Citation
Glades County Democrat

Material Information

Title:
Glades County Democrat
Alternate Title:
Democrat
Place of Publication:
Moore Haven, FL
Publisher:
Independent Newspapers Inc., Jose Zaragoza - Publisher
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Moore Haven (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Glades County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Glades -- Moore Haven
Coordinates:
26.833117 x -81.093123

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1922.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 8, no. 12 (June 21, 1929) issue misdated 1920.
General Note:
Editors: R.B. Child, <1926>; Keathley Bowden, <1929>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Sept. 24, 1926).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Glades County Democrat. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000358007 ( ALEPH )
01461464 ( OCLC )
ABZ6307 ( NOTIS )
sn 83000793 ( LCCN )
0745-4120 ( ISSN )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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Full Text

PAGE 1

Thursday, August 9, 2018 Vol. 90, No. 3250¢ plus tax14.39 feetLast Year: 13.09 feet Lake LevelsSource: South Florida Water Management District. Depth given in feet above sea level Biosolids contributing to phosphorus load in lake ... Page 2 See page 3 for information about how to contact this newspaper.gladescountydemocrat.com Corps accepts $50 million from state for dike repairs ... Page 8 Florida Health urges back-to-school immunizations ... Page 4 News from Buckhead Ridge ... Page 4 BHR gets more involved with Glades community ... Page 12 MHES aide conducted drive with help of family, friends and many donorsBy Chris FelkerGlades County Democrat Over 100 schoolchildren in Moore Haven enjoyed a special Back to School BashŽ last weekend, courtesy of Glades County School District paraprofessional Shon Croskey and a small multitude of like-minded citizens who donated school supplies and cash to her cause. A resident of Moore Haven and a single mother herself, Miss Croskey is a paraprofessional in the Voluntary Pre-K Department at Moore Haven Elementary School. She had conceived of the idea a couple of years back, and tapped members of her family as well as friends and acquaintances to donate items to help assist parents like her in getting their children ready for the new school year. I dont know where to begin, but I will start off by giving thanks to God for allowSchoolkids ”ock to supply giveaway Special to the Glades County Democrat/ Courtesy photosThey raf”ed off a slew of gift cards, and here are two of the happy recipients. Several kids also got free haircuts courtesy of two barbers, Anthony Holley and Jacob Smith, who donated their services, and two little girls had their hair braided by Darcel Kelly Hairstyles (not shown). By Chris FelkerOkeechobee News The sheriffs of“ces in Glades, Hendry and Palm Beach counties are investigating veiled threats that have been made online toward some residents of communities along Lake Okeechobee over water pollution issues affecting the coasts. A running cyber-debate over responsibility for algae blooms in the Caloosahatchee River and red tide along Gulf Coast communities in Southwest Florida has been going on via several Facebook pages whose owners have been actively posting articles and opinions about the issue. They have been attracting activists on all sides whove jumped in to make comments. But apparently some have crossed the line between mere commentary and remarks that may be intended or could be taken as threats. The authorities, and prominent activists, are taking them seriously. Hendry Count y Sheriff Steve Whidden and Glades Count y Sheriff David Hardin issued a joint statement on Friday, Aug. 3, about the internet posts: We are aware of a series of threats made online against the people in our communit y from several activists related to the coastal water issues. We are looking into each o f these threats individually, and will determine Online threats to communities taken seriously By Chris FelkerGlades County Democrat MOORE HAVEN „ During the special meeting July 30 when they chose a woman to be their new county manager, Glades County commissioners also voted 5-0 to reapply to the state for $2 million from the Florida Job Growth Grant Fund to “nish road connections to the regional training center. This was a grant that we had applied for in the past,Ž said County Board Chairman John Ahern, asking Connie Vanassche of CAS Governmental Services to come forward and explain what it involved to the commissioners, who were meeting that day at the Glades County Regional Training Facility (GCRTF). Back in February, the county applied for the infrastructure Job Growth Grant Fund (allocation) to put the roadway in from here over to Loves (truck stop) to connect that and add an entryway. This is what this grant is for,Ž she said. The GCRTF was envisioned to be part of the Americas Gateway Logistics Center that A. Duda & Sons, along with the county government and the Glades County Economic Development Council (EDC), has been working to establish north of U.S. 27 Grant sought to complete GCRTFs connections See GRANT „ Page 7 See SUPPLY „ Page 7 See THREATS „ Page 7

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2 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee August 9, 2018 800.763.2114St. Lic. #CMCO54668Refrigeration ~ AC ~ Ice MachinesServing the Lake Okeechobee Region Since 1929 CarrierJim and Monica McCarthy Clark Biosolids contribute to phosphorus load in lakeBy Katrina ElskenINI Florida Florida farmers are sometimes blamed for nutrient loading that originated in the coastal urban areas, according to Dr. Paul Gray of Florida Audubon. Dr. Gray gave a presentation on the issues affecting Lake Okeechobees water quality at the July 31 meeting of the Okeechobee Rotary Club. For many years, the coastal communities w ere hauling treated sewage and dumping it north of the lake, Dr. Gray explained. Some of the places were getting 100 tons of phosphorus in one year,Ž he added. A 2009 Florida Audubon report found 109 tons of phosphorus in biosolids had been applied to one 1,700-acre property in one year. To put that in perspective, Lake Okeechobee has a drainage basin of approximately 2.8 million acres, according to the South Florida Water Management District. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections target goal for phosphorus entering Lake Okeechobee from all runoff into the lake is a total of 105 metric tons per year. Because the sewage spreading sites w ere on land that was zoned agriculture,Ž this nutrient load in the runoff has been attributed to agriculture. This urban nutrient stream gets blamed on the agricultural community,Ž said Dr. Gray. In 2007, the Florida Legislature banned the land-spreading of Class B biosolids in the environmentally sensitive Lake Okeechobee watershed, but a loophole in the law allows unrestricted spreading of Class AA biosolids to continue. Florida Senate Bill 392, passed in 2007, states: After December 31, 2007, the department may not authorize the disposal of domestic wastewater residuals within the Lake Okeechobee watershed unless the applicant can af“rmatively demonstrate that the phosphorus in the residuals will not add to phosphorus loadings in Lake Okeechobee or its tributaries. This demonstration shall be based on achieving a net balance between phosphorus imports relative to exports on the permitted application site. Exports shall include only phosphorus removed from the Lake Okeechobee watershed through products generated on the permitted application site. This prohibition does not apply to Class AA residuals that are marketed and distributed as fertilizer products in accordance with department rule.Ž In the 2009 report, Audubon Florida called on the State of Florida, wastewater utilities and landowners to end the practice of land disposal of dried sludge from sewage treatment plants (also referred to as wastewater residuals and biosolids) in the Lake Okeechobee watershed. Nutrients in the lake and its tributaries exceed state and federal standards, and pollution from phosphorous has reached a crisis point. As a result, Floridas largest lake faces potential ecological collapse. Sludge contributes nearly one-fourth of the phosphorus in the Lake Okeechobee watershed and is the most preventable source of pollution. The costs of cleaning up the phosphorus from sewage sludge alone have not been calculated but will be in the billions of dollars. The existence of so much additional phosphorus in the watershed will complicate meeting state and federal standards and continue to contribute pollution for many years to come. The disposal of sludge and most of its use as a fertilizer in the Lake Okeechobee watershed should come to an immediate end,Ž Audubon wrote in 2009. In the February 2013 publication Expediting Lake Okeechobee Pollution Control,Ž Audubon again called on the Florida Legislature to remove the loophole that allows the application of Class AA biosolids in the watershed.Ž At the Rotary meeting, Dr. Gray explained that in the 1970s, the lake water had a phosphorus level of about 40 parts per billion (ppb). The goal is to get it back to 40 ppb.Ž In 2016, the level was around 125 ppb. This year it is even higher due to the churning of Hurricane Irma, which stirred up the muddy lake bottom. (Note: Phosphorus levels vary in different parts of the lake, with higher levels in the open water and lower levels in the marshes.) High levels of phosphorus in water entering the lake make it impossible to lower the phosphorus level in the lake, Dr. Gra y said. In 2017, water entering the lake averaged 146 ppb phosphorus, according to the South Florida Water Management District. In addition, high water levels damage or destroy the aquatic vegetation around the edges of the lake; that vegetation is the lakes natural “lter system, which helps clean the water. Nutrient load in the runoff from the Lake Okeechobee watershed continues to be many times higher than the 105 metric ton limit set by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection in 2000. In 1986, 421 metric tons of phosphorus entered the lake via runoff ”owing into the lake. In 2017, the annual total was 484 metric tons. The most recent “ve-year average was 531 tons. Some 95 percent of the nutrient load comes from the watershed north of Lake Okeechobee. A continuing series About Lake Okeechobee About Lake Okeechobee TRUTH Search for the Search for theUF/IFAS researchers solicit help from ranchers and dairy farmers Special to INI Florida Calling all Florida beef cattle ranchers and dairy farm operators „ University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences economists want to document your importance to the state, and need your help to do it. Through Aug. 31, a research team with the UF/IFAS Economic Impact Analysis Program is asking ranchers and dairy farmers to complete a short online survey, available at https://tinyurl.com/ya5q857m. The survey is also open to individuals employed by beef or dairy processing “rms, veterinary practices and livestock-related businesses such as feed stores and farm equipment dealerships.Data from survey responses will be used to develop a report pro“ling the economic contributions of Floridas beef and dairy industries, said Christa Court, an assistant scientist with the UF/IFAS food and resource economics department and assistant director of the Economic Impact Analysis Program.We expect our “ndings to be used by legislators and policymakers, in advocacy efforts by industry groups and to inform the public about the size and importance of these industries in Florida,Ž Ms. Court said. Florida has more than 1 million beef and dairy cows, so we hope to see a high level of participation, to ensure that we get the complete picture.Ž The report will be issued in early 2019, she said. It will be accessible to the public on the program website. In part, the new report will update 2007 “ndings on the states dairy industry, Court said. Survey participants will remain anonymous and are not required to answer all questions, she said. The survey also includes an item where participants are invited to explain in their own words how their efforts contribute to the local economy. Funding for the study was provided by the Florida Cattlemens Association, Southeast Milk Inc., Florida Dairy Farmers and the Milk Checkoff Research Fund.

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Legion to install ofcersMoore Haven American Legion Post 299, 600 River Road in Moore Haven, will hold its annual Installation of Ofcers on Saturday, Aug. 11, at 1 p.m. The ceremony will be presided over by Ofcers from the District. Dr. Jennifer Cook has been re-elected Commander. All veterans and their guests are invited. A complimentary meal will be provided. Auxiliary ofcers will be installed at this meeting. For information, call Kirby Sullivan 863-946-2556.Meals served at Legion PostMoore Haven American Legion Post 299, 600 River Road in Moore Haven, is sponsoring dinners in the Post Hall on each Friday and Saturday evening starting at 6 p.m. The Post is sponsoring breakfast each Sunday from 8 a.m. to noon. Both events are open to the public and there is a small charge. Preparation and serving are under the supervision of Mr. and Mrs. Glen Sparks. For information, call 863-946-2556.Drug/Tobacco Free meetingThe Drug Free Hendry County Coalition and the Hendry Tobacco-Free Partnership meeting will be held on Aug. 9, at 4 p.m. at the Carlson Memorial United Methodist ChurchFellowship Hall, 310 Campbell St. in LaBelle. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend. For more information, call Andrea May at 863-674-4041 ext. 6017 or email Andrea.May@health.gov.BHR VFW serves dinnerThe Buckhead Ridge VFW Post 9528, 29012 State Road 78 East in Buckhead Ridge, will serve dinner on Friday, Aug. 10, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Menu includes grilled boneless rib eye steak, grilled pork tenderloin, fried sh and shrimp, baked and french fried potatoes, baked sweet potatoes, onion rings, salad and desert. Live music by Phil and Cheryl. Proceeds benets homeless veterans. For information, call 863-467-2882.BHR Riders serves breakfastThe VFW Riders will serve breakfast from 8:30 to 11 a.m. and a wings and fries dinner at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 11 at the Buckhead Ridge VFW Post 9528, 29012 State Road 78 East in Buckhead Ridge. Proceeds goes to veterans services. For information, call 863-467-2882.BHR VFW serves breakfastThe Buckhead Ridge VFW Post 9528, 29012 State Road 78 East in Buckhead Ridge, will serve a full breakfast on Sunday, Aug. 12, from 8:30-11 a.m. Proceeds will go to veterans services. For information, call 863-467-2882. Glades at a Glance Special to the Glades County Democrat FORT MYERS The Calusa Waterkeeper continues to nd dangerously high levels of toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), this time, at three locations in Cape Coral tidal canals. On July 25, the waterkeeper took samples at Coral, Darcy and Nautilus canals in southeastern Cape Coral. GreenWater Laboratories in Palatka analyzed the samples. This lab specializes in detecting and quantifying cyanobacteria and their toxins. GreenWater Laboratories analyses on July 26 found that signicant levels (5,30038,450 ng/mL) of microcystin were present, greatly exceeding the Environmental Protection Agencys recreational threshold (4.0 ng/ mL). These levels are consistent with events linked to animal mortalities. The EPA has stated: The presence of cyanobacterial scum in swimming areas represents the highest risk of adverse health effects due to abundant evidence for potentially severe health outcomes associated with these scums (estimated at 50-100 ug microcystin/L). The Caloosahatchee River has had significant levels of cyanobacteria since at least June 22. Since June 1, a major cyanobacteria bloom has developed along the length of the Caloosahatchee River. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) sampled periodically for cyanotoxins in the Caloosahatchee at various locations during June and July, most recently on July 24. The highest toxin concentration, 463 ug/l, FDEP reported was for microcystin on June 26 at the Franklin Lock. The Calusa Waterkeeper applauds the states action in declaring Lee and six other counties as disaster areas, also calling for sharing adversity by all stakeholders during this crisis. Algae bloom continues in riverAugust 9, 2018 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 3 VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH Pastor Dr. John Hankins Independent-Fundamental King James Bible ~ Old fashioned Preaching Traditional Hymns Service Times Sunday School 10am Sunday Worship 11am Sunday Night 6pm Thursday Night Prayer & Bible Study 7pm For more information, please call 863-214-6121 www.victorybaptistclewiston.com 705 S. Olympia Street Clewiston, FL 33440Located in the center of Clewiston Judicial Assistant (Circuit Court) Published byGlades County DemocratServing Eastern Glades County Since 1923 To Reach Us Address: c/o Okeechobee News. 107 SW 17th St. Ste D., Okeechobee, Fl 34974 Website: gcdnews.comTo Submit Newse Glades County Democrat welcomes submissions from its readers. Opinions, calendar items, stories, ideas and photographs are welcome. Call (863) 763-3134 to reach our newsroom. Items may be mailed, faxed or emailed. e deadline for all news items is 12 p.m. Monday prior to the following ursday's publication. Email: gdcnews@newszap.com........................................................................To Place A Display Ad Call (863) 763-3134, deadline for all advertising is 12 p.m. Monday for the following ursday's publication. E-mail: southlakeads@newszap.com To Place A Classied Ad Call (877)353-2424 to place a classied advertisement from home. e deadline for all advertising is 12 p.m. Monday for the following ursday's publication. Fax: 1-877-354-2424 E-mail: classads@newszap.com Advertising Billing Department E-mail: billteam@newszap.com To Start or Stop A PaperPhone: (800) 282-8586 E-mail: readerservices@newszap.com e Glades County Democrat is delivered by mail or subscribers on ursday and is sold in racks and store locations in the Glades County area.Call (800)282-8586 to report a missed newspaper or poor delivery. Glades County Democrat USPS 117920 Published Weekly by Independent Newspapers, Inc. for $39.00 per year including tax. Periodical Class postage paidPublisher: Katrina Elsken Advertising: 863-763-3134E-mail: okeeadsales@newszap.comWe Pledge ... To operate this newspaper as a public trust. To help our community become a better place to live and work, through our dedication to conscientious journalism. To provide the information citizens need to make their own intelligent decisions about public issues. To report the news with honesty, accuracy, objectivity, fearlessness and compassion. To use our opinion pages to facilitate community debate, not to dominate it with our own opinions. To disclose our own conicts of interest or potential conicts to our readers. To correct our errors and to give each correction to the prominence it deserves. To provide a right to reply to those we write about. To treat people with courtesy, respect and compassion.

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Despite the days heat and the nights rain, the Buckhead Ridge Community Association had 52 people at its July 26 potluck supper meeting. Treasurer Sandy Attaway, who had been on sick leave, returned to her posi tion, reminding us that this is the end of her six-year term. She will still be around each month with her joyous humor. Following our invocation and Pledge of Allegiance, Glades County Sheriffs Deputy Stacy Murphy gave the July incident report. There were 69 mostly minor calls, with a few more serious „ two medical emergencies, one theft, one arrest, two criminal mischief and two illegal dumping calls. The gathering voted to donate $500 to the Glades County Back-to-School Program. County Commissioner Tim Stanley reported on many community concerns, including a proposed three-story hotel with a restaurant and storefronts to be built in Moore Haven on U.S. 27. He said that a meeting open to the public, concerning the reservoir that is to be situated opposite Buckhead Ridge along State Road 78, will take place Thursday, Aug. 2, at 6 p.m. at Indian River State College to consider the latest proposals. Mr. Stanley further asked for a yes/no show of hands on who wants sewer lines in Buckhead Ridge. While the majority present said no,Ž Commissioner Stanley said that it is eventually going to be mandatory, but probably not for a long while. He noted that the proposed development south of Buckhead will have to have sewer lines. In speaking of garbage and trash collections in Buckhead Ridge, he said that in ongoing talks with Waste Management, he learned that if the whole community went with one hauler, we might be able to see bills at half the current rate. New hires for the county were announced: Sue Buchann heads planning and zoning, and Jamie Wright is the new animal control of“cer. The county has interviewed four people for county manager, a post that became vacant after Paul Carlisle retired and the interim manager, Joe Helfenberger, who served for just weeks, left. Jennifer JamesMesloh has been selected, but there are still legal steps that must be completed. They will also interview for a new code enforcement of“cer; the Moore Haven city code of“cer is helping in this position until a new person is hired. Mr. Stanley said those needing transportation for medical or prescription needs in Buckhead Ridge had been told to call Good Wheels Transportation, which helps the disabled and disadvantaged. It has been found that when they call for help and give their Buckhead address, the help is refused as Buckhead addresses show Okeechobee.Ž That has now been corrected. If this service can help you, call 239-768-2900 or toll-free 800-741-1570. In other community news, sidewalks for Buckhead Ridge have been pushed back until 2022, and the money for the new playground is still available, awaiting plans. Due to the possibility of identity theft, which might cause a problem with voting rolls, be assured there will be provisional ballots available on voting day. Following the commissioners report, the Association was treated to a talk o n Buckhead history and development whe n 94-year-old Katherine Worth told about th e old wooden bridge at the entrance. She als o told how those laying out the area by boa t saw trees that looked like a deers head s o they decided to call it Buckhead Ridge. As a child, she had gone with her grandfather t o vote and saw him actually pay a $1 poll ta x before he could vote. Next months meeting will be one wee k early, on Aug. 23, at which time candidate s will be available to speak and answer ques tions at the annual Political Rally. A potluc k dinner at 6 p.m. will precede the rally. Com e get involved in YOUR community. News from Buckhead Ridge Special to the Glades County Democrat HENDRY/GLADES „ As students get ready for a new school year, the Florida Department of Health in Hendry and Glades Counties reminds parents and caregivers to review their childrens immunization records and make sure they have the required v accinations. Vaccinations help develop immunity to many serious diseases and infections, and they help keep students healthy and in school,Ž said State Surgeon General and DOH Secretary Dr. Celeste Philip. Making sure your child is fully immunized not only protects them, but it also protects children who cannot receive immunizations for medical reasons. I encourage everyone to make sure that their child is up-to-date on all their vaccinations to protect them and any other children at risk for acquiring vaccine-preventable diseases.Ž To learn which immunizations are required for your child, visit the departments School Immunization Requirements page. Students entering college should check with the health services at their college regarding immunization requirements. The department makes it easy to keep track of your childrens immunization records through Florida SHOTS, a free, statewide, centralized online immunization registry that helps healthcare providers, parents and schools keep track of immunization records to ensure that patients of all ages receive the vaccinations needed to protect them from dangerous vaccine-preventable diseases. Florida SHOTS makes it easier to keep up with your childrens immunization histories „ even when moving or switching doctors. The registry is endorsed by the Florida Academy of Family Physicians, Florida Asso ciation of Health Plans Inc., Florida Medical Association, Florida Osteopathic Medical Association and the Florida Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. If your child or children are due for a vac cine, visit your family healthcare provider or one of our health department clinics. Visit ImmunizeFlorida.org to learn more about immunizations your children may need or call your local county health department to “nd out locations and times for immunization services available near you. Florida Health urges back-to-school immunization4 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee August 9, 2018HENDRY COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASEHendry County School District today announced an amendment to its policy for serving meals to students under the [National School Lunch I School Breakfast Programs] for the 2018-2019 schoolyear. All students will be served [lunch/breakfast] at no charge at the following sites: Edward A. UptheGrove Elementary School LaBelle Elementary School Country Oaks Elementary School LaBelle High School LaBelle Middle School Clewiston Middle School Central Elementary School Clewiston High School Eastside/Westside Elementary School Montura Early Learning Center For additional information please contact: Hendry County School District Attention: SanJuanita Perez/Food Service Manager, Food Service Department, 111 Curry St., La Belle FL 33935, (863)67 4-4113, perezs@hendry-schools.net. In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, of“ces, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for bene“ts. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English. To “le a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_“ling_cust.html, and at any USDA of“ce, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: : mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture Of“ce of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 0 fax: (202) 690-7 442; or email: program.intake@usda.gov. This institution is an equal opportunity provider. By Brad BuckUF/IFAS A virus responsible for an illness outbreak in Venezuela is spreading to other parts of the Americas, says a University of Florida scientist who is closely monitoring the Mayaro virus. Even though the virus hasnt infected anyone in Florida or the United States, Barry Alto, an associate professor of entomology at the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci ences, is studying whether mosquitoes common in Florida can transmit the Mayaro virus to humans. In a new study, Mr. Alto and his research group found that yellow fever and Asian tiger mosquitoes „ two abundant spe cies in Florida „ can carry the virus. Mayaro virus is expanding in the Western Hemisphere, Mr. Alto said. Thats reason for some concern, he said. Furthermore, in the past decade, Florida has experienced out breaks of other mosquito-borne viruses, including zika, chikungunya and dengue. Increases in mosquito-borne viruses in the Americas, especially those transmitted by mosquitoes that live in Florida, increases the risk of imported and local transmission in the U.S.Ž Mr. Alto said. We should probably be moderately concerned that this virus could show up in Florida,Ž he said. Floridas wet, warm climate and presence of yellow fever and Asian tiger mosquitoes, coupled with a lot of human travel, makes the state susceptible to transmission of mosquito-borne viruses.Ž Mayaro virus produces symptoms similar to those of chikungunya, including fever lasting three to “ve days, chills, headache, rash and severe joint pain, which may persist for months, according to a study led by Baylor University scientists. For the new study, Mr. Altos research group conducted experiments with yellow fever and Asian tiger mosquitoes. They determined infectiousness of mosquitoes by testing their saliva for Mayaro virus. Infectiousness is the state in which mosquitoes may transmit the virus by biting other animals, including humans, Mr. Alto said. The group found that both mosquito species were highly susceptible to infection. The study has been published in the journal Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Researchers zero in on new mosquito virus

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August 9, 2018 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 5 James (Jim) Camaratta, 53CLEWISTON „ James (Jim) Camaratt a passed away on July 30, 2018 at the age of 53. Jim is the beloved father of Paul and daughter-in-law Ca sey, James, Danielle Norby and son-in-law J osh, Matthew, and Sean and daughter-inlaw Samara. He is the loving grandfather of Chloe, Damien, Elijah, Shane, Sophia, An orah and William (expected in September). J im was predeceased by his father, Joe; and survived by his mother, Rosena; brother, Joe J r. and sister-in-law Lorraine; ex-wife, Marijo; and many nieces and nephews. Jim graduated from Archbishop Ryan High School in Philadelphia, Pa. in 1983, and Pennco Tech technical school in Bucks County. A n electrician by trade, Jim moved to Florid a in 2001 where he worked in the construction industry. He enjoyed cooking, music, caring for his cats and was an avid Pittsburgh Steelers fan. Above all, he loved being with famil y and friends, sharing a story and making them laugh. Services are private. A donation in Jims memory may be made to the American Heart A ssociation at www.heart.org Billie Joyce Borst, 80BELLE GLADE „ Billie Joyce Borst passed away Aug. 5, 2018 in Palm Beach Gardens. She was born Feb. 27, 1938 in Weslaco, Texas, to Hulet and Vestie Jane (Hodge) Parson. Billie loved to cook, loved to dress up and look pretty, she enjoyed visiting with people. She enjoyed going to different churches, she w ould visit many of the area churches often, especially Alliance Church, First Baptist of Belle Glade and Lake Harbor Methodist Church. She was a loving mother, grandmother, great grandmother and sister who w ill be greatly missed by her entire family and friends. Survivors include four legged companion, Roxie; her three daughters, Karen Sue Wiseman Holcomb and her husband Cecil, Kath y W iseman Johnson and her husband Steve, Teresa Wiseman Runkles and her husband J ohn; son, Charles Ray Wiseman; grandchildren, Brandon Holcomb and his wife Alexis, Shannon Ransom and husband Daylan, Kevin Rhodes, and wife Ingrid, Clinton Johnson, Christy Runkles Imparato and husband Stev en, Jonathan Runkles; great grandchildren, Dayton Ransom, Danalyn Ransom, Hannah Holcomb, Austin Holcomb, Koston Rhodes, J ordan Runkles and Jarrett Runkles; brother, Tony Parson; and sister, Carole Bowman. Celebration of her life will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 10, 2018 in Akin-Davis Funeral Home where visitation will be from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Burial of cremains will take place at 3 p.m. Aug. 17, 2018 in Ridgelawn Cemetery. Cremation arrangements by Akin-Davis Funeral Home Clewiston.Billy Wade Dawson, Jr., 37CLEWISTON „ Billy Wade Dawson, Jr., passed away Aug. 5, 2018 in Lake Placid. He was born Feb. 17, 1981 in West Palm Beach to Billy W. Dawson, Sr. and Becky Pate. Billy was a Lab Chemist for U.S. Sugar for many years. He enjoyed the outdoors, spending a lot time outside “shing and hunting. Billy leaves behind his “ance and companion, Arelie Beltran; his children, Matthe w W ade Dawson and Olivia Jade Dawson; both of his parents, Billy Dawson, Sr. and wife; Martina and Becky Pate; brothers, Kevin, Michael, Travis; and one sister, Priscilla Dawson; and many extended family and friends. Celebration of Billys life will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 10, 2018 in Akin-Davis Funeral Home where visitation will be held Thursday evening from 6 to 8 p.m. Burial will be in Ridgelawn Cemetery. Arrangements by Akin-Davis Funeral Home Clewiston. Obituaries Obituaries should be submitted by sending e-mail to obits@newszap.com. Customers m ay also request photos and links to online g uest books. A link to the obituaries is a vailable at www.newszap.com. View obituaries from the past month at http://www.legacy.com Re” ections from the PulpitLearning from my 4-year-olds: A gift of spiritThe Reverend Samuel S. Thomas, Ph. D.+Saint Martins Church, Clewiston School is now in the process of opening for another year. My career includes teaching in secular and church settings; from kindergarten through college. My “ rst formal experience was at a large Church in Wisconsin, applying for a staff position while in seminary. The minister asked me about my background. I told him that I had studied history, New Testament, Old Testament, theology, liturgics, and pastoral care. He said Good, w e can use somebody in the 4-year-old kindergarten!Ž Thereafter I began to learn more than teach. I was impressed by the open hearts and minds of the youngsters; they would come out with anything that they thought (and often no doubt to the embarrassment of their parents!) Those who had come more recently from God didnt hold back and they w ere ready to share, to take turns, to listen w hen someone else was speaking, to ask questions, to bring up things they thought w ere important, to tell about events that w ere signi“ cant in their families. Paul, in his Epistle to the Ephesians (chapter 4, verses 2ff) wrote about what I w as seeing and learning as I shared with my new 4-year-old teachers. Lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, w ith all humility and gentleness, with patience bearing one another in love, making every effort to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.Ž The class was a microcosm of what I would later see as the call of each of us; gathered to learn something about a special relation with God and with each other, done w ith some humility sharing, being polite, w aiting ones turn, taking part in our worship together and laying before God what was important to us at that moment. Humility and gentleness, patience, bearing one another in love were all shared in what was a part of the way things worked out. Paul speaks of bearing one another in loveŽ with the realization that it takes bearingŽ to love each other at times. Some of us are more lovable than others and all of us have good days and bad days; the limits of love can be tested but our call is to love one another....anyway!Ž It is through our tolerances and understanding that the greater gift from loving one another will overcome the shortcomings of human imperfections. That is our calling from God, thats what seemed to take place among some 4-year-old children, bringing to that class the unity of Spirit in the bond of peace.Ž When there was no wrangling, need to have ones way all of the time, willingness to share and work together, that unity of Spirit in the bond of peaceŽ was a natural result of what took place. I could share with them stories of Noah and the Ark, David and Goliath, the Lord who was born in a manger because of a certain unity of our purpose in the gathering and why we were all there. Years later I shared with other organizations and groups whose existence was due to a common purpose or area of interest. Our unity of SpiritŽ came from the reasons for our gathering and led to seeing the greater purpose. That led to being patient and some humility and gentleness, or at least understanding and tolerance for others when we would meet. I see these qualities in those organizations that survive and the realization that We must work together to accomplish why were here.Ž Recently Ive read about the discovery of a part of us that is responsible for our having a sense of belief. I dont recall all of the details, but it seems that we are made to believe. I have no problem with accepting this discovery; God does great design work! In fact, people do have a sense of belief, that unity of SpiritŽ that Paul mentions. Whether it is a belief supported by those groups, churches, institutions and religious bodies or the awareness of persons outside of such support structures, there is that sense of belief in all of us. The discovery of our call to have that belief is supported best in our worship and common study of what is known about God, His creation, how we are sustained and how we are redeemed; the purposes for which we are here. I dont have to reinvent the wheelŽ and I can nourish that part of me that God has placed in us since creation. Since my experiences early in life, since m y being the teacherŽ with my four year old children, and ever since, I see how our callings and our faith plays out in our respect and love for one another. It opens the door to Gods Spirit in us and the Bond of peace we so desperately seem to need these days. God has given us the capacities to do it, the rest is up to us. Special to INI Florida ORLANDO „ After a record hurricane season in 2017, most Floridians are hoping for a calm summer. While none of us can control nature, all of us can be ready to w eather even the strongest storm. Every Floridian needs to prepare for hurricane season and that includes people w ith disabilities and access and functional needs. Disasters affect everyone but some „ such as seniors, people with chronic conditions, the economically disadvantaged, and those with access or functional needs „ are often disproportionately affected. The Florida Division of Emergency Management partnered with every local emergency management agency in the state to create a registry so residents with disabilities or access and functional needs can receive assistance during a disaster. Floridians can register with their local emergency management agency through the Florida Special Needs Registry. The statewide registry provides “ rst responders with valuable information to prepare for disasters or other emergencies. Registration is free and con“ dential. Information you offer will only be used to plan for and provide services during a disaster. Additional information on preparedness for individuals with disabilities, including how to create a disaster plan, is available at Ready.gov. For information on Hurricane Irma recovery, visit www.FEMA.gov/IrmaFL. Follow FEMA and the Florida Division of Emergency Management on Twitter at @ FEMARegion4 and @FLSERT. You may also visit FEMA and the Divisions Facebook pages at Facebook.com/FEMA and Facebook. com/FloridaSERT. Disabled Floridians should register w ith emergency management

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6 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee August 9, 2018 By Katrina ElskenINI Florida OKEECHOBEE „ We knew this meeting was going to be personal,Ž said Lt. Col. J ennifer A. Reynolds, deputy district com mander for South Florida in the Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District, at the Lake Okeechobee Watershed Restoration Project (LOWRP) meeting held Aug. 2 in the Wil liamson Conference Center at Indian River State College in Okeechobee. LOWRP meetings on July 31 in Lehigh A cres and Aug. 1 in Stuart attracted people more interested in complaining about the lake releases and algae in coastal waterways than discussing plans for water storage north of the lake. Those attending the Aug. 2 meeting in Okeechobee zeroed in on the proposed project to build a shallow reser v oir and wetlands project just north of State Road 78, adjacent to the Kissimmee River in Glades County. The Okeechobee gathering included public of“cials, anglers, business owners and residents from all around the big lake. Many of those who spoke at the meeting own property in or near the footprint of the proposed project. If the currently proposed project is built, some will lose their homes. Most in the crowd agreed there is a need to store water north of the lake. Many questioned why the storage is not planned farther north in the watershed, which starts at Orlando. They also urged the corps to use land the state already owns instead of taking more land off the tax rolls. Lisa Aley, corps manager for this project, said LOWRP is just one of many restoration projects going on in South Florida. The proposal is for above-ground and below-ground water storage as well as wetlands. LOWRP would work in conjunction w ith the Kissimmee River Restoration, the Everglades Agricultural Area reservoir south of the lake and the C-44 and C-43 reservoir projects under construction east and west of the lake. Florida has a pretty complex dynamic,Ž Ms. Aley explained. So many people now live in areas that historically used to be wet.Ž The ”ow down the Kissimmee River used to be a slow meander, she continued. In the rainy season, when the lake level rose, it w ould ”ow south in a large sheet”ow. The more people started moving here, the more drainage projects resulted,Ž she said. After the Great Florida Flood in 1947 left most of South Florida under water, in 1948 Congress directed the Army Corps to come up with a ”ood control plan. This plan in cluded canals to drain water off the land, the channelization of the Kissimmee River to speed water south, building the Herbert Hoover Dike around the lake, and using the St. Lucie Canal to the east and Caloosa hatchee River to the west to ”ow water from the lake to the ocean. Water comes in six times faster than we can release it,Ž she said. The system does not function as it used to. We have lost a lot of the storage and “ltration capabilities of the wetlands that used to be around the lake,Ž Ms. Aley said. We know we need more storage so we can have more ”exibility in water management,Ž she said. The corps also wants to restore some of the lost wetlands. The preliminary budget for LOWRP is $1.4 billion. This includes restoration of the Paradise Run wetlands near the mouth of the Kissimmee River and restoration of a wetlands area father north on the river. It also includes a wetlands attenuation project „ a 12,500-acre shallow storage area that will provide 43,000 acre-feet of storage. (One acre-foot is the amount of water needed to cover 1 acre of land 1 foot deep). As the water comes down the Kissimmee, we can divert the ”ow into this wetland attenuation feature so it doesnt go into the lake,Ž she said. In addition, the project includes 80 Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) wells. When we have too much surface water, we can treat it to drinking-water standards and then pump it into the aquifer,Ž Ms. Aley explained. During dry times, the water can be pumped back out. The 80 ASR wells could pump 400 million gallons per day. The ASRs do not require additional land acquisition, she said. They can all be built on land already owned by the South Florida Water Management District. The circles on the map presented at the meeting show the general locations proposed. The actual wells have a very small footprint. To restore the wetlands, we would recarve portions of the historic channel and ”ow the water back through,Ž she explained. The proposal would restore two wetland areas that were lost when the river was channelized. Ms. Aley said the corps hopes to see the lake within the ecologically preferred stages (12.5 to 15.5 feet) more often, with fewer extreme highs and extreme lows. Storing water north and keeping the lake within the preferred stages will also help restore the marshes around the lake, she said, which bene“t water quality and “sh and wildlife habitat.South lake of“cials objectThe public comment portion of the meeting brought out local concerns. Were de“nitely against you buying any land in the county and taking it off the tax rolls,Ž said Glades County Commissioner Tim Stanley. He said if the project has to be done, Glades County would like a half-mile corridor along State Road 78. With Bass Pro taking over the Okee-Tantie Recreation Area, that will be a prime area for commercial development, he said. Mr. Stanley said that leaving a half-mile buffer between SR 78 and the project would also protect most of the homesteads in that area. If there was an eagles nest out there, you would build around it,Ž he said. Shouldnt people be given the same consideration as a bird? Okeechobee Commissioner Bryant Culpepper said there are a lot of factors affecting the lakes water quality. Does Lake Okeechobee have blue-green algae? Absolutely. So does every other freshwater lake,Ž he said. Mr. Culpepper said the algae blooms along the coastal waterways are being fed by the drain “elds from septic tanks. Lets get those septic tanks and wells into a municipal system,Ž he said. I dont want to spend $1.4 billion and it is not going to work.Ž We dont believe that any land that is not already owned by the state or federal government should be used for any restoration project,Ž said Clewiston Mayor Mali Gardner. She said the South Florida Water Management District owns a lot of land throughout the district that could be used for restoration projects. There is land from Orange County down that should be looked at,Ž she said. We dont want to see any more land taken off anybodys tax rolls.Ž Mayor Gardner said she is fully supportive of ASR wells, which can be built on land SFWMD already owned. She added she also fully supports deep well injection, which would send water deep into the boulder zone, effectively sending it to tide by going straight down instead of east or west „ but that is not part of the LOWRP proposal. We all have to work together,Ž said Mayor Gardner. Its a problem north, south, east and west of Lake Okeechobee. We all want to see Lake Okeechobee clean and healthy,Ž she said. We stand together tonight knowing projects must be done. On the south end, we keep having “ngers pointed at us, and we know we are not the problem,Ž she added.Landowners speaking up, tooSteve Dobbs, who lives in Buckhead Ridge, said that as an engineer he often runs into the problem of NIMBYs „ people who dont object to a project in theory, but say, Not In My Back Yard!Ž Guess what? Im a NIMBY tonight,Ž he said, suggesting they consider excavating instead of building the reservoir above ground. Matt Pearce, of Rockhill Ranch and Pearce Cattle Co., said his family has two home sites in the project footprint „ one was established in the early 1900s. I am against the project but support what the corps is trying to do for the lake,Ž he said, adding that hes also concerned about cultural and archaeological sites within the footprint. Mr. Pearce stated that SFWMD owns thousands of acres to the north that could be used for northern storage without taking more land out of private ownership. The “fth-generation cattleman also questioned the work being done on the Kissimmee River restoration, noting the restored area is inundated with wax myrtles. Ramon Iglesias, from Roland and Mary Ann Martins Marina & Resort in Clewiston, asked whether its possible to start with the ASRs. If we dont have a healthy lake, we wont have a healthy Everglades,Ž he said. Before you take any land, you have to make sure these people are compensated,Ž he continued. We do need this project. We need it for the health of the lake. But if you do need to take any land, you need to make sure these people are compensated.Ž Glades County property owner Brad Phares said: Our property is not within the current footprint of the reservoir, but what it is effectively going to do is sandwich our property between two giant bodies of water. I have little faith that it is not going to lea k and affect our property next door.Ž He also asked the corps to look at other land SFWMD already owns. It needs to be done. I just think there should be a better place to do it,Ž he said. Fishing guide Justin Jones noted that the lakes water quality is hurt by the loss of aquatic vegetation. Chemical spraying o f Lake Okeechobee for invasive plants is hurting the lake, he said. I challenge biologists to rethink the ide a of the invasive vegetation to improve the water quality in the lake,Ž he said. My property is not in the footprint right now,Ž said Donald Jones, whose family has a ranch in Glades County. He said his land was in the footprint of an earlier version o f the LOWRP plan. Im not sure what we are seeing now is going to be the “nal project,Ž he said. You have started so many projects. Have yall ever “nished one?Ž he asked. Mr. Jones said his land was involved with the Lake Okeechobee Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM) project, which included testing runoff from ranches. Our water was clean enough out of our pastureland to go into the lake,Ž he said. Yet agriculture is being blamed for the problems in Lake Okeechobee. I dont think agriculture is getting the credit it deserves for taking care of the land.Ž Keith Pearce, who said he is probabl y the largest landowner within this footprint, explained that his father fought the original channelization of the Kissimmee River. He told the corps it was going to be nothing but a problem,Ž said Mr. Pearce. He told them leave it alone. You dug through the biggest phosphate deposit in the world when you dug the channel.Ž Now, pushing the material that was dredged from the channel back into the river is creating a bigger mess,Ž he said. Use this money and redirect it to anoth er project,Ž he suggested. Dennis Duke from the U.S. Department o f the Interior said the overall project provides a lot of good bene“ts. He said restoration o f the Paradise Run wetlands has been on the books for years. Mr. Duke said he is disappointed with the amount of water storage provided by this version of the project. Dr. Paul Gray of Audubon Florida said the extreme high and low water levels hurt the lake. This project is moving in the right direction,Ž said Dr. Gray. Lt. Col. Reynolds said public comments about LOWRP will be accepted through Aug. 20, and may be submitted by email. To send your comments via email, send to OkeechobeeWatershedRestoration@usace.army.mil, or they may be mailed to Dr. Gretchen Ehlinger, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District, P.O. Box 4970, Jacksonville, FL 32232-0019. The “nal plans will be submitted some time in the summer of 2019. The whole project will take “ve to eight years, she estimated. Once funding is authorized, work on the ASRs can start immediately, she explained. Property owners oppose siting of reservoir near SR 78

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August 9, 2018 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 7 ing my vision to “nally come true. After bugging my favorite cousin, Tony L. Patrick, for two years about doing the back-to-school drive, we “nally took that leap and it all came out according to plan,Ž she said. Miss Croskey and a bunch of helpers including her cousin converged at the Washington Park Community Center on Gamble Street at midafternoon Sunday to set up, and began welcoming children and their parents at 4:30. We gave away free school supplies to all the grades, kindergarten through 12th grade. We had backpacks, all the supplies you can think of; we had T-shirts; and I conducted a raf”e for all the gift certi“ cates that I received from different businesses around town,Ž she said. After she realized some time ago how costly it was to get kids what they need on a single persons salary, she decided to do this to help families with kids in the Glades County schools. We decided to put on the drive for this year. And it has been a very, I mean a BIG success,Ž Miss Croskey said. The outpouring of support from so many peo ple all over was amazing. Tony and I and our dream team would like to thank everybody who played a part in our event.Ž She said shed even received packages delivered by Amazon from former Moore Haven residents that used to live here years ago,Ž adding, Different people in the community have been reaching out to me, buying stuff.Ž Now entering her second year with the Glades County school system, she said shell continue to do this in future years. We are ready for next year, with supplies already packed up,Ž she said. Among those Miss Croskey wanted to thank, she said, are: The BP/Shell station here, which is owned by (Glades County Board Chairman) John Ahern, gave a couple of big gift cards. I got Subway gift cards from Leslie Pryor, and Commissioner (Weston) Pryor gave gift cards. The supervisor of elections, Miss Aletris Farnam, donated supplies. Ms. Patricia Pearce, whos running for School Board District 5, she brought tons and tons „ I mean, loaded my car down „ of supplies from her and her husband. We had gift cards to raf”e off from Subway, Shell gas station, iTunes, Regal Cinema, Dollar General and Texas Roadhouse Grill. We had two barbers cutting hair for free. It was a big success!Ž SUPPLYContinued From Page 1 Special to the Glades County Democrat/ Courtesy photoShon Croskey (at right) and her favorite cousin,Ž Tony L. Patric k (left), organized the Moore Haven Back-to-School Bash that took place at the Washington Park Community Center on Sunday afternoon. just west of the juncture with State Road 78. Loves is part of that development, and the road would provide a direct connection to the training center; also, turn lanes would be added on U.S. 27 leading into a new w estern entrance for the facility. The county, she explained, is seeking $2 million for the work, with a portion for engineering and design to put the “nal phase of this infrastructure in.Ž Ms. Vanassche said the state had changed the application form and that information had to be in cluded about the countys investment and any public-private partnerships that were involved. It now speci“es that the county contributed $750,000, acquired $332,000 from private sources and received $1.5 million in Community Development Block Grant “nancing, all of which went toward construction of the GCRTF. Mr. Ahern noted that staff also had updated the application with some things that have changed regarding the training center and development in the county. He said that since Glades County has been without a permanent manager, Schools Superintendent Scott Bass picked up where ex-County Manager Paul Carlisle left off in working to get educational and job training programs in place. The new application says “nishing the GCRTFs infrastructure will aid Glades County in becoming a rural economic provider of new jobs, attracting new business and ... maintaining present jobs.Ž It also mentions that with the expected expansion soon of Airglades Airport 9 miles south of Moore Haven, the need to provide shovel-ready sites with adequate roadways, water and sewer for economic diversi“cation is a critical component for companies relocating, expanding or for new start-ups to seek Glades County for their business home.Ž Two companies recently moved to the area, the application notes: € Burma Spice relocated to the area, is planning an expansion of its facility and expects to add eight new full-time positions. € Maxant Buttons relocated their manufacturing facility to Glades County, recently acquired a second aluminum products company and are expanding as Maxant Aluminum Products.Ž Finally, it also says the county recently approved a proposal for a new hotel and restaurant with retail shops in Moore Haven, correlated to the close proximity to the airport,Ž which means the potential for new local jobs „ chefs, management, wait staff, domestic positions „ as well as con struction-related positions is imminent.Ž While present job opportunities are mainly in agriculture, trucking and manufacturing, the application says, the GCRTF will provide needed certi“cate training and ... new job force entry applicants with skills to work in other industries.Ž Now being offered at GCRTF is training in tractor-trailer driving for a commercial drivers license. Expansion is being planned into welding, heating/ventilation/air conditioning and diesel mechanic training. Other possibilities cited are “re“ghter training, certi“cation and recerti“cation courses; GED and citizenship classes; local certi“ed and diploma courses from regional colleges; and the ability to serve businesses by having local employees enrolled in continuing education training. GRANTContinued From Page 1 w hether action will need to be taken on a case-by-case basis. We take every threat seriously, and any individual planning to do harm against our communities will be investigated and punished to the fullest ex tent of the law. If you have any information regarding threats made against our communities online, please report them by contacting the Hendry and Glades County Sheriffs Of“ces directly.Ž The numbers to call are: Hendry County Sheriffs Of“ce, 863-674-5600; Glades County Sheriffs Of“ce, 863-946-1600; Palm Beach County Sheriffs Of“ce, District 5 (Belle Glade), 561-996-1670. All three of “ces said anyone who feels any threat has been made directly against them also should call. Borderline comments have appeared in different strings on the Facebook pages of The South Florida Clean Water Movement, Glades Lives Matter Too and the Lake O (Business) Alliance, to name just a few. Janet Taylor, a former Hendry County commissioner, founded the group Glades Lives Matter in 2016 to be a voice for residents in cities around the southern rim of Lake Okeechobee „ Belle Glade, Clewiston, Moore Haven, Pahokee and South Bay. Hers has been a steady voice on citizens and farmers behalf in the debate over how to stop the severe algae blooms that occurred that year and have returned with a vengeance to both coasts after Hurricane Irma stirred up the lake waters 11 months ago. Ms. Taylor said Tuesday that she personally hadnt experienced any threats; however, shes very concerned about them. I just left the sheriffs department in LaBelle. I went (there) because I told them ... to me, this is a terrorist attack, the threats are. I know locally theyre (investigating) but I think we need to have FDLE and the FBI in here, because online, you dont know where those people are stating those threats from. Anything thats a threat to our community is a personal threat to me,Ž she “nished. Tammy Jackson-Moore, a member of the Lake Okeechobee Regional Economic Alliance of Palm Beach County and founder of Guardians of the Glades, was asked Tuesday whether shed been threatened. Not personally,Ž she replied. But, you know, when we hear the threats that weve heard, its against the community, and all of us are a part of the community, so the entire community has been threatened.Ž Sheriff Steve Whidden in Hendry was quoted as saying the threatening language was posted by several vocal people online and were generally aimed at people living near Lake Okeechobee. One person criticized the sugar industry for causing the problems and declared theyd show up 2nd Amendment in hand.Ž Another said protesters should gather near the lake to draw police,Ž take physical actionŽ on Lake Okeechobee and said I got a welder and an AR (assault ri”e) but its gonna take a big group to stand up to local la w enforcement.Ž Many people along the coasts of South Florida have been blaming the released lake waters themselves for causing the blooms this summer, and even for the red tide that recently has ravaged marine life along the shores of the Gulf of Mexico. Several scientists who have studied the algae and red tide outbreaks, however, have maintained that Lake O discharges play only a bit part in these phenomena. They say that runoff from residential septic systems, lawns and farm “elds where best management practices are not being used „ along the many miles between the coasts and Lake O, which drain into the St. Lucie and canals on the east and the Caloosahatchee River and other canals on the west „ are much bigger contributors to the problems. Glades Sheriff David Harden said Tuesday he hadnt received any speci“c reports of threats, but that his and the other sheriffs of“ces will be looking into any reported threats individually to decide whether the y need to take action against the threateners. THREATSContinued From Page 1

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8 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee August 9, 2018 Corps accepts $50 million from state for dike repairs Letter to the EditorSen. Bill Nelson: Algae partly due to lax state regulationDear Friends: This toxic green algae in our water is making people sick. Its killing the “sh and wildlife that call these waterways home. And its hurting our economy and the local businesses that rely on the tourists and visitors who typically visit our state „ and who are now looking for somewhere else to go. While we are trying to do everything we can to help those who are most affected by these toxic algae blooms „ whether its trying to get local businesses some muchneeded tax relief to help them make ends meet, or calling on the CDC to help us understand potential health impacts of algae exposure … its important to realize that there is no quick “x to this problem. There is no magical solution that will make this algae go away overnight. This is a problem thats been years in the making „ and its a problem thats going to take years to “x. And anyone who tells you that “xing the dike around Lake Okeechobee will somehow solve this problem is fooling you. The federal government is responsible for “xing the dike. And for the past 17 years, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has spent over $1 billion to strengthen the dike to prevent a massive, catastrophic breach that could kill thousands of people living south of Lake Okeechobee „ and we have just authorized $600 million more to speed up the completion of the dike by 2022. The State of Florida, on the other hand, is the one responsible for the quality and cleanliness of the water. For the past eight years our state leaders have repeatedly rolled back environmental standards, eased regulations and dismantled the states environmental agencies „ all of which have allowed more and more pollutants to be dumped into our states waterways. Our state leaders even passed a law to stop the periodic inspections of leaking septic tanks. The bottom line is this: more pollution means more algae. As that pollution sits in our waterways and lakes, baking in the hot summer sun, it turns into the green toxic sludge we see today. And when the water from Lake Okeechobee is released into the nearby estuaries and waterways, the toxic algae goes with it. It seems like the algae has never been this bad. Its never been this thick. Its never been this toxic. And thats because its never been this polluted. Thats why Sen. Marco Rubio and I are continuing to urge Congress to approve a massive reservoir project south of Lake Okeechobee that can be used to help store and clean some of the water being released from the lake before it goes into our waterways.Because, at the end of the day, it all comes down to how dirty the water is when it enters our waterways. Thats it. The more polluted the water is in our lakes and other waterways, the worse the algae blooms will be.So, to truly prevent these algae blooms from reoccurring year after year, we need our state leaders to change course. We need them to start doing the right thing and take the steps needed to keep our waterways clean „ instead of the steps they have been taking to allow them to become more polluted. As a “fth-generation Floridian who gre w up on the Indian River, I know how important these waterways are to our community. They are the lifeblood of our economy, and I will continue to do everything I can to protect them. Sincerely, Senator Bill Nelson Special to the Okeechobee News The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has signed an agreement with the State of Florida to accept an additional $50 million of state funds to help with rehabilitation of the Herbert Hoover Dike surrounding Lake Okeechobee. The agreement, known as a Contributed Funds Memorandum of Agreement, w as signed today by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District Commander Col. Jason Kirk and Florida Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Noah V alenstein. A similar agreement was signed earlier this year, bringing the total State of Florida contributions to advance Herbert Hoover Dike construction to $100 million. The signing of this additional agreement truly exempli“es the strength of our federal-state partnership and our collective dedication to expediting rehabilitation efforts of the Herbert Hoover Dike and more broadly our ongoing collaboration on the restoration of Americas Everglades,Ž said Col. Kirk. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been undertaking a $1.8 billion rehabilitation program designed to reduce ”ood risk for people living and working around the lake. Since 2001, the corps has invested more than $1 billion to construct several features that include installation of 21 miles of seepage barrier and replacement of close to two dozen water control structures. DEP Secretary Valenstein said: Florida remains committed to looking for opportunities to partner with both the federal government and local communities to protect South Floridas waterways, now and in the future. Thanks to Governor Scotts commitment, Florida has invested a historic $100 million to jump-start critical repairs to the Herbert Hoover Dike and make sure Floridas families are safe.Ž The states contributions, along with federal funding, will continue to advance Herbert Hoover Dike construction with the award of addition cutoff wall construction contracts over the next year. The dike, due to the methods of construction at the time, is susceptible to seepage that can lead to erosion. The installation of the cutoff wall and replacement of water control structures is expected to reduce seepage, thereby reducing risk for thos e who live and work in the area. The Herbert Hoover Dike project also re cently received $514 million in Supplemen tal Long Term Recovery Investment Pla n funding to fully “nance the project and com plete construction in 2022. C onnect with local of“cials now; h urricane season nearing peak S pecial to INI Florida Severe weather can happen anytime and a nywhere, especially in Florida. According to t he National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adm inistration, 40 percent of hurricane landfalls i n the United States happen here. The peak of hurricane season is approachi ng, falling on Sept. 10 „ the day Irma struck C udjoe Key last year „ so Floridians should l earn now how theyre going to remain alert f or the last three months of hurricane season. T here are many easy ways Floridians can conn ect with local of“cials to receive up-to-date i nformation about severe weather such as h urricanes and tropical storms. € Go online to the Florida Division of Emerg ency Management at FloridaDisaster.org/ A lertFlorida. From there Floridians can sign up f or electronic severe weather alerts speci“c to t heir community. € Buy a weather radio, preferably one that u ses batteries and has crank-power capabili ty. Radios provide continuous updates and w eather-related safety information from the closest National Weather Service of“ce. € Call the FDEM State Assistance and Information Line, or SAIL, at 800-342-3557. FDEM activates the toll-free hotline during emergencies. € Connect with local emergency managers on social media. Every Florida county has an emergency management of“ce and many are active on social media. Floridians may search for and follow their communitys of“ce on Twitter or Facebook to interact with them and get severe weather updates. € Connect with FDEM on social media. Follow FDEM on Twitter @FLSERT and “nd them on Facebook at facebook.com/FloridaSERT. € Enable Wireless Emergency Alerts on mobile devices. Many cellphones are capable of receiving automatic WEAs that provide local emergency alerts. Floridians can receive WEAs at all times since cell network congestion does not affect messages and providers offer the service for free. € Pay attention to local media. Local radio and television are great sources for continuous weather updates and advisories.

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August 9, 2018 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 9 Apartments Apartments ROYAL AMERICAN MANAGEMENT PUBLIC NOTICE Royal American will be accepting eligible project-based applicants for New South Bay Villas in New South Bay, Florida for 4 bedrooms ONLY on Thursday August 9th, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM at Tanner Park, 105 W. Palm Beach Road, South Bay, Florida 33493. Applications will be accepted onsite ONLY. PLEASE BRING: Valid Photo ID for all cates and social security cards for all household members, proof of income, and copy of bank statements. Applications must meet occupancy standard for the bedroom size available, meet PBCHA’s local preference and eligibility criteria. PBCHA’S Local Preference The PHA will offer a preference to any family that has been terminated from its HCV proPHA will offer a preference for working families, where the head, spouse or sole member is employed for at least 20 hours a week. However, an applicant where the head and spouse or sole member person age 62 or older, or is a person with disabilities, must also be will also offer a preference for homeless families. A homeless family is a household that is (1) living on the street, in an emergency shelter or in a transitional housing facility, or (2) is a client of a case-management program service for the homeless. The PHA will offer a preference for displaced families, a family in which each member, or whose sole member, is a person displaced by governmental action, or a person whose dwelling has been extensively damaged or destroyed as a result of a disaster declared or otherwise formally recognized pursuant to Federal disaster relief laws. All persons will be treated fairly and equally without regard to race, color, religion, sex, familial status, disability, gender identify or expression, sexual orientation, age or national origin in compliance with the Fair Housing Act. In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, if you are a disable person and need a reasonable accommodation in connection with the submission of an application, please contact us before 5:00 PM August 7th, 2018 at 561-708-8289. Roo“ ng Roo“ ng Metal Roofs Re-Roofs Roof Repairs Seamless Gutters Soffit & Fascia Free Estimates Lic# CCC037019 981 Cowboy Circle Office (863)675-7045 Fax (863)612-1158 Lic#CCC1325950 Of“ce: (863) 675-7045 1050 Commerce Dr. Suite B. Fax (863) 612-1158 Miscellaneous Notices Contractor Needed that is licensed and insured to build a Preschool. Must be experienced with references or portfolio of work completed. Please send information to: P.O. Box 433, Pahokee, Florida 33476 or abidingfaith. krobertson@gmail.com Attention: Shirley or KR Employment Full Time Cox Air Conditioning is looking for experienced A/C Service Tech and Installers. Must have at least 2 years’ experience Self-motivated, basic tools for the job Clean driving record Pay based on experience Quarterly Bonuses Take home vehicle Stop in to apply at 99 N Industrial Loop, LaBelle, FL 33935. Flash Trucking Wanted Drivers New Pay increase 401K Health Insurance vacation pay Great Equipment Call Matt Shop 863-674-1011 cell 941-232-5403 Employment Full Time Employment Full Time Employment Full Time The Barron Water Control District a government independent agency, is now accepting applications until position filled, for a full-time maintenance position in the LaBelle area. Qualifications: You must have experience in operation of heavy duty tractors, batwing mowers and some rubber tire back hoe loaders. The starting pay is $11.00 per hour. Do not apply without these qualifications. Application forms may be obtained from the District office on 3293 Dellwood Terrace in Port LaBelle or call 863-675-0346 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Mon.-Fri. Barron Water Control District is an equal opportunity employer and qualified applicants are considered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, marital or veteran status. Employment Wanted RH Harvesting, LLC is hiring 56 farmworkers to cultivate and harvest vegetable and sugar cane crops in Hendry, Palm Beach, Martin, and Glades Counties in FL for a temporary period starting on 09/05/2018 and ending on 04/30/2019. Three (3) months of work experience harvesting vegetables is required The wages offered are the highest of $11.29/ hr. or applicable piece rates. This job requires prolonged standing, bending, stooping, and reaching. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to pre-hire drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Workers must be able to lift 70lbs. to shoulder height repetitively throughout the workday and able to lift and carry 70lbs. in field. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each working day. Transportation and subsistence expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: FL10728260. Central County Water Drainage District is looking to hire a journeyman Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic with the skills to perform a full range of overhaul and repair work on heavy-duty mobile equipment and vehicles powered by internal combustion engines (gasoline, butane, diesel or multi-fuel). Types of equipment repaired include, but not limited to, construction and industrial equipment, i.e., excuvators, front end loaders, cranes, bulldozers, road graders, rollers, heavy duty compressors, large generators, tractors, large trucks, hydraulic lifts, vehicles and accessory equipment and attachments etc. Must have the ability to do the work of a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic without more than normal supervision, which includes the ability to able to remove, adjust, replace, clean, and install a variety of parts, components, bearings, springs, shock absorbers, wheel items of similar complexity. Also perform engine tune-ups and adjust brakes. Assist in the removal, disassembly, repair, and reassembly of engines and transmissions. Applications may be picked up at Central County Water Drainage District, 475 S. Cabbage Palm Street, Clewiston FL (Montura Ranch Estates) 33440. READING A NEWSPAPER HELPS YOU UNDERSTAND THE WORLD AROUND YOU. Need a few more bucks to purchase something deer? Pick up some extra bucks when you sell your used items in the classifeids. ADVERTISEand Get Results www.newszap.com click on classifieds READING A NEWSPAPER MAKES YOU A MORE INFORMED AND INTERESTING PERSON. No wonder newspaper readers are more popular! Reading a newspape helps you understan d the world around you No wonder newspape readers are more suc cessful people! 863.763.3134 | okeeadsales@newszap.com Great Branding & Image Building Opportunity

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10 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee August 9, 2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 20 18-CA-0003 51JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Pamela L. Lewis a/k/a Pamela Lewis, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant (s); Everglades Federal Credit Union; Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Joyce A. Talley, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant (s); Unknown Parties in Possession# 1, Ifliving, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Pamela L. Lewis a/k/a Pamela Lewis, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant (s): ADDRESS UNKNOWN and Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Joyce A. Talley, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant (s): ADDRESS UNKNOWN Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknovvn heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Hendry County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOTS 22 AND 23, BLOCK “K”, OF HARLEM ADDITION TO CLEWISTON, HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 79, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, YEAR: 2004, MAKE: GENERAL, VIN#: GMHGA4260330450A AND VIN#: GMHGA4260330450B. more commonly known as 1031 Della Tobias Avenue, Clewiston, FL 33440. T his action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, FL 33431, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 25th day of July, 2018. Barbara S. Butler Circuit and County Courts By: J. Bevis Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator;1700 Monroe Street, Suite 1213, Fort Myers, Florida 33901 (239) 533-1521 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 278175 CN 8/2,9/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GLADES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2017-CA-000009ABS REO TRUST II, Plaintiff, vs. W. JUSTIN COTTRELL AS TRUSTEE OF 1456 SOUTH SW[NGING TRAIL LAND TRUST DATED MARCH 4, 2013; DERRICK KLUMP A/KIA DERRICK Q. KLUMP; KRISTINE L. KLUMP A/K/A KRISTINE LYNN KLUMP; SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; UNKNOWN TENANT #I; UNKNOWN TENANT#2, Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Agreed Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 15, 2018, entered in Civil Case No.: 2017-CA-000009 of the Circuit Court of the Twentieth Judicial Circuit in and for Glades County, Florida, wherein ABS REO TRUST II, Plaintiff, and W. JUSTIN COTTRELL AS TRUSTEE OF 1456 SOUTH SWINGING TRAIL LAND TRUST DATED MARCH 4, 2013; DERRICK KLUMP A/KIA DERRICK Q. KLUMP; KRISTINE L. KLUMP A/K/A KRISTINE LYNN KLUMP; SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 NKA AMY HERROLD; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 NKA DANIEL HERROLD, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the Front Steps South Door of the Glades County Courthouse, 500 Avenue J, Moorehaven, FL 33471 at 11:00 AM, on the 23rd day of August, 2018, the following described real property as set forth in said Agreed Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATE IN GLADES COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, VIZ: TRACT A-31: THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE QUARTER OF SECTION I, TOWNSHIP 42 SOUTH, RANGE 28 EAST, GLADES COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO EASEMENTS OVER THE EAST 30 FEET, OVER THE WEST 30 FEET AND OVER THE SOUTH 60 FEET THEREOF. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the tis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on July 16, 2018. SANDRA BROWN CLERK OF THE COURT By: Tami Simmons Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire Popkin & Rosaler, P.A. 1701West Hillsboro Boulevard Suite 400 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 360-9030 Facsimile: (954) 420-5187 275850 GCD 8/2,9/2018 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 18CA331CIT BANK N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF DIS LEY G. BROWN A/K/ A DISLEY B. GRAHAM, DECEASED. et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF DIS LEY G. BROWN A/K/ A DISLEY B. GRAHAM, DECEASED. et. al. whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 15 AND THE WEST HALF OF NEW YORK STREET ABUTTING LOT 15, BLOCK B, SUNSET PARK, A SUBDIVISION IN THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 43 SOUTH, RANGE 29 EAST, HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 within 30 days from date of first publication of this Notice, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Okeechobee County, Florida, this 23rd day of July, 2018. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT CO BY: J. Bevis DEPUTY CLERK ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ, AND SCHNEID, PL ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 PRIMARY EMAIL: mail@rastlaw.com 277357 CN 8/2,9/2018 SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE OF WORK PLANNotice is hereby given that pursuant to “The Water Rights Compact Among the Seminole Tribe of Florida, The State of Florida, and The South Florida Water Management District,” the 32nd Annual Work Plan of the Seminole Tribe of Florida has been submitted to the South Florida Water Management District (District). The Seminole Tribe of Florida (Tribe), 6073 Stirling Road, Hollywood, FL 33024, has submitted, on July 25, 2018, the 32nd Annual Work Plan The Work Plan describes existing and proposed activities on Seminole land. The work proposed includes five (5) projects in three (3) different Reservations: Hollywood Reservation – 1) Betty Mae Jumper Medical Complex, 2) Potable Water Tank, 3) Gaming Warehouse; Big Cypress Reservation – 1) Lorelei Huggins SFWMD Right of Way; Brighton Reservation – 1) HP 5 Culvert Replacement. The Brighton Reservation is located in Glades County, Township 40 South, Range 32 East; Township 39 South, Range 32 East; Township 39 South, Range 33 East; Township 38 South, Range 33 East. The Immokalee Reservation is located in Collier County, Section 11, Township 47 South, Range 29 East. The Big Cypress Reservation is located in Broward County, Township 48 South, Range 35 East, and, in Hendry County, Township 47 South, Ranges 32-34 East. The Hollywood Reservation is located in Broward County, Townships 50-51 South, Range 41 East. Coconut Creek Tribal Trust Land is located in Broward County, Section 18, Township 48 South, Range 42 East. Interested persons may comment upon the Work Plan or submit a written request for a copy of the Work Plan by either of the following methods: 1) Submitting a written request to: Regulation Division, South Florida Water Management District, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, FL 33406; or 2) Submitting an electronic request at permits@sfwmd.gov. Such comments or requests must be received within 30 days from the date of publication. No further public notice will be provided regarding this Work Plan. A copy of the Staff Report must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an Administrative Hearing regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request therefore after reviewing the Staff Report.279527 GCD 8/9/2018 Public Notice Public Notice SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE OF WORK PLANNotice is hereby given that pursuant to “The Water Rights Compact Among the Seminole Tribe of Florida, The State of Florida, and The South Florida Water Management District,” the 32nd Annual Work Plan of the Seminole Tribe of Florida has been submitted to the South Florida Water Management District (District). The Seminole Tribe of Florida (Tribe), 6073 Stirling Road, Hollywood, FL 33024, has submitted, on July 25, 2018, the 32nd Annual Work Plan. The Work Plan describes existing and proposed activities on Seminole land. The work proposed includes five (5) projects in three (3) different Reservations: Hollywood Reservation – 1) Betty Mae Jumper Medical Complex, 2) Potable Water Tank, 3) Gaming Warehouse; Big Cypress Reservation – 1) Lorelei Huggins SFWMD Right of Way; Brighton Reservation – 1) HP 5 Culvert Replacement. The Brighton Reservation is located in Glades County, Township 40 South, Range 32 East; Township 39 South, Range 32 East; Township 39 South, Range 33 East; Township 38 South, Range 33 East. The Immokalee Reservation is located in Collier County, Section 11, Township 47 South, Range 29 East. The Big Cypress Reservation is located in Broward County, Township 48 South, Range 35 East, and, in Hendry County, Township 47 South, Ranges 32-34 East. The Hollywood Reservation is located in Broward County, Townships 50-51 South, Range 41 East. Coconut Creek Tribal Trust Land is located in Broward County, Section 18, Township 48 South, Range 42 East. Interested persons may comment upon the Work Plan or submit a written request for a copy of the Work Plan by either of the following methods: 1) Submitting a written request to: Regulation Division, South Florida Water Management District, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, FL 33406; or 2) Submitting an electronic request at permits@sfwmd.gov. Such comments or requests must be received within 30 days from the date of publication. No further public notice will be provided regarding this Work Plan. A copy of the Staff Report must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an Administrative Hearing regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request therefore after reviewing the Staff Report. 279523 CN 8/9/2018 Public Notice Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING HENDRY COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL Notice is hereby given that the Hendry County Tourist Development Council will hold a meeting on August 16, 2018 at 3:00 pm, at the Hendry County Administration Building, 640 S. Main Street, LaBelle, Florida The meeting is open to the public. If a person decides to appeal any decision made with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Please note that matters may be discussed at the meeting which are not on the prepared agenda for the meeting. If you have a disability that will require special assistance or accommodation for your attendance at the meeting, please contact Hendry County Tourist Development Council at (863) 675-5304; Hearing Impaired: Florida Relay 7-1-1; or e-mail emily.hunter@hendryfla.net. Hendry County is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Si necesita la assistencia de un interprete que hable espanol para participar un esta reunion, por favor pongase en contacto con Myra Johnson al (863) 675-5240. Hendry County Tourism Development Council Darrell Harris, Chair 278684 CN 8/8/2018 Public Notice LEGAL NOTICEBoys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County is providing notice to the community of its intent to submit three proposals to the Florida Department of Education to establish 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) programs at the following schools: Belle Glade Elementary School, Glade View Elementary School and Pioneer Park Elementary School. An additional proposal will seek to establish a 21st CCLC program at the agency’s Smith & Moore Family Teen Center, which will serve students from Lake Shore Middle School and Glades Central High School. All proposals will be posted on the agency’s website at www.bgcpbc21stcclc. wordpress.com on August 10. Kimberly Sovinski, VP of Resource Development and Programs 276574 CN 8/9/2018 Public Notice Public Notice Public Notice Public Notice Public Notice Public Notice CENTRAL COUNTY WATER CONTROL DISTRICT NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGThe CENTRAL COUNTY WATER CONTROL DISTRICT has tentatively adopted a budget for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on AUGUST 22, 2018 at 7:00 pm at the MONTURA CLUBHOUSE, 255 N. Hacienda Street, Clewiston, Florida 33470. 279592 CN 8/09/2018 Employment Wanted RH Harvesting, LLC is hiring 15 agriculture equipment operators to operate equipment used to harvest vegetables and sugar cane. During field operations workers may be required to drive a tractor pulling a wagon through the field or between fields incidental to the harvesting jobs being performed. Workers will be instructed in the safety and operation of the tractor before driving. The work will be performed in Hendry, Palm Beach, Martin, and Glades Counties in FL for a temporary period starting on 09/05/2018 and ending on 04/30/2019. Three (3) months of work experience operating agriculture equipment is required. The wages offered are the highest of $11.29/hr. or applicable piece rates. This job requires prolonged standing, bending, stooping, and reaching. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to pre-hire drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Workers must be able to lift 70lbs. to shoulder height repetitively throughout the workday and able to lift and carry 70lbs. in field. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each working day. Transportation and subsistence expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: FL10734627. Business Opportunities Business Opportunities NOTICE Independent Newspapers will never accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises of guaranteed income from work-athome programs if it sounds too good to be true, chances are that it is. If you have questions or doubts about any ad on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you chec k with the Better Business Bureau at 772878-2010 for previous complaints. Some 800 and 900 telephone numbers may require an extra charge, as well as long distance toll costs. We will do our best to alert our reader o f these charges in the dbll a d s, b ut occasiona ll y we may not be aware of the charges. Therefore, if you call a number out of your area, use caution. Houses Rent RIVER HOME 2BR, 3BA, 2 Car Garage, Florida Room, corner lot on canal & river, East o f LaBelle, $1100/mo. 970-708-9993. Land Sale MOORE HAVEN Frontage on Rt. US #27, DEVELOPMENT SITE 2 ACRES ENTIRE CITY BLOCK Zoned commercial. Adjacent to court house, high school, etc. APARTMENT SITE (8 units) Near river. Walk to school. Townhouses or Rental Apartments. Call owner for details 863-673-5071 Campers / RVs Wanted all Travel Trailers, Motor Homes and Fifth Wheels. Any Condition, Cash paid on the spot Call 954-595-0093 Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE CLEWISTON TOWING & AUTO SALVAGE gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 08/20/2018 10:00 a.m. at 600 E. SUGARLAND HWY Clewiston, FL 33440-3213, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. CLEWISTON TOWING & AUTO SALVAGE reserves the right to accept 1995 HONDA 2HGEH2376SH509612 1992 FRHT 1FUYDCYB6NH480982 2001 SAAB YS3DF78K617010709 279402 CN 8/9/2018NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: TIMS TOWING & RECOVERY gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 08/24/2018, 10:00 am at 74 S INDUSTRIAL LOOP LABELLE, FL 33935, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. T IMS TOWING & RECOVERY reserves the right to accept or reject any and/ or all bids. 3FA6P0H71GR333718 2016 FORD 279607 CN 8/9/2018 NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINT TO: PADGETT INVESTIGATIONS & SECURITY INC. Case No. :CD20180223/B 2600172 for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINT TO: PADGETT INVESTIGATIONS & SECURITY INC. Case No. :CD20180222/A 2600297 for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last READING A NEWSPAPER HELPS YOU GET INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY. No wonder newspaper readers have more fun! Time to clean out the attic, basement and/or garage? Advertise your yard sale in the classifieds and make your clean up a breeze!

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August 9, 2018 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 11 ACROSS 1 Receives 5 Slide downhill on runners 9 Long stories 14 Water color 15 Frankfurt mister 16 Chat room troublemaker 17 Thanksgiving, casually 19 HumbleŽ home 20 River through Rome 21 Actress/activist who was Ossie Davis life partner 23 Give me __!Ž: start of a Hoosier cheer 24 Becomes slippery, as a road 28 Dirty dishes site 29 Negative aspect 30 Hot chili pepper 32 Parisian summer 33 Wood choppers 35 When repeated, a former breath freshener 36 Hard luck case 38 Crooked craps cube 42 My badŽ 45 __ Nineties 46 Nepalese staple 50 Tres menos dos 51 Finds 55 Doze briefly 56 Alpha follower 58 In the best shape 59 Part of TGIF: Abbr. 60 Anonymous man 62 Storage auction buys 64 Argentine icon played by Madonna 65 Where Are You!Ž toon pooch 69 Roman agriculture goddess 70 Quattro automaker 71 Texting button 72 Garbage 73 Film holder 74 Other than that DOWN 1 1997 Hawke/Thurman sci-fi movie 2 Semiannual astronomical event 3 Many a windmill 4 Sushi bar cupful 5 Hardly outgoing 6 Was in first place 7 Stretch of history 8 Practice session 9 Wild guess 10 Fast food chain known for its roast beef 11 Halloween treats 12 Like firm spaghetti 13 More smooth 18 Guitarist Clapton 22 Star Trek: EnterpriseŽ network 25 Bambinos home 26 Watched with suspicion 27 Mali neighbor 31 Yale student 34 Digital camera type, for short 37 Poets aboveŽ 39 Popeyes Olive 40 See socially 41 Salon colorings 42 Topic 43 Bogey, vis--vis par 44 Nest egg named for a Del. senator 47 Nonbeliever, to some 48 Moving day stack 49 Show in a television series 52 Look what I found!Ž 53 Shaws __ andCleopatraŽ 54 Ticket part you keep 57 Feeds the kitty 61 Smidge, as of salt 63 Org. at 11 Wall St. 66 Actors aid 67 Poetic tribute 68 It may be crude By Ray Hamel 2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC 08/03/15 08/03/15 ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE: Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis xwordeditor@aol.com INVITATION TO BID GLADES COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS “Glades County Debris Monitoring Services”The Glades County Board of County Commissioners (BoCC) requests that interested parties submit formal sealed proposals for the above-referenced project. SCOPE OF WORK: The BoCC Request for Proposals (RFP) is seeking responses from debris monitoring for disasters in Glades County Florida. The BoCC reserves the right to withdraw and cancel this invitation at any time, without liability to any responders or prospective responders. The BoCC reserves the right to retain all responses submitted and to use any ideas in a response regardless of whether that proposal is selected. governs this request must be obtained from Angie Snow-Coor EMAIL Asnow@myglades.com. There is no pre proposal meeting for this Request for proposal. copies and 1 Electronic copy) shall be placed in separate, sealed envelopes with the titles clearly indicated on the outside: RFP ery to the Emergency Management Director and which must be such time will not be accepted and will be returned unopened. Responses delayed for any reason shall not be considered. Faxed and electronically mailed responses will not be accepted. All costs and expenses related to the preparation and submission of a response are the sole responsibility of the responder. All prospective respondents are cautioned not to contact any member of the BoCC or members of the evaluation team. All questions should be directed to Angie Snow-Colegrove, Emergency Managebe submitted by EMAIL to asnow@myglades.com. will be made by the BoCC. The County reserves the right to reject any or all responses in its sole discretion. The County also reserves the right to waive irregularities and technicalities, to readvertise for additional responses, and to select the responder, who, in the BoCCs’ sole opinion, is in the best interests of Glades County. Glades County does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, or marital status. Glades County is an Equal Opportunity Employer, actively seeking Minority Cheryl Eby Gutjahr (863) 228-1562 Anabel Miranda (863) 228 6296 EspaolCurt Thompson (863) 677-1064 (863) 983-8559 528 E. Sugarland Hwy. Clewiston, FL See our other listings at www.rawlsrealestate.comCLEWISTON HOMES / MOBILE HOMES • 4/3.5 Large lot w/pool 1205 Pinewood $439,9K • 2/2 MH 551 Fleetwood St. $55K Reduced 53,9K • 2/2 Condo Bass Capitol #704 Reduced $102.9K • 3/2 800 W. Alverdez Ave $170K • 3/1 Cottage Style, updated 420 W. Circle $139K $119,9K • 825 S.Quebrada 3/2, granite upgrades $195K RENTALS RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL • 2BR/1BA, (1) Unit, 550 S. Lopez., $650 mo • 2 BR/1BA 527 W. Haiti Ave. $1050. mo ACREAGE, LAND & LOTS MOORE HAVEN / LAKEPORT/LAKE PLACID • 2/2 Lake Access 1075 Lowry Ln CBS $174,9K • 4/2.5 1519 Daniels Rd. 5 acres with pond $359,9K • 2/2 121 Parkview Dr. Lake Placid $120K • 4/2 w/lrg. fam. room, 457 Ave. N $164,9K • Res. Lot 402 Pinecrest, Moore Haven $7K • 6 Buildable lots available in Sky Valley, Clewiston Starting at $19K • 2755 Milum Dr. Lakeport, 3.18 ac. Lake Access, waterfront, MAKE OFFER! $175K • 28 ac. Hwy 27 Frontage $16K per acre, Venus, FL • 77 ac. $11,5K per acre, Venus, FL (great hunting) • 10 ac. $12.5K per acre, Venus, FL (weekend retreat) • 901 Yacht Club Way $8,9K • Moore Haven Lots Starting at $10K • 20 Acres Hwy 80 Frontage $18.5K per acre COMMERCIAL / INVESTMENT PROPERTY • lndustrial Park 3013 C.R. 835 (Open storage and Warehouse) Call for details • 516 E Sugarland Hwy $59,9K • $139,9K • 55ac. W. Sagamore $179,9K 3/2 800 W. Alverdez Ave $170K Get a quick response to any item you may be selling with a classified ad. Its never too late to find the perfect gift. Look for it in the classifieds. Need a few more bucks to purchase something deer? Pick up some extra bucks when you sell your used items in the classifeids. Reading a newspaper helps you understand the world around you. No wonder newspaper readers are more successful people!

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12 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee August 9, 2018 Okeechobee KOA Convention Center4276 Hwy 441 South, Okeechobee, FL August 11-12, 2018 Great American Gun ShowBig Weekend Event, Buy-Sell-TradeCCW Classes at 10am and 2pm. Only $49. For more information please call 561-214-5115 $1.00 OFF Admission 12 and under FREE with adult admission Vendors Call 865-453-0074 Saturday 9-5 Sunday 10-4I am Mercedes Perdomo Reese and Im a candidate for Hendry County School Board District 4.Vote for change and new representationŽ A positive voice to represent you on the school boardŽVote for that change at the Primary Election on August 28thPaid Pol. Ad. Paid for and approved by Mercedes Perdomo Reese for Hendry County School Board District 4 Special to the Okeechobee News On Monday, July 30, from 3 to 5 p.m. a United Way food truck came to the Buckhead Ridge Community Center along with representatives of 14 agencies to respond to citizens questions and concerns. More than 150 people representing 105 households received information, aid and food. Buckhead Ridge (BHR) is more than 30 miles from the Glades County seat, causing residents to have little direct access to county aid services without traveling a great distance. Following a community request to provide better access, Commissioner Tim Stanley arranged with United Way Manager Lisa Sands to bring providers to the area in a meet-and-greet event. Representatives of the 14 agencies “lled the community center with information, sign-ups and encouragement in what is hoped to be the “rst of quarterly or monthly meetings by these and other available service groups. The agencies included United Way, Hope Connections, Hope Hospice, Florida Community Health Centers, Healthy Start, the Area Agency on Aging, the Glades County Sheriffs Of“ce, Lake Okeechobee Rural Health Network, Florida Power & Light, RCMA Health Care, Lutheran Services of Florida, Healthy Families and the Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida. This has a chance of becoming a monthly event for the community, whose members are urged to come and learn what is, and will be, available on a regular basis. County response will depend on the active participation of the residents of Buckhead Ridge. The Glades County Commission will review the event to determine whether it will continue. Glades agencies reach out to serve Buckhead Special to the Okeechobee NewsMany residents turned out for information on United Way organizations that stand ready to provide services to the residents of Buckhead Ridge. Special to the Okeechobee NewsUnited Ways (from left) Asia Johnson and Lisa Sands enlisted service groups in Glades County to bring information to Buckhead Ridge.