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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Glades County Democrat
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028301/00024
 Material Information
Title: Glades County Democrat
Alternate Title: Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Glades Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Moore Haven Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 2005
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Moore Haven (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Glades County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Glades -- Moore Haven
Coordinates: 26.834167 x -81.096111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1922.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 8, no. 12 (June 21, 1929) issue misdated 1920.
General Note: Editors: R.B. Child, <1926>; Keathley Bowden, <1929>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Sept. 24, 1926).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358007
oclc - 01461464
notis - ABZ6307
lccn - sn 83000793
issn - 0745-4120
System ID: UF00028301:00024

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
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        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
    Classifieds
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
        page 23
        page 24
Full Text




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Moore Haven, Fla. Thursday, June 16,2005 Volume 78, Number 53


At a Glance
Workshop
meeting
The Glades County School
Board will old a budget work-
shop on June 23 at 4 p.m. in the
Glades County School Board
meeting room, 400 10OStreet,
SW in Moore Haven
Fourth of July
VFW Post 9528, in Buckhead
Ridge, is sponsoring the annual
Fourth of July celebrations, to be
held at the VFW location, 2002,
Hwy. 78. Pork roast, baked
beans, cole slaw, and potato
salad will be served from 12:30-
3 p.m. Music will be available
from 1:30-4:30 p.m., with
karaoke by Deborah. Games,
such as washer pitch, shuffle-
board, and billiards will also be
available, as well as a cake auc-
tion. All proceeds are to benefit
Hospice. Call Commander John
Patent at (863) 467-2882, for
more information.
Moore Haven
Lion's Club meets
The Moore Haven Lions
Club has begun its summer
schedule. The next two meet-
ings will be Tuesday, July 12
and Tuesday, Aug. 9. Thereafter,
in September, the regular
schedule of meetings on the
second and fourth Tuesday of
each month will resume. All
meetings will have dinner and
are at the American Legion Hall
in Moore Haven starting at 5:30
p.m. Any questions contact
Kirby Sullivan at (86) 946-2556.
Flea Market
re-Opening
Moore Haven flea market
will re-open and will be offering
their spaces for free to sell your
stuff. For more information, call
(863) 227-6173 or (863) 946-
0037 ask for Ricardo.
Sugar Dolls hold
summer classes
The Clewiston Sugar Dolls
will be having summer classes,
starting June 8, with classes
being held at Central Elemen-.
tary every Wednesday. Beginner
ages are 4-12, class is at 3 p.m.,
ages 13 and up, class is at 4 p,m.
Sugar Dolls classes consist
of baton twirling, dance pom-
poms, and new this year flag
and flag corp, color guard, you
may take one class or all class-
es. Classes are $25 per month.
Registration fee is $12, which
includes your insurance. For
more information, please call
Judy at (863) 677-0025.
Economic Council
Meetings
The Glades County Eco-
nomic Development Council
normally meets the first Mon-
day of the month at 6:15 p.m. in
the conference room at Glades
Electric Cooperative. If you are
not a member, please contact
.the EDC about joining. If you
are a member, please plan to
attend the meetings. As the
Main Street effort, and other ini-
tiatives move forward, we will
need' a host of knowledgeable
volunteers to serve on various
committees and we encourage
your participation.

Lake Level

4.15.27

f above sea
level

Index
Classifieds ...... 20-23
Obituaries . . .2
Opinion . . .4
School . . . .9
See Page 4for information about
howto contact the newspaper.

-ap.-

Online news & information


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8 16510 00022 1


Gunshot wound kills Osceola


By Bill Fabian
PALMDALE In the morning
hours on Monday, June 13, the
Glades County Sheriff's Office
responded to a 911 emergency
call reporting an apparent acci-
dental shooting in the Palmdale
area of Glades County.
Sheriff's deputies, including
Sgt. Mike Pepitone, secured the
scene at the end of a dead-end
road in Palmdale, where they
found the victim, Kevin Osceola,
33, in his residence with what


appeared to be a gunshot
wound to the torso area.
According to Detective Ray
Van Houten of the Glades Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office, the victim had
been shot in his home by a .410
shotgun in the early morning
hours. Glades County Emer-
gency Medical Services respond-
ed along with sheriff's deputies
and rendered first aid to Osceola,
,and began to transport the vic-
tim to a helipad for air transport.
Osceola died en route to the heli-
pad.


The 911 emergency call had
been made by Billie Sue Hurst, a
friend of the victim who was
present at the time of the shoot-
ing, but apparently was not
directly involved, according to
Detective Van Houten.
Glades County Sheriff's inves-
tigators arrested Toby Reed Cop-
pler of Clewiston, and charged
him with manslaughter. Coppler,
34, had been handling the shot-
gun at the victim's home at the
time of the shooting, and appar-
ently was unaware the gun was


Nesting: Hummingbirds live a cozy life


No bigger than a 50-cent piece, some hummingbirds are more than comfortable' in
nests of this size.

Oh the Beauty Of hummingbirds
The smallest feathered
creature in the United States is
the calliope hummingbird,
which is about threeinches
long, native to the western
mountain regions.
Unfortunately this tiny crea-
ture does nottake t o Florida as ..
does one of its cousins, the '**,--"
ruby-throat hummer that ''
makes its yearly part-time
home in eastern North Amern- la. '
ca including all around the
Great Lakes, all of Florida and -
in over half the regions around .
the Gulf of Mexico.
It is the only hummer found
east of the Mississippi and
north of Florida. Predictably,
most ruby-throats head for
Central America to spend their :
winters. However, since our
winters are short and mostly /
sweet, the ruby-throats and
their families spend more of
their lives here than in Central
America while some stay in V
central and south Florida
throughout the year. Illustrations from "Florida's Birds" shows that unique
moment when the hummingbird is caught in the still of
See Birds Page 12 the moment.


loaded with live rounds when he
accidentally shot Osceola.
According to Detective
Houten, the pair had been modi-
fying .410 shells by replacing the
shot with tissue paper. It was
these dummy rounds that Cop-
pler thought were in the weapon
when Osceola was shot. Cop-
pler, who waived his Miranda
rights, told authorities that he did
not see that the gun had been
loaded with live shells by Osceo-
la, who was known by the nick-
name "Fatman".


Coppler was previously
arrested in Palm Beach County
February 10, on a battery charge,
according to Detective Van
Houten. He is currently being
detained at the Glades County
Jail pending a bail hearing.
In connection with the inci-
dent, an additional arrest of
Hurst was made for possession
of cocaine with intent to sell.
Hurst, 43, was also a friend of
See Shooting-Page 12


School days



along the




Kissimmee

Water managers preserve

history of old schoolhouse


A few missing slats on the
faded white clapboard build-
ing's facade allow bright sun-
beams to streak inside and
shed light on a disheveled'
interior, with its exposed
beams, wasp nests, spider-
webs and debris-covered
wooden floor. But first
appearances can be deceiv-
ing, and historical experts are
convinced this 'old school-
house still holds some lessons
for us all.


The Fort Basinger school-
house, built in Highlands
County in the early 1900s, was
recently evaluated for histori-
cal significance and deemed
worthy of preservation. Until a
few weeks ago it sat out of
sight along US 98, separated
,from tte' road -- and the 21st
century, it seems by a row
of trees, a fence line and an
old pasture now dotted with
See School-- Page 12


Tico's Spanish



Cuisine opens


By Tracy Whirls
Since opening in January,
Tico's Spanish Cuisine at 442 S.
Hwy. 27 in Moore Haven offers a
full range of Cuban and Mexican
favorites, for dining in or delivery
and can cater your special
events and meetings as well.
A family-oriented business,
owned by Tico Salgado, wife
Ana and frequented by their 2-
year- old daughter Anais, Tico's
parents have more than 30 years
experience in the restaurant
business and frequently help out
in the kitchen.
Open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Monday through Saturday, dur-
ing the summer, Tico's features
Cuban and Mexican favorites


including Cuban Sandwiches,
the Media Noche, (Midnight
Sandwich), Choripan (Cuban
Sausage Sandwich), Polio
Asado Ticos's, Filetillo De Polio
Salteado, Enchilada De
Camarones, (Shrimp Creole)
baked pork, shredded beef in
red sauce, yuca, plantains and
other favorites.
While domestic beer, import-
ed beer and wine are available
with lunch and dinner, they also
feature Cuban coffee and Caf
Con Leche, all in their spacious,
newly remodeled dining room..
They also offer a complete
breakfast menu, ranging from
See Cuisine Page 12


Stormscaping can help to


minimize storm


By Barbara Oehlbeck
Whoever would have
thought there'd ever be a book
of expert advice on how to
landscape to minimize damage
in the Sunshine State when
storms hit?
Well, "Stormscaping" does
just that in common sense,
practical terms and language.
The book is Volume 3 of the
Florida Gardening Series by
Pamela Crawford.
She lists the best plants to
withstand hurricanes, as well as
the worst plants for hurricanes.
She focuses on trees that are
dangerous, "survivor" gardens,
and the strongest plants to pro-
tect your home and garden.
According to Pamela, as a
result of extensive research and
experience, the three worst
trees to have anywhere near
you in a hurricane or even high


winds, are Australian pines,
Ficus benjamin and laurel
oaks. Her books details, in
depth, why these trees, are to be
avoided for safety's sake.
On the other hand, great
trees for windy times include
the Sabal palm, our state tree,
bald cypress, crepe myrtle, iron-
wood, Japanese maple, live
oak, which is consistently cate-
gorized as the most wind-toler-
ant shade tree for the. entire
state of Florida, southern mag-
nolia, Canary Island date palm,
date palm, foxtail palm, pindo
palm, royal palm, red bay, sand
live oaks, sea grape, saw pal-
metto, thatch. palm and the
stoppers redberry, Spanish
and white.
"Stormscaping" includes a
wealth of information. In fact,
it's more like a colorful encyclo-
pedia on the subject. For


damage
instance, to begin with,' we all
need to understand hurricane
basics, when they're coming
and what they can do to us. We
all need to know the most
important hurricane facts.
There are eigft of them all
highly detailed on page 26.
Since landscaping/planting
is year-round in Florida, it's
wise to know your plant's wind
tolerance, as some tolerate
wind much better than others.
One of the most susceptible is
one of the state's most strikingly
beautiful trees, the tabebuia,
commonly called tree of gold.
On the whole, palms toler-
ate wind better than shade trees
with the exception of Queen
palm/cocos plumosa, which
has very little wind tolerance.
When considering native

See Storms Page 12


Courtesy photos
This scene in front of a Florida building is not only pretty, but offers
additional protection when storm systems threaten the state.







Thursday, June 16,200


2 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Graduates


Summer Lyn Miller
Summer Lyn Miller
Summer Lyn Miller graduated
from Florida State University, on
April 29, 2005.
Her degree was in English
with an emphasis in creative
writing. Summer is a 2001 grad-
uate of Glades Day School. She
is the daughter of Allen and
Shelly Miller of Belle Glade. Her
-maternal grandmother is Ruby
Miller of South Bay. Summer is
currently employed at Smith
Barney in Belle Glade.


Leeann Murae Lamb
Leeann Lamb, a student at
Med Vance Institute in
Cookeville, Tenn. recently was
recognized for her 4.0 grade
point average. She was listed on
the President's list of students
for the term. Leeann is enrolled
as a Surgical Technician with
emphasis on Trauma Nursing in
the Bariatric field.
Leeann was in the class of
1993 at Clewiston High School.


She is married to Howard Lamb.
They have a daughter, Samara
and a son Marc.
The Med Vance Surgical Tech-
nology class, which Leeann is a
student recently traveled to
Nashville, Tenn. to put a bill in
place for higher wages in the
medical field. They experienced
the many steps of an initial bill
before it is signed into law. It
was a rewarding experience in
so much the bill was passed the
same day.
Dwayne Ryan Brown
The parents, family, and
friends of Mr. Dwayne "Ryan"
Brown would like to say how
proud we are of this young man
who on June of 2005 was nomi-
nated and inducted into Delta
Epsilon Iota Honor Society at
DeVry University.
Mr. Brown received a letter
from the President of DeVry Uni-
versity, Central Florida (Steve
Brown) congratulating Ryan on
his achievement. Mr. Brown
went on to say in his correspon-
dence that your achievement
represents an extraordinary
level of commitment to your uni-
versity, your studies, your career,


Birth


Beck birth
Laune and Joey Beck of Moore
Haven are proud to announce the
birth of their son, Jyles Lee Beck.
He was born June 6, 2005 at
Heartland Hospital in Sebring. He
weighed eight pounds, three
ounces and was 21 inches long at
birth:
Jyles was welcomed home by


Heather, Amanda and Dustin.
Maternal grandparents are
Susan James and George Purks of
New Jersey and Ohio.
Paternal grandparents are
Wanda Faye and Teddy Beck of
Moore Haven. Great-grandpar-
ents are Loraine and Alan Gary of
Columbus, N.J. and Ruth Borland
of Florence, N.J.


Obituaries


Dwayne Ryan Brown
and your community. We want-
ed to, as a family and a commu-
nity, let Ryan know how proud
we are of him. Ryan you have
been working so hard to stay on
track with you academics and it
has not gone unnoticed. We saw
great potential in you as a young
child and it has shadowed you
until this very day. Keep up the
good work and most of all; Keep
God first he will exalt you in due
time. We love you "Boo".


Happy

Anniversary

Owens anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Owens
celebrated their first year of mar-
riage, we wish them many more
years .of love and happiness -
they were married June 10, 2004.
Happy anniversary.

Summer


Clark Hull Wilkinson
Clark Hull Wilkinson passed
away on Saturday, June 11,
2005. She was born on Sept. 18,
1922 in Plant City, Florida. Her
parents are the late Walter G.
and Lois Clark Hull. Clark came
to Pahokee in the 1930s; her
family were some of the early
pioneers.
She is a graduate of Pahokee
High School with the class of
1939. After high school, she
attended Florida Southern Col-
lege and Webb School of Busi-
ness. .
She returned to Pahokee and
went to work for her father as a
bookkeeper for Hull Packing
Co., Inc. In 1946, she married
Ellis Floyd Wilkinson of Paho-
kee. Together, they founded Red
Devon Ranch, Inc. where they
raised cattle and grew vegeta-
bles.
Clark was very active in her
lifetime in civic, social and
church groups. She was a mem-
ber of Xi Beta Tau, the Pahokee
Women's Club, PEO, and the
First United Methodist Church of
Pahokee. She was part of a pro-
gram in WWII that knitted
wraps for soldiers, for which she
received a nice citation from the
President of the United States.
She was also one of the
founders of Glades Day School,
the first private school in the
Glades area.
One of her greatest accom-
plishments was becoming the
first female mayor for the city of
Pahokee. She served from 1987
to 1992. She took great pride in
her community and always
strived to make it a better place
to live.
She was preceded in death by
her former husband Ellis Floyd
Wilkinson, her son Walter Ellis
Wilkinson, and her sister Ginny
Wilkinson. She is survived by
her daughter Anne W. Hatton
and her husband Travis of Okee-
chobee, and by her grandchil-
dren Cameron Hatton of Okee-
chobee and Kristin Hatton of
Cape Coral, Brad Wilkinson of
Wellington and Michelle
Hollingsworth of Wellington,
sisters Kathryn Barnes of Paho-
kee, Hilda Wilkinson of Paho-


kee, and Tinky Nason of Vero
Beach, and four great grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services will be held
at the First United Methodist
Church of Pahokee on Wednes-
day at 3 p.m. There will be visita-
tion held one hour prior to the
service at the First United
Methodist Church of Pahokee.
Donations may be made to
the following: Florida United
Methodist Children's House,
Hospicq f Palm. Beach -County,
or the :W-st 'United Methodist
Church of Pahokee.

Gladolia "Bunny"
Marie Hunter
Gladolia "Bunny" Marie
Hunter, 84, of Lakeport, died
Wednesday, June 8, 2005, at
Raulerson Hospital in Okee-
chobee. Born April 16, 1920 in
Des Monies, Iowa, Mrs. Hunter
had been a resident of Lakeport
since 1980.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Ben Hunter.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Debbie Breski of Sebastian
and Audre (Bill) Sturtevant of
Cleveland, Arkansas; brother-in-
law, Glen (Lou) Hunter of Lake-
port; four grandchildren; and six
great grandchildren.
There will be no visitation or
services.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
Hospice of Okeechobee, P.O.
Box 1548, Okeechobee, FL
34973.
All arrangements were under
the direction and care of the
Buxton Funeral Home arid Cre-
matory.

Joe T. Maxwell
Joe T. Maxwell, 85, of Moore
Haven, died from a stroke on Fri-
day, June 3, 2005 at Bay Pines VA
Medical Center in St. Petersburg.
Born in Carroll County, Indiana,
on Aug. 14, 1919, Mr. Maxwell
came to Moore Haven from
Lakeland 15 years ago. He was a
partner of Pickard Maxwell Real-
tor in Lakeland for 15 years. He
was a WWII Army veteran. He
was a lifetime member of Real-
tors, and the Florida Association


of Realtors. He was of the safety tips
Methodist faith.


Mr. Maxwell is survived by his
son, Kevin Alderman, of Tampa;
daughter, Marilyn Dehne, of
Lafayette, Indiana; seven grand-
children; four great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitations was from 11 a.m.
to noon, Saturday, June 11,2005
at Gentry-Morrison Southside
Chapel. Funeral Service fol-
lowed at noon at the funeral
home chapel.
In Lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Elk's Chil-
dren Therapy Service & Elk's
youth camp. Checks may be
made payable to the Elk's Asso-
ciation, P.O. Box 49, 24175 E.
HWY 450, Umatilla, FL 32784-
049.

James Paul Carroll
James Paul Carroll, 88, of
Moore Haven, died Wednesday,
June 8, 2005 at Hendry Regional
Medical Center in Clewiston.
Born Nov. 27, 1916 in Anderson,
Indiana, Mr. Carroll had been a
resident of Moore Haven since
1986. He served in the Army Air
Corps during WWII and was a
lifetime member of the Ameri-
can Legion.
He was preceded in death by
his nephew, Charles Johnson.
Survivors include his beloved
wife of 59 years, Thelma J. Car-
roll of Moore Haven; nephews,
James R. Johnson, Joe Lakey of
Anderson, Indiana, Ralph Wil-
son of Pierston, Indiana, Jerry
Spaulding of Anderson, Indiana;
nieces, Diane BanBuskirk, of
Anderson, Indiana, Linda Ball of
Crossville, Tennessee and Karen
Richardson of Fort Lauderdale;
and a host of other nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were held on
Monday, June 13, 2005 at 11
a.m. at Buxton Funeral Home.
Rev. John Booher, Pastor of First
Christian Church in Moore
Haven officiated and interment
followed at Ortona Cemetery.
All arrangements were under
the direction and care of Bux-
ton's West Lake Funeral Home
and Crematory.


Summertime is approaching.
Would your child know what to
do if he/she got lost at a shop-
ping mall? A nice, friendly
stranger offered him/her a ride
home? A babysitter wanted to
play a secret game that no one
would know about? A friend
dared him/her to hitchhike?
Start With The Basics
Rehearse with your child his
or her full name, address, and
phone number, including area
code, and how to make emer-
gency phone calls from home and
public phones. Try practicing on
an unplugged phone.
Teach your child to go to a
store clerk, security guard, or life-
guard and ask for help if you
become separated in a store,
shopping mall, or the beach. Tell
them never to go into the parking
lot alone. In addition, when possi-
ble, accompany your child to the
restroom.


h

I


HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS
AT HENDRY REGIONAL

Dr. Ed Humbert is a fellowship
trained hip and knee surgeon
specializing in joint replacement
and arthroscopy of the hip and knee.

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT
Dr. Ed Humbert OINT
Next to Hendry Regional .. I T
in Suite B IMPLANT
530 W. Sagamore Avenue SURGEONS
Clewiston, FL 33440 1
ttp://www.jointimplant.com

6 Q -n9gqOF FLO.RIDA


V ~ -I Ylfl'- fl!'WITI"WT"! -~PUlt, ,,,9!W


Do You HAVE ASTHMA?.

Are you 25 64?
Have you ever been told by your healthcare provider that you have asthma?
Do you require daily long-term control. medicine?
Do you have questions about how asthma affects your breathing, how asthma
medicines help to control your asthma, or what to do in an emergency?

The American Lung Association has a new program for you!

Breathe Well Live Well / Learn how to be free of symptoms

/ Learn how to manage your asthma
Sand reduce your chances of letting
S? your asthma get out of control

v/ Learn that you can do everything
that a person without asthma can
:'" do!


Control your asthma; don't let your asthma control you!
The American Lung Association Breathe Well, Live Well program will be held at

GLADES GENERAL HOSPITAL

GLADES 1201 South Main Street
GENERAL
HOSPITAL

Orientation: Tuesday, June 21, 2005 from 5:15 pm 6:15 pm
Education Program: Saturday, June 25,.2005 from 8:00 am 12:30 pm
(Light breakfast available)
Space is limited, so register today by calling (561) 993-3632.

For participating and providing feedback on the new program, you will also
receive:
Orientation: Asthma Control Information Workbook
Education Program: Allergy Control Pillow Encasing
and Peak Flow Meter
.Three-Month Follow-up: $25 Gift Certificate to Winn Dixie
SAMERICAN
LUNG
ASSOCIATIONo
100 YEARS 1904-2004


uxton's (Wst Lake


Serving The Lake Area Since 1980


-. < Glades Ford *LincolnMercury
*- :,-E' !:WE RECENTLY RECEIVED A LARGE SHIPMENT OF
I J NEW AND PREOWNED VEHICLESS ,BD JISr DON'T
.....E HAVE TIME T,' E OSUNT ALL OF THEM.
Nd or inon-t r

S, , ,WE AkE PASSIrNG THE SAVINGS ON TO ,CjU.

800-726-8514
DeVaughn@gladesmotors.com





^ ^ Memorial Tribute
SM Remember a loved one
y who has departed with a special
' Memorial Tribute in this newspaper.
M, ka, "t-a, -
Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
together attractively and tastefully.


Visit www2.newszap.conm/memorials for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.

(jV ^- -...;-;....,fe ,i~i....!.. -- i^.i... .. K-.- -^ f i. *-"" -^ *-A-' : *'.... -* rt ~ :'i~ i~lv:.....-. .....,.












Flooded ditches bring health hazards to children


The first few days of summer
break brought torrential rainfall to
South Florida. While it may be
impossible to keep kids out of the
mud and puddles, there are some
health concerns to keep in mind.-
Never leave children unsuper-
vised, even when they are playing
in their own yard. Small children
can drown in a small amount of
water. An overflowing drainage
ditch can be tempting to a child,
and may be deeper than it looks.
Flooded pastures can make it
difficult to see exactly where a


with Katrina Elsken

pond starts and ends. Children
playing or riding ATVs in a flooded
area may find themselves falling


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
Libby Moya is the newest addition to ad services within the
South Lake Group, serving Clewiston, Glades County and
the Glades area.

Moya joins South Lake's ad

services department


The Belle Glade Sun, Clewis-
ton News and Glades County
Democrat office in Clewiston wel-
-.comes Libby Moya, its newest
staff addition.
Twenty-two-year-old Libby is
on her third week on the job,
hired in late May to help out in the
ad services department.
A native of the Glades, born in
Pahokee, and a resident of
Clewiston, Libby is growing
accustomed to her new job duties


and looks forward to taking on
more responsibilities. She is
preparing for the transition into
sales.
"I like it, it's something differ-
ent," said Libby about her job.
Supervisor Melissa Agee is
happy with how good of a worker
Libby has proven to be. "She's
very energetic and very motivat-
ed," Melissa said. "I know she is
going to do a good job."


into a deep pond.
Floodwaters may also contain
bacteria and toxins. Rainwater
draining across backyards, pas-
tures and roadways may contain
animal feces, insecticides, herbi-
cides, fertilizers and fuel residue.
It will also pick up natural bacte-
ria, which is in the soil.
Children often see any water
as a place to play or swim, but
storm drainage is not clean water.
Swallowing any of the drainage
water could make them sick. If
they have any cuts or scrapes, it


could .also lead to infection. If
despite your efforts to keep them
safe, you find your children have
been playing in the storm water,
make sure they shower well with
an anti-bacterial soap, and check
for any cuts or scrapes that might
be infected.
Another health hazard associ-
ated with flooding comes from
insects that breed in standing
water. Mosquitoes can carry dis-
eases such as West Nile Virus.. If
you have standing water in your
yard, take precautions to protect


Sian pnoto/laeyois Gonzmez
Bill Fabian, a Clewiston native, has joined the editorial
staff for the South .Lake Group, serving Clewiston,
Glades County, and the Glades area.


Fabian joins South


Lake editorial staff


Bill Fabian is a new addition
to the editorial staff. His duties
include reporting for the Clewis-
ton News and Glades County
Democrat.
Bill feels right at home in his
new profession. After finishing
up at Florida State in April 2005,
Bill moved back home to Clewis-
ton. Bill's family has lived in
Clewiston for 13 years. He defi-
nitely enjoys his new job and
responsibilities.
"I love what I've been doing
because you get the chance to
work hard on something and
then see the results, which is
very fun and rewarding," he
said. "Most importantly, it's great
to have the opportunity to serve
the town of Clewiston," he
added.


South Lake News Editor Mark
Young said that Bill has been a
nice surprise to the South Lake
staff.
"We basically struggled
through a month short on staff
waiting for Bill to graduate and
join the staff," he said. "All I can
really say is that it was worth the
wait. He is already writing stories
with a seasoned understanding
of what is important. I look for-
ward to watching him grow as a
journalist and am confident that
he has a very successful career
ahead of him."
If you would like. to\contact

Bill directly concerning a news
story, you may call him at (863)
228-3129, or send an email to
bfabian@newszap.com.


Green Thumbs .Garden Club Minutes


Lovely day, lovely setfihng! Eigh-
teen members of Green Thumbs
Garden Club met on May 1-7at the
Clewiston Country Club for a
delightful luncheon, concluding
their 2004-2005 year.
Using Genesis 2:8 as her devo-
tional reference, Kathy Hicks
reminded us that Eden was God's
Garden Masterpiece and that gar-
dens have always been a part of
His plan. Each garden has a pur-
pose in God's heart and in ours.
Dot Stacy reported a treasury
balance of $1,107.05.
Sue Phelps, Emily Drake and
Janet Summerlin excitedly report-
ed a fantastic District X meeting.
Winged Treasures was the theme
for the day. Dr. Ron Cave, from the
Indian River Research and Educa-
tion Center in Ft. Pierce, stressed
the importance of using insects to
save certain varieties of Bromili-
ads. Ken Gioeli, a Natural
Resource agent from the St. Lucie
County Extension Service spoke
about Bats; Florida's Winged
Treasures. The women learned a
lot and thoroughly enjoyed their
presentations. Janet had a lucky
streak and walked away with sev-
eral prizes, including a large Bon-
zai tree.
The Habitat house was dis-


cussed briefly, noting that we still
have landscaping work to do.
There will be a Museum open
house in the fall and the Green
Thumbs Garden Club is working
with the Clewiston Garden Club,
the Museum Board and the City
on the landscaping for the new
building.
The National Garden Club
Convention will be held in Orland
next year, May 24-28, 2006. All
clubs are asked to save tuna fish
cans, wash them and spray them
with flat black paint, to be used in
the table decorations.
Our club will observe the cele-
bration of National Garden Club
week, June 5-11, by placing an
arrangement in a prominent
place.
The Gardening and Design
Seminar will be held June 1-3 at
the University of Florida Confer-
ence Center.
We are sponsoring two girls
and two boys to Camp Wekiva at
Orlando.
Ninette Aker presented Ace
Hardware prizes to: Janet Sum-
merlin, Elizabeth Johnstone,
Shirley Perry, Marci Propes, Pat
mason, Vicki Austin and Dot
Stacy.
Officers for the new year are:


President, Linda Parker; First Vice-
President, Kathy Hicks; Second:
Vice-President, Vicky Austin;
Recording Secretary, Mary Lenz;
Corresponding Secretary, Betty
Lebo and Sharon Coots; Treasur-
er, Dot Stacy; Chaplain, Sandy
Stitt; Historian, Emma Jane
Helvey.
President Sue Phelps passed
the gavel to Linda Parker, wishing


her a successful term as our new
president. A round of applause
was the response of club mem-
bers as they thanked Sue for the
superb job she did during her
term.
Next meeting will be at Sandy
Stitt's home, U.S. 27, for the new
'05-'06 year. Meeting is scheduled
for September and guests inter-
ested in gardening are welcome.


City of Pahokee


The city of Pahokee will issue
Requests for Proposals (RFP's) for
roofing work on a variety of city-
owned properties. The bid
requires contractors to visit the
sites and determine the extent of
repair and/or replacement.
There are approximately 11
buildings at seven locations that
need to be brought up to current
building code and inspection stan-
dards. The bidder will provide cer-
tification that the company is not
suspended, debarred, or other-
wise ineligible to receive govern-
ment contracts.
This process is to ensure the
safety and welfare of the city and
the citizens in the communities.


The city of Pahokee has the right
to reject all proposals submitted, if
needed. It is the intention of the
city to invite local and minority
owned businesses to apply. Any
contract awarded will be given to
the city commissioners at the rec-
ommendation of the city manag-
er.
Because of the extent of work
and the condensed timeline, any
contract may be terminated for
failure to perform as contracted.
This is a continuous step to help
improve the appearance of the
community in the city of Pahokee.
Questions should be directed to
the Pahokee City Clerk at (562)
924-5534 Ext. 28.


your family against mosquito
bites. Drain water from contain-
ers such as flowerpots and wad-
ing pools. If it is not possible to
drain the standing water, there are
some chemical treatments avail-
able that will kill insect larvae.
Another option for ponds is to
add more fish. Fish eat insect lar-
vae and help control the mosqui-
to population.
Keep children indoors at peak


mosquito-biting times, such as
the hour before and after sunset.
Outdoors, wear long sleeves and
use insect repellant.
Before making any change in
your diet or exercise plan, consult
your doctor. This is especially
important if you are on any pre-
scription medications. Some
drugs interact badly with foods
that would otherwise be consid-
ered "healthy".


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Actions that are worth thousands of lectures; good and bad


The Reverend Samuel S.
Thomas, Ph. D.+
Saint Martin's Church, Clewiston
I entered graduate school
about a year after my daughter
was born and for her first few
years I was a full-time student.
There was a chair in our living
room where I studied, and there
were also her playthings and toys,
as well as "her chair".
That was a small, child-sized
chair made like a bear, with eyes
and ears that stood up, furry
brown covering and paws at the
feet.
One day while I was studying, I
noted that my daughter too was
sitting in her chair looking at a
book. I was a bit amused her
book was upside down. She had


no idea about reading then, but
there she was, intently staring at
this upside-down book. I watched
this go on and suddenly was
stunned.
"What have I taught?" I said to
myself. This was amazing a
child about age three sitting still
for a long peri-
od of time, r
looking at a '
book upside
down and star- '
ing at a printed
page that could "- ..
not mean any- .o- -./
thing to her. I
was really
taken aback
that moment: I Rev. Samuel
had seen her S.Thomas
copy what I


was doing day after day, hour
after hour, and she had obviously
learned that grown-ups stared at
books while sitting in their chairs.
I began to wonder what else I
had taught her to do at age three.
We didn't smoke. She didn't learn
that from her parents. We made
sure we went to Church, that was
important and a part of each
week. We noticed that the play
doctor's kit she had said on the
certificate that "HE was entitled to
practice play medicine" and the
play nurses' kit said that "SHE was
entitled to practice play nursing."
We didn't watch the football
games or sports activities on TV
and she didn't watch them either.
I began to think about what we
really taught our daughter and
how she learned it and how this


would affect her throughout her
life.
There is a Biblical account of a
man with two sons (Matthew
21:28ff) where a father has two
sons and asks one to work in his
vineyard. The son says, "I will
not" but late goes. When he asks
the other one to go and work, he
says that he will, but does not.
The parable is about actions, not
words; the first son is counted as
having done the will of his father.
The children do what they see;
the act speaks much louder than
the word. We are admonished in
James; epistle to be 'doers of the
word and not hearers only,
deceiving yourselves (Chapter 1,
verse 22)."
With the recent violence on
television, the number of reported


assaults, the murders and crimes
against people, I wonder about
the homes where such people
grow up. I have never heard of
anyone saying, "go out and attack
someone" or "you should shoot
the people that aggravate you."
Where do such things come
from? I am convinced that people
are deeply affected by what goes
on around them and what is
shown to be "normal" in their
homes. I believe watching what
goes on in their homes and neigh-
borhoods.
When there is a difference
between what people say and
what they do, those around them
will always put the actions before
the words as signs of what they
really believe, what they really
think is important, what is really


the "right way" to act. One of my
professors wrote a book that he
called "Doing the Truth" because
he realized that our character is
shaped by our acts so much more
than by our words.
My daughter grew up liking
books and reading and I am grate-
ful for having shared that with her
even when I didn't realize what I
was doing. When I see young
people accused of committing
acts of violence against people or
senselessly taking lives, I wonder
what examples were set or who
was a model that they followed. I
think they missed something. I
am my brother's keeper and my
children's keeper too. I am
responsible because they will
learn from me even when I don't
think about it.


How to save a drowning man; a responsibility in action vs inaction


Pastor John Hicks
First United Methodist Church
What would you do if you
saw someone drowning? A
number of years ago I was driv-
ing over a causeway when I saw
a bike rider suddenly drop his
bike and jump over the edge of
the bridge. Alarmed, I pulled
over to the side to check it out.
Others drove on. Even though
it's been over 20 years, the
events of that day still remain
with me. !
A young boy was paddling
across the river when the boat
he was in capsized. Away from
the boat, he was struggling in
the water. It was his struggling
and the cries for help, which
inspired the bicyclist to drop his
bike and jump in to help. I
arrived on the scene just as sev-
eral people were helping them
out of the water. While all of this
was going on, there were a num-


Pet Corner


Q: Dear Doc Savvy. Hello, my
name is Sean Bishop. I am doing
a project on eyesight for my fifth
grade class. Can you tell me why
dogs do not see in color. Thank
you.
A: Well hey there Sean!
Thanks for writing to me. I
always love helping with school
projects. Ok, here is your
answer: Eyesight boils down to
two things, rods and cones.1
Rods are responsible for black
and white vision and the cones
are responsible for color vision.
Dogs have 99 percent rods,
and only roughly one percent
cones. This is primarily why they
do not see in color. I hope that
answers your question. Hope
you make an "A"! Best wishes,
Doc Savvy.
Q: Dear Doc Savvy. Help Doc,
I am having an algae problem in
our fish tank! It is getting greener
and greener. Yuk! It looks like
nasty swamp water. What do I
do? I'm ashamed to give my real
name, so just call me "Swamp
Thing."
A: Well alrighty then, helll-
looooo- Swamp Thing! Huh,
okay, first we need to figure out
why you are having a problem
with algae. Is your tank getting
too much sunlight? Also, check
the content and ph of the water.
I guess you could start out fresh
and cull out the fish and totally
re-do the tank? Not! Just kid-
ding!
Okay, there are many anti-
algae products on the market.


ber of fishermen out there who
never put their rods down or
even made a motion to help.
The boy was drowning and they
did nothing. I
couldn't
believe it.
The reality
is that there
are a lot of
people around
us who are
struggling to
keep their
head above Pastor
water for one, John Hicks
reason or
another. There
are a lot of people who could
use a helping hand to keep them
from going under. And unfortu-
nately, there are a lot of people
just going about their business
doing nothing to help. Again the
question, "What would you do if
you saw someone drowning?"
A story is told about a man


who was on a luxury liner and
suddenly fell overboard. He
couldn't swim, and in despera-
tion began calling for help. Hear-
ing the cries for help, one man
reached into his briefcase and
pulled out a book on swimming
techniques. He tossed it to the
man in the water and he yelled:
"Now brother, you read that and
just follow the instructions and
you will be alright."
Another man on deck saw
the man fall overboard and
immediately started making
swimming motions with his
arms. He yelled, "Brother, watch
my motions. Do as I do and you
will be fine."
A third man looked upon the


drowning man's plight with
deep concern, and yelled out,
"Just hold on friend. Help is on
the way. We are going to estab-
lish a committee and discuss
your- problem. And then, if we
can come up with the proper
financing, we will resolve your
dilemma."
By this time the drowning
man was going down for the
third time and desperately start-
ed waving his hand. Caught up
in the excitement of the
moment, another man yelled
out, "Yes, brother, I see that
hand, is there another?" Finally,
someone on deck plunged into
the water at the risk of their own
life and pulled the victim to safe-


ty.
The moral of this little tail is
that if we are to be effective in
helping people who are strug-
gling to keep their heads above
water in this world, our evangel-
ism and mission outreach must
be pro-active, relational in
nature, and must meet people at
the point of their need.
Francis of Assisi, the kindly
13th century monk, informed
his brethren one day that he
planned to go into the nearby vil-
lage on a preaching mission. As
legend tells it, he invited a young
monk to go with him.
On their way, they passed an
injured man and Francis
promptly stopped, saw to the


man's needs and arranged med-
-ical care for him. They went on
and soon passed a homeless
man who was near starvation.
Again, Francis stopped and min-
istered to the man. All through
the day, as they encountered
people in need, Francis cared for
them the best he could.
As the sun went down, Fran-
cis said it was time to return to
the monastery for evening
prayers. Confused, the young
monk inquired, "Father, you said
we were coming to town to
preach to the people." Francis
smiled and replied, "My friend,
that's what we've been doing all
day."


A Day with a Field Crew Tending Inland Waters


"I hadn't even started the phys-
ical work yet, and I already had a
deeper appreciation for the level
of detail and expertise it takes to
maintain South Florida's water
management system."
That was the reaction of Irela
Bagu member of the South
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict's governing board, when she
traded in her office attire to spend
a day in the trenches with a crew
from the District's Homestead
Field Station. Her goal was to get a
better flavor of the kinds of hands-
on work needed to manage, pro-
tect and restore South Florida's
water resources.
Bagu learned what it takes
during her busy day. Here's the
rest of her narrative:
"I made sure I was on time -
early would be even better. I
know the field crews work on a
pretty rigid schedule, and they
depend on the entire unit being


fully prepped and ready to roll first
thing in the morning. After some
strong coffee and small chit-chat,
it was down to business."
"Since I volunteered to be an
operations and maintenance
worker for the day, the first order
was to get me outfitted and
trained. Hardhat, gloves (brought
my own work boots, thank you)
and protective goggles. Safety is
always a priority, so they were not
about to let me operate any
equipment without proper train-
ing and full understanding of the
machinery's capability."
"First up, they put me in a life
vest and plopped me behind the
controls of a tow boat. These ves-
sels ride low in the water and
have front-operated baskets that
collect and remove debris and
vegetation from canals. After a
few stilted and jerky practice
movements, I quickly got the
hang of it and was soon scooping


up and dumping trash onto the
canal banks."
"My next job was to help dis-
pose of the unwanted material
placed on the canal banks. This
time I operated the hydraulic
boom on a "trash truck" -
mechanically picking up and
placing the debris onto a 45-foot
trailer. To round out my work
duties, I helped conduct preven-
tive maintenance procedures at S-
20F, a District water-control struc-
ture."
"Later in the day, I switched
from my hard hat to my Govern-
ing Board member hat and met
with an agricultural business-
owner in the Homestead area."
"It was a tough, but rewarding,
day. Why did I do it? Because I
think it is vital for everyone to
understand the importance of the
water management system
throughout central and southern
Florida-how the canals, levees,


storage areas and structures work
to protect us, and how District
staff work to ensure that these
facilities are always in peak condi-
tion."
"As a Governing Board mem-
ber, these hands-on, in-the-field
experiences give me the broader
perspective I need in order to
make critical policy decisions and
to provide overall agency direc-
tion. My boots are well broken-in,
and I look forward to working
with other field crews during my
four-year tenure on the Board."
Bagu, a Miami resident, has
been a member of the District's
governing board since March of
last year, She was appointed by
Governor Jeb Bush to a term' that
extends through 2007. She is vice-
president of Gordon Reyes and
Partners in Miami, a public rela-
tions firm, and is on the board of
directors of the South Florida His-
panic Chamber of Commerce.


Gardening in the Everglades


The one I have the most success
is called "Algae Destroyer". Just
follow the directions and you
should be okay in about four or
five days. Also, you must take
the filter out of the cartridge
daily and rince it out. If that
doesn't help you Swampy, I
don't know what will. Take care
and I hope you don't have too
many barnacles growing on
your hull! Doc Savvy.
E-mail your pet questions to
DOCSAVVY@aol.com and
check out your pet answers
weekly in the "Pet Corner"! Be
sure to tune into "The Savvy Pet
Show" each and every Thurs-
day, at 10:30 a.m. on 95.5's The
Big Dawg.


SEGladi Csounty Dmocrt



Our Purpose...
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mumty's delibertaton of public issues

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' T.' 'plert u. ni-p i a public itust
* r. help our .'mmuraruy come a tntir
,lace I,:, iho dii, i.:,rlk. thrcOlji rwU! ,&dlc.
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1 To p.,idAe th inl't:.nir ..n cilierm nm- is.
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public ,LUS
* To rer.)n tliE ntw,. wi, hI.nsMt a.ccuradC'.
.bjuchitnt. eailesrieis arnd .mi a'po.,on
STo usE ru opinion pag to facnitate
r.:,mmunity debate, not to doamiate it aith
our own eopminins
* 1b .isk'se c.ur own c.:.nli of interest or
potential crnfljd sto our riaders
S b crt o u r.ur ciiosri ard i. e ea.h ....r
recirin tto ite pruirninence ite ie.eci
STprovide a right to reply to those we write
about,
' To treat people with courtesy, respect and
compassion.


Bill F~budr.


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Pmie~rm Ed Dulin
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E'eoi Er., tlt, Kirtria L ,.r,

Member of cz-LW


Florida Press
Association


A little dirt under the finger-
nails, a pink nose from the sun
and flattened hair from hours
under a hat could pretty much
describe any backyard gardener.
But it also describes the 25 volun-
teers who spent a few days in late
May planting 3,200 trees on the
northern fringe of the Everglades-
at the Loxahatchee Impound-
ment Landscape Assessment
project, better known as LILA.
LILA is an outdoor scientific
laboratory on a 64-acre scale.
Designed by the South Florida
Water Management District and
located in the Loxahatchee
National Wildlife Refuge, LILA is
four side-by-side marshes, called
macrocosms. Each macrocosm
has been sculpted to resemble
the Everglades landscape, with
wide and narrow paths for water
flow, shallow and deep pools -
including simulated alligator
holes and small rises of land
called tree islands.
That's where the gardeners
come in. Tree islands are an
important part of LILA. In the nat-
ural Everglades, they provide
some of the only dry land in the
vast River of Grass. Many dozens
of plant and animal species use
tree islands for habitat, food
and/or shelter. "Everglades tree
islands are biodiversity hotspots,"
said Fred Sklar, chief scientist at
the District and LILA's principle
designer. "In a sense, they are like
miniature tropical jungles."
Water levels strongly influence
the specific types of plants,
wildlife and even soils found on
tree islands. Human impacts-such
as urban and agricultural develop-
ment, drainage for flood protec-
tion, and increased water use-
have disrupted water flows in the
Everglades, including its wet and
dry seasonal rhythms. Restoring
historic water patterns is one of
the primary goals of Everglades
restoration. With LILA's electric
pump and re-circulating water
system, scientists can control
flows and levels across the simu-
lated landscape, evaluating spe-
cific restoration plans before
applying them on a large scale.
Planting a Tree Island
Over the course of three days,
3,200 tree seedlings of eight com-
mon Everglades species were
planted on the tree islands, thanks


to the 25 volunteers led by LILA
Site Manager Eric Cline. Red
maple, coco plum, pond apple,
dahoon holly, buttonbush, wax
myrtle, sweet bay and Carolina
willow joined the grasses and
other plants that sprouted after
LILA's construction.
Because this is a living labora-
tory, the 10-inch seedlings were
not just plunked into the ground
wherever volunteers thought they
might look attractive. Scientific
goals, which include extensive
monitoring, guided the planting
effort. Like a meticulous gardener,
Cline set out a specific grid pat-
tern with wooden stakes and
twine, even adding color-coded
flags to mark each row.
Then the crews got to work.
With 1.5-meter poles as spacing
guides, they used bladed tools to
form planting holes, strong hands
to fill in dirt around the seedlings
and big watering cans to give the
plants a long drink. Any gardener
knows the routine.
But most gardeners won't be
studying their handiwork with
satellites. In several years when
the trees are much larger, satellite
images of the LILA tree islands
will provide a "signature" for each
of the Everglades species growing
there. Their distinct color and pat-
tern-when viewed by satellite-will
be used to locate and identify
these trees in the vast Everglades
environment. Even before then,
scientists will be studying the
trees on the islands, evaluating
their growth rates and survival as
water levels change.
Those Nuisance Nibblers
The goal, of course, is to get
the trees to grow and flourish. But
tender, nursery-raised seedlings
are an appetizing meal to wildlife.
Cline's sleuthing efforts, which
included a motion-activated cam-
era and flash, revealed what most
gardeners already know is a
nemesis to young plants: rabbits.
It's no different in the Everglades.
Marsh rabbits can easily swim
across LILA's short stretches of
water to reach the tree islands.
They nibble the seedling's leaves
and soft stems almost to the
ground. To foil them, the team
anchored coffee-can size plastic
pipe around each plant, which
will allow the trees to mature
beyond seedling size.


A Healthy Everglades
When completed next year,
LILA will start providing scientists
and water managers with essen-
tial information needed to restore
and revitalize the Everglades-and
to sustain its health once that is
achieved. "LILA is unique in the
world for its ability to evaluate the
large-scale ecological effects of
water flow and-flooding," said Dr.
Sklar. "By recreating the Ever-
glades landscape in one con-
trolled setting, we can explore
ideas, test strategies and solve
problems before putting specific
projects into place during the
restoration effort."
LILA is a proving ground of
sorts, ultimately aimed at ensur-
inig that Everglades restoration
will be a success. It is also a plant-


ing ground, as the recent volun-
teers discovered. And they have
the dirty fingernails and pink
noses to show for it..

Visiting LILA: LILA is located at
the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatch-
ee National Wildlife Refuge. A vis-
itor's kiosk describes the LILA site
in further detail, and a nearby
observation platform provides an
elevated view. To get to the
Refuge, take 1-95 or the Florida
Turnpike to central Palm Beach
County, exiting at Boynton Beach
Boulevard (State Road 804). Trav-
el west to US-441, turn left (south)
and travel 2 miles to Lee Road.
Turn right (west) and continue 0.3
miles into the Refuge's entrance
and the visitor's center on the
right.


Glades County Democrat
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Serving Glades County Since 1923


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,20051







Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


.Thursav~ii,. June 16.2005


ond suspect taken into custody
was a Hispanic female identified as
Betty Sanchez.
Both were charged with posses-
sion of cocaine, possession of
cocaine with intent to sell, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and for
the sale of cocaine. Theywere both
booked into Hendry County Jail
and are awaiting bond.

.*.4


Hall shooting considered to be justifiable


S-,.- .. -" -


Staff photos/ Ideybis Gonzalez
Hendry County Sheriff investigators look over evidence,
which was found during a recent drug bust in Montura


A Hendry County Sheriff's deputy, along with a sheriff inves-
tigator, attempt to gain information from one of the person's
taken into custody following a recent drug bust.


Betty Sanchez


Drug busts
By Ideybis Gonzalez
MONTURA On Wednesday,
June 8, at around 4:36 p.m. Hendry
County Sheriff Criminal Investiga-
tions Division, serving a search
warrant, arrived at a residence
located at 212 Avenida Del Club in
Montura Ranch.
During the search of the resi-
dence, investigators found an
*excess of 10 grams of powder
cocaine, as well as paraphernalia
and packaging materials, which
were taken into evidence.
Following the execution of the
search warrant and an on scene
investigation, sheriff investigators
arrested two individuals, one of
which was a Hispanic male identi-
fied as Doberti Sanchez. The sec-

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Doberti Sanchez


State Attorney Steve Russell has
announced that the Hendry Coun-
ty Grand Jury has cleared six
Hendry County Sheriff's deputies
in the Sept. 22, 2004 shooting of
Deana K. Hall after a traffic pursuit
in LaBelle.
Ms. Hall survived her gunshot
wounds. '
The Grand Jury issued a report
on May 31, which sets forth its fac-
tual findings in the case and the
conclusion that the actions of the
deputies were legally justified. The
report had been sealed under Flori-
da law until the Grand Jury's find-
ings were released on June 3. State
Attorney Steve Russell thanked the
Grand Jury for their diligent and
lengthy review of the facts.
"We believe through this
process this matter has been thor-
oughly reviewed," Mr. Russell said.
The Grand Jury also issued an
eight-count indictment charging
Ms. Hall, 28, which includes: Three
counts of aggravated assault on a
law enforcement officer and one
count each of aggravated fleeing to
elude, resisting an officer with vio-
lence, leaving the scene of a crash,
DUI causing property damage and
driving while license suspended.
Ms. Hall was taken into custody by
-the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE), which inves-
tigated the case. Ms. Hall is being
held at the Hendry County Jail
without bond pending arraign-
ment scheduled for July 11.


The following information
about the incident is taken from the
Grand Jury's statement of findings.
The allegations against Ms. Hall
stem from a Sept. 22, 2004, inci-
dent in which a GMC Yukon SUV
driven by Ms. Hall reportedly
rammed into the rear of a vehicle
driven by Delma Gonzales, at a red
light at the intersection of SR 80
and Bridge Street. Ms. Hall report-
edly got out and talked to Ms. Gon-
zales, then drove away as Ms. Gon-
zales reported the crash to the
Hendry County Sheriff's Office via
cell phone.
When the Yukon reappeared
and headed west onto SR 80,
deputies followed with lights and
sirens activated. A video camera
mounted in Sgt. Jamie Thorpe's
patrol car captured the pursuit.
By the time it was over eight
officers were involved in the pur-
suit: Deputy Perry Short, Sgt. Thor-
pe, Lt. Chad Schipansky, Sgt.
Andrew Drew, Deputy David Galle-
gos, Investigator Steven Maldona-
do, Deputy Martin Meyer and Sgt.
Curtis Clay. The Yukon continued
westbound for several miles then
made a U-turn across the grass
median, heading east toward
LaBelle.
According to the Grand Jury's
findings, three attempts to deploy
"stop sticks," designed to deflate
tires, were unsuccessful in stop-
ping the vehicle. Two of the driver's
side tires did go flat, but the Yukon


Crimestoppers

Crimestoppers of Palm Beach
County is seeking the public's assis-
tance in locating the whereabouts
of Sheneka Byrd, a.k.a. Nickie Byrd.
Born on Aug. 8, 1977, Byrd is
described as a black female with -. --
black hair and brown eyes. She is
listed as being 5'6" tall and weighs
101 pounds.
Her last known address was 715
MHP, in Belle Glade. She is wanted
on one count of felony forgery.
If you have information on the.
whereabouts of Byrd, please call
(800) 458-TIPS' (8477). You may
remain anonymous and could be Courtesy Photo
eligible for a cash reward. Shenka Byrd

*.- V' Glades Ford Lincoln-Mercury
riv THERE'S .JE L7Eot
I ; BEEIS' A BETTER.


Edd.ieGoe


Salesman New & Used Vehicles
800-726-8514
r-ftm coda


continued to ride on the wheel
rims.
At one point, the left front of Sgt.
Clay's vehicle got stuck in the right
front side of the Yukon, dragging
the sheriff's unit along with it. After
almost striking a west-bound pick-
up truck head-on, the Yukon
approached the Shell gas station at
Martin Luther King Blvd., forcing a
PT Cruiser driven by Patricia Nixon
to back up on SR 80 and around
the corner onto MLK, then forcing
her off the road. On MLK, Deputy
Meyer got in front of the Yukon,
where his vehicle was struck in the
rear, spinning it to the left with the
driver's side facing the front of the
Yukon. The Yukon stopped, but
struck the driver's door of Deputy
Meyer's vehicle, pinning it shut.
The other deputies got out of their
vehicles and approached, but
Deputy Meyer could not exit
through the passenger's door
because the computer console
blocked his way. The Yukon
lurched backwards, apparently
going over the door of one of the
sheriff's vehicles.
The Grand Jury reasoned that
Deputy Meyer may have thought


he was going to be rammed when
he felt his vehicle move and shot
one time from his .40 caliber Glock
pistol. At almost the same time, Lt.
Schipansky fired four times, Sgt.
Drew fired twice, Deputy Gallegos
fired four times and Inv. Maldona-
do fired five times, all using their
Glocks. Sgt. Clay fired twice with a
12-gauge shotgun.
Deputies then secured the
scene and Hall was taken into cus-
tody. She had been struck several
times by bullet fragments, shotgun
pellets and broken glass. Off-duty
medics on-scene began medical
attention and she was then trans-
ported to Lee Memorial Hospital.
According to the Grand Jury
report, Ms. Hall's blood alcohol
content tested at .139. She also
reportedly tested positive for
cocaine, opiates and benzodi-
azephine. Hall's driver's license
was suspended at the time of the
incident.
The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement began investigating
the incident that evening.
Editors note: Post your com-
ment on this issue at http://news-
blog.info/0801/


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Resident watched Clewiston grow from beginning


By Frances Nail
As told to MaryAnn Morris
I was born in Nashville Ten-
nessee in June, 1913. We moved to
Chicago for six years, then to Jack-
sonville and then to Orlando, but
when I was 16 years old, my father
moved us here to Clewiston. Oh, I
cried! I thought my father had done
the worst thing in the world to us.
There was nothing! Not even a road!
Now I wouldn't live anywhere else.
Clewiston is, I think, a very,
unique small town, in that many of
the people who settled and formed
the town were important people in
other areas. One gentleman was
on the Board of Directors of Gener-
al Motors.
My father had the Western
Union office in town. Your com-
munications then were either let-
ters or telegrams. Everybody
would gather outside there at the
Western Union office and talk.
I'm a cat lover. We had a
Siamese cat here in 1936. People
heard about it and no one had ever
seen one. Someone came to see
"the twins" one time, not realizing
that we weren't talking about
Siamese twins.
Dr. Wells was the first real vet in
town. He had been vet for one of
the silent movie stars (it might have
been Norma Talmadge) when she
wintered in Florida. She had a.
female Siamese cat who became
pregnant, but when the kittens
were born, one wasn't pure
Siamese. She didn't want that one,
so Dr. Wells asked us if we wanted
it. My mother was a great cat lover
and had a Persian cat named
Sweetheart at that time, so she
took the kitten and named him
"Doc" after Doctor Wells. But Doc-
tor Wells never really liked that cat.
He said that Doc always looked at
him as if he (Doc the cat) knew
more than he (Doc the vet) did!
Those were the days of the Big
Band Era. Everyone, young and old
alike, listened to the same music.
There wasn't the difference there is
now. When I say old, I mean the
young married people. They were
old to us. Every other week a band
would come to town to the old
Clewiston Inn and the Inn would


have a dance. In the weeks the
band didn't come to Clewiston Inn,
we went to Belle Glade to dance.
Two men got into a fight one night.
A fight usually ended the dance for
that night.
One night two of the band
members who were staying at the
Inn got in a fight in their room. Two
of them were sharing a room. One
punched the other one so hard it
knocked him right through the wall
onto Mr. Plunkett's desk where he
was sitting in the next room in the
room next door! Mr. Plunkett was
an employee for the sugar compa-
ny who lived at the Inn, as did
many of the young people. Rentals
were scarce then, as they are now!
I remember one night that I was
sitting with my husband in the
lounge of the old Clewiston Inn,
the one that burned down. All of a
sudden, a live raccoon came
bounding across the room. People
screamed, and climbed up on the
chair seats and tables! Dr. Shoop
was there that night with a mem-
ber of the Board of General Motors.
What a scene! As it turned out, two
of the hotel guests had been out
hunting and thought it would be a
good joke to let the raccoon go in
the lounge that night!
The old Clewiston Inn burned
down in 1937. You see, they didn't
plant sugar cane for the sugar at
first, but from the Celotex they
could make from the canes and
use to make building materials.
But, Celotex burned very easily,
and the Inn was built with Celotex.
There's a mural in the cocktail
lounge of the new Inn painted by J.
Clinton Shepherd in the 1940s. The
mural covers all four walls of the
lounge. There is a raccoon shown
in the mural. When his daughter


This photo of the Clewiston School was taken in the 1940s.


had her 50th wedding anniversary,
she came out here to celebrate at
the Inn.
The original school building
was built from red brick and it's still
standing after all the hurricanes.
One of the first houses is still stand-
ing, too. It stands at the end of
Royal Palm Avenue and it was built
in 1928 by Clewiston's first mayor,
F. Dean Duff, who was mayor for
10 years. Dean Duff Avenue was
named after him.
The original office of the sugar
company was so friendly to every-
one here in town. They did so much
for this town. Anything they could
help with, they did. We had an 18-
hole golf course, a good library,
swimming pools and an auditori-
um. It's named John Boy Auditori-
um for Mr. John Boy who was a
president of U.S. Sugar. Clewiston
wouldn't be as nice as it is if they
hadn't been so nice to Clewiston.
I've lived this long and seen so
many changes that I've come to
realize all the different things I'm
familiar with now. I'm so lucky. My
life hias been so interesting.


Courtesy photo/Florida Archives
This photo from the 1920s shows Louise Groody with B.G. Dahlberg. Ms. Groody was the
star of "No, No, Nannette." Mr. Dahlberg was the president of Celotex Company and was
showing Ms. Groody plans for the Celotex bungalow.


Orchid popularity still growing in U]
DELRAY BEACH According California and Florida lead the membership, orchid-related topics
to the United States Department of nation and are nearly tied in pro- such as orchid education, research
Agriculture (USDA) Floriculture duction, accounting for 38.1 and and conservation, orchid shows
Crops Survey for the year 2004, 37:6 'percent of the country's and events, plarit-car'hggestiois
compiled by the National Agricul' orchids, respectively. Tog illi. and moree, vi.if th A'AiXefician
tural Statistics Survey, orchids are these two states account for more
growing in popularity in the United than 75 percent of the country's *
States. orchids. ***.
Currently second in potted flow- "Orchids are the largest group of ,
ering plant sales with a wholesale flowering plants in nature. There ^*
value of $128 million, orchid sales are more than 25,000 identified '*. "I
increased by five percent this past species, with the total number
year. This is the second highest per- probably reaching 30,000, and new *
centage increase of all the potted species are being discovered each *
flowering plants in the category. year," said Dr. Rob Griesbach, .
Orchids are second in sales behind genetic researcher of floral plants
poinsettias, which experienced a for the U.S. National Arboretum,
one percent increase with $248 mil- and past president of the American
lion in sales, and they are signifi- Orchid Society (AOS). "In addition
cantly ahead of third-ranked to that, there are more than 120,000
chrysanthemums, which increased hybrids registered with the Royal
eight percent to $75 million in sales. Horticultural Society. With so many
There were more than 17.2 mil- choices, there's an orchid for every
lion orchids sold in the United person's taste."
States in 2004, an increase of 13 Long known as a flower of dis- Hendry County executive C
percent from the previousyear. tinction, orchids have an undeni- rests
"This reflects the growth of the able mystique. Orchids are includ- presents certificates of app
flowers popularity. People are ed as backdrops in many cinema berg and LaBelle Mayor She
increasingly learning that orchids and television scenes, and are fea-
are not the delicate plants that they tured in countless advertisements Senator proi
were once perceived.to be, but are for everything from clothing and
hardy, easy-to-maintain plants that furniture to architecture and
have the ability to bloom all year design. Because of their beauty, rel-
long," said Lee Cooke, executive active low cost and heartiness,
director of the American Orchid orchids are also increasingly Sen. Dave Aronberg, who rep-
Society. becoming a central aesthetic touch resets constituents in parts of
Orchids have been included as a to the home lifestyle. Exceptional Lee, Glades, Palm Beach, Char-
separate entry in the annual USDA plants are produced at low cost by lotte and Hendry Counties, spoke
Floriculture Crops Summary nurseries throughout the United at the annual Jefferson/Jackson
Report since 1995, when they were States, but the huge volume of Day dinner the LaBelle Civic Cen-
first submitted by the nonprofit quality plants grown and marketed ter Friday, June 11.
AOS. Floriculture refers to plants in by large commercial growers in the nre nt n
the categories of bedding, cut culti- Florida and California contributed "Although I represent only a
vated greens, cut flowers, flowering to most of the sales boom. triangle of Lake Okeechobee in
potted plants and foliage plants. For information concerning Hendry County," he said, I still


united States
Orchid Society's Web site at
www.aos.org or call the AOS Visi-
tors Center and Botanical Garden in
Delrav Beach! floridut't f'561 )>4-
20u0. '


ON-SITE AND ON-LINE
BIDDING
Sat., July 9, Noon
Hartford, TN
200 Acres Will Sell in 5t Acre Tracts


Courtesy photo
committee Pauline New Born
reciation to Sen. Dave Aron-
rri Craichy.

mises fellow

or the future
represent you so you have two
Democrats representing Hendry
County. With Democrats on one
coast and Republicans on the
other, Hendry County is in
between.
"We can win if we don't give
up the fight. It's up to all of us. It is
not too early to start," he conclud-
ed.


ROu Box72g. Mt. Az;' NIC


B. Mark Rogers, Sales Manager
For additional information
www.mroersrealty.com
or Call 336-789-2926


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June 25, 2005 at 2:00
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Thursday, June 16,2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Reading helps connect children to their fathers
Years ago, the roles of father something fun with your kids, Bones, the very man that lay dead on the edge of their seat through aloud: Age four and older Read another kind of fishing feed-
and mother were narrowly then make the day complete with in his parents' inn. all 95 pages. yourself: ages 7-8 and older Today the-fish fishing!
defined. That's not true anymore. a couple of good books. With the recent death of his Librarian's Choice was going to be an exciting day This warm father-and-son


Today, fathers and mothers wear
interchangeable hats, performing
many of the same functions.
Throughout, the goal is the same:
To love, care and provide for their
children.
Reading books with children is
as much a father's job as it is a
mother's, and many dads love
those special moments together.
Dads, make extra time on Father's
Day to snuggle with your kids and
read to them. Read more than
you typically do a couple of
good books instead of one, or
extra chapters. After all, if it
weren't for your kids, you would-
n't be celebrating Father's Day at
all. So celebrate together. Go do


Books to Borrow
The following book is avail-
able at many public libraries.
*"Treasure Island" by Robert
Louis Stevenson, adapted by Lisa
Norby, illustrated in black-and-
white by Paul Wenzel, Bullseye
Step into Classics/Random
House, 95 pages Read aloud: age
8 and older Read yourself: age 9
and older Flint and his fellow
pirates buried gold on an island
many years ago. They made a
map to remember where they hid
the treasure. Now, through
strange circumstances, young Jim
Hawkins has found the map in
the sea chest of the pirate Billy


father, Jim seeks the advice of the
trusted Dr. Livesey and the town's
wealthiest man, Squire
Trelawney. Together they encour-
age Jim to mount an expedition
to recover the buried treasure. In
agreeing to do so, Jim Hawkins
has no idea what a deadly game
he is about to play as they set sail
for Treasure Island.
In this marvelous adaptation
of Robert Louis Stevenson's clas-
sic novel, Lisa Norby has captured
all the suspense, adventure and
excitement of the full novel for
younger children. Pirates, buried
gold, adventure on the high seas.-
it's all here in this fast-paced book
that is guaranteed to keep readers


Library: Chester Public
Library, 1784 Kings Highway,
Chester
Library director: Lynn Cop-
pers; children's librarian: Mau-
reen Jagos
Choices this week: "Brother
Eagle, Sister Sky" by Chief Seattle;
"The Empty Pot" by Demi; "The
Wide Mouthed Frog" by Keith
Faulkner.
Books to Buy
The following books are avail-
able at favorite bookstores.
*Piggy and Dad Go Fishing" by
David Martin, illustrated by Frank
Remkiewicz, Candlewick, 2005,
28 pages, $14.99 hardcover Read


because Piggy was going fishing
with his dad for the very first time.
After packing a lunch and digging
up worms for bait, the two set off.
When it came time for Piggy to
bait his hook; he didn't like the
idea of putting a hook into the
smiling worm. So Piggy uses
bread balls for bait instead.
Fishing takes patience, and
after a long time of waiting and
recasting, Piggy felt a tug on his
line and he reeled in a beautiful
fish! But when Piggy took a look
at the fish, he thought, it looked
sad and asked his dad if he could
throw it back into the water.
"Sure," said Dad. And from that
moment, Piggy and Dad did


story will have young and old
alike thinking about this sport in a
very different way.
"Daddy Hugs 1 *2*3," written
and illustrated by Karen Katz,
McElderry Books, 2005, 28 pages,
$12.95 hardcover Read aloud:
ages 1-3 Read yourself: Age seven
and older.
How many daddy hugs does it
take to say I love you? Beginning
with "one 'I'm so glad you're my
baby' hug" to "two teeny, tiny fin-
ger hugs" and all the way to 10
good-night hugs, this warm and
loving story about the love a
daddy has for his baby is just right
for Father's Day or any day of the
year.


The impact of the Bioterrorism threat |ECANELP REBUILD YOUR


By Douglas L Archer and
Fred H. Degnan
The events of September 11,
2001 and the aftermath anthrax
incidents have refocused the food
safety concerns and priorities of
regulatory agencies. The threat of
terrorism aimed at the food supply
and assuring biosecurity have
become nightly news stories. Can
biosecurity be supplied by the reg-
ulatory agencies, or will responsi-
bility largely fall on the growers,
packers, shippers, and processors
of our food? The question almost
answers itself: the burden falls on
the regulated industry to assure the
safety of its products.
What would such an attack on
the food supply accomplish? It is
difficult to envision that wide-
spread serious harm and death
would result, at least no more so
than we experience in large out-
breaks of food-borne disease. Nev-
ertheless, even if relatively little
harm to human health resulted-
.economic consequences could be
great, and consumer confidence in
the food supply and the regulatory
agencies, shaken.
The Tylenol(r) tampering
episodes of the early 1980s provide
a good model of the types of con-
siderations and prophylactic steps
the industry should be considering.
The episodes energized FDA-regu-
lated industries to implement
meaningful anti-tampering plans,
including new or modified drug
forms, and tamper-resistant pack-
,aging. FDA and the regulated
industry developed a cmaperative
relationship as never before--and


industry did the creative problem
solving. In the current situation,
FDA likely has its hands full in gen-
erally improving its state of pre-
paredness and ability to respond to
a bioterrorism emergency.
Increased inspection of imported
foods alone will stress FDA's exist-
ing work force, and its program pri-
orities will shift dramatically.
Recognizing that the level of
sophistication in the response to
potential bioterrorism will vary
with the size of a given company,
among other factors, there seem to
be some common points for food
growers, packers, shippers, and
processors to consider in light of
the current circumstances.
In the absence of better
knowledge about the nature and
seriousness of a threat, the distinc-
tion between under-reaction and
over-reaction is blurred.
A strong focus on facility and
personnel security is a must.
Where possible, background
checks for ALL personnel should
be required. NO ONE who is not so
authorized should have access to
the finished food product
Do you know who is deliver-
ing raw material to your facility,
and who is transporting finished
product out? What security precau-
tions are those entities taking?
Anti-tampering plans, if they
exist, should be re-evaluated. If
they don't exist, they should be
developed, adopted, and imple-
mented.
GAPs, GMPs, and HACCP
plans should be re-evaluated. Are
they sufficient to protect from pur-


poseful acts of food contamina-
tion? Do they cover the following
points?
1. raw material integrity
2. packaging integrity
3. air flow systems
4. end-line activities
5. storage and transportation
Consumer complaint han-
dling practices should be checked
and fine tuned.
Recall procedures should be
checked and fine tuned. Know
who you would contact at your
local FDA office and how to reach
them.
Know who could provide
quick access to analytical methods
or microbiological or chemical
analyses of your products on an
emergency basis. Have those con-
tact numbers readily available.
Improve preparedness
among all employees through reg-
ular training or drills. Develop a
heightened understanding of the
problem, its consequences, and
that increased awareness on the
part of all is an important compo-
nent of prevention.
Know that procedural
changes in handling a "possible
problem" are called for in the face
of a possible bioterrorism event.
The balance of internal (company)
investigation and FDA notification
favors early agency notification.
False alarms will be one price of
vigilance.
Be aware that FDA, CDC, and
state agriculture and health agen-
cies will likely be in a "help mode"
as previously seen in product tam-
pering incidents. Everyone recog-


Growth affects all Floridians


From traffic, taxes and tourism
to pollution,.housing and jobs -
all are impacted by the rate of
growth and development occur-
ring in local communities across
the state of Florida.
More than 1,000 people a day
arrive in Florida, as new residents
of the state. Each requires water,
,roads, landfills, police protection,
.emergency care and a host of
other publicly funded services.
Local communities struggle daily
with how to meet the needs of
existing populations in addition to
those newly locating to the Sun-
shine State.
Lawmakers tackled parts of
the problem in their recent Leg-
islative Session, passing major
legislation that will soon become
state law. The legislation has
drawn a mix of reactions, from
those who will play a role in car-
rying it out and from others con-
'cerned about Florida's growing
needs and quality of life.
Leading experts are analyzing
the new policy, and the state's
evolving needs, and will report on
their findings beginning June 15.
That is the start date for an inno-
vative and timely "virtual confer-
ence" on growth policy, issues,


impacts and solutions. "Growth
In Florida" is the theme for the
"event", an eight-week tele-semi-
nar series where both speakers
and participants will take part by
telephone. The program is set for
June 15 through August 3. Weekly
sessions will be held on an array
of growth topics and will feature a
faculty of over 40 experts on the
subjects.
Urban sprawl, housing
demands, water supplies, devel-
opment patterns, land conserva-
tion, citizen rights and an assort-
ment of other concerns affecting
everyday Floridians will be the
focus of the series. Local officials,
civic leaders, planners, develop-
ers, environmentalists and others
- anyone concerned about the
future of Florida will have an
interest in the series. Participants
will gain insights into Florida's
current standing and how to do
better in the future.
Participation in the event has
been made easy by organizers
since it will all be conducted by
phone, so anyone can call in from
virtually any area of the state or
country. The live sessions will also
be recorded and made available
through a playback line for those


who miss a call or want to hear a
session again. The approach is
unique in Florida and a new spe-
cialty of the sponsor, for public
awareness and involvement as
well as problem solving and
meeting the needs of Floridians.

In addition to informing Florid-
ians and helping improve the way
growth is addressed, the tele-
series is also a fundraising effort
for the sponsoring organization,
the Florida Public Interest Foun-
dation. The group is a nonprofit
that provides educational pro-
grams on major issues of concern
to Florida's future. Its Non-Profit
Institute also sponsors profession-
al development training services
for nonprofit groups to aid in their
effectiveness and success. Pro-
ceeds will enable the Foundation
to provide more such programs
throughout the state.

The Foundation has assem-
bled experts from diverse back-
grounds and professions and is
encouraging broad participation
in the calls. Registration fees have
been substantially discounted for
charitable and civic groups as
well as students.


Treasure Coast Dermatology
Specializing in the Treatment of Skin Cancer
Mohs Surgery Diseases of Skin, Hair & Nails *

Tim loannides, M.D. and Rick Romagosa, M.D.
are pleased to welcome

Robert S. Kirsner, M.D., PhD


Boaud C&Mtd
by tier
Ameffmbogd


B
Fdom
Of toe


In addition to
Stuart Fort Pierce St. Lucle West Vero Beach
221-3330 464-6464 878-3376 778-7782
448 SE Osceola St. 1801 South 23rd St., #5 1100 St. Lucle West Blvd., #105 1995 39th Ave.
Medicare, Humana. Employers Mutual accepted
Seea BoardCertiied Drmatoogist.. vey im.


nizes that terrorism is the fault of
the terrorists, not of a farm or a
food company.
The above list is certainly not
intended to be all-inclusive of pos-
sible preventive steps. Large com-
panies will likely have the
resources to take a risk-analysis
approach to their operation, and
use a team of experts to devise pre-
vention strategies, intervention
strategies, containment strategies,
and educational strategies-all
aimed at dealing with possible
bioterrorism. The sharing of strate-
gies and experience among com-
panies with similar attributes, or
sharing facilitated by trade organi-
zations, will strengthen the whole
of the effort, and should be encour-
aged by government. At all costs,
complacency needs to be avoided
for, as time passes, the specter of
possibly more and more sophisti-
cated terrorist acts looms.


Toll Free


E-Mail:


Coastal Financial Group
525 NW Avenue L 0 Belle Glade, FL
www.gladesmotors.com


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Florida's ancient past hidden near Kissimmee banks


The terrain is obscured by a
tangle of drooping oak limbs,
palmetto scrub and dense
underbrush, but Jim Fitch looks
into this thicket and sees clearly
the signs of a lost civilization and
its bygone culture.
"I just stumbled across this
Indian mound one day about 25
years ago," said Fitch, curator of
the Museum of Florida Art and
Culture at South Florida Com-
munity College in Sebring.
"The growth is such that I can
see it, but you cannot."
So you squint, look harder. It
is only then that you detect the
barely-perceptible upward slope
of the ground, beginning not 25
feet from where Fitch stands; it's
then you notice the climbing lay-
ers of the farthermost oak tree-
tops. Next you trudge up the
incline in Fitch's footsteps. A


couple of quick breathers and a
few branch scrapes later, you're
standing on a woodsy plateau 15
feet up. This is not a geographi-
cal anomaly in the local land-
scape, but a structure created by
human hands thousands of
years ago, Fitch said.
This Indian mound sits on
property now owned by the
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, not far from the
Kissimmee River. The District
acquired the land to serve as a
buffer for the Kissimmee River
restoration project. But District
officials agreed earlier this year
to let a team of archaeologists
investigate the mound for signs
of the peoples whom Fitch
believes called Florida home as
far back as 7,000 years ago.
Renowned Florida Archaeol-
ogist Dr. Robert Austin is leading


the investigation, which is spon-
sored by the Kissimmee Valley
Archaeological and Historical
Conservancy. The team, which
includes Fitch, has been doing
site clearing on the mound since
June and will get down to the
actual dig in early August. The
investigation could take six to
eight weeks.
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District officials believe it is
important to give the team
access to the site. The potential
that amateurs or treasure
hunters might locate the site,
damage it or sell artifacts to pri-
vate collectors is of particular
concern. Any artifacts found by
Austin's team become property
of the state.
"We just see this as an essen-
tial public service to make this
mound available to these


researchers to expand the
archaeological knowledge of the
state," said Jeff McLemore, a
District land steward for the
region. "We hope they gain valu-
able knowledge from the
mound, see what purposes it
served, who created it."
Who created it is the big mys-
tery, Fitch said. However, the
team recently found signs of an
earthen ramp adjacent to the
mound, which could indicate it
served ceremonial purposes, he
said.
With some luck and a great
degree of keen observation
skills, the team could uncover
signs that a tribal chieftain once
presided here. Perhaps they will
find artifacts crude clay pottery,
or animal bones and shells
formed into fishhooks, knives or
other tools. Postholes where


shelters were erected would be
a huge find, Fitch said.
Previous finds in the region
lead Fitch and others to con-
clude that the Kissimmee Valley
was once a primary trade route
as well as a place of permanent
and temporary settlements.
Those finds include a more
refined pottery than that pro-
duced by the locals, a style that
was indigenous to the Mississip-
pi Valley area and thus suggests
far-flung trade ties, he said. Still,
there is much more to learn
about these people who lived
long before recorded history
which, in Florida, beginswith the
arrival of Spanish explorer
Ponce de Leon in 1513.
"We're talking pre-history
here," Fitch said. "The prehisto-
ry of this area could easily date
to 5,000 B.C. We're uncovering


great evidence that there was
undoubtedly an indigenous cul-
ture here. They were organized,
established... we just don't have
a name for them."
However, if they find direct
evidence of these people in the
form of human bones, the inves-
tigation will halt abruptly. "If it's
a burial mound, we'll leave out
of respect," he said.
The search begins by digging
a series of test pits, about 2
meters square and 2 to 3 meters
deep. Any evidence of the socie-
ty that built these mounds,
excluding skeletal remains,
would lead to more extensive
digging, he said.
"We know something hap-
pened here, we just don't know
what," Fitch said.


Hickory Hammock: A refreshingly rustic camping hideaway.


Hike, camp, fish enjoy wildlife on this slice of old Florida


It is easy to get lost out on
Highway 98 where those two
lanes of blacktop cut through
the middle of nowhere,'some-
where between Lorida and Fort
Basinger in Highlands County. It
is simple, actually: Just a little
ways north of the Istokpoga
Canal, pull in at the sign marking
the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District's Hickory Ham-
mock, step outside and get lost
in 4,638 acres of natural terrain
cutting loose on a Florida wild
streak. Lose yourself in 8 miles
of meandering trails that pass
gracefully aging oaks bearded in
Spanish moss, open plains
sprinkled with colorful wildflow-
ers and cabbage palm, peaceful
lowland marshes lined with tall
maidencane and saw palmetto,
and a thriving community of crit-
ters that call Hickory Hammock
home.
On this protected preserve,
evidence of Florida's distant past


unfolds in gentle layers. It is not
difficult to look around and
imagine what the Seminoles
saw here centuries ago when
they were its only stewards.
Closer to the surface, telltale
signs of FlOrida's legacy as an
early trailblazer in America's cat-
tle industry lie dormant in the
overgrown terrain.
Hickory Hammock's natural
beauty also holds promises of
Florida's future. It is one of
numerous properties acquired
by the District and other state
agencies in a quest to restore
wildlands lost to the state's pop-
ulation surge.
Additionally, the upland ham-
mock lays down a wide berth
between civilization and the
ongoing efforts to return the
nearby Kissimmee River to its
original state as a winding
waterway flanked by sopping
floodplains. Shorebirds and
waterfowl are returning in sur-


prisingly high numbers along
the 15 miles of restored Kissim-
mee basin just a short feathered
flight east of the hammock.
"What we're trying to do here
is not only restore the Kissimmee
River itself, but also we're pro-
tecting and restoring the adjacent
uplands that are an integral part
of that whole ecosystem," said
Jeff McLemore, a District steward
for the region.
But it isn't necessary to
understand its role as a vital eco-
logical link to enjoy Hickory
Hammock as a great escape to
the outdoors. In addition to hik-
ing, the District allows primitive
camping (at two select sites)
and horseback riding. Both
require a permit. The District
also allows hunting, regulated
by the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission. The
Florida Cracker Trail Association
is busy restoring a vintage 1940s-
era barn at the north end of the


hammock to serve as' a gather-
ing place for horse riders.
The hiking trail itself is
refreshingly rustic, no more
defined in some places than a
path made by the repeated foot-
steps of youngsters hurrying to a
favorite fishing hole. And as you
walk farther in, the traffic noise
gives way to bird songs, buzzing
dragonflies and the rhythmic
chirping of cicadas. Wild grape,
scented wax myrtle, purple
blooms of pickerel weed, French
mulberry, hog plum, willow
trees and patches of white flow-
ered vetch mark the way from
shady oak bunches to wetland
marshes to upland fields. Under-
neath the native vegetation of
those fields is bahia grass, now
growing wild and un-grazed but
a reminder of when dairy cattle
roamed here before the District
acquired the land.
There's no rule that hikers
must stick to the beaten trail,


McLemore said. Venture out for
a closer look at a gopher tortoise
tossing dirt from its burrow, or
to get a better view of a circling
osprey. Pull aside the oak limbs
that hang to the ground and step
inside a shaded canopy where it
is cool and dark, except for the
smatterings of sunlight that
break through the leaves.
It is what Tony Braswell
insists on doing when he comes
out here from Sebring for a


nature break. "You have to get
off the trail to see it, but I see lots
of wildlife deer, hogs... even
turkey," said Braswell, who was
seeking solitude in the ham-
mock one recent afternoon. "It's
peaceful here. It's like what old
Florida must have been like."
For additional information or
a copy of the District's Public
Use Guide, contact the SFWMD
Land Stewardship Division at
(561) 682-6635.


J ames ...
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IKK~A


Helping to make a difference once again


Kevin McCarty brought a life-
time of political and business
experience to the South Florida
Water Management... District
:when he was appointed to the
Governing Board in March of
2003.
Still, the complexity and
scope of the issues facing the
district proved to be a major
challenge for McCarty, a veteran
financial professional with Bear
Stearns in Boca Raton.
Now, since celebrating his
first anniversary with the Dis-
trict, McCarty feels confident in
his role in helping to set policy
for one of Florida's most power-
ful and important government
agencies.
The South Florida Water Man-
agement District (SFWMD) is a.
regional agency that oversees
the water resources in the south-
ern half of the state. As the old-
est and largest of the state's
water management districts,
SFWMD manages water
resources in a booming 16-
county region that serves 6.6
million residents spread out over
about 18,000 square miles. *
"It is an amazing agency with
enormous responsibilities and
resources," says McCarty, a resi-
dent of Delray Beach. "It takes a
while to understand and fully
grasp the magnitude of the job
we have to do."'
SFWMD is involved in water
quality and supply issues, flood
control and the maintenance
and restoration of precious natu-
ral ecosystems.
McCarty, who says he is fasci-
nated and awed by the role and
importance of water resources
in Florida's overall well being,
says it took him a full six months
to understand the nuances of his
policymaking role.


"The staff has been wonder-
ful and so has the board," says
McCarty. "I'm very excited about
the team we have at the District.
They are the best professionals
in the business, and that's a
good thing because we have an
enormous job to do."
McCarty says his financial,
business and political skills have
served him well as a board
member. He says his back-
ground complements his fellow
board members who bring var-
ied backgrounds to the District.
McCarty has been politically
active for years and is the hus-
band of County Commissioner
Mary McCarty. Active in his
hometown of Delray Beach,
McCarty was a former vice chair
of that city's Community Rede-
velopment Agency, which has
helped to make downtown Del-
ray Beach one of the best down-
town comeback stories in the
Sunshine State.
"I know my way around the
political process," he says. "I've
gotten to know a lot of people
over the years in Palm Beach
County and in Tallahassee. They
have a comfort level with me,
and those relationships have
helped me to negotiate on
behalf of the District."
McCarty is extremely proud
of his role in two major projects
that occurred during his first
year' on the Governing Board.
When Palm Beach County
landed the Scripps Research
Institute, McCarty was able to
lend a hand in the negotiations
that will enable the world-
renowned bio-tech lab to open a
campus in northern Palm Beach
County.
McCarty was also instrumen-
tal in assisting with negotiations
for a land exchange that resulted


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in preservation of a 500-acre
environmentally sensitive prop-
erty in Palm Beach County,
located in an area of potential
commercial development. This
was achieved with no dollar
expenditure by taxpayers.
"In my first year, those are the
two things that I am most proud
of," he said. "It is very thrilling to
serve an agency that plays such
an important role in our environ-
ment and in our economy. I'm
also proud that we have gotten
over the hump with three major
water storage projects. That was
a great accomplishment for the
District."
McCarty is also pleased to
work closely with SFWMD Exec-
utive Director Henry Dean, con-
sidered 'the "Dean" of water
managers in Florida.
"Henry is a legend," says
McCarty. "He's simply the best in
the business, and he has sur-
rounded himself with a lot of tal-
ent. Having Henry at the helm
makes it possible to do some
amazing things. That's why I am
so excited about being on the
board and so excited about the
future and what we can accom-
plish as a team. Henry is great at
balancing personalities and find-
ing solutions. His depth of
knowledge is extraordinary. He
simply cannot be fooled, and
that's a great comfort to me as a
board member. He knows what
he needs to do and how to get it
done."
While McCarty is known for
his business acumen and finan-
cial skill, friends say he is affable
and always fun to be around.
"Kevin has a wonderful sense
of humor, and he's very smart,"
says former Delray Beach Mayor
Jay Alperin, a frequent golf part-
ner. "Being on the board means


a lot to him, and the public
should be happy because he's a
guy who always does his home-
work."
Indeed, McCarty says he
prides himself on studying the
District and the issues he votes
on. He finds the subject matter
complex but fascinating.
"The issues we deal with are
so important," he says. "I take it
very, very seriously. And while
I'm not an expert in water
resources, I feel confident in the
staff giving me the information I
need to make the best decisions
for the long-term benefit of
South Florida. I also feel very
confident that my background in
public finance can bring a
dimension to the District that is
needed as we look to the
future."
Delray Beach Vice Mayor Jon
Levinson has been a long time
friend of McCarty.
"Kevin looks carefully at all
the facts before he makes a deci-
sion," he says. "And that's what
you want in a public official,
someone who looks at all the
information, who thinks long
term and when necessary out of
the box. Kevin has never been
afraid to make the tough deci-
sions, and that's why he was so
valuable to us in Delray."
Looking ahead, McCarty says
he's ready to work hard on Ever-
glades restoration and other key
issues during the remainder of
his four-year term.
"It's a lot of work," he says.
"But it's also exciting to be a part
of the District at this time in its
history. This is a great opportuni-
ty to make a difference. And I'm
loving every minute of it."'


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Smith heads to national wrestling tourney History Of Father's Day


By Mark Young
CLEWISTON It's only his sec-
ond full year of ever competing in
wrestling, but Kris Smith, an
incoming Clewiston High School
junior, is making a big name for
himself in the sport.
Coming off a highly successful
sophomore season, Smith con-
cluded last year's high school com-
petition with a 25-10 overall record,
took third at the district tourna-
ment, was regional runner-up, and
made the top 12 during the state
finals while wrestling in the 140-
pound division.
Smith has been working hard
over the off season, staying active,
and successful in tournament
competition. Smith has picked up
a pair of gold medals this summer
already, qualifying him for the
National Open Wrestling Champi-
onships, to be held in Virginia
Beach, Virginia.
The tournament is scheduled to
kick off June 26 and will run
through June 29. In all, the trip will
be a seven-day event for the young
Tiger wrestler who already has
Cumberland University, in
Williamsburg, KY, eying him as a
potential scholarship prospect.
Cumberland and Clewiston
High School have a strong connec-
tion with head coach Jess Alford;


Michael Irving, a former national
champion, and Ryan Alfal all hail-
ing from Cumberland.
What Smith lacks in overall
experience, he more than makes
up for in natural talent and the
national tournament will be a
means to gain the experience he
needs to emerge as a state threat
next year. He will be moving up to
the 152-pound division for this
tournament, but the move up in
weight is of little consequence to
this focused young grappler.
"I'm going into this tournament
with one thing on my mind," said
Smith. "Just don't lose."
Smith loves the challenges of
single combat action that wrestling
provides, but recognizes that his
new love can also provide a means
to further his education. He's
focused on succeeding in the sport
and wants the opportunity to
advance his education as well.
Smith concluded his sopho-
more year with a 3.2 grade point
average, was nominated as a
Who's Who in student athletes.
The family is looking to the com-
munity for help in making this trip
possible and will be holding a
fundraising carwash Saturday,
June 18 at. Clewiston Middle
School, beginning at 8 a.m.


It would be interesting to
know how this holiday came
into practice. Therefore here is a
short history on the holiday, and
meaning of the different colors
of roses to be worn that day.
Father's Day is celebrated on
the third Sunday in June. The
idea for creating a day for chil-
dren to honor their fathers
began in Spokane, Washington.
A woman by the name of Sonora
Smart Dodd thought of the idea
for Father's Day while listening
to a Mother's Day sermon in
1909.
Having been raised by her
father, Henry Jackson Smart,
after her mother died, Sonora


wanted her father to know how
special he was to her. It was her
father that made all the parental
sacrifices and was, in the eyes of
his daughter, a courageous, self-
less, and loving man. Sonora's
father was born in June, so she
chose to hold the first Father's
Day celebration in Spokane,
Washington on the 19th of June,
1910.

In 1924 President Calvin
Coolidge proclaimed the third
Sunday in June as Father's Day.
Roses are the Father's Day flow-
ers: Red to be worn for a living
father and white if the father has
died.


Glades Ford, Lincoln-Mercury
SIE '.'E 'W JT T. r T 1 ..iOIvCPS & F1r4ICNDS
rJ C HL HA r': ] B 7 -'I'.N .)u [ El ;


Staff photo/Lauren Adams
Kris Smith, an incoming CHS junior and Tiger wrestler, will
be take the national spotlight while competing in the Nation-
al Open Wrestling Championships beginning June 26.


I 800-726-8514
steve(i'gladesmotors.coim

-ESSSBES ^E^r^I'Bi r"ei rn-


i


Sports Briefs


Tournament
registration
Registration for the Get Kids
Hooked on Fishing, not Drugs fish-
ing tournament will take place at 8
a.m. June 18, on the morning of the
tournament. Registration will take
place at the Clewiston boat ramp.
Contact the Clewiston, Police
Department for more information.
Golf Tournament
The Boys and Girls Club is host-
ing a golf tournament June 18 at
the Belle Glade Golf Course, start-
ing at 8:30 a.m. They are seeking
foursomes to play in the tourna-
ment. It is $50 per individual to play.


Prizes for first, second, and third
place teams, as well as for the
longest drive, closest to the pin, and
a car for making a hole-in-one at
the designated hole will be award-
ed. You can also purchase Ball
Drop tickets for $5 each for a
chance to win $500. Contact Kathy
Miller at (561) 992-5399 for more
information.

Fishing Tournament
Horizons Fishing Tournament
benefiting Hospice of Palm Beach
County's (HPBC) Horizons Chil-
dren's Bereavement Program will
be taking place soon. Horizons
Fishing Tournament (Kingfish,
Wahoo, Dolphin) is presented by


the brokerage firm of Robert W.
Baird & Company, Inc.
A Captain's Meeting is planned
for Thursday, July 14, at 5 p.m. to
8:30 pm at the Newcomb Hall -
Riviera Beach Marina.

Fishing Tournament
Saturday, July 16, lines in at 7
a.m. lines out by 3. p.m. and an
awards ceremony from 5-6 p.m.
can be expected. Departing from
any inlet; weigh in at Riviera Beach
Marina, 1950 E 13th Street, Riviera
Beach, $175 per boat until June 15;
$200 per boat until July 10; $250
per boat until July 14. For more
information contact Beth Charbon-
neau at (561) 227-5157, Special


Events Coordinator Hospice of
Palm Beach County or Willie's Bait
and Tackle (561) 848-4484.

Summer
Tumbling Camp
Clewiston Performing Arts Cen-
ter with Mrs. Mammen and Ms.
Escobar, June 6-16 Monday- Thurs-
day, $45 plus $15 registration, if
new to CPAC, ages five and up.
Beginning 2:15-3:15 p.m., Interme-
diate 3:15-4:15 p.m., Advance 4:15-
5:15 p.m. Registration will be
Thursday, April 28 and Thursday,
May 5, from 6-7 p.m. at 725 Central
Avenue, in Clewiston. For more
information call (239) 564-3473.


/


Boat ramp opens northernmost Everglades to public


Pay no mind to that hulking
gator floating on the water's sur-
face offshore from the new boat
ramp at the northern end of the
Loxahatchee National Wildlife
Refpge.;
The leathery eight-footer is cer-
tainly no "Freddy," the affable ani-
mated alligator mascot of the South
Florida Water Management District.
It's just that this neck of the Ever-
glades has been closed to the pub-
lic for several years.
But maybe this cold-blooded
Jurassic throwback will eventually
become the unofficial greeter to
the northernmost boat access to
the Everglades. The District ramp is
expected to generate a lot of traffic
from anglers, sightseers, birders
and other outdoor lovers when it


opens in September. The facility
includes an adjacent fishing dock, a
covered kiosk and environmentally
friendly, composting restrooms.
There is a paved parking lot and the
ramp can accommodate two boats
at once.
The facility is an improved
replacement to the previous District
boat ramp that served this end of
the Refuge, which also encompass-
es the District's Water Conservation
Area 1 (WCA 1). The old facility,
which closed in 1997, attracted a
"conservative estimate" of 200
boaters a week, said Serena Rinker,
an interpretive specialist with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
which oversees the Refuge.
"We put an announcement in
our newsletter and right off the bat


we got half a dozen calls," Rinker
said. "They all want to know when
it's going to open."
Public boat ramps on District
property are nothing new. There
are more than 160 ramps open to
the public throughout the 16-coun-
ty District, from the Everglades in
the south to Lake Tohopekaliga in
the north. But this is the first "major
new ramp we've done in many
years," said Fred Davis, the District's
land stewardship director. Its con-
struction is being handled by the
District, but the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife service will operate it.
"After the old boat ramp was
lost, people had to drive all the way
to (the refuge's main entrance)
west of Boynton Beach," Davis
said. "This will reconnect people in


western Palm Beach County to the
refuge. It's certainly the northern-
most boat access to the Everglades
system."
Entrance to the facility will be
monitored by a gate near 20-mile
Bend off of Southern Boulevard.
Admission will cost $5 per vehicle
and it will be open from sunrise to
sunset. A law enforcement official
will be on patrol or on call at all
times. And be sure to look for the
gator.
"Oh, yeah this is his home," a
construction worker at the boat
ramp said.one recent afternoon.
For directions or additional
information, visit
loxahatchee.fws.gov or call (561)
734-8303.


Tune In on the Web! It's "Everglades Radio Network"


South Florida's famous wetland
now has its own 24-hour-a-day radio
broadcast. Everglades Radio Net-
work has hit the airwaves and the
Internet to keep listeners enter-
tained and informed with facts, sto-
ries and even music about the
unique Everglades environment.
Travelers along Alligator Alley
(1-75) in Collier County can tune in
on FM 98.7 and FM 107.9. But any-
one in Florida or even around the
world can listen in by clicking onto
the radio network's Web site at
www.dep.state.fl.us/ern.
The idea for Everglades radio
programming was proposed five
years ago by Senator Bob Graham.
In a letter to the secretary of Flori-
da's Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP), Sen. Graham
suggested the idea of an auto tour,
of sorts. Travelers could listen to an
informative and entertaining broad-
cast while looking out the window
and watching the Everglades envi-
ronment pass by. It was an idea that
drew a lot of interest and support.
John Outland, DEP staff mem-
ber and project coordinator,
described the collective efforts of
numerous state organizations that
made ENR a reality. "Several agen-
cies contributed their expertise,"
he said. "DEP paid for program-
ming. The Department of Trans-
portation, which issues highway
radio advisories across the state,
contributed hardware plus expert-


ise on radio broadcasting and
licensing. The Division of Emer-
gency Management added funding
so the station could be a source for
weather advisories, accident
reports along the interstate and
evacuation notices during storms."
Many other organizations par-
ticipated in launching ERN by con-
tributing material for original pro-
gramming, including the South
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict. The District is partnered with
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
to carry out a 30-year plan for Ever-
glades restoration. Several pro-
gram segments describe this mon-
umental effort.
The Web site was an outgrowth
of the broadcast plan. It was creat-
ed by DEP staffer Krista Callen,
who updates it with a "Critter of the
Month" and other appealing items.
The site receives more than 10,000
hits every month. ERN is linked at
WGCU radio's Web site and at a
few environmental sites, but over-
all it is not widely promoted. That
may change if the word gets out to
educators. Outland would like to
see the site become a classroom
resource. "We're hoping that
teachers will start to tune in for
environmental education curricu-
lum," Outland said.
ERN is broadcast from the cam-
pus of Florida Gulf Coast University
in Ft. Myers, in the studio of WGCU.
There, Gene Craven, associate gen-


eral manager, supervises the auto-
mated system that broadcasts the
three hours of programming in a
continuous loop. A link on ERN's
Web site allows computer users to
tune in to the actual radio broad-
cast. Other links connect to each of
ERN's current programs.
Program topics include Ever-
glades animals, such as Florida
panthers, alligators and various
birds,, as well as interesting plants-
both natives and unwanted exotics
that are invading the ecosystem.
Personality profiles include photog-
rapher Clyde Butcher and author
Marjory Stoneman Douglas, who
coined the famous phrase "River of
Grass" to describe the Everglades
landscape. A historical segment
describes President Harry Tru-
man's dedication of Everglades
National Park in 1947. Nature
sounds, music and lively interviews
round out the broadcast.
An immediate goal of Ever-
glades Radio Network is to add
more programming. There are cur-
rently six 30-minute segments,
repeated several times in the
course of a 24-hour period. Addi-
tional segments will add variety,
new information and freshness to
the network.
"The start-up budget for ERN
does not include additional dollars
for expanded programming," Out-
land said. "That's where we hope
community sponsors will step in


with their support."
Like National Public Radio and
other noncommercial networks,
ERN does not sell advertising. But
sponsors can be recognized on air
for the programs they underwrite.
"We would like to get annual spon-
sors at $20,000 or quarterly at
$7,500," said Outland. "However,
we will certainly consider other
proposals." 'Two 30-second under-
writing messages are available
every hour.
The network has submitted a
request for federal funding as well.
"While government funds would
be beneficial," said Outland, "it
would be great for ERN to have
local, regional and even national
sponsors that support the Ever-
glades and its restoration."
For roadway travelers on 1-75 -
or armchair travelers on the Inter-
net-you don't need to be actually
standing among the cypress trees
or researching stories on South
Florida's history or listening to
herons calling from the reeds to
experience the famed River of
Grass. Everglades Radio Network
can take you there.
Everglades Radio Network is on
the Internet at
www.dep.state.fl.us/ern. You can
listen to the broadcast or click oh
links to hear any of the current pro-
grams.


Touching the
Glades one family
at a trime


C H It RCH

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(863) 983-5123


Happy Father's Day












William Marcus Sutton Jr.
March 18, 1936 May 31, 1998


I'm awaiting the day when I see you again,


Your Daughter Cathy


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Community Events


Foster parents
needed
HENDRY/GLADES The Chil-
dren's Network of Southwest Flori-
da, the community based care divi-
sion of Camelot Community Care,
Inc. is holding an orientation on
"How to become a Foster
Parent/Adoptive Parent" on Tues-
day, June 21 at the Department of
Children and Families, 485 East
Cowboy Way, LaBelle at 6 p.m.
Camelot Community Care, Inc.
serves as the lead agency to transi-
tion child welfare services to the
private sector in Collier, Lee, Char-
lotte, Hendry and Glades Counties.
Camelot Community Care, Inc. has
partnered with Family Preservation
Services, Lutheran Services of Flori-
da, Ruth Cooper Center for Behav-
ioral Health Care and the Florida
Baptist. Children's Home to recruit
more foster families in our five
county regions. For those interested
in becoming a foster/adoptive fam-
ily, please call (800) 89 FAMILY
Flea market
The next Trash to Treasures
indoor Flea Market will be held
June 24 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the


L.J. Nobles Senior Center, 475 E.
Cowboy Way, in Labelle. For more
information or to make a donation
call Barbara at (863) 675-1446. All
proceeds to benefit the Faith in
Action in LaBelle program. Come
in out of the heat and soak up some
bargains!
Family Caregiver

support groups
June topic is Social Security
Medication Program Information
and Answer Session. Come to a
free information sessions given by
a Social Security Administration
representative with real facts about
the upcoming Medicare prescrip-
tion drug program.
Wednesday, June 22at 4 p.m. at
the Clewiston Senior Center
(863) 983-7088 (Clewiston)
Wednesday, June 29 at 4 p.m. at
the Moore Haven Senior Center
(863) 946-1821 (Moore Haven)
Free Services
to help elders
Insurance counseling with a
trained SHINE (Seniors Helping
with Insurance Needs of Elders)


counselor is available every
Wednesday morning free of charge
at Nobles Center and in Moore
Haven at Senior Connections
offices. (Must call 675-1446 to
make appointment).
Post disaster help
for older adults
Disaster funds are still available
to help older adults living in Hendry
and Glades Counties who continue
to need assistance with such issues
as 'roof repair, debris removal,
insurance deductibles, appliance
repair or replacement, chore work,
etc. Elders in need of help due to
the hurricanes of last summer can
speak with a specially trained out-
reach worker in Clewiston (863)
983-7088 Monday- Friday.
Exercise
classes
Nobles Senior Center exercise
classes meet M-W-F at 9 a.m.
Come and join this lively group for
better health.
Bus driver class
The Glades County School Dis-
trict will be offering a bus-driving
course for anyone interested in
driving a school bus for the district
for daily routes and/or extracurricu-


lar trips. If interested, please con-
tact Doug Manke at (863) 946-3662.
Classes have begun and take place
in the evenings.
GED classes
The Glades County School Dis-
trict is offering GED prep classes at
Moore Haven High School (room
26-003) for adults who wish to
obtain their GED. Classes are on
Tuesday and Thursday nights from
6-8 p.m. You may register the night
of the classes. If you have any ques-
tions you may call Scott Bass at
(863) 946-0202 ext. 13.
Children's advo-
cates are needed
The Guardian Ad Litem (GAL)
Program needs volunteers to repre-
sent the best interests of abused,
abandoned and neglected children
before the court, social service
agencies and the community. No
special educational degree is
required. Guardians need to be
someone with common sense,
good judgment and a commitment
to helping a child. Attendance at
three training sessions held in Fort
Myers is required. Please contact
Kelie Hedrick at: (239) 461-4360 or
(800) 269-6210 for more informa-
tion, and to reserve your space for
training.


S Floridah Gardening Series. I volume 3


TORMSCAPING
Landscaping to Minimize
Wind Damage in Florida
hk I,inIn ( rim/rri/


I~


Worst plants for hurricanes
Trees that are dangerous
"Survivor" gardens
- The strongest plants in Floridal


Courtesy photos
--"Stormscaping", by Pamela Crawford, can be an invaluable
tool in deciding not only how to beautify your yard, but in
helping your home and property minimize storm damage by
protecting it with wind-tolerant trees.


School
Continued From Page 1
young pines.
The property where it stood is
owned and managed by the
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, part of land
acquired for the Kissimmee
River environmental restoration
project. This plot sits above the
100-year floodplain and is not
needed for the project, accord-
ing to Marjorie Moore, senior
supervising planner in the Dis-
trict's land stewardship division.
However, the property may be
sold as surplus, and District offi-
cials could not bear to let the
schoolhouse become lost histo-
ry.
Neither could Florida's Divi-
sion of H-istorical Resources.
After the District commissioned
Janus Research, a Florida firm
specializing in historical preser-
vation, to conduct an assess-
ment, the two agencies agreed
with Janus' recommendation
that the humble building's archi-
tectural character, historical
value and social relevance to its
era make it worth saving. Based


Birds
Continued From Page 1
And according to the book,
Florida's Birds/Pineapple
Press/Sarasota,. Fla., occasional-
ly, to the joy of all those who
take to hummingbirds, the
Rufous Hummingbird, Black-
chinned Hummingbird, Cuban
Emerald, and the Bahama
Woodstar, will stray into Florida
in fall and winter.
Rarely does a human being
see a hummingbird nest, which
is just the way Mrs. Hummer has
her home planned. High in the
branches of a tall tree, she builds
her nest of soft grass, bits of
bark, various fluff from plants
including the soft spongy fiber
behind the boot jacks of Sabal
palms. The outside is usually
covered with lichens of various
sorts. The little house is so clev-
erly camouflaged that even if
one were close by it would be
difficult to detect.
Both mother and father wear
a coat of brilliant metallic green,
but only the father has a bright
red throat. In watching hum-
mers, their wings move s6 fast
it's almost as if they leave
sparkling streaks through the air.


Cuisine

Continued From Page 1
three egg 6dnelets with ham and
Cuban toast to pancakes.
"If you have something in mind
that you want, just ask, "Tico says.
"I'm pretty sure we have it."
Servings are abundant, and
daily luncheon specials are


on these findings, the rural
schoolhouse may even qualify
for inclusion in the National Reg-
ister of Historic Places.
Arrangements were made to
relocate the schoolhouse to
another parcel of District land-
the nearby historic Edna Pearce
Lockett Estate, former home-
stead of a.long-time ranching
family. By consolidating histori-
cal structures at this location,
the District can .efficiently man-
age their preservation. Eventual-
ly the buildings may be restored
and opened to the public-and
the entire riverfront estate used
as an educational or recreational
site.
"Moving the schoolhouse
was the right thing to do,"
Moore said. "We're protecting
this resource rather than allow-
ing it to be demolished. It has
historic value, and we recognize
that."
After the paperwork was in
place, the next step was to
secure the building and prepare
it for the precarious move. Fortu-
nately, it's a short trip. The
Pearce Lockett Estate is just
across US 98, less than half a
mile from where the school


Insects make up a significant
part of the hummingbird's diet,
which they often find inside
flowers but just as often they
snatch them in flight.
Of all the flowers that hum-
mers favor, we've not seen any
with more attraction for them
than scarlet-bush, hamelia erec-
ta. Only this year have we dis-
covered the joy and beauty of
this bush-like tree as a growing
magnet for these little gem-like
birds.
Made up of clusters of
sparkling scarlett tubular flow-
ers literally all over the plant
from the ground up, these little
birds appear at first light and
come off and on the day long up
until and including last light,
often coming in groups of three
and four.. Our plant is from eight
to 10-feet tall and just as wide
and we have to keep some of the
bows tied up and away from the
path around the rose garden. In
going to and from, the hummers
visit the roses now and then and
potted impatiens on our various
porches. But without fail, it's the
scarlet-bush they love best.
In years .gone by, we've
always hung the hummingbird
feeder in early February and we
did so again this year. However,
in porch sitting we began to


planned for the summer, Deliveries
to businesses can be arranged by
phoning (863) 946-3500, with a
minimum order of $10. Tico's also
offers catering for meetings and
other special events.

"We're happy to be of service to
the community," Tico, who hopes
to open a chain of restaurants
around the state, says.


stood for almost a century. Also
near the school were two out-
houses, found tipped over in the
woods. These were deemed
quaint but not genuinely historic
and so would not be making the
trip.
The building was in capable
hands for the move. Brownie
Moving has something of leg-
endary reputation for transport-
ing big buildings in the region,
having moved everything from
old houses down city streets to
historic Palm Beach mansions
down the Intracoastal Water-
way.
In early November, the
movers arrived with their heavy
equipment: hydraulic lifts, trac-
tors, winches, and I-beams.
They secured the beams under
the schoolhouse and raised it off
the foundation pilings. Then
they literally slid the building
slowly across the field toward
US 98. Thanks to a work crew
from the Okeechobee Correc-
tional Institution, a wide swath
of vegetation was cleared to
smooth the way. At roadside, a
big diesel truck slowly pulled the
school, now mounted on a trail-
er, onto the blacktop. Traveling


notice right away that the feeder
hung at the south end of the
porch was being by-passed for
the scarlet-bush growing at the
north end. We took the feeder
down. Now the hummers con-
gregate entirely at the north end
where we see them all.day long
and listen to their humming.
It just may be that we have
the biggest hummer feeder in
these parts that doesn't ever
need re-filling! Hamelia reseeds
itself abundantly all year -
don't know how many seedlings
we've given away, which grow
large enough to bloom ,in a few
months. By the way, ours has
.never been fed nor watered. And
it takes to being pruned or cut
back just fine. It simply gets busy
and puts out new laterals that in
turn bloom in a short time. I sus-
pect that this plant will root
readily, but I must confess to
never trying to, and probably
won't since it re-seeds so fast.
And another plus for the scar-
let-bush: Those floating brilliant
jeivels of the sky, the butterflies
simply never leave. I sometimes
wonder whether it's the hum-
mers or the butterflies that have
the greatest love affair going for
hamelia erecta.
To A Hummingbird
Up from a silent, secret place


Shooting
Continued From Page 1
Osceola's and had been present
at the time of the shooting,
according to Sgt. Pepitone. She is
being detained in Glades County
Jail.
When asked if any of those
involved had been under the


at about 3 mph, the Ft. Basinger
schoolhouse eased on down the
road, attentive movers walking
alongside to watch for trouble.
The school was taken flaw-
lessly to a shady part of the Lock-
ett Estate grounds, not far from
the ranch house and barns, a
small family cemetery and the
Kissimmee River. It rests tem-
porarily on 1-beams while new
foundation pilings are prepared.
Then it will be. sealed up and
properly "mothballed," as
preservation experts recom-
mend, until decisions are made
about restoration.
Although the Lockett Estate
lost a few big trees in the hurri-
canes, this site is still a shady
one. And it's not so far from the
road that passersby can't see the
newly-placed schoolhouse. In
fact, if they slow on the curve of
US 98 next to the river in High-
lands County and look to the
south, the schoolhouse is' in
view under the spreading oaks.
It's a peek into Florida's history,
brought carefully into the pres-
ent by those who recognize that
inevitable 'change can some-
times provide opportunities to
preserve something of the past.


Hummingbird whirrs his
wings
into the innocence of June...
Then through the blue of
Summer
he quickly darts his steadfast
way
to higher planes...while I,
still on the ground, send up
my soul
to rise with him in cloudless
skies -
to seek his gentle ways above
the
hurt of my own shame to me
and mine...
(as he would not to his own
kind).
He charts his course from
flower to flower,
from.light of sun to night of
moon ~
one fragrance faithful to
another.
However elusive, however
fleeting,
he spreads his strength of
being
to us below.
A glimpse of glory, a touch of
joy...
Up from his silent, secret
place
Hummer flies again with
grace.


influence of drugs or alcohol,
Detective Van Houten stated that
nothing would be released pend-
ing toxicology laboratory reports
from the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement.
The Glades County Sheriff's
Office classified the investigation
as ongoing, and would release
further information when it
becomes available.


Storms
Continued From Page 1
plants versus exotics, think about
this: Natives were present in Flori-
da long before Christopher
Columbus discovered America.
Exotics are those plants, which
have been introduced into Florida
.since 1492.
This book is a treasure trove of
dependable information, guide-
lines that will not
necessarily prevent damage to
your plants, trees and gardens,
but most certainly will help mini-
mize damage and guide you
through recovery.
The author of "Stormscaping"


is not only personally experienced
in landscaping and gardens in
general, but she has also earned
highly important credits such as a
BA from Vanderbilt University and
a Masters Degree in Landscape
Architecture from Florida Interna-
tional University.
This is her third book follow-
ing the publication of "Easy Gar-
dens for South Florida" and "Best
Garden Color For Florida."
For detailed information about
Pamela Crawford's 168-page
book that's in full color through-
out, telephone, write,, or e-mail
Barbara Oehlbeck, 25075 Grassy
Run-Muse, LaBelle, Fl. 33935.
Telephone/fax same number:
863-675-2771,
e-mail: doco@strato.net.


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BEDROOM DINING ROOM
SUITES SUITES


LIVINGROOM 0 I ODDS
SUITES 8 ENDs





E


Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


David Meeks
Belle Glade I










Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


J I


_-1Ji -1


This is a special announcement to area residents! This is your

chance to go straight to the wholesaler! You will not pay retail!

Cars starting as low as $2,995!



Fleet Liquidators One of the nation's largest automobile whole-

salers, is announcing a one of a kind event being held at

Clewiston Old Kmart Parking Lot in Clewiston FL.



Due to our overwhelming success, major corporations all over

the country contract Fleet Liquidators to liquidate their excess

inventory. Due to the downward trend of travel, 2 major car com-

panies have excessive inventory that must be sold! Fleet

Liquidators has been ordered to conduct a final close-out of mil-

lions of dollars worth of inventory- Regardless of Loss of Profit!




#3B TERM CENTRIX NRSCRR NEXTEL CUP


SERIES CRR WILL BE RT THIS EVENT


WEDNESDAY' *Am *

JUNE 15ME

10.AM 7 PM


FRIDAY

JUNE 17m.

10 AM 7 PM


QAWLY* LOC47I A41:1


955 WEST SUGARLAND HWYk CL mT L ..


THE OLD K-MART PAIRKNO T







www.gladesmotors.com Toll Free Hotline: 1(800)579-0


1 O0 vehicles


Over


CENTURY
LESABRE
ASTRO
IMPALA
MALIBU
PRIZM
SILVERADO 1500
CARAVAN
CONCORDE LX
PT CRUISER
DURANGO
DURANGO
NEON
ESS0 XLT
ECONOLINE E1 SO
ECONOLINE E350
ESCAPE
ESCAPE
ESCAPE
EXCURSION
EXCURSION
EXCURSION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPL SPORT TRAC
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPRDITION 4X2
FISO


F10S





F150
F2SO
F250
P250
F250
F250
F2S0
F250
F250
F2SO
F250
P25


BUICK 01
BUICK 91
CHEVROLET 98
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 02
CHEVROLET 01
CHEVROLET 02
CHRYSLER 01
CHRYSLER 01
CHRYSLER 02
DODGE 03
DODGE 02
DODGE 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD OS
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 97
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 92
FORD 93
FORD 03
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 01
FORD 01
FORD 00
FORD 03
FORD 99
FORD 01
FORD 01
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 04,
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 03


m st,


250


BLUE
BLACK
SILVER
BLUE
WHITE

BLUE
GRAY
BLUE
RED
WHITE
WHITE
TAN
SILVER
GREEN
BLACK
WHITE



BLUE

WHITE
BLACK
GOLD
RED
BLUE
RED
WHITE
GREY

GOLD
WHITE
BLACK
WHITE
BLACK
WHITE



GREEN
GRAY
WHITE
WHITE
BLACK



BLUE
BLACK

WHITE
WHITE
BROWN
WHITE
RED


vehi


FORD 04
FORD 01
FORD 04
FORD 93
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 05
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 96
FORD 03
FORD 96
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 00
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 01
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD OS
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD OS
FORD OS
FORD 0S
FORD 0O
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 99
FORD 98
GMC 93
GMC 00
HONDA 99
HONDA 98
HONDA 01
HONDA '98
HONDA 02
HYUNDAI04
HYUNDAIO3
HYUNDAI04


be sold. during


tcles to choose


F250
F250 EXT LARIAT
P350
FSSO
F350
F350
P3so
F-3S0
F-450
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
FOCUS
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
RANGER
RANGER
RANGER
RANGER
RANGER
SPORTTRACK
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS /
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS MERLOT
TAURUS
TAURUS
WINDSTAR
WINDSTAR
SUBURBAN 2500
YUKON
ACCORD
CIVIC
CIVIC
CIVIC
CIVIC
ELANTRA
TIBURON GT
XG350


WHITE
RED


BLACK
SILVER
BLUE
BLACK
WHITE
GREY
WHITE
SILVER
WHITE
SILVER
WHITE
RED
SILVER
RED


GREY




BLUE
RED
WHITE
SILVER



GOLD
BLUE
CHAMP
SILVER
WHITE
GRAY
BEIGE
BEIGE
GOLD
SILVER
BEIGE

GOLD
GOLD



WHITE
GOLD


GREEN
BLACK
WHITE
RED


INFINITI 01
JEEP 02
JEEP 99
KIA 01
LINCOLN 04
LINCOLN 99
LINCOLN 01
LINCOLN 02
LINCOLN 03
LINCOLN 02
LINCOLN 97
LINCOLN 03
LINCOLN 04
LINCOLN 03
LINCOLN 95
LINCOLN 01
LINCOLN 96
LINCOLN 03
MAZDA 02
MAZDA 02
MAZDA 01
MERCURY 02
MERCURY 03
MERCURY 02
MERCURY 03
MERCURY 04
MERCURY 04
MERCURY 99
MERCURY 03
MERCURY 03
MERCURY 97
MERCURY 01
MITSUBISHI 03
MITSUBISHI 01
NAVISTAR INTL T 02
NISSAN 02
NISSAN 00
NISSAN 89
NISSAN 00
NISSAN 01
NISSAN 03
OLDSMOBILE 00
PLYMOUTH 87
PLYMOUTH 00
PONTIAC 02
PONTIAC 03
PONTIAC 01
SATURN 96
SUZUKI 03
TOYOTA 0t
TOYOTA 00
TOYOTA 03
TOYOTA 04
TOYOTA 00
TOYOTA 01
VOLKSWAGEN 01


Sent


G20 GOLD
CHEROKEE GRAY
GRAND CHEROKEE
SPORTAGE GRAY
AVIATOR
CONTINENTAL GRAY
CONTINENTAL WHITE
LS WHITE
LS SILVER
LS SILVER
MARK VIII GREEN
NAVIGATOR MAROON
NAVIGATOR
NAVIGATOR 4X4 SILVER
TOWN CAR BEIGE
TOWN CAR GREEN
TOWN CAR WHITE
TOWNCAR
MAZDA MPV ES SILVER
MELLENIUM
MPV
GRAND MARQUIS
MOUNTAINEER WHITE
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER GREEN
MYSTIQUE
SABLE WHITE
SABLE WHITE
TRACER WHtTE
VILLAGER WHITE
GALANT BLACK
MONTERO
WHITE
ALTIMA
ALTIMA GLE
MAXIMA
PATHFINDER RED
PATHFINDER WHffTE
SENTRA GXE BLUE
ALERO GLS BLACK
RELIANT
VOYAGER SE FWD ./GREEN
FIREBIRD SiLVER
GRAND PRIX GREY
GRAND PRCIX GREEN
SC WHITE
AERIO BLACK
RUNNER SILVER
CAMRY LE BLUE
HIGHLANDER LTBLUE
RAV4
SIENNA BLUE
SOLAR SILVER
PASSAT WHITE


Down payments may vary for lender approval or including buy here, pay here. Limited quanity first come first served, With approved credit. Cehicle purchased, credit history and term determines down pay-
ment needed to reach $89 per month for first 3 months. Vehicles subject to prior sale. With beacon score of 750 or greater and monthly car noted may not exceed 15% of gross monthly Income, 24 months
max term on select vehicles. All offers cannot be combined. All financed sales and leases subject to final lender approval


this

from


'IRL FINNO MCE



T CRR LIQUIon


SATURDAY

JUNE 18TH

10 A
a -,M,,*,17 PK
IEL:]


^BB









Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Senior happenings


Volunteer training
and opportunities
Faith in Action new volunteer
orientation will take place in
LaBelle June 28 at 2 p.m., and in
Clewiston at the Clewiston
Senior Center June 30 at 2 p.m.
Bring a friend. Faith in Action
program in Clewiston is still col-
lecting blankets to equip the Per-
sons with Special Needs Shelter
at John Boy auditorium. To help,
bring a new twin-sized blanket
to our Clewiston Senior Center
next to the. auditorium between
8-5, M-F. Call Liz at (863) 983-
7088 for more information.

Flea market
The next Trash and Treasures
Flea Market will take place June


24, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
L.J. Nobles Senior Center in
Labelle. For more information or
to make a donation, call (863)
675-1446. All proceeds to benefit
the Faith in Action in Labelle
program.

Upcoming meetings
and events
Family Caregiver Support
Groups in June will feature the
new Social Security Medication
Program information. Join us to
learn about the new medication
program and get assistance fill-
ing out the paperwork properly.
The next meeting will take place
in Labelle June 15, at 4 p.m. at
the L.J. Nobles Senior Center,
(863) 675-1446; in Cle iston


June 22, at 4 p.m. at the Clewis-
ton Senior Center, (863) 983-
7088; in Moore Haven June 29 at
4 p.m. at the Moore Haven
Senior Center, (863) 946-1821.

Exercise classes
Exercise classes are every M-
W-F at LJ Nobles Senior Center
from 9-10 a.m. All are welcome.

Free services
to help elders
Insurance counseling with a
trained SHINE (Seniors Helping
with Insurance Needs of Elders)
counselor is available every
Wednesday morning free of
charge at Nobles Center and in
Moore Haven at Senior Connec-
tions offices.

Legal help
Legal help from Florida Rural


Legal Services is available at the
Nobles Senior Center in LaBelle
on the second Wednesday of
each month from 9:30-11:30
a.m. (Must call 675-1446 to
make appointment)

Post disaster
help for older adults
Disaster funds are still avail-
able to help older adults living in
Hendry and Glades Counties
who continue to need assistance
with such issues as roof repair,
debris removal, insurance
deductibles, appliance repair or
replacement, chore work, etc.
Elders in need of help due to the
hurricanes of last summer can
speak with a specially trained
outreach worker in Clewiston
on Monday and Tuesdays, (983-
7088) and LaBelle Wednesday
through Friday (675-1446.)


Beat the rush for required immunizations


TALLAHASSEE Officials
for the Florida Department of
Health urged parents to make
sure their children receive the
required immunizations before
the next academic school year.
Immunizations are vital to the
health and welfare of all Floridi-
ans especially children.
"Our children's health should
be our number one priority,"
said DOH Secretary John 0.
Agwunobi, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H.
"Ensuring your child's health
through proper immunizations,
is the best start you can give him
or her for a successful school
year."
Before children can register


for school, parents must provide
documentation (Department of
Health Form 680, Certification of
Immunization) showing proof
of vaccination against diphthe-
ria, tetanus, pertussis, measles,
mumps, rubella, varicella
(chickenpox), hepatitis B, and
polio diseases.
Florida's effort to increase the
number of fully immunized chil-
dren continues to show positive
results. The recent goal of
immunizing 85 percent of two-
year old children this year was
exceeded, and new goals are
being established.
State officials point to Florida
SHOTS (State Health Online


Tracking System), the statewide
immunization registry, as a valu-
able tool in helping the state
reach immunization goals. The
mission of Florida SHOTS is to
develop public and private part-
nerships between health care
providers to share electronic
immunization data. This infor-
mation will be used as a tool to
increase and maintain child-
hood immunization levels, and
to help eliminate vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases.
Not only does Florida SHOTS
house immunization data,, it also
helps health care providers iden-
tify children who are due or past
due for vaccinations, and facili-


states providers quick access
to a child's vaccination history to
determine the vaccines needed
on a particular visit.
For more information on all
back-to-school immunization
requirements, visit the Depart-
ment of Health's Web site at
www.doh.state.fl.us, and click
the immunization services link.
For additional information on
how to obtain required vaccina-
tions, contact your health care
provider or your local health
department. For more informa-
tion on Florida SHOTS, visit
www.flshots.com.


Senator Bullard's


staff to meet with


area constituents

Legislative session and future

economic development on agenda


Miami Senator Larcenia
J. Bullard (Dem.), District 39
will have staff in attendance at
the Belle Glade City Hall Com-
mission Chambers Monday,
June 13, at 5:30 p.m. for a post
2005 legislative session town
meeting. The senator's staff
will discuss highlights of the
recently completed legislative
session that affect Belle Glade,
South Bay and Pahokee.
Additionally, the kri-Cities
Area has been designated a
rural area of economic con-
cern by Governor Jeb Bush.
This designation makes avail-
able funds, through the Rural
Economic Development Initia-
tive (REDI). Invited to partici-


pate in a discussion of the
areas future and how residents
can benefit are Mary Helen
Blakeslee, executive director
of REDI; Maurice Brazier of the
Small Business Association,
and Ted Kramer of the Small
Business Developmrent Center
of Florida Atlantic University's
(FAU) School of Business. The
city hall is located at 110 Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.,
West Belle Glade, FL. Resi-
dents of South Bay, Pahokee,
Belle Glade and neighboring
areas are welcome to attend.
You may contact the office of
Senator Bullard at (305) 668-
7344 for additional infornia-
tion.


CCCS provides the keys to home ownership


WEST PALM BEACH -
Home is where the heart is, and
the path to home ownership
should include realistic goals,
sound advice, careful planning,
and a clear understanding of the
costs involved. The time you
spend preparing for home own-
ership is as important an invest-
ment as the home you purchase,
and will help ensure that you
make the best choices for you
and your family.
To help you on your path,
Consumer Credit Counseling
Service of Palm Beach County &
the Treasure Coast is offering
free workshops for prospective
homeowners. During the six-
hour workshop, you will assess
your readiness for homeowner-
ship, take a realistic view of the
costs involved in purchasing and
maintaining a home and evalu-
ate your credit and financial situ-
ation to determine how much
house you can really afford.
You will also learn about the
various mortgage options and
what to look for in a lender, and
explore the tremendous benefits
of home ownership, from stabi-
lized housing costs and appreci-
ation to the many tax benefits.
Workshops scheduled
through September include:
June 29 and 30: 6-9 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)


July 16: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Com-
munity Foundation (700 S. Dixie
Hwy., WPB)
July 25 and 26: 6-9 p.m. Boyn-
ton Beach Community Dev.
Corp. (2191 North Seacrest, BB)
August 20:' 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)
September 10: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)
September 24: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB) IN SPAN-
ISH. -,
To register, call (866) 616-
3720. En espa-ol, (866) 616-
3719. 1
CCCS also offers free individ-
ual housing counseling sessions
by appointment; call (800) 330-
CCCS (2227).

About CCCS
Since 1975, families have
turned to Consumer Credit
Counseling Service (CCCS) of
Palm Beach County & the Trea-
sure Coast for help with money
problems. CCCS is a nonprofit,
community service agency dedi-
cated to empowering con-
sumers to achieve a lifetime of
economic freedom. A United
Way partner, CCCS provides
free, confidential budget coun-
seling, community and personal
money management education,


debt management programs,
and comprehensive housing
counseling.
CCCS is accredited by the
Council on Accreditation of Ser-
vices for Families and Children
and is a member of the Better
Business Bureau and the Nation-
al Foundation for Credit Coun-
seling (NFCC). Governed by a
community-based board of
directors, CCCS is funded by
creditors, clients, contributors
and grants from foundations,
business and government agen-
cies. Service is available in Eng-
lish, and Spanish. CCCS has
offices in West Palm Beach and
Boca Raton, with satellite serv-


ice in Stuart and Port St. Lucie,
and offers around the-clock help
by phone at (800) 330-CCCS or
at www.cccsinc.org.

CCCS of Palm Beach County
& the Treasure Coast is a mem-
ber of the CredAbility Network, a
family of agencies serving con-
sumers in south Florida, north
Georgia, middle Mississippi and
east Tennessee. Florida head-
quarters is in the Community
Foundation Building in West
Palm Beach. Please contact us
any time our virtual office is
always open at
www.cccsinc.org or (800)' 330-
CCCS.


Build your dream home on this prime location in LaBelle. .50+/-
acre on CR 78 across from waterfront park and the
Caloosahatchee River. $155,000.
Call 863-517-0977


Farm Bureau, Tobacco


Growers Association offer

seminar on buyout options


Florida Farm Bureau Federa-
tion is partnering with the Flori-
da Farm Bureau Insurance com-
panies, the Florida Tobacco
Growers Association and Farm
Bureau Bank to inform tobacco
growers and quota holders
about buyout options at a semi-
nar Thursday, June 23. The semi-
nar will begin at 6 p.m. at
Cheryl's Restaurant in Live Oak.
"Florida Farm Bureau is
proud of its role in achieving a
tobacco quota buyout," said
Kevin Morgan, director of the
Agricultural Policy Division.
"The buyout is now a reality and
will benefit our growers and the
communities where they live
and work."
Now that the buyout is a reali-
ty, Florida Farm Bureau is con-
centrating on providing growers
and quota owners with informa-
tion about options that will max-
imize profitability and minimize
tax burdens. At the June 23 sem-
inar, Larry Lanie, president of
Farm Bureau Bank, will discuss
options, including lump-sum.
settlements.
The financial service is being
made available to all tobacco
growers and allotment holders.
The Farm Bureau Bank settle-
ment plan will allow buyout
recipients to be paid for the full
amount of their buyout. pro-
ceeds through a single transac-
tion, less the cost to the bank of
financing the upfront payment.
Also at the seminar, a tax spe-
cialist will be available to answer
questions.
There is no registration
charge for the seminar, but reg-


istration is required by June 10.
Seating is limited. To register,
growers and quota holders
should contact Patti Brothers at
(352) 374-1544. Each registrant
should provide his/her, name,
mailing address, phone and e-
mail address if available, and
indicate the total number of indi-
viduals attending from his/her
operation.
Farm Bureau is offering the
financial settlement through
Farm Bureau Bank as a service
to tobacco growers and allot-
ment holders. The Florida Farm
Bureau Federation will not
receive any compensation from
the plan.
"We are working to ensure
that, as a result of competition in
the marketplace, farmers will
receive the highest return possi-
ble for their buyout payments,"
Morgan said.
The Florida Farm Bureau Fed-
eration is the state's largest gen-
eral-interest agricultural associa-
tion with more than 150,000
member-families statewide.
There are Farm Bureaus repre-
senting 64 counties in Florida,
where agriculture comprises a
stable, vital leg of Florida's econ-
omy, rivaling the tourism indus-
try in economic importance.
Headquartered in Gainesville,
the Federation is an independ-
ent, non-profit agricultural
organization and is not associat-
ed with any arm of the govern-
ment. More information about
Florida Farm Bureau is available
on the organization's Web site,
http://FloridaFarmBureau.org.


Call anytime to anywhere in the nation.


Other monthly charges apply.


4Spiinis


When you subscribe to a qualifying Sprint SolutionssM Standard plan, you can call
your friends and family just because. In the middle of the day. A weekday. Talk
about everything. Talk about nothing. With Sprint, you get unlimited nationwide
long distance. Even to Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam and the US Virgin Islands.
A clear, reliable connection. An affordable price. From a company you can trust.




Call 1-877-Sprint-2. Click sprint.com/Iocal.


**Price excludes taxes and surcharges (including a carrier universal service charge of 11.1%, which may vary by month, carrier-cost-recovery surcharge of $0.99 and certain in-state surcharges).
Surcharges are not taxes or government-required charges. Offer: Must subscribe to a Sprint Solutionss" Standard plan. If Sprint Solutions Standard plan is cancelled, the standard monthly fee for
unlimited long distance will apply and varies by state. Offer subject to change or cancel without notice. Additional restrictions may apply. Unlimited Nationwide Long Distance: For residential
voice service usage only. State-to-state and international long-distance services are governed by Sprint Terms & Conditions of Service. Local and in-state long-distance (including local toll) services
are governed by the applicable state tariffs and/or state terms and conditions of service. Monthly fee does not include usage for Directory Assistance, foncard" service or operator services. Service
not intended for commercial use, Internet, data or facsimile service. If Sprint determines that usage is not consistent with residential voice conversation, the service may be assessed a data usage
fee or disconnected. US residents only. Dial-1 service only. Calls to 900, 986, 555 and 700 NPAs are not considered unlimited interstate and intrastate Dial-1 calling. Monthly fee includes one phone
line. Customer's first invoice will include a partial monthly fee and the first month billed in advance. International rates vary, and surcharges may apply, including surcharges on residential calls made to
foreign mobile phones. Call 1-888-255-2099 for international rates. Additional in-state and universal service charges will apply. Operator-assisted calls and toll-free/calling card calls made from pay
phones in the US will be assessed a surcharge. All rates subject to change. Additional requirements and restrictions may apply. Some services included in previous calling plans may not be included
when converting to new unlimited long-distance plan. Contact Sprint for details. 2005 Sprint. All rights reserved. Sprint and the diamond logo are trademarks of Sprint Communications Company L.P.


BEAUTIFUL RIVERVIEW HOMESITE


I -m 1 _WV-IWMM


Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


At I










r ne238 N. Bridge St. LaBelle, FL 33935

863-675-8868
Lisa Andrews Lic. Real Estate Broker
Associates: Rose Mason, Dwight Hatfield,
Sandra Alexander, James Tanner, Roxana
Sf.4J w0 ~Cisneros, Linda Dekie Davis Kevin NeLson
ReA!lMt Grour Isc. www.southwestfloridarealtvyroup.com


Place your Call A Pro

today for only

$10 per week!

Call Lauren or Melissa at

863-983-9148, 863-946-

0511 or 561-996-4404


NO ONE WILL WORK HARDER FOR YOU THEN
JAMIE NAVARRO GIVE HIM A CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
REALTY) C. BAGANS FIRST
\WOR LD. 30 Colorado Rd. Lehigh Acres, FL 33936


I'VE SOLD ALL MY

LISTINGS FAST!

LET ME SELL

YOURS FAST TOO!
IIB


VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWVW.OAKREALTYINC.COM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS SALES
U UC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
AND TIM SPENCER
675-0500


]REALTY
NEW LOCATION!I
S233 N. BRIDGE ST
ON THE CORNER OF
ML] NB. BRIDGE ST&
Is 'N on* WASHINGTON

lARI GE; I ',i I '..iii i, 800SSOOA. ACR.GE i;roRs.u.E
NO P1IS A MUST SEEi This 4l'd:2Bah inanufaC-
H,[ '(it Sliu 'S" 1ured home with carport on 3+-- acres,
.N'E I ISTING IN PIOR1I ABIiL.LI This Includes firtplace, breakfast nook, retreat off
ii.'dr)m.'ih'! (Car 'l r'. hlor,' 1 sits on a m.st.r bedroom, front and back porch,
uin a ,uiap'i. .d; re loti ider -h Property also has 2100 sq. ii barn. Calf roday
pristigloous oask A, Lalki 'iintm b wedl main- for r ppn~tIrenr ..'ole 329,900.
taicnl witi .iupJ-i ,;'pl skiing IN i 'I [I til IIR\1100,\ O IANE 101
$13500. Acres *!+ witl.h wood frame house. Being sold
3BEDIROON21BATH/I "A CR G ARGE sits Is" Cali lbr iTh r devils.
on a h'iltlfl, corlcr I! lu it'i ll tit s .L 1 a.1id aista hktk,I ,,, kao11 ,>. I l II c urs [ ( R, l l ? R l. .* nod
lonli halus Ltge kitch.n ,V. : 1 b'.r.il.st nok. .1 ,, .1ttfy I 1- l. 00.
andm srccncld l.aii m ,.\kia $189,9 1,0. 1,TS FOR SAI.
lt'21h'l'lt cal'.i i( s!,'E t,"( 'n iBUSINIHSS l.OIIolln rdson Aveiue wilh old
S :. i .a.r h i blk ling Uld "Ags Ids" I '., 1 41 .011
.1 "asis;" R .h.ni',il niiiui I.OTS AVAIIABLE I1 I1l1lll \\6 DS
I I I I l II ll i _. ..,i i, i] .h .it 1 1 "' !.. ... .. 2 'i L O,
.i *,'I i I ,r. iIl ( \1 I ti \ I I-.T1 1 \\t IIABI-E LOTS
I- I. iu ,. l.r l i'il i\ kI't k l .\ 1.0 1 11
ill I [ ,i\i 11 0 I *l l 1 1 r i i '. ,i I 'll I' I -' ', ii i lI C o rti Asking
,.I, I i / l u., ,11 .., I lu l


MOBLE HOMES:
* "CSSto t 1iR0 ir C
* $249,000 Bi-A ''orbmr exotic animal home,
* l1',).'lI 21 1)/IRlBA m iK, ho1 e O1. 5
* $160,000 l I :'. '.. .I i. '. .
a1.o : wis hardn lilb. p;iBirl. formal diiing can ard
owa ,in i i..


hm" ti ra. Di .' I't 6 h
S$119,900 "i5is 31) 21A u01nta0d home fna-
$?1 1, 0 I, i. r. iU h. *i :.l! .I
Iisslt l.IMwil ",+i-





* $1025 clud.ts of tre
"m !v,'i'miwnewill "i 5+d-


* $998,025 Warchousc & ofict on 1t38+,- acre,
One iof a kind Anmo Salvagc yami. Organized with ckan
fbill o' he'alt.
S$668,500 I- iw 27 foniagv. tCurrentKy an Auto
Salvage ani. .
* 1i1t0 I. I u, 1c i ', ji, ,f IL 1' 21 e il i' s
aw'r ptarxxs an Bee 5TBrAn,, lots oftmtaXs! DuOWt miss


SE HAI1IAEsM-OL


OUt3l NSi UlqUC 1111)1 f crragr
M ON -119,00- 121.+1' 11.01111111..I MATt ft'aiur S laS 0

*$551000 1-ll0+J .102 55 (k11IN1Ofl 11155 I'ijd


$38,M0-0 2+ jaiT WAoelI ,Lfn daiI
ar in.Aon ttli!'n aFecs

*$33.

*$72,900 wulletundiIi ,in (mobrinl~ar LI 1011 1 .111
fliisfiR oaks"
- $55,90MOMESNWRROT
1$30,000-.25, .111 i




Lilit, spit,0 14iAe
i ANO. !.4 v A~


-i_ r, I' Home

Builders

Port LaBelle
Exciting New Plans
Homes from Mid $100S
Spec Homes Available Now















Lots Available, Seller Financing
Visit Our Model Center
2480 East State Road 80
863/612-0551
www.chlhomebuilders.com.


* This 3BR.'B manufactured home is in pris-
tine conditikoi You will al in sovw! with this
home the minimte you step foot on this oak
filled property Call lor a private showing
today befo it's too late Only $132,500.


* Solace at last.3gBR/2B home in LaBcliN.
" *i iI ,' i t ,' r'l.'i ,.1. i rI,. .'I1 en o r
i. i, '. iiU1i N ER OMTlnr cabi-
nets Outside is a spacious screened xrch,
fenced hack yard & above girond pool.
RtE['UC,) $195,900.
* r31',2 li r i u'es split
floor p1nb.at of paint.
$149,900r y m,
* IWhat a deal" l!3IR1.5 CBS home in LalleIle
onlyminutesf i* 'p1:" 1 I t.* < in, !;nl
new ceramic [il> h '1' i','i. Mi lI I 11 n,. n1
Only $147,900.
* Ciomlv country' 1" .' in this wonderfully
renovatted clhrmer I' 2B1VIB old Florida
crack or hoin in Oronaitsoi n .77''/-acres and
is inm Pistin condition. Truly ai must see!
$144,900.
2 bedroom htme in th Belminont Suixixvision
with 2 full b.ki.hs & 2 hall balths. This hoimc
a!si cmgfilElHl a ltlt 'cabin ets.
brceailast tr. septaite htving room and family
room. Noi to big and nor to small This one has
it all for only $129,900


*Gulf 2aMcl 11s1l' ijr% dock! is 0i
boating& water sports right out your door!1

P!wI.I n.1I1 Imuiv~f~, '[%,-I I R'n
a~ 0.1 i cI',*'..Ihji nj, i*.t ir ..4"Pr14.900 ,
*,I P 'BIT, ~JRL LI iFInprnlV-II j rrlilt14'
a~ttcSW g t,r itOLI!dbut OlnlyrminultCS
from tow Ii $W,011 I
a This 3BR12B ma'nufactua'ed horm. is-in pris,
tner condition! You will Al 1in lo"'t with this
homne the Itlinute you step foot on this oak
Nr led j'rwirtv Call 'or a piviatt showing
iJ.1, lI''rL IL -VW"I.ILt'I' nP S132.500,
0 %\Il 11111 JOUNORL I.'kI, .inion 38i
A.1. I F ItL-Li ,'j l.iIIL suI xI l ''d p-.d. ht'rst'
0 ;Ilk 21. ITIjOIILurc.I lh-'n!Lon 4i- aLrt%

01 I,'a e iiI.' I .'lIJ,1 it siiik i
gp'IiI likkto 10 jrt is 01(11 thisA l; l r iD 1.0
boin IIIA .ir tv'n4 'In l'x .E uular 2aj or

r ri W l ,lrpi,10ltd
$97,900.
0 OWN'21 .m.III'lt' td hoICI' l otiI.I111

ill IICI U~te& Ictedylilt) I~$U,51111.


* Partially cleared 5+,'- acres on Case Rd.
$224.900.
* Beautiful homesite partially cleared 5+*-
aii i, r ,r. i l,.i. i i22.4,00 n
*ll r, r, '.1. ,.tojt' 1 \Ia', don't ler this


ilTC gct al.kq .iALt On.1 !l' 3 II ''I .1L1 fI-)-01Y
S199.900
in Mont~-tur.Great for inVstetllet of honic'site.
Only $46,000,
o N 1.25+f, crv. Lotin Montura.
1 I25t,` UIJUfNEUGVNNST


* ,I 1; i .'*i :i. .tinerlot iindowntown
I IL i p' r rl Currentlyzoned for
Jup4k >r in. l nil '.' 'i li.'. 1
*I r1 r 1 I I pr uIi6bI0

* 2 LI hirgh A l. i I :,ndl f.l r d:p. I
;rnIcs5Tj'nt pI I. 'rip Onl %T6 000C o.A h
* 2 F.'AiLif-J! I0n1 t 102. 1i ] ".'-., .mi nI k
O nr, 'our i rr li t."' lhl, r U|i I'i ln.i 1- '.i1
-54,,900 th.
*Cein 1. I,r Im i ni l '1 1 T.Ir, ,,.,1. Ileautiful
lotfor m.'i'r,' h' 4 $ 4100
* Tripe kit in Unit 6. $49,900 each
* l'haik cr ioin Inii 9 $49.90i ca-h
*I L PI t8i lc in Port 1-fk ll. 49.900
* WI cat1
.47.i00 en n

* 1 a 1n suulr .iu
*t Li j I llri MBi




* I.18+k acres zoned C-1 commercial just
South of LaBelle city limits with 175+. f et of
frion[ag on 'R29 .mi: frontage on Luckey
tTr[ AsLn1 $4-IS0AN000


East Fort Myers!
Extraordinary 3 Bedroom/2 Bath custom
intracoaslal home located in a progres-
sive E. Ft Myers riverfront Community.
" ,' -' ..' ., 6 C


Lakjelront ana Woooc- ,'s.51 R~Aadwtlban10D'T~ 1. In LaBelle's Only Gated COTM~unity!
tcre omvlef I5 IocaednteIew a renwnew 11Sloei a~is n ez r pear -18 er O~ ce
Cae ommuinanty a oosa Preserve ae'11lIe.rdDie1Are
;;ei C-,C)QC) 2f5 a O 4 a520,O
"Ma I "'A


rI"R'A!Beautiful Ovemrli-d l'ome,.lrel LoElple Riv~-rfrorII Home
3R BABHOMOI an I1+1'aI- RI L',caea MCD~s~reOMMI). '4 Amm 3b IR~iI. j 65ddi Ll .1 3
~~~889C)C OC.(1 .a;1' 7 ..1 .


Thislto lPerfedfoiaGrwaljnFaimly dearfil PIver1i1, E ,1 ',"J0'n In Deed Restricted Area
269. .'0 -.1 ;3VI -3" L"' Alva RIVER/CREEKFRONT HOME!
ONE-OF-A-KINDI 3Bedroom / 2.
0 a [ 5Bathrooms / 3Garage Home Offered on
5+/- acres with 425' of riverfront.
C'OO 000




I
4,- -F- T
Ava ($12 90fSQ 3 38 Acre Business Lot Alva (S3 3,.Ci 24 00 Acre Business L:ot 1
Loled 2121 Palm BeaNh Bird Localed SR 80 & Joel Blvd
$ 1-,9 0 0 ,0 00. e'' : .-," '... ., .



BMAI SREETlBM^


Sherri Denning
Licensed-Real Estate Broker since 1985
Associates


21t




If you are thinking of buying or selling, give us a call! ML.I


I1


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursdav, June 16,2005


FmAlrUJRm-o Homml






Thursday, June 16, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


U',


Self defense against mosquitoes


Unless you just arrived from
another planet, you have proba-
bly noticed that summer rains
have begun to fill up our local
ditches canals and the chronic
wet spots in our Florida Yards.
Summertime has arrived, and
with it comes the "enjoyment" of
seeing and feeling the effects of
one of our unofficial state ani-
mals the mosquito.
Homeowners can play a role
in managing these pest popula-
tions, and today's column will
give you some tips on what you
can do in self-defense. Much of
this information comes to us from
Extension Specialist Dr. Roxanne
Rutledge of the University of Flori-
da's Medical Entomology Labora-
tory, which is located in Vero
Beach.
Dump Standing Water
Most but not all of our
pesky mosquitoes breed in
standing water. Even a small
amount of still water can provide
a place to a female mosquito to
lay a clutch of eggs and turn it
into a writhing mass of wrigglers.
Depending on the species, it may
only take a few days after a good
rainfall for the next generation to
emerge and look for bare flesh.
There are many water-holding
containers found in landscapes.
Can you get rid of them? Or, if you
do not want to remove them,
flush them out and replace the
water every 2-3 days. This will
remove mosquito larvae that are
in the container; larva will not
live long out of water and will not
develop to the adult stage.
Here is a short list assembled
by Osceola County Master Gard-
ner Nancy Pfister and some ides
on how to deal with breeding


Summer rains likely to continue, forecast says


GAINESVILLE Recent rains
came just in time for Southeast-
ern cotton and peanut crops,
and farmers can look forward to
adequate rainfall throughout the
summer.
That's the word from the
Southeast Climate Consortium,
or SECC, which issues quarterly
forecasts to help farmers in
Alabama, Florida and Georgia
manage their crops.
"We had a wet start earlier in
the spring, but May was dry in
some peanut and cotton areas,"
said Clyde Fraisse, an extension
specialist and SECC researcher
at the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences in Gainesville.
"Peanut and cotton fields
were showing stress that could
have retarded plant develop-
ment," Fraisse said.
The rest of the summer
should be hot, humid and hazy,
according to the SECC's summer
climate outlook, issued today.
"That's good news for agri-
culture throughout the South-
east," Fraisse said.
Florida State University's Cen-
ter for Ocean-Atmospheric Pre-
diction Studies, or COAPS, pro-


duces the SECC climate fore-
casts. At the Tallahassee center,
researchers monitor surface
water temperatures in the Pacific
Ocean near the equator to pre-
dict potential weather effects in
the Southeastern United States.
Periodic warming or cooling
in those surface temperatures,
known respectively as El Ni-o
and La Ni-a, can affect U.S.
weather patterns. El Ni-os are
associated with increased winter
rainfall, while La Ni-as have the
opposite effect.
Currently, Pacific Ocean sur-
face temperatures are near nor-
mal, asitplion cWerts call a
neutral phase, according to the
SECC. As with El Ninos and La
Ninas, neutral phases affect
global weather, including condi-
tions in the Southeast.
"For the past two years, the
Southeast has been in a neutral
phase," said COAPS Director Jim
O'Brien. "People often assume
that a neutral phase will bring
average weather."
But, O'Brien said, that's not
necessarily true.
"Weather can be all over the
place from dry to wet or aver-
age in a neutral phase. Still,


there's currently no indication of
drought this summer, so
chances are good that crops will
have adequate moisture," he
said.
Rainfall in Jackson County,
Fla., averages 4.5 inches in May
of neutral-phase years. This year,
cotton plots monitored by the
Jackson County Extension Ser-
vice received only 1.7 inches of
rain during May, but received 2.2
inches in the first week of June
alone.
The SECC forecast of typical
summer conditions should help
peanut farmers use their
resources effectively, said John
Beasley, a University of Georgia
extension agronomist in Tifton.
"They know if there is a high-
er probability of rainfall they can
irrigate less, which saves
money," Beasley said. "On the
other hand, it's important for
them to keep up their fungicide
applications, since most dis-
eases thrive in wet conditions.
"We were in a neutral phase
last summer as well," he said.
"Peanut and cotton growers did
very well, and they're hoping for
another good year."
The forecast also indicates lit-


tie chance of wildfires this sum-
mer, due to three factors -
recent heavy rains, the likelihood
of a wet summer and the end of
the Southeast's traditional wild-
fire season, which runs from
January through early June.
SECC's fall outlook, due in
early September, will indicate
whether the neutral phase is
continuing, said David Zierden,
an SECC researcher at the Talla-
hassee center.
The consortium's Web site,
http://agclimate.org, is available
to the public and provides
monthly forecasts of rainfall and
temperature for all counties in
Alabama, Florida and Georgia.
Member institutions of SECC
are the University of Florida,
Florida State University, Universi-
ty of Miami, University of Geor-
gia, Auburn University and Uni-
versity of Alabama at Huntsville.
SECC is funded by the Nation-
al Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, the USDA Coop-
erative States Research, Educa-
tion and Extension Service and
the USDA's Risk Management
Agency.


"Freddy" to help hone hurricane preparedness


While the South Florida
Water Management District is
done monitoring tropical storm
Arlene, the first named storm of
the 2005 hurricane season, it is
also getting ready to hold its
yearly hurricane exercise to test
the District's preparedness. Next
Wednesday, June 15, Hurricane
Freddy will "strike" the District
with full force.
The annual "Hurricane Fred-
dy" exercise is scheduled from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., when Dis-
trict officials will rehearse
response and recovery plans.
The exercise will encompass the
District's 16-county jurisdiction
involving participation from
regional service centers and field


operations. Other agencies rep-
resented include the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection and Florida Power
and Light Co.
While Freddy is only an inter-
nal exercise for training purpos-
es, the storm will be a realistic
test for water managers. It is
designed to test district staff to
resolve complex issues under
crises conditions with district
resources and capabilities
stretched to the limit. Also partic-
ipating will be some of the agen-
cies who partner with the Dis-
trict in a real emergency, such as
Florida Power and Light, the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers and the


Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection.
The South Florida Water Man-
agement District is a regional,
governmental agency that over-
sees the water resources in the
southern half of the state 16
counties from Orlando to the
Keys. It is the oldest and largest


of the state's five water manage-
ment districts. The agency mis-
sion is to manage and protect
water resources of the region by
balancing and improving water
quality, flood control, natural
systems and water supply. A key
initiative is cleanup and restora-
tion of the Everglades.


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mosquitoes:
Potted plants with pans -
Don't over water you plants, and
remove or turn the drip pan
upside down so it won't hold
water.
Drainage ditches Remove
vegetation and obstructions to
water flow mosquitoes don't
like moving water.
Low spots that hold water
- Fill and re-grade to move
standing water off your property.
Plugged roof gutters If they
haven't been blown away by the
storms, be sure to check them
and clean gutters clear of sticks,
leaves and other obstructions.
Pet dishes Change water
frequently.
e Trash piles Remove or
cover them, but be sure that cov-
ers don't hold water in small
pockets.
Old tires Remove, dispose
of or cover tires, which are one of
the best places to grow mosqui-
toes.
Water holding containers -
Remove or cover pails, barrels,
grills, or even some kinds of plas-
tic play ground equipment.
Poorly maintained pools or
spas Follow recommended
maintenance and keep up with
the pool chemical levels, which
kill mosquito larva.
Bromeliads Flush the hol-
low centers of these plants out
with a hose.
Tree holes Fill with sand
or concrete to keep water from
pooling inside or better yet,
remove these trees that will have
weakened trunks.
Debris on roofs Remove
debris; ripped and compromised
blue roof tarps can hold puddles


of water.
Ponds Keep them clear of
excessive aquatic vegetation, and
stock with minnows or tadpoles
to feed on the wrigglers.
Boats Cover or turn
upside down so the hulls don't
hold rainwater.
Birdbaths Flush at least
once per week.
If you must rely on chemical
control of breeding areas, or
insist on using pesticides to
reduce adult mosquitoes, please
check with us for the UF bulletin
on recommended, legal pesti-
cides.
Buying a Zapper?
Carefully evaluate the pur-
chase of mosquito control
devices. Dr. Rutledge has pio-
neered the evaluation of many of
the devices that are now on the
market to "eliminate" mosqui-
toes from your Florida Yard. Many
are not effective.
Some of these devices expel
carbon dioxide gas that attracts
these pests into a collection bag.
Research has not shown that they
actually eliminate local mosquito
populations. Other devices emit a
timed spray of insecticide. These
fail to consider differences in
mosquitoes and environmental
effects, and as a result will often
be too little, too late or kill a lot of
non-target organisms like birds,
pets and wildlife. They can also
lead to an increase pesticide
resistance among those mosqui-
toes that survive.
There are even devices being
sold that supposedly repel mos-
quitoes by emitting ultrasonic
waves. The Federal Trade Com-
mission has issued an order stop-
ping their sale because they sim-


Your LOCAL gateway

___- to the Internet


Red Larson named


Lancaster/Sunbelt Expo


Florida Farmer of the year


OKEECHOBEE Louis E.
(Red) Larson, of Okeechobee, is
the Lancaster/Sunbelt Expo Flori-
da Farmer of the Year and will rep-
resent Florida in the competition
that will name the Southeastern
Farmer of the Year. Larson owns
and operates a large dairy farm in
Okeechobee.
Larson and his family were
selected as Florida Farm Bureau's
first Farm Family of the Year in
1977. In 1979 he was elected to
the Dairy Hall of Fame and two
years later was inducted into the
Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame.
The FFA Foundation presented
Larson with its Distinguished Ser-
vice Award in 1990 and the Palm
Beach Post named him the Dairy-
man of the Century in 1999.
Larson was nominated for the
Farmer of the Year award by Flori-
da Farm Bureau Assistant Director
of Field Services Tom Hill.
"It has been my privilege to


bring recognition to people such
as Red, who have done an out-
standing job for Florida agricul-
ture," said Hill. "Florida will have
a very strong candidate in the
Southeastern competition."
Larson will receive a cash
award of $2,500 for winning the
Florida competition. The South-
eastern winner will be
announced on Oct. 18 at the Sun-
belt Agricultural Exposition in
Moultrie, Ga. and will receive a
$14,000 cash award. The state
and Southeastern winners will
also receive additional prizes
from participating sponsors.
Sunbelt Agricultural Exposi-
tion, "North America's Premier
Farm Show," will run from Oct.
18-20. The show emphasizes
information, education and
implementation of the latest agri-
cultural technology. Information
about Sunbelt is available online
at http://www.sunbeltexpo.com.


ply do not work to repel mosqui-
toes.
Got Mosquitoes? Get DEET!
If you can avoid exposing
yourself to mosquitoes, do so.
Limit your outdoor activities
around dusk and dawn, when
mosquitoes are most likely to be
active. If you must be outside,
wear light colored loose fitting
long pants and long sleeved
shirts, complete with hats, and
use an effective mosquito repel-
lent.
Repellants containing
"DEET", an abbreviation for the
chemical name of the active
ingredient, work the best when
properly applied. Other "natural"
repellants such as citronella,
eucalyptus or picaridin (i.e. Skin-
so-SoftTM) will work for 20 min-
utes or so; some forms of DEET
can last for upwards of five hours.
Knowing how to apply and reap-
ply these repellents can make all
the difference in the world. Ask
for the recently revised UF bul-
letin, Mosquito Repellants if you
want the details.
A great place for mosquito
information is Dr. Rutledge's Web
page; I've placed a link to it and
more information on our Okee-
chobee Web page, http://okee-
chobee.ifas.ufl.edu chobee.ifas.ufl.edu/> If you
need additional information on
homeowner mosquito control,
email us at
okeechobee@ifas.ufl.edu or call
us at (862) 763-6469. Local resi-
dents can stop by our office at
458 Hwy 98 North in Okee-
chobee, and visit our County
Master Gardeners from I to 5
p.m. on Tuesday afternoons.


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41 m A


60


Thursday, June 16,2005


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Five arrested in $2 million international seam


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist announced
the arrest of five individuals for their
involvement in an investment
scam that may have netted almost
$2 million from investors. The
defendants, who will be prosecut-
ed by the Attorney General's Office
of Statewide Prosecution, were
taken into custody on charges of
racketeering, conspiracy to com-
mit racketeering, 70 counts of
investment fraud, grand theft and
money laundering.
They are accused of operating
an investment scam that fraudu-
lently offered futures options on
the foreign exchange market but
never actually spent investors'
money for that purpose.
Victims of the scam would
receive unsolicited phone calls urg-
ing them to invest in futures
options on the foreign currency
exchange market. The victims
were promised lucrative returns on
their investments, and risk of loss


was minimized or glossed over by
the sellers. In addition, the callers
emphasized that time was of the
essence and the prospective
investors should immediately wire
money or send checks to a compa-
ny, which was actually operated by
those running the scam.
"Scams such as this one serve
to remind us that when something
seems too good to be true, it usual-
ly is," said Crist. "Investors should
always exercise the utmost caution
when choosing options that carry
such great financial weight,
because they can also carry great
financial risk."
Arrested were John Taddeo, 36,
of Lighthouse Point; Frank Desan-
tis, aka Josh Anthony, 38, of Light-
house Point; Erin Rose Desantis,
aka Erin Valko, 31, of Lighthouse
Point; Doreen Valko, 56, of
Coconut Creek, and Christopher
Boutchie, 36, of Coral Springs. The
Broward County Sheriff's
Office is still seeking Gavin Liv-


oti, 32, of Highland Beach, and
Daniel Ledoux, 40, of Richmond,
Virginia.
The five individuals were run-
ning the scam through a group of
four related companies: World
Banks Foreign Currency Traders,
Inc., International Investors Trad-
ing Group, Inc., and Compliance
and Customer Care, Inc., all based
in Florida, and International Invest-
ments Holding Corporation, an off-
shore company formed under
Bahamian laws. These companies
were established as part of the
criminal endeavor to defraud
investors.
Some of the victims did receive
transaction statements from
International Investments Hold-
ing Corporation informing them
about the "options" that had been
purchased in their name. However,
all of the victims eventually were
told that due to "unexpected mar-
ket conditions," they had lost all or
nearly all of their investment. The


losses typically ranged from $5,000
to $10,000, but in some cases were
much more. An investigation by
the Broward County Sheriff's
Office produced records that
revealed no money was trans-
ferred from the brokerage firms,
where the investors sent their
money, to the "clearing" bank,
where the purchases were sup-
posed to occur.
No options were purchased
and the money was going directly
to the defendants. Affidavits and
bank records were obtained show-
ing almost $2 million was sent to
the companies with little more
than $100,000 returned to
investors, a return of five cents on
the dollar.
If convicted of all charges, the
defendants could face maximum
prison terms ranging from 100 to
300 years, depending on each indi-
vidual's level of involvement in the
scam.


Free banners for boaters to help protect manatees


They're being used more and
more on the waterways by con-
cerned citizens bright yellow
banners from Save the Manatee
Club, designed to make it quick
and easy to communicate with
approaching boaters whenever
manatees are spotted in the area.
The free waterproof banner
which reads, "Please Slow: Mana-
tees Below," alerts boaters to the
presence of manatees with the
intent to slow boaters down to
help prevent manatee injuries and
deaths.
"The 4th of July weekend is one
of the busiest holiday weekends of
the year, and the waterways will be
very active," said Judith Vallee,
Save the Manatee Club's Executive
Director. "Manatees face ever-
increasing threats mostly from
human activities, and the largest


known cause of manatee mortality
is from collisions with boats. Hope-
fully, people will watch out for
manatees, and those who have the
banners will use them to help slow
down boat traffic if manatees are
spotted."
Those who plan to be out on
the waterways this 4th of July
weekend should follow some gen-
eral guidelines to help protect
these fascinating, endangered ani-
mals. Wear polarized sunglasses,
as they can help eliminate the glare
of the sun and can help you see
below the water's surface. Stay in
deep water channels and follow all
posted boat speed regulations.
Avoid boating over shallow vegeta-
tion beds where manatees might
be feeding. Look for the manatee's
snout, back, tail, or flipper breaking
the surface of the water a swirl


or a flat spot on the water signals a
manatee may be swimming
below. And if you see a manatee
when operating a powerboat,
remain a safe distance away -
about 50 feet. If you want to
observe the manatee, cut the
motor, but don't drift over the ani-
mal.
Also, if you spot an injured,
dead, tagged or orphaned mana-
tee, or if you see a manatee who is
being harassed, call (888) 404-
FWCC (3922) or #FWC or *FWC
on your cellular phone, or use VHF
Channel 16 on your marine radio.
Florida boaters can request a
free "Please Slow: Manatees
Below" banner by contacting Save
the Manatee Club via e-mail at edu-
cation@savethemanatee.org, by
regular mail at 500 N. Maitland
Ave., Maitland, FL 32751, or by call-


ing toll free at (800) 432-JOIN
(5646). Just include your name,
mailing and e-mail addresses, and
the area where you boat in Florida:
Also, if you are a Florida shoreline
property owner, you can get a free
aluminum sign for your dock
which reads, "Please Watch for
Manatees: Operate With Care." Be
sure to include your name and
mailing address and the address
where the sign will be posted, if dif-
ferent.
Manatee protection tips are
available on the Club's Web site at
www.savethemanatee.org/boater-
tips.htm. For more information on
manatees, the Adopt-A-Manatee
program, or Save the Manatee Club
programs and activities, visit the
Club's Web site at www.savethem-
anatee.org, call the toll free num-
ber listed above, or send a request
via regular mail.


Restitution comes to

thousands defrauded

by TRG Marketing


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist
announced that the principals
of TRG Marketing, LLC -
Carmelo Zanfei and William
Paul Crouse have pled
guilty to charges relating to the
sale of an unauthorized health
plan to more than 7,000
Floridians, which resulted in
millions of dollars of unpaid
claims.
Asserting that the self-
insured plan was exempt to
the licensing and certification
requirements of state law,
Zanfei and Crouse marketed
the health plan to citizens of
Florida, and 43 other states,
without seeking a certificate of
authority to sell the plan.
Investigators determined
the health plan was insuffi-
ciently funded and the group
failed to pay millions of dollars
of claims.
"TRG Marketing duped
thousands of trusting con-
sumers and left them with mil-
lions of dollars in unpaid med-
ical expenses," said Crist.
"Scams like this drive up the
cost of legitimate health insur-
ance, and consumers are left
to carry the burden. We will
work to ensure that justice is
served and restitution is made
to these victims."
Zanfei pled guilty to con-
spiracy to commit racketeer-
ing and four counts of unlaw-
ful transaction of insurance,
and will be sentenced to two
years in prison. Crouse pled


guilty to racketeering and four
counts of unlawful transaction
of insurance, and will be sen-
tenced to four years in prison.
After they are released from
prison, both defendants will
also be sentenced to 20 years
of supervised probation with
special conditions that they
make full and complete resti-
tution to more than 7,000
Floridians. The restitution is
expected to total $2.5 million
and could be substantially
more.
Formal sentencing of both
defendants. will be held in
approximately 120 days
before Ninth Judicial Circuit
Judge Julie H. O'Kane in
Orlando.
Although the health plan
was illegally marketed in 43
other states, Florida was the
only state to pursue criminal
charges. The case was prose-
cuted by the Attorney Gener-
al's Office of Statewide Prose-
cution and investigated by the
Department of Financial Ser-
vices.
Any citizen who believes he
or she has been a victim
should call the Attorney Gen-
eral's Fraud Hotline toll free at
(866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-
7226).
A copy of the arrest affidavit
is available at: http://myflori-
dalegal.com/webfiles.nsf/WF/
MRAY-6D8LVM
file/TRG Affidavit.pdf.


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330 W, SuarlandClewiston
86f.9830.36
216 S. Main St,, LaBelle
863-67513288
301 f, 15th St.
239057.1600


LABOR FINDERS


DAILY WORK DAILY PAY
ALL TYPES OF WORK AVAILABLE
m20 E. S*in (= fm aemsto#M
(863) 902-9494


--a- 6fs eidtt
Care Ceitfer
230 S. Barfield Hwy.
Pahokee, FL 33476-1834
Phone: (561) 924-55bl
Fax: (561) 924-9466
Email:
GladesCare@FloridaCare.net


SUNRISE APPLIANCE
New, Used, Scratch & Dent

401 US Hwy 27
Moore Haven
863-946-2666






525 1W AnLE, BiLE GiADE

800-513-7983
www.gladesmotors.com
i@,l 4441114-i1


GLENN J.
SNEIDER, LLC
Criminal Law
Bankruptcy Law
Immigration Law
200 S.W. 96* Street
Okeechobee, FL 34974
(863) 467-6570






S VIe STA
-i~ **** H H


Reich &
Mancini

1-888-784-6724
Wokee'Cmpe~nwtion Personl Injur
%spi. l ', rih Doi ijtllilv Wrongiul DeJhl
PIalm Ci itor I'irt r
Porn St. Lu ic
\,il PaIlm ktIiwh Bo* a iRatoll


GLADES BAC!HOg SERVICE
24 YEARS IN BUSINESS
DITCH CLEANING & DIGGING
ROCK EXCAVATION
OWNMEfRENDAN.\ PEACOCK


0 i W, Spril.li Hy, Clewit HOME 561-924-7123
8'834 mi CELL 561-261-0053
I'li' l"'1114 PAHOKEE, FL 33476


Brian Sullivan Pilar off lopers, I,
Class A Generallonactor (fG-6185i
863-441-4202 2501 W. 80th St. Suite 9
863-441-4202


863-465-1371
Se Habla Espaiol
m.hriaillimcotratoreom


James Fencing
Licensed & Insured
We Can-...
Do Installation of all types of fencing
P* rotrct your dug with quality Dog N Pen
Rpair all types of faeriiig
CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION
863-697-8462


HEiDRY REGI0ilu

MEDICAiL CENTER



8I6 3-99121


Hialeah, FL


1-800-901-2192




a xtion
-West Cake
FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY
805 N. Hwy. 27
Moore Haven
(863) 946-1233


BLUE WATER BOBCAT
CULVERTS DRIVEWAYS
LAND CLEARING PADS
ETC,

OFFICE 863-902-0477
CELL 863-228-2622


DR. MERCER'S DENTURE CLINIC

*BEST PRICES SAME DAY

US 41 SOUTH FT. MYERS



1-866-226-9400


L AUFT-11-r's
FURNITURE
CLEARANCE CENTER
The Blocker Family has turned
their LaBelle Showroom into a
Furniture Cklearance Center.
359 W Hickpoochee Ave
LaBelle, FL
863-675-2132


lS Lawn Service
Free Estimates on Bequest





8-or


Law Office of
Robert L. Vaughn, PA.
Bankruptcy Wrongful Death
Personal Injury Family Law/ Divorce
112 WC. Owen, Ckiwiston
863-902-9211
530 Main St., LaBelle
863-675-7719
2080 Collier Ave., Ft. Myers
239-936-9393
; *i ,.I > I .. J.*.. .. ..I .h .l.l, yn,,', i i ,.I
-, i I r ,





I t 1 I i I

370 Holiday Isle Blvd.
Clewiston
863-983-3181


iTreasure Coast Dcrmatoloqg,

Tim loannides. M.D.
Rick Romagosa, M.D.
Robert S, Kirsner. M.D. PhD

1924 US Hwy. 441 N.
Okeechobee
863-467-9555



Royal's
FVURNITUVRE
APPI I \I %L B.Dt)Ol


Ch~ni' Be ad'Id~t i le' Okeedob


K


lisheth Garcia
Lit, mortgage Broker

(305)786-om~

(561)99.23388
SeMI halaEpaiel
I Is rcatef moe star Itad I I I It


9HIEF'S
AuTo
CARE
From Strt CartoRa Cars
Wedoita#.
39ECowboy Wa 674-1010





Connections
I M, IN ,I'f. *ilA 1.1.1.
IN --.\ O <.''l' KR I I.'.. I .OKIIM )
CALL
(863) 612-0237
Scingular-

l+Jqa#',wxip]aM


(866) 549-2830
okCchofM (63)474 7m
Ft.sl. t (773 (M5M
Port S Lucl (772) 3353940
Sbmt M (772) 142177
Palm IDo** OfdoWe (6M) 8493M


GROCERY STORE & MEAT PROCESSING
863-946-2333
1205 EAST SR 78' Lakeport






S .is -' -..*W

m[ !, ~inttwm~


11:11111TO


Thursday, June 16,2005'


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee







Thursday, June 16,2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Important tips for homebuyers


FELTON, DE Home inspec-
tions are now considered so rou-
tine that an estimated 77 percent
of all homebuyers invest in one.
HGTV even devotes an entire
program to the service, called
"House Detectives." But televi-
sion does not always paint a true
portrait of the home inspection
process, suggests Cliff Grohe, Fel-
ton-area director of HouseMas-
ter(r).
"Watching 'House Detectives'
is a terrific way to educate home
buyers on the value of a home
inspection. But many of those
inspectors don't follow standard
industry protocol," says Grohe,
who notes that it is as important
to understand what a home
inspection is NOT, as well as
what a buyer should expect from
their inspection, in order to make
an informed home purchase
decision.
What a Home Inspection is
NOT: It is not a to-do list for the
seller. Over the past quarter-cen-
tury, two of the most common
questions asked of HouseMaster
inspectors are "Who should
make the repairs?" and "Should I
buy this house?"
The role of the home inspec-
tor is to provide the buyer with


their opinion of the home's con- Inspection:
edition at the time of inspection.
Because each real estate sales 0 Choose wisely when it
contract and transaction is differ- comes to selecting a home
ent, a buyer's real estate sales ,inspector. Even in areas where
professional or lawyer is better there is mandatory licensing, cre-
qualified to answer these types of dentials among inspectors can
questions. vary dramatically. Price should
SA home inspection is not a not be the reason to select a
pass/fail test. "Ition is up to the home inspector. It is also impor-
pass/fail test. "It is up to the t t mk s tat an inspec-
buyer to determine whether or tant to make sure that an inspec-
buyer to determine whether or tor provides a written inspection
not the home passes his own report that includes pertinent
test," says Grohe. "A couple look- details on the condition of major
ing to totally renovate a home elements of the home.
may realize that the need for lots
of repairs to the mechanical sys- Look for a home inspector
teams doesn't matter to them. that encourages you to go along
Conversely, a young couple on the inspection. "The inspec-
buying a 'starter home' in which tion is a terrific introduction to a
they plan to live only a few years home. A professional inspector
may find a home with many can answer questions, demon-
problems is just not for them." state how to operate various sys-
It does not make a home teams in the home, and provide
purchase risk-free. Most home helpful maintenance sugges-
inspection companies follow tions," says Grohe.
HouseMaster's lead and utilize Heed the inspector's advice.
an inspection contract that out- Deficiencies found on an inspec-
lines the specifics of the home tion will continue todeteriorate
inspection, as well as its limita- through usage and age. Plan on
tions. But it's important to addressing any outstanding con-
remember that while a home as soon as possible.
inspection is designed to reduce
the risk in buying a home, it can- A professional home inspec-
not eliminate that risk. tion is the best investment a
What to Look for in a Home homebuyer can make.


ALICO, INC. announces elections, meetings


LABELLE Alico, Inc.,
(NASDAQ:ALCO) one of the
South's best-known agribusi-
ness companies operating in
Central and Southwest Florida,
and with approximately 141,000
acres in real estate holdings,
announced that at its annual
stockholders meeting held Fri-
day June 10, John R. Alexander,
Robert E. Lee Caswell, Evelyn
D'An, Phillip S. Dingle, Gregory
T. Mutz, Charles Palmer, Baxter
G. Troutman, and Dr. Gordon
Walker were elected by the
stockholders to serve as direc-
tors of the Corporation. Addi-
tionally, the stockholders
approved the Alico, Inc. Director
Stock Compensation Plan.
At the annual meeting of the
Board of Directors following the
Stockholders meeting, the Board
re-elected Mr. Alexander as
Chairman and Mr. Gregory T.
Mutz as Lead Director. The
Board also elected the following
officers:
President & Chief Executive


Officer: John R. Alexander
Vice President Administrative
Division, Chief Financial Officer,
Treasurer and Assistant Secre-
tary: Patrick W. Murphy
Vice President, Ranch Divi-
sion: B. Wade Grigsby
Vice President, Heavy Equip-
ment and Facilities Maintenance
Division: Robert P. Miley
Vice President, Sugarcane
and Sod Division: Dwight Rock-
ers
Vice President, Citrus Divi-
sion: Steven M. Smith
Controller and Assistant Trea-
surer: Dennis J. Garbo
Corporate Secretary: Denise
Plair
.The Board also declared a
special dividend of $1 per share
payable to stockholders of
record as of June 30, 2005, with
payment expected on or about
July 15, 2005. Chairman Alexan-
der stated that the Company's
2004 fiscal year results were the
best in the Company's history
and the Board wanted the share-


holders to share in these results.
Chairman Alexander also
announced that the Board had
decided to begin paying regular
quarterly dividends beginning
with the end of the Company's
fourth quarter on August 31,
2005. The first such dividend in
the amount of $.25 will be paid
to shareholders of record as of
Sept. 30, 2005 with payment
expected on or about Oct. 15,
2005.
Chairman Alexander and Mr.
Greg Mutz, the company's lead
director, stated that they were
excited about working with the
new Board to continue the
process of enhancing the Com-
pany's business in the coming
year. They noted that "Alico is a
very different company than it
was two years ago. It has new
management and a new focus
and we are all dedicated to its
continuing success."


Your


SCewiston- .

'. r. .- ;^l ; ..- ':?


We pledge to operate our newspaper as a public trust.

We believe journalists are nothing more than guardians of every citizen's
right to a free press. We have no authority to compromise, bargain away
or dishonor the principles underlying the First Amendment.

We don't play loose with the facts. We give notice to your opinions, not
ours. We encourage vigorous discussion of public issues, but try to keep
everybody's comments within the bounds of fair play.

How are we doing?

Let us know by mailing feedback@newszap.com or calling your editor.



Clewiston News

GrLADES COUNTY


DEMOCRAT



TheSun
Community Service Through Journalism


Only $10.00 per week, per block.

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_T H E
OPTICAL CENTER
located in
FAMILY EYE CARE
100 N. Main St.
LaBelle, FL 33935
863-675-0761




Pa(863)983,s Plumbing881





(86)93Th8


COUNTRY HOMES &
LAND REAL ESTATE
Kathy Hutchins
Lic. Real Estate Broker
Office: 863-612-0551
Fax: 863-612-0553
Visit Our Website at:
CentralFloridaLandSales.com




IEC


RlEs iM R n1odlll
(Wl(i


1#a oeU f it nlsel




re Swe 1et flest








1111 S oo Ruae r I. I l finm Wili:t)


AIj ew
Horizons
Real Estate Corp.
580 S. Main St. LaBelle, FL
863-675-1973
emnail: newhorizons- re@earthlink.net
If you are thinking of buying
or selling, give
aiMLS l us a call!

= 11,1 1 M I


CLDWISTON ANIMAL CLINIC





863-983-9145



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ORE"[
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Southern
land1
Investments & Real Estate, Inc.
700 So.ih Main Stiet
P.O. Box 1680 LaBelle, Florida 33975
863-6754500 Fax: 863.675-6575
www.soland.cm
TOLL FREE: 877-314-3048


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Expect something extra.""
1-800-SHOP CVS
or Visit CVS.com

OPEN 8am-10pm
OR LONGER!
7 Days A Week



ARN E AWLT
LIC, REAL ESTATE BRKER











INC.
233 N. BRIDGE ST
ON fTHlE CORNER OF BRIDGE ST & WASHINGTON
VISIT US ON THE WEB AT
WWW.OAKREALTYINC.COM
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
O lWlEL RENTALS SALES






983-& 64'0
(l/,Z n j tit,,9:
i9Saw1%24 ^


VICKERS
CHIROPRACTIC &
REHABILITATION CLINIC
all for an Appointment Todayf
DR. EDWARD VICKERS SR.,
Chiropractor
(863) 983-8391
905 V, YEXTUR.4A :'E
CLEWISTO




de isrelt0so








NO ONE WILL


GIVE HIM A
CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
F-REALTY

C. BAGANS FIRST
30 Colorado Rd. Lehigh Acres, FL 33936






YR LO L SATELLITE PiOFESS10NAS

LABELLE 83-.74728
CM LEWIST 6


Dr. Ed Humbert
HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS AT
HENDRY GENERAL
CALL 7WAYFOR AN APPOINTMENT
530 W. Sagamore Avenue
Suite B
Clewiston, Florida 33440
(863) 983-2896
http: / /wwwjointimplant.com


^hCarolyn
homas
&ealty, Inc,
rorsf
Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505
c s, "h gve Lmy11.'


Your Realtor
for the
Western Communitiei

Teresa Sullivan
561-795-8533 ,

561-996-5623







82 W. !ICKPOOCHEE. IABIELLE
(ACROSS 'ROM BURGER KING)
CALL
(863) 675-TANU(8268)
Se. HaliA rsipalUno


fill


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005









rcskTJ


alnsif led







.8Toll F. U. -4 ABSOLUTELY
for any personal items for sale under $2,500


Announcements Mterchlandise li M 0ile Homes





Employment Agriculture creation





Financial Rentals Automobiles

kil .i in jg. g .jj.jjg-al


Services I Real Estate Ii

LI I I j J I


~150


More Papers Mean More Readers! u

1 Reach more readers when you run


your ad in several papers in
our newspaper network.


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reach more than 164,000 readers*!

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* Sources: Pulse Research Market Survey; Simmons Market Research; INI Market Research Center


Rules for placing FREE ads!
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No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!


Announcements

IT ip.:,H .- I Ir,.t.:r n
Please read your ad carefully
the first day it appears. In
case of an inadvertent error,
lease notify us prior to the
deadline listed. We will not
be responsible for more than
1 incorrect insertion, or for
more than the extent of the
ad rendered valueless by
such errors. Advertiser
assumes responsibility for all
statements, names and con-
tent of an ad, and assumes
responsibility for any claims
against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all copy, and
to insert above the copy the
word "advertisement". All
ads accepted are subject to
credit approval. All ads must
conform to Independent
Newspapers' style and are
restricted to their proper
classifications. Some classi-
fied categories require
advance payment. These
classifications are denoted
with an asterisk *.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


IRS auction sale of prime Or-
lando area residence!! 3/3,
3600+ ft, pool on 1 acre.
1745 Markham Woods Rd,
Longwood, FL 6/30 at 10
AM. Visit www.ustre-
as.gov/auctions/irs or call
Gary at (850)942-8990 x
249 for info.
LAND AUCTION Calhoun
County, SC. June 23,
6:00PM. 960+/- acres of-
fered in 14 tracts. Located
near 1-26 between Columbia
and Charleston, near Lake
Marion. Timberland, Crop-
land, Hunting, Homesites.
Previews: June 18 & 22
from 11:00AM-2:OOPM. Call
(800)551-3588 for more in-
ormation or visit
www.woltz.com. Woltz &
Associates, Inc., Brokers &
Auctioneers (SC#3663R).



Large Sale in LaBelle
Sat., June 25th @ 11am
Antiques, Tractors,
Trucks, Cars, Old Lures,
Loads of Hand Tools &
Power Tools.
See next weeks paper for:
Address & Complete List!!!
On line: auctionzio.com
#1 Liquidators Auction
Jim Tate AU2266
Liquidators AB1855
239-878-0621

READING A
NEWSPAPER...
leads you
to the
best products
i and services.


BURIAL PLOTS (2)- In old
section of Evergreen Ceme-
tery. $1100 for both.
(954)340-4475.





READING A
NEWSPAPER....
make" yo a me Inaltmwad
and ltereslng pea~ON.Mo
wonder newspaper meades
am f.w.o suoassdult


BLACK LAB MIX- large, male,
vicinity of Hwy 70 West"
(863)697-2513.
CD CASE- black, with CD's,
found on Wolff Rd. Call
(863)763-3134 to claim.
Young Female Cat Recently
Spayed. Okeetantie Area.
Call to identify.
(863)697-2265


BILLFOLDS (2) lost out of
purse, medical papers, pre-
scriptions, insurance cards,
driver license. Very impor-
tant, vic of Labelle Antique
Shop. (863)675-2384 or
(863)675-3990.
LOST DOG Pit/Cur Mix
blk w/ wht Vic of Dark Ham-
mock Rd, Burman Rd & 441
(772)260-6567 Reward
PIT/CUR MIX, 5yrs old, aprox
70lbs, missing on 6/4, vic of
Old Fort Denaud, reward
(863)675-2310


ADULT CATS 1 Blue Russian
female w/ 7 toes, 1 blk Tom,
good mouser, both free to
good home. (863)763-8892
BOBTAIL KITTENS (2)
Free to good homes.
(863)467-2139
CUR, 7 yrs. & Red Nosed Pit-
bull, 4 yrs. Neutered males.
Great w/kids. Housebroken,
updated shots. 863)447-0965

German Shepherd/Sharpel
mix puppies, 1 male, 1 fe-
male, 6 weeks old, to good
home. (863)675-4211
HOT TUB- you must move,
(863)357-2494.



Sale s 014

BELLE GLADE- Sat,
June 18th, 7:30am-?,
1505 NW Ave G,
Miscellaneous Yard Sale



EARN DEGREE online from
home. *Business, *Parale-
gal, *Computers. Job Place-
ment Assistance. Computer
& Financial aid if qualify.
(866)858-2121 www.tide-
watertechonline.com.
FREE LESSON. Saturday,
6/25. Experience the power!
Diesel Semis, Heavy Equip-
ment. Employers onsite, free
hotdogs, fun for all. National
Truck & Heavy ,Equipment
Operator School.
(800)488-7364.



Is Stress Ruining Your Life?
Read DIANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard Call
S813)872-0722 or send
7.99 to Dianetics, 3102 N.
Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607.


Employment


oyment 205

Medical 210

Employment
Wanted 220
Job Infornation 225
Job Training 227
Sales 230



Auto Transport, The Waggon-
ers Trucking: Hiring Exp &
Non-Experienced drivers for
- Aulo Transport in South East
Regions. -Must have valid
Class A CDL and verifiable 2
yrs OR 200K miles OTR.
Need stable work history
and clean MVR. High Earn-
ing Potential, Great Benefits
and matching 401K. CON-
TACT Susan at
(866)413-3074 EOE.
BRANCH MANAGER
GLADES AREA
American Red Cross- chapter
seeks f/t professional to run
the Glades Area Branch.
The position will provide
leadership in developing, im-
PAlementing and managing all
American Red Cross service
delivery to the communities
within the Branch's assigned
geographical area. Ideal
candidate will possess de-
gree and/or experience in
not-for-profit management
and knowledge of the local
communities. Excellent
benefits package. Please
email cover letter'
and resume to
bootheL(redcross-pbc.org
or fax (561)650-9147.
EOE/DFWP
Carpenter Wanted
must have tools &
transportation, steady
work. 1-800-345-0060
CARPENTERS, CONCRETE
RESTORATION &
LABORERS
Must have own tools
& transportation.
(561)637-2222
CFI HIRING RECENT STU-
DENT GRADS! Starting $.26,
increases to $.35 in 1 year.
Class A CDL Required. Local
ORIENTATION! (800)CFI-
DRIVE (800-234-3748) or
www.cfiddve.com.
COURT RECORDS CONTRAC-
TOR: Nationwide company
seeks experienced Indepen-
dent Contractors to collect
and research public records
in Florida courts. Laptop pre-
ferred. Pay based on pro-
duction. Fax resume to
Kassie (866)322-8246 or
Email: Kassie.Mill-
er@choicepoint.com.
DATA ENTRY Work ON YOUR
OWN. Flexible Hours!
$$$Great Pay!$$$ Personal
Computer 'required.
(800)873-0345 ext #300.
Find It faster. Sell t sooner
in the classifieds
EImploymen
FullTime 0


CUSTODIAN
Opening in Hendry County
Commissioners. Must be
able to work evenings. Full
time with benefits. Applica-
tions and copy of job de-
scription may be obtained
from Human Resource in the
LaBelle Courthouse or sub-
office in Clewiston. Deadline
for submission is May 25,
2005. Vet Pref. EEO. Drug
Free. Applicants needing as-
sistance in the application
process should contact HR.
Driver- COVENANT TRANS-
PORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams
& Graduate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly. Equal
Opportunity Employer.
(888)MORE PAY
888-667-3729).
HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE
STUDENTS arriving August
need Host Families. Has
own insurance and spending
money. Promotes World
Peace! American Intercultu-
ral Student Exchange.
(800)SIBLING
www.aise.com.
LAB TECHNICIAN:
Will train.
Apply @ Casa Flora,
13140 Hartman Plant Rd.,
Palmdale, FL 33944.
(863)675-0170.
*MOVIE EXTRAS* Earn
$150-$300/Day All
Looks/Types Needed. No ex-
perience Necessary TV, Mu-
sic Videos, Commercials,
Film, Print. Call Toll Free 7
days! (800)260-3949 Ext
3023.
**SALES REPS**, SALES
MANAGERS $7,000 per
week is what our Top Sales
People earn! Highly suc-
cessful national co. expand-
ing. Will train. Call Jay
(800)685-8004.
S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Driv-
ers. HOME WEEKENDS.
Mileage Pay, Benefits, 401K.
Trainees Welcome/ Miami
area- exp. req. 21 min
age/Class-A CDL Cypress
Truck Lines (800)545-1351.



.CARE GIVER/COMPANION-
needs work, Will do light
housekeeping and live in,
references (863)675-4239.

Financial

k-1 ITI
Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315




#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending
Machine units/You OK Loca-
tions Entire Business
$10,670 Hurry!
(800)836-3464 #B02428.

guIi -


MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT
Join our maintenance team! General maintenance
of a 120 bed nursing home & 40 unit
apartment complex. Knowledge of electrical,
plumbing, carpentry and A/C. Must be "on call"
every third week. Prior experience in similar
position. HS diploma or GED required. Excellent
salary and benefits. Mileage paid to and from
work for out-of-town employees.
Glades Health Care Center
Pahokee, Florida
Call 561-924-5561, ext. 110
or fax resume to 561-924-9466
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Equal Opportunity Employer


Emplymen
Ful im I'l


CARPENTERS

The Seminole Tribe of Florida Housing
Dept. is now hiring Carpenters for Big
Cypress & Brighton Reservations, 3-5
yrs. exp. in carpentry. HS Diploma/GED
req. Valid FL Driver's license req.

Resumes to galtmanasemtribe.com or
fax to 954-967-3477. Application online
@ www.seminoletribe.com. HR, 6300
Stirling Road, Hollywood, FL 33024


CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE I
(Preschoolers, South Bay Head Start)
$11.04/hr.

Plans indoor and outdoor program activities for
preschoolers; observes work of assistants and
guides them in performance of theirtasks. As-
soc. Degree in Early Childhood Ed./Child
Dev./other ECE Degree (or 60-sem./90-qtr. hrs.
related college); 1 yr. exp. working directly with
care and development of young children (ages
0-5--i.e., preschoolers-must specify on appl.);
equiv. Prefer 40 hrs. DCF Child Care Training.
Visit www.pbcgov.com for detailed position de-
scription & employment appl. Submit appl./re-
sume with any Vet. Pref. doc. for receipt by 5
p.m. 6/24/05 to Palm Beach County Human Re-
sources, 50 S. Military Trail #210, WPB, FL
33415 Fax 561-616-6893 EO/AA M/F/D/V
(DFWP)
I

p HEALTHCARE DISTRICT
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY

HCAP Health Care Navigator
Grant Position
Glades Area
Position #163-2125
This'position is to provide tailored care coordination services
to clients of Western Palm Beach County. Employee inter-
views clients in need of services and assists them in navi-
gating the eligibility process of medically and culturally
appropriate healthcare and social services. Employee must
provide high quality customer service with attention to spe-
cial needs of diverse client base. Employee participates in
outreach activities guiding clients to program services. As-
sociate's degree with course work emphasis in social work,
human services or\related; supplemented by three (3) years
previous experience or training that provides excellent
knowledge of eligibility criteria for alternative government
supported health care programs and benefits including Flori-
da KidCare, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security Disability
CHAMPUS, Veteran's Administration benefits, etc. and the
ability to perform interviews and advanced administrative
support functions; or an equivalent combination of educa-
tion, training, and experience. Position requires that the can-
didate possess moderate computer skills and possess and
maintain a current Florida Drivers License. Bi-llingual strongly
preferred. Pay Grade 7: $26,376. All applications & resumes
must be received by 5 PM 6/24/05. Resumes can be faxed
to (561)671-4670, send to: HCDPBC, 324 Datura Street,
Suite 401, West Palm Beach,.FL 33401 or e-mail to: .
Employment(hcdpbc.org.
The Health Care District is a Drug Free Work Place


JOIN A WINNING TEAM!
RNs & LPNs
12 Hr. Shifts 3 days on/4 off one week
4 on/3off the next week
Days 7 am 7 pm
Nights 7 pm-7 am
RNs $24-$28/hour
LPNs $18-$22/hour
+ $2/hour night differential
RN SUPERVISORS
12 Hr. Shifts-3 days on/4 off one week
4 on/3 off the next week
Nights 7pm-7am
$27-$31/hour
LTC & Management experience desirable
GLADES HEALTH CARE CENTER
Pahokee, Florida
Excellent Benefits
Mileage paid to and from work for
out-of-town employees
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Call: 561-924-5561 Fax: 561-924-9466
Equal Opportunity Employer


E-mploIyme
FulTimSe 02051


Empoyen
Ful Tie :2]0


CITY OF SOUTH BAY
POSITION AVAILABLE
WITHIN
SOUTH BAY POLICE
DEPARTMENT
RECORDS CLERK
$9.50 Hourly
Full-Time Position
Benefits
The City of South Bay is accepting applications for the position
of Records Clerk. This position requires excellent adminis-
trative organizational and filing skills; ability to follow de-
tailed written and verbal instructions; great communication
and telephone skills; knowledge of modem office equipment;
practices and procedures. This position also requires an in-
dividual to maintain records that are confidential. Must be
able to type 45 wpm. Must have high school diploma or
G.E.D., an AA degree in Business Administration or 1-3
years progressively responsible secretarial experience or
equivalent. Applications will be accepted until June 24,
2005 at 5:00 pm. Sent to ATTN: Human Resources Direc-
tor, City of South Bay, 335 SW 2nd Avenue, South Bay,-FLI
33493. Resumes may also be emailed to parchmen-
taf(southbayclty.com. Please Note: NO FAXES ACCEPTED.
EOE/AA/ADA/VET PREF


P/T Home Delivered Meal Driver Needed at La-
Belle agency serving seniors. If you have a
cheerful manner, valid FL license & clean driving
record, H.S. diploma or GED, we wantto talk to
you. Great place to work, training provided-per-
fect for moms of school-aged kids or active old-
er adults. Stop by L.J. Nobles Senior Center,
475 E. Cowboy Way, 8-5, M-F to fill out an ap-
plication.
Home care workers needed to assist frail elderly
in their own homes in Hendry & Glades Co.
Must have CNA cert., H.S. diploma or GED,
clean FL driver license. Background chks done
on all new hires. We pay mileage, offer health
and other benefits. Great place to work helping
others, so come talk to us! F/T case aide posi-
tion with full benefits available in our Clewiston
office. On-call home delivered meal driver need-
ed in Buckhead Ridge. Call the office nearest
you for more info about job openings in your
area. LaBelle: 675-1446, Clewiston: 963-7088,
Moore Haven: 946-1821. We are an EOE.



MANAGEMENT

Immediate restaurant management
openings in Lake Placid, Moore
Haven, LaBelle, Clewiston and
Okeechobee. We are a franchise with
27 restaurants throughout South
Florida and are hiring energetic,
honest, and responsible individuals.
We offer:
-Excellent Salaries
-Medical and Life Insurance
-Dental Insurance
-401K Savings Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Advancement Opportunities
-Training Program

For an interview please call:
863-983-4224
or mail your resume in confidence to:
Pauline Alvarez
Southern Management Corporation
1014 W. Sugarland Hwy.
Clewiston, FL 33440


$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 2005! Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)856-9591 Ext #113.
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We
will not be undersold!


AUTHENTIC $150k-$200k 1st
Yr. Potential 24/7 Msg
(888)783-7182 Or
www.freedomroad.biz "Only
Serious Inquires Only".
eBay OPPORTUNITY.
100,000 people are earning
a full-time income at home
with eBay. Are you ready? If
so contact Eric at
(866)932-2924.
Shop here first!
The classified ads


HELP WANTED Earn Extra in-
come assembling CD cases
from any location.
No Experience Necessary.
(800)405-7619 ext 90
www.easywork-great-
pay.com. (not valid in SD,
ND, WI or MD)
Professional Vending Route
and Equipment. Brand name
products, all sizes. Financing
available w/$7,500 Down.
877) 84 3- 8726
B02002-37).
Profitable online business for
sale. Home-based. Family
owned 6 years online. Com-
plete Internet marketing &
site training included. $48K
Call Richard after 2:
(407)322-4242.



$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 2005! Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)785-6360 Ext #75.
IMMEDIATE CASHIII US Pen-
sion Funding pays cash now
for 8 years of your future
pension payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a FREE,
no-obligation estimate.
www.uspensionfund-
ing.com.

Services


SCREEN & PATIO
ENCLOSURES
Rescreening & repair.
lic. #2001-19849 &
insured. (561)784-5568
or (561)358-2456

Need a few more bucks
to purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
sell your used items in
the classifeids.



DIVORCE$275-$350*COV-
ERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! *Ex-
cludes govt. fees! Call week-
days (800)462-2000,
ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce
Tech. Established 1977.


NEW SELF STORAGE
46 units 7x15, 8x15, 10x15,
10x30, 12x30, 15x25. Full
electric, secure on Commereio
St. 350 ft. from Clewiston
Police Dept. 863-983-6663,
863-983-2808, after hrs.
863-983-8979

Earn some extra cash.
Sell your used items in
the classifleds


-iEmplm
FulTme "I'l


Thursday, June 16,2005 i


I


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


0-1









Thur~dav. June 16. 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Emplymen


II


II


Join the most exciting attraction in SW Florida

JOB OPPORTUNITIES


Server $5.50 per hour plus grats
Maintenance $9 to $12 per hour
Housekeeping $8 to $9 per hour
Cashier $9.50 to $13.00 per hour
Players Club Rep. $10.00 per hour
(Customer Service)
Revenue Clerk $11.00 per hour


Benefits available for all employees
www.theseminolecasino.com
Apply in person at 506 S. 1 Street
Immokalee, FL 1-800-218-0001
e-mail resume to mramos@semtribe.com


Looking for a career

with a company you

can grow with?

Are you self motivated?
Do you like meeting new people?
Are you computer literate?
If so, this could be the opportunity
you have been looking for.
Full and/or part time
positions available.

The Caloosa Belle and Immokalee
Bulletin are looking for bright, self-
starters with computer skills and
reliable transportation who are will-
ing to learn newspaper advertising
sales from the ground up.
If you have what it takes, you
could be the outside salesperson
in these fast growing markets.

Our company offers:
a unique work environment
potential for advancement
competitive pay and benefits
life and disability insurance
.401. (K) plan
generous time tdibprgram

Email your resume to:
jkasten@strato.net
An equal opportunity employer


Service Technician I
$8.37 p/hr.
(Valid CDL "C")
Administrative Assistant
$23,707 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam, type 45 cwpm)
Weed & Seed Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
(BS degree)
Closing: June 20, 2005
Accounting Specialist (P-T/Temp)'
$10.40 p/hr.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Police Lieutenant
$48,672 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
losing June 29, 2005
Police Sergeant
$40, 250 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Closing: June 29, 2005
Police Officer
$14.68 p/hr.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Closing: June 29, 2005
Utility Systems Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
Closing: June 29, 2005

Unless stated All positions open until filled.

Positions noted CS -
must pas exam to complete eligibility.

Complete Valid Employment Applications
must be submitted to:
City of Belle Glade
Human Resources Department
110 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., W.
Belle Glade, FL 33430-3900
Business Hours: 8:00 to 5:00
Posted: 06-06-05


HELP WANTED

DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Applications are being accepted by the Hendry
County BOCC. This is a highly responsible posi-
tion coordinating and directing the development
of programs that protect the public's health and
safety from large-scale natural and technological
hazards. Requirements are BS degree and four
years of responsible experience in public safety
or emergency management or comparable
amount of experience. Applications can be ob-
tained at sub-office in Clewiston & at Court-
house in LaBelle. Deadline for submission is
June 16, 2005 at 5:00 PRM.

Vet pref., drug free, EEO, applicants with
disabilities needing assistance contact HR.


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 5301
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets. Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets.'Supplies.
Services 770
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
elevision/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740





AIR CONDITIONER-'05 York
3.5 ton package unitw/ heat
$1375 (954)309-8659
AIR CONDITIONER
20K BTU Reverse Cycle,
window unit, $275 or best
offer (863)674-0467.
AIR CONDITIONER
New, 21k BTU, electric $350
(863)357-8788
AIR CONDITIONERS (2) 5
Ton, For DW. Includes 6 yr.
warrantee. Like brand new.
$1200 (863)697-1894
AIR HANDLER, Trane, 2.5 ton,
220 volt, with heat, $150-.
(863)675-5929


CHINA CABINET- antique,
asking $30. (863)675-4912.


DRYER- apartment size,
works nice, $100.
(863)675-7694.
ELECTRIC STOVE- GE, 3 top
burners working, $15.
(863)467-0987.
MICROWAVE OVEN, excellent
condition, $20.
(863)675-2596
RANGE ( Roper) REFRIGERA-
TOR (Frigidaire 17 cu63 ft)
white, $300 for both.,
(863)467-3645.
REFRIGERATOR- 19 cu. ft.,
Frostfree, asking $75.
(863)675-0104.
REFRIGERATOR, Whirlpool,
Ig., beige, frost free, x-lg.
freezer, exc. cond., $150.
(863)675-2596
STOVE & HOOD FAN- Elec-
tric,Brand new. Never used.
$250. (863)763-7950
STOVE, Electric, Stainless
Steel. $50. (863)697-6464
STOVE, Gas, Frigidaire. White.
$400 or best offer.
(863)357-3639
WASHER & DRYER- Ken-
more, matching set, excel-
lent cditiondition, $220 for both
(863)675-5089.
WASHER & DRYER- Ken-
more, white, both work well.
$100 (321)593-2739.
WASHING MACHINE
Kelvinator, old but works very
well. $25 (863)467-2557


Empoyen
FullTim


Emlymn
FullTime I'lI


I I


The Paige Law Firm, PA.
Seeking experienced secretary, legal secretary experience
preferred but not necessary. Must be organized,
professional person willing to learn & work.
Salary is based upon experience. Fax resume to
(561)996-9337 or mail to 349 Northwest 16th St, Suite 108
Belle Glade, FL 33430 No Phone Calls Please.'


inploymen
Medical A [


-mlomint
|Medica 'I'l


- isc lIie u


SURVEY PARTY CHIEF

Experience needed in construction stake-out,
boundary and topo surveys. Pay is based on
experience. Apply in person at:

Johnson Engineering
251 W. Hickpochee (S.R. 80)
LaBelle,FL
or visit web site
www.johnsonengineering. corn
and download application.
recruiting(johnsoneng.com
DFWP







The GEO Group, Inc.

The GEO Group, Inc.
a worldwide leader in privatized corrections

OFFERS CHALLENGING AND EXCITING
OPPORTUNITIES. EXCELLENT BENEFITS

Current openings for:
CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS
DENTAL ASSISTANT
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
LIBRARY CONSULTANT (P/T 8 HRS. PER MO)

MOORE HAVEN
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
1990 East SR 78NW
Moore Haven FL 33471
Phone 868-946-2420
Fax 863-946-2487
EOE, M/F/V/H
I


COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR -
HEALTH (Medical & Health Services Manager L-1) (#64029893)
The Department of Health has an opening for a
County Health Department Director for Hendry and Glades Counties.
Annual Salary range is $120,000 $140,000.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
A physician licensed in Florida pursuantto Chapter 458 or Chapter 459
of the Florida Statutes who is trained In public health administration.
Five years progressively responsible experience in public health practice,
with management responsibilities in two or more areas of public health desired;
Five or more years of supervisory experience. Experience in grant writing,
public speaking, working with elected officials and the media.
Experience in quality improvement techniques, directing, planning, organizing,
developing, monitoring, budgeting, and human resource management.
Knowledge and experience in essential public health services.
Demonstrated knowledge of health policy issues. Proven professional writing skills
and experience in grant writing. Experience in Bioterrodsm and Disaster Response.
Please apply on-line at https://jobs.myflorida.com.
Refer to requisition number 64029893.
Closing date: June 27, 2005. EOE/AA/VP Employer.


MAGAZINES- 1 box of assort-
ed titles. $50 for all.
(863)467-0987.



BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bot-
tom Prices!" 20x30 Now
$2900. 30x40 $5170.
40x50 $8380. 40x60
$10,700. 50x100 $15,244.
Others. Ends/accessories
optional. "Priced to Sell!"
Pioneer (800)668-5422.
Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine
SteelMaster Buildings,
factory direct at HUGE Sav-
ings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50.
Perfect Garage/Work-
shop/Barn. Call
(800)341-7007. www.Steel-
MasterUSA.com.



FLOOR TILE includes tile
cutter, 50pcs, 12x12, light
grey $60 (863)467-2112
GARAGE DOOR- 16x8, good
condition, $250,
(863)467-1717.
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
Buy Direct From Manufactur-
er. 20 colors in stock with all
Accessories. Quick turn
around! Delivery Available
Toll Free (888)393-0335.
SLIDING PATIO DOORS (2)
4'x7', tinted glass, $100 for
both (239)246-3549
STEEL BUILDING- 30'x40'
Heritage Bought It, Now it's
not needed $6000
763-4149/561-758-4337
VINYL SIDING- 1 full box,
covers 200 sq ft, color is
Sunny Maize, $100 or best
offer. (863)635-0433.



BABY ITEMS boys clothes,
toys, too many to mention
$100 for all or will separate
(863)357-2863
TEDDY BEAR-LARGE
Light brown w/ red heart says
"I love you" Perfect condition
$20 (863)763-8149



ROSENTHAL- 8pi setting,
Made in Germany, wheat de-
sign, gold trim, 50 yrs old,
never used $400
(863)357-2233.


A COLLECTORS FIND!!
Polished, like new Farberware
set w/ percolator (works!)
$45 (863)763-8149
ELVIS RECORD & SOUVENIR
COLLECTION: Approx. 44
yrs. old. Rare items. $2500
all. 863)824-3358


&JHENDRY REGIONAL
AI MEDICAL CENTER
*eistered Nurses

., 1,, 1.. eFL. rt_ 1.1_ /,,.' .i '." .
LPN I & II
F;- LPA L.: rt Cer P. ,: rr r. T..
F-eq r,, P- 7 .-ne a. pr- r. F-,
O.R. Staff Nurse
-FL RA' L 4.: LC.L 5
C .\" C de .reo c J rt r.1 3.,redL
Respiratory Therapist
Fe- Deir CRT .R- R. 7 ore-r J-d i.. '-.r
BLS .,-,. ACL L ? -e ui.:: HX ..;' .'
Per Diem Pharma'c Techiucian
.-r..-V.,'#j.n .r,. 'a ho.e : .xn .l-.a ..- ,. C A.n: ,. .,-. a. -
A-rT.n .f'l tc,. ,i; ,:.:,--,u. =f,,e '. .. uc- t.,.. ., ', .,. ,'.._- h -.

Pull Time Patient Account Representative
.'^ e r: n ,tU.- n ,:, :,'7i '.. ',

Full Time Certified Dietary Manager

Director of Quality Improvement
i'r:f l : ritm-. .: n i a, e n .-.,'..- J r .. -
; :" 3 c u r r L : e : ,
Q ,jhr, ,ir.ans ,e.g,-n-nr e g/:er ie-,e ,t : -, .- F. .-
n-: u .i .'-': L a:nr; ..r? ,:,",* u. c* .r..... ,,- t F ,'.,,- a --,,'
Competition e Palar, ExcElenI, a.g.ei. -
Clinical Ladder Program Education Assistance
Phone: 863-902-3079 or Fox resume to: 863-983-0805
Drug Free Workplace EOE


LABOR <4 FINDERS\

DAILY WORK DAILY PAY
| All Types of Work Available
I +202 E. Sugarland Hwy. J
$ S (Across from Clewiston Inn)
(863) 902-9494 L "


FOOTBALL, BASKETBALL &
BASEBALL CARD
COLLECTION: $1500 for all.
Call (863)763-8943
RUBY RED STEM .WARE- as-
sorted sizes, asking $50.
(863)467-8050.



DELL COMPUTER- Windows
XR 256 MB Ram, Monitor,
Keyboard, Mouse & Lots of
games $150 863-843-0158.

-E

COMMERCIAL KILN & Pour-
ing table. $550 for all, will
sep. (863)467-8177


ANTIQUE COUCH
circa late 1800's, needs some
work $150 (772)418-0018
BOXSPRING & MATTRESS
Very Good Condition $50
(863)675-0969
COFFEE TABLE, 2-End tables
& Sofa table, chrome &
brass w/glass tops.
$300./all. (863)674-0467.
DAYBED- Cherry Sleigh bed
style, $300 or best offer.
(863)634-4200.


TREADMILL: Pro-Form, Cross
over performance. Spd adj.
Walk Length 42". Pd. $510
Asking $250 (863)946-1896


ROOF CARRIER: For Luggage.
Hard. 15 cu. ft. Good condi-
tion. $75 (863)610-0732


HOSPITAL BED- Invacare,
electric, new matt, plus air
matt w/pump incld. $900
neg. (863)655-3436.

WHEEL CHAIR LIFT, dual mo-
tors for vans, like new, ask-
ing $1500. (863)357-8788


AFFORDABLE HEALTH BENE-
FITS From $89.95 A Month
Entire Family! Including Doc-
tor, Hospital, Vision, Rx.
Anyone Accepted! Call Now!
Toll Free! 24 Hours!
(866)697-3739.

HAND PUMP- $80, water w/o
electric, complete w/steel fit-
ting & brass valves to install.
(863)467-4389 mornings.


Employment
Full Time 'I'll


DESK, Wooden. Great for
computer. $40
(863)697-6464
DESKS (3), 1 Gray Computer,
1 Brown, 1 Childs Adjustable
Desk. $85 will sep. Local
delivery. (561)723-6753
DINING ROOM CHAIRS (4)
Light oak, good condition $75
(863)675-8760
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/ four matching chairs.
Good cond. $225
(863)467-6550
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
6 long, light oak color, $85
(863)357-2863
HIGH BACK Wicker Chairs, (3)
Good condition, $36 will sell
separately. (863)467-5477.
LR SUITE- used, fair condi-
tion, color pattern, $100.
(863)675-4912.
MATTRESS- California King
size, good condition, paid
$800 asking $100
(863)675-0104
SOFA, Chair, Coffee Table &
glass top table, $250.
(863)635-4478
SOFA, SLEEPER SOFA, LOVE-
SEAT, blue, good condition,
all for $275.
(863)675-0998.
TABLE & 4 CHAIRS- antique
style, pecan, nice condition,
$100(863)357-4532.
WATERBED- King Size, mo-
tion free, mattress, liner and
heater. $50.
(863)357-4463.



GOLF CART- EZ GO, 2000
$1800 (863)763-7252
GOLF CART, Electric, 4 Seater
w/box bed. Work or Pleas-
ure. 36 V charger. $950.
(863)697-2033
Love the earth Recycle
your used items by
selling them in the
classified.

- Iployment
Meical0210


I (863)441-4722
KEY MACHINE
w/ blank keys, priced rea-
sonably at $400
(863)674-0296
Run your ad STATEWIDE!!!
For only $450 you can place
your 25 word classified ad
in over 150 newspapers
throughout the state reach-
ing over 5 MILLION readers.
Call this newspaper or Ad-
vertising Networks of Flodrida
at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.florida-classi-
fieds.com. Display ads also
available.



PIANO, Gul Bransen, real ivory
keys, perfect tuning, $600 or
best offer(863)467-6693 or
(863)634-1636


BABY CHINCHILLA- gray, 12
weeks old, $75.
(863)357-6825.
BULLDOG PUP- Male, no pa-
pers. $200. (863)634-7108
COCKATIEL'S- for sale, $50
(863)357-6825
DWARF RABBITS (6) $15 &
up (863)610-0843 after 5 p
EXOTIC FAINTING GOAT-
$150. Call evenings,
(863)675-4098.
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS-
AKC reg. 5-males, Ready
June 9th $325. Cash only.
(863)357-3026
JACK RUSSELL (f) for breed-
ing, Rottweiler (f) asking
$250 for both will sell sep.
(863)357-2494.
PARROLET, 1 year old female,
Banded. $100.
(863)357-0476
SIBERIAN HUSKY, Solid
White (F), 1 yr. old & Black &
White (M) 3 yrs. old. $500
both, will sep. 863)610-9812



BATHTUB & SINK
From travel trailer $20 for both
(863)675-8760
PORT-A-POTTY
New in box never been used
pd $80 sell for $50
(863)675-4361 after 5pm



SPA, Portable, Jade, Seats 5.
$1800. (863)983-2234 after
6pm.



SEW MACH TABLEi'ortable,-
1 drawer, legs can be re-
moved for transporting,
24x8 walnut $75
(863)467-7404.

'Ticets 720


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
For Dolly Hand Cultural Arts
Center. If interested please call

561-993-1160


GENERATOR- Coleman, 5000
watt, 10 HP, new in box ,
wheel kit included. $600.
(863)763-0944.
GENERATOR: Small. $500 or
best offer. (863)357-3388
PAINT SPRAYER, SPX Graco,
Hose & Gun. Used once.
Cleaned w/preservatives.
$700 (863)763-2692


MINI CHOPPER- Excellent
condition. 6 mo. old $500.
Firm.(863)697-1702
863-467-4041
One man's trash is
another man's treas-
ure. Turn your trash
to treasure with an ad
in the classified.


WANTED: FL ART
A.E. Backus, H. Newton,
Highwaymen Art.
(772)562-5567

Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed/Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies B45
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants/
Flowers 865




TRACTOR, 3430 w/Bush Hog,
Mint Condition. $7500 or
best offer. (863)673-3790



CHICKEN COOPS (4) 10X10,
all pressure treated, $3500
value will sell $1200 you
move,. (863)467-5906


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



1,2 &3 BR HOUSES &
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
No pets.
Call (863)983-4436.


Port LaBelle, 2BR, 1.5BA,
single family house, w/gar-
age, $750 mo. plus sec.
dep. 863-634-2975.


ROOMMATES WANTED: Male
or Female, No children, Pets
neg. $450 mo. + util.
(863)228-3887 LaBelle


REGISTERED HORSE SALE
Saturday, June 25th
Okeechobee Agri-Civic Center
11:00 am @ Tack
1:00 pm@ Horses.
Consionments Welcome
478-627-2727 or
850-532-9229
SLN#2120
SPOTTED WALKER FILLIE
2 1/2 yrs old, green broke, very
sweet, $1500.
(863)843-2495.
THOROUGHBRED GELDING-
11 yr old, black w/ white
face, papers, $1800.
(863)467-9212,



BUSH ALL- 5' Brand New
$400 (863)801-1666
FINISH MOWER, 6 ft., like
new, used one season,
$ 9 0 0
(863)675-1914/673-1846
FLY MOW LAWN MOWER,
Good condition. $75
(863)675-8168
LAWN TRACTOR/SWEEPER-
STX38 John Deere, needs
new belts & pulleys, $300.
(863)357-4532.
RIDING MOWER- John Deere
180 & Husky mower. $600.
ea. (863)763-4149 or
561-758-4337
RIDING MOWER-MTD Garden
Tractor, 18h/p B&S engine,
46" cut, gd tires, needs trans
axle $160 (863)697-9704
ROTO TILLER Yard Man,
rear tine, like new, $500 or
best offer (863)697-9704
SCREEN ROOM- w/insulated
roof, 12x26, $500 you must
remove. (772)486-1914.


Gazebo Sandbox
Here's a great looking do-it-
yourself project that com-
bines a big hcxagonal sand-
box with a classic gazebo, so
it's not only fun, but it makes
a handsome addition to any
yard. The sandhox measures
5 ft. wide by 7 ft. tall.
Gazebo Sandbox plan
(No. 792). .. $9.95
Playhouses/Structures Pack
4 plans incl. 792
(No. C104)... $24.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds
of projects).. $2.00
Please add $3.01) s&lh
(except cahalog-only orders)
To order, circle itemss. clip
and send with check to:
U-Bild, P.O. Box 2383,
Van Nuys, CA 91409.
Please hbe sure to include
your name, address, and the
name of this newspaper.
Allow 1-2 weeks for delivery.
Or call (800) 82-1U-ILl)
u-hild.conm
Money Back Guarantee


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursdav, June 16, 2005


Okeechobee Livestock
Market Sales every
Mon. 12pm & every
Tues. 11am. 763-3127

-E

SADDLE- McCellan Repro-
duction, almost new cond.,
w/bridle & blanket, asking
$200. (863)675-4098.


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses Sale1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1040
Lots Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspection 1060
Real Estate Wanted1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080





The Complete
Liquidation of DLC Corp.
SAT-UN 25-o1030 AM
Evensville,TN I
i .1llzfilh stnt 7 .%el
SABSOL(JT!
STractors Trailers
Heavy Equipment
SLogging Equipment
I Farm Implements
SComplete Machine
Shop wv Tool & Equip
701 ACRE FARM
i 1 Tral- 5I o 10 o A.;
4* U A.; oI TIIlable Lani
Former I 'j lrr'inei.'i l
V-r latEbl Farrr
S BaEau1.1h Vi ew I
Gre 31 H mesit--
Ponri
,112i ,e Px.d 90oad.
30 000 3F

I| | I \ .
\ \---- l\ll







Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise
your yard sale in the
classified and make
your clean up a breeze!


HOME & LAND, Appraised @
$85,000. Selling for $86,000.
Keller Williams, World Class
Realtors. (239)839-9368
LABELLE- 3br, 2ba, Family
Room, on corner lot, large
oak trees, 1 acre of land, 2
garage carports, 2 sheds,
screened porch, 1046 No-
bles Rd. Ser. Inq. Only!
(863)675-1172. for appt.
LABELLE, Very Nice Area,
Beautiful 3BR w/hard firs. 1
BA w/surrounding tile firs.
Kit., D/R, Carport w/laundry
rm. Beautiful Old Oaks,
Palm, Citrus. About 1/2
acre. $179,900. By Owner.
(863)675-8038.

LAKEPORT- Canal front, 2
story, 2br. 1 ba, 24x24 gar-
age, 1st floor, 2br, 2ba on
2nd floor, 2300 sq ft total,
$260,000 (321)593-2739.
Nice, Large, CBS home, fine
neighbors, w/2 extra Ig. lots,
$95,000 neg.
(561)924-6022 for details.
REDUCED-Must Sell! 2/1, w/
new roof, plumbing, elec.,
kitchen cabinets, plus c/a,
$66,500. (561)602-8000



Sportsmans Paradise Yearly
Memberships. Hunting, fish-
ing, lodging and meals con-
veniently located in White
Springs, Florida. Sign up be-
fore rates increase. For in-
formation call:
(800)655-6661.

Do-It-Yourself Ideas


Job
Information 0225


Job
Information 0225








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16, 2005


40 Years Experienc
GwA htBFwumintam Rrf ^*hdIWk1'ttc
tLIENED LINiR ~tD PRE-Salb t~hSPE( 10N


CHEROKEE
HOME INSPECTIONS, INC.
EARNEST -. RAWLS


4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths,
Many Upgrades $275,000
RESIDENTIAL-
CLEWISTON
* Bank Foreclosures -
Call for Details
*3BR, IBA Home in
Hooker's Point Area
$112,000
* 3BR, 2BA, MH on man-
made lake $70,000
* New construction on
Bayberry Loop, 4 BR,
2BA, Many Upgrades
$275,000
* 4BR 2BA, MH, Sherwood
S/D New Upgrades
$84,000
MONTURA
* Lots Available Call for Details


in Moore Havem
Reduced to $79,500
MOOREHAVEN
3BR, 2BA MH w/fencedyard
$79,500
*River View Lots available on
Caloosahatchee River
Call for Details
LAKEPORT
Listings Needed
ACREAGE LAND & LOTS
. Farm Land Available
Call for Details
COMMERCIAL
Office & Retail Space available
in Shopping Center
Call for Details.


y .AlVN DYLSS
IUC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
420 E. SUGARLAND HWY.
S(863) 983-66(863) 983-6663 (863) 983-9770
WEBSrrE: DYESSREALESTATE.COM E-MAIL: ANN@DYESSREALESTATE.COM
Se Habla Espafiol
AFTER HO & URS:
ANN DYESS FAYEKELTING LAURA SMITH TRAVIS DYESS KATHY GARCIA
(863) 983-8979 (863) 677-0707 (863)599-1209 (863)228-2215 (863) 228-4798


RESIDENTIAL.
2BR, 2BA New Condo
$184,900
5 New Homes
Under Contract Call for Details
3 oSAPS" A 900oo
3BR 2BA/_ $340,000
4 MtLiEFENDSJ l1900
Under Construction
ft. 04oo
Moore Haven Yacht Club
LotS,fPFENDIj)S5OO
3BPSEBPEPNDSJ I000
2B 80
acr Ws br aeails
2BR, 2BA 150'xlOO' $183,500
3BR, 2B^QQ,7rkshop
'$340,000
MOBIES~IBKOMES
3BR, 2Ba, BSOiD! $67,500
3BR, 2BA Easy Life $87,000
3BR, 2BA Seminole Manor
$87,500


3BB]altBMDB g900goo ACREAGE
MONTURA 9.9 acres Sears Rd. under
LOTS AVAILABLE Citrus SOLD!!// $94,900
4BSF*BER ~NBUW 005 s5 at& ejN i00oo
Lot in Holiday Isle $27,000
COMMERCIAL Montura 1.25 $42,000
w/ y
9 Commercial Lots on US
27 with Building $400,000 List Your
Building 2476 sq. ft. on
US 27 100'xloo' Home Here!
8 Lots Zoned Rl-B Home re!


$400,000
10 Lots Zoned Commercial
$500,000
Harlem Bar Great
Business Opportunity
Call for Details
Ind l" l "
10 .n
Cabinet Shop 4800sq.ft.
& Apt. $173,000


Marketing To
Every Potential
Buyer In The
World
www.hendry-gadesmmi.com


ES3P4=IA31.I. TqErVW LI lr~I'*Ci-


3 Bedroom. 2 Bath on Man Made Lake. Storage Shed
Call For Details
Real Estate in Hendry and Glades Counties, Florida
http://www.hehdry-gladesmmls.comn


Your Realtor for
Western Communities
Teresa Sullivan


Call For Listings


,561-795-8533 or 561-996-5623/


Brian Sullivan

General Contractor

CUSTOM HOMES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Call us for all of your new construction needs,
your design or ours.

Visit our new web site

www.briansullivancontractor.com

and look at some of our new homes.


(863)441-4202


(863)465-1371


License #CGCO061855


Vt_ifr < saLxrol iyntin



rokiers:
Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505
&de Associates"
l r k aAnn Donohue 228-0221
S... David Rister 634-2157
St i Us, 'weH fave fisnjfsf


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLI-
NA. MUST SEE THE BEAUTI-
FUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS
OF WESTERN NC MOUN-
TAINS. Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & Investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainreal-
ty.com Call for Free Bro-
chure (800)841-5868.
East Alabama Mountain Prop-
erty For Sale One hour west
of Atlanta in Piedmont, AL
Great for enjoyment or in-
v e s t m e n t
15-acres-$54,250.00 512-a
cres-$1,485,000.00 More
information Call Gary
McCurdy (256)239-8001.
The classified are the
most successful sales-
person in town.


Grand Opening! Lakefront
Acreage from $69,900.
Spectacular new waterfront
community on one of the
largest & cleanest mountain
lakes in America! Large, es-
tate-size parcels, gentle
slope to water, gorgeous
woods, panoramic views.
Paved roads, county water,
utilities. Low-financing. Call
now (800)564-5092 x198.
LAKEFRONT BARGAINS Start-
ing at $89,900. Gorgeous
lakefront parcels. Gently
sloping, pristine shoreline,
spectacular views. Across
from national forest on
35,000 acre recreational
lake in East Tenn. Paved
roads, underground utilities,
central water, sewer, Excel-
lent financing. Call now
S800)704-3145 ext 617,
unset Bay, LLC.
Montana River Frontage, Log
Home, Guest House, Horse
Barn, +/- 4941 acres. Witt
& Associates Realty, Box
1273, Bozeman MT, Russell
Pederson, Agent.
(406)485-2399 www.Mon-
tanaLandAuctions.com.
NORTH CAROLINA MOUN-
TAINS! Spring is blooming
and is beautiful! A wonderful
time to look for real estate.
See Photos: www.North-'
CarolinaMountainRealty.com
or call (800)293-1998. Free
Brochure.
Tennessee Lake Property
from $24,900! 6-1/2 Acre
lot $59,900. 27 Acre Lake
Estate $124,900. Lake Par-
cel and Cabin Package
Available $64,900..
(866)770-5263 ext 8 for de-
tails.
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS
North Carolina Where there
is: Cool Mountain Air,
Views & Stream, Homes,
Cabins & Acreage. CALL
FOR FREE BROCHURE OF
MOUNTAIN PROPERTY
SALES. (800)642-5333. Re-
alty Of Murphy 317 Peach-
tree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.



NEED CASH??
I Buy Houses, Land, Campers,
Boats or anything, any con-
dition. (863)228-2761.



READING A
NEWSPAHR MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
AND INTERESTING
PERSON.

J .o wondmnewpoper
IWW% W WWpIU


EilHomes -
Sale I'll


Moil Hrns


CLEWISTON COUNTRY ACRES
Modular/Models. From $59,900 & up,
3/4/5BR, 2/3BA, acre & 1/4 available or use
your land as down payment. Financing
available. 863-673-6417 or 561-753-8355


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home -Lots 2005
Mobile Home Parts 2010
Mobile Homes -Rent 2015
Mobile Homes Sale 2020



FIBERGLASS STAIRS- New,
for mobile home, 5 risers,
$250. (863)467-0506.



2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile
Homes For Rent
Stanton Mobile Homes
863-983-8106



Financing Available:
Buy Here, Pay Here.
Stanton Mobile Homes
Marginal Credit O.K.
Call 1-800-330-8106
or 863-983-8106

New & Used
Mobile Homes:
Land Home Packages
as little as $1,800 down.
Stanton Homes
863-983-8106

MUSE AREA '02 DWMH
wide, 5br, 2ba, 2000 sq. ft.,
on .48 acres, nicely land-
scaped, $140,000
(863)675-4912 Ive message
Owner Financing
ON MOBILE HOMES
& LAND
Call 863-228-1405
Reading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people


OF CLEWISTON

1 )Very Nice,
2/2 DW,
Applicances,
Screen Porch,
Extra DW
Carport, 2
Sheds
$74,900


2) Midstate
Loop Special,
3/2 DW,
Fence
Carport, Shed


3)New

Lan Home
Packages in
Sunshine Lake
Estates
NowAvailable

4)Tropi 50
2/
Ca AC
nces
8,900
2160 W. Hwy. 27 Clewiston
1.4 Miles N.W. of WAL-MART
983-4663
* cHamPion
HOME BUILDERS CO.


GOLF CAR- 3 Wheel, recondi- FORD AEROSTAR VAN, '92-
SRecr tion ltioned, smooth riding, $750. runs well, good shape, NTHERCU ANDFOR
RecreBaOnl3 [J(863)612-1648. $1500. (863)467-6423. IN THENDRY CIRCUIT OUNT IN ANY, FORIDA
Golf Carts, FORD HANDI CAPPED 1993, FILE NO.2005-068-CP
_______ ATV400Polaris Gas orElectric Fully equipped. After 8pm IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
Excellent shape $2500 Buy and Sell call (863)357-3534 $3800. JAMES MARTINDOLES,
.y (863)801-1666 Call (863)824-0878 Deceased
Boats 3005 PLYM. VOYAGER 1988, Good NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Cm -pers/RVs 3010 BOMBADEER DS650 Baja, HI engine, no rust, good tires,
S '03, very few hrs., $4500. power steering leaks. $795 The administration of the estate of
Marine Accessories 3020 (863)675-0939 Camper Shell, aluminum, for neg. (863)612-0111 JAFie Number 2005-08- MART is pending
MarineMiscellaneous3025 YAMAHA 350, '86, blue, new short bed, full sz. pickup, PLYM VOYAGER, '87- V6, Sin the CircuitsourtSfor &WdCounty,
Motorcycles 3030 tires, good condition, $1100 $350. (863)634-2975 AC/PS/CD, new tires, hitch, of which is25 E. 'Hickpochee Ave.,
Sport Vehicles/ATVs 3035 or best offer (863)673-8741 FLATBED, 8 Ft., Comes w/2 runs great, low miles, $1500 LaBelle,Florida33935.
.863)673-8741 FLATlBED, 8 Ft., Comes w/2- /The names and addresses of theperson-
tool boxes. Painted Diamond (863)763-6205. a representative and the persepon-
ePlate. $350. (863)228-2123re e attorney are set forth
utm i H$350. (863)228-2123 ow do you find a job below
HITCH, Reese, 5th Wheel, in today's competitive All Creditors of the decedent and other
14' V HULL BOAT Easy Slide w/mounting rails, market? In the persons having claims or demands
Aluminum, w/trailer. $350 L B OAT$250l(772)285-8405emak e n tseagainst decedents estate, including
Aluminum, w/trailer$350 $250. (772)285-8405 employment section unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
... ..62TIRE, Brand New Michelin & of the declassified isaserved must file their claims with
15'FIBERGLASS BOAT Ford Wheel. $85 this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
W/trailer vinltop & 35 h/p Automobiles 4005 (863) 0 I II MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
W/trailer, vinyl top & 35 /p Automobiles 4005 (863)674-1105 DI l FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
Evinrude motor. $1000 Autos Wanted 4010 Il Ull ba. OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
(863)675-6652 Classic Cars 4015 TRUCK CAP, Leer, High Top, iN oties V V SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
Commercial Trucks 4020 Fits full size Chevy. Pd. ONTHEM.
AIRBOAT125LYCOMING'05 Construction $1300, Asking $300. All other creditors of the decedent and
Brand new prop but needs Equipment 4025 (302)264-1301 mads against deceens estate, n-
Starter. $2500 Forein Cars 4030 TUROHYDRM.TITAS cluding unmatured, contingent or
starter. $2500 Foreign Cars 4030 TURBO HYDROMATIC TRANS unliquidated claims, must fie their
(863)634-8023 ask for John Four Wheel Drive 4035 installation avail. $250 or best Public Notice 5005 claims with this court WITHIN 3
AIR BOAT- Aluminum, 15ft Heavy Duty Trucks 4040 offer (863)467-8856 State Public MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THIS
oc go Parts Repairs 4045 Legal Notice 5500 FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE.
lll ,ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
smprop, runs good, trailer. Pickup Trucks 4050 ALFOREVERLBARRED.
$2500 (863)763-4643. Sport Utility 40551 Thedateof firet ublicationofthisNotic
S Tractor Trailers 4060 CHEVY Z71- 94, 1/2 Ton, 4x4 isJune,20PersonalRepresentative
AIR BOAT- small, 75HP Frank- Utility Trailers 4065 Ext cab 350, auto, $2500. RomaJ.Vanse
lin Aircraft engine, 5' prop, Vans 4070 (863)412-2504 LEGAL NOTICE 1658978thDrive North
needs tune-up, Must sell ( 1 Palm Beach Gardens,.FL33418
$850 (863)675-0254. DODGE 250 RAM 1981: 318 The following vehicle will e sold at pub- Attorney orPersonalRepresentative:
$850i(863)675-0254. D GE 250RAM 198l 3i8 lic auction on June 28 at 8:00 a.m. at Joseph DeGance, Esquire
ilengine, 130K. Has electrical 2190NW16th St.,Belle Glade, FL: Attorey
BOAT, 14 Ft. Flat Bottom, Alu- short. $500 (863)763-5392 Florida arNo.155360
minu m. $125 CADILLAC ELDOADO'79 FORD 1986, 308, V8, 4x4, VIN#1HGBA7429GA107886R Ft Lauderdale, FL3306
(863)2282123 Biarritz, 350 V8, only 78K mi, manual shift.. $1500 2CG5954-566-1531
BOAT TRAILER, 14 Ft. Galva- $3,900 (863)612-0046 (863)763-5392 6/16/05 59576CGS6/9i16/5
nized. Good shape. $200. HONDA CIVIC,'04- low miles, FORD F150 P/U 1989, Needs
863-674-1105. call for details, motor. $1200
SEA KAYAK, '98 Perception (863)983-7415. (863)634-4104
Eclipse, paddle, $700. PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 92 GMC S15 PU, '88- red, runs
(863)697-3004. Auto, Cold A/C, Good trans- good, $1500. neg. Notice is iereby given that the District School Board of Hendry County, Florida, will
portatin/d tires $3000 863- (863)763-1751. receive bids until 3:00 p.m. on June21,2005 at the Hendry County School
mr s s 310 47-657/57 (86143-1. Board's Finance Office, at which time they will be opened and tabulated.
TOYOTA PU, '87- drk. blue, 5 ProjectTitle: Central Elementary School Restroom Renovation
CAMPER TRAILER, 32 Ft. SATURN WAGON 1993, 4 spd, w/fibergaiss canopy, Project-2005
Good condition. $1000 or cyl., Auto., PW, A/C, Looks $1000, (863)697-3004. ProjectLocation: CentralElementarySchool
best offer. (863)763-8261 & Runs great. $1500 or best --re100 South eaCneuffAvenue
COACHMAN 5TH WHEEL RV, offer. (772)461-2629i it Clewiston, FL33440
'93- 27', excellent cond, TOYOTA TERCEL 1983, HEVY S- 1992, Good con- Name of Owner: Hendry County School Board
$5000.(863)697-2180 4 G Very clean d odc25 E.Hickpochee5Ave.
$5000. (863)697-2180. 4 cyl. Gas saver. Very clean dition, needs repair. $2000 LaBelleFL33935
SCAR TOWING (863)675-2598 Lv.mst offer. Call Jewel @ Project Scope: Furnishalllaborandmaterialsrequiredtocomplete
Honda, '2000 $1 00. 9 (863)7511358 the renovations ofthe designated restrooms at
(863)675-8168 I FORD BRONCO'86 CentralElementary School
TERRY FLEETWOOD- '81, 30' Full size, 4x4 $600 ask for Site Examination: The site may be examined bycontacting the
sleeps 6, Fair condition OLDSMOBILE TORONADO '85 Michael (863)967-6632 983-1550andschedulngthetimeofsitevisit.
$1800. 772-287-3602 or Totaly rebuilt, newtires, low HUNTING PACKAGE $8500 PlaceforReceiptof Bids: All bidsshallbedelvered o: HendCounty
772-486-1914 miles. Runs great! $6500 or Jeep '88, Cobra trir, tripod, 2 School Board's Finance & Purchasing Ofice,
good offer. (863)824-0884 htrs, 2 tree stands, climber 111 Curry Street, LaBelle, FL, ormaied to: Hendry
I___ _lI Call Natalia (954)304-4915 County School Board's Finance & Purchasing
Ti s '0 W e9l Office, RO. Box1980, LaBelle, FL 33975.
ISUZU TROOPER'91 Obtaining Bid Documents: Bidders may obtain documents, including com-
TROLLING MOTORS (2) ASK- V-6, A/C, good condition, runs plete drawing and specifications, by contacting
ING $75 for th. FORD EXPLORER SPORT '7 good $1000 or best offer theofficeofJayAmmonArchitect, Inc.,3246
ING $75 for both. FORD EXPLORER SPORT97, Lakeview Oaks Drive, Lon wood, Florida, 32779
(321)593-2739. 4X4, Loaded, 2 Dr., Needs (239)657-4348 telephone number (407)333-1977. All requests
motor 3work. $2500 f tor pl and specifications must be accompan-
lllfill I "l ied by a refundable deposit of $50.00 per set,
(863)634-4104 with checks payable to Jay Ammon Architect,
Inc.
BOAT&TRAILER JEEP Grand Wagoneer- '84, UTILITY TRAILER
Galvanized rocket boat trailer Camo paint job runs & looks w/ running boards & tires Allbidsmustbeenclosedinasealedenvelopeplainlymarkedontheoutside Cen-
w/ home made boat. $150 good $2500. $150 (863)675-0969 trial Elementary School Restroom Renovation Project- 2005. Bid Date: 6/21/05,
(863)763-3822 (863)673-0920. 3:00 p.m." The School Board of Hendry County reserves the right to reject any
( ) and all bids received, and to waive any and all irregularities in regard thereto. No
Sbids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt for bids for a
Harley Davidson 1200 GlCas 43period of sixty (60) calendar days without consent of the Board.
Sportster, '97, new tires, CHEVY VAN, '89- w/windows,
12k mi., never reg. in Fla. CLUB CAR GOLF CART- asking, beige w/ brown chndrycurtySchoolBoaard
Call Don bet. 5-8. w/charger, $600. stipe, runs good, $2500
(561)992-9491 (863)467-1518. neg.. (863)763-1751. 62638 CGS/GCB06/16/05


lHouses Sale


[Houses Sale


lHouses Sale


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lHouses Sale


lHouses Sale


lHouses Sale


lHouses Sale


lHouses Sale


lHouses Sale


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16, 2005 !










Thursday. June 16. 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Puli Notice


NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF LANDOWNERS OF
HENDRY-HILLIARD WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to call of the Board of Supervisors of Hendry-
Hilard Water Control District, and in accordance with Chapter 298, Flonda Stat-
utes 1941, and law amendatory thereto, the Annual Meeting of Landowners of
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District for the year 2005, will held at the office
of Hilliard Brothers of Florida, Ltd., 5500 FlagholeRoad, Clewiston, Florida on Frin-
day, June 17,2005 at 1:00 PM., forthe purpose of:
1. Electing one (1) supervisorfor a term of three (3) years.
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine.
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
Additionally, this notice advises that, if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District Board of Supervisors, with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and that, for such purpose. He may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Board of Supervisors
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District
By: Joe Martin Hilliard
President
61026 CGS 6/9,16/05

PAHOKEE HOUSING AUTHORITY, INC.
NOTICE
INVITATION FOR BID
BID NO. LM06O5
TO PROVIDE LAWN MAINTENANCE SERVICES
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the Pahokee Housing Au-
thority, until 3.00 p.m., Wednesday, June 22, 2005, local time, at which time
they will be publicly opened and read for furnishing of all labor, materials and
equipment, and performing all work necessary and incidental to Lawn Mainte-
nance Services for L.L. Stuckey Homes; McClure Village: Padgett Island Homes;
and Fremd Village, in accordance with the Pahokee Housing Authoritys plans,
specifications and contract documents.
The services for L.L Stuckey and McClure Village consist of removing litter; mow-
ing; edging; spraying; and weed eating of driveways and common areas.
The services for Padgett Island Homes and Fremd Village consist of removing litter,
mowing, spraying, weed eating, and edging of common areas and individual
yards; and edging of individual walkways and dnveways; trimming of perimeters
of individual units.
Bids shall be delivered and addressed to the Pahokee Housing Authority, 465
Friend Terrace, Pahokee, FL 33476, and shall be labeled "Lawn Maintenance, Bid
No. LM06/05; 3:00 p.m.,; June 22, 2005." Any Bidder who wishes their bid to be
considered is responsible for making certain that their bid is received in the Pa-
hokee Housing Authoritys office by the proper time. No oral, telegraphic, elec-
tronic, facsimile, or telephonic bids of modifications will be considered unless
specified. Bids must bear original signatures and figures. Specifications may be
examined and obtaidied at no charge by calling Julia Hale, Executive Director, at
(561) 924-5565.
Award will be made to the lowest responsible bidder whose bid meets the require-
ments of the invitation for bids. Pahokee Housing Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all bids and to waive any informality in bids, wherever it is in the
best interests of the Pahokee Housing Authority. Any late bids or bids received
after the scheduled deadline will be returned unopened. Pahokee Housing Au-
thority is an Equal Opportunity Employer and promotes a Drug-Free Workplace.
61335 CGS 6/16,23/05

SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF WORK PLAN
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to "The Water Rights Compact Among the
Seminole Tribe of Florida, The State of Florida, and The South Florida Water Man-
agement District', the 2nd Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan of the
Seminole Tribe of Florida has been submitted to the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District
The Seminole Tribe of Florida, 6073 Stiding Road, Hollywood, FL 33024, has sub-
mitted, on June 6, 2005, the 2nd Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan to
include the following projects: Big Cypress Reservation: Big Cypress Rock
Quarry Building construct a proposed office building at the Big Cypress Rock
Quarry (S8/T48S/R35E). Brighton Reservation: Brighton Water Treatment Plant
construct a water treatment plant (S18-20/T39S/R33E). Immokalee Reserva-
Bon: Immokalee Lake Drainage install a gravity control structure to help allevi-
ate flooding of the Immokalee Lake during the rainy season (S10/T47S/R29E).
Other: Coconut Creek Seminole Casino Expansion Phase 1 proposed expan-
sion of the existing casino building located on Trust lands. The proposed project
is located on Tract D, owned by the Seminole Tribe but not Trust land, at the
Commerce Center of Coconut Creek. Proposed project consists of a building ad-
dition, valet parking driveway, and a modification to the existing lake with an ad-
dition of a 270' seawall (S18/T48S/R42E). The Work Plan describes existing and
proposed activities on Seminole land. The Brighton Reservation is located in
Glades County, Township 40 South, Range 32 East; Township 39 South, Range
32 East; Township 39 South, Range 33 East; Township 38 South, Range 33
East. The Immokalee Reservation is located in Collier County, Township 47
South, Range 29 East. The Big Cypress Reservation is located in Hendry
County, Township 47 South, Ranges 32-34 East. The Hollywood Reservation is
located in Broward County, Townships 50-51 South, Range 41 East
Interested persons may comment upon the Work Plan or submit a written request
for a copy of the Staff Report containing proposed agency action regarding the
Work Plan by writing to: Environmental Resource Regulation, South Florida Wa-
ter Management District, PO Box 24680, West Palm Beach, FL 33416-4680;
such comments or requests must be received within 30 days from the date of
publication.
N,.. lu INt, I r.'.,: *. i ..,u t sII [.. u,....,,]i'0 ,,: ., i..: W* ... I: 1i. A copy of the
S in H.-...i Tu:i r,: ',.i ...- i .1 ,... ,. 1.. 1 ... 1 I further proceed-
,-, i, .: I ,' n,11 .ir, .,1 .. .1 ,-, i.. .' .- i ,.1 Adm inistrative
r. i ,,.j ,i Ii: "1. '', ,, ,,', 1 .,. ,.,- wn.e, request


REQUEST FOR BIDS (RFB) CN051024
S-65A EROSION REPAIRS, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The South Florida Water Management District will receive sealed bids through the
Procurement Office, 2nd Floor, B-1 Bldg., 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm
Beach, Florida 33406, for S-65A Erosion Repairs, Osceola County, FL on
Wednesday, June 29, 2005 at 2:30 p.m. local time, at which timely submitted
bids will be opened and publicly read. Work consists of constructing channel
protection including fill material & riprap revetment; removal & replacement of
existing dolphin piles & floating safety barrier; removal & replacement of fender
system; install galvanized metal walkways along fender systems. An OPTIONAL
pre-bid conference will be held onsite on Monday, June 20, 2005 at 9:30 a.m. -
onsite. FL Tnpk. to Yeehaw Juncton; go W SR60 aporo 19 miles. Left (South)
at S-65 access Rd. Proceed apprx 8 miles to S-65A structure. For directions
call (407) 846-5226. A site isit will immediately follow.
All bids must conform to the instructions in the Request for Bidders (RFB). Inter-
ested respondents may obtain a copy of the complete RFB by downloading It for
free from our websfte www.wmdgo. by obtaining a set for $40.00 at the
above address, by calling (561) 682-6391, or by calling the 24-hour BID HOT-
LINE 800-472-5290. The public is invited to attend the bid opening. Information
on the status of this solicitation can be obtained at our web site -
www.sfwmd.gov.
61670 CGS 6/16/05

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Hendry County Public Library Cooperative Governing Board will meet at 5:45
p.m., Monday, June 20, 2005, in the City Hall Commission Chambers, 115 West
Ventura Avenue, Clewiston, Florida. The purpose of this public meeting is to:
* Review and consider the Hendry County Public Library Annual Plan of Service
for 2005, and
* Review and consider the Hendry County Public Library Cooperative Annual
Budget for 2005.
All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend this public meeting. Any
person requiring a special accommodation to participate in the meeting because
of a disability or physical impairment, including speech or hearing impairments,
should contact the Hendry County Library Cooperative Board Coordinator at
(863) 983-1493 at least five calendar days priorto the scheduled meeting.
Christopher Kuechmann, Cooperative Coordinator
61889 CGS 6/16/05
nrTICE MnOTIPE nF EGIII UA MEEcTING


AUCTION on Friday, July 1,2005
at 9:00 a.m. at 1233 N.W. Avenue L,
Belle Glade, Florida
Property eofTamlca McRae:
living room set, chest of drawers, stereo
with speakers, misc. items
62653 CGS 6/16,23/05

NOTICE
AUCTION on Friday, June.17, 2005
at 9:00 a.m. at 1233 N.W. Avenue L,
Belle Glade, Florida
Property ofLaTonya Canty
Clothes, toys, basinet, baby tub and
CGS. misc. items.
60031 CGS 6/9,16/05

NOTICE OF BUDGET WORKSHOP/
SPECIAL MEETING
The Board of Supervisors for the Central
County Water Control District will hold
a budget workshop/special meeting
on Wednesday, June 22, 2005 at 5
p.m., the purpose of this workshop
will be to discuss the Districts budget,
security needs and its right of way
policy.
All interested persons are invited to at-
tend and be heard with respect to the
proposed budget Interested persons
may appear on their own behalf or by
agent or attorney. It anyone decides to
appeal a decision made by the Board
with respect to any matters c to insure
that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record Includes the
testimony and evidence upon which
(he appeal is to be based.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: IF YODU RE-
juijI -. :iul. i.l D) OR SERVICES AS
AD'Mi: ,iri THE AMERICAN
DISABILITIES ACT, PLEASE CONTACT
THE DISTRICT CLERK'S OFFICE AT
863) 983-5797, NO LESS THAN FIVE
DAYS PRIOR TO THE ABOVE
STATED HEARING DATE.
CENTRAL COUNTY WATER
CONTROL DISTRICT
59813 CGS 6/15/05
NOTICE TO PUBLIC
The Hendry County Hospital
Authority Financial Commit-
tee will conduct their month-
ly business meeting on
Thursday, June 30 at 10:00
a.m. in the Conference
Room at Hendry Regional
Medical Center, 500 West
Stigarland Highway, Clewis-
ton, Florida.
62398 CGS 6/16/05
Your next job could be in
today's classified. Did
you look for it?


OFTHE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
OF THE CENTRAL COUNTY WATER
CONTROL DISTRICT
You are hereby notified that the Regular
Meeting of the Board of Supervisors of
the Central County Water Control Dis-'
trict will be held on Wednesday, June
22, 2005 at 7 p.m. at the Montura
Clubhouse, Montura Ranch Estates,
State Road 833, Clewiston, Florida.
The purpose of this meeting is to
transact any and all business which
may come before the Board. If a per-
son decides to appeal the decision of
the Board of Supervisors with respect
to any matter considered at the public
meeting or hearing herein referred he
or she may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the
appeal is based.
59805 CGS 6/15/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Lakeside Condo Association of Pahokee,
Florida is seeking bids for lawn main-
tenance. Bid should include weekly
mowing, weedeating, edging, spraying
as needed, biyeady front hedge trim-
ming and putting down mulch, and
some yearly trimming. For information
contact Mrs. Burroughs at
561-261-3992. Mail bids to Lakeside
Condo Association, #40 Lakeside Cir-
cle, Pahokee, FL 33476. Closing date:
6/30/05
61680 CGS 6/16/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice is hereby given that Fergu-
sons wing will sell at public Auction,
freeorom all prior liens, the following
vehicles that remaining unclaimed in
storage with charges unpaid, pursuant
to Florida Statutes 713.78, to the high-
est bidder at 12065 Lakeshore Drive,
Canal Point, FL 33438 on June 20,
2005 at 9:00 A.M.
1991 Ford (van) Red
VlN#1FMDA11U9MZA27314
1992 Iszu (4-doorl Hed
VIN# 452CG58Z2N4353451
1986 Buick(2-doir) B61u
VIN# 1G4GM4A7GP231421)
2002 Chevrolet 4-do0r) Wh/
VIN# 2G1WF52E729376033
1991 Mercury(2-door) Bro
VIN#1MEPM6047MH623839
1999Daewo (4-doorl Grn
VIN# KLAJA52Z7XK237343
1983 Ford (Pickup) Grn
VIN# 1FTEF14G3DNA42155
60955 CGS 6/9,16/05


Grab a bargain from your
neighbor's garage, attic,
basement or closet in
today's classified,


Water, water everywhere for the rainy season


By MaiyAnn Morris
Water is a big subject in South
Florida's rainy season. For newcom-
ers, the "rainy season", extends from
late spring through early fall, roughly
from May or June through October or
November, depending on the year.
Daily rainfall on the relatively flat land
of South Florida means that water can
be a problem.
Government water managers, such
as the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, local drainage districts,
such as the Coquina Water Control
District, cities and county govern-
ments and homeowners associations
have the responsibility to manage
rainfall runoff for their areas, canals,
ditches and lakes, as their codes and
charters require. Property owners,
ranchers, farmers and individuals are
also responsible for the runoff from


Staff photos/MaryAnn Morris
Tickseed, said to have been
used by the Seminoles for heat
prostration is blooming almost
everywhere a mower hasn't
touched.


the land they own.
Dished medians in interstate high-
ways, roadside ditches and swales
along lot lines and residential roads all
work to drain water away from roads
we drive on and the buildings where
we work and live.
Sometimes water can be drained
off through public ditches, canals and
swales, or caught in ponds and partial-
ly contained in swales until it soaks in
or evaporates over time.
Nothing seems to cause more con-
tention than changing things on your
property that in some way changes
the water situation on your neighbor's
property. In short, you are expected to
keep your water and keep the ditches
flowing. This issue is known as "lot
drainage".
"Lot drainage in new subdivisions
is addressed as part of the review


process," said Jennifer Busbin, plan-
ner for the Okeechobee County Plan-
ning and Development Department.
When roads and homes are built, the
areas covered with concrete, roofs or
paving no longer allow rainwater to
soak in. Plans must be made so that
no one is hurt by the new construc-
tion.
"On existing properties," continued
Ms. Busbin, "neither may the drainage
flow be blocked nor may the lot be
changed in such a way to cause water
to flow onto or stand on neighboring
property."
So, what can you do?
Be you own best water manager.
Be sure that you understand the path
water takes as it leaves your property.
Don't block swales or ditches by plant-
ing in them or allow leaves, mulch
and other yard waste and sediment to


Pale Meadow Beauty is a little
flower, sometimes blooming with
Tickseed in open prairie. Its petals Spike Rush grows in ditches
fall off easily, especially in the and marshes often near or
afternoon, among Pickerel Weed


remain. Don't plant in swales and
ditches. Even tree trunks can interfere
with drainage. Older swales should
periodically be dug out to remove
accumulated sediment in the bottom
and sloped, if needed so that water
will flow to catch basins or soak into
the soil.

When changes on neighboring
property cause water problems on
your land, it can become a code
enforcement issue.

"If, for instance, you wish to build
higher than your neighbor, you can
where permitted, but you must keep
your water on your land with a swale.
You may not change drainage to
adversely impact your neighbor," said
Ms. Busbin, "Problems with existing
homes can be an issue for the Code
Compliance Department."


Yellow Colic-root's leaves form a
distinctive rosette at its base, mak-
ing it easy to identify.


Okeechobeers Many


Wildflowers; we lucky few


Tiny Shoe Buttons, also called Hat Pins looks like a tiny "pop" of
white fireworks on the slopes of ditches.


By MaryAnn Morris
Here in Okeechobee County, devel-
opment has not pushed the farms and
open space back and back and back. In
other, more developed areas where
many wildflowers once grew, now only
the Periwinkle and some never-say-die
Lantana survive as traffic blasts by. Here
we are lucky.
This time of year the roadsides and
ditches in Okeechobee County sparkle
with color. Wildflowers come popping
up year after year asking nothing, brush-
ing up, stretching up, and reaching for
US.
A riot of deep yellow Mohr's Susan
.pops up with nodding heads behind the
bands of lighter yellow Tickseed.


Ditch bottoms bloom in a prolifera-
tion of wild abandon with cobalt blue
Pickerel Weed, white Spike Rush and
the interesting little white plant called
Hatpins, or Shoe Buttons up the side of
the ditch. It reminds of a tiny burst of
white fireworks exploding on the
ground.
Roadside ditches often have a lacey
edge of yellow Tickseed to add to the
color palette. If you're out for a quiet
stroll or not driving too fast, you may
even see little Pale Meadow Beauty or
the delicate spikes of Yellow Colic-root.
Yes, here we are lucky.
Reference: Florida Wildflowers in
their Natural Communities by Walter
Kingsley Taylor


Researchers declare victory against invasive mole cricket


GAINESVILLE After a quarter-
century fight against three invasive
insects from South America, Universi-
ty of Florida researchers are declaring
victory against the pests that caused
$94 million in damage to turf and pas-
tures each year.
The successful battle against mole
crickets is a prime example of how
biological control agents can be used
to manage pests without conventional
pesticides, said Howard Frank, a pro-
fessor of entomology at UF's Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
He said the release of three benefi-
cial organisms wasps, nematodes
and flies imported from South Ameri-
ca that attack mole crickets has
reduced mole cricket populations in
the Gainesville area by 95 percent, and
the control is spreading throughout
Florida.
"Reductions increased during the
past 12 years as populations of the
introduced natural enemies increased
and began to have a spectacular effect
on the mole cricket pests," said Frank,
who has coordinated the mole cricket
research program since 1985.
Frank said four species of mole
crickets are found in Florida: North-
ern, short-winged, southern and
tawny.
The northern mole cricket, which is
indigenous to the state, is not closely
related to the three South American
invaders, and it is not troublesome
because native wasp and nematode
species in Florida keep it under con-
trol. Unfortunately, the three invasive
mole cricket species are not affected
by native wasps and nematodes in
Florida, he said.
Accidentally introduced to the
southeastern United States more than
75 years ago, the pest mole crickets
first became a problem for Florida
vegetable growers and were poorly
controlled with arsenic baits. The


invasive pests became a nuisance
again in the 1970s when the Environ-
mental Protection Agency banned
chlordane and similar pesticides.
"When the three invasive mole
crickets left their natural enemies
behind, there was nothing to stop
their population boom here," Frank
said. "These pest mole crickets, which
tunnel into the ground and feed on
plant roots, are now found from North
Carolina to Texas, and they continue
to spread north and west."
Of the three, the tawny mole crick-
et is the most destructive, eating grass
roots in Florida pastures and turf as
well as the roots of tomatoes, cab-
bages, eggplants and bell pepper
seedlings, Frank said.
He said the pest crickets have a real
affinity for bahiagrass, Florida's most
common pasture grass, which covers
more than 2.5 million of the state's 35-
million acres. Like the pest crickets,
bahiagrass was imported from South
America, and it provides the insects
with an almost endless food source.
They also eat Bermudagrass on Flori-
da golf courses.
"Early research on the three inva-
sive pests showed how mole crickets,
like moles, burrow into soil around
plant roots and prevent them from
absorbing water," Frank said. "We
also realized that permanent control
of these pests could only be achieved
with a classical biological control pro-
gram, and we began looking for natu-
ral enemies in South America."
A BENEFICIAL WASP
In Brazil, researchers found a
native wasp (Larra bicolor) that
attacks the pest mole crickets. After
the Brazilian wasp stings the pest
mole cricket and lays an egg, the wasp
grub (larva) begins feeding on the
mole cricket and kills it within two
weeks.
In 1981-1983, the Brazilian wasp


was released at several South Florida
locations, but it did not thrive and
failed to provide effective control of
the pest mole crickets.
Undaunted, UF researchers found a
tougher strain of the same wasp in the
higher elevations of Bolivia, releasing
it in the Gainesville area during 1988
and 1989. It attacks all three pest mole
cricket species, but does not threaten
Florida's native northern mole cricket.
"By late 1993, it was evident that
the Bolivian strain of the wasp had
become established," Frank said.
"Four years later, the population had
spread at least 20 miles east and west
of Gainesville. By 2002, it seems to
have spread 135 miles northwest and
perhaps as far south. In time, it is likely
to occupy all of Florida."
A BENEFICIAL NEMATODE
Next stop in the battle against the
mole cricket invasion was Uruguay
where a parasitic nematode a tiny,
worm-like animal was found and
brought to Florida for mass-rearing
and release.
"While other mole cricket natural
enemies live above ground, nema-
todes dwell in the soil where mole
crickets do most of their damage -
that's the real advantage of this para-
site," said Grover Smart, a professor of
nematology who brought the nema-
tode to Florida in 1985. "The nema-
tode does not affect Florida's native
northern mole crickets, but it does
attack all three invasive mole cricket
pests."
Once the parasitic nematode
(Steinernema scapterisci) enters the
body of a mole cricket to mature and
reproduce, it kills the cricket within 48
hours, Smart said. Young nematodes
emerge from the dead cricket about a
week later to seek new hosts. Once
infected, mole crickets can spread the
nematode to new areas by flying,
crawling or burrowing.


Between 1989 and 1992, scientists
working on the mole cricket research
program released more than 16 billion
nematodes in 21 Florida counties.
"We just don't see a lot of mole crick-
ets anymore in areas where we have
released this parasite," Smart said.
UF holds three patents on the
organism, which is now available
commercially as a biopesticide mar-
keted as Nematac-S by MicroBio, a
biotech firm owned by Becker Under-
wood Inc. in Ames, Iowa.
"If the nematode has not spread to
your land, it will eventually get there,"
Frank said. "If you want to speed up its
arrival, apply the biopesticide. It will
kill a large portion of your pest mole
crickets year after year."
A BENEFICIAL FLY
The third effective biocontrol is a
beneficial fly from Brazil (Ormia
depleta) that is attracted to two
species of the pest mole crickets by
the sounds they make.
"Like little guided missiles, the flies
home in on singing crickets and lay
their larvae on or near the singer,"
Frank said. "The larvae burrow into
the crickets and feed, killing the host
within a week."
He said the mole cricket research
program found and reared the Brazil-
ian fly, releasing a few hundred flies in
Gainesville and Bradenton in 1988.
Between 1989 and 1992, researchers
released more than 10,000 flies across
the state in cooperation with golf
courses and the Florida TurfGrass
Association. By 1994, the fly had
spread to 38 of Florida's 67 counties,
but the tropical insect does not seem
to survive permanently north of the
Orlando area.
"In counties where the fly is estab-
lished, surveys show significantly less
damage by pest mole crickets on golf
courses," Frank said.


Jubic Noice


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursdav, June 16,2005





Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16, 2005


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


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