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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Glades County Democrat
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028301/00023
 Material Information
Title: Glades County Democrat
Alternate Title: Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Glades Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Moore Haven Fla
Creation Date: June 9, 2005
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Moore Haven (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Glades County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Glades -- Moore Haven
Coordinates: 26.834167 x -81.096111 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1922.
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 8, no. 12 (June 21, 1929) issue misdated 1920.
General Note: Editors: R.B. Child, <1926>; Keathley Bowden, <1929>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 29 (Sept. 24, 1926).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358007
oclc - 01461464
notis - ABZ6307
lccn - sn 83000793
issn - 0745-4120
System ID: UF00028301:00023

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
    Classifieds
        page 18
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
Full Text




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GLADES


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Moore Haven, Fla. Thursday, June 9, 2005 Volume 78, Number 52


50o


At a Glance

Moore Haven Lions
Club meetings
The Moore Haven Lions
Club has begun its summer
schedule. The next meeting
will be Tuesday, June 14. The
next two meetings will be
Tuesday, July 12 and Tuesday,
Aug. 9. Thereafter, in Septem-
ber, the regular schedule of
meetings on the second and
fourth Tuesday of each month
will resume. All meetings will
have dinner and are at the
American Legion Hall in
Moore Haven starting at 5:30
p.m. Any questions contact
Kirby Sullivan at (86) 946-
2556.

Council meeting
The School Advisory Coun-
cil of Moore Haven Junior-
Senior High School will hold
its regular monthly meeting
on Monday, June 13 at 7 p.m.
in the media center.

Association
meeting
The Lakeport Community
Association has scheduled
their next meeting for June 14,
at 7 p.m.

Flea Market
re-Opening
Moore Haven flea market
will re-open and will be offer-
ing their spaces for free to sell
your stuff. For more informa-
tion, call' (863) 227-6173 or
(863) 946-0037 ask for Ricar-
do.

Sugar Dolls are
having classes
The Clewiston Sugar Dolls
will be having summer class-
es, starting June 8, with class-
es being held at Central Ele-
mentary every Wednesday.
Beginner ages are 4-12, class
is at 3 p.m., ages 13 and up,
class is at 4 p.m.
Sugar Dolls classes consist
of baton twirling, dance pom-
poms, and new this year flag
and flag corp, color guard, you
may take one class or all class-
es. Classes are $25 per month.
Registration fee is $12, which
includes your insurance. For
more information, please call
Judy at (863) 677-0025.

Gala night
The Hendry County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
hereby announces our Jeffer-
son/Jackson Gala on Friday,
June 10. Social Time is 6:30
p.m. and dinner is catered by
Gator Hammock Catering at 7
p.m. The Keynote Speaker is
Senator Dave Aronberg and
there will be raffle drawings
along with the buffet dinner.
This Gala will be held at the
LaBelle Civic Center behind
the LaBelle City Hall Building
on Highway 80 West. For fur-
ther information or tickets
please call 983-2960 or 675-
6131.


Lake Level

14.73

Feet
above sea
level

Index
Classifieds . .18-21
Obituaries . ... ...,2
Opinion ...4
School . . . .7
See Page 4 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.

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Main Street moving forward


MOORE HAVEN Work con-
tinues on the application seeking
Main Street designation for the city
of Moore Haven, aimed at revitaliz-
ing the city's historic commercial
district on the Caloosahatchee
River and beyond.
During a workshop held Tues-
day, May 24 at city hall, Glades
County Economic Development
Council Executive Director Tracy
Whirls, who is spearheading the
endeavor, gave a brief history of
the Main Street program and the
application process ahead.


"The national Main Street pro-
gram is 25 years old, active in 37
states. In Florida, since 1985," Ms.
Whirls said. "It doesn't provide a
big revenue stream, but what it
does provide is technical assis-
tance, with design, historic preser-
vation architecture, marketing and
helps to identify grant and revolv-
ing loan funds that can be sought
to finance the program."
Initially daunted by the 50-page
application, which must be com-
pleted and submitted to Tallahas-
see by July 29, Ms. Whirls noted


that roughly half of the application
is an assessment of the communi-
ty's readiness to begin a Main
Street program.
"The Main Street program
emphasizes a four-point approach
to historic preservation/revitaliza-
tion, focusing on design, organiza-
tion, promotion and economic
restructuring," Ms. Whirls said.
"One of our strengths is organi-
zation," Ms. Whirls said, noting
that the Economic Development
Council, as the sponsoring organi-
zation, is better organized and bet-


ter prepared to take on the chal-
lenge of revitalizing the historic
downtown than before. Recently
the EDC voted to hire a part time
assistant for the director, to free
some of her time to direct the Mainr
Street initiative.
The Moore Haven City Council
has endorsed the project, and.
named Jerrilyn Schuleter, at city
hall, and Mayor Dave McGee to the
Main Street application commit-
tee. Glades Electric Cooperative
has pledged its support of. the
endeavor, agreeing to fund the


By Lindsey Williams
(Editor's note: The following
historical feature was submitted
and re-printed courtesy of the
author, Lindsey Williams.)
Range wars of cattlemen ver-
sus rustlers and cattlemen
versus cattlemen were a peril in
the early days of herding in
southwest Florida.
Valuable four-footed property
wandered untended in vast,
open ranges like those in the
Ninety-Mile Prairie crescent
around Charlotte and DeSoto
Counties and that a'uui iud .lig.i-
tor Slough in Glades County.
An epidemic of rustling in
1890, in Arcadia is described by
Stetson Kennedy in his book


Graduating seniors from
Moore Haven High School's
Class of 2005 received scholar-
ships during the annual Class
Night ceremony, Tuesday, May
17, at the Moore Haven
Junior/Senior High School
Auditorium. Forty-two percent
of the seniors received scholar-
ships totaling more than
$55,000.
Scholarship recipients
included: American Society of
Sugar Cane Technologies, Shel-
by Bond; Beta Club Scholar-


review of the completed applica-
tion before its submittal, pledging
the Co-Op's assistance with seek-
ing funding and nominating Shan-
non Hall to the application com-
mittee, in charge of compiling the
"required information on the EDC,
as the sponsoring organization.
Patty Register, of Gatorama,
volunteered to gather tourism and
promotions information while for-,
mer historical society member
See Street Page 10


"Palmetto Country". He record-
ed oral histories in 1937 when
old ranchers remembered those
days clearly:
"One South Florida rancher
estimates that he and his friends
lost nearly 3,000 cattle between
1891 and 1896. In the latter year,
a band of rustlers ran off 300
steers in DeSoto County.
"When a quartet of rustlers
got as far'as Titusville with 200
cattle, a posse of swift riding cat-
tlemen overtook them.
"By tying blankets around
their-horses' hoofs, a posse of.
ranchers took a shortcut across
Canoe Creek Bog and came up
See War-Page 10


ship, Myrianette Figueroa; Beta
Blood Drive Scholarships,
Emily Buonpastore, Marrisa
Weeks, Wil Click and Shelby
Bond; Big Lake National Bank,
Derek Jones; Edison College
Scholarships, Leonardo Cen-
teno and Rosalio Morales; Ford
Corporation Scholarship, Shel-
by Bond; Garry A. Coleman
Memorial Scholarship, Justin
Guerry; George Berry Memori-
See Night Page 7


Ducks and daisies and acres
of asters. Just when it seemed
there could be no more pasture
ponds this year -after all, tradi-
tionally, this is supposed to be the
end. .of the dry season the
sheet flow of the more than eight
inches of rain from a week ago
has finally made it from the miles
north-northeast of here to these
sprawling flatlands more or less
north of the Big River.
Heading south past the barn,
peering through the cypress, the
pasture was as blue as the cobalt
sky-dome above it. Not a cloud in
sight, not even the usual streak of
clouds near the horizon. So
much water, so many meander-
ing.ponds with almost no begin-
nings and no endings and the
only green in sight being the sil-
very-iridescence of the smut
islands their long, slender
blades arching in every direction,
some so long they touch the sur-
rounding water. Ten thousand lit-
tle sea-green islands! Well, not
quite that many but a passel too
many to count.
The sounds of my knee boots
sloshing through the blue water


Small pasture ponds are creating a wonderful atmos-
phere for Florida's wildlife to hold onto the few remaining
weeks before the Florida summer quickly wisps away
what remains of small water holes.


was more than the ducks could
tolerate. Three huge flocks rose
in perfect formation, quacking in
a discordant chorus letting the
world know they were not happy
with the intrusion of their territo-
ry. From the looks of the expanse
of water and seeing the ducks
mostly along the edges of the


ponds, it didn't seem wise to try
wading the shortest route to the
old roadbed. leading to the mail-
box.
After all, there was no way to
see where the wallowing holes
were beneath the water. So turn-
See Rain Page 4


Shade gardening for Florida


By Barbara Oehlbeck
It's a pretty book, and more. It's
a beautiful book, one I am delight-
ed to add to our Florida collection
of plant books and to write about
so others may learn from an
authoritative source.
Monica Moran Brandies' book
SHADE Gardening For Florida is
inviting and magnetic causing a stir
amongst gardeners to go out and
seek shade, to plant shade plants
- many that bloom for year
'round beauty with minimal work
and supplies.
Monica writes, "Most of us
today have an overdose of public
exposure and need areas for
retreat, outdoors and
indoors...consequently planting
for privacy and seclusion becomes
more personal and your environ-
ment more unique."
Shade gardens offer a more
pleasant place for outdoor work
through much of the Florida year,
especially summer.
Addressing the problem of not
enough shade she writes: Getting
the shade you want is quick and


easy in the Sunshine State. Even if
we can grow shade quickly, it's
ridiculous to bulldoze away good
shade trees already growing and
leave new homeowners with glar-
ing sun instead. Better builders are
becoming more aware of the
advantages of working with nature
instead of against her, and are tak-
ing great pains to save the natural
environment.
Advice includes: Protecting
choice trees, taking precautions
during construction, being selec-
tive, being aware of too much
shade, getting to know and to
avoid plants that are pests and
more. Regarding some listed as
"invasive", it should be pointed out
that some are much more so than
others, and some of these others,
such as Strawberry guava (Psidi-
um littorale) are perfectly satisfac-
tory.
According to some profession-
als amongst plants, it's pointed out
that countless trees and shrubs are
planted by birds eating the fruit,
thus seeds are spread, thus new
plants here and there. However, by


most this is not considered a real
problem when it comes to the
strawberry guava. It's such a beau-
tiful, carefree tree and the "straw-
berry" fruit is second to none for
jelly-jam.
Want some tree-trimming les-
sons? See Chapter Five.
As to the development of your
shade garden, chapter six is where
the gold is.
To many, the most dramatically
beautiful shade plants are orchids,
which require minimal care. And
Monica spells. out those flowering
plants for moderate shade. In other
words, there's shade, deep shade,
moderate and other gradations in
between. There are vines and
ground covers, annuals and peren-
nials that grow well in Florida
shade.
As to maintenance, shade gar-
dens require less care and less
water. In chapter eight you'll find
superb color photos page after
page. On page 70, you'll see Fire-
bush Hamelia patens which
See Book Page 7


Murders



end Florida's



range wars


What dry season?: Late season rains beneficial


Courtesy photos
Recent rains have stemmed the tide of what is usually the beginning of Florida's dry
s easeR-.s -- - or -

After the sheet flow: A story


MHHS seniors



celebrate Class



Night at school








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 9, 2005


Engagement


Courtesy photo
Happy Birthday Georgia
Happy "95" Birthday Grandma Georgia McBride. You have
been a blessing to us, Happy Birthday from your children,
grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. We love you.


Shutts and Lakatos
engagement
Ronald and Raygene Buff of
Clewiston are pleased to
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Farrah Shutts to
Michael Lakatos, son of Joseph
and Linda Lakatos of Belle Glade.
Farrah is employed by Midway
Corporation and owner of SunSa-
tional Tans.
Michael is employed by Glades
Alarm Service.
The wedding ceremony will be
held at 6 p.m., June 18 at the
Community United Methodist
Church in Belle Glade.
The reception will be held at
The Belle Glade Elks Lodge
immediately following the cere-
mony. All family and friends are
invited to attend. After returning
from their .honeymoon, the cou-
ple will reside in Belle Glade.


Glades Ford- Lincoln-Mercury
"'-I Efi E S N3ErE1 R
I I E: rI EN A 13 E T- T 1R
-IMP4rE TO F [:: LT"-


Salesman New & Used Vehicles
800-726-8514




Law Offices of Robert L. Vaughn, P.A.


Farrah Shutts and
Lakatos


The upside of being on the downside


Pastor John Hicks
First United Methodist Church
Fired New York Times reporter
Jayson Blair, let go after the San
Antonio Express-News accused
him of plagiarizing an article last
year, is writing a book about his
exploits, looking for a publisher
and trying to sign a movie deal.
He makes no apology for cashing
in on doing something wrong.
But if writing is not your thing,
run over revelers with your SUV.
NYC publicist, Lizzie Grubman,
mowed down 16 people with her
SUV and is back at work, more
successful than ever. Notoriety
brought her clients. Disgraced fig-
ure skater, Tonya Harding, once
famous for having someone beat
rival skater Nancy Kerrigan on the
knee with a lead pipe before the
1992 Winter Olympics, stepped
into a boxing ring against Paula
Jones, former President Clinton's'
onetime favorite civil servant. She
made big bucks doing it.
Other ways to become suc-
cessful and make money you
can always lie to Congress, prac-
tice mail and wire fraud, or leak
government secrets. Check out


what's happening in the news
today.
For many, the step toward
fame and a financial fortune
begins with doing something bad.
They get caught, make the nation-
al news, temporarily face dishon-
or, disgrace and infamy. Then
they give interviews, tell all, say
they're sorry or not. Grant
more interviews and get contract
offers from publishers, movie pro-
ducers, TV or radio talk shows.
They find themselves quickly
restored to society,, and make
loads of money.
This pattern is the new sce-
nario for success, Amrnerican-style.
.Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas
Mavericks, commenting on the
Kobe Bryant case, was quoted as
saying, "From a business perspec-
tive, it's great for the NBA. It's real-
ity television, people love train
wreck television and you hate to
admit it, but that is the truth, that's
the reality today." Perhaps he has
a point.
These days redemption is
cheap, and being disgraced isn't
so bad. People don't want to feel
bad about themselves, at least not
for very long, especially when


there's money to be made. We
are a people who want to feel
good about ourselves even after
doing wrong. According to USA
Today, what little suffering or
shame there is these days is
wickedly foreshortened. A person
transgresses. He or she is caught,
briefly chastised and redeemed -
all in five minutes.
The five-minute redemption
might work for a quick fix, and it
obviously may be profitable, but it
doesn't satisfy God. One example
of this is seen with the people of
the prophet Isaiah's day. They
went through the motions of
faith, and then wondered why
there was no restoration. The
answer was: Their hearts weren't
into it. They performed the rites,
but only because they thought
doing so would cause God to help
them. Redemption had become a
tool, a means to an end. In other
words they sought redemption
because they thought it would be
profitable for them. They didn't
make changes in behaviors that
mattered.
God sees the shallow heart for
what it is. Real justice didn't mat-
ter to the Israelites. Real reform


wasn't important. All that mat-
tered was the profit, not the
prophet. God didn't want their
sackcloth. God had no use for
their ashes, their false humility,
their quarreling or their fighting.
What God wanted was gen-
uine repentance, genuine
remorse, genuine reform. Turning
around to face God that is what
repentance really is. Turn from
darkness, turn to the light -
that's repentance.
God told the Israelites what
was needed help the poor, free
those in bondage, give food to the
hungry and clothes to the naked.
These are visible acts of faith and
repentance that arise only from a
heart that has turned around to
face God.
Do these things, says the
prophet, and God will guide you
continually, and satisfy your
needs in parched places, and
make your bones strong and you
shall be like a watered garden,
like a spring of water, whose
waters never fail (Isaiah 58:11).
Do these things and life will be
good. With or without a book
deal.


Obituaries


112 W. C. Owen .1 iU P AML. ZUUjc-- nvc- *
Clewiston, FL 33440 LaBelle, FL 33975 Ft. Myers, FL 33901
| 863)902-9211 (863) 675-7719 (239) 936-9393




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SSince 1929

Royal's) i'f


FURNITURE Special Offer!
SL------ ---EDI---.-


James Ronaldo
Jones, II
James Ronaldo Jones, II, 23, of
Canal Point, died Sunday, May 29,
2005. Born Sept. 22, 1981 in Paho-
kee, Florida, Mr. Jones had been a
lifetime resident of Canal Point. He
enjoyed computers, fishing and
diving.
He was preceded in death by
his father, James R. Jones.
Survivors include his mother,
Sharon (David) Sours, of Canal
Point, sisters, Jennifer (Keith)
Hickman of Okeechobee; nieces,
Jordan and Kalyn Hickman of
Okeechobee; grandmother, Cora
Barnes of Trenton, New Jersey;
and a host of aunts, uncles and
cousins.
The family received friends at
the Funeral Home on June 3 from
10 a.m. until funeral service time
at 11 a.m.
All arrangements were under
the direction and care of the Bux-
ton Funeral Home and Crematory.
Wilma Evelyn Warren
Wilma Evelyn Warren, 91, of
Branford, passed away June 1,
2005 in Branford. She was born
Jan. 8, 1914 in Fort Lauderdale to
Harney Altman and Delia Frances
Howell Altman.
Survivors include her son:
Leon H. Warren (Pat) of Pt. St.
Lucie, daughters: Velma E. Car-
rington (Fred) of Branford and
Laura Elizabeth Alford (Dean) of
Branford, sister: Hazel Reynolds of
New Bern, NC, Grandchildren:
Jeff Warren, Tammy Ballard, Char-
lie Warren, Brain Warren, Robert
Tyler, Naith Veal, Caroline Hill,
Tony Alford and Susan Flick and
15 great-grandchildren.


She was preceded in death by
her husbandc'Lonnie J. Warren
and sister, Edna Giese.
Funeral Services were held Sat-
urday, June 4, 2005 at 10 a.m. at
the Akin-Davis Funeral Home in
LaBelle with Reverend John
O'Bannon officiating. Interment
followed at the Fort Denaud
Cemetery in LaBelle.
Mary 0. Miller
Mary 0. Miller, 94, of Belle
Glade, died Saturday, June 4, 2005
at Hendry Regional Medical Cen-
ter in Clewiston.
Mrs. Miller was born in Lily,
Florida in 1910. She had been a
resident of Belle Glade for over 60
years. Mrs. Miller was a member
of the First Baptist Church and the
Belle Glade Elks Club.
Survivors include her sons,
Paul R. Miller, of South Bay; John
W Miller, of Belle Glade; daughter,
Jacquelyn V. Ceriale, of Auburn-
,dale, Florida; 28 grandchildren, 33
great-grandchildren and seven
great-great-grandchildren.
Visitation was held Wednes-
day, June 8, 2005 from 10-11 a.m.
and service followed at 11 a.m. at
The First Baptist Church in Belle


Glade with Rev Gary Folds officiat-
ing interment followed at Hillcrest
Memorial Park in West Palm
Beach.
All arrangements by Glades
Funeral Chapel in Belle Glade.
Theodore "Pappa"
Larkin Beck
Theodore "Pappa" Larkin
Beck, 74, of Moore Haven, died
Friday, June 3, 2005. Born Oct. 17,
1930 to Theodore Martin and Ida
Marie Strickland Beck, he had
been a lifetime resident of Moore
Have. He served in the U.S. Army
and was a Korean War Veteran.
He was a member of the First Bap-
tist Church.
He was preceded in death by
his daughter, Julie Warren.'
Survivors include his beloved
wife of 38 years, Wanda Faye
Whidden Beck of Moore Haven;
sons David L. Beck of Jacksonville,
Charlie Beck Dave W Beck and
Joey Beck, all of Moore Haven;
daughters, Vickie (David) Palladi-
no and Jennifer Beck of Moore
Haven and Evelyn beck of Jack-
sonville; 22 grandchildren; 16
great grandchildren; sisters, Bob-


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Serving The Lake Area Since 1980


bie (John) Swindle of Clewiston,-
Virginia (Leroy) Roberts and Doris
(Larry) Williams, all of Lakeport.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday, June 8, 2005 at The
First Baptist Church in Moore
Haven,and interment followed in
Ortona Cemetery.
All arrangements were under
the directions and care of the Bux-
ton West Lake Funeral Home and
Crematory.


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GLADES GENERAL HOSPITAL

GLADES 1201 South Main Street
GENERAL
HOSPITAL
Orientation: Tuesday, June 21, 2005 from 5:15 pm 6:15 pm
Education Program: Saturday, June 25, 2005 from 8:00 am 12:30 pm
(Light breakfast available)
Space is limited, so register today by calling (561) 993-3632.

For participating and providing feedback on the new program, you will also
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Thursday, June 9, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee







Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Emergency
The Big Lake Amateur Radio tion relies
Club assists in the operations of capabilities
the Hendry County emergency annual Fiel
programs by providing skilled members w
communications operators to and feed l
get messages through in hurri- antennas to
canes and other emergencies. shelter.
This month, club members Field Da
will participate in "Field Day", a where radio
national exercise to test the nation opera
emergency preparedness of our period unde
communications networks and tions and ati
their abilities to operate under cate with as
emergency conditions. agency static
The principal communica- begins at 2
tions site in Clewiston is at John June 25, an
Boy Auditorium, where an ama- Sunday, June
teur radio station is set up and The exerc
will be tested. up temporary
The center is prepared to nas when ne
operate under emergency from batter
power conditions and the sta- generators,


test session planned


on the generator
there. Before the
d Day event, local
ill check antennas
ines that connect
the radios in the

y is an exercise
stations across the
*ate for a 24-hour
r emergency condi-
tempt to communi-
many other emer-
ons as possible. It
p.m. on Saturday,
d ends at 2 p.m. on
'26.
:ise includes putting
y emergency anten-
eeded and operating
ies, solar power or
independent of the


usual sources of electricity. Dif-
ferent modes of communication
will be used, including voice,
telegraph, digital modes, inter-
facing computers with radio
transceivers and, in some set-
tings, amateur television sta-
tions.
A recent article in an amateur
radio journal emphasized that
having experience in handling
messages has proven to be the
most valuable asset when emer-
gencies strike.
Often, messages go through
various formats (voice to tele-
graph, to computer-linked sta-
tions, back to telegraph or voice,
etc.) and that the practice
among communications opera-
tors is essential if the message is
to get through.


During the 24-hour period,
the stations will be open at the
John Boy Auditorium site. Every-
one is'invited to come and see
this test drill in progress. Espe-
cially invited are those who
would like to share in emer-
gency communications at one of
our hurricane shelters, whether
licensed as a radio amateur or
not.

The group hopes to provide
communications in the Clewis-
ton area, as well as an overall
plan for Hendry County and wel-
comes all who would be inter-
ested in playing a potentially life
saving role in our community
when needed.


James

Fencing
Licensed & Insured


- F).. *n..IaILbL...n 04
- I~... Ic 4-i nor

- E-~.~in4..* ~*EI ts
4 4 ~ o


Call for more information 96-6l-*9462


Stay safe when lightning strikes


This time of year, thunder-
storms are common. Lightning
is just part of life in Florida, and
the accompanying hazards
should be taken seriously.
Florida holds the record for
the most people killed by light-
ning each year. Between 1990
and 2003, of the 756 persons
killed by lightning in the United
States, 126 persons were in Flori-
da. Texas, which ranked number
two in lightning deaths,.reported
52 fatal lightning strikes in that
same period.
While hurricanes may grab
the headlines, lightning kills
more people in Florida than any
other weather-related phenome-
na.
According to the National
Weather Service, no place is
completely safe during a light-
ning storm. (Lightning can even
strike people who are indoors.)
Some places, however, are safer
than others.
The safest place to be during


A
Healthier
Life


with Katrina Elsken

a storm, according to the
National Weather Service, is a
large, enclosed building. Once
inside a building, stay away from
electrical appliances and plumb-
ing fixtures.
Lightning can travel a great
distance through power lines or
phone lines. It is generally con-
sidered.safe to use a cordless
phone, but the experts advise
against using a regular phone
during a lightning storm.
Open buildings, such as pic-
nic shelters are not considered
safe. Metal buildings, such as


storage sheds, are also unsafe.
If no suitable building is near-
by, an enclosed vehicle such as
an automobile, van or school
bus can be a good alternative.
Open vehicles, such as convert-
ibles, are not safe.
Inside the vehicle, roll up the
windows and avoid touching the
ignition, radio or doors until the
storm is over. Should lightning
strike the vehicle, the vehicle's.
metal shell will conduct the
lightning around and away from
you. (It's only a myth that the
rubber tires provide insulation.)
'Lightning can strike more
than 10 miles away from the
center of a thunderstorm. If you
hear a storm approaching, time
the delay between lightning and
the thunder. If there are 30 sec-
onds or less between the sound
of the thunder and the flash of
the lightning, you are within
striking range of the lightning
and should immediately seek
shelter.


Counting the seconds, how-
ever, does not always mean you
are safe because lightning can
sometimes strike beyond the
audible range of the storm.
That's why it's important to
check weather reports.
Most people who are struck
by lightning are not hit directly.
More often, they are struck by
current running through the
ground. This is called "side
flash".
The National Weather Service
provides the following tips for
treating lightning strike victims:
Call 9-1-1 immediately. Pro-
vide information about location
and about the lightning strike.
If the victim is in the open,
carefully move the victim to a
safer spot so the rescuers will
not be in danger.
If the victim is not breathing
and has no pulse, start mouth-
to-mouth resuscitation and CPR.


Vacation getting away from it or taking it with us?


The Reverend Samuel S.
Thomas, Ph. D.+
Saint Martin's Church, Clewis-
ton
John the Baptist had a direct
and abrasive style about him. He
would call people "a brood of
vipers (Mathew 3:7)" and tell
them that their old comfortable
ways would no longer work
(Luke 3:7ff).
Although he went olT by him-
self, he still came to the attention
of the authorities and Herod did-
n't like John's criticism even
from a distance. John wound up
going to jail and was finally
beheaded. The trouble may well
have been that when he left
town and wanted to get away
from it all, he took himself with
him! Now it's vacation time.
Everyone is thinking once more
about "getting away from it all"
and going to some favorite place
to have some peace and quite.
A while ago, I called a man
on his cell phone number. He
told me he was driving across
South Carolina and was on vaca-
tion. The ubiquitous cell phone


serves as.a perennial "leash"
and constant reminder that we
don't "get away from it all"
when it goes with us.
One vacation time, I was
asked where I was going and I
told the people at my Church
that I was going to tour the Euro-
pean countryside. "What will
we do if we want to get a hold of
you," I was asked? I had no
answer I didn't have a cell
phone and made no hotel reser-
vations in advance. I suggested
that I.could call in every so often,
but didn't know where I'd be
staying or how long it would
take me to get home.
How often should I call in?
Nobody knew and I left names
of contact persons in cases of
emergencies then took off
"incommunicado" for a month.
Life went on. I took myself with
me. I came home. I wanted to
get away from it all and I did.
There were no tragedies and
nothing .drastic had happened.
None of the contact persons
were called upon and all of the
potential "emergencies" never
happened.


Like John the Baptist, we take
ourselves with us whenever we
go anywhere. If we need to be in
touch, all well and good; but
don't talk about "getting away
from it all" because that's not it.
If we think people will tolerate
our abrasiveness because we're
away from home, think again. If
we go somewhere and set out to
criticize others and expect them
to appreciate our insights, we'll
be disappointed.
That's not "getting away from
it all" but living the same way in
a different location. That would
be a vacation that wouldn't help
refresh, heal, help us grow, give
us something to share when we
returned. What I like to do is to
try to take a part of "me" on
vacation that I don't ordinarily
get to see. There is a part of me
that likes to explore science
museums or sample restaurants
or browse in stores where I can
find things that I can't find at
home.
I hope I'm more likely to see
something new or find a new
way of doing things and learn
something to take home. I know


.1 might be "trapped" on a long
plane flight or train ride, so I'll
plan for it and take some books
that I've been waiting to read but
never got around to reading at
home. In short, I don't want to
take "me" with me on vacation, I
want to do something different
and think about different things.
Then the vacation becomes a
vacation.
Religious people have been
doing similar things for a long
time. They're called "retreats".
You leave your cell phone at
home and go off to a spot where
you can shift gears, and think
about new things in a new set-
ting. That can be refreshing and
renewing.
People think about recre-
ational activities and I hope that
they can re-create in the true
sense of the word; doing some-
thing that is different, seeing
something that refreshes and
finding a new face of God's cre-
ation they hadn't seen before.
That fulfills my dream of "getting
away from it all" and being able
to be renewed by that special
time set aside every so often.


Volunteers needed for native vegetation plantings on WEA.


WEST PALM BEACH The
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission is looking for
volunteers to help 1lant native
trees and shrubs to enhance
wildlife habitat at the John C.
and Mariana Jones/Hungry land


Wildlife and Environmental
Area.
This volunteer effort is, Satur-
day, June 11 from 7 a.m. until
noon.
John C. and Mariana
Jones/Hungry land Wildlife and


Environmental Area is just inside
the main gate in Martin. County
off of County Road'711, 1.5 miles
north of Indiantown Road (west
of Jupiter Farms). Lunch to be
provided.
Volunteers should wear long


pants, long sleeves and close
toed shoes, bring sunscreen, a
hat, and water, and prepare to
get dirty. To volunteer for this
planting, contact Beth Morford
at (561) 625-5122, ext. 142.


Gdes Ford Lincoln-Mercury
SFE -E tJILT[ I E, i.Er.L '* A L,.LF"- HiPMEN1 r ,- f
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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 9,2005


Speak Out

Speak out is our free 24-hour opinion line. Call 946-2002 to
express your opinion or ask a question about public issues.
You are not required to give your name. While we want you to
speak freely, the newspaper reserves the right to edit calls for
clarity, brevity, relevance and fairness.
Show your American pride
Flag Day, June 14, is approaching. It would be nice if everyone
would display the flag that day. After 9-11, everyone got very patri-
otic and flew the flag. However, many of those flags are in sad
shape. It is improper and illegal to fly a flag that is tattered and/or
torn. George Washington said, and I quote, "We take the stars
from heaven, the red from our mother country, separating it by
white stripes, thus showing that we have separated from her and
the white stripes go down to posterity representing liberty."

No place to rest
A few weeks ago, (someone) put barricades of sort to keep
vehicles from pulling off of 80 before the turn onto 27. Not a great
idea. Many cars pull on the shoulder when they're undecided if
they want to go left or right at turn into Clewiston. All the bad
wrecks are not there, they are at the middle split, usually going
onto 80. Keeping cars from pulling off is just going to cause cars to
swerve when they realize they made a mistake. Many truckers
stop there when they're too tired to go on. Isn't this safer than
driving tired? They need to figure a safer way to get on and off of
80 and 27 than trying to prevent tired drivers from pulling off the
road.


Rain

Continued From Page 1
ing eastward, it was almost a mat-
ter of straddling the barbed wire
fence to keep from sinking in up to
my knees. More and more it seems
as if it might be a good idea to take
along a little skiff for a time like this!
Come to think of it, maybe Mr. Rat
would lend his and we could relive
some of his grand adventures in
"Wind In The Willows".
At the end of the cow corridor,
there was the little shaded pool,
with shining star-face water lilies
and curly, crisp watercress. As long
as these warm days stay, so will
they. An old, falling-down fence
runs alongside the little water hole,
serving no purpose except to be a
poetic backdrop for various daisies
to lean against.
Continuing eastward 'away
from the oaks at the pool, which
would eventually lead to the rutted
roadbed, there were the pale little
faces of asters, acres of them!


Many of the blooms are no bigger
than a dime. They've usually gone
to seed by this time, but this year
their timetable has been elongated
considerably. They're in full bloom
with only a head of seeds here and
there. In wide ribbon-like drifts they
stretch across the pasture where
the ground is a little higher. They're
not averse to plenty of moisture,
but they don't take kindly to sitting
in water for more than a short time.
The old lock to the road gate
was too rusted to open, so climb-
ing over it afforded a good vantage
point to see the world from on high
- that is, as high as the big gate.
Standing a top the wide gatepost,
looking back, there was the giant
cypress sentinel, which is not far
from the cow corridor, totally deco-
rated with snow-white herons on
every branch from its pointed top
that sliced the cobalt blue to the
lowest limbs that almost touched
the ground.
And not a bird was moving! The
whole.tree looked as if it were artis-
tically decorated with big, fat Christ-
mas icicles and silver tinsel, known


as Spanish moss, which is not a
moss although its stems are moss-
like that bear small leaves and tiny
yellow flowers. The hanging stems
*are sometimes 20 feet long. At this
time of year when a leafless tree is
covered with the graceful scarves
of Spanish moss, the appearance is
purely ghostlike. Spanish moss
belongs to the family Bromeli-
aceae.
Almost at the mailbox on the
edge of the sand and clay road
that's almost like a causeway run-
ning between two wide, deep-
ditch canals, there is a continuous
parade of wildflowers that all but
defy identification. Some are there
one day and gone the next, others
bloom for weeks while still others
are seen perhaps every fewyears.
Their habits seem strange to
observers but may be perfectly nat-
ural in the wondrous world of the
wild. Like today, a great surprise at
seeing the pretty face of pink Ruel-
lia, a conspicuous sessile flower
that often lasts only a few hours,
which just may be the reason I had
not seen it before. But there it was,


atop a tall stem, fully open.
Returning along the fence line
that crosses the southwest pasture,
a far piece from the haunts of the
ducks to which they had returned,
their soft, faraway quacking was
the only sound as the sun dropped
lower and lower in the purple twi-
light, its rays radiantly reflected on
gathering night clouds. Suddenly
becoming aware of a great golden
light in the east, my feet broke into
a slow run hoping to get back to
the big pond in time to see the sun-
set reflections.
Oh what an aura of grandeur!
The entire pond was a moving
mass of reflections of the setting
scarlet sun another Van Gogh
original that only happens when
the sun hangs just above the hori-
zon. And suddenly, as if on cue
from an unseen director, a great
flock of white-winged doves dotted
the flaming image flying west into
the piney woods. The only sound
breaking the silence was the soft-
squeakings of those many white-
wings.
Our cup keeps running over...


Community Events


Foster parents

Think food safety needed
ENDALG/YDANEH _


this summer


TALLAHASSEE Florida Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles Bronson is
reminding people to keep safetyT
in mind to avoid turning a party
into a trip to the emergency room.
Picnics are a summertime
favorite so this is a good time to
remind consumers about how to
prevent food borne illnesses
caused by improper handling,
preparation and storage of food.
Each year, an estimated 76 million
people suffer from a food borne
illness and about 5000 cases are
fatal Cases of foodborne illness
normally increase during the
summer. However, there are
ways to ensure that the food you
prepare will be safe as well as
delicious.
"Picnics and barbeques are
extremely popular this time of
year but food safety measures are
particularly important, especially
as temperatures are heating up,"
Mr. Bronson said. "There are
some easy tips to follow to pre-
vent a tragedy from occurring."
Clean: Wash Hands and
Food Contact Surfaces Often.--
Unwashed hands and food con-
tact surfaces are a prime cause of
foodborne illness.
Separate: Don't Cross-Conta-
minate Cross-contamination
during storage, preparation,
grilling, and serving food are a
prime source of foodborne illness
organisms.
When packing the cooler for
an outing, wrap raw meat and
poultry securely to prevent liquids
from coming in contact with
other foods, especially ready-to-
eat food.
Wash plates, utensils, and
cutting boards that contact the
raw meat or poultry before using
again for cooked food. Carry a
clean plate out to the grill to hold
the safely cooked food.
It is best to use a different
cutting board for meats and veg-
etables to avoid contamination.
Cook: Cook to Proper Tem-
peratures Food safety experts
agree that food is safely cooked
when it reaches the safe internal
temperature needed to kill harm-
ful bacteria that cause foodborne
illness.
Take your thermometer
along. Meat and poultry cooked


on a grill often browns very fast
on the outside, so be sure that
they are cooked thoroughly.
Check them with a food ther-
mometer.
Cook hamburger and other
ground meats (veal, lamb, and
pork) to an internal temperature
of 160 iF and ground poultry to
165 iF. Beef, veal and lamb steaks
and roasts may be cooked to 145
iF for medium rare. Whole poul-
try should be cooked to 180
degrees Fahrenheit as measured
in the thigh; breast meat to 170
degrees F. All cuts of pork should
reach 160 degrees F.
Chill: Refrigerate Promptly
- Holding food at an unsafe tem-
perature is a prime cause of food-
borne illness. Keep cold food
cold!
Bacteria multiply rapidly
between 41 and 135 iF. Never
leave potentially hazardous food
in this "danger zone" more than
two hours. If potentially haz-
ardous food reaches 90 iF or
above discard the food if it has
reached this temperature in one
hour. -- .... .... ..
Cold perishable food like
luncheon meats, cooked meats,
chicken, and potato or pasta sal-
ads should be kept in an insulated
cooler packed with several inches
of ice, frozen gel packs, or con-
tainers of frozen water to keep the
temperature below 41 iF.
Keep the cooler in the
coolest part of the car, and place
'in the shade or shelter, out of the
sun, whenever possible. Chill
cold drinks in a separate cooler to
avoid constantly opening the one
containing perishable foods.
Preserve the cold tempera-
ture of the cooler by replenishing
the ice as soon as it starts melting.
Take-out food: If you don't
plan to eat take-out food within
two hours of purchase, plan
ahead and chill the food in your
refrigerator before packing for
your outing.
Following these simple food
safety tips can help ensure a pic-
nic or backyard barbeque is a cel-
ebration rather than resulting in
any number of food borne illness-
es which, while rarely fatal, can
make one violently ill -some-
times for a number of days.


Gad sCotunDmllat


Our Purpose...
The Glades County Democrat is published byv Independent Newspapers of
Flonda. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspa-
per to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the commu-
nity. Since no dividends are paid. the company is able to thrive on profit
margins below industry standards All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in
Independent's mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of
,the First Amendment of the U S. Constitution, and support of the comm-
munty's debbertation of public issues.


We Pledge...
* b -perae this ncAipaper i u apubhltc rn
* To help sur i:l.Thurairiny becm.'rl a t- nei
,1 h hI- .wini .:.ik. though u ourI d:.d..,
baorl h,..riAi' rerU,:a. i:urr-l,6T]
* T.. pt').iete lh I~Ij.rn .r. cMLtze r.id I,.
rinkah tihir ,,r, -li-Er lllu]t'-.:.r,; jh.l
puh.bl: dt
* Tc're-:,n le new ,wth hbinsry. accLur,:yt.
ult ~~i-wr' tI luraeme and compasionn
* To use um )piin ptawn lif' aiiaie
c..rrnnmDity debate notto I, ante n ith
our own pinmns
* To d o :'ui r : unl'crifctiolintereit or
piernalt] oiniA acu ur rrJd,.,'
* rt.. rricd ourerruri and .:, .each-t ..r
v;,naTn to the pronmirence i deer'is
* To provide a nght to reply to those we wnte
about.
SToIb treat people with courtesy, respect and
compassion.


tIi .-.. Eli Mrk' I"MnS ,p
P B ~l-11 .ilali0


Adverfift
aimail wmddk&iaadzapau~mm
Ad, ertmrl in -rt.i'r 1l't K3Kirir
Natril A J.,tn




P'. .-'irra E-lDuir
V1 Pt irffAFlit~, j,',i.-rn 'mByrd.




Florida Press
ftsosadvadu


The (hil-


dren's Network of Southwest Flori-
da, the community based care divi-
sion of Camelot Community Care,
Inc. is holding an orientation on
"How to become a Foster
Parent/Adoptive Parent" on Tues-
day, June 21 at the Department of
Children and Families, 485 East


Pet Corner


Question: Dear Doc Savvy! I
heard you mention that you can
microchip pets a few weeks ago
on The Savvy Vet Show. Can you
tell me more about how that is
done? Thanks Doc. Frank in Belle
Glade.
Answer: Dear Frank, There are
several companies which make
them, and I have had opportuni-
ties to use all of them. In my opin-
ion, Avid microchips are the best
choice. They are the most com-
monly used, easiest to administer,
and have universal detection serv-
ice, and devices. So, administra-
tion of the microchip is easy. It is a
simple injection, just like a vacci-
nation. It is placed between the
shoulder blades, and under the
skin. This way, in the event that
your pet is lost and picked up by
any Animal' Care 'and ControlbSer-'
vice, Humane Society, or yeteri-
nary hospital they can scan your
pet to identify information to con-
tact you. Once the identification is
made, it is as simple as a few
phone calls. My Chihuahuas Sami
and Luigi have microchips, and I
recommend it for dogs, cats,
horses, iguanas, guinea pigs, fer-
rets, snakes, rabbits, hamsters,
and gerbils. Thanks for that great
question Frank. Have a great one,
Doc Savvy.
Question: Dear Doc Savvy. It is
hard enough to make the deci-
sion of when to consider euthana-
sia for your pet, but what are a
pet's owner's options for your
pet's remains? Is it legal to bury
your pet in your back yard? Thank
you for your weekly column! It is
a wonderful forum for pet lovers!
Anonymous in Clewiston.
Answer: Dear Anonymous,
Thank you for your appreciation!
Yes, euthanasia is a very emotion-
al decision to make for your pet!
As far as what to do afterwards,
here are the options:


Cowboy Way, LaBelle at 6 p.m.
Camelot Community Care, Inc.
serves as the lead agency to transi-
tion child welfare services to the
private sector in Collier, Lee, Char-
lotte, Hendry and Glades Counties.
Camelot Community Care, Inc. has
partnered with Family Preservation
Services, Lutheran Services of Flori-
da, Ruth Cooper Center for Behav-
ioral Health Care and the Florida
Baptist Children's Home to recruit
more foster families in our five


county regions. For those interested
in becoming a foster/adoptive fam-
ily, please call (800) 89 FAMILY.

Economic Council

Meetings
The Glades County Economic
Development Council normally
meets the first Monday of the
month at 6:15 p.m. in the confer-
ence room at Glades Electric Coop-


erative. The June meeting has been
rescheduled for Monday, June 13 at
6:15 p.m. If you are not a member,
please contact the EDC about join-
ing. If you are a member, please
plan to attend the meetings. As the
Main Street effort, and other initia-
tives move forward, we will need a
host of knowledgeable volunteers
to serve on various committees
and we encourage your participa-
tion.


Fish kills more



common during



summer weather


1.) Cremation Services: Either
a private'service with'the ashes
returned to you, or a service
where the ashes are disposed of
in accordance with the county
regulations.
2.) 2.) Burial Services: It is
against the law to bury a pet with-'
in city limits! However, outside of
city limits is ok. There are various
pet cemetery locations for per-
sonal burials, and monuments.
3.) 3.) Memorials: Various
memorials in honor of your pet
can be made. Examples are The
Animal Rescue League's Memori-
al Wall, The Star Registry-naming
a star after your pet (both Sami
and Luigi have this already of
course!) and, having a tree plant-
ed in your pet's name.
I hope this answers your ques-
tion. Take care Anonymous! Doc
Savvy.
E-mail you pet questions to
DocSavvy@aol.com and check
out your answers weekly in the
Pet Corner! Be sure to tune into
The Savvy Vet Show each and
every Thursday at 10:30 a.m. on
The Big Dawg 93.5FM!


FWC reports that


freshwater


is the hot
Freshwater fisheries biologists
with the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) want you to know that
fishing is HOT in Water Conserva-
tion Area 3 right now. Low water
levels in the marsh are concen-
trating largemouth bass in the L-
67A Canal in Water Conservation
Area 3A (WCA3).
Anglers are reporting catches
of 20-30 bass a day. Soft plastics
(jerk baits and stick worms) and
topwater plugs are the go-to baits
right now.
Fishing for bream, Mayan cich-
lid and oscar might be even bet-
ter. Anglers are averaging four to
six cichlid and oscar an hour, with
some catching them. almost as
fast as they can bait their hooks.
Crickets fished 18-24 inches under
a bobber tight in the lily pads are
producing the most bites, but
worms with or with out a small jig
are also effective.
Excellent catches of bream are
possible with the same methods,
as well as worms fished deeper,
or fly rod popping bugs.
This fishery can be accessed
via FWC boat ramps at the S-333
structure off Tamiami Trail or
Everglades Holiday Park off US
Highway 27.


r fishing


test thing
Regulations: Five bass per day
only one of which may be over 14
inches; 50 bream, including
bluegill, spotted sunfish, war-
mouth, redear sunfish (shell-
cracker) per day; 25 crappie per
day; no limit on oscar, Mayan
cichlid or tilapia.
Mercury warnings from the
Florida Department of Health
(DOH): Largemouth bass over
14", bowfin, and gar from WCA3
are on the DOH's "No Consump-
tion" list; largemouth bass under
14", warmouth, spotted sunfish,
oscar, Mayan cichlid, and yellow
bullhead are on the "Limited con-
sumption" list meaning they
should be eaten no more fre-
quently than once a week. For
more information contact DOH at
(850)488-3385 or your county
Public Health Department.
It is illegal to feed alligators.
Should you witness someone
feeding or harassing alligators, or
taking fish over the limit, you are
encouraged to call the Wildlife
Alert Number at 888-404-3922.
You can remain anonymous and
if your information results in an
arrest, you may be eligible for a
reward of up to $1,000 (depend-
ing on the severity of the case).


West central Florida is blessed
with some of the best fishing in
the world because of the condi-
tions of climate, water and soil
that exist in generous supply.
Those same conditions also have
the potential to produce another
natural but not so desirable side
effect; summertime fish kills.
"In spite of summer fish kills,
most of our lakes are in relatively
healthy shape and fish popula-
tions remain stable. Angling suc-
cess is generally not impacted
over the long haul and the fish
populations .usually recover
quickly, even after those events
that might appear serious to the
untrained eye," said Jeff Willitzer,
avid angler and biological fish-
eries scientist for the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC).
The FWC receives dozens of
calls each week to its Fish Kill Hot-
line reporting dead fish floating in
estuaries, tributaries, inland lakes
and ponds throughout the state.
The mechanism that causes
this natural phenomenon is well
understood by scientists. The
process starts with hot summer
days punctuated by thunderous
echoes from nimbus clouds that
darken the sky.
"Cloudy, rainy weather and a
significant amount of decompos-
ing organic matter in runoff, rap-
idly depletes dissolved oxygen
(DO) in the water that fish breath.
Low DO causes fish to suffocate
and is the reason for the majority
of freshwater and brackish water
fish kills in our state," said
Willitzer.
Most of the oxygen that fish


breathe is produced when water-
borne microscopic algae use sun-
light to produce DO. This process
is called photosynthesis. When
heavy rains and overcast skies
persist for several days, there is
not enough sunlight to maintain
oxygen levels produced through
photosynthesis. Heavy rain and
wind during thunderstorms add
to the problem by stirring up bot-
tom sediments that muddy the
water, further reducing sunlight
penetration in the water column.
Heavy rains also wash large
amounts of decaying plant and
animal material into the water-
ways. In the decay process, bacte-
ria use oxygen to break down
organic matter in the water,
which further depletes DO levels.
In short, during extended peri-
ods of overcast, rainy or cloudy
weather, the biological system
starts using DO faster than it can
produce it. Hurricanes can aggra-
vate the situation by creating and
intensifying all the conditions that
lead to low DO levels in the water.
The FWC has already started
to see minor fish kills from low
DO levels in some areas. Fish kills
range in size from only a few indi-
viduals to massive kills where
hundreds of thousands of fish
become victims. It's important to
the FWC to keep track of the loca-
tion and extent of fish kills to see if
there are problems in an ecosys-
tem that might require investiga-
tion or restorative measures.
Please report fish kills to the
FWC's Fish Kill Hotline at 1-800-
636-0511, or the FWC's Lakeland
office at 863-648-3203.


Glades County Democrat
Published by Independent Newspaper, Inc.
Serving Glades County Since 1923


To Reach Us
Address: P 0 Box 1236
626 W SuL.irland Highw\a\
Clewlston. FL 33440
Website: -iv\ ne szap.c'nom
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welcomes submissions fIrom its
reader-.. Opinions. calendar
ti-nm storie-.. Ideas ajid pholo-
graphs are ,clcoeiit Call
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ne\ room. Items- mna' be mailed.
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for all ni-ws Items is 12 p m.
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E-mail: gcdnews-..neriewszap com
To Place A Classified Ad
Call 1877.353-2424 to place a
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tiur lIo r i'ons uin Itt GladesC r"Uflt%

1-3,11i l?37753-24214 to ntporl nt--
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Printing
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Get the lasiesi ki; al news at
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Thursday, June 9, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


I







TI I ul rCXI n, IU e.205Srvn hecm uite ouho-Lk1kecoe


Arrests


Pahokee Police Dept.
arrest report
(Editor's note: The following
individuals are not presumed guilty
until
May 23- Derrick Richardson, 32,
BM, Domestic Violation
May 23- Juvenile, 17, BM,
Assault
May 23- Juvenile, 17, BM,
Assault
May 23- Juvenile, 17, BM,
Assault
May 23- Marvin J. Wells, 21, BM,
F.T.A.
May 23- Lawrence Williams,
25,BM, Fleeing -DWLS
May 24- Wendy Robinson,
41,BF,Abuse
May 25- Derricks L. Roberts,
39,BM, Battery Domestic
May 27- Roy J. McKelton,
39,BM, Gambling-Dice
May 28- Alvin Pitman, 27, BM,
Poss. of Vehicle w/ altered Vin
number
. May 28- Juvenile, 16, BF, Bur-
glary/Resist w/violence
May 28- Tony Kinster, 27, BM,
Grand Theft Auto, Altered Vin num-


May 28- Robert L. Johnson,
24,BM, Warrant
May 29- Marquetta Scott, 21, BF,
Agg. Assault
May 30- Jimmy Mcalister, 57,
BM, Weapon Writ Whs, Dealing
stolen goods
May 30- Willie J. Mathis, 50, BM,
Burglary, Domestic Violence
Clewiston Police
Department arrest
report
May 28- Chris Kraus Barraza,
poss. of cocaine
May 28- Garrett James Holmes,
poss. and distribution of cocaine
May 28- Armando Reyes, DUI
May 28- Esteban Gaspar, open
container
May 28- Alberto Flores, open
container
May 28- Roberto Melchor, open
container
May 28- Balerio Anastasio, open
container
May 28- Herbert Monske, DL
suspension


May 29- Jorge Valadez, DUI
May 29- Jaime Valadez, obstruc-
tion of law
May 29- Raul Valadez, obstruc-
tion of law
May 30- Ryan K. Williams,
prowling
May 31- Jackie D. Simpson, war-
rant
June 01- Jessica 1. Cabaza, dis-
turbance
June 01- Reginald Ford, Battery
June 02- Carlton Rush, poss. of
cocaine to sell, warrant
June 02- Sylvester Ross, poss. of
drug equipment
June 02- Luis Pastor Cantillo,
warrant
June 02- Sarah L. Bailum, retail
theft
June 02- Lance McCullough-
sale of crack cocaine, fleeing and
eluding
June 02- Gene Golden, sale of
cocaine
Belle Glade Police Dept.
arrest report
May 30- Willie Stevenson, 41,
child abuse, felony domestic vio-
lence, resisting arrest with violence
May 31- Juvenile, 15, burglary,
possession of burglary tools, resist-
ing arrest without violence


May 31- Juvenile, 14, burglary,
resisting arrest without violence
May 31- Juvenile, 14, burglary,
resisting arrest without violence
May 31- Aetavious Wrren, 25,
Lewd or lascivious molestation,
lewd or lascivious battery
June 01- Devoxist Allen, 19,
attempted robbery with a firearm
June 01-Juvenile, 16, attempted
robbery with a firearm
June 01- Juvenile, 16, attempted
robbery with a firearm
June 01- Edwin Eugene Denard,
43, burglary, grand theft
June 05- Juvenile, 17, resisting
officer without violence, disorderly
intoxication, failure to obey lawful
order
June 05- Jesus NoelColoa-Fon-
seca, 25, Driving Under the influ-
ence
June 05- Juvenile, 14, retail theft,
poss. of alcohol by a minor
June 05- Juvenile, 10, retail theft,
poss. of alcohol by a minor
June 05- Juvenile, 12, retail theft,
poss. of alcohol by a minor
June 05- Juvenile, 12, retail theft
June 05-Juvenile, 12, retail theft
June 05- Aaren Johnson, 21,
domestic battery
June 05- Patrick Jean, 22,
domestic battery


Crist Testifies Before Congressional Panel


WASHINGTON, D.C. Florida
Attorney General Charlie Crist told
a Congressional subcommittee
that finding a solution to the perva-
sive problem of sex crimes against
children will require cooperation at
all levels of government and a
multi-faceted approach including
prevention, education, tracking
and enforcement. Crist testified at
the request of the House Judiciary
Subcommittee on Crime, Terror-
ism and Homeland Security at a
hearing in the Rayburn Office
Building.
"Nothing government does
matters as much as protecting the
safety and well-being of our law-
abiding citizens, especially our chil-
dren," said Crist. "Sex offenders
and predators represent the worst
of society, and it is up to govern-
ment at all levels to make sure-they
are not allowed to terrorize the

Crimestoppers


Courtesy photo
Truth Miller

Crimestoppers of Palm Beach
County is seeking public assis-
tance in locating;the whereabouts
of Truth Miller, a.k.a. Tee.
Miller is described as a black
male, with black hair, and brown
eyes. He is listed as being 5'9" tall
and weighs 135 pounds. His iden-
tifying marksare a tattoo of the
word "love" on his left arm, and
his last known address is SE 2nd
Street, in Belle Glade.
He is wanted for two counts of
felony sale of cocaine.
If you. have information
regarding the whereabouts of
Miller, please call (800) 458-TIPS
(8477). Your call can remain
anonymous and you could be eli-
gible for a cash reward.


most innocent among us."
Crist testified as part of a four-
person panel as the subcommittee
considers numerous bills address-
ing various aspects of sex crimes
against children: The Attorney Gen-
eral discussed Florida's experience
with such cases, particularly since
the shocking February 2004 abduc-
tion and murder of 11-year-old Car-
lie Brucia in Sarasota. Other high-
profile Florida cases include this
year's abductions and murders of
Jessica Lunsford and Sarah Lunde.
Crist told the subcommittee of
numerous steps Florida has taken
to minimize the risk to children
posed by sex offenders and preda-
tors. These measures include:
A new online database that
enables parents to learn when reg-
istered sex offenders live near their
homes, schools or other locations
their children visit. Since it was
unveiled on May 17, the Neighbor-
hood Search function has been
accessed by more than 350,000
Internet visitors
The Attorney General's Office
association with NetSmartz, an
interactive educational safety
.resource that teaches youngsters
and teens how to be safe on the
Internet. NetSmartz was created by
the National Center for Missing and
Exploited Children and the Boys &
Girls Clubs of America;
Escape School, a program
implemented by the Attorney Gen-
eral's Office in Florida where
experts teach children how to
make smart, safe choices in poten-
tially dangerous situation. To date,
the Attorney General's Office has
conducted 25 Escape School pro-
grams around the state attended by
some 4,669 Florida children and
parents;
Passage of the Jessica
Lunsford Act, which establishes
longer prison sentences for crimi-
nals who sexually molest children
and requires tracking devices once
they do get out;
Intensified enforcement and
prosecution efforts by Florida crim-
inal justice agencies, most recently


last week's conviction of a 52-year-
old Orange County man who tried
to use an Internet chat room to lure
a 13-year-old boy in reality, an
undercover officer to his home to
engage in sexual activity and view
child pornography.
"We cannot rely on one single
approach, or one single level of
government, to successfully target
sex crimes against children. We
must maintain and expand preven-
tion initiatives, tracking activities'
and enforcement efforts. We must
fight the battle at the local level and
the state level," Crist said in his pre-
pared testimony. "But in the end,
the success of these efforts will
depend onthe overall coordination
and resources that can come only
through a nationwide commit-
ment to wiping out this blight. With
the well-being of American youth
at stake, no amount, of commit-
ment can be considered too
much."
Crist praised the efforts of mem-
bers of Florida's Congressional Del-
egation for their dedication to find-
ing workable solutions .on this
important issue, including Reps.
Mark Foley, Katherine Harris and
Ginny Brown-Waite. He pledged to
work with the federal government
to develop and implement mean-
ingful procedures to protect chil-
dren from sex .off,., od, i.i who he
called "a blightpon society."
"I believe it was no accident that
the Founding Fathers stressed the
importance of safety and security
by placing in the very first line of the
U.S. Constitution the mandate that
the very purpose of our govern-
ment is 'to insure domestic tran-
quility.' Little we do as public ser-
vants will really matter if we do not
do something to prevent our most
innocent citizens from falling victim
to the unspeakable horrors com-
mitted by sex offenders and preda-
tors," said Crist.
Other witnesses on the panel
with Attorney General Crist were
Laura H. Parsky, Deputy Assistant
Attorney General of the Criminal
Division at the U.S. Department of


Glades Ford- Lincoln-Mercury

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3 -1 t5 rXs. rq <--

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Justice; Carol Fornoff, of Tempe,
Arizona, whose 13-year-old daugh-
ter Christy was abducted, raped
and murdered by a long-time sex
offender in 1984; and John Rhodes,
a federal public defender from
Montana.
A copy of Attorney General
Crist's.prepared testimony is avail-
able at:
http://myfloridalegal.com/web-,
files.nsf/WF/MRAY-6D5PLD
file/SexOffendersTestimony.pdf












Switclh to DISHN Me.umtrk allnd htV O i
avm I BO channels for the price ot 121!
Na.. tai a a lTilm j Ilr o Du 111 Ir owui
*B.r.i'.l if 1 i 'rii'i J ( 3 r ll rrv e ,,,in
f 1i i -v ui tI ni lliniir l a I O nl ,Li .i DS.k ue[


Two more arrested


in narcotics case


Sheriff Ronnie Lee reports
that the Hendry County Sheriff's
Office assault on narcotics in
Hendry County has led to two
more arrests. A traffic stop by
the HCSO Road Patrol utilizing
the HCSO K-9 Unit resulted in
the discovery of 23 small zip-
lock bags of cocaine and led to
information for an investigation
and search of a residence locat-
ed at 2288 County Road 78 Lot
Number 6 LaBelle.
Officers recovered cocaine,


marijuana, cutting agents, pack-
aging materials and miscella-
neous items of narcotics para-
phernalia. The investigation led
to the arrest of, David Ozuna,
age 48, for possession of
cocaine, possession with intent.
to sell, possession Marijuana,
Cocaine Trafficking and posses-
sion of narcotic paraphernalia.
Ramiro Ozuna, age 56, was
charged with Trafficking in
cocaine. Both men were booked
into the.Hendry County Jail.


HIP & KNEE' SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS
AT HENDRY REGIONAL

Dr. Ed Humbert is a fellowship
trained hip and knee surgeon
specializing in joint replacement
and arthroscopy of the hip and knee.


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Next to Hendry Regional
in Suite B IMPLANT
530 W. Sagamore Avenue SURGEONS


Clewiston, FL 33440
http://www.jointimplant.com

(863) 983-2896


OF FLORIDA


u,... .
11. PI



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LaBeUle (863) 674-4728 ',,' _, ...I ,,
Clewiston (863) 983-3086 ;."" I


Treasure Coast Dermatology

Specializing in the Treatment of Skin Cancer
Mohs Surgery Diseases of Skin, Hair & Nails *

Tim loannides, M.D. and Rick Romagosa, M.D.
are pleased to welcome

Robert S. Kirsner, M.D., PhD


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by tihe
American Board
ofDermatology


Stuart
221-3330
448 SE Osceola St.


to Treasure Coast Dermatology,

and announce the opening of their new office:

Okeechobee
863-467-9555
1924 US Highway 441, N.
in addition to


Port Pierce
464-6464
1801 South 23rd St., #5


Fellowa
of the


St. Lucie West Vero Beach
878-3376 778-7782
1100 St. Lucie West Blvd., #105 1995 39th Ave.


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2:00 P.M. PRIZES WILL BE
AWARDED AT 3:30 P.M.


FRY HARDWARE CO., INC.
sunI ONm My
111 S. SAN BENITO STREET
CLEWISTON, FL 33440


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Cooling
System Service

$49.95
* Inspection of hoses and belts
* Mopar antifreeze replacement
(2-gal max)
* Pressure test system
* Diesel engines and additional parts/labor extra
* Vehicles requiring longer-life antifreeze are higher
*additional charge for fluid disposal
Expires 6/18/05
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Wheel Balance &
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$24.95
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* Remove four wheel- ..
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* Complete chassis tube
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* Fluid level inspection
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suspension components
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V-1Os, Hemi" V-8s, fluid disposal, semi-synthetic
and synthetic oils Expires 6/18/05


HAMPTON CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP
HENDRY COUNTY'S ONL 5-STAR ___


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ICHRMYSLERI


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9, 2005








Thursday, June 9, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Courtesy photo/Lisa Click
Emily Buonpastore receives the Beta Club Scholarship from
Moore Haven High School Principal Jean Prowant and spon-
sor Susan Prowant during Class Night ceremonies May 17.


Night
Continued From Page 1
al Scholarship, Jaimee White;
Glades Electric Cooperative
Scholarship, Justin Guerry;
Glades Youth Livestock Scholar-
ship, Shelby Bond; Judge James
Miller Couse Memorial Scholar-
ship, Derek Jones Judge Kirby
Sullivan Scholarship, Almeta
Brown; Lakeport Community
Association Scholarship, Jaimee
White; the VanDeVelde/Thomp-
son Family Scholarship, Joshua
Brown; Moore Haven Lion's Club
Scholarship, Justin Guerry;
Moore Haven Women's Club
Scholarship, Almeta Brown, and
Marrisa Weeks; Presidential Free-
dom Scholarships, Almeta Brown
and Shelby Bond; Take Stock In
Children Scholarship, Christine
Murphy; Wild Turkey Federation
Scholarship, Justin Guerry; North-
lake Estates Quilters Scholarships,
Marrisa Weeks and Jaimee
White; Clewiston Area Ministerial
Scholarship, Shelby Bond; WI.F.E
Scholarship, Shelby Bond; Wood-
ward Memorial Scholarship,
Justin Guerry; Hilliard Brothers
Scholarship, Marrisa Weeks; L-
Cross X-Treme Scholarship, Cut-
ter Pearce; Joe Brown Memorial
Scholarship, Derek Jones; Jack


Book
Continued From Page 1
blooms the year 'round. The per-
fect location is one with dapple
sun-n-shade. This plant is com-
monly known as the hummingbird
bush because these little jewels of
the sky take to it from sunrise to
sunset. And we're told that natural
nectar from flowers is far better for
these tiny birds than merely sugar
water, Hamelia patens is also called
butterfly bush because butterflies
cannot stay away from these flow-
ers through the whole year.
And chapter nine you cannot
garden without! It's Monica's Direc-
tory of Popular Shade-Loving
Plants, over 50 pages of listings and
information.
Oftentimes, in Florida, a plant
label will state: FULL SUN, which is
fine for many so labeled. However,
there are plants that prefer half or
three-quarters full sun and others


Smith Memorial Scholarship,
Joshua Brown; Glades County
Youth Livestock Ag. Scholar-
ships,Justin Guerry and William
Carlton; Jim Rider Memorial
Scholarship, Joshua Brown; Bird-
well-Hendry Scholarship, Darian
Brown; Navy Scholarships, Juan
Cisneros, Eduardo Davilla, David
Heflin; Labriente Ash, Chance
Cline Lloyd Mathis and Justin
Guerry; Wade & Mildred B. Shiv-
ers Memorial Scholarship, Joshua
Brown; Glades County Sheriff's
Scholarships, Emily Buounpas-
tore, Leonardo Centeno, Valerie
Kelley, Christine Murphy, Shelby
Bond, Justin Guerry, Darcell Kelly,
Jaimee White, Derek Jones,
Joshua Brown, Marrisa Weeks,
Myrianette Figueroa, William
Carlton, Almeta Brown, and
Shalona Cooper; Senior Citizen's
Golden Age Scholarship, Almeta
Brown; Moore Haven High
School Scholarship Foundation

Scholarships, Christine Mur-
-phy, Derek Jones, Justin Guerry,
Darian Brown, Joshua Brown,
Emily Buounpastore,' William
Carlton, Leonardo Centeno,
Valerie Kelley, Darcell Kelly,
Jaimee White, Almeta Biown,
Marrisa Weeks and Cutter Pearce.


some gradation of shade. After all,
Florida sun is brighter and hotter
than in many other states and
unless "full sun plants" are kept
watered like mostly every day -
many struggle through the days
and do not bloom well.
This is particularly true of tender
annuals. Dapple sun, or come-and-
go sun is perfect for many of our
most colorful plants. So don't rule
out a modicum of shade for many
plants labeled FULL SUN. A case in
point: ROSES, which are purely
sun-lovin', will do well with six to
seven hours sunlight daily and the
rest some sort of shade. This would
not necessarily be true with all
roses in northern states. There's
nothing like experimenting when
conditions are less than ideal. You
might be surprised at the ones that
"must have" full sun while others
are perfectly happy with less. See
page 50 for The Most Shade Toler-
ant Roses.
And attention should be paid to
where the sun is and isn't in differ-


Courtesy photo/Lisa Click
Justin Guerry received the Garry A. Coleman Memorial
Scholarship from Emma Ruth Coleman-Beck.


Courtesy photo/Lisa Click
Derek Jones receives the Big Lake National Bank Scholar-
ship from BLNB publicist Teresa Chandler.


ent seasons, particularly regarding
plants that must have at least a little
sun. At our house in the woods, the
area at the south end is almost total
shade in wintertime due to huge
oaks. That's when re-arranging has
to take place. These are mostly
favorite plants that are growing in
containers, thus they're not difficult
to move.
SHADE Gardening for Florida is
an invaluable "how to" for "dab-
blers in dirt" an old saying vows,
it's not an art. This dabbling in dirt is
a disease. (If we have to have a dis-
ease this is the best one even if it is
"incurable.) By reading this book,
countless problems can be avoided
and pleasures multiplied.
SHADE Gardening for Florida is
a handsome soft back, 144 pages,
color and B/W photos. For more
information please phone, write, e-
mail or fax Barbara Oehlbeck,
25075 Grassy Run-Muse, LaBelle,
Fl. 33935. E-mail: doco@srat6.net,
telephone: (863) 675-2771, fax
same as phone.


Grimsley moved by tribute to WWII veterans


TALLAHASSEE State Repre-
sentative Denise Grimsley (R-
Lake Placid) praised today's dedi-
cation of Florida's World War II
Memorial Monument in Tallahas-
see.
"What a moving tribute to
Florida's World War II Veterans
and their families," said Repre-
sentative Grimsley. "I was
impressed with the entire cere-
mony and the long overdue
memorial to Florida's fallen."
In 1999, the Florida Legislature


approved the creation of Florida's
World' War II Memorial. Led by
the Florida Department of Veter-
ans' Affairs, the project has
involved several state agencies,
with support from private groups
and individuals.
The state World War II monu-.
ment, located on the grounds of
the R. A. Gray Building in Talla-
hassee, is the centerpiece of the
memorial effort. Among other
components:
A permanent museum exhibit


at the Museum of Florida History
covering Florida's role in World
War II.
A colorful Florida World War II
Heritage Trail guide documenting
over 150 historical sites around
the state.
A World War II Educational
Curriculum Supplement CD,
available to Florida high school
history teachers.
A World War II Florida-orient-
ed Web site with educational
resources.


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Family Eye Care

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L. Lamar Youmans, O.D.
Board Certified Primary Eyecare Physicians
Optical Services Available "Take Care of
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Thursday, June 9, 2005


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


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First Place All Stars iA


Courtesy photo
First place Dixie AAA sponsored by Popeye's. Coach-
es, Luis Rosquete, Jesse Quesada, Bernice Pereiro. Back
row, Luis Rosquete, Bernice Pereiro, Jesse Quesada, and
Bradon Cortez. Second row, Luis Rosquete Jr., Manuel
Pereiro, Emanuel Quesada, and Casey Crawford. Front
row, Amar Ali, Rolando Perez, Juan Ortega, Ali-Ali, Dustin
Guranious, and Eric Garcia not pictured: Tom Adams.


Courtesy photo
First place Dixie Belles sponsored by McDonalds.
Head coach Arnold Moore, assistant Bill Young and
Timmy Sherrell. Top left to right, Arnald More, Patrice Dix-
ion, Desire Lopez, Aimee Young, Bill Young, Timmy Sher-
rell. Bottom left to right, JaDaun Rawls, Courtney Moore,
Kayla Autrey, Meghan Carver, Stephanie Sherrell, Victoria
Yates, Rosenia Rawls.


Courtesy photo
First place major Dixie Youth sponsored by Glades
Gas. Coaches, Carlos Rios, Kevin McCarthy, and Mr.
Brown. Front row left to right, Julian Mendoza, Rashad
Williams, Victor Venegas, Andre Rios, Robbie McCarthy,
Jacob Seiler. Second row, Landon McDuffie, Teangelo


Ulett, Demetrio Clas, J.T.
Tommie.


Flounah, not pictured Catlin


Courtesy photo
First Place Team sponsored by Howell Oil Company.
Front left to right, Kelsfe Moore, Maegan Miller. Middle
left to right, Marylyn Rico, Brittany Basquin, Kristina Aut-
trey, Laura Ramero, Jenine Hannam. Back left to right,
Lisa Walker, Leslie Almanza, Sarah Howell, Morgan
Jones, Not sown- Casey Nash, Jade Sandelli. Coaches
left to right, Steve Hess, John Basquin, (not shown) Joey
Miller Head Coach- Keith Howell. (Congratulations
Girls!)


Sports Briefs


Golf Tournament
The Boys and Girls Club is
hosting a golf tournament June
18 at the Belle Glade Golf Course,
starting at 8:30 a.m.-dThey are
seeking foursomes to play in the
tournament. It is $50 per individ-
ual to play. Prizes for first, second,
and third place teams, as well as
for the longest drive, closest to the
'pin, and a car for making a hole-
in-one at the designated hole will
be awarded. You can also pur-
chase Ball Drop tickets for $5
each for a chance to win $500.
Contact Kathy Miller at (561) 992-
5399 for more information.
Fishing Tournament
Horizons Fishing Tournament.
benefiting Hospice of Palm Beach
County's (HPBC).Horizons Chil-
dren's Bereavement Program will
be taking place soon. Horizons

Action plan
"Today is a day of recognition;
a time to recognize the founda-
tions of reclaiming a magnificent
treasure," said Florida Sen. Ken
Pruitt yesterday while addressing
the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District's Water Resources
Advisory Commission at its meet-
ing in Jupiter. "It will take unified
efforts to reverse the dismal treat-
ment of Lake Okeechobee; after
all, it is an economic lifeline of the
region and the ecosystem
lifeblood for South Florida."
Last year's multiple hurricanes
and associated heavy rainfall
churned up phosphorus-laden
sediment, ripped up critical vege-
tation, and caused a rapid rise in
lake level endangering the eco-
logical health of the lake.
Recognizing the urgent need to
expedite phosphorus-reduction
projects to help recovery efforts
for Lake Okeechobee, Pruitt out-
lined his "Our Lake, Our
Future" plan of attack. The
2005 Legislature, with strong sup-
port from Governor Bush and the
citizens of Florida, passed new


Fishing Tournament (Kingfish,
Wahoo, Dolphin) is presented by
the brokerage firm of Robert W.
Baird & Company, Inc.
A Captain's Meeting is planned
for Thursday, July 14, at 5 p.m. to
8:30 pm at the Newcomb Hall -
Riviera Beach Marina.
Tournament registra-
tion
Registration for the Get Kids
Hooked on Fishing, not Drugs
fishing tournament will take place
at 8 a.m. June 18, on the*morning
of the tournament. Registration
will take place at the Clewiston
boat ramp. Contact the Clewiston
Police Department for more infor-
mation.
Fishing Tournament
Saturday, July 16, lines in at 7

to speed thi
legislation and $30 million in
appropriations to:
Rapidly implement the Lake
Okeechobee Protection Plan
Require implementing agen-
cies to develop priorities for annu-
al budget requests
Further promote and imple-
ment agricultural waste manage-
ment techniques called "best
management practices"
Continue to reduce maxi-
mum daily phosphorus loads
entering the lake; and
Review operational sched-
ules for Lake Okeechobee, its trib-
utary basins and lakes, and con-
necting estuaries.
"Approximately $96 million
have been allocated toward Lake
Okeechobee cleanup efforts since
2000; that is just the proverbial
'drop in the bucket' of the total
that will be needed to restore this
majestic wonder," Pruitt said. "We
expect funding for Lake Okee-
chobee protection to increase in
future years."
To carry out the "Our Lake,
Our Future" plan and other collab-


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a.m. lines out by 3 p.m. and an
awards ceremony from 5-6 p.m.
can be expected. Departing from
any inlet; weigh in at Riviera
Beach Marina, 1950 E 13th Street,
Riviera Beach, $175 per boat until
June 15; $200 per boat until July
10; $250 per boat until July 14. For
more information contact Beth
Charbonneau at (561) 227-5157,
Special Events Coordinator Hos-
pice of Palm Beach County or
Willie's Bait and Tackle (561) 848-
4484.
Summer Tumbling
Camp
Clewiston Performing Arts
Center with Mrs. Mammen and
Ms. Escobar, June 6-16 Monday-
Thursday, $45 plus $15 registra-
tion, if new to CPAC, ages five and
up. Beginning 2:15-3:15 p.m.,
Intermediate 3:15- 4:15 p.m.,


Advance 4:15-5:15 p.m. Registra-
tion will be Thursday, April 28 and
Thursday, May 5, from 6-7 p.m. at
725 Central Avenue, in Clewiston.
For more information call (239)
564-3473.

Glades Day
baseball camp
Glade Day School will be host-
ing a baseball camp June 6-10,
from 9 a.m. until noon, for ages
11-15. The cost is $50 and the
camp will offer not only an educa-
tion of the game, but promises
plenty of fun along the way. For
questions about the camp or reg-
istration, call (561) 996-6769.
Glades Day School, 400 Gator
Blvd, Belle Glade, application may
be dropped off or mailed to GDS,
Checks Payable to Glades Day
School


e recovery of ailing lake


orative Lake Okeechobee cleanup
and recovery efforts, the South
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict is establishing a special Water
Resources Advisory Commission
(WRAC) committee. Committee
members will be recommended
for approval al the June 8
Governing Board meeting in
Miami.
"We know that the creation of
a committee, passing legislation
and funding projects will not sud-
denly 'cure' the lake," Pruitt said.
"It is going to take perseverance
and sustained, cohesive effort. I


am committed to walk arm-in-
arm with the committee to make
it happen. The inception of the 15-
year Lake Okeechobee Protection
Plan was a major step in the right
direction but we have just started
to turn the corner in this ongoing
battle. The next 10 years will be
the true barometer for the lake's
future."
The first monthly WRAC Lake
Okeechobee Committee meeting
will be Wednesday, June 29, from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at South Florida.
Water Management District head-
quarters in West Palm Beach.


FWC reinforces Safe

Boating Week message
WEST PALM BEACH With ing summer boating season:
National Safe Boating Week wind- Stay alert, wear your life jacket
ing down, the Florida Fish and and don't drink and operate a boat.
Wildlife Conservation Commission In 2004, Palm Beach County
(FWC) reminds boaters of three had the second highest number of
key messages for the busy upcom- boating accidents in the state.


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9, 2005








Thursday, June 9,200.


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


War

Continued From Page 1
with the rustlers in Polk County.
Two were shot and two were
hung."
Though cattlemen condemned
rustling, they were not above "mis-
branding" stray cattle that got
mixed up with their herds. Calves
weaned from their mothers, but
not yet marked with their brands,
often would be branded by anoth-
er rancher.
The practice had become so
rampant by 1896 that Ziba King -
a prominent cattleman, merchant
and state senator at Fort Ogden -
received an order to gather up all
cattle with suspicious brands and
sell them.
Proceeds from the sale were
divided among the ranchers by
King, as equally as he could, in pro-
portion to the number of cattle
each man was supposed to own.
S There was some grumbling, but
King was well respected and had a
bunch of tough cowboys to back
him up. The other ranchers decid-
ed it was better to stop stealing
each other's stock.
King is remembered in Char-
lotte County part of DeSoto
County until 1921 by the mod-
ern highway bearing his name.
Originally it was an Indian trail,
then the route King used to drive
his cattle to the loading dock at
Charlotte Harbor town.

Last Range War
The late Leon Thompson of
Port Charlotte, a retired U.S. Marine
sergeant major, was a survivor of
the last range war:
"I was 14 years old in February
1933 when my cousin Lincoln
Whidden asked me to help him
find and butcher a cow. The animal
was part of Milton Norton's herd
near Old Venus on the prairie east


Street
Continued From Page i
Doug Korinke agreed to compile
historical data, both -on the city
itself, and the individual historic
buildings remaining in the com-
mercial district, all built between
1915 and the 1930s.volunteered to
head up committees to gather
tourism and promotions informa-
tion and historical data, both on the
city itself, and the individual historic
buildings remaining in the com-
mercial district, all built between
1915 and the 1930s.
Former Florida Main Street
coordinator Laura Lee Corbett,
who was the speaker at a town hail
meeting held April 26 to kick off the
initiative, said the city of Moore
Haven has a lot of assets, to make it
worthy of Main Street designation,
and Ms. Whirls agreed.
"The city and Glades County
have a lot going for them, and
while a lot hasn't been done in
terms of promotion, there's a lot
that's promotablee'. We have new
businesses that have come in, that
have done a good job of not only
renovating their businesses to
make them more attractive, but
which are promoting themselves
and, by extension, the city," Ms.
Whirls said.
New events, like the upcoming
River Rally slated for Saturday, have
been added to the city's calendar.
New attractions, like L-Cross
Extreme Events, are bringing new
visitors to the area. The city's low.
traffic, low crime and walkable
riverfront location are easily pro-
moted.
"The city's done a wonderful
job, creating the Riverwalk, com-
pleting the landscaping along U.S.
27, working with the school board
and volunteers to develop City Park
and other recreation facilities," Ms.
Whirls said.
Challenges remain, however,
and those challenges are what the
Main Street program is geared to
address.
"As part of the design assess-
ment, one of the questions is, is the
local program area, the commer-
cial district, laid out in a grid, and at
first I couldn't answer that ques-


of Fort Ogden.
"My father, Lorenzo, had a small
sawmill house (rough, unpainted
lumber) between Old Venus and
Palmdale where he could keep an
eye on his horses and cattle.
"Those were tough days in the
depth of the Great Depression. Men
with hungry families might kill
somebody else's range-cow to stay
alive.
"Cattlemen understood rustling
for food and never shot a hungry
man just warned him not to do it
again or get shot next time.
"Going along with us on the
butchering trip was Donald Nor-
ton, younger brother of Milton; and
Marvin Morrow, an Old Venus resi-
dent looking for work.
"Whidden's catch-dog, Rat,
was taken to help round up a desig-
nated cow. Whidden drove us in
Milton Norton's model-A Ford
truck. We found a cow bearing the
Norton brand and ear-notch, killed
and butchered it.
"On the way home, near Palm-
dale, I dropped off at the home-
stead of Willoughby Whidden, my
great uncle and a prominent pio-
neer cattleman. The other men
continued toward Lakeport where
there was a customer for the beef.
"About five minutes later, we
heard gun shots in the distance. No
one paid any attention because
hunting was common in those
parts.
"Rat, the catch-dog, badly
wounded, limped home that night
and tried in dog fashion to lead us
back in the direction from which
he came. However, he collapsed
and died.
"The next day, a Fort Myers pro-
duce dealer named David Goggins
came along the road and discov-
ered the truck wheel-deep in Alliga-
tor Slough where the road crossed
near Hall City.
Lincoln Whidden, Donald Nor-
ton and Marvin Morrow were dead
from gunshot wounds.


Courtesy photo
Glades County Economic
Development Council Execu-
tive Director Tracy Whirls
traveled to St. Cloud May 19
for a pre-application work-
shop for the Main Street Pro-
gram. The city of Moore
Haven is one of six Florida
communities applying for
Main Street designation this
year. Three new Main Streets
will be funded.
tion, until someone explained to
me that Avenue J used to be old 27,
and the original bridge crossed the
river downtown," Ms. Whirls said.
"Avenue J was essentially Moore
Haven's 'Main Street' and when
U.S., 27 was rerouted, it split the
commercial district in half."
Construction of the new fixed
span bridge, replacing the old bas-
cule.bridge, was the nail in the cof-
fin of the historic district.
Central to revitalizing the his-
toric commercial district will be
creating pedestrian malls, bike
paths, sidewalks and other design
elements that will use the new
bridge as a unifying 'canopy', link-
ing commercial establishments
east and west of the highway, as
well as those north and south of the
bridge.
"The design element is where
we really need the Main Street pro-
gram," Ms. Whirls said, because
Main Street site review committees
can assist with programs as simple
as facade improvements, aimed at
helping existing businesses
"spruce up", providing consultants
who can assist businesses with
revamping their displays to make
them more attractive, as well as
more complex projects involving
restoration of vacant buildings.


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"Whidden had a pistol in the car
and apparently was killed half in
and out of the car while trying to
protect himself. His fully loaded pis-
tol was found on the floor."

Widely Reported
Tampa Tribune clippings col-
lected by Mr. Thompson provide
details:
"Sheriff J.J. Wiggins of Glades
County led a posse in search of the
slayers of three men whose bodies
were found yesterday near Lock-
port at what is known as Gator
Slough.
"The sheriff indicted he was
seeking three suspects. It is
believed the killings were the result
of a range feud that has existed in
that section for several years.
"Milton Norton, older brother of
Donald, was attacked from
ambush near here in March 1930.
His body was riddled with bullets.
and shotgun pellets, but he recov-
ered".
After a few days of fruitless
investigation, Sheriff Wiggins
closed the case. Such killings were
a way of life on the open ranges of
south-central Florida.

Range Wars
The Arcadian newspaper of
DeSoto County reported the unsuc-
cessful assassination only briefly:
"Zeb Parker, a prominent cattle-
man and pioneer citizen of the
county, was arrested by Sheriff J.L.
Hampton this week on request of
officers of Glades County in con-
nection with the shooting there
recently of W.N. Norton.
"Mr. Parker was immediately
released on $5,000 bond pending
further developments in the case.
'According to the story current
here, Mr. Norton was shot near
Lakeport by somebody in ambush
five shots being fired and three
taking effect.
"Mr. Norton's wounds were


Ultimately the program will
assist in the economic reconstruc-
tion of the Main Street area, by
identifying and bringing in new
funding to assist in the restoration
of the district, and creating new
businesses in those buildings and
elsewhere in the city..
Ms. Whirls said if the city is suc-
cessful in earning Main Street desig-
nation, she sees the initial endeavor
as a five-year phased project.
"If we can start with a bed and
breakfast in one of the historic
buildings downtown rather quick-
ly, hopefully to coincide with reno-
vation of the city docks, then we
can begin to promote the riverfront
to yachtsmen on the Caloosahatch-
ee River, and with signage, to
motorists from 27," Ms. Whirls
said.
"There are more than 20 yacht-
ing clubs in Cape Coral alone that
every weekend have 15-20 mem-
bers boating to Gaspiralla, Sanibel,
even Clewiston, looking for new
places to visit and things to do," Ms.
Whirls said. "If we had a bed and
breakfast, we could offer bicycle
rentals or golf carts, to allow those
boaters to visit local stores and
restaurants. We could link with
local tour companies and offer
transport to the Brighton Casino,
Fisheating Creek, Gatorama or
other venues. We can bring new
visitors to our area festivals,
strengthening the organizations
that sponsor them and create more
traffic for our existing businesses,
and encourage others to launch
new businesses. Some of those vis-
itors might decide they like the area
so much, that they'll decide to stay,
bringing new homes, new busi-
nesses and new opportunities to
Moore Haven and Glades County.


serious, but he managed to leap
from his truck and take refuge in a
patch of palmettos nearby. The pal-
mettos were fired, but he crawled
to a safe location before the fire
reached him and made his sway to
a house a few miles distant.
"At that time, Mr. Norton identi-
fied his assailant as Zeb Parker, of
Arcadia, who owns extensive cattle
interests in the Lakeport section.
Though severely injured, Mr. Nor-
ton is now reported to be well on
the way to recovery.
"Officers in Glades County are
quoted as saying that Mr. Parker
and Mr. Norton had had some mis-
understanding over cattle some
years ago.
"Mr. Parker, it is stated by
friends, was at his home here on
the day the shooting occurred. The
charge against Parker eventually
was dropped on the basis of a 'per-
fect alibi.'"
Devotion of early cattlemen to
the bountiful range is legendary.
When Zeb Parker died years later,
his last request was that the song
"Bury Me Out On The Lone Prairie"
be sung at his funeral.
Gator Slough Again
The Tampa Tribune in April
1935, reported another range mur-
der with echoes to the 1933 "ten-
gallon hat affair:"
"Possibility that the two-year-
old Highlands County cattlemen's
feud has been renewed is seen at
Venus in the death of Bill Dias for-
merly of Arcadia.
"His lifeless body with three bul-
let holes ,in the chest was found yes-
terday about half mile from Alliga-
tor Slough. It was the scene of the
ambush slaying of three men two
years ago.
"Obe F. Hall of Arcadia (no rela-
tion to a Hall City resident) with
whom Dias is said to have last been
seen alive April 23, was taken into
.custody to Glades County for the
coroner's inquest. '


"Since I took this job,Feb. 24,
I've been contacted by several
developers, and each of those
who've taken the tour of the river-
front has told me Moore Haven is
sitting on a gold mine, as one of the'
few remaining undeveloped river-
fronts in Florida. If we work hard
and plan carefully, we can bring
new jobs and new opportunities to
the city, while at the same time pre-
serving the natural landscape and
the quality of life that is prized
here."
Even while she's confident that
the effort will ultimately be success-
ful, Ms. Whirls said volunteers are
still needed to assist with complet-
ing the application.
"Donna Storter and I attended
the Main Street pre-application
conference in St. Cloud, and
learned that Moore Haven is one of
six communities seeking Main
Street designation this year," Ms.
Whirls said, adding that only three
communities will become new
Main Streets when applications are
reviewed in August. "Because we
are an area of critical economic
concern, I think we have a good
chance at being selected, but that's
if, and only if, we get the applica-
tion done.
"We need the support of busi-'
ness owners, civic groups, and gov-
ernment officials, not only to gather
the necessary information, but to
demonstrate that we want a Main
Street program, and why we need it
here," Ms. Whirls said.
The next Moore Haven Main
Street workshop is slated for Tues-
day, June 14 at 5:30 p.m. at city hall.
For more information on the
Main Street program, or to volun-
teer to help, contact Ms. Whirls at
(863) 946-0300.


"Hall, a native of DeSoto Coun-
ty, a wounded war veteran and
long- time worker in the cattle
country, said he had been
employed at times by both Parker
Brothers of Arcadia, and Lykes
Brothers of Tampa, cattle compa-
nies."
At trial, Hall pleaded "not guilty"
despite a tire imprint of his car on a
"cow chip" at the Dias murder
scene. Hall blamed the death of
Dias on four men who had "bush-
whacked" Whidden, Norton and
Morrow in 1933.
Three of the men accused of the
killings and arrested on the basis of
SHall's accusations were Gus Harris
alias Bob Taylor, from Pine Level,
Finis Williams of Arcadia and
Squash Ford of Arcadia. Also
accused was Parker Mansfield
already in prison for a murder the
year before.
Hall testified "it was the general
belief that it had been the intention
of the murderers of Dias to get him


crimes."
The Hall jury returned a verdic
of guilty in the first degree wit,.
recommendation for life imprison
ment. Harris, Williams and For:
were dismissed because of insuffi
cient evidence.
Epilogue
These sensational cases stirre ;
the Florida Legislature to authoriz-
private fences. These were fre
quently cut down by cattlemen
accustomed to free, open ranges. !
Open ranges were outlawed as
highway hazards by Florida in
1949. The colorful era of "10-gal!
Ion-hat affairs" was over.
Hall City along Alligator Slough
scene of the last range feud -*
melted into the pastures that could,
not be tamed with city lots.
NEXTWEEK
Forgotten Hall City found
Lindsey Williams is a Sun columnist
who can be contacted at
LinWms@earthlink.net


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1.











Balsam Apple: Weed or vegetable? Choice is yours


"What is this weedy vine -
and how can I get rid of it?"
Warm weather and summer
rains can jumpstart many viney
weeds. A common vine found in
home gardens, citrus groves,
Florida yards and along the road-
side is the Balsam Apple. It is rec-
ognized as a nuisance and could
be poisonous.
This plant is also known as
wild cucumber because of its
fruit. Native to tropical Africa and
Southeast Asia, the Balsam Apple
has escaped cultivation, and it
now grows from Florida to
Texas. It is considered by most
local residents to be a problemat-
ic weed.
A wild cucumber
The Latin name of the Balsam
Apple (Momordica charantia)
refers to the bitten appearance of
the uneven seeds and the point-
ed fruit. There are many closely
related plants that add to the


name confusion. One of these is
a native to east India is known as
Balsam Pear, Bitter Cucumber, or
Bitter Melon. This plant is an arti-
cle of food in the Orient, but is
mainly grown as a curiosity in the
U.S. It is popularly grown as a
climbing annual with large orna-
mental fruit. Another species has
fruit shaped like a bull's heart,
with bright red fruit.
Balsam Apple rapidly grows
from seed and produces high-
climbing vines. The ridged stem
has slightly fuzzy stems. Look for
dark green leaves with deep
lobes, less than three inches
wide. The stems have string-like
tendrils that wrap around what
ever it can, and support the vine
onf fences or other garden plants.
It doesn't take long for the
vines to produce yellow blos-
soms. As with most squash rela-
tives, they produce separate
flowers with either male or


female parts. Male flowers pro-
duce only pollen, while the
female flowers produce.stumpy,
lumpy orange colored fruits that
are tapered at both ends.
At maturity the fruit bursts
open in thirds. The orange pulp
contains seeds covered with a
bright red skin. Seeds look much
like that of cucumber seed and
will measure about one-quarter
inch long. The "Apple" in Balsam
Apple refers to the bright red
pulp surrounding the seeds,
which are seen when the mature
orange rind splits and exposes
the seeds. The ripe fruits and
seeds are toxic.
Taming unwanted vines
Most local residents that dis-
cover Balsam apple vines invad-
ing their fences and crawling
though the landscape want to
know how to get rid of this invad-
er. There are no magic herbicides
that can be used to selectively kill


this plant without damaging
other landscape plants.
The key to managing this
weed is to keep ahead of it. If you
regularly observe your land-
scape, hand removal of small
seedlings before they take over is
the best course of action. If you
see a seedling that sprouts from a
left-behind Balsam Apple, you
will then know what a young
plant looks like, and train your
eye to pick it out from landscape
or garden plant beds while it is
small.
For situations where Balsam
Apple has got out of hand, the
use of our old standby herbicide
glyphosate can help to kill the
vine. You may know this chemi-
cal as Roundup(tm), a non-selec-
tive, systemic weed killer that
kills whatever it touches. Don't
spray it on wild cucumber vines
that are covering desirable
plants. Reading the label and fol-


lowing all label directions is not
only a good idea when using this
product, it is FEDERAL LAW! -
The weed killer will kill the
vine and the roots, but will not
kill the seed that have already
been produced. To prevent fur-
ther episodes of this vine crawl-
ing around your Florida yard,
careful removal of all the fruit
from dead vines before they split
and drop their seed will be need-
ed. And since it is unlikely that
you will be able to get all the
seed, follow-up management is
needed. By carefully looking for
new seedlings and promptly
pulling them up before they
grow flowers, the chances that
Balsam Apple will be a problem
are reduced.
Most consider Balsam Apple
to be a weed, but cultivated rela-
tives of this plant share its name.
Some used it as an ornamental
vine or savor its fruit as a veg-


etable. In the landscape, the larg-
er fruited Bitter melon can be
used as an ornamental plant. It
has larger more deeply lobed
leaves. With the small, yellow
flowers it can look striking as it
cascades over a retaining wall or
large barrel.
Our local balsam apple could
be used in a similar fashion, but
care should be given to prevent it
from escaping and becoming a
weed. I've placed more informa-
tion on our Okeechobee Web
page,
http://okeechobee.ifas.ufl.edu. If
you need additional information
on balsam apple, please email us
at okeechobee@ifas.ufl.edu or
call us at (863) 763-6469. Local
residents can stop by our office at
458 Hwy 98 North in Okee-
chobee, and visit our Okee-
chobee County Master Garden-
ers from 1-5 p.m. on Tuesday
afternoons.


UF expert cautions parents
GAINESVILLE Identity ment documents such as dri- tify students.
theft is not just for adults. very's licenses, or give it to police For older children, the popu-
Offenses against children are on when stopped or charged with a larity of personal computers in
the rise, and a University of Flori- crime, homes and schools creates a
da consumer education expert But when it comes to credit risk they will be victimized by
says the problem can actually be card fraud, child identity theft Internet scams such as "phish-
worse for younger victims. differs in an important respect: ing," Harrison said.
"Many parents don't realize Thieves necessarily create new "Even bright children who
that child identity theft exists, credit accounts for child victims, are very computer-savvy may
which means the crime often whereas most cases of adult not understand the dangers of
goes undetected for years," said identity theft involve existing being too free with their person-
Mary Harrison, a professor with accounts, she said. That can al information," she said.
UF's Institute of Food and Agri- make the crime worse for child Harrison recommends that
cultural Sciences. victims, parents monitor their children's.
"Parents need to know how According to a 2003 FTC sur- Internet use, talk to their kids
to recognize child identity theft vey, victims of new account about identity theft and tell them
because early discovery can fraud spend four times as much what information they should
greatly reduce the impact on vic- time and almost five times as and should not share with oth-
tims," she said. "If the crime is much money clearing their ers.
reported promptly, the thief has records compared with victims Parents should also monitor
less time to run up debt, and who had only existing accounts incoming mail for children of all
authorities have a better chance accessed. Victims of new ages because credit card offers
of finding evidence.' account fraud are also far more or even debt collection notices
For children under 18, the likely to encounter other prob- can indicate credit activity is tak-
number of identity theft com- lems, such as denial of credit, ing place already, said Linda
plaints reported to the U.S. Fed- loss of utility or phone service Foley of the Identity Theft
eral Trade Commission and criminal investigation. Resource Center, a nonprofit
increased by more than half Safeguarding a child's identi- organization based in San
between 2003 and 2004 from ty requires many of the same Diego, Calif.
about 6,400 cases to 9,800. At precautions parents should take "Getting a credit card offer
the same time, the percentage of for themselves but with a few addressed to your child does not
child victims among all identity twists, Harrison said. necessarily mean there's a prob-
theft cases increased from three Preschool-age children are lem," Foley said. "If you have
to four percent. unlikely to be approached by opened a bank account or a fre-
In some respects, identity scammers, so parents must bear quent flyer card in your child's
thieves treat personal data from the burden of protecting docu- name, your child may receive
children and adults the same ments and other information, mass-mailings from credit affili-
way, Harrison said. Most often, she said. Parents should ,avoid ates. Parents should call the
they use stolen information to carrying, their child's. Social company that has the child's
conduct fraudulent financial Security card, and should com- information to see if they're on a
transactions, though they some- plain if their child's school uses marketing list."
times use it to obtain govern- Social Security numbers to iden- Receiving debt collection


to be aware of child ID theft


notices in your child's name is a
much more serious indication
that your child's information is
being misused, and warrants
checking the child's credit
report with ,the three major
credit reporting agencies, Exper-
ian, TransUnion and Equifax,
she said.
Harrison said parents should
consider checking their chil-
dren's credit reports every year,
especially if they suspect their
personal information has been
compromised.
"Ordering an annual credit
report for your child increases
the likelihood you will uncover
child identity theft in a timely
fashion," she said. "If no credit
accounts have been established
in your child's name, the credit
agencies will inform you that
your child does not have a credit
report."
A new federal law will make
free credit reports available to
residents of Southeastern states
on June 1. The law provides for
a gradual rollout of this benefit;
West Coast consumers were the
first to gain access.
Parents who discover evi-
dence of child identity theft
should immediately report
fraudulent activity to one of the
three major credit reporting
agencies and ask that a fraud
alert be placed on the child's
credit record, she said. Parents
should also contact any credi-
tors listed in the child's credit


FWC makes it easier to speak up online


The people of Florida have an
unprecedented opportunity to
shape the future of our state's
fish and wildlife conservation
programs by helping create
Florida's Wildlife Legacy Initia-
tive. Now, the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) offers an unprece-
dented forum for public partici-
pation.
On June 9, from 7-8 p.m., the
FWC will host a live online virtu-
al workshop where FWC staff
will present an overview of Flori-
da's Wildlife Legacy Initiative
and ask for feedback. This is the
first time the FWC has conduct-
ed a public workshop through
the Internet. FWC staff will give
a 30-minute presentation fol-
lowed by public questions and
comment.
Instead of having to travel to a
traditional public meeting,
workshop attendees will be able
to "attend" from the comfort of
home, office or any place with
computer and Internet connec-
:,tion. Participants will see and
hear a presentation and interact
with FWC staff through chat,
questions and answers and
instant polling. Attendees will
also be able to comment and
make suggestions.
"The meeting will be. con-
ducted like a public workshop,


except that people can partici-
pate from virtually anywhere,"
said Thomas Eason, who is lead-
ing Florida's Wildlife Legacy Ini-
tiative for the FWC. Eason will
lead the live workshop.
.. Everyone interested in
"attending" the workshop, must
pre-register online before June
9. To get signed up, participants
should go to
MyFWC.com/wildlifelegacy and
follow the instructions to regis-
ter. Once registered, each will
receive e-mail reminders. ,
Complete information about
our Legacy Initiative and Con-
gress' requirements for the
Comprehensive Wildlife Conser-
vation Strategy is also on the
Web site.
But the Web isn't the only
way to participate. For the con-
venience of people who do not
have a computer with Internet
access, the FWC is making the
presentation available at six
locations around the state. Con-
cerned citizens can view the
computerized workshop arrd
meet with FWC biologists in
Lakeland, Lake City, Ocala,
Panama City, Tallahassee and
West Palm Beach. The West
Palm Beach workshop is at the
South Region Office, 8535
Northlake Boulevard, West Palm
Beach.


AMERICAN HOME CARE
A Home Health Agency has immediate openings
for the following positions in Clewiston:

Director of Nursing Fulltime Starting Salary $50,000
With Full Benefits Must Be RN, with Current Florida
License, has home health experience.

PRN Field Nurse RN $30.00/visit $55.00 Admission
and $60.00 for weekend admission plus mileage.

Data Entry Fulltime with Benefits.

PRN PT/OT/ST/MSW/Home Health Aide&
Please call at 1-866-766-0033 or
fax your resume at 863-983-5655 or
visit our website at www.americanhomecare.org
for more information.


Florida's Wildlife Legacy Ini-
tiative is a far-sighted approach
to link action plans to a distinct
funding program. Its aim is to
avert future declines of native
wildlife, with a goal of keeping
common species common. Pub-
lic participation is a crucial ele-
ment in developing this plan.
"The success of Florida's
Wildlife Legacy depends on
partnerships throughout from
creating, to securing funding, to
implementing the conservation
strategy. I hope-everyone who
cares about the future of Flori-
da's fish and wildlife will get
involved and help create a blue-
print for managing our
resources," Eason said.
Congress has challenged
each U.S. state and territory to
develop a comprehensive
wildlife conservation strategy
and to work together to create a
nationwide approach to wildlife
conservation. Florida's Compre-
hensive Wildlife Strategy is one
of 56 being developed by every
U.S. state and territory. As a
strong incentive to get states to
develop a plan, Congress made
it a requirement for participating
in the federal State Wildlife
Grants program. Florida's
Wildlife Legacy Initiative could
lead to millions of dollars of fed-
eral funding for our state's


wildlife and habitats.
The. FWC is leading the
process to create Florida's
Wildlife Legacy Initiative. But
this is not a plan for the FWC. It
is a plan for the future of our'
state's native wildlife.
"I encourage Floridians to get
involved and have their say,"
Eason said. "This is a chance for
everyone who is interested in
the future of Florida's wildlife to
participate and help craft the
plan.
A recorded copy of the virtual
workshop will be available at
MyFWC.com/wildlifelegacy after
the live workshop ends. People
can provide comments by click-
ing on the comment link on that
site, or by writing to Thomas
Eason at the FWC at 620 S.
Meridian St., Tallahassee, FL
32399-1600. The .deadline for
submitting comments is June
18.
In addition to the live online
workshop, the FWC is hosting a
special workshop with scientific
experts on June 17 at 8 a.m. On
June 18, the public and FWC
stakeholders are invited to an
open house throughout the day
to meet with FWC. staff and
comment on the strategy. Both
meetings will be held at Holiday
Inn Express, at 8310 Galbraith
Rd. (1-75 Exit 270) in Tampa.


BEDROOM DINING ROOM
SUITES SUITES

LIVINGROOM ODDS
SUITES ENDS


report and file a police report.
.Harrison said it is vital for
parents- of child victims to
understand the seriousness of
this crime and take action
promptly.
"A person's credit score is


becoming so important now -
not just for getting credit, but
also for obtaining insurance,
finding housing, and applying
for jobs," she said. "ID theft can
have a very far-reaching
Impact."


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1030 West Sugarland Hwy.
Clewiston, Florida
863-983-3663


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9, 2005












238 N. Bridge St. hrLaBeJue, FL 33935
863-675-8868
Lisa, Andrews Lic. Real Estate Broker
0 Associates. Dwight Hatfield, Sandra
FS Alexander, James Tanner, Roxana
57tal1ivest5t /O A Cisneros, Linda Dekle Davis Kevin Nelson
----Alt- -ntGrom InC. www.southwestfloridarealtv%)roun.com


Place your Call A Pro

today for only

$10 per week!

Call Lauren or Melissa at

863-983-9148, 863-946-

0511 or 561-996-4404


NO ONE WILL WORK HARDER FOR YOU THEN
JAMIE NAVARRO GIVE HIM A CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
-REALTt C. BAGANS FIRST
S D 30 Colorado Rd, Lehigh Acres, FL 33936


I'VE SOL) ALL MY

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iFT ME SELL

YOURS FAST TOO!

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VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWW.OAKREALTYINC.COM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS SALES
A ] CINDY L, ALEXANDER
1LIC, REAL ESTATE BROKER
3?E" U A E O i.' ,ER
A K fAc,-:tiTELF, E-nl'lLLER
?i ^^ f675-0500



NEW LOCATION!
233 N. BRIDGE ST
ON TE CORNER OF
BRIDGE ST &

~.. .. 1,, R.. i ; RDUCED '10 $400,000 aCI for an appointt
I.ARGE : i I1 Pil;; f I 'l 1 1 M $800/, BcIIray.
NOPET1IS I'---r"-'"' -1 ", 'I
HOM SIOR'RSAl. A MUST I i I I; :, ... ,,,,
Al"'I IRI'tO '.l 'ir, riI I 1 \R GARAGE irs on home with carports or 3+;, acres. Incutde.s fire-
, 1-. I,| ,.,,. l r il.J with fruit trees and place, breakfast nook. retreat off master bed,
jst a block away from the *. course. Home rom, front and back porch. Property also has
has large kitchen with breakfast nook and 2.nlO) sq Ift barn. Call today tr an appointmltnen
..,,. .il.,. h.i. ,S1 'J 'i I ,.9 9 I ,' ** Ii : :ri, I
INI' u i I' 1 \ _1li" r. i. ..,, i h Ilcar r ,kldirionaiil6.; "",
.., ..... -, .1Li. i J} ". I. tenor, II ,. I .'. I/- w w ood Iramne cracker house.
* |I[ !i.Lh)iO 1 il.l,., 1 1] ,. i I in";' ,' ,t,'
3BJED/2ATi 2 car garag CIIS house. Sirs on MM ) A
..I11. 'i ..: appro. 2 rlots Iron1 mout1t i L 1i 1 ti i iI : 2 'th wood
I "a, s is.Rcdu"ed to $600,000. i .... I M -h .* I 10,000.
" lI I t ; I l 9' ',., R t 1th i,' :'r
S. .. II "As BlUSINSS .I-U l veatexwith old
,,; t I .. l 's !s A' in $ 540.000.
. I-- I :.. ails TRY Crh,t -I in i no
I.l_ \1lll -. ,, i .. .. eeil I I i I I 1 1 1 VAII.ABIL .OTS IN
ig. custom "'c r -'Ion i .... i 'i IABf 1 -I.E.
scren: lanai, .:'ii1i lJ *. I i UNIT i. 1 Court,. Making
* ,2, T, ...n.. n lr l i i .; ,'D f1


SF, Hau f sm:NOL


* $210,000 lii 31. 51. I t. Myr hotte 9i a ii ew-ly
.li'l'9t "IIF 9'\l .,
$249.001{ ,. .... ..''i atimi1 iotne.
I "' 90ri 2I)/IA mbhile home on 5 ac'es
-tha's itm d. ha.' outkedl fish potnd, and hor se stal.
$160,000 ,i-'21A mobie h9itme wtlh fireplace,
' walk-ilii'oset.
ho "11 ... ,,i .. 1. ,' ,i't0!9
* $119,900 Thi 31BD1D1211A mmifiactend home f'a-
"'k

$89 900 3BI/2AM mobile he ott 1 +/- o re widh
9ew 9'pet vi tyl arid pailt
$89,900 New 3BDI/211iA mIbile ho1>m on ,65+/-
acre,
$82,500 INDtMA f k 9s wc a9'rp, vinyl '99d
ir(sfl paiint.
.,S t relk .
91 "B .' '
$1,025,600- 91l+/. arKs, ste idcdd, IOts of trees.
9m9a9s l'o rtwo 9, o 9,wner wii dide.
$998,025 \lrthuat: & 9ai9kc on 9,318+- atre.
On.e a1 kindtAuito Salage yard. Og:mnized with cl
hili of I il.lak,
$668,500 Hwy 27 frtnt'age, Canrrcmly ;I Awto
Saiwge yatrd
1 $550, .... ,. .
ir j-rcdi I on I, r' i i i i .. ,' I' i


o)ut on this intiq;Warecnagz
- $430,0M0- 204,"aertsb.ardn fidto't."irw, ner
*$300,000- 19,83+f-aiaaLN i99'a" tlumemOPO)Ssibil.
I I .' I''. -9I9I ailabI
*. I9.0)0 .. I. '-- awus>honieor
Mobile 9Iinxlmd pan S iiL.t tsnh 'pl lnk, 1'
$55,000 1.919"',' 9979 9997"' tt o!on paved, 91 no
911) hirte of Motttlt4

*$38,000 -1,25+", acre mtrood l nt in draiage~r
$345,000 -i LP14,/- arn Itwated ott paved nod out
9itg 1), +!. acre woxtciilot101atiJ htlc


o$50,000--


*$46,900 -.(Otvenjtirt in town 34 +,-awc'lot,

ufalle "'' 9e:ii'.h*. 19
~ ... '~ha ',U'' k


inMI~ki


CHL HOME BUILDERS

Port LaBelle

All CBS Construction

Exciting New Plans

Homes from Mid $100S

Spec Homes Available Now

















Lots Available, Seller Financing
Visit Our Model Center

2480 East State Road 80

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Se Habla Espanol


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Ifjyou are think

EATURED M HOM_

'- -*' 1 I .
-f' -' T ---- .< -



Comfy country living in this wtmderfully
renovated charmer. This 28R/1R old Florida
:ackcer homc in Orrona s.'itst on .7999 a 9csand
is hi Pristine condition, Trily a must sed!
',44 .h i0

i I HC'3MVI5
So-acc ar last'.3BR/2B home in i

nets.. Outside 1 i 'i' "cr'cened. porch,
1, -.. I.,,' i i ,.- ,i. .. ., ., "pool.
RIEDUCED $195,900.
", / llt if O Ntl Tl l B l T ,,9 ,,. .
$149900,.
* What a deal! 3RI151B CBS hIome hi iBelle
',n. ,,;, 9 f -,,,f. h-. catures include
S l i r and lots more.
; 1, 47 w. ill
* C(.oniy country 2 in this wondcrlfuly
renovated charmer i ,. 2BR1P old Florida
cracker home ti Ortona sits oih 77* '. acres and
is in Pritintc condition. Truly a ttt r seeI
$144,900,
* 2 bedroom homlc in the Bdemont Sukbdiviion
with 2 full baths& 2 halfbathll This home
19 lNDElr CONitO iT .dT
S I i 1 1 i i -
r,, h i h b .i i l I i i


bing of biYing or selling



c*l f~1 acc', by cotntnun dock! Fiahing,
boadtIg 9.' 21,1...,-t Your door
Th is VCt. i .. U aintained 211RIN1
inbl oeinn desirable Phuningo Oay on


o il r. Ir f0.,

4 "' .t 10H. 1,1 9
L ni I'0
0.LI I



''I thI J to 1


$979000
II 4 .1 'r rli -




99 1 .'.I fl 1o t 9 'id m .1 .1

11 r I~5 (, )I I 'ii
.9,f


give its cl!
turad or site built hompes $59,900 each.
0i 1 1161'.1 I1 ""a- ac. On jasminc'sr.
in Montura. 6rat for investment or homesite.
1 1 ..i.254 1",acre. Lot in Montira.
$42,500.


1I.AI

I 1 1.1't IF. 1 U.99 'Ii SII 't9



i i d rot 1 -1 1 C iT99 i




-4 'I
'1 d". aLi4Qi II
O B I I N XRCM TIRACO),, rd


UNUER CONTRACT


I, J. IT rh

fronrzav on SR2O 'and frontage on Luekey


SDil -inrtra Oa-Sh-adrd Hi-in- A Ppaitiful Pionec' r -H9m.inep Gacwii Two Story EUtape Huanell
ei-. oMM I Batrnom.s 084 I. Acras 2BsmomR I ;parro.Mq r 4 54 .- s3:ii -ir..';ainio.-mf.sa..LPiF 1.Amis' '
k .

East Fort Myers?
S- Extraordinary 3 Bedroom/2 Bath custom
---- 1 intracoastal home located in a progres-
sive E. Ft Myers riverfront Community.

r .' \i i .' I l lBPie Pi,- ifflri:.nt Home1 .[aB lui Rierfront Homet l
3BR/2BA CBS ir. ri I alI 91f a l iron, r arin,' I4 : 1:.r, 3E9 nlOfi i Sllrn.., DoaO i Y 113a4r0
.. : ',~: : '- .: .


li
Ri 3ii 0 9,ri 9.e]( ,,,u BiTnI, ,1, r Build your dream house on this
I ,. a .. ...... J81/. acre rrverfront site.


fb, ,9 ~aii~ilni tlId1l'1~t9 t Ltl"a. ~Dnificel I To~men O0aks[
V-divi'tb91ltiC Uri Kh I-' Al.-re. I IR J 9 2A I ON 63 -/- .CRES


r-- .i .- *


1 1!9 191'1Ifp lix aGivwing fai C lErloil Ifoe,rnrnl HRoi~me m
48!tA7 i 9~on,.A1 2 13 Am% BF12Solc4V9r; Boq.a Cou Fk


1,i' Ledeca Acres Lot! -----''
Locat.ed 14813-14810 OueenA..e Alva RIVER/CREEKFRONT HOME
ONE-OF-A-KIND! 3BR / 2 5BA / 3G Home
/(Y [I ,'Offered on 5+/- acres with detached
Workshop/Apt w/425' of Riverfront view!


liT.


*- ..e. *5.


"" -aa""so ____'m -"" ,, ,,u 'ti .
the BeauIv You Long For! Development Potential! Build For Your Future
Locate n in LaBele on 2 186 Acres Located in LaBelle on 5 11 */ Acres Located in LiaBelle on 2 55 i- Acres


Sherri Denning

Licensed-Real Estate Broker since 1985

'Associates


V


- Wayne IVIcquaig
- Lisa Cleghorn
- Bonnie Denning, CPA
- Tracey Williams
- Joyce Gerstman
^ S i-


- Lisa Herrero
- Paul Meador
- Art Fry
- Greg Bone
- Jesse Wallace
- Y\onne Illllnman



:~T t


JL Lh


BRAND NEW!! BEAU RIVAGE
Downto-wn Fo.-lt Myer Two i
3Bedroom In 3Batchroom mUnito
Choose From Got in on the Ground
Leval for this Investmenti


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9, 20051


9 1 LL








Thursday, June 9, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Public notice out for FSA elections


The election of agricultural
producers to Farm Service Agency
(FSA) county committees is
important to all. farmers and
ranchers with large- or small-scale
operations. It is crucial that every
eligible producer participate in
these elections because FSA coun-
ty committees are a direct link
between the agricultural commu-
nity and the U.S. Department of
Agriculture.
Committee members are a crit-
ical component of the operations
of FSA. They help deliver FSA farm
programs at the local level. Farm-
ers who serve on committees help
with the decisions necessary to
administer the programs their
counties offer. They work to make
FSA agricultural programs serve
the needs of local producers.
Committees provide local


input on:
Commodity price support
loans and payments;
Conservation programs;
Incentive, indemnity, and dis-
aster payments for some com-
modities; and
Other farm disaster assis-
tance.
FSA committees operate with-
in official regulations designed to
.carry out Federal laws. Committee
members apply their judgment
and knowledge to make local
decisions.
This year Local Administrative
Areas (LAA) 1 and 5 are up for
election. LAA 1 represents all of
Hendry County north of County
Road 846. LAA 5 represents all of
Glades County west of County
Road 78.
Eligible voters have the right to


nominate candidates) of their
choice by petition beginning June
15.
Agricultural producers who
participate or cooperate in an FSA
program may be nominated for
candidacy for the committee. Indi-
viduals may nominate themselves
or others as a candidate. In addi-
tion, organizations representing
socially disadvantaged (minorities
and women) farmers and ranch-
ers may nominate candidates. On
January 18, 2005, USDA issued
new uniform guidelines for coun-
ty committee elections to help
ensure that FSA county commit-
tees fairly represent the agricultur-
al producers of a county or multi-
county area, especially socially
disadvantaged (SDA) producers.
SDA persons are African'Amer-
icans, Native Americans, Alaska


Natives, Hispanics, Asians, Pacific
Islanders, other minorities, and
women. The guidelines, author-
ized by the 2002 Farm Bill, govern
the FSA county committee elec-
tion process and are designed to
increase participation by minori-
ties and women.
Blank nomination forms (FSA-
669A's) may be obtained at the
county FSA Office or online at
http://forms.sc.egov.usda.gov/efor
ms/mainservlet. A nomination
form signed by the nominee is
needed to nominate an individual.
The form includes a statement
that the nominee agrees to serve if
elected. Nomination forms must
be returned or postmarked or
received by close of business in
the local USDA-FSA. office on
August 1.


Canker found in Alico, Inc. orchards


LABELLE -Alico, Inc., (NAS-
DAQ:ALCO) one of the South's
best-known agribusiness com-
panies operating in Central and
Southwest Florida, and with
approximately 141,000 acres in
real estate holdings, was
informed on May 25 by the Flori-
-da Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services that cit-
rus canker was confirmed in
Alico's Lake Reedy grove located
in Polk County, Florida.
Citrus canker is a highly con-
tagipus bacterial disease of cit-
rus that causes premature leaf
and fruit drop. Citrus canker
causes no threat to humans, ani-
mals or plant life other than cit-


rus. In order to eradicate the dis-
ease, infected and exposed trees
within 1,900 feet of the canker
find, must be removed and
destroyed in accordance with
Florida law.
John R. Alexander, chairman
and CEO of Alico, Inc. said, "We
don't know all the facts sur-
rounding this canker find, but
will be following closely the
state's guidance and rules. The,
canker was found on one side of
a 250-acre grove. Although a
canker find is very serious, the
disease has not affected Alico's
other citrus acreage."
This 250-acre grove repre-
sents approximately two percent


of the company's 11,147 produc-
ing citrus acres. All of the trees in
this grove are covered under the
Federal Crop Insurance pro-
gram. Reimbursements to be
received under this coverage are
expected'to exceed the remain-
ing book basis of the trees or $46
thousand.
Additionally under the Florida
Canker Eradication Program, cit-
rus may not be replanted on the
property until it has been deter-
mined that the property has
been canker free for two years.
In light of this, the company will
evaluate the property for its best
future use. The Lake Reedy
grove is not contiguous to other


company groves.
About Alico
Alico, Inc., an agribusiness
company operating in Central
and Southwest Florida, owns
approximately 141,000 acres of
land located in Collier, Hendry,
Lee and Polk Counties. The com-
pany is involved in various oper-
ations and activities including
citrus fruit production, cattle
ranching, sugarcane, sod pro-
duction, and forestry. The com-
pany also leases land for farm-
ing, cattle grazing, recreation
and oil exploration, and is
increasingly involved in explor-
ing real estate development in
and beyond its holdings.


Senior happenings


Volunteer training
and opportunities
Faith in Action new volunteer
orientation will. be held in
Clewiston at the Clewiston
Senior Center June 30 at 2 p.m.
Bring a friend. Call Barbara at
(863) 675-1446 or Liz at (863)
983-7088 for more information.
Upcoming meetings
and events
Family caregiver support
groups in June will provide the
new Social Security Medication
Program information. Join us to
learn about the new medication
program and get assistance fill-
ing out the paperwork properly.
The next meeting will take place
in Labelle June 15 at 4 p.m. at


the L.J. Nobles Senior Center
(863) 675-1446; in Clewiston
June 22 at 4 p.m. at the Clewis-
ton Senior Center (863) 983-
7088; in Moore Haven June 29,
at 4 p.m. at the Moore Haven
Senior Center (863) 946-1821.
Flea market
The next Trash and Treasures
Flea Market will be held June 24,
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the L.J.
Nobles Senior Center in Labelle.
For more information or to make
a donation call Barbara at (863)
675-1446. All proceeds to benefit
the Faith in Action in Labelle pro-
gram.


trained SHINE (Seniors Helping
with Insurance Needs of Elders)
counselor is available every
Wednesday morning free of
charge at Nobles Center and in
Moore Haven at Senior Connec-
,tions offices.
Legal help
Legal help from Florida Rural
Legal Services is available at the
Nobles Senior Center iri LaBelle
on the second Wednesday of
each month from 9:30 to 11:30
am. (Must call 675-1446 to make
appointment)
Post disaster help


Free services to help for older adults


elders with insurance
Insurance counseling with a


Disaster funds are still avail-
able to help older adults living in
Hendry and Glades Counties


who continue to need assistance
with such issues as roof repair,
debris removal, insurance
deductibles, appliance repair or
replacement, chore work, etc.
Elders in need of help due to the
hurricanes of last summer can
speak with a specially trained
outreach worker in Clewiston on
Monday and Tuesdays, 983-
7088) and LaBelle Wednesday
through Friday (675-1446.)
Exercise classes
Nobles Senior Center exer-
cise classes meet M-W-F at 9
a.m. Come and join this lively
group for better health. Garners
come every Monday to the L.J.
Nobles Senior Center starting at
1:00 p.m. for card playing, Scrab-
ble and what-have-you. All are
welcome.


G-l ades Ford Nmoln-Mmcy
4Co oJ E"- Ir- r A ,ri D
L- -r--s 4V "n .o OU -r
L49k a- CT "S E-,-I-0 r 1EO-e T

New, Used & Leased Car Sales
800-726-8514
.... ..... jon (igladesmotors.com


800-363-4851
www. carshelpingpeople.org
SVoluntiteers
ofAmerica*
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fSkilled Long & Short Term Care Facility
State-Rated 5 Stars A
Healthcare Services Include:
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*Full Time Medical Director -Specialized HIV Care
*Dialysis Support -Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy
*Alzheimer's Support Groups *24 hour Registered Nurse Staffing
* Intravenous Therapy -Therapeutic Activities
230 South Barfield Highway
Pahokee, Florida 33476-1834
PHONE: 561-924-5561
FAX: 561-924-9466
Other facilities in Gainesville & Bradenton Visit our website at www.floridacare.net


ALACHUA COUNTY
SH KnlIF'S OFFICE
SuKprtn AND SURPLUS



Saturday, June 11th, 2005
Inspection & Registration 7:30 AM -,.
Auction at 8:30 AM on site at k
2621 SE Hawthorne Rd., Goinesville, FL Nefng
50+ Veraives Cars Trucks TuVs heui A i
Moiorichome Airbail Offic Equipn-,erl. ,,....._,
CoimrpuIers, Bikes, Lownrnoers,
Kilchen Equipment. Furro uie Jeweirvy,
P emonds and muh naaorel
10% Buyfer SPrem um ,

www.bencoampenouctioneers.com
PHN CONE: A 5 9CTIO6 2E
ST^^h-I:RUIFF' OFIC


UO~ft Of rttf "OE(IWiAL



r ~ ^^\


%'C"',

'-t. ~ F ,Ot 'C


Make up to $2,500

by filling in the space above!


Sell your personal valuables if
they're $2,500 or less
for absolutely free!
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* 4 lines for 2 weeks

* Price must be
included in ad

Private parties
only

S2 items per house-
SOd per issue
",Si!.. 'o*'if. 1 .


- Clewiston News

d^-T


* 1 used item or
grouping per ad
priced at $2,500
or less

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Newspapers
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disqualify any ad.


D DEMOCRAT


'he Sun


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... '


DEMOCRAT
City looks at water plant

Clewiston News
. New cemetery in Harlem
"' TheS u n


ft*.


City aproues 013,,ftr r.)Ievr'frf3


r


"In a democracy, the highest office is that of citizens."
US Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter.


We
the


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Clewiston News
GLADES COUNTY


DEMOCRAT



The Sun
Commrunitu Service Through Tournalism


Every




Voice




Counts.


I -- ka 5 W-N -


I


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9, 2005


J-
Bello Glade







14 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 9, 2005


0 4 CHEVROLET

I IMPALA


- Ul4s \
L il
o . ,-..


IOK MIlES, TAN. STK#5437A


`04 TOYOTA

RUNNER SR5
SR 5its
1~~ L..-^ ^ ^^ ^ S


AUTO, A/C. STK#54348A


r-H


35K MiHES. STK#53952A


. ___._
:,(.- z l '. _.

04. -, .,.


'94 GEO PRISM $
TAN, AUTO. STK#5-4356A........ ............... I 0
'94 NISSAN ALTIMA 299
56K MILES. STK#54366A......... ........ $ ,990
'98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2 99O
WHITE, AUTO. STK#5-4730A ............................ ,9
'97 OLDSMOBILE LS
56K MILES. STK#5790A......... 4,990
'01 DODGE INTREPID SE $
BLUE. STK#54022A..... 5,9 0
'99 HONDA ACCORD 6
SILVER. STK#52846A.......................................... 6 ,9 9 0
'01 DODGE INTREPID $7 9Q
SILVER. STK#6-059A__.... ......... ..... I ,
'04 KIA SPECTRA $9 99Q
STK#50697A ........................................................... ,
'01 NISSAN ALTIMA A 9990
TAN, AUTO. STK#5-4483A .......... .. ............
'03 PONTIAC GRAND AM $1 0n790
WHITE. STK#5-3845A..................................... $ 1 U


'96 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE $
AUTO, LOW MILES. STK#6042A 3,990
'99 FORD WINDSTAR s4 20
GREEN STK-5-37415B ,290
'99 ISUZU RODEO $7,990
WHITE, 30K MILES. STK#5-3162A 7,990
'01 FORD EXPLORER XLT $7 9n
STK#54301A i7,990
'02 DODGE CARAVAN Sl 0790
BLUE. STK#5-2844A 10,790
'00 FORD EXPEDITION XLT 10,990
WHITE, 50K MILES. STK#54438A1 ,99
'03 FORD WINDSTAR i 1,790
SILVER. STK#5-3986A
'02 CHEVROLET BLAZER l 1 99
STK#5926A *11,990
'02 DODGE DURANGO SLT 12990
STK#53297A.. 12,990


'02 DODGE 1500 QUAD CAB SLT 5 1.9
LEATHER. STK#51622B
'03 FORD RANGER
23K MILES. STK052864A
'04 DODGE DAKOTA
STK#53830A 3 ..
'02 DODGE RAM 1500
WHITE STi<6-1511A 1 9
'03 DODGE 1500 QUAD CAB LONGBED s1, 7-
SILVER, LOW MILES STK5-3388A
'02 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 6.9
GREEN. ST.#5-3952A 169
'03 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB ,1 ,
BLUE STK#5-3602A
'02 FORD F-150 1 7,99
STKOP6588 4 0


'04 F-250 4X4 LONGBED
WHITE STK#53556A


~z~qg~j


'02 DODGE STRATUS ES
SUNROOF, LEATHER, 20K MILES, STK#53895A...... I 1,990
'01 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE SPYDER GS s11
SILVER. STK#54285A....................................... .. 11 ,9 9 0
'00 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
GRAY. STK#P-4772A ......................................,
'03 PONTIAC AZTEK $
BURGUNDY, LOW MILES. STK#50594A... I .,59 U
'02 VW JETTA GLS TURBO
RED, SUNROOF. STK5346/7A........................... 1 3 ,9 9 0
'02 VW BEETLE GLS
SUNROOF, WHITE. STK#52924A...............13,990
'05 TOYOTA SCION XB
BLACK. STK#53904A............................... .... 1 5 ,9 9 0
'05 HONDA ACCORD EX 117,790
STK#5664A ............-............ ........... .I ,S..
'04 MAZDA RX-8 $
SILVER, LOADED. STK#5906A..... ................. 2,990


'03 DODGE DURANGO SLT
STK#53483A 112,990
'02 FORD ESCAPE XLT 3
LEATHER. STK#54015A 13,990
'03 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
SILVER. STK#5-3635A ................ 3,990
'03 JEEP WRANGLER
STK#52525A 15,990
'03 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 990
LOADED: STK#54185A ,990
'05 FORD SPORT TRAC
STK#52833A 22,990
'03 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN LT 25990
STK#53167B 25,990
'05 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
LOADED. STK#541221A 33,990


'03 TOYOTA TUNDRA $ .,
TAN, LOW MILES. STK#5-4032A .
'04 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SIT
BLUE, STK#5-1617A.............
'03 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB LARIAT
BLACK. STK#53270A
'04 FORD F-150 XLT -.
STK-51651A .
'05 DODGE 2500 HEMI
5K MILES STK454103A
'04 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW XLT ., -
BLUE. STKFP-6589 ,; y
'05 DODGE 2500 QUAD CAB LONGBED ,,.
2K MILES. WHITE STK5-J4065A
'02 FORD F-150 XLT SUPER CREW 4X4 .
STKO52688A
'02 FORD F-350 SUPER DUTY $
DIESEL DUALLY LiOW MILES STK=535-16A 3 99


Ti IlI SE HABLA ESPANOL PARLEZ VOUS FRANCAIS & CREOLE

STORE HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY: 8:30AM 9PM SATURDAY: 8:30AM 9PM SUNDAY: 11AM- 6PM
Offers expire date of publication. Must present this ad at time of purchase to receive advertised offers. All offers to qualified buyers. Savings based off original MSRP. Dealer not responsible
for typographical errors or omissions. Prices plus tax, tag & title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. See dealer for details. Art for illustration purposes only.


S


12 DODGE

QIAD AlAH


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9,2005


14


we









Thursday. June 9. 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


WESTERN PALM BEACH SUPERSTORE


VOLUME


PRICING


OVER 200 QUALITY PRE-OWNED VEHICLES 03-05




PROGRAM CARS SAVE UP TO 40% 60% OFF MSRj


P


- B~NO E- ---I a 1 _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _


2004 Chevy 2500 4x4



$28,995


or $465/mo.*


2002 Ford F15
Ranch Super Cab Sho

NOW


$23.,9


0 King 2UU5 lord xpeclntOo
rlt Bed 4D Eddie Bauer


9 $29,900

95 or $479/mo,


*


Diesel


NO CREDIT? BAD CREDIT? BANKRUPTCIES?
REPOSSESSIONS? NOT A PROBLEM!!












ALL PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
COMPLETE CARE PROTECTION
2 YEAR 24,000 MILES
.. ON USED CARS & RENTALS INCLUDED
24 HouR ASSISTANCE
/ & 1ST OIL CHANGE


$8,995


or $169/mo.*.


$14,995


or $259/mo.*


$18,995


or $335/mo.*


$24,995


or $399/mo.*


2005 Ford Taurus SE
Starting At



$13,995


or $199/mo.*
.^- ~'i5;r a 3rt~i -ga1 T ..i&=;^'W W


JUST A SAMPLE OF Oui


CARS STARTING AT $2,


BMW 04
BUICK 01
BUICK 97
CADILLAC 04
CHEVROLET 99
CHEVROLET 00
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 00
CHEVROLET 02
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 01
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 01
CHEVROLET 03
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 04
CHRYSLER 05
CHRYSLER 01
CHRYSLER 02
DODGE 97
DODGE 02
DODGE 02
DODGE 95
DODGE 03
DODGE 96
DODGE 03
DODGE 96
DODGE 02
FORD 94
FORD 89
FORD 99
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 99
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 05
FORD 0 .
FORD 03
FORD 01
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 0.4
FORD 02
FORD 02


325
CENTURY
SKYLARK
CTS BLK
CAVALIER
CORVETTE BLACK
IMPALA WHITE
IMPALA BLACK
MALIBU
MALIBU SILVER
MALIBU GOLD
MALIBU WHITE
PRIZM BLUE
SILVERADO 1500
SILVERADO 1500
TAHOE
TRAILBLAZER WHITE
TRAILBLAZER SILVER
300 JADE
CARAVAN
PT CRUISER GRAY
DAKOTA RED
DURANGO RED
NEON WHITE
RAM P.U 1500
RAM P U 1500
RAM P U 1SO00
RAM PIU 1500 SILVEF
RAM P,'U 2500
STRATUS
AEROSTAR GREEN
BRONCO BROWN
CONTOUR
E350 XLT WHITE
ECONOLINE E 150
ECONOLINE E250
ESCAPE Gft -Ei.i
ESCAPE
E XCURaION
EXCURISIOlII
EXCURSION 8LA,. K
LAPD 4X2 E B !u P
EXPEDiTICoI V.' I:I L
b XPEDIrlOf" L. ^
L. \PEDI[IION ,i' '
E APLOll i J r.
E (PEUI Iu I L .
r.APEDII A 1U1J LLAt.
EXPEDITIU'i Sig g. r.
EXPEulIIIOrJ bLULJ


FORD 02
FOR 0


FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
1-URD
FORD
I-ORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
FORD
VURD
F -)RD
1...HO



FORD
F-ORD
F ORD


EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPL SPORT TRAC
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPRDITION 4X2
F150
F150
F ISO
F ISO
F150
F150
F 150
F150
F150
F 150
FI50
F 150
FIS 150
F ISO
F 1Ib
F- 150
F150
F 15U
F 150
F250
F250
F2r,0
F250
F25U
F250
F250
F250
F2S50
F250
F250
F250 EXT LARIAT
F350


RED


SILVER
GRAY
WHITE
GREEN
GOLD
GRAY
GOLD

WHITE
GREEN
WHITE
BLACK







GRAY
WHITE
MAROON
SILVER
GOLD
RED
RED
SILVER
WHITE






BLUE
WHITE
WHITE
BROWN
RED
WHITE


RED
BLACK


995 OR
FORD 03 P350
FORD 02 F350
FORD 04 F350
FORD 01 F3SO
FORD 93 F350
FORD 04 F350
FORD 04 F350
FORD 03 F350
FORD 04 F350
FORD 02 F450
FORD 02 FOCUS
FORD 02 FOCUS
FORD 03 FOCUS
FORD 04 FREESTAR
FORD 02 MUSTANG
FORD 96 MUSTANG
FORD 04 MUSTANG
FORD 99 RANGER
FORD 02 RANGER
FORD 03 RANGER
FORD 00 RANGER
FORD 01 TAURUS
FORD 04 TAURUS
FORD 04 TAURUS
FORD 04 TAURUS
FORD 05 TAURUS
FORD 05 TAURUS
FORD 05 TAURUS
E FORD 05 TAURUS
FORD 05 TAURUS
FORD 05 TAURUS
FORD 99 WINDSTAR
FORD 98 WINDSTAR
FORD 99 WINDSTAR
FORD 99 WINDSTAR
GMC 02 SIERRA 1500
GMC 00 YUKON
HONDA 99 ACCORD
HONDA 98
HONDA 01
HONDA 98 CIVIC
HYUNDAI 04 ELANTRA
HYUNDAI 03 TIBURON GT
INFINITI 01 G20
JEEP 00 CHEROKEE
JEEP 02 CHEROKEE
KIA 01 SPORTAGE
LINCOLN 04 AVIATOR
LINCOLN 02 BLACKWOOD
LINCOLN 99 CONTINENTAL


$89 A MONTH
LINCOLN 01 CONTINENTAL WHITE
LINCOLN 02 LS WHITE


BLACK
SILVER
BLUE
WHITE
WHITE
RED
SILVER

WHITE





BLUE
WHITE

CHAMP
SILVER
TAN
WHITE
GRAY
BEIGE
BEIGE
SILVER
MERLOT


SILVER
RED
BLUE
WHITE
GOLD
CIVIC
CIVIC
GREEN
WHITE
RED
GOLD
BLACK
GRAY
GRAY


LINCOLN 02
LINCOLN 03
LINCOLN 02
LINCOLN 97
LINCOLN 03
LINCOLN 03
LINCOLN 03
LINCOLN 95
LINCOLN 01
LINCOLN 96
LINCOLN 03
MAZDA 023
MAZDA 02
MAZDA 01
MERCURY 02
MERCURY 01
MERCURY 02
MERCURY 03
MERCURY 04
MERCURY 01
MERCURY 03
MERCURY 01
MERCURY 02
MERCURY 97
MERCURY 01
MITSUBISHI 0
NAVISTAR INTL


LS
LS
LS
MARK VIII
NAVIGATOR
NAVIGATOR 4X4
TOWN CAR
TOWN CAR
TOWN CAR
TOWN CAR
TOWNCAR
MAZDA MPV ES
MILLENIA
MPV
GRAND MARQI
GRAND MARQI
MOUNTAINEER
MOUNTAINEER
MOUNTAINEER
SABLE
SABLE
SABLE
SABLE
TRACER
VILLAGER
1 MONTERO
T 02


NISSAN 00 ALTIMA GLE
NISSAN 89 MAXIMA
NISSAN 00 PATHFINDER
NISSAN 01 PATHFINDER
NISSAN 03 SENTRA GXE
PLYMOUTH 00 VOYAGER SE
PONTIAC 02 FIREBIRD
SATURN 95 SL
SUBARU 90 LEGACY
SUZUKI 03 AERIO
TOYOTA 01 RUNNER
TOYOTA 00 CAMRY LE
TOYOTA 05 COROLLA
TOYOTA 04 COROLLA
TOYOTA 04 COROLLA
TOYOTA 03 HIGHLANDER
TOYOTA 04 RAV4
TOYOTA 00 SIENNA
TOYOTA 01 SOLARA
TOYOTA 03 TACOMA


SILVER
SILVER
GREEN
MAROON
SILVER
GREY
BEIGE
GREEN
WHITE

SILVER


UIS GREEN
UIS
SILVER
SILVER
GREEN

WHITE
GREEN

WHITE
WHITE

WHITE


RED
WHITE
BLUE
FWD
SILVER
GRAY

BLACK
SILVER
BLUE

GOLD
BLACK
LTBLUE

BLUE
SILVER


GRAY


*%vAC 63, ini rf 31'.1 ..41 C tl' r IS ............I .--I.j., J, ~..~,*-rrrd~in -rnanc ,cE* A] I pr-rioc we' cm $3,00(0 cash or cratr eouirv ?MO Beacon or-itjIgher w. 3.01 0 c amh oMr r3iJ- equaIt, FPlus to %. Lsg oid Bl.nkrupiclei rmu itbedis.-
chuarged, do;& npa-, mr.L'. n -i.. g-.w All I II' ii ii r .nbr,-b d %Allinan-:ed aleq & eiies ubr..jbirt t lende~r upprul alProof of r.?qd.-nq'&. pay srrub mull be r.i- lPo:.'nrnems %apprv~dredit bmemcn 53.C000caah d.-.wn or
trade in equ~ry Plus ., r, nIlII, '- -. 1.- Y~..Ac: ,4,-, u.p Ur, *nriv 1,,e4 f.rhinrancing plus uixtug & title


Lariat 2003 F-350
Diesel


$25,995 $28,995


or $410/mo.* or $459/mo.*


R USED CARS & TRUCKS


I I Jul Clu"Y'


- in


AM AMVM AlSk J APAVAM

WWI Imqw gojtd P. -NEW AfAm"Ov"o,




525 N.W Avenue L 0 Belle Glade






INVVVw.glades otors.com 1(800)5737983


: I


i- '.*'< *"*" ; "W: ...:-'!- flf.^'r'W^l'h i'-"i'r1 ^~lAffthAaGffi^!& >CXBgAW"


09


i


BLACK







Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 9,2005


Crist,
TALLAHASSEE -
General Charlie Crist ar
for Health Care Administ
retary Alan Levine ann
new prescription drug
site aimed at assisting Fl
the search for the lowes
prescription drugs in their
The Web site, ww
daRx.com, provides pri
mation from competing
for the 50 most comm
prescription drugs in 1
well as generic equival
available. The Web site
mination of a full year c
tion and implementation
Florida consumers to c
shop for the lowest "usu
tomary prices" generz
as retail prices report(
pharmacies.
The Web site can
accessed from the attor


AHCA announce prescription d
Attorney all's Web site at http://myfloridale- their city, and even within their indi- can change daily.
rnd Agency gal.com/ or AHCA's Web site at vidual zip code. The price search AHCA was charged by the Flori-
tration Sec- http://www.fdhc.state.fl.us/. and other information are available da Legislature with creating the
bounced a "For many Floridians, prescrip- in both English and Spanish, and Web site to help Floridians com-
price Web tion drugs make up a significant the results can be downloaded into prison shop among pharmacies.
loridians in part of the family budget," said a spreadsheet so consumers can Since prescription drug prices are
;t prices on Crist. "This Web site is a giant leap review all prices at their conven- rarely advertised or displayed, the
ir area. forward for these families, and we ience. Web site supports the attorney gen-
w.MyFlori- are pleased to be working with a Joining Crist at announcing the eral's and AHCAs goal of providing
cing infor- partner like the Agency for Health Web site were legislative sponsors Floridians with reliable information
ig retailers Care Administration to help Florida and representatives of the Florida on the cost and reliability of health
only used consumers. By arming consumers Retail Federation, AARP and the care services in the state of Florida.
Florida, as with valuable prescription drug Florida Medical Association.
ents when pricing information, we will not Prices on the Web site reflect "Governor Bush has made
- the cul- only help consumers save money, what an uninsured consumer, with transparency in health care servic-
of prepara- we'll also encourage healthy cornm- no discount or supplemental plan, es a top priority, and this Web site
n enables petition." would normally pay. The informa- represents another advance in arm-
omparison Several other state attorneys tion on the Web site is meant to ing Floridians with information to
al and cus- general and federal agencies have help consumers compare prices at help them make the best health
ally known launched similar Web sites, but different pharmacies, and is not a care decisions," said AHCA Secre-
ed by local Florida's new Web site is unique guaranteed price. While the infor- taryAlan Levine. "AHCA is proud to
because it allows consumers to mation on the Web site will be be a part of this milestone on the
also be compare prices for prescription updated regularly, it is important to road to Governor Bush's goal of
ney gener- drugs charged by pharmacies in note that prescription drug prices total transparency in health care


rug price
pricing in the state of Florida."
The legislation calling for the
Web page was sponsored by Sena-
tor Durell Peaden and Representa-
tive Frank Farkas. Senator Peaden
joined Attorney General Crist at a
news conference launching the
Web page, while Representative
Farkas issued the following state-
ment in support:
"Floridians currently compare
prices when purchasing such
essentials as gasoline, groceries
and other products. This Web site
will allow our citizens to price shop
their prescription drugs, thus gen-
erating tremendous savings that
can be used for other basic needs."
The attorney general's Medicaid
Fraud Control Unit is involved with
pharmacy pricing issues as part of
its responsibility to investigate and
prosecute fraud involving physi-


Web site
'cians, pharmacists, hospitals,
durable medical equipment suppli-
ers and others suspected of inten-
tionally defrauding the state's Med-
icaid program. In the last two years,
investigations and prosecutions
conducted by the Medicaid Fraud
Control Unit have been responsible
for more than $40 million in recov-
eries for the Florida Medicaid pro-
gram as well as fines, forfeitures
and judgments.
Working to improve access to
affordable, quality health care to all
Floridians, the Agency for Health
Care Administration administers
Florida's $15 billion Medicaid pro-
gram, licenses and regulates more
than 32,000 health care facilities
and 30 health maintenance organi-
zations, and publishes health care
data and statistics.


$30 million in state funding to help


speed Lake
Recognizing the urgent need to
expedite recovery efforts for Lake
Okeechobee, the State Legislature
appropriated an additional $30 mil-
lion for Lake Okeechobee Protec-
tion Plan projects this year.
Florida Sen. Ken Pruitt will high-
light the recent legislative actions
and discuss additional plans for
expediting projects to benefit the
lake at the South Florida Water
Management District's Water
Resources Advisory Commission
meeting, Thursday, June 2, at 1:30
p.m. at the Jupiter Beach Resort in
Jupiter.
"With strong support from Gov.
Jeb Bush and the Florida Legislature,
I am confident that the South Florida
Water Management District and its
many partners will work quickly to
put this money to good use," said
Pruitt. "The future of the lake
depends on decisive action now!"


Okeechobee
Last year's multiple hurricanes
and associated heavy rainfall
churned up sediment and
increased the amount of storm
water entering the lake. This result-
ed in persistent poor water quality,
murky water and high water levels
that are endangering the ecological
health of the lake. Submerged
plants, which provide oxygen and
habitat for fish, are vanishing
because sunlight cannot penetrate
the onud-colored water. Algae
blooms are also of major concern.
The South Florida Water Man-
agement District is establishing a
special Water Resources Advisory
Commission (WRAC) committee
to recommend actions to expedite
collaborative Lake Okeechobee
recovery efforts.
"While this action is not an
overnight quick fix for the lake, it
will help us complete needed proj-


recovery
ects as fast as possible," said Dis-
trict Governing Board Member and
WRAC Chair Michael Collins.
Committee members will be
recommended for approval at the
June 8 Governing Board meeting in
Miami. The first monthly WRAC
Lake Okeechobee Committee
meeting will be Thursday, June 30,
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at South Flori-
da Water Management District
headquarters in West Palm Beach.
The new Lake Okeechobee
Committee will review Lake Okee-
chobee Protection Plan projects to
recommend improvements and
action steps to speed current proj-
ect implementation; and review
operational schedules for Lake
Okeechobee, its tributary basins
and lakes, and connecting estuar-
ies. Operational improvements will
also be recommended for Govern-
ing Board consideration.


Grants to improve EMS in


rural communities


TALLAHASSEE The Florida
Department of Health (DOH)
announces the awarding of
Emergency Medical Services
(EMS) grants totaling $409,801 to
the following counties: Baker,
DeSoto, Gilchrist, Glades, High-
lands, Holmes, Jackson and
Sumter. The grants will assist in
the purchase of equipment and
supplies to enhance and main-
tain EMS in local rural communi-
ties.
"These grants promote the
Department of Health's commit-
ment to improving public
health," said FDOH Secretary
John 0. Agwunobi, M.D., M.B.A.,
M.P.H. "We want to ensure that
all Floridians no matter what


the size of their community -
have access to adequate emer-
gency medical services."
These grants were made pos-
sible' through the EMS Rural
Matching Grant Program, author-
ized by Chapter 401, Part II, Flori-
da Statutes and funded by the
Legislature annually. Only rural
counties with total populations
of 100,000 or fewer people and
less than 100 people per square
mile density, as defined by sec-
tion 401.107(5), Florida Statutes,
are eligible to apply for these
EMS grants. The state funds 90
percent of the total project costs,
approved by FDOH as authorized
in section 401.113, Florida
Statutes, and 10 percent of the


SWhen you need a service, call a pr;


Only $10.00 per week, per block.


funds must be provided by the
grant applicant.
Funds must be used to
improve or preserve EMS and
can include: Upgrading commu-
nication systems; purchasing
ambulance or rescue vehicles;
providing training to EMS per-
sonnel and first responders; pur-
chasing medical equipment and'
supplies, addressing needs for
responding to mass casualty inci-
dents, and purchasing computer
software and computers for
patient records.
For more information on
these grants, visit the EMS Grants
Web site at
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/demo
/ems/Grants/Grants.html.


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863-946-2333
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Moore Haven
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(863) 902-9494


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Care C,%tter
230 S. Barfield Hwy.
Pahokee, FL 33476-1834
Phone: (561) 924-5561
Fax: (561) 924-9466
G Email:
GladesCarePFoddaCare.net


GLENN J.
SNEIDER, LLC
Criminal Law
Bankruptcy Law
Immigratton Law
200 S.W. 9" Street
Okeechobee, FL 34974
(863) 467-6570





M20 W.M, SUrsd H1,, ewioJ







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2,501 W. 80th St. Suite 9

Hialeah, FL

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FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY
805 N. Hwy. -27
Moore Haven
(863) 946-1233


BLUEWATER BOBCAT
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LAND CLEARING PADS
ETC,

OFFICE S63902.477
CELL 863-228-2622


Law Office of
Robert L. Vaughn, PA.
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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee









Thursday. June 9.2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


UF/IFAS Ecologist hosts new 'Living Green' TV Show


GAINESVILLE, Fla. To help
residents of Florida and the South-
east protect natural resources and
foster healthy communities, a Uni-
versity of Florida wildlife expert has
created a new television series that
explores regional environmental
problems and shows how people
are helping solve them.
The five-part "Living Green"
series features homeowners, regu-
lators and industry leaders explain-
ing how they are addressing a vari-
ety of environmental challenges,
said Mark Hostetler, an associate
professor with UF's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences.
"I think what sets this show
apart is its upbeat message most
environmental programming I
have seen focuses more on prob-


lems than solutions," Hostetler
said.
One episode is already available
to public television stations, and
several more shows will be com-
pleted later this year, he said. The
first 30-minute program aired on
WUFT-TV/DT in Gainesville on May
18, and will be rebroadcast by the
North Central Florida station July 28
at 10:30 p.m.
Hostetler, who serves as host,
writer, producer and editor for the
series, wants to show viewers they
can help themselves while helping
the environment.
"People are becoming more
aware that conservation has tangi-
ble benefits for them," he said.
"We're trying to present our view-
ers with ideas that will help them


save money on power and water
bills, and even protect their pets."
The first program explores
strategies for designing landscapes
that attract and protect wildlife. It
includes interviews with Florida
homeowners as well as developers
of "green" communities planned to
accommodate the needs of local
wildlife.
Other shows will deal with ener-
gy conservation, invasive animals
and plants, and conservation ease-
ments, legal agreements that pre-
serve the rural character of farm-
lands, he said.
Hostetler said he got his inspira-
tion for the television series from
years of participation in education
and outreach activities with Florida
homeowners, developers and poli-


cymakers.
"I realized the day-to-day deci-
sions made by people at all these
levels have a profound impact on
the health and sustainability of our
communities," he said. "I believe
environmental issues should be
discussed so that they can be
solved by all groups within a com-
munity."
Hostetler said he hopes the
show's quirky, humorous tone will
appeal to wide range of viewers.
"'Living Green' is designed to
provide useful information, but in a
way that is entertaining enough to
engage viewers and keep them
watching," he said.
Hostetler's unique approach is
part of the reason WUFT-TV/DT
helped produce the first program in


the series, said station manager
Titus Rush. "We became interested
in this project because we felt Dr.
Hostetler could bring a fresh per-
spective to some serious issues,"
he said.
The station, located in UF's Col-
lege of Journalism and Communi-
cations, is helping to market the
first program, which has been sent
to public television stations in Flori-
da. The program is available to
broadcasters at no cost, and future
editions will also be released
through WUFT-TV/DT, Rush said.
Major funding for the series is pro-
vided by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture and various organiza-
tions such as International Paper
Foundation and Progress Energy.
Hostetler is pleased to see the


show, which began production in
May 2004, finally reach viewers. No
stranger to the TV camera, he has
appeared on a number of national-
ly televised programs, including
"The Tonight Show with Jay Leno"
and "Ripley's Believe It Or Not."
But that experience did not quite
prepare him for "Living Green," he
said.

"With this show, I don't just sit
in front of the camera; I'm also
thinking about what shots we
need, where we are getting the
funding for the next episode, and a
million other things," he said. "But
building this program from the
ground up has been a great experi-
ence."


Feral pigs are big problem


GAINESVILLE Florida's
population boom now includes
some 500,000 wild hogs whose
piggish habits are causing prob-
lems for farmers; residents and
health officials as well as native
flora and fauna.
"Nothing personal, but the
only state with more wild hogs
than Florida is Texas," said Bill
Giuliano, an assistant professor
of wildlife ecology at the Univer-
sity of Florida's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences. Wild
or feral hogs can now be found
in every Florida county and in at
least 35 states including one-
to two-million hogs in the South-
east. Nationwide, their popula-
tion totals about three million.
"Because they are prolific
breeders, there is no way to com-
pletely eradicate them," Giuliano
said. "Even with intensive hunt-
ing pressure, you're not going to
get rid of them."
He said the problem can be
traced to 1539 when Hernando
DeSoto brought hogs into south-
west Florida, and some of them
found freedom in the New
World. Nearly 500 years later,
there are some three million
descendants of these "pioneer
pigs" across the nation.
In Florida, some of the highest
densities of feral hogs can be
found north and west of Lake
Okeechobee where large forest-
ed tracts, dense vegetation,
abundant water and limited pub.
lic access prot ide a., IdJeul rC I


ronment for the pigs. Hog num-
bers tend to be lower in areas
with intensive agriculture or
urban development.
"Although they are a popular
target for hunters, wild hogs are
coming into conflict with people
and wildlife," Giuliano said.
"Farmers are not happy when
feral hogs root up their fields,
and health officials say the ani-
mals carry diseases that could
affect wildlife, livestock and peo-
ple."
Giuliano, who conducts
research on the animals with
George Tanner, a professor in the
UF wildlife ecology and conser-
vation department, said hogs can
also host many diseases and par-
asites, including hog cholera,
psuedorabies, brucellosis, tuber-
culosis, salmonellosis, anthrax,
ticks, fleas, lice and various
flukes and worms.
"Wild hogs, which usually'
weigh 100 to 200 pounds, are
dangerous," Giuliano said.
"Although they prefer to run and
escape danger, they can be
aggressive when they're injured
or cornered. They can move with
great speed and can cause seri-
ous injury with their tusks."
Acorns are their favorite food,
but they will eat almost anything,
including dead animals, and it
seems like they're always look-
ing for opportunities, he said.
When natural foods are scarce or
nlllacc-sSlble, hIOcS V' .il frao e on
J ijlIIO_-' ,af", *I,_'[ i U ll r,jl l. .j Ic-


livestock feed. They will also feed
on tree-seeds and seedlings,
causing significant damage in
forests, groves and plantations.
In Florida and the Southeast, this
may be a problem in regenerat-
ing long-leaf pine forests.
In addition to the effects of
consuming, knocking down and
trampling large amounts of
native vegetation and crops, the
rooting behavior of wild hogs
causes significant damage, Giu-
liano said. Rooting digging for
foods below the surface of the
ground destabilizes the soil
surface, uprooting or weakening
native vegetation, damaging
lawns and causing erosion. Their
wallowing behavior destroys
small ponds and stream banks,
which may affect water quality.
They also prey upon ground-
nesting wildlife, including sea
turtles.
"Wild hogs compete for food
with other game animals such as
deer, turkeys and squirrels, arid
they may consume the nests and
young of many reptiles, ground-
nesting birds and mammals," he
said. "With their fine sense of
smell, wild hogs can find and
consume young domestic live-
stock, including poultry, lambs
and goats. Millions of dollars are
spent each year to prevent dam-
age from hogs."
Tanner said it may be possible
to limit further population expan-
sion bL hunting. variouss trapping
I nelti,_,.lJ's *,nd .\CcluSi'_ri


Okeechobee resident finally getting

recognized as an American


WASHINGTON, D.C. Elva
Marie Hagan will no longer be a
woman without a country. The
62-year.old daughter of a U.S.
serviceman is set to be given
United States citizenship, ending
her long fight to attain that
honor.
Hagan, who lives in Okee-
chobee, Florida, was shocked in
1998 when she was denied gov-
ernment benefits because Uncle
Sam didn't consider her a citizen
- even though she's known no
other home.
The problem stemmed from
the fact that her father spent time
abroad during World War I1,
married Hagan's mother in
Canada where Marie was
born but apparently didn't file
the proper paperwork on their
daughter's citizenship when
they came home when she was
a toddler.
As a result, Hagan grew up,
married, had children and
worked in the U.S. never realiz-
ing she wasn't officially an Amer-
ican citizen.
She was denied citizenship
for the past few years by federal
immigration officials until she
contacted the Florida office of
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. Nelson last
month' spoke directly with
Michael Jackson, the deputy sec-
retary of the Department of


Staff photo/Audrey Blackwell
Elva Marie Hagan, an Okeechobee resident was recently
given U.S. citizenship status, after receiving the shocking
news that she was not, despite living in America all of her


Homeland Security, and Jackson
promised Nelson common
sense would prevail.
And it has. U.S. Citizenship
and Immigration officials in
Miami are scheduled to give
Hagan her overdue citizenship
certificate meaning she now
will be eligible for Social Security
and other benefits she's earned.
Hagan is scheduled to take her
oath at 10:30 a.m. and, her
certificate will reflect citizenship
*2---,,' 4f


since June 17, 1942, her birthday.
"Wonderful glad we could
help," Nelson said Thursday,
upon receiving word from immi-
gration officials the problem is
being fixed. Nelson also credited
Jackson with promptly respond-
ing when he was told about the
case. Immigration is an arm of
Homeland Security. The decision
ends a lengthy ordeal for Hagan,
who turned to Nelson's office in
early April


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Fax: 863-612-0553
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Real Estate Corp.
580 S. Main St. LaBelle, FL
863-675-1973
e-mail: ncewhorizoiis-re@earthlink.ncet
If you are thinking of buying
,IX'.- or selling, give
Massi us a call!


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I W, Ventur Av, eIwn, FL 334N

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RENTALS SALES










509a cw
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VICKERS
CHIROPRACTIC &
REHABILITATION CLINIC
(Call for an Appointment Today j
DR. EDWARD VICKERS SR.,
Chiropractor
(863) 983-8391
905 I. VENTURA. AVE
CLEWISTON














NO ONE WILL
WORK HARD-
ER FOR YOU
1 THEN JAMIE
NAVARRO
GIVE HIM A
CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
M REALTY

C. BAGANS FIRST
30 Colorado Rd. Lehigh Acres, FL 33936





DEPOT
YOlU LOCAL SAmUTI POFSHSI(ONALS


COMB Ww4M


Dr. Ed Humbert
HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS AT
HENDRY GENERAL
CALL TODAYFORAN APPOINTMENT
530 W. Sagamore Avenue
Suite B
Clewiston, Florida 33440
(863) 983-2896
http: / /www.jointimiplant com


,.Carolyn
Iiomas

'Realty, Inc.
ro.rs:
Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505

eadu, Veyweistns!!


Your Realtor
for th~e
Western Comnrnunitie,


Teresa Sullivan
561-795-8533 F

561-996-5623 '


$2 W. HICKI'QOCIIFE. LAIWLLY
(ACRCISS FROM BURGEIR KING)
CALL
(863) 675-TANU(8268)
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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursdav, June 9,2005


17


y









Sevn h omnte suho aeOecoeeTusavJn ,20


.lassifieds i
^1 6H^ -^ ^ 'B -"^^^ ^B^^ ^UF
^*'F4t~^t W7 eA/,sza^JIp^Ifllr
-Y =. '': ''. L (. ".. ." ... .




1i877r353A2424 iralt ABs OLUTELn
____________________________________^ for any personal items for sale under $2,500


Announcements I Merchandise Mobile Homes 1





Employment Agriculture Recreation





Financial Rentals Automobiles

RTIT ~IIP 7 ,11


Services Real Estate I

VtifJ! ttEriI


Announcements


Important Informaiion
Please read your ad carefully
the first day it appears. In
case of an inadvertent error,
please notify us prior to the
deadline listed. We will not
be responsible for more than
1 incorrect insertion, or for
more than the extent of the
ad rendered valueless by
such errors. Advertiser
assumes responsibility for all
statements, names and con-
tent of an ad, and assumes
responsibility for any claims
against Independent
newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all copy, and
to insert above the copy the
word "advertisement'. All
ads accepted are subject to
credit approval. All ads must
conform i to Independent
Newspapers' style and are
restricted to their proper
classifications. Some classi-
fied categories require
advance payment. These
classifications are denoted
with an asterisk *,
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Sharearide 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memormia 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Carage/Yard Sate 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


Auction- Partnership, Invest-
ment & Capital Reallocation.
1488+/- acres offered di-
vided. Timberland, hunting,
recreational, homesites. Lin-
coln & Wilkes Counties, GA.
June 18th, 10:00 a.m. Row-
ell Auctions, Inc.
(800)323-8388 www.rowel-
lauctions.com 10% buyers
premium GAL AU-
C002594.


BURIAL PLOTS (2)- In old
section of Evergreen Ceme-
tery. $1100 for both.
(954)340-4475.


BLACK LAB- female, recent
surgery still has stitches, no
collar, vic of Hwy 441 SE
and 15B. (863)467-0501.
CD CASE- black, with CD's,
found on Wolff Rd. Call
(863)763-3134 to claim.
LADIES JACKET- Must de-
scribe. Leave message
(863)610-3920.


BLACK LONG HAIR RETRIEV-
ER- "Abby", lost in Platts
Bluff on 5/31.
(863)467-3645.
PIT/CUR MIX, 5yrs old, aprox
70lbs, missing on 6/4, vic of
Old Fort Denaud, reward
(863)675-2310


ADULT CATS 1 Blue RusSian
female w/ 7 toes, 1 blk Tom,
good mouser, both free to
good home. (863)763-8892
CUR, 7 yrs. & Red Nosed Pit-
bull, 4 yrs. Neutered males.
Great w/kids. Housebroken,
updated shots. 863)447-0965

CURR/BULL DOG MIX- Male,
lyr old. Free To Good Home
Only! (863)357-3994.
German Shepherd/Sharpei
mix puppies, 1 male, 1 fe-
male, 6 weeks old, to good
home. (863)675-4211
SIBERIAN HUSKY, Solid
White (F), 1 yr. old & Black &
White (M) 3 yrs. old. $500
both, will sep. 863)763-2749


EARN DEGREE online from
home. *Business, *Parale-
gal, *Computers. Job Place-
ment Assistance. Computer
& Financial aid if qualify.
(866)858-2121 www.tide-
watertechonline.com.
FREE LESSON. Saturday,
6/25. Experience the power!,
Diesel Semis, Heavy Equip-
ment. Employers onsite, free
hotdogs, fun for all. National
Truck & Heavy Equipment
Operator School.
(800)488-7364.


Is Stress. Ruining Your Life?
Read DIANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard Call
S813)872-0722 or send
7.99 to Dianetics, 3102 N.
Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607.

Your next job could be in
today's classified, Did
you ook for it?






Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Tralinng 227
Sales 230



Carpenter Wanted
must have tools &
transportation, steady
work. 1-800-345-0060
CUSTODIAN
Opening in Hendry County
Commissioners. Must be
able to work evenings. Full
time with benefits. Applica-
tions and copy of job de-
scription may be obtained
from Human Resource in the
LaBelle Courthouse or sub-
office in Clewiston. Deadline
for submission is May 25,
2005. Vet Pref. EEO. Drug
Free. Applicants needing as-
sistance in the application
process should contact HR.
DATA ENTRY Work ON YOUR
OWN. Flexible Hours!
$$$Great Pay!$$$ Personal
Computer required.
(800)873-0345 ext #300.
Driver- COVENANT TRANS-
PORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams
& Graduate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly. Equal
Opportunity Employer.
(888)MORE PAY
(888-667-3729).
Now hiring qualified drivers
for OTR positions. Food
grade tanker, No
hazmat. No pumps. Great
Benefits, Competitive Pay
and.new equipment.
Need 2 years OTR experi-
ence. Call Bynum Transport
for your opportunity today;
(800)741-7950.

is seeking applications for full
time teachers to work w/
toddlers and pre-schoolers.
CDA and experience req,
Appl in person

S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Driv-
ers. HOME WEEKENDS.
Mileage Pay, Benefits, 401 K.
Trainees Welcome/ Miami
area- exp. req. 21 min
age/Class-A CDL Cypress
Truck Lines (800)545-1351.


HI000


NURSING SUPERVISOR
Excellent career advance-
ment opportunity! Previ-
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experience required; expe-
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PLUS. Experienced Charge
Nurses/Unit Manag-
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RN/LPN
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Secure Environment
Low patient-to-nurse ra-
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Outpatient Setting
Convenient 12-Hour Shifts
An excellent opportunity to
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tracted medical services
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We offer competitive sala-
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truly rewarding environ-
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essence of caring. Please
apply to:
bpurcell@wexford
health.com
Fax: 888-937-4471
Phone: 800-903-3616
EOE
WE\X F ORD





for Podiatry Office in
Clewiston. Fax resume to
(239)481-8150



BABYSITTING 24/7- nights,
weekends, holidays, call
(863)763-8268 or
(863)443-3181.

Financial



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315



#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending
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tions Entire Business
$10,670 Hurry!
(800)836-3464 #802428.
$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 2005! Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)856-9591 Ext#105.
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We
will not be undersold!
HELP WANTED Earn Extra in-
come assembling CD cases
from any location.
No Experience Necessary.
(800)405-7619 ext 90
www.easywork-great-
pay.com. (not valid in SD,
ND, WI or MD)
Profitable online business for
sale. Home-based. Family
owned 6 years online. Com-
plete Internet marketing &
site training included. $48K
Call Richard after 2:
(407)322-4242.
Start Your Own Business:
Choose your hours, income &
rewards. Choose Avon!
863-677-0025


More Papers Mean More Readers!

Reach more readers when you run
..---,... your ad in several papers in M
our newspaper network.
Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers one
daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!

Call Today For Details!
* Sources: Pulse Research Market Survey; Simmons Market Research; INI Market Research Center ,


Rules for placing FREE ads!
To qualify, your ad
Must be for a personal iem. (No commercial items, pets or animals)
Must fit into 1 2 inch
(that's 4 lines, approximately 23 characters per line) .1
Mvlust include only one item and its price
(remember it must be S2.500 or less)
Call us!
No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!l


-mployme
FulTme 0205


L mlomn
Ful im I00


FRITO-LAY, INC.
Frito-Lay, Inc. has great opportunities for Route Sales Representative in the Clewiston area.
Qualified candidates should possess the following:
SSolid work history & experience
Excellent driving record
We offer starting pay of approximately 31 K per year and excellent benefits.
If you are interested please call
1-866-4-HIRING use zip code 33912
(1-866-444-7464) EOE, MF/D/V
I
FOAM INSULATION Company based out of Clewiston now
hiring installers, South Florida travel required. Company vehi-
cle provided; Monday through Friday. Piece work. Guaran-
teed minimum $550 a week during training period. Benefits,
bonus, and travel cost paid. Must be 21 years or older with
clean, class D drivers license. We are a drug free work-
place. Interviews will be conducted every Monday morning
from 8-1 Oa.m. at our Clewiston Facility. Call 800-683-3155
to line up an interview time. Directions to our facility will be
given to you at that time.

CITY OF CL:WISTON.- One EQUIPMENT OPERATOR








MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT
Join our maintenance team! General maintenance
of a 120 bed nursing home & 40 unit
apartment complex. Knowledge of electrical,
plumbing, carpentry and A/C. Must be "on call"
every third week. Prior experience in similar
position. HS diploma or GED required. Excellent
salary and benefits. Mileage paid to and from
work for out-of-town employees.
Glades Health Care Center
Pahokee, Florida
Call 561-924-5561, ext. 110
or fax resume to 561-924-9466
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Equal Opportunity Employer

Excavation / Earthmoving Operator
Okeechobee Field Station
Operates multi excavation equipment such as dragline, track-
hoe, backhoe, and earthmoving equipment such as grader,
dozer, front-end loader, dump truck with knuckle boom; also
includes the multi-purpose aquatic maintenance vessel utiliz-
ing various interchangeable attachments to control noxious
plants/vegetation, mow heavy brush on canal banks and re-
move sedimentation from the canals. Loads, hauls, and
dumps materials operating a 15-25 yard dump truck and
transports equipment and machinery on semi-trailer to and
from job site and its loading or off-loading.
Overtime will be required based on weather and/or environ-
mental conditions. HS Diploma or GED. 4 + years experi-
ence operating and transporting multiple pieces of
equipment including excavation and earthmoving equipment,
aquatic harvesters, large farm tractors, and lower unit dra-
gline. Forklift, First Aid and CPR certifications by American
Red Cross. Valid Florida driver's license (Class A) to operate
any tractor/trailer combination with a GVWR of 26,000 lbs or
more provided towed vehicle is more than 10,000 lbs (with
an airbrake endorsement). Job Reference # 205186
Please visit our website for more information and
APPLY ONLINE at www.sfwmd.gov.
SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT




Alln Human Resouicex
PRO. Box 24680
West Palm Beach, FL 33416-4680
EOE


-mployment
Full Tme 020


Empoyen
FullTime 020


|HI>'lllHItfMtiltl ll1 aluil:4lHIW11M l111iw
Position Summary Routine manual work in the collection of
trash or garbage and other general labor duties as directed.
Requires physical strength to lift and pull heavy objects.
Applications and full job description available at City Hall,
115W. Ventura.
EOE/D/F/W/P



NURSE (RN OR LPN)

Needed at the Glades County Health Department
in Moore Haven. Must have valid Florida Driver's
License, reliable transportation; must be willing to
do some home visiting & work in busy clinic.
EEO/AA
Call Alina @ 863-946-0707 x 208
or Patti @ 863-674-4041 x 135
for further details.


HEAD START CENTER MANAGER II
(Pahokee Head Start) $33,748
Administrative and supervisory work managing a
Head Start center, which involves planning, con-
trolling and supervising the day-to-day operation
of the center staff. Reviews and ensures that
staff's and children's files are updated and meet
all County, State, local and federal requirements.
BS/BA Early Childhood Education/Develop-
ment/related ECE Degree, Developmental Psy-
chology, Social Work, Sociology, Pub./Bus.
Adm./related; 1 yr. exp. in the supervision of a
programs) for Head Start, preschoolers or relat-
ed social service directed at preschoolers (must
specify on application) or 1 yr. exp. acting as a
Head Start Manager (or unrelated BS/BA and 2
yrs. related exp.). Will be required to obtain a
Florida Child Care and Education Program Direc-
tor Credential and a Florida Food Protection
Manager Certification within 6 months of hire.
Visit www.pbcgov.com for detailed position de-
scription and an employment application. Sub-
mit application/resume with any Vet. Pref. doc.
for receipt by 5 p.m. 6/17/05 to Palm Beach
County Human Resources, 50 S. Military Trail
#210, West Palm Beach, FL 33415 Fax
561-616-6893. EO/AA M/F/D/VN (DFWP)



#8 MANAGEMENT


Immediate restaurant management
openings in Lake Placid, Moore
Haven, LaBelle, Clewiston and
Okeechobee. We are a franchise with
27 restaurants throughout South
Florida and are hiring energetic,
honest, and responsible individuals.
We offer:
-Excellent Salaries
-Medical and Life Insurance
-Dental Insurance
-401K Savings Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Advancement Opportunities
-Training Program

For an interview please call:
863-983-4224
or mail your resume in confidence to:
Pauline Alvarez
Southern Management Corporation
1014 W. Sugarland Hwy.
Clewiston, FL 33440


The Paige Law Firm, P.A.
Seeking experienced secretary, legal secretary experience
preferred but not necessary. Must be organized,
professional person willing to learn & work.
Salary is based upon experience. Fax resume to
(561)996-9337 or mail to 349 Northwest 16th St, Suite 108
Belle Glade, FL 33430 No Phone Calls Please.


-


Mao~



U.t


yEu-
me 020


HELP WANTED

DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Applications are being accepted by the Hendry
County. BOCC. This is a highly responsible posi-
tion coordinating and directing the development
of programs that protect the public's health and
safety from large-scale natural and technological
hazards. Requirements are BS degree and four
years of responsible experience in public safety
or emergency management or comparable
amount of experience. Applications can be ob-
tained at sub-office in Clewiston & at Court-
house in LaBelle. Deadline for submission is
June 16, 2005 at 5:00 PM.
Vet pref., drug free, EEO, applicants with
disabilities needing assistance contact HR.


JOIN A WINNING TEAM!
RNs & LPNs
12 Hr. Shifts 3 days on/4 off one week
4 on/3 off the next week
Days 7 am 7 pm
Nights 7 pm-7 am
RNs $24-$28/hour
LPNs $18-$22/hour
+ $2/hour night differential
RN SUPERVISORS
12 Hr. Shifts-3 days on/4 off one week.
4 on/3 off the next week
Nights 7pm-7am
$27-$31/hour
LTC & Management experience desirable
GLADES HEALTH CARE CENTER
Pahokee, Florida
Excellent Benefits
Mileage paid to and from work for
out-of-town employees
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Call: 561-924-5561 Fax: 561-924-9466
Equal Opportunity Employer


Looking for a career

with a company you

can grow with?

Are you self motivated?
Do you like meeting new people?
Are you computer literate?
If so, this could be the opportunity
you have been looking for.
Full and/or part time
positions available.

The Caloosa Belle and Immokalee
Bulletin are looking for bright, self-
starters with computer skills and
reliable transportation who are will-
ing to learn newspaper advertising
sales from the ground up.
If you have what it takes, you
could be the outside salesperson
in these fast growing markets.

Our company offers:
a unique work environment
potential for advancement
competitive pay and benefits
life and disability insurance
401 (K) plan
generous time off program

Email your resume to:
jkasten@strato.net
An equal opportunity employer


Professional Vending Route
and Equipment. Brand name
products, all sizes. Financing
available w/$7,500 Down.
(877) 843-8726
802002-37).


Reading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people!


Thursday, June 9,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


m









Tt.im- inA m SeoobQ UnnIca


Emlymn
Ful im I00


Service Technician I
$8.37 p/hr.
(Valid CDL "C")
Administrative Assistant
$23,707 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam, type 45 cwpm)
Weed & Seed Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
(BS degree)
Closing: June 20, 2005
Accounting Specialist (P-T/Temp)
$10.40 p/hr.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Police Lieutenant
$48,672 Ann.
Must pass C.S. Exam)
losing June 29, 2005
Police Sergeant
$40, 250 Ann.
[Must pass C.S. Exam)
losing: June 29, 2005
Police Officer
$14.68 p/hr.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Closing: June 29, 2005
Utility Systems Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
Closing: June 29, 2005

Unless stated All positions open until filled.

Positions noted CS -
must pas exam to complete eligibility.

Complete Valid Employment Applications
must be submitted to:
City of Belle Glade
Human Resources Department
110 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., W.
Belle Glade, FL 33430-3900
Business Hours: 8:00 to 5:00
Posted: 06-06-05





:, HENDRY REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER


Registered Nurses
,, -. .-.

LPN I & u1

O.R. Staff Nurse
-L
Respiratory Therapist
S_ -,: e ,, ft .-, .' ,,
Per Diem Phrma Technician

Comp*- t t.: Sa .-y- x : .'-:, :nt-- Benef.,ts : ,-
Full Time Patnent Account Representative

Full Time Certified DieLtasy M-anager

Director of Quality Improvement
: :.re se,. ..r.e,' ,T,..n',-r.,a, pe..i'. ,-,r. .,-:. ,mi r ..,,'e.
11,'' : ,-'." :r, 1at ,.. ,..- eflr I..' L,-,i,-e n r
, r :6n:e ..,e:.ieo-,; a.,e .r.. reren.'
r" Frr F' ,;.I ,an.-r,',, cur 1 .t m.rn-d rr.r,
Competitive Salary Excellent Benefits
Clinical Ladder Program Education Assistance
Phone: 863-902-3079 or Fax resume to: 863-983-0805
Orug Free Workplace EOE


LABOR 0

DAILY WOR
$ All Types of
I <* 202 E. Su
(Across from
(863) 9

One man's trash is
another man's treas-
ure. Turn your trash
to treasure with an ad
in the classified,


Empoyen
Ful im I00


I


06 FINDERS

K DAILY PAY
Work Available I
garland Hwy. J
SClewiston Inn .
02-9494

How do you find a job
In today's competitive
market? In the
employment section
of the classified


Do-It-Yourself Ideas


Redwood Picnic Set
Relax and enjoy the fun of outdoor dining anytime
with this redwood picnic set. Ideal for the novice do-
it-yourselfer, most of the cuts for this project are
straight and it requires only basic tools.
The table measures 72 inches long by 33 inches
wide, and a revised materials list is included for
those who want a 60-inch table.
The choice of lumber is optional, but redwood is
preferred for its beauty, strength and resistance to
decay.
Redwood Picnic Set plan (No. 669)... $8.95
Picnic Tables Package (No. C91)
Four projects incl. 669 ... $22.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds of projects) ... $2.00
Please add $3.00 s&h (except catalog-only orders)


To order, circle item(s),
clip & send w/ check to:
U-Bild Features
P.O. Box 2383
Van Nuys, CA 91409


Please be sure to
include your name,
address and the name of
this newspaper. Allow
1-2 weeks for delivery.


Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
n u-bild.com
S Money Back Guarantee


The most important
20 minutes of your day
is the time spent reading
with your child from
birth to age nine.




$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 20051 Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)785-6360 Ext #75.
When doing those chores is
doing you in, its time to
look for a heper in the
classifieds,

Services

^'I I


Rescreening & repair.
insured. (561)W784-55684
or( 561)3&8-2456















Tim e t a nt o


classified and make




BANKRUPTCY DEBT PROBE.
SCREEN & PATIO
ENCLOSURES
Rescreening & repair.
lic. #2001-19849 &
insured. (561)784-5568
orC(561")358-2456

Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise
your yard sale in the
classifleds and make
your cleanthup a breeze


BANKRUPTCY DEBT PROB-
LEMS? Laws Changing
Soon File Now. Money Prob-
lems? Liens, Levies Foreclo-
sures, Repos, Medical Bills,
Judgements, Lawsuits & Di-
vorce A-A-A Attorney Refer-
ral Service (800)733-5342
24 hours 7 days a week.
DIVORCE$275-$350*COV-
ERS children, etc. Only one
signature, seure on Comm*Ex-
cSt.udes govt. fees Call week-
days (800)462-2000,
ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce
Tech. Established 1977,
NEED A LAWYER ARRESTED?
INJURED? Criminal Defense
*863-9State *Federal *Feonies
*Misdemeanors *DUI *Auto863-983-8979
Accident *Personal Injury
*Domestic Violence
*Wrongful Death "Protect
Your Rights" A-A-A Attorney
Referral Service
800)733-5342 24 HOURS



NEW SELF STORAGE
46 units 7x1 5, 8x1 5,10Ox1i5,
10x30,12x30,15x25. Full
electric, secure on Commereio
St. 350 ft. from Clewiston
Police Dept. 863-983-6663,
863-983-2808, after hrs.
863-983-8979


NOTICE
Independent Newspapers will
never accept any advertise-
ment that is illegal or con-
sidered fraudulent. In all
*cases of questionable val-
ue, such as promises of
guaranteed income from
work-at-home programs if
it sounds too good to be
true, chances are that it is.
If you have questions or
doubts about any ad on
these pages, we advise that
before responding or send-
ing money ahead of time,
you check with the Better
Business Bureau at
772-878-2010 for previous
complaints.
Some 800 and 900 telephone
numbers may require an
extra charge, as well as
long distance toll costs. We
will do our best to alert our
reader of these charges in
the ads, but occasionally
we may not be aware of the
charges. Therefore, if you
call a number out of your
area, use caution.


AIR CONDITIONER
20K BTU Reverse Cycle,
window unit, $275 or best
offer (863)674-0467.
AIR CONDITIONER
New, 21k BTU, needs 220
electric $350
(863)357-8788
AIR CONDITIONERS (2) 5
Ton, For DW. Includes 6 yr.
warrantee. Like brand new.
$1200 (863)697-1894
AIR HANDLER, Trane, 2.5 ton,
220 volt, with heat, $150-.
(863)675-5929


BREAKFRONT/SECRETARY:
Antique, Mahogany. Circa late
1800. Beautiful condition.
$500 neg. (863)467-6805
CHINA CABINET- antique,
asking $30. (863)675-4912.
SOFA, CHAIR, ROCKER- wal-
nut and cane, $350.
(863)763-4525.


DRYER- apartment size,
works nice, $100.
(863)675-7694.
MICROWAVE OVEN, excellent
condition, $20.
(863)675-2596
REFRIGERATOR- 19 cu. ft.,
Frostfree, asking $75.
(863)675-0104.
REFRIGERATOR, Whirlpool,
Ig., beige, frost free, x-Ig.
freezer, exc. cond., $150.
(863)675-2596
STOVE, Electric, Stainless
Steel. $50. (863)697-6464
STOVE, Gas, Frigidaire. White.
$400 or best offer.
(863)357-3639
Join all the people who
say, "I sold it in the
classifieds"


BIKE, Murray Whiplash, boys,
needs a good cleaning, $20.
(863)983-4915
SCHWINN, 1955- Original
condition, $900.
(863)467-5756.



STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory
Deals Save $$$. 40 x 60'
to 100 x 200'. Example: 50 x
100 x 12' = $3.60/sq ft.
(800)658-2885 www.rigid-
building.com.

Mateial 04


GARAGE DOOR- 16x8, good
condition, $250,
(863)467-1717.
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
Buy Direct From Manufactur-
er. 20 colors in stock with all
Accessories. Quick turn
around! Delivery Available
Toll Free (888)393-0335.
SLIDING PATIO DOORS (2)
4'x7', tinted glass, $100 for
both (239)246-3549
STEEL BUILDING- 30'x40'
Heritage Bought It, Now it s
not needed $6000
763-4149/561-758-4337
VINYL SIDING- 1 full box,
covers 200 sq ft, color Is
Sunny Maize, $100 or best
offer. (863)635-0433,



COOLER 6x8 walk In cooler
w/floor, good for drinks,
produce or hunters game
$2500 (239)657-3316
REACH-IN COOLER
3 door, good for drinks or
produce $800 (239)657-3316



BABY CRIB Oak color, grows
w/child into youth bed $75
(863)357-2863


ELECTRICAL BOX, Square D,
8 circuit, w/2 single & 2
double circuit breakers, $50.
(863)467-0479
FAN- Floor model, 20" Hamp-
,ton Bay, w/remote, $20.
(863)467-2112.
HAND PUMP- $80, water w/o
electric, complete w/steel fit-
ting & brass valves to install.
(863)467-4389 mornings.
KEY MACHINE
w/ blank keys, priced rea-
sonably at $400
(863)674-0296
Protect our environment. Save
trees/landfills. Canvas Gro-
cery Bags. Eight bag set,
$35. Bring your own bags to
grocery. Be a bag lady
www.motherearthbags.com.
PVC FENCE- 49 sections,
posts, caps and gates,
$850. (772)285-8405
Run your ad STATEWIDE!!!
For only $450 you can place
your 25 word classified ad
in over 150 newspapers
throughout the state reach-
ing over 5 MILLION readers.
Call this newspaper or Ad-
vertising Networks of Florida
at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.flodda-classi-
fieds.com: Display ads also
available.


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials 540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens & Fabris 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Fure 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Supplies 625
Household Itenp 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies/'
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
WanRsd to Bu 735
Wanted to Buy 740


ROSENTHAL- 8pl setting,
Made in Germany, wheat de-
sign, gold trim, 50 yrs old,
never used $400
(863)357-2233.


BASEBALL CARDS- Approx.
3000. Few NBA & Football.
95% is Major League. $250.
or best offer (863)634-6565



A NEW COMPUTER- BUT NO
CASH? You're APPROVED -
Guaranteed!* NO CREDIT
CHECK Bad Credit Bank-
ruptcy OK. (800)319-8860
8A-1OP EST Mon-Frl Sat.
11A-6P *Checking Account
Req'd www.pcs4all.com.
SCANNER- Colorado Primax
600p, brand new with cable.
$25. (863)983-4915.


BAKERS RACK, Wrought Iron,
Antique Blue. $75
(863)467-2112
BED, King Size, Complete.
$50 (863)983-7996
BR SUITE- head/foot board,
dbl. dresser, armoire, 2 nite
stands, $750.
(863)634-0936.
CHINA CABINET, Beautiful,
Lighted. 57W x 78H x 17D.
$200 (863)675-4990
COFFEE TABLE, 2-End tables
& Sofa table, chrome &
brass w/glass tops.
$300./all. (863)674-0467.
COMPUTER DESK- large,
gray, must see, will deliver
locally, $60. 983-0950 Cle-
wiston.
DAYBED- Cherry Sleigh bed
style, $300 or best offer.
(863)634-4200.
DESK, Wooden. Great for
computer. $40
(863)697-6464
DINETTE SET, 4 chairs on
caster -wheels. $50
(863)357-3439
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/ four matching chairs.
Good cond. $225
(863)467-6550
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
6' long, light oak color, $75
(863)357-2863
LR SUITE- used, fair condi-
tion, color pattern, $100.
(863)675-4912.
MATTRESS- California King
size, good condition, paid
$800 asking $100
(863)675-0104
QUEEN SIZE BED- mattress &
boxspring, frame & cream
colored wood headboard
$125. (239)728-9996.
SLEEPER SOFA
$150 (863)674-0405 or
(863)673-5325
SOFA, SLEEPER SOFA, LOVE-
SEAT, blue, good condition,
all for $275.
(863)675-0998.
WICKER SOFA- Coffee table &
chair. Good quality furniture.
$125. (863)467-6573
Find it faster, Sell it sooner
In the classifieds



CLUB CAR, '97- Exc. cond.,
good batt/charger, $1599.
(863)697-1350/763-2063.
EASY GO Good cond. good
battery, & charger. $799.
Neg. (863)697-1350 or
(863)763-2063.


GRENDEL P-10
Semi automatic, .380
$185 (863)763-4961


HOSPITAL BED- Invacare,
electric, new matt, plus air
matt w/pump incld. $900
neg. (863)655-3436.


AFFORDABLE HEALTH BENE-
FITS From $89.95/Month
Family! Hospital, Doctor Visit
And Morel Dental Included
Free! No Exclusions! Open
Enrollment To The Public
Ends Friday!
(866)697-3739.


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
For Dolly Hand Cultural Arts
Center. If interested please call
561-993-1160


CHAIN SAW
McCullach, new in box,
never used $110
(863)763-6342
GENERATOR 5500 watts, 110
& 220 volts, electric start,
batt. charger, like new cond.
$1150 (863)467-4328
GENERATOR- Coleman, 5000
watt, 10 HP, new in box,
wheel kit included. $600.
(863)763-0944.
GENERATOR: Small. $500 or
best offer. (863)357-3388


WANTED: FL ART
A.E. Backus, H. Newton,
Highwaymen Art.
(772)562-5567

Agriculture I



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed. Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845






QUARTER MARE 9yrs old
Gentle, $900 (863)675-3032

.SPOTTED WALKER FILLIE
2 V2 yrs old, green broke, very
sweet, $1500.
(863)843-2495.
T/B MARE
12yrs old, 14 hds, retired from
playing polo, perfect for old-
er child $400(863)467-0247



BUSH HOG
6ft offset, heavy duty
$1200 (863)763-4982
FINISH MOWER, 6 ft., like
new, used one season,
$ 9 0 0
(863)675-1914/673-1846
FLY MOW LAWN MOWER,
Good condition, $75
(863)675-8168
PROJECT TRACTOR
Massey Furgeson
$1500 (863)763-4982
RAIL ROAD TIES FOR SALE:
Approx. 200. $1400 for all,
will sep. (863)357-6202
RIDING MOWER- John Deere
180 & Husky mower. $600.
ea. (863)763-4149 or
561-758-4337


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property Sale 1010
Condos..'
Townhouses Sale 1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1040
Lots Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspection1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080


Farms -Sale i1

The Complete
Liquidation of DLC Corp.
T! S.U-JNl 25-10:30M I
Evensville,TN
.4I tllrms '.u-ti 7 sll

Tractors 'Trailers
Heavy Equipment
S* Logging Equipment
Farm Implements
Complete Machine
SShop w/ Tools & Equip.

701 ACRE FARM
S se(llswAh reserve)
11 Tracts; 5 to 300 Ac.
.400 Ac. of Tillable Land
Former Commercial
Vegetable Farm
Beautiful Views
Great HomeSites
2 Ponds
112 Mile Paved Roads
*30,000 $F
Warehouse .
m i ltIa l l ,m







Your new car could be in
today's paper. Have
you looked for it?

i|oues Sae 3102


HOME &,LAND, Appraised @
$85,000. Selling for $86,000.
Keller Williams, World Class
Realtors. (239)839-9368
LABELLE- 3br, 2ba, Family
Room, on corner lot, large
oak trees, 1 acre of land, 2
garage carports, 2 sheds,
screened porch, 1046 No-
bles Rd. Ser. Inq. Only!
(863)675-1172. for appt.


The Lowest Prescription Pric-
es LESS THAN CANADA.
Global Medicines, Arizona
Physician owned.
(866)634-0720 www.glo-
balmedicines.net.



PIANO, Gul Bransen, real ivory
keys, perfect tuning, $600 or
best offer (863)467-6693 or
(863)634-1636


AMERICAN BULL DOG- Ap-
prox 2 yr, Neutered Male,
Good w/children. House
broke. $250.863-634-6565.
BOAR- Poland China, pure
breed, 15 months old, about
400lbs. $350
(863)805-8789/677-0750
CUTE KITTENS- Some 7 toed,
Free To Good Home.
(863)763-8892.
DOG HOUSES- for medium to
large dogs. 2 for $30.
(863)763-7497 Okeecho-
bee.
EXOTIC FAINTING GOAT-
$150. Call evenings,
(863)675-4098.
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS-
AKC reg. 5-males, Ready
June 9th $400. Cash only.
(863)357-3026
GUINEA PIG / RABBIT CAGE1
Like new w/all accessories.
$30. (863)467-5756
PITT BULL PUPPIES- ADDA
registered, 4 males, 1 fe-
male, $300 each,
(863)697-0220.
SPICE FINCHES 2 PAIR
W/ furnished breeding cage
$50 (863)675-3032



PORT-A-POTTY
New in box never been used
pd $80 sell for $50
(863)675-4361 after 5pm



SPA, Portable, Jade, Seats 5.
$1800.(863)983-2234 after
6pm.



BOWLING BALL- Ladies, Ayr-
way Mustang, Tan/Gold, mar-
bleized, ex. con $12.5 lb.
w/bag. $40 (863)357-3779
BOWLING BALL- Men's, Black
Columbia 300, 16lbs, Good
condition. Black bag. $30.
(863)357-3779

imikes 72


SCREEN ROOM- w/insulated
roof, 12x26, $500 you must
remove. (772)486-1914.


Okeechobee Livestock
Market Sales every
Mon. 12pm & every
Tues. 11am. 763-3127



ROPING SADDLE
Custom built, 16" seat, used
less than 25 times $600
(863)467-0247
SADDLE- McCellan Repro-
duction, almost new cond.,
w/bridle & blanket, asking
$200. (863)675-4098.


Rentals,



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



1,2 &3 BR HOUSES &
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
No pets.
Call (863)983-4436.



Port LaBelle, 2BR, 1.5BA,
single family house, w/gar-
age, $750 mo. plus sec.
dep. 863-634-2975.


ROOMMATES WANTED: Male
or Female, No children, Pets
neg. $450 mo. + util.
(863)228-3887 LaBelle
SHARE HOUSE- in country,
walk in closet, full bath,
leave message
(863)902-8553.
Buying a car? Look in
the classified. Selling
a car? Look in the
classified.


CLEWISTON COUNTRY ACRES
Modular/Models. From $59,900 & Up,
3/4/5BR, 2/3BA, acre & 1/4 available or use
your land as down payment. Financing
available. 863-673-6417 or 561-753-8355


Financing Available:
Buy Here, Pay Here.
Stanton Mobile Homes
Marginal Credit O.K.
Call 1-800-330-8106
or 863-983-8106


Harley Davidson 1200
Sportster, '97, new tires,
12k ml., never reg. in Fla.
Call Don bet. 5-8.
(561)992-9491


LaBelle, 4 Bdrm., 2 Ba.
238 N. Riverview St., LaBelle.
For Sale By Owner. $199,900.
(863)612-0073 Mon-Fri.
LABELLE, Very Nice Area,
Beautiful 3BR w/hard firs. 1
BA w/surrounding tile firs.
Kit., D/R, Carport w/laundry
rm. Beautiful Old Oaks,
Palm, Citrus. About 1/2
acre. $179,900. By Owner.
(863)675-8038.

-E
640 Acres Tallahassee Flori-
da. Abundant wildlife sur-
rounded by National Forest.
Beautiful Creek. Excellent
ranch sites. $3.9m.
8850)576-5271 or
850)566-4325 cell. Owner
nancing available.



ATTENTION INVESTORS: Wa-
terfront lots in the Foothills
of NC. Deep water lake with
90 miles of shoreline. 20%
redevelopment discounts
and 90% financing. NO PAY-
MENTS for 1 year. Call now
for best selection.
www.nclakefrontproper-
ties.com (800)709-LAKE.
BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLI-
NA. MUST SEE THE BEAUTI-
FUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS
OF WESTERN NC MOUN-
TAINS. Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & Investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainreal-
ty.com Call for Free Bro-
chure (800)841-5868.
COASTAL GEORGIA- Water
access marshfront home-
sites. Gated community,
tennis, golf, kayaking & ca-
noeing. Preconstruction dis-
counts, limited
time. From the mid-70's.
(877)266-7376 www.coop-
erspoint.com.
East Alabama Mountain Prop-
erty For Sale One hour west
of Atlanta in Piedmont, AL
Great for enjoyment or in-
v e s t m e n t
15-acres-$54,250.00 512-a
cres-$1,485,000.00 More
information Call Gary
McCurdy (526)239-8001.
FINCASTLE, VIRGINIA 75
acre estate featuring 3760
sq. ft. manor home w/ dra-
matic views of Blue Ridge.
Guest cabin, barns, garages,
streams and pond. 15 min-
utes from Interstate 81.
$1,250,000. Bill Gearhart,
Anne Lee Stevens. Coldwell
Banker Townside.
(540)989-3311,
Grand Opening! Lakefront
Acreage from $69,900.
Spectacular new waterfront
community on one of the
largest & cleanest mountain
lakes in America! Large, es-
tate-size parcels, gentle
Sslope to water, gorgeous
woods, panoramic views.
Paved roads, county water,
utilities. Low-financing. Call
now (800)564-5092 xl198.
LAKEFRONT BARGAINS Start-
ing at $89,900. Gorgeous
lakefront parcels. Gently
sloping, pristine shoreline,
spectacular views, Across
from national forest on
35,000 acre recreational
lake in East Tenn. Paved
roads, underground utilities,
central water, sewer, Excel-
lent financing. Call now
S800)704-3145 ext 617,
unset Bay, LLC.
Tennessee Lake Property
from $24,900! 6-1/2 Acre
lot $59,900. 27 Acre Lake
Estate $124,900. Lake Par-
cel and Cabin Package
Available $64,900.
(866)770-5263 ext 8 for de-
tails.
VIEWS VIEWS VIEWS Hele-
na Montana 4.7 Acres
$79,990. Ride out your
backdoor to millions of
acres of national forest!
Awesome lake & mountain
views, close to Canyon Ferry
Lake, minutes to Helena.
Soils tested, utilities, ready
to build on. Call owner
(888)770-2240.



NEED CASH??
I Buy Houses, Land, Campers,
Boats or anything, any con-
dition. (863)228-2761.






Mobile Hame Lots 2005
Mobile Honm Patt 2010
Mobile Homes. Rent 2015
Mobile Homes Sale 2020



2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile
Homes For Rent
Stantonl Mobile Homes
863-983-8106

UnBHnfl^


I


i nursaay, june v, zuuo


CMEobiL HOmES

OF CLEWISTON

1)Very Nice,
2/ DW,
Applicances,
Screen Porch,
Extra DW
Carport, 2
Sheds
$74,900


2) Midstate
Loop Special,
3/2 DW,
Fence
Carport, Shed
$72,00

3)New
Land & Home

Packages in
Sunshine Lake
Estates
NowAvailable

4)Tropi 50
2/ N
Ca AC&
nces
8,900
2160W. Hwy.27Clewiston
1.4 Miles N.W of WAL-MART
983-4663
ai cHampion
ar HOME BUILDERS CO.

MUSE AREA '02 DWMH
wide, 5br, 2ba, 2000 sq. ft.,
on .48 acres, nicely land-
scaped, $140,000
(863)675-4912 Ive message
New & Used
Mobile Homes:
Land Home Pabkages
as little as $1,800 down.
Stanton Homes
863-983-8106

Owner Financing
ON MOBILE HOMES
& LAND
Call 863-228-1405

Recreation


Boats 3005
Campne/RVs 3010
Jt Skiis 3015
Marine Accessorles 3020
Marine Mleaellansous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport VehiclesATVs 3035


14 V HULL BOAT
Aluminum, w/trailer. $350
(863)657-6652
15' FIBERGLASS BOAT
W/trailer, vinyl top & 35 h/p
Evinrude motor. $1000
(863)675-6652
AIR BOAT 125 LYCOMING '05
Brand new prop but needs
starter. $2500
(863)634-8023 ask for John
AIR BOAT- Aluminum, 15ft,
small block Chevy, good
prop, runs good, trailer.
$2500 (863)763-4643.
BASS BOAT- 18' Fiberglass,
with custom hauler trailer.
115 HP Mercury motor. New
seat, pumps, trolling motor.
$3500 Neg. Call
(863)983-4397
BOAT TRAILER, 14 Ft. Galva-
nized. Good shape. $250.
863-674-1105.
COBRA BASS SKI BOAT, 17'-.
bow rider, 140 Johnson OB
motor, new bimini top, 2
bass seats, troll motor, good
trailer. $4500.
(863)612-1648.
FIBERGLASS BOAT-17 Ft.
Includes trailer & canopy to
cover boat. No motor.
$800 (863)675-6738
GHEENOE 16.5 FT, '91- w/'91
40 HP Johnson, trolling mo-
tor, trir, very fast, focal boat,
$2500 (863)926-0296.


TERRY FLEETWOOD- '81, 30',
sleeps 6, Fair condition
$1800. 772-287-3602 or
772-486-1914



MOTOR, 9.9 EVINRUDE 0/B,
Needs new coil. $50
(863)675-8168


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Job
Intormation 02251


Job
Information 0225









Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9, 2005


iouse Sae *102


r-'rin, 5


S 40 Years Experience
LIlEN"ED & ih4lRED PRE*-SALES INSPECTION



CHEROKEE
HOME INSPECTIONS, INC.
S- 8 8 8-5 56-46.37.


4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths,
Many Upgrades $275,000
RESIDENTIAL-
CLEWISTON
L Bank Foreclosures -
Call for Details
*3BR, 1BA Home in
Hooker's Point Area
$112,000
* 3BR, 2BA, MH on man-
made lake $70,000
* New construction on
Bayberry Loop, 4 BR,
2BA, Many Upgrades
$275,000
* 4BR, 2BA, MH, Sherwood
S/D New Upgrades$84000

MOT able Call for DetailsRA
* Lots Available Call for Details


3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths
in Moore Haven
Reduced to$79,500
MOORE HAVEN
* New Homes starting at
$145,000
3BR, 2BA MH w/fencedyard
$90,000
*River View Lots available on
Caloosahatchee River
Call for Details
LAKEPORT
* Listings Needed
ACREAGE; LAND & LOTS
* Farm Land Available
Call for Details
COMMERCIAL
* Office & Retail Space available
in Shopping Center
Call for Details.
TOWNHOMES
* 3BR 3BA in Greenacres
one ~ half hours east
of Clewiston. $155000


.A4VlV ZYD SS
LIC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
420 E. SUGARLAND HWY.
(863) 983-6663 (863) 983-9770


WEBSITE: DYESSREALESTATE.COM E-MAIL: ANN@DYESSREALESTATE.COM
Se Habla Espafiol
AFTER HOURS:
ANN DYESS FAYEKELTING LAURA SMITH TRAVIS DYESS KATHY GARCIA
(863) 983-8979 (863) 677-0707 (863)599-1209 (863)228-2215 (863) 228-4798
RESIDENTIAL 3BR, 2BA Ridgdill $84,900
2BR, 2BA New Condo MONTU-RA ACRW pE
$184,900 LOTS AVAILABLE 1.25 acres"3 .'Utopia
5 New Homes CSfAL. .V'rifVibltLS Montura t ,g $34,500
Under Contract Call forDetails 4BR, 2BAMontura $99,500 9.9 acres Sears Rd. under
3oSAE,/r2D"W3900T -lr cirSALE t& PENDINtJoo
3BR 2BA Pool $340,000 ts- 3 5 acres Ladeca $75,000
4 DI 1P900 w mo I-Ie -ome, sonly LoLt in Holiday Isle $27,000
Under Construction $106,000
3BR, 2BA 2294 sq. 9 Commercial Lots on US
fSAL E p O00 27 th B *4O,o00 List Your
Moore Haven-Yacht Club 5 Lots Zofctt ii-Family
Lota~PEMNDLfND 500 $250,000
3BR, 2BA $315,000 8 Lots Zoned R1-B Home Here!
2BR, 2BA Polebam 12.80 10Lots $400,000.
10 Lots Zoned Commercal .
acres Call for details $500,000 Marketing To
3BR,, 2BA $325,000 Harlem Bar Great
3BR, 2BA $2,r0rkshop Business Opportunity Every Potential
M$340,000 SA'Indu 'i Buyer In The
MOBISlW.OIMV S Industrial Reinery *S+ n i
3BR,2Ba,Ridgdfll' $67,500 00oo acres $2.5m World
3BR 2BAEasyLf $87,000 Cabinet Shop 4800sq.ft.
3B A 8 Apt. $173,000 whedyadmma
3BR, 2BA Seminole Manor w$wwhendry-gdesmmns.com
SALE PENDIN17,6o
SEECOTAIA NE;W LISTING
4 Bedroom, 4 BA fpgf fO.,n 1 In ac.:r
De 1W O'r L
Real Estate in Hevndry and Glades Counties, Florida
http://www.hendry-geladesmmls.com


Your Realtor for
Western Communities

Teresa Sullivan


Call For Listings


561-795-8533 or 561-996-5623



Brian Sullivan


General Contractor

CUSTOM HOMES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Call us for all of your new construction needs,

your design or ours.

Visit our new web site

www.briansullivancontractor.com

and look at some of our new homes.

(863)441-4202 (863)465-1371

License #CGCO061855


V "-s 3 E" 0 SX -w




Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505

Sdq Arsocwifes;
Ann Donohue 228-Q0,21,
David Rister 634-2157


HONDA GOLD WING INTER-
STATE- mint condition,
5750 miles, $2500
firm.(863)612-0090.
HONDA SHADOW V4- 33K
miles, 500 CC, $1200 or
trade. (863)612-0090



BOMBADEER DS650 Baja,
'03, very few hrs., $4500.
(863)675-0939


READING A

NEWSPAPER..,

saves you money by
providing information
about best buys.

No wonder newspaper
readers earn morel


Automobiles




Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks 4040
Parts Repairs 404.5
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



CLASSIC CHEVY CHEVETTE-
'79, 4 CYL, Runs good with
little gas. $500.
(863)675-2598 Lv msg
EL CAMINO- '83, white, Runs
good. Many new parts. New
Tires & CD player $1500.
(772)418-2087
HONDA CIVIC, '04- low miles,
call for details,
(863)983-7415.
OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME
1991 Runs good, 128k ml,
asking $1000 or best offer
(863)675-0278


SATURN WAGON 1993, 4
cyl., Auto., PW, A/C, Looks
& Runs great. $1500 or best
offer. (772)461-2629
TOYOTA TERCEL '89, $200.
or best offer.
(863)675-1038.


OLDSMOBILE TORONADO'85
Totally rebuilt, new tires,low
miles. Runs great! $6500 or
good offer. (863)824-0884



FORD BRONCO, '87 runs,
needs some work, $2500 or
trade for boat or 4 wheeler.
(863)634-4338.
FORD EXPLORER SPORT '97,
4X4, Loaded, 2 Dr., Needs
motor work. $2500
(863)634-4104
JEEP Grand Wagoneer- '84,
Camo paint job runs & looks
good $2500.
(863)673-0920.

W. I M

CLUB CAR GOLF CART-
w/charger, $600.
(863)467-1518.;
GOLF CAR- 3 Wheel, recondi-
tioned, smooth riding, $750.
(863)612-1648.


Uolf Carts,
Gas or Electric
Buy and Sell
Call (863)824-0878


Camper Shell, aluminum, for
short bed, full sz. pickup,
$350. (863)634-2975
HITCH RECEIVER- Class 3,
draw tite, for full size Ford.
$40. (863)697-6812.
RIMS & TIRES- see at Play-
time Car Audio. Dakkar
Blades, 22x9 V/, brand new,
$2400 neg. (863)357-6000.
SIDE TOOL BOX
2 doors, w/ keys, like new
$200 (863)357-6202
TIRES, 2 New BFGoodwrench,
R1 AG Tread, Power Radial -
80. Size 11.2R-20. $400 for
both. (863)674-5744
Love the earth Recycle
your used items by
selling them in the
classifileds,



CHEVY SHORT BED 1988,
Tagged. Racing motor.
Clean. Must see! $2500.
Firm. (302)335-3442
FordF150, '97, 180k mi.,
runs -good, $4500.
(863)697-1212
FORD F150 P/U 1989, Needs
motor. $1200
. (863)634-4104


FORD BRONCO'86
Full size, 4x4 $600 ask for
Michael (863)967-6632
HUNTING PACKAGE $8500
Jeep '88, Cobra trir, tripod, 2
htrs, 2 tree stands, climber.
Call Natalia (954)304-4915


TRAILER- Heavy duty, tires in
good condition. Side rail
ramps. $1500.
(772)418-2087




READING A
NEWSPAPER MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
AND INTERESTING
PERSON.

0 o wonder newspaper
readers are more popular



DODGE CARAVAN- A/C, Pow-
er steering, AM/FM, 96K,
Runs good. $2500.
(863)673-0065.
FORD HANDI CAPPED 1993,
Fully equipped. After 8pm
call (863)357-3534 $3800.


Public Notices




Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500



CITY OF SOUTH BAY
NOTICE OF INTENT TO APPLY
The City of South Bay is applying for
funding from the US Department of
Agriculture, Rural Utilities Service, for
the purpose of participation in the
construction of the Lake Region Water
Treatment Plant to supply water to the
City of South Bay.
Written comments may be directed to
Bobby "Tony" Smith, City Manager,
City of South Bay. 335 SW. 2nd Ave-
nue, South Bay, FL 33493.
59250 CGS 6/2,9/05
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
HENRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 2005-06B-CP
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
JAMES MARTIN BOLES,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JAMES MARTIN COLES deceased,
File Number 2005-068-CP is pending
in the Circuit Court for Hendrv County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 25 E: Hickpochee Ave.,
LaBelle, Florida 33935.
The names and addresses of the person-
al representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All Creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, Including
dnmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this notice
is served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedents estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THIS
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
is June 9,2005.
Personal Representative
Roma J. Vanse
16589 78th Drive North
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Joseph DeGance, Esquire
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 155360
S3'471 N. Federal Hwy. #300
Ft Lauderdale, FL 33306
954-566-1531
59576 CGS 6/9,16/05

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Port LaBelle Community Develop-
ment District Board of Supervisors will
meet at 7:00 p.m,, on Tuesday, June
21, 2005, at the District Office on
3293 Dellwood Terrace, Port LaBelle,
Florida, The purpose of this meeting is
to discuss and preliminary adopt next
fiscal year's (10/1/05-9/30/06) pro-
posed operating budget and conduct
other routine business requiring action
by the Board,
This meeting is open to the public.
The final budget and village rate will be
advertised, reviewed, and adopted
during public hearings In September,
2005.


59098 CB/CGS 6/2,9/0


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HENRY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 2004-74 DR
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MELVIN DENNIS,
Petitioner/Husband
and
ROSA T. DENNIS,
Respondent/Wife
AMENDED NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: ROSAT. DENNIS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Pe-
tition for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Thomas
Montgomery, Esquire, Attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is RO. Box
1510, Belle Glade, FL 33430, and file
the original with the Clerk of the
above-styled Court, in LaBelle, Hendry
County, lorida, on or before June 21,
2005, otherwise, a judgment against
you may be entered for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires
certain automatic disclosure of
documents and Information. Failure
to comply can result In sanctions, In-
cluding dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on May 9,2005.
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: /s/ Hammond
DEPUTY CLERK
54959 CGS 5/19,26;6/2,9/05
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO
HOME MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff
vs. Case No. 2005-173-CA
ROMAN CABRERA, et al,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROMAN BABRERA
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
2004 LIGHTHOUSE LANE
LABELLE, FL 33935-5317
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER, SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in HENDRY County, Florida:
LOT 13, BLOCK 6, PORT LABELLE
HOLIDAY PARK UNIT 1, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 3, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HENDRY COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30 days after the
first publication, if any, on Echevarria
& Associates, PA., Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is 9119 Corporate
LakteDrive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file th original with this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the, relief demanded in
the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each
week for two consecutive weeks in
the Clewiston News,
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 18th day of Apil, 2005.


Patrick Whidden
Chairman 59305 CGS 6/2
05


Barbara S. Butler
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Hammond
Deputy Clerk
,9/05


NOTICE
AUCTION on Friday, June 17, 2005
at 9:00 a.m. at 1233 N.W. Avenue L,
Belle Glade, Florida
Property of LaTonya Canty
Clothes, toys, basinet, baby tub and
misc. items.
60031 CGS 6/9,16/05

NOTICE OF SALE
TO: Chuck RoseBlum
You are hereby notified that
the property stored by you
with Randy Coyle & Rena
Blissett, Unit #6 located at
1801 Red Road, Clewiston,
FL 33440. The items are be-
lieved to be household and
miscellaneous items and will
be sold to the highest bidder
for cash at the above ad-
dress on June 10, 2005, at
11:00 a.m, along with the
advertising costs in the
amount of $100.72 plus
$39.69. We reserve the right
to refuse any and all bids.
58585 CGS 6/2,9/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Adelphia Communication provides the
following information on upcoming
changes:
On or about July 9th, 2005, select sur-
rounding areas of Belle Glades, Cle-
wiston, Unincorporated Palm Beach
County, and Okeechobee County will
receive the following additions and de-
letions on the digital tier channel line
up.
The following channels will be added:
Logo will be added to channel 170
The following channel will be deleted:
VH1 Mega Hits
60941 CGS 6/9/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice is hereby given that Fergu-
son Towing will sell at public Auction,
free from all prior liens; the following
vehicles that remaining unclaimed in
storage with charges unpaid, pursuant
to Florida Statutes 713.78, to the high-
est bidder at 12065 Lakeshore Drive,
Canal Point, FL 33438 on June 20,
2005 at 9:00 A.M.
1991 Ford (van) Red
VIN# 1FMDA11U9MZA27314
1992 Isuzua(4-door) Red
VIN# 452CG58Z2N4353451
1986 Buick (2-door Blu
VIN# 1G4GM47A7GP231421)
2002 Chevrolet (4-door) WhI
VIN#2G1WF52E729376033
1991 Mercury (2-door)Bro
VIN# 1MEPM6047MH623839
1999 Daawo 4-door)Grn
VN# KLAJA52Z7XK237343
1983 Ford (Pickutp)Grn
VIN# 1FTEF14G3DNA42155
60955 CGS 6/9,16/05

PUBLIC NOTICE
The monthly meeting of the Board of Su-
pervisors of the Flaghole Drainage
district has been scheduled for Friday,
June 17, 2005 at 1:30 PM. The meet-
ing will be held at Hilliard Brothers Of-
fice on 5500 Flaghole Road, Hendry
County, Florida.
Joe Madin Hilliard
Supervisor
Flaghole Drainage District
60972 CGS 6/9/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
The regularly scheduled monthly ineeting
of the Board of Supervisors of the
Sugarland Drainag District has been
scheduled for Friday, June 17, 2005,
1:45PM. The'meeting will be held at
Hilliard Brothers Office on 5500 Flag-
hole Road, Hendry County, Florida.
Joe Marin Hilliard
Supervisor
Sugarland Drainage District
S60967 CGS 6/9/05
Shop here first!
The classified ads


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J BS' '"V


REQUEST FOR BIDS (RFB) CN050518B
C-35, C-36, & C-37 CANAL BANK RESTORATION, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The South Florida Water Management District will receive sealed bids through the
Procurement Office, 2nd Floor, B-1 Bldg., 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm
Beach, Florida 33406, for C-35, C-36, & C-37 Canal Bank Restoration, Osceola
County, FL on Wednesday, June 29, 2005 at 2:30 p.m. local time, at which
timely submitted bids will be opened and publicly read. Involves all labor, equip-
ment & materials to restore the hurricane-damaged canal banks to their pre-
storm event condition, as specified in the contract documents. An OPTIONAL
pre-bid conference will be held on Thursday, June 16, 2005 at 10:30 a.m. al
SFWMD Kissimmee Field Station, 80 S. Hoagland Blvd., Kissimmee, FL 34741.
For directions call (407)846-5226. A site visit will immediately follow.
All bids must conform to the instructions in the Request for Bidders (RFB). Inter-
ested respondents may obtain a copy of the complete RFB, by downloading it for
free from obr website www.simd.boo by obtaining a set for $22.00 at the
above address, by calling (561) 682-6391, or by calling the 24-hour BID HOT-
LINE 800-472-5290. The public is invited to attend the bid opening. Information
on the status of this solicitation can be obtained at our web site -
www.sfwmd.gov.
60269 CGS 6/9/05


CITY OF CLEWISTON
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
TO PROVIDE
PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING, DESIGN, AND CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
FOR A WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY EXPANSION
and COLLECTION SYSTEM EXTENSION
In compliance with the requirements of Florida Statute 287.055, the Consultants
Competitive Negotiation Act, the City of Clewiston, Florida, is accepting State-
ments of Qualifications from qualified firms to provide Professional Engineering
Services. These services include preliminary engineering design and recommen-
dations, final design, permitting, and monitoring services during the construction
p hases to expand an existing 1.5 MGD wastewater treatment (WWTP) to a 3.0
GD capacity. Requested services also include extension of the WWTP collec-
tion system to accommodate approximately 225 new service connections.
Statement of Qualifications should be submitted in the following format:
1. Firm Overview: Include firm's capabilities, depth of resources and management
approach.
2. Project Staff Qualifications: Describe related experience and qualifications for
project team members.
3. Past Performances: Consultant should cleary outline relevant experience in simi-
lar assignments including preliminary engineering and design of waste water
systems plus experience with funding agencies (including Water Management
District and USDA Rural Development) for sewer systems.
4. References: Include a minimum of five government client references for which
you have performed similar projects.
5. Understanding of Local Needs and Familiarity with Local Conditions: Include
firms understanding of the specific needs of the City of Clewiston as well as
knowledge of working with local regulatory agencies.
Original and 5 copies of your submittal should be sent to: City of Clewiston, Attn:
Kevin McCarthy, 141 Central Av., Clewiston, FL 33440 by 4 PM on June 24,
2005. Late submittals will not be accepted. Questions should be directed to Mr
Kevin McCarthy, Director of Utilities, at (863) 983-1454. Submittals must be
cleary marked "Waste Water Facility RFQ." The City reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all Statements of Qualifications.
58342 CGS 6/2,9/05


SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF WORK PLAN
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to "The Water Rights Compact Among the
Seminole Tribe of Florida, The State of Florida, and The South Florida Water Man-
agement District', the 1st Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan of the
Seminole Tribe of Florida has been submitted to the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District.
The Seminole Tribe of Florida, 6073 Stirling Road, Hollywood, FL 33024, has sub-
mitted, on May 19, 2005, the 1st Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan to
include the following projects: Big Cypress Reservation Nextel Tower Re-
peater placement at the Motocross site adjacent to the West Boundary Road
(S8/T40
S/R33E); and, the second phase of the Snake Road (BIA 1281) Improvement pro-
ect totaling 13 mile8 of roadway (S32/T48S/R35E). Hollywood Reservation -
nstallation of a 2" well to irrigate 1 acre of landscape at the Extreme Rage Paint-
ball Park (S2/T51S/R41E). The Work Plan describes existing and proposed ac-
tivities on Seminole land. The Brighton Reservation is located in Glades County,
Township 40 South, Range 32 East; Township 39 South, Range 32 East; Town-
ship 39 South, Range 33 East; Township 38 South, Range 33 East. The Immok-
alee Reservation is located in Collier County, Township 47 South, Range 29 East.
The Big Cypress Reservation is located in Hendry County, Township 47 South,
Ranges 32-34 East. The Hollywood Reservation is located in Broward County,
Townships 50-51 South, Range 41 East.
Interested persons may comment upon the Work Plan or submit a written request
for a copy of the Staff Report containing proposed agency action regarding the
Work Plan by writing to: Environmental Resource Regulation, South Florida Wa-
ter Management District, PO Box 24680, West Palm Beach, FL 33416-4680;:
such comments or requests must be received within 30 days from the date of
publication.
No further public notice will be provided regarding this Work Plan. A copy of the
Staff Report must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceed-
ings. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an Administrative
Hearing regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request
therefore after reviewing the Staff Report,
59794 CGS 6/9/05


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READING A NEWSPAPER...


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Iubi Noice 005


GLADEVIEW WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICEOF
2005 ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING &
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries of
the GLADEVIEW WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, o applicable laws, a
meeting of the landowners of the GLADEVIEW WATER CONTROL DISTRICT will
be held on Thursday, June 23,2005 at 8:30 a.m. at the Sugar Farms Co-op, At-
lantic Sugar Mill Road, Belle Glade, Florida, for the following purposes:
1. Electing Supervisor(s);
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
The Board of Supervisors meeting will commence immediately thereafter and the
purpose of this meeting is to approve the budget and set the non-ad valorem as-
sessment rate for Fiscal Year 2005-2006 and to transact any and all business
that may come before the Board.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of Supervisors
with respect to any matter considered at these meetings, he/she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Pursuant to the provision of the American s with Disabilties Act, any person re-
uiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting because of a
Schoech, at (561) 655-0620 at least five (5) calendar days priorto the Meeting.
DATED this 27th day of May, 2005.
By: Charles Schoech, Esq.
59198 CGS 6/2,9/05

HIGHLAND GLADES WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICE OF
2005 ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING &
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries of
the HIGHLAND GLADES WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, pursuant to applicable
laws, a meeting of the landowners of the HIGHLAND GLADES WATER CONTROL
DISTRICT will be held on Monday, June 20, 2005 at 2:00 p.m. at the Sugar
Cane Growers Cooperative, 3rd Floor, West Sugar House Road, Belle Glade,
Flonida, for the following purposes:
1. Electing Supervisor(s);
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may property come before the meeting.
The Board of Supervisors meeting will commence immediately thereafter and the
purpose of this meeting is to approve the budget and set the non-ad valorem as-
sessment rate for Fiscal Year 2005-2006 and to transact any and all business
that may come before the Board.
Ift any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of Supervisors
with respect to any matter considered at these meetings, he/she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is madealich record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal ais to bled.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disablities Act, any person re-
uiring special accommodations to participate In this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the District's Attorney, Chadrles F
Scoech, at (561) 655-0620 at least five (5) calendar days pdor to the Meeting.
DATED this 27th day of May, 2005.
By: Charles F. Schoech, Esq.
59196 CGS 6/2,9/05

NOTICE OF ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING
OF DEVILS GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries of
DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, pursuant to applicable laws,
a Meeting of the Landowner's of DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
will be held on Monday, June 20, 2005 at 2:30 PM. at the office of Alico, Inc.,
640 South Main Street, LaBelle, Floriodda, for the purpose of:
1. Electing Supervisors;
2. Receiving Annual Reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the
Landowners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal the decision of the Board of Supervisors with respect
to any matter considered at the public meeting herein referred, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Amercian with Disabilities Act, any person requir-
Ing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the
District at (863) 675-2966 at least five (5) days prior td the date of proceeding.
DATED this 16th day of May 2005.
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF
DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
57498 CGSBy: Robert R Milley, Secretary
57498 CGS 6/2,9/05

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF LANDOWNERS OF
HENDRY-HILLIARD WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to call of the Board of Supervisors of Hendry-
Hillard Water Control District, and in accordance with Chapter 298, Florida Stat-
utes 1941, and law amendatory thereto, the Annual Meeing of Landowners of
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District, for the year 2005, willbe held at the office
of Hilliard Brothers of Florida Ltd., 5500 FagholeRoad, Clewiston, Florida on Fri-
day, June 17, 2005 at 1:00 PM., forthe purpose of:
1. Electing one (1) supervisor for term of three (3) years.
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine.
3. Transacting such other business as may property come before the meeting.

r''I).IIi). il'l'i rl l Ii.ii fju..r. | jl) ri t H, fr I TIy IfII:h Ij .uiil iril vrrl 1iTi

Board of Supervisors
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District
By: Joe Marlin Hilliard
President
61026CGS 6/9,16/05

NOTICEOFIMEETING OFTHE BOARD OF
SUPERVISORS OF DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Meeting of the Board of Supervisors of DEV-
IL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT will be held on Monday, June 20,
2005 at 3:00 RM. at the office of Alico, Inc., 640 South Main Street, LaBelle,
Florida.
The purpose of this meeting is to transact any and all business which may come
before the Board. ,
Itf a person decides to appeal the decision of the Board of Supervisors with respect
to any matter considered at the public meeting herein referred, he or she may
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made, which record
includes the testimony add evidence upon which the appeal Is based.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person re-
quirng special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact
the District Administrator at (863) 675-2966 at least five (5) days prior to the
date of the proceeding.
DATED this 16th day of May, 2006.
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF
DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
By: Robert RMiley, Secretary
57514 CGS 6/9/05

SHAWANO WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICE OF
2005 ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING &
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries of
the SHAWANO WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, pursuant to applicable laws, a
meeting of the landowners of the SHAWANO WATER CONTROL DISTRICT is
scheduled for Wednesday, June 22, 2005 at 8:30 a.m. at the Sugar Farms Co-
op, Atlantic Sugar Mill Road, Belle Glade, Florida, for the following purposes:
1. Electing Supervisor(s);
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
The Board of Supervisors meeting will commence immediately thereafter and the
purpose of this meeting is to approve the budget and set the non-ad valorem as-
sessment rate for Fiscal Year 2005-2006 and to transact any and all business
that may come before the Board.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of Supervisors
with respect to any matter considered at these meetings, he/she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person re-
quiring special accommodations to participate In this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Districts Atfomey, Charles E
Schoech, at (561) 655-0620 at least five (5) calendar days prior to the Meeting.
DATED this 27th day of May, 2005.
By: Charles F Schoech, Esq.
59206 CGS 6/2,9/05


PUBLIC NOTICE
The regularly scheduled monthly meeting
of the Board of Supervisors of the
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District
has been scheduled for Friday, June
17, 2005, 1:15PM. The meeting will
be held at Hilliard Brothers Office on
5500 Flaghole Road, Hendry County,
Florida.
Joe Marlin Hilliard
Supervisor
Hendry-Hilliard Water ControlDlstrict
61032 CiS 6/9/05


READING A
NEWSPAPER...
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Safety tips for backyard barbeques


For many Floridians, summer
means a chance to fire up their gas
grills and host a backyard barbecue for
friends and families. Florida Agriculture
and Consumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson reminds people to
follow safety precautions to help make
the summer season both safe and
enjoyable. Mr. Bronson and the Florida
Propane Safety, Education and
Research Council have compiled a list
of propane gas grill and cylinder safety
tips:

Propane Grill Do's:
Always read and follow the grill


manufacturer's instructions and keep
written materials and manuals in a safe,
accessible place.
When not in use, make sure all
grill burner controls are turned off and
that the cylinder valve is closed.
Never attempt to move a hot grill.
Make sure the grill is shut off and
cool to the touch before covering it
after use.
Always use or store cylinders out-
doors in an upright, vertical position.
When filling or exchanging a
cylinder, have the supplier check for
dents, damage, rust or leaks.
Before using a propane gas grill,


Unemployment

Florida's April 2005 unemployment The state continue
rate was the lowest experienced by the the total number of j
state since April 2001. The state's sea- from March 2005, tl
sonally adjusted April 2005 unemploy- which comparable
ment rate was 4.2 percent, down from from other states, F
the revised rate of 4.4 percent in March in the number of ne
and down 0.6 percentage point from had the fastest ra
4.8 percent year ago. growth among the
Florida's seasonally adjusted unem- states.
ployment rate for April 2005 was a full Solid growth con
percentage point lower than the nation- turning's durable go
al rate of 5.2 percent., gained 3,500 jobs (-
In April 2005, seasonally adjusted last April. Much
nonagricultural employment grew by durable goods was
224,700 jobs over the year, growing at a equipment manuf
rate of 3.0 percent. By comparison, the jobs, +5.4 percent)
national rate of growth was 1.7 percent electronic produce
for the same period. (+ 1,700 jobs, +3.5


rate
ued to see growth in
obs. Based on data
he latest month for
data are available
lorida led all states
w jobs created and
ite of annual job
ten most populous

itinued in manufac-
)ods sector, which
+ 1.4 percent) since
of the growth in
s in transportation
facturing (+2,200
and computer and
:t manufacturing
percent).


check all connections for tightness
using a leak-detection solution.
If you experience difficulties in the
operation of your gas grill, contact your
local propane provider for service.

Propane Grill Don'ts:
Do not smoke while handling the
propane cylinder.
Do not allow children to tamper or
play with the cylinder or grill.
Do not use, store or transport your
cylinder where it would be exposed to
high temperatures. (This includes stor-
ing spare cylinders under or near the
grill.)


Never leave the grill unattended
when in use.

"Propane grills are extremely popu-
lar, and when used properly they are
safe," Bronson said. "But we do hear
about accidents and one bad decision
can result in serious injury or worse so
we urge people to go over these safety
tips each year."

For a copy of the Department's free
brochure, Safe Cooking with Propane
Gas Grills, please contact the Depart-
ment's Bureau of Liquefied Petroleum
Gas Inspections at (850) 921-8001.


dropping in Florida

The newly redefined Miami-Ft. Hendry County had an unemploy-
Lauderdale-Miami Beach MSA led the ment rate of 6 percent with 18,597
state in employment growth (+55,500 workers and 1,114 unemployed.
jobs, +2.4 percent), followed by the Unemployment in March was 5.8 per-
Orlando and Tampa-St. Petersburg- cent.
Clearwater MSAs with over-the-year job Okeechobee County, with 16,130
growth in April 2005 of +42,000 jobs workers and 797 unemployed, had an
and +34,400 jobs, respectively, unemployment rate of 4.9 percent in
Palm Beach County had an unem- April. In March the Okeechobee County
ployment rate of 4.2 percent in April unemployment rate was 5.2 percent.
with a workforce of 6072,39 persons
and 25694 unemployed. In March the Walton County had the lowest
unemployment rate was 4.3 percent. unemployment rate in the state of Flori-
Glades County had an unemploy- da in April, with 2.8 percent unem-
ment rate of 4.1 percent in April with a played.
workforce of 5056 persons and 206 Madison County, with 5.8 percent
unemployed. Unemployment in March unemployed, had the highest unem-
was also 4.1 percent. ployment rate in the state in April.


Tips that will help to ensure a safe simmer

TALLAHASSEE The Florida between the peak sun hours of 10:00 blood, for many species this is during Poison control
Department of Health (DOH) encour- AM to 3:00 PM (even on cloudy days). the dusk and dawn hours).
ages summer safety during this heavy DRESS (wear clothing that covers DOH joins the Florida Poison Infor-
vacation season. By making wise choic- Puffer fish skin), mation Centers in encouraging individ-
es to protect your skin, food and overall Florida's seafood is among the best DEET (use mosquito repellents uals to take an active role in safeguard-
health, you and your family can have in the country, but take care to identify including DEET [N, N diethyl-metatolu- ing children from potential dangers that
fun in the sun while staying out of harm and avoid poisonous fish. Eating puffer amide] on skin. You can add to your involve products commonly found in
sway. fish, commonly known as blowfish; protection by applying a repellent every home. This focus on poison-
"While Floridians and visitors travel can cause saxitoxin poisoning. Saxitox- directly to your clothing when you are proofing your home is part of the annu-
throughout the state, being knowledge- in has no taste, color or smell and can- outside). Keep in mind, DEET is not rec- al campaign to educate the public on
able of safety -tips can drastically not be destroyed by cooking or clean- ommended for children younger than 2 the dangers and prevention of acciden-
decrease the number of summer relat- Symptoms of saxitoxin poisoning months old. Instead, avoid exposing tal poisonings. Almost one million chil-
ed injuries and accidents," says DOH include tingling, burnin poisonumbness, babies to mosquitoes. dren are exposed to a potential poison
Secretary John 0.- Agwunobi, M.D., drowsiness, incoherent speech, diffi- DRAINING (check your home to each year.
M.B.A., M.P.H. "Playing it safe is the culty breathing and in severe cases, rid it of standing water in which mos- Children under the age of five are
theme we want Floridians to remem- death. Also avoid locally harvested quitoes can lay their eggs). particularly vulnerable to these acci-
ber and employ this summer." shellfish during red tide occurrences. Elimination of breeding sites is one dental events due to their natural


Food safety
Few things in life are better than a
summer barbecue, and no barbecue is
complete without following the proper
food handling procedures below:
Always wash your hands with
warm, soapy water before and after'
handling food.
Keep marinating foods refrigerat-
ed and boil the used marinade sauce
before applying to cooked food. Also
avoid putting cooked food on any plate
that previously held raw food.
Use a meat thermometer to
ensure that food reaches a safe internal
temperature. Beef should be cooked to
at least 160iF and chicken to 170iF. Fish
is done when the meat is opaque and
flakes easily.
Pre-heat the coals on the grill for
20-30 minutes.
Pack plenty of ice or freezer packs
to maintain a constant cold tempera-
ture.

Sun safety
Precautions must be taken to avoid
sunburn and skin injuries. Exposure to
the sun's ultra-violet (UV) rays is the
leading environmental factor in the pro-
gression of skin cancer. Liberal use of
sunscreen with a sun protection factor
(SPF) of 15 or greater is recommended
to prevent sunburn. Other ways to pro-
tect yourself from sunburn are:
Seeking shade under shelter such
as a tree or umbrella,
Covering up with light-weight
clothing,
Wearing a hat to protect your face,
scalp, neck and ears, and
Wearing sunglasses that deter UV
rays (also necessary when using indoor
tanning facilities).
Individuals particularly sensitive to
the sun, may want to avoid exposure


Swimming safety
When enjoying our waters, Floridi-
ans and those visiting Florida should
engage in water sports that are safe for
all in\ ol ed %\ while taking note of marine
life and harmful algal blooms.
Marine life includes naturally occur-
ring plant-like algae, like blue-green
algae (cyanobacteria) and red tide,
which can be present in the open
ocean, bays, lagoons and freshwater
environments. DOH recommends
avoiding areas with obvious algal.
blooms as contact may cause skin rash,
runny nose and burning eyes. Howev-
er, symptoms are temporary and last
only for a few hours.
For more information or to report
symptoms related to red tide, blue
green algae exposure or puffer fish con-
sumption, call the toll-free Marine Toxin
Hotline at 1-888-232-8635. This hotline
is operated by the Florida Poison Con-
trol Center.
An example of an unsafe water
sport is teak surfing. Teak surfing
involves swimmers being towed
through the water while hanging on to
a powerboat s teak swim plat-
form. The threat of carbon monoxide is
present because moving boats produce
exhaust fumes. Carbon monoxide is a
highly toxic gas that has no smell or
taste. Inhaling carbon monoxide caus-
es the teak surfer to lose conscious-
ness, become submerged in the water
and quickly drown. Many surviving vic-
tims have sustained permanent brain
damage.

Mosquitoes
DOH officials continue to stress the
"5 D s" for prevention:
DUSK and DAWN (avoid. being
outdoors when mosquitoes are seeking


of the keys to prevention.
Tips on Eliminating Mosquito Breed-
ing Sites
1. Clean out eaves, troughs and gut-
ters.
2. Remove old tires or drill .holes in
those used in playgrounds to drain. :
3. Turn over orfemove empty plastic
pots.
4. Pick up all beverage containers
and cups.
5. Check tarps on boats or other
equipment that may collect water.
6. Pump out bilges on boats.
7. Replace water in birdbaths and
pet or other animal feeding dishes at
least once a week.
8. Change water in plant trays,
including hanging plants, at least once
week.
9. Remove vegetation or obstruc-
tions in drainage ditches that prevent
the flow of water.

Black henna tattoos
Other skin injuries can be sustained
by getting black henna tattoos or body
piercing. Henna is a coloring made
from a plant extract that has not been
approved by the US Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) for skin applica-
tion. Some of the henna contains a
product called p-phenlyenediamine
(PPD), which may cause allergic reac-
tions like intense itching, redness,
swelling and even scarring at the tattoo
site. Persons experiencing these symp-
toms should seek immediate medical
attention and report the instance to the
local health department. Body piercing
poses health risks if done with unclean
instruments. Unclean instruments
could be contaminated with Hepatitis B
or C, diseases which may severely
impair liver function. Also, an abnor-
mal overgrowth of scar tissue, called a
keloid, can form.


curiosity about the world around them.
What they see, touch and reach is gen-
erally put into their mouths.
Almost. 60 percent of all calls to the
poison information center involve
exposures in one of the following five
groups: Acetaminophen is used as an
aspirin substitute, pain reliever and
fever reducer and is often found in chil-
dren s medication. Toxic symp-
toms are delayed and can cause pro-
found effects, particularly liver damage.
Ethanol-containing products include
mouthwashes, perfumes, colognes,
hand sanitizers and adult cold medica-
tions. Toxic symptoms include sleepi-
ness, drop in blood sugar and shallow
breathing. Common hand soaps and
detergents may cause upset stomach
and may cause persistent vomiting,
diarrhea and even dehydration if ingest-
ed. Automatic dishwasher detergent
may be caustic. Hypochlorites include
bleach, pool chemicals and supplies
and cleaning products. Toxic symp-
toms can include irritation to the mouth
and stomach, and potential burns to
the mouth, throat and esophagus.
Hydrocarbon containing products
include gasoline, kerosene, charcoal
lighter fluid, automobile products and
lamp oil. Toxic symptoms may include
vomiting, and if the product enters the
lungs, fever, coughing, shortness of
breath, wheezing or chemical pneumo-
nia can occur.
For poisoning emergencies, call the
Poison Information Center; toll free 24
hours a day, at 1-800- 222-1222
(Voice/TDD); calls will be connected
based on geographic region. The
healthcare professionals at the Center
will immediately respond to poison
emergencies and answer poison-relat-
ed questions about medications,
household products and other poten-
tially dangerous substances.


Youth Leadership Camp moves to Belle Glade


This summer the glades community
hosts a new youth camp geared toward
developing leadership skills, enhancing
critical thinking skills and increasing
cultural awareness.
The highlights of the program
include visiting motivational speakers,
daily career highlights, business skills
workshops, educational field trips, cre-
ative writing lessons, hands on science
experiments, conflict resolution work-
shops, African-American history ses-
sions, and much more.


The Motivated, Organized, Venerat-
ed and Empowered (MOVE) youth
camp seeks to highlight the talented
youth of the glades community. What
will you do to prepare for tomorrow?
What career opportunities await you?
Do you like asking questions? Do you
like investigating things? Do you like
learning new and exciting things? Do
your peers tend to want to follow you?
Do you want to join others who share
similar interests?
Then make your MOVE and come


be apart of the Youth Summer Camp
that inspires and values your curiosity.
The educational field trips include the
Miami Museum of Science, Vizcaya
Museum & Gardens, Museum of Art of
Ft. Lauderdale, and the African-Ameri-
can Research Library & Cultural Center.
The camp is scheduled to start June 14,
at the Women's Civic Club on Martin
Luther King Blvd in Belle Glade, Fl, The
program is for student's age 12-17 years
of age and will run Tuesday to Thursday
from 9 am-4 pm for five weeks.


The Youth of Belle Glade have valu-
able contributions to offer the commu-
nity. The need only exists in receiving
the direction and guidance to nurture
those hidden talents. The MOVE youth
camp is also looking for individuals or
organizations to help sponsor partici-
pants for the program. If you are inter-
ested in supporting the leadership
development of glades youth please
contact the program coordinator at
(561) 449-6210.


Man convicted for using Internet to seduce child


TALLAHASSEE Attorney Gener-
al Charlie Crist announced the convic-
tion of an Orange County resident on
15 counts of using a computer to
seduce a child over the Internet.
Walter Hammel, 52, was arrested
when he traveled to Polk County to
meet a young boy for a pre-arranged
liaison, unaware that the person with
whom he communicated over the
Internet was an undercover law
enforcement officer. The case was
prosecuted by the Attorney General's
Office of Statewide Prosecution,
Ui


which has specific jurisdiction to pros-
ecute cases involving section
847.0135(3), Use of a Computer to
Seduce a Child over the Internet.
"Words cannot describe the atroci-
ty that could have taken place here,"
said Crist. "The insidious nature of this
crime is that this man used the Inter-
net to invade a home and a family in
order to lure his victim to him. It is
imperative that we continue to fight to
protect our children from these mon-
sters, and I commend the jury on
reaching its verdict."


The case began in October 2003
when an officer working with a Cen-
tral Florida task force on Internet
crimes against children monitored an
Internet chat room. Hammel struck
up an online conversation with the
agent, who he believed was a 13-year-
old boy named "Larry." Over a period
of time, Hammel attempted to lure
"Larry" to his home in Orange Coun-
ty, and at one point sent pornographic
images of young boys. After a month
of online conversations, Hammel trav-
eled to a Wal-Mart in Haines City


intending to pick up "Larry" and take
him to his home in Winter Garden.
Hammel was arrested when he
approached a decoy arranged by
agents.
Among the agencies involved in
the joint investigation were the Polk
County Sheriff's Department and the
Eagle Lake Police Department.
Sentencing is scheduled for July 22
in Bartow. Hammel, who is an Austri-
an national, faces up to 75 years in
prison.


IPublic Notice


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursdav, June 9,2005


I


t




Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 9,2005


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 9,2005,