 'self-propelled launcher-loader,
launcher pod-container and ancil-
lary equipment.


near the University of Tampa. At
the time, Tampa's renowned
Gasparilla Parade started and ended
at the fairgrounds site.
In 1975, the Florida Legislature
created the Florida State Fair
Authority and designated the annu-
al event in Tampa as the official
Florida State Fair.. In 1976, the Fair
moved to its current 355-acre site,
seven miles from its original down-
town location. (The original pur-
chase was 276 acres; 49 additional
acres were purchased in 1982, six
acres were sold in 1998, and addi-
tional acreage was bought from Jim
Ferman in 2005.) In February 1977,
the first Fair was held at its current
location, at the intersection of
Interstate 4 and U.S. Highway 301
in eastern Hillsborough County.
In 1995, the Florida Sate
Legislature eliminated the original
Florida State Fair Authority, putting
the fairgrounds and the Fair under
the administration of the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services. The Legisla-
ture also authorized Agriculture
Commissioner Bob Crawford to
appoint 21 members to the Fair's
Board of Directors and select an


a, a


:in-
.ick
ive
atil
six
and
nan


Now in its 103rd year, the
Florida State Fair always in
Tampa and always in February -
is organized by the Florida State
Fair Authority under the leadership
of Florida Department of Agricu-
Iture and Consumer Services.
Agriculture Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson leads the Authority,
which oversees the Florida State
Fairgrounds.and the annual Florida
State Fair.
For more information, visit
www.floridastatefair.com or call 1-
800-345-FAIR (3247).


actions, receipts totaled 6,115 compared to
ar ago. According to the Florida Federal-
iervice: compared to last week: slaughter
00 higher; feeder steers and heifers steady

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 130.00-200.00
300-400 lbs., 106.00-144.00; and
400-500 lbs., 92.00-115.00.

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 106.00-185.00;
300-400 lbs., 95.00-125.00; and
400-500 lbs., 86.00-102.50

0-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 43.00-48.00.

de No. 1-2, 1000-2100 Ibs., 56.00-65.00.



A A. I


un le Agenua

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular session today
(Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102, Courthouse Annex I,
412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The following is a synopsis of agenda
topics that may be of public interest. Times are approximate except for
advertised public hearings.
Proclamation of February as "Step Up, Florida" month, 8:35 a.m.
Award bid for Bowling Green area water improvement project,
8:45 a.m.
Loan documents for $1 million transportation trust funds, 8:55 a.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advdcate and the Hardee County Commission for those who may wish
to plan to attend.


-Priscella's Fabulous Touch
:'- *-Family Hair Salon
Cuts Perms Highlights Color Waxing

(863) 285-6300
Tues. Fri. 9-5 -Sat. 10-2
Sylist Needed Walk-ins Welcome
Must bring
resume 302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL 33841'
soc2:lp N. Hwy,.17, turn right after motel


Austin Growers


"4
A' i





..
: ::-;.,.;i1 .


NOTICE
HARDEE COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE

To Whom it may concern:
'You are hereby notified that the following described live-
stock" Dark Brindle Brahma cross cow approx. 800 lbs. was
found Steve Roberts Special/Nickerson Rd., Hardee County
and is now impounded at the Hardee Livestock Market. The
amount due by reason of such impounding is all incurred
fees. The above described livestock will, unless redeemed
within 3 days from date hereof, be offered for sale at public
auction to the highest and best bidder for cash.
J.L. Cogburn, Sheriff
Hardee County, FL
2:1,8c


Krqc[ ) yi crr




Gran4 Opening Sale




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD


9:00 AM -3:00 PM


Grand Opening Specials

Thursday 15% off our pottery collection
Friday 10% off 15 gallon plants and larger
Saturday Visit us at Grillin N' Chillin or the Garden Center
and bring in this ad for 25% off all 1 and 3 gallon plants



1329 US Highway 17 North, Wauchula


863-773-4450


We are


GROWING for you!



,c t ,
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/00 %


/00"-- ,_







6B The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


The


Classitieds-


ABOUT ...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Short Tune Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED* NO MONEY D.O'I N
*Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Mode Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr.
m -. mHOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and eauitv requirements apply.


toll free


G N D :00- 6


*

'* '







5'
:!i .-C;%


HAY FOR SALE! Round bales, fertil-
ized bahia, $28. 773-4642 832-0560.
2:1-3:1p
L. DICKS, INC. is now contracting to
purchase fruit for the 2006/7 season
and beyond. Contact Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 8:17tfc


FOR SALE: Used Frigidaire refrigera-
tor, like new, $300.773-9106. 2:1 p
WASHER/DRYER, $50 for both. 863-
445-3833. 2:1 p


1997 REGENCY Oldsmobile, 36,000
miles, $6,000. Loaded leather. 863-
781-3638. 2:1-8p
'98 CHEVY CAVALIER Z24, excellent
body, limo tint, needs engine work,
$1,000 OBO. 863-328-0032. 2:1 p


'97 MERCURY MYSTIC, good body,
has new engine, $2,000. 863-328-
0032. 2:1 p

Help Wanted
Opening for Night
Shift at Extruders
Unlimited in
Ft. Meade.
Drug free work place.
Call Shannon @
863-285-6711 for
appointment.
cl1:25;2:1p


U.S. Hwy 17 Bowling Green

375-4441


Open 7 Days a Week

Buy Here! Pay Here!

No Interest or
Finance Charges

Se Habla Espafiol


D


-Towing Service
* 24 Hour Service
* Lowest Possible Rates
* Fast. Reliable Service
(863) 781-3090
or
(863) 781-3091
.V CI


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873


Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122
FAX (863) 773-2173


AM-SOUTH REALTY


MAKING RI:AI, E.SATE REAL EASY."
An independently Owned and Operated Member of Coldwell Banker Real Estate Corporation


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jessica Smith, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate


781-3627
781-1186
773-0575


Donna Steffens


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


NEW YEAR, NEW HOME
SStart the new year in this 4 bedroom, 2 bath home,
located within 1 mile of Wauchula city limits. Open floor
plan with cathedral ceilings, ceramic tile, sun porch,
fireplace, two car carport and workshop on 2.5 acres.
Offered at $350,000.
If Cost IS an Objection! Overcome the obstacles with
this Priced-Right 2-bedroom 2-bath mobile home. Only
$45,000!
DISCOVER 9 acres of natural Florida land South of Zolfo
Springs. Only $85,000.
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING. This 5-acre tract is the
perfect place for horses or recreational purposes.
Located on Tall Oaks Trail in the Golden Oaks. Owner
motivated to sell! Reduced to $72,500.
Great Investment for Potential Rental Income.
3 BEDROOMS 1 BATH ON 2 LARGE SHADY LOTS ONLY
$65,000 WON'T LAST LONG AT THIS PRICE.
SECLUDED COUNTRY HOME
Immaculate 3 Bedroom, 2 bath MH on 5 beautiful acres.
Fenced for cattle or horses. Nice oaks and pines. Listed
price $155,000.
JUST LISTED
12 ACRES of Fenced Pasture land, with well and pond.
Great location for horses, or build you're new home.
Located south of Zolfo Springs. Listed price $179,500
Owner motivated make an offer.
HORSES ALLOWED
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH HOME WITH ATTACHED 2 BED-
ROOM 1 BATH APARTMENT, VERY CONVENIENTLY
LOCATED ON 1.8 ACRES ONLY $198,500.


INVEST IN 2007. Escape to the quiet in these 40 Acres on
Maude Road. Raise cattle, horses or build our own dream
home in this quiet area. $15,000 per Acre.
East Main Street
This remodeled 2 Bedroom 1 Bath home has highway
frontage on East Main Street Wauchula. t2.9 acre income
producing orange grove. Only $160,000.
OWNER SAYS SELL! Everything you've always wanted is
in this 3-bedroom, 2-bath mobile home that comes with
washer, dryer, 3-sheds and an above ground pool with
deck. 2-car garage with screened in porch. Reduced to
$57,000. Owner says make an offer, call for an appoint-
ment today!
SECLUDED! Calm yourself in the peaceable setting of this
5.5-Acre wooded tract. High and dry with beautiful oaks.
Located 3 miles south of Zolfo Springs. MUST SELL
$62,500.
TWO COMMERCIAL LOTS
Located on Hwy 17 North in Bowling Green Only $75,000.
HIGHWAY 17 FRONTAGE IN BOWLING GREEN ZONED
COMMERCIAL $25,000.


FEATURES OF THE WEEK!!
WHAT A DEAL! This 14x66 3-bedroom, 2-bath comes with screened porch, carport and shed.
Also included is a stove, refrigerator, microwave & a new washer & dryer. Ready to move right in.
Only $58,000. Owner will pay closing cost!
IN THIS NICE NEIGHBORHOOD, THIS ONE WON'TLAST LONG
2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath on shaded lot located in Ft. Meade. Central air and heat. Only $82,500


1993 CADILLAC Fleetwood Broug-
ham, fully loaded, leather, $7,500.
863-773-0166 863-781-0982.
1:25-2:22p
'78 DODGE RAM Charger, 360 engine,
4x4, removable top, $1,000. 328-0032.
1:25-2:1 p
'95 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE SSE, runs
good, needs body work, $500. 863-'
273-9806. 1:25-2:1 p
Even the crow sings with its
own voice.
NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-21Pc Sofa & Lovesat Ats $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen ed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot c4:20tfc


ASSISTANT MANAGER NEEDED. Full
time, able to work weekends, non-
smoker, office and computer skills a
must. Apply at Crystal Lake Village,
237 Maxwell Drive, 773-3582. 2:1-3:1p


SERVICE/ROUTE/PUMP REPAIR -
dependable person 'needed, able to
handle diverse tasks. Available @
Ullrich's Water, 409 Goolsby St. Apply
in person. 1:25-2:22c


PC Technician
Pay Salary: $24,028.85 (11.55) $33,124.04 (15.93)
Wanted for Hardee County ITS Department. Technical work
primarily focused in the area of computer operations, computer
repair, wire and cable installation, user and desktop support (hard-
ware and software) and helpdesk functions. Knowledge of
Microsoft Windows operating systems such as Windows 2000/XP
(OS), Microsoft Office XP/2003, and Microsoft Active Directory.
Knowledge of Best-networking principles, Industry Standards,
and the ability to configure, troubleshoot and resolve network
issues. Assist County departments in providing information
technology services and solutions. High School Graduate or
acceptable equivalency diploma and three years of professional
experience installing and configuring operating systems, drivers,
internal and external computer components, and local area
networked systems. Complete job description and application
forms posted on County website: www.hardeecounty.net. Please
submit applications to the Human Resource Department, 205
Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL 33873. Phone:'(863) 773-2161,
Fax: (863) 773-2154. Position closes 5:00 p.m., February 15,
2007.
EOE-F/M/V c12:1,8c


Home For Sale





















3B Bpartment behind house included.

Reduced to $225,000 Must Sell!

(863) 781-1062
cl2:1c
cl2:1 c


L AMBER T
REALTY INC. T
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
WHY BUILD WHEN YOU CAN OWN this lovely
home located on golf course! Newly constructed C/B
Stucco home with 3B/2Bth, 3 car garage, high ceilings
with upgraded light fixtures, split bedroom plan, ele-
gant master bath, bonus room with built-in cabinets
and sink, lovely landscaping. $299,500
ELEGANCE AND CHARM describe this 3 B/2Bth
plus study home located in Briarwood Estates; lovely
master suite with sunken tub, his and her's closets;
spectacular kitchen; formal areas; beautiful arched
doorways; tile and carpet floors; extra storage
throughout; this is your dream home! $310,000
COZY COTTAGE perfect for singles! 1B/1Bth
located in very convenient area; lot is approx. one acre
and fenced; new stove, water heater and roof! $69,500
LOCATION! Walk to shop, post office, churches and
schools! 2B/1Bth home; tile/carpet/hardwood floors;
large enclosed porch; fenced back yard. $110,000
Let's Make A Deal! This 3B/2Bth home is situated on
5 acres just outside of town; modern kitchen, tiled
floors, 24x36 concrete floored workshop; well main-
tained. Call for details
THE PRICE IS RIGHT for this 3B/1.5Bth, C/B with
brick veneer home; situated on 2 lots, fenced yard, sep-
arate well for irrigation; outside storage shed.
$140,000 CONTRACT PENDING
5 acres of vacant land; beautiful homesite; paved road
frontage and excellent location. $125,000
JUST RIGHT FOR BUILDING! 5 secluded acres;
some citrus trees; this tract would make a nice place
for mobile home or house. $125,000
PRICE REDUCED! PERFECT FOR WINTER VISI-
TORS OR SMALL FAMILY! 14'x70' River Birch,
SW Mobile Home, located in Charlie Creek ; nice lot
80x125. $55,000
LOOK NO FURTHER! This C/B home has 2B/1Bth,
recently renovated kitchen, roof, tile floors; fenced
yard; excellent family neighborhood. $128,000
A MUST SEE! 3B/2Bth CB/Stucco home; large family
room, new stainless steel appliances in kitchen, fenced
yard. $160,000
WHAT A DEAL! This 2B/2Bth Jacobson D/W, built in
2004; nice 100x175 lot; peaceful location; listed at
$78,000


SERVICE YOU


DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
S ASSOCIATE: DELOISJOHNSON.............773-9743
2 ASSOCIATE: DAVID McCLINTOCK.781-1226
IPORTU.,vY ASSOCIATE: RHODA McCOY............781-7230


cl2:1c


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net

Delois Johnson
PRICE REDUCED! Beautiful 5 acres with mature oaks
plus 2B/1.5Bth C/B home; outside storage 30x36; locat-
ed in secluded area. $200,000
This recently updated home has 3B/1.5Bth, new carpet
and flooring, new kitchen cabinets, fenced yard, conve-
nient location close to schools and shopping. $155,000
PLENTY OF ROOM for children to play in this
3B/1Bth home ; well maintained, desirable area; new
flooring, H/W heater, roof and garage door. Listed at
$155,000
Quiet and serene surroundings overlooking man-made
lakes! 25 acres of grove and 15 acres in pasture; prop-
erty has been divided into 5 and 10 acre tracts; two 2"
wells and one 8" well plus pond. 10 acre tracts $16,000
per acre; 5 acre tracts are $16,500 per acre
TWO WAYS TO PURCHASE! A total of 15 Acres,
fenced with 3B/1Bth C/B house, or house and 5 acres
barn, cow pens, feed lot; large oak trees on a paved
county road. Call today and make an appointment to
see. $400,000
INVESTMENT PROPERTY! Two houses located on
this Highway 64 road frontage property; one has
4B/1Bth the other has 2B/lBth; property could be used
as rentals or store fronts; located in Ona, zoned C-2.
$175,000
EXCELLENT HOMESITE! 10.52 acres of pasture
land; nice fish pond with dock; located in eastern
Hardee County. $185,000
15 secluded acres, perfect for house site or investment;
scattered oaks, fenced pasture. $10,000 per acre
DESIRABLE LOCATION for this 6.6 acre tract, some
trees, small pond, located in eastern Hardee. $149,850
Beautiful 5 acre tract with some fruit trees, large oaks,
one (1) acre pond; would make a lovely home site or
weekend retreat. $110,000
40 Acres of native pasture; paved road frontage; nice
scattered oaks. Call for more information.
SIX ACRES! Well, septic, and electricity already in
place on this 6 acre tract; beautiful, large oaks, small
creek runs through the west part of property; perfect
building site. $200,000
10 Acres in Duette Area; property is fenced and has a
12" well. Call for details.


CAN COUNT ON


KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: MICHAELADAMS ......781-2413
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971
ASSOCIATE: CAROL JACKSON..............991-1255
cl2:1c


I a I


I


I


U-11 0


AV






February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds-


ONE PERSON OFFICE answer
phones, schedule appointments, gen-
eral office assignments. Computer
skills required. Medical background
preferred. Health & dental insurance
.available. M-F. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Fax
resume to 863-767-1880. 1:18-2:15c
PART-TIME NURSING position for
doctor's office needed. Nursing expe-
-rience required. Please send resume
to PO. Box 428, Wauchula, FL 33873.
11:23tfc


REAL ESTATE
Hwy 17 Mixed Commercial 12 acres on Hwy 17 south with
mixed commercial use. $35,000 per acre.
Beautiful Pasture 40 acre lush pasture 9 miles east of town.
$12,000 per acre.
10 Acres in Sweetwater Just cleared and ready for 2 homes,
tree farm or nursery. Deep well plus highway frontage! $125,000.
20 acre Roble orange grove Just east of Bartow. Top produc-
er! $324,000. Call David Hitchcock @ (863) 557-0082.
64 acre grove with Highway-mixed land use. Close to new
school and Walmart. $25,000/acre Call David Hitchcock @
(863) 557-0082.
Payne Creek Grove 45 acres total with 25 acres in Hamlins.
Fine producer with creekfront $625,000. Call David @
863-557-0082.


K7E ,E


Mark Manuel
1-877-518-LAND
863-781-0384 (cell)
www.saundersrealestate.com


c12:lc


KELLER WILLIAMS
REALTY
OF
HIGHLANDS COUNTY


Dane Hendry Mikey Colding
Realtor Realtor
(863) 381-2769 (863) 781-1698
* 9 ac. Foliage nursery Hwy 66 E. Zolfo Springs. Call Dane.
* Commercial Property Hwy 17 Bowling Green. Call Dane.
* 1.5 ac. Commercial Property Hwy 17 S. Wauchula. Call Dane.
* 5 ac. w/mobile home, horse barn, Fish Branch Rd. Call Dane.
* 20 ac. Reduced Ollie Roberts Rd. Paynes Creek frontage. Call Dane.
* 6.5 ac. home site new fence, well & power Reduced. Call Dane.
*Beautiful 110 ac. tract wiwthimproved pasture and scattered oaks and
pines. Fenced, 1993 ft. county rd. frontage, 5 ac. wetlands. Great
Investment Property. Sweetwater area. Call Mikey.
* 3.61 ac. 7 mi. Point area, FR zoning, hard road frontage, only $52,000.
Call Mikey.
* 19.4 ac. Lake Bonnett Rd. Located in Highlands County., Ag zoned, barn
with concrete floor, great for tree or caladium farm. Hard rd frontage,
board fence entry, $219,000. Call Mikey.
* 3/1 frame home .25 ac lot, BSQ de= $72,000. Call Mikey.
* NEW LISTING: Great development potential! Or build your dream home
on this beautiful 9.5 acre tract with a creek running through the property.
Great location on Altman Road. Call Mikey.



S oeL


0 e N flt-

OO~ -D~i


INC.. REAL


TORS
(863) 773-2128

REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
JOHN H. O'NEAL


Monica Reas
See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


NEW LISTING! 5 acs. of native,
wooded land is near the Peace River
and has deeded access to the river.
$90,000!
Hardee Co. ranch includes 97 ac.
cleared pasture, 2 barns, cattle
pens, fencing and ponds. Unique 5
BR, 5 bath, 9,000 SF, CB home.
Marble foyer, stone fireplace, pine
paneling& beams, garden tubs,
inground pool. $1,900,000!
This 3 BR, 2 bath, 2 story home
with wrap around porches sits on
beautiful Peace River, close to town.
Includes 5 acs. with board fences
and guest house. Many o t h e r
extras, call for details. $450,000!
2 BR, 2 bath, 2,290 SF, CB home
with barrel tile roof in Sun-N-Lakes
in Sebring. $159,900!
1.28 ac. vacant tract in apex where
E Main St & E SR 64 come togeth-
er. 166' wide on west end & over
600' long on hwy. Zoned C-2. East
of Wauchula, Hardee Co, Fl.
$120,000!
395 ac. grove, Desoto Co. Hamlin
on Cleo, Valencia on Swingle.
$5,000,000!


27 ac. Hamlin grove. Eastern
Hardee Co. $15,000/ac!
Beautiful deed restricted homesites
close to Zolfo Springs, Fl. on paved
road. Two 10 ac. tracts-$180,000.
Two 5 ac. tracts-$110,000. Corner
5 ac. tract-$125,000. Call today for
full details.
PRICE REDUCED! 12 acs. with
water hole, Hwy 665. Bring your
horse! $132,000!
65 ac. grove in southwest Hardee
Co. 25 acs.-Valencia, 40 acs.-
E&M, lots of resets. 12" well
and new barn. Plenty of wildlife.
$900,000!
Ten 5-6 ac. tracts. Friendship area
of Hardee Co. Owner financing.
Some deed restrictions. $125,000
each!
3 BR, 2 bath CB home in Riverview.
Over size lot with many extras.
Owner is motivated! $159,000!
2.5 acs. east of Wauchula. Zoned
for a home or MH. Land is high and
dry. $60,000!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTERHOURS


KENNY SANDERS........781-0153 DAVID ROYAL.......7........781-3490
RICK KNIGHT................773-2472 SANDY LARRISON.......832-0130
MONICA REAS...............773-9609 J MIKE NICHOLSON


U.S. HIGHWAY' 17 SOUTH. WAJUCHLLA, FL 33873


cl2:1c


NEED MORE INCOME? Call 375-4467.
Avon representatives needed. 2:1p


SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST must
have experience & computer skills.
Mail resume to: PO. Box 1344,
Wauchula, FL 33873. 8:3tfc


NEW 3 BR/2 1/2 B HOME in Golfview,
1463 Dena Circle. 781-0335. 2:1 p
START YOUR NEW YEAR off in a.
newly remodeled home. 4 BR / 2 B on
1 acre lot, 2904 Golfview, $134,900.
Carol's Realty (863) 412-8932 or (941)
627-2769. 1:4tfc


IMMEDIATE OPENING for FT or PT
receptionist. Must have excellent tele-
phone skills and references. Call 773-
4450 for appt. 2:1-8c
C.N.A.'s NEEDED to work with elderly
and disabled adults. 40 hrs per wk,
$8.00/hr. Must have dependable trans-
portation. Mileage reimbursement at
$.445 per mile. Contact HOPE of
Hardee, 310 N. 8th Ave., Wauchula.
773-2022. Drug Free Work Place, EOE.
1:25-2:15c


A~C
SOUTN F)LRIDA
COMMUlNIT CoLLEGEL


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132* FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida. edu


POSITION VACANCIES
Coordinator, Fire Science Programs-Full-time, year-round position
responsible for instruction, recordkeeping, and supervision of instruction
in the firefighter standards and degree programs. Associates degree in
Fire Science required. Advanced degree preferred. Must meet all SFCC
credentialing requirements, have a min. of 5 yrs. exp. as a firefighter and
at least 3 yrs. exp. as a certified instructor. Must be a certified instructor
with the Florida Bureau of Fire Stai dards. Must have ability to effective-
ly communicate with students, staff, and the community. Competitive
salary and benefits including retirement, health/life insurance, vacation
and sick leave. Deadline: 5 p.m., Tuesday, 2/13/07.
Webmaster-Full-time, year-round position to direct the planning,
development, and maintenance of the SFCC Web site and related ser-
vices while ensuring high standards of performance and user accessi-
bility to the site. Baccalaureate degree required in computer science,
graphic design, art, communications, or a related field. (Extensive relat-
ed experience and demonstrated competence may substitute for edu-
cational requirements.) Experience in graphic design and Web site
design or management required; professional experience strongly pre-
ferred. Must be a dynamic, self-motivated individual with an understand-
ing and appreciation of community college mission and purposes.
Deadline: 5 p.m. Thursday, 2/20/07.
Full-time positions offer comprehensive benefit packages including
retirement, health/life insurance, vacation and sick leave. Application
forms are available in Human Resources, Building I (Highlands
Campus), at any SFCC campus/center or on our Web site.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cl2:1c






*Beautiful 3BR 2b ePlg-wFffb4ojtle with den or office,
2 car garage bnl 'idcatbd i 'l nAteh" d1/2 mile west of
Wauchula $275,000.
*13 to 20 AC with access to Kazen, Terrell and Polk Rd. Now in grove
$25,000 AC. 1/2 mile outside city limits.
*2BR/1BA remodeled, stucco, in Wauchula city limits with extra lot,
corner of Oak & 10th. $89,900.
*Lot ready for mobile home at Charle Creek, east of Wauchula.
$20,000.
*MH in Charle Creek. 2BR 1B $54 000.
*20 Acres with DgL 6rieG f BeeGis $250,000.
*4BR 3BA concrete block w/10 acres, beautiful home, 1 mile west,
Hwy 62 west of Wauchula. $399,000.
Frank Vasquez Broker Associate
863.781.4133 cell
Donald Buck, Broker 863.767.0071 Jerry Carlton, Sales Associate 863.781.3608






WE Pay Casu



FOR HOUSES



AND LAND



Office Ph: 375-3113


Mobile Ph: 781-4460




BILL STATO


417 N 9TH AVE. 5 BR / 2 B. Carol's
Realty (863) 412-8932 or (941) 627-
2769. 1:4tfc
HIGHLANDS COUNTY $1,000 MOVES
YOU IN! Brand new 3 BR/ 2 BA/ 2CG,
concrete block-stucco home. Approx.
$895 mo. Own today, no credit need-
ed. 863-402-4600. 1:25-3:29p
HARDEE COUNTY $1,000 MOVES
YOU IN! Brand new 3 BR/ 2 BA/ 2CG,
concrete block-stucco home. Approx.
$895 mo. Own today, no credit need-
ed. 863-402-4600. 1:25-3:29p


.HOGS AND PIGS FOR SALE. CALL
863-773-0168. 2:1 p
1 8 yr. OLD REGISTERED Angus bull;
1 18 mo. old Brangus bull. 813-334-
9321. 2:1-3:1 p




LAST SEEN Monday on Metheny and
Terrell Rd., 3 young cows. Please call
sheriff 773-0304. 2:1 p


Dependable person needed for delivery

and service of water treatment equipment.

Apply in person @
Ullrich's Water, 409 Goolsby St.
1:25;2:1c


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132 FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
COMMUNITY COOA www.southflorida. edu
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
COORDINATOR, FIRE SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Full-time, year-round position responsible for instruction, recordkeeping,
and supervision of instruction in the firefighter standards and degree
programs. Associates degree in Fire Science required. Advanced
degree preferred. Must meet all SFCC credentialing requirements, have
a min. of 5 yrs. exp. as a firefighter and at least 3 yrs. exp. as a certified
instructor. Must be a certified instructor with the Florida Bureau of Fire
Standards. Must have ability to effectively communicate with students,
staff, and the community. Competitive salary and benefits including
retirement, health/life insurance, vacation and sick leave. Deadline:
5 p.m., Tuesday, 2/13/07. Application forms are available in Human
Resources, Building I (Highlands Campus), at any SFCC campus/center
or on our Web site.

SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cll:25;2:1 c


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


John u. Freeman


*** 8PWS IX TF WnK ***
Think Victorian when you look at this charming 2 story
home 4BR/2.5BA with 2 car garage 3,404 sq. ft. total. On
120x140 corner lot located Western edge of Wauchula.
Reduced to $235,000.


Great Country Living and Room to
Spare-Enjoy the convenience of a 4
bedroom 3 full bath beautifully
maintained C/B home. Located on
1.38 acre parcel just east of Fort
Green Springs. Call for your
appointment today to view this out-
standing home. Asking $249,000
MLS 191061


Good Starter Home!-2BR/1BA
Home. Conveniently located close to
schools and shopping centers.
Perfect home if planning to retire or
just starting a family. Asking
$125,000 MLS 189615


Ready to Move In! 2004 Beautiful
CB home with 3BR/2BA in a great
location. Includes stoves, refrigera-
tor, dishwasher, and many extras.
Just needs owners. Call for details.
Price is $160,000.00 MLS 190478
Beautiful Home with Acreage-
3BR/2BA CB home with approxi-
mately 2,200 sq. ft. of living area
and a 2 car garage. Located just
west of Wauchula on 10 acres. New
roof, new insulation, new stucco and
fresh paint. Look at it today. Offered
at $449,900 MLS 179381


Ready To Move In! Brand New
Doublewide Mobile Home Take a
look at this spacious 4BR /2BA
located on a corner lot. Close to
schools and shopping. Enjoy the
comfort of a new home with central
air and heat plus new appliances.
Asking $115,000.00 MLS: 189017


Ft. Mfeade Special-1/3 mile from
Lake Hendry 4BR/2BA, 1,892 sq.
ft. living includes in-ground pool,
sheds, and fence on 2.5 Acres.
Asking $199,900 MLS 183867
REDUCED-$115,000 for this
3BR/2BA M.H. with 2 car carport,
approximately 2,400 sq. ft. plenty
of out buildings on 1 acre MLS
187656


Nice Clean Vacant Lot-Located
on the South Side of Bowling Green
just out of City Limits. The lot has
180 front and 150 dept fronting
Chester Ave. Lot zoned as C-1.
Listed Price $62,000
New Listing- 3BR/2BA MH on .46
acres located in Charlie Creek
Mobile Estates. Listed Price
$80,000 MLS 192339
Historical Home!-If these walls
could talk imagine the stories it
could share. Make your appoint-
ment today and be part of history in
the making. 4BR/3BA home with
central A/H, in-ground pool, BBQ
shack and so much more. Listed
Price $179,000 MLS 192374


** Whether you're buying or selling. The professionals at Flores
& Flores, Inc. will be happy to assist you. Let one of our associ-
ates help make your Real Estate dreams come true.**

*All of our properties are on our website at www.floresrealty.net
*WE BUY LOTS ANYWHERE IN
HARDEE COUNTY TOP PRICE CASH.
QUICK CLOSINGS.
WE BUY HOUSES FAST CLOSINGS
Contact After Hours
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net
o,,o,, After hours 863-773-2840
Noey Adam Flores 863) 781-4585 John Freeman 863)773-6141
Amanda Mishoe 863) 781-3587 Steve Lanier 863)559-9392
Lisa Douglas 863) 781-3247 Jessie Sambrano 863)245-6891
cl2:1c


Dietary Aide PART-TIME
For 79 bed long-term care facility to do tray set up, run
dishwasher and general cleaning. MUST BE ABLE TO
WORK EVENINGS AND WEEKENDS. If you enjoy work-
ing with the elderly come join our team.
Apply in person at:
Hardee Manor Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873 c12:1c



VOCA of Florida
Direct Support Lead Staff position available (Mon. Fri.
Hrs. 7:30 a.m. 3:30 p.m.) with adult day training pro-
gram in Wauchula. High School Diploma, valid drivers
license (in good standing) and 2 years experience in work
related field. Local law enforcement background complet-
ed. If interested please apply in person at 114 W. Carlton
St., Wauchula, FL.
E.O.E. M/F/VID
cl1:25; 2:1c


Hiring Immediately
Central Florida Health Care, Inc.
Avon Park Center
PRN Lab Assistant Processing of "in-house" and "send-out" lab,
perform daily duties of clinical lab operations. Technician license or
Phlebotomy certification required.
Frostproof Center
Dental Assistant Completed dental assisting program.
Experience in expanded duties.
Comp. salary, excellent benefits, pension plan. Corporation pays for LTD & life
insurance. Send Resume to: CFHC, 950 CR 17A West, Avon Park, FL, 33825,
Fax # (863) 452-3011. EOE/DFW. cll:25,2:1c


'- S i I


1 1.







8B The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007






-The


Classifieds


PARK MODEL RV adult park, mostly
furnished, many extras. Call 863-767-
1574. 1:25-2:22p
35' TRAILER, set-up at Oasis, fully fur-
nished! 863-781-1398 or 863-781-
4176. 1:11-2:8p
FULLY REMODELED 3/2 1994 dou-
blewide mobile home, 1560 sq. ft.
under air, on 5.14 acres, about 5 miles
from U.S. 17 (3436 E. Main St.,
Wauchula), $165,000. Contact Rita,
(863) 773-5662 or visit www.3436-
mainstreet.com. 1:4-2:1 p


HELP WANTED
Certified Teacher needed for year-round middle and high
school in juvenile justice facility near Arcadia. 50 paid
days off annually. $34K-36K depending upon certification
areas plus excellent benefits. English certification pre-
ferred.
Fax resume to A. Briseno at
863-491-5343 or e-mail to hr(hsainc.org
EOE/DFWP
cl2:1 c

-I Inc






Citrus Removal Land Clearing

backhoc Wodkc

Fond Digging Ditch Cleaning
Driveways Pebble Rock,'etc.




Shawn Rimes
(863) 781-0412
Agnet
158*17*9761


_ I



Topsy See
REAL ESTATE
773-5994

New Listing: 5 building lots in Bowling Green. 2 lots .94 acre $28,000 each.
3 lots 1/3 acre $15,000 each. Very good location.
Very nice 2BR/2B DW Mobile Home sits on 1/2 ac. lot. 22x32 garage w/1/2
bath. Also screened patio. New roof in 05. Appliances including washer &
dryer. Mostly furnished. $95,000.
10 Ac. parcel. Fenced & Cross fenced has small country house needs complete
remodeling inside. $220,000.
1987 DW 3 BR 2 Bth absolutely great condition. Porch with screen and vinyl
windows. Appliances and 2 utility buildings; city utilities. $85,000.
New Listing: 6.2 acres. Fenced & gated with utility building. Pond great loca-
tion in Western Hardee county. $129,000.
Wow this 3 BR-2B CB home is ready for new owners New roof, new cen-
tral air & heat. House completely remodeled inside & out. All you have to do
is move in. $175,00 now $170,000.
Duplex with 2BR-1B/1BR-1B. Very large lot. Room for another apartment.
Good location $95,000.
We Have Buyers! We Need Listings!
r1 Topsy See, Broker Vanette See, Realtor Associate
Cindy Hand, Realtor Associate
107 W. Main Street Wauchula, FL 33873 c12:1c
,, unuMuu uuu ul M ,,
MEM a O a AN4
lHOWlllSlNT

s4Bily Bob's Thin ^
We do it for LE$$'

ll,, Chrome Wheels Brand Name Tires! Ill
l 18" & up! come see our selection.l
IIAN il I


,r I HOURS gV' 1
I t o Mon. Fri. 8-6 o-
IA 'i Sat. 8-12 '
II i HIse ia bl, Espedll i

MIl Billy Ayers Donna Eures 1(Ile
1AtIl Tire Technician Secretary |1

MAI Fast & Friendly Service! ,
gI4l We won't be undersold! IV'

1i il .773-0777 773-0727 I
,IAl 116 REA Rd., Wauchula gI
MAIN (across from Wal-Mart) I

We also do
;S Semi-Tires & Trailer Tires!

?r'a ~ c1l:25 f

ME
II ".uu I~mm"


MOBILE HOME 55+ Park, 2 BD/ 1/2
B, hot tub in large screen room,
Florida room, carport, storage room,
AC/Heat, partially furnished, motivat-
ed seller, asking $12,000, 9 a.m. 5
p.m. 735-8656. After 5 p.m. 735-1040.
1:4-2:1 p
'95, 2BR / 2B, 66x14. 767-8822.
12:14tfc


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Edward
Maldonado will be sold pursuant to
warehouseman's lien: clothes, toys,'
household items, said sale will be at
B&J Storage, 210 N. 3rd., Wauchula,
Florida at 10:00 a.m., Feb. 12, 2007.
1:25-2:1 p


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Erika Lee;
Antonio Guerrero; Marie DeLeon will
be sold pursuant to warehouseman's
lien: clothes, toys, household items,
said sale will be at Bowling Green
Storage, 5018 Hwy. 17 N., Bowling
Green, Florida at 9:00 a.m., Feb. 12,
2007. 1:25-2:1 p



PUPPIES FOR SALE Miniature wire
haired Dashounds, 3 male and 2
female, CKC registration available,
health certificates and first shots,
both parents on site. Will be ready for
pick-up on 2/1/07. Call 863-735-2862
for more info. 1:25-2:1p


Sunrise Community is now
hiring the following position:
Direct Support Staff
Great new starting wages and benefits. Potential for growth!
Must have clean background/drug screening/driving record.
Please call 863-767-8941
for more information.
c11:18-2:8c



avBRAVES
CONSTRUCTION Walter Braves
& ROOFING Owner
CBC-040692 R-C-0067120

999 U.S. Highway 17 South Fort Meade, FL 33841-3343
863.285.7381 Fax 863.285.7395
cl:18-3:8c



BJD EXCAVATING

Complete Site Development Demolition
*ili--P *Dump Truck Hauling* /
[i[||~1i Underground Utilities*
O-l *Orange Tree Clearing*
Call for FREE Estimates 863-773-6195
cll.1 2tfc



Lonestar
ConstrLtction Corlp.

General Contractor .
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated

Office 863-773-4779 Fax 863-773-9865



PARKER FILL DIRT

DEMOLITION


* Fill Dirt *'Tree Removal .
*Stump Removal Dragline *
*Track Hoe Land Clearing *
Shell* Clay Top Soil
* Bulldozer Dump Trucks *


Special
Tandam Axle Load
114- 16 vards)
$75/Load
Fill Top SoilHard Pan
Hardee Counly Area onlvl


3-
BABY RABBITS FOR SALE. Several
different types. 863-735-0673 after 4
p.m. 2:1-3:1 p
FREE FEMALE pit bull, one year old.
Call 941-744-6585. 1:25-2:1p
BOSTON TERRIER PUPPIES for sale,
5 males, 1 female, $300 each. 863-
773-6224. 1:11-2:8p
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a pet
or are looking for a new one, the City
of Wauchula invites you to come and
see if you can find the pet you're look-
ing for. The Wauchula Animal Control
is located at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more information.
tfc-dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes 828.29
requires that all cats and dogs sold in
Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have
an official health certificate, have nec-
essary shots and be free of parasites.
tfc-dh


GARDNER EZ-PICK, FARM OPEN -
Canning tomatoes, tomatoes, pep-
pers 160 Fish Branth Road. 735-
1000. 12:21tfc



THREE ADJOINING 1/4 ACRE lots,
Village of Charlie Creek off 64, water,
zoned, Ag, R2; MH, $47,900 takes all
(863) 464-0917. 2:1-3:1p
FOR SALE BY OWNER 5 acres
cleared, private pond, $79,000. East
Ft. Meade area. 863-253-9098.
1:18-2:15p
MOBILE HOME lot 80x140 in ZS,
Gaylors Park. 260-416-2896 or 735-
8522. 1:11-2:8p
2 RESIDENTIAL LOTS in Zolfo
Springs on South Poplar Street,,
$35,000. 781-2601. 1:11-2:8p


BOWLNG GEEN UICKLUB
AND0 A AT RPAIR

5105 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
OUR TI a RS A ON SAL 3EVERYAY!


Open:
Mon Sat
* 8:00 5:00
375-4461


* We repair most
American cars
* Full time mechanic
* We are license
and insured!
Reg #MV-40625


amW',-a m1


Bo Espino
Auto Technician

B s y 0 . we" e e 0











Celito Lindo 3.75 acres MOL frontage on North & South Hwy 17. 8,160
SF auditorium includes beverage license. $1,180,000.
15 acre grove, irrigated, tiled, Rhynn Road, $300,000.
Prime 25 acres MOL at 5069 Oak Wood Dr. South of Nocatee off Woods
Road. Spacious brick home with 3,126 SF under roof, Ig barn & sheds.
$950,000 or $750,000 for 15 acres incl. home & buildings.
1 acre in Ona with 1/2 zoned C-1 includes 3 rental houses at $900 per
month. $140,000. &
60 acres with 50 acres MOL in young bearing grove with 8" well &'micro
jets. Close to town, EST. crop for 2006 $100,000 at $15,000 per acre, can
be divided.
5 acres Prime location. Vandolah Rd and Dink Albritton Rd. $110,000.
421 Grape St. BG 3/1, central H/A, FR $65,000.


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker


20 ac all Valencia grove. Fruit uncommitted. Estimated 8,000 boxes. 10'
deep well with diesel power unit. All microjet. Listed for $21,000 per acre.
7 1/2 Acre grove with mobile home and large pole barn. $225,000.
NEW LISTING!
20 acres in Sweetwater area. $200,000.
NEW LISTING!
Beautiful 3BR, 2BA home in nice quiet neighborhood. Many upgrades
including stone fireplace, solid wood cabinets, Jacuzzi tub. Also a large
detached garage with shop area and loft storage. Asking only $295,000!
BRIARWOOD LOT! $45,000
Build your dream house. 10 beautiful acres for only $150,000.


13.83 acres of grove and house. Now only $295,000.


SOLD!
10 beautiful acres of recreational property. Perfect for a small hunting
retreat! Creek runs through the back of the property. $70,000.
21 beautiful wooded acres on the Peace River. 2 BR 1 BA mobile home.
Huge Quonset also included. Asking only $416,000!
60 Acres
1 1/2 miles from Wauchula. Frontage on two paved roads.
High and dry. Zoned FR. Listed for $18,000 per acre.
UNDER CONTRACT!
ONLY ONE 1 Acre tract REMAINING in a new development area.
Deed restricted. Reduced to $28,500.
BUILD YOUR DREAM HOUSE! 4.8 tAcre deed restricted homesite.
Large oak tree on property with a 6" deep well. Listed for $99,000.
17 acres of young citrus grove on Parnell Road.
Listed for $19,500 per acre!
74 acres of prime development property.
City water and sewer within 1/2 mile.
Soon to be annexed, rezoned to single family with Developers Agreement.
$20,000 per acre.
83 ac. grove. Close to golf course and town.
Frontage on two County roads. $20,000 per acre.
1,800 ac. will divide. Starting at $12,500 per acre.
500 ac grove in DeSoto County. 55% Valencia, 45% Early & Mids. All
microjet. E & M sold for $1.75/lb, Valencias uncomitted. $5,200,000.
*


Ben Gibson
SJerry Conerly
Dusty Albritton


Realtor Associates
(941)737-2800 Robert Jones
(863)445-0662 John H. Gross
(863)781-0161


(863)781-1423
(863)273-1017
cl2:lc


ELECTRIC MOTOR SCOOTER, $50.
863-445-3833. 2:1 p
VERY NICE 55 gallon fish tank
w/matching top & canopy, $250. 773-
2205. 2:1-8p
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS Herbalife
products, must go. Vicky 863-781-
1244. 1:11-2:8p
YAMAHA STUDIO PIANO elegant,
new, 2005, deep walnut cabinet.
Yamaha portatone PSR-730 keyboard,
new. Remote control black hummer.
(863) 773-4480. 1:4-2:1 p


(1163) 735-2415
cll:4tfc


References Provided Upon Requests


cl8:8tfc













The


February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 9B





Classifieds


SOD
Sold by Pallet, Half Pallet, Piece
MULCH
Fill Dirt Drainfield & Driveway Rock, Stump Grinding
Potting & Top Soil (sold by the yard) R.R. Ties Delivery Available
120 Hogan St. Monday Friday 12:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
Wauchula, FL Saturday 8:00 a.m. 1 p.m.
'Behind Panda Restaurant) 773-3500 c17:27tfc


VOCA of Florida
Direct Support Staff position available with adult day
training program in Wauchula. High School Diploma or
GED and valid drivers license (in good standing). Local
law enforcement background completed. Must have at
least 2 years experience working with the
developmentally disabled. If interested please apply in
person at 114 W. Carlton St., Wauchula, FL.
E.O.E. M/F/V/D
cll:25; 2:lc


iSrAFFIG SERl ms^ IrNCO
*Employee Leasing Specialist Workers Compensation Payroll
Contact: Robby Albritton
Office (863) 735-9226 Cell (863) 528-7085
159 S.R. 64 E., Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
www.laborsolutions.com ralbritton@laborsolutions.com
c19:14tfc




Reserve Now! Summer Vacation-Mlouniain cabin. sleeps 4-5. Bryson City, NC
NEW LISTING-86 ac Hwy 64 Frontage. across from Linle Cypress, $1.3
NEW LISTING--Briarwood, 4/3. many extras, 1/2 ac. lot. $359,000.
3.87 ac. Whisier \\...ods. Deed Restricted.
45 ac Valencia. $15 1000 -:
Commercial 4 Lor~ iH,.) 17 $225,000. Buwing Green
18.9 ac. Ft. Green. C-2 Zoning, Het, 62 Frontage, frame home incl., $500,000.
5 ac. wooded. paed road. close in, 160"x1'12', $18.000 per ac.
75 ac w/ 55 ac citrus. microlet. Valencia crop uncomnmmed. $850,000.











2 Acre tracts available in a deed restricted community. $49,500.

THIS IS A BEAUTY! 10 Acres. Top of the line Manufactured Home (Palm
Harbor) on 10 beautiful, fenced, high and dry acres. Over 3000' ft including
screened porches, in ground heated pool, updated kitchen with breakfast
bar and wet bar. Paved Road but private. All this for $284,900.
3 BR/2BA on SLuSI6 Good location $295,000.
Check this out! Concrete Block, cathedral ceilings, Oak cabinets. 2058'
under air, on 3.82 acres. Maintained & landscaped! 45x48 Steel galvanized
metal enclosed barn with full kitchen for entertaining... $314,900
10 acres on CR665 Paved Country Road. 1982 MH in good condition. Large
40x60 and 24x40 Metal warehouses. Storage for Cars, Boats, equipment etc.
Fenced for cattle, wildlife plentiful. $289,900.
30 ac or 37 ac beautiful woods and pasture. Within 1/2 Mi. of College, Best
Western and Projected growth area. Access to Peace River $15,000 per ac.
cl2:1c


CUSTOM METAL BUILDINGS
20 x 25 x 9 Amhassadnr


Vertical Roof (2:12 Pitch)
1 Roll-up Door,
2 GableVents,
4" Concrete Slab $


25 x 30 x 9 Ambassador
Vertical Roof (2:12 Pitch)
2 Roll-up Doors, 1 Entry Door,
1 Window, 2 Gable Vents,
4" Concrete Slab $1 5


984


,096


30 x 35 x9 Executive
Vertical Roof (3:12 Pitch)
2 Roll-up Doors, 1 Entry Door,
1 Window, 2 Gable Vents,
4" Concrete Slab $20,295
- Meets 120 mph Wind Load
- Up to 35' Wide, Unlimited Length METAL SYSTEMS PLUS, LLC
- "Stamped" Florida Engineered Drawings 877 95
- Florida Owned & Operated O Y77 951-2300
Pric Plua Sol Tax &Counly Fe. Pho tofrdisplay purpo only C112:28tfC WWW.metalsystemsplus.com


3 BR/1 1/2 B Wauchula, $700 month,
first and last required. 773-0166.
2:1-3:1 p
3 BR/2 BTH, brick house in Wauchula,
$800/mth., $800 deposit, ready now.
781-3003. 2:1-3:1 p
1 BR ROOM FOR RENT w/bath, $300
month. Call Rodney 863-445-3833.
2:1p
3/1 ONE ACRE, animals welcome,
$1,000 month firm. 6621 Cypress St.,
Wauchula. After 7 p.m. 863-245-1733.
2:1p
HOUSES & APARTMENTS AVAIL-
ABLE. 773-6667. 2:1c
PARK MODEL in Crystal Lake 767-
8822 for rent. 1:25tfc
RVs IN CRYSTAL LAKE. 767-8822.
12:14tfc


~Iiii


Fill Dirt

Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-049


DOWNTOWN OFFICE space avail-
able, please call 773-4186 or 773-
6065. 11:23tfc
2 BR/ 1 B apartment, $650 deposit
plus 1st & last of $650 month. 773-
0100. 10:12tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising any
preference or limitation based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin, or
the intention to make such a prefer-
ence or limitation. Familial status
includes children under 18 living with
parents or guardians and pregnant
women, tfc-dh
If high heels were so wonder-
ful, men would be wearing them.
-Sue Grafton


Shell


Rock


Sand


Zolfo Springs
90 o0o:stc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


EAGLE
WELL DRILLWgB
WATER WELLS & COMPLETE SYSTEMS
4" Wells


GEORGE GOINS DALE ROGERS
863-444-0181 941-302-2426
LICENSE # 9372 c1:1:4-2:1p


"On The JoO t
S" -I -----..


RESCHKE CONSTRUCTION, INC.
State Certified Building and, Roofing Contractor
Residential Remodeling
Zolfo Springs, Florida
(863) 735-0660 (863) 832-0409
John Reschke .CCC-045925
Bill Reschke c14:21 tfc License CBC- 2430.


Make A

House

Call.


Selling your house?


Call Billy Hill first?

He pays top $!


781-1062
cl0:5tfc


COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL

Land Clearing *
Pond Excavation *
Dirt Hauling Grade Work *
SCitrus Tree Removal *
Demolition
Site Prep *


1 86-3-28-


DAVID MILLS, OWNER
Established 1972 cl2:1c
!j


DUMP TRUCK 4-HIRE, great rates, "U
call it I can haul it." 863-464-0917.
2:1-3:1 p
SHALLOW WELL DRILLING. Call
Martin @ 781-3141. 2:1-3:1 p
JIM'S PAINTING house & mobile
home repair, interior & exterior, free
estimates, lic. & insured. 767-9650.
2:1-3:1p
CAKES Specializing in wedding,
birthday, quince ofios and sculpted.
For a consultation call 863-328-0024.
2:1-22p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION, roof
overs, screen rooms, carports, glass
rooms, pool enclosures, rescreening.
Harold Howze Construction. 735-1158
RR050181. 1:25-3:29p
LAWN SERVICE Quality work.
Commercial, residential, licensed,.
insured. 873-9696. 1:25-2:22p


WILL BABYSIT in my home, week-
ends, weekdays, or nights. 781-5425.
,1:18-2:15p
DAVID'S LAWN SERVICE, quality
work, original business in Miami
since 1982, "I guarantee to please
you!" 773-9598. 1:18-
2:15p
BLACK TOP SOIL $250/Ld base
shell $275/Ld, 18 ton Lds, Hardee
area. 863-990-1648. 1:18-
2:15p
EAGLE WELL DRILLING 4" water
wells, complete systems. Lic.# 9372.
(863) 444-0181 (941) 302-2426.
1:4-2:1p
C&P CONSTRUCTION. Demolition, fill
dirt, tree removal, stump removal,
dragline, track hoe, land clearing,
shell, clay, top soil, loader, bulldozer,
dump trucks. 735-2415. 1:19tic


GILLIARD FILL DIRT INC.


NPDk Pl' a nttic -Drde. Icpp -


L 4- -- I |- i I-,,, j oII U.1 I 3l
FREE ESTIMATES
REFERENCES AVAILABLE
Sern ng Hardee Count\ for over 20 \ears
(863) 781-0012 (863) 202-6465
I,, il, -:J A i, "'. : ,- l, '.':l


VOCA of Florida
Direct Care Staff positions available in Wauchula group
homes. High School Diploma or GED and valid drivers
license (in good standing). Local law enforcement back-
ground completed. Experience providing services to the
developmentally disabled preferred.
Apply at 114 W. Carlton St., Wauchula, Florida.
(863) 773-0434. E.O.E. M/F/V/D
cl1:25;2:lc

We are known for the great people we
THE hire! If you are a FL Security D
"ENUDD Licensed Officer, we should talk!
GROUP We offer competitive pay, advancement
Snart Service Great People opportunities, and a positive work
environment.
Fax your resume to 813-635-9732,
E-mail tampajobs@buddgroup.com,
or call our job hotline at 800-888-2980.
We are committed to a diverse and drug-free workplace.
cl1:25;2:1c


HOUSE FOR SALE
A MUST SEE!
3BR, 2B, CB. Wonderful location,
terrific amenities, LARGE FENCED YARD

Call today for appointment
863-781-2600
c12:1c


^ EAB-LE

( WATER WELLS & COMPLETE SYSTEMS
4" Rotary Wells
GEORGE GOINS DALE ROGERS
863-444-0181 941-302-2426
LICENSE # 9372 cl:2:1-3:1p


S Florida Institute For
Neurologic Rehabilitation, Inc.
Where a Job Can Become A Career
FINR IS GROWING. Come join our team. The following
positions are now available.
Entry Level Positions
Minimum Requirements are H.S. Diploma or G.E.D., 18
years of age or older and no disqualifying offenses.
C.N.A. Current Florida license required. Evening, weekend,
night & PRN shifts are available in the Skilled Medical Center.
Experience is a plus.
R.S.A.'s. Provide direct care to clients. Duties include, supervi-
sion of 1-6 clients during assigned shift. Other duties are imple-
mentation of behavior plans, documentation, showering, feed-
ing, accompanying on transports, etc. C.N.A. License, AA, AS,
BA or BS preferred. Previous experience is a plus.
Skilled Positions
Utility Service Technician. Must be HVAC certified with 2-
5 yrs. experience.
Management Positions
Residential Shift Supervisor. Two positions available on the
Pediatric campus. Weekend and evening shifts available. BS/BA
in health related field with 2 to 5 yrs supervisory exp. preferred.
H.S. Diploma or GED with 2-5 years supervisory experience is
required.
Professional
RN. Night shift for our Skilled Medical Rehab Center. Current
License required.
RN's & LPN's for TLF. Evening, night & -weekend shifts
avail. Current FL License required.
Program Case Managers. 2 positions are available on the
Pediatric Campus & 2 positions are available on the Adult
Campus. Qualifications are BA/BS in Social Work, Criminal
Justice or Health related field. Previous Case Management expe-
rience is preferred.

Apply at 1962 Vandolah Rd., Wauchula, FL 33873, fax
resume to HR Dept (863)773-2041, or e-mail to
annettedhr@finr.net. FINR has an excellent benefit pack-
age including competitive pay scale and is a DFWP and
EOE. cl2:ltfc


B
.v 1,







10B The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007






-The


Classifieds


FRANK'S LAWN CARE Licensed,
insured, free estimates, commercial,
residential. 781-7360. 1:25-3:29p
FEMALE COLLEGE STUDENT seeks
houses to clean to earn extra cash.
References available. Funds nego-
tiable. 863-781-2386. 1:25-2:1 p
OSTOMY, COLOSTOMY, AND ideosto-
my supplies now in stock at Pete's
Pharmacy. tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs?
Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday
nights 7 p.m. at St. Michael's
Catholic Church, Heard Bridge Rd.,
Wauchula and Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday nights 7 p.m. at First
Methodist Church, Corner of Grape &
Church St., Bowling Green.
7:18tfcdh
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1998 TOYOTA
VIN: 4T1BG22K6WU298257
8:00 A.M., Feb. 13, 2007
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 HWY. 17 N WAUCHULA, FL
cl2:lc

PORTER/
GROUNDS-
KEEPER
needed for
apartment
community in
Wauchula.
Good benefits &
salary.

Call
863-773-6640
Fax
305-357-4744
Refer to REQ#2
cl1:25; 2:1c


2002 Chevy Avalanche


2003 Ford
auto. 71,000 miles


AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. Located
at the SFCC Annex, Room #105, Hwy.
17 North, Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a problem?
Call Alchoholics Anonymous in
Hardee County at 735-2511. Several
weekly meetings. dh
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales, service and
installation, call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-119
Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee
County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10
Paragraph D require all ads for any
construction-related service to carry
the contractor's license number.
dh


LET US PICK up junk cars out of your
yard. Will buy old farm tractors.
Crooms- 773-0637. 2:24tfc


1/2 ac. corner of Link St. & Ridge
Ave. Next to SFCC & Torrey Oaks
golf course.
$25,000
1/2 ac. with 48x28 concrete block
bldg.-- 263 Otter Run, Ona
$25,000
Call Today!
(863) 699-2845 or (954)294-1012
Leave message cl2:1-22p





Includes old house with storm
damage. Located in the coun-
try. Close to Sukannee River.
Work needed on properly.
Good farm land or residential.
Will sacrifice at $100,000)'
due to father's death.
(863) 245-1734 Ask for CarolIn.
c1 18-2 ip


NO INTEREST!

NO INTEREST!


WANTED: ADULT 3-wheel bike. Call
Wanda Gunn 773-0002 773-7927.
2:1c
COCA-COLA BOTTLES embossed 6"
or 6 1/2 ounce with Wauchula on bot-
tom of bottle. Phone 863-832-0640
ask for James Justiss. 2:1p


YARD/ESTATE SALE Saturday, 8-5,
1182 Aspen Lane, Wauchula. 2:1p
PARK SALE Cracker Lake RV Resort,
Hwy 64 E. Sale in Club house. Park
wide. Feb. 3, 8-? 2:1p
SAT., 8-1, Hwy. 66, Zolfo across from
Cycoles. 2:1 p
SATURDAY MULTI-FAMILY YARD
SALE 1676 Paul Drive in Golfview
Estates. Items include bunk beds,
children clothing, dishes, Boyd's
Bears, collectibles and much more.
8:00 Noon. 2:1 p


NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE!
George Town Loop, Saturday, 8 a.m. -
2 p.m. 2:1 c


3 FAMILY Fri., Sat., 8-4, motorcycle
600 Honda Magnum, some furniture.
210 Orange St., BG. 2:1p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 310 N. 10th,
Wauchula. Everything must go! Let's
make a deal! 2:1p
GIANT SUPER BOWL YARD SALE -
Saturday, 8-2, 4831 Dixiana (BG
Convenience Store) Bowling Green.
2:1 p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY Corner of Lisa
and Hanchey, Wauchula. Tools, iron
skillets, blankets, maternity, adult,
Children clothes. Lots of odds and
ends. 2:1 p
SATURDAY, 8-1, 1023 Mockingbird
Rd. in Charlie Crk. MHP on SR 64E.
Household items, junior, toddler and
baby clothes. 2:1 p
SATURDAY, 8-?, 1006 POLK RD. 2:1p
BIG SALE: Sat., 9 a.m., 3014 Spruce
St., ZS. 2:1p
BIG YARD SALE Sat., Sun., 8-5, 4065
East Main St. Cancel if rain. 2:1p
HUGE YARD SALE Saturday, 8-?,
1072 Boyd Cowart Road. 2:1p
LOTS OF BEDS, king beds, $100 up;
queen beds, $100 up and twin beds,
sofa beds, tables, chairs, stoves,
refrigerators. Edna's Place. 1:25-2:1c
BABY CLOTHING, strollers, toddler
beds, long dress, large ladies clothes.
Enda's Place. 1:25-2:1c


'98A PS


20 5 0 *pe C a 7 f a I


2004 Ford FJS0 Super Cab BUY HERE!' '98 y k ango


S57,00( actual miles

Lariat Fully


A must see!

Loaded!


PAY HERE! 2000o aialier
r r '


COURTESY PHOTO
Here are the "Tagalongs" of the Tax Collector's Office showing off their Relay for Life T-shirt.


Bingo Fundraiser


Set For Feb. 8


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Tax
Collector's Office has a unique way
of raising money for the American
Cancer Society.
The "Tagalongs" Relay for Life
team will be hosting its fourth
annual bingo fundraiser at the Elks
Lodge 318 W. Main St., Wauchula
next Thursday, Feb. 8. Winners will
receive prizes from various busi-
nesses in Wauchula and several
major restaurants.
Headed by Tax Collector Zee
Smith and Marianne Pakovich, the
annual bingo fundraiser was a big
success last year. "We had 120 peo-
ple attend, which was more than
double of what we had the year
before," said Pakovich.
She expects even more than that
this year, hoping for' 150 to 200 to
attend.
A single sheet of bingo cards
costs $7.50, which contains three
games worth of play. Pakovich said
extras could be bought on the floor
for 50 cents or $1 depending on
what the prize was.
"All of our prizes have been
donated, and we want each one that
is given away to be worth at least
$25," she said.
Prizes will be in the form of cash
and gift cards from businesses and
restaurants.
Area restaurants that have donat-
ed prizes include: Pizza Hut, Java
Caf6, The Bread Board, Nicholas'
Family Restaurant, Acapulco Cafe,
Double J Restaurant, Mojitos
Original Cuban Caf6 and Pioneer
Restaurant.

FOR SALE
IN CRYSTAL LAKE
VILLAGE
New and Used Mobile
Homes, Park Models,
and RV's.
Call 773-3582 or stop
by at 237 Maxwell Drive,
Wauchula.
cl11:18-2:8p


Several popular restaurant fran-
chises from out of town have also
given prizes, they are: Chili's,
Ruby Tuesday's and Outback
Steakhouse.
Local businesses and supermar-
kets have also pitched in, they
include: Crown Ford, English
Chevrolet, Main Street Market,
Winn-Dixie, Sweetbay Market,
Berries & Blooms, Wal-Mart,
Frankie's Hair Salon and Preston
Gas Company. Bingo Escape also
has donated prizes.
In addition to bingo, there will be
prizes raffled off through ticket
drawing. The tickets are $1 each or
an arm's length for $5.
If playing bingo or trying to win
a raffle makes you hungry, don't
worry. There will be plenty of food
at the event for everyone. Pulled
pork sandwiches, chili and home-
made deserts will.be sold.
All proceeds will go to the
American Cancer Society's Relay
for Life.
The doors open at 4:30 p.m. for
anyone wanting lunch, with early
bird games starting at 6;30. Regular
games begin at 7 p.m., and every-
one is invited to attend.
Go confidently in the direction
of your dreams. Live the life
you've imagined.
-Henry David Thoreau





s ,]plitfloor pln 0 f n' ca n



Cal8 343f
ment. 4


You should always learn, wit,,
life comes wisdom and with wis-
dom comes the courage to live.
your life selflessly. The more
you learn about yourself and
the experiences surrounding
your life, the more opportuni-
ties you have to make your life
better and more fulfilling.
-Amy Candy
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE ,
1988 NISSAN
VIN: 1N6ND1658JC399634
8:00 A.M., Feb. 19,2007
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 HWY. 17 N WAUCHULA, FL
cl2:lc

DeSoto County
Properties
8 acres, 4 miles east of
Arcadia on Paved Road,
$139;900 owner financing
80 acres, Brownville Area Will
Rezone, $20,000 per acre
w 4w.landcallpow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565
c112:21-2:8c

Good Shepherd Hospice
dii. ..I 0 .ii h H.Trtri MPi. C.-
wa.linUJrnljiin 19A.
NURSING
OPPORTUNITIES
Join the Good Shepherd Hospice
team and provide quality, end-of-
life care to our patients'and their
families.
WAUCHULA OFFICE
*RN: FT, 8a-5p
*RN: Per Diem, 8a-5p
*LPN: FT, 4p-12a
SEBRING OFFICE
*RN: Admissions
FT, 8a-5p
Our team members receive a competitive
salary and outstanding benefits package,
Including paid health premiums, four weeks
vacation your first year, tuition reimburse-
ment, retirement plan, mileage and much
more.
Bilingual Pay Premiumsl
For consideration, please call (800) 464-
3994 or apply online at
www.LPHcareers.com.
EOE/DFWP


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech
INSE*V' "Phone (863)-781-9720
gugles(earthlink.net home.earthlink.net/-guglegrl:
0^


'98(Ieuck



'94SC&I9uck


W e ca n fin a nce ai y43 e!


Bring this in for $500 off. This week only!








No Interest!
BSas No Interest!






Maria Billy Hill Ruby
Owner .
Buy Here! Pay Here! c
y 17 &cREA:Rd


a


J&R
.1 rr r r l


Grocery
A i- I I i *1 A m -


12 IN. otn Ave., vvaucnula, I-oriaa
PH: (863)773-9149
STORE HOURS: MON.-SAT. 6AM-9PM SUNDAY 8AM-8PM

MEAT DEPARTMENT SPECIALS

I Ne\\ York Strip Steak $ 6.99 LB
--5-= Bottom Round Roast $ 2.99 LB
Bottom Round Steak $ 3.19 LB .B,',i"


Pork Steak
Pork Stew
Pork Boston Butts


Leg Quarters (Chicken)
Whole Chicken


$ 2.19 LB
S 1.99 LB
$ 1.69 LB


.59
1.09


If i-, o
Liii


LB
LB


IVew.3n' be under,43d!


Hardee Car Co.


Pay to the (your name could be here)
order of $500.00
ItkV 0 00 400


Prices in this ad good through Tuesday, February 6, 2007.
------------


1224


,20


0~'-n ~'"i~


Fo r va,,


I







February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 11B


This week in history, as
researched from the archival pages
of The Florida Advocate, the
Hardee County Herald and The
Herald-Advocate of...

75 YEARS AGO
Durrance Opened Berry Festival:
The third annual Hardee County
Strawberry Festival opened at
Bowling Green Wednesday after-
noon with a large crowd on hand for
the opening exercises.
The formal opening, which was
delayed somewhat following a ban-
quet at the Green Terrace Hotel,
took place at the entrance to the fes-
tival grounds. Charles M. Durrance,
governor candidate and native to
this section, opened celebrations.

Carlton And Dishong Out For
Re-Election: The 1932 political
campaign got away to a delayed
start in Hardee County this week
when two candidates announced for
re-election.
Tax Collector Lloyd J. Carlton on
Wednesday announced his candida-
cy and Sheriff C.S. Dishong an-
nounced his candidacy at his booth
at the Strawberry Festival.

Royal Theater In Wauchula Un-
dergoes Repairs: E.A. Fletcher, the
well-known painter and decorator,
is doing extensive work for the
Royal Theater here, painting both
the exterior and interior.
The front will be done in silver
and gold, with the entrances being


remodeled, French doors being
installed in place of the old type.


50 YEARS AGO
Hardee High Athletes Feted By
Cats Paw Club: H.L. Jaudon, Mar-
:: Roberts and John Terrell are
shown on the front page of the Jan.
5, .1957, issue of The Herald-
Advocate, serving the head of the
line of Hardee High athletes at the
annual barbecue supper given last
Friday night by the Cats Paw Club
for coaches and athletes.

New Dance Band To Play Satur-
day: Saturday night at 8, the mem-
bers of the 15-piece dance band will
present their first formal dance. The
dance band was organized in
November.
They hope to bring the public of
Hardee County a truly professional
sounding dance group. This is not a
"combo" but a full-fledged orches-
tra. All dances sponsored by the
group will be formal.

Engagement Announced: Mr. and
Mrs. Hughlian Durrance, of Wau-
chula, are announcing the engage-
ment of their daughter, Helen, to
Sp-3 William (Sonny) Wadsworth,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Wads-
worth, of Wauchula.
Miss Durrance attended schools
in Hardee County and is employed
as cashier at Central Pharmacy. Sp-
3 Wadsworth also attended Hardee
County schools. After graduation he


Lady 'Cat Weightlifters Bow Out


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Despite best efforts, none of the
Hardee girls weightlifters was able
to advance from the sectional com-
petition last week.
Senior Danielle "Dani" Hines
had a personal best but was unable
to go to the state meet Feb. 10 at
River Ridge High in New Port
1ichey. Competing in the 139 divi-
sion, Hines placed sixth with a total
of 245, 115 in the bench press and
her new high of 130 in the clean
ahd jerk.
' Three other Hardee girls compet-
ed in the Jan. 24 state qualifier sec-
tional meet in Sarasota 'last
Wednesday. A fifth, nior
Bridgette Singletary, was unable to
make the trip.
S Junior Sarah Ezelle scored 220 in
the 169 division, with 115 in the
clean and jerk and 105 in the bench
press. Classmate Adilene Macedo,
in her first year of lifting, finished
at 210, with 110 in the clean and


jerk and 100 in the bench. "She was
so excited and really ready to come
back next year." said coach Jan
Brutus.
Freshman Shanique Outley com-
peted in the unlimited division, fin-
ishing with 200 pounds, a personal
best of 105 in the clean and jerk and
95 in the bench press.
"We've had a wonderful year and
made a lot of progress with team-
work and showing more dedica-
tion. I'm so proud of the way
they've worked together and sup-
port each other," said Brutus, who
expects it to be even better next
season.
She will lose only Hines to grad-
uation. Juniors Ezelle, Macedo,
Nicole Bromley, Katie Bryan,
Samantha Hagans and Bridgette
Singletary are expected back along
with sophs Marvysha Morris,
Rebecca Quinones and Casey
Johnson, and freshmen Outley,
Ariel Singletary and Charity Webb.


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked in
the top 10 in customer satisfaction in Florida
I have received Ford's highest Sales Honor
15 years running and been a member of
Ford's 300/500 Club for 20 years. Thanks
again and stop by soon.
t fFt. Meade
ISTEDEIcVL h375-2606
^~ W*-1t no.9um-WR-w


joined the U.S. Army and is now
stationed at Poitiers, France.

25 YEARS AGO
Wauchula Police Vote Union: By
a close five to four vote, the nine
eligible employees at the Wauchula
Police Department chose to be rep-
resented by the Police Benevolent
Association.
The election was held at the
Wauchula police station last week
under the supervision of the state
Public Employees Relations Com-
mission.

O.E.S. Queen's Court: The first
annual Queen's Coronation of the
Geraldine Chapter No. 132, O.E.S.,
of Wauchula convened on Dec. 19,
1981, at 7:30 p.m. at the First
Baptist Church.
Musical selection was presented
by the Star's group. Prayer and
Scripture were given by Rev. C.L.
Johnson. Crowned Queen was
Henrietta Benson; Princess was
Teresa White and Lady In Waiting,
Loretha Belcher.

Ova Morgan, of Wauchula, cele-
brated her 100th birthday this week.
Looking back on her life, she sees
no particular reason for her longevi-
ty except possibly hard work. She
grew up on her parents' farm in
Jackson County, Tenn.
She lives with her son, L.L.
Morgan, 70, in a mobile home in
Citrus Valley Mobile Home Estates
on South Florida Avenue. She still
does laundry, cooking and house-
work and is looking forward to rid-
ing a horse at her birthday party on
her grandson's farm.

10 YEARS AGO
Legislators Share County Con-
cerns: The needs of education, the
hindrance of stage agencies, state
costs passed along to the counties
and partial-year tax assessments
were some of the appeals made to
state legislators who visited the
county.
Newly elected state representa-
tive Lindsay Harrington joined vet-
eran state Sen. John McKay as they
came last Wednesday for their
annual fact-finding tour. Fresh into
his approach to state politics is
Harrington.

Keeping The Dream Alive: For
three days last weekend the focus
was on the memory of the late civil
rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Activities began with a
parade, followed by a luncheon for
community leaders.
The 1997 MLK Humanitarian
Award winners were teacher-coach
James Crayton and principal Mae
Robinson, with the Merit Award
going to long-time educator Mary
Sue Clemons.

Couple Plans May Wedding:
Wendy Lee Bilbrey and Robert
Dempsey Welch, both of Wauchula,
have announced their engagement
and upcoming marriage. The
prospective groom is the son of
Rick and Dixie Harris of Raiford
and Jerry and Dianne Welch of
Wauchula.
The bride-elect is a 1992 gradu-
ate of Hardee High School. Plans
are being made for a May 24 wed-
ding.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND SECOND READING OF ORDINANCE ANNEXING
CERTAIN PROPERTY INTO THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF
THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance Number 2007-
01.will be.:presented to the.City Commission.for approval upon the second reading at City Hall, 225
.East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 12th day of February 2007, at 6:00 PM. A copy
of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh
Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any person may appear and be heard with respect to the pro-
posed Ordinance. The proposed Ordinance is entitled as follows:

ORDINANCE 2007-01
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR THE
ANNEXATION OF APPROXIMATELY 8.30 ACRES LOCATED ON THE NORTH SIDE
OF STENSTROM ROAD, DESIGNATED AS THE BUFORD LONG A/K/A BUFORD E.
LONG ESTATE PROPERTY, INTO THE INCORPORATED LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, WITH A ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF R-3 MULTIFAMILY
HOUSING AND A FUTURE LAND USE MAP DESIGNATION OF MEDIUM DENSITY
RESIDENTIAL; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advis-
es that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and
that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
SThe City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any
ndjvidual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the
Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its pro-
grams or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans
with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-
3131.


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


2:1c


I Pages From The Past 1r


INVITATION TO BID

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
The Board of County Commissioners, Hardee County, Florida, hereinafter referred to as "County"
is soliciting bids from qualified firms to provide labor and materials to complete a Hazard Mitigation
Grant Program project as specified in the Scope of Services of this Invitation to Bid. Sealed BIDS
will be received at:
Hardee County Purchasing Office
Attn: Jack Logan, Purchasing Director
205 Hanchey Road
Wauchula, FL 33873
Until Thursday, 2:00 RM. local time. February 22, 2007, at which time they will be publicly opened by
the County Purchasing Director or designee and read aloud. Any BIDS received after the time spec-
ified will not be accepted.
Bid documents may be obtained from the Hardee County Purchasing Office, 205 Hanchey Road,
Wauchula, FL 33873, or by faxing a request to (863)773-0322. Bidders shall confine their bids to the
project in its entirety. Partial BIDS will not be considered. Bids submitted by FAX or other electron-
ic media will NOT be accepted under any circumstances. Late bids will NOT be accepted and will
be returned to the bidder.
An original BID (clearly marked as the "ORIGINAL') with two (2) copies must be sealed and the out-
side of the envelope MUST be marked: SEALED BID HAZARD MITIGATION GRANT PROGRAM.
Bid will be awarded by the Board of County Commissioners at a time and date to be determined later.
Hardee County reserves the right to: waive informalities and/or irregularities in any BID, delete any
portion of the project; extend the project within the limits of the work involved which in its judgment
is in the best interest of the County. Bids may be withdrawn prior to the date and time of bid open-
ing. The County reserves the right to reject any or all bid(s) and may postpone the award of the
Agreement for a period of time which shall not extend beyond sixty (60) calendar days from the Bid
opening date.

Bobby R. Smith, Chairman
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners 2:1c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON PROPOSED CHANGE

TO THE WAUCHULA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE

LAND USE ELEMENT, FUTURE LAND USE MAP FOR

THE CITY OF WAUCHULA

The City of Wauchula, Florida, proposes to change the use of land within the area shown in the
map in the advertisement. The change proposed in an amendment to the Wauchula Comprehensive
Plan Future Land Use Element, Future Land Use Map for the City of Wauchula.

Amendment #07-01-SS: A change of the official future land use classification
specifically changing the future land use classifications from County "Town
Center" to City "Medium Density Residential" on the Buford Long a/k/a Buford
E. Long Estate parcel of approximately 8.30 acres.

A public hearing will be held on the 12th day of February 2007, at 6:00 PM., and thereafter
Ordinance 2007-01B will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the second read-
ing at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, at which public hearings all parties
and interested citizens may appear and be heard as to any and all matters pertinent to the proposed
amendment to the Comprehensive Plan. Comments to Amendment #07-01-SS may be made oral-
ly at the hearing or in writing if submitted on or before the hearing dates.

A copy of the proposed amendment to the Comprehensive Plan may be inspected by the public
in the offices of the City Clerk, at the City Administrative Complex, 126 South 7th Avenue, Wauchula,
Florida 33873, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 RM., Monday through Friday, except holi-
days.
Please note that if any person decides to appeal any decision made by the council with respect
to any matter considered at the meeting or hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and
that for such purpose will need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeals are to be based.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT AND SECTION 286.26,
FLORIDA STATUTES, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS MEETING SHOULD CONTACT THE CITY CLERK'S OFFICE AT LEAST FIVE
(5) DAYS PRIOR TO THE DATE OF THE MEETING.

INTERESTED PARTIES MAY APPEAR AND BE HEARD AT SAID HEARING.


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
Attorney for the City of Wauchula
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873


s/ Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


2:1c


I Way Back When I


I Y_ _







12B The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


This week's column is written by
Judie Wall.

PRAYERS NEEDED
We need special prayers for sev-
eral this week: Marilyn Castile,
Laverne Hill, Tom Hill, Valera
Savieo, Curt Johnson, McKinsley
Pratt, Logan Benton, Ron Haverly,
Ken Long, George Proctor, Dee
McVeigh, Dale Brewer, and our
military personnel.
Welcome, reverend Jim Stall-
ings, to Wagon Wheel Church.
Special music was presented by
Joan Bell, "The Healer." There
were 68 in attendance for our first
church service of the year.

COFFEE KLATCH
The new people at the coffee
hour included, Pierrette Deschenes
and Ivan Cassie.
The birthday guys were Clyde
Anderson and Ivan Cassie. There
were no anniversaries this week.
The 50/50 was won by Greta
Knowlton. The lucky winners of
gift certificates, from local busi-
nesses, were Kenny Reichel, Mary
Whitman, Jean Sedini, Ben Hoff-
man, Mickie Jones, Ben Bates, Bob
Bell, Ginny Hardin, Wayne Boner,
Joyce Kaleita. Cloyce Swisher,
Thanna Adams, Joyce Pearsoll,
Rita Donnelly. Elaine Hoogkamp,
Frank Drust, Caryl Lauver, Pat
Siemen, Pierrette Dechons and
Francis Tessier.

Progressive Euchre
The high man was Carlos Dennis
with 73 points; runner-up, Bob Bell
with 70. High lady was Barbara
Lutz with 71 and her runner-up,
Kathy Vermeulan with 66 points.
Others were low man Francis
Smith with 46 and low lady Muriel
Bell with 44. Most loner, Edna
Broadworth with three points and
our friend Jean Alexander was
under the chair. There was a total of
seven tables for Monday's games.

BID EUCHRE
Tuesday, we had three tables.
The winner of the men's was Ivan
Cassie with 239 points, runner-up
man was Gordon Lantz 68 points.
The high woman was Joyce
Pearsall with 205 points, the run-
ner-up was Marilyn Banister with
58 points. The moon shots were
taken by Ivan Cassie and Vera
,Burke.


Thursday, we had four tables and
the winner of the high man's was
Cecil Bannister with 259 points.
The low man was Walt Broadworth
with 90 points. The high for the
women was Barbara Gersema with
233 points. The ladies low was
Marilyn Banister with 113 points.
Cecil Banister had two points for
the men's moon shot.

SHUFFLEBOARD
Thank you, Avion Palms for a
fun day.
Friday was our shuffleboard in
park Fun Day. All park residents
were invited, with 36 people pre-
sent. They had a fun day, learning
and playing. First place went to
Betty Vineyard with 133 points.
Bob Bell took second with 129, Bill
Kaleita third with 128. That was
close, guys. Last place was taken
by Ginnie Merriman.

LINE DANCING
Don't forget changes in the line
dancing classes. Tuesday and
Thursday at 3 p.m. at the Red Barn
and Wednesday at 9 a.m. in the day
room. Everyone welcome, men and
women. See Judie Wall #179

RED HAT LADIES
The Wagon Wheel Red Hat
Ladies met Tuesday with 18 mem-
bers present. Red hats were pre-
sented to each member attending,
made by Mickie Jones.
The monthly in-park meeting
was conducted by Kathy Vermeu-
len, our activity chairman. Plans
were made to motor to Punta Gorda
for shopping and cruise in Feb-
ruary. We will also be going to the
Strawberry Festival in March, to
see the Oak Ridge Boys.
A poem was read by Eunice
Franks,"When Life Gets You
Down." Agnes Perhola gave a read-
ing "Grandma's Rocker," stating
that grandmothers today are found
at the gym, shopping or on a cruise,
not at home rocking in her rocker.
Barbara Gersema lead the group
in playing "Zonk." Winning with a
high of 1,269 points was Katie
Crawford. Door prize was won by
Marge Luff. Refreshments were
served by the hostesses, Barbara
Gersema, Eunice Franks and Caryl
Lauver.

Always imitate the behavior of
the winners when you lose.


Red Sox Lead Minors


Wagon Wheel RV News
By Virginia Merriman


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two weeks into the season, the
only Dixie Youth Minors team
unbeaten is the Ullrich's Pitcher
Pump Red Sox.
At the end of week two, the Red
Sox had a 4-0 record and sole place
atop the standings for the half
dozen teams in the AAA division
commonly called the Minors.
Behind them are the Vols Cubs at
3-1 and C& B Cattle Co. Yankees
at 3-2. Trailing are the Pete's
Pharmacy Athletics "(A's), the CF
Industries White Sox and KMW
Photo Devil Rays.
In last Monday's only game, the
Cubs outlasted the Devil Rays 12-
8.
Tyler Hewett and Kendall Gough
were each triple-tally batters for the
Cubs. Jordon Jones and Aaron
Harrison added twin scores and
Bradley Brewer and Camden
Metheny each came around to
score once.
A Tyler Bragg triple and single
went for naught for the Devil Rays
as he was left on base. Julian
Galvez was the only batter to get all
the way home twice. Timmy
Perkins, Mikey Heine, Blake
Crawley, Jordan Ward and Jake
Pakovich added solos scores.
In Tuesday's night game, the
White Sox squelched the Yanks 11-
4.
Tanor Durden circled the bases
three times for the White Sox.
Devin Pearson and Kyler Caskay
touched home twice each and
Hunter Bryant, Marco DeLeon,
Alex Clarke and Naomi Rivera
made one trip around the bases.
Tyler Helms doubled and singled
to put two runs on the board for the
Yankees. Seth McGee and Tucker
Albritton came around to cross
home plate with a run apiece.
On Thursday night, it was the A's
whizzing past the White Sox 15-8.
Frank Farias tripled and Jake
Deanda doubled for the A's. Farias
and Jose Gonzales were each triple
score batters. Austin Altman, Omar
Alamia and Deanda put two runs
each on the board. Ruben Olmos,
Senida Garcia and Jacob Olmos
touched home plate once each.
DeLeon banged a pair of hits but
came all the way home only once
for the White Sox. Bryant, Zack
Caranco, Cesar Fimbres Durden,
Pearson Rivera and Jorden Rogers
each also came home once.
There was a double-header on


bat-around brought Dylan Salas,
Helms, Ryan Ramirez, Patrick
Carlton, Albritton and Cain.
Ramirez and Albritton added
fourth-inning tallies.


For the Rays, there was a first
inning score not listed and Tyler,
Bragg, Packovich and Galvez were
the only other batters to get all the
way around the bases.


Friday night. In the opener, the Red
Sox nipped the Cubs 5-3.
Marcus Battles and Cody
Spencer scored in the first inning
for the Red Sox. Battles came
around to score again in the third
inning. In the fourth, Keith Powell
and Conner Crawford added a pair
of scores.
The Cubs picked up a Dylan
Norwood score in the second
inning. Hewett walked and stole his
way around the bases in the third
inning and doubled and scored in
the fifth inning.
In the Friday nightcap, the Yanks
defeated the Rays 12-4.
Three batters scored for the
Yankees in the first inning before
the scorer was on hand. Cain
Roman got a run for the Yankees in
the second inning. A third inning


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE 2007-01A
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance Number
2007-01A will be presented to the City Commission for approval upon the second reading at City
Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 12th day of February, 2007, at 6:00 RM.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 126 South
Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any person may appear and be heard with respect to
the proposed Ordinance. The proposed Ordinance is entitled as follows:

ORDINANCE 2007-01A

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR A
CHANGE OF THE ZONING CLASSIFICATION OF APPROXIMATELY 8.30 ACRES
LOCATED ON THE NORTH SIDE OF STENSTROM ROAD, DESIGNATED AS THE
BUFORD LONG A/K/A BUFORD E. LONG ESTATE PROPERTY, FROM COUNTY "R-
3 MULTIPLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL' TO CITY "R-3 MULTIFAMILY RESIDENTIAL';
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advis-
es that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and
that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any
individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the
Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or treatment irhits pro-
grams or activities. Anyone requiring, reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans
with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-
3131.


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


s/Clarissa Abbott
CLARISSA ABBOTT, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


2:lc


Pioneer Paris Pays





Cover Art Contest


The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artwork for the
front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on
Hardee County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


Last year's winner....
ADULT DIVISION


Publication of your work
f f k Your photo and biograph

S" FSecond place: $100 U.S. Savings Bond.
O j j~ ~j~j so.~ I.S: n..L.u 4L.. sa~i~ o.


Third place:


Caleb Goodwin, Crewsville


JUDGES
JANE LONG Pioneer Park Days Director
MARCUS J. F7FI I F Circuit Judge for Hardee County
SUSAN W. ROBERTS Circuit Judge for 10th
Judicial Circuit and Ninth-Generation Floridian


on the cover of the special section.
ical story inside the cover.


* Publication of
your winning entry inside the special
* $50 U.S. Savings Bond.


Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.


CHILDREN'S DIVISION
FOR AGES 12 AND UNDER! $50 U.S. Savings Bond.
Week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days.
Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.


RULES:
1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.

2) Artwork must be original.

3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must be depicted.

4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.
5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high, including lettering which
reads "Pioneer Park Days 2007."

6) Deadline is Monday, Feb. 12, at noon.


TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the
drawing. Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail
to Cover Art Contest, The Herald-Advocate, RO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


Mushrooms that have a bad taste or are poisonous are often called
toadstools.


-- 1--










The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, February 1, 2007


ii-ll/~ji~t i i... .,,
''1a.


'Cats Host District Hoops


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Dual district victories last week
vaulted the Hardee basketball boys
into second place in the playoffs
which begin next week in
Wauchula.
Wins over Palmetto and Sarasota
Booker put Hardee in good seeding
for the Class 4A-District 10 play-
offs which begin Monday with sec-
ond-seed Hardee squaring off with
seventh-seed Braden River (1-11)
at 6 p.m.
DeSoto (12-0), undefeated in dis-
trict play, draws an early_ bye.
Tuesday games will have fourth-
seeded Palmetto (7-5) challenging
fifth-seed Avon Park (4-8) at 6 p.m.
and third-seed Booker (8-4) against
sixth-seed Sebring (2-10) at 7:30.
Action resumes next Friday. If
Hardee won on Monday evening,
the Wildcats will play the 7:30
game against the winner of the
Booker-Sebring matchup. DeSoto
would play the winner of the
Palmetto-Avon Park game at 6 p.m.
The district championship game
is at 7 p.m. Saturday. It will be pre-
ceded about 6 p.m. with a new twist
for the district playoffs this year.
Each district team can enter up to
two players in a three-point
shootout.
Hardee's Friday win over Booker
got it the second-place seeding
based on record. Both teams ended
with 8-4 records. They split their
games during the season and both
lost to DeSoto. Hardee, however,
beat fourth-seed Palmetto twice
during the season, while the
Tornados split games with the
Tigers.
HARDEE 56-PALMETTO 47
Without leading scorer senior Joe
Hills, out with a sprained ankle, the
Tigers were at less than full
strength. "We knew if we could
beat them, we could move up in the


standings so it was a big game for
us," described Hardee head coach
Vance Dickey.
"We played fairly decently, got
the ball inside a lot but didn't do
our free throws too well. It was
close for the first three and one-half
quarters. Then we got a 10-point
lead. Weston (Palmer) got a three-
pointer and Onel (Virgile) hit a key
pair of free throws. It was a good
overall effort," continued Dickey,
leading up to the fact Hardee won
this important game.
Hardee trailed 17-16 after a tense
first quarter. The game was tied at
28-all at halftime. Hardee inched
ahead by a point, 41-40 at the three-
quarter mark. Fouls mounted for
Palmetto and the Tigers were limit-
ed to only seven points in the final
stanza, while the Wildcats collected
15 to win 56-47.
Junior 'Cat center Mark St. Fort
lead all scorers with 19 points,
while junior Bryan Smith had 18
for Palmetto. For Hardee, Arnold
Louis had a dozen, Jermaine King
had six, Palmer and Virgile each
four and Tyrone Pace one-of-two at
the charity stripe. Josh Jackson,
Pete Solis and Marwin Simmons
spelled the starters with key relief
minutes.
HARDEE 60, BOOKER 56
Senior night ceremonies preced-
ed the Friday night game with
introductions and applause greeting
Palmer, King and Virgile. Each
hopes to pursue further education.
"I could never ask for three play-
ers with more character, work ethic
and selflessness that these three
young men. Regardless of where
they go from here, I hope that each
one of them will allow God to
direct their lives," said Dickey.
As the game started, St. Fort
tipped to Pace and the Wildcats
passed the ball around looking for a
good opening. Palmer found it


Golden Nuggets
By Lorraine and John Gillespie
Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries of Wauchula


"She opens her hand to the poor, yes, she reaches out her
filled hands to the needy (whether in body, mind, or spirit)."
Proverbs 31:20
The Proverbs' woman was a businesswoman and did it well. Many
people don't believe women should work outside the home. Proverbs 31
tells us otherwise. She was capable, intelligent and virtuous.
She bought and sold land, besides using her hands continually. She was
never idle, did not waste her time gossiping, and got up early to spend time
with the Lord and receive wisdom and strength from Him for the day.
She not only provided for her family but helped the poor and needy. In
other words, she took time to minister to others also. She looked in hei
hands to see what she had to share with others and gave freely.
She was a perfect woman, which most of us, if not all, could not do all
she did. Jesus was perfect, too and we cannot live up to His standard either
I believe both examples are for us to pursue and to grow to be more like
both of them.
A Golden Nugget would be to hold your hand out and see what you
have in your hand. If nothing is there, you can give nothing; pursue Jesus
and let Him fill it with His gifts so you will have something to give to oth-
ers.

It was two Algonquin tribes, the Michi Gama and the Michi Sepe,
that gave the names to the states of Michigan and Mississippi.

Ty Cobb had a higher lifetime batting average than any other player
in the history of baseball.


within 30 seconds with the first of
three treys for the night.
Shortly a Tornado shot by junior
Michael Gorman was rebounded by
Palmer. King fed St. Fort for a
jumper in the lane. That 5-0 lead
disappeared as Tornado senior
Sloan Collins and junior Marquis
Mack scored back-to-back to make
it 5-4.
Palmer calmly drained another
three-pointer. After a Booker shot
rimmed out, Hardee returned to its
passing game, with Palmer notch-
ing another trey at the 3:45 mark.
Hardee was up 11-4. Mack and St.
Fort swapped scores as time
passed.
When Palmer went baseline to
the hole for a bank shot, it was 15-
6. He took a break, but King dished
out to his replacement Simmons for
yet another three-pointer. As the
first period came to a close, King
and Mack traded shots, leaving
Hardee up 20-8.
As hot as Hardee was in the first
quarter, the 'Cats turned stone cold
in the second stanza. Senior Greg
Mullins and classmate Chris Tap-
pan hit back-to-back shots. The'
only bright spot for Hardee was
another trey by Simmons. By half-
time, Hardee's lead had been
trimmed to five points, 25-20.
Booker opened the third quarter
with an Eric Gurvarez shot. When
Collins sank a trey from the corner
it was a tie game. A free throw and
another Mullins shot put the
Tornadoes in front.
The score went back and forth,
with leads switching sides through
the rest of the period, which ended
in a 39-39 score.
Louis was fouled to open the
fourth quarter and hit one-of-two.
Within 20 seconds, St. Fort had a
chance and hit both shots. Back and
forth it went, momentum swinging
both ways. At the 4:50 mark, a pair
of St. Fort foul shots put Hardee
ahead to stay. Palmer sank another
pair. Then each time Booker threat-
" ened, Hardee forged ahead.
A three-pointer by King at the 2-
minute mark make it 55-51, but
Gorman hit a trey of his own to cut
the Hardee lead to 55-54. Palmer
hit a free throw and Mack hit a pair
Sto tie the game 56-all with 59 ticks
left on the clock.
After a Wildcat time-out, Sim-
mons became the hero with his
third three-point shot. The pro-
Hardee crowd was on its fee, clap-
ping and yelling. Tight defense
forced Booker into a turnover on
the five-second inbounds rule. St.
SFort was fouled and hit the front
Send of his two shots. A last-ditch
attempt by Mullins went awry and
Hardee had the 60-56 win.
"What can you say. It was a great
effort for our guys and Booker.
There was no quit in them. They


took it to us in the first half as I
knew they would. At halftime, I
challenged our players to be more
physical as Booker was and match
that type of play. Fortunately, we
made out free throws down the
stretch and Marwin hit that big
shot. We've been telling his to
shoot and keep shooting," said the
Hardee coach whose voice was


almost gone.
Collins topped Booker with 20
points while Mack added 15 more.
For the Wildcats, it was Palmer
as high man, matching Collins' 20
points. Palmer hit a trio of treys,
pair of deuces and 7-of-10 free
throws, including seven-of-eight in
the fourth quarter.
St. Fort added 18 points on five


#1eed DeSoto (12-0) Class 4J

Basketba

Bye Fri., Feb. 9
7:30 pm/6*
#4Seed Palmetto (7-5)

Tues., Feb. 6
6:00 pm

#5Seed Avon Park (4-8) Sat., Feb. 10


deuces and 8-of-ll free throws,
including five-of-six in the final
period.
King chipped in with nine points.
and Simmons matched that with his
trio of treys. Jackson also. drained a
trey, and Louis a free throv. Louis
and Pace also collected a goody
number of rebounds along with
King. Palmer and St. Fort.


I, District 10

ill Touirament


7:00 pm
#3 Seed Booker (8-4)

Tues., Feb. 6
7:30 pm

#6Seed Sebring (2-10) Fri.,Feb.
Fri., Feb. 9
#7Seed- Braden River (1-11) 6:00pm/730

Mon., Feb. 5
6:00 pm

#2 Seed Hardee (8-4)
Games may be reversed if Hardee wins opening game.



lE. 0. Koch Construction



J 3504 Office Park Road P.O. Box 1965

Sebring, FL 33871 Phone: (863) 385-8649


Commercial & Residential Construction
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property,
build your dream home, or do your remodeling.

ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DESIGN
ROOFING
New and repairs
ALUMINUM
Screen and glass enclosures carports patios siding soffit -fascia
SEAMLESS GUTTERS AND DOWNSPOUTS
"For all of your Aluminum, Steel, and Conventional construction needs"


Email: kochcon@strato.net


8:s1tfc State Certified License #CBC058444


Hardee County Fair Pageants



Reserve Ticket Information


All Reserved Seating is $8.00 per Ticket


Upcoming Concerts
Free with Park Admission
WillieNelson......................Feb3
TommyJames &the Shondells... Feb10
Diamond Rio....................Feb17
Hippie Fest Feb 18
Riders InTheSky................Feb24
Tracy Lawrence &Tracy Byrd.....Feb 25
Englebert Humperdinck..........Mar 3
TheDrifters&TheTams...........Mar4


Regularadminion S395. Jr(39ySi55Y-34) .95. Pepersn, plus ta. Parking adn d Dl Sayicket mnstl e Loretta Lynn MarO10
used witin 6 day nd is nonranserlable. Obtain 2n ay ticket al ticket upgrade center on 1st ds isrl. The Rat PackTribute............. Mar11
2:cyc
Winter Haven, FL m 863-324-2111 cypressgardens.com


Pageant


Miss Hardee County


Junior Miss


Kindergarten


Prince and Princess


Mrs. Hardee County


Lil' Miss Hardee
County


Deadline to Reserve


Tuesday, Feb. 13th
5:00 PM

Thursday, Feb. 15th
5:00 PM

Monday, Feb. 12th
5:00 PM

Wednesday, Feb. 14th
5:00 PM

Tuesday, Feb. 20th
5:00 PM

Wednesday, Feb. 21st


Ticket Pick-up*


Friday, Feb. 16th
7:00 PM 8:00 PM

Sunday, Feb. 18th
4:00 PM 6:00 PM

Thursday, Feb. 15th
6:00 PM 8:00 PM

Saturday, Feb. 17h
9:00 AM 10:00 AM

Thursday, Feb..22nd
7:00 PM 9:00 PM

Friday, Feb. 23rd


5:00 PM 3:30 PM 5:30 PM


*Al ticket pick-ups will be at the Civic Center

Call Kara Goodwyn at Farm Credit 863-773-3201 ext. 405


2-1 B


-AC


-ONE


.e

I
I-


~




~.. *~


9 DM~co


A
/fomolk










2C The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007




Schedule Of Weekly Services


printedd as a Public Service
by
The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula Florida

SDeadline: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning......................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ..........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ......................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ................
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study..........6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:30 p.m.
Wed. Discipleship ....................6:30 p.m.
Thurs. Mens Prayer ..................6:00 a.m.
Thurs. Ladies Bible Study........5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship...................... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ..7:30 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship................10:30 a.m
Sunday Evening........................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ................7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ..........5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1..1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................6:30 p.m

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape &.Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .....................:00 p.m.
'Wed. Bible Study......................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m
HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanal) Sunday ............7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo Serv. De Predicacion 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ............7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ......7:00 p.m.
Jueves Serv. De Predicacion ....7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship :................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday.Prayer......................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service..................... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer er. ..7:00 p.m.
SCommunion-2nd Sun. Evening 6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training ....................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ..........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..................7:30 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUt i a I
Murray Road off Hwy. 17 375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom...........9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ............5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico ....................6:30 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service...................... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Leaming ......6:30 p.m.
VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service ..............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study, Thurs. 7:30 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone Comm.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School.. 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .....................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ............7:00 p.m

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training .................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer......................6:00 p.m

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday AWANA for Kids...6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer Time...........7:00 p.m

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
English Service ....................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ..........1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer 7:00 p.m
Wednesday Service....................7:00 p.m
CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
529 W. Main St. (Robarts Chapel)
773-0427
Celebration Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ....... ............ 7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group....................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..............7:00 p.m.
Call for locations
CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Evening Worship ............7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................... 11:00 a.m..
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship ........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class ................11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship:.........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ............7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month............4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Priesthood 11:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. 735-8681
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning......................I 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night............. ......7:30 p.m.


The following merchants

urge you to attend

your chosen house of worship

this Sabbath




IIEaa-- -- --C7EZ-


Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA

ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service......................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service ......................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath. ....7:30 p.m.
Fri. Night (Holy Ghost Night)..7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper....................6:15 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Fellowship ..6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ............7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St. 767-8909
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service................1...1.. :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................5:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ....................7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
-Praise & Worship........ ............ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service......................5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service ........7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical ....................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Predicacion 11:30 a.m.
Studio Biblie, Miercoles ........7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Children's Programming
(0-12th grade) ................9:30-10:30 a.m.
Adult Bible Study ..........9:30-10:30 a.m.
Worship Service...................... 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Dinner 5:30 p.m.
PreK/3-4 yr. olds Class
(Lil'K)/Sonshine Singers..6:30-8:00 p.m.
Jam Team 6:30-7:15 p.m.
K-5th Kids World Groups 7:15-8:00 p.m.
6-12th Grade (Oasis)........6:30-8:00 p.m.
Adult Bible Study..............6:30-8:00 p.m
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ...................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service...................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship............6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study ..............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities................6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386.
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ......10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service ...........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family;Ministries...7:00 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service...................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts ......................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads & Lighthouse Min. 7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DE DIOS
PENTECOSTAL, M.I.
903 E. Summit St. (863) 452-6693
Pastor: Reinaldo Ortiz
Martes 7:30 9:00 p.m.
Viernes 7:30 9:00 p.m.
Domingo..............11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.
IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Morning................10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Evening ...... .........7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening ....................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES SPANISH
Sunday Evening 4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ......................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening...............7:30 p.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD MINISTRIES
Every Friday evening at 6:00 p.m.
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL


WAUCHULA

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service......................11:00 a.m.
SEvening Worship .. .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of 7th Ave. & Palmetto St.
735-0555
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School 9:45 a.in.
Morning Service.................... 1:00 a.m.
Church Training 5:J5 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave. 767-0023
Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .......................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service........4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor ........4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 1:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training...............6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper....................5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................6:45 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3" Sun. Communion ......10:00 a.m.
2"d & 4"' Sun. Divine Worship 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-5814
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ......................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 Nocth,US Hwy 17
Morning Service.......................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ......6:30 p.m.
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program WZZS Sundays9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST, MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....... ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..................7:00 p.m.
ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Holy Days ......

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ..........5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ............7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) ......................7:00 a.m.
(English) 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) .................... 1:00 a.m.
(Creole) 1:00 p.m.
Daily Mass in English ..............8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .........................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. ....11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting................7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning worship . 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship ............ 7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY
116 Orange St.
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train.7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service........ 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... .11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training . . 7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ..... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship........ 7:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .............10:00 a.m.
Church ............... . 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service .............. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.......... 7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer. ............. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship .......... 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church ....... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......... 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ........... 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ........... '7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
102 N. 6th Ave. (Earnest Plaza)
773-2929
Sunday Service ............ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.......... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service .... 7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

CHARLIE CREEK BAPTIST
CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ......... 7:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. .......... 7:00 p.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .............9:45 a.m,
Morning Worship ........ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ................ 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study. .............. 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ........... 11:00 a.m.
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. 735-2524 735-0989
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Worship ................. 11:00 a.m.
SEvening ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet.. .. 7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-8586
Morning Worship .......... 10:00 a.m.
Children's Church .......... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ........7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD
FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ........... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship .......... 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ............. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service............ 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............... 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH COWBOY
CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School .. ..........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month Cowboy
Fellowship ............... 7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ............. 9:30 a.i.
Morning Wqrship. ............ 11 a.m.
Wed. Pray~Service ......... 7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol... 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones .............. 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina ................. 11:360a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica. ..... .10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................. 11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club............... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche......... 7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ........ 6:00 p.m.
Servicio .................. 8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ...... 5:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........ ..11:00 a.m.
Training Union............. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER

Michael A. Guide
Nener, Georgia


A little girl took her first elevator
ride. It was exciting. Her father
asked, "How did you like it?"
"Why," she answered, "it was
so funny. We went into a little
house. And the upstairs came
down."
Cute, isn't it?
A poet had a similar experi-
ence. One day he turned his life
over to the Lord, and he wrote:
"Heaven came down and glory
filled my soul. When at the cross
the Savior made me whole. My
sins were washed away and my
night was turned to day. Heaven
came down and glory filled my
soul."


W e look forward to the start of the weekend all week long.
Friday! Finally...some time to play or sleep late. We've
worked hard all week, so whatever the pleasure'we deserve it!
God has been at work all week, too...keeping the universe
running in the right direction, making sure the sun rises every
morning, caring for all His creatures, not to mention answering a
multitude of prayers. God doesn't take a single day off...ever.
Do you really "Thank God It's Friday"? Then spend some time
with God on His day. Praise Him and tell Him of your love. Share
your needs for the week ahead. God is waiting to welcome you to
His House. "Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good; His love
endures forever." (Psalm 106:1)


Sunday
Acts
10.3448


Monday
Acts
3.1-26


Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Acts Acts 1 Luke Leviticus Deuteronomy
4.1-22 4.23-37 10.25-37 19.1-18 8.1-9


Soptures Selctadby The Amenicann Bb/ Socy
Copyright 2007, Keister-Wlliams Newspaper Services, P. O. Box 8187, Charlotesville, VA 22906, www.kwnmewsom


M

The Herald-Advocate


PRINTERS PUBLISHERS

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Telephone (863) 773-3255


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COURTESY PHOTO
We had a lot of fun at the Open House party.

The Oasis RV News
By Inez McFalls


OPEN HOUSE
Over 80 folks joined Bob and
Patrice at their home for an Open
House Saturday evening the 20th.
Beverages, finger food and great
conversation were the order of the
evening. Most people sat outside in
the delightfully cool weather. It was
a successful icebreaker bringing
together our newest residents and
our regulars.

MUSIC JAM
Sunday Jan. 22 saw 12 musicians
play for 95 listeners. 50/50 winners
were Dawn Ball, Ben Bohnett,
Camilla Stanley, Gene Vierling and

The family is the country of the
heart.
--Giuseppe Mazzini


ABOUT ...
Hardee
Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Monday.


Frank Huiet. Merchant coupons
were won by Leon Brandsasse,
Vera Burke, Bill Holder, Ruby
Ramey and G. Caissis. Our usual
emcee Ray Moore was under the
weather with the flu so Fred Marsh
and Larry Reid filled in and did a
terrific job.

SHUFFLEBOARD
Shuffleboard is very popular and
often has spectators as well as a
line to play. Stan and Bert are the
big winners so far.
BINGO AND CARDS
At bingo Jan. 18 Frank Huiet
won the 50/50 and merchant certifi-
cates went to Fred Lewis, Ralph
Doney, Sally Hatfield, Flo Nadeau
and Doug Jetsen. Charlotte
Longueuil won the jackpot and the
jar went to Mark and Mary Lou
Katzur.
On Jan. 23 Charlotte Longueuil
won the 50/50 and Mary Lou
Katzur won the jackpot. Merchant
certificates were won by Larry
Reid, Sally Hatfield, Carol, Stan
Sommers and Dale Bohnett.
Wednesday cards had four for
Phase 10 and Sally Hatfield and I
were winners. There were four for
Pokeno and Charlotte won.

NOTES FROM AROUND
THE PARK
We all extend our condolences to
Curt Meadows whose brother
George passed away on the 18th.
We wish all struck by the flu a safe
and speedy recovery. We're pray-
ing for you. A note of corrections
Charlotte Longueuil's name was
accidentally omitted from the list of
folks who cleaned the Rec Hall last
week.
Enjoy this beautiful weather,
until next time . Inez.


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police officers
investigated the following incidents and made the following arrests:

COUNTY
Jan. 28, thefts on North Florida Avenue and U.S. 17 North were
reported.

Jan. 27, Ruben Luna, 55, of 1445 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep.Shane Ward on warrants charging him with
violation of probation (original charges and violation of permanent revoca-
tion of license).
Jan. 27, a business burglary on U.S. 17 North was reported.

Jan. 26, a 17-year-old youth was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a
charge of failure to appear in court on a charge of battery.
Jan. 26, a residential burglary on Old Bradenton Road and a theft on
Garza Road were reported.

Jan. 25, Jeremy Gene Morel, 24, of 130 Hog Road, Avon Park, was
arrested by state Probation Ofc. Stacy Landers on Highlands County war-
rants charging him with violation of probation (original charges felony bat-
tery and attempted sexual battery).

Jan. 24, Monolito Stocking Ocasio, 33, of 4920 Smith Ryals Road,
Plant City, was arrested by Dep. David Drake on warrants charging him
with violation of probation (original charges burglary of a structure, grand
theft and possession of burglary tools).
Jan. 24, Mark Alan Andress, 41, of 1530 SR 64 East, Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Dep. David Drake on a warrant charging him with viola-
tion of probation (original charge possession of drug parpahernalia).
Jan. 24, a vehicle was reported stolen on Popash Road.

Jan. 23, Tyler Herbert Tardiff, 26, of 111817 Holly Hock Road,
Bradenton, was arrested by Dep. Jamie Wright on a capias alleging failure
to appear in court on a charge of loitering and prowling.
Jan. 23, James Albert Parlor, 39, of 817 Kentucky Ave., Lakeland, was
arrested by Dep. David Drake on a capias charging him with non-support.
Jan. 23, criminal mischief on Keeton Road and a residential burglary
on SR 64 East were reported.

Jan. 22, Kenneth Dale Richardson, 41, of 136 McEwen Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Barry Schnable on warrants charging him with
violation of probation (original charges violation of a domestic violence
injunction for protection and domestic battery).
Jan. 22, a business burglary on SR 62 West, and criminal mischief on
SR 66 and on U. S. 17 South were reported.

WAUCHULA
Jan. 28, Ivan Horatio Anaya-Chavez, 26, of 3797 Ninth Ave., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Cpl. Matthew Whatley and charged with DUI and
no valid license.
Jan. 28, James Louis Farren, 43, General Delivery, Wauchula, was
arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer .on Leon County warrants alleging failure
to appear in court on charges of violation of probation (original charges
DUI and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon).

Jan. 27, Ronald Jerome Romeo Jr., 24, of 4846 Sally Blvd., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with giving a false
name to a law enforcement officer and driving with knowledge of a sus-
pended license. He was detained on capiases alleging failure to appear in
court on two counts of driving with a suspended license.

Jan. 26, Martin Arroyo, 21, of 2191 Old Manning Road, Scranton,
S.C., was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with giving a false name
to a law enforcement officer and no valid license.
Jan. 26, a theft on South Eighth Avenue was reported.
Jan. 25, Joshua Wayne Reedy, 18, of 223 N. Illinois Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Gabriel Garza and charged with breach of peace.

Jan. 24, Joe Arthur Byers, 41, of 2523 Garza Road, Zolfo Springs,


February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 3C
was arrested by Cpl. Gabriel Garza and charged with violation of a domes-
tic violence injunction for protection.

Jan. 23, a 17-year-old youth was arrested by Ofc. Robert Spencer and
charged with domestic battery.
Jan. 22, Gabriel Lopez Meliton, 39, of unknown Wauchula address,
was arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with disorderly intoxication,
petit theft and drinking in public.
Jan. 22, a business burglary on West Palmetto Street was reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Jan. 27, Pedro Jiminez, 38, of 4517 Dixiana'Drive, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges'and charged with domestic battery.
Jan. 27, Lee Edward Taylor, 30, of 315 County Line Road, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and charged with battery and
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

Jan. 26, Luciano Lara IV, 20, of 4520 Maple Ave., Bowling Green,
was arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges on warrants charging him with viola-
tion of community control house arrest (original charges burglary of a
conveyance and grand theft of a motor vehicle.
Jan. 26, Leon Hernandez, 19, of Pettiway and Hancock roads, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with possession
of marijuana, giving a false name to a law enforcement officer, attaching
tag not assigned, no valid license and no vehicle registration.

Jan. 25, Santiago Sebastian Ramirez, 32, of unknown Bowling Green
address, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and charged with DUI
and no valid license.

Jan. 24, Ismael Calvillo, 19, of 5121 Dixianna Dr., Bowling Green,
was arrested by Ofc. Scott Grace and charged with domestic battery.

Jan. 23, Jimmy Harvey Forrester, 61, of 4731 Chester Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges and charged with disorderly
intoxication and corruption by threat.
Jan. 23, Kyle Matthew Lumley, 18, of 3867 Dixianna Drive, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Chief John Scheel and charged with possession of
marijuana. He was detained on a warrant charging him with violation of
probation (original charge possession of drug paraphernalia).

Jan. 22, Jose Jack Gutierrez, 32, of 804 Pleasant Way, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges on a warrant charging him with viola-
tion of probation (original charge domestic assault) and capias alleging fail-
ure to appear in court on a charge of driving while license suspended.
Jan. 22, Frank Williard Johns, 55, of 4120 U.S. 98 East, Fort Meade,
was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with possession of
methamphetamine, possession of marijuana, two counts possession of a
controlled substance without a prescription, possession of drug parapher-
nalia and driving with knowledge of a suspended license.

ZOLFO SPRINGS
Jan. 27, a residential burglary on Pear Street was reported.

Jan. 26, thefts on Finch Lane and another Pear Street address were
reported.

Jan. 24, a residential burglary on South Suwannee Street was report-
ed.

Jan. 22, a residential burglary on another South Suwannee Street
address was reported.




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4C The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


Peace River Refuge And Ranch



Is Home To Abandoned Animals


By SUE CARPENTER
For The Herald-Advocate
It is a fragile trust
that we are given
All creatures'fate
in our dominion
To hold or hurt
To harm or cherish
To nurture life
Or let it perish
Stephanie Leland

Eight years ago Kurt and Lisa
Stoner moved here from Holly-
wood, Fla., because the fish and
game laws were changing. They
sold their house and even held a
charitable benefit. They felt the
land here was most cost effective to
open a wildlife refuge. Today the
Peace River Refuge and Ranch is
comprised of 70 acres which they
own, and another 20 under lease.
"We were both animal lovers and
had worked as volunteers with wild
animals. I had worked at the Toledo
Zoo and with wildlife rehabilita-'
tion. I recommend anyone wanting
to open a sanctuary to first volun-
teer 60 to 80 hours a week for a few
years and be sure they are able to
feed their own family and have a
quality life. We went into this with
our eyes wide open. Although we
had made money in our unrelated
professions, we felt this was our
calling." Lisa Stoner said.
The Stoners and their two daugh-
ters, Sara and Ashley, started the
refuge in eastern Hardee County
with three lynx, and a 2-year-old
tiger named Zulu. Currently Sara


works at a bank and will be gradu-
ating from SFCC in finance.
Ashley starts college in May to
study animals. Zulu and the lynx
are the longest residents and con-
tinue to thrive at Peace River Re-
fuge and Ranch.
This 501c-nonprofit charitable
exotic animal sanctuary is fully
licensed and accredited by the
American Sanctuary Association.
It is also a member of The World
Society for the Protection of
Animals.
The Stoners are dedicated to the
lifetime care of abused, neglected,
confiscated or unwanted exotic ani-
mals to prevent them from being
destroyed. These animals are wild,
antisocial and most do not bond
with people. Many are nocturnal,
and their diets are difficult to prop-
erly maintain. Their natural instinct
is to sleep all day and forage at
night. These animals were never
intended to live with people or be
their entertainment.
They are tigers, cougars, a black
leopard, lynx, Florida panther, ser-
val (African cat), 70 Egyptian fruit
bats (the smallest of flying foxes),
lemurs, cotton-topped tamarins,
capuchin and spider monkeys,
Cockatoos, iguanas, Patagonian
caves (a South American wild
guinea pig), wolves, bears, tortois-
es and more. They were all re-
ceived from different sources like
failed zoos and disillusioned pri-
vate owners.
The Stoners do not sell, transfer
or give away any of the animals


Some Of The Residents At Peace River Refuge And Ranch
Green iguanas are native to South America and Mexico. Lurch (who
looks like the Mexican variety) was placed by a man who had raised him
for 15 years. As the man advanced in age, his health was failing, and he
was concerned for Lurch's well being. The diet of iguanas in captivity
should be specific vegetables and supplements, although there has been
much misinformation about their diet consisting of everything from
insects to fruit. Since it is difficult for most people to find reliable infor-
mation on proper husbandry, most captive iguanas die young. Lurch now
has an outdoor shelter that is 8x16-feet with a heated area, climbing logs
and a platform.
Blizzard is an 8-year-old white Bengal tiger He was born at a facili-
ty that raises white tigers for circuses and zoos. He arrived at Peace River
Refuge at only three months of age, after being repeatedly beaten with a
baseball bat in their misguided attempt to 'train' him. Although Blizzard
still shows emotional damage by this abuse, he is adjusting well. He is
now 450 pounds and has learned to trust people that care for him at the
facility. Blizzard is the perfect example for why they only offer guided
tours because he can become upset by strangers, unless he sees a familiar
face. If Blizzard shows signs of stress, the caretakers recognize it and
have the visitors move to another area of the sanctuary. Blizzard will live
here happily for the rest of his life with another tiger, Zulu.
Cotton-top tamarins are small primates native to South America.
They are one of the most endangered primates in the world. The U.S.
played a primary role in their decline by importing 10,000 to 20,000
tamarins per year in the 1970s and '80s for.biomedical research. Tamarins
were used in this research because they are the only primate that devel-
ops colon cancer the way people do, yet they usually only get it in cap-
tivity. These tamarins came from Cypress Gardens shortly before the
facility closed.
Lincoln is a three-year-old tortoise, (as opposed to a turtle, which
lives in water) and was kept in an enclosure in the bedroom of a mobile
home until he reached ten pounds at the age of 2. The woman knew he
would grow but had no idea just how fast. He not only grew larger than
her budget, but she had no idea that the proper diet for a sulcata tortoise
is almost impossible to purchase commercially, so Lincoln was fed
improperly. This resulted in a deformed shell and putting him at risk for
other serious health problems. Now Lincoln has the correct diet and a
large area to graze at the Peace River Refuge.
B-Bear was rescued from a backyard in Iowa where he was held for
seven years in a 10xl0-foot enclosure. He was living in filth with no reli-
able source of water. B-Bear was declawed, and his teeth are broken from
chewing on the wire. After arrival at the sanctuary, B-Bear went through
quarantine, a dental exam and was neutered. Then he was introduced to
their two female black bears in a habitat almost an acre in size. This was
B-Bear's first opportunity to feel grass beneath his feet, play with the oak
trees and swim in a pool.


Snakes, birds, and iguanas that
are not native are constantly being
released in the Everglades. It is a
tropical setting for them and they
thrive. However, they are taking
over and compounding problems
there when they breed and do not
have natural predators.
Peace River Refuge and Ranch is
a quiet, tropical space that is land-
scaped for privacy. Volunteers must
be at least 18 because of insurance
liability.
They are valuable workers who
handle food preparation and clean-
up. They come from all over the
world, most recently England,
Netherlands and Thailand.
"Our yearly cost of running


Peace River Refuge and Ranch is
$350,000. If it weren't for public
donations, volunteer workers, used
building materials, and a steady
supply of .fruits and vegetables
from Kash-N-Karry (Sweet Bay) in
Wauchula, it would be impossible,"
said Lisa Stoner.
They always have a wish list and
will gladly accept any type of'dona-
tion. They also offer a $10 guided
educational, tour which must be
reserved in advance. Call 863-735-
0804 or go to www.peaceriver-
refuge.org for additional informa-
tion. All donations are tax-
deductible and can be sent to P.O.
Box 1127, Zolfo Springs, FL
33890.


PHOTOS BY SUE ANN CARPENTER
Lisa Stoner visits with Bengal tiger named Blizzard.


Lurch'is a large green iguana.


Lincoln is a 3-year-old rescued tortoise.


B-Bear was rescued from a backyard in Iowa.



Frankie's
A REDKEN Hair Salon



773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
2:1 Hours: Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3


they rescue, and they are never
used for breeding. They are simply
protected from harm at this sanctu-
ary. The Stoners ensure that the ani-
mals' medical, nutritional, and
emotional needs are well met by
providing permanent habitats for
them.
They feel the needs of the ani-
mals come first not deriving
income from them. In addition, at
this educational facility FEMA
emergency teams are trained how
to immobilize and handle exotics
during a disaster. The volunteer
veterinarians in turn give free care
to the Refuge when needed.
The Stoners always try to place
rescued horses with people who
will sign a contract not to breed or
sell them. Some are trained, while
others are young and gentle.
"These horses were given to us to
care for rather than to be fed to the
cats. We only want these horses to
leave if someone can provide a life-
time home," Lisa Stoner said.
It is important for animals to
have large enclosures that allow
them to mimic their native behavior
in the wild. This is a priority for
even the smallest animals. Here a
brown lemur is able to rub his mark
all over the bark of the tree, and the
capuchin monkey can forage for
food, just as in nature.
Most people who purchase exot-
ic pets are unwittingly creating a
catastrophe because 99 percent of
them are dead within two years.
"We get over 500 calls a year for
animals that are over age 2 that
have become mature and mean. If
we don't take them, they are killed.
Extrapolating those numbers means
that 50,000 exotic animals are put
to death yearly because they have
no sanctuary to go to.
"We feel breeders lie and tell
people what they want to hear in
order to sell a wild animal. People
need to write to their lawmakers for
change also. For instance, if a lion
weighs 25 pounds and is on a leash,
it is legal that a person can charge
to have your photo taken with it.
But once it reaches 40 pounds, the
public is not allowed to touch them
and they must be caged. That's
when it starts costing the owner
money, and they usually sell the
animal to a taxidermist who will
end up stuffing it. There is no
happy ending to this story.
"Our laws promote these endeav-
ors. People are ignorant of the final
outcomes, and the disaster is mere-
ly one of timing. People should
write letters to legislators and at the
very least not support any endeavor
where money is made from taking
photos of you with an exotic ani-
mal, or letting you interact with it
or breeding exotics and selling their
babies," Lisa Stoner said.
People who buy exotic birds dis-
cover they can't just take them to a
local vet. They require an avian
veterinarian.
The Stoners spay and neuter all
animals that come to them and then
they are put with their own species.
Each tiger has a $5000 yearly food
budget. Their three bears require
one acre as a habitat. The cute
African Spurred tortoise that can be
found at a pet shop when it's about


the size of a ping pong ball, grows
to 150 pounds and requires one-
half acre to graze.
Iguanas are popular pets that
become a problem. They are pur-
chased for children, and when they
become mean, they're thrown
away. Iguanas are also a health risk
because they are carriers of salmo-
nella bacteria. If these animals
knew their fate and could talk,
they'd ask, "How could you?"


Cotton-top tamarins are small, endangered primates.


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February 1, 2007, The Herald-Advocate 5C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage license
was issued recently in the office of
the county court:
Jody Douglas Britt, 30, Parrish,
and Melanie Gue Hovland, 26,
Parrish.
Jose Angel Olvera, 30, Zolfo
Springs, and Monica Isabel Mendez
Tejeda, 26, Zolfo Springs.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recently by
the county judge:
Chase Bank USA vs. Jeannine
Johnson Tatum, settlement approv-
ed, case dismissed.
LVNV Funding LLC vs. Paula
Ellis, default judgment.
Portfolio Recovery Associates
LLC vs. Claretha Wilson, judgment,
execution withheld.
Billy and Janice Hill vs. Michael
Vermilye, default judgment.
Country Manor Associates LTD
d/b/a Country Manor Apartments
vs. Juan Castellanos et al, judgment
for removal of tenant.
Grimsley Groves Inc. vs. TNT
Fill Dirt Inc., Timothy Parrish and
Lisa Parrish, Christopher J. Eures
and Alicia A. Eures and Timothy W.
Parrish, judgment.
Suncoast Schools Federal Credit
Union vs. Jeffrey L. Henry and Beth
A. Henry, voluntary dismissal.
James Hill vs. Jason Nichols,
judgment for eviction.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs. La-
dusta L. Evans, judgment approving
arbitration award.
Country Manor Associates LTD
d/b/a Country Manor Apartments
vs. Christy Pace et al, judgment for
removal of tenant.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs. Gerald
T. Cruz, stipulated agreement and
judgment.
Country Manor Associates LTD
d/b/a Country Manor Apartments
vs. Christine Anderson,'judgment
for removal of tenant.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Ramon Salazar, default judgment.
Capital One Bank vs. James A.
Boyette III, default judgment.
Capital One Bank- vs. Mandy J.
Hines, stipulated settlement ap-
proved.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Marylou Woody, default judgment.

The following misdemeanor
cases were disposed of recently in
county court:
Lillie Mae Gray, battery, 30 days
in jail with credit for time served
(CTS), $667 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $60
investigative costs.
Francis Peter Grzegorzeski, do-
mestic -battery, adjudication with-
held, nine months probation, men-
tal health evaluation, no contact
with victim, $667 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees,
$50 investigative costs.
Martin Navaro, disorderly intox-
ication and violation of open con-
tainer law, $315 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees.
Mario Humberto Ramirez, ex-
posing sexual organs and disorder-
ly intoxication, $315 fine and court


costs, $60 investigative costs.
Willie James Robinson Jr., bat-
tery and resisting arrest without
violence, 30 days CTS, 12 months
probation, stay away from victim,
$667 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 investiga-
tive costs, restitution to be set.
Paul Anthony Romero, resisting
an officer without violence, not
prosecuted.
Felipe Ruiz, giving a false name
to a law enforcement officer, 29
days CTS, $315 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees,
$50 investigative costs.
Blanca Rubinos, sale of alcohol
to a person under 21, adjudication
withheld, probation three months,
no sale of alcoholic beverages,
$315 fine and court costs.
Tomas Toledo, discharging a
firearm in public, time served, $315
fine and court costs, $50 investiga-
tive costs.
Catarino Gallardo, resisting
arrest without violence and two
counts criminal mischief, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation six
months, $315 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $311.88
restitution.
Promotero Fernandez Mendez,
disorderly intoxication, not prose-
cuted.
David Sheridan Pickard, criminal
mischief, probation six months,
$315 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 investiga-
tive costs, $200 restitution; petit
theft, not prosecuted.
Bridget Austin Price, trespass,
adjudication withheld, probation
six months, $315 fine and court
costs; violation of open container
law, not prosecuted.
Alfonzo Roblero, disorderly in-
toxication, not prosecuted.
Nakkia Vontrese White, resisting
arrest without force, not prosecut-
ed.

The following criminal traffic
cases were disposed of recently in
county court. Dispositions are
based on Florida Statutes, dri-
ving record and facts concerning
the case.
Nakkia Vontrese White, failure to
sign citation, $330 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees,
$50 investigative costs.
Jose Castillo, driving while
license suspended (DWLS), 10
days in jail suspended if obtain
valid license within 60 days, $330
fine and court costs. -
Job I. Martinez-Casarrubia, pro-
hibited use of certain lights, $315
fine and court costs, $100 public
defender fees.
Claudia Perez, DWLS, adjudica-
tion withheld, 10 days suspend-
ed, $330 fine and court costs.
Mario Alonzo Rodriguez,
DWLS, $330 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees.
Rodney Jerome Romeo, viola-
tion of driver license restrictions,
adjudication withheld, $330 fine
and court costs.
Patricia Munoz, two counts
DWLS, 30 days CTS, $330 fine
and court costs, $100 public


I El IlrC411


REQUEST FOR BID

The City of Wauchula is soliciting bids for the purchase and installation of quantity = 110
water meters (i.e. 6 Dial meter that will connect and work with Itron 60W ERT's), quantity =
110 Itron 60W transmitters and quantity = 110 Itron 124 CISR Centron electric meters or
any other electric meter which can be electronically read by Itron hand held readers, with
integral RF transmitters. The bid must include services to ensure data integrity for interface
with City's CIS software and Itron meter reading equipment and software (MVRS 7.7). The
City's CIS software currently interfaces with reading from Itron handhelds. Also, the bid is
to include new meter serial numbers and new meter readings. This is a new installation,
consequently old meter removal should not be considered in the bid. Bids must be received
by. mail only in sealed envelopes marked "Electronic read meter bids for Valencia Gardens"
with Company name and address, to City Clerk Clarissa Abbott, at 126 S. 7th Ave,
Wauchula, Florida 33873, by 3:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 7, 2007, at which time the
sealed bids will be opened. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids. If you have
any further questions please call 863-773-3131 and ask for James Braddock, Finance
Director


ATTEST:
s/Clarissa Abbott
City Clerk


City of Wauchula
s/David B. Royal
Mayor, City Commission


2:1c


defender fees.
Gavino Rivera, DWLS, estreated
bond.
Raquel Diaz, DWLS and attach-
ing tag not assigned, 10 days CTS,
$330 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 investiga-
tive costs.
Emilio Moreno, DWLS, 60 days
CTS and concurrent with DeSoto
County sentence, $330 fine and
court costs placed on lien; DWLS,
second charge, dismissed.
Jennifer Ellen Wolfe, refusal to
submit to DUI test amended to
DUI, 12 months probation, license
suspended six months, tag
impounded 10 days, no alcohol or.
bars, DUI school, evaluation and
treatment, $622.50 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees,
$60 investigative costs, 50 hours
community service.
Mario Lopez-Santiago, violation
of probation (original charges DUI
with property damage and no valid
license), probation revoked, 180
days CTS, outstanding fines and
fees placed on lien.
Felipe Ruiz, DWLS, 30 days -
suspended, $330 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions were
filed recently in the office of the
circuit court:
Dorothy Sunday o/b/o minor
child vs. Tom Montgo o/b/o minor
child (two cases), petitions for in-
junction for protection.
Jami N. Penny and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR) vs.
Jerrick L. Brown, petition to en-
force administrative child support
order.
Leah Benavidez and DOR vs.
Julio C. Castilllo, petition for an
administrative child support order.
Kayla L. Granger and DOR vs.
Tony T. Cantu, petition to enforce
administrative child support order.
Florida Institute for Neurologic
Rehabilitation vs. James Duncan et
al, damages.
Gwendolyn Paussi vs. Lewis
Kilpatrick Jr., petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Maria E. Juarez and DOR vs.
Jose Ramon Orozco, interstate peti-
tion for child support.
Julia Ramos vs. Salvadore
Aguirre, petition for injunction for
protection.
Debra Driver vs. James Driver,
petition for injunction for protec-
tion.
Amelia Cleto Garcia and Nazario
Garcia, divorce.
Maria E. Arce vs. Wendy's Old
Fashioned Hamburgers of N. Y.,
damages.
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
vs. 'La\\rence Larimore et al, peti-
tion for forfeiture.
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
vs. Greg Schock, petition for forfei-
ture.
Franklin W. Cook vs. James R.
McDonough, state Department of
Corrections (DOC) et al, petition
for review of inmate situation.
Andrew Griffin vs. James
McDonough, DOC et al, petition
for review of inmate situation.
Kayla D. Pryor and DOR vs.
Charles E. Derringer III, petition
for administrative child support
order.
Ford Motor Credit Co. vs. J.
Santos Zuniga-Lugo, damages.

The following decisions on civil
cases pending in the circuit court
were handed down recently by
the circuit court judge:
Stacy Mendoza and DOR vs.
Gilbert Garcia, modification of
child support.
James Stewart Jr. and Brianna
Summer Chavarria Stewart, joint
stipulation approved.
Donna Pelham and DOR vs.
Kenneth F. High, voluntary dis-
missal.
Mindy C. Apolinar and DOR vs.
Jesus M. Apolinar, child support
order.
Wanda Guajardo and DOR vs.
David DeLaRosa, order.
Louann Rimes and DOR vs.
Dustin Dewayne Rimes, child sup-
port order.
Sandra Valerio o/b/o minor child
and DOR vs. Maria Castillo o/bio
minor child, child support order.


Thomas Sneider vs. Samantha
Alderman, child support order.
Alma Garcia vs. Joe Byers,
injunction for protection.
Doris C. Freeman and DOR vs.
Francisco Granadero, voluntary
dismissal.
Katrina Krell vs. Karl Krell,
injunction for protection dismissed.
NCO Portfolio Management Inc.
vs. Maria M. Mendoza and Eric J.
Lozano, voluntary dismissal.
Warsome Acquisition Corp. vs.
Ruth Crespo, judgment of mort-
gage foreclosure.
Lori A. Cutrer vs. David M.
Dease, child support order.
Una Marshall and Russell Lieux
as co-personal representatives vs.
Florida Institute for Neurologic
Rehabilitation, judgment.
Allstate Insurance Co. a/s/o
Russell Garman and Clarence
Garman vs. Alexander Jackson,
judgment.
Ronnie W. Bartley and DOR vs.
Kimberley McIntyre, order.
Toby Tremaine Ellison and Eleta
Rose McKay (Ellison), divorce.
Eugene Samuel Pace and DOR
vs. Debbie Theresa Luna, order on
child support arrearages.
Rose I. Ogle and Thomas Henry
Ogle, divorce.
Jennifer Rucker and DOR vs.
Gilberto Valdiviez, order on child
support arrearages.

The following felony criminal
cases were disposed of last week
by the circuit judge. Defendants
have been adjudicated guilty
unless noted otherwise. When
adjudication is withheld, it is
pending successful completion of
probation. Sentences are pur-
suant to an investigative report
by and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guidelines.
Final discretion is left to the
judge.
Sharon Allgood, possession of
methamphetamine and violation of
probation (original charge fleeing
to elude a police officer), probation
revoked, two years community
control house arrest, license sus-
pended two years, warrantless
search and seizure, curfew, no
drugs or alcohol, random drug
tests, $495 fine and court costs and
$100 public defender fees placed
on lien; possession of drug para-
phernalia and violation of proba-
tion (original charge driving while
license suspended), time served;
introduction of contraband into a
jail, not prosecuted.
Edward Lyle Beasley, violation


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of probation (original charge pos-
session of methamphetamine), pro-
bation terminated.
Bessie Mae Brown, violation of
probation (original charges uttering
a forged instrument and grand
theft), probation revoked, six
months CTS, outstanding fines and
fees placed on lien.
Cashina Nicole Cook, violation
of community control (original
charge fleeing to elude a police
officer), community control re-
voked, nine months in jail CTS,
outstanding fines and fees placed
on lien.
Gina Diane Doty, possession of
alprazolam, adjudication withheld,
18 months probation, no drugs or
alcohol, curfew, evaluation and
treatment, warrantless search and
seizure, $495 fine and court costs,
$340 public defender fees.
Shannon Allen Gentry, felony
driving while license suspended, 60
days CTS and 30 days suspended,
$495 fine and court costs, $40 pub-
lic defender fee.
Jose Carlos Martinez, violation
of probation (original charges two
counts uttering a forged instrument,
grand theft and felony driving
while license suspended), violation
affidavit withdrawn, resume proba-
tion with same conditions.
Reynaldo Raul Martinez, viola-
tion of community control (original
charges burglary of structure and
grand theft), modify two-year com-
munity control to include 90 days
in jail CTS and continue same other
conditions.
Manuel Rangel, possession of
methamphetamine, possession of
drug paraphernalia and felony dri-
ving while license suspended), 18
months drug offender probation,
curfew, warrantless search and
seizure, evaluation and treatment,
no drugs or alcohol, pay all motor
vehicle fines, $495 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees, 50
hours community service.
Donna Roberts, possession of
drug paraphernalia, transferred to
county misdemeanor court; posses-
sion of methamphetamine, not
prosecuted.
Louis Rodriguez, possession of
cocaine and possession of drug
paraphernalia, 60 days CTS, $495
fine and court costs and $100
public-defender fees placed on lien.
Andrew Rupert, false verifica-
tion of ownership to pawnbroker,
adjudication withheld, 18 months
probation, NCTI theft school, no
contact with victim, $495 fine and
court costs, $100 public defender
fees, 50 hours community service;


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petit theft, time served.
Collin Shirley, fleeing to elude a
police officer and failure to fulfill
duty upon damaging unattended
property,. 10 days in jail CTS, 18
months probation, $495 fine and
court costs, $100 pubic defended
fees.
Latisha Taylor, battery on a
detention or community facility .
staff, adjudication withheld, 1
months probation, anger manage
ment class, $495 fine and coufi
costs and $40 public defender fet
placed on lien, 100 hours commu
nity service.
Zachary Robert Thomas Benton
grand theft and burglary of.a struck
ture, adjudication withheld, proba
tion two years, $495 fine and cou i
costs, $40 public defender fee
$300 court-appointed attorney fee:
Jerry Garcia, burglary of a struc
ture and grand theft, not prosecute
ed.

The following real estate tranw
actions of $10,000 or more weic
filed recently in the office of thet
clerk of court:
Franky R. Jones to William
Costolo as trustee, $1,185,600.
Peter and Linh Pham to Robert
Jr. and Nicole Kenney, $400,000.
James E. and Charlotte I1
Shields to Wayne A. Taim
$80,000.
Thomas E. Snyder Jr. to Lisa A.
Lulmetta, $50,000.
Lawrence L. and Mary M
Beverly to Richard Albert Parsons
and Roberta Ann Rakespraw,
$32,500.
Shelby S. Graham to Pione-T
Grove Inc., $167,500.
Emory B. and Kay S. Hamptonr
to Pioneer Grove Inc., $167,500.
G&R Homes Inc. to J. Dima',
Orta Martinez and Joaquina
Gonzales, $36,500.
Chet Charles LLC to Robeii
Bair, $50,000.
Maria C. Pryne-Davis as trustee
to Nickerson Brothers LLC
$525,000.
Delois Johnson to Christopher G
and Karen M. Polly, $106,000.








6C The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


Cracker Country At State Fair


Named After Doyle, Mildred Carlton


Go back in time and reminisce in
rural Florida history at the Mildred
W. & Doyle E. Carlton Jr. Cracker
Country at the Florida State Fair.
This serene village is nestled


beneath towering oaks on the
southeast side of the fairgrounds
and features the enticing sights and
scenes of yesteryear including:
Bluegrass Bands Get your


Tonk is a neutered white English bulldog.
He is a large dog. Would you like to see him jump and spin? Then
come out and watch him "grab" at water as it comes out of a hose! His
adoption fee is only $20, so hurry out so he can go home with you
today.


Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neutering of
the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that
desperately need a loving home. The kennel location is 685 Airport Road,
Wauchula, at the county landfill.





YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate



PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a public hearing on
February 15, 2007, at 9:30 a.m.
or as soon thereafter
in the County Commission Chambers, Room 102, Courthouse Annex, 412 West
O-ange Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873 to consider, adoption of the following
c ,dinance:
ORDINANCE NO. 07-09

An Ordinance of the Hardee County Board of County Commissioners
amending Ordinance Number 07-07, Providing for New Section 8.B
Thereof with Respect to Exemptions; Providing for Severability and
Providing for an Effective Date.
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing to make
special arrangements should contact the County Commissioners Office at leasi
two (2) working days prior to the public hearing.
This Public Notice is published in compliance with Florida Statues 125.66(2)(a)
and 286.0105.
Copies of this ordinance are available for public inspection during regular office
hours at 412 West Orange Street, Room 103, Wauchula, Florida 33873, telephone
863/773-9430.
Interested parties may appear at the public hearing and be heard with respect tc
the proposed ordinance.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission, with respect
to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, they will need a record of
the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings ismade, which record includesthe testimony)
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.


Bobby Ray Smith, Chairman


02:01


toes tappin' and hands clappin'
while enjoying performances every
day on the open stage in the center
of Cracker Country.
Buddy, The Blacksmith -
Buddy is a true artist who shares
his knowledge and shows visitors
how he heats the iron and pounds it
into one of his unique creations.
Candle Dipping Cracker
Country docents will demonstrate
the process of making candles, dip-
ping them in and out of beeswax.
For $1, guests can dip a candle to
take home.
Carlton House Originally
built four miles west of Wauchula
in 1885, it was the home of
Florida's 25th governor, Doyle E.
Carlton, and his nine siblings.
Castalia Schoolhouse This
one-room schoolhouse, built in the
Castalia community of Old DeSoto
County (now Hardee County), fea-
tures life-like animatronic students
and a teacher who simulate class-
room life in the old days.
Fly Wheel Engine Demonstra-
tions An antique gristmill and a
100-year-old flywheel engine grind
corn meal and grits.
Governor's Inn Built in 1912
as an old country store and post
office in Lily, it's been restored and
decorated as a formal meeting
place where a collection of oil por-
traits of Florida's governors will
hang on display.
JR Terry General Store This
authentic general store will be
stocked with folk toys, jams and
jellies, and reproductions of old-
fashioned antique items.
Old Country Church Moved
from Gretna, this church is made of
heart pine lumber and has original
pews from the early 1900s. Old
time gospel music is shared
throughout each day.
Open Fire Cooking Sharon
Hutto shares hilarious down home
humor as she demonstrates how
pioneers cooked on the open fire.
Post Office Every day of the
Fair, visitors can mail letters ,from
Cracker Country with a commemo-
rative cancellation stamp from this
full working Post Office.
Print Shop Extra! Extra! Pick
up the Cracker Country Chronicle,
the Mildred W. & Doyle E. Carlton
Jr. newspaper, which is printed on a
100-year-old press.
Rainey Building Built in the
late 1800s, it's now the Cracker
Country bookstore. During the Fair,
working craftsmen demonstrate tra-
ditional trades and crafts in Lhis old
store. Plus, see an exhibit of histor-
ically significant clothing of the
era.
Rope Making Cracker
Country docents demonstrate the
simple, yet amazing process of con-
verting twine into rope, just as it
was done 100 years ago. For just
$1, they'll even help youngsters
make a jump rope to take home.
Sewing and Doll Making -
The Coyle family demonstrates the
use of antique treadle sewing
machines and techniques used to
make precious dolls.
Smoke House Fairgoers learn
about how hams, bacon and jerky
were made years ago, as Kenley
demonstrates how pioneers used
smoke houses to preserve a year's
supply of meat.
Soap Making Ms. Jenny will
show how the settlers made lye
soap by boiling a mixture of lard,
water and lye until it was just right.
Train Depot Built in 1898
and donated by the Seaboard Coast
Line Railroad System, this was one
of our state's first depots. In the
freight room is an expansive Lionel
train display depicting rural Florida
with handmade replicas of Cracker
Country buildings and intricate
working props.
Wood Working Ralph will
exhibit his traditional woodcarving
and whittling to create walking
sticks, and Nick will use his broad
ax and drill a square hole!
Cracker Country also provides
memorable tastes of yesteryear.
Guests are sure to love the old-
fashioned kettle corn, smoked beef
jerky or might even think about
taking home a country ham for din-
ner. Other favorite flavors of yes-
teryear wouldn't be complete with-
out fresh cooked pork rinds,
washed down with ice-cold country
lemonade.
Mildred W. & Doyle E. Carlton
Jr. Cracker Country is where guests
can see, touch and experience the
past while very much remaining in
the future. The gates of the Feb. 8-
19, 2007, Florida State Fair open
daily at 9 a.m. Cracker Country


closes at 6 p.m. on Monday through
Thursday, and at 7 p.m. on Friday,
Saturday and Sunday. For more
information, please contact Rip
Stalvey, museum director, at 813-
627-4225.
The Florida State Fair Authority
presents the 103rd Annual State
Fair always in Tampa, always in
February in association with the
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, Charles H.
Bronson, Commissioner.


Feb. 1 HJHS Basketball Hill-Gustat Away 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Boys Basketball Lake Placid Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Softball Pre-season DeSoto Away 7:00 p.m.
Feb. 3 Cancer Run/Walk Rec Complex HOME 8:00 a.m.
Feb. 5 Boys Basketball Playoff Braden River HOME 6:00 p.m.
Feb. 6 Varsity Baseball Lakes Wales HOME 7:00 p.m.
Feb. 8 Varsity Baseball Fort Meade HOME 4:00 p.m.
HJHS Basketball Lake Placid HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Softball Mulberry Away 5:30/7:30 p.m.
Feb. 9 Boys Basketball TBA HOME 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 10 Boys Basketball D. Championship HOME 7:00 p.m
Feb. 12 Varsity Baseball Haines City @Lake'Wales 7:00 p.m.
Feb. 13 Softball Sebring HOME 5:30/7:30 p.m.
Feb. 14 Varsity Baseball McKeel @Lake ales 7:00 p.m.
Feb. 15 Varsity Softball Santa Fe Away 4:00 p.m.





JV Boys Nip Booker 31-29


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
After a dismal Tuesday outing,
the Hardee junior varsity Wildcats
battled Sarasota Booker Friday to
steal the two-point victory.
The junior 'Cats complete their
season this week. They hosted the
Lakeland junior Dreadnaughts on
Tuesday and go to Lake Placid
today (Thursday) for the season
finale.
Last Tuesday at Palmetto,
Hardee could not find the rhythm.
The junior Wildcats were down 10-
12 as the first period ended but saw
that stretch to 23-14 by halftime.
Both teams were cold in the third
period, when Palmetto outscored
Hardee 9-6. Palmetto finished with
a flurry for the 42-25 win.
For Palmetto, two players each
had eight points and two more had
six apiece.
For Hardee, it was Antjuan Jones
with eight points, followed by
Ladarius Pace with a half dozen,
Skylar Alden with four, and Tyler
Alden, Ezayi Youyoute and Charles


Allen with two apiece and Nolan
Neuhauser one at the charity stripe.
Nathan Tomlinson, Ray Deanda,
Ryan Blair and Luke Juarez
grabbed rebounds and steals.
Versus Booker on Friday night, it
was seesaw early. When Neuhauser
sank a pair of free throws, and
Skylar Alden rebounded a Pace
shot, Hardee was up 9-6 as the first
period closed.
The second stanza followed suit
with scoring as the teams battled
for position most of the six min-
utes. Hardee was up 13-12 as the
buzzer sounded for halftime.
Early in the third period, Booker
claimed the lead, but Allen re-
bounded a Pace shot to knot the
game at 17-all. Booker got the final
points of the period to lead 22-19.
Tyler Alden narrowed that to 21-
22 within 15 seconds after the final
period started. A Deanda rebound
put Hardee in front 23-22. Jones
fed Pace at the top of the key for
another deuce and Hardee led 25-
22.
A pair of foul shots narrowed the


Wildcat lead to 25-24. Jones made
it a two-point advantage with a solo
foul shot. At the two-minute mark,
Neuhauser to Jones to Pace netted
another two points to make it 28-
24. With 15 seconds, Booker cut it
to 28-26.
The final minute was fast and
furious. A Booker player made it
28-27, but Deanda hit both ends of
his foul shots to make it 30-27 and
Jones notched another. Hardee led
31-27. One more Tornado rebound
made it a close game, but Hardee
hung on for the 31-29 win.
Pace nearly equaled the high of a'
Booker player with 15 points. Pace
hit seven shots for a total of 14.
Juarez had five, Jones and Deanda
each four and Neuhauser and Tyler
Alden each two points. Skylar
Alden and Allen chipped in on the
floor game.
"I'm proud of their effort. We've
been preaching togetherness and
they played great defense and
worked the press. Nolan, Luke and
Ladarius really rebounded well,"
said head coach Rod Smith.


Braves Lead Machine Pitch


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Culligan Water Conditioning
Braves sit atop the eight-team 2007
AA standings.
The Machine Pitch teams, which
occasionally miss having a game in
the scorebook, appear to have only
one unbeaten team, the Braves,
which are at 5-0.
Behind them are the Jack See
Construction Devil Rays at 3-0-1,
and the Lake Branch Dairy White
Sox at 3-1-1.
Trailing are the Sunshine Foliage
Marlins, Hardee Fire-Rescue
Yankees, Elks Club Giants, Scott
Hardcastle State Farm Cardinals
and Heartland Petroleum Rangers.
These teams have double-head-
ers every weekday evening except
Wednesday at 5:45 and 7:15.
In last Monday's early game, the
Braves nicked the Yankees 7-5.
Dakota Altman smacked a homer
and double and Cody Cumbee,
Hayden Lindsey and Jason Alamia
each doubled for the Braves.
Altman was the only twin-tally bat-
ter. Cumbee, Lindsey, Landon
Albritton and Alamia circled the
bases once each.
Kyle Choatae tripled and singled
and scored twice for the Yankees.
Isaac Flores added a pair of singles
and dual tallies. Tirease Morris put
a run on the board.
The nightcap was even closer as
the Rangers edged the Giants 6-5.
In the first inning, the Rangers
got scores from Joel Lee, Lance
Bursler, Kole Robertson and Cade
Roberts, aided by a Stevie Deanda
hit. Lee also came around to score
in the second inning and Roberts
singled and scored in the third
inning on a Deanda double.
Jacob /Rickett and Frankie
Coronado both singled and scored
on a Chase Benton hit in the first
inning for the Giants. Justin
Herrin singled and scored on a
Quinton Stone triple in the second
inning and Rickett and Samuel
Perez added third-inning tallies.
Tuesday's 5:45 game between
the Cardinals and Devil Rays ended
in a 3-3 tie when time ran out.
Mason Block singled and scored
both times he got on base for the
Cardinals. Matthew Laker also sin-
gled and scored. A Clayton
Prestridge double and Michael
Kujawski singled helped out.
The Devil Rays got all their
scores in the fourth inning, when
Austin Garcia and Kyle Hewett
each singled and rode home on a
Jhett See homer.
In the late game, it was the White
Sox beat the Marlins 11-7.
A pair of homers by Jacquez
Campbell and solo shot by Abel
Villarreal plus a triple by Ryan


Moore were the long-range bombs
for the White Sox. Campbell,
Trevor Walker and Marquis
Delgado were dual-score batters
and Litzy Vargas, Joseph Crawford,
Brandon Franks, Moore, and
Villarreal came 'around to score
once apiece.
Jesse Santoyo doubled and sin-
gled for the Marlins. He was the
only batter to come around to touch
home plate twice. Garrett Norris,
Will Roberts, Zack Richardson,
Aaron Delatorre and Zach Macias
each added a run.
There was no scoresheet for the
early game on Thursday between
the Giants and the Devil Rays. In
the late game, the Yankees out-
scored the Rangers 8-1.
Isaac Flores came around to
score three times for the Yanks.
Morris and Kyle Choate added two
runs apiece and Keith Choate,
Carlos Camacho and Larrett Smith
touched home once each.
Leadoff batter Joel Lee came
around to cross home plate for the
Rangers Bursler, Darby Farr and
Lee were also stranded.
It was another pair of close


encounters on Friday night.
The ;1arlns nipped the:CardinalS
5-4 in he opener and the Braves
edged the White Sox 8-7 in the late
game.
In the 5:45 game, Santoyo home-
red, leading a third-inning bat-
around which saw him, Norris,
Richardson, Gabrielle Allen 'and
Jaylon Ramirez all come around to
score.
For the Cardinals, Block circled
the bases twice. Hardcastle and
Rosie Rivers added a run apiece.
Rivers and Hardcastle were also
stranded and Laker was left on base
both times he got there.
In the week's finale, Lindsey
homered and doubled and put a pair
of runs on the board for the Braves.
Cumbee doubled. Boone Paris,
Tanner Carlton added twin tallies
and Alamia and Abby Clark added
a run each.
Brandon Franks tripled and both
Jessica Bembry and Campbell dou-
bled for the White Sox. Franks
crossed home plate twice and
Villarreal, Campbell, Moore,
Delgado and Walker added solo
scores.


HEARTLAND PEDIATRICS
"Aceptamos Pacientes Nuevos"


Infantes, Ninos, Adolescentes


Tricia Ahner
P.A.-C.


Especializando en el
tratamiento de
*Alergias *ADD
*Asthma


Horas:
Lunes Viernes
8:30 5:00


Apurba Manik
M.D., F.A.A.P.


Aceptamos asignaciones
*de Medicaid
*BCBS seguros, mayores


Se Habla Espanol


1125 S. 6TH AVE.
WAUCHULA
2:1c


INVITATION TO BID

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
The Board of County Commissioners, Hardee County,
Florida, hereinafter referred to as "County" is soliciting bids from
qualified firms to provide labor and materials to complete a
:Masonry Restoration project (Brick Repointing) as specified in the
.Scope of Services of this Invitation to Bid. Sealed BIDS will be
received at:
Hardee County Purchasing Office
Attn: Jack Logan, Purchasing Director
205 Hanchey Road
Wauchula, FL 33873
Until Thursday. 2:00 P.M. local time. February 22. 2007, at
which time they will be publicly opened by the County Purchasing
Director or designee and read aloud. Any BIDS received after the
time specified will not be accepted.
Bid documents may be obtained from the Hardee County
Purchasing Office, 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL 33873, or
by faxing a request to (863)773-0322. Bidders shall confine their
bids to the project in its entirety. Partial BIDS will not be consid-
ered. Bids submitted by FAX or other electronic media will NOT
be accepted under any circumstances. Late bids will NOT be
accepted and will be returned to the bidder.
An original BID (clearly marked as the "ORIGINAl") with two (2)
copies must be sealed and the outside of the envelope MUST be
marked: SEALED BID MASONRY RESTORATION (BRICK
.REPOINTING). Bid will' be awarded by the Board of County
Commissioners at a time and date to be determined later.
Hardee County reserves the right to: waive informalities and/or
irregularities in any BID, delete any portion of the project; extend
the project within the limits of the work involved which in its judg-
ment is in the best interest of the County. Bids may be withdrawn
prior to the date and time of bid opening. The County reserves
the right to reject any or all bid(s) and may postpone the award of
the Agreement for a period of time which shall not extend beyond
sixty (60) calendar days from the Bid opening date.

Bobby R. Smith, Chairman
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners 2:1c








February 1. 2007. The Herald-Advocate 7C


Project Graduation Crowns Its Queen


QUEEN AND COURT


Out of 26 contestants, these four "ladies" won crowns, sashes and cash prizes. Winners are (from
left) Cameron Durham, first runner-up; Joshua Mayer, Miss Project Graduation; Jose Alonso, sec-
ond runner-up; and Brett Martin, third runner-up and Miss Legs.


Brookside Bluff
By Mary Stock


News


COURTESY P.
Entertainer Doug Cain (center) visits with guests during in
mission.


Last Friday, Jan. 21, residents of
Brookside Bluff and guests were
treated to top entertainment. Doug
Cain, and entertainer from Haines
City, played music for dancing as
well as old familiar songs that had
S everyone singing.
The evening started with a dinner
of chicken and biscuits. The enter-
tainment committee, chaired by
Sue Fay and Linda Burns, did an
excellent job of preparing and serv-
ing the food. Flo Padrnos and Janet
Young were in charge of the
kitchen.
Country Western songs, Rock
and Roll songs and old-time favo-
rites were played by this one-man
S band. Many Elvis Presley songs,
such as "Love Me Tender" and
"Blue Suede Shoes" filled the
dance floor. Doug Cain kept the
evening lively with funny stories
and comic interaction with the
audience.

Comedy has to be based on


HOTO
iter-


truth. You take the truth and
you put a little curlicue at the
end.


By LAUREN RAULERSON
For The Herald-Advocate
On Saturday night, 26 senior
boys got all dolled up to vie for the
title of Miss Project Graduation,
and Joshua Mayer took home the
crown.
Miss Project Graduation is a
fundraiser put on by the parents of
the Class of 2007 to raise money
for an all-night celebration on the
night of graduation. It is a safe,
drug- and alcohol-free environment
for graduating seniors.
This year, Project Graduation
will be held at Adventure Island,
and all of the money which was
raised Saturday night will go
toward renting the park for, the
night. The pageant raked in $3,800.
Willie Gilliard was the emcee for
the evening. The boys began by
introducing themselves in casual
men's clothing and then performed
a dance.
The contestants then paraded on
stage in their dresses, make-up and
hairdos and answered questions
individually. The judges then
selected 10 young "ladies" to com-
pete for the crown. Those 10
answered another question and the
winners were selected.
At the end of the night, Joshua
Mayer was crowned Miss Project
Graduation. Cameron Durham was
first runner-up, Jose Alonso second
runner-up and Brett Martin third
runner-up.
Brett Martin also won the Miss
Legs competition. A week prior to
the pageant, each contestant carries
a container around school and asks
for donations. The contestant who
raises the most money wins $100
and the title of Miss Legs. Martin
raised over $300.
The boys who won received
prizes. Each won a crown, a sash,
roses and cash. Mayer won $100,
Durham $75, Alonso $50 and
Martin $25 plus his winnings as
Miss Legs.
Project Graduation will be host-
ing a barbecue dinner on Feb. 17,
the day of livestock weigh-in at the
fair. Also, local restaurants are
donating a percentage of their prof-
its to Project Graduation certain
days this month. On Monday, Feb.
19, Burger King is donating 20 per-
cent of profits made from 5 to 8
p.m., and Pizza Hut is donating a
portion of its entire day's profits on
Tuesday, Feb. 13, and Tuesday,
Feb. 27, but the customer must"
mention his desire to support Pro-
ject Graduation.


\lso, Project Graduation is
searching for a product to sell dur-
ing Pioneer Park Days. Local nurs-
eries and businesses are invited to
donate products to Project Grad-
uation for this purpose.
Project Graduation calendars,

WINNER


which include pictures of the Class
of 2007, are also being sold by
members of the senior class. To
purchase a calendar, barbecue tick-
et or donate a product to Project
Graduation, contact Candy Larrier
at 773-4308.


PHOTOS BY RALPH I IARRISQN
Senior Joshua Mayer was among many boys from the Class of
2007 who dressed up to vie for the title Miss Project Graduation.
Mayer was crowned the evening's winner on Saturday night.


Sink The Winner!
SPORTS NEWS DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT NOON


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cmusic, Sthada
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Piano Tuning & Recording Studio
Piano, Violin, Guitar,
all Band Instruments

(863) POP- TL' i'.


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8C The Herald-Advocate, February 1, 2007


N.W.E.S. Honor Roll (2nd 9 weeks)


KINDERGARTEN
Adamaris Garcia
Adelfo Hernandez
Anahi Cano
Anthony Merchant
Ashon Duncan
Aubrey Bragg
Betsy Mejia
Cain Thornton
Carlos Deloera
Chanel Boyett
Christina Short
Daniel Escobedo
Daniel Obregon
David Trenado
Desiree Rasor
Devan Rimes
Devin Hill
Devina Garza
Dexter Yang
Drew McGuckin
Drew Rigney
Drew Roberts
Ebony Lee
Emmanuel Pluviose
Eric Romero
Erica Martinez
Fatima Ramirez
Haley Canary
Hannah Bandy
Hannah Glisson
Hardee Pace
Idolina Villasana
J.C. Kulig
J.M. Brown
Jansen Walker
Jessica Deloera
Jose Jaramillo
Jose Mata-Chagoya
Juaquin Morales
Kaitlyn Powell
Kareli Plata
Laura-Kate Reynolds
Lillian Salazar
Makenna Dimock
Malik McMillian
Marcus Sambrano
Nicole Cruz
Norma Rivera
Nytavis Phiylor
Randy McLeod
Rebecca Kedzior
Ricardo Salgado
Sandra Lopez-Gonzales
Tony Webb
Viviana Flores
Yadira German

FIRST GRADE
Aaliyah Villafuerte
Alex Paulino


Alexis Neel
Anderson Severe
Angel Canejo
Angelica Salas
Anthony Loredo
Anwaun Hines-Gaines
Ashleigh Martinez
Austin Nellis
Caleb McCoy
Carlos Perez
Cierra Jones
Cody Gillis
Cori-Ann Rosales
Daniel Sambrano
Domingo Arroyo
.Edith Lopez
Elena Briones
Elizabeth Weeks
Enrique Gonzales
Garrett Norris
Halie Strey
Ivan Badillo
Jesaiah Delgado
Jesula Charles
Jordan Contrerras
Jose Rojas
Jose Sustaita
Joshua Litton
Kaylee Derby
Kendral Smith
Krupa Ahir
Layla Santoyo
Mario Gomez
Marisol Silos-Sanchez
Mary Brown
McKenzie Perkins
Miguel Benitez
Nicklaus Nichols
Noah Herrera
Nubia Gomez
Pablo Salgado
Pedro Hernandez
Petra Lopez
Raquel Perez
Ray Zuniga
Rouke Madronal
Sydni Lopez
Taylor Bone
Tori Brownell
Veronica Molina
Zachary Macias

SECOND GRADE
Adan Benitez
Agapito Leon
Agustin Morales
Annette Mondragon
Antonia Silos
Ariana Ramos
Audra Weeks
Austin Johnson


Blanca Mata-Ch
Cade Roberts
Cameron Strey
Clayton Prestrid
Courtney Cunni
Courtney O'Bry
Darby Farr
Destiny Yang
Drew Mimbs
Eddie
Santibanez
Emily Maldonai
Erika Martinez
Francisco Varga
Gannon Watson
J.T. Canary
Janie Elizalde
Jesse Santoyo
Jessica Bembry
Joshua Smith
Kalisa Outley
Kathy Marcial-I
Laina Durrance
Lance Bursler
Lawrence Robe
Livenson Metay
Lorenzo Farias
Lusero Salgado
Maricruz Gonza
Marisa Gonzale
Marquis Delgad
Molly Hartman
Odalis Hernand(
Priscilla Villaza
Rayann Kulig
Rodrigo Mendie
Rosendo Saldan
Sarah Welch
Sayra Campos
Taylor Graham
Will Roberts

THIRD GRAD
Alexis Chavez
Andrew Hagans
Austin Wallace
Bernice Roblero
Briana Cavazos
Camden Mether
Crystal Morales
Danielle Weeks
Desiree Ford
Emily Bennett
Emily Johnson
Faith Hodges
Felise Ehrenkau
Jakayla Mosley
Joel Garland
Julissa Ortiz
McClain Mitche
Mireya Mondraj


hagoya


Ige


Nicholas Strey
Sonya Calvillo
Stephanie Narciso


ngham FOURTH GRADE
an Allison Farr
Anabel Salgado
Aron Ruiz
Cassidy Lane
Molina Chloe Harvey
Christian Pena
do Daynaa Cruz
Deshawndre McMillan
is Emily Albritton
Esteve Metayer
Georgeanne Paris
Hayley Derby
Jacob Packovich
Jessica Cumbee
Karlee Benton
Melanie Harshburger
'alacios Nancy Spinks
Paige Bursler
Raquel Maldonado
rts Rebeca Lopez
'er Sadie King
Sadie Rigdon
Sarah Cavazos
lies
z FIFTH GRADE
1o Adam(Nickolas) Mendoza
Aundrea Pace
ez Blaine Harshburger
na Brea Farrer
Briana Gardner
ta Brittany O'Bryan
la Dana Miller
Dana Singleton
Elyric Romeo
Erica Molina
Erick Alvizo
Francisco Villasana
Hailey Andrews
Isabel Abel
Jacob Neuhofer
JJ Almaraz
Kramer Royal
ny Lacey McClenithan
Leah Weeks
Marco Ehrenkaufer
Marisol Sustaita
Matthew Lake
McKenzie Garcia
Michael Olivar-Ugalde
fer Norma Salgado
Riana Parks
Tarra Manwiller
Tori Hernardez
l11 Wyatt Maddox
gon Zachary Neuhofer


TEENS INTERVIEW ELDERS




GIRLS ALWAYS WORE




DRESSES To SCHOOL


By ASHLEY LEWIS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Velma Louise Johnson. (Maiden name
Randall.)
Q: When were you born and where?
A: Jan. 15, 1942, Wauchula.
Q: Did you live in the country or the
city?
A: City, Wauchula.
Q: Did you walk to school, and how far
did you walk, or did you ride the bus?
A: On some days she would ride the bus,

SLookin' Back

and walk to school on different occasions.
She would have to walk a mile and a half.
Q: How much did gas cost when you
were young?
A: Twenty-five cents.
Q: Did you go to see movies and if you
did, how far was it from your house?
A: Drive-in was three or four miles
away.. The walk-in movies was 1 1/2 miles
away.
Q: How did children dress back then?
A: Girls wore dresses to the knee. Boys
wore button-up shirts and jeans with belts.
Q: Did you eat at home or eat out?
A: We ate at home.
Q: What did your family do on
Saturday?
A: Went to town and bought groceries,
and talk to people in town.
Q: Did you do a lot of housecleaning,
and what did you have to do?
A: No. She helped her mom do dishes,
clothes and she cleaned her room.
Q: Did you have a TV when you were
young?


COURTESY PHOTO


Velma Randall's school days.


A: No.
Q: What war was going on when you
were young?
A: World War II and the Korean War.
Q: Did any of your family members go
into the war?
A: Yes, five uncles and her dad.
Q: What kind of games did you play?
A: Hopscotch, hide-n-go seek, ball and
jacks, checkers, Chinese checkers and
Monopoly.
Teens Interview Elders comes from a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High. Selected interviews
are published here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


W.E.S. Honor Roll (2nd 9 weeks)


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


Kindergarten Rene
Aliyah Bias Jax U
Dawson Cantu Ayana
Claire Carlton Lexi
Michael Cruz Lillia
Marc Delatorre Rico
Joely Garza Brilya
Cody Helms Josep
Ashlee Patterson Cody
Diamond Patton Marie
Shelby Spencer Savar
Trey Stephens Merci
Matt Tyson Emily
Valeria Lopez Lane
Hulices Hernandez Adria
Lianna Albritton Darw
Ben Clarke Karaa
Sarah Carlton Sophi
Conchita Torres Daws
Tara Hines Erika
Aubrey Stark Sergic
Joel Martinez Ben /
Shelby Zeigler Loren
Carrie Taylor Faith
Diamond Faulk Sophi
Ederika Austin Nubia
SEric Miranda Maria
Adrian Flores Marib
Neda Alqabsi Alicia
Donquarius Rosario Corie
Rachel St. Fort Shelb
Waylen Richardsori Conra
Russel Long Emil)
Anahi Ramos Destil
Ciera Munoz Migue
Tyson Sutton Joshu
Jerika Rimes Hope
Javier Montoya Norm
Angel Perez Ellie]
Kodie Myers Joley
Julie Harrison Gabri
Rafael Alvarez Brook
Dustin Willis Cole
Issac Normil Gracic
Alivia Hodges Gabri
Lily Franco Adeli
Lizandro "Bo" Villarreal Madis
Christian Brant Arma
Denali BrionesMigu
Anthony Rosado Jerry
Yamilex Miranda
Bryce Hernandez 2nd G
Bibiana Mier Land(
Land
Jasmin PantojaHolly
Colen Oakes Holly
Adriana Arana Park
Riley Boyette Abby
Marvin Cook Morge
Joseph Long Hayde
Hailey McLeod Selen
Makayla Wilson Vaugt
Oscar Mota Andre
Luis Martinez Catali
Kory Giles Soray
Daltoi
1st Grade Abel'
Lindsey Barwick Isiah I
Alexx Brant Isaac
Tanner Carlton Jaqua

Fear less, hope more; Whine less,
'breathe more; Talk less, say
more; Hate less, love more; And
all good things are yours.
-Swedish Proverb


Medina
llrich
a Daniels
Harris
nna Ponce
Arana
dance Augustus
h Crawford
Davis
ela Miramontes
inah Mullins
edes Owens
SPierce
Parks
n Rodriguez
yn Howard
Friers
a Diakamohalis
on Ratliff
Garcia
o Delgado
Adams
la Arana
Arreola
e Cardenas
SHernandez
Paniagua
bel Rodriguez
SRuiz
Benton
y Gibson
id Pace
SPatarini
ny Scheel
el Ruiz
a Ward
Elliott
a Hernandez
Palmer
Pleger
ella Ruiz
ke Shaw
rerrell
e Albritton
ela Montoya
na Servin
son Warnock
ndo Gonzalez
el Cardoza
King-Lopez

Grade
on Albritton
ann Brown
r Carlton
Clark
an Crews
en Lindsey
a Miranda
in Kirkland
ea Crawford
na Longoria
a Castillo
n Richey
Villarreal
Faulk
Flores
vious Kimbrough


Jennifer Lopez
Erika Ramirez
Madison Rucker
Ashley Ugarte
Rosie Fimbres
Brooklyn Graham
Levi Lovett
Boone Paris
Wyatt Zeigler
Shayla Albritton
Adrian Bruno-Perez
Kyle Choate
Briana Hanchey
Shayna Harned
Juan Hernandez
Jonatan Martinez
Arianna Perez
Amber Westberry
Kendall Winter
Aaron Delatorre
Connor Pritchard
Olivia Flories
Chase Benton
Dylan Carmona

3rd Grade
Gabrielle Allen
Jonathan Martin
Sarah McClenithan
Adam Salas
Brandi Swearingen
Josie Moore
Diesy Piedad
Mara Goodwyn
Kristen Burkett
Morgan Walters
Rebecca Albritton
Hannah Carlton
Jordan Evers
Dashawna Goad
Reyna Kirkland
Cheyenne Pohl
Carly Wadsworth
Rebeca Espinoza
Lily Strickland
Angelica Gonzalez
Karan Limbachiya
Beatriz Macedo.
Rachel Parlor
Austin Rimes
Dalton Baker
Mariah Boney
Taylor Roberts
Genesis Torres
Rosie Rivers
Kaydance Owens
Seth McGee
Hayden Hawthorne
Morgan Evans
Ally Dotson
Shelby Dees
Ricardo DeSantiago
Connor Crawford

4th Grade
Sarah Beth Albritton
Brooke Dixon
Caitlin Dufresne


Keyshawn McLeod
Roby Paris
Kiersten Ramirez
Alysa Salazar
Gemi Saunders
Dana Terrell
Anahi Arroyo
Valentina Cardoza
Patrick Carlton
Leah Chavez
Victor Deloera
Diana DeSantiago
Jace Flemer
Jordan Jones
Milli Jones
Naushin Khan
Angel Mancillas
Hannah Napier
Haneen Ottallah
Rayna Parks
Ashleigh Prieto
Danielle Smith
Cody Spencer
Alex Ullrich
Leonel Rodriguez
Tatiana Juarez
Elizabeth Alvarez
Andrea Gee
Timothy Perkins
Marissa Chancey
Cesar Fimbres
Daniel Kalinuk
Miles Yates
Makayla Deuberry
Tanor Durden
Kasandra Alvarez
Adriana Olivas
Michael Heine
Jose Sandoval
Brinkley Yeomans
Kevin Kunkel


5th Grade
Caroline Durrance
David Gibson
Karlee Henderson
Emily Hughes
Holly Hughes
Kris Johnson
Lark Lukawkski
Alexan Maddox
Luke Palmer
Katie Smith
Errica Snelling
Reed Woods
Tyler Helms
Zachery Taylor
Arissa Camel
Brandon Beatty
Savannah Miller
Luke Winter
Zachary Battles
Carleigh Coleman
Dustin Goodwyn
Kaitlin Thomas
Stephanie Belmares
Hannah Grisinger
Merislene Cimeus

Cherish your visions and your
dreams as they are the children
of your soul; the blueprints of
your ultimate achievements.
-Napoleon Hill


Best wishes to everyone cele-
brating a birthday or anniversary in
February.

COMING EVENTS
Don't forget the Chili Supper and
Fun Auction Saturday. This was a
lot of fun last year. Also, there will
be a Dessert and Fashion Show
Feb. 5 at the Rec Hall at 1 p.m.
Ladies, come out and support a
good cause.

KOFFEE KLATCH
Ron Swearingin led the U.S.
Pledge; Sylvia Baker led the
Candadian Pledge and Don
Merillat led the prayer to open
Koffee Klatch on Jan. 24. Barby
and Jerry Koehne were the hosts.
The 50/50 winners were Ron and
Betty Ackermann, F. Beeve, Al and
Izetta Murphy, Jeannette and
Laurie Hierlihy and Junior and
Betty O'Banion.

BINGO
Elaine Leverone and Millie
Kocher split the paper special on
Jan. 19. On Jan. 22, Barb Jones and
Don Lovell split the paper special
and Nancy Morrison and Nancy
Culver split a hot ball jackpot.

SCORES
Shuffling Jan 14: Pioneer Creek
visited Crystal Lake. The Crystal
Lake ladies won 11 games to seven
and the Crystal Lake men won 14
games to four.
Bowling Jan 17: first, Fearless
Four; second, Goof Offs; and third,
Mywin.


Men's Golf Jan. 18: Points F.
Beeve, B. Keener, G. Williams and
S. Gervase.
Ladies Golf Jan. 18: Lemon
Slush Marge Cook, Charlene
Baker, Barb Kramer and Barb
Newman.
Mixed Golf Jan. 22: Orange Ball
- Jean Jacques Dufour, Bob
Kramer, Barb Newman and Loyd
Lankford.
Shuffling Jan. 23: three game
winners were Chris Arend, Bob
Beshel, Mike Defreitas, Eleanor
Dice, Marilyn Funkhouser, Jack
Jacobs and Jean Willis.

CHURCH
Wilma Behymer, pianist and Jim
Bolhouse, organist, used familiar


hymns for the Prelude to open
church service on Jan. 21. Maxine
Stromme was the greeter for the
120 residents and visitors. Don
Merillat gave the Offertory Prayer.
Bob Wilday and Lowell Gordon
served as ushers as the organist and
pianist played "Just a Closer Walk
with Thee" during the receiving of
the offering. The choir's number "It
Took a Miracle" was directed by
Nancy Morriscon, accompanied by
the pianist. Rev. Winne used sever-
al references from the Book of
Psalms for his sermon "Praise the,
Lord." Following the service, a
time of fellowship was enjoyed.
Judy and Jerry McBride and Flo
Smith served doughnuts, coffee and
orange juice


I S-6VLEMAI


Six favorites for Six Bucks a piece!
Medium 1-Topping Pizza, Any Oven-Baked Sub,
6pc Chicken Tenders, 10pc How Wings,
Anv Medium Salad, or Oven-Baked Pasta


52.1 1 H,,y 17 N i5 SR C, EAST.
i-idRp ,, d, B


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Contact Amy Brown or Nancy Davis
At The Herald Advocate


INVITATION TO BID"
The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids in the County
Manager's Office, 412 West Orange Street, Room 103, Wauchula, Florida 33873 for:
ADVERTISING THE 2006 DELINQUENT TAXES
Bid forms and specifications may be obtained from the Hardee County Manager's Office at the above
address. Envelopes must be sealed and marked "2006 DELINQUENT TAXES and must be delivered
to:
HARDEE COUNTY MANAGER'S OFFICE
412 West Orange Street, Room 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
so as to reach said office no later than 10:00 a.m., Thursday, February 08, 2007. Bids received later
than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Board will not be responsible for the late
delivery of bids made in person, by mail, or any other type of delivery service.
ALL BIDS RECEIVED TIMELY SHALL BE OPENED IN THE COUNTY MANAGER'S OFFICE, AT 10:00
a.m. Thursday, February 08, 2007, OR AS SOON THEREAFTER AS PRACTICAL.
The Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any part thereof that may be con-
sidered to be in the best interest of Hardee County.
BOBBY RAY SMITH, CHAIRMAN
BOARD.OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA 2:1c


Tart words make no inc~ads; a'
spoonful of honey will catch
more flies than a gallon of
vinegar.
-Benjamin Franklin I


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