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The Herald-advocate
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00074
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Creation Date: June 8, 2006
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00074
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
    Section B
        page B 1
    Section B: Hardee Living
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
    Section B: The Classifieds
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
    Section B continued
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text




SHunters: Get Your

Applications In

-i.... Column 4B


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


A V


460
plus 4c ;ale, ita


kw


Road Improvements Bring Detours


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A couple of state road projects
will cause detours in Hardee
County.
The weekly transportation report
for the state Department of Trans-
portation notes detours on SR 62
and Ten Mile Grade, along with
intermittent traffic delays or partial


closures on several other roads:
On SR 62, starting Monday, June
12, ongoing resurfacing of the
east-west highway, will shut down
the road while replacement of the
railroad crossing at Fort Green
Springs is completed. The detour
will probably go from Mine View
to Beachwood to CR 663 and back
to SR 62, said county Road and


Bridge supervisor Mark Frazier.
A flagging operation by local law
enforcement will direct traffic
around the road closure, said the
DOT release. It is part of the state
project "to resurface the roadway
from Allapatah Road east to U.S.
17, install guardrails, made drain-
age improvements and replace the
railroad crossing. Motorists should


be alert, use caution and observe
the posted speed limits," continues
the release.
County commissioners recently
asked Frazier and Public Works
Director J.R. Prestridge to work
with DOT and Lane Construction
Corp. on including turn lanes into
the county's industrial park off SR
62.


Another detour is on the east-
west portion of Ten Mile Grade,
also called County Line Road
between DeSoto and Hardee
Counties. The current project, to
replace a pair of existing timber
bridges with concrete box culverts
over Oak Drain Creek, closes traf-
.fic between Scarborough Road
Southeast all the way to Marguerite


Road in neighboring Highlands
County. The roadway improve-
ments "consist of widening, instal-
lation of guardrails, signing and'
pavement marking."
Detour routes are posted at
Josephine, Crewsville and Scar-
borough roads.
Delays or cutting back to one
See DETOURS 2A.


Woman Who Aided



Escape Gets 4 Years

By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A woman who helped her stepfa-
ther after he escaped from the
Hardee County Jail last year has
herself now been sentenced to time
behind bars.
Kathy Ray Friel, 21, who lists
addresses of 3373 John Holt Road
in Ona and 416 N. Ninth Ave. in
Wauchula, was handed a four-year
state prison term last week in
Hardee Circuit Court. .
Friel was appearing before
See ESCAPE 2A Friel



ZS Official Quits


COURTESY PHOTO
An educational complex planned for the Range Cattle Station will include a 50-seat conference room, labs, a library and faculty
offices.



Range Cattle Station Seeks Public Support


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The first new building in 30
years may be ready for the 70th
anniversary of the Cattle Range
Station in Ona.
Area cattlemen and farmers have
the opportunity tb make it a reality
as all donations for it will be
matched dollar for dollar by the
state IFAS (Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences).
Part of the University of Florida
research programs, the Ona station
is one of 13 in the state but the only
one focused solely on cattle and
beef forage.
Local rancher/businessman Ed-
gar Davis told the Hardee County
Commission Thursday that "agri-
culture is becoming less and less
important to the state with tourism
and other industries. There's only a
certain amount of .money for
research centers and we need to
show our interest in it."
Davis seconded the presentation
by new Cattle Range Station direc-
tor John Arthington. "The county


needs to put an amount in the bud-
get annually to show its support. It
will help with private contributions
to show the importance of this cen-
ter."
Commissioner Minor Bryant was
recently appointed to the advisory
board for the central district, one of
five districts in the state, this one
from Indian River across the state
to Hardee County. "It's a really


good board of agricultural people
working to make agriculture sus-
tainable. Everything is changing
and you have to change with it," he
commented.
Arthington is only the fourth
director the local center has seen.
He took the position last summer
when the late Dr. Finley Pate
retired. Dr. Gordon Kirk was the
first director and Was followed by


Dr. Herb Chapman.
Davis recalled Dr. Kirk's dedica-
tion to the center. When the univer-
sity declared a holiday from
Christmas to New Year's, Kirk set a
schedule for all staff, including
See RANGE CATTLE 2A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
After just under a year on the job.
a Zolfo Springs Town Council
member has called it quits.
Roberta Meyer prepared a letter
of resignation on Wednesday of last
week the day after fired police
chief David Scheid appeared before
the council in a nighttime hearing
to seek reinstatement to his post.
His appeal failed in a 3-2 vote, with
Meyer and Chairman Roger
Green voting for the chief.
Her letter, dated May 31, arrived
at Town Hall on Monday of this
week. It reads:
"This letter is to inform you that
I hereby resign my position as
councilperson, vice chair, seat
number 5, effective immediately.


"AsI have been stonewalled
because of the hostile environment
now present within the town's gov-
erning body, I feel that I am unable
to do my job for the citizens of
Zolfo Springs to the best of my
abilities."
Meyer had taken office on June
13, 2005.
Because the vacancy her resigna-
tion creates is less than six months,
no special election will be held to
fill that slot, acting town clerk
Linda Roberson said on Tuesday.
Instead, the matter has been placed
on the agenda for Monday night's
regular Town Council meeting.
Council members, Roberson said,
will appoint a replacement.
Explaining her decision on
See ZOLFO 2A


SCHOOL'S OUT!


Sheriff's Budget Bid


Up By $1.6 Million

Adds 3 Deputies, 5 Dispatchers


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Adding eight new people to his
staff, along with their vehicles and
gear, will increase the Hardee
County Sheriff's budget a whop-
ping amount.
The proposed 2006-07 budget
Sheriff J. Loran Cogburn turned in
last week is $1.6 million higher
than his current one.
"This budget will maintain us at
our current operating levels to
include our traditional merit pay
increases as well as anticipated
increases in retirement, medical,
payroll, property and casualty
insurance increases for the coming
year," said Cogburn in his cover
letter to the Hardee County
Commission.
"The only additional request this
year is for five dispatchers to han-
dle the increased call load of both
law enforcement and Fire-Rescue
services. Also requested is the need
for three additional deputy posi-
tions and the capital outlay to sup-
port these positions..As our county
continues to, grow, these positions


are needed to keep up with increas-
ing demands," he concluded.
"I feel like we're holding to the
bare minimum with just tle cost of
living and insurance increases. Of
course, these all impact the bud-
get," said Cogburn. on Tuesday,
noting that there have also been
increases in fuel costs for vehicles
and cooking.
The Sheriff's Department budget
is traditionally the first to be
received, due by June 1. Those of
the other constitutional offices, the
Supervisor of Elections, Property
Appraiser, Tax Collector and Clerk
of Courts are also due shortly. The
commission will begin budget dis-
cussions in early July.
Cogburn said he is asking 'for
three new deputies, the first in
some time. "The biggest part of law
enforcement is to be prepared for
growth. We need to do itWnow. In
the 10 years I've been sheriff, I've
watched others have to suddenly
increase their budgets 15 to 25 per-
cent in a year. The Highlands
County Sheriff is asking for a 30
See BUDGET 2A


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee County School Board said goodbye to 21 employees with a total 509-1/2 years of
experience during its last meeting, stopping to join In a reception and to present plaques of
recognition. Schools Superintendent Dennis Jones remembered the contributions of each one,
and said all will be sorely missed. Pictured (front row, from left) are Sarah Johnson, custodian
with 30 years of service; Barbara Brannon, food service, 30 years; Jill Southwell, assistant prin-
cipal, 24 years; and Kathy Valentine, teacher, 36 years; (back row) Barbara Wllkins, media clerk,
31 years; Jan Knight, teacher 31 years; Dottle Abbey, food service, 17 years; Kay Wilson, teacher,
18 years; and Greg Dick, deputy schools superintendent, 30 years. Also honored were Connie
Frazier, tutor, 24 years; Evelyn Patten, clerk, 22 year; Grace Dubois, secretary, 30 years; James
Youmans, teacher, 30 years; Jane New, teacher, 15 years; Janie Agullar, custodian, 15 years; Judy
Himrod, teacher, 27 years; Julia Daughtry, teacher, 39-1/2 years; LIlle Crane, food service, 14
years; Roy Henderson, transportation, nine years; Virginia Colson, tutor, seven years; and Anne
Taylor, teacher, 30 years


106th Year, No. 26
3 Sections, 28 Pages


1.7~' 5


4o
plus 4 sal tax








2A The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006


JAMES R. KELL
I Publi her/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRA
Managing Editor
' . .
,JOAN M. SEAMAN
-SportsEditor 0atf

.iE:SSA. STALLINGS
ardee Living Editor

115 S. Seventh Ave. 4
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living -Thursday 5'p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
K Ads Tuesday noon


Y

HL


t.*. J
.,-.
*' -'.
-k


RALPH HARRISON
Production.Manager
'''
NOEYDE SANTIAG'O
Asst. Production Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255


Fax: (863)-773-0657


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months 16, 1 yr $28: 2 yrs. $54
Florida
6 months $20, I yr $37; 2 yrs $72
Out of State
6 months $24; I yr. $44. 2 yrs $86


,LETrERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest. Letters
should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed and include a daytime phone
Number.
;SUBMISSIONS:
,.Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be typed, dou-
Sble-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines All items are subject to editing.


Kelly's Column
By Jim .


Buford Long of Wauchula will be inducted into the Polk County All
Sports Hall of Fame on June 20 at the Lakeland Centre.
Buford graduated from Lake Wales High School where he played four
sports football, basketball, baseball and track. He was one of the top ath-
letes in the state.
He is the last three-sport letterman at the University of Florida where
he played football, baseball and track.
Buford after college played professional football with the New York
Giants.
He is a citrus grower; a Bull Gator and chairman of the board at First.
National Bank of Wauchula. He and his wife Sammie live in a nice home
on a pretty oak-shaded site on South Florida Avenue.
In recent months Buford has been getting medical treatment for a rare
type of'cancer. The county wishes him a full recovery.

Summer workouts begin this week for Hardee High School football.
This is largely built around weightlifting and conditioning.
HHS, under head coach Derren Bryan and a fine coaching staff, has a
very impressive 42-game regular season winning streak. This means the
last four regular seasons have been 10-0. This has never been done before
at HHS.
The Wildcats will have an option offense this fall sined..thre is B6 big
strong fullback or tailback. Most high schools would be happy to have an
8-2 or 7-3 record, even 6-4, and make the playoffs.
There have' been no state championships at Hardee High in athletics,
but recent football from the Wildcats has been golden.
The HHS academics team has won two state titles in recent years.

A golf tournament Saturday at Torrey Oaks will raise money for
Hardee native Frank Zajicek, a Christian missionary in Bolivia. The scram-
ble will begin at 8 a.m. and will cost $40 for a single player'or $150 for a
team.
Frank is the brother of Marie Lambert, wife of golf course owner Bill
Lambert.

Hardee County has another Christian missionary in Steven Nicholson
and his wife Amy who are in Cape Town in South Africa. They had a live
video-chat last week with the Wauchula Kiwanis Club.
Steven is the son of Charles and Penny Nicholson of Wauchula.

Nobody asked, but I think Barry Bonds is the one of the all-time great
baseball players.
He passed Babe Ruth for second all-time, but I am not sure I want him
to break Hank Aaron's record of 755 homeruns. I never even hit a home run
in Little League.
Babe Ruth hit his 714 homeruns in fewer at-bats than Bonds or Aaron
and was a great Major League pitcher in his early pro career.
Ted Williams, who once owned property in Hardee County with Joe L.
Davis, had 521 homeruns and was one of baseball's best hitters in history.
He gave up about four years in his prime to serve America in war-time.

The Tampa Bay Devil Rays in St. Pete offer a good summer entertain-
ment option at a low price. You can buy a seat for about $8 and.during the
game move to a more expensive seat due to current.low attendance..:. ,
The new owners have rolled out the welcome mat for fans. Free park-
ing. Bring in your own food and drinks in approved containers .
Some food prices haVe been lowered for this season..The Rays.hive "a
nice and patient manager in Joe Madden. The Tropicana Dome is 75 min-.
utes by auto from Wauchula.

Weather has continued to be somewhat dry in the county recently.


DETOURS
Continued From 1A


open lane at a time may occur on
different portions of U.S. 17, said
Frazier. One project is to realign the
crossover at Sauls Road, which will
be starting 'shortly. Traffic is not
expected to be stopped, but may be
curtailed to one lane, he said.
At Maxwell and Keeton roads,
crews are adding turn lanes to the
driveway entrance to the new K-8.
school, which will house Hardee
Junior High School and Hilltop.
Elementary School when the fall
session opens. "Motorists should
expect intermittent lane closures,"
says DOT.--
Nearby, crews will be repairing
ditch slopes and doing shoulder
repair. in front of Crystal Lake
Mobile Home Park. "Again,
motorists should expect slow mov-.
ing traffic and possible delays,"
said DOT.
Beginning in August, there will,
be a detour on Ollie Roberts Road:
while the bridge over Paynes Creek
is replaced. This will affect those
going to Hardee Lakes Park where


the entrance is on the west end of
Ollie Roberts Road. Detours should
be clearly marked by then, said
Frazier.
Other projects in the works will
cause some traffic disruptions in
coming months. In the late summer,
resurfacing on Dansby Road may
cause periodic day closures, but the
road will be open at night.
Resurfacing of Sweetwater Road
from U.S. 17 to SR 66, with widen-
ing and drainage work, will also
cause periodic closures, said
Frazier.
Later this year, probably after the
October 1 start of the new fiscal
year, resurfacing of Florida Avenue
from SR 64 north to Carlton Road,
and possibly all the way to West
Main Street, may also affect traffic.
Finally, #in late 2006, the state
project to resurface Goose, Pond
Road from Experiment Station
Road west about five miles to CR
665 will be another traffic chal-
lenge, said Frazier.


.The Herald-Advobate :
Hardee County's.gIometown Coverage. ,- '


and contributing to, the quality of
life to urban growth. "Grazing
cows is the least intensive agricul-
tural enterprise.
"We want to partner with the
county to put together a plan for
educated land use management,
what' the ranchers want, what water
management wants, what land uses
are best."
Bryant, said the legislature had
allocated $20 million for upgrades
at the research centers.
But there's opportunity for area
agriculturalists to help out. For
more information, call Arthington
at 735-1314.


;'Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate Publishing
'Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula. FL 33873 and additional
'entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmater," send address changes to: The Herald-
-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


Carolina. Ronald Smith stole his
brother-in-law's truck and drove
alone to Carrollton, Ga., where he
was captured on March 8, 2005.
Tammy Smith, 37, also was
charged with aiding escape. Her
case is pending in Hardee Circuit
Court.
Ronald Smith remains in
Georgia, where he faces multiple
charges associated with his capture
and the death of a motorist caught
up in the car chase that led to his
arrest.


percent increase this year. We want
to get it under control and maintain
control," he explained.
An increase in.the number of dis-
patch calls over the last several
years spurred Cogburn to seek five
new employees in that division, the
first in 10'years. ''Putting comput-
ers in patrol cars took a load off dis-
patch. But the work load has
increased dramatically in the last
year, especially in Fire-Rescue
calls, which are labor intensive. It
takes 4.7 people to fill 'one position
around the clock, seven days a
week, including regular shifts, two
days off a week and vacations and
sick leave. The.five new positions
will be dedicated strictly to the
Fire-Rescue calls," Cogburfn said.
The budget Cogburn presents is
broken down into three divisions,
civil, corrections and law enforce-
ment.
The civil division includes a
process server, sergeant and two
bailiffs who maintain the circuit
and county courts. Their salaries
and benefits, and occasional part-
time salaries, total $274,858. Add
to that attorney fees, meals for
jurors, uniforms and other expenses
and that division is $286,000, over
$77,100 up from this year's budget.
The corrections division includes
inmate care (clothing, food, bed-
ding, transportation and medical
expenses) as well as medical care,
which adds another $150,000 to the
mix.
Corrections staff includes a cap-
tain, two lieutenants, five sergeants,
five support staff and 19' correction




RANGE CATTLE
Continued From 1A
milking the cows every sixth morn-
ing and being at the office every
third Saturday to greet office visi-
tors.
Arthington had worked in the
grain industry in Indiana and his
wife and her family were from
Iowa. When the couple came here
in 1998, they were pleasantly sur-
prised to see so much rural land and
ranching/farming interest.
The center was started in 1938-
39 in response to the fence .laws
restricting where ranchers and
farmers could graze their stock. It
spurred an interest in improving
pastures so they would not be
grazed down. "Cattlemen view this
as 'their center' and embrace it
more than the others in the state.
Everything on a ranch is developed,
grasses, breeds of cattle, supple-
. ments, anything that impacts their
land prices," said Arthington.
The first building on the Station'
property was constructed in 1939-
40 and another in 1969. The oldest
one ,may have to be demolished
soon. "IFAS only gives us mainte-
.nance money based on the age of
the building and it's almost none it
is becoming too costly to keep up,"
said Arthington.
The recent retirements of Pate
and Dr. Robert Kahlbacher and
upcoming retirement of Dr. Paul
Mislevy has created vacancies.
There are two new faces and anoth-
er position was added recently by
the state.
Jogo Vendramini, from Texas
A&M University is a forage agron-
omist and Maria Silveira is a,
soil/water scientist with an empha-
sis on grazing landscaping. Soon to
be added is an economist with
emphasis on optimizing the value
of agricultural natural resources to
the community,
Arthington answered the ques-
tion of- County Manager. Lex.
Albritton on the recently, opened
center tn Balm and its. effect oh the
Ona station. "'It has not pulled.staff
away from this station. This is the
only cattle research station. IFAS is
behind it. They didn't have to give
us the three positions."
Plans for the new building at Ona
include a 50-seat conference room
with video feed-in, five faculty
offices in addition to the director's
room, three large workrooms, a
freezer and the -resource
center/office where people are
greeted. There are frequent visitors
from across .the state, nation and
world interested in the center's beef
forage programs, said Arthington.
Arthington said the center.,is
interested in development of pas-
tures on reclaimed phosphate land,
and is also looking at resources,
water, wildlife and native plants,


officers. Combining inmate care,
medical, salaries and benefits and
other expenses, that division has a
2006/07 budget of $2,387,911, up
$413,482 from the current year.
It does not include five new posi-
tions needed if a 72-bed addition
specifically to house federal
inmates is constructed. Cogburn
said he didn't believe it would be
done for use in the new fiscal year.
The, largest division is law
enforcement, broken down into
administration and dispatch, inires-
tigations and patrol. *;-
Patrol includes one lieutenant,
four sergeants, two agricultural
deputies and 17 road deputies, their
salaries and benefits, uniforms,
fuel, ammunition, travel and train-
ing and K-9 supplies. It reflects an
increase of three deputies, and
$108,000 capital expenses for their
vehicles and other equipment,
upping that portion of the budget
from $197,233 to $368,156.
In the investigations division,
there is a captain, two sergeants, a
secretary,, one evidence clerk and
seven investigators which includes
those heavily involved in the coun-
tywide Drug,Task Force. Salaries
and benefits, and expenses such as
photography and other investiga-
tion supplies, travel and training
and uniforms combine for a total
budget of $808,443 for the new fis-
cal year, up $115,539 from this
year.
The largest group is administra-
tion, varying from the sheriff and
undersheriff to a warrants officer,
two secretaries and two assistant
administrators, a computer techni-
cian, the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse
Resistance Education) and public
relations officer, finance, two
records clerks, a training officer
and 17 dispatchers.
The sheriff's salary is set by the
state and went up nearly $7,200 to
$107,972. Add to that other salaries
and benefits, phone, security,
required bonding, pre-employment
drug and credit checks, posse, vehi-
cle.fleet insurance, travel, printing,
utilities and all"the other miscella-
neous expenses necessary to run-
ning the sheriff's office.
The total for all the law enforce-
ment divisions is $1.113,638. 82
'larger than. this year. The
$4,582,589.82 is the lion's share of
the proposed 2006/07 budget. .
The total $7.3 budget also does
not include revenue or expenses for
housing federal inmates for the U.
S. Marshal's Office- and/or
Immigration and Naturalization
Services. "That's under a separate
contract, which reimburses us for
man hours and mileage. Currently
there are about 40 federal inmates
in our 176-bed facility.
"I also did not consider what per-
centage increase my budget
reflects," said Cogburn. "It depends




ESCAPE
Continued Fromn lA
Circuit Judge Robert L. Doyel for
what was to be a pre-trial status
hearing, but instead she and her
lawyer entered a change of plea in
conjunction with a plea agreement
worked out with the prosecution.
In addition to the aiding escape
charge, Friel had faced three other.
cases, all still pending in court and
all involving drug charges. As part
of the plea agreement, she changed
her "not guilty" pleas to "no con-
test" in the aiding escape case and
on dual counts of possession of
methamphetamine with intent to
sell.
In exchange, the state agreed to
drop other drug charges associated
withrthbse same cases.
Doyel accepted the plea agree-
ment, immediately imposing the
four-year prison term and assessing
$495 in fines and fees, all to be
placed on a lien against Friel. The
prison time will run concurrently,
the judge said.
Friel was accused of helping
Ronald Dale Smith, 32, when he
and Anthony Layne Deboy, 23,
escaped from the Hardee County
Jail on Feb. 28, 2005. Smith and
Deboy got a ride to a junk yard,
where Smith left Deboy and met up
with Friel.
Friel accompanied Smith to his
wife's her mother's residence in
Fort Green, saying, "I have a sur-
prise for you!" according to
Sheriffs Office spokesman Maj.
Claude Harris Jr.
The Smiths then fled the state,
driving to Tammy Jo Wilson-Friel
Smith's brother's house in North


Nutrition Notes

ONE KIND OF INFLAMMATION YOU SHOULD FIGHT
Is inflammation good or bad? Inflammation can be a good sign..
When your thumb swells after you accidentally bang it with a hammer, your
immune system sends white blood cells and other hormone-like substances
to help start the healing process. This swelling reaction is one kind of
inflammation that's easy to see. But scientists say that another invisible
kind can occur throughout the body, over and over again, and it may
increase our risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and even cancer.
The intensity of this general inflammation can be measured by blood
tests for markers like C-reactive protein (CRP), which is produced by the;
liver during periods of inflammation. People with increased levels of CRP:
seem to have a greater risk of heart disease from damage to their blood ves-"
sels. New research suggests that people with elevated blood sugar and CRP
levels may be at especially high risk.
Chronic inflammation may also be connected to cancers of the esoph-
agus, stomach, colon and liver. In one 11-year study, people with high lev-
els of CRP were more likely to develop colon cancer. Scientists say that
inflammation could promote cancer development by damaging our genes,
increasing cell turnover and increasing the development of blood vessels
that allow cancer cells to grow and spread.
; For how, federal recommendations call for the blood test known as
"high-specificity C-reactive protein" (hs-CRP) only for people with a mod-
erate heart disease risk not as a standard screening procedure for the gener-
al public. Some researchers argue, however, that this test provides.impor-
tant information because it seems to measure the danger from a variety of
risk factors. Other experts.disagree, saying that any treatment choice would
still be directed at specific risk factors.
While medical treatment of chronic inflammation may focus on con-:
trolling cholesterol, blood sugar, and blood pressure levels, lifestyle.choic-
es may directly affect it, according to early research.
Weight control seems.to be one important way to prevent or reduce,
inflammation. As, individuals become overweight, fat cells enlarge and
increase production of certain proteins that promote inflammation through-
out the body.
A mostly plant-based diet with plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole
grains and beans also seems to decrease inflammation. Studies link a
Mediteiranean-style diet with lower levels of CRP. Antioxidant vitamins
like vitamin C in these foods could interact with a whole range of protec-
tive plant compounds to provide protection.
A Mediterranean-style, diet also tends to be higher than the typical,
American diet in omega-3 fat, which is found especially in fish. A.healthy
balance of omega-3 fat with other fats reduces production of hormone-like
substances that stimulate inflammation.
Studies also show lower levels of markers of inflammation in those
who exercise regularly or don't smoke. Good dental care that prevents the
gum inflammation known as gingivitis may even help to reduce- overall
body inflammation.
Although the evidence linking diet and lifestyle to the kind of chronic
inflammation associated with cancer and heart risk is still preliminary, this
evidence is not the only reason to eat ard live more healthfully. It is esti-
mated that eating a mostly plant-based diet, maintaining a healthy weight:
and exercising regularly can lower your cancer risk by up to 30 to, 40 per-.
cent. We know that these healthy habits work. The growing research adds
to our understanding of how they work.



Take The Front Pew! I
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT 5 P.M.




ABOUT.

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


on whether the county allows us.to
keep the jail revenue or take that
revenue and give us back the total




Z01
Continue
Tuesday, Meyer said, "I don't think
we can make any progress. The
mayor (Mike Schofield), more or
. less, has taken over. I feel we're at
an impasse. Sides have been taken.
"People are divided," she contin-
ued. "Too many have made ip their
minds based on gossip. And when
they have already made up their
minds, they.won't listen."
She mentioned being the subject
of a recall petition a couple months
ago "for picking on" the police
department. Now she is criticized
for supporting it. She also said no
progress is being made on various
town grant-programs, and she fears
the funding will be lost.
"I do love the town and I do love
the people," Meyer added. "I would
like to see the town prosper but,
just now, we're at a standstill.",
Meyer thinks the best solution
would be a change in the town's
form of government, from the cur-
renit strong-mayor/council to the
proposed manager/commission.


BUDGET
Continued From 1A


budget requested. I anticipate about
$600,000 in federal iiimate revenue-
this next year," he concluded.




LFO
d From 1A
That question will be put to resi-
dents in a vote later this month.
"We need a qualified administra-
tor, someone with municipal expe-:
rience, someone with business'..
experience, someone with educa-:'
tion," she said.
Meyer said if voters do not:
approve that change in govern-:
ment, it would be better to "dis-
solve the town."
Still, she insisted she will contirii .
ue to assist the town, participating:
in fund raisers or any other activi- .
ties to benefit the town and its resi;
dents..
"I'd like to see the town thrive,..
she concluded.
Along with her letter of resigna-.
tion, Meyer also submitted a letter
separating herself from town.
actions which might fall under the:
federal Whistleblower's Act.
She said a "lawyer friend"'
:advised her to submit such a letter,
but said she had no reason to other
than "for protection."


--L


Adpp-


I


~:.- .- -----;I~- .._..,~aar.---..~i .~-


f, ,



























































WAI-IIf'I II A 1A FLFAITAd RY SCHOOLfC BFI FRRATFS RECORD-BREA KING READERS


-v Students and teachers at Wauchula Elementary School enjoyed a day of celebration recently
1 after breaking all school records with a total 38,611 Accelerated Reader points for the 2005-06
' academic year. The day began with an awards ceremony, where pupils were recognized for their
't accomplishments. Then, the youngsters, their teachers and their families were held spellbound
Sby Mad Science demonstrations filled with audience participation and fascinating experiments.


Top point scorer Katie Smith, a fourth grader in Donnie Carver's class, was presented with the
grand prize of a brand-new bicycle by Yolanda Esquivel of Hardee Manor Healthcare Center as
her teacher, Assistant Principal Tracey Nix and Principal Michele Polk looked on (at bottom, right
of center). The fun concluded with a hotdog picnic with all the trimmings.


- By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
u: Hancock and Ables, Ables and
bi Hancock!
-r Twenty-five years have passed,
and with it a new tandem of attor-
sl ney Cliff Ables and a member of
1 the Hancock family.
Daughter, Jane Hancock, has
joined the firm her father estab-
i lished nearly three decades ago.
SSharing heritage with three well-
known Hardee Countians she will
now serve as reserve Wauchula
attorney, backing up longtime city
attorney Ables.
SHancock's mother Jean is a sister
to Novetta Beeson, Faye Shackel-
ford and Williard Durrance, thus
bringing local ties to her work here.
Most of her work will be in the
Sebring main office of Ables and
Hancock, giving her an opportunity
.to be near her brother Ned
Hancock, who is a member of the
Highlands County School Board.
From 1975 to 1981, Ables was
the junior partner of Hancock and
Ables, with Jane's father, Jack
SHancock. Later Ables was joined
by Anthony .Ritenour, who was


Culting


cdge


recently, appointed as Highlands
County judge. Ritenour had been
attorney for the Wauchula code
enforcement board and police
departments.
Ables didn't have to look too far
for a new partner. Hancock had
been a government lawyer in
Tampa for the last 25 years. With
her, sons off to college, she was
looking for a chance to come back
to her home area.
She graduated from Sebring
High School in 1974, received an
associate's degree from South
Florida Community College and
went on to the University to earn
her bachelor's degree in 1978. She
continued her studies there to grad-
uate from the UF College of Law in
1980.
Over the next decade she worked
full- or part-time as a staff attorney
at the Second District Court of
Appeals in Lakeland. Beginning in
1990, she was Assistant Attorney
General under both Bob Butter-
worth and Charlie Crist.
During that era, Hancock was
also legal advisor to the Florida
New Motor Vehicle Arbitration
Board, Florida's Lemon Law.


&


9linistries


Will.be hosting a


Chicken


& Yellow


Rice


Dinner


Saturday, June 10, 2006

11:00 A.M. 2:00 RM.
701 N. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL

Price of dinner is $6.00 per plate.
Dinner will include: chicken & yellow rice,
green beans, coleslaw, roll & dessert

Please call 773-3800 or 781-7210


to purchase tickets in advance.


6:8c


SPHO TO BY JOAN SEAMAN
Attorney Jane Hancock (foreground) was Introduced to the
Wauchula City Commission as the new partner of city attorney
Cliff Ables.


Leaving Tampa in April for the
rural scene, Hancock says, "I am
now very happy to be.'home' work-


ing for Cliff, primarily in the
Sebring office now, but I'm hoping
to expand into Wauchula soon."


As early as 4000 B.C., ancient people used crude pens consisting
of hollow straws or reeds that supported a short column of liquid.


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


THURSDAY, JUNE 8
Vlndividuals with Disabilities
Education Act, planning meet-
ing, Hardee Junior High School
exceptional student education
department, 200 S. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula, 9 a.m.
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting, Hardee
Junior High School media cen-
ter, 200 S. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula, 5 p.m.,
FRIDAY, JUNE 9
VHardee County Commis-
sion, planning session, Room
102, Courthouse Annex 1, 412
W. Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.
SATURDAY, JUNE 10
/Hardee High School Class
of '76, reunion planning meet-
ing, Pizza Hut, 1498 US 17 N.,
Wauchula, 5 p.m.
MONDAY, JUNE 12
VWauchula City Commis-
sion, regular meeting, City Hall,
225 E. Main St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.
VZolfo Springs Town Council,
regular meeting, Civic Center,
3210 US 17 S., Zolfo Springs, 7
p.m.
TUESDAY, JUNE 13
VHardee County Teen Preg-
nancy Prevention Alliance, reg-
ular meeting, Hardee County
Extension Service office, 507
Civic Center Dr., Wauchula,
9:30 a.m.
/Hardee County Coalition for
the Homeless, regular meeting,
113 N. Seventh Ave., Wauchula,
S1:30 p.m.
VBowling Green City Com-
mission, regular meeting, City
Hall, 104 E. Main St., Bowling
Green, 7 p.m.
THURSDAY, JUNE 15
VHardee County Commis-
sion, regular meeting, Room
102, Courthouse Annex 1, 412
W. Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.

A farewell is necessary before
you can meet again. And meet-
ing again, after moments or life-
times, is certain for those who
are friends.
-Richard Bach


Report Cards
Ready At HHS-
Hardee Senior High School
has announced that report
cards and Florida Comprehen-
sion Achievement Test reports
are now available.
Students may pick them up at
the high school Mondays-Thurs-
days from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the
front office..

Learn Computer
At The Library
The Hardee County Public
Library, 315 N. Sixth Ave. (U.S.
17 N.) will be hosting a mobile
lab with computer classes.
Enrollees will be using laptops
during the class, and will be
instructed on how to turn on a
computer and how to use the
Internet.
The classes will be on
Tuesday from 9 to 11 a.m. The
more advanced class will be
from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on
Tuesday. The afternoon class
will alternate programs such as
the Internet, e-mail, and
Microsoft Word each week.

50-Year Reunion
In The Planning
The Hardee High School
Class of 1956 will be having a
50-year reunion planning meet-
ing on June 16.
The meeting will be held at the
Panda Restaurant at 1 p.m.,
806 S. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17 S.) in
Wauchula. Past class members
are invited to attend the meet-
ing.






P BL A IS l i



iic~lcphoc (63)773325


June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3A


SH.acock Joins. ity Law Firm
H "adiiock Joins Cityi Law Firm


cTailb cfmp/e


I,







4A The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006



Obituaries


WILLIAM H. GILLIARD
William H. Gilliard, 85, of Zolfo
Springs, died on Thursday, June 1,
2006.
Born March 6, 1921 to the late
Jess L. and Vilantie Gilliard in
Pelham, Ga., he served in the U.S.
Army during WWII. He was a for-
mer Mayor of Zolfo Springs and
was instrumental in getting the first
street lights installed.
He was preceded in death by his
wife Essie Mae and one son Dale.
He is survived by one daughter
Elizabeth Annette Cole and hus-
band Wendell of Zolfo Springs; two
sons, William Larry Gilliard and
wife Jewel of Madisonville, Tenn.
and Gerald Lamar Gilliard and wife
Joy of Zolfo Springs; 10 grandchil-
dren; and 13 great-grandchildren;
and one sister Lillie Crews of Zolfo
Springs.
Visitation was on June 4 from 4
to 6 p.m. at the funeral home.
Services were held on Monday,
June 5, at 10 a.m. at the Brant
Funeral Chapel. Burial was in New
Hope Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


DESIREE MAY CALVO
MORALES
Desiree May Calvo Morales,
infant, died, May 21, 2006.
She is survived by her mother
Berta Morales of Zolfo Springs;
father Steward Calvo; maternal
grandfather Ines Mendoza of Zolfo
Springs; maternal grandmother
Shirley Matias; uncle Michael
Guerrero of Wauchula; maternal
great-grandmother Charlotte Riley
of Maryland; great-grandfather
Robert Riley Sr. of Maryland;
paternal grandfather Weymar Calvo
of Miami; paternal grandmother
Aracelly Posso of Miami; uncle
Kendri Calvo of Texas; aunt Yenny
Liani of Miami; uncle Jhohan
Calvo of Miami; aunt Viaviana
Montoya and Joslin Calvo of
Miami.
Visitation was held on Thursday,
May 25 at Brant Funeral Chapel.
Services were held Sunday, May 28
at Boweus Cemetery in Snow Hill,
Maryland.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


At voting A 0emoko


JAMES RYLEY
DUDLEY
James Ryley Dudley, 44, of
Wauchula, died May 24, 2006 in
Wauchula.
He was born March 11, 1962 in
Lansing, Mich.
Survivors include his mother,
Della Mae Dudley of Wauchula;
wife, Jimmie McDaniel Dudley
of North Carolina; one son, Riley
Dale Dudley of Alaska; and one
sister, Tommie Sue Brown of
Valrico.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home



.9R o00g ie o#0


NICOLAS NAVARO
TORRES
Nicolas Navaro Torres, 28, of
Zolfo Springs, died May 28,
2006 in Wauchula.
He was born Feb. 10, 1978, in
Los Amoles De Guadalcasar,
San Luis Potosi, Mexico. He had
resided a short time in Hardee
County, coming from Michigan.
He was an agricultural worker
and an Catholic.
Survivors include his parents,
Candelario and Brijida of
Mexico; one daughter, Guada-
lupe of Mexico; one brother,
Saturena Torres of South
Carolina; and one sister, Juana
Torres of Mexico.
Services and burial will be
held in Mexico.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


DAVID FRANKLIN
TOMLINSON SR.
David Franklin Tomlinson Sr.,
72, formerly of Wauchula, died
Wednesday, May 31, 2006 in
Sarasota.
Born Sept. 9, 1933 in Hardee
County to James and Myrte Tom-
linson, he was a graduate of Hardee
High School. He remained on the
family farm until 1959. He joined
the Florida Highway Patrol and
was stationed in Moore Haven,
Clewiston and Okeechobee. In
1974 he returned to the family
farm.
He was preceded in death by one
daughter, Sandra Diane Tomlinson;
his parents Myrte Stephens Tom-
linson and James M. Tomlinson;
and one brother Ray Tomlinson.
He was married to Vida Albritton
Tomlinson for 53 years.
Survivors include one son and
daughter-in-law Frank and Denise
Tomlinson; two granddaughters,
Melissa and Stephanie tomlinson;
two brothers Orin Tomlinson and
Earl Tomlinson and wife Dot; and
one sister, Freda Bowen and hus-
band Glen.
Funeral services were held on
Friday, June 2 at 2 p.m. with visita-
tion one hour prior to services.
Burial was in Paynes Creek Ceme-
tery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula

NICOLAS NAVARO TORRES
Nicolas Navaro Torres, 28, of
Zolfo Springs, died May 28, 2006
in Wauchula.
He was born Feb. 10, 1978, in
Los Amoles De Guadalcasar, San
Luis Potosi, Mexico. He had
resided a short time in Hardee
County, coming from Michigan. He
was an agricultural worker and an
Catholic.
Survivors include his parents,
Candelario and Brijida of Mexico;
one daughter, Guadalupe of Mexi-
co; one brother, Saturena Torres of
South Carolina; and one sister,
Juana Torres of Mexico.
Services and burial will be held
in Mexico.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula

MARY E. HIMROD
Mary E. Himrod, 93, died Tues-
day, May 30, 2006, in Port Char-
lotte.
She was a lifelong resident of
Hardee County. She was atnember
of First United Methodist Church.
She is survived by one son
Malone D. Himrod Jr. of Engle-
wood; one daughter Sophie Pridgen
of Franklin, N.C.; one sister Louise
Bostick of Wauchula; three grand-
children; and seven great-grand-
children.
Funeral services were held
Saturday, June 3 at 10 a.m. at Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


ESPERANZA "HOPE"
MORALEZ GARAY
Esperanza "Hope" Moralez
Garay, 56, of Wauchula, died
SMonday, June 5, 2006.
She was a Hardee Junior High
School teacher.
Survivors include one daughter
Deborah Naranjo; three sons
Richard Loredo, Christopher Garay
and Elliott Garay; 10 brothers and
sisters; and 10 grandchildren.
Visitation was Wednesday, June
7 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home. Funeral services are today
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. at the funeral
home with interment to follow in
Wauchula Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula

ESPERANZA "HOPE" ,
MORALE GARAY
Esperanza "Hope" Moralez
Garay our beloved mother
passed away on Monday, June 5,
2006.
She is survived by four chil-
dren, Deborah Naranjo, Richard
Loredo, Christopher Garay and
Elliott Garay; by 10 brothers and
sisters; and leaves a legacy of 10
beautiful grandchildren whom
will cherish her always.
She leaves behind a lifetime of
wonderful memories to all those
that knew her. She leaves an
impression in the hearts and
minds of her students she taught
at Hardee Junior High School.
She leaves behind a legacy that
only eternity will reveal on that


REALLY SMOKIN' Hardee County is now welcoming another
new restaurant. The latest restaurant is Smile-N-Jack's BBQ, which opened
on Saturday, May 20, at 705 S. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17) in Wauchula.
The owners are Curtis and Lisa Frazier. They have recently moved to
Wauchula from Lakeland. Curtis Frazier says they moved here because he
is originally from here. He also said that they both knew that Hardee
County needs a good barbecue restaurant.
Smile-N-Jack's delivers and caters. Delivery charges depend on dis-
tance. As far as catering goes, the Fraziers will either take the food to the
location needed or it can be picked up at the restaurant. There is also a spe-
cial catering truck with a grill on wheels that can be used for catering.
The eatery serves steaks, ribs, chicken, pork, hamburgers and sausage.
Its specialty is ribs. It is rated No. 5 in the country by Cable News Network


. 1 -


I. \ *, ,t I' I


i


PHOTO BY KIMBERLY PATARINI
Smile-N-Jack's serves up barbecued ribs, pork, chicken, and
sausage.
barbecue judge Ray Lampe. The ribs and pork are smoked over oak wood.
The pork is smoked for 8-10 hours and the ribs are smoked for eight hours.



$575 FOR ZSE


S-LAST DAY

3 4LY

p; |I
- _'


1 Ii,* '* i '* I '* ; I "*' I



EASE 11









"t
..
/ .


. r


PHO~O Be ifICHAtL iELEL
English Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep of Wauchula recently presented a
check for $575 to Zolfo Springs Elementary. The Dodge division
of Daimler Chrysler donated $50 to ZSE for expenses involved in
hosting the event and an additional $5 for each demonstration
drive completed. Dodge Caravan, Magnum, and Ramx 1500
Mega Cab vehicles were provided for parents and friends to test
drive and examine. English provided the vehicles and volunteers
from the dealership were on had to assist. "Drive for the Kids is
a great program. We're interested in helping the schools, and
everyone has a good time," said Kevin Hanchey, sales manager
of English. "Parents are interested in testing the versatility of
these vehicles and we are able to provide additional dollars to
the school at no cost to the community." Pictured above are
Kevin Smith of English and Jan Beckley, principle of Zolfo
Springs Elementary.


JAMES RYLEY DUDLEY
'James Ryley Dudley, 44, of
Wauchula, died May 24, 2006 in
Wauchula.
He was born March 11, 1962 in
Lansing, Mich.
Survivors include his mother,
Della Mae Dudley of Wauchula;
wife, Jimmie McDaniel Dudley of
North Carolina; one son, Riley
Dale Dudley of Alaska; and one
sister, Tommie Sue Brown of
Valrico.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


FRANCES PAIGE WHEELER
Frances Paige Wheeler, 89, of
Bartow, died Sunday, June 4, 2006
at Rohr Nursing Home in Bartow.
. A former resident of the
Wauchula area, she was born Jan.
21, 1917 at Hubbard, Texas. She
moved to Bartow from Brooksville
13 years ago. She was a reception-
ist, member of the Scott Lake
Baptist Church in Lakeland and on
the Gulf Ridge Boy Scouts of
America council in Tampa for eight
years.
She was preceded in death by her
husband Maurice Paige.
Survivors include two daughters
Dorothy Swartz of Bartow and
Peggy Johnson of North Augusta,
S.C.; one son Frank Paige of
Broomfield, Colo.; two brothers
Bill Wylie of Meyia, Texas and Lee
Roy Wylie of Mansfield, Texas;
four grandchildren; and six great-
grandchildren.
Visitation is today (Thursday)
from 9 to 10 a.m. at the funeral
home. Services are at 10 a.m. at
Whidden-McLean Funeral Home,
650 E. Main St., Bartow with the
reverends John Holloway, Charles
Swartz and Stuart Carver officiat-
ing. Interment will following in
Wauchula Cemetery.
Whidden-McLean
Funeral Home
Bartow


ABOUT ,..
School News
The Herald-Advocate
encourages submissions
from Hardee County
schools. Photos and write-
ups should be of recent
events, and must include
first and last names for both
students and teachers.
Identify photos .front to
back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


Smile-N-Jack's is open from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through
Saturday.
"The community has been very nice and we have been busy from peo-
ple coming to check out the new place," says Frazier. Frazier also says that
the community has been very responsive and very helpful to them. ;
This is the fourth restaurant that the Fraziers have opened. One of the
four is Happy Jack's BBQ in Lakeland, which won a three-star rating from
the Lakeland Ledger.
Smile-N-Jack's offers a free meal on a customer's birthday. Bring a dri-
ver's license for proof of birthdate.


GOOD GRILLIN' Vermilye's American Grill is now open and
.ready for business.
SVermilye's is owned by Mike Vermilye with help from his girlfriendi
Da'Vita Greer. It is located at 1434 U.S. 17 N. (in the Wal-Mart Shopping
Center).'It officially opened on Thursday, May 25.
This is Vermilye's first restaurant. Both Vermilye and Greer have aboul
18 years of experience in the restaurant business. Vermilye decided to open
his own restaurant in Wauchula because he is originally from here.
The lunch menu includes foods such as homemade soup, buffalo chick-b
en salad, Cuban sandwiches and burgers.
Dinner entrees include such selections as crab cakes, chicken marsala
and the Smokey Mountain sirloin steak.. The eatery offers sides such asF
baked sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, steak'fries and coleslaw.
The kid's menu features chicken tenders, macaroni and cheese aqd
grilled chicken breasts.
Vermilye's American Grill offers party platters on its sandwiches, sadl
ads, wings, and appetizers. It does ask that customers call ahead to request
the platters.
Its hours are Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and
Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
"The community has been very supportive and very nice," sais
Vermilye. "At our restaurant we are down-to-earth people," says Greer.
"We have a very comfortable atmosphere and almost everyone who comes
in knows each other."



IL.II I_ ...
............G.R. e L


Vermilye's Americann Grill offers an assortment of food whlc!
features Cuban sandwiches and a wide range of wings.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call Kimberly
Patarini at 773-3255 with your business news. 4.I

Letter To The Editor

Wauchula Lions Club

U.S. Troop Support Campaign
Dear Editor,
To Residents and Business Owners ...
The Wauchula Lions Club is organizing a campaign to show members
of our community and beyond that a great-many residents and local busi-
nesses support our troops here and abroad. There will be two opportunities
for you to show your support.
From now until July 4 we will be seeking donations from residents and
businesses to help purchase prepaid calling cards for our troops currently
serving overseas.,The Wauchula Kiwanis Club has also committed to match
up to $2,500 to show their support.
We will also be having a "Best Decorated/Most Patriotic" contest,
Show your support by decorating your home and/or business.
Any person or business making donations for the prepaid phone cards
and the winner of the "Best Decorated/Most Patriotic: contest will bP
included in a full-page ad in the Herald-Advocate at the end of the cafi
paign.
An upcoming letter to the editor will list the soldiers from our com-
munity that are currently serving our country. '
Sincerely,
Wauchula Lions Club
"Support our Troops" Committee
Doug Knight, Kathleen Roehm, Pattie Detwiler


Support our Troops Campaign
Name
Address
City Phone (optional)
Mail Contributions to:
Wauchula Lions Club
c/o PO BOX 248
Wauchula, FL 33873
Blue Level $500 and up
White Level -$250-$499
Red Level $20-$249
1 I want my business/residence considered for the "Best Decorated/Most Patriotic" Contest


A Sincere Thank You


I would like to take this opportunity
to thank the people of Hardee County
for their support during the illness
and home going of my wife, Debbie.
The flowers, cards, food, prayers, and
comfort shown by everyone were a
blessing to my life. At times like
these, words are insufficient to
express my heartfelt gratitude and
appreciation to this community.

My staff has been loyal and faithful
filling in for me during my extended
absence, and I now look forward to
ministering to the needs of the people
of this community once again.
Sincerely,

efmi4' eR-ikcvd


FUNERAL HOMES


A Trusted Family Name Since 1906


529 West Main Street,
Wauchula

773-9773


day.
To our mom and friend, we
will always rejoice at the life you
shared with us.
Friends may call on
Wednesday, June 7, 2006 from 6
until 8 p.m. at the funeral home.
Services will on Thursday, June
8, 2006 at the Brant Funeral
Chapel at 10 a.m. with burial to
follow in W uchula Cemetery.
Brant funeral Chapel.
Wauchula, 6:8c


""UU"


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June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5A


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6A The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006


Honor Roll


North Wauchula Elementary School
Fourth Nine Weeks Honor Roll
Kindergarten


All E's
Zachary Macias
Caleb McCoy
Mario Gomez
Carlos Perez
Nicklaus Nichols
Kaylee Derby
Jesula Charles
Ray Zuniga
Nubia Gomez
Layla Santoyo
Cierra Jones
'Julissa Flores
Adela Rojas
Mercedes Owens
William Ennis
Aaliyah Villafuerte
Kendral Smith
Dominique Rojas
Adelina Luna-Muniz.
Noah Herrera
Alexandrea Hernandez
Alex Hernendez
Krupa Ahir
Laura Arce
Enrique "B.J. Gonzales
Jesaiah Delgado
Sydni Lopez
Garrett Norris
Cody Ellis
Halie Strey
Sarah Peoples


All E's
Rouke Madronal
Elizabeth Weeks
Alexis Neel
Adelina Villafranca
Cody Gillis

All E/S's
Elena Briones
Abigail Candelario
Jazmine Venegas
Laynee Galvan
Petra Lopez
Angel Conejo
Ra'hym Lewis
Anthony Loredo
Yosselin Mata
Edith Lopez
Mallory Gough
Jordan Contreras
Evan Badillo
Anwaun Hines-Gaines
Jarisa Lindsey
Mahala Pippin
Yamin Ramirez
Cori-Ann Rosales
Samantha Sockalosky
Jose Sustaita
Angelica Salas
Juan Guerrero
Alex Paulino
Mary Brown


First Grade


All A's
Vanessa Deloera
Cecilio Hernandez
Audra Weeks
Rosendo Saldana
Erika Martinez
Sarah Nicholson
Jeremy Reyna
Sarah Welch
Gerardo Jaimes
Stevie DeLarosa
Darby Farr
Agustin Morales
Cameron Strey
Noah Valletutti
Priscilla Villazana
Gannon Watson
Jessica Bembry
Lance Bursler
Sherry Lee
Kathy Marcial-Palacios
Kalisa Outley
Luciano Villafranca
Daymian Shoop
Cade Roberts
Rodrigo Mendieta
Marisa Gonzalez
Desiree Ford
'Lorenzo-Fairias '
J;.LT.:Cana.ry ,
Logan Cunningham
Molly Hartman


All A's
Boone Paris
Lusero Salgado

All A/B's
Cavaris Snell
Francisco Vargas
Litzy Vargas
Jhett See
Sayra Campos
Annetude Delhomme
Maricruz Gonzales
Drew Mimbs
Lawrence Walker
Selena Palacios
Aaron Estrada
Joshua Smith
Jose Gomez
Marquis Delgado
Carly Nadaskay
Will Roberts
Emily Maldonado
Chris Paugh
Courtney O'Bryan
Jennifer Lopez
Jacob Esquivel
Livenson Metayer
Annette Mondragon
Lucero Paz I
Breanna Rodriguez. --
Jesse Santoyo
Kaitlyn Vobroucek


Second Grade


All A's
Emily Bennett
Austin Wallace
Luis Deloera
McClain Mitchell
Faith Hodges
Danielle Weeks

AllA/B's
Damaris Arana
Brooke Fones
Shane Fulk
Jennifer Lopez
Omar Alamia
Alondra Meza
Trey Faulk
Berenice Roblero
Julissa Orfiz-Ortiz
Stephanie Narciso
Mireya Mondragon
Briana Arce
Amanda Bandy
Sonya Cavillo


AllbA/B's
Alexis Chavez
Erica Deloera
Emily Johnson
Dalton Krell,
Sawan Patel
Jordan Petrie
Joselyn Thompson
Jasmine Thompkins
Kyra Rivera
Cassidy Powell
Jorge Perez
Jakayla Mosley
Matthew Hall
Andrew Hagans
Alyssa Ennis
Felise Ehrenkaufer
Joel Garland
Crystal Morales
Zozimo Saldana
Danny Sustaita
Ty Trammell
Martha Valadez


London's Big Ben is named after Sir Benjamin Hall, the Chief Com-
missioner of Works when the bell was cast.


Be A Good Sport!
SPORTS NEWS DEADLINE IS NOON ON MONDAY






The Wing Is The Sweetest Part
Thanksgiving was disappointing, when I was a child,
Now I look back on that day, and it makes me smile.
First the leg was carved and neatly placed on mama's plate,
She would always smile and say, "Umm, it sure looks great!"
Her words pleased the family, it somewhat set the mood,
For we kids did the chopping and our dad, prepared the food.
Next, my sisters got the turkey breasts, they desired to eat,
Dad preferred the secondjoint, he liked the darker meat.
When it canie around to me, it amused the family,
As usual, Iprotested, when he passed the wing to me.
Then Dad would bless the table, starting with his favorite prayer
Years later, nothing's changed, the tradition is still there,
Except I am no longer a child, I can pick what I shall eat!
I choose the wing and happy to say, it's still a savory treat.
Thanksgiving isfor loving Lord I thank you from the heart,
And Daddy, too, because he knew, the wing... is the sweetest part.
-LillianA. Lop -Collazo-Jackso
BowflingGnen
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input. Only your
original work may be submitted. Send your poetry to: Poet's Place,
The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


Third Grade


All A's
Allison Farr
Mike Cao
Christian Pena

All A/B's
Patrick Craycraft
Sadie King
Tomas Gomez
Chloe Harvey
George Perez
Cheyanne Skinner
Wyatt Montgomery
Daynaa Cruz
Hayley Derby


All A/B's
Frank Farias
Melanie Harshburger,
Uriel Estrada
Jose Gonzales
Keifer Kedzior
Dylan Norwood
Parker Murphy
Logan Boyd
Nancy Spinks
Brianna Cavazos
Emily Albritton
Claudio Luna-Muniz
Jacob Pakovich
Tiffany Owens


Fourth Grade


All A's
Irene Ruiz-Venegas
Erica Roberts
Rachel Roberts
Zachary Neuhofer
Brea Farrer
Lacey McClenithan
Jacob Neuhofer
Dana Miller
Maribel Deloera
Kramer Royal
Isabel Abel
Hailey Clements
Megan Hartman
All A/B's
Kayleigh Johnson
Taylor Hodges
Lorena DeLoera
Bradley Brewer
Riana Parks
Triston Montgomery
Dieunide Metayer
Dana Singleton


All A/B's
Blaine Harshburger
Adriana Aguilar
Adriana Hernandez
Wyatt Maddox
Christian Manresa
Kaitlyn Shaw
Emily Rhodes
Marisol Sustaita
Becky Fleury
,Briana Gardner
Rosalina Jaimes
Angela Heukeroth
Leah Weeks
Erick Alvizo
Rachel Burton
T.J. Clax
Laura Jaimes
Johnny Hernandez
Janet Hernandez
Gerardo Rojas
Michael Ugalde
Erica Molina


Fifth Grade


All A's
Cory Taylor
Tyler Ennis
Wilson Bembry
Will Bennett
Kayla Knight
Alan Murphy
Kayla Nichols
Taylor Tompkins
Angelica Sustaita
Danielle Milby
Stuart Spinks
All A/B's
Savannah Taylor
Martin Luna
Daniel Boehm
Oralia Araujo
Joshua Dressel
Matthew Grace
Michael Grace


All A/B's
Allison Allen-Hunter
Carlos Deloera
Catarina Deloera
Anthony Maldonado
Adna Metayer
Brandon Vargas
Kalob Rickett
Willie Godwin
.Kalob Benton
Jesus Hernandez
Trenton Moon
Adriana Arroyo
William Beattie
Effie Pace
Keliyah White
Paul Gough
Shelby Lambert
Michael Moreno
Julie Prestridge


Wauchula Elementary School
Fourth Nine Weeks Honor Roll
Kindergarten


All E's
Taylor Bone
Hope Elliott
Damar Harris
Katharine McClellan
SEllie Palmer
Brooke Shaw
Cole Terrell
SYisselle Mier
Lindsey Barwick
Tanner Carlton
Katie Carver
Shelby Gibson
Mariela Miramontes
Sophie Cardenas
Emily Patarini
Maribel Rodriguez
Jax Ullrich
Bridgette Conley
Lilianna Ponce
Gabriella Ruiz
Gavin Morey
Savannah Mullins
Madison Warnock
Rene Medina
Nubia Hernandez
Destiny Scheel
Alexia Hodges
Mitchell Allen
Joshua Ward
Alexx Brant
Gracie Criss
Dawson Ratliff
Faith Arreola
Conrad Pace
Saralynne Adair
Darwyn Howard
All E/S's
Gracie Albritton
Corie Benton
Maria Paniagua
Miguel Ruiz
Norma Hernandez


AH UE/S'$
Miguel Perez,
Tylor Alvarado
Briana Juarez
David Duran
Shanel'Faulk
Jeremiah Mancillas
Brilyance Augustus
Cody Davis
. Armando Gonzalez
Daniel Salazar
Erika Garcia
Alicia Lopez
Sergio Delgado
Sierra Coker
Sophia Diakomihalis
Joel Hernandez
Bryan Knox
Brianna Medrano,
Jennifer Lucatero
Jose Castillo
Lexi Harris
Joey Smith
Cameron Herrera
Christian Arreola
Quinton Yates
Alicia Ruiz
' Marisol Silos
Adrian DeLeon
Zackary Deuberry
Melissa Santellan
Dinah Caldwell
Ayana Daniels
Ricardo Gomez-Molina
Emily Pierce
Mariah Villarreal
Ben Adams
Tomas De La Paz
Tom Pace
Alex Renteria
Alexis Piedad
Adelina Servin
Makayla Casey


PTI RINTER SISgHERS

P.lO.Btox 338 Wl R IIL1aR!,FL33I873






YOU Can Appear In...

kids korner
Hey, kidae How would you like your work to be printed in the paper?
Draw us a picture, write us a poem, make up a story or tell us a joke.
If you're sending us a drawing, use pencils or markers, not crayons.
And leave the lined notebook paper for homework, not your artwork.
Then print your name and age, your parents names and the town
where you live on the back. Get mom or dad to bring it to our office
or put it In the mall to: kids komer, The Herald-Advocate, RO. Box

338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


All A's
Brenda Miramontes
Kristian Judah
Deisy Piedad
Mara Goodwyn
Brandi Swearingen
Shelby Dees
Ally Dotson
Morgan Evans
Jordan Evers
Angelica Gonzalez
Hayden Hawthorne
Kaydance Owens
Morgan Walters
Logan Gunnoe
Sean Nickens
Eduardo Lopez
Chris Delatorre
Rebecca Albritton
Reyna Kirkland
Cheyenne Pohl
Genesis Torres
Austin Beck

All A/B's
Conner Crawford
Shelby Brown


All A's
Alex Ullrich
Patrick Carlton
Milli Jones
Casey Leal
SDaiielle Smith
Adam Smith'
Cody Spencer
Makayla Deuberry
Haneen Ottallah
Miles Yates

All A/B's
Sarah Beth Albritton'
Kasandra Alvarez
Cain Roman
Anahi Arroyo
Brooke Dixon
Jace Flemer
Brinkley Yeomans
Alysa Salazar
Dana Terrell
Gemi Saunders
Kevin Kunkel
Tanor Durden
Leonel Rodriguez ,
Donnie Williams
Elizabeth Alvarez
Victor Deloera


All A's
Luke Winter
Savannah Mille
Jessica Hernan
Carlista Brown
Brookelyn Knig
Caroline Durrai
David Gibson
Lark Lukawski
Luke Palmer
Kristopher John
Holly Hughes
Errica Snelling
Mason Gough
Emily Hughes
Dalton Reas
Katie Smith

All A/B's
Karlee Henders
German Figuer


All A's
Lauren Page
Sarah-Joy'
Roxborough
Jacob Evans
Jenna Flemer
Kaylee Mancill
Jennifer Napier
All A/B's
Zane Whiteside
Erika Andrews


First Grade


All A's
Shayna Harned
Parker Carlton
Chase Benton
Brooklyn Graham
Isaac Flores
Connor Pritchard
Abel Villarreal
Aaron Delatorre
Selena Miranda
Madison Rucker
Wyatt Zeigler
Abigail Castaneda
Esmeralda Arana
Rosie Fimbres
Landon Albritton
Holly Brown
Abby Clark
Morgan Crews
Hayden Lindsey
Levi Lovett
Adrian Bruno
Antonia Silos
Jennifer Vasquez

All A/B's
Kendall Winter
Faith Hays
Hunter Scranton
Dalton Richey
Brenna Parker
Kyle Choate


All A/B's
Shayla Albritton
Elias Valdez
Andrea Crawford
Lysette Cisneros
Alexis Gagnon
Erika Ramirez
Isaiah Chavez
Jessie Igo
Braddock Collom
Jennifer Aguilar
Aracely Lopez
Dakota Altman
Dylan Carmona
Rajhay Clark
Juan Hernandez
Angelica Soria
Calee Jardine
Amber Kilgore
Shelia Parlor
Brenda Rosas
Michaela Villarreal
Kaylee Hogenauer
Catalina Longoria
Arianna Perez
Eddie Kilgore
Dalton Igo
Makayla Dickey
Jaquavious Kimbrough
Araceli Mota
Keith Choate
Armando Cardenas


All A/B's
Andrew Alvarado
Sarah McClenithan
Hunter Bryant
Dalton Tubbs
Russell Weems
Josie Moore
Beatriz Macedo
Karley White
Katey Crawford
Rdsienell Rivers
Karan Limbachiya
Taylor Roberts
Bryan Cisneros
Austin Rimes
Dalton Baker
Gabrielle Allen
SAhlam Alqabsi
Rachel Parlor
Rebeca Espinoza
Samantha Salazar
Armando Garcia
Andrew Patterson
Emory Smith
Raul Diaz
Hannah Carlton
Seth McGee
Carly Wadsworth.


All A/B's
Caitlin Dufresne
Angel Mancillas
Joseph Beldin
Jordan Jones
Eeah Chavez
Cesar Ramirez
Hainah Napier
Ashleigh Prieto
Emily Ashkenase
Cesar Fembres
Aron Ruiz
Caitlin Castaneda
Daniel Kalinuk
Cassidy Lane
Keyshawn McLeod
Adriana Olivas
Alexandra Lopez
Kayla Rios
Roberto Palacios
Austin Altman
Valentina Cardoza
Mikey Heine
Jose Jurado
Naushin Khan
Kristiana Fluerimond
Diana Arana
Carlonica Brown
Maria Gonzalez
Tatiana Juarez


All A/B's
Jonathan Torres
r Rubisel Mejia
dez Jacob Bolin
Zachary Battles
ght Arissa Camel
nce Brooke Conley
Tyler Helms
Brandon Beatty
Moises Duran
ison Chantel Carlton
Stephanie Belmares
Justin Woods
Alexan Maddox
Austin McClellan
Zackery Taylor
Jorge Nolasco
Kelly Beall
Leah Cisneros
on Hannah Grisinger
oa Martina Perez

Fifth Grade


All A/B's
Cintia Hernandez
Layla Luna
Alma Ruiz
Rufino Gabriel
Krista Pilkington
Stephanie Helveston
Ashley Armstrong
Reham Alqabsi.
Michael Ramirez
Rosalinda Alvarez


Good communication is as stimulating as black coffee and just as
hard to sleep after.
-Anne Morrow Lindbergh



S Don't Hesitate!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.


as


Second Grade


Third Grade


Fourth Grade



------
----


















A reader from St. Petersburg early 1900s. His added that his
shared his story with me a few days grandfather was named after Gen.
ago over the phone. He is John Robert E. Lee and was born in 1864
Merada, and he attended Bowling in Leesburg. He had also owned a
Green Elementary in second -packing house and a merchandise
through fourth grades during. --' i tore in Bowling Green in the '20s
World War II era of the 1940s. rt30s.
He gave a history of Bowlingr^:.,,.John's grandmother had five chil-
Green Elementary, saying that his 'dren and ran a restaurant at one time
grandfather, Robert Lee Hopson, in Bowling Green. In the '40s and
had owned the property when he '50s, the grandfather sold the prop-
had an orange grove there in the erty to John's father, Robert, who in
turn sold it to the school. The price
was about $200 for the 20 acres
where the current school is now. .
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE The older generations of the
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Merada family rest in the cemetery
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR of the Methodist church in Bowling
HARDEE COUNTY Green, the Hopson family of grand-
CASE NO. 252006CA000250 parents and parents of John. It is a
very nice cemetery which is nicely.
DONALD E. SMITH and wife. kept.
SUSAN C. SMITH, John expressed interest in follow-
Plaintiffs, ing up his family genealogy
vs. through research on the Web. His
MAMIE BELLE BAXA, also known as great-grandfather, John Sydney
MAMIE BAXA; CHARLES CURK- Hopson, was a lieutenant in the
ENDOLL; ARTHUR B. CURKENDOLL Confederate Army of the 17th
and GLEN CURKENDOLL, being the Infantry of Company D. He had.
only heird of WILBUR CURK- stationed at Fort Bennin
ENDOLL, deceased; if alive or if been stationed at Fort Bennng's
dead, and their unknown spouses, Brigade in Georgia fighting battles
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, such as Fredericksburg among oth-
and all other parties claiming by, ers of the Civil War. He came to
through, under or against them, Leesburg in 1863 and John's graid-
Defendant(s). / father was born the year, after.

NOTICE OF ACTION Wow! The interesting facts you find
on the Web!
TQ THE DEFENDANTS: John Merada was in the Coast
MAMIE BELLE BAXA, also known Guard and is now a retired pharma-
as MAMIE BAXA cist living in St. Petersburg with his
Residence Unknowwife.


CHARLES CURKENDOLL
Weston Road
Buckhannon, WV 26201
Last Known Residence Address
ARTHUR B. CURKENDOLL
1381 Forest Glen Drive, Apt. 2
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44221
Last Known Residence Address
GLEN CURKENDOLL,
7700 Porcher Avenue
Myrtle Beach, SC 29572
Last Known Residence Address
if alive or if dead, and their unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under or against
them
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you,to quiet
title on the following described prop-
erty in Hardee County, Florida:
SNE 1/4 of SE 1/4.ofNW,14,
Section 17, TpwnshlR;-3j4
South, Range 25 East, Hardee
County, Florida
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
JOHN W. H. BURTON of Burton &
Burton, PA., Post Office Drawer 1729,
Wauchula, Florida 33873, on or
before the 23 day of June, 2006, and
file the original with the Clerk of the
Court either. before service on
Plaintiffs' attorney or immediately
thereafter, or a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on this 17 day of May,
2006.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of the Courts
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
5:25; 6:1,8,15c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE.TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 252006DR000235
Cynthia Ann Trevino
Petitioner,
and
Noah Anthony Trevino,
Respondent,
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
To: Noah Anthony Trevino, 704 E.
Palmetto St., Wauchula, FL 33873
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Cynthia A. Trevino, whose address is
704 E. Palmetto St., Wauchula, FL
33873, on or before June 16, 2006,
and file the original with the clerk of
this Court at 417 W. Main St.,
Wauchula, FL 33873, before service
on Petitioner or immediately there-
after. If you fail to do so, a default may
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of your
current address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclosure
of documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or striking
of pleadings.
DATED May 11, 2006.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
5:18-6:8p


Checking one's genealogy c
,exciting. The Web does ma
much easier to search docur
and sources related to family I
ries. Check the local library
Wauchula for additional infc
tion on tracing your family
Good luck!





IN THE CIRCUIT COURt OF
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLOOR
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO:25-2006-CA-00008
DIVISION
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC
CESSOR BY MERGER TO C
MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CC
RATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RUBELCI GALVEZ-ORTEGA, et
Defendant(s). /

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE S


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
suant to a Final Judgeme
Mortgage Foreclosure dated M
2006 and entered In Case NI
2006-CA-000088 of the Circuit
of the TENTH Judicial Circuit I
for HARDEE County, Florida, w
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC
CESSOR BY MERGER TO C
MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CC
RATION, is the Plaintiff and RU
GALVEZ-ORTEGA; DONNA GA
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PA
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UI
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN N
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEA
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKI
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTE
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIM
are Defendants, I will sell to the
est and best bidder for cash
NORTH FRONT DOOR OF
HARDEE COUNTY COURTHC
417 W. MAIN STREET at 11:00 A
the 21" day of June, 2006, the f
ing described property as set f(
said Final Judgment:
LOTS 12 AND 13, OF BLOCK
OF WAUCHULA HILLS SUBD
SION, ACCORDING TO HE P
THEREOF, AS RECORDED
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 1, OF
PUBLIC RECORDS OF HARI
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A MOB
HOME LOCATED THEREON
A PERMANENT FIXTU
AND APPURTENANCE THE
TO, DESCRIBED AS: A 2
SUMMERHILL. MODEL #720
SKYLINE MOBILE HOME; ID
TIFICATION NUMBER C1-
0439-R-A/B.
A/K/A 2001 ALAMO DRI
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
WITNESS MY HAND and the s
this Court on May 31, 2006.
B. Hugh B
Clerk of the Circuit
By: Connie
Deputy
In accordance with the Ame
Disabilities Act, persons with d
ties needing a special accomo
to participate in this proce
should contact the Indlvidu
agency sending the notice
Echevarria, McCalla, Raymer, I
& Frappier, 601 Bayshore Blvd.,
800, Tampa, Florida 33606, tele
(813) 251-4766, not later than
(7) days prior to the proceed
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-80
8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-87
Florida Relay Service.
6


an be
ke it
nents
histo-
ry in
)rma-
tree.






THE
AND
IIDA

88

suc-
;HASE


Sports Sense
& Nonsense
SBy Joan Seaman


Spring football was a success, capped with a 38-26 victory over vis-
iting Lake Wales. Summer conditioning will start shortly and take a break
just before the August start of school.

Girls ages 14 to 18 are invited to join a fast-pitch softball travel team
which is forming. For more information, call 773-0236.

The summer Sertoma Junior Golf tour kicked off last weekend with the
adult/child tournament in Sebring, During the summer, competition will be
held at golf courses in-Highlands, Hardee and DeSoto counties.
Hardee golf coach George Heine and up-coming senior Justin Painter
combined talents to win Sunday's opening event with a gross score of 75
and net of 68 on the alternate-shot format to beat Grover Crawford and
Blake Liles.
In the boys first flight division, Charles and Lincoln Saunders lost on
a match of the cards with Andrew and Drew Hornick, both scoring a 98
gross and net of 80. And, in the second flight Jhett and Jim See won with a
net of 77.

Speaking of golf, local duffers are reminded that the Frank Zajicek
benefit golf tournament was rescheduled to Saturday. All proceeds benefit
the United Methodist missionary and his work.

Hardee Youth Sports recently' finished the season for the softball
Ponytails and Belles, and the baseball Dixie Boys and Dixie Youth. The-
Peace River Racers won the Ponytails softball division and the Hardee
Signs Plus Tees Pride won the Belles division. The Nicholson Supply Co.
Reds won the Dixie Youth title and Florida Fertilizer Braves won the Dixie
Youth division.
All-Star teams and schedules will be available shortly. Hardee will host
a pair of the district All-Star tournaments. Also, team pictures for all four
divisions should be available shortly.

Youngsters, don't forget:the variety of summer athletic opportunities.
Besides the Sertoma golf, there is YMCA Flag Football, Soccer, Cheer and
Summer Camp, plus volleyball at South Florida Community College
Panther Camps for grades 6 through 12, tennis and volleyball locally for
all ages, and the summer bowling leagues which began this week.
The high school gym will be open to all girls for strength training and
conditioning from 4 to 6 p.m. and summer-long volleyball camp from 6 to
8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, starting Monday June 12, through July
20. For more information, call coach Ken Leupold at 773-3249.

And, don't forget the start of Youth Football is not that far off for ages
7 to 15 for both cheerleaders-and-football players.

Information from community and school athletic events is always welcome.
Please call The Herald-Advocate (773-3255) or e-mail me at news.heral-
dadvocate@earthlink.net with news for this biweekly column. The sports
news deadline is noon Mondays. News will be included as soon as time and
space allows.


Step Outdoors
With Michael Kelly


ORPO- .P ,,, ; .. ,-
With things starting to slow down for the summer I was really able to
do some catching up on my fishing during the last week.
Last Thursday afternoon I went to Anna Maria Island with my brother
Jonathan and Kellon Durrance, We were going after the Spanish mackerel
al, that have been running along the West coast for the past several weeks.
We got there just after a big thunderstorm so there were not very many
SALE people out on the pier we were going to fish off of. We laid claim to a cor-
ner of the pier, and I went to catch some bait. After making several throws
N pur- with my cast net I was able to get only about 15 or 20 greenbacks.
1nt of After getting bait it didn't take long before we were hooked up, and I
0. 25- was fighting the first fish of the day. It didn't last long though because the
Court fish quickly cut my line with its razor sharp teeth. Kellon followed by
In and catching the first fish, which was a nice-sized mackerel. Jonathan then
herein hooked up and got cut off so we tied on a leader like Kellon was using.
SUC- We then all started hooking and landing fish once we tied on a leader.
)RPO- We ended up with a half dozen mackerel before running out of bait and hav-
BELCI into leave to get back. While fishing we saw a manatee, a huge snook\and
,LVEZ; a tarpon.
RTIES
NDER, Saturday Kellon and I were back on the water again only this time it
AMED was the Peace River. Neither of us had fished the river in the past weeks so
HD OR we gave it a try. We slid our canoe into the water east of Bowling Green
NOWN around one o'clock and started our float.
EREST The water was extremely clear and well below the normal depths.
SEES, Several times we were forced to get out and walk and pull the canoe along
ANTS; some of the more shallow places. We did also come across a few very deep
high- holes we did not know about, one of them being eight to 10 feet deep.
at the
THE I brought my cast net with me; and we caught some live chubs to use
)USE, for bait. We were using light line and a small hook. Catching bait was not
AM, on easy because the wind was blowing just enough to ripple the water making
follw- it hard for me to see the baitfish lying along the bottom. Kellon found a
north In sifter left by some fossil hunter so he decided to quit helping me get bait
and start sifting the river. After he found about a dozen shark's teeth I told
(26, him if he didn't help I was going to make him fish with his shark's 'teeth
IVI- instead of the bait I was catching.
LAT We finally had enough bait to start fishing so we paddled downstream
D IN untilwe found some deephpoles._Assoon as my cork hit the water on the
THE first cast it immediat-ey went under. After a good fight with the light tack-_
DEE le I pulled up a nice two-pound bass. Kellon did the same thing catching in
a nice yearling bass. This carried on for about the next five minutes until
IILE we were out of bait. I couldn't believe after five minutes we were out of the
AS baitfish that took me so long to catch.
IRE We paddled down to a shallow stretch and started attempting to catch
RE- more bait. This time I made Kellon help me find the bait instead of looking
003 for gold in the middle of Peace River. We had a little better luck this time
1CT getting about 10 or 12 in just a few casts;
-61- We got back in the canoeand.started fishing. We both caught a gar
before we started, paddling downstream in'search of better water. Once we
found some holes it didn't take long for our corks to start going under again.
IVE, We caught several more nice bass with the biggest one being about three
pounds. Wie drifted up to Heard bridge right at dusk where my brother
3eal of Jeremy and Ryan Roehm were waiting to pick us up. We had a great float
and caught about 12 bass for the day.
The fish in the river seem to have had a successful spawn, as it was full
radley of small bream and little bass.
:Court
Coker Bear in mind that you should conduct yourself in life as at a feast.
.Clerk -Epictetus


irlcans
isabill-
dation
ceding
lal or
De at
3arrett
,Suite
phone
seven
ing. If
0-955-
70, via
:8,1 Sc


It pays to advertise in your Hometown Newspaper

We are saving this space just for


YOU!

The Herald-Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. 773-3255


June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7A














NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the. District's Final Agency Action is approval
of the Peace River Mitigation Bank (PRMB) on 487.3 acres to
serve Environmental Resource Permit known as Peace River
Mitigation Bank (PRMB). The project is located in Hardee
County, Section(s), 14, 15, 22 and 23, Township South, 34S,
Range East; 25.
The permit applicant is Peace River Land Holdings of Florida.
LLC whose address is 5300 Golf Road, Skokie. IL 60077. The
permit No.is 43029983.000.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available
for inspection Monday through Friday except for legal holidays,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida Water
Management District (District) Bartow Service Office.
NOTICE OF RIGHTS

Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the
District's action regarding this permit may request an administra-
tive hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative
Code (F.A.C), of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for
hearing must (1) explain how thesubstantial interests of each per-
son requesting the hearing will be affected biytie District's action,
or final action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person
requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts;
and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request
for hearing must be filed with and received by the Agency Clerk
Tof the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad
Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of
this notice (or within 14 days for an Environmental Resource
Permit with Proprietary Authorization for the use of -Sovereign
Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this
time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may
have to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and120.57,
F.S.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to for-
mulate final action, the filing of a petition means that the District's
final action may be different from the position taken by it in this
notice of final agency action. Persons whose substantial interests
will be affected by any such final decision of the District on the
application have the right to petition to become a party to the pro-
ceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an adminis-
trative dispute regarding the District's final action in this matter is
not available prior to filing of a request for hearing. 6:8c
_.S.


THE SIMILARITY 'l

BETWEEN PETS

AN OWNERS

By: Dr. Ross Ae

Hendry, DVM
Dr. Hendry
Over the course of my practice I have often noticed a striking simi-
larity between some pets and their owners, especially in their behaviors.
When I was in vet school there Was a guy in the senior class ahead of me
named Vernon Macanely who had an English bulldog named Spike.
One of the more frustrating things.for someone to do was to go visit
Vernon at home and even try to discuss anything serious. Vernon always
had to get down on all fours in the middle of the living room and start
rolling around, grunting, growling and wrestling with Spike. Frankly
Vernon looked as much like-an English bulldog as Spike did.
They would wrestle like that for twori-three minutes and be panting
and salivating at the mouth like two ferocious bulldogs. Vernon was the
'first case of a pet and the owner with similar behaviors I had ever seen
because Vernon and Spike obviously had identical personalities.
It reminds me of an incident a couple of years ago when I was work-
ing at one of our Saturday pet vaccinaton clinics north of Brandon and a
lady came in with a huge yellow and white pit bull dog. We finally got the
big guy on the table, but in retrospect he was actually the most obese dog
I had ever seen.
I was drawing some blood from the dog for a heartworm test and
working up my best discussion about obesity. Then I looked up at the
owner and realized the similarity between the lady and the dog, and I
realized I would probably be wasting my breath suggesting a diet of any
kind.
I know veterinarians everywhere agree that obesity is as serious a
problem in pets as it is in humans because it is involved in heart disease,
diabetes and arthritis
I was having lunch with a friend recently and was trying to explain
why I had a hard time doing what this generation calls "hanging out,"
which I assume means just sitting around doing nothing. In my effort to
explain how I felt I told him I had finally found a dog that I could relate
to.


My dog Zeuz is with me all the time, but he is much too obedient, well
mannered and laid-back for us to have even similar personalities.
However now I have a new little Jack Russell dog named "Rusty," and
he is a classic example of Ross Hendry. He can be to be very obedient, but
exhibits serious discipline problems from time to time, and it is impossi-
ble to predict his state of mind at any given time.
I'constantly remind him of what I want him to do, but he takes the
instructions better if he is running in a 10-foot diameter circle as I am
talking to him.
When it finally sinks in Rusty spins off the circle and goes off in a dead
run to do what I ask him to do. I told my friend that Rusty is the dog I can
relate to because I would be willing to bet Rusty would also find it impos-
sible to just "hang out."


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WapUchpila


Pet Care 773-6783

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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, June 8, 2006


4-H Offers Youth Variety


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
SWhether you're 8 or 18, there's
something for you.
i The Hardee County 4-H program
is not just for those interested in
raising livestock. Its nine clubs,
spread around the county, give
youth a chance to branch out into
more and more interests.
., A sampling is available in the
,Back To Basics" summer day
camp which began on Tuesday.
Veld at the Hardee County Agri-
C.ivic Center from 9 a.m. until noon
on Tuesday, Wednesdays and
Thursdays, through Thursday, July
13, the program is open to all ages.
S4-H coordinator Mary Mitchell
says the $10 fee covers all supplies
needed for classes in sewing, cro-
Oheting, soap-making, baking and
banning, knitting, handcrafts and
cooking and whatever else comes
6ip. To pre-register, call Mitchell at'
773-2164.
~. Last'week, four area youth pre-
,nted a program for the Hardee
County Commission, explaining
How 4-H has helped them. Includ-
ed were Lauren Raulerson, 16,
Catherine Polk, 15, Kaylee Brum-
inett, 14, and Makayla Chancey, 9.
Raulerson, an up-coming senior,
opened by telling the commission
bout the basics of 4-H, which
stands for the commitment or
pledge for head, heart, hands and
Health.
. Over 100 adults in the county are
therer leaders or contributors to
programs for the county's youth,
Sid Raulerson, who has represent-
d1 her local club at county, district
0hd state. She began by showing
swine, and now is more interested
in singing and 4-H congress and
leadership workshops, where
"there are some great speakers."
She added, "It's not strictly agri-
cultural any more. There are so
many opportunities." She had to
make a choice and felt she did not
have enough time to do both FFA
(Future Farmers of America) and 4-
H and chose 4-H.
', Polk, who is homeschooled, said
'.4-H gave me the opportunity to
learn new skills and develop'differ-
ent abilities. Her focus has been on
community outreach, such as the
.Salvation Army, nursing homes,
'and Operation Christmas Child,
which sends shoeboxes filled with
needy items to children' in other
countries. She has also been
involved in barrel racing and horse
shows.
SBrummett has been in horse
competitions as far away as Gaines-
ville. She also is involved in culi-
nary club where she has gone to
various competitions with her
demonstration on making, home-
made horse treats.
: Chancey, a fourth-grader showed
her homemade posters and ribbons
!for her presentation on "My Trip To
Hawaii," as well as Seal Life Park
and other cultural trips.
,, County Manager Lex Albritton
iaid he started in 4-H but found
pressure in high school to join FFA.
fle also kept with 4-H, which
qihcluded rabbits and beef but also
the 4-H Congress, similar to the
Legislative Day which commis-
iioners attend. Completing his
record books helped him learn to
documentt events, which became
iinportant to his future in its com-
tihitment to identifying and follow-
ing goals.
SRaulerson noted that in cities,
such as Miami and Orlando, 4-H
.blubs focus not on animals but gov-


ernment and community activity
and have more older members than
rural clubs may have.
She invited commissioners to an
Open House on August 24 from 3
to 7 p.m. to see what 4-H offers.
Currently, the HIardee 4-H club
list includes nine clubs.
One is Castaways Sport Fishing
with leaders Rex and Patricia
Richey. The club meets on the third
Saturday morning each month and
focuses on all aspects of sport fish-
ing, water safety and environmen-
tal conservation.
The Country Clovers club is led
by Trish and Eddie Newman, Candi
Larner and James Newman. It
meets the second Monday of each
month at 7 p.m. The primary focus
is swine, although there are other
animal projects and .activity in
community service.
The Cracker Trail club, under the
leadership of Monica Stevenson,
Kay Crews and Sharon Ussery,
meets the second Monday at New
Hope Baptist Church at 6:30 p.m.
and serves youth in the Lemon
Grove/New Hope area. It is an ooen
project club with participation in
livestock and community service.
The Culinary Clovers is directed
by Chef Megan Mitchell and
DeWayne Wyatt, and is the first
club with a primary focus on the
culinary arts. Participants have to
be at least 10 years old. Maximum
enrollment in the club is 20.
The Fort Green Community club
meets the first Thursday of each
month at the Fort Green Baptist
Church with leaders Patricia
Richey and Charlotte Yake. It is
also an 9pen project club, with
emphases on sewing, livestock and
community service.
Green Acres is a home school
club which meets the second
Tuesday of each month at 1 p.m.
with leaders Joy Brummett and
Sara Polk. It is another open project
club which also participates i'n live-
stock and community service.
The Hardee Beef & Bacon club
meets the first Thursday at 7 p.m.
and includes all areas of livestock
nutrition and showmanship as well
as leadership development and
community service. Its leaders are
Roy and Wendy Petteway and
Tommy and Barbara Arnold.
The Heart of Florida club, pri-
marily a beef, swine and horse
club, is hoping to branch out into
other areas of 4-H. It meets the first
Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. under the
leadership of Teresa Carver and.
Tracy Pate.
The final group is the Limestone
Community club under the leader-
ship of Pam Bishop and Debbie
Boyd. It meets the second Monday
at Limestone Baptist Church fel-
lowship hall at 6:30 p.m. It is a
community-based open project
club which includes everything
from sewing to livestock.
Future plans are for organizing a
new horse project club, an intercity
Wauchula club and possibly a
neighborhood club in the River-
view community. Volunteers are
also needed to help reorganize the
shooting sports club.
Youth development is the current'
by-word for the educational, demo-
cratic programs of 4-H. They focus
on building community spirits and
social connections with are sup-
portive relationships. Cooperation,
constructive learn-by-doing experi-
ences, -and utilizing direct access to
technological advances in agricul-
ture and life sciences, family and
consumer sciences, human devel-


opment and other "university"
knowledge are the important ways
to develop youth, says a handout
Raulerson provided at the end of
her program.
For more information on a spe-
cific club, how to start a club or
other aspects of 4-H, contact
Mitchell at the local Cooperative
Extension Office in the complex on
the west side of the Agri-Civic
Center at Stenstrom and Altman
roads west of Wauchula, or call her
at 773-2164.






A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
But, even so, 0 God, You love
me! You are holding my right
hand! You will keep on guiding
me all my life with Your wisdom
and counsel; and afterward
receive me into the glories of
Heaven.
Psalm 73:23-24 (TLB)
FRIDAY
(Jesus said), "You must be mer-
ciful as your Father in Heaven is
merciful. Don't judge other peo-
ple and you will not be judged
yourselves. Don't condemn and
you will not be condemned.
Make allowances for others and
people will make allowances for
you.
Luke 6:36-37 (PME)
SATURDAY
Whom have I in Heaven but
You? And I desire no one on
earth as much as You! My health
fails, my spirits droop, yet God
remains! He is the strength of
my heart; He is mine forever!
Psalm 73:25-26 (TLB)
SUNDAY
If you are angry, do not let anger
lead you into sin; do not let sun-
set find you still nursing it... No
bad language must pass your
lips, but only what is good and
helpful to the occasion, so that it
brings a blessing to those who
hear it.
Ephesians 4:26,29 (NEB)
MONDAY
But if you don't want to serve the
Lord God, you must choose for
yourselves today whom you will
serve ... as for me and my fam-
ily, we will serve the Lord.
Joshua 24:15 (NCV)
TUESDAY
Beloved, let us love one anoth-
er; for love is of God, and he
who loves is born of God and
knows God We love be-
cause He first loved us.
I John 4:7,19 (RSV)
WEDNESDAY
Fools have short fuses and
explode all too quickly; the pru-
dent quietly shrugs off insults ...
Rash language cuts and maims;
but there is healing in the words
of the wise.
Proverbs 12:6,18 (ME)
All verses are excerpted from The
Holy Bible: (KJV) King James
Version; (ME) The Message;
(NCV) New Century Version; (NEB)
New English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (RSV)
Revised Standard Version; (PME)
Phillips Modern English; and (TLB).
The Living Bible.


a Bi b r-.- --wfc r f- .-
COURTESY PHOTO
Four 4-H girls told the Hardee County Commission last week how the youth program benefited
them. Representing the commission, are Vice-Chairman Bobby Ray Smith (left) and Chairman
Nick Timmerman. Students (from left) are Makayla Chancey, Kaylee Brummett, Catherine Polk
and Lauren Raulerson.

In his garden every man may be his own artist without apology or explanation.
-Louise Beebe Wilder



HARDEE LIVESTOCK MARKET, INC.

RO. Box 1479 Wauchula, FL 33873


Phone: 863-773-9747

Robert Ray Smith, Owner


Sales Start Each Day At Noon
















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Any questions call the office or

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PAGE ONE


6:8-29c


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2B The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006





Hardee


Joneses To Celebrate


50th Anniversary


Friends are invited to join the
family of Joe and Gretta Larsen
Jones on Saturday, June 17, from 2
to 5 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church Fellowship Hall
in Bowling Green as they celebrate
50 years of marriage. There will be
a special time of sharing at 3.
Joe and Gretta Jones were mar-
ried on June 17, 1956, in the old
wood-frame Methodist church
building. They are both lifetime res-
idents of Bowling Green and
remain active members of the
church, where Gretta Jones has
taught the Young Adult/Welcome
Sunday School Class for the past 38
years.
Joe Jones served two years with
the U.S. Army during the Korean
Conflict. He attended Florida
Southern College and Polk
Community College, studying cit-
rus culture and postal management.
He was post office clerk when they
married, and served as postmaster
for 10 years until he retired in 1989.
He served on the Bowling Green


Joe and Gretta Jones today.


'NeLL i&^ow there s asc olOl
t'vive,. l IZtAow t's the hccap iest
t.vvte of MU.L fe, weLL the tiwAe
hc.s oovwe avd. we're
goL4L, to CtLeb~rcle o.r 3Lst
On4.iVaer-snr ot'the 3th olso
ofjLv'.e. w4 -vvpred th.s LadU
baokzic the ear of '7~5 Om ,'


Mabel Sage Woman Boone Frtiday cafter-
vnoovn.. I've Loved this Lady for a
Lov0g tLiee aai, this Love gets'
better aLL the tiVve, the Lord gave
her to me a Lovg tiete ago. .1er
hav. e is MabeL oone camnd n.
vnciae s clifford B.oone.
We're cheroleee.


.Z.'2* -

~t ~b;AL
A\p 4


Chief Clifford Silent Bear Boone
A


n rlDaI~ly at I10:00.-M,
Lt~etpJRBam4


Sin.-t

[ j


City Commission for three terms,
and as mayor for two terms. He is
currently serving as vice chairman
of the Hardee County School
Board. He has been involved in the
cattle industry, and is now actively
involved in the citrus industry.
Gretta Jones is a graduate of
Florida State University and began
her teaching career at Bowling
Green Elementary in August 1956.
After 12 years, she transferred to
Lewis Elementary in Fort Meade,
where she taught for nine years then
served as assistant principal for 18
years until retiring in December
1994.
They have a daughter, Gretchen,
and son-in-law James Wilkins, who
live in Bowling Green with their
sons, J.B. Wilkins, Hunter and
Tanner Brummett, and Landon
Wilkerson.
Their son, Tommy, and daughter-
in-law Bev live in Lakeland with
their son, John. Their daughter,
Tara, also lives in Lakeland with
her husband, Dave Allen.


Habitat Happenings'
By Julie Durrance

A busy summer work season is here and Habitat is looking for volu
teers and mission groups willing to help us put faith into action. In the pa
several months, we have been blessed by collegiate work teams from fiv
different universities from across the country. These young men an
women gave up spring break at the beach to come here and help build house
#5. By the time our friends had returned to school, the house was dried i
all in a matter of weeks. More on these fine young people next month.
Habitat praises the Lord for the hard work and commitment of the
spring break crews and their supervisors, as well as local volunteers, busi-
nesses, civic and school groups who lend a helping hand. Now we are look
ing for help from our local churches. I
Habitat for Humanity is a Christian organization. Since our affiliate
was established, only a few churches have made a commitment to help and
members of their congregations actually shown up to work. did you kno,
that there are 97 churches in Hardee County? Just think of the work that
could accomplished right here in our communities if just one person from
each church would make a commitment to lend a hand!
Our goal at Habitat is to eliminate poverty housing.in Hardee County,
one house at time. Before purchasing their home, prospective homeowners
must put in 400 hours of work on that house or the house of another fami-
ly, and must meet other strict requirements as well. The mission of Habitat
is to give a hand up, not a hand out.
The need for simple, decent homes in Hardee County is real. Jtst take
a drive around some of our neighborhoods. Better yet, talk to the families
who are working hard to improve their living conditions and those of oth'-
ers. Come and work side by side with them and learn what it takes not just
to build a house, but to build a better life.
In an essay from his book, "Building Materials for Life," Habitat
founder Millard Fuller talks about being concerned to the point of action:.
He writes, "many people are concerned about various things, but not to the
point of actually doing something about the matter ... I remember the old
gospel hymn that was so popular in revival services when I was growing up
in Alabama, "Almost Persuaded." Many people are almost persuaded t6
take action, but something holds them back. Maybe fear, maybe uncertain
ty, maybe lack of conviction. In any event, there are so many good intend
tions that never get translated into action. The old cliche rings true: "The
road tohell is paved with good intentions."
"Good intentions or concern are essential as a starting point to chang
ing things for the better,'but concern must be translated into action if actut
al change is tO take place. As the Bible says, we are called to do good, not
just think good or be concerned about good."
Are you being called? Habitat needs you! There are so-many ways to
help, not just in actual construction. Please call our Volunteer Coordinator
Sherron Jensen at 773-0579 or 773-6602 and she can put your talents to
good use.
And all you churches out there, please pray about making a cdmmit-
ment to Habitat. Your mission teams don't have to leave the country; there
is a mission field right here in your own back yard. If you are willing;
please'contact our church relations chairman, The Hon. Marcus Ezelle. He
can schedule a work day, one Saturday morning a month, for your volun-
teers.
Thank you to all those who have supported Habitat for Humanity
financially, prayerfully, and with their blood, sweat and tears. Your works
ihittine to' b 'a blessing. God bless you for.putting your faith into action
R mrimeniber Jai'e 2'2 17. "'..." ; q

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COURTESY PHOTOS
The Joneses on their wedding day in 1956.




Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson

NO CROWDED SCHEDULE
A reporter was once sent to interview the great American opera singer
Jerome Hines. As the two sat down to talk, the writer was apologetic, "I'm
sure you have a very crowded schedule."
"Crowded?" Hines exclaimed, "Not at all!"
He went on to explain that tight schedules were, indeed, a part of his
past life but no more. The change came, he said, when he stopped before
saying "yes" to any commitment and prayed about it.
"When I let God set my agenda, my schedule mysteriously meshes with
everyone else's!" '
This made me think of our Lord Jesus when He walked the roads of
ancient Galilee. There was never any haste. He-always seemed to meet peo-
ple in their hour of need. On and on He walked, while thousands followed
Him for healing of body and mind and for wisdom.
What was His secret? Surely it was that He was inwardly focused to
hear the moment-by-moment directions of His Father.
My sister-in-law and her husband never seem to have a problem "fit-
ting into" the schedules of the people they visit. They are hardly out of their
car before they are raking, weeding or trimming our hedges. They are
always looking for a need to fill. As a result, they always arrive for a visit
at just the right time.
Are you oriented to the needs of those around you, or only to your own
needs? Are you a lonely individualist or someone involved in the lives of
others? Are you waiting for someone to help you or are you everybody's
servant?
The world scorns people who make themselves "door-'mats." But

Christians follow One who humbled Himself, even to death on a cross for
the sake of those who put Him there.


MESSAGE CHANGED DAILY!




Call in DAILY for a
short.Bible message.
6:8c


' Happy 1s

Birthday


Gardner Baptist Church will
celebrate its 116th Homecoming on
Sunday. The church pastor, Dr.
Harold Brown, will, bring the
homecoming message at the 11
a.m. service which follows the 10
a.m. Sunday School hour. ,
A basket dinner will be served in
the church fellowship hall follow-
ing the morning service. Everyone
is welcome.


AcademicAssociates
-Learnig Centerss


SUPER BUFFET & LOUNGE
American & Chinese Cuisine


* Over 100 Items on the Buffet
* Karaoke
* Two 100" Screen TVs
* Hibachi Grill


* Happy Hour Drinks
* Dine-in or Carry Out
* Banquet Room seats
up to 100.


Open 7 Days a Week
11am 10pm
806 South 6th Ave, South Bound Hwy. 17
863-773-3015 |


Gospel Sing


The Gospel Tabernacle
Saturday Night 7:00 PM.
June 10, 2006


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:et'in L 8.613.324.21 1 cypressgardens.com
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Hayllynn:
Love,

Dad & Jen


Daddy loves you
doodlebug
soc6:8p4


(863) 735-8079 or 781-2708

Pastor Harold Howze and The Taylor family wanted to do
something in memory of Pauline and Curtis Taylor.
Nothing would make our Mother happier than to have all of us
come back to our home church and have a Great Service. We
would like to see all of our friends come out and lets have a
wonderful time in the Lord. Come expecting to be blessed.
Bring your shouting shoes, we are going to have a good time.
That's the way Mom and Dad would have wanted it.
The Gospel Aires, (Marie's family)
The Gospel Messengers (Patricia's group),


We hope to see you there.
+ ,u"0. 1


Rose Mitchell-Freeman.
ReadinglInstruction '"
Specialist
:8d (863)773-6141


The Gospel Aires
The Gospel Messengers
Pastor Harold Howze


soc6:8p





June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3B


KEY CLUB FUNDRAISER


COURTESY PHOTO
The Key Club at Hardee Senior High School was recently awarded a trophy for its outstanding
fundraising efforts. The club raised $435 for the United Nations International Children's
emergency Fund (UNICEF). The money will be sent to South Africa to help children. The club was
Recognized for its excellent achievement at a recent Kiwanis meeting held at the Panda
Restaurant. Pictured receiving the trophy are Blake Stagg, Marcus Garza, Mark Harrell, Key Club
Advisor Richard Nicholson, Superintendent of Schools Dennis Jones and Bill Shackelford.


'Graduate

Receives National

Scholarship
Rita "Maricela" DeSantiago was
recently awarded Burger King's
$1,000 scholarship.
S Maricela became one of 1,572
4igh' school students across the
country to receive this scholarship.
9he is the only Hardee Senior High
School graduate to receive the
award this year.
Maricela; along with 98 other
Floridians 'to receive this award,
was selected based on her grade-
Point average, work experience,
financial need, co-curricular activi-
ties and community service.
The scholarship program award-
ed close to $1.8 million this year in
order to help graduates pay for col-
lege or a post-secondary vocation-
al/technical school.


ONE PINK, NO BLUES


Mr. and Mrs. Shane Grantham,
Bowling Green, a seven pound five
ounce daughter, Kyri Elizabeth,
born April 29, 2006, Lakeland.
Mrs. Grantham is the former
Kristen Kinder. Maternal grandpar-
ents are Kay Kinder, and Henry and
Debbie Kinder. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Tom and Yvonne Hackle,
and Dennis and Diane Grantham.


U


Community College 101
By Teresa Crawford
Hardee Center Coordinator


Garcia

Garcia Heads

To Citadel


Share The Good Word!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINES THURSDAY AT 5 P.M.
I' LiWEIS


The South Florida Community College Hardee Campus is offering a
summer dance camp in July. Instructors for the program will be Jacqueline
Waldron and Katrice Mosley. The camp will be held Monday-Thursday,
July 10-27, 2-5 p.m. The cost for the camp is $75 and includes a T-shirt.
Dancers between 8 and 12 years of age are invited to participate. For regis-
tration information, contact the Hardee Campus at 773-3081.
Beginning this fall, Warner Southern College will be offering the
Organizational Management bachelor's degree at the Hardee Campus.
Interested students should contact Laura White at the SFCC University
Center, Highlands Campus, Avon Park.
Parents of sophomores, juniors -and seniors are reminded that the
SFCC Hardee Campus will offer a free Florida Comprehensive Assessment
Test review prior to the June testing for juniors and seniors. For more
information, parents can contact the campus. We are also offering a free
Scholastic Assessment Test review May 30-June 2. Registration forms are
available at the high school and at the Hardee Campus.
The Hardee Campus will also host, "Building and Maintaining a
Sound Behavioral Climate," July 17- Aug. 1, 6-10 p.m. This is a 40-hour
law enforcement and correction incentive course. The Hardee Campus will
host another incentive course in October, "Substance Abuse Awareness and
Education." For further information on either course, contact the SFCC
Public Service Academy-at 784-7280 or the SFCC Hardee Campus at 773-
3081.




SYoli sCo.
Full gorvieo Hair and Nail falon

"Walk-InR Woleome o
767-YOLI (9654)
107 S. 9th Ave., Wauchula
soc5:4tfc


Alex McQuaig

Celebrates

1st Birthday
Alex McQuaig, son of Judy
McQuaig, turned I-year-old on
April 20.
Alex had a Pooh birthday party to
celebrate his birthday on April 22 at
grandparents Reuben and Nancy
McQuaig's home in Fort Green.
Hamburgers, hotdogs and the star
of the table, grandma's homemade
Pooh birthday cake, were served at
the party.
Among the guests were Uncle
David, Aunt Eiin, Patrick. Grandma
Helen Plumley. Debbie, Haley and
Emily McQuaig. Fave and Norma
Davis, Edith, Amy, Arron and
Rebeka Brown.
Also attending the Winnie the
Pooh bash were Elizabeth, Kasie,
K-Lyn, Chrysta, MaKayla, Austin,
Heather, Scott, Michelle, Megan,
Shelby,. Nichole, Nancy Lynn,
Nichole, JoAnn, JoJo, Andrew,
Joshua and Bob Granda.


Alex


Class of

'76 Plans

Reunion
The Hardee Senior High School
Class of 1976 will be holding a
planning meeting on Saturday at 5
p.m. at the Wauchula Pizza Hut.
Plans are being made to move the
reunion date from the summer to
the fall. Come on down and help
plan this good time!
For more information, call Kay
Crews at (863) 781-2908 or Cindy
Barlow at (863) 773-3529.


Patrick

Patrick McQuaig

Turns 1-Year-Old

With Party'
On April 19, Patrick McQuaig
turned 1-year-old.
Patrick, son of David and Erin
McQuaig, celebrated his birthday
on April 15 at his parent's home.
Hamburgers, hotdogs, cupcakes
were' served. Grandma Nancy's
homemade bunny birthday cake
completed the birthday menu.
Grandma Nancy and Grandpa
Reuben of Fort Green, Grandma
Peggy Parke,. Grandma Morgan,
Christen, Hunter, Bret, Jen, Great-
Grandma Helen Plumley, Haley,
Emily McQiaig and many more
friends and family celebrated the
event with Patrick.

I believe humans get a lot done,
not because we're smart, but
because we have thumbs so we
can make coffee.
-Flash Rosenberg
At 870 Fahrenheit, Venus has
the hottest average temperature
of any planet in the solar system.
The c6ldest average surface tem-
perature is that of Pluto (-370
Fahrenheit).





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had the Curves program under close scientific scrutiny since the fall of
2002. Initial studies confirmed that the Curves program is effective at
I helping women lose weight, increase bone intensity, gain muscle
I strength and aerobic capacity, and raise metabolism. This latest study
focused on the intensity of the workout and the number of calories
burned by study participants. The least fit women in the study burned
I between 164 and 238 calories in 30 minutes. And the fittest test
I subjects? They burned as many as 522 calories in-30 minutes. "As
I you progress and become more fit, your capacity for burning calories
increases," says Kreider, Ph.D, FACSM, professor and director of
Baylor's Exercise and Sport Nutrition Lab. "The Curves program
I elicits a mean exercise intensity that meets the recommendations of
Sthe American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American
Heart Association for improving aerobic fitness, as well as eliciting
the appropriate workload resistance as recommended by the ACSM
Sand the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) for
I these women." So what's the bottom line? "The Curves workout is
I unique in that the intensity can adjust automatically to the fitness level
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4B The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
When the season ended last
Thursday, the Peace River Growers
Racers were the clear 2006 win-
ners.
The Racers ended the season
with a 13-2 record, far ahead of
their opponents. They lost their first
pair of games of the season, then
never looked back.
Behind, them were the Central
Pump and Irrigation Dragons, the
CGC AgriManagement Pride and
the Gourley Plastering Wahoos.
There were only three games in
the final week of play, a double-
header on May 30 and solo game
on June 1.
In the early game on May 30, the
Dragons downed the Pride 13-3 in/
the final game of the year for the
Pride.
For the Dragons, Elvira Servin,
banged a pair of doubles and a sin-
gle, coming around to score three
times. Courtney Parks, Kourtney
Henderson and Kendall Gough
each circled the bases twice and
Karlee Henderson, Alexan Mad-
dox, Angelica Florez and Abigail
Vargas added solo scores.
Kayla Powell, Summer Sisum
and Kayla Nichols came around to
cross home plate for the Pride. Left
standing on the bases were Ashley
Trone, Brea Farrer, Amanda
McNabb, Emma Marshall and
Powell. Others playing for the
Pride this season are Penny
McGuire, Kelsey Powell, Brittany
Dunlap and Kayla Garay.
In the Monday nightcap, the
Racers barely escaped the Wahoos
15-13.


A Savannah Selph double was
the only extra base hit for the
Racers. Kate Thomas, Kayla
Knight, Sabrina Hernandez,
Brooke Knight and Caryssa John-
son were all twin-tally batters.
Katie Smith, Lacey McClenithan,
Hailey Andrews, Cassidy Knight
and Selph put a run each on the
board. Gemi Saunders, Sierra
Coronado and Katelyn Hines also
played for the Racers.
For the Wahoos, Kate Krause and
Taylor Bolin smacked doubles.
Arissa Camel, Emily Hughes,
Holly Hughes, Alex Ullrich and
SaraBeth Albritton were twin-score
batters, Krause, Bolin and Millie
Jones each added a run.
The season finale was last
Thursday, a nail-biter in which the
Wahoos nipped the Dragons 13-12.
Krause homered and Bolin
tripled to pace the Wahoos. Leadoff
batter Camel came home three
times. Krause, Carleigh Coleman
and Albritton each put a pair of
scores on the board and Bolin, the
Hughes sisters Holly and Emily,
and Jones chipped* in with a run
each. Also playing for the Wahoos
this season were Samantha
Schnable, Ullrich, Emily Albritton
and Brooke Samuels.
Servin doubled, tripled and sin-
gled in nearly hitting for the cycle,
for the Dragons. Gough, Parks and
Florez joined Servin in two trips
apiece around the bases. Taylor
Pohl, Kourtney Henderson, Karlee
Henderson and Brooke Conley
added a run apiece. Other playing
for the Dragons this season are
Maddox, Vargas, Angela Hue-
cheroth and Amber Hernandez:


Letter To The Editor

Call Senators Nelson, Martinez

On Proposed Marriage Amendn

Dear Editor, Constitution Marriage
We are writing once again about Amendment (MPA).
the status of protecting. traditional Senator Bill Nelson:
marriage between one man and one 7161 (Main District
woman. There are two separate Orlando) (202) 224-5
issues going on with protecting Toll-free: 1-888-671-405
marriage: one is in our state by Senator Mel Marti
amending the Florida State 398-8586 (Main Distric
Constitution and the other is in Jacksonville) (202)
Washinigton, DC pertaining to all (D.C.)
the states by amending' ihe United
States Constitution which of course Hardee Count
would be the ultimate protection Protection
for traditional marriage.
SAs you know there has been an
effort underway in Florida to col- No coffee can be go(
lect enough petitions (611,009) to mouth that does not I
be placed on the ballot in a sweet offering of oc
November 2006 for a vote by the nostrils.
people. Unfortunately we fell just -Henry Ward
short of that by the deadline in
February 2006 by approximately
155,000 petitions.
The good news is that all of those
petitions that have been collected in
this process over the last year are
still good through 2008. So the
effort now is to collect the remain-
ing petitions.
The people of Florida will have a
chance to decide on this matter for
our state in November 2008, and
we thank all of those helping in this
ongoing effort. Please visit
Florida4Marriage.org for more
information.
The second issue pertaining to
protecting traditional marriage is
amending the U.S. Constitution
with the Marriage Protection
Amendment (MPA). This is a long
process beginning in the Senate in
Washington, D.C. This effort first
began.in July 2004, but unfortu-
nately at that time many Senators
didn't feel that traditional marriage
was in any danger of being changed
from one man and one woman, and
many felt that this matter was not:
important to the American people.
They also felt this matter should be
left to the states.
During this time approximately
19 states have added Marriage
Protection Amendments to their'
state constitutions by an over-
whelming majority of votes, but it
seems this is not the best protection
for marriage since two of those
states have had the will of the peo-
ple revoked by activist judges in
those states.
There will be serious social con-
sequences for our nation if the core
of our families as we know it, tradi-
tional marriage, changes. Don't be
fooled into thinking it doesn't mat-
ter. The definition of marriage for
our children's generation will soon
be decided either by our elected
representatives and us or by
unelected, unaccountable judges.
This matter is again coming to
the floor of the Senate the week of
June 5. It is imperative that our
Florida Senators, Bill Nelson and
Mel Martinez, hear from us. They
need to know this matter is impor- __
tant to you! Please call them today FDIC
and ask them to vote for the ulti- LENDER
mate protection of traditional mar- NASDAQ: SBCF
riage' by a United States


nent


Protection

(407) 872-
Office in
274 (D.C.)
91.
nez: (904)
t Office in
224-304 1

Janrus ass
y Marriage
Task Force


od in the
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N


Outta' The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^i


APPLY NOW FOR QUOTA HUNT PERMITS
Every hunter knows you have the best chance of catching a monster
buck off-guard during the first part of hunting season. That's why many of
us enjoy hunting the archery and muzzleloading gun seasons and, why
we can't miss opening weekend of the general gun season.
If you plan to hunt on public land next season, you should know many
of Florida's wildlife management areas (WMAs) require a quota permit to
hunt during archery, muzzleloading gun and the first nine days of general
gun season.
There are several types of quota permits and most are issued by ran-
dom drawing. No costs are involved with quota permits, but hunters may
apply only once for each type of permit during the first phase of the appli-
cation period.
The application period for applying for archery/muzzleloading gun and
general gun quota hunt permits runs June 1-11, so you better get on the
stick. There also are quota permits available for hunts involving airboats,
track vehicles, quail, youths, families and mobility-impaired persons. The
application period for these hunts is June 20 to July 7. You may apply as
early as 10 a.m. 'on the first day of the application period and have until
midnight on the last day.
Two of these quota permits are unique to the state's South Region.
An airboat quota permit is required for anyone wishing to hunt out of an air-
boat on Everglades and Francis S. Taylor WMA in Broward and Miami-
Dade counties. But, if you'd rather hunt off a track vehicle there, or on
Rotenberger or Holey Land WMAs in Palm Beach County, you'll need a
track vehicle quota permit.
In the western Panhandle, hunters wanting to quail hunt at the field trail
area of Santa Rosa County's Blackwater WMA or Hutton Unit must have a
quail quota permit.
The FWC offers youth hunts for deer at.Camp Blanding WMA in Clay
County and Andrews WMA in Levy County. If you have children ages 8-
15, and you want them to have the chance of experiencing one of these
great hunts, apply for a youth hunt quota permit. During .these hunts, only
the youngsters may hunt, and they and.their adult supervisors are the only
people allowed on the area.
Another effort to increase hunting opportunities for youths next sea-
son allows youngsters to accompany an adult quota permit holder on any
WMA even if the area doesn't allow for exemptions. However, adults
and youngsters share a single bag limit.
Matanzas WMA in St. Johns County offered the first family-hunt last
season, and it was a huge success. Next season, this great opportunity
expands to include Andrews and Devil's Hammock (both in Levy County),
Dinner Island Ranch (Hendry County) and the newly established Lafayette
Creek WMA (Walton County).
You must apply for a family hunt quota permit to hunt these areas dur-
ing specific time periods. Should you get drawn, the permit requires one
adult to take one or two youths hunting.
Disabled hunters, certified mobility-impaired, can apply for mobility-
impaired person quota permits. These permits allow exclusive access to
general-gun hunt on eight of the state's better public hunting areas.
If any of this is starting to sound exciting to you, you'll want to get
hold of the correct quota permit worksheet so you can apply for one or more
of these great opportunities. All quota permit worksheets are at
MyFWC.com/hunting under "Quota." General gun and archery/muzzle-
loading gun quota worksheets also are available at tax collectors' offices
and license agents. Worksheets for other quota permits are obtainable at
FWC regional offices.
Once you've completed the worksheet, you may submit it to any
license agent or tax collector's office. If you have a valid Florida driver
license, you also can go through the Internet at MyFWC.com/hunting.
The random drawings to decide who gets general gun and archery/muz-
zleloading gun quota hunt permits take place in late June. In early July,
Sever. one % ho applied receives.-b\ mail, a quota permitor'-a rejectioin nbtice:-:
You should knffc by late Nugust iFyou've-drah one'ofi thi other qlota'per-,
Smls. Also, the results are posted after each drawing at MyFWC.com/hunt-
ing under "Limited Entry Hunts."
If you'd like to apply for one or more of the FWC's many quota per-
mits, you need to do it soon. Here's wishing you all luck in drawing one.
Tony Young is a media relations coordinator for ihe FWC's Division of
Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him with questions about
hunting at Tony.Young@FWC.com.


Light One Candle
By Dennis Heaney
President Of1 The Christophers


SURVIVING
West Virginia is called the "Mountain State" or "Almost Heaven" for
the raw beauty of its Appalachians.
It's a long way between the cities of Huntington and Sago. People there
are used to going around, over or through the mountains and their hills and
"hollers" to get from place to place. In fact, I've been told that West
Virginians measure distance in time, not miles.
The state is neither rich nor populous and, when it makes headlines, all
too often it's because of a disaster like the one at the Sago Mine in January
that left 12 men dead and one severely injured.
Most of us were glued to the news during those terrible hours, and we
were shocked by the horrific outcome. Yet for those of us with no ties to the
community, the story was gradually pushed aside for other events, other
sensations, otiler deaths.
But at the end of April, a letter brought it all back.
Randal McCloy Jr., the sole survivor of the explosion, wrote to the fam-
ilies of the men who died. He shared his memories of the explosion and the
miners' intense, but ultimately unsuccessful, efforts to save themselves. "He
wrote, "We were worried and afraid, but we began to accept our fate."
They prayed together, and then all but one died.
"I cannot explain why I was spared while the others perished," McCloy
continued. "I hope that my words will offer some solace to the miners' fam-
ilies and friends, who have endured what no one should ever have to
endure."
What was it like waiting in the dark? Perhaps only someone who has
stood in death's shadow could understand.
Now I am reminded of another West Virginia tragedy.
In 1970, Marshall University's football team was returning from a
game on a chartered flight. Seventy-five people boarded that plane, includ-
ing 37 team members, the entire coaching staff and a number of team sup-
porters. It was a wet foggy night, and the airplane struck the treetops on a
hill near their home airport at Huntington. No one aboard survived the
crash.
The story was just recently covered in USA Today because a movie is.
being filmed about the disaster not just the terrible loss of life that affect-
ed so many in that close-knit university town of Huntington, but the attempt
by those left behind to pick up the pieces of their lives. People talk about
survivor's guilt, and it seems that grief is often exacerbated by the feeling
that "it could have been me."
That's why fielding a football team the next-year took on a significance
to the school and city far beyond sports. Matthew McConiaughey, a star of
the film "We Are Marshall," said, "The moral of this story isn't about win-
ning and losing, or even how you play the game, but that you do play the
game."
If anything gets people through such tough times, it's the effort to cre-
ate some good from pain and loss. And that means allowing God's love to
express itself in our actions by choosing to lead lives with the purpose of
healing others who are suffering as much or more than we are.
We can reach out to help those trying to put their lives back together in
our own community or halfway around the world.
In some sense, each of usis a survivor until the moment our life ends
- entrusted by God to be an instrument of His healing and hope, His faith
and love. It's been said that success consists of getting up one more time
than we fall down.
Whatever our burdens, God will always grace-us with the chance to get
up again one more time for just as long as we live.
For a free copy of "Dealing With Grief write: The Christophers, 12 East
48th Street, New York, NY 10017; or e-mail: mail@christophers.org


ew Name,


Same Commitment


With the merger of Big Lake National Bank and Seacdast National Bank completed, our customers'
experience is made even better through added services, flexibility, and convenience. New services include
free checking with online banking and bill pay, a Telephone Banking Center with extended weekday and
Saturday hours, Treasury Management, investment, trust and estate planning services and more. All with
the same local decision-making and personal service you've come to expect. All of us at Seacoast National
Bank look forward to serving your financial needs and to seeing you at community events around town.
In the coming months, our signs will change to display our new name, but what won't change is our solid
commitment to serving you.


Sincerely,



Joe Mullins
Regional President
Seacoast National Bank


Seacoast

NATIONAL BANK


www.seacoastnational.com
800-589-1657


6:lc


Racers Take


Ponytails Title


A subsidiary ofSeacoast Banking Corporation ofFlorida


1 _


ii






June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Returning Hope To Rural Afghanistan


By LOCHRANE A. GARY
6. Special To The Herald-Advocate
Part 2: It is not possible to travel any-
'1 where in Afghanistan without seeing scores
bn of both men and women with limbs lost due
to landmine accidents.
liH Most of the mines were placed in the
v ground by the Soviets during their 10-year
occupation beginning in December 1979.
American military forces began removing
a, many of these mines during Operation
Enduring Freedom.
A study on the social impact of land-
r mines in Afghanistan indicates that the bulk
,E of the loss was suffered by the Kuchi
(nomads), who reported losses of nearly
35,000 animals. That would average 24.4
o animals per household, or $2,933 at local
o, market prices. A study by the Mine
Clearance Planning Agency reports on a
a- survey conducted in 949 villages document-
ing 264,136 sheep and goats, 55,369 cows
, and oxen, 36,276 horses and donkeys, and
b. 5,354 camels were killed by landmines
-q. since the beginning of the Soviet invasion.
Farmers plowing their fields and chil-
drdn at play suffered the most.
-i : I saw several United Nations bomb dis-
-.: posal teams working in remote areas as
!q,: ell as private contractors methodically
Sweeping fields. It may cost as little as $3
to produce a landmine. It costs $300 to
)- $1,000 ,to remove one.
to. : Extensive and prolonged medical and
'i rehabilitation services are needed but are
mostly unavailable. The World Health
-a-1 Organization estimates that without land-
01 mines in Afghanistan, agricultural produc-
t ion could increase by 80-200 percent. It
i also estimates that, at the current rate of
removal, it will take 1,100 years to remove
br all of the several million landmines
ii believed to exist in Afghanistan.

s Security
For more than 20 years the people of
' Afghanistan have faced violence, lawless-
ness, torture, killing, rape and every sort of
suffering that characterizes war. Whatever
measure of human welfare or security one
chooses life expectancy, the mortality of
Women and children, health, literacy, access
6-o-cJean waer nrutntion -Afghamstan. '
Sranks near t'e''bott6m.'Afghanistan has no





,V


A street vendor prays as he sits surrounded
by stacks of his iridescent pottery wares.


It's universal. All toddlers love grapes.
national institutions even capable of com-
piling accurate data for reporting. The data
which is available represents rough esti-
mates compiled by international non-gov-
ernmental organizations (NGOs).
The security situation remains critical for
American citizens. There are remnants of
the former Taliban regime and the terrorist
al-Qaida network who want to drive all
Westerners out of Afghanistan. They do not
hesitate to use violence to achieve their
aims.
Terrorist actions include suicide opera-
tions, bombings, assassinations, carjack-
ings, rocket attacks, assaults and kidnap-
pings. Both threats and incidents have
increased in recent months. Of greatest con-
cern are attacks using vehicle-borne explo-
sives, improvised explosive devices and
other forms of bombs.
There is an ongoing threat to kidnap
U.S. citizens and NGO workers throughout
the country. There is also a real danger
from the presence of millions of unexplod-
ed landmines and other ordinance.
During my-staytipn Afghanistan, there
were six rocket attacks in Kabul. We'
received daily Warden Messages from the
Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in
Kabul. Many of the warnings concerned
vehicle-borne explosive devices. A common
tactic is for the terrorist to indicate a radia-
tor problem by raising the car hood and
walking away pretending to fetch water to
fill the radiator. The car would then be
remotely detonated.
Many areas are simply off limits to
Americans. These include all restaurants,
Internet cafes, bazaars, military facilities
and areas with high population densities.
Travel after dark is strictly forbidden.

Religion
Religion is the strongest common bond
among Afghanistan's various ethnic groups.
It has been said that there are three things
an Afghan will.die for:' his religion, his
family and his land. The overwhelming
majority of Afghans, or about 99 percent,
are Muslims. About 84 percent are Sunni
Muslims and about 15 percent are Shia
Muslims. Small groups of Hindus, Sikhs,
Parsis and Jews are scattered in rural towns.
Mazar-e Sharif, where the tomb of the
Muslim leader Ali is said to be located in a


The two husband-wife veterinarian teams listen as Lockie Gary instructs them. The lesson is also
captured on video.


4b 7.)
.I :






The same plastic bags that Americans find at the grocery store here hang from a rack on a stall
at a vegetable market in downtown Kabul. The variety is great, filling the area with bright and deep
colors, with some of the markets such as this one having as many as 1,000 stalls. Most of the pro-
duce comes from Pakistan. Kabul, Hardee County Extension Director Lockie Gary says, is a city
of about five million.


An objective of the agricultural assistance program is to improve not only the quality and quanti-
ty, but the safety of food products. Land o' Lakes established two milk collection centers in
Afghanistan, and is working with technicians there to improve the hygiene of incoming milk.


15th-century mosque, is a leading place of
Muslim pilgrimage,
An important figure in Muslim life is the
mullah (a male religious leader or teacher).
Any man who can recite the Qur'an
(Koran), the sacred scriptural text of Islam,
from memory can be a mullah. In
Afghanistan, however, the mullah may not
understand either the words or the meaning
because the book was written and is memo-
rized in Arabic, which is not a local lan-
guage.


The mullah conducts the Friday sermon
and prayers, marriages and funerals.
Mullahs also teach the laws and doctrines
of Islam to both adults and children.
Mullahs arbitrate local disputes, based upon
Islamic law, and are called upon to provide
advice and resolution for many other social
and personal problems, including such
things as medicine, local water disputes or
even a family feud. The more remote the


See AFGHANISTAN 11B






6B The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Hardee Car Co.
Pay to the (your name
order of


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


,20 1224
could be here) $500.00


GOOD USED FORD 4600 SU diesel
tractor, will trade for 15 young cows.
Call 863-773-9334. 6:8-22p
1941 FARMALL MODEL A tractor, runs
good, has PTO. See at 307, S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. First $2,500 takes it.
6:1-8p
FORD N-8 MODEL TRACTOR, good
tires, runs good, good tractor, $3,500.
781-3090. 6:8-15c


GE WASHER & DRYER set, Frigidare
electric cook stove, 1 yr. old, works
great, white. Priced to sell. Call 863-
773-4242 after 12:00 noon. 6:8p


1985 DODGE RAM pick-up, AC, runs
great, toolbox, $1,000 OBO. 863-375-
2566. 6:8-15p


1988 MUSTANG, runs great, fresh
motor, $3,500 Firm. Serious inquiries
only. Call 863-773-4242 or direct con-
nect 161*23873*1. 6:8p
1994 CHEVROLET LUMINA, mini-van,
runs good, $1,500 OBO. 863-445-.
0572. 6:8-15p
1994 FORD AEROSTAR, mini-van,
runs good, new motor, new tires, AC,
etc., $2,500 OBO. 863-445-0572.
6:8-15p
MUST SELL 2005 DODGE Stratus
SCT, 4 door, black, tinted windows,
auto., 13,500 miles. 863-781-0106.
6:8p
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
2004 KAWK
VIN: JKAEXMF174DA03269
8:00 A.M., JUNE 22, 2006
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 HWY. 17 N WAUCHULA, FL
c16:8c


Shell


GILLIARD FILL DIRT INC.


Fill Dirt


Znlfn Snrings


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490 ci4:28tfc


TheHerldAdvoca.

TcI~ hl t4plione 863)773-255


^i//e //t/nd//e'ct c/ncl 1v-oo --Pay^i// H ere'^
For Vl -,Q B Aj


All Vehicles Listed Are Only $5995!!!


2001 Kia Breo 4 door 37,000actualmiles
2000 Monte Carlo .
2002 Ford F150 -
'98 Explorer (red)


O 2002 Ford Focus S.W.
O 2000 bodge Caravan
0 2001 Grand Prix
4 door, low mileage


-e i ri. e1/
veh are BI ERE PAY HERE '




Home of Hardee County's Best Sales Team!


Sviner


Sand


2004 DODGE NEON SXT-4, black,
29,000 miles, good shape, still has
warranty. (863) 781-3202. 6:8-15c
1998 DODGE DAKOTA SLT, $1,500,
runs good, dents in body. 767-6146.
6:1-8p


21' PONTOON boat, good condition.
773-0736. 6:8p
14' ALUMINUM boat w/trailer, $300.
767-1205. 6:8p


WOODEN BUNK BEDS w/mattresses
twin on top full on bottom, $300. Call
773-2364 leave message. 6:8p


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773.3337 Fax: (863) 773.0144
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker,.oralia@floresrealty.net
www.floresrealty.net
A TEAM EFFORT!


DRIVER AND WAREHOUSE person
needed. Local deliveries, nights and
week-ends off. Drug free workplace,
401K, insurance, good benefits. Class
B CDL with tanker and hazmat
endorsements. Starting pay $9.50
hour. Call weekdays 863-773-3187
between 7 a.m. 5 p.m. 6:1-8c
SECRETARY BI-LINGUAL. Apply in
person. No phone calls. Hill's Auto
World, Highway 17, Bowling Green,
across from Presto. 6:8c
EXPERIENCED SPREADER truck dri-
ver. Class D license. Motivated,
dependable, health benefits, paid hol-
idays. Call Patty 941-737-1484 DFWP.
5:25-6:15p
GENERAL OFFICE HELP Apply
Peace River Growers, 3521 N. Nursery
Rd., Zolfo Springs, FL 33890. EOE.
6:8-15cc


Mobile: (941) 456-6507


For Rent Mountain cabin, Bryson City, V.C. Sleeps 4 to 5. Bring tooth-
brush. Call Bart
House in Bowling Green. 4BR/2Bth on Big lot. $160,000.
18.9 ac. Ft. Green, C-2 Zoning, Hwy 62 Frontage, frame home incl., $500,000.
Commercial 4 Lots Hwy 17 $225,000. Bowling Green.
37 ac.- 1/2 pasture, 1/2 Hamlin on Swingle, micro irrigation. $14,000 per ac.
160 ac.-120 ac. citrus/40 ac.woods. 2 wells w/jets. Lots of rd. frntg.
$14,000/ac.
40 ac. Wc l.tl .,, a lg tauti P2 r Cp3W ntertop in
kitchen, wood iors, tirepacein master Bedroom and ling roo 700,000.
57 ac. total. 38 ac citrus w/2wells, microjet and 19 ac. in woods $14,000 per ac.
"7 ac total w/55 ac. citrus, deep well, microjet, Ft. Green area, $1,000,000.
4'W a. citrus,, el1,'lifibiojet, iadia r-fd fintg., can'divide, $21,000 per ac:
106 ac. on Hwy 64, over 2750 ft. of frontage, Lemon Grove area, deep well,
2 frame houses, $3,180,000. c16:8c


L2
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


SPECIAL OF THE WEEK *
REDUCED 2002 DW in Wauchula Hills. 3BR/2BA, spacious kitchen with
skylight. Well maintained and ready for new owners. REDUCED $79,000.


Nice Cute Home 2BR/2BA 1993 Mobile
Home with Central Air & Heat. Large Florida
Room, Garage and/or workshop with open cov-
ered area on side. In excellent condition. Asking
$69,900.
2.5 Acres in Zolfo Springs on Murphy Road
for $60,000.
Home in Riverview 2BR/1BA fully renovat-
ed interior CB-home with central air & heat on
100x125 fenced lot. Asking $149,900.
Brand New 2006 Doublewide 3BR/2BA,
Fireplace, Very Nice Kitchen Cabinets and
Counter-tops, Big back yard with oak trees on
paved road. Call us for all the details.
Completely Remodeled-3BR/2BA, Central
Air & Heat 2002 Doublewide Mobile Home in
Downing Circle. Being offered at $77,500.


N
A
L


Huge Doll House 3BR/2BA 2 Story home in
Riverview. This home is in immaculate condi-
tion and ready for it's new owners. Screened
back and front porch. 1,966 sq. ft. of living
area. Being offered at $179,900. MLS#178258.
U-Pick We have Several tracts of land in
Fort Meade on W. Lake Buffum Road. Call
today for details.
Newly Remodeled Home in Bowling Green -
3BR/2BA 1976 Home with 1,668 Sq. Ft. of liv-
ing area, new roof, fresh paint, inground pool,
central air & heat with 1 acre. Must see to
appreciate. Asking $189,000.
Unbelievable Never thought we would see
$40,000 for a home again! This 1994 2BR/1BA
Mobile Home is priced to sell just west of Zolfo
Springs. For more details call today.


WE BUY HOMES & LOTS -.ANYWHERE IN
HARDEE COUNTY TOP PRICE CASH. QUICK CLOSINGS.
Contact After Hours
loey Adam Flores (863) 781-4585 John Freeman (863) 781-40(
manda Mishoe (863) 781-3587 Steve Lanier (863) 559-93!
isa Douglas (863) 781-3247 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-689
cl6


84
92
91
:8c


; O' 3oh1n Mayerg s
S & Pressure Washi,
"Done right the first time" t
Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured
John D. Mayer, Jr. Cell 863-781-2606
John D. Mayer, Sr. c15:25-6:29p Cell 863-445-0195


DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
HARDEE COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
CAREER SERVICE POSITION
EMPLOYMENT WITH BENEFITS
SENIOR CLERK
Hardee County Health Department is seeking a sen-
ior clerk for its Public Health Preparedness &
Epidemiology Program. This is a Grant Funded
Career Service position. Strong clerical, secretarial
and computer skills are required. Candidate should
have excellent written and oral skills in both English
and Spanish. This is a highly responsible position
requiring a detailed oriented and motivated self
starter.
If you meet these requirements and are interested,
apply online at the People First Website @
www.myflorida.com or call 1-877-562-7287.
Fingerprinting required
EEO/AA/VPEmpioyer
For additional information call:
(863) 773-4161
Christine Archer
Applications accepted through June 14, 2006.
cl6:8c


HOUSE FOR SALE








".t .1J .;. ,, .. .
-a I


F^..- .. ... .. "
-



3 BR/1 Bth Home in Riverview. Fenced
in backyard. New laminate and tile
flooring. Remodeled interior. e "j
$129,000 OBO. Call 781-2525. c6:8p


[Flores & Flores &uInc.


Naria


SE HABLA ESPANOL


7,,


v- I I 1 000


Vx ,


Wauchula
505 N. 6th Ave.
(across from First National Bank)
773-6667


Wauchula Hills
Corner of Hwy 17 & Rea Rd,
773-2011 1


"Y.f ""-






June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


LABORER NEEDED Apply in person,
Auto Restoration Depot, 122 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. 6:8-22p
NURSERY LABORERS Apply Peace
River Growers, 3521 N. Nursery Rd.,
Zolfo Springs. EOE 6:8-15c
DRIVER CLASS A CDL local, experi-
enced, motivated, dependable, clean
record, health benefits, paid holidays.
Call Patty 941-737-1484 DFWP
5:25-6:15p
DRIVER WANTED Reliable, hard-
working service work or delivery man.
$1,000 signing bonus. 231 W. Main
St., Wauchula. Apply in person. 773-
4172. 5:11tfc


3 BR/ 2 B, 2904 Golfview Dr.,
$129,900. (941) 627-2769 or (863) 412-
8932. Carol's Realty. 6:8c


NEW 20x25 STEEL bldg., still crated,
$5,000. (863) 773-6616 or (863) 445-
0915 cell. 6:8-15p
GATEWAY COMPUTER, scanner and
printer for sale, $200. Call 941-744-
6585. 5:11-6:8p


We &fy



........ ............ .. .-.- .
AM-SOUTH REALTY
:. 773-2

] .( AM


ELECTRICIAN -
Prestigious local manufacturing company seeks
experienced electrician. Knowledge of wiring
motors and understanding of variable frequency
drives a plus.
Please fax resumes to Sonny at (863) 735-1172. c16:8,15c


Help Wanted
Southeast Modular Mfg. South
Has an Immediate opening for all
phases of modular construction.
Experienced welders, framers, trim carpenters,
plumbers and electricians.
Competitive pay, benefits and 401-K.
Apply in person 1340 Highway 17 North
Wauchula, FL 33873
EOE/Drug Free Workplace c14:20tfc


DIRECTOR OF PLANNING
PAY RATE: $63,961.74(30.75) $83,923.34(40.35)
Wanted for the Hardee County Planning and
Development Department. This position is highly
responsible for the management, administration and
supervision of the staff and activities assigned to the
Planning Department. Ensures program compliance
with criteria governing local, state, and federal legisla-
ture,.,relating to grqoyh management. Knowledge of the
principles and practices of county planning. Knowledge
of the Development of Regional Impact review process.
Knowledge of graphics and reproduction techniques.
Position requires a (4) Four-year degree in Busi-
ness/Public Administration and Planning or related
fields. (5) Five-years experience in Planning, Zoning, or
Public Administration. AICP Certification preferred.
Complete job description and application forms posted
on the County website: www.hardeecounty.net. Please
send applications to the Human Resource Department,
205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL 33873, Phone: (863)
773-2161; Fax: (863) 773-2154. EOE F/M/V. Open until
filled. c16:8c


AVON PERFUME, COLOGNE filled
bottles, 30 years old for sale. (863)
375-2639. 6:8nc
CONSOLE PIANO, excellent condi-
tion, $600. 375-3559 or 445-0771.
6:8p


FOR SALE: NEW CHAR BROIL grill,
$100 OBO. 773-9122. 5:25-6:29p
DOUBLE WIDE storage unit, 24x36,
$1,000 you move. 767-8822. 5:18tfc
5 WHITE DOVE for sale. 735-0881.
6:8p


EXPERIENCED GROVE

WORKER WANTED
HEARTLAND AREA 175 acres of grove. Looking for an expe-
rienced grove worker willing to make day to day decisions as
well as working in the grove. Knowledge of running and main-
taining equipment is a must. Working hours are 40 to 50 a
week. Salary according to experience. Must have valid drivers
license. EOP/DFWP. Send resume to, Box K, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. cl6:8c




IEL P WANTED)

Positions Now Available
Data Entry/Dispatch/Scale
for fast-paced office. Must be able to multi-task and be proficient
in Microsoft Word & Excel. Some evenings & weekends required.
Full-time position with benefits.
Maintenance Supervisor
Must have electrical background.
Production Supervisor
Must have experience.
Apply in person:
Seaboard Supply
6681 N CR 663, Bowling Green
c16:18c


CROWN FORD SERVICE SPECIALS
FREE ALIGNMENT CHECK
Our Ford technicians will check the alignment on
your car or truck absolutely free!
A/C SYSTEM CHECK $29.95
Includes performance test, leak inspection
""and check of belts and hoses.
Refrigerant extra. See service advisor for details.

A&E. SERVEMOT WOKES AD WODE.
A ERMIC WAUES AND MVAC.
WE SERVICE MOST MAKES AND MODELS.


STORAGE LOT will store your mobile
homes, RVs, trailers. 767-8822. 2:9tfc


2 & 3 BEDROOM MOBILE homes from
$450/month and up, plus deposit, no
pets, quiet family park, close to ele-
mentary school in Wauchula. Call
today (863) 698-4910. 6:8-29c
FOR SALE IN ZOLFO SPRINGS
mobile home with 5 acres, river
access, $85,000 OBO. 863-655-1512.
6:1-8p


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


2 BR/ 2 B BRAND NEW mobile home,
2044 Petteway Ave., (941) 627-2769 or
(863) 412-8932. Carol's Realty. 6:8c
2 BEDROOM SINGLE wide mobile
home, $8,995. Crystal Lake Village.
773-3582. 6:8-7:6c
14x56 IN PARK. Can be moved. 767-
8822. 6:8tfc



FREE WALKER hound dog. 375-
4081. 6:8nc


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132- FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida. edu


STUDENT DATA SYSTEMS SPECIALIST
Full-time position responsible for development and preparation of
reports and providing technical support in Student Services.
Associates (or higher) degree in Computer Science, Data
Processing, or related field required. Applied technical diploma or
extensive related experience may substitute for educational require-
ments. Experience working with one or more of the following appli-
cations preferred: Banner, Oracle, SQL, or Microsoft Access.
Starting annual salary range: $22,259 to $24,930 plus comprehen-
sive benefits package including retirement, health & life insurance,
vacation and sick leave. Application deadline: 5 p.m. Thurs. June
15, 2006.
Application forms are available in Human Resources, Building I
(Avon Park), at any SFCC campus/center, and on our Web site.
EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/VETERAN'S PREFERENCE T


Florida Institute For
Neurologic Rehabilitation, Inc. (FINR),
in Wauchula, is now hiring for the following positions.
Applicants must be at least 18 yrs of age & have a mini-
mum of a HS Diploma/GED.

THERAPISTS PT/PTA/OT/COTA Current FL
licensure & experience is required. Part time and Full
Time positions available.
CASE MANAGER BA in Social Work, Healthcare
or related field required. 3-5 yrs experience preferred.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CMA/C.N.A.
preferred. Secretarial experience required.
ACTIVITY COORDINATOR COTA preferred.
Experience in Occ. Therapy or Voc activities required.
Experience with brain injuries or special needs a plus.
C.N.A. Current-FLlicensure and experience required.
B, C, w/end shifts.
UTILITY SERVICE TECH- Electrical, plumbing &
tile work. Prefer 3-5 yrs experience.
ENVIRONMENTAL TECH- Trash removal, supply
deliveries & misc. cleaning duties.
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT-
Provide direct care to clients. Must be patient, reliable &
trustworthy. C shift & weekends available. No experience
required.
Apply at 1962 Vandolah Rd., fax resume to 863-773-2041,
or e-mail to annettedhr@finr.net. EOE/DFWP cl5:25tfc


"Iih


I BUY HERE! PAY HERE! I[
iir I __1
"~ SIsw Ik7
nI~ a gum


6L


L A M B E R T
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
BE THE FIRST TO SEE this beautiful country home
one mile from town on 2.5 acres; latest upgrades;
4 B/2Bths. Call for details.
MOVE IN NOW! 2B/1Bth M/H; 1320 sq. ft., central
H/A, inside utility, screened porch, patio; outside stor-
age. $58,000.
GREAT LOCATION WITH PLENTY OF SPACE!!
4B/2Bth home on 2.5 lots, 3397 sq. ft., 2 fireplaces, large
rooms including family, dining, living and 2 utility
rooms; 12x15 workshop with electricity. Make an
appointment to see! $250,000.
NEW PRICE MUST SEE! 17 Acres and lovely
3B/2Bth Brick home; beautiful ceramic tile floors, fire-
place, large kitchen and much more; entrance has satel-
lite gate and alarm system. $455,000.
Commercial corner lot; 90x1139, high and dry ready for
building. PRICE JUST REDUCED! $200,000.
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS PRICE REDUCTION!
2255 square feet, 3 or 4 bedrooms on approximately 1
acre in desirable neighborhood. This home has been
updated with customized kitchen, new floors, baths and
much more! $250,000.
RENTAL PROPERTY large home has one apart-
ment plus possible studio apartment on back; quiet
neighborhood; yard has large oaks. $100,000.
OWNER VERY MOTIVATED! 2677 sq. ft. stucco
home, recently renovated; 3B/2Bth, inside utility, and
fireplace, perfect location for walking to school and
shopping. Make an offer today!
MAKE AN OFFER on this 4B/1.5Bth home, inside util-
ity, garage; located in family neighborhood. Listed at
$160,000.
PERFECT CONDITION! This home is move-in ready,
3B/2Bth, 1838 sq. ft. home featuring carpet/ceramic tile
floors, some furniture included in sale; nice yard with
automatic sprinkler system; new roof; metal storage
and boat shed. $175,000.


OIPO-.aNI
mrrl -lr


DORIS S.
ASSOCIATE:
ASSOCIATE:
ASSOCIATE:


SERVICE YOU


LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
DELOIS JOHNSON.............773-9743
MIKEY COLDING..............781-1698
CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


C


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Charlotte Terrell
LOOKING FOR VALUE? This 3B/2Bth home comes
with some furniture, 12x20 concrete floored workshop
with electricity and water, nice lot with plenty of fruit
trees. See today! $126,000.
THIS HOME WAS RECENTLY REMODELED!
2B/1Bth M/H, located on nice, large lot; storage shed.
Listed at $50,000.
PASTURE LAND 6 ACRES, road frontage; large
oaks, fruit trees, one acre pond and 4" well; beautiful
nomesite or weekend retreat! $110,000.
TEN ACRES with 12" well; located in good area.
$365,000.
BEAUTIFUL LOCATION for building! A total of 15
acres with road frontage. Call for details. $17,500 per
acre.
40 Acres of native pasture; paved road frontage; nice
scattered oaks. Call for more information.
120 acres of beautiful, high and dry land; located in
eastern Hardee County; development potential; good
hunting. Call today for details.
10 Acres in Duette Area; property is fenced and has an
8" well. Call for details.
GREAT LOCATION FOR BUILDING!. 4 Acres with 2
wells, electrical hookup, septic tank, fenced on 3 sides -
ready for new construction or mobile home. $90,000.
JUST LISTED IDEAL HOMESITES! One 5 acre
tract @ $90,000 and One 9.50 acre tract @ $171,000
high and dry; on county maintained road; two 2" wells.
Western Hardee County 5 acres cleared with 6" well;
convenient location. $100,000.
Commercial lot, Highway 17, busy location. $75,000.
STATE ROAD 66 Commercial corner lot and 1200
sq. ft. building. Listed at $175,000.
4 ACRES OF COMMERCIAL property plus suite of
offices, fruit scales, outdoor workshop/shed, fenced;
located just outside of city limits. $198,500.
:AN COUNT ON
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATE: MICHAELADAMS ......781-2413
ASSOCIATE: DAVID McCLINTOCK.781-1226
ASSOCIATE: RHODA McCOY............781-7230
cl6:8c REALTOR
________ ........___ 1- 1


I ~


711







8B The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006






-The


FREE TO GOOD HOME, one year old,
blue tick, male. 781-3895. 6:8nc
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a pet
or are looking for a new one, the City
of Wauchula invites you to come and
see if you can find the pet you're look-
ing for. The Wauchula Animal Control
is located at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more information.
tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 828.29
requires that all cats and dogs sold in
Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have
an official health certificate, have nec-
essary shots and be free of parasites.
tfc-dh



-ROBERTSON'S FARMS U-PICK. Now
Open! Closed Wed. & Sun. 781-4327,
781-4325. 5:25-6:8p


DESOTO COUNTY 5 acres on paved
roads, $150,000. HARDEE COUNTY -
1 acre on SR 64, $39,900. www.land-'
callnow.com 1-941-778-7980/7565.
4:27-6:15c
' DESOTO COUNTY 80 acres will split.
$20,000 per acre. www.landcall-
now.com 1-941-778-7980/7565.
4:27-6:15c
CB 2 BR (3 BR optional) 1 bath home
with central AC, new paint, ceramic.
and laminate wood flooring, large
fenced backyard located in Riverview,
$129,000. 863-781-2525. 5:11-6:8pr
4 ACRES WITH 3 bedroom/2 bath
mobile home in good condition,
zoned commercial or residential,
close to town. Asking $137,000.
773-6692. 6:8-15p
RESTAURANT FOR RENT or sell, over
100 seats, good location. (863) 285-
7777 or (941) 234-7709. 5:18-6:15p


5105 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green

OU IE AREONALEVRYAY


Open:
Mon Sat
8:00 5:00
375-4461


m 14


* We repair most
American cars
. Full time mechanic
* We are license
and insured!
Reg #MV-40625


Bo Espino
Auto Technician


107 W. Main Street
TopSy See Wauchula, FL 33873
REAL ESTATE 773-5994


Very lovely homin Sunst Park 3 BI.BA. Api 2049 sq. ft. Ready to
move into. D(d~i- R i iimlooarfie ia i il ighborhood.
$185,000.
New Listing: Beautiful 4BR/2BA Double Wide MH on 11/4 AC. Porch
built across back. This is a must see $136,500.
Beautiful homesite. You can hide away in this approx. 24 acres of
wooded property with creek and Oak hammock. Fenced and cross
fenced. $20,000 acre.
Approximately 40 acres. Call for information.
10 acres 'prine" property close to Wauchula. $23,000 Reduced 'tot
$21,500 per acre. ;. i
We Have Buyers! We Need Listings!
Topsy See, broker Vanette See, associate
Or email us at: TSEEREALESTATE@yahoo.com 6:8c







I JI AEE A Y, I IN






NEW LISTING! Recently remodeled 3 BR 2 BA brick home on 1.1 acres in
city. Large rooms, spacious storage, 3 car garage. Listed for $228,000! Call
Robert Jones 781-1423.
REDUCED! Perfect location close to town off Popash Road! 2,514 total SF,
3 BR, 2,bath, open floor plan, CBS/stucco home on 5 beautiful acres! Lots
of beautiful old oaks! Deed restricted. Call Mary Rollins to see! $295,000!
OWNERS HAVE MOVED! READY TO SELL! 3 BR/2 BA cedar home on
approximately 1.52 acres within 1 mile of town. Beautiful home with many
upgrades. Recently repainted. Country living close to town. REDUCED TO
$265,000!
TWO 1 Acre tracts available in a new development area. Deed restricted.
Asking $37,500 each.
4.8 Acre deed restricted homesite. Large oak tree on property with a 6"
deep well. Listed for $99,000.
4.8 Acres close to town. Beautiful homesite located in a new subdivision.
Deed restricted. Now only $91,000.
Good home sites on paved road! Three 5-ac. tracts on Parnell Road. Listed
for $19,500 per acre!
215 acres of grove, 37 wooded acres and two 3BR/2BA homes each on 6
acres of cleared land. The possibilities are endless for this 264 acres! Call
our office for details!
122 acres development property on US 98 near US 27. Presently a good
quality citrus grove. Offered at $20,000 per acre!
83 ac. .close to golf course and town. Frontage on two County roads.
Currently:zoned FR-1. $20,000 per acre.
13.83: acres' of. grose and house.. This great property comes with an
adorable I or 2 bedroom, 1 1/2BA frame house and pole barns. Don't wait
to see this call Tanya Dubberly today. Asking only $375,000.
UNDER CONTRACT! BRAND NEW HOUSE! 3 BR/2 BA on corner lot
with lots of oaks. Many extras including crown molding, island with bar in
kitchen, tray ceiling aild-plant shelves in living room. The master suite has
a walk in closet and walk in shower. Two car garage. Only $177,500!

Highlands County! We have listings! Call John Gross for more information!
WE WANT YOUR LISTINGS!
CALL OU.R OFFICE TODAY!
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker
SSales Associates
S(after hours)

Mary Rollins (863) 781-9495 Robert Jones (863) 781-1423
Ben Gibson (941) 737-2800 John H. Gross (863) 273-1017
Joseph F.Smith (863) 781-1851 Tanya Dubberly (863) 781-3069
Bruce E. Shackelford (941) 725-1358
We are a member of the Wauchula Board of Realtors and Multiple Listing
Service, and can; service other Realtors' listings. cl:8c


Classifieds


WE BUY HOMES! Stop foreclosure.
We can help! Call Mike/Stephanie
(407) 474-2388 or (813) 719-6263.
6:8-7:6p
BEAUTIFUL 3 BR/ 2 BA CB home in
great neighborhood. Built in 2001 with
a large screened porch on an acre lot.
Includes appliances and a bonus stor-
age shed. Call for appointment. 863-
781-2875. 6:8p ,



1985 35' TRAVEL TRAILER, AC, frig.,
oven, stove, microwave, hot water,
remodeled interior, $2,500 OBO. 863-
781-4364. 6:8-15c
1988 HOLIDAY RAMBLER Presidential
Edition, 5th wheel, $7,000 or best
offer. 781-3090. 6:8-15c
RV FOR SALE 767-8822. 3:2tfc
35'FLEETWOOD PROWLER 767-8822.
4:20tfc



HOUSES, APARTMENTS, trailers,
weekly, monthly, $350/wk., $700/mo.
lease. 863-370-2393 or 773-6616.
5:18-6:15p


warehouses, 20,000 s.f. avallable.E
Build to suit. 773-6616. 5:18-6:15p





For 79 bed long-term
care facility to do tray
set up, run dishwasher
and general cleaning.
MUST BE ABLE TO
WORK EVENINGS
AND WEEKENDS. If
you enjoy working with
the elderly come join
our team.
Apply in person at:
Hardee Manor
Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873
cl6:8c


Vacant corner lot. 62x175, located on West Main St, Wauchula. In the
downtown Historical district, building ready. $175,000.
309 Illinois Ave. Large frame home. 4/2. Large lot. $67,500.
421 Grape St. BG 3/1, central H/A, CB $65,000.
509 Peace Dr., 2/1. H/A, nice lot. $80,000.
319 SE 7th St., Ft. Meade, largelot, 3/2 with air, like new, $165,000.
15 acre grove, irrigated, tiled, Rhyme Road, $300,000.
5 acres Prime location. Vandolah Rd and Dink Albritton Rd. $110,000.
1 acre in Ona with 1/2 zoned C-1 includes 3 rental houses at $900 per
month. $140,000.
Commercial lot, 75x169, with rental home in Ona $69,500.


NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat sets$687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North Sebring Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot d4:20tfc


HOSPICE
OPPORTUNITIES
Discover a richly satisfying
and rewarding future where
compassionate profession-
als like you make a positive
difference in the lives of
hospice patients and their
families every day. Join us
in one of the following
opportunities based out of
our Sebring office:

ARNP
Provide primary or consultative.
hospice and palliative care serv-
ices to patients and families in
Highlands/Hardee counties under
the protocol of our Medical
Services Director and team; and
participate in interdisciplinary
team decisions.

MASTER OF
SOCIAL WORK
Seeking part-time MSW to con-
duct initial assessments and pro-
vide a variety of psychosocial
services to hospice patients and
families facing end-of-life
issues. LCSW
preferred. Flexible schedule
available

LPN
Full-time LPN needed for contin-
uous care visits to patients and
families in home, nursing home
or ALF settings. Spend entire
shift at the bedside with one
patient providing direct, personal
care. 4p-12a.

Our team members receive a
competitive salary and out-
standing benefits package,
including 28 days of paid time
off your first year, In-house
CEU's, tuition reimbursement,
retirement plan, mileage and
much morel

For consideration, please call
Jen at (800) 464-3994 or fax
resumes to (863) 687-6977.
EOE, DFWP cI6:8c.


Materials Manager
Responsible for purchasing
supplies, inventory manage-
ment and contract negotia-
tions. 5 years of hospital
management experience
.' required. ,



Desoto Memorial Hospital
900 N. Robert Ave.
Arcadia, FL 34266
OR
www.dmh.org
and look under Careers
OR
Fax Resumes to: 863-494-8400
E-mail: hr@dmh.org
Phone Number: 863-494-8405
cl6:8c


ATTENTION .The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising any
preference or limitation based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,,
familial status or national origin, or
the intention to make such a prefer-
ence or limitation. Familial status
includes children under 18 living with
parents or guardians and pregnant
women, tfc-dh
* F T. M E A D E* *
Several very nice apartments avail-
able in nice neighborhood. Suitable
for adults. Call Sheila 375-9988, 285-
7203, 781-4927. 6:8tfc


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jerry Carlton, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Dane Hendry, Associate


VERY NICE 34' AVION trailer, fully fur-
nished, roof a/c, satellite TV available.
No pets. $500 month plus $250 secu-
I rity deposit includes utilities. 863-375-
4424. 6:8-15p
ADULT PARK Crystal Lake. We have
RVs for sale and rent. Spme can be.
moved. 767-8822. 3:16tfc
'TheHerad-Adocat


40 0b IFC

A
1, 2, 5, 10, 20 Acre Tracts Available. Call for information.
20 Acres producing citrus grove. 2300' 3BR/1.5 Ba block Home in West
Hardee. Great out buildings 2 wells, production records available. $487,900.
20 beautiful acres, homesite, investment, pasture. Minutes from Wauchula,
great location $15,500. per acre
Briarwood: Beautiful 3/2 on 1/2 ac. Den, formal sitting room, 10' ceilings,
open floor plan, 2 car garage. Deed restricted, stable area. $349,900.
67 ac. beautiful woods and pasture. Within 1/2 Mi. of College, Best
Western and Projected growth area. 600' from Peace River $15,000 per ac.
Looking for large acreage? Call me about 500 acres in Hardee County.
cl6:8c





CAROL'S REALTY
o 1534 YANCY STREET
p rC 'AP PORT CHARLOTTE, FL.
33952


****** WAUCHULA ******

2904 Golf View Dr. 3/2 $129,900

417 N. 9th St. 5/2 $80,000

3863 Fussell Rd. 2/1 CBS 2.5 Acres $98,000

2044 Petteway Ave. Brand New Mobile

2/2 $79,900


****** ZOLFO SPRINGS ******

1260 Mockingbird (Charley Creek) 3/2

New AC $58,000


JAMES COLLIE


OFFICE
CELL
CELL
FAX


LIC. ASSOCIATE


1-941-627-2769
1-941-628-7835
1-863-412-8932
1-941-627-1741


c16:8c


(-


AM-SOUTH REALTY


MAKING( REAI. ESTATE REA, EASY.'"
An Indepdedently Owned and Operated Member of Codwel Banker Real Estate Cororation


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873


781-3627
375-2887
773-0575
381-2769


Donna Steffens


4 X
Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


COMFORT TO SMILE ABOUT! And we know you'll smile
when you see this Inviting 20-acres. It also includes an
older mobile home. The scenery consists of oak trees to
hang your hammock and relax. There's more! Call for
more details! $375,000.
DO YOU NEED LAND? I have a +6.6-acre tract that is
just right for you! $105,000.
DOGGONE GOOD DEAL! This 3-bedroom/2-bath home
includes a yard for a dog to run and a privacy fence,
plus a large, screened front porch. All this for a pet
friendly price of just $179,900. Call for more frisky facts
SECLUSION A MUST? Then relocate to the peace and
quiet of this hideaway located on Golden Oaks Road.
16 1/2-acres with a double-wide mobile home 3 bed-

rooms and 1 bath. $190,000.
TWO BEDROOM/ONE BATH HOME. Comes with 2.5
acres. Call 773-2122 for more details. $200,000.
NOTHING SPARED. Best of everything has gone into
this compelling 3-bedroom/2-bath home in Knollwood.
This Immaculate home has tile floors, a large family
room, and a large yard to go with it. Only thing missing
is you and your family! Call to complete the picture!
$225,000.
COMMERCIAL LOT IN THE CITY Great location within
the city limits in Zolfo Springs. 100 x 155. Act fast!
$35,000. __
2.5 Acres. A 2BR/1BA home. Call for more details.
$200,000.


NICE NEIGHBORHOOD. 5-acre tract on Stenstrom Rd.
Great location for building a new home. Close to Hardee
Senior High School. Don't wait too long! Call Dane.
$200,000. ---
RENT RUNNING YOU RAGGED? I'm an affordable 2-bed-
room/1-bath home in Bowling Green. The price has been
reduced to $62,000. For a new outfit, call 773-2122.
EXCELLENT LOCATION. 285.2 Sq. Ft. of Hwy. frontage,
commercial property 1.5 Ac. Excellent place for stor-
age units or a new business call Donna. Owner motivat-
ed to seel. Make your best Offer! $275,000. ,
TWO-BEDROOM/ONE-BATH HOME. It Is located In
Bowling Green. It has a new roof and an enticing price of
$77,900.
STUCK IN SQUARE ONE? Unstick yourself with this easy-
to-buy 2001 3 bedroom 2 bath Manufactured home on
.88-acres. It Is set at a great price and a motivated sell-
er, unstick and call 773-2122 for more Information.
$140,000.00.
RESTAURANT FOR SALE. Located in Fort Meade,
Located on Hwy 17 in a great location, plenty of parking,
fully furnished and ready for new ownership. Owner very
motivated to sell. Call Donna. You won't find a better
deal. Now only $225,000.
PRICE REDUCED! 4-bedroom/2-bath home on 5-acres.
Owner is motivated to sell Buy It now for only $175,0/.
PRETTY AS A PICTURE! Must see to appreciate all tRe
value of this concrete block 3BR/1 BA home on large lot
with extra building lot. Call Donna $159,000.


Featured Listing!
LIKE NEW!
2005 manufactured home with 3 bedrooms and 2 baths on completely
fenced 5 acres w/pond and 12 inch well. Also comes with a Ford 1700
Diesel Farm Tractor. Owner motivated to sell. $174,500.
Call Donna to show you this nice and quiet area. Mca


Gary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122
FAX (863) 773-2173


C~I'1~I1





June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advbcate 9B


The


LAWN CARE & LANDSCAPE service.
Commercial and residential, insured,
locally owned and operated. Free
Estimates. Call My Florida Landscape
Service 863-832-2102. 4:6-6:8p



For 79 bed long-term
care facility. For Fri.,
Sat., Sun. & Mon. shift.
If you enjoy working
with the elderly come
join our team.
Apply in person at:
Hardee Manor
Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873
cl6:8c


SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a problem?
Call Alchoholics Anonymous in
Hardee County at 735-2511. Several
weekly meetings. dh

FACILITIES MANAGER
Responsible for all plant
operations, engineering,
grounds, housekeeping and
laundry. 5 years of hospital
management required.



Desoto Memorial Hospital
900 N. Robert Ave.
Arcadia, FL 34266
OR
www.dmh.org
and look under Careers
OR
Fax Resumes to: 863-494-8400
E-mail: hr@dmh.org
Phone Number: 863-494-8405
cl6:8c


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132 FAX (863) 784-7497
E-MAIL: jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida.edu


INSTRUCTOR, EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
Full-time faculty position to teach in the Emergency Medical Technician program
starting in the Fall (August, 2006). Must have current E.M.T. licensure (FL or eligi-
bility to obtain), and a minimum of 2 years recent experience as an EMT or,
Paramedic. Associate's or higher degree in Emergency Medical
Services/Paramedic.preferred. Teaching experience preferred. Competitive salary
and'benefit package including retirement, health & life insurance, and sick leave.
Application forms available in Human Resources, Building I (Avon Park), at any
SFCC campus/eenter, and on our Web site.
Application deadline: 5 p.m., Friday, June 9,2006.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION cl6:1,8c


BeautifuLkAB/2Bt4, country home one .mile from
town on 2.5 acres; spacious and modern kitchen
with all the latest upgrades, tile floors, cathedral
ceilings. A must see!


c16:8c


COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL
Land Clearing ,*
Pond Excavation *
Dirt Hauling / Grade Work *
Citrus Tree Removal *
Demolition *
SitePrep *


1 0 .3 5-0278 1


DAVID MILLS, OWNER
Established 1972 c14:27tfc


Classifieds


***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales, service and
installation, call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-119
Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee
County Ordinance 87-09 .Section 10
Paragraph D require all ads for any
construction-related service to carry
the contractor's license number.
dh
OSTOMY, COLOSTOMY, AND ideosto-
my supplies now in stock at Pete's
Pharmacy. tfc
C&P CONSTRUCTION. Demolition, fill
dirt, tree removal, stump removal,
dragline, track hoe, land clearing,
shell, clay, top soil, loader, bulldozer,
dump trucks. 735-2415. 1:19tfc
CENTRAL PUMP & IRRIGATION, INC.,
(863) 773-6259. Services include aer-
ators, house pumps, new installation
& repair on yard systems. 5:26tfc
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. Located
at the SFCC Annex, Room' #105, Hwy.
17 North, Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc


NOBLE LAWNS Quality service at
affordable prices. Free Estimates.
781-3559. 6:8-7:6p
EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER to sit
with your elderly or disabled.
References. Full or part time. 863-773-
9727. 6:8-7:6p
BRITE-WAY SANDBLASTING FOR.
SALE Everything needed to blast.
185 compressor. John Deere power.
600 lb. sand pot. Air condition helmet.
10 years contacts in Hardee,
Highlands & DeSoto. Good income for
young man. Only $12,000. Call (863)
781-2457. 6:8p
BABYSITTING IN MY HOME. Mon. -
Sat. 6:30 a.m. 6 p.m. Great with chil-
dren. Play and learn. 375-9995. 6:1-8p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs?
Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday
nights 7 p.m. at St. Michael's
Catholic Church, Heard Bridge Rd.,
Wauchula and Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday nights 7 p.m. at First
Methodist Church, Corner of Grape &
Church St., Bowling Green.
7:18tfcdh
LET US PICK up junk cars out of your'
yard. Will buy old farm tractors.
Crooms- 773-0637. 2:24tfc


*LE BODY HELP WANTED

Manager Trainee needed for Able Body Labor's Wauchula
team. Company specializes in servicing the construction, hos-
pitality, light industrial and special events market. Duties
include dispatching workersto: job sites, setting-up new
accounts, making service calls'to clients, recruiting workers,
etc. Ability to work flexible hours to include weekends a
MUST. EOE Competitive salary, bonus & benefits pkg.
E-mail resume to: region5jobs@ablebody.net c16:1,8c



Abu Ilpiud B


4'1,


Billy Hill


That's exactly where
Billy goes for all
his customers.
He goes the distance!
Sell your House to Billy Hill today!





Pay no commission fees!
Pay no closing costs!

781-1062


Bowling Green Youth Academy
is currently seeking an
LPN or RN.

The starting salary range is

$18-$22 for LPN and

$20-$25 per hour for RN.


are available


at the


facility or you can send a resume to:
PO Box 369
Bowling Green, FL 33834
(863) 375-2000 ext. 221
Fax (863) 375-9929 15:18-6:8c



M.C. M.C. 2000 Realty
2C0 0 505 W. Interlake Blvd.
S Lake Placid, Fl. 33852
888-988-8839
Swww.mchoy.com
BEAT Marie Claire-Hoy, Broker
REALTY





Located in nice neighborhood in Wauchula and close to
schools and shopping. 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, c/b, with new
roof, tile, carpet, and Dupont wood floors. Spacious mas-
ter bedroom with French doors leading to porch and spa.
Fenced back yard with central irrigation throughout.
MLS#185685 $189,000


McQUAIG'S FENCE SERVICE-
Specializing in barb wire and board
fencing. Wayne McQuaig, owner, 1-
863-228-7369 Nextel 159*224977*12.
5:25-6:29p
D.C. PHONE SERVICE Residential
and small business installation and
repair. Specializing in mobile homes,
computer wiring, 35 years experience.
773-9179. 4:27-6:29p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION Car-
ports, screen rooms, additions, pool
cages. Harold Howze Construction.
735-1158. 4:6-6:22p
HARDEE WELCOME GROUP of
Alcoholics Anonymous is moving to
First Baptist of Zolfo Springs, 4th St.
Starting June 4. 6:1-29nc


- U .-dda


5 YOUNG COWS or springing heifers,
will pay cash. Leave message at 781-
3100. 6:8-29p


WE HAVE refrigerators, gas stoves,
electric washers, dryers, freezers,
metal bunkbed, twin on top, full on
bottom, king & queen beds, dressers,
chests at Edna's Place. 4:20tfc
GARAGE SALE Friday and Saturday
only, 8-4. 311 Turner Avenue,
Wauchula. Lots of miscellaneous.
6:8p
FRI. & SAT., 8-2. Moving Sale. 925
Diana Lane off Marion Street, Zolfo.
Lawn mower, freezer, household
items. Everything must go. 6:8p
211 GEORGIA ST. Saturday, 8 a.m.-
??. A lot of stuff to sell. 6:8p
SATURDAY SUNDAY, 9-6. 3439 Elm
Street, Zolfo Springs. House full. 6:8p


Truck Drivers Wanted
Taking applications for team drivers to haul cat-
tle out West. Must have clean MVR and Class A
CDL license. Must be at least 25 and have three
years experience OTR.
Call 863-781-0669 or 863-735-9574, if no answer
leave name, number, and brief message.
Someone will get back with you. 5:25-6:15p


ALL OVEI TOWN


Break down anywhere in town and we'll be there in a flurry!
Call us for 24-hour Emergency Service.

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Jimmy Hill Dan Hill
(863) 781-3090 (863) 781-3091
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CALL
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863-781-6103
steve(),mchoy.com cl5:25-6:15p


Call Delois @ Lambert Realty
for more details.
863-781-2360 or 773-0007.


Applications


WiE Pay CaSH


FOR HOUSES


A(D LaND


Office Ph: 375-3113

Mobile Ph: 781-4460



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10B The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006


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Payroll
Temporary or Federal and State
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1 LA1 3 R' Deposits
Personnel and I R ILUTIONS Tax Reports
ar. '- '" Personnel Sevices Worker's Comp
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(863) 773-9225 10:21f



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A9 a in" ,

RESCHKE CONSTRUCTION, INC.
State Certified Building and Roofing Contractor
Residential Remodeling
Zolfo Springs, Florida
(863) 735-0660 (863) 832-0409


J-N-T's
MOWING SERVICE
Jimmy & Tammy McNabb
Licensed & Insured
Office 863-735-2902 Cell 863-781-6703
Nextel 161*149209*3 Fax 863-735-0126
Specializing In
Lot Clearing Dirt Work m
Fence Building Bush Hogging
Brush Removal Pasture/Grove Mowing



T N T FILL PI1T. INC
Dirt, Sand, Shell, Citrus Tree Removal, Land Clearing,
Building House Pads and Driveways
3721 E Main St Tim Parrish
Wauchula FL 33873 (863) 781-3342
Office (863) 773-9446 Nextel
Fax (863) 773-3599 '. 158*17*31234

We Accept Most Major Credit Cards 3:16tfc


C.N.A. Training Course
If you are interested in a rewarding career in caring for the
elderly, Hardee Manor is interviewing for their
C.N.A. TRAINING COURSE.
Must be at least 18 years old, able to work
3:00 PM. to 11 PM. SHIFT or 11:00 PM. to 7:00 A.M. SHIFT.
You must be of good character, dependable, responsible,
and be able to pass an FDLE background check.
If you feel you are interested in this exciting opportunity,
please apply in person
Mon Fri., 9:30 A.M. to 3:30 PM. ONLY.
Hardee Manor Healthcare Center
401 Orange Place
Wauchula, FL 33873 c16:8,15c


WEATHER SUMMARY
Scattered storms helped alleviate dry conditions in several areas across
the State during the week of May 29-June 4. The scattered nature of the
recent rains left some areas dry with the danger of wildfire high. Some
localities received traces of rainfall. Areas receiving over one inch of pre-
cipitation included Alachua, Fort Pierce, Jay, Live Oak, Orlando, Palm-
dale, Tallahassee and Tampa. Bronson and Frostproof recorded over two
inches of rainfall for the week. Temperatures at the major stations hovered
around normal. Hot daytime highs were in the upper 80s and lower 90s.
Pleasant evening temperatures were in the 60s and 70s with some areas
recording at least one low in the 50s.
FIELD CROPS
More rains are needed in the Panhandle for growers to complete peanut
planting. Lack of rainfall in the Panhandle and northern Peninsula locali-
ties is hindering some growers from applying timely herbicides as well as
fungicide applications to peanuts. Peanut condition is rated sixteen percent
poor, seventy-five percent fair and nine percent good. Peanut planting is 87
percent finished compared with 93 percent planted by this date last year
and the five-year average of 88 percent completed. In Jefferson County,
earlier moisture caused significant scab on pecans; however, current mois-
ture stress may cause pecans to drop nuts. Soil moisture across the State is
rated mostly very short to adequate.
:- Topsoil Subsoil
re This Last Last This Last Last
g week week year week week Year
Percent
Very short 40 55 1 33 50 0
Short 30 35 7 .22 30 10
Adequate 30 10 67 45 20 88
Surplus 0 0 25 0 0 2
VEGETABLES
Most field activities remained on schedule despite scattered rains.
Producers marketed cantaloupes, sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant, okra,
peppers, potatoes, radishes, tomatoes and watermelons.
LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
In the Panhandle, pasture is in very poor to good condition, with most in
fair condition. Pasture is green but drying out due to drought since early
May. Bahia pasture is greasy-grey and crisp. The cattle are in fair to good
condition..In the northern areas, livestock are being fed supplemental hay.
In the central areas, pasture condition is very poor to good, with'most in
poor condition. Cattlemen are still feeding hay and running out shortly.
Pastures are not growing due to lack of moisture. In the southwest, pasture
condition is poor to good. Statewide, the cattle condition is mostly fair.


Don't Be 'Fashionably Late!"
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.


Lonestar
Conastirui3.ctionr Co.X-p-

General Contractor
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated

Office 863-773-4779 Fax 863-773-9865


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o oor CAROL'S


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-* B b a -. "-, -10 Years Experience-
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Cell: 863-449-1806
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Catle Pasture
Condition This Last This Last
week week week week
Percent
Very poor 0 5 10 20
Poor 15 35 35 50
Fair 50 50 30 25
Good 20 10 25 5
Excellent 15 0 0 0
CITRUS
Temperatures across the citrus belt continued with hot and humid con-
ditions all week. Highs ranged from 90 degrees in Ft Pierce to over 94
degrees in Lake Alfred. Along with the hot, humid conditions, afternoon
seabreezes brought widely scattered thunderstorms. All areas recorded
some rainfall during the week ranging from less than one half inch at Lake
Alfred to over two inches at Frostproof and Immokalee. Allcitrus areas are
still well below average rainfall for the year and non-irrigated groves con-
tinue to show signs of stress. Valencia estimated harvest is running slightly
below 5 million boxes weekly and harvest labor shortages continue to be
reported. Activity in the groves has slowed some, with some growers apply-
ing copper sprays to control citrus canker, seasonal nutritional sprays, and
mowing and removing brush from groves. Grapefruit harvest is winding
down for the season, with most going to processing.'Honey tangerine har-
vest is also coming to an end. Many packinghouses are closed for the sea-
son with only Valencia oranges being packed in volume.
ESTIMATED BOXES HARVESTED WEEK ENDED
Crop May 21 May 28 June 4
In thousands of 1-3/5 bushel boxes
Valencia 3,622 4,923 4,493
Grapefruit 13 42 6
Honey Tangerines 78 28 9

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REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
REALTOR JOE L. DAVIS, J
JOHN H. O'NE/
Rick Knight
See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


NEW LISTING! Great buy on this
home and extra lot in Sebring! 2
BR, 1.5 bath, CB home includes 2-
bay metal garage w/electric service
& storage shed. Located across
from Orange Blossom Lk boat
ramp. Adjacent 75'x125' lot includ-
ed!. $175,000!
20t acs. close in to Wauchula.
Citrus, 2 wells. $220,000!
20 ac. Hamlin grove between Avon
Park & Wauchula. Mostly young
trees, increasing in production with
micro-jet irrigation. $260,000!
Serene beautiful homesites in the
country await you! One 5 ac. par-
cel is cleared & pasture, listed for
$99,000. An adjacent 9.47 ac. par-
cel has a small lake (complete with
ducks) and 4" diameter well, listed
for $189,000. Seller will consider
assistance with buyer closing costs.
3 BR, 2 bath, CB home with 1876
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RICK KNIGHT...............773-2472
MONICA REAS.............773-9609


8



IR.
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Frontage on Hwy 17 N. South of new
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Approximately 3.5 acs. with 2 homes
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Asking $100,000 each! Make your
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1.28 ac. vacant tract in apex where
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300 ac. grove, Desoto Co. Hamlin
on Cleo, Valencia on Swingle.
$5,000,000!
27 ac. Hamlin grove. Eastern
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Road frontage on three sides and
plenty of trees make this property
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Ten 5-6 ac. tracts. Friendship area
of Hardee Co. Owner financing.
Some deed restrictions. $125,000
each!
CB home. 4 BR, 2 bath on Saunders
St in Wauchula. $99,000!
3 BR, 1 bath CB home in Wauchula
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i, :







June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 11B


A young woman of the nomadic Kuchi Tribe sweeps outside her tent: She is sweeping an area
clean for her husband, who will soon approach with a prayer rug for prayer time.

AFGHANISTAN
Continued From 5B ?; N" 'i


area, the greater the influence of the mul-
lah. o

Outlook
SThe challenges facing Afghanistan are
formidable. Four years after the fall of the
Taliban, an estimated 153,000 people
remain displaced.
Food insecurity persists in large parts of
the country, particularly in rural areas
where the absorption capacity for returnees
continues to be stretched.
In an incessantly, tense security environ-
ment with increasing attacks, by insurgents
on representatives of the international com-
munity, the Afghan government is making
an effort to assert its sovereignty.
Try to imagine yourself in the city of
Kabul, with a locally estimated population
of five million persons. Only the main
streets are paved. Most of the side streets
are unpaved and full of deep potholes.
There are no traffic signals none
whatsoever! Anyone can drive anywhere,
and they do. Many drive the wrong way on
one-way streets. There are numerous traffic
circles and speedbumps, without which
many more persons would be killed.
Livestock fill the highways, as well as ven-
dors. ;. -
There is no sewer system. All waste is
simply flushed onto the streets, where it
quickly dries. A large yellow cloud engulfs
the capital city each day as people go about
their business with a cloth covering their
face.
The challenges seem overwhelming
when one considers that until recently girls
were not allowed to attend school.
Hospitals are poorly staffed and inadequate-
ly stocked. Iiifant mortality is among the
highest in the world. Clean water is largely
unavailable.
And then there is the problem of
women's rights.
While' the Afghan government is striving
to ensure women's rights, it was reported
by the Afghanistan Independent Human
Rights Commission that over 100 cases of
self-immolation have been documented
over the past year alone: Self-immolation is
the act of setting oneself ablaze. The num-
ber of self-immolation cases could be high-
er than recorded, as many women and their
relatives cannot report to police because of
fear of divorce, killing and more violation.
SAround 80 cases of forced marriages and
199 cases of physical torture and beating
also have been registered over the past year,
the report said.
But in the rural villages I visited, there is


An elderly, ruralAfghan man.


COURTESY PHOTOS
An imam offers a blessing at a slaughter-
house. The meat will be used for food at a
gathering at the mosque during Ramadan.
much hope.

Summation '
The Dairy Industry Reviflizaiion '
Project began in Parwan province north of
Kabul. We worked intensively with 24 vil-
lages with 708 families of women farmers
representing 778 mature cows.
Fresh milk is collected daily by a milk
collector driving a three-wheeled motorcy-
cle. The driver performs a simple alcohol
test to determine freshness at the farm gate.
Farmers know when he will arrive to pick
Sup the milk, and coordinate their milking
times t expedite the task of collecting/con-
solida ng the milk.
Th driver rushes the milk directly to
restaurants and ice-cream makers, ensuring
optimal freshness. The restaurant owners
are assured of receiving a reliable and com-
paratively high-quality raw milk product in
a tiri ly manner. The women farmers
receive twice as much income from their
milk by simply coordinating collection
activities.
The entire project was best summed up
at the Farmer's Field Day held in the
Sofeyan village of Charikar, when the pres-
ident of the local shura addressed the crowd
of over 100 persons as follows:
"We have 85 farmers in this area cooper-
ating in the Land O' Lakes Dairy
Revitalization Program. Their cows are pro-
ducing more milk and the farmers are more
profitable. But we have 1,100 farmers in
this village, and we need all of them
involved in this program."
My last impression on this assignment
was of three women farmers excitedly
speaking to one of our women extension
workers in the midst of their three cows.
They were all smiling.
Hope comes one farmer at a time.
Lockie Gary is the director of the Hardee
County Extension Service. He makes fre-
quent trips to Central Asia, where he con-
ducts humanitarian and livestock assistance
projects. Many of the livestock tools and vet-
erinary supplies used on this- trip were
donated by the Kiwanis'Club in Wauchula.
This, the second of two parts, concludes this
report on Gary's first trip into Afghanistan.
A report on his recently completed trip to
that nation is not yet ready for publication.'



Older people love to give good
advice; it compensates'them
for their inability to set a bad
example.
-Francois Due de La
Rochefoucauld


These Afghan women in light blue burqas are students in Hardee County Extension Director
Lockie Gary's agricultural class. They stopped to shop at a' produce market on their way home to
their village.




County To Create 2 New Positions


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There may be two new high-paid
positions in county government in
coming months.
At its meeting. Thursday, the
Hardee County Commission ap-
proved readvertising for a county
planner at a new salary range and
qualifications. The commission de-
ferred to the June 15 meeting the
position of assistant county manag-
er at the request of Commissioner
Minor Bryant who had been a
Small County Coalition meetings
in Tallahassee and not had time to
study this request.
Both positions will be in the
newly created salary range 39,
which is $63,961.74 ($30.75 per
hour) to $83,923.34 ($40.35 per
hour).
County Manager Lex Albritton,
who was recently moved up to the
highest salary level 40 ($73,000-
93,000), said that he had been
unsuccessful, in getting qualified
candidates for the badly needed
county planner position. "With
Development of Regional Impacts
coming from Mosaic and CF
Industries and other projects, we
, need to get that. position filled."
^Commission Chairman Nick;
Timmerman said he hoped there
would be more success in attracting
someone qualified in the new step
39, bringing wages more in line
with others in similar positions.
Bryant said getting a county
manager could do away with so
many department directors.
Commissioner Dale Johnson said
to get someone to fill either posi-
tion could be difficult. "You'd prac-
tically have to be able to walk on
water to fulfill all the requirements
listed."

In other action, the commission:
approved a resolution setting
up a letter of credit with Wachovia
Bank for landfill expansion and
other expenses.
Janice Williamson, director of
finance, said the amount would be
up to $2.9 million. The contract
with low bidder Comanco Environ-
mental Corp. was negotiated to
$130,600 less and is now $2.6 mil-
lion for the five-acre expansion, but
closure of the current landfill and
o. their construction and equiplnent
will take the additional amount.
Williamson said a $1. million
transfer from the Solid Waste con-
tingency to capital construction
will get the project going. She said
although the letter of credit-allows
up to the 12 percent interest used-to
calculate the total loan amount, the
actual base will be 2.9 percent
interest. This loan is part of the up-
to-$10 million the county had.
already established for hurricane
recovery expenses until reimburse-
ments from state and federal
sources come in.
:..' learned that Bryant had been
elected to the Board of Directors
for the Small County Coalition.
"You can get more done from
Inside than out," he commented.
He said during the recent trip to
Tallahassee he learned that almost
everything asked for was funded
for Hardee as one of the fiscally
constrained counties. "They cut
about $15 or $20,000 from the
Wauchula Hills sewer/water budget
but overall it went well. We need to
applaud our senators and represen-
tatives, lobbyists and the Small
County Coalition for the work they
do for us." He added that most of
the funds approved were re-occur-
ring.
agreed to apply for poll
worker recruitment and training
funds which have become avail-
able. Each county's share is based
on the registered voters in the 2004
election.
discussed the non-homestead
properties around the county on


which no hurricane cleanup has
even been attempted. Commis-
sioner Bobby Ray Smith mentioned
several on which fines have been
assessed.
County attorney Ken Evers said
there is a way to place a lien and
institute foreclosure, especially on
those which are beyond repair and
create i public safety hazard. The
county has to decide whether envi-
ronmental responsibility for any
hazardous material on the property
and other liability is worth foreclo-
sure, cleanup and resale of a partic-
ular property. He will begin looking
at each one with these factors in
mind..
discussed the SR 62 current
repaving project, Tinimerman ,said
it was'important to work with the


state Department of Transportation
to coordinate the turn lanes at
Gebhardt Road and into the county
industrial park while that work is
ongoing.
discussed briefly the monthly
planning session on June 9 which
will be on the road capital improve-
ment plan over the next 10 years as
the county will receive $600,000 to
$700,000 in the five-cent gas tax
which went into effect in January.
Another topic will be codification
of the Land Development Regu-
lations to include existing ordi-
nances which have not been
merged with the LDRs, and not
accepting applications for rezones
which do not meet the required ele-
ments of the Comprehensive Land
Use Plan.


It pays to advertise in your Hometown Newspaper

We are saving this space just for


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The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, June 8, 2006


** ** "****************1*-*
935 05-08-03 14P
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611


Attitudes On Ag
By Bill Hodge
Retired Farmer & Rancher


AG-FEST
Hardee County Farm Bureau hosted all 354 Hardee County fourth
graders on May 4 at its annual Ag-Fest.
This annual event provides students an opportunity to see, and in some
cases, a hands-on experience with the many facets of Hardee County agri-
culture. The students arrived around 8 a.m. and each class rotated through
15 stations. There was a break at 11:15 for the students to have lunch.
Some of the stations were: a cow-calf operation, working cow horses,
citrus planting, irrigation, digging for fossils in mine tailings- and various
other agricultural operations. Thanks to the Hardee County Cattlemen's
Association for making the area available for this event.
OUTSTANDING
Steve Johnson of Bowling Green, Jeb S. Smith of Hastings and Drew
Phypers of Lake Placid are the finalists in Florida Farm Bureau
Federation's 2006 Outstanding Young Farmer and Rancher contest. Young'
Farmers & Ranchers are full-time Florida agricultural producers aged 18-
35..One of the finalists will win a new Dodge Ram quad cab and receive an
expense-paid trip to the American Farm Bureau annual meeting Jan. 7-10,
2007 in Salt Lake City, Utah. There, they will represent Florida in the
national YF&R competition. The winner of the national competition will
receive a Dodge Ram 3500 Quad Cab 4x4 SLT pickup and an Arctic Cat
454 4x4 ATV. We congratulate Steve, and Andrea, on their accomplish-
ment.
HURRICANES
In Washington, D.C., U.S. Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns
announced that sign-up began May 17, for four crop and livestock assis-
tance programs providing aid to producers affected by the destructive 2005
hurricanes. These programs are funded by $250 million in Section 32 funds
authorized immediately following these destructive storms.
"We will do everything we can at USDA to continue to help people
who have suffered through hurricanes and lost their crops, or who need help
with cleanup or rebuilding their communities," said Johanns. "I strongly
support targeted assistance to help people who are in need. USDA has been
very aggressive in finding the resources to provide nearly five billion dol-
lars in hurricane assistance."
The four programs Livestock Indemnity Program, Feed Indemnity
Program, Hurricane Indemnity Program and Tree Indemnity Program -
are funded through Section 32 of the Act of August 24, 1935. Johanns
authorized the use of $250 million from Section 32 funds in October 2005
for crop disaster, livestock, tree and aquaculture assistance. To see what you
may be eligible for, check the USDA Farm Service Agency in Wauchula.
LOBBYISTS
In Tallahassee, just outside the chambers of the Florida Legislature,
hordes of lobbyists pore over BlackBerries, huddle around TVs tuned to
floor debate and grab lawmakers for one-on-one appeals. It's a boiler room
of influence financed by the cable and phone industries, gun and insurance
groups, developers and home builders. And now, taxpayers in Southwest
Florida are paying, too.
Commissioners in Sarasota, Manatee and Charlotte counties have
bankrolled a small army of lobbyists to protect their interests in
Tallahassee. The tab this year, more than $240,000. Across the state, local
governments are spending more money to hire more lobbyists. In the last-




Burning Issues
By Patrick M. Mahoney
m Division of Forestry


Beware! Now that the fire season is here we need to look around our
yards, pastures and groves to see where there is a high fire risk.
Are the palmettos too high and/or too thick, is the grass too high, or is
there a fire line cut around your groves and or pastures?
With the lack of rain in our area, and the low humidity, the danger of
wildfire is extremely high. Be careful as you work in and around your grove
and/or pasture not to accidentally set any fire. If a fire does happen, first call
911 to report it, then, if it is safe, try to put it out. If you are not able to put
it out, get to a'safe place and help guide the fire department to the fire.
There are certain guidelines to follow before you burn.
1.) You have permission from the landowner or his designee.
2.) You have received authorization from the Division of Forestry or
its designated agent before starting the fire.
3.) There are adequate fire brakes at the site, personal and firefighting
equipment for the control of the fire.
4.) The fire remains within the, boundary of the authorized site.
5.) Someone is at the site until the fire is completely out:
6.) The authorization was not canceled by DOE
7.) DOF determines that the air quality and fire danger are favorable
for a safe burn. A person who burns wild land or vegetative land, learning
debris in a manner that violates any requirement of law commits a misde-
meanor of the second degree, punishable as provided by state statute.
There are certain guidelines for homeowners who want to burn' trash.
You may bum if:
1.) No local, ordinance 'forbids it.
2.) The material to be burned must be generated on the premises where
it is burned, and the premises can be occupied by no more than two family
units.
3.) The open burning is 50 feet or more from any residence on the
property where the burning is being conducted, 300 -feet from any other
occupied building, 100 feet or more from any public road and 25 feet or
more from 'any woodlands, forest or brush.
4.) The fire must be attended and adequate fire equipment readily avail-
able at all times.
j5) The fire must not cause smoke, soot, odors, visible emissions, heat,
radiation or other conditions to the degree that they become a nuisance.
6.) The fire must be started after 9 a.m. and be out by one hour before
sunset.
7.) The burning must be enclosed in a non-combustible container or
ground excavation covered by a metal mesh or grill.
8.) The moisture content and composition of the material to be burned
t be favorable to good burning as that air pollution is minimized. Green
or t material may not be burned.
SThe burning of the following is prohibited: Tires, rubber materials,
tar, rad cross ties, other creosoted lumber, plastics, waste pesticide con-
aerarbage (food materials) or 'trash other than yard trash and house-
hold pa products.
An~ rson burning for agricultural, forestry or land clearing without
proper auization from the Florida Division of Forestry will be guilty of
a misdemeof the second degree. This is also the same charge for
allowing an to escape your control and burn onto the property of anoth-

a/. oa fne or a second-degree misdemeanor is up to 60 days in jail
and/or a fine o o $500.
To report sts, call the Arson Alert Hotline at (800) 342-5869 to
receive up to ake reward for information leading to an arrest.
at you tell those around you who smoke not to dis-
card theii e window, and to make sure that they are extin-


five years, the number of lobbyists working for counties jumped about 70
percent, from 145 to 245. Cities hired about-185 lobbyists in 2001 and have
since added more than 100 to their ranks.
Local officials say they used. to have more faith in the legislative
process, relying mostly on phone calls and letters to members of delegation.
But they've been burned too many times. A sentence in a bill can cost them
millions in revenue. And other groups, like developers with projects facing
county review, are spending big money protecting their interests.
FARM WORKER PAY
Florida farmers pay equitable wages for labor. The Florida Farm
Bureau is concerned that the current public focus on immigration and
immigration reform may lack accurate information about farming and farm
worker pay.
"There appears to be a perception that agricultural producers are pay-
ing less than minimum wage to foreign workers," said Kevin Morgan,
FFBF director of agricultural policy. "In fact, the average wage paid to
farmworkers by Florida growers is far higher than the state or federal min-
imum wage."
Florida farm workers are paid, on average, more than $9 an hour,
according to farm labor statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
These statistics show that, contrary to popular notions, farm workers are
being paid a fair wage. Field harvesters are paid at least the state minimum
wage of $6.40, which is above the federal minimum wage of $5.15. The


RIBS. ................ ............. $8.95
CHOPPED PORK ......................... 7.95
RIBS & PORK ............... ...........$9.84


WHOLE ROASTED ..................


,. ..0.
CHIPS....... .... . .$.5
BOILED PEANUTS (PINT) ................. .2.2
CHOCOLATE CAKE. ..........


q,


I T
average pay of all -hired workers was $9.49 an hour, while the average pay;
for agricultural services workers was $9.20 an hour.
As the state's largest general-interest agricultural association, Florida'
Farm Bureau recognizes that a steady supply of workers is essential to their
production process. This supply of workers must be available when cropsi
are ready for harvest.
The Florida Farm Bureau continues to work with members of Congress
to ensure that any immigration reform measure has a practical guest work-
er program.


E GARDEN C


^'d b SOD P rA
Sold by Pallet, Half Pallet, Piece
MULCH
Fill Dirt Drainfield & Driveway Rock
Potting & Top Soil (sold by the yard) R.R. Ties 14.99 Each


120 Hogan St.
Wauchula, FL
(Behind Panda Restaurant) 5:25ff
5:25tfc


Monday Friday 12:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. 2 p.m.
773-3500


Now OPENI


~4


HALF CHICKEN ...................... $7.25
RIBS & CHICKEN COMBO ..................$9.75
STEAKS SIRLOINN 12-13 09.) COOKED TO SERVE .$9.85


.,....$29.95 IA BROASTED .. .......................4.60


"EXTRAS
50 BOILED PEANUTS (QUABT) ............... 2.50
0 CHEESE CAKE
SHESE.CARE ........................ $2.50
5 APPLE PIE........ .................$2.00


B.3B.Q.

STEAKS & MORE

863-773-3700

705 6TH AVENUE S. (iWY. 17) WAUCHULA
DINE IN, DELIVfEBt AND TAKE OUT
MON. SAT. 10:00 8:00 CLOSED SUNDAY
CATERNG AVAILABLE DELIVER WITHIN 3 MILES 3.00 MORE THAN 3 MILES $5.00

DINNERS -
Served with any 2 sides and rolls or garlic toast


~ SANDWICHES.
Sandwich Platters (Choose 2 sides) add $1.25
RIB ~ PORK SPABERIB ON TEXAS TOAST ......... $4.75 CHICKEN ON A BUN ,......... .........;.. .$4.75
CHOPPED PORK .................. ...$4.50 HAMBURGER .., ..................... $2.75,
SAUSAGE ~ ON A RO. ~ .................. .$3.20 BEEF ~ WHEN AVAILABLE ............... .$5.95
HOTDOOS .................... ...... ... $2.00

~ SIDES
BAKED BEANS POTATO SALAD COBN GREEN BEANS MASHED POTATOES HOTDOOS COLE SLAW *
$1.25 PER PERSON
$2.50 PINT ~ $5.25 QUART

S. CHICKEN .
WHOLE ................... .....$6.80 HF ** * * ...... .. ......$4.70
* ** * *


WHOLE SLAB .. ....... ........ .... $18.95 SB.. ........ ... . .....$10.45

SFAMILY"ATTERS
$41.95

OUR TASTY PLATTER IS SERVED WITH 2 SLABS OF OP-L OAK SOKED RIBS, ALONs r 2 LARE SIDES AND ROLLS.
DRINKS'

PEPSI COKE SPRITE. DR. PEPPER MOU/ DEW AND MOR SK YOUR S "YE) ........ ..... .. 75
SWEET AND UNSWEET TEA ............. ... /"........... "........... ...*** ... ..... $1.50
BOTTLED WATER 416 OZ.) ...... ... .. / .. "' "" ... ",". .*.*** **** ****. .. ...... .25


SKIDS MENU ~
f CHILD SIZE PORTION OF ANY ADULT MEAL PRICES YARY

S/ BATED 5TH IN COUNTRY BY C.N.. BBQ JUDGE RAY LAMPE
FOUNDEsS OF HAPPY JACKS BBQ IN LAKELAND
PREE MEAL ON BIRTHDAY. MUST BRING DRIVERS LICENSE. $10.00 VALUE
Sny problems or inconveniences you may have experienced during our first week.
Sor We have worked out any problems and hope you will return.
Thank You,
Curtis and Lisa
Smile-N-Jacks
_ 6:8c


I i


i.:




II




















I


"t~c~t










2C The Herald-Advocate, June 8,2006





-Schedule Of Weekly Services


Printed as a Public Service
by
The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ..........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ......................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
'Sunday Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ................
4:00p.m. 3:00p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ..........6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:30 p.m.
Wed. Discipleship ....................6:30 p.m.
Thurs. Mens Prayer ..................6:00 a.m.
Thurs. Ladies Bible Study........5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship..............:....... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship................ 10:30 a.m
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ................7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs:.........5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ...........:.....7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................6:30 p.m

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship....................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..............-.6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ....................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m
HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday............7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo Serv. De Predicacionll:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ............7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ......7:00 p.m.
Jueves Serv. De Predicacion ....7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................:...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... ........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School' 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service...........11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer Ser. ..7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Evening 6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........--. 11:00 a.m.
SDisciples Training .................:5:.00 p.m.
Evening Worship .-...........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..............7:30 p.m.


The following

urge you 1

your chosen ho

this Sa


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17 375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom...........9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion............5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico .................6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................r:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service ..............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study, Thurs. 7:30 p.m.

ONA


LIMESTONE BAPTIST CIIURCII
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone Comm
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...... ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.


NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ......................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ............7:00 p.m
NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training ..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer....................6:00 p.m

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer.................7:00 p.m


UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
SWednesday Prayer Time ............7:00 p.m


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
New York Ave. and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................7:00 p.m.


CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East:- 773-3447.
Sunday School -10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............:.......7:00 p.m. '
Wed. Evening Worship .........7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ....:...-.........11:00 a.m..
Wednesday 7:00 p.m,
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship ........9:30 a.ni.
Sunday Bible Class ...............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship..........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class .;..........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class .
2nd Sunday of Month............4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
MartixiLuther King Blvd.
:767-0199'


WAUCHULA

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ......................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper....................615 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Fellowship ..6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St. 767-8909
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...................5:00 p.m.
Thursday Service .....................7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship ...................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night Service ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CIIURCII
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MISSION BAUTISTA '
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical.................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Predicacion 11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles ........7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................... 10:45 a.m.
Wed. Youth Meeting ......6:30- 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..6:30- 7:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service....................11:00'a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .....................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service...................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-0657
Early Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Worship.................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities:...............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386.
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ......10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service ............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Ministries...7:00 p,m..

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service..................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts ...................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner.................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.:
Iro0--A- P.Lgnn seNA.*1:0- p m


C~C OF GODrossroads & Lighthouse Min. :00 p.m.
CHUR(3 OF GOD
OF THE I1:ST BORN IGLESIA DE DIOS
807 S. 8tve. PENTECOSTAL, M.I.
3-4 '903 E. Summit St. (863) 452-6693
CUC OF Ma rPastor: Reinaldo'Orliz
CHURCH OF JESUS C IST Martes 7:30- 900 p.m
OF LATTER-DAY SAIN S iees. 7:30 9 00 p.m
630 Hanchey Rd. 173-35 Domingo. I 00 a.m. 1:00 p.m..
Sacrament Meeting .........9:0m ,
Sunday School .. 000 IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
Priesthood .. 100 a.mn, SEPTIMODIA
COMMU Y LIGH SE Old Bradenton Road
903 Summit St. 735-s 67-1010.
Sunday School 10 JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES ENGLISH
Sunday Morning 11 00. 155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Night 6 00 p Sunday Morning............. 10:00a.m.
Wednesday Night .7 30 p m Tuesday Evenrig ................:7:30 p.m
ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY nursday Evening .................7:30 p.m.
501 N. 9th & Geoigia St. 773'3470, HOVAH'S WITNESSES SPANISH
Sunday School 10:00. a.m. Evening 4:00 p.m.
Morning Service............1.. 1:.. 30,a.m. V Eening 7:30 p.m,.
Evening Service .................. 7:30 p.m. Eening 7 30 p m
Wed. Bible St..& Yth. Gath ....7:30'p.m. LA
Fri, Night (Holy Ghost Night)..7:30 p.m. 302 LE BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Sc Bridge Road 773-6622
Morning Ser ".... ......9:45 a.m.
Evening Wors *::..':.....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Pray ........6:00 p.m.
., .... -7:00 p.m....
NEW BEG
Corner of 7thAv CHURCH
7.35-0 melto St.
NEW HOPE BAPT .
g merchants 1999 State Roiad RCH
g m er nSunday School
Morning Service ...............
to attend, .Church Training 5:
Evening Worship ......................6:30
use of worship, Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.

bbath
-. YOU Can Aap ear In...


yea JE g ^at o (T0 7
Wholesale Nursery


Donnis & Kathy Barber (863)735-070
Hwy. 66 East pr86 3 4L
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave. 767-0023
Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School 4:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service........4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor ........4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947 ,
Sunday School. 45 am.
Morning Worship .............111:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training...:..........6:00 pd .
Evening Worship ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper.................5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................6:45 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .... ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship.........:...... 1:00 a.m.
Weight Witchers
meet Thursday..................... 5:00 p.m.

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-5814
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...................... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program WZZS Sundays9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship.................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................;11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday.Service ................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday 9:00.a.m,
Holy Days

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ..........5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ............7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish)......................7:00 a.m.
(English) 8:30 a.m.,
(Sparish) .....I..:b :0t
(Creole) 1:'O).00 .
Daily Mass in English ..'.:......8:30 a.m.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting...............7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer,...................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road'
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... :.... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ........ 7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship. ............ 7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY
116 Orange St.
Sunday School ..... ..... 10:00 a.m.
: Morning Worship ....... ;..'. 11.30 a.m.
:Evening Worship ... .I .' :. 7 00 p m.
Tues Bible Stdy & Child Ttain 7 00 p.m
Friday Prayer Ser ice..... .. .7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther Kiiig Jr. AMe.
;' ,.. 773-019
Sunday School ... ,.0:00 a m.
SMorning Worship .....'...,. 1:15 a:m.
Evening Worship 6 00 pm
Wed.Night Fam. Training .. 7:30 p m
Thurs. Youth Bible Study .7 00 pm
.'Friday Night Worship 7,30 p m


SWAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
; TEMiPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School '. '.:' 10:00 a.m.
Church. ;... '...'.. :..y0'i00 aom.
'Ybuth Service ... ... .' :. 6:00p.m.
SEvening Service .. .. .. *: 7.00 p.m.
Wednesday Service '. ,7-30 p.m.


S WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School 10 00 a.m.
Evening Worshi- ... ..:'.7:30 p.m.
L Tuis day Prayer.. .. .: '. : 7:30 p.m.
, -Thiursday Worship .......... 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship...........7:30 p:m.


kids ko
Hey, kidsl.How would you.lka.your w
Draw us a picture, write us a pooem make noted In the paper?
If you're sending us a drawing; use pencfls or tel us a joke.
And leave the lined notebook paper for honm not crayons.
Then. print your names.and age, your parent our artwork.
where you: ve on the back. Get mom or dad to b thetown
or put It In the mall to: kide korner, The Herald-Ad ur office
.33Waucthla, FL 33873. Box
; ...., ,. .B o x


WAUCHULA
, WAUCHULAIREVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .......... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church ...... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ........... 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
102 N. 6th Ave. (Earnest Plaza)
773-2929
Sunday Service... ....... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service. .. ..... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. .... ...7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service..... 7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

CHARLIE CREEK BAPTIST
CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday'School~. ... ...... 0:0Q, a.m..
SMorning Worship ......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship".` .......... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ...... 7:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE
64 E. & School-House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-8586
Morning Worship ..... ... 10:00 a.m.
Children's Church........ ...10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... ..... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth &,FT.. .... ... 7:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning.Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .......... .7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.......... 7:00 p.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ............ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
SWednesday Prayer ..........7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School :.. ......... 10:00 a.m.-
Morning Worship. .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......... .. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ...............7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study. .............. 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ............ 11:00 a.m.,
G; A GRDNER A PiStiTCHURe- .
South Hwy. 17 494-54562,,,'- :
Sunday.School ..... .... : .' 10.00'a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ........... 7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special.
& Oxendine Rds; 735-2524 735-1851
Sunday.School .... ........ 10:00 a.m.
Worship,.. ...... ........11:00 a.m.
Evening .'. .... ..... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet... 7:00.p.m.,

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD
FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship........... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship .......... .7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship ..... ..... 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship........... 7:30 p.m.


PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ..... ........ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service .. ..... 6:30 p.m.-.
5th Sunday ................ 6:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

REALITY RANCH COWBOY
CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School .............. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month Cowboy
Fellowship ........ ...7-9 p.m.

ST, PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S.'Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ............. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship........ ..... 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ......... 7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol .. .10:30 a.m.
Confesiones ..... ......... 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina ...... ......... 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ......... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ............... 11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club. .............. 630 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche......... 7:00 p.m.
SMierecoles Merienda ........ 6:00 p.m.
Servicio .................. 8:00 p.m..
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ..... 5:00 p.m.

ZOLFO BAPTIST CHURCH
311 E. 4th Ave. 735-1200
Sunday School ........... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Training Union............. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:30 p.m.





CG^uiAMiAz(^<:AA





Ur^ ~te
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SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER.

Michael A Guido
Metier. Georgia


A wife sent her husband to
borrow a saucepan. He returned
without it, but with a battered face.
"What happened?" she asked.
"On the way to our neighbors I
thought, 'He'll be watching the ball
ga'.-. He won't like me. Stupid
guy, he won't give me a chance.'"
"So when the door opened, I
shouted, 'You bum, I didn't:want
your saucepan to begin with!' He
hit me."
Negative thinking-it's a magnet
for the worst, not the best. It
makes for failure, not success.
The Living Bible says, "Fix your
thought on what is true and good
and right. Dwell on the good
things in others."


DOeams oToday.. Realities
7becmwdedschool *f TO M 01''0 W
auditoriumisebusTbedas the I T ii row
strains of'pomp and circumstance" fll the air with excitement and .
antiipation. Gradutig se march proudly down the aisle m their
traditional cap and gown; families proudly watd .
ome of these yopg people are our future doctors scientists, poets
and presides. Others ivil operate our factories orfarm our land
Wateter the endeavor, each wi leave bis or ber mark upon our world.
Abrougb them, the dreams oftoday shall became therealities of tomornmo it
As we hoor our new graduates let us praise God as Be continues
along their chosen paths and strengthen them with His moving touch; qb2 nting
teaches you about all things...just as it has taught you, remain in H J2 e).

SUNWY MINIY 1IIIESIAY WElillusBN TTII lSAY NTagy
Alct Act ActS Ast A CItt 1 ct A1is
2:121 22M-47 412 42M? 1:- ;
Scapham es Se1c1tod Te Arnfe]aq ibl/e dVA 2s02L.
Copy/ight 2006. Keisler-Wiams Newspaper Se~vies, P. O. Box 887, Ch


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June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate, 3C


I.. WayT Back Whe-


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The Herald-Advocate of...

75 YEARS AGO
Hardee County's School Teachers
For 1931-32 Terms Have Been
Chosen: Teachers in the schools of
Hardee County were selected a few
days ago by the School Board, and
the list is made public today for the
first time. The faculty of the Hardee
County high school is the same as
last year, the entire staff having
been chosen to fill their respective
positions again..
Professor John M. Crowell will
be supervisor of city schools again,
Miss Ruth Southerland will be


supervisor of the elementary grades
and Miss Ella Beeson supervisor of
the primary grades. Professor P.G.
Shaver will be principal at Bowling
Green and the principal at Zolfo
Springs has not yet been chosen.

Play 'Daddy Longlegs' Will Be
Staged June 11: The play "Daddy
Longlegs" by Jean Webster, to be
given at the city auditorium next
Thursday night, is one you just
can't miss. You'll just have to take
off your hat to Adison Whitman as
Mr. Jervis Pendleton. How that man.'
does love! And Mrs. Pendleton is
one of the prissiest sisters you ever
saw. She's afraid the family might
lose some social prestige. Julia
Pendleton plays her part well.
Judy, Margaret Blanch Lentz, is a


Freda's Foibles
By Freda B. Douglas



You've been reading my fiction for the last few weeks. This week I'm
going to tell you about the last adventure Linda and I had together. By the
time you conclude this article I think you'll agree "truth is stranger than fic- '
tion."
We were scheduled to fly out of Tampa for Las Vegas in the late after- -
noon on May 12, but before we left I had made an appointment with Rose
to get my hair done in the morning; Because I never carry a purse because
of the inconvenience, I had given the check to pay for my hairdo to Linda
to hold for me.. When we arrived, Rose told me I didn't owe her anything
because "an anonymous friend" had already paid for my hair appointment.
I was amazed because I didn't remember telling anybody but Linda about
my plans. Whoever my anonymous friend is, thank you. I like to get my
hair done, so your generosity certainly did not go unappreciated.
Right on schedule we pulled away from my house shortly after noon,
and had an uneventful trip to the airport with time to get something to eat
before boarding. But when we got to St. Louis we had a two-hour layover,
coupled with a bad rainstorm in Chicago which delayed that flight. Linda
almost didn't find a place to sit down, and getting something to eat was
impossible.
I had made travel accommodations to our hotel by shuttle before leav-
ing, but we found their kiosk closed when we arrived in Vegas. (So much
for reservations.) By the time we arrived at our hotel it was 2 a.m. and my
reservation, which I had made in December 2005, was not in the computer.
Then, even though we were staying in the host hotel, which was not
cheap by any standard, the clerk tried to get an extra $200 from us "in
case." I don't know what in case meant, since we paid cash, but she did
reduce that amount to $50. We got it back before we left, but it left a sour
taste in our mouths. It is the second time we have been there for a Xango-
mini-regional, but I guarantee you it will be the last.'
Before leaving, Linda fell in the room where we were staying, hitting
my wheelchair. We had to call the paramedics to stop the bleeding from her
forehead and when we arrived home, Jason, Linda's son, took herto the
;hospital where she had to .have five stitches.
Tuesday things weib ~ackii t~ormal. Linda went to work and I stayed
home. (That's a normal fay for is:)
Then there came Wednesday. Linda had made arrangements prior to
leaving for Las Vegas to have surgery on her left hand. She had to be there
very early so her fiance took her up. What we didn't expect was that I
would wake up at 4:45 a.m. with'what was determined to be a virus when
the ambulance took me to the hospital. You just haven't lived uhtil you
spend six days in the hospital in bed, and you have no idea how weak your
already useless leg can get in that length of time.
So if you haven't seen me lately, that is why.

LESSONS WE LEARN FROM GEESE
(Author Unknown)
SFact 1: As each goose flaps its wings it creates an "uplift" for the
birds that follow. By flying in a "V" formation, the whole flock adds 71 per-
cent greater flying range than if each. bird flew alone.
Lesson: People who share a common direction and sense of communi-
ty can get where they are going quicker and easier because they are travel-
ing on the thrust of one another.
Fact 2: When a goose falls out of formation, it suddenly feels the
drag and resistance of flying alone. It quickly moves back into formation to
take advantage of the lifting power of the bird immediately in front of it.
Lesson: If we have as much sense as a goose we stay in formation with
those headed where we want to go. We are willing to accept their help and
give our help to others.
Fact 3: When the lead goose tires, it rotates back into the formation
and another goose flies to the point position.
Lesson: It pays to take turns doing the hard tasks and sharing leader-
ship. As with geese, people are interdependent on each other's skills, capa-
bilities and unique arrangements of gifts, talents or resources.
Fact 4: The geese flying.in formation honk.to encourage those up
front to keep up their speed;
Lesson: We need to make sure honking is encouraging. In groups where
there is encouragement, the production is much greater. The power of
encouragement (to stand by One's heart or core values and encourage the
heart and core of others) is the quality of honking we seek.'
Fact 5: When a goose gets sick, wounded or shot down, two geese
drop out of formation and follow it down to help'and protect it. They stay
with it until it dies or is able to fly again. Then, they launch' out with anoth-
er formation or catch up with the flock.
Lesson: If we have as much sense as geese, we will stand by each other
in difficult times as well as when we are strong.

There but for the grace of God go you and I.


NOTICE OFCHARTER AMENDMENT
The Town of Zolfo Springs, Florida will hold a special election
to seek the citizen's approval to substantially amend its Town
Charter to change the Town's form of government from a
strong elected mayor form of government where the mayor
managed the Town's affairs to a manager-commission form of
government where the Mayor would be selected from body of
e commission by the commission and an appointed -Town
nager would manage the Town's affairs.
election, to determine whether the citizens of Zolfo
SP s approve the change to the Charter shall be held on
the day of June, 2006 at Town Hall, 3210 US Hwy 17
Soutr olfo Springs, Florida.
Copie the proposed charter are available at the City Hall
(Alddre above) for review.
This iS a abled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing ~ ake special arrangements should contact the
Town Hall olfo Springs, Phone # 863-735-0405 at least
forty eight ( ours prior to the election.
ATTEST:
Linda Robers wn Clerk Howard E. Schofield Jr. Mayor
6:8c


peach. She is cute, sweet, serious
and funny, all at the same time, and
is brimming over with "IT." Then
there are those orphans: Gladiola
(Mabel Nicks), Sadie Kate (Jennie
B. Spivey), Loretta (Ronella
Haymans), Mamie (Mary Sessions
and Freddie Perkins (Ralph
Metheny). They're a scream!

15 Men On Roster Of Wauchula
Ball Club: Fifteen men are on the
roster of the Wauchula club of the
Orange Belt League, according to
.Manager Marvin Cowart, who this
week announced the official sched-
ule of games for the season.
The official schedule, so far,
reads as follows: Sebring, away,
June 4; Frostproof, home, June 11;
Frostproof, away, June 18; Lake
Wales, home, June 25; Bowling
Green, home, July 2; Avon Park,
away, July 9; Okeechobee, home,
July 16; Lake Wales, away, July 23;
Avon Park, home, July 30;
Okeechobee, away, Aug. 6;
Sebring, home, Aug. 27; Fort
Meade, away, Sept. 3.

50 YEARS AGO
Clothing Store Opens Today: The
Dad & Lad Shop, a new clothing
store for men and boys, is sched-
uled to open today on West Main
Street, next door to the Red &
White Grocery. The concern will
specialize in clothing and shoes for
boys, young men and men.
Proprietor is Herb Pyle, who
recently moved to Wauchula with
his family from Knoxville, Tenn.
They are making their home in the
Relyea subdivision.

Big Wauchula Store Celebrates
50th Anniversary: J.W. Earnest &
Co., pioneer Hardee County depart-
ment store, today begins a 10-day
Golden Anniversary Sale commem-
orating the 50th anniversary of its
founding. The big star, Wauchula's
largest merchandising concern, was
founded in 1906 as a small "gener-


al" store and since that time has
shown steady growth until now it
advertises "South Central Florida's
Shopping Center." It draws trade to
Wauchula from a large section of
the state.
Under its present ownership the
store has expanded until it now
occupies three floors of a large
building on Main Street and does a
volume of more than half a million
dollars of sales each year. Its most
recent large-scale expansion was an
addition of a new furniture depart-
ment. In celebration of the event,
J.W. Earnest & Co. is advertising
hundreds of bargains throughout all
departments of the store.

Two Local Scouts Get Eagle
Rank; Two local members of Troop
160, Boy Scouts of America, were
installed as Eagle Scouts in an
impressive ceremony at the Youth
Center last week. The occasion was
the monthly Phosphate Court of
Honor. Besides the honor of having
two members join the coveted rank
of Eagle, the troop won the achieve-
ment award, which is given to the
troop in the district each month with
the outstanding number of individ-
ual awards given.
Standing with 'their parents
before a five-man court, Larry
Cummings and Tilman Hagans
,were interviewed and then accepted
into the Eagle rank. Scout Field
Director Maurice Paige presented
the Eagle badges, and corsages and
single carnations to the parents.
Eagle mothers also have the privi-
lege of wearing a miniature Eagle
badge.

25 YEARS AGO
Revenge Motive For Burglaries:
In a presentence hearing Wednes-
day morning, a Lakeland psycholo-
gist told the court C.H. Griffin Jr.
committed the 17 burglaries he
admitted to in March because he
wanted to make the former-sheriff,
Newton Murdock, look bad. Dr.
Allan Gessner, a practicing clinical
psychologist, said that Griffin had
explained to him that-the burglaries
were a result of a clash he had with
former-sheriff Murdock.


I *LOIA IVSOC ARETRPOT


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE

For the week ended June 1, 2006:

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 4,384 compared
last week 7,814 and 4,888 a year ago. According to the Florida Fede
Stare Livestock Market News Service: compared to last week, slaugl
cows and bulls were steady to 1.00 higher, feeder steers and heifers w
mostly steady.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 Ibs., 152.00-210.00;
300-400 lbs., 122.00-150.00; and
400-500 lbs., 110.00-135.00.

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 128.00-154.00;
300-400 lbs., 108.00-137.50; and
400-500 lbs., 100.00-120.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 44.00-49.0(

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 lbs., 58.00-68.(


Griffin told him he felt he was
being '.ridden" by the sheriff,
Gessner said, and he wanted to get
back at him. "He thought he could
embarrass the sheriff by committing
crimes that were difficult to solve,"
he said. Gessner described Griffin's
thinking as offbeat, even irrational
in many respects, when he commit-
ted the crimes, but he said he was
not psychotic.


Law To Close Bars At Midnight
Being Passed: Amid protests from
the owners of The Outlaw Den, the
Wauchula council approved the first
reading Monday night of an ordi-
nance restricting the hours of estab-
lishments where alcoholic bever-
ages are sold, served or consumed.
The ordinance, which will
become effective on Aug. 11 if it is
approved at each of the next two
meetings, applies specifically to
bars, dance halls, pool halls and
bottle clubs within the city limits.
Under the ordinance,.the businesses
must close between the hours of
midnight at 7 a.m.

Grand. Jury Indicts Antonio F.
Moya: A Hardee County grand jury
returned a sealed indictment for
first-degree murder against Antonio
Forcado Moya on Wednesday of
last week. Moya, 22, of Immokalee,
has been a prime suspect in the
murder of Emory Alvin Hill, 37, of
Ernest Road, Wauchula Hills, on
Christmas Eve. A warrant was
issued for his arrest shortly after the
murder, but he has never been cap-
tured.
He is believed to have been one
of five men who confronted Hill in
C.B.'s Caf6 on Dec. 24 and took
him outside, where he was beaten
and stabbed in front of Grimes' TV
Center. Moya is also believed to be
the one who inflicted the fatal knife
wound in Hill's chest. The other
men arrested in connection with the
case have been released for lack of
evidence.

10 YEARS AGO
Finance-Director Starts: The city
of Wauchula's newest employee
will be its highest paid. Stephen
Wofford, a certified public accoun-


tant, filled the new position of'
finance director for the municipali-
ty beginning last week. He will earn
a salary of $45,000 a year.
Creation of a finance director's,.
post was recommended in a man-
agement and. personnel study con-
ducted by an independent auditing
firm last year. City Council mem-
bers agreed the expertise was need-
ed to deal with the annual $9 mil-
lion budget, utility accounts, pay-
roll and other financial operations
and controls dealt with on a daily
basis, but quickly found they could
not compete in a statewide market-
place for qualified candidates.

'Cats Join In Jamboree Action:
About three dozen Hardee Wildcats
took their turns on the gridiron in
last week's Spring Jamboree at,.
Avon Park. New head coach Phil
Rasmussen, himself a 22-year
Wildcat veteran, and his seasoned"
coaching crew kept busy shuffling
bodies on and off the playing field.
The first-year head coach said he
was impressed with the good sharp
passing of senior-to-be Ray Rivas,.
who had matured during his bap-
tism of fire in last fall's state cham-
pionship game, when he came in
the game to relieve injured quarter-
back Justin Hays and did a solid
job. "Ray's passing will be a defi-
nite bright spot and give us more
options," Rasmussen said.

Fire-Rescue Volunteers Raise
Golf Tourney $$$: A golf tourna-
ment during the last weekend of
May was successful in raising the
dollars to help the Hardee County
Fire-Rescue volunteers help others.
The more than $1,300 raised will be
used for holiday food baskets, other
service projects and updating gear
and equipment for the men who
provide a vital backup to the profes-
sional staff.
The team of John Dean, Scott
Terrell, Bob Claman and Paul Staes
won the third annual golf fundraiser
at Torrey Oaks Golf Course. All
monies raised went to the volunteer
firemen's association, said the
enthusiastic coordinator- Todd
Stewart.


Letter To The Editor

Kiwanis Club Joins Lions

Club To Support U.S. Troops


d to Dear Editor,
ral- I am writing this letter to inform
hter tlWcitizens of Hardee County that
'ere the Kiwanis Club of Wauchula
fully supports our troops and their
efforts at home and abroad for giv-
ing our country freedom to its citi-
zens and aiding other countries in
their freedom and safety of their
citizens.
Our club is in full support of the
fund-raising campaign that the
Wauchula Lions Club is doing to
buy phone calling cards for our
Hardee County troops overseas to
use in calling home and talking to
0. their friends and' loved ones. To
help the Lions Club raise money,
00. we the Kiwanis Club will match


A. held onsite by


ATKINSOPA<Y & AUCTION, INC.
00-756-4098
-I .itions online atwww.atkinsononline.com
See Tenns &13 64-5181 ABi141 AU1608
F'
DIRECTIONS:
.ivy. 17 to S.R. 62, west on S.R. 62 nine miles to auction on
n I. '-orth side of highway. 5984 S.R. 62, Wauchula, FL


every dollar they raise up to
$2,500.
So when a lobal'Libn ask'a citi-
zen of Hardee County fdo a doria-
tion for our troops, please give gen-
erously and remember and that
your local Kiwanis Club will match
your money to double it up to
$2,500 "for our troops."
Thank you active troops and vet-
erans for our freedom!
Kenneth Hunt, President
Kiwanis Club of Wauchula

The world is a book, and those
who do not travel read only a
page.
-Augustine


,son 1
'ol

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~p~ct~~c\ FTMNYtRS
V11cioo








4C The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006





During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police officers
investigated the following incidents and made the following arrests:
COUNTY
June 4, Henry Anthony Royal, 35, of 502 North Street, Wauchula, and
John Clifton Royal Jr., 37, of 3207 W. Main St., Wauchula, were arrested
by Det. Andrew McGuckin and each charged with trespass.
June 4, a residential burglary on Manatee Street, thefts on SR 64 East
and SR 64 West and a fight on U.S. 17 North were reported.

June 3, Rogelio I. Gonzalez, 25, of 73 Palmer Road, Franklin, N.C.,
was arrested by Dep. Mixon Trammell and charged with resisting arrest
without violence, battery on a law enforcement officer with bodily fluid,
criminal mischief and no valid license.
June 3, Stephen Chevo Rodriguez, 22, of 3876 Creek Road, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White on capiases alleging failure to pay
fines on convictions for disorderly intoxication and resisting arrest without
force.
June 3, a theft on Keeton Road a fight on East Main Street were report-
ed.
June 2, Manuel Cisneros III, 19, of 4615 First Street, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Sgt. Eric Thompson and charged with possession of mari-
juana.
June 2, Daniel Balderas, 34, of 565 Cypress St., Wauchula, was arrest-
ed by Sgt. Kevin White on capiases alleging failure to appear in court on
charges of possession of drug paraphernalia and non-support.
June 2, Vallan Jerrilee O'Brien Jr., 32, of 2737 Golfview St.,
Lakeland, was arrested by Det. John Shivers on a Polk County warrant
charging him with violation of probation (original charge DUI).
June 2, a residential burglary on Smith Road, and thefts on Cactus
Avenue, Quail Road and Pool Road were reported.



I~e Ofe1The Week0I


This sweety


is an adult female, white English bulldog
with black spotted ears.


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4





~.






Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neutering of
the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that
desperately need a loving home. The kennel location is 685 Airport Road,
Wauchula, at the county landfill.


June 1, Jose Rosas, 21, General Delivery, Wauchula, was arrested by
Dep. David Drake on a warrant charging him with petit theft.
June 1, Jessica Nicole Guevera, 22, of 708 Green St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. David Drake on a court-ordered pickup.
June 1, a residential burglary on CR 663 North, and thefts on
Alderman and Helen roads were reported.
May 31, Robert Daniel Fowler, 44, of 310 N. 10th Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by corrections Capt. Jimmy Harrison on a capias/pickup order
on a charge of civil contempt.
May 31, Amanda Renae Driggers, 26, of 1127 N. Vermont Ave.,
Lakeland, was arrested by Dep. David Drake on a court pickup order.
May 31, Amy Nichole Pontifes, 30, of 607 Saunders St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. David Drake on a court pickup order.
May 31, Joyce Ann Rivers, 24, of 681 Sally Place, Wauchula, was
arrested on Charlotte County warrants alleging failure to appear in court on
two charges of possession of a controlled substance.
May 31, a theft on CR 663 North was reported.

May 30, Clyde Edwin Hall Jr., 57, of 215 Whatley Blvd., Sebring, was
arrested by Dep. David Drake on a capias alleging violation of a domestic
violence injunction for protection.
May 30, a vehicle stolen on Moseley Road, a tag stolen on Morales
Road, criminal mischief at Country Manor Apartments and thefts on
Commerce Drive and Snebl Street were reported.
29, Barnabe Salvador, 26, of 100 Simms Road, Wauchula, was arrest-
ed by Dep. Julie Bridges and charged with disorderly intoxication.
WAUCHULA
June 4, Jose DeJesus Covarrubias Castro, 24, of 701 Jones St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Matthew Whatley on warrants charg-
ing him with violation of probation (original charges DUI and no valid
license).
June 3, Jose Fransisco Santos, of 396 Grimes St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Ofc. Matthew Whatley and charged with DUI and no valid
license.
June 3, a theft on East Bay Street was reported.

June 2, Jason Wyatt Ellison, 21, of 531 South Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Cpl. Gabriel Garza on an Orange County warrant charging him
with possession of marijuana.
June 1, Juan Aranda, 35, General Delivery, Wauchula,'was arrested by
Ofc. Chris LeConte and charged with trespassing and disorderly Intoxica-
tion.
June 1, Jesus Junior Lopez, 33, of 125 Carlton St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Sgt. Thomas Harris and sheriff's Sgt. Eric Thompson on war-
rants alleging violation of probation (original charges two counts domestic
battery) and capiases alleging failure to appear in court on charges of two
counts possession of methamphetamine, aggravated battery, two counts
possession of drug paraphernalia, uttering a forged instrument and posses-
sion of marijuana.'He was also charged with driving while license sus-
pended and giving a false name to a law enforcement officer.
June 1, burglary of a conveyance on East Bay Street was reported.
May 30, a theft on South Seventh Avenue and a tag stolen on South
Seventh Avenue were reported.
BOWLING GREEN
June 3, criminal mischief on two locations on Maple Avenue were
reported.
June 2, Brenda Joyce Henry, 50, of 854 Pleasant Way, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and charged with aggravated domestic
assault with a deadly weapon and domestic assault.

May 31, Gabriel Ybarra Valadez, 26, of 512 E. Banana St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Sgt. Robert Ehrenkaufer and charged with,aggra-
vated domestic battery.
ZOLFO SPRINGS
June 4, a theft on Parkview Terrace was reported.


To Your Health!
By Erin E. Hess
Hardee County Health Department


MEN'S HEALTH WEEK
Men's Health Week is celebrated each year as the week leading up to
and including Father's Day. The purpose of Men's Health Week is to height-
en the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early
detection and treatment of diseases among men and boys.
No matter how much you know about men's health, there's always
room to know more about ways to a better lifestyle, the top men's health
concerns, and the importance of getting medical care and regular screening.
tests. After all, men not only have unique health concerns, but they also suf-
fer more from certain diseases. And worldwide, women outlive men.
Why? Some reasons include:
Men tend to smoke and drink more than women and generally have
less healthy lifestyles.
Men do not seek medical help as often as women. Women are 100
percent more likely to visit the doctor for annual examinations and preven-
tive services than men. (Centers for Disease Control, 2001)
Men tend to join in fearless, risky, dangerous behaviors more than
women.
Men also largely define themselves by their work,'which adds to
stress and to being disconnected from their emotional side. This can add to
problems in relationships, as well as in jobs and careers.
The good/fiews is that many of the major health risks that men face can
be prevented and treated if they are diagnosed early.
So, you deserve to pay more attention to yourself! Take better care of
yourself physically, mentally and emotionally. Or if you are a woman
searching for ways to help the men in your life, tell them the same.
As a father, husband, brother, uncle, adult male role model in some-.
one's life, we urge you to set a healthy example for your family and your
community. The National Diabetes Education Program suggests the five
small steps below you can take today to live a healthier life and lead to big
rewards in the future.
1.) Find out if you are at risk: Routine screening tests are part of
basic prevention medicine and are commonly available through your physi-!
cian. Early and regular screenings are recommended for high blood pres-
sure (hypertension), high cholesterol, diabetes, cancer of the colon, prostate
cancer, glaucoma, melanoma and other skin cancers, as well as bladder
cancer.
2.) Set realistic goals: You don't have to knock yourself out! Start by
making small changes. For example, try to get 15 minutes of physical activ-
ity a day this week. Each week add five minutes until you build up to the
recommended 30 minutes a day, five days a week.
3.) Make better food choices: Try to eat more fruits and vegetables,,
beans and grains. Reduce the amount of fat iri your diet. Choose grilled or
baked foods instead of fried.
4.) Record your progress: Write down everything you eat and drink.,
Keeping a food diary is one of the most effective ways to lose weight and
keep it off. Review this diary with your health-care provider.
5.) Keep at it: Making even modest lifestyle changes can be tough in
the beginning. Try adding one new healthy change a week. Always get'back
on track, even if you fall off a few times. The key is just to keep at it.


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June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Bartering With Iced


Blueberry Pop


By C.J. MOUSER
For The Herald-Advocate
Little D and his family moved onto the
neighboring property just after Hurricane
Charley hit. He always waved at us when
we passed, and would come by occasional-
ly for short visits really just to observe
whatever happened to be going on at the
farm at the moment.
He became a regular fixture, his appear-
ance announced well in advance by the
mosquito-like whine of his little dirt bike.
When you're a kid and live out in the
middle of nowhere, yoti find your entertain-.
ment where you can. Since there were no
; other children his age to play with, he took
to hanging around us, learning little things.
"Hey, she likes me!" he said once, after
the cat jumped up in his lap while we were
sitting on the porch together.
"He," I corrected. "You know how to tell
the difference?" I asked automatically, not
looking up from what I was doing.
He murmured that he did.
"You a boy or a girl?"
"You know!" he said defensively, then
giggled.
"Would you want somebody calling' you a
girl?"
"No!"
To him, such a horrible mistake would
clearly be the end of the world. I glanced
up and he gazed into my eyes to let me
know that he had gotten the message.
He showed up on the front porch one -
evening, a small stick figure with two upper
front teeth that were just growing in, mak-
ing him pronounce his P's and B's like V's.
I have learned that when he's not excited,
he can form those letters better, but if he's
worked up about something, all bets are off.
He stood there, holding the helmet he
wears when he's riding the dirt bike, and I
knew he had urgent news by his wide-eyed
look and the way he kept turning that hel-,
met over and over in his hands.
"Hey. How are you?" I asked, always
glad to see him.
"Hey." He grinned, and then spilled the
4 bean. -"Your vigs are in our yard."
"Our what?"
"Vigs. Vigs ... you know!" He pointed
at the pigs in the pasture.
"Oh!.Big ones?"
"Yeah!" He went serious again. "Vigger
than our dog."


SLight One Ca
By Dennis Heane
President Of The ChristoF

COMPLIMENT & ENCOURAGE EACH OT
A friend recently told me that she grew up in a home
ments or encouragement were literally never given, nor wa
keri.


Tarts


"Well, we'll have to fix that, won't we?" I
said.
He grinned again, showing those two
teeth to full advantage.
About that time my husband, Fred, came
down the Foad and, while Little D and I
watched, herded the two pigs neatly down
the road with the use of his truck.
"Done," I said. "Wanna come in?"
"Sure," he replied.
And he's been in and out that front door
almost as many times as we have since
then.
It's gotten to the point now that I don't
even notice he's around unless he speaks
and calls attention to himself. Many's the
time I have walked past the couch and not
realized he was stretched out there watch-
ing TV until I almost sat on him.
He comes and goes at his own pleasure,
and if he's around, he steps right in and
helps out. And he's a fine help. He may not
be able to do everything, but he's not afraid
to try.
He does what he's asked and has never
asked for anything in return, which both-
ered me. I like to reward good behavior and
since he always displays the same, I wanted
to make sure he knew I appreciated it.
I tried to give him a few dollars once
and he turned it down. Tried,to give him
some homemade fudge and he wrinkled his
nose. Tried to give him a baby pig and he
clearly wanted it, but mama and daddy said
"no not yet."
One day, coming home from the grocery
store, he followed me down the road on his
dirt bike and helped me carry groceries in
the house. It was then that I learned how to
repay Little D for his help..
"Are those Vop Tarts?" he asked, peek-
ing into one of the bags and turning a win-
some grin on me. "Vlue-verry?"
"The very same. Want some?" I asked.

"I sure do."
He ate not two, but four, and I didn't
begrudge him a bite.
That's been our system since: I always
make sure I have Blueberry Pop Tarts (with
the icing) and he wibrks harder than he ever
has to help with feeding and egg collecting
and whatever else we put him to work on.
If I experience a temporary breakfast
toaster-pastry deficit, I don't worry as I
know my credit is good with Little D.
A better arrangement has never been
reached between two families.

Tears, idle tears? Not quite. In
addition to clearing your eyes of
dust, hairs and such stuff, your
mndle tears contain substances that
fight bacteria and proteins that
y .combat eye infection.
hers

HER! I
e where compli-
.s love ever spo-


e Fromsi The Past~


The Wildfire That Would Not Die!


If you drove down Parnell Road
recently, you probably noticed a lit-
tle smoke in the air. That is because
there was a small wildfire that
refused to die.
The Division of Forestry
responded to a wildfire on Parnell
Road in the southeastern part of
Hardee County on Saturday, May
13, and again on Sunday, May 21,
at the request of Hardee County
Fire-Rescue. According to Forest
Ranger Matt Crews, "This is a
muck fire, and they are very hard to
put out."
After 10 days the fire had burned
about 25 acres. It was finally extin-
guished late Tuesday night, May
23.
A muck fire is a fire burning in or
below the duff (middle) layer in soil
containing decaying organic matter,
such as peat. Muck fires usually
occur in dry marshes or swamps
during a drought. Muck fires are
problematic because they may burn


for days or weeks, creating a smoke
hazard and, for firefighters, a safety
issue because of their underground
pockets of fire that can collapse
under the weight of humans or
machinery.
The cause of this muck fire is still
under investigation.
,'People. need to understand that
wa are under severe drought condi-
tions and we all need to be very
careful," said.Patrick M. Mahoney,
wildfire mitigation specialist for the
Division of Forestry. Mahoney cov-
ers the entire Myakka River For-
estry District, which includes
Hardee,.DeSoto, Sarasota, Manatee
and Charlotte counties.
Fortunately, the fire resulted in
little damage. It burned off the
heavy bush in the area and no
homes were in danger.
To date, many of the wildfires in
Hardee County have been started


by unauthorized outdoor burning
(debris piles or yard trash).
This is a good time to look
around your house to make sure that
there is no dead, and highly flam-
mable, vegetation close to your
house; that limbs of trees next to
your house are trimmed back; and
that your roof and gutters are clear
of debris.
Firewise guidelines suggest that
structures should be surrounded by
a buffer zone extending at least 30
feet. This.,area should be free of
highly flammable vegetation and be
well maintained. Flammable mater-
ial including wood, vehicles and
propane gas (LPG) tanks should not
be stored next to your house.
Report all fires quickly to the
local fire department.
If you need more information,
contact the local Division of
Forestry by calling 735-1968 or vis-
iting the Web site at www.fl-
dof.com.


She was a very good student and consistently brought home report
cards with excellent grades, but rather than being complimented, she was
Invariably challenged to do better. When she was chosen for the lead in a
High school musical, her parents cautioned her to spend extra time rehears-
Sing so that she knew her lines and lyrics perfectly and didn't make a mis-
take.
S And, worst of all, neither of her parents ever said they loved her or her
siblings.
My friend, now in her 50s, says that she still finds it extremely hard to
believe in her own talents'or feel herself worthy of the good things that hap-
pen to her. She believes that although she has been happily married for over
25 years' and'is the mother of two very talented children,, the success of her
marriage and parenting comes from the goodness of her husband and chil-
dren, not as a result of anything she does.
Through the years as a wife and mother she has learned to express love
and gratitude, but she still has difficulty believing that she is lovable. Even
at work, where her performance has won praise, she feels that she can or
should do better.
I know that my friend's case is extreme and, thank God, she's getting
counseling to help her. But after listening to her story, I thought about how'
Many times each day we miss the chance to compliment or encourage one
another.
Another friend tells of the time he and his wife were having dinner at a
friend's home and he told the hostess how much he liked the coffee she was
Serving. On the way home, my friend's wife asked him if he liked the cof-
fee she made and he, smartly, responded that it was delicious. "Well," his
wife asked, "why don't you ever compliment my coffee?"
My friend says that he realized he was very good about complimenting
outside his home, but was not as thoughtful with his own family. Now he
makes it a practice to look for reasons to give honest compliments to his
wife and children. He sees that it has had a ripple effect among family mem-
'ers and that, in turn, has created a much more positive atmosphere around
house.
Along the same lines, I recently read an article that says we don't com-
p t ourselves enough. When we do a good job on something we seldom
stanack and say, "Nice going." However, when we make a mistake we
are Vquick to tear ourselves down. I know that I do. When I'm working
'bn ap t at home or in the office and make an error I will very often mut-
Ster a set-precating phrase like, "How stupid was that?"
clesaid that some mental health professionals believe that in
aiming moments at ourselves we are "playing 'bad tapes" that can
wear down self-confidence, even our self-image. An alternative when
we make take would be to let it go with an "Oops!" or "Better fix
what one mor went on to suggest that in forgiving our own mistakes
t e ending n to accepting the mistakes of others with patience and
Gnderistinding
iving sce t honest compliments, to others and to ourselves, is
anoth-ter ay that f us can be Christ-bearers, changing our world for
thebetter, one pers time.
time.


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Home(
Preview








6C The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006


BGE Fetes Top Spellers


COURTESY PHOTOS
Bowling Green Elementary School's kindergarten spelling bee winners were: (in random order)
Brianna Waters, Daylin Newcomb, Humberto DeLaRosa, Julissa Molina-Lozano, Jared Noel, first
place Oscar Trevino, second place Jocelyn Denham, third place Jenny Lopez, Carlos Pyatt, Ella
Lagui, Enrique Gomez, Ryan Duisen, Alexis Garza, Matthew Laker, Judith Zamora, Marcus
Knight, Casey Juarez, Ruby Rivera, Peyton Roberts, Aaron Maldonado and Nakeisha Lemaine.


Second grade: (randomly) Sophia Moreno, Erica Castillo, Abigel Trevino, Kyle Hewett, first place
Florence Lee, second place Francisco Cortez, third place George Lackey, Shirley Hamilton,
Aaron Brown, Vanessa Miranda, Mariah Alvarado, Alex Lopez, Fredy Pena, Brianna Juarez,
Nadawi Ortiz, James Gibson, Jesse Fowler and Leeanna Castanon.


Third grade: (randomly listed) Senida Garcia, Crystal Gonzales, first place Amy Davila, second
place Lillian Denham, third place Ruben Figuerora, Vanessa Gonzalez-Lopez, Stephan Jones,
Chealsey Huron, Caryssa Johnson, Abigail Vargas, Amanda Wilson, Nijah Williams, Marie Thoa,
Daisy Belmarez, Elizabeth Juarez, Dalton Garza, Tatyanna Faulk and Christian Molina.


First grade: (in random order) Jazmin Garcia, Grace Coronado, Illeana Flores, first place Jose
Pablo Felix, second place Enrique Iniquez, third place Lori Betancourt, Ivan Chavez, Arianna
Delarosa, Johnny Murillo-Calderon, Anna Velasco, Susana Velasco, Valentin DeJesus, Jordan
Chancey, Antwuan Donaldson, Jorge Reyes, Yolanda Benitez, Samuel Harbaraugh and (not pic-
tured) Madison Marple.


SFourth grade: (in random order) Morgan Garcia, Sergio Rodriguez, Thomas Trevino, Mariah
SGarcia, Mayra Rodriguez, first place Poncho Granadero, second place Tyler Hewett, third place
Michelle Thao, Margarita Alamia, Alea Maya, Emiliano Castillo, Austin Turner, Yoana Alvarez,
SGage Harbaraugh and Marilu Juarez.


Fifth grade: (randomly) first place Nyshira Jackson, Shaina Todd, second place Selena Miranda,
third place Brittany Gough, Tara Deeson, Diana Ibarra, Oscar Raminez, Alex Pierstorff, Rontavia
Davis, Enrique Zamora, Freddie Juarez and Sharna Gross.


Missy Massey's class: (randomly) William Fowler, Oscar
Gomez, Jorge Bautista, Matthew Cochran, Ricardo Castillo,
Crystal Gallegos, first place Andrea, Castaneda, second place
injelica Jackson and third place Michael Albritton.


i



* Signed Penny
By Penny Johnson
QO&A With A Biblical Perspective


WHY ARE GIRLS SO DIFFICULT?
Q: What makes girls so difficult? I am a teenage boy and I have
:already discovered that girls are unpredictable. Just when you think
:you get one figured out their mood changes. Help! Will I ever under-
stand girls?
: Signed, Teenager
S A: Here's a story that I think will-help answer your question. A man
:was walking along the beach and came across an old bottle buried in the
*sand. The man picked it up and as soon as he removed the lid a magic genie
:was so excited and immediately began thanking the man forsetting him
-free. He said, "I will grant you one wish." The man thought a minute and
'then replied, "All right, build me a highway from the main land to Hawaii."
:The magic genie quickly replied, "That is to hard to do even for me. I have
.never granted such a hard request. Do you have another wish?" The man
said, "All right then, help me understand my wife?" The magic genie said,
:"Would you like that highway a two- or four-lane?"
Welcome to the real world. Men have been trying to figure women out
as far back as the Garden of Eden when Eve allowed herself to be deceived
by a talking snake. Women are a perfect creation of God created to be a
'companion to man but they are also as unpredictable as the weather. But, it
'seems you've already figured that out.
The Bible teaches us about mighty men who found out that women
were the tests of their true strength. A beautiful orphan girl named Esther
.captured the heart of King Xerxes. He loved her so much that he was will-


Elizabeth Radford's class: (random list) Edgar Almeyda,
Augustin Bravo, first place Juan Molina, second place Analuisa
Bermudez, third place Vanessa Diego, Allen Brown, .Laura
Guerrero, Gabriel Garcia, Joshua Adriani and Angelica
Gallegos.



ing to give her anything she requested up to half of his kingdom (Esther
5:3).
Also, Abraham because of his wife's beauty, lied to the Egyptians in..
hopes that they would spare his life. Genesis 12:14-15 (LT) "And sure
enough, when they arrived in Egypt, everyone spoke of her beauty. When
the palace officials saw her, they sang her praises to their king, the pharaoh,
and she was taken into his harem."
King David, a man after God's own heart, killed a man because he
desired to have his beautiful wife Bathsheba (2 Samuel 11).
And last, but not least, we've all read about Samson and Delilah.
Judges 16:4 (LT) "Later, Samson fell in love with a woman' named Delilah
..." We find out that his love for her becomes the life of him. He confides
in her about the secret of his strength. 16:15-17 "How can you say you love
me when you don't confide in me ... So day after day she nagged him until
he couldn't stand it any longer. Finally, Samson told her his secret."
For years, the beauty of women has pulled at the heart strings of men
causing them to act irrational and against their better judgment. These
unpredictable creations of God are beyond finding out. They are made up
of material that is unique, special and very priceless. Don't spend your time
trying to understand girls; just accept them for who they are and love them
regardless. Only God knows why women are so moody, tender and unpre-
dictable.
Signed Penny
For answers with a biblical perspective, send your questions to Signed
Penny, P.O. Box 2604, Wauchula, FL 33873, or e-mail penny5@earth-
link.net.



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June 8, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage licens-
es were issued recently in the
office of the county court:
Marco Antonio Deleon, 25,
Zolfo Springs, and Patricia Cabrea,
24, Zolfo Springs.
Feliciano Contreras Rodrignez,
Wauchula, 26, and Maria Grce,,:; ,
Rodriguez, 32, Wauchula. l-
Miguel Aguirre-Torres, 31, Zo6lf.
Springs, and Lupe Gonzales Juares;
32, Zolfo Springs.
George L. Rodriguez, 25, Ona,
and Victoria Ellin Jackson, 20,
Ona.
Herminio Morales Rosario, 28,
Fort Meade, and Higinia Alejandra
Navarro, 24, Fort Meade.
Adan Hernandez Molina, 19,
Wauchula, and Sandy -Mercedes
Rincon Gallejos, 18, Wauchula. "

The following small claims
cases wer disposed of recently by
the county judge:
Ford Motor Credit Co. vs. Jorge,
Luviano, judgment.
Mildred C. Smith vs. David K.
Woodrow, amended default judg-
ment.

The following misdemeanor
cases were disposed of recently in
county court:
Robert Cline Albritton Jr.,
assault, transferred to pretrial inter-
vention (PTI) program with 26-
week batters intervention class.
Lorie Jane Ayers, domestic bat-
tery, transferred to PTI program.
Paula Zorano Ellis, petit theft,
adjudication withheld, probation
six months, $315 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees,
$50 investigative costs, $300 resti-
tution, 10 hours community ser-
vice.
Angel Sanchez, domestic battery,
transferred to PTI program with
four-hour domestic violence class
and alcohol abuse evaluation.
Adalberto Agustin Silva, domes-
tic assault, transferred to PTI pro-
gram.
Steven Cole Albritton, posses-
sion of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia, not prosecuted.
Daniel Cuevas, possession of
drug paraphernalia, 12 months pro-
bation, random drug tests, warrant-
less search and seizure, drug abuse
evaluation and treatment, $315 fine
and court costs, $40 public defend-
er fee, $50 investigative costs, 10
hours community service; ,esjsting
arrest without 'force, n6o r rosecut-
ed.
Maria Isabel Garduno, battery,'
not prosecuted.
Pamela Marie Kiella; domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Zsavana Elmore, sale of alcohol
to a person under 21, adjudication
withheld, probation six months, no
sale of alcohol while on probation,


$315 fine and court costs, $60
investigative costs, 10 hours com-
munity service.
James Stanley Rogers, posses-
sion of marijuana, 12 months pro-
bation, $315 fine and court costs;
possession of drug paraphernalia,
not prosecuted.

The following criminal traffic
"cases were disposed of recently in
county court. Dispositions are
based on Florida Statutes, dri-
ving record and facts concerning
the case.
Daniel Cuevas, DUI, not prose-
cuted.
Jeffrey Boyd, driving while
license suspended (DWLS), adjudi-
cation withheld, 10 days in jail -
suspended if obtain valid license,
$330 fine and court costs.
Gabino Hernandez, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, produced
valid license, $205 court costs.
Eric Joseph Labadie, DWLS, 20
days suspended, $330 fine and
court costs.
Maria Cristina Marquez, DWLS,
dismissed, provided proof of insur-
ance and license.
Donald Elmer Pelham, DWLS,
adjudication Withheld, 10 days -
suspended, $330 fine and court
costs.
Maria Gomez Pina, DWLS. 10
days suspended, $330 fine nd
court costs.
Katherine Sisum, \DWLS, 20
days-suspended, $330 fine':arnd
court costs.
Shannon Allen Gentry, DWLS,
adjudication withheld, 180 days -
suspended, $330 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender fees, 30
hours community service.
Louis U. Gutierrez, DWLS, 30
days suspended, $330 fine and'
court. costs, $100 public defender
fees.
Robert Lee Mendoza, DWLS,
dismissed.
Elias Salvatore Richardson,
refusal to sign citation reduced
to civil infraction, $330 fine and
court costs.
Freddie J. Richardson, DWLS,
ajducation withheld, 30 days -
suspended, $330 fine and court
cost, $100 public defender fees.
James Stanley Rogers, DUI -
amended to willful and wanton
reckless driving, DWLS and
refusal to submit to DUI test, 12
months probation with condition of
.3_0 days. in jail, multiple offender
DUI school, evaluation and treat-'
ment, no alcohol or bars, $885 fine
and court costs, $50 investigative
costs.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the office of
the circuit court:
Justina Byers vs. Pete Byers,
r


'courthouse Report


The following felony criminal
cases were disposed of last week
by the circuit judge. Defendants
have been adjudicated guilty
Unless noted otherwise. When
Melody'Lopez ColonJr. adjudication is withheld, .it is
pending successful completion of
probation. Sentences are pur-
suant to' an' investigative report
by and ',the recommendation of
the. state probation office and
:aalso state sentencing guidelines.
TOLL FREE 866-534-3777 Final discretion is left to the
*-judge.
Shanoh Armstrong, uttering a
forged instrument, 18 months pro-
bation' with condition of 20 days in


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petition for injunction for protec-
tion.
Wheeler Inc. vs. Custom. Craft
Modular Inc. and M. James
Goodwin,.damages.
Herman Edward Spencer. and
Bernice Spencer, petition for sepa-
rate maintenance.
Matthew Eugene Fowler and
Donya Leigh Fowler, divorce.
Freda Kersey vs. Arlie Kersey
Sr., petition for injunction for pro-
tection.
Donna Jean Galvez and Rubelci
Galvez-Ortega, divorce.
Bountiful Lands Inc. vs. J.A.
Seims, petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
James Ricky Selph vs.Glenda F.
Selph, petition for injunction for
protection.
Deutsche Bank ,National vs.
Pauline Starnes and Edward
Starnes, petition for mortgage.fore-
closure.
Doug Kizer o/b/o minor child vs.
Cindy. Lundry, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Custom Square Leasing Corp.
vs. Custom Craft Modulars Inc. and
Judy Goodwin, damages.

The following decisions on civil
cases pending in the circuit court
were handed down recently by
the circuit court judge:
Josephina Garza vs. SahJuan.
Cisneros, injunction for protection.
David Juarez vs. Krysia J.
Schofield, voluntary dismissal.
Louise Lampley and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR) vs.
John Gibson, child support termi-
nated.
Jackqulon Camel Powell and
Paul Melvin Powell, divorce.
Delfina Martinez and DOR vs.
Maribel Melissa Martinez, child
support order.
Janet Swint and DOR vs.
Richard Polk, child support oider.-
Lorie J. Ayers .vs.. Mitchell A.
Ayers, voluntary dismissal 'of
injunction for protection.
..-
Brookside Bluff; Condominium
Association vs. Jerry Cuinniigham,
judgment offoreclosure,,
Terra Danielle Coleman and
Marshall Todd Coleman, divorce.
Bank of- America National'
Association vs. Lola Lopez, volun-
tary dismissal:
Brandi D. Johnson and DOR vs.
Elissa J. Hollingsworth, child sup-
port order.
Heather E. Lang and DOR vS.
Richard W. Julius, child support
order.
Mary CaiinMariin and DOR vs.
Iaid Nathaniel Martin, child sup-
'p. order.
Charlene Danielle Rich and
DOR vs. Lawrence Wesley Smith,
child support order.
Michelle D. Jardine and DOR vs.
Gary L. Dudek, amended child sup-
port order. .
SThe Department of Children and
Families arid DOR vs. Everardo
Maldonado Sr., voluntary dis-
missal.
Gloria Faulk and DOR vs.
Sheldon L. Faulk, amended support
order.
Richard J. Barringer and
Margaret A. Barringer, divorce.
Mary K. Kilpatrick and DOR vs.
Billy G. Boleman, child support
order.
Katonya L. Cook and Marvin G.
Cook, divorce.


jail with credit for time served
(CTS), $395 fine and court costs,
$115 public defender.fees, $512.89
restitution.
Rico Garcia Cielo, violation of
probation (original charges posses-
sion of methamphetamine and
aggravated stalking), probation re-
yoked, one year one day Florida
State Prison, consecutive to other
active sentences, outstanding fines
and fees placed on lien; violation of
probation (original charge violation
of a domestic violence injunction
for protection), time served.
Omar Cuevas, grand theft, not
prosecuted.
SRamiro Moreno DeLaCruz, pos-
session of marijuana, 20 days CTS,
$495 fine and court costs.and $50
investigative costs placed on lien.
Paula Zorano Ellis, grand theft,
not prosecuted, transferred to coun-
ty court with'filing of misdemeanor
charge.
S Rolie Gamble, burglary of an
occupied building, not prosecuted,
transferred to county court with fil-
ing of misdemeanor charge.
Selethia Alfreda-Glaze, aggravat-
ed assault with a deadly weapon,
aggravated battery with a deadly
weapon and resisting arrest without
force, not prosecuted, transferred to
county court with filing of misde-
meanor charges.
Heather Nicole Kassay, violation
of probation (original charge felony
driving while license suspended),
probation revoked, one year com-
munity control house arrest fol-
lowed by one year probation, with
same other conditions and concur-
rent with Sarasota County sen-
tence:
Juan Gutierrez Lopez, violation
of probation (original charges bur-
g!ary of a conveyance and grand
theft), probation revoked, 90 days
jn jail, outstanding fines and fees
placed on lien.
SHelen Mullins, felony driving
while license suspended, probation
18 months, $495 fine and court
costs, $140 public defender fees.
f Wanda Biinson Odom, violation
of probation (original charge pos-
.session of methamphetamine with
intent to sell), probation revoked,
six months in jail CTS, license sus-
pended two years, outstanding
fines and fees placed on lien.
Arturo Manuel Regules, aggra-
vated assault with a firearm and
giving a false name to a law
enforcement officer, not prosecut-
'd, transferred to county court with
filing of misdemeanor charges.
Richard Allen Rimes, possession
of methamphetamine, possession
of drug paraphernalia and tamper-
ing with physical evidence, not
prosecuted, transferred to county
court with filing of misdemeanor
.charges.


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Fidencio Alexander Salazar, pos-
session of methamphetamine, pos-
session of a controlled substance
without a valid prescription and
possession of drug paraphernalia,
transferred to drug PTI program.
Francisca Hernandez Salgado,
felony driving while license sus-
pended, 60 days in jail CTS, $495 '
fine and court costs and $90 public
defender fee placed on lien.
Angel Sanchez, aggravated bat-
tery with deadly weapon, not pros-
ecuted, transferred to county court
with filing of misdemeanor charge.
Benjamin Willis Sanders, viola-
tion of probation (original charge
grand, theft auto), probation re-
voked, six months in jail, concur-
rent with other sentences, outstand-
ing fines and fees placed on lien:
Dania Michelle Smith, violation
of probation (original charges
introduction of contraband into jail
and tampering or fabricating physi-
cal evidence), probation revoked,
18 months community control with
same other conditions, license sus-
pended two years; violation of pro-
bation (original charges possession
of marijuana and driving while
license suspended), time served.
Justin Spiker, violation of com-
munity control (original charge
possession of methamphetamine),
probation revoked, 18 months
Florida State Prison, outstanding
fines and fees placed on lien.
Jesus Trejo, aggravated assault,
not prosecuted, transferred to coun-
ty court.with filing of misdemeanor'
charge.
David Rivera, trafficking in a
controlled substance and' posses-
sion of a firearm by a convicted
felon, 36 months.minimum/manda-
tory Florida State Prison, $50,000
fine placed on lien; possession/dis-
charge of a firearm during a felony,
possession of a shortbarrel shot-
gun/rifle, possession of drug para--


I


SECOND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
The City of Bowling Green is applying to the Florida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) for a
grant under the Neighborhood Revitalization category in the amount of $700,000.00 under the Small
Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. For each activity that is proposed, at
least 70% of the funds must benefit low and moderate income persons. The activities, dollar
amounts and estimated percentage benefit to low and moderate income persons for which the City
of Bowling Green is applying are:
Activity Number and Name Budget Range LMI% Benefit
04c Flood & Drainage $524,000.00 to $574,000.00 At least 51%
006 Parks, Playgrounds $ 50,000.00 to $70,000.00 At least 51%
16 Engineering $ 20,000.00 to 50,000.00 N/A
A -- d -- __ N/A


13 Administration


The project will undertake improvements to the drainage in the Grove Street service area; and park-
ing and handicap venues for two (2) parks in the City of Bowling Green. Exact budget figures will be
available at the public hearing.
The City of Bowling Green plans to minimize displacement of persons as a result of planned CDBG
funded activities; if any persons are displaced as a result of these planned activities the City of
Bowling Green will assist with relocation payments based on uniform act requirements.
The public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application will be held at
the City of Bowling Green, City Hall, Tuesday, June 13, 2006, at 7:00,p.m. or as soon thereafter as
possible. A draft copy of parts of the application will be available for review at that time. A final copy
of the application will be made available at the City of Bowling Green, City Hall, Monday through
Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. no more than five (5) working days after July
.21; 2006. For obtain additional information concerning the application and the public hearing con-
tact Mr. David Elbertson, City Manager, City of Bowling Green, 104 East Main Street, Bowling Green,
Florida 33834. Telephone 863-375-2255.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped per-
son requiring special accommodations or requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the
visually impaired should contact Mr. David Elbertson at least five calendar days prior to the meeting
and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public
hearing should contact Mr. Elbertson at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language
interpreter will be provided. To access a Telecommunications Device for Deaf Persons (TDD) please
call (863) 375-2255.
Pursuant to Section 102 of the HUD Reform Act of 1989, the following disclosures will be submitted
to DCA with the application. The disclosures will be made available by the City of Bowling Green
and DCA for public inspection upon request. These disclosures will be made available for a mini
mum period of five years.
1. Other Government (federal, state, and local) assistance to the project in the form
of a gift, grant, loan, guarantee, insurance payment, rebate, subsidy, credit, tax,
benefit or any other form of direct or indirect benefits by source and amount;

2. The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers, contractors, or consultants
involved in the application for assistance or in the planning or development of the
project or activity;

3. The identities and pecuniary-interests of any other persons with a pecuniary.inter
est in the project that can reasonably be expected to exceed $50,000.00 or 10% of
the grant request (whichever is lower);

4. For those developers, contractors, consultants, property owners, or others listed
in two (2) or three (3) above which are corporations, or other entities, the identifi-
cation and pecuniary interest by corporation or entity of each officer, director, prin-
cipal stockholder, or other official of the entity;

5. The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the project by.each of the
providers of those funds and the amount provided; and

6. The expected uses of all funds by activities and amount. -
6:8c


phernalia and felony driving whik
license suspended, not prosecuted.,
Michael Parker Daughtry, pos-
session of methamphetamine with
intent to sell and possession of drug
paraphernalia, not prosecuted.
Eradio Cerna. Jr., three counts
aggravated assault with a firearm,
not prosecuted.
Johnnie Garcia, three counts
aggravated assault with a firearm
and discharging a firearm in public,
not prosecuted. .
Christopher Jermaine Pace'
introduction of contraband into ia
county detention facility, not prose-
cuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or more
were filed recently in the office f
the clerk of court:
Burrus Enterprises LLC to Felix
M. Viera, $365,000.
Elaine Hendriksen to ,Mary N;
Ward, Robert Carlton Ward, Ann D,
Ward and Robert Carlton Ward as
trustee, $24,000.
Richard Lee Jr. and Angela M.
Hines to Michael L. Walkeri
$160,000.
Javier Perez to Antonio Zuniga,
$20,000. '
Marilyn E. Aker and Lois A.
Franklin to Frank R. and Donna L
Pisarsky, $35,000.
Marvin Andrew Lambert POA
for James R. Price to Travis and
Nettie Hill, $29,000.
John Handly to Arthur Charles
Duffield as trustee, $70,000.
Robert Rodriguez and Darrelli
Gibson to Russell Charles anco
Rhonda May Long, $134,100.
William T. and Velma M. Millet
to Elwood and Pamela Merchant!
$35,000.
Ethelind S. Prescott as trustee to
Michael A. and Layne Prescott
(two properties), $105,000.


m.


N/A






-S


8C The Herald-Advocate, June 8, 2006


Fin anc


ial Lesson


C ASH


YOUR


CHECK


You keep more of it.
Ck to*


SIn the few minutesit takes to cash



your check, some check cashing


services are also taking



a significant amount '


of your money. As profitable


as it may be for those places, we don't



do business that way. When you join



Suncoast Schools Federal Credit



Union, you pay a flat fee of $3 per
.* ;; "', '' : ,


month to cash approved checks and



receive up to 12r free money orders per


day. That'sless than it costs to cash one
day. That's less than. it costs to cash one


check at many traditional check cashing



services. And if certain minimum



requirements are met, check



cashing is completely



Free with Suncoast.I We



think it's fair, and one of the many



Who's eligible to
join Suncoast?
IF YOU LIVE IN HARDEE COUNTY;
YOU'RE ELIGIBLE FOR MEMBERSHIP AT
SUNCOAST.2 PLUS, ANYONE WHO WORKS,
WORSHIPS OR ATTENDS SCHOOL HERE
CAN JOIN. IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBERS
CAN JOIN TOO.


reasons you should consider joining



Suncoast. Call 800-999-5887 or go


to joinsuncoast.org to find out more.


Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union
WHERE SMART PEOPLE KEEP THEIR MONEY.
www.joinsuncoast.org


IMembership eligibility is required. The $3/month fee is waived if the member has at least one other Suncoast product such as a checking account, credit card,
or loan, or maintains a minimum balance of $1oo in their savings account. 2Unexpired government photo ID is required.


W E


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