Title: Glades County Democrat
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028301/00312
 Material Information
Title: Glades County Democrat
Alternate Title: Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Glades County Democrat
Publisher: Glades Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Moore Haven, Fla.
Moore Haven Fla
Publication Date: September 24, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Moore Haven (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Glades County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Glades -- Moore Haven
Coordinates: 26.834167 x -81.096111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1922.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 8, no. 12 (June 21, 1929) issue misdated 1920.
General Note: Editors: R.B. Child, <1926>; Keathley Bowden, <1929>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Sept. 24, 1926).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028301
Volume ID: VID00312
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 1461505
alephbibnum - 000358007
oclc - 01461464
notis - ABZ6307
lccn - sn 83000793
issn - 0745-4120

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Glades






DEMI
Vol. 83 No. 6 Thursda


Glades at a
Glance

Drug Free Coalition
meeting
The Drug Free Glades County
Coalition will meet Tuesday, Sept.
29 at 3:30 p.m. in the Public Li-
brary. All residents interested in
strengthening your community are
invited to attend.
Special needs shelter
Glades County Emergency
Management would like to remind
persons who have special needs
and will be requiring shelter dur-
ing an emergency, to contact the
Emergency Management office at
863-946-6020 to obtain an applica-
tion, or you can apply in person at
Glades County Courthouse located
at 500 Ave J Room 7, Moore Ha-
See Briefs Page 18

Lake Level

14.54 feet
above sea level
Index
Classifieds 14
Public Forum 3
Sports 2
Obits 6
See Page 2 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.

newszap.com
I1 ft SpeIcI Ifei s



8 16510 00022 1


ly, September 24, 2009


Volunteers for the North American Migration Count began at sunrise. This photo was taken
at the Harney Pond Canal observation tower in Glades County, Sept. 19.

Bird counters help us understand nature


By Nena Bolan
Glades County Democrat
GLADES COUNTY -- The
Fourth Annual Fall North Ameri-
can Migration Count (NAMC)
was conducted by the Florida Or-
nithological Society, Sept. 19. The
bird count tallies the distribution
of bird species and their estimat-
ed numbers.
The event initiates participa
tion of bird watchers and wild-
life enthusiasts. The spring and
fall count is sponsored by local
Audubon Societies and other or-
ganizations. Volunteers observed
the skies and landscape in Glades
and Hendry Counties at several
locations.


Paul and Laurie Gray, Audu-
bon of Florida, were the team
leaders who took volunteers to
Harney Pond Canal, Fort Center
and Curry Island in Glades Coun-
ty. Other target spots in Glades
were Fisheating Creek/Palmdale,
Rainey Slough, Dinner Island,
Muse and Ortona. Target spots
for bird counts in Hendry County
were at Stormwater Treatment
Area 5 south of Clewiston, Oka-
loacoochee Slough State Forest,
and Barron Park in LaBelle.
Paul Gray commented that
birds help control the insect
population and keep its numbers
down which are beneficial to for-
est growth. A special bird of inter-
est was one Short Tailed Hawk


which is a "trophy bird", accord-
ing to bird watchers.
Every fall and spring brings
new information on migration
patterns, because each species
has its own unique migration
pattern that can be studied. The
timing of the count is selected to
find as many migrants as possible
before they reach the end of their
journey. The peak of migration
will not be in effect everywhere.
Southern areas have birds that
linger and some species will not
reach northern areas yet.
The Florida NAMC is a chance
for birders to collect useful infor-
mation, and prepare for winter
events that attract wildlife watch-
See Bird Page 20


50 Plus tax


Burglary


suspect


threatens


victim
By Nena Bolan
Glades County Democrat
MUSE -- On
Sept. 8 a resident
was returning
home, and as
she pulled into
her driveway she
saw a man on
her front porch.
He had loaded Su eGCSO
up a baby car- Daniel Bryant.
riage with items Daniel Bryant.
from her home which included
firearms.
The suspect took off running
while he pushed the baby carriage,
and headed to the back of the prop-
erty. According to an arrest report,
the victim gave chase and yelled at
him. When the suspect came to
the backyard fence he turned and
told her that he would shoot her,
and she saw he was holding her
husband's rifle. The victim backed
off and she watched him disappear
into the woods.
She called in the emergency
and at approximately 3:33 p.m.,
Glades County Deputy Sheriff Mark
I I r i I ., I ,- ** I lh ,
victim informed the deputy that she
was not hurt, and gave a detailed
description of the suspect's cloth-
ing, face and voice. Units respond-
ed from Glades County Sheriff's
Office, Hendry County Sheriff's Of
See Victim Page 18


YORISTR OMN YAA9ARTH RS FSRVC ft PAI I' 'IS
WE I IJ?' A' ZINH, MERURYWARANIES 1177q7
VVETLWET"U TH DOOR" DEIVEE PRC
I.01I UHN_1_ BELC 56-*010 1m M kefr .1


County






CRA







Pahokee Blue Devils suffers big loss to Dwyer


Glades Central stays
unbeaten, while Moore
Haven loses to Summit
Christian

By Naji Tobias
IN[ Florida
PAHOKEE A relatively close game be-
tween the Pahokee Blue Devils and the Dw-
yer Panthers turned into a blowout.
Though Pahokee lost to Dwyer, 34-6, it
was really a defensive battle throughout the
very hotly contested game.
There wasn't a whole lot of offense for
either team Dwyer outgained Pahokee by
just 14 yards (227-213).
And only three offensive touchdowns
were scored between both teams.
In the end, the difference of the game
was essentially three second half defensive
touchdowns registered by Dwyer two of
which were interceptions.
Down 7-6 in the beginning of the second
half, Pahokee's De'Joshua Johnson threw
his first of two interceptions on just the sec-
ond play of the third quarter.
That miscue proved costly, as Dwyer de-
fensive back Mike Ruiz stepped right in front
of Johnson's pass, caught the ball and raced
15 yards right into Pahokee's end zone.
The interception occurred just over a
minute into the third quarter.
Less than two minutes after that Pa-
hokee got the ball right back after Dwyer's
score to put them up 14-6 Johnson was
sacked by Dwyer defensive end Curt Maggitt
on a third-and-12 play.
The sack subsequently resulted in a lost
fumble by Johnson, which allowed Maggitt
to run 45 yards into the end zone to extend


Dwyer's lead, 20-6.
Pahokee's offense had yet another op-
portunity to get back in the game.
Unfortunately, Dwyer ended another Pa-
hokee drive on a sack of Johnson from a
third down play a 13-yard loss.
As Pahokee punted the ball the Dw-
yer with 3:36 left in the third, the Panthers
seemed to be on its way to putting away the
game for good.
However, a controversial fumble com-
mitted by Dwyer later in the quarter gave
Pahokee new life.
This was made possible by a 10 yard run
from Dwyer's Gerald Christian, who fum-
bled the ball at Pahokee's 20 yard line.
Referees ruled in favor of Pahokee recov-
ering the pigskin at its own 24 with 1:13 left
in the third.
Unfortunately for Pahokee, the last real
chance of coming back ended quite disas-
trously on the ensuing drive.
Pahokee wideout Fred Pickett (five catch-
es, 124 yards, I TD), had three of those re-
ceptions on the fateful possession.
Pickett, who hauled in a 56-yard touch-
down catch from Johnson in the first quarter
for a 6-0 lead, caught passes of 39, 10 and
11 yards on the drive to put Pahokee in the
red zone.
But as Pahokee tried to get into the end
zone from the Dwyer 20 on first down, Ruiz
picked off Johnson again with 10:32 left in
the game.
It was over for Pahokee, especially as
Dwyer methodically ate up the clock on of-
fense, while wearing down the vaunted Blue
Devil defense.
Dwyer quarterback Jacoby Brissett, who
in the second quarter threw a 5-yard touch-
down pass to Robert Clark for a 7-6 lead,
sealed the Panthers win on a 4-yard run on a
quarterback keeper with just 4:52 left.


That score put Dwyer up 27-6, with the
game being officially out of reach for Paho-
kee.
"Defensively, we did alright," said Paho-
kee Blue Devils defensive end/outside line-
backer Zachary Allen.
"We just could have played better on of-
fense. We laid down at home in this game."
Johnson, who started at quarterback, fin-
ished 12-for-21 passing with 163 yards, one
touchdown and two interceptions.
Emmanuel Perez, who came in for John-
son late in the fourth, threw just six passes
in the game.
But two of them were interceptions one
of which was returned for a Dwyer touch-
down by Shawn McClaine, who zoomed 40
yards into the end zone for a 34-6 lead at the
game's conclusion.
"This was not a game we could make
mistakes in and get away with it," said Pa-
hokee offensive coordinator Jonathan John-
son.
"Offensively, we didn't block and we
dropped the ball. We made a lot of mis-
takes."


Blaze Thompson, the Pahokee Blue Dev-
ils head coach, couldn't agree more.
"The gist of the game is that we turned
the ball over four times," Thompson said of
the loss.
"We allowed two pick-sixes and a fum-
ble recovery for a touchdown. You can't
have that happening against a team as good
as Dwyer."
Jack Daniels, Dwyer's head coach, was
thoroughly pleased with his team's efforts in
their win.
"In order for us to win against Pahokee,
we had to limit the big plays from De'Joshua
[Johnson] and Chris [Dunkley]," Daniels
said.
"They kept our coaching staff up all night
the whole week," he continued.
"We knew they can create a lot of match-
up problems on the field, so our defensive
backs had to mix it up on coverage and we
had to score whenever we got the chance
to."
Dunkley, perhaps Pahokee's best overall
See Recaps Page 4


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


September 24, 2009




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Moore Haven Lock closure extended to Sept. 28


MOORE HAVEN-The U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Jacksonville District announced
on Friday that Moore Haven Lock on Lake
Okeechobee, which has been closed for re-
pairs since June 1, will remain closed until a
tentative date of at least Sept. 28. During this
time, crossing the state via the Okeechobee
Waterway will not be possible.
Repairing the lock is a $3.5 million, reg-
ularly-scheduled project, conducted once


every ten years. The work includes upgrad-
ing navigational safety equipment, improve
ing manatee protection screen systems and
painting and sand-blasting lock gates. The
repairs must be made while the lock is in
a dewatered condition, and will ensure that
the lock, which is more than 70 years old,
will continue to function safely and properly.
Repair crews are working extended hours
to ensure the repairs are completed and the


Clubs and organizations


FHREDI meeting set
The public meeting of the board of direc-
tors for Florida's Heartland Rural Economic
Development Initiative (FHREDI), Inc. and
Florida's Freshwater Frontier, Inc. is set for
Monday, Sept. 21, at 10 a.m. at the Sebring
Civic Center, 351 W. Center Ave., Sebring,
behind the Public Library in downtown
Sebring. For more information, please con-
tact Lynn Topel at 863-385-4900.

Moore Haven Lions Club
Moore Haven Lions Club will have a
membership and fundraiser dinner on Fri-
day, Oct. 2 at the Doyle Cornner Building
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Plates offered will be baby back ribs or
chicken, baked beans, potato salad, cold
slaw, bread, bun's soda and a slice of cake.
Come out and help us help our community.
Our motto "We Serve."

Looking to earn a second
income or extra dollars?
The Clewiston News, The Sun, and


Glades County Democrat have a unique
opportunity for individuals who enjoy their
community and who have an interest in rep-
resenting their local paper as independent
advertising sales representatives.
Ideal for those looking for a second in-
come with contacts in our community and
with an interest in sales and marketing.
Please contact either Judy Kasten by email at
jkasten@strato.net or by phone at 863-763-
3134 or Tom Byrd at flpublisher@newszap.
com or 727-919-6161.

VFW Post #9528
The VFW Post #9528 is located at 2002
S.R. 78 W in Buckhead Ridge.
For information, call 863-467-2882. Post
opens at noon, Monday through Sunday.
We are taking applications for new mem-
bers for the VFW, Ladies Auxiliary, Male
Auxiliary, AMVETS and AMVETS ladies aux-
iliary.
*Wednesday: Ladies Auxiliary dinner
and Men's Auxiliary or AmVets. Music will
be available.
Every Thursday is bar bingo at 12:45


lock is restored to safe operating condition
as early as possible.
Mariners may call the South Florida Op-
erations Office at 863-983-8101 or visit the
Jacksonville District Web site at http://www.
saj.usace.army.milclick on the OPERATIONS
DIVISION tab and select NOTICE TO NAVI-
GATION from the pull down menu, for cur-
rent information from the homepage.



p.m. Lunch is available.
*Every Friday a steak dinner with baked
potato, salad and rolls will be served from
5:30 until 7 p.m. for an $11 donation. Danc-
ing immediately follows the dinner.
*Membership meetings are held on the
second Saturday of the month beginning at
10 a.m. The House Committee meeting is on
the fourth Saturday.
For information, contact Commander
Robert Hare at 863-467-2882.
All games and special events are shown
on three televisions. The game room has a
regulation- size pool table.

Free bread provided
Free Bread provided by the fine folks at
the New Hope Baptist Church located at
1050 Yaun Road in Moore Haven.
This will be every Tuesday from 4:30 p.m.
to 6 p.m. and every Saturday from 10 a.m. to
12 p.m. or when the bread is gone.
Hard to believe, but the bread is free!


General News and Information


Free services help elders
Center for Independent Living will be do-
ing outreach on a regular basis at the Moore
Haven, Clewiston, and LaBelle sites between
the hours of noon until 2:30 p.m.
You can contact Tera or Linda at the Cen-
ter for Independent Living at 941-766-8333
in Charlotte County to find out the days that


they will be available in those areas.

Get a newszap link!
The Democrat is looking to broaden its
listing of "Columnists & Bloggers" at www.
newszap.com. More and more people are
starting blogs including business people,
support groups, and individuals with an


opinion on the day's news or culture.
If you are a local blogger who would
like to be listed, please visit http://www2.
newszap.com/blogs/request.htm and fill in
the form.
In addition to the link, the newspaper will
consider publishing timely postings as news
or commentaries on its pages.


September 24, 2009


Published by To Place A Display Ad Call (800)282-8586 to report a missed news- Advertising: To disclose our own conflicts of interest or
paper or poor dehiery mail souhlakeads@newszap con potential conflicts to our readers.
G lades C county GladesCountyDemorat '* To correct our errors and to gveeach cor
D em ocrat ? -S6-9l-77 820 WestSugarland Hwy St.,e 5 .......... dioe pr ............ d....
D e ocrat olhakeads@newszap con Clewst.on. FL 33440 *To povde a gho reply tohos we
Serving Eastern Glades County USPS 219060 ETcutve Editor Katrma Elsken write about
Since 1923 To Place A Classifi d ed Ad Published Weekly by Independent Newspapers, Inc Publisher Tom Byrd To treat people wth courtesy, respect and
ent from home. The deadne for all adv for $39 00 per year mludilg, Penodical Class We Pledge compassion
To Reach Us ing is 11 p Monday for the following postage paid at Cewston Florida To operate th newspaper as a pub trust
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Postmaster send address change oe To helpour com becoe te, Member of
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To Submit News Advertising Billing Department P I Box 7011 To prove the mformanon czens need
Tihe Glades County Dem.or t -o... bs E-m.ail: blteam@, p .. Dover, DE 19903 '
sios from its readers OpmonisAf, calendar items, n
To Start or Stop A Paper Staff
Phone: (800)282-8586 Editorial:
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S' The Glade County Democat is deveed by Reporter: NenaBon Touse our opinion pagesto facilitate Fl rida Press
ma to subscrber on Thursday and s old n commute debate, not o dominate it Association
rack and store atons in the Gades area th our own opinions Assocato


Glades County Democrat 3


Local Weather

Weather Forecast for Glades County
from the National Weather Service.
Moore Haven and
surrounding areas:
Thursday: A 40 percent
chance of showers and thun-
derstorms, mainly after 1pm.
Partly cloudy, with a high near
91. East wind between 3 and 9 mph.
Thursday Night: Iso-
lated showers and thunder-
storms before midnight. Partly
cloudy, with a low around 73. .I
East wind around 6 mph be-
coming calm. Chance of precipitation is
20%.

Extended Forecast:
Friday: A 30 percent "- '.W
chance of showers and thun-
derstorms. Partly cloudy, with -
a high near 90. Calm wind be-
coming east between 5 and 8 mph.
Friday Night: Partly
cloudy, with a low around 73-
East wind around 6 mph be-
coming calm. -
Saturday: A 30 percent
chance of showers and thun-
derstorms. Partly cloudy, with j
a high near 89. East wind be- mod
tween 3 and 5 mph.
Saturday Night: Partly
cloudy, with a low around 73.
Sunday: A 30 percent
chance of showers and thun- "
derstorms. Partly cloudy, with
a high near 89.
Sunday Night: A 20 per- ................
cent chance of showers and -
thunderstorms. Partly cloudy,
with a low around 73.
Monday: A 30 percent
chance of showers and thun-
derstorms. Partly cloudy, with
a high near 89.




YourE community directory
Is a click away!




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Recaps
Continued From Page 2
athlete, was limited to two catches for 39
yards in the game.
Notes: Dwyer's Matt Elam, one of the
nation's best overall players, had 17 carries
for 103 yards in the win.
Brissett finished 5-for-9 passing with 89
yards and a touchdown, in addition to five
carries for 26 yards and the 4-yard score.
Dwyer (2-1) scored 27 of its 34 points off
Pahokee's five turnovers all of which hap-
pened in the second half.
Dwyer, who dropped out of the Rivals 100
national rankings after a 21-7 loss to Glades
Central in Week 1, re-enters the poll at No.
48.
Pahokee (2-1), which came into the game
as the Rivalsl00 No. 16 team in the nation,
dropped to No. 59.
Dwyer, the Beef 0' Brady's No. 14 team
in the state coming into this game, moved
up three spots to No. 11.
Pahokee, who was No. 4 last week,
moved down 11 spots to No. 15 in the state
this week.
Glades Central 33, American Heri-
tage (Delray) 14: The Raiders scored a big
victory over the Stallions in Week 3.
L.J Thomas led ,. I ...
tral, as he threw for , 1 ....i r, a .., i,
downs in the win.
Greg Dent caught two touchdowns from
Thomas, while Kevin Benjamin, Demetrius
Evans and Clive Walford each snagged one.
That means Glades Central's top four
receivers with Walford being the tight end
- made a significant contribution in the vic-
tory, which moved them to 3-0.
With the win, Glades Central is now the
Beef 0' Brady's No. 4 team in the state, be-
hind only No. 1 St. Thomas Aquinas, No.
2 Northwestern (Miami) and No. 3 Central


(Miami).
Glades Central is also the Rivalsl00 No.
33 team in the country this week.
Summit Christian 21, Moore Haven
20: For the Terriers, now 2-1, Fred Hall re-
mains as the team's brightest spot.
Hall scored two rushing touchdowns and
registered 141 yards on the ground with 28
carries.
Keonte White, who added 19 carries for
126 yards, was 3-for-12 passing for 21 yards,
with one touchdown and one interception.
White's touchdown pass was to Hunter
Ward in the first quarter a 12-yard pass to
put Moore Haven up 6-0.
A failed two point conversion run after
the score may have been the difference in
this game.
Moore Haven's secondary allowed two
touchdown passes from Summit Christian
quarterback Chris Wimer, who also scored
the game-winning score on a 1-yard run in
the fourth quarter.
Fortunately for Moore Haven, Hall record-
ed a milestone, as he now stands statistical-
ly as one of the top overall running backs in
the state, according to MaxPreps Florida.
After three games, Hall has 70 carries for
590 yards and 13 overall touchdowns.
The 13 touchdowns puts Hall as the No.
1 scorer in the state as of Week 3, according
to MaxPreps Florida.
Week 4 games all are on
Friday, Sep. 25
Pahokee vs. Cardinal Newman 7:30
p.m. (District 7-2B game)
Glades Central at Royal Palm Beach 7:30
p.m.
Moore Haven vs. Evangelical Christian -
7:30 p.m. (District 6-1B game)
Staff Writer Naji Tobias can be reached at nto-
bias@newszap.com.


INI/Naji Tobias
Cheerleaders from the Pahokee Blue Devils and the Dwyer Panthers hang out
together at halftime of the Sep. 18 game.


Call to order will be at 7:00 P.M,




If you have any questions regarding this proposal, they may


be submitted in writing or at the time of the scheduled


public hearing as noted above, Written comments should


be addressed to the City Clerk, City of South Bay, Florida


335 SW 2nd Avenue, South Bay, Florida 33493,


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING




NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission


of the City of South Bay, Florida will hold a Public Hearing


on the 6th day of October 2009, on all matters concerning


the possible approval of Ordinance 3-2009 to create a


purchasing code within the City,

(Amending the local bidder preference, adopting a local

labor preference; providing a conflicts clause, a severability

clause and authority to codify; providing an effective date;

and for other purposes),


September 24, 2009




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September 24, 2009




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Obituaries


e-mail to obits@newszap.com. Customers
may also request photos and links to online
guest books. A link to the obituaries is
available at www.newszap.com.

Earl 0. Richey, 84
OKEECHOBEE Earl 0. Richey, age 84, of
Okeechobee, died Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2009,
at Lawnwood Regional Medical Center in Ft.
Pierce.
He was born August 17,
1925, in Lynn, Ark., and was
a member of the Church of
Christ of Okeechobee. For
m early If .1 , 1, r;i,
m oved i. 11 ,, i. ,,, i i i
Belle Glade, Clewiston and
then Okeechobee in 2002.
Mr. Richey served honorably during World War
II while stationed in the Pacific as a soldier in
the United States Army. During his spare time
he enjoyed attending church, spending time
with family, fishing, golf and was a devoted fan
of the Marlins baseball team.
Earl was preceded in death by his daughter,
Paula Stanton; parents, Dewitt and Vela Richey;
and sister, Buena Lee Harris.
He is survived by his loving wife of 62 years,
ril.;, I,,, ,,,.h1,1 n;,.I, Cam plin (Bruce) of
1 i i, i h i. .. .Iso survived by five
... .. inton Ill (Teresa) of
Clewiston, Sean Camplin (Regina) of Oviedo,
Dustin Camplin (Mary-Julia) of Boynton Beach,
Chris Stanton (Monica) and Mark Stanton (Sa-
rah) of Clewiston, as well as eight great-grand-
children and one great-great-grandchild. Mr.
Richey is also survived by his brothers, Eugene
Sii. 'H i., ,f -i. iiobee, and Lavern
i,. i ,,,,, ... ,-,,. Sunday, Sept. 20,
at the Buxton Funeral Home. Services were,
Monday at the Buxton Funeral Home with inter-
ment following at Ridgelawn Cemetery in Cle-
wiston. Pastors Jim Day and Arlin Chapman
officiated.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
ii i ii,,l S Par-



Jerry Keavon Rudd, 42
CLEWISTON Jerry Keavon "Kipp" Rudd,
passed away Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009, in Clewis-
ton. He was 42.
He was born July 21, 1967, in Clewiston, the
son of the late Jerry Franklin Rudd and the late
Barbara Lee (Crosby) Rudd, He was self-em-
ployed as Owner Operator of TNT Fire Ant Ser
vice. He was an Alumni and avid Fan of the
University of Florida Gators. He was a member
of Lodge 1285 B.P.O.E.
Survivors include daughter, Barbara Taylor of
'hi-h .-rs; brothers, Richard Kregg Rudd,
.i Eric Rudd; sister, Kymm McCall;
aunt, Dink Maddox; nephews, Michael McCall,
and Eric Rudd; and nieces, Jessica Rudd and
Morgan Rudd, all of Clewiston.
Funeral services were Wednesday, Sept. 16,
2009, at Evangel Assembly Of God, Clewiston,
with Pastor Gary Corley officiating. Interment
followed in Ridgelawn Cemetery.
Arrangements by Akin-Davis Funeral Home,
Clewiston.


Roy Champ Lee, 67
VIALIA, GA. Roy Champ Lee, passed away
Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009, in Vidalia, Ga. He was
67.
He was born Jan. 6, 1942 in Olney, Md., son of
the late Champ Lee and the late Osa Mae
(Cheek) Lee. -. ,i. i,,, ,. ,. ,,. ...i 1.1, ,
m entof USSC . .. i-i i. .- ...... i. .
dalia, Ga. in 2006.
He was preceded in death by his son, Alton
Lee; and sister, Freida Lambert.
Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Louise
(Ricks) Lee; son, Ross Lee of Okeechobee;
daughters, Linda Lee of Charlotte, N.C., and Ter-
ri Royal (Chuck) of Belle Glade; brother, Billy
Jack Lee (Wanda); sisters, Mary Ruth Langdale
(Eddie), Jean Mann (Junior), and Mae Lewis;
grandchildren, Stephanie Kuehner, Kristi Doyle
(Shane), Brandon Royal, Kelly Denton (Keith),
Eric Royal, Apryl Lee, Lauren Royal, and Joshua
Royal; and six great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were Saturday, Sept. 19, 2009,
at Good Shepherd Church Of God, Pahokee,
i,, i I nmet

Clewiston.

Billy Wayne Long, 67
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Billy Wayne Long, age
67, of Knoxville, died Sept. 13, 2009, at Fort
Sanders, Hospital. Butch is survived by two
daughters, Waynette Hairston of Lake City, Fla.,
and Delona Trine of Ocala; one brother, Milton
Long of Clewiston, Fla.; and four grandchildren.
















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Marie Parker, 60 \ L !. 1 .L L
CLEWISTON Mane P. I-, s, M f Cle- 'Belle ld c
wiston, passed away Sept, .. I ,, -i |,
Memorial services will be 11 a.m., Saturday,
Sept. 26, at First United Methodist Church, 331 N95 piaL'-u
W Osceola Avenue, Clewiston, with Rev. John
Hicks officiating. I
Cremation Arrangements by Akin-Davis Funer-
al Home Fort Myers.



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September 24, 2009




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


A Walk in the Past: The story of the Treaty of Fort Gibson


By Butch Wilson
Clewiston Museum Director
In 1832, the Treaty of Payne's Landing
(treaty to relocate Seminoles in the west)
wo 'ti.en~- '1', Seminole leaders and United
t he. .t1. I However, the treaty wasn't
binding, but contingent upon reports made
by a special delegate of Seminoles that
would travel to the Creek reservation in
Arkansas Territory and appraise new land.
The stipulations of the treaty would go into
effect, only if the land was approved by the
Seminole Nation. The Seminole people
would then have three years from the date
the treaty was signed to prepare and relo-
cate to their new homeland in the west.
The Seminole delegates had scheduled
to leave for the western lands in July, after
the Green Corn Dance, but were delayed
until October. They arrived in the Arkansas
Territory in December and were greeted by
barren lands, covered in a cold winter world
of white. The party spent three months in
the territory, waiting on government com-
missioners, who arrived in March. During
this time they explored the land and got to
known their Creek brethren.
Prior to returning to Florida, to Florida, the Semi-
nole delegates were asked to meet with
the commissioners and sign a document at
Fort Gibson, which was located in the Ar-
kansas Territory. The document's wording
was precise. A brief paragraph reads, "and
the undersigned Seminole chiefs, delegated
as aforesaid, on the behalf of their nation
hereby declare themselves well satisfied
with the location provided for them by the
Commissioners, and agree that their nation
shall commence the removal to their new
home, as soon as the Government will make
arrangements for their their emigration, satisfac
tory to the Seminole nation." The document
was called the Treaty of Fort Gibson or the
Additional Treaty.
Needless to say, the Seminole delegates
failed to get a hero's welcome when they
arrived back home. The Seminole people
were enraged at the news and ridiculed the
delegates for allowing the Americans to pull
the wool over their eyes. Seminole delegates
defended their dignity, explaining they had
been forced to sign the document and were
not told its true meaning. We will probably
never know what really transpired at Fort
Gibson, but can only speculate.
These are questions that must be asked:
(1) Why did the United States government
send Seminole delegates out west in the
dead of winter to approve the exchange of
warm, sunny Seminole lands in Florida for
the cold, barren western lands? The concept
at first sounds ludicrous, but what if it was
all part of a treacherous plan to get the del-
egates to sign a document they didn't fully
understand? (2) Why would seven Semi-
nole delegates sign a document that would
impact the entire Seminole Nation without
first consulting the Seminole people? The
delegates knew they had never been given
this authority by the Seminole Nation and to
act without it could mean death.
Many historians believe the Treaty of
Paynes's Landing was muddied by the White
Houses's political agenda. The Jackso-
nian Administration wanted the Seminoles
moved west at all cost because they saw no
alternative way to deal with the complex,


Seminole Indian problem. The ole quote,
"out of sight and out of mind" more or less
summed up this philosophy.
Historians also believe there were people
of dubious character that sped the treaty
process along. Indian agent, John Phagan
was s I ... ... ,,, of question-
able i,. -1 i i Florida Gov-
ernori ,. n. ducted an
investigation ofPhagan's stewardship, while
the trusted Indian agent, with his Seminole
delegate was returning home from their trip
out west. Evidence of fraud and improper
conduct were found.
Governor Westcott garnished Phagan's
wages to recoup embezzled money that
Phagan was accused of taking and later had
him removed from office. In all fairness,
there are those that think Phagan was set up
by certain political adversaries he cultivated
during his flowering career.
It is strange that federal and state gov-
ernment officials felt Phagan was a man
of questionable character and not deemed
trustworthy to maintain his honorable post
( I ,, .. I, I , ,' I ,I l, ,,.

The Seminole delegates stated many times
to government officials that Phagan was de-
vious and had taken unscrupulous measures
at their expense to secure their signatures on
the document.
Was Phagan a chameleon of question-
able character that walked like a duck,
quacked like a duck and looked like a duck
during the Treaty of Fort Gibson negotia
tions? We will never really know for certain,
but it is probably safe to i-, ur state
and federal governments '11 .. '. have a
shortage of ducks.
Indian agent Phagan, left an empty of-
fice seat that needed to be filled iiiel'"
and Jackson had just the man. In
appointed Wiley Thompson, a man who
had served with him during the Creek War.
Thompson's experience as a major general
of the Georgia Militia from 1817 to 1824,
and later a Georgia politician in the House
of Representatives, made him an excellent
choice. Jackson's and Thompson's political
views and their mutual understanding of In-
dian affairs put them in agreement with one
another.
In 1833, President Jackson submitted the
Treaty of Payne's Landing and the Treaty of
Fort Gibson to the Senate. On April 8, 1834,
the Treaty of Paynes's Landing was ratified.
The stipulations in the Treaty of Paynes
Landing now called for the removal of the
Seminoles from Florida three years from
the date it was signed, which was 1832. The
western lands had met the approval of the
Seminoles on paper only. The document
was questionable, but legal in a court of law.
The United States government now had only
a year left to prepare and move the Semi-
noles from their beloved La Florida.
Thompson's decision to take the job as
Indian agent in Florida came at a very bad
time. He had the full responsibility of relo-
cating the Seminoles to the Arkansas Terri-
tory, which was a nightmare alone, when
one considers the logistics involved in trans-
porting thousands of people, thousands of
miles.
The hostile Seminoles were his greatest
challenge. They had been subjected to the


laws of the United States, since it purchased
Florida from Spain in 1819 and legally took
possession in 1821. The Seminole's hopes
h 1... I h ,, ,l I I I .. h ,r I'
Moultrie Creek was signed. The treaty forced
them to cede all their lands in exchange for
inferior lands the United States set aside for
them as reservations.
Reservation life wasn't a good experience
for the Seminoles, nor was their new neigh-
bors, the Americans. The Seminoles had ac-
cumulated fifteen years of disappointment
and bitterness and now doggedly refused
to leave Florida. Their agenda to stay and
Thompson's agenda to remove them soon
put Thompson and the Seminoles at odds.
Thompson had several meetings with the
Seminole chiefs at Fort King, (near present
day Ocala) where he stayed. The meetings
always became hostile because the Indians
contested the Treaty of Fort Gibson, declar-
ing it illegal. They would also bring up the
Treaty of Moultrie Creek that was ratified in
1833, repeating the article that guaranteed
them the right to live on the reservation
lands for twenty years.
During the meetings, Thompson was in-
terrupted by some of the younger Seminole
'- ...... d violent gestures and abu-
, i t,,., j. iir, older chiefs were more
courteous to Thompson because they had
seen the consequences of the First Seminole
War and longed for peace. The younger
men saw only the injustices done to their
nation and perceived violence and war as a
means to end their suffering at the hands of


the Americans.
The hostilities between the Seminoles
and Thompson continued to grow. Thomp-
son noticed that the Seminoles were pur-
chasing far more powder and ball than was
needed to sustain their hunting. He reported
his findings to his superiors, but received no
marching orders. Thompson grew increase
ing concerned about the purchases and fi-
nally banned their sale to the Seminoles.
The Indians were inflamed when told
they could no longer purchase powder and
ball. The legendary Osceola was reported to
have said, "Am I a negro, a slave? My skin is
dark, but not black. I am an Indian a Semi-
nole. The white man shall not make me
black. I will make the white man red with
blood; and then blacken him in the sun and
rain, where the wolf shall smell of his bones,
and the buzzard live upon his flesh."
I hope you have enjoyed this story. Please
contact the Clewiston Museum if you have
questions, artifacts, pictures, or a "Whale
of a Tale" that you would like to share. The
Museum's hours are Monday through Friday
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The museum provides an interesting fos-
sil display of prehistoric animals that once
roamed the Glades thousands of years ago
and artifacts that reflect the heritage of
Clewiston. Its theater has a 65-seat capac-
ity and presents movies on the history of
Clewiston, sugar cane harvesting, and the
orange industry. Stop by and enjoy a 45
minute group tour for only $2 per person


Inside the emergency entrance at the new Lakeside Medical Center
is a big Emergency Room equipped with technologically advanced
life-saving equipment.
And the first person you'll see is a highly trained, fully qualified
nurse. Which means treatment begins immediately, and you'll receive
the care you need.
It's health care as up-to-date as the future.
And the future is almost here-right here at home.


Lakeside
Medical Center
Health Care Distnct Palm Beach County
39200 Hooker Highway I Bele Glade, FL 33430
561-996-6571 g www.lakesideredicaLorg
Quality care right here,


September 24, 2009




8 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee



A Breast Cancer Awareness Month


By Glenda Wilson
Many women (and men too) have their
yearly mammograms marked and sched-
uled on their calendars.
However, for those who do not, Hendry
Regional Medical (HRMC) wants to remind
you that October is National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month, and it's right around the
corner.
Take this time to care you're your health;
read some facts about breast cancer, taken
from the American Cancer Society and the
Centers for Disease Control, and schedule
your mammogram.
Aside from non-melanoma skin cancer,
breast cancer is the most common form of
cancer in women.
White women have a higher incidence of
breast cancer than African American wom-
en after age 40.
In contrast, African American women
have a higher incidence rate before age 40
and are more likely to die from breast can-
cer at every age. (Breast cancer is the num-
ber one cause of cancer death in Hispanic
women.)
There are different types of breast cancer.
The kind of breast cancer depends on which
cells in the breast turn into cancer.
Breast cancer can begin in different
parts of the breast such as the ducts or the
glands.
According to the latest statistics from the
American Cancer Society, approximately
40,460 women in the United States were ex-
pected to die from breast cancer in 2007.
Lung cancer was the only type of cancer
anticipated to cause more cancer deaths in
women.
Also, about 2,030 cases of breast cancer
were expected to occur among men, ac-
counting for about 1% of all breast cancers.


This means that approximately 450 men
were expected to die from breast cancer
during the year 2007.
The National Cancer Institute estimates
that approximately 2.4 million women with
a history of breast cancer were alive in Janu-
ary 2004.
Most of these women were cancer-free,
while others still had evidence of cancer and
may have been undergoing treatment.
The 5-year relative survival rate is slightly
lower among women diagnosed with breast
cancer before age 40 (82%) compared to
women diagnosed at ages 40 and older
(89%).
Tumors diagnosed in younger women
may be more aggressive and less responsive
to treatment.
Mammograms
A mammogram is an X-ray of the breast.
Mammograms are the best method to detect
breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat
and before it is big enough to feel or cause
symptoms.
Having regular mammograms can lower
the risk of dying from breast cancer.
If you are age 40 years or older, you
should have a screening mammogram ev-
ery one to two years.
Talk to your doctor if you have any breast
symptoms or changes in your breast, or if
breast cancer runs in your family.
You may be instructed to have mam-
mograms before age 40 or more often than
usual.
Preliminary results from a large clinical
trial of digital versus traditional film mam-
mograms reveal that those women with
dense breasts who are pre- or perimeno-
pausal (i.e., women who had a last menstru-


al period within 12 months of their mammo-
grams) or who are younger than age 50 may
benefit from having a digital rather than a
film mammogram.
Digital mammography allows the radi-
ologist to view the X-ray image more closely,
zeroing in on suspicious or concerning ar-
eas and enabling them to make additional
images.
Digital mammography takes less than half
the time of traditional film-based exams.
Digital mammograms are performed at
Hendry Regional Medical Center.
Schedule your yearly mammogram. Re-
member the best form of protection is early
detection!


Citrus Trees Resistant to
Canker and Greening

Clewiston, FL This week Southern Gar-
dens Citrus began its second set of research
field trials planting a group of citrus trees
which have shown resistance to greening in
the laboratory. These trees were developed
in conjunction with Integrated Plant Genet-
ics, a private research company based in
Alachua, Florida."
"This field trial continues our efforts to
develop a solution to the current challeng-
ing citrus diseases of greening and canker,"
said Ricke Kress, president.
Kress said that this research project was
initiated in 2007 and that the trees have been
planted in compliance with the issued field
testing permit as received from the United
States Department of Agriculture Biotech-
nology Regulatory Services.
Consistent with the previous planted field
trials that are in place within the Southern
Gardens Citrus Hendry County groves, "We


will continue to follow all issued regulations
related to the safety and integrity of the trial,
including strict access control", said Rick
Kress, president.
Kress said that Southern Gardens Citrus
continues to be very proactive in working
with all facets of the citrus industry including
UF/IFAS, USDA, FDACS, Texas A&M AgriLife
Research, Cornell University, and indepen-
dent researchers in an effort to combat and
eliminate the HLB/greening disease.
Citrus greening disease or Huanglong-
bing (HLB) is considered to be the most seri-
ous disease of citrus trees in the world. HLB
was first identified and confirmed in Florida
in September 2005. Today, HLB has spread
to all Florida counties with commercial cit-
rus groves.
Southern Gardens Citrus, one of the larg-
est citrus producers in the state, has three
groves in southwest Florida, all of which are
infected to some extent with HLB.


September 24, 2009


SHEWMAKER ANIMAL HOSPITAL
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We will be at Tractor Supply
in Clewiston
Monday, Tuesday & Thursday
From 3pm to 6 pm

Shewmaker
Animal Hospital
1566 N. Bridge St.
LaBelle, FL 33935
863-675-2441
Fax 863-675-3629
Dr. Lee Shewmaker D.VM.
Dr. Bridgette Shewnaker-
Cochran D VM.
Dr. Shana Damirana D.VM.


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Southern Gardens Citrus Plants


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Glades County Democrat 11


Flu Season is here Be prepared, get vaccinated


By Pat Dobbins
Administrator for the
Hendry & Glades County
Health Departments
Reports of the HIN1-
Swine Flu keep flashing
on the news screens and
filling our newspapers,
but it's also time to think Pat Dobbins.
about other flu viruses.
Our flu season typically starts in October and
will last through the fall and winter. Symp-
toms of flu can include fever or chills and
cough or sore throat. Other symptoms of flu
can include runny nose, body aches, head-
ache, tiredness, diarrhea, or vomiting.
We are asking that you plan to stay home
if you are sick until at least 24 hours after you
no longer have a fever (100 degrees Fahren-
heit) This should be determined without the
use of fever-reducing medicines (any medi-
cine that contains ibuprofen or acetamino-
phen such as Tylenol, Advil, or Aleve). Other
signs of a fever can include having chills,
feeling very warm, have a flushed appear-
ance, or are sweating. If your symptoms are
severe, please see your healthcare provider.
You will keep hearing reminders to cover
your coughs and sneezes and to wash your
hands often with soap and water, or to use
an alcohol-based hand cleaner if soap and
water are not available. This sounds like
common sense, right?
If a severe flu outbreak hits our commu-


nity, please take additional steps to avoid
spreading the flu virus in schools, in the
workplace, and in our communities. Take
actions now to prepare! Get your vaccine for
seasonal flu. Many health providers in our
community now have the vaccine for sea-
sonal flu. Also ask your healthcare provider
if the pneumonia vaccine is right for you.
Vaccination guidance for seasonal flu
and H1N1-Swine Flu are different. The 2009
H1N1-Swine Flu vaccine is not intended to
replace the seasonal flu vaccine it is in-
tended to be used along-side seasonal flu
vaccine

Seasonal Flu Vaccine
People who should get a seasonal flu
vaccination each year include:
Children aged 6 months up to their
19th birthday
Pregnant women
People 50 years of age and older
People of any age with certain chronic
medical conditions
People who live in nursing homes and
other long-term care facilities
People who live with or care for those
at high risk for complications from flu, in-
cluding: Health care workers, household
contacts of persons at high risk for compli-
cations from the flu, household contacts
and out of home caregivers of children less
than 6 months of age (these children are too
young to be vaccinated)


H1N1-Swine Flu Vaccine
Once the 2009 HINI Swine Flu vaccine
becomes available, the groups recommend
ed to receive this vaccine include:
Pregnant women because they are at
higher risk of complications and can poten-
tially provide protection to infants who can-
not be vaccinated
Household contacts and caregivers for
children younger than 6 months of age be-
cause younger infants are at higher risk of
influenza-related complications and cannot
be vaccinated
Healthcare and emergency medical
services personnel because this can be a
potential source of infection for vulnerable
patients. Also, increased absenteeism in this
population could reduce healthcare system
capacity
All people from 6 months through
24 years of age: Children from 6 months
through 18 years of age because children
have close contact with each other in school
and day care settings, which increases the
likelihood of disease spread. Young adults
19 through 24 years of age: Healthy young
adults often live, work, and study in close
contact with each other, and they socialize
more often
People aged 25 through 64 years who
have chronic health conditions and may
have higher risk of medical complications
from influenza.
For more information about priority


groups for this vaccination, please talk with
your healthcare provider or you can go on-
line at: www.cdc.gov/hlnlflu/vaccination/
acip.htm.
Make plans to take care of your family
members at home if they get sick. Have a
plan on how to care for your children if they
cannot attend school. Be prepared in case
you get sick and need to stay home. Have
the following items on hand: fever-reducing
medicines that contain acetaminophen or
ibuprofen (such as Tylenol, Advil, Aleve,
etc,), alcohol-based hand cleaners, tissues,
lots of liquids to drink and other items to
help you be comfortable while you are sick.
Being prepared will help avoid the need to
make trips out in public while you are sick.
There are many ways to learn about the
flu and what you can do to help minimize
your chances of getting sick as well as know-
ing what to do if unfortunately you do get
sick. To find out more about preparing for
the flu, please talk to your healthcare pro
vider or you can go on-line at: www.flu.gov
. You can also call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-
232-4636) or call the Florida Flu Informa-
tion Line 1-877-352-3581 or visit the website
www.myflusafety.com
By working together, we can protect our
families and our communities!
Patricia Dobbins is the Administrator for the
Hendry and Glades County Health Departments.
If you would like to read an article about a
particular health topic, please call 863-674-4041,
extension 117.


Religion briefs


Moore Haven
P.F.C has a new website
We at Pentecostal Faith Cathedral would
like to take the time to inform you of our
building fund project that is now taking
place.
We're on a new journey and this journey
has brought us to a critical moment of real-
izing that technology is a great resource of
reaching out to communicate across the
globe to everyone.
This is how the creation of our new web-
site began. For those of you, who have been
there from the beginning, are aware of this
website but for those that don't, you can
learn more about Pentecostal Faith Cathe-
dral and our building fund by going to our
site.
For those of you that are aware of it,
you may learn that our web address has
changed. The new web address is www.
pentecostalfaithcathedral.org.
Please go to our website to learn all about
us and this venture in more detail. You will
find, our e-mail address and our contact in-
formation if you need to reach us. You will
also learn about the updates of our project
and the events that are taking place on the
event calendar.
New information will be posted frequent-
ly to keep you updated. There is so much
more information you will learn if you visit
our website. We at P.F.C. (Pentecostal Faith
Cathedral) hope to hear from you soon!


Thrift shop open at Church of God of
Prophecy
The Church of God of Prophecy, in Moore
Haven, will have a thrift shop open on Sat-
urdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., all things are
given for a donation, this is to help for ex-
penses of the church.
We feel in helping the church it is helping
you also, with your needs.
All things are nice and clean, these things
are supplied by Cowboy Church Hand and
Hand Ministries of Palmdale, if you would
like to help us call 863-612-0640, if no an-
swer leave message, God bless you.

Clewiston
Food Bank at Iglesia Vida Nueva
Everyone hits hard times at some point.
To ease the crisis a small food bank is
open at Iglesia Vida Nueva on Sundays from
10a.m. to 12 p.m.
Restrictions apply. Iglesia Vida Nueva is
located at 217 East Aztec Ave in Clewiston.
For more information please call 863-983-
1070.

Services Times at Iglesia Vida Nueva
Sunday services will be 11 a.m. V.I.D.A
Kids 4-10; VI.D.A Teens 12-18 celebration
services will begin at 6 p.m.
Monday services begin at 7 p.m. C4 Youth
Group for ages 12-18.
Wednesday prayer and bible study ser-
vices will begin at 7 p.m., Friday prayer and
bible study will also begin at 7 p.m.


I he new Lakeside Medical Center is coming. And that means a new day
in health care for our community, with access to advanced medical technology,
sophisticated procedures, and clinical expertise like never before.
It's health care as up-to-date as the future. And the future is almost
here-right here at home.



': Lakeside
1B '5 I 9 Medical Center
SM Health Care District Palm Beach County
S 39200 Hooker Highway I Belle Glade, FL 33430
561-996-6571 | www.lakesidemedical.org
.:. Quality care right here.
S2


September 24, 2009




12 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee September 24, 2009


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PLUS




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Remembrance of the Storm: Hurricane victims honored


1928 storm remembered at
service

By Charles M. Murphy
Okeechobee News
They came to remember history and to
honor the dead.
The East Stuart Historical Society hosted
the 81st remembrance of the Storm of 1928
at the Port Mayaca Cemetery on Wednes-
day.
The service paid homage to the 1,600
people, *. i i.i. t .. r .... i,1i -
w ho los I-h i -- ........ i 'i.- I- Ii- i
natural disasters in U.S. history on Sept. 16,
1928.
The storm was one of the most power-
ful hurricanes that ever slammed into Palm
Beach County, Lake Okeechobee, and what
is now known as the Treasure Coast. The of-
ficial death toll at one time was 1,836, but
historians believe as many as 3,000 were
killed.
Searches went on for at least six weeks
to find bodies. Many were buried in mass
graves, some were stacked in piles and
burned, and many bones are still found out
in the Glades by farmers. Some 674 bodies
were placed in unmarked graves in West
Palm Beach. Seventy white victims were
buried at West Palm Beach's Woodlawn


Cemetery.
Survivor Purnell Green, who was four
years old when the storm hit, remembered
spending the night at an old two story pack-
ing house in Belle Glade, "I was playing the
whole time, the whole night. I was holding
onto my mothers dress standing by the win
dow, patting the water, second story up. At
four years old, you don't think nothing is se-
rious."
Green had to spend days in the hospital
because he drank water out of ditches that
contained dead bodies. He noted there was
no advance warning of the storm. His father
was told by Seminole Indians to leave the
Glades before the storm. They said some big
water was coming.
"He said he was too busy making money,
and waited until the last minute. Father had
a boat, and he carried us to this building. He
then went back for my mother's wedding
stuff. We didn't see him for days. He picked
up at the hospital in West Palm Beach."
Bells were tolled for the victims and Bur-
nett said many thought he and his mom had
perished in the storm so bells were actually
tolled for them.
Burnett also survived a plane crash in
Greensboro, S.C. and fought in World War
II.
Another survivor, Esther Williams, lived
in a shack in Santee Quarters, on U.S. 441
near Canal Point during the storm. She said


it began to rain and the water began to flow,
knocking on the windows and doors of the
tiny shack. "I don't remember too much
about it. The weather was bad. It was storm-
ing and raining. Little huts were blowing
about everywhere, even across the railroad.
Many people got lost. One lady, the Aunt of
two women who now live in Indiantown,
got lost in a tree, they never found her."
Williams said she tries to forget about the
deaths and destruction but the Lord won't
let her. She noted God has been good to her
and those memories remind her of the Lord
and his kindness.
"Later that day the sun started shining but
the damage had already been done. They
had bodies in boxes sitting besides the road
in Pahokee, other bodies were just thrown
into holes," she added.
Fannie Moore, Dr. W Jay Thompson, Ava
Locklear, and the Reverend Jerry Gore, all
participated in Wednesday's observance.
Indiantown's Thelma Water read a num-


ber of proclamations from local govern-
ments which honored the victims of the
storm.
The unnamed storm of 1928 filled Lake
Okeechobee to the brim, broke out man-
made dikes and literally swept people away.
The storm still colors Florida's past and
changed the Glades and Florida forever, she
said.
Ms. Locklear said the search for bodies
went on for six weeks until authorities ran
out of money. She noted most of the victims
were impoverished migrant workers who
had come to Florida to take advantage of
the agriculture boom of the 1920s. She ex-
plained that whites and blacks were buried
separately at first. However, as the search
went on and decomposition set in, Ms.
Locklear said it was very hard to distinguish
between the black and white victims, and
many were buried together, or burned.


Purnell Green, who survived the deadly storm 81 years ago, places a flower on
the memorial at Port Mayaca cemetery after Wednesdays service.


Okeechobee News/Charles Murphy
Esther Williams, a survivor of the storm, places a rose on the 1928 hurricane
victims' memorial at Port Mayaca cemetery. Also in photo is Dr. Jay Thompson
of the East Stuart historical society.


September 24, 2009


Glades County Democrat 13




14 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee September 24, 2009


Create Your Own Ads Online! Two weeks FREE... It's Easy!

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Post your ads in any of these newspapers for only $8 each:
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notify us prior to the dead-
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1 incorrect insertion, or for
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the ad rendered valueless
by such errors. Advertser
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content of an ad, and
assumes responsibility for
any claims against the
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advertising is subject to
,ibhllher'e 9prpR-l Th.
to accept or reject any or
all copy, and to insert
above the copy the word
"advertisement". All ads
accepted are subject to
credit approval. All ads
must conform to Delaware
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restricted to their proper
classifications. Some clas-
sified categories require
advance payment. These
classifications are denoted
with an asterisk *.
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Upcoming Consignment
Equipment & Machinery
Auction
October 3 at 9 am
Add your equipment to
these: 7 Ford 12 pass.
shuttle busses w/handi-
cap ramp, Ford &
Dodge 12 pass. vans,
boats, trucks, farm
equip, shop tools
Lee Civic Center
N. Ft Myers
Highway 31 and 78
land uctionservce.com
(239) 936-4121
Frank E. Land
Auctioneer
AB2084 AU2814
Find it faster. Sell it sooner
in the classifieds
Need a few more bucks
to purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
sell your used items in
the classifeids.


LOST-2 DOGS Female
- Missing from N.W. Ist
St/Ave. I n Belle Glade.
Belle, a medium-size pit
bull, black and white,
1&1/2 years old, pink
collar, together with Li-
ly, a solid black lab mix,
large, eight months old.
Both are friendly.
Belle's left front Ig is
still healing from a bad
break. She requires
medical care. Reward.
(561)996-3573
(561)985-1999
Grab a bargain from your
neighbor's garage, attic,
basement or closet in
today's classifieds.
LOST--2 DOGS Female
- Missing from N.W. 1st
St/Ave. I in Belle Glade.
Belle, a medium-size pit
bull, black and white,
1&1/2 years old, pink
collar, together with Li
ly, a solid black lab mix,
large, eight months old.
Both are friendly
Belle's left front leg is
still healing from a bad
break. She requires
medical care. Reward.
(561)996-3573
561)985-1999




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go to
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BOOKKEEPER At least
5 years experience,
able to multi task, call
during the day
(863)634-7552 even-
ings (863)763-5321
GLADES COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
Is seeking full time
Maintenance Worker,
HVAC exp. REQUIRED.
Call 863-946-0202 ext.
119 for more info.
WANTED
EXP. AG/FARM
MECHANIC
Please call
(239)503-0604


B HENDRY REGIONAL

MEDICAL CENTER
'Wrelt'sffAbt Getti Betterff'

R1 ie atAered Rmi (Opening in E UJ)

Valid Fia license wit at east one yea exp in
area t expertise.

Perc dn ffied Nursig Assistantotg shift)
Must possess :,iIli:j~l:'in as a Nursing
Assistant BLS required

a* :O msww ~f.rus, Fa W tlb4xe EE


MEDICAL BUSINESS
OFFICE ASSISTANT

Full time position. Ex-
perience with Accounts
Payable, Accounts Re-
ceivable required.
Medical billing experi-
ence preferred. Must
be reliable, organized,
maintain strict confi-
dentiality, work inde-
pendently and able to
multi task.
Apply at:
Palm Terrace
of Clewiston
863-983-5123

One man's trash is
another man's treas-
ure. Turn your trash
to treasure with an
ad in the classified.

Reading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people!


PART TIME
TELLERS
Now accepting applca-
tlons for Part Time Tell-
ers. Must have excellent
communicabon skills,
previous experience pre-
erred. Bi-lingual a +.
May apply in person or
mail resume to 1099 W.
Ventura Ave., Clewiston,
FL 33440, Attn: Marta or
email resume to:
martasmihth
everaladesfcu.com




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go to
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CHOOSE YOUR
HOURS, INCOME &
YOUR REWARDS!
CHOOSE AVON
GWEN (888)265-1256
How do you find a job
in today competi-
tive market? In the
employment section
of the classified


NOTICE
Independent Newspapers
will never accept any ad-
vertisement that is illegal
or considered fraudulent.
In all cases of ques-
tionable value, such as
promises of guaranteed
income from work-at-
home programs if it
sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it
is. If you have questions
or doubts about any ad
on these pages, we ad-
vise that before respond-
ing or sending money
ahead of time, you check
with the Better Business
Bureau at 772-878-2010
for previous complaints.
Some 800 and 900 tele-
phone numbers may re-
quire an extra charge, as
well as long distance toll
costs. We will do our best
to alert our reader of
these charges in the ads,
but occasionally we may
not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if
you call a number out of
your area, use caution.




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VACATION Orlando or
3,t;-n3 F nr,tt f-r
fee (863)983-7863




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go to
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North Side 2BR Duplex,
Water/Sewer Included.
(863)983-3151


GREENTREE EAST
APARTMENTS
Available for
Immediate Occupancy
2 Bedroom Apartments
*Rental Assistance
Available to qualified
households
*Spacious Apartment in
quiet, country setting
*Full time bilingual Site
Manager
*Rental rates starting
at $529 plus Utilities
Call 902-1577
TDD #1-800-955-8771
701 W Ventura
Clewiston; 8:00 AM
3:00 PM, Mon-Fri
Equal Opportunity
Provider & Employer

^
Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise your
yard sale in the classi-
fieds and make your
clean up a breeze!


CLEWISTON 1004
Johnson Rd., 2BR/1BA,
$650 mo. + $550 sec.,
no inside pets. Call Shir-
ley (561)996-3744
CLEWISTON 112 West
El Paso, 3br, 2ba,
$700/mo. $600 sec. No
inside pets, Call Shirley
(561)996-3744
CLEWISTON NORTH-
SIDE Rent w/option to
buy. 3BR/1BA, FR,
$1050 mo. + $650 sec.
dep. Call 863-885-1718
How fast can your car
go? It can go even
faster when you sell
it in the classified.
MOORE HAVEN 3BR,
2BA, 1600 sq. ft.
$1,000/mo. with gar &
W/D. 950 sq. ft. effi-
ciency with carport,
$850/mo. Max. 2 peo-
ple, W/D. 863-227-3333
NORTH SIDE 2 BR,
Fenced in yard.
(863)983-3151


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go to
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FORECLOSURES,
DEALER REPO'S,
& SHORT SALES.
Singles, Doubles,
Modulars. LOW Interest
Rates. 1-800-622-2832

PRICE
REDUCED!
Will Consider all
Serious Offers!

For Sale By Owner
Nearly 2300 sq. ft. on
corner lot. Extras:
2 full-sized adjoining
rooms for possible
home office business
or mother-in-law suite.
Nice yard. Possible
lease option. Call
828-293-2542.
Please, no
brokers or real
estate agents!
Looking for a place to
hang your hat? Look
no further than the
classified.




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go to
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CLEWISTON: Sher-
wood, 3/2, A/C, 560
Fleetwood St. $560
Call 863-674-5715
Buying a car? Look in


classified.
LAKE PORT -2br, 2ba,
$550/mo, 1st & last,
partially furnished,
W/D, (678)588-4364


M.HAVEN RENTALS
Furn./Unfurn.
*1BR, MH, furn, $375/mo
3BR, 1.5BA MH, Screen
orch, fenced yd., shed
650/mo.
*2BR/2BA MH, $550
mo.
* 3BR/1BA MH, $600 mo.
*Lakeport 3BR/2BA,
DW MH on lake $750
mo.
Furnished Weekly
Rentals with utilites
Lg. 1BR Apt.
$210 wk.
Room for Rent
$50 per week
863-509-0096


BANK REPO'S
MOVE TO YOUR LAND
Mobile Home Angels
561-721-2230

Find it faster. Sell it sooner
in the dassifieds

Shop here first!
The classified ads

The classified are the
most successful sales-
person in town.

Join all the people who
say, "I sold it in the
classifieds"

Earn some extra cash.
Sell your used items
in the classified

Get a quick response to
any item you may be sell-
ing with a classified ad.

It's never too late to find
the perfect gift. Look
for it in the classified.

When you want some-
thing sold, advertise in
the cassifieds.

Shop from a gift catalog
that's updated regulaly:
the classified.




September 24, 2009


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


1r R

RENT/IASE *Moore I lven CBS I Ioln $129.9K 10 Acres /, 03MI I a $112.9K
-- (2) a18 a hllda Ib irgMa 2 a $0 Vacant Lot 1 2K Texa Are
*828 E Coo rda (2) studs *\;i [omne Stpls :laglol $525K1 Acrre *IngCa,~ i a 5 ac beautyful1! Sau.
& bd $475 & $525r S l 1525K1A- C 5 24W
SSugar(ane TI I w~l $ mn "Ml1 & wI ..ia I .n -20 acrs w/1 lole 59
St -( pilC>iAad22 *Bass n 1 u-S Condo (. $1 1 o 6 E V1tl05K
Strag On rt *.Vacant lot i.. ClS.$19.9K Sho 03 f $1
1004 W Avcrdcz N.c- $14) R5d. a L4,-aLl 5aLd/ M 19i Rl l- 13..d 3K
R-staura.nt Spare 202-B W BL-aniutiiI M Rnrlo3Il'imd$nut $125K /MII '9ilaraon 1/3 acr S9K
Vcntra $1,2(X) 1 1670 RidgdlMII I w/pond l$39.9K *22 5 acres MI tenced $39,90
CALLFORMORE -213 San Gabriel Like New $123K *Clwiston An mal ChcI Reduced
RENTALS OR VISIT WEB IROI Ilr (i ,.lli .S99-RK *469 Bald Cvpaia, $49K







A4 MM 401fe<11` a& WaMMAMSwo
4. .. w U.s.min Vse aere~i

AFTER ANNDYESS LAURA SMITH Bmrasoa TRAVIS OYESS ANGELICA GONZALEZ
HOURS: (863) 9838979 (863)599-1209 (863)228-2215 (863)228-0023
RESIDENTIAL New 3/2 Orchard 3/2 DWMH on lake Residential lot
Bass Capital 2/2 For Park $134,000 Allen Rd $120,000 Hookers Point area
Rent 3/2 with large shed 3/2 DWMH has CBS $15 900
3/2/2 with pool and and fenced yard E outbuilding Magnolia COMMERCIAL
g uesthouseConc o r d Lane $79.9K Worehouse (rented) +
245,000 $169,900 3/2 SWMH Hookers 85 storage units (some
2/2 E Ventura Ave 3/2/2 with pool E Point Rd $44,900 a/c) E El Paso Call for
$85K Del Monte $189.9K VACANT LAND details.
Bass Capital Unit RENTALS 27.5 acres Pioneer SHORT SALE
402 $130K 2/1 duplex $600 $245K 1117 Mississippi
S ,- -$285K p.m 10 Monrt oks $9,900 Ave 4/2 SFR
$adena 1042 Boyberry 4/3 ead 328 W Ventura Ave
$115K $1800 p.m 2.5acesMor a $25K 3/1 SFR
2/2 Condo Boss 'n MOBILE HOMES MooeHaven 5 lots 512 E Osceolo Ave
Sun furnished 5112K 3/2 WVMHw/o/gpod $75K 4/2 SFR
4/1.5 E. Aiverdez Evemcne Rd Redued MooreHoven-2lots 1005 Caribbean -
$109K $165K $39.9K 4/2/2 SFR


a qwly4 (863)983-8559
1 --- $18 E, sula8gB id Hwy., Clewelol



Su*- s.1

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*3005e$a2n509S0eo trtlda&OaBnro $0505

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*JeO112BAMBSaReansrrIkaItA $15 00
ACREAC KIAN D 11,1011 3 .. i11
~Ba~5o2U.OBss9OneVhlsd~$250ros9

-51A--JBIWBA-$75%0
*300SuMlaMH'B~,daO.ArBiyrrK8,Arrlg$OK

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Ghc Coiu~tN 11cio a


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Is it time to sell your home?
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Clewiston News Glades County Democrat The Sun 1-863-983-9148




16 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee September 24, 2009


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www.newszap.com

IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 20th
JUDICL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND R GLADES COUNT
CEe #; 29-CA-000110
DeuShe Banl, Natna Trust C
pany as Trustee T rust, or the
bneit of the Cercateholders for
Amerca t Mortgae SeCur
Trust 25-RB etBacked Pa-
Through erotcates, Senes 205-
R8'PlanBff,




















LOT 4, COUNTRY SIDE MEADOWS,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGES 134 AND 135, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF GLADES COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN
YEAR 1994, MAKE PINES, VIN#
47620159GA AND VIN#
476201S9GB, MANUFACTURED
HOME, WHICH IS PERMANTLY
AFKED TO THE ABOVE DE-
SCRIBED LANDS, AS SUCH T
DEEMEDTO BE FIXTURE AND A
PART OF THE REAL ESTATE
ANy PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTH-
ER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF
THE US PENDENS MUST MLE
A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AF-
TER THE SALE,













IOE FLINT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Glades County, Florida















The regular meebng of the Board
of Supevisor of Hendr HIllrd
Water Control Dlstr has been
scheduled for Tuesday, Septem
ber. 29 200 at 930 am The
meeting wl be hed at Hllard
Brother of Florida off oated
at 5500 Flaghole Road, Clewiston,

Joe Madln Hlllard


CASE NO: 22-2008 -U-0292

CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Planiff,
UAN A, ALBERT, et l,
Defendant/s).
MENDEDNOTICE OF ACTION
TO USA MORTGAGE BUSINESS,

A DISSOLED CORPORATION




CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN







LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN





,,, 'A UNKNO, N











































WnTES my hand an the ea of
thi cou on th'i 10, day of ,
2089,
loe Fint










PUBLO C NOTICE

of Supe of Sugaand Dra-
age DIn, ha,, been shedued
Ir Tuday, Septemer 2 009
at 9,00 am. T ,he meen wl e"
held at Hiland Brother of Florida
Office lated at 5500 Fagle

TFe Mar mln Hl rd
of suIl fSgradDan


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GLADES COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
ASE NO. 22-2008-CA-00024
U S BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE OR
WFMBS 2006-4116
GERMAN ALEX BERG AK/A GERMAN
ALJRIANRO CUERVO BERG et al,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE















THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUAR-
TER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-
A/R/A 04OF SECTION 24,
WHIPELL42 OUTH, RAN339GE
28 EMST ADES C T,
FLORID.; SUBJECT TO EASE-
MENTS MR INGRESS AND












EeEO oA olnta
a/ 20- ERN Oo "ANE

















3on2 nedina specio
Ilac, Fodaio .t, a.c .ten





t-, T,,
who00e9 8770ce /, loaed at
312, 1700 o S ot
M r Flod 33901 leph
2 V13) 335-299;
3336 FNTO/24,10/1N209
FeenLORda; SUBmECTT AE


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
GLADES COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FIle No. 209CP21
IN RE STAT OF
GUYS. LOUGHEED,
Deceased

(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE,













Name Address
Onedi None




t o I




ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NO-
TIRED THAT,
All credlto of the estate of the
Dedet and peO n havng lam
or demands against the estate of the
Deedent other than thoe for whom
provision for full payment was made
in the Order of Summary Adm-nsta
ton must file their clams wth ths
-out WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733 702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
NOTWISTANDING AMY OTHER
APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD ANY
CLAIM FLED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED,
The dae of first publlatlion of th
Nobte is Sept 10th, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 20th
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN ND FORHENDRY COUNTY







AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
I-7,:, ,i -,, :' ,
















BLOCK C, LOT 3, OF SECTION 27,
TOWNSHIP 43 SOUTH, RANGE 31
EAST IN HENRY COUNTY, FLORI-
DA THE NORTHEAST ONEUAR-
TER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-
QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST
ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTH-
WEST ONE-QUARTER ALSO
KNOWN AS PIONEER PLANT
TION

NY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE THE MOFHE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.












BARBARAS BUTLER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
HendR Coun...ty, Foda
BY, S, ,HAMMOND
DEP UTCLERK
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN LLP
10004 North Dae Mab16 Hwy,
S-ute 112
Tampa, Florida 33618
334- CN 9/24,101.09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH UDICIALCIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HENRY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.09-465CA

































, ,,




Flo,',d ts 28th d 'f Aut
OR BARBAA HERNA ILER
SDeendan ,























As Clerk of Tald CouRt













OF ELE GADE ANNOUNCES THAT
A SPECIAL ME HAS BEE





CALLED N ORDER TO SE BLECT A






CONTRA CTOR FOR DE UPCOMINGTHE


REHAB PROJECT THE MEETING IS
SCHEDULED FOR 1 30 PM ON SEP-
TEMBER 29, 2009 AT THE ADMIN
ISTRATION OFFICE IN OSCEOLA
CENTER, 1204 N W AVENUE L TER-
RACE, BELLE GLADE, FL
333954 SUN 9/24109


RFP 2009-38
HENRY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
HENRY COUNTY HOUSING PROGRAM




SIH.,R Progrm,























Janet Tay, '
ChaIrperon, BOCC
333416 CB/CN 9/17,24/09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
GLADES COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 09 CP 24
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARTA M. ACQUARRIE,
Deceased.
NOTICE TOCREDITORS


























, . WILL BE
.BE

NOTWISTANDING THE TIME PE-
RIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED 2 YEARS OR MORE AF
TER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED
The date of the firt publication of
ths Notice Is September 17,2009
Martha S Vanhose,
as Personal Re remntative
of tie Estate of












PUBUC NOTICE







3. Maeln Hlllard
Supervsor
FRIaghole DaIage Dsct
334017 CN 9/24/09

I,11r, I


NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Florida Deparrnent of Transportation Pmject


Ranlng Commiettee Meetings
RFQ 2009-35 and RFQ 2009-36


F











W cn




1


CI a


Q)



LY~



c,


OQ)















as


~n~mm


~mr~n~n~


SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT CUSTRICT
PUBLIC OTICE OF APPLICATIO




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


C


The se on is open to the pub c, but n


o public comment will be taken

,' ,


BOARD OF COUNT COMMISSIONERS
OF HENRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
Janet Taylor, Charwoman
33725 CBICN 9/24/09

REQUEST FOR BIDS
SUPPLY VARIOUS L L ROAD MATERIALS TO HENRY COUNTY
BID NUMBER: 2009-34










OPENING DATE AND TIME: October 7, 2009 at 2:00 p.m.


























REQUEST FO R PROIDLS,
INSUHOMELAND CURI S ERTSE
BID NUMBER: 2009-37



















OPENING DATE AND TIME: Saeutr 05, 20010 at 2:00 p.m.


endry County an Eqgu Oppotunl Employer and DuSmoe F
Wor ug/Soke Pla. W Pl
laetB Tayor Charoman










319 CB/CN 9/r17,24/09
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS,
INSURANCE & RISK MANAGEMENT
FIR NUMBER: 2009-41
OPENING DATE AND TIME: Seauamr 15, 2010 at 2;00 p.m.













Hendry County is an Eq ual Opp ortunity E mpl yer and D/ Fee
-aret B Taylor, Cha-r..
!3419 CB/CN 9/24,10/1,815/09


Zlllllll


Zlllllll


NOTICE OFSCHE ULINGOF NEGOTINITING ESSION
"'" HENDRYCOUNT
PROFESSIONAL EMT & PAIRAM-WC LOU 45M~


REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
AIRPORT DEVELOPMENT AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL
-

ENGINEERING SERVICES IN HENRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
RQ. N. 200-39
OPENING DATE: October 15, 2009, at 2:00 p.m.
',















Bad of Co un Commone
net B Talor, Chaman
333405 CB/CN 9/17,24,10/1,8/09


NOTICEOFSHFRIFFS SAIL




-, ,,,,,






0et to a 40 Roadway E t the side ad, aN 6 foot
Roadway Easement along the Eat ide hereof
More common efeed to as 3350 15 Street, Pionee Plantatin Hend-





Steve Whdden
Sheriff
Hendr County, Flida
Lieutenant Andy L-Cs
33374 CN 9/24,10,,115/09



NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S ALE










3anng.
ubJ to a 40 oot Roadway Earement along the South side and a 60 foot
R oadway Ea,,emen along the at side thereof,
More mmony referred to a3350 15th Stre Poner Plantaton, Hed-
ry County Flonda





Steve Whdden
Sheriff
Hendy County, Fonda
Lieutenant ndy Lewis
333746 CN 9/24;10/1,8,15/09


I


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RELATIONSHIP PROBLEMS?
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FREE ESTIMATES
Resicenlial & Commercial
Member of the BBB

Metal Roofs, Re-Roobl, Roof Repairs
Office (863) 675-7045
License #C(CC1325950(


September 24, 2009


DON'T EAT IT...READ IT!
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There is no better place to learn about your kingdom
than inside the pages of the newspaper.

IT ALL STARTS WITH NEWSPAPERS
www.newsvoyager.org
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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Burglary investigations



lead to arrests


$8,000 worth of items
recovered in Moore Haven
incident

By Nena Bolan
Glades County Democrat

MOORE HAVEN --
Glades County Detective
Sergeant Steve Harris re-
sponded to a burglary at
a Moore Haven residence
along Avenue K, August
27. The resident explained
that he came home from
work and noticed his front
door was ajar. When he Christopher
entered his bedroom he Layton.
saw several items on the
bed that are normally se-
cured in another area. He
discovered that firearms,
coins and other valuables
were missing. A case of
shotgun shells was sitting
by the front door.
Detective Sergeant
Harris did not find a point Joseph Mal-
of entry, however the phrus.
victim thinks suspects
entered through a back
door which is situated so
neighbors cannot easily
see intruders. According
to an arrest report, the de-
tective sergeant believes
someone knew where to
look for items since the
place was not ransacked.
On August 28, the Dwight Bill-
victim advised Detective wings.
Sergeant Harris that he had placed several
phone calls to acquaintances to see if they
had heard any information. Later, he re-
ceived a call from Dwight Christopher Bill-
ings who mentioned that he found two of
the missing guns. Mr. Billings asked the vic-
tim to come meet him in LaBelle. The vic-
tim traveled there, and Billings explained
that an unknown male was trying to sell
.. U I I ,. L I I ..
r i, l i. .. ..,.. ,.- .i r s shotguns
in their cases. The victim took them back,
and later met with the detective sergeant;
whereby they were processed for finger-
prints.
According to the arrest report, a friend
of his was at the residence about a week
before the incident. The friend explained
that while he was there, Mr. Billings came
by to talk to the victim, and the friend ex-
plained he was at work. The victim com-
mented that he has not invited Mr. Billings
to his residence, nor does he have regular
contact with Mr. Billings.
On Sept. 2, Detective Sergeant Harris
met with Dwight Billings in LaBelle and
they went to the Hendry County Sheriff's
Office annex building. According to the ar-


rest report, Mr. Billings explained he had to
provide $100 for information he gained at
the bar, and also paid an additional $600 for
the two shotguns. Then Detective Sergeant
Harris informed Mr. Billings that finger-
prints were recovered; and a car belonging
to his girlfriend was identified by witnesses
as being at the scene of the incident.
The suspect then cooperated and com-
mented that he and Joseph Allen Mal-
phrus, 20; and Christopher Bradley Layton,
20, had jimmied the rear door of the house
on Avenue K. Fourteen firearms, coins and
jewelry were taken and stored at various
places.
An unidentified minor was questioned
the same day, and advised Detective Ser-
geant Harris that she had driven the three
suspects to the victim's house earlier in the
week, but someone was there and they
left. She returned them to the scene on
Aug. 27 and dropped them off, then she
drove around and waited for a phone call.
When the call was received the unidenti-
fied minor went back to the scene and the
suspects loaded the items and they left, ac-
cording to the arrest report.
When the interviews were over, the de-
tective sergeant took Dwight Christopher
Billings, 20, to different locations to retrieve
the stolen items. Approximately $8,000
worth of firearms, ammunition, coins, jew-
elry and swords were recovered, according
to a GCSO press release.
Additionally, Detective Sergeant Har-
ris and Detective Sergeant Mike Pepitone
were able to conduct further investigations
after the suspects, Mr. Malphrus and Mr.
Layton, were arrested on warrants. They
were interviewed about other burglaries
in Hendry and Glades Counties. Mr. Bill-
ings and Mr. Malphrus, admitted to steal-
ing a stereo and microwave oven from the
Maple Corner Manufactured Home Park in
west Glades County.
Both detective sergeants assisted Inves-
tigator McVey of the Hendry County Sher
iff's Office with five or six burglaries in the
LaBelle area; and recovered firearms, a sat-
ellite radio, GPS systems and other items.
Dwight Billings has been charged with
one count of armed burglary to a dwell-
ing, one count of burglary to an unoccu-
pied structure and two counts of grand
theft. Mr. Billings is in the Glades County
Jail on bond. Christopher Layton has been
charged with one count of armed burglary
to a dwelling and one count of grand theft.
Mr. Layton is held on bond. Joseph Mal-
phrus has been charged with one count of
armed burglary to a dwelling, one count of
burglary to an unoccupied structure and
two counts of grand theft. Mr. Malphrus is
held on bond.
Anyone having additional information
regarding these or any other criminal activ-
ities is asked to contact the Glades County
Sheriff's Office at 863-946-1600.
Staff writer Nena Bolan can be reached at
nenabolan@yahoo.com.


FSA announces qualified



Biomass Conversion Facility


The Florida Acting State Executive Di-
rector for the USDA Farm Service Agency
(FSA ) L, .1 r ,,I ... ..... ..... ., ,
Cane ' 1.-. .. i Il. ..
mass conversion facility is now qualified
under the Biomass Crop Assistance Pro
gram (BCAP). Eligible material owners
may be eligible for matching payments
for delivery of eligible material to Sugar
Cane Growers Cooperative of Florida. The
contact information for this facility is listed
on FSAs BCAP webpage located at http://
* - f-, -i --: .- :-, Owners of eli-
,ii .- .... i L, j i, Glades, Hendry,
Okeechobee, and Palm Beach counties
in Florida may contact their nearest FSA
county office to begin applying for collec-
tion, harvest, storage and transportation
(CHST) matching payments. The CHST
matching payments are paid at a rate of $1
for $1 per dry-ton equivalent received from
a qualified biomass conversion facility, not
to exceed $45 per dry-ton equivalent. An
eligible material owner is able to receive
payments for a period of two years. The


Victim
Continued From Page 1

fice and from Fish and Wildlife Commission.
A search perimeter was set up.
According to the arrest report, GCSO's
Deputy Sheriff Gary Johnson, Captain Jeff
Hill and Chief Deputy DeWayne Pottorff ap-
prehended the suspect after a foot pursuit
across pastures, ditches and wooded areas.
The suspect, Daniel Isaiah Bryant, 28, Old
Muse Road, LaBelle, was brought to the
scene, and according to the arrest report,
he kept repeating that it was not him. The
victim was able to identify clothing, physical
appearance and his voice.
When the suspect was caught he was not
in possession of the stolen property. GCSO


Briefs cont.
ven, FI33471.
Office hours are Monday
a.m. to 5p.m.

Narcotics


Friday from 8


Anonymous meets
Narcotics Anonymous meets Mondays at
7 p.m. for open discussion meeting at Buck
Head Ridge Christian Church, 3 Linda Rd.,
Buckhead Ridge. For more information,
please call 863-634-4780.

Go Green
Help The Glades County Democrat GO
GREEN and raise money for your commu-
nity group at the same time!
Now readers can read The Glades Coun-
ty Democrat online with every page exactly


purpose of the matching payments is to
assist biomass producers with the CHST
cost of delivering biomass to a qualified
biomass conversion facility.
Eligible material owners or producers,
who market eligible material to a qualified
biomass conversion facility, must apply for
the CHST matching payment program at
their nearest FSA county office before the
eligible material is delivered. Eligible ma-
terial owners must provide an agreement
with the qualified biomass conversion fa-
cility as part of an application for a CHST
matching payment. After the product is
delivered, a producer must provide FSA
with documentation of product quantity,
quality, and payment rate. County offices
will validate payment requests with infor-
mation provided under the terms of the
Agreement with the qualified biomass con-
version facilities.
For more information on the BCAP and
on what material is eligible please visit
http://www.fsa.usda.gov/energy or call
your county office.


Criminal Investigation Division was able to
obtain physical evidence. The suspect then
confessed to the burglary, and many stolen
items were recovered with the suspect's co-
operation.
A pocket knife found in the suspect's
pocket was positively identified by the vic
tim's husband. Several firearms, compound
hunting bows, knives, coins and sporting
goods were among the items retrieved.
According to Chief Deputy Pottorff, the
victim commented that when the suspect
allegedly threatened to shoot her, she knew
that the firearms were loaded. She then
backed off and called 911. Daniel Isaiah Bry-
ant was charged with aggravated assault
with a firearm, armed burglary and grand
theft of firearms. Bond was set at $45,000.
Staff writer Nena Bolan can be reached at nen-
abolan@yahoo.com.


as it appears in print with an electronic e-
subscription.These subscriptions are avail-
able by themselves (for those looking to
go totally "green" and read online only) or
also bundled with a print subscription to the
newspaper. The Glades County Democrat
will donate $10 of every e-subscription or
print subscription sold by recognized local
community and civic groups. For details, e-
mail okcirc@strato.net or call Janet at 863-
634 1188.

We want your news!
The Glades County Democrat welcomes
news from the community. Post your news
events, photos and opinions online at www.
newszap.com. To contact us, e-mail to gcd
news@newszap.com or call toll free 866
399-5253. For more information, see the At
Your Service Box on page 4.


18 Glades County Democrat


September 24, 2009




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


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September 24, 2009





20 Glades County Democrat Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee September 24, 2009


count outing provides other enjoyment like
h-. t-rr.1 i ri-ni- hiking and kayaking.
S .i....i. .. go to www.audu-
bonofflorida.org and www.birds.cornell.
edu
Staffwriter Nena Bolan can be reached at nen-
abolan@yahoo.com.


il/Nl ena uolan
Audubon of Florida and other organizations support the 4th Annual North Amer-
ican Migration Count, Sept. 19. Paul Gray, Audubon of Florida, lives in Lorida
and devotes time to study and help bird life at Lake Okeechobee. He uses the
spotting scope at Harney Pond Canal, Glades County.


-A. ST .

IQ.-!
DURING THESE TOUGH ECONOMIC TIMES

CLEWISTON VISION ACE CARES

COME IN AND SAVE 20% OFF THE ENTIRE STORE

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 27TH ,

RAFFLE PRIZES FREE HOT DOGS AND COKE ,
FROM 11 A.M. TO 3 PM.





A; T1 hEst pulan pi.y
1 310 East Sugarldan Higway 863-983-8353
*"s ^lo^7rW~^.\i


David Simpson, experienced bird guide, carries the spotting scope at Harney
Pond Canal, Glades County during the North American Migration Count which
helps bird scientists and conservationists.


Li








rh a new Carrier Inf.ty System Call s t-ayl


Pittman
Air Conditioning
863-675-0044


Turn to the Experts


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local
jouralism!






tine when newspapers
everywhere are struggling to survive,
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Imp. t liti iillnil -i rl' l 111


Birds
Continued From Page 1
ers, eco-tourists, and festival-goers. The bird


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


20 Glades County Democrat


September 24, 2009




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