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The Herald-advocate
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00071
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Creation Date: May 18, 2006
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00071
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
    Section B
        page B 1
    Section B: Hardee Living
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
    Section B: The Classifieds
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text





~rJ.
q.


Local Boxers.,

Win Acclaim


The


106th Year, No. 23
3 Sections, 32 Pages


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
A i--i


40s
plus 4 sales tax


4 Thursday, May 18, 2006


Judicia


Ezelle


Election Makes I


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Without so much as the bang of a
gavel, circuit-wide history was
made right here in Hardee County
at noon on Friday.
County Judge Marcus J. Ezelle
became the first circuit judge elect-
ed from Hardee County. This coun-
ty has never before had a resident
circuit judge, neither elected nor
appointed.
Circuit judges are selected by the
voters of the entire 10th Judicial
Circuit, which encompasses Har-
dee, Highlands and Polk counties.
And of a total 26 such judges, Polk


claims the greater share, with 23
resident circuit judges. Highlands
has three. Hardee, zero.
Until Friday.
Friday marked the end of the
official qualifying period for all
judicial candidates.
When the noon deadline arrived,
Ezelle had drawn no opponents
from the entire three-county area in
his bid to win the Group 11 seat
being vacated by retiring Chief
Circuit Judge Ronald A. Herring.
Ezelle's term as county judge
will expire at the close of this year.
His first six-year term as a circuit
judge will begin the week of Jan. 1.


And his seat on the county bench
will be assumed by Wauchula attor-
ney Jeff J. McKibben. McKibber,
too, was elected automatically to
the county judgeship when no chal-
lengers qualified to run against him
by noon Friday. County judges
must reside within the county they
serve, and are elected solely by vot-
ers there.
"I'm a thankful lawyer who will
be a judge in January," McKibben
said this week.
When he completes his term at
the start of 2007, Ezelle will have
served as a county judge for six
years. As a circuit judge, he will


History
continue to reside in Hardee
County, but may be assigned to
courtrooms in any county in the cir-
cuit. For instance, currently the cir-
cuit judge presiding in Hardee
Circuit Court travels here from his
home in Lakeland.
Said a humble Ezelle after learn-
ing he won elevation to the circuit
bench, "I thank the citizens of
Hardee County for giving me the
opportunity to serve as a county
judge. My goal to be on the circuit
bench would not have been possi-
ble without the people of Hardee
County first allowing me to serve
See HISTORY 2A


Here


'Tax Holiday'




On Hurricane




Supplies Opens


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of THM Herald-Advocate
A 12-day sales tax holiday for
hurricane supplies begins Sunday.
From May 21 to June 1, Florida
shoppers can purchase a variety of
items to help them cope with the
six-month hurricane season which
begins June 1st and continues
through Nov. 30.
Whether it's Alberto, Beryl,


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
A brush fire claimed eight acres of land off SR 64 East and Kelly Roberts Road this Sunday. At 4:31 p.m. the call came in and 16
'minutes later three fire trucks, one tanker and six personnel were on the scene, according to Lt. John Adler of Hardee County Fire-
Rescue. They found a fast-moving and dangerous fire, whose cause is still unknown. It took two hours to fully extinguish and clear
the eight-acre tract of land. This is one of the 21 fires, Hardee County firefighters have battled in the last two weeks. Adler gives
these words pf precaution, "Remember that everything is dry and that you should call and get a burn permit beforehand. While
Burning, just use common sense. If you're with a pile, be sure to stay with it until it is out. And if the wind is blowing hard, just
don't burn."


Governor Applauds Bowling Green Elementary


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
;Of The Herald-Advocate
Writing test scores have
improved so much at one local ele-
mentary school that it has received
: personal accolades from Gov. Jeb
j Bush.
Bowling Green Elementary
i boosted its FCAT Writing+ results
I from a 3.1 in 2005 to a 3.6 in 2006.
It also had one of the state's highest
increases in the percentage of
pupils scoring at 3.5 or above. The
governor feted 100 Florida schools
for that achievement.
Dated Friday, May 12, a letter to
Principal David Durastanti from


Classifieds 6B
Courthouse Report.........4C
Community Calendar......8A
Crime Blotter 5C
Hardee Living................2B
Information Roundup.... 10A
Lunch Menus ...............4C
Obits 4A


the Governor's Office reads:
"Congratulations to you, your
faculty, students, and, school com-
munity for being honored as one of
the top 100 elementary schools in
the state of Florida for making
progress in writing. This recogni-
tion is for the schools that had the
highest increase in the percent of



Mayor


Fires


Chief
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The mayor of the Zolfo Springs
has fired the town's police chief.
David Scheid, already on sus-
pension without pay, was terminat-
ed by letter last Thursday after-
noon. The reason for the firing was
unrelated to the criminal charges
which led to his suspension.
Scheid, 47, was arrested on Jan.
4 by Special Agent William Miles
of the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement. He was booked into
the Hardee County Jail on felony
charges of two counts official mis-
conduct and one count each of
See MAYOR 2A


students scoring 3.5 and above on
the 2006 Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test Writing+ over the
previous year.
"You and your staff have done a


remarkable job helping students
improve their writing skills.
Closely linked to reading, writing is
. a core skill that lays the foundation
See GOVERNOR 2A


Chris or Debby, or even Valerie or
William, the 2006 hurricane season
is expected to be busy, perhaps
equal to the 28 storms of last year's
record-breaking season.
Beginning Sunday, Floridians are
urged to prepare for the upcoming
season. "In this period of increased
tropical activity, it is vital for all
Floridians to prepare. Families and
See HURRICANE 3A


Man 'Sexual Predator'
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 30-year-old Wauchula man has
been sentenced to prison and desig-
nated a sexual predator for molest-
ing a 10-year-old girl.
Arturo Trevino Castillo, of 780
Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue,
originally had been charged with
sexual battery on a child under 12
in two separate incidents involving
the same victim.
But in Hardee Circuit Court
recently, Castillo entered into nego-
tiations with the prosecution,
See PREDATOR 3A Castillo


CLASS OF 2006


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The 200 or so members of Hardee Senior High School's graduating Class of 2006 will receive their diplomas on Saturday at 10
a.m. In the Cattlemen's Arena at the county fairgrounds off Altman and Stenstrom roads in Wauchula. Michael Minegar Is the class
valedictorian, while Kimberly Patarini is the salutatorian. Read their speeches and more In The Herald-Advocate's annual
Graduation Keepsake Edition next week.


BRUSH FIRE


register Now For

summer Programs
S...Story OA


I







2A The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor .- .
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor

BESS A. STALLINGS
Hardee Living Editor

115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Production Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate Publishing
Co Inc Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office. Wauchula. FL 33873 and additional
entry office (ISPS 578-780), "Postmaster." send address changes to: The Herald-
Advocate. PO Box 338. Wauchula. FL 33873


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Spons Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p m.
General News Monday 5 pm.
Ads -Tuesday noon


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest. Letters
should be bnef, and must be written in good taste, signed and include a dayume phone
number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome Subnmssions should be .typed, dou-
ble-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines All items are subject to ediong.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Tampa attorney Bill McBride a few weeks ago campaigned in Hardee
County for his wife Alex Sink who is running in 2006 for Florida's chief
financial officer.
She and her husband live in Thonotosassa with their two children, Bert
and Lexie, who attendSeffner Armwood High School. The family is active
in the Presbyterian Church of Seffner.
Sink, 58, grew up on a small farm in North Carolina. Their son, 6-3 and
295, was a lineman on Armwood's championship football team and has
accepted a football scholarship to Stanford University beginning this fall.
She began professional service as a teacher in West Africa and later
became Florida's highest ranking female bank president.' She served as
Florida president of NationsBank, which later became Bank of America.
Her campaign said Sink managed over $40 billion in assets and supervised
over 9,000 employees in 800 branches.
Gov. Lawton Chiles appointed her to the Commission on Government
Accountability to the People. She was, vice chair of Florida TaxWatch,
* which advocates fiscal responsibility in state government.
Sink has been on Gov. Chiles' Commission on Education, served on
the board of directors of the Hillsborough Education Foundation, and was
chair of Take Stock in Children.
.Wt,q.1yic..nv91nviments.tave included service witii fe 'Floiida Ct6tier
of the Nature Conservancy, the Beth El Farm Workers Minisayf, and-%bard
"'chairianfi'i United Way of Hithsborough 'Cotnty. .
She is a Democrat. The state's current chief financial officer (CFO) is
Tom Gallagher, who is running for governor in 2006. Sink has lived in
Miami, Jacksonville and Tampa.
Two Republicans are seeking the CFO post: State Rep. Randy Johnson
of Celebration and State Sen. Tom Lee of Brandon.
In November 1998 Florida voters approved a constitutional amend-
ment to reorganize the state cabinet and combine the three-pronged office
of treasurer/insurance commissioner/fire marshall with the office of comp-
troller. The new position was titled chief financial officer, or CFO.
The Florida Legislature in 2002 empowered the CFO and created the
new Department of Financial Services. This is one of the most powerful
positions in the state.
The CFO has direct responsibility for 11 divisions of the Department
of Financial Services: Treasury, Insurance Fraud, Consumer Services,
Agents and Agency Services, Accounting and Auditing, Worker's
Compensation, Risk Management, State Fire Marshall, Funerals and
Cemeteries,,Administration, and Rehabilitation and Liquidation.
As a potential fiscal watchdog, the CFO monitors the expenditure of
state funds, pays all state financial obligations, and investigates alleged
waste, fraud or abuse of taxpayer money.
She has promised to review contracts of private companies that do state
government work to ,"make sure that taxpayers are receiving the promised
benefits of outsourcing."
The Florida Cabinet has four people governor, chief financial offi-
cer, attorney general, and commissioner of agriculture and consumer
affairs.
Current CFO Tom Gallagher was elected without opposition as CFO in
2002. 2006 will be the first time Florida voters elect the CFO in a contest-
ed election..
Sink's husband, Bill McBride, once ran the law firm of Holland and
Knight'and ran for governor as a Democrat in 2002 against incumbent Jeb
Bush, who won his second term. In 1994 Bush lost a close election for gov-
ernor to Lawton Chiles, who had been a state legislator and U.S. senator.
"Walkin' Lawton" was an excellent governor and is remembered for his
remark in a televised campaign debate, "The he-coon walks just before the
light of day." Jeb Bush rebounded to win the election for governor in 1998
and 2002 and also has been an excellent governor for Florida.

The Citrus Industry magazine is an excellent publication, edited by
Ernie Neff and published in Bartow.
It looks like Florida grove owners will need to learn to live with canker
since the federal and state reimbursement program has ended. Many will be
using sprays that contain copper if they have canker in their groves.
Growers in Brazil sometimes use pruning and chemical defoliants on
infected trees, then it takes 20 to 24 months for those trees to return to full
fruiting, reports Citrus Industry magazine.

'Terry Sacks in the May 2006 Lions magazine offers advice for better
sleeping. The advice. includes avoiding smoking and alcohol, reduce caf-
feine: consumption, and avoid exercise and physical exertion too near bed-
time. Cut down on irregular work schedules.
Sleep deprivation is another issue. People can accumulate "sleep
debts" that need to be paid off with extra hours of sleep.
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration points out
"drowsy drivers are responsible each year for at least 100,000 automobile
accidents, 71,000 injuries and 1,550 deaths" in the U.S.
Prolonged, untreated sleep disorders can cause high blood pressure,
stroke, heart attack or heart failure, obesity and mental problems, including
.depression and strong mood swings, says Dr. Rosalind Cartwright of
Chicago's Rush University Sleep Disorder Center.
She said adults who sleep less than four hours a night or more than 10
hours have a mortality rate for times higher than those who sleep regularly.
Dr. James Walsh, executive director of the Sleep and Medicine
Research Center at St. Luke's Hospital in St. Louis, says the average adult
needs 7.5 hours of sleep a night. "If you lose an hour of sleep for 8 to 10
days in a row, your body responds basically as if you were up all night."
Dr., William Dement, of the Stanford University Center for the
Diagnosis and Treatment of Sleep Disorders, says college students need
"well over eight hours of sleep" a night. "The only way to reduce your indi-
viddal sleep debt is by obtaining extra sleep over and above your daily
,requirement.' "


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $16, 1 yr. $28:2 yrs. $54
Florida
6 months $20: I yr. $37. 2 yrs. $72
Out of State
6 months $24; I yr $44. 2 yrs. $86


given away to students with perfect
attendance during the FCAT
administration who "tried their
best." No "Christmas trees"
allowed, he said.
Further, any child who scored a
3.5 or higher was eligible for a
drawing for a telescope.
"We all need a little motivation at
times," the principal pointed out.
Again, he gave faculty and staff
the praise. "Mainly our fourth-
grade teachers worked very hard
and, of course, our third-grade
teachers worked hard last year in
getting them to this point."'
And students worked hard as
well, Durastanti said.


grand theft, tampering with a wit-
ness and fabricating physical evi-
dence. He also was charged with a
single misdemeanor count of petit
theft.
Following a two-month probe,
Miles alleged Scheid falsified the
training records of two police offi-
cers, sold departmental firearms
and kept the money for his own
use, threatened a witness to the
coverup of those sales, fabricated'
documents to explain the sales and
kept some collectible coins taken as
evidence from a burglary victim.
Scheid posted a $5,250 surety
bond to gain his release from jail
pending trial. His next date in
Hardee Circuit Court is set for June
20. A jury trial is scheduled for
Aug. 14. He is being represented by
defense lawyer Gil Colon Jr.
His termination last week result-
ed from two investigations con-
ducted by private investigator Al
Smith of The Inquest Group, a
Winter Haven firm recommended
by town attorney Gerald Buhr.
Smith checked into the background
and employment application of
officer Warren Brittingham, who
has since resigned from the Zolfo
Springs Police Department. Scho-
field, however, has just recently
received Smith's final reports.
Those investigations were refer-
enced in Mayor Mike Schofield's
letter of termination to Scheid.
Schofield gave his reason for dis-
missing the chief as violation of a
section of the town's Personnel
Policy Manual:
"Failure to meet town standards
of work performance. Work perfor-
mance encompasses factors includ-
ing attendance, punctuality, person-
al conduct, job proficiency and
general compliance with the town's
policies and procedures."
In his letter to Scheid, Schofield
noted he has 10 days to file for an
appeal of his firing.
The termination letter was hand-
delivered to Scheid at 12:25 p.m.
on Thursday, while he was working
at the town's sewer plant under the
employment of the town's indepeqn-
dent water and wastewater contrac-
tor. Police Lt. Chris Baty, who
delivered the letter, noted that
Scheid refused to sign it as request-




GOVERNOR
Continued FromlA
for students' continued success
throughout their education. I com-
mend you for setting high standards
and providing students the support
they need to exceed expectations.
"It is my pleasure to. join
Education Commissioner John
Winn in thanking your staff for
their dedication, commitment and
hard work. Please enjoy this time
of celebration and share this suc-
cess with your faculty and stu-
dents."
The letter is signed by Bush and
by Winn.
Durastanti said the letter arrived
in the mail on Monday.
"We were tickled with it," he
said.' "It's always good to get
something positive like that in the
mail."
Equally pleased was Schools
Superintendent Dennis Jones, who
said the entire educational commu-
Snity "is very very proud" of
Bowling Green Elementary.
Durastanti said Jones told a
group of principals at a meeting on
Monday that being one of the top
100 schools in Rhode Island, where
they probably only have 100
schools, would be no "big deal."
But in Florida, where there are
thousands of elementary schools,
"it's quite an accomplishment.", **.
The elated principal said he
shared the letter with faculty and
staff.
He credited them and the stu-
dents for "working very hard."
Durastanti said teachers partici-
pated in in-service training with a
consultant four times this past year,
children practiced writing weekly,
and sample tests with the Florida
Write Score program were sent off
for scoring four or five times dur-
ing the year.
"Our students showed quite a bit
of improvement before February,"
when the FCAT, is administered,
Durastanti said.
There also was .an incentive pro-
gram for the youngsters.
Durastanti said 200 prizes were


WEDNESDAY
(The Lord said), "Who has a
claim against Me that I must
pay? Everything under heaven
belongs to Me."
Job 41:11 (NIV)
All verses are excerpted from The
Holy Bible: (KJV) King James
Version; (ME) The Message;
(NCV) New Century Version; (NEB)
New English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (RSV)
Revised Standard Version; (PME)
Phillips Modern English; and (TLB)
The Living Bible.


ed to indicate its receipt.
On Tuesday, Schofield said
Scheid was fired for "failure to do
his job in hiring Mr. Brittingham."
He offered Smith's reports as
explanation.
Both reports were highly critical
of Scheid.
In his investigation into
Brittingham's background, Smith
wrote in his recommendation to the
towri: "Although Brittingham's
personnel file included a 'back-
ground investigation' apparently
prepared by Chief David Scheid ...
it was clear that this 'background
investigation' was lacking any real
substance and little effort was
apparently made to verify'informa-
tion provided by Brittingham
"Not much of :Brittingham's
background was apparently investi-
gated," Smith continued. "For the
most part, the background investi-
gation appears to be nothing more
than a regurgitation of information
provided by Brittingham on his
application for employment.
He added that Scheid intdr-
viewed only two of six references
listed by Brittingham, and that nb
pre-employment drug test, poly-
graph or psychological profile was
conducted.
In the second investigation, into
items listed on Brittingham's
employment application, Smith's
conclusion challenges Britting-
ham's employment, experience and
licensing claims.
"Brittingham and Chief Scheid
may be the only two people on
earth who believe Brittingham was
in the Reserve Services Program at
the Sarasota Police Department,"
he wrote. "Clearly, that belief is not
shared by the Sarasota Police
Department."
Smith said the "lack of effort" to
verify Brittingham's application "is
troubling."
Continuing in his recommenda-
tions to the town, Smith noted,
"The entire application process for
a police officer should be consid-
ered for a major overhaul." He
began by saying the application
itself should be changed, requiring
the applicant to swear under oath
that the information contained in it
is true. A section should be added,








A Daily Thought

THURSDAY
The heavens are Yours, 0 Lord,
the world, everything for You
created them all.
Psalms 89:11 (TLB)

FRIDAY
Again Jesus spoke to them, "I
am the Light of the world; he
who follows Me will not walk in
darkness but will have the light
of life."
John 8:12 (RSV)

SATURDAY
Then the Lord said to him, "Who
made a person's mouth? And
who makes someone deaf and
not able to speak? Or who gives
a person sight or blindness? It is
I, the Lord.
Exodus 4:11 (NCV)

SUNDAY
Thank God, the father of our
Lord Jesus Christ, that He is our
Father and the source of all
mercy and comfort. For He
gives us comfort in our trials, so
that we in turn may be able to
give the same sort of strong
sympathy to others in theirs.
I Corinthians 1:3-4 (PME)

MONDAY
Though the cherry trees don't
blossom and the strawberries
don't ripen; though the apples
are worm-eaten and the wheat
fields stunted; though the sheep
pens are sheepless and the cat-
tle barns empty, I'm singing joy-
ful praise to God. I'm turning
cartwheels of joy to my Savior
God.
Habakkuk 3:17-18(ME)

TUESDAY
I pray you.. may grasp what is
the breadth and length and
height and depth of the love of
Christ Jesus.
Ephesians 3:19 (NEB)


as their county judge."
Added Ezelle, "I sincerely feel
this is a dual personal achievement
.and a community achievement.
"While I'm very pleased to have
achieved this office because of the
opportunity I had to serve as a
county judge, I feel this is also a
recognition from Hardee County
that it was finally our turn to com-
plete our membership in the 10th
Judicial Circuit by having a resi-
dent circuit judge," he said.
"I may be assigned from time to
time in Bartow or Sebring, but I
live in Hardee County and I plan to
stay in Hardee County," the soon-
to-be circuit judge said.
Ezelle said the decision to run, to
tackle the odds, was both easy and
difficult.
"When you enjoy the practice of
law and come to realize through
your practice the important deci-
sions that are made and the lives
that are affected by those decisions
the court makes, I think there is a
natural pull to take part in that
responsibility," he said in explain-'
ing his original desire to become a
county judge.
"I enjoy the judicial responsibili-
ty," he added in explanation of his
bid for elevation to the circuit level.
"With the developing opportuni-
ty that became apparent (Herring's
pending retirement), I was encour-
aged by the bench and the bar to
consider running," he said, refer-
ring to other judges and lawyers.
"The decision to run in the 10th
Judicial Circuit, a large geographic
area with 370,000 registered voters,
most fundamentally reflects the
degree of support I had in the areas
I knew I needed."
And Ezelle is profoundly grate-
ful for that support.
Judicial candidates qualified
from noon on Monday, May 8, to.
noon on Friday, May 12. Their
candidacy was registered through
the Secretary of State's office ,in
Tallahassee.
Ezelle said he checked that Web
site that Monday to confirm he was,
indeed, qualified to run. He backed
that up with a phone call. He did
not check the Web site again, to see
if any opponents had surfaced, until
Thursday. Then he checked once
more on Friday, calling again to


for business associations, in order
to help uncover any questionable
business dealings an applicant may
be involved in. And applicants
should be screened for drugs, given
a polygraph and profiled psycho-
logically.
The report states, "One of the
dangers in conducting the kind of
lax background check done in this
case is the department may if it
hasn't already'- get a reputation as
an agency that will accept officers
rejected from other agencies with
tougher employment standards,
those who have been terminated for
misdeeds or those who just could-
n't get a law enforcement job any-
where else."
It continues, "The bigger danger
in not conducting proper back-
ground checks is that an individual


confirm he had no opponents and,
therefore, had been elected to
office.
"I was satisfied," he said.
Ezelle was equally pleased with
McKibben's success in winning the
county seat Ezelle will be vacating.
McKibben this week expressed
similar sentiments to Ezelle's in
explaining a lawyer's motivation to
run for a judgeship. "I believe any
lawyer who has been in court has
thoughts of how he would manage
the courtroom were he the judge,
and this was an opportunity to put
those ideas into practice," McKib-
ben said.
Another consideration, he said, is
natural progression. "I've practiced
law, in December, for 33 years and
I think a change will be interesting
and certainly a challenge."
Noted the newly elected county
judge, "A judge has a duty to be
courteous to the litigants. and to
require that the litigants be courte-
ous to each other. I intend for reci-
procal courtesy to be a hallmark of
my courtroom." *
McKibben added, "I look for-
ward to being able to draw on my
varied experiences of practicing
and living in Hardee County as I
make decisions in court for the peo-
ple of Hardee County."
As for his private 'practice,
"We're not taking a sixth-month
vacation," he said of the time re-
maining before he assumes office.
"We're completing as many as mat-
ters as possible.
"T4-% most difficult part -of
becoming a county judge is I will
no longer be able to meet the needs
of the families I have taken care of
for many years, in some cases for
four generations," McKibben said.
He said he has not yet made a
decision of the dispensation of his
private practice.
McKibben, too, was humble and
"gratified," as was Ezelle, by the
affirmation other lawyers provided
by supporting him in his bid for the
judgeship. And he described the
legal community in Hardee County
as "close knit" and "collegial." :
Both men will be installed into
office the first week of January.
An investiture ceremony will be
held in Hardee County. That date
for that event has not yet been set.


Florida Citrus Growers Can Learn

Global Perspective On Citrus Health


The Florida Citrus Industry
Annual Conference Educational
Session on June 8 in Bonita Springs
will offer growers a variety of per-
spectives on issues affecting citrus
health.
The session, 'titled "Citrus
Greening and Citrus Canker a
Global Perspective" will feature
representatives from the Florida cit-
rus industry as well as Brazil and
California. Juliano Ayres, scientific
manager for Fundecitrus in Brazil,
will address the control of citrus
canker in Sao Paulo State. Ayres,
along with Alexandre Tachibana,
general manager of Santa Maria


Farm in Brazil, will also discuss cit-
rus greening control.
Representatives from the
University of Florida Citrus
Research and Education Center will
talk to growers about production
practices that Florida's growers can
implement to assure citrus health.
The session will conclude with a
question and answer session featur-
ing a panel of growers from Brazil,
California and Florida.
The 2006 Florida Citrus Industry
Annual Conference will be held
June 7-10 at the Hyatt Regency
Coconut Point Resort & Spa in
Bonita Springs.


MAYOR
Continued From 1A


hired as a police officer could be a
liability for the town. A failure of
the town to screen that type of indi-
vidual can lead to serious legal
problems for the town in the event
-that an officer turns out to be a
problem."
Smith cautioned that losingg just
one negligent hiring or negligent
retention lawsuit could break the
financial back of the town of Zolfo
Springs."
Finally, Smith added that during
the course of his investigations he
"became aware" of other situations
and incidents concerning the de-
partment.
"In my combined 28 years of law
enforcement and private investiga-
tions, I have never seen a more dys-
functional police agency than this
one," Smith said.


HISTORY
Continued From 1A


9lomecoming

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Triendsbip Church




9wag 26th



c5eroice atf 11 am witb dinner on
he ground a followingSp







May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3A


a


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Herald-Advocate on Friday
and Monday received a letter to the
editor about a report of a local con-
.venience store and a local service-
C man.
There has been a lot of conversa-
Xtion and rumors about the alleged
incident in the last couple of weeks.
The serviceman in the alleged
incident, when he reportedly was
treated rudely by a clerk in Mid-


March, is in the Army Reserve and
is now in Iraq.
The Herald-Advocate on Tues-
day talked with the store's owner
and three employees. They said the
alleged incident did not happen and
is just a rumor.
"We respect the military, police-
men, post office workers, people in
uniform, farmers, cowboys, truck
drivers, jailers. We have opened
before or after regular hours for
customers.


SCrews Trial Delayed


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Scheduling conflicts have led to
a last-minute delay in the trial of a.
,Zolfo Springs man accused of mur-
odering a Bowling Green woman
reported missing nearly four years
ago.
d Thomas Jessie Crews Jr., 40, was
,supposed to go to trial in a Bartow
.courtroom beginning on Monday of
,this week, charged with second-
!-degree murder in the Oct. 10, 2002,
disappearance of 20-year-old
v Sondra Barrington.
g But on Friday of last week,
t Circuit Judge J. Dale Durrance
,,granted the state's motion for a
11continuance. The assistant state
_,attorney who is prosecuting the
case had two trials set for the same
Mday, Durrance's judicial assistant,
L-Mary Carrier, explained.
n That practice is not uncommon
4 in Polk County, where trials are
numerous but plea deals, witness
availability, evidentiary concerns
or other delays often force a change
cin a trial's set date. In fact, in the
- case of successful plea negotia-
- tions, a trial is no longer necessary
, at all.
So, with two murder trials ready'
_ to begin on Monday, one of them
had to be moved last Friday.
A new date has not yet been set
I for the Crews trial. Carrier said that
- will' happen on Friday, June 2, at
8:30 a.m. as the lawyers meet with
the judge. Carrier said a June date
r may be possible.
The fact that the trial is being

MARKET O~....N...
MARKET DEMOLbION


held in Bartow at all stems from the
Hardee County Grand Jury's indict-
ment of Crews. Investigators could
not pinpoint in which of three
counties the alleged murder oc-
curred, hence the indictment accus-
es Crews of killing Barrington in
either DeSoto, Hardee oT Polk
county.
In such an instance, state law
allows the defendant to choose the
county where the case will be tried.
Crews and Assistant Public De-
fender Mel McKinley selected Polk
County.
Sondra Barrington clocked out of
her job at DeSoto Memorial
Hospital at 6:03 p.m. on Oct. 10,
2002. She never made it home, and
she has not been seen since nor has
her body ever been found,
Her car was discovered aban-
doned on U.S. 17 in DeSoto
County, just two miles south of the
Hardee County line. Her purse was
still inside.
Shirley Barrington, her mother,
said Sondra Barrington was due to
testify against Crews in court the
next day, Oct. 11, 2002, regarding a
domestic complaint.
Sheriff J. Loran Cogburn said
authorities from various agencies
searched in DeSoto, Hardee and
Polk for evidence and for Sondra
Barrington's remains.
The indictment was handed up
on July 21, 2004. Crews was arrest-
ed that same day.
He has remained in custody
pending trial, and is now being held
in the Polk County Jail..

,ma to us I .


"We are happy to sell business.
We respect all human beings.
Nothing happened like this
(rumor). The store's business has
been off lately. We have done good
business," said the owner and
employees.
"There have been all kinds of
rumors and locations. We have no
reason to say I don't like your uni-
form. No one would say that. We
respect the military. Somebody
wants to hurt the business. We
opened early for a jailer. An Air
Force man comes to our store every
day. We opened early for a police
lady so she could get coffee."
The store's owner has a son who
is a police officer and a son-in-law
who is in the U.S. Army.
The father of the local service-
man said he did not want any pub-
lication of his son's name and the
family did not seek any publicity.
The serviceman's father said his
son was in uniform, stopped to buy
gasoline and went inside to buy a
drink, and was on his way to the
base in Tampa. The clerk frowned,
the serviceman asked if anything.
was wrong, and she put his change
on the counter and said she did not
like him. Two customers in line
placed their items on the counter
and left, said the father.
The store owner thought the
rumors started from a female cus-
tomer who was trying to hide some
items behind her back and did not
have enough money to pay for
them and when questioned by a
female clerk, threw the items on the
counter and walked out, and the
story falsely expanded into a rumor
involving a serviceman.'
Lt. Chris Baty of the Zolfo
Springs Police Department told
The Herald-Advocate Tuesday he
had been contacted late last week
by the U.S. Attorney General's
office to investigate the alleged
incident. The serviceman's name
was not released except to the store
owner.

The store owner said, "If some-
one will come as a witness and say
when, where and what time (this
alleged incident occurred) and we
find it is true, we are ready to apol-
ogize." He can check work records
to see who was on duty then.

~t. _. '. .',.
x-* .,r*t, *, i' ., : ,.


o .,- I- '- R
COURTESY PHOTO
.,Beginning on Monday of last week, a packing house at the State Farmers Market that was dam-
I aged by Hurricane Charley was demolished (above). By Friday the packing house, most recently
used by Severt & Sons Inc. to pack strawberries and cantaloupes, was nothing more than a vacant
Xcponcrete slab (bottom), said Diana Durrance, senior market manager for the state of Florida. The
b demolition was done by Cross Construction. This is just the first step in the repair and recon-
Sstruction of the State Farmers Market on U.S. 17 in Wauchula. It will take $5 million from FEMA to
t get everything back to the way it was before the hurricane. Starting in a few weeks, the packing
house will be rebuilt like it was before it was damaged by Hurricane Charley, Durrance said.


Below are the two letters to the
editor:

Dear Editor,
This week I was told about an
active military serviceman in uni-
form going to the convenience
store on U.S. 17 and State Rd. 64
within the past couple of months.
He made a purchase and went to
the store clerk to pay for his pur-
chase. The clerk made the transac-
tion and took the change and threw
it on the counter in front of him.
The serviceman asked if there
was a problem, and the clerk
responded she did not like him. I
did not appreciate hearing about the
clerk's conduct, so I stopped at the
store yesterday and relayed to the
clerk on duty what I had been told.
He responded by saying that he
knew of no such incident occurring.
It reminded me of what my
brother-in-law, Bob Farwell,
relayed to me a few years ago. He
returned from his tour of duty
.(1971) in Vietnam in uniform. He
was walking to the airport in our
country and was spat upon by a fel-
low American. Bob has never for-
gotten that day, the incident being
vivid in his memory so many years
later.
Know that most Americans sup-
port our troops, for they know the
military can be placed in harm's
way at any particular moment. For
those Americans who do not sup-
port our troops, I suggest that you
consider moving to another coun-
try. God bless our troops and God
bless America.
Sincerely,
Richard S. Button
Punta Gorda

Dear Editor,
For the past few weeks rumors
have been spread across Hardee
County concerning the BP store at
the comer of Highway 64 and 17
south. The rumors concern an
alleged incident involving an
American serviceman and store
personnel.
The rumors range from the ser-
viceman being refused service to
him being treated disrespectively
because he was in uniform.
Hardee County needs to know
the truth.
If they. are unfounded they need
to stop. If they are true, the people
of Hardee Cotinty need to demand
a public-apology from the store.
-The people of. Hardee County
will not and should not tolerate the
public disrespect of our men and
women in uniform who risk their
lives for their country.
There were people in the store at
the time of the incident, and they
need to come forward with the
facts.
Tommy Irby
Zolfo Springs




Pets Take S1
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"I'm not leaving my home if
Fluffy can't go too."
How many people in Hardee
County ride out hurricanes at home
because they don't want to leave
their beloved pets, members of
their family?
The Hardee County Emergency
Management office is trying to get
a handle on how many people
would use a pet-friendly storm
shelter or make other plans for their
pets.
"We urge all animal owners to
respond to our recent survey, so we
can know how to better help folks,"
said Emergency Management
Director Rich Shepard on Tuesday.
Shepard said a stakeholders
group, those involved in hurricane
planning about animals, has been
meeting for about two months and
expects to have a plan ready in
about a month.
"But, it sure would help if we can
find out what number of pets we're
talking about," said Shephard.
The stakeholders group is a


CPR Classes
To Be Held
Mary Godwin, of My Dummy-
N-Me Training Center, will be
teaching full adult, child and
infant CPR (cardiopulmonary
resuscitation), which will include
information about Automated


Defibrillation (AED), standard
first aid and emergency care.
Each student participating in the
class will be certified nationally
for two years.
Due to limited space, pre-reg-
istration is recommended. The
location will be announced at a
later date. A price for a single
course in CPR or First Aid is $25
or to take both is $40. For more
information or to register, call
My Dummy-N-Me Training
Center at 773-3738.


Convenience Store Owner Respects


All Customers, Seeks Truth On Rumor


purchase price Is subject to tax.
Qualifying items selling for $10 or less:
* Blue ice or those items sold as artificial ice
Qualifying items selling for $20 or less:
9 Any portable self-powered light source
* Battery-powered flashlights
* Battery-powered lanterns
* Gas-powered lanterns (including propane,
kerosene, lamp oil, or similar fuel)
Tiki type torches
Candles
Qualifying items selling for $25 or less:
Any gas or diesel fuel container (including
LP gas containers and kerosene containers)
Qualifying items selling for$30 or less:
* Batteries, including rechargeable (listed
sizes only)
SAAA-cell
SAA-cell
C-cell
D-cell
6-volt (excluding automobile and boat
batteries)
9-volt (excluding automobile and boat
batteries)
Coolers (food-storage; non-lectrical)
Ice chests (food-storage; non-electrical)
Qualifying Items selling for $40 or less:
Any cell phone charger
Qualifying Items selling for $50 or less:
Radios (self-powered or battery-powered)
Two-way radios (setf-powered or battery-
powered)
Weather band radios (self-powered or
battery-powered)


* Tarpaulins (tarps)
* Visqueen, plastic sheeting, plastic drop
cloths, and other flexible waterproof
sheeting
Ground anchor systems
Tie-down kits (items that are advertised or
normally sold as a tie-down or anchoring
kit)
Bungee cords
Ratchet straps
Qualifying items selling for $60 or less:
Any cell phone batteries
Qualifying items selling for $75 or less:
* Any carbon monoxide detectors
* Any package consisting of two or more of
the previously listed qualifying hurricane-
preparedness Iems sold for $75 or less will
qualify for the exemption.
a Any package consisting of one or
more of the previously listed hurricane-
preparedness items and at least one other
item that is otherwise tax-exempt and the
package is sold for $75 or less will qualify
for the exemption..
Qualifying items selling for $200 or less:
Storm shutter devices (defined as materials
and products specifically manufactured,
rated, and marketed for the purpose of
preventing window damage from storms)
Qualifying items selling for $1,000 or
less:
Portable generators that will be used
to provide light, communications, or to
preserve perishable food in the event of a
power outage.


HURRICANE
Continued From 1A


businesses that prepare are safer
and recover quicker than those who
don't plan and don't take action,"
said Florida Gov. Jeb Bush as-he
signed the legislation authorizing
the sales tax holiday.
"This legislation is an incentive
for Floridians to stock up on sup-
plies, as well as a reminder to pre-
pare for the safety of their fami-
lies," said state Sen. Carey Baker,
one of the authors of the bill.
No state.ir local sales tax will be
col6 acted on hurricane prepared-
ness items, which range from those
selling for $10 or less to portable
generators of $1,000 or less. Items
purchased may include flashlights
and other self-powered light
sources; batteries; portable, two-
way and weather-band radios; flex-
ible waterproof sheeting or tarps;
gas or diesel fuel containers; non-


electrical food storage coolers; car-
bon monoxide detectors; and storm
shutter devices.
In the off-season, several munic-
ipal, county and school buildings
have had storm shutters or other
safety devices installed, bought
generators, and generally made
hurricane preparations to enable
them to help hurricanes victims
more effectively.
Residents are particularly urged
to get the NOAA.(National Oceanic
and Atmospheric .Administration)
radios and keep tuned to them as
storms approach the state. An
updated copy of the All Hazards
Guide for the county is now avail-
able at the courthouse, many bui-
nesses and the emergency manage-
ment office. It lists shelter informa-
tion, preparation hints and other
information.


shelter From Hurricanes?
cooperative effort of animal control like to avoid both of those, the
staffs, veterinarians, city, county potential for feral or wild behavior
and School Board representatives, and the unnecessary deaths of peo-
Most of the shelters are at schools ple by having a pet-friendly shel-
and managed by School Board ter," added Shepard.


employees.
Shepard said pet shelters will be
mandated by the state legislature,
but "we want to be able to do it as
soon as possible. We cannot
diverge the human need from the
animal need. We know people stay
home because of their pets. It's an
additional burden on the search-
and-rescue efforts after the storms
pass," commented Shepard.
He went to help in Mississippi
after Hurricane Katrina. There were
instances where they found people
in their homes with their pets. Also,
abandoned animals adopted a feral
mentality, forming packs and creat-
ing an additional hazard. "We'd


For anyone who didn't reply to
the survey or needs one, Shepard
said they can be downloaded at
www.hardeecounty.net/eoc or by
calling(773-6373) or stopping by
the emergency operations center at
404 W. Orange St., (off the court-
house east parking lot), Wauchula.
They need to be returned by May
31 to help the planning process.
While there, or any many public
offices and businesses, pick up a
copy of the 2006-07 All Hazards
Guide which has a lot of helpful
information on preparing for hurri-
canes and what to do after the
storm passes.


PREDATOR
Continued From 1A


agreeing to plead to the lesser
charge of lewd and lascivious
molestation.
And Circuit Judge Robert L.
Doyel has now sentenced Castillo
to 10 years in state prison, allowing
him credit for the time he has
served since his July 29, 2005,
arrest. Following his release from
prison, the judge ordered him to
spend 10 years on supervised pro-
bation with special sexual-offender
restrictions.
Further, Doyel classified Castillo
as a sexual predator, a designation
that will remain with him for life.
According to Maj. Claude Harris
Jr., a spokesman for the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office, the
molestation first came to light


while the child and her family were
at a business office on U.S. 17 in
Wauchula. The little girl told
someone there, he said.
The girl said she had been
"touched."
Authorities were called, and Det.
Sgt. John Shivers began an investi-
gation into the claim, Harris
described. The child named a sus-
pect, and Shivers went to talk to
that man.
In a taped interview, Castillo
admitted to molesting the 10-year-
old on two occasions over a two-
month period, he said.
Castillo was jailed by 11:30 p.m.
on the same day the child first told
of being molested.


SJoin The Club!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.


2006 Sales Tax Holiday for

Hurricane Preparedness
May 21 through June 1,2006

For the period beginning 12:01 a.m., May21,2006, and ending at midnight,
June 1, 2006, the 2006 Florida Legislature enacted and the Governor
approved a tax-free period directing that: No sales tax shall be collected
on specific items related to hurricane preparedness. The specific items
must be in the price ranges specified on the list below.

List of tax-exempt items
The following is a list of the specified items that will be tax free. If the sales price of a qualifying
item exceeds the allowable threshold amount, the tax exemption will not apply and the total







4A The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


Obituaries


DOROTHY CREWS
Dorothy Crews, 79, of Lake
Placid, died Monday, May 15, 2006
at Lake Placid Health Care Center.
Born in Wauchula, she came to
Lake Placid from Belle Glade in
1966. She was a homemaker and a
member of the Venus Baptist
Church.
She was preceded in death by
husband Emory "Buster" Crews
and son Bobby Crews.
Survivors include two sisters,
Lovonia Johns of Sarasota and
Mary Albritton of Lake Placid;
three sister-in-laws Vida Murphy of
Lake Placid, Zelda Randall of
LaBelle and Audrey Conley of
Wauchula; one brother-in-law Roy
Crews and wife Shirley of Ona;
two grandchildren; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Visitation was Wednesday, May
17, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral
home chapel. Funeral services will
be today (Thursday) at 10 a.m. at
the funeral home with Pastor Bill
Moss and the Rev. Jack Cochran
officiating. Burial will follow in
Midway Cemetery in Crewsville.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests memorials be sent to the
Venus Baptist Church Building
Fund.
Chandler Funeral Home
Lake Placid
RUBY WILLIAMS
Ruby Williams, 89, of Fort
Meade, died Saturday, May 13,
2006, at Bartow Care Center.
Born June 15, 1916 in Cotton-
wood, Ala., she came to Fort
Meade over 60 years ago. She was'
a homemaker and attended the
Church of God.
She was preceded in death by her
husband Ruben Frank Williams,
one daughter Donna Hancock and
two sons, Jack Williams and
Johnny Ray Williams.
Survivors include three sons,
Rickey L. Williams of Fort Meade,
Victor Lamar Williams of
Wauchula and Wallace M. Williams
of Goose Creek, S.C.; one brother,
Emmett Benton of Dothan, Ala.;
eight grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren.
Visitation is Sunday, May 21,
from 2 to 4 p.m. at the funeral
home. Graveside funeral services
are Monday, May 22 at Evergreen
Cemetery in Fort Meade.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


LEROY "ROY" MADISON
Leroy "Roy" Madison, 97, of
Zolfo Springs, died Monday, May
8, 2006 in Hemet, Calif.
He was born in Mississippi and
was a farmer most of his life.
He is survived by his wife, Mary
Louise Madison of Zolfo Springs;
sons and daughters, Royal
McHenry of Atlanta, Ga., Gary
McHenry of Hayward, Calif., Larry
McHenry of Zolfo Springs, Diane
McHenry of Dothan, Ala., Norman
McHenry of Union City, Herman
McHenry and Raymond McHenry
both of Memphis, Tenn., Darleana
McHenry of Hemet, Calif., Willie
McHenry Jr. of Memphis, Tenn.,
Berlin Madison of St. Louis, Mo.,
Saundra Madison of Zolfo Springs,
Marilyn Madison of Arcadia, and
Ira Lou Curry of Atlanta, Ga.; 29
grandchildren and many great-
grandchildren.
Graveside services were held at
1 p.m., Monday, at Lakeview
Memorial Gardens in Avon Park.
Morris Funeral Chapel
Sebring


JUNE E. GUIDRY
June E. Guidry, 81 of Arcadia
died Friday, May 12, 2006.
She was born in DeSoto County
on Sept. 23, 1924.
She was preceded in death by her
husband Earl Guidry.
She is survived by four sons, Earl
(Trisha) Guidry of Colorado
Springs, Colo., Everett (Karen)
Guidry of Arcadia, Robin Guidry of
Arcadia and Thomas (Rochelle)
Guidry of Arcadia; two daughters,
Mary Jane Florin of Albuquerque,
N.M., and Layne (Mike) Prescott of
Wauchula; and one brother, Pat
Hansel of Arcadia; 13 grandchil-
dren; and two great grandchildren.
Visitation will be 7 to 9 ,p.m.
Wednesday, May 17, 2006 at
Robarts Funeral Home in Arcadia.
Services will be at 4 p.m. today
(Thursday), May 18, 2006 at St
Paul's Catholic Church in Arcadia
with Father Vincent Martin officiat-
ing. Burial will follow at Joshua
Creek Cemetery.
Robarts Funeral Home
Arcadia

It takes more than 4,000
autumn crocus flowers to yield
an ounce of commercial saffron.


DEBORAH JEANNE
ROBARTS,
Deborah Jeanne Robarts, 42, of
Wauchula died Sunday, May 14,
2006 in Arcadia.
She was born Jan. 30, 964 in
Wauchula, and had been a lifelong
resident of Wauchula. She was a
member of the First Baptist Church
of Wauchula, and a past member of
the Junior Woman's Club. She was
co-owner of Robarts Family
Funeral Home.
She was preceded in death by her
father, Wayne Rickett.
Survivors include her husband,
Dennis Russell Robarts; mother,
Debbie Rickett of Wauchula; two
sons, Joseph Wayne Porter of
Wauchula, and Dennis Russell
Robarts II and wife Summer of
Fernandia Beach; one daughter,
Brooklyn Kristina Porter of
Wauchula; and two grandchildren,
Alexandra Robarts and Dennis
Russell Robarts III.
The family will receive friends
on Thursday from 6-8 p.m. at
Robarts Family Garden Chapel,
Wauchula. Services will be held at
2 p.m. Friday, May 19, in the sanc-
tuary of the First Baptist Church of
Wauchula with the Rev. Jim Davis
and Dr. James Miller officiating.
Burial will follow in Wauchula.
Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to the
church of one's choice for the
spreading of the Gospel of Jesus
Christ.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula

WILLIAM H. PIESTER
William H. Piester, 81, of Fort
Meade, died Tuesday, May 9,2006,
at home.
Born March 1, 1925, in Staten
Island, N.Y., he came to Fort
Meade six years ago from Concho,
Ariz. He was a cattleman, a Baptist
and served in the U.S. Navy in
World War II as an operator of the
amphibious assault landing craft.
He was preceded in death by his
wife Gloria Piester.
Survivors include two sons,
Leland Piester of Fort Meade and
Allen William Piester of Copake,
N.Y.; one daughter Sharon Lynn
Radcliffe of Corona, Calif.; six
grandchildren; and seven great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were Friday,
May 12, at 6 p.m. at the funeral
home with Pastor John Arrowood
officiating.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


After Thoughts
By C.J. Mouser


THE TEENAGE TRACK
Ever argue with a 16-year-old boy? It's hopeless. Like trying to thread
a wet string through a soda straw. Or trying to go uphill on roller skates.
Or, well, somewhere out there is that perfect analogy for this situation. But,
for the moment, it eludes me.
The closest I can come is ... it's like playing five-card stud against
someone with only four cards.
No matter how hard they try to win, they're young and inexperienced.
And wisdom will beat enthusiasm any day of the week. Which leads to hard
feelings. But, occasionally, it works out where humor can stop things from
going too far. Those are the good days in a household with teenagers.
The following all occurred after a heated scene with my son over dri-
ving "rights" versus driving "privileges."
"You're way off track," he said finally, after 15 minutes of trying to get
me to see his point of view. Which is: He knows everything and I know
nothing.
"I think it's you who is a little off track," I retorted. "You have a histo-
ry of that, remember?" I wasn't trying to be mean, only repeating something
he'd said about himself the day before. I was using his own words against
him.
"Well, at least my track isn't decrepit and falling apart," he snapped
back, one eyebrow cocked and raised, "and likely to derail the train at any
given moment."
... And we were off!
"Hey," I said, "my track may be a little rusty, but yours isn't even built
yet. There're still crews of Chinese men laying your track down. If I sneak
in your room late at night while you're asleep and put my ear right next to
yours, I can hear the ring of steel on steel ... the sound of sledgehammers
hitting spikes. How can you sleep through all that, anyway?" I joked.
"Well, at least my track is straight, not crooked like yours." He grinned
in momentary triumph.
"But there're big gaps in it," I continued. "You're still waiting on ties to
be delivered."
"... and when they get here, they'll be new and strong and sturdy. Not
all warped and bent and out of line, like some people's."
"From California," I went on as if he hadn't even spoken, "from the
redwood forest where there are people chaining themselves to the trees to
keep them from being cut down to make your ties, that's how long you have
to wait for your track to be finished!"
In case you haven't picked up on it, this was all about intelligence, or
the lack thereof.
"Look, son," I said, "all I care about is that you're ready to take on the
responsibility of driving and not go off half-cocked and get yourself killed.
Is that so bad?"
"No, but I drive every bit as good as you do, you just don't know it."
"I've been driving for almost 10 years longer than you've been alive,
son. It's remarks like that which make me lose faith in your ability to think
rationally."
"There you go, getting off track again! I'm a good driver. Everyone
says so."
"Everyone except me, and hey. what's that sound? I can hear the
explosions from here as the workers blast through the hillsides making tun-
nels." J.cupped:my hand around my ear for dramatic effect. "Even if they
haul the tree-huggers away, it could be years before..."
"Are we going back to that again?!"
"You started it," I reminded him.
"Well, now I want to stop it!"
"Hey ... you don't stop a powerful locomotive like this," I tapped my
temple, "on a dime, boy."
I had laid out my hand, and it was a royal flush.
It took a few seconds, but eventually I saw the grin forming, bunching
his cheeks and squeezing the corners of his eyes closed. He lost. But it was
funny.
It was one of those good days.


..d ~ ;.. -,


0ioVL


u1AeoyM


A warm smile


0 0.


A loving touch...




A compassionate heart.





dtWe dcdtecatd hed/ Qe to etwLg otheg.


qWe glat palse and gcoky to Qod.





Dennis Robarts


and the staff of








FUNERAL HOMES


cDeboiah 4obaots


obit5:18c


*1


DEBORAH JEANNE
ROBARTS
Deborah Jeanne Robarts, 42, of
Wauchula died Sunday, May 14,
2006 in Arcadia.
She was born Jan. 30, 1964 in
Wauchula, and had been a life-
long resident of Wauchula. She
was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Wauchula, and
a past member of the Junior
Woman's Club. She was co-
owner of Robarts Family Funeral
Home.
She was preceded in death by
her father, Wayne Rickett.
Survivors include her husband,
Dennis Russell Robarts; mother,
Debbie Rickett of Wauchula; two
sons, Joseph Wayne Porter of
Wauchula, and Dennis Russell
Robarts II and wife Summer of
Fernandia Beach; one daughter,
Brooklyn Kristina Porter of
Wauchula; and two grandchil-
dren, Alexandra Robarts and
Dennis Russell Robarts III.
The family will receive friends
on Thursday from 6-8 p.m. at
Robarts Family Garden Chapel,
Wauchula. Services will be held
at 2 p.m. Friday, May 19, in the
sanctuary of the First Baptist
Church of Wauchula with the
Rev. Jim Davis and Dr. James
Miller officiating. Burial will fol-
low in Wauchula Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to the
church of one's choice for the
spreading of the Gospel of Jesus
Christ.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula



Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


rF=


'. .-I


t '
>











Safe Keeping
By Rich Shepard
Emergency Management Director


AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION
Greetings, readers! It seems we are faced with preparing for what looks
to be a busy hurricane season. I am proud to report this year the state
Legislature and Gov. Bush have once again provided for the Hurricane
Preparedness Sales Tax Holiday. A complete list of items can be obtained
by visiting our Web site. Of course, many local vendors will have the list
available when you go to purchase these items.
Hurricane Preparedness Week
The week of May 21-27 has been designated as Hurricane
Preparedness Week. Each day is devoted to focusing on a different hurri-
cane hazard: high wind, flooding, storm surge and tornadoes. Other days
are devoted to hurricane forecasting and hurricane history. In our area, we
are fortunate not to have to plan for storm surge, but the other areas of con-
cern can certainly keep us busy enough. This month's focus will be on the
specific hazards hurricanes pose to our area.
High Winds
The intensity of a landfalling hurricane is expressed in terms of cate-
gories that relate wind speeds and potential damage. According to the
Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, a Category 1 hurricane has lighter winds
compared to storms in higher categories. A Category 4 hurricane would
have winds between 131 and 155 mph and, on the average, would usually
be expected to. cause 100 times the damage of the Category 1 storm.
Depending on circumstances, less intense storms may still be strong enough
to produce damage, particularly in areas that have not prepared in advance.,
Tropical storm-force winds are strong enough to be dangerous to those
caught in them. For this reason, emergency managers plan on having their
evacuations complete and their personnel sheltered before the onset of trop-
ical storm-force winds, not hurricane-force winds.
Hurricane-force winds can easily destroy poorly constructed buildings
and mobile homes. Debris such as signs, roofing material and small items
left outside become flying missiles in hurricanes. Extensive damage to
trees, towers, water and underground utility lines (from uprooted trees), and
fallen poles cause considerable disruption.
The strongest winds usually occur in the right side of the eyewall of the
hurricane. Wind speed usually decreases significantly within 12 hours after
landfall. Nonetheless, winds can stay above hurricane strength well inland.
hurricanee Hugo (1989), for example, battered Charlotte, N.C., (which is


Freda's Foibles
By Freda B. Douglas


This is a work of fiction even your children would like to read, espe-
Cially if they are as fond of animals as I am. This story was written in the
atter part of 1990, and I find this an appropriate time to share it. It will run
h serial form, so look for its continuation in sequential issues of this paper.
AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY
(An American Fable)
Swifty was an industrious rabbit. Always alert to the needs of his com-
munity, he seized every opportunity to make a little dough. When he had
accumulated some capital he secured the advice of his friendly banker, the
squirrel. The squirrel advised him to use his capital to open a general store.
Fe assured Swifty _hat.h.e. would.beufilfing a community need.
SA nd .o Swifty invested if a general store. He developed into a good
manager and his store prospered. He was careful to put some of his earn-
Jngs back into the business. As his enterprise grew, he found he needed
help. He hired Kitty, the cat who had retired from her position in the house
across the street, as his clerk. She knew how to deal with the public, and
soon she was generating enough extra sales that she was more than paying
ler own way.
When John Bull, the farmer from whom Swifty bought his eggs, raised
!is prices more than Swifty liked, Swifty enlarged his business. He built a
ien house and hired a crew of chickens to produce eggs. He paid them a
-niece rate, so that he would not be taking a chance losing money by putting
he hens on salary. He even insisted that the rooster do double duty as ajan-
tor.
For several years things went along smoothly. Swifty was filling an
economic need in the community. He was providing productive employ-
ment and adding to his account in the squirrel's bank. And then he heard
-'rom the government.
It was a sunny day in June when Scotty, a Scottish terrier, walked into
he store and identified himself as an agent of the Department of Revenue.
_-e explainecdthe government had created an income tax, and from now on
Swifty would have to withhold money from his employees' wages, and
send that money to the government. He would also have to pay an income
ax on his profits.
a This forced Swifty to hire Chippy, the chipmunk, as a part-time book-
_eeper. This bothered him because all the other help paid their own way.
Chippy would be non-revenue-producing overhead.
s Now his employees were unhappy because they were not taking home
as much pay. They demanded more wages, and Swifty denied the request-
ed increase. He could not afford to cut into his profits. After all, he, too, was
-ow required to pay taxes out of his profits. The employees argued, but
Swifty held his ground.
The issue did not die. About three months later, Kitty approached
Swifty one morning while he was inspecting the egg production and said,
'Swifty, we can't live on our reduced wages. We must have an increase."
"But you are getting the same wage," Swifty responded. "It's just that
the government is taking some of it away from you. Don't look at me."
Kitty was about to continue the discussion when a customer came into
lie store. She left Swifty, and went behind the counter to help the customer.
All day she thought about the income tax while she went about her duties.
She liked working for Swifty, but with the government taking a bite out of
income she knew she just had to have an increase in pay. She made up her
mund to get the other workers to side with her so they could insist on a pay
-aise from Swifty.
In a few days a bulldog walked into the store, and demanded that
Swifty talk with him. Swifty was working in his office when Kitty stuck her
lead in the door and told him he had a visitor. Swifty left his desk and
walked into the store, where he saw the stranger. He extended his paw and
0aid to the bulldog, "I'm Swifty, the owner. May I help you?
"Yes," the bulldog answered. "I am president of the local labor union.
our employees have asked that our union represent them."
"But they don't need representation," responded Swifty. "I pay my
employees a fair wage and they have good working conditions."
h "Yes, you did pay them a fair wage, but they need an increase to offset
e loss of the tax they are paying the government."
"Can't we talk about this?" Swifty asked.
"Yes," said the bulldog. "I have arranged a meeting tomorrow at 10
clockk in the morning at the Holiday Inn."

Look forward to the next issue. It will take at least two more issues to
reay the whole story. Any comments, nay or yea, are welcome at 773-5764.
ilthe meantime, remember God loves all His creatures.





[]


175 miles inland) with gusts to nearly 100 mph.
The Inland High WindModelcaii be used by emergency managers to
estimate how far inland strong winds extend. The inland wind estimates can
only be made shortly before landfall, when the windfield forecast errors are
relatively small. This information is most useful in the decision-making
process to decide which p'., ple might be most vulnerable to high winds at
inland locations.
Flooding
While storm surge is always a potential threat, more people have died
from inland flooding from 1970 up to 2000. Intense rainfall is not directly
related to the wind speed of tropical cyclones. In fact, some os :. greatest
rainfall amounts occur from weaker storms that drift slowly or stall over an
area.
Inland flooding can be a major threat to communities hundreds of
miles from the coast as intense rain falls from these huge tropical air mass-
es.
In a study from 1970 to 1999, freshwater flooding accounted for more
than half (59 percent) of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths. These floods are why
63 percent of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths during that period occurred in
inland counties.
At least 23 percent of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths occur to people who
drown in, or attempting to abandon, their cars.
Also, 78 percent of children killed by tropical cyclones drowned in
freshwater floods.
So, the next time you hear "hurricane," think inland flooding!
Tornadoes
Hurricanes can also produce tornadoes that add to the storm's destruc-
tive power. Tornadoes are most likely to occur in the right-front quadrant of
the hurricane. However, they are also often found elsewhere, embedded in
the rainbands, well away from the center of the hurricane.
Some hurricanes seem to produce no tornadoes, while others develop
multiple ones. Studies have shown that more than half of the landfalling
hurricanes produce at least one tornado. Hurricane Buelah (1967) spawned
141, according to one study. In general, tornadoes associated with hurri-
canes are less intense than those that occur in the Great Plains. Nonetheless,
the effects of tornadoes, added to the larger area of hurricane-force winds,
can produce substantial damage.
We have no way at present to predict exactly which storms will spawn
tornadoes or where they will touch down. The new Doppler radar systems
have greatly improved the forecaster's warning capability, but the technolo-


I've heard all the rumors, how fees will rise,
accounts will change and the phone will no
longer be answered by a person. Nothing could
be further from the truth. The integration of Big
Lake National Bank and Seacoast National Bank
will be completed on June 5, and is a "win-win"
for Big Lake 'National Bank customers.
The same employees will be servicing you,
service charges will not change and loan-
decisions will still be made locally.
The merger with Seacoast will only
enhance our customers' banking experience.
New services will include free online banking
and bill pay, and a Telephone Banking Center
with extended weekday and Saturday hours
where customers can call and speak with a live
banking representative. Cash management,
marine financing, investment products, trust
and estate planning and annuities are
additional services that will be available to
you. We will have an expanded network with
41 Florida offices for greater convenience. The
automated MoneyPhone, formally known as
BLISS, will also be available 24/7.
Seacoast National Bank is known for
providing big bank services with small bank
attention, which means they are able to provide
a larger variety of financial services often
offered by the large mega-banks, with the
personal service associated with smaller
community banks. It's truly the best of both
worlds for our customers.


May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5A

gy usually provides lead times from only a few minutes up to about 30 min-
utes. Consequently, preparedness is critical.
Tornado Facts
When associated with hurricanes, tornadoes are not usually
accompanied by hail or a lot of lightning, clues that citizens in
other parts of the country watch for.
Tornado production can occur for days after landfall when the
tropical cyclone remnants maintain an identifiable low pressure
circulation.
They can also develop at any time of the day or night during
landfall. However, by 12 hours after landfall, tornadoes tend to
occur mainly during daytime hours.
Personal Preparedness
Discuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know your
home's vulnerability to flooding and wind.
Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each
hurricane hazard. In certain circumstances the safest areas may
not be your home but within your community.
Determine escape routes from your home and places to meet.
These should be measured in tens of miles rather than hundreds
of miles.
Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact, so all your fam-
ily members have a single point of contact.
Make a plan now for what to do with your pets if you need to
evacuate.
Post emergency telephone numbers by your phones and make
sure your children know how and when to call 911.
Check your insurance coverage. Flood damage is not usually
covered by homeowners insurance.
Stock non-perishable emergency supplies and a Disaster
Supply Kit.
Use a NOAA weather radio. Remember to replace its battery
every six months, as you do with your smoke detectors.
Take First Aid, CPR and disaster preparedness classes.
TIP OF THE MONTH
Hardee County Emergency Management is pleased to announce we
have the 2006 version of the "All Hazards Guide." They can be found at
many local restaurants, grocery stores, all county offices, and The Herald-
Advocate. Pick yours up today in English, Spanish or Creole.
Remember, managing your emergencies begins with you!


Seacoast National Bank has a long history of
supporting community events and employee
involvement with charities. Just as you've
always been able to find Big Lake National
Bank employees on hand to help out at
community functions.
Customers will see that only positive
changes are coming their way. More services,
more flexibility, more convenience. And yes,
there will still be a live person answering
the phone.
All of us at Big Lake National Bank and
Seacoast National Bank are excited about
the opportunity to continue serving your
financial needs and look forward to seeing you
in our branches and around town. Just as
before, our bankers' hours don't stop at the
office door. We are committed to serving our
customers now more than ever.
By the way, if you have a question or
concern you'd like to share with us, call your
local Big Lake National Bank office or call me at
863-467-4663. Our lines are open and will
be answered by a live person not a machine.
Thank you for your continued trust.


Regional Presidt


Joe Mullins
lent, Seacoast National Bank.


Seacoast
NATIONAL BANK

LENDMEMBER
NASDAQ: SBCF A subsidiary of Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida
5:18c


PAID ADVERTISEMENT




Rumors vs. Reality:



The Arrival of the



Seacoast National Name


The merger of Big Lake National
Bank and Seacoast National Bank

brings with it a wealth of additional

services and benefits to customers.
Joe Mullins, Big Lake's president
for the past 18 years, knows that

a merger also brings rumors. The
following is an open letter from

Joe to Big Lake National Bank
Customers:


To our customers and the communities we serve,







6A The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
MONTAGE BY DIANE BEATTY


I ,.


Football Takes Spotlight Friday


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's spring and football is in the
air.
That's right, it's time for spring
football. Friday night at 7.30,
Wildcat Stadium is the place to be
for the annual spring classic, this
year against the visiting Lake
Wales Highlanders.
Both teams will try to use as
many players as possible, getting a
look at them in offensive and
defensive positions. In the third
quarter, the junior varsity Wildcats
will take the field.
There are 45 varsity and 42
junior varsity players which have
been spending their afternoons.
since May going through the drills
and scrimmages to prepare them
for this game. After a short break,
summer workouts will resume in
late June.
The final scrimmage was on
Saturday morning (see montage
above).
Many of the players taking the
field on Friday evening will have
familiar names and numbers.


Sign- Ups

Friday, May 19 Saturday, May 20
5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. to 12 noon


Junior High Gym

Ages 7 15

Before Aug. 1, 2005

COST: $50 Registration/FOOTBALL


NOTE: Cheerleaders only time to sign up!
Cost: $25. Registration & $75
Deposit/Cheerleading


0 T*BIG:Cp fbit cr ifia e (otfotp int -CpyoIrprtcad- hsia
Cidmsbepeetare istatonasth byshvetoUM s 5:8


Others will be completely new to
longtime Wildcat fans.
Junior quarterbacks Weston
Palmer and Will Krause will spell
each other. Behind them are run-
ning backs Jimmy Cimeus, Donald
White, Jordan Grimsley, Andrew
Cisneros, Kierre Cook, Jayquan
Gandy, Ricky Wiggins, Erik
Blandin. David Newcomb and
Gerardo Villegaas.
Or, they could throw to wide
receivers Terry Redden, Marwin
Simmons, Trey Small, Lisnell
Youyoute, Yogi Lozano, Josh
Mayer, Steven Narango, Pete Solis,
Jermaine King, Tacory Daniels or
Francisco "Paco" Lozano. The' tight
ends are Johnny Ray Harris, Olnel
Virgile, Dan Timmons, Ian Dur-
rance and Postene Louisjeune.
Back for kicking duties will be
junior Pablo Anselmo, with Krause
probably handling the punting.
Pushing forward, making holes
for runners, will be offensive line-
men Joseph Barton, Briant Shu-
mard, Jason Jester, Logan Thomas,
Jerry Hendry, Jesus Jaimes, Eric
Cobb, Jake "Lance" Benavides,
Reggie Grizzard, Lionel Vasquez,
Jorge Lopez, Alex Lanier, Kyle
Parrish, Haceem Shweil, Daniel
Robinson, Cameron Durham and
Tyrone Pace.
* When the Wildcats go on
defense, the d-backs will be
Cimeus, Simmons, White,
Youyoute, Palmer, Grimsley, Solis,
King and Blandin. In front of them
are linebackers Small, Krause, Yogi
Lozano, Mayer, Naranjo, Shumard,
Cisneros, Daniels, Cook, Wiggins,
Newcomb, Villegas, Barton and
Paco Lozano.


Defensive ends include
Louisjeune, Durrance, Benavides,
Timmons, Virgile and Harris.
Anchoring the defensive line are
Gandy, Jester, Thomas, Hendry,
Jaimes, Cobb, Grizzard, Vasquez,
Lopez, Lanier; Shweil, Robinson,
Durham and Pace.
Directing the Wildcats are sev-
enth-year head coach Derren
Bryan, his well-known assistants
John Sharp, Steve Rewis, Dale
Carlton and Jason Clark, along with
new running backs coach David
Mahoney.
On the sidelines hoping to get
into action in the third quarter will
be the junior varsity players under
their head coach Rod Smith, with
his assistants Barry White, Todd,
Bolin, James Carpenter and Dan
Duke.
Their 42-man roster includes
Tony Martinez, Devan Lampley,'
Ariel Vallejo, Rikki Watts, Adam
Cartwright, Michael Dixon,
Johnathan DeLaRosa, Charlie
Powell, Coty Skinner, Sofio
Arroyo, Arnulfo "Junior" Cortez,
Skyler Alden, Stoney Ortiz, Mike
Torrez, Michael McTaw, Damien
Richard, Jesus Gonzalez, Steven
Rodriguez, Justin Corbin, Jerrod
Hendry and Adrian Barringer.
Also, Chris Rivas, Eddie Hunt,
Ray DeAnda, Jose Garcia, Julian
Garcia, Emilio Batista, Shawn
Brown, Carlos Ramirez, Matt
Crews, Brett Tyson, John Vandiver,
Johnathan Almarez, Josh Rodgers,
Kevin Cochran, Andrew Allison,
Willie Stephens, Jean Frenot, Rico
Rios, Kriss Rossman, Luis
Garduno and Justin Tomlinson.


Don't accept your dog's admiration as conclusive evidence that
you are wonderful.
New York and Vermont lead the United States in maple syrup pro-
duction but the Canadian province of Quebec produces more maple
syrup than all 50 states put together.


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked in
the top 10 in customer satisfaction in Florida
",l f--r I have received Ford's highest Sales Honor
S' 15 years running and been a member of
Ford's 300/500 Club for 20 years. Thanks
again and stop by soon.
*I t S EDEM R Ft. Meade
\ ST 375-2606
:, :: 800-226-3325


Manage Psylla
Populations
to Slow
Spread of Citrus
Greening Disease
Citrus Greening Disease (CGD) is
here to stay A systemic disease that
can kill an infected tree in three to
five years, CGD is proving to be
much more difficult to control than
canker. Symptoms often don't show
up in infected trees for up to three
years. By then, it's too late.
Management of CGD depends on
controlling the insect that spreads
the disease the Asian citrus psyllid.
An Integrated Pest Management
program, including both biological
and chemical controls to keep all
nursery and young trees psyllid-fiee,
is the most effective means for
controlling the pest and limiting
dithe disease's devastation.
It is also important to protect the
mature trees, especially during the
spring and early summer flushes.
Groves should be scouted
regularly, and those where psylla
are present should be treated. For
quick, economical management
of infestations, depend on
Lorsban*-4E insecticide as
part of the treatment rotation.
Foliar-applied at a rate of 5 pts./A,
Lorsban helps keep psylla populations
under control and provides
broad-spectrum protectionagainst
other pests found in graves, including
citrus rust mite, scale, mealybugs,
aphids, whiteflies and fire ants.
Beneficial insects are also important
to psyllid control, and the quick
knockdown action of Lorsban
allows for fast recolonization of
beneficial populations.
For more information on
recommended psyllid treatment
schedules for
management of
CGD, contact
your local county
Extension office.
For additional
information about
Lorsban"-4E
insecticide, see your
local ag retailer.


W Dow AgroSciences


-omirrk ort~wArmoS;6nvreestI.
L.~j,4-4E a a kesekeedU'e I c~id&
Aim i mWA s' edan ho ime aeck-,
www.FarmnSmart.com


5:18c


FINALS

could be the least

of your worries.


If you were sick or injured and didn't have health
A insurance, would you be able to pay your medical bills
B -i and your tuition? See your State Farmt agent today to
_.J find out more about Student Select Insurance though
Assurant Health.

Scott Hardcastle, Agent
105 W. Summit St.
Wauchula, FL 33873
Bus: 863-773-2147

LIKE A GOOD
See a local State Farm agent for more details on NEIGHBOR
coverage, costs, restrictions, and renewability
*Assurant Hcahh products are underwritten ST
and issued by Tine Insurance Company,
Milwaukee, WI, which is financially respon-
sible for these products. No member of the INS
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Company are not affiliates of State Farm.
tState Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Cornpany-Bloomiington, IL
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ft





May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Hardee Wildcat Football
Spring 2006 Roster (Junior Varsity)
Name


NO.
2
4
7
11
12
19
20
21
24
25
27
30
32
36
42
43
45
46
48
49
50

Rod
Dan I


Tony Martinez 55
Devan Lampley 57
Ariel Vallejo 60
Rikki Watts 63
Adam Cartwright 64
Michael Dixon 65
Jonathan DeLarosa 72
Charlie Powell 74
Coty Skinner 75
Sofio Arroyo 76
Junior Cortez 78
Skyler Alden 80
Stoney Ortiz 81
.Mike Torrez 82
Michael McTaw 85
Damien Richard 86
Jesus Gonzalez 87
Steven Rodriguez 88
Justin Corbin 89
Jerrod Hendry 90
Adrian Barringer 99
Coaches


Smith, Barry White, Todd Bolin, James Carpen
Duke. Manager: Rodney Spinks


Li
S1
,


cq wsb'y"v y9mon9
,9fasio Studio
408 cast 9Wlaino &use, lVatAudaa
Lessons, Instruments. Accessories,
Kindermusic, & Piano Tuning
Piano, Violin, Guitar,
all Band Instruments
(863) POP TUNE
9


Chris Rivas
Eddie Hunt
Ray Deanda
Jose Garcia
Julian Garcia
Emilio Batista
Shawn Brown
Carlos Ramirez
Matt Crews
Brett Tyson
John Vandiver
Johnathan Alma
Josh Rodgers
Kevin Cochran
Andrew Allison
Willie Stephens
Jean Frenot
Rico Rios
Kris Rossman
Luis Garduno
Justin Tomlinsor


NO.
1
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
10
11
trez 12
13
14
15
17
19
21
n 24
25
iter, 32
42
43
44
48
50
51
53
54
55
:2c 57
60
63
65
66
68
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V ilU


Sports Sense
& Nonsense
By Joan Seaman -


Hardee Wildcat Football
Spring 2006 Roster (Varsity)
Name Postion
Terry Redden DB/WR
Jimmy Cimeus RB/DB
Marwin Simmons DB/WR
Trey Small WR/OLB
Donald White RB/DB
Lisnell Youyoute WR/DB
Will Krause QB/WR/OLB
Johnny Ray Harris DE/TE
Weston Palmer QB/DB
Jordan Grimsley RB/DB
Yogi Lozano WR/OLB
Josh Mayer WR/OLB
Steven Naranjo WR/OLB
Pete Solis WR/DB
Jermaine King WR/DB
Andrew Cisneros RB/LB
Tacory Daniels WR/LB
Kierre Cook RB/OLB
Olnel Virgile TE/DE
Jayquan Gandy RB/DL
Ricky Wiggins RB/LB
Erik Blandin RB/DB
David Newcomb RB/LB
Gerardo Villegas RB/OLB
Joseph Barton OL/LB
Briant Shumard OLB/OL
Jason Jester OL/DL
Logan Thomas OL/DL
Dan Timmons TE/DE
Jerry Hendry DL/OL
Jesus Jaimes DL/OL
Eric Cobb DUOL
Lance Benavides OL/DE
Reggie Grizzard DL/OL
Lionel Vasquez OL/DL
Jorge Lopez DL/OL
Alex Lanier OL/DL
lan Durrance TE/DE
Kyle Parrish OL
Haceem Shweil OL/DL
Daniel Robinson OI/DL
Cameron Durham OL/DL
Paco Lozano WR/OLB
Pablo Anselmo K
Postene Louisjeune TE/DE
Tyrone Pace OL/DL


SVarsity Coaches
Derren Bryan, head coach; John Sharp, Steve Rewis,
Dale Carlton, Jason Clark and David Mahoney

I Earn A Gold Star!
SCHOOL NEWS DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.


+


l11 AM SAT., MAY 20 ARCADIA, FL. (DESOTO COUNTY)


Located just north of Arcadia, this Southwest
Florida property is ideally positioned near US-17 in
DeSoto County and provides efficient access to
several major metropolitan areas on both coasts of
Florida via State Road 70.

Offered in 18 Parcels

Ranging from

27 to 118 Acres

Great Development Potential *
at Auction Prices

PREVIEW TOMORROW
Preview will be held on site,
Friday, May 12, from 2 PM 6 PM
/


Come one, come all, Wildcat fans are invited to the spring football
game tomorrow (Friday) night at Wildcat Stadium. At 7:30, the Wildcats
will go head to head with the Lake Wales Highlanders with 45 varsity and
42 junior varsity players hoping to get in on the actions. The JVs are slated
to play the third quarter. Come and get your first look at the 2006 Wildcats.
Congratulations are due to a pair of area boxers.
Pro Edner Cherry successfully defended his NABF lightweight cham-
pionship belt with a TKO win over previously unbeaten Monty Meza-Clay.
The referee stopped the bout 23 seconds into the 11th round when Cherry
scored over 10 blows without an answer from his 25-year-old opponent,
who lost for the first time in his five-year, 21-bout career.
Daniel Lozano, an experienced 16-year-old amateur, once again won
the state Junior Olympics title, this time at 106 pounds. He will box in the
regionals on June 9-11 at Royal Palm Beach and hope to return to the
nationals and repeat as champion there. Lozano is aiming to participate in
the 2008 Olympics.
Golfers, please note that the Frank Zajicek benefit golf tournament has
been changed from this weekend to June 10. The United Methodist Church
offers this fund-raiser tourney each year, with proceeds benefiting the
Zajicek mission work. For more information on the four-person team
scramble which has a shotgun start, call Torrey Oaks at 767-0302. Hurry,
the deadline for signup is June 7, unless the field is filled before then as it
usually is.
There's a whole host of athletic opportunities for kids of all ages. An
article on the skills challenge Saturday, swimming, basketball, volleyball,
tennis, bowling, flag football, soccer and what not is elsewhere in this issue.
Some of the local high school athletes will also go to basketball or
other sport camps this summer. Arnold Louis and Mark St. Fort will have
the unique opportunity to play for the Team Florida 17-and-under hoop
squad. At least four girls are playing on summer area softball teams.
Information from community and school athletic events is always welcome.
Please call The Herald-Advocate (773-3255) or e-mail me at news.heral-
dadvocate@earthlink.net with news for this biweekly column. The sports
news deadline is noon Mondays. News will be included as soon as time and
space allows.
March was the first month of the ancient Roman calendar. Julius
Caesar moved the year's beginning to January.

Soft Serve Ice Cream
Buv 1-Getl FREE
SNO-KONES

Buy 1- Get 1 FREE Good
Staton's Video & Game Room thru
Bowling Green 375-4422 s:18oc







8A The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


Annual Banquet Honors Graduates


By LAUREN RAULERSON
For The Herald-Advocate
Sixty seniors from the Class of
2006 were recognized at this year's
Senior Honors Banquet.
The banquet was held at the
Agri-Civic Center on Tuesday
night, May 2. The seniors were
feted following a brief ceremony
honoring Dr. Sylvia McDonald
Collins, who was inducted into the
Hardee County Schools Hall of
Fame.
Principal Mike Wilkinson, assis-
tant principals Marsha Timmerman
and Bill Robinson and teacher
Linda Smith called out the gradu-
ates' names and noted their
achievements.


The graduates and their parents
were treated to a turkey dinner.
Members of the National Honor
Society served at the banquet.
Hardee Senior High School's Air
Force Junior Reserve Officer
Training Corps presented the colors
and led the group in the Pledge of
Allegiance.
The vice-chair of the Hardee
County School Board, Joe Jones,
led the invocation, and Hardee
County Teacher of the Year, Phil
Rasmussen, of Bowling Green
Elementary School, provided a few
encouraging words to the gradu-
ates.
Honored graduates included
Robert Abbott, Jenna Andrews,
John-Paul Barton, James Basey,


JL


Alice Belonares, Jarrett Benavides,
Haley B'itt, Christie Burrus,
Brandy C stleberry, Angel Crews,
Kimberly Cummins, Maricela De-
Santiago, Rebecca Durrance, Justin
English, Robert Estes, Amanda
Farmer, Sabrina Freeman, Martin
Gainous, Marcus Garza, Micaela
Hall, Santresa Harris, Adan Hem-
andez and Gloria Hernandez.

Also honored were graduates
Raquel Herrera, Thomas Hildreth,
Brett Jarnagin, Jeremy Kelly, Sara
Kershner, Anthony Lecocq, Jean-
nette Lopez, Vaillajon LouisJeune,
Re kah, Mahoney, Karrissa Man-
chester, Brenton McClenithan,
Micl ael Minegar, Daniel Moore,
Logan Nickerson, Walter Olliff,


Hardee County Teacher of the Year Phil Rasmussen was the
guest speaker at the banquet, and encouraged the graduates.
He is pictured here with his wife, Sonya.


PHO TOS BY LAUREN RAULERSON
Hardee Senior High School acknowledged the achievement of a number of 12th-grade students at its annual Senior Honors


COURTESY PHOTO
Chairpersons Debra Rutledge and Rita Youngman plan activities-
for the camp with Debbie Corder, the Florida Heartland Heritage':
Foundation special events coordinator.

Outdoor Drama To Sponsor

Summer Camp At SFCC


Students who were honored at the banquet are pictured on the bridge which was recently used as a prom decoration.


Before the Senior Honors Banquet, Dr. Sylvia Collins was inducted into the Hardee County
Schools Hall of Fame. She is pictured here with her family: (from left) son-in-law Peter Preston,
daughter Candace Preston, the honoree, son Robert Earl Collins and daughter-in-law Martha Ree
Collins.


Letter To The Editor

Low Income Seniors Need

Added Homestead Tax Break


Dear Editor,
The Tampa Tribune had a piece
on the front page Friday, May 5, on
the state legislature passing a bill
on property taxes of people over 65
to get another $25,000 homestead
exemption.
Ha, ha. We haven't got the first
one yet or rather just $10,000 of it.
Our county commissioners are still
dragging their feet and want us to
be the 1900s county instead of
2000 century.
I have not fought with them
because I got no help last time from


anybody. Every senior wants it, but
nobody wants to help get it. The
commissioners only see their name
on the ballot, not what's on it and
passes by the voters, so it comes up
again on the ballot and if it passes it
will not do any good, for you will
not fight for what you vote for and
nobody is going to profit from it
themself.
This is there backwards way of
keeping you broke in taxes.
Edward L. Farmer Sr.
Bowling Green
Editor's Note: The Tribune report-


ed "the Florida Legislature passed a
resolution that would allow an
additional $25,000 homestead
property tax exemption for people
65 and older. The proposal will go
on the ballot this fall as an amend-
ment to the Florida Constitution,
with voters having the final say.
Current law grants a $25,000
homestead tax exemption to all
Florida residents, with an option for
counties to increase the exemption
to $50,000 for seniors with an
income that does not exceed
$20,000 adjusted annual for infla-
tion. The new proposal would
allow counties to add another
$25,000 to the exemption for
seniors, for a total of up to
$75,000."


THURSDAY, MAY 18
VHardee County Commis-
sion, regular meeting, Room
102, Courthouse Annex I, 412
W. Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.

TUESDAY, MAY 23
VHardee County Players,
youth auditions, Wauchula City
Hall Auditorium, 225 E. Main St.,
6 p.m.

THURSDAY. MAY 25
VHardee. County School
Board, regular meeting, Junior
High Media Center, 200 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.
V/Hardee County Players,
youth auditions, 6 p.m., plan-
ning for next season and board
elections, 7 p.m., Wauchula City
Hall Auditorium, 225 E. Main St.

ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate
welcomes letters to the edi-
tor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be
brief, and must be written in
good taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be
received by 5 p.m. on
Monday to be considered
for that week's edition.
Submissions should be
typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P0. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


Chris Parsons, artistic consultant
of Florida Heartland Heritage
Foundation, announced this week
the' Florida outdoordrama'comp'any,
will sponsor a theatre arts camp this..'
summer to be held at South Florida,
Community College campus in
Lake Placid from June 19 through
June 30.
"As the FLORIDA! outdoor
drama moves toward its inaugural
season," said Parsons. "We will be
having many distinguished perfor-
mance artists and technicians,
craftspersons and design specialists
becoming available in our county.
The board of directors felt that
sponsoring a camp would be a good
educational use of these talented
individuals," he concluded.
The two-week program will be
open to those of middle school,
high school and college ages and
will offer sessions on acting, direct-
ing, music, dance, voice/speech,
sound, lighting, costuming, stage
combat, set building, scene painting
and makeup. Students also will
have outstanding recreational and
educational opportunities, includ-
ing a swim- party, an archaeology
dig, a backstage tour of Highlands
Little Theatre, and picnics.
Two prominent Lake Placid busi-
ness women volunteered to serve as
chairwomen of the camp: Debra
Rutledge, former owner of Hair
Works, and Rita Youngman, realtor
from Coldwell Banker Highlands
Properties.
"The SFCC campus in Lake
Placid offers a wonderful facility
for the camp," said Youngman, who
met last Thursday with Randy
Paeplow, LP Center director, to
finalize details. "There is a fine
dance studio, a computer lab, plen-


teous classrooms, an ampi-the-
atre/choral arena for our vocal and
acting practices and plenty of out-
door space," she added. "And the
staff is so cooperative!"
Students will have a choice of siy,
of 12 theatre programs and will'
work as teams to produce a short,
one-act play at the end of the two
weeks. They will showcase their
skills in a final presentation on
Friday, June 30, at 7 p.m. at the col-'
lege. The performance is free of
charge and open to the public.
Debra Rutledge, who is arranging
for student meals, among othei.
duties, said, "Our lunches will b6
favorite meals of young people,
such as pizza and chicken nuggets',
and will be included in the cost of
the camp."
The camp fee will also include
two field trips. One June 22, stu-
dents will be transported to
Highlands Little Theatre where
executive director Vanessa Logsdon
will conduct a unique backstage
tour. On June 29, Anne Reynolds,
outdoor drama board member and
former president of Kissimmee
Valley Archaeological and
Historical Conservancy, will coor-
dinate a session on early Florida
history and an archaeology dig on
the prominent Blueberry site adja-
cent to the outdoor drama site.
Fee for the two-week camp ,is
$295, which includes sessions,
lunches, snacks, field trips, and
materials. Camp runs daily,
Monday through Friday, from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. Registration began
April 24 and will continue until the
sixty students slots are filled.
To register, call (863) 465-3994
or write 950 County Road 29, Lake
Placid, Fl 33852.


CandaceS a Prstnga4
,4ttor a. ay-andonerat a w




Wacufa afrd a3a73


Kimberly Patarini, Bobbi Pelham,
Jara Pella, Sonia Perez, Chelsea
Price, Michael Prine, Evelyn
Reyes, Ryan Roehm, Amy Rojas
and Jose Salvador.
Graduates recognized also
included Dominique Sanchez,
Jessie Sanders, Kevin Sanders,
Randi Sasser, William Shackelford,
Stephanie Steger, Courtney
Thomas, Jennifer Trammell, Kara
Ward, Jessica Weed and Amber
Wilkerson.
By the ending of the evening,
graduates had received recognition
for their grade-point averages, a
dinner, and many words of wisdom
to guide them in the next chapter of
their lives.






May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 9A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 252006CP00003A
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DENNIS LAMAR ALBRITTON,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate of,
DENNIS LAMAR ALBRITTON,
deceased, file number
252006CP00003A Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which Is P.O. Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, Florida 33873. The name
and address of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that chal-
lenge the validity of the will, the qual-
ifications of the personal representa-
tive, venue, or jurisdiction of this
Court are required to file their
objections with the Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
ALL creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this notice is
served within three months after the
date of the first publication of this
notice must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with the
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is May 18, 2006.
Personal Representative:
DAVID ALBRITTON
907 Seminole Avenue
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-4174
Attorney for Personal Representative:
JAMES W. KELLY
14 South Lake Avenue
Avon Park, Florida 33825
(863) 453-7509
Florida Bar Number: 206237
5:18,25c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 252006DR000235


Cynthia Ann Trevino
Petitioner,
and
Noah Anthony Trevino,
Respondent,


NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
To: Noah Anthony Trevino, 704 E.
Palmetto St., Wauchula, FL 33873
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Cynthia A. Trevino, whose address is
704 E. Palmetto, St., Wauchula, FL
33873, on or before June 16, 2006,
and file the original with the clerk of
this Court at 417 W. Main St.,
Wauchula, FL 33873, before service
on Petitioner or immediately there-
after. If you fail to do so, a default may
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in toe petition.
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of your
current address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclosure
of documents and information.
Failure to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or striking
of pleadings.
DATED May 11, 2006.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
5:18-6:8p
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 25-2006-CA-000113

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
RURAL HOUSING SERVICE,
USDA, f/k/a FARMERS
HOME ADMINISTRATION,
Plaintiff,
v.
BERNICE WHITE; ._, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BERNICE WHITE; THE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANTEES,
DEVISEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES,
AND CREDITORS OF KATIE KING,
DECEASED, AND ALL CLAIMANTS,
PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL
O cJDRPORATE, AND WHOSE
EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS
UNKNOWN, CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
KATIE KING, DECEASED, OR ANY OF
THE HEREIN NAMED OR
DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS OR PAR-
TIES CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN AND
TO THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED; ELIZABETH REED; _
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ELIZABETH
REED; BERTHA JONES; _
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BERTHA
JONES; BETTY SELLINGG_


UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BETTY
SELLING; HENRY MCIVERY;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HENRY
MCIVERY; JEROME V. SELLING;
RALPH W. SELLING; and all
unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the herein
named Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties claim as heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
llenors, creditors, trustees, spouses,
or other claimants; TENANT #1
and/or TENANT #2, the parties
Intended to account for the person
or persons In possession; CAPITAL
RESOURCE GROUP, LLC.
Defendants. /

NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RALPH W. SELLING, and all
unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the above
named Defendant, who Is not known
to be dead or alive, whether said
unknown parties claim as heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses,
or other claimants Current Residence
Unknown, but whose last known
addresses were: 714 Palmetto Street,
Bowling Green, FL 33834 and 5030
Appleville Street, Memphis, TN
38109.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property In HARDEE County,
Florida, to-wit:
LOTS 11, 12 AND 13 OF
BLOCK 2 OF THE LEWIS. &
BALDWIN ADDITION TO THE
TOWN OF BOWLING GREEN,
FLORIDA, AS PER PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGES 2-40
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on DOU-
GLAS C. ZAHM, PA., Plaintiff's attor-
ney, whose address Is 18830 U.S.
Highway 19 North, Suite 300,
Clearwater, Florida 33764, on or
before June 9, 2006 or within thirty
(30) days after the first publication of
this Notice of Action, and file the orig-
Inal with the Clerk of this Court at P.O.
Drawer 1749, Wauchula, FL 33873,
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the
Court on this 5 day of May, 2006.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
5:11-18c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 252006CA000236

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
$1860.00 U.S. CURRENCY /


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CALVIN GENE MARTIN AND
ALL OTHERS CLAIMING AN INTER-
EST IN OR TO THE PROPERTY
DESCRIBED BELOW.


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for forfeiture of the following-
described personal property In
Hardee County, Florida:

$1860.00 U.S. CURRENCY

has been filed against you by peti-
tioner, THE CITY OF WAUCHULA,
FLORIDA, POLICE DEPARTMENT, and
you are required 'to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, on
Kenneth B. Evers, Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address is Post
Office Drawer 1308, Wauchula,
Florida 33873-1308, on or before June
9, 2006, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on Petitioner's Attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.

Dated on May 9, 2006.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
5:11-6:1c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR THE COUNTY OF HARDEE
STATE OF FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 252006000165
DIVISION:
JUDGE: ROBERT L. DOYEL

IN RE: FORFEITURE OF
1994 SATURN SL SEDAN
4 DOOR (MAROON)
VIN: 1G8ZF5595RZ185045 /

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
PROCEEDINGS
TO ANY AND ALL PERSONS WHO
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE FOL-
LOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY:

1994 SATURN SL SEDAN
4 DOOR (MAROON)
VIN: 1G8ZF5595RZ185045

NOTICE IS given pursuant to
Sections 932.701 through 932.707,
Florida Statutes (2005), that the
Petitioner, Florida Department of
Highway Safety Motor Vehicles,
through its division, the Florida
Highway Patrol, seized the above-
described property on or about
February 15, 2006, in Hardee County
Florida, and is holding the property
pending the outcome of forfeiture
proceedings. All persons or .entitles
who have a legal Interest in the sub-
ject property may request a hearing
concerning the seized property by
contacting Robert Dietz, Assistant
Attorney General, Office of the
Attorney General, 501 East Kennedy
Boulevard, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL
33602. A Petition for Forfeiture has
been filed in the above-styled Court.
On April 26, 2006, the trial court
entered an Order Finding Probable
Cause. If there Is no response by
Claimants, Petitioner will seek a Final
Order of Forfeiture. 5:18,25c


Inside Out

By Chip Ballard


CUSTOMER DIS-SERVICE
On April 20 I published an account of an hour-long wait in the
"express" lane at Wal-Mart, with only three buggies ahead of me. For the
harrowing details of that nightmarish ordeal, you will have to go back and
read that column, for space doesn't allow a recap.
A week after the column appeared, I went back to Wal-Mart (by neces-
sity, not choice) and noticed the sign above the express lane register had
been changed from "10 Item Maximum" to 20-item max. The week after
that, a strip of white tape'had crossed out the 20-item max, meaning, I
assume, there is no limit to the number of items you can check out in the
express lane, which was true all along.
But now, let's shift our attention to the Customer Service counter.
The counter is plenty large enough for four people to maneuver com-
fortably, but usually there is only one person working it. There are two reg-
isters, one with a scale for weighing produce, which seems strange as the
main purpose of Customer Service, I thought, was for people to return or
exchange items, not check out.
Last Saturday I was working on a project that required the use of
Memorex Slim Jewel CD cases. These come in cartons of 50: red, blue, yel-
low, purple and green, 10 of each color. Of the 10 or 15 I used, only two
snapped shut as they are supposed to do. The others just hung loose, allow-
ing the CD to fall out on the floor.
As I have used hundreds of these CD cases and never had this problem
before (oh, maybe one or two out of 50 won't work right, but that isn't bad),
I figured I must,ve gotten a bad batch. And I decided to go exchange it. Bad
idea.
The store was crowded and, as usual, there was one person manning
the Customer Service counter. I counted eight people standing in line.
When my turn came 30 minutes later I explained about the defective
CD jackets to a young associate, who glanced at the long line behind me,
cringed, and sent me for another carton.
When I returned, three minutes later, the line was longer than the first
time I'd gotten in it. Again, I had to go to the back of the line. I wasn't over-
joyed about this and said so to no one in particular, but loud enough for
everyone anywhere nearby to hear. They were deeply distressed at my
predicament, but obviously too shy to acknowledge my grief or offer to let
me up front, for none did.
So, again, I waited. And waited. And waited. Forty minutes later I
finally stood before the register, again, and the young associate who was
looking more frazzled by the minute. "Can I help you?" she asked. "I hope
so," I said, and showed her my new carton of CD cases.
"Oh, yeah," she said, popping her gum. "Listen, there are 11 cases
missing out of that carton you brought back. Where are they?"
"In my garbage can at home. I told you, they wouldn't snap shut. They
*were no good."
She reached in\her purse and pulled out a knife. I backed off fast, but
instead of attacking me she slit open the top of my new carton and started
picking out the CD cases.
"What are you doing?"
"Taking out 11 for the ones you didn't return."
"But they're in the garbage, where they belong. You want me to go get
'em?"
She shrugged. "If you want to stand in line again, go ahead."
"Couldn't you just let me back up front, since I've already stood in line
twice?'
She shook her head. "Company policy doesn't allow it."
She smirked and picked out some more CD cases.
"You're getting all the red ones!"
She gave me an evil eye, huffed and puffed, and stomped off. Moans
and groans rose from the long line behind me. I dared not look back, for
fear of getting hit in the face with a flying object. The associate came hur-
rying back with a chubby, stern-looking young man who didn't look old
enough to shave. He came straight to me and said in a voice I guess he


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thought was intimidating, "What's the problem?"
I was quiet a moment to give him time to let him think he'd scared me.
In that moment I heard a soft popping sound, and realized the young man
had emitted a very unpleasant odor. I took a step back, and said, "The prob-
lem is, sir, you need more people working this Courtesy Counter. Look at
that line. It's a disgrace." I glanced back at the 12 or 13 people standing in
line. "All I want is to exchange this carton of defective CD cases for anoth-
er one."
"What's wrong with those?"
"They're defective. Most of thorn won't snap shut. I've used hundreds
of these things and I've never had this problem. This is a bad batch."
"Where are the ones that are missing?"
"They're in my garbage can at home."
"Want to go get them?"
"And wait in that &%$#! line again?"
"Please, sir. Language."
"But I don't want to have to wait in that %$#%& line three times!"
"Company policy," he said. "We can't replace the ones you didn't
bring back."
"Why not?"
"How do we know they were bad, that this isn't a scam?"
I looked at my watch. "Listen," I said, "it's Saturday morning, and I've
been in this store for two hours. Do you think I'd waste all that time, go to
all this trouble and put up with such aggravation to beat Wal-Mart out of a
few lousy slim-jim CD cases?"
He smirked. "One never knows what one might do, does one?"
Now I was being accused of potential theft. I took out my wallet and
gave him some money. "Your associate took out all the red ones," I said.
"Put them back. I want them all. I'll pay for them."
He rang up the sale, handed me my receipt, and almost smiled. As I
walked toward the door, he said, "Hey, what about these you brought
back?"
I stopped and looked at him. His smooth pale cheeks were shiny in the
overhead light. I couldn't help but wonder if he really did shave. I said, "Put
them back on the shelf and resell them. A penny pinched is a penny earned."
I glanced at the long line of miserable faces behind him.
On impulse, I pointed to the Customer Service sign. "Oh, by the way,
sir, either you change that Customer Service sign to Customer Disservice,
or I'm going to sue you for fraud, false advertising, misleading the public,
scrofulous facades, meretricious mediocrity, malicious malfeasance, and
frivolous flatulence."
I think the last word registered. His smugness evaporated and his pale
cheeks burned bright red. Maybe my Saturday morning wasn't a total
waste, after all.




Northside Baptist Church

invites you to

come hear




Warren Elliott



Sunday, May 21

11 a.m. & 6p.m.


Dinner on the grounds following morning service ~
912 N. 8th Ave., Wauchula 773-6947
5:18c







10A The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


COOPERATIVE 'CATS


Athlete


s Have


COURTESY PHOTO
Junior high and elementary school students recently worked together in a joint venture to write and illustrate a variety of books.
Students in Dana Conley's class at Hardee Junior High visited youngsters in Sherri Kouns' class at Wauchula Elementary for a few
minutes each day over a period of three weeks. In all, the-teams composed seven books. Each group read and showed its book
to the others. The teachers celebrated the team effort's success with a small party on April 28.


The cadets dressed in full uniform for the event. Many received promotions as well as national and local awards.


JROTC Finishes Year



With Awards Banquet

By hUREN RAULERSON awards banquet on Tuesday, May 9. Spencer Lofton led the cadet this
For T Herald-Advocate Many cadets were rewarded for year in teaching them these virtues.
Hardee Senior High School's their dedication and achievement. Tuesday night's banquet was
Junior Reserve Officer Training This school year was the first done by military protocol. At the
Corps (JROTC) program finished year Hardee Senior High had a beginning of the banquet the colors
its first year with several awards JROTC program. The program's were presented, cadets led the
and promotions. purpose is "to instill Americanism guests in the Pledge of Allegiance
The JROTC had its second and leadership in youth." Staff Sgt. and chaplain Capt. Maia Faulk


PHOTOS BY LAUREN RAULERSON
Many guests attended the U.S. Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) awards
banquet May 9, including military officers, county commissioners and School Board members.
Guests included (from left) retired Capt. Louis J. Brough of the USAF, Hardee Senior High School
Principal Mike Wilkinson, retired Col. Roy P Whitton of the USAF, Schools Superintendent Dennis
Jones, Staff Sgt./Instructor Spencer Lofton, and Sgt. Gregory Williams of the Florida Army
National Guard.




Special- Opportunity Hunt


Deadline Is June 14


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
will accept applications May 9 -
June 14 for 2006-07 special-oppor-
tunity deer, hog and released quail
hunts.
Applying for these unique hunts
is automated through FWC's Total
Licensing System. To apply for
these permits, visit any license
agent or tax collector's office of


submit an application at
MyFWC.com. Applications will be
available beginning April 20 from
FWC regional offices and at
MyFWC. com.
Special-opportunity hunts offer
hunters vast areas, abundant game,
low hunter quotas and excellent
chances to bag quality deer, hogs
and released quail on select wildlife
management areas throughout


The Romans wrote all numbers using some combination of only
seven symbols: I for 1, V for 5, X for 10, L for 50, C for 100, D for 500
and M for 1,000., .


Florida.
Based on past years, demand for
these hunts is greater than the num-
ber of available slots, so a random
drawing is conducted to select
hunters. Hunters can improve their
chances of being selected by sub-
mitting as many non-refundable $5
applications as they want. The cost
of the hunts for selected applicants
ranges from $50 to $175.
Visit MyFWC.com/hunting for
more information on how to apply
for special-opportunity hunt per-
mits.


blessed the food. Before dinner was
served, a ceremony to honor sol-
diers who are missing in action and
prisoners of war was conducted.
After the ceremony, the dreaded
"grog" was brought out as punish-
ment for those breaking military
protocol. The grog is a semi-liquid
fluid mixed up of unknown food
which cadets are forced to drink if
they break the rules.
Toasts were then made to the dif-
ferent areas of the military and to
the leaders of America. After the
toasts, the guests were served a
chicken dinner.
Those who attended the banquet
were cadets and their parents, coun-
ty commissioners, School Board
members, school administrators,
Superintendent Dennis Jones, Sgt.
Gregory Williams of the Florida
Army National: Guard, Capt. Louis,
J. Brough, who is retired from the
Air Force, and several veterans.
Guest speakers included Col.
Roy P. Whitton, who retired from
the United States Air Force, and
Hardee Senior High. School
Principal Mike Wilkinson.
Whitton spoke of the origin of
the JROTC program and its pur-
pose, and thanked as well as com-
mended Lofton for a job well done.
Wilkinson expressed the pride he
had in the cadets and described the
change the program has brought to
many students. "It's one of the best
steps we've taken at Hardee High
in a long time." He also was proud
to see those who had "found them-
selves through the military pro-
gram" and have "developed into
leaders." He thanked Lofton as well
for taking on the job of two indi-
viduals.
After the guest speakers finished
and the food had been devoured,
the awards ceremony began.
Lofton introduced the award pre-
senters and described the qualifica-
tions for each award. Colonel
Elmer Sanchez received the highest
award of the evening.
National awards, which are
given to cadets across the country,
were presented and local awards
followed.
After the awards were presented,
a change of command ceremony
took place. Kelli Johnston replaced
Ryan Abbott as commander, the
highest post of the unit, during the
ceremony.
The seniors were then honored to
finish the evening's events. When
asked how he felt the first year of
the JROTC program went, Lofton
says the community support was
outstanding but he hopes for more
school support next year. He says
the best part of the year was seeing
the change in the kids.
The future of the JROTC pro-
gram is nothing but bright. Lack of
interest by the students is definitely
not a problem. The program has
built upstanding individuals and
helped others find the right path to
a bright future successfully fulfill-
ing its purpose, Lofton concluded.


Busy Summer
By JOAN SEAMAN p.m. daily and volleyball
Of The Herald-Advocate June 12 through July 20.
For area youth interested in A volleyball camp will
sports it could be a very fun sum- held at South Florida Com
mer. College Gym in July. Th
On tap in various forms are grade camp is July 17-18 an
swimming, bowling, tennis, volley- $50. It includes morning am
ball, basketball, soccer, flag foot- noon drills and instruction..
ball, cheer camp and several others. There are also three-day
for older girls, each costi
SKILLS CHALLENGE Seventh and eighth graders
First on the agenda is Saturday's 19-21, ninth and 10th grad
Hardee County Youth Sports Skills 24-26 and 11-12th graders
Challenge to which boys and girls (evening) and July 27-28 (c
from 4 to 15 (using April 30 as the For more information, or
age cutoff date) are invited. Cost is ister, call college coach (and
$10 per entry. Lady Wildcat) Kim Craw
For the teens, ages 13-15, regis- 773-2252, ext. 7037.
tration is at 3:30 at Farr Field off
South Florida Avenue. Competition BOWLING
begins at 4 p.m. Bowl-Of-Fun Lanes on
Those between four and 12 will South will start its summe:
register at 5:30 p.m. at the George for youth on June 1 with
Heine Jr. Park behind (west) of Farr Junior League bowlers ages
Field. Competition begins at 6 p.m. There will be free bowling f
Winners in each category and age mer leaguers on Frida
divisions 4-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and Saturdays, starting June 2.
13-15 will receive awards. u Beginning June 5, the
junior league (ages 12 an
SWIMMING and mixed singles league st
Registration for summer swim June 6, there is the Tuesday
lessons were last weekend and Minor leagues (two adu]
tomorrow (Friday) from 4 to 8 p.m. children). And, on June
at the Recreation Complex pool Wednesday Casino and C
just north of the high school off leagues start.
Altman Road. Children 18 months For more information
and up to 16 can receive instruction and schedules, contact the
for $45 per session. Sessions are 9 alley at 773-6391.
to 10 a.m. June 5-16; 10 to 11 a.m.
June 19-30; and July 3-14 11 a.m. YMCA CAMPS
to noon. The Young Men's C
For recreational swimming, each Association, most often ca
pool session is $2. The pool will be Y, will have three specific
open for swimming on Saturdays 1 addition to its summer-lot
to 5 p.m., Sundays 2 to 5 p.m.; for children of its member
Wednesday 1 to 3 p.m. and/or 3 to May 25-Aug. 8.
5 p.m; and Mondays, Tuesdays, Soccer camp will be fro
Thursday and Fridays from 1 to 3, 11 a.m. on Monday
3 to 5, or 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday from June
behind the old Hardee Jun
BASKETBALL/VOLLEYBALL School. Flag football
There will be summer youth Tuesdays and Thursdays fr
camps May 30 to June 2 for both 11 a.m. June 6 to 29, alsc
girls basketball and volleyball. the old junior high. The
Cost is $30 for one, $50 for both., weeklong cheer camp Jui
Camp is for girls going into third from 9 to 11 a.m. at the
through ninth grade. Basketball studio.
will be from 8 a.m. until noon and For 'more information,
volleyball from 1 to 5 p.m. Camp the Y at 610 W. Ora
applications are at the schools or Wauchula or call 773-6445
call coach Ken Leupold at 773-
3249 or 773-3181 for more infor- TENNIS
mation. Last but not least i
High school volleyball tryouts lessons for boys and gil
will start on 8 a.m. on Monday July into second grade throu
31, with three sessions that day. school. Lessons are June 19
Players must have parent permis- Monday through T
sion forms, physical and proof of Beginners are 8 to 9 a.m.,
insurance to participate. diate and advanced 9
The high school gym will be Private lessons can
open to all girls for strength train- arranged. Registration will
ing and conditioning from 4 to 6 tenniscourts on West Oak


Youth Theater
Holds Auditions
The Hardee County Players,
Inc., Youth Theater is holding
auditions on Tuesday, May 23
and Thursday, May 25 at 6 p.m.
at the Wauchula City Hall
Auditorium at 225 E. Main St.
Those interested must be
between the ages of 8 and 18
by August 2006 and must have
a parent or guardian with them
at the audition.
Participation fees for the
Youth Theater are $25 and are
due by the first week of
rehearsals, Aug. 7. Perform-
ances are scheduled for the
weekend of September 29, 30
and October 1. If you are inter-
ested in the Youth Theater or
becoming a member of the
Hardee County players, please
call 767-1220.

Health Dept.
Hosts Blood Drive
The Hardee County Health
Department is hosting a blood
drive on Friday, May 26 from 9
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Health
Department employee parking
lot, at 115 K.D. Revell Road, off
U.S. 17 North, Wauchula. A free
T-shirt will be given to every reg-
istered blood donor.
The Health Department
encourages people to come to
help raise the Hardee County
blood supply inventory to a safe
level. The Blood Net USA
Bloodmobile will be on site to
give free physical to those who
wish to participate. For more
information, contact the Health
Department at 773-4161.

I once had a sparrow alight
upon my shoulder for a moment,
while I was hoeing in a village
garden, and I felt that I was
more distinguished by that cir-
cumstance than I should have
been by any epaulet I could
have worn.


waucnula, on June 19. 1
information, call Jonathan
at 773-3249 or 245-4175.


1 canm

also be;
nmunifty
e sixth-
nd costs-
nd after-

y camps
ng $7,
are July',
ers July;'
July 3
lays). ;
r to reg-1
d former
ford at


U.S. 1
r league
h Mixed'
6 to I:
for sur-\
ys artd'

Monday
d older)'
arts. On
y Major-3
Its, t\w.,
7, tie'
oloraraA

on costs'
bowling;


:hristianr
called tlie
camps.r -,
ng carqn
ers from

om 0ltcc
ys acdd
5 to 2g
ior HIgh
will be
om lOto*
o behind
ere is '
ne 19-2
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, contact
nge St.,
5.

s tennis
rls gomi

9-Jul
'hurs .
internld-
to nodd.
also b'e
1 be at the
: Street ini
For more
LeupqlOi
4.j


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E HERALD-ADVOCATE

irdee's County s Hometown Coverage
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erald oce also offers a complete selection"
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Always A W

A. ,Home At Sch

Wherever


C-
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V


welcome Sight

ool Otnacation

You Are!





12A The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


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The Herald-Advocate
_ _ __'_,. (USPS 578-780) .
' Thursday, May 18, 2006
e., ,
., ..i


PAGE ONE


Lozano Wins 3 More


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
He added the third title belt on
Friday night.
Bowling Green's Daniel Lozano
continues to pile up championship
belts, along the way increasing his
amateur record to 55-8.
The 16-year-old son of Daniel
and Sylvia Lozano won the state
Junior Olympics 106-pound title on
Friday night, the third victory since
he moved up to the 106-pound
division.
He will represent Florida in the
regional Junior Olympics at Royal
Palm Beach June 9-11, expecting to
return to nationals in July. He is last
year's national champion at 101.
In late 2005, he was supposed to
fight at 101 but had no opponent at


that weight level. Rather than take a
walkover win, Lozano chose to
move up to the 106-pound division
and took a unanimous 5-0 decision
over Dan Bernal.
His recent string of title belts
began nearly a year ago in Plant
City when he took a 5-0 decision
from Dave Hamby.
In April, Lozano traveled to
Washington, D.C. for a match-up
against another national champion
Kevin Rivers in a show bout in
Rivers' hometown. Lozano took the
decision in the three-round bout.
In Friday's bout, Lozano was
fighting another hometown
favorite, a boy named Brian from
Orlando. Lozano claimed another
unanimous decision.
When the Junior Olympics


championships are over, Lozano
plans to petition the national PAL
(Police Athletic League) for per-
mission to move up to the-open
division in September or October
when their bouts start, rather than
waiting for his 17th birthday in
November.
The open division is for amateur
boxers ages 17 to 34. Lozano wants
to move up now so he can try to
qualify for the 2008 Olympics.
The 10th grader said Monday
that first he thanks God for his abil-
ity and strength, then he thanks his
parents and the many sponsors who
have made it possible for him to
travel to get to all his bouts, some
as far away as Michigan.
Come June, it could be time for
yet another championship belt.


PHOTOS BY MICHAEL KELLY
Surrounded by boxing officials, Wauchula's Edner Cherry displays his three lightweight champi-
onship belts, from the World Boxing Council, North American Boxing Federation and National
Boxing Association.


Cherry Keeps Title Belt


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There was two years difference
in their ages and six inches differ-
ence in their heights.
Wauchula boxer Edner Cherry
successfully defended two of his
three championship belts Friday
night in an 11th-round TKO (techn-
cal knockout) of previously unbeat-
en Monty Meza-Clay.
Cherry mixed it up for 10 rounds
of the scheduled 12-round title bout
before coming out in the 11th with
a series of unanswered blows
which caused the referee to stop the
bout just 23 seconds into the round.
Meza-Clay, who has been fight-
ing up and down, from 130 to 140
pounds, had trouble making 130
andcame in.at 133. Cherry, who
usually fights at 136, came down to
132.8 for this bout. Meza-Clay, car-
rying a 20-0 record, is listed at
5'2", but Cherry appeared much
larger than his 5-8 listed height.
The 25-year-old Clay has been
boxing for six years and Cherry, 23,
has been a professional for four
years after a lengthy amateur
career.
"I feel pretty good, happy, it's a
step up beating a 20-0 guy," said
Cherry on Monday. He upped his
professional record to 20-4-2 with
nine KOs.
"I knew he would be coming in;
I would never have to find him, so
I planned to keep my jab busy.
When he got iif close, I kept work-
ing the body. At the end of the 10th
round, his right eye was watery and
glazing. So I decided to go for it in


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
A pair of champions display their host of title belts. At center is pro boxing champion Edner
Cherry with belts he retained in Friday night's win. Flanking him are 16-year-old Dani Daniel
Lozano, who also won a championship bout Friday night. He now has so many championship
belts his father Daniel (at right) has to help carry them.


****** VOTE FOR CHANGE ******




P a u l. .-.G,, .... .....u els_.


Amid the post-fight crowd in the ring, Cherry shares a special
moment with his wife Elizabeth.


the 11th. I think the referee stopped
it pretty quickly, but that's right or
the guy would have gotten hurt,"
said Cherry, now ranked 38th in the
world in the lightweight division.


Cherry started from the first
round, boxing on the outside and
looking for the uppercut or hitting a
looping right hand over the arms of
See CHERRY 5B


Announcing Candidancy


for
KWI. yjl J J


AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Paul G. Samuels, non-partisan for School Board District 1 5:18p


1,,h. -. i$66Aoo Weeks
x9e -e seS W.o Usther eek/p..


9:00 au, *



YMCA CAMP
Ages K 8th Grade (This applies to all "camps")
$1500 Summer Camp Participants each sessior-


is


$3000 Members each session
S6000 Non-Members each session


SOCCER
June 5th June 28rd, 2006
every Monday & Wednesday
behind old Hardee Junior High
10:00 am 11:00 am


FLAG FOOTBALL
June 6th June 29rd, 2006
every Tuesday & Thursday
behind Old Junior High
10:00 am 11:00 am


Hardee County Family YMCA
S 610 W. Orange St. 773-6445


Monday Junior League Ages 12 & Over 1:00 P.M. June 5

FFGU5-7 P.M.
"Bowling Specials" 8-11 P.M. June 5
Bowling $125, Game $12, Shoes $125,
Hot Dogs $2", Soda 75c
Tuesday Major-Minor (2 adults, 2 Children) 7:00 P.M. June 6
EOI *MS 12-2 P.M.

Wednesday Casino League 7:30 P.M. June 7
Colorama 1:00 P.M.
FREBWINO UMMELAGU* B E5-7 P.M.


Thursday



Friday


Saturday


Mixed League
Junior League Ages 6-11


FRE OWIG ORSMMR EAU BWLR

FRE OWIN 6FR UMERLEGU 6BWLR


Mixed No-Tap League


FRE1OLIGFO UMME L* OWER


7:30 P.M.
1:00 P.M.
5-7 P.M.


12-2 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


June
June


June 2


12-2 P.M.
4-6 P.M.


BOWL-OF-FUN LANES
HwY 17 S., WAUCHULA
773-6391


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2B The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006





-Hardee


Shay Shau

Celebrates

1st Birthday
Shay-lin Vanessa Shau turned
one year old on April 15.
She celebrated with a party host-
ed by her parents Peter and Sasha
Shau of Zolfo Springs. The theme
for the party was Strawberry
Shortcake.
Joining in the celebration were
her brothers Peter Jr., Anthony and
QuiQue and sister Bella. Also
attending the special occasion were
grandparents Mickey and Harold
Patterson and grandmother Noemi
DeLeon.


COURTESY PHOTO
James Albritton & Heidi Noel

Heidi Noel & James

Albritton Are Engaged


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Zolfo Springs Elementary School Student Council gave a report to the Hardee Rotary Club
on May 3 at the Panda Restaurant. In recent Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test results for
ZSE third graders, 71 percent scored a Level 3 or above in reading and 81 percent scored at Level
3 or higher in math, said Principal Jan Beckley. In photo (from left) are fifth graders Christina
Sustaita, Kenia Villeva, Student Council President Kaylee Myers, Vice President Mercedes
Cisneros, Julie Yang, Secretary Michelle DeLaTorre, Cody Dayfiert, Sid Crews and Rotary mem-
ber Linda Adler.


Hardee County Congratulates


Shay-lin


Joe and Veronica Noel of Ona
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Heidi Marie, to James
Glenn Albritton, son of Bill and
Monica Albritton of Limestone.
The bride-elect is a 2004 gradu-
ate of Hardee High School, and is
employed as a certified nurses's
assistant with Bartow Regional
Medical Center. She is currently
pursuing a degree in message thera-
py at. Florida Metropolitan


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Nh4so LI~kn~xuil %..rl PatrrTune~
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University.
The prospective groom is a 2003
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School, and is employed as a dis-
patcher with the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office. He is currently
pursuing a criminal justice degree
at South Florida Community
College.
Plans are being made for an April
2007 wedding.


*111%. F'.11IT. 1.'
It\N Pe7 i u
* IPN. PoM l


ONE PINK, ONE BLUE
Mr. and Mrs. Eric Mushrush,
Zolfo Springs, a seven pound six
ounce daughter, Carli Jade, born
April 25, 2006, at Florida Hospital,
Sebring. Mrs. Mushrush is the for-
mer Liberty Lozano. Maternal
grandmother is Margarita Hernan-
dez of Bowling Green. Paternal
grandparents are Perry and Donna
Mushrush of Zolfo Springs.
Mr. and Mrs. Virgilio Avilez,
Wauchula, a seven pound son,
Miguel Angel, born May 5, 2006, at
Florida Hospital, Arcadia. Mrs.
Avilez is the former Lendy De
Santiago. Maternal grandmother is
Blanca De Santiago of Zolfo
Springs. Paternal grandparents are
Indalecio and Trinidad Avilez.
The HeraldAdvct


kr o n Iciduaio. a.;. wi ll IJ.n Air l(i~hl or.W i % rsuiflc5 lo qtV.Al 61'"'17,I


Gaood SepbeiHospice


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4ve$ #d6A4Wk4


die4,kan~d 4ve* oid


One of Hardee's youngest upcoming Stars. Amey, at the age of two years, has
already won various awards and is in preparation for upcoming travels through-
out the state in pursuit of career opportunities. Her next competition is in Miami,
followed by Orlando where she will compete for America's Cover Miss. She is
L shown here in two of her favorite photos. A


Living


.- guiding with strength.
caring with compassion. -
P ".i n, 111. I I "r., J 1, ",n i hi r, .l.r L., inp ,, o vrid;
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May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3B


PRECO GROWTH


2-Year-Old Has PRIZE SLOGAN



A nnalise M Terrell w as tw o .-" .'^ .
years old on April 7 and was hon-
ored with a birthday party on April
8 at Pioneer Park.
Hosted by her parents Jose
Carrera and Amanda Terrell, the
party included a pizza menu and
birthday cake with the party theme,
The Princess.
Among those attending were her '
great-grandparents Edward and
Joan Terrell.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Wauchula Kiwanis Club recently heard a report on Peace River Electric Cooperative from
energy services manager Jeff Cornelius and energy services technician Marty Gainous. PRECo
serves 10 counties and has about 33,000 meters The largest growth area in recent years has
been Manatee County, which has about 13,000 PRECo meters. Eastern Manatee County has
experienced many new residents, including the Lakewood Ranch area. Pictured (from left) are
Richard Maenpaa, retired PRECo manager; Dr. Mike McCoy; Cornelius; and Gainous.


Annalise


The Most
Anticipated
Moment
The most anticipated moment for a
parent is the sound of a child's first
words. But what if the words are
delayed, jumbled, or never come at
all. Speech and language problems
can affect early learning and self-
esteem. Give your child a chance by
Seeking proper treatment from a
".:; --' speech-language pathologist.

Joyce Oliver-Fulse
Certified Clinical Competent Speech Language Pathologist
4831 Dixiana Avenue Bowling Green, Florida
Phone: 863-375-9996
Providing Speech Language Pathology Services in Hardee County
Treatment for:
Speech/Language Delays Aural Rehabilitation Articulation Disorders
Aphasia Voice Disorders Apraxia
Oral Motor Disorders Dysarthria Swallowing/Feeding Delays
Stuttering
We accept:
SMedicaid Private Insurance Private Pay
We provide:
Screenings (Individual and Mass): Hearing/Speech/Language
Assessment with Recommendations
Therapy/Rehabilitation
soc5:18p


SFCC Breaks

Ground On

New Center
South Florida Community
College will hold a groundbreaking
ceremony next week for its $10.9
million, 51,320-square-foot Health
and Science Education Center.
The ceremony will take place
at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, May 24,
next to the Dental Education Center
on the main campus off U.S. 27 in
Avon Park. The public is invited to
attend.
The new two-story facility will
include state-of-the art instructional
technology, classrooms and labora-
tory space for natural science and
health science programs.
The center will enable the col-
lege to meet the community's criti-
cal need for trained health-care per-
sonnel and science graduates. It will
house SFCC's radiological techni-
cian program that begins in the fall
of 2007.
For more information, contact
SFCC's Community Relations
Office at ext. 7251 at 773-2252.


Mount Pisgah Baptist Church
is holding its homecoming service
on Sunday with the Rev. Jim Win-
gate, former pastor in 1995-96 and
interim pastor in 1978, conducting
the morning services.
There will be a covered dish din-
ner after the morning service, fol-
lowed by singing. Everyone is
invited to the church at 6210 Mt.
Pisgah Road, south of Fort Meade,
for this special occasion.

Friendship Chapel is planning
its homecoming service for next
-week, Sunday, May 28. There will
be dinner on the grounds following
the 11 a.m. service.
Everyone is invited to share this
occasion with the church on Moffitt
Road south of Zolfo Springs in the
Friendship community.


The Cat. He walked by himself,
What would life be if we had no and all places were alike to him.
courage to attempt anything? -Rudyard Kipling


COURTESY PHOTO
Young Mitchell Shackelford, of Clearwater, was the grand prize
winner in the Clearwater Police Department Officer Friendly's
2006 Safety Slogan Contest. The grandson of Rowland and
Helga Shackelford, of Wauchula, the six-year-old suggested
"Nothing to lose, everything to gain. Wear your helmet and pro-
tect your brain," winning the top prize to the delight of his par-
ents Kurt and Sandra Shackelford. The Clearwater youngster is
in kindergarten at Saint Cecilia Catholic School.




May 16th

Happy 16th Birthday Biggen

You work hard, play hard
and love alot, we can't
even begin to put into
words, how proud we are
1 ,-s of all you have accom-
plished, and we look for-
ward to your bright future.
There is no one
else like you.
Today We Celebrate You!
We love you so much,

SDad, omr, 2)esi, )ay&n,
2 rlsten, w, ana and papa





4B The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


DURRANCE REUNION


Rise & Shine
By Ted Simonson
THE S WORD
Does your life seem flat and uninspired? Is church a bore? Find it
impossible to pray?
It could be because of sin. Not big spectacular offenses like adultery or
murder, but sin in its most insidious form: a lifestyle that quietly pursues
one's own independent agenda without taking God into account for a
moment.
We are living in a culture that has relegated God to the sidelines. Self-
fulfillment is the reigning virtue. Many "swim" in this spirit of the age until
the conscience dies and all sensitivity to the divine is smothered.
Here is a test question to ask yourself: How would you react if you
knew you would commit several sins today?
1.) Doesn't everybody sin? Who can avoid it?
2.) Sorry about that. I've got to me more careful.
3.) No problem. I'll ask forgiveness when I say my prayers tonight.
4.) Terrible! How can I sin against the One who died for me?
If your reaction is any one of the above except No. 4, then you're in
trouble. Your sensitivity to sin has been dulled by saying, doing or thinking
things you know you shouldn't until, at last, your moral reaction is nearly
zero.
That the fourth reaction is biblical, look up Genesis 39 and note the
response of Joseph to an immoral proposition.
Some will argue that this kind of sensitivity will cause a person to be
stressed, nerves tight, worried and anxious. Actually, the opposite is what
happens. The person who makes it his business to avoid what God hates
finds that he has gained a mighty Friend and Ally.
Sin means separation from God, the source of all life. What can be
more suicidal than to antagonize one's Creator? Who can hope to win such
an unequal contest?
Sin is much more terrible than any of us can imagine. Fortunately, God
knows and sent His Son on a costly rescue mission. Now the separation is
no more. Christ Himself became the bridge and, by faith, anyone can cross
over.
Most folks construct a homemade theology made up of feelings, opin-
ions and ideas picked up from books, TV and the newspapers. Abetter plan
is to read the Bible.
"I have hidden Your Word in my heart that I might not sin against You"
(Psalms 119:11).


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The descendants of Augustus Sidney Durrance gathered for their annual family reunion on April 22 in the fellowship hall at New
Zion Baptist Church. All of "Grandpa Gus'" grandchildren were in attendance, along with many of their children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. Other relatives and friends, some from out of state, joined them for the occasion. Grandchildren pic-
tured above are (front row, from left) Phillip Roberts, Louise Roberts Johnson, Dale Roberts, Barbara Jean Durrance Dishon and
Lory Durrance; (back row) Sharon Durrance Lee, Carmen Durrance Harrison, Jerry Roberts, David Durrance, Laurence Durrance
and Dan Durrance. Eight of them grew up in the New Zion community of western Hardee County.


soc5:4tfc


*
, YoliU&co.
Full gorvieo Hair and Nail galon

"Walk-Ins Wolcom"'
767-YOLI (9654)
107 S. 9th Ave., Wauchula


LORDY, LORDY,

AIN'T IT TRUE,

NONA DASHER IS

52!


Job Fair On
Monday Offers

Open Positions
Need a job or thinking of chang-
ing careers? Then the upcoming Job
Fair is for you!
The Heartland Career Connec-
tion System, with sponsorship from
the Hardee County Economic
Development Council and the
Heartland Workforce Investment
Board Inc., will host a Job Fair and
Community Event with more than
25 participating employers who
have open positions in professional,
skilled and entry-level work.
Areas such as health care, bank-
ing, food services, transportation,
customer service, protective ser-
vices, utilities, construction, gov- -
-ernment, manufacturing andd others.
will be represented.
County, city and state agencies
will also be on site to inform the
community of the services they
have available all under one roof.
The Wauchula Police Department
will be sponsoring child finger-
printing at no charge. The Blood
Net Mobile will be onsite, with
giveaways for those who donate
blood.
This event is free, open to the
public and will take place on
Monday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at
the Hardee County Agri-Civic
Center, at the intersection of Altman
and Stenstrom roads in Wauchula.
Job seekers should bring resumes
and dress in business attire.
For additional information, call
Blanca Llano, business services
manager for the Heartland Career
Connection System, at (863) 385-
3672 ext 237. -
And when love speaks, the voice
of all the gods makes heaven
drowsy with the harmony.
-William Shakespeare


-The / 9ardee %r /-igh c5chool tS" Grade 'Dance Commillee
'Would like to agy a big cThank cfJou to the following 'Businesses and individuals
who helped to make /be 2006 53' Grade CDance a huge success:
Wal-Mart
Buckhorn Nursery/Ron Lambert
Scott Henderson
Keith Weems
HJH Administration 0
HIH Cafeteria @
f HSH School
/ David Radford
S Hazel's Flower Shop
Cooper's Flower Shop
Main Street Market
Mid Florida Hardware
l, Amy Rigney
Master's Touch
8th Grade Parents for their financial support,
, donation of food, and their valuable time. 5:18C
A *4


SAFER SCHOOLS


PHOTO BY LAUREN RAULERSON,
A new fence has been erected around Hardee Senior High School because of the state's inten-
ion of making schools safer, says Deputy Superintendent Rocky Kitchens. The Hardee County
School District received funding for this purpose, and decided to use it for a new fence at the
high' school. The fence has brought mixed feelings from students and faculty. Students such as
Student Body President Ashley Islas and Senior Class President Holly Kouns saythe fence makes |
hem feel imprisoned, and they predict it will be ineffective. However, first-year teacher Staff Sgt.
Spencer Lofton feels the fence is a "really good idea" and believes it will make his job easier.
While opinions of the fence are varied, most everyone was surprised by the change of scenery. [



14ArMAY 20ors 2006 rS, /8





MAY 200,2006


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5kiLL$ cOnpetition w, Y5 IQrLK5

ag toI15W.
Your competition age i5 the a'y were 0. 2006

13. l4. lefia yy
PLea5e arrive and r ,b 0fi.
o'm petition begins atin n r fieLd

4 Achr 12,ye'VaiLds'


Please arrip
Competifi
Gerg *- .


rgi5t~r y5:3Opm.
- in5 at. 60Opm at
deine, Jr. Park


4. 5,66 7 9ds10 11612 13 .14 e 15

The 5kiLLs Coj 1tion incLude5 throwing, running. 6 hitting.

All conc I ns 5 sill be open and a drawing for
gre prizes donated by local area
businesses wil be hbld. Tickets will be
ori ale-fer-1 each. 5
**, ______ 5 :1 8c_


4 /








CHERRY
Continued From 1B


Meza-Clay. With 56 seconds left in
the round, a hard Cherry right
pushed Meza-Clay back for the
first time, but he shortly resumed
coming after Cherry.
The Wauchula pro also had a
good second round, continuing to
meet the Pittsburgh fighter with
counter punches as he came in.
Again, Meza-Clay almost went
down, barely touching the canvas
with his hand before regaining his
balance.
The third round was better com-
petition, but the pattern continued,
with Cherry dancing to keep out of
range of Clay's reach and hitting
him with right hands as he barged
in.
In the fourth, Cherry followed
his game plan with right crosses
behind his left jab.
Meza-Clay got the nod from
ringside officials in the fifth round,
the only one he scored. He landed a
series of punches on the inside and
outside but, as ringside commenta-
tor Teddy Atlas said, Meza-Clay
also ate a lot of punches to get
inside.
In the sixth, Cherry alternated
between ,going inside for body
shots, taking a few himself but
fending most off with his elbows.
He would move outside and jab
before coming in again.
The seventh was another produc-
tive round for Cherry, said Atlas,


due to the productive right hand
from the outside. The eighth was
another with Cherry "keeping his
distance, keeping focused on his
game plan," Cherry's trainer Peter
Fernandez told Atlas. "There's no
quit in this guy (Meza-Clay); he
keeps coming forward. Edner is
staying with our plan."
The scenario continued through
the ninth and 10th rounds, Meza-
Clay trying to corner Cherry, who
escaped along the ropes and kept
moving in and out. With all the
action, Cherry received a caution
for hitting behind the head. He
scored a right uppercut at the bell.
The ring physician checked
Meza-Clay's eyes between rounds
and allowed the bout to continue,
but Cherry's power surge to open
the 11th round quickly got the ref-
eree to stop the bout. Commented
Atlas, "Meza-Clay could not get
out of his wading pool into the
ocean of Cherry, who went out and
earned the technical knockout
(TKO)."
According to ringside announcer
Stephen A. Smith, Cherry landed
330 of the 1,085 punches he threw,
most clean hard shots. He has won
17 of his last 19 bouts.
The future is uncertain. Cherry
will take a couple of weeks off
before returning to the gym and
learning when and where his next
fight will be.

The true secret of giving advice
is, after you have honestly given
it, to be perfectly indifferent
whether it is taken or not, and
never persist in trying to set
people right.
-Hannah Whitall Smith


THE BOND

BETWEEN PETS

AND THEIR

OWNERS
By: Dr. Ross A.
Hendry, DVM
Dr. Hendry
Since I grew up a country boy in a small town with all the benefits it offered
I had several really wonderful dogs, and I developed a real attachment for them.
Those dogs and my love of the cattle business propelled me to vet school, but
when I got there I had to treat cats, and I had absolutely no appreciation for
them:.'
. ..-We4thought cats were just -omething our dogs chased up a tree, and even
(houh there were a few peoplewho were attached to cats there weren't as many
people who had cats like they do today.
However, I ran into a professor in college named Dr. Gore, who told me and
another group of young students, "The reason you don't like cats is because you
are afraid of them and don't understand them. I will teach you how to handle
cats, and once you learn how to handle them you will develop an appreciation of
them because they are a unique and entertaining animal."
I found that to be the case and over the last 18 years I have had the best cat
on earth in my house, and I learned a lot about them. They are in fact unique and
different from dnogs, and in general once a cat adopts a home and a family he may
not want an additional cat for a buddy.
Some cats socialize well and other cats don't socialize at all, and that was the
case with my ,Moca. When I added cats to the house Moca let us know in no
uncertain terms he didn't want a companion and that was a learning experience
for me.
I went into practice right out of vet school in Arcadia, and I thought I had
learned everything there was to know about veterinary medicine, but one day the
principal of DeSoto High School, Jesse Blanton, came into my office with a guinea
pig and put it down on the table in front of me. It was laying on its side paddling,
and I looked up at Jesse and said, "Jesse, it is time to get another guinea pig."
When I said that big tears welled up in his eyes and splashed down his face,
and I realized I hadn't learned everything I needed to know about people and
their interaction with unique pets. I told Jesse I, would see what I could do, that
Dr. Overcash would be in later in the day and I would consult with him. We
would go ahead and get treatment started. I gave the guinea pig some VAL
Tetracycline and a very small shot of penicillin.
When Dr. Overcash came in about two hours later from a large animal call I
said, "Ron, I got a guinea pig and I don't know what to do with it." We went back
to the cage, and on the way he said, "I hope you didn't give any penicillin". Dr.
Overcash explained that penicillin messes up a guinea pig's gut and gives him an
intractable diarrhea and a lot of them die.
When we got back to the cage my guinea pig was sitting up looking at us so
we gave him some food and water and he started eating, and I was able to send
him home the next day.
I learned that I didn't know much about treating guinea pigs. I really mis-
judged the importance of a guinea pig in Jesse's life.
Over the course of my life I encountered all kinds of unusual pets, and I have
treated snakes, been to Ringling Brothers to treat a giraffe one night. I did a post
postmortem on a three-year-old elephant, surgery on tigers, lions, panthers and
all kind of interesting pets and realized people really cared about them.
I had worked on horses all my life and I knew that people got attached to
them, but I was going down the Grand Canyon with a veterinarian who had a
Ph.D. in nutrition and at dinner one night he was talking about the incredible
relationship he had with a horse.
Having been out of the cow business and had lost my obsession to ride hors-
es, I told him I thought maybe we ought to eat horses. It was obvious my com-
ment really hurt the guy beyond my comprehension. It was one of those things I
would have liked to take back and couldn't, but I resolved I would never tell any-
body that I thought we ought to eat horses.
Recently I had a lady come into my office with a rat, a big rat. He had a
tumor on his abdomen about an inch in diameter, and she said she wanted it
taken off. I have finally accepted the human attachment to unusual animals so we
took the rat into surgery. We put him on gas anesthesia and removed the tumor
with laser and were fortunate to not have any blood loss so we sutured him up
and sent him home.
When the lady came back for me to take the stitches out she reinforced the
lesson that I had learned so slowly in my practice life. She told me, "Dr. Hendry,
you were the only person who took me seriously about my affection for my rat,
fnd from now on I am going to bring my other animals to your hospital."
When I tell these stories to other people sometimes they think they are really
amusing, and I think they are, except we must understand they are not funny to
the people involved. They are just genuinely attached to these animals.
They are no different than the owners who come into my office to put a dog
to sleep and they sit quietly in the exam room and cry for 30 minutes while one
of our staff has their arm around them. I depend on my staff because they under-
stand the animal-human bond even if it is a rat or a guinea pig.

915N. 6thAve. Pet Care 773-6783
Wauchula Center
5:18c


Financial Solutions
By Patrick M. Lange
Licensed Financial Advisor


MID-YEAR FINANCIAL CHECKUP
Many people make financial New Year's Resolutions, and e' :" set spe-
cific goals for the year ahead. But by May or June, most of us can't even
remember what our resolutions were.
With the year nearly half gone, are you halfway to reaching your annu-
al financial goals?
Following are a few tips for running a simple mid-year financial check-
up. The good news is, you still have half a year left to reach your financial
goals.
Make Specific Goals If you made financial resolutions on New
Year's Day, how specific were they? You need a clear concise financial goal,
rather than a general intention. For example, don't plan on simply increas-
ing your college savings. Instead, set an amount and make a plan to achieve
it, such as starting a Section 529 College Savings Plan. Then have with-
drawals made twice monthly from your checking account on the same day
your receive you paycheck.
Don't Be A Budget-Buster Was 2006 the year you were going to
* finally stick to a budget? Now is a great time to see if you are on track. Start
with the basics: Have you tracked your expenses for a few months? Do you
know how much you spend? Are you saving money from each paycheck?
Withhold With Care Did you receive a sizable income-tax refund,
or did you owe a chunk of money in April? If either one happened, mid-year
is a good time to correct that by changing how much you are withholding
from your paycheck or paying in estimated taxes. In order to reduce the size
of your refund, increase the number of allowances you claim on your W-4
form (or pay less in estimated taxes due in June, September and January).
But don't forget to save and invest the difference each month. Also, consid-
er meeting with a tax advisor before you make any changes to your tax with-
holding.
Itemize Deductions A 2002 government study found that up to 2.2
million taxpayers overpay their taxes by an average of $438 simply because
they claimed the standard deduction instead of itemizing, according to
"Money" magazine in December of 2005. Mid-year is a good time to meet
with your tax professional to determine if you should itemize your deduc-
tions this year rather than claim the standard deduction. Find out what
records and receipts you will need to support your itemization come year-
end, so you are not left scrambling for your back-up in December.
Prepare For Open Enrollment Many companies hold their open
enrollment sessions for employees in the fall. Therefore, it is best to start
researching and thinking about your choices in the summertime. Your
employer may have changed health-care plans, existing plans may have
been updated or perhaps your family circumstances have changed, such as
the addition of a child. Review your choices now and take time to research
your options before your narrow window of opportunity for change during
the open enrollment period quickly passes.
Review Your Portfolio Just because your portfolio had the right
mix of assets at the start of the year, doesn't mean that it doesn't need to be
modified before next year. A portion of your portfolio may have done
extremely well or poorly, meaning you may want to rebalance it to bring the
proper mix back in line.
Plan Ahead Review your other year-end financial deadlines, such
as flexible spending accounts for health care where you forfeit a balance not
spent by Dec. 31 or charitable giving that must take place before the year-
end. Calculate how much you have spent by the ihiddle of the year so you
may strategically plan your spending or giving for the remainder of the year,
rather than make rash decisions late in December when the clock is ticking.
Seek Professional Help There is not a better time than now to con-
sult a qualified financial planner to get a professional mid-year financial
checkup that would include creating or updating your financial plan.


SREENWOO.
CHEVROLET OldCsmobile.d


Fort Meade, Florida
ios*t nr uuheif at:. w* Uwwu rJrefhtn.c u ho rinm


New



Sticker


May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5B


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular session today
(Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102, Courthouse Annex I,
412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The following is a synopsis of agenda
topics that may be of public interest. Times are approximate except for
advertised public hearings.
Commission/Zoning public hearing. Three requests are for rezon-
ing of land off Abendhoff Drive and Parnell Road area for a combined 250
acres from Agriculture to Farm Residential and another 19 acres off Old
Bradenton Road to C-2 for single- and multi-family residences, 8:35 a.m.
Public hearing, review of site plan for Orange Walk, a 71-residence
planned unit development for homes for older adults, off Heard Bridge
Road, 8:50 a.m.
Landfill construction phase II bids, 9 a.m.
Impact fee study final report, 9:15 a.m.
Video-conferencing for Hardee and Hernando counties, 9:30 a.m.
Discussion of sidewalks and other school-related improvements in
Wauchula Hills, 10:05 a.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who may wish
to plan to attend.


Fort Meade, Florida


Fort Meade, Florida
205 N. Charleston

(863) 773-2530

(863) 285-8131


L power



Prices"!


kI OVE :250 NEW CHEV1 'A:IROLETS LL O SLE


NEW 2006 CHEVROLET
EQUINOX
LS


V6, Auto., Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD.
Stk.#06102

$19,995


NEW 2006 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO EXT CAB
4 DOOR




Auto., Air, Tilt/Cruise.
Stk.#06618

$17,995


NEW 2006 CHEVROLET
IMPALA
LS


V6, Auto., Air, PW/PL.
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#1087

$19,995


NEW 2006 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO REG CAB
4X4




V8, Auto., Air, Tilt/Cruise,
Heavy Duty Trailering.
Stk.#06582

$19,995


AN AMERICAN EVOLUTION


2004 JEEP WRANGLER
CONVERTIBLE 4X4
6 Cylinder, auto., air, tilt/cruise,
CD, only 18,000 miles.
Stk.#06609A
$18,995

2003 CHEVROLET
SUBURBAN
LS
3rd seat, dual air, pw/pl,
tilt/cruise, CD. Stk.#06500A
$18,995

2006 PONTIAC
GRAND PRIX
V6, auto., air, leather, pw/pl,
tilt/cruise, CD.
Stk.#5081
$18,995


2004 FORD F-350
CREW CAB DUALLY
Power Stroke Diesel, auto., air,
pw/pl, tilt/cruise, CD.
Stk.#06549B
$29,995

2002 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
4x4
V8, auto., air, pw/pl, tilt/cruise.
Stk.#06444A
$16,995


2004 CHEVROLET
SUBURBAN Z71 4X4
Leather, 6 disc CD, XM Satellite
Radio, OnStar, only 19,000
miles. Stk.#07022A
$30,995

2004 GMC
SIERRA EXT CAB
4X4
V8, auto., air, pw/pl, tilt/cruise.
Stk.#06136A
$19,995


2001 DODGE
RAM
EXT CAB
V8, auto., air, pw/pl, tilt/cruise,
Stk.#06489B
$13,995

2006 CHEVROLET
UPLANDER EXT
VAN
V6, auto, dual air, 7 passenger, dual
power doors, rear DVD.
Stk.#6087
$20,995

2003 CHEVROLET
BLAZER 2 DOOR LS
V6, auto., air, pw/pl, tilt/cruise,
only 14,000 miles.
Stk.#06245B
$12,995


*All rebates and Incentives assigned to dealer. APR Is W.A.C. for up to 60 months. All prices are plus tax, tag and $149.95 dealer fee.


5:18c


Our selection of trucks, prices and customer service makes it worth the drive to Bob Elliott's Greenwood Chevrolett


Over 100

Used In Stock


I The

Herald-Advocate
-PRINTERS PUBLISHERS -
115 S. 7th Ave.
WaLldltlki, FL 33873
T

L eleplione (863) 773-3255


visit our wVusliv at; WWW.ulFvL;9GrlvvvA;Lplll N 0






6B The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Short Time Job Bankruptcy Repo Slow Pay
Just meet our easy requirements and you are conditionally
APPROVED!* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly payments Competitive Rates Not Buy Here-Pay Here
Established Credit Late Model Cars & Trucks. Call now for your credit approval on our 24 hr. toll free
HOTLINE 1-800-535-6061
You must meet our lender's credit standards. Income and equity requirements apply.



1123 S. 6th Ave.
E B ODY Wauchula, FL 33873
SAR 863-767-1000

HELP WANTED
Bus Driver Take workers to work and back to office.
Split Shift Full time Bilingual a plus.
Good pay and full benefits.
Drug-Free Workplace.
Criminal and driving backgrounds done also.
Come by today and fill out an application.
c15:18c


HELP WANTED,. .
Bowling Green Youth Academy is looking for a v'
Licensed Mental'Health Counselor (LMHC) to serve as
the programs Clinical Director for 52 female youth.
Applicants having experience providing mental health
and substance abuse treatment services to youth in a
residential setting is preferred. Competitive salary and
benefit package is available. Bowling Green Youth
Academy is also looking for a Bachelor level therapist
to provide mental health services to the female youth
in our program. All individuals interested should con-
tact Patricia Wheeler at 863-375-2000 ext. 221.
The program is located at
4705 US Highway 17 N
Bowling Green, Florida 33834
cl5:18-6:1 c


'87 NISSAN MAXIMA, great shape,
custom wheels, $2000 OBO. 863-781-
1244. 5:18-25p
'93 HONDA CIVIC, runs great, 35-40i
mpg, $1,200. 773-3896. 5:18p
1984 GMC SIERRA, 3/4 ton pick-up
with topper, $800. Call 863-735-8335.
5:18p


15 FOOT FIBERGLASS bass boat, 40
h.p. outboard. Runs great comes with
trailer. Make offer. Must sell. 781-
9628. 5:18p
15' FIBERGLASS 40 horse Evinrude,
new deck & carpet, $1,500 OBO. Can,
be seen at 411 Illinois Ave. or call 773-
0501. 5:18-25p-


Help Wanted
Apt. complex is seeking a full time
maintenance helper with full benefits.
Must be able to work outdoors and lift heavy appliances.
Position starts at $10.00 an hour. 40 hours a week.
Must pass drug screening and background check.
Pick up an application at Country Manor Apts. on Hwy 62.



1980 Jeep CJ-5J

. -Custom Paint, 33"
Mud Tires, New
Clutch, Runs Great!
$4,278 obo
781-9628



TWH CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Terry Harrison Owner/President
(863) 781-2283/ Nextel ID# 161*132695*5

PO Box 356, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863) 381-1726
Fax (863) 773-0643
twhconstructioninc@yahoo.com

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
Marmac Const LC# CB-C038892 c15:4-25p


PHLEBOTOMIST Full Time,
5:30 A 2:00 P



Human Resources
DeSoto Memorial Hospital
900 N. Robert Ave.
Arcadia, Fl. 34266
OR
www.dmh.org
and look under Careers
OR
Fax Resumes to: 863-494-8400
E-mail: hr@dmh.org
Phone Number: 863-494-8405
cl5:18c


Help Wanted
Need
packinghouse
laborers.
Call Martin at:
863-767-9673
4:27tfc


BRAND NEW living room suite with
tags, green sofa and love seat, area
rug, coffee table and 2 end tables,
brass lamp, $1,600. 941-270-7659.
5:18p
QUEEN SIZE sofa bed complete with
bed linens and new slipcover, $200
OBO. 767-0443. 5:18p


HARDEE COUNTY DISPOSAL now
hiring labor positions. 4 openings
available. Starting pay $7.50 an hour.'
Call for details 773-6079 EOE DFWP >.
5:18-25c


DRIVER WANTED Reliable, hard-
working service work or delivery man.
$1,000 signing bonus. 231 W. Main
St., Wauchula. Apply in person. 773-
, 4172. 5:11tfc


CNA's NEEDED 40 hr/wk. Mon.-Fri.
8:00 to 4:30. Must have dependable
transportation. Mileage reimburse-
ment and other benefits available.
Apply at HOPE of Hardee County, 310
N. 8th Ave., Wauchula. 773-2022: EOE,
DFWP. 3:16-5:18c
POSITIONS AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE-
LY: Cashier, stock, and daily cleaning
persons. Full or part-time, Duette
Country Store. Intersection of SR62 &,
CR39, Manatee County. Call Lenora at
(941) 776-1097. 7:21 tfc
CUBAN RESTAURANT OPENING
SOON in downtown Wauchula!
Several position needed: waitress,
hostess, bus boys, dish washes.
Accepting applications on Tuesday,,
May 23 at 212 W. Main St., Wauchula,!
between 10 a.m. 2 p.m. For more'!
information call (305) 970-1957:
(Biliingual a plus!) 5:18c.


HELP WANTED
Bowling Green Youth Academy is currently seeking
Direct Care Workers to provide supervision of
female youth 12-18 years of age.
Salary is based on experience.
Applications are available at the facility
or you can send a resume to
PO Box 369 Bowling Green, FL 33834.
(863) 375-2000 ext. 221
Fax (863) 375-9929 15:18-6:1


HELP WANTED
Part time (16 hrs/wk) Veterans Service Officer ($11.38-
$14.93) wanted for Hardee County Public Safety Depart-
ment. Performs tasks in administration of the Veterans' pro-
grams. Knowledge of local, federal and state laws and regu-
lations relative to organizing and maintaining Veterans
Services Programs. High School graduation or possession of
an acceptable equivalency diploma. Four (4) years experi-
ence in administration, supervisory and public contact back-
ground; or an equivalent of training and experience. Must
meet requirements for Veterans Services Officer as provided
by the State Statutes (Section 292.11 Florida Statutes).
Applications accepted in the Human Resource Department,
205 Hanchey Rd, Wauchula, F1 33873, through May 26,
2006. Excellent benefits including State Retirement.
EOE/F/M-VET PERF. cd5:11-18c



HELP WANTED
CITY OF BOWL N GREEN
TRUCK DRIVER
PAY $9.25 $10.00 HR.
Must be in good physical health and capable of manual labor, lift-
ing, walking, etc., required. Must possess Florida Driver's License
(Class B). Must be capable of understanding oral and written
instruction. Will not be restricted to any one job in the same clas-
sification. Drug test is required. Preference in appointment will be
given to eligible veterans or spouses of veterans. Equal
Opportunity Employer. Applications will be accepted at City Hall,
104 E. Main Street, Bowling Green, Florida. Positions will remain
open until filled. 5:18c


(


AM-SOUTH REALTY

MAKING REAL ESATr REAL EASY."
An IndependentlyOwned and Operated Member olCoklwel Banker Real Estate Corporation


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873

3ary Delatorre Broker
(863) 773-2122 F2g
FAX (863) 773-2173


Donna Steffens, Associate
Jerry Carlton, Associate
Richard Dasher, Associate
Dane Hendry, Associate


781-3627
375-2887
773-0575
381-2769


Donna Steffens


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM


WHAT'S MY LINE? I'm an affordable 2-bedroom/I-bath
home in Bowling Green. The price has been reduced to
$62,000. For true identity, call 773-2122.
~~-----
LOVE THAT TRAFFIC! 1.5 acres of commercial property
with 285.2 sq. ft. of frontage on Hwy. 17. Bowling Green
is growing. Owner motivated to sell. Make your best call
yet! $275,000.
DOGGONE GOOD DEAL! This 3-bedroom/2-bath home
includes a yard for a dog to run and a privacy fence,
plus a large, screened front porch. All this for a pet
friendly price of just $179,900. Call for more frisky facts!
TWO-BEDROOM/ONE-BATH HOME. It Is located in
Bowling Green. It has a new roof and an enticing price
of $77,900.
NOTHING SPARED. Best of everything has gone into
this compelling 3-bedroom/2-bath home in Knollwood.
This Immaculate home has tile floors, a large family
room, and a large yard to go with it. Only thing missing
is you and your family! Call to complete the picture!
$225,000.
TWO BEDROOM/ONE BATH HOME. Comes with 2.5
acres. Call 773-2122 for more details. $200,000.
DO YOU NEED LAND? I have a 6.6-acre tract that is just
right for you! $105,000.


COMFORT TO SMILE ABOUT! And we know you'll smile
when you see this inviting 20-acres. It also includes an
older mobile home. The scenery consists of oak trees to
hang your hammock and relax. There's more! Call for
more details! $375,000.
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY If you've never bought a
home, this 2-bedroom/2-bath mobile home is the one to
buy! The mobile home is located on two lots. Terms,
price, and location all say call 773-2122 now! $110,000.
PRICE REDUCED! 4-bedroom/2-bath home on 5-acres.
Owner is motivated to sell! Buy it now for only $175,000.
COMPLETELY REMODELED. 3-bedroom/2-bath home.
$144,900.
COMMERCIAL LOT IN THE CITY Great location within
the city limits in Zolfo Springs. 100 x 155. Act fast!
$35,000.
NICE NEIGHBORHOOD. 5-acre tract on Stenstrom Rd.
Great location for building a new home. Close to Hardee
Senior High School. Don't wait too long! Call Dane.
$200,000.
SECLUSION A MUST? Then relocate to the peace and
quiet of this hideaway located on Golden Oaks Road. 16
1/2 acres with a double-wide mobile home. 3 bedrooms
and 1 bath. $190,000.


Featured Listing!
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY FOR SALE.
Seven Seas Restaurant in Fort Meade, Located on Hwy 17 in a great location.
Fully furnished and ready to go! Owner motivated to sell. Call Donna.
$326,000
Reduced to $275,000.


ooi


c15:18c


Congratulations,


GRADUATES!


You've Earned It!


' 2002
N Pontiac
Sunfire
40,000 actual
miles
S--- 7-== 7
'y '/// '


7, l /// 7
2001
Chrysler
Concorde
90,000 actual
miles
,,- ,


\' l 7 / l// 7
2002
Dodge
Stratus
actual
miles


2002 N
Daewoo
Nubira
40,000 actual
miles
N ,


S/ ////////" 1' / 1 //////< '// 7////< ////////
2001 Dodge 1999 Jeep N N
Grand Caravan Grand Cherokee 200 1 2001
Sport N N Laredo N N Ford N N Chevy
Great for 4x4 Taurus Lumina
vacation N actual miles N N N
r N,, N/, N /


Dan Hill


375-4441
U.S. Hwy. 17
Bowling Green
(across from Presto)


Jimmy Hill


e 34 V 4


No Interest Charge
No Finance Charge


Tax, tag & title not included.


BUY HERE! PAY HERE


I I-hhqhl 1 cnsqnn


Hill's Auto World is not responsible for typographical errors.


Lopl:lul
C15:18C


*


I


11


I


Em-


I






May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7B


BEAUTIFUL 3 BR/2 BA CB home In
great neighborhood. Built in 2001 with
a large screened porch on an acre lot..
Includes appliances and a bonus stor-.
age shed, $199,000. Call for appoint-
ment. 863-781-2875. 5:18p
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1987 NISSAN
VIN: JN1HZ1459HX210919
8:00A.M., JUNE 2,2006
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 HWY. 17 N WAUCHULA, FL
cl5:s18c


107 W. Main Street
Topsy See Wauchula, FL 33873
REAL ESTATE 773-5994


Approximately 40 acres. Call for information.
New Listing: Beautiful 4BR/2BA Double Wide MH on 11/4 AC. Porch
built across back. This is a must see $136,500.
Beautiful homesite. You can hide away in this approx. 24 acres oT
wooded property with creek and Oak hammock. Fenced and cross
fenced. $20,000 acre.
Very lovely hye n t 3 ^t q ft. Ready to
move into. l rftthii l tf neighborhood.
$185,000.
10 acres prime property close to Wauchula. $33~,000 Reduced to
$21,500 per acre.
We Have Buyers! We Need Listings!
STopsy See, broker Vanette See, associate
Or email us at: TSEEREALESTATE@yahoo.com 5:18s


m S"


De W



--e -


LAMBER
REALTY INC.
402 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


...- a


NEW PRICE MUST SEE! 17 Acres and lovely
3B/2Bth Brick home; beautiful ceramic tile floors,
fireplace, large kitchen and much more; entrance
has satellite gate and alarm system. $455,000.
Commercial corner lot; 90x139, high and dry ready for
building. PRICE JUST REDUCED! $200,000.
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS PRICE REDUCTION!
2255 square feet, 3 or 4 bedrooms on approximately 1
acre in desirable neighborhood. This home has been
updated with customized kitchen, new floors, baths and
much more! $250,000.
RENTAL PROPERTY large home has one apartment
plus possible studio apartment on back; quiet neigh-
borhood; yard has large oaks. $100,000.
OWNER VERY MOTIVATED! 2677 sq. ft. stucco
| home, recently renovated; 3B/2Bth, inside utility, and
fireplace, perfect location for walking to school and
shopping. Make an offer today!
MAKE AN OFFER on this 4B/1.5Bth home, inside util-
ity, garage; located in family neighborhood. Listed at
$160,000.
PERFECT CONDITION! This home is move-in ready,
3B/2Bth, 1838 sq. ft. home featuring carpet/ceramic tile
floors, some furniture included in sale; nice yard with
automatic sprinkler system; new roof; metal storage
and boat shed. $175,000.
GREAT LOCATION WITH PLENTY OF SPACE!!
4B/2Bth home on 2.5 lots, 3397 sq. ft., 2 fireplaces,
* large rooms including family, dining, living and 2 utili-
ty rooms; 12x15 workshop with electricity. Make an
appointment to see! $250,000.
A PERFECT PLACE! 15 Acres just outside of town
with 3B/2Bth CB home, plus a large, vinyl siding, 80x80
barn with 4 horse stalls, 2 roll up doors, 2 pole barns,
property is fenced and has many extras Call today
to see! $450,000.
: SERVICE YOU 4
SDORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
I ASSOCIATE: DELOISJOHNSON.............773-9743
| ASSOCIATE: MIKEYCOLDING..............781-1698
op"""e"'" ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL...781-6971


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net


Charlotte Terrell M
WESTERN HARDEE 15 acres cleared pasture with
small barn and 3B/1Bth home; large oaks, paved road
frontage. $400,000.
WHAT A STEAL! 3B/1Bth home in Ft. Meade Area,
inside utility and storage, fenced back yard, sprinkler
system; located in great neighborhood. $105,000.
LOOKING FOR VALUE? This 3B/2Bth home comes
with some furniture, 12x20 concrete floored workshop
with electricity and water, nice lot with plenty of fruit
trees. See today! $126,000.
MOVE IN NOW! 2B/1Bth M/H; 1320 sq.ft., central
H/A, inside utility, screened porch, patio; outside stor-
age. $58,000.
THIS HOME WAS RECENTLY REMODELED!
2B/lBth M/H, located on nice, large lot; storage shed.
Listed at $50,000.
PASTURE LAND 6 ACRES, road frontage; large
oaks, fruit trees, one acre pond and 4" well; beautiful
homesite or weekend retreat! $110,000.
TEN ACRES with 12" well; located in good area.
$365,000.
BEAUTIFUL LOCATION for building! A total of 15
acres with road frontage. Call for details. $17,500 per
acre.
EXCELLENT PASTURELAND! 20.3 acres, two
ponds, fenced and cross fenced. $20,000/acre.
40 Acres of native pasture; paved road frontage; nice
scattered oaks. Call for more information.
120 acres of beautiful, high and dry land; located in
eastern Hardee County; development potential; good
hunting. Call today for details.
10 Acres in Duette Area; property is fenced and has an
8" well. Call for details.
GREAT LOCATION FOR BUILDING! 4 Acres with 2
wells, electrical hookup, septic tank, fenced on 3 sides
ready for new construction or mobile home. $90,000.
JUST LISTED IDEAL HOMESITES! One 5 acre
tract @ $90,000 and One 9.50 acre tract @ $171,000
high & dry; on county maintained road; two 2" wells.
Western Hardee County 5 acres cleared with 6" well;
convenient location. $100,000.
Commercial lot, Highway 17, busy location. $75,000.
STATE ROAD 66 Commercial corner lot and 1200 sq.
ft. building. Listed at $175,000.
4 Acres of commercial property plus suite of offices
fruit scales, outdoor workshop/shed, fenced; located
just outside of city limits. $198,500.
CAN COUNT ON
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker rr|
ASSOCIATE: MICHAEL ADAMS......781-2413
ASSOCIATE: DAVID McCLINTOCK.781-1226
ASSOCIATE: RHODA McCOY............781-7230 R
cl5:18c REALTOR


-
Clas sifieds


WANTED: PASTURE for 4 horses-
lease rent. 30-40 acres with water
supply, shade, good fencing. Can
share with cattle/horses. Well
behaved, won't damage property/-'
fence. Not big eaters. 941-223-8863 or,
941-223-8862. 4:27-6:25p


2004 HEAVY DUTY dual axle trailer,.
adjustable military hitch; diamond
plate fenders, 10 ply tires, 18' low pro-
file oak bed with dove tail, E-Z lube
hubs, 12,000 GBWR. Heavy duty 5
foot ramps and jack. Like new, $3,500.
863-899-1714 or 773-3500. 5:18c '


ALL CVIIV TCW~


Break down anywhere in town and we'll be there in a hurry!

Call us for 24-hour Emergency Service.

1-863-375-4441
Jimmy Hill Dan Hill
(863) 781-3090 (863) 781-3091
24-Hour Emergency Towing Lowes 'c:::Ale Rates Fast, Reliable Service


cl4:27tfc


MAKE AN OFFER FOR extended cab,
slip in camper, self contained. Ready
to use. To see call 863-773-6421.
5:11-18p'


DOUBLE WIDE storage unit, 24x36,
$1,000 you move. 767-8822. 5:18tfc
STORAGE LOT will store.your mobile
homes, RVs, trailers. 767-8822. 2:9tfc'


VAN DRIVER NEEDED Must be 18 or
older. Part-time position. Good driving
record. Compassion for the elderly.
For more information, call Ruth Long,
HOPE of Hardee, 773-2022. Apply at,
310 N. 8th Ave., Wauchula. EOE,,
DFWP. 5:11-25c
MTR FARMS INC. looking for CDL
class B driver for local deliveries. Full
time, M-F, position. Call 767-1667.
5:11-18p
LIVE-IN HOUSEKEEPER needed.
Send resume to P.O. Box 338, Box N,
Wauchula, FL 33873. 5:18p


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


'* LISTING IN Pou" COUNTY 2BR/1BA 1984 SINGLEWIDE ON 5 ACR "INF i' s .
ASKING $120,000 A o


New Listing in Zolfo Springs -
3BR/1 1/2 Bath CB Home with
Central Air & Heat, Close to
schools. Great location. Asking
$129,000.
REDUCED 2BR/1BA, 1,024
sq. ft. heated, Central Air & Heat
in Wauchula with nice privacy
fence. Good starter home. Asking
$115,000.00.
Well Maintained Home in
Riverview 2BR/1BA CB home
with central air & heat on 100x125
lot. Asking $149,900.
Duplex in Zolfo Springs Great
investment opportunity 4BR/2BA
total & Central Air & Heat. Asking
$138,000.
Move Back to the Country -
3BR/2BA 2005 Doublewide Mobile
Home on 5 Acres in Zolfo Springs.
Large front & back porch, pond,
horse stalls and a small workshop.
Call our office today for all the
details. Being Offered At:
$179,900.00.
Great Home for a Great Price -
Nice home for a large family 4BR +
Den/2BA, 1,892 sq. ft. heated with
in ground pool, 2 sheds, open area
in the rear, some private and chain-
link fencing on 2.5 Acres. 1/3 mile
from Lake Hendry. Located 6 miles
east of Ft. Meade, Florida.
MLS#: 183867 $249,000.


N
A
L


Spacious Home + Acreaage
3BR/2BA, 2 Car garage Large
Home with large pole barn and
fishing pond. New Carpet & New
Paint. Plenty of room for enjoying
a country lifestyle within a bike
ride to town. MLS#: 184963. Asking
$485,000.
Must See to Appreciate Brand
New 2006 Doublewide 3BR/2BA,
Fireplace, Very Nice Kitchen
Cabinets and Countertops, Big
back yard with oak trees on paved
road. Call us for all the details.
Brand New Home on Beautiful
Land 3BR/2BA, 2,000 sq. ft. of
living area, Central Air & Heat,
Fireplace, Beautiful Kitchen with
plenty of cabinet and counter
space. Home is on 4.81 acres with
two ponds, Great country setting.
Home is still under construction.
Call today for more details. Asking
$332,500.00.
REDUCED-Wauchula Hills
Special 3BR/2BA 2002 DW,
Spacious kitchen with skylight,
covered carport. Home has been
well maintained and is ready for
new owners. $79,000.00.
Beautiful Family Home -
3BR/2BA 2 Story home in
Riverview. This home is in immac-
ulent condition and ready for it's
new owners. Screened back and
front porch, 1,966 sq. ft. of living
area. Being offered at $179,900.00.
MLS#: 178258


Great Possibilities 9.5 Acres in
Bowling Green with an older frame
home 1BR/1BA and a singlewide
3BR/2BA. Use it as an investment
for now and build your dream
home later. MLS#:183008. Asking
$225,000.00.
Nice 2002 DW 3BR/2BA, 1,296
sq. ft. on 1 AC in Fort Green.
Asking $96,000.
Quiet Country Setting Good
Starter Mobile Home or
Investment 2BR/2BA 1992
Singlewide Mobile Home on 1
Acres could also be great future
homesite. Call for more details.
$65,000.00.
120 Acres Premium Grove and
Pasture Land Property located
in southeastern Hardee County.
Great homesite or ranch location.
Improved land all fenced in with
well maintained drainage. Being
offered at $2,415,740.00.
Come and Take a Look at this
Beautiful Property 3BR/2BA
CB home with approximately
2,200 sq ft. of living area and a 2
car garage. Located just west of
Wauchula on 10 acres. Close to
schools, shopping and downtown.
Home has new roof, new insula-
tion, new stucco and fresh paint.
Take a look at it today call for your
appointment Asking $469,900.
Land Listing in Zolfo Springs 5
acres fronting Sasser Road with
pond. Great for residential con-
struction or mobile home.
REDUCED $89,000.00.


WE BUY LOTS ANYWHERE IN
HARDEE COUNTY TOP PRICE CASH. QUICK CLOSINGS.
Contact After Hours
Joey Adam Flores (863) 781-4585 John Freeman (863) 781-408
,manda Mishoe (863) 781-3587 Steve Lanier (863) 559-939
.isa Douglas (863) 781-3247 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-689


4
2
1


G19:1 OU


u1~.


The


Help Wanted
Manager Trainee needed for Able Body Labor's Wauchula
area team. Company specializes in servicing the construction,
hospitality, light industrial and special events market. Duties
include dispatching workers to job site, setting-up new
accounts, making service calls to clients, recruiting temps,
etc. Ability to work flexible hours to include weekends a
MUST. EOE Competitive salary, bonus & benefits pkg.
E-mail resume to: region5jobs@ablebody.net cl5:18,25c


NOW RENTING!
THE PALMS APTS.
ATTENTION FARM WORKERS
4 Bedroom Apartments
Located at: 701 La Playa Drive
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 AM 5:00 PM
Monthly rent from $570 + utilities
Occupancy restricted to households with one family member receiving 50%
or more of their gross annual income from farm labor activities.
For Rental Info & Applications
The Palms at 863-773-3809
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Housing Opportunity
AHORA ARQUILANDO!
ATENCION TRABAJADORES DE FINCA
THE PALMS APARTMENTS
4 cuarto
Localizado en: 701 La Playa Drive
Horas de Oficina: Lunes y Viemes de 9:00 AM 5:00 P.M.
Mensualidades de renta comenzando de $570 + utilidades
Apartamentos designados para los encapacitados y desabilitados.
Intalarse es restrict a un miembro de familiar que reciban el 50% o mas de
Ingreso grueso annual en actividades de labor en agriculture.
Para information de renta o solicitudes
Llame, The Palms al: 863-773-3809
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Iqual Oportunidades de Viviendas cl5:18,25c


Help Wanted
Florida Fertilizer
Needs Truck Drivers and a Housekeeper.
We need drivers with a clean CDL "A" license, HazMat, tanker
endorsements, & 21 years old. Full time job, home each night, &
great benefits package.
We need someone to clean our office part-time, will train the right
person. Hours are M-F, 1 to 5.
Applicants need to apply at our office and must pass a drug test,
we are a drug-free workplace.
cl5:18c


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green


m [llilll]


Realtor
220 N. 6th Avenue Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net
Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net
www.floresrealty.net
A TEAM EFFORT!


(


w







8B The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


The


Classifieds


"Mac computer, OS9 operating sys-.
tem, upgradable to OS10, make offer.
767-1156. 5:18p
GATEWAY COMPUTER, scanner and
printer for sale, $200. Call 941-744-
6585. 5:11-6:8p


PERSONAL PROPERTY of Amanda
Griffin, Tracy Harris, Pamela Davis,
Paula Rodriguez, Maricela Lopez,
David Masten will be sold pursuant to
Warehouseman's lien: clothes, toys,
tools, household items. Said sale will
be at Bowling Green Storage, 5020
Hwy. 17 N. Bowling Green, Florida at,
9:00 a.m. Monday, June 5, 2006.
5:18-25p


5 MONTH OLD PUPPY, part Cur to
good home. 781-1545. 5:18nc
FREE PUPPIES: 4 months and 1
female one year all good for hunting.'
863-773-6370. 5:18p
FREE KITTENS: 11 weeks Please
give us a home. 863-445-0689. 5:18nc
LOOKING FOR HOMES for 4 big dogs,,
2 small dogs and six very cute kittens..
Contact All Creatures Animal Hospital
773-9215 or stop by and see. 5:18-25c'
BEAUTIFUL orange kitten with light
stripes & ring. FREE 773-0664. Good;
homes only. 5:18nc
STAFFORDSHIRE BULL Terrier pup-
pies, short/stocky, fawn & brindle,,
AKC registered, parents on premises.
(863) 781-6590. 5:4-6:1p


Teacher needed for a school located in a juvenile justice facil-
ity near Arcadia. Requires bachelor's degree and current
teaching certification or statement of eligibility. Year round
position with 50 paid days off. $32,500 plus excellent benefits.
Please fax resume to Greg Clark at 863-491-5343 or e-mail to
greg.clark(desoto.k12.fl.us EOE/DFWP c15:18c


BEAGLES one female, three males,
vet checked, 10 wks. old, trl-color.,
Call Hugh 445-3330. 4:20-5:18p
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a pet.
or are looking for a new one, the City
of Wauchula invites you to come and
see if you can find the pet you're look-'
Ing for. The Wauchula Animal Control,
Is located at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more information.
tfc-dh.


BULLDOG PUPPIES for sale
Johnson/Altman cross, $150. 735-
.2657. 5:11-18p.
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 828.29"
requires that all cats and dogs sold in.
Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have
an official health certificate, have nec-'
essary shots and be free of parasites.
tfc-dh
The first duty of love is to listen


Loader Work

Citrus Trees and Land Clearing


863-781-2089
cl5:18-6:29c


NEW FURNITURE
FOR LESS!
Lamps $17, 100-Barstools $39 up,
50-Desks $97 up, 3 Pc Dropleaf dinette
$197, 50-table and 4 chairs $397 up,
200-Recliners $297 up,
50-2 Pc Sofa & Loveseat Ats $687 up,
50-TV Ent. Centers $167 up, 2 Pc
Queen Bed Set $297 up, 50-4Pc bed-
room sets $387 up, 3 Pc Livingroom
tables $97 up,
100-Headboards $79 up.
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2346 U.S. 27 North* Sebring Florida
Next to Lowes & across
from Home Depot d4:20tfc


2002 Saturn


SPRING LANDSCAPING SALE: Pine'
bark nuggets, $14 per cubic yard; red
mulch, $18 per cubic yard. Pickup
truck load minimum. All prices F.O.B.
Florida Fence Post Company, Ona,'
FL. 863-735-1361. 5:4-25c.


U-PICK CORN and blackeyed peas,
SR 62. Call (941) 915-8821 for more
Information. 5:18p


p -


DESOTO COUNTY 5 acres on paved
roads, $150,000. HARDEE COUNTY -
1 acre on SR 64, $39,900. www.land-
callnow.com 1-941-778-7980/7565.
4:27-6:15c
DESOTO COUNTY 80 acres will split.
'$20,000 per acre. www.landcall-
now.com 1-941-778-7980/7565.
4:27-6:15c
TWO 1/4 acre lots, Charlie Creek
MHR $15,000 each, 781-5437.
4:27-5:25p


PiePiO Rive r ElectricCnnperative. Inc.
P.O. Box 1310*Wauchula. F1. 33873*(863)773-4116* fax (863) 773-3737* www.preco.org
A iToP.ltrinc Eiwrg% ( iperatI ive _,


Peace River Electric Cooperative is actively seeking an
Administrative Assistant

Our team-oriented company is growing and frankly, we need the help. We aren't willing to settle
for second best We require that you have at least a 2 year degree and also at least 5 years of
experience. The candidates must be proficient in Microsoft office and have good organizational
skills and be detail orientated. Must be able to work on a schedule and be able to meet
deadlines.

Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. has so much to offer and we work hard to be your
employer of choice. Take a chance and see if you have the "right stuff." If you are interested in
the position listed below, please pick up an application at any of our district offices, or download
an application from our website at www.oreco.orq. We are looking to hire right away, so don't
hesitate to apply. If you have any questions regarding the positions, salary or benefits, please
contact Barry Terrell at 863 767-4691 or by email at barry.terrell@oDreco.org.
Positions


Administrative Assistant


Central District


(Wauchula)


^es are g ERE PAY


Home of Hardee County's Best Sales Team!


15. I

c5 18c


PeP ee River Electric Cnperative Inc.
_______B___ P.O. Box 1310eWauchula. Fl. 33873e(863)773-4116* fax (863) 773-3737*www.prcco.org
A T"',udimiM wr o i r' ( :..'t':iwrl ti, v __t_-.


Peace River Electric Cooperative is actively seeking a
Payroll Specialist

Our team-oriented company is growing and frankly, we need the help. We aren't willing to settle
for second best. We require that you have at least a 2 year degree or at least 3 years of
experience in payroll. The candidates must be proficient in Microsoft office and have good
organizational skills and be detail orientated. Must be able to work on a schedule and be able to
meet deadlines.

Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. has so much to offer and we work hard to be your
employer of choice. Take a chance and see if you have the "right stuff." If you are interested in
the position listed below, please pick up an application at any of our district offices, or download
an application from our website at www.preco.orq. We are looking to hire right away, so don't
hesitate to apply. If you have any questions regarding the positions, salary or benefits, please
contact Barry Terrell at 863 767-4691 or by email at barrv.terrellapreco.orq.
Positions


Peace River Electric Nondiscrimination Statement

"Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (PRECO) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs,
sexual orientation, and marital or family status. Persons with disabilities who require alternative
means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc., Human Resources at (863) 767-4691.

To file a complaint of discrimination write Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc, Director of
Human Resources, P.O. Box 1310, 1499 US Highway 17 North or by telephone at (863) 767-
4691. PRECO is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Peace River Electric Cooperative is a Drug Free Workplace. All selected candidates are subject
to a pre-employment physical, drug test and background check as a condition of employment. 5s:18c


^^ Pence River Electri Cnnnerative. Inc..


" i ~P.O. Box 1310eWauchula, Fl.33873*(863)773-4116*fax (863)773-3737*www.prcco.org
'"IftwoorATom


Finkhlo Emic' mnCooprrdLivc___


Peace River Electric Cooperative is actively seeking a
Line Technician Apprentice and Meter Technician
Apprentice

Our team-oriented company is growing and frankly, we need the help. But we aren't willing to
settle for second best. We require that you have at least a 2 year degree and also at least 3
years of experience. The candidates must be proficient in Microsoft office and have good
organizational skills and be detail orientated. Must be able to work on a schedule and be able to
meet deadlines.

Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. has so much to offer and we work hard to be your
employer of choice. Take a chance and see if you have the "right stuff." If you are interested in
the position listed below, please pick up an application at any of our district offices, or download
an application from our website at www.preco.org. We are looking to hire right away, so don't
hesitate to apply. If you have any questions regarding the positions, salary or benefits, please
contact Barry Terrell at 863 767-4691 or by email at barry.terrell(apreco.orq.
Positions


Payroll Specialist


Central District


(Wauchula)


Peace River Electric Nondiscrimination Statement

"Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (PRECO) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs,
sexual orientation, and marital or family status. Persons with disabilities who require alternative
means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc., Human Resources at'(863) 767-4691.

To file a complaint of discrimination write Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc, Director of
Human Resources, P.O. Box 1310, 1499 US Highway 17 North or by telephone at (863) 767-
4691. PRECO is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Peace River Electric Cooperative is a Drug Free Workplace. All selected candidates.are subject
to a pre-employment physical, drug test and background check as a condition of employment
5:18c


Line Technician Apprentice
Line Technician Apprentice
Line Technician Apprentice
Meter Technician Apprentice


(1 position)
(2 positions)
(3 positions)
(1 position)


Eastern District (Indian Lake Estates)
Central District (Wauchula)
Western District (Bradenton)
Central District Wauchula


Peace River Electric Nondiscrimination Statement

"Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (PRECO) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and
activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs,
sexual orientation, and marital or family status. Persons with disabilities who require alternative
means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should
contact Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc., Human Resources at (863) 767-4691.

To file a complaint of discrimination write Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc, Director of
Human Resources, P.O. Box 1310, 1499 US Highway 17 North or by telephone at (863) 767-
4691. PRECO is an equal opportunity provider and employer. 5:18c


HELP WANTED
Bowling Green Youth Academy is looking for a
Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) to serve as
the programs Clinical Director for 52 female youth.
Applicants having experience providing mental health
and substance abuse treatment services to youth in a
residential setting is preferred. Competitive salary and
benefit package is available. Bowling Green Youth
Academy is also looking for a Bachelor level therapist
to provide mental health services to the female youth
in our program. All individuals interested should con-
tact Patricia Wheeler at 863-375-2000 ext. 221.
The program is located at
4705 US Highway 17 N
Bowling Green, Florida 33834
cl4:27-5:18c


Hiring Immediately
Central Florida Health Care, Inc.

Avon Park Center
Quality Improvement/Risk Manager Ability
to collect and analyze quality improvement data.
Knowledge of JACHO, safety regulations and appro-
priate safety measures, OSHA standards as they relate
to ambulatory centers. Travel within service area
(Highlands, Hardee, Polk). R.N., B.S.N. and/or license
in healthcare risk management.
Comp. salary, excellent benefits, pension plan. Corporation
pays for LTD & life insurance. Send Resume to: CFHC, 950
CR 17A West, Avon Park, FL, 33825, Fax # (863) 452-3011.
EOE/DFW. e15:18,25c


The Herald-Advocate
PRIWERS PUBLISHERS
P.O. Box 338 WWICIILIkI. FL 33873
'Mcphone (863) 773-3255






May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 9B


T he


WILL TRADE from Ft. Lauderdale new
05, 3 Bed 2 Bth M/H, and boat work
shop fully equipped including 26 ft.
boat for acreage with home or M/H
near town. Phil 954-547-1072 or 954-
966-5767. 5:18-25p.
RESTAURANT FOR RENT or sell, over
100 seats, good location. (863) 285-
7777 or (941) 234-7709. 5:18-6:15p


CB 2 BR (3 BR optional) 1 bath home
with central AC, new paint, ceramic
and laminate wood flooring, large
fenced backyard located in Riverview,,
$129,000. 863-521-0090. 5:11-6:8p
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY, 3309 Hwy.
17 N., BG. 1.76 ac., 4 units, $398,900
OBO. Call Ruthy (863) 245-1112.
5:4-6:1 p


DREDGE OPERATOR needed F/T for SMR
Aggregates mining company to run dredge and
pump systems to feed shell plant. Must be capa-
ble of maintain 300 TPH and feed to Shell Plant.
Email resumes to human.resources@smr-


ranch.com attn. HR, or
Schroeder-Manatee Ranch
Bradenton. EOE Drug Free


apply in person at
6215 Lorraine Road,
cl5:18c


Home-based Hardee County Magazine.
No experience necessary.
Customer base established for you. Training.
Net $75k.
Retiring. $39,900.
(941) 539-4353










Commercial lot, 75x169, with rental home in Ona $69,500.
5 acres Prime location. Vandolah Rd and Dink Albritton Rd. $110,000.
1 acre in Ona with 1/2 zoned C-1 includes 3 rental houses at $900 per
month. $140,000.
Vacant corner lot. 62x175, located on West Main St., Wauchula. In the
downtown Historical district, building ready. $175,000.
309 Illinois Ave. Large frame home. 4/2. Large lot. $67,500.
15 acre grove, irrigated, tiled, Rhyme Road, $300,000.
509 Peace Dr., 2/1. H/A, nice lot. $80,000.
319 SE 7th St., Ft. Meade, large lot, 3/2 with air, like new, $165,000.
421 Grape St. BG 3/1, central H/A, CB $65,000.





WE Pay CaSH



FOR HOUSES







Office Ph: 375-3113

Mobile Ph: 781-4460



BILL STATON
cl1:5tfc



Geta new set of

TREADS!

Fast & Friendly We won't be
Service Undersold


( We do
am -2f 1 --Ilma


'i


Trailer Tires! /




I IU flrY H


HOURS 116 REA Rd.
Mon. Fri. 8-6 Wauchula
Sat. 8-12 (across from Wal-Mart)

863-773-0777
863-773-0727
Billy Ayers Donna Eures
Tire Technician We do it for LE$$! Secretary
ISe Ilabl Espanell -.
4 I 1


Classifieds-


U-

COME LIVE IN TENNESSEE 2 BR/2
Bath home, in the country also
Includes 14x70 mobile home, has
screened-in back porch all on large.
lot. Located in Waynesboro, Tenn.,
$60,000. 1-800-875-1012. 5:11-18p
OWNER WILL FINANCE Lots DeSoto
County and North Port. No credit
check and no bank needed. (941) 358-
5325. 5:4-18p




-a,
-, ,, Ia. Fl- ',3S7
II c [hon (863) 73-32.55


SOUTH4 FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLFGF


RV FOR SALE 767-8822. 3:2tfc
35'FLEETWOOD PROWLER 767-8822.
4:20tfc


COMMERCIAL OFFICES, stores,
warehouses, 20,000 s.f. available.
Build to suit. 773-6616. 5:18-6:15p
2 BEAUTIFUL HOMES FOR RENT! 1-
3 BR/ 2 BA; 1-2 BR/ 1 BA on 3 acres.
Both completely remodeled, ready to
move in; 1st/last/security. (305) 970-
1957. 5:18-25c
2 BR/ 1 B APARTMENT, $650 month,
1st, last plus deposit required. 773-
0100. 5:4tfc
ADULT PARK Crystal Lake. We have
RVs for sale and rent. Some can be
moved. 767-8822. 3:16tfc


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, Fl 33825
(863) 784-7132 FAX (863) 784-7497
E-Mail; jobs@southflorida.edu
www.southflorida.edu


INSTRUCTOR, DENTAL EDUCATION
Full-time faculty position to teach Dental Hygiene and Dental Assisting
starting in the Fall (August, 2006). Bachelor's degree required and a min-
imum of 2 yrs. clinical exp. as a hygienist required. (Current enrollment
in a Bachelor's degree program and extensive experience may substitute
if degree award is expected within 3 years.) Competitive salary and ben-
efit package including retirement, health & life insurance, and sick leave.
Application forms and detailed position announcements are available in
Human Resources, Building I (Avon Park), at any SFCC campus/center,
and on our web site.
Application deadline: 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 7, 2006
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
c15:18,25c


For Rent Mountain cabin, Bryson City, N.C. Sleeps 4 to 5. Bring tooth-
brush. Call Bart
House in Bowling Green. 4BR/2Bth on Big lot. $160,000:
18.9 ac. Ft. Green, C-2 Zoning, Hwy 62 Frontage, frame home incl., $500,000.
Commercial 4 Lots Hwy 17 $225,000. Bowling Green.
37 ac..- 1/2 pasture, 1/2 Hamlin on Swingle, micro irrigation. $14,000 per ac.
160 ac.-120 ac. citrus/40 ac.woods. 2 wells w/jets. Lots of rd. fmtg.
$14,000/ac.
40 ac. WM Itbnterto in
kitchen, woorffd ors, irp'acrp in maser b'edrooS and. lingf ron6 00,000.
57 ac. total. 38 ac citrus w/2wells, microjet and 19 ac. in woods $14,000 per ac.
75 ac. total w/55 ac. citrus, deep well, microjet, Ft. Green area, $1,000,000.
40 ac. citrus, well, microjet, hard road fmtg., can divide, $21,000 per ac.
106 ac. on Hwy 64, over 2750 ft. of frontage, Lemon Grove area, deep well,
2 frame houses, $3,180,000. c15:18c






Joe L.Dayvis
INC., REALTORS
S(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
SREALTORJOHN H. O'NEAL
Monica Reas
See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS
20 ac. Hamlin grove between Avon RELAX & ENJOY! This beautiful,
Park & Wauchula. Mostly young wooded 52 ac. tract in SW Hardee
trees, increasing in production with Co has easy access with dble road
micro-jet irrigation. $260,000! frontage. $780,000!
4 BR, 2 bath home in Golfview with Ready for your new home! Three 5
2457 living SF. New A/C, 1 yr old acre tracts in western Hardee Co.
roof, in ground screened pool, land- Asking $100,000 each! Make your
escaped yard, and appliances, offer today. Owners motivated!
$250,000! 18 acs. prime development. South
20 ac. Hamlin grove approx. 2.5 side of Bowling Green. Future land
miles east of Wauchula. Paved rd use is Highway Mixed Use.
frontage. $320,000! $622,000!
Serene beautiful homesites in the Take part and locate your business
country await you! One 5 ac. par- in this growing commercial area!
cel is cleared & pasture, listed for 450' on North Florida Ave. Zoned
$99,000. An adjacent 9.47 ac. par- commercial. $360,000!
cel has a small lake (complete with 27 ac. Hamlin grove. Eastern
ducks) and 4" diameter well, listed Hardee Co. $15,000/ac!
for $189,000. Seller will consider 20 acs. in western Hardee Co.
assistance with buyer closing costs. Beautiful homesite with a lake view.
3 BR, 2 bath, CB home with 1876 $220,000. Deed Restrictions.
SF on 2.5 cleared acs. Security sys- Experience native Florida with this
tem, all appliances, large yard shed 23 ac. parcel east of Zolfo Springs!
included. $195,000! Road frontage on three sides and
Beautiful 10 ac. homesite, pasture, plenty of trees make this property
woods on paved road. $180,000! attractive. Only $276,000!
Two wooded 1 ac. tracts in the 2 BR, 1 bath CB home in Wauchula
Inverness area. Two minutes from on Orange St. Convenient location.
boat landing to the Withlacootchee. $120,000!
One tract has well, septic & electric CB home. 4 BR, 2 bath on Saunders
plus fill for your home. $60,000! St in Wauchula. $99,000!
REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS-......781-0153 DAVID ROYAL................781-3490
RICK KNIGHT. .........-773-2472 SANDY LARRISON........832-0130
MONICA REAS.-. ....773-9609 MIKE NICHOLSON


U.S. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c5:18c


WAREHOUSES, SEVERAL DIFFER-
ENT sizes. Jack UIIrich Warehouses.
773-6448. 5:18c
NORTHSIDE APARTMENTS: Ft.
' Meade. Nice neighborhood, 2 BR/ 1 B,
C/HA, $600 month plus security. Call
Shella (863) 375-9988, (863) 285-'
7203, (863) 781-4927. Suitable for
adults. 5:18-25c


VERY NICE 34' AVION trailer. 1 BR,
roof air, fully furnished, no pets,,
$500/month, $250 security deposit,
includes utilities. 374-4424. 5:18-25p
HOUSES, APARTMENTS, trailers,
weekly, monthly, $350/wk., $700/mo.
lease. 863-370-2393 or 773-6616.
5:18-6:15p


Help Wanted
Position available to provide (NRSS) Non-Residential
Support Services to individuals with developmental
disabilities. Interested individuals shall have at least 1
year experience in a related field. High School Diploma
or Equivalent, State of Florida Driver's License (in
good standing) own vehicle and proof of insurance
required. Background checks are conducted. If inter-
ested please apply at
VOCA OF FLORIDA
114 W. Carlton St. Wauchula, FL
(863)-773-0434.
M/F V/D E.O.E
cl5:18,25c


Florida Institute For
Neurologic Rehabilitation, Inc. (FINR),
in Wauchula, is now hiring for the following positions.
Applicants must be at least 18 yrs of age & have a mini-
mum of a HS Diploma/GED.
THERAPISTS PT/PTA/OT/COTA Current FL
licensure & experience is required. Part time and Full
Time positions available.
CASE MANAGER BA in Social Work, Healthcare
or related field required. 3-5 yrs experience preferred.
C.N.A. Current FL licensure and experience required.
B, C, w/end shifts.

UTILITY SERVICE TECH- Electrical, plumbing &
tile work. Prefer 3-5 yrs experience.
ENVIRONMENTAL TECH- Trash removal, supply
deliveries & misc. cleaning duties.
GROUNDSKEEPER- Responsible for all aspects of
landscaping & maintaining grounds. Experience preferred.
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT-'
Provide direct care to clients. Must be patient, reliable &
trustworthy. C shift & weekends available. No experience
required.
A ly at.1-962-Vandolah Rd., fax resume to 863-773-204-1-,.
o'e.-maitto annettedhr@finr.net. EOE/DFWP cI5 8rfc


JIMlEE REALTYI ,I NC








NEW LISTING! Brand new home! 3 BR/2BA on cornerlot with lots of oaks.
Many extras including crown molding, island with bar in kitchen, tray ceil-
ing and plant shelves in living room. The master suite has a walk in closet
and walk in shower. Two car garage. Only $177,500!
OWNERS HAVE MOVED! READY TO SELL! 3 BR/2 BA cedar home on
approximately 1.52 acres within 1 mile of town. Beautiful home with many
upgrades. Recently repainted. Country living close to town. Only $285,000.
13.83 acres of grove and house. This great property comes with an
adorable 1 or 2 bedroom, 1 1/2BA frame house and pole barns. Don't wait
to see this, call Tanya Dubberly today. Asking only $375,000.
Perfect location close to town off Popash Road! 2,514 total SF, 3 BR, 2 bath,
open floor plan, CBS/stucco home on 5 beautiful acres! Lots of beautiful old
oaks! Deed restricted. Call Mary Rollins to see! Listed at just $310,000!
215 acres of grove, 37 wooded acres and two 3BR/2BA homes each on 6
acres of cleared land. The possibilities are endless for this 264 acres! Call
our office for details!
83 ac. close to golf course and town. Frontage on two County roads.
Currently zoned FR-1. $20,000 per acre.
4.8 Acres close to town. Beautiful homesite located in a new subdivision.
Don't miss a chance to own the last parcel available in this area. Now only
$91,000.
Good home sites on paved road! Three 5-ac. tracts on Parnell Road. Listed
for $19,500 per acre!
37 acres in Polk County Approximately 700 feet on Lake Lizzie. 2400
feet of paved road frontage and 30 acres of citrus. One 8" well and one 6"
well. Asking $1,100,000.
122 acres development property on US 98 near US 27. Presently a good
quality citrus grove. Offered at $20,000 per acre!
3,242 ac. of prime development property located in Manatee County, with
3.7 miles of paved road frontage and over 3 miles along the Myakka River.
This property already has two single family homes, equipment barns, cow
pens and six wells with diesel power units! Will sell in 2 tracts! Call Bruce
Shackelford for details!
2,060 ac SR 70 Manatee County ranch/development property. Over 85%
uplands. Two small houses, packinghouse with cold storage. Call Ben
Gibson for details.
NEW LISTING! 1 acre tract in new development area. Deed restricted.
Electric available. Good location. Listed for $37,500.
Highlands County! We have listings! Call John Gross for more information!
WE WANT YOUR LISTINGS!
O CALL OUR OFFICE
TODAY!
www.jimseerealty.com n -
James V. See, Jr., Broker James V. See, Sr., Broker
Sales Associates
(after hours)
Mary Rollins (863) 781-9495 Robert Jones (863) 781-1423
Ben Gibson (941) 737-2800 John H. Gross (863) 273-1017
Joseph F. Smith (863) 781-1851 Tanya Dubberly (863) 781-3069
Bruce E. Shackelford (941) 725-1358
We are a member of the Wauchula Board of Realtors and Multiple Listing
Service, and can service other Realtors' listings. cl5:18c






10B The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


.The


Classifieds


ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising any
preference or limitation based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin, or
the intention to make such a prefer-
ence or limitation. Familial status
includes children under 18 living with
parents or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a problem?
Call Alchoholics Anonymous in
Hardee County at 735-3109. Several
weekly meetings. dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP.
For complete well, sales, service and
installation, call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
LET US PICK up junk cars out of your
yard. Will buy old farm tractors.
Crooms- 773-0637. 2:24tfc


C&P CONSTRUCTION. Demolition, fill
dirt, tree removal, stump removal,
dragline, track hoe, land clearing,
shell, clay, top soil, loader, bulldozer,
dump trucks. 735-2415. 1:19tfc
CENTRAL PUMP & IRRIGATION, INC.,
(863) 773-6259. Services include aer-
ators, house pumps, new installation
& repair on yard systems. 5:26tfc
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUR Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. Located
at the SFCC Annex, Room #105, Hwy.
17 North, Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
OSTOMY, COLOSTOMY, AND ideosto-
my supplies now in stock at Pete's
Pharmacy. tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs?
Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday
nights .7 p.m. at St. Michael's
Catholic Church, Heard Bridge Rd.,
Wauchula and Tuesday, Friday and
Saturday nights 7 p.m. at First
Methodist Church, Corner of Grape &
Church St., Bowling Green.
7:18tfcdh
PAINTING BY PRO- small jobs, Inside
or outside. 941-518-9476. 5:11:18p


SEPTIC PROBLEMS? DRAINFIELD PROBLEMS?
CALL
HASH PLUMBING, INC.
773-9294

WE ARE THERE FOR ALL YOUR PLUMBING NEEDS
RESIDENTAIL OR COMMERCIAL
REPAIRS REMODELS NEW CONSTRUCTION -LEAKY FAUCETS *
WATER HEATERS DRAIN CLEANING *
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
LICENSED & INSURED: RF11067178 cl5:11,18c 608 SOUTH 6TH AVE WAUCHULA, FL

Help Wanted
Southeast Modular Mfg. South
Has an Immediate opening for all
phases of modular construction.
Experienced welders, framers, trim carpenters,
plumbers and electricians.
Competitive pay, benefits and 401-K.
Apply in person 1340 Highway 17 North
Wauchula, FL 33873
EOE/Drug Free Workplace c14:20tfc


NEED A WEB SITE set up? Call 941-
270-7659. See our sample at pearlsof-
perfection.com. 5:18p
I WILL DO BABY SITTING in my home
anytime. 863-445-0572. 5:11-18p
JIM'S PAINTING SERVICE. House and
mobile home repair.. Interior and exte-
rior. Mobile top coating, pressure
washing, free estimates, Lic. & Ins.
#218. 767-9650. 5:11-25p
D.C. PHONE SERVICE Residential
and small business installation and
repair. Specializing in mobile homes,
computer wiring, 35 years experience.
773-9179. 4:27-6:29p"
DISCING, MOWING, hauling, tractor
service. 781-3141, 735-0140 leave
message. 4:13-5:18p

DIVORCE


BANKRUPTCY


$69
863-314-0846
(non-lawyer) ,~t


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-119
Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee'
County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10'
Paragraph D require all ads for any
construction-related service to carry
the contractor's license number.
dh
HANDYMAN FREE ESTIMATES.
Remodeling, decks, flooring, tile,
doors, windows. No job too small
David Newcomb & Son. Lic.#0967.
David Sr., (863) 781-6479; David Jr.,
(863) 781-3139; home, (863) 375-
2526. Call anytime. 5:4-6:1 p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION Car-
ports, screen rooms, additions, pool
,cages. Harold Howze Construction.
735-1158. 4:6-6:22p


We I y




AM-SOUTH REALTY
;r;(!3) 773 r2^2,1-
7*^~r'H4
o :*;?,. ..jjL.!.*.-*


5105 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green


Open:
Mon Sat
8:00 5:00
375-4461


* We repair most
American cars
* Full time mechanic
* We are license
and Insured!
Reg #MV-40625


Bo Espinoi
Auto Technician


I LUnfOtcf
PAINTING & PRESSURE WASHING

Mike Gantt 863-832-1012
Insured/Residential and Commercial/ Free Quotes
cl5:18p


COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL RESIDENTIAL

Land Clearing *
Pond Excavation *
Dirt Hauling / Grade Work *
Citrus Tree Removal *
Demolition *
Site Prep *


86-75-27


DAVID MILLS, OWNER
Established 1972 cl4:27tfc


Citrus Removal Land Clearing
backhoe Work
Fond Digging Ditch Cleaning
Driveways pebble Rock, etc.



Shawn Rimes
(863) 781-0412
Agnet
158*17*9761
References Provided Upon Requests cl8:8tfc


Bowling Green Youth Academy
is currently seeking an
LPN or RN.

The starting salary range is

$18-$22 for LPN and

$20-$25 per hour for RN.


Applications


are available at the


STRUCTURED LAWNCARE and land-
scaping. Licensed and Insured, com-
mercial and residential, new landscap-
Ing, relandscaping. Call Jesse
DeBoom C-863-781-2753 or H-863-
735-0590. 2:23-5:25p
B SEE
SOUND
PRO-AUDIO for any event. 773-6375..
www.bseesound.com. 2:16-5:25p,
LAWN CARE & LANDSCAPE services
Commercial and residential, insured,
locally owned and operated. Free
Estimates. Call My Florida Landscape
Service 863-832-2102. 4:6-6:8p


LADY IN HER 60s that likes country
living, eating out, gardening, and fish-
Ing with man in his 60s owns his own
home. Call (863) 781-2457. 5:18p


WE HAVE refrigerators, gas stoves,
electric washers, dryers, freezers,
metal bunkbed, twin on top, full on
bottom, king & queen beds, dressers,
chests at Edna's Place. 4:20tfc
SATURDAY: 8-? 431 Altman Rd. Lots
of everything. 5:18p
MULTI-FAM. SALEI Electronics, furni-
ture, toys, ladies & newborn clothes,
household Items. Sat., 8-12:30. 301 W.
Oak St. 5:18p


FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 8 a.m. ?
2402 Hampton Rd., Wauchula. Large'.
size prom dress, lots of miscella-:
neous, some new some old. 5:18p.;
AIRPORT RD. Carl's Auto Salvage.
Fri., 9-4, Sat., 9-12. 5:18p
FRIDAY: 8:00, 274 West Main St., 3
miles from FLa. Ave. Tapes, motorcy-
cle helmets, tools, crafts, toys, lots of
household items. 5:18p
HUGE YARD SALE: Fri. & Sat. 8 til ? at
904 S. 8th Ave., Wauchula. 5:18p.-.
FRIDAY/SATUDAY, 7 a.m. ?, 4953-
Central Ave., BG. 5:18p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY if weather per-
mits. 3439 Elm Street, Zolfo Springs. "
5:18p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 8-5, 772 Polk
Road. Baby clothes and misc. 5:18p
SATURDAY: 8 a.m. 2 p.m., 1813
Ratliff Rd., Wauchula. 5:18p
BIG YARD SALE: Sat. 5/20/06 at 109
N. Fl. Ave. Everything refrigerators,
stoves, clothes, toys, antiques, furni-
ture, dry sink, to much to list. Don't
'miss this one. 5:18p





-IIhoe(83.73325


AHelp Wanted
Projgretssive Ear(y ChUWhoo04
Deve(o>lo ent Center
Now Hiring
A ,(Mv at 19 Man(ey R4d Wauchu(a
Phone 773-5816 c15:11,18c


f/ CITY OF WAUCHULA
Accepting applications for the position of Customer
Service Clerk/Cashier. Duties include servicing existing
utility customers, setting up new accounts, and collecting
payments; providing service related to cemetery plots;
answering telephones and directing calls to correct per- :
son. Must have working knowledge of modern office prac-
tices and equipment. Must be able to demonstrate ability
to collect and account for cash transactions. Must be able
to use Microsoft Office applications effectively. Bi-lingual
capability (Spanish) highly desirable, but not required.
Competitive salary, excellent benefits. To apply for this
position, or for additional information, contact Human i
Resources at 126 S. 7th Ave., Wauchula. EEO/DFWP
Closing date for accepting application is 5/22/2006 @ 5:00pm.
S5:18



OIL"I

Reafltor
5757 Trask Road, Ft. Meade
(863) 285-7118

255 a/c "Sweetwater" area. 155 in woods
with creek, 100 citrus grove with 10"
well. Paved & clay roads $10,000 a/c.
Would sell woods separate.

125 a/c Hills Co. Citrus, woods, creek,
paved road. 21 miles SW of Plant City.
$19,500 a/c.
Check my web site
www.maryadsit.com.
cl5:11118.25c


facility or you can send a resume to:
PO Box 369
Bowling Green, FL 33834
(863) 375-2000 ext. 221
Fax (863) 375-9929 c5:18-6:8c


E.J. MILLS & SONS INC.


0


0


I












The


All Types Roofing
Repairs Roofing HARDEE ROOFING INC.

Reroofs
Rerooftal 863-773-0377
Shingles at"71 S. Fl. Ave
Flat Fl. S" c. no. CCC1326969
Licensed & Insured
Serving Hardee, DeSoto, &
Polk Counties for 12 years.
cl3:30-6:1p


PILKINGTON TREE SERVICE INC
Bobcat and Crano orvico Troo Trimming
Comploto Troo Removal
*FREE ESTIMATES*

(883) 781-2089
Licensed a Insured Accept M/. s Visa



Shell

GILLIARD FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Sand
Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 c14:28ffc Mobile: (941) 456-6507

Payroll
Temporary or Federal and State
Permanent LABO Taxes
*A Deposits
Personnel and SOLUTIONS Tax Reports
Payroll Services Personnel Services Worker's Comp
Payroll Services FICA
Year End W2's
CONTACT:
ROBBY ALBRITTON 116 W. Orange St., Wauchula
(863) 773-9225 1o:21tic



Con e't star.
c, Co. st3 tzoi c .r ,- c o, -
G9ieral Contractor
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated

Office 863-773-4779 Fax 863-773-9865 I



Golf Carts
2006 Club Cars
Gas special $4,150
electric also available

"863-773-2353 :nc





General help and person
experienced in spraying
or willing to learn at our
Zolfo Springs location.
Applicant must have a valid ID & Social Security.
All positions are full time.
Apply in person at:
Sunshine Foliage World
2060 Steve Roberts Special
iS Zolfo Springs, FL cl4:20c


lToday

(863) 781-1062

*$1,0ooo Bonus if
Billy Buys your
house!
Billy pays all Closing
Costs!


7:7 Close in as little
SHillas 7 days!


y-e.a1,7


May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 11B





Clas sifieds


Light One Candle
By Dennis Heaney
President Of The Christophers


NO WEDDING GIFTS, PLEASE
"No gifts, please."
That's the kind of invitation most of us welcome, for a variety of rea-
sons. Obviously it frees the recipient from the obligation of going out and
buying a present, but beyond that it usually signifies a happy occasion -
the birthday or wedding anniversary of older people, perhaps, who already
have more than enough material goods and for whom the presence of
friends is far more important than whatever they might bring with them.
But, "No wedding gifts, please"? That's a little more unexpected, espe-
cially in a culture where the money spent on weddings and everything that
goes with them has pretty much gone over the top.
Still, "No wedding gifts, please" was precisely the headline I spotted in
The Orange County Register during my recent visit to California. Of course
I had to read on.
The story, written by Jeff Rowe, told of a couple from the town of Aliso
Viejo who made their wedding day a special one in a very different way.
Rob Pelletier and Sue Eggert, who were married on March 31, sent out the
usual invitations in advance. But they asked everyone who received one to
skip the traditional wedding gift and make a donation instead specifical-
ly, a donation to the Village of Hope in the Orange County community of
Tustin, which is building a homeless shelter and training complex on a five-
acre site that's part of a former Marine Corps base.
"We're blessed," said Pelletier, who explained that he and his new wife
already have all the household goods they need. The idea to ask for dona-
tions instead of gifts came to them at Coast Hills Church in Aliso Viejo,
which stresses the virtue of giving to others. There was also a motive behind
the request, he added: "Our hope was to spur other people to do this."
Naturally, the folks at the Village of Hope and the Orange County
Rescue Mission, which will operate the facility when it's completed, were
delighted.
"This has never happened before," said Melanie McNiff, a spokes-
woman for the mission. "We're excited and totally blessed that they wanted
to share their day with us."
As it is throughout the country, the task being taken on by the Village
of Hope is huge and daunting. The complex will house 192 homeless peo-
ple and provide classes to train them for jobs, but many many more need
attention. The county estimates it has some 35,000 people without homes,
about 80 percent of them the "working poor" who don't earn enough to
afford steady shelter.
Still, this is a start and Rescue Mission officials are deeply grateful.
They estimated that donations from the Pelletier-Eggert wedding will total
about $7,000.
It's reasonable to hope that the publicity resulting from the newlyweds'
generous gesture will indeed spur others to follow their example, just as
they hope. After all, in many cases today the bride and groom are older or
are marrying for the second time (as were Pelletier and Eggert), and have
already accumulated some substantial possessions.
At any rate, what they did was especially thoughtful, in a way that will
benefit many other people. That's in the finest Christopher tradition, and
that's what I call making a difference.
For a free copy of "Getting To Know You: Thoughts For Engaged Couples"
write: The Christophers, 12 East 48th Street, New York, NY 10017; or e-
mail: mail@christophers.org. .


PARKER FILL DIRT
DEMOLITION
Fill Dirt Tree Removal Stump Removal*
Dragline Track Hoe Land Clearing *
Shell Clay -Top Soil Bulldozer *
Dump Trucks *
(863) 735-2415i c,:tra


J-N-T's -
MOWING SERVICE
l Jimmy &Thmmy McNabb A
a.wcS^VS Licensed & Insured &SIlK- f-
Office 863-735-2902 *.Celi 863-781-6703
Nextel 161*149209*3 Fax 863-735-0126
Specializing In
Lot Clearing Dirt Work "
Fence Building Bush Hogging ,
Brush Removal Pasture/Grove Mowing
___ _______ __ ...._ ___ _...:' __________'


CAROL'S
POOL
SERVICE
-10 Years Experience-
Certified & Insured
Office: 863-452-6026
Cell: 863-449-1806


AJ's Tree Service
We Will Not Be Under Bid
., TREE TRIMMING
CUTTING CLEAN-UP, ETC.
1 Free Estimates
1,4 (863) 767-0934
Cell: (863) 781-2783
4:27-5:25p


WEATHER SUMMARY
Significant showers fell over the Panhandle and parts of the northern
and central Peninsula during the week of May 8 14. Most of the southern
Peninsula received a quarter inch or less of rain for the week. Homestead
and Ft. Lauderdale reported no rainfall; nearly seven inches fell in
Carrabelle. Hail accompanied the rains in Gadsden County with no reports
of significant crop damage occurring. Temperatures in the major cities
averaged from 2 degrees below to 2 degrees above normal during the week.
Daytime highs were in the 80s and 90s while nighttime lows were in the
50s, 60s and 70s. Tallahassee and Ona reported at least one low in the 40s.
Wild fire danger remains high in central and southern areas and in some
northern Peninsula localities with a significant muck fire in Brevard County
producing heavy smoke.
FIELD CROPS
The rain allowed field work to resume in most areas of the Panhandle
.and northern Peninsula. Growers resumed peanut and cotton planting as
field conditions permitted. However,. some planting was delayed by .wet
ground in Jefferson County. Peanut planting is 20 percent completed com-
pared with 27 percent planted last year by this date and the five-year aver-
age of 37 percent. Pecans show a good catkin bloom in Jefferson County.
Soil moisture supplies improved across the Panhandle with Jefferson,
Holmes and Washington counties reporting areas having surplus moisture.
The central and southern Peninsula remained dry with soil moisture rated
very short to short.


Moisture
Rating


Topsoil


- Subsoii.


This I-Last Last This- '---ait I st--
week Iweek year -week--- -week: I--Year'


Percent
Very short 35 49 2 35 52 1
Short 40 46 27 30 38 21
Adequate 21 5 69 35 10 76
Surplus 4 0 2 0 0 2
VEGETABLES
Mostly dry conditions over the southern and central Peninsula allowed
harvesting to proceed on schedule with growers starting shipments to meet
the Memorial Day demand. Celery cutting is virtually finished with only a
very light amount marketed during the week. Producers continued to cut
very light supplies of cabbage with harvesting near the end. Other vegeta-
bles and non citrus fruit marketed during the week included beans, blue-
berries, cantaloupes, sweet corn, cucumbers, eggplant, okra, peppers, pota-
toes, radishes, squash, tomatoes and watermelons. Very light amounts of
endive and escarole were also shipped during the week.
LIVESTOCK AND PASTURES
In the Panhandle, most pasture and cattle are in fair to good condition.
Pasture grass is growing following recent rain, reducing supplemental hay
feeding. In the North, most pasture is in fair condition. Hay feeding is
active. Pasture is finally starting to grow after receiving some rain. In the
central areas, pasture condition is mostly poor and cattle are in poor to
good condition. In the southwest, pasture is in very poor to fair condition.
Statewide, cattle condition varies from poor to good with most in fair con-
dition.
Cattle Pasture -
Condition This Last This. Last
-week week week week:
Percent
Vry poor.-, 0 1 5 5
Poor r-. 25 9 60 45
Fair 65 70 30 49
Good 10 20 5 1
Excellent 0 0 0 0
CITRUS
Rain finally came to the State, but only reached the northern citrus area
in significant quantities. Almost two inches fell in Apopka, where few cit-
rus groves remain. All other citrus growing areas had less than a half of an
inch. Daytime temperatures reached the high 80s to low 90s in all areas,
.with a high of 94 degrees in Sebring. Groves with minimal irrigation are
showing signs of stress from lack of water. Some areas have reported less
than half of an inch of rain in the last six weeks. The southern area is
extremely dry, giving groves with low maintenance an abandoned and
uncared-for look. Growers are applying copper sprays to control citrus
canker, conducting canal maintenance and herbiciding. Valencia harvest
continues to be the main effort and will be picked heavily into June.
Grapefruit harvest is beginning to wind down for the season with the major-
ity going to processing. Honey tangerine utilization dropped below one
hundred thousand boxes last week, being picked primarily for the fresh
market. .
ESTIMATED BOXES HARVESTED WEEK ENDED
Crop I Apr 30 | May 07 May 15
In thousands of 1-3/5 bushel boxes
Valencia 4,781 5,062 4,785
Grapefruit 188 136 67
Honey Tangerines 132 117 98
Temples 1 2 0


Joyce Oliver-Fulse
Certified Clinical Competent Speech Language Pathologist
4831 Dixiana Avenue, Suite C
Bowling Green, Florida
Phone: 863-375-9996
Fax: 863-375-3149
Providing Speech -Language Pathology Services in Hardee County
s5:Sp


guiding with strength -."
caring with compassion.
Mmx) 3 thrinhl' ubsking and mrriiding hnur sxr lc c ipcmwmr
pmfeumuh tie nu n=6i a predne diferene ih he lnes of triacep &ybsd ~~u .ay
Nlaslee of Social %oVA FaII.11nie LPN, FoiTUmn
NlJ.a.U5ji 4p.I2L W- withirotating wecmk
NISSmcaof Social %VO'.L aj-rune R. N. N ,Dims
M1 hoop. ums k MLHome igi,. I lot'1c hedbingi


SLPN. P Dion


M-emsil, e hodulmgI ~..~ubedcuag
iCCIC,d)n i r4 mI I r.. 9M CCH IS ill~uxa riI,.r41M10,cimeildhVIKIIcIii lt. lla~w" midmachnlnd
loit cnidcrtwo. pl~casell cre al iSGO,464-3994oc he rmmta to (363) 6870M7.


"On The Jok


RESCHKE CONSTRUCTION, INC.
State Certified Building and Roofing Contractor
Residential Remodeling
Zolfo Springs, Florida
(863) 735-0660 (863) 832-0409
John Reschke CCC-045
Bill Reschke cl4:21tfc License CBC-12


*V.
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5925
2430




12B The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006
U


You won't find lower Ford Prices anywhere!
Our low country overhead allows us to sell for less every time!
Bring us your Best Deal from any Ford
dealer anywhere, and if we can't *:?t -


u oye vas $100 or more
well Pay You $1,000 Cash!*


(ISED CARS ZEROA


DOWN I)AYS!


Buy any used vehicle with absolutely No Money Down!
Shop the nicest, cleanest used inventory anywhere in this area!


Tax, Tag, And $397 Dealer Fee Not Included In Sale Prices. Payments Based On 72 Months @ 5.99% APR. Requires 740+ Credit Beacon. If Not, Your Payments Will Be Higher. All Payments With No Money Down. WAC
*Crown Ford reserves the right to buy competitors vehicle at same price.


NNW-
Over 250 New Fords in stock and ready MM
for immediate delivery! NNW
MPPI'


















Dixie Belles Finish 3 More


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's down to the final games for


the Dixie Youth Belles.
The 12-to-14-year division has
just three games left on the sched-


Braves Pick Up


D 0 0 0
ixie Wins


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Florida Fertilizer Braves
notched another pair of victories in
Dixie Boys play last week.
The wins cemented the undefeat-
ed Braves as the team to beat in the
final two weeks of the season.
At the end of last week the
Braves had a 7-0 record, followed
by the Torrey Oaks Rangers and the
BJD Excavating Red Sox, although
scores from interleague games with
Bartow, Fort Meade and Winter
Haven have not always been avail-
able.
Last Monday, the Red Sox-
downed the Rangers 10-2.
For the Sox, Nick Battles used
three hits and a walk for three
Scores. Leadoff batter Jacob Mayer
added three hits and three tallies
and Taylor Barlow and Marcus
Chancey had two scores apiece.
Dillon Rabon added a solo score.
Trenton Muntz, Thomas Flores and
Battles were also stranded on the
base paths.
For the Rangers, Michael
Forrester walked and scored in the
fifth inning and Josh Rickett sin-
gled and scored in the sixth. Left on
base were Jonathan Kelly, Danson


Hansley, Kalan Royal, Lincoln
Saunders, Danny Rodriguez and
Dustin Maddox.
On Tuesday night, there was no
score in the early game between
Bartow and the Rangers.
In the late game, the Braves shut
Bartow out 9-0.
Carson Davis had three trips.
around the bases for the Braves.
Tyler Cobb and Conner Davis
added two more apiece and Dalton
Farr and Caleb Reas had one each.
Farr doubled twice and Carson
Davis and Grayson Lambert each
also doubled.
Bartow stranded only one runner
with eight batters striking out when
Conner Davis took the mound.
On Friday evening, the Braves
shut out the Sox 10-0.
Leadoff batter Carson Davis dou-
bled twice of his three hits and
scored twice for the Braves. Cobb
and Reas each also crossed home
plate twice. Cobb had twin hits.
Lambert, Conner Davis and
Dustin Ratliff chipped in with solo
scores.
Chancey, Battles, Flores and
Rabon were left on base for the Red
Sox, although 11 batters went down
on strikes by Braves pitcher Cobb.


Adrian Melendez says:


I moved north,

come and see why.

"iT rlll t Ft. Meade
5:1,Vbfr rcv s;375-2606
5:18c (a800-226-3325


, 326ocate
~~ UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 16P 15S
404 LIBRARY OF FLORIDAO HISTORY
;" ES-WRY WEST
ay 8,2006 .', INESVILLE FL 32611




Men's League At Tourney Time


ule after the pair tonight
(Thursday). At the end of last week,
it appeared the Hardee Signs Plus
Tees Pride had an insurmountable
lead with an 8-0 record. The State
Farm Racers and Crown Ford
Wahoos trail by a considerable
amount.
Last Monday, the Racers outlast-
ed the Wahoos 25-17 in the only
game of the evening.
Catcher Kayla Owens paced the
Racers with three hits and two
walks to score five times. Emily
Starratt and Breanna Nellis chipped
in with. four runs apiece and
Vanessa Garza added three more.
Harley Franklin, Lola Rivera and
Kristina Garcia put two runs each
on the board and Lenoria Shoffner
and Megan Henderson had one
apiece.
For the Wahoos, it was Nicole
Beck with four trips around the
basepaths. Kristen Bergens con-
tributed a trio of tallies, and
Courtney Buckley, Ashley Albrit-
ton, Jessica Sisum and Stephanie
Peterson added two each. Michele
Beck and Shelby Dunlap had solo
scores.
In the early game of Thursday's
double-header, the Pride downed
the Wahoos 14-4.,
Paige Clark came around to score
three times for the Pride. TaylQp
Hulsey, Sierra Gee and Miranda
Powell put a pair of runs apiece on
the board and Amber Hines,
Courtney Chason, Halley Marshall
and Chelsea Harris added one
apiece.
For the Wahoos, leadoff batter
Chelsea Steedley doubled and sin-
gled and scored both times she got
on base. Nicole Beck, Bergens,
Buckley and Lindee Rossman each
put one score in the book.
In the Thursday nightcap, the,
Pride beat the Racers 15-10.
Gee topped the Pride with a quar-
tet of tallies, with Powell and
Marisa Shivers each putting three
on the board and Hines, Kaitlyn
Chason and Courtney Chason each
getting a run.
Shoffner led the Racers with
three tiips to home plate. Owens
came home twice and Garza,
Starratt. Rilera, Henderson and
Nelli'g-came around to score once
each.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With the regular season finishing
up tonight (Thursday), the 2006
Men's Church Softball will head
into a single-elimination tourna-
ment next week.
Standings as of last week had St.
Michael's Catholic in the lead with
a 10-1 record, its only loss to
Wauchula First Baptist, which is at
9-2, and has lost once each to St.
Michael's and Christian Heritage.
Heritage took it on the chin last
week and dropped to third place
with an 8-3 record, followed by
Bowling Green Baptist, First
Christian and St. Alfonso's Chapel.
In action on May 2, the field 4
game was a close encounter, with
Heritage outscoring Bowling Green
12-10.
For Heritage, Trent Skinner
tripled and Scotty Whitener dou-
bled twice. Skinner ended up with
five hits and four RBIs. Jared
* Tisko, Ryan Driskell and Skinner
were two-tally batters and
Whitener, Johnny Gonzales, Daniel
Kline,. Tony Smith, Bob B. and
Arco added a run apiece.
Ian Trott homered for Bowling
Green and Jeremy Goodwyn
chipped in with a double for the
only long-ball hits. Goodwyn and
Hank Butler were the only twin-
score batters. Bryan Coomer, Wally
Helms, Lewis Martin, Trott, Matt
Grubel and Jason Evans added a
run each.
Meanwhile, there was a double-
header on Field 3. In the opener, St.
Michael's struggled in winning 23-
18 over St. Alfonso's.
Homers by Ray Rivas, Josh
McKibben and Rodger Brutus
sparked St. Michael's. Mike Carte
and Robert Navarro each chipped
in with a triple, double and single.
John Roberson was the only four-
score batter. Ri\ as, Thomas
Trevino and Roy Rodriguez added
three runs each; McKibben, Carte,
Butus and Navarro were twin-tally
batters and David Navarro and
Rigo Briones added a run each.
Pick-up player Todd Rogers
homered for St. Alfonso's. He had a
five-hit,, five-RBI -nfight. Isauro
Figuerea doubled and singled twice..
for 'three RBIS' ard three runs.
Rogers had four scores, and Lee V.,
Jobse Gomez, Mike T. and 'Ralph
Atice were two-score batters.


In the May 2 nightcap, First
Baptist won a marathon game 30-
21 over First Christian.
For First Baptist, Gerry Lindsey,
Todd Rogers and Efran Schrader all
homered. Jerry Albritton tripled
twice and doubled twice. Lindsey
hit for the cycle with a homer,
triple, double and pair of singles,
scoring all five times he got on
base. Albritton added four runs and
West Palmer, Kellon Durrance and
Rogers had three trips across home
plate.
James Blum homered for First
Christian. Joseph Johnston tripled
and Randy Benton doubled.
Leadoff batter Eddie H. made three
trips around the bases and Chris
Knight, Alan Tubbs, Johnston,
Benton, John Scheel and Mike
Driskell had twin tallies.
There were no games on May 4
because of National Day of Prayer
activities.
Last Monday began on field 3
With First Baptist overwhelming St.
Alfonso 18-2.
Lindsey and Daniel Barnett each
tripled and doubled for First
Baptist. Rogers and Durrance each
also tripled and Jay Belflower and
Dale Carlton each doubled.
Lindsey picked up five RBIs. Brian
Alexy, Carlton and Steve Johnson
came around to score three times
apiece.
St. Alfonso got its scores in the
fourth inning when Isauro Figueroa
doubled and Bryan Smith followed
with a double. Hits by Ivan
Figueroa and Arce pushed the bat-
ters home.
In the Monday late game,
Bowling Green won the duel with
First Christian 25-23.
Austin Helms and Michael
Allison both tripled and doubled
for Bowling Green. Wally Helms
and Butler doubled twice apiece.
Butler finished the night with six
hits and seven RBIs, scoring five
times. Wally Helms, son Austin and
Coomer each circled the bases four,
times.
For First Christian, Tubbs home-
red twice and Reed Benton home-
red and tripled. Tony and Tommy
Hartman each smacked a pair of
doubles. JohngtQn,h1, four, hits,
fou- RBIsI and four scores. Dusty
Massey and Hartman each scored
three times.
Meanwhile, on field 4, St.


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Michael's beat Heritage 19-8.
McKibben homered twice and
Rivas added a grand slam and dou-
ble for a half dozen RBIs for St.
Michael's. Nine players each
scored twice.
Willie Dickerson homered and
doubled and Whitener tripled for
Heritage. Dickerson, Eric Russell
and Kline had three hits apiece.
Dickerson was the only batter to
score twice.
In last Thursday's field 4 game,
St. Michael's doubled up on First
Christian for a 16-8 win.
Ray Rivas homered and
Roberson tripled for St. Michael's.
McKibben, Rivas and Trevino each
also doubled. Ruben Rivas, Ray
Rivas and Trevino each came
around to.score three times. Carte
added double tallies.
Eddie tripled and Blum doubled
for First Christian. Both Eddie and
Johnston scored twice, and Blum
came home once on his three hits
and three RBIs.
On field 3 in Thursday's 6:45
game, in a battle of the Zolfo
Springs squads, Heritage won 14-
10 over St. Alfonso's.
Harold Smith homered twice and
Whitener added another shot for
Heritage.. Whitener finished with
four hits and a half dozen RBIs.
Smith got on base four times on
three hits and an error, scored four
runs and finished with four RBIs.
Tony Smith added triple tallies.
St. Alfonso responded with a
triple by Alex, and pair of doubles
by Lee and pickup player Todd
Rogers. Sam Rivera, Ivan Figueroa
and Isauro Figueroa each circled
the bases twice.
In the Thursday finale on field 3,
First Baptist socked Bowling Green
22-4.
Alexy and Barnett each homered
and doubled for First Baptist. Mark
McGee doubled twice. Lindsey,
McGee and Alexy scored three
times apiece and Barnett, Durrance,
Palmer, Schrader and Carlton
added twin tallies.
Lewis Martin hit a two-run
homer in the first inning for
Bowling Green, -scoring himself
and Coomer. Caleb Cook and Justin
BromleyAdded the other muns.

Sleep is a symptom of caffeine
deprivation.
-Author Unknown









2C The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006





-Schedule Of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
by
The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning...................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ..........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service......................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
'Sunday Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship Ist & 3rd ..............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ..........6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship..................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:30 p.m.
Wed. Discipleship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Thurs. Mens Prayer ................6:00 a.m.
Thurs. Ladies Bible Study ........5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..... ............ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship................... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship................10:30 a.m
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting..............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs..........5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 375-2253
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................6:30 p.m

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
SuniaStoi..r .. -... .9 45 a m
morning Worship ....... ........... 11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship...........5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..... ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .............7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 77319013
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .........11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m
HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ............7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370
Domingo Serv. De Predicacionll 1:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ...........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudioi Juvenil .....7:00 p.m.
Jueves Serv. De Predicacion ....7:00 p.m.

IMMANUELBAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ,. ... ....... 00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer...... :..........7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH'
607 Palmetto'St.
church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service.................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer Ser. ..7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Evening 6:00 p.m.
11
SMT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH ,
S6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:0Q a.m.
Disciples Training ....................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ..........7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School 1000 a.m.
Sunday Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..................7:30 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN


PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17 375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom...........9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ............5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico .................. 6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service ..............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study, Thurs. 7:30 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone Comm
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
M morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m.


NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service ........ ........ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ............7:00 p.m
NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training .................. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer.................... 6:00 p.m

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship..................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer..................7:00 p.m


UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ............7:00 p.m


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
New York Ave. and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday Service 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................7:00 p.m.


CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
... 6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
- SundaySchoo- "''" t0:00.ri.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Evening Worship ............7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m..
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship .........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class ..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship..........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ............7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month............4:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576


CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Priesthood 11:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. 735-8681
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning...................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night......................7:30 p.m.
ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service ..... ..........7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ....7:30 p.m.
Fri. Night (Holy Ghost Night)..7:30 p.m.


The following merchants

urge you to attend

your chosen house of worship 1

1 this Sabbath
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Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.0, Box.780, Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper.................. 6:15 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Fellowship ..6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St. 767-8909
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service....................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 5:00 p.m.
Thursday Service .................... 7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship..................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00.p.m.
Wednesday Night Service ........7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .... ............. 6:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical .................. 9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Predicacion 11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles ........7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service...................... 10:45 a.m.
Wed. Youth Meeting ......6:30- 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..6:30- 7:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service......................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-0657
Early Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Worship............11....1:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities................ 6:00 p.m.


FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386.
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ......10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ........ ........6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service ............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Ministries...7:00 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts ....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads & Lighthouse Min. 7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DE DIOS
PENTECOSTAL, M.I.
903 E. Summit St. (863) 452-6693
Pastor: Reinaldo Ortiz
Martes 7:30 9:00 p.m.
- Viernes 7:30 9:00 p.m.
Domingo..............11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Morning......................10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Evening ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening ....................7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES SPANISH
Sunday Evening 4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ......................7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening................7:30 p.m.
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service............. ......11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of 7th Ave. & Palmetto St.
735-0555
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
M morning Service......................11:00 a.m.
Church Training 5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave. 767-0023 -
Mom. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service........4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor ........4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper....................5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:45 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship..................11:00 a.m.
Weight Watchers
meet Thursday ................... 5:00 p.m.

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main 773-5814
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service.................... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program WZZS Sundays9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................1:00 a.m.
Evening Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday 9:00 a.m.
Holy Days

ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ..........5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ............7:30 p.m.
Sunday (Spanish) .................... 7:00 a.m.
(English) 8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ..................... 1:00 a.m.
(Creole) 00p'.t, '
Daily Mass in Englishl ~' .........8:30a'.m.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting................7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship. .. 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ......... 7:30 p.m.
Friday Worship............ .7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY
116 Orange St.
Sunday School .... .... .... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ....... :... 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train.7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ........ 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .......... .10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........ ... 11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship...........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training .'. 7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ..... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ........ 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....... ... ...10:00 a.m.
Church . ... ... ... 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service . . ... ...6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .. . 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service......... 7:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School . . ... ...10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship . .. .... 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ... .. ..7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship .......... 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ... .. ... ... 7:30 p.m.


YOU Can Appear In ...

kids korner
Hey, kidsl How would you like your work to be printed In the paper?
Draw us a picture, write us a poem, make up a story or tell us a joke.
If you're sending us a drawing, use pencils or markers, not crayons.
And leave the lined notebook paper for homework, not your artwork.
Then print your name and age, your parents names and the town
where you live on the back. Get mom or dad to bring it to our office
or put It in the mail to: kids korner, The Herald-Advocate, RO. Box
338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


WAUCHULA
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church....... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ........... 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ...... .. 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
102 N. 6th Ave. (Earnest Plaza)
773-2929
Sunday Service ............ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .......... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ..... 7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

CHARLIE CREEK BAPTIST
"CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ......... 7:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-8586
Morning Worship .......... 10:00 a.m.
Children's Church .......... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ....... 7:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .......... 7:00 p.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ............. 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ................ 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ............... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ........... 11:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .......... ..-. 10:00 a.m. -
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. 735-2524 735-1851
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Worship ................. 11:00 a.m-
Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet..... 7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD
FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship. .......... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship ............ 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.


PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ............... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ............ 6:30 p.m.
5tfh Sunday .....'.. .... 6:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

REALITY RANCH COWBOY
CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School........ .9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month Cowboy
Fellowship ............... 7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ............. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ......... 7:00 p.m..

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol.. 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones .............. 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina ............ ... 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ... ...... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio .......... ...... 11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club ............... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche. ........ 7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ........ 6:00 p.m.
Servicio .................. 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ...... 5:00 p.m.

ZOLFO BAPTIST CHURCH
311 E. 4th Ave. 735-1200
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ............ 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:30 p.m.





WaddiZ44 (Owt, -


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER'

Michael A. Guido
Mener, Georgia


One night during dinner, a son
said to his parents, "I'm s6
happy!"
"Why?" asked his mother.
"Because I'm your kid!" he
answered.
That thrilled his mother and
father.
And it got me to thinking about
John 1:12 and 13, 'To all whd

received Him, to those wh
believed on His name, He gav.
the right to become children ov
God-children bprn not of natural
descent,: not of human decision.
but born of God."
Let us wh6 have received Him,
just now look up into the heaven?,;
and say, "God, I'm so happy:
because I'm Your child!"


liee~ 0&Ut~oJ


There are
many changing
postures of
motherhood. A


unchanged... a 1 -
posture of r ,
prayerful love A r
child is always in
his mother's
prayers No one
quite loves us like our mothers... except God. In Isaiah 66:13 we read,
"As a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you...."
On Mother's Day, mav e bow and offer a thankful prayer for
mothers ev ervwhere as we worship in God's House

SUNAY Nl(NfAN TU,'AY EDES M* TURMY FIDAY SATRD .
Kvdm, EW11F Kwhis Ev ~is lx-dw Fvdiv Kwh
3: 1 4:1-17 1. 13 11:1111 12: 1 Y 13:l^f l^


Sni0ptuws Selscted by The AmerPan Bible So.Aety
Copynght 2006, Keisler.-lliams Newspaper Seomoes. P. 0. Box 8187. Chadotteslle. VA 22906. wn. ,


I


I






May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3C


THE PERFECT SCORE


Ponytail Softball Still Going


COURTESY PHOTO
North Wauchula Elementary School's fourth-grade FCAT Writing+ scorers are (from left) Megan
Hartman, Rebecca Fleury, Rachel Roberts, Erica Roberts, Irene Ruiz-Venegas, Norma Salgado
and Lacey McClenithan.m These students led their classmates on the assessment test by receiv-
ing a 6 from one of the two state scorers who graded their essays. The district had a total of five
perfect scores, where both state scorers gave an essay a 6, with four coming from this group.




Dixie Youth Near End Of Season


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With just this week and next, the
2006 Dixie Youth season comes to
a close.
As the season draws to the end,
the Nicholson Supply Co. Reds are
alone at the top of the slate with an
11-0 record. Behind them are the
Joe L. Davis Braves at 8-3, fol-
lowed by the All Creatures Animal
Hospital Yankees, Countryside
Growers Devil Rays, Florida Fuel
Mets and Chapman Fruit Co.
Athletics (A's).
There was only one game last
Monday, as the Reds cemented
their lead with a 4-1 victory over
the Braves.
The Reds scored all their runs in
the fifth inning. with Dalton
Hewitt, Colton Mills and Justin
Bromley getting on base before a
Malik Tatis triple. A hit by Jeremy
Rowe brought Tatis in.
The Braves scored their only run


in the first inning to take a 1-0 lead.
Justin Knight took first on a walk
and came around to score on a
Luke Palmer hit. Palmer was
stranded twice and Dawson
Crawford, Vince Grimsley, Kyle
Schrank and Caleb Bryan were all
left on base.
On Tuesday on Field 1, the Mets
took the measure of the A's with a
10-2 win.
Garrett Albritton had the heavy
hand,, stroking a triple, double and
single in nearly hitting for the cycle
for the Mets. Leadoff batter Dalton
Reas circled the bases three times
and Albritton, Eric Klein and Kris
Johnson added twin tallies. Dustin
Goodwyn added one more run.
The A's put their scores in the
'book in the third inning. Daniel
Miller led off with a double,
advanced on a hit by Dalton
Rabon and came home on a Murrell
Winter hit. Michael Grace had
three hits and Winter two but both


I Be A.oGood Sport! "
SPORTS NEWS&DlIfNE IS NOON ON MONDAY



I HEARTLAND PEDIATRICS
] "Aceptamos Pacientes Nuevos" I


Especializando en el
tratamiento de
*Alergias *ADD
*Asthma


Apurba Manik
M.D., F.A.A.P



Horas:
Lunes Viernes
8:30 5:00


5:18c


Aceptamos asignaciones
*de Medidaid
*BCBS seguro.s, mayores


Beverley Walker
RA.-C


1125 South 6th Ave.
Wauchula


were stranded. Also left on base
were Jarod Jernigan and Cole
Choate.
Meanwhile, on Field 2, the Rays
raced past the Yanks 11-1.
Leadoff batter Deonte Evans
smacked twin hits and scored twice
for the Rays. Wintz Terrell got on
base three times and came home all
three times. Carter Lambert. Sid
Crews, Dylan Farr, German
Figueroa and Mason Waters
chipped in with a run each.
Jake Altman was hit by a pitch
and circled the bases on hits by
Codie Dean and Mason Gough to
score for the Yankees. Altman,
Dean, Gough and Austin Judah
were all stranded.
On Thursday, the Reds won 6-2
over the A's.
Hewitt, Tatis and Jeremy Rowe
all stroked doubles for the Reds.
Bromley and Tatis scored twice
each and Hewitt and Mills added
solo scores.
For the A's, it was leadoff batter
Miller singling twice and coming
around to score both times. Justin
Forrqe.r also had twin hits.
Choat, Jernigan and Rabon were
each left on base.
There was another double-header
on Friday evening.
On Field 1, the Braves barely got
past the Rays 14-12.
Palmer tripled, doubled and sin-
gled for the Braves. Knight,
Crawford, Grimsley, and Palmer
each scored twice while Chase
Revell came around to score three
times on a pair of homers and a
triple. Will Bennett added one more
run.
For the D-Rays, Evans circled
the bases three times and Lambert
and Terrell added twin tallies,
Crews, Abel Esquivel, Waters and
Matthew Lake added a run each.
The final game of the week was
Field 2's clash between the Mets
and the Yahkees, which won 12-1.
Altman led off with three hits
and twin scores for the Yanks.
Garrett Mimbs and Scheel each
tripled. Tanner Gough had three
hits and scored three times. Mimbs
added twin tallies and Jesse Zuniga,
Gough,' Ramiro Briories' .'and
Scheel each chipped in with a run.
For the Mets, Sean Holmes
walked and scored in the third
inning, aided by a Johnson hit.
Albritton and Johnson were strand-
ed,


,:HARDEE COUNTY,
PUBLIC NOTICE


The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners
adopted Ordinances Nos. 02-17 and 04-01, which
authorize a financial hardship exception to the solid
waste disposal and fire rescue portions of the special
assessment fees. Property owners qualifying for this
exception will receive a refund or a credit in the
amount of the current tax year's approved non-ad
valorem taxes toward the special assessment fees for
solid waste disposal and fire rescue assessment fees.

If, you are interested in applying for this exception, or
if you have any questions pertaining to this issue,
please contact the Office of Management and Budget
at 8631773-3199. Applications will be accepted until


May 31, 2006.

Clifton N. Timmerman, Chairman
.Board of County Commissioners'
Hardee County, Florida


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Youth Sports Dixie
Ponytails keep moving, with games
several nights a week.
At the end of last week, the Peace
River Growers Racers led the
league of 10-to-12-year-olds with
an 8-2 record, followed by the
Central Pump and Irrigation
Dragons, the CGAgriManagement
Pride and the Gourley Plastering
Wahoos.
Games last week began on
Monday with a clash between the
Racers and the Wahoos, with the
Racers winning 13-3.
The Racers spread their scores
over five innings, finishing with a
six-run outburst in the fifth. Kayla
Knight circled the bases three
times, with Kate Thomas and Katie
Smith chipping in with twin tallies.
Cassidy Knight tripled in the sec-
ond stanza but was out at home try-
ing to stretch it into an in-the-park
homer. She, Sabrina Hernandez,
Savannah Selp, Gemi Saunders,
Sierra Coronado and Katelyn Hines
-each put one run on the board.
The Wahoos put all their scores
on the board in the. fourth inning,
when Kate Krause, Brooke
Samuels and Taylor Bolin came
around to cross home plate. In other
innings, Krause, Samantha
Schnable, Carleigh Coleman, Holly
Hughes and Millie Jones were left
on base, Hughes and Jones twice
apiece.
On Tuesday evening, the
Dragons outscored the Pride 13-9.
Kendall Gough paced the
Dragons with four trips around the
bases. Courtney Parks, Elvira
Servin, who homered and doubled,
Abigail Vargas and Brooke Conley
each scored twice and Angelica
Florez put one run on the base.
Summer Sisum was the only
twin-tally batter for the Pride.
Kaitlyn Rowe, Emma Marshall,
Brittany Dunlap, Penny McGuire,
Kayla Nichols, Kelsey Powell and
Ashley Trone crossed home one
each.
There were two games on
Thursday evening. In the early
game, the Racers beat the Pride 12-
2.
For the Racers, Kayla Knight
tripled. She joined Thomas and
Cassidy Knight in scoring twice
apiece. Hernandez, Brooke Knight,
Selph, Caryssa Johnson, Hailey
Andrews and Lacey McClenithan


each put a run on the board.
The Pride got a run from
Kaitlyne Rowe and Marshall.
Dunlap, Nichols and McGuire were
stranded.
In the Thursday nightcap, the
Dragons slipped past the Wahoos
14-10.
Gough, Servin, Conley and
Megan Hartman were each two-
score batters for the Dragons.
Taylor Pohl, Parks, Florez, Angela


Huecheroth, Vargas and Kourtney
Henderson came around to cross
home plate once each.
For the Wahoos, Coleman and
Holly Hughes put twin scores on
the board. Arissa Camel, Krause,
Samuels, Taylor Bolin, Alex
Ullrich and Jones chipped in with
solo scores. SaiaBeth Albritton,
Camel, Krause, Bolin, Emily
Hughes and Jones were all strand-
ed.


Arbor Day Foundation Offers

Free Tree-Care Booklet


Those who care about trees will
find advice on pruning and related
topics in The National Arbor Day
Foundation's free booklet, "How To
Prune Young Shade Trees." From
pruning in the early years of a tree's.
life, to learning how to strengthen
trees by removing branches, this
illustrated, easy-to-follow guide
offers timely and practical tips.
"How a tree is pruned in its first
few years of life will affect its
shape, strength, and even lifespan,"
said Arbor Day Foundation
President John Rosenow. "People
who value their trees will learn how
to make them safer, more beautiful,
healthier an easier to maintain with


this guide and its step-by-step illus-
trations."
Other tips in "How To Prune
Young Shade Trees" cover the best
ways to make a pruning cut, how to
prune for form, and how to main-
tain a tree's health by removing
trouble spots. It also offer such
basic advice as how to hold a pair of
pruning shears and make cuts at the
proper angle.
For your free copy, send your
name and address to: How To
Prune, National Arbor Day
Foundation, 100 Arbor Avenue,
Nebraska City, NE 68410, or go
online at www.arborday.org.


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE
For the week ended May 11, 2006:
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 6,030 compared to
last week 7,183 and 7,244 a year ago. According to the Florida Federal-
State Livestock Market News Service: compared to last week, slaughter
cows and bulls were steady to 1.00 lower, feeder steers and heifers were
unevenly steady.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 142.00-195.00;
300-400 lbs., 120.00-150.00; and
400-500 lbs., 107.00-132.00.
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 126.00-170.00;
300-400 lbs., 110.00-138.00; and
400-500 lbs., 100.00-123.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs., 85-90 percent, 44.00-50.00.
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 lbs., 57.00-66.00.


S ,

Now Hiring *



ORDERFILLERS

At


WAL-MART


Grocery Distribution Center


$12.50/hr
Plus... $0.50 Orderfiller premium (after 90 days of orderfilling) *
Plus... $0.35 2nd /3i shift differential Plus ... $1.35 weekend shift differential *
Possible ... $0.751hour worked Quarterly bonus *
Position requires: repetitive heavy lifting of product cases weighing up to 80lbs
occasionally overhead, constant walking/standing, bending, twisting and stooping,
ability to work with power equipment/forklifts, and work in temperature ranges of -20
below up to in excess of 100 degrees.

Full-time & Part-time Positions *

Weekend (Fri-Sun) & Weekday (Mon-Thur)
1st & 2nd shifts available


Must be 18 years Wal-Mart's benefits include: Progressive wage increases, discounts, 401(K),
stock purchase plan, profit sharing, health benefits and career advancement opportunities.

APPLY AT THE DISTRIBUTION CENTER

HIRING KIOSKS OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY -7 DAYS A WEEK
THE APPLICATION TAKES 30 MINTUES -1 HOUR TO COMPLETE.
YOUR APPLICATION WILL BE ACTIVE FOR 60 DAYS.

THINGS TO BRING: YOUR COMPLETE WORK HISTORY (DATES & PHONE #'S),
NAMES, ADDRESSES AND PHONE #'S FOR REFERENCES WHO ARE NOT RELATED TO YOU
(CO-WORKERS, TEACHERS, CLIENTS, AND ORGANIZATIONS YOU'VE VOLUNTEERED WITH, ETC.)
AN ACCURATE PHONE NUMBER WHERE YOU CAN BE REACHED, THE DAYS AND HOURS YOU'LL BE
AVAILABLE TO WORK

FROM 1-75, TAKE EXIT 164 AND PROCEED 8 MILES NORTH ON HwY 17. DC IS ON THE RIGHT.

WAL-MART RANKED AMONG '100 BEST' ON FORTUNE LIST
WAL-MART STORES, INC. IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 5:18-6:1c


4:27,5:4;5:11,5:18,5:25c


40 9'ATRiG
0


Infantes, Nines, Adolescentes




767-14414
24 Horas







4C The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006




--Courthouse Report^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage license
was issued recently in the office
of the county court:
Frederick W. Snowdeal, 46,
Wauchula, and Hazel Maria
Poucher, 44, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recently
by the county judge:
HSBC Bank Nevada NA vs.
Judy Shields, voluntary dismissal.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Kenneth W. Harris, voluntary dis-
missal.

There was no misdemeanor or
criminal traffic court last week as
it was trial week.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the office of
the circuit court:
Roneaka Williamson and
Matthew Buxton vs. Charles Clin-
ton Heath, damages.
Wauchula State Bank vs. Janice
Browning Wheeler et al, petition to
foreclose mortgage.
Cynthia A. Trevino and Noah A.
Trevino, divorce.
Wauchula Police Department vs.
Calvin Martin, petition for forfei-
ture.
Alesha Baughman Pohl and
Jason Donald Pohl, divorce.
Mindy C. Apolinar and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR) vs.
Jesus M. Apolinar, petition to enter
child support order.
Thomas Rivera d/b/a Gardner's
Welding & Machine Shop Inc. vs.
Cati Brothers Inc., damages.
Sandra Elaine Masters and
Melvin Woodrow Masters Jr.,
divorce.

The following decisions on civil


cases pending in the circuit court
were handed down recently by
the circuit court judge:
Joann Lopez and DOR vs. Saul
Ledezma, voluntary dismissal of
petition to modify child support.
Krista Loraine Rucker and DOR
vs. Frederick Elliott Hansen, volun-
tary dismissal of petition to amend
child support.
Lylia Hernandez o/b/o minor
child vs. Kayla Hernandez, injunc-
tion for protection.
Kayla Moralez vs. Lylia
Hernandez o/b/o minor child,
injunction for protection.
Cindy Lee Warren vs. Donald
Aaron Hughes, voluntary dismissal
of injunction for protection.
Billie Sue Parker vs. Michael
Harry Mohn, voluntary dismissal
of injunction for protection.
Gregoria Perez vs. Janet Lee
Perez, child support order suspend-
ed.
Lucia Villalva-Vasquez vs.
Ancelmo Villalva, voluntary dis-
missal of injunction for protection.
Octavia Nicole Johnson and
DOR vs. Saintony Virgile,- volun-
tary dismissal.
Myrtle Weeks and DOR vs. Dale
Radandt, voluntary dismissal.
Diane Radandt and DOR vs.
Dale Radandt, voluntary dismissal.
U.S. Bank National Association
vs. Maggie Belcher et al, order.
Myrtle E. Weeks and DOR vs.
Diane Olivia Radandt, child sup-
port order.

Child support contempt orders
were entered in the following
cases:
Mary Lee Cook and DOR vs.
Eddie Cofield.
Guadalupe Sanchez and DOR vs.
Pablo Rivera.
Sandra Hernandez and DOR vs.
Joel Cuevas.


TN T FILL PI TINC
Dirt, Sand, Shell, Citrus Tree Removal, Land Clearing,
Building House Pads and Driveways

3721 E Main St Tim Parrish
Wauchula FL 33873 (863) 781-3342
Office (863) 773-9446 Nextel
Fax (863) 773-3599 158*17*31234

We Accept Most Major Credit Cards 3:16tfc


I .


vd I g GARDEN
Corner of 7th & Hogan
(Behind Panda Restaurant)


SOD
BY THE PIECE, PALLET OR HALF PALLET
Bahia $.75 per piece
Floratam $1.00 per piece
Classic (Shade Tolerant) $1.25 per piece

Also: Red Mulch Cypress Mulch Topsoil *
Rock Stone Fill Dirt Mason Sand
(sold by the yard)
U PICK UP


Now OPEN
Mon. thru Fri. 12:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. Sun.CLOSED


773-3500
DELIVERY
AVAILABLE
4:20tfc


Amy Judah and DOR vs. John
Roberts.
Virginia Snyder and DOR vs.
Freddie Munoz.
Christine Gibson and DOR vs.
Catherine Vasquez.

There was no felony criminal
court last week as it was trial
week.

The following real estate trans-
actions of $10,000 or more were
filed recently in the office of the
clerk of court:
Kathleen C. Burghardt to Jack R.
and Sharon K. Williams, $180,000.
James K. Sellers to James L. and
Patricia A. Davis, $33,000.
Nancy A. Morrissey to Jack and
Angela Yost, $30,000.
Edward K. and R. Lorine
Sumner to Rafael and Pamela C.
Freytes, $700,000.
James R. and Carol Lynn Nowlin
to Colin W. and Kelly M. Furness,
$290,000.
Brian D. and Mary L. Cadle to
Carlos and Maritza Barrios-Pereira,
$260,000.
Coca Cola Enterprises Inc. to
Land South Lodge LLC, $1.760
million.
Cornelia M. Vickers to Manuel
Camacho Barcenas and Gloria
Rodriguez-Vislas, $123,000.
Carl and Shirley Bedford to
Thomas Scott Dietiker, $30,000.
GEM Developers LLC to
Williard Kelly and Elizabeth A.
Durrance, $500,000.
Leslie W. and Mary W. Rollins to
Thomas R. and Catherine T.
Walker, $227,500.
Wauchula Woman's Club Inc. to
Mark Smythe, $15,000.
Gilbert J. and Patricia A.
Mitchell to Mason M. and Donna
S. Bowman, $64,000.
George and Rachel Moyers to
Mason M. and Donna S. Bowman,
$30,000.
Fast Cash Home Solutions LLC
to Margaret M. Pilkington,
$102,000.
James Bruce Crawford, Jedina C.
Altman Justesen and Corby Shafter
Crawford as co-trustees to Mid-
night Partners LLC, $739,000.
Gary D. Bumgarner, J. C.
Bumgarner and Rafter R. Ranch to
Hugo A. and Leticia Flores,
$137,000.
Alfredo Martinez Cortez and
Herlinda Candelario-Cartiel to
Francisco Romero-Cisneros and
Maria C. Romero, $44,000.
Miguel A. II and Madgaly
Santana .to Erick and Jessica
Feliciano, $75,000.
Erwin and Elvira Hoefling et al
to W.D. Parker as trustee,
.$200,000.
Faustino Israel Jr. and Alicia Q.
Ozuna to Bao Xiong and Lao Lee
Leenhiavue, $70,000.
James H. Webb and Sharyn
Salter to David C. and Daniell S.
Newcomb, $115,000.
Love is, above all, the gift of
oneself.


Letter To The Editor

She Enjoyed National

Day Of Prayer Service


Dear Editor,
This letter is for those who did
not attend the National Day of
Prayer County-Wide Prayer
Service at First Baptist Church of
Wauchula on May 4. The Hardee
County Ministerial Association did
a wonderful job of putting this ser-
vice together.
I can tell you all of those attend-
ing received a wonderful blessing
and fellowship just to be able to be
together and pray for our country. I
wish everyone who has military
personnel in their families could
have been there. The entire service
was a wonderful tribute to remind
us of why our loved ones are fight-
ing to keep our country safe and to
keep God in all our lives and why
we need to pray for one another and
lift up. each other with God's words.
Many times during the service I
had chill bumps .on my arms. What
a wonderful feeling to be touched
by the singing, the prayers and the
words that were spoken.
If you were not there you missed
the beautiful organ music by Dr.
Frank Gibbs. First Baptist Church
of Wauchula's Praise Band did
"America The Beautiful" and the
Hardee County Mass Choir sang
"Days of Elijah." We were wel-
comed by Pastor Jimmy Morse.
The Color Guard presented the
colors. David Radford led us in the
Pledge of Allegiance" and The
Star-Spangled Banner." The
Hardee County Mass Choirsang "If
My People."
The beautiful heart-warming
song "Pray" was sung by Suzanne
See and brought tears to your eyes.
Praise and worship by Rev. Tim
Davis. We sang "Mine Eyes Have
Seen The Glory," "God Of Our
Fathers" and "God Bless America."
Pastor Jim Williams told us a
wonderful story about where the
offering was going to go and how
many people the Hardee Help
Center has helped. If his story did
not touch you and help out, nothing
ever would.
We had an offering of prayers.
Pastor Jim Davis spoke on families
and prayed for all the families and
how ou. lives are today. Pastor Bob
Norman spoke on education and
prayed over it.
The Honorable David Royal,
mayor of Wauchula, spoke on gov-
ernment and reminded us of how
fortunate we were to ha'e prayers
in our government offices in
Hardee County at board meetings.
Then he prayed over it.
Pastor Wendell Smith spoke on
media and how we can stop what
we don't agree with on TV and
videos. Then he prayed over it.
Pastor Darin Canary spoke on the
church and what the church and its


PUBLIC NOTICE
The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the Hardee County Planning Agency
will hold a public hearing on
Thursday, June 01, 2006, 6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter in the BCC Board Room
412 West Orange St.
Courthouse Annex Room 102, Wauchula, FL
for the following requests:
Agenda No.

06-34
Steven P.IBetty Jo T. Haney by and through their Authorized Represen-
tative request a Rezone of 4.0MOL ac from F-R (Farm-Residential) to
R-3 (Multiple-Family Residential) for the highest and best use of the
parcel for development of up to 12 unitslacre for residential townhomes/
condos in a Residential Mixed Use Future Land Use District
On or abt Old Bradenton Rd 29 33 250000 092500000
4.0MOL ac Beg at SW corn of E1/l2 of NEll4 of SE1/4 & run E 170 ftto Beg then
E 170 ft N 1000 ft W 170 ft S 1000 ft to Beg S29, T33S, R25E

06-35
Triple H Grove Corp. by and through its Authorized Representative re-
quests approval of a Final Site Development Plan for Tierra Verde S/D
a 126-lot Planned Unit Development, 47MOL ac, zoned R-2
On or abt Bostick/Barkdoll Rds 2033250000013700000
47MOL ac S112 of NE1/4 of NW1/4 LESS Beg NE corn of SEll4 of NEll4 of
NW1l4 & run S 286.50 ftto POB then S 104 ftW 223 ft N 104 ft & E 223 ftto POB
& Beg NE corn of S1/2 of NWIl4 of NW1/4 for POB then cont S 89deg52min W
329.75 ft thence S 01deg35min E 176.62 ft thence S 48deg32minl9sec E 433.50
ft thence run N 464.38 ft to POB & E1/2 of NW114 of NE1l4 of NW1/4 & NW1/4 of
SEll4 of NW1/4 LESS E 13 ft & NEll4 of NEll4 of NW1/l4
S20 T33S, R25E
Roger Conley, Chairman, Planning/Zoning Board


PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a Public Hearing to receive recommendations from the
Planning/lZoning Board on
Thursday, June 15, 2006, 8:35 A.M.
or as soon thereafter
412 West Orange St.
Courthouse Annex Room 102, Wauchula, FL
for Agenda No. 06-34
Clifton N. Timmerman., Chairman, Board of County Commissioners
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing to make
special arrangements should contact the Building/lZoning Department at least
two (2) working days prior to the public hearing.
This Public Notice Is published In accordance with the Hardee County Land
Development Code. Copies of the documents relating to these proposals are
available for public Inspection during weekdays between the hours of 8:30 A.M.
and 3:00 P.M. at the Zoning Department, 401 West Main Street, Wauchula,
Florida.
All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering any
decision the Boards shall rely solely on testimony that is relevant and material.
Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded, anyone wishing to
appeal any decision made at the public hearings will need to ensure a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made by a court reporter. 05:18,25c


pastors need to be doing to reach
everyone. In his prayer he had us
put a church besides our own in our
minds and pray for it. Pray that we
could all unite together and be
more powerful that ever and reach
more lives.
I won't even try to explain the
powerful closing prayer Pastor Lou
Liotta gave. Wouldn't it be wonder-
ful if the Hardee County Minister-
ial Association could do a repeat of
Thursday after all those who were
in attendance went out and told
their churches, friends and families
about the powerful evening we had
together, praying for one another
and this great nation we are fight-
ing to keep God's name and word
in.
I know we all have busy lives,
and We forgot about the service at
First Baptist Church even though
we passed that large banner across
Hwy. 17 two or three times a day.
As Pastor Darin Canary said, fami-
lies are very busy these days with
work, school, and children's activi-
ties. We are always on the run..
As I thought about this I came to
realize that if the National Day of
Prayer had been on Sunday morn-
ing, think how packed all of the
churches would be. Isn't it wonder-
ful that God does not set aside one
day or one hour only to hear our
prayers and problems. Think how
miserable we would be to have to
wait to ask God to hear our prob-
lems and pray for that person who
has just had a heart attack, for
someone on their deathbed and we












ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS I


MONDAY
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9,


have to wait until that time to pray
for them. Would it be too late by!
then?
For those of you who gathered in
groups to pray on May 4 I thank,
you, and I thank all. of those wh1
were in the program and all for
coming together and praying fori
our nation and for those of you whd|
cannot get out for praying in your;
homes.
I only regret that I did not make
more phone calls inviting others t.]
join me. I took it for granted all of
those I would have called would
have been there. But isn't that th&
way we all think?
Everybody knows church will be
on Sunday morning so people wilL
come if they want to. So we don't
ask them to join us when someone
is just waiting to be invited to come;
along and join you. ;
I know this is long but my pegi
won't stop writing, because I wanf'
everyone to know what a wonder-
ful time we had together and&
because they missed a wonderful.
uplifting experience.
If all our church leaders in'
Hardee County would have been
there I could only imagine what the
Sunday morning services would
have been like on May 7. Isn't it'
great I have the freedom to talk,
about God. God bless you all.
Carla Sperry,
Wauchula
P.S. In case you wonder I am not
a Baptist. I attend a church of
another denomination. But that
doesn't mean a Baptist preacher
cannot send chills down my spine
by speaking God's word. After all1
isn't that what it's all about?9
Everyone spreading God's word. A
stranger on the street can touch you,
with the word of God when )ou.
need it most.


JUNIOR HIGH

MONDAY
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TUESDAY
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WEDNESDAY
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SENIOR HIGH |


-. ,J .
IL.


MONDAY
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Colon & Lopez IPA
AGGRESSIVE REPRESENT ION I


NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that STEVE AND BJ HANEY,
the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate
for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO. 334 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 1999
Description of Property:
PARCEL 45: Begin at SE corner of N 1/2 of SW 1/4 of
Section 29, Township 33 South, Range 25 East and run
thence North a distance of 210 feet; thence West a dis-
tance of 1100 feet; thence North a distance of 155 feet
for point of beginning, thence North a distance of
220.91 feet, thence South 84028'34" East a distance of
105.49 feet; thence South a distance of 210.76 feet;
thence West a distance of 105 feet; to point of begin-
ning; less 25 feet off the South side for Road right-of-
way, Hardee County Florida.
PARCEL 46: Begin at SE corner of N 1/2 of SW 1/4 of
Section 29, Township 33 South, range 25 East and run
thence North a distance of 210 feet; thence West a dis-
tance of 1205 feet; thence North a distance of 155 feet
for point of beginning; thence North a distance of
231.06 feet; thence South 84028'34" East a distance of
105.49 feet; thence South a distance of 220.91 feet;
thence West a distance of 105 feet to point of begin-
ning; less 25 feet off the South side for Road right-of-
way, Hardee County, Florida.
PARCEL 47: Begin at SE corner of N 1/2 of SW 1/4 of
Section 29, Township 33 South, Range 25 East and run
thence North a distance of 210 feet; thence West a dis-
tance of 1310 feet, thence North a distance of 155 feet
for point of beginning; thence North a distance of
241.22 feet; thence South 84o28'34" East a distance of
105.49 feet; thence South a distance of 231.06 feet;
thence West a distance of 105 feet to point of begin-
ning; less 25 feet off the South side for Road right-of-
way, Hardee County, Florida.
SUBJECT TO COVENANTS, RESERVATIONS, RESTRIC-
TIONS AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD, RECORDED IN THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
AS RECORDED IN BOOK: 259 PAGE: 229-230
Name in which assessed: RICHARD G DOWNS JR &
DEBORAH T DOWNS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State of
Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law
the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the
highest bidder at the courthouse door located at 417 West
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the 14th day of JUNE,
2006, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 5th day of MAY, 2006.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD NO. 1
By: LAURA L BARKER
Deputy Clerk 5:11-6:1c













During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police officers
investigated the following incidents and made the following arrests:
COUNTY
May 14, Jesus Trejo, 25, of 365 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. L. A. Hart and charged with two counts aggra-
vated assault and giving a false name to a law enforcement officer.
May 14, Selethia Alfreda Glaze, 34, P.O. Box 446, Ona, was arrested
by Dep. Paul Johnson and charged with aggravated battery with a weapon,
aggravated assault with a weapon, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest
without force.
May 14, burglary of a conveyance on Edison Avenue, a theft on Griffin
Road and criminal mischief on East Broward Street were reported.

May 13, a vehicle stolen on Allen Road, burglary of a business on U.S.
17 South and burglary of a conveyance on SR 62 were reported.

May 12, Lori Jane Ayers, 37, of 512 S. llth Ave., Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. L. Williams and charged with domestic battery.
May 12, William Edward Brown, 35, of 506 N. 10th Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. L. Williams and charged with battery. He was
detained on a capias charging him with non-support.
May 12, Jose Felipe Galindo, 22, of 2913 SE Norman Drive, Arcadia,
was arrested by Sgt. James Adler and charged with possession of MDMA,
possession of methamphetamine, introduction of contraband into a deten-
tion facility and possession of cocaine.
May 12, James Edward Wiseman, 73, of 306 N. Fondulac Road, Avon
Park, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. M. Cloud and charged
with DUI and DUI with property damage.
May 12, a 14-year-old Bowling Green youth was arrested by correc-
tions Dep. Earl Harrison on a court pickup order.
May 12, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.

May 11, a residential burglary on Fish Branch Road, burglary of a con-
veyance on U.S. 17 North, and thefts at Honeysuckle Street, Hightower
Lane and Morgan Grice Road were reported.

May 10, a theft on Griffin Whidden Road and criminal mischief on
Makowski Road were reported.

May 9, Kelvin Delnard Lindsey, 38, of 4816 Sally Blvd., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Manuel Zuniga on a Polk County warrant
charging him with non-support.
May 9, a theft on U.S. 17 North and vehicle stolen on U.S. 17 South
were reported.

May 8, Scott Randalle Berg, 29, of 4214-61St West, Bradenton, was
arrested by Sgt. Everett Lovett on a charge of violation of probation (orig-
inal lessor charge of felony battery).
May 8, Michael Ellis Carpenter, 17, of 841 Chamberlain Blvd.,
Wauchula, was arrested by School Resources Dep. Larry Cook and charged
with possession of marijuana on school grounds and possession of mari-
juana with intent to sell.
May 8, criminal mischief on Academy Drive, and thefts on Mosley
Road, East Broward Street, SR 62 and Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue were
reported.
WAUCHULA
May 14, Meliton Lopez Gabriel-Lopez, 38, P.O. Box 1981, Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. Chris LeConte and charged with disorderly intoxica-
tion.
May 14, a robbery on East Palmetto Street was reported.

May 12, thefts on East Palmetto Street and South Florida Avenue
were reported.

May 10, Jessica Nicole Guevera, 22, of 708 Green St., Wauchula, was
arrested -by Ofc. Michael Stone on a DeSoto County warrant charging her
Sith violation of community control-house arrest (original charge posses-
'sion of methamphetami ie
May 10, a 17-year-old Wauchula youth was arrested by Ofc. Michael


Stone on a warrant alleging failure to appear in court on a charge of pos-
session of marijuana.
May 10, a theft on South Eighth Avenue was reported.

May 9, Mary Ann Johnston, 39, of 122 Doss Road, Frostproof, was
arrested by Ofc. Chris LeConte and charged with possession of metham-
phetamine and two counts possession of drug paraphernalia. She was
detained on a capias alleging failure to appear in court on a charge of dri-
ving while license suspended.
May 9, a theft on South Seventh Avenue was reported.

May 8, Ambrocio Salas Perez, age not given, of 707 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with disorderly
intoxication.
BOWLING GREEN
May 14, Benjamin Carlos Otero, 22, P. 0. Box 825, Pearson, Ga., was
arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and charged with giving a false name to a
law enforcement officer and no valid license.

May 13, a theft on First Street was reported.

May 12, Omar Valencia Cuevas, 25, of Pine Tree Trailer Park Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with grand
theft and uttering a forged, check.
May 12, a theft on Church Avenue and a fight on Grove Street were
reported.

May 11, Paula Zorana Ellis, 34 of 837 Pleasant Way, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Sgt. Robert Ehrenkaufer and charged with grand theft.
May 11, a fight on Pleasant Way was reported.

May 10, Rolie Gamble, 47, of 421 Grape St., Bowling Green, was
arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and charged with burglary of a residence.
May 10, a theft on Pleasant Way and a robbery on West Jones Street
were reported.

May 9, Arturo Manuel Regules, 25, of 4202 Middle Drive, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Daniel Arnold and charged with aggravated
assault with a firearm and giving a false name to a law enforcement officer.
May 9, Ramiro Moreno DeLaCruz, 20, of 209 E. Main St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Chief John Scheel and charged with possession of
marijuana.
May 9, a fight on Dixianna Drive, a residential burglary on Snelling
Avenue and a theft were reported.

May 8, Willie Lee Grey, 35, of 618 Sally Place, Wauchula, was arrest-
ed by Ofc. Jereme Bridges on a warrant charging him with violation of pro-
bation (original charge petit theft) and also charged with no valid license.
May 8, a nine-year-old Bowling Green youth was arrested by Ofc.
Daniel Arnold and charged with aggravated domestic violence assault.
ZOLFO SPRINGS
May 13, a theft on Third Street East was reported.

May 10, criminal mischief on Vermillion Street was reported.

May 8, criminal mischief on Finch Lane was reported.


Frankie's
A REDKEN Hair Salon

Haircuts Highlights Perms

S773-5665


Hours: Tues. Fri. 9-6. Sal. 9-3
1, a 8


116-Earlton St.. Wauchula


May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5C


S -

Breed: Terrier Mix
Age: Adult medium-size
Sex: Female
Color: White w/one brown ear


Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neutering of
the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that
desperately need a loving home. The kennel location is 685 Airport Road,
Wauchula, at the county landfill.





Florida Grapefruit Crop


Increase By
On Monday the U.S. Department
of Agriculture (USDA) released its
seventh crop forecast for the 2005-
06 season. The USDA increased the
state's grapefruit crop by 1.2 million
boxes to 19.2 million boxes.
Colored grapefruit account for 12.7
million boxes of the crop, with
white grapefruit making up the
remaining 6.5 million.
Early-mids and Navel oranges
remain unchanged at 75 million
boxes, and the forecast for Valencia
oranges remains at 78 million
boxes. The FCOJ yield was
increased one point to 1.62.
The estimate for Honey tanger-


1.2 Million
ines was also increased 350,000
boxes to 2.55 million boxes, and
early varieties were increased
50,000 boxes to 2.85 million boxes.
Estimates for other specialty fruit
varieties where unchanged at
700,000 boxes of Temples and 1.4
million boxes of Tangelos.
The Florida citrus industry has a
$9.1 billion economic impact to the
state, employs nearly 90,000 people
and covers 750,000 acres in the
state. Florida Citrus Mutual, found-
ed in 1948, is the state's largest cit-
rus grower's organization with
nearly 11,000 grower members.


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cFlcommunity credit union


01 AlF







6C The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


The students who won awards in the swine division were Jimmy Sasser, Dillon Roberts, Wintz
Terrell, Jarrett Stevenson, Justin Hines, Kara Keene and Kyndall Robertson.


Award winners in the beef breeding division were Shelby Albritton, Blake Stagg, Greg Aleman and
Kramer Royal.


Awards given to those who kept the neatest and most accurate record book were: Kaylan Royal,
Kaitlyn Stevenson, Lance McCrary, Sabrina Freeman and Tyler Robertson.


Winners of the poultry awards were Dalton Richey, Bryan Yake, Andrew Hunt, Austin Wallace,
Jessica Hunt, Kayla Hanchey, Savannah Hunt and Jessica Deese.


Steer showmanship awards were given to Kaitlyn Stevenson, Blake Stagg, Ryan Roehm, Kaylan
Royal, Kramer Royal and Caleb Reas.


Winners of the carcass judging were Cristen Robertson, Tyler Robertson, Justin Englih, Caleb
Reas, Dalton Reas, Ryan Roehm, Brad Keene, John Paul Barton, Jessica McVey and Blake Stagg.


(IhII~\




igE~


PHOTOS BY BRETT JARNAGIN
Grooming-contest winners were Ryan Roehm, Justin English, Matt Chapman, Dalton Reas, Greg Grand Champion of the rabbit
Aleman and Kaitlyn Stevenson. division, Dalton Richey.


Kaylee Brummett and Jackson Floyd were Grand Champion and
Reserve Champion for the dairy judging.


Fair Association


Hosts Banquet


Sabrina Freeman and Ryan Roehm were recipients offthe Dean
Culllns Award.


Grand and Reserve Grand champions of the beef-breeding divi-
sion were Kaitiyn Stevenson and Blake Stagg.


By BRETT JARNAGIN
For The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Fair Associ-
ation held a banquet for all 4-H and
Future Farmers of America stu-
dents who raised livestock and sold
it at the 2006 Hardee County Fair.
The doors opened at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, April 18, for the families
of the students at the Agri-Civic
Center at the intersection of Altman
and Stenstrom roads in Wauchula.
A meal of barbecue pulled pork
was served by members of the Fair
Association, and the program offi-
cially began at 7. Then, Dan Smith,


the emcee for the occasion, gave a
short speech.
Participants who won special
recognition in the five divisions of
livestock at the fair were given
their awards. The divisions are:
poultry, rabbits, steer, swine and
dairy cows.
At the end of the awards ceremo-
ny the students were allowed to
finally collect their checks.for all of
the hard work they put into their
animals.
Special award winners are pic-
tured.







May 18, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Arcadia Podiatry
Dr. Anthony Spinella
Dr. Doug Finkel
.:;'_ & Dr. Mary Bogen
Complete Foot Care Including:
*Ingrown Nails *Heel Pain
*Bunions -Hammer Toes
*X-ray On Site
Board Certified in Foot Surgery
Medicare Assignment Accepted
494-3478 ...


The Frank Zajicek

Golf Tournament

Shas been

rescheduled from

May 20 to June 10. .

Please call Torrey Oaks for
more information
S767-0302. 511 18


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The Herald-Advocate of...

75 YEARS AGO
Some Folks Have The Luck -
This Fellow Did: Friday morning
J.W. Boddy traded for a Ford coupe
te with Clarence Carlton, salesman for
,hool Gym the Cobb Motor Co. That is, he
hool Gym agreed to buy, but said he wanted to
orida show the car to his wife. Carlton
programm agreed to this and waited while
Boddy drove the car away, promis-
nd "Ridin' ing to be back in a few minutes.
Carlton waited but Boddy never
returned, so Sheriff Dishong was
notified and the search was on.
Saturday morning, the University
of Florida station, WRUF, broad-
,,, casted a description of the stolen
vehicle and aman from Fort Meade
called the Sheriff's Office after he
saw the car driven by Boddy. He
'a also said that Boddy had family in
Winter Garden, so Dishong wired
the officers there to make a search.
After the call, both Boddy and the
car were found. Boddy is now sit-
ting in the county jail wondering
why some guys have all the luck.

Tree Limb Kills Man Near
Bowling Green: An unusual acci-
dent claimed the life of Horace
Crews, 35, near his home four miles
northeast of Bowling Green
Wednesday morning. Mr. Crews, in
Company with a neighbor named
Mathis, was cutting down a bee tree
in the Peace River swamp near his
home.
The bee tree fell, knocking a limb
from another tree. This limb struck
Mr. Crews, breaking his neck.
Mathis was also knocked down by
the limb. Mr. Crews' wife was fish-
ing nearby and brought a doctor to
the scene, but discovered her hus-
band had died instantly.

Orange Belt League Will Open
On May 21: Towns in this section
of Florida have united to form a
baseball league, and plans have
S been made for weekly baseball
games this summer, according to
advices from Avon Park.
Avon Park, Bowling Green,
Frostproof, Okeechobee, Sebring
,, ,,,. and Wauchula will form the six-
It is a mistake to regard ageas club Orange Belt League, with the
a downhill grade toward disso-., possibility that Fort Meadce,
lutiop. The reverse is true. As Arcadia, Lake Wales, or some other
one gows older, one climbs with furnish
surprising strides. .towns, .y furmsh two teams nec-
-George Sand essary to make an eight-club circuit.


Call in DAILY for a
short Bible message.





MESSAGE CHANGED DAILY!
5:1 sc


50 YEARS AGO
Anti-Segregation Unit To Be Set
Up In Hardee: A unit of the
Federation of Constitutional
Government is scheduled for cre-
ation in Hardee County Monday
night at 8 in a meeting at the
Wauchula City Hall, according to
Frank Bass, who is interested in the
formation of the unit.
The organization is already set up
in Florida with headquarters in
Jacksonville. Pinellas County has
three units at St. Petersburg,


Clearwater and Tarpon Springs. The
Clearwater unit claims 3,000 mem-
bers. Scheduled for Monday night
is a speaker who will explain the
aims of the organization.

Father-Son FFA Banquet Big
Success: The Hardee Chapter of the
Future Farmers of. America staged
one of its most successful Father-
Son banquets in history last Friday
night at the High School Cafeteria.
The big dining hall was crowded
with fathers, members and guests.
Principal speech of the evening
was by Colin Williamson, Florida
Christian College, a former state
president of FFA. His talk was
inspirational. He reminded his lis-
teners that they could reach the

heights of success by setting their
goals high and keep striving.

Hardee County Is Now Home Of
Thoroughbreds: A thoroughbred
horse farm is being developed in
Hardee County by Ed Webb, who
has six brood mares and a stallion
about a mile east of Wauchula. The
stallion, "Halt," ran just out of the
money in the 1949 Kentucky
Derby. In addition, Webb has a
string of five racers now performing
at a track near Cleveland, Ohio.
Under trainer James Burgens, the
Webb string won two firsts at.
Hialeah and one first at Tropical.
On purse money alone the Florida
racing season showed Webb a nice
profit. In addition to the wins, the
string was in the money a dozen
times.

25 YEARS AGO
Dedication Of Swimming Pool
Set For Saturday: Rocky Kitchens,
recreation complex director, has
announced that the new eight-lane,
25-yard swimming pool and bath
facility is soon to open and that an
instructional program is to be insti-
tuted. The opening and dedication
of the pool is set for this Saturday at
1 p.m.

Water Table Drops As Drought
Continues: Citrus trees wilting, pas-
tures turning brown and light pro-
duce and watermelon volume are all
signs of the prolonged drought
experienced in Hardee County and
elsewhere this spring.
It has now been 59 days since a
significant amount of rain has been
recorded in the county. Last Thurs-
day a mere' .09 of an inch was
recorded at Peace River Electric
Co-op and none fell in many areas
of the county, including the Ona
Agriculture Research Center. The
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment Districted was expected to put
mandatory water conservation mea-
sures on the area Wednesday morn-
ing.

Proposed Band Shell For Pioneer
Park Gains Momentum As Plans
Are Formulated: Hardee County is
most fortunate indeed to have such
a beautiful tract of land available to
the public as Pioneer Park in Zolfo
Springs. The possibilities of


Pioneer Park have hardly been con-
ceived by the residents of Hardee
County. The potential for many
events during the year in addition to
those now held is amazing.
Pioneer Park Days coordinator
George Collins has recommended
to the county that a permanent band
shell be erected at Pioneer Park.
This proposal by Collins has been
approved by the park board and
county commissioners and is about
ready to get off the ground..
Suggested location would be next
to the picnic shelter bounded by
Seminole Road, Twin Lakes Lane
and Pioneer Lane.

10 YEARS AGO
School Employees Will Get
Raises: After promising last fall to
re-examine the issue when the dis-
trict's financial picture became
more clear, the School Board has
now said "Yes!" to raises.
If the agreement worked out
between negotiating teams late
Monday afternoon passes muster
with their respective groups, teach-
ers and school-related personnel'
will receive pay hikes of from one
to three percent, retroactive to last'
summer.

Pictured on the front page of the
May 16, 1996, issue of The Herald-
Advocate is the groundbreaking
ceremony of the Hardee County
Public Health building. It took a
combined effort to officially start.
the $3.7 million construction,
which will take shape beside K.D.
Revell Road at the Industrial
Development Park off U.S. 17 north
of Wauchula.
Getting a hand on shovels are
planning committee chairwoman'
Nancy Dick, nursing director
Marsha Carlton, nurse Sandy
Griffin, state Sen. John McKay's
aide Mary Middlebrooks, state Rep.
Vernon Peeples' aide Sharon
Neuhofer, Wauchula Mayor Henry
Graham, County Commissioner
Milton Lanier, HRS District XIV
supervisor Sue Gray, health unit
budget officer Donna Jo Disharoon
and commissioners Walter Olliff Jr.,
Minor Bryant and Ted Hite.
Construction began on Friday
and is expected to be completed in
March 1997.

It's Best To Retire Now!: After
two decades as Hardee County's
clerk of courts, Colemon Best is.
stepping down. Best, who will Pbe
63 in December, announced his
impending retirement Monday
morning. It will be effective Dec.
31.
The news came as a surprise to
many of the employees who gath-
ered on the second floor of the
County Courthouse for the brief
staff meeting. Earlier, Best had said
he would seek re-election to a sixth
term in office. But Best explained
the recent retirement of his wife --
the city of Wauchula's elected city
clerk, Mavis Best, on April 29 ,--
led him to change his mind.


414 N. Brevard, Hwy 17 N
Fountain Plaza
565774


I Way Back When I





8C The Herald-Advocate, May 18, 2006


I


I Financial Lesson


CASH


YOUR


CHECK.


You keep


0 In the few minutes it takes to cash


more of it.


check at many traditional check cashing


I


your check, some check cashing


services are also taking



a significant amount


of your money. As profitab]


as it may be for those places, we don't


services. And if certain minimum


requirements are met, check



cashing is completely



free with Suncoast. We



think it's fair, and one of the many


do business that way. When you join



Suncoast Schools Federal Credit



Union, you pay a flat fee of $3 per


month to cash approved checks and


receive up to 12 free money orders per


.Who's
join


eligible to
Suncoast ?


lF YOU LIVE IN HARDEE COUNTY,
YOU'RE ELIGIBLE FOR MEMBERSHIP AT
SUNCOAST.2 PLUS, ANYONE WHO WORKS,
WORSHIPS OR ATTENDS SCHOOL HERE
CAN JOIN. IMMEDIATE FAMILY MEMBERS
CAN JOIN TOO.


reasons you should consider joining



Suncoast. Call 800-999-5887 or go


day. That's less


than it costs to cash one


to joinsuncoast.org to find out more.


SSuncoast Schools Federal Credit Union
WHERE SMART PEOPLE KEEP THEIR MONEY.
www.joinsuncoast.org


IMembership eligibility is required. The $3/month fee is waived if the member has at least one other Suncoast product such as a checking account, credit card,
or loan, or maintains a minimum balance of $100 in their savings account. 2Unexpired government photo ID is required.


WE


#17


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