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The Herald-advocate
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00055
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Creation Date: January 19, 2005
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00055
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
    Section A: Main: The Classifieds
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
    Section A continued
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
    Section B
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
    Section B: Hardee Living
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
    Section C
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text



I 'Paws In The

| Park' Winners

e .. .Photos 4C


Orange Crop

Estimate Lowered

...Story 6C


The


106th Year, No. 6
3 Sections, 28 Pages


S Thursday, January 19, 2006


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


46
Plu : Ie 3.1


TOTAL LOSS


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
A fire demolished a small mobile home off Boyd Cowart Road last week. Hardee County Fire-Rescue Department firefighters and
investigators check what little remains of a "suspicious" fire at 2905 Platt Road. An engine, tanker and brush truck responded
about 8:30 Friday night and prevented the fire's spread to a nearby house and the travel trailer seen in the background. The owner
came out of nearby groves shortly after the fire was extinguished, said Deputy Fire Chief Dan Harshburger. Cause of the fire
remains under investigation.


Industrial Park





Is Atracting





New Businesses


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
. Manufacturing, spec buildings,
business models or headquarters
may put a variety of commercial
endeavors in the IDA park.
Officially known as the Hardee
County Commerce Park, the 100-
acre tract off SR 62 less than a mile
from U. S. 17 is generating a lot of
interest, said former Economic
Development Director Park Winter.
Winter, who now concentrates
more on utilities, gave an update
Friday to the Dependent District
Board, which includes all five
county commissioners and several


members of the Industrial
Development Authority (IDA).
After several delays, the paver
and asphalt were coordinated and
most of the roadwork has been
done. "There are only a piddly few
things to be done," said Winter.
"Austin Groves has a great design
for the landscaping and, with some
volunteer work, the monument
should be done in a couple of
months," he described.
A regional distribution and tile
company is under contract, a large-
scale manufacturing company is
interested in four lots, and another
See INDUSTRIAL PARK 2A


Graduation Returns To Arena!


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Tradition returns for Hardee Senior High School's
Class of 2006 as the graduation ceremony has offi-
cially been moved back to its long-standing venue.
Once again, graduates will take the stage at the
Hardee County Cattlemen's Arena, a facility which
was badly damaged in Hurricane Charley in August
of 2004, forcing the graduates of 2005 to travel to
Tampa for a suitable site.
At the time, Wildcat Stadium, the only other local
alternative capable of accommodating a huge crowd,
was equally damaged and unusable. Then, it was
repaired in time for this past football season, so it
became the logical choice for Graduation 2006.
But Hardee County School Board members learned
last Thursday night that the Cattlemen's Arena has
been repaired and renovated, and it ready for use.
'There will be no rain, no wet bleachers, no sun in
anybody's face," Deputy Superintendent Rocky
Kitchens pointed out.
School Board members and Project Graduation
parents agreed a return to the traditional facility
would be wiser and more comfortable. The date and


.time, howeaver,,-will not-be-ehaaged--d. -: .
Graduation will be Saturday, May 20, at 10 a.m. in
the Cattlemen's Arena.
Cost for use of the renovated facility will be $500
a day. Schools Superintendent Dennis Jones estimat-
ed it will take 3-4 days for stage and seating prepara-
tion, the ceremony itself and teardownn."
Deputy Superintendent Greg Dick added that a cus-
todian will also be required in each of the restrooms.
Though the stadium would not cost as much, Dick
noted, "If it were to rain, we really had no backup
plan. This way, we're safe. We're in the clear. It
will be dryer and cooler under cover."
Jones, Kitchens and Dick described a "new and
improved" Cattlemen's Arena to the board. The
facility now has aluminum ,bleachers and railings at
the steps, they said.
Following agreement to move the annual ceremony
back to its more traditional spot, Jones said,
"Obviously, it removes the weather factor from the
equation. We now know, rain or shine, we can hold
graduation on time."
The superintendent added, "I'm glad to be back in
See GRADUATION 2A


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The bill for the county's expan-
. sions of its wastewater and water
facilities could reach $10 million.
During its planning session
Friday, the Hardee County
Commission was presented with
long-range plans to expand the
Wauchula Hills wastewater plant
and develop wells and a water
treatment plant to supplement and
extend Wauchula's water supply.
Gene Schriner of Craig A. Smith
& Associates, the company which
has done the planning and overseen
construction of both the Vandolah


and Wauchula Hills wastewater
plants, gave his company's presen-
tation in coordination with Park
Winter, recently redirected to head
the county utility department.
The Wauchula Hills wastewater
plant currently has lines connected
to South Florida Community
College, Country Manor Apart-
ments, Crystal Lake Village, Best
Western Heritage Inns and Suites
and the new K-8 school under con-
struction.
In the next couple of years, a half
dozen more will be added, includ-
ing Orange Blossom and Wagon
Wheel RV parks, Pine Cone park


and vicinity, Wauchula Hills subdi-
vision, the Hardee County
Commerce Park and the Country
Walk vicinity and expansion of
Crystal Lake along Maxwell Drive.
Down the road, there is expan-
sion to subdivisions off Bostick
Road and Torrey Community and
commercial development anticipat-
ed along the U.S. 17 corridor.
All of this will require force main
extensions and pump stations as
well as additions to the wastewater
plant, bringing the estimated cost to
just over $5 million, said Schriner.
Discussion then continued on
See UTILITIES 2A


BB-Gun


, Drugs


COMMEMORATIVE CADENCE


Earn Expulsions


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A boy who brought a BB-gun to
school and two others with mari-
juana have been expelled.
That was the action of the
Hardee County School Board fol-
lowing, three separate expulsion
hearings last Thursday night.
Total expulsions for the 2005-06
school year now number six.
In each instance, fellow students



;i :-- s' ml o.0
S01n/12 2 S 0.o00
G' Olna so s o.oo '
/14 s68 51 h.Oo
011s 69 38 0.00
:1/1' 76 38 o0.00
S0117 80 49 0.00
gral. Rainton to o0naBOS Wo.1
S Same period tles.year o0.0
Annual average s8A5
souln- u* of FW.pn MRan caMdW

; INDEX
Classifieds 6A
Courthouse Report.......6C
Community Calendar....5A
Crime Blotter..................7C
Hardee Living................4B
Information Roundup...2A
Obits 4A
SSchool Lunch Menus...4C


were the ones who tipped off
administrators to the suspected
wrongdoing on their campuses.
"What continues to impress me,"
said Deputy Superintendent Greg
Dick, who sat in on the hearings,
"is the level of cooperation from
the students who see, who witness
this activity. They want a safe cam-
pus just as much as administrators,
teachers and parents do. They
want to be safe at school."
The BB-gun, he noted, had been
altered to better resemble a genuine
pistol. It had been filed and the
orange tip on its barrel had been
painted black, Dick said.
Coincidentally, a recent incident
of an altered BB-gun in a South
Florida school evolved to the point
the student was shot by police. He
later died. In the local case, howev-
er, the boy did not display the gun
nor threaten anyone.
Celestino Garcia Jr., 14, of 1752
Star Ave., Wauchula, has been
charged with carrying a concealed
weapon on school grounds, a third-
degree felony, as a result of the
Dec. 15 incident at Hardee Senior
High School.
Other students gave a description
of the ninth grader to school
resource officer Dep. Larry Cook
after seeing a gun drop out of his
jacket pocket and fall to the ground.
He stooped to pick it up and went
See EXPULSIONS 2A


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Drummers keep the beat of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream alive as they head up a parade in his honor early this week in
Wauchula. Marchers following the drummers carry a portrait of the slain civil rights leader, whose birthday was celebrated
nationally and locally on Monday. For more photos of the parade, see 3A.


County Utility Expansion



Estimated At S10 Million


.r'


106th Year, No. 6
3 Sections, 28 Pages


I I


i L- I


:~
r
~.~EERC1AI~L~I' ~rL:.7
'
~;-~ ~~.~"nl.rp~~sFlll~f~I r








2A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Assi. Production Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Florida. by The Herald-Advocate
Pubhshing Co. Inc. Penodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula. FL 33873
(LISPS 578-780).' Posunaster.' send address changes to- The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box
338, Wauchula. FL 33873


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 pm
'Spons Monday noon
Hardee Living Monday 5 p m
General New1 Monday 5 pm
K Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months 16, yr 28; 2yrs. 54 -
Florida
6 months $20. 1 yr. 537; 2 yrs. $72
Out of Stare
6 months $24. 1 yr. 144; 2 yrs. $86


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes leners.ro the editor on makers ofpublic interesL Letters
should be bnie. and must be 'nulen in good taste, signed and include a daytime phpon
number.
SUBMISSIONS:
.(Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be typed, cbu-
* ble-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines All items are subject to editing. '
WOO


S-| Kelly's Column
By Jim


The January 2006 AARP Bulletin reports President George W. Bush i
in excellent physical condition, standing nearly 6 feet tall, weighing 19
pounds and having an at-rest jleart rate of 47 beats per minute.
Bob Deans wrote Bush for decades ran to keep in shape, maintaining
seven-minute mile pace into his mid-50s. Two years ago doctors told hir
to stop the strenuous running to prevent knee damage. Bush reluctantly
gave up his running shoes for a mountain bike.
Deans recently did a 17-mile tour with the president on the Bush ranc
in Texas. They rode bikes for two hours: Bush wears a heart monitor, an
his heart rate averaged 139 beats per minute, peaking at 177 on one extend
ed climb. He burned 1,493 calories.
Bush, 59, ranks in the top 99 percent in fitness among men his ag(
wrote Deans. He has lost 8 pounds during the past year and dropped hi
body fat 3 percentage points to a lean 15.8 percent,
Bush is a cross-trainer. He rides, lifts weights or works out on an ellip
tical machine six times a week. Bush says exercise is good preventive med
icine for him.
Bush said regular exercise helps a person sleep better, eat a better die
and reduces desire for.coffee and cigarettes. The president has a tough jo
.and has-the:w.il.lpowerto -be tough physically as'welli -

AARP reports the Top 10 majortreasons, in order, for people working
after reaching retirement age: need the money, desire to stay mental
active, need the health benefits, and desire to stay physically active,,remai
productive or useful, do something fun or enjoyable, help other people, b
around other people, learn new things and pursue a dream.
Eminent journalist H.L. Mencken once explained why he kept working
after reaching retirement age, "I go on working for the same reason that
hen goes on laying eggs. There is in evdry living creature a powerful
impulse to active functioning. Life demands to be lived."

The Waichula Kiwanis Club will have its annual sporting clays shock
SSaturday, Feb. 11, at the Matheny Ranch east of Zolfo Springs. The cost i
$45'a person, lunch and refreshments included. There will be trophies fo
the best shooters in each .competition. For more information call Bo
Hanchey or Lee Hawthorne at 773-4151.
The Kiwanis Club sponsors various youth activities, including th
Hardee High School Key Club.

The Hardee County Health Department is sponsoring a 5-K walk an
run Saturday, Feb. .18, starting at the Hardee Family YMCA at Orange S
: and Florida Ave. in Wauchula. Registration begins at 7 a.m. followed b
.stretching exercises at 8.a.m. and the walk/run at 8:15. Call Erin Hess a
773-4161 ext. 176 for more information. Participation is free.
This is part of "Step Up Florida on our way to healthy living,"
Sstate-wide initiative to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles t
Florida's citizens and visitors.
Register by Feb. 17 and get a free T-shirt while supply lasts.


IWMlUIDTDIRI nEBD


The Herald-Advocate' .
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRILHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor

BESS A. STALLINCS
Hardee Living Editor

115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wanchula, FL 33873


,,RIN1

IsOA 4
It'cA. J


INUUO I nIL rInn
Continued From 1A
wants three acres for an 8,000-
square-foot office and manufactur-
ing which hopes to expand to
10,000 square feet, said Winter.
Two other groups hope to lease
one-to-three acres for speculative
buildings, which could each house
several small businesses and/or
offices. One company wants four
acres for an expansion of their
headquarters of a common manu-
facturing industry.
Finally, the IDA is looking at
contracts pending for two more
companies and their business mrod-
els, explained Winter.
There is probably 10-15 acres in
the southwest corer of the park,
wetlands by the hammock, which
will be undevelopable. Some might
be used for storage areas. "We
won't do anything near Hog
Branch, only develop north of the
creek," commented Winter.
"More advertising is done by
word of mouth. It's easy to sell
Hardee County, there are great
opportunities here. We talk to a lot
of people, but some don't follow
through with their dreams. At
$35,000 an acre, it is much less
than many surrounding counties
and there's not a lot of land left on
the coast," he added.
S"I applaud your efforts, but 100
jobs is not very much," said
Commissioner Dale Johnson.
Winter said the IDA was looking
to capitalize on the number and
quality of jobs. With a population
of 27,000, the labor force in Hardee
County is about one-third that,
9,500 to 10,000. Even though
unemployment is in the top five
percent of the state for the past 10-
20 years, that is only 400 to 600
people, including the homeless.
i The workforce board is looking at a
2 minimum wage of $6.50, but the
IDA is looking for quality jobs.
I believe the park is going well,
a better than anticipated, but if you
create high-paying jobs, they will
Y go to people in Polk or Manatee
h counties," said Commissioner
d Minor Bryant.
id "Most of the businesses say.they
will train labor," responded
Durrance.
e, "In economic. development you
s look in a 30-50-mile radius for
employees, knowing that sooner or
I- later they will get tired of commut-
ing and move here," concluded
Winter.
t, The district board also received
its audit for 2004-2005. Of the over
:$5 millionireceive handled in'ithe
last fiscal year, $4.25 million was
g used to clear the debt on the
n water/wastewater plant, and pur-
Schase of the land and construction
at the IDA park.
"It was a pretty straight forward
g audit, no violations of Florida
a Statutes, no significant accounting
standards issues and no recommen-
dations," said Mike Carter of the
t Sebring-based NCT group which
s completed the audit.
s The IDA is the more public arm
r of economic development, buying
and selling,, leasing, making con-
tracts. Its members are chairman
e Richard Nicholson, vice-chairman
Lory Durrance, Jama Abbott,
S Lavon Cobb, Dana English, Mike
d Manley and Dewey Terrell.
t. These also belong to the recently
y restored Economic Development
t Council'(EDC), which will be the
a outreach arm of economic develop-
ment in the county. Other members
are Joe Albritton, John Barlow,
Nancy Craft, Teresa Crawford,
Keith Davis and Oralia Flores.


sized for growth.
He said the estimated costs were
generous and included design, con-
struction and all. "With the
increased prices on concrete, pipe
and other items, I tried to consider
the most cost rather than the most
conservative so you won't..be sur-
prised later. I'd rather it come in
much lower than higher."
Winter explained that the capaci-
ty for each development was esti-
mated on state Department of
Environmental Protection charts.
For instance, at the new school, the
estimate is 5,500 gallons per day,
based on historical averages at
older schools, but the new school
has modern water-saving plumbing
and the 1,700 to 2,100 students
would probably use more like
2,500 per day.
All of this would be phased in
and certificates of completion
(COs) issued for residential and
commercial development as they
could be added.
County Manager Lex Albritton
said the county is committed to
opening up to Orange Blossom by
May, 2007 when their permits end.
He also said the $10 million cost
was a high estimate as some of the
extensions costs would be picked
up by developers.


. The county will also make appli-
cation to the newly formed
Independent Economit
Development Board for funding for
these projects. However,'those spe-
cial phosphate severance tax dol-
lars are tied to development of jobs
and-ahe.application will have to .
geared, that way too. It will-receive
its first tax revenue in June, so theqe
is time to complete an application,
said Albritton.
Timmerman asked if bonding,
impact fees and other revenue
could meet the costs.
Albritton said there was also
related road paving which would
have to be done, especially in
Wauchula Hills. ;
Schriner said that as capacity is
added that would, of course,
increase revenue and it would be
important to revisit the fees
charged for water and wastewater
services. Currently they are
charged on a residential unit basis,
with larger facilities charged on the
estimated number of residential
units they would equate to.
After a bit more discussion, the
commission consensus was to
move forward. Financial feasibility
and an analysis of revenue and
costs will be brought to a later
meeting.


.Beth Kerly, special assistant to Gov. Jeb Bush, will speak to the
Wauchula Lions Club Thursday, Jan. 26, at the noon luncheon at the local
VFW building.

Over 2 million bankruptcy cases filed in the United States in 2005 were
up 31.6 percent over the 1.55 million cases filed in 2004. A new federal
,bankruptcy law took effect Oct. 17, 2005, making it tougher to file.
Lundquist Consulting Inc. of Burlingame, Calif., estimated one in 53
households filed bankruptcy petitions in 2005. There were over 100,000 fil-
ings in Florida. This would equate to over 100 petitions filed by Hardee
County residents or businesses.


Nearly all men can stand adver-
sity, bt if you want to. test a
man's character, giye him power.
-Abraham Lincoln


I am neither especially. clever
nor especially gifted. I am only
very, very curious.
-Albert Einstein


Io f n a o p a u

B*ITRWR7Mrfflons apply.








Open Saturdays 9211-:6
^^^^^^~jjjjj^^^- = = I^^^f


on to class, the students reported.
Dick said Cook and Dean of
Students Todd Durden checked the
area and found two boys fitting the
description provided. A search of
.Garcia allegedly revealed the BB-'
guin in the waistband of his pants
and a switchblade knife in his pants
pocket,
Dick said the boy and his parents
were present at the expulsion hear-
ing. The teen told the board he had
been "messing around" with the
BB-gun the day before, and did not
realize it was still in his pocket
until it was "too late."
The board expelled him for the
remainder of the current school
year and for the first semester of
2006-07, he said. The boy may
attend Pioneer Career Academy, the
district's alternative school in Zolfo
Springs.
"The School Board has zero tol-
erance for that type of thing," Dick
later said. "I turned on the televi-
sion news that same night and saw
a report on a middle-school student
who pointed a BB-gun like that at a
SWAT team and was critically
injured. And just this morning, I
saw that he died.
"This, too, could have ended
tragically," Dick noted, adding,
however, that the local boy had no
BBs and did not point the gun at
anyone.
The other incident involved two


seventh graders at Hardee Junior
High School, one 13 years old and
the other 14.
Dick said that on Dec. 6, the 13-
year-old found a marijuana ciga-
rette in a hedge near the school and
sold it to the 14-year-old for $10.
Students who witnessed the
alleged transaction reported it, he
said.
Both boys admitted their wrong-
doing and cooperated with admin-
istrators, he said. Further, in both
instances their parents had them
independently tested for drug use
with negative results.
The younger boy returned the
$10 and wrote a letter of apology to
the school, Dick said. The older
boy admitted to buying the ciga-
rette because of peer pressure and a
desire to be "cool."
Because he was the only one of
the two found with drugs in his
possession, however, he was crimi-
nally charged with the first-degree
misdemeanor crime of possession
of marijuana on school grounds.
.Both boys were expelled. The
younger boy, who no longer had the
marijuana cigarette but who admit-
ted to selling it, was expelled for
the remainder of this school year.
The older boy, who had the mar-
ijuana on him, was expelled for the
rest of this year and the first semes-
ter of the next.
Both may attend PCA, Dick said.


it (the Cattlemen's Arena). It's new
and improved. The new bleachers
are very, very nice.
."It's one more sign ve're back to
normal," Jones concluded "After
all, we've been through in the last
year or so, it's nice to return to nor-
malcy."
One change mandated by the


hurricane damage to local facilities,
though, will remain intact despite
repairs. Graduates will still spenf
their Project Graduation party at
Adventure Island in Tampa.
Last year's trip, Dick Said, was a
big success for all involved, and
this year's graduates wanted to be
able to have that same experience.


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pots
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


IBustrativie bite Plan

COURTESY CHAR
Contracts are pending or completed on several lots at Hardee County Commerce Park off SR 62,
not far from U.S. 17. About 100 jobs may be available when construction is completed.


UTILITIES
Continued From 1A


water facilities. The county pre-
sently purchases water from
Wauchula and re-pumps it to retail
customers, using a 400,000-gallon
ground storage pump, chlorination
stations and an emergency power
back-up generator.
Planners propose' drillingWal.pir
of 10-inch wells with pumpk, aera-
tion and chemical seed facilities,
high-service pumping additions
and control system modifications.
Extensions would go to the
Barkdoll Road, SR 62 loop,
Wauchula Hills and adjacent areas
up and down the U.S. 17 corridor.
The total bill for the wells, water
plant and extensions could be as
high as $5.6 million.
Schriner said this is the first time
he has seen unprecedented growth
in the rural areas of the state and
said it was important to get water
and wastewater up and'running in
Wauchula Hills. It would make no
sense to tear up the roads twice and
should all be done at the same time.
Commission Chairman Nick
Timmerman said "It's exciting, the
expansions you plan. How far can
lines be extended?"
Schriner said pressure is lost with
distance, but with bigger pumps
and lift stations, it would be reason-
able to go five miles. He said he
would use 12-inch lines generously


EXPULSIONS
Continued From 1A


GRADUATION
Continued From 1A


I-I


i II







January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Martin Luther King Jr. Parade



-.gm" 2. L'


Navy Log Offered Free To

Sea Service Members Vets


S' txrtension agent


AIM FOR A HEALTHY WEIGHT THIS YEAR!
- Have you made a new year's resolution to lose weight Jan. 22-28 has
-been declared as National Healthy Weight Week, so what better time to start
%6nyour goal of reaching and Taintaining a healthy weight for yourself?
s'-" 'Why is a healthy w~eihti important? Reaching and maintaining a
iEal'thy weight is good for i&6iir overall health and will help you prevent and
control many diseases and conditions. We know that an increase in weight
also increases a person's risk for heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood
pressuree diabetes, gallbladder disease, gynecologic disorders, arthritis,
some types of cancer and even some lung problems. Maintaining a healthy
weight has many benefits, including feeling good about yourself and hav-
'ing more energy to enjoy life.
SA person's weight is the result of many things: height, genes, metab-
';olism, behavior and environment. Maintaining a healthy weight requires
keeping a balance ... a balance of energy. You must balance the calories
,'you get from food and beverages with the calories you use to keep your
,tody going and being physically active. Remember the following:
a3 The same amount of energy in and energy out over time =
y- weight stays the same. More in than out over time = weight
1: gain. More out than in over time = weight loss.
5 Your energy in and out do not have to balance. exactly every day. It is
the balance over time that will help you to maintain a healthy weight in the
-ong run.
S For many people, this balance means eating fewer calories and increas-
ing their physical activity. Cutting back on: calories is a matter of choice.
:Making healthy food choices that are lower in fats, especially saturated and
'trans,fat, cholesterol, added sugars and salt can help you cut back on calo-
'ties, as can paying attention to portion sizes.
s We have all heard the facts: To lose weight, you have to eat less and
-move more. But this: is often easier said than done. Many people make
repeated attempts, often using different fad diets and weight-loss gimmicks
and are unsuccessful.
*Did you know that simply losing as little as 10 percent of your current
body weight can make a difference in your health? Achieving this initial
weight-loss goal will help to lower your risk for heart disease and other
conditions, including high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and.
certain types of cancer.
*Did you know that a reasonable and safe weight loss is 1-2 pounds per
week? While it may take as long as six months to lose the weight, it'will
jpake it easier to keep the weight off. And it will give you the time to make
,pew healthy lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet and increasing
.your physical activity.
*Did you know that it is better, to maintain a moderate weight loss over
fa longer period of time than it is to lose lots of weight and regain it? You
San consider additional weight loss after you have lost 10 percent of your
currentt body weight and have maintained it for six months.
What foods make up a healthy eating plan? A healthy eating plan is one
that gives your body the nutrients it needs every day while staying within
your daily calorie level. Foods that'should be included are lower in calories,
tal fat, saturated and trans fat, cholesterol and sodium (salt). Examples of
these foods include fat-free and low-fat dairy products; lean meat, fish and
Sultry; high-fiber foods such as whole grains, breads and cereals; fruits;
nd vegetables.
Canola or olive oils and soft margarines made from these oils are heart
healthy and can be used in moderate amounts. Unsalted nuts can also be
built into a'healthy diet as long as you watch the amount.
A healthy eating plan includes foods from all the basic food groups. It
s low in saturated fats, trans fat, cholesterol, salt (sodium) and added sug-
prs. It contains enough calories for good health butnot too many so that you
-gain weight. A healthy eating plan also emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole
grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, lean meats, poultry, fish,
beans, eggs and nuts. It also allows for reasonable portion sizes to control
calories and prevent unhealthy weight gain.
So, if maintaining a healthy weight is one of your goals for 2006, why
not start now using the ideas given here, and make your health a priority
this year? You will be glad you did! To find out more about weight man-
agement, please visit the NHLBI Aim for a Healthy Weight Web site at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/index.htm; or con-
tact the Hardee County Extension-Office at 773-2164.
May you have a happy and healthy new year.


Don't Be Left Out!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 PM.


The United States Navy
Memorial, located on Pennsylvania
SAvenue in Washington, D.C., is a
national memorial that honors those
who served and are serving in
America's Sea Services Navy,
Marine Corps, Coast Guard and
Merchant Marine.
The focus 'of the U.S. Navy
Memorial is not a particular type of
ship, battle or conflict, but rather
the individual whose service and
sacrifice is honored and celebrated.
The heart of the U.S. Navy
Memorial is the Navy Log.
The Navy Log is the permanent
public registry where Sea Service
members and veterans can record
their service information name,
duty stations, awards, photos and
memories. The Navy Log may be


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REASON LAMAR HOLT
Deceased,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252005CP000152

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
REASON LAMAR HOLT, deceased,
whose date of death was September
8th, 2005, and whose Social Security
Number is 264-72-4539, is pending in
the Circuit Court for HARDEE County,
Florida,.Probate Division, the address
of which is P.O. Drawer 1749
Wauchula, FL 33873. The names and
addresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is January 12, 2006.
Personal Representative:
Roberta Holt Beattie
2975 George Anderson Road
Wauchula, FL 33873
Trolano & Roberts, PA.
Attorneys for Personal
Representative
317 South Tennessee Avenue
Lakeland, FL 33801-4617
(863) 686-7136
Florida Bar No. 0221864 1:12,19,26.2:2c


viewed at the U.S. Navy Memorial,
or .via the Internet at www.lone-
sailor. org. The goal of the
Memorial is to record the service
history of all eligible uniformed
individuals and veterans.
Now through the end :of July
2006, all members and veterans of
the Sea Services active duty and
reservists are able to enroll in the
U.S. Navy Memorial's Navy Log
without charge and without any
obligation. Family members and
friends can record service informa-
tion for veterans who are deceased
or those who are unable to record
their own information.
To enroll your information or to
enroll family members simply enter
the appropriate information at
www.lonesailor.org. If you have
any questions, please contact the
Navy Log Department of the U.S.
Navy Memorial, at 1-800-NAVY-
LOG (1-800-628-9564).





-4cul 7-4 9



A Safe Place
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE
S1 (800) 500-1119
End The Abuse!


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular session today
(Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102, Courthouse Annex I,
412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The following is a synopsis of agenda
topics that may be of public interest. Times are approximate except for
advertised public hearings.
-Zoning issues, 8:35 a.m.
-Resolution on county employee travel reimbursements, Jane Long,
9 a.m.
-Resolution on housing programs, Janet Gilliard, 9:30 a.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who may wish
to plan to attend.

This is the real secret of life-to be completely engaged with what
you are doing in the here and now. And instead of calling it work,
realize it is play.
-Alan Watts


Words-Just-Aren't-Enough
Words alone cannot express our grati-
tude for your kindness shown. The flow-
ers you sent were beautiful, the meals
you prepared were delicious. Although
nothing can replace Danny, your
prayers, and support during this most
difficult of times are greatly appreciated
and have made our loss a little easier to
bear.
Your continued friendship, love, con-
cern, and support make the future a lit-
tle brighter.

Gratefully,

jhe Jamily of anny accio


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Email: kochcon@strato.net 8:1ltc State Certified License #CBC058444







4A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


GREGORY L. WILLIAMS
Gregory L. Williams of
Wauchula died Monday, Jan. 16,
2006 at Tampa General Hospital.
He was born July 13, 1958 in
Lakeland. He worked as the
Assistant Supervisor of the Polk
Regional Detention Center and was
a pistol marksman. He was a mem-
ber of Florida's First Assembly
Church of God.
He is survived by his wife of 27
years Lora; six children, Beverly
Gooding and husband William of
Wauchula, Lance Corporal Stephen
Williams of Okinawa, Japan and
Krystle Williams, D.J. Williams,
Jenna Williams and Donnie
Williams all of Wauchula; two
grandchildren, Josiah Gooding and
Rebekah Gooding; parents, Earl
and Kay Williams; one sister, Beth
Broen and husband James of
Sebring; and several nieces and
nephews..
Visitation will be Wednesday,
Jan. 18 from 6 to 8 p.m. Services
are at the Florida's First Assembly
of God today (Thursday) Jan. 19 at
10:30 a.m. Continuing services and
burial follow immediately at
Wauchula Cemetery.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula


LOUISE B. CHILDERS
Louise B. Childers, 90, of
Lexington, Ky., died Jan. 10, 2006
in' Wauchula.
She'was born May 4, 1915 in
.Richmond, Ky. and was a winter
resident of Hardee County for 20
years. She was a member of the
Epworth Methodist Church in
Lexington, and had worked as a
sales clerk at Stewart's Department
Store in Lexington.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, John Childers, on July 28,
1997.
SSurvivors include one son, John
Childers and his wife of Zellwood;
two daughters, Betty Childers of
Lexington, Ky., and Helen "Sissy"
-Nelson and her husband- of Ft.
Myers; one brother, James Blake of
Catlettsburg, Ky.; five grandchil-
dren, John Childers, Mari Lee
Stephens, Ken Moberly, Gina
Sanders and Justy Wilson; nine
great-grandchildren; and one great-
great-granddaughter.
Services were held at noon
Tuesday, Jan 17 at Kerr Brothers
Fuaieral Honme"in' Lexington, Ky.
with -visitation one -hour prior.
Burial was in Lexington Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to the
Lighthouse Baptist Church,
Jardines deArecibo Calle A D6,
Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


i Skoviig dUenmotg














MARSHIA ANN
CARROLL
Marshia Ann Carroll, 24, of
Bowling Green, died Jan. 9,
2006, in Manatee County.
She was born Nov. 28, 1981 in'
Liberal, Kan., and had lived in
Bowling Green most of her life.
She was a graduate of Hardee
High School and a member of
New Zion Baptist Church. She
was employed as a laborer with
Murphy's Harvesting.
Survivors include her mother,
Brenda Carroll of Bowling
Green; two sons, Marcos Carroll
of Pavo, Ga., and Juan Lucas
Martinez of Bowling Green; one
brother, Shawn Stevens of
Washington, D.C.; and three sis-
ters, Kimberly Carroll of
Wauchula, Michelle Bell and
husband Robert and Brenda
Carroll all of West Virginia.
Services were held at 11 a.m.
Friday, Jan. 13 at Robarts Family
Funeral Home with the Rev.
John Brown officiating.
Visitation was 10-11 a.m. with
burial in Bowling Green
,Cemetery.
Contributions may be made to
help the family.


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


WALLACE SIMPSON
Wallace Simpson, 72, of
Wauchula, died Jan. 16, 2006 at
home.
He was born June 14, 1933 in
Baton, Ga. and had been a Hardee
County resident since 1955, com-
ing from Pelham, Ga. He was a
farmer, a road equipment operator
for Macasphalt of Winter Haven,
and a member of Faith Assembly of
God in Bowling Green.
Survivors include his wife,
Margaret; five children, 'Billy and
wife Terri of Wauchula, Sanora
Morgan and husband Ronnie of
Wauchula, Dean and wife Kathy of
Fort Meade, Lewis of Wauchula,
and Gilbert. and wife Christi of
Georgia; one brother, Robart and
wife Mary Ann of Georgia; two sis-
ters, Shirley Hook and husband J.F.
of Georgia and Jean Connor of
Georgia; six grandchildren and five
great-grandchildren..
.Services will be held at 11 a.m.
Friday, Jan. 20 at Faith'Assembly
of God in Bowling Green with Dr.
James Miller officiating. Burial is
in Lake Dale Baptist Cemetery.
Visitation is today (Thursday) 6-8'
p.m., at Robarts Family Garden
Chapel.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula

AMELIA MARIE BURNS
Amelia Marie Burns, 57,. of
Wauchula, died Jan. 10, 2006, in
Sarasota.
She was born Sept. 5, 1948 in
Alton, Ill., and came to Wauchula
.in 1984 from Dyersburg, Tenn. She
was a retired farm laborer.
Survivors include her husband,
Jimmie bums; three sons, Johnny
Bums and wife Marie of Sebring,
David Burs and wife Melissa of
Sebring; and Daniel Bums and wife
Amanda of Wauchula; four daugh-
ters, Carol Burns and husband
David of Cape Coral, Martha Burns
and husband Adam of Arcadia,
Ruby Burs and husband Kevin of
Michigan, and Rosa Burns of
Palmdale; one brother, Dean
"Sonny" Grizle of LaBelle; and 35
grandchildren.
Services were held at 2 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 14 at Robarts Family
Garden Chapel with visitation 1-2
p.m. Burial was in Wauchula
Cemetery,
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula :

APOLINAR ROMERO
MATINEZ
Apolinar Romero Martinez, 48,
of Nocatee, died Jan. 9, 2006.
He was born Jan. 8, 1958 in
Mexico.
Services are pending.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


3' LOvtC) emoity














AMELIA MARIE
BURNS
Amelia Marie Burns, 57, of
Wauchula, died Jan. 10, 2006, in
Sarasota.
She was born Sept. 5, 1948 in
Alton, Ill., and came to
Wauchula in 1984 from
Dyersburg, Tenn. She was a
retired farm laborer.
Survivors include her husband,
Jimmie burns; three sons,
Johnny Burns and wife Marie of
Sebring, David Burns and wife
Melissa of Sebring; and Daniel
Burns and wife Amanda of
Wauchula; four daughters, Carol
Burns and husband David of
Cape Coral, Martha Burns and
husband Adam of Arcadia, Ruby
Burns and husband Kevin of
Michigan, and Rosa Burns of
Palmdale; one brother, Dean
"Sonny" Grizle of LaBelle; and
35 grandchildren.
Services were held at 2 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 14 at Robarts
Family Garden Chapel with visi-
tation 1-2 p.m. Burial was in
Wauchula Cemetery


FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


Obituaries


Funeral. Home in Lexington, Ky.
with visitation one hour prior.
Burial was in Lexington
Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to the
Lighthouse Baptist Church,
Jardines deArecibo Calle A D6,
Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula


wvp^
Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


MARSHIA ANN CARROLL
Marshia Ann Carroll, 24, of
Bowling Green, died Jan. 9, 2006,
in Manatee County.'
She was born Nov. 28, 1981 in
Liberal, Kan., and had lived in
Bowling Green most of her life.
She was a graduate of Hardee High
School and a member of New Zion
Baptist Church. She was employed
as a laborer with Murphy's
Harvesting.
Survivors include her mother,
Brenda Carroll of Bowling Green;
two sons, Marcos Carroll of Pavo,
Ga., and Juan Lucas Martinez of
Bowling Green; one brother,
Shawn Stevens of Washington,
D.C.; and three sisters, Kimberly
Carroll of Wauchula, Michelle Bell
and husband Robert and Brenda
Carroll all of West Virginia.
Services were held at 11 a.m.
Friday, Jan. 13 at Robarts Family
Funeral Home with the Rev. John
Brown officiating. Visitation was
10-11 a.m. with burial in Bowling
Green Cemetery.
Contributions may be made to
help the family.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula

VIRGINIA ANN FREIDANK
Virginia Ann Freidank, 64, of
Fort Meadb, died Jan. 10, 2006, in
Sebring.
She was born May 19, 1941 in
Huntington, Long Island, New
York, and had lived in Fort Meade
for six years, coming from New
York. She liked to bowl, and .had
worked for the Hardee County
Office of Community Develop-
ment.
She is survived by one brother,
Woody Freidank of North Carolina;
two sisters, Lynn Gramling of
Zolfo Springs and Juanita McCue
of Clermont; and several nieces and
nephews.'
The family received friends on
Friday, Jan. 13 from 5-7 p.m. at
Robarts Family Funeral Home.
Memorials may be made to the
American Cancer Society, P.O. Box
1268, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


LEOBARDO ARMENTA
MORALES
Leobardo Armenta Morales, 31,
of Ona, died Jan. 4, 2006 in
Sebring.
He was born Feb. 4, 1974 .in
Cuautepec, Guerrero, Mexico, and
worked in Hardee County in the
winter. He was employed by
Orange-: Blossom Harvesting, and
was a Catholic. "4 ,
Survivors include his parents,
Leobardo and Urfina of Mexico;
wife, Viancy of Mexico; two sons,
Edgar Armenta al Cazas and
Eduardo Armenta al Cazas; two
brothers, Candido and Alejandro of
Mexico; and four sisters, Mirna,
Maribel, Lizbeth and Lucero, all of
Mexico.
Burial will be in Pantcon
Muncipal in Cuautepec, Guerrero,
Mexico.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


.'0n LkOLig 0uemokq


LOUISE B.
CHILDERS
Louise B. Childers, 90, of
Lexington, Ky., died Jan. 10,
2006 in Wauchula.
She was born May 4, 1915 in
Richmond, Ky. and was a winter
resident of Hardee County for 20
years. She was a member of the
Epworth Methodist Church in
Lexington, and had worked as a"
sales clerk at Stewart's
.Department Store ill Lexington.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, John Childers, on
July 28, 1997.
Survivors include one son,
John Childers and his wife of
Zellwood; two daughters, Betty
Childers of Lexington, Ky., and
Helen "Sissy" Nelson and her
husband of Ft. Myers; one broth-
er, James Blake of Catlettsburg,
Ky.; five grandchildren, John
Childers, Mari Lee Stephens,
Ken Moberly, Gina Sanders and
Justy Wilson; nine great-grand-
children; and' one great-great-
granddaughter.
Services were held at noon
Tuesday, Jan 17 at Kerr Brothers


VIRGINIA B. HUNNEMAN
Virginia B. Hunneman, 82, of
Winter Haven, formerly of
Bowling Green, and North
Carolina died Saturday, Jan. 14,
2006, in Winter Haven.
Born Dec. 9, 1923, she was the
ninth of 10 children born to J.R.
and Katie I. Bums of Drexel, N.C.
She was a retired nurse.
She was preceded in.death by her
parents; three husbands, J.P.
Hawkins, W.F. Bishop Sr. and J.E.
Hunneman Sr.; and one son, W. F.
Bishop Jr.
She is survived by one daughter,
Karen B. Barrett and husband'
James of Jowling Green; one
brother, Tellus Burns of North
Carolina; one sister, Sue Barnes of
North Carolina; one daughter-in-
law, Mary S. Bishop of South
Carolina; one grandson, Steve
Bishop of South Carolina; one
granddaughter, Pamela B. Dymock
and husband Steve of North
Carolina; two great-grandchildren,
Amanda and Michele Dymock of
North Carolina; and numerous
nephews and nieces.
Robarts Family Funeral Home in
Wauchula is in charge of arrange-
ments with private burial Jan. 23 in
Charlotte, N.C.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula

BETTY J. BESAW
Betty J. Besaw, 79, of Bowling
Green; died Monday, Jan. 16,2006,
at Bartow Regional Medical
Center.
Born July 24, 1926, in
Kalamazoo, Mich., she was a
school teacher in Muskegon, Mich.
for 27 years. She was a member of
Westwood Reformed Church of
American in Muskegon. A winter
visitor for 14 years, she attended
the First Baptist Church, of
Wauchula.
Survivors are her husband,
Kenneth Besaw of Bowling Green;
one son Donald Besaw of Hamil-
ton, Ohio; one daughter Amy
Huston of Muskegon, Mich.; five
grandchildren and nine great-
grandchildren.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade


To read a book for the first time
is to make the acquaintance of
a new friend; to read it a sec-
ond time is to meet an old one.


0A Skoviog (uAe0o19y
i "- '

LEOBARDO ARMENTA
MORALES
Leobardo Armenta Morales,
31, of Ona, died Jan. 4, 2006 in
Sebring.
He was born Feb. 4, 1974 in
Cuautepec, Guerrero, Mexico,
and worked in Hardee County in
the winter. He was employed by
Orange Blossom Harvesting, and
was a Catholic.
Survivors include his parents,
Leobardo and Urfina of Mexico;
wife, Viancy of Mexico; two
sons, Edgar Armenta al Cazas
and Eduardo Armenta al Cazas;
two brothers, Candido and
Alejandro of Mexico; and four
sisters, Mira, Maribel, Lizbeth
and Lucero, all of Mexico.
Burial will be in Pantcon
Muncipal in Cuautepec,
Guerrero, Mexico.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home


SYLVIA CHAVEZ
Sylvia Chavez, 57, of Frostproof,
died Sunday, Jan. 8, 2006, at
Lakeland Regional Hospital.
Born Jan. 9, 1948, in
Brownsville, Texas, she moved to
Frostproof from Fort Meade where
she was a resident for 18 years. She
was a member of The Holy Spirit
Catholic Church in Lake Wales.
She worked with the clerk of courts
at the Polk County Courthouse.
She is survived by her husband
Jose B. Chavez of Frostproof; two
sons, Jose A. Chavez of Frostproof
and Luis A. Chavez of Bartow; two
daughters, Anna L. Loaiza of
Frostproof and Laura E. Valdez of
Frostproof; her mother, Hortencia
P. Garza of Brownsville, Texas; six
sisters, Mary Jo Champion of.
Houston, Texas, Lidia Garza of
Brownsville, Texas, Irma Garza of
Brownsville, Texas, Maria E. Garza
of Corpus Christi, Texas, Ana Leal
of Houston,-Texas Turnbough of Corpus Christi,
Texas; and eight grandchildren.
.Visitation was, Wednesday, Jan.
'11 at Moody-Brant Funeral Chapel
and services were held on
Thursday, Jan. 12 at St. Elizabeth
Catholic Church.
Brant Funeral Chapel
Wauchula





SCard ofd

Thanks

SThe expression of your
kindness and sympathy,
food, and other kind
deeds will always be
remembered with deep
gratitude.
Each neighbor, friend
and loved one helped so
much in our time of loss.
We appreciate it more
than words can express
arid may God richly
bless each of you. .


soc1:19p .



n Solving uiewolty


VIRGINIA ANN
FREIDANK
Virginia Ann Freidank, 64; of
Fort Meade, died Jan. 10, 2006,
in Sebring.
She was born May 19, 1941 in'
Huntington, Long Island, New
York, and had lived in ,Fort
Meade for, six years, coming
from New York. She liked to
bowl, and had worked for the
Hardee County Office of
Community Develop-ment.
She is survived by one bother,
Woody Freidank of North
Carolina; two sisters, Lynn
Gramling of Zolfo Springs and
Juanita McCue of Clermont; and
several nieces and nephews.
The family received friends on
Friday, Jan. 13 from 5-7 p.m. at
Robarts Family Funeral Home.
Memorials may be made to the
American Cancer Society, P.O
Box 1268, Wauchula, FL 33873.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home .


On loving 6Memopt:,"


WALLACE
SIMPSON
Wallace Simpson, 72, of
Wauchula, died Jan. 16, 2006 at
home.
He was born June 14, 1933 in
Baton, Ga. and had been a
Hardee County resident since
1955, coming from Pelham, Ga.
He was a farmer, a road equip-
ment operator for Macasphalt of
Winter Haven, and a member of
Faith Assembly of God in
Bowling Green.
Survivors include his wife,
Margaret; five children, Billy and
wife Terri of Wauchula', Sanora
Morgan and husband Ronnie of
Wauchula, Dean and wife Kathy
of Fort Meade, Lewis of
Wauchula, and Gilbert and wife
Christi of Georgia; one brother,
Robart and wife Mary Ann .of
Georgia; two sisters, Shirley
Hook and husband J.F. of
Georgia and Jean Connor of
Georgia; six grandchildren and
five great-grandchildren.
Services will be held at 11 a.m.
Friday, Jan. 20 at Faith Assembly
of God in.Bowling Green with
Dr. James Miller officiating.
Burial is in Lake Dale Baptist
Cemetery. Visitation is today
(Thursday) 6-8 p.m. at Robarts
Family Garden Chapel.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula




Provided as a courtesy of
Robarts Family Funeral Home



n seovtuig klHm o/lgy:


VIRGINIA B.
HUNNEMAN
SVirginia B. Hunneman, 82, of
Winter Haven, formerly of
Bowling Green, and North
Carolina died Saturday, Jan. 14,
2006, in Winter Haven.
Born Dec. 9, 1923, she was the
ninth of 10 children born to J.R.
andKatie I Burns of Drexel,
NI.h he "as a retired nurse.:
She was preceded in death by.
her parents; three husbands, J.P.
Hawkins, W.F. Bishop Sr. and
J.E. Hunneman Sr.; and one son,.
W. F. Bishop Jr.
SShe is survived by one daugh-
ter, Karen B. Barren and hus-
band James of Bowling Green;
one brother. Tellus Burns of
North Carolinai one sister,. Sue
Barnes of North Carolina; one
daughter-in-law. Mary S. Bishop
of South Carolina; one grandson,
Steve Bishop of South Carolina;
one 'granddaughter, Pamela B.
Dymock and husband'Steve of
North Carolina; two great-grand-
children, Amanda, and Michele:
,Dymock-of North Carolina; and
numerous nephews and nieces.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
in Wauchula is in charge of
arrangements with private burial
Jan. 23 in Charlotte, N.C.



FUNERAL HOMES
529 W. Main Street
Wauchula, yF ;




Provided as a courtesy of :
Robarts Family Funeral Home. "


Increasingly Preferred




Because we care...







FUNERAL HOMES


A Trusted Family Name Since 1906

529 West Main Street,
.Wauchula


Deborah & Dennis Robarts, Owners


773-9773






January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5A


CHILI ON TRIAL!


The Verdict Is In For


The Courthouse Crew


Assistant Public Defender Mel McKinley and Judicial Assistant Libby Bradley prepare luncheon
plates from the variety of offerings that accompanied the chili and its traditional fixings of
chopped onions, grated cheese and hot peppers.


The team that can't be beat: First-place winners (from left) Yolanda Villarreal, Dee Brummett, Jill
Peve and Pete Zelyk of the County Probqtion & Employees Team.


Sharing the witness box and sampling contest entries are judicial assistants (from left) Libby
Bradley, of County Judge Marcus J. Ezelle's office, and Andrea Small, of Circuit Judge Robert L.
Doyel's office.


Russell Odam of the Department of Corrections plans a taste test of the competition.
o Russell Odham of the Department of Corrections plans a taste test of the competition.


Deputy Clerk Brad Reed of the Clerk of Courts Office dips into
a pot to sample one of the nine entries lined up for the compe-
tition.



,_.M. '. .


Courts Clerk Hugh Bradley reads the verdict along with lawyer Candace S. Preston, who pre-
sented the winner's trophy and certificate as The Best Chili in the annual Hardee County
Courthouse Chili Cookoff to Team 7, County Probation & Employees. Second place went to Team
4, the Public Defender's Office. Winning third-place honors was Team 1, the Department of
Corrections.


Jill Peve scrapes the pot for a serving of winning entry.
Jill Peve scrapes the pot for a serving of a winning entry.


THURSDAY, JAN. 19
/Hardee County Commis-
sion, regular and zoning meet-
ing, Room 102, Courthouse
Annex 1, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.

THURSDAY, JAN. 26
i/Hardee County School
Board, media center; Hardee
Junior High School, 200-S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula, work-
shop on growth management 4
p.m., regular meeting 5 p.m.









IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH-JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 25-2004-CA-547
CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE
MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPO-
RATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JENNIFER N. WILLIAMS, et ux., et
al.,
Defendant(s). /


PHOTOS BY CYNTHIA KRAHL
Serving as judges for the annual fall event were (from left) lawyer Val Patarini, State Attorney Jerry
Hill, County Judge Marcus J. Ezelle, Courts Clerk Hugh Bradley and Circuit Judge Robert L.
Doyel. They deliberated in private in the Hardee County Courthouse's third-floor Jury Room.


Sitting in the jury box in Courtroom A, where the event was held, and sampling the entries are
i(from left) Assistant State Attorney Gene Malpas of the Wauchula office and elected State
,Attorney Jerry Hill of Bartow headquarters for the 10th Judicial Circuit.


To A Grandmother
My idle mind was so hopelessly adrift in the currents
of juvenile oceans
That your life line couldn't pull me free of those
immature notions.
Only Father Time could merge our channels but you were
powerless to wait.
The meaning of your every word and deed is now dawning,
but much too late.
After that fall, when you answered your God's call, you faded
from my conscious mind.
Among uncouths, I couldn't use your simple truths, having
to respond in kind.
But now, after many years of standstill and failure to fulfull,
I wish with all my soul.that I'd surrendered to your will.
If your message had not escaped me and I'd kept your
ideals in sight,
I'd be richer, much more successful and much, much more
at peace tonight.
Belton Dominick
Temple Terrace

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input. Only your
original work may be submitted. Send your poetry to: Poet's Place,
The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Final Judgement entered
in this case now pending in said
Court, the style of which is indicated
above.
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the Hardee County
Courthouse, at the North Front Steps,
417 West Main Street, Wauchula,
Florida 33873, on the 25 day of
January, 2006, at 11:00 a.m., the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Order or Final
Judgement, to wit:
LOTS 1 TO 4 BLOCK "D" OF
MOONLIGHT PARK SUBDIVI-
SION, A SUBDIVISION IN
SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
BOOK 4, PAGE 9, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, SUBJECT
TO EXISTING ROAD RIGHT
OF WAY.
ORDERED AT HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA this 6 day of January, 2006.

B. HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
As Clerk, Circuit Court
HARDEE, Florida
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceeding
you are entitled at no cost to you, to
the provision or certain assistance.
Please contact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863) 534-4690, within
(2) working days of your receipt of
this (described notice); if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call TDD
(863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay
Service 711. 1:12,19c


ii~-~Si IFC
CI
-a~
a .




,r
A

.






6A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


The


Classifieds


ABOUT...

Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $3.75 for 10 words. Each additional
word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services.
Wanted,
Yard Sales


250U uOHR UK. n.H nUIIo yUou,
$4500 OBO. 863-245-1164. 1:12-2:2p
FREE 4 LARGE 8'x3' concrete culvert
pipes, 781-0384. 1:12-19c
HAY FOR SALE! Just cut fertilized
bahia round bales. Pick up in field.
$26/bale. 773-4642 after 5 p.m.


1994 GMC DUMP TRUCK, 1993
International bucket truck. 781-2089.
1:19-26p
2002 DODGE 1500 SERIES, 4 dr., 4x4,
$2500 and assume loan. 781-7444.
1:19p





U1,..amet Sre


Short Time Job- Bmkupt ~y Repo,- Slow r F
Ju"t mt ourw y rroqulwnwtm nd you m condllMonly
APPROVED* NO MONEY DOWN
*Low monthly pmnMnt Conipt v Ret N Not Bu H)ePa Hr '
Etabllhd Crd t t Mo(l Cm & Trda.C now tryoura adlt ppo on our 24 hr. tol fr
HOTUNE 140044ar.ne
You must mmet our nw'd*e credR *Mnddf. Inoome isd eqttv reoulreente y lK.


1994 JEEP GRAND Cherokee Laredo,
reduced to $2500. Call 773-9025 after
6:00 p.m. 1:19p
FOR SALE: 1998 FORD EXPLORER
SC, Eddie Bauer Edition, white with
gold trim, leather interior, $6000 OBO.
767-0488. 1:12-2:9p


1:5-2:2p 2002 FORD EXPLORER Sport, 53K
miles, 1 owner, power & towing pack-
age, tilt, cruise, $11,200 OBO. (863)
202-6440. 1:12-19p


I- Auomot


1983 BUS, 9.0 diesel, Allison-auto,
strong motor, great for watermelon
truck, $3500. Also 7.3 diesel, auto,
.1800, 6.2 diesel, auto, shortbus,
$1500. (863) 781-7027. 1:19p
L--

DRIVER NEEDED for flatbed truck sod
deliveries. CDL, 2 yrs. exp., clean
record required. Call Ben at T&B Turf.
727-638-1852. 1:19-2:16p
BOAT MANUFACTURER in Sebring
looking to fill all positions:
Laminators, gel coaters, and riggers
needed. Call (863) 385-3501. 1:19p
RECEPTIONIST/ OPTICIAN/TECH
needed for medical office in
Wauchula. Looking for energetic,
dependable, detail oriented person.
SBilingual a plus. Please mail resume
to: P.O. Box 1648, Avon Park, FL 33825
or fax 863-452-1462 Attn: Personnel.
1:12tfc


UP


P/T CUSTODIAL WORK POSITION:
Local church is looking to hire a cus-
todian to work two days per week (16
hours) cleaning their facility.
Experience is preferred. Pay is based
upon experience. Please call the
church office at 773-9243 for more
information and to set up an interview.
1:19-26c
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT NEED-
ED with Quickbqoks and Microsoft
Excel experience. Please fax resume
to (863) 773-3379. 1:19c
RECEPTIONIST NEEDED for general
office duties including filing, answer-
ing multi-line phone, and greeting
customers. Please fax resume to
(863) 773-3379. 1:19c
BEAUTICIAN (INDEPENDENT CON-
TRACTOR) needed at Hardee Manor
Healthcare Center two days per week.
Apply at 401 Orange Place, Wauchula,
'FL or call Janice Horton at 773-3231.
1:19-26c


Carol Tomblin CAROL'S

-POOL
SERVICE
10 Years Experience -
S Crtlfied & Insured
I Office: 863-452-6026
I Cell: 863-449-1806
P.O. Box 974 Avon Park, FL 33826
c1428ffc


I


'97 NISSAN TRUCK, cold air, good
shape, good fuel mileage. 735-1333 or
after 7 p.m. 735-1476. 1:19p
'98 CHEVY SILVERADO, 4x4, good
condition, $5000 OBO. 773-4110.
1:12-19p
2000 CHEVY, HD2500, 4x4, extended
cab, 6.0, auto, $12,000 OBO. 767-
6468. 1:19p
FOUR 37x12.50R 16.5 LT-Mts military-
OZ, Goodyear tires, mounted on
wheels. Tires in good shape. Make
offer. Anytime 767-1660. 1:19p

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1994 FORD
VIN: 1FTCR14U1RTA26186
,8:00 A.M., JAN. '30, 2006
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy. 17 N., Wauchula FL
cll:19c

HOSPICE
OPPORTUNITIES
Would you like to make a dif-
ference in the lives of our
patients and their families?
Join the Good Shepherd
Hospice team in providing
compassionate, end of life
care throughout Highlands
and Hardee counties.

RN, Case Manager
Provide and manage direct care
to patients and families as part of
our interdisciplinary team. The
selected candidate will incorpo-
rate psychosocial, spiritual, cul-
tural, physical and biological
components, as well as appropri-
ate nursing intervention.
M-F, 8a-5p.
LPN, FT
Responsible for assessing
patient and family needs and
providing hospice care at the
bedside. Work three 12 hour
shifts with one patient the entire
shift in their home or a nursing
homp setting SFrday,,Saturday
;; and Sunday-8p-.E':ETcellent
health benefits included.
LPN, Per Diem
Responsible for assessing
patient and family needs and
providing hospice and palliative
care at the bedside. Work 8 hour
shifts with one patient the entire
shift in their home or nursing
home setting. Must be available
any 2 shifts. Flexible schedules,
8a-4p, 4p-12a and/or 12a-8a.
Interested candidates, should
send resume to: Human
Resources, fax (863) 687-
6977; or call (863) 682-0027.
EOE
Scl :19c


33952
****** WAUCHULA ******
1074 DOWNING CIRCLE


3 BEDROOMS


2 BATHROOMS


FLORIDA ROOM (12 X 20)

UTILITY ROOM AND STORAGE (10 X 12)


CENTRAL HEAT & AIR


BUILT IN 1986


: CARPORT FENCED YARD (2 LOTS)

DOUBLE WIDE MODULAR HOME (2280 SQ FT)
INCLUDES ALL FURNITURE.

ASKING $79,900
MAKE OFFER


JAMES COLLIE
OFFICE 1-941-627-2769
CELL 1-941-628-7835
CELL 1-863-412-8932
FAX 1-941-627-1741


LIC. ASSOCIATE


PPORTIUNITY


ci 1:19C


702 SOUTH 6TH AVENUE
WAUCHULA, FL 33873


NEW LISTING BE THE FIRST TO SEE this
3B/2Bth Brick home on 17 acres; beautiful ceramic
tile floors, fireplace, a cook's dream kitchen and much
more; entrance has satellite gate and alarm system.
$485,000.
NEWLY RENOVATED INSIDE AND OUT!
3B/1Bth, frame with brick front, ceramic tile floors,
some furniture included. $145,000.
BEAUTIFUL WOODED ACREAGE! 2308 square
feet, 3B/2Bth CB home, located just outside of town on
15 acres, fenced, plus a large, vinyl siding, 80x80 barn
with 4 horse stalls, 2 roll up doors, 2 pole barns, many
extras must see to appreciate!
This home is completely furnished and ready for occu-
pancy! 2B/1Bth, 12x60 M/H, washer/dryer, lawn
mower, gas grill, all the extras! $49,900.
PRICE CHANGE on this large, 4B/2Bth D/W on 5
ACRES; 2387 total square feet; built in 1998; conve-
nient area; reduced to $170,000.
WHAT A BONUS! 12x20 workshop/storage space with
concrete floor and electricity PLUS a lovely, move-in
ready 3B/2Bth, built in 1998, D/W on corner lot;
1328 square feet, new washer and dryer, some furni-
ture included. See today! $135,000.
MAKE AN OFFER on this 3B/2Bth home on 5 acres,
fenced and cross fenced, large oaks and pond; first
class workshop and horse barn with electricity; 4 wells
on property. Call today!
NICE and COMFORTABLE 3B/1Bth CB/Stucco
home on 1 acre located in secluded area, great for
small family or retirement. $150,000.
SECLUDED AREA! This 4B/2Bth home has 1732
square feet; lovely setting nice oaks; not far from
town. $265,000.
CUSTOM BUILT 3B/2Bth HOME- built in 2003 on
2.5 acres; too many extras to list. $350,000.


OPPORTUNITY


S


REDUCED! 15 acres cleared pasture with small barn
and 3B/lBth home; large oaks, paved road frontage.
$400,000.
4 ACRES OF COMMERCIAL property plus suite of
offices, fruit scales, outdoor workshop/shed, fenced;
located just outside of city limits. $198,500.
20.3 acres, fenced and cross fenced; excellent pasture-
land. Call for details!
40 Acres of native pasture; paved road frontage; nice
scattered oaks. $800,000.
HIGHWAY 62 ROAD FRONTAGE 10 Acres -
Zoned I-2; office space and service shop. Call for
details!
Park model D/W M/H on nicely landscaped corner lot;
2B/2Bth, 1656 square feet, some furniture included in
sale. $85,000.
Excellent location for this 20 acre tract; can be divided
for home sites; Call for details.
Commercial corner lot, good location. Call office for
information.
Abundant wildlife including turkey, deer, and hogs
plus a 2B/1.5Bth Mobile Home on secluded 17 acres.
$175,000.
Vacant.lot in restricted area, perfect for your mobile
home; located short distance from town. $15,000.
Plenty of wildlife ,on this 7.5 acre tract, convenient
location; excellent home sites. $150,000.
Beautiful, native 5 acres with large oaks, fronts on
Hampton Road, excellent home site, just minutes from
town. $140,000.


www.lambertrealty.net
SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON
ASSOCIATE: DELOIS JOHNSON...............773-9743
ASSOCIATE: MICHAEL ADAMS ...............781-2413
ASSOCIATE: MIKEY COLDING.................781-1698
ASSOCIATE: DAVID McCLINTOCK..........781-1226
ASSOCIATE: CHARLOTTE TERRELL......781-6971


REALTOR

cl11 lQ


AM-SOUTH REALTY

MAKING RE:AL ESTATE REAI. EASY.'
An Independent Owned and Operated Member ol Cowel Banker Real Estate Coporat


ary Delatorre Broker

(863) 773-2122
FAX (863) 773-2173
AFTER HOURS CALL:
Donna Steffens, Associate 781-3627
Jerry Carlton, Associate 375-2887
Richard Dasher, Associate 773-0575
Dane Hendry, Associate 381-2769


Dane Hendry


Office hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM
HOME WITH A HEARTH, feel the warmth of the fireplace 311 RIVERSIDE DRIVE, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath CB home.
through h L P ~ bath CB $129,900.
s'm amrpia~'' sm ----
home. Pef /rl,' Mfed7/ mM,5dff4AC/H and
more. $138,500. 24 ACRES GREAT FOR HUNTING AND RECREATION.
PRIME DT/Cabbage palms, oaks and secluded. $6,000 per acre.
PRIME DjYb%,I,= =aPJygfihb- r ------
hood art-b-ltbl-- -f1ctt-i4 50,00. WOODED 6.6 ACRE TRACT building site for convention-
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY HWY 17 Includes commercial al home or mobile home. $118,800.
and residential lots. $138,000. SERENE SURROUNDINGS 3 bedroom, 2 bath MH on 8
PRICED TO SELL, Mobile Home on 5 acres $75,000. acres. Large barn and more. $195,000.
HWY 17 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 1.76 acres with build- HIGHWAY 66 FRONTAGE. Zolfo Springs lot. $40,000
ings. $389,900.~------
ings. $389,900. PRICE REDUCED, OWNER SAYS SELL this 38 1B home
LAKE FRONTAGE ON LAKE ISIS. This 3 bedroom, 3 bath on South 7th Avenue, Wauchula. Fenced back yard.
home has an attached 1 bedroom, 1 bath apartment. Great condition and location. $94,500.
$599,999.---
STARTER HOME in good neighborhood. 2 bedroom, 1
LARGE LOT corner of Main and Hwy 17 In Bowling bath in excellent condition. $110,000.
Green. $200,000.---
S~~~~ NICE QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath with
PARTIALLY REMODELED 3 bedroom, 2 bath home In large lot. $55,000.
Riverview subdivision. New roof and more. $110,000.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY OR INVESTMENT PROPERTY 5 ACRES Closeto schools. F-R zoning. $200,000.
HWY 17 FRONTAGE, Bowling Green north. Great loca-
tion. $249,900. AVION PALMS RESORT Beautiful 40' Chariot Park Model
.---- with large screened porch. 'Faces North on Coconut
WOODED TRACT 5 acres South of Zolfo Springs. Lane. 55 years or older. $69,900.
$80,000.


We need listings We have qualified buyers!
Member of the Wauchula Board of Realtors and the Multiple Listing Service.
Look for us at Mid-FloridaHomes.com
WE SELL HUD HOMES, CALL US FOR LISTINGS


c11:19c


D


CAB


;; L-r.FF


I -


L; L~t~


.OL'S REALTY
1534 YANCY STREET,
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL.


~T~T~T~T~T~T~T~T~T~T~


I


C_






January 19, 2006, The' Herald-Advocate 7A


The


Clas sifieds


WANTED
Delivery Truck Driver
Must possess current State of FL Class A CDL Drivers
License with Current Health Certificate as required by FL DOT
standards to operate a commercial tractor trailer upon Florida
highways. Must have verifiable experience with clean driving
history. We provide uniforms, paid vacations and paid holi-
days. Company retirement and health insurance available.
Monday thru Friday work week, home nights.
Drug FREE Workplace.
Apply In Person At:
Florida Fence Post Co
5251 SR 64 West
Ona, FL
863-735-1361 cll:12-26c




Sell your house to Billy Hill!



Billy Hill pays
all closing costs!


ANO Hassle!
Quick Closings!






Billy Hill ll IX
BIclI :5tfc

SIr FloresIn IcI





Realtor r
220 N. 6th Avenue
O0UNWY .Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net

SPECIAL OF THE WEEK
**Newly Remodeled Home in Bowling Green 3BR/2BA 1976 Home
with 1,668 Sq., Ft. of living area4 inground pool; central air & heat "
With 1 acre. Must see to appreciate. Asking $179,900.
1991 Wassau Home 3BR/2BA Nature at it's Best Spacious
Completely renovated home in secluded home located off Murphy
.Wauchula with Central Air & Road in South Western Hardee
Heat. Walking distance to.Schools, County. 7.5 acres surrounded by
Hospital and Restaurants. Must Florida Native woodlands, Stocked
See To Appreciate. Pond, several outbuildings and
Conveniently Located state of the art dog pens. This is
3BR/2BA 2002 Home with 1,440 definitely a MUST SEE TO
Heated Sq. Ft., 2 Car Garage, APPRECIATE. ALL THIS FOR
Central Air & Heat. Home in great ONLY $399,000.
location just west of Wauchula on Unbelievable Never thought we
1.3 Acres. Call us today. would see $40,000 for a home
4 Acres Close To Town New again! This 1994 2 BR/1BA Mobile
school and shopping center close Home is priced to sell just west of
by. You can build a new home or Zolfo Springs. For more details call
set up a mobile home on this prop- today.
erty. Take a look today. $80,000. REDUCED Investors take a look at
Great Family Home 3 BR/2BA this!, 51 Acres with develop-
2001 Frame Home on 2.50 Acres meant potential zoned Farm
1in Zofo Springs. Nice and aResidential. Property currently has
in Zolfo Springs. Nice and .approximately 35 acres of income
Peaceful living. MLS #177992. producing grove and approximate-
Asking $198,000. ly 16 acres of natural woodlands
2 Story Home in Riverview Conveniently located between
Very well maintained 3 BR/2BA Wauchula and Bowling Green. Call
CB with central air & heat. Move for your appointment today.
in readyeverything that you have Asking $13,900 an acre.
been looking for and so much Good Homesite 5 Acres paved
more. MLS# 178258. Asking road frontage, approximately 2
$179,900. miles west of town. Don't Let this
This really is a great investment Deal Pass You By! Asking $110,000.
opportunity 2 CB Duplexes = 4 Nice and Quiet 6 BR/3BA
Rental Opportunities. Very well Spacious Family Home in
maintained on nice quiet niegh- Knollwood with Inground Pool,
borhood. Buy one or both. Being extra lot, ceramic tile throughout
offered at $157,000 Per Duplex. and so much more. Great Home for
Homesite within 7 miles from town a growing family. Being offered at
- 20 Acres mostly pastureland $320,000.
and some natural woodlands with Large Corner Lot 3 BR/2BA
access from Ed Wells Road and large Frame Home within
Rabbit Run. Asking $13,900 an Wauchula city with lots of poten-
acre. tial. Asking $205,000.







Noey Flores John Freeman Amanda Mishoe Steve Lanier Lisa Douglas

** Whether you're buying or selling. The pro-
fessionals at Flores & Flores, Inc. will be happy
to assist you. Let one of our associates help
make your Real Estate dreams come true.**
'All of our properties are on our website at www.floresreally.net

WE BUY HOUSES FAST CLOSINGS
Contact After Hours


O.R. (Tony) Flores, Broker, tony@floresrealty.net

Oralia D. Flores, Broker, oralia@floresrealty.net
After hours............863-773-2840
Lawrence A. Roberts.................(863) 773-9256
Noey Adam Flores (863) 781-4585
John Freeman (863) 773-6141
Amanda Mishoe (863) 781-3587
Steve Lanier (863) 559-9392
Lisa Douglas (863) 781-3247 c:19


MOTIVATED PERSON with good
communication skills, computer
skills, retail car sales, some book-
keeping knowledge, and overall great
personality! Bilingual a +, must be
willing to work on Saturday every
other week. Please call (863) 773-
5959 for an appointment. For applica-
tion apply in person at Wauchula Auto
Mart. 1:12tf


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1989 FORD
VIN: 1FTEE14Y7KHA50718
8:00 A.M., JAN. 30 2006
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy. 17 N., Wauchula FL
c11-19c


KENNY SANDERS........781-0153
RICK KNIGHT.............773-2472
MONICA REAS...-......773-9609


US. HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WA


WANTED MATURE BOOKKEEPER live
on estate. Must have valid drivers
license. Call 863-634-7552 or 863-763-
5321. 11:3tfc
POSITIONS AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE-
LY: Cashier, stock, and daily cleaning
persons. Full or part-time, Duette
Country Store. Intersection of SR62 &
CR39, Manatee County. Call Lenora at
(941)776-1097. 7:21tfc
BOWLING GREEN COUNTRY CLUB, a
lounge and package store, is seeking
help. Please apply in person, 9 a.m. -
5 p.m. at 245 Hwy. 17, Bowling Green.
Ask for Sheila or Debbie. 375-9988.
1:19c


BOOKKEEPER/OFFICE MANAGER for
busy manufacturer in Sebring. Fax
resume to (239) 566-3994. 1:19p


POSITION AVAILABLE
DATA ENTRY SPECIALIST
The Data Entry Specialist is responsible for computer input
of data resulting from property evaluations. This employee
assists in maintaining a database of all parcels located
within Hardee County. Data entry includes but is not
limited to the input of data and information pertaining to
certain properties obtained during field inspections. This
employee is responsible for initiating property evaluations
to ensure that information pertaining to the property is
accurately recorded. Applicant may also be required to
assist with field inspections and property evaluations.
Knowledge of standard office practices and procedures and
ability to establish and maintain effective working
relationships with employees and the general public is
required. Applicant must have the ability to gain knowledge
of policies, practices and procedures of the office.
Applicant must be willing to attend classes and obtain
certification as a "Certified Florida Evaluator". Computer
skills and knowledge of various computer applications is
required. Applicant must be a high school graduate or have
an acceptable equivalency diploma.

Applications can be obtained at the Property Appraiser's
Office located at the Courthouse Annex II, 315 North 6th
Ave., Wauchula, or by logging on to our website at
www.hardeeDa.net. If you have previously completed an
application with our office and would like to be considered,
please contact our office at 773-2196. Applications will be
accepted until January 26th 1:19






JoeLTDavis
I t"" I'NC.,?.-;R E A- L T 0 R S
(863) 773-2128

| REALTORS
RB JOE L. DAVIS
REALTOR JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
JOHN H. O'NEAL
Rick Knight
See more listings at www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


20 ac. grove in Villa Citrus
area of Hardee Co. $172,000!
46 ac. grove in Villa Citrus
area. Has deep well and
frontage on Ed Wells Rd.
$550,000!
10 acs. near Hardee Sr. High
School. Zoned F-R. Plenty of
trees. $300,000!
Palmetto Ridge Subdivision: 3
beautiful homesites on 15 acs.
3 miles west of Zolfo Springs.
Good scrub land with oaks and
deer. $300,000!
5 inr

3 BR, 2 bath CB home has for-
mal living and dining, spacious
family room and large utility
room. There is also an oversized
porch and an above ground pool
with deck. All located on 5 acs.
in Eastern Hardee Co.
$340,000!
Take part and locate your busi-
ness in this growing commercial
area! 450' on North Florida
Ave. Zoned commercial.
$360,000!
Ready for your new home!
Three 5 acre tracts in western
Hardee Co. $100,000 each!
5 ac. tract in Ft Green area has
older frame home and well. Call
today. $135,000!
18 acs. prime development.
South side of Bowling Green.
Future land use is Highway
Mixed Use. $622,000!
Fish, Hunt & Relax! 1,014 acs.
on beautiful Charlie Creek.
Good citrus grove for cash flow.
Abundant wildlife. Great home,
barns & office. $21,000,000!
34.4 ac. Valencia grove with
red & green jets. Good produc-
er. $18,000/ac!


Frontage on Hwy 17 N. South of
new Suncoast Schools Credit
Union. Approximately 3.5 acs.
with 2 homes and 1 office.
$1,000,000!
2 BR, 1 bath home in Bowling
Green, Has new roof, subfloors,
drywall, & doors. Large lot, can
accommodate- second home.
$45,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Country
living in this 3 BR, 1 bath home
sitting on 0.9 ac. Just east of
town. Remodeled inside. Nice
lot with room to grow! Now
$150,000!
Two wooded 1 ac. tracts in the
Inverness area. Two minutes
from boat landing to the
Withlacootchee One tract has
well, septic & electric plus fill
for your home. $60,000!
Beautiful pasture located close
to town. 20 ac. parcel with
paved road frontage and an
installed culvert for great
access. Listed for $280,000!
4 BR, 2 bath home in Golfview
with 2457 living SF. New A/C,
1 yr old roof, in ground
screened pool, landscaped yard,
and appliances. $250,000!
Secluded 2000 MH on 15 acs.
with 3 BR, 2 baths, 1809 SF liv-
ing area, 3855 total SF
Includes large concrete, covered
patio/carport, shed, and dog
pens. $270,000!
18 acs. SR 62 & CR 663 Ft.
Green area. Zoned C-2. Frame
home included. $500,000!
Residential lot in Frostproof
ready for your home. This
50'x330' lot is priced at $11,500!
PRICE REDUCED! Beautifully
maintained 2 BR, 2 bath, MH in
Brookside Bluff. Includes all
appliances, golf cart and some
furniture! Adjacent to "The
Bluffs" 18-hole championship
golf course. $85,000!


DAVID ROYAL...............781-3490
SANDY LARRISON........832-0130
MIKE NICHOLSON



LUCHULA, FL 33873
dl:1Bc


PART TIME SALES/bottled water
delivery. A.M. schedule. Must be reli-
able, have good attitude, and be able
to lift 45 Ibs. (5 gallon water bottles).
Apply in person at Ullrich's Water
Conditioning Service, Inc., 409
Goolsby Street, Wauchula. 1:12tfc


WOOD FRAME HOUSE, Wauchula, 5
BR/2 BA, on large lot, $60,000. 781-
3090 or 375-4440. 1:19c
5 BR/ 2 BA with 2 extra lots, ZS. 781-
0579 or 781-0692. 1:12-2:9p



PRINTER CARTRIDGES for HP 4000-
4100 printers. One HP 8061X, $60; two
HP compatible 61X, $50 each. Call
863-773-3187, 8-4, Monday thru
Friday. 1:5-26c


24'x24' ABOVE GROUND POOL,
6'x12' deck with storage area, pump,
filter and chemicals, many extras. Call
767-9671. $900 you take down. 1:19p
ORANGES FOR SALE; 5 gallon buck-
et, $3. 735-2296. 1664 Broadus
Williams Rd off of Hwy 64 E., ZS.
1:5-2:2p
DELL COLOR PRINTER, brand new in
box, $50. 773-3255. 1:5-19nc


1997 DOUBLE-WIDE, 3 BR/ 2 BA,
large front porch, on 2.5 acres, east of
Wauchula, very nice, $98,000. 781-
3090 or 375-4440. 1:19c
FOR SALE: GOOD condition, 2 BR,
C/H/A, screened lanai, storage shed,
carport, $8900. 773-6755. 1:19p
1998 MOBILE HOME by owner, 3 BR,
2 BA on 5 acres, above ground pool,
large new pole barn, $170,000. 863-
735-2294. 1:12-18p


THE


24 -Ho agency Towng Lowest Possible Rates Fast Reliable Service


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green







A IAM SE RELTYA IN.





76 ac near Wauchula with paved road frontage. Zoned FR-1.
Development potential! Listed at $25,000 per acre!
3 BR/2 BA cedar home on approximately 1.52 acres. Beautiful home with
many upgrades. Listed for $295,000.
3BR/1-1/2BA House and 10 acres, near town on a paved road. Asking
$250,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 804 W Palmetto St, Wauchula. Beautifully restored
vintage home. Main house has 2 BR, 2 baths, hardwood floors, gas fire-
place, recessed lighting, 10' ceilings. Kitchen appliances included. New
roof in 2002, new thermal windows in main house. Central heat and air.
Unique circular screened porch, large screened lanai. Includes guest quar-
ters or one BR, 1 bath apartment. Double garage! Listed for only
$235,000!
BIG PRICE REDUCTION! On Lake Placid! Beautiful lake home at 3279
Placid View Drive. Fully furnished 2BR, 2 BA in main house. 1 BR, 1 BA
in guest quarters. 2CHAC units. Security system. New Smithbuilt shed.
"AS IS" $595,000 firm.
Developers don't miss your chance! 12,000 acres located jn Northern
Okeechobee County. Near the Interstate. Over 1 mile of Highway
frontage. Call Jim' for more details or visit jimseerealty.com.
What an opportunity! Approximately 215 acres of grove, 37 wooded acres
and two 3BR/2BA homes each on 6 acres of cleared land. The possibilities
are endless for this 264 acres! Call our office for details!
PRICE REDUCED! Oversized lot in a very desirable subdivision! City
water & electric available. This is a great area to build your new home.
Reduced to $32,500. Call Mary today!
Good home sites on paved road! Three 5-ac. tracts on Parnell Road.
Listed for $19,500 per acre!
83 ac. close to golf course and town. Frontage on two County roads.
Currently zoned FR-1. $20,000 per acre.
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY! Large corner parcel on new Northbound
US 17! Cleared and ready to build! Listed at $245,000!
33 ac commercial development site on Highway 17 North. Lots of poten-
tial! (all Joe Smith for price, location and details!
Highlands County! We have listings! Call John Gross for more information!

WE WANT YOUR LISTINGS!
CALL OUR OFFICE TODAY!
www.jimseerealty.com


James V. See, Jr., Broker


James V. See, Sr., Broker


Sales Associates
0J (after hours)I 1]
Mary Rollins (863) 773-9673 Robert Jones (863) 781-1423
Ben Gibson (941) 737-2800 John H. Gross (863) 273-1017
Joseph F. Smith (863) 781-1851 Tanya Dubberly (863) 781-3069
Bruce E. Shackelford (941) 725-1358
We are a member of the Wauchula Board of Realtors and Multiple Listing
Service, and can service other Realtors' listings. cil:19c


Lonestar
SConstrtItion C or .

General Contractor
Lic.# RG291103615
Locally owned and operated

Office 863-773-4779 Fax 863-773-9865 S
____________________________________, ___ ___________ ________


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS






8A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


The


Classifieds


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863)453-6661 FAX (863)784-7497
wSOUH FLA ww.southflorida. edu
SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
DENTAL ASSISTING INSTRUCTOR
Immediate opening. Full-time faculty position to teach in SFCC's Dental
Assisting program. Bachelor's degree (or current enrollment in a bac-
calaureate program) required. Extensive experience as a Dental
Assistant or Dental Hygienist experience required; related teaching
experience preferred. Must be a Certified Dental Assistant. Must be com-
petent in basic computer skills. Competitive salary and benefits.. Open
until filled.
Application forms are available in Human Resources, Building I (Avon
Park), at any SFCC satellite center or on our web site.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cl1:19,26c






Citrus Removal Land Clearing
Baclkhoe Work
Fond Digging Ditch Cleaning
Driveways P bble Roc, etc.



Shawn Rimes
(863) 781-0412
Agnet
158*17*9761


28x72 DOUBLE WIDE PALM HARBOR,
3 or 4 bedrrom, 2 bath on private road
out in the country also 28x26 work-
shop on 2.22 acres, 3 miles east of
town, $179,000. Call 863-767-0437 or
863-781-4573. 1:12-2:9p
2 RECENTLY REMODELED mobile
homes for sale. 3 BR/1 B and 2 BR/1
B, $85,000 for both OBO. (863) 245-
1507. 1:12-2:9p


I


ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a pet
or are looking for a new one, the City
of Wauchula invites you to come and
see if you can find the pet you're look-
ing for. The Wauchula Animal Control
is located at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more information.
tfc-dh
SUN CONOR BIRD very lovable, $400.
Call for more info. 773-4110. 1:12-19p


For Sale!
Secluded Pasture For Sale!
24.25 Acres of secluded pasture S. of Zolfo Springs.
$125,000
Call- (863)781-4529 1:12tff

ICHAEL

B u. I l- R i, Nc License #CGC1506478
Michael E. Scheipsmeier P.O. Box 493
CEO Wauchula, FL 33873
michael@MSBuildersinc.com 863.773.3304 Office
863.773.3305 Fax
863.781.3222 Direct
u 1- u I r C a .
Residential Design Build cl1:19,26p







M IL- A **A TY
Commercial lot, 75x169, with rental home in Ona $69,500.
309 Illinois Ave. Large frame home. 4/2. Large lot. $67,500.


5 acres Prime location. Vandolah Rd and Dink Albritton Rd. $110,000.
4 Rental houses in Ona. Current rental $1,250.00, per month. $120,000.
22 acres MOL Grove, deep 'well, corner of Barlow Rd. and S.R. 64E.
W/MH.
Vacant corner lot. 62x175, located on West Main St., Wauchula. In the
downtown Historical district, building ready. $175,000.
170 College Lane, 2BR 1 Bth Central H/A. Large wooded lot $69,500.


I


2 Mobile Home Lots in Charlie Creek.'Water available. $15,000 per lot or
$25,000 for hoth.
?, LN 421 Grape St. BG 3/1. central H/A, CB $65.000. .
5!.

Office Ph: 375-3113 -o -)NE 1

Mobile Ph: 781-4460 NTANT

INSTANTLY* .
I I

BILL STATON I Family Business Service I
.l:5tlf 1217 W. Palmetto Street Wauchulal


773-4749


WE OFFER


%5ur gAX F/LING
*Based on Refund Anticipation Loan Approval and Funding.
*Certain Restrictions Apply.


| Open Saturdays 9-2 ,1,,,.1
@------------- J

Florida Institute For
Neurologic Rehabilitation, Inc.

"Where a Job Can Become a Career"
Our New Starting Rate of Pay is $9.00 PER HOUR
We are currently accepting applications for the fol-
lowing positions:

R.S.A.'s "Weekend" Shift-full time or part time. High
School Diploma or G.E.D. $9.00 per hour starting rate.

Environmental Technician Weekend (Sun, Mon, Fri,
Sat). HS Diploma or G.E.D. Training provided. $9.00
per hour starting rate. Experienced preferred/will train.

RN's B & C shift. Rate of pay $28-32 per hour.

C.N.A.'s 2nd, 3d, and Weekend shifts available.
Current Florida Licensure & HS Diploma or GED
required, experience preferred. C.N.A.'s start at $9.50.

Dietary Server- Must have HS Diploma or GED.
Hours vary with rotation of weekends. Waitress experi-
ence preferred. Starting rate of pay is $9.00 per hour.

FINR offers an excellent benefit package, is an EOE
and a Drug Free Workplace. If you are interested in
joining a fast growing company, please stop by
1962 Vandolah Rd., Wauchula, FL to fill out an
application, fax resume to 863-773-2041 or e-mail
to annettedhr@finr.net. c112:15ffc


FREE 2 LEOPARD CUR DOGS, 4 yrs.
old. 863-452-0453 or 863-443-1962.
1:19nc.
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
watch dog that would make a nice
family pet? Come on down to All
Creatures Animal Hospital, we have 3
older dogs in need of a good home.
Contact us at 773-9215. 1:19-26c
GET 8-MONTH protection before
heavy flea/tick infestation starts. Ask
for the Happy Jack Novatioqn pro-
tective band with patented release.
TSC Stores (773-3456). www.e-
stitch.com 1:12-2:2c


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 828.29
requires that all cats and dogs sold In
Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have
an official health certificate, have nec-
essary shots and be free of parasites.
tfc-dh


SMR Aggregates mining company is seeking
professionals for the following positions:
Dredge Operator *
S* Equipment Operator *
SWeighmaster/Materials Testing *
SHeavy Equipment Diesel Mechanic *
We offer great benefits, competitive pay and growth opportunities.
Email resumes to human.resources@smrranch.com attn.' HR, or
apply in person at Schroeder-Manatee Ranch, 6215.Lorraine Road,
Bradenton. EOE Drug Free
cl1:19c

107 W. Main Street
TOpsy See Wauchula, FL 33873
REAL ESTATE 773-5994

5 secluded acres with fishing pond. 3BR/2B 1990 M/H tin roof with
wood siding. Includes all appliances. $119,500.
2.10 acres parcel in Pioneer Acres. $30,000.
10 acres prime property close to Wauchula. $23,000 per acre.


Approximately. 25 acres Call for information.
Approximately 40 acres. Call for information.

We Have Buyers!


We Need Listings!


Topsy See, broker. Y netteSee, associate
Or email us at: TSEEREALESTATEiayhoo.corn 9


I.ue Birge (863) 781-3s536


Lots Available 1, 2, 5, 10, 20+ acre Building Tracts in Hardee
County.
*Briarwood. Beautiful 3/2 with den. Formal sitting room, 10 ft. ceil-
ings, open floor plan, 2 car garage, beautiful lot. Deed restricted.
$349,900.
*Nice 3/2 or 2/2 with guest quarters. Zoned for Duplex, 2 complete
kitchens. Completely remodeled, 2 car garage and storage buildings.
$179,900.
*67 ac. beautiful woods and pasture. Within one mile of college,
Best Western, and projected growth area. 600 ft. from Peace River.
$15,000 per acre.
*Nice 3/2 MH on 2.5 acres. Family & living room. Well maintained.
$129,900.
*3/2 Home built in 2004 on 5 beautiful acres. Great location. Front
& Back porches. $380,000.
*3 BR house on 15.71 Acres. Crewsville Area. Great location.
$355,000. I1
cll:19c


CAROL'S REALTY
1534 YANCY STREET
,P0*'" PPORT CHARLOTTE, FL.


33952


****** BOWLING GREEN ****

Quick Lube.

Oil & Tire Change Center

Comes with

*Large Compressor

*Tire Changing Equipment

*2 Hoists

MAKE OFFER


JAMES COLLIE


OFFICE
CELL
CELL
FAX


1-941-627-2769
1-941-628-7835
1-863-412-8932
1-941-627-1741


cl 1:19c


LIC. ASSOCIATE


12Y
EQUAL HOU594G
OPPORTUNITY


A


HELP WANTED
FAMILY CASE MANAGER
Kids Hope United provides support services for abused/neglected chil-
dren and their families for Central Florida counties. We have case-
worker positions available in Sebring and Mulberry locations. Must
have a BA in Social Work or related field or non-related degrees will
be considered if related exp. Child Protection Professional Cert pre-
ferred. Competitive salary ($32,000 $38,000), benefit package, excel-
lent paid time off.
DFWP/EEO


Forward resume and salary history HR, 407-386-3499 or
flnitj b; idqhnBi,; i_.td-nra


d1:19-2:9c


References Provided Upon Requests c18:Btfc


IB b


ao s s apeun e .org


References Provided Upon Requests


cl8:8tfc


C, -~OF






January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 9A


The


Clas sifieds


HWY 64, 2 SIDE BY SIDE LOTS. 1/4
acre each, zoned mobile home, resi-
dential, agriculture, nice, clean, with
trees, drinking water, paved roads.
Build today. Package 29K by owner.
863-464-0917. 1:12-2:23p


1996 CLASS C WINNEBAGO Minnie
Winne DL, 29 ft., 34K miles, trailer
hitch, rear camera, generator, fully
loaded, $22,000. 863-773-9420.
1:5-2:2p
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1992 DODGE
VIN: 2B4GH45R2NR572395
8:00 A.M., FEB. 3, 2006
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy. 17 N., Wauchula FL
ellIO,1


JAMES COLLIE
OFFICE 1-941-6272769
CELL# 1-941-6287835
CELL# 1-863-412-8932
FAX# 1-941-6271741


34' .5th WHEEL, 2005 Keystone
Challenger, like new, 2 A/C units, 3
slides, no smoking, no pets, $32,000
OBO, 2005 4x4 Dodge dually w/20K,
Reese hitch also available. 863-899-
1714 or 863-773-9121. 1:5-2:2p


NICE CLEAN FURNISHED efficiency
apartment for one person only.
AC/Heat, utilities furnished. $110 per
week. First and last weeks rent, dam-
age deposit and references required.
773-9793. 1:19p
2 BR/ 2 BA MH, carport, shed, unfur-
nished, central A/H. No pets. (863)
299-1401. 1:19tfc
2 BR/1 BA, concrete block home, cot-
tage-style, big yard. 1st/last/security
deposit, $600/month. (863) 773-4049
or (305) 970-1957. 1:12-2:2c


TRANSCRIPTIONIST NEEDED
The Therapy Center Wauchula has a full-time tran-
scription/general office duties position available. 65+
wpm. Hours 8-5, M-F. Applicant must be self motivat-
ed and dependable. Starting hourly rate $8.00. Full-
time benefits. Apply at The Therapy Center, 1330
Hwy 17 South, Wauchula, FL or call 767-0111 for
more information. 11:12,19c






5105 N.,Hwy 17 Bowling Green
OURTIESARE ON ALEEERYAY


Open:
.Mon-Sat
8:00- 5:00
375-4461


* We repair most .
American cars
* Full time mechanic
* We are license
and insured!
Reg #MV-40625


Bo Espino
Auto Technician


NOW RENTING!
THE-PALMS APTS:
.ATTENTION FARM WORKERS
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Located at: 701 La Playa Drive
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 AM 5:00 PM
Monthly rent from $453 + utilities
Occupancy restricted to households with one family member receiving 50%
or more of their gross annual income from farm labor activities.
For Rental Info,& Applications
The Palms at 863-773-3809
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Housing Opportunity
AHORA ARQUILANDO!
ATENCION TRABAJADORES DE FINCA
THE PALMS APARTMENTS
2, 3 y 4 cuarto
Localizado en: 701 La Playa Drive
Hoias de Oficina: Lunes y Viernes de 9:00 AM 5:00 P.M.
Mensualidades de renta comenzando de $453 + utilidades
Apartamentos designados para los encapacitados y desabilitados.
Intalarse es restrict a un miembro de familiar que reciban el 50% o mas de
Ingreso grueso annual en actividades de labor en agriculture.
Para information de renta o solicitudes
Llame, The Palms al: 863-773-3809
I (TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Iqual Oportunidades de Viviendas cl 1:19-2:16c





CAROL'S REALTY
S1534 YANCY STREET
o^pDint. PORT CHARLOTTE, FL.
Ga o a33952
****** Bowling Green ******



Home on 2 1/2 acres


2 Bedroom


1 Bath


LIC. ASSOCIATE


n
MAL p OYUI


NORTHSIDE APARTMENTS, 719
Wannamaker Ave., Ft. Meade. 2 BR/ 1
B, C/HA, nice neighborhood, no pets.
$600/month, security required. Call
Sheila 375-9988 or (863) 285-7203.
1:19C
2 BR/ 1 BA APARTMENT, call after 3
p.m. 773-2056. 1:12-19p
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising any
preference or limitation based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national origin, or
the intention to make such a prefer-
ence or limitation. Familial status
includes children under 18 living with
parents or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh



DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs?
Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday
nights 7:30 p.m. at St. Michael's
Catholic Church, Heard Bridge Rd.,
Wauchula and Friday and Saturday
nights 7 p.m. at First Methodist
Church, Corner of Grape & Church
St., Bowling Green.
7:18tfc


D.C. PHONE SERVICE. Residential
and small business installation &
repair. Specializing in mobile homes,
35 years experience. 863-773-9179.
10:13-1:19p
CENTRAL PUMP & IRRIGATION, INC.,
(863) 773-6259. Services include aer-
ators, house pumps, new installation
& repair on yard systems. 5:26tfc
AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP. Every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. Located
at the SFCC Annex, Room #105, Hwy.
17 North, Wauchula. 735-2511. tfc-nc
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a problem?
Call Alchoholics Anonymous in
Hardee County at.735-3109. Several
weekly meetings. tfc
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales, service and
installation, call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-119
Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee
County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10
Paragraph D require all ads for any
construction-related service.to carry
the contractor's license number.
tfc-dh


Help Wanted!!
Immediate opening for person willing to work hard with a positive atti-
tude and the ability to learn to service and install petroleum equipment
and related services. Electrical, mechanical, and/or construction back-
ground a+. Drivers License Required. Class A or B CDL preferred.
Willing to train right person. Call 863-773-2213 for an appointment or
send resume to: Heartland Pump and Tank Co., Inc. P.O. Box 873
-Wauchula, FL 33873 EOE DFWP
Heartland Pump and TankCo., Inc. 11:7ctfc





oRE-OPEN


Every Friday, Saturday, 0
Sunday
-Restrooms
*Water
*Electric .


Bowling Green Flea Market.

781-1062 c 10:20tfc


HOUSE CLEANING. References avail-
able. Rosa Garcia. 735-0356. 1:19p
POLK PAINTING, interior, exterior,
free estimates, licensed and Insured.
Mike Thomas at 863-412-9169.
1:19-3:16p
LAWN CARE & LANDSCAPE service.
Commercial and residential, insured,
locally owned and operated. Free
Estimates. Call My Florida Landscape
Service 863-832-2102. 1:19-3:23p
MOBILE HOME SPECIALIST:
Refurbishing, painting, vinyl. We do it
all. 863-399-0059. 1:19p
LOOKING FOR SMALL stone and
stucco jobs. 30 years experience.
863-402-1302. 1:5-2:2p
STRUCTURED LAWNCARE AND
Landscaping. Free estimates, com-
mercial and residential, for all your
yard needs. Call Jesse 863-781-2753
cell or 863-735-0590 home.
11:24-1:26p
C&P CONSTRUCTION. Demolition, fill
dirt, tree removal, stump removal,
dragline, track hoe, land clearing,
shell, clay, top soil, loader, bulldozer,
dump trucks. 735-2415. 1:19tfc
OSTOMY, COLOSTOMY, AND ideosto-
my supplies now in stock at Pete's
Pharmacy. tfc
LET US PICK up junk cars out of your
yard. Will buy old farm tractors.
Crooms- 773-0637. 2:24tfc


TRAILERS good condition, will
remove for free. (863) 375-3500.
12:22-1:19p



SATURDAY, 8-?, Corner of Summit
and Walton. 1:19p
MANAGER'S SALE: Bowling Green
Storage, household, toys. Sat. 8-1.
1:19p
FIRST U. METHODIST CHURCH, Zolfo
Springs, corner of 6th St. and
Suwannee St. Saturday 8:30 a.m. -
1:00 p.m. Clothes for men, women &
children and other misc. items. 1:19p
4715 CHESTER AVE,, B.G. Fri. & Sat.,
8:00 3:00, new clothes, mowers, bike
parts, furniture & misc. 1:19p
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, 8:00 ?, 4676
County Road, 663 N. Fort Green.
Dishes, tables, car seats, dressers,
lots of clothes, ind lots of misc. 1:19p
EDNA'S PLACE BIGGEST SALE
EVER. Gas cook stoves, freezers,
refrigerators. Lots of beds, all sizes
on sale this week. Lots of work
clothes of all kinds. Chest of drawers,
bedroom sets. 1:19c
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 7 a.m. ?, 658
Apostolic Rd., Wauchula. Furniture
and morel 1:19p
SATURDAY, 8-?, 1735 Louislanna St.
Inside Salel Movingl 3 families,
Housewares, furniture, clothes, misc.
Everything must go. 1:19p

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
2000 CHEV
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Office: (863) 767-1556



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Realtor cfrgr@earthlink.net Realtor Associate.
40 ac. Wooded Country Estate with beautiful 2 story home, corian countertop in
kitchen, wood floors, fireplace in master bedroom and living room. Quiet
country living. $700,000.
160 ac. total. 120 ac. citrus and 40 ac. in oak woods. 2 wells w/microjet. Lots of
road fmtg. $14,000 per ac.
57 ac. total. 38 ac citrus w/2wells, microjet and 19 ac. in woods $14,000 per ac.
120 ac. citrus, 3 wells, lots of road frontage, $12,000 per ac.
75 ac. total w/55 ac. citrus, deep well, niicrojet, Ft. Green area, $1,000,000.
21 ac. citrus, heavy to Valencia, well w/irrigation, Ft. Green area, $15,000
per ac.
40 ac. citrus, well, microjet, Sweetwater area, hard road frontage, can divide,
$21,000 per ac.
106 ac. on Hwy 64, over 2750 ft. of frontage, Lemon Grove area, deep well,
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F ol?







10A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


USDA Determines Citrus Canker Eradication Not Feasible


Florida Commissioner of
Agriculture and Consumer Services
Charles H. Bronson has received
word from top United States
Department of Agriculture officials
that they no longer believe that it is
possible to eradicate citrus canker.
USDA's position was formally
communicated in a letter from
Deputy Secretary Chuck Conner.
Officials said based on USDA's sci-
entific analysis of the potential
spread of the disease from the
unprecedented 2004 and 2005 hur-
ricane seasons, a new management
plan must be devised.
The USDA officials say the pro-
gram needs to undertake a new
approach that focuses on maintain-

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ing bacteria levels low enough to
sustain citrus production and pro-
tect citrus groves that have not been
infested with canker. In the mean-
time, USDA states that they will no
longer fund tree removal that is
done with eradication as the goal.
The federal agency, in conjunc-
tion with the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services, intends to develop a
response plan with scientific, indus-
try and public input that will limit
further tree removal and implement
management practices that will
accomplish the goals of controlling
and suppressing canker infestations.
"I am committed to working with
our federal partner, the scientific
community and growers on steps to
ensure the continued sustainability
of this industry, so critical to the
economic well being of our state as
well as protecting the thousands of
residential trees that have not yet
been impacted by citrus canker. I
will make all resources available to
determine whqre we go to secure
the future of the citrus industry"'
Bronson said.
The change comes after a review
of scientific research that indicates
Hurricane Wilma may have spread


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the disease to the point where an
estimated 168,000 to 220,000 aces
of commercial citrus could be
infected and exposed to canker.
This is in addition'to the more than
80,000 acres of commercial citrus
that was affected by the 2004 hurri-
canes.
The USDA also indicates that
growers have said they cannot sur-


vive the loss of more than 25% of'
the state's citrus acreage and that'
federal costs to implement the 1900
foot tree removal would cost signif-
icantly more than the annual $36
million dollar federal appropriation
as well as hundreds of millions
more in compensation payments to
Growers. The USDA has provided a
significant portion of the funding


Inside Out
By Chip Ballard


MY WALK ON THE WILD SIDE
My walk on the wild side occurred when I was a sophomore in high
school. The fad that year was for boys to bleach white a thin strip of hair an
inch or two long through their hairline above their forehead. Back then my
hair was very thick and so dark it was almost black. I tried to wear it like
Elvis, but mine never looked quite like his in spite of the large amounts of
time I spent primping in front of a mirror with $2 bottles of Wildroot Cream
Oil hair tonic, 50-cent cans of Royal Crown axle grease and a 10-cent
comb.
On this particular balmy autumn afternoon I stopped at Ballard's
Grocery on my way home from school and bought a bottle of peroxide and
a toothbrush. At the house, I showered and lathered my, hair several times
to get out all the grease and hair oil. I poured the peroxide into a coffee
mug, stuck the toothbrush into my pocket, went out the back door into the
back yard and walked over to a chair under an oak tree.
I dragged a chair out into the warm October sunshine and looked at my
hair in a hand mirror I'd borrowed from my mother's dresser. I combed my
hair straight back, then forward down over my forehead, then to one side,
then the other; I kept repeating this process until my hair was dry, the wavy
Elvis-like pompadour standing three inches high.
Ignoring a slight foreboding that I was making a mistake, I dipped the
toothbrush into the peroxide and carefully applied a thin strip through my
hairline above my left eyebrow. Then I leaned back in my chair and
.watched deer feeding in our neighbor's pasture near the edge of the Peace
River Swamp.
I had no idea how long it took the peroxide to work, but after about 10
minutes I began to get impatient. I had a date to meet a girl at the skating
rink at 7, and I wanted to impress her with my cool new look. So, I applied
more peroxide, a little thicker this time. Waited 10 more minutes. Still noth-
ing. I applied more, thicker still. Ten more minutes. Nothing.
I decided I.must have gotten a bad bottle, and poured the remainder of
the mug over my pompadour, soaking it thoroughly. At 6:30 there still was
no sign that the peroxide was going to work. I thought, "The heck with it!
I'll buy another bottle tomorrow." I borrowed Daddy's car and lit out for the
skating rink.
In the morning it was with abject horror that my saucer-sized eyes
stared into the mirror at my -beloved pompadour, now an intense orange
color so bright it seemed to glow. Near panic, I wet my hair, lathered up and
scrubbed until my scalp was sore. But the orange glow would not go away.
It was there to stay.
When I went out to breakfast, Daddy saw me and burst into spasms of
raucous laughter that shook the table and brought to my eyes tears of
shame. Without touching his food, he struggled up from the table and stag-
gered out the front door, howling all the way.
I pleaded with my mother to let me stay home from school. Hiding a
grin, she assured me the big orange pompadour, looked "cute," But as I
trudged out the door, like a condemned man .g ing, to hij d.,pom i, lard
shrieks of laughter. My spirits sunk even lower. .
As hats or caps were not allowed at school, I could not cover my
shame; so I skulked through the day like a one-man freak show, looking no
one teachers or students in the eye. If anyone spoke, I hung.my head
and grunted. Mostly people just giggled and pointed. I endured endless
stares and paralyzing humiliation.
It was a long day.
As soon as the dismissal bell rang, I ran for the nearest barber shop and
had it dyed back to its original color.
As a sign of how much times have changed, today my wild, outrageous
orange hair would not warrant a second glance. Anything goes today.
Nothing is too weird.
Dress is as far out as hair. Ten-year-old girls wear makeup, hip-huggers
and halter tops; they dye their hair every color of the rainbow. Boys, too,.
dye their hair. And wear nail polish, earrings and nose rings. Some pierce
their tongues, eyelids and other body parts. They shave their heads or grow
it long; wear Mohawks or spike it six inches high, each spike often a dif-
ferent color. Boys who idolize and emulate rappers and gang-bangers pull
dirty socks over their heads, down to their eyebrows, and wear pants four
sizes too big that to keep from falling down to the ground, they go around
holding their crotch all day.
By today's standards, my walk on the wild side was about as wild as
tiptoeing through the tulips with Tiny Tim. But it was a monumental embar-
rassment to me then. And it will be a long, long time before I apply perox-
ide to my hair again.
Comments or questions? E-mail Chip Ballard at chipkyle746-@earth-
link.net.


--" N
El I


"God created the world and left His footprints of love." anon.

A belatedHappy New Year to all my loyal readers. Let me reiterate
what has been happening to me recently and that will explain my absence
last week.
Thursday, Dec. 23, started much the same way as every other day.
I was sitting at my kitchen table, reading The News Herald which came
in the mail that day as usual. All of a sudden I felt sick. This was not a case
of upset stomach because this feeling persisted. I went to the bathroom as
fast as my wheelchair would carry me. I haven't been sick since I came
down with hepatitis in 1968.
I called Linda who came and put me to bed. When she asked me if I
would be all right if she left to get some sleep, I assured her the worst was
over. Was I every wrong. I guess it was about an hour when "it" reared its
nasty appearance and much more.
I finally was able to call Linda, my faithful best friend, who came
about five minutes later just as the dawn was breaking. She called the
ambulance who transported me to the hospital where I was a patient for five
days, diagnosis of virus and pneumonia.
The short hospital stay left me weak in so many ways that tonight, after
seven days at home, I am still recovering. And so goes my reason for not
writing my column last week.
My sympathy goes out to my loyal friend James in the loss of his wife
Eva. That makes two friends I have lost over the holidays. My sympathy
also goes out to Bobbie on the loss of her husband Bill. Bill and I founded
the Hardee County Players. I will miss both friends.

Would the lady with fibromyalgia and wants a support group please
call me.

Your thought for January: "There are infinite possibilities in little
beginnings if God is in them."

Remember, God loves you and you, and even me.


for the canker eradication program
and all of the grower compensation
since its inception in 1995.
"Unfortunately, everything the
scientists predicted has come.true,"
Bronson said. "The legal delaysand
unprecedented hurricanes enabled
the bacteria to leap frog significant-
ly beyond the 1900 foot cutting
zone that science showed was nec-
essary to prevent spread under nor-
mal weather conditions."
In addition, Bronson pledged to
continue his efforts to convince the
Legislature and USDA to provide
compensation for homeowners and


growers who have already had trees
removed. He will be requesting
additional funding for homeowners
during the 2006 legislative session
and will be working with USDA to
secure money for growers who are
currently on a waiting list for feder-
al compensation dollars.
As a result of the USDA decision,
the Florida Legislature will have to
revisit the laws that guide the
canker eradication program,
notably ,the requirement that the
department remove infected citrus
trees and those exposed because
they are located within 1900 feet.


From The Field
By Lockie Gary
County Agent


PRESCRIBED FIRE ON RANCHLAND
With over 1,200 people per day moving to Florida for permanent resi-
dency, many newcomers become alarmed when they see fire in the woods
or on a pasture. I have personally witnessed neighbors and well-meaning
citizens driving wildly up the lane and screaming, "There's a fire in your
pasture!"
It's almost comical when this happens and they see a water wagon, a
tractor and disc and fire lanes plowed as you calmly answer, "Yes, we inten-
tionally set this fire. Didn't you see the note we left on your front door? We
:also left a message on your answering machine, alerting you that we intend-
ed to burn today."
Many folks simply are unaware of the benefits of prescribed fire or a,
control burn.
The purposes of prescribed burning in present-day Florida are as fol-
lows:
1. Ecological
2. Wildlife
3. Protection
4. Forest Management
5. Range Management
6. Water Management
7. Access
8. Aesthetics
9. Exotic Control
Without fire, fuel loads reach dangerous levels and desirable plant
species are displaced. Properly conducted-burns can increase the abundance
of food plants, increase flowering and seed production, and attract an abun-
dance of wildlife. Hazard fuel reduction is an important consideration.
Hazard fuels are a risk to livestock, timber, people and improved property.
Prescribed burns which reduce fuels benefit the landowner, neighbors and
the public.
Fire can benefit wildlife in many ways. As food plants and seed pro-
duction increase, they attract wildlife. Bobwhite quail, turkey and deer are
popular game species that respond readily to fire. Likewise, scrub jays,
gopher tortoise, sandhill cranes and caracara benefit when a consistent
long-range program is established.
People often take for granted the benefits of prescribed and naturally
occurring fire. Areas that have been recently burned can protect livestock,
people and property from devastating wild fires. In many cases these
-recently burned areas will act as effective fire breaks, and the fire wifl sim-
,ply go out. Even in'cases where the fire cbntinipS to bum, the intensity is
reduced and the fire can be readily suppressed. ;, ...
Forest managers have relied on fire as a land-management tool. In
some cases, fire is used on a regular basis to reduce fuel loads and control
hardwoods. On other areas fire may be used to burn logging slash, for site
preparation and to promote natural regeneration. Fire can also be usd to
maintain a healthy forest and to control insects or diseases such as "brown
spot" in pines.
I realize I am preaching to the choir. Today's ranchers and their great-
grandfathers have been burning the woods for years, but not everyone who
lives in this beautiful state recognizes why we do it. Please consider patient-
ly explaining the benefits of prescribed fire to residents who ask, so that we
may continue to utilize the privilege.


After Thoughts
By C.J. Mouser


NEW WRINKLE ON FACE CREAMS
There's a pill for anything that ails you from halitosis to toe fungus -
'cause, as you may have heard, there are fungus among us. There're creams
to lift your face and lower your sun exposure. There're dyes, lotions,
potions, elixirs, mixes, ointments and salves. There're Toll-ons and spray-
ons and press-ons and put-ons.
And, if you have enough money, there's a doctor or two out there with
I a vacuum hose and a scalpel that can put them all to shame. All in the name
of preserving youth.
Then you've got your financially challenged people, like me, who,gaze
wistfully at the miracle cures and leave them on the shelf because they're
just too expensive. Until one day when something unusual, happened: I
found a "wrinkle-zapping" face mask that was on sale for 98 percent off. '
S I thought, well, why not? If it got any cheaper, they would have to pay;
me to take it out of the store. So I gave the lady my quarter plus tax, and,
I brought it home.
Naturally, my 14-year-old daughter had to try it out.
"What! You need to look younger?" I gazed at her crease-free sweet
face and nodded my permission, and together we stood in front of the mir-;
ror smearing my youth and her curiosity all over our expectant faces.
"We have to let it dry 10 minutes," Jenny said, reading the label.
Five minutes later, I couldn't blink my eyes. By the time this stuff was
fully dry I couldn't move my mouth. After I dared to go look in the mirror,
I found that my face looked like a creek bed after a bad drought. The mask
started out clear and smooth, but as it dried it turned into eraser dust and:
systematically sucked every single ounce of moisture out of my face.
"Oh,", we both said in unison, peering closely at the mirror trying to'
find the improvement.
I tried a smile and, lo and behold, found every single wrinkle I knew.
about and some I didn't know I had. I couldn't rinse fast enough!
By the time it was all over, I had to find a remedy in the medicine cab-:
inet designed for bad sunburns to reverse the effects of the miracle mask. I
was starting to see why it was 98 percent off.
"Well, that was ... different," I said after the crisis had passed and we
both were lathered from chin to hair line with Oil of Antivenin.
I am no authority when it comes to what to buy or how to use it wheq
trying to reverse the hands of time, but I am now inclined to think that there
is a lot to be said for aging gracefully and letting nature take its course. I
am so grateful that I learned my lesson so cheaply.
I'm not even going to demand my quarter plus tax back. I figure the
investment was worth the wisdom gained.


If we had no winter, the spring
would not be so pleasant: If we
did not sometimes taste of
adversity, prosperity would not
be so welcome.
-Anne Bradstreet


Free Electronic Filing
Family Business Service
217 W. Palmetto Street
Wauchula 773-4749
1 1 19-2 9c I


Freda's Foibles
By Freda B. Douglas


I I ~ II I


F':78p






January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 11A


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The city of Bowling Green on
Jan. 10 received a favorable annual
audit report from city auditor Ed
Leonard of Christopher, Smith,
Leonard, Bristow and Stanell.
The city commission approval
the'first reading of an ordinance to
rezone the McCoy property from
commercial to residential at 4427
U.S. 17 North and West Lemon
Street. The property is just over
one-fourth acre.
The commission approved the
first reading of an ordinance to
change the zoning from residential
to commercial on the Dunne prop-
erty on U.S. 17 south of Wauchula
State Bank. Dunne recently pur-
chased the Gerald Brummett prop-
erty and plans to restore old cars,
mainly Corvettes.
City Manager David Elbertson
said the two city parks will be open
from 8 a.m. until dark.
Commissioner Fern Gibson said
a pole barn is needed over the loco-
motive north of the old train depot.
.Regarding the city audit for the
fiscal year ending September 2005,
Leonard said the general fund bal-
ances are $749,199. He said rev-
enue in the general fund was
$923,197, up $92,000, while
expenses were $749,351, with a
fund balance increase of $173,846.
He said unrestricted net assets in
the proprietary fund were
$266,786.
Operating revenues this past fis-
cal year for water, sewer and
garbage pickup were $689,186,
while expenses were $794,327, an
operating loss of $105,141 and an
asset reduction of $94,000..
Leonard said a rate increase which
took effect in- September 2005
should help the city.
Leonard said the city should seek
higher interest rates on its bank
deposits.
The city has five bond issues, at
interest rates of 4.5 to 5 percent,
with a total balance outstanding of
$1,078,900. The bonds mature
from 2009 to 2039. These are sewer
and water revenue bonds. The



SEEDS
FROM
THE.-, I-
SOWER,
MichaelA. Guido
Metter, Georgia

The employer asked, "Do you
have any dependents?"
"Nope," she answered.
"But .I thought you were
married."
"I am," she replied, "but my
husband isn't what I'd call
dependable."
SThe greatest satisfaction in life
comes in doing, not in dodging,
duty; in serving, not in being
served; in solving problems, not in
sponsoring them; in being de-
pendable, not a dependant.
Ability is .f little value without
dependability.
To.know what to do is wisdom.
To know how to do it is skill. But
always doing it well tops the
others. That's dependability.


The first adhesive postage
stamps went on sale July 1, 1847.


interest due on the bond issues
between now and 2039 is
$774,213.
The city also owes $25,815 in a
capital lease at 2.79 percent interest
for the purchase of two police cars,
said Leonard.
Leonard said the city's annual
.debt service is about 8 percent of
total annual revenues and added
that level is "okay."
Leonard said the number and
amounts of overdue and old
accounts for utility bills continued
to increase over the past fiscal year,
as was noted last year. The city
should work in this area harder,
said Leonard, as well as having all
grant records in the city clerk's
office and perhaps getting more
help for the city manager.
One person should be designated
as the grant coordinator for over-
seeing the grant projects. Separate
grant files, with revenue and expen-
diture accounts, should be main-
tained for each grant to keep grant
amendments and all supporting
documentation for receipts, dis-
bursements and billing requests.
The grants should be billed time-
ly for reimbursements or grant pro-
jects, so as to reduce the time
between the city paying for projects
and being reimbursed for those
expenditures.
'The city commission at their
Dec. 14 meeting approved several
changes to the CDBG/Volunteer
Florida Program at the request of
co-administrator Melissa Fox. The
commission approved a change
order of $785 to Reschke
Construction on the Willie Mae Lee
home.

On the Jose Sandoval home pro-
,ject, $11,500 was approved for Jack
See Construction due to rising costs
of materials. There was a change
order of $65,990 approved to
Reschke Construction for the
Rayfield Rodriguez project.
The commission approved an
end of year merit bonus of $100 for
every city employee at the request
of commissioner Randy Mink.
Mink thanked Mosaic for hang-
ing the city's Christmas decoration
with their boom truck in early
December.
The commission heard a request
from George and Christy Page to
rezone their property on Spruce
Street from R-1 to R-3. Wanda
Ledford said she did'not want the
property rezoned because it would
devalue her home. The Page prop-
erty is next to the Branch trailer
park.
The property is 2.25 acres, and
Page wants to build six single fam-
ily homes on lots that are 50 by 200
feet. The homes would be 1,100
square feet and sell for $105,000 to
'$110,000. UnderR-1 zoning the
lots would have to be 75 feet wide,
but Page said he could build four
duplexes, on the property under R-
1. The first reading passed 3-1, with
Fern Gibson opposed.
The first reading was approved
for an ordinance that would change'
the purchase order requirement
from $200 to $500 without prior
city commission approval.
The commission approved.a new
Sinterlocal agreement with the coun-
ty for building inspections.
Avion Palms RV Park requested
the ability to have free-standing
carports in front of some of the
trailers, with a five-foot setback
from the street. City attorney
Gerald Buhr said those carports
would require a building permit
from the county and they would
have to meet hurricane wind
requirements.
Commissioner Richard, Barone


asked how the progress is regarding
improving the city's two parks.
Mink wants the gates to the parks
locked at night with signs posted
for park hours.
Gibson asked what will be done
with the old fire station next to city
hall.
Commissioner David Durastanti
praised the work of building con-
tractor John Garcia for his housing
project on Banana Street.




4 Hurt As

Vehicle


Overturns

By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Three young adults sustained
minor injuries and one' teen was
seriously injured when their vehicle
overturned north of Wauchula early
Sunday, the Florida Highway Patrol-
reported.
The single-vehicle accident
occurred at 2:09 a.m. on Heard
Bridge Road just north of REA
Road, according to Tpr. L.M. Smith
Jr.
Amber Goodman, 20, of
Bowling Green, was driving a 1996
Dodge four-door north at the time,
Smith said. She veered across the
southbound lane and went into a
ditch on the west side of the road-'
way.
There, the trooper, said, the
Dodge overturned onto its roof.
Neither Goodman nor her pas-
sengers were wearing seat belts,
Smith said.
Robert A.. Gallegas, 17, of
Bowling Green, who was seated in
the right rear of the car, suffered
serious injuries in the crash and
was airlifted by medical helicopter
to Tampa General Hospital.
Daniel Garza, 18, of Zolfo
Springs, and Gealpe Vella, 18, of
Wauchula, sustained minor injuries.
and were. taken to Florida Hospital
Wauchula.
Goodman was not transported to
a hospital, according to Smith.
The trooper estimated the dam-
age' 6 the Dodge at $3,500.
Goodman was charged with
careless driving, Smith said.


Obituaries"

CHARLES C. AEBY
Charles C. Aeby, 86, of
Wauchula, died Jan. 15, 2006 at
home.
He was born Feb. 6, 1919 in
Brooklyn, Ark., and had been a res-
ident of Wauchula for about 20
years, coming from Ohio. He
retired from Kaiser Aluminum in
Ohio, was a member of The
American Legion Post 0085 in
Newark, Ohio, and was a World
War II veteran serving in the U.S.
Navy.
Survivors include four sons,
Charles E. Aeby of Weeki Wachee,
and Robert Lee Aeby, Lonnie Earl
Aeby and Johnny Ray Aeby, all of
Newark, Ohio; one sister, Jenny
May Roberts of Jonesboro, Ark.;
and 13 grandchildren.
Interment will be in Newark,
Ohio.
Robarts Family Funeral Home
Wauchula


FIELD TRIP


COURTESY PHOTO
The first-grade students in Jill Tyson, Mary Lynne Driskell and Yesenia Brown's classes at
Wauchula Elementary School took a trip to the Lakeshore Cinema in Sebring and watched the
moiie "Polar Express." Students who participated were (from left, front row) Kaylee Hogenauer,
Lorena Arana, Catie Longoria, Ari Perez, Abby Clark, Holly Brown, Briana Hanchey, Dalton Richey,
Kyle Choate and Danisha Fagan; (middle row) Dora Cardoza, Kendall Winter, Levi Lovett, Simon
Lopez, Josue Arana, Joc'Quez Campbell, Hunter Scranton, Alicia Villegas, Parker Carlton, Jordon
Ragland and Larrett Smith; (back row) Hayden Lindsey, Brenna Parker, Shayna Harned, Shayla
Albritton, Faith Hays, Yatzine Sanchez, Jarret Carlton, Morgan Crews, Eddie Kilgore, Diego Oliva,
Adrian Rodriguez, Gabriela Montoya and Jonathan Naranjo. Students not pictured are Norberto
Gonzalez, Chase Benton and Landon Albritton.




Trucker Rear Ends Trucker


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A semi-truck sustained $35,000
in damages in a minor collision
Tuesday. night, the Florida
Highway Patrol said.
According to a report filed by
Tpr. Larry McClellan, Freddie
Francisco, 21, of Lake Placid, was







SFCC Offers Free
Senior Workshop
South Florida Community
College (SFCC) will sponsor a
financial aid workshop for all
high school seniors and their
parents on Thursday, Feb. 2 in
the University Center Auditor-
ium at the Highlands Campus in
Avon Park from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Presentations will cover top-
ics such as scholarships,
Federal Student Aid, work-study
programs, loans and grants.
Reservations for this free work-
shop can be made through
Friday, Jan. 27 by contacting
Felecia Dozier at 773-2252 ext.
7403.

Fair Program
Under Way
The 2006 Hardee County Fair
Program is under way. Those
businesses, families and orga-
nizations wishing to place an ad
in the program should do so
now.
For prices and information,
contact Rosayln Bass at Farm
Credit at 773-4108. The dead-
line to place an ad is Monday,
Jan. 23.

Library Offers
Computer Classes
The Hardee County Library is
offering basic and advanced
computer classes as well as
Microsoft Word computer class
and an E-mail class.
The classes are all taught by
Gabrielle Turner. To register, call
or stop by the library in
Courthouse Annex II, 315 U.S.
17 South, Wauchula or call 773-
6438.


driving a 1999 Mack truck south on
CR 663 in Ona when the crash
occurred at 7:20 p.m.
Francisco was approaching the
intersection with SR 64 at the time,
McClellan described. There was a
vehicle in front of him, which wias
stopped at the intersection.
The trooper said Francisco failed
to stop and his Mack truck rear-
ended the other vehicle, a 2001
Mack truck, colliding with 'its trail-
er.


am


The front of Francisco's truck
was badly damaged in the crash.
Francisco received minor in-
juries. He was not transported to a
hospital. Francisco was not wear-
ing a seat belt.
The driver of the 2001 Mack
truck, Homero, Espinoza, 38, of
Nocatee, was uninjured, McClellan
said. Espinoza was wearing a seat
belt.
McClellan charged Francisco
with careless driving, he said.


Telling The Truth...
By J. Adam Shanks
Preacher


JESUS' ADVICE
Life is so interesting and challenging. It is amazing how many things
there are to learn, how many people there are to meet and influence and
love.
And when you have the direction of God through the Bible, there are so
'many challenges in life that we are to meet. Every time I study His Word, I
learn something else and one more challenge on how to be better. I have
become convinced that I will never figure it all out and do it all perfectly.
But,t won't keep me from trying!
Because life is so interesting, I still hae not figured out why so many
people spend more time thinking and dreaming about death and the end of
the world. It is amazing as a preacher how many questions you get from
people about the destruction of earth. They want to know how it works,
what we can expect, what is going to happen after the earth, and how they
can be sure about all of that.
Because of this, people are fascinated with certain parts of the Bible,
particularly the prophetic passages of the Old Testament and the book of
Revelation. Despite how interesting and challenging God has made life,
people forget about life because of the distraction of the end.
So I thought that I would share the same answer that Jesus gave to the
apostles regarding death and His second coming. In Matthew 24:3, it seems
that the apostles had the same kind of questions that I receive constantly.
They asked three questions: 1.) When will these things be? (Regarding the
destruction of Jerusalem which happened in A.D. 70.) 2.) What will be the
sign of Your coming? 3.) What will be the sign of the end of the age?
Jesus answered this last question the same way your kids answer you
when you ask them a question: "I don't know!" Verse 36 says "but of that
day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of Heaven nor the Son, but
My.Father only."
Jesus told them that He couldn't tell them when it would happen, but
He did tell them what they needed to do! Jesus told them the parable of the
faithful and evil servants. Then He told them the parable of the wise and
foolish virgins. He told them to be prepared!
So that is my advice to you. Instead of worrying about when God's
going to do what, He is going to do, work on doing what you need to be'
doing. Be prepared for God and the end will not take you by surprise. I'm
Telling the Truth!
J. Adam Shanks is minister of the Church of Christ in Wauchula. He can be
e-mailed at wearewe@earthlink.net

There are 40 spaces on the perimeter of the Monopoly board-22
of them are properties.


Grillin'& Chillin' on Main


2d A..,nn February 3rd & 4th-


cullum' Professional &
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ii5 along with

wMk Dessert & Chili Cookoff


LMain Stret CASH PRIZES IN EACH!
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Entry deadline January 27, 2006.

For more
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12A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


NA.


2


5


All remaining 2005s In Stock Reduced to Rock Bottom!


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any new Ford throughout Ford Motor Credit

and your first payment will be on us!


2005 F-150 Supercrew

_.. I Nascar Edition ^


MSRP -


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2005 EDDIE BAUER
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2005 MUSTANG
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'01 F-150 Super Crew XLT


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'03 Ford F-150 XLT Supercab

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'02 Mercury Grand Marquis
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'04 Nissan Sentra

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'01 Ford Focus.
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'02 Ford F-150 4x4 Supercrew
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Over 200
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I I








The Herald-Advocate
Thur a, i y 19. 2 67

Thursday, January 19. 2006


PAGE ONE


Cherry Wins In First Round Knockout


After the win, Cherry falls to his knees and points towards the
sky in his celebration. He dropped his opponent 1:02 into the
first round.


After the fight Cherry was greeted by his family and friends; (from left) Pastor Victor, Cherry, his brother Francois Cherry and his
wife Elizabeth.

$10,000 Cutest Pet Photo Contest Open To County Residents


The International Pet Owners
Club is proud to announce that over
$10,000 in cash and prizes will be
awarded in the 2006 Spring Cutest
Pet Photo Contest.
Pet 'owners from the Hardee
County/area are welcome to win
their share of the prizes. The dead-
line fyr the contest is Feb. 28. The
contest is open to everyone and
entry-is free.:
"Every pet owner has at least one
photo that shows how cute their pet


is," stated Rosa Bonbeur, contest
chairman. "When people learn
about the contest, they get excited
about the chance at winning and the
potential for national attention,"
continued Bonbeur.
To enter, send one photograph
(full color or b/w) size 8"x10" or
smaller.
All photo entries must include
the photographer's name and
address on the back.
Photographs should be sent to:


2006 Spring Photo Contest, c/o The
International Pet Owners Club, P.O.
Box 1748, Pittsburgh, KS 66762.
Entries must be postmarked by
Feb. 28, 2006. You may also submit
your photo directly online at
www.cutestpetcontest.com.
The International Pet Owners
Club is an organization dedicated to
bringing pet owners from around
the world together for fun and fel-
lowship. Membership in the club is
not necessary to participate.


Cherry had many supporters from Hardee County attend. Denise Miller, general manager of
Royal's Furniture, where he works, has always been a big supporter of Edner.


Edner showed off his new belt with boxing officials; he now holds the WBC Caribbean, NANA and
NBA boxing titles in the lightweight division.


I I -








2B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


Hardee Wildcats Lose


Tough


Trio


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcats hit the
hard-luck trail last week.
The Cats came out on the short
end of three rough district games.
There is more of the same this
week as the Cats played at Palmetto
on Tuesday;, travel to Avon Park
tonight (Thursday) and are home
for a visit from DeSoto on Friday
night.
There are four more games, all at
home, in the final two weeks of the
regular season. On Jan. 26, it is
against Palmetto, and Jan. 27 it is
Sebring, the last of the district
opponents. On Jan. 31, Lakeland
comes to call and Lake Placid is the
Senior Night home finale on Feb. 2.
District playoffs are the week of
Feb 7-11.

BOOKER 68, HARDEE 38
Player of the game, #12 Weston
Palmer.


in double-digits, with 14 points.
For Hardee, Palmer countered
with 19 points, including 11 in the
fourth quarter. Jermaine King had
seven, Robbie Jones five, Mark St.
Fort three, and Arnold Louis and
Terry Redden each two points.
Reggie Grizzard, Tyrone Pace,
Trey Smalls and Thelinor "Lino"
Jena did not score.

DESOTO 64, HARDEE 54
Offensive Player of the Game-
#5 Robbie Jones
i


Jones


Defensive Player of the Game-
#30 Arnold Louis


Louis
The Wildcats battled the
Bulldogs point for point in this
game. They were up 19-15 at.the
end of quarter one and 30-29 at
halftime. Down 45-40 at the three-
quarter mark, the Cats were behind
by just two points with a minute
left. Forced to foul, they lost by 10
points as Shavon Shine hit 5-of-6 at
the free throw line among his 14
fourth-quarter points.
Dickey was pleased with his


Arnold Louis (30) skies to battle for rebound with Avon Park defender.


Palmer
Head coach Vance Dickey was
"disappointed with the overall
effort and expectations" in the
game at Sarasota. "We came out
knowing we would lose and played
that way. We rebounded with them
even 18-18 in the first half and held
the No. 4 team in the state to 30
points," said Dickey.
He named junior guard Weston
Palmer as player of the game. "He
played" aggressively offensively
and defensively, even to and
beyond his limits. Even when he
was exhausted, he refused to let
up."
Dickey said his squad had oppor-
tunities offensively in the first half.
"We called a time-out and went
over how to work against their
zone, but the players didn't execute
it. They just held outside. If we had
matched up with their defense, we
would have had opportunity. We
didn't play smart. We played hard,
but only had one assist. There was
no togetherness. We coaches can't
do it, they have to believe in them-
selves," concluded Dickey.
Gary Clark was the only Tornado
m~a,, m


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARR
Only a few weeks old, youngest fan Ben Rewis has caught
Wildcat fever from his parents, teachers Steve and Jamie Rewis.


fS,"" F,- ,; -* .--- .. '-- w amaHH msMeuL mm Mllm l
Teammate Jermaine King (33) sets up block as Arnold Louis (30) heads to the hole. Weston
Palmer (12) and Robbie Jones (5) are in on the play.


Jermaine King (33) gets pushed as he goes for layup.


team's efforts. "Defensively, over-,
all it was a decent job. We did a
great job rebounding, but turnovers
killed us. They got three or four
layups from turnovers in the fourth
quarter."
The coach named co-players of
the game. Senior Jpnes "played
with intensity, he had 19 points,'.
including eight-of-eight from the
free throw line." Defensively, it
was Louis, "who really came out
and set the tone on the boards,
clearing out, especially defensive-
ly."
Palmer, who sprained an ankle in
the second quarter, had it taped and
"played through it. It was a gutsy
effort," said Dickey.
"The Shine boys got their rhythm
and it was hard for us to stop
them," concluded Dickey. Shavon
Shine finished with 26 points and
Sheldon Shine had 22, the only
DeSoto players in double-digits.
For Hardee, Jones nailed three
treys and a deuce to go with his per-,
fect night at the charity stripe, fin-
ishing with 19 points. Palmer hit a
trio of deuces and pair of tre, tf.-r a
dozen points. Jena added 1I) to put
three Cats in double figures. King
had a half dozen, St. Fort four and
Arnold three points.

AVON PARK 60, HARDEE 49
The Cats started well in this
game. Although Red Devil center
Patrick Menzies got the first deuce,
Jones responded to tie the game ,,
then stole the ball, threw to Jena
and got it back in time to be fouled.
After a minute of back-and-forth
ball, with another Jones' theft, Jena
canned a deuce. When he nailed a
trey a minute later, Hardee had a 7-
2 lead. Avon Park worked its way
back for an 8-7 lead, and Palmer hit
a free throw ii the waning
moments of the first period for an
8-8 tie.
Avon Park picked up the niomen-
tum in the second period and
outscored Hardee 22-10 to take a
commanding 16-8 advantage and
up it to 30-18 by halftime.
Devaris Strange and Louis traded
shots to start the second half, and
again turnovers gave Avon Park the
advantage and a 50-29 lead after
three quarters. ,Jones sank a trey,
Palmer dished to Jena and Palmer
drove baseline. When Louis
grabbed a defensive rebound and
threw to Palmer for the shot,
Hardee had.cut the lead to 51-40.
The Cats kept trying but were
unable to get closer than nine
points and lost by 11.
Asked if the furious Avon Park
pace bothered the Cats, Dickey
said, "probably so, a bit, but we
were our own worst enemy. We're
still not ready for opponents, we
just let them come to us. We're not
executing. Avon Park played well,
and took advantage of that."
Dickey said he would not name a
player of the game as "no individ-
ual stood out. We're focusing more
on scoring than on the team. We're
not playing team ball."
Avon Park, which had sever
seniors and one junior, finished
with three players in double fig-
ures. Menzies had 18, Rafael
Johnson 16 and Strange 14 points.
For Hardee, Palmer was tops
with 16 points and Jones added 10.
King had nine points, Louis eight,
and Jena a half dozen before foul-
ing out.


Yet all how beautiful! Pillars of
pearl propping the cliffs above,
stalactites bright from the ice
roof depending; and beneath,
grottoes and temples with their
crystal spires and gleaming
columns radiant in the sun.
-William Henry Burleigh


Perhaps the oldest fan, former Wildcat and South Florida,
Community College coach Dunning Terrell (left) who attends
nearly every home game, chats a moment with Principal Mike)
Wilkinson.


Step Outdoors
With Michael Kelly


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has
started a six-month project to restore shallow-water habitat in Lake
Josephine, a 1,236-acre lake in Highlands County. P
The $1.1 million project targets two of the lake's three pools for
restoration, the central and west. Plans are'to lower the pool's water levels
separately and at different times for individual attention.
To protect the bass fishery during the project, the FWC is imposing a
temporary regulation that requires anglers to release all largemouth basse
unharmed immediately upon capture throughout the lake until June 1.
FWC project manager Beacham Furse said, "With water levels being'
so low, anglers should catch a lot of fish, which is why we decided t9
impose a temporary prohibition against harvesting bass during the project.
Access and navigation to the lower sections will be limited, but anglers
with small boats or canoes should be able to get in and fish these sections.
"Anglers who fish the east pobl of Lake Josephine will have no prob-
lem with access since the draw-down will only affect the west and center
pools. Even so, the temporary restriction on harvesting largemouth bass
applies to the entire lake," Furse said.
In order to restore the degraded habitat, workers will remove under-
water muck deposits and mats, and replace them with clean sand and ben-
eficial aquatic plants.
Officials have constructed temporary dams to separate all three sec-
tions of Lake Josephine and enable workers to control water levels in each'
section independently and expose the lake bottom. Heavy equipment will
scrape the exposed muck and remove the thick mats of shoreline vegetation
that have accumulated over the past several decades. Then the lake mar-i
agers will plant beneficial aquatic plants and begin to refill the lake during
the summer wet season and remove the dams. i
Furse said it is important to note that as a lake ages, muck from decay-'
ing plants accumulates on the bottom. Eventually, muck builds to a point'
where it inhibits the spawning of bass and other sport fish by covering andA
suffocating their eggs. Scraping the bottom will leave a clean sand bottom.
that provides an excellent spawning habitat.
Hopefully this project will be a success and improve the quality and.
quantity of the fishing, in this lake. Many people from Hardee County and.
the surrounding area fish Lake Josephine. r

I was not brave enough to whether the wind and cold to do any fishing
or hunting this week. Hopefully the blue skies of Monday will hold up until
the weekend so I can get back to the woods and water. .

Don't forget this Sunday, Jan. 22, is the last day of deer season.



Go To The Head Of The Class!
SCHOOL NEWS DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT5 P.M.


I I




4,-^EP


January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3B


JV Boys Battle



In 3 Games


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee junior varsity
Wildcats are still going at it despite
difficult three -game stand last
feek.
There are only seven games left
in the season for the junior Cats,
ith three of them this week. They
ere at Palmetto on Tuesday
evening, travel to Avon Park
tonight (Thursday) and come home
tomorrow to face DeSoto.
SThe season ends with a pair of
games next week and a final pair
the week of Jan. 31, all home
ames. Next week's are Thursday
. Palmetto and Friday against
*Sbring. The final games are Jan.
31 vs. Lakeland and Feb. 2 vs. Lake
Alacid.
'At Sarasota Booker on Jan. 10,
the young Cats were simply over-
whelmed in a 60-20 loss. The lead-
iig Tornado scorer had 19 points.
SFor Hardee, Jaime Harrison had
a, half dozen, including four-of-five
at the foul line in the rough-and-
timble game. Josh Jackson and
rain Fermin each had three, and
larwin Simmons, Alex Flores,'
Dusty Massey and Lucas Juarez


each two points. Pete Solis and
Postene Louisjeune were held
scoreless.
At DeSoto last Thursday, Hardee
could not overcome the seven
three-pointers of the junior
Bulldogs. Jerrell Thomas led
DeSoto with 16 points.
For Hardee, Louisjeune and Solis
each had nine points, Jackson and
Massey each seven, Simmons four
and Harrison two points.
At home on Friday against Avon
Park, Hardee led early, but a full-
court press put the junior Devils up
13-9 at the end of the first period.
Hardee kept at it and held the half-
time score to an eight-point advan-
tage, 26-18.
The second half was about even,
with Avon ,Park picking up four
more points than Hardee for the 49-
37 win. Virgil Cooper hit often for
Avon Park for 18 points.
For Hardee, Flores went to the
hole and hit outside for 15 points.
Simmons added 11 more and
Massey had five, a deuce and a trey.
Jackson and Solis each had two
points and Fermin and Harrison
each nailed a free throw.


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
The JV boys pose for a picture after recent game; (from left, kneeling) manager Rodney Spinks, Marwin Simmons, Alex Flores, Pete
Solis and Josh Jackson; (back row) assistant coach Lee Thomas, Efrain Fermin, Dusty Massey, Lucas Juarez, Jaime Harrison and
coach Rod Smith; missing, Postene Louisjeune.


Efrain Fermin (22) takes baseline shot. Jaime Harrison (30) looks for rebound.


COURTESY PHOTO
Doug Jensen presents $60,000 check from Vandolah Power Company to Hardee Habitat For
Humanity represented by President Pam Warren. This will pay for a new HFH home In Wauchula
in 2006.


Vandolah Power Donates $60,000


To Hardee Habitat For Humanity


Dusty Massey (50) launches a successful three-pointer in the first quarter.


Weightlifters Prepare For Regionals


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
At least two, and probably four,
Hardee girls are going to the
weightlifting regional finals.
Junior Danielle Hines and fresh-
man Kember Townsend won trips
to regionals during the sub-region-
als held at Sebring on Saturday.
Junior Madison Graham and soph
Samantha Hagans are preparing to
go along as alternates, hoping to get
anshot at it.
The Jan. 27 regionals are at
Sarasota Booker this year. In Class
10 Section 7, there are 22 schools,
including Avon Park, Bradenton
Bayshore, Tampa's Berkeley Prep,
! Braden River, Charlotte, DeSoto,
UaBelle, Lake Placid, Lakewood
Ranch, Lemon Bay, Manatee,
North Port, Northside Christian of
St. Petersburg, Palmetto, Port
Charlotte, Sarasota Riverview,
Sebring, Bradenton Southeast,
nice, Hardee and Booker.
'ij Coach Jan Brutus is proud of her
tnall but dedicated team which had
o more meets before the regional
!;


competition. The girls hosted
DeSoto on Tuesday and travel
today (Thursday) to the Travis
Todd Invitational at Avon Park.
Hardee had twin meets last week.
The Lady Cats greeted lifters
from Avon Park, Lake Placid and
LaBelle on Tuesday, Jan. 10.
Hardee had no lifters in five of the
weight classes. As a result, Hardee
finished third overall. Avon Park
was first with 51 points, with
LaBelle at 32, Hardee 21 and Lake
Placid 18 points.
Hagans placed first in her 101-
pound weight group, with a total of
110 pounds for the bench press and
the clean-and-jerk.
Hines placed second with a 190
total in the 139 division. Soph
Nicole Bromley placed fourth and
classmate Katie Bryan was just
behind for fifth place. "She is a
very dedicated member of the
team," commented Brutus.
Townsend placed second in the
154 group, with a 215 total.
Freshman Candice Reed was fifth
overall.


In the 169 group, junior Graham
placed third overall; At 119, fresh-
man Candis Thomas was fifth.
Only five lifters were able to
attend the sub-regionals at Sebring
on Saturday.
Townsend took a second place in
the 154 division, with a combined
total of 220, 110 pounds in both the
bench press and the clean-and-jerk.
Hines placed third at 139, scoring a
195-pound total, 100 pounds in the
press and 95 in the clean-and-jerk.
These two automatically qualified
for regionals.
Hagans placed fourth in her divi-
sion and Graham in hers. This
allows them to be alternates at the
regional meet. Bryan placed out of
the top four in the busy 139 group
and will not get-to go to regionals.
Bromley went as an alternate to
the sub-regionals as did junior
Elizabeth Buffalo, who was unable
to lift because of an injury.

Mother's Day was declared a
national holiday in 1914.


Vandolah Power Company of
Wauchula and Vandolah Power's
owner, Houston, Texas-based
Northern Star Generation LLC,
announced a significant expansion
of their support for Habitat for
Humanity, Hardee County Chapter.
In recognition of the needs of the
community in which the plant is
located and many of its staff reside,
and in order to convey its sincere
appreciation and deep respect for
the work performed by the local
Habitat For Humanity Affiliate in
reducing poverty housing by build-
ing homes for low-income families
in need, Vandolah Power will pro-
vide a one-time grant of $60,000 in
order to fund an energy efficient
home in Wauchula during the calen-
dar year 2006. In addition to the
grant, Vandolah expects to continue
its traditional support of Habitat for
Humanity.
Vandolah Power and its employ-
ees have been involved with every
Habitat for Humanity home built in
Hardee County since the power
plant went commercial in 2002.
Vandolah Power volunteers have
performed rough-in and finish elec-
trical installations on each home in
addition to assisting in almost every
other facet of the home's construc-
tion.
"Vandolah Power and its employ-
ees feel strongly about community
involvement and are excited to con-
tinue and expand our support for the
terrific team which leads the local
Habitat for Humanity Chapter,"
Vandolah Power plant manager
Doug Jensen commented.
"Vandolah Power would also like
to commend the particular efforts of
the Habitat for Humanity, Hardee
County Chapter which has contin-
ued building homes for the commu-
nity in spite of personal losses dur-
ing Hurricane Charley and Jeanne
during 2004. Their efforts have not
gone unnoticed, and we commend
the personal sacrifice put forth by
each member of the affiliates as
well as the many volunteers that
work to build these homes."
"In particular, Vandolah Power
would like to take this opportunity
to applaud the efforts of those vol-
unteers with whom we have worked
most closely, including Pam
Warren, president; Jim Sampson,
vice president; Kermit Stevens,
building construction; Sherron


Jensen, volunteer coordinator;
Sheila Roberts, treasurer; Hon.
Marcus Ezelle, church relations;
Charles Sanders, family selection;
Pauline Ochoa, family support; and
Julie Durrance, secretary," said
Jensen.
In addition to Habitat for
Humanity, Vandolah Power sup-
ports Project Graduation and has
provided financial contributions to
the Hardee County Fire Department
to fund the purchase of rescue
equipment as well as donating
$100,000 to Hardee Lakes and,
ongoing support of the Hardee
County Little League. Vandolah
Power employees serve as officers
in both the Wauchula Kiwanis Club
and Habitat for Humanity,' Hardee
County Chapter.
Persons or other corporate citi-


zens who wish to also participate
with Habitat for Humanity to eradi-
cate poverty housing may contact
the local Chapter at 863-773-0579.

Vandolah Power is a 680-mega
watt dual fuel peaking power plant
located in Hardee County. It cur-
rently employees 13 direct employ-
ees and 4 additional indirect
employees. Northern Star Gener-
ation Services Company (NSG) is a
privately !held power generation
company, dedicated to providing
reliable service to its customers,
most of whom hold long-term con-
tracts with our facilities for power
generation capacity and energy.
NSG operates four plants and holds
interests in 14 gas-fired combustion
turbine and steam turbine plants in
the United States.


YOU Can Appear In...

kids korner
Hey, kids! How would you like your work to be printed in the paper?
Draw us a picture, write us a poem, make up a story or tei us a joke.
If you're sending us a drawing, use pencils or markers, not crayons.
And leave the lined notebook paper for homework, not your artwork.
Then print your name and age, your parents names and the town
where you live on the back. Get mom or dad to bring it to our office
or put it in the mail to: kids komer, The Herald-Advocate, RO. Box
338, Wauchula, FL 33873.

r -
F YOUR TAX MONEY I



INSTANTLY* I
I I

I Family Business Service I

1217 W. Palmetto Street Wauchulal

773-4749

WE OFFER
MKLECFRONBMI
I WTAA FILIN.IG
*Based on Refund Anticipation Loan Approval and Funding.
*Certain Restrictions Apply.

Open Saturdays 9-2
L- --





4B ihe lerald-Advocate, January 19, 2006





Hardee


Sally Dyal & Joshua

Harned Are Engaged


Living..


Tia Rockwell & Will

Mackay Are Married


Keith and Kathy Dyal of DeSoto
County announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of their
daughter, Sally Lynn Dyal of
DeSoto County, to Joshua Dale
Harned of Hardee County, the son


of Dale Harned of Hardee County
and Audrey Oakes of Okeechobee
County.
Plans are being made for a
Saturday, April 22, wedding on
Anna Maria Island.


Tia Rockwell and Will Mackay
were married in an evening ceremo-
ny on Nov. 26 in Melbourne sur-
rounded by family and frindr~
The bride is the daughter of Bob
and Kim Pierce and Perry Rockwell


of Melbourne.
The groom is the son of Joe and'
Caroline Mackay of Bowling:
Green.
After a brief honeymoon in,
Orlando, the newlyweds are at
home in Palm Bay.


COURTESY PHOTO


oo006 REVIVAL


JANOARY2 -,9 F- FBAR Y I, 006
Services wil be held at 11:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. on
Sunday and at 6:30 p.m. Monday Wednesday,

Gudst Speaker:


Jj KVAW0W$
--i JO J fN'A4 t, I

of Lu bbock, Texas
3ro. Randles has served as chaplain for the
Dallas Cowboys, Texas Tech, & the Oklahoma Sooners.

Special Music provided.by:
,ANN/Y WAC>, JA D Al JBE,

,i- L FIRS7" 0I PRZSSYON

WENDI1VEDY: Y 3TH N "
(youth emphasis b'ut ALL are invited)
f MATT OIAZ OF THE ATLANTA BRAVES
WILL BE SHARING HIS TESTIMONY.
PIZZA NIGHT (youth gradees 7th 12th only)
5:30 p.m. 6:15 p.m. First Come, First Serve

First Baptist Church
4531 US Hwy 17 N, Bowling Green, Fl. 33834
For more info call (863) 375-2253 or
visit our website @ www.fbebgflorida.org


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Eddie Hart

Melina Lackey & Eddie

Hart Exchange Vows


Melina Catherine Lackey of
Wauchula became the bride of
Eddie,Leon Hart of Avon Park on
Dec. 16 in a late afternoon wedding
at Hardee Park in Wauchula.
The bride is the daughter of
Nelson and Melinda Lackey of
Wauchula. The groom is the son of
Eddie Leon Smith and Charlotte
Hart of Avon Park.
Officiating at the 4 o'clock cere-
mony was Pauline Hendrickson.
Wedding decorations were in the
colors of gold, off-white and white.
The bride was given in marriage
-by her father, Nelson Lackey.
She wore a gown of shimmering
gold and carried a bouquet of red
roses.
The maid of honor was the
bride's sister, Whitney Lackey, who
wore a blue dress. Brother George
Lackey served as ring bearer.
The mother of the bride wore
gold and maroon, graced with a
cream-white rose corsage.
Following the exchange of vows,
a reception was held. Gold and

MARy KAy

turn. back

time.
Clear. Smooth. Radiant
skin. The TimeWise* system
delivers anti-aging benefits
'you can see and feel,
To start looking younger now,
call me to try TimeWisee
products for reei
Diane Beatty
Independent Beauty Consultant
(863) 832-2089
www.marykay.com/dbeatty soc 1:19-2:9c


PEACE VALLEY CAMP MEETING
BOWLING GREEN, FLORIDA


KEN OSBORNE
Music Evangelist and
Southern Gospel
Music Artist


DENNIS E. WAYMIRE
Evangelist
Pastor of Faith Wesleyan
Church Lakeland, FL
DAILY SCHEDULE
Breakfast 8:00 A.M.
Bible Study 10:30 A.M.
Lunch 12:00 Noon
Supper 5:30 P.M.
,Prayer 6:30 P.M.
Evening Worship 7:00 P.M.
SUNDAY
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
Evening Worship 7:00 P.M.


STATEMENT OF FAITH
We Believe...
In the salvation of the human soul, including the
new birth, and in a subsequent work of God in the
soul, a crisis wrought by faith, where by the heart
is cleansed from all sin and filled with the Holy
Spirit. This gracious experience is retained by
faith as expressed in a constant obedience to God's
revealed will, thus giving us perfect cleansing
moment by moment, (1 John 1: 7-9). We stand for
the Wesleyan position.
For further information contact:
Claudeene Herron, Secretary
P.O. Box 1194
Bowling Green, FL 33834
863-773-9072
Ron Herron, Treasurer
P.O. Box 694
Wauchula, FL 33873

(863) 773-9072
I Hookup for Trailer $3.00 per day
All Churches Invited
January 19- 29


O n p rog~g~~pert 1of Cai ng.I d Pe~o pulei ni striesingcUBowliTkv npg Gre n.
3bocs -est n 6out LneRadofeo..S.1.o 109


off-white decorations set off a white
cake with red poinsettias. Punch
also was served.
The bride received a general edu-
cation diploma in 2000, and plans
to enroll in licensed practical nurs-
ing classes in the fall.
The groom is employed with
Florida Beef Co.
The couple reside in Wauchula.


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Will Mackay


Between 1870 and 1980, the
United States successfully


defended the America's Cup:
yachting title 25 straight times.


GufStt


2 Nights of Southern Gospel Music
Friday, January 20th at 7:30 pm and
Saturday, January 21st at 7:00 pm
Concert Location:
Fort Green Baptist Church
2875 Baptist Church Road, Bowling Green, FL
(located off State Road 62 approximately 8 miles west of
Highway 17 near Wauchula, FL)
For Information Call 863-773-9123
There is no charge for admission or parking a freewill offering will be accepted.


.. ,


0'~


Promotions


1:19c


i.


S,' 4Jt-.4





January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5B


BICENTENNIAL BABY
(*a, Thursday, January F, 1976


Senior Citizen News
By Jim Walton

What a time was had by all last night at the Catheryn McDonald Senior
Center. Again,.it was relaxing music and dancing to Big Band of the 1940s
as well as Western swing and Dixieland jazz.
The bands performances were super! Bill and Elina sang soothing
numbers together, such as "I Am Confessing That I Love You," "Moon
Over Miami," "All of Me," "The Very Thought of You" and several others
requested from the audience.
Sorip friends were in attendance for the first time at the center. Our
charming hostess, Darlene, from Crystal Lake Village, introduced all new-
comers to all present, and before the evening was over, we all exchanged
friendly greetings as well as words of encouragement.
At intermission and snack time, our friend Jerry from the Wagon
Wheel park gave a 10-minute performance of one liners that brought the
house down with laughter.
The door prizes were won by Fran from Wauchula and Mike from
Wagon Wheel. We wish to thank again all who were in attendance and,
above all, Hardee County for providing this center for everyone to enjoy.
Please encourage others to attend the wonderful music and dancing
that are offered every Thursday evening here at the center from 7 to 9 p.m.
We hope to: see you again tonight (Thursday). We all hope to see Wanda in
performance! We sure miss her andpray that see gets well real soon.


a I

Hardee's First Bicentennial Baby
Hardee County's f;r i baby of I,. ;', the nation's 200th
birthday, is Ann Marie M.aldonado, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Daniel Maidonado of Wauchula. She was
born at 9:21 a.m. New Year's Day at Wauchula
General Hospital. Ann weighed in at seven pounds and
was 19 inches long. The pr ud papa is head custodian
at the,hospital. The family; will receive numerous gifts
donated by local merciha ts who participated in the
annual baby contest.


COURTESY PHOTO
The newspaper clipping at left from the Jan. 8, 1976, edition of The Herald-Advocate proudly proclaims the birth of the county's
first baby of the year as the country celebrated the 200th anniversary of its birth. Little Ann Marie Maldonado.is all grown up now,
and has just turned 30. Mother Beulah Maldonado says Ann Marie is married and the mother of two, Jasenia, 8; and Tony, 6. She
is shown at right with her husband of 10 years, Orlando Guerra. The family lives in Bartow. Hardee County's Bicentennial Baby
went on to be the assistant director of the recreational complex in Winter Haven before resigning to attend teacher's aide class-
es at Polk Community College and to spend more time at home with her children, Maldonado notes.


YOU Can Appear In ...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published in this
newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies solely on
reader submissions. Poems must be your own original work, written
by you, not someone else. To appear in this feature, send your poet-
ry, name and town of residence to: Poet's Place, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338. Wauchula, FL 33873 or fax 773-0657.


Tracy's Haa
&Tanning
----------- --
-; Unlimited
i 00 Month
or
I $ 15 Sessions!
I To be used within the year of purchase. I
L. ----------------- -----
Conveniont Hours:
Mon Fri: 7:30 a.m. 7:30 p.m.
al.: 8 a.m. 1 p.m.
'cekl', Dr.. ings All Lotions On Sal-e
i* Tnning Beds.*,


767-1118 1


0

The sun is shining once again at




JAN'S

215 W. Orange St., Wauchula

773-3033
We are offering Extra Specials for Jr. Miss,
Miss Hardee County, Mrs. Hardee County and
Miss Project Graduation Contestants.

We are continuing a special on all lotions
and jewelry thru January 27.

We would like to thank our Customers for making
our Grand Opening a huge success.
We would also like to thank our Family and
Extended Family for their help in
getting us ready to open.


Our same friendly certified staff is here to serve you


7:00 AM til 6:oo PM


Julie Platt
Nails & Spray Tanning
s' 1oc1:1 i


National Wild Turkey Federation

Dinner Set Jan. 27 In Bartow


Help support wild turkey conser-
vation and have a great time by
attending the Wild Turkey Super
Fund Auction and Dinner, hosted by
the Bartow-Fort Meade-Mulberry
Chapter of the National Wild
Turke) Federation. This event will
be held Friday, Jan. 27, at the
Bartow Civic Center.
The doors open at 6 p.m., so you
can enjoy a social hour before eat-
ing a meal prepared by Florida
BBQ Catering Services.
All ticket holders will be eligible
to win valuable prizes exclusive to
National Wild Turkey Federation
events. Place the highest bid and
you could go home with sporting
art, hunting guns, knives, calls, out-
door equipment, and more.
The tickets are $50 single and
$75 for a couple. Membership will
help the NWTF support wildlife
management on public, private and
corporate lands and preserve hunt-
ing as a traditional North American
sport.
Since the NWTF was founded 32
years ago, more than $175 million
NWTF and cooperative dollars
have been spent of over 24,000 pro-
jects benefiting wild turkeys
throughout the United States,
Canada and Mexico. The work of
NWTF volunteers and supporters is
paying off. In 1973 there were an
estimated 1.3 million wild turkeys
and 1.5 million turkey hunters in
the U.S. Today there are over 6 mil-
lion wild turkeys and about 2.6 mil-
lion hunters.
SIf you want to join the nation's
fastest growing and most progres-
sive conservation organization
today, reserve tickets by calling
Hal's Gun Shop, 863-533-9563;
Dennis Coleman, 581-1207; or Jim
Keller, 863-640-4484: There is lim-
ited seating available, so purchase
Sign up now for
Painting Classes
All day oil, weekly acrylic &
China painting classes
offered now at
Louise's Arts & Crafts
202 N. 8th Ave.
For more information
Call Louise @ 863-773-2386
socl:19, 26p


10 HOURS A
MONTH!
That's all it takes to speak up
for a child. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


tickets in advance.
For more information, log on the
website at www.nwtf.org. .,


T
ONE BLUE, NO PINKS
Danielle Goolsby DeLeon,
Bowling Green, a seven pound
three ounce son Shawn Dainian,
born Dec. 14, 2005, DeSoto
Memorial Hospital, Arcadia.
Maternal grandparents are Greg III
and Julie Guzman of Bowling
Greeen. Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Greg Jr. and Jessie Guzman
of Wauchula.

I1 W PlmttIS1e t


Auxiliary

Dinner

Is Today
The auxiliary at Florida Hospital
Wauchula will hold a stuffed cab-
bage roll dinner today (Thursday)
for those who purchased tickets in
advance.
The meal will be served from 11
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tickets were $6.
Tickets entitle the holder to a din-
ner of two cabbage rolls, mashed
potatoes, baby carrots, cornbread
and cookies.
Jockey Albert Adams won
nine consecutive races over a
three-day period at a Maryland
track in 1930.


4-:
a.r


1,3 e9 9~Zhke'~drse,

(86Y)/ 452-2005

asoiu.Ift1e' 4dowhin-


j DA One Man One Woman.

*Fj EID 4 I VJ RI.AILILI OI10]L


Have you


signed it yet?








We are down to the last few weeks

so don't delay.

Download petitions from

florida4marriage.org

and hand them out to family and friends.

Sign them and send them in immediately.

Don't have internet access?
Call 773-9608 or 773-4520
for copies of petitions.

These are also available in Spanish.
Disponible en espafiol.



Will you do your part in protecting

marriage for future generations?


lay Friday.


M ond

. Jan Platt
Tanning


J


I,-


~O~D~b~k;~~






6B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


Lady Cats Battle Every Game


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Lady Cat hoops continue to be a
puzzle.
Coach Don Gray has his girls on
the verge, but just not quite able to
get over the hump in pulling out
victories in close encounters.
The girls lost to Sarasota Booker
45-33, beat DeSoto 56-27 and lost
at Avon Park 51-48 in last week's
action.
This week there was a home
game against Palmetto on Tuesday
and a trip to DeSoto tomorrow
(Friday). The Jan. 24 varsity-only
game at Evangel Christian has been
cancelled. That leaves only a trip to
Frostproof on Jan. 26 to finish the
regular season.
The Class 4A District 10 playoffs
are the week of Jan. 30 at Sebring,
ranked sixth in the state with its 14-
0 record. Other schools in the dis-
trict games are Avon Park, Sarasota
Booker, Braden River, DeSoto and
Palmetto.

BOOKER 46, HARDEE 33
Hardee started last week's three
games with a Tuesday visit from
Booker. After Hardee lost by only
four points at Booker, the Lady
Tornadoes were ready to use their
superior height and speed to shut
Hardee down.
Booker did get the first deuce of
the game, but Lady Cat senior Kim
Cummins was fouled and hit one-


of-two from the charity strike.
Booker countered with a solo free
throw. Shortly Hardee's Gloria
Solis rebounded a shot to force a 3-
3 tie.
Booker went on a shooting spree
to lead 11-3 before Solis fed
Thelicia Jena for a runner. The
Tornadoes took a 17-7 advantage at
the end of quarter one and were up
28-19 at the half as Hardee had a
one-point advantage in the second
quarter scoring.
Booker returned all its starters to
the court to start the second half.
Hardee countered and it was nearly
midway in the period before
Thelicia Jena nailed a shot in the
key. Twenty seconds later, she hit
one-of-two and shortly received a
pass on the run to cut the Booker
lead to 28-24.
After a Booker time-out settled
down the rattled Lady Tornadoes, it
was a close third period in which
Hardee picked one more point than
Booker to cut the lead to 35-27.
Cat junior D. K. Davis threw to
classmate Christina Jena two min-
utes into a tough fourth period to
narrow the gap to 35-29. When
Davis fouled out, Booker picked up
momentum and forged ahead- to a
41-30 advantage with less than
three minutes left in the game.
Booker kept at least three starters in
the game for the final minutes to
secure its 46-33 victory.
Shandra Polynice topped Booker


with 19 points, with Latavia
Matthews adding 15.
For the Lady Cats, senior
Thelicia Jena had 11 points, while
junior sister Christina had, nine.
Normally high-scoring senior
Cummins was limited to just five
points, while Davis, Solis, Sherisa
Jones and Sabrina Holmes each had
two points. Ciara Lambert,
Santresa Harris and Joia Jones
added to the floor game as they
spelled the starters.
Solis led Hardee with five
rebounds against the taller oppo-
nents. Cummins and Davis each
had four, and Homes and Thelicia
Jena each three. Lambert and
Sherise Jones added two apiece.

HARDEE 56, DESOTO 27
Thursday's home game against
the DeSoto Lady Bulldogs was a'
different matter. Between grades
coming out and discipline, DeSoto
was down to a half dozen players,
including three freshmen, a soph, a
junior and lone senior De'Creisha
Arrington, their tallest player at
5'10". She got their first points
and freshman Tara Miller got the
next for a brief 4-0 DeSoto lead.
After that, it was all Hardee.
When Cummins stole the ball and
dished to Christina Jena, Hardee
took a 5-4 lead. By the end of the
first period, it was 14-4 and
reserves were hitting the floor.
Shyrika Neal hit back-to-back
I ,


Jan. 19 Girls Weightlifting Avon Park Away 4:30
HJHS Basketliall DeSoto Away 5:30/6:30
Boys Basketball Avon Park Away 6/7:30
Boys Soccer Lake Region Away 7 p.m.
Jan. 20 Girls Basketball DeSoto Away 6/7:30
Boys Basketball DeSoto HOME 6/7:30
Jan. 23 HJHS Basketball Avon Park Away 5:30/6:30
Girls Basketball Heartland Chr. HOME 6/7:30
'23-27 Boys Soccer Playoffs HOME TBA
Jan. 24 Girls Basketball Evangel,Chr. HOME 5:30/6:30
(Varsity Only)
Jan. 26 HJHS Basketball Sebring HOME 5:30/6:30
Girls Basketball Frostproff Away 6/7:30
Boys Basketball Palmetto HOME 6/7:30
Jan. 27 Girls Weightlifting Booker Away TBA
Boys Basketball Sebring HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 30 HJHS Basketball Hill-Gustat HOME 5:30/6:30
Jan. 30-Feb. 3 Girls Basketball
Districts Sebring. Away TBA
Jan. 31 Boys Basketball Lakeland HOME 6/7:30
Feb. 2 HJHS Basketball Heartland Chr. HOME 5:30/6:30
Boys Basketball Lake Placid HOME


shots to start the second period and
cut the Hardee lead to 14-8, before
Cummins grabbed a defensive
rebound and went all the way
downcourt to score. By halftime,
Hardee was up 19-11.
Anreka Bristol and Arrington led
the charge for DeSoto early in the
third period. Hardee put the starters
on the floor to start the quarter, but
quickly gave them a seat as Hardee
had more players that DeSoto's,
which were getting tired.
Without trying to run up the
score, Hardee was still up 42-16 as
the buzzer sounded to end the third
period. To their credit, in the final
eight minutes, the Lady Bulldogs
never quit trying and put a dozen
points in the hole. The final score
was 56-27.
Cummins was high scorer for
Hardee with 19 points, but fresh-
man Holmes was close behind with
15. Christina Jena had seven,
Thelicia Jena six, Sherisa Jones
four, Davis three and Solis two
points.
All of the players had at least one
rebound, with Cummins tops with
seven of them. She also had five
steals, but thefts and assists were
counted for most of the bther play-
ers as well.
\ .
AVON PARK 51, HARDEE 48
This was a closer matchup
between these teams than their
December game.
Hardee trailed just 12-10 at the
end of the first period and swept
ahead to a 27-19 lead at halftime.
Avon Park crept back in the game
and tied it 35-35 going into the,
final eight minutes. Cummins a pair
of her five three-pointers early in
the period, but Lady Devil Tacoria
Jones waited until the final
moments to nail back-to-back treys
to give her squad the 51-48 victory.
Taller Avon Park center
Shantavia Sims was tough inside
for 20 points, some every period.
Jones added 15 for the Lady Devils,
with 14 of them coming in the sec-
ond half.
For Hardee, Cummins matched
the game-high with 20 points, 15 of
them coming from three-point
range. Holmes nailed a pair of treys
and pair of deuces and a free throw
for 11 points. Sherisa Jones had six,
Christina Jena four, Solis three and
Davis and Thelicia Jena each two
points.

JV GAMES
The junior varsity Lady Wildcats
had similar experiences, losing a
two-pointer to Booker, beating
DeSoto and losing badly at Avon
Park.
In the first game. Hardee battled
Booker to a 9-9 first-quarter tie.
Stymied in the second period,
Hardee got only two points, while
the junior Tornadoes got nine to
lead 18-11 at the half.
Hardee turned the tables in the
third. quarter to narrow Booker's
lead to 21-19 at the end of the third


period. Hardee whittled away and
tied the game at 29-all with 12 sec-
onds left in the game. Aveia Coney
was able to get a layup in the hole
with three seconds left to give
Booker the 31-29 win.
For Hardee, JaNisha Mosley was
high scorer with eight points, all in
the fourth-quarter. Andrea
Parkinson added a half dozen,
Naomi Alvarado four, and Paige
Avery, Jericca Grimsley, Brandy
Crockett and Charlene Anderson
each two points. Erica Ureste,
Tareka Coney and Angel Simmons
didn't score. Crockett had five
rebounds, with Simmons and
Mosely each four. Anderson had
five steals and Simmons and
Parkinson each four.
It was a close game Thursday
against the half dozen DeSoto
junior Lady Bulldogs. Hardee
bounded out to a 12-4 lead at the
end of the first period and then
went stone cold. DeSoto allowed
only two points for Hardee, while


CHURCH
Attendance at church was 121
residents. Pastor Dixson's message
was about how each person is spe-
cial and that we need to love one
another, along with loving God.

COFFEE HOUR
Shirley Anderson opened with
the pledge and prayer. Our speaker
was Mr. Brightenbok from the
National Cremation Society. We
had 171 people in attendance.
Thirty-five new or just-back resi-
dents introduced themselves.
Merchants certificates were given
out. The 50/50 of $59.50 was won
by Ted Parolari. This is Ted and
wife Caye's first winter with us.
Welcome.

GAME SCORES,
Winners in bowling: Ladies high
game of 182 and series of 438 was
Arlene Sebright. Men's high game
of 226 was Dick Wilton, high series
of 529 was Bob Bellis. We have
about 30 bowlers.

CHAIRPERSON OF THE
WEEK
Theresa Wilhelm is our line
. dance instructor. Theresa is from
Norwalk, Ohio. She and her hus-
band, Arnold, have been coming to
Florida for quite a few years. She
has taught in our park for three
years, she has also taught in other
parks, but does not teach in Ohio
now.
Theresa is always learning new
dances to teach. She says basic
steps learned are used in most of the
dances. Come join the fun and the
great exercise of line dancing. We
all appreciate Theresa's time and
energy.

SHUFFLEBOARD
Bill Morrison didn't make his pro
points, as I reported last week.
At our draw tournament held here


taking a 16-14 halftime advantage.
There were 'four ties and lead
changes in the third period, before
Hardee got the last three baskets for
a 26-20 advantage. In the final stan-
za, Hardee had only four points
while DeSoto managed five.
Hardee hung on for the 30-25 win.
Keosha Jackson led DeSoto with
10 points, while, Hardee's high trio
was Mosley, Parkinson and Coney
with six points apiece. Grimsley
and Crockett each had four points
and Simmons and Ureste each two
points.
The Hardee JV was simply ovei-
whelmed as Avon Park used its
height and speed to shut down the
junior Lady Cats in a 44-12 win.
Beonca Goodfrey led Avon Park
with 20 points, some every quarter
as she stayed in the game through-
out.
For Hardee, Parkinson had four
points and Ureste, Avery, Mosley
and Coney two apiece.


in the park on Jan. 7, withi Ruth and
Larry Brown directing, we had 11
teams. Winners in the main event
were: first, Bud Brown and Dick
Barham; second, Les Anderson and
Nancy Singleton; third, Cheryl
Conkle and Mary Ann Fisher;
fourth, Darlene Morrison and
Annette Napier.
Winners in consolation were:
first, Bob Hoskins and Bill
Morrison; second, Mary Johns and
Jack Napier; third, Emerson Cross
and Mamie Morton; fourth,
Annabelle Smith and Irehe Lunny.
After the tournament the winners
of the turkey shoot on Dec. 22 gave
up their prizes of turkey and other
foul for a carry-in. It was very nice
of all who gave food, prepared it
and set everything up and the clean
up. We hosted Floral Lakes in the
inter-park shuffle. Results were
Pioneer Creek 13 and Floral Lakes
11. We will go to Floral Lakes Feb.
9. Wednesday at 3 p.m. Bob and
Cheryl Conkle will be showing new
shuffle players the basics of shuffle-
board. Ruth Brown won first in
main at the St. Cloud tournament
Jan. 9.

NEWS OF INTEREST
Nelson and Doris Sweetheimer
had visitors for a week, their daugh-
ter, granddaughter and two great-
granddaughters were here to cele-
brate Nelson's. birthday. Our
spaghetL dinner was a big success;
202 people were served.

COMING EVENTS
On Jan. 21 there will be a pan-
cake breakfast. At our last one we
served over 200 people. Also on the
21st, the Jo & Jan Edwards Musical
will be at 7 p.m. On the 22nd'Patsy
Cristy from Nashville will entertain
us. Please check your park calendar
for all the different activities going
on in the park.


Memory Lane


'I' 1- ~ F~IyI : a I" '


Ni














1 0-












.F


PHOTO SUBMITTED BY JOAN KROLL
If there is one thing evident about these three cowboys, it's that this is not their first rodeo. This photo-
graph was taken by Joan Kroll in the late 1950s. Every year Hardee County held a big rodeo, Kroll rec-
ollects. At this rodeo, Kroll could not see the events because of the large, aggressive crowd. Therefore,
she took a picture of what was visible: these cowboys' boots. Kroll says rodeos were rougher back then.
"Cowboys really had a rough time," she says. Take note at how the cowboys cuffed their jeans.

SHARE YOUR OLD PHOTOS WITH US!
Take readers on a walk down Memory Lane by sharing your photos from Hardee County's past. Bnng your submissions to the newspa-
per office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. or mail to The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula., FL 33873. Photos will be returned.


FLORIDA MARKETS AT A GLANCE

For the week ended January 12, 2006:

At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipts totaled 10,807 compared
to last week 6,218, and 10,066 a year ago. According to the Florida
Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: compared to last week,
slaughter cows and bulls were steady, feeder steers and heifers were 1.00
to 3.00 higher.


Feeder Steers:



Feeder Heifers:


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 175.00-225.00;
300-400 Ibs., 126.00-170.00; and
400-500 lbs., 110.00-144.00.

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2:
200-300 lbs., 127.00-200.00;
300-400 Ibs., 110.00-145.00; and
400-500 lbs., 102.00-125.00.


Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 Ibs; 85-90 percent, 40.00-46.00.


Slaughter Bulls:


Yield Grade No. 1-2, 1000-2100 Ibs; 52.00-65.00.


Yoli s Co.

Full gorvice Hair and Nail galon


"Walk-Ins Woleomo"
767-YOLI (9654)
soci2:8tfc 107 S. 9th Ave., Wauchula


GENE DAVIS SAYS THANKS
Stop by and see why so many neighbors
from Hardee County buy from me. Ranked in
I the top 10 in customer satisfaction in Florida
I have received Ford's highest Sales Honor
15 years running and been a member of
Ford's 300/500 Club for 20 years. Thanks
S again and stop by soon.
S, Ft. Meade
375-2606
15tc I M 800-226-3325


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Edna Bell & Wanda Brown


~" ".. .-~=1;Srlii
r: .-. Irt~.~ .. *.t ...F-






January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7B


HJHS Boys Win



Two Games


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High boys
basketball team has hit the winning
trail.
The junior Cats bounced ba
from a loss at Hill-Gustat to win a'
Heartland Christian and came
home for a victory over visiting
Lake Placid in an unusual three-
game week.
Hardee girls can't quite get over
the hump, as they lost by three
points at Hill-Gustat and Heartland
Christian before dropping the home
game to Lake Placid by a wider
margin.
This week there were no Monday
games but the teams go to DeSoto
tonight (Thursday). Next week's
games are at Avon Park on Monday
and home Thursday for the start of
a final homestand. On Jan. 30 Hill-
Gustat visits, on Feb 2, it is the sea-
son finale against Heartland
Christian, rescheduled from earlier
in the season.
At Hill-Gustat on Jan. 9, the
Hardee girls lost 16-13, with
Emmonice McCullins getting 14 of
her team's 16 points.
For Hardee, Carleen Brown hit
five free throws, Jalyn Smith had
four points, and Elvira Servin and
Kristina Garcia each two points.
Other Lady Cats are Chelsey
Steedley, Halley Marshall, Lacey
Garza, Hannah Jacobs, Courtney
Buckley, Daisha Blandin, Ivette
Cisneros, Yesenia Vargas, Paige
Massey and Ali Holle.
Hardee boys, meanwhile, hit the
floor at Hill-Gustat, which had a
pair of heavy scorers, on with 21
points and another with 13. It was a
tie game, 20-20 at halftime, but the
Golden Eagles pressured the Cats-
and won 47-31.
For Hardee, Antjuan Jones had
eight points, Ezayi Youyoute seven,


Kelsheem White and Tyler Alden
each a half dozen, and Ivan Fermin
and Jake -Mayer each two points.
Other young Cats are Jarrius
Lindsey, Kalan Royal, Scott
Donaldson, Charles Allen, Austin
'restridge. D'Vonte Hooks,
Octavio Cisneros and Tre'
Anderson.
At Heartland Christian on Jan.
10, Hardee girls struggled but lost
18-15. For Hardee, it was Smith,
Vargas and Servin each with four
points, Brown with two and Garza
one at the charity stripe.
Hardee boys had the best night of
the season in a 55-14 rout in which
coach Carl Coleman was able to
clear his bench. White led all scor-
ers with 10 points. Prestridge had
eight, Jones seven, Anderson five,
Hooks, Youyoute and Cisneros
each four points, Royal and Mayer
each three, Tatis, Allen and
Donaldson each two points and
Alden one at the free throw line.
Last Thursday, Hardee girls start-
ed well, but a 14-point second-
quarter splurge by Lake Placid led
to its 33-24 win. Brittany Bentley,
with 11 and Soman Clark, with 10,
led Lake Placid.
For Hardee, it was Vargas as high
scorer with seven points. Holle
added four, Brown and Cisneros
each three, Steedley, Massey and
Garcia each two points and Servin
one at the foul line.
The Hardee boys avenged an ear-
lier seven-point loss at Lake Placid,
using the press effectively for the
44-37 victory. Only one Lake
Placid player was in double-digits,
with 14 points.
White hit the hoops for Hardee in
every quarter and finished with a
season-high 23 points. Jones
chipped in with eight points, while
Youyoute added seven Prestridge
two and Mayer one point.


PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Running the court for the junior Cats are (front row, from left) Jake Mayer, Malik Tatis, Jarrius Lindsey,Tre' Anderson and DVonte
Hooks; (second row) Tyler Alden, Charles Allen, Austin Prestridge, Octavio Cisneros and Ivan Fermin; (third row) Ezayi Youyoute,
Scott Donaldson, Kelsheel White, Kalan Royal and Antjuan Jones; (back row) manager Dillon Justice, assistant coach David
Mitchner, coach Carl Coleman and assistant coach Rashad Faison.


Jalyn Smith (12) looks to pass to Elvira Servin (34) despite pres-
sure from junior Lady Dragons.


Taking the floor for the junior Lady Wildcats are (seated, left to right) Ivette Cisneros, Hannah Jacobs, Daisha Blandin, Courtney
Buckley and Lacey Garza; (kneeling) manager Summer Palmer, Elvira Servin, Paige Massey, Ali Holle, Chelsey Steedley, Jalyn
Smith and manager Rebekah Nix; (standing) assistant coach Sherry Morris, Halley Marshall, Carleen Brown, Yesenia Vargas,
Kristina Garcia and-coach Ami Whilden.


Hardee girls box in. opponent with the ball, trying to force a
turnover.











217 W. Palmetto S treet Wul

773-474


WE OFFj E


[kABlFLAWMMt T Iii
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ r-A X "s~[*~tff~y>L R Va^^^^^^^^^^^^
*Base on Rfun Aticiatin Lan pprvalandFuning


Rooting for the junior high hoopsters are (in front, from left) Sierra Gee, Jennifer Ligon, Dana Douglas, Chelsea Wallace and Emma
. Marshall; (second row) Holly Johnson, Smokee Barker, Stephanie Driver and Brittany Abbott; (in back) mascot Jessica Abbott,
Valerie Cobb, Melissa Hartley, Lindsay Moon and coach Leslie Moon; missing, Jalyn Smith, Courtney Buckley, Amanda Rigney,
mascot Kailah White, Savannah Albritton and assistant coach Amy Rigney.








2A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


The Herald-Advocate'
Hardee Counti's Hometown Coverage


JAMES R. KELLY
PublisherEditor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Spons Editor

BESS A. STALLINGS
Hardee Living Editor

115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


'QIur- J


RALPH HARRIS
Production Man

NOEY DE SANTIA
Asst. Production Man

Phone: (863) 773-3

Fax: (863) 773-(


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Florida. by The Herald-Advo
.Publishing Co. Inc. Penodical Postage paid at U S. Post Office, Wauchula. FL 32
(LISPS 578-780).' Posunaster." send address changes io The Herald-Advocate, P.O.
338, Wauchula. FL 33873


DEADLINES:
Schools-Thursday 5pm
S Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Monday 5 p m.
General NewI Monday 5pm.
Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months 516; 1 yr. $28; 2 yrs. $S
Florida
6 months $20. 1 yr. $37: 2 yrs. s
Out of Stare
6 months $24; I yr. $44; 2 yrs. $S


LETTERS:
The Herald-Ad.ocate welcomes lenersro the editor on matters ofpublic interesL Li
sbonld be bnef. and must be wntlen in good taste, signed and include a daytime p
number.
SUBMISSIONS:
aiPress releases on community matters me welcome Submissions should be typed,
ble-spaced and adhere to the abo'e deadlines All items are subject to editing.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


The January 2006 AARP Bulletin reports President George W. Bush is
in excellent physical condition, standing nearly 6 feet tall, weighing 192
pounds and having an at-rest Jeart rate of 47 beats per minute.
Bob Deans wrote Bush for decades ran to keep in shape, maintaining a
seven-minute mile pace into his mid-50s. Two years ago doctors told him
to stop the strenuous running to prevent knee damage. Bush reluctantly
gave up his running shoes for a mountain bike.
Deans recently did a 17-mile tour with the president on the Bush ranch
in Texas. They rode bikes for two hours: Bush wears a heart monitor, and
his heart rate averaged 139 beats per minute, peaking at 177 on one extend-
ed climb. He burned 1,493 calories.
Bush, 59, ranks in the top 99 percent in fitness among men his age,
wrote Deans. He has lost 8 pounds during the past year and dropped his
body fat 3 percentage points to a lean 15.8 percent,
Bush is a cross-trainer. He rides, lifts weights or works out on an ellip-
tical machine six times a week. Bush says exercise is good preventive med-
icine for him.
Bush said regular exercise helps a person sleep better, eat a better diet,
and reduces desire for coffee and cigarettes. The president has a tough job
,and has-.the-TW4llpowercto-be tough physically as welli- -' -

AARP reports the Top 10 major reasons, in order, for'people working
after reaching retirement age: need the money, desire to stay mentally
active, need the health benefits, and desire to stay physically active, remain
productive or useful, do something fun or enjoyable, help other people, be
around other people, learn new things and pursue a dream.
Eminent journalist H.L. Mencken once explained why he kept working
after reaching retirement age, "I go on working for the same reason that a
hen goes on laying eggs. There is in every living creature a powerful
impulse to active functioning. Life demands to be lived."

The Wauchula Kiwanis Club will have its annual sporting clays shoot
'Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Matheny Ranch east of Zolfo Springs. The cost is
$45"a person, lunch and refreshments included. There will be trophies for
'the best shooters in each .competition. For more information -call Bob
Hanchey or Lee Hawthorne at 773-4151.
The Kiwanis Club sponsors, various youth activities, including the
Hardee High School Key Club.

The Hardee County Health Department is sponsoring a 5-K walk and
run Saturday, Feb. .18, starting at the Hardee Family YMCA at Orange St.
:and Florida Ave. in Wauchula. Registration begins at 7 a.m. followed by
Stretching exercises at 8:a.m. and the walk/run at 8:15. Call Erin Hess at
773-4161 ext. 176 for more information. Participation is free.
SThis is part of "Step Up Florida on our way to healthy living," a
state-wxide initiative to promote physical activity and healthy lifestyles to
Florida's citizens and visitors.
Register by Feb. 17 and get a free T-shirt while supply lasts.

Beth Kerly, special assistant to Gov. Jeb Bush, will speak to the
Wauchula Lions Club Thursday, Jan. 26, at the noon luncheon at the local
VFW building.

Over 2 million bankruptcy cases filed in the United States in 2005 were
up 31.6 percent over the 1.55 million cases filed in 2004. A new federal
-bankruptcy law took effect Oct. 17, 2005, making it tougher to file.
Lundquist Consulting Inc. of Burlingame, Calif., estimated one in 53
:households filed bankruptcy petitions in 2005. There were over 100,000 fil-
ings in Florida. This would equate to over 100 petitions filed by Hardee
County residents or businesses.


Nearly all men can stand adver-
sity, but if you want to. test a
man's character, give him power.
-Abraham Lincoln


I am neither especially clever
nor especially gifted. I am only
very, very curious.
-Albert Einstein


YOUR TAX, MONEY





IN7STA TLY*








^^^^^^^^^^^^773-4749fT!TSl*Tl'^^^^^^^^^^^M

^^^^K~fWE OFFRB^^^^^


I--'


on to class, the students reported.
Dick said Cook and Dean of
Students Todd Durden checked the
area and found two boys fitting the
description provided. A search of
Garcia allegedly revealed the BB-'
grin in the waistband of his pants
and a switchblade knife in his pants
pocket.
Dick said the boy and his parents
were present at the expulsion hear-
ing. The teen told the board he had
been "messing around" with the
BB-gun the day before, and did not
realize it was still in his pocket
until it was "too late."
The board expelled him for the
remainder of the current school-
year and for the first semester of
2006-07, he said. The boy may
attend Pioneer Career Academy, the
district's alternative school in Zolfo
Springs.
"The School Board has zero tol-
erance for that type of thing," Dick
later said. "I turned on the televi-
sion news that same night and saw
a report on a middle-school student
who pointed a BB-gun like that at a
SWAT team and was critically
injured. And just this morning, I
saw that he died.
S"This, too, could have ended
tragically," Dick noted, adding,
however, that the local boy had no
BBs and did not point the gun at
,anyone.
The other incident involved two


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INDUSTRIAL PARK
Continued From 1A
wants three acres for an 8,000-
square-foot office and manufactur-
ing which hopes to expand to
10,000 square feet, said Winter.
Two other groups hope to lease
one-to-three acres for speculative
buildings, which could each house
several small businesses and/or
offices. One company wants four
acres for an expansion' of their
headquarters of a common maru-
facturing industry.
Finally, the IDA is looking at
contracts pending for two more
companies and their business mod-
els, explained Winter.
There is probably 10-15 acres in
the southwest corer of the park,
wetlands by the hammock, which
will be undevelopable. Some might
be used for storage areas. "We
won't do anything near Hog
Branch, only detrelop north of the
creek," commented Winter.
"More advertising is done by
word of mouth. It's easy to sell
Hardee County, there are great
opportunities here. We talk to a lot
of people, but some don't follow
through with their dreams. At
$35,000 an acre, it is much less
than many surrounding counties
and there's not a lot of land left on
the coast," he added.
S"I applaud your efforts, but 100
jobs is not very much," said
Commissioner Dale Johnson.
Winter said the IDA was looking
to capitalize on the number and
quality of jobs. With a population
of 27,000, the labor force in Hardee
County is about one-third that,
9,500 to 10,000. Even though
unemployment is in the top five
percent of the state for the past 10-
M 20 years, that is only 400 to 600
people, including the homeless.
SThe workforce board is looking at a
minumun wage of $6.50, but the
IDA is looking for quality jobs.
I believe the park is going well,
better than anticipated, but if you
create high-paying jobs, they will
go to people in Polk or Manatee
counties," said Commissioner
Minor Bryant.
"Most of the businesses say they
will train labor," responded
Durrance.
"In economic. development you
look in a 30-50-mile radius for
employees, knowing that sooner or
later they will get tired of commut-
Sing and move here," concluded
Winter.
The district board also received
its audit for 2004-2005. Of the over
:$5 millioil receive handled ii' the
last fiscal year, $4.25 million was
used to clear the debt on the
water/wastewater plant, and pur-
chase of the land and construction
at the IDA park.
"It was a pretty straight forward
audit, no violations of Florida
Statutes, no significant accounting
standards issues and no recommen-
dations," said Mike Carter of the
Sebring-based NCT group which
completed the audit.
The IDA is the more public arm
of economic development, buying
and selling, leasing, making con-
tracts. Its members are chairman
Richard Nicholson, vice-chairman
Lory Durrance, Jama Abbott,
*Lavon Cobb, Dana English, Mike
Manley and Dewey Terrell.
SThese also belong to the recently
restored Economic Development
Council (EDC), which will be the
outreach arm of economic develop-
ment in the county. Other members
are Joe Albritton, John Barlow,
Nancy Craft, Teresa Crawford,
Keith Davis and Oralia Flores.


The county will also make appli-
cation to the newly formed
Independent Economic
Development Board for funding for
these projects. However, those spe-
cial phosphate severance tax dol-
lars are tied to development of jobs
and-rthe.application will have to be
., geare: that way too. It will-receive
its first tax revenue in June, so they
is time to complete an application,
said Albritton.
Timmerman asked if bonding,
impact fees and other revenue
could meet the costs.
Albritton said there was also
related road paving which would
have to be done, especially in
Wauchula Hills. .
Schriner said that as capacity is
added that would, of course,
increase revenue and it would be
important to revisit the fees
charged for water and wastewater
services. Currently they are
charged on a residential unit basis,
with larger facilities charged on the
estimated number of residential
units they would equate to.
After a bit more discussion, the
commission consensus was to
move forward. Financial feasibility
and an analysis of revenue and
costs will be brought to a later
meeting.


seventh graders at Hardee Junior
High School, one 13 years old and
the other 14.
Dick said that on Dec. 6, the 13-
year-old found a marijuana ciga-
rette in a hedge near the school and
sold it to the 14-year-old for $10.
Students who witnessed the
alleged transaction reported it, he
said.
Both boys admitted their wrong-
doing and cooperated with admin-
istrators, he said. Further, in both
instances their parents had them
independently tested for drug use
with negative results.
The younger boy returned the
$10 and wrote a letter of apology to
the school, Dick said. The older
boy admitted to buying the ciga-
rette because of peer pressure and a
desire to be "cool."
Because he was the only one of
the two found with drugs in his
possession, however, he was crimi-
nally charged with the first-degree
misdemeanor crime of possession
of marijuana on school grounds.
SBoth boys were expelled. The
younger boy, who no longer had the
marijuana cigarette but who admit-
ted to selling it, was expelled for
the remainder of this school year.
The older boy, who had the mar-
ijuana on him, was expelled for the
rest of this year and the first semes-
ter of the next.
Both may attend PCA, Dick said.


it (the Cattlemer's Arena). It's new
and improved. The new bleachers
are very, very nice.
"It's one more sign ve're back to
normal," Jones concluded "After
all, we've been through in the last
year or so, it's nice to return to nor-
malcy."
One change mandated by the


hurricane damage to local facilities,
though, will remain intact despite
repairs. Graduates will still spent
their Project Graduation party at
Adventure Island in Tampa.
Last year's trip, Dick said, was a
big success for all involved, and
this year's graduates wanted to be
able to have that same experience.


ABOUT... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon

word is 20 cents. Ads in all capitals are 32 cents
per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box
numbers are $3 extra.
B!LLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pots
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational Vehicles
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


EXPULSIONS
Continued From 1A


GRADUATION
Continued From 1A


Sliustrative bite Pkln.

COURTESY CHAR)
Contracts are pending or completed on several lots at Hardee County Commerce Park off SR 62,
not far from U.S. 17. About 100 jobs may be available when construction is completed.


- I


UTILITIES
Continued From 1A


water facilities. The county pre-
sently purchases water from
Wauchula and re-pumps it to retail
customers, using a 400,000-gallon
ground storage pump, chlorination
stations 'and an emergency power
back-up generator.
Planners propose- drilling a pdir
of 10-inch wellswith pump, aera-
tion and chemical seed facilities,
high-service pumping additions
and control system modifications.
Extensions would go to the
Barkdoll Road, SR 62 loop,
Wauchula Hills and adjacent areas
up and down the U.S. 17 corridor.
The total bill for the wells, water
plant and extensions could be as
high as $5.6 million.
Schriner said this is the first time
he has seen unprecedented growth
in the rural areas of the state and
said it was important to get water
and wastewater up and'running in
Wauchula Hills. It would make no
sense to tear up the roads twice and
should all be done at the same time.
Commission Chairman Nick
Timmerman said "It's exciting, the
expansions you plan. How far can
lines be extended?"
Schriner said pressure is lost with
distance, but with bigger pumps
and lift stations, it would be reason-
able to go five miles. He said he
would use 12-inch lines generously


sized for growth.
He said the estimated costs were
generous and included design, con-
struction and all. "With the
increased prices on concrete, pipe
and other items, I tried to consider
the most cost rather than the most
conservative so you won't.be sur-
prised later. I'd rather it come in
much lower than higher."
Winter explained that the capaci-
ty for each development was esti-
mated on state Department of
Environmental Protection charts.
For instance, at the new school, the
estimate is 5,500 gallons per day,
based on historical averages at
older schools, but the new school
has modern water-saving plumbing
and the 1,700 to 2,100 students
would probably use more like
2,500 per day.
All of this would be phased in
and certificates of completion
(COs) issued for residential and
commercial development as they
could be added.
County Manager Lex Albritton
said the county is committed to
opening up to Orange Blossom by
May, 2007 when their permits end.
He also said the $10 million cost
was a high estimate as some of the
extensions costs would be picked
up by developers.





8B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


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January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Martin Luther King Jr. Parade
O~S'4 ~ ~J~ 1 ~ ~ m'fi. 24


Navy Log Offered Free To

Sea Service Members Vets


S 'Extension Agent


SAIM FOR A HEALTHY WEIGHT THIS YEAR!
- Have you made a new year's resolution to lose weight Jan. 22-28 has
-been declared as National Healthy Weight Week, so what better time to start
5fh'yoir gbal of reaching and 'maintaining a healthy weight for yourself?
T' -"-''Why is a healthy weight important? Reaching and maintaining a
fiael'thy weight is good foir 6ur overall health and will help you prevent and
controll many diseases and conditions. We know that an increase in weight
also increases a person's risk for heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood
pressure diabetes, gallbladder disease, gynecologic disorders, arthritis,
some types of cancer and even some lung problems. Maintaining a healthy
weight has many benefits, including feeling good about yourself and hav-
:ing more energy to enjoy life.
,t A person's weight is the result of many things: height, genes, metab-
"olism, behavior and environment. Maintaining a healthy weight requires
keeping a balance ... a balance of energy. You must balance the calories
*you get from food and beverages with the calories you use to keep your
,body going and being physically active. Remember the following:
t The same amount of energy in. and energy out over time =
" weight stays the same. More in than out over time = weight
T' gain. More out than in over time = weight loss.
SYour energy in and out do not have to balance.exactly every day. It is
the balance over time that will help you to maintain a healthy weight in the
long run.
For many people, this balance means eating fewer calories and increas-
ing their physical activity. Cutting back on:calories is a matter of choice.
:Making healthy food choices that are lower in fats, especially saturated and
'trans fat, cholesterol, added sugars and salt can help you cut back on calo-
ties, as can paying attention to portion sizes.
.. We have all heard the facts: To lose weight, you have to eat less and
"move more. But this is often easier said than done. Many people make
repeated attempts, often using different fad diets and weight-loss gimmicks
and are unsuccessful.
*Did you know that simply losing as little as 10 percent of your current
body ,weight can make a difference in your health? Achieving this initial
weight-loss goal will help to lower your risk for heart disease and other
conditions, including high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and
certain types of cancer.
*Did you know that a reasonable and safe weight loss is 1-2 pounds per
) eek? While it may take as long as six months to lose the weight, it will
ake it easier to keep the weight off. And it will give you the time to make
,pew healthy lifestyle changes such as eating a healthy diet and increasing
.your physical activity.
*Did you know that it is better to maintain a moderate weight loss over
fa longer period of time than it is to lose lots of weight and regain it? You
tan consider additional weight loss after you have lost 10 percent of your
currentt body weight and have maintained it for six months.
What foods make up a healthy eating plan? A healthy eating plan is one
that gives your body the nutrients it needs every day while staying within
your daily calorie level. Foods thatshould be included are lower in calories,
Sotal fat, saturated and trans fat, cholesterol and sodium (salt). Examples of
these foods include fat-free and low-fat dairy products; lean meat, fish and
poultry; high-fiber foods such as whole grains, breads and cereals; fruits;
nd vegetables.
Canola or olive oils and soft margarines made from these oils are heart
S healthy and can be used in moderate amounts. Unsalted nuts can also be
uilt into a'healthy diet as long as you watch the amount.
A healthy eating plan includes foods from all the basic food groups. It
is low in saturated fats, trans fat, cholesterol, salt (sodium) and added sug-
ars. It contains enough calories for good health but-not too many so that you
gain weight. A healthy eating plan also emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole
grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, lean meats, poultry, fish,
beans, eggs and nuts. It also allows for reasonable portion sizes to control
calories and prevent unhealthy weight gain.
So, if maintaining a healthy weight is one of your goals for 2006, why
not start now using the ideas given here, and make your health a priority
this year? You will be glad you did! To find out more about weight man-
agement, please visit the NHLBI Aim for a Healthy Weight Web site at:
www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/losewt/index.htm; or con-
tact the Hardee County Extension-Office at 773-2164.
May you have a happy and healthy new year.


Don't Be Left Out!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 PM.


The United States Navy
Memorial, located on Pennsylvania
Avenue in Washington, D.C., is a
national memorial that honors those
who served and are serving in
America's Sea Services '- Navy,
Marine Corpsj Coast Guard and
Merchant Marine. *
The focus 'of the U.S. Navy
Memorial is not a particular type of
ship, battle or conflict, but rather
the individual whose service and
sacrifice is honored and celebrated.
The heart of the U.S. Navy
Memorial is the Navy Log.
The Navy Log is the permanent
public registry where Sea Service
members and veterans can record
their service information name,
duty stations, awards, photos and
memories. The Navy Log may be


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REASON LAMAR HOLT
Deceased,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252005CP000152

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
REASON LAMAR HOLT, deceased,
whose date of death was September
8th, 2005, and whose Social Security
Number is 264-72-4539, is pending in
the Circuit Court for HARDEE County,
Florida, .Probate Division, the address
of which is RO. Drawer 1749
.Wauchula, FL 33873. The names and
addresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is January 12, 2006.
Personal Representative:
Roberta Holt Beattie
2975 George Anderson Road
Wauchula, FL 33873
Trolano & Roberts, P.A.
Attorneys for Personal
Representative
317 South Tennessee Avenue
Lakeland, FL 33801-4617
(863) 686-7136
Florida Bar No. 0221864 1:12,19,26;22c


viewed at the U.S. Navy Memorial,
or .via the Internet at www.lone-
sailor. org. The goal of the
Memorial is'to record the service
history of all eligible uniformed
individuals and veterans.
Now through the end of July
2006, all members and veterans of
the Sea Services active duty and
reservists are able to enroll in the
U.S. Navy Memorial's Navy Log
without charge and without any
obligation. Family members and
friends can record service informa-
tion for veterans who are deceased
or those who are unable to record
their own information.
To enroll your information or to
enroll family members simply enter
the appropriate information at
www.lonesailor.org. If you have
any questions, please contact the
Navy Log Department of the U.S.
Navy Memorial, at 1-800-NAVY-
LOG (1-800-628-9564).










A Safe Place
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE
1 (800) 500-1119
End The Abuse!


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular session today
(Thursday) beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102, Courthouse Annex I,
412 W. Orange St, Wauchula. The following is a synopsis of agenda
topics that may be of public interest Times are approximate except for
advertised public hearings.
-Zoning issues, 8:35 a.m.
-Resolution on county employee travel reimbursements, Jane Long,
9 a.m.
z:-Resolution on housing programs, Janet Gilliard, 9:30 a.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who may wish
to plan to attend.

This is the real secret of life-to be completely engaged with what
you are doing in the here and now. And instead of calling it work,
realize it is play.
-Alan Watts


Words-Just-Aren't-Enough
Words alone cannot express our grati-
tude for your kindness shown. The flow-
ers you sent were beautiful, the meals
you prepared were delicious. Although
nothing can replace Danny, your
prayers, and support during this most
difficult of times are greatly appreciated
and have made our loss a little easier to
bear.
Your continued friendship, love, con-
cern, and support make the future a lit-
tle brighter.

Gratefully,

.Jke amilty of anny fnuccio


El 0. Koch Construction


3504 Office Park Road-P. O. Box 1965

Sebring, FL 33871-Phone:(863) 385-8649


Commercial & Residential Construction
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property,
build your dream home, or do your remodeling.

ENGINEERED STEEL BUILDINGS
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SEAMLESS GUTTERS AND DOWNSPOUTS

"For all of your Aluminum, Steel, and Conventional construction needs"


Email: kochcon@strato.net


S8:18tfc


State Certified License #CBC058444


II








The Herald-Advocate
tUSPS 578 780)

Thursday, January 19. 2006


326
15S


935 05-08-0317P
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611


Minors Get Great Start


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Dixie League Minors divi-
sion got under way with three
games on Saturday.
Six of the seven teams played,
with the seventh drawing a bye.
Games will continue on Monday,
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday
evenings and Saturday mornings at
11 a.m.
In early action on Saturday, Team
1, the Ullrich's Pitcher Pump Red
Sox were overwhelmed by Team .2,
the Florida Fuel Devil Rays in a 16-
0 loss.
For the visiting Devil Rays, a
triple by Luke Winter and double
by Taylor Griffin were the only
long-ball hits. Dalton Reas,
Kristopher Johnson, Winter,
Griffin, Tim Perkins and Michael
Heine all circled the bases twice.
Abel Esquivel, Blake Vermilye and
Darrell Johnston added solo scores.
Other D-Rays are Patrick
Craycroft, Brandon Hill and Selina
Prestridge.
For the home team Red Sox,
Marcus Battles and Dakota
Caldwell were stranded on the
basepaths when teammates made


the third out. Other Sox are Dustin
Goodwin, Robie Paris, Cody
Spencer, Zack Battles, Kenneth
Vargas, Thomas Gomez, Kyle
Stone, Keith Powell, Sahmaud
Blandin, Brandon Powell and
Brandon Vargas.
In the 12:15 Saturday game, the
C&B Cattle Yanks outscored the
Pete's Pharmacy Athletics (A's) 10-
6.
For the visiting Yanks, it was
Dylan Salas scoring all four times
he got on base. Ryan Ramirez came
home three times and Jacob Bolin,
Tyler Helms and Luke Palmer
crossed home plate, once each.
Other Yankees are Wilson Bembry,
Eric Klein, Byron Kilpatrick, Cain
Roman, Patrick Carlton and Lacey
Cumbee.
Armando Alamia came home
twice for the A's., Frank Farias had
twin hits and scored once. Jose
Gonzales, German Figueroa and
Jake Deanda added a run each.
Other A's are Omar Alamia, Austin
Altman, Aaron Briones, Marco
Briones, Josh Flowers and Tyler
Congleton.
In the day's finale, the Vols Cubs
vaulted past the Dr. Timothy Ellis-


Our Groomer, ,

Pat Roberts '

Has Returned -
Pat Roberts giving a Scnnauzer a rharcul
We \welcome back Pat Roberts, a talented groomer who has
been in Delaware for a couple of \ears and found out once
again just how cold it really\ is up there. Pat returned after Beth
Brown left Pet Care Center to care for an aging parent.
Pat is an excellent groomer and she is ker- much aware that
grooming is more than just a trip to the beauty shop for dogs.
She examines all the dogs closely and uses a special flea comb
to detect fleas because just parting the hair is certain\ not 'ery
effective.
Then she determines if the dog might hale flea allergies, ear
mites, fungus infections, dental problems, serious skin condi-
tions or e'en undetected small grow ths or a tumor as she wash-
es and dries the dogs.
There have been occasions w hen Pat found Sarcoptic Mange or
"scabies" and this- is especially dangerous because scabies can
be transmitted to humans. This disease and other skin condi-
tions make a pet extremely uncomfortable because of the
intense itching.
Pat will hate a full inventory of dips and sprays to use on my
recommendation for the variouss skin problems. Then she cuts
the dog's hair, trims their nails and sometimes paints them
bright red so when the owners pick them up the\ are alas
delighted with a pet that is free of fleas. clean, comfortable and
cute.
Ross .. Hendrv D\'M


Pet Care Center
915 North 6th Avenue
Wauchula
863-773-6783 ,,


sponsored White Sox 16-6.
For the visiting White Sox, Alex
Clarke put two scores on the board
and Matthew Lake, Matt Hamilton,
Mason Waters and Brooke Samuels
chipped in with a run each. Other
White Sox are Marco DeLeon,
Zack Crews, Tanor Durden, Zack
Caranco, Kyler Caskay and Devon
Pearson.
Tyler Hewett had the hot hand
for the Vols Cubs with three hits
and four tallies. Steven Crews came
home three times, Jordon Jones and
Mason Gough had twin scores and
Bradley Brewer, David Gibson and
Cleston Sanders each'came home
once. Glen Ellis, Adam Ramirez,
Korey Watson and Dylan Norwood
round out the squad.
Team 7, which drew a bye, is the
Wauchula State Bank Brayes. On
that squad are Austin Stoner,
Ariana Spears, Austin McClellan,
Caryssa Johnson, Christian
Valadez, Christopher Lee, Garrett
Albritton, Kendall Gough, Reed
Woods, Sadie King, Tyler Bragg
and Wyatt Maddox.









A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
I will proclaim the greatness of
the Lord God. How glorious He
is! He is the Rock. His work is
perfect. Everything He does is
just and fair. He is faithful, with-
out sin.
Deuteronomy 32:3-4 (TLB)

FRIDAY
But the man who looks into the
perfect mirror of God's law, the
law of liberty, and makes a habit
of doing it, is not the man who
sees (it) and forgets. But, he
puts that law into practice and
thus he finds true happiness.
James 1:25 (PME)
SATjRDAV .
Lord, who may live on Your boly
mountain? Only those Who are
innocent and who do what is
right. Such .people speak the
truth from their hearts and do
not tell lies about others. They
do no wrong to their neighbors
and do not gossip. They do not
respect, hateful people but
honor those who honor the
Lord.
Psalm 15:1b-4a (NCV)

SUNDAY
(Jesus said), "Whoever does the
will of God is my brother, and
sister, and mother."
Mark 3:35 (RSV)

MONDAY
(Solomon said), "I've also con-
cluded that whatever God does,
that's the way it is, going to be,
always. No additions, no sub-
traction. God's done it and that's
it.
Ecclesiastes 3:14 (ME)

TUESDAY
Now to Him who is able to do
immeasurably more than all we
can ask or conceive in our
minds, by the power which is at
work among us, to Him be glory
in the church and in Christ
Jesus from generation to gener-
ation evermore. Amen.
Ephesians 3:20 (NEB)

WEDNESDAY
(God told Joshua), "Do not let
this Book of the Law depart from
your mouth; meditate on it day
and night so that you may be
careful to do everything written
in it. Then you will be prosper-
ous and successful.
Joshua 1:8 (NIV)
All verses are excerpted from The
Holy Bible: (KJV) King James
Version; (ME) The Message;
(NCV) New Century Version; (NEB)
New English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (RSV)
Revised Standard Version; (PME)
Phillips Modern English; and (TLB)
The Living Bible.


M ![] I


c'


~~3)


, Hardee County
,. ,
* :' *. ,' "f .- ; ** .; *


Entry


Fair Association



,rF r J :'


, .Forpn.: '" *,"-; *


PRINT OR TYPE
CONTESTANT NAME:


PARENT/GUARDIAN NAME:


MAILING ADDRESS:


S PHONE NUMBER: DAY:


EVENING:


COMPETITION AGE: DATE OF BIRTH:

Eligibility Rules:
1. Child must reside in Hardee County and be enrolled in a Kindergarten
class in school. CAN ONLY COMPETE IN THIS CONTEST ONE TIME.
2. Entry fee of $25.00 made payable to Hardee County Fair.
3. Clothing for contest will consist of "dressy" dress only. No Pageant Style
Dresses. No formal or Floor length dresses. Dress is subject to approval
and must be. age appropriate.
4. ENTRY DEADLINE IS FRIDAY, FEB. 3, 2005.
5. The Fair Assoc. reserves the right to cancel this contest due to lack
of participation. u


6. Judging will consist of: 1. Coloring Contest
i 2. Stage Interaction
3. Stage Appearance and


Mail entry to:


Overall Personality


Lynn Crawford
RO. Box 2605
Wauchula, FL 33873


f you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call
Lynn Crawford at (863) 261-4415
(if no answer leave a message)
Kindergarten Princess Pageant will be held Sunday, February
f at 2 p.m. at the Hardee County Agri-Civic Center.


19

i


I 19.26,2:2c


The Herald-Advocate
PRINTERS PUBLISHERS
P.O. Box 33S Wauchula. FL 3387,
Tclephone (863) 773-3255
Quatin. pn) 11111g.scl vi((' (it (omp"fith'. pri,
ATION'
ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS IN ONr COPIENIENTLOC I


ML

lli


WE 21 M-iaRm


-a.
v' *










2C The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006





-Schedule Of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
by
S The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula, Florida

0 iine: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN

APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning...................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ..........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ...................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
%unday Worship 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd ..............
4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study..........6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship....................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:30 p.m.
Wed. Discipleship ....................6:30 p.m.
Thurs. Mens Prayer ..................6:00 a.m.
Thurs. Ladies Bible Study........5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Hwy 17 and Ratliff Rd. 375-22311
375-3100
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship...................... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.

S COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship................10:30 a.m
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ................7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs .........5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................6:30 p.m

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
. Sunday Schdol'' 9:45,a.m.-
, Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ...................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ........... .......11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ........:...7:00 p.m
HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ............7:00 p.m.

S, IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-3370.
Domingo Serv. De Predicacionll:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ............7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ......7:00 p.m.
Jueves Serv. De Predicacion ....7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4228 or
773-9019
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
'Evening Worship :......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service...................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer Ser. ..7:00 p.m.


MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School '' 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .... ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training ...:...:.........:5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ..........7:00 p.m.

OPENl DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St. '
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ..................7:30 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN


PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17 375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom...........9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ............5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico ....................6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Service ..............7:00 p.m.
Mid-Week Bible Study, Thurs. 7:30 p.m.

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00 a.m.
Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..........'........7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time .....A.....7:00 p.m
NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Woiship ...................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training ...................6:00 p.m.
SEvening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer......................:00 p.m

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
S131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ............7:00 p.m


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
New York Ave. and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday.Service 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .................7:00 p.m.
BETHEL MISSIONARY CHURCH
405 S. Florida Ave.
'Sunday Morning Service ........10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ,3.....11:00 a.m.
...Wed..Night Service.&-Worship 7:00 p.m
Saturday Prayer 7:00 p.m.
CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11:00.a.m.
Evening Worship ......................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Evening Worship ............7:00p.ni.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
S773-9678
SBible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service ....................11:00 a.m..
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship ........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class ................11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship;.........6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ...........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month............4:00p.m.
CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199
CHURCH OF GOD
OF THE FIRST BORN
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ..................9:00 a.m..
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Priesthood 11:00 a.m.
COMMUNITY LIGHTHOUSE
903 Summit St. 735-8681
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning..:.................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Night......................7:30 p.m.
ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service...................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service ......................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath. ....7:30 p.m.
Fri. Night (Holy Ghost Night)..7:30 p.m.


The following merchants

urge you to attend

your chosen house of worship

this Sabbath

--- ---- ------------- --------------------




E ac dE C LTC7 1ZO WE Z.

Wholesale Nursery

Dbnnis & Kathy Barber
'Hwy. 66 East (863) 7350470
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ......................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper.................6:15 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Fellowship ..6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St. 767-8909
Sunday School '10:00 a.m.
Morning Service...................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................5:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ......................7:00 p.m.
FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Praise & Worship................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
SWednesday Night Service ........7:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship.................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...................... 6:00 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
MISSION BAUTISTA
713 E. Bay St. 773-4722
Escuela Dominical....................9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion ............11:00 a.m.
Predicacion 11:30 a.m.
Estudio Biblie, Miercoles ........7:30 a.m.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service....................;.10:45 a.m.
Wed. Youth Meeting ......6:30- 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ..6:30- 7:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service.................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service.......................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207, N. Seventh Ave. 773-0657
Early Worship 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Traditional Worship.................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities................6:00 p.m.


FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH '
1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386.
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ......10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Youth Service ............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Family Ministries...7:00 p.m.

STHE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
Pentecostal
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
Morning Service......................0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service..................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts .....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads & Lighthouse Min. 7:00 p.mn.

IGLESIA DE DIOS
PENTECOSTAL, M.I.
903 E. Summit St.- (863) 452-6693
Pastor: Reinaldo Ortiz
Martes 7:30 9:00 p.m.
Viernes 7:30 9:00 p.m.
Domingo..............11:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
* Sunday Morning.....:.............. 10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Evening ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening .............:......7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES SPANISH
Sunday Evening 4:00 p.m.
Monday Evening ..........7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Evening........7:30 p.m.
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service......................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Corner of 7th Ave. & Palmetto St.
735-0555
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service..........11:00 a.m.
Church Training 5:15 p.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CIIURCII
10 Martin Luther King Ave. 767-0023
Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ........................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service........4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor .........4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study ..........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......:.................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
Discipleship Training............. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... .........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper....................5:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ....................6:45 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCII
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ..........................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................. 1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study............6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stepstrom Road 773-2858
Sunday Service...... .10:00 ain
Sunday Fellowship................ 11:00 a.m.
Weight Watchers
meet Thursday ......................5:00 p.m.

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CIURCII
149 Manley Road East Main 773-5814
Sunday School .........................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .... ............... 11:00 a.m.
,Wed. Evening Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCII
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program WZZS Sundays9:00 a.m.
Sunday school :......... .......... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ... ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................. .700 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ........:.............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ...... 7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ......9:00 a.m.
H o ly D ays ..............................................
ST. MICHAEL'S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
'Saturday Mass (English) .........5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ............7:30 p.m.
Sunday'(English) ............... ... 9:00 a.m.
(Spanish) ..................10:30 a.m.
(Creole) ............. .. 100 p.m.
SDaily Mass in Englisibji .......... 81.a.ni

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH.
'205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting................7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......n........ :00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. ...6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................... 7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
773-2946
Sunday Morning Worship ... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship... .: 7 30 p.m.
Friday Worship .............7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY
116 Orange St.
Sunday School .......... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .......... 7.00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train.7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ....... 7:00 p.m.

WAUCIIULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ......... 10:00a.m.
Morning Worship ........ 11:15 a m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training 7:30 p.m.
Thurs: Youth Bible Study ... .7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ..... .. 7:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA IIILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
'Sunday School ......... .. 10:00 a.m.
Church. .... . . 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service .......... ... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ......... 7:00 p.m.
-Wednesday Service. .. 7:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ........ ... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......... .7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.......... 7:30 p m.
Thursday Worship .. .. .. 7730 p.m.
Saturday Worship . 7 30 p.m.


YOU Can Appear In ...

kids korner
Hey, kidsl How would you like your work to be printed in the paper?
Draw us a picture, write us a poem, make up a story or tell us a joke.
If you're sending us a drawing, use pencils or markers, not crayons.
And leave the lined notebook paper for homework, not your artwork.
The prirln your name and age, your parents names and the town
netoU U irfvSe 0ri the baik. Get mom or dad to bring it to our office
or put it in the mail to: kids korner, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box
338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


WAUCHULA
WAUCIIULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ........ ... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church....... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ........ 7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ........ 7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA WORSHIP CENTER
102 N. 6th Ave. (Earnest Plaza)
773-2929
Sunday Service.......... 10:00 a.m..
Evening Service ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. .........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service..... 7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

CHARLIE CREEK BAPTIST
CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .......... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ......... 7:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-8586
Morning Worship .......... 10:00 a.m.
Children's Church .......... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... .6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.I. ........ 7:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ........ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .: ....... ,11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .......... 7:00 p.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ............. 9:45 am.
Morning Worship ......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............ 7:00 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ............ 1.0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ....... .. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday..... .. .... ... 7:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study........ .... 10:00 a.um.
Worship Service ........... 11:00 a.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 4.4-5456 ...";S
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.ni.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:00 p.m.

MARANATIIA BAPTIST CHURCH
S Corner of Steve Roberts Special
& Oxendine Rds. 735-2524 735-1851
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet.... 7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD
FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ........... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ., ..... :.. 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ...... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship .......... 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship .......... 7:30 p.m.


PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .. ...... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ........... 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............... 6:00 p.m.'


ZOLFO SPRINGS


REALITY RANCH COWBOY
CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of a
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-735-8600
Sunday School. ............ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Last Friday of Each Month Cowboy
Fellowship ................ 7-9 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School .... ... ...... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship. .............. 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ......... 7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-5889
Domingo, Misa en Espanol... 10:30 a.m.
Confesiones .............. 10:00 a.m.
Doctrina ..... ............ 11:30 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ......... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................. 11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club. ............... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche. ........ 7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ........ 6:00 p.m.
Servicio .................. 8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ...... 5:00 p.m.

ZOLFO BAPTIST CHURCH
311 E. 4th Ave. 735-1200
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Training Union............. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .......... 7:30 p.m.

















I. .


Her husband died, and she
inscribed on his tombstone, "The
light of mylife has gone out."
But two years later she met and
married a very fine gentleman.
And she asked her pastor, "What
shall I do about that inscription?"
"Just add," he answered, "I
struck another match."
Trials and tears will come to
you. They come to everyone. No
one is without suffering.
But no one need be without the
Savior in suffering. Ask Him to
come into your heart and home,
and you'll find He's a very present
help in trouble.
When He comes in, He'll turn
your tragedy into triumph and.
lead you on from victory to victory.


If this house had not been neglected, it would still
be functional today. Just a coat of paint and some
consistent care might have saved it from the damaging
destruction of time. Such a simple thing...
In Genesis 15:1, God said to Abraham, "I
am your shield, your very great reward." Our
Fathercan protect us from the wear aqdt
tear of life. If we open our hearts and let"
him in, the reward will be great.
As you attend your house of
-i worship this week, let God be your
shield and your reward. He will
Protect your soul and keep your
spirit shining and new. It's such
S a simple thing.





Scnpfures SJeled by The Ammean Bble Society
' ry, r .6m. k"is r i'r- tams Noewspaper Seivices, PO0 Box 8187. Chadotteswile, VA 22906. www awnewscom


>







I






January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 3C


InWayBack : When


Machine Pitch In Tight.Games


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Advocate,
the Hardee County Herald and
The Herald-Advotate of...
75 YEARS AGO
Shipments Of Berries Total
1,500,000 Pints: Strawberry ship-
ments from Hardee County set a
new season's record this week
:when a total of more than 360,000
pints left this county up to and
,,including Wednesday's shipments.
A check of shipping records
made by The Advocate yesterday
reveals that 20 solid carloads left
'this county besides more than 400
"refrigerators.
The prices are holding up well,
ranging from 10 to 14 cents a pint.

Prices Of Fruit Rise And
,Demand Steady: The first carload
rof fruit to leave Wauchula in the
fnew containers recently adopted by
the Florida Citrus Exchange rolled
out of the exchange house here
Wednesday night.
SUnder the new method, the fruit
is being packed in bags holding 20
to 30 oranges, depending on the
size of the fruit. Each bag of fruit
:weighs 10 pounds.
The bags, called "visinet," enable.
the buyer to see the fruit through the
meshes and a bag is just the right
size package for the average family.

Wauchula Taxpayer Organi-
zation Formed: A Wauchula
Taxpayer League was formed at a
meeting of representative citizen
and property owners in the city
auditorium Monday night.
The purpose of the organization,
it was explained at the meeting, is
"to co-operate with the City
Council and bond holders of the
city of Wauchula."

Anita Roth Woodring To Appear


Here 27th: Mrs Anita Roth
Woodring, well known contralto of
Bartlesville, Okla., will appear in
person at the city hall auditorium
next Friday night, Feb. 27, under
the auspices of the Wauchula
Kiwanis Club. She will be singing
for the benefit of the Boy Scouts.

50 YEARS AGO
From the "Not Headlined" col-
umn by Buck Kelly:
Litter on the streets and highways
is becoming a national problem.
Cans, bottles and paper wrappings
consumed in autos and by pedestri-
ans make for a mess. America is
becoming careless and sloppy.
.The streets of Wauchula can be
cleaned early in the morning but by
nightfall they are littered again.
The motoring public fire beer
cans and all sorts of trash out the
windows as they speed along the
highways. Near Wauchula some
even dump bags of garbage on the
right of ways.
A "For Sale" ad in the Classified
section reads as follows: For Sale
- 1947 Chevrolet, in excellent
condition, $250. Phone 3-4311.

Wildcats Beat Favored Greenie
Team 47 To 44: Hardee High's
surprising basketeers turned in a
victory Tuesday night over a heavy
Fort Myers Green Wave quintet.
' Coach Dunning Terrell laid the
win a "team victory" plus the best
single quarter of the year. He par-
ticularly praised the defensive work
of George Wadsworth, Dan Hunter
and Billy Grimsley. Leading the
Hardee scorers were Johnny Terrell
and Reynolds Alien with 14 and 13
points respectively.


25 YEARS AGO
Incinerator Vs.


W BEDNESA ,1

karaoke with Uiz Edna


FRiDAi & S ATUJRD

"Off the Cuff" Band




Western Pleasure Karaok


No Membership Requiredl "
::E e Now Open to the Public

-E'&


Bowling Green

Country Club
245 Hwy 17, Bowling Green
375-9988
. ... 4~.....


Contro-versy: Tempers aared last
Thursday as Commissioner John
Roy Gough tried to put the brakes
on plans to re-advertise for the
countywide incinerator project. "
Gough told the other board mem-
bers that Jake Vern, head of the
Department of Environmental
Regulation, had talked with him
about a landfill and farther study of
a landfill before committing the
county to the incinerator project.
Gough told the other board mem-
bers he is still very much concerned
about the incinerator. He said he
had still not gotten answers to some
of his questions.

Businessmen Thought Donations
Went To Volunteer Fire Dept.:
Some local businessmen were dis-
gusted while others were downright
angry this week when they found
out money they thought they donat-
ed to the Wauchula Volunteer Fire
Department actually went to
finance the "Memories of Elvis"
show Friday.
The show was sponsored by the
Wauchula Fire Department and was
performed at the Agri-Civic Center
by the Tupelo Oprey.
Altogether, 70 Wauchula and
Bowling Green businessmen and
five from out of county wrote
checks for between $15 and $300 to
the Wauchula Fire Department.
Of the 12 businessmen contacted
by The Herald-Advocate, all of
them thouglit their money was
going directly to volunteers for
local projects.
Instead, 90 percent of their
money, about $3,500, went to the
Tupelo Oprey of Tulelo, Miss.

10 YEARS AGO


36-Year-Old BG Man Shoot To
Death: A 36-year-old Bowling
LGreen man was shot and killed late
Landfill Tuesday night during an argument,
city police report.
S Jose Estevan Valenzuela, a farm
worker who resided at 260 S.
Chester Ave., died'outside his home
from at least two bullet wounds,
Bowling Green Police Chief Bobby
Brown said.

Company Seeks Tax Abatement
1 From County: Should the County
SCommission give an economic tax
break to a local pepper plant so it
can expand?
Officials form the Mancini
Packing Co. think so, and asked the
commission to help them out finan-
cially with a'O0-year delay in pay-
ing taxes on planned improvements
I to the canning plant.
SR 64 Reopens After Crash: A
tanker truck crashed and overturned
in Hardee County this past week-
end, spilling part of its gasoline
load and causing the highway to be
closed for 11/2 days.
The accident forced ,the most
complicated extrication effort and
massive cleanup detail in years.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate
encourages, submissions
from Hardee County
schools. Photos and write-
ups should be of recent
events, and must include
first and last names for both
students and teachers.
Identify photos front to
back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
On opening day Saturday all
eight teams in the 2005 Machine
Pitch league got into the action.
Games were close as there were
two ties and two clo encounters.
The new Hardee County Youth
Sports Dixie League continues
games on Mondays, Tuesdays,
Thursday and Fridays, with one or
two games each evening, depend-
ing on when the Tee-Ball tots or
Minors are playing. There are also
Saturday gimes.
Saturday began with a 9:30 clash
between Team 1, the Elks Giants
4nd Team 2, the Hardee Petroleum
Rangers. When the regulation four
innings were over, the teams were
tied 2-2.
For the visiting Rangers, Aaron
Harrison scored in both the second
and fourth innings. His teammates
are Kole Robertson, Rosienell
Rivers, Drew Mimbs, Allison Farr,
Joel Garland, Ally Dotson, Eric
Rentz, Ruben Olmos, Stevie
Deanda, Darby Farr and Cade
Roberts.
For the home team Giants, Kayla
Garay and Desiree Ford came
home in the fourth inning on hits by
Adam Salas and Jordan Ward to tie
the game before it was called on
time limit. Their teammates are
Ashley Trone, Illeana Flores,
Austin Garcia, Frankie Coronado,
Cerrando Martinez, Jacob Lazo, Ty
Trammell, Noah Valletutti and
Gannon Watson.
At 11:15, Team 3, the Peace
River Electric Cooperative Inc.
(PRECo) Pirates tangled with Team
4, the Lake Branch Dairy White
Sox, with the game ending in a 3-3
tie.
For the visiting White Sox,
William McClelland scored in the
second inning, and Ryan Moore
and Joseph Crawford came around
to cross home plate in the top of the
fourth. Other Sox are Jessica
Bembry, Marquis Delgado, Abel
Villarreal, Taylor Graham, Andrew
Alvarado, Tyler Alvarado, Litzy
Vargas, Alyssa Ennis and Alyssa
Skinner.
For the home team Pirates,
Christopher Hull and Jimmy Lane
crossed home plate in the bottom of
the second and Noah Purser added
a run in the third. On their squad
also are Quinton Sanchez, Daryl
Mashburn, Aaron Brown, Tiffany
Owens, Janessa Tamayo, Danny
Owens, Justin Herrin, Taylor
Roberts, Benjamin Tamayo and
Joselyn Thompson.
Ii the 12:45 game, the Culligan
Water Conditioning Braves outlast-
ed the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office'Marlins.
Conner Crawford and Kyle
Hewett rounded third to cross home
for the Marlins in the top of the first
inning. Tirease Morris.came home


1:19c


in the second inning, but other run-
ners were left stranded. Other play-
ers are Gabrielle Allen, Thomas
Atchley, Austin Beck, Colton
Howell, Brandon Young, Dalton
Krell, Austin Wallace, Josie
Hancock and Cheyenne Pohl.
The Braves opened with a quartet
of scores in the home half of the
first inning by Dakota Altman,
Hayden Lindsey, Seth McGee and
Boone Paris. Tucker Albritton
chipped in with a run in the third
inning. Other Braves are Cody
Cumbee, Hunter Scranton, Abby
Clark, Parker Calton, J. T. Canary,
Russell Weems, Rayna Parks,
Landon Albritton and James
Canary.
In the final game at 2:15, the
Crown Ford Devil Rays downed
the Hardee Fire-Rescue Yankees 7-
5.
The visiting Devil Rays scored.in
the first, second and fourth innings,
with Hunter Bryant coming home
three times, Marc Salazar twice and
Brooke Dixon and Dalton Bryant


TlHE STOO( lI
(HILDRENr


Nancy Bandy
RonBeldin
Andrea Campb
Irene Castanon
Teresa Crawfor
Gloria Davis
Pauline Evans
Scarlet Gonzali
Karen Hartman
Grant Hignight
Sharri Knight
Joe Kohan


once apiece. Their teammates are
Jesse Santoya, Sherry Lee, Reyna
Kirkland, Chase Benton, Catalina
Longoria, Vaughn Kirkland
Christopher Rogers and Janessa
Tamayo.
Keith Choate and Fimbres Cesar
crossed home plate in the first
inning for the Yankees. Wyatt
Zeigler and Keith Choate added
two more scores in the third stanza.
Jett See added another in the fourth.
Other Yanks are Carlos Camacho,
Kyle Choate, Isaac Flores, Larrett
Smith, Danielle Smith, Justin
Newman, Levi Lovett and Laina
Durrance.

Every winter, when the great
sun has turned his face away,
the earth goes down into a vale
of grief, and fasts, and weeps,
and shrouds herself in sables,
leaving her wedding-garlands
to decay-then leaps in spring
to his returning kisses.
-Charles Kingsley


Take Stock In Children
Would like to thank some of the
busiest people in Hardee County
for taking the time to mentor
our scholars:



Joann McCray
SophiaPeavy
ell Araceli Plata
Dr. Sara Polk
rd Candace Preston
RitaRodriguez
Kathleen Roehm
ez Erica Scheipsmeier
Mary Villarreal
SLuisa Villegas
Teresa White


You can take part by donating one hour a week as a
, mentor For more information, please call the South
S Florida Community College Foundation at 453-3133.




SOUTi FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE


1:19dh


is under the new ownership of Miquel and Mirtha Ponce.
Beu,. Jon and Joe will be remaining on staff.


Winter Service Special
c $99.95 Riding Mowers
S (includes Pick-Up and delivery within 20 mile radius)
$49.95 Walk Behinds


Se Habla Espanol

Thank You for Your Continued Business and Support
230 West Main Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
863-773-6215


National ild TrkeyFederation!,
Aucionan inne


The Brown Family sings Southern Gospel music accompanied by violins.
They tour the country with their awesome music in church concerts and on cruise ships.
You will not want to miss this exciting, motivating, challenging and inspiring concert at the


Phone 863-767-8909 or 239-543-5122 or 863-735-1239


Friday, January 27
Doors open at 6 p.m. Dinner at 7 p.m.
Bartow Civic Center
Hosted by: the South Polk Long Beards Chapter
Dinner Prepared by Florida BBQ & Catering Services
Limited Seating Available!
Purchase Tickets Novw!
$50/Single 915/Couple

Live Auction and Raffle
Some items include:
24 Guns *
SNWTF Prints and Paintings *
SHunting/Outdoors Equipment *
Lots and Lots More! *


For Tikteevaie inti
H s S ( ) 3nn 3)

1 Ji Keler (63) 40-484


44\1






4Lk i iii: dc.d Advocate, January i9, 2006


Annual 'Paws In The Park'




Is A Howling Success!


COURTESYPHOTOS Jake McKibben with Sugar, an English bulldog. Sugar's per-
The annual Paws in the Park competition was held recently in formance won second place in tricks.
Heritage Park in downtown Wauchula, one of the many activi-
ties sponsored by Main Street Wauchula Inc. Prizes were given I
in several categories. Here, Jordan and Carla Sperry are pic-
tured with Peanut, a fox terrier awarded Best of Show.


Molly, a shihtzu, took second in the prettiest category. Holding
her is Josh McKibben.
'- *


t',4A9,a".* ;-$ :tA j: ": -
Fifi, a shihtzu, won first place in the Prettiest category. Owner
is Timea Kepecz..


Adrian Melendez says:

Ride with the King!

) FFord Super Duty Trucks!

SOTr tlr f Ft. Meade
SSTEDE IVI a375-2606
.. c 800-226-3325













4 .. .


91fsic, Studio'
-^ i408 W ast llain Stzeea, t'au cAul
SLessons. Instruments, Accessories,
Kindermusic, & Piano Tuning
l Piano, Violin, Guitar,
\ iall Band Instruments
l (863) POP TUNE
9:29tfc


.9 4







Winning first place as Most Handsome was Petey, a dachshund.
Sarah Parks holds him.
- a m mua a


Dressed the best was Macy, a cocker spaniel. Assisting in
earning the first-place Best Costume prize was Claire Roberts.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Donut, Juice,
Yogurt, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Fryz or Sausage
on a Bun (Salad Try, Potato Rounds,
Juice, Applesauce, Roll) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
Sandwich, Applesauce, Milk
Lunch: Deli Turkey Sandwich or
Cheeseburger on a Bun (Salad Tray,
Whole Kernel Corn, Birthday Cake,
Ice Cream, Juice Bar) and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffle, Syrup,
Baked Ham, Pineapple Chunks, Milk
Lunch: Corndog or Hamburger
Gravy (Salad Tray, Mashed
Potatoes, Green Peas, Juice, Roll)
and 'Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese Grits,
Buttered Toast, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Baked, Turkey or Stacked
Ham Sandwich (Salad Tray, Savory
Rice, Green Beans, Cranberry
Sauce, Apple Crisp, Juice, Roll) and
Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Danish,
Peaches, Milk
Lunch: Tacos-or Toasted Ham &
Cheese Sandwich (Salad Tray, Pinto
Beans, Juice, Jell-O) and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Donut, Yogurt,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Chicken Fryz or Sausage
Sandwich or Cheese Pizza (Tossed
Salad, Whole Kernel Corn, Cole
Slaw, Applesauce, JJice, Roll) and
Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Buttered Toast,
Cinnamon, Oatmeal, Applesauce,
Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza or Deli
Turkey Sandwich or Cheeseburger
on a Bun (Lettuce & Tomato, Juice


Especializando en el
tratamiento de
*Alergias *ADD
-Asthma


Apurba Manik
M.D., F.A.A.R



Horas:
Lunes Viernes
8:30 5:00


1:19c


Bar, French Fries, Yellow Cake, Ice
Cream) and Milk I'
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffle, Syrup,
Baked Ham, Pineapple Chunks, Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy or
Corndog or Mozzarella Stick
(Tossed Salad, Garden Pea',
Mashed Potatoes, Peaches, Juicej
Waldorf Salad, Roll) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese Grits,
Buttered Toast,.Juice, Milk
Lunch: Baked Turkey w/Gravy or
Stacked Ham Sandwich or
Pepperoni Pizza (Tossed Salad, Rolli
Green Beans, Savory Rice, Juice,
Apple Crisp, Carrot-Raisin Salad,
Cranberry Sauce) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Danish
Peaches, Milk
Lunch: Toasted Ham & Cheese or
Cheese Pizza or Tacos (Lettuce &
Tomato, Pinto Beans & Ham, Jell-O,
Juice, Pears) and Milk
SENIOR HIGH

MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Donut, Yogurt,
Juice, Milk
Lunch: Red Beans and Sausage
(Tossed Salad, Rice, Turnip Green',
Black-Eyed Peas, Beets,
Applesauce, Juice) and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage Patyy
Sandwich, Juice, Milk j
Lunch: Deil Turkey Sandwich
(Tossed Salad, Potato Rounds,
Corn, Cucumber & Tomato Salad,
Yellow Cake, Ice Cream, Juice Bar)
and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, French Toast,
Syrup, Sausage, Juice, Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy (Tossed
Salad, Mashed Potatoes, Green
Beans, Squash, Fruit Snacks, Roll,
Juice) and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese Gritis
Buttered Toast, Juice, Milk l
Lunch: Baked Turkey (TosseA
Salad, Chicken Gravy, Mashepl
Potatoes, Green Beans, Swe.t
Potato Souffle, Apple Crisp, Juic~i
Roll) and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, DanishI
Peaches, Milk lo
Lunch: Toasted Ham & Cheese
(Tossed Salad, Potato Rounds,
Vegetable Soup, Carrot Salad, Jell-
O w/Fruit, Juice) and Milk


Aceptamos asignaciones
*de Medicaid
*BCBS seguros, mayores


Beverley Walker
P.A.-C


1125 South 6th Ave.
Wauchula


The Hardee High Class of 1965'

Reunion Commitee wishes to thank

the following merchants for their

generous donations


CF Industries The Bread Board


Wood's Wood


Joshua Smith with Gizzie, second place in Most Handsome.


Cooper's Flowers


Snails travel on "roadways" that they make themselves. A snail.
produces a sticky liquid on the underside of its flat foot. The rim of its
foot skids along on the liquid with a rippling motion. Wave after wave
of this motion pushes the snail along.









HEARTLAND PEDIATRICS
"Aceptamos Pacientes Nuevos"


I Infantes, Ninos, Adolescentes



767-1414
24 Horas


The Panda Restaurant

Wauchula Wal-Mart
Carl Saunders
(In memory of Mattie Mae Saunders)


You Helped Make Our

40th Year Reunion

A Great Success!
1:19c
ajr.J __ia _.ri i.Fiar._i rB_.liir.a.iarsJiaraaiar. J~tr..aiiar.aJ~r.aiB^






January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 5C
1-- -- -


COURTESY PHOTO
Home decorator winners (from left) are Betty and Cal Gadsby,
Sandy and Rudy Lapp, Li and Dan Vicari, Corene and John
Ritsema, Dolly and Matt Curry, Rosalie and Earl Folnsbee, and
Eleanor and Gerold Dice; missing are Jerry and Dick Craig.

Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


Our prayers and thoughts go out
to Milt Miller, Ted Saunders,
Winnie Symons, Leona Weyant,
Annie Wilkison and Durwood Zank
who are either in the hospital or


running, rolling and playing with
each other. It was a beautiful sight.
It is well worth going next year if
Sandy has a trip scheduled.


recuperating after stays in the hos- SCORES
pital. Our prayers also go out to Bridge Jan. 2: First Bernice
Ellie and Larry Schunck on the loss Danielson, 2620; second Leo
of their daughter. Messier, 2560; third Gary Breyer,
2440; fourth Marilyn Funkhouser,
BINGO 2210; and the low Linda Etzel, 480.
The winner of the paper special Bridge Jan. 4: First Darlene
on Jan. 9 was Judy Shepard who Jackson, 3110; second Bernice
just arrived from Illinois. .Danielson, 3080; third Gary Breyer,
2880; fourth Mert Wolf, 2680; and
DANCES the low Sharon Waterloo, 1200.
: There was a good turnout for the Euchre Jan. 3: Ladies first Leoma
New Year's Eve dance. Shirley Kuntze, 60; second Joanne
Johnson added a little extra excite- Rambacher, 58. Men first Charlie
ment. The next dance is Jan. 28 Molett, 58; second Joe Bennitt, 55.
with the Memory Makers. Lone hands Vern Iceman (3) and
Charlie Molett (3).
KOFFEE KLATCH Cribbage Jan. 4: First Ted
The hosts on Jan. 11 were Jack DeFouw, 718; second Jack Elofson,
Sand Bert Elofson and Dewey and 716; third Dick Robinson, 706.
SNancy Morrison. The U.S. Pledge Skunks Claire Shaw, Esther Boddy,
was led by Gary Chamberlain, the Linda Fletcher and Mert Wolf.
Canadian Pledge was led by Sylvia Pinochle Jan. 5: First George
Baker and Lee Roy Behymer led Strausbaugh, 678; second Fran
the prayer. The 50/50 winners were -Robinson, 605; third Harold
Sylvia and Dale Baker, Verna and Johnson, 601. and Jack Elofson,
Ken Dawson, Lois and Cam 601. Trickless hands Joe Bennitt
Dunbar, Lorraine and Shirley Smith and Charlie Molett. Double
and Jean and Dick Carlson. pinochle Lorraine Howerter.
Shuffling Jan. 3: Three-game
DINNER THEATRE winners, Charlene Baker, Ray
Sandy and Rudy Lapp took a full Baker, Dick Barker, Bob Beshel,
bus load of CLV residents to a din- Elanor Dice,' Mel Hegge, Gary
ner theatre in Kissimmee on Jan. 7.' Householder, Al Johnson, Bob
It was the last weekend for its Jones, Al Murphy, Fran Robinson,
Christmas ,show. During the finale, Don Stadler and Doug Taylor.
::eight performers on horses. went to Jan. 5- Crystal Lake hosted A ion
the sides of the arena anditamed Palhs "CLV ladies lost 15 games to
' Theh iall the hours esh'rOl ea'dlingj'' three 'ganies. CLV men won over
r'?'.the ghod were released 'io~the1 cen- A ion Palms men 12 games to six
: ter where they entertained eter)one games.


Bowling Jan. 4: The CLV bowl-
ing league met for the first time.
The league consists of eight teams
with four members on each team.
There are also five substitute
bowlers. Several bowlers rolled
games well above their individual
averages. Durwood Zank rolled a
198 game, 65 pins above his aver-
age. Mary Rose Ulbrich rolled a
189 games, 69 pins above her aver-
age and Alice Hunt rolled an all-
spare game consisting of 10 spares.
Standings after week one, Team 8 is
in first place, Fight'n 4 is in second
place and Ball Busters is in third
place.
Bowling Jan. 11: The group had
its photo taken for the park directo-
ry. Standings after the second week,
first Shirley's Slayers, 12 points;
second Ball Busters, 12 points; and
third Beth's Foursome, seven
points. Several bowlers rolled
games well above their individual
averages, George Strausbaugh, 57
over average, rolled 161; Linda
Thompson, 46 over average, rolled
146; Buck Walters, 55 over aver-
age, polled 186; Frankie Walters, 43
over average, rolled 192; Albin
Johnson, 45 over average, rolled
201; and Judy McBride, 41 over
average, rolled 134.

CHURCH
The church service on Jan. 8
opened with Rev. Robert Winne
leading everyone in singing
"Amazing Grace." Nancy Morrison
played the guitar, sang a solo
"Consider The Lilies" and also
directed the choir for it anthem
"Wonderful Peace: accompanied by
pianist Carole Jones. Rev. Lloyd
Hall gave the offertory prayer. The
familiar hymn "Great Is Thy
Faithfulness" was played by organ-
ist Jim Bolhouse during the receiv-
ing of the offering. The ushers were
Bob Wilday and Lowell Gordon.
Rev. Winne chose Scripture from
St. Matthews 15:1-18 for his mes-
sage titled "Are You Offensive?"
Hymns used during the service
were "My Savior's Love",
"Leaning On The Everlasting
Arms", and "Higher Ground."
There were 114 in attendance-and
the service closed with everyone
singing "God Be With You Till We
Meet Again."

Equations are just the boring
part of mathematics. I at-
tempt to see things in terms
of geometry.
-Stephen Hawking

In a way winter is the real
Ssing--the time when the inner
things happen, the resurgence
ofnature. :
-Edna O'Brien


COFFEE HOUR
Pancake and sausage breakfast
Jan. 9 had 65 members present. The
announcements made today were
that the quilt they are doing for the
raffle is now ready for our band
sewers. Please come on Thursday
afternoon at 1. On Friday, Jan. 20,
Just Country will be here to enter-
tain after our monthly potluck din-
ner.
Merchant coupon winners were
Marvin Rule, Loretta Curtis, Ruth
lozzino, Ardith McDonald, Kitty
SKelsey and Mert Atchinson. Guests
introduced this morning were Glen
and Mary Ruhl from Lincolnton,
N.C., and Tom and Betty, Wolford
from Galien, Ohio. The 50/50 win-
ners were Ardith McDonald and
Juliis Goerbig.
Wednesday, Jan. 11, coffee hour
had 41 present. Our hosts were
Chuck and Doris O'Dell and Joanne
Easton. Merchant coupon winners
were Gladys Ruhl, Betty Brief,
Gerry Brackenrich, Doris O'Dell,
Kitty Kelsey, Betty Worford and
Muriel Gurney.
Our vice president, Ted Morris,
and his wife, Joan, have finally
arrived from Ohio and we are all
very happy to have them back. We
have been running on a very short
staff of officers. Moe and Millie
Welbaum have also gotten back
after a trip back home to Ohio for
Christmas. We now have a secre-
tary. Millie has been filling in for
Geri Jantz, who lost her husband
during the summer and has yet to
return.
Tour guide Phyllis Goerbig
announced a side tour to Highlands
Hammock State Park. There will be
room for 32, so sign up early. The
dog race trip has been canceled. .
Phyllis then introduced Salvation
Army Kettle Chairwoman Mary
Alderman, who thanked our dedi-
cated. volunteers and bell ringers.
Mary reported the kettle collection
this year was over $10,000. That
was almost $200 over last year. She
said that the Orange Blossom
ringers had collected almost $2,000
on the days they rang the bell. She
said the complete fund stays in
Hardee County and is dispersed by
Hardee Help Center.
Phyllis presented her with
Orange Blossom Association check
plus funds, which were collected at
the Ladies Tea for a total of almost
$300. Our bell-ringer volunteers
were Moe and Millie Welbaum,
Howie and Jean Snider, Dick and
Virginia Kern, Betty Brandel, Polly
Albertson, Corrine Albertson, Jean
Miller, Ardie McDonald, Ken


Besaw, Beth Thomas, Don and'
Carol Rick, Doris Geeting, Jane
Conway, Charlie Hill and Marie
Dean.

CRIBBAGE
Wednesday night, Jan. 11, had
Junior Atchison in first with 845,
George Jarvis in second with 824
and Fred Dale in third with 813.

EUCHRE
Saturday night, Jan. 9, had 30


CHURCH NEWS
AND PRAYERS
The sermon was by Rev.
Weyman Darley with 43 people in
attendance. Our choir sang "In The
Shadow Of The Cross," ad special
music was performed by Dan
Yurovich, "Softly & Tenderly."
We have several persons on our
prayer list, Barbara Gersema, Marie
and Mike Condra, Charlotte
Laurey, Wanda May, Valorie Dolan,
Dean Morrow, the Danny Nuccio
family, Jim Wohlford, Lavern Hill,
Roger Craig, Clarence Barbor, Joe
Nelles, Earl Van Raalte and Enos.
Yoder. Also, Shirley and Cloyce
Swisher's granddaughter, and great-
granddaughter.
Sunday afternoon, we were enter-
tained by Joel Finnesgard, from
South Dakota, at "Sound Of The
Trumpet." His program consisted of
a musical video, which he accom-
panied with the trumpet. He per-
formed both gospel and patriotic
music, and the audience sang along
with the words posted on the video
screen. It was truly an enjoyable
program.

KOFFEE KLATCH
New people in the Hall were
Steve and Jackie Brady, Elaine and
Dick Hoogkamp, Jim and Audrey
Lasher, Cecil and Marilyn
Bannister, Vaughn and Thanna
Adams, Larry Gallis and Jo, and
Morton and Mable Mantel. We had
only one birthday this week,
Gordon Lauver, and no anniver-
saries.
Our Red Hat Ladies are on a
cruise; have fun ladies ...
We have our regular Jam
Sessions: on Wednesday and
Saturday nights. Grace Moore, and
her helpers provide coffee and
cookies for all in attendance.


Orange Blossom RV News
By Sandi Pucevich


Our 50/50 winner was Tom
Franks, and the plant went to Joyce
Pearsal. Merchant certificates were
won by 24 people.

BID EUCHRE
The firsi night this week yielded'
the following winners: men's high,,
Cloyce Swisher with 277; ladies'
high, Shirley Swisher with 245;
men's low, Francis Smith with 169;'
and ladies' low, Gloria Lavigne
with 170. Men's moon shots title
went to Roger Bell with one, and
ladies moon shots went to Shirley
Swisher with one.
The second night Bob Sears and
Earl Bodary tied for men's high at
240; ladies high was Marge Luff
with 244. Men's low went to Roger
Bell with 224; and Gloria Lavigne
had ladies' low. Ladies' moon shots
went to Marge Luff and Gloria
Lavigne, who tied with one each,

REGULAR EUCHRE
In regular euchre this week, high
man went to Roger Bell with 81.
High lady was Wanda Bechler with
69. Runner-up man was Walt
Broadworth at 63, and runner-up
lady was Jean Alexander with 66.
Low man was Francis Smith with
53, and low lady was Joyce Bates at
48. Most loners went to Marge Luff
with four.

SHUFFLEBOARD
On Jan. 5, Wagon Wheel shuf-
flers played Fort Meade, and the
women won nine and lost six
games. The men didn't do much
better, winning 10 games and losing
five. Wagon Wheel shufflers served
a lunch for Fort Meade players, and
our own group. First place went to
Mary Thoimson and Cecil
Banister, and second place went to
Janet Brown and Wally Prince.


YEA R"S






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1 Certificate yields are subject to change without notice, and this is a limited time offer. Offer valid as of January 10, 2006. Offer is only valid for new certificates and new money and is not available on certificate renewals. The maximum certificate amount allowed per household is 1100,000.00.
The Annual Percentage Yield advertised is based on the assumption that funds will remain in the certificate until maturity. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawals. A $5.00 minimum savings account is required for membership with MIDFLORIDA Federal Credit Union.
This offer is not open to institutional investments. Fees may reduce earnings. 2 If you live, work, worship or attend school in Polk, Highlands, Hardee, DeSoto or Okeechobee counties or the Poinciana area of Osceola County, you can join.




1~4u*W~uu~ur~l1: 19C~


present. First place was a tie
between. Loretta Curtis and
Margaret' Volz with 56. Second
Place was Millie Shick with 54 and.
a tie for third place with Carl Craib.
and Charlie Shick with 53. Julius'
Goerbig and Doris Geeting tied for
most loners with three each and
Delphine Collison had the low for,
the night with 37.
Jan. 11 had 35 present with Jim
Hardiman in first with 60, John'
Latour in second with a 59 and a tie
for third between Charlie Shick and
Ron Kintz with 57. There was a tie
for most loners between Charlie
Shick and Margaret Volz with three
each and Betty Brief had the low for
the evening with 35.


Wagon Wheel RV News
By Geri Geraci


NEW


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oco,


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~-------~-~-1L-







6C The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006


COUNTY COURT

The following marriage licens-
es were issued recently in the
office of the county court:
Andrew Dale Hrabal, 23,
Wauchula, and Virginia Louise
Faulkner, 23, Wauchula.
Miguel Angel Lozano-Olivares,
28, Wauchula, and Aurelia Torres,
22, Wauchula.
Carlos Benitez-Jiminez, 21,
Bowling Green, and Jacqueline
Jaimes, 18, Fort Meade.
Michael Liberty Johnson, 24,
Wauchula, and Renee H. Prine, 20,
Wauchula.
Matthew Lyle Rickett, 18,
Wauchula, and Ashley Lorraine
Newman, 16, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recently
by the county judge:
Discover Bank vs. Tracy K.
Hutson, voluntary dismissal.
CACV of Colorado LLC vs.
Thomas J. Lewis and Janet M.
Lewis, voluntary dismissal.

The following misdemeanor
cases were disposed of recently in
county court:
Ronald Boyd, disorderly intoxi-
cation, resisting an officer without
violence force and violation of pro-
bation (original charges disorderly
intoxication and resisting arrest
Violence, probation revoked, 90
days in jail, $315 fine and court
costs and $100 public defender fees
added to outstanding fines and fees
'and placed on lien.
Marvin Glen Cook, violation of a
domestic violence injunction for
protection, resisting arrest without
force, possession of marijuana and
violation of probation (original
charge violation of a domestic vio-
lence injunction for protection),
probation revoked, 3.64 days in jail
with 184 days suspended, $315
fine and court costs and $100 pub-
lic defender fees added to outstand-
ing fines and fees and placed on
lien; resisting arrest without force
and possession of marijuana, not
prosecuted.'
Blakeslee Lee Dodge, petit theft
and violation of probation (original
charge retail theft), probation
revoked, 60 days in jail, $315 fine
and court costs and $40 public
defender fees added to outstanding
fines and fees and placed on lien.
Margaret Ramos-Lugo, resisting
arrest without force and disorderly
intoxication, 12 months probation,
alcohol abuse evaluation and treat-
ment, $315 fine and court costs,
$100 public defender fees, $60
investigative costs.
Timothy Michael Smith, posses-


41


sion of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia, adjudication
withheld, probation 12 months,
drug abuse evaluation and treat-
ment, random drug screens, $315
fine and court costs, $50 investiga-
tive costs, 50 hours community ser-
vice.
Dustin Aaron Grimsley, domes-
tic battery, not prosecuted.
Masharie Laquentes Hebert, tres-
pass, not prosecuted.
Glenn Theadore Curry Jr., viola-
tion of probation (original charge
possession of drug paraphernalia),
probation revoked, 30 days in jail
with credit for time served (CTS),
outstanding fines and fees placed
on lien.
Linda Joyce Johnston, violation
of probation (original charges pos-
session of marijuana and two
counts possession of drug para-
phernalia), probation revoked, 27
days CTS, new probation period
with same conditions.
Robert Elwood Selph, violation
of probation (original charge pos-
session of drug paraphernalia), pro-
bation revoked, 20 days CTS, newf
probation period with same condi-
tions.

There was only a brief criminal
traffic court last week. as it was
trial week. There were no items
for this section.

CIRCUIT COURT

The following civil actions
were filed recently in the office of
the clerk of court:
James Lamar Cumbee and Jackie
Lynn Cumbee, divorce.
David Eugene Drake v s. Maria
Delcarmen Drake, petition for
injunction for protection.
Vandolah Power Co. LLC vs.
Kathy Crawford as Property
Appraiser of Hardee County,
Zerelda Smith as Tax Collector of
Hardee County and James Zingale,
executive director of the State of
Florida Department of Revenue,
appeal of 2005 tax evaluation and
bill.
GMAC Mortgage Corp. vs.
Mark J. Long, Betty Sue Long et al,
petition for mortgage foreclosure.
Robert J. Meehan vs. Lena M.
Coughlin, petition for mortgage
foreclosure.
Krista K. Staton and Dale'R.
Staton, divorce.
Kerry Sue Crawford vs. James
Bruce Crawford, petition for
injunction for protection.
Seamus Shafer vs. state
Department of Corrections, petition
to review inmate situation.

The following decisions on civil


Colon & Lop PA
AGGRESSIVE REPRESENTATION


I court ouse R 'port


cases pending in the circuit court
were handed down recently by
the circuit court judge:
Melissa Hays as personal repre-
sentative vs. Florida Institute for
Neurologic Rehabilitation, volun-
tary dismissal.
Darling Huffman as personal
representative vs. Donald ,B.
Geldart, Pioneer Medical Center et
al, dismissal of Charles Richard
Kennedy P.A. as defendant.
Ronald Woods and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR) vs.
Matthew Woods, child support case
closed.
Richard Anthony Martinez and
DOR vs. Travis John Downey,
child support order.
Thelma Ellison Reddics and
DOR vs. Jan Alfonzo Ellison, child
support order.
Vida Marie Grimsley and DOR
vs. Richard J. Parisi Jr., child sup-
port order.
Samantha Diane Rucker Minor
and DOR-vs. Coy B. Rucker, mod-
ification of child support.
Tony R. and Dana A. Wells vs.
Jay E. and Jamie S. Wells, stipulat-
ed settlement approved.
Mary Ann Rodriguez and DOR
vs. Carlos Martinez, child support
order.

There was no felony criminal
court last week as it was trial
week.

The following real estate trans-
actions of $10,000 or more were
filed recently in the office of the
clerk of court:
Donna Faye McKinney to
Michael J. Choate and Robert L.


Florida Orange Crop Estimate

Is Decreased By 4 Million Boxes


The U.S. 'Department of
Agriculture (USDA) has released
its third crop forecast for the 2005-
06 season. The USDA expects the
state's orange crop to produce 158
million boxes during the 2005-06
season, a nearly 17 percent decrease
from the Oct. 12 estimate. The four
million-box decrease was in the
Valencia estimate, which is now
projected at 78 million boxes.
"This decrease is largely due to
smaller than. expected fruit size,"
said Andy LaVigne, executive vice
president/CEO of Florida Citrus
Mutual.
The forecast for early and mid-
season varieties, which includes 3.5
11 "3F9


million boxes of Navels, remails
unchanged at 80 million boxes.
Grapefruit estimates remain
unchanged at 16 million boxes. For
speciality fruit, the USDA predicts
800,000 boxes of Temples; 1.2 mil-
lion boxes of Taigelos; and 5.7 mil-
lion boxes of Tangerines, including
3.5 million boxes of early varieties
and 2.2 million boxes of Honeys.
The Florida citrus industry has a
$9.1 billion economic impact to the
state, employs nearly 90,000 people
and covers 750,000 acres in the
state. Florida Citrus Mutual, found-
ed in 1948, is the state's largest cit-
rus grower's organization with
nearly 11,000 grower members.
1.'r: S


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ANTONY C. LEE, the holder of the following
certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which
it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO. 1110 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2001

Description of Property:

1/2 mineral interests in and to: Tracts 43 and 55 of Unit One of Republic Groves, as
recorded in Plat Book 3, page 21 public records of Hardee County, Florida, and
Tracts 107, 113 and 119 of Unit Two of Republic Groves, as recorded in Plat Book 3,
page 22, public records of Hardee County, Florida.

SUBJECT TO COVENANTS, RESERVATIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND EASE-
MENTS OF RECORD, RECORDED IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF HARD-
EECOUNTY, FLORIDA.

Name in which assessed: DAVIS & GAINES INC

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in
such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door located at
417 West Main Street on the 22nd day of FEBRUARY, 2006, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 12th day of JANUARY, 2006.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No 1
By: Alicia C Albritton
Deputy Clerk 1:19 2:9c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ANTHONY C. LEE, the holder of the following
certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which
it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO. 1111 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2001

Description of Property:

1/2 mineral interest only:

Tracts 92B, 97B, 98, 99, 111, 112, 117 and 118 of Unit Three of Republic Groves, as
recorded in Plat Book 3, page 23, public records of Hardee County, Florida.

SUBJECT TO COVENANTS, RESERVATIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND EASE-
MENT OF RECORD, RECORDED IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Name in which assessed: DAVIS & GAINES INC

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in
such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door located at
417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the 22nd day of FEBRUARY, 2006,
at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 12th day of JANUARY, 2006.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No 1
By: LAURA L. BARKER
Deputy Clerk 1:19, 26; 2:2,9c


Shiver Sr., $40,000.
Trealdo Groves Inc. to Williard
Kelly Jr. and Elizabeth Ann
Durrance, $240,000.
Junior Ray Griffin to Kimberly
L. Grimsley, $18,096.
Trealdo Groves Inc. to J. Ned
and Tammv J. Hancock, $480.000.
Alphonso Jackson, Secretary of
Housing and Urban Development
to James D. Hill, $58,000.
Joe L. Davis Sr. to Williard K. Jr.
and Elizabeth Ann Durrance,
$352,600.
Sweetwater Groves LC to
Edward S. Schontag Jr., Stine
Family Partnership and Joseph K.
Lopez Sr. Family Partnership,
$1,060,457.
Sweetwater Groves LC 'to
Eugene H. Turner Jr. and Cary M.
Mercer, $402,299.
Angelo Martinez Jr. to David R.
and Anita A. Parrish, $26,000.
Russell Charles and Rhonda May
Long to Dixon" of Wauchula, Inc.,
$19,000.
Jeffrey P. and Irene Y. Dorsey to
Maria Paz Rodriguez, $26,000.
John D. and Mildred L. White as
trustees to Ronald G.'and Patricia J.
Driskell, $210,000.
Richard 0. and Ann B. Ball as
trustees to William R. and
Jacqueline J. Burton, $68,600.
Karen Bishop Bennett to James
Roger and Nancy Jean Hackler,
$15,000.
Dolores Inc. to Deonarain and
Mohinee Gobardhan, $360,000.
Earl C. Sr. and Mary K. Holland
and Earl C. Holland Jr. to Olen and
Alice Edwards, $356,250.
John Handly as personal repre-
sentative to John Handly, $19,000.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that RONALD THOMAS, the holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names
in which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO. 390 YEAR OF ISSUANCE 2003

Description of Property:

Tracts #8, 9 and 10:
Commence at the NE corner of the NW1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 36,'Township 33
South, Range 25 East, thence run South 89o46'00" West for a distance of 533.23 feet
for point of beginning, thence continue South 8946'00" West for a distance of 208.71
feet, thence South 001'24" West for a distance of 233.71 feet, thence North
89*46'00" East for a distance of 208.71 feet, thence North 001'24" East for a dis-
tance of 233.71 feet to the point of beginning. LESS the North 25 feet thereof for
Road Right-of-Way.

AS RECORDED IN BOOK: 283 PAGE: 514

SUBJECTTO COVENANTS, RESERVATIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND EASE-
MENT OF RECORD, RECORDED IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Name in which assessed: DEWEY W QUINN & MIMIA QUINN

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in
such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door located at
417 West Main Street on the 22nd day of FEBRUARY, 2006, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 12th day of JANUARY, 2006.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida 1:19 -2:9c


COURTESY PHOTO
Raymond Ramey and Charles West dished out the ice cream.


The Oasis RV News
By Inez McFalls

SUCCESSFUL BREAKFAST Brenda Williams. Claude and
Saturday, Jan. 7,.saw 71 hungry Charlotte Longueuil are entertain-
people line up and enjoy a pancake ing his sister and her husband,
breakfast prepared by George and Janice and Bob Wagner. Ray and Jo
Audrey Semler and Ben and Pat Moore are enjoying their daughter,
Bohnett. Audrey and Ben made Chris and her friend Dave. Bob and
sausage gravy, Ben fried sausage Patrice Christie have welcomed
patties and Audrey made pancakes Emerson and Betty Christie to
while Pat baked biscuits. George, spend the winter with them. We
uh, George supervised, good job would also like to welcome back
George! Jim and Sally Hatfield, Bill and
Judy Cundiff and Judy's dad Ralph,
MUSIC DRAWS CROWD Guy and Frances. Rousse, and.
Twenty talented musicians enter- Harold and Sharon Lake who have
trained 120 people on Sunday the just returned from holidays up
8th. The 50/50 winners were Mary North with the family. George
Sanford, Roger VanBlois, Jerry Semler is glad all his horseshoe
Kruys, Lucy Bush and newcomer buddies are back. Big, congratula-
Gene Vierling. Walt Penrod, Donna tions go out to Bill and Thelma
Tucker, Myrnna Verneersch, LeBright who attended the wedding
Darlene Thibert and Fred Murray of their granddaughter Samantha to
all won merchant certificates. her true love Joe on Saturday the
7th. Bill and Thelma have been an
BINGO AND CARDS important part of this young lady's
Twenty-four played bingo on life and this was a very special day
Thursday the 5th. Julie Hood won for them.
the 50/50 and Joni Branham won
the jackpot. Dale Bohnett, Ben COVERED DISH BLISS
Bohnett, Joanne Bray and Lucy Fifty-five people enjoyed' a
Bush all won merchant certificates, potluck supper on Wednesday the
On Tuesday the 12th 23 played and 11th. Two coconut cream pies made
Shirley Hyde won the 50/50 while by Claude Longueuil's sister Janice
Charlotte Longueuil won the jack- Wagner who owns a large restau-
pot. Four lucky folks won merchant rant, in Michigan highlighted the
certificates; Mary Lou Katzur, Leon evening.
Summner, Gene Vierling and
Charlotte Longueuil. On Wednes- Life shrinks or expands.in pro-
day for cards there were five portion to one'scourage.
Pokeno players and Mary Lou -Anais Nin
Katzur was the big winner. Phase
10 had four players and Sally.
Hatfield, Jackie Meado s and me
were winners. I "61

AROUND THE PARK MESSAGE CHANGED DAILY!
It' good to have Anita and Don -- _E'
Albert back.. They tried going to 6
Texas but found out Florida is the .
best place to winter. Lots of folks
have visitors this week. Terry and Call in DAILY
Janette Johnston welcomed their fora short
friends, the Fellers. Shirley and Bible message.
Maurice Rousse are enjoying the
company of their friends, Ken and 1:19C



SAM ALBRITTON

ELECTRICAL SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL WIRING INSTALLATION CEILING FANS
COMMERCIAL WIRING WATER PUMPS
REPAIR WATER HEATERS

767-0313 Office
781-0377 Mobile
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W A M ART Photographer Hours: 10am-pm
Photographer will be available these days only:
Portrait Studio Thursday, January 19 through Monday, January 23



Hwy 17 N.
Wauchula


Photographer Hours: 10am-7pm
One W eek .o SUB)CFEESORADOImONAi CHARGES ,' *-. a
O nly! t. -.o' I" :'""' ..
Sies 3z"rim ,
,nditotI"s p 19
*,. 1:19c







January 19, 2006, The Herald-Advocate 7C


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police officers investi-
Sgated the following incidents and made the following arrests:
COUNTY
Jan.'15, a theft on John Holt Road and a tag stolen on Sims Road were
reported.
Jan. 14, Six people were arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force,
with the following charges: Es- Rodriguez, 30, and Estela Rodriguez
Valdez, 34, and Elias Valdez, 38, a'l c- 1525 Valdez Road, Zolfo Springs,
each charged with possession of dr,: paraphernalia. Rodriguez was also
charged with possession of methamphetamine, while Estela Valdez was
also charged with possession of marijuana. Elias Valdez was also charged
with possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana and operat-
ing a nuisance drug house.
Justin Heath Morris, 26, of 2472 SR 66 East, Zolfo Springs, was
charged with possession of marijuana and possession of drug parapherna-
lia.
Roberto Martinez Rodriguez, 19, of 290 Griffin Road, Wauchula, was
charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug para-
phernalia. He was detained on warrants charging him with violation of pro-
bation (original charges possession of drug paraphernalia and giving a false
name to a law enforcement officer and a capias alleging failure to appear
in court on a charge of no valid license.
Guillermo Alvarado Jr., 38, of 836 Allen Road, Wauchula, was charged
with possession of methamphetamine; possession of marijuana and posses'
sion of drug paraphernalia, and was detained on two counts non-support
and capiases alleging failure to appear in court on charges of loitering and
prowling, resisting arrest without force and trespassing on school grounds.
Jan. 14, burglary of a conveyance on Eagle Drive and a stolen tag were
reported.
Jan. 13, Santos Contreras, 23, of 214 S. Third Ave., Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Clay Nicholson and charged with possession of metham-
phetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Jan. 13, William Vazquez, 23, of SR 3 and Second Avenue,
Immokalee, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a warrant charging him
with violation of probation (original charge DUI).
Jan. 13, David Wayne Gould, 34, of 22235 Catherine Ave., Port
Charlotte, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on charges of violation of pro-
bation (original charges purchase of marijuana and possession of drug para-
.phernalia).
Jan. 13, Joshua Caine Lanham, 16, of 112 N. First Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Mixon Trammell and charged with battery on a law
enforcement officer and resisting arrest with violence.
Jan. 13, a tag stolen on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue was reported.
Jan. 12, three people were arrested by the Drug Task Force.
Denna Danette Carlton, 40, and Freddie Carltonr, 50, both of 4390
Steven Carlton Place, Wauchula, were each charged with possession of
methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and operating a nui-
sance drug house.
Steven Lee Purser, 35, of 630 Grove St., Bowling Green, was arrested
on capiases alleging failure to appear in court on charges of sale of metham-
phetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Jan. 12, San Juana Calderon, 32, of 445 Calvert Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a warrant charging her with violation of
probation (original charge retail theft).
Jan. 12, Crispin Gutierrez Dominguez, 29, of 37 Pine Cone Trailer
Park Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a warrant charg-
ing him with violation of probation (original charge violation of a domes-
tic violence injunction for protection).
Jan. 12, a theft on Knight Road was reported.
Jan. 11, Vincent Alan Tifer II, 19, of 4545 Apache Trail, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on warrants charging him with violation
of.probation (original. charges possession of marijuana and possession of
,. ,.. ,1 3to

drug paraphernalia).
Jan. 11, Wanda Louise Stettler, 36, P.O. Box 313, Wauchula, was
arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a capias charging her with non-support.
Jan. 11, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North and a fight were reported.
Jan. 10, Reginald Eugene Sutton, 40, of 2410 Everglades Drive,
Miramar, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on warrants charging him with
two counts uttering a forgery and two counts grand theft.
Jan. 10, Jerry Lavon Chambers, 53, of 8600 Mac Griffin Road, Plant
City, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of non-support.
Jan. 10, Angel Rodriguez Castro, 78, of 3151 Dixiana Drive, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on warrants charging him with vio-
lation of probation (original charges possession of cocaine with intent to
sell and possession of drug paraphernalia).
Jan. 10, Juan Jose Alcantar, 23 ,P.O. Box 1457, Bowling Green, was
arrested by Dep. Joe Marble on a charge of violation of community con-
trol-house arrest (original charge possession of methamphetamine) and a
capias alleging failure to appear in court on a charge of driving while
license suspended.
Jan. 10, a 13-year-old Bowling Green youth was arrested by Dep.
Mixon Trammell on a pick-up order alleging violation of probation (origi-
nal charge battery).
Jan. 10, axtheft on Doyle Carlton Road and Rodeo Drive was reported.
Jan. 9, Juan Danile Gonzales, 27, of 1889 Kazen Road, Wauchula, was
arrested by corrections Dep. Earl Harrisorfon a court-ordered pickup on a
charge of domestic battery.
Jan. 9, a theft and a stolen tag were reported.
WAUCHULA
Jan. 14, a burglary on West Bay Street was reported.
Jan. 13, Becky Lynn Hyder, 27, of 311 Georgia St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with false report of a crime.
Jan. 10, thefts on North Florida and Illinois avenues and criminal mis-
chief on North 10th Avenue were reported.
Jan. 9, Joshua Daniel Miller, 20, of 411 Melendy St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Sgt. John Eason on a Polk County warrant charging him with
violation of probation (original charge possession of methamphetamine).
Jan 9, a residential burglary on Carlton Street was reported.
BOWLING GREEN
Jan. 13, June A. Lee, 43, of 1618 NW 46th Terrace, Okeechobee, was
arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with possession of mari-
juana.
Jan. 13, Sharon Denise Griffin, 41, of 5025 Dixiana Drive, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc; Jereme Bridges and charged with possession of
cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting arrest without force.
Jan. 13, Dimesha Renee Fields, 15, of 4705 U.S. 17, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Chief John Scheel and charged with battery on detention -
staff.
ZOLFO SPRINGS
Jan. 13, Victor Juarez, 21, of 116 Griffin Road, Wauchula, and Jose
Luis Alvarez, 20, P.O. Box 1372, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc.
Warren Bermingham and each charged with resisting arrest without vio-
lence. Alvarez was also charged with drinking in public, a minor in posses-
sion of alcohol and obstruction by disguise.
Jan. 9, Ellis Steven Hodges, 30, of 3707 Ninth Ave. W., Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Ofc. Ricky Selph on a warrant charging him with non-sup-
port.
Jan. 9, a residential burglary on Elm Street was reported.



Be A Headliner!
]JARDIEE LIVING DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M.
D ALN IS


FIRST BUCK


COURTESY PHOTO
Kacey Bryant bagged his first buck during a recent hunting trip
in the Limestone area. The North Wauchula Elementary School
fifth grader was hunting with his dad and granddad. The-11-year-
old is the son of Leighton and Lara Bryant of Wauchula, and
grandson of Elmo and Annie Redding'also of Wauchula. Kacey,
who has been hunting for about two years, has gotten does
before, but this was his first buck, a nine-pointer.



On The Local Links
CRYSTAL LAKE LADIES' LEAGUE
Partners, Low Net was the game of the week. Aideen DuFour and
Nancy King took first place with 71. Three teams tied for second with 73.
Monique DuFour and partner Barb Newman; Nancy Morrison and partner
Darlene Jackson; and Betty, Jacobs partner Donna Gervase made up the
three teams. Marilyn Funkhouser was closest to the #5 pin.
CRYSTAL LAKE MEN'S LEAGUE
SA+B+C+D was the game played on Thursday. Coming in first, with
169, were Don Ahearn, Harold Johnson, L. Cahill and Dick Robinson.
,Second place went to Doug Taylor, Don Shanks, George Strausbaugh and
Jim Hammon, with a score of 165. Fred Kessler, Albin Johnson, G. Hunt
and B. K6ener came in with 162, tying for third with Don Harkin, Charlie
.MKnight, R. Grandstaff and Jim McBride.


ioneer Par4 Pays


Cover


Art


,- .... '_ ; -= -S- -



The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artwork for the front and back covers of its annual
special tabloid section on Hardee County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


Last year's winner...


Second place:

Third place:


Monica Turner

Sebring, FL


* $200 U.S. Savings Bond.
* Publication of your work on the cover of the special section.
* Your photo and biographical story inside the cover.
* $100 U.S. Savings Bond.
* Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.
* $50 U.S. Savings Bond.


Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.

CHILDREN'S DIVISION $50 U.S. Savings Bond.
A Week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days.
FOR AGES 12 AND UNDER! Publication of your winning entry inside the
special section.

JUDGES
JANE LONG Pioneer Park Days Director
ROBERT L. DOYEL Circuit Judge for Hardee County
SUSAN W. ROBERTS Circuit Judge for 10th Judicial Circuit and ninth-generation Floridian

RULES: BOTH DIVISIONS
1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
2) Artwork must be original.
3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must be depicted.
4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker. Drawing must be able to be reproduced in the newspaper.
5) Art must fill an area 10.5 inches wide by 13 inches high, including lettering which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2006."
6) Deadline is Monday, Feb. 13, at noon.
TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the
drawing. Bring entries in person to the-newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail
to Cover Art Contest, The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


ADULT DIVISION
First place:







8C The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2006

A A A 'ld JI T IIIIIIII I I rLl fll I 'iif T !


PLATTNER'S ARCADIA CHEVROLET BUICK PONTIAC ANNOUNCING...


EVERY CAR EVERY TRUCK EVERY S.U.V.i

:IjI NOW WITH A LOWER STICKER PRICE
PLUS DUE TO RECENT SUCCESS WE HAVE A HUGE SUPPLY OF FRESH LOW MILEAGE LATE MODEL TRAP. 7
T iT ii ii'11 1 fi Iii i l l 1 MCREDIT HOTLLII....': 888-272-3567
CREDIT WEBSITE: www.carloans-now.com


DEMONSTRATOR SALE CHEVY TRUCKS


2005 Chevrolet Malibu LS Demo New 2006 Silverado 2-LS 1500 Crew Cab New 2006
St~#339 6 MSRP ................24,265 St#208524, Air Conditioning, Power Windows, ,St
Power Locks AM/FI CD
Power Mirurr
bnrome Wnrer.



MSRP ............................... ....$. 27,990 Ms .
2005 Chevrolet Avalanche Demo Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $6,091 Arcadia Discoul
StIW158807 MSRP .................$34,9 SALE 20, 552 S269*SALE $
MANY CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE
mifles MANY TOCHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANYTOCHOOSE


nt & Reba
20
FROM X


N dream up
dream up-


PONTIAC CHEVY CARS L


k LaCrosse New 2006 Pontiac Vibe New 2006 Cobalt Coul
, Automatic transmission, St#400820, air conditioning, St#641808, Autor
jir conditioning, power AM/FM stereo & more. air conditic
vi ..nvdows & locks, bucket s
Sd cruise, and st re &
I much more.


523,575 MSRP.......... ............. $16,990 MSRP.................................$15,710
ates ....... $3,696 Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $1,841 Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $2,359
,999SALE $ SALE
c,999* 5,999* ACE E 13,351
SIMIARSAVIN MANYTOCHOOSEFROM ATSIMILAR SAVINGS MANYTOCHOOSE FROMATSIMILARSAV
AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVlW


*G
NJGS


St#4157677 MSRP ........ 38,700

SALE'PRICE
4M24,984*


2005 Buick Rendezvous Demo.
St4533303 MSRP ................$38,980

"^ i SALE PRICE
2-6,975*
t0


New:




41


New 2006 Buick Lucerne
StI147414


MSRP ....... ....... ........ $34,990
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $9,485
SiACE 25 505*
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


New 2006 Express Work Van 1500
St#114556, AM/FM Stereo, Fixed Glass, Rear/Side Doors,
_- 4' 3 V-6 Air Conditioning.


C kAe lMSRPa ...................................... $24,260
2005 Chevrolet Iverado Demo Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $4,261
St#4265608 MSRP........ 20,235 SALE S 9,999 *
SOV 36SS 'PRICE 9999
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
SALE PRICE New 2005 Suburban 1500
4,980 St#253556, Power Windows,
Power Locks, Power
mirrors, AM/FM CD,

2005 Chevrolet Tahoe LS 4x4 Demo o

N.' C~ ~ -;


New 2006 Pontiac G-6 Sedan
St#189147, Automatic transmission, air conditioning,
AM/FM stereo &
,much more


MSRP ................................. $27,240 MSRP ........................... ..... $17,990
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ........ $1041 Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $2,612
SALE SALE 36 M
PRI CE 26,1 99* PRI CEA 15,998T O199* OI R SO
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


New 2006 Buick Rendezvous
St#516404, Automatic transmission, air conditioning,
D\ ower windows & locks,
S iIlli, cruise and
much more.



MSRP................................. $27,305
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $4,306
SALE
PRICE $22,999*
AANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS I
New 2005 Terraza FWD CXL
St#T18955 CD, MP3, Satellite Radio, Alum.
hrome WrneeI, Leather,
Power Windows,
Powver Locks,
Mirrors.


MSRP ................................. $33,395
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $7,596
SALE $IM C yekk*


New 2006 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP
St#173951, Automatic transmission, air conditioning,
owerwindows &' locks,
tilt, cruise &
much more.



MSRP .......... .............. $33,520
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $3,521
SALE $ 999*
PRICE F M29 999
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS



New 2006 Malibu Maxx
St#117014, Automatic, air conditioning, power
windowsD& locks,
CD Player,
tilt, cruise.



MSRP ...... .. ......... ......... $21,590
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $2,660
PRICE $18,930*
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


New 2006 Impala Sedan
St#118394, Automatic,
air conditioning,
bucket seats,
stereo &
more.


MSRP........... .................... 21,990
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $2,991
SALEE $1 8999*
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


New 2006 Pontiac Torrent New 2006 Chevrolet Equinox
St#043407, Automatic transmission, air conditioning, St 010104, Air conditioning,
power wndovs & locks, power windows &
tiltwiee & more! locks, tilt, cruise,
CD player &
more.


MSRP... ..............22,990 MSRP................22,9 M................. $22,345
Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $2,791 Arcadia Discount & Rebates ....... $2,746
SALE $onA CaIAc* SALE $ioA jfIA*


PRICE I PRICE I PRICE PRICE ',%l
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
l ll Al ." "A !.


PROGRAM CARS & TRUCKS


Cavalier 2005 Pontiac Bonneville S/E
Stk#377873 Stk#3125070

E MSRP MSRP
$16,800 $29,649
$.,119* '. Sale $ 9 Lf *1
or SA PriceM O CH 11 Lease ForM A S
MILAR SAVINGS MANYTO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


PRE-OWNED LOW MILES


rolet Avalanche 2003 Chevrolet Malibu 2002 Cadillac
Stk#4159992 Stk#5583130 /'g '"
SRP MSRP
$21,347
Sale $ nOra $1Ao Sale
$73 19875
Price .7 380I ease For IPrice S9875
FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT


SDeVille
Srk#4275290

rf- MSRP
S28,350


SIMILAR SAVINGS


2005 Chevrolet Impala 2005 Buick LeSabre 2005 PR tiac Aztek AWD 2005 Chevrolet Astro LS 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe
Stk#3148075 Stk#3119564 Stk#4542967 Stk#4113809 Stk#5128551

MSRP MSRP MSRP MSRP MSRP
$22,480 $28,987 $24,910 $29,670. $41,075
Sal Saleale 4 r $9ale $ AF0r $ e 38, 984
Price 9804 Lease For' I 9 Price$ 3987 Price 4 Lease For Price 16,495 Lease For I Price
MANY O CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOSE FROMAT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHN0SE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOSE FROM AT SIMitAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHN0SE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


2005 Ch vrolet TrailBlazer 2 5 k Rendezvous 2005 Chevrolet Silverado LS Ext Cab
Stk#3125070 T l Stk#4525580 Stk#5282376


MSRP MSRP MSRP
$22,480 $26,455 $30,090
Price' 4 L F Price 0Lease For Price 376LeaseFor
ease8F..r8249 ::* ,275 Lease For$259* 76 aseFor$289*
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
2005 Pontiac Grand Am 2005 P cSunfire S/E Coupe 2005 Chrysler Sebring
Stk#130912 Stk#3197251 Stk#4530843
_r0hfFMAl 1N &Z-_4%f~tM -Arpt.fh


vrolet Express 2003 Chevrolet Silverado
ssenger Van Stk#4134781 Regular Cab
Stk#301783
MSRP
MSRP $20,270
$33,487
o Lease For 259* sPrice 10899 I
FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


2005 Chevrolet Venture LS
Stk#4136330
^^^*fj^l^^^^^^^^^Hr'S FAfMteft~ll


-CHM|^11K^HBB!TA -S-I-GT-C
_44AQ-7 11,511~m


-MSRP
$22,495
SPiae $ldO4 Or $1 *
Price ,984Lease For 139
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


2005 Buick Century 2005
; FF Stk#4115368

MSIRP
$23,981
S $1lale $. f m*Sale
Price 0984Lease For139* Price
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO

US HIGHWAY 17,

ARCADIA

CALL TOLL FREE

1-3800-479-3838


MSRP MSRP MSRP
$17,517 $24,965 $29,431
P134DSale $1 24 waF Or $18 *1 sF$199
ce S. o Fo 3 5 P 2rice a5 as sFor Pr 81e* e840iceLe 99*
MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS


Chevrolet
~19~*-;;


Monte Carlo 2005 Buick
Stk#288307
MSRP
$23,800
5179* :Sle18.984
I.<7 S3!?Price.18,984


PAT


A


LaCrosse 2005 F
Stk#222130

MSRP
$25,335
IlAl IAVlly-G SaleNY $A
Price' *14
T SIMILAR SAVINGS MANY TO CHO


Pr_


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dream up-
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'ontiac


Montana
Stk#3133314

MSRP
$;29,287
F .$201
rIRaii an CAX/ nimo


Sale
PriceMANY TO CH
MANY TO CH


2005


Sale
Price I 1 I1
AnA y Tin r


sler Pacifica
Stk#4332896

MSRP
$24,375
54 eo,, $269
FROM AT SIMILAR SAVINGS
Grand Caravan S/E
Stk#2225676 $

IIAS RP
$23,630
34na aFor nm
CFDm AT tIMI ADR IM AS


SALE HOURS: GM CERTIFIED UED
MONDAY-FRIDAY 9am 8pm CERIF IED USED
MONDAY-FRIDAY 9am 6pm VEHICLES COME WITH
SUNDAY 11am 5pm A GM-Backed Limited Warranty
N 24-Hour Roadside Assistance
NEW SERVICE HOURS: A 108- Point MechanicaV j
MONDAY-FRIDAY 7:3Oam-5:30pm Appearance Inspection
CloSAT ed SUNRDAYam -6pA 3-Day 50-Miles ,
Closed SUNDAY Satisfaction Guarantee Cftmlfl
SE HABLA ESPANOL ......-.,.,'."
'WE GUARANTEE TO BEAT YOUR 3EST DEAL BY 5500! Customer must present a local compettot rs igltuiate
adertled price o written uyer s order of Idntical lehIcl Mut e m s tsocL and comparable equippd. Ofter lid da
of puohtcation on'y. Corvettes and Ourama, s Exludel, Not responsible for typoaraiphlcal erTorms p llta pmart
errors Arcadia Chevrole Pontiac Buick, Oldsmobie s alutllorzed to cu' competitors vehide at ri c p listed by
customer. II unable to do so. ccmoetitois wil not be deemed a 'legriale olfer. Not to be sed Ti conjunction wit
any other offers New vehine payments based on a 48 mnlnh Ipase 12k Ir-Iyea WAC All HmeYlnt kiud a $3,000
Y Tc or trade equiy plus tax. tag and title Used vehicle payments based on 66 mos. at 5.9% WAC. ".On elct units.
Sealer IIfor deis. 1:1C
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